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Sample records for regression aromatherapy massage

  1. Immunological and Psychological Benefits of Aromatherapy Massage

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    This preliminary investigation compares peripheral blood cell counts including red blood cells (RBCs), white blood cells (WBCs), neutrophils, peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBLs), CD4+, CD8+ and CD16+ lymphocytes, CD4+/CD8+ ratio, hematocrit, humoral parameters including serum interferon-γ and interleukin-6, salivary secretory immunoglobulin A (IgA). Psychological measures including the State–Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI) questionnaire and the Self-rating Depression Scale (SDS) between recipients (n = 11) of carrier oil massage and aromatherapy massage, which includes sweet almond oil, lavender oil, cypress oil and sweet marjoram oil. Though both STAI and SDS showed a significant reduction (P aromatherapy and carrier massage, no difference between the aromatherapy and control massage was observed for STAI and SDS. Aromatherapy, in contrast to control massage, did not significantly reduce RBC count or hematocrit. However, aromatherapy massage showed a significant (P > 0.05) increase in PBLs, possibly due to an increase in CD8+ and CD16+ lymphocytes, which had significantly increased post-treatment (P aromatherapy massage could be beneficial in disease states that require augmentation of CD8+ lymphocytes. While this study identifies the immunological benefits of aromatherapy massage, there is a need to validate the findings prospectively in a larger cohort of patients. PMID:15937558

  2. Anxiolytic Effect of Aromatherapy Massage in Patients with Breast Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Imanishi, Jiro; Kuriyama, Hiroko; Shigemori, Ichiro; Watanabe, Satoko; Aihara, Yuka; Kita, Masakazu; Sawai, Kiyoshi; Nakajima, Hiroo; Yoshida, Noriko; Kunisawa, Masahiro; Kawase, Masanori; Fukui, Kenji

    2009-01-01

    We examined how aromatherapy massage influenced psychologic and immunologic parameters in 12 breast cancer patients in an open semi-comparative trial. We compared the results 1 month before aromatherapy massage as a waiting control period with those during aromatherapy massage treatment and 1 month after the completion of aromatherapy sessions. The patients received a 30 min aromatherapy massage twice a week for 4 weeks (eight times in total). The results showed that anxiety was reduced in on...

  3. Anxiolytic Effect of Aromatherapy Massage in Patients with Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuriyama, Hiroko; Shigemori, Ichiro; Watanabe, Satoko; Aihara, Yuka; Kita, Masakazu; Sawai, Kiyoshi; Nakajima, Hiroo; Yoshida, Noriko; Kunisawa, Masahiro; Kawase, Masanori; Fukui, Kenji

    2009-01-01

    We examined how aromatherapy massage influenced psychologic and immunologic parameters in 12 breast cancer patients in an open semi-comparative trial. We compared the results 1 month before aromatherapy massage as a waiting control period with those during aromatherapy massage treatment and 1 month after the completion of aromatherapy sessions. The patients received a 30 min aromatherapy massage twice a week for 4 weeks (eight times in total). The results showed that anxiety was reduced in one 30 min aromatherapy massage in State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI) test and also reduced in eight sequential aromatherapy massage sessions in the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) test. Our results further suggested that aromatherapy massage ameliorated the immunologic state. Further investigations are required to confirm the anxiolytic effect of aromatherapy in breast cancer patients. PMID:18955225

  4. Anxiolytic Effect of Aromatherapy Massage in Patients with Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiro Imanishi

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We examined how aromatherapy massage influenced psychologic and immunologic parameters in 12 breast cancer patients in an open semi-comparative trial. We compared the results 1 month before aromatherapy massage as a waiting control period with those during aromatherapy massage treatment and 1 month after the completion of aromatherapy sessions. The patients received a 30 min aromatherapy massage twice a week for 4 weeks (eight times in total. The results showed that anxiety was reduced in one 30 min aromatherapy massage in State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI test and also reduced in eight sequential aromatherapy massage sessions in the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS test. Our results further suggested that aromatherapy massage ameliorated the immunologic state. Further investigations are required to confirm the anxiolytic effect of aromatherapy in breast cancer patients.

  5. Immunological and Psychological Benefits of Aromatherapy Massage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroko Kuriyama

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available This preliminary investigation compares peripheral blood cell counts including red blood cells (RBCs, white blood cells (WBCs, neutrophils, peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBLs, CD4+, CD8+ and CD16+ lymphocytes, CD4+/CD8+ ratio, hematocrit, humoral parameters including serum interferon-γ and interleukin-6, salivary secretory immunoglobulin A (IgA. Psychological measures including the State–Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI questionnaire and the Self-rating Depression Scale (SDS between recipients (n = 11 of carrier oil massage and aromatherapy massage, which includes sweet almond oil, lavender oil, cypress oil and sweet marjoram oil. Though both STAI and SDS showed a significant reduction (P 0.05 increase in PBLs, possibly due to an increase in CD8+ and CD16+ lymphocytes, which had significantly increased post-treatment (P < 0.01. Consequently, the CD4+/CD8+ ratio decreased significantly (P < 0.01. The paucity of such differences after carrier oil massage suggests that aromatherapy massage could be beneficial in disease states that require augmentation of CD8+ lymphocytes. While this study identifies the immunological benefits of aromatherapy massage, there is a need to validate the findings prospectively in a larger cohort of patients.

  6. Effects of aromatherapy massage on the sleep quality and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    related concerns, unknown encounters after surgery, quality of sleep, restrictions in position after surgery is known to be serious. The study was conducted to determine the effect of aromatherapy massage on quality of sleep and physiological ...

  7. Aromatherapy Massage on the Abdomen for Alleviating Menstrual Pain in High School Girls: A Preliminary Controlled Clinical Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hur, Myung-Haeng; Lee, Myeong Soo; Seong, Ka-Yeon; Lee, Mi-Kyoung

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the alleviating effects of aromatherapy massage and acetaminophen on menstrual pain in Korean high school girls. Subjects were divided into two groups: the aromatherapy massage (treatment) group (n = 32) and the acetaminophen (control) group (n = 23). Aromatherapy massage was performed on subjects in the treatment group. The abdomen was massaged once using clary sage, marjoram, cinnamon, ginger, and geranium in a base of almond oil. The level of menstrual pain was assessed using a visual analogue scale at baseline and twenty-four hours afterward. The reduction of menstrual pain was significantly higher in the aromatherapy group than in the acetaminophen group. Using multiple regression, aromatherapy massage was found to be more highly associated with reduction in the level of menstrual pain than acetaminophen. These finding suggest that aromatherapy massage may be an effective treatment for menstrual pain in high school girls. However, it could not be verified whether the positive effects derived from the aromatherapy, the massage, or both. Further rigorous studies should be conducted using more objective measures. PMID:21949670

  8. Effect of aromatherapy massage on dysmenorrhea in Turkish students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apay, Serap Ejder; Arslan, Sevban; Akpinar, Reva Balci; Celebioglu, Ayda

    2012-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of aromatherapy massage on dysmenorrhea. The study used a quasiexperimental design with the subjects as their own control. Every participant applied both aromatherapy massage with lavender oil and placebo massage with odorless liquid petrolatum [soft paraffin]. The population comprised 438 midwifery and nursing students. The 150 students who had declared that they had suffered from dysmenorrhea used a visual analog scale to indicate their level of pain. Higher scores reflected a greater severity of dysmenorrhea. Forty-four students volunteered to participate in the study. When the lavender massage and the placebo massage were compared, the visual analog scale score of the lavender massage was found to decrease at a statistically significant rate. This study showed that massage was effective in reducing dysmenorrhea. In addition, this study showed that the effect of aromatherapy massage on pain was higher than that of placebo massage. Copyright © 2012 American Society for Pain Management Nursing. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Effect of aromatherapy massage on menopausal symptoms: a randomized placebo-controlled clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darsareh, Fatemeh; Taavoni, Simin; Joolaee, Soodabeh; Haghani, Hamid

    2012-09-01

    Menopause is a significant event in most women's lives because it marks the end of a woman's natural reproductive life. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of aromatherapy massage on menopausal symptoms. A randomized placebo-controlled clinical trial was conducted at a menopausal clinic at a gynecology hospital in Tehran. The study population comprised 90 women who were assigned to an aromatherapy massage group, a placebo massage group, or a control group. Each participant in the aromatherapy massage group received 30-minute aromatherapy treatment sessions twice a week for 4 weeks with aroma oil, whereas participants in the placebo massage group received the same treatment with plain oil. No treatment was provided to participants in the control group. The outcome measures in this study were menopausal symptoms, as obtained through the Menopause Rating Scale. The mean baseline level of the menopausal score did not differ among all groups. However, after eight sessions of intervention, the Menopause Rating Scale score differed significantly among the three groups (P aromatherapy massage group and the placebo massage group had a lower menopausal score than the control group (P aromatherapy massage and the placebo massage groups were compared, the menopausal score for the aromatherapy massage group was found to be significantly lower (P aromatherapy massage were effective in reducing menopausal symptoms. However, aromatherapy massage was more effective than only massage.

  10. Effect of aromatherapy massage on elderly patients under long-term hospitalization in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satou, Tadaaki; Chikama, Mizuki; Chikama, Yoshiko; Hachigo, Masato; Urayama, Haruna; Murakami, Shio; Hayashi, Shinichiro; Koikem, Kazuo

    2013-03-01

    To verify the effectiveness of aromatherapy massage on elderly patients under long-term hospitalization. Aromatherapy massage was performed twice a week for a total of eight times. Nursing home. Elderly women under long-term hospitalization. Questionnaire and measurement of stress marker levels (salivary amylase activity) before and after the first, fifth, and eighth aromatherapy massages. Questionnaire (Face scale, General Health Questionnaire-12 [GHQ-12]), measurement of salivary amylase activity. A decrease in stress after aromatherapy massage compared to before each massage was confirmed at all measurement times and with the stress marker. No marked reduction was observed in Face scale or saliva amylase activity as a whole over the long term, although decreasing tendencies were seen. Marked reductions in GHQ-12 were observed over the long term. Aroma massage appears likely to prove effective in reducing psychological stress among elderly patients under long-term hospitalization.

  11. Effect of aromatherapy massage on pain in primary dysmenorrhea: A meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sut, Necdet; Kahyaoglu-Sut, Hatice

    2017-05-01

    This meta-analysis investigates the effect of aromatherapy massage on pain in primary dysmenorrhea. Randomized controlled trials were searched by keywords in several databases (Pubmed, ISI Web of Sciences, and Google Scholar). Six randomized controlled trials that included 362 participants with primary dysmenorrhea, comparing abdominal aromatherapy massage (n = 184) with massage with placebo oils (n = 178), were analyzed in the meta-analysis. The change in the visual analogue scale (VAS) pain score from the first menstruation cycle to the second cycle at the first menstruation day was used as the primary outcome. Aromatherapy massage with essential oils was superior to massage with placebo oils (standardized mean difference = -1.06 [95% CI: -1.55 to -0.55]). Abdominal aromatherapy massage with essential oils is an effective complementary method to relieve pain in primary dysmenorrhea. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. The effect of aromatherapy massage on the psychological symptoms of postmenopausal Iranian women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taavoni, S; Darsareh, F; Joolaee, S; Haghani, H

    2013-06-01

    Menopausal symptoms experienced by women vary widely, and while many women transition through menopause with manageable symptoms, others experience severe symptoms, which may impair their quality of life. A randomized clinical trial was conducted to determine the effect of aromatherapy massage on psychological symptoms during menopause. The study population comprised 90 women. Each subject in the aromatherapy massage group received 30 min aromatherapy sessions with aroma oil, twice a week, for four weeks; each subject in the massage therapy group received the same treatment with odorless oil, while no treatment was provided to subjects in the control group. The outcome measures were psychological symptoms, as obtained through the psychological subscale of the Menopause Rating Scale. A total of 87 women were evaluated. A statistically significant difference was found between the participants' pre- and post-application psychological score in intervention groups, whereas the score in the control group did not differ significantly. Aromatherapy massage decreased the psychological score MD: -3.49 (95% Confidence Interval of Difference: -4.52 to -2.47). Massage therapy also decreased the psychological score MD: -1.20 (95% Confidence Interval of Difference: -2.19 to -0.08). To distinguish the effect of aromatherapy from massage separately, we compared the reduction in the psychological score. Aromatherapy massage decreased the psychological score more than massage therapy MD: -2.29 (95% Confidence Interval of Difference: -3.01 to -0.47). Both aromatherapy massage and massage were effective in reducing psychological symptoms, but, the effect of aromatherapy massage was higher than massage. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Aromatherapy Massage Affects Menopausal Symptoms in Korean Climacteric Women: A Pilot-Controlled Clinical Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hur, Myung-Haeng; Yang, Yun Seok

    2008-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of aromatherapy massage on menopausal symptoms in Korean climacteric women. Kupperman's menopausal index was used to compare an experimental group of 25 climacteric women with a wait-listed control group of 27 climacteric women. Aromatherapy was applied topically to subjects in the experimental group in the form of massage on the abdomen, back and arms using lavender, rose geranium, rose and jasmine in almond and primrose oils once a week for 8 weeks (eight times in total). The experimental group reported a significantly lower total menopausal index than wait-listed controls (P aromatherapy massage may be an effective treatment of menopausal symptoms such as hot flushes, depression and pain in climacteric women. However, it could not be verified whether the positive effects were from the aromatherapy, the massage or both. Further rigorous studies should be done with more objective measures. PMID:18830459

  14. Effect of Aromatherapy Massage on Agitation and Depressive Mood in Individuals With Dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ya-Ping; Wang, Chi-Jane; Wang, Jing-Jy

    2016-09-01

    The current study examined the effects of aromatherapy massage on alleviating agitation and depressive mood in individuals with dementia. A randomized controlled trial and repeated measures design was conducted. A total of 59 participants were randomly assigned to intervention or control groups. The intervention group received aromatherapy massage once per week for 8 weeks. Results indicated no significant changes over time in overall agitation for either group, but agitation decreased from Week 1 to Week 5 for the intervention group. In addition, the overall depressive symptoms decreased significantly over time for the intervention group compared to the control group (p aromatherapy massage showed some significant changes in Weeks 5 and 9. Aromatherapy massage can be an effective and safe intervention to alleviate specific agitated behaviors and depressive mood in individuals with dementia. [Journal of Gerontological Nursing, 42(9), 38-46.]. Copyright 2016, SLACK Incorporated.

  15. Massage with aromatherapy: effectiveness on anxiety of users with personality disorders in psychiatric hospitalization

    OpenAIRE

    Domingos, Thiago da Silva; Braga, Eliana Mara

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To investigate the effectiveness of aromatherapy massage using the essential oils (0.5%) of Lavandula angustifolia and Pelargonium graveolens for anxiety reduction in patients with personality disorders during psychiatric hospitalization. METHOD Uncontrolled clinical trial with 50 subjects submitted to six massages with aromatherapy, performed on alternate days, on the cervical and the posterior thoracic regions. Vital data (heart and respiratory rate) were collected before and afte...

  16. Comparison of the effect of classic massage and aromatherapy on cardiac parameters in patients with cervical spine pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika Sadeck

    2017-11-01

    Conclusions: Classical massage treatments affect the changing parameters of blood pressure and heart rate immediately after the massage and 5 minutes after the massage. Aromatherapy massage exhibits superior analgesic effect than classic massage, what to look for when selecting treatment for patients with back pain.

  17. Evaluating Effects of Aromatherapy Massage on Sleep in Children with Autism: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Tim I.

    2006-01-01

    Previous studies have found beneficial effects of aromatherapy massage for agitation in people with dementia, for pain relief and for poor sleep. Children with autism often have sleep difficulties, and it was thought that aromatherapy massage might enable more rapid sleep onset, less sleep disruption and longer sleep duration. Twelve children with autism and learning difficulties (2 girls and 10 boys aged between 12 years 2 months to 15 years 7 months) in a residential school participated in a within subjects repeated measures design: 3 nights when the children were given aromatherapy massage with lavender oil were compared with 14 nights when it was not given. The children were checked every 30 min throughout the night to determine the time taken for the children to settle to sleep, the number of awakenings and the sleep duration. One boy's data were not analyzed owing to lengthy absence. Repeated measures analysis revealed no differences in any of the sleep measures between the nights when the children were given aromatherapy massage and nights when the children were not given aromatherapy massage. The results suggest that the use of aromatherapy massage with lavender oil has no beneficial effect on the sleep patterns of children with autism attending a residential school. It is possible that there are greater effects in the home environment or with longer-term interventions. PMID:16951722

  18. Massage with or without aromatherapy for symptom relief in people with cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Ein-Soon; Seo, Kyung-Hwa; Lee, Sun-Hee; Jang, Ji-Eun; Jung, Yu-Min; Kim, Min-Ji; Yeon, Ji-Yun

    2016-06-03

    Massage and aromatherapy massage are used to relieve cancer-related symptoms. A number of claims have been made for these treatments including reduction of pain, anxiety, depression, and stress. Other studies have not shown these benefits. To evaluate the effects of massage with or without aromatherapy on pain and other symptoms associated with cancer. We searched the following databases and trials registries up to August 2015: the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL, 2015, Issue 7), MEDLINE (Ovid), EMBASE (Ovid), PsycINFO (Ovid), CINAHL (EBSCO), PubMed Cancer Subset, SADCCT, and the World Health Organization (WHO) ICTRP. We also searched clinical trial registries for ongoing studies. Randomised controlled studies (RCTs) reporting the effects of aromatherapy or massage therapy, or both, in people with cancer of any age. We applied no language restrictions. Comparators were massage (using carrier oil only) versus no massage, massage with aromatherapy (using carrier oil plus essential oils) versus no massage, and massage with aromatherapy (using carrier oil plus essential oils) versus massage without aromatherapy (using carrier oil only). At least two review authors selected studies, assessed the risk of bias, and extracted data relating to pain and other symptoms associated with cancer, using standardised forms. We assessed the evidence using GRADE (Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation) and created two 'Summary of findings' tables. We included 19 studies (21 reports) of very low quality evidence with a total of 1274 participants. We included 14 studies (16 reports) in a qualitative synthesis and five studies in a quantitative synthesis (meta-analysis). Thirteen studies (14 reports, 596 participants) compared massage with no massage. Six studies (seven reports, 561 participants) compared aromatherapy massage with no massage. Two studies (117 participants) compared massage with aromatherapy and massage without

  19. Aromatherapy massage seems to enhance relaxation in children with burns: an observational pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Flaherty, Linda-Anne; van Dijk, Monique; Albertyn, Rene; Millar, Alastair; Rode, Heinz

    2012-09-01

    This observational pilot study investigated effects of aromatherapy massage in paediatric burn patients. The setting was a 17 beds level I burn unit in Cape Town, South Africa. Between January and October 2009 heart rates and respiratory rates of patients who underwent aromatherapy massage sessions were read before and after the sessions. Primary outcomes were decline in heart rates and respiratory rates, a sign of relaxation. Behavioural responses (sleep/awake state, facial expression, body posture) were documented as secondary outcomes. A convenience sample of 71 paediatric burn patients (median age 3 years) underwent a total of 126 massage sessions. Mean heart rate decreased significantly from 118 (SD 20) to 109 (SD 21), t=9.8, pAromatherapy massage seems to be a helpful nonpharmacological approach to reduce hospitalized paediatric burn patients' distress. Future studies with better research designs and validated outcome measures should confirm our findings. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  20. Experiences of aromatherapy massage among adult female cancer patients: A qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Simone S M; Kwong, Alice N L; Wan, Karen W S; Ho, Rosita M L; Chow, Ka Ming

    2017-12-01

    To explore the experiences towards aromatherapy massage use, and to examine the perceived benefits and adverse effects of aromatherapy massage among adult female cancer patients. A qualitative research design was used. Fifteen women with cancer were recruited for semi-structured interviews. Sample recruitment was undertaken through cancer self-help groups and referrals of a private aromatherapy clinic by convenience sampling. The interview data were analysed by thematic analysis. All participants had a positive experience towards aromatherapy massage. The perceived benefits of aromatherapy massage included physical and psychological dimensions: overall comfort, relaxation, reduced pain, muscular tension, lymphoedema and numbness, improved sleep, energy level, appetite and mood. Interestingly, a few participants reported that aromatherapy massage helped to enhance self-acceptance and coping with their altered torso. No adverse effects were reported. The findings focused on four main themes that emerged: (i) an immediate effect that brings all-round comfort and reconnection to daily life; (ii) a pleasurable moment to forget the disease with aroma as a booster; (iii) a pampering experience of being cared for with a sense of dignity preserved; and (iv) communicating with the failing body. This study contributed by providing a better understanding in aromatherapy massage from female cancer patients' perspective which adds to the existing body of knowledge. The implications for nursing practice, education and future research were suggested. Aromatherapy massage seems to have both physical and psychological benefits for women with cancer. The findings elucidated a wide range of benefits that are perceived in such complex intervention, and the contextual factors that may influence these perceived benefits. This will inform future nurse-led quantitative research in the clinical setting. The study highlights the importance of touch towards a caring relationship and the

  1. The Effects of Aromatherapy Massage on Sleep Quality of Nurses on Monthly Rotating Night Shifts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chao-Ling

    2017-01-01

    The goal of this study is to examine the effects of aromatherapy massage on sleep quality of nurses with monthly rotating night shifts. Subjects were enrolled at a medical center in central Taiwan with overall score ≥ 5 of Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) and randomly assigned to the treatment or control groups. They were validated by pretests during their first graveyard shift in the trial period and the sleep quality information was collected by using the PSQI and sleep detectors. During the second graveyard shift, the treatment group received aromatherapy massage and the control group rested in the same aromatherapy room after work. All subjects filled out the PSQI surveys and the sleep quality information was collected during massage or resting and the following night. We found that the total PSQI was significantly decreased in the treatment group following the aromatherapy massage. Specifically, the components such as subjective sleep quality, sleep disturbance, and daytime dysfunction were significantly decreased. However, there were no significant changes of average PSQI scores between the two groups before and after intervention. Taken together, our study suggested that aromatherapy massage could improve sleep quality of nurses with monthly rotating night shift. PMID:28761497

  2. Aromatherapy Massage for Neuropathic Pain and Quality of Life in Diabetic Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gok Metin, Zehra; Arikan Donmez, Ayse; Izgu, Nur; Ozdemir, Leyla; Arslan, Ismail Emre

    2017-07-01

    This study aimed to examine the effects of aromatherapy massage on neuropathic pain severity and quality of life (QoL) in patients suffering from painful diabetic neuropathy. This open-label randomized controlled clinical study was conducted in a university hospital endocrine outpatient clinic in Turkey. The study sample consisted of 46 patients, randomly allocated to an intervention group (n = 21) and a control group (n = 25). The intervention group received aromatherapy massage three times per week for a period of 4 weeks. The control group received only routine care. Data were collected from patients using the Douleur Neuropathique questionnaire, the visual analog scale, and the Neuropathic Pain Impact on Quality of Life questionnaire. Neuropathic pain scores significantly decreased in the intervention group compared with the control group in the fourth week of the study. Similarly, QoL scores significantly improved in the intervention group in the fourth week of the study. Aromatherapy massage is a simple and effective nonpharmacological nursing intervention that can be used to manage neuropathic pain and improve QoL in patients with painful neuropathy. Aromatherapy massage is a well-tolerated, feasible, and safe nonpharmacological method that can be readily integrated into clinical settings by nursing staff. The essential oils rosemary, geranium, lavender, eucalyptus, and chamomile can be safely used by nurses in the clinical setting, if applicable. However, training and experience of nurses in aromatherapy massage is critical to achieving positive results. © 2017 Sigma Theta Tau International.

  3. Modulatory effects of aromatherapy massage intervention on electroencephalogram, psychological assessments, salivary cortisol and plasma brain-derived neurotrophic factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jin-Ji; Cui, Yanji; Yang, Yoon-Sil; Kang, Moon-Seok; Jung, Sung-Cherl; Park, Hyeung Keun; Yeun, Hye-Young; Jang, Won Jung; Lee, Sunjoo; Kwak, Young Sook; Eun, Su-Yong

    2014-06-01

    Aromatherapy massage is commonly used for the stress management of healthy individuals, and also has been often employed as a therapeutic use for pain control and alleviating psychological distress, such as anxiety and depression, in oncological palliative care patients. However, the exact biological basis of aromatherapy massage is poorly understood. Therefore, we evaluated here the effects of aromatherapy massage interventions on multiple neurobiological indices such as quantitative psychological assessments, electroencephalogram (EEG) power spectrum pattern, salivary cortisol and plasma brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) levels. A control group without treatment (n = 12) and aromatherapy massage group (n = 13) were randomly recruited. They were all females whose children were diagnosed as attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and followed up in the Department of Psychiatry, Jeju National University Hospital. Participants were treated with aromatherapy massage for 40 min twice per week for 4 weeks (8 interventions). A 4-week-aromatherapy massage program significantly improved all psychological assessment scores in the Stat-Trait Anxiety Index, Beck Depression Inventory and Short Form of Psychosocial Well-being Index. Interestingly, plasma BDNF levels were significantly increased after a 4 week-aromatherapy massage program. Alpha-brain wave activities were significantly enhanced and delta wave activities were markedly reduced following the one-time aromatherapy massage treatment, as shown in the meditation and neurofeedback training. In addition, salivary cortisol levels were significantly reduced following the one-time aromatherapy massage treatment. These results suggest that aromatherapy massage could exert significant influences on multiple neurobiological indices such as EEG pattern, salivary cortisol and plasma BDNF levels as well as psychological assessments. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  4. Effects of Aromatherapy Massage on Pregnant Women's Stress and Immune Function: A Longitudinal, Prospective, Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Pao-Ju; Chou, Cheng-Chen; Yang, Luke; Tsai, Yu-Lun; Chang, Yue-Cune; Liaw, Jen-Jiuan

    2017-10-01

    This study's aims are to examine the effects of aromatherapy massage on women's stress and immune function during pregnancy. This longitudinal, prospective, randomized controlled trial recruited 52 healthy pregnant women from a prenatal clinic in Taipei using convenience sampling. The participants were randomly assigned to the intervention (n = 24) or control (n = 28) group using Clinstat block randomization. The intervention group received 70 min of aromatherapy massage with 2% lavender essential oil every other week (10 times in total) for 20 weeks; the control group received only routine prenatal care. In both groups, participants' salivary cortisol and immunoglobulin A (IgA) levels were collected before and after the intervention group received aromatherapy massage (every month from 16 to 36 weeks gestation) and were analyzed using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The pregnant women in the intervention group had lower salivary cortisol (p aromatherapy massage than those in the control group, which did not receive massage treatment. Comparing the long-term effects of aromatherapy massage on salivary IgA levels between groups at different times, the study found that the pretest salivary IgA levels at 32 (p = 0.002) and 36 (p aromatherapy massage could significantly decrease stress and enhance immune function in pregnant women. The findings can guide clinicians or midwives in providing aromatherapy massage to women throughout the pregnancy.

  5. Comparing the effects of aromatherapy massage and inhalation aromatherapy on anxiety and pain in burn patients: A single-blind randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seyyed-Rasooli, Alehe; Salehi, Feridoon; Mohammadpoorasl, Asghar; Goljaryan, Sakineh; Seyyedi, Zahra; Thomson, Brian

    2016-12-01

    Anxiety and pain are recognized as major problems of burn patients; because pharmaceutical treatments for controlling anxiety and pain symptoms lead to complications and an increase in health costs, nonpharmacological nursing interventions were considered for this group of patients. This led to the present study aimed at comparing the effect of aromatherapy massage with inhalation aromatherapy for anxiety and pain in burn patients. This single-blind clinical trial was carried out on 90 patients with burns aromatherapy massage, inhalation aromatherapy, and control group. The patients assigned to the aromatherapy massage group received a massage for half an hour using a blend of lavender and almond oils, while a blend of rose and lavender aroma was used for the inhalation aromatherapy group. Spielberger State Anxiety Inventory was used for measuring anxiety and the visual analog scale (VAS) scale was used for measuring pain. The results showed that three groups were equal in terms of demographics, disease characteristics, and scores of anxiety and pain at the baseline. The mean decreases of anxiety scores were -0.04±5.08, 6.33±12.55, and 6.43±10.60 in the control group, aromatherapy massage group, and inhalation group, respectively (p=0.007). The mean decrease of pain scores were -0.10±0.96, 1.70±1.84, and 0.97±1.56 in the control group, aromatherapy massage group, and inhalation group, respectively (paromatherapy massage and inhalation aromatherapy compared with the control group in reducing both anxiety and pain of burn patients. Therefore, both interventions, which are inexpensive, and noninvasive nursing tasks can be proposed for alleviating anxiety and pain of burn patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  6. EFFECT OF MASSAGE AND AROMATHERAPY ON STRESS AND PROLACTIN LEVEL AMONG PRIMIPAROUS PUERPERAL MOTHERS IN SEMARANG, CENTRAL JAVA, INDONESIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melyana Nurul Widyawati

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Exclusive breastfeeding in Semarang during the past five years remains low. Only 20 to 64% of mothers were breastfed exclusively in 2010-2012. The incidence of postpartum blues was reported by 29.9% mothers, and mostly (56.6% was primiparous. Objective: This study aims to determine the effect of Loving Massage, aromatherapy, and a combination of Loving Massage and aromatherapy on stress levels, and changes in levels of prolactin in primiparous puerperal in Semarang. Method: A true experimental study with a randomized pretest-posttest control group design. Cluster random sampling was used to select 12 health centers from the 37 health centers in Semarang. A random assignment with a sealed envelope was performed to divide study participants into four groups; loving massage group, aromatherapy group, and a combination group of loving massage and aromatherapy, and a control group. A total of 52 primiparous puerperal mothers was involved, with 13 mothers were distributed equally in each group. Results: Loving Massage, aromatherapy, and a combination of Loving Massage and aromatherapy effectively changed mother’s stress and prolactin levels. Effectiveness of each treatment assessed from the average difference in scores before and after treatment. Combination of Loving Massage and aromatherapy had proven as the most effective treatment in reducing stress levels (11.61 ± 6.76, and increasing prolactin level (83.13 ± 6.41 ng/ml. Conclusions: Loving Massage & Aromatherapy shown to lower the levels of stress, and can increase the levels prolactin in postpartum primiparous. Therefore, it is recommended to provide Loving Massage therapy and aromatherapy to postpartum primiparous mothers.

  7. Is reflexology as effective as aromatherapy massage for symptom relief in an adult outpatient oncology population?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyer, Jeannie; Thomas, Karen; Sandsund, Cathy; Shaw, Clare

    2013-08-01

    To test whether reflexology was inferior to aromatherapy massage for ameliorating self-selected problems or concerns. Non-blinded, randomised study with a 1:1 allocation. Adult outpatients recruited from a UK cancer centre, randomised by the minimisation method to either four aromatherapy massage or four reflexology sessions. MYCaW scores at baseline and completion; VAS (relaxation) pre and post-sessions. Unpaired t-test for the primary outcome; analysis of variance tests for repeated measures for VAS (relaxation); descriptive statistics (means and 95% confidence intervals) and content analysis for patient comments. 115 subjects (58 aromatherapy massage, 57 reflexology) recruited. Reflexology was found to be no less effective than aromatherapy massage for MYCaW first concerns (p = 0.046). There was no statistical difference between groups for MYCaW second concerns or overall well-being scores, proportions of patients gaining clinical benefit, VAS scores over time (p = 0.489) or between groups (p = 0.408) or in the written responses. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Aromatherapy Massage Affects Menopausal Symptoms in Korean Climacteric Women: A Pilot-Controlled Clinical Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myung-Haeng Hur

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the effects of aromatherapy massage on menopausal symptoms in Korean climacteric women. Kupperman's menopausal index was used to compare an experimental group of 25 climacteric women with a wait-listed control group of 27 climacteric women. Aromatherapy was applied topically to subjects in the experimental group in the form of massage on the abdomen, back and arms using lavender, rose geranium, rose and jasmine in almond and primrose oils once a week for 8 weeks (eight times in total. The experimental group reported a significantly lower total menopausal index than wait-listed controls (P < 0.05. There were also significant intergroup differences in subcategories such as vasomotor, melancholia, arthralgia and myalgia (all P < 0.05. These findings suggest that aromatherapy massage may be an effective treatment of menopausal symptoms such as hot flushes, depression and pain in climacteric women. However, it could not be verified whether the positive effects were from the aromatherapy, the massage or both. Further rigorous studies should be done with more objective measures.

  9. [Massage with aromatherapy: effectiveness on anxiety of users with personality disorders in psychiatric hospitalization].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domingos, Thiago da Silva; Braga, Eliana Mara

    2015-06-01

    To investigate the effectiveness of aromatherapy massage using the essential oils (0.5%) of Lavandula angustifolia and Pelargonium graveolens for anxiety reduction in patients with personality disorders during psychiatric hospitalization. Uncontrolled clinical trial with 50 subjects submitted to six massages with aromatherapy, performed on alternate days, on the cervical and the posterior thoracic regions. Vital data (heart and respiratory rate) were collected before and after each session and an anxiety scale (Trait Anxiety Inventory-State) was applied at the beginning and end of the intervention. The results were statistically analyzed with the chi square test and paired t test. There was a statistically significant decrease (p Aromatherapy has demonstrated effectiveness in anxiety relief, considering the decrease of heart and respiratory rates in patients diagnosed with personality disorders during psychiatric hospitalization.

  10. Massage with aromatherapy: effectiveness on anxiety of users with personality disorders in psychiatric hospitalization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thiago da Silva Domingos

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE To investigate the effectiveness of aromatherapy massage using the essential oils (0.5% of Lavandula angustifolia and Pelargonium graveolens for anxiety reduction in patients with personality disorders during psychiatric hospitalization. METHOD Uncontrolled clinical trial with 50 subjects submitted to six massages with aromatherapy, performed on alternate days, on the cervical and the posterior thoracic regions. Vital data (heart and respiratory rate were collected before and after each session and an anxiety scale (Trait Anxiety Inventory-State was applied at the beginning and end of the intervention. The results were statistically analyzed with the chi square test and paired t test. RESULTS There was a statistically significant decrease (p < 0.001 of the heart and respiratory mean rates after each intervention session, as well as in the inventory score. CONCLUSION Aromatherapy has demonstrated effectiveness in anxiety relief, considering the decrease of heart and respiratory rates in patients diagnosed with personality disorders during psychiatric hospitalization.

  11. Massage with aromatherapy: effectiveness on anxiety of users with personality disorders in psychiatric hospitalization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thiago da Silva Domingos

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE To investigate the effectiveness of aromatherapy massage using the essential oils (0.5% of Lavandula angustifolia and Pelargonium graveolens for anxiety reduction in patients with personality disorders during psychiatric hospitalization. METHOD Uncontrolled clinical trial with 50 subjects submitted to six massages with aromatherapy, performed on alternate days, on the cervical and the posterior thoracic regions. Vital data (heart and respiratory rate were collected before and after each session and an anxiety scale (Trait Anxiety Inventory-State was applied at the beginning and end of the intervention. The results were statistically analyzed with the chi square test and paired t test. RESULTS There was a statistically significant decrease (p < 0.001 of the heart and respiratory mean rates after each intervention session, as well as in the inventory score. CONCLUSION Aromatherapy has demonstrated effectiveness in anxiety relief, considering the decrease of heart and respiratory rates in patients diagnosed with personality disorders during psychiatric hospitalization.

  12. A literature review evaluating the role of Swedish massage and aromatherapy massage to alleviate the anxiety of oncology patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benney, Stuart; Gibbs, Vivien

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Research into the anxiety relief of oncology patients resulting from Swedish massage and aromatherapy massage techniques has often been underfunded, resulting in small cohorts and sometimes poor methodology of the studies undertaken. A review of the literature was undertaken to investigate results of research that has been performed in this area, in order to provide evidence for practice. Only one systematic review has been carried out specifically addressing anxiety relief in oncology using aromatherapy massage, which is now outdated, and it was perceived that a gap in the body of knowledge exists. Methodology: Articles were retrieved from four appropriate databases using combinations of terms, such as: anxiety, radiotherapy and aromatherapy. A hand search was also carried out of grey literature. Retrieved articles were sorted by inclusion criteria and then scrutinised. A critique framework was devised drawing on the concepts of appropriate critiques used in literature. Results: Intervention deliveries varied across trials according to the authors' treatment philosophies, and whether the therapists were allowed autonomy in the treatment process. Some trials were of poor quality thereby reducing the validity of the evidence. Cohorts were often smaller than desirable, however, of greatest concern was poor trial designs and methodologies used in some trials, leading to potential bias, lack of validity and misleading results. Overall, the results of the review demonstrated immediate anxiety relief associated with both treatments. Evidence for intermediate relief is compelling but less conclusive. Conclusion: The immediate effects of massage treatments lends itself for use with oncology patients experiencing heightened anxiety, caused by concern over impending procedures. Protocols for a course of treatments should be devised to ensure continued symptom relief. Further research is needed to better establish the efficacy of massage therapies and to reach a

  13. The effect of self-aromatherapy massage of the abdomen on the primary dysmenorrhoea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadeghi Aval Shahr, H; Saadat, M; Kheirkhah, M; Saadat, E

    2015-05-01

    Primary dysmenorrhoea (PD) is the most common gynaecological complaint that occurs in women. This study was a randomised controlled trial. The subjects were 75 students whose severity of pain was measured by visual analogue scale (VAS). Subjects were randomly divided into three groups: massage group with rose oil (n = 25) who applied self-massage with Rose damascene; a placebo group (n = 25) who performed self-massage with unscented almond oil and a no treatment control group (n = 25) who applied just self-massage. All three groups received the intervention in the first day of menstruation in two subsequent cycles. The severity of pain was self-reported by the students before and after intervention. All three groups were matched in demographic characteristics. The baseline pain reduced in the first cycle but this reduction was not significant in the groups (p > 0.05). In the second cycle, the menstrual pain was significantly lower in the rose oil group than in the other two groups after intervention (between massage with rose oil, almond oil p = 0.003 and massage with rose oil and just massage p = 0.000). Massage with aromatherapy reduces the severity of primary dysmenorrhoea, in comparison with massage therapy alone.

  14. The Effects of Aromatherapy Massage and Reflexology on Pain and Fatigue in Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gok Metin, Zehra; Ozdemir, Leyla

    2016-04-01

    Nonpharmacologic interventions for symptom management in patients with rheumatoid arthritis are underinvestigated. Limited data suggest that aromatherapy massage and reflexology may help to reduce pain and fatigue in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. The aim of this study was to examine and compare the effects of aromatherapy massage and reflexology on pain and fatigue in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. The study sample was randomly assigned to either an aromatherapy massage (n = 17), reflexology (n = 17) or the control group (n = 17). Aromatherapy massage was applied to both knees of subjects in the first intervention group for 30 minutes. Reflexology was administered to both feet of subjects in the second intervention group for 40 minutes during weekly home visits. Control group subjects received no intervention. Fifty-one subjects with rheumatoid arthritis were recruited from a university hospital rheumatology clinic in Turkey between July 2014 and January 2015 for this randomized controlled trial. Data were collected by personal information form, DAS28 index, Visual Analog Scale and Fatigue Severity Scale. Pain and fatigue scores were measured at baseline and within an hour after each intervention for 6 weeks. Pain and fatigue scores significantly decreased in the aromatherapy massage and reflexology groups compared with the control group (p aromatherapy massage (week 1 vs week 2 for pain, week 1 vs week 4 for fatigue) (p Aromatherapy massage and reflexology are simple and effective nonpharmacologic nursing interventions that can be used to help manage pain and fatigue in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Pain Management Nursing. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Aromatherapy hand massage for older adults with chronic pain living in long-term care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cino, Kathleen

    2014-12-01

    Older adults living in long-term care experience high rates of chronic pain. Concerns with pharmacologic management have spurred alternative approaches. The purpose of this study was to examine a nursing intervention for older adults with chronic pain. This prospective, randomized control trial compared the effect of aromatherapy M technique hand massage, M technique without aromatherapy, and nurse presence on chronic pain. Chronic pain was measured with the Geriatric Multidimensional Pain and Illness Inventory factors, pain and suffering, life interference, and emotional distress and the Iowa Pain Thermometer, a pain intensity scale. Three groups of 39 to 40 participants recruited from seven long-term care facilities participated twice weekly for 4 weeks. Analysis included multivariate analysis of variance and analysis of variance. Participants experienced decreased levels of chronic pain intensity. Group membership had a significant effect on the Geriatric Multidimensional Pain Inventory Pain and Suffering scores; Iowa Pain Thermometer scores differed significantly within groups. M technique hand massage with or without aromatherapy significantly decreased chronic pain intensity compared to nurse presence visits. M technique hand massage is a safe, simple, but effective intervention. Caregivers using it could improve chronic pain management in this population. © The Author(s) 2014.

  16. Effectiveness of Aromatherapy Massage and Inhalation on Symptoms of Depression in Chinese Community-Dwelling Older Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Mei; Li, Yanzhang; Tang, Ping; Zhang, Yuping; Cao, Min; Ni, Junwei; Xing, Mengmeng

    2018-03-22

    Geriatric depression is a major public health problem in China. The study compared the intervention and follow-up effects of aromatherapy massage and inhalation on symptoms of depression in community-dwelling older adults after an 8-week intervention. A prospective, randomized controlled trial was conducted on community-dwelling adults ≥60 years old, with symptoms of depression. Participants were randomly assigned, by Latin Square, to aromatherapy massage, inhalation, or control groups (each n = 20). The aromatherapy massage group received 30 min of aromatherapy massage with 5 mL oil, twice weekly for 8 weeks. The oil contained 50 μL (one drop) of compound essential oils (lavender [Lavandula angustifolia], sweet orange [Citrus sinensis], and bergamot (Citrus bergamia in a 2:1:1 ratio)], diluted in sweet almond oil to a concentration of 1%. The aromatherapy inhalation group received 30 min of nasal inhalation of 50 μL of the compound essential oils blended in 10 mL of purified water, twice weekly for 8 weeks. The control group received no intervention. The Geriatric Depression Scale Short Form (GDS-SF) and Patient Health Questionnaire-9 (PHQ-9) were used for assessment at pretest, posttest, and 6- and 10-week follow-ups in all groups. 5-Hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) concentration was assessed pretest and posttest. Postintervention, the aromatherapy massage and inhalation groups demonstrated significantly lower GDS-SF and PHQ-9 scores than control participants. Compared with the pretest, the GDS-SF and PHQ-9 scores for depressive symptoms in both experimental groups remained lower at posttest (8 weeks), 6-week (14 weeks), and 10-week (18 weeks) follow-ups. However, the GDS-SF and PHQ-9 scores did not differ among the four time points in the control group. The posttest 5-HT concentrations in the aromatherapy massage and inhalation groups were increased over pretest values. Both aromatherapy massage and aromatherapy inhalation may have important

  17. The Clinical Effects of Aromatherapy Massage on Reducing Pain for the Cancer Patients: Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ting-Hao Chen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Aromatherapy massage is an alternative treatment in reducing the pain of the cancer patients. This study was to investigate whether aromatherapy massage could improve the pain of the cancer patients. Methods. We searched PubMed and Cochrane Library for relevant randomized controlled trials without language limitations between 1 January 1990 and 31 July 2015 with a priori defined inclusion and exclusion criteria. The search terms included aromatherapy, essential oil, pain, ache, cancer, tumor, and carcinoma. There were 7 studies which met the selection criteria and 3 studies were eventually included among 63 eligible publications. Results. This meta-analysis included three randomized controlled trials with a total of 278 participants (135 participants in the massage with essential oil group and 143 participants in the control (usual care group. Compared with the control group, the massage with essential oil group had nonsignificant effect on reducing the pain (standardized mean difference = 0.01; 95% CI [-0.23,0.24]. Conclusion. Aromatherapy massage does not appear to reduce pain of the cancer patients. Further rigorous studies should be conducted with more objective measures.

  18. The feasibility of aromatherapy massage to reduce symptoms of Idiopathic Environmental Intolerance: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araki, Atsuko; Watanabe, Kazuhiko; Eitaki, Yoko; Kawai, Toshio; Kishi, Reiko

    2012-12-01

    Idiopathic Environmental Intolerance (IEI) is an acquired disorder with multiple recurrent symptoms, which is associated with diverse environmental factors that are tolerated by the majority of people. IEI is an illness of uncertain aetiology, making it difficult to treat using conventional medicine. Therefore, there is a need for novel therapies to control the symptoms of IEI. The objective of this study was to evaluate the feasibility and impact of aromatherapy massage for individuals with IEI. Non-blinded crossover trial. IEI patients who attended a clinic in Sapporo city were recruited, and sixteen patients were enrolled. Participants were clinically examined by an experienced medical doctor and met the criteria included in the working definition of IEI disorder. During the active period, participants received four one-hour aromatherapy massage sessions every two weeks. During the control period, the participants did not receive any massages. Scores on the IEI-scales trigger checklist, symptoms, life impact, and the State Anxiety Inventory were assessed before and after each period. Short-term mood enhancement was evaluated using the Profiles of Mood Status (POMS) before and after sessions. Due to period effects, evaluation of the results had to be restricted to the first period, and the result showed no effect of intervention. All six sub-scales of the POMS improved after each session (mean score differences: 4.89-1.33, PAromatherapy was well tolerated by subjects with IEI; however, aromatherapy, as applied in this study, did not suggest any specific effects on IEI condition. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. The effect of aromatherapy and massage administered in different ways to women with breast cancer on their symptoms and quality of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ovayolu, Ozlem; Seviğ, Umit; Ovayolu, Nimet; Sevinç, Alper

    2014-08-01

    The primary objective of this study was to assess the effect of aromatherapy and classic massage administered in various ways to breast cancer patients on their symptoms and quality of life. The sampling consisted of 280 patients. Quality of life and symptoms of the patients were evaluated once at baseline and then at week 6 and week 10 following the intervention. After intervention, the control group was observed to have lower total quality of life score and subdomain scores, whereas fragrance, massage and aromatherapy massage groups had higher scores, and the increase was more obvious particularly in the patients in the aromatherapy massage group. Similarly, whereas psychological and physical symptoms were experienced more intensely in the control group, the severity of all the symptoms experienced by the other patients decreased at week 6 and week 10 as compared with baseline especially in the group that was administered massage with aromatherapy. © 2013 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  20. A randomised controlled trial of the use of aromatherapy and hand massage to reduce disruptive behaviour in people with dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Chieh-Yu; Moyle, Wendy; Cooke, Marie

    2013-07-10

    Aromatherapy and hand massage therapies have been reported to have some benefit for people with dementia who display behavioural symptoms; however there are a number of limitations of reported studies. The aim is to investigate the effect of aromatherapy (3% lavender oil spray) with and without hand massage on disruptive behaviour in people with dementia living in long-term care. In a single blinded randomised controlled trial 67 people with a diagnosis of dementia and a history of disruptive behaviour, from three long-term care facilities were recruited and randomised using a random number table into three groups: (1) Combination (aromatherapy and hand massage) (n = 22), (2) Aromatherapy (n = 23), (3) Placebo control (water spray) (n = 22). The intervention was given twice daily for six weeks. Data on residents' behaviour (CMAI) and cognition (MMSE) were collected before, during and after the intervention. Despite a downward trend in behaviours displayed not one of the interventions significantly reduced disruptive behaviour. Further large-scale placebo controlled studies are required where antipsychotic medication is controlled and a comparison of the methods of application of aromatherapy are investigated. ACTRN12612000917831.

  1. The Effect of Aromatherapy Abdominal Massage on Alleviating Menstrual Pain in Nursing Students: A Prospective Randomized Cross-Over Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marzouk, Tyseer M. F.; El-Nemer, Amina M. R.; Baraka, Hany N.

    2013-01-01

    Dysmenorrhea is a common cause of sickness absenteeism from both classes and work. This study investigated the effect of aromatherapy massage on a group of nursing students who are suffering of primary dysmenorrhea. A randomized blind clinical trial of crossover design was used. In the first treatment phase, group 1 (n = 48) received aromatherapy abdominal massage once daily for seven days prior to menstruation using the essential oils (cinnamon, clove, rose, and lavender in a base of almond oil). Group 2 (n = 47) received the same intervention but with placebo oil (almond oil). In the second treatment phase, the two groups switched to alternate regimen. Level and duration of pain and the amount of menstrual bleeding were evaluated at the baseline and after each treatment phase. During both treatment phases, the level and duration of menstrual pain and the amount of menstrual bleeding were significantly lower in the aromatherapy group than in the placebo group. These results suggests that aromatherapy is effective in alleviating menstrual pain, its duration and excessive menstrual bleeding. Aromatherapy can be provided as a nonpharmacological pain relief measure and as a part of nursing care given to girls suffering of dysmenorrhea, or excessive menstrual bleeding. PMID:23662151

  2. The Effect of Aromatherapy Abdominal Massage on Alleviating Menstrual Pain in Nursing Students: A Prospective Randomized Cross-Over Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tyseer M. F. Marzouk

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Dysmenorrhea is a common cause of sickness absenteeism from both classes and work. This study investigated the effect of aromatherapy massage on a group of nursing students who are suffering of primary dysmenorrhea. A randomized blind clinical trial of crossover design was used. In the first treatment phase, group 1 ( received aromatherapy abdominal massage once daily for seven days prior to menstruation using the essential oils (cinnamon, clove, rose, and lavender in a base of almond oil. Group 2 ( received the same intervention but with placebo oil (almond oil. In the second treatment phase, the two groups switched to alternate regimen. Level and duration of pain and the amount of menstrual bleeding were evaluated at the baseline and after each treatment phase. During both treatment phases, the level and duration of menstrual pain and the amount of menstrual bleeding were significantly lower in the aromatherapy group than in the placebo group. These results suggests that aromatherapy is effective in alleviating menstrual pain, its duration and excessive menstrual bleeding. Aromatherapy can be provided as a nonpharmacological pain relief measure and as a part of nursing care given to girls suffering of dysmenorrhea, or excessive menstrual bleeding.

  3. Effectiveness of aromatherapy with light thai massage for cellular immunity improvement in colorectal cancer patients receiving chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khiewkhern, Santisith; Promthet, Supannee; Sukprasert, Aemkhea; Eunhpinitpong, Wichai; Bradshaw, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Patients with colorectal cancer are usually treated with chemotherapy, which reduces the number of blood cells, especially white blood cells, and consequently increases the risk of infections. Some research studies have reported that aromatherapy massage affects the immune system and improves immune function by, for example, increasing the numbers of natural killer cells and peripheral blood lymphocytes. However, there has been no report of any study which provided good evidence as to whether aromatherapy with Thai massage could improve the immune system in patients with colorectal cancer. The objectives of this study were to determine whether the use of aromatherapy with light Thai massage in patients with colorectal cancer, who have received chemotherapy, can result in improvement of the cellular immunity and reduce the severity of the common symptoms of side effects. Sixty-six patients with colorectal cancer in Phichit Hospital, Thailand, were enrolled in a single-blind, randomised-controlled trial. The intervention consisted of three massage sessions with ginger and coconut oil over a 1-week period. The control group received standard supportive care only. Assessments were conducted at pre-assessment and at the end of one week of massage or standard care. Changes from pre-assessment to the end of treatment were measured in terms of white blood cells, neutrophils, lymphocytes, CD4 and CD8 cells and the CD4/CD8 ratio and also the severity of self-rated symptom scores. The main finding was that after adjusting for pre-assessment values the mean lymphocyte count at the post-assessment was significantly higher (P=0.04) in the treatment group than in the controls. The size of this difference suggested that aromatherapy with Thai massage could boost lymphocyte numbers by 11%. The secondary outcomes were that at the post assessment the symptom severity scores for fatigue, presenting symptom, pain and stress were significantly lower in the massage group than in the

  4. Effects of aromatherapy massage on face-down posture-related pain after vitrectomy: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adachi, Naho; Munesada, Minako; Yamada, Noriko; Suzuki, Haruka; Futohashi, Ayano; Shigeeda, Takashi; Kato, Satoshi; Nishigaki, Masakazu

    2014-06-01

    Postoperative face-down posturing (FDP) is recommended to optimize the effects of intraocular gas tamponade after vitrectomy. However, patients undergoing FDP usually experience physical and psychological burdens. This 3-armed, randomized, single-center trial investigated the effects of aromatherapy on FDP-related physical pain. Sixty-three patients under FDP were randomly allocated to one of three treatment groups: aromatherapy massage with essential oil (AT), oil massage without essential oil (OT), and a control group. The AT and OT groups received 10 minutes of massage by ward nurses trained by an aromatherapist, while the control group received usual care. Outcomes were assessed as short-term (pre- to post-intervention) and long-term (first to third postoperative day) changes in physical pain in five body regions using face-scale. The AT and OT groups both revealed similar short-term pain reductions after intervention, compared with the control group. Regarding long-term effects, neither group experienced significant effects until the second day. Significantly more pain reduction compared with usual care occurred on the third day, mainly in the AT group, though there were few significant differences between the AT and OT groups. In conclusion, this study suggests that simple oil massage is an effective strategy for immediate pain reduction in patients undergoing FDP, while aromatherapy may have a long-term effect on pain reduction. Copyright © 2014 American Society for Pain Management Nursing. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. The Preliminary Effects of Massage and Inhalation Aromatherapy on Chemotherapy-Induced Acute Nausea and Vomiting: A Quasi-Randomized Controlled Pilot Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zorba, Pinar; Ozdemir, Leyla

    2017-04-20

    Despite pharmacological treatment, chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV) are observed in patients. This quasi-randomized controlled pilot study evaluated the feasibility and preliminary effects of massage and inhalation aromatherapies on chemotherapy-induced acute nausea/vomiting. Seventy-five patients with breast cancer were randomly grouped into 1 of 3 groups: massage (n = 25), inhalation (n = 25), and control (n = 25). The patients in the massage group received 20-minute aromatherapy foot massage, whereas those in the inhalation group received 3-minute inhalation aromatherapy before their second, third, and fourth chemotherapy cycles. The control group underwent only the routine treatment. A nausea, vomiting, and retching patient follow-up form was used to evaluate nausea severity by visual analog scale and frequency of vomiting and retching. The incidence of nausea and retching was significantly higher in the control group than in the other groups in the third and fourth chemotherapy cycles (P aromatherapy groups than in the control group. Nausea and retching incidence was reduced in the aromatherapy groups compared with that in the control group. Nonpharmacological approaches are recommended for managing CINV. Massage and inhalation aromatherapy seems promising regarding the management of CINV.

  6. Comparisons for Effectiveness of Aromatherapy and Acupressure Massage on Quality of Life in Career Women: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kao, Yu-Hsiu; Huang, Yi-Ching; Chung, Ue-Lin; Hsu, Wen-Ni; Tang, Yi-Ting; Liao, Yi-Hung

    2017-06-01

    This study was aimed to compare the effectiveness of aromatherapy and acupressure massage intervention strategies on the sleep quality and quality of life (QOL) in career women. The randomized controlled trial experimental design was used in the present study. One hundred and thirty-two career women (24-55 years) voluntarily participated in this study and they were randomly assigned to (1) placebo (distilled water), (2) lavender essential oil (Lavandula angustifolia), (3) blended essential oil (1:1:1 ratio of L. angustifolia, Salvia sclarea, and Origanum majorana), and (4) acupressure massage groups for a 4-week treatment. The Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index and Short Form 36 Health Survey were used to evaluate the intervention effects at pre- and postintervention. After a 4-week treatment, all experimental groups (blended essential oil, lavender essential oil, and acupressure massage) showed significant improvements in sleep quality and QOL (p aromatherapy and acupressure massage improve the sleep and QOL and may serve as the optimal means for career women to improve their sleep and QOL.

  7. EFFECTS OF AROMATHERAPY MASSAGE ON THE SLEEP QUALITY AND PHYSIOLOGICAL PARAMETERS OF PATIENTS IN A SURGICAL INTENSIVE CARE UNIT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özlü, Zeynep Karaman; Bilican, Pınar

    2017-01-01

    Surgical pain is experienced by inpatients with clinical, disease-related concerns, unknown encounters after surgery, quality of sleep, restrictions in position after surgery is known to be serious. The study was conducted to determine the effect of aromatherapy massage on quality of sleep and physiological parameters in surgical intensive care patients. This is an experimental study. The sample of this study consisted of 60 patients who were divided into two groups as experimental group and control group including 30 patients in each one. The participants were postoperative patients, absent complications, who were unconscious and extubated. A data collection form on personal characteristics of the patients, a registration form on their physical parameters and the Richards-Campbell Sleep Scale (RCSQ) were used to collect the data of the study. The Richards-Campbell Sleep Scale indicated that while the experimental group had a mean score of 53.80 ± 13.20, the control group had a mean score of 29.08 ± 9.71 and there was a statistically significant difference between mean scores of the groups. In a comparison of physiologic parameters, only diastolic blood pressure measuring between parameters in favor of an assembly as a statistically significant difference was detected. Results of the study showed that aromatherapy massage enhanced the sleep quality of patients in a surgical intensive care unit and resulted in some positive changes in their physiological parameters.

  8. Effect of aromatherapy massage with lavender essential oil on pain in patients with osteoarthritis of the knee: A randomized controlled clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasiri, Ahmad; Mahmodi, Mohammad Azim; Nobakht, Zohre

    2016-11-01

    Osteoarthritis of the knee is the most common chronic joint disease that involves middle aged and elderly people. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of aromatherapy massage with lavender essential oil on pain in patients with osteoarthritis of the knee. In this single-blinded, randomized clinical trial, 90 patients with osteoarthritis of the knee who referred to the outpatient rheumatology clinics affiliated with Birjand University of Medical Sciences were selected through convenience sampling method. They were randomly assigned to three groups: intervention (aromatherapy massage with lavender essential oil), placebo (massage with almond oil) and control (without massage). The patients were evaluated at baseline, immediately after the intervention, 1 week, and 4 weeks after the intervention in terms of pain via visual analogue scale. The data were analyzed in SPSS (version 16) using the repeated measure ANOVA, one-way ANOVA, and chi-squared test. Pain severity of the patients in the intervention group was significantly different immediately and 1 week after the intervention compared with their initial status (p Aromatherapy massage with lavender essential oil was found effective in relieving pain in patients with knee osteoarthritis. However, further studies are needed to confirm findings of this study. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Aromatherapy and Essential Oils (PDQ®)—Health Professional Version

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aromatherapy with the use of essential oils has been studied in cancer patients to help with symptom relief. Read about how aromatherapy massage or inhalation of essential oils have reduced symptoms in cancer patients in this expert-reviewed summary.

  10. Aromatherapy: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooke, B; Ernst, E

    2000-01-01

    Aromatherapy is becoming increasingly popular; however there are few clear indications for its use. To systematically review the literature on aromatherapy in order to discover whether any clinical indication may be recommended for its use, computerised literature searches were performed to retrieve all randomised controlled trials of aromatherapy from the following databases: MEDLINE, EMBASE, British Nursing Index, CISCOM, and AMED. The methodological quality of the trials was assessed using the Jadad score. All trials were evaluated independently by both authors and data were extracted in a pre-defined, standardised fashion. Twelve trials were located: six of them had no independent replication; six related to the relaxing effects of aromatherapy combined with massage. These studies suggest that aromatherapy massage has a mild, transient anxiolytic effect. Based on a critical assessment of the six studies relating to relaxation, the effects of aromatherapy are probably not strong enough for it to be considered for the treatment of anxiety. The hypothesis that it is effective for any other indication is not supported by the findings of rigorous clinical trials. PMID:10962794

  11. The Effectiveness of Aromatherapy for Depressive Symptoms: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngai, Shirley Pui-Ching; He, Wanjia; Chow, Jason Ka-Wing; Tsang, Hector Wing-Hong

    2017-01-01

    Background. Depression is one of the greatest health concerns affecting 350 million people globally. Aromatherapy is a popular CAM intervention chosen by people with depression. Due to the growing popularity of aromatherapy for alleviating depressive symptoms, in-depth evaluation of the evidence-based clinical efficacy of aromatherapy is urgently needed. Purpose. This systematic review aims to provide an analysis of the clinical evidence on the efficacy of aromatherapy for depressive symptoms on any type of patients. Methods. A systematic database search was carried out using predefined search terms in 5 databases: AMED, CINHAL, CCRCT, MEDLINE, and PsycINFO. Outcome measures included scales measuring depressive symptoms levels. Results. Twelve randomized controlled trials were included and two administration methods for the aromatherapy intervention including inhaled aromatherapy (5 studies) and massage aromatherapy (7 studies) were identified. Seven studies showed improvement in depressive symptoms. Limitations. The quality of half of the studies included is low, and the administration protocols among the studies varied considerably. Different assessment tools were also employed among the studies. Conclusions. Aromatherapy showed potential to be used as an effective therapeutic option for the relief of depressive symptoms in a wide variety of subjects. Particularly, aromatherapy massage showed to have more beneficial effects than inhalation aromatherapy. PMID:28133489

  12. Aromatherapy for deaf and deafblind people living in residential accommodation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, F; Heidingsfeld, V

    2000-11-01

    This article looks at ways in which aromatherapy and therapeutic massage have been found to be beneficial for a group of deaf and deafblind adults with special needs, living in residential accommodation. Our basic aim is to promote confidence and communication as well as enhancing a sense of well-being through the judicial use of aromatic plant materials and therapeutic massage. Aromatherapy sessions have become an accepted enjoyable and therapeutic part of the residents' lifestyle. It is our belief that this gentle, non-invasive therapy can benefit deaf and deafblind people, especially as their intact senses can be heightened. This paper explores both professional and caring issues related to the use of aromatherapy in this environment.

  13. The effects of aromatherapy on sleep improvement: a systematic literature review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Eunhee; Shin, Sujin

    2015-02-01

    To evaluate the existing data on aromatherapy interventions for improvement of sleep quality. Systematic literature review and meta-analysis on the effects of aromatherapy. Study Sources: Electronic databases, including the Korea Education and Research Information Service (KERIS), Korean studies Information Service System (KISS), National Assembly Library, and eight academies within the Korean Society of Nursing Science, were searched to identify studies published between 2000 and August 2013. Randomized controlled and quasi-experimental trials that included aromatherapy for the improvement of sleep quality. Of the 245 publications identified, 13 studies met the inclusion and exclusion criteria, and 12 studies were used in the meta-analysis. Meta-analysis of the 12 studies using a random-effects model revealed that the use of aromatherapy was effective in improving sleep quality (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.540-1.745; Z=3.716). Subgroup analysis revealed that inhalation aromatherapy (95% CI, 0.792-1.541; Z=6.107) was more effective than massage therapy (95% CI, 0.128-2.166; Z=2.205) in unhealthy (95% CI, 0.248-1.100; Z=3.100) and healthy (95% CI, 0.393-5.104; Z=2.287) participants, respectively. Readily available aromatherapy treatments appear to be effective and promote sleep. Thus, it is essential to develop specific guidelines for the efficient use of aromatherapy.

  14. Aromatherapy in midwifery practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Einion, Alys

    2016-05-01

    Aromatherapy is a complementary therapy that uses essential oils of plants to achieve therapeutic effects. Midwives can offer complementary therapies to women if they have been trained in their use and follow the required professional frameworks for regulation, permissions, monitoring and insurance. This article explores the use of aromatherapy to ease a common condition of pregnancy: that of lower back pain. This may be due to the lordosis of pregnancy, caused by the hormone relaxin--which increases in pregnancy and causes greater flexibility of joints and connective tissue--and by changes in body mass and centre of gravity; but it could also be caused by something else, such as strain or repeated movement. Any midwife offering aromatherapy should ensure that all other potential conditions and contraindications have been considered before commencing treatment, and would carry out a full assessment including taking adetailed history.

  15. Aromatherapy for dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forrester, Lene Thorgrimsen; Maayan, Nicola; Orrell, Martin; Spector, Aimee E; Buchan, Louise D; Soares-Weiser, Karla

    2014-02-25

    Complementary therapy has received great interest within the field of dementia treatment and the use of aromatherapy and essential oils is increasing. In a growing population where the majority of patients are treated by US Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved drugs, the efficacy of treatment is short term and accompanied by negative side effects. Utilisation of complimentary therapies in dementia care settings presents as one of few options that are attractive to practitioners and families as patients often have reduced insight and ability to verbally communicate adverse reactions. Amongst the most distressing features of dementia are the behavioural and psychological symptoms. Addressing this facet has received particular interest in aromatherapy trials, with a shift in focus from reducing cognitive dysfunction to the reduction of behavioural and psychological symptoms in dementia. To assess the efficacy of aromatherapy as an intervention for people with dementia. ALOIS, the Cochrane Dementia and Cognitive Improvement Group Specialized Register, was searched on 26 November 2012 and 20 January 2013 using the terms: aromatherapy, lemon, lavender, rose, aroma, alternative therapies, complementary therapies, essential oils. All relevant randomised controlled trials were considered. A minimum length of a trial and requirements for follow-up were not included, and participants in included studies had a diagnosis of dementia of any type and severity. The review considered all trials using fragrance from plants defined as aromatherapy as an intervention with people with dementia and all relevant outcomes were considered. Titles and abstracts extracted by the searches were screened for their eligibility for potential inclusion in the review. For Burns 2011, continuous outcomes were estimated as the mean difference between groups and its 95% confidence interval using a fixed-effect model. For Ballard 2002, analysis of co-variance was used for all outcomes, with the

  16. Effects of aromatherapy on agitation and related caregiver burden in patients with moderate to severe dementia: A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turten Kaymaz, Tugce; Ozdemir, Leyla

    We examined the effects of aromatherapy on agitation in patients with dementia and evaluated related caregiver burden. Patients and their caregivers from two hospitals in Turkey were selected and divided into an intervention group (n = 14) and a control group (n = 14). Patients were stratified according to their dementia phase and intake of antipsychotic medication. The intervention group received aromatherapy via massage and inhalation at home for 4 weeks. The control group received no intervention. Data were collected using the Neuropsychiatric Inventory (NPI), the Cohen-Mansfield Agitation Inventory (CMAI) and the Zarit Burden Interview (ZBI). At 2 and 4 weeks, the NPI scores were significantly lower in the intervention group (p aromatherapy, agitation, neuropsychiatric symptoms, and caregiver distress significantly reduced, and aromatherapy prevented caregiver burden increase. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Perineal massage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Duarte González

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Most women want to give birth without perineal tears, cuts or sutures, because these often cause back pain and discomfort and may have a negative impact on sexual functioning. It is suggested that perineal massage during the last month of pregnancy as a possible way of allowing the perineal tissue to expand more easily during birth. Perineal massage, which makes the woman or her partner (for only one or two times a week from 35 weeks reduces the likelihood of perineal trauma (mainly episiotomies and perineal pain during and after birth.The FAME (Federation of Associations for Midwives in Spain recognizes that perineal massage during pregnancy reduces perineal trauma (episiotomy and tears during childbirth.

  18. Aromatherapy Oils: Commodities, Materials, Essences

    OpenAIRE

    Barcan, Ruth

    2014-01-01

    This article examines the essential oils that are the central tools of aromatherapy and uses them as a case study for different approaches to material culture. It considers the conceptual and political implications of thinking of essential oils as, in turn, commodities, materials and essences. I argue that both cultural studies and aromatherapy have something to learn from each other. Classic materialist approaches might do well to focus more attention on the material properties and effects o...

  19. Aromatherapy for managing menopausal symptoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jiae; Lee, Hye Won; Lee, Ju Ah; Lim, Hyun-Ja; Lee, Myeong Soo

    2018-01-01

    Abstract Background: Aromatherapy is often used as a complementary therapy for women's health. This systematic review aims to evaluate the therapeutic effects of aromatherapy as a management for menopausal symptoms. Methods: Eleven electronic databases will be searched from inception to February 2018. Randomized controlled trials that evaluated any type of aromatherapy against any type of control in individuals with menopausal symptoms will be eligible. The methodological quality will be assessed using the Cochrane risk of bias tool. Two authors will independently assess each study for eligibility and risk of bias and to extract data. Results: This study will provide a high quality synthesis of current evidence of aromatherapy for menopausal symptoms measured with Menopause Rating Scale, the Kupperman Index, the Greene Climacteric Scale, or other validated questionnaires. Conclusions: The conclusion of our systematic review will provide evidence to judge whether aromatherapy is an effective intervention for patient with menopausal women. Ethics and dissemination: Ethical approval will not be required, given that this protocol is for a systematic review. The systematic review will be published in a peer-reviewed journal. The review will also be disseminated electronically and in print. Systematic review registration: PROSPERO CRD42017079191. PMID:29419673

  20. Aromatherapy Oils: Commodities, Materials, Essences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruth Barcan

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available This article examines the essential oils that are the central tools of aromatherapy and uses them as a case study for different approaches to material culture. It considers the conceptual and political implications of thinking of essential oils as, in turn, commodities, materials and essences. I argue that both cultural studies and aromatherapy have something to learn from each other. Classic materialist approaches might do well to focus more attention on the material properties and effects of things. Aromatherapy, on the other hand, could benefit from the enriched political understanding associated with classic materialist critique. New materialist strains of cultural studies may also find the vibrancy of matter that underpins many CAM/New Age practices worthy of examination.

  1. Aromatherapy as an adjuvant treatment in cancer care--a descriptive systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boehm, Katja; Büssing, Arndt; Ostermann, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Claims of benefits of aromatherapy for cancer patients include reduced anxiety levels and relief of emotional stress, pain, muscular tension and fatigue. The objective of this paper is to provide an updated descriptive, systematic review of evidence from pre-clinical and clinical trials assessing the benefits and safety of aromatherapy for cancer patients. Literature databases such as Medline (via Ovid), the Cochrane database of systematic reviews, Cochrane Central were searched from their inception until October 2010. Only studies on cancer cells or cancer patients were included. There is no long lasting effect of aromatherapy massage, while short term improvements were reported for general well being, anxiety and depression up to 8 weeks after treatment. The reviewed studies indicate short-term effects of aromatherapy on depression, anxiety and overall wellbeing. Specifically, some clinical trials found an increase in patient-identified symptom relief, psychological wellbeing and improved sleep. Furthermore, some found a short-term improvement (up to 2 weeks after treatment) in anxiety and depression scores and better pain control. Although essential oils have generally shown minimal adverse effects, potential risks include ingesting large amounts (intentional misuse); local skin irritation, especially with prolonged skin contact; allergic contact dermatitis; and phototoxicity from reaction to sunlight (some oils). Repeated topical administration of lavender and tea tree oil was associated with reversible prepubertal gynecomastia.

  2. [Aromatherapy - From Traditional and Scientific Evidence into Clinical Practice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steflitsch, Wolfgang

    2017-12-01

    Essential oils (EOs), also known as volatile oils, are concentrated natural plant products which contain volatile aroma compounds. Most EOs are derived by steam distillation, a tradition which can be traced back as many as 5000 years. They possess unique properties which result in various possibilities for application, also in modern medical contexts. Areas for medical aromatherapy include respiratory diseases, pain management or stress alleviation, amongst many others. Different modes of application exist: The rich ingredients can be absorbed by the body by anointment, gentle massage, inhalation, or oral intake of capsules. Also the risks of EO application in medical contexts should be considered, such as rare allergic reactions, overdosing, poor substance quality or overestimation of the effectiveness. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  3. Find a Massage Therapist

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Legal Notice Massage is Good Medicine Take advantage of the many health benefits of massage therapy. ... care community. Learn more Helpful info About FAQ Advertising Newsroom Refer a friend Contact us 500 Davis ...

  4. The uses of aromatherapy in women's health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tillett, Jackie; Ames, Diane

    2010-01-01

    Aromatherapy is the practice of therapeutic use of essential plant-based oils. Essential oils and aromatherapy have been used in the care of women for centuries. The published research has used small samples and often combines other complementary therapies with aromatherapy; however, the use of essential oils has not been shown to cause harm and is accepted by women. Aromatherapy mixtures are appropriate for use by nurses in labor and delivery settings. The article reviews the literature and discusses appropriate essential oil mixtures for use in women's health setting and labor and delivery.

  5. Essential oils and anxiolytic aromatherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setzer, William N

    2009-09-01

    A number of essential oils are currently in use as aromatherapy agents to relieve anxiety, stress, and depression. Popular anxiolytic oils include lavender (Lavandula angustifolia), rose (Rosa damascena), orange (Citrus sinensis), bergamot (Citrus aurantium), lemon (Citrus limon), sandalwood (Santalum album), clary sage (Salvia sclarea), Roman chamomile (Anthemis nobilis), and rose-scented geranium (Pelargonium spp.). This review discusses the chemical constituents and CNS effects of these aromatherapeutic essential oils, as well as recent studies on additional essential oils with anxiolytic activities.

  6. [Effects of Aromatherapy on Menopausal Symptoms, Perceived Stress and Depression in Middle-aged Women: A Systematic Review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Shinmi; Song, Ji Ah; Kim, Mi Eun; Hur, Myung Haeng

    2016-10-01

    This study was a systematic review to evaluate the effects of aromatherapy on menopausal symptoms, perceived stress and depression in middle aged-women. Eight databases were searched from their inception September 8, 2015. Two reviewers independently performed the selection of the studies, data abstraction and validations. The risk of bias was assessed using Cochrane criteria. For analysis of the data, a meta-analysis of the studies was performed. From the electronic databases, 73 articles were selected, and 19 removed due to duplication. After two reviewers read the abstracts of 54 studies, 34 studies were selected. Complete papers for 34 original articles were read and, 12 studies which met selection criteria were reviewed and the effects of aromatherapy on menopausal symptoms, stress and depression analyzed using meta-analysis with RevMan. In the 2 studies which included Randomized Controlled Trials testing of aromatherapy on menopausal symptoms and comparison of control and placebo groups were done. Aromatherapy massage was favorably effective in reducing the menopausal symptoms compared to the control group (n=118, MD=-6.33; 95% CI -11.51 to -1.15), and compared to the placebo group (n=117, MD=-4.14; 95% CI -7.63 to -0.64). Also aromatherapy was effective in reducing stress (n=72, SMD=-0.64; 95% CI -1.12 to -0.17) and depression (n=158, MD=-5.63; 95% CI -10.04 to -1.22). There is limited evidence suggesting that aromatherapy for middle-aged women may be effective in controlling menopausal symptoms, perceived stress and depression.

  7. Massage therapy research review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field, Tiffany

    2016-08-01

    In this review, massage therapy has been shown to have beneficial effects on varying conditions including prenatal depression, preterm infants, full-term infants, autism, skin conditions, pain syndromes including arthritis and fibromyalgia, hypertension, autoimmune conditions including asthma and multiple sclerosis, immune conditions including HIV and breast cancer and aging problems including Parkinson's and dementia. Although many of the studies have involved comparisons between massage therapy and standard treatment control groups, several have compared different forms of massage (e.g. Swedish versus Thai massage), and different active therapies such as massage versus exercise. Typically, the massage therapy groups have experienced more positive effects than the control or comparison groups. This may relate to the massage therapy providing more stimulation of pressure receptors, in turn enhancing vagal activity and reducing cortisol levels. Some of the researchers have assessed physical, physiological and biochemical effects, although most have relied exclusively on self-report measures. Despite these methodological problems and the dearth of research from the U.S., the massage therapy profession has grown significantly and massage therapy is increasingly practiced in traditional medical settings, highlighting the need for more rigorous research. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Stress Management: Massage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Healthy Lifestyle Stress management Massage can be a powerful tool to help you take charge of your health and well-being. See if ... article: http://www.mayoclinic.org/healthy-lifestyle/stress-management/in-depth/massage/art-20045743 . Mayo Clinic Footer ...

  9. Massage Therapy Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field, Tiffany; Diego, Miguel; Hernandez-Reif, Maria

    2007-01-01

    Massage therapy has been notably effective in preventing prematurity, enhancing growth of infants, increasing attentiveness, decreasing depression and aggression, alleviating motor problems, reducing pain, and enhancing immune function. This review covers massage therapy research from the last decade, as an update to the American Psychologist 1998…

  10. Comparing effects between music intervention and aromatherapy on anxiety of patients undergoing mechanical ventilation in the intensive care unit: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chiu-Hsiang; Lai, Chiung-Ling; Sung, Yi-Hui; Lai, Mei Yu; Lin, Chung-Ying; Lin, Long-Yau

    2017-07-01

    Using patient-reported outcomes and physiological indicators to test the effects of music intervention and aromatherapy on reducing anxiety for intensive care unit (ICU) patients undergoing mechanical ventilation. Patients with ICU admission duration >24 h were randomly assigned to a Music intervention group (n = 41), Aromatherapy group (n = 47), or Control group (rest only; n = 44). Each patient in the Music group listened to music; each patient in the Aromatherapy group received lavender essential oil massage on his/her back for 5 min; each patient in the Control group wore noise-canceling headphones. Anxiety was measured using the Chinese version of the Stage-Trait Anxiety Inventory (C-STAI) and the Visual Analogue Scale for Anxiety (VAS-A) at baseline, post-test, and 30-min follow-up. Heart rate, breathing rate, and blood pressure were measured every 10 min from baseline to the 30-min follow-up. The Music group had significantly better post-test VAS-A and C-STAI scores, and had lower heart rate and blood pressure than the Control group. The Aromatherapy group had significantly better VAS-A score and lower heart rate than the Control group. The 30-min follow-up showed that both Music and Aromatherapy groups had lower heart rate and blood pressure than the Control group. Music and aromatherapy interventions were both effective for ICU patients. The effects of music intervention were greater than that of aromatherapy; both interventions maintained the effects for at least 30 min.

  11. [Aromatherapy and nursing: historical and theoretical conception].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gnatta, Juliana Rizzo; Kurebayashi, Leonice Fumiko Sato; Turrini, Ruth Natalia Teresa; Silva, Maria Júlia Paes da

    2016-02-01

    Aromatherapy is a Practical or Complementary Health Therapy that uses volatile concentrates extracted from plants called essential oils, in order to improve physical, mental and emotional well-being. Aromatherapy has been practiced historically and worldwide by nurses and, as in Brazil is supported by the Federal Nursing Council, it is relevant to discuss this practice in the context of Nursing through Theories of Nursing. This study of theoretical reflection, exploratory and descriptive, aims to discuss the pharmacognosy of essential oils, the historical trajectory of Aromatherapy in Nursing and the conceptions to support Aromatherapy in light of eight Nursing Theorists (Florence Nightingale, Myra Levine, Hildegard Peplau, Martha Rogers, Callista Roy, Wanda Horta, Jean Watson and Katharine Kolcaba), contributing to its inclusion as a nursing care practice.

  12. Aromatherapy and nursing: historical and theoretical conception

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Rizzo Gnatta

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Aromatherapy is a Practical or Complementary Health Therapy that uses volatile concentrates extracted from plants called essential oils, in order to improve physical, mental and emotional well-being. Aromatherapy has been practiced historically and worldwide by nurses and, as in Brazil is supported by the Federal Nursing Council, it is relevant to discuss this practice in the context of Nursing through Theories of Nursing. This study of theoretical reflection, exploratory and descriptive, aims to discuss the pharmacognosy of essential oils, the historical trajectory of Aromatherapy in Nursing and the conceptions to support Aromatherapy in light of eight Nursing Theorists (Florence Nightingale, Myra Levine, Hildegard Peplau, Martha Rogers, Callista Roy, Wanda Horta, Jean Watson and Katharine Kolcaba, contributing to its inclusion as a nursing care practice.

  13. Aromatherapy and nursing: historical and theoretical conception

    OpenAIRE

    Gnatta, Juliana Rizzo; Kurebayashi, Leonice Fumiko Sato; Turrini, Ruth Natalia Teresa; Silva, Maria Júlia Paes da

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Aromatherapy is a Practical or Complementary Health Therapy that uses volatile concentrates extracted from plants called essential oils, in order to improve physical, mental and emotional well-being. Aromatherapy has been practiced historically and worldwide by nurses and, as in Brazil is supported by the Federal Nursing Council, it is relevant to discuss this practice in the context of Nursing through Theories of Nursing. This study of theoretical reflection, exploratory and descrip...

  14. The Effectiveness of Aromatherapy for Depressive Symptoms: A Systematic Review

    OpenAIRE

    Sánchez-Vidaña, Dalinda Isabel; Ngai, Shirley Pui-Ching; He, Wanjia; Chow, Jason Ka-Wing; Lau, Benson Wui-Man; Tsang, Hector Wing-Hong

    2017-01-01

    Background. Depression is one of the greatest health concerns affecting 350 million people globally. Aromatherapy is a popular CAM intervention chosen by people with depression. Due to the growing popularity of aromatherapy for alleviating depressive symptoms, in-depth evaluation of the evidence-based clinical efficacy of aromatherapy is urgently needed. Purpose. This systematic review aims to provide an analysis of the clinical evidence on the efficacy of aromatherapy for depressive symptoms...

  15. Massage Therapy Research Review

    OpenAIRE

    Field, Tiffany

    2014-01-01

    Moderate pressure massage has contributed to many positive effects including increased weight gain in preterm infants, reduced pain in different syndromes including fibromyalgia and rheumatoid arthritis, enhanced attentiveness, reduced depression and enhanced immune function (increased natural killer cells and natural killer cell activity). Surprisingly, these recent studies have not been reviewed, highlighting the need for the current review. When moderate and light pressure massage have bee...

  16. An elective course in aromatherapy science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esposito, Emily R; Bystrek, Mary V; Klein, JoAnn S

    2014-05-15

    To evaluate the impact of an innovative team-taught elective course on second-year (P2) students' knowledge and skills relating to the relationship between aromatherapy and pharmacy. An Aromatherapy Science elective course was offered to P2 students in an accelerated doctor of pharmacy (PharmD) degree program and was designed to provide an elective course experience while focusing on active-learning skills such as group work, student-led presentations, and in-class activities. Lectures were designed to reinforce core curricular threads from the basic sciences within the pharmaceutical sciences department while highlighting key aromatherapy principles. Course evaluations, grades, and student self-assessments were used to evaluate student fulfillment and knowledge gained. Students agreed this hands-on course integrated pharmaceutical science experiences, enriched their pharmacy education, and provided knowledge to enhance their confidence in describing essential oil uses, drug interactions, and key aromatherapy clinical implications. Students agreed this course prepared them to identify essential oil therapeutic uses and potential essential oil-drug interactions, and interpret literature. The introduction of aromatherapy principles to pharmacy students will prepare a new generation of healthcare professionals on the role of alternative medicines.

  17. Allergic Contact Dermatitis (type IV hypersensitivity and type I hypersensitivity following aromatherapy with ayurvedic oils (Dhanwantharam thailam, Eladi coconut oil presenting as generalized erythema and pruritus with flexural eczema

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chembolli Lakshmi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Herbal and Ayurvedic medications, believed to be "mild" and "natural" are usually sought as the first line of treatment before resorting to "stronger" allopathic medication. There are very few reports of adverse reactions to either topical and/or systemic Ayurvedic medications. Massage aromatherapy with ayurvedic oils plays an important role in alleviation of pain, but may cause allergic contact dermatitis. This is the second case report of allergic contact dermatitis to ayurvedic oil.

  18. The multisensory approach to birth and aromatherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutteridge, Kathryn

    2014-05-01

    The birth environment continues to be a subject of midwifery discourse within theory and practice. This article discusses the birth environment from the perspective of understanding the aromas and aromatherapy for the benefit of women and midwives The dynamic between the olfactory system and stimulation of normal birth processes proves to be fascinating. By examining other health models of care we can incorporate simple but powerful methods that can shape clinical outcomes. There is still more that midwives can do by using aromatherapy in the context of a multisensory approach to make birth environments synchronise with women's potential to birth in a positive way.

  19. Touch massage, a rewarding experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindgren, Lenita; Jacobsson, Maritha; Lämås, Kristina

    2014-12-01

    This study aims to describe and analyze healthy individuals' expressed experiences of touch massage (TM). Fifteen healthy participants received whole body touch massage during 60 minutes for two separate occasions. Interviews were analyzed by narrative analysis. Four identifiable storyline was found, Touch massage as an essential need, in this storyline the participants talked about a desire and need for human touch and TM. Another storyline was about, Touch massage as a pleasurable experience and the participants talked about the pleasure of having had TM. In the third storyline Touch massage as a dynamic experience, the informants talked about things that could modulate the experience of receiving TM. In the last storyline, Touch massage influences self-awareness, the participants described how TM affected some of their psychological and physical experiences. Experiences of touch massage was in general described as pleasant sensations and the different storylines could be seen in the light of rewarding experiences. © The Author(s) 2014.

  20. A brief review of current scientific evidence involving aromatherapy use for nausea and vomiting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lua, Pei Lin; Zakaria, Noor Salihah

    2012-06-01

    The objective of this study was to compile existing scientific evidence regarding the effects of essential oils (EOs) administered via inhalation for the alleviation of nausea and vomiting. CINAHL, PubMed, and EBSCO Host and Science Direct databases were searched for articles related to the use of EOs and/or aromatherapy for nausea and vomiting. Only articles using English as a language of publication were included. Eligible articles included all forms of evidence (nonexperimental, experimental, case report). Interventions were limited to the use of EOs by inhalation of their vapors to treat symptoms of nausea and vomiting in various conditions regardless of age group. Studies where the intervention did not utilize EOs or were concerned with only alcohol inhalation and trials that combined the use of aromatherapy with other treatments (massage, relaxations, or acupressure) were excluded. Five (5) articles met the inclusion criteria encompassing trials with 328 respondents. Their results suggest that the inhaled vapor of peppermint or ginger essential oils not only reduced the incidence and severity of nausea and vomiting but also decreased antiemetic requirements and consequently improved patient satisfaction. However, a definitive conclusion could not be drawn due to methodological flaws in the existing research articles and an acute lack of additional research in this area. The existing evidence is encouraging but yet not compelling. Hence, further well-designed large trials are needed before confirmation of EOs effectiveness in treating nausea and vomiting can be strongly substantiated.

  1. Infant Massage: Understand This Soothing Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Research suggests that infant massage can have various health benefits. For example, infant massage might: Encourage interaction between ... massage in a warm, quiet place — indoors or outdoors. Remove your jewelry. Sit comfortably on the floor ...

  2. EFFECTS OF AROMATHERAPY FOR SELF-CARE DURING PREGNANCY

    OpenAIRE

    Igarashi, Toshiko; Fujita, Mineko

    2010-01-01

    Stress reduction care is important for pregnant women to decrease obstetric complications and children's health problems after birth. We investigated the long-term effects during pregnancy of daily self-care with aromatherapy using essential oils containing linalyl acetate and linalool. We randomly assigned 16 healthy pregnant women into an aromatherapy group and a control group. Nine participants were assigned to the aromatherapy group and seven participants to the control group. Interventio...

  3. Aromatherapy as treatment for postoperative nausea: a randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Ronald; Dienemann, Jacqueline; Norton, H James; Hartley, Wendy; Hudgens, Amanda; Stern, Thomas; Divine, George

    2013-09-01

    Postoperative nausea (PON) is a common complication of anesthesia and surgery. Antiemetic medication for higher-risk patients may reduce but does not reliably prevent PON. We examined aromatherapy as a treatment for patients experiencing PON after ambulatory surgery. Our primary hypothesis was that in comparison with inhaling a placebo, PON will be reduced significantly by aromatherapy with (1) essential oil of ginger, (2) a blend of essential oils of ginger, spearmint, peppermint, and cardamom, or (3) isopropyl alcohol. Our secondary hypothesis was that the effectiveness of aromatherapy will depend upon the agent used. A randomized trial of aromatherapy with patients who reported nausea in the postanesthesia care unit was conducted at one ambulatory surgical center. Eligibility criteria were adult, able to give consent, and no history of coagulation problems or allergy to the aromatherapy agents. Before surgery, demographic and risk factors were collected. Patients with a nausea level of 1 to 3 on a verbal descriptive scale (0-3) received a gauze pad saturated with a randomly chosen aromatherapy agent and were told to inhale deeply 3 times; nausea (0-3) was then measured again in 5 minutes. Prophylactic and postnausea antiemetics were given as ordered by physicians or as requested by the patient. A total of 1151 subjects were screened for inclusion; 303 subjects reporting nausea were enrolled (26.3%), and 301 meeting protocol were analyzed (26.2%). The change in nausea level was significant for the blend (P aromatherapy was also significantly reduced with ginger or blend aromatherapy versus saline (P = 0.002 and P aromatherapy would be effective as a treatment for PON was supported. On the basis of our results, future research further evaluating aromatherapy is warranted. Aromatherapy is promising as an inexpensive, noninvasive treatment for PON that can be administered and controlled by patients as needed.

  4. Massage Therapy for Health Purposes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... C. Changes in clinical parameters in patients with tension-type headache following massage therapy: a pilot study . Journal of Manual & Manipulative Therapy . 2008; 16(2):106–112. Moraska A, Pollini RA, ... adjustments to stress measures following massage therapy: a review of the ...

  5. [Benefits of aromatherapy in dementia special care units].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilien, Corinne; Depas, Nathalie; Delaporte, Ghislaine; Baptiste, Nathalie

    2016-01-01

    Aromatherapy is classed as a non-pharmacological treatment, recognised as a therapy for certain disorders. This practice was the subject of a study in a special care unit for patients with dementia. The objective was to demonstrate the benefit of aromatherapy diffusion on major behavioural disorders. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. Massage Therapy in Iranian Traditional Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir-Mohammad Jaladat

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Massage training and how the body is influenced by massage are common issues which are seriously under study and discussion in Iranian traditional medicine. Iranian physicians considered motion and massage as major principles of health maintenance.In this study, we examined the available literature of traditional medicine to evaluate location, purpose and use of massage therapy in Iranian medicine in comparison with other popular conventional styles.The aim of Iranian massage is to regulate the core body temperature and aid to eliminate the waste products from the body. This type of massage is divided into five categories including solid, soft, moderate, great and aggressive, based on the intensity, speed, duration and techniques of massage.Iranian physicians proposed general body massage or massage of a particular area based on subjective complaints. They recommended specific massages in particular groups including children, pregnant women, the elderly and athletes. In some cases, the effects of these recommendations have been studied in clinical trials.Conclusion: It seems that the major difference between Iranian massage and other styles of massage is special attention of Iranian massage to the individual circumstances, and the cause of the problem rather than technique of the massage.

  7. Aromatherapy for health care: an overview of systematic reviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Myeong Soo; Choi, Jiae; Posadzki, Paul; Ernst, Edzard

    2012-03-01

    Aromatherapy is the therapeutic use of essential oil from herbs, flowers, and other plants. The aim of this overview was to provide an overview of systematic reviews evaluating the effectiveness of aromatherapy. We searched 12 electronic databases and our departmental files without restrictions of time or language. The methodological quality of all systematic reviews was evaluated independently by two authors. Of 201 potentially relevant publications, 10 met our inclusion criteria. Most of the systematic reviews were of poor methodological quality. The clinical subject areas were hypertension, depression, anxiety, pain relief, and dementia. For none of the conditions was the evidence convincing. Several SRs of aromatherapy have recently been published. Due to a number of caveats, the evidence is not sufficiently convincing that aromatherapy is an effective therapy for any condition. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. The Effect of Lavender Aromatherapy on the Pain Severity of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    investigated the effect of lavender aromatherapy on pain severity in primary dysmenorrhea. ... message of olfaction to limbic system and cause releasing ... using a formula sample size was estimated 200 people. The ..... Rational Phytotherapy:.

  9. Effect of aromatherapy on patients with Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jimbo, Daiki; Kimura, Yuki; Taniguchi, Miyako; Inoue, Masashi; Urakami, Katsuya

    2009-12-01

    Recently, the importance of non-pharmacological therapies for dementia has come to the fore. In the present study, we examined the curative effects of aromatherapy in dementia in 28 elderly people, 17 of whom had Alzheimer's disease (AD). After a control period of 28 days, aromatherapy was performed over the following 28 days, with a wash out period of another 28 days. Aromatherapy consisted of the use of rosemary and lemon essential oils in the morning, and lavender and orange in the evening. To determine the effects of aromatherapy, patients were evaluated using the Japanese version of the Gottfries, Brane, Steen scale (GBSS-J), Functional Assessment Staging of Alzheimer's disease (FAST), a revised version of Hasegawa's Dementia Scale (HDS-R), and the Touch Panel-type Dementia Assessment Scale (TDAS) four times: before the control period, after the control period, after aromatherapy, and after the washout period. All patients showed significant improvement in personal orientation related to cognitive function on both the GBSS-J and TDAS after therapy. In particular, patients with AD showed significant improvement in total TDAS scores. Result of routine laboratory tests showed no significant changes, suggesting that there were no side-effects associated with the use of aromatherapy. Results from Zarit's score showed no significant changes, suggesting that caregivers had no effect on the improved patient scores seen in the other tests. In conclusion, we found aromatherapy an efficacious non-pharmacological therapy for dementia. Aromatherapy may have some potential for improving cognitive function, especially in AD patients.

  10. The Effectiveness of Aromatherapy in Reducing Pain: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheafer, Heather; Tepper, Deborah

    2016-01-01

    Background. Aromatherapy refers to the medicinal or therapeutic use of essential oils absorbed through the skin or olfactory system. Recent literature has examined the effectiveness of aromatherapy in treating pain. Methods. 12 studies examining the use of aromatherapy for pain management were identified through an electronic database search. A meta-analysis was performed to determine the effects of aromatherapy on pain. Results. There is a significant positive effect of aromatherapy (compared to placebo or treatments as usual controls) in reducing pain reported on a visual analog scale (SMD = −1.18, 95% CI: −1.33, −1.03; p aromatherapy is more consistent for treating nociceptive (SMD = −1.57, 95% CI: −1.76, −1.39, p aromatherapy is most effective in treating postoperative pain (SMD = −1.79, 95% CI: −2.08, −1.51, p aromatherapy can successfully treat pain when combined with conventional treatments. PMID:28070420

  11. Bulimic Adolescents Benefit from Massage Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field, Tiffany; Schanberg, Saul; Kuhn, Cynthia; Field, Tory; Fierro, Karen; Henteleff, Tanja; Mueller, Cynthia; Yando, Regina; Shaw, Seana; Burman, Iris

    1998-01-01

    Female bulimic inpatients (N=24) were randomly assigned to massage therapy or standard treatment group. Massaged patients showed immediate reductions in anxiety and depression; additional improvements were noted by the last day of therapy. Massage therapy is shown to be effective as an adjunct treatment for bulimia. (Author/EMK)

  12. Integrating Research Competencies in Massage Therapy Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hymel, Glenn M.

    The massage therapy profession is currently engaged in a competency-based education movement that includes an emphasis on promoting massage therapy research competencies (MTRCs). A systems-based model for integrating MTRCs into massage therapy education was therefore proposed. The model and an accompanying checklist describe an approach to…

  13. A Descriptive Study of the Practice Patterns of Massage New Zealand Massage Therapists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Joanna M.; Sullivan, S. John; Baxter, G. David

    2011-01-01

    Background: Massage therapy has grown in popularity, yet little is known globally or in New Zealand about massage therapists and their practices. Purpose and Setting: The aims of this study were to describe the practice patterns of trained Massage New Zealand massage therapists in New Zealand private practice, with regard to therapist characteristics; practice modes and settings, and therapy characteristics; referral patterns; and massage therapy as an occupation. Research Design and Participants: A survey questionnaire was mailed to 66 trained massage therapist members of Massage New Zealand who were recruiting massage clients for a concurrent study of massage therapy culture. Results: Most massage therapists were women (83%), NZ European (76%), and holders of a massage diploma qualification (89%). Massage therapy was both a full- (58%) and part-time (42%) occupation, with the practice of massage therapy being the only source of employment for 70% of therapists. Nearly all therapists (94%) practiced massage for more than 40 weeks in the year, providing a median of 16 – 20 hours of direct client care per week. Most massage therapists worked in a “solo practice” (58%) and used a wide and active referral network. Almost all therapists treated musculoskeletal symptoms: the most common client issues or conditions treated were back pain/problem (99%), neck/shoulder pain/problem (99%), headache or migraine (99%), relaxation and stress reduction (96%), and regular recovery or maintenance massage (89%). The most frequent client fee per treatment was NZ$60 per hour in a clinic and NZ$1 per minute at a sports event or in the workplace. Therapeutic massage, relaxation massage, sports massage, and trigger-point therapy were the most common styles of massage therapy offered. Nearly all massage therapists (99%) undertook client assessment; 95% typically provided self-care recommendations; and 32% combined other complementary and alternative medicine therapies with their

  14. A descriptive study of the practice patterns of massage new zealand massage therapists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Joanna M; Sullivan, S John; Baxter, G David

    2011-03-30

    Massage therapy has grown in popularity, yet little is known globally or in New Zealand about massage therapists and their practices. The aims of this study were to describe the practice patterns of trained Massage New Zealand massage therapists in New Zealand private practice, with regard to therapist characteristics; practice modes and settings, and therapy characteristics; referral patterns; and massage therapy as an occupation. A survey questionnaire was mailed to 66 trained massage therapist members of Massage New Zealand who were recruiting massage clients for a concurrent study of massage therapy culture. Most massage therapists were women (83%), NZ European (76%), and holders of a massage diploma qualification (89%). Massage therapy was both a full- (58%) and part-time (42%) occupation, with the practice of massage therapy being the only source of employment for 70% of therapists. Nearly all therapists (94%) practiced massage for more than 40 weeks in the year, providing a median of 16 - 20 hours of direct client care per week. Most massage therapists worked in a "solo practice" (58%) and used a wide and active referral network. Almost all therapists treated musculoskeletal symptoms: the most common client issues or conditions treated were back pain/problem (99%), neck/shoulder pain/problem (99%), headache or migraine (99%), relaxation and stress reduction (96%), and regular recovery or maintenance massage (89%). The most frequent client fee per treatment was NZ$60 per hour in a clinic and NZ$1 per minute at a sports event or in the workplace. Therapeutic massage, relaxation massage, sports massage, and trigger-point therapy were the most common styles of massage therapy offered. Nearly all massage therapists (99%) undertook client assessment; 95% typically provided self-care recommendations; and 32% combined other complementary and alternative medicine therapies with their massage consultations. This study provides new information about the practice of

  15. Aromatherapy for pain management in labour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Caroline A; Collins, Carmel T; Crowther, Caroline A

    2011-07-06

    Many women would like to avoid pharmacological or invasive methods of pain management in labour and this may contribute towards the popularity of complementary methods of pain management. This review examined currently available evidence supporting the use of aromatherapy for pain management in labour. To examine the effects of aromatherapy for pain management in labour on maternal and perinatal morbidity. We searched the Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group's Trials Register (31 October 2010), The Cochrane Complementary Medicine Field's Trials Register (October 2010), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (The Cochrane Library 2010, Issue 4), MEDLINE (1966 to 31 October 2010), CINAHL (1980 to 31 October 2010), the Australian and New Zealand Trials Registry (31 October 2010), Chinese Clinical Trial Register (31 October 2010), Current Controlled Trials (31 October 2010), ClinicalTrials.gov (31 October 2010), ISRCTN Register (31 October 2010), National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine (NCCAM) (31 October 2010) and the WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (31 October 2010). Randomised controlled trials comparing aromatherapy with placebo, no treatment or other non-pharmacological forms of pain management in labour. Two authors independently assessed trial quality and extracted data. We contacted study authors for additional information. We included two trials (535 women) in the review. The trials found no difference between groups for the primary outcomes of pain intensity, assisted vaginal birth (risk ratio (RR) 1.04, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.48 to 2.28, one trial, 513 women; RR 0.83, 95% CI 0.06 to 11.70, one trial, 22 women), and caesarean section (RR 0.98, 95% CI 0.49 to 1.94, one trial, 513 women; RR 2.54, 95% CI 0.11 to 56.25, one trial, 22 women); there were more babies admitted to neonatal intensive care in the control group of one trial (RR 0.08, 95% CI 0.00 to 1.42, one trial, 513 women) but this

  16. Aromatherapy for treatment of hypertension: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hur, Myung-Haeng; Lee, Myeong Soo; Kim, Chan; Ernst, Edzard

    2012-02-01

    The objective of this review is to systematically review the evidence for the effectiveness of aromatherapy in the treatment of high blood pressure. Twelve databases were searched from their inception through December 2009. Controlled trials testing aromatherapy in patients with hypertension of any origin that assessed blood pressure were considered. The selection of studies, data extraction and validations were performed independently by two reviewers. One randomized clinical trial (RCT) and four non-randomized controlled clinical trials (CCTs) met our inclusion criteria. The one RCT included tested the effects of aromatherapy as compared with placebo and showed significant reduction of systolic blood pressure and diastolic blood pressure. All of the four CCTs showed favourable effects of aromatherapy. However, all of the CCTs also had a high risk of bias. The existing trial evidence does not show convincingly that aromatherapy is effective for hypertension. Future studies should be of high quality with a particular emphasis on designing an adequate control intervention. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  17. Biosignals Analysis for Kidney Function Effect Analysis of Fennel Aromatherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Bong-Hyun; Cho, Dong-Uk; Seo, Ssang-Hee

    2015-01-01

    Human effort in order to enjoy a healthy life is diverse. IT technology to these analyzes, the results of development efforts, it has been applied. Therefore, I use the care and maintenance diagnostic health management and prevention than treatment. In particular, the aromatherapy treatment easy to use without the side effects there is no irritation, are widely used in modern society. In this paper, we measured the aroma effect by applying a biosignal analysis techniques; an experiment was performed to analyze. In particular, we design methods and processes of research based on the theory aroma that affect renal function. Therefore, in this paper, measuring the biosignals and after fennel aromatherapy treatment prior to the enforcement of the mutual comparison, through the analysis, studies were carried out to analyze the effect of fennel aromatherapy therapy on kidney function. PMID:25977696

  18. Touch and Massage for Medically Fragile Infants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livingston, Karen; Beider, Shay; Kant, Alexis J.; Gallardo, Constance C.; Joseph, Michael H.

    2009-01-01

    Research investigating the efficacy of infant massage has largely focused on premature and low birth weight infants. The majority of investigations have neglected highly acute patients in academic neonatal intensive care units (NICUs). The current study was developed with two aims: (Phase 1) to develop, implement and demonstrate the feasibility and safety of a parent-trained compassionate touch/massage program for infants with complex medical conditions and (Phase 2) to conduct a longitudinal randomized control trial (RCT) of hand containment/massage versus standard of care in a level III academic Center for Newborn and Infant Critical Care (CNICC). Certified infant massage instructors (CIMIs) taught parents to massage their hospitalized infants. Massage therapy and instruction were performed for seven consecutive days and health outcomes were collected for up to 1 month following treatment. Caregivers, nurses and certified infant massage therapists indicated moderate to high levels of satisfaction and feasibility with the implementation of hand containment/massage in a level III academic center CNICC. In addition, infant behavioral and physiological measures were within safe limits during the massage sessions. All caregivers participating in the massage group reported high levels of satisfaction 7 days into the intervention and at the 1-month follow-up with regards to their relationship with their infant, the massage program's impact on that relationship and the massage program. Due to unequal and small sample sizes, between group analyses (control versus massage) were not conducted. Descriptive infant characteristics of health outcomes are described. Preliminary data from this study indicates feasibility and safety of infant massage and satisfaction among the caregivers, CIMIs and the nurses in the CNICC. An important contribution from this study was the demonstration of the infants’ safety based on physiological stability and no change in agitation/pain scores

  19. [Clinical trial of aromatherapy on postpartum mother's perineal healing].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hur, Myung Haeng; Han, Sun-Hee

    2004-02-01

    This study was designed to verify the effect of aromatherapy on a postpartum mother's perineal healing. The research design was a clinical trial. The methods of aromatherapy were applied sitz bath or soap application using essential oils with Lavender, Myrrh, Neroli, Rose, Grapefruit, Mandarin, Orange, and Roman Chamomile. The subjects of this experiment were postpartum mothers who delivered vaginally with an episiotomy. They were allocated to one of three groups; the aroma-sitz bath group, aroma-soap application group or control group. To evaluate the effect of aromatherapy, the perineal healing status was measured using the REEDA scale and smears of episiotomy wound were obtained. The data were analyzed by repeated measures of ANOVA, ANCOVA, chi2-test, and multiple response analysis via SPSS program. The REEDA scale was significantly low in the experimental group at postpartum 5th and 7th days (P=.009, P=.003), respectively. Most were observed 'few'(5-10 bacteria per field) bacteria in the smears of episiotomy wound. The one bacteria was identified in the 50.8% of subjects in pretest and two bacteria in the 60.3% in posttest. Most frequently identified bacteria were Escherichia coli and Enterococcus faecalis. In conclusion, these findings indicate that postpartum aromatherapy for perineal care could be effective in healing the perineum perineal care could be effective in healing the perineum.

  20. A bibliometric analysis of two decades of aromatherapy research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koo, Malcolm

    2017-01-18

    Quantitative data are lacking on the profile of published research in aromatherapy. The objective of the study was to investigate the profile of original and review articles under the topic aromatherapy using bibliometric analysis. Articles on aromatherapy, published between 1995 and 2014, were retrieved from the Science Citation Index-Expanded database from the Web of Science. The records extracted were analyzed for citation characteristics, including the distribution of publication years, languages, countries or regions, journals, articles, and authors using HistCite 12.03.17. VOSviewer v.1.61 was used to construct bibliometric diagrams. A total of 549 original and review articles, published in 287 different peer-reviewed journals by 1888 authors, were identified. There was a steady increase in the number of published articles from 1995 to 2014. The majority of the articles was written in English (95.8%) and the United States was the leading country in the total number of published articles (n = 107, 19.5%) Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine published the greatest number of articles on the topic (n = 31, 5.6%). The article that received the greatest number of citations was published in Complementary Therapies in Medicine. Visualization analysis based on co-occurrences of words in the title and abstract revealed three clusters of research topics, including essential oil, intervention, and complementary medicine. This study provided a systematic overview of productivity and visibility of research work in aromatherapy and the findings could be used for organizing and prioritizing future research efforts in aromatherapy research.

  1. Aggressive Adolescents Benefit from Massage Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diego, Miguel A.; Field, Tiffany; Hernandez-Reif, Maria; Shaw, Jon A.; Rothe, Eugenio M.; Castellanos, Daniel; Mesner, Linda

    2002-01-01

    Seventeen aggressive adolescents were assigned to a massage therapy group or a relaxation therapy group to receive 20-minute therapy sessions, twice a week for five weeks. The massaged adolescents had lower anxiety after the first and last sessions. By the end of the study, they also reported feeling less hostile and they were perceived by their…

  2. Comparison of massage based on the tensegrity principle and classic massage in treating chronic shoulder pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassolik, Krzysztof; Andrzejewski, Waldemar; Brzozowski, Marcin; Wilk, Iwona; Górecka-Midura, Lucyna; Ostrowska, Bożena; Krzyżanowski, Dominik; Kurpas, Donata

    2013-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the clinical outcomes of classic massage to massage based on the tensegrity principle for patients with chronic idiopathic shoulder pain. Thirty subjects with chronic shoulder pain symptoms were divided into 2 groups, 15 subjects received classic (Swedish) massage to tissues surrounding the glenohumeral joint and 15 subjects received the massage using techniques based on the tensegrity principle. The tensegrity principle is based on directing treatment to the painful area and the tissues (muscles, fascia, and ligaments) that structurally support the painful area, thus treating tissues that have direct and indirect influence on the motion segment. Both treatment groups received 10 sessions over 2 weeks, each session lasted 20 minutes. The McGill Pain Questionnaire and glenohumeral ranges of motion were measured immediately before the first massage session, on the day the therapy ended 2 weeks after therapy started, and 1 month after the last massage. Subjects receiving massage based on the tensegrity principle demonstrated statistically significance improvement in the passive and active ranges of flexion and abduction of the glenohumeral joint. Pain decreased in both massage groups. This study showed increases in passive and active ranges of motion for flexion and abduction in patients who had massage based on the tensegrity principle. For pain outcomes, both classic and tensegrity massage groups demonstrated improvement. Copyright © 2013 National University of Health Sciences. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Aromatherapy for treatment of postoperative nausea and vomiting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hines, Sonia; Steels, Elizabeth; Chang, Anne; Gibbons, Kristen

    2018-03-10

    Postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV) is a common, unpleasant phenomenon and current therapies are not always effective for all patients. Aromatherapy has been suggested as an addition to the available treatment strategies. This review was originally published in 2012 and updated in 2017. The main objective was to establish the efficacy and safety of aromatherapy comparable to standard pharmacological treatments for PONV in adults and children. We searched CENTRAL; MEDLINE; Embase; CINAHL; CAM on PubMed; Informit; LILACS; and ISI Web of Science as well as grey literature sources and the reference lists of retrieved articles up to March 2017. The original search was performed in August 2011. We included all randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and controlled clinical trials (CCTs) where aromatherapy was used to treat PONV. Interventions were all types of aromatherapy compared to placebo or with standard antiemetics. Primary outcomes were severity and duration of PONV. Secondary outcomes were adverse reactions, use of rescue antiemetics and patient satisfaction. Two review authors independently assessed risk of bias in the included studies and extracted data. For dichotomous outcome variables, we used a random-effects model and calculated risk ratio (RR) with associated 95% confidence interval (95% CI). For continuous outcome variables, we used a random-effects model and calculated standardized mean difference (SMD) with associated 95% CI. We used the GRADE software to compile 'Summary of findings' tables. We included seven new studies with 663 participants in the 2017 update; five RCTs and two CCTs. These were added to the nine previously included studies (six RCTs and three CCTs with a total of 373 participants) for a total of 16 included studies and 1036 participants in this updated review. The mean age and range data for all participants were not reported for all studies. We identified two registered trials that met the inclusion criteria for this review

  4. The self-prescribed use of aromatherapy oils by pregnant women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibbritt, David W; Catling, Christine J; Adams, Jon; Shaw, Andrea J; Homer, Caroline S E

    2014-03-01

    While some studies have reported effectiveness of aromatherapy oils use during labour there is no reported evidence of efficacy or risks of aromatherapy oils use for pregnancy-related symptoms or conditions. A number of aromatherapy oils are unsafe for use by pregnant women yet there is currently no research examining the prevalence and characteristics of women who use aromatherapy oils during pregnancy. To conduct an empirical study of the prevalence and characteristics of women who use aromatherapy oils during pregnancy. The research was conducted as part of the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health (ALSWH), focusing on the nationally representative sample of Australian women aged 31-36 years. Data were collected via a cross-sectional questionnaire (n=8200) conducted in 2009. Self-prescribed aromatherapy oils were used by 15.2% of pregnant women. Pregnant women were 1.57 (95% CI: 1.01, 2.43) times more likely to self-prescribe use of aromatherapy oils if they have allergies or hayfever, and 2.26 (95% CI: 1.34, 3.79) times more likely to self-prescribe use of aromatherapy oils if they have a urinary tract infection (UTI). Our study highlights a considerable use of aromatherapy oils by pregnant women. There is a clear need for greater communication between practitioners and patients regarding the use of aromatherapy oils during pregnancy, as well a need for health care practitioners to be mindful that pregnant women in their care may be using aromatherapy oils, some of which may be unsafe. Copyright © 2013 Australian College of Midwives. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Massage therapy plus topical analgesic is more effective than massage alone for hand arthritis pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field, Tiffany; Diego, Miguel; Solien-Wolfe, Lynda

    2014-07-01

    20 adults were randomly assigned to a massage therapy or a massage therapy plus a topical analgesic application group. Both groups received a weekly massage from a therapist and were taught self-massage (same procedure) to be done by each participant once daily over a four-week period. The massage plus topical analgesic group as compared to the massage group had greater improvement in hand function as measured by a digital hand exerciser following the first session and across the four-week period. That group also had a greater increase in perceived grip strength and a greater decrease in hand pain, depressed mood and sleep disturbances over the four-week period. Massage therapy has been effective for several pain syndromes including migraine headaches (Lawle and Cameron, 2006)), lower back pain (Hsieh et al., 2004), fibromyalgia (Kalichman, 2010), neck and shoulder pain (Kong et al., 2013), carpal tunnel syndrome (Elliott and Burkett, 2013), and pain related to upper limb arthritis (Field et al., 2013). The purpose of the current study was to determine whether applying a topical analgesic following massage might be more effective than massage alone in treating pain associated with hand arthritis. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Assessing the Metabolic Effects of Aromatherapy in Human Volunteers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yinan Zhang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aromatherapy, a form of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM that uses essential oils through inhalation, is believed to enhance physical and spiritual conditions. Although clinical studies suggest that the use of essential oils may have therapeutic potential, evidence for the efficacy of aromatherapy in treating medical conditions remains poor, with a particular lack of studies employing rigorous analytical methods that capture its identifiable impact on human biology. Here, we report a comprehensive metabolomics study that reveals metabolic changes in people after exposed to aroma inhalation for 10 continuous days. In this study, the metabolic alterations in urine of 31 females with mild anxiety symptoms exposed to aerial diffusion of aromas were measured by GC-TOF-MS and UPLC-Q-TOF-MS analyses. A significant alteration of metabolic profile in subjects responsive to essential oil was found, which is characterized by the increased levels of arginine, homocysteine, and betaine, as well as decreased levels of alcohols, carbohydrates, and organic acids in urine. Notably, the metabolites from tricarboxylic acid (TCA cycle and gut microbial metabolism were significantly altered. This study demonstrates that the metabolomics approach can capture the subtle metabolic changes resulting from exposure to essential oils, which may lead to an improved mechanistic understanding of aromatherapy.

  7. The effect of aromatherapy on haemodialysis patients' pruritus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cürcani, Mehtap; Tan, Mehtap

    2014-12-01

    To determine the effect of aromatherapy on pruritus observed in haemodialysis patients. Although the prevalence of pruritus in kidney failure has decreased in the recent years, pruritus is a difficult and serious problem which concerns the majority of haemodialysis patents and is hard to cure. A prospective, pretest-post-test quasi-experimental design was used. The research is quasi-experimental clinical trial conducted as pretest and post-test with control groups between January 2011-April 2012, in haemodialysis units of hospitals in Erzurum. The collection of the data is achieved using a questionnaire to detect the patients' individual and pruritus score scale and to clarify certain laboratory parameters regarding the pruritus. Chi-square analysis and t-test are used for the analysis of data. The experimental group's mean post-test pruritus scores (7·20 ± 3·14) were found to be lower than that of control group patients (10·00 ± 2·47), and a highly significant difference was found between the groups (p aromatherapy was found to decrease the pruritus problem of haemodialyses patients and led to positive changes in some laboratory parameters related to pruritus. One of the roles of health professionals is to advise individuals, who are living on this problem, using the nonpharmacological methods in checking the itching. By preventing or reducing uraemic pruritus, aromatherapy may also improve quality of life in this patient group. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. The Effect of Aromatherapy on Insomnia and Other Common Symptoms Among Patients With Acute Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackburn, Lisa; Achor, Sara; Allen, Betty; Bauchmire, Nicole; Dunnington, Danielle; Klisovic, Rebecca; Naber, Steven; Roblee, Kirsten; Samczak, Angela; Tomlinson-Pinkham, Kelly; Chipps, Esther

    2017-07-01

    To determine if the use of aromatherapy improves insomnia and other common symptoms in hospitalized patients with newly diagnosed acute leukemia. A randomized, crossover, washout trial. An inpatient acute leukemia unit at the Arthur G. James Cancer Hospital and Richard L. Solove Research Institute of the Wexner Medical Center at Ohio State University in Columbus. 50 patients who were newly diagnosed with acute leukemia and hospitalized to receive their initial four weeks of intensive induction chemotherapy. Patients were offered a choice of three scents to be used during the trial: lavender, peppermint, or chamomile. Each patient was randomized to receive either the chosen aromatherapy intervention or a placebo intervention during alternate weeks, with a washout period in between. Sleep quality and other common symptoms were measured. Aromatherapy, sleep, insomnia, pain, tiredness, drowsiness, nausea, lack of appetite, shortness of breath, depression, anxiety, and well-being. Most patients reported poor quality sleep at baseline, but aromatherapy had a statistically significant positive impact. Improvements were noted in tiredness, drowsiness, lack of appetite, depression, anxiety, and well-being because of aromatherapy. Aromatherapy is a viable intervention for improving insomnia and other symptoms commonly experienced by patients with acute leukemia. Oncology nurses can employ aromatherapy safely and inexpensively, and with minimal training, as an effective tool in decreasing many symptoms that plague patients with leukemia. Patients can exercise a greater sense of control over their treatment environments through the use of aromatherapy.

  9. Questions for Your Prospective Massage Therapist

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... my health concerns or conditions? If you are scheduling a massage therapy appointment for a specific health ... care community. Learn more Helpful info About FAQ Advertising Newsroom Refer a friend Job Bank Contact us ...

  10. Massage Therapy: What You Knead to Know

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... especially when practical matters like time, labor and convenience were considered. Other research suggests that massage therapy ... source and send us a copy. For more consumer health news and information, visit health.nih.gov . ...

  11. Randomized trial of aromatherapy versus conventional care for breast cancer patients during perioperative periods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamaki, Kentaro; Fukuyama, Akiko Komatsu; Terukina, Shigeharu; Kamada, Yoshihiko; Uehara, Kano; Arakaki, Miwa; Yamashiro, Kazuko; Miyashita, Minoru; Ishida, Takanori; McNamara, Keely May; Ohuchi, Noriaki; Tamaki, Nobumitsu; Sasano, Hironobu

    2017-04-01

    Several studies focused on the effect of aromatherapy on mood, quality of life (QOL), and physical symptoms in patients with cancer. We compared the effects on QOL, vital signs, and sleep quality between aromatherapy and conventional therapy during perioperative periods of the breast cancer patients in this study. Patients were randomly assigned in a 2:1 ratio to receive aromatherapy or usual care. The primary endpoint was QOL, which was assessed using the quality of life questionnaire QLQ-C30, Version 3.0 of the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) Study Group on quality of life. Secondary endpoints included the necessity of hypnotics, vital signs including blood pressure and heart rate and adverse events. In addition, we also summarized the patients' perception of the experience from a free description-type questionnaire. A total of 249 patients had breast cancer surgery and 162 patients gave physician consent and were recruited; 110 were randomly assigned to aromatherapy group (eight patients showed incomplete EORTC QLQ-C30) and 52 to control group (one patient showed incomplete EORTC QLQ-C30). There were no statistically significant differences between the aromatherapy group and control group in the EORTC QLQ-C30 at the surgery day. As for the results of the post-operation day 1, trends for differentiations of physical functioning and role functioning were detected between aromatherapy group and control group, but the differences did not reach statistical significance (p = 0.08 and 0.09). There were no significant differences of systolic and diastolic blood pressures between aromatherapy group and control group (p = 0.82 and 0.68). There was no statistically significant difference in heart rates between aromatherapy group (70.6 ± 11.0 bpm) and control group (71.2 ± 9.8 bpm) (p = 0.73). Likewise, the rate of hypnotic use was not statistically significant (p = 0.10). No adverse events were reported after aromatherapy

  12. Neck massage induced dural sinus thrombosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verma Ashish

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Thrombosis of the intracranial dural sinuses and internal jugular veins may occur as a complication of head and neck infections, surgery, central venous access, local malignancy, polycythemia, hyperhomocysteinemia, neck massage and intravenous drug abuse. A high degree of clinical suspicion followed by adequate imaging is prerequisite to early diagnosis and management. We report a young man who had dural sinus thrombosis with jugular venous thrombosis following neck massage.

  13. A prospective randomized study of the effectiveness of aromatherapy for relief of postoperative nausea and vomiting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodge, Nancy S; McCarthy, Mary S; Pierce, Roslyn M

    2014-02-01

    Postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV) is a major concern for patients having surgery under general anesthesia as it causes subjective distress along with increased complications and delays in discharge from the hospital. Aromatherapy represents a complementary and alternative therapy for the management of PONV. The objective of this study was to compare the effectiveness of aromatherapy (QueaseEase, Soothing Scents, Inc, Enterprise, AL) versus an unscented inhalant in relieving PONV. One hundred twenty-one patients with postoperative nausea were randomized into a treatment group receiving an aromatic inhaler and a control group receiving a placebo inhaler to evaluate the effectiveness of aromatherapy. Initial and follow-up nausea assessment scores in both treatment and placebo groups decreased significantly (P aromatherapy was significantly higher in the treatment group (P Aromatherapy was favorably received by most patients and represents an effective treatment option for postoperative nausea. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  14. Aromatherapy for treatment of postoperative nausea and vomiting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hines, Sonia; Steels, Elizabeth; Chang, Anne; Gibbons, Kristen

    2012-04-18

    Postoperative nausea and vomiting is a common and unpleasant phenomenon and current therapies are not always effective for all patients. Aromatherapy has been suggested as a possible addition to the available treatment strategies. This review sought to establish what effect the use of aromatherapy has on the severity and duration of established postoperative nausea and vomiting and whether aromatherapy can be used with safety and clinical effectiveness comparable to standard pharmacological treatments. We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library 2011, Issue 3); MEDLINE; EMBASE; CINAHL; CAM on PubMed; Meditext; LILACS; and ISI Web of Science as well as grey literature sources and the reference lists of retrieved articles. We conducted database searches up to August 2011. We included all randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and controlled clinical trials (CCTs) where aromatherapy was used to treat postoperative nausea and vomiting. Interventions were all types of aromatherapy. Aromatherapy was defined as the inhalation of the vapours of any substance for the purposes of a therapeutic benefit. Primary outcomes were the severity and duration of postoperative nausea and vomiting. Secondary outcomes were adverse reactions, use of rescue anti-emetics and patient satisfaction with treatment. Two review authors assessed risk of bias in the included studies and extracted data. As all outcomes analysed were dichotomous, we used a fixed-effect model and calculated relative risk (RR) with associated 95% confidence interval (95% CI). The nine included studies comprised six RCTs and three CCTs with a total of 402 participants. The mean age and range data for all participants were not reported for all studies. The method of randomization in four of the six included RCTs was explicitly stated and was adequate. Incomplete reporting of data affected the completeness of the analysis. Compared with placebo, isopropyl alcohol vapour

  15. Massage therapy for preventing pressure ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qinhong; Sun, Zhongren; Yue, Jinhuan

    2015-06-17

    Pressure ulcers affect approximately 10% of patients in hospitals and the elderly are at highest risk. Several studies have suggested that massage therapy may help to prevent the development of pressure ulcers, but these results are inconsistent. To assess the evidence for the effects of massage compared with placebo, standard care or other interventions for prevention of pressure ulcers in at-risk populations.The review sought to answer the following questions:Does massage reduce the incidence of pressure ulcers of any grade?Is massage safe in the short- and long-term? If not, what are the adverse events associated with massage? We searched the Cochrane Wounds Group Specialised Register (8 January 2015), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (2015, Issue 1), Ovid MEDLINE (1946 to 8 January 2015), Ovid MEDLINE (In-Process Other Non-Indexed Citations 8 January 2015), Ovid EMBASE (1974 to 8 January 2015), and EBSCO CINAHL (1982 to 8 January 2015). We did not apply date or language restrictions. We planned to include all randomised controlled trials (RCTs) and quasi-randomised controlled trials (Q-RCTs) that evaluated the effects of massage therapy for the prevention of pressure ulcers. Our primary outcome was the proportion of people developing a new pressure ulcer of any grade. Two review authors independently carried out trial selection. Disagreements were resolved by discussion. No studies (RCTs or Q-RCTs) met the inclusion criteria. Therefore, neither a meta-analysis nor a narrative description of studies was possible. There are currently no studies eligible for inclusion in this review. It is, therefore, unclear whether massage therapy can prevent pressure ulcers.

  16. [Therapeutic massage on behavioral disturbances of elderly patients with dementia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barquilla Ávila, Carolina; Rodríguez-Mansilla, Juan

    2015-12-01

    To know the efficacy of therapeutic massage on behavioral disturbances of elderly patients with dementia. Literature review. The literature search was done in six scientific databases: PubMed, Cochrane Library Plus, PEDro, Dialnet, Scopus and CSIC, between 1983 and 2013. The search terms were "massage", "dementia", "therapy", "behavior disorders" and "Alzheimer". Of the 496 articles analyzed, 11 scientific articles have met the selection criteria. Inclusion criteria were: clinical trials, published in English or Spanish, which had analyzed the effects of massage therapy on altered behaviors in people with dementia. The variables were massage benefits, type of massage and massage lubricant. Their authors use different massage techniques (effleurage, pétrissage, pressures, frictions and kneading), obtain better conduct disorders (aggression, anxiety, agitation, and resistance to care) of elderly. The therapeutic massage can be a complementary treatment in the rehabilitation program for better behavior disorders. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  17. Sleep Problems in Infants Decrease following Massage Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field, Tiffany; Hernandez-Reif, Maria

    2001-01-01

    Examined the effectiveness of pre-bedtime massages for infants and toddlers with sleep onset problems. Found that, compared to bedtime stories, massages produced fewer sleep delays and a shortened latency to sleep onset. (Author/DLH)

  18. The Effect of Aromatherapy Treatment on Fatigue and Relaxation for Mothers during the Early Puerperal Period in Japan: A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyoko Asazawa

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Early in the postpartum period, mothers are often nervous and tired from the delivery, breast-feeding and caring for a new-born. The aim of this study was to evaluate the process and outcome of using aromatherapy treatments to increase relaxation and decrease fatigue for mothers during the first to the seventh day of the postpartum period. Methods: This non-randomized controlled study with a quasi-experimental one-group pretest-posttest design was used to evaluate scores in relaxation and fatigue before and after the intervention. Aromatherapy hand treatments were performed on a purposive sample of 34 postpartum mothers in Tokyo, Japan, from May to July 2016. The single treatment included a choice of one of five essential aroma oils through hand and forearm massage. Relaxation and fatigue were measured by self-administered valid and reliable questionnaires. Wilcoxon signed-rank test was conducted to analyze the data before and after the intervention. The software programs SPSS, v. 23.0 (SPSS, Tokyo, was used to analyze the data, with the significance level set at 5%. Results: Valid responses were obtained from 29 participants. A comparison of the scores before and after aroma treatment intervention indicated that the participants’ relaxation scores increased significantly (P<0.001 and fatigue scores were significantly reduced (P<0.001. The majority of participants (77.8% were satisfied with the treatment. Conclusion: The aroma treatments significantly improved relaxation and reduced fatigue for mothers in the early puerperal period and were well received. Therefore, a larger study using a pretest-posttest random control trial is recommended.

  19. Emergency department waiting room stress: can music or aromatherapy improve anxiety scores?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holm, Lydia; Fitzmaurice, Laura

    2008-12-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effect of music alone, aromatherapy alone, and music in addition to aromatherapy on anxiety levels of adults accompanying children to a pediatricemergency department waiting area. The study was conducted over 28 consecutive days, assigned to 1 of 4 groups: no intervention, music, aromatherapy, and both music and aromatherapy. Adults accompanying children to the emergency department of an urban pediatric tertiary care referral center were given a survey including a Spielberger state anxiety inventory with additional questions about whether they noticed an aroma or music and if so their response to it. The music was classic ingenre with a tempo of 60 to 70 beats per minute. The aromatherapyused the essential oil Neroli dispersed using 2 aromatherapydiffusers placed in strategic airflow ends of the emergency department. The 1104 surveys were completed. There was a statistically significant decrease in anxietylevel on those days when music was playing (36.3 vs. 39.2; P = 0.017). There was no difference in anxiety levels on those days when aromatherapy was present compared with the nonaromatherapy days (37.3 vs. 38.0; P = 0.347). Music is an easy and useful way to decrease the anxiety of visitors in an emergency department waiting area. Although no difference was detected for the aromatherapy group, this could be because of environmental conditions or imprecise application of the aromatherapy; further study is needed to either prove or disprove its effectiveness in this setting.

  20. Investigating the effect of aromatherapy in patients with renal colic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayan, Murat; Tas, Ufuk; Sogut, Erkan; Suren, Mustafa; Gurbuzler, Levent; Koyuncu, Feridun

    2013-04-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the usefulness of rose essential oil as a supplementary and adjunctive therapy for the relief of renal colic, specifically because rose essential oil is soothing and can act as a muscle relaxant. Eighty patients who were diagnosed with renal colic in the emergency room were included in the study, with ages ranging from 19 to 64 years. Half of the patients (n=40) were treated with conventional therapy (diclofenac sodium, 75 mg intramuscularly) plus placebo (physiological serum, 0.9% NaCl), while the other half (n=40) were given aromatherapy (rose essential oil) in addition to conventional therapy. In each patient, the severity of pain was evaluated using the Visual Analog Scale (VAS) (0 [no pain] to 10 [very severe pain]). The VAS values prior to the start of therapy, and 10 and 30 minutes after therapy were 8.18 ± 1.36, 5.60 ± 2.02, and 3.75 ± 2.08 for the conventional therapy plus placebo group, while for the conventional therapy plus aromatherapy group, the VAS values were 8.63 ± 1.03, 4.25 ± 1.72, and 1.08 ± 1.07, respectively. There was no statistically significant difference between the starting VAS values of the two groups, but the VAS values 10 or 30 minutes after the initiation of therapy were statistically lower in the group that received conventional therapy plus aromatherapy. This study demonstrated that rose essential oil therapy in addition to conventional therapy effectively reduces renal colic pain.

  1. Preschool Children's Sleep and Wake Behavior: Effects of Massage Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field, Tiffany; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Preschool children received twice-weekly massages for five weeks. Compared to control children, the massaged children had better behavior ratings on mood state, vocalization, activity, and cooperation following massage on day one and throughout the study. Teachers rated their behavior more optimally, and their parents rated them as having less…

  2. Sportsmen's experience of the impact of massage by somatologists ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    For the purpose of massages before and after sports events, sportsmen are increasingly visiting somatologists working at private somatology clinics instead of other massage therapists. Massage is frequently utilised as a means of enhancing performance. It is known to have both calming and stimulating properties.

  3. Using Aromatherapy Massage to Increase Shared Attention Behaviours in Children with Autistic Spectrum Disorders and Severe Learning Difficulties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomons, Steve

    2005-01-01

    Children with autistic spectrum disorders (ASD) characteristically display a lack of shared attention behaviours and the lack of these behaviours impacts on their ability to develop social interactions and relationships with others. Steve Solomons, assistant headteacher at Rectory Paddock School and Research Unit in the London Borough of Bromley,…

  4. The Anxiolytic Effect of Aromatherapy on Patients Awaiting Ambulatory Surgery: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng-Hua Ni

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine if aromatherapy could reduce preoperative anxiety in ambulatory surgery patients. A total of 109 preoperative patients were randomly assigned to experimental (bergamot essential oil and control (water vapor conditions and their responses to the State Trait Anxiety Inventory and vital signs were monitored. Patients were stratified by previous surgical experience, but that did not influence the results. All those exposed to bergamot essential oil aromatherapy showed a greater reduction in preoperative anxiety than those in the control groups. Aromatherapy may be a useful part of a holistic approach to reducing preoperative anxiety before ambulatory surgery.

  5. EFFECT OF OXYTOCIN MASSAGE USING LAVENDER ESSENTIAL OIL ON PROLACTIN LEVEL AND BREAST MILK PRODUCTION IN PRIMIPAROUS MOTHERS AFTER CAESAREAN DELIVERY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panglukies Ratna Agustie

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Low milk production is one of the barries to exclusive breastfeeding. Oxytocin massage is considered as an alternative treatment, which combined with lavender essential oil as an aromatherapy. Objective: This study aims to examine the effect of oxytocin massage using lavender essential oil on the increase of levels of prolactin and milk production in primiparaous mothers after caesarean section. Methods: This was a quasi-experimental study with non-equivalent control group design conducted in October-December 2016 at the General Hospital of Dr.H. Soewondo Kendal. There were 32 recruited by consecutive sampling, divided to be intervention (16 participants and control group (16 participants. Prolactin hormone levels were measured using Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELIZA, breast milk production was measured based on the indicators of milk volume, urination and defecation frequency and sleep duration of babies; and infant’s weight was also measured by digital scale. Data were analyzed using Mann Whitney and Wilcoxon test. Results: The mean difference of prolactin hormone level in control group was 17.82 ng / ml while mean of difference of hormone prolactin level in intervention group was 132.13 ng / ml. There were statistically significant differences between intervention and control group in prolactin levels (p-value 0.000, milk volume (p-value 0.000, infant weight (p-value 0.000, urination frequency (p-value 0.017, defecation frequency (p-value 0.002, and infant sleep duration (p-value 0.000. Conclusion: There was a significant effect of the oxytocin massage using lavender essential oil on the increase of breast milk production and prolactin levels. Therefore, oxytocin massage using lavender essential oil can be used as an alternative treatment for midwives and other health professionals in an effort to increase milk production in postpartum.

  6. Baby massage classes and the work of the International Association of Infant Massage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, R

    2001-02-01

    This article describes the role of the International Association of Infant Massage (IAIM) in promoting the importance of touch for the developing relationship between the parents and infants. Infants are unique personalities and it is important that the parent learns how to respond appropriately to the infant's needs. Infant massage classes can demonstrate and promote interaction with infants using eye-to-eye contact, recognizing infant cues, talking and singing, and responding in a loving and sensitive manner. The photographs are of an infant massage class held recently in Leicestershire.

  7. An Investigative Study of the Perceptions of Nationally Certified Massage Practitioners toward Entry Level Web Based Massage Therapy Curriculum Designs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlahos, Efthimios

    2011-01-01

    This descriptive study examines the current status of online education in massage therapy with respect to the development of web based curriculums. Participants are drawn from the public listing of the National Certification Board for Therapeutic Massage and Bodywork (NCBTMB). The Online Curriculum Survey in Massage Therapy is used as an…

  8. Energy expenditure in growing preterm infants receiving massage therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahat, Sharon; Mimouni, Francis B; Ashbel, Gina; Dollberg, Shaul

    2007-08-01

    Massage therapy has been consistently shown to increase weight gain in preterm infants. The mechanism of this presumed improved metabolic efficiency is unknown. We conducted the following trial to test the hypothesis that massage therapy reduces energy expenditure in growing healthy preterm infants. A prospective, randomized, cross-over design study was conducted in 10 healthy, appropriate weights for gestational age, gavage fed preterm infants. Each infant was studied twice: after a period of either 5 days of massage therapy, or after a period of 5 days without massage therapy. Infants were randomized to 5 days of massage followed by 5 days of no massage (n = 5) or the opposite sequence (n = 5). During the massage therapy period, massage was provided daily for three 15 minute periods at the beginning of each 3 hour period every morning. Metabolic measurements were performed by indirect calorimetry, using the Deltatrac II Metabolic cart. Energy expenditure was significantly lower in infants after the 5 day massage therapy period (59.6 +/- 3.6 Kcal/Kg/ 24 hours) than after the period without (63.1 +/- 5.4 Kcal/Kg/ 24 hours) (p = 0.05). Energy expenditure is significantly lowered by 5 days of massage therapy in metabolically and thermally stable preterm infants. This decrease in energy expenditure may be in part responsible for the enhanced growth caused by massage therapy.

  9. Effects of Aromatherapy on the Anxiety, Vital Signs, and Sleep Quality of Percutaneous Coronary Intervention Patients in Intensive Care Units

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Mi-Yeon; Min, Eun Sil; Hur, Myung-Haeng; Lee, Myeong Soo

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of aromatherapy on the anxiety, sleep, and blood pressure (BP) of percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) patients in an intensive care unit (ICU). Fifty-six patients with PCI in ICU were evenly allocated to either the aromatherapy or conventional nursing care. Aromatherapy essential oils were blended with lavender, roman chamomile, and neroli with a 6 : 2 : 0.5 ratio. Participants received 10 times treatment before PCI, and the same essential oils were inhaled another 10 times after PCI. Outcome measures patients' state anxiety, sleeping quality, and BP. An aromatherapy group showed significantly low anxiety (t = 5.99, P aromatherapy effectively reduced the anxiety levels and increased the sleep quality of PCI patients admitted to the ICU. Aromatherapy may be used as an independent nursing intervention for reducing the anxiety levels and improving the sleep quality of PCI patients. PMID:23476690

  10. Massage Therapy in Outpatient Cancer Care: A Metropolitan Area Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miccio, Robin Streit; Parikh, Bijal

    2017-01-01

    Massage offers cancer patients general quality of life benefits as well as alleviation of cancer-related symptoms/cancer-treatment–related symptoms including pain, anxiety, and fatigue. Little is known about whether massage is accessible to cancer patients who receive treatment in the outpatient setting and how massage is incorporated into the overall cancer treatment plan. Outpatient cancer centers (n = 78) in a single metropolitan area were included this mixed-methods project that included a systematic analysis of website information and a telephone survey. Massage was offered at only 40 centers (51.3% of total). A range of massage modalities were represented, with energy-based therapies (Reiki and Therapeutic Touch) most frequently provided. Although massage therapists are licensed health care providers in the states included in this analysis, massage was also provided by nurses, physical therapists, and other health care professionals. PMID:28845677

  11. Mechanical Model of Traditional Thai Massage for Integrated Healthcare

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salinee Rattanaphan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, a mechanical model was developed, aiming to provide standardized and programmable traditional Thai massage (TTM therapy to patients. The TTM was modeled and integrated into a mechanical hand (MH system, and a prototype massage chair was built and tested for user satisfaction. Three fundamental principles of Thai massage were integrated: pull, press, and pin. Based on these principles, the mechanics of Thai massage was studied and a mathematical model was developed to describe the dynamics and conditions for the design and prototyping of an MH. On average, it was found that users were satisfied with the treatment and felt that the treatment was similar to that performed by human hands. According to the interview results, users indicated that they were likely to utilize the MH as an alternative to traditional massage. Therefore, integrated TTM with an MH may help healthcare providers deliver standardized, programmable massage therapy to patients as opposed to variable, inconsistent human massage.

  12. Massage Therapy in Outpatient Cancer Care: A Metropolitan Area Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowen, Virginia S; Miccio, Robin Streit; Parikh, Bijal

    2017-10-01

    Massage offers cancer patients general quality of life benefits as well as alleviation of cancer-related symptoms/cancer-treatment-related symptoms including pain, anxiety, and fatigue. Little is known about whether massage is accessible to cancer patients who receive treatment in the outpatient setting and how massage is incorporated into the overall cancer treatment plan. Outpatient cancer centers (n = 78) in a single metropolitan area were included this mixed-methods project that included a systematic analysis of website information and a telephone survey. Massage was offered at only 40 centers (51.3% of total). A range of massage modalities were represented, with energy-based therapies (Reiki and Therapeutic Touch) most frequently provided. Although massage therapists are licensed health care providers in the states included in this analysis, massage was also provided by nurses, physical therapists, and other health care professionals.

  13. Process for massage therapy practice and essential assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Ann Blair; Cambron, Jerrilyn A; Sharpe, Patricia A; Travillian, Ravensara S; Saunders, Ruth P

    2016-07-01

    Little evidence exists about processes in massage therapy practice. Investigating current frameworks is warranted. This qualitative study is a secondary data analysis using grounded theory to understand how massage therapy experts describe massage therapy practice. 31 massage therapy experts were invited to a 2-day symposium to discuss best practices for the profession. Through qualitative analysis, memoing, and discussion, the data were summarized into themes. Three themes were identified around massage therapy practice: 1) client centered, 2) structure for practice, and 3) influencing factors. Each theme is clarified and expanded. Conceptual models were developed for research and clinical practice and a definition for massage therapy practice was identified. Challenges and limitations are discussed. The goal of providing these models is to give massage therapists tools to deliver the best possible care. The models need testing to see if they help advance the profession. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  14. Adverse effects of aromatherapy: a systematic review of case reports and case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posadzki, Paul; Alotaibi, Amani; Ernst, Edzard

    2012-01-01

    This systematic review was aimed at critically evaluating the evidence regarding the adverse effects associated with aromatherapy. Five electronic databases were searched to identify all relevant case reports and case series. Forty two primary reports met our inclusion criteria. In total, 71 patients experienced adverse effects of aromatherapy. Adverse effects ranged from mild to severe and included one fatality. The most common adverse effect was dermatitis. Lavender, peppermint, tea tree oil and ylang-ylang were the most common essential oils responsible for adverse effects. Aromatherapy has the potential to cause adverse effects some of which are serious. Their frequency remains unknown. Lack of sufficiently convincing evidence regarding the effectiveness of aromatherapy combined with its potential to cause adverse effects questions the usefulness of this modality in any condition.

  15. Comparing the effects of relaxation technique and inhalation aromatherapy on fatigue in patients undergoing hemodialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassanzadeh, Mohammadali; Kiani, Fatemeh; Bouya, Salehoddin; Zarei, Mohammad

    2018-05-01

    This study aimed to compare the effects of relaxation techniques on fatigue in hemodialysis patients. This clinical trial study was conducted on 105 hemodialysis patients. The subjects were categorized into three groups as: relaxation, aromatherapy and control. In the relaxation group, Benson muscle relaxation techniques were employed; in the aromatherapy group, the inhalation of two drops of 5% lavender essential oil used and the control group only received regular healthcare actions. Data collected by using brief fatigue inventory, before and after the intervention. Results of the current study indicated significant differences in the mean of changes in fatigue scores before and after the intervention between the relaxation and aromatherapy groups, but the difference was insignificant in the control group. Aromatherapy with lavender essential oil can decrease the level of fatigue in the patients undergoing hemodialysis compared to Benson relaxation techniques. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. The Physical Effects of Aromatherapy in Alleviating Work-Related Stress on Elementary School Teachers in Taiwan

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Shing-Hong; Lin, Tzu-Hsin; Chang, Kang-Ming

    2013-01-01

    People use aromatherapy to relieve the symptoms of physical and psychological stress. However, previous studies have not precisely clarified a scientific basis for the beneficial effects of aromatherapy. Therefore, the overall purpose of this study was to elucidate the beneficial effect of aromatherapy in relieving work-related stress. Twenty-nine elementary school teachers from Taiwan participated in this study. The experimental procedures comprised 2 phases. First, we verified the effect of...

  17. Aromatherapy With Citrus Aurantium Oil and Anxiety During the First Stage of Labor

    OpenAIRE

    Namazi, Masoumeh; Amir Ali Akbari, Seddigheh; Mojab, Faraz; Talebi, Atefe; Alavi Majd, Hamid; Jannesari, Sharareh

    2014-01-01

    Background: Anxiety is the most common psychological response of women to labor. Aromatherapy, i.e. the use of fragrant essential oils to stimulate the olfactory system, can create a state of calmness and help to alleviate anxiety. Objectives: The present study tried to determine the efficacy of aromatherapy with Citrus aurantium oil in reducing anxiety during the first stage of labor. Patients and Methods: This randomized clinical trial was conducted on two groups of pregnant women, referred...

  18. The Effect of Inhalation of Aromatherapy Blend containing Lavender Essential Oil on Cesarean Postoperative Pain

    OpenAIRE

    Olapour, Alireza; Behaeen, Kaveh; Akhondzadeh, Reza; Soltani, Farhad; al Sadat Razavi, Forough; Bekhradi, Reza

    2013-01-01

    Background Pain is a major problem in patients after cesarean and medication such as aromatherapy which is a complementary therapy, in which the essences of the plants oils are used to reduce such undesirable conditions. Objectives In this study, the effect of aromatherapy using Lavender (Lavandula) essential oil on cesarean postoperative pain was assessed. Materials and Methods In a triple blind, randomized placebo-controlled trial study, 60 pregnant women who were admitted to a general hosp...

  19. An investigation into the use of aromatherapy in intrapartum midwifery practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, E E; Blamey, C; Ersser, S J; Barnetson, L; Lloyd, A J

    2000-04-01

    The principal aim of the study was to examine the contribution of aromatherapy to the promotion of maternal comfort during labor and as a tool to improve the quality of midwifery care. Evaluative study. Delivery suite in a large British teaching hospital with approximately 6,500 deliveries per annum. A total of 8,058 mothers were evaluated between 1990 and 1998. Women were offered aromatherapy to relieve anxiety, pain, nausea and/or vomiting or to strengthen contractions. Routine data collected on the use of aromatherapy over the period were analyzed. Data from the unit audit were used to provide a comparison group of mothers not given aromatherapy (n = 15,799) from the study center. Outcome measures include mothers' ratings of effectiveness, outcomes of labor, use of pharmacologic pain relief, uptake of intravenous oxytocin, reported associated symptoms, and annual costs. The use of aromatherapy during childbirth was an increasingly popular care option with mothers and midwives. More than 50% of mothers rated it as helpful, and only 14% found it unhelpful. The use of aromatherapy was not confined to low-risk mothers. Sixty percent of the sample were primigravidae, and 32% overall had had their labor induced. The administration of aromatherapy in childbirth did appear to reduce the need for additional pain relief in a proportion of mothers. More than 8% of primigravidae and 18% of multigravidae used no conventional pain relief during labor after using essential oils. During the years of the study, the use of pethidine in the study center declined from 6% to 0.2% of women. The study also showed that aromatherapy may have the potential to augment labor contractions for women in dysfunctional labour. A very low number of associated adverse symptoms were reported (1%). This study represents a successful example of the integration of a complementary therapy into mainstream midwifery practice and forms a basis for future research.

  20. Development of a Health System-Based Nurse-Delivered Aromatherapy Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joswiak, Denise; Kinney, Mary Ellen; Johnson, Jill R; Kolste, Alison K; Griffin, Kristen H; Rivard, Rachael L; Dusek, Jeffery A

    2016-04-01

    Healthcare systems are increasingly looking to integrate aromatherapy (essential oils) as a safe, low-cost, and nonpharmacologic option for patient care to reduce pain, nausea, and anxiety and to improve sleep. This article describes the development and implementation of a healthcare system-wide program of nurse-delivered essential oil therapeutic interventions to inpatients throughout an acute care setting. In addition, we provide lessons learned for nursing administrators interested in developing similar nurse-delivered aromatherapy programs.

  1. The Effectiveness of Aromatherapy in Reducing Pain: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaheen E. Lakhan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Aromatherapy refers to the medicinal or therapeutic use of essential oils absorbed through the skin or olfactory system. Recent literature has examined the effectiveness of aromatherapy in treating pain. Methods. 12 studies examining the use of aromatherapy for pain management were identified through an electronic database search. A meta-analysis was performed to determine the effects of aromatherapy on pain. Results. There is a significant positive effect of aromatherapy (compared to placebo or treatments as usual controls in reducing pain reported on a visual analog scale (SMD = −1.18, 95% CI: −1.33, −1.03; p<0.0001. Secondary analyses found that aromatherapy is more consistent for treating nociceptive (SMD = −1.57, 95% CI: −1.76, −1.39, p<0.0001 and acute pain (SMD = −1.58, 95% CI: −1.75, −1.40, p<0.0001 than inflammatory (SMD = −0.53, 95% CI: −0.77, −0.29, p<0.0001 and chronic pain (SMD = −0.22, 95% CI: −0.49, 0.05, p=0.001, respectively. Based on the available research, aromatherapy is most effective in treating postoperative pain (SMD = −1.79, 95% CI: −2.08, −1.51, p<0.0001 and obstetrical and gynecological pain (SMD = −1.14, 95% CI: −2.10, −0.19, p<0.0001. Conclusion. The findings of this study indicate that aromatherapy can successfully treat pain when combined with conventional treatments.

  2. The effect of aromatherapy with Rosa damascena essential oil on sleep quality in children

    OpenAIRE

    A.S. Keyhanmehr; M. Movahhed; S. Sahranavard; L. Gachkar; M. Hamdieh; Sh. Afsharpaiman*; H. Nikfarjad

    2018-01-01

    Background and objectives: Sleep disorder is one of the main problems in children. Poor sleep quality can lead to adverse effects on their growth and development. Aromatherapy is a kind of method for improving sleep. In Iranian traditional medicine, inhaling Rosa damascena has been recommended for treating sleep disorder. Due to the side effects of chemical drugs and trend to alternative medicine due to less complication, the aim of this study was to investigate the effect of aromatherapy wit...

  3. Massage, reflexology and other manual methods for pain management in labour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Caroline A; Levett, Kate M; Collins, Carmel T; Dahlen, Hannah G; Ee, Carolyn C; Suganuma, Machiko

    2018-03-28

    Many women would like to avoid pharmacological or invasive methods of pain management in labour, and this may contribute towards the popularity of complementary methods of pain management. This review examined the evidence currently available on manual methods, including massage and reflexology, for pain management in labour. This review is an update of the review first published in 2012. To assess the effect, safety and acceptability of massage, reflexology and other manual methods to manage pain in labour. For this update, we searched Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth's Trials Register (30 June 2017), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL; 2017, Issue 6), MEDLINE (1966 to 30 June 2017, CINAHL (1980 to 30 June 2017), the Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry (4 August 2017), Chinese Clinical Trial Registry (4 August 2017), ClinicalTrials.gov, (4 August 2017), the National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health (4 August 2017), the WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP) (4 August 2017) and reference lists of retrieved trials. We included randomised controlled trials comparing manual methods with standard care, other non-pharmacological forms of pain management in labour, no treatment or placebo. We searched for trials of the following modalities: massage, warm packs, thermal manual methods, reflexology, chiropractic, osteopathy, musculo-skeletal manipulation, deep tissue massage, neuro-muscular therapy, shiatsu, tuina, trigger point therapy, myotherapy and zero balancing. We excluded trials for pain management relating to hypnosis, aromatherapy, acupuncture and acupressure; these are included in other Cochrane reviews. Two review authors independently assessed trial quality, extracted data and checked data for accuracy. We contacted trial authors for additional information. We assessed the quality of the evidence using the GRADE approach. We included a total of 14 trials; 10 of these (1055 women

  4. Aromatherapy Benefits Autonomic Nervous System Regulation for Elementary School Faculty in Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kang-Ming Chang

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Workplace stress-related illness is a serious issue, and consequently many stress reduction methods have been investigated. Aromatherapy is especially for populations that work under high stress. Elementary school teachers are a high-stress working population in Taiwan. In this study, fifty-four elementary school teachers were recruited to evaluate aromatherapy performance on stress reduction. Bergamot essential oil was used for aromatherapy spray for 10 minutes. Blood pressure and autonomic nervous system parameters were recorded 5 minutes before and after the application of the aroma spray. Results showed that there were significant decreases in blood pressure, heart rate, LF power percentage, and LF/HF while there were increases in heart rate variability and HF power percentage (P<.001∗∗∗ after application of the aromatherapy spray. Further analysis was investigated by dividing subjects into three background variables (position variables, age variables, gender variables and anxiety degree groups. All parameters were significantly different for most subgroups, except for the substitute teachers and the light-anxiety group. Parasympathetic nervous system activation was measured after aromatherapy in this study. It encouraged further study for other stress working population by aromatherapy.

  5. Aromatherapy Benefits Autonomic Nervous System Regulation for Elementary School Faculty in Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Kang-Ming; Shen, Chuh-Wei

    2011-01-01

    Workplace stress-related illness is a serious issue, and consequently many stress reduction methods have been investigated. Aromatherapy is especially for populations that work under high stress. Elementary school teachers are a high-stress working population in Taiwan. In this study, fifty-four elementary school teachers were recruited to evaluate aromatherapy performance on stress reduction. Bergamot essential oil was used for aromatherapy spray for 10 minutes. Blood pressure and autonomic nervous system parameters were recorded 5 minutes before and after the application of the aroma spray. Results showed that there were significant decreases in blood pressure, heart rate, LF power percentage, and LF/HF while there were increases in heart rate variability and HF power percentage (P aromatherapy spray. Further analysis was investigated by dividing subjects into three background variables (position variables, age variables, gender variables) and anxiety degree groups. All parameters were significantly different for most subgroups, except for the substitute teachers and the light-anxiety group. Parasympathetic nervous system activation was measured after aromatherapy in this study. It encouraged further study for other stress working population by aromatherapy. PMID:21584196

  6. The effects of aromatherapy in relieving symptoms related to job stress among nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Miao-Chuan; Fang, Shu-Hui; Fang, Li

    2015-02-01

    Workplace-related stress has become today's most serious occupational hazard. Aromatherapy is a simple, convenient and non-invasive method of stress relief. There is little research regarding the efficacy of aromatherapy by means of inhaling essential oil in reducing workplace stress-related symptoms among nurses. Therefore, this study was to examine the effectiveness of lavender oil inhalation in reducing job stress-related symptoms among nurses. The 53 nurses in the experimental group pinned small bottles containing 3% lavender oil on the clothes of their right chests, whereas 57 participants in the control group pinned bottles with no lavender oil. Aromatherapy was shown to be effective in the reduction of the number of stress symptoms for 3 or 4 days. The stress symptoms of the experimental group decreased from 6.1 to 2.8 after aromatherapy was carried out (P = 0.126, 0.159, 0.035 and 0.026). This represented a significant decrease in stress, whereas the stress symptoms in the control group increased from 5.6 to 5.8. Hospital staff managers are still encouraged to include aromatherapy concepts and techniques in the continuing education of nursing staff. Concurrently, future research should focus on the possible side effects of aromatherapy to assure safety. © 2013 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  7. The Effects of Inhalation Aromatherapy on Anxiety in Patients With Myocardial Infarction: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najafi, Zahra; Taghadosi, Mohsen; Sharifi, Khadijeh; Farrokhian, Alireza; Tagharrobi, Zahra

    2014-01-01

    Background: Anxiety is an important mental health problem in patients with cardiac disease. Anxiety reduces patients’ quality of life and increases the risk of different cardiac complications. Objectives: The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of inhalation aromatherapy on anxiety in patients with myocardial infarction. Patients and Methods: This was a randomized clinical trial conduced on 68 patients with myocardial infarction hospitalized in coronary care units of a large-scale teaching hospital affiliated to Kashan University of Medical Sciences, Kashan, Iran in 2013. By using the block randomization technique, patients were randomly assigned to experimental (33 patients receiving inhalation aromatherapy with lavender aroma twice a day for two subsequent days) and control (35 patients receiving routine care of study setting including no aromatherapy) groups. At the beginning of study and twenty minutes after each aromatherapy session, anxiety state of patients was assessed using the Spielberger’s State Anxiety Inventory. Data was analyzed using SPSS v. 16.0. We used Chi-square, Fisher’s exact, independent-samples T-test and repeated measures analysis of variance to analyze the study data. Results: The study groups did not differ significantly regarding baseline anxiety mean and demographic characteristics. However, after the administration of aromatherapy, anxiety mean in the experimental group was significantly lower than the control group. Conclusions: Inhalation aromatherapy with lavender aroma can reduce anxiety in patients with myocardial infarction. Consequently, healthcare providers, particularly nurses, can use this strategy to improve postmyocardial infarction anxiety management. PMID:25389481

  8. Methyl eugenol aromatherapy enhances the mating competitiveness of male Bactrocera carambolae Drew & Hancock (Diptera: Tephritidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haq, Ihsan; Vreysen, Marc J B; Cacéres, Carlos; Shelly, Todd E; Hendrichs, Jorge

    2014-09-01

    Males of Bactrocera carambolae Drew & Hancock (Diptera: Tephritidae) are strongly attracted to methyl eugenol (ME) (1,2-dimethoxy-4-(2-propenyl)benzene), a natural compound occurring in variety of plant species. ME-feeding is known to enhance male B. carambolae mating competitiveness 3 days after feeding. Enhanced male mating competitiveness due to ME-feeding can increase the effectiveness of sterile insect technique (SIT) manifolds. However, the common methods for emergence and holding fruit flies prior to field releases do not allow the inclusion of any ME feeding treatment after fly emergence. Therefore this study was planned to assess the effects of ME-aromatherapy in comparison with ME feeding on male B. carambolae mating competitiveness as aromatherapy is pragmatic for fruit flies emergence and holding facilities. Effects of ME application by feeding or by aromatherapy for enhanced mating competitiveness were evaluated 3d after treatments in field cages. ME feeding and ME aromatherapy enhanced male mating competitiveness as compared to untreated males. Males treated with ME either by feeding or by aromatherapy showed similar mating success but mating success was significantly higher than that of untreated males. The results are discussed in the context of application of ME by aromatherapy as a pragmatic approach in a mass-rearing facility and its implications for effectiveness of SIT. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  9. Aromatherapy alleviates endothelial dysfunction of medical staff after night-shift work: preliminary observations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimada, Kenei; Fukuda, Shota; Maeda, Kumiko; Kawasaki, Toshihiro; Kono, Yasushi; Jissho, Satoshi; Taguchi, Haruyuki; Yoshiyama, Minoru; Yoshikawa, Junichi

    2011-02-01

    Night-shift work causes mental stress and lifestyle changes, and is recognized as a risk of cardiovascular diseases associated with impaired endothelial function. Aromatherapy is becoming popular as a complementary therapy that is beneficial for mental relaxation. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of aromatherapy on the endothelial function of medical staff after night-shift work. This study consisted of 19 healthy medical personnel (19 men, mean age 32 ± 7 years), including 11 physicians and 8 technicians. Aromatherapy was performed for 30 min by inhalation of the essential oil of lavender. Flow-mediated dilation (FMD) of the brachial artery was measured three times in each subject: on a regular workday, and after night-shift work before and immediately after aromatherapy. A control study was performed to assess the effect of a 30-min rest without aromatherapy. The mean value of sleep time during night-shift work was 3.3 ± 1.3 h. FMD after night-shift work was lower than on a regular workday (10.4 ± 1.8 vs. 12.5 ± 1.7%, Pnight-shift work impaired endothelial function in medical staff, an effect that was alleviated by short-term aromatherapy.

  10. Uterine massage for preventing postpartum haemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmeyr, G Justus; Abdel-Aleem, Hany; Abdel-Aleem, Mahmoud A

    2013-07-01

    Postpartum haemorrhage (PPH) (bleeding from the genital tract after childbirth) is a major cause of maternal mortality and disability, particularly in under-resourced areas. In these settings, uterotonics are often not accessible. There is a need for simple, inexpensive techniques which can be applied in low-resourced settings to prevent and treat PPH. Uterine massage is recommended as part of the routine active management of the third stage of labour. However, it is not known whether it is effective. If shown to be effective, uterine massage would represent a simple intervention with the potential to have a major effect on PPH and maternal mortality in under-resourced settings. To determine the effectiveness of uterine massage after birth and before or after delivery of the placenta, or both, to reduce postpartum blood loss and associated morbidity and mortality. We searched the Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group's Trials Register (30 April 2013). All published, unpublished and ongoing randomised controlled trials comparing uterine massage alone or in addition to uterotonics before or after delivery of the placenta, or both, with non-massage. Two researchers independently considered trials for eligibility, assessed risk of bias and extracted the data using the agreed form. Data were checked for accuracy. The effect of uterine massage commenced before or after placental delivery were first assessed separately, and then the combined for an overall result. This review included two randomised controlled trials. The first trial included 200 women who were randomised to receive uterine massage or no massage following delivery of the placenta, after active management of the third stage of labour including use of oxytocin. The numbers of women with blood loss more than 500 mL was small, with no statistically significant difference (risk ratio (RR) 0.52, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.16 to 1.67). There were no cases of retained placenta in either group. The mean

  11. The physical effects of aromatherapy in alleviating work-related stress on elementary school teachers in taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shing-Hong; Lin, Tzu-Hsin; Chang, Kang-Ming

    2013-01-01

    People use aromatherapy to relieve the symptoms of physical and psychological stress. However, previous studies have not precisely clarified a scientific basis for the beneficial effects of aromatherapy. Therefore, the overall purpose of this study was to elucidate the beneficial effect of aromatherapy in relieving work-related stress. Twenty-nine elementary school teachers from Taiwan participated in this study. The experimental procedures comprised 2 phases. First, we verified the effect of aromatherapy by conducting 2 blind tests. We used natural bergamot essential oil extracted from plants and synthesized a chemical essential oil as the placebo to do the aromatherapy. Second, we analyzed the performance of the aromatherapy treatment on the teachers who had various workloads. We measured the teachers' heart rate variability to evaluate their autonomic nervous system activity. The results show that only the natural bergamot essential oil had an effect and that the aromatherapy treatment relieved work-related stress of teachers with various workloads. However, the aromatherapy treatment had a weak effect on young teachers who had a heavy workload. Moreover, the aromatherapy treatment exhibited no effect on teachers who belong to the abnormal body mass index subgroup having a heavy workload.

  12. The Physical Effects of Aromatherapy in Alleviating Work-Related Stress on Elementary School Teachers in Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shing-Hong Liu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available People use aromatherapy to relieve the symptoms of physical and psychological stress. However, previous studies have not precisely clarified a scientific basis for the beneficial effects of aromatherapy. Therefore, the overall purpose of this study was to elucidate the beneficial effect of aromatherapy in relieving work-related stress. Twenty-nine elementary school teachers from Taiwan participated in this study. The experimental procedures comprised 2 phases. First, we verified the effect of aromatherapy by conducting 2 blind tests. We used natural bergamot essential oil extracted from plants and synthesized a chemical essential oil as the placebo to do the aromatherapy. Second, we analyzed the performance of the aromatherapy treatment on the teachers who had various workloads. We measured the teachers’ heart rate variability to evaluate their autonomic nervous system activity. The results show that only the natural bergamot essential oil had an effect and that the aromatherapy treatment relieved work-related stress of teachers with various workloads. However, the aromatherapy treatment had a weak effect on young teachers who had a heavy workload. Moreover, the aromatherapy treatment exhibited no effect on teachers who belong to the abnormal body mass index subgroup having a heavy workload.

  13. The Physical Effects of Aromatherapy in Alleviating Work-Related Stress on Elementary School Teachers in Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shing-Hong; Lin, Tzu-Hsin; Chang, Kang-Ming

    2013-01-01

    People use aromatherapy to relieve the symptoms of physical and psychological stress. However, previous studies have not precisely clarified a scientific basis for the beneficial effects of aromatherapy. Therefore, the overall purpose of this study was to elucidate the beneficial effect of aromatherapy in relieving work-related stress. Twenty-nine elementary school teachers from Taiwan participated in this study. The experimental procedures comprised 2 phases. First, we verified the effect of aromatherapy by conducting 2 blind tests. We used natural bergamot essential oil extracted from plants and synthesized a chemical essential oil as the placebo to do the aromatherapy. Second, we analyzed the performance of the aromatherapy treatment on the teachers who had various workloads. We measured the teachers' heart rate variability to evaluate their autonomic nervous system activity. The results show that only the natural bergamot essential oil had an effect and that the aromatherapy treatment relieved work-related stress of teachers with various workloads. However, the aromatherapy treatment had a weak effect on young teachers who had a heavy workload. Moreover, the aromatherapy treatment exhibited no effect on teachers who belong to the abnormal body mass index subgroup having a heavy workload. PMID:24228065

  14. Aromatherapy Improves Work Performance Through Balancing the Autonomic Nervous System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Lin; Capdevila, Lluis

    2017-03-01

    This study analyzed the efficacy of aromatherapy in improving work performance and reducing workplace stress. The initial sample comprised 42 administrative university workers (M age  = 42.21 years, standard deviation = 7.12; 10 male). All sessions were performed in a university computer classroom. The participants were randomly assigned into an aromatherapy group (AG) and a control group (CG), and they were invited to participate in a specific session only once. They were seated in front of a computer. During the intervention period, some oil diffusers were switched on and were in operation throughout the session with petitgrain essential oil for AG sessions and a neutral oil (almond) for CG sessions. At the same time, participants completed a computer task on a specific Web site typing on their keyboard until they had finished it. The single times were different for all participants and were recorded on the Web site as "performance time." Before and after the intervention, participants completed anxiety and mood state questionnaires (the Stait-Trait Anxiety Inventory [STAI] and the Profile of Mood States [POMS]). Heart-rate variability (HRV) was measured before (PRE), during (20-25 min), and after (POS) the intervention to analyze autonomic nervous system regulation. The AG performed the Web site task 2.28 min faster than the CG (p = 0.05). The two groups showed differences in the following HRV parameters: low frequency (p = 0.05), high frequency (p = 0.02), standard deviation of all RR intervals (p = 0.05), and root mean square of differences (p = 0.02). All participants in all groups showed a decrease from PRE to POST for STAI (p Aromatherapy (inhaling petitgrain essential oil) can improve performance in the workplace. These results could be explained by an autonomic balance on the sympathetic/parasympathetic system through a combined action of the petitgrain main components (linalyl acetate, linalool, and myrcene). The final

  15. Dual Regression

    OpenAIRE

    Spady, Richard; Stouli, Sami

    2012-01-01

    We propose dual regression as an alternative to the quantile regression process for the global estimation of conditional distribution functions under minimal assumptions. Dual regression provides all the interpretational power of the quantile regression process while avoiding the need for repairing the intersecting conditional quantile surfaces that quantile regression often produces in practice. Our approach introduces a mathematical programming characterization of conditional distribution f...

  16. The Effect of Aromatherapy on Anxiety in Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barati, Farzaneh; Nasiri, Ahmad; Akbari, Negarin; Sharifzadeh, Gholamreza

    2016-01-01

    Background Anxiety is the most common mental disorder in end-stage renal disease patients. The use of aromatherapy as a treatment for anxiety has increased substantially in most countries. Objectives This study aimed to investigate the effect of inhaling rose water aromatherapy on anxiety in hemodialysis patients. Methods This randomized controlled clinical trial was carried out in the hemodialysis ward of Birjand Vali-Asr hospital on 46 patients who were randomly divided into control and experimental groups. The standard state-trait anxiety inventory of Spielberger was used to investigate the anxiety level of the samples. The experimental group inhaled rose water for 4 weeks, but the control group did not undergo any intervention. At the end of week 2 and week 4, the participants’ anxiety was measured, and the results were statistically analyzed. Results Mean scores of state and trait anxiety in the experimental group before intervention were 47/47 ± 7/6 and 49/56 ± 13/8, respectively; those after week 4 following the intervention were reduced to 37/1 ± 6/5 and 42/9 ± 10/1; inhalation of rose water fragrance in the experimental group caused a significant decrease (P < 0.001) in the state and trait anxiety levels compared with controls (P = 0.43). Conclusions According to the present study, rose water noticeably reduces the anxiety of hemodialysis patients. Therefore, inhalation of rose water can improve the patient’s emotional and spiritual condition during hemodialysis treatment. PMID:27878109

  17. EFEKTIFITAS ENDORPHIN MASSAGE TERHADAP FUNGSI SEKSUAL PEREMPUAN PADA MASA MENOPAUSE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sri Wahyuni

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: The purpose of this study is to identify the effectiveness ofendorphine massage on female sexual function during menopause inNgampel District of Kendal Regency. Sampling was done by samplingcriteria acsidental aged less than 60 years old, have a husband, in a healthycondition. Data processing was performed using the Wilcoxon test todetermine differences in sexual function before and after the interventionwhile endorphine effectiveness of massage performed by using MannWhitney.Hasil research: Wilcoxon test showed that there are significantdifferences in sexual function before and after being given endorphineMassage with p value 0.00. While Mann Whitney test showed p value of0.13 and the value of z score of -2.828, which means there is a stronginfluence among endorphine Massage to increased sexual function soendorphine Massage is effective for improving sexual function.Keyword: menopause, endorphin massage, sexual function

  18. Massage Therapy and Frequency of Chronic Tension Headaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, Christopher; Chandler, Clint; Moraska, Albert

    2002-01-01

    Objectives. The effect of massage therapy on chronic nonmigraine headache was investigated. Methods. Chronic tension headache sufferers received structured massage therapy treatment directed toward neck and shoulder muscles. Headache frequency, duration, and intensity were recorded and compared with baseline measures. Results. Compared with baseline values, headache frequency was significantly reduced within the first week of the massage protocol. The reduction of headache frequency continued for the remainder of the study (P = .009). The duration of headaches tended to decrease during the massage treatment period (P = .058). Headache intensity was unaffected by massage (P = .19). Conclusions. The muscle-specific massage therapy technique used in this study has the potential to be a functional, nonpharmacological intervention for reducing the incidence of chronic tension headache. PMID:12356617

  19. Physical and psychologic effects of aromatherapy inhalation on pregnant women: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Igarashi, Toshiko

    2013-10-01

    Stress reduction care is important for pregnant women to decrease obstetric complications and children's health problems after birth. The aim of this study is to clarify the physical and psychologic effects of inhalation aromatherapy on pregnant women. Essential oils with high linalool and linalyl acetate content that may be used during pregnancy were selected and among these, and the one preferred by the participant was used. This was a prospective, randomized, controlled trial. This trial was performed at a gynecology outpatient department in a hospital in Kyoto, Japan. The study included pregnant women in week 28 of a single pregnancy with a normal course. Participants were randomly assigned into an aromatherapy group and a control group. They were seated in the resting, seated position for 10 minutes. During the latter 5 minutes of each 10-minute session, aromatherapy inhalation was performed for the aromatherapy group. Before and after the intervention, the Profile of Mood States (POMS) was measured. During the trial, the heart-rate fluctuations were measured for the autonomic nervous system regulation. A total of 13 pregnant women participated in the trial. Seven (7) participants were assigned to the aromatherapy group and 6 participants to the control group. The results of the POMS were such that based on an intragroup comparison, significant differences were observed in the Tension-Anxiety score (paromatherapy. The results of the autonomic nervous system regulation were such that based on an intragroup comparison within the aromatherapy group, the parasympathetic nerve activity increased significantly (pAromatherapy inhalation using essential oils containing linalyl acetate and linalool was found to be effective for the POMS and parasympathetic nerve activity, based on an intragroup comparison. However, based on a comparison between the groups, no substantial difference was observed; hence, further study is necessary in the future.

  20. Efficacy of aromatherapy for reducing pain during labor: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanvisut, Rajavadi; Traisrisilp, Kuntharee; Tongsong, Theera

    2018-05-01

    Many strategies for labor pain management have been studied, including aromatherapy, which is a noninvasive, alternative medicine used as an adjunct for labor pain control. Nevertheless, the results were contradictory. Therefore, we conducted this study to determine the effectiveness of aromatherapy for reducing pain during labor. A randomized controlled trial was carried out on Thai laboring primigravidae who were a low-risk singleton pregnancy undergoing vaginal delivery. All participants, both study and control group, received standard obstetric care. Aromatherapy was only provided to the study group during the first stage of labor. The women rated their pain intensity by rating scales at different stages of labor. The primary outcome was pain scores and the secondary outcomes were necessity of painkiller usage, labor time, aromatherapy-associated complications, route of delivery, and Apgar scores. A total of 104 women were recruited, 52 in each group. Baseline characteristics and baseline pain scores were comparable. The median pain score of latent and early active phase was lower in the aromatherapy group, 5 vs 6 and 7 vs 8, respectively. The mean differences of pain scores between latent and early active phase and the baseline were significantly lower in the aromatherapy group, 1.88 vs 2.6 (p = 0.010) and 3.82 vs 4.39 (p = 0.031), respectively. Late active phase pain scores and other perinatal outcomes were not significantly different. Aromatherapy is helpful in reducing pain in latent and early active phase, and can probably be used as an adjunctive method for labor pain control without serious side effects.

  1. Changing the culture of clinical education in massage therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baskwill, Amanda

    2011-01-01

    Much within the profession of massage therapy is done according to tradition. From an epistemological viewpoint, tradition is a way of knowing or, by extension, being, that is based upon both tenacity and authority and not always in best practices. As the profession of massage therapy moves in the direction of evidence-based medicine, or evidence-informed practice, the opportunity to re-evaluate massage therapy education presents itself.

  2. Pain relief assessment by aromatic essential oil massage on outpatients with primary dysmenorrhea: a randomized, double-blind clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ou, Ming-Chiu; Hsu, Tsung-Fu; Lai, Andrew C; Lin, Yu-Ting; Lin, Chia-Ching

    2012-05-01

    This study assessed the effectiveness of blended essential oils on menstrual cramps for outpatients with primary dysmenorrhea and explored the analgesic ingredients in the essential oils. A randomized, double-blind clinical trial was conducted. Forty-eight outpatients were diagnosed with primary dysmenorrhea by a gynecologist and had 10-point numeric rating scales that were more than 5. The patients were randomly assigned to an essential oil group (n = 24) and a synthetic fragrance group (n = 24). Essential oils blended with lavender (Lavandula officinalis), clary sage (Salvia sclarea) and marjoram (Origanum majorana) in a 2:1:1 ratio was diluted in unscented cream at 3% concentration for the essential oil group. All outpatients used the cream daily to massage their lower abdomen from the end of the last menstruation continuing to the beginning of the next menstruation. Both the numeric rating scale and the verbal rating scale significantly decreased (P menstrual cycle intervention in the two groups. The duration of pain was significantly reduced from 2.4 to 1.8 days after aromatherapy intervention in the essential oil group. Aromatic oil massage provided relief for outpatients with primary dysmenorrhea and reduced the duration of menstrual pain in the essential oil group. The blended essential oils contain four key analgesic components that amount to as much as 79.29%; these analgesic constitutes are linalyl acetate, linalool, eucalyptol, and β-caryophyllene. This study suggests that this blended formula can serve as a reference for alternative and complementary medicine on primary dysmenorrhea. © 2012 The Authors. Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology Research © 2012 Japan Society of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

  3. Intelligent monitoring-based safety system of massage robot

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡宁; 李长胜; 王利峰; 胡磊; 徐晓军; 邹雲鹏; 胡玥; 沈晨

    2016-01-01

    As an important attribute of robots, safety is involved in each link of the full life cycle of robots, including the design, manufacturing, operation and maintenance. The present study on robot safety is a systematic project. Traditionally, robot safety is defined as follows: robots should not collide with humans, or robots should not harm humans when they collide. Based on this definition of robot safety, researchers have proposed ex ante and ex post safety standards and safety strategies and used the risk index and risk level as the evaluation indexes for safety methods. A massage robot realizes its massage therapy function through applying a rhythmic force on the massage object. Therefore, the traditional definition of safety, safety strategies, and safety realization methods cannot satisfy the function and safety requirements of massage robots. Based on the descriptions of the environment of massage robots and the tasks of massage robots, the present study analyzes the safety requirements of massage robots; analyzes the potential safety dangers of massage robots using the fault tree tool; proposes an error monitoring-based intelligent safety system for massage robots through monitoring and evaluating potential safety danger states, as well as decision making based on potential safety danger states; and verifies the feasibility of the intelligent safety system through an experiment.

  4. Massage therapy for essential hypertension: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, X J; Li, S J; Zhang, Y Q

    2015-03-01

    Massage, an ancient Chinese healing art, is widely practiced for symptom relief in hypertensive patients with anxiety, depression, headache, vertigo, chronic pain in neck, shoulder and back. A large number of case series and clinical trials have been published. However, it is still unclear whether massage can be recommended as an effective therapy for essential hypertension (EH). We estimated the current clinical evidence of massage for EH. Articles published before 10 December 2013 were searched using Cochrane Library, PubMed, EMBASE, Chinese Scientific Journal Database (VIP), Chinese Biomedical Literature Database, Wanfang data and Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure. Randomized controlled trials comparing massage with any type of control intervention were included. Trials testing massage combined with antihypertensive drugs versus antihypertensive drugs were included as well. Meta-analysis was performed on the effects on blood pressure (BP). Twenty-four articles involving 1962 patients with EH were selected. Methodological quality of most trials was evaluated as generally low. Meta-analyses demonstrated that massage combined with antihypertensive drugs may be more effective than antihypertensive drugs alone in lowering both systolic BP (SBP; mean difference (MD): -6.92 (-10.05, -3.80); Phypertensive patients as compared with antihypertensive drugs. Safety of massage is still unclear. There is some encouraging evidence of massage for EH. However, because of poor methodological quality, the evidence remains weak. Rigorously designed trials are needed to validate the use of massage in future.

  5. The role of massage in scar management: a literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Thuzar M; Bordeaux, Jeremy S

    2012-03-01

    Many surgeons recommend postoperative scar massage to improve aesthetic outcome, although scar massage regimens vary greatly. To review the regimens and efficacy of scar massage. PubMed was searched using the following key words: "massage" in combination with "scar," or "linear," "hypertrophic," "keloid," "diasta*," "atrophic." Information on study type, scar type, number of patients, scar location, time to onset of massage therapy, treatment protocol, treatment duration, outcomes measured, and response to treatment was tabulated. Ten publications including 144 patients who received scar massage were examined in this review. Time to treatment onset ranged from after suture removal to longer than 2 years. Treatment protocols ranged from 10 minutes twice daily to 30 minutes twice weekly. Treatment duration varied from one treatment to 6 months. Overall, 65 patients (45.7%) experienced clinical improvement based on Patient Observer Scar Assessment Scale score, Vancouver Scar Scale score, range of motion, pruritus, pain, mood, depression, or anxiety. Of 30 surgical scars treated with massage, 27 (90%) had improved appearance or Patient Observer Scar Assessment Scale score. The evidence for the use of scar massage is weak, regimens used are varied, and outcomes measured are neither standardized nor reliably objective, although its efficacy appears to be greater in postsurgical scars than traumatic or postburn scars. Although scar massage is anecdotally effective, there is scarce scientific data in the literature to support it. © 2011 by the American Society for Dermatologic Surgery, Inc. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Chemical Burns Following Massage With Chopped Pulsatilla koreana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Jinkyung; Tae, Sangpil; Joo, Hongsil; Lee, Sang-Yeul; Sung, Kun-Yong

    2017-11-01

    Herbal massage is commonly used for cosmetic and antirheumatic purposes in the Republic of Korea. Cutaneous burns can complicate herbal massages, but this is a very rare occurrence. Pulsatilla koreana, the Korean pasque flower, is a species of the genus Pulsatilla from the Ranunculaceae family. It is a perennial plant native to Korea, where it is used in herbal and folk medicine for its antipyretic, analgesic, anti-inflammatory, astringent, and hemostatic effects. Three cases of burns as a result of herbal massages with Pulsatilla koreana are presented herein to increase public awareness about the adverse effects of products used incorrectly for herbal massage.

  7. Effectiveness of aromatherapy in decreasing maternal anxiety for a sick child undergoing infusion in a paediatric clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueki, Shingo; Niinomi, Kazuteru; Takashima, Yuko; Kimura, Ryoko; Komai, Kazuyo; Murakami, Kiyotaka; Fujiwara, Chieko

    2014-12-01

    We examined whether aromatherapy involving inhalation of yuzu (Citrus ichangensis×Citrus reticulata) oil was effective in decreasing mothers' anxiety for her sick child receiving an infusion at a paediatric clinic. Controlled clinical trial. Mothers of sick children who arrived at the hospital were asked to complete an anonymous questionnaire. After a doctor examined the child and confirmed the necessity for infusion, the mothers who agreed to participate in our study were allocated to an aromatherapy or a control group. A diffuser was filled with yuzu oil before the subjects entered the aromatherapy room. The mother was shown how to use the aromatherapy diffuser while the child was receiving an infusion in the same room. Fifteen minutes after entering the room, the mothers were asked to complete an another questionnaire. We measured the mother's anxiety with the state anxiety score from the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory. There were 60 subjects in the aromatherapy group and 61 in the control group. Both groups were well balanced in terms of demographic characteristics. Using analysis of variance, we demonstrated a significant difference in two-factor interactions between the control and aromatherapy groups. Maternal state anxiety was significantly lower in the aromatherapy than in the control group. Inhalation of yuzu oil was shown to decrease maternal anxiety for a sick child. A multicentre randomized controlled trial or double-blind study is necessary to obtain objective evidence of this benefit of aromatherapy. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. A Randomized Controlled Trial Provides Evidence to Support Aromatherapy to Minimize Anxiety in Women Undergoing Breast Biopsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trambert, Renee; Kowalski, Mildred Ortu; Wu, Betty; Mehta, Nimisha; Friedman, Paul

    2017-10-01

    Aromatherapy has been used to reduce anxiety in a variety of settings, but usefulness associated with breast biopsies has not been documented. This study was conducted in women undergoing image-guided breast biopsy. We explored the use of two different aromatherapy scents, compared to placebo, aimed at reducing anxiety with the intent of generating new knowledge. This was a randomized, placebo-controlled study of two different types of external aromatherapy tabs (lavender-sandalwood and orange-peppermint) compared with a matched placebo-control delivery system. Anxiety was self-reported before and after undergoing a breast biopsy using the Spielberger State Anxiety Inventory Scale. Eighty-seven women participated in this study. There was a statistically significant reduction in self-reported anxiety with the use of the lavender-sandalwood aromatherapy tab compared with the placebo group (p = .032). Aromatherapy tabs reduced anxiety during image-guided breast biopsy. The completion of the biopsy provided some relief from anxiety in all groups. The use of aromatherapy tabs offers an evidence-based nursing intervention to improve adaptation and reduce anxiety for women undergoing breast biopsy. Lavender-sandalwood aromatherapy reduced anxiety and promoted adaptation more than orange-peppermint aromatherapy or placebo. © 2017 Sigma Theta Tau International.

  9. The benefits of giving a massage on the mental state of massage therapists: a randomized, controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Anne M; Ramasamy, Adaikalavan; Hotek, Judith; Roel, Brian; Riffe, Drew

    2012-12-01

    The objective of this study was to determine whether giving a massage had an impact of the mental state of the massage therapist. The design of this study was a randomized, controlled, blinded study with two parallel groups. This study was conducted at an accredited school of therapeutic massage in Dallas, Texas. The study comprised healthy female and male final-term massage students between ages 18 and 65 years. The participants were randomized into two groups: (1) the experimental group who gave a 1-hour Swedish massage to a massage client (Massage group), or (2) the control group who sat in a room doing normal, daily activities (Control group). Both these activities were a normal part of the daily routine for these massage students. The primary outcomes were the change in the Depression Anxiety and Stress Scale (DASS) scores pre- and postparticipation. Twenty-two (22) participants were randomized in this trial. The baseline characteristics were comparable between the two groups. A statistically significant advantage for the massage group was found relative to the control group in subjective anxiety (DASS Anxiety Subscale, p=0.014). There were no significant differences between the groups with regard to total DASS score (p=0.540), subjective depressive symptoms (DASS Depression Subscale, p=0.472) and subjective stress-related symptoms (DASS Stress Subscale, p=0.919). There were no adverse events reported by any participant. This study shows that massage therapists themselves may benefit from giving a therapeutic massage by experiencing less subjective anxiety following the giving of a massage.

  10. The changing motivation of massage therapy students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finch, P

    2007-05-01

    The study was conducted in order to determine whether the level of motivation related to intrinsic (people-oriented) and extrinsic (external reward) value complexes in a class of massage therapy students changed during their professional education. The research was a quasi-experimental within-subject design, in which survey data was collected from students on their first day in the massage therapy program and again towards the end of their final term. The data were collated and summarized, and the differences in motivation scores were assessed using Fisher's Least Significant Difference procedure. The results support the hypothesis that massage therapy students are motivated more strongly by intrinsic than extrinsic rewards both at the commencement of their studies and as they approach entry to practice. Also evident from the data is the fact that the students' motivation changed during their professional studies. This change involved a significant decrease in the level of intrinsic motivation and significant increase in the level of extrinsic motivation. Thus, although intrinsic motivation reduced while extrinsic motivation increased, the former remained the more powerful influence. Professional programs should consider the balance between intrinsic and extrinsic student motivation and attempt to control influences that might shift this such that the humanistic / altruistic mission of health care is undermined.

  11. Male courtship behavior in Ceratitis Capitata (Diptera: Tephritidae) that have received Aromatherapy with ginger root oil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Briceno, D.; Eberhard, W.; Shelly, T.

    2007-01-01

    The results of previous studies that showed that exposing mass-reared male Mediterranean fruit flies Ceratitis capitata (Wiedemann) to ginger root oil ('aromatherapy') increases the likelihood of mating with wild females were confirmed. The increased male success could be due to female responses to changes in male behavior or male pheromones. There were no significant differences in the types of courtship movements executed by males with and without aromatherapy. The durations of movements also did not differ when mass-reared males were paired with mass-reared females; however, when they were paired with wild females, there were a few, small differences. Previous studies indicated that the effectiveness of the male long-distance attractant pheromone is not affected by aromatherapy, but these studies did not consider pheromones released at close range during courtship, which behavioral analyses suggest may be different. We propose the following possible explanation for the different effects of aromatherapy with different females. Selection on males under mass rearing may have altered their close-range pheromones in ways that can be remedied by aromatherapy; and only wild females respond because the pheromonal responsiveness of mass-reared females has also changed. We propose observations that could test these ideas. (author) [es

  12. Aromatherapy benefits autonomic nervous system regulation for elementary school faculty in taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Kang-Ming; Shen, Chuh-Wei

    2011-01-01

    Workplace stress-related illness is a serious issue, and consequently many stress reduction methods have been investigated. Aromatherapy is especially for populations that work under high stress. Elementary school teachers are a high-stress working population in Taiwan. In this study, fifty-four elementary school teachers were recruited to evaluate aromatherapy performance on stress reduction. Bergamot essential oil was used for aromatherapy spray for 10 minutes. Blood pressure and autonomic nervous system parameters were recorded 5 minutes before and after the application of the aroma spray. Results showed that there were significant decreases in blood pressure, heart rate, LF power percentage, and LF/HF while there were increases in heart rate variability and HF power percentage (P gender variables) and anxiety degree groups. All parameters were significantly different for most subgroups, except for the substitute teachers and the light-anxiety group. Parasympathetic nervous system activation was measured after aromatherapy in this study. It encouraged further study for other stress working population by aromatherapy.

  13. Aromatherapy for managing menopausal symptoms: A protocol for systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jiae; Lee, Hye Won; Lee, Ju Ah; Lim, Hyun-Ja; Lee, Myeong Soo

    2018-02-01

    Aromatherapy is often used as a complementary therapy for women's health. This systematic review aims to evaluate the therapeutic effects of aromatherapy as a management for menopausal symptoms. Eleven electronic databases will be searched from inception to February 2018. Randomized controlled trials that evaluated any type of aromatherapy against any type of control in individuals with menopausal symptoms will be eligible. The methodological quality will be assessed using the Cochrane risk of bias tool. Two authors will independently assess each study for eligibility and risk of bias and to extract data. This study will provide a high quality synthesis of current evidence of aromatherapy for menopausal symptoms measured with Menopause Rating Scale, the Kupperman Index, the Greene Climacteric Scale, or other validated questionnaires. The conclusion of our systematic review will provide evidence to judge whether aromatherapy is an effective intervention for patient with menopausal women. Ethical approval will not be required, given that this protocol is for a systematic review. The systematic review will be published in a peer-reviewed journal. The review will also be disseminated electronically and in print. PROSPERO CRD42017079191.

  14. Aromatherapy for Sexual Problems in Menopausal Women: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khadivzadeh, Talat; Najafi, Mona Najaf; Irani, Morvarid; Dizavandi, Fatemeh Rajab; Shariati, Khatereh

    2018-01-01

    Objectives The aim of the present systematic review and meta-analysis is the exploration of the potential evidence of the effectiveness of aromatherapy products on the sexual function of menopausal women. Methods From inception to December 2017, the search process was performed using the MEDLINE and Scopus databases and the Cochrane Library regarding the trials on the effectiveness of herbal-medicine aromatherapy on the sexual function of menopausal women. Results Three of the trials comprise suitable data for inclusion in the meta-analysis. According to the meta-analysis, it is possible to improve the standardized mean difference (SMD) of the sexual desire up to 0.56 in the aromatherapy group compared with the control group (SMD = 0.56; P aromatherapy with neroli oil or lavender (monopreparation) and combined-oil aromatherapy with lavender, fennel, geranium, and rose significantly improved human sexual function; however, a significant change of the serum-estrogen level was not detected. The findings of the present review should be presented cautiously because of the corresponding limitations such as the lack of a standardized tool, the lack of intention-to-treat reporting, the low study amount, and the short-term follow-up. PMID:29765928

  15. Effect of Inhalation of Aromatherapy Oil on Patients with Perennial Allergic Rhinitis: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Seo Yeon

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effects of aromatherapy oil inhalation on symptoms, quality of life, sleep quality, and fatigue level among adults with perennial allergic rhinitis (PAR). Fifty-four men and women aged between 20 and 60 were randomized to inhale aromatherapy oil containing essential oil from sandalwood, geranium, and Ravensara or almond oil (the placebo) for 5 minutes twice daily for 7 days. PAR symptoms determined by Total Nasal Symptom Score (TNSS), the Rhinoconjunctivitis Quality of Life Questionnaire (RQLQ), sleep quality by Verran Synder-Halpern (VSH) scale, and fatigue level by Chalder Fatigue Scale (CFS) were assessed before and after intervention period. Compared with the placebo, the experimental group showed significant improvement in TNSS, especially in nasal obstruction. The aromatherapy group also showed significantly higher improvements in total score of RQLQ and CFS. These findings indicate that inhalation of certain aromatherapy oil helps relieve PAR symptoms, improve rhinitis-specific quality of life, and reduce fatigue in patients with PAR. In conclusion, inhalation of aromatherapy essential oil may have potential as an effective intervention to alleviate PAR. PMID:27034695

  16. Effect of Inhalation of Aromatherapy Oil on Patients with Perennial Allergic Rhinitis: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seo Yeon Choi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to investigate the effects of aromatherapy oil inhalation on symptoms, quality of life, sleep quality, and fatigue level among adults with perennial allergic rhinitis (PAR. Fifty-four men and women aged between 20 and 60 were randomized to inhale aromatherapy oil containing essential oil from sandalwood, geranium, and Ravensara or almond oil (the placebo for 5 minutes twice daily for 7 days. PAR symptoms determined by Total Nasal Symptom Score (TNSS, the Rhinoconjunctivitis Quality of Life Questionnaire (RQLQ, sleep quality by Verran Synder-Halpern (VSH scale, and fatigue level by Chalder Fatigue Scale (CFS were assessed before and after intervention period. Compared with the placebo, the experimental group showed significant improvement in TNSS, especially in nasal obstruction. The aromatherapy group also showed significantly higher improvements in total score of RQLQ and CFS. These findings indicate that inhalation of certain aromatherapy oil helps relieve PAR symptoms, improve rhinitis-specific quality of life, and reduce fatigue in patients with PAR. In conclusion, inhalation of aromatherapy essential oil may have potential as an effective intervention to alleviate PAR.

  17. Integration of Massage Therapy in Outpatient Cancer Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowen, Virginia S; Tafuto, Barbara

    2018-03-01

    Massage therapy can be helpful in alleviating cancer-related symptoms and cancer treatment-related symptoms. While surveys have noted that cancer patients seek out massage as a nonpharmacologic approach during cancer treatment, little is known about the integration of massage in outpatient cancer care. The purpose of this study was to examine the extent to which massage is being integrated into outpatient cancer care at NCI-designated Cancer Centers. This study used descriptive methods to analyze the integration of massage in NCI-designated Cancer Centers providing clinical services to patients (n = 62). Data were collected from 91.1% of the centers (n = 59) using content analysis and a telephone survey. A dataset was developed and coded for analysis. The integration of massage was assessed by an algorithm that was developed from a set of five variables: 1) acceptance of treatment as therapeutic, 2) institution offers treatment to patients, 3) clinical practice guidelines in place, 4) use of evidence-based resources to inform treatment, and 5) shared knowledge about treatment among health care team. All centers were scored against all five variables using a six-point scale, with all variables rated equally. The integration of massage ranged from not at all (0) to very high (5) with all five levels of integration evident. Only 11 centers (17.7% of total) rated a very high level of integration; nearly one-third of the centers (n = 22) were found to have no integration of massage at all-not even provision of information about massage to patients through the center website. The findings of this analysis suggest that research on massage is not being leveraged to integrate massage into outpatient cancer care.

  18. Integration of Massage Therapy in Outpatient Cancer Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowen, Virginia S.; Tafuto, Barbara

    2018-01-01

    Background Massage therapy can be helpful in alleviating cancer-related symptoms and cancer treatment-related symptoms. While surveys have noted that cancer patients seek out massage as a nonpharmacologic approach during cancer treatment, little is known about the integration of massage in outpatient cancer care. Purpose The purpose of this study was to examine the extent to which massage is being integrated into outpatient cancer care at NCI-designated Cancer Centers. Setting This study used descriptive methods to analyze the integration of massage in NCI-designated Cancer Centers providing clinical services to patients (n = 62). Design Data were collected from 91.1% of the centers (n = 59) using content analysis and a telephone survey. A dataset was developed and coded for analysis. Main Outcome Measure The integration of massage was assessed by an algorithm that was developed from a set of five variables: 1) acceptance of treatment as therapeutic, 2) institution offers treatment to patients, 3) clinical practice guidelines in place, 4) use of evidence-based resources to inform treatment, and 5) shared knowledge about treatment among health care team. All centers were scored against all five variables using a six-point scale, with all variables rated equally. Results The integration of massage ranged from not at all (0) to very high (5) with all five levels of integration evident. Only 11 centers (17.7% of total) rated a very high level of integration; nearly one-third of the centers (n = 22) were found to have no integration of massage at all—not even provision of information about massage to patients through the center website. Conclusions The findings of this analysis suggest that research on massage is not being leveraged to integrate massage into outpatient cancer care. PMID:29593842

  19. Nurses experience of aromatherapy use with dementia patients experiencing disturbed sleep patterns. An action research project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johannessen, Berit

    2013-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to gain an insight into nurses' experiences of incorporating aromatherapy into the care of residents suffering from dementia, anxiety and disturbed sleep patterns. Twenty-four residents and twelve nurses from four nursing homes participated in an action research study. The use of lavender augustofolia essential oil diffused nightly was perceived as an effective care modality reducing insomnia and anxiety in this patient cohort. Nurses experienced some negative attitudes among colleagues because they considered aromatherapy as not evidence based. Nurses require greater access to evidence based use of Aromatherapy. Further research is needed to study how smell can enhance dementia care. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. A systematic review of the use of aromatherapy in treatment of behavioral problems in dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fung, Jo Kamen K M; Tsang, Hector W H; Chung, Raymond C K

    2012-07-01

    We aimed to fill the literature gap by identifying the clinical benefits of aromatherapy in older adults with dementia, and its efficacy in reducing behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia (BPSD) based on available randomized controlled trials (RCT). A systematic review of 11 clinical trials shortlisted from electronic databases from 1995 to 2011 was carried out. The RCT showed that aromatherapy had positive effects on reduction of BPSD, improvement in cognitive functions, increasing quality of life, enhancing independence of activities of daily living and so on. However, adverse effects were noted in some studies. Limitations on methodology are discussed and suggestions on directions of further studies are made. It is recommended that aromatherapy shows the potential to be applied as a therapeutic and safe complementary and alternative therapy for the management of BPSD on more evidence collected from better designed RCT. © 2012 Japan Geriatrics Society.

  1. Effects of Inhalation Aromatherapy on Symptoms of Sleep Disturbance in the Elderly with Dementia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanuki, Emiko

    2017-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of inhalation aromatherapy on sleep disturbance in elderly individuals with dementia. In 19 subjects, normal sleep was observed for a 20-day control period, inhalation aromatherapy was then applied for a 20-day intervention period, and the control and intervention periods were compared. During the intervention period, essential oils were placed nightly on towels around the subjects' pillows. The measured sleep conditions were sleep latency, total sleep time, sleep efficacy, duration of the longest sustained sleep period, wake time after sleep onset, early morning awakening, total daytime sleep, and the Neuropsychiatric Inventory. Total sleep time was significantly longer in the intervention period than in the control period (p aromatherapy on symptoms of sleep disturbance in elderly individuals with dementia. PMID:28400839

  2. Effect of Rosa damascene aromatherapy on sleep quality in cardiac patients: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajibagheri, Ali; Babaii, Atye; Adib-Hajbaghery, Mohsen

    2014-08-01

    Sleep disorders are common among patients hospitalized in coronary care unit (CCU). This study aimed to investigate the effect of Rosa damascene aromatherapy on sleep quality of patients hospitalized in CCU. In this randomized controlled trial, 60 patients who met the inclusion criteria were conveniently sampled and randomly allocated to the experimental and control groups. Patients in the control group received routine care. In the experimental group, patients received routine care and Rosa damascene aromatherapy for three subsequent nights. In the both groups the sleep quality was assessed using the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index. After the study, the mean scores of five domains of Pittsburg Sleep Quality Index as well as the mean of total score of the index in the experimental group were significantly lower than the control group. Rosa damascene aromatherapy can significantly improve the sleep quality of patients hospitalized in CCUs. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Cerebral Palsy Symptoms in Children Decreased Following Massage Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez-Reif, Maria; Field, Tiffany; Largie, Shay; Diego, Miguel; Manigat, Natasha; Seoanes, Jacqueline; Bornstein, Joan

    2005-01-01

    Twenty young children (mean age = 32 months) with cerebral palsy (CP) recruited from early intervention programs received 30 minutes of massage or reading twice weekly for 12 weeks. The children receiving massage therapy showed fewer physical symptoms including reduced spasticity, less rigid muscle tone overall and in the arms, and improved fine…

  4. Father-Infant Interactions Are Enhanced by Massage Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cullen, Christy; Field, Tiffany; Escalona, Angelica; Hartshorn, Kristin

    2000-01-01

    Examined the impact of fathers giving massages to their infants, ages 3 to 14 months, for 15 minutes prior to their daily bedtime for 1 month. Found that fathers who had massaged their infants were more expressive and showed more enjoyment and more warmth during floor-play interactions with their infants than did fathers in the wait-list control…

  5. Massage in children with cancer: effectiveness of a protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luís Manuel da Cunha Batalha

    2013-11-01

    Conclusions: despite the small sample size, massage therapy appears to be a useful intervention in reducing pain in children with cancer. However, there are still questions regarding the effectiveness of this massage protocol. The authors recommend its use due to its contribution to the promotion of the child's well-being and quality of life.

  6. Adolescents with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder Benefit from Massage Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field, Tiffany M.; Quintino, Olga; Hernandez-Reif, Maria; Koslovsky, Gabrielle

    1998-01-01

    Twenty-eight adolescents with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder were provided either massage therapy or relaxation therapy for 10 consecutive school days. The massage therapy group, but not the relaxation therapy group, self-rated as happier, and observers rated them as fidgeting less following the sessions. Teachers reported more time on…

  7. Neural correlates of a single-session massage treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sliz, D; Smith, A; Wiebking, C; Northoff, G; Hayley, S

    2012-03-01

    The current study investigated the immediate neurophysiological effects of different types of massage in healthy adults using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Much attention has been given to the default mode network, a set of brain regions showing greater activity in the resting state. These regions (i.e. insula, posterior and anterior cingulate, inferior parietal and medial prefrontal cortices) have been postulated to be involved in the neural correlates of consciousness, specifically in arousal and awareness. We posit that massage would modulate these same regions given the benefits and pleasant affective properties of touch. To this end, healthy participants were randomly assigned to one of four conditions: 1. Swedish massage, 2. reflexology, 3. massage with an object or 4. a resting control condition. The right foot was massaged while each participant performed a cognitive association task in the scanner. We found that the Swedish massage treatment activated the subgenual anterior and retrosplenial/posterior cingulate cortices. This increased blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) signal was maintained only in the former brain region during performance of the cognitive task. Interestingly, the reflexology massage condition selectively affected the retrosplenial/posterior cingulate in the resting state, whereas massage with the object augmented the BOLD response in this region during the cognitive task performance. These findings should have implications for better understanding how alternative treatments might affect resting state neural activity and could ultimately be important for devising new targets in the management of mood disorders.

  8. Aromatherapy for reducing colonoscopy related procedural anxiety and physiological parameters: a randomized controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Pei-Hsin; Peng, Yen-Chun; Lin, Yu-Ting; Chang, Chi-Sen; Ou, Ming-Chiu

    2010-01-01

    Colonoscopy is generally tolerated, some patients regarding the procedure as unpleasant and painful and generally performed with the patient sedated and receiving analgesics. The effect of sedation and analgesia for colonoscopy is limited. Aromatherapy is also applied to gastrointestinal endoscopy to reduce procedural anxiety. There is lack of information about aromatherapy specific for colonoscopy. In this study, we aimed to performed a randomized controlled study to investigate the effect of aromatherapy on relieve anxiety, stress and physiological parameters of colonoscopy. A randomized controlled trail was carried out and collected in 2009 and 2010. The participants were randomized in two groups. Aromatherapy was then carried out by inhalation of Sunflower oil (control group) and Neroli oil (Experimental group). The anxiety index was evaluated by State Trait Anxiety Inventory-state (STAI-S) score before aromatherapy and after colonoscopy as well as the pain index for post-procedural by visual analogue scale (VAS). Physiological indicators, such as blood pressure (systolic and diastolic blood pressure), heart rate and respiratory rate were evaluated before and after aromatherapy. Participates in this study were 27 subjects, 13 in control group and 14 in Neroli group with average age 52.26 +/- 17.79 years. There was no significance of procedural anxiety by STAI-S score and procedural pain by VAS. The physiological parameters showed a significant lower pre- and post-procedural systolic blood pressure in Neroli group than control group. Aromatic care for colonoscopy, although with no significant effect on procedural anxiety, is an inexpensive, effective and safe pre-procedural technique that could decrease systolic blood pressure.

  9. The effectiveness of nurse-delivered aromatherapy in an acute care setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Jill R; Rivard, Rachael L; Griffin, Kristen H; Kolste, Alison K; Joswiak, Denise; Kinney, Mary Ellen; Dusek, Jeffery A

    2016-04-01

    To examine the use and effectiveness of essential oil therapeutic interventions on pain, nausea, and anxiety, when provided by nurses to patients in acute hospital settings across a large health system. This study expands upon the limited body of literature on aromatherapy use among inpatients. Retrospective, effectiveness study using data obtained from electronic health records. Ten Allina Health hospitals located in Minnesota and western Wisconsin. Nurse-delivered aromatherapy. Change in patient-reported pain, anxiety, and nausea, rated before and after receiving aromatherapy using a numeric rating scale (0-10). There were 10,262 hospital admissions during the study time frame in which nurse-delivered aromatherapy was part of patient care. The majority of admissions receiving aromatherapy were females (81.71%) and white (87.32%). Over 75% of all aromatherapy sessions were administered via inhalation. Lavender had the highest absolute frequency (49.5%) of use regardless of mode of administration, followed by ginger (21.2%), sweet marjoram (12.3%), mandarin (9.4%), and combination oils (7.6%). Sweet marjoram resulted in the largest single oil average pain change at -3.31 units (95% CI: -4.28, -2.33), while lavender and sweet marjoram had equivalent average anxiety changes at -2.73 units, and ginger had the largest single oil average change in nausea at -2.02 units (95% CI: -2.55, -1.49). Essential oils generally resulted in significant clinical improvements based on their intended use, although each oil also showed ancillary benefits for other symptoms. Future research should explore use of additional essential oils, modes of administration, and different patient populations. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  10. Meaning of becoming mother and son/daughter through massage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisca Márquez Doren

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Revealing the experience of mothers when massaging their children to know the phenomenon in the context of a mother-child healthy development. Method: This is a qualitative study with a phenomenological approach carried out with 11 women who massaged their children and answered the guiding question: What did the experience of massaging your child mean to you? Results: The experience of massaging their children meant the development of their being a mother and of being a son/daughter, in addition to developing the attachment relationship between them. The massage can operationalize this integrality, become a tool of communication, stimulation and promotion of secure attachment, by promoting the loving interaction between mother and child. Conclusion: This practice should be considered as an option in the programs that promote the comprehensive health of the mother and child.

  11. The theoretical analysis content correctional massage for athletes with disabilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romanna Rudenko

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: to analyze the content authoring methodology of correction massage for athletes with disabilities. Material and Methods: analysis and synthesis of information for scientific, methodical and special literature; pedagogical supervision; analysis of medical cards; methods of mathematical statistics. The study involved 60 athletes with disabilities qualifications of different nosological groups. Results: of correction massage technique developed taking into account the level of physical activity, nosological group, physiological effects of massage techniques on the system. Forms of correction massage must meet the intensity of physical activity, main course and related diseases in the training cycle athletes with disabilities. Conclusions: apply total, partial, intermittent, local, segmental-reflex massage, paravertebral zones, taking into account intensity physical activity, individual tolerance for exercise

  12. Aromatherapy for the treatment of PONV in children: a pilot RCT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiberd, Mathew B; Clarke, Suzanne K; Chorney, Jill; d'Eon, Brandon; Wright, Stuart

    2016-11-09

    Postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV) is one of the most common postoperative complications of general anesthesia in pediatrics. Aromatherapy has been shown to be effective in treating PONV in adults. Given the encouraging results of the adult studies, we planned to determine feasibility of doing a large-scale study in the pediatric population. Our group conducted a pilot randomized controlled trial examining the effect of aromatherapy on post-operative nausea and vomiting in patients 4-16 undergoing ambulatory surgery at a single center. Nausea was defined as a score of 4/10 on the Baxter Retching Faces Scale (BARF scale). A clinically significant reduction was defined as a two-point reduction in Nausea. Post operatively children were administered the BARF scale in 15 min internals until discharge home or until nausea score of 4/10 or greater. Children with nausea were randomized to saline placebo group or aromatherapy QueaseEase™ (Soothing Scents, Inc, Enterprise, AL: blend of ginger, lavender, mint and spearmint). Nausea scores were recorded post intervention. A total of 162 subjects were screened for inclusion in the study. Randomization occurred in 41 subjects of which 39 were included in the final analysis. For the primary outcome, 14/18 (78 %) of controls reached primary outcome compared to 19/21 (90 %) in the aromatherapy group (p = 0.39, Eta 0.175). Other outcomes included use of antiemetic in PACU (control 44 %, aromatherapy 52 % P = 0.75, Eta 0.08), emesis (Control 11 %, 9 % aromatherapy, P = 0.87, Eta = 0.03). There was a statistically significant difference in whether subjects continued to use the intervention (control 28 %, aromatherapy 66 %, p-value 0.048, Eta 0.33). Aromatherapy had a small non-significant effect size in treating postoperative nausea and vomiting compared with control. A large-scale randomized control trial would not be feasible at our institution and would be of doubtful utility. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT

  13. Influence of classic massage on cardiac autonomic modulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mário Augusto Paschoal

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction: Massage can be defined as the rhythmic and smooth manipulation of body tissues, with the aim to promote health and well-being. Objective: To assess the influence of classic massage on cardiac autonomic modulation. Methods: Cross-sectional study that evaluated healthy participants, with mean age between 18 and 25 years, divided into two groups: test group (TG, n=11 and control group (CG, n=10. The TG had their heartbeat recorded for 5min before receiving a classic massage for 40min and during three periods after this procedure: 0-5min, 5-10min and 10-15min. The CG had their heartbeats recorded at the same time; without receive massage. Cardiac autonomic modulation was investigated by heart rate variability (HRV. Results: The mean values of HRV rates were: pNN50, respectively, for the TG: before massage (10.5 ± 9.5%, and after massage: 0-5min (11.6 ± 7.2%, 5-10min (12.1 ± 8.0% and 10-15min (11.1 ± 7.9%, with no significant statistical difference. The same result was found for the mean values of rMSSD index of the TG; before massage: 52.1 ± 46.2 ms, and after massage: 0-5min (50.0 ± 21.6ms, 5-10min (52.0 ± 27.4 ms and 10-15min (48.2 ± 21.1 ms. Also, the values of LFnuand HFnu indexes did not change significantly before and after massage, and they were not statistically different from the values presented by the control group. Conclusion: The study results suggest that one session of classic massage does not modify cardiac autonomic modulation in healthy young adults.

  14. EFEKTIVITAS MASSAGE LUMBAL DAN BREAST MASSAGE TERHADAP KONTRAKSI UTERUS PADA IBU BERSALIN KALA I

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ipang Suparti

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Penyulit dalam persalinan antara lain adanya kelainan presentasi dan posisi, distosia karena kelainan alat kandungan, distosia karena kelainan janin, dan distosia karena kelainan his (Manuaba, 2010. Distosia karena kelainan his dapat terjadi karena sifat his yang berubah-ubah, tidak adanya koordinasi dan sinkronisasi kontraksi dan bagian–bagiannya sehingga kontraksi tidak efisien dalam mengadakan pembukaan. Kelainan his juga dapat terjadi karena his yang tidak adekuat untuk melakukan pembukaan serviks atau mendorong anak keluar. His yang tidak adekuat ini disebut dengan inersia uteri (Leveno K, 2010 dalam Atun Raudotul dkk. Upaya non farmakologis merupakan suatu upaya untuk membantu timbulnya kontraksi tanpa bantuan obat atau bahan sintetik lainnya. Dimana upaya tersebut dengan melakukan pijatan pada bagian tubuh agar merangsang pengeluaran oksitosin secara lebih alami dan aktif sehingga diharapkan tidak menimbulkan efek yang berbahaya bagi ibu maupun janin. Sampel pada penelitian ini yaitu ibu bersalin kala I di BPM Siti Sugiharti pada periode Maret-April 2016. Teknik pengambilan sampel pada penelitian ini menggunakan purposive sampling. Jenis penelitian ini menggunakan metode penelitian kuantitatif dengan desain penelitian quasi experimental yaitu desain yang mempunyai kelompok kontrol, tetapi tidak dapat berfungsi sepenuhnya untuk mengontrol variabel-variabel luar yang mempengaruhi pelaksanaan eksperimen (Sugiyono, 2013. tindakan massage lumbal yang dilakukan pada ibu bersalin kala I terjadi peningkatan kontraksi uterus sebanyak 20 (95,24% responden. Sedangkan pada tindakan breast massage terjadi peningkatan kontraksi uterus sebanyak 19 (90,48% responden. Penelitian ini dapat disimpulkan bahwa tindakan massage lumbal yang dilakukan pada ibu bersalin kala I lebih berhasil dibandingkan dengan breast massage. Terdapat perbedaan kontraksi uterus sebelum dan setelah dilakukan Breast Massage terhadap peningkatan kontraksi uterus pada ibu bersalin

  15. Five-Week Outcomes From a Dosing Trial of Therapeutic Massage for Chronic Neck Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherman, Karen J.; Cook, Andrea J.; Wellman, Robert D.; Hawkes, Rene J.; Kahn, Janet R.; Deyo, Richard A.; Cherkin, Daniel C.

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE This trial was designed to evaluate the optimal dose of massage for individuals with chronic neck pain. METHODS We recruited 228 individuals with chronic nonspecific neck pain from an integrated health care system and the general population, and randomized them to 5 groups receiving various doses of massage (a 4-week course consisting of 30-minute visits 2 or 3 times weekly or 60-minute visits 1, 2, or 3 times weekly) or to a single control group (a 4-week period on a wait list). We assessed neck-related dysfunction with the Neck Disability Index (range, 0–50 points) and pain intensity with a numerical rating scale (range, 0–10 points) at baseline and 5 weeks. We used log-linear regression to assess the likelihood of clinically meaningful improvement in neck-related dysfunction (≥5 points on Neck Disability Index) or pain intensity (≥30% improvement) by treatment group. RESULTS After adjustment for baseline age, outcome measures, and imbalanced covariates, 30-minute treatments were not significantly better than the wait list control condition in terms of achieving a clinically meaningful improvement in neck dysfunction or pain, regardless of the frequency of treatments. In contrast, 60-minute treatments 2 and 3 times weekly significantly increased the likelihood of such improvement compared with the control condition in terms of both neck dysfunction (relative risk = 3.41 and 4.98, P = .04 and .005, respectively) and pain intensity (relative risk = 2.30 and 2.73; P = .007 and .001, respectively). CONCLUSIONS After 4 weeks of treatment, we found multiple 60-minute massages per week more effective than fewer or shorter sessions for individuals with chronic neck pain. Clinicians recommending massage and researchers studying this therapy should ensure that patients receive a likely effective dose of treatment. PMID:24615306

  16. Regression Phalanxes

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Hongyang; Welch, William J.; Zamar, Ruben H.

    2017-01-01

    Tomal et al. (2015) introduced the notion of "phalanxes" in the context of rare-class detection in two-class classification problems. A phalanx is a subset of features that work well for classification tasks. In this paper, we propose a different class of phalanxes for application in regression settings. We define a "Regression Phalanx" - a subset of features that work well together for prediction. We propose a novel algorithm which automatically chooses Regression Phalanxes from high-dimensi...

  17. The Effects of Aroma Foot Massage on Blood Pressure and Anxiety in Japanese Community-Dwelling Men and Women: A Crossover Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eri Eguchi

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of aroma foot massage on blood pressure, anxiety, and health-related quality of life (QOL in Japanese community-dwelling men and women using a crossover randomized controlled trial.Fifty-seven eligible participants (5 men and 52 women aged 27 to 72 were randomly divided into 2 intervention groups (group A: n = 29; group B: n = 28 to participate in aroma foot massages 12 times during the 4-week intervention period. Systolic and diastolic blood pressure (SBP and DBP, respectively, heart rate, state anxiety, and health-related QOL were measured at the baseline, 4-week follow-up, and 8-week follow-up. The effects of the aroma foot massage intervention on these factors and the proportion of participants with anxiety were analyzed using a linear mixed-effect model for a crossover design adjusted for participant and period effects. Furthermore, the relationship between the changes in SBP and state anxiety among participants with relieved anxiety was assessed using a linear regression model.Aroma foot massage significantly decreased the mean SBP (p = 0.02, DBP (p = 0.006, and state anxiety (p = 0.003 as well as the proportion of participants with anxiety (p = 0.003. Although it was not statistically significant (p = 0.088, aroma foot massage also increased the score of mental health-related QOL. The change in SBP had a significant and positive correlation with the change in state anxiety (p = 0.01 among participants with relieved anxiety.The self-administered aroma foot massage intervention significantly decreased the mean SBP and DBP as well as the state anxiety score, and tended to increase the mental health-related QOL scores. The results suggest that aroma foot massage may be an easy and effective way to improve mental health and blood pressure.University Hospital Medical Information Network 000014260.

  18. Value of qualitative research in the study of massage therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kania, Ania; Porcino, Antony; Vehoef, Marja J

    2008-12-15

    Qualitative inquiry is increasingly used in health research because it is particularly suited to the study of complex topics or issues about which little is known and concerning which quantification cannot easily create or effectively convey understanding. By exploring the lived experience of people providing and receiving massage therapy and the meaning that those people ascribe to those experiences, in-depth understanding of the nature of massage therapy and of how it affects people's lives is possible. Qualitative research may also provide insights into the outcomes, process and context of massage therapy that cannot be fully achieved through quantification alone.The purpose of the present article is to describe qualitative research and to discuss its value to the massage therapy profession. The target audience is massage therapists who want to be able to better understand the research literature, novice massage therapy researchers who are unfamiliar with qualitative research, and teachers of research methods courses in massage therapy training programs who want to include qualitative research methods in their curriculum.

  19. Durability of effect of massage therapy on blood pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Givi, Mahshid

    2013-05-01

    Pre-hypertension is considered as a cardiovascular disease predicator. Management of pre-hypertension is an appropriate objective for clinicians in a wide range of medical centers. Treatment of pre-hypertension is primarily non-pharmacological, one of which is massage therapy that is used to control the BP. This study aimed to evaluate the survival effect of Swedish massage (face, neck, shoulders, and chest) on BP of the women with pre-hypertension. This was a single-blind clinical trial study. Fifty pre-hypertensive women selected by simple random sampling which divided into control and test groups. The test group (25 patients) received Swedish massage 10-15 min, 3 times a week for 10 sessions and the control groups (25 patients) also were relaxed at the same environment with receiving no massage. Their BP was measured before and after each session and 72 h after finishing the massage therapy. Analyzing the data was done using descriptive and inferential statistical methods (Chi- square, Mann-Whitney, paired t-test and Student t-test) through SPSS software. The results indicated that mean systolic and diastolic BP in the massage group was significantly lower in comparison with the control group (P massage therapy was a safe, effective, applicable and cost-effective intervention in controlling BP of the pre-hypertension women and it can be used in the health care centers and even at home.

  20. [Foot reflexology massage: a clinical study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kesselring, A

    1999-02-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the possible usefulness of foot reflexology on the recovery after a surgical intervention. 130 patients participated in the study. They underwent abdominal surgery under full anesthesia for different, but exclusively gynecological reasons. Foot reflexology investigated in this study was applied only for a few days for each patient. The following parameters were recorded: the subjective, self-assessed, general condition, pain intensity, movement of the bowels, micturition and sleep, beginning on the day before operation until day 10. Two other treatments served as controls, a simple massage of the foot or a personal conversation. The simple massage turned out to be a relaxing, positive experience, whereas foot reflexology had various effects, some of them were even negative. The conclusion was that foot reflexology is not recommended for acute, abdominal postsurgical situations in gynecology because it can occasionally trigger abdominal pain. This project is one of the few studies planned, conducted and performed by the nursing staff.

  1. Does Foot Massage Relieve Acute Postoperative Pain? A Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chanif Chanif

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: This study aimed to examine the current state of knowledge regarding foot massageto determine if foot massage has an effect on relieving acute postoperative pain.Method: The following questions were used to guide this review: How does pain occur?What is the pain management modalities used in relieving acute postoperative pain? Does footmassage relieve acute postoperative pain? A comprehensive systematic search of publishedliterature and journal articles from Science Direct, CINAHL, PubMed, ProQuest and fromrelevant textbooks was conducted. The universal case entry website, Google-scholar was usedas well. The following keywords were used: foot massage, pain management, andpostoperative pain. Eight studies on foot massage and more than thirty related articles werereviewed.Result: Postoperative pain is caused by tissue damage that induces release of chemicalmediators from the surgical wound. The four processes of pain are transduction, transmission,perception and modulation. Pain medication is the goal standard for acute postoperative painrelief. In addition, foot massage is a modality that can be used in relieving acute postoperativepain. Massage stimulates large nerve fibers and dermatome layers which contain tactile andpressure receptors. The receptors subsequently transmit the nerve impulse to the centralnervous system. The gate control system in the dorsal horn is activated through the inhibitoryinterneuron, thus closing the gate. Subsequently, the brain does not receive the pain message.Eight reviewed studies demonstrated that foot massage relieves acute postoperative pain.However, there were some methodological limitations of these studies.Conclusion: It is recommended to examine the effect of foot massage on acute postoperativepain with high homogenous samples using various duration of massage and range of time forpain measurement at different settings.Key words: foot massage, pain management and postoperative pain.

  2. Meta-Analysis of Massage Therapy on Cancer Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sook-Hyun; Kim, Jong-Yeop; Yeo, Sujung; Kim, Sung-Hoon; Lim, Sabina

    2015-07-01

    Cancer pain is the most common complaint among patients with cancer. Conventional treatment does not always relieve cancer pain satisfactorily. Therefore, many patients with cancer have turned to complementary therapies to help them with their physical, emotional, and spiritual well-being. Massage therapy is increasingly used for symptom relief in patients with cancer. The current study aimed to investigate by meta-analysis the effects of massage therapy for cancer patients experiencing pain. Nine electronic databases were systematically searched for studies published through August 2013 in English, Chinese, and Korean. Methodological quality was assessed using the Physiotherapy Evidence Database (PEDro) and Cochrane risk-of-bias scales. Twelve studies, including 559 participants, were used in the meta-analysis. In 9 high-quality studies based on the PEDro scale (standardized mean difference, -1.24; 95% confidence interval, -1.72 to -0.75), we observed reduction in cancer pain after massage. Massage therapy significantly reduced cancer pain compared with no massage treatment or conventional care (standardized mean difference, -1.25; 95% confidence interval, -1.63 to -0.87). Our results indicate that massage is effective for the relief of cancer pain, especially for surgery-related pain. Among the various types of massage, foot reflexology appeared to be more effective than body or aroma massage. Our meta-analysis indicated a beneficial effect of massage for relief of cancer pain. Further well-designed, large studies with longer follow-up periods are needed to be able to draw firmer conclusions regarding the effectiveness. © The Author(s) 2015.

  3. The effect of lavender aromatherapy on the pain severity of primary ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Primary dysmenorrhea is the most common complaint in adolescents and adult young women that disturbs their daily life performance. Aim: The current study investigated the effect of lavender aromatherapy on pain severity in primary dysmenorrhea. Subjects and Methods: This triple‑blind randomized clinical ...

  4. The Effect of Diffused Aromatherapy on Test Anxiety among Baccalaureate Nursing Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Catherine E.

    2013-01-01

    A quantitative, randomized, pretest, posttest study was conducted to assess the effect of aromatherapy on cognitive test anxiety among nursing students. Sophomore nursing students (n = 39) from a private, 4-year college, were randomized into either the control group (n = 18) or the experimental group (n = 21). Each participant completed the…

  5. The effects of lavender aromatherapy on pain following needle insertion into a fistula in hemodialysis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagheri-Nesami, Masoumeh; Espahbodi, Fatemeh; Nikkhah, Attieh; Shorofi, Seyed Afshin; Charati, Jamshid Yazdani

    2014-02-01

    This study sought to determine the effects of lavender aromatherapy on pain following needle insertion into a fistula in patients undergoing hemodialysis. This is a randomized controlled clinical trial in which 92 patients undergoing hemodialysis with arteriovenous fistulas were randomly divided into two groups. The experimental-group patients inhaled lavender essence with a concentration of 10% for 5 min during 3 hemodialysis sessions, while the control-group patients received aromatherapy free of lavender essence. The mean VAS pain intensity score in the experimental and control groups before the intervention was 3.78 ± 0.24 and 4.16 ± 0.32, respectively (p = 0.35). The mean VAS pain intensity score in the experimental and control groups after three aromatherapy sessions was 2.36 ± 0.25 and 3.43 ± 0.31, respectively (p = 0.009). Lavender aromatherapy may be an effective technique to reduce pain following needle insertion into a fistula in hemodialysis patients. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Effect of lavender aromatherapy on menopause hot flushing: A crossover randomized clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafat Kazemzadeh

    2016-09-01

    Conclusion: This study indicated that the use of lavender aromatherapy reduced menopause flushing. Given the impact of stress on flushing and the undesirable effects of menopause symptoms on the quality of life, it would appear that this simple, noninvasive, safe, and effective method can be used by menopausal women with noticeable benefits.

  7. Salicylate toxicity from ingestion of traditional massage oil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muniandy, Rajesh Kumar; Sinnathamby, Vellan

    2012-01-01

    A 16-month-old child developed a brief generalised tonic–clonic fitting episode and vomiting at home, after accidental ingestion of traditional massage oil. As the patient presented with clinical features of salicylate toxicity, appropriate management was instituted. He was admitted to the intensive care unit for multiorgan support. The child was discharged well 1 week after the incident. Methyl-salicylate is a common component of massage oils which are used for topical treatment of joint and muscular pains. However, these massage oils may be toxic when taken orally. Early recognition of the salicylate toxicity is very important in producing a good patient outcome. PMID:22922924

  8. Clarifying Definitions for the Massage Therapy Profession: the Results of the Best Practices Symposium†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Ann B.; Cambron, Jerrilyn A.; Sharpe, Patricia A.; Travillian, Ravensara S.; Saunders, Ruth P.

    2016-01-01

    Background Massage therapists are at times unclear about the definition of massage therapy, which creates challenges for the profession. It is important to investigate the current definitions and to consider the field as a whole in order to move toward clarity on what constitutes the constructs within the profession. Purpose To determine how a sample of experts understand and describe the field of massage therapy as a step toward clarifying definitions for massage and massage therapy, and framing the process of massage therapy practice. Setting A two-day symposium held in 2010 with the purpose of gathering knowledge to inform and aid in the creation of massage therapy best practice guidelines for stress and low back pain. Participants Thirty-two experts in the field of massage therapy from the United States, Europe, and Canada. Design Qualitative analysis of secondary cross-sectional data using a grounded theory approach. Results Three over-arching themes were identified: 1) What is massage?; 2) The multidimensional nature of massage therapy; and 3) The influencing factors on massage therapy practice. Discussion The data offered clarifying definitions for massage and massage therapy, as well as a framework for the context for massage therapy practice. These clarifications can serve as initial steps toward the ultimate goal of creating new theory for the field of massage therapy, which can then be applied in practice, education, research, and policy. Conclusions Foundational research into how experts in the profession understand and describe the field of massage therapy is limited. Understanding the potential differences between the terms massage and massage therapy could contribute to a transformation in the profession in the areas of education, practice, research, policy and/or regulation. Additionally, framing the context for massage therapy practice invites future discussions to further clarify practice issues. PMID:27648109

  9. Clarifying Definitions for the Massage Therapy Profession: the Results of the Best Practices Symposium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Ann B; Cambron, Jerrilyn A; Sharpe, Patricia A; Travillian, Ravensara S; Saunders, Ruth P

    2016-09-01

    Massage therapists are at times unclear about the definition of massage therapy, which creates challenges for the profession. It is important to investigate the current definitions and to consider the field as a whole in order to move toward clarity on what constitutes the constructs within the profession. To determine how a sample of experts understand and describe the field of massage therapy as a step toward clarifying definitions for massage and massage therapy, and framing the process of massage therapy practice. A two-day symposium held in 2010 with the purpose of gathering knowledge to inform and aid in the creation of massage therapy best practice guidelines for stress and low back pain. Thirty-two experts in the field of massage therapy from the United States, Europe, and Canada. Qualitative analysis of secondary cross-sectional data using a grounded theory approach. Three over-arching themes were identified: 1) What is massage?; 2) The multidimensional nature of massage therapy; and 3) The influencing factors on massage therapy practice. The data offered clarifying definitions for massage and massage therapy, as well as a framework for the context for massage therapy practice. These clarifications can serve as initial steps toward the ultimate goal of creating new theory for the field of massage therapy, which can then be applied in practice, education, research, and policy. Foundational research into how experts in the profession understand and describe the field of massage therapy is limited. Understanding the potential differences between the terms massage and massage therapy could contribute to a transformation in the profession in the areas of education, practice, research, policy and/or regulation. Additionally, framing the context for massage therapy practice invites future discussions to further clarify practice issues.

  10. A Regional Analysis of U.S. Insurance Reimbursement Guidelines for Massage Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miccio, Robin S; Cowen, Virginia S

    2018-03-01

    Massage techniques fall within the scope of many different health care providers. Physical therapists, occupational therapists, and chiropractors receive insurance reimbursement for health care services, including massage. Although many patients pay out of pocket for massage services, it is unclear how the insurance company reimbursement policies factor provider qualifications into coverage. This project examined regional insurance reimbursement guidelines for massage therapy in relation to the role of the provider of massage services. A qualitative content analysis was used to explore guidelines for 26 health insurance policies across seven US companies providing coverage in the northeastern United States. Publicly available information relevant to massage was obtained from insurance company websites and extracted into a dataset for thematic analysis. Data obtained included practice guidelines, techniques, and provider requirements. Information from the dataset was coded and analyzed using descriptive statistics. Of the policies reviewed, 23% explicitly stated massage treatments were limited to 15-minute increments, 19% covered massage as one part of a comprehensive rehabilitation plan, and 27% required physician prescription. Massage techniques mentioned as qualifying for reimbursement included: Swedish, manual lymphatic drainage, mobilization/manipulation, myofascial release, and traction. Chiropractors, physical therapists, and occupational therapists could directly bill for massage. Massage therapists were specifically excluded as covered providers for seven (27%) policies. Although research supports massage for the treatment of a variety of conditions, the provider type has not been separately addressed. The reviewed policies that served the Northeastern states explicitly stated massage therapists could not bill insurance companies directly. The same insurance companies examined reimbursement for massage therapists in their western U.S. state policies. Other

  11. Effectiveness of focused structural massage and relaxation massage for chronic low back pain: protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deyo Richard A

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chronic back pain is a major public health problem and the primary reason patients seek massage treatment. Despite the growing use of massage for chronic low back pain, there have been few studies of its effectiveness. This trial will be the first evaluation of the effectiveness of relaxation massage for chronic back pain and the first large trial of a focused structural form of massage for this condition. Methods and Design A total of 399 participants (133 in each of three arms between the ages of 20 and 65 years of age who have low back pain lasting at least 3 months will be recruited from an integrated health care delivery system. They will be randomized to one of two types of massage ("focused structural massage" or "relaxation massage", or continued usual medical care. Ten massage treatments will be provided over 10 weeks. The primary outcomes, standard measures of dysfunction and bothersomeness of low back pain, will be assessed at baseline and after 10, 26, and 52 weeks by telephone interviewers masked to treatment assignment. General health status, satisfaction with back care, days of back-related disability, perceived stress, and use and costs of healthcare services for back pain will also be measured. Outcomes across assigned treatment groups will be compared using generalized estimating equations, accounting for participant correlation and adjusted for baseline value, age, and sex. For both primary outcome measures, this trial will have at least 85% power to detect the presence of a minimal clinically significant difference among the three treatment groups and 91% power for pairwise comparisons. Secondary analyses will compare the proportions of participants in each group that improve by a clinically meaningful amount. Conclusion Results of this trial will help clarify the value of two types of massage therapy for chronic low back pain. Trial registration Clinical Trials.gov NCT 00371384.

  12. Effectiveness of focused structural massage and relaxation massage for chronic low back pain: protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherkin, Daniel C; Sherman, Karen J; Kahn, Janet; Erro, Janet H; Deyo, Richard A; Haneuse, Sebastien J; Cook, Andrea J

    2009-10-20

    Chronic back pain is a major public health problem and the primary reason patients seek massage treatment. Despite the growing use of massage for chronic low back pain, there have been few studies of its effectiveness. This trial will be the first evaluation of the effectiveness of relaxation massage for chronic back pain and the first large trial of a focused structural form of massage for this condition. A total of 399 participants (133 in each of three arms) between the ages of 20 and 65 years of age who have low back pain lasting at least 3 months will be recruited from an integrated health care delivery system. They will be randomized to one of two types of massage ("focused structural massage" or "relaxation massage"), or continued usual medical care. Ten massage treatments will be provided over 10 weeks. The primary outcomes, standard measures of dysfunction and bothersomeness of low back pain, will be assessed at baseline and after 10, 26, and 52 weeks by telephone interviewers masked to treatment assignment. General health status, satisfaction with back care, days of back-related disability, perceived stress, and use and costs of healthcare services for back pain will also be measured. Outcomes across assigned treatment groups will be compared using generalized estimating equations, accounting for participant correlation and adjusted for baseline value, age, and sex. For both primary outcome measures, this trial will have at least 85% power to detect the presence of a minimal clinically significant difference among the three treatment groups and 91% power for pairwise comparisons. Secondary analyses will compare the proportions of participants in each group that improve by a clinically meaningful amount. Results of this trial will help clarify the value of two types of massage therapy for chronic low back pain.

  13. Aromatherapy with citrus aurantium oil and anxiety during the first stage of labor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namazi, Masoumeh; Amir Ali Akbari, Seddigheh; Mojab, Faraz; Talebi, Atefe; Alavi Majd, Hamid; Jannesari, Sharareh

    2014-06-01

    Anxiety is the most common psychological response of women to labor. Aromatherapy, i.e. the use of fragrant essential oils to stimulate the olfactory system, can create a state of calmness and help to alleviate anxiety. The present study tried to determine the efficacy of aromatherapy with Citrus aurantium oil in reducing anxiety during the first stage of labor. This randomized clinical trial was conducted on two groups of pregnant women, referred to Vali-Asr Hospital (Tuyserkan, Iran) between June and September 2013. The sample size was comprised of 63 subjects in each group. Gauzes impregnated with 4 mL of C. aurantium distillate and normal saline were attached to the collar of subjects in the aromatherapy and control groups, respectively. The gauzes were changed every 30 minutes. The levels of anxiety in both groups were measured at baseline and after the intervention at dilations of 3-4 and 6-8 cm. The participants were followed up until delivery and the first- and fifth-minute Apgar scores were recorded. Data were collected using a demographic and obstetric characteristics questionnaire, an examination and observation checklist, and Spielberger state-trait anxiety questionnaire. Data analysis was performed with independent-t, Mann-Whitney, and chi-square tests in SPSS-22. P values less than 0.05 were considered significant. Before the intervention, both groups had same levels of anxiety. However, the levels of anxiety at dilations of 3-4 and 6-8 cm were significantly lower in the aromatherapy group compared with the control group. The results of this study confirmed aromatherapy with C. aurantium blossom oil as a simple, inexpensive, noninvasive, and effective intervention to reduce anxiety during labor.

  14. Aromatherapy: Does It Help to Relieve Pain, Depression, Anxiety, and Stress in Community-Dwelling Older Persons?

    OpenAIRE

    Tang, Shuk Kwan; Tse, M. Y. Mimi

    2014-01-01

    To examine the effectiveness of an aromatherapy programme for older persons with chronic pain. The community-dwelling elderly people who participated in this study underwent a four-week aromatherapy programme or were assigned to the control group, which did not receive any interventions. Their levels of pain, depression, anxiety, and stress were collected at the baseline and at the postintervention assessment after the conclusion of the four-week programme. Eighty-two participants took part i...

  15. The Effect of Lemon Inhalation Aromatherapy on Nausea and Vomiting of Pregnancy: A Double-Blinded, Randomized, Controlled Clinical Trial

    OpenAIRE

    Yavari kia, Parisa; Safajou, Farzaneh; Shahnazi, Mahnaz; Nazemiyeh, Hossein

    2014-01-01

    Background: Nausea and vomiting of pregnancy are amongst the most common complaints that effects on both the physical and mental conditions of the pregnant women. Due to the increasing tendency of women to use herbal medications during pregnancy, the effect of lemon inhalation aromatherapy on nausea and vomiting of pregnancy was investigated in this study. Objectives: The aim of this study was to determine the effect of lemon inhalation aromatherapy on nausea and vomiting during pregnancy. Ma...

  16. EFFECTIVENESS OF LAVENDER AROMATHERAPY AND CLASSICAL MUSIC THERAPY IN LOWERING BLOOD PRESSURE IN PREGNANT WOMEN WITH HYPERTENSION

    OpenAIRE

    Sri Maisi; Suryono; Melyana Nurul Widyawati; Ari Suwondo; Suryati Kusworowulan

    2017-01-01

    Background: Hypertension during pregnancy remains high in Indonesia. It is a major cause of maternal death. Aromatherapy lavender and classical music therapy are considered effective in lowering blood pressure in hypertension. Objective: To examine the effect of lavender aromatherapy and classical music therapy in lowering blood pressure in pregnant women with hypertension. Methods: A quasy experimental study with pretest-posttest control group design. There were 52 pregnant women with ...

  17. The effects of clinical aromatherapy for anxiety and depression in the high risk postpartum woman - a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conrad, Pam; Adams, Cindy

    2012-08-01

    The aim of this study was to determine if aromatherapy improves anxiety and/or depression in the high risk postpartum woman and to provide a complementary therapy tool for healthcare practitioners. The pilot study was observational with repeated measures. Private consultation room in a Women's center of a large Indianapolis hospital. 28 women, 0-18 months postpartum. The treatment groups were randomized to either the inhalation group or the aromatherapy hand m'technique. Treatment consisted of 15 min sessions, twice a week for four consecutive weeks. An essential oil blend of rose otto and lavandula angustifolia @ 2% dilution was used in all treatments. The non-randomized control group, comprised of volunteers, was instructed to avoid aromatherapy use during the 4 week study period. Allopathic medical treatment continued for all participants. All subjects completed the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS) and Generalized Anxiety Disorder Scale (GAD-7) at the beginning of the study. The scales were then repeated at the midway point (two weeks), and at the end of all treatments (four weeks). Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) was utilized to determine differences in EPDS and/or GAD-7 scores between the aromatherapy and control groups at baseline, midpoint and end of study. No significant differences were found between aromatherapy and control groups at baseline. The midpoint and final scores indicated that aromatherapy had significant improvements greater than the control group on both EPDS and GAD-7 scores. There were no adverse effects reported. The pilot study indicates positive findings with minimal risk for the use of aromatherapy as a complementary therapy in both anxiety and depression scales with the postpartum woman. Future large scale research in aromatherapy with this population is recommended. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Effect of therapeutic Swedish massage on anxiety level and vital signs of Intensive Care Unit patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves da Silva, Tatiana; Stripari Schujmann, Debora; Yamada da Silveira, Leda Tomiko; Caromano, Fátima Aparecida; Fu, Carolina

    2017-07-01

    To evaluate how Swedish massage affects the level of anxiety and vital signs of Intensive Care Unit (ICU) patients. Quasi-experimental study. ICU patients, 18-50 years old, cooperative, respiratory and hemodynamic stable, not under invasive mechanical ventilation. allergic to massage oil, vascular or orthopedic post-operative, skin lesions, thrombosis, fractures. A 30-min Swedish massage was applied once. arterial pressure, heart rate, respiratory rate, S-STAI questionnaire. Timing of evaluation: pre-massage, immediately post-massage, 30 min post-massage. Comparison: T-test, corrected by Bonferroni method, level of significance of 5%, confidence interval of 95%. 48 patients included, 30 (62.5%) female, mean age 55.46 (15.70) years old. Mean S-STAI pre-massage: 42.51 (9.48); immediately post-massage: 29.34 (6.37); 30 min post-massage: 32.62 (8.56), p < 0.001 for all comparison. Mean vital signs achieved statistical significance between pre-massage and immediately post-massage. Swedish massage reduced anxiety of ICU patients immediately and 30 min post-massage. Vital signs were reduced immediately post-massage. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. The motivation of massage therapy students to enter professional education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finch, Paul

    2004-12-01

    In Ontario massage therapy is a regulated health profession, and it has been speculated that massage therapy students are motivated primarily by altruistic values, as has been documented in medicine. Students at Sutherland-Chan School and Teaching Clinic in Ontario were surveyed regarding their motivation to enter massage therapy education, with the intention of assessing the influence of certain value complexes on their decision. The results indicate that their decision was influenced more strongly by intrinsic values related to helping and working with people than by the prospect of extrinsic rewards (p < 0.0005). This supports a belief commonly held within the professional community, and bodies well for the future of massage therapy as a caring profession.

  20. Yoga and massage therapy reduce prenatal depression and prematurity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field, Tiffany; Diego, Miguel; Hernandez-Reif, Maria; Medina, Lissette; Delgado, Jeannette; Hernandez, Andrea

    2012-04-01

    Eighty-four prenatally depressed women were randomly assigned to yoga, massage therapy or standard prenatal care control groups to determine the relative effects of yoga and massage therapy on prenatal depression and neonatal outcomes. Following 12 weeks of twice weekly yoga or massage therapy sessions (20 min each) both therapy groups versus the control group had a greater decrease on depression, anxiety and back and leg pain scales and a greater increase on a relationship scale. In addition, the yoga and massage therapy groups did not differ on neonatal outcomes including gestational age and birthweight, and those groups, in turn, had greater gestational age and birthweight than the control group. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Effects of Aromatherapy on the Anxiety, Vital Signs, and Sleep Quality of Percutaneous Coronary Intervention Patients in Intensive Care Units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mi-Yeon Cho

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of aromatherapy on the anxiety, sleep, and blood pressure (BP of percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI patients in an intensive care unit (ICU. Fifty-six patients with PCI in ICU were evenly allocated to either the aromatherapy or conventional nursing care. Aromatherapy essential oils were blended with lavender, roman chamomile, and neroli with a 6 : 2 : 0.5 ratio. Participants received 10 times treatment before PCI, and the same essential oils were inhaled another 10 times after PCI. Outcome measures patients' state anxiety, sleeping quality, and BP. An aromatherapy group showed significantly low anxiety (t=5.99, P<.001 and improving sleep quality (t=−3.65, P=.001 compared with conventional nursing intervention. The systolic BP of both groups did not show a significant difference by time or in a group-by-time interaction; however, a significant difference was observed between groups (F=4.63, P=.036. The diastolic BP did not show any significant difference by time or by a group-by-time interaction; however, a significant difference was observed between groups (F=6.93, P=.011. In conclusion, the aromatherapy effectively reduced the anxiety levels and increased the sleep quality of PCI patients admitted to the ICU. Aromatherapy may be used as an independent nursing intervention for reducing the anxiety levels and improving the sleep quality of PCI patients.

  2. Effects of aromatherapy on the anxiety, vital signs, and sleep quality of percutaneous coronary intervention patients in intensive care units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Mi-Yeon; Min, Eun Sil; Hur, Myung-Haeng; Lee, Myeong Soo

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of aromatherapy on the anxiety, sleep, and blood pressure (BP) of percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) patients in an intensive care unit (ICU). Fifty-six patients with PCI in ICU were evenly allocated to either the aromatherapy or conventional nursing care. Aromatherapy essential oils were blended with lavender, roman chamomile, and neroli with a 6 : 2 : 0.5 ratio. Participants received 10 times treatment before PCI, and the same essential oils were inhaled another 10 times after PCI. Outcome measures patients' state anxiety, sleeping quality, and BP. An aromatherapy group showed significantly low anxiety (t = 5.99, P < .001) and improving sleep quality (t = -3.65, P = .001) compared with conventional nursing intervention. The systolic BP of both groups did not show a significant difference by time or in a group-by-time interaction; however, a significant difference was observed between groups (F = 4.63, P = .036). The diastolic BP did not show any significant difference by time or by a group-by-time interaction; however, a significant difference was observed between groups (F = 6.93, P = .011). In conclusion, the aromatherapy effectively reduced the anxiety levels and increased the sleep quality of PCI patients admitted to the ICU. Aromatherapy may be used as an independent nursing intervention for reducing the anxiety levels and improving the sleep quality of PCI patients.

  3. Compressed air massage hastens healing of the diabetic foot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mars, M; Desai, Y; Gregory, M A

    2008-02-01

    The management of diabetic foot ulcers remains a problem. A treatment modality that uses compressed air massage has been developed as a supplement to standard surgical and medical treatment. Compressed air massage is thought to improve local tissue oxygenation around ulcers. The aim of this study was to determine whether the addition of compressed air massage influences the rate of healing of diabetic ulcers. Sixty consecutive patients with diabetes, admitted to one hospital for urgent surgical management of diabetic foot ulcers, were randomized into two groups. Both groups received standard medical and surgical management of their diabetes and ulcer. In addition, one group received 15-20 min of compressed air massage, at 1 bar pressure, daily, for 5 days a week, to the foot and the tissue around the ulcer. Healing time was calculated as the time from admission to the time of re-epithelialization. Fifty-seven patients completed the trial; 28 received compressed air massage. There was no difference in the mean age, Wagner score, ulcer size, pulse status, or peripheral sensation in the two groups. The time to healing in the compressed air massage group was significantly reduced: 58.1 +/- 22.3 days (95% confidence interval: 49.5-66.6) versus 82.7 +/- 30.7 days (95% confidence interval: 70.0-94.3) (P = 0.001). No adverse effects in response to compressed air massage were noted. The addition of compressed air massage to standard medical and surgical management of diabetic ulcers appears to enhance ulcer healing. Further studies with this new treatment modality are warranted.

  4. Review of Randomized Controlled Trials of Massage in Preterm Infants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna-Kaisa Niemi

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Preterm birth affects about 10% of infants born in the United States. Massage therapy is being used in some neonatal intensive care units for its potential beneficial effects on preterm infants. This article reviews published randomized controlled trials on the effects of massage in preterm infants. Most studies evaluating the effect of massage in weight gain in premature infants suggest a positive effect on weight gain. Increase in vagal tone has been reported in infants who receive massage and has been suggested as a possible mechanism for improved weight gain. More studies are needed on the underlying mechanisms of the effects of massage therapy on weight gain in preterm infants. While some trials suggest improvements in developmental scores, decreased stress behavior, positive effects on immune system, improved pain tolerance and earlier discharge from the hospital, the number of such studies is small and further evidence is needed. Further studies, including randomized controlled trials, are needed on the effects of massage in preterm infants.

  5. Assessment of the effects of massage therapy on premenstrual syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leily Ghaedi

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Premenstrual syndrome is characterized by the cyclic occurrence physical, psychological and behavioral symptoms during the luteal phase of the menstruation cycle and will be disappear within a few days of the onset of menstruation. The aim of this research was to assess the effect of massage therapy on premenstrual syndrome. Materials and Method: A randomized clinical trial was carried out on 30 volunteer students of Tehran University with PMS diagnosis. After surveying two menstruation cycles and confirming PMS existence, subjects were randomly assigned into massage and control group. Massage protocol was performed for eight weeks. Volunteers completed Daily Symptom Rating (DSR during 2 cycles before and 2 cycles after intervention. Data collected via data gathering form, criteria for PMS (DSM- IV, DSR and Beck test. Data were analyzed by descriptive and analytic statistics (χ2, Fischer's exact test, paired and independent t tests.Results: In comparison between before and after intervention, massage group showed significant decrease averagely in mean of somatic (56.7%, psychological (64.8% (p<0.001.This is while, in control group only mean of somatic symptoms (averagely 21.2% relieved obviously (p=0.02. comparing two groups often intervention, we did not found any significant difference in mean of somatic symptoms while psychological (p=0.01 and total symptoms (p=0.03 in massage group was significantly less than controls.Conclusion: The authors concluded that massage therapy is an effective method for relieving symptoms of premenstrual syndrome

  6. 'To give is better than to receive?' Couples massage significantly benefits both partners' wellbeing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naruse, Sayuri M; Cornelissen, Piers L; Moss, Mark

    2018-03-01

    This experimental study evaluated the differential effects of 'giving' and 'receiving' massage on wellbeing in healthy but stressed couples. Forty-two volunteers started the study and of these, 38 (i.e. 19 couples) completed a 3-week massage course. Emotional stress and mental clarity were assessed before and after mutual massage between each pair of adults belonging to a couple at home. While massage benefitted both parties' wellbeing within a session, critically we found no differences in wellbeing between those 'giving' and 'receiving' massage. These novel findings suggest that home-based massage may be advocated to couples as a 'selves-care', health-promoting behaviour.

  7. Autistic Regression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matson, Johnny L.; Kozlowski, Alison M.

    2010-01-01

    Autistic regression is one of the many mysteries in the developmental course of autism and pervasive developmental disorders not otherwise specified (PDD-NOS). Various definitions of this phenomenon have been used, further clouding the study of the topic. Despite this problem, some efforts at establishing prevalence have been made. The purpose of…

  8. Linear regression

    CERN Document Server

    Olive, David J

    2017-01-01

    This text covers both multiple linear regression and some experimental design models. The text uses the response plot to visualize the model and to detect outliers, does not assume that the error distribution has a known parametric distribution, develops prediction intervals that work when the error distribution is unknown, suggests bootstrap hypothesis tests that may be useful for inference after variable selection, and develops prediction regions and large sample theory for the multivariate linear regression model that has m response variables. A relationship between multivariate prediction regions and confidence regions provides a simple way to bootstrap confidence regions. These confidence regions often provide a practical method for testing hypotheses. There is also a chapter on generalized linear models and generalized additive models. There are many R functions to produce response and residual plots, to simulate prediction intervals and hypothesis tests, to detect outliers, and to choose response trans...

  9. The force control and path planning of electromagnetic induction-based massage robot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wendong; Zhang, Lei; Li, Jinzhe; Yuan, Xiaoqing; Shi, Yikai; Jiang, Qinqin; He, Lijing

    2017-07-20

    Massage robot is considered as an effective physiological treatment to relieve fatigue, improve blood circulation, relax muscle tone, etc. The simple massage equipment quickly spread into market due to low cost, but they are not widely accepted due to restricted massage function. Complicated structure and high cost caused difficulties for developing multi-function massage equipment. This paper presents a novel massage robot which can achieve tapping, rolling, kneading and other massage operations, and proposes an improved reciprocating path planning algorithm to improve massage effect. The number of coil turns, the coil current and the distance between massage head and yoke were chosen to investigate the influence on massage force by finite element method. The control system model of the wheeled massage robot was established, including control subsystem of the motor, path algorithm control subsystem, parameter module of the massage robot and virtual reality interface module. The improved reciprocating path planning algorithm was proposed to improve regional coverage rate and massage effect. The influence caused by coil current, the number of coil turns and the distance between massage head and yoke were simulated in Maxwell. It indicated that coil current has more important influence compared to the other two factors. The path planning simulation of the massage robot was completed in Matlab, and the results show that the improved reciprocating path planning algorithm achieved higher coverage rate than the traditional algorithm. With the analysis of simulation results, it can be concluded that the number of coil turns and the distance between the moving iron core and the yoke could be determined prior to coil current, and the force can be controllable by optimizing structure parameters of massage head and adjusting coil current. Meanwhile, it demonstrates that the proposed algorithm could effectively improve path coverage rate during massage operations, therefore

  10. Development of Foot Massage Program on Nausea and Vomiting for Cancer Patients: A Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ni Ketut Guru Prapti

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This study aims to develop a foot massage program to support care activity in reducing nausea and vomiting for cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy. Two phases, a literature review and the development of a foot massage program were conducted. The literature review was to analyze state of the art massage techniques by reviewing problems, related theories and supporting evidence. Method: Eight published studies in the English language were reviewed. A massage can be performed for different durations, from 10 minutes up to 60 minutes for three to six weeks and can be applied on various body areas. We found that the soft stroke/effleurage seems to be the best method and is most suitable for patients with cancer. It is also evident that foot massaging can be applied as a modality to reduce nausea and vomiting for cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy. Result: We developed a foot massage program specifically for patients with cancer. The foot massage program comprised of three sessions, including 1 education session, 2 preparation session, and 3 foot massage session. In the education session, patients obtain brief information about the definition of a foot massage, the benefits and contraindication of foot massaging. During the preparation phase, foot soaking and warming up are performed. Subsequently, the foot massage is applied and should last for 30 minutes. Further research is recommended to test the effectiveness of the proposed foot massage program for nausea and vomiting in cancer patients across countries including Indonesia. Key Words: Foot massage program, chemotherapy, nausea and vomiting

  11. Multiple 60-Minute Massages per Week Offer Relief for Chronic Neck Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... W X Y Z Multiple 60-Minute Massages per Week Offer Relief for Chronic Neck Pain Share: © ... funded study found that multiple 60-minute massages per week were more effective than fewer or shorter ...

  12. The effect of aromatherapy on postoperative nausea in women undergoing surgical procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferruggiari, Luisa; Ragione, Barbara; Rich, Ellen R; Lock, Kathleen

    2012-08-01

    Postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV) is a common source of patient discomfort and decreased satisfaction. Aromatherapy has been identified as a complementary modality for the prevention and management of PONV. The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of aromatherapy on the severity of postoperative nausea (PON) in women undergoing surgical procedures in the postanesthesia care unit. Women complaining of PON received traditional antiemetics, inhalation of peppermint oil, or saline vapor. A visual analog scale was used to rate nausea at the first complaint; at 5 minutes after intervention; and, if nausea persisted, at 10 minutes after intervention. At both 5 and 10 minutes, statistical analysis showed no significant differences between intervention and nausea rating. Obtaining eligible subjects was challenging. Although many women consented, most received intraoperative antiemetics and did not report nausea postoperatively. Copyright © 2012 American Society of PeriAnesthesia Nurses. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Both lavender fleur oil and unscented oil aromatherapy reduce preoperative anxiety in breast surgery patients: a randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco, Lola; Blanck, Thomas J J; Dugan, Kimberly; Kline, Richard; Shanmugam, Geetha; Galotti, Angela; von Bergen Granell, Annelise; Wajda, Michael

    2016-09-01

    The objective of this study was to determine whether lavender fleur oil (LFO) aromatherapy would reduce anxiety when administered to women before undergoing breast surgery. This was a single-site, randomized study comparing the effect of LFO to unscented oil (UO). The study was conducted in the preoperative holding area of the ambulatory surgery department of NYU Langone Medical Center. Ninety three women, 18 years and older, scheduled for breast surgery. Women meeting inclusion/exclusion criteria were randomized to either LFO or UO aromatherapy and were blind to their assigned treatment. Subjects completed a Speilberger State Anxiety Inventory for Adults (STAI) before and after aromatherapy. Vital signs were recorded before and after aromatherapy. STAI-State questions were divided into positive and negative emotions for analysis. Before aromatherapy, there was no significant difference between groups by individual questions or overall average answer of either positive or negative questions. The use of both LFO and UO increased the positive STAI score totals, with the LFO group having a slightly, but statistically significant, greater increase. Both resulted in a statistically significant decrease in the negative score totals after treatment. There were no differences in vital signs between groups for either treatment. Following the conclusion of the trial LFO was analyzed and found to contain a very low content of the 2 major Lavandula angustifolia constituents. Both LFO and UO aromatherapy treatments lowered anxiety before surgery despite no significant changes in vital signs. LFO treatment generated a slight but statistically significant increase in positive feelings compared with UO treatment. It is probable that the beneficial effect observed was due to both aromatherapy with LFO and a placebo effect related to the added attention given to the patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. AROMATHERAPY IN POSTPARTUM AND PUERPERIUM: A SYSTEMATIC, EVIDENCE-BASED REVIEW

    OpenAIRE

    Muñoz-Mahmud, Blanca; Zabaleta-Domínguez, Janina; Gómez-Gamboa, Encarna; Arranz-Betegon, Ángela

    2018-01-01

    IntroductionThe early abandonment of breastfeeding is closely related to tiredness and postpartum depression. The side effects of drugs have led to a high demand among users for natural therapies as an alternative. ObjectivesTo determine the effects of aromatherapy in postpartum mothers, in relation to mood and the impact on breastfeeding. Material and MethodsA literature review was carried out with searches of the Medline, Pubmed, Cochrane, LILACS, Google Scholar and Web of Science databases...

  15. The Effect of Lavender Aromatherapy on Autonomic Nervous System in Midlife Women with Insomnia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-Wei Chien

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study is to determine the effects of 12 weeks of lavender aromatherapy on self-reported sleep and heart rate variability (HRV in the midlife women with insomnia. Sixty-seven women aged 45–55 years, with a CPSQI (Chinese version of Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index greater than 5, were recruited from communities in Taiwan. The experimental group (=34 received lavender inhalation, 20 min each time, twice per week, for 12 weeks, with a total of 24 times. The control group (=33 received health education program for sleep hygiene with no intervention. The study of HRV was analyzed by time- and frequency-domain methods. Significant decrease in mean heart rate (HR and increases in SDNN (standard deviation of the normal-to-normal (NN intervals, RMSDD (square root of the mean squared differences of successive NN intervals, and HF (high frequency of spectral powers analysis after lavender inhalation were observed in the 4th and 12th weeks of aromatherapy. The total CPSQI score of study subjects was significantly decreased in the experimental group (<0.001, while no significant difference was observed across the same time period (=0.776 in the control group. Resting HR and HRV measurements at baseline 1 month and 3 months after allocation showed no significant difference between the experimental and control groups. The study demonstrated that lavender inhalation may have a persistent short-term effect on HRV with an increase in parasympathetic modulation. Women receiving aromatherapy experienced a significant improvement in sleep quality after intervention. However, lavender aromatherapy does not appear to confer benefit on HRV in the long-term followup.

  16. Face and shoulder massage as the element of logopedic therapy in people after tounge cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka Hamerlińska

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available This article concerns the use of facial and shoulder massage in speech therapy. Contains synthetic characteristics of the causes, methods and consequences of the treatment of tongue cancer. The concept of classical massage has been described, the factors determining proper massage performance and its technique have been described. It has been justified to use massage therapy in people after removing the tongue.

  17. Expectancy of Stress-Reducing Aromatherapy Effect and Performance on a Stress-Sensitive Cognitive Task

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina Chamine

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Stress-reducing therapies help maintain cognitive performance during stress. Aromatherapy is popular for stress reduction, but its effectiveness and mechanism are unclear. This study examined stress-reducing effects of aromatherapy on cognitive function using the go/no-go (GNG task performance and event related potentials (ERP components sensitive to stress. The study also assessed the importance of expectancy in aromatherapy actions. Methods. 81 adults were randomized to 3 aroma groups (active experimental, detectable, and undetectable placebo and 2 prime subgroups (prime suggesting stress-reducing aroma effects or no-prime. GNG performance, ERPs, subjective expected aroma effects, and stress ratings were assessed at baseline and poststress. Results. No specific aroma effects on stress or cognition were observed. However, regardless of experienced aroma, people receiving a prime displayed faster poststress median reaction times than those receiving no prime. A significant interaction for N200 amplitude indicated divergent ERP patterns between baseline and poststress for go and no-go stimuli depending on the prime subgroup. Furthermore, trends for beneficial prime effects were shown on poststress no-go N200/P300 latencies and N200 amplitude. Conclusion. While there were no aroma-specific effects on stress or cognition, these results highlight the role of expectancy for poststress response inhibition and attention.

  18. Aromatherapy and the central nerve system (CNS): therapeutic mechanism and its associated genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Xiao Nan; Liu, Zhu Jun; Zhang, Huan Jing; Tzeng, Chi Meng

    2013-07-01

    Molecular medical research on aromatherapy has been steadily increasing for use as an adjuvant therapy in managing psychiatric disorders and to examine its therapeutic mechanisms. Most studies, as well as clinically applied experience, have indicated that various essential oils, such as lavender, lemon and bergamot can help to relieve stress, anxiety, depression and other mood disorders. Most notably, inhalation of essential oils can communicate signals to the olfactory system and stimulate the brain to exert neurotransmitters (e.g. serotonin and dopamine) thereby further regulating mood. However, little research has been done on the molecular mechanisms underlying these effects, thus their mechanism of action remains ambiguous. Several hypotheses have been proposed regarding the therapeutic mechanism of depression. These have mainly centered on possible deficiencies in monoamines, neurotrophins, the neuroendocrine system, c-AMP, cation channels as well as neuroimmune interactions and epigenetics, however the precise mechanism or mechanisms related to depression have yet to be elucidated. In the current study, the effectiveness of aromatherapy for alleviating psychiatric disorders was examined using data collected from previously published studies and our unpublished data. A possible signaling pathway from olfactory system to the central nerve system and the associated key molecular elements of aromatherapy are also proposed.

  19. Expectancy of Stress-Reducing Aromatherapy Effect and Performance on a Stress-Sensitive Cognitive Task

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamine, Irina; Oken, Barry S.

    2015-01-01

    Objective. Stress-reducing therapies help maintain cognitive performance during stress. Aromatherapy is popular for stress reduction, but its effectiveness and mechanism are unclear. This study examined stress-reducing effects of aromatherapy on cognitive function using the go/no-go (GNG) task performance and event related potentials (ERP) components sensitive to stress. The study also assessed the importance of expectancy in aromatherapy actions. Methods. 81 adults were randomized to 3 aroma groups (active experimental, detectable, and undetectable placebo) and 2 prime subgroups (prime suggesting stress-reducing aroma effects or no-prime). GNG performance, ERPs, subjective expected aroma effects, and stress ratings were assessed at baseline and poststress. Results. No specific aroma effects on stress or cognition were observed. However, regardless of experienced aroma, people receiving a prime displayed faster poststress median reaction times than those receiving no prime. A significant interaction for N200 amplitude indicated divergent ERP patterns between baseline and poststress for go and no-go stimuli depending on the prime subgroup. Furthermore, trends for beneficial prime effects were shown on poststress no-go N200/P300 latencies and N200 amplitude. Conclusion. While there were no aroma-specific effects on stress or cognition, these results highlight the role of expectancy for poststress response inhibition and attention. PMID:25802539

  20. Distillation of Essential Oils from Pontianak Orange Peel Wastes and Its Utilization for Aromatherapy Soap

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hidayati Hidayati

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Orange (Citrus nobilis var. microcarpa is the main commodities in Pontianak. Production of essential oils from orange peel wastes and its use for soap aromatherapy substance could improve its economic value. This study is aimed to produce the essential oils from orange peel wastes with the highest limonene content by distillation. Its application for aromatherapy soap substance also evaluated. Distillation of essential oils from orange peels was performed at 1000C and 1100C for 4, 5, 6 and 7 hours. The results showed that at 1000C for 7 hours produced the highest limonene content, reach 97.69%. The essential oils color was pale yellow, specific gravity 0.84, refractive index 1.47, solubility in 90% ethanol 1:1 (transparent, acid value 0.143% and ester number 5.37. The aromatherapy soap produced with addition of 3.6% of limonene oils is in accordance with SNI 06-3532-1994 except for water content parameter.

  1. Aromatherapy with two essential oils from Satureja genre and mindfulness meditation to reduce anxiety in humans

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    Marilú Roxana Soto-Vásquez

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this study was to verify whether association of aromatherapy with essential oils of Satureja brevicalyx or Satureja boliviana and mindfulness meditation can reduce anxiety levels in humans. A randomized experimental trial was carried out with 108 participants who were divided into 6 groups, comprising a waiting list control group and five experimental groups. Aromatherapy was carried out by inhalation of essential oils while mindfulness intervention program was focused on “flow meditation”. The anxiety index was evaluated by State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI. Measures were taken two times: pretest and posttest. State and Trait anxiety scores showed a decrease in posttest study phase in comparison with pretest in all experimental groups (p < 0.005, especially in those where aromatherapy and mindfulness meditation were used together. All Cohen's d scores were over to 1 that means a large size effect in anxiety variable. Percentages of change showed reductions of anxiety variable ranging between 20% and 47%. All treatments used isolated or associated, may be considered alternative treatment options for anxiety.

  2. Effects of Inhalation Aromatherapy on Symptoms of Sleep Disturbance in the Elderly with Dementia

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    Ai Takeda

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the effects of inhalation aromatherapy on sleep disturbance in elderly individuals with dementia. In 19 subjects, normal sleep was observed for a 20-day control period, inhalation aromatherapy was then applied for a 20-day intervention period, and the control and intervention periods were compared. During the intervention period, essential oils were placed nightly on towels around the subjects’ pillows. The measured sleep conditions were sleep latency, total sleep time, sleep efficacy, duration of the longest sustained sleep period, wake time after sleep onset, early morning awakening, total daytime sleep, and the Neuropsychiatric Inventory. Total sleep time was significantly longer in the intervention period than in the control period (p<0.05. The duration of the longest sustained sleep period was significantly longer in the intervention period than in the control period (p<0.05. Early morning awakening in the intervention period was significantly less compared to that in the control period (p<0.05. Total daytime sleep could not be adequately measured and was omitted from the analysis. No significant differences in other sleep conditions were observed. These results indicated positive effects of inhalation aromatherapy on symptoms of sleep disturbance in elderly individuals with dementia.

  3. Evidence-informed massage therapy - an Australian practitioner perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ooi, Soo Liang; Smith, Lauren; Pak, Sok Cheon

    2018-05-01

    Massage therapy (MT) is the most popular complementary and alternative medicine therapy used by the Australian public. With the growing emphasis by the Australian health authority on evidence-informed healthcare decision-making, there is an increasing demand for massage therapists to move towards the evidence-informed practice (EIP). With MT research gaining significant attention over the last 30 years, clinical evidence exists to support the efficacies of MT on many health conditions, including chronic low back pain. This growing body of research supports MT to become an evidence-informed therapeutic modality. The evidence utilization process of asking clinical questions, searching for available research evidence, and appraising the evidence critically can be incorporated into the clinical practice of MT. Moreover, integrating practitioners' skills and experience with research evidence enables the best treatment plan to address the clients' needs and stated goals. No dichotomy exists between scientific research and the humanistic client care of MT. A massage therapist can gain greater confidence in practice, improve critical thinking and decision-making skills, and increase career satisfaction through EIP. Despite its high public utilization, massage therapists in Australia remain a low-paying profession dominated by part-time workers who rarely utilize research evidence in practice. Professional associations of massage therapists in Australia need to play a key role in promoting EIP through continuing professional education, providing the access to research information and resources, as well as fostering a culture of EIP. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Pengaruh Swedish Massage Therapy terhadap Tingkat Kualitas Hidup Penderita Leukemia Usia Sekolah

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    Dewi Umu Kulsum

    2017-08-01

    Hasil penelitian menggambarkan terdapat perbedaan kualitas hidup pada kelompok intervensi sebelum dan sesudah dilakukan swedish massage therapy (p = 0,000 pada α = 5. Hasil penelitian merekomendasikan bahwa swedish massage therapy bisa dipakai sebagai metode alternatif dalam meningkatkan kualitas hidup penderita leukemia usia sekolah. Kata kunci: Kualitas hidup, leukemia, swedish massage therapy.

  5. Sexual Health Education in Massage Therapy Programs: A Survey of Program Directors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamboni, Brian D.; Healey, Dale K.

    2016-01-01

    Massage therapy program directors completed an online survey to explore sexual education in massage therapy programs. The overall data suggest that program directors are supportive of sexual health education in the training of massage therapists and that such education is integrated into several aspects of their training programs. To enhance…

  6. The Efficacy of Lavender Aromatherapy in Reducing Preoperative Anxiety in Ambulatory Surgery Patients Undergoing Procedures in General Otolaryngology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wotman, Michael; Levinger, Joshua; Leung, Lillian; Kallush, Aron; Mauer, Elizabeth

    2017-01-01

    Background Preoperative anxiety is a common problem in hospitals and other health care centers. This emotional state has been shown to negatively impact patient satisfaction and outcomes. Aromatherapy, the therapeutic use of essential oils extracted from aromatic plants, may offer a simple, low‐risk and cost‐effective method of managing preoperative anxiety. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of lavender aromatherapy in reducing preoperative anxiety in ambulatory surgery patients undergoing procedures in general otolaryngology. Methods A prospective and controlled pilot study was conducted with 100 patients who were admitted to New York‐Presbyterian/Weill Cornell Medical Center for ambulatory surgery from January of 2015 to August of 2015. The subjects were allocated to two groups; the experimental group received inhalation lavender aromatherapy in the preoperative waiting area while the control group received standard nursing care. Both groups reported their anxiety with a visual analog scale (VAS) upon arriving to the preoperative waiting area and upon departure to the operating room. Results According to a Welch's two sample t‐test, the mean reduction in anxiety was statistically greater in the experimental group than the control group (p = 0.001). Conclusion Lavender aromatherapy reduced preoperative anxiety in ambulatory surgery patients. This effect was modest and possibly statistically significant. Future research is needed to confirm the clinical efficacy of lavender aromatherapy. Level of Evidence 2b PMID:29299520

  7. Optimizing methyl-eugenol aromatherapy to maximize posttreatment effects to enhance mating competitiveness of male Bactrocera carambolae (Diptera: Tephritidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haq, Ihsan ul; Vreysen, Marc J B; Cacéres, Carlos; Shelly, Todd E; Hendrichs, Jorge

    2015-10-01

    Methyl-eugenol (ME) (1,2-dimethoxy-4-(2-propenyl)benzene), a natural phytochemical, did enhance male Bactrocera carambolae Drew & Hancock (Diptera: Tephritidae) mating competitiveness 3 d after ingestion. Enhanced male mating competitiveness can significantly increase the effectiveness of the sterile insect technique (SIT). ME application to mass reared sterile flies by feeding is infeasible. ME application by aromatherapy however, would be a very practical way of ME application in fly emergence and release facilities. This approach was shown to enhance mating competitiveness of B. carambolae 3 d posttreatment (DPT). Despite this added benefit, every additional day of delaying release will reduce sterile fly quality and will add cost to SIT application. The present study was planned to assess the effects of ME-aromatherapy on male B. carambolae mating competitiveness 1DPT and 2DPT. ME aromatherapy 1DPT or 2DPT did enhance mating competitiveness of B. carambolae males whereas ME feeding 1DPT and 2DPT did not. Male mating competitiveness was enhanced by the ME aromatherapy irrespective if they received 1DPT, 2DPT or 3DPT. ME aromatherapy, being a viable approach for its application, did enhance mating competitiveness of male B. carambolae 1 d posttreatment as ME feeding did 3 d after ingestion. ©2014 The Authors Journal compliation © Insititute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Science.

  8. Pulmonary functions of children with asthma improve following massage therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fattah, Mohammed Abdel; Hamdy, Basant

    2011-11-01

    This study aimed at evaluating the effect of massage therapy on the pulmonary functions of stable Egyptian children with asthma. This study was an open, randomized, controlled trial. The study was conducted in pediatric allergy and chest unit of the New Children's Hospital of Cairo University, Egypt. Sixty (60) children with asthma were divided randomly into two equal groups: massage therapy group and control group. Subjects in the massage therapy group received a 20-minute massage therapy by their parents at home before bedtime every night for 5 weeks in addition to the standard asthma treatment. The control group received the standard asthma treatment alone for 5 weeks. Spirometry was performed for all children on the first and last days of the study. Forced expiratory flow in first second (FEV1), forced vital capacity (FVC), FEV1/FVC and peak expiratory flow (PEF) were recorded. At the end of the study, mean FEV1 of the massage therapy group was significantly higher than controls (2.3-0.8 L versus 1.9-0.9 L, p=0.04). There was no significant difference in FVC (2.5-0.8 L versus 2.7-0.7 L, p=0.43). However, FEV1/FVC ratio showed a significant improvement in the massage therapy group (92.3-21.5 versus 69.5-17, pmassage therapy in pediatric asthma is suggested. It improved the key pulmonary functions of the children, namely, FEV1 and FEV1/FVC ratio. However, further research on a larger scale is warranted. © Mary Ann Liebert, Inc.

  9. Evaluating the efficacy of lavender aromatherapy on peripheral venous cannulation pain and anxiety: A prospective, randomized study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karaman, Tugba; Karaman, Serkan; Dogru, Serkan; Tapar, Hakan; Sahin, Aynur; Suren, Mustafa; Arici, Semih; Kaya, Ziya

    2016-05-01

    This study was designed to evaluate the effectiveness of lavender aromatherapy on pain, anxiety, and level of satisfaction associated with the peripheral venous cannulation (PVC) in patients undergoing surgery. One hundred and six patients undergoing surgery were randomized to receive aromatherapy with lavender essential oil (the lavender group) or a placebo (the control group) during PVC. The patients' pain, anxiety, and satisfaction scores were measured. There was no statistically significantly difference between the groups in terms of demographic data. After cannulation, the pain and anxiety scores (anxiety 2) of the patients in the lavender group were significantly lower than the control group (for p = 0.01 for pain scores; p aromatherapy had beneficial effects on PVC pain, anxiety, and satisfaction level of patients undergoing surgery. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Massage therapy for people with HIV/AIDS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillier, Susan L; Louw, Quinette; Morris, Linzette; Uwimana, Jeanine; Statham, Sue

    2010-01-20

    Infection with human immunodeficency virus (HIV) and acquired immunodeficency syndrome (AIDS) is a pandemic that has affected millions of people globally. Although major research and clinical initiatives are addressing prevention and cure strategies, issues of quality of life for survivors have received less attention. Massage therapy is proposed to have a positive effect on quality of life and may also have a positive effect on immune function through stress mediation. The objective of this systematic review was to examine the safety and effectiveness of massage therapy on quality of life, pain and immune system parameters in people living with HIV/AIDS. A comprehensive search strategy was devised incorporating appropriate terms for HIV/AIDS, randomised controlled trials (RCTs), massage therapy and the pertinent measures of benefit. All electronic databases identified were searched in November 2008, including Cochrane Group Trials Register, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, EMBASE, SCIENCE CITATION INDEX, AIDSLINE, AIDSearch, CINAHL, HEALTHSTAR, PsycLIT, AMED, Current Contents, AMI, NLM GATEWAY, LILACS, IndMed, SOCIOFILE, SCI, SSCI, ERIC and DAI. We also reviewed relevant published and unpublished conference abstracts and proceedings and scrutinised reference lists from pertinent journals. There were no language or date restrictions. Studies were identified by two reviewers based on trial design (RCTs) and participants (ie, people of any age with HIV/AIDS, at any stage of the disease) who had undergone an intervention that included massage therapy for the identified aims of improving quality of life and activity and participation levels, improving immune function, reducing pain and improving other physiological or psychological impairments. Two reviewers independently identified included studies and extracted relevant data. Two other reviewers independently reviewed the included studies for risk of bias. All data and risk of bias

  11. EFFECTIVENESS OF LAVENDER AROMATHERAPY AND CLASSICAL MUSIC THERAPY IN LOWERING BLOOD PRESSURE IN PREGNANT WOMEN WITH HYPERTENSION

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    Sri Maisi

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Hypertension during pregnancy remains high in Indonesia. It is a major cause of maternal death. Aromatherapy lavender and classical music therapy are considered effective in lowering blood pressure in hypertension. Objective: To examine the effect of lavender aromatherapy and classical music therapy in lowering blood pressure in pregnant women with hypertension. Methods: A quasy experimental study with pretest-posttest control group design. There were 52 pregnant women with the inclusion criteria selected as samples using simple random sampling, divided into lavender aromatherapy group, classical music group, combination of aromatherapy and music group, and control group. Sphygmomanometer was used to measure blood pressure. Mann Whitney and Post Hoc test were used for data analysis. Results: Results showed that four groups have a significant decrease in systolic blood pressure after given intervention with p-value <0.05. The mean decrease of systolic blood pressure among four groups was: lavender group (5.77 mmHg, music group (7.23 mmHg, combination group (9.54 mmHg, and control group (3.67 mmHg; and the mean decrease of diastolic blood pressure was: the lavender group (2.77 mmHg, music group (0.61 mmHg, combination group (8.23 mmHg, and control group (3.42 mmHg. Conclusion: there was a significant effect of lavender aromatherapy and classical music therapy in lowering blood pressure in pregnant women with hypertension. However, the combination of both interventions was more effective than lavender aromatherapy or music therapy alone.

  12. Effects of electronic massager on patients with advanced cancer of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The electronic massager has in recent times become so popularized that it is used in the treatment of almost every ailment. Its prescriptions range from treatment of obesity through acute painful conditions to the treatment of complications of cancer conditions. There are many claims and counter claims from the ...

  13. [Occupational low back pain in nursing workers: massage versus pain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borges, Talita Pavarini; Kurebayashi, Leonice Fumiko Sato; Silva, Maria Júlia Paes da

    2014-08-01

    To assess the efficacy of massage for decreasing occupational low back pain in workers of a Nursing team in an Emergency Room. A randomized controlled trial, using a socio-demographic/morbidity questionnaire and a Pain Numeric Scale. Forty-five subjects were randomly allocated for intervention (G1 - Massage by acupressure), placebo group (G2 - application of Garlium Arseneid Laser 904 nm turned off) and control (G3 - no intervention). The main triggering factor, as well as the worsening of pain, was the patient manipulation, both with a prevalence of 34.9%. The main treatment for low back pain before this research was the use of medication, with a prevalence of 44.2%. In accordance with a variance analysis, only G1 presented a significant statistical difference, with a better result after 12 sessions. Massage presented an enormous effect (d = 4.59), corresponding to 86% of reduction in the pain level. Massage was effective to decrease occupational low back pain of those Nursing workers.

  14. Traumatic Injuries in the Newborn from Abdominal Massage in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    OBJECTIVE: This case is presented to highlight this preventable and treatable cause of early neonatal death. METHOD: An early neonatal death due to liver rupture caused by maternal abdominal manipulation and massage is presented. RESULTS: An apparently healthy baby girl was born to a 26 years old primigravida ...

  15. Occupational low back pain in nursing workers: massage versus pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Talita Pavarini Borges

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To assess the efficacy of massage for decreasing occupational low back pain in workers of a Nursing team in an Emergency Room. Method: A randomized controlled trial, using a socio-demographic/morbidity questionnaire and a Pain Numeric Scale. Forty-five subjects were randomly allocated for intervention (G1 – Massage by acupressure, placebo group (G2 – application of Garlium Arseneid Laser 904nm turned off and control (G3 – no intervention. Results: The main triggering factor, as well as the worsening of pain, was the patient manipulation, both with a prevalence of 34.9%. The main treatment for low back pain before this research was the use of medication, with a prevalence of 44.2%. In accordance with a variance analysis, only G1 presented a significant statistical difference, with a better result after 12 sessions. Massage presented an enormous effect (d = 4.59, corresponding to 86% of reduction in the pain level. Conclusion: Massage was effective to decrease occupational low back pain of those Nursing workers.

  16. Advancing Massage Therapy Research Competencies: Dimensions for Thought and Action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hymel, Glenn M.

    Two major developments in the therapeutic massage and bodywork profession have recently brought to the forefront the issue of research competencies. The profession has been called to a potentially heightened level of credibility. One challenge to the profession's development is that of coordinating the various curricular, instructional,…

  17. The effect of massage therapy on restless leg syndrome

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    Rahim Mirnasuri

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Restless Leg Syndrome (RLS is a kind of mal-movement which is identified by too much movement of the feet during rest. Although a host of scientific resources have pointed to the significant effect of massage on this disease, no well-designed study to date has explored the efficiency of massage on the RLS. Materials and methods: This study adopted a quasi-experimental design with pre-and post-test. Two groups served as the participants of the study. Experimental group received treatment, while control group received no intervention. Both groups were pre- and post-tested. The participants were 300 male and female students (at higher education centers of Lorestan province, whose age ranged from 18 to 30 years. Also, their height ranged from 155-1990, while their weight was 55-85 kg. A researcher-made questionnaire, including multiple-choice questions associated with RLS which show gravity of the mal-movement on a four-point Likert scale from very weak to very strong. T-test was used for data analysis. Results: The results of the study  showed that a period of massage therapy had a significant effect on tingling therapy on the foot, the foot throbbing, burning feet, the sudden jump feet, sleep the sleep quality Conclusion: The current study revealed that performing a massage-therapy protocol have a significant effect on reducing the symptoms of RLS.

  18. Positive effects of massage therapy on a patient with narcolepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Robyn; Baskwill, Amanda

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this case report was to investigate the effects of massage therapy on the sleep patterns of a woman with narcolepsy. The 23-year-old woman's primary symptoms included excessive daytime sleepiness and periodic leg movements (PLM), which were associated with her diagnoses of both narcolepsy and cataplexy. Five 45-minute massage therapy treatments were administered over a five-week period. The patient's sleep patterns were recorded each week before the treatment. A final measurement was recorded in the sixth week. The sleep patterns were monitored using the Leeds Sleep Evaluation Questionnaire, which included ten visual analogue scales. The results of this case report included an improvement in getting to sleep by 148%, an improvement in quality of sleep by 1100%, an improvement in awake following sleep by 121%, and an improvement in behaviour following wakening by 28% using the Leeds Sleep Evaluation Questionnaire. This case report suggests that massage therapy had a positive effect on this patient with narcolepsy. Further research is needed to investigate the effects of massage therapy on narcolepsy and sleep patterns.

  19. Small Animal Massage Therapy: A Brief Review and Relevant Observations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Formenton, Maira Rezende; Pereira, Marco Aurélio Amador; Fantoni, Denise Tabacchi

    2017-12-01

    Massage therapy is becoming increasingly popular in human and animal physiotherapy and rehabilitation. Wider application of the technique led to research efforts aimed at providing scientific support to anecdotal beneficial effects, particularly pain relief. Recent studies have shown that massage therapy alters dopamine and serotonin levels, decreases noradrenaline levels, and modulates the immune system. Psychological effects such as reduction of stress and anxiety, with improvement of depressive patients, have been reported in humans. This article set out to review the major aspects of massage therapy based on recent publications on the topic, and to extrapolate concepts and practical aspects described in human physiotherapy to the veterinary patient, particularly the applicability of different techniques in Small Animal Medicine. Indications of massage therapy in small animals include pain relief, orthopedic rehabilitation, Canine Sports Medicine, intensive care, and management of nonspecific edema. Techniques described in this article were originally intended for use in humans and scientific data supporting anecdotal, beneficial effects in domestic animals are still lacking; this fruitful area for research is therefore open to veterinary professionals. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Durability of effect of massage therapy on blood pressure

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    Mahshid Givi

    2013-01-01

    Conclusions: Findings of the study indicated that massage therapy was a safe, effective, applicable and cost-effective intervention in controlling BP of the pre-hypertension women and it can be used in the health care centers and even at home.

  1. A Meta-Analysis of Massage Therapy Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moyer, Christopher A.; Rounds, James; Hannum, James W.

    2004-01-01

    Massage therapy (MT) is an ancient form of treatment that is now gaining popularity as part of the complementary and alternative medical therapy movement. A meta-analysis was conducted of studies that used random assignment to test the effectiveness of MT. Mean effect sizes were calculated from 37 studies for 9 dependent variables. Single…

  2. THE EFFECT OF MASSAGE ON SOME RECOVERY PARAMETERS

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    Bilgehan Baydil

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was investigate the effect of total classic body massage on some recovery and circulation parameters. Fourteen non-athlete physically active male university students voluntarily participated in the study. Participants randomly divided into two group Massage Group (MG and Control Group (KG. All participants were informed about the purpose of the study, food consumption and not join the exercise before the test. 30 second Wingate Test protocol was used as exhaustive exercise. Heart Rate (KAH, systolic (SKB and diastolic (DKB blood pressures and blood lactate measured immediately after and 15 min recovery after exhaustive exercise. During 15 min recovery, total classic body massage was applied to MG group. Passive recovery was applied to KG group. The Shapiro Wilk Test of normality was used to determine if the data were normally distributed. Pair Sample T-Test was used for data’s were normally distributed, Wilcoxon Signed Ranks Test was used for data’s were not normally distributed. All analyses were set at p.05. Both groups blood lactate levels were significantly decreased (MG; t = 4.47, p = .004; KG; t = -2.36, p = .018. Blood lactate levels were determined as -51.60% and -24.63% on MG group and KG group respectively. Consequently, the total classic body massage thought to be effective on lactate removal level in short period of recovery.

  3. Effect of inhalation aromatherapy with lavender essential oil on stress and vital signs in patients undergoing coronary artery bypass surgery: A single-blinded randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bikmoradi, Ali; Seifi, Zahra; Poorolajal, Jalal; Araghchian, Malihe; Safiaryan, Reza; Oshvandi, Khodayar

    2015-06-01

    At present, aromatherapy is used widely in medical research. This study aimed to investigate the effects of inhalation aromatherapy using lavender essential oil to reduce mental stress and improve the vital signs of patients after coronary artery bypass surgery (CABG). A single-blinded randomized controlled trial was conducted with 60 patients who had undergone CABG in a 2-day intervention that targeted stress reduction. Sixty subjects following coronary artery bypass surgery in two aromatherapy and control groups. The study was conducted in Ekbatan Therapeutic and Educational Center, Hamadan, Iran, in 2013. On the second and third days after surgery, the aromatherapy group patients received two drops of 2% lavender essential oil for 20min and the control group received two drops of distilled water as a placebo. The primary outcome was mental stress, which was measured before and after the intervention using the DASS-21 questionnaire. The secondary outcomes were vital signs, including the heart rate, respiratory rate, and systolic and diastolic blood pressure, which were measured before and after the intervention. The individual characteristics of the aromatherapy and control groups were the same. There were no significant difference in the mean mental stress scores and vital signs of the aromatherapy and control groups on the second or third days after surgery. Inhalation aromatherapy with lavender essential oil had no significant effects on mental stress and vital signs in patients following CABG, except the systolic blood pressure. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. The Effect of Inhalation of Aromatherapy Blend containing Lavender Essential Oil on Cesarean Postoperative Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olapour, Alireza; Behaeen, Kaveh; Akhondzadeh, Reza; Soltani, Farhad; Al Sadat Razavi, Forough; Bekhradi, Reza

    2013-01-01

    Pain is a major problem in patients after cesarean and medication such as aromatherapy which is a complementary therapy, in which the essences of the plants oils are used to reduce such undesirable conditions. In this study, the effect of aromatherapy using Lavender (Lavandula) essential oil on cesarean postoperative pain was assessed. In a triple blind, randomized placebo-controlled trial study, 60 pregnant women who were admitted to a general hospital for cesarean section, were divided randomly into two groups. After cesarean, the Lavender group inhaled about 3 drops of 10% Lavender oil essence and the placebo group inhaled 3 drops of placebo after the start of postoperative pain, four, eight and 12 hours later, for 5 minutes from the 10 cm distance. Patient's pain was measured by the VAS (Visual Analog Scale) score before and after each intervention, and vital sign, complications and level of satisfaction of every patient were recorded before and after aromatherapy. There was no statistically significant difference between groups in age, height, weight, and time to the first analgesic requirement. Patients in the Lavender group had less postoperative pain in four (P = 0.008), eight (P = 0.024) and 12 (P = 0.011) hours after first medication than the placebo group. The decreased heart rate and patients' level of satisfaction with analgesia were significantly higher in the Lavender group (P = 0.001). In the placebo group, the use of diclofenac suppositories for complete analgesia was also significantly higher than the Lavender group (P = 0.008). The inhaled Lavender essence may be used as a part of the multidisciplinary treatment of pain after cesarean section, but it is not recommended as the sole pain management.

  5. Ice massage on chemotherapy induced nausea and vomiting

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    Mehdi Sadeghi Shermeh

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Nausea and vomiting are the most common side effects of chemotherapy. The aim of the current study was to assess the effect of ice massage applied to the pericardium 6 (P6 or Neigaun acupuncture point on nausea– vomiting due to chemotherapy in cancer patient. Materials and Methods: In a randomized clinical trial one- blind, 114 patients were randomly divided into three groups. Ice massage group were massaged gently on the skin around P6 point of the hand with ice cube into a wet gauze pad for 7 minutes twice a day with 12-hours interval for 24 hours by the patient. Placebo group were massaged with wooden cube and the control group received no interventions. Nausea and vomiting in three groups rated by Morrow Assessment of Nausea and Emesis (MANE Questionnaire in 4 periods of time in 24 hours was used for the assessment of nausea and vomiting. Results: There were significant decreases in the frequency of nausea (P<0.01 and vomiting (P<0.03 and a decrease in the intensity of nausea (P=0.63 and vomiting (P=0.34 in the case group. Frequency of nausea was significantly lower among placebo group than the control group (P<0.02. Conclusion: Ice massage on Neigaun point is effective on reducing the frequency of chemotherapy induced nausea and vomiting in cancer patients. Placebos, patient-practitioner relationship, suggestion, and the patient's view on nausea and vomiting and the role of interaction between the therapist and the patient is effective to some extent.

  6. Neck arthritis pain is reduced and range of motion is increased by massage therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field, Tiffany; Diego, Miguel; Gonzalez, Gladys; Funk, C G

    2014-11-01

    The literature on the effects of massage therapy on neck arthritis pain is mixed depending on the dose level, and it is also based on self-report. In the present study an attempt was made to enhance the effects of weekly massage therapy by having the participants massage themselves daily. And in addition to self-reports on pain, range of motion (ROM) and the associated ROM pain were assessed before and after the first massage session and pre-post the last session one month later. Staff and faculty members at a medical school who were eligible for the study if they had neck arthritis pain were randomly assigned to a massage or a waitlist control group (N = 24 per group). The massage group received moderate pressure massages weekly by a massage therapist plus daily self-massages. The waitlist control group received the same schedule massages one month after being control subjects. The massage group showed significant short-term reductions after the first and last day massages in self-reported pain and in ROM-associated pain as well as an increase in ROM. Comparisons between the massage group (N = 23) and the control group (N = 14) on the last versus the first day data suggested significantly different changes including increased ROM and reduced ROM-associated pain for the massage group and reduced ROM and increased ROM-associated pain for the control group. These changes occurred specifically for flexion and right and left lateral flexion motions. These data highlight the importance of designing massage therapy protocols that target the most affected neck muscle groups and then assessing range of motion and related pain before and after the massage therapy. Comparisons with other studies also suggest that moderate pressure may contribute to the massage effects, and the use of daily self-massages between sessions may sustain the effects and serve as a cost-effective therapy for individuals with neck arthritis pain. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  7. Nosocomial outbreak of extensively drug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa associated with aromatherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayr, Astrid; Hinterberger, Guido; Lorenz, Ingo H; Kreidl, Peter; Mutschlechner, Wolfgang; Lass-Flörl, Cornelia

    2017-04-01

    An increase of extensively drug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa (XDR-PA) in various clinical specimens among intensive care unit patients (n = 7) initiated an outbreak investigation consisting of patient data analyses, control of adherence to infection control guidelines, microbiologic surveys, and molecular-based studies. XDR-PA was detected in a jointly used aroma-oil nursing bottle for aromatherapy. We implemented the restriction of oil sharing among patients. Hence, the outbreak was controlled successfully. Copyright © 2017 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Composition of milk obtained from unmassaged versus massaged breasts of lactating mothers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foda, Mervat I; Kawashima, Takaaki; Nakamura, Sadako; Kobayashi, Michiko; Oku, Tsuneyuki

    2004-05-01

    The Oketani method is a program of breast massage and clinical counseling developed by the midwife Satomi Oketani. The purpose of this study is to examine the effects of the method on the quality of breast milk by determining the chemical composition of the milk before and after massage. Milk samples were obtained immediately before and after massage from healthy, exclusively breast-feeding Japanese mothers at two different periods of lactation one 3 months after parturition. Lipids, whey protein, casein, lactose, ash, and total solids in milk were measured in milk samples. The gross energy content of milk was estimated. Breast massage significantly increased lipids in the late lactating period but not in the early lactating period. In the early lactating period casein was increased by breast massage but was not significantly affected in the late lactating period. Breast massage caused a significant increase in total solids from the first day to 11 months post partum. The gross energy in the late lactating period was significantly increased by breast massage but not in the early lactating period. Lactose was not significantly changed by breast massage. Breast massage improves the quality of human milk by significantly increasing total solids, lipids, and casein concentration and gross energy. The milk of mothers treated by Oketani breast massage may improve the growth and development of infants.

  9. Effect of massage stimulation on weight gain in full term infants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nyoman Nursari Dewi

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Background Massage is a tactile/kinesthetic stimulation with biochemical and physiological effects on the body. Newborn infant massage stimulation given by mothers may promote maternal-infant bonding and attachment, enhance infant weight gain and stimulate the production of breast milk. There have been few studies on the effect of massage stimulation on weight gain in full term infants, and this topic remains controversial. Objective To examine the effect of massage stimulation on weight gain in full term infants. Methods This quasi-experimental study was held in Sanglah Hospital and Bunda Setia Maternity Clinic. Massage stimulation was performed by mothers once daily for a four week period. Massage stimulation was given to 30 full term infants and their weight gain was compared to 31 control infants who did not receive massages. Results There were no differences in subject characteristics between the massage and control groups. Median weight gain in the massage group was 1230 grams, while that in the control group was 830 grams (P=0.028. Conclusion Weight gain in full term infants in the massage group was significantly greater than that in the control group after 4 weeks.

  10. Massage therapy for home care patients using the health insurance system in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondo, H; Ogawa, S; Nishimura, H; Ono, A

    2018-02-01

    To clarify the status of home care massage services provided to patients. This will help in understanding how many patients utilize this service and the circumstances under which treatment is provided. A retrospective study. Fifty-four acupuncture, moxibustion, and massage clinics. Participants were patients who had received home care massage for six months or more. We collected a total of 1587 responses from these 54 massage clinics; of these, 1415 responses (mean age = 79.1 ± 11.5 years) were valid (valid response rate 89.2%). Actual patients and actual care services. The most common disorder observed among patients who utilized home care massage services was cerebrovascular disease (at approximately 36%), while the second most common were arthropathy-related disorders (16.3%). Although most patients received massage, approximately 30% received manual therapy (e.g. manual correction) and hot fomentation as part of thermotherapy. Notably, only around 10% of patients received massage alone; the majority received treatment in combination with range of motion and muscle-strengthening exercises. This study helped to clarify the actual state of patients receiving home care massage and the details of the massage services provided. This study clearly showed the treatment effectiveness of massage, which can be used by home medical care stakeholders to develop more effective interventions. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. The culture of massage therapy: valued elements and the role of comfort, contact, connection and caring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Joanna M; Sullivan, S John; Baxter, G David

    2009-08-01

    To explore the attributes of the therapy encounter valued by repeat users of health-related massage therapy. A qualitative design with telephone focus group methodology was used. A total of 19 repeat users of massage therapy participated in three telephone focus groups where audiotaped semi-structured interviews were conducted. Telephone focus group with massage clients from a range of provincial and urban regions in New Zealand. Summary of reported themes of the massage experience. Data were thematically analysed using the general inductive approach. Six valued elements of the massage encounter (time for care and personal attention, engaging and competent therapist, trust partnership, holism and empowerment, effective touch and enhancing relaxation), four modulators (comfort, contact, connection and caring) and two themes relating to adding experiential value (enjoyment, escapism) characterize the massage therapy culture. The culture of massage therapy care incorporates a number of characteristics that are congruent with the complementary and alternative medicine approach to health. In addition, massage specific factors were identified. The humanistic aspects of the therapy encounter valued by clients offer insight into the growing use of massage therapy and the success of massage therapy outcomes.

  12. PREMM: preterm early massage by the mother: protocol of a randomised controlled trial of massage therapy in very preterm infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Melissa M; D'Acunto, Giulia; Guzzetta, Andrea; Boyd, Roslyn N; Rose, Stephen E; Fripp, Jurgen; Finnigan, Simon; Ngenda, Naoni; Love, Penny; Whittingham, Koa; Pannek, Kerstin; Ware, Robert S; Colditz, Paul B

    2016-08-27

    Preterm infants follow an altered neurodevelopmental trajectory compared to their term born peers as a result of the influence of early birth, and the altered environment. Infant massage in the preterm infant has shown positive effects on weight gain and reduced length of hospital stay. There is however, limited current evidence of improved neurodevelopment or improved attachment, maternal mood or anxiety. The aim of this study is to investigate the effects of infant massage performed by the mother in very preterm (VPT) infants. Effects on the infant will be assessed at the electrophysiological, neuroradiological and clinical levels.  Effects on maternal mood, anxiety and mother-infant attachment will also be measured. A randomised controlled trial to investigate the effect of massage therapy in VPT infants. Sixty VPT infants, born at 28 to 32 weeks and 6 days gestational age, who are stable, off supplemental oxygen therapy and have normal cranial ultrasounds will be recruited and randomised to an intervention (infant massage) group or a control (standard care) group. Ten healthy term born infants will be recruited as a reference comparison group. The intervention group will receive standardised massage therapy administered by the mother from recruitment, until term equivalent age (TEA). The control group will receive care as usual (CAU). Infants and their mothers will be assessed at baseline, TEA, 12 months and 24 months corrected age (CA), with a battery of clinical, neuroimaging and electrophysiological measures, as well as structured questionnaires, psychoanalytic observations and neurodevelopmental assessments. Optimising preterm infant neurodevelopment is a key aim of neonatal research, which could substantially improve long-term outcomes and reduce the socio-economic impact of VPT birth. This study has the potential to give insights into the mother-baby relationship and any positive effects of infant massage on neurodevelopment. An early intervention

  13. The Effect of Infant Massage Counseling on Infant Massage Practice by Mothers in Tugu Village, Jumantono Sub-District, Karanganyar Regency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maecelina Hestin Ambasari

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Infant massage is a traditional child care whose efficacy has been proven. Therefore, the mothers need to get a health extension on the correct infant massage techniques so that they can do infant massage practice autonomously. This research aim to investigate the effect of infant massage extension on the infant massage practice by mothers in Tugu village, Jumantono sub-district, Karanganyar regency. The research used pre-experimental research method with the one group pretest-posttest design. Its samples consisted of 57 respondents and were taken by using proportional random sampling technique. The data of research were collected through checklist and analyzed by using the Wilcoxon test aided with the computer program of SPSS. Prior to the infant massage extension, the average score was 10.8, the highest score was 14, and the lowest score was 8. Following the extension, the average score was 25.6, the highest score was 29, and the lowest score was 21 as indicated by the score of Wilcoxon test in which the score of Z  was -6.583 and the significance value was p = 0.000. Infant massage extension had an effect on the infant massage practice by mothers.

  14. Research on Curriculum Plan and Learning Achievement for Aromatherapy with the Concept of the Chinese Five Elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Pei-Ching

    2012-01-01

    In Taiwan, people are getting more aware of beauty treatments and the concept of health care. This study hopes to bring all relevant concepts such as Aromatherapy, essential scented oils, medical foods, human meridians, Chinese five elements therapy, and beauty business management into the curriculum design, and seriously considered many factors…

  15. The Effects of Aromatherapy on Intensive Care Unit Patients' Stress and Sleep Quality: A Nonrandomised Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Eun Hee; Lee, Mi-Young

    2017-01-01

    Background Stress has both physiological and psychological effects and can negatively impact patients' treatment and recovery. We examined whether the aromatherapy alleviated patients' stress and improved their sleep quality and provided data that can be utilized in clinical settings. Methods This was a nonrandomised controlled experimental study. Participants included lucid adult patients who were admitted to the intensive care unit and had spent more than two nights there. The experimental treatment required participants to engage in deep breathing with essential oils as part of the aromatherapy. The control group was instructed to go to sleep without receiving the lavender aroma oil. Results The experimental group and control group showed a significant difference in perceived stress (F = 60.11, p aromatherapy alleviated stress and improved sleep quality in intensive care unit patients after 2 days of the experimental treatment. These results demonstrate that aromatherapy affects stress and sleep quality, thus indicating its value in nursing interventions. This trial is registered with KCT0002344. PMID:29375641

  16. THE IMPACT OF LAVENDER AROMATHERAPY ON PAIN INTENSITY AND BETA-ENDORPHIN LEVELS IN POST-CAESAREAN MOTHERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yohana Putri Apryanti

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Caesarean section is one of the most common interventions to overcome labor complications. However, pain cannot be avoided after the surgery. Lavender aromatherapy is considered as one of non-pharmacological therapy to reduce pain and increase beta-endorphin levels. Objective: To examine the effect of lavender aromatherapy on the intensity of pain and beta-endorphin levels in post-caesarean mothers. Methods: This was a quasy-experimental study with pretest and posttest with control group at Sembiring Delitua General Hospital on December 2016 to February 2017. There were 40 samples selected using purposive sampling, with 20 samples assigned in the experiment and control group. Numerical Rating Scale (NRS was used to measure pain and ELIZA methods to measure beta-endorphin levels. Independent t-test and paired t-test were used for data analysis Results: Results of this study showed that there was a significant difference in the mean value of pain intensity levels (p=0.000 and beta-endorphin levels (p=0.023 between experiment and control group. Conclusion: There was a significant effect of lavender aromatherapy on the decrease of pain intensity and the increase of beta-endorphin hormone in post-caesarean mothers. It is expected that lavender aromatherapy can be used as an alternative treatment to reduce pain and increase beta-endorphin levels in post-caesarean mothers.

  17. The Effects of Aromatherapy on Intensive Care Unit Patients’ Stress and Sleep Quality: A Nonrandomised Controlled Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eun Hee Cho

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Stress has both physiological and psychological effects and can negatively impact patients’ treatment and recovery. We examined whether the aromatherapy alleviated patients’ stress and improved their sleep quality and provided data that can be utilized in clinical settings. Methods. This was a nonrandomised controlled experimental study. Participants included lucid adult patients who were admitted to the intensive care unit and had spent more than two nights there. The experimental treatment required participants to engage in deep breathing with essential oils as part of the aromatherapy. The control group was instructed to go to sleep without receiving the lavender aroma oil. Results. The experimental group and control group showed a significant difference in perceived stress (F=60.11, p<.001, objective stress index (F=25.65, p<.001, systolic blood pressure (F=9.09, p<.001, diastolic blood pressure (F=2.47, p=.046, heart rate (F=5.71, p<.001, and sleep quality (F=109.46, p<.001. Conclusions. The results revealed that aromatherapy alleviated stress and improved sleep quality in intensive care unit patients after 2 days of the experimental treatment. These results demonstrate that aromatherapy affects stress and sleep quality, thus indicating its value in nursing interventions. This trial is registered with KCT0002344.

  18. Comparison of the efficacy of aroma-acupressure and aromatherapy for the treatment of dementia-associated agitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Man-Hua; Lin, Li-Chan; Wu, Shiao-Chi; Chiu, Jen-Hwey; Wang, Pei-Ning; Lin, Jaung-Geng

    2015-03-29

    One of the most common symptoms observed in patients with dementia is agitation, and several non-pharmacological treatments have been used to control this symptom. However, because of limitations in research design, the benefit of non-pharmacological treatments has only been demonstrated in certain cases. The purpose of this study was to compare aroma-acupressure and aromatherapy with respect to their effects on agitation in patients with dementia. In this experimental study, the participants were randomly assigned to three groups: 56 patients were included in the aroma-acupressure group, 73 patients in the aromatherapy group, and 57 patients in the control group who received daily routine as usual without intervention. The Cohen-Mansfield Agitation Inventory (CMAI) scale and the heart rate variability (HRV) index were used to assess differences in agitation. The CMAI was used in the pre-test, post-test and post-three-week test, and the HRV was used in the pre-test, the post-test and the post-three-week test as well as every week during the four-week interventions. The CMAI scores were significantly lower in the aroma-acupressure and aromatherapy groups compared with the control group in the post-test and post-three-week assessments. Sympathetic nervous activity was significantly lower in the fourth week in the aroma-acupressure group and in the second week in the aromatherapy group, whereas parasympathetic nervous activity increased from the second week to the fourth week in the aroma-acupressure group and in the fourth week in the aromatherapy group. Aroma-acupressure had a greater effect than aromatherapy on agitation in patients with dementia. However, agitation was improved in both of the groups, which allowed the patients with dementia to become more relaxed. Future studies should continue to assess the benefits of aroma-acupressure and aromatherapy for the treatment of agitation in dementia patients. ChiCTR-TRC-14004810; Date of registration: 2014/6/12.

  19. The usefulness of carotid sinus massage in different patient groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Narasimhan Pradeep; Thomas, Alan; Mudd, Paul; Morris, Robert O; Masud, Tahir

    2003-11-01

    to determine the positive yield of carotid sinus massage in different patient groups: unexplained syncope, falls, dizziness and controls. observational study. teaching hospital. we studied consecutive patients over the age of 60 years referred to the 'falls clinic' with a history of unexplained syncope, unexplained falls and unexplained dizziness. We also studied asymptomatic control subjects recruited from a general practice register aged 60 years and over. All patients and control subjects underwent a full clinical assessment (comprehensive history and detailed clinical examination including supine and erect blood pressure measurements) and 12-lead electrocardiography. We performed carotid sinus massage in the supine position for 5 seconds separately on both sides followed by repeating the procedure in the upright positions using a motorised tilt table. Heart rate and blood pressure were recorded using a cardiac monitor and digital plethysmography respectively. The test was considered positive if carotid sinus massage produced asystole with more than a 3 second pause (cardioinhibitory type of carotid sinus syndrome), or a fall in systolic blood pressure of more than 50 mmHg in the absence of significant cardioinhibition (vasodepressor type of carotid sinus syndrome) or where there was evidence of both vasodepressor and cardio-inhibition as above (mixed type). we studied 44 asymptomatic control subjects and 221 symptomatic patients (130 with unexplained syncope, 41 with unexplained falls and 50 with unexplained dizziness). In the overall symptomatic patient group, the positive yield (any type of carotid sinus syndrome) was 17.6% (95% CI = 12.7-22.5). The positive yield in men (26.3% (95% CI = 16.4-36.2)) was twice that in women (13.1% (95% CI = 7.6-18.6)) (P = 0.014). Overall any type of carotid sinus syndrome was present in 22.3% (n = 29) of the syncope group, 17.1% (n = 7) in the unexplained fallers group and 6% (n = 3) in the dizziness group. We also found that

  20. Lattice Boltzmann simulation of behaviour of particles moving in blood vessels under the rolling massage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hou-Hui, Yi; Cai-Feng, Wang; Xiao-Feng, Yang; Hua-Bing, Li

    2009-01-01

    The rolling massage is one of the most important manipulations in Chinese massage, which is expected to eliminate many diseases. Here, the effect of the rolling massage on a pair of particles moving in blood vessels under rolling massage manipulation is studied by the lattice Boltzmann simulation. The simulated results show that the motion of each particle is considerably modified by the rolling massage, and it depends on the relative rolling velocity, the rolling depth, and the distance between particle position and rolling position. Both particles' translational average velocities increase almost linearly as the rolling velocity increases, and obey the same law. The increment of the average relative angular velocity for the leading particle is smaller than that of the trailing one. The result is helpful for understanding the mechanism of the massage and to further develop the rolling techniques. (classical areas of phenomenology)

  1. Adverse Events of Massage Therapy in Pain-Related Conditions: A Systematic Review

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    Ping Yin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Pain-related massage, important in traditional Eastern medicine, is increasingly used in the Western world. So the widening acceptance demands continual safety assessment. This review is an evaluation of the frequency and severity of adverse events (AEs reported mainly for pain-related massage between 2003 and 2013. Relevant all-languages reports in 6 databases were identified and assessed by two coauthors. During the 11-year period, 40 reports of 138 AEs were associated with massage. Author, year of publication, country of occurrence, participant related (age, sex or number of patients affected, the details of manual therapy, and clinician type were extracted. Disc herniation, soft tissue trauma, neurologic compromise, spinal cord injury, dissection of the vertebral arteries, and others were the main complications of massage. Spinal manipulation in massage has repeatedly been associated with serious AEs especially. Clearly, massage therapies are not totally devoid of risks. But the incidence of such events is low.

  2. Effect of lavender aromatherapy on menopause hot flushing: A crossover randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazemzadeh, Rafat; Nikjou, Roya; Rostamnegad, Masoumeh; Norouzi, Hosein

    2016-09-01

    Flushing is generally considered to be the primary symptom of menopause and is typically the most common complaint in menopausal women. Although flushing poses no danger to a woman's health, it decreases the quality of life. Thus, the purpose of this study was to determine the effect of lavender aromatherapy on menopause flushing. This double-blinded crossover clinical trial included 100 menopausal women 45-55 years of age who were referred to various health centers in Ardabil, Iran in 2013-2014. Samples were blocked randomly and divided into two intervention (lavender) and control (diluted milk) groups. Lavender aroma was smelled for 20 minutes twice a day, over a 12-week period. Data were collected using a demographic questionnaire, and flushing numbers were duly recorded. Data analysis was performed by SPSS version 16 (SPSS Inc., Chicago, IL, USA) using the Chi-square and t test. The results of our investigation showed that both groups had no significant difference according to demographic characteristics (p > 0.05). Additionally, the flushing number significantly decreased in the intervention group than in the control group (p aromatherapy reduced menopause flushing. Given the impact of stress on flushing and the undesirable effects of menopause symptoms on the quality of life, it would appear that this simple, noninvasive, safe, and effective method can be used by menopausal women with noticeable benefits. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Taiwan LLC.

  3. The Effect of Aromatherapy on Sleep Quality of Elderly People Residing in a Nursing Home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faydalı, Saide; Çetinkaya, Funda

    Sleep is important for health and quality of life in the elderly, and sleep disturbances are reported to be associated with many of the adverse medical conditions. This research was carried out to evaluate the effect of inhalation of lavender oil on sleep quality of nursing home residents. A questionnaire was used to evaluate sociodemographic characteristics and sleeping properties of the 30 volunteers, enrolled. Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index was applied as a pre- and posttest to measure sleep quality of individuals who inhaled lavender oil drops on the pillows every evening for a week before sleeping. Before and after aromatherapy, the mean Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index score of the nursing home residents was (Equation is included in full-text article.)= 6.0 ± 5.1 and (Equation is included in full-text article.)= 2.6 ± 3.4, respectively, whereas statistically significant difference was not observed for independent variables. Cronbach α reliability coefficient of the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index scale was found to be 0.816. The results indicated an improvement of sleep quality of nursing home residents after the application of aromatherapy with lavender oil.

  4. The effects of lavender essential oil aromatherapy on anxiety and depression in haemodialysis patients

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    Masoumeh Bagheri-Nesami

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available This study was intended to examine the effects of lavender essential oil aromatherapy on anxiety and depression in haemodialysis patients. This randomised clinical trial was conducted on 72 haemodialysis patients divided into control and experimental groups. The control group only received the routine care. The experimental group received aromatherapy with 3 drops of lavender essential oil 5% for 10 minutes every time they underwent haemodialysis for a period of one month. Anxiety and depression were measured in both groups at baseline and by the end of the second and fourth weeks during the first hour of a dialysis session. The rANOVA showed no significant difference between the two groups in terms of the severity of anxiety before the intervention and by the end of the second and fourth weeks (p  =  0.783. However, the  rANOVA revealed a significant difference with respect to the severity of depression between the two groups (p  =  0.005. Current research suggests that we need various concentrations of lavender essential oil to relieve anxiety compared to depression. In sum, future studies are required to investigate different concentrations of lavender essential oil at different times during haemodialysis sessions to obtain specific doses for lavender essential oil to be used on haemodialysis patients suffering from anxiety and depression.

  5. The effect of aromatherapy with Rosa damascena essential oil on sleep quality in children

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    A.S. Keyhanmehr

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and objectives: Sleep disorder is one of the main problems in children. Poor sleep quality can lead to adverse effects on their growth and development. Aromatherapy is a kind of method for improving sleep. In Iranian traditional medicine, inhaling Rosa damascena has been recommended for treating sleep disorder. Due to the side effects of chemical drugs and trend to alternative medicine due to less complication, the aim of this study was to investigate the effect of aromatherapy with Rosa damascena essential oil on sleep quality in children. Methods: This study was an experimental before and after study that conducted in 30 children with sleep disorder. Children inhaled 5 drops of Rosa damascena essential oil on a cotton ball before sleep for 20 min (2 weeks. Before and after intervention, BEARS questionnaire was asked. Wilcoxon signed-rank test was used for comparisons by SPSS software. Results: The results of this study showed that resistance to sleep, difficulty waking in the morning, nightmare and waking up during the night in children decreased (p

  6. Effects of aromatherapy with Rosa damascena on nulliparous women's pain and anxiety of labor during first stage of labor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamdamian, Sepideh; Nazarpour, Soheila; Simbar, Masoumeh; Hajian, Sepideh; Mojab, Faraz; Talebi, Atefeh

    2018-03-01

    Reducing labor pain and anxiety is one of the most important goals of maternity care. This study aimed to assess the effects of aromatherapy with Rosa damascena on pain and anxiety in the first stage of labor among nulliparous women. This was a randomized clinical trial of 110 nulliparous women. The eligible participants were randomly assigned to two groups of aromatherapy and control in an Iranian maternity hospital. The participants received 0.08 mL of Rosa damascena essence in the aromatherapy group and 0.08 mL of normal saline in the control group, every 30 min. Pain was measured 3 times, once each at three stages of cervical dilation (4-5, 6-7, and 8-10 cm). Anxiety was measured twice, once each at two stages of cervical dilation (4-7 and 8-10 cm). The tools for data collection were the Spielberger anxiety questionnaire, numerical pain rating scale, demographic and obstetric questionnaire, and an observational checklist. Data analyses included the t-test, Mann-Whitney U test and Chi-square test. Severity of labor pain and severity of anxiety were used as primary outcome measures. Labor and delivery characteristics (including number of contractions, duration of contractions in second stage, Bishop score, augmentation by oxytocin, Apgar score, and mode of delivery), demographic characteristics, and fertility information were used as secondary outcome measures. Pain severity in the group receiving aromatherapy with R. damascena was significantly lower than in the control group after treatment at each pain assessment (cervical dilation of 4-5, 6-7, and 8-10 cm; P labor. Aromatherapy with R. damascena is a convenient and effective method for pain and anxiety reduction during the first stage of labor. Iranian Registry of Clinical Trial: IRCT201306258801N3. Copyright © 2018 Shanghai Changhai Hospital. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Benefits of Combining Massage Therapy with Group Interpersonal Psychotherapy in Prenatally Depressed Women

    OpenAIRE

    Field, Tiffany; Deeds, Osvelia; Diego, Miguel; Hernandez-Reif, Maria; Gauler, Andy; Sullivan, Susan; Wilson, Donna; Nearing, Graciela

    2009-01-01

    One hundred twelve pregnant women who were diagnosed depressed were randomly assigned to a group who received group Interpersonal Psychotherapy or to a group who received both group Interpersonal Psychotherapy and massage therapy. The group Interpersonal Psychotherapy (one hour sessions) and massage therapy (30 minute sessions) were held once per week for six weeks. The data suggested that the group who received psychotherapy plus massage attended more sessions on average, and a greater perce...

  8. Massage therapy and exercise therapy in patients with multiple sclerosis: a randomized controlled pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negahban, Hossein; Rezaie, Solmaz; Goharpey, Shahin

    2013-12-01

    The primary aim was to investigate the comparative effects of massage therapy and exercise therapy on patients with multiple sclerosis. The secondary aim was to investigate whether combination of both massage and exercise has an additive effect. Randomized controlled pilot trial with repeated measurements and blinded assessments. Local Multiple Sclerosis Society. A total of 48 patients with multiple sclerosis were randomly assigned to four equal subgroups labelled as massage therapy, exercise therapy, combined massage-exercise therapy and control group. The treatment group received 15 sessions of supervised intervention for five weeks. The massage therapy group received a standard Swedish massage. The exercise therapy group was given a combined set of strength, stretch, endurance and balance exercises. Patients in the massage-exercise therapy received a combined set of massage and exercise treatments. Patients in the control group were asked to continue their standard medical care. Pain, fatigue, spasticity, balance, gait and quality of life were assessed before and after intervention. Massage therapy resulted in significantly larger improvement in pain reduction (mean change 2.75 points, P = 0.001), dynamic balance (mean change, 3.69 seconds, P = 0.009) and walking speed (mean change, 7.84 seconds, P = 0.007) than exercise therapy. Patients involved in the combined massage-exercise therapy showed significantly larger improvement in pain reduction than those in the exercise therapy (mean change, 1.67 points, P = 0.001). Massage therapy could be more effective than exercise therapy. Moreover, the combination of massage and exercise therapy may be a little more effective than exercise therapy alone.

  9. Integrative evaluation of automated massage combined with thermotherapy: physical, physiological, and psychological viewpoints

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Dowon; Lee, Daewoon; Schreiber, Jürgen; Im, Changhwan; Kim, Hansung

    2016-01-01

    Various types of massages are reported to relieve stress, pain, and anxiety which are beneficial for rehabilitation; however, more comprehensive studies are needed to understand the mechanism of massage therapy. In this study, we investigated the effect of massage therapy, alone or in combination with infrared heating, on 3 different aspects: physical, physiological, and psychological. Twenty-eight healthy university students were subjected to 3 different treatment conditions on separate days...

  10. The effect of inhalation aromatherapy with damask rose (Rosa damascena essence on the pain intensity after dressing in patients with burns: A clinical randomized trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Bikmoradi

    2016-01-01

    Conclusions: Inhalation aromatherapy with damask rose could be effective for relieving the pain caused after dressing in patients with burns. Therefore, it could be suggested as a complementary therapy in burn patients for pain relief.

  11. Effectiveness of different styles of massage therapy in fibromyalgia: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Susan Lee King; Matsutani, Luciana Akemi; Marques, Amélia Pasqual

    2015-04-01

    The systematic review aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of massage in fibromyalgia. An electronic search was conducted at MEDLINE, SCiELO, EMBASE, ISI, PEDro, SPORTDiscus, CINAHL, Cochrane CENTRAL and LILACS (Jan 1990-May 2013). Ten randomized and non-randomized controlled trials investigating the effects of massage alone on symptoms and health-related quality of life of adult patients with fibromyalgia were included. Two reviewers independently screened records, examined full-text reports for compliance with the eligibility criteria, and extracted data. Meta-analysis (pooled from 145 participants) shows that myofascial release had large, positive effects on pain and medium effects on anxiety and depression at the end of treatment, in contrast with placebo; effects on pain and depression were maintained in the medium and short term, respectively. Narrative analysis suggests that: myofascial release also improves fatigue, stiffness and quality of life; connective tissue massage improves depression and quality of life; manual lymphatic drainage is superior to connective tissue massage regarding stiffness, depression and quality of life; Shiatsu improves pain, pressure pain threshold, fatigue, sleep and quality of life; and Swedish massage does not improve outcomes. There is moderate evidence that myofascial release is beneficial for fibromyalgia symptoms. Limited evidence supports the application of connective tissue massage and Shiatsu. Manual lymphatic drainage may be superior to connective tissue massage, and Swedish massage may have no effects. Overall, most styles of massage therapy consistently improved the quality of life of fibromyalgia patients. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. The effects of precompetition massage on the kinematic parameters of 20-m sprint performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher, Iain M

    2010-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate what effect precompetition massage has on short-term sprint performance. Twenty male collegiate games players, with a minimum training/playing background of 3 sessions per week, were assigned to a randomized, counter-balanced, repeated-measures designed experiment used to analyze 20-m sprints performance. Three discrete warm-up modalities, consisting of precompetition massage, a traditional warm-up, and a precompetition massage combined with a traditional warm-up were used. Massage consisted of fast, superficial techniques designed to stimulate the main muscle groups associated with sprint running. Twenty-meter sprint performance and core temperature were assessed post warm-up interventions. Kinematic differences between sprints were assessed through a 2-dimensional computerized motion analysis system (alpha level p velocity were found to be significantly greater in the warm-up and massage combined with warm-up modalities when compared to massage alone. No significant differences were demonstrated in any measures when the warm-up and massage and warm-up combined conditions were compared. Massage as a preperformance preparation strategy seems to decrease 20-m sprint performance when compared to a traditional warm-up, although its combination with a normal active warm-up seems to have no greater benefit then active warm-up alone. Therefore, massage use prior to competition is questionable because it appears to have no effective role in improving sprint performance.

  13. Electromagnetic interference of implantable cardiac devices from a shoulder massage machine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Saeko; Fujiwara, Kousaku; Kohira, Satoshi; Hirose, Minoru

    2014-09-01

    Shoulder massage machines have two pads that are driven by solenoid coils to perform a per cussive massage on the shoulders. There have been concerns that such machines might create electromagnetic interference (EMI) in implantable cardiac devices because of the time-varying magnetic fields produced by the alternating current in the solenoid coils. The objective of this study was to investigate the potential EMI from one such shoulder massage machine on implantable cardiac devices. We measured the distribution profile of the magnetic field intensity around the massage machine. Furthermore, we performed an inhibition test and an asynchronous test on an implantable cardiac pacemaker using the standardized Irnich human body model. We examined the events on an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) using a pacemaker programmer while the massage machine was in operation. The magnetic field distribution profile exhibited a peak intensity of 212 (A/m) in one of the solenoid coils. The maximal interference distance between the massage machine and the implantable cardiac pacemaker was 28 cm. Ventricular fibrillation was induced when the massage machine was brought near the electrode of the ICD and touched the Irnich human body model. It is necessary to provide a "don't use" warning on the box or the exterior of the massage machines or in the user manuals and to caution patients with implanted pacemakers about the dangers and appropriate usage of massage machines.

  14. THE EFFECTIVENESS OF COMBINATION OF OXYTOCIN AND ENDORPHIN MASSAGE ON UTERINE INVOLUTION IN PRIMIPAROUS MOTHERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nurmala Sari

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: One of the puerperal complication is uterine subinvolution that can cause bleeding to maternal death. Oxytocin massage can stimulate oxytocin hormone that plays a role in the process of uterine involution. Endorphine massage can increase the release of oxytocin and endorphine hormone that give a sense of calm and comfort. It also increases production of oxytocin hormone that can improve the process of uterine involution. Objective: To prove the effectiveness of a combination of oxytocin massage and endorphine massage to uterine involution in primiparaous mothers during postpartum period. Methods: This was a quasy-experimental study with pretest-posttest with control group design. Total samples were 44 normal postpartum mothers selected using purposive sampling technique, which were randomly assigned in four groups, namely: 1 oxytocin massage group, 2 endorphin massage group, 3 combined oxytocin-endorphin massage group, and 4 control group. The data were analyzed using univariate, bivariate and One Way Anova to test the effectiveness of the intervention. Results: There were statistically significant differences of fundal height before and after intervention among the four groups (p=<0.05. Conclusion: The combination of oxytocin massage and endorphine massage proved most effective in accelerating uterine involution in normal postpartum mothers.

  15. Effects of traditional Japanese massage therapy on gene expression: preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donoyama, Nozomi; Ohkoshi, Norio

    2011-06-01

    Changes in gene expression after traditional Japanese massage therapy were investigated to clarify the mechanisms of the clinical effects of traditional Japanese massage therapy. This was a pilot experimental study. The study was conducted in a laboratory at Tsukuba University of Technology. The subjects were 2 healthy female volunteers (58-year-old Participant A, 55-year-old Participant B). The intervention consisted of a 40-minute full-body massage using standard traditional Japanese massage techniques through the clothing and a 40-minute rest as a control, in which participants lie on the massage table without being massaged. Before and after an intervention, blood was taken and analyzed by microarray: (1) The number of genes whose expression was more than double after the intervention than before was examined; (2) For those genes, gene ontology analysis identified statistically significant gene ontology terms. The gene expression count in the total of 41,000 genes was 1256 genes for Participant A and 1778 for Participant B after traditional Japanese massage, and was 157 and 82 after the control, respectively. The significant gene ontology terms selected by both Participants A and B after massage were "immune response" and "immune system," whereas no gene ontology terms were selected by them in the control. It is implied that traditional Japanese massage therapy may affect the immune function. Further studies with more samples are necessary.

  16. Principle Study of Head Meridian Acupoint Massage to Stress Release via Grey Data Model Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ya-Ting

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the scientific study of the effectiveness and action principle of head meridian acupoint massage by applying the grey data model analysis approach. First, the head massage procedure for massaging the important head meridian acupuncture points including Taiyang, Fengfu, Tianzhu, Fengqi, and Jianjing is formulated in a standard manner. Second, the status of the autonomic nervous system of each subject is evaluated by using the heart rate variability analyzer before and after the head massage following four weeks. Afterward, the physiological factors of autonomic nerves are quantitatively analyzed by using the grey data modeling theory. The grey data analysis can point out that the status of autonomic nervous system is greatly improved after the massage. The order change of the grey relationship weighting of physiological factors shows the action principle of the sympathetic and parasympathetic nerves when performing head massage. In other words, the grey data model is able to distinguish the detailed interaction of the autonomic nervous system and the head meridian acupoint massage. Thus, the stress relaxing effect of massaging head meridian acupoints is proved, which is lacked in literature. The results can be a reference principle for massage health care in practice.

  17. Overzealous cardiac massage leading to unintentional infant death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinani, Fatos; Ymaj, Besim; Vyshka, Gentian

    2011-10-16

    The case of an 18-month child is presented, with a picture demonstrating the thoracic trauma, caused from a hand pressure movement, perpetrated with an open right palm, in an attempt to perform an external cardiac massage. The child showed continuous episodes of 'crying spells' that the medical staff considered as benign, but an overprotective and mentally unstable mother kept on violently 'resuscitating' her son during such episodes. The last episode was characterised with a strenuous massage of the thoracic wall, causing evident bruises and leading to a cardiac contusion. The mother who perpetrated the trauma was sentenced for manslaughter, after the accidental character of the event, as well as the severity of her family situation and the precarious living environment of a socially abandoned single-acting parent, were all taken into account. The particular psychopathology of the care giver (mother) and the characteristics of the inflicted thoracic blow are described.

  18. Effectiveness of massage tuina in the periartritis escapulohumeral.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deysi Lourdes González Acosta

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available It was carried out a prospective, longitudinal, explanatory and applicable study, with the purpose of determining the therapeutic effectiveness of massage Tuina in the treatment of the periartritis escapulohumeral. The sample of the study was formed by 80 patients (40 patients for each one to receive independent treatments that were divided in a matched up way, according to the age, sex and semiología of pain, looking for the homogeneity of them, patients that went to Provincial Hospital of Rehabilitation Faustino Pérez Hernandez in Sancti Spíritus, between February 2007 and November 2008 .The investigation denoted a prevalence of patient with age between 45 and 64 years and feminine sex. It was possible to reduce the intensity, frequency and rhythm from the pain while evaluating the 2 studied moments, the excellent and very good therapeutic evaluation prevailed. The treatment with Massage Tuina that was applied to the patients with Periartritis Escapulohumeral was beneficial.

  19. Facilitating Case Studies in Massage Therapy Clinical Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baskwill, Amanda

    2013-01-01

    The integration of evidence into reflective health care practice has been on the rise in recent years and is a phenomenon that has affected all health care professions, including massage therapy. Clinical case studies are a research design that follows one patient or subject, making the studies ideal for use in clinical practice. They are valuable for communicating information from clinical practice to the broader community. Case studies have face validity that may be more valuable to individual practitioners than homogeneous randomized controlled trials, as the practitioner may recognize a complex patient in the case report. At Humber College, Student Massage Therapists (SMTs) create, conduct, and communicate results of a clinical case study prior to graduation. This article describes the process and experience. PMID:23730397

  20. LAVENDER (LAVANDULA ANGUSTIFOLIA) AROMATHERAPY AS AN ALTERNATIVE TREATMENT IN REDUCING PAIN IN PRIMIPAROUS MOTHERS IN THE ACTIVE FIRST STAGE OF LABOR

    OpenAIRE

    Hilda Yani Karo Karo; Noor Pramono; Sri Wahyuni; Imam Djamaluddin Mashoedi; Leny Latifah

    2017-01-01

    Background: Labor and childbirth is an extremely painful process. Aromatherapy is considered as one of the nonpharmacological methods to reduce labor pain. Objective: To determine the effect of Lavender (Lavandula Angustifolia) aromatherapy on the level of pain in primipara in the first stage of labor. Methods: A quasy-experimental research with pretest and posttest design with control group conducted between October until November 2016. Forthy respondents selected using consecutive sa...

  1. Clinical Holistic Medicine: Holistic Sexology and Acupressure Through the Vagina (Hippocratic Pelvic Massage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Søren Ventegodt

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Many gynecological and sexological problems (like urine incontinence, chronic pelvic pains, vulvodynia, and lack of lust, excitement, and orgasm are resistant to standard medical treatment. In our work at the Research Clinic for Holistic Medicine in Copenhagen, we have found that vaginal acupressure, or Hippocratic pelvic massage, can help some of these problems. Technically, it is a very simple procedure as it corresponds to the explorative phase of the standard pelvic examination, supplemented with the patient's report on the feelings it provokes and the processing and integration of these feelings. Sometimes it can be very difficult to control the emotions released by the technique, i.e., regression to earlier traumas from childhood sexual abuse. This review discusses the theory behind vaginal acupressure, ethical aspects, and presentation of a case story. This procedure helped the patient to become present in her pelvis and to integrate old traumas with painful emotions. Holistic gynecology and sexology can help the patient to identify and let go of negative feelings, beliefs, and attitudes related to sex, gender, sexual organs, body, and soul at large. Shame, guilt, helplessness, fear, disgust, anxiety, anger, hatred, and other strong feelings are almost always an important part of a sexual or functional problem as these feelings are “held” by the tissue of the pelvis and sexual organs. Acupressure through the vagina/pelvic massage must be done with great care by an experienced physician, with a third person present, after obtaining consent and the necessary trust of the patient. It must be followed by conversational therapy and further holistic existential processing.

  2. Acupoint Massage in Relieving Pain after Ureteroscopic Holmium Laser Lithotripsy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xia Wei-qin

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To observe the effect of acupoint massage in relieving pain after ureteroscopic holmium laser lithotripsy. Methods: Ninety-two patients undergone ureteroscopic holmium laser lithotripsy were enrolled and randomized into a treatment group and a control group, 46 in each group. Patients in the control group were given regular nursing care, while patients in the treatment group were intervened by acupoint massage in addition to the regular nursing care. The pain was evaluated by visual analogue scale (VAS) at 6 h, 12 h, and 24 h after operation, and compared between the two groups. Results:There was no significant difference in comparing the VAS score at 6 h after operation between the two groups (P>0.05). The VAS scores in the treatment group at 12 h and 24 h after operation were significantly lower than those in the control group (both P Conclusion: Acupoint massage can effectively relieve the pain after ureteroscopic holmium laser lithotripsy, reduce the use of analgesics, and promote the recovery.

  3. Comparison of the effect of aromatherapy with Jasminum officinale and Salvia officinale on pain severity and labor outcome in nulliparous women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaviani, Maasumeh; Maghbool, Shahla; Azima, Sara; Tabaei, Mohammad Hosein

    2014-01-01

    Background: Using non-pharmacological pain relief methods for reducing labor pain has always been one of the major concerns in obstetrics and gynecology. Objective: Comparing the effects of aromatherapy with jasmine and salvia on pain severity and labor outcome in nulliparous women. Materials and Methods: In this randomized clinical trial, 156 nulliparous women in labor were randomly selected and divided into salvia, jasmine, and control groups (52 in each group). The study duration was 6 months (from October 2009 to March 2010). Each group underwent aromatherapy using an incense mask for 15 min (distilled water for the control group). Pain severity was measured before and 30 and 60 min after the incense aromatherapy. Also, duration of the first and second stages of labor, first- and fifth-minute APGAR scores of the baby, and the frequency of labor type were measured and recorded in each group. Results: In comparison to the other groups, pain severity and duration of the first and second stages of labor were significantly lower in the aromatherapy group of salvia 30 min after the intervention (P = 0.001). However, no significant difference was found among the three groups regarding pain severity 60 min after the aromatherapy, first- and fifth-minute APGAR scores of the baby, and the frequency of labor type. Conclusions: The results of the present study indicated that aromatherapy with saliva had beneficial effects on pain relief, shortened the labor stages, and had no negative impact on the baby's APGAR score. PMID:25558267

  4. Differentiating regressed melanoma from regressed lichenoid keratosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Aegean H; Shulman, Kenneth J; Lee, Bonnie A

    2017-04-01

    Distinguishing regressed lichen planus-like keratosis (LPLK) from regressed melanoma can be difficult on histopathologic examination, potentially resulting in mismanagement of patients. We aimed to identify histopathologic features by which regressed melanoma can be differentiated from regressed LPLK. Twenty actively inflamed LPLK, 12 LPLK with regression and 15 melanomas with regression were compared and evaluated by hematoxylin and eosin staining as well as Melan-A, microphthalmia transcription factor (MiTF) and cytokeratin (AE1/AE3) immunostaining. (1) A total of 40% of regressed melanomas showed complete or near complete loss of melanocytes within the epidermis with Melan-A and MiTF immunostaining, while 8% of regressed LPLK exhibited this finding. (2) Necrotic keratinocytes were seen in the epidermis in 33% regressed melanomas as opposed to all of the regressed LPLK. (3) A dense infiltrate of melanophages in the papillary dermis was seen in 40% of regressed melanomas, a feature not seen in regressed LPLK. In summary, our findings suggest that a complete or near complete loss of melanocytes within the epidermis strongly favors a regressed melanoma over a regressed LPLK. In addition, necrotic epidermal keratinocytes and the presence of a dense band-like distribution of dermal melanophages can be helpful in differentiating these lesions. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Massage therapy has short-term benefits for people with common musculoskeletal disorders compared to no treatment: A systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.C. Bervoets (Diederik C.); P.A.J. Luijsterburg (Pim); J.J.N. Alessie (Jeroen J.N.); M.J. Buijs (Martijn J.); A.P. Verhagen (Arianne)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractQuestion: Is massage therapy effective for people with musculoskeletal disorders compared to any other treatment or no treatment? Design: Systematic review of randomised clinical trials. Participants: People with musculoskeletal disorders. Interventions: Massage therapy (manual

  6. Comparing the effects of two Swedish massage techniques on the vital signs and anxiety of healthy women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farzaneh Gholami-Motlagh

    2016-01-01

    Conclusions: Massage therapy caused a decrease in systolic BP, pulse, and respiratory rate. It can be concluded that massage therapy was useful for decreasing the vital signs associated with anxiety in healthy women.

  7. Development of a Hospital-based Massage Therapy Course at an Academic Medical Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dion, Liza J; Cutshall, Susanne M; Rodgers, Nancy J; Hauschulz, Jennifer L; Dreyer, Nikol E; Thomley, Barbara S; Bauer, Brent

    2015-03-01

    Massage therapy is offered increasingly in US medical facilities. Although the United States has many massage schools, their education differs, along with licensure and standards. As massage therapy in hospitals expands and proves its value, massage therapists need increased training and skills in working with patients who have various complex medical concerns, to provide safe and effective treatment. These services for hospitalized patients can impact patient experience substantially and provide additional treatment options for pain and anxiety, among other symptoms. The present article summarizes the initial development and description of a hospital-based massage therapy course at a Midwest medical center. A hospital-based massage therapy course was developed on the basis of clinical experience and knowledge from massage therapists working in the complex medical environment. This massage therapy course had three components in its educational experience: online learning, classroom study, and a 25-hr shadowing experience. The in-classroom study portion included an entire day in the simulation center. The hospital-based massage therapy course addressed the educational needs of therapists transitioning to work with interdisciplinary medical teams and with patients who have complicated medical conditions. Feedback from students in the course indicated key learning opportunities and additional content that are needed to address the knowledge and skills necessary when providing massage therapy in a complex medical environment. The complexity of care in medical settings is increasing while the length of hospital stay is decreasing. For this reason, massage provided in the hospital requires more specialized training to work in these environments. This course provides an example initial step in how to address some of the educational needs of therapists who are transitioning to working in the complex medical environment.

  8. EVALUATING THE INFLUENCE OF MASSAGE ON LEG STRENGTH, SWELLING, AND PAIN FOLLOWING A HALF-MARATHON

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter M. Tiidus

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Massage therapy is commonly used following endurance running races with the expectation that it will enhance post-run recovery of muscle function and reduce soreness. A limited number of studies have reported little or no influence of massage therapy on post-exercise muscle recovery. However, no studies have been conducted in a field setting to assess the potential for massage to influence muscle recovery following an actual endurance running race. To evaluate the potential for repeated massage therapy interventions to influence recovery of quadriceps and hamstring muscle soreness, recovery of quadriceps and hamstring muscle strength and reduction of upper leg muscle swelling over a two week recovery period following an actual road running race. Twelve adult recreational runners (8 male, 4 female completed a half marathon (21.1 km road race. On days 1,4, 8, and 11 post-race, subjects received 30 minutes of standardized massage therapy performed by a registered massage therapist on a randomly assigned massage treatment leg, while the other (control leg received no massage treatment. Two days prior to the race (baseline and preceding the treatments on post-race days 1, 4, 8, and 11 the following measures were conducted on each of the massage and control legs: strength of quadriceps and hamstring muscles, leg swelling, and soreness perception. At day 1, post-race quadriceps peak torque was significantly reduced (p 0.05. All measures had returned to baseline at day 11. Massage did not affect the recovery of muscles in terms of physiological measures of strength, swelling, or soreness. However, questionnaires revealed that 7 of the 12 participants perceived that the massaged leg felt better upon recovery.

  9. Regression: A Bibliography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedrini, D. T.; Pedrini, Bonnie C.

    Regression, another mechanism studied by Sigmund Freud, has had much research, e.g., hypnotic regression, frustration regression, schizophrenic regression, and infra-human-animal regression (often directly related to fixation). Many investigators worked with hypnotic age regression, which has a long history, going back to Russian reflexologists.…

  10. Staff Report to the Senior Department Official on Recognition Compliance Issues. Recommendation Page: Commission on Massage Therapy Accreditation

    Science.gov (United States)

    US Department of Education, 2010

    2010-01-01

    The Commission on Massage Therapy Accreditation (COMTA) was created in response to massage therapy and bodywork educators' desire that rigorous standards be applied to institutions of massage therapy and bodywork. COMTA has conducted accrediting activities since 1992. In 1996, an elected commission was seated. Since 1996, COMTA has granted…

  11. [Corrective effect of aromatherapy on indices of heart rate variability in students under exam stress conditions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrahamyan, H T; Minasyan, S M

    2016-01-01

    There were investigated changes in indices of the activity of regulatory mechanisms of heart rhythm in student under exam stress conditions and the possibility of their correction with aid of aromatherapy. The examination stress was established to be accompanied by pronounced shifts of integral and spectral indices of heart rhythm in students, indicating to the activation of the sympathetic circuit of Autonomic Nervous System in conditions of examination stress. A positive, relaxation impact of the essential oil of orange on the investigated indices was also recorded. The latter is expressed by weakly pronounced changes or lack of them in data of integral and spectral heart rate indices in students from the experimental group, that indicates to the stabilizing effect of used ethereal oil on the psycho-physiological state of students in conditions of exam stress

  12. Experienced Practitioners’ Beliefs Utilized to Create a Successful Massage Therapist Conceptual Model: a Qualitative Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Anne B.; Munk, Niki

    2017-01-01

    Background The massage therapy profession in the United States has grown exponentially, with 35% of the profession’s practitioners in practice for three years or less. Investigating personal and social factors with regard to the massage therapy profession could help to identify constructs needed to be successful in the field. Purpose This data-gathering exercise explores massage therapists’ perceptions on what makes a successful massage therapist that will provide guidance for future research. Success is defined as supporting oneself and practice solely through massage therapy and related, revenue-generating field activity. Participants and Setting Ten successful massage therapy practitioners from around the United States who have a minimum of five years of experience. Research Design Semistructured qualitative interviews were used in an analytic induction framework; index cards with preidentified concepts printed on them were utilized to enhance conversation. An iterative process of interview coding and analysis was used to determine themes and subthemes. Results Based on the participants input, the categories in which therapists needed to be successful were organized into four main themes: effectively establish therapeutic relationships, develop massage therapy business acumen, seek valuable learning environments and opportunities, and cultivate strong social ties and networks. The four themes operate within specific contexts (e.g., regulation and licensing requirements in the therapists’ state), which may also influence the success of the massage therapist. Conclusions The model needs to be tested to explore which constructs explain variability in success and attrition rate. Limitations and future research implications are discussed. PMID:28690704

  13. 21 CFR 872.6650 - Massaging pick or tip for oral hygiene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Massaging pick or tip for oral hygiene. 872.6650 Section 872.6650 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... hygiene. (a) Identification. A massaging pick or tip for oral hygiene is a rigid, pointed device intended...

  14. The Effect of Massage Therapy on Children's Learning Process: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emtiazy, Majid; Abrishamkar, Mahboobeh

    2016-05-01

    Massage therapy is the scientific manipulation of the soft tissues of the body for normalizing those tissues and consists of manual techniques that include applying fixed or movable pressure, holding, and/or causing movement of or to the body. There are more than 1500 massage training centers or schools in the United States. Several studies evaluated the effect of massage on elevating child health and to treat various disorders. In this review, keywords related to the subject were searched in ScienceDirect, Google, Google Scholar, PubMed, and Cochrane library. The data were classified, analyzed, and interpreted. Studies showed massage in pupils could increase blood circulation in the body, make breathing better, better growth, increased concentration and IQ, improved immune system, reduction in stress, pain, anger, and aggressiveness as well as allowing restful sleep. All these together would elevate their learning ability. In addition, massage therapy is studied on a variety of disorders such as blood pressure, rheumatoid arthritis, autism, cystic fibrosis, back pain, nervous pain, muscle and joints pain and headache. To promote health in pupils, it I proposed to introduce the concept of "classmates massage during break" program. Such groups massage therapy, next to its health benefits, would contribute to their peace, tranquility, and teamwork. A similar program is running in Australia as well as few other countries under the codename "massage in schools program (MISP)". This program has had a tangible effect on children's capabilities.

  15. Brief Report: Improvements in the Behavior of Children with Autism Following Massage Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escalona, Angelica; Field, Tiffany; Singer-Strunck, Ruth; Cullen, Christy; Hartshorn, Kristen

    2001-01-01

    Twenty children with autism, ages 3 to 6 years, received either massage therapy or reading attention by their parents for 15 minutes daily for one month. Evaluation suggested that children in the massage group exhibited less stereotypic behavior and showed more on-task and social relatedness behavior during play observations at school, and they…

  16. Insulin and insulin-like growth factor-1 increased in preterm neonates following massage therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field, Tiffany; Diego, Miguel; Hernandez-Reif, Maria; Dieter, John N I; Kumar, Adarsh M; Schanberg, Saul; Kuhn, Cynthia

    2008-12-01

    To determine if massage therapy increased serum insulin and insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) in preterm neonates. Forty-two preterm neonates who averaged 34.6 weeks (M = 29.5 wk gestational age; M birth weight = 1237 g) and were in the "grower" (step-down) nursery were randomly assigned to a massage therapy group (body stroking and passive limb movements for three, 15-minute periods per day for 5 days) or a control group that received the standard nursery care without massage therapy. On Days 1 and 5, the serum collected by clinical heelsticks was also assayed for insulin and IGF-1, and weight gain and kilocalories consumed were recorded daily. Despite similar formula intake, the massaged preterm neonates showed greater increases during the 5-day period in (1) weight gain; (2) serum levels of insulin; and (3) IGF-1. Increased weight gain was significantly correlated with insulin and IGF-1. Previous data suggested that preterm infant weight gain following massage therapy related to increased vagal activity, which suggests decreased stress and gastric motility, which may contribute to more efficient food absorption. The data from this study suggest for the first time that weight gain was also related to increased serum insulin and IGF-1 levels following massage therapy. Preterm infants who received massage therapy not only showed greater weight gain but also a greater increase in serum insulin and IGF-1 levels, suggesting that massage therapy might be prescribed for all growing neonates.

  17. Massage Therapy Training in South Carolina: What You Should Know before You Enroll

    Science.gov (United States)

    South Carolina Commission on Higher Education, 2007

    2007-01-01

    This brochure provides a checklist of information for individuals considering massage therapy training in South Carolina. Areas covered include: (1) Oversight; (2) Requirements to Become a Licensed Massage Therapist (LMT); (3) Evaluating a School; (4) How to Decide; (5) While You're Enrolled; (6) After You Graduate; (7) Continuing Education; (8)…

  18. Can stimulating massage improve joint repositioning error in patients with knee osteoarthritis?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Hans; Henriksen, Marius; Bartels, Else M

    2009-01-01

    PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of massage applied to the thigh muscles on joint repositioning error (JRE) in patients suffering from osteoarthritis (OA).We hypothesized that stimulating massage of the muscles around an osteoarthritic knee joint, could improve the...

  19. The Effect of Massage on Anticipatory Anxiety and Procedural Pain in Patients with Burn Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najafi Ghezeljeh, Tahereh; Mohades Ardebili, Fatimah; Rafii, Forough; Manafi, Farzad

    2017-01-01

    Pain related to burn injuries is one of the most troublesome pain intensity. This study aimed to investigate the effect of massage on anticipatory anxiety, procedural pain intensity, vital signs and relaxation level of patients with burn injury. In this quasi-experimental study, through convenience sampling, 60 hospitalized adult burn patients were selected from a specialized burn and reconstructive hospital. Subjects were assigned to massage and control groups through simple randomization. Massage was offered by using non aromatic oil about 10-15 minutes before wound care on intact part of the body once a day for 20 minutes on patients' bedside for 3 consecutive days. In the 3 days, the control group did not received any massage and were asked to stay at bed. Demographic and clinical characteristics and vital signs, Visual Analogue Scale and the Persian version of Burn Specific Pain Anxiety Scale were used to determine baseline and procedural pain, anxiety and relaxation levels and anticipatory anxiety. No significant difference was noted between mean score of pain intensity, anxiety and relaxation level, and vital signs in massage and control groups after intervention following wound care. In massage and control groups, there was no significant differences between mean scores of anticipatory anxiety before and after intervention. There was no significant difference between the mean scores of anticipatory anxiety in massage and control groups after intervention prior wound care. Massage was shown not to have any effect on anticipatory anxiety and procedural pain.

  20. Experienced Practitioners' Beliefs Utilized to Create a Successful Massage Therapist Conceptual Model: a Qualitative Investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Anne B; Munk, Niki

    2017-06-01

    The massage therapy profession in the United States has grown exponentially, with 35% of the profession's practitioners in practice for three years or less. Investigating personal and social factors with regard to the massage therapy profession could help to identify constructs needed to be successful in the field. This data-gathering exercise explores massage therapists' perceptions on what makes a successful massage therapist that will provide guidance for future research. Success is defined as supporting oneself and practice solely through massage therapy and related, revenue-generating field activity. Ten successful massage therapy practitioners from around the United States who have a minimum of five years of experience. Semistructured qualitative interviews were used in an analytic induction framework; index cards with preidentified concepts printed on them were utilized to enhance conversation. An iterative process of interview coding and analysis was used to determine themes and subthemes. Based on the participants input, the categories in which therapists needed to be successful were organized into four main themes: effectively establish therapeutic relationships, develop massage therapy business acumen, seek valuable learning environments and opportunities, and cultivate strong social ties and networks. The four themes operate within specific contexts (e.g., regulation and licensing requirements in the therapists' state), which may also influence the success of the massage therapist. The model needs to be tested to explore which constructs explain variability in success and attrition rate. Limitations and future research implications are discussed.

  1. Effects of the application of therapeutic massage in children with cancer: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Rodríguez-Mansilla

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: to learn about the effects of the use of therapeutic massage in children with cancer. Method: systematic review of controlled clinical trials The search was conducted in November 2014 in the following databases: Pubmed, CSIC, Dialnet, Scopus, Cochrane and PEDro. Inclusion criteria were: clinical trials, published in English or Spanish, analyzing the effects of massage on the different stages and types of childhood cancer (between 1 and 18 years old. Results: of 1007 articles found, 7 met the inclusion criteria. Their authors use different massage techniques (Swedish massage, effleurage, petrissage, frictions, pressures, obtaining benefits in the symptoms present during the illness (decrease of pain, nausea, stress, anxiety and increase of white blood cells and neutrophils. Conclusion: therapeutic massage improves the symptoms of children with cancer, but there is a need for more research that may support the effects attributed to it.

  2. Effect of partial sports massage on blood pressure and heart rate

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    T.D. Pystupa

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available With the growing popularity and demand for different types of massages (including sports is a growing need for research on specific forms. There is also a need to study the advantages and effects on various body functions. The objective was to study the effect of partial sports massage on blood pressure and heart rate in both men and women. Material and methods. Research has been extended 80 healthy men and women are physically active (age 20-25 years. Blood pressure and heart rate were made on the left arm automatic digital device (model HEM - 907. The device is intended to measure blood pressure. It is established that it is possible to verify the existing beliefs. This promotes more efficient use of massage therapy. Conclusions . Sports massage has an effect on hemodynamic changes, the increase (decrease in blood pressure acceleration (deceleration of the heart rate. It depends on what part of the body exposed to the massage procedure.

  3. A literature review about effectiveness of massage therapy for cancer pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somani, Salima; Merchant, Samima; Lalani, Sharifa

    2013-11-01

    This literature review explores the effectiveness of massage therapy to reduce cancer pain. As part of the review, systematic literature search was carried out on various electronic databases and specialised journals. Included are 19 research-based articles and 8 review articles. The review suggests that cancer has become a common health problem in the world and most of the cancer patients are going through intense and unbearable pain. Studies have reported that most of the cancer patients' pain reduced with therapeutic massage. Seventy-three per cent of cancer patients use massage therapy in the USA. Few studies are available in the context of the developing world related to massage therapy and we could not find any study in the Pakistani context. There is a need to conduct an interventional study about the effectiveness of massage therapy to control cancer pain in developing countries such as Pakistan.

  4. Aromatherapy with Rosa Damascenes in Apnea, Bradycardia and Spo2 of Preterm Infants; a Randomized Clinical Trial

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    Saeideh Aghagoli

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background  Apnea is one of the most common problems in preterm neonates. This study aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of aromatherapy on the reduction of apnea, bradycardia, and Pulse Oximetry (SPO2 in premature infants. Materials and Methods In a clinical trial study, 60 preterm neonates randomly divided in two groups and exposed to aromatherapy with Rosa damascenes distillate or distilled water beside the routine treatment. In experimental group, two drops of 10% Rosa damascenes distillate was dropped on the pad eye in second day of birth at 6 Am. The intervention was repeated in 9 AM, 12 Am, 15 PM and 18 PM hours. A same condition applied for control group and distilled water was dropped on the pad eye. The number of apnea attacks, bradycardia and decrease in SpO2 compared between two groups using chi-square test, independent t-test and repeated measure test. Results The overall apnea attacks, bradycardia, and SPO2 in tree studied days were lower in intervention group than control group (0.47±0.13 vs. 2.6±0.41, 0.47±0.13 vs. 2.56±0.41 and 0.70±0.17 vs. 2.77±0.21, respectively. In addition, the repeated measurement test showed that the mean number of apnea attacks, decrease in heart pulse rate, and decrease in SpO2 was statistically lower in intervention group with aromatherapy than controls in first, second, third and sum of three days (P< 0.05. Conclusion Aromatherapy with Rosa damascenes distillate can reduce more and speedy the occurrence of apnea attacks, bradycardia and SPO2 in premature infants, along with other routine treatment.

  5. [Effects of massage on delayed-onset muscle soreness].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakowski, Paweł; Musielak, Bartosz; Sip, Paweł; Biegański, Grzegorz

    2008-01-01

    Delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS) is the pain or discomfort often felt 12 to 24 hours after exercising and subsides generally within 4 to 6 days. Once thought to be caused by lactic acid buildup, a more recent theory is that it is caused by inflammatory process or tiny tears in the muscle fibers caused by eccentric contraction, or unaccustomed training levels. Exercises that involve many eccentric contractions will result in the most severe DOMS. Fourteen healthy men with no history of upper arm injury and no experience in resistance training were recruited. The mean age, height, and mass of the subjects were 22.8 +/- 1.2 years, 178.3 +/- 10.3 cm, and 75.0 +/- 14.2 kg, respectively. Subjects performed 8 sets of concentric and eccentric actions of the elbow flexors with each arm according to Stay protocol. One arm received 10 minutes of massage 30 minutes after exercise, the contralateral arm received no treatment. Measurements were taken at 9 assessment times: pre-exercise and postexercise at 10 min, 6, 12, 24, 36, 48, 72 and 96 hours. Dependent variables were range of motion, perceived soreness and upper arm circumference. There was noticed difference in perceived soreness across time between groups. The analysis indicated that massage resulted in a 10% to 20% decrease in the severity of soreness, but the differences were not significant. Difference in range of motion and arm circumference was not observed. Massage administered 30 minutes after exercises could have a beneficial influence on DOMS but without influence on muscle swelling and range of motion.

  6. The effectiveness of traditional Malay massage: A narrative review

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    Nurhanisah Sejari

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The traditional Malay massage (TMM, also known locally as urut Melayu, is one of the fields of traditional and complementary medicine. The practices and understanding are originally related to Malay culture in selected hospitals under the Ministry of Health since 2007. This study is to review the available evidence on the effectiveness of TMM as an alternative therapeutic approach to various conditions. An online electronic search in databases (Ovid™ , Scopus, EMBASE and PubMed was performed using keywords such as Malay massage and urut Melayu. Documents including case studies, case reports, and research studies were examined and analyzed. Two case studies and one qualitative research study about TMM for chronic diseases were explored. It was reported that the majority of those having chronic diseases sought TMM as an alternative treatment to improve mobility and quality of life. The second case study explored the effectiveness of TMM for a postpartum stroke patient, and there was improvement of physical function, mobility and optimizing the activity of daily living for this patient. The third article provided treatment-seeking behavior of poststroke patients and their TMM practitioners. From their interviews with 17 volunteers, they reported that Malay massage is very helpful for their body conditions after stroke due to high blood pressure and postdelivery complications. The patients revealed that TMM has provided them positive, beneficial effects. The review indicated that TMM could serve as an alternative treatment for those having chronic diseases, postpartum stroke and poststroke conditions. Therefore, the current review highlights the role TMM has in view of positive, beneficial effects to improve and optimize mobility, physical function, activity, daily living and quality of life.

  7. A controlled trial of the effect of aromatherapy on birth outcomes using "Rose essential oil" inhalation and foot bath

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    Masoomeh Kheirkhah

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and aim: Aromatherapy is the art and science of using essential oils extracted from aromatic plants, and is concerned with natural balance, coordination and promotion of health. This study was designed to determine the effect of "rose (Rosa damascena essential oil" inhalation and foot bath on the improvement of maternal and neonatal health outcomes. Material and methods: This study was a randomized clinical trial, conducted on 80 primiparous women in Shahid Akbar Abadi Maternity Hospital, Tehran, Iran. Subjects were randomly assigned to aromatherapy and control groups. Aromatherapy group received methods of inhalation and foot bath with rose essential oil for 10 minutes at the beginning of the active phase and then at the onset of the transitional phase of labor. Control group received the routine care of the delivery room. The measured variables in this study included episiotomy in the second stages of labor, Apgar score, admission to neonatal intensive care unit (NICU, and maternal satisfaction with the administration of pain relievers. Statistical analysis of the extracted data was performed using SPSS version 16 with Chi-square and t student test. Results: Two groups were significantly different in terms of the second stage of labor duration (P

  8. Learning and adherence to baby massage after two teaching strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz, Cláudia Marchetti; Caromano, Fátima Aparecida; Gonçalves, Lia Lopes; Machado, Thais Gaiad; Voos, Mariana Callil

    2014-07-01

    Little is known about learning/adherence after different baby massage teaching strategies. We compared the learning/adherence after two strategies. Twenty mothers from the group manual-course (GMC) and 20 from the group manual-orientations (GMO) received a booklet. GMC participated in a course during the third trimester. GMO received verbal instructions during the postpartum hospital stay. Multiple-choice and practical tests assessed learning (GMC: performing strokes on a doll; GMO: on the baby). Adherence was measured 3 months after childbirth. No differences were found between the groups in learning/adherence. Both teaching strategies showed similar and positive results. © 2014, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Massage Therapy Education Online: Student Satisfaction and Achievement, Part I

    Science.gov (United States)

    McQuillan, David James

    2010-01-01

    In recent years, providers of massage therapy education have, in growing numbers, started to use online technologies to support the learning processes of their students. Using a narrative review of the existing online learning literature, this paper aims to provide a solid pedagogical foundation for these early explorations. It identifies five key factors—instructional pedagogy, quality of instruction, interaction and communication, individual learner qualities, and the online interface—that contribute to student satisfaction and achievement in the online context. The relationships between those factors and the experience of the online learner are discussed with reference to maximization of student satisfaction and achievement. PMID:21589705

  10. Evaluation of the effect of aromatherapy with Rosa damascena Mill. on postoperative pain intensity in hospitalized children in selected hospitals affiliated to Isfahan University of Medical Sciences in 2013: A randomized clinical trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marofi, Maryam; Sirousfard, Motahareh; Moeini, Mahin; Ghanadi, Alireza

    2015-01-01

    Background: Pain is the common complication after a surgery. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of aromatherapy with Rosa damascena Mill. on the postoperative pain in children. Materials and Methods: In a double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial, we selected 64 children of 3–6 years of age through convenient sampling and divided them randomly into two groups. Patients in group A were given inhalation aromatherapy with R. damascena Mill., and in group B, the patients were given almond oil as a placebo. Inhalation aromatherapy was used at the first time of subjects’ arrival to the ward and then at 3, 6, 9, and 12 h afterward. Common palliative treatments to relieve pain were used in both groups. Thirty minutes after aromatherapy, the postoperative pain in children was evaluated with the Toddler Preschooler Postoperative Pain Scale (TPPPS). Data were statistically analyzed using Chi-square test, one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA), and repeated measures ANOVA. Results: There was no significant difference in pain scores at the first time of subjects’ arrival to the ward (before receiving any aromatherapy or palliative care) between the two groups. After each time of aromatherapy and at the end of treatment, the pain score was significantly reduced in the aromatherapy group with R. damascena Mill. compared to the placebo group. Conclusions: According to our results, aromatherapy with R. damascena Mill. can be used in postoperative pain in children, together with other common treatments without any significant side effects. PMID:25878704

  11. Salivary oxytocin concentrations in seven boys with autism spectrum disorder received massage from their mothers: a pilot study

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    Shuji eTsuji

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Seven male children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD, aged 8 – 12 years, attending special education classrooms for ASD and disabled children, were assigned to receive touch therapy. Their mothers were instructed to provide gentle touch in the massage style of the International Liddle Kidz Association. The mothers gave massages to their child for 20 minutes every day over a period of 3 months followed by no massage for 4 months. To assess the biological effects of such touch therapy, saliva was collected before and 20 minutes after a single session of massage for 20 minutes from the children and mothers every 3 weeks during the massage period and every 4 weeks during the non-massage period, when they visited a community meeting room. Salivary oxytocin levels were measured using an enzyme immunoassay kit. During the period of massage therapy, the children and mothers exhibited higher oxytocin concentrations compared those during the non-massage period. The changes in oxytocin levels before and after a single massage session were not significantly changed in children and mothers. The results suggested that the ASD children (massage receivers and their mothers (massage givers show touch therapy-dependent changes in salivary oxytocin concentrations.

  12. The effect of massage with medium-chain triglyceride oil on weight gain in premature neonates.

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    Reza Saeadi

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Prematurity and poor weight gaining are important causes for neonatal hospitalization. The present study aimed to investigate the role of medium-chain triglyceride (MCT oil via massage therapy as a supplementary nutritional method on the weight gain of Neonatal Intensive Care Units (NICU-hospitalized neonates. This randomized clinical trial performed among 121 stable premature neonates hospitalized in the NICU of Qaem Educational Hospital, Mashhad, Iran. They were randomly divided into three groups: oil-massage, massage alone and control groups. These groups were compared on the basis of weight gain during a one-week interval. The three groups were matched for sex, mean gestational age, birth weight, head circumference, delivery, and feeding type (P>0.05. The mean weight gain on the 7th day in the oil massage group was 105±1.3gr and 52±0.1gr in the massage group; whereas 54±1.3gr weight loss was observed in the control group. Significant differences were observed between the oil-massage group and the other two groups, respectively (P=0.002 and P=0.000. The findings of this study suggest that transcutaneous feeding with MCT oil massage therapy in premature neonates can result in accelerated weight gain in this age group with no risk of NEC.

  13. Integrative Evaluation of Automated Massage Combined with Thermotherapy: Physical, Physiological, and Psychological Viewpoints

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    Do-Won Kim

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Various types of massages are reported to relieve stress, pain, and anxiety which are beneficial for rehabilitation; however, more comprehensive studies are needed to understand the mechanism of massage therapy. In this study, we investigated the effect of massage therapy, alone or in combination with infrared heating, on 3 different aspects: physical, physiological, and psychological. Twenty-eight healthy university students were subjected to 3 different treatment conditions on separate days, one condition per day: control, massage only, or massage with infrared heating. Physical (trunk extension [TE]; maximum power of erector spinae, physiological (heart-rate variability [HRV]; electroencephalogram [EEG], and psychological (state-trait anxiety inventory [STAI]; visual analogue scale [VAS] measurements were evaluated and recorded before and after each treatment condition. The results showed that massage therapy, especially when combined with infrared heating, significantly improved physical functioning, increased parasympathetic response, and decreased psychological stress and anxiety. In the current study, we observed that massage therapy contributes to various physical, physiological, and psychological changes, where the effect increases with thermotherapy.

  14. Moderate Versus Light Pressure Massage Therapy Leads to Greater Weight Gain in Preterm Infants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field, Tiffany; Diego, Miguel A.; Hernandez-Reif, Maria; Deeds, Osvelia; Figuereido, Barbara

    2007-01-01

    Sixty-eight preterm infants (M GA=3Owks.) were randomly assigned to a moderate or to a light pressure massage therapy group to receive 15 massages 3 times per day for 5 days. Behavior state, stress behaviors and heart rate were recorded for 15 minutes before and during the first 15-minute therapy session. Weight gain was recorded over the 5 day therapy period. The moderate versus light pressure massage group gained significantly more weight per day. During the behavior observations the moderate versus light pressure massage group showed significantly lower increases from the pre-session to the session recording on: 1) active sleep; 2) fussing; 3) crying; 4) movement; and 5) stress behavior (hiccupping). They also showed a smaller decrease in deep sleep, a greater decrease in heart rate and a greater increase in vagal tone. Thus, the moderate pressure massage therapy group appeared to be more relaxed and less aroused than the light pressure massage group which may have contributed to the greater weight gain of the moderate pressure massage therapy group. PMID:17138310

  15. A Standardized, Evidence-Based Massage Therapy Program for Decentralized Elite Paracyclists: Creating the Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Ann B; Trilk, Jennifer L

    2015-09-01

    Evidence suggests that para-athletes are injured more often than able-bodied athletes. The benefits of massage therapy for these disabled athletes are yet to be explored. This paper documents the process followed for creating a massage program for elite paracycling athletes with the goal to assess effects on recovery, rest, performance, and quality of life both on and off the bike. Massage therapists' private practices throughout the United States. A United States Paracycling team consisting of 9 elite athletes: 2 spinal cord injury, 2 lower limb amputation, 1 upper limb amputation, 1 transverse myelitis, 1 stroke, 1 traumatic brain injury, and 1 visually impaired. The process used to develop a massage therapy program for para-cyclists included meetings with athletes, coaching staff, team exercise physiologist, and sports massage therapists; peer-reviewed literature was also consulted to address specific health conditions of para-athletes. Team leadership and athletes identified needs for quicker recovery, better rest, and improved performance in elite paracyclists. This information was used to generate a conceptual model for massage protocols, and led to creation of the intake and exit questionnaires to assess patient health status and recovery. Forms also were created for a general health intake, therapist information, and a therapist's SOAAP notes. The conceptual model and questionnaires developed herein will help to operationalize an exploratory study investigating the feasibility of implementing a standardized massage therapy program for a decentralized elite paracycling team.

  16. The role of massage in sports performance and rehabilitation: current evidence and future direction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brummitt, Jason

    2008-02-01

    Massage is a popular treatment choice of athletes, coaches, and sports physical therapists. Despite its purported benefits and frequent use, evidence demonstrating its efficacy is scarce. To identify current literature relating to sports massage and its role in effecting an athlete's psychological readiness, in enhancing sports performance, in recovery from exercise and competition, and in the treatment of sports related musculoskeletal injuries. Electronic databases were used to identify papers relevant to this review. The following keywords were searched: massage, sports injuries, athletic injuries, physical therapy, rehabilitation, delayed onset muscle soreness, sports psychology, sports performance, sports massage, sports recovery, soft tissue mobilization, deep transverse friction massage, pre-event, and post exercise. RESEARCH STUDIES PERTAINING TO THE FOLLOWING GENERAL CATEGORIES WERE IDENTIFIED AND REVIEWED: pre-event (physiological and psychological variables), sports performance, recovery, and rehabilitation. Despite the fact clinical research has been performed, a poor appreciation exists for the appropriate clinical use of sports massage. Additional studies examining the physiological and psychological effects of sports massage are necessary in order to assist the sports physical therapist in developing and implementing clinically significant evidence based programs or treatments.

  17. Integrative Evaluation of Automated Massage Combined with Thermotherapy: Physical, Physiological, and Psychological Viewpoints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Do-Won; Lee, Dae Woon; Schreiber, Joergen; Im, Chang-Hwan; Kim, Hansung

    2016-01-01

    Various types of massages are reported to relieve stress, pain, and anxiety which are beneficial for rehabilitation; however, more comprehensive studies are needed to understand the mechanism of massage therapy. In this study, we investigated the effect of massage therapy, alone or in combination with infrared heating, on 3 different aspects: physical, physiological, and psychological. Twenty-eight healthy university students were subjected to 3 different treatment conditions on separate days, one condition per day: control, massage only, or massage with infrared heating. Physical (trunk extension [TE]; maximum power of erector spinae), physiological (heart-rate variability [HRV]; electroencephalogram [EEG]), and psychological (state-trait anxiety inventory [STAI]; visual analogue scale [VAS]) measurements were evaluated and recorded before and after each treatment condition. The results showed that massage therapy, especially when combined with infrared heating, significantly improved physical functioning, increased parasympathetic response, and decreased psychological stress and anxiety. In the current study, we observed that massage therapy contributes to various physical, physiological, and psychological changes, where the effect increases with thermotherapy.

  18. The Effects of Massage Therapy on Multiple Sclerosis Patients’ Quality of Life and Leg Function

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    Brittany Schroeder

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Massage therapy is a noninvasive treatment that many individuals with multiple sclerosis (MS use to supplement their conventional treatment. Objective. We hypothesize that massage therapy will improve the leg function and overall quality of life (QoL of MS patients. Design. A two-period (rest, massage crossover design was used. Twenty-four individuals with MS ranging from 3.0 to 7.0 on the Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS received Swedish massage treatments for four weeks. Exercise capacity and leg function as well as QoL were assessed using the Six-Minute Walk Test (6MWT and the Hamburg Quality of Life in Multiple Sclerosis (HAQUAMS instrument, respectively. Assessments were measured before and after a massage period and a rest period where no massages were employed. Results. The results displayed no significant changes in 6MWT distances or HAQUAMS scores. However, the participants perceived improvement in overall health as expressed in written comments. Conclusions. Massage is a safe, noninvasive treatment that may assist MS patients in managing the stress of their symptoms. Future studies with larger sample size and cortisol measures are warranted.

  19. Incorporation of massage into psychotherapy: an integrative and conjoint approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posadzki, Paul; Parekh-Bhurke, Sheetal

    2011-02-01

    This article presents the potential integration of psychotherapy and massage when considering the essence of their beneficial effects. The essence of this model of practice is multifaceted, combining principles from anatomy, physiology and neuroscience with psychotherapy to benefit patient care. It has been advocated that possessing multidisciplinary knowledge from these areas of science enhances psychotherapists' holistic care of their depressive patients. A narrative review of the literatures and a qualitative, conceptual synthesis has been performed to create a new theoretical-pragmatic construct. This article introduces the concept of massage practice as a part of psychotherapy practice and presents the potential integration of psychotherapeutic knowledge with clinical decision-making and the management of depressive symptoms. The authors emphasize the usefulness of multi- and interdisciplinary knowledge in the psychotherapeutic process and explain how this knowledge might be extrapolated and incorporated into theoretical and practical settings to benefit depressive patients. The justification for this concept is also presented. The principles set out in this article may be a useful source of information for psychotherapists concerned about their patients' holistic well-being in addition to the psychopathology for which they have sought treatment. Researchers and psychotherapists can obtain valuable and additional knowledge through cross-fertilization of ideas across the arguments presented here.

  20. Reduced Rank Regression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Søren

    2008-01-01

    The reduced rank regression model is a multivariate regression model with a coefficient matrix with reduced rank. The reduced rank regression algorithm is an estimation procedure, which estimates the reduced rank regression model. It is related to canonical correlations and involves calculating...

  1. Massage Therapy Treatment and Outcomes for a Patient with Parkinson's Disease: a Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casciaro, Yolanda

    2016-03-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a complex neurological disorder. The disease is progressive and, in time, results in severe disability. Many patients turn to massage in an attempt to alleviate symptoms of pain and rigidity, though the effects of massage with respect to PD are not well studied. This case adds one more instance in which massage therapy has provided temporary respite from resting tremor, one unrelenting symptom of PD. To determine if massage therapy can produce favorable outcomes with respect to the severity of rigidity and tremor in a patient with PD. A 63-year-old female patient with idiopathic, long-standing, Hoehn-Yahr Stage 4 PD was treated with massage therapy five times over the course of six weeks. A SPES/SCOPA Motor Impairments rating scale was used to measure rigidity and tremor pre- and post-treatment, to gauge treatment effectiveness. The massage treatments consisted of deep longitudinal stroking, muscle squeezing techniques, passive range of motion movements, and general relaxation techniques to encourage a soothing environment while promoting a decrease in muscular tone and hyperactivity. Massage therapy administration was by a student near the end of her two-year diploma. The results obtained indicated that massage therapy treatment had a positive effect on reducing resting and postural tremor in a patient with long-standing PD. The treatment was also effective in temporarily reducing rigidity during treatment, but did not produce a lasting effect. Further study is required; however, the results of this case were consistent with the limited research available on the subject of massage therapy and Parkinson's disease, in that positive change with respect to tremor-and to a lesser degree, rigidity-were achieved with focused, intentional treatment.

  2. Massage Therapy Treatment and Outcomes for a Patient with Parkinson’s Disease: a Case Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casciaro, Yolanda

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Parkinson’s disease (PD) is a complex neurological disorder. The disease is progressive and, in time, results in severe disability. Many patients turn to massage in an attempt to alleviate symptoms of pain and rigidity, though the effects of massage with respect to PD are not well studied. This case adds one more instance in which massage therapy has provided temporary respite from resting tremor, one unrelenting symptom of PD. Objective To determine if massage therapy can produce favorable outcomes with respect to the severity of rigidity and tremor in a patient with PD. Case Presentation A 63-year-old female patient with idiopathic, long-standing, Hoehn-Yahr Stage 4 PD was treated with massage therapy five times over the course of six weeks. A SPES/SCOPA Motor Impairments rating scale was used to measure rigidity and tremor pre- and post-treatment, to gauge treatment effectiveness. The massage treatments consisted of deep longitudinal stroking, muscle squeezing techniques, passive range of motion movements, and general relaxation techniques to encourage a soothing environment while promoting a decrease in muscular tone and hyperactivity. Massage therapy administration was by a student near the end of her two-year diploma. Results The results obtained indicated that massage therapy treatment had a positive effect on reducing resting and postural tremor in a patient with long-standing PD. The treatment was also effective in temporarily reducing rigidity during treatment, but did not produce a lasting effect. Conclusion Further study is required; however, the results of this case were consistent with the limited research available on the subject of massage therapy and Parkinson’s disease, in that positive change with respect to tremor—and to a lesser degree, rigidity—were achieved with focused, intentional treatment. PMID:26977216

  3. Massage therapy for patients with metastatic cancer: a pilot randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toth, Maria; Marcantonio, Edward R; Davis, Roger B; Walton, Tracy; Kahn, Janet R; Phillips, Russell S

    2013-07-01

    The study objectives were to determine the feasibility and effects of providing therapeutic massage at home for patients with metastatic cancer. This was a randomized controlled trial. Patients were enrolled at Oncology Clinics at a large urban academic medical center; massage therapy was provided in patients' homes. Subjects were patients with metastatic cancer. There were three interventions: massage therapy, no-touch intervention, and usual care. Primary outcomes were pain, anxiety, and alertness; secondary outcomes were quality of life and sleep. In this study, it was possible to provide interventions for all patients at home by professional massage therapists. The mean number of massage therapy sessions per patient was 2.8. A significant improvement was found in the quality of life of the patients who received massage therapy after 1-week follow-up, which was not observed in either the No Touch control or the Usual Care control groups, but the difference was not sustained at 1 month. There were trends toward improvement in pain and sleep of the patients after therapeutic massage but not in patients in the control groups. There were no serious adverse events related to the interventions. The study results showed that it is feasible to provide therapeutic massage at home for patients with advanced cancer, and to randomize patients to a no-touch intervention. Providing therapeutic massage improves the quality of life at the end of life for patients and may be associated with further beneficial effects, such as improvement in pain and sleep quality. Larger randomized controlled trials are needed to substantiate these findings.

  4. Effects of massage therapy on sleep quality after coronary artery bypass graft surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nerbass, Flavia Baggio; Feltrim, Maria Ignez Zanetti; Souza, Silvia Alves de; Ykeda, Daisy Satomi; Lorenzi-Filho, Geraldo

    2010-01-01

    Having poor sleep quality is common among patients following cardiopulmonary artery bypass graft surgery. Pain, stress, anxiety and poor sleep quality may be improved by massage therapy. This study evaluated whether massage therapy is an effective technique for improving sleep quality in patients following cardiopulmonary artery bypass graft surgery. Participants included cardiopulmonary artery bypass graft surgery patients who were randomized into a control group and a massage therapy group following discharge from the intensive care unit (Day 0), during the postoperative period. The control group and the massage therapy group comprised participants who were subjected to three nights without massage and three nights with massage therapy, respectively. The patients were evaluated on the following mornings (i.e., Day 1 to Day 3) using a visual analogue scale for pain in the chest, back and shoulders, in addition to fatigue and sleep. Participants kept a sleep diary during the study period. Fifty-seven cardiopulmonary artery bypass graft surgery patients were enrolled in the study during the preoperative period, 17 of whom were excluded due to postoperative complications. The remaining 40 participants (male: 67.5%, age: 61.9 years ± 8.9 years, body mass index: 27.2 kg/m² ± 3.7 kg/m²) were randomized into control (n = 20) and massage therapy (n = 20) groups. Pain in the chest, shoulders, and back decreased significantly in both groups from Day 1 to Day 3. The participants in the massage therapy group had fewer complaints of fatigue on Day 1 (p=0.006) and Day 2 (p=0.028) in addition, they reported a more effective sleep during all three days (p=0.019) when compared with the participants in the control group. Massage therapy is an effective technique for improving patient recovery from cardiopulmonary artery bypass graft surgery because it reduces fatigue and improves sleep.

  5. Effects of massage therapy on sleep quality after coronary artery bypass graft surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flavia Baggio Nerbass

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Having poor sleep quality is common among patients following cardiopulmonary artery bypass graft surgery. Pain, stress, anxiety and poor sleep quality may be improved by massage therapy. OBJECTIVE: This study evaluated whether massage therapy is an effective technique for improving sleep quality in patients following cardiopulmonary artery bypass graft surgery. METHOD: Participants included cardiopulmonary artery bypass graft surgery patients who were randomized into a control group and a massage therapy group following discharge from the intensive care unit (Day 0, during the postoperative period. The control group and the massage therapy group comprised participants who were subjected to three nights without massage and three nights with massage therapy, respectively. The patients were evaluated on the following mornings (i.e., Day 1 to Day 3 using a visual analogue scale for pain in the chest, back and shoulders, in addition to fatigue and sleep. Participants kept a sleep diary during the study period. RESULTS: Fifty-seven cardiopulmonary artery bypass graft surgery patients were enrolled in the study during the preoperative period, 17 of whom were excluded due to postoperative complications. The remaining 40 participants (male: 67.5%, age: 61.9 years ± 8.9 years, body mass index: 27.2 kg/m² ± 3.7 kg/m² were randomized into control (n = 20 and massage therapy (n = 20 groups. Pain in the chest, shoulders, and back decreased significantly in both groups from Day 1 to Day 3. The participants in the massage therapy group had fewer complaints of fatigue on Day 1 (p=0.006 and Day 2 (p=0.028 in addition, they reported a more effective sleep during all three days (p=0.019 when compared with the participants in the control group. CONCLUSION: Massage therapy is an effective technique for improving patient recovery from cardiopulmonary artery bypass graft surgery because it reduces fatigue and improves sleep.

  6. Posterior interosseous nerve palsy as a complication of friction massage in tennis elbow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ya-Ying; Hsu, Wei-Chih; Wang, Han-Cheng

    2010-08-01

    Friction massage is a commonly used physical therapy that is usually safe and without complication. We report an unusual case of posterior interosseous nerve palsy that arose after friction massage. Electrophysiologic findings confirmed a focal neuropathy 4-6 cm distal to the lateral epicondyle. The neurologic symptoms resolved completely 2 mos after discontinuation of friction massage. This case experience broadens the spectrum of etiologies of posterior interosseous nerve palsy. Nerve conduction studies may be a useful adjunct to a thorough physical examination to confirm the diagnosis and is important to prognostic evaluation, if unexplained neurologic symptoms develop after certain physical therapy procedures. Further treatment includes avoiding compression and observation.

  7. Practice and research in Australian massage therapy: a national workforce survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wardle, Jonathan L.; Barnett, Rebecca; Adams, Jon

    2015-01-01

    Background Massage is the largest complementary medicine profession in Australia, in terms of public utilisation, practitioner distribution, and number of practitioners, and is being increasingly integrated into the Australian health care system. However, despite the increasing importance of massage therapists in Australian health care delivery, or the increased practice and education obligations this may entail, there has been little exploration of practice, research, and education characteristics of the Australian massage therapist workforce. Purpose To identify practice, research, and education characteristics among the Australian massage therapist workforce. Settings The Australian massage therapy profession. Participants 301 randomly selected members of the Association of Massage Therapists (Australia). Research Design A 15-item, cross-sectional telephone survey. Main Outcomes Measures Massage therapists’ demographic information, practice characteristics, and education and research characteristics. Results Most respondents (73.8%) worked 20 hours per week or less practising massage, nearly half of all respondents (46.8%) treated fewer than 10 massage clients per week, and over three-quarters (81.7%) of respondents were self-employed. Massage therapy was the sole source of income for just over half (55.0%) of the study respondents. Only 5.7% of respondents earned over the average wage ($50,000) through their massage activities. Nearly half of all respondents (43.3%) reported regularly exceeding their continuing professional education (CPE) quota mandated by their professional association. However, 21.1% reported struggling to achieve their CPE quota each year. Over one-third of respondents (35.6%) were not interested in acquiring further CPE points beyond minimum requirements. Respondents were significantly more likely to have an active approach to research if they had higher income (p = .015). Multivariate analysis showed factors associated with access to

  8. [Development of a massage device based on microcontroller in the field of alimentary tract].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Rong; Peng, Chenglin; He, Hongmei; Zhu, Jing

    2007-12-01

    In this artical is first reported a survey of the progress in research of MEMS technology. Then, the basic structure, features and the principles of a massage device based on microcontroller in the field of alimentary tract are introduced. Special emphasis is laid on the utilization of MSP430F123 microprocessor for producing a kind of period pulse to control the power of massage capsule. In general, the research and development of the massage device in the field of alimentary tract have active support and deep significance to therapy in the clinical and business settings as well as in the development of biomedical engineering and MEMS.

  9. The Efficacy of Aromatherapy in the Treatment of Postdischarge Nausea in Patients Undergoing Outpatient Abdominal Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcilvoy, Laura; Richmer, Linda; Kramer, Deborah; Jackson, Rita; Shaffer, Leslee; Lawrence, Jeffrey; Inman, Kevin

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the effectiveness of the aromatherapy product QueaseEASE (QE) for decreasing postdischarge nausea (PDN) in patients undergoing outpatient abdominal surgery. Prospective exploratory study. Informed Consent was obtained preoperatively from a convenience sample of adult patients scheduled for outpatient abdominal surgery procedures. Prior to discharge, subjects were instructed in the use of QE and given instructions on how to rate their nausea on a 0-10 scale. They recorded nausea scales > 0 any time they occurred for the next 24 hours, used the QE, and recorded their nausea scales 3 minutes later. A study nurse called subjects the next day to collect the information. The sample included 70 outpatients who underwent abdominal surgery. Twenty-five participants (36%) reported experiencing PDN and their concomitant use of QE. There was a significant difference in mean age of those reporting PDN (37 years) versus those without nausea (48 years, P = .004) as well as a significant difference in mean intravenous fluid intake during hospitalization of those reporting PDN (1,310 mL) versus those without nausea (1,511 mL, P = .04). The PDN group had more female participants (72% vs 42%, P = .02), more participants that were less than 50 years of age (84% vs 53%, P = .02), and received more opioids (100% vs 76%, P = .006) than the no nausea group. The 25 PDN participants reported 47 episodes of PDN in which they used QE. For all of the 47 PDN episodes experienced, participants reported a decrease in nausea scale (0 to 10) after the use of QE; for 22 (47%) of the PDN episodes experienced, a nausea scale of 0 after using QE was reported. The mean decrease in nausea scale for all 25 participants was 4.78 (±2.12) after using QE. This study found that the aromatherapy QE was an effective treatment of PDN in select same-day abdominal surgery patients. Copyright © 2015 American Society of PeriAnesthesia Nurses. Published by Elsevier Inc

  10. Effects of thai foot massage on balance performance in diabetic patients with peripheral neuropathy: a randomized parallel-controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatchawan, Uraiwan; Eungpinichpong, Wichai; Plandee, Piyawan; Yamauchi, Junichiro

    2015-04-20

    BACKGROUND Peripheral neuropathy is the most common complications of diabetic patients and leads to loss of plantar cutaneous sensation, movement perception, and body balance. Thai foot massage is an alternative therapy to improve balance. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of Thai foot massage on balance performance in diabetic patients with peripheral neuropathy. MATERIAL AND METHODS Sixty patients with type-2 diabetes were recruited and randomly assigned into either the Thai foot massage or control groups. The Thai foot massage group received a modified Thai traditional foot massage for 30 min, 3 days per week for 2 weeks. We measured timed up and go (TUG), one leg stance: OLS), the range of motion (ROM) of the foot, and foot sensation (SWMT) before treatment, after the first single session, and after the 2-week treatment. RESULTS After the single treatment session, only the Thai foot massage group showed a significant improvement in TUG. After the 2-week treatment, both Thai foot massage and control groups showed a significant improvement of TUG and OLS (Pfoot massage group showed better improvement in TUG than the control group (pfoot massage group also showed significant improvements in ROM and SWMT after the 2-week treatment. CONCLUSIONS The results of this study suggest that Thai foot massage is a viable alternative treatment for balance performance, ROM of the foot, and the foot sensation in diabetic patients with peripheral neuropathy.

  11. The effect of manipulation plus massage therapy versus massage therapy alone in people with tension-type headache. A randomized controlled clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espí-López, Gemma V; Zurriaga-Llorens, Rosario; Monzani, Lucas; Falla, Deborah

    2016-10-01

    Manipulative techniques have shown promising results for relief of tension-type headache (TTH), however prior studies either lacked a control group, or suffered from poor methodological quality. The aim of this study was to compare the effect of spinal manipulation combined with massage versus massage alone on range of motion of the cervical spine, headache frequency, intensity and disability in patients with TTH. Randomized, single-blinded, controlled clinical trial. University clinic. We enrolled 105 subjects with TTH. Participants were divided into two groups: 1) manipulation and massage; 2) massage only (control). Four treatment sessions were applied over four weeks. The Headache Disability Inventory (HDI) and range of upper cervical and cervical motion were evaluated at baseline, immediately after the intervention and at a follow-up, 8 weeks after completing the intervention. Both groups demonstrated a large (ƒ=1.22) improvement on their HDI scores. Those that received manipulation reported a medium-sized reduction (ƒ=0.33) in headache frequency across all data points (Pheadache. Although massage provided relief of headache in TTH sufferers, when combined with cervical manipulation, there was a stronger effect on range of upper cervical spine motion.

  12. Tapping but not massage enhances vasodilation and improves venous palpation of cutaneous veins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichimura, Mika; Sasaki, Shinsuke; Mori, Masaharu; Ogino, Tetsuya

    2015-01-01

    This paper investigated whether tapping on the median cubital vein or massaging the forearm was more effective in obtaining better venous palpation for venipuncture. Forty healthy volunteers in their twenties were subjected to tapping (10 times in 5 sec) or massage (10 strokes in 20 sec from the wrist to the cubital fossa) under tourniquet inflation on the upper arm. Venous palpation was assessed using the venous palpation score (0-6, with 0 being impalpable). Three venous factors-venous depth, cross-sectional area, and elevation-were also measured using ultrasonography. The venous palpation score increased significantly by tapping but not by massage. Moreover, all 3 venous measurements changed significantly by tapping, while only the depth decreased significantly by massage. The three venous measurements correlated significantly with the venous palpation score, indicating that they are useful objective indicators for evaluating vasodilation. We suggest that tapping is an effective vasodilation technique.

  13. Massage Therapy for Reducing Stress Hormones and Enhancing Immune Function in Breast Cancer Survivors

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ironson, Gail

    2001-01-01

    The objectives and specific aims of the ongoing study are to evaluate massage and relaxation therapies for an ethnically diverse group of women with early stages of breast cancer (Stages 1 and 2) for 1...

  14. Massage Therapy for Reducing Stress Hormones and Enhancing Immune Function in Breast Cancer Survivors

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tronson, Gail

    2000-01-01

    The objectives and specific aims of the ongoing study are to evaluate massage and relaxation therapies for an ethnically diverse group of women with early stages of breast cancer (Stages 1 and 2) for (1...

  15. Time to Talk: 6 Things To Know About Massage Therapy for Health Purposes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... that massage therapy may also promote relaxation and boost mood in people with cancer. A recent review ... mail More Tips 5 Things To Know About Mind and Body Approaches for Substance Use Disorders 6 ...

  16. A guiding framework to understand relationships within the profession of massage therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baskwill, Amanda

    2016-07-01

    An element of professionalization is the development of a body of knowledge and the integration of that knowledge into practice, also known as evidence-informed practice (EIP). EIP was officially adopted in Ontario, Canada, by the massage therapy profession in 2002 when the professional competency document was updated to include competencies related to research literacy (College of Massage Therapists of Ontario, 2002). Despite efforts to increase EIP, there continues to be a research-practice gap in massage therapy. However, there also seems to be interest in finding ways to support the increase massage therapists' capacity to apply research. To support change, it is useful to describe the relationships in the profession that may have an effect on the use of evidence in practice and the development of a broader culture of inquiry. In order to better understand how these relationships may impact on EIP, an ecological model is proposed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Massage Therapy for Reducing Stress Hormones and Enhancing Immune Function in Breast Cancer Survivors

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ironson, Gail

    2001-01-01

    ... (immune measures that fight tumors and viruses). During the course of the three-year study, 60 women diagnosed with Stage 1 and 2 breast cancer will be recruited and assigned to a massage therapy (n=20...

  18. Massage Therapy for Reducing Stress Hormones and Enhancing Immune Function in Breast Cancer Survivors

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tronson, Gail

    2000-01-01

    ... (immune measures that fight tumors and viruses). During the course of the three-year study, 60 women diagnosed with Stage 1 and 2 breast cancer will be recruited and assigned to a massage therapy (n=20...

  19. FORTY CASES OF INSOMNIA TREATED WITH ACUPUNCTURE, MASSAGE AND MUSIC THERAPY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Lin-yu

    2005-01-01

    @@ Insomnia is a commonly encountered sleep disorder in clinical practice. The author of the present paper treated 40 cases of insomnia with acupuncture and massage combined with music therapy and achieved satisfied outcomes. Following is the report.

  20. The effect of foot reflexology and back massage on hemodialysis patients' fatigue and sleep quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unal, Kevser Sevgi; Balci Akpinar, Reva

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this study is to examine the effectiveness of foot reflexology and back massage on optimizing the sleep quality and reducing the fatigue of hemodialysis patients. The study includes 105 volunteer patients who were registered at a private dialysis clinic and were receiving hemodialysis treatment. Foot reflexology and back massage were administered to the patients two times a week for four weeks. The Visual Analogue Scale for Fatigue and the Pittsburg Sleep Quality Index were used to collect data. The differences between the pretest and posttest score averages of the patients on the Visual Analogue Scale for Fatigue and the Pittsburg Sleep Quality Index were statistically significant (p Foot reflexology and back massage were shown to improve the sleep quality and reduce the fatigue of hemodialysis patients. Compared to back massage, foot reflexology was determined to be more effective. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Effects of Controlled Breathing, With or Without Aromatherapy, in the Treatment of Postoperative Nausea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cronin, Sherill Nones; Odom-Forren, Jan; Roberts, Holli; Thomas, Melissa; Williams, Sandy; Wright, Margaret Imelda

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the effectiveness of controlled breathing (CB), with and without aromatherapy (isopropyl alcohol [IPA]), in the treatment of postoperative nausea (PON) in adult females undergoing elective outpatient laparoscopic procedures. A prospective randomized two-group quasi-experimental design was used. A convenience sample was used. Patients were consented and assigned to either a control (CB) or treatment (IPA) group. Symptomatic patients rated nausea severity before and at 2 and 5 minutes after receiving either CB or CB with IPA. Complete data for one episode of nausea were obtained on 82 patients (41 in each group). Results showed that although nausea severity decreased significantly over time, there was no significant difference in PON treatment effectiveness between the two groups, nor was there a difference in requests for rescue medications. Patients who experience PON should be encouraged to take slow deep breaths as an initial response to symptoms. This approach has no side effects or costs and could also aid the patient to self-manage symptoms after discharge. Copyright © 2015 American Society of PeriAnesthesia Nurses. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Lavender-thymol as a new topical aromatherapy preparation for episiotomy: A randomised clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marzouk, T; Barakat, R; Ragab, A; Badria, F; Badawy, A

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of topical lavender-thymol in promoting episiotomy healing. This placebo-controlled, single-blinded, randomised clinical trial involved 60 primiparous women. REEDA score was used to evaluate the outcome of the trial. On the 7th post-partum day, women in Placebo-treated group had worse Redness, Edema, Ecchymosis, Discharge and Approximation (REEDA) score of 3.93 ± 3.65 compared with those in Lavender-thymol-treated group (2.03 ± 1.7) with significant difference (P = 0.013). Visual analogue Scale (VAS) score for pain at episiotomy in Lavender-thymol-treated group was 3.5 ± 1.9, whereas in Placebo-treated group it was 2.1 ± 2.2 (p = 0.011) for dyschezia, 3.8 ± 1.7 and 2.8 ± 1.6 in Placebo- and Lavender-thymol-treated women, respectively (p = 0.023). At 7th post-partum week, dyspareunia was more severe in Placebo-treated group compared with that in Lavender-thymol-treated group (5.3 ± 2.7 vs 2.7 ± 1.5 and p aromatherapy using lavender-thymol was highly effective, suitable and safe for episiotomy wound care with little or no expected side effects compared with that using placebo.

  3. Usage patterns of aromatherapy among the French general population: A descriptive study focusing on dermal exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dornic, N; Ficheux, A S; Roudot, A C; Saboureau, D; Ezzedine, K

    2016-04-01

    Although likely benefits of aromatherapy are well documented, little is known about essential oils consumption and exposure to molecules present in the oils. The aim of our study was to determine usage patterns of 12 types of essential oils among a quite large panel, sorted per sex and quintile of age from birth to 70. A survey was conducted in September 2014 among 1507 French individuals, selected to build a representative panel of the general population. The key point of our study, apart from the fact that it has never been done among general population, was the focus on dermal exposure. Information about types of essential oils used, skin areas exposed, frequencies and quantities were collected. Our work revealed that some sub-populations could be significantly exposed to molecules of toxicological concern, especially in terms of skin sensitization. This work is the first step to assess human exposure to these molecules, and will help safety authorities and risk managers to protect the population. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Influence of aromatherapy on medication administration to residential-care residents with dementia and behavioral challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Suzanne G; Clair, Alicia Ann

    2002-01-01

    Thirteen older persons (seven men and six women) in residential care participated as subjects in this study. All participants had histories of confusion due to dementia and were identified by staff as being consistently resistant to medication administration as indicated by vocal outbursts, moving away, or physical combativeness. Subjects were exposed to four aroma interventions during medication administration: 1) lavender vera (lavendula officinalis); 2) sweet orange (citrus aurantium); 3) tea tree (malaleuca alternifolia); and 4) no aroma (control). All medication administrations were videotaped for later data collection. Observers were trained to record frequency and duration of resistive behaviors during medication administration in allfour interventions for each subject. Reliability between two observers was extremely high. Results showed no statistically significant differences across all aroma conditions for either resistive behavior or duration of administration. Also, there were no statistically significant differences based on gender. This study indicates that aromatherapy does not reduce combative, resistive behaviors in individuals with dementia. Research with a larger sample in future studies may yield other results.

  5. Effect of aromatherapy on dental patient anxiety: A randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Venkataramana

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Dental anxiety is a common and potentially distressing problem, both for the patients and for dental practitioners. It is considered to be the main barrier and affects the working lives of dental professional potentially compromising their performance. Aim: To know the effect of aromatherapy in the reduction of dental anxiety and to compare the anxiety levels of dental patients with the control group. Materials and Methods: A randomized controlled trial design was used. Of 40 dental clinics in Khammam town, 10 dental clinics were selected by simple random sampling method. A total of 100 patients attending the dental clinic for the first time were included in the study. Ambient odor of lavender was maintained with a candle warmer. A questionnaire comprising demographic information, smoking status, Modified dental anxiety scale (Humphries et al. in 1995, was given to the patients when they were waiting in the waiting room. Student's t-test and ANOVA test were used for data analysis. The level of significance was set at 0.05. Results: Considerable decrease in anxiety scores in 3 age groups was observed. A statistically significant (P = 0.002 decrease with age in mean anxiety score. A significant difference in anxiety scores of lavender group, a significant decrease of anxiety scores with an increase of age. Conclusion: Lavender decreased the current anxiety scores of patients effectively.

  6. Regression analysis by example

    CERN Document Server

    Chatterjee, Samprit

    2012-01-01

    Praise for the Fourth Edition: ""This book is . . . an excellent source of examples for regression analysis. It has been and still is readily readable and understandable."" -Journal of the American Statistical Association Regression analysis is a conceptually simple method for investigating relationships among variables. Carrying out a successful application of regression analysis, however, requires a balance of theoretical results, empirical rules, and subjective judgment. Regression Analysis by Example, Fifth Edition has been expanded

  7. Physiological adjustments to stress measures following massage therapy: a review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moraska, Albert; Pollini, Robin A; Boulanger, Karen; Brooks, Marissa Z; Teitlebaum, Lesley

    2010-12-01

    Use of massage therapy by the general public has increased substantially in recent years. In light of the popularity of massage therapy for stress reduction, a comprehensive review of the peer-reviewed literature is important to summarize the effectiveness of this modality on stress-reactive physiological measures. On-line databases were searched for articles relevant to both massage therapy and stress. Articles were included in this review if (i) the massage therapy account consisted of manipulation of soft tissues and was conducted by a trained therapist, and (ii) a dependent measure to evaluate physiological stress was reported. Hormonal and physical parameters are reviewed. A total of 25 studies met all inclusion criteria. A majority of studies employed a 20-30 min massage administered twice-weekly over 5 weeks with evaluations conducted pre-post an individual session (single treatment) or following a series of sessions (multiple treatments). Single treatment reductions in salivary cortisol and heart rate were consistently noted. A sustained reduction for these measures was not supported in the literature, although the single-treatment effect was repeatable within a study. To date, the research data is insufficient to make definitive statements regarding the multiple treatment effect of massage therapy on urinary cortisol or catecholamines, but some evidence for a positive effect on diastolic blood pressure has been documented. While significant improvement has been demonstrated following massage therapy, the general research body on this topic lacks the necessary scientific rigor to provide a definitive understanding of the effect massage therapy has on many physiological variables associated with stress.

  8. Massage therapy decreases pain and perceived fatigue after long-distance Ironman triathlon: a randomised trial

    OpenAIRE

    Guilherme S Nunes; Paula Urio Bender; Fábio Sprada de Menezes; Igor Yamashitafuji; Valentine Zimermann Vargas; Bruna Wageck

    2016-01-01

    Question: Can massage therapy reduce pain and perceived fatigue in the quadriceps of athletes after a long-distance triathlon race (Ironman)? Design: Randomised, controlled trial with concealed allocation, intention-to-treat analysis and blinded outcome assessors. Participants: Seventy-four triathlon athletes who completed an entire Ironman triathlon race and whose main complaint was pain in the anterior portion of the thigh. Intervention: The experimental group received massage to the quadri...

  9. Effects of the application of therapeutic massage in children with cancer: a systematic review

    OpenAIRE

    Rodríguez-Mansilla, Juan; González-Sánchez, Blanca; Torres-Piles, Silvia; Martín, Jorge Guerrero; Jiménez-Palomares, María; Bellino, Macarena Núñez

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: to learn about the effects of the use of therapeutic massage in children with cancer. Method: systematic review of controlled clinical trials The search was conducted in November 2014 in the following databases: Pubmed, CSIC, Dialnet, Scopus, Cochrane and PEDro. Inclusion criteria were: clinical trials, published in English or Spanish, analyzing the effects of massage on the different stages and types of childhood cancer (between 1 and 18 years old). Results: of 1007...

  10. Cyriax's deep friction massage application parameters: Evidence from a cross-sectional study with physiotherapists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaves, Paula; Simões, Daniela; Paço, Maria; Pinho, Francisco; Duarte, José Alberto; Ribeiro, Fernando

    2017-12-01

    Deep friction massage is one of several physiotherapy interventions suggested for the management of tendinopathy. To determine the prevalence of deep friction massage use in clinical practice, to characterize the application parameters used by physiotherapists, and to identify empirical model-based patterns of deep friction massage application in degenerative tendinopathy. observational, analytical, cross-sectional and national web-based survey. 478 physiotherapists were selected through snow-ball sampling method. The participants completed an online questionnaire about personal and professional characteristics as well as specific questions regarding the use of deep friction massage. Characterization of deep friction massage parameters used by physiotherapists were presented as counts and proportions. Latent class analysis was used to identify the empirical model-based patterns. Crude and adjusted odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals were computed. The use of deep friction massage was reported by 88.1% of the participants; tendinopathy was the clinical condition where it was most frequently used (84.9%) and, from these, 55.9% reported its use in degenerative tendinopathy. The "duration of application" parameters in chronic phase and "frequency of application" in acute and chronic phases are those that diverge most from those recommended by the author of deep friction massage. We found a high prevalence of deep friction massage use, namely in degenerative tendinopathy. Our results have shown that the application parameters are heterogeneous and diverse. This is reflected by the identification of two application patterns, although none is in complete agreement with Cyriax's description. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Massage Therapy Restores Peripheral Vascular Function following Exertion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franklin, Nina C.; Ali, Mohamed M.; Robinson, Austin T.; Norkeviciute, Edita; Phillips, Shane A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To determine if lower extremity exercise-induced muscle injury (EMI) reduces vascular endothelial function of the upper extremity and if massage therapy (MT) improves peripheral vascular function after EMI. Design Randomized, blinded trial with evaluations at 90 minutes, 24 hours, 48 hours, and 72 hours. Setting Clinical research center at an academic medical center and laboratory Participants Thirty-six sedentary young adults were randomly assigned to one of three groups: 1) EMI + MT (n=15; mean age ± standard error (SE): 26.6±0.3), 2) EMI only (n=10; mean age ± SE: 23.6±0.4), and 3) MT only (n=11; mean age ± SE: 25.5 ± 0.4). Intervention Participants were assigned to either EMI only (a single bout of bilateral, eccentric leg-press exercise), MT only (30-minute lower extremity massage using Swedish technique), or EMI + MT. Main outcome measures Brachial artery flow-mediated dilation (FMD) was determined by ultrasound at each time point. Nitroglycerin-induced dilation was also assessed (NTG; 0.4 mg). Results Brachial FMD increased from baseline in the EMI + MT group and the MT only group (7.38±0.18 to 9.02±0.28%, p<0.05 and 7.77±0.25 to 10.20±0.22%, p < 0.05, respectively) at 90 minutes remaining elevated until 72 hrs. In the EMI only group FMD was reduced from baseline at 24 and 48 hrs (7.78±0.14 to 6.75±0.11%, p<0.05 and 6.53±0.11, p<0.05, respectively) returning to baseline after 72 hrs. Dilations to NTG were similar over time. Conclusions Our results suggest that MT attenuates impairment of upper extremity endothelial function resulting from lower extremity EMI in sedentary young adults. PMID:24583315

  12. Dominican Children with HIV Not Receiving Antiretrovirals: Massage Therapy Influences their Behavior and Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Hernandez-Reif

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Forty-eight children (M age = 4.8 years infected with HIV/AIDS and living in the Dominican Republic were randomly assigned to a massage therapy or a play session control group. The children in the massage therapy group received two weekly 20-min massages for 12 weeks; the children in the control group participated in a play session (coloring, playing with blocks for the same duration and length as the massage therapy group. Overall, the children in the massage therapy group improved in self-help abilities and communication, suggesting that massage therapy may enhance daily functioning for children with HIV/AIDS. Moreover, the HIV infected children who were six or older also showed a decrease in internalizing behaviors; specifically depressive/anxious behaviors and negative thoughts were reduced. Additionally, baseline assessments revealed IQ equivalence below normal functioning for 70% of the HIV infected children and very high incidences of mood problems (depression, withdrawn for 40% of the children and anxiety problems for 20% of the children, suggesting the need for better monitoring and alternative interventions in countries with limited resources to improve cognition and the mental health status of children infected with HIV/AIDS.

  13. Integrative technology of massage manipulations in physical rehabilitation of students with backbone pathology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.I. Kotelevskiy

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose:to analyze effectiveness of massage manipulations’ integrative technology in physical rehabilitation of higher educational establishments’ students with backbone pathology. Material: in the research 195 students of 19-20 years’ age participated. All students had periodical initial neurological symptoms of functional pathology and first stage osteochondrosis in different parts of backbone. We conducted a course of 10 sessions of therapeutic massage. Results: the sense of massage integrative technology is that every specialist shall have certain optimal set of skills and knowledge in technique of manipulation sessions of massage. Integrative technology of massage manipulations consists of psycho-corrective and manipulation parts. It considers psycho-somatic, mechanical and reflex rehabilitation aspects of patho-genesis of backbone functional disorders and vertebral osteochondrosis. Conclusions: depending on pathological process or backbone functional state of every person (peculiarities of his (her psycho-somatic status or, even, his (her bents. Individual approach in choice of strategy, tactic and methodological provisioning of massage session shall be used.

  14. Massage therapy techniques as pain management for erythromelalgia: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dicks, Krista; Rizek, Philippe

    2010-12-16

    Erythromelalgia is characterized by temperature-dependent redness, pain, and warmth in one or more extremities. It may be a primary disease, or it may occur secondarily because of underlying illness. It is a chronic, debilitating condition often resistant to medical treatment. The present report evaluates massage as a complementary therapy to reduce pain and other symptoms associated with erythromelalgia. A 31-year-old female with a long-standing history of erythromelalgia bilaterally in the lower extremities presented with complaints of acute pain exacerbation, anxiety, decreased quality of sleep, and difficulty with activities of daily living for prolonged periods of time. She had no previous experience with massage therapy or any other complementary therapies. Massage therapy was introduced over the course of 9 treatments, each 1 hour in duration, using various massage therapy techniques, remedial exercise, and recommended home care. In this patient with erythromelalgia, effleurage and petrissage as massage therapy techniques provided temporary pain relief in the lower extremities and long-term benefits that relieved anxiety, which improved restorative sleep and increased the patient's participation in activities of daily living. For this treatment protocol, therapist observation and patient feedback suggest that massage therapy may lead to a state of increased relaxation, decreased stress, decreased muscle tension, and improved sleep. These positive effects may have an indirect role in the ability of the patient to cope with erythromelalgia day to day.

  15. Knee arthritis pain is reduced and range of motion is increased following moderate pressure massage therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field, Tiffany; Diego, Miguel; Gonzalez, Gladys; Funk, C G

    2015-11-01

    The literature on massage therapy effects on knee pain suggests that pain was reduced based on self-report, but little is known about range of motion (ROM) effects. Medical School staff and faculty who had knee arthritis pain were randomly assigned to a moderate pressure massage therapy or a waitlist control group (24 per group). Self-reports included the WOMAC (pain, stiffness and function) and the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index. ROM and ROM-related pain were assessed before and after the last sessions. The massage group showed an immediate post-massage increase in ROM and a decrease in ROM-associated pain. On the last versus the first day of the study, the massage group showed greater increases in ROM and decreases in ROM-related pain as well as less self-reported pain and sleep disturbances than the waitlist control group. These data highlight the effectiveness of moderate pressure massage therapy for increasing ROM and lessening ROM-related pain and long-term pain and sleep disturbances. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. The effectiveness of massage therapy in the treatment of infantile colic symptoms: A randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheidaei, Ali; Abadi, Alireza; Zayeri, Farid; Nahidi, Fatemeh; Gazerani, Nafiseh; Mansouri, Anita

    2016-01-01

    Infantile colic, cry-fuss and sleep problems are transient in the initial months of life, but they contribute to maternal depression, parenting stress and family mental health problems. In this randomized clinical trial, we aimed to explore the efficacy of massage therapy compared to rocking in reducing infantile colic symptoms including duration and number of cries, sleep duration and severity of infant colic. This was a single blind RCT study with a one-week follow-up. One hundred colicky infants aged younger than 12 weeks old were randomly assigned into massage and rocking groups. Infants in the massage group received a massage for 15-20 minutes once during a day and once at night before sleeping for a week. In the control group, mothers rocked their infants gently for 5-25 minutes when the symptoms of colic appeared. Parents recorded the details of the colic symptoms in a diary every day. A GEE approach was applied to explore the effect of the intervention. Efficiency of massage therapy was significantly higher than rocking. At the end of the study, the mean number of daily cries was 4.26±1.40 in the massage and 6.9±2.14 the rocking groups (pmassage therapy is more effective than rocking for treating infant colic symptoms.

  17. Long-term effect of massage therapy on blood pressure in prehypertensive women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Givi, Mahshid; Sadeghi, Masoumeh; Garakyaraghi, Mohammad; Eshghinezhad, Ameneh; Moeini, Mahin; Ghasempour, Zahra

    2018-01-01

    Prehypertension is one of the cardiovascular disease predicators. Management of prehypertension is an appropriate objective for clinicians in a wide range of medical centers. Massage therapy is primarily nonpharmacological treatment that is used to control blood pressure (BP). This study intends to investigate the long-term effect of massage therapy on BP in prehypertensive women. This was a single-blind clinical trial study conducted on 50 prehypertensive women who referred to Sedigheh Tahereh Cardiovascular Center, during 6 months in 2009. Participants were selected by simple random sampling and were divided into control and intervention groups. The test group (25 patients) received massage for 10-15 min, three times a week for 10 sessions, and the control group (25 patients) was relaxed in the same environment but with no massage. Their BP was measured before and after each session and 72 h and 2 weeks after finishing the massage therapy. Analyzing the data was done using descriptive and inferential statistical methods (Chi-square, Mann-Whitney, paired t -test, and Student's t -test) through SPSS software version 18 and a significant level was considered as P 0.05) between the two groups. Although massage therapy seems to be a safe, effective, applicable, and cost-effective intervention to control BP of prehypertensive women, its effects do not persist for a long time.

  18. The effect of burn rehabilitation massage therapy on hypertrophic scar after burn: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Yoon Soo; Jeon, Jong Hyun; Hong, Aram; Yang, Hyeong Tae; Yim, Haejun; Cho, Yong Suk; Kim, Do-Hern; Hur, Jun; Kim, Jong Hyun; Chun, Wook; Lee, Boung Chul; Seo, Cheong Hoon

    2014-12-01

    To evaluate the effect of burn rehabilitation massage therapy on hypertrophic scar after burn. One hundred and forty-six burn patients with hypertrophic scar(s) were randomly divided into an experimental group and a control group. All patients received standard rehabilitation therapy for hypertrophic scars and 76 patients (massage group) additionally received burn scar rehabilitation massage therapy. Both before and after the treatment, we determined the scores of visual analog scale (VAS) and itching scale and assessed the scar characteristics of thickness, melanin, erythema, transepidermal water loss (TEWL), sebum, and elasticity by using ultrasonography, Mexameter(®), Tewameter(®), Sebumeter(®), and Cutometer(®), respectively. The scores of both VAS and itching scale decreased significantly in both groups, indicating a significant intragroup difference. With regard to the scar characteristics, the massage group showed a significant decrease after treatment in scar thickness, melanin, erythema, TEWL and a significant intergroup difference. In terms of scar elasticity, a significant intergroup difference was noted in immediate distension and gross skin elasticity, while the massage group significant improvement in skin distensibility, immediate distension, immediate retraction, and delayed distension. Our results suggest that burn rehabilitation massage therapy is effective in improving pain, pruritus, and scar characteristics in hypertrophic scars after burn. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  19. Health psychology as a context for massage therapy: a conceptual model with CAM as mediator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hymel, Glenn M; Rich, Grant J

    2014-04-01

    Health psychology represents a context within which massage therapy research, education, and practice can be positioned for the mutual benefit of both. Furthermore, complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) more often than not plays a mediating role in relating massage therapy to health psychology. On occasion, though, the linkage between health psychology and massage therapy can be quite direct without the mediating influence of CAM. This paper, accordingly, advances a conceptual model via both flowchart and Venn diagram displays for viewing the health psychology context for massage therapy with the possibility of CAM as a mediating factor. Attention is also given to the broad range of issues constituting contemporary health psychology as well as its correspondence to an equally diverse array of client populations and health conditions addressed in massage therapy research. Future directions in the areas of health psychology, CAM, and massage therapy are proposed with a view toward a mutual and reciprocal benefit accruing to these behavioral and health science arenas. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Visually induced analgesia during massage treatment in chronic back pain patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Löffler, A; Trojan, J; Zieglgänsberger, W; Diers, M

    2017-11-01

    Previous findings suggest that watching sites of experimental and chronic pain can exert an analgesic effect. Our present study investigates whether watching one's back during massage increases the analgesic effect of this treatment in chronic back pain patients. Twenty patients with chronic back pain were treated with a conventional massage therapy. During this treatment, patients received a real-time video feedback of their own back. Watching a neutral object, a video of another person of the same sex being massaged, a picture of the own back, and keeping one's eyes closed were used as controls. These conditions were presented in randomized order on five separate days. All conditions yielded significant decreases in habitual pain intensity. The effect of real-time video feedback of the own back on massage treatment was the strongest and differed significantly from the effect of watching a neutral object, but not from the other control conditions, which may have induced slight effects of their own. Repeated real-time video feedback may be useful during massage treatment of chronic pain. This study shows that inducing visual induced analgesia during massage treatment can be helpful in alleviating chronic pain. © 2017 European Pain Federation - EFIC®.

  1. Aromatherapy for the Treatment of Patients with Behavioral and Psychological Symptoms of Dementia: A Descriptive Analysis of RCTs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Press-Sandler, Olga; Freud, Tamar; Volkov, Ilya; Peleg, Roni; Press, Yan

    2016-06-01

    Behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia (BPSD) are a common problem among patients with dementia. This problem is usually treated by drugs, but they have limited efficacy and often cause adverse effects. Aromatherapy is a nonpharmacologic treatment that is simple to use and devoid of significant adverse effects. To review the literature on the effectiveness of aromatherapy treatment in patients with BPSD. A descriptive analysis of randomized clinical trials (RCTs) published in the English-language literature and cited in PubMed. Eleven articles on RCTs were found, of which 1 had fewer than 10 participants, 2 were mistakenly presented as RCTs, and another did not report treatment for BPSD. In all, 7 articles with 417 participants total (range, 15-114) were reviewed. The mean age in all studies was greater than 69 years (range, 69-85 years), and the percentage of women was 55% (range, 50%-57%). The intervention period ranged from 10 days to 12 weeks. Two studies used Melissa oil and 5 others used lavender oil. The studies described different methods of administration for the oils, including spraying and rubbing over various body organs. The duration of treatment differed among the studies. In 3 studies the investigators concluded that the treatment was not effective and in 3 that it was effective; in 1 study no clear conclusion could be drawn. The difference between positive and negative studies was not explained by differences in the study population, the type of oil, or the duration of treatment. The significant difference apparently stems from the method of administration. When the oil was applied close to the olfactory system the outcome was positive. A study should be designed to assess the effect of the site of application of aromatherapy.

  2. Quantile Regression Methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fitzenberger, Bernd; Wilke, Ralf Andreas

    2015-01-01

    if the mean regression model does not. We provide a short informal introduction into the principle of quantile regression which includes an illustrative application from empirical labor market research. This is followed by briefly sketching the underlying statistical model for linear quantile regression based......Quantile regression is emerging as a popular statistical approach, which complements the estimation of conditional mean models. While the latter only focuses on one aspect of the conditional distribution of the dependent variable, the mean, quantile regression provides more detailed insights...... by modeling conditional quantiles. Quantile regression can therefore detect whether the partial effect of a regressor on the conditional quantiles is the same for all quantiles or differs across quantiles. Quantile regression can provide evidence for a statistical relationship between two variables even...

  3. A controlled trial of the effect of aromatherapy on birth outcomes using "Rose essential oil" inhalation and foot bath

    OpenAIRE

    Masoomeh Kheirkhah; Nassimeh Setayesh Valipour; Leila Neisani; Hamid Haghani

    2013-01-01

    Background and aim: Aromatherapy is the art and science of using essential oils extracted from aromatic plants, and is concerned with natural balance, coordination and promotion of health. This study was designed to determine the effect of "rose (Rosa damascena) essential oil" inhalation and foot bath on the improvement of maternal and neonatal health outcomes. Material and methods: This study was a randomized clinical trial, conducted on 80 primiparous women in Shahid Akbar Abadi Maternity H...

  4. Massage therapy services for healthcare: a telephone focus group study of drivers for clients' continued use of services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Joanna M; Sullivan, S John; Baxter, G David

    2009-01-01

    To explore opinions of why clients use, value and continue to seek massage therapy as a healthcare option. Telephone focus group methodology was used. Current and repeat users (n = 19) of either relaxation, remedial or sports massage therapy services participated in three telephone focus groups. Audiotaped semi-structured interviews were conducted. Telephone focus group with massage clients from provincial and urban localities in New Zealand. Summary of reported themes of the massage experience and suggested drivers for return to, or continuing with massage therapy. Data were transcribed, categorised (NVivo7) and thematically analysed using the general inductive approach. Key drivers for return to, or continuing with, massage therapy were: positive outcomes, expectations of goals being met, a regular appointment and the massage therapy culture. Massage therapy is perceived and valued as a personalised, holistic and hands-on approach to health management, which focuses on enhancing relaxation in conjunction with effective touch, within a positive client-therapist relationship and a pleasant non-rushed environment. Massage therapy as a health service is result and client driven but is reinforced by the culture of the experience.

  5. Specific and cross over effects of massage for muscle soreness: randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jay, Kenneth; Sundstrup, Emil; Søndergaard, Stine D; Behm, David; Brandt, Mikkel; Særvoll, Charlotte A; Jakobsen, Markus D; Andersen, Lars L

    2014-02-01

    Muscle soreness can negatively interfere with the activities of daily living as well as sports performance. In the working environment, a common problem is muscle tenderness, soreness and pain, especially for workers frequently exposed to unilateral high repetitive movements tasks. The aim of the study is therefore to investigate the acute effect of massage applied using a simple device Thera-band roller Massager on laboratory induced hamstring muscle soreness, and the potential cross over effect to the non-massaged limb. 22 healthy untrained men (Mean age 34 +/- 7 years; mean height 181.7 +/- 6.9 cm; mean weight 80.6 +/- 6.4 kg; BMI: 24.5 +/- 1.3) with no prior history of knee, low back or neck injury or other adverse health issues were recruited. Participants visited the researchers on two separate occasions, separated by 48 hours, each time providing a soreness rating (modified visual analog scale 0-10), and being tested for pressure pain threshold (PPT) and active range of motion (ROM) of the hamstring muscles. During the first visit, delayed onset muscular soreness of the hamstring muscles was induced by 10 x 10 repetitions of the stiff-legged dead-lift. On the second visit participants received either 1) 10 minutes of roller massage on one leg, while the contralateral leg served as a cross over control, or 2) Resting for 10 minutes with no massage at all. Measurement of soreness, PPT and ROM were taken immediately before and at 0, 10, 30 and 60 min. after treatment. There was a significant group by time interaction for soreness (p < 0.0001) and PPT (p = 0.0007), with the massage group experiencing reduced soreness and increasing PPT compared with the control group. There was no group by time interaction for ROM (p = 0.18). At 10 min. post massage there was a significant reduction in soreness of the non-massaged limb in the cross over control group compared to controls but this effect was lost 30 minutes post massage. Massage with a roller device reduces

  6. Understanding logistic regression analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Sperandei, Sandro

    2014-01-01

    Logistic regression is used to obtain odds ratio in the presence of more than one explanatory variable. The procedure is quite similar to multiple linear regression, with the exception that the response variable is binomial. The result is the impact of each variable on the odds ratio of the observed event of interest. The main advantage is to avoid confounding effects by analyzing the association of all variables together. In this article, we explain the logistic regression procedure using ex...

  7. Introduction to regression graphics

    CERN Document Server

    Cook, R Dennis

    2009-01-01

    Covers the use of dynamic and interactive computer graphics in linear regression analysis, focusing on analytical graphics. Features new techniques like plot rotation. The authors have composed their own regression code, using Xlisp-Stat language called R-code, which is a nearly complete system for linear regression analysis and can be utilized as the main computer program in a linear regression course. The accompanying disks, for both Macintosh and Windows computers, contain the R-code and Xlisp-Stat. An Instructor's Manual presenting detailed solutions to all the problems in the book is ava

  8. Alternative Methods of Regression

    CERN Document Server

    Birkes, David

    2011-01-01

    Of related interest. Nonlinear Regression Analysis and its Applications Douglas M. Bates and Donald G. Watts ".an extraordinary presentation of concepts and methods concerning the use and analysis of nonlinear regression models.highly recommend[ed].for anyone needing to use and/or understand issues concerning the analysis of nonlinear regression models." --Technometrics This book provides a balance between theory and practice supported by extensive displays of instructive geometrical constructs. Numerous in-depth case studies illustrate the use of nonlinear regression analysis--with all data s

  9. A Randomized Controlled Trial for the Effectiveness of Aromatherapy in Decreasing Salivary Gland Damage following Radioactive Iodine Therapy for Differentiated Thyroid Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakayama, Michihiro; Okizaki, Atsutaka; Takahashi, Koji

    2016-01-01

    Objective. The aim of this study was to investigate effects of aromatherapy in decreasing salivary gland damage for patients undergoing radioactive iodine (RAI) therapy with differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC). Materials and Methods. The subjects were 71 patients with DTC. They were divided into aromatherapy group (group A, n = 35) and a control group (group B, n = 36). We blended 1.0 mL of lemon and 0.5 mL of ginger essential oils. The patients in the inhalation aromatherapy group inhaled this blend oil and those in the control group inhaled distilled water as placebo for 10 min during admission. We statistically compared salivary gland function before and after treatment between groups A and B. Results. In comparison with group B, the rate of change of the accumulation rate was significantly higher in the parotid glands and submandibular glands of group A ( P aromatherapy in the prevention of treatment-related salivary gland disorder. This trial is registered with UMIN Clinical Trial Registry: UMIN000013968.

  10. A Randomized Controlled Trial for the Effectiveness of Aromatherapy in Decreasing Salivary Gland Damage following Radioactive Iodine Therapy for Differentiated Thyroid Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michihiro Nakayama

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The aim of this study was to investigate effects of aromatherapy in decreasing salivary gland damage for patients undergoing radioactive iodine (RAI therapy with differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC. Materials and Methods. The subjects were 71 patients with DTC. They were divided into aromatherapy group (group A, n=35 and a control group (group B, n=36. We blended 1.0 mL of lemon and 0.5 mL of ginger essential oils. The patients in the inhalation aromatherapy group inhaled this blend oil and those in the control group inhaled distilled water as placebo for 10 min during admission. We statistically compared salivary gland function before and after treatment between groups A and B. Results. In comparison with group B, the rate of change of the accumulation rate was significantly higher in the parotid glands and submandibular glands of group A (P<0.05. In comparison with group B, a significant increase in rate of secretion change before and after treatment was noted in the bilateral parotid glands in group A (P<0.05. Conclusion. Because an amelioration of salivary gland function was observed in the present study, our results suggest the efficacy of aromatherapy in the prevention of treatment-related salivary gland disorder. This trial is registered with UMIN Clinical Trial Registry: UMIN000013968.

  11. A narrative review of massage and spinal manipulation in the treatment of low back pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nurhanisah Sejari

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Low back pain (LBP is one of the most common musculoskeletal problems that affect patients′ daily life. Nowadays, treatment of LBP is very challenging due to the recurrent nature of the problem. This narrative review focuses on massage and spinal manipulation on LBP condition. The other issues consist of epidemiology, etiology, symptoms, and rapport between clinician and patient on treatment were explored. Online electronic search in databases (Ovid TM , Scopus, EMBASE and PubMed was performed using key words such as LBP, massage, and spinal manipulation. Textbooks and web page are additional sources that were used for gathering information. Literature reported that high incidence of LBP in agriculture areas which is farmer, in the urban area mainly office worker and industrial area mainly factory operator. LBP frequently occurs among office workers, pregnant, and obesity due to poor body mechanics. Building a successful rapport is a single most important factor in a relationship between clinician and patient. Understanding patient′s perspective in their illness such as belief about cause, treatment approaches, and quality-of-life will help clinician create plans that are more appropriate to patient′s situation and preferences. Patient′s trust is the easing way for the clinician to provide treatments. Based on current evidence, there are arrays of conservative treatments shown to be effective in treating LBP. However, massage and spinal manipulation are the most popular among LBP patients because it contributes good effect in reducing pain intensity. Massage preferred by certain patient such as traditional Malay massage, Thai massage, Tui Na because it provide a relaxation on the body. In addition, spinal manipulation also showed a positive outcome on pain reduction and joint hypomobility. LBP is a common problem, and various methods could be used as a treatment. However, traditional massage is fast gaining popularity even in the

  12. Massage Therapy in Patients With Cancer Pain: A Review on Palliative Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miladinia

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Cancer-related pain (CRP and its treatments are common and the scariest problems that patients with cancer fear and negatively affect their quality of life. Despite medical intervention, the pain of cancer still remains a clinical problem. Thus, the use of complementary medicine methods such as massage therapy is essential to control pain in the patients. Methodology It was a review type study limited to national and international studies from 1995 to 2015. Searching processes were completed by electronic databases and search engines. Finally, based on inclusion and exclusion criteria as well as the elimination of duplicate studies, nine articles were selected for final review among which five were clinical trials and four were review or meta-analysis articles. Results In all five clinical trials, massage therapy reduced pain of patients with cancer, which reflects the positive effects of massage therapy in adult patients with cancer. In addition, although various methods of massage therapy were employed, with short-term and long-term periods, it still had a positive impact. Meanwhile, four review or meta-analysis studies while different in the year of study, inclusion and exclusion criteria, manifested that the results of massage therapy was an effective non-pharmacological pain control in patients with cancer. Conclusions Finally, it can be concluded that massage therapy is an effective non-pharmacological way to control pain in adult patients with cancer. Furthermore, studies in Iran on the effects of massage therapy on pain in patients with cancer are limited and much more research is needed in this area.

  13. The effects of massage therapy on pain management in the acute care setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Rose; White, Barb; Beckett, Cynthia

    2010-03-17

    Pain management remains a critical issue for hospitals and is receiving the attention of hospital accreditation organizations. The acute care setting of the hospital provides an excellent opportunity for the integration of massage therapy for pain management into the team-centered approach of patient care. This preliminary study evaluated the effect of the use of massage therapy on inpatient pain levels in the acute care setting. The study was conducted at Flagstaff Medical Center in Flagstaff, Arizona-a nonprofit community hospital serving a large rural area of northern Arizona. A convenience sample was used to identify research participants. Pain levels before and after massage therapy were recorded using a 0 - 10 visual analog scale. Quantitative and qualitative methods were used for analysis of this descriptive study. Hospital inpatients (n = 53) from medical, surgical, and obstetrics units participated in the current research by each receiving one or more massage therapy sessions averaging 30 minutes each. The number of sessions received depended on the length of the hospital stay. Before massage, the mean pain level recorded by the patients was 5.18 [standard deviation (SD): 2.01]. After massage, the mean pain level was 2.33 (SD: 2.10). The observed reduction in pain was statistically significant: paired samples t(52) = 12.43, r = .67, d = 1.38, p massage therapy into the acute care setting creates overall positive results in the patient's ability to deal with the challenging physical and psychological aspects of their health condition. The study demonstrated not only significant reduction in pain levels, but also the interrelatedness of pain, relaxation, sleep, emotions, recovery, and finally, the healing process.

  14. Developing, maintaining, and using a body of knowledge for the massage therapy profession.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sefton, Joellen M; Shea, Michael; Hines, Chip

    2011-01-01

    The diverse field of massage therapy has lacked a formal body of knowledge to serve as a practice and educational foundation and to guide future development. This deficit has hampered the growth of the profession and its acceptance and recognition by the medical and allied health care community. To provide massage therapists, bodyworkers, physicians, educators, and associated allied health care professionals in the United States with a description of the purpose and development of the massage therapy body of knowledge (MTBOK) and recommendations for its future development and utilization. Professional groups in the massage therapy community came together and established a task force to develop a body of knowledge for the profession. Five groups became the stewards for this effort. A nationwide search produced a task force of eight volunteers from diverse areas of the profession charged with the responsibility of researching and developing the MTBOK document. Review of documents, curricula, state laws and regulations, certification exam content, interviews, and public comment resulted in the development of the MTBOK. During development multiple opportunities for comment and discussion by stakeholders (public) were provided in an effort to create a professional consensus. The resulting MTBOK document establishes professional descriptions of the field; scope of practice; knowledge, skills, and abilities for entry-level massage therapists; and definitions for terminology to insure standardization, in order to provide a foundation for future discussion and growth. The MTBOK fulfills the goal for which it was developed, to serve as a foundation for the growth and development of the massage therapy profession as a whole. A living document, it should continue to evolve and grow with the profession. Maintenance and continued stewardship of this document by the massage therapy community is vital for continued professional progress.

  15. Treatment effects of massage therapy in depressed people: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Wen-Hsuan; Chiang, Pai-Tsung; Hsu, Tun-Yen; Chiu, Su-Ying; Yen, Yung-Chieh

    2010-07-01

    To systematically investigate the treatment effects of massage therapy in depressed people by incorporating data from recent studies. A meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of massage therapy in depressed people was conducted using published studies from PubMed, EMBASE, PsycINFO, and CINAHL electronic database from inception until July 2008. The terms used for the search were derived from medical subheading term (MeSH) massage combined with MeSH depression. Hand searching was also checked for bibliographies of relevant articles. Retrieval articles were constrained to RCTs/clinical trials and human subjects. No language restrictions were imposed. We included 17 studies containing 786 persons from 246 retrieved references. Trials with other intervention, combined therapy, and massage on infants or pregnant women were excluded. Two reviewers independently performed initial screen and assessed quality indicators by Jadad scale. Data were extracted on publication year, participant characteristics, and outcomes by another single reviewer. All trials showed positive effect of massage therapy on depressed people. Seventeen RCTs were of moderate quality, with a mean quality score of 6.4 (SD = 0.85). The pooled standardized mean difference in fixed- and random-effects models were 0.76 (95% CI, 0.61-0.91) and 0.73 (95% CI, 0.52-0.93), respectively. Both indicated significant effectiveness in the treatment group compared with the control group. The variance between these studies revealed possible heterogeneity (tau(2) = 0.06, Cochran chi-squared(16) = 25.77, P = .06). Massage therapy is significantly associated with alleviated depressive symptoms. However, standardized protocols of massage therapy, various depression rating scales, and target populations in further studies are suggested. (c) Copyright 2010 Physicians Postgraduate Press, Inc.

  16. Massage Therapy and Quality of Life in Osteoarthritis of the Knee: A Qualitative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Ather; Rosenberger, Lisa; Weiss, Theresa R; Milak, Carl; Perlman, Adam I

    2017-06-01

     We hypothesized that participants receiving Swedish massage would experience benefits such as stress reduction and enhanced quality of life, in addition to the osteoarthritis-specific effects assessed in a randomized controlled clinical trial.  Qualitative methods were used to explore a deeper contextual understanding of participants' experiences with massage and osteoarthritis, in addition to the quantitative data collected from primary and secondary outcome measures of the dose-finding study.  Two community hospitals affiliated with academic health centers in Connecticut and New Jersey. Eighteen adults who previously participated in a dose-finding clinical trial of massage therapy for osteoarthritis of the knee.  Face-to-face and telephone interviews using a standardized interview guide. Triangulation of qualitative and quantitative data allowed for a more thorough understanding of the effects of massage therapy.  Three salient themes emerged from our analysis. Participants discussed 1) relaxation effects, 2) improved quality of life associated with receiving massage therapy, and 3) the accessibility of massage therapy in treating osteoarthritis.  Participant responses noted empowerment with an improved ability to perform activities of daily living after experiencing massage therapy. The majority of statements were consistent with their quantitative changes on standard osteoarthritis measures. Future research in pain conditions should include health-related quality of life assessments as well as outcomes related to perceived well-being, along with greater exploration of the concept of salutogenic side effects of an intervention in the context of complementary and integrative therapies. © 2016 American Academy of Pain Medicine. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com

  17. Efficacy of the Yumeiho therapy massage on Repositioning error, Range of motion trunk Flexation and functional power in women volleyball players with Hyper lordosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yousef yarahmadi

    2018-03-01

    Conclusion: results showed that the effect of Yumeiho therapy massage on repositioning error, Flexation range of motion trunk and functional power had a significant. It therapists recommended to include Yumeiho therapy massage in order to enhance these variables.

  18. Controlled breathing with or without peppermint aromatherapy for postoperative nausea and/or vomiting symptom relief: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sites, Debra S; Johnson, Nancy T; Miller, Jacqueline A; Torbush, Pauline H; Hardin, Janis S; Knowles, Susan S; Nance, Jennifer; Fox, Tara H; Tart, Rebecca Creech

    2014-02-01

    With little scientific evidence to support use of aromatherapy for postoperative nausea and/or vomiting (PONV) symptoms, this study evaluated controlled breathing with peppermint aromatherapy (AR) and controlled breathing alone (CB) for PONV relief. A single blind randomized control trial design was used. On initial PONV complaint, symptomatic subjects received either CB (n = 16) or AR (n = 26) intervention based on randomization at enrollment. A second treatment was repeated at 5 minutes if indicated. Final assessment occurred 10 minutes post initial treatment. Rescue medication was offered for persistent symptoms. Among eligible subjects, PONV incidence was 21.4% (42/196). Gender was the only risk factor contributing to PONV symptoms (P = .0024). Though not statistically significant, CB was more efficacious than AR, 62.5% versus 57.7%, respectively. CB can be initiated without delay as an alternative to prescribed antiemetics. Data also support use of peppermint AR in conjunction with CB for PONV relief. Copyright © 2014 American Society of PeriAnesthesia Nurses. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Aromatherapy: does it help to relieve pain, depression, anxiety, and stress in community-dwelling older persons?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Shuk Kwan; Tse, M Y Mimi

    2014-01-01

    To examine the effectiveness of an aromatherapy programme for older persons with chronic pain. The community-dwelling elderly people who participated in this study underwent a four-week aromatherapy programme or were assigned to the control group, which did not receive any interventions. Their levels of pain, depression, anxiety, and stress were collected at the baseline and at the postintervention assessment after the conclusion of the four-week programme. Eighty-two participants took part in the study. Forty-four participants (37 females, 7 males) were in the intervention group and 38 participants (30 females, 8 males) were in the control group. The pain scores were 4.75 (SD 2.32) on a 10-point scale for the intervention group and 5.24 (SD 2.14) for the control group before the programme. There was a slight reduction in the pain score of the intervention group. No significant differences were found in the same-group and between-group comparisons for the baseline and postintervention assessments. The depression, anxiety, and stress scores for the intervention group before the programme were 11.18 (SD 6.18), 9.64 (SD 7.05), and 12.91 (SD 7.70), respectively. A significant reduction in negative emotions was found in the intervention group (Paromatherapy programme can be an effective tool to reduce pain, depression, anxiety, and stress levels among community-dwelling older adults.

  20. Effect of lavender aromatherapy on vital signs and perceived quality of sleep in the intermediate care unit: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lytle, Jamie; Mwatha, Catherine; Davis, Karen K

    2014-01-01

    Sleep deprivation in hospitalized patients is common and can have serious detrimental effects on recovery from illness. Lavender aromatherapy has improved sleep in a variety of clinical settings, but the effect has not been tested in the intermediate care unit. To determine the effect of inhalation of 100% lavender oil on patients' vital signs and perceived quality of sleep in an intermediate care unit. A randomized controlled pilot study was conducted in 50 patients. Control patients received usual care. The treatment group had 3 mL of 100% pure lavender oil in a glass jar in place at the bedside from 10 pm until 6 am. Vital signs were recorded at intervals throughout the night. At 6 am all patients completed the Richard Campbell Sleep Questionnaire to assess quality of sleep. Blood pressure was significantly lower between midnight and 4 am in the treatment group than in the control group (P = .03) According to the overall mean change score in blood pressure between the baseline and 6 am measurements, the treatment group had a decrease in blood pressure and the control group had an increase; however, the difference between the 2 groups was not significant (P = .12). Mean overall sleep score was higher in the intervention group (48.25) than in the control group (40.10), but the difference was not significant. Lavender aromatherapy may be an effective way to improve sleep in an intermediate care unit.

  1. Aromatherapy for stress reduction in healthy adults: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hur, Myung-Haeng; Song, Ji-Ah; Lee, Jeonghee; Lee, Myeong Soo

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this review was to systematically assess the effectiveness of aromatherapy for stress management. Seven databases were searched from their inception through April 2014. RCTs testing aromatherapy against any type of controls in healthy human person that assessed stress level and cortisol level were considered. Two reviewers independently performed the selection of the studies, data abstraction and validations. The risk of bias was assessed using Cochrane criteria. Five RCTs met our inclusion criteria, and most of them had high risk of bias. Four RCTs tested the effects of aroma inhalation compared with no treatment, no aroma, and no odour oil. The meta-analysis suggested that aroma inhalation has favourable effects on stress management (n=80; standard mean difference (SMD), -0.96; 95% CI, -1.44 to -0.48; P<0.0001; I(2)=0%). Three of included RCTs tested aroma inhalation on saliva or serum cortisol level compared with control and meta-analysis failed to show significant difference between two groups (n=88, SMDs -0.62; 95% CIs -1.26 to 0.02, P=0.06, I(2)=46%). In conclusion, there is limited evidence suggesting that aroma inhalation may be effective in controlling stress. However, the number, size and quality of the RCTs are too low to draw firm conclusions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. The Effect of Aromatherapy on Level of Exam Anxiety Among Nursing Students in Alborz University of Medical Sciences

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    S. Khoshkesht

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Exam anxiety and reduce of that, is one of the problems of educational systems. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of aromatherapy on level of exam anxiety among nursing students in Alborz University of Medical Sciences. Methods: This is a triple blind clinical trial on 91 nursing students of Alborz University of Medical Sciences which have been sampled simply and randomized divided into group A and group B. Vital signs and Spielberg state–trait anxiety inventory were measured and recorded at baseline and 5 minutes after intervention and after exam .Then, the students were asked to place the bottle of aroma (lavender or sterile water at a distance of 5 cm of nose and inhale for 10 minutes. Half of students were exposed to bottles that fulfilled by 5 drops of lavender essential oil and half of them were exposed to bottles that fulfilled by 5 drops of sterile water that labeled as A or B and was blind for subjects, researchers and analyzer. After analysis, content of each bottle was disclosed. Results: The results showed that there were meaningful difference between average exam anxiety, pulse and systolic blood pressure along the time (P=0.000, 0.023, 0.009. Conclusion: These results showed that although aromatherapy has been not meaningful statistical effective but can reduce the exam anxiety in nursing student along the time.

  3. Analgesia Is Enhanced by Providing Information regarding Good Outcomes Associated with an Odor: Placebo Effects in Aromatherapy?

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    Yuri Masaoka

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available No previous report has described whether information regarding an odor used in aromatherapy has placebo effects. We investigated whether placebo analgesia was engendered by verbal information regarding the analgesic effects of an odor. Twelve of 24 subjects were provided with the information that a lavender odor would reduce pain (informed, whereas the other 12 subjects were not (not-informed. Concurrent with respiration recording, the subjects were administered a lavender-odor or no-odor treatment during application of painful stimulation to the forefinger. The subjects reported their experience of pain and its unpleasantness on a visual analogue scale after the painful stimulation. The lavender-odor treatment significantly alleviated pain and unpleasantness compared with the no-odor treatment in the informed (P<0.01 and not-informed groups (P<0.05. The no-odor treatment in the informed group significantly alleviated pain and unpleasantness compared with both the no-odor and lavender-odor treatments in the not-informed group (P<0.05. Rapid and shallow breathing induced by the painful stimulation became slow and deep during the lavender-odor and no-odor treatments in both groups. Information regarding a lavender odor, the lavender odor itself, and slower breathing contributed to reduced perceptions of pain and unpleasantness during painful stimulation, suggesting that placebo effects significantly contribute to analgesia in aromatherapy.

  4. Development and application of a newly designed massage instrument for deep cross-friction massage in chronic non-specific low back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Yong-Soon; Yu, Ki-Pi; Lee, Kwang Jae; Kwak, Soo-Hyun; Kim, Jong Yun

    2012-02-01

    To introduce a newly designed massage instrument, the Hand Grip T-bar (HT-bar) and use it to relieve chronic non-specific low back pain (nLBP) through deep cross-friction massage (roptrotherapy). 22 subjects (9 males and 13 females, aged 51.6±6.7) with chronic nLBP were allocated randomly to a Roptrotherapy group (n=12) and a Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation (TENS) group (n=10). The Roptrotherapy group received deep cross-friction massage with the HT-bar, which was made of metal and had a cylinder for increasing weight and grooves for an easy grip. It was applied across the middle and lower back for 20 minutes a day, 3 days a week for 2 weeks. The TENS group received TENS for 20 minutes a day, 5 days a week for 2 weeks. The outcome was measured on the pain numeric rating scale (PNRS), by the Oswestry disability index (ODI), and by the Roland & Morris Disability Questionnaire (RMDQ) at pre-treatment, at immediate post-treatment and 2 weeks later. The application of the HT-bar was assessed by a questionnaire to 19 therapists. At post-treatment, immediately and 2 weeks later, both groups showed significant improvement in PNRS, ODI and RMDQ. During the two weeks after post-treatment, however, the Roptrotherapy group improved in PNRS, ODI and RMDQ, but the TENS group did not. Over 80% of the therapists responded that the HT-bar was useful and comfortable. This study suggests that deep cross-friction massage can be a beneficial therapeutic technique and that the HT-bar can be a useful instrument in deep cross-friction massage for chronic nLBP patients.

  5. The Effects of Massage by Mothers on Mother-Infant Attachment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoghi, Mahnaz; Sohrabi, Soroor; Rasouli, Mahboobe

    2017-11-04

    Context • Transferring a newborn to the intensive care unit due to a premature birth is a major obstacle in the establishment of emotional attachment between a mother and her child. Researchers believe that the formation and continuation of such an attachment have a profound effect on the child's mental development and behavior in the coming years of life. Not all studies have agreed, however, that skin contact alone, such as massage provides, can improve attachment. Objective • The aim of this study was to determine the effects on maternal attachment behaviors of infants hospitalized in a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) of massage provided by mothers for their premature neonates. Design • The research team designed a randomized, controlled trial. Setting • The study took place at the Hazrat Ali Asghar Hospital of the Iran University of Medical Sciences (Tehran, Iran). Participants • Participants were 40 mothers and 40 newborns admitted to the NICU at the hospital. Intervention • The study divided participants randomly into a massage (intervention) group and a control group receiving no massages. Mothers in the intervention group trained by watching educational videos and practicing the massage on infant manikins. Subsequently, the intervention group massaged its infants according to a 5-d program, in which each neonate received a 15-min massage session per day. Outcome Measures • Mother-infant attachment behaviors were assessed in both groups 4 times. The maternal attachment scale was used for data collection. Results • According to the statistical analyses, the between-groups difference was not significant at baseline (P > .05). The study showed a statistically significant difference between baseline and postintervention in the mean frequencies of maternal attachment behaviors for both groups (P attachment between the intervention and control groups (P = .000). Conclusion • Massage given to premature neonates by their mothers on a daily

  6. Anti-cellulite and slimming effect of vacuum massage - a case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Baryluk

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Cellulite - local metabolic disease that begins deep in the subcutaneous tissue, refers to fat cells and microcirculation mainly in the hips, thighs and abdomen area. The mechanism of cellulite is strictly connected with impaired microcirculation. Swollen tissue compresses blood vessels causing disturbance of microcirculation in the skin and subcutaneous tissue, which in turn causes fat cells ischemia. One of the therapeutic methods used in the case of cellulite is a vacuum massage, which includes Chinese cupping massage, and glass bubbles. This type of anti-cellulite massage affects the skin nutrition by improving the circulatory and lymphatic systems. The case report concerned a woman aged 25, with a normal BMI (21 kg / m2, and apple obesity type (WHR 1.14, treated pharmacologically due to phenylketonuria, irregularly nourished with a low protein diet, but rich in vegetables, fruit and fluids. The study and observations period lasted 30 days, including 20 days of treatments conducted every other day (glass buble and buble gum by turns, and 10 days of total withdrawal from the vacuum massage, in order to exemine the long-term results. Each treatment began with vigorous rubbing and kneading the thighs in order to obtain congestion, and then the appropriate vacuum massage. The treatment time - 30 min. per thigh. During the study there were four thigh circuits measurements performed using the dipstick anthropometric as well as a photographic documentation completed in order to exemine the progress of treatment. The measurements and photographs were taken on the first day of the treatments, in the middle of the treatments, and at the end of the treatments also after 10 days of the massage withdrawal. The circuits measurements were collected in three different places. First directly on the patella and another two at a distance of 9 cm from the previous measurement in the cephalad direction. The greatest change in the circumference of the thigh was

  7. Boosted beta regression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthias Schmid

    Full Text Available Regression analysis with a bounded outcome is a common problem in applied statistics. Typical examples include regression models for percentage outcomes and the analysis of ratings that are measured on a bounded scale. In this paper, we consider beta regression, which is a generalization of logit models to situations where the response is continuous on the interval (0,1. Consequently, beta regression is a convenient tool for analyzing percentage responses. The classical approach to fit a beta regression model is to use maximum likelihood estimation with subsequent AIC-based variable selection. As an alternative to this established - yet unstable - approach, we propose a new estimation technique called boosted beta regression. With boosted beta regression estimation and variable selection can be carried out simultaneously in a highly efficient way. Additionally, both the mean and the variance of a percentage response can be modeled using flexible nonlinear covariate effects. As a consequence, the new method accounts for common problems such as overdispersion and non-binomial variance structures.

  8. Deep Friction Massage Versus Steroid Injection in the Treatment of Lateral Epicondylitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Rosemary; Bratchenko, Walter W; Tan, Virak

    2018-01-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the efficacy of deep friction massage in the treatment of lateral epicondylitis by comparing outcomes with a control group treated with splinting and therapy and with an experimental group receiving a local steroid injection. A randomized clinical trial was conducted to compare outcomes after recruitment of consecutive patients presenting with lateral epicondylitis. Patients were randomized to receive one of 3 treatments: group 1: splinting and stretching, group 2: a cortisone injection, or group 3: a lidocaine injection with deep friction massage. Pretreatment and posttreatment parameters of visual analog scale (VAS) pain ratings, Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand (DASH) scores, and grip strength were measured. Outcomes were measured at early follow-up (6-12 weeks) and at 6-month follow-up. There was a significant improvement in VAS pain score in all treatment groups at early follow-up. DASH score and grip strength improved in the cortisone injection group and the deep friction massage group at early follow-up; these parameters did not improve in the splinting and stretching group. At 6-month follow-up, only patients in the deep friction massage group demonstrated a significant improvement in all outcome measures, including VAS pain score, DASH score, and grip strength. Deep friction massage is an effective treatment for lateral epicondylitis and can be used in patients who have failed other nonoperative treatments, including cortisone injection.

  9. The Effect of Massage Therapy on Autonomic Activity in Critically Ill Children

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    Ling Guan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. Our main objective was to describe the effect of foot and hand (F&H massage on the autonomic nervous system (ANS activity in children hospitalized in a pediatric intensive care unit (PICU; the secondary objectives were to assess the relationship between ANS function and the clinical severity and to explore the effects of repeated massage sessions on the ANS. Methods. Design was a descriptive experimental study. Intervention was single or six session(s of F&H massage. ANS function was assessed through the frequency-domain analysis of heart rate variability. Main metrics included high and low frequency power (HF and LF, HF + LF, and LF/HF ratio. Results. Eighteen children participated in the study. A strong Spearman’s correlation (ρ=-0.77 was observed between HF + LF and clinical severity. During massage, the parasympathetic activity (measured by HF increased significantly from baseline (P=0.04 with a mean percentage increase of 75% (95% CI: 20%∼130%. LF increased by 56% (95% CI: 20%∼92% (P=0.026. Repeated sessions were associated with a persistent effect on HF and LF which peaked at the second session and remained stable thereafter. Conclusions. HF + LF is positively correlated with clinical severity. F&H massage can improve the ANS activity and the effect persists when repeated sessions are offered.

  10. Swedish Massage and Abnormal Reflexes of Children with Spastic Cerebral Palsy

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    Vida Alizad

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Massage therapy is one of the most widely used complementary and alternative medicine therapies for children. This study was conducted to determine the effect of wedish massage on abnormal reflexes in children with spastic cerebral palsy (CP. Methods: This study was a single blind clinical trial conducted on forty children with spastic CP who were recruited from clinics of the University of Social Welfare & Rehabilitation Sciences. They were randomly assigned to intervention and control groups. The routine occupational therapy (OT techniques were performed during a 3 month-period in both groups. The intervention group also received Swedish massage for 30 minutes before every OT session. Primary, spinal, brain stem, midbrain, cortical and automatic reflexes were evaluated at the beginning of the study and 3 months later. The data analysis was done by parametric and nonparametric tests. Results: Finally, thirteen subjects in the intervention group and 14 subjects in the control group were remained and studied. The average ages in the intervention and control groups were 49.5 and 42.1 months respectively. There were no statistically significant differences in abnormal reflexes in the intervention group in comparison to the control (P>0.05. Discussion: Adding Swedish massage to traditional OT techniques had no significant effects on abnormal reflexes in children with spastic cerebral palsy. Evidently more research is required in order to completely reject the effects of Swedish massage on abnormal reflexes of children with CP.

  11. Relationship between massage therapy usage and health outcomes in older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munk, Niki; Zanjani, Faika

    2011-04-01

    Physical and emotional decline in older adults is a serious issue affecting not only quality of life but also susceptibility to injury. Non-pharmacological interventions addressing the needs of older adults are important for reducing medication burden and possible drug interactions. This study (N=144) examines the potential of massage therapy as such an intervention for older adults by comparing self-reported health outcome scores among adults 60 and older who have and have not utilized massage therapy in the past year. When controlling for age and cumulative morbidities, older adults who reported massage therapy usage in the past year had significantly better health outcome scores in the following domains: 1) emotional well-being, 2) limitations due to physical issues, and 3) limitations due to emotional issues. Because previous massage therapy research has not included or focused on older adults, studies examining massage therapy and emotional health, specifically among this population, are warranted. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Effects of Swedish Massage Therapy on Blood Pressure, Heart Rate, and Inflammatory Markers in Hypertensive Women

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    Izreen Supa’at

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Swedish Massage Therapy (SMT is known for its therapeutic relaxation effects. Hypertension is associated with stress and elevated endothelial inflammatory markers. This randomized control trial measured the effects of whole body SMT (massage group or resting (control group an hour weekly for four weeks on hypertensive women. Blood pressure (BP and heart rate (HR were measured before and after each intervention and endothelial inflammatory markers: vascular endothelial adhesion molecules 1 (VCAM-1 and intracellular adhesion molecules 1 (ICAM-1 were measured at baseline and after the last intervention. Massage group (n=8 showed significant systolic BP (SBP reduction of 12 mmHg (P=0.01 and diastolic BP (DBP reduction of 5 mmHg (P=0.01 after four sessions with no significant difference between groups. Reductions in HR were also seen in massage group after sessions 1, 3, and 4 with significant difference between groups. VCAM-1 showed significant reduction after four sessions: the massage group showed reduction of 998.05 ng/mL (P=0.03 and the control group of 375.70 ng/mL (P=0.01 with no significant differences between groups. There were no changes in ICAM-1. In conclusion, SMT or resting an hour weekly has effects on reducing BP, HR, and VCAM-1 in hypertensive women.

  13. The effect of foot massage on night sleep quality in hemodialysis patients

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    farhad Ariamanesh

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Background : Studies have shown, about 20 to 80 percent of hemodialysis patients have sleep problems that can lead to reduction of their quality of life. With regard to high number of hemodialysis patients in the present age, promoting the level of their health issues are deemed important. In this regared, the purpose of this research was to determine the effect of foot massage on night sleeping in hemodialysis patients. Materials and Methods: This experimental clinical trial design, was conducted on 80 hemodialysis patients, admitted to the hemodialysis wards of Shahid Rahimi and Shohada hospitals of Khorramabad city in 2014. Data gathering was done by Pittsburg questionnaire and Sleep Log, by which the sleep condition of the subjects was assessed before and after the night of massage therapy. The treatment was Stroke Foot Massage, carried out during dialysis for 10 minutes, three times a week, for four consecutive weeks. Results: Changes in the Pittsburg questionnaire score indicated that, using foot massage can improve sleep quality of hemodialysis patients and sleep hours increased and generally sleep condition was progressively improving each week than the week before (p<0/001. Conclusion: According to the results of this study, foot massage has a favorable impact on sleep quality in hemodialysis patients undergoing hemodialysis and can be applied and trained as a useful method to improve sleep quality of patients in hemodialysis wards.

  14. Massage Therapy in Children with Asthma: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ji; Yang, Xi-Wen; Zhang, Ming

    2017-01-01

    To systematically evaluate the efficacy of massage, a traditional treatment method of traditional Chinese medicine on children with asthma. Literatures from 5 databases using the date ranging from 1 January, 1990, to 13 December, 2016, were reviewed, which were all randomized controlled trials evaluating the efficacy on children with asthma and effect on lung function mainly by massage therapy. 14 researches with 1299 patients were included in the meta-analysis. Compared with control group, a better efficacy was found in treatment group, which focused on massage therapy. Compared with control group, there was remarkable increase on FEV1 as well as PEF in treatment group. All studies have shown that massage therapy has a significantly positive effect on children with asthma, improves the pulmonary function parameters of large airway, reduces the plasma concentrations of PAF and prostaglandin, and increases the levels of PAF-AH and DP1; therefore, it greatly improves pulmonary function. However, the limited research designs of included studies lead to high risk of bias. More randomized controlled trials with better methodological quality are needed to further confirm the effectiveness of massage.

  15. Evaluating the use of gas discharge visualization to measure massage therapy outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haun, Jolie; Patel, Nitin; Schwartz, Gary; Ritenbaugh, Cheryl

    2017-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to evaluate the short-term effects of massage therapy using gas discharge visualization (GDV), a computerized biophysical electrophoton capture (EPC), in tandem with traditional self-report measures to evaluate the use of GDV measurement to assess the bioenergetic whole-person effects of massage therapy. Methods This study used a single treatment group, pre–post-repeated measures design with a sample of 23 healthy adults. This study utilized a single 50-min full-body relaxation massage with participants. GDV measurement method, an EPC, and traditional paper-based measures evaluating pain, stress, muscle tension, and well-being were used to assess intervention outcomes. Results Significant differences were found between pre- and post-measures of well-being, pain, stress, muscle tension, and GDV parameters. Pearson correlations indicate the GDV measure is correlated with pain and stress, variables that impact the whole person. Conclusions This study demonstrates that GDV parameters may be used to indicate significant bioenergetic change from pre- to post-massage. Findings warrant further investigation with a larger diverse sample size and control group to further explore GDV as a measure of whole-person bioenergetic effects associated with massage. PMID:26087069

  16. Massage Therapy of the Back Using a Real-Time Haptic-Enhanced Telerehabilitation System

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    Cristina Ramírez-Fernández

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We present the usability evaluation of a haptic-enhanced telerehabilitation system for massage therapy of the back using the Vybe haptic gaming pad and the gesture sensor LEAP motion controller. The evaluated system includes features that allow for (i administering online therapy programs, (ii providing self-adjustable and safety treatment of back massages using a virtual environment, and (iii saving and replaying massage sessions according to a patient’s therapy program. The usability evaluation with 25 older adults and 10 specialists suggests that the haptic telerehabilitation system is perceived with high usability and pleasurable user experience, while providing personalized intensity of haptic therapy in a supervised, real-time, and secure way to treat the patient. Moreover, the specialists totally agree that the system design features, such as save and play, and delimiting therapy zones are the most important for back massage therapy, while the features of regulating feedback intensity and providing/receiving a massage remotely are also important. Finally, based on their comments, five design insights aiming at improving the current version of the system were generated.

  17. Understanding logistic regression analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sperandei, Sandro

    2014-01-01

    Logistic regression is used to obtain odds ratio in the presence of more than one explanatory variable. The procedure is quite similar to multiple linear regression, with the exception that the response variable is binomial. The result is the impact of each variable on the odds ratio of the observed event of interest. The main advantage is to avoid confounding effects by analyzing the association of all variables together. In this article, we explain the logistic regression procedure using examples to make it as simple as possible. After definition of the technique, the basic interpretation of the results is highlighted and then some special issues are discussed.

  18. Applied linear regression

    CERN Document Server

    Weisberg, Sanford

    2013-01-01

    Praise for the Third Edition ""...this is an excellent book which could easily be used as a course text...""-International Statistical Institute The Fourth Edition of Applied Linear Regression provides a thorough update of the basic theory and methodology of linear regression modeling. Demonstrating the practical applications of linear regression analysis techniques, the Fourth Edition uses interesting, real-world exercises and examples. Stressing central concepts such as model building, understanding parameters, assessing fit and reliability, and drawing conclusions, the new edition illus

  19. Applied logistic regression

    CERN Document Server

    Hosmer, David W; Sturdivant, Rodney X

    2013-01-01

     A new edition of the definitive guide to logistic regression modeling for health science and other applications This thoroughly expanded Third Edition provides an easily accessible introduction to the logistic regression (LR) model and highlights the power of this model by examining the relationship between a dichotomous outcome and a set of covariables. Applied Logistic Regression, Third Edition emphasizes applications in the health sciences and handpicks topics that best suit the use of modern statistical software. The book provides readers with state-of-

  20. Risk Behaviors among Asian Women Who Work at Massage Parlors in San Francisco: Perspectives from Masseuses and Owners/Managers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemoto, Tooru; Iwamoto, Mariko; Oh, Hyun Joo; Wong, Serena; Nguyen, Hongmai

    2005-01-01

    This study investigates cognitive, cultural, and contextual factors that influence HIV-related risk behaviors among Asian women who engage in sex work at massage parlors in San Francisco. Focus groups and qualitative interviews were conducted for Vietnamese and Thai masseuses and massage parlor owners/managers. Economic pressure as well as…

  1. Improved Speech Following Parent-Delivered Qigong Massage in Young Children with Down Syndrome: A Pilot Randomised Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Louisa M. T.; Schalock, Mark; Williams, Mary

    2013-01-01

    Qigong massage is an eastern form of massage that can be delivered by western parents to their children with appropriate training and support. It has been shown to improve developmental measures in young children with autism when given daily for five months. A recent trial evaluating its effect on motor development in young children with Down…

  2. Understanding poisson regression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayat, Matthew J; Higgins, Melinda

    2014-04-01

    Nurse investigators often collect study data in the form of counts. Traditional methods of data analysis have historically approached analysis of count data either as if the count data were continuous and normally distributed or with dichotomization of the counts into the categories of occurred or did not occur. These outdated methods for analyzing count data have been replaced with more appropriate statistical methods that make use of the Poisson probability distribution, which is useful for analyzing count data. The purpose of this article is to provide an overview of the Poisson distribution and its use in Poisson regression. Assumption violations for the standard Poisson regression model are addressed with alternative approaches, including addition of an overdispersion parameter or negative binomial regression. An illustrative example is presented with an application from the ENSPIRE study, and regression modeling of comorbidity data is included for illustrative purposes. Copyright 2014, SLACK Incorporated.

  3. Massage therapy in post-operative rehabilitation of children and adolescents with cerebral palsy - a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, Stefan; Johansson, Gunilla; Enskär, Karin; Himmelmann, Kate

    2011-08-01

    The purpose of this pilot study was to explore the use of massage therapy in children with cerebral palsy undergoing post-operative rehabilitation. Three participants were randomized to massage therapy and another three participants to rest. All children had undergone surgery in one or two lower limbs. Pain, wellbeing, sleep quality, heart rate and qualitative data were collected for each child. The scores of pain intensity and discomfort were low in all participants. Heart rate decreased in participants who were randomized to rest, but no change was found in the massage therapy group. The lack of decrease in heart rate in the study group of massage therapy may imply an increased sensitivity to touch in the post-operative setting. Further research with larger study populations are needed to evaluate how and when massage therapy is useful for children with cerebral palsy. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Acute effects of massage or active exercise in relieving muscle soreness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Lars L; Jay, Kenneth; Andersen, Christoffer H

    2013-01-01

    Massage is commonly believed to be the best modality for relieving muscle soreness. However, actively warming up the muscles with exercise may be an effective alternative. The purpose of this study was to compare the acute effect of massage with active exercise for relieving muscle soreness. Twenty...... healthy female volunteers (mean age 32 years) participated in this examiner-blind randomized controlled trial (ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01478451). The participants performed eccentric contractions for the upper trapezius muscle on a Biodex dynamometer. Delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS) presented 48 hours...... later, at which the participants (a) received 10 minutes of massage of the trapezius muscle or (b) performed 10 minutes of active exercise (shoulder shrugs 10 × 10 reps) with increasing elastic resistance (Thera-Band). First, 1 treatment was randomly applied to 1 shoulder while the contralateral...

  5. Report on Disaster Medical Operations with Acupuncture/Massage Therapy after the Great East Japan Earthquake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shin Takayama

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The Great East Japan Earthquake inflicted immense damage over a wide area of eastern Japan with the consequent tsunami. Department of Traditional Asian Medicine, Tohoku University, started providing medical assistance to the disaster-stricken regions mainly employing traditional Asian therapies. We visited seven evacuation centers in Miyagi and Fukushima Prefecture and provided acupuncture/massage therapy. While massage therapy was performed manually, filiform needles and press tack needles were used to administer acupuncture. In total, 553 people were treated (mean age, 54.0 years; 206 men, 347 women. Assessment by interview showed that the most common complaint was shoulder/back stiffness. The rate of therapy satisfaction was 92.3%. Many people answered that they experienced not only physical but also psychological relief. At the time of the disaster, acupuncture/massage therapy, which has both mental and physical soothing effects, may be a therapeutic approach that can be effectively used in combination with Western medical practices.

  6. Effectiveness of massage therapy for shoulder pain: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeun, Young-Ran

    2017-05-01

    [Purpose] This study performed an effect-size analysis of massage therapy for shoulder pain. [Subjects and Methods] The database search was conducted using PubMed, CINAHL, Embase, PsycINFO, RISS, NDSL, NANET, DBpia, and KoreaMed. The meta-analysis was based on 15 studies, covering a total of 635 participants, and used a random effects model. [Results] The effect size estimate showed that massage therapy had a significant effect on reducing shoulder pain for short-term efficacy (SMD: -1.08, 95% CI: -1.51 to -0.65) and for long-term efficacy (SMD: -0.47, 95% CI: -0.71 to -0.23). [Conclusion] The findings from this review suggest that massage therapy is effective at improving shoulder pain. However, further research is needed, especially a randomized controlled trial design or a large sample size, to provide evidence-based recommendations.

  7. Traditional massage of newborns in Nepal: implications for trials of improved practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullany, Luke C; Darmstadt, Gary L; Khatry, Subarna K; Tielsch, James M

    2005-04-01

    Mustard oil massage of newborns is an integral component of traditional care practices in many communities. Recent evidence suggests that this practice may have detrimental effects, particularly for preterm infants or for those whose skin barrier function is otherwise sub-optimal. Other natural oils such as sunflower, sesame or safflower seed oil may have a beneficial impact on newborn health and survival. Little is known, however, about cultural and other factors related to the acceptance and uptake of alternative, more beneficial oils for massage of the newborn. A questionnaire concerning the usage and reasons for application of mustard and other oils to newborn skin was administered to the caretakers of 8580 newborns in Sarlahi district of rural Nepal. Four focus group discussions among representative groups were conducted to describe the perceived benefits of oil massage and the factors involved in the decision to apply oil. The potential for the introduction of alternative natural oils was explored. Approximately 99 per cent of newborns were massaged at least once with mustard oil in the 2 weeks after birth, and 80 per cent were massaged at least twice daily. Promotion of strength, maintenance of health, and provision of warmth were the most commonly cited reasons for application of mustard oil. Focus group discussion participants noted that smell, oiliness, mode of pre-massage preparation, and perceived absorptive potential on the skin are important contextual factors involved in the practice. Caretakers are willing to consider adaptation of established traditions for the promotion of positive health outcomes if essential contextual criteria are met. An understanding of cultural, social, and economic factors that shape the context of traditional healthcare practices is essential to the design and implementation of intervention trials examining the relative efficacy of application of oils in reducing neonatal mortality and morbidity.

  8. Massage therapy for children with autism spectrum disorders: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Myeong Soo; Kim, Jong-In; Ernst, Edzard

    2011-03-01

    We aimed to assess the effectiveness of massage as a treatment option for autism. We searched the following electronic databases using the time of their inception through March 2010: MEDLINE, AMED, CINAHL, EMBASE, PsycINFO, Health Technology Assessment, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects, Psychology and Behavioral Sciences Collection, 6 Korean medical databases (KSI, DBpia, KISTEP, RISS, KoreaMed, and National Digital Library), China Academic Journal (through China National Knowledge Infrastructure), and 3 Japanese medical databases (Journal@rchive, Science Links Japan, and Japan Science & Technology link). The search phrase used was "(massage OR touch OR acupressure) AND (autistic OR autism OR Asperger's syndrome OR pervasive developmental disorder)." The references in all located articles were also searched. No language restrictions were imposed. Prospective controlled clinical studies of any type of massage therapy for autistic patients were included. Trials in which massage was part of a complex intervention were also included. Case studies, case series, qualitative studies, uncontrolled trials, studies that failed to provide detailed results, and trials that compared one type of massage with another were excluded. All articles were read by 2 independent reviewers (M.S.L. and J-I.K.), who extracted data from the articles according to predefined criteria. Risk of bias was assessed using the Cochrane classification. Of 132 articles, only 6 studies met our inclusion criteria. One randomized clinical trial found that massage plus conventional language therapy was superior to conventional language therapy alone for symptom severity (P firm conclusions cannot be drawn. Future, more rigorous randomized clinical trials seem to be warranted. © Copyright 2011 Physicians Postgraduate Press, Inc.

  9. Massage therapy for fibromyalgia: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan-hui Li

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Although some studies evaluated the effectiveness of massage therapy for fibromyalgia (FM, the role of massage therapy in the management of FM remained controversial. OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this systematic review is to evaluate the evidence of massage therapy for patients with FM. METHODS: Electronic databases (up to June 2013 were searched to identify relevant studies. The main outcome measures were pain, anxiety, depression, and sleep disturbance. Two reviewers independently abstracted data and appraised risk of bias. The risk of bias of eligible studies was assessed based on Cochrane tools. Standardised mean difference (SMD and 95% confidence intervals (CI were calculated by more conservative random-effects model. And heterogeneity was assessed based on the I(2 statistic. RESULTS: Nine randomized controlled trials involving 404 patients met the inclusion criteria. The meta-analyses showed that massage therapy with duration ≥ 5 weeks significantly improved pain (SMD, 0.62; 95% CI 0.05 to 1.20; p = 0.03, anxiety (SMD, 0.44; 95% CI 0.09 to 0.78; p = 0.01, and depression (SMD, 0.49; 95% CI 0.15 to 0.84; p = 0.005 in patients with FM, but not on sleep disturbance (SMD, 0.19; 95% CI -0.38 to 0.75; p = 0.52. CONCLUSION: Massage therapy with duration ≥ 5 weeks had beneficial immediate effects on improving pain, anxiety, and depression in patients with FM. Massage therapy should be one of the viable complementary and alternative treatments for FM. However, given fewer eligible studies in subgroup meta-analyses and no evidence on follow-up effects, large-scale randomized controlled trials with long follow-up are warrant to confirm the current findings.

  10. Massage therapy for fibromyalgia: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yan-hui; Wang, Feng-yun; Feng, Chun-qing; Yang, Xia-feng; Sun, Yi-hua

    2014-01-01

    Although some studies evaluated the effectiveness of massage therapy for fibromyalgia (FM), the role of massage therapy in the management of FM remained controversial. The purpose of this systematic review is to evaluate the evidence of massage therapy for patients with FM. Electronic databases (up to June 2013) were searched to identify relevant studies. The main outcome measures were pain, anxiety, depression, and sleep disturbance. Two reviewers independently abstracted data and appraised risk of bias. The risk of bias of eligible studies was assessed based on Cochrane tools. Standardised mean difference (SMD) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated by more conservative random-effects model. And heterogeneity was assessed based on the I(2) statistic. Nine randomized controlled trials involving 404 patients met the inclusion criteria. The meta-analyses showed that massage therapy with duration ≥ 5 weeks significantly improved pain (SMD, 0.62; 95% CI 0.05 to 1.20; p = 0.03), anxiety (SMD, 0.44; 95% CI 0.09 to 0.78; p = 0.01), and depression (SMD, 0.49; 95% CI 0.15 to 0.84; p = 0.005) in patients with FM, but not on sleep disturbance (SMD, 0.19; 95% CI -0.38 to 0.75; p = 0.52). Massage therapy with duration ≥ 5 weeks had beneficial immediate effects on improving pain, anxiety, and depression in patients with FM. Massage therapy should be one of the viable complementary and alternative treatments for FM. However, given fewer eligible studies in subgroup meta-analyses and no evidence on follow-up effects, large-scale randomized controlled trials with long follow-up are warrant to confirm the current findings.

  11. Development of a manualized protocol of massage therapy for clinical trials in osteoarthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Ather

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Clinical trial design of manual therapies may be especially challenging as techniques are often individualized and practitioner-dependent. This paper describes our methods in creating a standardized Swedish massage protocol tailored to subjects with osteoarthritis of the knee while respectful of the individualized nature of massage therapy, as well as implementation of this protocol in two randomized clinical trials. Methods The manualization process involved a collaborative process between methodologic and clinical experts, with the explicit goals of creating a reproducible semi-structured protocol for massage therapy, while allowing some latitude for therapists’ clinical judgment and maintaining consistency with a prior pilot study. Results The manualized protocol addressed identical specified body regions with distinct 30- and 60-min protocols, using standard Swedish strokes. Each protocol specifies the time allocated to each body region. The manualized 30- and 60-min protocols were implemented in a dual-site 24-week randomized dose-finding trial in patients with osteoarthritis of the knee, and is currently being implemented in a three-site 52-week efficacy trial of manualized Swedish massage therapy. In the dose-finding study, therapists adhered to the protocols and significant treatment effects were demonstrated. Conclusions The massage protocol was manualized, using standard techniques, and made flexible for individual practitioner and subject needs. The protocol has been applied in two randomized clinical trials. This manualized Swedish massage protocol has real-world utility and can be readily utilized both in the research and clinical settings. Trial registration Clinicaltrials.gov NCT00970008 (18 August 2009

  12. Massage Alleviates Delayed Onset Muscle Soreness after Strenuous Exercise: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianmin Guo

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The purpose of this systematic review and meta-analysis was to evaluate the effects of massage on alleviating delayed onset of muscle soreness (DOMS and muscle performance after strenuous exercise.Method: Seven databases consisting of PubMed, Embase, EBSCO, Cochrane Library, Web of Science, CNKI and Wanfang were searched up to December 2016. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs were eligible and the outcomes of muscle soreness, performance (including muscle maximal isometric force (MIF and peak torque and creatine kinase (CK were used to assess the effectiveness of massage intervention on DOMS.Results: Eleven articles with a total of 23 data points (involving 504 participants satisfied the inclusion criteria and were pooled in the meta-analysis. The findings demonstrated that muscle soreness rating decreased significantly when the participants received massage intervention compared with no intervention at 24 h (SMD: –0.61, 95% CI: –1.17 to –0.05, P = 0.03, 48 h (SMD: –1.51, 95% CI: –2.24 to –0.77, P < 0.001, 72 h (SMD: –1.46, 95% CI: –2.59 to –0.33, P = 0.01 and in total (SMD: –1.16, 95% CI: –1.60 to –0.72, P < 0.001 after intense exercise. Additionally, massage therapy improved MIF (SMD: 0.56, 95% CI: 0.21–0.90, P = 0.002 and peak torque (SMD: 0.38, 95% CI: 0.04–0.71, P = 0.03 as total effects. Furthermore, the serum CK level was reduced when participants received massage intervention (SMD: –0.64, 95% CI: –1.04 to –0.25, P = 0.001.Conclusion: The current evidence suggests that massage therapy after strenuous exercise could be effective for alleviating DOMS and improving muscle performance.

  13. Salivary cortisol as an indicator of adrenocortical function in healthy infants, using massage therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monalisa de Cássia Fogaça

    Full Text Available CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVE: The evaluation of adrenocortical function with the use of therapeutic massage has been little studied in Brazil. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the salivary cortisol levels before and after Shantala massage therapy on healthy infants. DESIGN AND SETTING: Prospective case series, in a public nursery, in São Paulo. METHODS: Saliva was obtained from 11 infants at the times of 8:00-9:00 a.m. and 4:00-5:00 p.m. in a nursery and 9:00-10:00 p.m. at home. They received a 15-minute therapeutic massage on two consecutive days, and saliva was collected before and after the massage. The procedure was repeated after a one-week interval. Cortisol values (intra-assay < 5%; inter-assay < 10% at different times of the day were compared by ANOVA. RESULTS: The mean cortisol values (nmol/l ± SD on the first day were: morning (M = 14.1 ± 5.7, afternoon (A = 8.3 ± 2.7, night (N = 3.3 ± 1.1; after two consecutive days of therapeutic massage: M = 22.3 ± 13.5, A = 13.4 ± 6.0, N = 5.8 ± 3.5; after a one-week interval: M = 15.8 ± 7.7, A = 14.3 ± 7.7, N = 3.4 ± 2.0. CONCLUSION: There was a modification in the salivary cortisol values following massage, thus reflecting possible adaptation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis.

  14. The diagnosis and treatment of chronic back pain by acupuncturists, chiropractors, and massage therapists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherman, Karen J; Cherkin, Daniel C; Deyo, Richard A; Erro, Janet H; Hrbek, Andrea; Davis, Roger B; Eisenberg, David M

    2006-01-01

    To describe the diagnostic and therapeutic content of visits for chronic back pain to acupuncturists, chiropractors, and massage therapists. Randomly selected acupuncturists, chiropractors, and massage therapists in two states were surveyed, and then eligible providers collected data on consecutive patient visits. The authors analyzed information on diagnosis, treatment, and self-care recommendations for chronic back pain patients collected during consecutive patient visits to these complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) providers. Back pain was the most common reason for visits to each of these providers, with chronic back pain representing about 10% of visits to acupuncturists, 20% of visits to chiropractors, and 12% of visits to massage therapists. Diagnosis by acupuncturists included traditional questioning and inspecting the patient as well as pulse and tongue assessment and palpation of the acupuncture meridians. Treatments usually included acupuncture needling, heat of some sort, and other modalities, such as East Asian massage, herbs, and/or cupping (application of suction cups to the skin). Lifestyle recommendations were common, particularly exercise and dietary counseling. Visits to chiropractors usually included spinal and muscle/soft tissue examinations and spinal manipulation. Soft tissue techniques (eg, "active release"), stretch or strength training, and home exercise recommendations were much less common. Massage therapists usually performed a tissue assessment and commonly assessed range of motion. They emphasized Swedish, deep tissue, and trigger point massage techniques and usually made self-care recommendations, particularly increased water intake, hot/cold therapy, exercise, and body awareness. Information on the care patients routinely receive from CAM providers will help physicians better understand these increasingly popular forms of care.

  15. Vector regression introduced

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mok Tik

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This study formulates regression of vector data that will enable statistical analysis of various geodetic phenomena such as, polar motion, ocean currents, typhoon/hurricane tracking, crustal deformations, and precursory earthquake signals. The observed vector variable of an event (dependent vector variable is expressed as a function of a number of hypothesized phenomena realized also as vector variables (independent vector variables and/or scalar variables that are likely to impact the dependent vector variable. The proposed representation has the unique property of solving the coefficients of independent vector variables (explanatory variables also as vectors, hence it supersedes multivariate multiple regression models, in which the unknown coefficients are scalar quantities. For the solution, complex numbers are used to rep- resent vector information, and the method of least squares is deployed to estimate the vector model parameters after transforming the complex vector regression model into a real vector regression model through isomorphism. Various operational statistics for testing the predictive significance of the estimated vector parameter coefficients are also derived. A simple numerical example demonstrates the use of the proposed vector regression analysis in modeling typhoon paths.

  16. [Development of lipoma following a single cupping massage - a case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumann, Stefan; Lauche, Romy; Hohmann, Claudia; Zirbes, Thomas; Dobos, Gustav; Saha, Felix Joyonto

    2012-01-01

    The cupping massage is a form of bloodless cupping. This type of cupping is particularly used to treat muscular tension and musculoskeletal pain, such as chronic neck pain; however the data records on mechanisms and potential side effects are not satisfactory. In a study on the effectiveness of cupping massage in patients with chronic neck pain, one patient showed a formation of a lipoma in the cupping area after the first treatment session. Because of the short time interval between therapy and development of the lipoma, a primary cause is not realistic. This adverse event has not been described in the literature before, and the present report describes the case in summary.

  17. [The effect of breast massage at different time in the early period after cesarean section].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, J Y; Zhang, L; Zhang, Y J; Yang, M J; Li, X W; Sun, L L

    2017-11-06

    Objective: To evaluate the effect of breast massage at different time in the early period on maternal lactation after cesarean section. Methods: 80 women delivered by cesarean section were randomly selected from maternity ward of a hospital in Shandong province during Jan. 2013 to Jan. 2015; which were divided into four groups, with 20 patients in each. Three groups received 3 times of breast massage every 24 hoursbeginning from 2, 12 and 24 h after cesarean section, respectively. The control group didn't receive any breast massage. The starting time and status of lactation were observed and recorded after cesarean section. 5 ml venous blood sample was drawn from each patient respectively at 2 h before cesarean, 6, 12, 24, 48 and 72 h after cesarean to test the level of serum prolactin. The lactation status of each group was compared. Results: The P (50) ( P (25)- P (75)) of starting time of lactation of the three massage groups and control group were 3 (2-6) h, 4 (2-8) h, 4 (3-12) h and 4 (2-12) h, respectively, whose differences showed no statistical significance ( H =3.32, P= 0.345).The number of delivered women with adequate lactation 24 hours after cesarean was 10 in the group who received massage beginning from 2 h after cesarean; while the number was only 2 in the control group. The number of delivered women with adequate lactation 48 hours after cesarean was 18 in the group who received massage beginning from 2 h after cesarean; while the number was 8 in the control group. The differences showed statistical significances ( P values were 0.021 and 0.008, respectively). The serum prolactin level in the group of delivered women who received massage from 2 h after cesarean was separately (195.9±78.5), (176.0±96.5), (216.4±110.0), (190.0±56.8) and (184.8±69.6) μg/L at 2, 12, 24, 48 and 72 h after cesarean, which were significantly higher than those in the control group (which were (128.8±40.6), (127.3±66.8), (162.2±58.8), (145.1±64.7) and (141.7±49

  18. Multicollinearity and Regression Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daoud, Jamal I.

    2017-12-01

    In regression analysis it is obvious to have a correlation between the response and predictor(s), but having correlation among predictors is something undesired. The number of predictors included in the regression model depends on many factors among which, historical data, experience, etc. At the end selection of most important predictors is something objective due to the researcher. Multicollinearity is a phenomena when two or more predictors are correlated, if this happens, the standard error of the coefficients will increase [8]. Increased standard errors means that the coefficients for some or all independent variables may be found to be significantly different from In other words, by overinflating the standard errors, multicollinearity makes some variables statistically insignificant when they should be significant. In this paper we focus on the multicollinearity, reasons and consequences on the reliability of the regression model.

  19. Minimax Regression Quantiles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bache, Stefan Holst

    A new and alternative quantile regression estimator is developed and it is shown that the estimator is root n-consistent and asymptotically normal. The estimator is based on a minimax ‘deviance function’ and has asymptotically equivalent properties to the usual quantile regression estimator. It is......, however, a different and therefore new estimator. It allows for both linear- and nonlinear model specifications. A simple algorithm for computing the estimates is proposed. It seems to work quite well in practice but whether it has theoretical justification is still an open question....

  20. riskRegression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ozenne, Brice; Sørensen, Anne Lyngholm; Scheike, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    In the presence of competing risks a prediction of the time-dynamic absolute risk of an event can be based on cause-specific Cox regression models for the event and the competing risks (Benichou and Gail, 1990). We present computationally fast and memory optimized C++ functions with an R interface...... for predicting the covariate specific absolute risks, their confidence intervals, and their confidence bands based on right censored time to event data. We provide explicit formulas for our implementation of the estimator of the (stratified) baseline hazard function in the presence of tied event times. As a by...... functionals. The software presented here is implemented in the riskRegression package....

  1. Multiple linear regression analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, T. R.

    1980-01-01

    Program rapidly selects best-suited set of coefficients. User supplies only vectors of independent and dependent data and specifies confidence level required. Program uses stepwise statistical procedure for relating minimal set of variables to set of observations; final regression contains only most statistically significant coefficients. Program is written in FORTRAN IV for batch execution and has been implemented on NOVA 1200.

  2. Bayesian logistic regression analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Erp, H.R.N.; Van Gelder, P.H.A.J.M.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we present a Bayesian logistic regression analysis. It is found that if one wishes to derive the posterior distribution of the probability of some event, then, together with the traditional Bayes Theorem and the integrating out of nuissance parameters, the Jacobian transformation is an

  3. Linear Regression Analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Seber, George A F

    2012-01-01

    Concise, mathematically clear, and comprehensive treatment of the subject.* Expanded coverage of diagnostics and methods of model fitting.* Requires no specialized knowledge beyond a good grasp of matrix algebra and some acquaintance with straight-line regression and simple analysis of variance models.* More than 200 problems throughout the book plus outline solutions for the exercises.* This revision has been extensively class-tested.

  4. Nonlinear Regression with R

    CERN Document Server

    Ritz, Christian; Parmigiani, Giovanni

    2009-01-01

    R is a rapidly evolving lingua franca of graphical display and statistical analysis of experiments from the applied sciences. This book provides a coherent treatment of nonlinear regression with R by means of examples from a diversity of applied sciences such as biology, chemistry, engineering, medicine and toxicology.

  5. Bayesian ARTMAP for regression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasu, L M; Andonie, R

    2013-10-01

    Bayesian ARTMAP (BA) is a recently introduced neural architecture which uses a combination of Fuzzy ARTMAP competitive learning and Bayesian learning. Training is generally performed online, in a single-epoch. During training, BA creates input data clusters as Gaussian categories, and also infers the conditional probabilities between input patterns and categories, and between categories and classes. During prediction, BA uses Bayesian posterior probability estimation. So far, BA was used only for classification. The goal of this paper is to analyze the efficiency of BA for regression problems. Our contributions are: (i) we generalize the BA algorithm using the clustering functionality of both ART modules, and name it BA for Regression (BAR); (ii) we prove that BAR is a universal approximator with the best approximation property. In other words, BAR approximates arbitrarily well any continuous function (universal approximation) and, for every given continuous function, there is one in the set of BAR approximators situated at minimum distance (best approximation); (iii) we experimentally compare the online trained BAR with several neural models, on the following standard regression benchmarks: CPU Computer Hardware, Boston Housing, Wisconsin Breast Cancer, and Communities and Crime. Our results show that BAR is an appropriate tool for regression tasks, both for theoretical and practical reasons. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Bounded Gaussian process regression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Bjørn Sand; Nielsen, Jens Brehm; Larsen, Jan

    2013-01-01

    We extend the Gaussian process (GP) framework for bounded regression by introducing two bounded likelihood functions that model the noise on the dependent variable explicitly. This is fundamentally different from the implicit noise assumption in the previously suggested warped GP framework. We...... with the proposed explicit noise-model extension....

  7. and Multinomial Logistic Regression

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This work presented the results of an experimental comparison of two models: Multinomial Logistic Regression (MLR) and Artificial Neural Network (ANN) for classifying students based on their academic performance. The predictive accuracy for each model was measured by their average Classification Correct Rate (CCR).

  8. Mechanisms of neuroblastoma regression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodeur, Garrett M.; Bagatell, Rochelle

    2014-01-01

    Recent genomic and biological studies of neuroblastoma have shed light on the dramatic heterogeneity in the clinical behaviour of this disease, which spans from spontaneous regression or differentiation in some patients, to relentless disease progression in others, despite intensive multimodality therapy. This evidence also suggests several possible mechanisms to explain the phenomena of spontaneous regression in neuroblastomas, including neurotrophin deprivation, humoral or cellular immunity, loss of telomerase activity and alterations in epigenetic regulation. A better understanding of the mechanisms of spontaneous regression might help to identify optimal therapeutic approaches for patients with these tumours. Currently, the most druggable mechanism is the delayed activation of developmentally programmed cell death regulated by the tropomyosin receptor kinase A pathway. Indeed, targeted therapy aimed at inhibiting neurotrophin receptors might be used in lieu of conventional chemotherapy or radiation in infants with biologically favourable tumours that require treatment. Alternative approaches consist of breaking immune tolerance to tumour antigens or activating neurotrophin receptor pathways to induce neuronal differentiation. These approaches are likely to be most effective against biologically favourable tumours, but they might also provide insights into treatment of biologically unfavourable tumours. We describe the different mechanisms of spontaneous neuroblastoma regression and the consequent therapeutic approaches. PMID:25331179

  9. Massage treatment and medial tibial stress syndrome; A commentary to provoke thought about the way massage therapy is used in the treatment of MTSS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogarty, Sarah

    2015-07-01

    As students and practitioners we are taught about the treatment and causative factors of medial shin pain, in particular' shin splints' or the more recent term; medial tibial stress syndrome (MTSS). During the years there have been many theories, conjecture and misunderstandings about the mechanisms of 'shin splints/medial tibial stress syndrome' however the ramifications of these mechanisms on how massage treatment is delivered have not being discussed. The evidence for the treatment of MTSS is largely clinical with little evidence of any treatment being proven to be effective in treating MTSS. The aim of this article is to present a summary of the mechanisms of MTSS and a commentary to provoke thought about the way massage therapy is used in the treatment of MTSS based on these mechanisms. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. The effect of lemon inhalation aromatherapy on nausea and vomiting of pregnancy: a double-blinded, randomized, controlled clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yavari Kia, Parisa; Safajou, Farzaneh; Shahnazi, Mahnaz; Nazemiyeh, Hossein

    2014-03-01

    Nausea and vomiting of pregnancy are amongst the most common complaints that effects on both the physical and mental conditions of the pregnant women. Due to the increasing tendency of women to use herbal medications during pregnancy, the effect of lemon inhalation aromatherapy on nausea and vomiting of pregnancy was investigated in this study. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of lemon inhalation aromatherapy on nausea and vomiting during pregnancy. This was a randomized clinical trial in which 100 pregnant women with nausea and vomiting who had eligibility criteria were randomly divided into intervention and control groups based on four- and six-random block sampling method. Lemon essential oil and placebo were given to the intervention and control groups, respectively, to inhale it as soon as they felt nausea. The nausea, vomiting, and retch intensity were investigated 24 hours before and during the four days of treatment by means of PUQE-24 (24-hour Pregnancy Unique Quantification of Emesis). There was a statistically significant difference between the two groups in the mean scores of nausea and vomiting on the second and fourth days (P = 0.017 and P = 0.039, respectively). The means of nausea and vomiting intensity in the second and fourth days in the intervention group were significantly lower than the control group. In addition, in intragroup comparison with ANOVA with repeated measures, the nausea and vomiting mean in the five intervals, showed a statistically significant difference in each group (P < 0.001 and P = 0.049, respectively). Lemon scent can be effective in reducing nausea and vomiting of pregnancy.

  11. Aromatherapy Versus Oral Ondansetron for Antiemetic Therapy Among Adult Emergency Department Patients: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    April, Michael D; Oliver, Joshua J; Davis, William T; Ong, David; Simon, Erica M; Ng, Patrick C; Hunter, Curtis J

    2018-02-17

    We compare aromatherapy with inhaled isopropyl alcohol versus oral ondansetron for treating nausea among emergency department (ED) patients not requiring immediate intravenous access. In a randomized, blinded, placebo-controlled trial, we enrolled a convenience sample of adults presenting to an urban tertiary care ED with chief complaints including nausea or vomiting. We randomized subjects to 1 of 3 arms: inhaled isopropyl alcohol and 4 mg oral ondansetron, inhaled isopropyl alcohol and oral placebo, and inhaled saline solution placebo and 4 mg oral ondansetron. The primary outcome was mean nausea reduction measured by a 0- to 100-mm visual analog scale from enrollment to 30 minutes postintervention. Secondary outcomes included receipt of rescue antiemetic medications and adverse events. We enrolled 122 subjects, of whom 120 (98.3%) completed the study. Of randomized subjects, 40 received inhaled isopropyl alcohol and oral ondansetron, 41 received inhaled isopropyl alcohol and oral placebo, and 41 received inhaled saline solution placebo and oral ondansetron. The mean decrease in nausea visual analog scale score in each arm was 30 mm (95% confidence interval [CI] 22 to 37 mm), 32 mm (95% CI 25 to 39 mm), and 9 mm (95% CI 5 to 14 mm), respectively. The proportions of subjects who received rescue antiemetic therapy in each arm were 27.5% (95% CI 14.6% to 43.9%), 25.0% (95% CI 12.7% to 41.2%), and 45.0% (95% CI 29.3% to 61.5%), respectively. There were no adverse events. Among ED patients with acute nausea and not requiring immediate intravenous access, aromatherapy with or without oral ondansetron provides greater nausea relief than oral ondansetron alone. Copyright © 2018 American College of Emergency Physicians. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Roller-massager application to the quadriceps and knee-joint range of motion and neuromuscular efficiency during a lunge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradbury-Squires, David J; Noftall, Jennifer C; Sullivan, Kathleen M; Behm, David G; Power, Kevin E; Button, Duane C

    2015-02-01

    Roller massagers are used as a recovery and rehabilitative tool to initiate muscle relaxation and improve range of motion (ROM) and muscular performance. However, research demonstrating such effects is lacking. To determine the effects of applying a roller massager for 20 and 60 seconds on knee-joint ROM and dynamic muscular performance. Randomized controlled clinical trial. University laboratory. Ten recreationally active men (age = 26.6 ± 5.2 years, height = 175.3 ± 4.3 cm, mass = 84.4 ± 8.8 kg). Participants performed 3 randomized experimental conditions separated by 24 to 48 hours. In condition 1 (5 repetitions of 20 seconds) and condition 2 (5 repetitions of 60 seconds), they applied a roller massager to the quadriceps muscles. Condition 3 served as a control condition in which participants sat quietly. Visual analog pain scale, electromyography (EMG) of the vastus lateralis (VL) and biceps femoris during roller massage and lunge, and knee-joint ROM. We found no differences in pain between the 20-second and 60-second roller-massager conditions. During 60 seconds of roller massage, pain was 13.5% (5.7 ± 0.70) and 20.6% (6.2 ± 0.70) greater at 40 seconds and 60 seconds, respectively, than at 20 seconds (P joint ROM was 10% and 16% greater in the 20-second and 60-second roller-massager conditions, respectively, than the control condition (P joint ROM and neuromuscular efficiency during a lunge.

  13. Massage therapy has short-term benefits for people with common musculoskeletal disorders compared to no treatment: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bervoets, Diederik C; Luijsterburg, Pim A J; Alessie, Jeroen J N; Buijs, Martijn J; Verhagen, Arianne P

    2015-07-01

    Is massage therapy effective for people with musculoskeletal disorders compared to any other treatment or no treatment? Systematic review of randomised clinical trials. People with musculoskeletal disorders. Massage therapy (manual manipulation of the soft tissues) as a stand-alone intervention. The primary outcomes were pain and function. The 26 eligible randomised trials involved 2565 participants. The mean sample size was 95 participants (range 16 to 579) per study; 10 studies were considered to be at low risk of bias. Overall, low-to-moderate-level evidence indicated that massage reduces pain in the short term compared to no treatment in people with shoulder pain and osteoarthritis of the knee, but not in those with low back pain or neck pain. Furthermore, low-to-moderate-level evidence indicated that massage improves function in the short term compared to no treatment in people with low back pain, knee arthritis or shoulder pain. Low-to-very-low-level evidence from single studies indicated no clear benefits of massage over acupuncture, joint mobilisation, manipulation or relaxation therapy in people with fibromyalgia, low back pain and general musculoskeletal pain. Massage therapy, as a stand-alone treatment, reduces pain and improves function compared to no treatment in some musculoskeletal conditions. When massage is compared to another active treatment, no clear benefit was evident. Copyright © 2015 Australian Physiotherapy Association. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Effects of foot massage applied in two different methods on symptom control in colorectal cancer patients: Randomised control trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uysal, Neşe; Kutlutürkan, Sevinç; Uğur, Işıl

    2017-06-01

    This randomized controlled clinical study aimed to determine the effect of 2 foot massage methods on symptom control in people with colorectal cancer who received chemoradiotherapy. Data were collected between June 16, 2015, and February 10, 2016, in the Department of Radiation Oncology of an oncology training and research hospital. The sample comprised 60 participants. Data were collected using an introductory information form, common terminology criteria for adverse events and European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaires C30 and CR29. Participants were randomly allocated to 3 groups: classical foot massage, reflexology, and standard care control. The classical massage group received foot massage using classical massage techniques, and the reflexology group received foot reflexology focusing on symptom-oriented reflexes twice a week during a 5-week chemoradiotherapy treatment schedule. The control group received neither classical massage nor reflexology. All patients were provided with the same clinic routine care. The classical massage was effective in reducing pain level and distension incidence while foot reflexology was effective in reducing pain and fatigue level, lowering incidence of distension and urinary frequency and improving life quality. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  15. Ridge Regression Signal Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhl, Mark R.

    1990-01-01

    The introduction of the Global Positioning System (GPS) into the National Airspace System (NAS) necessitates the development of Receiver Autonomous Integrity Monitoring (RAIM) techniques. In order to guarantee a certain level of integrity, a thorough understanding of modern estimation techniques applied to navigational problems is required. The extended Kalman filter (EKF) is derived and analyzed under poor geometry conditions. It was found that the performance of the EKF is difficult to predict, since the EKF is designed for a Gaussian environment. A novel approach is implemented which incorporates ridge regression to explain the behavior of an EKF in the presence of dynamics under poor geometry conditions. The basic principles of ridge regression theory are presented, followed by the derivation of a linearized recursive ridge estimator. Computer simulations are performed to confirm the underlying theory and to provide a comparative analysis of the EKF and the recursive ridge estimator.

  16. Subset selection in regression

    CERN Document Server

    Miller, Alan

    2002-01-01

    Originally published in 1990, the first edition of Subset Selection in Regression filled a significant gap in the literature, and its critical and popular success has continued for more than a decade. Thoroughly revised to reflect progress in theory, methods, and computing power, the second edition promises to continue that tradition. The author has thoroughly updated each chapter, incorporated new material on recent developments, and included more examples and references. New in the Second Edition:A separate chapter on Bayesian methodsComplete revision of the chapter on estimationA major example from the field of near infrared spectroscopyMore emphasis on cross-validationGreater focus on bootstrappingStochastic algorithms for finding good subsets from large numbers of predictors when an exhaustive search is not feasible Software available on the Internet for implementing many of the algorithms presentedMore examplesSubset Selection in Regression, Second Edition remains dedicated to the techniques for fitting...

  17. Effects of hand massage on anxiety in patients undergoing ophthalmology surgery using local anesthesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jafar Rafiei Kiasari

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Anxiety is a common disorder in patients before surgery. Inappropriately managed anxiety can cause psychological and physiological reactions and will affect the process of surgery and recovery. Therefore, this study examined the effects of hand mas-sage on anxiety in patients undergoing ophthalmology surgery using local anesthesia. Methods: In this interventional study, 52 patients who were supposed to undergo oph-thalmology surgery using local anesthesia were studied. Patients were randomly as-signed to two groups of intervention, who received hand massage before surgery (n = 27 and control (n = 25. Massaging lasted for 5 minutes (2.5 minutes on each hand before surgery. Stroking and scrubbing methods were performed by 2 trained research-ers. Anxiety level, blood pressure, heart rate, and respiratory rate were measured before and after the intervention in both groups. Anxiety was evaluated using Spielberger State-Trait Anxiety Inventory. Data was analyzed by chi-square, independent samples t-test, and paired t-test. Results: There were no significant differences in mean anxiety, systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, heart rate, and respiratory rate between the two groups before the intervention (p > 0.05. However, there was a significant differenc in the mean stress level between the two groups after the intervention (p 0.05. Conclusion: Our findings suggested that 5 minutes of hand massage before ophthalmology surgery (under local anesthesia could reduce anxiety. Therefore, this method can be used to increase patient comfort and reduce anxiety before surgical interventions.

  18. Influence of massage and occlusion on the ex vivo skin penetration of rigid liposomes and invasomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trauer, S.; Richter, H.; Kuntsche, Judith

    2014-01-01

    Liposomes are frequently described as drug delivery systems for dermal and transdermal applications. Recently, it has been shown that particulate substances penetrate effectively into hair follicles and that the follicular penetration depth can be increased by massaging the skin, which simulates...

  19. Effect of classic massage in quality of life of university students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuno Miguel Lopes de Oliveira

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction : Due to often excessive academic activities, some university students are affected by stress, anxiety and depression, which can negatively influence quality of life. The classical massage was tested as a strategy for improving quality of life, since it presents psychogenic effects that contribute to this. Objective : To evaluate the effects of classical massage on quality of life, in stress, anxiety, depression and cardiorespiratory variables of university students. Methods : The sample consisted of an intervention group and a control group. While the intervention group (n = 10 received ten massage sessions, twice a week, for 30 minutes in the region of the cervical and thoracic spine, the control group (n = 12 received no intervention. For evaluating psychological variables, the Quality of Life Scale, the Lipp Inventory of Stress Symptoms for Adults, and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale were used. To assess cardiorespiratory variables, blood pressure, heart and respiratory rate were measured. Results : There was a significant improvement in quality of life and significant decrease in cardiorespiratory variables. Conclusion : The classic massage can be a strategy for the improvement of quality of life in university students who present symptoms of stress, anxiety, elevation of blood pressure, heart and respiratory rate.

  20. How Effective is Swedish Massage on Blood Glucose Level in Children with Diabetes Mellitus?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Firoozeh Sajedi

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available "nThis study was conducted to determine the effect of Swedish massage on blood glucose level in children with diabetes mellitus (DM. It was prospective randomized controlled trial study that conducted on 36 children, 6-12 years old with DM, recruited from a hospital in Qom City, Iran. The children were randomly assigned to intervention and control groups. Swedish massage was performed 15 minutes, 3 times a week, for 3 months in intervention group. The blood glucose levels were evaluated immediately after every session of massage in two groups. The mean ages of children in the intervention (n=18 and control (n=18 groups were 9.05 ± 1.55 and 9.83 ±2.03 years respectively. There was statistically no significant difference in blood glucose levels before intervention between two groups (P=0.586, but the blood glucose levels were lower significantly in intervention group in comparison with control group after intervention (P<0.0001. Addition of Swedish massage to daily routines; exercise, diet and medication regimens, is an effective intervention to reduce blood glucose level in diabetic children.

  1. Massage and Reiki used to reduce stress and anxiety: Randomized Clinical Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonice Fumiko Sato Kurebayashi

    Full Text Available ABTRACT Objective: to evaluate the effectiveness of massage and reiki in the reduction of stress and anxiety in clients at the Institute for Integrated and Oriental Therapy in Sao Paulo (Brazil. Method: clinical tests randomly done in parallel with an initial sample of 122 people divided into three groups: Massage + Rest (G1, Massage + Reiki (G2 and a Control group without intervention (G3. The Stress Systems list and the Trace State Anxiety Inventory were used to evaluate the groups at the start and after 8 sessions (1 month, during 2015. Results: there were statistical differences (p = 0.000 according to the ANOVA (Analysis of Variance for the stress amongst the groups 2 and 3 (p = 0.014 with a 33% reductions and a Cohen of 0.78. In relation to anxiety-state, there was a reduction in the intervention groups compared with the control group (p < 0.01 with a 21% reduction in group 2 (Cohen of 1.18 and a 16% reduction for group 1 (Cohen of 1.14. Conclusion: Massage + Reiki produced better results amongst the groups and the conclusion is for further studies to be done with the use of a placebo group to evaluate the impact of the technique separate from other techniques. RBR-42c8wp

  2. The beneficial effects of massage therapy for insomnia in postmenopausal women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Hachul

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available With increases life expectancy, the incidence of undesirable manifestations of menopause has increased as well. The effects of lost ovarian function include progressive decrease in estradiol secretion, trophic changes in the breast, vasomotor symptoms, anxiety, depression, and sleep disorders. Insomnia, which has physiological consequences and can result in a loss of quality of life, is prevalent in women after menopause. Hormone therapy has been widely used to reduce menopausal symptoms, but its use in recent years has been questioned because of the reported risks of cardiovascular events and increased incidence of tumors. This controversy has generated significant interest in non-hormonal treatments among both physicians and patients. Our previous research has shown a positive effect of massage therapy on menopausal symptoms. We explored the hypothesis that massage therapy would produce beneficial effects in postmenopausal women through inflammatory and immunological changes. Recent results from self-report questionnaires have shown improvements in sleep pattern and quality of life following massage therapy. These findings demonstrate the effectiveness of massage therapy for the treatment of postmenopausal symptoms, particularly insomnia, and indicate that it is a promising line of research.

  3. Clavicular fractures in neonates: the possible role of massage as a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Journal Home > Vol 8, No 1 (2014) > ... Case Report: Three neonates aged 10 days, 18 days and 8 days presented to our hospital with history of shoulder swellings and crying whenever the upper limbs ... A 4th neonate presented on the 12 day of birth with history of shoulder swelling but had no history of being massaged.

  4. CUTANEUS STIMULATION: SLOW-STROKE BACK MASSAGE REDUCES THE INTENSITY OF OSTEOARTRITIS PAIN OF ELDERLY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mira Triharini

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Osteoarthritis disease is the result of both mechanical and biological process which lead come to unstable degradation and synthesis of condrozyte cartilage and extracellular matrix. The risk factor of this instability is aging process. The aging process stimulates osteophytes formation and degradation of cartilage, and emerged pain as primary clinical symptom. One of the non pharmacological ways to cope this pain is by applying cutaneus stimulation through slow-stroke back massage method. The objective of this study was to analyze the effect of applying cutaneus stimulation with slow-stroke back massage method to osteoarthritis’s pain intensity. Method: Pre experimental design with one group pre test-post test approach was used in this study. The subject of this study were elderly above 50 years old living in Panti Werdha Hargo Dedali Surabaya, 15 participants were involved using purpose sampling technique. This study started on January 29th until February 6th, 2010. Data were collected by interview and observation and analyzed by WIlcoxcon Signed Rank Test α = 0.05, p value <α. Result: The Result showed that the message intervention was significantly affect the elder’s level of osteoarthritis pain in Panti Werdha Hargo Dedali Surabaya (p = 0.003. Discussion: It can be concluded that gives stimulation cutaneus: slow-stroke back massage reduce osteoathritis pain intensity. Slow-stroke back massage increase level of endorphin, so that pain reduction and individual pain perception will decrease.

  5. Change in the nose areas in children with mouth breathing after nasal cleansing and massage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melo, Ana Carolina Cardoso de; Gomes, Adriana de Oliveira Camargo; Cunha, Daniele Andrade da; Lima, Sandro Júnior Henrique; Lima, Wigna Rayssa Pereira; Cunha, Renata Andrade da; Silva, Hilton Justino da

    2016-01-01

    To analyze the changes occurred in the nasal cavity geometry, before and after nasal cleansing, through nasal aeration and acoustic rhinometry in children with oral breathing. Twenty children aged four to 12 years were included in the study. The gathering of participants was conducted at the Multifunctional Laboratory of the Speech Pathology Department of the Federal University of Pernambuco - UFPE. The following procedures were conducted: Identification Index of Signs and Symptoms of Oral Breathing; marking of nasal expiratory airflow using the graded mirror of Altmann, and examination of the Nasal Geometry by Acoustic Rhinometry. The same procedures were performed after nasal massage and cleansing with saline solution. Significant change was observed in the areas with respect to the nasal airflow on both sides after nasal cleansing and massage. As for nasal geometry, measured by acoustic rhinometry, comparison between the nostrils showed that the effect of cleansing and massage was discrete. Nasal aeration measures showed sensitivity to the cleansing and massage technique and measures of nasal geometry confirmed its effect on respiratory physiology.

  6. Children with Down Syndrome Improved in Motor Functioning and Muscle Tone Following Massage Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez-Reif, Maria; Field, Tiffany; Largie, Shay; Mora, Dana; Bornstein, Joan; Waldman, Ronnie

    2006-01-01

    Twenty-one moderate to high functioning young children (mean age, two years) with Down syndrome receiving early intervention (physical therapy, occupational therapy and speech therapy) were randomly assigned to additionally receive two 0.5-hour massage therapy or reading sessions (control group) per week for two months. On the first and last day…

  7. [Treatment of insomnia with shujing massage therapy: a randomized controlled trial].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Hongliang; Chen, Zhao; Pang, Jun; Mo, Qiaoming

    2015-08-01

    To compare the differences in the clinical efficacy on insomnia between shujing massage therapy and medication with estazolam. Eighty patients of insomnia were randomized into a shujing mass age therapy group (40 cases) and a medication group (40 cases). In the shujing massage therapy group, the spreading massage manipulation was applied along the running course of the gallbladder meridian of foot-shaoyang on the temporal area. The pressing and kneading manipulation was done at Yangbai (GB 14), Benshen (GB 13), Toulinqi (GB 15), Zhengying (GB 17), Chengling (GB 18), Shuaigu (GB 8), and Fengchi (GB 20), etc, 1 min at each acupoint. In the medication group, 1 mg estazolam was taken orally half an hour before sleep. The treatment was given once every day in the two groups. After the continuous treatment for 1 month, every dimensional score and the total score in the Pittsburgh sleep quality index scale (PSQI) and the clinical efficacy were evaluated between the two groups. After the intervention, the each item score of PSQI was improved as compared with that before treatment in the patients of the two groups (all P0. 05). In the shujing massage therapy group, the scores of sleep quality, sleep efficiency, sleep disturbance and daytime dysfunction, as well as the total score were all lower than those in the medication group (all Pmassage therapy achieves the superior efficacy on insomnia compared with the oral administration of estazolam.

  8. Case Study: The Use of Massage Therapy to Relieve Chronic Low-Back Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Laura

    2016-09-01

    To study the effects of massage on chronic low-back pain in a patient with four different diagnoses: osteoarthritis, scoliosis, spinal stenosis, and degenerative disc disease. The patient's goal was to cut down on the amount of pain medication he takes. A 63-year-old man with chronic back pain received four massages across a twenty-day period. Progress was recorded using the Oswestry Low Back Pain Scale, as he self-reported on levels of pain and interference with his activities of daily living. Improvement was noted in 9 out of 10 measurements of self-reported pain and activities of daily living, with the only exception being his ability to lift heavy objects, which remained unchanged. The most dramatic differences were improvements in his ability to walk, and in the changing degrees of pain. The client also self-reported being able to decrease his pain medication and the ability to ride his bicycle for the first time in years. Massage therapy is a promising treatment for chronic low-back pain for patients who may have multiple pathologies, any one of which could be responsible for the condition. Further study is encouraged to determine the efficacy of massage therapy as a readily accessible, lower-cost alternative to more invasive therapies and as an adjunct to regular medical care, when appropriate.

  9. The Use of Massage Therapy in the Treatment of Self-Injurious Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McEvoy, Christopher; And Others

    The report documents the theoretical basis and application of massage therapy, with six students who exhibited self-injurious behaviors (SIB), in two studies. The first study investigated the relationship between physical and/or emotional stress and self-abusive behavior in five severely mentally impaired students. Subjects received two to three…

  10. The effect of massage therapy on occupational stress of Intensive Care Unit nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazari, Fateme; Mirzamohamadi, Mojtaba; Yousefi, Hojatollah

    2015-01-01

    One of the main causes of stress in the lives of people is their jobs. Occupational stress is causing a wide range of significant issues in health and community services. Nursing is the most stressful profession in the health services. Massage therapy is one way of coping with stress. This study was conducted to determine the effect of massage therapy on stress in nurses. This study was a clinical trial on 66 male and female nurses working in intensive care units (dialysis, ICU, and CCU) of Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Iran, in 2013. Participants were selected according to the aims and inclusion criteria of the study. Then, they were randomly divided into experimental and control groups. The Occupational Stress Inventory (OSI) (Osipow and Spokane, 1987) was completed by participants of the two groups before, immediately after, and 2 weeks after the intervention. General Swedish massage was performed on participants of the experimental group for 25 min in each session, twice a week for 4 weeks. Data were analyzed by descriptive and inferential statistics [Chi-square, t-test, and repeated measures analysis of variance (ANOVA)] using SPSS software. Results showed that the difference in overall mean occupation stress scores between experimental and control groups 2 weeks after the intervention was significant (P < 0.001). According to the results, it is recommended that massage, as a valuable noninvasive method, be used for nurses in intensive care units to reduce their stress, promote mental health, and prevent the decrease in quality of nursing work life.

  11. The beneficial effects of massage therapy for insomnia in postmenopausal women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hachul, H; Oliveira, D S; Bittencourt, L R A; Andersen, M L; Tufik, S

    2014-06-01

    With increases life expectancy, the incidence of undesirable manifestations of menopause has increased as well. The effects of lost ovarian function include progressive decrease in estradiol secretion, trophic changes in the breast, vasomotor symptoms, anxiety, depression, and sleep disorders. Insomnia, which has physiological consequences and can result in a loss of quality of life, is prevalent in women after menopause. Hormone therapy has been widely used to reduce menopausal symptoms, but its use in recent years has been questioned because of the reported risks of cardiovascular events and increased incidence of tumors. This controversy has generated significant interest in non-hormonal treatments among both physicians and patients. Our previous research has shown a positive effect of massage therapy on menopausal symptoms. We explored the hypothesis that massage therapy would produce beneficial effects in postmenopausal women through inflammatory and immunological changes. Recent results from self-report questionnaires have shown improvements in sleep pattern and quality of life following massage therapy. These findings demonstrate the effectiveness of massage therapy for the treatment of postmenopausal symptoms, particularly insomnia, and indicate that it is a promising line of research.

  12. Attitudes and Practices of Massage Therapists as Related to Conventional Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Footracer, Katherine G.; Monaghan, Melissa; Wisniewski, Nicole P.; Mandel, Ellen

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Research into opinions about complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) has focused on conventional medical practitioners with little exploration of CAM practitioners’ views. Purpose To survey attitudes and practices of massage therapists toward conventional medicine. Research Design An anonymous online survey consisting of Likert-type scales, fill-in answers, and multiple-choice questions was used. Participants Members of the Associated Bodywork & Massage Professionals (ABMP), the largest massage therapy association in the US with over 77,000 members. Main Outcome Measures Participants were asked about their years of practice and training, choice of health care practitioners, sources for information about CAM and Western/allopathic medicine, client referral patterns, optimal treatment approaches for various medical conditions, and overall impressions of CAM and Western/ allopathic medicine. Results Analysis of n = 3,148 responses indicated that while 66.9% of respondents had a neutral or worse impression of Western/allopathic medicine, 64.3% use a conventional medicine practitioner as their primary health care provider, 61.9% have referred clients to a conventional medicine practitioner in the past six months, and 90.5% seek out information on Western/allopathic medicine. The mode response of the best treatment approach to various medical problems was a mix of Western/allopathic medicine and CAM. Conclusions This study suggests that despite the ambivalence of many massage therapists towards conventional medicine, many use it, encourage clients to do so, and see involvement of both as crucial to health. PMID:22553480

  13. Creating integrative work: a qualitative study of how massage therapists work with existing clients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortune, Luann Drolc; Hymel, Glenn M

    2015-01-01

    As one of the most often used complementary treatments, massage is increasingly positioned as an essential component of integrative medicine. Recent studies evaluate the clinical efficacy of massage therapy, but few studies explore how massage therapists (MTs) execute their work and exercise clinical reasoning in natural settings. To gain foundational knowledge about clinical reasoning and applied knowledge, this study examined how 10 MTs executed an entire session with established clients. Results support translational research design and inform educators. Ethnomethodology and phenomenology informed the qualitative design. Data were collected by videotaping actual sessions and interviewing the participants immediately afterward while viewing the videos. Computer-aided analysis identified data patterns for thematic interpretation. The MTs shared tacit knowledge that directed their work: a) maintaining a primarily biomechanical focus, b) prerequisite safe touch, c) multitasking not allowed, d) MTs assume physical risk, and e) the work affects multiple bodily systems. The MTs sensed effectiveness experientially by adopting common tactics: a) visualizing the manual engagement points, b) assuming the client controlled the physiological release, and c) educating the client. Within these commonalities, they operationalized their work in complex and singular ways, with the particular client relationship critical to structuring the session and evaluating the outcome. MTs viewed their work primarily as a biomechanical intervention, but understood therapeutic massage as serving multiple functions. Process-oriented clinical reasoning mirrored models found in psychotherapy and was informed by experience, intuition, and training, which resulted in an intentionally holistic approach. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Comparing the effectiveness of myofascial techniques with massage in persons with upper crossed syndrome (preliminary report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Łukasik Edyta

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Upper crossed syndrome is a postural syndrome, with myofascial and functional imbalance within the shoulder girdle and the cervical spine. The therapy usually includes myofascial techniques or massage. The aim of this work was to indicate which of these forms of therapy is more effective in terms of myofascial release.

  15. Comparison the effect of lidocaine gel and inhalation of lavender aromatherapy on pain score of arteriovenous fistula puncture in hemodialysis patients

    OpenAIRE

    Abbaszadeh

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: patients undergoing hemodialysis repetitively experience pain and anxiety related to arterivenous fistula (AVF) punctures. Using of appropriate methods of pain relief in these patients is very important. The purpose of this study was to compare the effect of lidocaine gel and inhalation of lavender aromatherapy on pain intensity of arterivenous fistula puncture in hemodialysis patients. Methods: In this before and after clinical trial study, 40 hemodialysis patients were sele...

  16. The clinical impact and cost-effectiveness of essential oils and aromatherapy for the treatment of acne vulgaris: a protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agnew, Tamara; Leach, Matthew; Segal, Leonie

    2014-05-01

    Acne is a prevalent, chronic, and sometimes severe skin disorder affecting an estimated 85% of adolescents and 50% of adults older than age 20 years. The psychosocial implications of acne can be considerable, often continuing long after physical symptoms resolve. Although effective acne medications are available, most exhibit adverse-effect profiles that can leave the patient with few effective treatment options. Emerging evidence indicates that plant-derived essential oils may be a biologically plausible treatment for acne, although high-quality evidence of effectiveness and safety is lacking. To examine the clinical effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of essential oils and aromatherapy for the treatment of acne. This randomized, wait-list controlled trial will have three parallel groups; 192 participants with acne vulgaris, aged 16-45 years, will be recruited primarily through eight Technical and Further Education campuses across Adelaide, South Australia. Participants will be randomly assigned to standard essential oil blend, customized aromatherapy treatment, or wait-list control. Changes in the physical and psychosocial symptoms of acne will be assessed at baseline and 6 and 12 weeks by using the Leeds Acne Grading System, Assessment of Quality of Life-8 Dimension instrument, and Acne-Specific Quality of Life instrument. Costs of treatment will be measured on the basis of resource inputs and unit costs and will be limited to acne treatment. The clinical effectiveness and cost-effectiveness will be compared between each intervention and against usual care, using standard health economic techniques. The provision of high-quality evidence of the effectiveness of essential oils and aromatherapy in the treatment of acne may help consumers make better-informed choices about acne management. Insights gained from this research will also contribute to the academic field of complementary medicine, specifically aromatherapy, for which the evidence base is extremely

  17. MUSIC AND AROMATHERAPY: A GOOD COMBINATION FOR REDUCING ANXIETY AND STABILIZING NON-INVASIVE HEMODYNAMIC STATUS IN PATIENTS IN THE INTENSIVE CARE UNIT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferry Kumala

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Combining musical and aromatherapy therapy is expected to have a stronger effect in the reduction of anxiety and non-invasive hemodynamic stability. Objective: To examine the effect of the combination of music and aromatherapy on anxiety and non-invasive hemodynamic in patients in the intensive care unit. Methods: This was a quasy experimental study with non-equivalent group. An experimental group was given a combined musical and aromatherapy, while a control group was given music therapy. Thirty samples selected using accidental sampling, with 15 samples randomly assigned in the music group and combination group. HARS scale (Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale was used to measure anxiety. Non-invasive hemodynamic status of patients such as blood pressure and heart rate were documented in the observation sheet. Paired t-test and one-way ANOVA were used for data analysis. Results: There were significant effects of combination therapy on anxiety (p=0.001, diastole (p=0.004 and heart rate (p=0.031, but no significant effect on systole (p=0.387. While music therapy alone had a significant effect on anxiety (p=0.001, systole (p=0.047, and diastole (p=0.037. Conclusion: The combination therapy (music-aromatherapy had a greater effect than the music therapy alone in decreasing anxiety, and stabilizing diastolic blood pressure and heart rate. This therapy can be used as an alternative in nursing interventions, and can be used as inputs to develop standard of operational procedure for anxiety and non-invasive hemodynamic stability.

  18. Better Autologistic Regression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark A. Wolters

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Autologistic regression is an important probability model for dichotomous random variables observed along with covariate information. It has been used in various fields for analyzing binary data possessing spatial or network structure. The model can be viewed as an extension of the autologistic model (also known as the Ising model, quadratic exponential binary distribution, or Boltzmann machine to include covariates. It can also be viewed as an extension of logistic regression to handle responses that are not independent. Not all authors use exactly the same form of the autologistic regression model. Variations of the model differ in two respects. First, the variable coding—the two numbers used to represent the two possible states of the variables—might differ. Common coding choices are (zero, one and (minus one, plus one. Second, the model might appear in either of two algebraic forms: a standard form, or a recently proposed centered form. Little attention has been paid to the effect of these differences, and the literature shows ambiguity about their importance. It is shown here that changes to either coding or centering in fact produce distinct, non-nested probability models. Theoretical results, numerical studies, and analysis of an ecological data set all show that the differences among the models can be large and practically significant. Understanding the nature of the differences and making appropriate modeling choices can lead to significantly improved autologistic regression analyses. The results strongly suggest that the standard model with plus/minus coding, which we call the symmetric autologistic model, is the most natural choice among the autologistic variants.

  19. Regression in organizational leadership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kernberg, O F

    1979-02-01

    The choice of good leaders is a major task for all organizations. Inforamtion regarding the prospective administrator's personality should complement questions regarding his previous experience, his general conceptual skills, his technical knowledge, and the specific skills in the area for which he is being selected. The growing psychoanalytic knowledge about the crucial importance of internal, in contrast to external, object relations, and about the mutual relationships of regression in individuals and in groups, constitutes an important practical tool for the selection of leaders.

  20. Classification and regression trees

    CERN Document Server

    Breiman, Leo; Olshen, Richard A; Stone, Charles J

    1984-01-01

    The methodology used to construct tree structured rules is the focus of this monograph. Unlike many other statistical procedures, which moved from pencil and paper to calculators, this text's use of trees was unthinkable before computers. Both the practical and theoretical sides have been developed in the authors' study of tree methods. Classification and Regression Trees reflects these two sides, covering the use of trees as a data analysis method, and in a more mathematical framework, proving some of their fundamental properties.

  1. Logistic regression models

    CERN Document Server

    Hilbe, Joseph M

    2009-01-01

    This book really does cover everything you ever wanted to know about logistic regression … with updates available on the author's website. Hilbe, a former national athletics champion, philosopher, and expert in astronomy, is a master at explaining statistical concepts and methods. Readers familiar with his other expository work will know what to expect-great clarity.The book provides considerable detail about all facets of logistic regression. No step of an argument is omitted so that the book will meet the needs of the reader who likes to see everything spelt out, while a person familiar with some of the topics has the option to skip "obvious" sections. The material has been thoroughly road-tested through classroom and web-based teaching. … The focus is on helping the reader to learn and understand logistic regression. The audience is not just students meeting the topic for the first time, but also experienced users. I believe the book really does meet the author's goal … .-Annette J. Dobson, Biometric...

  2. Acupoint Massage for Managing Cognitive Alterations in Older Adults: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Fang; Shen, Cuiling; Yao, Liqun; Li, Zhuangmiao

    2018-06-01

    Cognitive disorders pose a major problem in the aging population across the globe. Acupoint massage has been used to improve cognitive functions in older adults. In this study, the authors performed a meta-analysis to evaluate the usefulness of acupoint massage in preventing cognitive declines in older adults. The authors searched for randomized controlled trials (RCTs) reporting on the effectiveness of acupoint massage on cognition in older adults in the following literature databases: PubMed, MEDLINE, Embase, CINAHL, ScienceDirect, Foreign Medical Journal Service, Cochrane Library, VIP Information, Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure, WANFANG, and Chinese Biomedical. Two reviewers independently extracted the data related to the study and participants' characteristics and the cognitive impairment outcomes. Only RCTs meeting the inclusion criteria were used in the present meta-analysis. Eight RCTs with 657 participants in total (age ≥60 years) were included. It is actually 8 for synthetic and 6 in the meta-analysis. The authors calculated the pooled estimates of the random effects of changes in the Mini-Mental State Examination to compare the groups with and without acupoint massage. The merged mean difference (MD) was 1.94 (95% confidence interval, C.I., [1.41-2.47], p < 0.00001) after 3 months of acupoint massage treatment and 3.04 (95% C.I. [2.43-3.64], p < 0.00001) after 6 months of treatment. They also calculated the merged MD of the Wechsler Memory Scale-Revised Chinese version after 6 months of acupoint massage. Visual Reproduction was 2.95 (95% C.I. [1.30-4.60], p = 0.0005), Associate Learning was 1.89 (95% C.I. [1.41-2.37], p < 0.00001), Logical Memory was 2.85 (95% C.I. [2.06-3.63], p < 0.00001), and Digit Span was 3.16 (95% C.I. [2.59-3.73], p < 0.00001). The Cochrane Handbook for Systematic Reviews of Interventions was used to rate the quality of the studies, which was moderate overall. The findings suggested that

  3. LAVENDER (LAVANDULA ANGUSTIFOLIA AROMATHERAPY AS AN ALTERNATIVE TREATMENT IN REDUCING PAIN IN PRIMIPAROUS MOTHERS IN THE ACTIVE FIRST STAGE OF LABOR

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    Hilda Yani Karo Karo

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Labor and childbirth is an extremely painful process. Aromatherapy is considered as one of the nonpharmacological methods to reduce labor pain. Objective: To determine the effect of Lavender (Lavandula Angustifolia aromatherapy on the level of pain in primipara in the first stage of labor. Methods: A quasy-experimental research with pretest and posttest design with control group conducted between October until November 2016. Forthy respondents selected using consecutive sampling, which 20 assigned in each group. a Numerical Rating Scale (NRS pain scale was used. Paired and independent t-test were used for data analyses. Results: The results showed that the p-value of labor pain after intervention was 0.000 (<0.05, which indicated that there was statistically mean difference of labor pain between intervention (6.10 and control group (4.05 in primipara in the first active stage of labor. Conclusion: The women in the lavender aromatherapy group reported lower intensity of labor pain. The intervention study could be practiced in the community health centers for pregnant women in order for them to apply this healing method.

  4. Effect of Aromatherapy with Peppermint Oil on the Severity of Nausea and Vomiting in Pregnancy: A Single-blind, Randomized, Placebo-controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joulaeerad, Narges; Ozgoli, Giti; Hajimehdipoor, Homa; Ghasemi, Erfan; Salehimoghaddam, Fatemeh

    2018-01-01

    Nausea and vomiting are common complaints in the first half of pregnancy. These symptoms can significantly affect a person's personal and professional life. Aromatherapy is one of the types of complementary medicine that is used in the treatment of nausea and vomiting. The objective of this study was to determine the effect of aromatherapy with peppermint oil on the severity of nausea and vomiting of pregnancy (NVP). This was a single-blind clinical trial that was conducted on 56 pregnant women with mild to moderate severity of NVP and 6 to 20 weeks of gestational age. After the determination of gestational age and base severity of NVP in each woman, they were randomly assigned to one of the two groups: peppermint oil (n=28) or placebo (n=28). Inhalation aromatherapy was done for four days and at the end of each day, they responded to the Pregnancy Unique Quantification of Emesis/Nausea questionnaire (PUQE). The data obtained were analyzed with Mann-Whitney test and ANOVA with repeated measures using SPSS software version 22. Also, the level of significance was paromatherapy with peppermint oil and placebo were the same in this study. This similarity can be due to psychological impacts of intervention on pregnant women.

  5. The effect of inhalation aromatherapy with damask rose (Rosa damascena) essence on the pain intensity after dressing in patients with burns: A clinical randomized trial

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    Bikmoradi, Ali; Harorani, Mehdi; Roshanaei, Ghodratollah; Moradkhani, Shirin; Falahinia, Golam Hossein

    2016-01-01

    Background: Pain is one of the common problems encountered by patients with burns, which increases after each dressing. This study aimed to investigate the effect of inhalation aromatherapy with damask rose essence on the pain of patients with burns that is caused after dressing. Materials and Methods: A randomized clinical trial was conducted on 50 patients with second- and third-degree burn wounds. The baseline pain of the patients was assessed 30 min before they entered into the dressing room on the first and second days of intervention. The patients in the experimental group inhaled five drops of damask rose essence 40% in distilled water, while those in the control group inhaled five drops of distilled water as placebo. The pain intensity was assessed using Visual Analogue Scale at 15 and 30 min after the patients exited from the dressing room. Data were analyzed by SPSS (version 18) using descriptive and inferential statistics. Results: There was significant difference between the mean of pain intensity before and after intervention at 15 and 30 min after dressing (P aromatherapy in the experimental group (P aromatherapy with damask rose could be effective for relieving the pain caused after dressing in patients with burns. Therefore, it could be suggested as a complementary therapy in burn patients for pain relief. PMID:27186201

  6. The Effect of Inhalation Aromatherapy on Physiological and Psychological Parameters of Patient’s Candidate for Coronary Artery Bypass Graft: Pilot Study

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    N. Rajai

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Anxiety and stress are common problems before coronary artery bypass graft surgery has a destructive effect on the patient's condition. One of the medications therapies that are effective in reducing anxiety level is Aromatherapy. The aim of this study is to assess the effect of inhalation aromatherapy on physiological and psychological parameters of patients who are candidate for coronary artery bypass graft. Method: In this pilot study, 30 patients candidate of coronary artery bypass graft were selected by convenient sampling method. For intervention on the morning of the surgery, patients inhaled Lavender essential oil from a distance of 5 cm of the nose, for 20 minutes. Physiological and psychological parameters of patients the day before surgery and then 5 and 30 minutes after intervention was estimated by Form vital signs and DASS questionnaire. Data were analyzed in three phases using Descriptive Statistics and repeated measures ANOVA by SPSS.17. Results: 20% of patients were female, 80% male with an average age of 65/36±8/05. The results show a significant difference between the three time phases in variable of the pulse (P = 0/041, respiration (P = 0/040 and stress (P=0.046. Discussion: Aromatherapy can be an effective way to reduce stress levels and pulse in patients candidate for coronary artery bypass graft. Since this results study obtained from a pilot study, to Generalize the results, clinical trials with larger sample size is recommended.

  7. Utilizing Chair Massage to Address One Woman's Health in Rural Ghana West Africa: a Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meryanos, Cathy J

    2016-12-01

    There is limited access to health care in rural Ghana and virtually no rehabilitative services available. This situation presents a unique opportunity to utilize chair massage in addressing women's health in rural Ghana, particularly when it comes to muscle pain and fatigue from heavy labor. The objective of this case report is to determine the results of chair massage as a strategy to reduce neck, shoulder, and back pain, while increasing range of motion. The patient is a 63-year-old Ghanaian female, who was struck by a public transport van while carrying a 30-50 pound load on her head, two years prior. The accident resulted in a broken right humerus and soft tissue pain. A traditional medicine practitioner set the bone, however there was no post-accident rehabilitation available. At the time of referral, she presented complaints of shoulder, elbow, and wrist pain. In addition, she was unable to raise her right hand to her mouth for food intake. The results of this case report include an increase in range of motion, as well as elimination of pain in the right shoulder, elbow, and hand. Visual assessments showed an approximate increase of ROM within the ranges of 45-65 degrees in the right arm, as well as 10-15 degrees in 4th and 5th fingers. There was also a decrease in muscle hypertonicity in the thoracic and cervical areas, and a profound increase in quality of life for the patient. This case report illustrates how therapeutic chair massage was utilized to address a common health concern for one woman in rural Ghana. It also demonstrates that pre-existing musculoskeletal disorders and pain may be eliminated with massage intervention. Massage therapy may be important to ameliorating certain types of health problems in remote rural villages in low income countries.

  8. Effect of Adding Swedish Massage to Occupational Therapy on Muscle Tone of Spastic Cerebral Palsied Children

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    Firouzeh Sajedi

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Cerebral palsy is a nonprogressive disorder in body posture and movement, due to different etiologies. Different medical and rehabilitation interventions include massage have been used in these children. This study has been done to determine the effect of adding massage to occupational therapy on muscle tone of children with spastic cerebral palsy. Materials & Methods: This study was a double blind clinical trial. The children were recruited from clinics of University of Welfare & Rehabilitation Sciences. The individuals were divided to intervention and control groups. The routine rehabilitation techniques were done in 3 months in both groups. The intervention group received massage for 30 minutes before rehabilitation. Muscle tonicity was evaluated at the beginning of the study and 3 months later by Ashworth test. The data analysis was done by parametric (t test, paired t test and nonparametric (Mann Whitney, Wilcoxon tests. Results: Thirteen subjects of case (intervention group and 14 subjects of control group were studied. The average age in case group and control group was 49.5, and 42.1 months respectively. There were no statistically significant differences in Tonicity of upper and lower limbs, trunk and neck between intervention group and control group (P>0/05. Conclusion: In general based on the results of this study, adding massage to occupational therapy had no effect on tonicity of spastic cerebral palsied children. Regarding to some effects of massage mentioned in different articles on physical abilities of children with C.P. as well as executive limitations in this research, it is not possible to reject the effects of homeopathy on physical abilities of children with C.P.

  9. Infant massage improves attitudes toward childbearing, maternal satisfaction and pleasure in parenting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vicente, Sónia; Veríssimo, Manuela; Diniz, Eva

    2017-11-01

    The first year of motherhood is a period of growth and adaptation in women's lives with several challenges such as identifying the baby's needs and giving appropriate answers, so that mother and baby get to know each other and form a strong bond. Infant massage is one of the approaches that make an important contribution to the psychological and physiological wellbeing of both baby and mother, helping to form a harmonious relationship. This longitudinal study assessed the benefits of infant massage in the relationship between mother and baby, from birth to 12 months old. Comprising 194 dyads of mothers and their babies the subjects were divided into two groups of 97 dyads each. The Experimental group (EG) comprised mothers who undertook infant massage in a postnatal program with a physical therapist once a week. The Control group (CG) comprised mothers who did not attend any postnatal program and did not perform infant massage. Self-reported measures of attitudes concerning motherhood (CAQ-P), experience associated to motherhood (WBPB), parental satisfaction (PSS) and maternal separation anxiety (MSAS) were evaluated. Results showed that mothers in the experimental group were better adapted to motherhood, had greater confidence in their abilities and received more support from their mothers and husbands than mothers in the control group and were therefore more confident in their abilities. The EG group experienced a stronger relationship with their babies and described it as more positive than mothers in the control group. This longitudinal study suggests that mothers who learned how to perform infant massage had more positive attitudes towards the experience of motherhood in helping to increase the level of knowledge, regulation and proximity in the dyad. These findings can in turn help mothers to develop strategies that enable them to better cope with motherhood. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. The impact of the Swedish massage on the kinesthetic differentiation in healthy individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mustafa, Kamil; Furmanek, Mariusz Pawel; Knapik, Aleksandra; Bacik, Bogdan; Juras, Grzegorz

    2015-03-01

    Swedish massage is one of the common treatments to provide optimal start and readiness of athletes. The ability of kinesthetic differentiation (KD) is crucial in sport performance. This skill allows to adapt demanded muscle forces to optimize the motor tasks, and it is responsible for the precision. In the literature, there is no evidence how Swedish massage influences the kinesthetic differentiation. The objective of the study was to evaluate the impact of Swedish massage on the kinesthetic differentiation and muscle strength of hand grip. Thirty participants took part in this investigation (17 women and 13 men). The assessment consisted of KD tests conducted on the dominant (DH) and nondominant hand (NDH) after 15 minutes of hand and forearm Swedish massage. The procedure consisted of 13 trials for each extremity. The first three were done for 100% of the participants' capabilities (Fmax), the next five trials were done using 50% of maximum force (50% of Fmax), and in the last five trials, the participants tried to use only 50% of their previous force (1/2 of 50%). Finally, the absolute force production error (FPE) was calculated for 50% (FPE_50%) and 25% (FPE_25%). The two-way repeated measure analysis of variance ANOVA did not reveal any statistically significant changes in maximal strength grip and KD between pre- and postmassage intervention in both DH and NDH hand. Correlations showed strong relationship between pre- and postmassage for maximum force (r = 0.92, p = .01 for DH, and r = 0.94, p = .01 for NDH), and only for the FPE_50% (r = 0.67, p = .01 for DH, and r = 0.71, p = .01 for NDH). The results obtained indicated that the application of the Swedish massage did not affect the kinesthetic differentiation in this particular young adult group.

  11. The Impact of the Swedish Massage on the Kinesthetic Differentiation in Healthy Individuals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mustafa, Kamil; Furmanek, Mariusz Pawel; Knapik, Aleksandra; Bacik, Bogdan; Juras, Grzegorz

    2015-01-01

    Background: Swedish massage is one of the common treatments to provide optimal start and readiness of athletes. The ability of kinesthetic differentiation (KD) is crucial in sport performance. This skill allows to adapt demanded muscle forces to optimize the motor tasks, and it is responsible for the precision. In the literature, there is no evidence how Swedish massage influences the kinesthetic differentiation. Purpose: The objective of the study was to evaluate the impact of Swedish massage on the kinesthetic differentiation and muscle strength of hand grip. Methods: Thirty participants took part in this investigation (17 women and 13 men). The assessment consisted of KD tests conducted on the dominant (DH) and nondominant hand (NDH) after 15 minutes of hand and forearm Swedish massage. The procedure consisted of 13 trials for each extremity. The first three were done for 100% of the participants’ capabilities (Fmax), the next five trials were done using 50% of maximum force (50% of Fmax), and in the last five trials, the participants tried to use only 50% of their previous force (1/2 of 50%). Finally, the absolute force production error (FPE) was calculated for 50% (FPE_50%) and 25% (FPE_25%). Results: The two-way repeated measure analysis of variance ANOVA did not reveal any statistically significant changes in maximal strength grip and KD between pre- and postmassage intervention in both DH and NDH hand. Correlations showed strong relationship between pre- and postmassage for maximum force (r = 0.92, p = .01 for DH, and r = 0.94, p = .01 for NDH), and only for the FPE_50% (r = 0.67, p = .01 for DH, and r = 0.71, p = .01 for NDH). Conclusions: The results obtained indicated that the application of the Swedish massage did not affect the kinesthetic differentiation in this particular young adult group. PMID:25780470

  12. Evaluation of the effect of reflexology massage on pain severity after abdominal surgery

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    Abolfazl Rahimi Zarchi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: The pain caused by surgery is one of the major problems of the patients. Therefore, pain reduction through using noninvasive and simple methods is one of the nursing priorities. This study aimed to evaluate the effect of reflexology massage on pain intensity in the patients following the abdominal surgery. Methods: This clinical trial was conducted on 90 patients undergoing abdominal surgery, referring to the Imam Khomeini Hospital in Tehran, Iran, in 2016. The participants were selected using the purposive sampling technique, and then randomly divided into three groups of 30 cases. The a 30-minute session of reflexology and simple massage were applied by the researcher for the first and second groups, respectively, after transferring the patients to the ward and regaining full consciousness. The pain was measured immediately, 10 min, and 24 h after the massage (30 min after the pre-test using the visual analogue scale. The data analysis was performed in the SPSS version 19, using the one-way and repeated measures ANOVA as well as Chi-square test. Results: According to the results of this study, 24 h after the intervention, the foot reflexology group had lower mean score of pain intensity (1.9±1.6, compared to the simple massage (3.3±1.64 and control groups (3.8±02 (P<0.001. The decrease in the pain score was significant between the groups only 10 min and 24 h after the intervention (P<0.001 Conclusion: As the findings of the present study indicated, the reflexology massage could alleviate the pain in the patients after abdominal surgery. Given the simple and non-invasive nature of this method, it could be used to reduce the pain in the patients along with other healthcare measures.

  13. Inner power, physical strength and existential well-being in daily life: relatives' experiences of receiving soft tissue massage in palliative home care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cronfalk, Berit Seiger; Strang, Peter; Ternestedt, Britt-Marie

    2009-08-01

    This article explores relatives' experiences of receiving soft tissue massage as a support supplement while caring for a dying family member at home. In palliative home care, relatives play an important role as carers to seriously ill and dying family members. To improve their quality of life, different support strategies are of importance. Complementary methods, such as soft tissue massage have become an appreciated supplement for these patients. However, only few studies focus on relatives experiences of receiving soft tissue massage as a supplemental support. Qualitative design Nineteen relatives received soft tissue massage (hand or foot) nine times (25 minutes) in their homes. Open-ended semi-structured tape-recorded interviews were conducted once per relative after the nine times of massage, using qualitative content analysis. Soft tissue massage gave the relatives' feelings of 'being cared for', 'body vitality' and 'peace of mind'. For a while, they put worries of daily life aside as they just experienced 'being'. During massage, it became apparent that body and mind is constituted of an indestructible completeness. The overarching theme was 'inner power, physical strength and existential well-being in their daily lives'. All relatives experienced soft tissue massage positively, although they were under considerable stress. Soft tissue massage could be an option to comfort and support relatives in palliative home care. In palliative nursing care, soft tissue massage could present a worthy supplement in supporting caring relatives.

  14. Steganalysis using logistic regression

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    Lubenko, Ivans; Ker, Andrew D.

    2011-02-01

    We advocate Logistic Regression (LR) as an alternative to the Support Vector Machine (SVM) classifiers commonly used in steganalysis. LR offers more information than traditional SVM methods - it estimates class probabilities as well as providing a simple classification - and can be adapted more easily and efficiently for multiclass problems. Like SVM, LR can be kernelised for nonlinear classification, and it shows comparable classification accuracy to SVM methods. This work is a case study, comparing accuracy and speed of SVM and LR classifiers in detection of LSB Matching and other related spatial-domain image steganography, through the state-of-art 686-dimensional SPAM feature set, in three image sets.

  15. SEPARATION PHENOMENA LOGISTIC REGRESSION

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    Ikaro Daniel de Carvalho Barreto

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes an application of concepts about the maximum likelihood estimation of the binomial logistic regression model to the separation phenomena. It generates bias in the estimation and provides different interpretations of the estimates on the different statistical tests (Wald, Likelihood Ratio and Score and provides different estimates on the different iterative methods (Newton-Raphson and Fisher Score. It also presents an example that demonstrates the direct implications for the validation of the model and validation of variables, the implications for estimates of odds ratios and confidence intervals, generated from the Wald statistics. Furthermore, we present, briefly, the Firth correction to circumvent the phenomena of separation.

  16. riskRegression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ozenne, Brice; Sørensen, Anne Lyngholm; Scheike, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    In the presence of competing risks a prediction of the time-dynamic absolute risk of an event can be based on cause-specific Cox regression models for the event and the competing risks (Benichou and Gail, 1990). We present computationally fast and memory optimized C++ functions with an R interface......-product we obtain fast access to the baseline hazards (compared to survival::basehaz()) and predictions of survival probabilities, their confidence intervals and confidence bands. Confidence intervals and confidence bands are based on point-wise asymptotic expansions of the corresponding statistical...

  17. Adaptive metric kernel regression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goutte, Cyril; Larsen, Jan

    2000-01-01

    Kernel smoothing is a widely used non-parametric pattern recognition technique. By nature, it suffers from the curse of dimensionality and is usually difficult to apply to high input dimensions. In this contribution, we propose an algorithm that adapts the input metric used in multivariate...... regression by minimising a cross-validation estimate of the generalisation error. This allows to automatically adjust the importance of different dimensions. The improvement in terms of modelling performance is illustrated on a variable selection task where the adaptive metric kernel clearly outperforms...

  18. Adaptive Metric Kernel Regression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goutte, Cyril; Larsen, Jan

    1998-01-01

    Kernel smoothing is a widely used nonparametric pattern recognition technique. By nature, it suffers from the curse of dimensionality and is usually difficult to apply to high input dimensions. In this paper, we propose an algorithm that adapts the input metric used in multivariate regression...... by minimising a cross-validation estimate of the generalisation error. This allows one to automatically adjust the importance of different dimensions. The improvement in terms of modelling performance is illustrated on a variable selection task where the adaptive metric kernel clearly outperforms the standard...

  19. The Effects of Massage with Coconut and Sunflower Oils on Oxygen Saturation of Premature Infants with Respiratory Distress Syndrome Treated With Nasal Continuous Positive Airway Pressure

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    Sousan Valizadeh

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Nowadays particular emphasis is placed on the developmental aspects of premature infants care. Massage therapy is one of the best-known methods of caring. Due to the minimal touch policy in neonatal intensive care units (NICUs, massaging is not usually performed on premature infants. However, there is not sufficient evidence to support the claim that newborn infants with complex medical conditions should not be massaged. This study aimed to determine the effects of massage with coconut and sunflower oils on oxygen saturation of infants with respiratory distress syndrome (RDS treated with nasal continuous positive airway pressure (NCPAP. Methods: This was a randomized controlled trial on 90 newborns who were admitted to Alzahra Hospital (Tabriz, Iran. The infants were divided into control and massage therapy groups (massage with coconut and sunflower oils. Data was collected using a hospital documentation form. A 15-minute daily massage was performed for 3 days. Respiratory rate (RR, fraction of inspired oxygen (FiO2 and oxygen saturation were measured 5 minutes before the massage, 3 times during the massage, and 5 minutes after the massage. The collected data was analyzed using a mixed model. Results: In comparison to coconut oil and control groups, mean oxygen saturation of sunflower oil group was improved. In addition, the coconut massage group showed lower oxygen saturation than the control group but was all values were within the normal range. Although massage decreased oxygen saturation, there was no need to increase FiO2. Conclusion: Massage therapy can provide developmental care for infants treated with NCPAP.

  20. Effectiveness of massage therapy as co-adjuvant treatment to exercise in osteoarthritis of the knee: a randomized control trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortés Godoy, Virginia; Gallego Izquierdo, Tomás; Lázaro Navas, Irene; Pecos Martín, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    The effectiveness of exercise therapy in the treatment of osteoarthritis of the knee (KOA) is widely evidenced. The current study aims to compare the effectiveness of massage therapy as a co-adjuvant treatment for KOA. A blind, randomized controlled trial design was used. Eighteen women were randomly allocated to two different groups. Group A was treated with massage therapy and an exercise program, and Group B was treated with the exercise program alone. The intervention lasted for 6 weeks. Outcomes were assessed using a verbal analogue scale (VAS), the WOMAC index, and the Get-Up and Go test. Baseline, post-treatment, and 1- and 3- month follow-up data were collected. Values were considered statistically significant at a p massage therapy may lead to clinical improvement in patients with KOA. The use of massage therapy combined with exercise as a treatment for gonarthrosis does not seem to have any beneficial effects.