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Sample records for regulate microtubule dynamics

  1. EWSR1 regulates mitosis by dynamically influencing microtubule acetylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yi-Long; Chen, Hui; Zhan, Yi-Qun; Yin, Rong-Hua; Li, Chang-Yan; Ge, Chang-Hui; Yu, Miao; Yang, Xiao-Ming

    2016-08-17

    EWSR1, participating in transcription and splicing, has been identified as a translocation partner for various transcription factors, resulting in translocation, which in turn plays crucial roles in tumorigenesis. Recent studies have investigated the role of EWSR1 in mitosis. However, the effect of EWSR1 on mitosis is poorly understood. Here, we observed that depletion of EWSR1 resulted in cell cycle arrest in the mitotic phase, mainly due to an increase in the time from nuclear envelope breakdown to metaphase, resulting in a high percentage of unaligned chromosomes and multipolar spindles. We also demonstrated that EWSR1 is a spindle-associated protein that interacts with α-tubulin during mitosis. EWSR1 depletion increased the cold-sensitivity of spindle microtubules, and decreased the rate of spindle assembly. EWSR1 regulated the level of microtubule acetylation in the mitotic spindle; microtubule acetylation was rescued in EWSR1-depleted mitotic cells following suppression of HDAC6 activity by its specific inhibitor or siRNA treatment. In summary, these results suggest that EWSR1 regulates the acetylation of microtubules in a cell cycle-dependent manner through its dynamic location on spindle MTs, and may be a novel regulator for mitosis progress independent of its translocation.

  2. Kinesin-13 regulates flagellar, interphase, and mitotic microtubule dynamics in Giardia intestinalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, Scott C; Sagolla, Meredith S; Mancuso, Joel J; Woessner, David J; House, Susan A; Fritz-Laylin, Lillian; Cande, W Zacheus

    2007-12-01

    Microtubule depolymerization dynamics in the spindle are regulated by kinesin-13, a nonprocessive kinesin motor protein that depolymerizes microtubules at the plus and minus ends. Here we show that a single kinesin-13 homolog regulates flagellar length dynamics, as well as other interphase and mitotic dynamics in Giardia intestinalis, a widespread parasitic diplomonad protist. Both green fluorescent protein-tagged kinesin-13 and EB1 (a plus-end tracking protein) localize to the plus ends of mitotic and interphase microtubules, including a novel localization to the eight flagellar tips, cytoplasmic anterior axonemes, and the median body. The ectopic expression of a kinesin-13 (S280N) rigor mutant construct caused significant elongation of the eight flagella with significant decreases in the median body volume and resulted in mitotic defects. Notably, drugs that disrupt normal interphase and mitotic microtubule dynamics also affected flagellar length in Giardia. Our study extends recent work on interphase and mitotic kinesin-13 functioning in metazoans to include a role in regulating flagellar length dynamics. We suggest that kinesin-13 universally regulates both mitotic and interphase microtubule dynamics in diverse microbial eukaryotes and propose that axonemal microtubules are subject to the same regulation of microtubule dynamics as other dynamic microtubule arrays. Finally, the present study represents the first use of a dominant-negative strategy to disrupt normal protein function in Giardia and provides important insights into giardial microtubule dynamics with relevance to the development of antigiardial compounds that target critical functions of kinesins in the giardial life cycle.

  3. Kinesin-13 Regulates Flagellar, Interphase, and Mitotic Microtubule Dynamics in Giardia intestinalis▿ †

    OpenAIRE

    Dawson, Scott C.; Sagolla, Meredith S.; Mancuso, Joel J.; Woessner, David J.; House, Susan A.; Fritz-Laylin, Lillian; Cande, W. Zacheus

    2007-01-01

    Microtubule depolymerization dynamics in the spindle are regulated by kinesin-13, a nonprocessive kinesin motor protein that depolymerizes microtubules at the plus and minus ends. Here we show that a single kinesin-13 homolog regulates flagellar length dynamics, as well as other interphase and mitotic dynamics in Giardia intestinalis, a widespread parasitic diplomonad protist. Both green fluorescent protein-tagged kinesin-13 and EB1 (a plus-end tracking protein) localize to the plus ends of m...

  4. Kinesin superfamily proteins and the regulation of microtubule dynamics in morphogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niwa, Shinsuke

    2015-01-01

    Kinesin superfamily proteins (KIFs) are microtubule-dependent molecular motors that serve as sources of force for intracellular transport and cell division. Recent studies have revealed new roles of KIFs as microtubule stabilizers and depolymerizers, and these activities are fundamental to cellular morphogenesis and mammalian development. KIF2A and KIF19A have microtubule-depolymerizing activities and regulate the neuronal morphology and cilia length, respectively. KIF21A and KIF26A work as microtubule stabilizers that regulate axonal morphology. Morphological defects that are similar to human diseases are observed in mice in which these KIF genes have been deleted. Actually, KIF2A and KIF21A have been identified as causes of human neuronal diseases. In this review, the functions of these atypical KIFs that regulate microtubule dynamics are discussed. Moreover, some interesting unanswered questions and hypothetical answers to them are discussed.

  5. Shaping the tracks : Regulation of microtubule dynamics by kinesins KIF21A and KIF21B

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Riel, W.E.

    2016-01-01

    Control of microtubule dynamics is important for cell morphogenesis. Kinesins, motor proteins known to function in cargo transport, were recently also implicated in altering the microtubule network. Several kinesins are described to cause microtubule network reorganization or stabilization, either

  6. Autoinhibition of TBCB regulates EB1-mediated microtubule dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carranza, Gerardo; Castaño, Raquel; Fanarraga, Mónica L; Villegas, Juan Carlos; Gonçalves, João; Soares, Helena; Avila, Jesus; Marenchino, Marco; Campos-Olivas, Ramón; Montoya, Guillermo; Zabala, Juan Carlos

    2013-01-01

    Tubulin cofactors (TBCs) participate in the folding, dimerization, and dissociation pathways of the tubulin dimer. Among them, TBCB and TBCE are two CAP-Gly domain-containing proteins that together efficiently interact with and dissociate the tubulin dimer. In the study reported here we showed that TBCB localizes at spindle and midzone microtubules during mitosis. Furthermore, the motif DEI/M-COO(-) present in TBCB, which is similar to the EEY/F-COO(-) element characteristic of EB proteins, CLIP-170, and α-tubulin, is required for TBCE-TBCB heterodimer formation and thus for tubulin dimer dissociation. This motif is responsible for TBCB autoinhibition, and our analysis suggests that TBCB is a monomer in solution. Mutants of TBCB lacking this motif are derepressed and induce microtubule depolymerization through an interaction with EB1 associated with microtubule tips. TBCB is also able to bind to the chaperonin complex CCT containing α-tubulin, suggesting that it could escort tubulin to facilitate its folding and dimerization, recycling or degradation.

  7. KATNAL1 regulation of sertoli cell microtubule dynamics is essential for spermiogenesis and male fertility.

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    Lee B Smith

    Full Text Available Spermatogenesis is a complex process reliant upon interactions between germ cells (GC and supporting somatic cells. Testicular Sertoli cells (SC support GCs during maturation through physical attachment, the provision of nutrients, and protection from immunological attack. This role is facilitated by an active cytoskeleton of parallel microtubule arrays that permit transport of nutrients to GCs, as well as translocation of spermatids through the seminiferous epithelium during maturation. It is well established that chemical perturbation of SC microtubule remodelling leads to premature GC exfoliation demonstrating that microtubule remodelling is an essential component of male fertility, yet the genes responsible for this process remain unknown. Using a random ENU mutagenesis approach, we have identified a novel mouse line displaying male-specific infertility, due to a point mutation in the highly conserved ATPase domain of the novel KATANIN p60-related microtubule severing protein Katanin p60 subunit A-like1 (KATNAL1. We demonstrate that Katnal1 is expressed in testicular Sertoli cells (SC from 15.5 days post-coitum (dpc and that, consistent with chemical disruption models, loss of function of KATNAL1 leads to male-specific infertility through disruption of SC microtubule dynamics and premature exfoliation of spermatids from the seminiferous epithelium. The identification of KATNAL1 as an essential regulator of male fertility provides a significant novel entry point into advancing our understanding of how SC microtubule dynamics promotes male fertility. Such information will have resonance both for future treatment of male fertility and the development of non-hormonal male contraceptives.

  8. ATX-2, the C. elegans Ortholog of Human Ataxin-2, Regulates Centrosome Size and Microtubule Dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stubenvoll, Michael D; Medley, Jeffrey C; Irwin, Miranda; Song, Mi Hye

    2016-09-01

    Centrosomes are critical sites for orchestrating microtubule dynamics, and exhibit dynamic changes in size during the cell cycle. As cells progress to mitosis, centrosomes recruit more microtubules (MT) to form mitotic bipolar spindles that ensure proper chromosome segregation. We report a new role for ATX-2, a C. elegans ortholog of Human Ataxin-2, in regulating centrosome size and MT dynamics. ATX-2, an RNA-binding protein, forms a complex with SZY-20 in an RNA-independent fashion. Depleting ATX-2 results in embryonic lethality and cytokinesis failure, and restores centrosome duplication to zyg-1 mutants. In this pathway, SZY-20 promotes ATX-2 abundance, which inversely correlates with centrosome size. Centrosomes depleted of ATX-2 exhibit elevated levels of centrosome factors (ZYG-1, SPD-5, γ-Tubulin), increasing MT nucleating activity but impeding MT growth. We show that ATX-2 influences MT behavior through γ-Tubulin at the centrosome. Our data suggest that RNA-binding proteins play an active role in controlling MT dynamics and provide insight into the control of proper centrosome size and MT dynamics.

  9. ATX-2, the C. elegans Ortholog of Human Ataxin-2, Regulates Centrosome Size and Microtubule Dynamics.

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    Michael D Stubenvoll

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Centrosomes are critical sites for orchestrating microtubule dynamics, and exhibit dynamic changes in size during the cell cycle. As cells progress to mitosis, centrosomes recruit more microtubules (MT to form mitotic bipolar spindles that ensure proper chromosome segregation. We report a new role for ATX-2, a C. elegans ortholog of Human Ataxin-2, in regulating centrosome size and MT dynamics. ATX-2, an RNA-binding protein, forms a complex with SZY-20 in an RNA-independent fashion. Depleting ATX-2 results in embryonic lethality and cytokinesis failure, and restores centrosome duplication to zyg-1 mutants. In this pathway, SZY-20 promotes ATX-2 abundance, which inversely correlates with centrosome size. Centrosomes depleted of ATX-2 exhibit elevated levels of centrosome factors (ZYG-1, SPD-5, γ-Tubulin, increasing MT nucleating activity but impeding MT growth. We show that ATX-2 influences MT behavior through γ-Tubulin at the centrosome. Our data suggest that RNA-binding proteins play an active role in controlling MT dynamics and provide insight into the control of proper centrosome size and MT dynamics.

  10. History-dependent catastrophes regulate axonal microtubule behavior

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T. Stepanova (Tatiana); I. Smal (Ihor); J.A.J. van Haren (Jeffrey); U. Akinci (Umut); Z. Liu (Zhe); M. Miedema (Marja); R. Limpens (Ronald); M. van Ham (Marco); M. van der Reijden (Michael); R.A. Poot (Raymond); F.G. Grosveld (Frank); M. Mommaas (Mieke); E. Meijering (Erik); N.J. Galjart (Niels)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractIn Chinese hamster ovary cells, microtubules originate at the microtubule organizing center (MTOC) and grow persistently toward the cell edge, where they undergo catastrophe [1]. In axons, microtubule dynamics must be regulated differently because microtubules grow parallel to the plasma

  11. The Kinesin Adaptor Calsyntenin-1 Organizes Microtubule Polarity and Regulates Dynamics during Sensory Axon Arbor Development

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    Mary C. Halloran

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Axon growth and branching, and development of neuronal polarity are critically dependent on proper organization and dynamics of the microtubule (MT cytoskeleton. MTs must organize with correct polarity for delivery of diverse cargos to appropriate subcellular locations, yet the molecular mechanisms regulating MT polarity remain poorly understood. Moreover, how an actively branching axon reorganizes MTs to direct their plus ends distally at branch points is unknown. We used high-speed, in vivo imaging of polymerizing MT plus ends to characterize MT dynamics in developing sensory axon arbors in zebrafish embryos. We find that axonal MTs are highly dynamic throughout development, and that the peripheral and central axons of sensory neurons show differences in MT behaviors. Furthermore, we show that Calsyntenin-1 (Clstn-1, a kinesin adaptor required for sensory axon branching, also regulates MT polarity in developing axon arbors. In wild type neurons the vast majority of MTs are directed in the correct plus-end-distal orientation from early stages of development. Loss of Clstn-1 causes an increase in MTs polymerizing in the retrograde direction. These misoriented MTs most often are found near growth cones and branch points, suggesting Clstn-1 is particularly important for organizing MT polarity at these locations. Together, our results suggest that Clstn-1, in addition to regulating kinesin-mediated cargo transport, also organizes the underlying MT highway during axon arbor development.

  12. Regulation of Kif15 localization and motility by the C-terminus of TPX2 and microtubule dynamics.

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    Mann, Barbara J; Balchand, Sai K; Wadsworth, Patricia

    2017-01-01

    Mitotic motor proteins generate force to establish and maintain spindle bipolarity, but how they are temporally and spatially regulated in vivo is unclear. Prior work demonstrated that a microtubule-associated protein, TPX2, targets kinesin-5 and kinesin-12 motors to spindle microtubules. The C-terminal domain of TPX2 contributes to the localization and motility of the kinesin-5, Eg5, but it is not known whether this domain regulates kinesin-12, Kif15. We found that the C-terminal domain of TPX2 contributes to the localization of Kif15 to spindle microtubules in cells and suppresses motor walking in vitro. Kif15 and Eg5 are partially redundant motors, and overexpressed Kif15 can drive spindle formation in the absence of Eg5 activity. Kif15-dependent bipolar spindle formation in vivo requires the C-terminal domain of TPX2. In the spindle, fluorescent puncta of GFP-Kif15 move toward the equatorial region at a rate equivalent to microtubule growth. Reduction of microtubule growth with paclitaxel suppresses GFP-Kif15 motility, demonstrating that dynamic microtubules contribute to Kif15 behavior. Our results show that the C-terminal region of TPX2 regulates Kif15 in vitro, contributes to motor localization in cells, and is required for Kif15 force generation in vivo and further reveal that dynamic microtubules contribute to Kif15 behavior in vivo. © 2017 Mann, Balchand, and Wadsworth. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). Two months after publication it is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  13. Plasma membrane factor XIIIA transglutaminase activity regulates osteoblast matrix secretion and deposition by affecting microtubule dynamics.

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    Hadil F Al-Jallad

    Full Text Available Transglutaminase activity, arising potentially from transglutaminase 2 (TG2 and Factor XIIIA (FXIIIA, has been linked to osteoblast differentiation where it is required for type I collagen and fibronectin matrix deposition. In this study we have used an irreversible TG-inhibitor to 'block -and-track' enzyme(s targeted during osteoblast differentiation. We show that the irreversible TG-inhibitor is highly potent in inhibiting osteoblast differentiation and mineralization and reduces secretion of both fibronectin and type I collagen and their release from the cell surface. Tracking of the dansyl probe by Western blotting and immunofluorescence microscopy demonstrated that the inhibitor targets plasma membrane-associated FXIIIA. TG2 appears not to contribute to crosslinking activity on the osteoblast surface. Inhibition of FXIIIA with NC9 resulted in defective secretory vesicle delivery to the plasma membrane which was attributable to a disorganized microtubule network and decreased microtubule association with the plasma membrane. NC9 inhibition of FXIIIA resulted in destabilization of microtubules as assessed by cellular Glu-tubulin levels. Furthermore, NC9 blocked modification of Glu-tubulin into 150 kDa high-molecular weight Glu-tubulin form which was specifically localized to the plasma membrane. FXIIIA enzyme and its crosslinking activity were colocalized with plasma membrane-associated tubulin, and thus, it appears that FXIIIA crosslinking activity is directed towards stabilizing the interaction of microtubules with the plasma membrane. Our work provides the first mechanistic cues as to how transglutaminase activity could affect protein secretion and matrix deposition in osteoblasts and suggests a novel function for plasma membrane FXIIIA in microtubule dynamics.

  14. Aging of dynamically stabilized microtubules

    CERN Document Server

    Ebbinghaus, M

    2009-01-01

    The microtubule network, an important part of the cytoskeleton, is constantly remodeled by alternating phases of growth and shrinkage of individual filaments. Plus-end tracking proteins (+TIPs) interact with the microtubule and in many cases alter its dynamics. While it is established that the prototypal CLIP-170 enhances microtubule stability by increasing rescues, the plus-end tracking mechanism is still under debate. We present a model for microtubule dynamics in which a rescue factor is dynamically added to the filament while growing. As a consequence, the filament shows aging behavior which should be experimentally accessible and thus allow one to exclude some hypothesized models of the inclusion of rescue factors at the microtubule plus end. Additionally, we show the strong influence of the cell geometry on the quantitative results.

  15. Connexin43 modulates cell polarity and directional cell migration by regulating microtubule dynamics.

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    Richard Francis

    Full Text Available Knockout mice deficient in the gap junction gene connexin43 exhibit developmental anomalies associated with abnormal neural crest, primordial germ cell, and proepicardial cell migration. These migration defects are due to a loss of directional cell movement, and are associated with abnormal actin stress fiber organization and a loss of polarized cell morphology. To elucidate the mechanism by which Cx43 regulates cell polarity, we used a wound closure assays with mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs to examine polarized cell morphology and directional cell movement. Studies using embryonic fibroblasts from Cx43 knockout (Cx43KO mice showed Cx43 deficiency caused cell polarity defects as characterized by a failure of the Golgi apparatus and the microtubule organizing center to reorient with the direction of wound closure. Actin stress fibers at the wound edge also failed to appropriately align, and stabilized microtubule (Glu-tubulin levels were markedly reduced. Forced expression of Cx43 with deletion of its tubulin-binding domain (Cx43dT in both wildtype MEFs and neural crest cell explants recapitulated the cell migration defects seen in Cx43KO cells. However, forced expression of Cx43 with point mutation causing gap junction channel closure had no effect on cell motility. TIRF imaging revealed increased microtubule instability in Cx43KO cells, and microtubule targeting of membrane localized Cx43 was reduced with expression of Cx43dT construct in wildtype cells. Together, these findings suggest the essential role of Cx43 gap junctions in development is mediated by regulation of the tubulin cytoskeleton and cell polarity by Cx43 via a nonchannel function.

  16. Regulation of microtubule dynamics by Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent kinase IV/Gr-dependent phosphorylation of oncoprotein 18.

    OpenAIRE

    Melander Gradin, H; Marklund, U; Larsson, N; Chatila, T A; Gullberg, M.

    1997-01-01

    Oncoprotein 18 (Op18; also termed p19, 19K, p18, prosolin, and stathmin) is a regulator of microtubule (MT) dynamics and is phosphorylated by multiple kinase systems on four Ser residues. In addition to cell cycle-regulated phosphorylation, external signals induce phosphorylation of Op18 on Ser-25 by the mitogen-activated protein kinase and on Ser-16 by the Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent kinase IV/Gr (CaMK IV/Gr). Here we show that induced expression of a constitutively active mutant of CaMK IV/Gr...

  17. Progesterone modulates microtubule dynamics and epiboly progression during zebrafish gastrulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckerle, Stephanie; Ringler, Mario; Lecaudey, Virginie; Nitschke, Roland; Driever, Wolfgang

    2017-12-26

    Control of microtubule dynamics is crucial for cell migration. We analyzed regulation of microtubule network dynamics in the zebrafish yolk cell during epiboly, the earliest coordinated gastrulation movement. We labeled microtubules with EMTB-3GFP and EB3-mCherry to visualize and measure microtubule dynamics by TIRF microscopy live imaging. Yolk cell microtubules dynamics is temporally modulated during epiboly progression. We used maternal zygotic Pou5f3 mutant (MZspg) embryos, which develop strong distortions of microtubule network organization and epiboly retardation, to investigate genetic control of microtubule dynamics. In MZspg embryos, microtubule plus-end growth tracks move slower and are less straight compared to wild-type. MZspg embryos have altered steroidogenic enzyme expression, resulting in increased pregnenolone and reduced progesterone levels. We show that progesterone positively affects microtubule plus-end growth and track straightness. Progesterone may thus act as a non-cell-autonomous regulator of microtubule dynamics across the large yolk cell, and may adjust differing demands on microtubule dynamics and stability during initiation and progression phases of epiboly. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. ASPM and CITK regulate spindle orientation by affecting the dynamics of astral microtubules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gai, Marta; Bianchi, Federico T; Vagnoni, Cristiana; Vernì, Fiammetta; Bonaccorsi, Silvia; Pasquero, Selina; Berto, Gaia E; Sgrò, Francesco; Chiotto, Alessandra Ma; Annaratone, Laura; Sapino, Anna; Bergo, Anna; Landsberger, Nicoletta; Bond, Jacqueline; Huttner, Wieland B; Di Cunto, Ferdinando

    2016-10-01

    Correct orientation of cell division is considered an important factor for the achievement of normal brain size, as mutations in genes that affect this process are among the leading causes of microcephaly. Abnormal spindle orientation is associated with reduction of the neuronal progenitor symmetric divisions, premature cell cycle exit, and reduced neurogenesis. This mechanism has been involved in microcephaly resulting from mutation of ASPM, the most frequently affected gene in autosomal recessive human primary microcephaly (MCPH), but it is presently unknown how ASPM regulates spindle orientation. In this report, we show that ASPM may control spindle positioning by interacting with citron kinase (CITK), a protein whose loss is also responsible for severe microcephaly in mammals. We show that the absence of CITK leads to abnormal spindle orientation in mammals and insects. In mouse cortical development, this phenotype correlates with increased production of basal progenitors. ASPM is required to recruit CITK at the spindle, and CITK overexpression rescues ASPM phenotype. ASPM and CITK affect the organization of astral microtubules (MT), and low doses of MT-stabilizing drug revert the spindle orientation phenotype produced by their knockdown. Finally, CITK regulates both astral-MT nucleation and stability. Our results provide a functional link between two established microcephaly proteins. © 2016 The Authors.

  19. Dynamic microtubule organization and mitochondrial transport are regulated by distinct Kinesin-1 pathways

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    Anna Melkov

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The microtubule (MT plus-end motor kinesin heavy chain (Khc is well known for its role in long distance cargo transport. Recent evidence showed that Khc is also required for the organization of the cellular MT network by mediating MT sliding. We found that mutations in Khc and the gene of its adaptor protein, kinesin light chain (Klc resulted in identical bristle morphology defects, with the upper part of the bristle being thinner and flatter than normal and failing to taper towards the bristle tip. We demonstrate that bristle mitochondria transport requires Khc but not Klc as a competing force to dynein heavy chain (Dhc. Surprisingly, we demonstrate for the first time that Dhc is the primary motor for both anterograde and retrograde fast mitochondria transport. We found that the upper part of Khc and Klc mutant bristles lacked stable MTs. When following dynamic MT polymerization via the use of GFP-tagged end-binding protein 1 (EB1, it was noted that at Khc and Klc mutant bristle tips, dynamic MTs significantly deviated from the bristle parallel growth axis, relative to wild-type bristles. We also observed that GFP-EB1 failed to concentrate as a focus at the tip of Khc and Klc mutant bristles. We propose that the failure of bristle tapering is due to defects in directing dynamic MTs at the growing tip. Thus, we reveal a new function for Khc and Klc in directing dynamic MTs during polarized cell growth. Moreover, we also demonstrate a novel mode of coordination in mitochondrial transport between Khc and Dhc.

  20. Geometric features of microtubule dynamics

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    Ponce-Dawson, Silvina; Pearson, John E.; Reynolds, William N.

    Microtubules are long and stiff polymers that form the cytoskeleton of eucaryotic cells. They perform a series of tasks, such as determining the cell shape and providing a network of “rails” along which molecular motors transport organelles to different parts of the cell. They are particularly important during the process of cell division, since they provide the forces by which replicated chromosomes are segregated into what will be the two daughter cells. Microtubules are formed from a protein called tubulin and undergo a process called dynamic instability. In this paper we study, via numerical simulations of some simplified models, how the interaction between microtubules and the diffusion of free tubulin affects their spatial organization.

  1. Neurodegeneration and microtubule dynamics: Death by a thousand cuts

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    Jyoti eDubey

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Microtubules form important cytoskeletal structures that play a role in establishing and maintaining neuronal polarity, regulating neuronal morphology, transporting cargo and scaffolding signaling molecules to form signaling hubs. Within a neuronal cell, microtubules are found to have variable lengths and can be both stable and dynamic. Microtubule associated proteins, post-translational modifications of tubulin subunits, microtubule severing enzymes, and signaling molecules are all known to influence both stable and dynamic pools of microtubules. Microtubule dynamics, the process of interconversion between stable and dynamic pools, and the proportions of these two pools have the potential to influence a wide variety of cellular processes. Reduced microtubule stability has been observed in several neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis and tauopathies like Progressive Supranuclear Palsy. Hyperstable microtubules, as seen in Hereditary Spastic Paraplegia, also lead to neurodegeneration. Therefore, the ratio of stable and dynamic microtubules is likely to be important for neuronal function and perturbation in microtubule dynamics might contribute to disease progression.

  2. Stochastic Model of Microtubule Dynamics

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    Hryniv, Ostap; Martínez Esteban, Antonio

    2017-10-01

    We introduce a continuous time stochastic process on strings made of two types of particle, whose dynamics mimics that of microtubules in a living cell. The long term behaviour of the system is described in terms of the velocity v of the string end. We show that v is an analytic function of its parameters and study its monotonicity properties. We give a complete characterisation of the phase diagram of the model and derive several criteria of the growth (v>0) and the shrinking (v<0) regimes of the dynamics.

  3. Recruitment of EB1, a Master Regulator of Microtubule Dynamics, to the Surface of the Theileria annulata Schizont

    KAUST Repository

    Woods, Kerry L.

    2013-05-09

    The apicomplexan parasite Theileria annulata transforms infected host cells, inducing uncontrolled proliferation and clonal expansion of the parasitized cell population. Shortly after sporozoite entry into the target cell, the surrounding host cell membrane is dissolved and an array of host cell microtubules (MTs) surrounds the parasite, which develops into the transforming schizont. The latter does not egress to invade and transform other cells. Instead, it remains tethered to host cell MTs and, during mitosis and cytokinesis, engages the cell\\'s astral and central spindle MTs to secure its distribution between the two daughter cells. The molecular mechanism by which the schizont recruits and stabilizes host cell MTs is not known. MT minus ends are mostly anchored in the MT organizing center, while the plus ends explore the cellular space, switching constantly between phases of growth and shrinkage (called dynamic instability). Assuming the plus ends of growing MTs provide the first point of contact with the parasite, we focused on the complex protein machinery associated with these structures. We now report how the schizont recruits end-binding protein 1 (EB1), a central component of the MT plus end protein interaction network and key regulator of host cell MT dynamics. Using a range of in vitro experiments, we demonstrate that T. annulata p104, a polymorphic antigen expressed on the schizont surface, functions as a genuine EB1-binding protein and can recruit EB1 in the absence of any other parasite proteins. Binding strictly depends on a consensus SxIP motif located in a highly disordered C-terminal region of p104. We further show that parasite interaction with host cell EB1 is cell cycle regulated. This is the first description of a pathogen-encoded protein to interact with EB1 via a bona-fide SxIP motif. Our findings provide important new insight into the mode of interaction between Theileria and the host cell cytoskeleton. 2013 Woods et al.

  4. Recruitment of EB1, a master regulator of microtubule dynamics, to the surface of the Theileria annulata schizont.

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    Kerry L Woods

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The apicomplexan parasite Theileria annulata transforms infected host cells, inducing uncontrolled proliferation and clonal expansion of the parasitized cell population. Shortly after sporozoite entry into the target cell, the surrounding host cell membrane is dissolved and an array of host cell microtubules (MTs surrounds the parasite, which develops into the transforming schizont. The latter does not egress to invade and transform other cells. Instead, it remains tethered to host cell MTs and, during mitosis and cytokinesis, engages the cell's astral and central spindle MTs to secure its distribution between the two daughter cells. The molecular mechanism by which the schizont recruits and stabilizes host cell MTs is not known. MT minus ends are mostly anchored in the MT organizing center, while the plus ends explore the cellular space, switching constantly between phases of growth and shrinkage (called dynamic instability. Assuming the plus ends of growing MTs provide the first point of contact with the parasite, we focused on the complex protein machinery associated with these structures. We now report how the schizont recruits end-binding protein 1 (EB1, a central component of the MT plus end protein interaction network and key regulator of host cell MT dynamics. Using a range of in vitro experiments, we demonstrate that T. annulata p104, a polymorphic antigen expressed on the schizont surface, functions as a genuine EB1-binding protein and can recruit EB1 in the absence of any other parasite proteins. Binding strictly depends on a consensus SxIP motif located in a highly disordered C-terminal region of p104. We further show that parasite interaction with host cell EB1 is cell cycle regulated. This is the first description of a pathogen-encoded protein to interact with EB1 via a bona-fide SxIP motif. Our findings provide important new insight into the mode of interaction between Theileria and the host cell cytoskeleton.

  5. Tao-1 is a negative regulator of microtubule plus-end growth.

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    Liu, Tao; Rohn, Jennifer L; Picone, Remigio; Kunda, Patricia; Baum, Buzz

    2010-08-15

    Microtubule dynamics are dominated by events at microtubule plus ends as they switch between discrete phases of growth and shrinkage. Through their ability to generate force and direct polar cell transport, microtubules help to organise global cell shape and polarity. Conversely, because plus-end binding proteins render the dynamic instability of individual microtubules sensitive to the local intracellular environment, cyto-architecture also affects the overall distribution of microtubules. Despite the importance of plus-end regulation for understanding microtubule cytoskeletal organisation and dynamics, little is known about the signalling mechanisms that trigger changes in their behaviour in space and time. Here, we identify a microtubule-associated kinase, Drosophila Tao-1, as an important regulator of microtubule stability, plus-end dynamics and cell shape. Active Tao-1 kinase leads to the destabilisation of microtubules. Conversely, when Tao-1 function is compromised, rates of cortical-induced microtubule catastrophe are reduced and microtubules contacting the actin cortex continue to elongate, leading to the formation of long microtubule-based protrusions. These data reveal a role for Tao-1 in controlling the dynamic interplay between microtubule plus ends and the actin cortex in the regulation of cell form.

  6. Electric fields generated by synchronized oscillations of microtubules, centrosomes and chromosomes regulate the dynamics of mitosis and meiosis

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    Zhao Yue

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Super-macromolecular complexes play many important roles in eukaryotic cells. Classical structural biological studies focus on their complicated molecular structures, physical interactions and biochemical modifications. Recent advances concerning intracellular electric fields generated by cell organelles and super-macromolecular complexes shed new light on the mechanisms that govern the dynamics of mitosis and meiosis. In this review we synthesize this knowledge to provide an integrated theoretical model of these cellular events. We suggest that the electric fields generated by synchronized oscillation of microtubules, centrosomes, and chromatin fibers facilitate several events during mitosis and meiosis, including centrosome trafficking, chromosome congression in mitosis and synapsis between homologous chromosomes in meiosis. These intracellular electric fields are generated under energy excitation through the synchronized electric oscillations of the dipolar structures of microtubules, centrosomes and chromosomes, three of the super-macromolecular complexes within an animal cell.

  7. Escape from Mitotic Arrest: An Unexpected Connection Between Microtubule Dynamics and Epigenetic Regulation of Centromeric Chromatin in Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Anuja A; Walworth, Nancy C

    2015-12-01

    Accurate chromosome segregation is necessary to ensure genomic integrity. Segregation depends on the proper functioning of the centromere, kinetochore, and mitotic spindle microtubules and is monitored by the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC). In the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, defects in Dis1, a microtubule-associated protein that influences microtubule dynamics, lead to mitotic arrest as a result of an active SAC and consequent failure to grow at low temperature. In a mutant dis1 background (dis1-288), loss of function of Msc1, a fission yeast homolog of the KDM5 family of proteins, suppresses the growth defect and promotes normal mitosis. Genetic analysis implicates a histone deacetylase (HDAC)-linked pathway in suppression because HDAC mutants clr6-1, clr3∆, and sir2∆, though not hos2∆, also promote normal mitosis in the dis1-288 mutant. Suppression of the dis phenotype through loss of msc1 function requires the spindle checkpoint protein Mad2 and is limited by the presence of the heterochromatin-associated HP1 protein homolog Swi6. We speculate that alterations in histone acetylation promote a centromeric chromatin environment that compensates for compromised dis1 function by allowing for successful kinetochore-microtubule interactions that can satisfy the SAC. In cells arrested in mitosis by mutation of dis1, loss of function of epigenetic determinants such as Msc1 or specific HDACs can promote cell survival. Because the KDM5 family of proteins has been implicated in human cancers, an appreciation of the potential role of this family of proteins in chromosome segregation is warranted. Copyright © 2015 by the Genetics Society of America.

  8. Fission yeast mtr1p regulates interphase microtubule cortical dwell-time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlier-Grynkorn, Frédérique; Ji, Liang; Fraisier, Vincent; Lombard, Berangère; Dingli, Florent; Loew, Damarys; Paoletti, Anne; Ronot, Xavier; Tran, Phong T

    2014-06-13

    The microtubule cytoskeleton plays important roles in cell polarity, motility and division. Microtubules inherently undergo dynamic instability, stochastically switching between phases of growth and shrinkage. In cells, some microtubule-associated proteins (MAPs) and molecular motors can further modulate microtubule dynamics. We present here the fission yeast mtr1(+), a new regulator of microtubule dynamics that appears to be not a MAP or a motor. mtr1-deletion (mtr1Δ) primarily results in longer microtubule dwell-time at the cell tip cortex, suggesting that mtr1p acts directly or indirectly as a destabilizer of microtubules. mtr1p is antagonistic to mal3p, the ortholog of mammalian EB1, which stabilizes microtubules. mal3Δ results in short microtubules, but can be partially rescued by mtr1Δ, as the double mutant mal3Δ mtr1Δ exhibits longer microtubules than mal3Δ single mutant. By sequence homology, mtr1p is predicted to be a component of the ribosomal quality control complex. Intriguingly, deletion of a predicted ribosomal gene, rps1801, also resulted in longer microtubule dwell-time similar to mtr1Δ. The double-mutant mal3Δ rps1801Δ also exhibits longer microtubules than mal3Δ single mutant alone. Our study suggests a possible involvement of mtr1p and the ribosome complex in modulating microtubule dynamics. © 2014. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  9. Microtubule dynamics: Caps, catastrophes, and coupled hydrolysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Flyvbjerg, H.; Holy, T.E.; Leibler, S.

    1996-01-01

    and probability distributions relating to available experimental data are derived. Caps are found to be short and the total rate of hydrolysis at a microtubule end is found to be dynamically coupled to growth. The so-called catastrophe rate is a simple function of the microtubule growth rare and fits experimental...... data. A constant nonzero catastrophe rare, identical for both microtubule ends, is predicted at large growth rates. The delay time for dilution-induced catastrophes is stochastic with a simple distribution that fits the experimental one and, like the experimental one, does not depend on the rate...... description of several apparently contradictory experimental data. Experimental results for the catastrophe rate at different concentrations of magnesium ions and of microtubule associated proteins are discussed in terms of the model. Feasible experiments are suggested that can provide decisive tests...

  10. Nonlinear dynamics of C–terminal tails in cellular microtubules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sekulic, Dalibor L., E-mail: dalsek@uns.ac.rs; Sataric, Bogdan M.; Sataric, Miljko V. [University of Novi Sad, Faculty of Technical Sciences, Novi Sad (Serbia); Zdravkovic, Slobodan [University of Belgrade, Institute of Nuclear Sciences Vinca, Belgrade (Serbia); Bugay, Aleksandr N. [Laboratory of Radiation Biology, Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation)

    2016-07-15

    The mechanical and electrical properties, and information processing capabilities of microtubules are the permanent subject of interest for carrying out experiments in vitro and in silico, as well as for theoretical attempts to elucidate the underlying processes. In this paper, we developed a new model of the mechano–electrical waves elicited in the rows of very flexible C–terminal tails which decorate the outer surface of each microtubule. The fact that C–terminal tails play very diverse roles in many cellular functions, such as recruitment of motor proteins and microtubule–associated proteins, motivated us to consider their collective dynamics as the source of localized waves aimed for communication between microtubule and associated proteins. Our approach is based on the ferroelectric liquid crystal model and it leads to the effective asymmetric double-well potential which brings about the conditions for the appearance of kink–waves conducted by intrinsic electric fields embedded in microtubules. These kinks can serve as the signals for control and regulation of intracellular traffic along microtubules performed by processive motions of motor proteins, primarly from kinesin and dynein families. On the other hand, they can be precursors for initiation of dynamical instability of microtubules by recruiting the proper proteins responsible for the depolymerization process.

  11. Altered microtubule dynamics in Mecp2-deficient astrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nectoux, Juliette; Florian, Cedrick; Delepine, Chloe; Bahi-Buisson, Nadia; Khelfaoui, Malik; Reibel, Sophie; Chelly, Jamel; Bienvenu, Thierry

    2012-05-01

    Rett syndrome (RTT) is a severe neurodevelopmental disorder caused by mutations in the gene MECP2 encoding the methyl-CpG binding protein 2. This genetic disease affects predominantly girls and is characterized by a period of normal development that lasts for 8-18 months, followed by neurologic regression affecting both motor and mental abilities. Previous studies performed on brains from RTT subjects and Mecp2-deficient mice showed striking changes in neuronal maturation and dendritic arborization. Recently, we showed that expression of stathmin-like 2 (STMN2) was significantly reduced in fibroblasts from RTT patients, and similar results were obtained in the cerebellum of Mecp2-deficient mice. Because assembly and dynamics of microtubules are known to be modulated by STMN2, we studied microtubule dynamics in brain cells from Mecp2-deficient mice. We observed that Mecp2 deficiency affects microtubule dynamics in astrocytes from Mecp2-deficient mice. Our data reinforce the fact that the loss of Mecp2 in astrocytes may influence the onset and progression of RTT. These results imply that Mecp2 has a stabilizing role in microtubule dynamics and that Mecp2 deficiency, which is associated with STMN2 down-regulation, could lead to impaired microtubule stability, hence explaining the dendritic abnormalities observed in RTT brains. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. ATIP3, a novel prognostic marker of breast cancer patient survival, limits cancer cell migration and slows metastatic progression by regulating microtubule dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molina, Angie; Velot, Lauriane; Ghouinem, Lydia; Abdelkarim, Mohamed; Bouchet, Benjamin Pierre; Luissint, Anny-Claude; Bouhlel, Imène; Morel, Marina; Sapharikas, Elène; Di Tommaso, Anne; Honoré, Stéphane; Braguer, Diane; Gruel, Nadège; Vincent-Salomon, Anne; Delattre, Olivier; Sigal-Zafrani, Brigitte; André, Fabrice; Terris, Benoit; Akhmanova, Anna; Di Benedetto, Mélanie; Nahmias, Clara; Rodrigues-Ferreira, Sylvie

    2013-05-01

    Metastasis, a fatal complication of breast cancer, does not fully benefit from available therapies. In this study, we investigated whether ATIP3, the major product of 8p22 MTUS1 gene, may be a novel biomarker and therapeutic target for metastatic breast tumors. We show that ATIP3 is a prognostic marker for overall survival among patients with breast cancer. Notably, among metastatic tumors, low ATIP3 levels associate with decreased survival of the patients. By using a well-defined experimental mouse model of cancer metastasis, we show that ATIP3 expression delays the time-course of metastatic progression and limits the number and size of metastases in vivo. In functional studies, ATIP3 silencing increases breast cancer cell migration, whereas ATIP3 expression significantly reduces cell motility and directionality. We report here that ATIP3 is a potent microtubule-stabilizing protein whose depletion increases microtubule dynamics. Our data support the notion that by decreasing microtubule dynamics, ATIP3 controls the ability of microtubule tips to reach the cell cortex during migration, a mechanism that may account for reduced cancer cell motility and metastasis. Of interest, we identify a functional ATIP3 domain that associates with microtubules and recapitulates the effects of ATIP3 on microtubule dynamics, cell proliferation, and migration. Our study is a major step toward the development of new personalized treatments against metastatic breast tumors that have lost ATIP3 expression.

  13. Mmb1p binds mitochondria to dynamic microtubules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Chuanhai; Jain, Deeptee; Costa, Judite; Velve-Casquillas, Guilhem; Tran, Phong T.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background Mitochondria form a dynamics tubular network within the cell. Proper mitochondria movement and distribution are critical for their localized function in cell metabolism, growth, and survival. In mammalian cells, mechanisms of mitochondria positioning appear dependent on the microtubule cytoskeleton, with kinesin or dynein motors carrying mitochondria as cargos and distributing them throughout the microtubule network. Interestingly, the timescale of microtubule dynamics occurs in seconds, and the timescale of mitochondria distribution occurs in minutes. How does the cell couple these two time constants? Results Fission yeast also relies on microtubules for mitochondria distribution. We report here a new microtubule-dependent but motor-independent mechanism for proper mitochondria positioning in fission yeast. We identify the protein mmb1p, which binds to mitochondria and microtubules. Mmb1p attaches the tubular mitochondria to the microtubule lattice at multiple discrete interaction sites. Mmb1 deletion causes mitochondria to aggregate, with the long-term consequence of defective mitochondria distribution and cell death. Mmb1p decreases microtubule dynamicity. Conclusion Mmb1p is a new microtubule-mitochondria binding protein. We propose that mmb1p act to couple long-term mitochondria distribution to short-term microtubule dynamics by attenuating microtubule dynamics, thus enhancing the mitochondria-microtubule interaction time. PMID:21856157

  14. Dynamics of microtubules: highlights of recent computational and experimental investigations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barsegov, Valeri; Ross, Jennifer L.; Dima, Ruxandra I.

    2017-11-01

    Microtubules are found in most eukaryotic cells, with homologs in eubacteria and archea, and they have functional roles in mitosis, cell motility, intracellular transport, and the maintenance of cell shape. Numerous efforts have been expended over the last two decades to characterize the interactions between microtubules and the wide variety of microtubule associated proteins that control their dynamic behavior in cells resulting in microtubules being assembled and disassembled where and when they are required by the cell. We present the main findings regarding microtubule polymerization and depolymerization and review recent work about the molecular motors that modulate microtubule dynamics by inducing either microtubule depolymerization or severing. We also discuss the main experimental and computational approaches used to quantify the thermodynamics and mechanics of microtubule filaments.

  15. Basement Membrane Laminin α2 Regulation of BTB Dynamics via Its Effects on F-Actin and Microtubule Cytoskeletons Is Mediated Through mTORC1 Signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Ying; Chen, Haiqi; Lui, Wing-Yee; Lee, Will M; Cheng, C Yan

    2017-04-01

    A local axis connects the apical ectoplasmic specialization (ES) at the Sertoli-spermatid interface, the basal ES at the blood-testis barrier (BTB), and the basement membrane across the seminiferous epithelium functionally in rat testes. As such, cellular events that take place simultaneously across the epithelium such as spermiation and BTB remodeling that occur at the apical ES and the basal ES, respectively, at stage VIII of the cycle are coordinated. Herein, laminin α2, a structural component of the basement membrane, was found to regulate BTB dynamics. Sertoli cells were cultured in vitro to allow the establishment of a tight junction (TJ) barrier that mimicked the BTB in vivo. Knockdown of laminin α2 by transfecting Sertoli cells with laminin α2-specific short hairpin RNA vs the nontargeting negative control was shown to perturb the Sertoli cell TJ barrier, illustrating laminin α2 was involved in regulating BTB dynamics. This regulatory effect was mediated through mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) signaling because the two mTORC1 downstream signaling molecules ribosomal protein S6 and Akt1/2 were activated and inactivated, respectively, consistent with earlier findings that mTORC1 is involved in promoting BTB remodeling. Also, laminin α2 knockdown induced F-actin and microtubule (MT) disorganization through changes in the spatial expression of F-actin regulators actin-related protein 3 and epidermal growth factor receptor pathway substrate 8 vs end-binding protein 1 (a MT plus-end tracking protein, +TIP). These laminin α2 knockdown-mediated effects on F-actin and MT organization was blocked by exposing Sertoli cells to rapamycin, an inhibitor of mTORC1 signaling, and also SC79, an activator of Akt. In summary, laminin α2-mediated regulation on Sertoli cell BTB dynamics is through mTORC1 signaling. Copyright © 2017 Endocrine Society.

  16. Microtubules Modulate F-actin Dynamics during Neuronal Polarization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Bing; Meka, Durga Praveen; Scharrenberg, Robin; König, Theresa; Schwanke, Birgit; Kobler, Oliver; Windhorst, Sabine; Kreutz, Michael R; Mikhaylova, Marina; Calderon de Anda, Froylan

    2017-08-29

    Neuronal polarization is reflected by different dynamics of microtubule and filamentous actin (F-actin). Axonal microtubules are more stable than those in the remaining neurites, while dynamics of F-actin in axonal growth cones clearly exceed those in their dendritic counterparts. However, whether a functional interplay exists between the microtubule network and F-actin dynamics in growing axons and whether this interplay is instrumental for breaking cellular symmetry is currently unknown. Here, we show that an increment on microtubule stability or number of microtubules is associated with increased F-actin dynamics. Moreover, we show that Drebrin E, an F-actin and microtubule plus-end binding protein, mediates this cross talk. Drebrin E segregates preferentially to growth cones with a higher F-actin treadmilling rate, where more microtubule plus-ends are found. Interruption of the interaction of Drebrin E with microtubules decreases F-actin dynamics and arrests neuronal polarization. Collectively the data show that microtubules modulate F-actin dynamics for initial axon extension during neuronal development.

  17. A Case for Microtubule Vulnerability in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis: Altered Dynamics During Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jayden A Clark

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS is an aggressive multifactorial disease converging on a common pathology: the degeneration of motor neurons, their axons and neuromuscular synapses. This vulnerability and dysfunction of motor neurons highlights the dependency of these large cells on their intracellular machinery. Neuronal microtubules are an intracellular structure that facilitates a myriad of vital neuronal functions, including activity dependent axonal transport. In ALS it is becoming increasingly apparent that microtubules are likely to be a critical component of this disease. Not only are disruptions in this intracellular machinery present in the vast majority of seemingly sporadic cases, recent research has revealed that mutation to a microtubule protein, the tubulin isoform TUBA4A, is sufficient to cause a familial, albeit rare, form of disease. In both sporadic and familial disease, studies have provided evidence that microtubule mediated deficits in axonal transport are the tipping point for motor neuron survivability. Axonal transport deficits would lead to abnormal mitochondrial recycling, decreased vesicle and mRNA transport and limited signalling of key survival factors from the neurons peripheral synapses, causing the characteristic peripheral ‘die back’. This disruption to microtubule dependant transport in ALS has been shown to result from alterations in the phenomenon of microtubule dynamic instability: the rapid growth and shrinkage of microtubule polymers. This is accomplished primarily due to aberrant alterations to microtubule associated proteins (MAPS that regulate microtubule stability. Indeed, the current literature would argue that microtubule stability, particularly alterations in their dynamics, may be the initial driving force behind many familial and sporadic insults in ALS. Pharmacological stabilisation of the microtubule network offers an attractive therapeutic strategy in ALS; indeed it has shown promise in

  18. Tubulin Post-Translational Modifications and Microtubule Dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorota Wloga

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Microtubules are hollow tube-like polymeric structures composed of α,β-tubulin heterodimers. They play an important role in numerous cellular processes, including intracellular transport, cell motility and segregation of the chromosomes during cell division. Moreover, microtubule doublets or triplets form a scaffold of a cilium, centriole and basal body, respectively. To perform such diverse functions microtubules have to differ in their properties. Post-translational modifications are one of the factors that affect the properties of the tubulin polymer. Here we focus on the direct and indirect effects of post-translational modifications of tubulin on microtubule dynamics.

  19. The Role of Molecular Microtubule Motors and the Microtubule Cytoskeleton in Stress Granule Dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristen M. Bartoli

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Stress granules (SGs are cytoplasmic foci that appear in cells exposed to stress-induced translational inhibition. SGs function as a triage center, where mRNAs are sorted for storage, degradation, and translation reinitiation. The underlying mechanisms of SGs dynamics are still being characterized, although many key players have been identified. The main components of SGs are stalled 48S preinitiation complexes. To date, many other proteins have also been found to localize in SGs and are hypothesized to function in SG dynamics. Most recently, the microtubule cytoskeleton and associated motor proteins have been demonstrated to function in SG dynamics. In this paper, we will discuss current literature examining the function of microtubules and the molecular microtubule motors in SG assembly, coalescence, movement, composition, organization, and disassembly.

  20. Microtubule minus-end regulation at spindle poles by an ASPM-katanin complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Kai; Rezabkova, Lenka; Hua, Shasha; Liu, Qingyang; Capitani, Guido; Altelaar, A F Maarten; Heck, Albert J R; Kammerer, Richard A; Steinmetz, Michel O; Akhmanova, Anna

    2017-05-01

    ASPM (known as Asp in fly and ASPM-1 in worm) is a microcephaly-associated protein family that regulates spindle architecture, but the underlying mechanism is poorly understood. Here, we show that ASPM forms a complex with another protein linked to microcephaly, the microtubule-severing ATPase katanin. ASPM and katanin localize to spindle poles in a mutually dependent manner and regulate spindle flux. X-ray crystallography revealed that the heterodimer formed by the N- and C-terminal domains of the katanin subunits p60 and p80, respectively, binds conserved motifs in ASPM. Reconstitution experiments demonstrated that ASPM autonomously tracks growing microtubule minus ends and inhibits their growth, while katanin decorates and bends both ends of dynamic microtubules and potentiates the minus-end blocking activity of ASPM. ASPM also binds along microtubules, recruits katanin and promotes katanin-mediated severing of dynamic microtubules. We propose that the ASPM-katanin complex controls microtubule disassembly at spindle poles and that misregulation of this process can lead to microcephaly.

  1. Actin- and microtubule-dependent regulation of Golgi morphology by FHDC1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copeland, Sarah J.; Thurston, Susan F.; Copeland, John W.

    2016-01-01

    The Golgi apparatus is the central hub of intracellular trafficking and consists of tethered stacks of cis, medial, and trans cisternae. In mammalian cells, these cisternae are stitched together as a perinuclear Golgi ribbon, which is required for the establishment of cell polarity and normal subcellular organization. We previously identified FHDC1 (also known as INF1) as a unique microtubule-binding member of the formin family of cytoskeletal-remodeling proteins. We show here that endogenous FHDC1 regulates Golgi ribbon formation and has an apparent preferential association with the Golgi-derived microtubule network. Knockdown of FHDC1 expression results in defective Golgi assembly and suggests a role for FHDC1 in maintenance of the Golgi-derived microtubule network. Similarly, overexpression of FHDC1 induces dispersion of the Golgi ribbon into functional ministacks. This effect is independent of centrosome-derived microtubules and instead likely requires the interaction between the FHDC1 microtubule-binding domain and the Golgi-derived microtubule network. These effects also depend on the interaction between the FHDC1 FH2 domain and the actin cytoskeleton. Thus our results suggest that the coordination of actin and microtubule dynamics by FHDC1 is required for normal Golgi ribbon formation. PMID:26564798

  2. EB1 regulates attachment of Ska1 with microtubules by forming extended structures on the microtubule lattice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Geethu E; Bandopadhyay, K; Sutradhar, Sabyasachi; Renjith, M R; Singh, Puja; Gireesh, K K; Simon, Steny; Badarudeen, Binshad; Gupta, Hindol; Banerjee, Manidipa; Paul, Raja; Mitra, J; Manna, Tapas K

    2016-05-26

    Kinetochore couples chromosome movement to dynamic microtubules, a process that is fundamental to mitosis in all eukaryotes but poorly understood. In vertebrates, spindle-kinetochore-associated (Ska1-3) protein complex plays an important role in this process. However, the proteins that stabilize Ska-mediated kinetochore-microtubule attachment remain unknown. Here we show that microtubule plus-end tracking protein EB1 facilitates Ska localization on microtubules in vertebrate cells. EB1 depletion results in a significant reduction of Ska1 recruitment onto microtubules and defects in mitotic chromosome alignment, which is also reflected in computational modelling. Biochemical experiments reveal that EB1 interacts with Ska1, facilitates Ska1-microtubule attachment and together stabilizes microtubules. Structural studies reveal that EB1 either with Ska1 or Ska complex forms extended structures on microtubule lattice. Results indicate that EB1 promotes Ska association with K-fibres and facilitates kinetochore-microtubule attachment. They also implicate that in vertebrates, chromosome coupling to dynamic microtubules could be mediated through EB1-Ska extended structures.

  3. Intracellular spatial localization regulated by the microtubule network.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Chen

    Full Text Available The commonly recognized mechanisms for spatial regulation inside the cell are membrane-bounded compartmentalization and biochemical association with subcellular organelles. We use computational modeling to investigate another spatial regulation mechanism mediated by the microtubule network in the cell. Our results demonstrate that the mitotic spindle can impose strong sequestration and concentration effects on molecules with binding affinity for microtubules, especially dynein-directed cargoes. The model can recapitulate the essence of three experimental observations on distinct microtubule network morphologies: the sequestration of germ plasm components by the mitotic spindles in the Drosophila syncytial embryo, the asymmetric cell division initiated by the time delay in centrosome maturation in the Drosophila neuroblast, and the diffusional block between neighboring energids in the Drosophila syncytial embryo. Our model thus suggests that the cell cycle-dependent changes in the microtubule network are critical for achieving different spatial regulation effects. The microtubule network provides a spatially extensive docking platform for molecules and gives rise to a "structured cytoplasm", in contrast to a free and fluid environment.

  4. MARK4 regulates NLRP3 positioning and inflammasome activation through a microtubule-dependent mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xuan; Thome, Sarah; Ma, Xiaodan; Amrute-Nayak, Mamta; Finigan, Alison; Kitt, Lauren; Masters, Leanne; James, John R.; Shi, Yuguang; Meng, Guoyu; Mallat, Ziad

    2017-01-01

    Excessive activation of the NLR family pyrin domain containing 3 (NLRP3) inflammasome is involved in many chronic inflammatory diseases, including cardiovascular and Alzheimer’s disease. Here we show that microtubule-affinity regulating kinase 4 (MARK4) binds to NLRP3 and drives it to the microtubule-organizing centre, enabling the formation of one large inflammasome speck complex within a single cell. MARK4 knockdown or knockout, or disruption of MARK4-NLRP3 interaction, impairs NLRP3 spatial arrangement and limits inflammasome activation. Our results demonstrate how an evolutionarily conserved protein involved in the regulation of microtubule dynamics orchestrates NLRP3 inflammasome activation by controlling its transport to optimal activation sites, and identify a targetable function for MARK4 in the control of innate immunity. PMID:28656979

  5. Control of microtubule dynamics using an optogenetic microtubule plus end-F-actin cross-linker.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adikes, Rebecca C; Hallett, Ryan A; Saway, Brian F; Kuhlman, Brian; Slep, Kevin C

    2017-12-19

    We developed a novel optogenetic tool, SxIP-improved light-inducible dimer (iLID), to facilitate the reversible recruitment of factors to microtubule (MT) plus ends in an end-binding protein-dependent manner using blue light. We show that SxIP-iLID can track MT plus ends and recruit tgRFP-SspB upon blue light activation. We used this system to investigate the effects of cross-linking MT plus ends and F-actin in Drosophila melanogaster S2 cells to gain insight into spectraplakin function and mechanism. We show that SxIP-iLID can be used to temporally recruit an F-actin binding domain to MT plus ends and cross-link the MT and F-actin networks. Cross-linking decreases MT growth velocities and generates a peripheral MT exclusion zone. SxIP-iLID facilitates the general recruitment of specific factors to MT plus ends with temporal control enabling researchers to systematically regulate MT plus end dynamics and probe MT plus end function in many biological processes. © 2018 Adikes et al.

  6. The NIMA-family kinase Nek3 regulates microtubule acetylation in neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Jufang; Baloh, Robert H; Milbrandt, Jeffrey

    2009-07-01

    NIMA-related kinases (Neks) belong to a large family of Ser/Thr kinases that have critical roles in coordinating microtubule dynamics during ciliogenesis and mitotic progression. The Nek kinases are also expressed in neurons, whose axonal projections are, similarly to cilia, microtubule-abundant structures that extend from the cell body. We therefore investigated whether Nek kinases have additional, non-mitotic roles in neurons. We found that Nek3 influences neuronal morphogenesis and polarity through effects on microtubules. Nek3 is expressed in the cytoplasm and axons of neurons and is phosphorylated at Thr475 located in the C-terminal PEST domain, which regulates its catalytic activity. Although exogenous expression of wild-type or phosphomimic (T475D) Nek3 in cultured neurons has no discernible impact, expression of a phospho-defective mutant (T475A) or PEST-truncated Nek3 leads to distorted neuronal morphology with disturbed polarity and deacetylation of microtubules via HDAC6 in its kinase-dependent manner. Thus, the phosphorylation at Thr475 serves as a regulatory switch that alters Nek3 function. The deacetylation of microtubules in neurons by unphosphorylated Nek3 raises the possibility that it could have a role in disorders where axonal degeneration is an important component.

  7. Microtubule dynamics at the cell cortex probed by TIRF microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grigoriev, Ilya; Akhmanova, Anna

    2010-01-01

    Total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy is a technique that allows selective excitation of fluorescence at a liquid/solid interface within a short distance from the boundary. The penetration depth of TIRF microscopy depends on the angle of illumination resulting in a range of depths, which typically vary from approximately similar 70-200 nm up to reverse approximately 500 nm. The advantages of TIRF microscopy include excellent signal-to-noise ratio, high sensitivity, low photobleaching, and low photodamage. TIRF microscopy is widely used for studying cell adhesion, exo- and endocytosis, and the dynamics of plasma membrane-associated molecules. TIRF microscopy can also be applied for selective visualization of any other cellular processes that occur near the basal membrane even if their localization is not restricted to this part of the cell. For example, microtubules are distributed throughout the cytoplasm, but the use of TIRF microscopy makes it possible to visualize specifically the microtubule subpopulation in the vicinity of the basal cortex and thus study cortical microtubule attachment and stabilization, interactions between microtubules and matrix adhesion structures, and the behavior of specific molecules involved in these processes. In this chapter we describe the application of a commercially available setup to analyze microtubule behavior in live mammalian cells using TIRF microscopy. 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. A polarised population of dynamic microtubules mediates homeostatic length control in animal cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Remigio Picone

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Because physical form and function are intimately linked, mechanisms that maintain cell shape and size within strict limits are likely to be important for a wide variety of biological processes. However, while intrinsic controls have been found to contribute to the relatively well-defined shape of bacteria and yeast cells, the extent to which individual cells from a multicellular animal control their plastic form remains unclear. Here, using micropatterned lines to limit cell extension to one dimension, we show that cells spread to a characteristic steady-state length that is independent of cell size, pattern width, and cortical actin. Instead, homeostatic length control on lines depends on a population of dynamic microtubules that lead during cell extension, and that are aligned along the long cell axis as the result of interactions of microtubule plus ends with the lateral cell cortex. Similarly, during the development of the zebrafish neural tube, elongated neuroepithelial cells maintain a relatively well-defined length that is independent of cell size but dependent upon oriented microtubules. A simple, quantitative model of cellular extension driven by microtubules recapitulates cell elongation on lines, the steady-state distribution of microtubules, and cell length homeostasis, and predicts the effects of microtubule inhibitors on cell length. Together this experimental and theoretical analysis suggests that microtubule dynamics impose unexpected limits on cell geometry that enable cells to regulate their length. Since cells are the building blocks and architects of tissue morphogenesis, such intrinsically defined limits may be important for development and homeostasis in multicellular organisms.

  9. Structure, function, and evolution of plant NIMA-related kinases: implication for phosphorylation-dependent microtubule regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takatani, Shogo; Otani, Kento; Kanazawa, Mai; Takahashi, Taku; Motose, Hiroyasu

    2015-11-01

    Microtubules are highly dynamic structures that control the spatiotemporal pattern of cell growth and division. Microtubule dynamics are regulated by reversible protein phosphorylation involving both protein kinases and phosphatases. Never in mitosis A (NIMA)-related kinases (NEKs) are a family of serine/threonine kinases that regulate microtubule-related mitotic events in fungi and animal cells (e.g. centrosome separation and spindle formation). Although plants contain multiple members of the NEK family, their functions remain elusive. Recent studies revealed that NEK6 of Arabidopsis thaliana regulates cell expansion and morphogenesis through β-tubulin phosphorylation and microtubule destabilization. In addition, plant NEK members participate in organ development and stress responses. The present phylogenetic analysis indicates that plant NEK genes are diverged from a single NEK6-like gene, which may share a common ancestor with other kinases involved in the control of microtubule organization. On the contrary, another mitotic kinase, polo-like kinase, might have been lost during the evolution of land plants. We propose that plant NEK members have acquired novel functions to regulate cell growth, microtubule organization, and stress responses.

  10. NIMA-related kinases 6, 4, and 5 interact with each other to regulate microtubule organization during epidermal cell expansion in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motose, Hiroyasu; Hamada, Takahiro; Yoshimoto, Kaori; Murata, Takashi; Hasebe, Mitsuyasu; Watanabe, Yuichiro; Hashimoto, Takashi; Sakai, Tatsuya; Takahashi, Taku

    2011-09-01

    NimA-related kinase 6 (NEK6) has been implicated in microtubule regulation to suppress the ectopic outgrowth of epidermal cells; however, its molecular functions remain to be elucidated. Here, we analyze the function of NEK6 and other members of the NEK family with regard to epidermal cell expansion and cortical microtubule organization. The functional NEK6-green fluorescent protein fusion localizes to cortical microtubules, predominantly in particles that exhibit dynamic movement along microtubules. The kinase-dead mutant of NEK6 (ibo1-1) exhibits a disturbance of the cortical microtubule array at the site of ectopic protrusions in epidermal cells. Pharmacological studies with microtubule inhibitors and quantitative analysis of microtubule dynamics indicate excessive stabilization of cortical microtubules in ibo1/nek6 mutants. In addition, NEK6 directly binds to microtubules in vitro and phosphorylates β-tubulin. NEK6 interacts and co-localizes with NEK4 and NEK5 in a transient expression assay. The ibo1-3 mutation markedly reduces the interaction between NEK6 and NEK4 and increases the interaction between NEK6 and NEK5. NEK4 and NEK5 are required for the ibo1/nek6 ectopic outgrowth phenotype in epidermal cells. These results demonstrate that NEK6 homodimerizes and forms heterodimers with NEK4 and NEK5 to regulate cortical microtubule organization possibly through the phosphorylation of β-tubulins. © 2011 The Authors. The Plant Journal © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  11. Interplay of microtubule dynamics and sliding during bipolar spindle formation in mammalian cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kollu, Swapna; Bakhoum, Samuel F.; Compton, Duane A.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Accurate chromosome segregation during mitosis relies on the organization of microtubules into a bipolar spindle. Kinesin-5 proteins play an evolutionarily conserved role in establishing spindle bipolarity [1, 2] and clinical trials are currently evaluating inhibitors of human kinesin-5 (i.e. Eg5) for chemotherapeutic potential. However, in mammalian somatic cells Eg5 activity is dispensable for maintenance of bipolar spindles once they are formed [3, 4], suggesting distinct requirements for establishment versus maintenance of spindle bipolarity. By combining Eg5 inhibition with RNA interference of other spindle proteins, we show that mitotic cells deficient in MCAK fail to maintain spindle bipolarity in the absence of Eg5 activity. Collapse of bipolar spindles in MCAK-deficient cells is driven by pole focusing activities and is independent of MCAK function at centromeres, implicating hyperstabilized non-kinetochore microtubules in spindle collapse. Conversely, destabilizing non-kinetochore microtubules in early mitosis reduces the reliance on Eg5 for establishment of spindle bipolarity and renders cells partially resistant to Eg5 inhibitors. Thus, the temporal requirement for microtubule sliding generated by Eg5 activity during bipolar spindle assembly in mammalian cells is regulated by changes in the dynamic behavior of microtubules during mitosis. PMID:19931454

  12. Force fluctuations and polymerization dynamics of intracellular microtubules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brangwynne, Clifford

    2008-03-01

    Microtubules are dynamic biopolymers within the cytoskeleton of living cells. They play a central role in many biological processes including cell division, migration, and cargo transport. Microtubules are significantly more rigid than other cytoskeletal biopolymers, such as actin filaments, and are insensitive to thermal fluctuations on cellular length scales. However, we show that intracellular microtubules exhibit bending amplitudes with a surprisingly thermal-like wavevector dependence, but with an apparent persistence length about 100 times smaller than that measured in vitro. By studying the time-dependent bending fluctuations of individual filaments, we find that the thermal-like bends are fluctuating significantly only on short length scales, while they are frozen-in on longer length scales [1], reminiscent of non-ergodic behavior seen in systems far from equilibrium. Long wavelength bends are suppressed by the surrounding elastic cytoskeleton, which confines bending to short length scales on the order of a few microns [2]. These short wavelength bending fluctuations naturally cause fluctuations in the orientation of the microtubule tip. Tip fluctuations result in a persistent random walk trajectory of microtubule growth, but with a small non-equilibrium persistence length, explaining the origin of quenched thermal-like bends. These results suggest that intracellular motor activity has a highly fluctuating character that dominates over thermal fluctuations, with important consequences for fundamental biological processes. [1] CP Brangwynne, FC MacKintosh, DA Weitz, PNAS, 104:16128 (2007). [2] CP Brangwynne, FC MacKintosh, S Kumar, NA Geisse, J Talbot, L. Mahadevan, KK Parker, DE Ingber, DA Weitz, JCB, 173:733 (2006).

  13. Katanin Effects on Dynamics of Cortical Microtubules and Mitotic Arrays in Arabidopsis thaliana Revealed by Advanced Live-Cell Imaging

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    George Komis

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Katanin is the only microtubule severing protein identified in plants so far. Previous studies have documented its role in regulating cortical microtubule organization during cell growth and morphogenesis. Although, some cell division defects are reported in KATANIN mutants, it is not clear whether or how katanin activity may affect microtubule dynamics in interphase cells, as well as the progression of mitosis and cytokinesis and the orientation of cell division plane (CDP. For this reason, we characterized microtubule organization and dynamics in growing and dividing cotyledon cells of Arabidopsis ktn1-2 mutant devoid of KATANIN 1 activity. In interphase epidermal cells of ktn1-2 cortical microtubules exhibited aberrant and largely isotropic organization, reduced bundling and showed excessive branched microtubule formation. End-wise microtubule dynamics were not much affected, although a significantly slower rate of microtubule growth was measured in the ktn1-2 mutant where microtubule severing was completely abolished. KATANIN 1 depletion also brought about significant changes in preprophase microtubule band (PPB organization and dynamics. In this case, many PPBs exhibited unisided organization and splayed appearance while in most cases they were broader than those of wild type cells. By recording PPB maturation, it was observed that PPBs in the mutant narrowed at a much slower pace compared to those in Col-0. The form of the mitotic spindle and the phragmoplast was not much affected in ktn1-2, however, the dynamics of both processes showed significant differences compared to wild type. In general, both mitosis and cytokinesis were considerably delayed in the mutant. Additionally, the mitotic spindle and the phragmoplast exhibited extensive rotational motions with the equatorial plane of the spindle being essentially uncoupled from the division plane set by the PPB. However, at the onset of its formation the phragmoplast undergoes rotational

  14. Tau can switch microtubule network organizations: from random networks to dynamic and stable bundles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prezel, Elea; Elie, Auréliane; Delaroche, Julie; Stoppin-Mellet, Virginie; Bosc, Christophe; Serre, Laurence; Fourest-Lieuvin, Anne; Andrieux, Annie; Vantard, Marylin; Arnal, Isabelle

    2017-11-22

    In neurons, microtubule networks alternate between single filaments and bundled arrays under the influence of effectors controlling their dynamics and organization. Tau is a microtubule bundler which stabilizes microtubules by stimulating growth and inhibiting shrinkage. The mechanisms by which tau organizes microtubule networks remain poorly understood. Here, we studied the self-organization of microtubules growing in the presence of tau isoforms and mutants. The results show that tau's ability to induce stable microtubule bundles requires two hexapeptides located in its microtubule-binding domain, and is modulated by its projection domain. Site-specific pseudo-phosphorylation of tau promotes distinct microtubule organizations: stable single microtubules, stable bundles or dynamic bundles. Disease-related tau mutations increase the formation of highly dynamic bundles. Finally, cryo-electron microscopy experiments indicate that tau and its variants similarly change the microtubule lattice structure by increasing both the protofilament number and lattice defects. Overall, our results uncover novel phospho-dependent mechanisms governing tau's ability to trigger microtubule organization and reveal that disease-related modifications of tau promote specific microtubule organizations which may have a deleterious impact during neurodegeneration. © 2017 by The American Society for Cell Biology.

  15. TCS1, a Microtubule-Binding Protein, Interacts with KCBP/ZWICHEL to Regulate Trichome Cell Shape in Arabidopsis thaliana.

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    Liangliang Chen

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available How cell shape is controlled is a fundamental question in developmental biology, but the genetic and molecular mechanisms that determine cell shape are largely unknown. Arabidopsis trichomes have been used as a good model system to investigate cell shape at the single-cell level. Here we describe the trichome cell shape 1 (tcs1 mutants with the reduced trichome branch number in Arabidopsis. TCS1 encodes a coiled-coil domain-containing protein. Pharmacological analyses and observations of microtubule dynamics show that TCS1 influences the stability of microtubules. Biochemical analyses and live-cell imaging indicate that TCS1 binds to microtubules and promotes the assembly of microtubules. Further results reveal that TCS1 physically associates with KCBP/ZWICHEL, a microtubule motor involved in the regulation of trichome branch number. Genetic analyses indicate that kcbp/zwi is epistatic to tcs1 with respect to trichome branch number. Thus, our findings define a novel genetic and molecular mechanism by which TCS1 interacts with KCBP to regulate trichome cell shape by influencing the stability of microtubules.

  16. The non-catalytic domains of Drosophila katanin regulate its abundance and microtubule-disassembly activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyle D Grode

    Full Text Available Microtubule severing is a biochemical reaction that generates an internal break in a microtubule and regulation of microtubule severing is critical for cellular processes such as ciliogenesis, morphogenesis, and meiosis and mitosis. Katanin is a conserved heterodimeric ATPase that severs and disassembles microtubules, but the molecular determinants for regulation of microtubule severing by katanin remain poorly defined. Here we show that the non-catalytic domains of Drosophila katanin regulate its abundance and activity in living cells. Our data indicate that the microtubule-interacting and trafficking (MIT domain and adjacent linker region of the Drosophila katanin catalytic subunit Kat60 cooperate to regulate microtubule severing in two distinct ways. First, the MIT domain and linker region of Kat60 decrease its abundance by enhancing its proteasome-dependent degradation. The Drosophila katanin regulatory subunit Kat80, which is required to stabilize Kat60 in cells, conversely reduces the proteasome-dependent degradation of Kat60. Second, the MIT domain and linker region of Kat60 augment its microtubule-disassembly activity by enhancing its association with microtubules. On the basis of our data, we propose that the non-catalytic domains of Drosophila katanin serve as the principal sites of integration of regulatory inputs, thereby controlling its ability to sever and disassemble microtubules.

  17. Kindlin1 regulates microtubule function to ensure normal mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Hitesh; Stavrou, Ifigeneia; Shrestha, Roshan L; Draviam, Viji; Frame, Margaret C; Brunton, Valerie G

    2016-08-01

    Loss of Kindlin 1 (Kin1) results in the skin blistering disorder Kindler Syndrome (KS), whose symptoms also include skin atrophy and reduced keratinocyte proliferation. Kin1 binds to integrins to modulate their activation and more recently it has been shown to regulate mitotic spindles and cell survival in a Plk1-dependent manner. Here we report that short-term Kin1 deletion in mouse skin results in impaired mitosis, which is associated with reduced acetylated tubulin (ac-tub) levels and cell proliferation. In cells, impaired mitosis and reduced ac-tub levels are also accompanied by reduced microtubule stability, all of which are rescued by HDAC6 inhibition. The ability of Kin1 to regulate HDAC6-dependent cellular ac-tub levels is dependent on its phosphorylation by Plk1. Taken together, these data define a novel role for Kin1 in microtubule acetylation and stability and offer a mechanistic insight into how certain KS phenotypes, such as skin atrophy and reduced cell proliferation, arise. © The Author (2016). Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Journal of Molecular Cell Biology, IBCB, SIBS, CAS.

  18. Signatures of a macroscopic switching transition for a dynamic microtubule

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aparna, J. S.; Padinhateeri, Ranjith; Das, Dibyendu

    2017-04-01

    Characterising complex kinetics of non-equilibrium self-assembly of bio-filaments is of general interest. Dynamic instability in microtubules, consisting of successive catastrophes and rescues, is observed to occur as a result of the non-equilibrium conversion of GTP-tubulin to GDP-tubulin. We study this phenomenon using a model for microtubule kinetics with GTP/GDP state-dependent polymerisation, depolymerisation and hydrolysis of subunits. Our results reveal a sharp switch-like transition in the mean velocity of the filaments, from a growth phase to a shrinkage phase, with an associated co-existence of the two phases. This transition is reminiscent of the discontinuous phase transition across the liquid-gas boundary. We probe the extent of discontinuity in the transition quantitatively using characteristic signatures such as bimodality in velocity distribution, variance and Binder cumulant, and also hysteresis behaviour of the system. We further investigate ageing behaviour in catastrophes of the filament, and find that the multi-step nature of catastrophes is intensified in the vicinity of the switching transition. This assumes importance in the context of Microtubule Associated Proteins which have the potential of altering kinetic parameter values.

  19. Dynamics and regulation at the tip : a high resolution view on microtubele assembly

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Munteanu, Laura

    2008-01-01

    Microtubules are highly dynamic protein polymers that and are essential for intracellular organization and fundamental processes like transport and cell division. In cells, a wide family of microtubule-associated proteins (MAPs) tightly regulates microtubule dynamics. The work presented in this

  20. Dynamic instabilities in the kinetics of growth and disassembly of microtubules

    OpenAIRE

    Katrukha, Eugene

    2016-01-01

    Dynamic instability of microtubules is considered using frameworks of non-linear thermodynamics and non-equilibrium reaction-diffusion systems. Stochastic assembly/disassembly phases in the polymerization dynamics of microtubules are treated as a result of collective clusterization of microdefects (holes in structure). The model explains experimentally observed power law dependence of catastrophe frequency from the microtubule growth rate. Additional reaction-diffusion-precipitation model is ...

  1. A TIRF microscopy assay to decode how tau regulates EB's tracking at microtubule ends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez-Rios, Sacnicte; Serre, Laurence; Stoppin-Mellet, Virginie; Prezel, Elea; Vinit, Angélique; Courriol, Emilie; Fourest-Lieuvin, Anne; Delaroche, Julie; Denarier, Eric; Arnal, Isabelle

    2017-01-01

    Tau is a major microtubule-associated protein (MAP) mainly expressed in the brain. Tau binds the lattice of microtubules and favors their elongation and bundling. Recent studies have shown that tau is also a partner of end-binding proteins (EBs) in neurons. EBs belong to the protein family of the plus-end tracking proteins that preferentially associate with the growing plus-ends of microtubules and control microtubule end behavior and anchorage to intracellular organelles. Reconstituted cell-free systems using purified proteins are required to understand the precise mechanisms by which tau influences EB localization on microtubules and how the concerted activity of these two MAPs modulates microtubule dynamics. We developed an in vitro assay combining TIRF microscopy and site-directed mutagenesis to dissect the interaction of tau with EBs and to study how this interaction affects microtubule dynamics. Here, we describe the detailed procedures to purify proteins (tubulin, tau, and EBs), prepare the samples for TIRF microscopy, and analyze microtubule dynamics, and EB binding at microtubule ends in the presence of tau. © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Polo-like kinase 1 regulates Nlp, a centrosome protein involved in microtubule nucleation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casenghi, Martina; Meraldi, Patrick; Weinhart, Ulrike; Duncan, Peter I; Körner, Roman; Nigg, Erich A

    2003-07-01

    In animal cells, most microtubules are nucleated at centrosomes. At the onset of mitosis, centrosomes undergo a structural reorganization, termed maturation, which leads to increased microtubule nucleation activity. Centrosome maturation is regulated by several kinases, including Polo-like kinase 1 (Plk1). Here, we identify a centrosomal Plk1 substrate, termed Nlp (ninein-like protein), whose properties suggest an important role in microtubule organization. Nlp interacts with two components of the gamma-tubulin ring complex and stimulates microtubule nucleation. Plk1 phosphorylates Nlp and disrupts both its centrosome association and its gamma-tubulin interaction. Overexpression of an Nlp mutant lacking Plk1 phosphorylation sites severely disturbs mitotic spindle formation. We propose that Nlp plays an important role in microtubule organization during interphase, and that the activation of Plk1 at the onset of mitosis triggers the displacement of Nlp from the centrosome, allowing the establishment of a mitotic scaffold with enhanced microtubule nucleation activity.

  3. Regulation of developmental and environmental signaling by interaction between microtubules and membranes in plant cells

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    Qun Zhang

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Cell division and expansion require the ordered arrangement of microtubules, which are subject to spatial and temporal modifications by developmental and environmental factors. Understanding how signals translate to changes in cortical microtubule organization is of fundamental importance. A defining feature of the cortical microtubule array is its association with the plasma membrane; modules of the plasma membrane are thought to play important roles in the mediation of microtubule organization. In this review, we highlight advances in research on the regulation of cortical microtubule organization by membrane-associated and membrane-tethered proteins and lipids in response to phytohormones and stress. The transmembrane kinase receptor Rho-like guanosine triphosphatase, phospholipase D, phosphatidic acid, and phosphoinositides are discussed with a focus on their roles in microtubule organization.

  4. Microtubules Nonlinear Models Dynamics Investigations through the exp(−Φ(ξ-Expansion Method Implementation

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    Nur Alam

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available In this research article, we present exact solutions with parameters for two nonlinear model partial differential equations(PDEs describing microtubules, by implementing the exp(−Φ(ξ-Expansion Method. The considered models, describing highly nonlinear dynamics of microtubules, can be reduced to nonlinear ordinary differential equations. While the first PDE describes the longitudinal model of nonlinear dynamics of microtubules, the second one describes the nonlinear model of dynamics of radial dislocations in microtubules. The acquired solutions are then graphically presented, and their distinct properties are enumerated in respect to the corresponding dynamic behavior of the microtubules they model. Various patterns, including but not limited to regular, singular kink-like, as well as periodicity exhibiting ones, are detected. Being the method of choice herein, the exp(−Φ(ξ-Expansion Method not disappointing in the least, is found and declared highly efficient.

  5. A mutation of the fission yeast EB1 overcomes negative regulation by phosphorylation and stabilizes microtubules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iimori, Makoto; Ozaki, Kanako [Graduate School of Biostudies, Kyoto University, Kitashirakawa-Oiwake cho, Sakyo ku, Kyoto, 606-8502 (Japan); Chikashige, Yuji [Kobe Advanced ICT Research Center, National Institute of Information and Communications Technology, Kobe, 651-2492 (Japan); Habu, Toshiyuki [Graduate School of Biostudies, Kyoto University, Kitashirakawa-Oiwake cho, Sakyo ku, Kyoto, 606-8502 (Japan); Radiation Biology Center, Kyoto University, Yoshida-Konoe cho, Sakyo ku, Kyoto, 606-8501 (Japan); Hiraoka, Yasushi [Kobe Advanced ICT Research Center, National Institute of Information and Communications Technology, Kobe, 651-2492 (Japan); Graduate School of Frontier Biosciences, Osaka University, 1-3 Yamadaoka, Suita, 565-0871 (Japan); Maki, Takahisa; Hayashi, Ikuko [Graduate School of Nanobioscience, Yokohama City University, Tsurumi, Yokohama, 230-0045 (Japan); Obuse, Chikashi [Graduate School of Life Science, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 001-0021 (Japan); Matsumoto, Tomohiro, E-mail: tmatsumo@house.rbc.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Graduate School of Biostudies, Kyoto University, Kitashirakawa-Oiwake cho, Sakyo ku, Kyoto, 606-8502 (Japan); Radiation Biology Center, Kyoto University, Yoshida-Konoe cho, Sakyo ku, Kyoto, 606-8501 (Japan)

    2012-02-01

    Mal3 is a fission yeast homolog of EB1, a plus-end tracking protein (+ TIP). We have generated a mutation (89R) replacing glutamine with arginine in the calponin homology (CH) domain of Mal3. Analysis of the 89R mutant in vitro has revealed that the mutation confers a higher affinity to microtubules and enhances the intrinsic activity to promote the microtubule-assembly. The mutant Mal3 is no longer a + TIP, but binds strongly the microtubule lattice. Live cell imaging has revealed that while the wild type Mal3 proteins dissociate from the tip of the growing microtubules before the onset of shrinkage, the mutant Mal3 proteins persist on microtubules and reduces a rate of shrinkage after a longer pausing period. Consequently, the mutant Mal3 proteins cause abnormal elongation of microtubules composing the spindle and aster. Mal3 is phosphorylated at a cluster of serine/threonine residues in the linker connecting the CH and EB1-like C-terminal motif domains. The phosphorylation occurs in a microtubule-dependent manner and reduces the affinity of Mal3 to microtubules. We propose that because the 89R mutation is resistant to the effect of phosphorylation, it can associate persistently with microtubules and confers a stronger stability of microtubules likely by reinforcing the cylindrical structure. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We characterize a mutation (mal3-89R) in fission yeast homolog of EB1. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The mutation enhances the activity to assemble microtubules. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mal3 is phosphorylated in a microtubule-dependent manner. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The phosphorylation negatively regulates the Mal3 activity.

  6. Dynamic properties of nucleated microtubules: GTP utilisation in the subcritical concentration regime.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Symmons, M F; Martin, S R; Bayley, P M

    1996-11-01

    Microtubule assembly kinetics have been studied quantitatively under solution conditions supporting microtubule dynamic instability. Purified GTP-tubulin (Tu-GTP) and covalently cross-linked short microtubule seeds (EGS-seeds; Koshland et al. (1988) Nature 331, 499) were used with and without biotinylation. Under sub-critical concentration conditions ([Tu-GTP] assembly, that was found to abolish the GDP release. The variation of the GDP release with tubulin concentration (Jh(c) plot) was determined below the critical concentration (Cc). The GDP production observed was consistent with the elongation of the observed seeded microtubules with an apparent rate constant of 1.5 x 10(6) M-1 second-1 above a threshold of approximately 1 microM tubulin. The form of this Jh(c) plot for elongation below Cc is reproduced by the Lateral Cap model for microtubule dynamic instability adapted for seeded assembly. The behaviour of the system is contrasted with that previously studied in the absence of detectable microtubule elongation (Caplow and Shanks (1990) J. Biol. Chem. 265, 8935-8941). The approach provides a means of monitoring microtubule dynamics at concentrations inaccessible to optical microscopy, and shows that essentially the same dynamic mechanisms apply at all concentrations. Numerical simulation of the subcritical concentration regime shows dynamic growth features applicable to the initiation of microtubule growth in vivo.

  7. Biallelic Mutations in TBCD, Encoding the Tubulin Folding Cofactor D, Perturb Microtubule Dynamics and Cause Early-Onset Encephalopathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Flex, E.; Niceta, M.; Cecchetti, S.; Thiffault, I.; Au, M.G.; Capuano, A.; Piermarini, E.; Ivanova, A.A.; Francis, J.W.; Chillemi, G.; Chandramouli, B.; Carpentieri, G.; Haaxma, C.A.; Ciolfi, A.; Pizzi, S.; Douglas, G.V.; Levine, K.; Sferra, A.; Dentici, M.L.; Pfundt, R.R.; Pichon, J.B. Le; Farrow, E.; Baas, F.; Piemonte, F.; Dallapiccola, B.; Graham, J.M.; Saunders, C.J.; Bertini, E.; Kahn, R.A.; Koolen, D.A.; Tartaglia, M.

    2016-01-01

    Microtubules are dynamic cytoskeletal elements coordinating and supporting a variety of neuronal processes, including cell division, migration, polarity, intracellular trafficking, and signal transduction. Mutations in genes encoding tubulins and microtubule-associated proteins are known to cause

  8. Mathematical modeling of the microtubule dynamic instability: a new approch of GTP-tubulin hydrolysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barlukova Ayuna

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Microtubules, components of the cytosqueleton, play an important role in cell division, cell migration and thus in the cancer proccess through dynamic instability. Therefore they are an important target for anti-cancer treatment. Proper modelling of dynamic instability is a crucial tool to understand the mechanism of action of microtubule targeting agents. In this paper, we propose a new concept for GTP-tubulin hydrolysis which allow the model to accurately reproduce microtubule dynamics observed in vitro or in cells. This approach will be more appropriate to take study the effects of drugs.

  9. Fibrils connect microtubule tips with kinetochores: a mechanism to couple tubulin dynamics to chromosome motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIntosh, J Richard; Grishchuk, Ekaterina L; Morphew, Mary K; Efremov, Artem K; Zhudenkov, Kirill; Volkov, Vladimir A; Cheeseman, Iain M; Desai, Arshad; Mastronarde, David N; Ataullakhanov, Fazly I

    2008-10-17

    Kinetochores of mitotic chromosomes are coupled to spindle microtubules in ways that allow the energy from tubulin dynamics to drive chromosome motion. Most kinetochore-associated microtubule ends display curving "protofilaments," strands of tubulin dimers that bend away from the microtubule axis. Both a kinetochore "plate" and an encircling, ring-shaped protein complex have been proposed to link protofilament bending to poleward chromosome motion. Here we show by electron tomography that slender fibrils connect curved protofilaments directly to the inner kinetochore. Fibril-protofilament associations correlate with a local straightening of the flared protofilaments. Theoretical analysis reveals that protofilament-fibril connections would be efficient couplers for chromosome motion, and experimental work on two very different kinetochore components suggests that filamentous proteins can couple shortening microtubules to cargo movements. These analyses define a ring-independent mechanism for harnessing microtubule dynamics directly to chromosome movement.

  10. Conserved Lysine Acetylation within the Microtubule-Binding Domain Regulates MAP2/Tau Family Members.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew W Hwang

    Full Text Available Lysine acetylation has emerged as a dominant post-translational modification (PTM regulating tau proteins in Alzheimer's disease (AD and related tauopathies. Mass spectrometry studies indicate that tau acetylation sites cluster within the microtubule-binding region (MTBR, a region that is highly conserved among tau, MAP2, and MAP4 family members, implying that acetylation could represent a conserved regulatory mechanism for MAPs beyond tau. Here, we combined mass spectrometry, biochemical assays, and cell-based approaches to demonstrate that the tau family members MAP2 and MAP4 are also subject to reversible acetylation. We identify a cluster of lysines in the MAP2 and MAP4 MTBR that undergo CBP-catalyzed acetylation, many of which are conserved in tau. Similar to tau, MAP2 acetylation can occur in a cysteine-dependent auto-regulatory manner in the presence of acetyl-CoA. Furthermore, tubulin reduced MAP2 acetylation, suggesting tubulin binding dictates MAP acetylation status. Taken together, these results uncover a striking conservation of MAP2/Tau family post-translational modifications that could expand our understanding of the dynamic mechanisms regulating microtubules.

  11. Hoxb1b controls oriented cell division, cell shape and microtubule dynamics in neural tube morphogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Žigman, Mihaela; Laumann-Lipp, Nico; Titus, Tom; Postlethwait, John; Moens, Cecilia B.

    2014-01-01

    Hox genes are classically ascribed to function in patterning the anterior-posterior axis of bilaterian animals; however, their role in directing molecular mechanisms underlying morphogenesis at the cellular level remains largely unstudied. We unveil a non-classical role for the zebrafish hoxb1b gene, which shares ancestral functions with mammalian Hoxa1, in controlling progenitor cell shape and oriented cell division during zebrafish anterior hindbrain neural tube morphogenesis. This is likely distinct from its role in cell fate acquisition and segment boundary formation. We show that, without affecting major components of apico-basal or planar cell polarity, Hoxb1b regulates mitotic spindle rotation during the oriented neural keel symmetric mitoses that are required for normal neural tube lumen formation in the zebrafish. This function correlates with a non-cell-autonomous requirement for Hoxb1b in regulating microtubule plus-end dynamics in progenitor cells in interphase. We propose that Hox genes can influence global tissue morphogenesis by control of microtubule dynamics in individual cells in vivo. PMID:24449840

  12. Non-linear dynamics in biological microtubules: solitons and dissipation-free energy transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mavromatos, Nick E.

    2017-08-01

    I review some recent developments concerning soliton solutions in biological microtubules and their significance in transferring energy without dissipation. I discuss various types of soliton solutions, as well as ‘spikes’, of the associated non-linear Lagrange equations describing the dynamics of a ‘pseudo-spin non-linear σ-model’ that models the dynamics of a microtubule system with dipole-dipole interactions. These results will hopefully contribute to a better understanding of the functional properties of microtubules, including the motor protein dynamics and the information transfer processes. With regards to the latter we also speculate on the use of microtubules as ‘logical’ gates. Our considerations are classical, but the soliton solutions may have a microscopic quantum origin, which we briefly touch upon.

  13. Microtubule-dependent transport of vimentin filament precursors is regulated by actin and by the concerted action of Rho- and p21-activated kinases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert, Amélie; Herrmann, Harald; Davidson, Michael W; Gelfand, Vladimir I

    2014-07-01

    Intermediate filaments (IFs) form a dense and dynamic network that is functionally associated with microtubules and actin filaments. We used the GFP-tagged vimentin mutant Y117L to study vimentin-cytoskeletal interactions and transport of vimentin filament precursors. This mutant preserves vimentin interaction with other components of the cytoskeleton, but its assembly is blocked at the unit-length filament (ULF) stage. ULFs are easy to track, and they allow a reliable and quantifiable analysis of movement. Our results show that in cultured human vimentin-negative SW13 cells, 2% of vimentin-ULFs move along microtubules bidirectionally, while the majority are stationary and tightly associated with actin filaments. Rapid motor-dependent transport of ULFs along microtubules is enhanced ≥ 5-fold by depolymerization of actin cytoskeleton with latrunculin B. The microtubule-dependent transport of vimentin ULFs is further regulated by Rho-kinase (ROCK) and p21-activated kinase (PAK): ROCK inhibits ULF transport, while PAK stimulates it. Both kinases act on microtubule transport independently of their effects on actin cytoskeleton. Our study demonstrates the importance of the actin cytoskeleton to restrict IF transport and reveals a new role for PAK and ROCK in the regulation of IF precursor transport.-Robert, A., Herrmann, H., Davidson, M. W., and Gelfand, V. I. Microtubule-dependent transport of vimentin filament precursors is regulated by actin and by the concerted action of Rho- and p21-activated kinases. © FASEB.

  14. Mps1 Regulates Kinetochore-Microtubule Attachment Stability via the Ska Complex to Ensure Error-Free Chromosome Segregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maciejowski, John; Drechsler, Hauke; Grundner-Culemann, Kathrin; Ballister, Edward R; Rodriguez-Rodriguez, Jose-Antonio; Rodriguez-Bravo, Veronica; Jones, Mathew J K; Foley, Emily; Lampson, Michael A; Daub, Henrik; McAinsh, Andrew D; Jallepalli, Prasad V

    2017-04-24

    The spindle assembly checkpoint kinase Mps1 not only inhibits anaphase but also corrects erroneous attachments that could lead to missegregation and aneuploidy. However, Mps1's error correction-relevant substrates are unknown. Using a chemically tuned kinetochore-targeting assay, we show that Mps1 destabilizes microtubule attachments (K fibers) epistatically to Aurora B, the other major error-correcting kinase. Through quantitative proteomics, we identify multiple sites of Mps1-regulated phosphorylation at the outer kinetochore. Substrate modification was microtubule sensitive and opposed by PP2A-B56 phosphatases that stabilize chromosome-spindle attachment. Consistently, Mps1 inhibition rescued K-fiber stability after depleting PP2A-B56. We also identify the Ska complex as a key effector of Mps1 at the kinetochore-microtubule interface, as mutations that mimic constitutive phosphorylation destabilized K fibers in vivo and reduced the efficiency of the Ska complex's conversion from lattice diffusion to end-coupled microtubule binding in vitro. Our results reveal how Mps1 dynamically modifies kinetochores to correct improper attachments and ensure faithful chromosome segregation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Specific In Vivo Labeling of Tyrosinated α-Tubulin and Measurement of Microtubule Dynamics Using a GFP Tagged, Cytoplasmically Expressed Recombinant Antibody

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassimeris, Lynne; Guglielmi, Laurence; Denis, Vincent; Larroque, Christian; Martineau, Pierre

    2013-01-01

    GFP-tagged proteins are used extensively as biosensors for protein localization and function, but the GFP moiety can interfere with protein properties. An alternative is to indirectly label proteins using intracellular recombinant antibodies (scFvs), but most antibody fragments are insoluble in the reducing environment of the cytosol. From a synthetic hyperstable human scFv library we isolated an anti-tubulin scFv, 2G4, which is soluble in mammalian cells when expressed as a GFP-fusion protein. Here we report the use of this GFP-tagged scFv to label microtubules in fixed and living cells. We found that 2G4-GFP localized uniformly along microtubules and did not disrupt binding of EB1, a protein that binds microtubule ends and serves as a platform for binding by a complex of proteins regulating MT polymerization. TOGp and CLIP-170 also bound microtubule ends in cells expressing 2G4-GFP. Microtubule dynamic instability, measured by tracking 2G4-GFP labeled microtubules, was nearly identical to that measured in cells expressing GFP-α-tubulin. Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching demonstrated that 2G4-GFP turns over rapidly on microtubules, similar to the turnover rates of fluorescently tagged microtubule-associated proteins. These data indicate that 2G4-GFP binds relatively weakly to microtubules, and this conclusion was confirmed in vitro. Purified 2G4 partially co-pelleted with microtubules, but a significant fraction remained in the soluble fraction, while a second anti-tubulin scFv, 2F12, was almost completely co-pelleted with microtubules. In cells, 2G4-GFP localized to most microtubules, but did not co-localize with those composed of detyrosinated α-tubulin, a post-translational modification associated with non-dynamic, more stable microtubules. Immunoblots probing bacterially expressed tubulins confirmed that 2G4 recognized α-tubulin and required tubulin’s C-terminal tyrosine residue for binding. Thus, a recombinant antibody with weak affinity for its

  16. Reconstitution and quantification of dynamic microtubule end tracking in vitro using TIRF microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Telley, Ivo A; Bieling, Peter; Surrey, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Several microtubule-associated proteins localize in living cells selectively to an extended region at the growing microtubule plus ends. Over the last years, these plus-end-tracking proteins, also called +TIPs, have attracted considerable interest because they are involved in a large variety of essential intracellular processes. GFP-labeled versions of EB proteins are also often used as markers for intracellular microtubule organization and dynamics. The mechanism of selective +TIP binding to the end region of growing microtubule was unknown. Recently, the phenomenon of end tracking was reconstituted in vitro from purified proteins, which allowed the identification of EB proteins as the minimal core of the plus-end-tracking system and the dissection of the molecular mechanism of end tracking by these proteins. This in vitro reconstitution has started to be widely used for several +TIPs and promises to provide mechanistic insight into the functioning of the dynamic +TIP network at growing microtubule ends. Here, we describe the purification of EB1 and CLIP-170, the total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy assay to observe dynamic end tracking in vitro, and the quantitative analysis of fluorescent +TIP comet shape and of single +TIP molecule turnover at growing microtubule ends.

  17. Microtubule dynamics in the peripheral nervous system: A matter of balance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida-Souza, Leonardo; Timmerman, Vincent; Janssens, Sophie

    2011-11-01

    The special architecture of neurons in the peripheral nervous system, with axons extending for long distances, represents a major challenge for the intracellular transport system. Two recent studies show that mutations in the small heat shock protein HSPB1, which cause an axonal type of Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) neuropathy, affect microtubule dynamics and impede axonal transport. Intriguingly, while at presymptomatic age the neurons in the mutant HSPB1 mouse show a hyperstable microtubule network, at postsymptomatic age, the microtubule network completely lost its stability as reflected by a marked decrease in tubulin acetylation levels. We here propose a model explaining the role of microtubule stabilization and tubulin acetylation in the pathogenesis of HSPB1 mutations.

  18. Discrete states of a protein interaction network govern interphase and mitotic microtubule dynamics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philipp Niethammer

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available The cytoplasm of eukaryotic cells is thought to adopt discrete "states" corresponding to different steady states of protein networks that govern changes in subcellular organization. For example, in Xenopus eggs, the interphase to mitosis transition is induced solely by activation of cyclin-dependent kinase 1 (CDK1 that phosphorylates many proteins leading to a reorganization of the nucleus and assembly of the mitotic spindle. Among these changes, the large array of stable microtubules that exists in interphase is replaced by short, highly dynamic microtubules in metaphase. Using a new visual immunoprecipitation assay that quantifies pairwise protein interactions in a non-perturbing manner in Xenopus egg extracts, we reveal the existence of a network of interactions between a series of microtubule-associated proteins (MAPs. In interphase, tubulin interacts with XMAP215, which is itself interacting with XKCM1, which connects to APC, EB1, and CLIP170. In mitosis, tubulin interacts with XMAP215, which is connected to EB1. We show that in interphase, microtubules are stable because the catastrophe-promoting activity of XKCM1 is inhibited by its interactions with the other MAPs. In mitosis, microtubules are short and dynamic because XKCM1 is free and has a strong destabilizing activity. In this case, the interaction of XMAP215 with EB1 is required to counteract the strong activity of XKCM1. This provides the beginning of a biochemical description of the notion of "cytoplasmic states" regarding the microtubule system.

  19. An epigenetic regulator emerges as microtubule minus-end binding and stabilizing factor in mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meunier, Sylvain; Shvedunova, Maria; Van Nguyen, Nhuong; Avila, Leonor; Vernos, Isabelle; Akhtar, Asifa

    2015-08-05

    The evolutionary conserved NSL complex is a prominent epigenetic regulator controlling expression of thousands of genes. Here we uncover a novel function of the NSL complex members in mitosis. As the cell enters mitosis, KANSL1 and KANSL3 undergo a marked relocalisation from the chromatin to the mitotic spindle. By stabilizing microtubule minus ends in a RanGTP-dependent manner, they are essential for spindle assembly and chromosome segregation. Moreover, we identify KANSL3 as a microtubule minus-end-binding protein, revealing a new class of mitosis-specific microtubule minus-end regulators. By adopting distinct functions in interphase and mitosis, KANSL proteins provide a link to coordinate the tasks of faithful expression and inheritance of the genome during different phases of the cell cycle.

  20. Matrix rigidity regulates microtubule network polarization in migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raab, Matthew; Discher, Dennis E

    2017-03-01

    The microtubule organizing center (MTOC) frequently polarizes to a position in front of the nucleus during cell migration, but recent work has shown conflicting evidence for MTOC location in migratory polarized cells. Here, we show that subcellular localization of the MTOC is modulated by extracellular matrix stiffness. In scratch wound assays as well as single cell migration of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) the MTOC appears randomly positioned when cells are migrating on soft matrix, whereas on stiff matrix the MTOC is in front of the nucleus. The bulk of the microtubule density is also equally likely to be in front of or behind the nucleus on soft matrix, but it is polarized in front of the nucleus on stiff matrix. This occurred during cell migration with cells in interphase. During cytokinesis, the centrosomes polarize on either side of the chromosomes even on soft matrix, with MIIB localized strongly in the cleavage furrow which depolarizes only on soft matrix as cells exit cytokinesis. When cells are immobilized on micro-patterns printed on the top of substrates of different stiffness, MIIB polarized if the matrix was sufficiently stiff similar to results with migrating cells. However, the MTOC was randomly positioned with respect to the nucleus independent of matrix stiffness. We deduce that cell migration is necessary to orient the MTOC in front of the nucleus and that matrix stiffness helps to drive cell polarization during migration. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Microtubule dynamic instability: A new model with coupled GTP hydrolysis and multistep catastrophe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowne-Anderson, Hugo; Zanic, Marija; Kauer, Monika; Howard, Jonathon

    2013-01-01

    A key question in understanding microtubule dynamics is how GTP hydrolysis leads to catastrophe, the switch from slow growth to rapid shrinkage. We first provide a review of the experimental and modeling literature, and then present a new model of microtubule dynamics. We demonstrate that vectorial, random, and coupled hydrolysis mechanisms are not consistent with the dependence of catastrophe on tubulin concentration and show that, although single-protofilament models can explain many features of dynamics, they do not describe catastrophe as a multistep process. Finally, we present a new combined (coupled plus random hydrolysis) multiple-protofilament model that is a simple, analytically solvable generalization of a single-protofilament model. This model accounts for the observed lifetimes of growing microtubules, the delay to catastrophe following dilution and describes catastrophe as a multistep process. PMID:23532586

  2. Calcium-independent disruption of microtubule dynamics by nanosecond pulsed electric fields in U87 human glioblastoma cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, Lynn; Bardet, Sylvia M.; Burke, Ryan C.; Arnaud-Cormos, Delia; Leveque, Philippe; O’Connor, Rodney P.

    2017-01-01

    High powered, nanosecond duration, pulsed electric fields (nsPEF) cause cell death by a mechanism that is not fully understood and have been proposed as a targeted cancer therapy. Numerous chemotherapeutics work by disrupting microtubules. As microtubules are affected by electrical fields, this study looks at the possibility of disrupting them electrically with nsPEF. Human glioblastoma cells (U87-MG) treated with 100, 10 ns, 44 kV/cm pulses at a frequency of 10 Hz showed a breakdown of their interphase microtubule network that was accompanied by a reduction in the number of growing microtubules. This effect is temporally linked to loss of mitochondrial membrane potential and independent of cellular swelling and calcium influx, two factors that disrupt microtubule growth dynamics. Super-resolution microscopy revealed microtubule buckling and breaking as a result of nsPEF application, suggesting that nsPEF may act directly on microtubules. PMID:28117459

  3. Microtubule minus-end regulation at spindle poles by an ASPM-katanin complex

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jiang, Kai|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/374338094; Rezabkova, Lenka; Hua, Shasha|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/377295698; Liu, Qingyang|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/375265147; Capitani, Guido; Altelaar, Maarten|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304833517; Heck, Albert J R|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/105189332; Kammerer, Richard A; Steinmetz, Michel O; Akhmanova, Anna|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/156410591

    2017-01-01

    ASPM (known as Asp in fly and ASPM-1 in worm) is a microcephaly-associated protein family that regulates spindle architecture, but the underlying mechanism is poorly understood. Here, we show that ASPM forms a complex with another protein linked to microcephaly, the microtubule-severing ATPase

  4. Microtubule dynamics. II. Kinetics of self-assembly

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Flyvbjerg, H.; Jobs, E.

    1997-01-01

    dependence on initial conditions-except it is known to be impossible for equilibrium reactions. This article presents a case study of a far-from-equilibrium reaction: it presents a systematic phenomenological analysis of experimental time series for the amount of final product, a biopolymer, formed from...... to analyze the self-assembly of microtubules from tubulin are general, and many other reactions and processes may be studied as inverse problems with these methods when enough experimental data are available....

  5. Microtubule stabilization reduces scarring and causes axon regeneration after spinal cord injury

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F. Hellal (Farida); A. Hurtado (Andres); J. Ruschel (Jörg); K.C. Flynn (Kevin); C.J. Laskowski (Claudia); M. Umlauf (Martina); L.C. Kapitein (Lukas); D. Strikis (Dinara); V. Lemmon (Vance); J. Bixby (John); C.C. Hoogenraad (Casper); F. Bradke (Frank)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractHypertrophic scarring and poor intrinsic axon growth capacity constitute major obstacles for spinal cord repair. These processes are tightly regulated by microtubule dynamics. Here, moderate microtubule stabilization decreased scar formation after spinal cord injury in rodents through

  6. TRESK background K(+ channel is inhibited by PAR-1/MARK microtubule affinity-regulating kinases in Xenopus oocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriella Braun

    Full Text Available TRESK (TWIK-related spinal cord K(+ channel, KCNK18 is a major background K(+ channel of sensory neurons. Dominant-negative mutation of TRESK is linked to familial migraine. This important two-pore domain K(+ channel is uniquely activated by calcineurin. The calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein phosphatase directly binds to the channel and activates TRESK current several-fold in Xenopus oocytes and HEK293 cells. We have recently shown that the kinase, which is responsible for the basal inhibition of the K(+ current, is sensitive to the adaptor protein 14-3-3. Therefore we have examined the effect of the 14-3-3-inhibited PAR-1/MARK, microtubule-associated-protein/microtubule affinity-regulating kinase on TRESK in the Xenopus oocyte expression system. MARK1, MARK2 and MARK3 accelerated the return of TRESK current to the resting state after the calcium-dependent activation. Several other serine-threonine kinase types, generally involved in the modulation of other ion channels, failed to influence TRESK current recovery. MARK2 phosphorylated the primary determinant of regulation, the cluster of three adjacent serine residues (S274, 276 and 279 in the intracellular loop of mouse TRESK. In contrast, serine 264, the 14-3-3-binding site of TRESK, was not phosphorylated by the kinase. Thus MARK2 selectively inhibits TRESK activity via the S274/276/279 cluster, but does not affect the direct recruitment of 14-3-3 to the channel. TRESK is the first example of an ion channel phosphorylated by the dynamically membrane-localized MARK kinases, also known as general determinants of cellular polarity. These results raise the possibility that microtubule dynamics is coupled to the regulation of excitability in the neurons, which express TRESK background potassium channel.

  7. Fission yeast mitochondria are distributed by dynamic microtubules in a motor-independent manner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tianpeng; Zheng, Fan; Cheung, Martin; Wang, Fengsong; Fu, Chuanhai

    2015-01-01

    The cytoskeleton plays a critical role in regulating mitochondria distribution. Similar to axonal mitochondria, the fission yeast mitochondria are distributed by the microtubule cytoskeleton, but this is regulated by a motor-independent mechanism depending on the microtubule associated protein mmb1p as the absence of mmb1p causes mitochondria aggregation. In this study, using a series of chimeric proteins to control the subcellular localization and motility of mitochondria, we show that a chimeric molecule containing a microtubule binding domain and the mitochondria outer membrane protein tom22p can restore the normal interconnected mitochondria network in mmb1-deletion (mmb1∆) cells. In contrast, increasing the motility of mitochondria by using a chimeric molecule containing a kinesin motor domain and tom22p cannot rescue mitochondria aggregation defects in mmb1∆ cells. Intriguingly a chimeric molecule carrying an actin binding domain and tom22p results in mitochondria associated with actin filaments at the actomyosin ring during mitosis, leading to cytokinesis defects. These findings suggest that the passive motor-independent microtubule-based mechanism is the major contributor to mitochondria distribution in wild type fission yeast cells. Hence, we establish that attachment to microtubules, but not kinesin-dependent movement and the actin cytoskeleton, is required and crucial for proper mitochondria distribution in fission yeast. PMID:26046468

  8. Coordination of microtubule and microfilament dynamics by Drosophila Rho1, Spire and Cappuccino.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosales-Nieves, Alicia E; Johndrow, James E; Keller, Lani C; Magie, Craig R; Pinto-Santini, Delia M; Parkhurst, Susan M

    2006-04-01

    The actin-nucleation factors Spire and Cappuccino (Capu) regulate the onset of ooplasmic streaming in Drosophila melanogaster. Although this streaming event is microtubule-based, actin assembly is required for its timing. It is not understood how the interaction of microtubules and microfilaments is mediated in this context. Here, we demonstrate that Capu and Spire have microtubule and microfilament crosslinking activity. The spire locus encodes several distinct protein isoforms (SpireA, SpireC and SpireD). SpireD was recently shown to nucleate actin, but the activity of the other isoforms has not been addressed. We find that SpireD does not have crosslinking activity, whereas SpireC is a potent crosslinker. We show that SpireD binds to Capu and inhibits F-actin/microtubule crosslinking, and activated Rho1 abolishes this inhibition, establishing a mechanistic basis for the regulation of Capu and Spire activity. We propose that Rho1, cappuccino and spire are elements of a conserved developmental cassette that is capable of directly mediating crosstalk between microtubules and microfilaments.

  9. The microtubule-associated protein ASPM regulates spindle assembly and meiotic progression in mouse oocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiao-Ling; Ma, Wei; Zhu, Yu-Bo; Wang, Chao; Wang, Bing-Yuan; An, Na; An, Lei; Liu, Yan; Wu, Zhong-Hong; Tian, Jian-Hui

    2012-01-01

    The microtubule-associated protein ASPM (abnormal spindle-like microcephaly-associated) plays an important role in spindle organization and cell division in mitosis and meiosis in lower animals, but its function in mouse oocyte meiosis has not been investigated. In this study, we characterized the localization and expression dynamics of ASPM during mouse oocyte meiotic maturation and analyzed the effects of the downregulation of ASPM expression on meiotic spindle assembly and meiotic progression. Immunofluorescence analysis showed that ASPM localized to the entire spindle at metaphase I (MI) and metaphase II (MII), colocalizing with the spindle microtubule protein acetylated tubulin (Ac-tubulin). In taxol-treated oocytes, ASPM colocalized with Ac-tubulin on the excessively polymerized microtubule fibers of enlarged spindles and the numerous asters in the cytoplasm. Nocodazole treatment induced the gradual disassembly of microtubule fibers, during which ASPM remained colocalized with the dynamic Ac-tubulin. The downregulation of ASPM expression by a gene-specific morpholino resulted in an abnormal meiotic spindle and inhibited meiotic progression; most of the treated oocytes were blocked in the MI stage with elongated meiotic spindles. Furthermore, coimmunoprecipitation combined with mass spectrometry and western blot analysis revealed that ASPM interacted with calmodulin in MI oocytes and that these proteins colocalized at the spindle. Our results provide strong evidence that ASPM plays a critical role in meiotic spindle assembly and meiotic progression in mouse oocytes.

  10. The microtubule-associated protein ASPM regulates spindle assembly and meiotic progression in mouse oocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Ling Xu

    Full Text Available The microtubule-associated protein ASPM (abnormal spindle-like microcephaly-associated plays an important role in spindle organization and cell division in mitosis and meiosis in lower animals, but its function in mouse oocyte meiosis has not been investigated. In this study, we characterized the localization and expression dynamics of ASPM during mouse oocyte meiotic maturation and analyzed the effects of the downregulation of ASPM expression on meiotic spindle assembly and meiotic progression. Immunofluorescence analysis showed that ASPM localized to the entire spindle at metaphase I (MI and metaphase II (MII, colocalizing with the spindle microtubule protein acetylated tubulin (Ac-tubulin. In taxol-treated oocytes, ASPM colocalized with Ac-tubulin on the excessively polymerized microtubule fibers of enlarged spindles and the numerous asters in the cytoplasm. Nocodazole treatment induced the gradual disassembly of microtubule fibers, during which ASPM remained colocalized with the dynamic Ac-tubulin. The downregulation of ASPM expression by a gene-specific morpholino resulted in an abnormal meiotic spindle and inhibited meiotic progression; most of the treated oocytes were blocked in the MI stage with elongated meiotic spindles. Furthermore, coimmunoprecipitation combined with mass spectrometry and western blot analysis revealed that ASPM interacted with calmodulin in MI oocytes and that these proteins colocalized at the spindle. Our results provide strong evidence that ASPM plays a critical role in meiotic spindle assembly and meiotic progression in mouse oocytes.

  11. Microtubule-Mediated Inositol Lipid Signaling Plays Critical Roles in Regulation of Blebbing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatsuroh Sugiyama

    Full Text Available Cells migrate by extending pseudopods such as lamellipodia and blebs. Although the signals leading to lamellipodia extension have been extensively investigated, those for bleb extension remain unclear. Here, we investigated signals for blebbing in Dictyostelium cells using a newly developed assay to induce blebbing. When cells were cut into two pieces with a microneedle, the anucleate fragments vigorously extended blebs. This assay enabled us to induce blebbing reproducibly, and analyses of knockout mutants and specific inhibitors identified candidate molecules that regulate blebbing. Blebs were also induced in anucleate fragments of leukocytes, indicating that this assay is generally applicable to animal cells. After cutting, microtubules in the anucleate fragments promptly depolymerized, followed by the extension of blebs. Furthermore, when intact cells were treated with a microtubule inhibitor, they frequently extended blebs. The depolymerization of microtubules induced the delocalization of inositol lipid phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5-trisphosphate from the cell membrane. PI3 kinase-null cells frequently extended blebs, whereas PTEN-null cells extended fewer blebs. From these observations, we propose a model in which microtubules play a critical role in bleb regulation via inositol lipid metabolism.

  12. Pathogenic mutation of spastin has gain-of-function effects on microtubule dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solowska, Joanna M; D'Rozario, Mitchell; Jean, Daphney C; Davidson, Michael W; Marenda, Daniel R; Baas, Peter W

    2014-01-29

    Mutations to the SPG4 gene encoding the microtubule-severing protein spastin are the most common cause of hereditary spastic paraplegia. Haploinsufficiency, the prevalent model for the disease, cannot readily explain many of its key aspects, such as its adult onset or its specificity for the corticospinal tracts. Treatment strategies based solely on haploinsufficiency are therefore likely to fail. Toward developing effective therapies, here we investigated potential gain-of-function effects of mutant spastins. The full-length human spastin isoform called M1 or a slightly shorter isoform called M87, both carrying the same pathogenic mutation C448Y, were expressed in three model systems: primary rat cortical neurons, fibroblasts, and transgenic Drosophila. Although both isoforms had ill effects on motor function in transgenic flies and decreased neurite outgrowth from primary cortical neurons, mutant M1 was notably more toxic than mutant M87. The observed phenotypes did not result from dominant-negative effects of mutated spastins. Studies in cultured cells revealed that microtubules can be heavily decorated by mutant M1 but not mutant M87. Microtubule-bound mutant M1 decreased microtubule dynamics, whereas unbound M1 or M87 mutant spastins increased microtubule dynamics. The alterations in microtubule dynamics observed in the presence of mutated spastins are not consistent with haploinsufficiency and are better explained by a gain-of-function mechanism. Our results fortify a model wherein toxicity of mutant spastin proteins, especially mutant M1, contributes to axonal degeneration in the corticospinal tracts. Furthermore, our results provide details on the mechanism of the toxicity that may chart a course toward more effective treatment regimens.

  13. A computational framework for cortical microtubule dynamics in realistically shaped plant cells

    KAUST Repository

    Chakrabortty, Bandan

    2018-02-02

    Plant morphogenesis is strongly dependent on the directional growth and the subsequent oriented division of individual cells. It has been shown that the plant cortical microtubule array plays a key role in controlling both these processes. This ordered structure emerges as the collective result of stochastic interactions between large numbers of dynamic microtubules. To elucidate this complex self-organization process a number of analytical and computational approaches to study the dynamics of cortical microtubules have been proposed. To date, however, these models have been restricted to two dimensional planes or geometrically simple surfaces in three dimensions, which strongly limits their applicability as plant cells display a wide variety of shapes. This limitation is even more acute, as both local as well as global geometrical features of cells are expected to influence the overall organization of the array. Here we describe a framework for efficiently simulating microtubule dynamics on triangulated approximations of arbitrary three dimensional surfaces. This allows the study of microtubule array organization on realistic cell surfaces obtained by segmentation of microscopic images. We validate the framework against expected or known results for the spherical and cubical geometry. We then use it to systematically study the individual contributions of global geometry, cell-edge induced catastrophes and cell-face induced stability to array organization in a cuboidal geometry. Finally, we apply our framework to analyze the highly non-trivial geometry of leaf pavement cells of Arabidopsis thaliana, Nicotiana benthamiana and Hedera helix. We show that our simulations can predict multiple features of the microtubule array structure in these cells, revealing, among others, strong constraints on the orientation of division planes.

  14. A Kinase-Phosphatase Network that Regulates Kinetochore-Microtubule Attachments and the SAC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallardi, Giulia; Cordeiro, Marilia Henriques; Saurin, Adrian Thomas

    2017-01-01

    The KMN network (for KNL1, MIS12 and NDC80 complexes) is a hub for signalling at the outer kinetochore. It integrates the activities of two kinases (MPS1 and Aurora B) and two phosphatases (PP1 and PP2A-B56) to regulate kinetochore-microtubule attachments and the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC). We will first discuss each of these enzymes separately, to describe how they are regulated at kinetochores and why this is important for their primary function in controlling either microtubule attachments or the SAC. We will then discuss why inhibiting any one of them individually produces secondary effects on all the others. This cross-talk may help to explain why all enzymes have been linked to both processes, even though the direct evidence suggests they each control only one. This chapter therefore describes how a network of kinases and phosphatases work together to regulate two key mitotic processes.

  15. Label-Free Imaging of Single Microtubule Dynamics Using Spatial Light Interference Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandel, Mikhail E; Teng, Kai Wen; Selvin, Paul R; Popescu, Gabriel

    2017-01-24

    Due to their diameter, of only 24 nm, single microtubules are extremely challenging to image without the use of extrinsic contrast agents. As a result, fluorescence tagging is the common method to visualize their motility. However, such investigation is limited by photobleaching and phototoxicity. We experimentally demonstrate the capability of combining label-free spatial light interference microscopy (SLIM) with numerical processing for imaging single microtubules in a gliding assay. SLIM combines four different intensity images to obtain the optical path length map associated with the sample. Because of the use of broadband fields, the sensitivity to path length is better than 1 nm without (temporal) averaging and better than 0.1 nm upon averaging. Our results indicate that SLIM can image the dynamics of microtubules in a full field of view, of 200 × 200 μm(2), over many hours. Modeling the microtubule transport via the diffusion-advection equation, we found that the dispersion relation yields the standard deviation of the velocity distribution, without the need for tracking individual tubes. Interestingly, during a 2 h window, the microtubules begin to decelerate, at 100 pm/s(2) over a 20 min period. Thus, SLIM is likely to serve as a useful tool for understanding molecular motor activity, especially over large time scales, where fluorescence methods are of limited utility.

  16. Inter-dependent apical microtubule and actin dynamics orchestrate centrosome retention and neuronal delamination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasioulis, Ioannis; Das, Raman M; Storey, Kate G

    2017-10-23

    Detachment of newborn neurons from the neuroepithelium is required for correct neuronal architecture and functional circuitry. This process, also known as delamination, involves adherens-junction disassembly and acto-myosin-mediated abscission, during which the centrosome is retained while apical/ciliary membranes are shed. Cell-biological mechanisms mediating delamination are, however, poorly understood. Using live-tissue and super-resolution imaging, we uncover a centrosome-nucleated wheel-like microtubule configuration, aligned with the apical actin cable and adherens-junctions within chick and mouse neuroepithelial cells. These microtubules maintain adherens-junctions while actin maintains microtubules, adherens-junctions and apical end-foot dimensions. During neuronal delamination, acto-myosin constriction generates a tunnel-like actin-microtubule configuration through which the centrosome translocates. This movement requires inter-dependent actin and microtubule activity, and we identify drebrin as a potential coordinator of these cytoskeletal dynamics. Furthermore, centrosome compromise revealed that this organelle is required for delamination. These findings identify new cytoskeletal configurations and regulatory relationships that orchestrate neuronal delamination and may inform mechanisms underlying pathological epithelial cell detachment.

  17. TBCD links centriologenesis, spindle microtubule dynamics, and midbody abscission in human cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mónica López Fanarraga

    Full Text Available Microtubule-organizing centers recruit alpha- and beta-tubulin polypeptides for microtubule nucleation. Tubulin synthesis is complex, requiring five specific cofactors, designated tubulin cofactors (TBCs A-E, which contribute to various aspects of microtubule dynamics in vivo. Here, we show that tubulin cofactor D (TBCD is concentrated at the centrosome and midbody, where it participates in centriologenesis, spindle organization, and cell abscission. TBCD exhibits a cell-cycle-specific pattern, localizing on the daughter centriole at G1 and on procentrioles by S, and disappearing from older centrioles at telophase as the protein is recruited to the midbody. Our data show that TBCD overexpression results in microtubule release from the centrosome and G1 arrest, whereas its depletion produces mitotic aberrations and incomplete microtubule retraction at the midbody during cytokinesis. TBCD is recruited to the centriole replication site at the onset of the centrosome duplication cycle. A role in centriologenesis is further supported in differentiating ciliated cells, where TBCD is organized into "centriolar rosettes". These data suggest that TBCD participates in both canonical and de novo centriolar assembly pathways.

  18. Titanium dioxide nanoparticles alter cellular morphology via disturbing the microtubule dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Zhilei; Xu, Bo; Ji, Xiaoli; Zhou, Kun; Zhang, Xuemei; Chen, Minjian; Han, Xiumei; Tang, Qiusha; Wang, Xinru; Xia, Yankai

    2015-04-01

    Titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanoparticles (NPs) have been widely used in our daily lives, for example, in the areas of sunscreens, cosmetics, toothpastes, food products, and nanomedical reagents. Recently, increasing concern has been raised about their neurotoxicity, but the mechanisms underlying such toxic effects are still unknown. In this work, we employed a human neuroblastoma cell line (SH-SY5Y) to study the effects of TiO2 NPs on neurological systems. Our results showed that TiO2 NPs did not affect cell viability but induced noticeable morphological changes until 100 μg ml-1. Immunofluorescence detection showed disorder, disruption, retraction, and decreased intensity of the microtubules after TiO2 NPs treatment. Both α and β tubule expressions did not change in the TiO2 NP-treated group, but the percentage of soluble tubules was increased. A microtubule dynamic study in living cells indicated that TiO2 NPs caused a lower growth rate and a higher shortening rate of microtubules as well as shortened lifetimes of de novo microtubules. TiO2 NPs did not cause changes in the expression and phosphorylation state of tau proteins, but a tau-TiO2 NP interaction was observed. TiO2 NPs could interact with tubule heterodimers, microtubules and tau proteins, which led to the instability of microtubules, thus contributing to the neurotoxicity of TiO2 NPs.Titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanoparticles (NPs) have been widely used in our daily lives, for example, in the areas of sunscreens, cosmetics, toothpastes, food products, and nanomedical reagents. Recently, increasing concern has been raised about their neurotoxicity, but the mechanisms underlying such toxic effects are still unknown. In this work, we employed a human neuroblastoma cell line (SH-SY5Y) to study the effects of TiO2 NPs on neurological systems. Our results showed that TiO2 NPs did not affect cell viability but induced noticeable morphological changes until 100 μg ml-1. Immunofluorescence detection showed disorder

  19. A Genome-wide RNAi Screen for Microtubule Bundle Formation and Lysosome Motility Regulation in Drosophila S2 Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amber L. Jolly

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Long-distance intracellular transport of organelles, mRNA, and proteins (“cargo” occurs along the microtubule cytoskeleton by the action of kinesin and dynein motor proteins, but the vast network of factors involved in regulating intracellular cargo transport are still unknown. We capitalize on the Drosophila melanogaster S2 model cell system to monitor lysosome transport along microtubule bundles, which require enzymatically active kinesin-1 motor protein for their formation. We use an automated tracking program and a naive Bayesian classifier for the multivariate motility data to analyze 15,683 gene phenotypes and find 98 proteins involved in regulating lysosome motility along microtubules and 48 involved in the formation of microtubule filled processes in S2 cells. We identify innate immunity genes, ion channels, and signaling proteins having a role in lysosome motility regulation and find an unexpected relationship between the dynein motor, Rab7a, and lysosome motility regulation.

  20. Optimization of microtubule affinity regulating kinase (MARK) inhibitors with improved physical properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sloman, David L.; Noucti, Njamkou; Altman, Michael D.; Chen, Dapeng; Mislak, Andrea C.; Szewczak, Alexander; Hayashi, Mansuo; Warren, Lee; Dellovade, Tammy; Wu, Zhenhua; Marcus, Jacob; Walker, Deborah; Su, Hua-Poo; Edavettal, Suzanne C.; Munshi, Sanjeev; Hutton, Michael; Nuthall, Hugh; Stanton, Matthew G. (Merck)

    2016-09-01

    Inhibition of microtubule affinity regulating kinase (MARK) represents a potentially attractive means of arresting neurofibrillary tangle pathology in Alzheimer’s disease. This manuscript outlines efforts to optimize a pyrazolopyrimidine series of MARK inhibitors by focusing on improvements in potency, physical properties and attributes amenable to CNS penetration. A unique cylcyclohexyldiamine scaffold was identified that led to remarkable improvements in potency, opening up opportunities to reduce MW, Pgp efflux and improve pharmacokinetic properties while also conferring improved solubility.

  1. Erucin, the major isothiocyanate in arugula (Eruca sativa, inhibits proliferation of MCF7 tumor cells by suppressing microtubule dynamics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga Azarenko

    Full Text Available Consumption of cruciferous vegetables is associated with reduced risk of various types of cancer. Isothiocyanates including sulforaphane and erucin are believed to be responsible for this activity. Erucin [1-isothiocyanato-4-(methylthiobutane], which is metabolically and structurally related to sulforaphane, is present in large quantities in arugula (Eruca sativa, Mill., kohlrabi and Chinese cabbage. However, its cancer preventive mechanisms remain poorly understood. We found that erucin inhibits proliferation of MCF7 breast cancer cells (IC50 = 28 µM in parallel with cell cycle arrest at mitosis (IC50 = 13 µM and apoptosis, by a mechanism consistent with impairment of microtubule dynamics. Concentrations of 5-15 µM erucin suppressed the dynamic instability of microtubules during interphase in the cells. Most dynamic instability parameters were inhibited, including the rates and extents of growing and shortening, the switching frequencies between growing and shortening, and the overall dynamicity. Much higher erucin concentrations were required to reduce the microtubule polymer mass. In addition, erucin suppressed dynamic instability of microtubules reassembled from purified tubulin in similar fashion. The effects of erucin on microtubule dynamics, like those of sulforaphane, are similar qualitatively to those of much more powerful clinically-used microtubule-targeting anticancer drugs, including taxanes and the vinca alkaloids. The results suggest that suppression of microtubule dynamics by erucin and the resulting impairment of critically important microtubule-dependent cell functions such as mitosis, cell migration and microtubule-based transport may be important in its cancer preventive activities.

  2. Nerve growth factor stimulates axon outgrowth through negative regulation of growth cone actomyosin restraint of microtubule advance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turney, Stephen G.; Ahmed, Mostafa; Chandrasekar, Indra; Wysolmerski, Robert B.; Goeckeler, Zoe M.; Rioux, Robert M.; Whitesides, George M.; Bridgman, Paul C.

    2016-01-01

    Nerve growth factor (NGF) promotes growth, differentiation, and survival of sensory neurons in the mammalian nervous system. Little is known about how NGF elicits faster axon outgrowth or how growth cones integrate and transform signal input to motor output. Using cultured mouse dorsal root ganglion neurons, we found that myosin II (MII) is required for NGF to stimulate faster axon outgrowth. From experiments inducing loss or gain of function of MII, specific MII isoforms, and vinculin-dependent adhesion-cytoskeletal coupling, we determined that NGF causes decreased vinculin-dependent actomyosin restraint of microtubule advance. Inhibition of MII blocked NGF stimulation, indicating the central role of restraint in directed outgrowth. The restraint consists of myosin IIB- and IIA-dependent processes: retrograde actin network flow and transverse actin bundling, respectively. The processes differentially contribute on laminin-1 and fibronectin due to selective actin tethering to adhesions. On laminin-1, NGF induced greater vinculin-dependent adhesion–cytoskeletal coupling, which slowed retrograde actin network flow (i.e., it regulated the molecular clutch). On fibronectin, NGF caused inactivation of myosin IIA, which negatively regulated actin bundling. On both substrates, the result was the same: NGF-induced weakening of MII-dependent restraint led to dynamic microtubules entering the actin-rich periphery more frequently, giving rise to faster elongation. PMID:26631553

  3. Mutations in Human Tubulin Proximal to the Kinesin-Binding Site Alter Dynamic Instability at Microtubule Plus- and Minus-Ends

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ti, Shih-Chieh; Pamula, Melissa C.; Howes, Stuart C.; Duellberg, Christian; Cade, Nicholas I.; Kleiner, Ralph E.; Forth, Scott; Surrey, Thomas; Nogales, Eva; Kapoor, Tarun M.

    2016-04-01

    The assembly of microtubule-based cellular structures depends on regulated tubulin polymerization and directional transport. In this research, we have purified and characterized tubulin heterodimers that have human β-tubulin isotype III (TUBB3), as well as heterodimers with one of two β-tubulin mutations (D417H or R262H). Both point mutations are proximal to the kinesin-binding site and have been linked to an ocular motility disorder in humans. Compared to wild-type, microtubules with these mutations have decreased catastrophe frequencies and increased average lifetimes of plus- and minus-end-stabilizing caps. Importantly, the D417H mutation does not alter microtubule lattice structure or Mal3 binding to growing filaments. Instead, this mutation reduces the affinity of tubulin for TOG domains and colchicine, suggesting that the distribution of tubulin heterodimer conformations is changed. Together, our findings reveal how residues on the surface of microtubules, distal from the GTP-hydrolysis site and inter-subunit contacts, can alter polymerization dynamics at the plus- and minus-ends of microtubules.

  4. Mutations in KIF7 link Joubert syndrome with Sonic Hedgehog signaling and microtubule dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dafinger, Claudia; Liebau, Max Christoph; Elsayed, Solaf Mohamed; Hellenbroich, Yorck; Boltshauser, Eugen; Korenke, Georg Christoph; Fabretti, Francesca; Janecke, Andreas Robert; Ebermann, Inga; Nürnberg, Gudrun; Nürnberg, Peter; Zentgraf, Hanswalter; Koerber, Friederike; Addicks, Klaus; Elsobky, Ezzat; Benzing, Thomas; Schermer, Bernhard; Bolz, Hanno Jörn

    2011-07-01

    Joubert syndrome (JBTS) is characterized by a specific brain malformation with various additional pathologies. It results from mutations in any one of at least 10 different genes, including NPHP1, which encodes nephrocystin-1. JBTS has been linked to dysfunction of primary cilia, since the gene products known to be associated with the disorder localize to this evolutionarily ancient organelle. Here we report the identification of a disease locus, JBTS12, with mutations in the KIF7 gene, an ortholog of the Drosophila kinesin Costal2, in a consanguineous JBTS family and subsequently in other JBTS patients. Interestingly, KIF7 is a known regulator of Hedgehog signaling and a putative ciliary motor protein. We found that KIF7 co-precipitated with nephrocystin-1. Further, knockdown of KIF7 expression in cell lines caused defects in cilia formation and induced abnormal centrosomal duplication and fragmentation of the Golgi network. These cellular phenotypes likely resulted from abnormal tubulin acetylation and microtubular dynamics. Thus, we suggest that modified microtubule stability and growth direction caused by loss of KIF7 function may be an underlying disease mechanism contributing to JBTS.

  5. The Interplay of the N- and C-Terminal Domains of MCAK Control Microtubule Depolymerization Activity and Spindle Assembly

    OpenAIRE

    Ems-McClung, Stephanie C.; Hertzer, Kathleen M.; Zhang, Xin; Miller, Mill W.; Walczak, Claire E.

    2007-01-01

    Spindle assembly and accurate chromosome segregation require the proper regulation of microtubule dynamics. MCAK, a Kinesin-13, catalytically depolymerizes microtubules, regulates physiological microtubule dynamics, and is the major catastrophe factor in egg extracts. Purified GFP-tagged MCAK domain mutants were assayed to address how the different MCAK domains contribute to in vitro microtubule depolymerization activity and physiological spindle assembly activity in egg extracts. Our biochem...

  6. Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator Reduces Microtubule-Dependent Campylobacter jejuni Invasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kido, Junko; Shimohata, Takaaki; Amano, Sachie; Hatayama, Sho; Nguyen, Anh Quoc; Sato, Yuri; Kanda, Yuna; Tentaku, Aya; Fukushima, Shiho; Nakahashi, Mutsumi; Uebanso, Takashi; Mawatari, Kazuaki; Takahashi, Akira

    2017-10-01

    Campylobacterjejuni is a foodborne pathogen that induces gastroenteritis. Invasion and adhesion are essential in the process of C. jejuni infection leading to gastroenteritis. The mucosal layer plays a key role in the system of defense against efficient invasion and adhesion by bacteria, which is modulated by several ion channels and transporters mediated by water flux in the intestine. The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) plays the main role in water flux in the intestine, and it is closely associated with bacterial clearance. We previously reported that C. jejuni infection suppresses CFTR channel activity in intestinal epithelial cells; however, the mechanism and importance of this suppression are unclear. This study sought to elucidate the role of CFTR in C. jejuni infection. Using HEK293 cells that stably express wild-type and mutated CFTR, we found that CFTR attenuated C. jejuni invasion and that it was not involved in bacterial adhesion or intracellular survival but was associated with microtubule-dependent intracellular transport. Moreover, we revealed that CFTR attenuated the function of the microtubule motor protein, which caused inhibition of C. jejuni invasion, but did not affect microtubule stability. Meanwhile, the CFTR mutant G551D-CFTR, which had defects in channel activity, suppressed C. jejuni invasion, whereas the ΔF508-CFTR mutant, which had defects in maturation, did not suppress C. jejuni invasion, suggesting that CFTR suppression of C. jejuni invasion is related to CFTR maturation but not channel activity. When these findings are taken together, it may be seen that mature CFTR inhibits C. jejuni invasion by regulating microtubule-mediated pathways. We suggest that CFTR plays a critical role in cellular defenses against C. jejuni invasion and that suppression of CFTR may be an initial step in promoting cell invasion during C. jejuni infection. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  7. Regulation of outer kinetochore Ndc80 complex-based microtubule attachments by the central kinetochore Mis12/MIND complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudalkar, Emily M.; Scarborough, Emily A.; Umbreit, Neil T.; Zelter, Alex; Gestaut, Daniel R.; Riffle, Michael; Johnson, Richard S.; MacCoss, Michael J.; Asbury, Charles L.; Davis, Trisha N.

    2015-01-01

    Multiple protein subcomplexes of the kinetochore cooperate as a cohesive molecular unit that forms load-bearing microtubule attachments that drive mitotic chromosome movements. There is intriguing evidence suggesting that central kinetochore components influence kinetochore–microtubule attachment, but the mechanism remains unclear. Here, we find that the conserved Mis12/MIND (Mtw1, Nsl1, Nnf1, Dsn1) and Ndc80 (Ndc80, Nuf2, Spc24, Spc25) complexes are connected by an extensive network of contacts, each essential for viability in cells, and collectively able to withstand substantial tensile load. Using a single-molecule approach, we demonstrate that an individual MIND complex enhances the microtubule-binding affinity of a single Ndc80 complex by fourfold. MIND itself does not bind microtubules. Instead, MIND binds Ndc80 complex far from the microtubule-binding domain and confers increased microtubule interaction of the complex. In addition, MIND activation is redundant with the effects of a mutation in Ndc80 that might alter its ability to adopt a folded conformation. Together, our results suggest a previously unidentified mechanism for regulating microtubule binding of an outer kinetochore component by a central kinetochore complex. PMID:26430240

  8. Mechanism of dynamic reorientation of cortical microtubules due to mechanical stress

    CERN Document Server

    Muratov, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Directional growth caused by gravitropism and corresponding bending of plant cells has been explored since 19th century, however, many aspects of mechanisms underlying the perception of gravity at the molecular level are still not well known. Perception of gravity in root and shoot gravitropisms is usually attributed to gravisensitive cells, called statocytes, which exploit sedimentation of macroscopic and heavy organelles, amyloplasts, to sense the direction of gravity. Gravity stimulus is then transduced into distal elongation zone, which is several mm far from statocytes, where it causes stretching. It is suggested that gravity stimulus is conveyed by gradients in auxin flux. We propose a theoretical model that may explain how concentration gradients and/or stretching may indirectly affect the global orientation of cortical microtubules, attached to the cell membrane and induce their dynamic reorientation perpendicular to the gradients. In turn, oriented microtubules arrays direct the growth and orientatio...

  9. GTSE1 is a microtubule plus-end tracking protein that regulates EB1-dependent cell migration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massimilano Scolz

    Full Text Available The regulation of cell migration is a highly complex process that is often compromised when cancer cells become metastatic. The microtubule cytoskeleton is necessary for cell migration, but how microtubules and microtubule-associated proteins regulate multiple pathways promoting cell migration remains unclear. Microtubule plus-end binding proteins (+TIPs are emerging as important players in many cellular functions, including cell migration. Here we identify a +TIP, GTSE1, that promotes cell migration. GTSE1 accumulates at growing microtubule plus ends through interaction with the EB1+TIP. The EB1-dependent +TIP activity of GTSE1 is required for cell migration, as well as for microtubule-dependent disassembly of focal adhesions. GTSE1 protein levels determine the migratory capacity of both nontransformed and breast cancer cell lines. In breast cancers, increased GTSE1 expression correlates with invasive potential, tumor stage, and time to distant metastasis, suggesting that misregulation of GTSE1 expression could be associated with increased invasive potential.

  10. NIMA-related kinases regulate directional cell growth and organ development through microtubule function in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motose, Hiroyasu; Takatani, Shogo; Ikeda, Tatsuya; Takahashi, Taku

    2012-12-01

    NIMA-related kinase 6 (NEK6) regulates cellular expansion and morphogenesis through microtubule organizaiton in Arabidopsis thaliana. Loss-of-function mutations in NEK6 (nek6/ibo1) cause ectopic outgrowth and microtubule disorganization in epidermal cells. We recently found that NEK6 forms homodimers and heterodimers with NEK4 and NEK5 to destabilize cortical microtubules possibly by direct binding to microtubules and the β-tubulin phosphorylation. Here, we identified a new allele of NEK6 and further analyzed the morphological phenotypes of nek6/ibo1 mutants, along with alleles of nek4 and nek5 mutants. Phenotypic analysis demonstrated that NEK6 is required for the directional growth of roots and hypocotyls, petiole elongation, cell file formation, and trichome morphogenesis. In addition, nek4, nek5, and nek6/ibo1 mutants were hypersensitive to microtubule inhibitors such as propyzamide and taxol. These results suggest that plant NEKs function in directional cell growth and organ development through the regulation of microtubule organization.

  11. The Vip1 inositol polyphosphate kinase family regulates polarized growth and modulates the microtubule cytoskeleton in fungi.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Pöhlmann

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Microtubules (MTs are pivotal for numerous eukaryotic processes ranging from cellular morphogenesis, chromosome segregation to intracellular transport. Execution of these tasks requires intricate regulation of MT dynamics. Here, we identify a new regulator of the Schizosaccharomyces pombe MT cytoskeleton: Asp1, a member of the highly conserved Vip1 inositol polyphosphate kinase family. Inositol pyrophosphates generated by Asp1 modulate MT dynamic parameters independent of the central +TIP EB1 and in a dose-dependent and cellular-context-dependent manner. Importantly, our analysis of the in vitro kinase activities of various S. pombe Asp1 variants demonstrated that the C-terminal phosphatase-like domain of the dual domain Vip1 protein negatively affects the inositol pyrophosphate output of the N-terminal kinase domain. These data suggest that the former domain has phosphatase activity. Remarkably, Vip1 regulation of the MT cytoskeleton is a conserved feature, as Vip1-like proteins of the filamentous ascomycete Aspergillus nidulans and the distantly related pathogenic basidiomycete Ustilago maydis also affect the MT cytoskeleton in these organisms. Consistent with the role of interphase MTs in growth zone selection/maintenance, all 3 fungal systems show aspects of aberrant cell morphogenesis. Thus, for the first time we have identified a conserved biological process for inositol pyrophosphates.

  12. Integrins Regulate Apical Constriction via Microtubule Stabilization in the Drosophila Eye Disc Epithelium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vilaiwan M. Fernandes

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available During morphogenesis, extracellular signals trigger actomyosin contractility in subpopulations of cells to coordinate changes in cell shape. To illuminate the link between signaling-mediated tissue patterning and cytoskeletal remodeling, we study the progression of the morphogenetic furrow (MF, the wave of apical constriction that traverses the Drosophila eye imaginal disc preceding photoreceptor neurogenesis. Apical constriction depends on actomyosin contractility downstream of the Hedgehog (Hh and bone morphogenetic protein (BMP pathways. We identify a role for integrin adhesion receptors in MF progression. We show that Hh and BMP regulate integrin expression, the loss of which disrupts apical constriction and slows furrow progression; conversely, elevated integrins accelerate furrow progression. We present evidence that integrins regulate MF progression by promoting microtubule stabilization, since reducing microtubule stability rescues integrin-mediated furrow acceleration. Thus, integrins act as a genetic link between tissue-level signaling events and morphological change at the cellular level, leading to morphogenesis and neurogenesis in the eye.

  13. Integrins regulate apical constriction via microtubule stabilization in the Drosophila eye disc epithelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Vilaiwan M; McCormack, Kasandra; Lewellyn, Lindsay; Verheyen, Esther M

    2014-12-24

    During morphogenesis, extracellular signals trigger actomyosin contractility in subpopulations of cells to coordinate changes in cell shape. To illuminate the link between signaling-mediated tissue patterning and cytoskeletal remodeling, we study the progression of the morphogenetic furrow (MF), the wave of apical constriction that traverses the Drosophila eye imaginal disc preceding photoreceptor neurogenesis. Apical constriction depends on actomyosin contractility downstream of the Hedgehog (Hh) and bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) pathways. We identify a role for integrin adhesion receptors in MF progression. We show that Hh and BMP regulate integrin expression, the loss of which disrupts apical constriction and slows furrow progression; conversely, elevated integrins accelerate furrow progression. We present evidence that integrins regulate MF progression by promoting microtubule stabilization, since reducing microtubule stability rescues integrin-mediated furrow acceleration. Thus, integrins act as a genetic link between tissue-level signaling events and morphological change at the cellular level, leading to morphogenesis and neurogenesis in the eye. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. MVL-PLA2, a snake venom phospholipase A2, inhibits angiogenesis through an increase in microtubule dynamics and disorganization of focal adhesions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amine Bazaa

    Full Text Available Integrins are essential protagonists of the complex multi-step process of angiogenesis that has now become a major target for the development of anticancer therapies. We recently reported and characterized that MVL-PLA2, a novel phospholipase A2 from Macrovipera lebetina venom, exhibited anti-integrin activity. In this study, we show that MVL-PLA2 also displays potent anti-angiogenic properties. This phospholipase A2 inhibited adhesion and migration of human microvascular-endothelial cells (HMEC-1 in a dose-dependent manner without being cytotoxic. Using Matrigel and chick chorioallantoic membrane assays, we demonstrated that MVL-PLA2, as well as its catalytically inactivated form, significantly inhibited angiogenesis both in vitro and in vivo. We have also found that the actin cytoskeleton and the distribution of alphav beta3 integrin, a critical regulator of angiogenesis and a major component of focal adhesions, were disturbed after MVL-PLA2 treatment. In order to further investigate the mechanism of action of this protein on endothelial cells, we analyzed the dynamic instability behavior of microtubules in living endothelial cells. Interestingly, we showed that MVL-PLA2 significantly increased microtubule dynamicity in HMEC-1 cells by 40%. We propose that the enhancement of microtubule dynamics may explain the alterations in the formation of focal adhesions, leading to inhibition of cell adhesion and migration.

  15. CLASP2 interacts with p120-catenin and governs microtubule dynamics at adherens junctions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shahbazi, Marta N; Megias, Diego; Epifano, Carolina

    2013-01-01

    Classical cadherins and their connections with microtubules (MTs) are emerging as important determinants of cell adhesion. However, the functional relevance of such interactions and the molecular players that contribute to tissue architecture are still emerging. In this paper, we report that the MT...... plus end-binding protein CLASP2 localizes to adherens junctions (AJs) via direct interaction with p120-catenin (p120) in primary basal mouse keratinocytes. Reductions in the levels of p120 or CLASP2 decreased the localization of the other protein to cell-cell contacts and altered AJ dynamics...... and stability. These features were accompanied by decreased MT density and altered MT dynamics at intercellular junction sites. Interestingly, CLASP2 was enriched at the cortex of basal progenitor keratinocytes, in close localization to p120. Our findings suggest the existence of a new mechanism of MT targeting...

  16. Dissecting EB1-microtubule interactions from every direction: using single-molecule visualization and static and dynamic binding measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Benjamin

    2015-03-01

    EB1 is an important microtubule associating protein (MAP) that acts as a master coordinator of protein activity at the growing plus-end of the microtubule. We can recapitulate the plus-end binding behavior of EB1 along the entire length of a static microtubule using microtubules polymerized in the presence of the nonhydrolyzable GTP analogs GMPCPP and GTP γS instead of GTP. Through the use of single-molecule TIRF imaging we find that EB1 is highly dynamic (with a sub-second characteristic binding lifetime) and continuously diffusive while bound to the microtubule. We measure the diffusion coefficient, D, through linear fitting to mean-squared displacement of individually labeled proteins, and the binding lifetime, τ, by fitting a single exponential decay to the probability distribution of trajectory lifetimes. In agreement with measurements of other diffusive MAPs, we find that D increases and τ decreases with increasing ionic strength. We also find that D is sensitive to the choice of GTP analog: EB1 proteins bound to GTP γS polymerized microtubules have a D half of that found with GMPCPP polymerized microtubules. To compare these single-molecule measurements to the bulk binding behavior of EB1, we use TIRF imaging to measure the intensity of microtubules coated with EB1-GFP as a function of EB1 concentration. We find that EB1 binding is cooperative and both the quantity of EB1 bound and the dissociation constant are sensitive to GTP analog and ionic concentration. The correlation between binding affinity and D and the cooperative nature of EB1-microtubule binding leads to a decrease in D with increasing EB1 concentration. Interestingly, we also find an increase in τ at high EB1 concentrations, consistent with attractive EB1-microtubule interactions driving the cooperativity. To further understand the nature of the cooperativity we estimate the interaction energy by measuring the association and dissociation rates (kon and koff respectively) at different

  17. PP2A regulates kinetochore-microtubule attachment during meiosis I in oocyte.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, An; Shi, Peiliang; Song, Anying; Zou, Dayuan; Zhou, Yue; Gu, Pengyu; Huang, Zan; Wang, Qinghua; Lin, Zhaoyu; Gao, Xiang

    2016-06-02

    Studies using in vitro cultured oocytes have indicated that the protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A), a major serine/threonine protein phosphatase, participates in multiple steps of meiosis. Details of oocyte maturation regulation by PP2A remain unclear and an in vivo model can provide more convincing information. Here, we inactivated PP2A by mutating genes encoding for its catalytic subunits (PP2Acs) in mouse oocytes. We found that eliminating both PP2Acs caused female infertility. Oocytes lacking PP2Acs failed to complete 1(st) meiotic division due to chromosome misalignment and abnormal spindle assembly. In mitosis, PP2A counteracts Aurora kinase B/C (AurkB/C) to facilitate correct kinetochore-microtubule (KT-MT) attachment. In meiosis I in oocyte, we found that PP2Ac deficiency destabilized KT-MT attachments. Chemical inhibition of AurkB/C in PP2Ac-null oocytes partly restored the formation of lateral/merotelic KT-MT attachments but not correct KT-MT attachments. Taken together, our findings demonstrate that PP2Acs are essential for chromosome alignments and regulate the formation of correct KT-MT attachments in meiosis I in oocytes.

  18. An antitubulin agent BCFMT inhibits proliferation of cancer cells and induces cell death by inhibiting microtubule dynamics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ankit Rai

    Full Text Available Using cell based screening assay, we identified a novel anti-tubulin agent (Z-5-((5-(4-bromo-3-chlorophenylfuran-2-ylmethylene-2-thioxothiazolidin-4-one (BCFMT that inhibited proliferation of human cervical carcinoma (HeLa (IC(50, 7.2 ± 1.8 µM, human breast adenocarcinoma (MCF-7 (IC(50, 10.0 ± 0.5 µM, highly metastatic breast adenocarcinoma (MDA-MB-231 (IC(50, 6.0 ± 1 µM, cisplatin-resistant human ovarian carcinoma (A2780-cis (IC(50, 5.8 ± 0.3 µM and multi-drug resistant mouse mammary tumor (EMT6/AR1 (IC(50, 6.5 ± 1 µM cells. Using several complimentary strategies, BCFMT was found to inhibit cancer cell proliferation at G2/M phase of the cell cycle apparently by targeting microtubules. In addition, BCFMT strongly suppressed the dynamics of individual microtubules in live MCF-7 cells. At its half maximal proliferation inhibitory concentration (10 µM, BCFMT reduced the rates of growing and shortening phases of microtubules in MCF-7 cells by 37 and 40%, respectively. Further, it increased the time microtubules spent in the pause (neither growing nor shortening detectably state by 135% and reduced the dynamicity (dimer exchange per unit time of microtubules by 70%. In vitro, BCFMT bound to tubulin with a dissociation constant of 8.3 ± 1.8 µM, inhibited tubulin assembly and suppressed GTPase activity of microtubules. BCFMT competitively inhibited the binding of BODIPY FL-vinblastine to tubulin with an inhibitory concentration (K(i of 5.2 ± 1.5 µM suggesting that it binds to tubulin at the vinblastine site. In cultured cells, BCFMT-treatment depolymerized interphase microtubules, perturbed the spindle organization and accumulated checkpoint proteins (BubR1 and Mad2 at the kinetochores. BCFMT-treated MCF-7 cells showed enhanced nuclear accumulation of p53 and its downstream p21, which consequently activated apoptosis in these cells. The results suggested that BCFMT inhibits proliferation of several types of cancer cells including drug

  19. Acentrosomal microtubule nucleation in higher plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmit, Anne-Catherine

    2002-01-01

    Higher plants have developed a unique pathway to control their cytoskeleton assembly and dynamics. In most other eukaryotes, microtubules are nucleated in vivo at the nucleation and organizing centers and are involved in the establishment of polarity. Although the major cytoskeletal components are common to plant and animal cells, which suggests conserved regulation mechanisms, plants do not possess centrosome-like organelles. Nevertheless, they are able to build spindles and have developed their own specific cytoskeletal arrays: the cortical arrays, the preprophase band, and the phragmoplast, which all participate in basic developmental processes, as shown by defective mutants. New approaches provide essential clues to understanding the fundamental mechanisms of microtubule nucleation. Gamma-tubulin, which is considered to be the universal nucleator, is the essential component of microtubule-nucleating complexes identified as gamma-tubulin ring complexes (gamma-TuRC) in centriolar cells. A gamma-tubulin small complex (gamma-TuSC) forms a minimal nucleating unit recruited at specific sites of activity. These components--gamma-tubulin, Spc98p, and Spc97p--are present in higher plants. They play a crucial role in microtubule nucleation at the nuclear surface, which is known as the main functional plant microtubule-organizing center, and also probably at the cell cortex and at the phragmoplast, where secondary nucleation sites may exist. Surprisingly, plant gamma-tubulin is distributed along the microtubule length. As it is not associated with Spc98p, it may not be involved in microtubule nucleation, but may preferably control microtubule dynamics. Understanding the mechanisms of microtubule nucleation is the major challenge of the current research.

  20. Microtubule's conformational cap

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chretien, D.; Janosi, I.; Taveau, J.C.

    1999-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms that allow elongation of the unstable microtubule lattice remain unclear. It is usually thought that the GDP-liganded tubulin lattice is capped by a small layer of GTP- or GDP-P(i)-liganded molecules, the so called "GTP-cap". Here, we point-out that the elastic properties...... of the microtubule lattice cause a difference in stability between the elongating tubulin sheet and the completed microtubule wall. The implications of our observations for microtubule structure and dynamics are discussed....

  1. Connecting macroscopic dynamics with microscopic properties in active microtubule network contraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Peter J.; Yan, Wen; Fürthauer, Sebastian; Shelley, Michael J.; Needleman, Daniel J.

    2017-12-01

    The cellular cytoskeleton is an active material, driven out of equilibrium by molecular motor proteins. It is not understood how the collective behaviors of cytoskeletal networks emerge from the properties of the network’s constituent motor proteins and filaments. Here we present experimental results on networks of stabilized microtubules in Xenopus oocyte extracts, which undergo spontaneous bulk contraction driven by the motor protein dynein, and investigate the effects of varying the initial microtubule density and length distribution. We find that networks contract to a similar final density, irrespective of the length of microtubules or their initial density, but that the contraction timescale varies with the average microtubule length. To gain insight into why this microscopic property influences the macroscopic network contraction time, we developed simulations where microtubules and motors are explicitly represented. The simulations qualitatively recapitulate the variation of contraction timescale with microtubule length, and allowed stress contributions from different sources to be estimated and decoupled.

  2. The mitotic checkpoint kinase NEK2A regulates kinetochore microtubule attachment stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, J; Cai, X; Yao, J; Ding, X; Wu, Q; Pei, S; Jiang, K; Zhang, Y; Wang, W; Shi, Y; Lai, Y; Shen, J; Teng, M; Huang, H; Fei, Q; Reddy, E S; Zhu, J; Jin, C; Yao, X

    2008-07-03

    Loss or gain of whole chromosome, the form of chromosome instability commonly associated with cancers is thought to arise from aberrant chromosome segregation during cell division. Chromosome segregation in mitosis is orchestrated by the interaction of kinetochores with spindle microtubules. Our studies show that NEK2A is a kinetochore-associated protein kinase essential for faithful chromosome segregation. However, it was unclear how NEK2A ensures accurate chromosome segregation in mitosis. Here we show that NEK2A-mediated Hec1 (highly expressed in cancer) phosphorylation is essential for faithful kinetochore microtubule attachments in mitosis. Using phospho-specific antibody, our studies show that NEK2A phosphorylates Hec1 at Ser165 during mitosis. Although such phosphorylation is not required for assembly of Hec1 to the kinetochore, expression of non-phosphorylatable mutant Hec1(S165) perturbed chromosome congression and resulted in a dramatic increase in microtubule attachment errors, including syntelic and monotelic attachments. Our in vitro reconstitution experiment demonstrated that Hec1 binds to microtubule in low affinity and phosphorylation by NEK2A, which prevents aberrant kinetochore-microtubule connections in vivo, increases the affinity of the Ndc80 complex for microtubules in vitro. Thus, our studies illustrate a novel regulatory mechanism in which NEK2A kinase operates a faithful chromosome attachment to spindle microtubule, which prevents chromosome instability during cell division.

  3. Griseofulvin stabilizes microtubule dynamics, activates p53 and inhibits the proliferation of MCF-7 cells synergistically with vinblastine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rathinasamy, Krishnan; Jindal, Bhavya; Asthana, Jayant; Singh, Parminder; Balaji, Petety V; Panda, Dulal

    2010-05-19

    Griseofulvin, an antifungal drug, has recently been shown to inhibit proliferation of various types of cancer cells and to inhibit tumor growth in athymic mice. Due to its low toxicity, griseofulvin has drawn considerable attention for its potential use in cancer chemotherapy. This work aims to understand how griseofulvin suppresses microtubule dynamics in living cells and sought to elucidate the antimitotic and antiproliferative action of the drug. The effects of griseofulvin on the dynamics of individual microtubules in live MCF-7 cells were measured by confocal microscopy. Immunofluorescence microscopy, western blotting and flow cytometry were used to analyze the effects of griseofulvin on spindle microtubule organization, cell cycle progression and apoptosis. Further, interactions of purified tubulin with griseofulvin were studied in vitro by spectrophotometry and spectrofluorimetry. Docking analysis was performed using autodock4 and LigandFit module of Discovery Studio 2.1. Griseofulvin strongly suppressed the dynamic instability of individual microtubules in live MCF-7 cells by reducing the rate and extent of the growing and shortening phases. At or near half-maximal proliferation inhibitory concentration, griseofulvin dampened the dynamicity of microtubules in MCF-7 cells without significantly disrupting the microtubule network. Griseofulvin-induced mitotic arrest was associated with several mitotic abnormalities like misaligned chromosomes, multipolar spindles, misegregated chromosomes resulting in cells containing fragmented nuclei. These fragmented nuclei were found to contain increased concentration of p53. Using both computational and experimental approaches, we provided evidence suggesting that griseofulvin binds to tubulin in two different sites; one site overlaps with the paclitaxel binding site while the second site is located at the alphabeta intra-dimer interface. In combination studies, griseofulvin and vinblastine were found to exert synergistic

  4. Griseofulvin stabilizes microtubule dynamics, activates p53 and inhibits the proliferation of MCF-7 cells synergistically with vinblastine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balaji Petety V

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Griseofulvin, an antifungal drug, has recently been shown to inhibit proliferation of various types of cancer cells and to inhibit tumor growth in athymic mice. Due to its low toxicity, griseofulvin has drawn considerable attention for its potential use in cancer chemotherapy. This work aims to understand how griseofulvin suppresses microtubule dynamics in living cells and sought to elucidate the antimitotic and antiproliferative action of the drug. Methods The effects of griseofulvin on the dynamics of individual microtubules in live MCF-7 cells were measured by confocal microscopy. Immunofluorescence microscopy, western blotting and flow cytometry were used to analyze the effects of griseofulvin on spindle microtubule organization, cell cycle progression and apoptosis. Further, interactions of purified tubulin with griseofulvin were studied in vitro by spectrophotometry and spectrofluorimetry. Docking analysis was performed using autodock4 and LigandFit module of Discovery Studio 2.1. Results Griseofulvin strongly suppressed the dynamic instability of individual microtubules in live MCF-7 cells by reducing the rate and extent of the growing and shortening phases. At or near half-maximal proliferation inhibitory concentration, griseofulvin dampened the dynamicity of microtubules in MCF-7 cells without significantly disrupting the microtubule network. Griseofulvin-induced mitotic arrest was associated with several mitotic abnormalities like misaligned chromosomes, multipolar spindles, misegregated chromosomes resulting in cells containing fragmented nuclei. These fragmented nuclei were found to contain increased concentration of p53. Using both computational and experimental approaches, we provided evidence suggesting that griseofulvin binds to tubulin in two different sites; one site overlaps with the paclitaxel binding site while the second site is located at the αβ intra-dimer interface. In combination studies

  5. Griseofulvin stabilizes microtubule dynamics, activates p53 and inhibits the proliferation of MCF-7 cells synergistically with vinblastine

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background Griseofulvin, an antifungal drug, has recently been shown to inhibit proliferation of various types of cancer cells and to inhibit tumor growth in athymic mice. Due to its low toxicity, griseofulvin has drawn considerable attention for its potential use in cancer chemotherapy. This work aims to understand how griseofulvin suppresses microtubule dynamics in living cells and sought to elucidate the antimitotic and antiproliferative action of the drug. Methods The effects of griseofulvin on the dynamics of individual microtubules in live MCF-7 cells were measured by confocal microscopy. Immunofluorescence microscopy, western blotting and flow cytometry were used to analyze the effects of griseofulvin on spindle microtubule organization, cell cycle progression and apoptosis. Further, interactions of purified tubulin with griseofulvin were studied in vitro by spectrophotometry and spectrofluorimetry. Docking analysis was performed using autodock4 and LigandFit module of Discovery Studio 2.1. Results Griseofulvin strongly suppressed the dynamic instability of individual microtubules in live MCF-7 cells by reducing the rate and extent of the growing and shortening phases. At or near half-maximal proliferation inhibitory concentration, griseofulvin dampened the dynamicity of microtubules in MCF-7 cells without significantly disrupting the microtubule network. Griseofulvin-induced mitotic arrest was associated with several mitotic abnormalities like misaligned chromosomes, multipolar spindles, misegregated chromosomes resulting in cells containing fragmented nuclei. These fragmented nuclei were found to contain increased concentration of p53. Using both computational and experimental approaches, we provided evidence suggesting that griseofulvin binds to tubulin in two different sites; one site overlaps with the paclitaxel binding site while the second site is located at the αβ intra-dimer interface. In combination studies, griseofulvin and vinblastine were

  6. Radial intercalation is regulated by the Par complex and the microtubule-stabilizing protein CLAMP/Spef1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, Michael E.; Putzbach, William; Bacon, Elizabeth; Kim, Sun K.

    2014-01-01

    The directed movement of cells is critical for numerous developmental and disease processes. A developmentally reiterated form of migration is radial intercalation; the process by which cells move in a direction orthogonal to the plane of the tissue from an inner layer to an outer layer. We use the radial intercalation of cells into the skin of Xenopus laevis embryos as a model to study directed cell migration within an epithelial tissue. We identify a novel function for both the microtubule-binding protein CLAMP and members of the microtubule-regulating Par complex during intercalation. Specifically, we show that Par3 and aPKC promote the apical positioning of centrioles, whereas CLAMP stabilizes microtubules along the axis of migration. We propose a model in which the Par complex defines the orientation of apical migration during intercalation and in which subcellular localization of CLAMP promotes the establishment of an axis of microtubule stability required for the active migration of cells into the outer epithelium. PMID:25070955

  7. Murine CENP-F regulates centrosomal microtubule nucleation and interacts with Hook2 at the centrosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moynihan, Katherine L; Pooley, Ryan; Miller, Paul M; Kaverina, Irina; Bader, David M

    2009-11-01

    The microtubule (MT) network is essential in a broad spectrum of cellular functions. Many studies have linked CENP-F to MT-based activities as disruption of this protein leads to major changes in MT structure and function. Still, the basis of CENP-F regulation of the MT network remains elusive. Here, our studies reveal a novel and critical localization and role for CENP-F at the centrosome, the major MT organizing center (MTOC) of the cell. Using a yeast two-hybrid screen, we identify Hook2, a linker protein that is essential for regulation of the MT network at the centrosome, as a binding partner of CENP-F. With recently developed immunochemical reagents, we confirm this interaction and reveal the novel localization of CENP-F at the centrosome. Importantly, in this first report of CENP-F(-/-) cells, we demonstrate that ablation of CENP-F protein function eliminates MT repolymerization after standard nocodazole treatment. This inhibition of MT regrowth is centrosome specific because MT repolymerization is readily observed from the Golgi in CENP-F(-/-) cells. The centrosome-specific function of CENP-F in the regulation of MT growth is confirmed by expression of truncated CENP-F containing only the Hook2-binding domain. Furthermore, analysis of partially reconstituted MTOC asters in cells that escape complete repolymerization block shows that disruption of CENP-F function impacts MT nucleation and anchoring rather than promoting catastrophe. Our study reveals a major new localization and function of CENP-F at the centrosome that is likely to impact a broad array of MT-based actions in the cell.

  8. Active Erk Regulates Microtubule Stability in H-ras-Transformed Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rene E. Harrison

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Increasing evidence suggests that activated erk regulates cell functions, at least in part, by mechanisms that do not require gene transcription. Here we show that the map kinase, erk, decorates microtubules (MTs and mitotic spindles in both parental and mutant active rastransfected 10T1 /2 fibroblasts and MCF10A breast epithelial cells. Approximately 20% of total cellular erk decorated MTs in both cell lines. A greater proportion of activated erk was associated with MTs in the presence of mutant active H-ras than in parental cells. Activation of erk by the ras pathway coincided with a decrease in the stability of MT, as detected by a stability marker. The MKK1 inhibitor, PD98059 and transfection of a dominant negative MKK1 blocked ras-induced instability of MTs but did not modify the association of erk with MTs or affect MT stability of the parental cells. These results indicate that the subset of active erk kinase that associates with MTs contributes to their instability in the presence of a mutant active ras. The MT-associated subset of active erk likely contributes to the enhanced invasive and proliferative abilities of cells containing mutant active H-ras.

  9. The Monopolin Complex Crosslinks Kinetochore Components to Regulate Chromosome-Microtubule Attachments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corbett, Kevin D.; Yip, Calvin K.; Ee, Ly-Sha; Walz, Thomas; Amon, Angelika; Harrison, Stephen C. (Harvard-Med); (MIT)

    2010-09-27

    The monopolin complex regulates different types of kinetochore-microtubule attachments in fungi, ensuring sister chromatid co-orientation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae meiosis I and inhibiting merotelic attachment in Schizosaccharomyces pombe mitosis. In addition, the monopolin complex maintains the integrity and silencing of ribosomal DNA (rDNA) repeats in the nucleolus. We show here that the S. cerevisiae Csm1/Lrs4 monopolin subcomplex has a distinctive V-shaped structure, with two pairs of protein-protein interaction domains positioned {approx}10 nm apart. Csm1 presents a conserved hydrophobic surface patch that binds two kinetochore proteins: Dsn1, a subunit of the outer-kinetochore MIND/Mis12 complex, and Mif2/CENP-C. Csm1 point-mutations that disrupt kinetochore-subunit binding also disrupt sister chromatid co-orientation in S. cerevisiae meiosis I. We further show that the same Csm1 point-mutations affect rDNA silencing, probably by disrupting binding to the rDNA-associated protein Tof2. We propose that Csm1/Lrs4 functions as a molecular clamp, crosslinking kinetochore components to enforce sister chromatid co-orientation in S. cerevisiae meiosis I and to suppress merotelic attachment in S. pombe mitosis, and crosslinking rDNA repeats to aid rDNA silencing.

  10. Regulation of microtubule motors by tubulin isotypes and post-translational modifications

    OpenAIRE

    Vale, Ronald; M. SIRAJUDDIN; Rice, LM; Vale, RD

    2014-01-01

    The 'tubulin-code' hypothesis proposes that different tubulin genes or post-translational modifications (PTMs), which mainly confer variation in the carboxy-terminal tail (CTT), result in unique interactions with microtubule-associated proteins for specifi

  11. Drosophila spastin regulates synaptic microtubule networks and is required for normal motor function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina Tang Sherwood

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available The most common form of human autosomal dominant hereditary spastic paraplegia (AD-HSP is caused by mutations in the SPG4 (spastin gene, which encodes an AAA ATPase closely related in sequence to the microtubule-severing protein Katanin. Patients with AD-HSP exhibit degeneration of the distal regions of the longest axons in the spinal cord. Loss-of-function mutations in the Drosophila spastin gene produce larval neuromuscular junction (NMJ phenotypes. NMJ synaptic boutons in spastin mutants are more numerous and more clustered than in wild-type, and transmitter release is impaired. spastin-null adult flies have severe movement defects. They do not fly or jump, they climb poorly, and they have short lifespans. spastin hypomorphs have weaker behavioral phenotypes. Overexpression of Spastin erases the muscle microtubule network. This gain-of-function phenotype is consistent with the hypothesis that Spastin has microtubule-severing activity, and implies that spastin loss-of-function mutants should have an increased number of microtubules. Surprisingly, however, we observed the opposite phenotype: in spastin-null mutants, there are fewer microtubule bundles within the NMJ, especially in its distal boutons. The Drosophila NMJ is a glutamatergic synapse that resembles excitatory synapses in the mammalian spinal cord, so the reduction of organized presynaptic microtubules that we observe in spastin mutants may be relevant to an understanding of human Spastin's role in maintenance of axon terminals in the spinal cord.

  12. shot regulates the microtubule reorganization required for localization of axis-determining mRNAs during oogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jiyeon; Lee, Sujung; Chen, Cheng; Shim, Hyeran; Kim-Ha, Jeongsil

    2016-02-01

    The Drosophila mid-oogenesis stages are notable as the time when most maternal mRNAs become localized at discrete regions of the oocyte. Microtubule rearrangement occurs during this period and is critical for the localization of axis-determining maternal mRNAs. We have identified shot as a key player in establishing the cytoskeletal arrangement required for the spatial localization of axis-determining maternal mRNAs. We also found that the spatial distribution of the Shot protein is regulated by its mRNA localization. Our results suggest that the RNA localization mechanism is used not only for restricted accumulation of patterning molecules but also for the microtubule organization that leads to the initial development of oocyte polarity. © 2016 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  13. Highly dynamic microtubules improve the effectiveness of early stages of human influenza A/NWS/33 virus infection in LLC-MK2 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Conto, Flora; Di Lonardo, Enrica; Arcangeletti, Maria Cristina; Chezzi, Carlo; Medici, Maria Cristina; Calderaro, Adriana

    2012-01-01

    This study aims to investigate the role of microtubule dynamics in the initiation of NWS/33 human influenza A (NWS) virus infection in MDCK and LLC-MK2 mammalian kidney cells. We previously demonstrated a host-dependent role of the actin cytoskeleton in inducing restriction during the early phases of NWS infection. Furthermore, we showed the differential infectious entry of NWS virus in the above mentioned cell models. By first employing a panel of microtubule-modulators, we evidenced that microtubule-stabilization negatively interferes with NWS replication in LLC-MK2 but not in MDCK cells. Conversely, microtubule-depolymerization improves NWS growth in LLC-MK2 but not in the MDCK model. By using immunofluorescence labelling and Western blotting analyses upon NWS infection in mammalian kidney cells, it was observed that the occurrence of alpha-tubulin hyperacetylation--a post-translational modified form suggestive of stable microtubules--was significantly delayed in LLC-MK2 when compared to MDCK cells. Furthermore, mock-infected LLC-MK2 cells were shown to have higher levels of both acetylated alpha-tubulin and microtubule-associated protein 4 (MAP4), the latter being essential for the maintenance of normal microtubule polymer levels in interphase epithelial cells. Finally, to obtain highly dynamic microtubules in LLC-MK2 cells, we knocked down the expression of MAP4 by using a RNA-mediated RNA interference approach. The results evidenced that MAP4 silencing improves NWS growth in LLC-MK2 cells. By evidencing the cell type-dependent regulatory role of microtubule dynamics on NWS replication in mammalian kidney cells, we demonstrated that microtubule-stabilization represents a restriction factor for the initiation of NWS infection in LLC-MK2 but not in MDCK cells.

  14. Highly dynamic microtubules improve the effectiveness of early stages of human influenza A/NWS/33 virus infection in LLC-MK2 cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flora De Conto

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: This study aims to investigate the role of microtubule dynamics in the initiation of NWS/33 human influenza A (NWS virus infection in MDCK and LLC-MK2 mammalian kidney cells. We previously demonstrated a host-dependent role of the actin cytoskeleton in inducing restriction during the early phases of NWS infection. Furthermore, we showed the differential infectious entry of NWS virus in the above mentioned cell models. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: By first employing a panel of microtubule-modulators, we evidenced that microtubule-stabilization negatively interferes with NWS replication in LLC-MK2 but not in MDCK cells. Conversely, microtubule-depolymerization improves NWS growth in LLC-MK2 but not in the MDCK model. By using immunofluorescence labelling and Western blotting analyses upon NWS infection in mammalian kidney cells, it was observed that the occurrence of alpha-tubulin hyperacetylation--a post-translational modified form suggestive of stable microtubules--was significantly delayed in LLC-MK2 when compared to MDCK cells. Furthermore, mock-infected LLC-MK2 cells were shown to have higher levels of both acetylated alpha-tubulin and microtubule-associated protein 4 (MAP4, the latter being essential for the maintenance of normal microtubule polymer levels in interphase epithelial cells. Finally, to obtain highly dynamic microtubules in LLC-MK2 cells, we knocked down the expression of MAP4 by using a RNA-mediated RNA interference approach. The results evidenced that MAP4 silencing improves NWS growth in LLC-MK2 cells. CONCLUSION: By evidencing the cell type-dependent regulatory role of microtubule dynamics on NWS replication in mammalian kidney cells, we demonstrated that microtubule-stabilization represents a restriction factor for the initiation of NWS infection in LLC-MK2 but not in MDCK cells.

  15. Highly Dynamic Microtubules Improve the Effectiveness of Early Stages of Human Influenza A/NWS/33 Virus Infection in LLC-MK2 Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Conto, Flora; Di Lonardo, Enrica; Arcangeletti, Maria Cristina; Chezzi, Carlo; Medici, Maria Cristina; Calderaro, Adriana

    2012-01-01

    Background This study aims to investigate the role of microtubule dynamics in the initiation of NWS/33 human influenza A (NWS) virus infection in MDCK and LLC-MK2 mammalian kidney cells. We previously demonstrated a host-dependent role of the actin cytoskeleton in inducing restriction during the early phases of NWS infection. Furthermore, we showed the differential infectious entry of NWS virus in the above mentioned cell models. Methodology/Principal Findings By first employing a panel of microtubule-modulators, we evidenced that microtubule-stabilization negatively interferes with NWS replication in LLC-MK2 but not in MDCK cells. Conversely, microtubule-depolymerization improves NWS growth in LLC-MK2 but not in the MDCK model. By using immunofluorescence labelling and Western blotting analyses upon NWS infection in mammalian kidney cells, it was observed that the occurrence of alpha-tubulin hyperacetylation - a post-translational modified form suggestive of stable microtubules - was significantly delayed in LLC-MK2 when compared to MDCK cells. Furthermore, mock-infected LLC-MK2 cells were shown to have higher levels of both acetylated alpha-tubulin and microtubule-associated protein 4 (MAP4), the latter being essential for the maintenance of normal microtubule polymer levels in interphase epithelial cells. Finally, to obtain highly dynamic microtubules in LLC-MK2 cells, we knocked down the expression of MAP4 by using a RNA-mediated RNA interference approach. The results evidenced that MAP4 silencing improves NWS growth in LLC-MK2 cells. Conclusion By evidencing the cell type-dependent regulatory role of microtubule dynamics on NWS replication in mammalian kidney cells, we demonstrated that microtubule-stabilization represents a restriction factor for the initiation of NWS infection in LLC-MK2 but not in MDCK cells. PMID:22911759

  16. KIF5C S176 Phosphorylation Regulates Microtubule Binding and Transport Efficiency in Mammalian Neurons.

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    Artur ePadzik

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Increased phosphorylation of the KIF5 anterograde motor is associated with impaired axonal transport and neurodegeneration, but paradoxically also with normal transport, though the details are not fully defined. JNK phosphorylates KIF5C on S176 in the motor domain; a site that we show is phosphorylated in brain. Microtubule pelleting assays demonstrate that phosphomimetic KIF5C(1-560S176D associates weakly with microtubules compared to KIF5C(1-560WT. Consistent with this, 50% of KIF5C(1-560S176D shows diffuse movement in neurons. However the remaining 50% remains microtubule bound and displays decreased pausing and increased bidirectional movement. The same directionality switching is observed with KIF5C(1-560WT in the presence of an active JNK chimera, MKK7-JNK. Yet, in cargo trafficking assays where peroxisome cargo is bound, KIF5C(1-560S176D-GFP-FRB transports normally to microtubule plus ends. We also find that JNK increases the ATP hydrolysis of KIF5C in vitro. These data suggest that phosphorylation of KIF5C-S176 primes the motor to either disengage entirely from microtubule tracks as previously observed in response to stress, or to display improved efficiency. The final outcome may depend on cargo load and motor ensembles.

  17. Non-critical string theory formulation of microtubule dynamics and quantum aspects of brain function

    CERN Document Server

    Mavromatos, Nikolaos E

    1995-01-01

    Microtubule (MT) networks, subneural paracrystalline cytosceletal structures, seem to play a fundamental role in the neurons. We cast here the complicated MT dynamics in the form of a 1+1-dimensional non-critical string theory, thus enabling us to provide a consistent quantum treatment of MTs, including enviromental {\\em friction} effects. We suggest, thus, that the MTs are the microsites, in the brain, for the emergence of stable, macroscopic quantum coherent states, identifiable with the {\\em preconscious states}. Quantum space-time effects, as described by non-critical string theory, trigger then an {\\em organized collapse} of the coherent states down to a specific or {\\em conscious state}. The whole process we estimate to take {\\cal O}(1\\,{\\rm sec}), in excellent agreement with a plethora of experimental/observational findings. The {\\em microscopic arrow of time}, endemic in non-critical string theory, and apparent here in the self-collapse process, provides a satisfactory and simple resolution to the age...

  18. A Dynamic Microtubule Cytoskeleton Directs Medial Actomyosin Function during Tube Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booth, Alexander J.R.; Blanchard, Guy B.; Adams, Richard J.; Röper, Katja

    2014-01-01

    Summary The cytoskeleton is a major determinant of cell-shape changes that drive the formation of complex tissues during development. Important roles for actomyosin during tissue morphogenesis have been identified, but the role of the microtubule cytoskeleton is less clear. Here, we show that during tubulogenesis of the salivary glands in the fly embryo, the microtubule cytoskeleton undergoes major rearrangements, including a 90° change in alignment relative to the apicobasal axis, loss of centrosomal attachment, and apical stabilization. Disruption of the microtubule cytoskeleton leads to failure of apical constriction in placodal cells fated to invaginate. We show that this failure is due to loss of an apical medial actomyosin network whose pulsatile behavior in wild-type embryos drives the apical constriction of the cells. The medial actomyosin network interacts with the minus ends of acentrosomal microtubule bundles through the cytolinker protein Shot, and disruption of Shot also impairs apical constriction. PMID:24914560

  19. Up-regulation of microtubule-associated protein 2 accompanying the filial imprinting of domestic chicks (Gallus gallus domesticus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Shinji; Fujii-Taira, Ikuko; Murakami, Akio; Hirose, Naoki; Aoki, Naoya; Izawa, Ei-Ichi; Fujimoto, Yasuyuki; Takano, Tatsuya; Matsushima, Toshiya; Homma, Koichi J

    2008-06-15

    Using cDNA microarrays, we have identified elsewhere the genes of microtubule-associated proteins as a group up-regulated in newly hatched chick brains after filial imprinting training. Here we show by in situ hybridization that the mRNA for the microtubule-associated protein 2 (MAP2) gene was enriched in the mesopallium and the hippocampus in the trained chick brain. The regionally specific enrichments of MAP2 mRNA were not observed in the brain of dark-reared or light-exposed chick as controls, implying an association between the degree of expression and the strength of the learned preference. In agreement with the gene expression, MAP2 protein was accumulated in the mesopallium of the trained chick brain, but not in the brains of the controls. The accumulation of MAP2 was found in the cytosol of neurons and co-localized with beta-tubulin, suggesting a change in microtubule assembly. Our results suggest a postnatal reorganization of cytoskeleton following filial imprinting.

  20. The Drosophila orthologue of the INT6 onco-protein regulates mitotic microtubule growth and kinetochore structure.

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    Fioranna Renda

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available INT6/eIF3e is a highly conserved component of the translation initiation complex that interacts with both the 26S proteasome and the COP9 signalosome, two complexes implicated in ubiquitin-mediated protein degradation. The INT6 gene was originally identified as the insertion site of the mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV, and later shown to be involved in human tumorigenesis. Here we show that depletion of the Drosophila orthologue of INT6 (Int6 results in short mitotic spindles and deformed centromeres and kinetochores with low intra-kinetochore distance. Poleward flux of microtubule subunits during metaphase is reduced, although fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP demonstrates that microtubules remain dynamic both near the kinetochores and at spindle poles. Mitotic progression is delayed during metaphase due to the activity of the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC. Interestingly, a deubiquitinated form of the kinesin Klp67A (a putative orthologue of human Kif18A accumulates near the kinetochores in Int6-depleted cells. Consistent with this finding, Klp67A overexpression mimics the Int6 RNAi phenotype. Furthermore, simultaneous depletion of Int6 and Klp67A results in a phenotype identical to RNAi of just Klp67A, which indicates that Klp67A deficiency is epistatic over Int6 deficiency. We propose that Int6-mediated ubiquitination is required to control the activity of Klp67A. In the absence of this control, excess of Klp67A at the kinetochore suppresses microtubule plus-end polymerization, which in turn results in reduced microtubule flux, spindle shortening, and centromere/kinetochore deformation.

  1. LIM kinase regulation of cytoskeletal dynamics is required for salivary gland branching morphogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Shayoni; Fanti, Joseph A.; Macedo, Diego P.; Larsen, Melinda

    2014-01-01

    Coordinated actin microfilament and microtubule dynamics is required for salivary gland development, although the mechanisms by which they contribute to branching morphogenesis are not defined. Because LIM kinase (LIMK) regulates both actin and microtubule organization, we investigated the role of LIMK signaling in mouse embryonic submandibular salivary glands using ex vivo organ cultures. Both LIMK 1 and 2 were necessary for branching morphogenesis and functioned to promote epithelial early- and late-stage cleft progression through regulation of both microfilaments and microtubules. LIMK-dependent regulation of these cytoskeletal systems was required to control focal adhesion protein–dependent fibronectin assembly and integrin β1 activation, involving the LIMK effectors cofilin and TPPP/p25, for assembly of the actin- and tubulin-based cytoskeletal systems, respectively. We demonstrate that LIMK regulates the early stages of cleft formation—cleft initiation, stabilization, and progression—via establishment of actin stability. Further, we reveal a novel role for the microtubule assembly factor p25 in regulating stabilization and elongation of late-stage progressing clefts. This study demonstrates the existence of multiple actin- and microtubule-dependent stabilization steps that are controlled by LIMK and are required in cleft progression during branching morphogenesis. PMID:24966172

  2. Proteasomes raise the microtubule dynamics in influenza A (H1N1) virus-infected LLC-MK2 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Conto, Flora; Chezzi, Carlo; Fazzi, Alessandra; Razin, Sergey V; Arcangeletti, Maria Cristina; Medici, Maria Cristina; Gatti, Rita; Calderaro, Adriana

    2015-12-01

    The dynamics of microtubule networks are known to have an impact on replication of influenza A virus in some cellular models. Here we present evidence suggesting that at late stages of LLC-MK2 cell infection by influenza A (H1N1) virus the ubiquitin-proteasome protein degradation system participates in destabilization of microtubules, and favours virus replication. Chemical inhibition of proteasome activity partially suppresses influenza A virus replication, while stimulation of proteasome activity favours influenza A virus replication. Conversely, in another cellular model, A549 cells, inhibitors and activators of proteasomes have a small effect on influenza A virus replication. These data suggest that influenza A virus might take selective advantage of proteasome functions in order to set up a favourable cytoskeletal "environment" for its replication and spread. Furthermore, the relationship between influenza virus and the host cell is likely to depend on both the cellular model and the virus strain.

  3. Sites of glucose transporter-4 vesicle fusion with the plasma membrane correlate spatially with microtubules.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennine M Dawicki-McKenna

    Full Text Available In adipocytes, vesicles containing glucose transporter-4 (GLUT4 redistribute from intracellular stores to the cell periphery in response to insulin stimulation. Vesicles then fuse with the plasma membrane, facilitating glucose transport into the cell. To gain insight into the details of microtubule involvement, we examined the spatial organization and dynamics of microtubules in relation to GLUT4 vesicle trafficking in living 3T3-L1 adipocytes using total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF microscopy. Insulin stimulated an increase in microtubule density and curvature within the TIRF-illuminated region of the cell. The high degree of curvature and abrupt displacements of microtubules indicate that substantial forces act on microtubules. The time course of the microtubule density increase precedes that of the increase in intensity of fluorescently-tagged GLUT4 in this same region of the cell. In addition, portions of the microtubules are highly curved and are pulled closer to the cell cortex, as confirmed by Parallax microscopy. Microtubule disruption delayed and modestly reduced GLUT4 accumulation at the plasma membrane. Quantitative analysis revealed that fusions of GLUT4-containing vesicles with the plasma membrane, detected using insulin-regulated aminopeptidase with a pH-sensitive GFP tag (pHluorin, preferentially occur near microtubules. Interestingly, long-distance vesicle movement along microtubules visible at the cell surface prior to fusion does not appear to account for this proximity. We conclude that microtubules may be important in providing spatial information for GLUT4 vesicle fusion.

  4. Sites of Glucose Transporter-4 Vesicle Fusion with the Plasma Membrane Correlate Spatially with Microtubules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawicki-McKenna, Jennine M.; Goldman, Yale E.; Ostap, E. Michael

    2012-01-01

    In adipocytes, vesicles containing glucose transporter-4 (GLUT4) redistribute from intracellular stores to the cell periphery in response to insulin stimulation. Vesicles then fuse with the plasma membrane, facilitating glucose transport into the cell. To gain insight into the details of microtubule involvement, we examined the spatial organization and dynamics of microtubules in relation to GLUT4 vesicle trafficking in living 3T3-L1 adipocytes using total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy. Insulin stimulated an increase in microtubule density and curvature within the TIRF-illuminated region of the cell. The high degree of curvature and abrupt displacements of microtubules indicate that substantial forces act on microtubules. The time course of the microtubule density increase precedes that of the increase in intensity of fluorescently-tagged GLUT4 in this same region of the cell. In addition, portions of the microtubules are highly curved and are pulled closer to the cell cortex, as confirmed by Parallax microscopy. Microtubule disruption delayed and modestly reduced GLUT4 accumulation at the plasma membrane. Quantitative analysis revealed that fusions of GLUT4-containing vesicles with the plasma membrane, detected using insulin-regulated aminopeptidase with a pH-sensitive GFP tag (pHluorin), preferentially occur near microtubules. Interestingly, long-distance vesicle movement along microtubules visible at the cell surface prior to fusion does not appear to account for this proximity. We conclude that microtubules may be important in providing spatial information for GLUT4 vesicle fusion. PMID:22916292

  5. Conformational changes in tubulin in GMPCPP and GDP-taxol microtubules observed by cryoelectron microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yajima, Hiroaki; Ogura, Toshihiko; Nitta, Ryo; Okada, Yasushi; Sato, Chikara

    2012-01-01

    Microtubules are dynamic polymers that stochastically switch between growing and shrinking phases. Microtubule dynamics are regulated by guanosine triphosphate (GTP) hydrolysis by β-tubulin, but the mechanism of this regulation remains elusive because high-resolution microtubule structures have only been revealed for the guanosine diphosphate (GDP) state. In this paper, we solved the cryoelectron microscopy (cryo-EM) structure of microtubule stabilized with a GTP analogue, guanylyl 5′-α,β-methylenediphosphonate (GMPCPP), at 8.8-Å resolution by developing a novel cryo-EM image reconstruction algorithm. In contrast to the crystal structures of GTP-bound tubulin relatives such as γ-tubulin and bacterial tubulins, significant changes were detected between GMPCPP and GDP-taxol microtubules at the contacts between tubulins both along the protofilament and between neighboring protofilaments, contributing to the stability of the microtubule. These findings are consistent with the structural plasticity or lattice model and suggest the structural basis not only for the regulatory mechanism of microtubule dynamics but also for the recognition of the nucleotide state of the microtubule by several microtubule-binding proteins, such as EB1 or kinesin. PMID:22851320

  6. Effect of microtubule-associated protein tau in dynamics of single-headed motor proteins KIF1A

    CERN Document Server

    Sparacino, J; Lamberti, P W

    2013-01-01

    Intracellular transport based on molecular motors and its regulation are crucial to the functioning of cells. Filamentary tracks of the cells are abundantly decorated with non-motile microtubule-associated proteins, such as tau. Motivated by experiments on kinesin-tau interactions [Dixit et al. Science 319, 1086 (2008)] we developed a stochastic model of interacting single-headed motor proteins KIF1A that also takes into account the interactions between motor proteins and tau molecules. Our model reproduce experimental observations and predicts significant effects of tau on bound time and run length which suggest an important role of tau in regulation of kinesin-based transport.

  7. Dendrites differ from axons in patterns of microtubule stability and polymerization during development

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    Butts Matthew

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dendrites differ from axons in patterns of growth and development, as well as in morphology. Given that microtubules are key structural elements in cells, we assessed patterns of microtubule stability and polymerization during hippocampal neuron development in vitro to determine if these aspects of microtubule organization could distinguish axons from dendrites. Results Quantitative ratiometric immunocytochemistry identified significant differences in microtubule stability between axons and dendrites. Most notably, regardless of developmental stage, there were high levels of dynamic microtubules throughout the dendritic arbor, whereas dynamic microtubules were predominantly concentrated in the distal end of axons. Analysis of microtubule polymerization using green fluorescent protein-tagged EB1 showed both developmental and regional differences in microtubule polymerization between axons and dendrites. Early in development (for example, 1 to 2 days in vitro, polymerization events were distributed equally in both the anterograde and retrograde directions throughout the length of both axons and dendrites. As development progressed, however, polymerization became biased, with a greater number of polymerization events in distal than in proximal and middle regions. While polymerization occurred almost exclusively in the anterograde direction for axons, both anterograde and retrograde polymerization was observed in dendrites. This is in agreement with predicted differences in microtubule polarity within these compartments, although fewer retrograde events were observed in dendrites than expected. Conclusion Both immunocytochemical and live imaging analyses showed that newly formed microtubules predominated at the distal end of axons and dendrites, suggesting a common mechanism that incorporates increased microtubule polymerization at growing process tips. Dendrites had more immature, dynamic microtubules throughout the entire arbor

  8. Microtubule-Dependent Mitochondria Alignment Regulates Calcium Release in Response to Nanomechanical Stimulus in Heart Myocytes

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    Michele Miragoli

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Arrhythmogenesis during heart failure is a major clinical problem. Regional electrical gradients produce arrhythmias, and cellular ionic transmembrane gradients are its originators. We investigated whether the nanoscale mechanosensitive properties of cardiomyocytes from failing hearts have a bearing upon the initiation of abnormal electrical activity. Hydrojets through a nanopipette indent specific locations on the sarcolemma and initiate intracellular calcium release in both healthy and heart failure cardiomyocytes, as well as in human failing cardiomyocytes. In healthy cells, calcium is locally confined, whereas in failing cardiomyocytes, calcium propagates. Heart failure progressively stiffens the membrane and displaces sub-sarcolemmal mitochondria. Colchicine in healthy cells mimics the failing condition by stiffening the cells, disrupting microtubules, shifting mitochondria, and causing calcium release. Uncoupling the mitochondrial proton gradient abolished calcium initiation in both failing and colchicine-treated cells. We propose the disruption of microtubule-dependent mitochondrial mechanosensor microdomains as a mechanism for abnormal calcium release in failing heart.

  9. Formation of orthopoxvirus cytoplasmic A-type inclusion bodies and embedding of virions are dynamic processes requiring microtubules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Amanda R; Moss, Bernard

    2012-05-01

    In cells infected with some orthopoxviruses, numerous mature virions (MVs) become embedded within large, cytoplasmic A-type inclusions (ATIs) that can protect infectivity after cell lysis. ATIs are composed of an abundant viral protein called ATIp, which is truncated in orthopoxviruses such as vaccinia virus (VACV) that do not form ATIs. To study ATI formation and occlusion of MVs within ATIs, we used recombinant VACVs that express the cowpox full-length ATIp or we transfected plasmids encoding ATIp into cells infected with VACV, enabling ATI formation. ATI enlargement and MV embedment required continued protein synthesis and an intact microtubular network. For live imaging of ATIs and MVs, plasmids expressing mCherry fluorescent protein fused to ATIp were transfected into cells infected with VACV expressing the viral core protein A4 fused to yellow fluorescent protein. ATIs appeared as dynamic, mobile bodies that enlarged by multiple coalescence events, which could be prevented by disrupting microtubules. Coalescence of ATIs was confirmed in cells infected with cowpox virus. MVs were predominantly at the periphery of ATIs early in infection. We determined that coalescence contributed to the distribution of MVs within ATIs and that microtubule-disrupting drugs abrogated coalescence-mediated MV embedment. In addition, MVs were shown to move from viral factories at speeds consistent with microtubular transport to the peripheries of ATIs, whereas disruption of microtubules prevented such trafficking. The data indicate an important role for microtubules in the coalescence of ATIs into larger structures, transport of MVs to ATIs, and embedment of MVs within the ATI matrix.

  10. Wood cell-wall structure requires local 2D-microtubule disassembly by a novel plasma membrane-anchored protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oda, Yoshihisa; Iida, Yuki; Kondo, Yuki; Fukuda, Hiroo

    2010-07-13

    Plant cells have evolved cortical microtubules, in a two-dimensional space beneath the plasma membrane, that regulate patterning of cellulose deposition. Although recent studies have revealed that several microtubule-associated proteins facilitate self-organization of transverse cortical microtubules, it is still unknown how diverse patterns of cortical microtubules are organized in different xylem cells, which are the major components of wood. Using our newly established in vitro xylem cell differentiation system, we found that a novel microtubule end-tracking protein, microtubule depletion domain 1 (MIDD1), was anchored to distinct plasma membrane domains and promoted local microtubule disassembly, resulting in pits on xylem cell walls. The introduction of RNA interference for MIDD1 resulted in the failure of local microtubule depletion and the formation of secondary walls without pits. Conversely, the overexpression of MIDD1 reduced microtubule density. MIDD1 has two coiled-coil domains for the binding to microtubules and for the anchorage to plasma membrane domains, respectively. Combination of the two coils caused end tracking of microtubules during shrinkage and suppressed their rescue events. Our results indicate that MIDD1 integrates spatial information in the plasma membrane with cortical microtubule dynamics for determining xylem cell wall pattern. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. RhoA Regulates Peroxisome Association to Microtubules and the Actin Cytoskeleton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lay, Dorothee; Wiese, Sebastian; Meyer, Helmut E.; Warscheid, Bettina; Saffrich, Rainer; Peränen, Johan; Gorgas, Karin; Just, Wilhelm W.

    2010-01-01

    The current view of peroxisome inheritance provides for the formation of new peroxisomes by both budding from the endoplasmic reticulum and autonomous division. Here we investigate peroxisome-cytoskeleton interactions and show by proteomics, biochemical and immunofluorescence analyses that actin, non-muscle myosin IIA (NMM IIA), RhoA, Rho kinase II (ROCKII) and Rab8 associate with peroxisomes. Our data provide evidence that (i) RhoA in its inactive state, maintained for example by C. botulinum toxin exoenzyme C3, dissociates from peroxisomes enabling microtubule-based peroxisomal movements and (ii) dominant-active RhoA targets to peroxisomes, uncouples the organelles from microtubules and favors Rho kinase recruitment to peroxisomes. We suggest that ROCKII activates NMM IIA mediating local peroxisomal constrictions. Although our understanding of peroxisome-cytoskeleton interactions is still incomplete, a picture is emerging demonstrating alternate RhoA-dependent association of peroxisomes to the microtubular and actin cytoskeleton. Whereas association of peroxisomes to microtubules clearly serves bidirectional, long-range saltatory movements, peroxisome-acto-myosin interactions may support biogenetic functions balancing peroxisome size, shape, number, and clustering. PMID:21079737

  12. Dynamic behavior of GFP-CLIP-170 reveals fast protein turnover on microtubule plus ends.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K.A. Drägestein (Katharina Asja); W.A. van Cappellen (Gert); J.A.J. van Haren (Jeffrey); G.D. Tsibidis (George); A.S. Akhmanova (Anna); T.A. Knoch (Tobias); F.G. Grosveld (Frank); N.J. Galjart (Niels)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractMicrotubule (MT) plus end – tracking proteins (+TIPs) specifi cally recognize the ends of growing MTs. +TIPs are involved in diverse cellular processes such as cell division, cell migration, and cell polarity. Although +TIP tracking is important for these processes, the mechanisms

  13. In vitro reconstitution of dynamic microtubules interacting with actin filament networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Preciado Lopez, M.; Huber, F.; Grigoriev, Ilya; Steinmetz, M.O.; Akhmanova, Anna; Dogterom, M.; Koenderink, G.H.

    2014-01-01

    Interactions between microtubules and actin filaments (F-actin) are essential for eukaryotic cell migration, polarization, growth, and division. Although the importance of these interactions has been long recognized, the inherent complexity of the cell interior hampers a detailed mechanistic study

  14. The peroxisomal multifunctional protein interacts with cortical microtubules in plant cells

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    Mullen Robert T

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The plant peroxisomal multifunctional protein (MFP possesses up to four enzymatic activities that are involved in catalyzing different reactions of fatty acid β-oxidation in the peroxisome matrix. In addition to these peroxisomal activities, in vitro assays revealed that rice MFP possesses microtubule- and RNA-binding activities suggesting that this protein also has important functions in the cytosol. Results We demonstrate that MFP is an authentic microtubule-binding protein, as it localized to the cortical microtubule array in vivo, in addition to its expected targeting to the peroxisome matrix. MFP does not, however, interact with the three mitotic microtubule arrays. Microtubule co-sedimentation assays of truncated versions of MFP revealed that multiple microtubule-binding domains are present on the MFP polypeptide. This indicates that these regions function together to achieve high-affinity binding of the full-length protein. Real-time imaging of a transiently expressed green fluorescent protein-MFP chimera in living plant cells illustrated that a dynamic, spatial interaction exits between peroxisomes and cortical microtubules as peroxisomes move along actin filaments or oscillate at fixed locations. Conclusion Plant MFP is associated with the cortical microtubule array, in addition to its expected localization in the peroxisome. This observation, coupled with apparent interactions that frequently occur between microtubules and peroxisomes in the cell cortex, supports the hypothesis that MFP is concentrated on microtubules in order to facilitate the regulated import of MFP into peroxisomes.

  15. Regulation of retinoschisin secretion in Weri-Rb1 cells by the F-actin and microtubule cytoskeleton.

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    Eiko Kitamura

    Full Text Available Retinoschisin is encoded by the gene responsible for X-linked retinoschisis (XLRS, an early onset macular degeneration that results in a splitting of the inner layers of the retina and severe loss in vision. Retinoschisin is predominantly expressed and secreted from photoreceptor cells as a homo-oligomer protein; it then associates with the surface of retinal cells and maintains the retina cellular architecture. Many missense mutations in the XLRS1 gene are known to cause intracellular retention of retinoschisin, indicating that the secretion process of the protein is a critical step for its normal function in the retina. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying retinoschisin's secretion remain to be fully elucidated. In this study, we investigated the role of the F-actin cytoskeleton in the secretion of retinoschisin by treating Weri-Rb1 cells, which are known to secrete retinoschisin, with cytochalasin D, jasplakinolide, Y-27632, and dibutyryl cGMP. Our results show that cytochalasin D and jasplakinolide inhibit retinoschisin secretion, whereas Y-27632 and dibutyryl cGMP enhance secretion causing F-actin alterations. We also demonstrate that high concentrations of taxol, which hyperpolymerizes microtubules, inhibit retinoschisin secretion. Our data suggest that retinoschisin secretion is regulated by the F-actin cytoskeleton, that cGMP or inhibition of ROCK alters F-actin structure enhancing the secretion, and that the microtubule cytoskeleton is also involved in this process.

  16. Regulation of Retinoschisin Secretion in Weri-Rb1 Cells by the F-Actin and Microtubule Cytoskeleton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitamura, Eiko; Gribanova, Yekaterina E.; Farber, Debora B.

    2011-01-01

    Retinoschisin is encoded by the gene responsible for X-linked retinoschisis (XLRS), an early onset macular degeneration that results in a splitting of the inner layers of the retina and severe loss in vision. Retinoschisin is predominantly expressed and secreted from photoreceptor cells as a homo-oligomer protein; it then associates with the surface of retinal cells and maintains the retina cellular architecture. Many missense mutations in the XLRS1 gene are known to cause intracellular retention of retinoschisin, indicating that the secretion process of the protein is a critical step for its normal function in the retina. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying retinoschisin's secretion remain to be fully elucidated. In this study, we investigated the role of the F-actin cytoskeleton in the secretion of retinoschisin by treating Weri-Rb1 cells, which are known to secrete retinoschisin, with cytochalasin D, jasplakinolide, Y-27632, and dibutyryl cGMP. Our results show that cytochalasin D and jasplakinolide inhibit retinoschisin secretion, whereas Y-27632 and dibutyryl cGMP enhance secretion causing F-actin alterations. We also demonstrate that high concentrations of taxol, which hyperpolymerizes microtubules, inhibit retinoschisin secretion. Our data suggest that retinoschisin secretion is regulated by the F-actin cytoskeleton, that cGMP or inhibition of ROCK alters F-actin structure enhancing the secretion, and that the microtubule cytoskeleton is also involved in this process. PMID:21738583

  17. T1R3 homomeric sweet taste receptor regulates adipogenesis through Gαs-mediated microtubules disassembly and Rho activation in 3T3-L1 cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yosuke Masubuchi

    Full Text Available We previously reported that 3T3-L1 cells express a functional sweet taste receptor possibly as a T1R3 homomer that is coupled to Gs and negatively regulates adipogenesis by a Gαs-mediated but cAMP-independent mechanism. Here, we show that stimulation of this receptor with sucralose or saccharin induced disassembly of the microtubules in 3T3-L1 preadipocytes, which was attenuated by overexpression of the dominant-negative mutant of Gαs (Gαs-G226A. In contrast, overexpression of the constitutively active mutant of Gαs (Gαs-Q227L as well as treatment with cholera toxin or isoproterenol but not with forskolin caused disassembly of the microtubules. Sweetener-induced microtubule disassembly was accompanied by activation of RhoA and Rho-associated kinase (ROCK. This was attenuated with by knockdown of GEF-H1, a microtubule-localized guanine nucleotide exchange factor for Rho GTPase. Furthermore, overexpression of the dominant-negative mutant of RhoA (RhoA-T19N blocked sweetener-induced dephosphorylation of Akt and repression of PPARγ and C/EBPα in the early phase of adipogenic differentiation. These results suggest that the T1R3 homomeric sweet taste receptor negatively regulates adipogenesis through Gαs-mediated microtubule disassembly and consequent activation of the Rho/ROCK pathway.

  18. Microtubule-Dependent Mitochondria Alignment Regulates Calcium Release in Response to Nanomechanical Stimulus in Heart Myocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miragoli, Michele; Sanchez-Alonso, Jose L; Bhargava, Anamika; Wright, Peter T; Sikkel, Markus; Schobesberger, Sophie; Diakonov, Ivan; Novak, Pavel; Castaldi, Alessandra; Cattaneo, Paola; Lyon, Alexander R; Lab, Max J; Gorelik, Julia

    2016-01-05

    Arrhythmogenesis during heart failure is a major clinical problem. Regional electrical gradients produce arrhythmias, and cellular ionic transmembrane gradients are its originators. We investigated whether the nanoscale mechanosensitive properties of cardiomyocytes from failing hearts have a bearing upon the initiation of abnormal electrical activity. Hydrojets through a nanopipette indent specific locations on the sarcolemma and initiate intracellular calcium release in both healthy and heart failure cardiomyocytes, as well as in human failing cardiomyocytes. In healthy cells, calcium is locally confined, whereas in failing cardiomyocytes, calcium propagates. Heart failure progressively stiffens the membrane and displaces sub-sarcolemmal mitochondria. Colchicine in healthy cells mimics the failing condition by stiffening the cells, disrupting microtubules, shifting mitochondria, and causing calcium release. Uncoupling the mitochondrial proton gradient abolished calcium initiation in both failing and colchicine-treated cells. We propose the disruption of microtubule-dependent mitochondrial mechanosensor microdomains as a mechanism for abnormal calcium release in failing heart. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Induction of centrosome injury, multipolar spindles and multipolar division in cultured V79 cells exposed to dimethylarsinic acid: role for microtubules in centrosome dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochi, T

    2000-11-06

    Role for microtubules in the induction of multiple microtubule organizing centers (MTOCs) and multipolar spindles by dimethylarsinic acid (DMAA), a methylated derivative of inorganic arsenics, was investigated with respect to the effects of microtubule disruption and reorganization. DMAA induced multiple signals of gamma-tubulin, a well-characterized component of MTOCs in the centrosome, in a manner specific to mitotic cells. The multiple signals of gamma-tubulin were co-localized with multipolar spindles caused by DMAA. Disruption of microtubules by nocodazole (NOZ) suppressed the appearance of centrosome injury caused by DMAA while disorganization of actin microfilaments by cytochalasin D did not. Post-treatment incubation of cells in which multiple signals of gamma-tubulin caused by DMAA had been coalesced to one or two dots by NOZ caused the reappearance of mitotic cells with multiple signals of gamma-tubulin, in conjunction with reorganization of the microtubules. These results suggest a role for microtubules in the dynamic behavior of the mitotic centrosome. DMAA induced aberrant cytokinesis, such as tripolar and quadripolar division, in a concentration-dependent manner. These results, together with the findings of earlier studies, suggest that the centrosome is the primary target for the induction of multipolar spindles by DMAA and the resultant induction of multinucleation and multipolar division.

  20. Polyamine sharing between tubulin dimers favours microtubule nucleation and elongation via facilitated diffusion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alain Mechulam

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We suggest for the first time that the action of multivalent cations on microtubule dynamics can result from facilitated diffusion of GTP-tubulin to the microtubule ends. Facilitated diffusion can promote microtubule assembly, because, upon encountering a growing nucleus or the microtubule wall, random GTP-tubulin sliding on their surfaces will increase the probability of association to the target sites (nucleation sites or MT ends. This is an original explanation for understanding the apparent discrepancy between the high rate of microtubule elongation and the low rate of tubulin association at the microtubule ends in the viscous cytoplasm. The mechanism of facilitated diffusion requires an attraction force between two tubulins, which can result from the sharing of multivalent counterions. Natural polyamines (putrescine, spermidine, and spermine are present in all living cells and are potent agents to trigger tubulin self-attraction. By using an analytical model, we analyze the implication of facilitated diffusion mediated by polyamines on nucleation and elongation of microtubules. In vitro experiments using pure tubulin indicate that the promotion of microtubule assembly by polyamines is typical of facilitated diffusion. The results presented here show that polyamines can be of particular importance for the regulation of the microtubule network in vivo and provide the basis for further investigations into the effects of facilitated diffusion on cytoskeleton dynamics.

  1. Toward Discovery of Novel Microtubule Targeting Agents: A SNAP-tag-Based High-Content Screening Assay for the Analysis of Microtubule Dynamics and Cell Cycle Progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berges, Nina; Arens, Katharina; Kreusch, Verena; Fischer, Rainer; Di Fiore, Stefano

    2017-04-01

    Microtubule targeting agents (MTAs) are used for the treatment of cancer. Novel MTAs could provide additional and beneficial therapeutic options. To improve the sensitivity and throughput of standard immunofluorescence assays for the characterization of MTAs, we used SNAP-tag technology to produce recombinant tubulin monomers. To visualize microtubule filaments, A549 cells transfected with SNAP-tubulin were stained with a membrane-permeable, SNAP-reactive dye. The treatment of SNAP-tubulin cells with stabilizing MTAs such as paclitaxel resulted in the formation of coarsely structured microtubule filaments, whereas depolymerizing MTAs such as nocodazole resulted in diffuse staining patterns in which the tubulin filaments were no longer distinguishable. By combining these components with automated microscopy and image analysis algorithms, we established a robust high-content screening assay for MTAs with a Z' factor of 0.7. Proof of principle was achieved by testing a panel of 10 substances, allowing us to identify MTAs and to distinguish between stabilizing and destabilizing modes of action. By extending the treatment of the cells from 2 to 20 h, our assay also detected abnormalities in cell cycle progression and in the formation of microtubule spindles, providing additional readouts for the discovery of new MTAs and facilitating their early identification during drug-screening campaigns.

  2. Theory of dynamic force spectroscopy for kinetochore-microtubule attachments: rupture force distribution

    CERN Document Server

    Ghanti, Dipanwita

    2016-01-01

    Application of pulling force, under force-clamp conditions, to kinetochore-microtubule attachments {\\it in-vitro} revealed a catch-bond-like behavior. In an earlier paper ({\\it Sharma et al. Phys. Biol. (2014)} the physical origin of this apparently counter-intuitive phenomenon was traced to the nature of the force-dependence of the (de-)polymerization kinetics of the microtubules. In this brief communication that work is extended to situations where the external forced is ramped up till the attachment gets ruptured. In spite of the fundamental differences in the underlying mechanisms, the trend of variation of the rupture force distribution observed in our model kinetochore-microtubule attachment with the increasing loading rate is qualitatively similar to that displayed by the catch bonds formed in some other ligand-receptor systems. Our theoretical predictions can be tested experimentally by a straightforward modification of the protocol for controlling the force in the optical trap set up that was used in...

  3. Novel Piperazine-based Compounds Inhibit Microtubule Dynamics and Sensitize Colon Cancer Cells to Tumor Necrosis Factor-induced Apoptosis*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chopra, Avijeet; Anderson, Amy; Giardina, Charles

    2014-01-01

    We recently identified a series of mitotically acting piperazine-based compounds that potently increase the sensitivity of colon cancer cells to apoptotic ligands. Here we describe a structure-activity relationship study on this compound class and identify a highly active derivative ((4-(3-chlorophenyl)piperazin-1-yl)(2-ethoxyphenyl)methanone), referred to as AK301, the activity of which is governed by the positioning of functional groups on the phenyl and benzoyl rings. AK301 induced mitotic arrest in HT29 human colon cancer cells with an ED50 of ≈115 nm. Although AK301 inhibited growth of normal lung fibroblast cells, mitotic arrest was more pronounced in the colon cancer cells (50% versus 10%). Cells arrested by AK301 showed the formation of multiple microtubule organizing centers with Aurora kinase A and γ-tubulin. Employing in vitro and in vivo assays, tubulin polymerization was found to be slowed (but not abolished) by AK301. In silico molecular docking suggests that AK301 binds to the colchicine-binding domain on β-tubulin, but in a novel orientation. Cells arrested by AK301 expressed elevated levels of TNFR1 on their surface and more readily activated caspases-8, -9, and -3 in the presence of TNF. Relative to other microtubule destabilizers, AK301 was the most active TNF-sensitizing agent and also stimulated Fas- and TRAIL-induced apoptosis. In summary, we report a new class of mitosis-targeting agents that effectively sensitizes cancer cells to apoptotic ligands. These compounds should help illuminate the role of microtubules in regulating apoptotic ligand sensitivity and may ultimately be useful for developing agents that augment the anti-cancer activities of the immune response. PMID:24338023

  4. Microtubules in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    Microtubules (MTs) are highly conserved polar polymers that are key elements of the eukaryotic cytoskeleton and are essential for various cell functions. αβ-tubulin, a heterodimer containing one structural GTP and one hydrolysable and exchangeable GTP, is the building block of MTs and is formed by the sequential action of several molecular chaperones. GTP hydrolysis in the MT lattice is mechanistically coupled with MT growth, thus giving MTs a metastable and dynamic nature. MTs adopt several distinct higher-order organizations that function in cell division and cell morphogenesis. Small molecular weight compounds that bind tubulin are used as herbicides and as research tools to investigate MT functions in plant cells. The de novo formation of MTs in cells requires conserved γ-tubulin-containing complexes and targeting/activating regulatory proteins that contribute to the geometry of MT arrays. Various MT regulators and tubulin modifications control the dynamics and organization of MTs throughout the cell cycle and in response to developmental and environmental cues. Signaling pathways that converge on the regulation of versatile MT functions are being characterized.

  5. The nphp-2 and arl-13 Genetic Modules Interact to Regulate Ciliogenesis and Ciliary Microtubule Patterning in C. elegans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warburton-Pitt, Simon R. F.; Silva, Malan; Nguyen, Ken C. Q.; Hall, David H.; Barr, Maureen M.

    2014-01-01

    Cilia are microtubule-based cellular organelles that mediate signal transduction. Cilia are organized into several structurally and functionally distinct compartments: the basal body, the transition zone (TZ), and the cilia shaft. In vertebrates, the cystoprotein Inversin localizes to a portion of the cilia shaft adjacent to the TZ, a region termed the “Inversin compartment” (InvC). The mechanisms that establish and maintain the InvC are unknown. In the roundworm C. elegans, the cilia shafts of amphid channel and phasmid sensory cilia are subdivided into two regions defined by different microtubule ultrastructure: a proximal doublet-based region adjacent to the TZ, and a distal singlet-based region. It has been suggested that C. elegans cilia also possess an InvC, similarly to mammalian primary cilia. Here we explored the biogenesis, structure, and composition of the C. elegans ciliary doublet region and InvC. We show that the InvC is conserved and distinct from the doublet region. nphp-2 (the C. elegans Inversin homolog) and the doublet region genes arl-13, klp-11, and unc-119 are redundantly required for ciliogenesis. InvC and doublet region genes can be sorted into two modules—nphp-2+klp-11 and arl-13+unc-119—which are both antagonized by the hdac-6 deacetylase. The genes of this network modulate the sizes of the NPHP-2 InvC and ARL-13 doublet region. Glutamylation, a tubulin post-translational modification, is not required for ciliary targeting of InvC and doublet region components; rather, glutamylation is modulated by nphp-2, arl-13, and unc-119. The ciliary targeting and restricted localization of NPHP-2, ARL-13, and UNC-119 does not require TZ-, doublet region, and InvC-associated genes. NPHP-2 does require its calcium binding EF hand domain for targeting to the InvC. We conclude that the C. elegans InvC is distinct from the doublet region, and that components in these two regions interact to regulate ciliogenesis via cilia placement, ciliary

  6. The ARM Domain of ARMADILLO-REPEAT KINESIN 1 is Not Required for Microtubule Catastrophe But Can Negatively Regulate NIMA-RELATED KINASE 6 in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eng, Ryan C; Halat, Laryssa S; Livingston, Samuel J; Sakai, Tatsuya; Motose, Hiroyasu; Wasteneys, Geoffrey O

    2017-08-01

    Microtubules are dynamic filaments, the assembly and disassembly of which are under precise control of various associated proteins, including motor proteins and regulatory enzymes. In Arabidopsis thaliana, two such proteins are the ARMADILLO-REPEAT KINESIN 1 (ARK1), which promotes microtubule disassembly, and the NIMA-RELATED KINASE 6 (NEK6), which has a role in organizing microtubule arrays. Previous yeast two-hybrid and in vitro pull-down assays determined that NEK6 can interact with ARK1 through the latter protein's Armadillo-repeat (ARM) cargo domain. To explore the function of the ARM domain, we generated fluorescent reporter fusion proteins to ARK1 lacking the ARM domain (ARK1ΔARM-GFP) and to the ARM domain alone (ARM-GFP). Both of these constructs strongly associated with the growing plus ends of microtubules, but only ARK1ΔARM-GFP was capable of inducing microtubule catastrophe and rescuing the ark1-1 root hair phenotype. These results indicate that neither the ARM domain nor NEK6's putative interaction with it is required for ARK1 to induce microtubule catastrophe. In further exploration of the ARK1-NEK6 relationship, we demonstrated that, despite evidence that NEK6 can phosphorylate ARK1 in vitro, the in vivo distribution and function of ARK1 were not affected by the loss of NEK6, and vice versa. Moreover, NEK6 and ARK1 were found to have overlapping but non-identical distribution on microtubules, and hormone treatments known to affect NEK6 activity did not stimulate interaction. These findings suggest that ARK1 and NEK6 function independently in microtubule dynamics and cell morphogenesis. Despite the results of this functional analysis, we found that overexpression of the ARM domain led to complete loss of NEK6 transcription, suggesting that the ARM domain might have a regulatory role in NEK6 expression. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Japanese Society of Plant Physiologists. All rights reserved. For permissions

  7. Interactive domains in the molecular chaperone human alphaB crystallin modulate microtubule assembly and disassembly.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joy G Ghosh

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Small heat shock proteins regulate microtubule assembly during cell proliferation and in response to stress through interactions that are poorly understood.Novel functions for five interactive sequences in the small heat shock protein and molecular chaperone, human alphaB crystallin, were investigated in the assembly/disassembly of microtubules and aggregation of tubulin using synthetic peptides and mutants of human alphaB crystallin.The interactive sequence (113FISREFHR(120 exposed on the surface of alphaB crystallin decreased microtubule assembly by approximately 45%. In contrast, the interactive sequences, (131LTITSSLSSDGV(142 and (156ERTIPITRE(164, corresponding to the beta8 strand and the C-terminal extension respectively, which are involved in complex formation, increased microtubule assembly by approximately 34-45%. The alphaB crystallin peptides, (113FISREFHR(120 and (156ERTIPITRE(164, inhibited microtubule disassembly by approximately 26-36%, and the peptides (113FISREFHR(120 and (131LTITSSLSSDGV(142 decreased the thermal aggregation of tubulin by approximately 42-44%. The (131LTITSSLSSDGV(142 and (156ERTIPITRE(164 peptides were more effective than the widely used anti-cancer drug, Paclitaxel, in modulating tubulinmicrotubule dynamics. Mutagenesis of these interactive sequences in wt human alphaB crystallin confirmed the effects of the alphaB crystallin peptides on microtubule assembly/disassembly and tubulin aggregation. The regulation of microtubule assembly by alphaB crystallin varied over a narrow range of concentrations. The assembly of microtubules was maximal at alphaB crystallin to tubulin molar ratios between 1:4 and 2:1, while molar ratios >2:1 inhibited microtubule assembly.Interactive sequences on the surface of human alphaB crystallin collectively modulate microtubule assembly through a dynamic subunit exchange mechanism that depends on the concentration and ratio of alphaB crystallin to tubulin. These are the first

  8. Regulation of the MEI-1/MEI-2 Microtubule-Severing Katanin Complex in Early Caenorhabditis elegans Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah M. Beard

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available After fertilization, rapid changes of the Caenorhabditis elegans cytoskeleton occur in the transition from meiosis to mitosis, requiring precise regulation. The MEI-1/MEI-2 katanin microtubule-severing complex is essential for meiotic spindle formation but must be quickly inactivated to allow for proper formation of the mitotic spindle. MEI-1/MEI-2 inactivation is dependent on multiple redundant pathways. The primary pathway employs the MEL-26 substrate adaptor for the CUL-3/cullin-based E3 ubiquitin ligase, which targets MEI-1 for proteosomal degradation. Here, we used quantitative antibody staining to measure MEI-1 levels to determine how other genes implicated in MEI-1 regulation act relative to CUL-3/MEL-26. The anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome, APC/C, the DYRK (Dual-specificity tyrosine-regulated kinase, MBK-2, and the CUL-2-based E3 ubiquitin ligase act together to degrade MEI-1, in parallel to MEL-26/CUL-3. CUL-2 is known to keep MEL-26 low during meiosis, so CUL-2 apparently changes its target from MEL-26 in meiosis to MEI-1 in mitosis. RFL-1, an activator of cullin E3 ubiquitin ligases, activates CUL-2 but not CUL-3 for MEI-1 elimination. HECD-1 (HECT/Homologous to the E6AP carboxyl terminus domain E3 ligase acts as a MEI-1 activator in meiosis but functions as an inhibitor during mitosis, without affecting levels of MEI-1 or MEI-2. Our results highlight the multiple layers of MEI-1 regulation that are required during the switch from the meiotic to mitotic modes of cell division.

  9. Taking directions: the role of microtubule-bound nucleation in the self-organization of the plant cortical array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deinum, Eva E.; Tindemans, Simon H.; Mulder, Bela M.

    2011-10-01

    The highly aligned cortical microtubule array of interphase plant cells is a key regulator of anisotropic cell expansion. Recent computational and analytical work has shown that the non-equilibrium self-organization of this structure can be understood on the basis of experimentally observed collisional interactions between dynamic microtubules attached to the plasma membrane. Most of these approaches assumed that new microtubules are homogeneously and isotropically nucleated on the cortical surface. Experimental evidence, however, shows that nucleation mostly occurs from other microtubules and under specific relative angles. Here, we investigate the impact of directed microtubule-bound nucleations on the alignment process using computer simulations. The results show that microtubule-bound nucleations can increase the degree of alignment achieved, decrease the timescale of the ordering process and widen the regime of dynamic parameters for which the system can self-organize. We establish that the major determinant of this effect is the degree of co-alignment of the nucleations with the parent microtubule. The specific role of sideways branching nucleations appears to allow stronger alignment while maintaining a measure of overall spatial homogeneity. Finally, we investigate the suggestion that observed persistent rotation of microtubule domains can be explained through a handedness bias in microtubule-bound nucleations, showing that this is possible only for an extreme bias and over a limited range of parameters.

  10. LGN Directs Interphase Endothelial Cell Behavior via the Microtubule Network.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine E Wright

    Full Text Available Angiogenic sprouts require coordination of endothelial cell (EC behaviors as they extend and branch. Microtubules influence behaviors such as cell migration and cell-cell interactions via regulated growth and shrinkage. Here we investigated the role of the mitotic polarity protein LGN in EC behaviors and sprouting angiogenesis. Surprisingly, reduced levels of LGN did not affect oriented division of EC within a sprout, but knockdown perturbed overall sprouting. At the cell level, LGN knockdown compromised cell-cell adhesion and migration. EC with reduced LGN levels also showed enhanced growth and stabilization of microtubules that correlated with perturbed migration. These results fit a model whereby LGN influences interphase microtubule dynamics in endothelial cells to regulate migration, cell adhesion, and sprout extension, and reveal a novel non-mitotic role for LGN in sprouting angiogenesis.

  11. A ROP2-RIC1 pathway fine-tunes microtubule reorganization for salt tolerance in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Changjiang; Lu, Hanmei; Li, Wei; Yuan, Ming; Fu, Ying

    2017-07-01

    The reorganization of microtubules induced by salt stress is required for Arabidopsis survival under high salinity conditions. RIC1 is an effector of Rho-related GTPase from plants (ROPs) and a known microtubule-associated protein. In this study, we demonstrated that RIC1 expression decreased with long-term NaCl treatment, and ric1-1 seedlings exhibited a higher survival rate under salt stress. We found that RIC1 reduced the frequency of microtubule transition from shortening to growing status and knockout of RIC1 improved the reassembly of depolymerized microtubules caused by either oryzalin treatment or salt stress. Further investigation showed that constitutively active ROP2 promoted the reassembly of microtubules and the survival of seedlings under salt stress. A rop2-1 ric1-1 double mutant rescued the salt-sensitive phenotype of rop2-1, indicating that ROP2 functions in salt tolerance through RIC1. Although ROP2 did not regulate RIC1 expression upon salt stress, a quick but mild increase of ROP2 activity was induced, led to reduction of RIC1 on microtubules. Collectively, our study reveals an ROP2-RIC1 pathway that fine-tunes microtubule dynamics in response to salt stress in Arabidopsis. This finding not only reveals a new regulatory mechanism for microtubule reorganization under salt stress but also the importance of ROP signalling for salinity tolerance. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Cell cycle-dependent microtubule-based dynamic transport of cytoplasmic dynein in mammalian cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takuya Kobayashi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cytoplasmic dynein complex is a large multi-subunit microtubule (MT-associated molecular motor involved in various cellular functions including organelle positioning, vesicle transport and cell division. However, regulatory mechanism of the cell-cycle dependent distribution of dynein has not fully been understood. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we report live-cell imaging of cytoplasmic dynein in HeLa cells, by expressing multifunctional green fluorescent protein (mfGFP-tagged 74-kDa intermediate chain (IC74. IC74-mfGFP was successfully incorporated into functional dynein complex. In interphase, dynein moved bi-directionally along with MTs, which might carry cargos such as transport vesicles. A substantial fraction of dynein moved toward cell periphery together with EB1, a member of MT plus end-tracking proteins (+TIPs, suggesting +TIPs-mediated transport of dynein. In late-interphase and prophase, dynein was localized at the centrosomes and the radial MT array. In prometaphase and metaphase, dynein was localized at spindle MTs where it frequently moved from spindle poles toward chromosomes or cell cortex. +TIPs may be involved in the transport of spindle dyneins. Possible kinetochore and cortical dyneins were also observed. CONCLUSIONS AND SIGNIFICANCE: These findings suggest that cytoplasmic dynein is transported to the site of action in preparation for the following cellular events, primarily by the MT-based transport. The MT-based transport may have greater advantage than simple diffusion of soluble dynein in rapid and efficient transport of the limited concentration of the protein.

  13. Optomechanical proposal for monitoring microtubule mechanical vibrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barzanjeh, Sh.; Salari, V.; Tuszynski, J. A.; Cifra, M.; Simon, C.

    2017-07-01

    Microtubules provide the mechanical force required for chromosome separation during mitosis. However, little is known about the dynamic (high-frequency) mechanical properties of microtubules. Here, we theoretically propose to control the vibrations of a doubly clamped microtubule by tip electrodes and to detect its motion via the optomechanical coupling between the vibrational modes of the microtubule and an optical cavity. In the presence of a red-detuned strong pump laser, this coupling leads to optomechanical-induced transparency of an optical probe field, which can be detected with state-of-the art technology. The center frequency and line width of the transparency peak give the resonance frequency and damping rate of the microtubule, respectively, while the height of the peak reveals information about the microtubule-cavity field coupling. Our method opens the new possibilities to gain information about the physical properties of microtubules, which will enhance our capability to design physical cancer treatment protocols as alternatives to chemotherapeutic drugs.

  14. 6α-Acetoxyanopterine: A Novel Structure Class of Mitotic Inhibitor Disrupting Microtubule Dynamics in Prostate Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levrier, Claire; Sadowski, Martin C; Rockstroh, Anja; Gabrielli, Brian; Kavallaris, Maria; Lehman, Melanie; Davis, Rohan A; Nelson, Colleen C

    2017-01-01

    The lack of a cure for metastatic castrate-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) highlights the urgent need for more efficient drugs to fight this disease. Here, we report the mechanism of action of the natural product 6α-acetoxyanopterine (6-AA) in prostate cancer cells. At low nanomolar doses, this potent cytotoxic alkaloid from the Australian endemic tree Anopterus macleayanus induced a strong accumulation of LNCaP and PC-3 (prostate cancer) cells as well as HeLa (cervical cancer) cells in mitosis, severe mitotic spindle defects, and asymmetric cell divisions, ultimately leading to mitotic catastrophe accompanied by cell death through apoptosis. DNA microarray of 6-AA-treated LNCaP cells combined with pathway analysis identified very similar transcriptional changes when compared with the anticancer drug vinblastine, which included pathways involved in mitosis, microtubule spindle organization, and microtubule binding. Like vinblastine, 6-AA inhibited microtubule polymerization in a cell-free system and reduced cellular microtubule polymer mass. Yet, microtubule alterations that are associated with resistance to microtubule-destabilizing drugs like vinca alkaloids (vinblastine/vincristine) or 2-methoxyestradiol did not confer resistance to 6-AA, suggesting a different mechanism of microtubule interaction. 6-AA is a first-in-class microtubule inhibitor that features the unique anopterine scaffold. This study provides a strong rationale to further develop this novel structure class of microtubule inhibitor for the treatment of malignant disease. Mol Cancer Ther; 16(1); 3-15. ©2016 AACR. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  15. Kinetic suppression of microtubule dynamic instability by griseofulvin: Implications for its possible use in the treatment of cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panda, Dulal; Rathinasamy, K.; Santra, Manas K.; Wilson, Leslie

    2005-01-01

    The antifungal drug griseofulvin inhibits mitosis strongly in fungal cells and weakly in mammalian cells by affecting mitotic spindle microtubule (MT) function. Griseofulvin also blocks cell-cycle progression at G2/M and induces apoptosis in human tumor cell lines. Despite extensive study, the mechanism by which the drug inhibits mitosis in human cells remains unclear. Here, we analyzed the ability of griseofulvin to inhibit cell proliferation and mitosis and to affect MT polymerization and organization in HeLa cells together with its ability to affect MT polymerization and dynamic instability in vitro. Griseofulvin inhibited cell-cycle progression at prometaphase/anaphase of mitosis in parallel with its ability to inhibit cell proliferation. At its mitotic IC50 of 20 μM, spindles in blocked cells displayed nearly normal quantities of MTs and MT organization similar to spindles blocked by more powerful MT-targeted drugs. Similar to previously published data, we found that very high concentrations of griseofulvin (>100 μM) were required to inhibit MT polymerization in vitro. However, much lower drug concentrations (1–20 μM) strongly suppressed the dynamic instability behavior of the MTs. We suggest that the primary mechanism by which griseofulvin inhibits mitosis in human cells is by suppressing spindle MT dynamics in a manner qualitatively similar to that of much more powerful antimitotic drugs, including the vinca alkaloids and the taxanes. In view of griseofulvin's lack of significant toxicity in humans, we further suggest that it could be useful as an adjuvant in combination with more powerful drugs for the treatment of cancer. PMID:15985553

  16. Models for microtubule cargo transport coupling the Langevin equation to stochastic stepping motor dynamics: Caring about fluctuations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouzat, Sebastián

    2016-01-01

    One-dimensional models coupling a Langevin equation for the cargo position to stochastic stepping dynamics for the motors constitute a relevant framework for analyzing multiple-motor microtubule transport. In this work we explore the consistence of these models focusing on the effects of the thermal noise. We study how to define consistent stepping and detachment rates for the motors as functions of the local forces acting on them in such a way that the cargo velocity and run-time match previously specified functions of the external load, which are set on the base of experimental results. We show that due to the influence of the thermal fluctuations this is not a trivial problem, even for the single-motor case. As a solution, we propose a motor stepping dynamics which considers memory on the motor force. This model leads to better results for single-motor transport than the approaches previously considered in the literature. Moreover, it gives a much better prediction for the stall force of the two-motor case, highly compatible with the experimental findings. We also analyze the fast fluctuations of the cargo position and the influence of the viscosity, comparing the proposed model to the standard one, and we show how the differences on the single-motor dynamics propagate to the multiple motor situations. Finally, we find that the one-dimensional character of the models impede an appropriate description of the fast fluctuations of the cargo position at small loads. We show how this problem can be solved by considering two-dimensional models.

  17. Katanin: A Sword Cutting Microtubules for Cellular, Developmental, and Physiological Purposes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luptovčiak, Ivan; Komis, George; Takáč, Tomáš; Ovečka, Miroslav; Šamaj, Jozef

    2017-01-01

    KATANIN is a well-studied microtubule severing protein affecting microtubule organization and dynamic properties in higher plants. By regulating mitotic and cytokinetic and cortical microtubule arrays it is involved in the progression of cell division and cell division plane orientation. KATANIN is also involved in cell elongation and morphogenesis during plant growth. In this way KATANIN plays critical roles in diverse plant developmental processes including the development of pollen, embryo, seed, meristem, root, hypocotyl, cotyledon, leaf, shoot, and silique. KATANIN-dependent microtubule regulation seems to be under the control of plant hormones. This minireview provides an overview on available KATANIN mutants and discusses advances in our understanding of KATANIN biological roles in plants.

  18. Katanin: A Sword Cutting Microtubules for Cellular, Developmental, and Physiological Purposes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Luptovčiak

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available KATANIN is a well-studied microtubule severing protein affecting microtubule organization and dynamic properties in higher plants. By regulating mitotic and cytokinetic and cortical microtubule arrays it is involved in the progression of cell division and cell division plane orientation. KATANIN is also involved in cell elongation and morphogenesis during plant growth. In this way KATANIN plays critical roles in diverse plant developmental processes including the development of pollen, embryo, seed, meristem, root, hypocotyl, cotyledon, leaf, shoot, and silique. KATANIN-dependent microtubule regulation seems to be under the control of plant hormones. This minireview provides an overview on available KATANIN mutants and discusses advances in our understanding of KATANIN biological roles in plants.

  19. The Norovirus NS3 Protein Is a Dynamic Lipid- and Microtubule-Associated Protein Involved in Viral RNA Replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotton, Ben T; Hyde, Jennifer L; Sarvestani, Soroush T; Sosnovtsev, Stanislav V; Green, Kim Y; White, Peter A; Mackenzie, Jason M

    2017-02-01

    Norovirus (NoV) infections are a significant health burden to society, yet the lack of reliable tissue culture systems has hampered the development of appropriate antiviral therapies. Here we show that the NoV NS3 protein, derived from murine NoV (MNV), is intimately associated with the MNV replication complex and the viral replication intermediate double-stranded RNA (dsRNA). We observed that when expressed individually, MNV NS3 and NS3 encoded by human Norwalk virus (NV) induced the formation of distinct vesicle-like structures that did not colocalize with any particular protein markers to cellular organelles but localized to cellular membranes, in particular those with a high cholesterol content. Both proteins also showed some degree of colocalization with the cytoskeleton marker β-tubulin. Although the distribution of MNV and NV NS3s were similar, NV NS3 displayed a higher level of colocalization with the Golgi apparatus and the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). However, we observed that although both proteins colocalized in membranes counterstained with filipin, an indicator of cholesterol content, MNV NS3 displayed a greater association with flotillin and stomatin, proteins known to associate with sphingolipid- and cholesterol-rich microdomains. Utilizing time-lapse epifluorescence microscopy, we observed that the membrane-derived vesicular structures induced by MNV NS3 were highly motile and dynamic in nature, and their movement was dependent on intact microtubules. These results begin to interrogate the functions of NoV proteins during virus replication and highlight the conserved properties of the NoV NS3 proteins among the seven Norovirus genogroups. Many mechanisms involved in the replication of norovirus still remain unclear, including the role for the NS3 protein, one of seven nonstructural viral proteins, which remains to be elucidated. This study reveals that murine norovirus (MNV) NS3 is intimately associated with the viral replication complex and ds

  20. Microtubule Regulation of Kv7 Channels Orchestrates cAMP-Mediated Vasorelaxations in Rat Arterial Smooth Muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindman, Johanna; Khammy, Makhala M; Lundegaard, Pia R

    2018-01-01

    of this pathway in vascular smooth muscle cells, we investigated the role of microtubule stability on β-adrenoceptor signaling in rat renal and mesenteric arteries. In isometric tension experiments, incubation with the microtubule inhibitors colchicine and nocodazole enhanced isoprenaline-mediated relaxations...... of renal and mesenteric arteries that the microtubule stabilizer, paclitaxel, prevented. Sharp microelectrode experiments showed that colchicine treatment caused increased hyperpolarization of mesenteric artery segments in response to isoprenaline. Application of the Kv7 channel blocker, XE991, attenuated...... the effect of colchicine on isoprenaline relaxations, whereas iberiotoxin-a BKCa channel blocker-had no effect. In addition, colchicine improved the relaxations to the Kv7.2 to 7.5 activator, S-1, in both renal and mesenteric artery segments compared with dimethyl sulfoxide incubation. We determined...

  1. C-terminal region of MAP7 domain containing protein 3 (MAP7D3 promotes microtubule polymerization by binding at the C-terminal tail of tubulin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saroj Yadav

    Full Text Available MAP7 domain containing protein 3 (MAP7D3, a newly identified microtubule associated protein, has been shown to promote microtubule assembly and stability. Its microtubule binding region has been reported to consist of two coiled coil motifs located at the N-terminus. It possesses a MAP7 domain near the C-terminus and belongs to the microtubule associated protein 7 (MAP7 family. The MAP7 domain of MAP7 protein has been shown to bind to kinesin-1; however, the role of MAP7 domain in MAP7D3 remains unknown. Based on the bioinformatics analysis of MAP7D3, we hypothesized that the MAP7 domain of MAP7D3 may have microtubule binding activity. Indeed, we found that MAP7 domain of MAP7D3 bound to microtubules as well as enhanced the assembly of microtubules in vitro. Interestingly, a longer fragment MDCT that contained the MAP7 domain (MD with the C-terminal tail (CT of the protein promoted microtubule polymerization to a greater extent than MD and CT individually. MDCT stabilized microtubules against dilution induced disassembly. MDCT bound to reconstituted microtubules with an apparent dissociation constant of 3.0 ± 0.5 µM. An immunostaining experiment showed that MDCT localized along the length of the preassembled microtubules. Competition experiments with tau indicated that MDCT shares its binding site on microtubules with tau. Further, we present evidence indicating that MDCT binds to the C-terminal tail of tubulin. In addition, MDCT could bind to tubulin in HeLa cell extract. Here, we report a microtubule binding region in the C-terminal region of MAP7D3 that may have a role in regulating microtubule assembly dynamics.

  2. External electric field effects on the mechanical properties of the αβ-tubulin dimer of microtubules: a molecular dynamics study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saeidi, H R; Lohrasebi, A; Mahnam, K

    2014-08-01

    The mechanical properties of the αβ-tubulin dimer of microtubules was modeled by using the molecular dynamics (MD) simulation method. The effect on the mechanical properties of the dimer of the existence and nonexistence of an applied electric field, either constant or periodic, was studied. Since there are charged or polar groups in the dimer structure, the electric field can interact with the dimer. The elastic constant and Young's modulus of the dimer were decreased when the dimer was exposed to a constant electric field of 0.03 V/nm. Furthermore, applying an oscillating electric field in the 1 GHz range to the dimer increased the elastic constant and Young's modulus of the dimer. These parameters were related to dimer rigidity and, consequently, in this frequency range, the application of electric fields may affect the function of microtubules.

  3. Helicobacter pylori-induced changes in microtubule dynamics conferred by α-tubulin phosphorylation on Ser/Tyr mediate gastric mucosal secretion of matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) and its modulation by ghrelin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slomiany, B L; Slomiany, A

    2016-10-01

    Regulation of matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) secretion in response to proinflammatory challenge remains under a strict control of factors that affect the stability dynamics of the major cytoskeleton polymeric structures, microtubules (MTs). In this study, we report that H. pylori LPS-elicited induction gastric mucosal MMP-9 secretion is accompanied by the enhancement in MT stabilization as evidenced by the increase in α-tubulin acetylation and detyrosination while the modulatory influence of hormone, ghrelin, is associated with MT destabilization and reflected in a decrease in α-tubulin acetylation and detyrosination. Further, we reveal that the LPS-induced enhancement in MT stabilization and up-regulation in MMP-9 secretion as well as the modulatory influence of ghrelin occur with the involvement of PKCδ and SFK. The LPS effect is reflected in a marked increase in PKCδ-mediated α-tubulin phosphorylation on Ser, while the modulatory effect of ghrelin on MT dynamics and MMP-9 secretion is manifested by the SFK-dependent phosphorylation of α-tubulin on Tyr. Moreover, the changes in α-tubulin phosphorylation and MT stabilization dynamics occur in concert with the Golgi recruitment and activation of PKD2 and Arf-GEF. The findings demonstrate that the enhancement in gastric mucosal MMP-9 secretion in response to H. pylori and its modulation by ghrelin are the result of changes in MT dynamics conferred by PKCδ/SFK- mediated α-tubulin Ser/Tyr phosphorylation.

  4. Modeling microtubule oscillations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jobs, E.; Wolf, D.E.; Flyvbjerg, H.

    1997-01-01

    Synchronization of molecular reactions in a macroscopic volume may cause the volume's physical properties to change dynamically and thus reveal much about the reactions. As an example, experimental time series for so-called microtubule oscillations are analyzed in terms of a minimal model...... for this complex polymerization-depolymerization cycle. The model reproduces well the qualitatively different time series that result from different experimental conditions, and illuminates the role and importance of individual processes in the cycle. Simple experiments are suggested that can further test...... and define the model and the polymer's reaction cycle....

  5. Proteomic Analysis of Brassica Stigmatic Proteins Following the Self-incompatibility Reaction Reveals a Role for Microtubule Dynamics During Pollen Responses*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuel, Marcus A.; Tang, Wenqiang; Jamshed, Muhammad; Northey, Julian; Patel, Darshan; Smith, Daryl; Siu, K. W. Michael; Muench, Douglas G.; Wang, Zhi-Yong; Goring, Daphne R.

    2011-01-01

    Mate selection and maintenance of genetic diversity is crucial to successful reproduction and species survival. Plants utilize self-incompatibility system as a genetic barrier to prevent self pollen from developing on the pistil, leading to hybrid vigor and diversity. In Brassica (canola, kale, and broccoli), an allele-specific interaction between the pollen SCR/SP11 (S-locus cysteine rich protein/S locus protein 11) and the pistil S Receptor Kinase, results in the activation of SRK which recruits the Arm Repeat Containing 1 (ARC1) E3 ligase to the proteasome. The targets of Arm Repeat Containing 1 are proposed to be compatibility factors, which when targeted for degradation by Arm Repeat Containing 1 results in pollen rejection. Despite the fact that protein degradation is predicted to be important for successful self-pollen rejection, the identity of the various proteins whose abundance is altered by the SI pathway has remained unknown. To identify potential candidate proteins regulated by the SI response, we have used the two-dimensional difference gel electrophoresis analysis, coupled with matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization/time of flight/MS. We identified 56 differential protein spots with 19 unique candidate proteins whose abundance is down-regulated following self-incompatible pollinations. The identified differentials are predicted to function in various pathways including biosynthetic pathways, signaling, cytoskeletal organization, and exocytosis. From the 19 unique proteins identified, we investigated the role of tubulin and the microtubule network during both self-incompatible and compatible pollen responses. Moderate changes in the microtubule network were observed with self-incompatible pollinations; however, a more distinct localized break-down of the microtubule network was observed during compatible pollinations, that is likely mediated by EXO70A1, leading to successful pollination. PMID:21890472

  6. Proteomic analysis of Brassica stigmatic proteins following the self-incompatibility reaction reveals a role for microtubule dynamics during pollen responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuel, Marcus A; Tang, Wenqiang; Jamshed, Muhammad; Northey, Julian; Patel, Darshan; Smith, Daryl; Siu, K W Michael; Muench, Douglas G; Wang, Zhi-Yong; Goring, Daphne R

    2011-12-01

    Mate selection and maintenance of genetic diversity is crucial to successful reproduction and species survival. Plants utilize self-incompatibility system as a genetic barrier to prevent self pollen from developing on the pistil, leading to hybrid vigor and diversity. In Brassica (canola, kale, and broccoli), an allele-specific interaction between the pollen SCR/SP11 (S-locus cysteine rich protein/S locus protein 11) and the pistil S Receptor Kinase, results in the activation of SRK which recruits the Arm Repeat Containing 1 (ARC1) E3 ligase to the proteasome. The targets of Arm Repeat Containing 1 are proposed to be compatibility factors, which when targeted for degradation by Arm Repeat Containing 1 results in pollen rejection. Despite the fact that protein degradation is predicted to be important for successful self-pollen rejection, the identity of the various proteins whose abundance is altered by the SI pathway has remained unknown. To identify potential candidate proteins regulated by the SI response, we have used the two-dimensional difference gel electrophoresis analysis, coupled with matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization/time of flight/MS. We identified 56 differential protein spots with 19 unique candidate proteins whose abundance is down-regulated following self-incompatible pollinations. The identified differentials are predicted to function in various pathways including biosynthetic pathways, signaling, cytoskeletal organization, and exocytosis. From the 19 unique proteins identified, we investigated the role of tubulin and the microtubule network during both self-incompatible and compatible pollen responses. Moderate changes in the microtubule network were observed with self-incompatible pollinations; however, a more distinct localized break-down of the microtubule network was observed during compatible pollinations, that is likely mediated by EXO70A1, leading to successful pollination.

  7. Dynein dynamics at the microtubule plus-ends and cortex during division in the C. $\\textit{elegans}$ zygote

    OpenAIRE

    Garcia, Ruddi Rodriguez; Chesneau, Laurent; Pastezeur, Sylvain; Roul, Julien; Tramier, Marc; Pécréaux, Jacques

    2017-01-01

    During asymmetric cell division, dynein generates forces, which position the spindle to reflect polarity and ensure correct daughter cell fates. The transient cortical localization of dynein raises the question of its targeting. We found that it accumulates at the microtubule plus-ends like in budding yeast, indirectly hitch-hiking on $\\text{EBP-2}^{\\text{EB1}}$ likely via dynactin. Importantly, this mechanism, which modestly accounts for cortical forces, does not transport dynein, which disp...

  8. Modulating the microtubule-tau interactions in biomotility systems by altering the chemical environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharyya, S; Kim, K; Nakazawa, H; Umetsu, M; Teizer, W

    2016-12-05

    Obstacles in microtubule mediated neuronal transport can trigger dementia. We use bio-motility assays, that simulate the neuron chemistry in axonopathy, to screen chemicals, that retain the microtubule dynamics in healthy neuronal activity. Tau protein inhibits microtubule activity and leads to oligomerization. Iron(iii) untangles, whereas mono-sodium-glutamate destabilizes the microtubule oligomer.

  9. SKI-178: A Multitargeted Inhibitor of Sphingosine Kinase and Microtubule Dynamics Demonstrating Therapeutic Efficacy in Acute Myeloid Leukemia Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hengst, Jeremy A; Dick, Taryn E; Sharma, Arati; Doi, Kenichiro; Hegde, Shailaja; Tan, Su-Fern; Geffert, Laura M; Fox, Todd E; Sharma, Arun K; Desai, Dhimant; Amin, Shantu; Kester, Mark; Loughran, Thomas P; Paulson, Robert F; Claxton, David F; Wang, Hong-Gang; Yun, Jong K

    2017-01-01

    To further characterize the selectivity, mechanism-of-action and therapeutic efficacy of the novel small molecule inhibitor, SKI-178. Using the state-of-the-art Cellular Thermal Shift Assay (CETSA) technique to detect "direct target engagement" of proteins intact cells, in vitro and in vivo assays, pharmacological assays and multiple mouse models of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Herein, we demonstrate that SKI-178 directly target engages both Sphingosine Kinase 1 and 2. We also present evidence that, in addition to its actions as a Sphingosine Kinase Inhibitor, SKI-178 functions as a microtubule network disrupting agent both in vitro and in intact cells. Interestingly, we separately demonstrate that simultaneous SphK inhibition and microtubule disruption synergistically induces apoptosis in AML cell lines. Furthermore, we demonstrate that SKI-178 is well tolerated in normal healthy mice. Most importantly, we demonstrate that SKI-178 has therapeutic efficacy in several mouse models of AML. SKI-178 is a multi-targeted agent that functions both as an inhibitor of the SphKs as well as a disruptor of the microtubule network. SKI-178 induced apoptosis arises from a synergistic interaction of these two activities. SKI-178 is safe and effective in mouse models of AML, supporting its further development as a multi-targeted anti-cancer therapeutic agent.

  10. The mitotic kinesin-14 Ncd drives directional microtubule-microtubule sliding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fink, Gero; Hajdo, Lukasz; Skowronek, Krzysztof J; Reuther, Cordula; Kasprzak, Andrzej A; Diez, Stefan

    2009-06-01

    During mitosis and meiosis, the bipolar spindle facilitates chromosome segregation through microtubule sliding as well as microtubule growth and shrinkage. Kinesin-14, one of the motors involved, causes spindle collapse in the absence of kinesin-5 (Refs 2, 3), participates in spindle assembly and modulates spindle length. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying these activities are not known. Here, we report that Drosophila melanogaster kinesin-14 (Ncd) alone causes sliding of anti-parallel microtubules but locks together (that is, statically crosslinks) those that are parallel. Using single molecule imaging we show that Ncd diffuses along microtubules in a tail-dependent manner and switches its orientation between sliding microtubules. Our results show that kinesin-14 causes sliding and expansion of an anti-parallel microtubule array by dynamic interactions through the motor domain on the one side and the tail domain on the other. This mechanism accounts for the roles of kinesin-14 in spindle organization.

  11. CSPGs inhibit axon branching by impairing mitochondria-dependent regulation of actin dynamics and axonal translation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sainath, Rajiv; Ketschek, Andrea; Grandi, Leah; Gallo, Gianluca

    2017-04-01

    Chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans (CSPGs) inhibit the formation of axon collateral branches. The regulation of the axonal cytoskeleton and mitochondria are important components of the mechanism of branching. Actin-dependent axonal plasticity, reflected in the dynamics of axonal actin patches and filopodia, is greatest along segments of the axon populated by mitochondria. It is reported that CSPGs partially depolarize the membrane potential of axonal mitochondria, which impairs the dynamics of the axonal actin cytoskeleton and decreases the formation and duration of axonal filopodia, the first steps in the mechanism of branching. The effects of CSPGs on actin cytoskeletal dynamics are specific to axon segments populated by mitochondria. In contrast, CSPGs do not affect the microtubule content of axons, or the localization of microtubules into axonal filopodia, a required step in the mechanism of branch formation. It is also reported that CSPGs decrease the mitochondria-dependent axonal translation of cortactin, an actin associated protein involved in branching. Finally, the inhibitory effects of CSPGs on axon branching, actin cytoskeletal dynamics and the axonal translation of cortactin are reversed by culturing neurons with acetyl-l-carnitine, which promotes mitochondrial respiration. Collectively these data indicate that CSPGs impair mitochondrial function in axons, an effect which contributes to the inhibition of axon branching. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Develop Neurobiol 77: 419-437, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Ringing the changes: emerging roles for DASH at the kinetochore-microtubule Interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buttrick, Graham J; Millar, Jonathan B A

    2011-04-01

    Regulated interaction between kinetochores and the mitotic spindle is essential for the fidelity of chromosome segregation. Potentially deleterious attachments are corrected during prometaphase and metaphase. Correct attachments must persist during anaphase, when spindle-generated forces separate chromosomes to opposite poles. In yeast, the heterodecameric DASH complex plays a vital pole in maintaining this link. In vitro DASH forms both oligomeric patches and rings that can form load-bearing attachments with the tips of polymerising and depolymerising microtubules. In vivo, DASH localises primarily at the kinetochore, and has a role maintaining correct attachment between spindles and chromosomes in both Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Schizosaccharomyces pombe. Recent work has begun to describe how DASH acts alongside other components of the outer kinetochore to create a dynamic, regulated kinetochore-microtubule interface. Here, we review some of the key experiments into DASH function and discuss their implications for the nature of kinetochore-microtubule attachments in yeast and other organisms.

  13. Potent antiproliferative cembrenoids accumulate in tobacco upon infection with Rhodococcus fascians and trigger unusual microtubule dynamics in human glioblastoma cells.

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    Aminata P Nacoulma

    Full Text Available AIMS: Though plant metabolic changes are known to occur during interactions with bacteria, these were rarely challenged for pharmacologically active compounds suitable for further drug development. Here, the occurrence of specific chemicals with antiproliferative activity against human cancer cell lines was evidenced in hyperplasia (leafy galls induced when plants interact with particular phytopathogens, such as the Actinomycete Rhodococcus fascians. METHODS: We examined leafy galls fraction F3.1.1 on cell proliferation, cell division and cytoskeletal disorganization of human cancer cell lines using time-lapse videomicroscopy imaging, combined with flow cytometry and immunofluorescence analysis. We determined the F3.1.1-fraction composition by gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry. RESULTS: The leafy galls induced on tobacco by R. fascians yielded fraction F3.1.1 which inhibited proliferation of glioblastoma U373 cells with an IC50 of 4.5 µg/mL, F.3.1.1 was shown to increase cell division duration, cause nuclear morphological deformations and cell enlargement, and, at higher concentrations, karyokinesis defects leading to polyploidization and apoptosis. F3.1.1 consisted of a mixture of isomers belonging to the cembrenoids. The cellular defects induced by F3.1.1 were caused by a peculiar cytoskeletal disorganization, with the occurrence of fragmented tubulin and strongly organized microtubule aggregates within the same cell. Colchicine, paclitaxel, and cembrene also affected U373 cell proliferation and karyokinesis, but the induced microtubule rearrangement was very different from that provoked by F3.1.1. Altogether our data indicate that the cembrenoid isomers in F3.1.1 have a unique mode of action and are able to simultaneously modulate microtubule polymerization and stability.

  14. Minsky and dynamic macroprudential regulation

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    Jan Kregel

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In the context of current debates about the proper form of prudential regulation and proposals for the imposition of liquidity and capital ratios, the paper examines Hyman Minsky’s work as a consultant to government agencies exploring financial regulatory reform in the 1960s. As the author explains, this often-overlooked early work, a precursor to Minsky’s “financial instability hypothesis”, serves as yet another useful guide to explaining why regulation and supervision in the lead-up to the 2008 financial crisis were flawed, and why the approach to reregulation after the crisis has been incomplete.

  15. Microtubule-associated protein tau (Mapt) is expressed in terminally differentiated odontoblasts and severely down-regulated in morphologically disturbed odontoblasts of Runx2 transgenic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyazaki, Toshihiro; Baba, Tomomi T; Mori, Masako; Moriishi, Takeshi; Komori, Toshihisa

    2015-08-01

    Runx2 is an essential transcription factor for osteoblast and odontoblast differentiation and the terminal differentiation of chondrocytes. We have previously shown that the terminal differentiation of odontoblasts is inhibited in Runx2 transgenic {Tg(Col1a1-Runx2)} mice under the control of the 2.3-kb Col1a1 promoter, which directs the transgene expression to osteoblasts and odontoblasts. Odontoblasts show severe reductions in Dspp and nestin expression and lose their characteristic polarized morphology, including a long process extending to dentin, in Tg(Col1a1-Runx2) mice. We study the molecular mechanism of odontoblast morphogenesis by comparing gene expression in the molars of wild-type and Tg(Col1a1-Runx2) mice, focusing on cytoskeleton-related genes. Using microarray, we found that the gene expression of microtubule-associated protein tau (Mapt), a neuronal phosphoprotein with important roles in neuronal biology and microtubule dynamics and assembly, was high in wild-type molars but severely reduced in Tg(Col1a1-Runx2) molars. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed that Mapt was specifically expressed in terminally differentiated odontoblasts including their processes in wild-type molars but its expression was barely detectable in Tg(Col1a1-Runx2) molars. Double-staining of Mapt and Runx2 showed their reciprocal expression in odontoblasts. Mapt and tubulin co-localized in odontoblasts in wild-type molars. Immunoelectron microscopic analysis demonstrated Mapt lying around α-tubulin-positive filamentous structures in odontoblast processes. Thus, Mapt is a useful marker for terminally differentiated odontoblasts and might play an important role in odontoblast morphogenesis.

  16. Xyloglucan Deficiency Disrupts Microtubule Stability and Cellulose Biosynthesis in Arabidopsis, Altering Cell Growth and Morphogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiao, Chaowen; Zhang, Tian; Zheng, Yunzhen; Cosgrove, Daniel J.; Anderson, Charles T.

    2015-11-02

    Xyloglucan constitutes most of the hemicellulose in eudicot primary cell walls and functions in cell wall structure and mechanics. Although Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) xxt1 xxt2 mutants lacking detectable xyloglucan are viable, they display growth defects that are suggestive of alterations in wall integrity. To probe the mechanisms underlying these defects, we analyzed cellulose arrangement, microtubule patterning and dynamics, microtubule- and wall-integrity-related gene expression, and cellulose biosynthesis in xxt1 xxt2 plants. We found that cellulose is highly aligned in xxt1 xxt2 cell walls, that its three-dimensional distribution is altered, and that microtubule patterning and stability are aberrant in etiolated xxt1 xxt2 hypocotyls. We also found that the expression levels of microtubule-associated genes, such as MAP70-5 and CLASP, and receptor genes, such as HERK1 and WAK1, were changed in xxt1 xxt2 plants and that cellulose synthase motility is reduced in xxt1 xxt2 cells, corresponding with a reduction in cellulose content. Our results indicate that loss of xyloglucan affects both the stability of the microtubule cytoskeleton and the production and patterning of cellulose in primary cell walls. These findings establish, to our knowledge, new links between wall integrity, cytoskeletal dynamics, and wall synthesis in the regulation of plant morphogenesis.

  17. An essential role for katanin p80 and microtubule severing in male gamete production.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liza O'Donnell

    Full Text Available Katanin is an evolutionarily conserved microtubule-severing complex implicated in multiple aspects of microtubule dynamics. Katanin consists of a p60 severing enzyme and a p80 regulatory subunit. The p80 subunit is thought to regulate complex targeting and severing activity, but its precise role remains elusive. In lower-order species, the katanin complex has been shown to modulate mitotic and female meiotic spindle dynamics and flagella development. The in vivo function of katanin p80 in mammals is unknown. Here we show that katanin p80 is essential for male fertility. Specifically, through an analysis of a mouse loss-of-function allele (the Taily line, we demonstrate that katanin p80, most likely in association with p60, has an essential role in male meiotic spindle assembly and dissolution and the removal of midbody microtubules and, thus, cytokinesis. Katanin p80 also controls the formation, function, and dissolution of a microtubule structure intimately involved in defining sperm head shaping and sperm tail formation, the manchette, and plays a role in the formation of axoneme microtubules. Perturbed katanin p80 function, as evidenced in the Taily mouse, results in male sterility characterized by decreased sperm production, sperm with abnormal head shape, and a virtual absence of progressive motility. Collectively these data demonstrate that katanin p80 serves an essential and evolutionarily conserved role in several aspects of male germ cell development.

  18. TIPsy tour guides: How microtubule plus-end tracking proteins (+TIPs facilitate axon guidance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth A Bearce

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The growth cone is a dynamic cytoskeletal vehicle, which drives the end of a developing axon. It serves to interpret and navigate through the complex landscape and guidance cues of the early nervous system. The growth cone’s distinctive cytoskeletal organization offers a fascinating platform to study how extracellular cues can be translated into mechanical outgrowth and turning behaviors. While many studies of cell motility highlight the importance of actin networks in signaling, adhesion, and propulsion, both seminal and emerging works in the field have highlighted a unique and necessary role for microtubules in growth cone navigation. Here, we focus on the role of singular pioneer microtubules, which extend into the growth cone periphery and are regulated by a diverse family of microtubule plus-end tracking proteins (+TIPs. These +TIPs accumulate at the dynamic ends of microtubules, where they are well-positioned to encounter and respond to key signaling events downstream of guidance receptors, catalyzing immediate changes in microtubule stability and actin cross-talk, that facilitate both axonal outgrowth and turning events.

  19. Microtubule actin crosslinking factor 1 regulates the Balbiani body and animal-vegetal polarity of the zebrafish oocyte.

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    Tripti Gupta

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Although of fundamental importance in developmental biology, the genetic basis for the symmetry breaking events that polarize the vertebrate oocyte and egg are largely unknown. In vertebrates, the first morphological asymmetry in the oocyte is the Balbiani body, a highly conserved, transient structure found in vertebrates and invertebrates including Drosophila, Xenopus, human, and mouse. We report the identification of the zebrafish magellan (mgn mutant, which exhibits a novel enlarged Balbiani body phenotype and a disruption of oocyte polarity. To determine the molecular identity of the mgn gene, we positionally cloned the gene, employing a novel DNA capture method to target region-specific genomic DNA of 600 kb for massively parallel sequencing. Using this technique, we were able to enrich for the genomic region linked to our mutation within one week and then identify the mutation in mgn using massively parallel sequencing. This is one of the first successful uses of genomic DNA enrichment combined with massively parallel sequencing to determine the molecular identity of a gene associated with a mutant phenotype. We anticipate that the combination of these technologies will have wide applicability for the efficient identification of mutant genes in all organisms. We identified the mutation in mgn as a deletion in the coding sequence of the zebrafish microtubule actin crosslinking factor 1 (macf1 gene. macf1 is a member of the highly conserved spectraplakin family of cytoskeletal linker proteins, which play diverse roles in polarized cells such as neurons, muscle cells, and epithelial cells. In mgn mutants, the oocyte nucleus is mislocalized; and the Balbiani body, localized mRNAs, and organelles are absent from the periphery of the oocyte, consistent with a function for macf1 in nuclear anchoring and cortical localization. These data provide the first evidence for a role for spectraplakins in polarization of the vertebrate oocyte and egg.

  20. Microtubule actin crosslinking factor 1 regulates the Balbiani body and animal-vegetal polarity of the zebrafish oocyte.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Tripti; Marlow, Florence L; Ferriola, Deborah; Mackiewicz, Katarzyna; Dapprich, Johannes; Monos, Dimitri; Mullins, Mary C

    2010-08-19

    Although of fundamental importance in developmental biology, the genetic basis for the symmetry breaking events that polarize the vertebrate oocyte and egg are largely unknown. In vertebrates, the first morphological asymmetry in the oocyte is the Balbiani body, a highly conserved, transient structure found in vertebrates and invertebrates including Drosophila, Xenopus, human, and mouse. We report the identification of the zebrafish magellan (mgn) mutant, which exhibits a novel enlarged Balbiani body phenotype and a disruption of oocyte polarity. To determine the molecular identity of the mgn gene, we positionally cloned the gene, employing a novel DNA capture method to target region-specific genomic DNA of 600 kb for massively parallel sequencing. Using this technique, we were able to enrich for the genomic region linked to our mutation within one week and then identify the mutation in mgn using massively parallel sequencing. This is one of the first successful uses of genomic DNA enrichment combined with massively parallel sequencing to determine the molecular identity of a gene associated with a mutant phenotype. We anticipate that the combination of these technologies will have wide applicability for the efficient identification of mutant genes in all organisms. We identified the mutation in mgn as a deletion in the coding sequence of the zebrafish microtubule actin crosslinking factor 1 (macf1) gene. macf1 is a member of the highly conserved spectraplakin family of cytoskeletal linker proteins, which play diverse roles in polarized cells such as neurons, muscle cells, and epithelial cells. In mgn mutants, the oocyte nucleus is mislocalized; and the Balbiani body, localized mRNAs, and organelles are absent from the periphery of the oocyte, consistent with a function for macf1 in nuclear anchoring and cortical localization. These data provide the first evidence for a role for spectraplakins in polarization of the vertebrate oocyte and egg.

  1. Dynamics of bacterial gene regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narang, Atul

    2009-03-01

    The phenomenon of diauxic growth is a classical problem of bacterial gene regulation. The most well studied example of this phenomenon is the glucose-lactose diauxie, which occurs because the expression of the lac operon is strongly repressed in the presence of glucose. This repression is often explained by appealing to molecular mechanisms such as cAMP activation and inducer exclusion. I will begin by analyzing data showing that these molecular mechanisms cannot explain the strong lac repression because they exert a relatively weak effect. I will then present a minimal model accounting only for enzyme induction and dilution, which yields strong repression despite the absence of catabolite repression and inducer exclusion. The model also explains the growth patterns observed in batch and continuous cultures of various bacterial strains and substrate mixtures. The talk will conclude with a discussion of the experimental evidence regarding positive feedback, the key component of the minimal model.

  2. In vivo FRET imaging revealed a regulatory role of RanGTP in kinetochore-microtubule attachments via Aurora B kinase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoke-Peng Lee

    Full Text Available Under the fluctuating circumstances provided by the innate dynamics of microtubules and opposing tensions resulted from microtubule-associated motors, it is vital to ensure stable kinetochore-microtubule attachments for accurate segregation. However, a comprehensive understanding of how this regulation is mechanistically achieved remains elusive. Using our newly designed live cell FRET time-lapse imaging, we found that post-metaphase RanGTP is crucial in the maintenance of stable kinetochore-microtubule attachments by regulating Aurora B kinase via the NES-bearing Mst1. More importantly, our study demonstrates that by ensuring stable alignment of metaphase chromosomes prior to segregation, RanGTP is indispensible in governing the genomic integrity and the fidelity of cell cycle progression. Our findings suggest an additional role of RanGTP beyond its known function in mitotic spindle assembly during the prometaphase-metaphase transition.

  3. Regulatory functions of microtubules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasiliev, J M; Samoylov, V I

    2013-01-01

    This mini-review summarizes literature and original data about the role of microtubules in interphase animal cells. Recent data have shown that functioning of microtubules is essential for such diverse phenomena as directional cell movements, distribution of organelles in the cytoplasm, and neuronal memory in the central nervous system. It is suggested that microtubules can act as an important regulatory system in eukaryotic cells. Possible mechanisms of these functions are discussed.

  4. Studies of spindle fibre function and organization using the UV microbeam: The effect of ultraviolet light in blocking myofibril contraction and chromosome movement and an investigation of spindle microtubule dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, P.J.

    1989-01-01

    The ultraviolet (UV) microbeam was used to investigate spindle organization and function. The first part of this study tested the hypothesis that the 270 and 290 nm peaks in the action spectra for stopping chromosome motion and myofibril contraction are due to effects on actin and myosin, respectively, using myofibrils as a model actomyosin system. The results suggest that both wavelengths affect myosin. It was also determined that phalloidin protects actin in vitro but not in myofibrils from depolymerization by UV light. Failure to protect actin in myofibrils is likely due to its failure to bind uniformly to the thin filaments. A second group of experiments studied the poleward motion of areas of reduced birefringence (ARBs) which are produced by UV microbeam irradiation on chromosomal fibres. The author tested the hypothesis that the poleward motion of the ARB is due to microtubule treadmilling. Studies showed that microtubules are depolymerized in the ARB and that the edges of the ARB move at different rates 50% of the time. Further, two ARBs on a single fibre do not move poleward but rather the birefringent portion in between depolymerizes. These results suggest that the ARBs do not move poleward due to microtubule treadmilling. Experiments with an antibody specific to acetylated atubulin show that kinetochore fibres in crane-fly spermatocytes contain acetylated microtubules and suggest that ARB movement is not due to microtubule polymerization at the edge of the ARB but may be due to polymerization at the kinetochore. Studies of ARBs in asters provide evidence for two populations of microtubules in asters, a dynamic and a stable one. ARBs in PtK spindles result in spindle destruction in metaphase, but generally move poleward in anaphase.

  5. Microtubules: A network for solitary waves

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    Zdravković Slobodan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present paper we deal with nonlinear dynamics of microtubules. The structure and role of microtubules in cells are explained as well as one of models explaining their dynamics. Solutions of the crucial nonlinear differential equation depend on used mathematical methods. Two commonly used procedures, continuum and semi-discrete approximations, are explained. These solutions are solitary waves usually called as kink solitons, breathers and bell-type solitons. [Project of the Serbian Ministry of Education, Science and Technological Development, Grant no. III45010

  6. LKB1 destabilizes microtubules in myoblasts and contributes to myoblast differentiation.

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    Isma Mian

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Skeletal muscle myoblast differentiation and fusion into multinucleate myotubes is associated with dramatic cytoskeletal changes. We find that microtubules in differentiated myotubes are highly stabilized, but premature microtubule stabilization blocks differentiation. Factors responsible for microtubule destabilization in myoblasts have not been identified. FINDINGS: We find that a transient decrease in microtubule stabilization early during myoblast differentiation precedes the ultimate microtubule stabilization seen in differentiated myotubes. We report a role for the serine-threonine kinase LKB1 in both microtubule destabilization and myoblast differentiation. LKB1 overexpression reduced microtubule elongation in a Nocodazole washout assay, and LKB1 RNAi increased it, showing LKB1 destabilizes microtubule assembly in myoblasts. LKB1 levels and activity increased during myoblast differentiation, along with activation of the known LKB1 substrates AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK and microtubule affinity regulating kinases (MARKs. LKB1 overexpression accelerated differentiation, whereas RNAi impaired it. CONCLUSIONS: Reduced microtubule stability precedes myoblast differentiation and the associated ultimate microtubule stabilization seen in myotubes. LKB1 plays a positive role in microtubule destabilization in myoblasts and in myoblast differentiation. This work suggests a model by which LKB1-induced microtubule destabilization facilitates the cytoskeletal changes required for differentiation. Transient destabilization of microtubules might be a useful strategy for enhancing and/or synchronizing myoblast differentiation.

  7. Multiscale modeling and simulation of microtubule-motor-protein assemblies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Tong; Blackwell, Robert; Glaser, Matthew A.; Betterton, M. D.; Shelley, Michael J.

    2015-12-01

    Microtubules and motor proteins self-organize into biologically important assemblies including the mitotic spindle and the centrosomal microtubule array. Outside of cells, microtubule-motor mixtures can form novel active liquid-crystalline materials driven out of equilibrium by adenosine triphosphate-consuming motor proteins. Microscopic motor activity causes polarity-dependent interactions between motor proteins and microtubules, but how these interactions yield larger-scale dynamical behavior such as complex flows and defect dynamics is not well understood. We develop a multiscale theory for microtubule-motor systems in which Brownian dynamics simulations of polar microtubules driven by motors are used to study microscopic organization and stresses created by motor-mediated microtubule interactions. We identify polarity-sorting and crosslink tether relaxation as two polar-specific sources of active destabilizing stress. We then develop a continuum Doi-Onsager model that captures polarity sorting and the hydrodynamic flows generated by these polar-specific active stresses. In simulations of active nematic flows on immersed surfaces, the active stresses drive turbulent flow dynamics and continuous generation and annihilation of disclination defects. The dynamics follow from two instabilities, and accounting for the immersed nature of the experiment yields unambiguous characteristic length and time scales. When turning off the hydrodynamics in the Doi-Onsager model, we capture formation of polar lanes as observed in the Brownian dynamics simulation.

  8. Multiscale modeling and simulation of microtubule-motor-protein assemblies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Tong; Blackwell, Robert; Glaser, Matthew A; Betterton, M D; Shelley, Michael J

    2015-01-01

    Microtubules and motor proteins self-organize into biologically important assemblies including the mitotic spindle and the centrosomal microtubule array. Outside of cells, microtubule-motor mixtures can form novel active liquid-crystalline materials driven out of equilibrium by adenosine triphosphate-consuming motor proteins. Microscopic motor activity causes polarity-dependent interactions between motor proteins and microtubules, but how these interactions yield larger-scale dynamical behavior such as complex flows and defect dynamics is not well understood. We develop a multiscale theory for microtubule-motor systems in which Brownian dynamics simulations of polar microtubules driven by motors are used to study microscopic organization and stresses created by motor-mediated microtubule interactions. We identify polarity-sorting and crosslink tether relaxation as two polar-specific sources of active destabilizing stress. We then develop a continuum Doi-Onsager model that captures polarity sorting and the hydrodynamic flows generated by these polar-specific active stresses. In simulations of active nematic flows on immersed surfaces, the active stresses drive turbulent flow dynamics and continuous generation and annihilation of disclination defects. The dynamics follow from two instabilities, and accounting for the immersed nature of the experiment yields unambiguous characteristic length and time scales. When turning off the hydrodynamics in the Doi-Onsager model, we capture formation of polar lanes as observed in the Brownian dynamics simulation.

  9. Microtubule Self- Assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jho, Yongseok; Choi, M. C.; Farago, O.; Kim, Mahnwon; Pincus, P. A.

    2008-03-01

    Microtubules are important structural elements for neurons. Microtubles are cylindrical pipes that are self-assembled from tubulin dimers, These structures are intimately related to the neuron transport system. Abnormal microtubule disintegration contributes to neuro-disease. For several decades, experimentalists investigated the structure of the microtubules using TEM and Cryo-EM. However, the detailed structure at a molecular level remain incompletely understood. . In this presentation, we report numerically studies of the self-assembly process using a toy model for tubulin dimers. We investigate the nature of the interactions which are essential to stabilize such the cylindrical assembly of protofilaments. We use Monte Carlo simulations to suggest the pathways for assembly and disassembly of the microtubules.

  10. Integrin-linked kinase regulates oligodendrocyte cytoskeleton, growth cone, and adhesion dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michalski, John-Paul; Cummings, Sarah E; O'Meara, Ryan W; Kothary, Rashmi

    2016-02-01

    Integrin-linked kinase (ILK), a focal adhesion protein, brokers the link between cytoskeleton, cell membrane, and extracellular environment. Here, we demonstrate a role for ILK in laminin-2-mediated adhesion in primary murine oligodendrocytes (OLs) - with ILK loss leading to severe defects in process branching and outgrowth. These defects were partially recovered when the ILK-depleted OLs were instead grown on the non-integrin-activating substrate poly-l-lysine. Intriguingly, ILK loss on the neutral poly-l-lysine substrate led to swelling at the tips of OL processes, which we identified as enlarged growth cones. Employing the bloated ILK-depleted growth cones as template, we demonstrate the appearance of distinct cytoskeletal domains within OL growth cones bearing classic neuronal growth cone architecture. Further, microtubule organization was severely perturbed following ILK loss, with centripetal microtubule looping and failure to bundle occurring in a laminin-2-independent manner. Together, our work highlights differences in specific aspects of OL biology as driven by laminin-2-dependent or independent ILK governed mechanisms. We also reinforce the idea of OLs as growth cone bearing cells and describe the neuronal-like cytoskeleton therein. Finally, we demonstrate a role for ILK in OL growth cone maturation through microtubule regulation, the loss of which translates to decreased process length and myelin production capacity. We describe herein how different substrates fundamentally alter the oligodendrocyte's response to loss of integrin-linked kinase (ILK). On laminin-2 (Ln-2), ILK-depleted oligodendrocytes appear stunted and malformed, while on the non-integrin-activating substrate PLL branching and membrane formation are restored. We also reinforce the idea of oligodendrocytes as growth cone-bearing cells, detailing the growth cone's cytoskeletal architecture. Strikingly, loss of ILK on poly-l-lysine leads to growth cone swelling, the structure's size and

  11. KIF7 Controls the Proliferation of Cells of the Respiratory Airway through Distinct Microtubule Dependent Mechanisms.

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    Garry L Coles

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The cell cycle must be tightly coordinated for proper control of embryonic development and for the long-term maintenance of organs such as the lung. There is emerging evidence that Kinesin family member 7 (Kif7 promotes Hedgehog (Hh signaling during embryonic development, and its misregulation contributes to diseases such as ciliopathies and cancer. Kif7 encodes a microtubule interacting protein that controls Hh signaling through regulation of microtubule dynamics within the primary cilium. However, whether Kif7 has a function in nonciliated cells remains largely unknown. The role Kif7 plays in basic cell biological processes like cell proliferation or cell cycle progression also remains to be elucidated. Here, we show that Kif7 is required for coordination of the cell cycle, and inactivation of this gene leads to increased cell proliferation in vivo and in vitro. Immunostaining and transmission electron microscopy experiments show that Kif7dda/dda mutant lungs are hyperproliferative and exhibit reduced alveolar epithelial cell differentiation. KIF7 depleted C3H10T1/2 fibroblasts and Kif7dda/dda mutant mouse embryonic fibroblasts have increased growth rates at high cellular densities, suggesting that Kif7 may function as a general regulator of cellular proliferation. We ascertained that in G1, Kif7 and microtubule dynamics regulate the expression and activity of several components of the cell cycle machinery known to control entry into S phase. Our data suggest that Kif7 may function to regulate the maintenance of the respiratory airway architecture by controlling cellular density, cell proliferation, and cycle exit through its role as a microtubule associated protein.

  12. Temporal dynamics and regulation of lake metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stæhr, Peter Anton; Jensen, Kaj Sand

    2007-01-01

    We studied temporal dynamics and regulation of oxygen metabolism in the upper mixed layer of a nutrientrich shallow Danish lake by continuous measurements of oxygen, irradiance, wind, and temperature and frequent measurements of algal chlorophyll, organic pools, and inorganic nutrients. Chlorophyll...... and minima from fall to spring after broad-scale changes in irradiance, temperature, mixing depth, and biomass and growth rate of the algal community and concentrations of inorganic nutrients. Lake metabolism was annually balanced (mean GPP :R 1.04 in 2003 and 1.01 in 2004), with net autotrophy occurring...... significantly reduced GPP. Normalizing GPP to chlorophyll provided an index of algal growth potential (GPPB), which followed a hyperbolic relationship to Emean, and both parameters were related to blooms and collapses of algal biomass. Metabolic rates were much more variable from day to day than algal biomass...

  13. A new identity for MLK3 as an NIMA-related, cell cycle-regulated kinase that is localized near centrosomes and influences microtubule organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swenson, Katherine I; Winkler, Katharine E; Means, Anthony R

    2003-01-01

    Although conserved counterparts for most proteins involved in the G(2)/M transition of the cell cycle have been found in all eukaryotes, a notable exception is the essential but functionally enigmatic fungal kinase NIMA. While a number of vertebrate kinases have been identified with catalytic domain homology to NIMA, none of these resemble NIMA within its extensive noncatalytic region, a region critical for NIMA function in Aspergillus nidulans. We used a bioinformatics approach to search for proteins with homology to the noncatalytic region of NIMA and identified mixed lineage kinase 3 (MLK3). MLK3 has been proposed to serve as a component in MAP kinase cascades, particularly those resulting in the activation of the c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK). Here we describe the first in-depth study of endogenous MLK3 and report that, like NIMA, MLK3 phosphorylation and activity are enhanced during G(2)/M, whereas JNK remains inactive. Coincident with the G(2)/M transition, a period marked by dramatic reorganization of the cytoplasmic microtubule network, endogenous MLK3 transiently disperses away from the centrosome and centrosomal-proximal sites where it is localized during interphase. Furthermore, when overexpressed, MLK3, like NIMA, localizes to the centrosomal region, induces profound disruption of cytoplasmic microtubules and a nuclear distortion phenotype that differs from mitotic chromosome condensation. Cellular depletion of MLK3 protein using siRNA technology results in an increased sensitivity to the microtubule-stabilizing agent taxol. Our studies suggest a new role for MLK3, separable from its function in the JNK pathway, that may contribute to promoting microtubule instability, a hallmark of M phase entry.

  14. Structural basis for CRMP2-induced axonal microtubule formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niwa, Shinsuke; Nakamura, Fumio; Tomabechi, Yuri; Aoki, Mari; Shigematsu, Hideki; Matsumoto, Takashi; Yamagata, Atsushi; Fukai, Shuya; Hirokawa, Nobutaka; Goshima, Yoshio; Shirouzu, Mikako; Nitta, Ryo

    2017-09-06

    Microtubule associated protein Collapsin response mediator protein 2 (CRMP2) regulates neuronal polarity in developing neurons through interactions with tubulins or microtubules. However, how CRMP2 promotes axonal formation by affecting microtubule behavior remains unknown. This study aimed to obtain the structural basis for CRMP2-tubulin/microtubule interaction in the course of axonogenesis. The X-ray structural studies indicated that the main interface to the soluble tubulin-dimer is the last helix H19 of CRMP2 that is distinct from the known C-terminal tail-mediated interaction with assembled microtubules. In vitro structural and functional studies also suggested that the H19-mediated interaction promoted the rapid formation of GTP-state microtubules directly, which is an important feature of the axon. Consistently, the H19 mutants disturbed axon elongation in chick neurons, and failed to authorize the structural features for axonal microtubules in Caenorhabditis elegans. Thus, CRMP2 induces effective axonal microtubule formation through H19-mediated interactions with a soluble tubulin-dimer allowing axonogenesis to proceed.

  15. Regulation and controlled synchronization for complex dynamical systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huijberts, H.J.C.; Nijmeijer, Henk; Willems, R.M.A.

    2000-01-01

    In this paper we investigate the problem of controlled synchronization as a regulator problem. In controlled synchronization one is given autonomous transmitter dynamics and controlled receiver dynamics. The question is to find a (output) feedback controller that achieves matching between

  16. The Role of Microtubule End Binding (EB) Proteins in Ciliogenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schrøder, Jacob Morville

    centrosomal MT array and abnormally long centriole-associated rootlet filaments. Cells lacking EB1 also had stumpy cilia and a disorganized centrosomal MT array, but rootlet filaments appeared normal. Further, live imaging revealed increased release frequency of MTs from the centrosome upon EB1 or EB3......EB1 is a small microtubule (MT)-binding protein that associates preferentially with MT plus ends. EB1 plays a role in regulating MT dynamics, localizing other MT-associated proteins to the plus end, and in regulating interactions of MTs with the cell cortex, mitotic kinetochores and different......, are required for assembly of primary cilia in cultured human cells. The EB3 - siRNA ciliary phenotype could be rescued by GFP-EB1 expression, and GFP-EB3 over expression resulted in elongated cilia. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) revealed that EB3-depleted cells possess stumpy cilia, a disorganized...

  17. Microtubule nucleation by γ-tubulin complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kollman, Justin M; Merdes, Andreas; Mourey, Lionel; Agard, David A

    2011-10-12

    Microtubule nucleation is regulated by the γ-tubulin ring complex (γTuRC) and related γ-tubulin complexes, providing spatial and temporal control over the initiation of microtubule growth. Recent structural work has shed light on the mechanism of γTuRC-based microtubule nucleation, confirming the long-standing hypothesis that the γTuRC functions as a microtubule template. The first crystallographic analysis of a non-γ-tubulin γTuRC component (γ-tubulin complex protein 4 (GCP4)) has resulted in a new appreciation of the relationships among all γTuRC proteins, leading to a refined model of their organization and function. The structures have also suggested an unexpected mechanism for regulating γTuRC activity via conformational modulation of the complex component GCP3. New experiments on γTuRC localization extend these insights, suggesting a direct link between its attachment at specific cellular sites and its activation.

  18. Spatiotemporal relationships between growth and microtubule orientation as revealed in living root cells of Arabidopsis thaliana transformed with green-fluorescent-protein gene construct GFP-MBD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granger, C. L.; Cyr, R. J.

    2001-01-01

    Arabidopsis thaliana plants were transformed with GFP-MBD (J. Marc et al., Plant Cell 10: 1927-1939, 1998) under the control of a constitutive (35S) or copper-inducible promoter. GFP-specific fluorescence distributions, levels, and persistence were determined and found to vary with age, tissue type, transgenic line, and individual plant. With the exception of an increased frequency of abnormal roots of 35S GFP-MBD plants grown on kanamycin-containing media, expression of GFP-MBD does not appear to affect plant phenotype. The number of leaves, branches, bolts, and siliques as well as overall height, leaf size, and seed set are similar between wild-type and transgenic plants as is the rate of root growth. Thus, we conclude that the transgenic plants can serve as a living model system in which the dynamic behavior of microtubules can be visualized. Confocal microscopy was used to simultaneously monitor growth and microtubule behavior within individual cells as they passed through the elongation zone of the Arabidopsis root. Generally, microtubules reoriented from transverse to oblique or longitudinal orientations as growth declined. Microtubule reorientation initiated at the ends of the cell did not necessarily occur simultaneously in adjacent neighboring cells and did not involve complete disintegration and repolymerization of microtubule arrays. Although growth rates correlated with microtubule reorientation, the two processes were not tightly coupled in terms of their temporal relationships, suggesting that other factor(s) may be involved in regulating both events. Additionally, microtubule orientation was more defined in cells whose growth was accelerating and less stringent in cells whose growth was decelerating, indicating that microtubule-orienting factor(s) may be sensitive to growth acceleration, rather than growth per se.

  19. EB1 recognizes the nucleotide state of tubulin in the microtubule lattice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marija Zanic

    Full Text Available Plus-end-tracking proteins (+TIPs are localized at the fast-growing, or plus end, of microtubules, and link microtubule ends to cellular structures. One of the best studied +TIPs is EB1, which forms comet-like structures at the tips of growing microtubules. The molecular mechanisms by which EB1 recognizes and tracks growing microtubule ends are largely unknown. However, one clue is that EB1 can bind directly to a microtubule end in the absence of other proteins. Here we use an in vitro assay for dynamic microtubule growth with two-color total-internal-reflection-fluorescence imaging to investigate binding of mammalian EB1 to both stabilized and dynamic microtubules. We find that under conditions of microtubule growth, EB1 not only tip tracks, as previously shown, but also preferentially recognizes the GMPCPP microtubule lattice as opposed to the GDP lattice. The interaction of EB1 with the GMPCPP microtubule lattice depends on the E-hook of tubulin, as well as the amount of salt in solution. The ability to distinguish different nucleotide states of tubulin in microtubule lattice may contribute to the end-tracking mechanism of EB1.

  20. The microtubule plus-end-tracking protein CLIP-170 associates with the spermatid manchette and is essential for spermatogenesis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.S. Akhmanova (Anna); A.L. Mausset-Bonnefont (Anne-Laure); W.A. van Cappellen (Gert); N. Keijzer (Nanda); C.C. Hoogenraad (Casper); T. Stepanova (Tatiana); K. Drabek (Ksenija); J. van der Wees (Jacqueline); M. Mommaas (Mieke); J. Onderwater (Jos); H. van der Meulen (Hans); M.E. Tanenbaum (Marvin); R.H. Medema (Rene); J.W. Hoogerbrugge (Jos); J.T.M. Vreeburg (Jan); E.J. Uringa; J.A. Grootegoed (Anton); F.G. Grosveld (Frank); N.J. Galjart (Niels)

    2005-01-01

    textabstractCLIP-170 is a microtubule "plus-end-tracking protein" implicated in the control of microtubule dynamics, dynactin localization, and the linking of endosomes to microtubules. To investigate the function of mouse CLIP-170, we generated CLIP-170 knockout and GFP-CLIP-170 knock-in alleles.

  1. The microtubule plus-end-tracking protein CLIP-170 associates with the spermatid manchette and is essential for spermatogenesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Akhmanova, A.S.; Mausset-Bonnefont, A.-L.; Cappellen, W. van; Keijzer, N.; Hoogenraad, C.C.; Stepanova, T.; Drabek, K.; Wees, J. van der; Mommaas, M.; Onderwater, J.; Meulen, H. van der; Tanenbaum, M.E.; Medema, R.H.; Hoogerbrugge, J.; Vreeburg, J.; Uringa, E.-J.; Grootegoed, J.A.; Grosveld, F.; Galjart, N.

    2005-01-01

    CLIP-170 is a microtubule "plus-end-tracking protein" implicated in the control of microtubule dynamics, dynactin localization, and the linking of endosomes to microtubules. To investigate the function of mouse CLIP-170, we generated CLIP-170 knockout and GFP-CLIP-170 knock-in alleles. Residual

  2. PASK (proline-alanine-rich Ste20-related kinase) binds to tubulin and microtubules and is involved in microtubule stabilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsutsumi, Tomonari; Kosaka, Takamitsu; Ushiro, Hiroshi; Kimura, Kazushi; Honda, Tomoyuki; Kayahara, Tetsuro; Mizoguchi, Akira

    2008-09-15

    Proline-alanine-rich Ste20-related kinase (PASK, also referred to as SPAK) has been linked to ion transport regulation. Here, we report two novel activities of PASK: binding to tubulin and microtubules and the promotion of microtubule assembly. Tubulin binding assay showed that full-length PASK and its kinase domain bound to purified tubulin whereas the N-terminal or C-terminal non-catalytic domains of PASK did not. The full-length PASK and its kinase domain were sedimented with paclitaxel-stabilized microtubules by ultracentrifugation. These results indicate that the kinase domain of PASK can interact directly with both microtubules and soluble tubulin in vitro. Truncated PASK lacking the N-terminal non-catalytic domain promoted microtubule assembly at a subcritical concentration of purified tubulin. FLAG-PASK expressed in COS-7 cells translocated to the cytoskeleton when the cells were stimulated with hypertonic sodium chloride, and stabilized microtubules against depolymerization by nocodazole. Our findings suggest that PASK may regulate the cytoskeleton by modulating microtubule stability.

  3. Tubulin bond energies and microtubule biomechanics determined from nanoindentation in silico

    CERN Document Server

    Kononova, Olga; Theisen, Kelly E; Marx, Kenneth A; Dima, Ruxandra I; Ataullakhanov, Fazly I; Grishchuk, Ekaterina L; Barsegov, Valeri

    2015-01-01

    Microtubules, the primary components of the chromosome segregation machinery, are stabilized by longitudinal and lateral non-covalent bonds between the tubulin subunits. However, the thermodynamics of these bonds and the microtubule physico-chemical properties are poorly understood. Here, we explore the biomechanics of microtubule polymers using multiscale computational modeling and nanoindentations in silico of a contiguous microtubule fragment. A close match between the simulated and experimental force-deformation spectra enabled us to correlate the microtubule biomechanics with dynamic structural transitions at the nanoscale. Our mechanical testing revealed that the compressed MT behaves as a system of rigid elements interconnected through a network of lateral and longitudinal elastic bonds. The initial regime of continuous elastic deformation of the microtubule is followed by the transition regime, during which the microtubule lattice undergoes discrete structural changes, which include first the reversib...

  4. Role of the Number of Microtubules in Chromosome Segregation during Cell Division

    CERN Document Server

    Bertalan, Zsolt; La Porta, Caterina A M; Zapperi, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    Faithful segregation of genetic material during cell division requires alignment of chromosomes between two spindle poles and attachment of their kinetochores to each of the poles. Failure of these complex dynamical processes leads to chromosomal instability (CIN), a characteristic feature of several diseases including cancer. While a multitude of biological factors regulating chromosome congression and bi-orientation have been identified, it is still unclear how they are integrated so that coherent chromosome motion emerges from a large collection of random and deterministic processes. Here we address this issue by a three dimensional computational model of motor-driven chromosome congression and bi-orientation during mitosis. Our model reveals that successful cell division requires control of the total number of microtubules: if this number is too small bi-orientation fails, while if it is too large not all the chromosomes are able to congress. The optimal number of microtubules predicted by our model compa...

  5. Dietary antioxidant curcumin inhibits microtubule assembly through tubulin binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Kamlesh K; Bharne, Shubhada S; Rathinasamy, Krishnan; Naik, Nishigandha R; Panda, Dulal

    2006-12-01

    Curcumin, a component of turmeric, has potent antitumor activity against several tumor types. However, its molecular target and mechanism of antiproliferative activity are not clear. Here, we identified curcumin as a novel antimicrotubule agent. We have examined the effects of curcumin on cellular microtubules and on reconstituted microtubules in vitro. Curcumin inhibited HeLa and MCF-7 cell proliferation in a concentration-dependent manner with IC(50) of 13.8 +/- 0.7 microm and 12 +/- 0.6 microm, respectively. At higher inhibitory concentrations (> 10 microm), curcumin induced significant depolymerization of interphase microtubules and mitotic spindle microtubules of HeLa and MCF-7 cells. However, at low inhibitory concentrations there were minimal effects on cellular microtubules. It disrupted microtubule assembly in vitro, reduced GTPase activity, and induced tubulin aggregation. Curcumin bound to tubulin at a single site with a dissociation constant of 2.4 +/- 0.4 microm and the binding of curcumin to tubulin induced conformational changes in tubulin. Colchicine and podophyllotoxin partly inhibited the binding of curcumin to tubulin, while vinblastine had no effect on the curcumin-tubulin interactions. The data together suggested that curcumin may inhibit cancer cells proliferation by perturbing microtubule assembly dynamics and may be used to develop efficacious curcumin analogues for cancer chemotherapy.

  6. A thermodynamic model of microtubule assembly and disassembly.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernard M A G Piette

    Full Text Available Microtubules are self-assembling polymers whose dynamics are essential for the normal function of cellular processes including chromosome separation and cytokinesis. Therefore understanding what factors effect microtubule growth is fundamental to our understanding of the control of microtubule based processes. An important factor that determines the status of a microtubule, whether it is growing or shrinking, is the length of the GTP tubulin microtubule cap. Here, we derive a Monte Carlo model of the assembly and disassembly of microtubules. We use thermodynamic laws to reduce the number of parameters of our model and, in particular, we take into account the contribution of water to the entropy of the system. We fit all parameters of the model from published experimental data using the GTP tubulin dimer attachment rate and the lateral and longitudinal binding energies of GTP and GDP tubulin dimers at both ends. Also we calculate and incorporate the GTP hydrolysis rate. We have applied our model and can mimic published experimental data, which formerly suggested a single layer GTP tubulin dimer microtubule cap, to show that these data demonstrate that the GTP cap can fluctuate and can be several microns long.

  7. Looped host defense peptide CLP-19 binds to microtubules and inhibits surface expression of TLR4 on mouse macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Di; Liu, Yao; Yang, Ya; Chen, Jian-hong; Yang, Jie; Zou, Lin-yun; Tian, Zhi-qiang; Lv, Jun; Xia, Pei-yuan

    2013-06-15

    The looped host defense peptide CLP-19 is derived from a highly functional core region of the Limulus anti-LPS factor and exerts robust anti-LPS activity by directly interacting with LPS in the extracellular space. We previously showed that prophylactic administration of CLP-19 even 20 h prior to LPS challenge might significantly increase the survival rate in a lethal endotoxin shock mouse model. Such an effect may be associated with immune regulation of CLP-19. To investigate the underlying mechanisms, peptide affinity chromatography, immunofluorescence, and Western blotting procedures were used to identify α- and β-tubulin as direct and specific binding partners of CLP-19 in the mouse macrophage cell line RAW 264.7. Bioinformatic analysis using the AutoDock Vina molecular docking and PyMOL molecular graphics system predicted that CLP-19 would bind to the functional residues of both α- and β-tubulin and would be located within the groove of microtubules. Tubulin polymerization assay revealed that CLP-19 might induce polymerization of microtubules and prevent depolymerization. The immunoregulatory effect of CLP-19 involving microtubules was investigated by flow cytometry, immunofluorescence, and Western blotting, which showed that CLP-19 prophylactic treatment of RAW 264.7 cells significantly inhibited LPS-induced surface expression of TLR4. Taken together, these results suggest that CLP-19 binding to microtubules disrupts the dynamic equilibrium of microtubules, reducing the efficacy of microtubule-dependent vesicular transport that would otherwise translocate TLR4 from the endoplasmic reticulum to the cell surface.

  8. Microtubule-associated proteins and tubulin interaction by isothermal titration calorimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsvetkov, P O; Barbier, P; Breuzard, G; Peyrot, V; Devred, F

    2013-01-01

    Microtubules play an important role in a number of vital cell processes such as cell division, intracellular transport, and cell architecture. The highly dynamic structure of microtubules is tightly regulated by a number of stabilizing and destabilizing microtubule-associated proteins (MAPs), such as tau and stathmin. Because of their importance, tubulin-MAPs interactions have been extensively studied using various methods that provide researchers with complementary but sometimes contradictory thermodynamic data. Isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) is the only direct thermodynamic method that enables a full thermodynamic characterization (stoichiometry, enthalpy, entropy of binding, and association constant) of the interaction after a single titration experiment. This method has been recently applied to study tubulin-MAPs interactions in order to bring new insights into molecular mechanisms of tubulin regulation. In this chapter, we review the technical specificity of this method and then focus on the use of ITC in the investigation of tubulin-MAPs binding. We describe technical issues which could arise during planning and carrying out the ITC experiments, in particular with fragile proteins such as tubulin. Using examples of stathmin and tau, we demonstrate how ITC can be used to gain major insights into tubulin-MAP interaction. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Microtubule-dependent ribosome localization in C. elegans neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noma, Kentaro; Goncharov, Alexandr; Ellisman, Mark H

    2017-01-01

    Subcellular localization of ribosomes defines the location and capacity for protein synthesis. Methods for in vivo visualizing ribosomes in multicellular organisms are desirable in mechanistic investigations of the cell biology of ribosome dynamics. Here, we developed an approach using split GFP for tissue-specific visualization of ribosomes in Caenorhabditis elegans. Labeled ribosomes are detected as fluorescent puncta in the axons and synaptic terminals of specific neuron types, correlating with ribosome distribution at the ultrastructural level. We found that axonal ribosomes change localization during neuronal development and after axonal injury. By examining mutants affecting axonal trafficking and performing a forward genetic screen, we showed that the microtubule cytoskeleton and the JIP3 protein UNC-16 exert distinct effects on localization of axonal and somatic ribosomes. Our data demonstrate the utility of tissue-specific visualization of ribosomes in vivo, and provide insight into the mechanisms of active regulation of ribosome localization in neurons. PMID:28767038

  10. Drosophila Xpd regulates Cdk7 localization, mitotic kinase activity, spindle dynamics, and chromosome segregation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoming Li

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The trimeric CAK complex functions in cell cycle control by phosphorylating and activating Cdks while TFIIH-linked CAK functions in transcription. CAK also associates into a tetramer with Xpd, and our analysis of young Drosophila embryos that do not require transcription now suggests a cell cycle function for this interaction. xpd is essential for the coordination and rapid progression of the mitotic divisions during the late nuclear division cycles. Lack of Xpd also causes defects in the dynamics of the mitotic spindle and chromosomal instability as seen in the failure to segregate chromosomes properly during ana- and telophase. These defects appear to be also nucleotide excision repair (NER-independent. In the absence of Xpd, misrouted spindle microtubules attach to chromosomes of neighboring mitotic figures, removing them from their normal location and causing multipolar spindles and aneuploidy. Lack of Xpd also causes changes in the dynamics of subcellular and temporal distribution of the CAK component Cdk7 and local mitotic kinase activity. xpd thus functions normally to re-localize Cdk7(CAK to different subcellular compartments, apparently removing it from its cell cycle substrate, the mitotic Cdk. This work proves that the multitask protein Xpd also plays an essential role in cell cycle regulation that appears to be independent of transcription or NER. Xpd dynamically localizes Cdk7/CAK to and away from subcellular substrates, thereby controlling local mitotic kinase activity. Possibly through this activity, xpd controls spindle dynamics and chromosome segregation in our model system. This novel role of xpd should also lead to new insights into the understanding of the neurological and cancer aspects of the human XPD disease phenotypes.

  11. Quantitative analysis of microtubule self-assembly kinetics and tip structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prahl, Louis S; Castle, Brian T; Gardner, Melissa K; Odde, David J

    2014-01-01

    Microtubules are dynamic polymers of the cytoskeleton, which play important roles in cell division, polarization, and intracellular transport. Self-assembly of microtubule polymer from αβ-tubulin heterodimers is highly variable, with stochastic switching between alternate states of net growth and net shortening, a phenomenon known as dynamic instability. Microtubule tip structures are also variable and directly influence the kinetics of assembly and vice versa. TipTracker, a semiautomated, image processing-based tool, permits high spatial and temporal resolution measurements from fluorescence microscopy images (~10-40 nm, or 1-5 dimer lengths, at 1-10 Hz) with simultaneous tip structure estimation. We provide a walkthrough of the TipTracker code to demonstrate methods used to (1) fit the coordinates of the microtubule backbone; (2) track microtubule tip position; and (3) estimate tip structure from the spatial decay of the tip fluorescence distribution, discuss possible sources of error, and include an example protocol for nanometer-scale tip tracking in living cells. Additionally, we evaluate TipTracker's accuracy on simulated digital images and fixed microtubules to estimate accuracy under realistic imaging conditions. In summary, this chapter demonstrates the use of TipTracker in making robust, high-resolution measurements of microtubule tip dynamics and structures, facilitating quantitative investigations into nanoscale/molecular control of microtubule assembly. Although our primary focus is on microtubules, these methods are, in principle, suitable for other polymer structures, such as F-actin. © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Viscoelastic properties of microtubule networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lin, Y. C.; Koenderink, G.H.; Mac Kintosh, F.C.; Weitz, D. A.

    2007-01-01

    Microtubules are filamentous protein biopolymers found in eukaryotic cells. They form networks that guide active intracellular transport and support the overall cell structure. Microtubules are very rigid polymers, with persistence lengths as large as a millimeter. As such, they constitute an

  13. Live cell imaging reveals structural associations between the actin and microtubule cytoskeleton in Arabidopsis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sampathkumar, A.; Lindeboom, J.J.; Debolt, S.; Gutierrez, R.; Ehrhardt, D.W.; Ketelaar, T.; Persson, S.

    2011-01-01

    In eukaryotic cells, the actin and microtubule (MT) cytoskeletal networks are dynamic structures that organize intracellular processes and facilitate their rapid reorganization. In plant cells, actin filaments (AFs) and MTs are essential for cell growth and morphogenesis. However, dynamic

  14. Developmental reorientation of transverse cortical microtubules to longitudinal directions: a role for actomyosin-based streaming and partial microtubule-membrane detachment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sainsbury, Frank; Collings, David A; Mackun, Ken; Gardiner, John; Harper, John D I; Marc, Jan

    2008-10-01

    Transversely oriented cortical microtubules in elongating cells typically reorient themselves towards longitudinal directions at the end of cell elongation. We have investigated the reorientation mechanism along the outer epidermal wall in maturing leek (Allium porrum L.) leaves using a GFP-MBD microtubule reporter gene and fluorescence microscopy. Incubating leaf segments for 14-18 h with the anti-actin or anti-actomyosin agents, 20 microm cytochalasin D or 20 mM 2,3-butanedione monoxime, inhibited the normal developmental reorientation of microtubules to the longitudinal direction. Observation of living cells revealed a small subpopulation of microtubules with their free ends swinging into oblique or longitudinal directions, before continuing to assemble in the new direction. Electron microscopy confirmed that longitudinal microtubules are partly detached from the plasma membrane. Incubating leaf segments with 0.2% 1 degree-butanol, an activator of phospholipase D, which has been implicated in plasma membrane-microtubule anchoring, promoted the reorientation, presumably by promoting microtubule detachment from the membrane. Stabilizing microtubules with 10 microm taxol also promoted longitudinal orientation, even in the absence of cytoplasmic streaming. These results were consistent with confocal microscopy of live cells before and after drug treatments, which also revealed that the slow (days) global microtubule reorientation is superimposed over short-term (hours) regional cycling in a clockwise and an anti-clockwise direction. We propose that partial detachment of transverse microtubules from the plasma membrane in maturing cells exposes them to hydrodynamic forces of actomyosin-driven cytoplasmic streaming, which bends or shifts pivoting microtubules into longitudinal directions, and thus provides an impetus to push microtubule dynamics in the new direction.

  15. Stabilizing versus Destabilizing the Microtubules: A Double-Edge Sword for an Effective Cancer Treatment Option?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniele Fanale

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Microtubules are dynamic and structural cellular components involved in several cell functions, including cell shape, motility, and intracellular trafficking. In proliferating cells, they are essential components in the division process through the formation of the mitotic spindle. As a result of these functions, tubulin and microtubules are targets for anticancer agents. Microtubule-targeting agents can be divided into two groups: microtubule-stabilizing, and microtubule-destabilizing agents. The former bind to the tubulin polymer and stabilize microtubules, while the latter bind to the tubulin dimers and destabilize microtubules. Alteration of tubulin-microtubule equilibrium determines the disruption of the mitotic spindle, halting the cell cycle at the metaphase-anaphase transition and, eventually, resulting in cell death. Clinical application of earlier microtubule inhibitors, however, unfortunately showed several limits, such as neurological and bone marrow toxicity and the emergence of drug-resistant tumor cells. Here we review several natural and synthetic microtubule-targeting agents, which showed antitumor activity and increased efficacy in comparison to traditional drugs in various preclinical and clinical studies. Cryptophycins, combretastatins, ombrabulin, soblidotin, D-24851, epothilones and discodermolide were used in clinical trials. Some of them showed antiangiogenic and antivascular activity and others showed the ability to overcome multidrug resistance, supporting their possible use in chemotherapy.

  16. Directional cell expansion requires NIMA-related kinase 6 (NEK6)-mediated cortical microtubule destabilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takatani, Shogo; Ozawa, Shinichiro; Yagi, Noriyoshi; Hotta, Takashi; Hashimoto, Takashi; Takahashi, Yuichiro; Takahashi, Taku; Motose, Hiroyasu

    2017-08-10

    Plant cortical microtubules align perpendicular to the growth axis to determine the direction of cell growth. However, it remains unclear how plant cells form well-organized cortical microtubule arrays in the absence of a centrosome. In this study, we investigated the functions of Arabidopsis NIMA-related kinase 6 (NEK6), which regulates microtubule organization during anisotropic cell expansion. Quantitative analysis of hypocotyl cell growth in the nek6-1 mutant demonstrated that NEK6 suppresses ectopic outgrowth and promotes cell elongation in different regions of the hypocotyl. Loss of NEK6 function led to excessive microtubule waving and distortion, implying that NEK6 suppresses the aberrant cortical microtubules. Live cell imaging showed that NEK6 localizes to the microtubule lattice and to the shrinking plus and minus ends of microtubules. In agreement with this observation, the induced overexpression of NEK6 reduced and disorganized cortical microtubules and suppressed cell elongation. Furthermore, we identified five phosphorylation sites in β-tubulin that serve as substrates for NEK6 in vitro. Alanine substitution of the phosphorylation site Thr166 promoted incorporation of mutant β-tubulin into microtubules. Taken together, these results suggest that NEK6 promotes directional cell growth through phosphorylation of β-tubulin and the resulting destabilization of cortical microtubules.

  17. Linking cortical microtubule attachment and exocytosis [version 1; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivar Noordstra

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Exocytosis is a fundamental cellular process whereby secreted molecules are packaged into vesicles that move along cytoskeletal filaments and fuse with the plasma membrane. To function optimally, cells are strongly dependent on precisely controlled delivery of exocytotic cargo. In mammalian cells, microtubules serve as major tracks for vesicle transport by motor proteins, and thus microtubule organization is important for targeted delivery of secretory carriers. Over the years, multiple microtubule-associated and cortical proteins have been discovered that facilitate the interaction between the microtubule plus ends and the cell cortex. In this review, we focus on mammalian protein complexes that have been shown to participate in both cortical microtubule capture and exocytosis, thereby regulating the spatial organization of secretion. These complexes include microtubule plus-end tracking proteins, scaffolding factors, actin-binding proteins, and components of vesicle docking machinery, which together allow efficient coordination of cargo transport and release.

  18. Synthesis and biological evaluation of structurally simplified noscapine analogues as microtubule binding agents

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ghaly, P.E.; Churchill, C.D.M.; Abou El-Magd, R.M.; Hájková, Zuzana; Dráber, Pavel; West, F.G.; Tuszyński, J.A.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 95, č. 6 (2017), s. 649-655 ISSN 0008-4042 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA15-22194S Institutional support: RVO:68378050 Keywords : noscapine * microtubule * tubulin * cytotoxicity * microtubule dynamics * docking Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 1.080, year: 2016

  19. Microtubule motor Ncd induces sliding of microtubules in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oladipo, Abiola; Cowan, Ann; Rodionov, Vladimir

    2007-09-01

    The mitotic spindle is a microtubule (MT)-based molecular machine that serves for equal segregation of chromosomes during cell division. The formation of the mitotic spindle requires the activity of MT motors, including members of the kinesin-14 family. Although evidence suggests that kinesins-14 act by driving the sliding of MT bundles in different areas of the spindle, such sliding activity had never been demonstrated directly. To test the hypothesis that kinesins-14 can induce MT sliding in living cells, we developed an in vivo assay, which involves overexpression of the kinesin-14 family member Drosophila Ncd in interphase mammalian fibroblasts. We found that green fluorescent protein (GFP)-Ncd colocalized with cytoplasmic MTs, whose distribution was determined by microinjection of Cy3 tubulin into GFP-transfected cells. Ncd overexpression resulted in the formation of MT bundles that exhibited dynamic "looping" behavior never observed in control cells. Photobleaching studies and fluorescence speckle microscopy analysis demonstrated that neighboring MTs in bundles could slide against each other with velocities of 0.1 microm/s, corresponding to the velocities of movement of the recombinant Ncd in in vitro motility assays. Our data, for the first time, demonstrate generation of sliding forces between adjacent MTs by Ncd, and they confirm the proposed roles of kinesins-14 in the mitotic spindle morphogenesis.

  20. Dynamical Analysis of bantam-Regulated Drosophila Circadian Rhythm Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ying; Liu, Zengrong

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) interact with 3‧untranslated region (UTR) elements of target genes to regulate mRNA stability or translation, and play a crucial role in regulating many different biological processes. bantam, a conserved miRNA, is involved in several functions, such as regulating Drosophila growth and circadian rhythm. Recently, it has been discovered that bantam plays a crucial role in the core circadian pacemaker. In this paper, based on experimental observations, a detailed dynamical model of bantam-regulated circadian clock system is developed to show the post-transcriptional behaviors in the modulation of Drosophila circadian rhythm, in which the regulation of bantam is incorporated into a classical model. The dynamical behaviors of the model are consistent with the experimental observations, which shows that bantam is an important regulator of Drosophila circadian rhythm. The sensitivity analysis of parameters demonstrates that with the regulation of bantam the system is more sensitive to perturbations, indicating that bantam regulation makes it easier for the organism to modulate its period against the environmental perturbations. The effectiveness in rescuing locomotor activity rhythms of mutated flies shows that bantam is necessary for strong and sustained rhythms. In addition, the biological mechanisms of bantam regulation are analyzed, which may help us more clearly understand Drosophila circadian rhythm regulated by other miRNAs.

  1. Oscillatory fluid flow influences primary cilia and microtubule mechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinha, Lina C; Hoey, David A; Fernandes, Paulo R; Rodrigues, Hélder C; Jacobs, Christopher R

    2014-07-01

    Many tissues are sensitive to mechanical stimuli; however, the mechanotransduction mechanism used by cells remains unknown in many cases. The primary cilium is a solitary, immotile microtubule-based extension present on nearly every mammalian cell which extends from the basal body. The cilium is a mechanosensitive organelle and has been shown to transduce fluid flow-induced shear stress in tissues, such as the kidney and bone. The majority of microtubules assemble from the mother centriole (basal body), contributing significantly to the anchoring of the primary cilium. Several studies have attempted to quantify the number of microtubules emanating from the basal body and the results vary depending on the cell type. It has also been shown that cellular response to shear stress depends on microtubular integrity. This study hypothesizes that changing the microtubule attachment of primary cilia in response to a mechanical stimulus could change primary cilia mechanics and, possibly, mechanosensitivity. Oscillatory fluid flow was applied to two different cell types and the microtubule attachment to the ciliary base was quantified. For the first time, an increase in microtubules around primary cilia both with time and shear rate in response to oscillatory fluid flow stimulation was demonstrated. Moreover, it is presented that the primary cilium is required for this loading-induced cellular response. This study has demonstrated a new role for the cilium in regulating alterations in the cytoplasmic microtubule network in response to mechanical stimulation, and therefore provides a new insight into how cilia may regulate its mechanics and thus the cells mechanosensitivity. Copyright © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Visualization of microtubule growth in cultured neurons via the use of EB3-GFP (end-binding protein 3-green fluorescent protein)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T. Stepanova (Tatiana); J.E. Slemmer (Jennifer); C.C. Hoogenraad (Casper); G.W.A. Lansbergen; B.R. Dortland (Bjorn); C.I. de Zeeuw (Chris); W.A. van Cappellen (Gert); A.S. Akhmanova (Anna); N.J. Galjart (Niels); F.G. Grosveld (Frank)

    2003-01-01

    textabstractSeveral microtubule binding proteins, including CLIP-170 (cytoplasmic linker protein-170), CLIP-115, and EB1 (end-binding protein 1), have been shown to associate specifically with the ends of growing microtubules in non-neuronal cells, thereby regulating microtubule

  3. Myomegalin is necessary for the formation of centrosomal and Golgi-derived microtubules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Régine Roubin

    2012-12-01

    The generation of cellular microtubules is initiated at specific sites such as the centrosome and the Golgi apparatus that contain nucleation complexes rich in γ-tubulin. The microtubule growing plus-ends are stabilized by plus-end tracking proteins (+TIPs, mainly EB1 and associated proteins. Myomegalin was identified as a centrosome/Golgi protein associated with cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase. We show here that Myomegalin exists as several isoforms. We characterize two of them. One isoform, CM-MMG, harbors a conserved domain (CM1, recently described as a nucleation activator, and is related to a family of γ-tubulin binding proteins, which includes Drosophila centrosomin. It localizes at the centrosome and at the cis-Golgi in an AKAP450-dependent manner. It recruits γ-tubulin nucleating complexes and promotes microtubule nucleation. The second isoform, EB-MMG, is devoid of CM1 domain and has a unique N-terminus with potential EB1-binding sites. It localizes at the cis-Golgi and can localize to microtubule plus-ends. EB-MMG binds EB1 and affects its loading on microtubules and microtubule growth. Depletion of Myomegalin by small interfering RNA delays microtubule growth from the centrosome and Golgi apparatus, and decreases directional migration of RPE1 cells. In conclusion, the Myomegalin gene encodes different isoforms that regulate microtubules. At least two of these have different roles, demonstrating a previously unknown mechanism to control microtubules in vertebrate cells.

  4. Microtubule and Actin Interplay Drive Intracellular c-Src Trafficking.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Arnette

    Full Text Available The proto-oncogene c-Src is involved in a variety of signaling processes. Therefore, c-Src spatiotemporal localization is critical for interaction with downstream targets. However, the mechanisms regulating this localization have remained elusive. Previous studies have shown that c-Src trafficking is a microtubule-dependent process that facilitates c-Src turnover in neuronal growth cones. As such, microtubule depolymerization lead to the inhibition of c-Src recycling. Alternatively, c-Src trafficking was also shown to be regulated by RhoB-dependent actin polymerization. Our results show that c-Src vesicles primarily exhibit microtubule-dependent trafficking; however, microtubule depolymerization does not inhibit vesicle movement. Instead, vesicular movement becomes both faster and less directional. This movement was associated with actin polymerization directly at c-Src vesicle membranes. Interestingly, it has been shown previously that c-Src delivery is an actin polymerization-dependent process that relies on small GTPase RhoB at c-Src vesicles. In agreement with this finding, microtubule depolymerization induced significant activation of RhoB, together with actin comet tail formation. These effects occurred downstream of GTP-exchange factor, GEF-H1, which was released from depolymerizing MTs. Accordingly, GEF-H1 activity was necessary for actin comet tail formation at the Src vesicles. Our results indicate that regulation of c-Src trafficking requires both microtubules and actin polymerization, and that GEF-H1 coordinates c-Src trafficking, acting as a molecular switch between these two mechanisms.

  5. The Centrosome Is a Selective Condensate that Nucleates Microtubules by Concentrating Tubulin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodruff, Jeffrey B; Ferreira Gomes, Beatriz; Widlund, Per O; Mahamid, Julia; Honigmann, Alf; Hyman, Anthony A

    2017-06-01

    Centrosomes are non-membrane-bound compartments that nucleate microtubule arrays. They consist of nanometer-scale centrioles surrounded by a micron-scale, dynamic assembly of protein called the pericentriolar material (PCM). To study how PCM forms a spherical compartment that nucleates microtubules, we reconstituted PCM-dependent microtubule nucleation in vitro using recombinant C. elegans proteins. We found that macromolecular crowding drives assembly of the key PCM scaffold protein SPD-5 into spherical condensates that morphologically and dynamically resemble in vivo PCM. These SPD-5 condensates recruited the microtubule polymerase ZYG-9 (XMAP215 homolog) and the microtubule-stabilizing protein TPXL-1 (TPX2 homolog). Together, these three proteins concentrated tubulin ∼4-fold over background, which was sufficient to reconstitute nucleation of microtubule asters in vitro. Our results suggest that in vivo PCM is a selective phase that organizes microtubule arrays through localized concentration of tubulin by microtubule effector proteins. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Within-Family Dynamics and Self-Regulation in Preschoolers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Karreman, A.

    2006-01-01

    Separate research lines have stressed the importance of within-family dynamics on the one hand and self-regulation on the other hand for the development and stability of problem behavior in young children. Few empirical studies have directly addressed the relation between family processes and

  7. MAP6-F is a temperature sensor that directly binds to and protects microtubules from cold-induced depolymerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delphin, Christian; Bouvier, Denis; Seggio, Maxime; Couriol, Emilie; Saoudi, Yasmina; Denarier, Eric; Bosc, Christophe; Valiron, Odile; Bisbal, Mariano; Arnal, Isabelle; Andrieux, Annie

    2012-10-12

    Microtubules are dynamic structures that present the peculiar characteristic to be ice-cold labile in vitro. In vivo, microtubules are protected from ice-cold induced depolymerization by the widely expressed MAP6/STOP family of proteins. However, the mechanism by which MAP6 stabilizes microtubules at 4 °C has not been identified. Moreover, the microtubule cold sensitivity and therefore the needs for microtubule stabilization in the wide range of temperatures between 4 and 37 °C are unknown. This is of importance as body temperatures of animals can drop during hibernation or torpor covering a large range of temperatures. Here, we show that in the absence of MAP6, microtubules in cells below 20 °C rapidly depolymerize in a temperature-dependent manner whereas they are stabilized in the presence of MAP6. We further show that in cells, MAP6-F binding to and stabilization of microtubules is temperature- dependent and very dynamic, suggesting a direct effect of the temperature on the formation of microtubule/MAP6 complex. We also demonstrate using purified proteins that MAP6-F binds directly to microtubules through its Mc domain. This binding is temperature-dependent and coincides with progressive conformational changes of the Mc domain as revealed by circular dichroism. Thus, MAP6 might serve as a temperature sensor adapting its conformation according to the temperature to maintain the cellular microtubule network in organisms exposed to temperature decrease.

  8. Acentrosomal Microtubule Assembly in Mitosis: The Where, When, and How.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meunier, Sylvain; Vernos, Isabelle

    2016-02-01

    In mitosis the cell assembles the bipolar spindle, a microtubule (MT)-based apparatus that segregates the duplicated chromosomes into two daughter cells. Most animal cells enter mitosis with duplicated centrosomes that provide an active source of dynamic MTs. However, it is now established that spindle assembly relies on the nucleation of acentrosomal MTs occurring around the chromosomes after nuclear envelope breakdown, and on pre-existing microtubules. Where chromosome-dependent MT nucleation occurs, when MT amplification takes place and how the two pathways function are still key questions that generate some controversies. We reconcile the data and present an integrated model accounting for acentrosomal microtubule assembly in the dividing cell. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Self-regulated dynamical criticality in human ECoG

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillermo eSolovey

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Mounting experimental and theoretical results indicate that neural systems are poised near a critical state. In human subjects, however, most evidence comes from functional MRI studies, an indirect measurement of neuronal activity with poor temporal resolution. Electrocorticography (ECoG provides a unique window into human brain activity: each electrode records, with high temporal resolution, the activity resulting from the sum of the local field potentials of sim 10^5 neurons. We show that the human brain ECoG recordings display features of self-regulated dynamical criticality: dynamical modes of activation drift around the critical stability threshold, moving in and out of the unstable region and equilibrating the global dynamical state at a very fast time scale. Moreover, the analysis also reveals differences between the resting state and a motor task, associated with increased stability of a fraction of the dynamical modes.

  10. Using distraction to regulate emotion: insights from EEG theta dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uusberg, Andero; Thiruchselvam, Ravi; Gross, James J

    2014-03-01

    Distraction is a powerful and widely-used emotion regulation strategy. Although distraction regulates emotion sooner than other cognitive strategies (Thiruchselvam, Blechert, Sheppes, Rydstrom, & Gross, 2011), it is not yet clear whether it is capable of blocking the earliest stages of emotion generation. To address this issue, we capitalized on the excellent temporal resolution of EEG by focusing on occipital theta dynamics which were associated with distinct stages of visual processing of emotional stimuli. Individually defined theta band dynamics were extracted from a previously published EEG dataset (Thiruchselvam et al., 2011) in which participants attended to unpleasant (and neutral) images or regulated emotion using distraction and reappraisal. Results revealed two peaks within early theta power increase, both of which were increased by emotional stimuli. Distraction did not affect theta power during an early peak (150-350 ms), but did successfully decrease activity in a second peak (350-550 ms). These results suggest that although distraction acts relatively early in the emotion-generative trajectory, it does not block fast detection of emotional significance. Given that theta dynamics were uncorrelated with Late Positive Potential activity, the present results also encourage researchers to add the occipital theta to the growing toolkit of EEG-based measures of emotion regulation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Microtubule depolymerization induces traction force increase through two distinct pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rape, Andrew; Guo, Wei-hui; Wang, Yu-li

    2011-01-01

    Traction forces increase after microtubule depolymerization; however, the signaling mechanisms underlying this, in particular the dependence upon myosin II, remain unclear. We investigated the mechanism of traction force increase after nocodazole-induced microtubule depolymerization by applying traction force microscopy to cells cultured on micropatterned polyacrylamide hydrogels to obtain samples of homogeneous shape and size. Control cells and cells treated with a focal adhesion kinase (FAK) inhibitor showed similar increases in traction forces, indicating that the response is independent of FAK. Surprisingly, pharmacological inhibition of myosin II did not prevent the increase of residual traction forces upon nocodazole treatment. This increase was abolished upon pharmacological inhibition of FAK. These results suggest two distinct pathways for the regulation of traction forces. First, microtubule depolymerization activates a myosin-II-dependent mechanism through a FAK-independent pathway. Second, microtubule depolymerization also enhances traction forces through a myosin-II-independent, FAK-regulated pathway. Traction forces are therefore regulated by a complex network of complementary signals and force-generating mechanisms. PMID:22193960

  12. Molecular regulation of mitochondrial dynamics in cardiac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nan, Jinliang; Zhu, Wei; Rahman, M S; Liu, Mingfei; Li, Dan; Su, Shengan; Zhang, Na; Hu, Xinyang; Yu, Hong; Gupta, Mahesh P; Wang, Jian'an

    2017-07-01

    Mitochondrial homeostasis is critical for keeping functional heart in response to metabolic or environmental stresses. Mitochondrial fission and fusion (mitochondrial dynamics) play essential roles in maintaining mitochondrial homeostasis, defects in mitochondrial dynamics lead to cardiac diseases such as ischemia-reperfusion injury (IRI), heart failure and diabetic cardiomyopathy. Mitochondrial dynamics is determined by mitochondrial fission and fusion proteins, including OPA1, mitofusins and Drp1. These proteins are tightly regulated by a series of signaling pathways through different aspects such as transcription, post translation modifications (PTMs) and proteasome-dependent protein degradation. By modulating these mitochondrial fission and fusion proteins, mitochondria fine-tune their metabolic status to meet the energy demands of the heart. Moreover, these mitochondrial fission and fusion proteins are essential for mediating mitochondrial autophagy (mitophagy), leading to clearance of damaged mitochondria to maintain a healthy population of mitochondria in heart under stressed conditions. Mitochondrial dynamics dependent improvement in mitochondrial metabolism and quality could partially reverse the pathological conditions of heart. This review describes an overview of mechanisms on mitochondrial dynamics regulation and provides potential therapeutic targets for treating cardiovascular diseases. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Implications for kinetochore-microtubule attachment from the structure of an engineered Ndc80 complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciferri, Claudio; Pasqualato, Sebastiano; Screpanti, Emanuela; Varetti, Gianluca; Santaguida, Stefano; Dos Reis, Gabriel; Maiolica, Alessio; Polka, Jessica; De Luca, Jennifer G; De Wulf, Peter; Salek, Mogjiborahman; Rappsilber, Juri; Moores, Carolyn A; Salmon, Edward D; Musacchio, Andrea

    2008-05-02

    Kinetochores are proteinaceous assemblies that mediate the interaction of chromosomes with the mitotic spindle. The 180 kDa Ndc80 complex is a direct point of contact between kinetochores and microtubules. Its four subunits contain coiled coils and form an elongated rod structure with functional globular domains at either end. We crystallized an engineered "bonsai" Ndc80 complex containing a shortened rod domain but retaining the globular domains required for kinetochore localization and microtubule binding. The structure reveals a microtubule-binding interface containing a pair of tightly interacting calponin-homology (CH) domains with a previously unknown arrangement. The interaction with microtubules is cooperative and predominantly electrostatic. It involves positive charges in the CH domains and in the N-terminal tail of the Ndc80 subunit and negative charges in tubulin C-terminal tails and is regulated by the Aurora B kinase. We discuss our results with reference to current models of kinetochore-microtubule attachment and centromere organization.

  14. TCTEX1D4, a novel protein phosphatase 1 interactor: connecting the phosphatase to the microtubule network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luís Korrodi-Gregório

    2013-03-01

    Reversible phosphorylation plays an important role as a mechanism of intracellular control in eukaryotes. PPP1, a major eukaryotic Ser/Thr-protein phosphatase, acquires its specificity by interacting with different protein regulators, also known as PPP1 interacting proteins (PIPs. In the present work we characterized a physiologically relevant PIP in testis. Using a yeast two-hybrid screen with a human testis cDNA library, we identified a novel PIP of PPP1CC2 isoform, the T-complex testis expressed protein 1 domain containing 4 (TCTEX1D4 that has recently been described as a Tctex1 dynein light chain family member. The overlay assays confirm that TCTEX1D4 interacts with the different spliced isoforms of PPP1CC. Also, the binding domain occurs in the N-terminus, where a consensus PPP1 binding motif (PPP1BM RVSF is present. The distribution of TCTEX1D4 in testis suggests its involvement in distinct functions, such as TGFβ signaling at the blood–testis barrier and acrosome cap formation. Immunofluorescence in human ejaculated sperm shows that TCTEX1D4 is present in the flagellum and in the acrosome region of the head. Moreover, TCTEX1D4 and PPP1 co-localize in the microtubule organizing center (MTOC and microtubules in cell cultures. Importantly, the TCTEX1D4 PPP1BM seems to be relevant for complex formation, for PPP1 retention in the MTOC and movement along microtubules. These novel results open new avenues to possible roles of this dynein, together with PPP1. In essence TCTEX1D4/PPP1C complex appears to be involved in microtubule dynamics, sperm motility, acrosome reaction and in the regulation of the blood–testis barrier.

  15. ALKBH4-dependent demethylation of actin regulates actomyosin dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, M.-M.; Shi, Y.; Niu, Y.

    2013-01-01

    Regulation of actomyosin dynamics by post-transcriptional modifications in cytoplasmic actin is still poorly understood. Here we demonstrate that dioxygenase ALKBH4-mediated demethylation of a monomethylated site in actin (K84me1) regulates actin-myosin interaction and actomyosin-dependent proces......Regulation of actomyosin dynamics by post-transcriptional modifications in cytoplasmic actin is still poorly understood. Here we demonstrate that dioxygenase ALKBH4-mediated demethylation of a monomethylated site in actin (K84me1) regulates actin-myosin interaction and actomyosin......-dependent processes such as cytokinesis and cell migration. ALKBH4-deficient cells display elevated K84me1 levels. Non-muscle myosin II only interacts with unmethylated actin and its proper recruitment to and interaction with actin depend on ALKBH4. ALKBH4 co-localizes with the actomyosin-based contractile ring......-type but not catalytically inactive ALKBH4. Similar to actin and myosin knock-out mice, homozygous Alkbh4 mutant mice display early embryonic lethality. These findings imply that ALKBH4-dependent actin demethylation regulates actomyosin function by promoting actin-non-muscle myosin II interaction....

  16. FcɛRI-mediated mast cell degranulation requires calcium-independent microtubule-dependent translocation of granules to the plasma membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishida, Keigo; Yamasaki, Satoru; Ito, Yukitaka; Kabu, Koki; Hattori, Kotaro; Tezuka, Tohru; Nishizumi, Hirofumi; Kitamura, Daisuke; Goitsuka, Ryo; Geha, Raif S.; Yamamoto, Tadashi; Yagi, Takeshi; Hirano, Toshio

    2005-01-01

    The aggregation of high affinity IgE receptors (Fcɛ receptor I [FcɛRI]) on mast cells is potent stimulus for the release of inflammatory and allergic mediators from cytoplasmic granules. However, the molecular mechanism of degranulation has not yet been established. It is still unclear how FcɛRI-mediated signal transduction ultimately regulates the reorganization of the cytoskeleton and how these events lead to degranulation. Here, we show that FcɛRI stimulation triggers the formation of microtubules in a manner independent of calcium. Drugs affecting microtubule dynamics effectively suppressed the FcɛRI-mediated translocation of granules to the plasma membrane and degranulation. Furthermore, the translocation of granules to the plasma membrane occurred in a calcium-independent manner, but the release of mediators and granule–plasma membrane fusion were completely dependent on calcium. Thus, the degranulation process can be dissected into two events: the calcium-independent microtubule-dependent translocation of granules to the plasma membrane and calcium-dependent membrane fusion and exocytosis. Finally, we show that the Fyn/Gab2/RhoA (but not Lyn/SLP-76) signaling pathway plays a critical role in the calcium-independent microtubule-dependent pathway. PMID:15998803

  17. Shaping plant microtubule networks via overlap formation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keijzer, de Jeroen

    2017-01-01

    Microtubules are long filaments made up from protein building blocks and ubiquitously employed by eukaryotic cells for a wide range of often essential cellular processes. To perform these functions, microtubules are virtually always organized into higher order networks. Microtubule networks in cells

  18. Distribution and dynamics of the cytoskeleton in graviresponding protonemata and rhizoids of characean algae: exclusion of microtubules and a convergence of actin filaments in the apex suggest an actin-mediated gravitropism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, M; Wasteneys, G O

    1998-05-01

    The organization of the microtubule (MT) and actin microfilament (MF) cytoskeleton of tip-growing rhizoids and protonemata of characean green algae was examined by confocal laser scanning microscopy. This analysis included microinjection of fluorescent tubulin and phallotoxins into living cells, as well as immunofluorescence labeling of fixed material and fluorescent phallotoxin labeling of unfixed material. Although the morphologically very similar positively gravitropic (downward growing) rhizoids and negatively gravitropic (upward growing) protonemata show opposite gravitropic responses, no differences were detected in the extensive three-dimensional distribution of actin MFs and MTs in both cell types. Tubulin microinjection revealed that in contrast to internodal cells, fluorescent tubulin incorporated very slowly into the MT arrays of rhizoids, suggesting that MT dynamics are very different in tip-growing and diffusely expanding cells. Microtubules assembled from multiple sites at the plasma membrane in the basal zone, and a dense subapical array emerged from a diffuse nucleation centre on the basal side of the nuclear envelope. Immunofluorescence confirmed these distribution patterns but revealed more extensive MT arrays. In the basal zone, short branching clusters of MTs form two cortical hemicylinders. Subapical, axially oriented MTs are distributed in equal density throughout the peripheral and inner cytoplasm and are closely associated with subapical organelles. Microtubules, however, are completely absent from the apical zones of rhizoids and protonemata. Actin MFs were found in all zones of rhizoids and protonemata including the apex. Two files of axially oriented bundles of subcortical actin MFs and ring-like actin structures in the streaming endoplasm of rhizoids were detected in the basal zones by microinjection or rhodamine-phalloidin labeling. The subapical zone contains a dense array of mainly axially oriented actin MFs that co-distribute with

  19. Measuring the regulation of keratin filament network dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Moch, Marcin; Herberich, Gerlind; Aach, Til; Leube, Rudolf E.; Windoffer, Reinhard

    2013-01-01

    The organization of the keratin intermediate filament cytoskeleton is closely linked to epithelial function. To study keratin network plasticity and its regulation at different levels, tools are needed to localize and measure local network dynamics. In this paper, we present image analysis methods designed to determine the speed and direction of keratin filament motion and to identify locations of keratin filament polymerization and depolymerization at subcellular resolution. Using these meth...

  20. Structural insights into microtubule doublet interactions inaxonemes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Downing, Kenneth H.; Sui, Haixin

    2007-06-06

    Coordinated sliding of microtubule doublets, driven by dynein motors, produces periodic beating of the axoneme. Recent structural studies of the axoneme have used cryo-electron tomography to reveal new details of the interactions among some of the multitude of proteins that form the axoneme and regulate its movement. Connections among the several sets of dyneins, in particular, suggest ways in which their actions may be coordinated. Study of the molecular architecture of isolated doublets has provided a structural basis for understanding the doublet's mechanical properties that are related to the bending of the axoneme, and has also offered insight into its potential role in the mechanism of dynein activity regulation.

  1. Dynamic measures of RSA predict distress and regulation in toddlers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooker, Rebecca J; Buss, Kristin A

    2010-05-01

    In this study, we examined a new method for quantifying individual variability using dynamic measures of respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA). This method incorporated temporal variation into the measurement of RSA and provided information beyond that offered by more traditional quantifications such as difference scores. Dynamic and static measures of change in RSA were tested in relation to displays of emotion and affective behaviors during a fear-eliciting episode in a sample of 88 typically developing and high-fear toddlers during a laboratory visit at age 24 months. Dynamic measures of RSA contributed information that was unique from traditionally employed, static change scores in predicting high-fear toddlers' displays of shyness during a fear-eliciting episode. In contrast, RSA change scores offered information related to boldness in nonhigh-fear children. In addition, several associations included estimates of nonlinear change in RSA. Implications for the study of individual differences in RSA and relations with emotion and emotion regulation are discussed.

  2. Microtubule alignment and manipulation using AC electrokinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uppalapati, Maruti; Huang, Ying-Ming; Jackson, Thomas N; Hancock, William O

    2008-09-01

    The kinesin-microtubule system plays an important role in intracellular transport and is a model system for integrating biomotor-driven transport into microengineered devices. AC electrokinetics provides a novel tool for manipulating and organizing microtubules in solution, enabling new experimental geometries for investigating and controlling the interactions of microtubules and microtubule motors in vitro. By fabricating microelectrodes on glass substrates and generating AC electric fields across solutions of microtubules in low-ionic-strength buffers, bundles of microtubules are collected and aligned and the electrical properties of microtubules in solution are measured. The AC electric fields result in electro-osmotic flow, electrothermal flow, and dielectrophoresis of microtubules, which can be controlled by varying the solution conductivity, AC frequency, and electrode geometry. By mapping the solution conductivity and AC frequency over which positive dielectrophoresis occurs, the apparent conductivity of taxol-stabilized bovine-brain microtubules in PIPES buffer is measured to be 250 mS m(-1). By maximizing dielectrophoretic forces and minimizing electro-osmotic and electrothermal flow, microtubules are assembled into opposed asters. These experiments demonstrate that AC electrokinetics provides a powerful new tool for kinesin-driven transport applications and for investigating the role of microtubule motors in development and maintenance of the mitotic spindle.

  3. Atomic-resolution structure of the CAP-Gly domain of dynactin on polymeric microtubules determined by magic angle spinning NMR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Si; Guo, Changmiao; Hou, Guangjin; Zhang, Huilan; Lu, Xingyu; Williams, John Charles; Polenova, Tatyana

    2015-11-24

    Microtubules and their associated proteins perform a broad array of essential physiological functions, including mitosis, polarization and differentiation, cell migration, and vesicle and organelle transport. As such, they have been extensively studied at multiple levels of resolution (e.g., from structural biology to cell biology). Despite these efforts, there remain significant gaps in our knowledge concerning how microtubule-binding proteins bind to microtubules, how dynamics connect different conformational states, and how these interactions and dynamics affect cellular processes. Structures of microtubule-associated proteins assembled on polymeric microtubules are not known at atomic resolution. Here, we report a structure of the cytoskeleton-associated protein glycine-rich (CAP-Gly) domain of dynactin motor on polymeric microtubules, solved by magic angle spinning NMR spectroscopy. We present the intermolecular interface of CAP-Gly with microtubules, derived by recording direct dipolar contacts between CAP-Gly and tubulin using double rotational echo double resonance (dREDOR)-filtered experiments. Our results indicate that the structure adopted by CAP-Gly varies, particularly around its loop regions, permitting its interaction with multiple binding partners and with the microtubules. To our knowledge, this study reports the first atomic-resolution structure of a microtubule-associated protein on polymeric microtubules. Our approach lays the foundation for atomic-resolution structural analysis of other microtubule-associated motors.

  4. Griseofulvin-induced aggregation of microtubule protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roobol, A; Gull, K; Pogson, C I

    1977-01-01

    Griseofulvin (7-chloro-2',4,6-trimethoxy-6'-methylspiro[benzofuran-2(3H),1'-[2]cyclohexene]-3,4'-dione) induces aggregation of microtubule protein at 0 degrees C. This aggregate contains approx. 90% of the microtubule-associated proteins originally present in the microtubule protein. The supernatant obtained after removal of the griseofulvin-induced aggregate does not form microtubules on warming at 37 degrees C. Addition of the griseofulvin-aggregated protein to this supernatant and warming to 37 degrees C gives rise to a limited amount of microtubule assembly. The possible involvement of griseofulvin-induced aggregation of microtubule protein at 0 degrees C in the inhibition by griseofulvin of microtubule assembly in vitro is discussed. Images PLATE 1 PLATE 2 PMID:588267

  5. Dynamic landscape and regulation of RNA editing in mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Meng How; Li, Qin; Shanmugam, Raghuvaran; Piskol, Robert; Kohler, Jennefer; Young, Amy N; Liu, Kaiwen Ivy; Zhang, Rui; Ramaswami, Gokul; Ariyoshi, Kentaro; Gupte, Ankita; Keegan, Liam P; George, Cyril X; Ramu, Avinash; Huang, Ni; Pollina, Elizabeth A; Leeman, Dena S; Rustighi, Alessandra; Goh, Y P Sharon; Chawla, Ajay; Del Sal, Giannino; Peltz, Gary; Brunet, Anne; Conrad, Donald F; Samuel, Charles E; O'Connell, Mary A; Walkley, Carl R; Nishikura, Kazuko; Li, Jin Billy

    2017-10-11

    Adenosine-to-inosine (A-to-I) RNA editing is a conserved post-transcriptional mechanism mediated by ADAR enzymes that diversifies the transcriptome by altering selected nucleotides in RNA molecules. Although many editing sites have recently been discovered, the extent to which most sites are edited and how the editing is regulated in different biological contexts are not fully understood. Here we report dynamic spatiotemporal patterns and new regulators of RNA editing, discovered through an extensive profiling of A-to-I RNA editing in 8,551 human samples (representing 53 body sites from 552 individuals) from the Genotype-Tissue Expression (GTEx) project and in hundreds of other primate and mouse samples. We show that editing levels in non-repetitive coding regions vary more between tissues than editing levels in repetitive regions. Globally, ADAR1 is the primary editor of repetitive sites and ADAR2 is the primary editor of non-repetitive coding sites, whereas the catalytically inactive ADAR3 predominantly acts as an inhibitor of editing. Cross-species analysis of RNA editing in several tissues revealed that species, rather than tissue type, is the primary determinant of editing levels, suggesting stronger cis-directed regulation of RNA editing for most sites, although the small set of conserved coding sites is under stronger trans-regulation. In addition, we curated an extensive set of ADAR1 and ADAR2 targets and showed that many editing sites display distinct tissue-specific regulation by the ADAR enzymes in vivo. Further analysis of the GTEx data revealed several potential regulators of editing, such as AIMP2, which reduces editing in muscles by enhancing the degradation of the ADAR proteins. Collectively, our work provides insights into the complex cis- and trans-regulation of A-to-I editing.

  6. Endothelin-1 Regulation of Exercise-Induced Changes in Flow: Dynamic Regulation of Vascular Tone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert M. Rapoport

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Although endothelin (ET-1 is a highly potent vasoconstrictor with considerable efficacy in numerous vascular beds, the role of endogenous ET-1 in the regulation of vascular tone remains unclear. The perspective that ET-1 plays little role in the on-going regulation of vascular tone at least under physiologic conditions is supported by findings that potential ET-1 constriction is minimized by the release of the vasodilator and ET-1 synthesis inhibitor, nitric oxide (NO. Indeed, ET-1 release and constriction is self-limited by ET-1-induced, endothelial ETB receptor-mediated release of NO. Moreover, even if the balance between ET-1 and NO were reversed as the result of lowered NO activity, as occurs in a number of pathophysiologies associated with endothelial dysfunction, the well-known resistance of ET-1 constriction to reversal (as determined with exogenous ET-1 precludes ET-1 in the dynamic, i.e., moment-to-moment, regulation of vascular tone. On the other hand, and as presently reviewed, findings of ET-1-dependent modulation of organ blood flow with exercise under physiologic conditions demonstrate the dynamic regulation of vascular tone by ET-1. We speculate that this regulation is mediated at least in part through changes in ET-1 synthesis/release caused by pulsatile flow-induced shear stress and NO.

  7. Microtubules mediate changes in membrane cortical elasticity during contractile activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Rekabi, Zeinab; Haase, Kristina; Pelling, Andrew E

    2014-03-10

    The mechanical properties of living cells are highly regulated by remodeling dynamics of the cytoarchitecture, and are linked to a wide variety of physiological and pathological processes. Microtubules (MT) and actomyosin contractility are both involved in regulating focal adhesion (FA) size and cortical elasticity in living cells. Although several studies have examined the effects of MT depolymerization or actomyosin activation on biological processes, very few have investigated the influence of both on the mechanical properties, FA assembly, and spreading of fibroblast cells. Here, we examine how activation of both processes modulates cortical elasticity as a function of time. Enhancement of contractility (calyculin A treatment) or the depolymerization of MTs (nocodazole treatment) individually caused a time-dependent increase in FA size, decrease in cell height and an increase in cortical elasticity. Surprisingly, sequentially stimulating both processes led to a decrease in cortical elasticity, loss of intact FAs and a concomitant increase in cell height. Our results demonstrate that loss of MTs disables the ability of fibroblast cells to maintain increased contractility and cortical elasticity upon activation of myosin-II. We speculate that in the absence of an intact MT network, a large amount of contractile tension is transmitted directly to FA sites resulting in their disassembly. This implies that tension-mediated FA growth may have an upper bound, beyond which disassembly takes place. The interplay between cytoskeletal remodeling and actomyosin contractility modulates FA size and cell height, leading to dynamic time-dependent changes in the cortical elasticity of fibroblast cells. Crown Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Everolimus Stabilizes Podocyte Microtubules via Enhancing TUBB2B and DCDC2 Expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefanie Jeruschke

    Full Text Available Glomerular podocytes are highly differentiated cells that are key components of the kidney filtration units. The podocyte cytoskeleton builds the basis for the dynamic podocyte cytoarchitecture and plays a central role for proper podocyte function. Recent studies implicate that immunosuppressive agents including the mTOR-inhibitor everolimus have a protective role directly on the stability of the podocyte actin cytoskeleton. In contrast, a potential stabilization of microtubules by everolimus has not been studied so far.To elucidate mechanisms underlying mTOR-inhibitor mediated cytoskeletal rearrangements, we carried out microarray gene expression studies to identify target genes and corresponding pathways in response to everolimus. We analyzed the effect of everolimus in a puromycin aminonucleoside experimental in vitro model of podocyte injury.Upon treatment with puromycin aminonucleoside, microarray analysis revealed gene clusters involved in cytoskeletal reorganization, cell adhesion, migration and extracellular matrix composition to be affected. Everolimus was capable of protecting podocytes from injury, both on transcriptional and protein level. Rescued genes included tubulin beta 2B class IIb (TUBB2B and doublecortin domain containing 2 (DCDC2, both involved in microtubule structure formation in neuronal cells but not identified in podocytes so far. Validating gene expression data, Western-blot analysis in cultured podocytes demonstrated an increase of TUBB2B and DCDC2 protein after everolimus treatment, and immunohistochemistry in healthy control kidneys confirmed a podocyte-specific expression. Interestingly, Tubb2bbrdp/brdp mice revealed a delay in glomerular podocyte development as showed by podocyte-specific markers Wilm's tumour 1, Podocin, Nephrin and Synaptopodin.Taken together, our study suggests that off-target, non-immune mediated effects of the mTOR-inhibitor everolimus on the podocyte cytoskeleton might involve regulation of

  9. Dynamics Analysis for Hydroturbine Regulating System Based on Matrix Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiafu Wei

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The hydraulic turbine model is the key factor which affects the analysis precision of the hydraulic turbine governing system. This paper discusses the basic principle of the hydraulic turbine matrix model and gives two methods to realize. Using the characteristic matrix to describe unit flow and torque and their relationship with the opening and unit speed, it can accurately represent the nonlinear characteristics of the turbine, effectively improve the convergence of simulation process, and meet the needs of high precision real-time simulation of power system. Through the simulation of a number of power stations, it indicates that, by analyzing the dynamic process of the hydraulic turbine regulating with 5-order matrix model, the calculation results and field test data will have good consistency, and it can better meet the needs of power system dynamic simulation.

  10. Heterogeneous Tau-Tubulin Complexes Accelerate Microtubule Polymerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiao-Han; Rhoades, Elizabeth

    2017-06-20

    Tau is an intrinsically disordered protein with a central role in the pathology of a number of neurodegenerative diseases. Tau normally functions to stabilize neuronal microtubules, although the mechanism underlying this function is not well understood. Of note is that the interaction between tau and soluble tubulin, which has implications both in understanding tau function as well as its role in disease, is underexplored. Here we investigate the relationship between heterogeneity in tau-tubulin complexes and tau function. Specifically, we created a series of truncated and scrambled tau constructs and characterized the size and heterogeneity of the tau-tubulin complexes formed under nonpolymerizing conditions. Function of the constructs was verified by tubulin polymerization assays. We find that, surprisingly, the pseudo-repeat region of tau, which flanks the core microtubule-binding domain of tau, contributes largely to the formation of large, heterogeneous tau tubulin complexes; additional independent tubulin binding sites exist in repeats two and three of the microtubule binding domain. Of particular interest is that we find positive correlation between the size and heterogeneity of the complexes and rate of tau-promoted microtubule polymerization. We propose that tau-tubulin can be described as a "fuzzy" complex, and our results demonstrate the importance of heterogeneous complex formation in tau function. This work provides fundamental insights into the functional mechanism of tau, and more broadly underscores the relevance of heterogeneous and dynamic complexes in the functions of intrinsically disordered proteins. Copyright © 2017 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. The role of symmetry in the regulation of brain dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Evelyn; Giusti, Chad; Cieslak, Matthew; Grafton, Scott; Bassett, Danielle

    Synchronous neural processes regulate a wide range of behaviors from attention to learning. Yet structural constraints on these processes are far from understood. We draw on new theoretical links between structural symmetries and the control of synchronous function, to offer a reconceptualization of the relationships between brain structure and function in human and non-human primates. By classifying 3-node motifs in macaque connectivity data, we find the most prevalent motifs can theoretically ensure a diversity of function including strict synchrony as well as control to arbitrary states. The least prevalent motifs are theoretically controllable to arbitrary states, which may not be desirable in a biological system. In humans, regions with high topological similarity of connections (a continuous notion related to symmetry) are most commonly found in fronto-parietal systems, which may account for their critical role in cognitive control. Collectively, our work underscores the role of symmetry and topological similarity in regulating dynamics of brain function.

  12. Dynamic regulation of Polycomb group activity during plant development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bemer, Marian; Grossniklaus, Ueli

    2012-11-01

    Polycomb group (PcG) complexes play important roles in phase transitions and cell fate determination in plants and animals, by epigenetically repressing sets of genes that promote either proliferation or differentiation. The continuous differentiation of new organs in plants, such as leaves or flowers, requires a highly dynamic PcG function, which can be induced, modulated, or repressed when necessary. In this review, we discuss the recent advance in understanding PcG function in plants and focus on the diverse molecular mechanisms that have been described to regulate and counteract PcG activity in Arabidopsis. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Microtubule-associated proteins from Antarctic fishes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Detrich, H W; Neighbors, B W; Sloboda, R D; Williams, R C

    1990-01-01

    Microtubules and presumptive microtubule-associated proteins (MAPs) were isolated from the brain tissues of four Antarctic fishes (Notothenia gibberifrons, N. coriiceps neglecta, Chaenocephalus aceratus, and a Chionodraco sp.) by means of a taxol-dependent, microtubule-affinity procedure (cf. Vallee: Journal of Cell Biology 92:435-442, 1982). MAPs from these fishes were similar to each other in electrophoretic pattern. Prominent in each preparation were proteins in the molecular weight ranges 410,000-430,000, 220,000-280,000, 140,000-155,000, 85,000-95,000, 40,000-45,000, and 32,000-34,000. The surfaces of MAP-rich microtubules were decorated by numerous filamentous projections. Exposure to elevated ionic strength released the MAPs from the microtubules and also removed the filamentous projections. Addition of fish MAPs to subcritical concentrations of fish tubulins at 0-5 degrees C induced the assembly of microtubules. Both the rate and the extent of this assembly increased with increasing concentrations of the MAPs. Sedimentation revealed that approximately six proteins, with apparent molecular weights between 60,000 and 300,000, became incorporated into the microtubule polymer. Bovine MAPs promoted microtubule formation by fish tubulin at 2-5 degrees C, and proteins corresponding to MAPs 1 and 2 co-sedimented with the polymer. MAPs from C. aceratus also enhanced the polymerization of bovine tubulin at 33 degrees C, but the microtubules depolymerized at 0 degrees C. We conclude that MAPs are part of the microtubules of Antarctic fishes, that these proteins promote microtubule assembly in much the same way as mammalian MAPs, and that they do not possess special capacities to promote microtubule assembly at low temperatures or to prevent cold-induced microtubule depolymerization.

  14. Lamin A and microtubules collaborate to maintain nuclear morphology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tariq, Zeshan; Zhang, Haoyue; Chia-Liu, Alexander; Shen, Yang; Gete, Yantenew; Xiong, Zheng-Mei; Tocheny, Claire; Campanello, Leonard; Wu, Di; Losert, Wolfgang; Cao, Kan

    2017-07-04

    Lamin A (LA) is a critical structural component of the nuclear lamina. Mutations within the LA gene (LMNA) lead to several human disorders, most striking of which is Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria Syndrome (HGPS), a premature aging disorder. HGPS cells are best characterized by an abnormal nuclear morphology known as nuclear blebbing, which arises due to the accumulation of progerin, a dominant mutant form of LA. The microtubule (MT) network is known to mediate changes in nuclear morphology in the context of specific events such as mitosis, cell polarization, nucleus positioning and cellular migration. What is less understood is the role of the microtubule network in determining nuclear morphology during interphase. In this study, we elucidate the role of the cytoskeleton in regulation and misregulation of nuclear morphology through perturbations of both the lamina and the microtubule network. We found that LA knockout cells exhibit a crescent shape morphology associated with the microtubule-organizing center. Furthermore, this crescent shape ameliorates upon treatment with MT drugs, Nocodazole or Taxol. Expression of progerin, in LA knockout cells also rescues the crescent shape, although the response to Nocodazole or Taxol treatment is altered in comparison to cells expressing LA. Together these results describe a collaborative effort between LA and the MT network to maintain nuclear morphology.

  15. Interactive Domains in the Molecular Chaperone Human ?B Crystallin Modulate Microtubule Assembly and Disassembly

    OpenAIRE

    Ghosh, Joy G.; Houck, Scott A.; Clark, John I.

    2007-01-01

    Small heat shock proteins regulate microtubule assembly during cell proliferation and in response to stress through interactions that are poorly understood.Novel functions for five interactive sequences in the small heat shock protein and molecular chaperone, human alphaB crystallin, were investigated in the assembly/disassembly of microtubules and aggregation of tubulin using synthetic peptides and mutants of human alphaB crystallin.The interactive sequence (113)FISREFHR(120) exposed on the ...

  16. Fast Responding Voltage Regulator and Dynamic VAR Compensator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Divan, Deepak [Varentec, Incorporated, San Jose, CA (United States); Moghe, Rohit [Varentec, Incorporated, San Jose, CA (United States); Tholomier, Damien [Varentec, Incorporated, San Jose, CA (United States)

    2014-12-31

    The objectives of this project were to develop a dynamic VAR compensator (DVC) for voltage regulation through VAR support to demonstrate the ability to achieve greater levels of voltage control on electricity distribution networks, and faster response compared to existing grid technology. The goal of the project was to develop a prototype Fast Dynamic VAR Compensator (Fast DVC) hardware device, and this was achieved. In addition to developing the dynamic VAR compensator device, Varentec in partnership with researchers at North Carolina State University (NCSU) successfully met the objectives to model the potential positive impact of such DVCs on representative power networks. This modeling activity validated the ability of distributed dynamic VAR compensators to provide fast voltage regulation and reactive power control required to respond to grid disturbances under high penetration of fluctuating and intermittent distributed energy resources (DERs) through extensive simulation studies. Specifically the following tasks were set to be accomplished: 1) Development of dynamic VAR compensator to support dynamic voltage variations on the grid through VAR control 2) Extensive testing of the DVC in the lab environment 3) Present the operational DVC device to the DOE at Varentec’s lab 4) Formulation of a detailed specification sheet, unit assembly document, test setup document, unit bring-up plan, and test plan 5) Extensive simulations of the DVC in a system with high PV penetration. Understanding the operation with many DVC on a single distribution system 6) Creation and submittal of quarterly and final reports conveying the design documents, unit performance data, modeling simulation charts and diagrams, and summary explanations of the satisfaction of program goals. This report details the various efforts that led to the development of the Fast DVC as well as the modeling & simulation results. The report begins with the introduction in Section II which outlines the

  17. Kinetochore microtubules in PTK cells

    OpenAIRE

    1992-01-01

    We have analyzed the fine structure of 10 chromosomal fibers from mitotic spindles of PtK1 cells in metaphase and anaphase, using electron microscopy of serial thin sections and computer image processing to follow the trajectories of the component microtubules (MTs) in three dimensions. Most of the kinetochore MTs ran from their kinetochore to the vicinity of the pole, retaining a clustered arrangement over their entire length. This MT bundle was invaded by large numbers of other MTs that wer...

  18. Cyclostreptin and microtubules: is a low-affinity binding site required?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prussia, Andrew J; Yang, Yutao; Geballe, Matthew T; Snyder, James P

    2010-01-04

    Cyclostreptin (CS) is a recently discovered natural product with cytotoxic activity caused by microtubule stabilization. It is the only known microtubule-stabilizing agent (MSA) that covalently binds to tubulin. It also exhibits the fast-binding kinetics seen for other MSAs. Through careful peptide digestion and mass spectrometry analysis, Buey et al. found that two amino acids are labeled by CS: Asn228, near the known taxane-binding site, and Thr220, in the type I microtubule pore. This led Buey et al. to propose Thr220 resides at the site previously predicted to be a way station or low-affinity site. By using molecular dynamics simulations and structural considerations of the microtubule pore and tubulin dimer, we conclude that postulation of a low-affinity site is unnecessary to explain the available experimental data. An alternative explanation views the microtubule pore as a structural entity that presents a substantial kinetic barrier to ligand passage to the known taxane-binding site-an entry point to the microtubule lumen that becomes completely blocked if cyclostreptin is bound at Thr220. Simulations of the free dimer also suggest a common mechanism of microtubule stabilization for taxane site MSAs through their conformational effect on the M-loop. Such an effect explains the low tubulin polymerization caused by cyclostreptin in vitro despite its covalent attachment.

  19. Long astral microtubules and RACK-1 stabilize polarity domains during maintenance phase in Caenorhabditis elegans embryos.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erkang Ai

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Cell polarity is a very well conserved process important for cell differentiation, cell migration, and embryonic development. After the establishment of distinct cortical domains, polarity cues have to be stabilized and maintained within a fluid and dynamic membrane to achieve proper cell asymmetry. Microtubules have long been thought to deliver the signals required to polarize a cell. While previous studies suggest that microtubules play a key role in the establishment of polarity, the requirement of microtubules during maintenance phase remains unclear. In this study, we show that depletion of Caenorhabditis elegans RACK-1, which leads to short astral microtubules during prometaphase, specifically affects maintenance of cortical PAR domains and Dynamin localization. We then investigated the consequence of knocking down other factors that also abolish astral microtubule elongation during polarity maintenance phase. We found a correlation between short astral microtubules and the instability of PAR-6 and PAR-2 domains during maintenance phase. Our data support a necessary role for astral microtubules in the maintenance phase of cell polarity.

  20. Laulimalide induces dose-dependent modulation of microtubule behaviour in the C. elegans embryo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Megha Bajaj

    Full Text Available Laulimalide is a microtubule-binding drug that was originally isolated from marine sponges. High concentrations of laulimalide stabilize microtubules and inhibit cell division similarly to paclitaxel; however, there are important differences with respect to the nature of the specific cellular defects between these two drugs and their binding sites on the microtubule. In this study, we used Caenorhabditis elegans embryos to investigate the acute effects of laulimalide on microtubules in vivo, with a direct comparison to paclitaxel. We observed surprising dose-dependent effects for laulimalide, whereby microtubules were stabilized at concentrations above 100 nM, but destabilized at concentrations between 50 and 100 nM. Despite this behaviour at low concentrations, laulimalide acted synergistically with paclitaxel to stabilize microtubules when both drugs were used at sub-effective concentrations, consistent with observations of synergistic interactions between these two drugs in other systems. Our results indicate that laulimalide induces a concentration-dependent, biphasic change in microtubule polymer dynamics in the C. elegans embryo.

  1. Microtubules mediate germ-nuclear behavior after meiosis in conjugation of Paramecium caudatum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakajima, Yuka; Ishida, Masaki; Mikami, Kazuyuki

    2002-01-01

    Microtubule dynamics in Paramecium caudatum were investigated with an anti-alpha-tubulin antibody and a microinjection technique to determine the function of microtubules on micronuclear behavior during conjugation. After meiosis, all four haploid micronuclei were connected by microtubular filaments to the paroral region and moved close to this region. This nuclear movement was micronucleus-specific, because some small macronuclear fragments transplanted from exconjugants never moved to the region. Only one of the four germ nuclei moved into the paroral cone and was covered by microtubule assembly (the so-called first assembly of microtubules, AM-I). This nucleus survived there, while the other three not in this region degenerated. The movement of germ nucleus was inhibited by the injection of the anti-alpha-tubulin antibody. The surviving germ nucleus divided once and produced a migratory pronucleus and a stationary pronucleus. Prior to the reciprocal exchange of the migratory nuclei, microtubules assembled around the migratory pronuclei again (the so-called second assembly of microtubules, AM-II). Then, the migratory pronucleus moved into the partner cell and fused with the stationary pronucleus. Thus, microtubules appear to be indispensable for nuclear behavior: they enable migration of postmeiotic nuclei to the paroral region and they permit the survival of the nucleus at the paroral cone.

  2. Structural differences between yeast and mammalian microtubules revealed by cryo-EM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howes, Stuart C. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Biophysics Graduate Group; Geyer, Elisabeth A. [Univ. of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States). Dept. of Biophysics; Univ. of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States). Dept. of Biochemistry; LaFrance, Benjamin [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Molecular and Cell Biology Graduate Program; Zhang, Rui [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Howard Hughes Medical Inst.; Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Molecular Biophysics and Integrated Bioimaging Division; Kellogg, Elizabeth H. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Howard Hughes Medical Inst.; Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Molecular Biophysics and Integrated Bioimaging Division; Westermann, Stefan [Univ. of Duisburg-Essen, Essen (Germany). Dept. of Molecular Genetics, Center for Medical Biotechnology; Rice, Luke M. [Univ. of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States). Dept. of Biophysics; Univ. of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States). Dept. of Biochemistry; Nogales, Eva [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Howard Hughes Medical Inst.; Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Molecular Biology and California Inst. for Quantitative Biosciences; Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Molecular Biophysics and Integrated Bioimaging Division

    2017-06-26

    Microtubules are polymers of αβ-tubulin heterodimers essential for all eukaryotes. Despite sequence conservation, there are significant structural differences between microtubules assembled in vitro from mammalian or budding yeast tubulin. Yeast MTs were not observed to undergo compaction at the interdimer interface as seen for mammalian microtubules upon GTP hydrolysis. Lack of compaction might reflect slower GTP hydrolysis or a different degree of allosteric coupling in the lattice. The microtubule plus end–tracking protein Bim1 binds yeast microtubules both between αβ-tubulin heterodimers, as seen for other organisms, and within tubulin dimers, but binds mammalian tubulin only at interdimer contacts. At the concentrations used in cryo-electron microscopy, Bim1 causes the compaction of yeast microtubules and induces their rapid disassembly. In conclusion, our studies demonstrate structural differences between yeast and mammalian microtubules that likely underlie their differing polymerization dynamics. These differences may reflect adaptations to the demands of different cell size or range of physiological growth temperatures.

  3. Microtubule-targeting drugs rescue axonal swellings in cortical neurons from spastin knockout mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coralie Fassier

    2013-01-01

    Mutations in SPG4, encoding the microtubule-severing protein spastin, are responsible for the most frequent form of hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP, a heterogeneous group of genetic diseases characterized by degeneration of the corticospinal tracts. We previously reported that mice harboring a deletion in Spg4, generating a premature stop codon, develop progressive axonal degeneration characterized by focal axonal swellings associated with impaired axonal transport. To further characterize the molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying this mutant phenotype, we have assessed microtubule dynamics and axonal transport in primary cultures of cortical neurons from spastin-mutant mice. We show an early and marked impairment of microtubule dynamics all along the axons of spastin-deficient cortical neurons, which is likely to be responsible for the occurrence of axonal swellings and cargo stalling. Our analysis also reveals that a modulation of microtubule dynamics by microtubule-targeting drugs rescues the mutant phenotype of cortical neurons. Together, these results contribute to a better understanding of the pathogenesis of SPG4-linked HSP and ascertain the influence of microtubule-targeted drugs on the early axonal phenotype in a mouse model of the disease.

  4. TRIM46 Controls Neuronal Polarity and Axon Specification by Driving the Formation of Parallel Microtubule Arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Beuningen, Sam F B; Will, Lena; Harterink, Martin; Chazeau, Anaël; van Battum, Eljo Y; Frias, Cátia P; Franker, Mariella A M; Katrukha, Eugene A; Stucchi, Riccardo; Vocking, Karin; Antunes, Ana T; Slenders, Lotte; Doulkeridou, Sofia; Sillevis Smitt, Peter; Altelaar, A F Maarten; Post, Jan A; Akhmanova, Anna; Pasterkamp, R Jeroen; Kapitein, Lukas C; de Graaff, Esther; Hoogenraad, Casper C

    2015-12-16

    Axon formation, the initial step in establishing neuronal polarity, critically depends on local microtubule reorganization and is characterized by the formation of parallel microtubule bundles. How uniform microtubule polarity is achieved during axonal development remains an outstanding question. Here, we show that the tripartite motif containing (TRIM) protein TRIM46 plays an instructive role in the initial polarization of neuronal cells. TRIM46 is specifically localized to the newly specified axon and, at later stages, partly overlaps with the axon initial segment (AIS). TRIM46 specifically forms closely spaced parallel microtubule bundles oriented with their plus-end out. Without TRIM46, all neurites have a dendrite-like mixed microtubule organization resulting in Tau missorting and altered cargo trafficking. By forming uniform microtubule bundles in the axon, TRIM46 is required for neuronal polarity and axon specification in vitro and in vivo. Thus, TRIM46 defines a unique axonal cytoskeletal compartment for regulating microtubule organization during neuronal development. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Dynamic plasticity in phototransduction regulates seasonal changes in color perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimmura, Tsuyoshi; Nakayama, Tomoya; Shinomiya, Ai; Fukamachi, Shoji; Yasugi, Masaki; Watanabe, Eiji; Shimo, Takayuki; Senga, Takumi; Nishimura, Toshiya; Tanaka, Minoru; Kamei, Yasuhiro; Naruse, Kiyoshi; Yoshimura, Takashi

    2017-09-04

    To cope with seasonal changes in the environment, organisms adapt their physiology and behavior. Although color perception varies among seasons, the underlying molecular basis and its physiological significance remain unclear. Here we show that dynamic plasticity in phototransduction regulates seasonal changes in color perception in medaka fish. Medaka are active and exhibit clear phototaxis in conditions simulating summer, but remain at the bottom of the tank and fail to exhibit phototaxis in conditions simulating winter. Mate preference tests using virtual fish created with computer graphics demonstrate that medaka are more attracted to orange-red-colored model fish in summer than in winter. Transcriptome analysis of the eye reveals dynamic seasonal changes in the expression of genes encoding photopigments and their downstream pathways. Behavioral analysis of photopigment-null fish shows significant differences from wild type, suggesting that plasticity in color perception is crucial for the emergence of seasonally regulated behaviors.Animal coloration and behavior can change seasonally, but it is unclear if visual sensitivity to color shifts as well. Here, Shimmura et al. show that medaka undergo seasonal behavioral change accompanied by altered expression of opsin genes, resulting in reduced visual sensitivity to mates during winter-like conditions.

  6. The Drosophila microtubule-associated protein mars stabilizes mitotic spindles by crosslinking microtubules through its N-terminal region.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gang Zhang

    Full Text Available Correct segregation of genetic material relies on proper assembly and maintenance of the mitotic spindle. How the highly dynamic microtubules (MTs are maintained in stable mitotic spindles is a key question to be answered. Motor and non-motor microtubule associated proteins (MAPs have been reported to stabilize the dynamic spindle through crosslinking adjacent MTs. Mars, a novel MAP, is essential for the early development of Drosophila embryos. Previous studies showed that Mars is required for maintaining an intact mitotic spindle but did not provide a molecular mechanism for this function. Here we show that Mars is able to stabilize the mitotic spindle in vivo. Both in vivo and in vitro data reveal that the N-terminal region of Mars functions in the stabilization of the mitotic spindle by crosslinking adjacent MTs.

  7. The Drosophila Microtubule-Associated Protein Mars Stabilizes Mitotic Spindles by Crosslinking Microtubules through Its N-Terminal Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Gang; Beati, Hamze; Nilsson, Jakob; Wodarz, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    Correct segregation of genetic material relies on proper assembly and maintenance of the mitotic spindle. How the highly dynamic microtubules (MTs) are maintained in stable mitotic spindles is a key question to be answered. Motor and non-motor microtubule associated proteins (MAPs) have been reported to stabilize the dynamic spindle through crosslinking adjacent MTs. Mars, a novel MAP, is essential for the early development of Drosophila embryos. Previous studies showed that Mars is required for maintaining an intact mitotic spindle but did not provide a molecular mechanism for this function. Here we show that Mars is able to stabilize the mitotic spindle in vivo. Both in vivo and in vitro data reveal that the N-terminal region of Mars functions in the stabilization of the mitotic spindle by crosslinking adjacent MTs. PMID:23593258

  8. Precise regulation of gene expression dynamics favors complex promoter architectures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dirk Müller

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Promoters process signals through recruitment of transcription factors and RNA polymerase, and dynamic changes in promoter activity constitute a major noise source in gene expression. However, it is barely understood how complex promoter architectures determine key features of promoter dynamics. Here, we employ prototypical promoters of yeast ribosomal protein genes as well as simplified versions thereof to analyze the relations among promoter design, complexity, and function. These promoters combine the action of a general regulatory factor with that of specific transcription factors, a common motif of many eukaryotic promoters. By comprehensively analyzing stationary and dynamic promoter properties, this model-based approach enables us to pinpoint the structural characteristics underlying the observed behavior. Functional tradeoffs impose constraints on the promoter architecture of ribosomal protein genes. We find that a stable scaffold in the natural design results in low transcriptional noise and strong co-regulation of target genes in the presence of gene silencing. This configuration also exhibits superior shut-off properties, and it can serve as a tunable switch in living cells. Model validation with independent experimental data suggests that the models are sufficiently realistic. When combined, our results offer a mechanistic explanation for why specific factors are associated with low protein noise in vivo. Many of these findings hold for a broad range of model parameters and likely apply to other eukaryotic promoters of similar structure.

  9. Minus-end-directed motor Ncd exhibits processive movement that is enhanced by microtubule bundling in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furuta, Ken'ya; Toyoshima, Yoko Yano

    2008-01-22

    Drosophila Ncd, a kinesin-14A family member, is essential for meiosis and mitosis. Ncd is a minus-end-directed motor protein that has an ATP-independent microtubule binding site in the tail region, which enables it to act as a dynamic crosslinker of microtubules to assemble and maintain the spindle. Although a tailless Ncd has been shown to be nonprocessive, the role of the Ncd tail in single-molecule motility is unknown. Here, we show that individual Ncd dimers containing the tail region can move processively along microtubules at very low ionic strength, which provides the first evidence of processivity for minus-end-directed kinesins. The movement of GFP-Ncd consists of both a unidirectional and a diffusive element, and it was sensitive to ionic strength. Motility of a truncation series of Ncd and removal of the tubulin tail suggested that the Ncd tail serves as an electrostatic tether to microtubules. Under higher ionic conditions, Ncd showed only a small bias in diffusion along "single" microtubules, whereas it exhibited processive movement along "bundled" microtubules. This property may allow Ncd to accumulate preferentially in the vicinity of focused microtubules and then to crosslink and slide microtubules, possibly contributing to dynamic spindle self-organization.

  10. Microtubule arrays and Arabidopsis stomatal development

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jessica R. Lucas; Jeanette A. Nadeau; Fred D. Sack

    Microtubule arrays in living cells were analysed during Arabidopsis stomatal development in order to more closely define stages in the pathway and contexts where intercellular signalling might operate...

  11. Tubulin Bond Energies and Microtubule Biomechanics Determined from Nanoindentation in Silico

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Microtubules, the primary components of the chromosome segregation machinery, are stabilized by longitudinal and lateral noncovalent bonds between the tubulin subunits. However, the thermodynamics of these bonds and the microtubule physicochemical properties are poorly understood. Here, we explore the biomechanics of microtubule polymers using multiscale computational modeling and nanoindentations in silico of a contiguous microtubule fragment. A close match between the simulated and experimental force–deformation spectra enabled us to correlate the microtubule biomechanics with dynamic structural transitions at the nanoscale. Our mechanical testing revealed that the compressed MT behaves as a system of rigid elements interconnected through a network of lateral and longitudinal elastic bonds. The initial regime of continuous elastic deformation of the microtubule is followed by the transition regime, during which the microtubule lattice undergoes discrete structural changes, which include first the reversible dissociation of lateral bonds followed by irreversible dissociation of the longitudinal bonds. We have determined the free energies of dissociation of the lateral (6.9 ± 0.4 kcal/mol) and longitudinal (14.9 ± 1.5 kcal/mol) tubulin–tubulin bonds. These values in conjunction with the large flexural rigidity of tubulin protofilaments obtained (18,000–26,000 pN·nm2) support the idea that the disassembling microtubule is capable of generating a large mechanical force to move chromosomes during cell division. Our computational modeling offers a comprehensive quantitative platform to link molecular tubulin characteristics with the physiological behavior of microtubules. The developed in silico nanoindentation method provides a powerful tool for the exploration of biomechanical properties of other cytoskeletal and multiprotein assemblies. PMID:25389565

  12. The chromosomal passenger complex controls spindle checkpoint function independent from its role in correcting microtubule-kinetochore interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vader, Gerben; Cruijsen, Carin W. A.; van Harn, Tanja; Vromans, Martijn J. M.; Medema, Rene H.; Lens, Susanne M. A.

    2007-01-01

    The chromosomal passenger complex (CPC) is a critical regulator of chromosome segregation during mitosis by correcting nonbipolar microtubule-kinetochore interactions. By severing these interactions, the CPC is thought to create unattached kinetochores that are subsequently sensed by the spindle

  13. Dynamic and Regulated Competition in the Portuguese Pharmacy Market

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Gomes

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The pharmacy sector in Portugal has faced a time of profound changes and challenges: from market deregulation until the implementation of austerity measures as consequence of the international crisis boosted in 2008 and the signature of the Memorandum of Understanding (2011 between the Portuguese Government and Troika. The economic unsustainability of the sector and in consequence, the increasing number of pharmacies in insolvencies or seizures is a reality. This study analyses the dynamics of the pharmacy market following the introduction of pro-competitive measures and the impact of the economic crisis while the market was adjusting to a new configuration and structure. Methods: A retrospective analysis was conducted using data from ANF national registries of community pharmacy between 2010 and 2016. Closures were counted for existing pharmacies and openings were counted for new pharmacies and reopenings. Descriptive statistics and correlation analysis were performed. Results: The results show the existence of a dynamic and competitive market, evidenced by the entry and exit of pharmacies. In the last six years 236 pharmacies opened and 147 closed, which shows a positive balance with 89 new pharmacies. The distribution of pharmacies seems to follow citizens’ needs meeting the national health policy goals of equity and access to health care services. Conclusion: These results suggest that pharmacies were able to restructure and adapt to times of change and a mature and fully functioning market. The flexibility of the legal framework promotes a market of regulated competition through the entry and exists of pharmacies.

  14. TIRF microscopy evanescent field calibration using tilted fluorescent microtubules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gell, C; Berndt, M; Enderlein, J; Diez, S

    2009-04-01

    Total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy has become a powerful tool to study the dynamics of sub-cellular structures and single molecules near substrate surfaces. However, the penetration depth of the evanescent field, that is, the distance at which the excitation intensity has exponentially decayed to 1/e, is often left undetermined. This presents a limit on the spatial information about the imaged structures. Here, we present a novel method to quantitatively characterize the illumination in total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy using tilted, fluorescently labelled, microtubules. We find that the evanescent field is well described by a single exponential function, with a penetration depth close to theoretically predicted values. The use of in vitro reconstituted microtubules as nanoscale probes results in a minimal perturbation of the evanescent field; excitation light scattering is eliminated and the refractive index of the sample environment is unchanged. The presented method has the potential to provide a generic tool for in situ calibration of the evanescent field.

  15. Movement of chromosomes with severed kinetochore microtubules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forer, Arthur; Johansen, Kristen M; Johansen, Jørgen

    2015-05-01

    Experiments dating from 1966 and thereafter showed that anaphase chromosomes continued to move poleward after their kinetochore microtubules were severed by ultraviolet microbeam irradiation. These observations were initially met with scepticism as they contradicted the prevailing view that kinetochore fibre microtubules pulled chromosomes to the pole. However, recent experiments using visible light laser microbeam irradiations have corroborated these earlier experiments as anaphase chromosomes again were shown to move poleward after their kinetochore microtubules were severed. Thus, multiple independent studies using different techniques have shown that chromosomes can indeed move poleward without direct microtubule connections to the pole, with only a kinetochore 'stub' of microtubules. An issue not yet settled is: what propels the disconnected chromosome? There are two not necessarily mutually exclusive proposals in the literature: (1) chromosome movement is propelled by the kinetochore stub interacting with non-kinetochore microtubules and (2) chromosome movement is propelled by a spindle matrix acting on the stub. In this review, we summarise the data indicating that chromosomes can move with severed kinetochore microtubules and we discuss proposed mechanisms for chromosome movement with severed kinetochore microtubules.

  16. Survivin counteracts the therapeutic effect of microtubule de-stabilizers by stabilizing tubulin polymers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsieh Hsing-Pang

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Survivin is a dual function protein. It inhibits the apoptosis of cells by inhibiting caspases, and also promotes cell growth by stabilizing microtubules during mitosis. Over-expression of survivin has been demonstrated to induce drug-resistance to various chemo-therapeutic agents such as cisplatin (DNA damaging agent and paclitaxel (microtubule stabilizer in cancers. However, survivin-induced resistance to microtubule de-stabilizers such as Vinca alkaloids and Combretastatin A-4 (CA-4-related compounds were seldom demonstrated in the past. Furthermore, the question remains as to whether survivin plays a dominant role in processing cytokinesis or inhibiting caspases activity in cells treated with anti-mitotic compounds. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the effect of survivin on the resistance and susceptibility of human cancer cells to microtubule de-stabilizer-induced cell death. Results BPR0L075 is a CA-4 analog that induces microtubule de-polymerization and subsequent caspase-dependent apoptosis. To study the relationship between the expression of survivin and the resistance to microtubule de-stabilizers, a KB-derived BPR0L075-resistant cancer cell line, KB-L30, was generated for this study. Here, we found that survivin was over-expressed in the KB-L30 cells. Down-regulation of survivin by siRNA induced hyper-sensitivity to BPR0L075 in KB cells and partially re-stored sensitivity to BPR0L075 in KB-L30 cells. Western blot analysis revealed that down-regulation of survivin induced microtubule de-stabilization in both KB and KB-L30 cells. However, the same treatment did not enhance the down-stream caspase-3/-7 activities in BPR0L075-treated KB cells. Translocation of a caspase-independent apoptosis-related molecule, apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF, from cytoplasm to the nucleus was observed in survivin-targeted KB cells under BPR0L075 treatment. Conclusion In this study, survivin plays an important role in the

  17. Dynamic curvature regulation accounts for the symmetric and asymmetric beats of Chlamydomonas flagella

    CERN Document Server

    Sartori, Pablo; Scholich, Andre; Jülicher, Frank; Howard, Jonathon

    2015-01-01

    Axonemal dyneins are the molecular motors responsible for the beating of cilia and flagella. These motors generate sliding forces between adjacent microtubule doublets within the axoneme, the motile cytoskeletal structure inside the flagellum. To create regular, oscillatory beating patterns, the activities of the axonemal dyneins must be coordinated both spatially and temporally. It is thought that coordination is mediated by stresses or strains that build up within the moving axoneme, but it is not known which components of stress or strain are involved, nor how they feed back on the dyneins. To answer this question, we used isolated, reactivate axonemes of the unicellular alga Chlamydomonas as a model system. We derived a theory for beat regulation in a two-dimensional model of the axoneme. We then tested the theory by measuring the beat waveforms of wild type axonemes, which have asymmetric beats, and mutant axonemes, in which the beat is nearly symmetric, using high-precision spatial and temporal imaging....

  18. Disruption of microtubule network rescues aberrant actin comets in dynamin2-depleted cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuji Henmi

    Full Text Available A large GTPase dynamin, which is required for endocytic vesicle formation, regulates the actin cytoskeleton through its interaction with cortactin. Dynamin2 mutants impair the formation of actin comets, which are induced by Listeria monocytogenes or phosphatidylinositol-4-phosphate 5-kinase. However, the role of dynamin2 in the regulation of the actin comet is still unclear. Here we show that aberrant actin comets in dynamin2-depleted cells were rescued by disrupting of microtubule networks. Depletion of dynamin2, but not cortactin, significantly reduced the length and the speed of actin comets induced by Listeria. This implies that dynamin2 may regulate the actin comet in a cortactin-independent manner. As dynamin regulates microtubules, we investigated whether perturbation of microtubules would rescue actin comet formation in dynamin2-depleted cells. Treatment with taxol or colchicine created a microtubule-free space in the cytoplasm, and made no difference between control and dynamin2 siRNA cells. This suggests that the alteration of microtubules by dynamin2 depletion reduced the length and the speed of the actin comet.

  19. Using total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy to visualize cortical actin and microtubules in the Drosophila syncytial embryo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Rebecca L; Rozov, Orr; Watkins, Simon C; McCartney, Brooke M

    2009-10-01

    The Drosophila syncytial embryo is a powerful developmental model system for studying dynamic coordinated cytoskeletal rearrangements. Confocal microscopy has begun to reveal more about the cytoskeletal changes that occur during embryogenesis. Total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy provides a promising new approach for the visualization of cortical events with heightened axial resolution. We have applied TIRF microscopy to the Drosophila embryo to visualize cortical microtubule and actin dynamics in the syncytial blastoderm. Here, we describe the details of this technique, and report qualitative assessments of cortical microtubules and actin in the Drosophila syncytial embryo. In addition, we identified a peak of cortical microtubules during anaphase of each nuclear cycle in the syncytial blastoderm, and using images generated by TIRF microscopy, we quantitatively analyzed microtubule dynamics during this time.

  20. SPR2 protects minus ends to promote severing and reorientation of plant cortical microtubule arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Masayoshi; Lindeboom, Jelmer J; Saltini, Marco; Mulder, Bela M; Ehrhardt, David W

    2018-01-16

    The cortical microtubule arrays of higher plants are organized without centrosomes and feature treadmilling polymers that are dynamic at both ends. The control of polymer end stability is fundamental for the assembly and organization of cytoskeletal arrays, yet relatively little is understood about how microtubule minus ends are controlled in acentrosomal microtubule arrays, and no factors have been identified that act at the treadmilling minus ends in higher plants. Here, we identify Arabidopsis thaliana SPIRAL2 (SPR2) as a protein that tracks minus ends and protects them against subunit loss. SPR2 function is required to facilitate the rapid reorientation of plant cortical arrays as stimulated by light perception, a process that is driven by microtubule severing to create a new population of microtubules. Quantitative live-cell imaging and computer simulations reveal that minus protection by SPR2 acts by an unexpected mechanism to promote the lifetime of potential SPR2 severing sites, increasing the likelihood of severing and thus the rapid amplification of the new microtubule array. © 2018 Nakamura et al.

  1. A quantitative and dynamic model for plant stem cell regulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florian Geier

    Full Text Available Plants maintain pools of totipotent stem cells throughout their entire life. These stem cells are embedded within specialized tissues called meristems, which form the growing points of the organism. The shoot apical meristem of the reference plant Arabidopsis thaliana is subdivided into several distinct domains, which execute diverse biological functions, such as tissue organization, cell-proliferation and differentiation. The number of cells required for growth and organ formation changes over the course of a plants life, while the structure of the meristem remains remarkably constant. Thus, regulatory systems must be in place, which allow for an adaptation of cell proliferation within the shoot apical meristem, while maintaining the organization at the tissue level. To advance our understanding of this dynamic tissue behavior, we measured domain sizes as well as cell division rates of the shoot apical meristem under various environmental conditions, which cause adaptations in meristem size. Based on our results we developed a mathematical model to explain the observed changes by a cell pool size dependent regulation of cell proliferation and differentiation, which is able to correctly predict CLV3 and WUS over-expression phenotypes. While the model shows stem cell homeostasis under constant growth conditions, it predicts a variation in stem cell number under changing conditions. Consistent with our experimental data this behavior is correlated with variations in cell proliferation. Therefore, we investigate different signaling mechanisms, which could stabilize stem cell number despite variations in cell proliferation. Our results shed light onto the dynamic constraints of stem cell pool maintenance in the shoot apical meristem of Arabidopsis in different environmental conditions and developmental states.

  2. Evaluating sustainability of truck weight regulations: A system dynamics view

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pei Liu

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Targeting the problem of overload trucking in Highway Transportation of iron ore from Caofeidian to Tangshan (HTCT, this paper aims to assess long-term effects of alternative Truck Weight Regulation (TWR policies on sustainability of HTCT. Design/methodology/approach: A system dynamics model was established for policy evaluation. The model, composed of six interrelating modules, is able to simulate policies effects on trucking issues such as freight flow, truck traffic flow, pavement performance, highway transport capacity and trucking time, and further on the Cumulative Economic Cost (CEC including transport cost and time cost of freight owners and the Cumulative Social Cost (CSC including pavement maintenance cost, green house gas emission cost, air pollutants emission cost and traffic accidents cost, so the effects of TWR policies on sustainability of HTCT could be evaluated. Findings: According to different values of overload ratio which a TWR policy allows, alternative TWR policies are classified into three types, which are The Rigid Policy (TRP, The Moderate Policy (TMP and The Tolerant Policy (TTP. Results show that the best policy for sustainability of HTCT depends on the importance of CSC which is expected by the local government. To be specific, (1 if CSC is considered much less important than CEC, the local government should continue implementing the current TTP with the maximum overload ratio; (2 if CSC is considered much more important than CEC, then TRP is recommended; and (3 if CSC is considered slightly more important than CES, TMP with overload ratio of 80% is the best. Practical implications: Conclusions of this paper may help the local government design appropriate TWR policies to achieve sustainability of HTCT. Originality/value: To the best of our knowledge, this is the first effort to evaluate TWR policies on sustainability of regional freight transportation based on system dynamics modeling.

  3. Nonlinear dynamics of mood regulation in bipolar disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz, Abigail; Bradler, Kamil; Garnham, Julie; Slaney, Claire; Alda, Martin

    2015-03-01

    We sought to study the underlying dynamic processes involved in mood regulation in subjects with bipolar disorder and healthy control subjects using time-series analysis and to then analyze the relation between anxiety and mood using cross-correlation techniques. We recruited 30 healthy controls and 30 euthymic patients with bipolar disorder. Participants rated their mood, anxiety, and energy levels using a paper-based visual analog scale; and they also recorded their sleep and any life events. Information on these variables was provided over a three-month period on a daily basis, twice per day. We analyzed the data using Box-Jenkins time series analysis to obtain information on the autocorrelation of the series (for mood) and cross-correlation (mood and anxiety series). Throughout the study, we analyzed 10,170 data points. Self-ratings for mood, anxiety, and energy were normally distributed in both groups. Autocorrelation functions for mood in both groups were governed by the autoregressive integrated moving average (ARIMA) (1,1,0) model, which means that current values in the series were related to one previous point only. We also found a negative cross-correlation between mood and anxiety. Mood can be considered a memory stochastic process; it is a flexible, dynamic process that has a 'short memory' both in healthy controls and euthymic patients with bipolar disorder. This process may be quite different in untreated patients or in those acutely ill. Our results suggest that nonlinear measures can be applied to the study of mood disorders. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Tracking of plus-ends reveals microtubule functional diversity in different cell types

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaebani, M. Reza; Pasula, Aravind; Ott, Albrecht; Santen, Ludger

    2016-07-01

    Many cellular processes are tightly connected to the dynamics of microtubules (MTs). While in neuronal axons MTs mainly regulate intracellular trafficking, they participate in cytoskeleton reorganization in many other eukaryotic cells, enabling the cell to efficiently adapt to changes in the environment. We show that the functional differences of MTs in different cell types and regions is reflected in the dynamic properties of MT tips. Using plus-end tracking proteins EB1 to monitor growing MT plus-ends, we show that MT dynamics and life cycle in axons of human neurons significantly differ from that of fibroblast cells. The density of plus-ends, as well as the rescue and catastrophe frequencies increase while the growth rate decreases toward the fibroblast cell margin. This results in a rather stable filamentous network structure and maintains the connection between nucleus and membrane. In contrast, plus-ends are uniformly distributed along the axons and exhibit diverse polymerization run times and spatially homogeneous rescue and catastrophe frequencies, leading to MT segments of various lengths. The probability distributions of the excursion length of polymerization and the MT length both follow nearly exponential tails, in agreement with the analytical predictions of a two-state model of MT dynamics.

  5. Bmp indicator mice reveal dynamic regulation of transcriptional response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna L Javier

    Full Text Available Cellular responses to Bmp ligands are regulated at multiple levels, both extracellularly and intracellularly. Therefore, the presence of these growth factors is not an accurate indicator of Bmp signaling activity. While a common approach to detect Bmp signaling activity is to determine the presence of phosphorylated forms of Smad1, 5 and 8 by immunostaining, this approach is time consuming and not quantitative. In order to provide a simpler readout system to examine the presence of Bmp signaling in developing animals, we developed BRE-gal mouse embryonic stem cells and a transgenic mouse line that specifically respond to Bmp ligand stimulation. Our reporter identifies specific transcriptional responses that are mediated by Smad1 and Smad4 with the Schnurri transcription factor complex binding to a conserved Bmp-Responsive Element (BRE, originally identified among Drosophila, Xenopus and human Bmp targets. Our BRE-gal mES cells specifically respond to Bmp ligands at concentrations as low as 5 ng/ml; and BRE-gal reporter mice, derived from the BRE-gal mES cells, show dynamic activity in many cellular sites, including extraembryonic structures and mammary glands, thereby making this a useful scientific tool.

  6. Targeting microtubules by natural agents for cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukhtar, Eiman; Adhami, Vaqar Mustafa; Mukhtar, Hasan

    2014-02-01

    Natural compounds that target microtubules and disrupt the normal function of the mitotic spindle have proven to be one of the best classes of cancer chemotherapeutic drugs available in clinics to date. There is increasing evidence showing that even minor alteration of microtubule dynamics can engage the spindle checkpoint, arresting cell-cycle progression at mitosis and subsequently leading to cell death. Our improved understanding of tumor biology and our continued appreciation for what the microtubule targeting agents (MTAs) can do have helped pave the way for a new era in the treatment of cancer. The effectiveness of these agents for cancer therapy has been impaired, however, by various side effects and drug resistance. Several new MTAs have shown potent activity against the proliferation of various cancer cells, including resistance to the existing MTAs. Sustained investigation of the mechanisms of action of MTAs, development and discovery of new drugs, and exploring new treatment strategies that reduce side effects and circumvent drug resistance could provide more effective therapeutic options for patients with cancer. This review focuses on the successful cancer chemotherapy from natural compounds in clinical settings and the challenges that may abort their usefulness.

  7. Emotion regulation and the dynamics of feelings: A conceptual and methodological framework [IF: 3.3

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoeksma, J.B.; Oosterlaan, J.; Schipper, E.M.

    2004-01-01

    The emotional system is defined as a dynamical system that has neurological and biochemical structures that force the system to change in a regular and consistent way. This dynamic view allows for an alternative definition of emotion regulation, which describes when emotion regulation is needed,

  8. Emotion regulation and the dynamic of feelings: A conceptual and methodological framework

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoeksma, J.B.; Oosterlaan, J.; Schipper, E.

    2004-01-01

    The emotional system is defined as a dynamical system that has neurological and biochemical structures that force the system to change in a regular and consistent way. This dynamic view allows for an alternative definition of emotion regulation, which describes when emotion regulation is needed,

  9. Actin filaments connected with the microtubules of lipotubuloids, cytoplasmic domains rich in lipid bodies and microtubules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwiatkowska, M; Popłońska, K; Stepiński, D

    2005-12-01

    Lipotubuloids, i.e., cytoplasmic domains containing an agglomeration of lipid bodies surrounded by half-unit membrane, entwined and held together by a system of microtubules, have been found in the ovary epidermis of Ornithogalum umbellatum. Ultrastructural studies demonstrated thin filaments in lipotubuloids that are probably actin filaments arranged parallel to microtubules. It is suggested that interaction of actin filaments with the microtubules determines the driving force for the rotary motion characteristic of lipotubuloids, as this movement is sensitive to cytochalasin B.

  10. Detection of disulfide bonds in bovine brain tubulin and their role in protein folding and microtubule assembly in vitro: a novel disulfide detection approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhuri, A R; Khan, I A; Ludueña, R F

    2001-07-31

    and the stability of tubulin in vitro. Our results suggest that tubulin disulfides may play a role in tubulin folding and that thiol-disulfide exchange in tubulin could be a key regulator in microtubule assembly and dynamics of tubulin in vivo.

  11. Rho proteins of plants--functional cycle and regulation of cytoskeletal dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mucha, Elena; Fricke, Inka; Schaefer, Antje; Wittinghofer, Alfred; Berken, Antje

    2011-11-01

    Rho-related ROP proteins are molecular switches that essentially regulate a wide variety of processes. Of central interest is their influence on the plant cytoskeleton by which they affect vital processes like cell division, growth, morphogenesis, and pathogen defense. ROPs switch between GTP- and GDP-bound conformations by strictly regulated nucleotide exchange and GTP-hydrolysis, and only the active GTP-form interacts with downstream effectors to ultimately provoke a biological response. However, the mode of action of the engaged regulators and effectors as well as their upstream and downstream interaction partners have long been largely unknown. As opposed to analogous systems in animals and fungi, plants use specific GTPase activating proteins (RopGAPs) with a unique domain composition and novel guanine nucleotide exchange factors (RopGEFs) with a probable link to cell surface receptors. Moreover, plants comprise novel effector molecules and adapters connecting ROPs to mostly unknown downstream targets on the route to the cytoskeleton. This review aims to summarize recent knowledge on the molecular mechanisms and reaction cascades involved in ROP dependent cytoskeletal rearrangements, addressing the structure and function of the unusual RopGAPs, RopGEFs and effectors, and the upstream and downstream pathways linking ROPs to cell receptor-like kinases, actin filaments, and microtubules. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  12. LIS1 and DCX: Implications for Brain Development and Human Disease in Relation to Microtubules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orly Reiner

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Proper lamination of the cerebral cortex requires the orchestrated motility of neurons from their place of birth to their final destination. Improper neuronal migration may result in a wide range of diseases, including brain malformations, such as lissencephaly, mental retardation, schizophrenia, and autism. Ours and other studies have implicated that microtubules and microtubule-associated proteins play an important role in the regulation of neuronal polarization and neuronal migration. Here, we will review normal processes of brain development and neuronal migration, describe neuronal migration diseases, and will focus on the microtubule-associated functions of LIS1 and DCX, which participate in the regulation of neuronal migration and are involved in the human developmental brain disease, lissencephaly.

  13. Identification and characterization of SSE15206, a microtubule depolymerizing agent that overcomes multidrug resistance

    KAUST Repository

    Manzoor, Safia

    2018-02-13

    Microtubules are highly dynamic structures that form spindle fibres during mitosis and are one of the most validated cancer targets. The success of drugs targeting microtubules, however, is often limited by the development of multidrug resistance. Here we describe the discovery and characterization of SSE15206, a pyrazolinethioamide derivative [3-phenyl-5-(3,4,5-trimethoxyphenyl)-4,5-dihydro-1H-pyrazole-1-carbothioamide] that has potent antiproliferative activities in cancer cell lines of different origins and overcomes resistance to microtubule-targeting agents. Treatment of cells with SSE15206 causes aberrant mitosis resulting in G2/M arrest due to incomplete spindle formation, a phenotype often associated with drugs that interfere with microtubule dynamics. SSE15206 inhibits microtubule polymerization both in biochemical and cellular assays by binding to colchicine site in tubulin as shown by docking and competition studies. Prolonged treatment of cells with the compound results in apoptotic cell death [increased Poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase cleavage and Annexin V/PI staining] accompanied by p53 induction. More importantly, we demonstrate that SSE15206 is able to overcome resistance to chemotherapeutic drugs in different cancer cell lines including multidrug-resistant KB-V1 and A2780-Pac-Res cell lines overexpressing MDR-1, making it a promising hit for the lead optimization studies to target multidrug resistance.

  14. Three-dimensional tracking of plus-tips by lattice light-sheet microscopy permits the quantification of microtubule growth trajectories within the mitotic apparatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamashita, Norio; Morita, Masahiko; Legant, Wesley R.; Chen, Bi-Chang; Betzig, Eric; Yokota, Hideo; Mimori-Kiyosue, Yuko

    2015-10-01

    Mitotic apparatus, which comprises hundreds of microtubules, plays an essential role in cell division, ensuring the correct segregation of chromosomes into each daughter cell. To gain insight into its regulatory mechanisms, it is essential to detect and analyze the behavior of individual microtubule filaments. However, the discrimination of discrete microtubule filaments within the mitotic apparatus is beyond the capabilities of conventional light microscopic technologies. Recently, we detected three-dimensional (3-D) microtubule growth dynamics within the cellular cytoplasmic space using lattice light-sheet microscopy in conjunction with microtubule growth marker protein end-binding 1, a microtubule plus-end-tracking protein, which was fused to green fluorescent protein (EB1-GFP). This technique enables high-resolution 3-D imaging at subsecond intervals. We adapted mathematical computing and geometric representation techniques to analyze spatial variations in microtubule growth dynamics within the mitotic spindle apparatus. Our analytical approach enabled the different dynamic properties of individual microtubules to be determined, including the direction and speed of their growth, and their growth duration within a 3-D spatial map. Our analysis framework provides an important step toward a more comprehensive understanding of the mechanisms driving cellular machinery at the whole-cell level.

  15. Dynamic Spectrum Access: regulations, standards and green radio policy considerations

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mfupe, L

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available spectrum management regulations. In this context, this paper investigates conventional and emerging RF spectrum regulations and standards necessary to realise maximum benefits that such technologies might bring. In addition, this paper considers the ever...

  16. MAP1S controls microtubule stability throughout the cell cycle in human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tegha-Dunghu, Justus; Bausch, Elena; Neumann, Beate; Wuensche, Annelie; Walter, Thomas; Ellenberg, Jan; Gruss, Oliver J

    2014-12-01

    Summary Understanding the molecular basis for proper cell division requires a detailed functional analysis of microtubule (MT)-associated proteins. MT-associated protein 1S (MAP1S), the most ubiquitously expressed MAP1 family member, is required for accurate cell division. Here, using quantitative analysis of MT plus-end tracking, we show that MAP1S knockdown alters MT dynamics throughout the cell cycle. Surprisingly, MAP1S downregulation results in faster growing, yet short-lived, MTs in all cell cycle stages and in a global loss of MT acetylation. These aberrations correlate with severe defects in the final stages of cell division. In monopolar cytokinesis assays, we demonstrate that MAP1S guides MT-dependent initiation of cytokinesis. Our data underline the key role of MAP1S as a global regulator of MT stability and demonstrate a new primary function of MAP1S to regulate MT dynamics at the onset of cytokinesis. © 2014. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  17. Biological Information Processing in Single Microtubules

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-03-05

    replaced x and y spatial co- ordinates of a fractal space with frequency (x,y~f1,f2). Their microtubule research showed that the resonance frequency...human technologies Lecture 2: Topological insulators, semiconductors, metals: the physics of new generation materials Lecture 3: Revolutionary...bottom we have rectangular close packing. Scale bar 8 nm. The lattice switching is found to occur naturally, reversibly in microtubule. c. Three

  18. Mto2 multisite phosphorylation inactivates non-spindle microtubule nucleation complexes during mitosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borek, Weronika E.; Groocock, Lynda M.; Samejima, Itaru; Zou, Juan; de Lima Alves, Flavia; Rappsilber, Juri; Sawin, Kenneth E.

    2015-01-01

    Microtubule nucleation is highly regulated during the eukaryotic cell cycle, but the underlying molecular mechanisms are largely unknown. During mitosis in fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, cytoplasmic microtubule nucleation ceases simultaneously with intranuclear mitotic spindle assembly. Cytoplasmic nucleation depends on the Mto1/2 complex, which binds and activates the γ-tubulin complex and also recruits the γ-tubulin complex to both centrosomal (spindle pole body) and non-centrosomal sites. Here we show that the Mto1/2 complex disassembles during mitosis, coincident with hyperphosphorylation of Mto2 protein. By mapping and mutating multiple Mto2 phosphorylation sites, we generate mto2-phosphomutant strains with enhanced Mto1/2 complex stability, interaction with the γ-tubulin complex and microtubule nucleation activity. A mutant with 24 phosphorylation sites mutated to alanine, mto2[24A], retains interphase-like behaviour even in mitotic cells. This provides a molecular-level understanding of how phosphorylation ‘switches off' microtubule nucleation complexes during the cell cycle and, more broadly, illuminates mechanisms regulating non-centrosomal microtubule nucleation. PMID:26243668

  19. Dysregulation of Microtubule Stability Impairs Morphofunctional Connectivity in Primary Neuronal Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verstraelen, Peter; Detrez, Jan R; Verschuuren, Marlies; Kuijlaars, Jacobine; Nuydens, Rony; Timmermans, Jean-Pierre; De Vos, Winnok H

    2017-01-01

    Functionally related neurons assemble into connected networks that process and transmit electrochemical information. To do this in a coordinated manner, the number and strength of synaptic connections is tightly regulated. Synapse function relies on the microtubule (MT) cytoskeleton, the dynamics of which are in turn controlled by a plethora of MT-associated proteins, including the MT-stabilizing protein Tau. Although mutations in the Tau-encoding MAPT gene underlie a set of neurodegenerative disorders, termed tauopathies, the exact contribution of MT dynamics and the perturbation thereof to neuronal network connectivity has not yet been scrutinized. Therefore, we investigated the impact of targeted perturbations of MT stability on morphological (e.g., neurite- and synapse density) and functional (e.g., synchronous calcium bursting) correlates of connectivity in networks of primary hippocampal neurons. We found that treatment with MT-stabilizing or -destabilizing compounds impaired morphofunctional connectivity in a reversible manner. We also discovered that overexpression of MAPT induced significant connectivity defects, which were accompanied by alterations in MT dynamics and increased resistance to pharmacological MT depolymerization. Overexpression of a MAPT variant harboring the P301L point mutation in the MT-binding domain did far less, directly linking neuronal connectivity with Tau's MT binding affinity. Our results show that MT stability is a vulnerable node in tauopathies and that its precise pharmacological tuning may positively affect neuronal network connectivity. However, a critical balance in MT turnover causes it to be a difficult therapeutic target with a narrow operating window.

  20. Microtubule-associated protein 1b is required for shaping the neural tube.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayachandran, Pradeepa; Olmo, Valerie N; Sanchez, Stephanie P; McFarland, Rebecca J; Vital, Eudorah; Werner, Jonathan M; Hong, Elim; Sanchez-Alberola, Neus; Molodstov, Aleksey; Brewster, Rachel M

    2016-01-18

    Shaping of the neural tube, the precursor of the brain and spinal cord, involves narrowing and elongation of the neural tissue, concomitantly with other morphogenetic changes that contribue to this process. In zebrafish, medial displacement of neural cells (neural convergence or NC), which drives the infolding and narrowing of the neural ectoderm, is mediated by polarized migration and cell elongation towards the dorsal midline. Failure to undergo proper NC results in severe neural tube defects, yet the molecular underpinnings of this process remain poorly understood. We investigated here the role of the microtubule (MT) cytoskeleton in mediating NC in zebrafish embryos using the MT destabilizing and hyperstabilizing drugs nocodazole and paclitaxel respectively. We found that MTs undergo major changes in organization and stability during neurulation and are required for the timely completion of NC by promoting cell elongation and polarity. We next examined the role of Microtubule-associated protein 1B (Map1b), previously shown to promote MT dynamicity in axons. map1b is expressed earlier than previously reported, in the developing neural tube and underlying mesoderm. Loss of Map1b function using morpholinos (MOs) or δMap1b (encoding a truncated Map1b protein product) resulted in delayed NC and duplication of the neural tube, a defect associated with impaired NC. We observed a loss of stable MTs in these embryos that is likely to contribute to the NC defect. Lastly, we found that Map1b mediates cell elongation in a cell autonomous manner and polarized protrusive activity, two cell behaviors that underlie NC and are MT-dependent. Together, these data highlight the importance of MTs in the early morphogenetic movements that shape the neural tube and reveal a novel role for the MT regulator Map1b in mediating cell elongation and polarized cell movement in neural progenitor cells.

  1. Activation of tubulin assembly into microtubules upon a series of repeated femtosecond laser impulses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tulub, AA; Stefanov, VE

    2004-01-01

    Tubulin, a globular protein, mostly distributed in nature in the dimeric alpha, beta form, can polymerize in vivo and in vitro into microtubules-longitudinal dynamic assemblies, involved in numerous cellular functions, including cell division and signaling. Tubulin polymerization starts upon binding

  2. The organization of the Golgi complex and microtubules in skeletal muscle is fiber type-dependent

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ralston, E; Lu, Z; Ploug, Thorkil

    1999-01-01

    Skeletal muscle has a nonconventional Golgi complex (GC), the organization of which has been a subject of controversy in the past. We have now examined the distribution of the GC by immunofluorescence and immunogold electron microscopy in whole fibers from different rat muscles, both innervated...... of the hindlimb muscles, GC elements as well as microtubules converge toward a common pattern, that of the slow-twitch fibers, in all fibers. Our data suggest that innervation regulates the distribution of microtubules, which in turn organize the Golgi complex according to muscle fiber type....

  3. Possible link between guanosine 5|IH triphosphate hydrolysis and solitary waves in microtubules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trpisováand, B.; Tuszyński, J. A.

    1997-03-01

    The cytoskeleton of eucaryotic cells is composed of several classes of protein polymers among which microtubules (MTs) are the most prominent. Microtubules are important in a variety of cellular activities but the physical reasons underlying their behavior are largely unknown. Inside the cell they usually exist in an unstable dynamic state characterized by a continuous addition and dissociation of the molecules of tubulin. The addition of each tubulin is accompanied by the hydrolysis of guanosine 5|IH triphosphate bound to the Β monomer of the molecule. Experiments show that an amount of energy comparable to 6.25×10-21 J is freed in this reaction. A few researchers have put forward a hypothesis that this energy can travel along MTs as a kinklike solitary wave. In this paper two models are analyzed whose special solutions are traveling kinks that arise as a result of coupling between dielectric and elastic degrees of freedom of tubulin. By means of these models a collision of the kink wave with an impurity in the microtubule is studied. The impurity may represent a protein attached to the microtubule or a structural discontinuity in the arrangement of the tubulin molecules. We conjecture that the collisions of the quanta of energy propagating in the form of kinks with such defects may explain some features of the microtubule behavior.

  4. A study of microtubule dipole lattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nandi, Shubhendu

    Microtubules are cytoskeletal protein polymers orchestrating a host of important cellular functions including, but not limited to, cell support, cell division, cell motility and cell transport. In this thesis, we construct a toy-model of the microtubule lattice composed of vector Ising spins representing tubulin molecules, the building block of microtubules. Nearest-neighbor and next-to-nearest neighbor interactions are considered within an anisotropic dielectric medium. As a consequence of the helical topology, we observe that certain spin orientations render the lattice frustrated with nearest neighbor ferroelectric and next-to-nearest neighbor antiferroelectric bonds. Under these conditions, the lattice displays the remarkable property of stabilizing certain spin patterns that are robust to thermal fluctuations. We model this behavior in the framework of a generalized Ising model known as the J1 - J2 model and theoretically determine the set of stable patterns. Employing Monte-Carlo methods, we demonstrate the stability of such patterns in the microtubule lattice at human physiological temperatures. This suggests a novel biological mechanism for storing information in living organisms, whereby the tubulin spin (dipole moment) states become information bits and information gets stored in microtubules in a way that is robust to thermal fluctuations.

  5. Rho proteins − the key regulators of cytoskeleton in the progression of mitosis and cytokinesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Klimaszewska

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The Rho proteins are members of the Ras superfamily of small GTPases. They are thought to be crucial regulators of multiple signal transduction pathways that influence a wide range of cellular functions, including migration, membrane trafficking, adhesion, polarity and cell shape changes. Thanks to their ability to control the assembly and organization of the actin and microtubule cytoskeletons, Rho GTPases are known to regulate mitosis and cytokinesis progression. These proteins are required for formation and rigidity of the cortex during mitotic cell rounding, mitotic spindle formation and attachment of the spindle microtubules to the kinetochore. In addition, during cytokinesis, they are involved in promoting division plane determination, contractile ring and cleavage furrow formation and abscission. They are also known as regulators of cell cycle progression at the G1/S and G2/M transition. Thus, the signal transduction pathways in which Rho proteins participate, appear to connect dynamics of actin and microtubule cytoskeletons to cell cycle progression. We review the current state of knowledge concerning the molecular mechanisms by which Rho GTPase signaling regulates remodeling of actin and microtubule cytoskeletons in order to control cell division progression.

  6. Effect of Food Regulation on the Spanish Food Processing Industry: A Dynamic Productivity Analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdalena Kapelko

    Full Text Available This article develops the decomposition of the dynamic Luenberger productivity growth indicator into dynamic technical change, dynamic technical inefficiency change and dynamic scale inefficiency change in the dynamic directional distance function context using Data Envelopment Analysis. These results are used to investigate for the Spanish food processing industry the extent to which dynamic productivity growth and its components are affected by the introduction of the General Food Law in 2002 (Regulation (EC No 178/2002. The empirical application uses panel data of Spanish meat, dairy, and oils and fats industries over the period 1996-2011. The results suggest that in the oils and fats industry the impact of food regulation on dynamic productivity growth is negative initially and then positive over the long run. In contrast, the opposite pattern is observed for the meat and dairy processing industries. The results further imply that firms in the meat processing and oils and fats industries face similar impacts of food safety regulation on dynamic technical change, dynamic inefficiency change and dynamic scale inefficiency change.

  7. Effect of Food Regulation on the Spanish Food Processing Industry: A Dynamic Productivity Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapelko, Magdalena; Lansink, Alfons Oude; Stefanou, Spiro E.

    2015-01-01

    This article develops the decomposition of the dynamic Luenberger productivity growth indicator into dynamic technical change, dynamic technical inefficiency change and dynamic scale inefficiency change in the dynamic directional distance function context using Data Envelopment Analysis. These results are used to investigate for the Spanish food processing industry the extent to which dynamic productivity growth and its components are affected by the introduction of the General Food Law in 2002 (Regulation (EC) No 178/2002). The empirical application uses panel data of Spanish meat, dairy, and oils and fats industries over the period 1996-2011. The results suggest that in the oils and fats industry the impact of food regulation on dynamic productivity growth is negative initially and then positive over the long run. In contrast, the opposite pattern is observed for the meat and dairy processing industries. The results further imply that firms in the meat processing and oils and fats industries face similar impacts of food safety regulation on dynamic technical change, dynamic inefficiency change and dynamic scale inefficiency change. PMID:26057878

  8. Effect of Food Regulation on the Spanish Food Processing Industry: A Dynamic Productivity Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapelko, Magdalena; Oude Lansink, Alfons; Stefanou, Spiro E

    2015-01-01

    This article develops the decomposition of the dynamic Luenberger productivity growth indicator into dynamic technical change, dynamic technical inefficiency change and dynamic scale inefficiency change in the dynamic directional distance function context using Data Envelopment Analysis. These results are used to investigate for the Spanish food processing industry the extent to which dynamic productivity growth and its components are affected by the introduction of the General Food Law in 2002 (Regulation (EC) No 178/2002). The empirical application uses panel data of Spanish meat, dairy, and oils and fats industries over the period 1996-2011. The results suggest that in the oils and fats industry the impact of food regulation on dynamic productivity growth is negative initially and then positive over the long run. In contrast, the opposite pattern is observed for the meat and dairy processing industries. The results further imply that firms in the meat processing and oils and fats industries face similar impacts of food safety regulation on dynamic technical change, dynamic inefficiency change and dynamic scale inefficiency change.

  9. Explaining and predicting the impact of regulation on innovation: towards a dynamic model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Montalvo Corral, C.

    2007-01-01

    Although much work has been done on the regulation and governance of innovation, it provides few formal analytical tools to enable us to learn about the dynamics of the regulatory system in terms of the interaction between regulators and firms. If governance occurs in a context of mutual

  10. The Dynamics of Naval Power System with Integrator Proportional and Derivative Integrator Proportional Regulators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florentiu Deliu

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The essay analyses the dynamics activity of the naval power system regulators using the integrator proportional and derivative integrator proportional regulators, system that provides the necessary energy for ship consumers so that the voltage and the frequency is always within nominal values.

  11. Dynamic regulation of cerebral DNA repair genes by psychological stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Forsberg, Kristin; Aalling, Nadia; Wörtwein, Gitta

    2015-01-01

    was seen in HC, but with overall smaller effects and without the induction after acute stress. Nuclear DNA damage from oxidation as measured by the comet assay was unaffected by stress in both regions. We conclude that psychological stress have a dynamic influence on brain DNA repair gene expression...

  12. Dynamic regulation of hepatic lipid droplet properties by diet.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda E Crunk

    Full Text Available Cytoplasmic lipid droplets (CLD are organelle-like structures that function in neutral lipid storage, transport and metabolism through the actions of specific surface-associated proteins. Although diet and metabolism influence hepatic CLD levels, how they affect CLD protein composition is largely unknown. We used non-biased, shotgun, proteomics in combination with metabolic analysis, quantitative immunoblotting, electron microscopy and confocal imaging to define the effects of low- and high-fat diets on CLD properties in fasted-refed mice. We found that the hepatic CLD proteome is distinct from that of CLD from other mammalian tissues, containing enzymes from multiple metabolic pathways. The hepatic CLD proteome is also differentially affected by dietary fat content and hepatic metabolic status. High fat feeding markedly increased the CLD surface density of perilipin-2, a critical regulator of hepatic neutral lipid storage, whereas it reduced CLD levels of betaine-homocysteine S-methyltransferase, an enzyme regulator of homocysteine levels linked to fatty liver disease and hepatocellular carcinoma. Collectively our data demonstrate that the hepatic CLD proteome is enriched in metabolic enzymes, and that it is qualitatively and quantitatively regulated by diet and metabolism. These findings implicate CLD in the regulation of hepatic metabolic processes, and suggest that their properties undergo reorganization in response to hepatic metabolic demands.

  13. Dynamic Regulation of Hepatic Lipid Droplet Properties by Diet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crunk, Amanda E.; Monks, Jenifer; Murakami, Aya; Jackman, Matthew; MacLean, Paul S.; Ladinsky, Mark; Bales, Elise S.; Cain, Shannon; Orlicky, David J.; McManaman, James L.

    2013-01-01

    Cytoplasmic lipid droplets (CLD) are organelle-like structures that function in neutral lipid storage, transport and metabolism through the actions of specific surface-associated proteins. Although diet and metabolism influence hepatic CLD levels, how they affect CLD protein composition is largely unknown. We used non-biased, shotgun, proteomics in combination with metabolic analysis, quantitative immunoblotting, electron microscopy and confocal imaging to define the effects of low- and high-fat diets on CLD properties in fasted-refed mice. We found that the hepatic CLD proteome is distinct from that of CLD from other mammalian tissues, containing enzymes from multiple metabolic pathways. The hepatic CLD proteome is also differentially affected by dietary fat content and hepatic metabolic status. High fat feeding markedly increased the CLD surface density of perilipin-2, a critical regulator of hepatic neutral lipid storage, whereas it reduced CLD levels of betaine-homocysteine S-methyltransferase, an enzyme regulator of homocysteine levels linked to fatty liver disease and hepatocellular carcinoma. Collectively our data demonstrate that the hepatic CLD proteome is enriched in metabolic enzymes, and that it is qualitatively and quantitatively regulated by diet and metabolism. These findings implicate CLD in the regulation of hepatic metabolic processes, and suggest that their properties undergo reorganization in response to hepatic metabolic demands. PMID:23874434

  14. Mechanisms regulating regional cerebral activation during dynamic handgrip in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Williamson, James; Friedman, D B; Mitchell, J H

    1996-01-01

    Dynamic hand movement increases regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) of the contralateral motor sensory cortex (MS1). This increase is eliminated by regional anesthesia of the working arm, indicating the importance of afferent neural input. The purpose of this study was to determine the specific...... type of afferent input required for this cerebral activation. The rCBF was measured at +5.0 and +9.0 cm above the orbitomeatal (OM) plane in 13 subjects during 1) rest; 2) dynamic left-hand contractions; 3) postcontraction ischemia (metaboreceptor afferents); and 4) biceps brachii tendon vibration...... +/- 8.6 ml.100 g-1.min-1 (P neural input from muscle spindles or metabolically sensitive nerve fibers, although the involvement of mechanoreceptors (group III or Ib) cannot be excluded....

  15. Endothelin-1 Regulation of exercise-induced changes in flow: Dynamic regulation of vascular tone

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rapoport, R.M. (Robert M.); D. Merkus (Daphne)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractAlthough endothelin (ET)-1 is a highly potent vasoconstrictor with considerable efficacy in numerous vascular beds, the role of endogenous ET-1 in the regulation of vascular tone remains unclear. The perspective that ET-1 plays little role in the on-going regulation of vascular tone at

  16. Lipids: architects and regulators of membrane dynamics and trafficking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreau, Patrick

    2007-05-01

    We have recently shown that an inhibition of sterol synthesis by fenpropimorph leads to an accumulation of sterol precursors, hydroxypalmitic acid-containing glucosylceramides and detergent resistant membranes in the Golgi bodies instead of the plasma membrane, suggesting that the individual molecules or the microdomains were blocked in the Golgi. These results and others from several eukaryotic models link lipid metabolism with membrane morphodynamics that are involved in membrane trafficking. Focus has been expanded to other lipid families, and numerous evidences are given showing lipids and lipid-modifying enzymes as key regulators of membrane homeostasis which can strongly regulate membrane morphodynamics and therefore trafficking. Beside protein-based machineries, lipid-based machineries are also shown as crucial regulatory forces involved in protein transport and sorting.

  17. Confinement and dynamical regulation in two-dimensional convective turbulence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bian, N.H.; Garcia, O.E.

    2003-01-01

    In this work the nature of confinement improvement implied by the self-consistent generation of mean flows in two-dimensional convective turbulence is studied. The confinement variations are linked to two distinct regulation mechanisms which are also shown to be at the origin of low......-frequency bursting in the fluctuation level and the convective heat flux integral, both resulting in a state of large-scale intermittency. The first one involves the control of convective transport by sheared mean flows. This regulation relies on the conservative transfer of kinetic energy from tilted fluctuations...... to the mean component of the flow. Bursting can also result from the quasi-linear modification of the linear instability drive which is the mean pressure gradient. For each bursting process the relevant zero-dimensional model equations are given. These are finally coupled in a minimal model of convection...

  18. Differential involvement of the microtubule cytoskeleton in insulin receptor substrate 1 (IRS-1) and IRS-2 signaling to AKT determines the response to microtubule disruption in breast carcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercado-Matos, Jose; Clark, Jennifer L; Piper, Andrew J; Janusis, Jenny; Shaw, Leslie M

    2017-05-12

    The insulin receptor substrate (IRS) proteins serve as essential signaling intermediates for the activation of PI3K by both the insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor (IGF-1R) and its close family member, the insulin receptor (IR). Although IRS-1 and IRS-2 share significant homology, they regulate distinct cellular responses downstream of these receptors and play divergent roles in breast cancer. To investigate the mechanism by which signaling through IRS-1 and IRS-2 results in differential outcomes, we assessed the involvement of the microtubule cytoskeleton in IRS-dependent signaling. Treatment with drugs that either stabilize or disrupt microtubules reveal that an intact microtubule cytoskeleton contributes to IRS-2- but not IRS-1-mediated activation of AKT by IGF-1. Proximal IGF-1R signaling events, including IRS tyrosine phosphorylation and recruitment of PI3K, are not inhibited by microtubule disruption, indicating that IRS-2 requires the microtubule cytoskeleton at the level of downstream effector activation. IRS-2 colocalization with tubulin is enhanced upon Taxol-mediated microtubule stabilization, which, together with the signaling data, suggests that the microtubule cytoskeleton may facilitate access of IRS-2 to downstream effectors such as AKT. Of clinical relevance is that our data reveal that expression of IRS-2 sensitizes breast carcinoma cells to apoptosis in response to treatment with microtubule-disrupting drugs, identifying IRS-2 as a potential biomarker for the response of breast cancer patients to Vinca alkaloid drug treatment. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  19. Explaining the Microtubule Energy Balance: Contributions Due to Dipole Moments, Charges, van der Waals and Solvation Energy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayoub, Ahmed Taha; Staelens, Michael; Prunotto, Alessio; Deriu, Marco A; Danani, Andrea; Klobukowski, Mariusz; Tuszynski, Jack Adam

    2017-09-22

    Microtubules are the main components of mitotic spindles, and are the pillars of the cellular cytoskeleton. They perform most of their cellular functions by virtue of their unique dynamic instability processes which alternate between polymerization and depolymerization phases. This in turn is driven by a precise balance between attraction and repulsion forces between the constituents of microtubules (MTs)-tubulin dimers. Therefore, it is critically important to know what contributions result in a balance of the interaction energy among tubulin dimers that make up microtubules and what interactions may tip this balance toward or away from a stable polymerized state of tubulin. In this paper, we calculate the dipole-dipole interaction energy between tubulin dimers in a microtubule as part of the various contributions to the energy balance. We also compare the remaining contributions to the interaction energies between tubulin dimers and establish a balance between stabilizing and destabilizing components, including the van der Waals, electrostatic, and solvent-accessible surface area energies. The energy balance shows that the GTP-capped tip of the seam at the plus end of microtubules is stabilized only by - 9 kcal/mol, which can be completely reversed by the hydrolysis of a single GTP molecule, which releases + 14 kcal/mol and destabilizes the seam by an excess of + 5 kcal/mol. This triggers the breakdown of microtubules and initiates a disassembly phase which is aptly called a catastrophe.

  20. Explaining the Microtubule Energy Balance: Contributions Due to Dipole Moments, Charges, van der Waals and Solvation Energy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Taha Ayoub

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Microtubules are the main components of mitotic spindles, and are the pillars of the cellular cytoskeleton. They perform most of their cellular functions by virtue of their unique dynamic instability processes which alternate between polymerization and depolymerization phases. This in turn is driven by a precise balance between attraction and repulsion forces between the constituents of microtubules (MTs—tubulin dimers. Therefore, it is critically important to know what contributions result in a balance of the interaction energy among tubulin dimers that make up microtubules and what interactions may tip this balance toward or away from a stable polymerized state of tubulin. In this paper, we calculate the dipole–dipole interaction energy between tubulin dimers in a microtubule as part of the various contributions to the energy balance. We also compare the remaining contributions to the interaction energies between tubulin dimers and establish a balance between stabilizing and destabilizing components, including the van der Waals, electrostatic, and solvent-accessible surface area energies. The energy balance shows that the GTP-capped tip of the seam at the plus end of microtubules is stabilized only by − 9 kcal/mol, which can be completely reversed by the hydrolysis of a single GTP molecule, which releases + 14 kcal/mol and destabilizes the seam by an excess of + 5 kcal/mol. This triggers the breakdown of microtubules and initiates a disassembly phase which is aptly called a catastrophe.

  1. Centrosomal microtubule nucleation activity is inhibited by BRCA1-dependent ubiquitination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sankaran, Satish; Starita, Lea M; Groen, Aaron C; Ko, Min Ji; Parvin, Jeffrey D

    2005-10-01

    In this study we find that the function of BRCA1 inhibits the microtubule nucleation function of centrosomes. In particular, cells in early S phase have quiescent centrosomes due to BRCA1 activity, which inhibits the association of gamma-tubulin with centrosomes. We find that modification of either of two specific lysine residues (Lys-48 and Lys-344) of gamma-tubulin, a known substrate for BRCA1-dependent ubiquitination activity, led to centrosome hyperactivity. Interestingly, mutation of gamma-tubulin lysine 344 had a minimal effect on centrosome number but a profound effect on microtubule nucleation function, indicating that the processes regulating centrosome duplication and microtubule nucleation are distinct. Using an in vitro aster formation assay, we found that BRCA1-dependent ubiquitination activity directly inhibits microtubule nucleation by centrosomes. Mutant BRCA1 protein that was inactive as a ubiquitin ligase did not inhibit aster formation by the centrosome. Further, a BRCA1 carboxy-terminal truncation mutant that was an active ubiquitin ligase lacked domains critical for the inhibition of centrosome function. These experiments reveal an important new functional assay regulated by the BRCA1-dependent ubiquitin ligase, and the results suggest that the loss of this BRCA1 activity could cause the centrosome hypertrophy and subsequent aneuploidy typically found in breast cancers.

  2. Increased dynamic regulation of postural tone through Alexander Technique training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cacciatore, T W; Gurfinkel, V S; Horak, F B; Cordo, P J; Ames, K E

    2011-02-01

    Gurfinkel and colleagues (2006) recently found that healthy adults dynamically modulate postural muscle tone in the body axis during anti-gravity postural maintenance and that this modulation is inversely correlated with axial stiffness. Our objective in the present study was to investigate whether dynamic modulation of axial postural tone can change through training. We examined whether teachers of the Alexander Technique (AT), who undergo "long-term" (3-year) training, have greater modulation of axial postural tone than matched control subjects. In addition, we performed a longitudinal study on the effect of "short-term" (10-week) AT training on the axial postural tone of individuals with low back pain (LBP), since short term AT training has previously been shown to reduce LBP. Axial postural tone was quantified by measuring the resistance of the neck, trunk and hips to small (±10°), slow (1°/s) torsional rotation during stance. Modulation of tone was determined by the torsional resistance to rotation (peak-to-peak, phase-advance, and variability of torque) and axial muscle activity (EMG). Peak-to-peak torque was lower (∼50%), while phase-advance and cycle-to-cycle variability were enhanced for AT teachers compared to matched control subjects at all levels of the axis. In addition, LBP subjects decreased trunk and hip stiffness following short-term AT training compared to a control intervention. While changes in static levels of postural tone may have contributed to the reduced stiffness observed with the AT, our results suggest that dynamic modulation of postural tone can be enhanced through long-term training in the AT, which may constitute an important direction for therapeutic intervention. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Tubulin dimers oligomerize before their incorporation into microtubules.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julien Mozziconacci

    Full Text Available In the presence of GTP, purified dimers of alpha- and beta-tubulin will interact longitudinally and laterally to self-assemble into microtubules (MTs. This property provides a powerful in vitro experimental system to describe MT dynamic behavior at the micrometer scale and to study effects and functioning of a large variety of microtubule associated proteins (MAPs. Despite the plethora of such data produced, the molecular mechanisms of MT assembly remain disputed. Electron microscopy (EM studies suggested that tubulin dimers interact longitudinally to form short oligomers which form a tube by lateral interaction and which contribute to MT elongation. This idea is however challenged: Based on estimated association constants it was proposed that single dimers represent the major fraction of free tubulin. This view was recently supported by measurements suggesting that MTs elongate by addition of single tubulin dimers. To solve this discrepancy, we performed a direct measurement of the longitudinal interaction energy for tubulin dimers. We quantified the size distribution of tubulin oligomers using EM and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS. From the distribution we derived the longitudinal interaction energy in the presence of GDP and the non-hydrolysable GTP analog GMPCPP. Our data suggest that MT elongation and nucleation involves interactions of short tubulin oligomers rather than dimers. Our approach provides a solid experimental framework to better understand the role of MAPs in MT nucleation and growth.

  4. Localization of a microtubule organizing center by kinesin motors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arita, Chikashi; Bosche, Jonas; Lück, Alexander; Santen, Ludger

    2017-12-01

    Molecular motors are proteins which bind to a polarized cytoskeletal filament and move steadily along it. Molecular motors of the kinesin family move along microtubules (MTs), which are a component of the cytoskeleton. A very processive kinesin motor Kip3p, is known to promote catastrophes and pausing of MT, in particular on cortical contact. These properties play an important role in positioning the mitotic spindle in budding yeast. We present a theoretical approach to positioning of MT networks under confinement. In order to explore a localization mechanism of a microtubule organizing center (MTOC), we introduce an idealized system of two MTs connected by a MTOC. The dynamics of Kip3p is modeled by interacting stochastic particles, which allows us to study the effects of motor-induced depolymerization in a finite volume. We find that localization in the middle of the cavity is realized in a parameter regime where the motor densities on the MTs are increasing with the distance from the MTOC. Localization at an asymmetric position is also possible by tuning model parameters.

  5. Microtubules guide root hair tip growth

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sieberer, B.; Ketelaar, M.J.; Esseling, J.J.; Emons, A.M.C.

    2005-01-01

    The ability to establish cell polarity is crucial to form and function of an individual cell. Polarity underlies critical processes during cell development, such as cell growth, cell division, cell differentiation and cell signalling. Interphase cytoplasmic microtubules in tip-growing fission yeast

  6. Dynamic regulation of neurotransmitter specification: Relevance to nervous system homeostasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borodinsky, Laura N.; Belgacem, Yesser Hadj; Swapna, Immani; Sequerra, Eduardo Bouth

    2013-01-01

    During nervous system development the neurotransmitter identity changes and coexpression of several neurotransmitters is a rather generalized feature of developing neurons. In the mature nervous system, different physiological and pathological circumstances recreate this phenomenon. The rules of neurotransmitter respecification are multiple. Among them, the goal of assuring balanced excitability appears as an important driving force for the modifications in neurotransmitter phenotype expression. The functional consequences of these dynamic revisions in neurotransmitter identity span a varied range, from fine-tuning the developing neural circuit to modifications in addictive and locomotor behaviors. Current challenges include determining the mechanisms underlying neurotransmitter phenotype respecification and how they intersect with genetic programs of neuronal specialization. PMID:23270605

  7. Naval Power System Dynamics with Proportional Type Regulators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florentiu Deliu

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available This work analyzes the dynamic behavior of naval power system using proportional type controllers, system which provides energy for consumers on the vessel so that the voltage and frequency is always in nominal value limits. Essential problems of the work relates to the tuning of controllers, because the system is nonlinear and we can’t apply known criteria. Analyzing type P controllers we found that oscillations known to occur in proportional type controller can put out the naval power system.

  8. Catecholaminergic Regulation of Learning Rate in a Dynamic Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jepma, Marieke; Nassar, Matthew R.; Rangel-Gomez, Mauricio; Meeter, Martijn; Nieuwenhuis, Sander

    2016-01-01

    Adaptive behavior in a changing world requires flexibly adapting one’s rate of learning to the rate of environmental change. Recent studies have examined the computational mechanisms by which various environmental factors determine the impact of new outcomes on existing beliefs (i.e., the ‘learning rate’). However, the brain mechanisms, and in particular the neuromodulators, involved in this process are still largely unknown. The brain-wide neurophysiological effects of the catecholamines norepinephrine and dopamine on stimulus-evoked cortical responses suggest that the catecholamine systems are well positioned to regulate learning about environmental change, but more direct evidence for a role of this system is scant. Here, we report evidence from a study employing pharmacology, scalp electrophysiology and computational modeling (N = 32) that suggests an important role for catecholamines in learning rate regulation. We found that the P3 component of the EEG—an electrophysiological index of outcome-evoked phasic catecholamine release in the cortex—predicted learning rate, and formally mediated the effect of prediction-error magnitude on learning rate. P3 amplitude also mediated the effects of two computational variables—capturing the unexpectedness of an outcome and the uncertainty of a preexisting belief—on learning rate. Furthermore, a pharmacological manipulation of catecholamine activity affected learning rate following unanticipated task changes, in a way that depended on participants’ baseline learning rate. Our findings provide converging evidence for a causal role of the human catecholamine systems in learning-rate regulation as a function of environmental change. PMID:27792728

  9. Microtubule Initiation from the Nuclear Surface Controls Cortical Microtubule Growth Polarity and Orientation in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambrose, Chris; Wasteneys, Geoffrey O.

    2014-01-01

    The nuclear envelope in plant cells has long been known to be a microtubule organizing center (MTOC), but its influence on microtubule organization in the cell cortex has been unclear. Here we show that nuclear MTOC activity favors the formation of longitudinal cortical microtubule (CMT) arrays. We used green fluorescent protein (GFP)-tagged gamma tubulin-complex protein 2 (GCP2) to identify nuclear MTOC activity and GFP-tagged End-Binding Protein 1b (EB1b) to track microtubule growth directions. We found that microtubules initiate from nuclei and enter the cortex in two directions along the long axis of the cell, creating bipolar longitudinal CMT arrays. Such arrays were observed in all cell types showing nuclear MTOC activity, including root hairs, recently divided cells in root tips, and the leaf epidermis. In order to confirm the causal nature of nuclei in bipolar array formation, we displaced nuclei by centrifugation, which generated a corresponding shift in the bipolarity split point. We also found that bipolar CMT arrays were associated with bidirectional trafficking of vesicular components to cell ends. Together, these findings reveal a conserved function of plant nuclear MTOCs and centrosomes/spindle pole bodies in animals and fungi, wherein all structures serve to establish polarities in microtubule growth. PMID:25008974

  10. Microtubule initiation from the nuclear surface controls cortical microtubule growth polarity and orientation in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambrose, Chris; Wasteneys, Geoffrey O

    2014-09-01

    The nuclear envelope in plant cells has long been known to be a microtubule organizing center (MTOC), but its influence on microtubule organization in the cell cortex has been unclear. Here we show that nuclear MTOC activity favors the formation of longitudinal cortical microtubule (CMT) arrays. We used green fluorescent protein (GFP)-tagged gamma tubulin-complex protein 2 (GCP2) to identify nuclear MTOC activity and GFP-tagged End-Binding Protein 1b (EB1b) to track microtubule growth directions. We found that microtubules initiate from nuclei and enter the cortex in two directions along the long axis of the cell, creating bipolar longitudinal CMT arrays. Such arrays were observed in all cell types showing nuclear MTOC activity, including root hairs, recently divided cells in root tips, and the leaf epidermis. In order to confirm the causal nature of nuclei in bipolar array formation, we displaced nuclei by centrifugation, which generated a corresponding shift in the bipolarity split point. We also found that bipolar CMT arrays were associated with bidirectional trafficking of vesicular components to cell ends. Together, these findings reveal a conserved function of plant nuclear MTOCs and centrosomes/spindle pole bodies in animals and fungi, wherein all structures serve to establish polarities in microtubule growth. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Japanese Society of Plant Physiologists. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. Dynamical Processes in Ageing, Gene Regulation and Communication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendtsen, Kristian Moss

    My thesis consists of three parts. The first part covers ageing phenomena. In the first project I measured the mobility of two DNA repair proteins. Contrasting diffusion coefficients from literature I was able to classify DNA repair protein into either "scanners" or "responders". In a second...... project we constructed a mathematical model and showed that if DNA damage is primarily caused by geno-toxic agents, it would be advantageous for cells to have a fragile DNA repair mechanism. The second part of my Ph.D. thesis covers gene regulation. In the first project we show how RNA polymerase can...

  12. Dynamic model of gene regulation for the lac operon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Angelova, Maia; Ben-Halim, Asma, E-mail: maia.angelova@northumbria.ac.uk, E-mail: asma.benhalim@northumbria.ac.uk [Intelligent Modelling Lab, School of Computing, Engineering and Information Sciences, Northumbria University, Newcastle upon Tyne NE2 1XE (United Kingdom)

    2011-03-01

    Gene regulatory network is a collection of DNA which interact with each other and with other matter in the cell. The lac operon is an example of a relatively simple genetic network and is one of the best-studied structures in the Escherichia coli bacteria. In this work we consider a deterministic model of the lac operon with a noise term, representing the stochastic nature of the regulation. The model is written in terms of a system of simultaneous first order differential equations with delays. We investigate an analytical and numerical solution and analyse the range of values for the parameters corresponding to a stable solution.

  13. Dynamical self-regulation in self-propelled particle flows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopinath, Arvind; Hagan, Michael F; Marchetti, M Cristina; Baskaran, Aparna

    2012-06-01

    We study a continuum model of overdamped self-propelled particles with aligning interactions in two dimensions. Combining analytical theory and computations, we map out the phase diagram for the parameter space covered by the model. We find that the system self-organizes into two robust structures in different regions of parameter space: solitary waves composed of ordered swarms moving through a low density disordered background, and stationary radially symmetric asters. The self-regulating nature of the flow yields phase separation, ubiquitous in this class of systems, and controls the formation of solitary waves. Self-propulsion and the associated active convection play a crucial role in aster formation.

  14. Nuclear deformability and telomere dynamics are regulated by cell geometric constraints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makhija, Ekta; Jokhun, D S; Shivashankar, G V

    2016-01-05

    Forces generated by the cytoskeleton can be transmitted to the nucleus and chromatin via physical links on the nuclear envelope and the lamin meshwork. Although the role of these active forces in modulating prestressed nuclear morphology has been well studied, the effect on nuclear and chromatin dynamics remains to be explored. To understand the regulation of nuclear deformability by these active forces, we created different cytoskeletal states in mouse fibroblasts using micropatterned substrates. We observed that constrained and isotropic cells, which lack long actin stress fibers, have more deformable nuclei than elongated and polarized cells. This nuclear deformability altered in response to actin, myosin, formin perturbations, or a transcriptional down-regulation of lamin A/C levels in the constrained and isotropic geometry. Furthermore, to probe the effect of active cytoskeletal forces on chromatin dynamics, we tracked the spatiotemporal dynamics of heterochromatin foci and telomeres. We observed increased dynamics and decreased correlation of the heterochromatin foci and telomere trajectories in constrained and isotropic cell geometry. The observed enhanced dynamics upon treatment with actin depolymerizing reagents in elongated and polarized geometry were regained once the reagent was washed off, suggesting an inherent structural memory in chromatin organization. We conclude that active forces from the cytoskeleton and rigidity from lamin A/C nucleoskeleton can together regulate nuclear and chromatin dynamics. Because chromatin remodeling is a necessary step in transcription control and its memory, genome integrity, and cellular deformability during migration, our results highlight the importance of cell geometric constraints as critical regulators in cell behavior.

  15. The calcium-modulated proteins, S100A1 and S100B, as potential regulators of the dynamics of type III intermediate filaments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Garbuglia

    1999-10-01

    Full Text Available The Ca2+-modulated, dimeric proteins of the EF-hand (helix-loop-helix type, S100A1 and S100B, that have been shown to inhibit microtubule (MT protein assembly and to promote MT disassembly, interact with the type III intermediate filament (IF subunits, desmin and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP, with a stoichiometry of 2 mol of IF subunit/mol of S100A1 or S100B dimer and an affinity of 0.5-1.0 µM in the presence of a few micromolar concentrations of Ca2+. Binding of S100A1 and S100B results in inhibition of desmin and GFAP assemblies into IFs and stimulation of the disassembly of preformed desmin and GFAP IFs. S100A1 and S100B interact with a stretch of residues in the N-terminal (head domain of desmin and GFAP, thereby blocking the head-to-tail process of IF elongation. The C-terminal extension of S100A1 (and, likely, S100B represents a critical part of the site that recognizes desmin and GFAP. S100B is localized to IFs within cells, suggesting that it might have a role in remodeling IFs upon elevation of cytosolic Ca2+ concentration by avoiding excess IF assembly and/or promoting IF disassembly in vivo. S100A1, that is not localized to IFs, might also play a role in the regulation of IF dynamics by binding to and sequestering unassembled IF subunits. Together, these observations suggest that S100A1 and S100B may be regarded as Ca2+-dependent regulators of the state of assembly of two important elements of the cytoskeleton, IFs and MTs, and, potentially, of MT- and IF-based activities.

  16. Microtubules search for chromosomes by pivoting around the spindle pole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolic-Norrelykke, Iva

    2014-03-01

    During cell division, proper segregation of genetic material between the two daughter cells requires that the spindle microtubules attach to the chromosomes via kinetochores, protein complexes on the chromosome. The central question, how microtubules find kinetochores, is still under debate. We observed in fission yeast that kinetochores are captured by microtubules pivoting around the spindle pole body, instead of growing towards the kinetochores. By introducing a theoretical model, we show that the observed angular movement of microtubules is sufficient to explain the process of kinetochore capture. Our theory predicts that the speed of the capture process depends mainly on how fast microtubules pivot. We confirmed this prediction experimentally by speeding up and slowing down microtubule pivoting. Thus, microtubules explore space by pivoting, as they search for intracellular targets such as kinetochores.

  17. Microtubules are reversibly depolymerized in response to changing gaseous microenvironments within Aspergillus nidulans biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukla, Nandini; Osmani, Aysha H; Osmani, Stephen A

    2017-03-01

    How microtubules (MTs) are regulated during fungal biofilm formation is unknown. By tracking MT +end-binding proteins (+TIPS) in Aspergillus nidulans, we find that MTs are regulated to depolymerize within forming fungal biofilms. During this process, EB1, dynein, and ClipA form transient fibrous and then bar-like structures, novel configurations for +TIPS. Cells also respond in an autonomous manner, with cells separated by a septum able to maintain different MT dynamics. Surprisingly, all cells with depolymerized MTs rapidly repolymerize their MTs after air exchange above the static culture medium of biofilms. Although the specific gasotransmitter for this biofilm response is not known, we find that addition of hydrogen sulfide gas to growing cells recapitulates all aspects of reversible MT depolymerization and transient formation of +TIPs bars. However, as biofilms mature, physical removal of part of the biofilm is required to promote MT repolymerization, which occurs at the new biofilm edge. We further show MT depolymerization within biofilms is regulated by the SrbA hypoxic transcription factor and that without SrbA, MTs are maintained as biofilms form. This reveals a new mode of MT regulation in response to changing gaseous biofilm microenvironments, which could contribute to the unique characteristics of fungal biofilms in medical and industrial settings. © 2017 Shukla et al. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). Two months after publication it is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  18. A Dynamical Model of B-T Cell Regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kürten, Karl E.; Castiglione, Filippo

    We present a minimal regulatory model for the dynamics of the humoral immune response of two lymphocytes populations (B and T helper) interacting with a specific antigen pool (bacterium). Stability analysis reveals that the system accounts for the occurrence of multiple steady states in the absence as well as in the presence of the antigen population. The model exhibits (i) a state of immune memory, (ii) one state with high antigen and low helper concentration (disease), and (iii) one state with low antigen and high helper concentration (tolerance). The latter state allows oscillatory behavior. Injection of high antigen doses as well as minimal changes of structural parameters provoke the system to jump from the state of disease to the state of tolerance. This is reminiscent of therapies where the patient is treated with allergen, immuno-suppressants or drugs.

  19. Dynamic regulation of neurotransmitter specification: relevance to nervous system homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borodinsky, Laura N; Belgacem, Yesser Hadj; Swapna, Immani; Sequerra, Eduardo Bouth

    2014-03-01

    During nervous system development the neurotransmitter identity changes and coexpression of several neurotransmitters is a rather generalized feature of developing neurons. In the mature nervous system, different physiological and pathological circumstances recreate this phenomenon. The rules of neurotransmitter respecification are multiple. Among them, the goal of assuring balanced excitability appears as an important driving force for the modifications in neurotransmitter phenotype expression. The functional consequences of these dynamic revisions in neurotransmitter identity span a varied range, from fine-tuning the developing neural circuit to modifications in addictive and locomotor behaviors. Current challenges include determining the mechanisms underlying neurotransmitter phenotype respecification and how they intersect with genetic programs of neuronal specialization. This article is part of the Special Issue entitled 'Homeostatic Synaptic Plasticity'. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Dynamic regulation of Schwann cell enhancers after peripheral nerve injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Holly A; Sun, Guannan; Keles, Sunduz; Svaren, John

    2015-03-13

    Myelination of the peripheral nervous system is required for axonal function and long term stability. After peripheral nerve injury, Schwann cells transition from axon myelination to a demyelinated state that supports neuronal survival and ultimately remyelination of axons. Reprogramming of gene expression patterns during development and injury responses is shaped by the actions of distal regulatory elements that integrate the actions of multiple transcription factors. We used ChIP-seq to measure changes in histone H3K27 acetylation, a mark of active enhancers, to identify enhancers in myelinating rat peripheral nerve and their dynamics after demyelinating nerve injury. Analysis of injury-induced enhancers identified enriched motifs for c-Jun, a transcription factor required for Schwann cells to support nerve regeneration. We identify a c-Jun-bound enhancer in the gene for Runx2, a transcription factor induced after nerve injury, and we show that Runx2 is required for activation of other induced genes. In contrast, enhancers that lose H3K27ac after nerve injury are enriched for binding sites of the Sox10 and early growth response 2 (Egr2/Krox20) transcription factors, which are critical determinants of Schwann cell differentiation. Egr2 expression is lost after nerve injury, and many Egr2-binding sites lose H3K27ac after nerve injury. However, the majority of Egr2-bound enhancers retain H3K27ac, indicating that other transcription factors maintain active enhancer status after nerve injury. The global epigenomic changes in H3K27ac deposition pinpoint dynamic changes in enhancers that mediate the effects of transcription factors that control Schwann cell myelination and peripheral nervous system responses to nerve injury. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  1. Evolutionary dynamics of gene and isoform regulation in Mammalian tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merkin, Jason; Russell, Caitlin; Chen, Ping; Burge, Christopher B

    2012-12-21

    Most mammalian genes produce multiple distinct messenger RNAs through alternative splicing, but the extent of splicing conservation is not clear. To assess tissue-specific transcriptome variation across mammals, we sequenced complementary DNA from nine tissues from four mammals and one bird in biological triplicate, at unprecedented depth. We find that while tissue-specific gene expression programs are largely conserved, alternative splicing is well conserved in only a subset of tissues and is frequently lineage-specific. Thousands of previously unknown, lineage-specific, and conserved alternative exons were identified; widely conserved alternative exons had signatures of binding by MBNL, PTB, RBFOX, STAR, and TIA family splicing factors, implicating them as ancestral mammalian splicing regulators. Our data also indicate that alternative splicing often alters protein phosphorylatability, delimiting the scope of kinase signaling.

  2. Characterizing and engineering microtubule properties for use in hybrid nanodevices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeune-Smith, Yolaine

    The emergence of nanotechnology in materials science research has had a major impact in biotechnology. Nature provides novel materials and structures that can be redesigned and reassembled for engineering purposes. One system in particular is the intracellular transport system consisting of the kinesin motor protein and microtubule. For synthetic devices, either the bead geometry (kinesin motors walking along a microtubule coated surface) or the gliding geometry (microtubules gliding over a kinesin-coated surface) is used. Molecular shuttles, utilizing the gliding geometry, have the potential for use in hybrid nanodevices such as biosensors. The kinesin-powered molecular shuttle has been extensively studied. Advances have been made in controlling activation of the kinesin motors, guiding movement of kinesin motors and cargo loading onto the molecular shuttles. In this dissertation the interest in molecular shuttle development is extended with a research focus on the microtubule filament. The microtubule is a central element in the molecular shuttle. The sensing capabilities and limitations of molecular shuttles are tied to the microtubules. It would be desired to have nanodevices with molecular shuttles of predictable size, speed and lifetime. Three materials properties of the microtubules are examined. First, the microtubule length distribution is measured and compared to the length distribution of synthetic polymers. Post polymerization processing techniques, shearing and annealing, are utilized to try to reduce the polydispersity index of the microtubule length distribution. Second, the effect of kinesin activity on the lifetime of the microtubules is observed and quantified. Degradation of microtubules is monitored as a function of kinesin activity and time. Lastly, the effect of cargo loading on microtubule gliding speed is measured to gain insight on the mechanism of cargo attachment. These property behaviors will play a role in the final development of

  3. Dynamic regulation of sensorimotor integration in human postural control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterka, Robert J; Loughlin, Patrick J

    2004-01-01

    Upright stance in humans is inherently unstable, requiring corrective action based on spatial-orientation information from sensory systems. One might logically predict that environments providing access to accurate orientation information from multiple sensory systems would facilitate postural stability. However, we show that, after a period in which access to accurate sensory information was reduced, the restoration of accurate information disrupted postural stability. In eyes-closed trials, proprioceptive information was altered by rotating the support surface in proportion to body sway (support surface "sway-referencing"). When the support surface returned to a level orientation, most subjects developed a transient 1-Hz body sway oscillation that differed significantly from the low-amplitude body sway typically observed during quiet stance. Additional experiments showed further enhancement of the 1-Hz oscillation when the surface transitioned from a sway-referenced to a reverse sway-referenced motion. Oscillatory behavior declined with repetition of trials, suggesting a learning effect. A simple negative feedback-control model of the postural control system predicted the occurrence of this 1-Hz oscillation in conditions where too much corrective torque is generated in proportion to body sway. Model simulations were used to distinguish between two alternative explanations for the excessive corrective torque generation. Simulation results favor an explanation based on the dynamic reweighting of sensory contributions to postural control rather than a load-compensation mechanism that scales torque in proportion to a fixed combination of sensory-orientation information.

  4. Complexin synchronizes primed vesicle exocytosis and regulates fusion pore dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhara, Madhurima; Yarzagaray, Antonio; Schwarz, Yvonne; Dutta, Soumyajit; Grabner, Chad; Moghadam, Paanteha K.; Bost, Anneka; Schirra, Claudia; Rettig, Jens; Reim, Kerstin; Brose, Nils; Mohrmann, Ralf

    2014-01-01

    ComplexinII (CpxII) and SynaptotagminI (SytI) have been implicated in regulating the function of SNARE proteins in exocytosis, but their precise mode of action and potential interplay have remained unknown. In this paper, we show that CpxII increases Ca2+-triggered vesicle exocytosis and accelerates its secretory rates, providing two independent, but synergistic, functions to enhance synchronous secretion. Specifically, we demonstrate that the C-terminal domain of CpxII increases the pool of primed vesicles by hindering premature exocytosis at submicromolar Ca2+ concentrations, whereas the N-terminal domain shortens the secretory delay and accelerates the kinetics of Ca2+-triggered exocytosis by increasing the Ca2+ affinity of synchronous secretion. With its C terminus, CpxII attenuates fluctuations of the early fusion pore and slows its expansion but is functionally antagonized by SytI, enabling rapid transmitter discharge from single vesicles. Thus, our results illustrate how key features of CpxII, SytI, and their interplay transform the constitutively active SNARE-mediated fusion mechanism into a highly synchronized, Ca2+-triggered release apparatus. PMID:24687280

  5. Kindlin-1 regulates integrin dynamics and adhesion turnover.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margadant, Coert; Kreft, Maaike; Zambruno, Giovanna; Sonnenberg, Arnoud

    2013-01-01

    Loss-of-function mutations in the gene encoding the integrin co-activator kindlin-1 cause Kindler syndrome. We report a novel kindlin-1-deficient keratinocyte cell line derived from a Kindler syndrome patient. Despite the expression of kindlin-2, the patient's cells display several hallmarks related to reduced function of β1 integrins, including abnormal cell morphology, cell adhesion, cell spreading, focal adhesion assembly, and cell migration. Defective cell adhesion was aggravated by kindlin-2 depletion, indicating that kindlin-2 can compensate to a certain extent for the loss of kindlin-1. Intriguingly, β1 at the cell-surface was aberrantly glycosylated in the patient's cells, and its expression was considerably reduced, both in cells in vitro and in the patient's epidermis. Reconstitution with wild-type kindlin-1 but not with a β1-binding defective mutant restored the aberrant β1 expression and glycosylation, and normalized cell morphology, adhesion, spreading, and migration. Furthermore, the expression of wild-type kindlin-1, but not of the integrin-binding-defective mutant, increased the stability of integrin-mediated cell-matrix adhesions and enhanced the redistribution of internalized integrins to the cell surface. Thus, these data uncover a role for kindlin-1 in the regulation of integrin trafficking and adhesion turnover.

  6. Kindlin-1 regulates integrin dynamics and adhesion turnover.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coert Margadant

    Full Text Available Loss-of-function mutations in the gene encoding the integrin co-activator kindlin-1 cause Kindler syndrome. We report a novel kindlin-1-deficient keratinocyte cell line derived from a Kindler syndrome patient. Despite the expression of kindlin-2, the patient's cells display several hallmarks related to reduced function of β1 integrins, including abnormal cell morphology, cell adhesion, cell spreading, focal adhesion assembly, and cell migration. Defective cell adhesion was aggravated by kindlin-2 depletion, indicating that kindlin-2 can compensate to a certain extent for the loss of kindlin-1. Intriguingly, β1 at the cell-surface was aberrantly glycosylated in the patient's cells, and its expression was considerably reduced, both in cells in vitro and in the patient's epidermis. Reconstitution with wild-type kindlin-1 but not with a β1-binding defective mutant restored the aberrant β1 expression and glycosylation, and normalized cell morphology, adhesion, spreading, and migration. Furthermore, the expression of wild-type kindlin-1, but not of the integrin-binding-defective mutant, increased the stability of integrin-mediated cell-matrix adhesions and enhanced the redistribution of internalized integrins to the cell surface. Thus, these data uncover a role for kindlin-1 in the regulation of integrin trafficking and adhesion turnover.

  7. Phosphorylated filamin A regulates actin-linked caveolae dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muriel, Olivia; Echarri, Asier; Hellriegel, Christian; Pavón, Dácil M; Beccari, Leonardo; Del Pozo, Miguel A

    2011-08-15

    Caveolae are relatively stable membrane invaginations that compartmentalize signaling, regulate lipid metabolism and mediate viral entry. Caveolae are closely associated with actin fibers and internalize in response to diverse stimuli. Loss of cell adhesion is known to induce rapid and robust caveolae internalization and trafficking toward a Rab11-positive recycling endosome; however, pathways governing this process are poorly understood. Here, we report that filamin A is required to maintain the F-actin-dependent linear distribution of caveolin-1. High spatiotemporal resolution particle tracking of caveolin-1-GFP vesicles by total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy revealed that FLNa is required for the F-actin-dependent arrest of caveolin-1 vesicles in a confined area and their stable anchorage to the plasma membrane. The linear distribution and anchorage of caveolin-1 vesicles are both required for proper caveolin-1 inwards trafficking. De-adhesion-triggered caveolae inward trafficking towards a recycling endosome is impaired in FLNa-depleted HeLa and FLNa-deficient M2-melanoma cells. Inwards trafficking of caveolin-1 requires both the ability of FLNa to bind actin and cycling PKCα-dependent phosphorylation of FLNa on Ser2152 after cell detachment. © 2011. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd

  8. Characterization of microtubule-binding and dimerization activity of Giardia lamblia end-binding 1 protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Juri; Nagami, Sara; Lee, Kyu-Ho; Park, Soon-Jung

    2014-01-01

    End-binding 1 (EB1) proteins are evolutionarily conserved components of microtubule (MT) plus-end tracking protein that regulate MT dynamics. Giardia lamblia, with two nuclei and cytoskeletal structures, requires accurate MT distribution for division. In this study, we show that a single EB1 homolog gene of G. lamblia regulates MT dynamics in mitosis. The haemagglutinin-tagged G. lamblia EB1 (GlEB1) localizes to the nuclear envelopes and median bodies, and is transiently present in mitotic spindles of dividing cells. Knockdown of GlEB1 expression using the morpholinos-based anti-EB1 oligonucleotides, resulted in a significant defect in mitosis of Giardia trophozoites. The MT-binding assays using recombinant GlEB1 (rGlEB1) proteins demonstrated that rGlEB1102-238, but not rGlEB11-184, maintains an MT-binding ability comparable with that of the full length protein, rGlEB11-238. Size exclusion chromatography showed that rGlEB1 is present as a dimer formed by its C-terminal domain and a disulfide bond. In vitro-mutagenesis of GlEB1 indicated that an intermolecular disulfide bond is made between cysteine #13 of the two monomers. Complementation assay using the BIM1 knockout mutant yeast, the yeast homolog of mammalian EB1, indicated that expression of the C13S mutant GlEB1 protein cannot rescue the mitotic defect of the BIM1 mutant yeast. These results suggest that dimerization of GlEB1 via the 13th cysteine residues plays a role during mitosis in Giardia.

  9. Characterization of Microtubule-Binding and Dimerization Activity of Giardia lamblia End-Binding 1 Protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Juri; Nagami, Sara; Lee, Kyu-Ho; Park, Soon-Jung

    2014-01-01

    End-binding 1 (EB1) proteins are evolutionarily conserved components of microtubule (MT) plus-end tracking protein that regulate MT dynamics. Giardia lamblia, with two nuclei and cytoskeletal structures, requires accurate MT distribution for division. In this study, we show that a single EB1 homolog gene of G. lamblia regulates MT dynamics in mitosis. The haemagglutinin-tagged G. lamblia EB1 (GlEB1) localizes to the nuclear envelopes and median bodies, and is transiently present in mitotic spindles of dividing cells. Knockdown of GlEB1 expression using the morpholinos-based anti-EB1 oligonucleotides, resulted in a significant defect in mitosis of Giardia trophozoites. The MT-binding assays using recombinant GlEB1 (rGlEB1) proteins demonstrated that rGlEB1102–238, but not rGlEB11–184, maintains an MT-binding ability comparable with that of the full length protein, rGlEB11–238. Size exclusion chromatography showed that rGlEB1 is present as a dimer formed by its C-terminal domain and a disulfide bond. In vitro-mutagenesis of GlEB1 indicated that an intermolecular disulfide bond is made between cysteine #13 of the two monomers. Complementation assay using the BIM1 knockout mutant yeast, the yeast homolog of mammalian EB1, indicated that expression of the C13S mutant GlEB1 protein cannot rescue the mitotic defect of the BIM1 mutant yeast. These results suggest that dimerization of GlEB1 via the 13th cysteine residues plays a role during mitosis in Giardia. PMID:24828878

  10. An integrated model of microtubule-based pronuclear motion in the single-celled C. elegans embryo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinar, Tamar; Shelley, Michael

    2010-11-01

    We present an integrated computational model of microtubule-based pronuclear motion in the single-celled C. elegans embryo. In this model, centrosomes initiate stochastic microtubule growth and these microtubules interact with motor proteins distributed in the cytoplasm. Consequent pulling forces drag the pronucleus through the cytoplasm, here modeled as an incompressible, Newtonian fluid whose motions are constrained by contact with the cell periphery. The cell periphery also limits microtubule growth. Our computational method is based on an immersed boundary formulation which allows for the simultaneous treatment of fluid flow and the dynamics of structures immersed within. Our simulations show pronuclear migration, and moreover, a geometry-dependent pronuclear centration and rotation very similar to that observed in vivo. We study the dynamic interaction of motor proteins embedded in the fluid with microtubule filaments, allowing for relative motion of fluid along MT tracks as has been observed experimentally. We demonstrate numerically that this is sufficient to propel the pronucleus while causing a counterflow of the cytoplasm.

  11. The nucleoporin MEL-28 promotes RanGTP-dependent γ-tubulin recruitment and microtubule nucleation in mitotic spindle formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokoyama, Hideki; Koch, Birgit; Walczak, Rudolf; Ciray-Duygu, Fulya; González-Sánchez, Juan Carlos; Devos, Damien P; Mattaj, Iain W; Gruss, Oliver J

    2014-01-01

    The GTP-bound form of the Ran GTPase (RanGTP), produced around chromosomes, drives nuclear envelope and nuclear pore complex (NPC) re-assembly after mitosis. The nucleoporin MEL-28/ELYS binds chromatin in a RanGTP-regulated manner and acts to seed NPC assembly. Here we show that, upon mitotic NPC disassembly, MEL-28 dissociates from chromatin and re-localizes to spindle microtubules and kinetochores. MEL-28 directly binds microtubules in a RanGTP-regulated way via its C-terminal chromatin-binding domain. Using Xenopus egg extracts, we demonstrate that MEL-28 is essential for RanGTP-dependent microtubule nucleation and spindle assembly, independent of its function in NPC assembly. Specifically, MEL-28 interacts with the γ-tubulin ring complex and recruits it to microtubule nucleation sites. Our data identify MEL-28 as a RanGTP target that functions throughout the cell cycle. Its cell cycle-dependent binding to chromatin or microtubules discriminates MEL-28 functions in interphase and mitosis, and ensures that spindle assembly occurs only after NPC breakdown.

  12. CYK4 promotes antiparallel microtubule bundling by optimizing MKLP1 neck conformation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tim Davies

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Centralspindlin, a constitutive 2:2 heterotetramer of MKLP1 (a kinesin-6 and the non-motor subunit CYK4, plays important roles in cytokinesis. It is crucial for the formation of central spindle microtubule bundle structure. Its accumulation at the central antiparallel overlap zone is key for recruitment and regulation of downstream cytokinesis factors and for stable anchoring of the plasma membrane at the midbody. Both MKLP1 and CYK4 are required for efficient microtubule bundling. However, the mechanism by which CYK4 contributes to this is unclear. Here we performed structural and functional analyses of centralspindlin using high-speed atomic force microscopy, Fӧrster resonance energy transfer analysis, and in vitro reconstitution. Our data reveal that CYK4 binds to a globular mass in the atypically long MKLP1 neck domain between the catalytic core and the coiled coil and thereby reconfigures the two motor domains in the MKLP1 dimer to be suitable for antiparallel microtubule bundling. Our work provides insights into the microtubule bundling during cytokinesis and into the working mechanisms of the kinesins with non-canonical neck structures.

  13. HSPB1 facilitates the formation of non-centrosomal microtubules.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo Almeida-Souza

    Full Text Available The remodeling capacity of microtubules (MT is essential for their proper function. In mammals, MTs are predominantly formed at the centrosome, but can also originate from non-centrosomal sites, a process that is still poorly understood. We here show that the small heat shock protein HSPB1 plays a role in the control of non-centrosomal MT formation. The HSPB1 expression level regulates the balance between centrosomal and non-centrosomal MTs. The HSPB1 protein can be detected specifically at sites of de novo forming non-centrosomal MTs, while it is absent from the centrosomes. In addition, we show that HSPB1 binds preferentially to the lattice of newly formed MTs in vitro, suggesting that its function occurs by stabilizing MT seeds. Our findings open new avenues for the understanding of the role of HSPB1 in the development, maintenance and protection of cells with specialized non-centrosomal MT arrays.

  14. The Caenorhabditis elegans Elongator complex regulates neuronal alpha-tubulin acetylation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jachen A Solinger

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Although acetylated alpha-tubulin is known to be a marker of stable microtubules in neurons, precise factors that regulate alpha-tubulin acetylation are, to date, largely unknown. Therefore, a genetic screen was employed in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans that identified the Elongator complex as a possible regulator of alpha-tubulin acetylation. Detailed characterization of mutant animals revealed that the acetyltransferase activity of the Elongator is indeed required for correct acetylation of microtubules and for neuronal development. Moreover, the velocity of vesicles on microtubules was affected by mutations in Elongator. Elongator mutants also displayed defects in neurotransmitter levels. Furthermore, acetylation of alpha-tubulin was shown to act as a novel signal for the fine-tuning of microtubules dynamics by modulating alpha-tubulin turnover, which in turn affected neuronal shape. Given that mutations in the acetyltransferase subunit of the Elongator (Elp3 and in a scaffold subunit (Elp1 have previously been linked to human neurodegenerative diseases, namely Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis and Familial Dysautonomia respectively highlights the importance of this work and offers new insights to understand their etiology.

  15. Motor protein accumulation on antiparallel microtubule overlaps

    CERN Document Server

    Kuan, Hui-Shun

    2015-01-01

    Biopolymers serve as one-dimensional tracks on which motor proteins move to perform their biological roles. Motor protein phenomena have inspired theoretical models of one-dimensional transport, crowding, and jamming. Experiments studying the motion of Xklp1 motors on reconstituted antiparallel microtubule overlaps demonstrated that motors recruited to the overlap walk toward the plus end of individual microtubules and frequently switch between filaments. We study a model of this system that couples the totally asymmetric simple exclusion process (TASEP) for motor motion with switches between antiparallel filaments and binding kinetics. We determine steady-state motor density profiles for fixed-length overlaps using exact and approximate solutions of the continuum differential equations and compare to kinetic Monte Carlo simulations. The center region, far from the overlap ends, has a constant motor density as one would na\\"ively expect. However, rather than following a simple binding equilibrium, the center ...

  16. Optomechanical proposal for monitoring microtubule mechanical vibrations

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Barzanjeh, Sh.; Salari, V.; Tuszynski, J. A.; Cifra, Michal; Simon, C.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 96, č. 1 (2017), č. článku 012404. ISSN 2470-0045 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA15-17102S Grant - others:AV ČR(CZ) SAV-15-22 Program:Bilaterální spolupráce Institutional support: RVO:67985882 Keywords : Vibrational modes * Microtubule * Resonance frequencies Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering Impact factor: 2.366, year: 2016

  17. Organization of spindle microtubules in Ochromonas danica

    OpenAIRE

    1980-01-01

    The entire framework of microtubules (MTs) in the mitotic apparatus of Ochromonas danica is reconstructed (except at the spindle poles) from transverse serial sections. Eleven spindles were sectioned and used for numerical data, but only four were reconstructed: a metaphase, an early anaphase, a late anaphase, and telophase. Four major classes of MTs are observed: (a) free MTs (MTs not attached to either pole); (b) interdigitated MTs (MTs attached to one pole which laterally associate with MT...

  18. Differential turnover of tyrosinated and detyrosinated microtubules.

    OpenAIRE

    Webster, D. R.; Gundersen, G G; Bulinski, J C; Borisy, G G

    1987-01-01

    Turnover of tyrosinated and detyrosinated microtubules ([Tyr]MTs and [Glu]MTs, respectively) was analyzed by the combined use of hapten-mediated immunocytochemistry and peptide-specific antibodies. Cells were microinjected with hapten-labeled tubulin and then processed for triple-label immunofluorescence to determine the pattern of incorporation of the injected subunits into [Tyr]- and [Glu]-MTs. Within 2 min of microinjection, hapten-labeled domains were present at the ends of virtually all ...

  19. Interpolar spindle microtubules in PTK cells

    OpenAIRE

    1993-01-01

    Spindle microtubules (MTs) in PtK1 cells, fixed at stages from metaphase to telophase, have been reconstructed using serial sections, electron microscopy, and computer image processing. We have studied the class of MTs that form an interdigitating system connecting the two spindle poles (interpolar MTs or ipMTs) and their relationship to the spindle MTs that attach to kinetochores (kMTs). Viewed in cross section, the ipMTs cluster with antiparallel near neighbors throughout mitosis; this bund...

  20. Capital Regulation, Liquidity Requirements and Taxation in a Dynamic Model of Banking

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Di Nicolo, G.; Gamba, A.; Lucchetta, M.

    2011-01-01

    This paper formulates a dynamic model of a bank exposed to both credit and liquidity risk, which can resolve financial distress in three costly forms: fire sales, bond issuance ad equity issuance. We use the model to analyze the impact of capital regulation, liquidity requirements and taxation on

  1. Capital Regulation, Liquidity Requirements and Taxation in a Dynamic Model of Banking

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Di Nicolo, G.; Gamba, A.; Lucchetta, M.

    2011-01-01

    This paper formulates a dynamic model of a bank exposed to both credit and liquidity risk, which can resolve financial distress in three costly forms: fire sales, bond issuance and equity issuance. We use the model to analyze the impact of capital regulation, liquidity requirements and taxation on

  2. Dynamics of Emotion Regulation in Infants of Clinically Depressed and Nondepressed Mothers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manian, Nanmathi; Bornstein, Marc H.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Emotion regulation (ER) has been conceptualized as an ongoing process of the individual's emotion patterns in relation to moment-to-moment contextual demands. In contrast to traditional approaches of descriptively quantizing ER, we employed a dynamic approach to ER by examining key transitions in infants of clinically depressed and…

  3. Quantitative analysis of proteome and lipidome dynamics reveals functional regulation of global lipid metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Casanovas, Albert; Sprenger, Richard R; Tarasov, Kirill

    2015-01-01

    Elucidating how and to what extent lipid metabolism is remodeled under changing conditions is essential for understanding cellular physiology. Here, we analyzed proteome and lipidome dynamics to investigate how regulation of lipid metabolism at the global scale supports remodeling of cellular...

  4. Dynamic Scaffolding of Socially Regulated Learning in a Computer-Based Learning Environment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Molenaar, I.; Roda, Claudia; van Boxtel, Carla A.M.; Sleegers, P.J.C.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study is to test the effects of dynamically scaffolding social regulation of middle school students working in a computer-based learning environment. Dyads in the scaffolding condition (N = 56) are supported with computer-generated scaffolds and students in the control condition (N =

  5. Mechanism of microtubule stabilization by taccalonolide AJ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuxi; Yu, Yamei; Li, Guo-Bo; Li, Shu-Ang; Wu, Chengyong; Gigant, Benoît; Qin, Wenming; Chen, Hao; Wu, Yangping; Chen, Qiang; Yang, Jinliang

    2017-06-06

    As a major component of the cytoskeleton, microtubules consist of αβ-tubulin heterodimers and have been recognized as attractive targets for cancer chemotherapy. Microtubule-stabilizing agents (MSAs) promote polymerization of tubulin and stabilize the polymer, preventing depolymerization. The molecular mechanisms by which MSAs stabilize microtubules remain elusive. Here we report a 2.05 Å crystal structure of tubulin complexed with taccalonolide AJ, a newly identified taxane-site MSA. Taccalonolide AJ covalently binds to β-tubulin D226. On AJ binding, the M-loop undergoes a conformational shift to facilitate tubulin polymerization. In this tubulin-AJ complex, the E-site of tubulin is occupied by GTP rather than GDP. Biochemical analyses confirm that AJ inhibits the hydrolysis of the E-site GTP. Thus, we propose that the β-tubulin E-site is locked into a GTP-preferred status by AJ binding. Our results provide experimental evidence for the connection between MSA binding and tubulin nucleotide state, and will help design new MSAs to overcome taxane resistance.

  6. Spindle pole body-anchored Kar3 drives the nucleus along microtubules from another nucleus in preparation for nuclear fusion during yeast karyogamy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibeaux, Romain; Politi, Antonio Z; Nédélec, François; Antony, Claude; Knop, Michael

    2013-02-01

    Nuclear migration during yeast karyogamy, termed nuclear congression, is required to initiate nuclear fusion. Congression involves a specific regulation of the microtubule minus end-directed kinesin-14 motor Kar3 and a rearrangement of the cytoplasmic microtubule attachment sites at the spindle pole bodies (SPBs). However, how these elements interact to produce the forces necessary for nuclear migration is less clear. We used electron tomography, molecular genetics, quantitative imaging, and first principles modeling to investigate how cytoplasmic microtubules are organized during nuclear congression. We found that Kar3, with the help of its light chain, Cik1, is anchored during mating to the SPB component Spc72 that also serves as a nucleator and anchor for microtubules via their minus ends. Moreover, we show that no direct microtubule-microtubule interactions are required for nuclear migration. Instead, SPB-anchored Kar3 exerts the necessary pulling forces laterally on microtubules emanating from the SPB of the mating partner nucleus. Therefore, a twofold symmetrical application of the core principle that drives nuclear migration in higher cells is used in yeast to drive nuclei toward each other before nuclear fusion.

  7. ABT737 enhances cholangiocarcinoma sensitivity to cisplatin through regulation of mitochondrial dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fan, Zhongqi [Department of Hepatobiliary & Pancreas Surgery, The First Hospital, Jilin University, Changchun, Jilin 130021 (China); Yu, Huimei [Department of Pathophysiology, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Jilin University, Changchun, Jilin 130021 (China); Cui, Ni [Bethune Medical College, Jilin University, Changchun, Jilin 130021 (China); Kong, Xianggui; Liu, Xiaomin; Chang, Yulei [State Key Laboratory of Luminescence and Applications, Changchun Institute of Optics, Fine Mechanics and Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changchun, Jilin 130033 (China); Wu, Yao [Department of Pathophysiology, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Jilin University, Changchun, Jilin 130021 (China); Sun, Liankun, E-mail: sunlk@jlu.edu.cn [Department of Pathophysiology, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Jilin University, Changchun, Jilin 130021 (China); Wang, Guangyi, E-mail: wgymd@sina.com [Department of Hepatobiliary & Pancreas Surgery, The First Hospital, Jilin University, Changchun, Jilin 130021 (China)

    2015-07-01

    Cholangiocarcinoma responses weakly to cisplatin. Mitochondrial dynamics participate in the response to various stresses, and mainly involve mitophagy and mitochondrial fusion and fission. Bcl-2 family proteins play critical roles in orchestrating mitochondrial dynamics, and are involved in the resistance to cisplatin. Here we reported that ABT737, combined with cisplatin, can promote cholangiocarcinoma cells to undergo apoptosis. We found that the combined treatment decreased the Mcl-1 pro-survival form and increased Bak. Cells undergoing cisplatin treatment showed hyperfused mitochondria, whereas fragmentation was dominant in the mitochondria of cells exposed to the combined treatment, with higher Fis1 levels, decreased Mfn2 and OPA1 levels, increased ratio of Drp1 60 kD to 80 kD form, and more Drp1 located on mitochondria. More p62 aggregates were observed in cells with fragmented mitochondria, and they gradually translocated to mitochondria. Mitophagy was induced by the combined treatment. Knockdown p62 decreased the Drp1 ratio, increased Tom20, and increased cell viability. Our data indicated that mitochondrial dynamics play an important role in the response of cholangiocarcinoma to cisplatin. ABT737 might enhance cholangiocarcinoma sensitivity to cisplatin through regulation of mitochondrial dynamics and the balance within Bcl-2 family proteins. Furthermore, p62 seems to be critical in the regulation of mitochondrial dynamics. - Highlights: • Cholangiocarcinoma may adapt to cisplatin through mitochondrial fusion. • ABT737 sensitizes cholangiocarcinoma to cisplatin by promoting fission and mitophagy. • p62 might participate in the regulation of mitochondrial fission and mitophagy.

  8. AlphaE-catenin regulates actin dynamics independently of cadherin-mediated cell-cell adhesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benjamin, Jacqueline M; Kwiatkowski, Adam V; Yang, Changsong; Korobova, Farida; Pokutta, Sabine; Svitkina, Tatyana; Weis, William I; Nelson, W James

    2010-04-19

    alphaE-catenin binds the cell-cell adhesion complex of E-cadherin and beta-catenin (beta-cat) and regulates filamentous actin (F-actin) dynamics. In vitro, binding of alphaE-catenin to the E-cadherin-beta-cat complex lowers alphaE-catenin affinity for F-actin, and alphaE-catenin alone can bind F-actin and inhibit Arp2/3 complex-mediated actin polymerization. In cells, to test whether alphaE-catenin regulates actin dynamics independently of the cadherin complex, the cytosolic alphaE-catenin pool was sequestered to mitochondria without affecting overall levels of alphaE-catenin or the cadherin-catenin complex. Sequestering cytosolic alphaE-catenin to mitochondria alters lamellipodia architecture and increases membrane dynamics and cell migration without affecting cell-cell adhesion. In contrast, sequestration of cytosolic alphaE-catenin to the plasma membrane reduces membrane dynamics. These results demonstrate that the cytosolic pool of alphaE-catenin regulates actin dynamics independently of cell-cell adhesion.

  9. αE-catenin regulates actin dynamics independently of cadherin-mediated cell–cell adhesion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benjamin, Jacqueline M.; Kwiatkowski, Adam V.; Yang, Changsong; Korobova, Farida; Pokutta, Sabine; Svitkina, Tatyana

    2010-01-01

    αE-catenin binds the cell–cell adhesion complex of E-cadherin and β-catenin (β-cat) and regulates filamentous actin (F-actin) dynamics. In vitro, binding of αE-catenin to the E-cadherin–β-cat complex lowers αE-catenin affinity for F-actin, and αE-catenin alone can bind F-actin and inhibit Arp2/3 complex–mediated actin polymerization. In cells, to test whether αE-catenin regulates actin dynamics independently of the cadherin complex, the cytosolic αE-catenin pool was sequestered to mitochondria without affecting overall levels of αE-catenin or the cadherin–catenin complex. Sequestering cytosolic αE-catenin to mitochondria alters lamellipodia architecture and increases membrane dynamics and cell migration without affecting cell–cell adhesion. In contrast, sequestration of cytosolic αE-catenin to the plasma membrane reduces membrane dynamics. These results demonstrate that the cytosolic pool of αE-catenin regulates actin dynamics independently of cell–cell adhesion. PMID:20404114

  10. Ubiquitin receptor protein UBASH3B drives Aurora B recruitment to mitotic microtubules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krupina, Ksenia; Kleiss, Charlotte; Metzger, Thibaud; Fournane, Sadek; Schmucker, Stephane; Hofmann, Kay; Fischer, Benoit; Paul, Nicodeme; Porter, Iain Malcolm; Raffelsberger, Wolfgang; Poch, Olivier; Swedlow, Jason Reese; Brino, Laurent; Sumara, Izabela

    2017-01-01

    Summary Mitosis ensures equal segregation of the genome and is controlled by a variety of ubiquitylation signals on substrate proteins. However, it remains unexplored how the versatile ubiquitin code is read out during mitotic progression. Here, we identify the ubiquitin receptor protein UBASH3B as an important regulator of mitosis. UBASH3B interacts with ubiquitylated Aurora B, one of the main kinases regulating chromosome segregation, and controls its subcellular localization but not protein levels. UBASH3B is a limiting factor in this pathway, and is sufficient to drive Aurora B to microtubules prior to anaphase. Importantly, targeting Aurora B to microtubules by UBASH3B is necessary for the timing and fidelity of chromosome segregation in human cells. Our findings uncover an important mechanism defining how ubiquitin attachment to a substrate protein is decoded during mitosis. PMID:26766443

  11. Electric field generated by axial longitudinal vibration modes of microtubule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cifra, M; Pokorný, J; Havelka, D; Kucera, O

    2010-05-01

    Microtubules are electrically polar structures fulfilling prerequisites for generation of oscillatory electric field in the kHz to GHz region. Energy supply for excitation of elasto-electrical vibrations in microtubules may be provided from GTP-hydrolysis; motor protein-microtubule interactions; and energy efflux from mitochondria. We calculated electric field generated by axial longitudinal vibration modes of microtubules for random, and coherent excitation. In case of coherent excitation of vibrations, the electric field intensity is highest at the end of microtubule. The dielectrophoretic force exerted by electric field on the surrounding molecules will influence the kinetics of microtubule polymerization via change in the probability of the transport of charge and mass particles. The electric field generated by vibrations of electrically polar cellular structures is expected to play an important role in biological self-organization. 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Rapid regulation of endoplasmic reticulum dynamics in dendritic spines by NMDA receptor activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Ai Na; Doherty, Andrew J; Lombroso, Paul J; Emptage, Nigel J; Collingridge, Graham L

    2014-08-19

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is motile within dendritic spines, but the mechanisms underlying its regulation are poorly understood. To address this issue, we have simultaneously imaged morphology and ER content of dendritic spines in cultured dissociated mouse hippocampal neurons. Over a 10 min period, spines were highly dynamic, with spines both increasing and decreasing in volume. ER was present in approximately 50% of spines and was also highly dynamic, with a net increase over this period of time. Inhibition of the endogenous activation of NMDA receptors resulted in a reduction in ER growth. Conversely, augmentation of the synaptic activation of NMDA receptors, by elimination of striatal-enriched protein tyrosine phosphatase (STEP), resulted in enhanced ER growth. Therefore, NMDA receptors rapidly regulate spine ER dynamics.

  13. Dynamic regulation of gene expression using sucrose responsive promoters and RNA interference in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Thomas C; Espinosa, Monica I; Nielsen, Lars K; Vickers, Claudia E

    2015-04-01

    Engineering dynamic, environmentally- and temporally-responsive control of gene expression is one of the principle objectives in the field of synthetic biology. Dynamic regulation is desirable because many engineered functions conflict with endogenous processes which have evolved to facilitate growth and survival, and minimising conflict between growth and production phases can improve product titres in microbial cell factories. There are a limited number of mechanisms that enable dynamic regulation in yeast, and fewer still that are appropriate for application in an industrial setting. To address this problem we have identified promoters that are repressed during growth on glucose, and activated during growth on sucrose. Catabolite repression and preferential glucose utilisation allows active growth on glucose before switching to production on sucrose. Using sucrose as an activator of gene expression circumvents the need for expensive inducer compounds and enables gene expression to be triggered during growth on a fermentable, high energy-yield carbon source. The ability to fine-tune the timing and population density at which gene expression is activated from the SUC2 promoter was demonstrated by varying the ratio of glucose to sucrose in the growth medium. Finally, we demonstrated that the system could also be used to repress gene expression (a process also required for many engineering projects). We used the glucose/sucrose system to control a heterologous RNA interference module and dynamically repress the expression of a constitutively regulated GFP gene. The low noise levels and high dynamic range of the SUC2 promoter make it a promising option for implementing dynamic regulation in yeast. The capacity to repress gene expression using RNA interference makes the system highly versatile, with great potential for metabolic engineering applications.

  14. Microglial morphology and dynamic behavior is regulated by ionotropic glutamatergic and GABAergic neurotransmission.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aurora M Fontainhas

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Microglia represent the primary resident immune cells in the CNS, and have been implicated in the pathology of neurodegenerative diseases. Under basal or "resting" conditions, microglia possess ramified morphologies and exhibit dynamic surveying movements in their processes. Despite the prominence of this phenomenon, the function and regulation of microglial morphology and dynamic behavior are incompletely understood. We investigate here whether and how neurotransmission regulates "resting" microglial morphology and behavior. METHODS: We employed an ex vivo mouse retinal explant system in which endogenous neurotransmission and dynamic microglial behavior are present. We utilized live-cell time-lapse confocal imaging to study the morphology and behavior of GFP-labeled retinal microglia in response to neurotransmitter agonists and antagonists. Patch clamp electrophysiology and immunohistochemical localization of glutamate receptors were also used to investigate direct-versus-indirect effects of neurotransmission by microglia. RESULTS: Retinal microglial morphology and dynamic behavior were not cell-autonomously regulated but are instead modulated by endogenous neurotransmission. Morphological parameters and process motility were differentially regulated by different modes of neurotransmission and were increased by ionotropic glutamatergic neurotransmission and decreased by ionotropic GABAergic neurotransmission. These neurotransmitter influences on retinal microglia were however unlikely to be directly mediated; local applications of neurotransmitters were unable to elicit electrical responses on microglia patch-clamp recordings and ionotropic glutamatergic receptors were not located on microglial cell bodies or processes by immunofluorescent labeling. Instead, these influences were mediated indirectly via extracellular ATP, released in response to glutamatergic neurotransmission through probenecid-sensitive pannexin hemichannels

  15. Microtubules are organized independently of the centrosome in Drosophila neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nguyen Michelle M

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The best-studied arrangement of microtubules is that organized by the centrosome, a cloud of microtubule nucleating and anchoring proteins is clustered around centrioles. However, noncentrosomal microtubule arrays are common in many differentiated cells, including neurons. Although microtubules are not anchored at neuronal centrosomes, it remains unclear whether the centrosome plays a role in organizing neuronal microtubules. We use Drosophila as a model system to determine whether centrosomal microtubule nucleation is important in mature neurons. Results In developing and mature neurons, centrioles were not surrounded by the core nucleation protein γ-tubulin. This suggests that the centrioles do not organize functional centrosomes in Drosophila neurons in vivo. Consistent with this idea, centriole position was not correlated with a specific region of the cell body in neurons, and growing microtubules did not cluster around the centriole, even after axon severing when the number of growing plus ends is dramatically increased. To determine whether the centrosome was required for microtubule organization in mature neurons, we used two approaches. First, we used DSas-4 centriole duplication mutants. In these mutants, centrioles were present in many larval sensory neurons, but they were not fully functional. Despite reduced centriole function, microtubule orientation was normal in axons and dendrites. Second, we used laser ablation to eliminate the centriole, and again found that microtubule polarity in axons and dendrites was normal, even 3 days after treatment. Conclusion We conclude that the centrosome is not a major site of microtubule nucleation in Drosophila neurons, and is not required for maintenance of neuronal microtubule organization in these cells.

  16. Molecular Pathway of Microtubule Organization at the Golgi Apparatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jingchao; de Heus, Cecilia; Liu, Qingyang; Bouchet, Benjamin P; Noordstra, Ivar; Jiang, Kai; Hua, Shasha; Martin, Maud; Yang, Chao; Grigoriev, Ilya; Katrukha, Eugene A; Altelaar, A F Maarten; Hoogenraad, Casper C; Qi, Robert Z; Klumperman, Judith; Akhmanova, Anna

    2016-10-10

    The Golgi apparatus controls the formation of non-centrosomal microtubule arrays important for Golgi organization, polarized transport, cell motility, and cell differentiation. Here, we show that CAMSAP2 stabilizes and attaches microtubule minus ends to the Golgi through a complex of AKAP450 and myomegalin. CLASPs stabilize CAMSAP2-decorated microtubules but are not required for their Golgi tethering. AKAP450 is also essential for Golgi microtubule nucleation, and myomegalin and CDK5RAP2 but not CAMSAP2 contribute to this function. In the absence of centrosomes, AKAP450- and CAMSAP2-dependent pathways of microtubule minus-end organization become dominant, and the presence of at least one of them is needed to maintain microtubule density. Strikingly, a compact Golgi can be assembled in the absence of both centrosomal and Golgi microtubules. However, CAMSAP2- and AKAP450-dependent Golgi microtubules facilitate Golgi reorientation and cell invasion in a 3D matrix. We propose that Golgi-anchored microtubules are important for polarized cell movement but not for coalescence of Golgi membranes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Calculation of the Electromagnetic Field Around a Microtubule

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Havelka

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Microtubules are important structures in the cytoskeleton which organizes the cell. A single microtubule is composed of electrically polar structures, tubulin heterodimers, which have a strong electric dipole moment. Vibrations are expected to be generated in microtubules, thus tubulin heterodimers oscillate as electric dipoles. This gives rise to an electromagnetic field which is detected around the cells. We calculate here the electromagnetic field of microtubules if they are excited at 1 GHz. This paper includes work done for the bachelor thesis of the first author. 

  18. Producing Conditional Mutants for Studying Plant Microtubule Function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richard Cyr

    2009-09-29

    The cytoskeleton, and in particular its microtubule component, participates in several processes that directly affect growth and development in higher plants. Normal cytoskeletal function requires the precise and orderly arrangement of microtubules into several cell cycle and developmentally specific arrays. One of these, the cortical array, is notable for its role in directing the deposition of cellulose (the most prominent polymer in the biosphere). An understanding of how these arrays form, and the molecular interactions that contribute to their function, is incomplete. To gain a better understanding of how microtubules work, we have been working to characterize mutants in critical cytoskeletal genes. This characterization is being carried out at the subcellular level using vital microtubule gene constructs. In the last year of funding colleagues have discovered that gamma-tubulin complexes form along the lengths of cortical microtubules where they act to spawn new microtubules at a characteristic 40 deg angle. This finding complements nicely the finding from our lab (which was funded by the DOE) showing that microtubule encounters are angle dependent; high angles encounters results in catastrophic collisions while low angle encounters result in favorable zippering. The finding of a 40 deg spawn of new microtubules from extant microtubule, together with aforementioned rules of encounters, insures favorable co-alignment in the array. I was invited to write a New and Views essay on this topic and a PDF is attached (News and Views policy does not permit funding acknowledgments and so I was not allowed to acknowledge support from the DOE).

  19. The polarity protein Par6 is coupled to the microtubule network during molluscan early embryogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Homma, Taihei [Department of Biophysics and Biochemistry, Graduate School of Science, The University of Tokyo, Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Shimizu, Miho [Kuroda Chiromorphology Team, ERATO-SORST, JST, Komaba, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 153-8902 (Japan); Kuroda, Reiko, E-mail: ckuroda@mail.ecc.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Department of Biophysics and Biochemistry, Graduate School of Science, The University of Tokyo, Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Kuroda Chiromorphology Team, ERATO-SORST, JST, Komaba, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 153-8902 (Japan); Department of Life Sciences, Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, The University of Tokyo, Komaba, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 153-8902 (Japan)

    2011-01-07

    Research highlights: {yields} The cDNAs encoding Par6 and aPKC homologues were cloned from the snail Lymnaea stagnalis. {yields} L. stagnalis Par6 directly interacts with tubulin and microtubules and localizes to the microtubule cytoskeleton during the early embryogenesis. {yields} Identical sequence and localization of LsPar6 for the dextral and the sinistral snails exclude the possibility of the gene being the primary determinant of body handedness. -- Abstract: Cell polarity, which directs the orientation of asymmetric cell division and segregation of fate determinants, is a fundamental feature of development and differentiation. Regulators of polarity have been extensively studied, and the critical importance of the Par (partitioning-defective) complex as the polarity machinery is now recognized in a wide range of eukaryotic systems. The Par polarity module is evolutionarily conserved, but its mechanism and cooperating factors vary among different systems. Here we describe the cloning and characterization of a pond snail Lymnaea stagnalis homologue of partitioning-defective 6 (Lspar6). The protein product LsPar6 shows high affinity for microtubules and localizes to the mitotic apparatus during embryonic cell division. In vitro assays revealed direct binding of LsPar6 to tubulin and microtubules, which is the first evidence of the direct interaction between the two proteins. The interaction is mediated by two distinct regions of LsPar6 both located in the N-terminal half. Atypical PKC, a functional partner of Par6, was also found to localize to the mitotic spindle. These results suggest that the L. stagnalis Par complex employs the microtubule network in cell polarity processes during the early embryogenesis. Identical sequence and localization of LsPar6 for the dextral and the sinistral snails exclude the possibility of the gene being the primary determinant of handedness.

  20. Motivational dynamics of eating regulation: a self-determination theory perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verstuyf Joke

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Within Western society, many people have difficulties adequately regulating their eating behaviors and weight. Although the literature on eating regulation is vast, little attention has been given to motivational dynamics involved in eating regulation. Grounded in Self-Determination Theory (SDT, the present contribution aims to provide a motivational perspective on eating regulation. The role of satisfaction and thwarting of the basic psychological needs for autonomy, competence, and relatedness is introduced as a mechanism to (a explain the etiology of body image concerns and disordered eating and (b understand the optimal regulation of ongoing eating behavior for healthy weight maintenance. An overview of empirical studies on these two research lines is provided. In a final section, the potential relevance and value of SDT in relation to prevailing theoretical models in the domain of eating regulation is discussed. Although research on SDT in the domain of eating regulation is still in its early stages and more research is clearly needed, this review suggests that the SDT represents a promising framework to more thoroughly study and understand the motivational processes involved in eating regulation and associated problems.

  1. Motivational dynamics of eating regulation: a self-determination theory perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Within Western society, many people have difficulties adequately regulating their eating behaviors and weight. Although the literature on eating regulation is vast, little attention has been given to motivational dynamics involved in eating regulation. Grounded in Self-Determination Theory (SDT), the present contribution aims to provide a motivational perspective on eating regulation. The role of satisfaction and thwarting of the basic psychological needs for autonomy, competence, and relatedness is introduced as a mechanism to (a) explain the etiology of body image concerns and disordered eating and (b) understand the optimal regulation of ongoing eating behavior for healthy weight maintenance. An overview of empirical studies on these two research lines is provided. In a final section, the potential relevance and value of SDT in relation to prevailing theoretical models in the domain of eating regulation is discussed. Although research on SDT in the domain of eating regulation is still in its early stages and more research is clearly needed, this review suggests that the SDT represents a promising framework to more thoroughly study and understand the motivational processes involved in eating regulation and associated problems. PMID:22385782

  2. The prolactin gene: a paradigm of tissue-specific gene regulation with complex temporal transcription dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Featherstone, K; White, M R H; Davis, J R E

    2012-07-01

    Transcription of numerous mammalian genes is highly pulsatile, with bursts of expression occurring with variable duration and frequency. The presence of this stochastic or 'noisy' expression pattern has been relatively unexplored in tissue systems. The prolactin gene provides a model of tissue-specific gene regulation resulting in pulsatile transcription dynamics in both cell lines and endocrine tissues. In most cell culture models, prolactin transcription appears to be highly variable between cells, with differences in transcription pulse duration and frequency. This apparently stochastic transcription is constrained by a transcriptional refractory period, which may be related to cycles of chromatin remodelling. We propose that prolactin transcription dynamics result from the summation of oscillatory cellular inputs and by regulation through chromatin remodelling cycles. Observations of transcription dynamics in cells within pituitary tissue show reduced transcriptional heterogeneity and can be grouped into a small number of distinct patterns. Thus, it appears that the tissue environment is able to reduce transcriptional noise to enable coordinated tissue responses to environmental change. We review the current knowledge on the complex tissue-specific regulation of the prolactin gene in pituitary and extra-pituitary sites, highlighting differences between humans and rodent experimental animal models. Within this context, we describe the transcription dynamics of prolactin gene expression and how this may relate to specific processes occurring within the cell. © 2012 The Authors. Journal of Neuroendocrinology © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  3. Kinectin-mediated endoplasmic reticulum dynamics supports focal adhesion growth in the cellular lamella.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xin; Tee, Yee Han; Heng, Justin K; Zhu, Yajuan; Hu, Xian; Margadant, Felix; Ballestrem, Christoph; Bershadsky, Alexander; Griffiths, Gareth; Yu, Hanry

    2010-11-15

    Focal adhesions (FAs) control cell shape and motility, which are important processes that underlie a wide range of physiological functions. FA dynamics is regulated by cytoskeleton, motor proteins and small GTPases. Kinectin is an integral endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane protein that extends the ER along microtubules. Here, we investigated the influence of the ER on FA dynamics within the cellular lamella by disrupting the kinectin-kinesin interaction by overexpressing the minimal kinectin-kinesin interaction domain on kinectin in cells. This perturbation resulted in a morphological change to a rounded cell shape and reduced cell spreading and migration. Immunofluorescence and live-cell imaging demonstrated a kinectin-dependent ER extension into the cellular lamella and ER colocalisation with FAs within the cellular lamella. FRAP experiments showed that ER contact with FAs was accompanied with an increase in FA protein recruitment to FAs. Disruption of the kinectin-kinesin interaction caused a reduction in FA protein recruitment to FAs. This suggests that the ER supports FA growth within the cellular lamella. Microtubule targeting to FAs is known to promote adhesion disassembly; however, ER contact increased FA size even in the presence of microtubules. Our results suggest a scenario whereby kinectin-kinesin interaction facilitates ER transport along microtubules to support FA growth.

  4. Alteramide B is a microtubule antagonist of inhibiting Candida albicans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Yanjiao; Li, Yaoyao; Li, Zhenyu; Zhang, Juanli; Lu, Chunhua; Wang, Haoxin; Shen, Yuemao; Du, Liangcheng

    2016-10-01

    Alteramide B (ATB), isolated from Lysobacter enzymogenes C3, was a new polycyclic tetramate macrolactam (PTM). ATB exhibited potent inhibitory activity against several yeasts, particularly Candida albicans SC5314, but its antifungal mechanism is unknown. The structure of ATB was established by extensive spectroscopic analyses, including high-resolution mass spectrometry, 1D- and 2D-NMR, and CD spectra. Flow cytometry, fluorescence microscope, transmission electron microscope, molecular modeling, overexpression and site-directed mutation studies were employed to delineate the anti-Candida molecular mechanism of ATB. ATB induced apoptosis in C. albicans through inducing reactive oxygen species (ROS) production by disrupting microtubules. Molecular dynamics studies revealed the binding patterns of ATB to the β-tubulin subunit. Overexpression of the wild type and site-directed mutants of the β-tubulin gene (TUBB) changed the sensitivity of C. albicans to ATB, confirming the binding of ATB to β-tubulin, and indicating that the binding sites are L215, L217, L273, L274 and R282. In vivo, ATB significantly improved the survival of the candidiasis mice and reduced fungal burden. The molecular mechanism underlying the ATB-induced apoptosis in C. albicans is through inhibiting tubulin polymerization that leads to cell cycle arrest at the G2/M phase. The identification of ATB and the study of its activity provide novel mechanistic insights into the mode of action of PTMs against the human pathogen. This study shows that ATB is a new microtubule inhibitor and a promising anti-Candida lead compound. The results also support β-tubulin as a potential target for anti-Candida drug discovery. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Dynamics of chromatin accessibility and gene regulation by MADS-domain transcription factors in flower development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pajoro, Alice; Madrigal, Pedro; Muiño, Jose M; Matus, José Tomás; Jin, Jian; Mecchia, Martin A; Debernardi, Juan M; Palatnik, Javier F; Balazadeh, Salma; Arif, Muhammad; Ó'Maoiléidigh, Diarmuid S; Wellmer, Frank; Krajewski, Pawel; Riechmann, José-Luis; Angenent, Gerco C; Kaufmann, Kerstin

    2014-03-03

    Development of eukaryotic organisms is controlled by transcription factors that trigger specific and global changes in gene expression programs. In plants, MADS-domain transcription factors act as master regulators of developmental switches and organ specification. However, the mechanisms by which these factors dynamically regulate the expression of their target genes at different developmental stages are still poorly understood. We characterized the relationship of chromatin accessibility, gene expression, and DNA binding of two MADS-domain proteins at different stages of Arabidopsis flower development. Dynamic changes in APETALA1 and SEPALLATA3 DNA binding correlated with changes in gene expression, and many of the target genes could be associated with the developmental stage in which they are transcriptionally controlled. We also observe dynamic changes in chromatin accessibility during flower development. Remarkably, DNA binding of APETALA1 and SEPALLATA3 is largely independent of the accessibility status of their binding regions and it can precede increases in DNA accessibility. These results suggest that APETALA1 and SEPALLATA3 may modulate chromatin accessibility, thereby facilitating access of other transcriptional regulators to their target genes. Our findings indicate that different homeotic factors regulate partly overlapping, yet also distinctive sets of target genes in a partly stage-specific fashion. By combining the information from DNA-binding and gene expression data, we are able to propose models of stage-specific regulatory interactions, thereby addressing dynamics of regulatory networks throughout flower development. Furthermore, MADS-domain TFs may regulate gene expression by alternative strategies, one of which is modulation of chromatin accessibility.

  6. Dynamics of actin cables in polarized growth of the filamentous fungus Aspergillus nidulans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna eBergs

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Highly polarized growth of filamentous fungi requires a continuous supply of proteins and lipids to the hyphal tip. This transport is managed by vesicle trafficking via the actin and microtubule cytoskeletons and their associated motor proteins. Particularly, actin cables originating from the hyphal tip are essential for hyphal growth. Although specific marker proteins to visualize actin cables have been developed in filamentous fungi, the exact organization and dynamics of actin cables has remained elusive. Here we visualized actin cables using tropomyosin (TpmA and Lifeact fused to fluorescent proteins in Aspergillus nidulans and studied the dynamics and regulation. GFP tagged TpmA visualized dynamic actin cables formed from the hyphal tip with cycles of elongation and shrinkage. The elongation and shrinkage rates of actin cables were similar and approximately 0.6 μm/s. Comparison of actin markers revealed that high concentrations of Lifeact reduced actin dynamics. Simultaneous visualization of actin cables and microtubules suggests temporally and spatially coordinated polymerization and depolymerization between the two cytoskeletons. Our results provide new insights into the molecular mechanism of ordered polarized growth regulated by actin cables and microtubules.

  7. Linker histone H1 and H3K56 acetylation are antagonistic regulators of nucleosome dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernier, Morgan; Luo, Yi; Nwokelo, Kingsley C; Goodwin, Michelle; Dreher, Sarah J; Zhang, Pei; Parthun, Mark R; Fondufe-Mittendorf, Yvonne; Ottesen, Jennifer J; Poirier, Michael G

    2015-12-09

    H1 linker histones are highly abundant proteins that compact nucleosomes and chromatin to regulate DNA accessibility and transcription. However, the mechanisms that target H1 regulation to specific regions of eukaryotic genomes are unknown. Here we report fluorescence measurements of human H1 regulation of nucleosome dynamics and transcription factor (TF) binding within nucleosomes. H1 does not block TF binding, instead it suppresses nucleosome unwrapping to reduce DNA accessibility within H1-bound nucleosomes. We then investigated H1 regulation by H3K56 and H3K122 acetylation, two transcriptional activating histone post translational modifications (PTMs). Only H3K56 acetylation, which increases nucleosome unwrapping, abolishes H1.0 reduction of TF binding. These findings show that nucleosomes remain dynamic, while H1 is bound and H1 dissociation is not required for TF binding within the nucleosome. Furthermore, our H3K56 acetylation measurements suggest that a single-histone PTM can define regions of the genome that are not regulated by H1.

  8. [The dynamics of feed-forward loop depends on regulator type in indirect pathway].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duk, M A; Samsonov, A M; Samsonova, M G

    2015-01-01

    Gene networks contain a recurring motif, called the feed-forward loop, in which a transcription factor regulates target expression directly and indirectly via the second regulator. Here we present the results of mathematical modeling of feed-forward loops with either the transcription factor or miRNA as a repressor in the indirect pathway. We showed that the substitution of the transcription factor with miRNA changes the dynamic behavior of the feed-forward loop and lends new properties critical for biological system functioning.

  9. [Dynamic accumulation regulation of curcumin, demethoxycurcumin and bisdemethoxyeurcumin in three strains of curcuma longae rhizome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qing-Miao; Yang, Wen-Yu; Tang, Xue-Mei; Zhang, Mei; Zhou, Xian-Jian; Shu, Guang-Ming; Zhao, Jun-Ning; Fang, Qing-Mao

    2014-06-01

    The paper is aimed to study the dynamic accumulation regulation of curcumin (Cur), demethoxycurcumin (DMC) and bisdemethoxyeurcumin (BDMC) in three strains of Curcuma longa, and provide scientific references for formalized cultivation, timely harvesting, quality control and breeding cultivation of C. longa. The accumulation regulation of the three curcumin derivatives was basically the same in rhizome of three strains. The relative contents decreased along with plant development growing, while the accumulation per hectare increased with plant development growing. The accumulation of curcuminoids per hectare could be taken as the assessment standard for the best harvest time of C. longa. A3 was the best strain in terms of Cur and BDMC content.

  10. Emerging microtubule targets in glioma therapy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Katsetos, C.D.; Reginato, M.J.; Baas, P.W.; D'Agostino, L.; Legido, A.; Tuszynski, J. A.; Dráberová, Eduarda; Dráber, Pavel

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 22, č. 1 (2015), s. 49-72 ISSN 1071-9091 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LH12050; GA MZd NT14467 Grant - others:GA AV ČR M200521203PIPP; NIH(US) R01 NS028785; Philadelphia Health Education Corporation (PHEC)–St. Christopher’s Hospital for Children Reunified Endowment (C.D.K.)(US) 323256 Institutional support: RVO:68378050 Keywords : glioma tumorigenesis * glioblastoma * tubulin * microtubules Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 1.303, year: 2015

  11. Cdk1 and Plk1 mediate a CLASP2 phospho-switch that stabilizes kinetochore–microtubule attachments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Zaira; Kabeche, Lilian; Barisic, Marin; Maffini, Stefano; Macedo-Ribeiro, Sandra; Cheeseman, Iain M.; Compton, Duane A.; Kaverina, Irina

    2012-01-01

    Accurate chromosome segregation during mitosis relies on a dynamic kinetochore (KT)–microtubule (MT) interface that switches from a labile to a stable condition in response to correct MT attachments. This transition is essential to satisfy the spindle-assembly checkpoint (SAC) and couple MT-generated force with chromosome movements, but the underlying regulatory mechanism remains unclear. In this study, we show that during mitosis the MT- and KT-associated protein CLASP2 is progressively and distinctively phosphorylated by Cdk1 and Plk1 kinases, concomitant with the establishment of KT–MT attachments. CLASP2 S1234 was phosphorylated by Cdk1, which primed CLASP2 for association with Plk1. Plk1 recruitment to KTs was enhanced by CLASP2 phosphorylation on S1234. This was specifically required to stabilize KT–MT attachments important for chromosome alignment and to coordinate KT and non-KT MT dynamics necessary to maintain spindle bipolarity. CLASP2 C-terminal phosphorylation by Plk1 was also required for chromosome alignment and timely satisfaction of the SAC. We propose that Cdk1 and Plk1 mediate a fine CLASP2 “phospho-switch” that temporally regulates KT–MT attachment stability. PMID:23045552

  12. Effects of automobile steering characteristics on driver vehicle system dynamics in regulation tasks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcruer, D. T.; Klein, R.

    1975-01-01

    A regulation task which subjected the automobile to a random gust disturbance which is countered by driver control action is used to study the effects of various automobile steering characteristics on the driver/vehicle system. The experiments used a variable stability automobile specially configured to permit insertion of the simulated gust disturbance and the measurement of the driver/vehicle system characteristics. Driver/vehicle system dynamics were measured and interpreted as an effective open loop system describing function. Objective measures of system bandwidth, stability, and time delays were deduced and compared. These objective measures were supplemented by driver ratings. A tentative optimum range of vehicle dynamics for the directional regulation task was established.

  13. Dynamic regulation of mitochondrial fission through modification of the dynamin-related protein Drp1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chuang-Rung; Blackstone, Craig

    2017-01-01

    Mitochondria in cells comprise a tubulovesicular network shaped continuously by complementary fission and fusion events. The mammalian Drp1 protein plays a key role in fission, while Mfn1, Mfn2, and OPA1 are required for fusion. Shifts in the balance between these opposing processes can occur rapidly, indicating that modifications to these proteins may regulate mitochondrial membrane dynamics. We highlight posttranslational modifications of the mitochondrial fission protein Drp1, for which these regulatory mechanisms are best characterized. This dynamin-related GTPase undergoes a number of steps to mediate mitochondrial fission, including translocation from cytoplasm to the mitochondrial outer membrane, higher-order assembly into spirals, GTP hydrolysis associated with a conformational change and membrane deformation, and ultimately disassembly. Many of these steps may be influenced by covalent modification of Drp1. We discuss the dynamic nature of Drp1 modifications and how they contribute not only to the normal regulation of mitochondrial division, but also to neuropathologic processes. PMID:20649536

  14. Renal blood flow regulation and arterial pressure fluctuations: a case study in nonlinear dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holstein-Rathlou, N H; Marsh, D J

    1994-01-01

    of experimental hypertension provide tubular pressure records that pass statistical tests for ordered structure and sensitive dependence on initial conditions in the reconstructed state space, two of the hallmarks of deterministic chaos. These records also pass recent more stringent tests for chaos...... another in a long list of oscillations and related dynamics arising in the inherently nonlinear properties of living systems. Some nonlinear systems can bifurcate to states known collectively as deterministic chaos, and TGF is a clear example of such a system. Rats with two different and unrelated forms....... The significance of deterministic chaos in the context of renal blood flow regulation is that the system regulating blood flow undergoes a physical change to a different dynamical state, and because the change is deterministic, there is every expectation that the critical change will yield itself to experimental...

  15. Microtubules in Plant Cells: Strategies and Methods for Immunofluorescence, Transmission Electron Microscopy, and Live Cell Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celler, Katherine; Fujita, Miki; Kawamura, Eiko; Ambrose, Chris; Herburger, Klaus; Holzinger, Andreas; Wasteneys, Geoffrey O

    2016-01-01

    Microtubules (MTs) are required throughout plant development for a wide variety of processes, and different strategies have evolved to visualize and analyze them. This chapter provides specific methods that can be used to analyze microtubule organization and dynamic properties in plant systems and summarizes the advantages and limitations for each technique. We outline basic methods for preparing samples for immunofluorescence labeling, including an enzyme-based permeabilization method, and a freeze-shattering method, which generates microfractures in the cell wall to provide antibodies access to cells in cuticle-laden aerial organs such as leaves. We discuss current options for live cell imaging of MTs with fluorescently tagged proteins (FPs), and provide chemical fixation, high-pressure freezing/freeze substitution, and post-fixation staining protocols for preserving MTs for transmission electron microscopy and tomography.

  16. Pironetin reacts covalently with cysteine-316 of α-tubulin to destabilize microtubule

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jianhong; Wang, Yuxi; Wang, Taijing; Jiang, Jian; Botting, Catherine H.; Liu, Huanting; Chen, Qiang; Yang, Jinliang; Naismith, James H.; Zhu, Xiaofeng; Chen, Lijuan

    2016-06-01

    Molecules that alter the normal dynamics of microtubule assembly and disassembly include many anticancer drugs in clinical use. So far all such therapeutics target β-tubulin, and structural biology has explained the basis of their action and permitted design of new drugs. However, by shifting the profile of β-tubulin isoforms, cancer cells become resistant to treatment. Compounds that bind to α-tubulin are less well characterized and unexploited. The natural product pironetin is known to bind to α-tubulin and is a potent inhibitor of microtubule polymerization. Previous reports had identified that pironetin reacts with lysine-352 residue however analogues designed on this model had much lower potency, which was difficult to explain, hindering further development. We report crystallographic and mass spectrometric data that reveal that pironetin forms a covalent bond to cysteine-316 in α-tubulin via a Michael addition reaction. These data provide a basis for the rational design of α-tubulin targeting chemotherapeutics.

  17. Features of Autonomic Regulation of Cardiorespiration System in Dynamics of Training Cycle of Year

    OpenAIRE

    Romanchuk, A.P.

    2015-01-01

    In the given work the analysis of the results of the research of the vegetative regulation of cardiorespiration system with the help of spiroarterio- cardiorythmography is carried out in dynamics of a training cycle of a year. According to the change of the parameters of ratio LF/HF of variability of a cardiac rhythm, systolic and diastolic arterial pressure, and also spontaneous respiration, the analysis is carried out for ranking distributions and correlation matrixes which has allowed to d...

  18. The role of γ-tubulin in centrosomal microtubule organization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eileen O'Toole

    Full Text Available As part of a multi-subunit ring complex, γ-tubulin has been shown to promote microtubule nucleation both in vitro and in vivo, and the structural properties of the complex suggest that it also seals the minus ends of the polymers with a conical cap. Cells depleted of γ-tubulin, however, still display many microtubules that participate in mitotic spindle assembly, suggesting that γ-tubulin is not absolutely required for microtubule nucleation in vivo, and raising questions about the function of the minus end cap. Here, we assessed the role of γ-tubulin in centrosomal microtubule organisation using three-dimensional reconstructions of γ-tubulin-depleted C. elegans embryos. We found that microtubule minus-end capping and the PCM component SPD-5 are both essential for the proper placement of microtubules in the centrosome. Our results further suggest that γ-tubulin and SPD-5 limit microtubule polymerization within the centrosome core, and we propose a model for how abnormal microtubule organization at the centrosome could indirectly affect centriole structure and daughter centriole replication.

  19. CLIP-170 facilitates the formation of kinetochore-microtubule attachments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tanenbaum, M.E.; Galjart, N.; Vugt, M.A.T.M. van; Medema, R.H.

    2006-01-01

    CLIP-170 is a microtubule 'plus end tracking' protein involved in several microtubule-dependent processes in interphase. At the onset of mitosis, CLIP-170 localizes to kinetochores, but at metaphase, it is no longer detectable at kinetochores. Although RNA interference (RNAi) experiments have

  20. Structural microtubule cap: Stability, catastrophe, rescue, and third state

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Flyvbjerg, H.; Chretien, D.; Janosi, I.M.

    2002-01-01

    Microtubules polymerize from GTP-liganded tubulin dinners, but are essentially made of GDP-liganded tubulin. We investigate the tug-of-war resulting from the fact that GDP-liganded tubulin favors a curved configuration, but is forced to remain in a straight one when part of a microtubule. We poin...

  1. Molecular Pathway of Microtubule Organization at the Golgi Apparatus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wu, Jingchao; de Heus, Cecilia; Liu, Qingyang|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/375265147; Bouchet, Benjamin P|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/371636019; Noordstra, Ivar; Jiang, Kai|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/374338094; Hua, Shasha|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/377295698; Martin, Maud; Yang, Chao; Grigoriev, Ilya; Katrukha, Eugene A; Altelaar, A F Maarten|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304833517; Hoogenraad, Casper C|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/227263502; Qi, Robert Z; Klumperman, Judith; Akhmanova, Anna|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/156410591

    2016-01-01

    The Golgi apparatus controls the formation of non-centrosomal microtubule arrays important for Golgi organization, polarized transport, cell motility, and cell differentiation. Here, we show that CAMSAP2 stabilizes and attaches microtubule minus ends to the Golgi through a complex of AKAP450 and

  2. Role of membrane sterols and cortical microtubules in gravity resistance in plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoson, T.; Koizumi, T.; Matsumoto, S.; Kumasaki, S.; Soga, K.; Wakabayashi, K.; Sakaki, T.

    Resistance to the gravitational force is a principal graviresponse in plants comparable to gravitropism Nevertheless only limited information has been obtained for this graviresponse We have examined mechanisms of signal perception transformation and transduction of the perceived signal and response to the transduced signal in gravity resistance using hypergravity conditions produced by centrifugation In Arabidopsis hypocotyls hypergravity treatment greatly increased the expression level of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-Coenzyme A reductase HMGR which catalyzes a reaction producing mevalonic acid a key precursor of terpenoids such as membrane sterols Geranyl diphosphate synthase gene was also up-regulated by hypergravity whereas the expression of other genes involved in membrane lipid metabolism was not influenced Hypergravity caused an increase in sterol content in azuki bean epicotyls but not in phospholipid glycolipid or fatty acid content Also hypergravity did not influence fatty acid composition in any lipid class Thus the effect of hypergravity on membrane lipid metabolism was specific for sterol synthesis On the other hand alpha- and beta-tubulin genes were up-regulated by hypergravity treatment in Arabidopsis hypocotyls Hypergravity also induced reorientation of cortical microtubules in azuki epicotyls the percentage of epidermal cells with transverse microtubles was decreased whereas that with longitudinal microtubules was increased Inhibitors of HMGR action and microtubule-disrupting agents completely prevented the gravity resistance

  3. Probing molecular mechanisms of the Hsp90 chaperone: biophysical modeling identifies key regulators of functional dynamics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anshuman Dixit

    Full Text Available Deciphering functional mechanisms of the Hsp90 chaperone machinery is an important objective in cancer biology aiming to facilitate discovery of targeted anti-cancer therapies. Despite significant advances in understanding structure and function of molecular chaperones, organizing molecular principles that control the relationship between conformational diversity and functional mechanisms of the Hsp90 activity lack a sufficient quantitative characterization. We combined molecular dynamics simulations, principal component analysis, the energy landscape model and structure-functional analysis of Hsp90 regulatory interactions to systematically investigate functional dynamics of the molecular chaperone. This approach has identified a network of conserved regions common to the Hsp90 chaperones that could play a universal role in coordinating functional dynamics, principal collective motions and allosteric signaling of Hsp90. We have found that these functional motifs may be utilized by the molecular chaperone machinery to act collectively as central regulators of Hsp90 dynamics and activity, including the inter-domain communications, control of ATP hydrolysis, and protein client binding. These findings have provided support to a long-standing assertion that allosteric regulation and catalysis may have emerged via common evolutionary routes. The interaction networks regulating functional motions of Hsp90 may be determined by the inherent structural architecture of the molecular chaperone. At the same time, the thermodynamics-based "conformational selection" of functional states is likely to be activated based on the nature of the binding partner. This mechanistic model of Hsp90 dynamics and function is consistent with the notion that allosteric networks orchestrating cooperative protein motions can be formed by evolutionary conserved and sparsely connected residue clusters. Hence, allosteric signaling through a small network of distantly connected

  4. Probing molecular mechanisms of the Hsp90 chaperone: biophysical modeling identifies key regulators of functional dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixit, Anshuman; Verkhivker, Gennady M

    2012-01-01

    Deciphering functional mechanisms of the Hsp90 chaperone machinery is an important objective in cancer biology aiming to facilitate discovery of targeted anti-cancer therapies. Despite significant advances in understanding structure and function of molecular chaperones, organizing molecular principles that control the relationship between conformational diversity and functional mechanisms of the Hsp90 activity lack a sufficient quantitative characterization. We combined molecular dynamics simulations, principal component analysis, the energy landscape model and structure-functional analysis of Hsp90 regulatory interactions to systematically investigate functional dynamics of the molecular chaperone. This approach has identified a network of conserved regions common to the Hsp90 chaperones that could play a universal role in coordinating functional dynamics, principal collective motions and allosteric signaling of Hsp90. We have found that these functional motifs may be utilized by the molecular chaperone machinery to act collectively as central regulators of Hsp90 dynamics and activity, including the inter-domain communications, control of ATP hydrolysis, and protein client binding. These findings have provided support to a long-standing assertion that allosteric regulation and catalysis may have emerged via common evolutionary routes. The interaction networks regulating functional motions of Hsp90 may be determined by the inherent structural architecture of the molecular chaperone. At the same time, the thermodynamics-based "conformational selection" of functional states is likely to be activated based on the nature of the binding partner. This mechanistic model of Hsp90 dynamics and function is consistent with the notion that allosteric networks orchestrating cooperative protein motions can be formed by evolutionary conserved and sparsely connected residue clusters. Hence, allosteric signaling through a small network of distantly connected residue clusters may be

  5. Lorentz-Violating Regulator Gauge Fields as the Origin of Dynamical Flavour Oscillations

    CERN Document Server

    Alexandre, Jean; Mavromatos, Nick E

    2013-01-01

    We show how a mass mixing matrix can be generated dynamically, for two massless fermion flavours coupled to a Lorentz invariance violating (LIV) gauge field. The LIV features play the role of a regulator for the gap equations, and the non-analytic dependence of the dynamical masses, as functions of the gauge coupling, allows to consider the limit where the LIV gauge field eventually decouples from the fermions. Lorentz invariance is then recovered, to describe the oscillation between two free fermion flavours, and we check that the finite dynamical masses are the only effects of the original LIV theory. We also discuss briefly a connection of our results with the case of Majorana neutrinos in both, the standard model, where only left-handed (active) neutrinos are considered, and extensions thereof, with sterile right-handed neutrinos.

  6. Quantitative analysis of microtubule orientation in interdigitated leaf pavement cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akita, Kae; Higaki, Takumi; Kutsuna, Natsumaro; Hasezawa, Seiichiro

    2015-01-01

    Leaf pavement cells are shaped like a jigsaw puzzle in most dicotyledon species. Molecular genetic studies have identified several genes required for pavement cells morphogenesis and proposed that microtubules play crucial roles in the interdigitation of pavement cells. In this study, we performed quantitative analysis of cortical microtubule orientation in leaf pavement cells in Arabidopsis thaliana. We captured confocal images of cortical microtubules in cotyledon leaf epidermis expressing GFP-tubulinβ and quantitatively evaluated the microtubule orientations relative to the pavement cell growth axis using original image processing techniques. Our results showed that microtubules kept parallel orientations to the growth axis during pavement cell growth. In addition, we showed that immersion treatment of seed cotyledons in solutions containing tubulin polymerization and depolymerization inhibitors decreased pavement cell complexity. Treatment with oryzalin and colchicine inhibited the symmetric division of guard mother cells.

  7. Microtubules are an intracellular target of the plant terpene citral.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaimovitsh, David; Abu-Abied, Mohamad; Belausov, Eduard; Rubin, Baruch; Dudai, Nativ; Sadot, Einat

    2010-02-01

    Citral is a component of plant essential oils that possesses several biological activities. It has known medicinal traits, and is used as a food additive and in cosmetics. Citral has been suggested to have potential in weed management, but its precise mode of action at the cellular level is unknown. Here we investigated the immediate response of plant cells to citral at micromolar concentrations. It was found that microtubules of Arabidopsis seedlings were disrupted within minutes after exposure to citral in the gaseous phase, whereas actin filaments remained intact. The effect of citral on plant microtubules was both time- and dose-dependent, and recovery only occurred many hours after a short exposure of several minutes to citral. Citral was also able to disrupt animal microtubules, albeit less efficiently. In addition, polymerization of microtubules in vitro was inhibited in the presence of citral. Taken together, our results suggest that citral is a potent, volatile, anti-microtubule compound.

  8. Dynamics Analysis and Prediction of Genetic Regulation in Glycerol Metabolic Network via Structural Kinetic Modelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianxiong Ye

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Glycerol can be biologically converted to 1,3-propanediol (1,3-PD by Klebsiella pneumoniae. In the synthesis pathway of 1,3-PD, the accumulation of an intermediary metabolite 3-hydroxypropionaldehyde (3-HPA would cause an irreversible cessation of the dynamic system. Genetic manipulation on the key enzymes which control the formation rate and consumption rate of 3-HPA would decrease the accumulation of 3-HPA, resulting in nonlinear regulation on the dynamic system. The interest of this work is to focus on analyzing the influence of 3-HPA inhibition on the stability of the dynamic system. Due to the lack of intracellular knowledge, structural kinetic modelling is applied. On the basis of statistical account of the dynamical capabilities of the system in the parameter space, we conclude that, under weak or no inhibition to the reaction of 3-HPA consumption, the system is much easier to obtain a stable state, whereas strong inhibition to its formation is in favor of stabilizing the system. In addition, the existence of Hopf bifurcation in this system is also verified. The obtained results are helpful for deeply understanding the metabolic and genetic regulations of glycerol fermentation by Klebsiella pneumoniae.

  9. Noncoding transcription by alternative rna polymerases dynamically regulates an auxin-driven chromatin loop

    KAUST Repository

    Ariel, Federico D.

    2014-08-01

    The eukaryotic epigenome is shaped by the genome topology in three-dimensional space. Dynamic reversible variations in this epigenome structure directly influence the transcriptional responses to developmental cues. Here, we show that the Arabidopsis long intergenic noncoding RNA (lincRNA) APOLO is transcribed by RNA polymerases II and V in response to auxin, a phytohormone controlling numerous facets of plant development. This dual APOLO transcription regulates the formation of a chromatin loop encompassing the promoter of its neighboring gene PID, a key regulator of polar auxin transport. Altering APOLO expression affects chromatin loop formation, whereas RNA-dependent DNA methylation, active DNA demethylation, and Polycomb complexes control loop dynamics. This dynamic chromatin topology determines PID expression patterns. Hence, the dual transcription of a lincRNA influences local chromatin topology and directs dynamic auxin-controlled developmental outputs on neighboring genes. This mechanism likely underscores the adaptive success of plants in diverse environments and may be widespread in eukaryotes. © 2014 Elsevier Inc.

  10. Evidence for dynamic network regulation of Drosophila photoreceptor function from mutants lacking the neurotransmitter histamine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    An eDau

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Synaptic feedback from interneurons to photoreceptors can help to optimize visual information flow by balancing its allocation on retinal pathways under changing light conditions. But little is known about how this critical network operation is regulated dynamically. Here, we investigate this question by comparing signaling properties and performance of wild-type Drosophila R1-R6 photoreceptors to those of the hdcJK910 mutant, which lacks the neurotransmitter histamine and therefore cannot transmit information to interneurons. Recordings show that hdcJK910 photoreceptors sample similar amounts of information from naturalistic stimulation to wild-type photoreceptors, but this information is packaged in smaller responses, especially under bright illumination. Analyses reveal how these altered dynamics primarily resulted from network overload that affected hdcJK910 photoreceptors in two ways. First, the missing inhibitory histamine input to interneurons almost certainly depolarized them irrevocably, which in turn increased their excitatory feedback to hdcJK910 R1-R6s. This tonic excitation depolarized the photoreceptors to artificially high potentials, reducing their operational range. Second, rescuing histamine input to interneurons in hdcJK910 mutant also restored their normal phasic feedback modulation to R1-R6s, causing photoreceptor output to accentuate dynamic intensity differences at bright illumination, similar to the wild-type. These results provide mechanistic explanations of how synaptic feedback connections optimize information packaging in photoreceptor output and novel insight into the operation and design of dynamic network regulation of sensory neurons.

  11. Polysome profiling in liver identifies dynamic regulation of endoplasmic reticulum translatome by obesity and fasting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Suneng; Fan, Jason; Blanco, Joshua; Gimenez-Cassina, Alfredo; Danial, Nika N; Watkins, Steve M; Hotamisligil, Gökhan S

    2012-08-01

    Obesity-associated metabolic complications are generally considered to emerge from abnormalities in carbohydrate and lipid metabolism, whereas the status of protein metabolism is not well studied. Here, we performed comparative polysome and associated transcriptional profiling analyses to study the dynamics and functional implications of endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-associated protein synthesis in the mouse liver under conditions of obesity and nutrient deprivation. We discovered that ER from livers of obese mice exhibits a general reduction in protein synthesis, and comprehensive analysis of polysome-bound transcripts revealed extensive down-regulation of protein synthesis machinery, mitochondrial components, and bile acid metabolism in the obese translatome. Nutrient availability also plays an important but distinct role in remodeling the hepatic ER translatome in lean and obese mice. Fasting in obese mice partially reversed the overall translatomic differences between lean and obese nonfasted controls, whereas fasting of the lean mice mimicked many of the translatomic changes induced by the development of obesity. The strongest examples of such regulations were the reduction in Cyp7b1 and Slco1a1, molecules involved in bile acid metabolism. Exogenous expression of either gene significantly lowered plasma glucose levels, improved hepatic steatosis, but also caused cholestasis, indicating the fine balance bile acids play in regulating metabolism and health. Together, our work defines dynamic regulation of the liver translatome by obesity and nutrient availability, and it identifies a novel role for bile acid metabolism in the pathogenesis of metabolic abnormalities associated with obesity.

  12. TIRF assays for real-time observation of microtubules and actin coassembly: Deciphering tau effects on microtubule/actin interplay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prezel, Eléa; Stoppin-Mellet, Virginie; Elie, Auréliane; Zala, Ninon; Denarier, Eric; Serre, Laurence; Arnal, Isabelle

    2017-01-01

    Microtubule and actin cytoskeletons are key players in vital processes in cells. Although the importance of microtubule-actin interaction for cell development and function has been highlighted for years, the properties of these two cytoskeletons have been mostly studied separately. Thus we now need procedures to simultaneously assess actin and microtubule properties to decipher the basic mechanisms underlying microtubule-actin crosstalk. Here we describe an in vitro assay that allows the coassembly of both filaments and the real-time observation of their interaction by TIRF microscopy. We show how this assay can be used to demonstrate that tau, a neuronal microtubule-associated protein, is a bona fide actin-microtubule cross-linker. The procedure relies on the use of highly purified proteins and chemically passivated perfusion chambers. We present a step-by-step protocol to obtain actin and microtubule coassembly and discuss the major pitfalls. An ImageJ macro to quantify actin and microtubule interaction is also provided. © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. The Metamorphic Nature of the Tau Protein: Dynamic Flexibility Comes at a Cost

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan J Sabbagh

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Accumulation of the microtubule associated protein tau occurs in several neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer’s disease (AD. The tau protein is intrinsically disordered, giving it unique structural properties that can be dynamically altered by post-translational modifications such as phosphorylation and cleavage. Over the last decade, technological advances in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR spectroscopy and structural modeling have permitted more in-depth insights into the nature of tau. These studies have helped elucidate how metamorphism of tau makes it ideally suited for dynamic microtubule regulation, but how it also facilitates tau self-assembly, oligomerization, and neurotoxicity. This review will focus on how the distinct structure of tau governs its function, accumulation, and toxicity as well as how other cellular factors such as molecular chaperones control these processes.

  14. Binding of nucleoid-associated protein fis to DNA is regulated by DNA breathing dynamics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristy Nowak-Lovato

    Full Text Available Physicochemical properties of DNA, such as shape, affect protein-DNA recognition. However, the properties of DNA that are most relevant for predicting the binding sites of particular transcription factors (TFs or classes of TFs have yet to be fully understood. Here, using a model that accurately captures the melting behavior and breathing dynamics (spontaneous local openings of the double helix of double-stranded DNA, we simulated the dynamics of known binding sites of the TF and nucleoid-associated protein Fis in Escherichia coli. Our study involves simulations of breathing dynamics, analysis of large published in vitro and genomic datasets, and targeted experimental tests of our predictions. Our simulation results and available in vitro binding data indicate a strong correlation between DNA breathing dynamics and Fis binding. Indeed, we can define an average DNA breathing profile that is characteristic of Fis binding sites. This profile is significantly enriched among the identified in vivo E. coli Fis binding sites. To test our understanding of how Fis binding is influenced by DNA breathing dynamics, we designed base-pair substitutions, mismatch, and methylation modifications of DNA regions that are known to interact (or not interact with Fis. The goal in each case was to make the local DNA breathing dynamics either closer to or farther from the breathing profile characteristic of a strong Fis binding site. For the modified DNA segments, we found that Fis-DNA binding, as assessed by gel-shift assay, changed in accordance with our expectations. We conclude that Fis binding is associated with DNA breathing dynamics, which in turn may be regulated by various nucleotide modifications.

  15. Multi-Equilibria Regulation Agent-Based Model of Opinion Dynamics in Social Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Koulouris

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This article investigates the Multiple Equilibria Regulation (MER model, i.e., an agent-based simulation model, to represent opinion dynamics in social networks. It relies on a small set of micro-prerequisites (intra-individual balance and confidence bound, leading to emergence of (nonstationary macro-outcomes. These outcomes may refer to consensus, polarization or fragmentation of opinions about taxation (e.g., congestion pricing or other policy measures, according to the way communication is structured. In contrast with other models of opinion dynamics, it allows for the impact of both the regulation of intra-personal discrepancy and the interpersonal variability of opinions on social learning and network dynamics. Several simulation experiments are presented to demonstrate, through the MER model, the role of different network structures (complete, star, cellular automata, small-world and random graphs on opinion formation dynamics and the overall evolution of the system. The findings can help to identify specific topological characteristics, such as density, number of neighbourhoods and critical nodes-agents, that affect the stability and system dynamics. This knowledge can be used to better organize the information diffusion and learning in the community, enhance the predictability of outcomes and manage possible conflicts. It is shown that a small-world organization, which depicts more realistic aspects of real-life and virtual social systems, provides increased predictability and stability towards a less fragmented and more manageable grouping of opinions, compared to random networks. Such macro-level organizations may be enhanced with use of web-based technologies to increase the density of communication and public acceptability of policy measures.

  16. Dynamic stereotype and vegetative regulation corection in childrens with effects of organic lesion of nervous system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Наталія Юріївна Гришуніна

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Aim of research. An assessment of the CNS state, neuropsychological indicators and influence of the modern methods of physical rehabilitation on the dynamics of vegetative adaptive and compensatory brain systems in patients with effects of an early organic lesion of nervous system.Materials and methods of research. There were examined and treated 20 children 7-11 years old. An assessment of vegetative homeostasis was carried out using cardiointervalography (CIG, neuropsychic functions and deficiency of statomotor development – the method of Luriya neuropsychological testing. The children of the first group (10 persons underwent massage and therapeutic physical training with special attention to the dynamic stereotype in complex with generally developmental, breathing, special passive and active, static and dynamic exercises, postisometric relaxation, massotherapy. The patients of the second group (10 persons underwent traditional therapeutic physical training and massage.Results of research. It was observed an inhibition of the humoral control of heart rate in examined children and at the same time an activation of sympathetic system. As a result it was detected an increase of the stress index of compensatory reactions of organism (stress index SI — 124 un. at the norm 65,0 ud.. Neuropsychological features of these patients indicated the presence of the left hemispheric and less right hemispheric deficiency, dysfunction of subcortical and stem structures.The use of the complex methodology of rehabilitation with special attention to the dynamic stereotype and manual therapy according to the aspects of genesis of myofascial dysfunction favored an optimization of the stress of compensatory mechanisms of organism (SI — 51,0 un.. In the second group it was observed a stable activity of sympathetic regulation of the heart rate compared with indicators before treatment and an insignificant decrease of the stress index of vegetative balance (SI

  17. The POLARIS peptide of Arabidopsis regulates auxin transport and root growth via effects on ethylene signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chilley, Paul M; Casson, Stuart A; Tarkowski, Petr; Hawkins, Nathan; Wang, Kevin L-C; Hussey, Patrick J; Beale, Mike; Ecker, Joseph R; Sandberg, Göran K; Lindsey, Keith

    2006-11-01

    The rate and plane of cell division and anisotropic cell growth are critical for plant development and are regulated by diverse mechanisms involving several hormone signaling pathways. Little is known about peptide signaling in plant growth; however, Arabidopsis thaliana POLARIS (PLS), encoding a 36-amino acid peptide, is required for correct root growth and vascular development. Mutational analysis implicates a role for the peptide in hormone responses, but the basis of PLS action is obscure. Using the Arabidopsis root as a model to study PLS action in plant development, we discovered a link between PLS, ethylene signaling, auxin homeostasis, and microtubule cytoskeleton dynamics. Mutation of PLS results in an enhanced ethylene-response phenotype, defective auxin transport and homeostasis, and altered microtubule sensitivity to inhibitors. These defects, along with the short-root phenotype, are suppressed by genetic and pharmacological inhibition of ethylene action. PLS expression is repressed by ethylene and induced by auxin. Our results suggest a mechanism whereby PLS negatively regulates ethylene responses to modulate cell division and expansion via downstream effects on microtubule cytoskeleton dynamics and auxin signaling, thereby influencing root growth and lateral root development. This mechanism involves a regulatory loop of auxin-ethylene interactions.

  18. Dynamics and regulation of nuclear import and nuclear movements of HIV-1 complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burdick, Ryan C.; Chen, Jianbo; Sastri, Jaya; Hu, Wei-Shau

    2017-01-01

    The dynamics and regulation of HIV-1 nuclear import and its intranuclear movements after import have not been studied. To elucidate these essential HIV-1 post-entry events, we labeled viral complexes with two fluorescently tagged virion-incorporated proteins (APOBEC3F or integrase), and analyzed the HIV-1 dynamics of nuclear envelope (NE) docking, nuclear import, and intranuclear movements in living cells. We observed that HIV-1 complexes exhibit unusually long NE residence times (1.5±1.6 hrs) compared to most cellular cargos, which are imported into the nuclei within milliseconds. Furthermore, nuclear import requires HIV-1 capsid (CA) and nuclear pore protein Nup358, and results in significant loss of CA, indicating that one of the viral core uncoating steps occurs during nuclear import. Our results showed that the CA-Cyclophilin A interaction regulates the dynamics of nuclear import by delaying the time of NE docking as well as transport through the nuclear pore, but blocking reverse transcription has no effect on the kinetics of nuclear import. We also visualized the translocation of viral complexes docked at the NE into the nucleus and analyzed their nuclear movements and determined that viral complexes exhibited a brief fast phase (nuclear import, viral core uncoating, and intranuclear movements that precede integration site selection. PMID:28827840

  19. Decoration of microtubules in solution by the kinesin-14, Ncd.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hjelm, Rex P; Stone, Deborah Bennett; Fletterick, Robert J; Mendelson, Robert A

    2010-11-01

    The kinesin-14, Ncd, is a cellular motor involved in microtubule spindle assembly and contraction during mitosis and meiosis. Like other members of the kinesin superfamily, Ncd consists of two motor heads connected by a linker and a long cargo-carrying stalk. The motor heads hydrolyze ATP to ADP to provide the power stroke that moves them and the cargo along the microtubule. Whereas conventional kinesins move processively along the sense of the microtubule right-handed helix, Ncd moves in the opposite direction, apparently using a different motive mechanism. According to the current model, the microtubule-binding state of Ncd is bound by one head and then released during the motive cycle. This is distinguished from the binding states of conventional kinesins, in which the motor heads are always bound in the motive cycle with alternating one-head and two-head binding. The objective was to determine the extent of binding, the binding states of Ncd in the presence of an ATP analogue, AMPPNP, and whether the binding is cooperative. Small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) of microtubules decorated with a deuterated Ncd construct, Ncd281, in solution containing 42% D(2)O was used. These conditions render the microtubule `invisible' to SANS, while amplifying the SANS from the Ncd constructs. In the presence of AMPPNP, 75% of Ncd281 was not bound. The remainder was bound cooperatively by one of its motor heads to the microtubule.

  20. ADAMTS9-Mediated Extracellular Matrix Dynamics Regulates Umbilical Cord Vascular Smooth Muscle Differentiation and Rotation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sumeda Nandadasa

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Despite the significance for fetal nourishment in mammals, mechanisms of umbilical cord vascular growth remain poorly understood. Here, the secreted metalloprotease ADAMTS9 is shown to be necessary for murine umbilical cord vascular development. Restricting it to the cell surface using a gene trap allele, Adamts9Gt, impaired umbilical vessel elongation and radial growth via reduced versican proteolysis and accumulation of extracellular matrix (ECM. Both Adamts9Gt and conditional Adamts9 deletion revealed that ADAMTS9 produced by mesenchymal cells acted non-autonomously to regulate smooth muscle cell (SMC proliferation, differentiation, and orthogonal reorientation during growth of the umbilical vasculature. In Adamts9Gt/Gt, we observed interference with PDGFRβ signaling via the mitogen-activated protein kinase/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (MAPK/ERK pathway, which regulates cytoskeletal dynamics during SMC rotation. In addition, we observed disrupted Shh signaling and perturbed orientation of the mesenchymal primary cilium. Thus, ECM dynamics is a major influence on umbilical vascular SMC fate, with ADAMTS9 acting as its principal mediator.

  1. Algorithm of dynamic regulation of a system of duct, for a high accuracy climatic system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arbatskiy, A. A.; Afonina, G. N.; Glazov, V. S.

    2017-11-01

    Currently, major part of climatic system, are stationary in projected mode only. At the same time, many modern industrial sites, require constant or periodical changes in technological process. That is 80% of the time, the industrial site is not require ventilation system in projected mode and high precision of climatic parameters must maintain. While that not constantly is in use for climatic systems, which use in parallel for different rooms, we will be have a problem for balance of duct system. For this problem, was created the algorithm for quantity regulation, with minimal changes. Dynamic duct system: Developed of parallel control system of air balance, with high precision of climatic parameters. The Algorithm provide a permanent pressure in main duct, in different a flow of air. Therefore, the ending devises air flow have only one parameter for regulation – flaps open area. Precision of regulation increase and the climatic system provide high precision for temperature and humidity (0,5C for temperature, 5% for relative humidity). Result: The research has been made in CFD-system – PHOENICS. Results for velocity of air in duct, for pressure of air in duct for different operation mode, has been obtained. Equation for air valves positions, with different parameters for climate in room’s, has been obtained. Energy saving potential for dynamic duct system, for different types of a rooms, has been calculated.

  2. Curcumin alters the cytoskeleton and microtubule organization on trophozoites of Giardia lamblia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez-Gutiérrez, Filiberto; Palomo-Ligas, Lissethe; Hernández-Hernández, José Manuel; Pérez-Rangel, Armando; Aguayo-Ortiz, Rodrigo; Hernández-Campos, Alicia; Castillo, Rafael; González-Pozos, Sirenia; Cortés-Zárate, Rafael; Ramírez-Herrera, Mario Alberto; Mendoza-Magaña, María Luisa; Castillo-Romero, Araceli

    2017-08-01

    Giardia lamblia is a worldwide protozoan responsible for a significant number of intestinal infections. There are several drugs for the treatment of giardiasis, but they often cause side effects. Curcumin, a component of turmeric, has antigiardial activity; however, the molecular target and mechanism of antiproliferative activity are not clear. The effects of curcumin on cellular microtubules have been widely investigated. Since tubulin is the most abundant protein in the cytoskeleton of Giardia, to elucidate whether curcumin has activity against the microtubules of this parasite, we treated trophozoites with curcumin and the cells were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy and confocal microscopy. Curcumin inhibited Giardia proliferation and adhesion in a time-concentration-dependent mode. The higher inhibitory concentrations of curcumin (3 and 15μM) disrupted the cytoskeletal structures of trophozoites; the damage was evident on the ventral disk, flagella and in the caudal region, also the membrane was affected. The immunofluorescence images showed altered distribution of tubulin staining on ventral disk and flagella. Additionally, we found that curcumin caused a clear reduction of tubulin expression. By docking analysis and molecular dynamics we showed that curcumin has a high probability to bind at the interface of the tubulin dimer close to the vinblastine binding site. All the data presented indicate that curcumin may inhibit Giardia proliferation by perturbing microtubules. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  3. Actomyosin contractility and microtubules drive apical constriction in Xenopus bottle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jen-Yi; Harland, Richard M

    2007-11-01

    Cell shape changes are critical for morphogenetic events such as gastrulation, neurulation, and organogenesis. However, the cell biology driving cell shape changes is poorly understood, especially in vertebrates. The beginning of Xenopus laevis gastrulation is marked by the apical constriction of bottle cells in the dorsal marginal zone, which bends the tissue and creates a crevice at the blastopore lip. We found that bottle cells contribute significantly to gastrulation, as their shape change can generate the force required for initial blastopore formation. As actin and myosin are often implicated in contraction, we examined their localization and function in bottle cells. F-actin and activated myosin accumulate apically in bottle cells, and actin and myosin inhibitors either prevent or severely perturb bottle cell formation, showing that actomyosin contractility is required for apical constriction. Microtubules were localized in apicobasally directed arrays in bottle cells, emanating from the apical surface. Surprisingly, apical constriction was inhibited in the presence of nocodazole but not taxol, suggesting that intact, but not dynamic, microtubules are required for apical constriction. Our results indicate that actomyosin contractility is required for bottle cell morphogenesis and further suggest a novel and unpredicted role for microtubules during apical constriction.

  4. Kinesin-5-independent mitotic spindle assembly requires the antiparallel microtubule crosslinker Ase1 in fission yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rincon, Sergio A; Lamson, Adam; Blackwell, Robert; Syrovatkina, Viktoriya; Fraisier, Vincent; Paoletti, Anne; Betterton, Meredith D; Tran, Phong T

    2017-05-17

    Bipolar spindle assembly requires a balance of forces where kinesin-5 produces outward pushing forces to antagonize the inward pulling forces from kinesin-14 or dynein. Accordingly, Kinesin-5 inactivation results in force imbalance leading to monopolar spindle and chromosome segregation failure. In fission yeast, force balance is restored when both kinesin-5 Cut7 and kinesin-14 Pkl1 are deleted, restoring spindle bipolarity. Here we show that the cut7Δpkl1Δ spindle is fully competent for chromosome segregation independently of motor activity, except for kinesin-6 Klp9, which is required for anaphase spindle elongation. We demonstrate that cut7Δpkl1Δ spindle bipolarity requires the microtubule antiparallel bundler PRC1/Ase1 to recruit CLASP/Cls1 to stabilize microtubules. Brownian dynamics-kinetic Monte Carlo simulations show that Ase1 and Cls1 activity are sufficient for initial bipolar spindle formation. We conclude that pushing forces generated by microtubule polymerization are sufficient to promote spindle pole separation and the assembly of bipolar spindle in the absence of molecular motors.

  5. Kinesin-5-independent mitotic spindle assembly requires the antiparallel microtubule crosslinker Ase1 in fission yeast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rincon, Sergio A.; Lamson, Adam; Blackwell, Robert; Syrovatkina, Viktoriya; Fraisier, Vincent; Paoletti, Anne; Betterton, Meredith D.; Tran, Phong T.

    2017-05-01

    Bipolar spindle assembly requires a balance of forces where kinesin-5 produces outward pushing forces to antagonize the inward pulling forces from kinesin-14 or dynein. Accordingly, Kinesin-5 inactivation results in force imbalance leading to monopolar spindle and chromosome segregation failure. In fission yeast, force balance is restored when both kinesin-5 Cut7 and kinesin-14 Pkl1 are deleted, restoring spindle bipolarity. Here we show that the cut7Δpkl1Δ spindle is fully competent for chromosome segregation independently of motor activity, except for kinesin-6 Klp9, which is required for anaphase spindle elongation. We demonstrate that cut7Δpkl1Δ spindle bipolarity requires the microtubule antiparallel bundler PRC1/Ase1 to recruit CLASP/Cls1 to stabilize microtubules. Brownian dynamics-kinetic Monte Carlo simulations show that Ase1 and Cls1 activity are sufficient for initial bipolar spindle formation. We conclude that pushing forces generated by microtubule polymerization are sufficient to promote spindle pole separation and the assembly of bipolar spindle in the absence of molecular motors.

  6. Microtubule-mediated transport of the tumor-suppressor protein Merlin and its mutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benseñor, Lorena B; Barlan, Kari; Rice, Sarah E; Fehon, Richard G; Gelfand, Vladimir I

    2010-04-20

    The neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2) tumor-suppressor protein Merlin is a member of the ERM family of proteins that links the cytoskeleton to the plasma membrane. In humans, mutations in the NF2 gene cause neurofibromatosis type-2 (NF2), a cancer syndrome characterized by the development of tumors of the nervous system. Previous reports have suggested that the subcellular distribution of Merlin is critical to its function, and that several NF2 mutants that lack tumor-suppressor activity present improper localization. Here we used a Drosophila cell culture model to study the distribution and mechanism of intracellular transport of Merlin and its mutants. We found that Drosophila Merlin formed cytoplasmic particles that move bidirectionally along microtubules. A single NF2-causing amino acid substitution in the FERM domain dramatically inhibited Merlin particle movement. Surprisingly, the presence of this immotile Merlin mutant also inhibited trafficking of the WT protein. Analysis of the movement of WT protein using RNAi and pull-downs showed that Merlin particles are associated with and moved by microtubule motors (kinesin-1 and cytoplasmic dynein), and that binding of motors and movement is regulated by Merlin phosphorylation. Inhibition of Merlin transport by expression of the dominant-negative mutant or depletion of kinesin-1 results in increased nuclear accumulation of the transcriptional coactivator Yorkie. These results demonstrate the requirement of microtubule-dependent transport for Merlin function.

  7. Visualizing and Analyzing Branching Microtubule Nucleation Using Meiotic Xenopus Egg Extracts and TIRF Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Matthew; Petry, Sabine

    2016-01-01

    Mitotic and meiotic spindles consist primarily of microtubules, which originate from centrosomes and within the vicinity of chromatin. Indirect evidence suggested that microtubules also originate throughout the spindle, but the high microtubule density within the spindle precludes the direct observation of this phenomenon. By using meiotic Xenopus laevis egg extract and employing total internal reflection (TIRF) microscopy, microtubule nucleation from preexisting microtubules could be demonstrated and analyzed. Branching microtubule nucleation is an ideal mechanism to assemble and maintain a mitotic spindle, because microtubule numbers are amplified while preserving their polarity. Here, we describe the assays that made these findings possible and the experiments that helped identify the key molecular players involved.

  8. Identification of interphase functions for the NIMA kinase involving microtubules and the ESCRT pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meera Govindaraghavan

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The Never in Mitosis A (NIMA kinase (the founding member of the Nek family of kinases has been considered a mitotic specific kinase with nuclear restricted roles in the model fungus Aspergillus nidulans. By extending to A. nidulans the results of a synthetic lethal screen performed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae using the NIMA ortholog KIN3, we identified a conserved genetic interaction between nimA and genes encoding proteins of the Endosomal Sorting Complex Required for Transport (ESCRT pathway. Absence of ESCRT pathway functions in combination with partial NIMA function causes enhanced cell growth defects, including an inability to maintain a single polarized dominant cell tip. These genetic insights suggest NIMA potentially has interphase functions in addition to its established mitotic functions at nuclei. We therefore generated endogenously GFP-tagged NIMA (NIMA-GFP which was fully functional to follow its interphase locations using live cell spinning disc 4D confocal microscopy. During interphase some NIMA-GFP locates to the tips of rapidly growing cells and, when expressed ectopically, also locates to the tips of cytoplasmic microtubules, suggestive of non-nuclear interphase functions. In support of this, perturbation of NIMA function either by ectopic overexpression or through partial inactivation results in marked cell tip growth defects with excess NIMA-GFP promoting multiple growing cell tips. Ectopic NIMA-GFP was found to locate to the plus ends of microtubules in an EB1 dependent manner, while impairing NIMA function altered the dynamic localization of EB1 and the cytoplasmic microtubule network. Together, our genetic and cell biological analyses reveal novel non-nuclear interphase functions for NIMA involving microtubules and the ESCRT pathway for normal polarized fungal cell tip growth. These insights extend the roles of NIMA both spatially and temporally and indicate that this conserved protein kinase could help integrate cell

  9. Identification of interphase functions for the NIMA kinase involving microtubules and the ESCRT pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Govindaraghavan, Meera; McGuire Anglin, Sarah Lea; Shen, Kuo-Fang; Shukla, Nandini; De Souza, Colin P; Osmani, Stephen A

    2014-03-01

    The Never in Mitosis A (NIMA) kinase (the founding member of the Nek family of kinases) has been considered a mitotic specific kinase with nuclear restricted roles in the model fungus Aspergillus nidulans. By extending to A. nidulans the results of a synthetic lethal screen performed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae using the NIMA ortholog KIN3, we identified a conserved genetic interaction between nimA and genes encoding proteins of the Endosomal Sorting Complex Required for Transport (ESCRT) pathway. Absence of ESCRT pathway functions in combination with partial NIMA function causes enhanced cell growth defects, including an inability to maintain a single polarized dominant cell tip. These genetic insights suggest NIMA potentially has interphase functions in addition to its established mitotic functions at nuclei. We therefore generated endogenously GFP-tagged NIMA (NIMA-GFP) which was fully functional to follow its interphase locations using live cell spinning disc 4D confocal microscopy. During interphase some NIMA-GFP locates to the tips of rapidly growing cells and, when expressed ectopically, also locates to the tips of cytoplasmic microtubules, suggestive of non-nuclear interphase functions. In support of this, perturbation of NIMA function either by ectopic overexpression or through partial inactivation results in marked cell tip growth defects with excess NIMA-GFP promoting multiple growing cell tips. Ectopic NIMA-GFP was found to locate to the plus ends of microtubules in an EB1 dependent manner, while impairing NIMA function altered the dynamic localization of EB1 and the cytoplasmic microtubule network. Together, our genetic and cell biological analyses reveal novel non-nuclear interphase functions for NIMA involving microtubules and the ESCRT pathway for normal polarized fungal cell tip growth. These insights extend the roles of NIMA both spatially and temporally and indicate that this conserved protein kinase could help integrate cell cycle progression

  10. Probabilistic Evaluation of Anthropogenic Regulations In a Vegetated River Channel Using a Vegetation Dynamics Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyamoto, Hitoshi

    2015-04-01

    Vegetation overgrowth in fluvial floodplains, gravel beds, and sand bars has been a serious engineering problem for riparian management in Japan. From the viewpoints of flood control and ecological conservation, it would be necessary to predict the vegetation dynamics accurately for long-term duration. In this research, we have developed a stochastic model for predicting the vegetation dynamics in fluvial floodplains with emphasis on the interaction with flood impacts. The model consists of the following four components: (i) long-term stochastic behavior of flow discharge, (ii) hydrodynamics in a channel with floodplain vegetation, (iii) variation of riverbed topography, and (iv) vegetation dynamics on floodplains. In the vegetation dynamics model, the flood discharge (i) is stochastically simulated using a filtered Poisson process, one of the conventional approaches in hydrological time-series generation. The component for vegetation dynamics (iv) includes the effects of tree growth, mortality by floods, and infant tree recruitment. Vegetation condition has been observed mainly before and after floods since 2008 at a field site located between 23-24 km from the river mouth in Kako River, Japan. The Kako River has the catchment area of 1,730 km2 and the main channel length of 96 km. This site is one of the vegetation overgrowth sites in the Kako River floodplains. The predominant tree species are willows and bamboos. In the field survey, the position, trunk diameter and height of each tree as well as the riverbed materials were measured after several flood events to investigate their impacts on the floodplain vegetation community. This presentation tries to examine effects of anthropogenic river regulations, i.e., thinning and cutting-down, in the vegetated channel in Kako River by using the vegetation dynamics model. Sensitivity of both the flood water level and the vegetation status in the channel is statistically evaluated in terms of the different cutting

  11. Regulation of Mitochondrial Dynamics and Autophagy by the Mitochondria-Associated Membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tagaya, Mitsuo; Arasaki, Kohei

    2017-01-01

    Mitochondria are powerhouses and central to metabolism in cells. They are highly dynamic organelles that continuously fuse, divide, and move along the cytoskeleton to form the mitochondrial network. The fusion and fission are catalyzed by four dynamin-related GTPases in mammals that are controlled by a variety of protein-protein interactions and posttranslational modifications. Mitochondrial dynamics and metabolism are linked and regulate each other. Starvation induces mitochondrial elongation, which enables the mitochondria to produce energy more efficiently and to escape from autophagic degradation. Damaged portions of mitochondria are removed from the healthy parts by division, and subsequently degraded via a specific mode of autophagy termed mitophagy. Recent studies shed light on the contribution of the endoplasmic reticulum to mitochondrial dynamics and the cooperation of the two organelles for the progression of autophagy including mitophagy. A subdomain of the endoplasmic reticulum apposed to mitochondria is called the mitochondria-associated membrane (MAM), which comprises a unique set of proteins that interact with mitochondrial proteins. Here we review our current understanding of the molecular mechanisms of mitochondrial dynamics and mitochondria-related processes in the context of the interaction with the endoplasmic reticulum.

  12. Conformational Rigidity and Protein Dynamics at Distinct Timescales Regulate PTP1B Activity and Allostery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choy, Meng S; Li, Yang; Machado, Luciana E S F; Kunze, Micha B A; Connors, Christopher R; Wei, Xingyu; Lindorff-Larsen, Kresten; Page, Rebecca; Peti, Wolfgang

    2017-02-16

    Protein function originates from a cooperation of structural rigidity, dynamics at different timescales, and allostery. However, how these three pillars of protein function are integrated is still only poorly understood. Here we show how these pillars are connected in Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase 1B (PTP1B), a drug target for diabetes and cancer that catalyzes the dephosphorylation of numerous substrates in essential signaling pathways. By combining new experimental and computational data on WT-PTP1B and ≥10 PTP1B variants in multiple states, we discovered a fundamental and evolutionarily conserved CH/π switch that is critical for positioning the catalytically important WPD loop. Furthermore, our data show that PTP1B uses conformational and dynamic allostery to regulate its activity. This shows that both conformational rigidity and dynamics are essential for controlling protein activity. This connection between rigidity and dynamics at different timescales is likely a hallmark of all enzyme function. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Cognitive radio policy and regulation techno-economic studies to facilitate dynamic spectrum access

    CERN Document Server

    Holland, Oliver

    2014-01-01

    This book offers a timely reflection on how the proliferation of advanced wireless communications technologies, particularly cognitive radio (CR) can be enabled by thoroughly-considered policy and appropriate regulation. It looks at the prospects of CR from the divergent standpoints of technological development and economic market reality. The book provides a broad survey of various techno-economic and policy aspects of CR development, and provides the reader with an understanding of the complexities involved as well as a toolbox of possible solutions to enable the evolutionary leap towards successful implementation of disruptive CR technology or indeed any other novel wireless technologies. Cognitive Radio Policy and Regulation showcases the original ideas and concepts introduced into the field of CR and dynamic spectrum access policy over nearly four years of work within COST Action IC0905 TERRA, a think-tank with participants from more than 20 countries. The book’s subject matter includes: • deploymen...

  14. Tissue organization by cadherin adhesion molecules: dynamic molecular and cellular mechanisms of morphogenetic regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niessen, Carien M.; Leckband, Deborah; Yap, Alpha S.

    2013-01-01

    This review addresses the cellular and molecular mechanisms of cadherin-based tissue morphogenesis. Tissue physiology is profoundly influenced by the distinctive organizations of cells in organs and tissues. In metazoa, adhesion receptors of the classical cadherin family play important roles in establishing and maintaining such tissue organization. Indeed, it is apparent that cadherins participate in a range of morphogenetic events that range from support of tissue integrity to dynamic cellular rearrangements. A comprehensive understanding of cadherin-based morphogenesis must then define the molecular and cellular mechanisms that support these distinct cadherin biologies. Here we focus on four key mechanistic elements: the molecular basis for adhesion through cadherin ectodomains; the regulation of cadherin expression at the cell surface; cooperation between cadherins and the actin cytoskeleton; and regulation by cell signaling. We discuss current progress and outline issues for further research in these fields. PMID:21527735

  15. Light-activated regulation of cofilin dynamics using a photocaged hydrogen peroxide generator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Evan W; Taulet, Nicolas; Onak, Carl S; New, Elizabeth J; Lanselle, Julie K; Smelick, Gillian S; Chang, Christopher J

    2010-12-08

    Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) can exert diverse signaling and stress responses within living systems depending on its spatial and temporal dynamics. Here we report a new small-molecule probe for producing H2O2 on demand upon photoactivation and its application for optical regulation of cofilin-actin rod formation in living cells. This chemical method offers many potential opportunities for dissecting biological roles for H2O2 as well as remote control of cell behavior via H2O2-mediated pathways.

  16. The demography of climate-driven and density-regulated population dynamics in a perennial plant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahlgren, Johan; Bengstsson, Karin; Ehrlén, Johan

    2016-01-01

    important aspect of such forecasts. We examined the simultaneous impact of climate and intraspecific density on vital rates of the dwarf shrub Fumana procumbens over 20 yr, using generalized additive mixed models. We then analyzed effects on population dynamics using integral projection models...... to be driven solely by the environment can overestimate extinction risks if there is density dependence. We conclude that density regulation can dampen effects of climate change on Fumana population size, and discuss the need to quantify density dependence in predictions of population responses...

  17. A dynamic response regulator protein modulates G-protein-dependent polarity in the bacterium Myxococcus xanthus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Zhang

    Full Text Available Migrating cells employ sophisticated signal transduction systems to respond to their environment and polarize towards attractant sources. Bacterial cells also regulate their polarity dynamically to reverse their direction of movement. In Myxococcus xanthus, a GTP-bound Ras-like G-protein, MglA, activates the motility machineries at the leading cell pole. Reversals are provoked by pole-to-pole switching of MglA, which is under the control of a chemosensory-like signal transduction cascade (Frz. It was previously known that the asymmetric localization of MglA at one cell pole is regulated by MglB, a GTPase Activating Protein (GAP. In this process, MglB specifically localizes at the opposite lagging cell pole and blocks MglA localization at that pole. However, how MglA is targeted to the leading pole and how Frz activity switches the localizations of MglA and MglB synchronously remained unknown. Here, we show that MglA requires RomR, a previously known response regulator protein, to localize to the leading cell pole efficiently. Specifically, RomR-MglA and RomR-MglB complexes are formed and act complementarily to establish the polarity axis, segregating MglA and MglB to opposite cell poles. Finally, we present evidence that Frz signaling may regulate MglA localization through RomR, suggesting that RomR constitutes a link between the Frz-signaling and MglAB polarity modules. Thus, in Myxococcus xanthus, a response regulator protein governs the localization of a small G-protein, adding further insight to the polarization mechanism and suggesting that motility regulation evolved by recruiting and combining existing signaling modules of diverse origins.

  18. A Dynamic Response Regulator Protein Modulates G-Protein–Dependent Polarity in the Bacterium Myxococcus xanthus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yong; Guzzo, Mathilde; Ducret, Adrien; Li, Yue-Zhong; Mignot, Tâm

    2012-01-01

    Migrating cells employ sophisticated signal transduction systems to respond to their environment and polarize towards attractant sources. Bacterial cells also regulate their polarity dynamically to reverse their direction of movement. In Myxococcus xanthus, a GTP-bound Ras-like G-protein, MglA, activates the motility machineries at the leading cell pole. Reversals are provoked by pole-to-pole switching of MglA, which is under the control of a chemosensory-like signal transduction cascade (Frz). It was previously known that the asymmetric localization of MglA at one cell pole is regulated by MglB, a GTPase Activating Protein (GAP). In this process, MglB specifically localizes at the opposite lagging cell pole and blocks MglA localization at that pole. However, how MglA is targeted to the leading pole and how Frz activity switches the localizations of MglA and MglB synchronously remained unknown. Here, we show that MglA requires RomR, a previously known response regulator protein, to localize to the leading cell pole efficiently. Specifically, RomR-MglA and RomR-MglB complexes are formed and act complementarily to establish the polarity axis, segregating MglA and MglB to opposite cell poles. Finally, we present evidence that Frz signaling may regulate MglA localization through RomR, suggesting that RomR constitutes a link between the Frz-signaling and MglAB polarity modules. Thus, in Myxococcus xanthus, a response regulator protein governs the localization of a small G-protein, adding further insight to the polarization mechanism and suggesting that motility regulation evolved by recruiting and combining existing signaling modules of diverse origins. PMID:22916026

  19. Novel Regulation of Ski Protein Stability and Endosomal Sorting by Actin Cytoskeleton Dynamics in Hepatocytes*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vázquez-Victorio, Genaro; Caligaris, Cassandre; Del Valle-Espinosa, Eugenio; Sosa-Garrocho, Marcela; González-Arenas, Nelly R.; Reyes-Cruz, Guadalupe; Briones-Orta, Marco A.; Macías-Silva, Marina

    2015-01-01

    TGF-β-induced antimitotic signals are highly regulated during cell proliferation under normal and pathological conditions, such as liver regeneration and cancer. Up-regulation of the transcriptional cofactors Ski and SnoN during liver regeneration may favor hepatocyte proliferation by inhibiting TGF-β signals. In this study, we found a novel mechanism that regulates Ski protein stability through TGF-β and G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) signaling. Ski protein is distributed between the nucleus and cytoplasm of normal hepatocytes, and the molecular mechanisms controlling Ski protein stability involve the participation of actin cytoskeleton dynamics. Cytoplasmic Ski is partially associated with actin and localized in cholesterol-rich vesicles. Ski protein stability is decreased by TGF-β/Smads, GPCR/Rho signals, and actin polymerization, whereas GPCR/cAMP signals and actin depolymerization promote Ski protein stability. In conclusion, TGF-β and GPCR signals differentially regulate Ski protein stability and sorting in hepatocytes, and this cross-talk may occur during liver regeneration. PMID:25561741

  20. Novel regulation of Ski protein stability and endosomal sorting by actin cytoskeleton dynamics in hepatocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vázquez-Victorio, Genaro; Caligaris, Cassandre; Del Valle-Espinosa, Eugenio; Sosa-Garrocho, Marcela; González-Arenas, Nelly R; Reyes-Cruz, Guadalupe; Briones-Orta, Marco A; Macías-Silva, Marina

    2015-02-13

    TGF-β-induced antimitotic signals are highly regulated during cell proliferation under normal and pathological conditions, such as liver regeneration and cancer. Up-regulation of the transcriptional cofactors Ski and SnoN during liver regeneration may favor hepatocyte proliferation by inhibiting TGF-β signals. In this study, we found a novel mechanism that regulates Ski protein stability through TGF-β and G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) signaling. Ski protein is distributed between the nucleus and cytoplasm of normal hepatocytes, and the molecular mechanisms controlling Ski protein stability involve the participation of actin cytoskeleton dynamics. Cytoplasmic Ski is partially associated with actin and localized in cholesterol-rich vesicles. Ski protein stability is decreased by TGF-β/Smads, GPCR/Rho signals, and actin polymerization, whereas GPCR/cAMP signals and actin depolymerization promote Ski protein stability. In conclusion, TGF-β and GPCR signals differentially regulate Ski protein stability and sorting in hepatocytes, and this cross-talk may occur during liver regeneration. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  1. SPOT14-Positive Neural Stem/Progenitor Cells in the Hippocampus Respond Dynamically to Neurogenic Regulators

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    Marlen Knobloch

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Proliferation of neural stem/progenitor cells (NSPCs in the adult brain is tightly controlled to prevent exhaustion and to ensure proper neurogenesis. Several extrinsic stimuli affect NSPC regulation. However, the lack of unique markers led to controversial results regarding the in vivo behavior of NSPCs to different stimuli. We recently identified SPOT14, which controls NSPC proliferation through regulation of de novo lipogenesis, selectively in low-proliferating NSPCs. Whether SPOT14-expressing (SPOT14+ NSPCs react in vivo to neurogenic regulators is not known. We show that aging is accompanied by a marked disappearance of SPOT14+ NSPCs, whereas running, a positive neurogenic stimulus, increases proliferation of SPOT14+ NSPCs. Furthermore, transient depletion of highly proliferative cells recruits SPOT14+ NSPCs into the proliferative pool. Additionally, we have established endogenous SPOT14 protein staining, reflecting transgenic SPOT14-GFP expression. Thus, our data identify SPOT14 as a potent marker for adult NSPCs that react dynamically to positive and negative neurogenic regulators.

  2. MMSET is dynamically regulated during cell-cycle progression and promotes normal DNA replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Debra L; Zhang, Haoxing; Ham, Hyoungjun; Pei, Huadong; Lee, SeungBaek; Kim, JungJin; Billadeau, Daniel D; Lou, Zhenkun

    2016-01-01

    The timely and precise duplication of cellular DNA is essential for maintaining genome integrity and is thus tightly-regulated. During mitosis and G1, the Origin Recognition Complex (ORC) binds to future replication origins, coordinating with multiple factors to load the minichromosome maintenance (MCM) complex onto future replication origins as part of the pre-replication complex (pre-RC). The pre-RC machinery, in turn, remains inactive until the subsequent S phase when it is required for replication fork formation, thereby initiating DNA replication. Multiple myeloma SET domain-containing protein (MMSET, a.k.a. WHSC1, NSD2) is a histone methyltransferase that is frequently overexpressed in aggressive cancers and is essential for normal human development. Several studies have suggested a role for MMSET in cell-cycle regulation; however, whether MMSET is itself regulated during cell-cycle progression has not been examined. In this study, we report that MMSET is degraded during S phase in a cullin-ring ligase 4-Cdt2 (CRL4(Cdt2)) and proteasome-dependent manner. Notably, we also report defects in DNA replication and a decreased association of pre-RC factors with chromatin in MMSET-depleted cells. Taken together, our results suggest a dynamic regulation of MMSET levels throughout the cell cycle, and further characterize the role of MMSET in DNA replication and cell-cycle progression.

  3. [An approach to a graphical representation of regulation and determination in population dynamics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thalenhorst, W

    1968-11-01

    The present paper continues a line which has been marked by publications of WILBERT (1962) and SCHWERDTFEGER (1968) and aims at a cybernetical interpretation of the dynamics of animal (especially insect) populations. Here, the author tries to apply this conception to concrete situations in the population dynamics of two Arthropoda.On two spruce plantations, one of them being experimentally differentiated in plots, the plants of the other being classified according to their needles' length, differences in population density ("infestation mosaic") of the phytophagous Arthropoda were overcompensated by density-dependent factors. This could be represented by a regression line in a diagram with - both as logarithms - the initial population density in the abscissa and the multiplication index in the ordinate. Then, regulation appears as the inclination of the regression line, determination as its intersections with the abscissa (=momentary equilibrium density).Peculiar to this method is that the analysis - unless it is repeated - deals with variations in space instead of fluctuations in time. Example 1 (see Fig. 1). Eucosma tedella (CL.) (Microlep.). The regression lines 1962/63 and 1963/64 differ in their inclination. Regulation was 1963/64 stronger than 1962/63. In neither generation was the equilibrium density (see intersection with abscissa) attained; the population density of the insect continued to rise. Example 2 (see Fig. 2). Oligonychus ununguis (JAC.) (Acari). The four parallel regression lines range corresponding to the length of the spuce needles. Parallelism means that regulation had the same value; the different position of the lines which can be read off either on the abscissa or on the ordinate represents differences in determination.The question as to the causes of regulation and determination is, for the present, disregardable. However, it can be generalized that the disposition of a food plant (for which the needles' length may be representative) is

  4. The presynaptic microtubule cytoskeleton in physiological and pathological conditions: lessons from Fragile X Syndrome and Hereditary Spastic Paraplegias

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felipe Bodaleo

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The capacity of the nervous system to generate neuronal networks relies on the establishment and maintenance of synaptic contacts. Synapses are composed of functionally different presynaptic and postsynaptic compartments. An appropriate synaptic architecture is required to provide the structural basis that supports synaptic transmission, a process involving changes in cytoskeletal dynamics. Actin microfilaments are the main cytoskeletal components present at both presynaptic and postsynaptic terminals in glutamatergic synapses. However, in the last few years it has been demonstrated that microtubules (MTs transiently invade dendritic spines, promoting their maturation. Nevertheless, the presence and functions of MTs at the presynaptic site are still a matter of debate. Early electron microscopy (EM studies revealed that MTs are present in the presynaptic terminals of the central nervous system (CNS where they interact with synaptic vesicles (SVs and reach the active zone. These observations have been reproduced by several EM protocols; however, there is empirical heterogeneity in detecting presynaptic MTs, since they appear to be both labile and unstable. Moreover, increasing evidence derived from studies in the fruit fly neuromuscular junction proposes different roles for MTs in regulating presynaptic function in physiological and pathological conditions. In this review, we summarize the main findings that support the presence and roles of MTs at presynaptic terminals, integrating descriptive and biochemical analyses, and studies performed in invertebrate genetic models.

  5. Simultaneous tracking of 3D actin and microtubule strains in individual MLO-Y4 osteocytes under oscillatory flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baik, Andrew D; Qiu, Jun; Hillman, Elizabeth M C; Dong, Cheng; Guo, X Edward

    2013-02-22

    Osteocytes in vivo experience complex fluid shear flow patterns to activate mechanotransduction pathways. The actin and microtubule (MT) cytoskeletons have been shown to play an important role in the osteocyte's biochemical response to fluid shear loading. The dynamic nature of physiologically relevant fluid flow profiles (i.e., 1Hz oscillatory flow) impedes the ability to image and study both actin and MT cytoskeletons simultaneously in the same cell with high spatiotemporal resolution. To overcome these limitations, a multi-channel quasi-3D microscopy technique was developed to track the actin and MT networks simultaneously under steady and oscillatory flow. Cells displayed high intercellular variability and intracellular cytoskeletal variability in strain profiles. Shear Exz was the predominant strain in both steady and oscillatory flows in the form of viscoelastic creep and elastic oscillations, respectively. Dramatic differences were seen in oscillatory flow, however. The actin strains displayed an oscillatory strain profile more often than the MT networks in all the strains tested and had a higher peak-to-trough strain magnitude. Taken together, the actin networks are the more responsive cytoskeletal networks in osteocytes under oscillatory flow and may play a bigger role in mechanotransduction pathway activation and regulation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. The IQD Family of Calmodulin-Binding Proteins Links Calcium Signaling to Microtubules, Membrane Subdomains, and the Nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bürstenbinder, Katharina; Möller, Birgit; Plötner, Romina; Stamm, Gina; Hause, Gerd; Mitra, Dipannita; Abel, Steffen

    2017-03-01

    Calcium (Ca 2+ ) signaling and dynamic reorganization of the cytoskeleton are essential processes for the coordination and control of plant cell shape and cell growth. Calmodulin (CaM) and closely related calmodulin-like (CML) polypeptides are principal sensors of Ca 2+ signals. CaM/CMLs decode and relay information encrypted by the second messenger via differential interactions with a wide spectrum of targets to modulate their diverse biochemical activities. The plant-specific IQ67 DOMAIN (IQD) family emerged as possibly the largest class of CaM-interacting proteins with undefined molecular functions and biological roles. Here, we show that the 33 members of the IQD family in Arabidopsis ( Arabidopsis thaliana ) differentially localize, using green fluorescent protein (GFP)-tagged proteins, to multiple and distinct subcellular sites, including microtubule (MT) arrays, plasma membrane subdomains, and nuclear compartments. Intriguingly, the various IQD-specific localization patterns coincide with the subcellular patterns of IQD-dependent recruitment of CaM, suggesting that the diverse IQD members sequester Ca 2+ -CaM signaling modules to specific subcellular sites for precise regulation of Ca 2+ -dependent processes. Because MT localization is a hallmark of most IQD family members, we quantitatively analyzed GFP-labeled MT arrays in Nicotiana benthamiana cells transiently expressing GFP-IQD fusions and observed IQD-specific MT patterns, which point to a role of IQDs in MT organization and dynamics. Indeed, stable overexpression of select IQD proteins in Arabidopsis altered cellular MT orientation, cell shape, and organ morphology. Because IQDs share biochemical properties with scaffold proteins, we propose that IQD families provide an assortment of platform proteins for integrating CaM-dependent Ca 2+ signaling at multiple cellular sites to regulate cell function, shape, and growth. © 2017 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  7. The IQD Family of Calmodulin-Binding Proteins Links Calcium Signaling to Microtubules, Membrane Subdomains, and the Nucleus1[OPEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plötner, Romina; Stamm, Gina; Hause, Gerd; Mitra, Dipannita; Abel, Steffen

    2017-01-01

    Calcium (Ca2+) signaling and dynamic reorganization of the cytoskeleton are essential processes for the coordination and control of plant cell shape and cell growth. Calmodulin (CaM) and closely related calmodulin-like (CML) polypeptides are principal sensors of Ca2+ signals. CaM/CMLs decode and relay information encrypted by the second messenger via differential interactions with a wide spectrum of targets to modulate their diverse biochemical activities. The plant-specific IQ67 DOMAIN (IQD) family emerged as possibly the largest class of CaM-interacting proteins with undefined molecular functions and biological roles. Here, we show that the 33 members of the IQD family in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) differentially localize, using green fluorescent protein (GFP)-tagged proteins, to multiple and distinct subcellular sites, including microtubule (MT) arrays, plasma membrane subdomains, and nuclear compartments. Intriguingly, the various IQD-specific localization patterns coincide with the subcellular patterns of IQD-dependent recruitment of CaM, suggesting that the diverse IQD members sequester Ca2+-CaM signaling modules to specific subcellular sites for precise regulation of Ca2+-dependent processes. Because MT localization is a hallmark of most IQD family members, we quantitatively analyzed GFP-labeled MT arrays in Nicotiana benthamiana cells transiently expressing GFP-IQD fusions and observed IQD-specific MT patterns, which point to a role of IQDs in MT organization and dynamics. Indeed, stable overexpression of select IQD proteins in Arabidopsis altered cellular MT orientation, cell shape, and organ morphology. Because IQDs share biochemical properties with scaffold proteins, we propose that IQD families provide an assortment of platform proteins for integrating CaM-dependent Ca2+ signaling at multiple cellular sites to regulate cell function, shape, and growth. PMID:28115582

  8. Nonequilibrium Diffusion and Capture Mechanism Ensures Tip Localization of Regulating Proteins on Dynamic Filaments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reithmann, Emanuel; Reese, Louis; Frey, Erwin

    2016-08-12

    Diffusive motion of regulatory enzymes on biopolymers with eventual capture at a reaction site is a common feature in cell biology. Using a lattice gas model we study the impact of diffusion and capture for a microtubule polymerase and a depolymerase. Our results show that the capture mechanism localizes the proteins and creates large-scale spatial correlations. We develop an analytic approximation that globally accounts for relevant correlations and yields results that are in excellent agreement with experimental data. Our results show that diffusion and capture operates most efficiently at cellular enzyme concentrations which points to in vivo relevance.

  9. Mechanisms to Avoid and Correct Erroneous Kinetochore-Microtubule Attachments

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    Michael A. Lampson

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In dividing vertebrate cells multiple microtubules must connect to mitotic kinetochores in a highly stereotypical manner, with each sister kinetochore forming microtubule attachments to only one spindle pole. The exact sequence of events by which this goal is achieved varies considerably from cell to cell because of the variable locations of kinetochores and spindle poles, and randomness of initial microtubule attachments. These chance encounters with the kinetochores nonetheless ultimately lead to the desired outcome with high fidelity and in a limited time frame, providing one of the most startling examples of biological self-organization. This chapter discusses mechanisms that contribute to accurate chromosome segregation by helping dividing cells to avoid and resolve improper microtubule attachments.

  10. Mitochondrial translocation of EGFR regulates mitochondria dynamics and promotes metastasis in NSCLC.

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    Che, Ting-Fang; Lin, Ching-Wen; Wu, Yi-Ying; Chen, Yu-Ju; Han, Chia-Li; Chang, Yih-leong; Wu, Chen-Tu; Hsiao, Tzu-Hung; Hong, Tse-Ming; Yang, Pan-Chyr

    2015-11-10

    Dysfunction of the mitochondria is well-known for being associated with cancer progression. In the present study, we analyzed the mitochondria proteomics of lung cancer cell lines with different invasion abilities and found that EGFR is highly expressed in the mitochondria of highly invasive non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells. EGF induces the mitochondrial translocation of EGFR; further, it leads to mitochondrial fission and redistribution in the lamellipodia, upregulates cellular ATP production, and enhances motility in vitro and in vivo. Moreover, EGFR can regulate mitochondrial dynamics by interacting with Mfn1 and disturbing Mfn1 polymerization. Overexpression of Mfn1 reverses the phenotypes resulting from EGFR mitochondrial translocation. We show that the mitochondrial EGFR expressions are higher in paired samples of the metastatic lymph node as compared with primary lung tumor and are inversely correlated with the overall survival in NSCLC patients. Therefore, our results demonstrate that besides the canonical role of EGFR as a receptor tyrosine, the mitochondrial translocation of EGFR may enhance cancer invasion and metastasis through regulating mitochondria dynamics.

  11. Dynamic hubs show competitive and static hubs non-competitive regulation of their interaction partners.

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    Apurv Goel

    Full Text Available Date hub proteins have 1 or 2 interaction interfaces but many interaction partners. This raises the question of whether all partner proteins compete for the interaction interface of the hub or if the cell carefully regulates aspects of this process? Here, we have used real-time rendering of protein interaction networks to analyse the interactions of all the 1 or 2 interface hubs of Saccharomyces cerevisiae during the cell cycle. By integrating previously determined structural and gene expression data, and visually hiding the nodes (proteins and their edges (interactions during their troughs of expression, we predict when interactions of hubs and their partners are likely to exist. This revealed that 20 out of all 36 one- or two- interface hubs in the yeast interactome fell within two main groups. The first was dynamic hubs with static partners, which can be considered as 'competitive hubs'. Their interaction partners will compete for the interaction interface of the hub and the success of any interaction will be dictated by the kinetics of interaction (abundance and affinity and subcellular localisation. The second was static hubs with dynamic partners, which we term 'non-competitive hubs'. Regulatory mechanisms are finely tuned to lessen the presence and/or effects of competition between the interaction partners of the hub. It is possible that these regulatory processes may also be used by the cell for the regulation of other, non-cell cycle processes.

  12. Caudal regulates the spatiotemporal dynamics of pair-rule waves in Tribolium.

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    Ezzat El-Sherif

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available In the short-germ beetle Tribolium castaneum, waves of pair-rule gene expression propagate from the posterior end of the embryo towards the anterior and eventually freeze into stable stripes, partitioning the anterior-posterior axis into segments. Similar waves in vertebrates are assumed to arise due to the modulation of a molecular clock by a posterior-to-anterior frequency gradient. However, neither a molecular candidate nor a functional role has been identified to date for such a frequency gradient, either in vertebrates or elsewhere. Here we provide evidence that the posterior gradient of Tc-caudal expression regulates the oscillation frequency of pair-rule gene expression in Tribolium. We show this by analyzing the spatiotemporal dynamics of Tc-even-skipped expression in strong and mild knockdown of Tc-caudal, and by correlating the extension, level and slope of the Tc-caudal expression gradient to the spatiotemporal dynamics of Tc-even-skipped expression in wild type as well as in different RNAi knockdowns of Tc-caudal regulators. Further, we show that besides its absolute importance for stripe generation in the static phase of the Tribolium blastoderm, a frequency gradient might serve as a buffer against noise during axis elongation phase in Tribolium as well as vertebrates. Our results highlight the role of frequency gradients in pattern formation.

  13. Dynamics of glycolytic regulation during adaptation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to fermentative metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Brink, Joost; Canelas, André B; van Gulik, Walter M; Pronk, Jack T; Heijnen, Joseph J; de Winde, Johannes H; Daran-Lapujade, Pascale

    2008-09-01

    The ability of baker's yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) to rapidly increase its glycolytic flux upon a switch from respiratory to fermentative sugar metabolism is an important characteristic for many of its multiple industrial applications. An increased glycolytic flux can be achieved by an increase in the glycolytic enzyme capacities (V(max)) and/or by changes in the concentrations of low-molecular-weight substrates, products, and effectors. The goal of the present study was to understand the time-dependent, multilevel regulation of glycolytic enzymes during a switch from fully respiratory conditions to fully fermentative conditions. The switch from glucose-limited aerobic chemostat growth to full anaerobiosis and glucose excess resulted in rapid acceleration of fermentative metabolism. Although the capacities (V(max)) of the glycolytic enzymes did not change until 45 min after the switch, the intracellular levels of several substrates, products, and effectors involved in the regulation of glycolysis did change substantially during the initial 45 min (e.g., there was a buildup of the phosphofructokinase activator fructose-2,6-bisphosphate). This study revealed two distinct phases in the upregulation of glycolysis upon a switch to fermentative conditions: (i) an initial phase, in which regulation occurs completely through changes in metabolite levels; and (ii) a second phase, in which regulation is achieved through a combination of changes in V(max) and metabolite concentrations. This multilevel regulation study qualitatively explains the increase in flux through the glycolytic enzymes upon a switch of S. cerevisiae to fermentative conditions and provides a better understanding of the roles of different regulatory mechanisms that influence the dynamics of yeast glycolysis.

  14. The Microtubule Plus-End Tracking Protein CLASP2 Is Required for Hematopoiesis and Hematopoietic Stem Cell Maintenance

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    Ksenija Drabek

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Mammalian CLASPs are microtubule plus-end tracking proteins whose essential function as regulators of microtubule behavior has been studied mainly in cultured cells. We show here that absence of murine CLASP2 in vivo results in thrombocytopenia, progressive anemia, and pancytopenia, due to defects in megakaryopoiesis, in erythropoiesis, and in the maintenance of hematopoietic stem cell activity. Furthermore, microtubule stability and organization are affected upon attachment of Clasp2 knockout hematopoietic stem-cell-enriched populations, and these cells do not home efficiently toward their bone marrow niche. Strikingly, CLASP2-deficient hematopoietic stem cells contain severely reduced mRNA levels of c-Mpl, which encodes the thrombopoietin receptor, an essential factor for megakaryopoiesis and hematopoietic stem cell maintenance. Our data suggest that thrombopoietin signaling is impaired in Clasp2 knockout mice. We propose that the CLASP2-mediated stabilization of microtubules is required for proper attachment, homing, and maintenance of hematopoietic stem cells and that this is necessary to sustain c-Mpl transcription.

  15. Equilibria of idealized confined astral microtubules and coupled spindle poles.

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    Ivan V Maly

    Full Text Available Positioning of the mitotic spindle through the interaction of astral microtubules with the cell boundary often determines whether the cell division will be symmetric or asymmetric. This process plays a crucial role in development. In this paper, a numerical model is presented that deals with the force exerted on the spindle by astral microtubules that are bent by virtue of their confinement within the cell boundary. It is found that depending on parameters, the symmetric position of the spindle can be stable or unstable. Asymmetric stable equilibria also exist, and two or more stable positions can exist simultaneously. The theory poses new types of questions for experimental research. Regarding the cases of symmetric spindle positioning, it is necessary to ask whether the microtubule parameters are controlled by the cell so that the bending mechanics favors symmetry. If they are not, then it is necessary to ask what forces external to the microtubule cytoskeleton counteract the bending effects sufficiently to actively establish symmetry. Conversely, regarding the cases with asymmetry, it is now necessary to investigate whether the cell controls the microtubule parameters so that the bending favors asymmetry apart from any forces that are external to the microtubule cytoskeleto