WorldWideScience

Sample records for refraction spacetime folding

  1. Derivation of a Vacuum Refractive Index in a Stringy Space-Time Foam Model

    CERN Document Server

    Ellis, Jonathan Richard; Nanopoulos, D V

    2008-01-01

    It has been suggested that energetic photons propagating in vacuo should experience a non-trivial refractive index due to the foamy structure of space-time induced by quantum-gravitational fluctuations. The sensitivity of recent astrophysical observations, particularly of AGN Mk501 by the MAGIC Collaboration, approaches the Planck scale for a refractive index depending linearly on the photon energy. We present here a new derivation of this quantum-gravitational vacuum refraction index, based on a stringy analogue of the interaction of a photon with internal degrees of freedom in a conventional medium. We model the space-time foam as a gas of D-particles in the bulk space-time of a higher-dimensional cosmology where the observable Universe is a D3-brane. The interaction of an open string representing a photon with a D-particle stretches and excites the string, which subsequently decays and re-emits the photon with a time delay that increases linearly with the photon energy and is related to stringy uncertainty...

  2. Liquid refractive index sensor based on a 2D 10-fold photonic quasicrystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shuai; Sun, XiaoHong; Wang, Cong; Peng, Gangding; Qi, Yongle; Wang, XiShi

    2017-09-01

    A liquid refractive index sensor is designed and optimized by using silicon-rods based on a 10-fold photonic quasicrystal without defects. The resonant mode with high Q value is chosen as the sensing wavelength in the transmission spectrum. By changing the radius of the silicon pillars, the sensor size and the refractive index of the background media, different types of sensors are designed and investigated. On the other hand, the performance of the sensor is investigated including the measurement range, sensitivity, etc. In the detection limit of spectral instruments, 0.02 nm, the sensing accuracy is 10-4 refractive index unit with a figure of merit of 1478. The measurement range is from 1.2731 to 1.4185. This will provide a new method for the design and fabrication of lab-on-chip, microfluidic optical elements and integrated optical circuits.

  3. Psychological Spacetime

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucian Gideon Conway

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available It has been an accepted scientific fact in physics for almost 100 years that time speeds up and slows down for an observer based on factors—such as motion and gravity—that affect space. Yet this fact, drawn from the theory of relativity, has not been widely integrated into the study of the psychology of time. The present article helps to fill in this gap between physics and psychology by reviewing evidence concerning what a psychological spacetime processor—one that accounted for the theory of relativity’s empirically validated predictions of the compensatory relationship between time and space—would look like. This model of the spacetime processor suggests that humans should have a psychological mechanism for slowing time down as motion speeds up, a prediction that already has widespread research support. We also discuss several novel hypotheses directly suggested by the spacetime model and a set of related speculations that emerge when considering spacetime (some of which have already received empirical support. Finally, we compare and contrast three very different potential reasons why we might have developed a spacetime processor in the first place. We conclude that the spacetime model shows promise for organizing existing data on time perception and generating novel hypotheses for researchers to pursue. Considering how humans might process spacetime helps reduce the existing gap between our understanding of physics and our understanding of human psychology.

  4. Spacetime equals entanglement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nomura, Yasunori [Berkeley Center for Theoretical Physics, Department of Physics, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Theoretical Physics Group, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Kavli Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe (WPI), The University of Tokyo Institutes for Advanced Study, Kashiwa 277-8583 (Japan); Salzetta, Nico, E-mail: nsalzetta@berkeley.edu [Berkeley Center for Theoretical Physics, Department of Physics, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Theoretical Physics Group, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Sanches, Fabio; Weinberg, Sean J. [Berkeley Center for Theoretical Physics, Department of Physics, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Theoretical Physics Group, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2016-12-10

    We study the Hilbert space structure of classical spacetimes under the assumption that entanglement in holographic theories determines semiclassical geometry. We show that this simple assumption has profound implications; for example, a superposition of classical spacetimes may lead to another classical spacetime. Despite its unconventional nature, this picture admits the standard interpretation of superpositions of well-defined semiclassical spacetimes in the limit that the number of holographic degrees of freedom becomes large. We illustrate these ideas using a model for the holographic theory of cosmological spacetimes.

  5. Refractive Errors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... halos around bright lights, squinting, headaches, or eye strain. Glasses or contact lenses can usually correct refractive errors. Laser eye surgery may also be a possibility. NIH: National Eye ...

  6. Refractive errors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiefer, Ulrich; Kraus, Christina; Baumbach, Peter; Ungewiß, Judith; Michels, Ralf

    2016-10-14

    All over the world, refractive errors are among the most frequently occuring treatable distur - bances of visual function. Ametropias have a prevalence of nearly 70% among adults in Germany and are thus of great epidemiologic and socio-economic relevance. In the light of their own clinical experience, the authors review pertinent articles retrieved by a selective literature search employing the terms "ametropia, "anisometropia," "refraction," "visual acuity," and epidemiology." In 2011, only 31% of persons over age 16 in Germany did not use any kind of visual aid; 63.4% wore eyeglasses and 5.3% wore contact lenses. Refractive errors were the most common reason for consulting an ophthalmologist, accounting for 21.1% of all outpatient visits. A pinhole aperture (stenopeic slit) is a suitable instrument for the basic diagnostic evaluation of impaired visual function due to optical factors. Spherical refractive errors (myopia and hyperopia), cylindrical refractive errors (astigmatism), unequal refractive errors in the two eyes (anisometropia), and the typical optical disturbance of old age (presbyopia) cause specific functional limitations and can be detected by a physician who does not need to be an ophthalmologist. Simple functional tests can be used in everyday clinical practice to determine quickly, easily, and safely whether the patient is suffering from a benign and easily correctable type of visual impairment, or whether there are other, more serious underlying causes.

  7. Refraction test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... you good vision. If you have a refractive error, you have a "prescription." Your prescription is a series of numbers that ... CA. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Medical Director, Brenda Conaway, Editorial Director, and the A.D.A.M. Editorial team. ... Latest Health News Read more Health ...

  8. Fractional and noncommutative spacetimes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arzano, M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/32616443X; Calcagni, M.; Oriti, D.; Scalisi, M.

    2011-01-01

    We establish a mapping between fractional and noncommutative spacetimes in configuration space. Depending on the scale at which the relation is considered, there arise two possibilities. For a fractional spacetime with log-oscillatory measure, the effective measure near the fundamental scale

  9. Quantum-Spacetime Phenomenology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni Amelino-Camelia

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available I review the current status of phenomenological programs inspired by quantum-spacetime research. I stress in particular the significance of results establishing that certain data analyses provide sensitivity to effects introduced genuinely at the Planck scale. My main focus is on phenomenological programs that affect the directions taken by studies of quantum-spacetime theories.

  10. Surface Tension of Spacetime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perko, Howard

    2017-01-01

    Concepts from physical chemistry and more specifically surface tension are introduced to spacetime. Lagrangian equations of motion for membranes of curved spacetime manifold are derived. The equations of motion in spatial directions are dispersion equations and can be rearranged to Schrodinger's equation where Plank's constant is related to membrane elastic modulus. The equation of motion in the time-direction has two immediately recognizable solutions: electromagnetic waves and corpuscles. The corpuscular membrane solution can assume different genus depending on quantized amounts of surface energy. A metric tensor that relates empty flat spacetime to energetic curved spacetime is found that satisfies general relativity. Application of the surface tension to quantum electrodynamics and implications for quantum chromodynamics are discussed. Although much work remains, it is suggested that spacetime surface tension may provide a classical explanation that combines general relativity with field theories in quantum mechanics and atomic particle physics.

  11. RADIO REFRACTIVITY RADIO REFRACTIVITY STUDY IN AKURE ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    eobe

    The basic parameters that describe the troposphere region are pressure, temperature and relative humidity. Variations in these conditions within the troposphere cause changes in the refractive index of air and large scale changes of refractive index with height cause radio waves to be refracted and the effect can be quite.

  12. Symmetry, structure, and spacetime

    CERN Document Server

    Rickles, Dean

    2007-01-01

    In this book Rickles considers several interpretative difficulties raised by gauge-type symmetries (those that correspond to no change in physical state). The ubiquity of such symmetries in modern physics renders them an urgent topic in philosophy of physics. Rickles focuses on spacetime physics, and in particular classical and quantum general relativity. Here the problems posed are at their most pathological, involving the apparent disappearance of spacetime! Rickles argues that both traditional ontological positions should be replaced by a structuralist account according to which relational

  13. Space-time structure

    CERN Document Server

    Schrödinger, Erwin

    1985-01-01

    In response to repeated requests this classic book on space-time structure by Professor Erwin Schrödinger is now available in the Cambridge Science Classics series. First published in 1950, and reprinted in 1954 and 1960, this lucid and profound exposition of Einstein's 1915 theory of gravitation still provides valuable reading for students and research workers in the field.

  14. REFRACTIVE NEUTRON LENS

    OpenAIRE

    Petrov, P. V.; Kolchevsky, N. N.

    2013-01-01

    Compound concave refractive lenses are used for focusing neutron beam. Investigations of spectral and focusing properties of a refractive neutron lens are presented. Resolution of the imaging system on the base of refractive neutron lenses depends on material properties and parameters of neutron source. Model of refractive neutron lens are proposed. Results of calculation diffraction resolution and focal depth of refractive neutron lens are discussed.

  15. Universal spacetimes in four dimensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hervik, S.; Pravda, V.; Pravdová, A.

    2017-10-01

    Universal spacetimes are exact solutions to all higher-order theories of gravity. We study these spacetimes in four dimensions and provide necessary and sufficient conditions for universality for all Petrov types except of type II. We show that all universal spacetimes in four dimensions are algebraically special and Kundt. Petrov type D universal spacetimes are necessarily direct products of two 2-spaces of constant and equal curvature. Furthermore, type II universal spacetimes necessarily possess a null recurrent direction and they admit the above type D direct product metrics as a limit. Such spacetimes represent gravitational waves propagating on these backgrounds. Type III universal spacetimes are also investigated. We determine necessary and sufficient conditions for universality and present an explicit example of a type III universal Kundt non-recurrent metric.

  16. Uniform Refraction in Negative Refractive Index Materials

    CERN Document Server

    Gutierrez, Cristian E

    2015-01-01

    We study the problem of constructing an optical surface separating two homogeneous, isotropic media, one of which has a negative refractive index. In doing so, we develop a vector form of Snell's law, which is used to study surfaces possessing a certain uniform refraction property, both in the near and far field cases. In the near field problem, unlike the case when both materials have positive refractive index, we show that the resulting surfaces can be neither convex nor concave.

  17. Gravitation and spacetime

    CERN Document Server

    Ohanian, Hans C

    2013-01-01

    The third edition of this classic textbook is a quantitative introduction for advanced undergraduates and graduate students. It gently guides students from Newton's gravitational theory to special relativity, and then to the relativistic theory of gravitation. General relativity is approached from several perspectives: as a theory constructed by analogy with Maxwell's electrodynamics, as a relativistic generalization of Newton's theory, and as a theory of curved spacetime. The authors provide a concise overview of the important concepts and formulas, coupled with the experimental results underpinning the latest research in the field. Numerous exercises in Newtonian gravitational theory and Maxwell's equations help students master essential concepts for advanced work in general relativity, while detailed spacetime diagrams encourage them to think in terms of four-dimensional geometry. Featuring comprehensive reviews of recent experimental and observational data, the text concludes with chapters on cosmology an...

  18. Classification of spacetimes with symmetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicks, Jesse W.

    Spacetimes with symmetry play a critical role in Einstein's Theory of General Relativity. Missing from the literature is a correct, usable, and computer accessible classification of such spacetimes. This dissertation fills this gap; specifically, we. i) give a new and different approach to the classification of spacetimes with symmetry using modern methods and tools such as the Schmidt method and computer algebra systems, resulting in ninety-two spacetimes; ii) create digital databases of the classification for easy access and use for researchers; iii) create software to classify any spacetime metric with symmetry against the new database; iv) compare results of our classification with those of Petrov and find that Petrov missed six cases and incorrectly normalized a significant number of metrics; v) classify spacetimes with symmetry in the book Exact Solutions to Einstein's Field Equations Second Edition by Stephani, Kramer, Macallum, Hoenselaers, and Herlt and in Komrakov's paper Einstein-Maxwell equation on four-dimensional homogeneous spaces using the new software.

  19. Refraction near the horizon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaefer, Bradley E.; Liller, William

    1990-01-01

    Variations in astronomical refraction near the horizon are examined. Sunset timings, a sextant mounted on a tripod, and a temperature profile are utilized to derive the variations in refraction data, collected from 7 locations. It is determined that the refraction ranges from 0.234 to 1.678 deg with an rms deviation of 0.16, and it is observed that the variation is larger than previously supposed. Some applications for the variation of refraction value are discussed.

  20. Pediatric refractive surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stahl, Erin D

    2017-07-01

    Refractive surgery procedures have been performed on children since the early 1980s. This article will review this history as well as current thoughts on treating children with large refractive errors. Pediatric refractive surgery has developed slowly as very few children fit the criteria for treatment. For this reason, practice patterns are varied and publications are rare. Publications in recent years have focused on intraocular procedures over laser refractive surgery. Pediatric refractive surgery is an evolving field as surgeons try to find the best long-term treatments for these young patients.

  1. Type II universal spacetimes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hervik, S.; Málek, T.; Pravda, V.; Pravdová, A.

    2015-12-01

    We study type II universal metrics of the Lorentzian signature. These metrics simultaneously solve vacuum field equations of all theories of gravitation with the Lagrangian being a polynomial curvature invariant constructed from the metric, the Riemann tensor and its covariant derivatives of an arbitrary order. We provide examples of type II universal metrics for all composite number dimensions. On the other hand, we have no examples for prime number dimensions and we prove the non-existence of type II universal spacetimes in five dimensions. We also present type II vacuum solutions of selected classes of gravitational theories, such as Lovelock, quadratic and L({{Riemann}}) gravities.

  2. Emergent universe from noncommutative spacetime

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jungjai [Daejin University, Pocheon (Korea, Republic of); Yang, Hyunseok [Ewha Womans University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-09-15

    The Big Bang, which was the birth of our Universe, happened at the Planck epoch. It was not an event that developed in a pre-existing space-time. Rather, it was a cosmological event simultaneously generating space-time as well as all other matter fields. Therefore, in order to describe the origin of our Universe, it is necessary to have a background-independent theory for quantum gravity in which no space-time structure is a priori assumed, but is defined from the theory. The emergent gravity based on noncommutative gauge theory provides such a background-independent formulation of quantum gravity, and the emergent space-time leads to a novel picture of the dynamical origin of space-time. We address some issues about the origin of our Universe and discuss the implications to cosmology of the emergent gravity.

  3. Springer handbook of spacetime

    CERN Document Server

    Petkov, Vesselin

    2014-01-01

    The Springer Handbook of Spacetime is dedicated to the ground-breaking paradigm shifts embodied in the two relativity theories, and describes in detail the profound reshaping of physical sciences they ushered in. It includes in a single volume chapters on foundations, on the underlying mathematics, on physical and astrophysical implications, experimental evidence and cosmological predictions, as well as chapters on efforts to unify general relativity and quantum physics. The Handbook can be used as a desk reference by researchers in a wide variety of fields, not only by specialists in relativity but also by researchers in related areas that either grew out of, or are deeply influenced by, the two relativity theories: cosmology, astronomy and astrophysics, high energy physics, quantum field theory, mathematics, and philosophy of science. It should also serve as a valuable resource for graduate students and young researchers entering these areas, and for instructors who teach courses on these subjects. The Han...

  4. Atmospheric refraction: a history

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehn, Waldemar H.; van der Werf, Siebren

    2005-09-01

    We trace the history of atmospheric refraction from the ancient Greeks up to the time of Kepler. The concept that the atmosphere could refract light entered Western science in the second century B.C. Ptolemy, 300 years later, produced the first clearly defined atmospheric model, containing air of uniform density up to a sharp upper transition to the ether, at which the refraction occurred. Alhazen and Witelo transmitted his knowledge to medieval Europe. The first accurate measurements were made by Tycho Brahe in the 16th century. Finally, Kepler, who was aware of unusually strong refractions, used the Ptolemaic model to explain the first documented and recognized mirage (the Novaya Zemlya effect).

  5. Ambient cosmology and spacetime singularities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antoniadis, Ignatios [Bern University, Albert Einstein Center for Fundamental Physics, Institute for Theoretical Physics, Bern (Switzerland); Ecole Polytechnique, Palaiseau (France); Cotsakis, Spiros [CERN, Theory Division, Department of Physics, Geneva 23 (Switzerland); National Technical University, School of Applied Mathematics and Physical Sciences, Athens (Greece)

    2015-01-01

    We present a new approach to the issues of spacetime singularities and cosmic censorship in general relativity. This is based on the idea that standard 4-dimensional spacetime is the conformal infinity of an ambient metric for the 5-dimensional Einstein equations with fluid sources. We then find that the existence of spacetime singularities in four dimensions is constrained by asymptotic properties of the ambient 5-metric, while the non-degeneracy of the latter crucially depends on cosmic censorship holding on the boundary. (orig.)

  6. Interactions Between Real and Virtual Spacetimes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Javadi, Hossein; Forouzbakhsh, Farshid

    2014-01-01

    . In this article, we analyzed that c is the edge of visible and invisible particles such as virtual photons and graviton. It leads us passing the real spacetime and enter into the virtual spacetime and describe interactions between real spacetime and virtual spacetime and reach to non-obvious space....

  7. Geometric U-folds in four dimensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazaroiu, C. I.; Shahbazi, C. S.

    2018-01-01

    We describe a general construction of geometric U-folds compatible with a non-trivial extension of the global formulation of four-dimensional extended supergravity on a differentiable spin manifold. The topology of geometric U-folds depends on certain flat fiber bundles which encode how supergravity fields are globally glued together. We show that smooth non-trivial U-folds of this type can exist only in theories where both the scalar and space-time manifolds have non-trivial fundamental group and in addition the scalar map of the solution is homotopically non-trivial. Consistency with string theory requires smooth geometric U-folds to be glued using subgroups of the effective discrete U-duality group, implying that the fundamental group of the scalar manifold of such solutions must be a subgroup of the latter. We construct simple examples of geometric U-folds in a generalization of the axion–dilaton model of \

  8. Quasilocal Energy in Kerr Spacetime

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Jian-Liang

    2016-01-01

    In this work we study the quasilocal energy as in [11] for a constant radius surface in Kerr spacetime in Boyer-Lindquist coordinates. We show that under suitable conditions for isometric embedding, for a stationary observer the quasilocal energy defined in [11] for constant radius in a Kerr like spacetime is exactly equal to the Brown-York quasilocal energy [2]. By some careful estimations, we show that for a constant radius surface in the Kerr spacetime which is outside the ergosphere the embedding conditions for the previous result are satisfied. Finally we discuss extremal solutions as described in [14] and show that near the horizon of the Kerr spacetime for the small rotation case the extremal solutions are trivial.

  9. Atmospheric refraction : a history

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lehn, WH; van der Werf, S

    2005-01-01

    We trace the history of atmospheric refraction from the ancient Greeks up to the time of Kepler. The concept that the atmosphere could refract light entered Western science in the second century B.C. Ptolemy, 300 years later, produced the first clearly defined atmospheric model, containing air of

  10. Advances in Refractive Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Li; Moss, Hart; Ventura, Bruna V; Padilha, Henrique; Hester, Christian; Koch, Douglas D

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to review advances in the field of refractive surgery as reported in the peer-reviewed literature over the previous year. This was a literature review. We conducted a PubMed search for terms related to refractive surgery and reviewed prominent international ophthalmic journals published from May 2012 through April 2013. All pertinent articles were reviewed, and selected articles with the greatest relevance were included. Many studies over the previous year have highlighted progress in the field of refractive surgery; topics included keratoconus screening, photorefractive keratectomy and laser in situ keratomileusis, corneal cross-linking, small-incision lenticule extraction, phakic intraocular lenses, corneal inlays, presbyopic corneal treatments, and femtosecond laser-assisted astigmatic keratotomy. The field of refractive surgery continues to provide exciting developments. Improvements in established procedures and promising new surgical options make the current climate an appealing one for refractive surgeons and patients.

  11. Parsimonious refraction interferometry

    KAUST Repository

    Hanafy, Sherif

    2016-09-06

    We present parsimonious refraction interferometry where a densely populated refraction data set can be obtained from just two shot gathers. The assumptions are that the first arrivals are comprised of head waves and direct waves, and a pair of reciprocal shot gathers is recorded over the line of interest. The refraction traveltimes from these reciprocal shot gathers can be picked and decomposed into O(N2) refraction traveltimes generated by N virtual sources, where N is the number of geophones in the 2D survey. This enormous increase in the number of virtual traveltime picks and associated rays, compared to the 2N traveltimes from the two reciprocal shot gathers, allows for increased model resolution and better condition numbers in the normal equations. Also, a reciprocal survey is far less time consuming than a standard refraction survey with a dense distribution of sources.

  12. Iterative supervirtual refraction interferometry

    KAUST Repository

    Al-Hagan, Ola

    2014-05-02

    In refraction tomography, the low signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) can be a major obstacle in picking the first-break arrivals at the far-offset receivers. To increase the S/N, we evaluated iterative supervirtual refraction interferometry (ISVI), which is an extension of the supervirtual refraction interferometry method. In this method, supervirtual traces are computed and then iteratively reused to generate supervirtual traces with a higher S/N. Our empirical results with both synthetic and field data revealed that ISVI can significantly boost up the S/N of far-offset traces. The drawback is that using refraction events from more than one refractor can introduce unacceptable artifacts into the final traveltime versus offset curve. This problem can be avoided by careful windowing of refraction events.

  13. Macroscopic Spacetime Shortcuts in the Manyfold Universe

    CERN Document Server

    Loup, F

    2004-01-01

    Recently the idea of a Manyfold Universe was proposed by some authors to explain Dark Matter . In this study we assume that the Standard Model(SM) of particles and fields with gravity propagating in the Higher Dimensional Spacetime(Bulk) while other interactions are confined to 3+1 Einsteinian spacetime(Brane) is not due to open strings and closed loops but instead is due to the capability of gravity as the weakest and "smallest" interaction to penetrate these small Bulk size ($10^{-31}$m to $10^{-35}$m) while protons,neutrons and other interactions stronger and "larger" than gravity do not "fits" in the size of the Bulk and remains trapped on the Brane and we present a equation to justify this point of view. Our picture relies over the geometrical beauty of the Manyfold Universe proposal that Dark Matter is chemically identical to ordinary matter but lies on other Folds. Also the geometrical point of view for the small size of the Bulk eliminates the need of trapping mechanisms to confine matter in the Brane...

  14. Averaging Schwarzschild spacetime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tegai, S. Ph.; Drobov, I. V.

    2017-07-01

    We tried to average the Schwarzschild solution for the gravitational point source by analogy with the same problem in Newtonian gravity or electrostatics. We expected to get a similar result, consisting of two parts: the smoothed interior part being a sphere filled with some matter content and an empty exterior part described by the original solution. We considered several variants of generally covariant averaging schemes. The averaging of the connection in the spirit of Zalaletdinov's macroscopic gravity gave unsatisfactory results. With the transport operators proposed in the literature it did not give the expected Schwarzschild solution in the exterior part of the averaged spacetime. We were able to construct a transport operator that preserves the Newtonian analogy for the outward region but such an operator does not have a clear geometrical meaning. In contrast, using the curvature as the primary averaged object instead of the connection does give the desired result for the exterior part of the problem in a fine way. However for the interior part, this curvature averaging does not work because the Schwarzschild curvature components diverge as 1 /r3 near the center and therefore are not integrable.

  15. Uncorrected refractive errors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kovin S Naidoo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Global estimates indicate that more than 2.3 billion people in the world suffer from poor vision due to refractive error; of which 670 million people are considered visually impaired because they do not have access to corrective treatment. Refractive errors, if uncorrected, results in an impaired quality of life for millions of people worldwide, irrespective of their age, sex and ethnicity. Over the past decade, a series of studies using a survey methodology, referred to as Refractive Error Study in Children (RESC, were performed in populations with different ethnic origins and cultural settings. These studies confirmed that the prevalence of uncorrected refractive errors is considerably high for children in low-and-middle-income countries. Furthermore, uncorrected refractive error has been noted to have extensive social and economic impacts, such as limiting educational and employment opportunities of economically active persons, healthy individuals and communities. The key public health challenges presented by uncorrected refractive errors, the leading cause of vision impairment across the world, require urgent attention. To address these issues, it is critical to focus on the development of human resources and sustainable methods of service delivery. This paper discusses three core pillars to addressing the challenges posed by uncorrected refractive errors: Human Resource (HR Development, Service Development and Social Entrepreneurship.

  16. Uncorrected refractive errors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naidoo, Kovin S; Jaggernath, Jyoti

    2012-01-01

    Global estimates indicate that more than 2.3 billion people in the world suffer from poor vision due to refractive error; of which 670 million people are considered visually impaired because they do not have access to corrective treatment. Refractive errors, if uncorrected, results in an impaired quality of life for millions of people worldwide, irrespective of their age, sex and ethnicity. Over the past decade, a series of studies using a survey methodology, referred to as Refractive Error Study in Children (RESC), were performed in populations with different ethnic origins and cultural settings. These studies confirmed that the prevalence of uncorrected refractive errors is considerably high for children in low-and-middle-income countries. Furthermore, uncorrected refractive error has been noted to have extensive social and economic impacts, such as limiting educational and employment opportunities of economically active persons, healthy individuals and communities. The key public health challenges presented by uncorrected refractive errors, the leading cause of vision impairment across the world, require urgent attention. To address these issues, it is critical to focus on the development of human resources and sustainable methods of service delivery. This paper discusses three core pillars to addressing the challenges posed by uncorrected refractive errors: Human Resource (HR) Development, Service Development and Social Entrepreneurship.

  17. Uncorrected refractive errors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naidoo, Kovin S; Jaggernath, Jyoti

    2012-01-01

    Global estimates indicate that more than 2.3 billion people in the world suffer from poor vision due to refractive error; of which 670 million people are considered visually impaired because they do not have access to corrective treatment. Refractive errors, if uncorrected, results in an impaired quality of life for millions of people worldwide, irrespective of their age, sex and ethnicity. Over the past decade, a series of studies using a survey methodology, referred to as Refractive Error Study in Children (RESC), were performed in populations with different ethnic origins and cultural settings. These studies confirmed that the prevalence of uncorrected refractive errors is considerably high for children in low-and-middle-income countries. Furthermore, uncorrected refractive error has been noted to have extensive social and economic impacts, such as limiting educational and employment opportunities of economically active persons, healthy individuals and communities. The key public health challenges presented by uncorrected refractive errors, the leading cause of vision impairment across the world, require urgent attention. To address these issues, it is critical to focus on the development of human resources and sustainable methods of service delivery. This paper discusses three core pillars to addressing the challenges posed by uncorrected refractive errors: Human Resource (HR) Development, Service Development and Social Entrepreneurship. PMID:22944755

  18. Refractive surgery for keratoconus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ormonde, Sue

    2013-03-01

    Traditionally, keratoconus has been managed with glasses when mild, contact lenses when moderate and keratoplasty when severe. When cornea-based refractive surgery was first developed it appeared to be a useful option for keratoconus until reports of post-operative progressive ectasia emerged and thus keratoconus was considered a contraindication to refractive surgery. However, improvements in older techniques and the development of new techniques mean that there are now several viable options to avoid keratoplasty in contact lens-intolerant patients. This review discusses the risks and benefits of excimer laser refractive procedures, both with and without corneal collagen cross linking, as well as intra-corneal ring segments, phakic intraocular lenses and refractive lens exchange with toric intraocular lens implantation. © 2013 The Author. Clinical and Experimental Optometry © 2013 Optometrists Association Australia.

  19. Correction of refractive errors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir Pfeifer

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Spectacles and contact lenses are the most frequently used, the safest and the cheapest way to correct refractive errors. The development of keratorefractive surgery has brought new opportunities for correction of refractive errors in patients who have the need to be less dependent of spectacles or contact lenses. Until recently, RK was the most commonly performed refractive procedure for nearsighted patients.Conclusions: The introduction of excimer laser in refractive surgery has given the new opportunities of remodelling the cornea. The laser energy can be delivered on the stromal surface like in PRK or deeper on the corneal stroma by means of lamellar surgery. In LASIK flap is created with microkeratome in LASEK with ethanol and in epi-LASIK the ultra thin flap is created mechanically.

  20. Domain walls and spacetime-filling branes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergshoeff, E; Wess, J; Ivanov, EA

    1999-01-01

    We discuss branes with one transversal direction (domain walls) and no transversal direction (spacetime-filling branes). In particular, we briefly discuss a relationship between spacetime-filling branes and superstring theories with sixteen supercharges.

  1. Radiation Transport in Dynamic Spacetimes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnittman, Jeremy; Baker, John G.; Etienne, Zachariah; Giacomazzo, Bruno; Kelly, Bernard J.

    2017-08-01

    We present early results from a new radiation transport calculation of gas accretion onto merging binary black holes. We use the Monte Carlo radiation transport code Pandurata, now generalized for application to dynamic spacetimes. The time variability of the metric requires careful numerical techniques for solving the geodesic equation, particularly with tabulated spacetime data from numerical relativity codes. Using a new series of general relativistic magneto-hydrodynamical simulations of magnetized flow onto binary black holes, we investigate the possibility for detecting and identifying unique electromagnetic counterparts to gravitational wave events.

  2. Distributed space-time coding

    CERN Document Server

    Jing, Yindi

    2014-01-01

    Distributed Space-Time Coding (DSTC) is a cooperative relaying scheme that enables high reliability in wireless networks. This brief presents the basic concept of DSTC, its achievable performance, generalizations, code design, and differential use. Recent results on training design and channel estimation for DSTC and the performance of training-based DSTC are also discussed.

  3. Spacetime Metrics from Gauge Potentials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ettore Minguzzi

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available I present an approach to gravity in which the spacetime metric is constructed from a non-Abelian gauge potential with values in the Lie algebra of the group U(2 (or the Lie algebra of quaternions. If the curvature of this potential vanishes, the metric reduces to a canonical curved background form reminiscent of the Friedmann S3 cosmological metric.

  4. Infections after refractive surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haq, Zeeshan; Farooq, Asim V; Huang, Andrew J W

    2016-07-01

    The purpose of the review is to provide a summary of the recent literature concerning infections after refractive surgery pertinent to each procedure category. New data from a large retrospective study suggest that the incidence of post-laser assisted in-situ keratomileusis infectious keratitis is declining. Additionally, recent case studies have reported viral, fungal, and Acanthamoeba pathogens. Corneal collagen cross-linking is emerging as an alternative therapeutic option for early stage post-LASIK infectious keratitis. Postoperative bandage contact lens used in patients undergoing surface ablation procedures may confer a higher risk of infection because of greater colonization rates in those individuals, such as healthcare providers, with relatively high risk of exposure to potential pathogens. In the setting of post-penetrating keratoplasty astigmatism, femtosecond laser astigmatic keratotomy procedures pose a risk of infectious keratitis and even endophthalmitis. Lastly, recent case reports of endophthalmitis after refractive lens procedures highlight the importance of postoperative monitoring for this sight threatening, albeit rare, complication. The risks and management of infections after surgical refractive procedures vary widely depending on the specific technique employed. As technology and treatment options continue to evolve with further research, we anticipate continued success in the management of postoperative infections after refractive surgery.

  5. Conceptualization of Light Refraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokolowski, Andrzej

    2013-01-01

    There have been a number of papers dealing quantitatively with light refraction. Yet the conceptualization of the phenomenon that sets the foundation for a more rigorous math analysis is minimized. The purpose of this paper is to fill that gap. (Contains 3 figures.)

  6. Refractive index based measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2014-01-01

    In a method for performing a refractive index based measurement of a property of a fluid such as chemical composition or temperature, a chirp in the local spatial frequency of interference fringes of an interference pattern is reduced by mathematical manipulation of the recorded light intensity...

  7. Refractive index based measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2014-01-01

    A refractive index based measurement of a property of a fluid is measured in an apparatus comprising a variable wavelength coherent light source (16), a sample chamber (12), a wavelength controller (24), a light sensor (20), a data recorder (26) and a computation apparatus (28), by - directing...

  8. Refractive index based measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2014-01-01

    In a method for performing a refractive index based measurement of a property of a fluid such as chemical composition or temperature by observing an apparent angular shift in an interference fringe pattern produced by back or forward scattering interferometry, ambiguities in the measurement caused...

  9. Refraction corrections for surveying

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lear, W. M.

    1980-01-01

    Optical measurements of range and elevation angles are distorted by refraction of Earth's atmosphere. Theoretical discussion of effect, along with equations for determining exact range and elevation corrections, is presented in report. Potentially useful in optical site surveying and related applications, analysis is easily programmed on pocket calculator. Input to equation is measured range and measured elevation; output is true range and true elevation.

  10. Dark energy from discrete spacetime.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trout, Aaron D

    2013-01-01

    Dark energy accounts for most of the matter-energy content of our universe, yet current theories of its origin rely on radical physical assumptions such as the holographic principle or controversial anthropic arguments. We give a better motivated explanation for dark energy, claiming that it arises from a small negative scalar-curvature present even in empty spacetime. The vacuum has this curvature because spacetime is fundamentally discrete and there are more ways for a discrete geometry to have negative curvature than positive. We explicitly compute this effect using a variant of the well known dynamical-triangulations (DT) model for quantum gravity. Our model predicts a time-varying non-zero cosmological constant with a current value, [Formula: see text] in natural units, in agreement with observation. This calculation is made possible by a novel characterization of the possible DT action values combined with numerical evidence concerning their degeneracies.

  11. Dark energy from discrete spacetime.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aaron D Trout

    Full Text Available Dark energy accounts for most of the matter-energy content of our universe, yet current theories of its origin rely on radical physical assumptions such as the holographic principle or controversial anthropic arguments. We give a better motivated explanation for dark energy, claiming that it arises from a small negative scalar-curvature present even in empty spacetime. The vacuum has this curvature because spacetime is fundamentally discrete and there are more ways for a discrete geometry to have negative curvature than positive. We explicitly compute this effect using a variant of the well known dynamical-triangulations (DT model for quantum gravity. Our model predicts a time-varying non-zero cosmological constant with a current value, [Formula: see text] in natural units, in agreement with observation. This calculation is made possible by a novel characterization of the possible DT action values combined with numerical evidence concerning their degeneracies.

  12. Embedding Graphs in Lorentzian Spacetime

    CERN Document Server

    Clough, James R

    2016-01-01

    Geometric approaches to network analysis combine simply defined models with great descriptive power. In this work we provide a method for embedding directed acyclic graphs into Minkowski spacetime using Multidimensional scaling (MDS). First we generalise the classical MDS algorithm, defined only for metrics with a Euclidean signature, to manifolds of any metric signature. We then use this general method to develop an algorithm to be used on networks which have causal structure allowing them to be embedded in Lorentzian manifolds. The method is demonstrated by calculating embeddings for both causal sets and citation networks in Minkowski spacetime. We finally suggest a number of applications in citation analysis such as paper recommendation, identifying missing citations and fitting citation models to data using this geometric approach.

  13. Massive gravitons in arbitrary spacetimes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazuet, Charles; Volkov, Mikhail S.

    2017-12-01

    We present two different versions of the consistent theory of massive gravitons in arbitrary spacetimes which are simple enough for practical applications. The theory is described by a nonsymmetric rank-2 tensor whose equations of motion imply six algebraic and five differential constraints, reducing the number of independent components to five. The theory reproduces the standard description of massive gravitons in Einstein spaces. In generic spacetimes it does not show the massless limit and always propagates five degrees of freedom, even for the vanishing mass parameter. We illustrate these features by an explicit calculation for a homogeneous and isotropic cosmological background. We find that the gravitons are stable if they are sufficiently massive, hence they may be a part of dark matter at present. We also discuss other possible applications.

  14. Ringing in de Sitter spacetime

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex Buchel

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Hydrodynamics is a universal effective theory describing relaxation of quantum field theories towards equilibrium. Massive QFTs in de Sitter spacetime are never at equilibrium. We use holographic gauge theory/gravity correspondence to describe relaxation of a QFT to its Bunch–Davies vacuum — an attractor of its late-time dynamics. Specifically, we compute the analogue of the quasinormal modes describing the relaxation of a holographic toy model QFT in de Sitter.

  15. Black Hole: The Interior Spacetime

    CERN Document Server

    Ong, Yen Chin

    2016-01-01

    The information loss paradox is often discussed from the perspective of the observers who stay outside of a black hole. However, the interior spacetime of a black hole can be rather nontrivial. We discuss the open problems regarding the volume of a black hole, and whether it plays any role in information storage. We also emphasize the importance of resolving the black hole singularity, if one were to resolve the information loss paradox.

  16. Space-Time Quantum Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronald E. Meyers

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available We report on an experimental and theoretical investigation of quantum imaging where the images are stored in both space and time. Ghost images of remote objects are produced with either one or two beams of chaotic laser light generated by a rotating ground glass and two sensors measuring the reference field and bucket field at different space-time points. We further observe that the ghost images translate depending on the time delay between the sensor measurements. The ghost imaging experiments are performed both with and without turbulence. A discussion of the physics of the space-time imaging is presented in terms of quantum nonlocal two-photon analysis to support the experimental results. The theoretical model includes certain phase factors of the rotating ground glass. These experiments demonstrated a means to investigate the time and space aspects of ghost imaging and showed that ghost imaging contains more information per measured photon than was previously recognized where multiple ghost images are stored within the same ghost imaging data sets. This suggests new pathways to explore quantum information stored not only in multi-photon coincidence information but also in time delayed multi-photon interference. The research is applicable to making enhanced space-time quantum images and videos of moving objects where the images are stored in both space and time.

  17. Lorentz violations in multifractal spacetimes

    CERN Document Server

    Calcagni, Gianluca

    2016-01-01

    Using the recent observation of gravitational waves (GW) produced by a black-hole merger, we place a lower bound on the energy above which a multifractal spacetime would manifest an anomalous geometry and, in particular, violations of Lorentz invariance. In the so-called multifractional theory with $q$-derivatives, we show that the deformation of dispersion relations is much stronger than in generic quantum-gravity approaches (including loop quantum gravity) and, contrary to the latter, present observations on GWs can place very strong bounds on the characteristic scales at which spacetime deviates from standard Minkowski. The energy at which multifractal effects should become apparent is $E_*>10^{14}\\,\\text{GeV}$ (thus improving previous bounds by 12 orders of magnitude) when the exponents in the measure are fixed to their central value $1/2$. We also estimate, for the first time, the effect of logarithmic oscillations in the measure (corresponding to a discrete spacetime structure) and find that they do not...

  18. Embedding graphs in Lorentzian spacetime.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James R Clough

    Full Text Available Geometric approaches to network analysis combine simply defined models with great descriptive power. In this work we provide a method for embedding directed acyclic graphs (DAG into Minkowski spacetime using Multidimensional scaling (MDS. First we generalise the classical MDS algorithm, defined only for metrics with a Riemannian signature, to manifolds of any metric signature. We then use this general method to develop an algorithm which exploits the causal structure of a DAG to assign space and time coordinates in a Minkowski spacetime to each vertex. As in the causal set approach to quantum gravity, causal connections in the discrete graph correspond to timelike separation in the continuous spacetime. The method is demonstrated by calculating embeddings for simple models of causal sets and random DAGs, as well as real citation networks. We find that the citation networks we test yield significantly more accurate embeddings that random DAGs of the same size. Finally we suggest a number of applications in citation analysis such as paper recommendation, identifying missing citations and fitting citation models to data using this geometric approach.

  19. Lorentz violations in multifractal spacetimes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calcagni, Gianluca [Instituto de Estructura de la Materia, CSIC, Madrid (Spain)

    2017-05-15

    Using the recent observation of gravitational waves (GW) produced by a black-hole merger, we place a lower bound on the energy above which a multifractal spacetime would display an anomalous geometry and, in particular, violations of Lorentz invariance. In the so-called multifractional theory with q-derivatives, we show that the deformation of dispersion relations is much stronger than in generic quantum-gravity approaches (including loop quantum gravity) and, contrary to the latter, present observations on GWs can place very strong bounds on the characteristic scales at which spacetime deviates from standard Minkowski. The energy at which multifractal effects should become apparent is E{sub *} > 10{sup 14} GeV (thus improving previous bounds by 12 orders of magnitude) when the exponents in the measure are fixed to their central value 1 / 2. We also estimate, for the first time, the effect of logarithmic oscillations in the measure (corresponding to a discrete spacetime structure) and find that they do not change much the bounds obtained in their absence, unless the amplitude of the oscillations is fine tuned. This feature, unavailable in known quantum-gravity scenarios, may help the theory to avoid being ruled out by gamma-ray burst (GRB) observations, for which E{sub *} > 10{sup 17} GeV or greater. (orig.)

  20. Thermal dimension of quantum spacetime

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amelino-Camelia, Giovanni, E-mail: amelino@roma1.infn.it [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università “La Sapienza” and Sez. Roma1 INFN, P.le A. Moro 2, 00185 Roma (Italy); Brighenti, Francesco [Theoretical Physics, Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College, London, SW7 2BZ (United Kingdom); Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia dell' Università di Bologna and Sez. Bologna INFN, Via Irnerio 46, 40126 Bologna (Italy); Gubitosi, Giulia [Theoretical Physics, Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College, London, SW7 2BZ (United Kingdom); Santos, Grasiele [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università “La Sapienza” and Sez. Roma1 INFN, P.le A. Moro 2, 00185 Roma (Italy)

    2017-04-10

    Recent results suggest that a crucial crossroad for quantum gravity is the characterization of the effective dimension of spacetime at short distances, where quantum properties of spacetime become significant. This is relevant in particular for various scenarios of “dynamical dimensional reduction” which have been discussed in the literature. We are here concerned with the fact that the related research effort has been based mostly on analyses of the “spectral dimension”, which involves an unphysical Euclideanization of spacetime and is highly sensitive to the off-shell properties of a theory. As here shown, different formulations of the same physical theory can have wildly different spectral dimension. We propose that dynamical dimensional reduction should be described in terms of the “thermal dimension” which we here introduce, a notion that only depends on the physical content of the theory. We analyze a few models with dynamical reduction both of the spectral dimension and of our thermal dimension, finding in particular some cases where thermal and spectral dimension agree, but also some cases where the spectral dimension has puzzling properties while the thermal dimension gives a different and meaningful picture.

  1. Thermal dimension of quantum spacetime

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni Amelino-Camelia

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Recent results suggest that a crucial crossroad for quantum gravity is the characterization of the effective dimension of spacetime at short distances, where quantum properties of spacetime become significant. This is relevant in particular for various scenarios of “dynamical dimensional reduction” which have been discussed in the literature. We are here concerned with the fact that the related research effort has been based mostly on analyses of the “spectral dimension”, which involves an unphysical Euclideanization of spacetime and is highly sensitive to the off-shell properties of a theory. As here shown, different formulations of the same physical theory can have wildly different spectral dimension. We propose that dynamical dimensional reduction should be described in terms of the “thermal dimension” which we here introduce, a notion that only depends on the physical content of the theory. We analyze a few models with dynamical reduction both of the spectral dimension and of our thermal dimension, finding in particular some cases where thermal and spectral dimension agree, but also some cases where the spectral dimension has puzzling properties while the thermal dimension gives a different and meaningful picture.

  2. An Observation Operator for Radar Refractivity Change: Comparison of Observations and Convective-Scale Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caumont, Olivier; Foray, Anouck; Besson, Lucas; Parent du Châtelet, Jacques

    2013-08-01

    Weather radar refractivity depends on low-level moisture, temperature, and pressure and is available at high space-time resolutions over large areas. It is of definite meteorological interest for assimilation, verification, and process-study purposes. In this study, the path-averaged refractivity change is simulated from the Arome cloud-resolving atmospheric system analyses and compared with corresponding radar observations over a 35-day period with various meteorological conditions. For that, a novel post-processing procedure is applied to radar data to improve its quality. Also, an observation operator is developed that ingests Arome analyses and simulates a 3-h path-averaged refractivity change. A sensitivity study shows that simulated path-averaged refractivity change is immune to the modelling of the beam height as long as it remains below approximately 60 m above the ground. Comparisons show overall consistency between observed and simulated path-averaged refractivity change, with discrepancies at times that suggest an improvement in analyses once radar refractivity change observations are assimilated. Finally, errors introduced when retrieving local refractivity from path-averaged refractivity are estimated and it is found for our dataset that such retrievals halve the range of usable observations.

  3. Mapping curved spacetimes into Dirac spinors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabín, Carlos

    2017-01-11

    We show how to transform a Dirac equation in a curved static spacetime into a Dirac equation in flat spacetime. In particular, we show that any solution of the free massless Dirac equation in a 1 + 1 dimensional flat spacetime can be transformed via a local phase transformation into a solution of the corresponding Dirac equation in a curved static background, where the spacetime metric is encoded into the phase. In this way, the existing quantum simulators of the Dirac equation can naturally incorporate curved static spacetimes. As a first example we use our technique to obtain solutions of the Dirac equation in a particular family of interesting spacetimes in 1 + 1 dimensions.

  4. [Keratectasia after refractive surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkler von Mohrenfels, C; Salgado, J P; Khoramnia, R

    2011-08-01

    Refractive surgery has become more and more popular in the past years. One of the most severe complications is iatrogenic keratectasia. The purpose of this article is to review the current knowledge about iatrogenic keratectasia. METHOD. A literature research (Medline) using the key words keratectasia, complication after refractive surgery and cross-linking was carried out. Apart from this, our own data from partially unpublished studies have been used. Since the first publication of keratectasia in 1998 more and more cases of keratectasia have been published. The main risk factor is a preoperative irregular topography. But also thin corneas, deep ablations, thin residual stromal beds and young patients age at the time of the laser surgery are further risk factors. Although preoperative examinations before refractive surgery are becoming more and more accurate and the inclusion criteria for laser ablation have become stricter, iatrogenic keratectasia still occurs. Therefore longer follow-up visits should be performed over a longer period to diagnose keratectasia in an early stage and to provide therapy. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  5. Topology Change of Spacetime and Resolution of Spacetime Singularity in Emergent Gravity

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Sunggeun; Roychowdhury, Raju; Yang, Hyun Seok

    2012-01-01

    Emergent gravity is based on the Darboux theorem or the Moser lemma in symplectic geometry stating that the electromagnetic force can always be eliminated by a local coordinate transformation as far as U(1) gauge theory is defined on a spacetime with symplectic structure. In this approach, the spacetime geometry is defined by U(1) gauge fields on noncommutative (NC) spacetime. Accordingly the topology of spacetime is determined by the topology of NC U(1) gauge fields. We show that the topolog...

  6. Conformal symmetry inheritance in null fluid spacetimes

    CERN Document Server

    Tupper, B O J; Hall, G S; Coley, Alan A; Carot, J

    2003-01-01

    We define inheriting conformal Killing vectors for null fluid spacetimes and find the maximum dimension of the associated inheriting Lie algebra. We show that for non-conformally flat null fluid spacetimes, the maximum dimension of the inheriting algebra is seven and for conformally flat null fluid spacetimes the maximum dimension is eight. In addition, it is shown that there are two distinct classes of non-conformally flat generalized plane wave spacetimes which possess the maximum dimension, and one class in the conformally flat case.

  7. Refraction in adults with diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Barbara E K; Lee, Kristine E; Klein, Ronald

    2011-01-01

    To examine refraction, change in refraction, and risk factors for change in refraction in adults with type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus. Population-based study. Modified Early Treatment of Diabetic Retinopathy Study refractions and a standard history were obtained for all participants. Baseline and 10-year follow-up data were available. Age and education were significantly associated with refraction in persons with younger-onset diabetes (T1D) and in those with older-onset diabetes (T2D); refractions were similar for both groups. Persons of similar age with T1D were likely to be more myopic than were those with T2D (P refraction in 10 years. Those with longer duration of diabetes and proliferative retinopathy were more likely to have hyperopic shifts in refraction. In persons with T2D, there was, on average, a +0.48-D change in refraction during the 10 years, but there was little consistency in the amount of change by age at baseline. In persons of similar age, those with T1D were likely to be slightly more myopic than were those with T2D. Overall, mean refraction and the important risk factors of age and education were similar to those reported in nondiabetic populations.

  8. Geometry of Space-Time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruchholz U. E.

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available The geometry of the space-time is deduced from gravitational and electromagnetic fields. We have to state that Rainich's "already unified field theory" is the ground work of the proposed theory. The latter is deduced independently on Rainich. Rainich's analogies are brilliantly validated. His formulae are verified this way. Further reaching results and insights demonstrate that Rainich's theory is viable. In final result, we can formulate an enhanced equivalence principle. It is the equivalence of Newton's force with the Lorentz force.

  9. Unstable Fields in Kerr Spacetimes

    CERN Document Server

    Dotti, Gustavo; Ranea-Sandoval, Ignacio F

    2011-01-01

    We present a generalization of previous results regarding the stability under gravitational perturbations of nakedly singular super extreme Kerr spacetime and Kerr black hole interior beyond the Cauchy horizon. To do so we study solutions to the radial and angular Teukolsky's equations with different spin weights, particulary $s=\\pm 1$ representing electromagnetic perturbations, $s=\\pm 1/2$ representing a perturbation by a Dirac field and $s=0$ representing perturbations by a scalar field. By analizing the properties of radial and angular eigenvalues we prove the existence of an infinite family of unstable modes.

  10. Probing Gravity with Spacetime Sirens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deffayet, Cédric; Menou, Kristen

    2007-10-01

    A gravitational observatory such as LISA will detect coalescing pairs of massive black holes, accurately measure their luminosity distance, and help identify a host galaxy or an electromagnetic counterpart. If dark energy is a manifestation of modified gravity on large scales, gravitational waves from cosmologically distant spacetime sirens are direct probes of this new physics. For example, a gravitational Hubble diagram based on black hole pair luminosity distances and host galaxy redshifts could reveal a large distance extradimensional leakage of gravity. Various additional signatures may be expected in a gravitational signal propagated over cosmological scales.

  11. Compound Refractive Lenses for Thermal Neutron Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gary, Charles K.

    2013-11-12

    This project designed and built compound refractive lenses (CRLs) that are able to focus, collimate and image using thermal neutrons. Neutrons are difficult to manipulate compared to visible light or even x rays; however, CRLs can provide a powerful tool for focusing, collimating and imaging neutrons. Previous neutron CRLs were limited to long focal lengths, small fields of view and poor resolution due to the materials available and manufacturing techniques. By demonstrating a fabrication method that can produce accurate, small features, we have already dramatically improved the focal length of thermal neutron CRLs, and the manufacture of Fresnel lens CRLs that greatly increases the collection area, and thus efficiency, of neutron CRLs. Unlike a single lens, a compound lens is a row of N lenslets that combine to produce an N-fold increase in the refraction of neutrons. While CRLs can be made from a variety of materials, we have chosen to mold Teflon lenses. Teflon has excellent neutron refraction, yet can be molded into nearly arbitrary shapes. We designed, fabricated and tested Teflon CRLs for neutrons. We demonstrated imaging at wavelengths as short as 1.26 ? with large fields of view and achieved resolution finer than 250 μm which is better than has been previously shown. We have also determined designs for Fresnel CRLs that will greatly improve performance.

  12. [Peripheral refraction: cause or effect of refraction development?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarutta, E P; Iomdina, E N; Kvaratskheliya, N G; Milash, S V; Kruzhkova, G V

    to study peripheral refraction and the shape of the eyeball in children with different clinical refraction. Using an original method, peripheral refraction was measured at 10-12 degrees temporally and nasally from the fovea in 56 right eyes with different clinical, or axial, refraction of 20 boys and 36 girls aged 7 to 16 years (11.9±1.17 years on average). The shape of the eyeball was judged of by the ratio of its anterior-posterior axial length (AL) to horizontal diameter (HD). The incidence and value of peripheral myopic defocus in children appeared to decrease with clinical refraction increasing from high hyperopia to high myopia. This was the first time, mixed peripheral refraction was found in children, occurring more frequently in higher myopia. This mixed peripheral defocus, shown to be a transitional stage between relative peripheral myopia and relative hyperopia, indicates non-uniform stretching of posterior pole tissues in the course of refraction development and myopia progression. As ocular refraction increases from high hyperopia to high myopia, the growth of AL outpaces that of HD. Obviously, natural peripheral defocus results from changes in size and shape of the eyeball in the course of refraction development.

  13. The Folded t Distribution

    OpenAIRE

    Psarakis, Stelios; Panaretos, John

    1990-01-01

    Measurements are frequently recorder without their algebraic sign. As a consequence the underlying distribution of measurements is replaced by a distribution of absolute measurements. When the underlying distribution is t the resulting distribution is called the “folded-t distribution”. Here we study this distribution, we find the relationship between the folded-t distribution and a special case of the folded normal distribution and we derive relationships of the folded-t distribution to othe...

  14. Cosmic Censorship for Gowdy Spacetimes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hans Ringström

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Due to the complexity of Einstein’s equations, it is often natural to study a question of interest in the framework of a restricted class of solutions. One way to impose a restriction is to consider solutions satisfying a given symmetry condition. There are many possible choices, but the present article is concerned with one particular choice, which we shall refer to as Gowdy symmetry. We begin by explaining the origin and meaning of this symmetry type, which has been used as a simplifying assumption in various contexts, some of which we shall mention. Nevertheless, the subject of interest here is strong cosmic censorship. Consequently, after having described what the Gowdy class of spacetimes is, we describe, as seen from the perspective of a mathematician, what is meant by strong cosmic censorship. The existing results on cosmic censorship are based on a detailed analysis of the asymptotic behavior of solutions. This analysis is in part motivated by conjectures, such as the BKL conjecture, which we shall therefore briefly describe. However, the emphasis of the article is on the mathematical analysis of the asymptotics, due to its central importance in the proof and in the hope that it might be of relevance more generally. The article ends with a description of the results that have been obtained concerning strong cosmic censorship in the class of Gowdy spacetimes.

  15. Cosmic Censorship for Gowdy Spacetimes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ringström, Hans

    2010-01-01

    Due to the complexity of Einstein's equations, it is often natural to study a question of interest in the framework of a restricted class of solutions. One way to impose a restriction is to consider solutions satisfying a given symmetry condition. There are many possible choices, but the present article is concerned with one particular choice, which we shall refer to as Gowdy symmetry. We begin by explaining the origin and meaning of this symmetry type, which has been used as a simplifying assumption in various contexts, some of which we shall mention. Nevertheless, the subject of interest here is strong cosmic censorship. Consequently, after having described what the Gowdy class of spacetimes is, we describe, as seen from the perspective of a mathematician, what is meant by strong cosmic censorship. The existing results on cosmic censorship are based on a detailed analysis of the asymptotic behavior of solutions. This analysis is in part motivated by conjectures, such as the BKL conjecture, which we shall therefore briefly describe. However, the emphasis of the article is on the mathematical analysis of the asymptotics, due to its central importance in the proof and in the hope that it might be of relevance more generally. The article ends with a description of the results that have been obtained concerning strong cosmic censorship in the class of Gowdy spacetimes.

  16. Warped product space-times

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Xinliang; Wong, Willie Wai Yeung

    2018-01-01

    Many classical results in relativity theory concerning spherically symmetric space-times have easy generalizations to warped product space-times, with a two-dimensional Lorentzian base and arbitrary dimensional Riemannian fibers. We first give a systematic presentation of the main geometric constructions, with emphasis on the Kodama vector field and the Hawking energy; the construction is signature independent. This leads to proofs of general Birkhoff-type theorems for warped product manifolds; our theorems in particular apply to situations where the warped product manifold is not necessarily Einstein, and thus can be applied to solutions with matter content in general relativity. Next we specialize to the Lorentzian case and study the propagation of null expansions under the assumption of the dominant energy condition. We prove several non-existence results relating to the Yamabe class of the fibers, in the spirit of the black-hole topology theorem of Hawking–Galloway–Schoen. Finally we discuss the effect of the warped product ansatz on matter models. In particular we construct several cosmological solutions to the Einstein–Euler equations whose spatial geometry is generally not isotropic.

  17. Refractive changes after strabismus surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaMattina, Kara C; DeBenedictis, Caroline N

    2016-09-01

    The purpose of this review is to report the impact of strabismus surgery on refractive error. Vector analysis was recently employed to show that refractive changes often occur after strabismus surgery but are transient and regress over time. Studies have shown that while transient changes in refractive error often occur, even statistically significant shifts are often not clinically important, and regress with long-term follow-up.

  18. Minkowski Spacetime A Hundred Years Later

    CERN Document Server

    Petkov, Vesselin

    2009-01-01

    This volume is dedicated to the one hundredth anniversary of the publication of Hermann Minkowski's paper "Space and Time" in 1909. His work on the spacetime representation of special relativity had a huge impact on the twentieth century physics to the extent that modern physics would be impossible without the notion of spacetime. While there is consensus on the mathematical significance of spacetime in theoretical physics, for a hundred years there has been no consensus on the nature of spacetime itself. We owe Minkowski a clear answer to the question of the nature of spacetime -- whether it is only a mathematical space or represents a real four-dimensional world. A century after its publication the original Minkowski paper still represents an enrichment to the physicists, especially the relativists, who read it with the intent to fully investigate the depth of Minkowski's ideas on space and time and the physical meaning of special relativity. The volume begins with an excellent retranslation of Minkowski's ...

  19. Traversable acausal retrograde domains in spacetime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tippett, Benjamin K.; Tsang, David

    2017-05-01

    In this paper we present geometry which has been designed to fit a layperson’s description of a ‘time machine’. It is a box which allows those within it to travel backwards and forwards through time and space, as interpreted by an external observer. Timelike observers travel within the interior of a ‘bubble’ of geometry which moves along a circular, acausal trajectory through spacetime. If certain timelike observers inside the bubble maintain a persistent acceleration, their worldlines will close. Our analysis includes a description of the causal structure of our spacetime, as well as a discussion of its physicality. The inclusion of such a bubble in a spacetime will render the background spacetime non-orientable, generating additional consistency constraints for formulations of the initial value problem. The spacetime geometry is geodesically incomplete, contains naked singularities, and requires exotic matter.

  20. Evolving spacetimes with purely radial tension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Nasre Esfahani

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available   In this study time-dependent and spherically symmetric solutions of the Einstein field equations in an anisotropic background with a purely radial tension are presented. There exist three classes of solutions,1 An open spacetime with a wormhole at its center. 2 A conical spacetime. 3 A closed spacetime. These inhomogeneous solutions are reduced to FRW spacetimes in matter-dominated era, asymptotically. Therefore, they can be used to describe local inhomogeneities that are not considered in the standard model. For the wormhole solution. it is explicity shown that the considered matter is non-exotic, that is, it does not violate the energy conditions. Also, static solutions are studied. There is only one static solution,a conical spacetime. In this case, the matter satisfies the energy condition critically.

  1. Electrodynamics and spacetime geometry: Astrophysical applications

    CERN Document Server

    Cabral, Francisco

    2016-01-01

    After a brief review of the foundations of (pre-metric) electromagnetism in differential forms, we proceed with the tensor formulation and explore physical consequences of Maxwell's equations in curved spacetime. The generalized Gauss and Maxwell-Amp\\`ere laws, as well as the wave equations, reveal potentially interesting astrophysical applications. The physical implications of these equations are explored and some solutions are obtained. In all cases new electromagnetic couplings and related phenomena are induced by the spacetime curvature. The applications of astrophysical interest considered here correspond essentially to the following geometries: the Schwarzschild spacetime and the spacetime around a rotating spherical mass in the weak field and slow rotation regime. In the latter, we use the Parameterised Post-Newtonian (PPN) formalism. In general, new electromagnetic effects induced by spacetime curvature include the following: Gravitational contributions for the decay of electric and magnetic fields in...

  2. Exact geodesic distances in FLRW spacetimes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, William J.; Rideout, David; Halverson, James; Krioukov, Dmitri

    2017-11-01

    Geodesics are used in a wide array of applications in cosmology and astrophysics. However, it is not a trivial task to efficiently calculate exact geodesic distances in an arbitrary spacetime. We show that in spatially flat (3 +1 )-dimensional Friedmann-Lemaître-Robertson-Walker (FLRW) spacetimes, it is possible to integrate the second-order geodesic differential equations, and derive a general method for finding both timelike and spacelike distances given initial-value or boundary-value constraints. In flat spacetimes with either dark energy or matter, whether dust, radiation, or a stiff fluid, we find an exact closed-form solution for geodesic distances. In spacetimes with a mixture of dark energy and matter, including spacetimes used to model our physical universe, there exists no closed-form solution, but we provide a fast numerical method to compute geodesics. A general method is also described for determining the geodesic connectedness of an FLRW manifold, provided only its scale factor.

  3. Colored Flag by Double Refraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Bill

    1994-01-01

    Describes various demonstrations that illustrate double refraction and rotation of the plane of polarization in stressed, transparent plastics, with the consequent production of colored designs. (ZWH)

  4. Causality, Nonlocality, and Negative Refraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forcella, Davide; Prada, Claire; Carminati, Rémi

    2017-03-31

    The importance of spatial nonlocality in the description of negative refraction in electromagnetic materials has been put forward recently. We develop a theory of negative refraction in homogeneous and isotropic media, based on first principles, and that includes nonlocality in its full generality. The theory shows that both dissipation and spatial nonlocality are necessary conditions for the existence of negative refraction. It also provides a sufficient condition in materials with weak spatial nonlocality. These fundamental results should have broad implications in the theoretical and practical analyses of negative refraction of electromagnetic and other kinds of waves.

  5. Current thoughts in pediatric refractive surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stahl, Erin D

    2008-01-01

    The goal of this article is to review current literature regarding the emerging field of pediatric refractive surgery. This encompasses current thought in adult refractive surgery, published literature in pediatric refractive surgery, and future possibilities for refractive technology in the pediatric population. This study includes a comprehensive review of literature in the general refractive surgery, cornea, and pediatric literature.

  6. Constraining spacetime torsion with LAGEOS

    Science.gov (United States)

    March, Riccardo; Bellettini, Giovanni; Tauraso, Roberto; Dell'Agnello, Simone

    2011-11-01

    We compute the corrections to the orbital Lense-Thirring effect (or frame-dragging) in the presence of spacetime torsion. We analyze the motion of a test body in the gravitational field of a rotating axisymmetric massive body, using the parametrized framework of Mao, Tegmark, Guth and Cabi. In the cases of autoparallel and extremal trajectories, we derive the specific approximate expression of the corresponding system of ordinary differential equations, which are then solved with methods of Celestial Mechanics. We calculate the secular variations of the longitudes of the node and of the pericenter. We also show how the LAser GEOdynamics Satellites (LAGEOS) can be used to constrain torsion parameters. We report the experimental constraints obtained using both the nodes and perigee measurements of the orbital Lense-Thirring effect. This makes LAGEOS and Gravity Probe B complementary frame-dragging and torsion experiments, since they constrain three different combinations of torsion parameters.

  7. Newtonian gravity on quantum spacetime

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Majid Shahn

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The bicrossproduct model λ-Minkowski (or ‘κ-Minkowski’ quantum space-time has an anomaly for the action of the Poincaré quantum group which was resolved by an extra cotangent direction θ’ not visible classically. We show that gauging a coefficient of θ′ introduces gravity into the model. We solve and analyse the model nonrelativisticaly in a 1/r potential, finding an induced constant term in the effective potential energy and a weakening and separation of the effective gravitational and inertial masses as the test particle Klein-Gordon mass increases. The present work is intended as a proof of concept but the approach could be relevant to an understanding of dark energy and possibly to macroscopic quantum systems.

  8. Refractive Index of Fly Rhabdomeres

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stavenga, D.G.

    1974-01-01

    The refractive index reported previously for the rhabdomeres of flies (1.349) has been corrected for waveguide effects. The presented correction method has yielded n1 = 1.365 ± 0.006. It is argued that an acceptable estimate for the refractive index of the inhomogeneous surroundings of fly

  9. Excimer lasers for refractive surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vartapetov, Serge K.

    2003-10-01

    Over the last decade excimer lasers have been broadly used for technological and medical processes. One of the most widespread applications of excimer laser is the clinical use for refractive surgery. Refractive surgery with excimer lasers is the prevalent method for the eye acuity correction. Operation at 193 nanometers, the excimer laser is able to precisely sculpt the corneal surface to correct refractive errors. Both the increase in the accuracy of sculpturing and the predictability of procedures are the key elements of the excimer laser designed for refractive surgery. The novel excimer laser for refractive surgery is offered for small aberration treatment. The excimer laser with both a full aperture Gaussian beam and fly spot system is described. The comparison of different systems of laser correction is reviewed.

  10. Probing Superluminal Neutrinos Via Refraction

    CERN Document Server

    Stebbins, Albert

    2011-01-01

    One phenomenological explanation of superluminal propagation of neutrinos, which may have been observed by OPERA and MINOS, is that neutrinos travel faster inside of matter than in vacuum. If so neutrinos exhibit refraction inside matter and should exhibit other manifestations of refraction, such as deflection and reflection. Such refraction would be easily detectable through the momentum imparted to appropriately shaped refractive material inserted into the neutrino beam. For NuMI this could be as large as ~10g cm/s. If these effect were found, they would provide new ways of manipulating and detecting neutrinos. Reasons why this scenario seems implausible are given, however it is still worthwhile to conduct simple searches for differential refraction of neutrinos.

  11. Fast protein folding kinetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelman, Hannah; Gruebele, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Fast folding proteins have been a major focus of computational and experimental study because they are accessible to both techniques: they are small and fast enough to be reasonably simulated with current computational power, but have dynamics slow enough to be observed with specially developed experimental techniques. This coupled study of fast folding proteins has provided insight into the mechanisms which allow some proteins to find their native conformation well less than 1 ms and has uncovered examples of theoretically predicted phenomena such as downhill folding. The study of fast folders also informs our understanding of even “slow” folding processes: fast folders are small, relatively simple protein domains and the principles that govern their folding also govern the folding of more complex systems. This review summarizes the major theoretical and experimental techniques used to study fast folding proteins and provides an overview of the major findings of fast folding research. Finally, we examine the themes that have emerged from studying fast folders and briefly summarize their application to protein folding in general as well as some work that is left to do. PMID:24641816

  12. Particle Physics Probes of Extra Spacetime Dimensions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hewett, JoAnne L

    2002-05-13

    The possibility that spacetime is extended beyond the familiar 3+1-dimensions has intrigued physicists for a century. Indeed, the consequences of a dimensionally richer spacetime would be profound. Recently, new theories with higher dimensional spacetimes have been developed to resolve the hierarchy problem in particle physics. These scenarios make distinct predictions which allow for experiment to probe the existence of extra dimensions in new ways. We review the conceptual framework of these scenarios, their implications in collider and short-range gravity experiments, their astrophysical and cosmological effects, as well as the constraints placed on these models from present data.

  13. Cylindrical symmetry locally isometric $AdS_{4}$ spacetime

    CERN Document Server

    Ahmed, Faizuddin; Sarma, Debojit; Myrzakulov, Ratbay

    2016-01-01

    We present a maximally symmetric vacuum spacetime, which is locally isometric anti- de Sitter, admitting closed timelike curves appear after a definite instant of time i.e., a time-machine spacetime. The spacetime is regular, free-from curvature singularities and an $4D$ extension of the Misner space in curved spacetime with identical causality violating properties.

  14. Light bullets in waveguide arrays: spacetime-coupling, spectral symmetry breaking and superluminal decay [Invited].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eilenberger, Falk; Minardi, Stefano; Szameit, Alexander; Röpke, Ulrich; Kobelke, Jens; Schuster, Kay; Bartelt, Hartmut; Nolte, Stefan; Tünnermann, Andreas; Pertsch, Thomas

    2011-11-07

    We investigate the effects of the space-time coupling (STC) on the nonlinear formation and propagation of Light Bullets, spatiotemporal solitons in which dispersion and diffraction along all dimensions are balanced by nonlinearity, through periodic media with a weak transverse modulation of the refractive index, i.e. waveguide arrays. The STC arises from wavelength dependence of the strength of inter-waveguide coupling and can be tuned by variation of the array geometry. We show experimentally and numerically that the STC breaks the spectral symmetry of Light Bullets to a considerable degree and modifies their group velocity, leading to superluminal propagation when the Light Bullets decay.

  15. On Safe Folding

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bossi, Annalisa; Bruynooghe, Maurice; Cocco, Nicoletta; Wirsing, Martin; Etalle, Sandro

    In [3] a general fold operation has been introduced for definite programs wrt computed answer substitution semantics. It differs from the fold operation defined by Tamaki and Sato in [26,25] because its application does not depend on the transformation history. This paper extends the results in [3

  16. Spacetime Encodings III - Second Order Killing Tensors

    CERN Document Server

    Brink, Jeandrew

    2009-01-01

    This paper explores the Petrov type D, stationary axisymmetric vacuum (SAV) spacetimes that were found by Carter to have separable Hamilton-Jacobi equations, and thus admit a second-order Killing tensor. The derivation of the spacetimes presented in this paper borrows from ideas about dynamical systems, and illustrates concepts that can be generalized to higher- order Killing tensors. The relationship between the components of the Killing equations and metric functions are given explicitly. The origin of the four separable coordinate systems found by Carter is explained and classified in terms of the analytic structure associated with the Killing equations. A geometric picture of what the orbital invariants may represent is built. Requiring that a SAV spacetime admits a second-order Killing tensor is very restrictive, selecting very few candidates from the group of all possible SAV spacetimes. This restriction arises due to the fact that the consistency conditions associated with the Killing equations require...

  17. Quantum healing of spacetime singularities: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konkowski, D. A.; Helliwell, T. M.

    2018-02-01

    Singularities are commonplace in general relativistic spacetimes. It is natural to hope that they might be “healed” (or resolved) by the inclusion of quantum mechanics, either in the theory itself (quantum gravity) or, more modestly, in the description of the spacetime geodesic paths used to define them. We focus here on the latter, mainly using a procedure proposed by Horowitz and Marolf to test whether singularities in broad classes of spacetimes can be resolved by replacing geodesic paths with quantum wave packets. We list the spacetime singularities that various authors have studied in this context, and distinguish those which are healed quantum mechanically (QM) from those which remain singular. Finally, we mention some alternative approaches to healing singularities.

  18. Metastring theory and modular space-time

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Freidel, Laurent; Leigh, Robert G; Minic, Djordje

    2015-01-01

    String theory is canonically accompanied with a space-time interpretation which determines S-matrix-like observables, and connects to the standard physics at low energies in the guise of local effective field theory...

  19. Field Theory on Curved Noncommutative Spacetimes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Schenkel

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available We study classical scalar field theories on noncommutative curved spacetimes. Following the approach of Wess et al. [Classical Quantum Gravity 22 (2005, 3511 and Classical Quantum Gravity 23 (2006, 1883], we describe noncommutative spacetimes by using (Abelian Drinfel'd twists and the associated *-products and *-differential geometry. In particular, we allow for position dependent noncommutativity and do not restrict ourselves to the Moyal-Weyl deformation. We construct action functionals for real scalar fields on noncommutative curved spacetimes, and derive the corresponding deformed wave equations. We provide explicit examples of deformed Klein-Gordon operators for noncommutative Minkowski, de Sitter, Schwarzschild and Randall-Sundrum spacetimes, which solve the noncommutative Einstein equations. We study the construction of deformed Green's functions and provide a diagrammatic approach for their perturbative calculation. The leading noncommutative corrections to the Green's functions for our examples are derived.

  20. The bizarre anti-de Sitter spacetime

    CERN Document Server

    Sokolowski, Leszek M

    2016-01-01

    Anti--de Sitter spacetime is important in general relativity and modern field theory. We review its geometrical features and properties of light signals and free particles moving in it. Applying only elementary tools of tensor calculus we derive \\textit{ab initio\\/} all these properties and show that they are really weird. One finds superluminal velocities of light and particles, infinite particle energy necessary to escape at infinite distance and spacetime regions inaccessible by a free fall, though reachable by an accelerated spaceship. Radial timelike geodesics are identical to the circular ones and actually all timelike geodesics are identical to one circle in a fictitious five--dimensional space. Employing the latter space one is able to explain these bizarre features of anti--de Sitter spacetime; in this sense the spacetime is not self--contained. This is not a physical world.

  1. Resident laser refractive surgery training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madu, Assumpta A; Ali, Tofik

    2010-07-01

    The Residency Review Committee Ophthalmology of the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education has recently established guidelines pertaining to the minimum operative requirements for training ophthalmology residents in refractive surgery. Despite being one of the most frequently performed ophthalmic surgical procedures, there is a paucity of literature on residency training in refractive surgery. Moreover, the literature indicates that only half of training programs offer surgical exposure to trainees. The purpose of this article is to review recent research on training ophthalmology residents in refractive surgery and offer an approach to incorporating laser refractive surgery curriculum in residency education. Kwon et al. performed a national survey to evaluate current trends in resident laser in-situ keratomileusis (LASIK) training in the USA. The result shows that 54% of respondents had resident-performed LASIK surgery with 9.1% of surveyed programs not offering any LASIK experience. In addition, residents in the study performed a mean of 4.4 LASIK surgeries (range 1-10) during residency training starting during the second year. The data emerging from the survey show that refractive surgery experience is fundamental to the education of the ophthalmology resident. Although the demand for refractive surgery continues to gain pace with millions of such procedures performed worldwide, only a little over half of ophthalmology residency programs offer residents the opportunity to gain surgical experience. With the current mandate, programs must now look for strategies to provide laser refractive surgical experience to residents.

  2. Refractive surgery after corneal transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Daniel H; Hardten, David R

    2005-08-01

    Many patients who have undergone corneal transplantation are unable to achieve satisfactory visual acuity with spectacle and contact lens correction alone. For these patients, refractive surgery becomes a viable option to reduce the post-keratoplasty ametropia. With the many recent advances in refractive surgery for naturally occurring refractive error, new possibilities arise for application to this complicated set of patients. This review discusses key recent developments in refractive surgery after corneal transplantation. The biomechanical effects of incisional keratotomy on post-keratoplasty corneas continue to be studied, and these techniques remain a common and simple method of reducing astigmatism. Photorefractive keratectomy, previously problematic for regression and haze formation, is gaining new prominence as early experience with the adjunctive use of mitomycin C has demonstrated good results. Long-term studies with laser in-situ keratomileusis (LASIK) have continued to show good safety and efficacy. Modern developments in cataract surgery appear to have lower incidences of graft rejection and failure. Developments in lens implantation technology continue to offer expanding options for intraocular refractive surgery. Although visual rehabilitation after corneal transplantation remains a formidable challenge, developments in refractive surgery for naturally occurring ametropias directly translate into an improved ability to help these most challenging refractive cases. Continued research will bring about improved efficacy while maintaining a high level of safety.

  3. Double conformal space-time algebra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Easter, Robert Benjamin; Hitzer, Eckhard

    2017-01-01

    The Double Conformal Space-Time Algebra (DCSTA) is a high-dimensional 12D Geometric Algebra G 4,8that extends the concepts introduced with the Double Conformal / Darboux Cyclide Geometric Algebra (DCGA) G 8,2 with entities for Darboux cyclides (incl. parabolic and Dupin cyclides, general quadrics, and ring torus) in spacetime with a new boost operator. The base algebra in which spacetime geometry is modeled is the Space-Time Algebra (STA) G 1,3. Two Conformal Space-Time subalgebras (CSTA) G 2,4 provide spacetime entities for points, flats (incl. worldlines), and hyperbolics, and a complete set of versors for their spacetime transformations that includes rotation, translation, isotropic dilation, hyperbolic rotation (boost), planar reflection, and (pseudo)spherical inversion in rounds or hyperbolics. The DCSTA G 4,8 is a doubling product of two G 2,4 CSTA subalgebras that inherits doubled CSTA entities and versors from CSTA and adds new bivector entities for (pseudo)quadrics and Darboux (pseudo)cyclides in spacetime that are also transformed by the doubled versors. The "pseudo" surface entities are spacetime hyperbolics or other surface entities using the time axis as a pseudospatial dimension. The (pseudo)cyclides are the inversions of (pseudo)quadrics in rounds or hyperbolics. An operation for the directed non-uniform scaling (anisotropic dilation) of the bivector general quadric entities is defined using the boost operator and a spatial projection. DCSTA allows general quadric surfaces to be transformed in spacetime by the same complete set of doubled CSTA versor (i.e., DCSTA versor) operations that are also valid on the doubled CSTA point entity (i.e., DCSTA point) and the other doubled CSTA entities. The new DCSTA bivector entities are formed by extracting values from the DCSTA point entity using specifically defined inner product extraction operators. Quadric surface entities can be boosted into moving surfaces with constant velocities that display the length

  4. Space-time singularities in Weyl manifolds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lobo, I.P. [CAPES Foundation, Ministry of Education of Brazil, Brasilia (Brazil); Sapienza Universita di Roma, Dipartimento di Fisica, Rome (Italy); Barreto, A.B.; Romero, C. [Universidade Federal da Paraiba, Departamento de Fisica, C. Postal 5008, Joao Pessoa, PB (Brazil)

    2015-09-15

    We extend one of the Hawking-Penrose singularity theorems in general relativity to the case of some scalar-tensor gravity theories in which the scalar field has a geometrical character and space-time has the mathematical structure of a Weyl integrable space-time. We adopt an invariant formalism, so that the extended version of the theorem does not depend on a particular frame. (orig.)

  5. Exact Philosophy of Space-Time

    CERN Document Server

    Vucetich, Héctor

    2011-01-01

    Starting from Bunge's (1977) scientific ontology, we expose a materialistic relational theory of space-time, that carries out the program initiated by Leibniz, and provides a protophysical basis consistent with any rigorous formulation of General Relativity. Space-time is constructed from general concepts which are common to any consistent scientific theory and they are interpreted as emergent properties of the greatest assembly of things, namely, the world.

  6. Twin Paradox in de Sitter Spacetime

    CERN Document Server

    Boblest, Sebastian; Wunner, Günter

    2010-01-01

    The "twin paradox" of special relativity offers the possibility to make interstellar flights within a lifetime. For very long journeys with velocities close to the speed of light, however, we have to take into account the expansion of the universe. Inspired by the work of Rindler on hyperbolic motion in curved spacetime, we study the worldline of a uniformly accelerated observer in de Sitter spacetime and the communication between the traveling observer and an observer at rest.

  7. Dynamical Space-Time and Gravitational Waves

    CERN Document Server

    van Holten, J W

    2016-01-01

    According to General Relativity gravity is the result of the interaction between matter and space-time geometry. In this interaction space-time geometry itself is dynamical: it can store and transport energy and momentum in the form of gravitational waves. We give an introductory account of this phenomenon and discuss how the observation of gravitational waves may open up a fundamentally new window on the universe.

  8. Space-Time Disarray and Visual Awareness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Koenderink

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Local space-time scrambling of optical data leads to violent jerks and dislocations. On masking these, visual awareness of the scene becomes cohesive, with dislocations discounted as amodally occluding foreground. Such cohesive space-time of awareness is technically illusory because ground truth is jumbled whereas awareness is coherent. Apparently the visual field is a construction rather than a (veridical perception.

  9. Electrodynamics and spacetime geometry: Astrophysical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabral, Francisco; Lobo, Francisco S. N.

    2017-07-01

    After a brief review of the foundations of (pre-metric) electromagnetism, we explore some physical consequences of electrodynamics in curved spacetime. In general, new electromagnetic couplings and related phenomena are induced by the spacetime curvature. The applications of astrophysical interest considered here correspond essentially to the following geometries: the Schwarzschild spacetime and the spacetime around a rotating spherical mass in the weak field and slow rotation regime. In the latter, we use the Parameterised Post-Newtonian (PPN) formalism. We also explore the hypothesis that the electric and magnetic properties of vacuum reflect the spacetime isometries. Therefore, the permittivity and permeability tensors should not be considered homogeneous and isotropic a priori. For spherical geometries we consider the effect of relaxing the homogeneity assumption in the constitutive relations between the fields and excitations. This affects the generalized Gauss and Maxwell-Ampère laws, where the electric permittivity and magnetic permeability in vacuum depend on the radial coordinate in accordance with the local isometries of space. For the axially symmetric geometries we relax both the assumptions of homogeneity and isotropy. We explore simple solutions and discuss the physical implications related to different phenomena, such as the decay of electromagnetic fields in the presence of gravity, magnetic terms in Gauss law due to the gravitomagnetism of the spacetime around rotating objects, a frame-dragging effect on electric fields and the possibility of a spatial (radial) variability of the velocity of light in vacuum around spherical astrophysical objects for strong gravitational fields.

  10. To assemble or fold?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Anindita; Ghosh, Suhrit

    2014-10-11

    This communication reports an elegant structure formation by an amide functionalized donor (D)-acceptor (A) dyad by stepwise folding and assembly. It adopts a folded conformation by intra-chain CT-interaction that subsequently dimerizes by inter-molecular H-bonding to produce a folded dimer (FD) with a DAAD stacking sequence. Incompatibility of the aromatic stacked face with MCH triggers macroscopic assembly by solvophobically driven edge-to-edge stacking of the FD with concomitant growth in the orthogonal direction by D-D π-stacking leading to the formation of a reverse-vesicle.

  11. Thermodynamics of quantum spacetime histories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smolin, Lee

    2017-11-01

    We show that the simplicity constraints, which define the dynamics of spin foam models, imply, and are implied by, the first law of thermodynamics, when the latter is applied to causal diamonds in the quantum spacetime. This result reveals an intimate connection between the holographic nature of gravity, as reflected by the Bekenstein entropy, and the fact that general relativity and other gravitational theories can be understood as constrained topological field theories. To state and derive this correspondence we describe causal diamonds in the causal structure of spin foam histories and generalize arguments given for the near horizon region of black holes by Frodden, Gosh and Perez [Phys. Rev. D 87, 121503 (2013); , 10.1103/PhysRevD.87.121503Phys. Rev. D 89, 084069 (2014); , 10.1103/PhysRevD.89.084069Phys. Rev. Lett. 107, 241301 (2011); , 10.1103/PhysRevLett.107.241301Phys. Rev. Lett.108, 169901(E) (2012)., 10.1103/PhysRevLett.108.169901] and Bianchi [arXiv:1204.5122.]. This allows us to apply a recent argument of Jacobson [Phys. Rev. Lett. 116, 201101 (2016).10.1103/PhysRevLett.116.201101] to show that if a spin foam history has a semiclassical limit described in terms of a smooth metric geometry, that geometry satisfies the Einstein equations. These results suggest also a proposal for a quantum equivalence principle.

  12. Diplopia associated with refractive surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kushner, Burton J

    2012-01-01

    When diplopia occurs after refractive surgery, a systematized approach to diagnosis and treatment is useful. First, determine if the problem is monocular or binocular. Monocular diplopia usually is caused by anterior segment complications and should be referred to an anterior segment surgeon. If the problem is binocular, determine if there is iatrogenic monovision. If monovision was created by the refractive surgery, determine if the double vision is due to fixation switch diplopia. If so, the monovision state needs to be reversed. If fixation switch is not the cause of the symptoms, try "optical rescue". If monovision is not present, check old refraction and motility records, and correct any residual refractive error. Strabismus may need to be treated with surgery, orthoptic exercises, or prisms.

  13. The uncorrected refractive error challenge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kovin Naidoo

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Refractive error affects people of all ages, socio-economic status and ethnic groups. The most recent statistics estimate that, worldwide, 32.4 million people are blind and 191 million people have vision impairment. Vision impairment has been defined based on distance visual acuity only, and uncorrected distance refractive error (mainly myopia is the single biggest cause of worldwide vision impairment. However, when we also consider near visual impairment, it is clear that even more people are affected. From research it was estimated that the number of people with vision impairment due to uncorrected distance refractive error was 107.8 million,1 and the number of people affected by uncorrected near refractive error was 517 million, giving a total of 624.8 million people.

  14. Refractive surgery following corneal graft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alió, Jorge L; Abdou, Ahmed A; Abdelghany, Ahmed A; Zein, Ghassam

    2015-07-01

    To review the different surgical procedures for management of postkeratoplasty refractive errors after total suture removal. There are different surgical options to address residual refractive errors that frequently occur after corneal transplantation. The correction can be done on the corneal surface or intraocular with intraocular lens (IOL) implantation which requires complete tectonic and refractive stability after suture removal. The most commonly used procedures are photorefractive keratectomy, laser in-situ keratomileusis and Phakic IOLs. Keratoplasty has been profited by recent advances in refractive surgery. Custom excimer laser ablation is an alternative way to treat irregular errors. New IOL modalities are good practical options for a wide range of errors. Femtosecond laser, as a new option in the toolbox, can modify corneal grafting refractive results and assist corrective refractive procedures. Although being the most successful organ transplantation, keratoplasty is usually followed by significant ametropia. Different corrective modalities exist and the choice should fit ocular conditions, patient requirements, surgeon skills and the available technologies. Recent advances in ophthalmic surgery have improved the outcomes.

  15. Parsimonious Refraction Interferometry and Tomography

    KAUST Repository

    Hanafy, Sherif

    2017-02-04

    We present parsimonious refraction interferometry and tomography where a densely populated refraction data set can be obtained from two reciprocal and several infill shot gathers. The assumptions are that the refraction arrivals are head waves, and a pair of reciprocal shot gathers and several infill shot gathers are recorded over the line of interest. Refraction traveltimes from these shot gathers are picked and spawned into O(N2) virtual refraction traveltimes generated by N virtual sources, where N is the number of geophones in the 2D survey. The virtual traveltimes can be inverted to give the velocity tomogram. This enormous increase in the number of traveltime picks and associated rays, compared to the many fewer traveltimes from the reciprocal and infill shot gathers, allows for increased model resolution and a better condition number with the system of normal equations. A significant benefit is that the parsimonious survey and the associated traveltime picking is far less time consuming than that for a standard refraction survey with a dense distribution of sources.

  16. Refractive change following pseudophakic vitrectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danjoux Jean-Pierre

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To assess the occurrence and magnitude of refractive change in pseudophakic eyes undergoing 20 gauge pars plana vitrectomy without scleral buckling and to investigate possible aetiological factors. Methods Retrospective case note review of 87 pseudophakic eyes undergoing 20 gauge pars plana vitrectomy for a variety of vitreo-retinal conditions over a three-year period. Anterior chamber depth (ACD was measured before and after vitrectomy surgery in 32 eyes. Forty-three pseudophakic fellow eyes were used as controls. Results Eighty-seven eyes (84 patients were included in the study. Mean spherical equivalent refraction prior to vitrectomy was -0.20 dioptres, which changed to a mean of -0.65 dioptres postoperatively (standard deviation of refractive change 0.59, range-2.13 to 0.75 dioptres (p Mean ACD preoperatively was 3.29 mm and postoperatively 3.27 mm (p = 0.53 (n = 32 and there was no significant change in ACD with tamponade use. Regression analysis revealed no statistically significant association between changes in anterior chamber depth, as well as a wide variety of other pre-, intra and postoperative factors examined, and the refractive change observed. Conclusion Significant refractive changes occur in some pseudophakic patients undergoing 20 g pars plana vitrectomy. The mean change observed was a small myopic shift but the range was large. The aetiology of the refractive change is uncertain.

  17. [Reproducibility of subjective refraction measurement].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grein, H-J; Schmidt, O; Ritsche, A

    2014-11-01

    Reproducibility of subjective refraction measurement is limited by various factors. The main factors affecting reproducibility include the characteristics of the measurement method and of the subject and the examiner. This article presents the results of a study on this topic, focusing on the reproducibility of subjective refraction measurement in healthy eyes. The results of previous studies are not all presented in the same way by the respective authors and cannot be fully standardized without consulting the original scientific data. To the extent that they are comparable, the results of our study largely correspond largely with those of previous investigations: During repeated subjective refraction measurement, 95% of the deviation from the mean value was approximately ±0.2 D to ±0.65 D for the spherical equivalent and cylindrical power. The reproducibility of subjective refraction measurement in healthy eyes is limited, even under ideal conditions. Correct assessment of refraction results is only feasible after identifying individual variability. Several measurements are required. Refraction cannot be measured without a tolerance range. The English full-text version of this article is available at SpringerLink (under supplemental).

  18. Mapping superintegrable quantum mechanics to resonant spacetimes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evnin, Oleg; Demirchian, Hovhannes; Nersessian, Armen

    2018-01-01

    We describe a procedure naturally associating relativistic Klein-Gordon equations in static curved spacetimes to nonrelativistic quantum motion on curved spaces in the presence of a potential. Our procedure is particularly attractive in application to (typically, superintegrable) problems whose energy spectrum is given by a quadratic function of the energy level number, since for such systems the spacetimes one obtains possess evenly spaced, resonant spectra of frequencies for scalar fields of a certain mass. This construction emerges as a generalization of the previously studied correspondence between the Higgs oscillator and anti-de Sitter spacetime, which has been useful for both understanding weakly nonlinear dynamics in anti-de Sitter spacetime and algebras of conserved quantities of the Higgs oscillator. Our conversion procedure ("Klein-Gordonization") reduces to a nonlinear elliptic equation closely reminiscent of the one emerging in relation to the celebrated Yamabe problem of differential geometry. As an illustration, we explicitly demonstrate how to apply this procedure to superintegrable Rosochatius systems, resulting in a large family of spacetimes with resonant spectra for massless wave equations.

  19. Folded waveguide resonator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2013-01-01

    A waveguide resonator comprising a number of side walls defining a cavity enclosed by said sidewalls defining the cavity; and two or more conductive plates extending into the cavity, each conductive plate having a first side and a second side opposite the first side, and wherein the conductive...... plates are adapted to cause a standing electromagnetic wave to fold around the conductive plates along at least a first and a second direction and to extend on both sides of each of the conductive plates; wherein the conductive plates are adapted to cause the standing electromagnetic wave to fold...

  20. Noncommutative effects of spacetime on holographic superconductors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debabrata Ghorai

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The Sturm–Liouville eigenvalue method is employed to analytically investigate the properties of holographic superconductors in higher dimensions in the framework of Born–Infeld electrodynamics incorporating the effects of noncommutative spacetime. In the background of pure Einstein gravity in noncommutative spacetime, we obtain the relation between the critical temperature and the charge density. We also obtain the value of the condensation operator and the critical exponent. Our findings suggest that the higher value of noncommutative parameter and Born–Infeld parameter make the condensate harder to form. We also observe that the noncommutative structure of spacetime makes the critical temperature depend on the mass of the black hole and higher value of black hole mass is favourable for the formation of the condensate.

  1. Noncommutative effects of spacetime on holographic superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghorai, Debabrata, E-mail: debanuphy123@gmail.com [S.N. Bose National Centre for Basic Sciences, JD Block, Sector III, Salt Lake, Kolkata 700098 (India); Gangopadhyay, Sunandan, E-mail: sunandan.gangopadhyay@gmail.com [Department of Physics, West Bengal State University, Barasat (India); Inter University Centre for Astronomy & Astrophysics, Pune (India)

    2016-07-10

    The Sturm–Liouville eigenvalue method is employed to analytically investigate the properties of holographic superconductors in higher dimensions in the framework of Born–Infeld electrodynamics incorporating the effects of noncommutative spacetime. In the background of pure Einstein gravity in noncommutative spacetime, we obtain the relation between the critical temperature and the charge density. We also obtain the value of the condensation operator and the critical exponent. Our findings suggest that the higher value of noncommutative parameter and Born–Infeld parameter make the condensate harder to form. We also observe that the noncommutative structure of spacetime makes the critical temperature depend on the mass of the black hole and higher value of black hole mass is favourable for the formation of the condensate.

  2. On the reconstruction of Lifshitz spacetimes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gentle, Simon A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Keeler, Cynthia [Niels Bohr International Academy, Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, Blegdamsvej 17, DK 2100, Copenhagen (Denmark)

    2016-03-30

    We consider the reconstruction of a Lifshitz spacetime from three perspectives: differential entropy (or ‘hole-ography’), causal wedges and entanglement wedges. We find that not all time-varying bulk curves in vacuum Lifshitz can be reconstructed via the differential entropy approach, adding a caveat to the general analysis of http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/JHEP10(2014)149. We show that the causal wedge for Lifshitz spacetimes degenerates, while the entanglement wedge requires the additional consideration of a set of boundary-emanating light-sheets. The need to include bulk surfaces with no clear field theory interpretation in the differential entropy construction and the change in the entanglement wedge formation both serve as warnings against a naive application of holographic entanglement entropy proposals in Lifshitz spacetimes.

  3. Scalar fields in black hole spacetimes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thuestad, Izak; Khanna, Gaurav; Price, Richard H.

    2017-07-01

    The time evolution of matter fields in black hole exterior spacetimes is a well-studied subject, spanning several decades of research. However, the behavior of fields in the black hole interior spacetime has only relatively recently begun receiving some attention from the research community. In this paper, we numerically study the late-time evolution of scalar fields in both Schwarzschild and Kerr spacetimes, including the black hole interior. We recover the expected late-time power-law "tails" on the exterior (null infinity, timelike infinity, and the horizon). In the interior region, we find an interesting oscillatory behavior that is characterized by the multipole index ℓ of the scalar field. In addition, we also study the extremal Kerr case and find strong indications of an instability developing at the horizon.

  4. Dynamics of quantum entanglement in de Sitter spacetime and thermal Minkowski spacetime

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiming Huang

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the dynamics of entanglement between two atoms in de Sitter spacetime and in thermal Minkowski spacetime. We treat the two-atom system as an open quantum system which is coupled to a conformally coupled massless scalar field in the de Sitter invariant vacuum or to a thermal bath in the Minkowski spacetime, and derive the master equation that governs its evolution. We compare the phenomena of entanglement creation, degradation, revival and enhancement for the de Sitter spacetime case with that for the thermal Minkowski spacetime case. We find that the entanglement dynamics of two atoms for these two spacetime cases behave quite differently. In particular, the two atoms interacting with the field in the thermal Minkowski spacetime (with the field in the de Sitter-invariant vacuum, under certain conditions, could be entangled, while they would not become entangled in the corresponding de Sitter case (in the corresponding thermal Minkowski case. Thus, although a single static atom in the de Sitter-invariant vacuum responds as if it were bathed in thermal radiation in a Minkowski universe, with the help of the different dynamic evolution behaviors of entanglement for two atoms one can in principle distinguish these two universes.

  5. Charged fluid distribution in higher dimensional spheroidal space-time

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A general solution of Einstein field equations corresponding to a charged fluid distribution on the background of higher dimensional spheroidal space-time is obtained. The solution generates several known solutions for superdense star having spheroidal space-time geometry.

  6. The birth of spacetime atoms as the passage of time

    CERN Document Server

    Dowker, Fay

    2014-01-01

    The view that the passage of time is physical finds expression in the classical sequential growth models of Rideout and Sorkin in which a discrete spacetime grows by the partially ordered accretion of new spacetime atoms.

  7. Racing a quantum computer through Minkowski spacetime

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biamonte, Jacob D [Oxford University Computing Laboratory, Wolfson Building, Parks Road, Oxford, OX1 3QD (United Kingdom)

    2010-05-01

    The Lorentzian length of a timelike curve connecting both endpoints of a computation in Minkowski spacetime is smaller than the Lorentzian length of the corresponding geodesic. In this talk, I will point out some properties of spacetime that allow an inertial classical computer to outperform a quantum one, at the completion of a long journey. We will focus on a comparison between the optimal quadratic Grover speed up from quantum computing and an n=2 speedup using classical computers and relativistic effects. These results are not practical as a new model of computation, but allow us to probe the ultimate limits physics places on computers.

  8. Perturbative spacetimes from Yang-Mills theory

    CERN Document Server

    Luna, Andrés; Nicholson, Isobel; Ochirov, Alexander; O'Connell, Donal; Westerberg, Niclas; White, Chris D.

    2017-04-12

    The double copy relates scattering amplitudes in gauge and gravity theories. In this paper, we expand the scope of the double copy to construct spacetime metrics through a systematic perturbative expansion. The perturbative procedure is based on direct calculation in Yang-Mills theory, followed by squaring the numerator of certain perturbative diagrams as specified by the double-copy algorithm. The simplest spherically symmetric, stationary spacetime from the point of view of this procedure is a particular member of the Janis-Newman-Winicour family of naked singularities. Our work paves the way for applications of the double copy to physically interesting problems such as perturbative black-hole scattering.

  9. Wave regularity in curve integrable spacetimes

    CERN Document Server

    Sanchez, Yafet Sanchez

    2015-01-01

    The idea of defining a gravitational singularity as an obstruction to the dynamical evolution of a test field (described by a PDE) rather than the dynamical evolution of a particle (described by a geodesics) is explored. In particular, the concept of wave regularity is introduced which serves to show that the classical singularities in curve integrable spacetimes do not interrupt the well-posedness of the wave equation. The techniques used also provide arguments that can be extended to establish when a classically singular spacetime remains singular in a semi-classical picture.

  10. Special relativity derived from spacetime magma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greensite, Fred

    2014-01-01

    We present a derivation of relativistic spacetime largely untethered from specific physical considerations, in constrast to the many physically-based derivations that have appeared in the last few decades. The argument proceeds from the inherent magma (groupoid) existing on the union of spacetime frame components [Formula: see text] and Euclidean [Formula: see text] which is consistent with an "inversion symmetry" constraint from which the Minkowski norm results. In this context, the latter is also characterized as one member of a class of "inverse norms" which play major roles with respect to various unital [Formula: see text]-algebras more generally.

  11. Special relativity derived from spacetime magma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fred Greensite

    Full Text Available We present a derivation of relativistic spacetime largely untethered from specific physical considerations, in constrast to the many physically-based derivations that have appeared in the last few decades. The argument proceeds from the inherent magma (groupoid existing on the union of spacetime frame components [Formula: see text] and Euclidean [Formula: see text] which is consistent with an "inversion symmetry" constraint from which the Minkowski norm results. In this context, the latter is also characterized as one member of a class of "inverse norms" which play major roles with respect to various unital [Formula: see text]-algebras more generally.

  12. Folding worlds between pages

    CERN Multimedia

    Meier, Matthias

    2010-01-01

    "We all remember pop-up books form our childhood. As fascinated as we were back then, we probably never imagined how much engineering know-how went into these books. Pop-up engineer Anton Radevsky has even managed to fold a 27-kilometre particle accelerator into a book" (4 pages)

  13. Vocal Fold Collision Modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Granados, Alba; Brunskog, Jonas; Misztal, M. K.

    2015-01-01

    When vocal folds vibrate at normal speaking frequencies, collisions occurs. The numerics and formulations behind a position-based continuum model of contact is an active field of research in the contact mechanics community. In this paper, a frictionless three-dimensional finite element model of t...

  14. Characterizing conical refraction optical tweezers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, C; McDougall, C; Rafailov, E; McGloin, D

    2014-12-01

    Conical refraction occurs when a beam of light travels through an appropriately cut biaxial crystal. By focusing the conically refracted beam through a high numerical aperture microscope objective, conical refraction optical tweezers can be created, allowing for particle manipulation in both Raman spots, and in the Lloyd/Poggendorff rings. We present a thorough quantification of the trapping properties of such a beam, focusing on the trap stiffness, and how this varies with trap power and trapped particle location. We show that the lower Raman spot can be thought of as a single-beam optical gradient force trap, while radiation pressure dominates in the upper Raman spot, leading to optical levitation rather than trapping. Particles in the Lloyd/Poggendorff rings experience a lower trap stiffness than particles in the lower Raman spot, but benefit from rotational control.

  15. Refraction of coastal ocean waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuchman, R. A.; Kasischke, E. S.

    1981-01-01

    Refraction of gravity waves in the coastal area off Cape Hatteras, NC as documented by synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imagery from Seasat orbit 974 (collected on September 3, 1978) is discussed. An analysis of optical Fourier transforms (OFTs) from more than 70 geographical positions yields estimates of wavelength and wave direction for each position. In addition, independent estimates of the same two quantities are calculated using two simple theoretical wave-refraction models. The OFT results are then compared with the theoretical results. A statistical analysis shows a significant degree of linear correlation between the data sets. This is considered to indicate that the Seasat SAR produces imagery whose clarity is sufficient to show the refraction of gravity waves in shallow water.

  16. Space-time system architecture for the neural optical computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Yee-Man V.

    1991-02-01

    The brain can perform the tasks of associative recall detection recognition and optimization. In this paper space-time system field models of the brain are introduced. They are called the space-time maximum likelihood associative memory system (ST-ML-AMS) and the space-time adaptive learning system (ST-ALS). Performance of the system is analyzed using the probability of error in memory recall (PEMR) and the space-time neural capacity (ST-NC). 1.

  17. Stability of generic thin shells in conformally flat spacetimes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amirabi, Z.

    2017-07-01

    Some important spacetimes are conformally flat; examples are the Robertson-Walker cosmological metric, the Einstein-de Sitter spacetime, and the Levi-Civita-Bertotti-Robinson and Mannheim metrics. In this paper we construct generic thin shells in conformally flat spacetime supported by a perfect fluid with a linear equation of state, i.e., p=ω σ . It is shown that, for the physical domain of ω , i.e., 0Mannheim spacetime as the outer region is also investigated.

  18. Riemann curvature of a boosted spacetime geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battista, Emmanuele; Esposito, Giampiero; Scudellaro, Paolo; Tramontano, Francesco

    2016-10-01

    The ultrarelativistic boosting procedure had been applied in the literature to map the metric of Schwarzschild-de Sitter spacetime into a metric describing de Sitter spacetime plus a shock-wave singularity located on a null hypersurface. This paper evaluates the Riemann curvature tensor of the boosted Schwarzschild-de Sitter metric by means of numerical calculations, which make it possible to reach the ultrarelativistic regime gradually by letting the boost velocity approach the speed of light. Thus, for the first time in the literature, the singular limit of curvature, through Dirac’s δ distribution and its derivatives, is numerically evaluated for this class of spacetimes. Moreover, the analysis of the Kretschmann invariant and the geodesic equation shows that the spacetime possesses a “scalar curvature singularity” within a 3-sphere and it is possible to define what we here call “boosted horizon”, a sort of elastic wall where all particles are surprisingly pushed away, as numerical analysis demonstrates. This seems to suggest that such “boosted geometries” are ruled by a sort of “antigravity effect” since all geodesics seem to refuse to enter the “boosted horizon” and are “reflected” by it, even though their initial conditions are aimed at driving the particles toward the “boosted horizon” itself. Eventually, the equivalence with the coordinate shift method is invoked in order to demonstrate that all δ2 terms appearing in the Riemann curvature tensor give vanishing contribution in distributional sense.

  19. Space-time modeling of timber prices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mo Zhou; Joseph Buongriorno

    2006-01-01

    A space-time econometric model was developed for pine sawtimber timber prices of 21 geographically contiguous regions in the southern United States. The correlations between prices in neighboring regions helped predict future prices. The impulse response analysis showed that although southern pine sawtimber markets were not globally integrated, local supply and demand...

  20. On the genericity of spacetime singularities

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We consider here the genericity aspects of spacetime singularities that occur in cosmology and in gravitational collapse. The singularity theorems (that predict the occurrence of singularities in general relativity) allow the singularities of gravitational collapse to be either visible to external observers or covered by an event ...

  1. Geometry of Minkowski Space-Time

    CERN Document Server

    Catoni, Francesco; Cannata, Roberto; Catoni, Vincenzo; Zampetti, Paolo

    2011-01-01

    This book provides an original introduction to the geometry of Minkowski space-time. A hundred years after the space-time formulation of special relativity by Hermann Minkowski, it is shown that the kinematical consequences of special relativity are merely a manifestation of space-time geometry. The book is written with the intention of providing students (and teachers) of the first years of University courses with a tool which is easy to be applied and allows the solution of any problem of relativistic kinematics at the same time. The book treats in a rigorous way, but using a non-sophisticated mathematics, the Kinematics of Special Relativity. As an example, the famous "Twin Paradox" is completely solved for all kinds of motions. The novelty of the presentation in this book consists in the extensive use of hyperbolic numbers, the simplest extension of complex numbers, for a complete formalization of the kinematics in the Minkowski space-time. Moreover, from this formalization the understanding of gravity co...

  2. Twin Paradox in de Sitter Spacetime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boblest, Sebastian; Muller, Thomas; Wunner, Gunter

    2011-01-01

    The "twin paradox" of special relativity offers the possibility of making interstellar flights within a lifetime. For very long journeys with velocities close to the speed of light, however, we have to take into account the expansion of the universe. Inspired by the work of Rindler on hyperbolic motion in curved spacetime, we study the worldline…

  3. Wave Equations in Bianchi Space-Times

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Jamal

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the wave equation in Bianchi type III space-time. We construct a Lagrangian of the model, calculate and classify the Noether symmetry generators, and construct corresponding conserved forms. A reduction of the underlying equations is performed to obtain invariant solutions.

  4. Superconformal quantum field theory in curved spacetime

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Medeiros, Paul; Hollands, Stefan

    2013-09-01

    By conformally coupling vector and hyper multiplets in Minkowski space, we obtain a class of field theories with extended rigid conformal supersymmetry on any Lorentzian 4-manifold admitting twistor spinors. We construct the conformal symmetry superalgebras which describe classical symmetries of these theories and derive an appropriate BRST operator in curved spacetime. In the process, we elucidate the general framework of cohomological algebra which underpins the construction. We then consider the corresponding perturbative quantum field theories. In particular, we examine the conditions necessary for conformal supersymmetries to be preserved at the quantum level, i.e. when the BRST operator commutes with the perturbatively defined S-matrix, which ensures superconformal invariance of amplitudes. To this end, we prescribe a renormalization scheme for time-ordered products that enter the perturbative S-matrix and show that such products obey certain Ward identities in curved spacetime. These identities allow us to recast the problem in terms of the cohomology of the BRST operator. Through a careful analysis of this cohomology, and of the renormalization group in curved spacetime, we establish precise criteria which ensure that all conformal supersymmetries are preserved at the quantum level. As a by-product, we provide a rigorous proof that the beta-function for such theories is one-loop exact. We also briefly discuss the construction of chiral rings and the role of non-perturbative effects in curved spacetime.

  5. Kundt spacetimes minimally coupled to scalar field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tahamtan, T. [Charles University, Institute of Theoretical Physics, Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, Prague 8 (Czech Republic); Astronomical Institute, Czech Academy of Sciences, Prague (Czech Republic); Svitek, O. [Charles University, Institute of Theoretical Physics, Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, Prague 8 (Czech Republic)

    2017-06-15

    We derive an exact solution belonging to the Kundt class of spacetimes both with and without a cosmological constant that are minimally coupled to a free massless scalar field. We show the algebraic type of these solutions and give interpretation of the results. Subsequently, we look for solutions additionally containing an electromagnetic field satisfying nonlinear field equations. (orig.)

  6. Quantum fluctuations in FRLW space-time

    OpenAIRE

    Rabochaya, Y.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we study a quantum field theoretical approach, where a quantum probe is used to investigate the properties of generic non-flat FRLW space time. The fluctuations related to a massless conformal coupled scalar field defined on a space-time with horizon is identified with a probe and the procedure to measure the local temperature is presented.

  7. The Thermal Entropy Density of Spacetime

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rongjia Yang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introducing the notion of thermal entropy density via the first law of thermodynamics and assuming the Einstein equation as an equation of thermal state, we obtain the thermal entropy density of any arbitrary spacetime without assuming a temperature or a horizon. The results confirm that there is a profound connection between gravity and thermodynamics.

  8. Cataract surgery after refractive surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naseri, Ayman; McLeod, Stephen D

    2010-01-01

    To review recent contributions addressing the challenge of intraocular lens (IOL) calculation in patients undergoing cataract extraction following corneal refractive surgery. Although several articles have provided excellent summaries of IOL selection in patients wherein prerefractive surgery data are available, numerous authors have recently described approaches to attempt more accurate IOL power calculations for patients who present with no reliable clinical information regarding their refractive history. Additionally, results have been reported using the Scheimpflug camera system to measure corneal power in an attempt to resolve the most important potential source of error for IOL determination in these patients. IOL selection in patients undergoing cataract surgery after corneal refractive surgery continues to be a challenging and complex issue despite numerous strategies and formulas described in the literature. Current focus seems to be directed toward approaches that do not require preoperative refractive surgery information. Due to the relative dearth of comparative clinical outcomes data, the optimal solution to this ongoing clinical problem has yet to be determined. Until such data are available, many cataract surgeons compare the results of multiple formulas to assist them in IOL selection for these patients.

  9. REFLECTION AND REFRACTION, VOLUME 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    KLAUS, DAVID J.; AND OTHERS

    THIS VOLUME 2 OF A TWO-VOLUME SET PROVIDES AUTOINSTRUCTION IN PHYSICS. THE UNITS COVERED IN THIS VOLUME ARE (1) REFLECTION OF LIGHT, (2) PHOTOMETRY, (3) POLARIZATION, (4) REFRACTION OF LIGHT, (5) SNELL'S LAW, (6) LENSES, FOCUS, AND FOCAL POINTS, (7) IMAGE FORMATION, AND (8) ABERRATIONS, THE EYE, AND MAGNIFICATION. THE INTRODUCTION AND UNITS ON…

  10. Retinal folds in Terson syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keithahn, M A; Bennett, S R; Cameron, D; Mieler, W F

    1993-08-01

    Perimacular retinal folds have been reported in the shaken baby syndrome, but have not been described in adults with Terson syndrome. The authors present two patients with perimacular retinal folds in adults with Terson syndrome. In one patient, electron microscopy was used to examine the membrane spanning the fold. The membrane spanning the perimacular fold was found to be internal limiting membrane. The pathogenesis of these perimacular folds found in adults sustaining direct head trauma is probably different from that previously described for folds seen in infant eyes with shaken baby syndrome. Retinal folds occurring in Terson syndrome are clinically similar to those seen in the shaken baby syndrome.

  11. PREVALENCE OF REFRACTIVE ERROR AND VISUAL ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    GB

    prevalence of refractive error was 3.5% (myopia 2.6% and hyperopia 0.9%). Refractive error was the major cause of visual impairment accounting for 54% of all causes in the study group. No child was found wearing corrective spectacles during the study period. CONCLUSIONS: Refractive error was the commonest cause ...

  12. Past and present of corneal refractive surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, Anders Højslet

    Surgical correction of refractive errors is becoming increasingly popular. In the 1990s, the excimer laser revolutionized the field of corneal refractive surgery with PRK and LASIK, and lately refractive lenticule extraction (ReLEx) of intracorneal tissue, using only a femtosecond laser, has become...

  13. Survey of Radar Refraction Error Corrections

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-11-01

    ELECTRONIC TRAJECTORY MEASUREMENTS GROUP RCC 266-16 SURVEY OF RADAR REFRACTION ERROR CORRECTIONS DISTRIBUTION A: Approved for...DOCUMENT 266-16 SURVEY OF RADAR REFRACTION ERROR CORRECTIONS November 2016 Prepared by Electronic...This page intentionally left blank. Survey of Radar Refraction Error Corrections, RCC 266-16 iii Table of Contents Preface

  14. Emergence of spacetime in stochastic gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattingly, James

    2013-08-01

    I focus on the stochastic gravity program, a program that conceptualizes spacetime as the hydrodynamic limit of the correlation hierarchy of an underlying quantum theory, that is, a theory of the microscopic theory of gravity. This approach is relatively obscure, and so I begin by outlining the stochastic gravity program in enough detail to make clear the basic sense in which, on this approach, spacetime emerges from more fundamental physical structures. The theory, insofar as it is a univocal theory, is quite clear in its basic features, and so issues of philosophical interpretation can be readily isolated. The most obvious reason to investigate the theory as a model for the emergence of spacetime structure is how close it is to the stage at which the behavior that we recognize as spacetime actually emerges from the micro gravitational system. Approaches that begin with fully quantum gravity (insofar as there is such a thing) treat a system that is conceptually quite far removed from the stage at which emergence is relevant. The stochastic approach however begins by identifying the point at which spacetime emerges as a phenomena of interest. I begin with an analysis of the emergence question generally and ask how best we should understand it, especially from the point of view of thinking of spacetime as emergent. A nice feature of the stochastic program is how clear the question of emergence is on this approach. In part this is because of its similarity by design to the kinetic theory of gases and solid state physics. And so many of the analyses of the emergence of macroscopic variables in the thermodynamic limit can be repurposed to understand how an apparently continuous metrical space emerges from the behavior of a non-spatial system. A serious interpretive problem looms however. The problem is that there is no clear connection between features of the kinetic theory of gravity, as a quantum theory, and any final theory of gravity. In the third part of the paper

  15. Modification of Low Refractive Index Polycarbonate for High Refractive Index Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gunjan Suri

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Polycarbonates and polythiourethanes are the most popular materials in use today, for optical applications. Polycarbonates are of two types which fall in the category of low refractive index and medium refractive index. The present paper describes the conversion of low refractive index polycarbonates into high refractive index material by the use of a high refractive index monomer, polythiol, as an additive. Novel polycarbonates, where the properties of refractive index and Abbe number can be tailor made, have been obtained. Thermal studies and refractive index determination indicate the formation of a new polymer with improved properties and suitable for optical applications.

  16. Super-Virtual Refraction Interferometric Redatuming: Enhancing the Refracted Energy

    KAUST Repository

    Aldawood, Ali

    2012-02-26

    onshore seismic data processing. Refraction tomography is becoming a common way to estimate an accurate near surface velocity model. One of the problems with refraction tomography is the low signal to noise ration in far offset data. To improve, we propose using super-virtual refraction interferometry to enhance the weak energy at far offsets. We use Interferometric Green\\'s functions to redatum sources by cross-correlating two traces recorded at receiver stations, A and B, from a source at location W. The result is a redatumed trace with a virtual source at A and a receiver at B, which can also be obtained by correlating two traces recorded at A and B from different shots. Stacking them would enhance the signal-to-noise ratio of this "virtual" trace. We next augment redatuming with convolution and stacking. The trace recorded at B from a virtual source at A is convolved with the original trace recorded at A from a source at W. The result is a "super-virtual" trace at B in the far-offset from a source at W. Stacking N traces gives a vN-improvement. We applied our method to noisy synthetic and field data recorded over a complex near-surface and we could pick more traces at far offsets. It was possible to accommodate more picks resulting in a better subsurface coverage

  17. Information from folds: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudleston, Peter J.; Treagus, Susan H.

    2010-12-01

    Folds are spectacular geological structures that are seen in layered rock on many different scales. To mark 30 years of the Journal of Structural Geology, we review the information that can be gained from studies of folds in theory, experiment and nature. We first review theoretical considerations and modeling, from classical approaches to current developments. The subject is dominated by single-layer fold theory, with the assumption of perfect layer-parallel shortening, but we also review multilayer fold theory and modeling, and folding of layers that are oblique to principal stresses and strains. This work demonstrates that viscosity ratio, degree of non-linearity of the flow law, anisotropy, and the thickness and spacing distribution of layers of different competence are all important in determining the nature and strength of the folding instability. Theory and modeling provide the basis for obtaining rheological information from natural folds, through analysis of wavelength/thickness ratios of single layer folds, and fold shapes. They also provide a basis for estimating the bulk strain from folded layers. Information about folding mechanisms can be obtained by analysis of cleavage and fabric patterns in folded rocks, and the history of deformation can be revealed by understanding how asymmetry can develop in folds, by how folds develop in shear zones, and how folds develop in more complex three-dimensional deformations.

  18. Triangulation in Random Refractive Distortions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alterman, Marina; Schechner, Yoav Y; Swirski, Yohay

    2017-03-01

    Random refraction occurs in turbulence and through a wavy water-air interface. It creates distortion that changes in space, time and with viewpoint. Localizing objects in three dimensions (3D) despite this random distortion is important to some predators and also to submariners avoiding the salient use of periscopes. We take a multiview approach to this task. Refracted distortion statistics induce a probabilistic relation between any pixel location and a line of sight in space. Measurements of an object's random projection from multiple views and times lead to a likelihood function of the object's 3D location. The likelihood leads to estimates of the 3D location and its uncertainty. Furthermore, multiview images acquired simultaneously in a wide stereo baseline have uncorrelated distortions. This helps reduce the acquisition time needed for localization. The method is demonstrated in stereoscopic video sequences, both in a lab and a swimming pool.

  19. Electro-refractive photonic device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zortman, William A.; Watts, Michael R.

    2015-06-09

    The various technologies presented herein relate to phase shifting light to facilitate any of light switching, modulation, amplification, etc. Structures are presented where a second layer is juxtaposed between a first layer and a third layer with respective doping facilitating formation of p-n junctions at the interface between the first layer and the second layer, and between the second layer and the third layer. Application of a bias causes a carrier concentration change to occur at the p-n junctions which causes a shift in the effective refractive index per incremental change in an applied bias voltage. The effective refractive index enhancement can occur in both reverse bias and forward bias. The structure can be incorporated into a waveguide, an optical resonator, a vertical junction device, a horizontal junction device, a Mach-Zehnder interferometer, a tuneable optical filter, etc.

  20. Seismic reflection and refraction methods

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Chaubey, A.K.

    , reflection method is a very sophisticated version of the echosounding used in submarines, ships, and radar systems. Whereas, in seismic refraction method, principal portion of the wave-path is along the interface between the two layers and hence... into electrical signals, which are recorded digitally. The Ocean Bottom Seismometers 221 (OBS) are normally designed to record the earth motion under oceans and lakes from air-gun seismic sources. The air gun array is towed behind a ship usually at a...

  1. Petrov classification and holographic reconstruction of spacetime

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gath, Jakob [Centre de Physique Théorique, Ecole Polytechnique, CNRS UMR 7644,91128 Palaiseau Cedex (France); Mukhopadhyay, Ayan [Department of Physics, University of Crete,Heraklion 71003 (Greece); Petkou, Anastasios C. [Department of Physics, Institute of Theoretical Physics,Aristotle University of Thessaloniki,54124, Thessaloniki (Greece); Petropoulos, P. Marios [Centre de Physique Théorique, Ecole Polytechnique, CNRS UMR 7644,91128 Palaiseau Cedex (France); Siampos, Konstantinos [Albert Einstein Center for Fundamental Physics,Institute for Theoretical Physics, Bern University, Sidlerstrasse 5, 3012 Bern (Switzerland)

    2015-09-01

    Using the asymptotic form of the bulk Weyl tensor, we present an explicit approach that allows us to reconstruct exact four-dimensional Einstein spacetimes which are algebraically special with respect to Petrov’s classification. If the boundary metric supports a traceless, symmetric and conserved complex rank-two tensor, which is related to the boundary Cotton and energy-momentum tensors, and if the hydrodynamic congruence is shearless, then the bulk metric is exactly resummed and captures modes that stand beyond the hydrodynamic derivative expansion. We illustrate the method when the congruence has zero vorticity, leading to the Robinson-Trautman spacetimes of arbitrary Petrov class, and quote the case of non-vanishing vorticity, which captures the Plebański-Demiański Petrov D family.

  2. Geometric inequalities in spherically symmetric spacetimes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Csukás, Károly Z.

    2017-07-01

    In geometric inequalities ADM mass plays more fundamental role than the concept of quasi-local mass. This paper is to demonstrate that using the quasi-local mass some new insights can be acquired. In spherically symmetric spacetimes the Misner-Sharp mass and the concept of the Kodama vector field provides an ideal setting to the investigations of geometric inequalities. We applying the proposed new techniques to investigate the spacetimes containing black hole or cosmological horizons but we shall also apply them in context of normal bodies. Most of the previous investigations applied only the quasi-local charges and the area. Our main point is to include the quasi-local mass in the corresponding geometrical inequalities. This way we recover some known relations but new inequalities are also derived.

  3. spacetime : Spatio-Temporal Data in R

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edzer Pebesma

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available This document describes classes and methods designed to deal with different types of spatio-temporal data in R implemented in the R package spacetime, and provides examples for analyzing them. It builds upon the classes and methods for spatial data from package sp, and for time series data from package xts. The goal is to cover a number of useful representations for spatio-temporal sensor data, and results from predicting (spatial and/or temporal interpolation or smoothing, aggregating, or subsetting them, and to represent trajectories. The goals of this paper is to explore how spatio-temporal data can be sensibly represented in classes, and to find out which analysis and visualisation methods are useful and feasible. We discuss the time series convention of representing time intervals by their starting time only. This document is the main reference for the R package spacetime, and is available (in updated form as a vignette in this package.

  4. Black hole evaporation rates without spacetime.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braunstein, Samuel L; Patra, Manas K

    2011-08-12

    Verlinde recently suggested that gravity, inertia, and even spacetime may be emergent properties of an underlying thermodynamic theory. This vision was motivated in part by Jacobson's 1995 surprise result that the Einstein equations of gravity follow from the thermodynamic properties of event horizons. Taking a first tentative step in such a program, we derive the evaporation rate (or radiation spectrum) from black hole event horizons in a spacetime-free manner. Our result relies on a Hilbert space description of black hole evaporation, symmetries therein which follow from the inherent high dimensionality of black holes, global conservation of the no-hair quantities, and the existence of Penrose processes. Our analysis is not wedded to standard general relativity and so should apply to extended gravity theories where we find that the black hole area must be replaced by some other property in any generalized area theorem.

  5. Twin paradox in de Sitter spacetime

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boblest, Sebastian; Wunner, Guenter [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Universitaet Stuttgart, Pfaffenwaldring 57 IV, 70550 Stuttgart (Germany); Mueller, Thomas, E-mail: sebastian.boblest@itp1.uni-stuttgart.de, E-mail: Thomas.Mueller@vis.uni-stuttgart.de, E-mail: guenter.wunner@itp1.uni-stuttgart.de [Visualisierungsinstitut der Universitaet Stuttgart (VISUS), Allmandring 19, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany)

    2011-09-15

    The 'twin paradox' of special relativity offers the possibility of making interstellar flights within a lifetime. For very long journeys with velocities close to the speed of light, however, we have to take into account the expansion of the universe. Inspired by the work of Rindler on hyperbolic motion in curved spacetime, we study the worldline of a uniformly accelerated observer in de Sitter spacetime and the communication between the travelling observer and an observer at rest. This paper is intended to give graduate students who are familiar with special relativity and have some basic experience of general relativity a deeper insight into accelerated motion in general relativity, into the relationship between the proper times of different observers and the propagation of light signals between them, and into the use of compactification to describe the global structure of a relativistic model.

  6. Frustration, function and folding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreiro, Diego U; Komives, Elizabeth A; Wolynes, Peter G

    2017-11-01

    Natural protein molecules are exceptional polymers. Encoded in apparently random strings of amino-acids, these objects perform clear physical tasks that are rare to find by simple chance. Accurate folding, specific binding, powerful catalysis, are examples of basic chemical activities that the great majority of polypeptides do not display, and are thought to be the outcome of the natural history of proteins. Function, a concept genuine to Biology, is at the core of evolution and often conflicts with the physical constraints. Locating the frustration between discrepant goals in a recurrent system leads to fundamental insights about the chances and necessities that shape the encoding of biological information. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. An Uncertainty Relation of Space-Time

    OpenAIRE

    Sasakura, N.

    1999-01-01

    We propose an uncertainty relation of space-time. This relation is characterized by GhT \\lesssim \\delta V, where T and \\delta V denote a characteristic time scale and a spatial volume, respectively. Using this uncertainty relation, we give qualitative estimations for the entropies of a black hole and our universe. We obtain qualitative agreements with the known results. The holographic principle of 't Hooft and Susskind is reproduced. We also discuss cosmology and give a relation to the cosmi...

  8. Space-time fractional Zener wave equation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atanackovic, T M; Janev, M; Oparnica, Lj; Pilipovic, S; Zorica, D

    2015-02-08

    The space-time fractional Zener wave equation, describing viscoelastic materials obeying the time-fractional Zener model and the space-fractional strain measure, is derived and analysed. This model includes waves with finite speed, as well as non-propagating disturbances. The existence and the uniqueness of the solution to the generalized Cauchy problem are proved. Special cases are investigated and numerical examples are presented.

  9. Folding, Tiling, and Multidimensional Coding

    OpenAIRE

    Etzion, Tuvi

    2009-01-01

    Folding a sequence $S$ into a multidimensional box is a method that is used to construct multidimensional codes. The well known operation of folding is generalized in a way that the sequence $S$ can be folded into various shapes. The new definition of folding is based on lattice tiling and a direction in the $D$-dimensional grid. There are potentially $\\frac{3^D-1}{2}$ different folding operations. Necessary and sufficient conditions that a lattice combined with a direction define a folding a...

  10. Space-time modeling of soil moisture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zijuan; Mohanty, Binayak P.; Rodriguez-Iturbe, Ignacio

    2017-11-01

    A physically derived space-time mathematical representation of the soil moisture field is carried out via the soil moisture balance equation driven by stochastic rainfall forcing. The model incorporates spatial diffusion and in its original version, it is shown to be unable to reproduce the relative fast decay in the spatial correlation functions observed in empirical data. This decay resulting from variations in local topography as well as in local soil and vegetation conditions is well reproduced via a jitter process acting multiplicatively over the space-time soil moisture field. The jitter is a multiplicative noise acting on the soil moisture dynamics with the objective to deflate its correlation structure at small spatial scales which are not embedded in the probabilistic structure of the rainfall process that drives the dynamics. These scales of order of several meters to several hundred meters are of great importance in ecohydrologic dynamics. Properties of space-time correlation functions and spectral densities of the model with jitter are explored analytically, and the influence of the jitter parameters, reflecting variabilities of soil moisture at different spatial and temporal scales, is investigated. A case study fitting the derived model to a soil moisture dataset is presented in detail.

  11. Entwinement and the emergence of spacetime

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balasubramanian, Vijay [David Rittenhouse Laboratories, University of Pennsylvania, 209 S 33 Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); CUNY Graduate Center, Initiative for the Theoretical Sciences, 365 Fifth Avenue, New York, NY 10016 (United States); Chowdhury, Borun D. [Department of Physics, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona 85287 (United States); Czech, Bartłomiej [Department of Physics, Stanford University, 382 Via Pueblo Mall, Stanford, CA 94305-4060 (United States); Boer, Jan de [Institute for Theoretical Physics, University of Amsterdam, Science Park 904, Postbus 94485, 1090 GL Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2015-01-12

    It is conventional to study the entanglement between spatial regions of a quantum field theory. However, in some systems entanglement can be dominated by “internal”, possibly gauged, degrees of freedom that are not spatially organized, and that can give rise to gaps smaller than the inverse size of the system. In a holographic context, such small gaps are associated to the appearance of horizons and singularities in the dual spacetime. Here, we propose a concept of entwinement, which is intended to capture this fine structure of the wavefunction. Holographically, entwinement probes the entanglement shadow — the region of spacetime not probed by the minimal surfaces that compute spatial entanglement in the dual field theory. We consider the simplest example of this scenario — a 2d conformal field theory (CFT) that is dual to a conical defect in AdS{sub 3} space. Following our previous work, we show that spatial entanglement in the CFT reproduces spacetime geometry up to a finite distance from the conical defect. We then show that the interior geometry up to the defect can be reconstructed from entwinement that is sensitive to the discretely gauged, fractionated degrees of freedom of the CFT. Entwinement in the CFT is related to non-minimal geodesics in the conical defect geometry, suggesting a potential quantum information theoretic meaning for these objects in a holographic context. These results may be relevant for the reconstruction of black hole interiors from a dual field theory.

  12. Inequivalence of coset constructions for spacetime symmetries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Creminelli, Paolo [Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics,Strada Costiera 11, 34151 Trieste (Italy); Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, NJ 08540 (United States); Serone, Marco [SISSA, via Bonomea 265, 34136 Trieste (Italy); Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics,Strada Costiera 11, 34151 Trieste (Italy); INFN - Sezione di Trieste, 34151 Trieste (Italy); Trevisan, Gabriele [SISSA, via Bonomea 265, 34136 Trieste (Italy); INFN - Sezione di Trieste, 34151 Trieste (Italy); Trincherini, Enrico [Scuola Normale Superiore, piazza dei Cavalieri 7, 56126 Pisa (Italy); INFN - Sezione di Pisa, 56100 Pisa (Italy)

    2015-02-05

    Non-linear realizations of spacetime symmetries can be obtained by a generalization of the coset construction valid for internal ones. The physical equivalence of different representations for spacetime symmetries is not obvious, since their relation involves not only a redefinition of the fields but also a field-dependent change of coordinates. A simple and relevant spacetime symmetry is obtained by the contraction of the 4D conformal group that leads to the Galileon group. We analyze two non-linear realizations of this group, focusing in particular on the propagation of signals around non-trivial backgrounds. The aperture of the lightcone is in general different in the two representations and in particular a free (luminal) massless scalar is mapped in a Galileon theory which admits superluminal propagation. We show that in this theory, if we consider backgrounds that vanish at infinity, there is no asymptotic effect: the displacement of the trajectory integrates to zero, as can be expected since the S-matrix is trivial. Regarding local measurements, we show that the puzzle is solved taking into account that a local coupling with fixed sources in one theory is mapped into a non-local coupling and we show that this effect compensates the different lightcone. Therefore the two theories have a different notion of locality. The same applies to the different non-linear realizations of the conformal group and we study the particular case of a cosmologically interesting background: the Galilean Genesis scenarios.

  13. Towards a theory of spacetime theories

    CERN Document Server

    Schiemann, Gregor; Scholz, Erhard

    2017-01-01

    This contributed volume is the result of a July 2010 workshop at the University of Wuppertal Interdisciplinary Centre for Science and Technology Studies which brought together world-wide experts from physics, philosophy and history, in order to address a set of questions first posed in the 1950s: How do we compare spacetime theories? How do we judge, objectively, which is the “best” theory? Is there even a unique answer to this question? The goal of the workshop, and of this book, is to contribute to the development of a meta-theory of spacetime theories. Such a meta-theory would reveal insights about specific spacetime theories by distilling their essential similarities and differences, deliver a framework for a class of theories that could be helpful as a blueprint to build other meta-theories, and provide a higher level viewpoint for judging which theory most accurately describes nature. But rather than drawing a map in broad strokes, the focus is on particularly rich regions in the “space of spaceti...

  14. Zero mass limit of Kerr spacetime is a wormhole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbons, Gary W.; Volkov, Mikhail S.

    2017-07-01

    We show that, contrary to what is usually claimed in the literature, the zero mass limit of Kerr spacetime is not flat Minkowski space but a spacetime whose geometry is only locally flat. This limiting spacetime, as the Kerr spacetime itself, contains two asymptotic regions and hence cannot be topologically trivial. It also contains a curvature singularity, because the power-law singularity of the Weyl tensor vanishes in the limit but there remains a distributional contribution of the Ricci tensor. This spacetime can be interpreted as a wormhole sourced by a negative tension ring. We also extend the discussion to similarly interpret the zero mass limit of the Kerr-(anti-)de Sitter spacetime.

  15. Cosmological applications of algebraic quantum field theory in curved spacetimes

    CERN Document Server

    Hack, Thomas-Paul

    2016-01-01

    This book provides a largely self-contained and broadly accessible exposition on two cosmological applications of algebraic quantum field theory (QFT) in curved spacetime: a fundamental analysis of the cosmological evolution according to the Standard Model of Cosmology; and a fundamental study of the perturbations in inflation. The two central sections of the book dealing with these applications are preceded by sections providing a pedagogical introduction to the subject. Introductory material on the construction of linear QFTs on general curved spacetimes with and without gauge symmetry in the algebraic approach, physically meaningful quantum states on general curved spacetimes, and the backreaction of quantum fields in curved spacetimes via the semiclassical Einstein equation is also given. The reader should have a basic understanding of General Relativity and QFT on Minkowski spacetime, but no background in QFT on curved spacetimes or the algebraic approach to QFT is required.

  16. Cosmological Applications of Algebraic Quantum Field Theory in Curved Spacetimes

    CERN Document Server

    Hack, Thomas-Paul

    2015-01-01

    This monograph provides a largely self--contained and broadly accessible exposition of two cosmological applications of algebraic quantum field theory (QFT) in curved spacetime: a fundamental analysis of the cosmological evolution according to the Standard Model of Cosmology and a fundamental study of the perturbations in Inflation. The two central sections of the book dealing with these applications are preceded by sections containing a pedagogical introduction to the subject as well as introductory material on the construction of linear QFTs on general curved spacetimes with and without gauge symmetry in the algebraic approach, physically meaningful quantum states on general curved spacetimes, and the backreaction of quantum fields in curved spacetimes via the semiclassical Einstein equation. The target reader should have a basic understanding of General Relativity and QFT on Minkowski spacetime, but does not need to have a background in QFT on curved spacetimes or the algebraic approach to QFT. In particul...

  17. Refractions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hougaard, Anna Katrine; Søberg, Martin; Lorentsen, Elise

    2016-01-01

    The book focuses on new directions in architectural research, how architects develop new knowledge through their artistic design practice, working in a field between Art and Science. What new digital potentials are there in architectural media like models and drawings and how to put words on arti...

  18. Novel Applications of Space-Time Processing for Wireless Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Hult, Tommy

    2006-01-01

    Space-time processing techniques have emerged as one of the most promising areas of research and development in wireless communications. Space-time processing signifies the signal processing performed on a system consisting of several antenna elements, whose signals are processed adaptively in order to exploit both the spatial (space) and temporal (time) dimensions of the radio channel. Space-time processing techniques can be applied at the transmitter, the receiver or both. The use of space-...

  19. Predicting Refractive Surgery Outcome: Machine Learning Approach With Big Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achiron, Asaf; Gur, Zvi; Aviv, Uri; Hilely, Assaf; Mimouni, Michael; Karmona, Lily; Rokach, Lior; Kaiserman, Igor

    2017-09-01

    To develop a decision forest for prediction of laser refractive surgery outcome. Data from consecutive cases of patients who underwent LASIK or photorefractive surgeries during a 12-year period in a single center were assembled into a single dataset. Training of machine-learning classifiers and testing were performed with a statistical classifier algorithm. The decision forest was created by feature vectors extracted from 17,592 cases and 38 clinical parameters for each patient. A 10-fold cross-validation procedure was applied to estimate the predictive value of the decision forest when applied to new patients. Analysis included patients younger than 40 years who were not treated for monovision. Efficacy of 0.7 or greater and 0.8 or greater was achieved in 16,198 (92.0%) and 14,945 (84.9%) eyes, respectively. Efficacy of less than 0.4 and less than 0.5 was achieved in 322 (1.8%) and 506 (2.9%) eyes, respectively. Patients in the low efficacy group (analysis revealed significantly decreased efficacy with increased age (r = -0.67, P big data from refractive surgeries may be of interest. [J Refract Surg. 2017;33(9):592-597.]. Copyright 2017, SLACK Incorporated.

  20. Stability of generic thin shells in conformally flat spacetimes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amirabi, Z. [Eastern Mediterranean Univ., Gazimagusa (Turkey). Dept. of Physics

    2017-07-15

    Some important spacetimes are conformally flat; examples are the Robertson-Walker cosmological metric, the Einstein-de Sitter spacetime, and the Levi-Civita-Bertotti-Robinson and Mannheim metrics. In this paper we construct generic thin shells in conformally flat spacetime supported by a perfect fluid with a linear equation of state, i.e., p = ωσ. It is shown that, for the physical domain of ω, i.e., 0 < ω ≤ 1, such thin shells are not dynamically stable. The stability of the timelike thin shells with the Mannheim spacetime as the outer region is also investigated. (orig.)

  1. Matter collineations of spacetime homogeneous Gödel-type metrics

    CERN Document Server

    Camci, U

    2003-01-01

    The spacetime homogeneous Gödel-type spacetimes which have four classes of metrics are studied according to their matter collineations. The results obtained are compared with Killing vectors and Ricci collineations. It is found that these spacetimes have an infinite number of matter collineations in the degenerate case, i.e. det(T sub a sub b) = 0, and do not admit proper matter collineations in the non-degenerate case, i.e. det(T sub a sub b) not = 0. The degenerate case has the new constraints on the parameters m and w which characterize the causality features of the Gödel-type spacetimes.

  2. Refractive Surgery: Malpractice Litigation Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Custer, Benjamin L; Ballard, Steven R; Carroll, Robert B; Barnes, Scott D; Justin, Grant A

    2017-10-01

    To review data on malpractice claims related to refractive surgery to identify common allegations and injuries and financial outcomes. The WestlawNext database was reviewed for all malpractice lawsuits/settlements related to refractive eye surgery. Data evaluated included patient demographics, type of operation performed, plaintiff allegation, nature of injury, and litigation outcomes. A total of 167 cases met the inclusion criteria, of which 108 cases (64.7%) were found to be favorable and 59 cases (35.3%) unfavorable to the defendant. A total of 141 cases were tried by a jury with 108 cases (76.4%) favorable and 33 cases (23.6%) unfavorable to the defendant. Laser in situ keratomileusis was performed in 127 cases (76%). The most common allegations were negligence in treatment or surgery in 127 cases (76%) and lack of informed consent in 83 cases (49.7%). For all cases, the need for future surgery (P = 0.0001) and surgery resulting in keratoconus (P = 0.05) were more likely to favor the plaintiff. In jury verdict decisions, cases in which failure to diagnose a preoperative condition was alleged favored the defendant (P = 0.03), whereas machine malfunction (P = 0.05) favored the plaintiff. After adjustment for inflation, the overall mean award was $1,287,872. Jury verdicts and settlements led to mean awards of $1,604,801 and $826,883, respectively. Malpractice litigation in refractive surgery tends to favor the defendant. However, large awards and settlements were given in cases that were favorable to the plaintiff. The need for future surgery and surgery leading to keratoconus increased the chance of an unfavorable outcome.

  3. Theory of supervirtual refraction interferometry

    KAUST Repository

    Bharadwaj, Pawan

    2012-01-01

    Inverting for the subsurface velocity distribution by refraction traveltime tomography is a well-accepted imaging method by both the exploration and earthquake seismology communities. A significant drawback, however, is that the recorded traces become noisier with increasing offset from the source position, and so accurate picking of traveltimes in far-offset traces is often prevented. To enhance the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the far-offset traces, we present the theory of supervirtual refraction interferometry where the SNR of far-offset head-wave arrivals can be theoretically increased by a factor proportional to; here, N is the number of receiver or source positions associated with the recording and generation of the head-wave arrival. There are two steps to this methodology: correlation and summation of the data to generate traces with virtual head-wave arrivals, followed by the convolution of the data with the virtual traces to create traces with supervirtual head-wave arrivals. This method is valid for any medium that generates head-wave arrivals recorded by the geophones. Results with both synthetic traces and field data demonstrate the feasibility of this method. There are at least four significant benefits of supervirtual interferometry: (1) an enhanced SNR of far-offset traces so the first-arrival traveltimes of the noisy far-offset traces can be more reliably picked to extend the useful aperture of the data, (2) the SNR of head waves in a trace that arrive later than the first arrival can be enhanced for accurate traveltime picking and subsequent inversion by later-arrival traveltime tomography, (3) common receiver-pair gathers can be analysed to detect the presence of diving waves in the first arrivals, which can be used to assess the nature of the refracting boundary, and (4) the source statics term is eliminated in the correlation operations so that the timing of the virtual traces is independent of the source excitation time. This suggests the

  4. Comparison of self-refraction using a simple device, USee, with manifest refraction in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annadanam, Anvesh; Varadaraj, Varshini; Mudie, Lucy I; Liu, Alice; Plum, William G; White, J Kevin; Collins, Megan E; Friedman, David S

    2018-01-01

    The USee device is a new self-refraction tool that allows users to determine their own refractive error. We evaluated the ease of use of USee in adults, and compared the refractive error correction achieved with USee to clinical manifest refraction. Sixty adults with uncorrected visual acuity refraction and self-refraction. Subjects had a mean (±SD) age of 53.1 (±18.6) years, and 27 (45.0%) were male. Mean (±SD) spherical equivalent measured by manifest refraction and self-refraction were -0.90 D (±2.53) and -1.22 diopters (±2.42), respectively (p = 0.001). The proportion of subjects correctable to ≥20/30 in the better eye was higher for manifest refraction (96.7%) than self-refraction (83.3%, p = 0.005). Failure to achieve visual acuity ≥20/30 with self-refraction in right eyes was associated with increasing age (per year, OR: 1.05; 95% CI: 1.00-1.10) and higher cylindrical power (per diopter, OR: 7.26; 95% CI: 1.88-28.1). Subjectively, 95% of participants thought USee was easy to use, 85% thought self-refraction correction was better than being uncorrected, 57% thought vision with self-refraction correction was similar to their current corrective lenses, and 53% rated their vision as "very good" or "excellent" with self-refraction. Self-refraction provides acceptable refractive error correction in the majority of adults. Programs targeting resource-poor settings could potentially use USee to provide easy on-site refractive error correction.

  5. Contact lens management following corneal refractive surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Michael A

    2003-09-01

    Corneal refractive surgery has enjoyed considerable success and popularity in recent years; LASIK has become the surgical procedure of choice. The incidence of visually significant complications varies widely, but is inversely related to surgeon experience. Visual complaints include multifocal images, shadows, ametropias, anisometropia, night vision difficulties, decreased contrast sensitivity and loss of BCVA. Contact lenses offer an option to rehabilitate patients when visually symptomatic following refractive surgery. RGP lenses provide the best postoperative visual rehabilitation following refractive surgery.

  6. Optical Negative Refraction in Ferrofluids with Magnetocontrollability

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-22

    Optical Negative Refraction in Ferrofluids with Magnetocontrollability Y. Gao,1,2 J. P. Huang,1,* Y.M. Liu,3 L. Gao,4 K.W. Yu,2 and X. Zhang3...China (Received 5 October 2009; published 20 January 2010) We numerically demonstrate optical negative refraction in ferrofluids containing isotropic...certain soft materials. As a result, we reveal, for the first time, a new class of all-angle broadband optical nega- tive refraction in ferrofluids with

  7. Repeatability and Reproducibility of Virtual Subjective Refraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perches, Sara; Collados, M Victoria; Ares, Jorge

    2016-10-01

    To establish the repeatability and reproducibility of a virtual refraction process using simulated retinal images. With simulation software, aberrated images corresponding with each step of the refraction process were calculated following the typical protocol of conventional subjective refraction. Fifty external examiners judged simulated retinal images until the best sphero-cylindrical refraction and the best visual acuity were achieved starting from the aberrometry data of three patients. Data analyses were performed to assess repeatability and reproducibility of the virtual refraction as a function of pupil size and aberrometric profile of different patients. SD values achieved in three components of refraction (M, J0, and J45) are lower than 0.25D in repeatability analysis. Regarding reproducibility, we found SD values lower than 0.25D in the most cases. When the results of virtual refraction with different pupil diameters (4 and 6 mm) were compared, the mean of differences (MoD) obtained were not clinically significant (less than 0.25D). Only one of the aberrometry profiles with high uncorrected astigmatism shows poor results for the M component in reproducibility and pupil size dependence analysis. In all cases, vision achieved was better than 0 logMAR. A comparison between the compensation obtained with virtual and conventional subjective refraction was made as an example of this application, showing good quality retinal images in both processes. The present study shows that virtual refraction has similar levels of precision as conventional subjective refraction. Moreover, virtual refraction has also shown that when high low order astigmatism is present, the refraction result is less precise and highly dependent on pupil size.

  8. RNA folding: structure prediction, folding kinetics and ion electrostatics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Zhijie; Zhang, Wenbing; Shi, Yazhou; Wang, Fenghua

    2015-01-01

    Beyond the "traditional" functions such as gene storage, transport and protein synthesis, recent discoveries reveal that RNAs have important "new" biological functions including the RNA silence and gene regulation of riboswitch. Such functions of noncoding RNAs are strongly coupled to the RNA structures and proper structure change, which naturally leads to the RNA folding problem including structure prediction and folding kinetics. Due to the polyanionic nature of RNAs, RNA folding structure, stability and kinetics are strongly coupled to the ion condition of solution. The main focus of this chapter is to review the recent progress in the three major aspects in RNA folding problem: structure prediction, folding kinetics and ion electrostatics. This chapter will introduce both the recent experimental and theoretical progress, while emphasize the theoretical modelling on the three aspects in RNA folding.

  9. Descemet membrane endothelial keratoplasty and refractive surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, C Maya; Baydoun, Lamis; Melles, Gerrit R J

    2017-07-01

    Descemet membrane endothelial keratoplasty (DMEK) has become a first-line treatment in corneal endothelial diseases because of its exceptional clinical outcomes and low complication rates. Because of its improved refractive predictability, DMEK is now also considered for managing cases with endothelial decompensation following previous refractive procedures, or in combination with those. This article reviews the clinical outcomes in these cases and discusses the possibility of refractive interventions following DMEK. DMEK has been successfully performed in eyes after laser in-situ keratomileusis, eyes after anterior chamber intraocular lens (IOL) implantation and aphakic eyes. Often, DMEK is combined with cataract surgery (triple-DMEK). Initial reports on reducing the refractive cylinder by toric IOL implantation are available. Although there are some reports on phacoemulsification and IOL implantation after phakic DMEK, reports on laser refractive procedures following DMEK are lacking. In contrast to earlier keratoplasty techniques, DMEK induces on average only mild refractive shifts owing to the 'natural' restoration of the cornea. As such, DMEK may be ideal in managing corneal decompensation in refractive patients. However, further studies are required to assess the safety and efficacy of DMEK after refractive treatment and of refractive procedures following DMEK.

  10. Unravelling Lorentz Covariance and the Spacetime Formalism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cahill R. T.

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available We report the discovery of an exact mapping from Galilean time and space coordinates to Minkowski spacetime coordinates, showing that Lorentz covariance and the space-time construct are consistent with the existence of a dynamical 3-space, and absolute motion. We illustrate this mapping first with the standard theory of sound, as vibrations of a medium, which itself may be undergoing fluid motion, and which is covariant under Galilean coordinate transformations. By introducing a different non-physical class of space and time coordinates it may be cast into a form that is covariant under Lorentz transformations wherein the speed of sound is now the invariant speed. If this latter formalism were taken as fundamental and complete we would be lead to the introduction of a pseudo-Riemannian spacetime description of sound, with a metric characterised by an invariant speed of sound. This analysis is an allegory for the development of 20th century physics, but where the Lorentz covariant Maxwell equations were constructed first, and the Galilean form was later constructed by Hertz, but ignored. It is shown that the Lorentz covariance of the Maxwell equations only occurs because of the use of non-physical space and time coordinates. The use of this class of coordinates has confounded 20th century physics, and resulted in the existence of a allowing dynamical 3-space being overlooked. The discovery of the dynamics of this 3-space has lead to the derivation of an extended gravity theory as a quantum effect, and confirmed by numerous experiments and observations

  11. Psychophysiology of Refractive Accommodative Esotropia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ungsoo Samuel Kim

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To investigate the psychophysiologic aspects of refractive accommodative esotropia (RAE. Methods. I prospectively recruited patients aged 3–6 years with more than 3.0 diopters of hyperopia who presented at Kim’s Eye Hospital from January 2011 to March 2013. I compared Korean Child Behavior Checklist (K-CBCL which consists of internalizing factors (social withdrawal, somatic complaints, anxiety, and depression and externalizing factors (social problems, thought problems, attention problems, delinquent behavior, and aggressive behavior between RAE group and control group. Results. Two out of three internalizing indexes were significantly different between groups (somatic complaints: RAE children 50.1±4.6 and controls 46.6±5.8, P=0.026; depression/anxiety: RAE children 48.8±7.9 and controls 43.9±6.8, P=0.024. Although there was no significant difference, RAE children scored slightly higher on the externalizing behavior index. In the RAE group, the far angle of esodeviation showed a moderate correlation with withdrawn behaviors. Conclusion. Hypermetropic children with high scores on the somatic complaint and depression/anxiety subscales of the CBCL could be at high risk for developing RAE. Psychosocial problems might be related to the pathogenesis of refractive accommodative esotropia.

  12. Femtosecond laser corneal refractive surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurtz, Ron M.; Spooner, Greg J. R.; Sletten, Karin R.; Yen, Kimberly G.; Sayegh, Samir I.; Loesel, Frieder H.; Horvath, Christopher; Liu, HsiaoHua; Elner, Victor; Cabrera, Delia; Muenier, Marie-Helene; Sacks, Zachary S.; Juhasz, Tibor

    1999-06-01

    We evaluated the efficacy, safety, and stability of femtosecond laser intrastromal refractive procedures in ex vivo and in vivo models. When compared with longer pulsewidth nanosecond or picosecond laser pulses, femtosecond laser-tissue interactions are characterized by significantly smaller and more deterministic photodisruptive energy thresholds, as well as reduced shock waves and smaller cavitation bubbles. We utilized a highly reliable, all-solid-state femtosecond laser system for all studies to demonstrate clinical practicality. Contiguous tissue effects were achieved by scanning a 5 μm focused laser spot below the corneal surface at pulse energies of approximately 2 - 4 microjoules. A variety of scanning patterns was used to perform three prototype procedures in animal eyes; corneal flap cutting, keratomileusis, and intrastromal vision correction. Superior dissection and surface quality results were obtained for lamellar procedures (corneal flap cutting and keratomileusis). Preliminary in vivo evaluation of intrastromal vision correction in a rabbit model revealed consistent and stable pachymetry changes, without significant inflammation or loss of corneal transparency. We conclude that femtosecond laser technology may be able to perform a variety of corneal refractive procedures with high precision, offering advantages over current mechanical and laser devices and techniques.

  13. The Refractive Relativity Theory (RRT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colsman, Eckart

    2007-03-01

    It is suggested that in the General Relativity Theory in the equation for the 4th dimension l=ct, the velocity of light c should replace the time t as a variable. This results in simplified algorithms and more transparency for the GRT. Replacing the time warp with a variable c results in a theory, which is a true complementary concept in the sense of Niels Bohr. It does not contradict any tests, which supports the GRT. The Refractive Relativity Theory (RRT): (A) calculates the bending of light by a body of mass with the theory of refraction per the Snell's law, (B) interprets the cosmological redshift as a universal change of c over time instead with the Doppler effect, (C) describes the gravity field as a dimensional gradient of c, (D) recognizes that the expansion rate of the universe is given by the constant of gravity G, (E) calculates the Hubble constant H to 68.65 km/sec/Mpc, (F) gives the Higgs field a clear definition and addresses the weight conundrum of the W and Z boson particles. Using c as a variable in the universe, the RRT shows the way to a theory unifying the General Relativity with the electromagnetic theory!

  14. The Adventures of Space-Time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertolami, Orfeu

    Since the nineteenth century, it is known, through the work of Lobatchevski, Riemann, and Gauss, that spaces do not need to have a vanishing curvature. This was for sure a revolution on its own, however, from the point of view of these mathematicians, the space of our day to day experience, the physical space, was still an essentially a priori concept that preceded all experience and was independent of any physical phenomena. Actually, that was also the view of Newton and Kant with respect to time, even though, for these two space-time explorers, the world was Euclidean.

  15. An Uncertainty Relation of Space-Time

    OpenAIRE

    Naoki, SASAKURA; Department of Physics, Kyoto University

    1999-01-01

    We propose an uncertainty relation of space-time. This relation is characterized by Gh^^-T IsimδV, where T and δV denote a characteristic time scale and a spatial volume, respectively. Using this uncertainty relation, we give qualitative estimations for the entropies of a black hole and our universe. We obtain qualitative agreements with the known results. The holographic principle of't Hooft and Susskind is reproduced. We also discuss cosmology and give a relation to the cosmic holographic p...

  16. An Uncertainty Relation of Space-Time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasakura, N.

    1999-07-01

    We propose an uncertainty relation of space-time. This relation is characterized by G hbar T Susskind is reproduced. We also discuss cosmology and give a relation to the cosmic holographic principle of Fischler and Susskind. However, as for the maximal entropy of a system with an energy E, we obtain the formula sqrt{EV/Ghbar2, with V denoting the volume of the system, which is distinct from the Bekenstein entropy formula ER / hbar with R denoting the length scale of the system.

  17. The emergence of spacetime in string theory

    CERN Document Server

    Vistarini, Tiziana

    2018-01-01

    The nature of space and time is one of the most fascinating and fundamental philosophical issues which presently engages at the deepest level with physics. During the last thirty years this notion has been object of an intense critical review in the light of new scientific theories which try to combine the principles of both general relativity and quantum theory—called theories of quantum gravity. This book considers the way string theory shapes its own account of spacetime disappearance from the fundamental level.

  18. Charged black holes in colored Lifshitz spacetimes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhong-Ying Fan

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available We consider Einstein gravities coupled to a cosmological constant and SU(2 Yang–Mills fields in four and five dimensions. We find that the theories admit colored Lifshitz solutions with dynamic exponents z>1. We study the wave equations of the SU(2 scalar triplet in the bulk, and find that the vacuum color modifies the scaling dimensions of the dual operators. We also introduce a Maxwell field and construct exact solutions of electrically-charged black holes that approach the D=4, z=3 and D=5, z=4 colored Lifshitz spacetimes. We derive the thermodynamical first law for general colored and charged Lifshitz black holes.

  19. Asymptotically flat spacetimes with BMS3 symmetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Compère, Geoffrey; Fiorucci, Adrien

    2017-10-01

    We construct the phase space of 3-dimensional asymptotically flat spacetimes that forms the bulk metric representation of the BMS group consisting of both supertranslations and superrotations. The asymptotic symmetry group is a unique copy of the BMS group at both null infinities and spatial infinity. The BMS phase space obeys a notion of holographic causality and can be parametrized by boundary null fields. This automatically leads to the antipodal identification of bulk fields between past and future null infinity in the absence of a global conical defect.

  20. Generalising the coupling between spacetime and matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carloni, Sante

    2017-03-01

    We explore the idea that the coupling between matter and spacetime is more complex than the one originally envisioned by Einstein. We propose that such coupling takes the form of a new fundamental tensor in the Einstein field equations. We then show that the introduction of this tensor can account for dark phenomenology in General Relativity, maintaining a weak field limit compatible with standard Newtonian gravitation. The same paradigm can be applied any other theory of gravitation. We show, as an example, that in the context of conformal gravity a generalised coupling is able to solve compatibility issues between the matter and the gravitational sector.

  1. Generalising the coupling between spacetime and matter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sante Carloni

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available We explore the idea that the coupling between matter and spacetime is more complex than the one originally envisioned by Einstein. We propose that such coupling takes the form of a new fundamental tensor in the Einstein field equations. We then show that the introduction of this tensor can account for dark phenomenology in General Relativity, maintaining a weak field limit compatible with standard Newtonian gravitation. The same paradigm can be applied any other theory of gravitation. We show, as an example, that in the context of conformal gravity a generalised coupling is able to solve compatibility issues between the matter and the gravitational sector.

  2. Discreteness of Curved Spacetime from GUP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Adel Abutaleb

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Diverse theories of quantum gravity expect modifications of the Heisenberg's uncertainty principle near the Planck scale to a so-called Generalized uncertainty principle (GUP. It was shown by some authors that the GUP gives rise to corrections to the Schrodinger , Klein-Gordon, and Dirac equations. By solving the GUP corrected equations, the authors arrived at quantization not only of energy but also of box length, area, and volume. In this paper, we extend the above results to the case of curved spacetime (Schwarzschild metric. We showed that we arrived at the quantization of space by solving Dirac equation with GUP in this metric.

  3. Generalising the coupling between spacetime and matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carloni, Sante, E-mail: sante.carloni@gmail.com

    2017-03-10

    We explore the idea that the coupling between matter and spacetime is more complex than the one originally envisioned by Einstein. We propose that such coupling takes the form of a new fundamental tensor in the Einstein field equations. We then show that the introduction of this tensor can account for dark phenomenology in General Relativity, maintaining a weak field limit compatible with standard Newtonian gravitation. The same paradigm can be applied any other theory of gravitation. We show, as an example, that in the context of conformal gravity a generalised coupling is able to solve compatibility issues between the matter and the gravitational sector.

  4. Evolutionary optimization of protein folding.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cédric Debès

    Full Text Available Nature has shaped the make up of proteins since their appearance, [Formula: see text]3.8 billion years ago. However, the fundamental drivers of structural change responsible for the extraordinary diversity of proteins have yet to be elucidated. Here we explore if protein evolution affects folding speed. We estimated folding times for the present-day catalog of protein domains directly from their size-modified contact order. These values were mapped onto an evolutionary timeline of domain appearance derived from a phylogenomic analysis of protein domains in 989 fully-sequenced genomes. Our results show a clear overall increase of folding speed during evolution, with known ultra-fast downhill folders appearing rather late in the timeline. Remarkably, folding optimization depends on secondary structure. While alpha-folds showed a tendency to fold faster throughout evolution, beta-folds exhibited a trend of folding time increase during the last [Formula: see text]1.5 billion years that began during the "big bang" of domain combinations. As a consequence, these domain structures are on average slow folders today. Our results suggest that fast and efficient folding of domains shaped the universe of protein structure. This finding supports the hypothesis that optimization of the kinetic and thermodynamic accessibility of the native fold reduces protein aggregation propensities that hamper cellular functions.

  5. Reversing the direction of space and inverse Doppler effect in positive refraction index media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Fei; He, Sailing

    2017-01-01

    A negative refractive index medium, in which all spatial coordinates are reversed (i.e. a left-hand triplet is formed) by a spatial folding transformation, can create many novel electromagnetic phenomena, e.g. backward wave propagation, and inversed Doppler effect (IDE). In this study, we use coordinate rotation transformation to reverse only two spatial coordinates (e.g. x‧ and y‧), while keeping z‧ unchanged. In this case, some novel phenomena, e.g. radiation-direction-reversing illusions and IDE, can be achieved in a free space region wrapped by the proposed shell without any negative refractive index medium, which is easier for experimental realization and future applications.

  6. Questionnaires for Measuring Refractive Surgery Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandel, Himal; Khadka, Jyoti; Lundström, Mats; Goggin, Michael; Pesudovs, Konrad

    2017-06-01

    To identify the questionnaires used to assess refractive surgery outcomes, assess the available questionnaires in regard to their psychometric properties, validity, and reliability, and evaluate the performance of the available questionnaires in measuring refractive surgery outcomes. An extensive literature search was done on PubMed, MEDLINE, Scopus, CINAHL, Cochrane, and Web of Science databases to identify articles that described or used at least one questionnaire to assess refractive surgery outcomes. The information on content quality, validity, reliability, responsiveness, and psychometric properties was extracted and analyzed based on an extensive set of quality criteria. Eighty-one articles describing 27 questionnaires (12 refractive error-specific, including 4 refractive surgery-specific, 7 vision-but-non-refractive, and 8 generic) were included in the review. Most articles (56, 69.1%) described refractive error-specific questionnaires. The Quality of Life Impact of Refractive Correction (QIRC), the Quality of Vision (QoV), and the Near Activity Visual Questionnaire (NAVQ) were originally constructed using Rasch analysis; others were developed using the Classical Test Theory. The National Eye Institute Refractive Quality of Life questionnaire was the most frequently used questionnaire, but it does not provide a valid measurement. The QoV, QIRC, and NAVQ are the three best existing questionnaires to assess visual symptoms, quality of life, and activity limitations, respectively. This review identified three superior quality questionnaires for measuring different aspects of quality of life in refractive surgery. Clinicians and researchers should choose a questionnaire based on the concept being measured with superior psychometric properties. [J Refract Surg. 2017;33(6):416-424.]. Copyright 2017, SLACK Incorporated.

  7. Refractive Changes Induced by Strabismus Corrective Surgery in Adults

    OpenAIRE

    Daphna Mezad-Koursh; Ari Leshno; Tomer Ziv-Baran; Chaim Stolovitch

    2017-01-01

    Purpose. To investigate refractive changes after strabismus correction procedures among adults. Methods. Retrospective chart review of adult patients who had horizontal recti muscles surgery with preoperative and postoperative cycloplegic refraction measurements. The preoperative refraction was mathematically subtracted from the postoperative refraction, and the induced refractive changes were statistically analyzed. Vector analysis was used to examine the magnitude of the toric change. The p...

  8. The ribosome regulates flavodoxin folding

    OpenAIRE

    Houwman, Joseline A.

    2017-01-01

    During and after their translation by the ribosome, folding of polypeptides to biologically active proteins is of vital importance for all living organisms. Gaining knowledge about nascent chain folding is required to enhance our understanding of protein folding in the cell. This in turn allows us to obtain insights into factors responsible for protein misfolding, aggregation, and, potentially, for numerous devastating pathologies. In Chapter 1 the model protein flavodoxin is introduced. Also...

  9. Space-time discontinuous Galerkin method for compressible flow

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klaij, C.M.

    2006-01-01

    The space-time discontinuous Galerkin method allows the simulation of compressible flow in complex aerodynamical applications requiring moving, deforming and locally refined meshes. This thesis contains the space-time discretization of the physical model, a fully explicit solver for the resulting

  10. Quantum mechanics in fractional and other anomalous spacetimes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Calcagni, Gianluca; Nardelli, Giuseppe; Scalisi, Marco

    2012-01-01

    We formulate quantum mechanics in spacetimes with real-order fractional geometry and more general factorizable measures. In spacetimes where coordinates and momenta span the whole real line, Heisenberg's principle is proven and the wave-functions minimizing the uncertainty are found. In spite of the

  11. Curved non-relativistic spacetimes, Newtonian gravitation and massive matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geracie, Michael, E-mail: mgeracie@uchicago.edu; Prabhu, Kartik, E-mail: kartikp@uchicago.edu; Roberts, Matthew M., E-mail: matthewroberts@uchicago.edu [Kadanoff Center for Theoretical Physics, Enrico Fermi Institute and Department of Physics, The University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States)

    2015-10-15

    There is significant recent work on coupling matter to Newton-Cartan spacetimes with the aim of investigating certain condensed matter phenomena. To this end, one needs to have a completely general spacetime consistent with local non-relativistic symmetries which supports massive matter fields. In particular, one cannot impose a priori restrictions on the geometric data if one wants to analyze matter response to a perturbed geometry. In this paper, we construct such a Bargmann spacetime in complete generality without any prior restrictions on the fields specifying the geometry. The resulting spacetime structure includes the familiar Newton-Cartan structure with an additional gauge field which couples to mass. We illustrate the matter coupling with a few examples. The general spacetime we construct also includes as a special case the covariant description of Newtonian gravity, which has been thoroughly investigated in previous works. We also show how our Bargmann spacetimes arise from a suitable non-relativistic limit of Lorentzian spacetimes. In a companion paper [M. Geracie et al., e-print http://arxiv.org/abs/1503.02680 ], we use this Bargmann spacetime structure to investigate the details of matter couplings, including the Noether-Ward identities, and transport phenomena and thermodynamics of non-relativistic fluids.

  12. Photoelectric effect for twist-deformed space-time

    OpenAIRE

    Daszkiewicz, Marcin

    2016-01-01

    In this article, we investigate the impact of twisted space-time on the photoelectric effect, \\ie, we derive the $\\theta$-deformed threshold frequency. In such a way, we indicate that the space-time noncommutativity strongly enhances the photoelectric process.

  13. Space-time algebra for the generalization of gravitational field ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The Maxwell–Proca-like field equations of gravitolectromagnetism are formulated using space-time algebra (STA). The gravitational wave equation with massive gravitons and gravitomagnetic monopoles has been derived in terms of this algebra. Using space-time algebra, the most generalized form of ...

  14. Inflationary scenario from higher curvature warped spacetime

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Banerjee, Narayan [Indian Institute of Science Education and Research Kolkata, Department of Physical Sciences, Nadia, West Bengal (India); Paul, Tanmoy [Indian Association for the Cultivation of Science, Department of Theoretical Physics, Kolkata (India)

    2017-10-15

    We consider a five dimensional warped spacetime, in presence of the higher curvature term like F(R) = R + αR{sup 2} in the bulk, in the context of the two-brane model. Our universe is identified with the TeV scale brane and emerges as a four dimensional effective theory. From the perspective of this effective theory, we examine the possibility of ''inflationary scenario'' by considering the on-brane metric ansatz as an FRW one. Our results reveal that the higher curvature term in the five dimensional bulk spacetime generates a potential term for the radion field. Due to the presence of radion potential, the very early universe undergoes a stage of accelerated expansion and, moreover, the accelerating period of the universe terminates in a finite time. We also find the spectral index of curvature perturbation (n{sub s}) and the tensor to scalar ratio (r) in the present context, which match with the observational results based on the observations of Planck (Astron. Astrophys. 594, A20, 2016). (orig.)

  15. Spacetime-bridge solutions in vacuum gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sengupta, Sandipan

    2017-11-01

    Vacuum spacetime solutions, which are representations of a bridgelike geometry, are constructed as purely geometric sources of curvature in gravity theory. These configurations satisfy the first-order equations of motion everywhere. Each of them consists of two identical sheets of asymptotically flat geometry, connected by a region of finite extension where the tetrad is noninvertible. The solutions can be classified into nonstatic and static spacetimes. The first class represents a single causal universe equipped (locally) with a timelike coordinate everywhere. The latter, on the other hand, could be interpreted as a sum of two self-contained universes which are causally disconnected. These geometries, even though they have different metrical dimensions in the regions within and away from the bridge, are regular. This is reflected through the associated gauge-covariant fields, which are continuous across the hypersurfaces connecting the invertible and noninvertible phases of the tetrad and are finite everywhere. These vacuum bridge solutions have no analogue in the Einsteinian theory of gravity.

  16. Radiation memory, boosted Schwarzschild spacetimes and supertranslations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mädler, Thomas; Winicour, Jeffrey

    2017-06-01

    We investigate gravitational radiation memory and its corresponding effect on the asymptotic symmetries of a body whose exterior is a boosted Schwarzschild spacetime. First, in the context of linearized theory, we consider such a Schwarzschild body which is initially at rest, then goes through a radiative stage and finally emerges as a boosted Schwarzschild body. We show that the proper retarded solution of the exterior Schwarzschild spacetime for this process can be described in terms of the ingoing Kerr-Schild form of the Schwarzschild metric for both the initial and final states. An outgoing Kerr-Schild or time symmetric metric does not give the proper solution. The special property of Kerr-Schild metrics that their linearized and nonlinear forms are identical allows us to extend this result to processes in the nonlinear regime. We then discuss how the nonlinear memory effect, and its associated supertranslation, affect angular momentum conservation. Our approach provides a new framework for studying nonlinear aspects of the memory effect.

  17. The Finsler spacetime framework. Backgrounds for physics beyond metric geometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pfeifer, Christian

    2013-11-15

    The fundamental structure on which physics is described is the geometric spacetime background provided by a four dimensional manifold equipped with a Lorentzian metric. Most importantly the spacetime manifold does not only provide the stage for physical field theories but its geometry encodes causality, observers and their measurements and gravity simultaneously. This threefold role of the Lorentzian metric geometry of spacetime is one of the key insides of general relativity. During this thesis we extend the background geometry for physics from the metric framework of general relativity to our Finsler spacetime framework and ensure that the threefold role of the geometry of spacetime in physics is not changed. The geometry of Finsler spacetimes is determined by a function on the tangent bundle and includes metric geometry. In contrast to the standard formulation of Finsler geometry our Finsler spacetime framework overcomes the differentiability and existence problems of the geometric objects in earlier attempts to use Finsler geometry as an extension of Lorentzian metric geometry. The development of our nonmetric geometric framework which encodes causality is one central achievement of this thesis. On the basis of our well-defined Finsler spacetime geometry we are able to derive dynamics for the non-metric Finslerian geometry of spacetime from an action principle, obtained from the Einstein-Hilbert action, for the first time. We can complete the dynamics to a non-metric description of gravity by coupling matter fields, also formulated via an action principle, to the geometry of our Finsler spacetimes. We prove that the combined dynamics of the fields and the geometry are consistent with general relativity. Furthermore we demonstrate how to define observers and their measurements solely through the non-metric spacetime geometry. Physical consequence derived on the basis of our Finsler spacetime are: a possible solution to the fly-by anomaly in the solar system; the

  18. Singularities and the geometry of spacetime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawking, Stephen

    2014-11-01

    The aim of this essay is to investigate certain aspects of the geometry of the spacetime manifold in the General Theory of Relativity with particular reference to the occurrence of singularities in cosmological solutions and their relation with other global properties. Section 2 gives a brief outline of Riemannian geometry. In Section 3, the General Theory of Relativity is presented in the form of two postulates and two requirements which are common to it and to the Special Theory of Relativity, and a third requirement, the Einstein field equations, which distinguish it from the Special Theory. There does not seem to be any alternative set of field equations which would not have some undeseriable features. Some exact solutions are described. In Section 4, the physical significance of curvature is investigated using the deviation equation for timelike and null curves. The Riemann tensor is decomposed into the Ricci tensor which represents the gravitational effect at a point of matter at that point and the Welyl tensor which represents the effect at a point of gravitational radiation and matter at other points. The two tensors are related by the Bianchi identities which are presented in a form analogous to the Maxwell equations. Some lemmas are given for the occurrence of conjugate points on timelike and null geodesics and their relation with the variation of timelike and null curves is established. Section 5 is concerned with properties of causal relations between points of spacetime. It is shown that these could be used to determine physically the manifold structure of spacetime if the strong causality assumption held. The concepts of a null horizon and a partial Cauchy surface are introduced and are used to prove a number of lemmas relating to the existence of a timelike curve of maximum length between two sets. In Section 6, the definition of a singularity of spacetime is given in terms of geodesic incompleteness. The various energy assumptions needed to prove

  19. Refractive Index Measurement at TV Tower Prague

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Kvicera

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available Propagation related parameters are used for design and frequencyplanning of microwave networks. Atmospheric refractive index is theimportant parameter that influences the propagation of electromagneticwaves during so-called "clear sky" conditions. The refractive indexmeasurement, which was launched in TESTCOM, is presented in this paper.Some statistical characteristics and their utilization are introduced.

  20. Refractive index measurement based on confocal method

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Zhe; Xu, XiPing; Yang, JinHua; Qiao, Yang; Liu, Yang

    2017-10-01

    The development of transparent materials is closed to optoelectronic technology. It plays an increasingly important role in various fields. It is not only widely used in optical lens, optical element, optical fiber grating, optoelectronics, but also widely used in the building material, pharmaceutical industry with vessel, aircraft windshield and daily wear glasses.Regard of solving the problem of refractive index measurement in optical transparent materials. We proposed that using the polychromatic confocal method to measuring the refractive index of transparent materials. In this article, we describes the principle of polychromatic confocal method for measuring the refractive index of glass,and sketched the optical system and its optimization. Then we establish the measurement model of the refractive index, and set up the experimental system. In this way, the refractive index of the glass has been calibrated for refractive index experiment. Due to the error in the experimental process, we manipulated the experiment data to compensate the refractive index measurement formula. The experiment taking the quartz glass for instance. The measurement accuracy of the refractive index of the glass is +/-1.8×10-5. This method is more practical and accurate, especially suitable for non-contact measurement occasions, which environmental requirements is not high. Environmental requirements are not high, the ordinary glass production line up to the ambient temperature can be fully adapted. There is no need for the color of the measured object that you can measure the white and a variety of colored glass.

  1. Measurements of photoinduced refractive index changes in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We report the pump-probe measurements of nonlinear refractive index changes in photochromic bacteriorhodopsin films. The photoinduced absorption is caused by pump beam at 532 nm and the accompanying refractive index changes are studied using a probe beam at 633 nm. The proposed technique is based on a ...

  2. Achieving target refraction after cataract surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Shira S; Chee, Yewlin E; Haddadin, Ramez I; Veldman, Peter B; Borboli-Gerogiannis, Sheila; Brauner, Stacey C; Chang, Kenneth K; Chen, Sherleen H; Gardiner, Matthew F; Greenstein, Scott H; Kloek, Carolyn E; Chen, Teresa C

    2014-02-01

    To evaluate the difference between target and actual refraction after phacoemulsification and intraocular lens implantation at an academic teaching institution's Comprehensive Ophthalmology Service. Retrospective study. We examined 1275 eye surgeries for this study. All consecutive cataract surgeries were included if they were performed by an attending or resident surgeon from January through December 2010. Postoperative refractions were compared with preoperative target refractions. Patients were excluded if they did not have a preoperative target refraction documented or if they did not have a recorded postoperative manifest refraction within 90 days. The main outcome measure was percentage of cases achieving a postoperative spherical equivalent ± 1.0 diopter (D) of target spherical equivalent. We performed 1368 cataract surgeries from January through December of 2010. Of these, 1275 (93%) had sufficient information for analysis. Of the included cases, 94% (1196 of 1275) achieved ± 1.0 D of target refraction by 90 days after cataract surgery. This paper establishes a new benchmark for a teaching hospital, where 94% of patients achieved within 1.0 D of target refraction after cataract surgery. The refractive outcomes after cataract surgery at this academic teaching institution were higher than average international benchmarks. Copyright © 2014 American Academy of Ophthalmology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Microstructured optical fiber refractive index sensor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Town, Graham E.; McCosker, Ravi; Yuan, Scott Wu

    2010-01-01

    We describe a dual-core microstructured optical fiber designed for refractive index sensing of fluids. We show that by using the exponential dependence of intercore coupling on analyte refractive index, both large range and high sensitivity can be achieved in the one device. We also show...

  4. Conical refraction and higher microlocalization

    CERN Document Server

    Liess, Otto

    1993-01-01

    The main topic of the book is higher analytic microlocalization and its application to problems of propagation of singularities. The part on higher microlocalization could serve as an introduction to the subject. The results on propagation refer to solutions of linear partial differentialoperators with characteristics of variable multiplicity and are of conical refraction type. The relation and interplay between these results and results or constructions from geometrical optics in crystal theory is discussed with many details. The notes are written foremost for researchers working in microlocal analysis, but it is hoped that they can also be of interest for mathematicians and physicists who work in propagation phenomena from a more classical point of view.

  5. Retinal Image Simulation of Subjective Refraction Techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perches, Sara; Collados, M Victoria; Ares, Jorge

    2016-01-01

    Refraction techniques make it possible to determine the most appropriate sphero-cylindrical lens prescription to achieve the best possible visual quality. Among these techniques, subjective refraction (i.e., patient's response-guided refraction) is the most commonly used approach. In this context, this paper's main goal is to present a simulation software that implements in a virtual manner various subjective-refraction techniques--including Jackson's Cross-Cylinder test (JCC)--relying all on the observation of computer-generated retinal images. This software has also been used to evaluate visual quality when the JCC test is performed in multifocal-contact-lens wearers. The results reveal this software's usefulness to simulate the retinal image quality that a particular visual compensation provides. Moreover, it can help to gain a deeper insight and to improve existing refraction techniques and it can be used for simulated training.

  6. Refracting surface plasmon polaritons with nanoparticle arrays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Radko, I.P.; Evlyukhin, A.B.; Boltasseva, Alexandra

    2008-01-01

    deduced from the SPP refraction by triangular arrays. The SPP refractive index is found to decrease slightly for longer wavelengths within the wavelength range of 700-860 nm. Modeling based on the Green's tensor formalism is in a good agreement with the experimental results, opening the possibility......Refraction of surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) by various structures formed by a 100-nm-period square lattice of gold nanoparticles on top of a gold film is studied by leakage radiation microscopy. SPP refraction by a triangular-shaped nanoparticle array indicates that the SPP effective refractive...... index increases inside the array by a factor of ~1.08 (for the wavelength 800 nm) with respect to the SPP index at a flat surface. Observations of SPP focusing and deflection by circularly shaped areas as well as SPP waveguiding inside rectangular arrays are consistent with the SPP index increase...

  7. The Refractive Error of Professional Baseball Players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laby, Daniel M; Kirschen, David G

    2017-05-01

    High levels of visual acuity are required to hit a baseball effectively. Research has shown that any decrease in vision is likely caused by low-order optical aberrations. This study is designed to validate the SVOne autorefractor, and describe the amount and type, of low-order optical aberrations present in a large cohort of professional baseball players. A retrospective chart review on the 608 Major League Baseball players evaluated during the 2016 Spring Training Season was performed. Results for a subset of players who had both manifest refraction as well as autorefraction were calculated. Subsequently, after determining the accuracy of the autorefraction system in this population, refractive results for the entire population were determined. There was a borderline statistically significant difference in mean spherical refractive error (M) between the manifest refraction and the SVOne auto refraction (-0.273D in the manifest refraction method vs. -0.503D in the SVOne method, P = .06) in the subset of athletes who underwent both tests. Additionally, there was no difference in the J0 or J45 cylindrical component vectors for each method. For the entire eligible population, the SVOne autorefraction system found a mean spherical refractive error (M) of -0.228D, a J0 value of -0.013D, and a J45 value of -0.040D. These data suggest that the SVOne autorefraction system is generally able to measure the refractive error in the baseball population. The system was slightly biased, often reporting more myopia in myopic subjects. Thus, careful evaluation of the refractive status of these athletes coupled with careful subjective refractive correction for those with less than average vision for baseball is strongly suggested.

  8. Problem Solving through Paper Folding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wares, Arsalan

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe a couple of challenging mathematical problems that involve paper folding. These problem-solving tasks can be used to foster geometric and algebraic thinking among students. The context of paper folding makes some of the abstract mathematical ideas involved relatively concrete. When implemented…

  9. Teaching computers to fold proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winther, Ole; Krogh, Anders Stærmose

    2004-01-01

    A new general algorithm for optimization of potential functions for protein folding is introduced. It is based upon gradient optimization of the thermodynamic stability of native folds of a training set of proteins with known structure. The iterative update rule contains two thermodynamic average...

  10. Postoperative refraction in the second eye having cataract surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leffler, Christopher T; Wilkes, Martin; Reeves, Juliana; Mahmood, Muneera A

    2011-01-01

    Introduction. Previous cataract surgery studies assumed that first-eye predicted and observed postoperative refractions are equally important for predicting second-eye postoperative refraction. Methods. In a retrospective analysis of 173 patients having bilateral sequential phacoemulsification, multivariable linear regression was used to predict the second-eye postoperative refraction based on refractions predicted by the SRK-T formula for both eyes, the first-eye postoperative refraction, and the difference in IOL selected between eyes. Results. The first-eye observed postoperative refraction was an independent predictor of the second eye postoperative refraction (P refraction. Compared with the SRK-T formula, this model reduced the root-mean-squared (RMS) error of the predicted refraction by 11.3%. Conclusions. The first-eye postoperative refraction is an independent predictor of the second-eye postoperative refraction. The first-eye predicted refraction is less important. These findings may be due to interocular symmetry.

  11. Reproducibility of manifest refraction between surgeons and optometrists in a clinical refractive surgery practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinstein, Dan Z; Yap, Timothy E; Carp, Glenn I; Archer, Timothy J; Gobbe, Marine

    2014-03-01

    To measure and compare the interobserver reproducibility of manifest refraction according to a standardized protocol for normal preoperative patients in a refractive surgery practice. Private clinic, London, United Kingdom. Retrospective case series. This retrospective study comprised patients attending 2 preoperative refractions before laser vision correction. The first manifest refraction was performed by 1 of 7 optometrists and the second manifest refraction by 1 of 2 surgeons, all trained using a standard manifest refraction protocol. Spherocylindrical data were converted into power vectors for analysis. The dioptric power differences between observers were calculated and analyzed. One thousand nine hundred twenty-two consecutive eyes were stratified into a myopia group and a hyperopia group and then further stratified by each surgeon-optometrist combination. The mean surgeon-optometrist dioptric power difference was 0.21 diopter (D) (range 0.15 to 0.32 D). The mean difference in spherical equivalent refraction was 0.03 D, with 95% of all refractions within ±0.44 D for all optometrist-surgeon combinations. The severity of myopic or hyperopic ametropia did not affect the interobserver reproducibility of the manifest refraction. There was close agreement in refraction between surgeons and optometrists using a standard manifest refraction protocol of less than 0.25 D. This degree of interobserver repeatability is similar to that in intraobserver repeatability studies published to date and may represent the value of training and the use of a standard manifest refraction protocol between refraction observers in a refractive surgery practice involving co-management between surgeons and optometrists. Copyright © 2014 ASCRS and ESCRS. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Fully 3D refraction correction dosimetry system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manjappa, Rakesh; Makki, S Sharath; Kumar, Rajesh; Vasu, Ram Mohan; Kanhirodan, Rajan

    2016-02-21

    The irradiation of selective regions in a polymer gel dosimeter results in an increase in optical density and refractive index (RI) at those regions. An optical tomography-based dosimeter depends on rayline path through the dosimeter to estimate and reconstruct the dose distribution. The refraction of light passing through a dose region results in artefacts in the reconstructed images. These refraction errors are dependant on the scanning geometry and collection optics. We developed a fully 3D image reconstruction algorithm, algebraic reconstruction technique-refraction correction (ART-rc) that corrects for the refractive index mismatches present in a gel dosimeter scanner not only at the boundary, but also for any rayline refraction due to multiple dose regions inside the dosimeter. In this study, simulation and experimental studies have been carried out to reconstruct a 3D dose volume using 2D CCD measurements taken for various views. The study also focuses on the effectiveness of using different refractive-index matching media surrounding the gel dosimeter. Since the optical density is assumed to be low for a dosimeter, the filtered backprojection is routinely used for reconstruction. We carry out the reconstructions using conventional algebraic reconstruction (ART) and refractive index corrected ART (ART-rc) algorithms. The reconstructions based on FDK algorithm for cone-beam tomography has also been carried out for comparison. Line scanners and point detectors, are used to obtain reconstructions plane by plane. The rays passing through dose region with a RI mismatch does not reach the detector in the same plane depending on the angle of incidence and RI. In the fully 3D scanning setup using 2D array detectors, light rays that undergo refraction are still collected and hence can still be accounted for in the reconstruction algorithm. It is found that, for the central region of the dosimeter, the usable radius using ART-rc algorithm with water as RI matched

  13. Wave-vector and polarization dependence of conical refraction

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Turpin, A; Loiko, Yu V; Kalkandjiev, T K; Tomizawa, H; Mompart, J

    2013-01-01

    We experimentally address the wave-vector and polarization dependence of the internal conical refraction phenomenon by demonstrating that an input light beam of elliptical transverse profile refracts...

  14. Newman-Janis Ansatz in conformastatic spacetimes

    CERN Document Server

    Gutiérrez-Piñeres, Antonio C

    2016-01-01

    The Newman-Janis Ansatz was used first to obtain the stationary Kerr metric from the static Schwarzschild metric. Many works have been devoted to investigate the physical significance of this Ansatz, but no definite answer has been given so far. We show that this Ansatz can be applied in general to conformastatic vacuum metrics, and leads to stationary generalizations which, however, do not preserve the conformal symmetry. We investigate also the particular case when the seed solution is given by the Schwarzschild spacetime and show that the resulting rotating configuration does not correspond to a vacuum solution, even in the limiting case of slow rotation. In fact, it describes in general a relativistic fluid with anisotropic pressure and heat flux. This implies that the Newman-Janis Ansatz strongly depends on the choice of representation for the seed solution. We interpret this result as as a further indication of its applicability limitations.

  15. Superluminal propagation: Light cone and Minkowski spacetime

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mugnai, D. [' Nello Carrara' Institute of Applied Physics, CNR Florence Research Area, Via Madonna del Piano 10, 50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy)]. E-mail: d.mugnai@ifac.cnr.it

    2007-05-14

    Superluminal behavior has been extensively studied in recent years, especially with regard to the topic of superluminality in the propagation of a signal. Particular interest has been devoted to Bessel-X waves propagation, since some experimental results showed that these waves have both phase and group velocities greater that light velocity c. However, because of the lack of an exact definition of signal velocity, no definite answer about the signal propagation (or velocity of information) has been found. The present Letter is a short note that deals in a general way with this vexed question. By analyzing the field of existence of the Bessel X-pulse in pseudo-Euclidean spacetime, it is possible to give a general description of the propagation, and to overcome the specific question related to a definition of signal velocity.

  16. Relativistic Magnetic Reconnection in Kerr Spacetime.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asenjo, Felipe A; Comisso, Luca

    2017-02-03

    The magnetic reconnection process is analyzed for relativistic magnetohydrodynamical plasmas around rotating black holes. A simple generalization of the Sweet-Parker model is used as a first approximation to the problem. The reconnection rate, as well as other important properties of the reconnection layer, has been calculated taking into account the effect of spacetime curvature. Azimuthal and radial current sheet configurations in the equatorial plane of the black hole have been studied, and the case of small black hole rotation rate has been analyzed. For the azimuthal configuration, it is found that the black hole rotation decreases the reconnection rate. On the other hand, in the radial configuration, it is the gravitational force created by the black hole mass that decreases the reconnection rate. These results establish a fundamental interaction between gravity and magnetic reconnection in astrophysical contexts.

  17. Phantom space-times in fake supergravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bu Taam, Maryam; Sabra, Wafic A.

    2015-12-01

    We discuss phantom metrics admitting Killing spinors in fake N = 2, D = 4 supergravity coupled to vector multiplets. The Abelian U (1) gauge fields in the fake theory have kinetic terms with the wrong sign. We solve the Killing spinor equations for the standard and fake theories in a unified fashion by introducing a parameter which distinguishes between the two theories. The solutions found are fully determined in terms of algebraic conditions, the so-called stabilisation equations, in which the symplectic sections are related to a set of functions. These functions are harmonic in the case of the standard supergravity theory and satisfy the wave-equation in flat (2 + 1)-space-time in the fake theory. Explicit examples are given for the minimal models with quadratic prepotentials.

  18. A quantum kinematics for asymptotically flat spacetimes

    CERN Document Server

    Campiglia, Miguel

    2014-01-01

    We construct a quantum kinematics for asymptotically flat spacetimes based on the Koslowski-Sahlmann (KS) representation. The KS representation is a generalization of the representation underlying Loop Quantum Gravity (LQG) which supports, in addition to the usual LQG operators, the action of `background exponential operators' which are connection dependent operators labelled by `background' $su(2)$ electric fields. KS states have, in addition to the LQG state label corresponding to 1 dimensional excitations of the triad, a label corresponding to a `background' electric field which describes 3 dimensional excitations of the triad. Asymptotic behaviour in quantum theory is controlled through asymptotic conditions on the background electric fields which label the {\\em states} and the background electric fields which label the {\\em operators}. Asymptotic conditions on the triad are imposed as conditions on the background electric field state label while confining the LQG spin net graph labels to compact sets. We...

  19. Relative-locality effects in Snyder spacetime

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mignemi, S., E-mail: smignemi@unica.it [Dipartimento di Matematica e Informatica, Università di Cagliari, viale Merello 92, 09123 Cagliari (Italy); INFN, Sezione di Cagliari, Cittadella Universitaria, 09042 Monserrato (Italy); Samsarov, A., E-mail: andjelo.samsarov@irb.hr [Rudjer Bošković Institute, Bijenička cesta 54, 10002 Zagreb (Croatia)

    2017-05-18

    Most models of noncommutative geometry and doubly special relativity suggest that the principle of absolute locality should be replaced by the milder notion of relative locality. In particular, they predict the occurrence of a delay in the time of arrival of massless particle of different energies emitted by a distant observer. In this letter, we show that this is not the case with Snyder spacetime, essentially because the Lorentz invariance is not deformed in this case. Distant observers may however measure different times of flight for massive particles. - Highlights: • We discuss the dynamics of the Snyder model from the point of view of relative locality. • We show that no time delay is present for particles emitted by distant observers. • We ascribe this fact to the Lorentz invariance of the model. • Distant observers may however measure different times of flight for massive particle.

  20. Selective reconstruction of space-time spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voronin, E. N.

    1985-12-01

    The relationship between the active component of mutual resistance and radiation patterns of arbitrary receive-transmit antennas is simplified on the basis of the reciprocity theorem. The simplification does not violate the identity of the relationship, and has a useful application to the correction of the near-field holograms of arbitrary sources with the aim of the selective reconstruction of the space-time spectra of homogeneous or inhomogeneous waves. The version of the relationship obtained can also be extended to acoustic antennas. Numerical simulation results are presented concerning the reconstruction of the radiation pattern of a half-wave dipole on the basis of near-field sounding in a cylindrical shielded chamber.

  1. Mass ladder operators from spacetime conformal symmetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardoso, Vitor; Houri, Tsuyoshi; Kimura, Masashi

    2017-07-01

    Ladder operators can be useful constructs, allowing for unique insight and intuition. In fact, they have played a special role in the development of quantum mechanics and field theory. Here, we introduce a novel type of ladder operators, which map a scalar field onto another massive scalar field. We construct such operators, in arbitrary dimensions, from closed conformal Killing vector fields, eigenvectors of the Ricci tensor. As an example, we explicitly construct these objects in anti-de Sitter (A d S ) spacetime and show that they exist for masses above the Breitenlohner-Freedman bound. Starting from a regular seed solution of the massive Klein-Gordon equation, mass ladder operators in AdS allow one to build a variety of regular solutions with varying boundary condition at spatial infinity. We also discuss mass ladder operator in the context of spherical harmonics, and the relation between supersymmetric quantum mechanics and so-called Aretakis constants in an extremal black hole.

  2. Straylight values after refractive surgery: screening for ocular fitness in demanding professions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Bree, Maartje C J; van Verre, Hedwig P; Devreese, Marina T; Larminier, Frans; van den Berg, Thomas J T P

    2011-05-01

    To study straylight testing as a screening method for ocular fitness after refractive surgery in demanding professions and to determine the distribution of elevations in straylight as a result of refractive surgery in a non-research setting in contrast with earlier reports in research settings. Cross-sectional study. The refractive surgery population consisted of 373 eyes in 198 subjects with a history of refractive surgery. The reference population consisted of 402 eyes in 214 young individuals without a history of refractive surgery. Data were collected as part of routine testing at The Queen Astrid Military Hospital (Belgium), an independent military institution responsible for medical fitness examinations. Intraocular straylight was measured with the commercially available C-Quant instrument (Oculus Optikgeräte GmbH, Wetzlar, Germany), using the psychophysical compensation comparison (CC) method. Fellow eyes were compared to evaluate methodological aspects. The prevalence of impairment was evaluated for 2 age-independent cutoff criteria, a 2.0-fold and 3.2-fold increase, and an age-dependent cutoff criterion corresponding to an increase of 0.20 log units. Methodological aspects such as repeatability, systematic differences, and distance to impaired scores, and prevalence of impaired straylight values after refractive surgery using proposed cutoff criteria. The CC method exhibited good repeatability, and the chance of impaired scores due to variability in measurement was small. The prevalence of impaired straylight values was minimal in the reference population. In the refractive population, 9% (33/373) of values were above the factor 2.0 criterion, 2% (7/373) were above the factor 3.2 criterion, and 12% (45/373) were 0.20 log units above the age reference. Straylight testing is a viable screening method for ocular fitness after refractive surgery. Patients from the general population who have undergone refractive surgery have significant elevations more

  3. Emergent spacetime in stochastically evolving dimensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afshordi, Niayesh; Stojkovic, Dejan

    2014-12-01

    Changing the dimensionality of the space-time at the smallest and largest distances has manifold theoretical advantages. If the space is lower dimensional in the high energy regime, then there are no ultraviolet divergencies in field theories, it is possible to quantize gravity, and the theory of matter plus gravity is free of divergencies or renormalizable. If the space is higher dimensional at cosmological scales, then some cosmological problems (including the cosmological constant problem) can be attacked from a completely new perspective. In this paper, we construct an explicit model of ;evolving dimensions; in which the dimensions open up as the temperature of the universe drops. We adopt the string theory framework in which the dimensions are fields that live on the string worldsheet, and add temperature dependent mass terms for them. At the Big Bang, all the dimensions are very heavy and are not excited. As the universe cools down, dimensions open up one by one. Thus, the dimensionality of the space we live in depends on the energy or temperature that we are probing. In particular, we provide a kinematic Brandenberger-Vafa argument for how a discrete causal set, and eventually a continuum (3 + 1)-dim spacetime along with Einstein gravity emerges in the Infrared from the worldsheet action. The (3 + 1)-dim Planck mass and the string scale become directly related, without any compactification. Amongst other predictions, we argue that LHC might be blind to new physics even if it comes at the TeV scale. In contrast, cosmic ray experiments, especially those that can register the very beginning of the shower, and collisions with high multiplicity and density of particles, might be sensitive to the dimensional cross-over.

  4. Refractive surgery after Descemet's stripping endothelial keratoplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prince, Jessica; Chuck, Roy S

    2012-07-01

    Descemet's stripping endothelial keratoplasty (DSEK) has become a preferred surgical correction for endothelial dysfunction. Patient dissatisfaction secondary to refractive error is emerging as a significant complaint after anatomically successful DSEK. This article reviews refractive surgeries after DSEK to address this problem. There are various surgical options available to treat refractive compromise following DSEK. Cataract extraction with intraocular lens (IOL) implantation is a well tolerated option to restore visual acuity after DSEK in cases with significant lens opacities. Laser in-situ keratomileusis (LASIK) and photorefractive keratectomy (PRK) can otherwise successfully correct simple refractive errors. Phototherapeutic keratectomy (PTK) may be employed in cases wherein visually significant subepithelial fibrosis and scarring become evident after DSEK. To obtain maximum visual rehabilitation, patients undergoing DSEK may require further refractive surgeries. Cataract extraction, LASIK, PRK, PTK, and various combination procedures have been shown to optimize corneal clarity and visual acuity in patients who previously had successful DSEK with subsequent refractive errors. Technological advancements and continued research are necessary to perfect optimal timing and outcomes of these secondary refractive surgeries.

  5. [Refraction and its components in anisometropia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tayah, David; Dall'coll, Marcelo Weslley Lopes; Alves, Milton Ruiz

    2009-01-01

    To compare the individual means of ocular components of both eyes in patients with anisometropia; to correlate the differences of the components with refractive differences; and to identify the smallest number of factors that contain the same level of information expressed in the set of variables that influence refractive difference. An analytical transversal study was carried out in 77 patients with anisometropia of two or more dioptres seen at the Ophthalmologic Clinic, University Hospital, Nilton Lins Medical School, Manaus. All participants were submitted to ophthalmologic examination which included objective and subjective cycloplegic refractometry, keratometry and ultrasound biometry. Data analysis comprised the following statistical models: univariate, multivariate, multiple and factorial regression analyses. There were no significant differences in the comparison between the individual means of the ocular components. There was negative correlation between refractive difference and difference of axial length (r= -0.64; p<0.01) and weak negative correlation between refractive difference and crystalline lens power difference (r= -0.34; p<0.01). The analyzed variables reached 78% of the total variation of refractive difference. Three factors were identified for refractive differences: a) factor 1 (refraction, axial length); b) factor 2 (anterior chamber depth, cornea power), and c) factor 3 (crystalline lens power).

  6. [Does refractive surgery really make eyeglasses superfluous?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seiler, T

    2001-06-14

    Spectacles have become a problem of life-style in some societies. In the USA, in 1999 approximately 1 million LASIK operations have been performed to correct myopia and astigmatism and in Europe the frequency of refractive surgery stead by increases. However, only 3 to 5% of these operations are medically indicated. Refractive surgery is evaluated regarding safety and efficacy. Modern laser techniques demonstrate excellent refractive results: photorefractive keratectomy (PRK) achieved refractive success rates of 90% and more with complication rates of 0.5% and less. PRK is, therefore, a valuable technique for corrections of myopia up to -6.0 D. Similar efficacy is obtained with LASIK (laser in situ keratomileusis) in corrections up to -10 D, however, the complication rate is somewhat higher. Laser correction of hyperopia is equally successful regarding the refractive success but shows an even higher complication rate and the patient satisfaction is lower. Modern refractive laser surgery may replace spectacles in the majority of the cases, however, none of the techniques is free of complications. Therefore, we understand refractive surgery still to be inferior to the correction of ametropia by means of spectacles and any such operation should be attempted only after thorough discussion.

  7. [Calculations of mean refraction and variation of refraction using a dioptric space].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Touzeau, O; Costantini, E; Gaujoux, T; Borderie, V; Laroche, L

    2010-11-01

    Polar notations (sphere, cylinder, and axis) of refraction perfectly characterize a single refraction but are not suitable for statistical analysis or graphic representation. While the spherical component of refraction can be easily analyzed by the spherical equivalent, statistical analysis of astigmatism requires non-polar expressions of refraction. Indeed, the cylinder and axis of astigmatism are not independent data. In addition, axis is a directional data including a non-trigonometric cycle. Refraction can be written in a non-polar notation by three rectangular coordinates (x, y, z), which can also represent the spherocylinder by one point in a dioptric space. These three coordinates constitute three independent (orthogonal) variables that correspond to a sphere-equivalent component and a pair of Jackson cross-cylinder components, oriented at 0°/90° (WTR/ATR astigmatism) and 45°/135° (oblique astigmatism). Statistical analysis and graphical representation become less complicated when using rectangular coordinates of refraction. Rectangular coordinates of the mean refraction are obtained by average rectangular coordinates. Similarly, rectangular coordinates of refraction change are obtained by a single subtraction of rectangular coordinates between the final and initial refractions. After statistical analysis, the rectangular coordinates obtained can be converted into a polar form for a more easily understood result. Finally, non-polar notations including rectangular coordinates are useful for statistical and graphical analysis, which would be difficult with only conventional polar notations of refraction. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  8. An xp model on AdS{sub 2} spacetime

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Molina-Vilaplana, Javier, E-mail: xavmol@gmail.com [Universidad Politécnica de Cartagena, Cartagena (Spain); Sierra, Germán [Instituto de Física Teórica, UAM-CSIC, Madrid (Spain)

    2013-12-01

    In this paper we formulate the xp model on the AdS{sub 2} spacetime. We find that the spectrum of the Hamiltonian has positive and negative eigenvalues, whose absolute values are given by a harmonic oscillator spectrum, which in turn coincides with that of a massive Dirac fermion in AdS{sub 2}. We extend this result to generic xp models which are shown to be equivalent to a massive Dirac fermion on spacetimes whose metric depend of the xp Hamiltonian. Finally, we construct the generators of the isometry group SO(2,1) of the AdS{sub 2} spacetime, and discuss the relation with conformal quantum mechanics.

  9. Quantum relativistic fluid at global thermodynamic equilibrium in curved spacetime

    CERN Document Server

    Becattini, F

    2015-01-01

    We present a new approach to the problem of the thermodynamical equilibrium of a quantum relativistic fluid in a curved spacetime in the limit of small curvature. We calculate the mean value of local operators by expanding the four-temperature Killing vector field in Riemann normal coordinates about the same spacetime point and we derive corrections with respect to the flat spacetime expressions. Thereby, we clarify the origin of the terms proportional to Riemann and Ricci tensors introduced in general hydrodynamic expansion of the stress-energy tensor.

  10. Quaternion wave equations in curved space-time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edmonds, J. D., Jr.

    1974-01-01

    The quaternion formulation of relativistic quantum theory is extended to include curvilinear coordinates and curved space-time in order to provide a framework for a unified quantum/gravity theory. Six basic quaternion fields are identified in curved space-time, the four-vector basis quaternions are identified, and the necessary covariant derivatives are obtained. Invariant field equations are derived, and a general invertable coordinate transformation is developed. The results yield a way of writing quaternion wave equations in curvilinear coordinates and curved space-time as well as a natural framework for solving the problem of second quantization for gravity.

  11. Classical black holes: the nonlinear dynamics of curved spacetime.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorne, Kip S

    2012-08-03

    Numerical simulations have revealed two types of physical structures, made from curved spacetime, that are attached to black holes: tendexes, which stretch or squeeze anything they encounter, and vortexes, which twist adjacent inertial frames relative to each other. When black holes collide, their tendexes and vortexes interact and oscillate (a form of nonlinear dynamics of curved spacetime). These oscillations generate gravitational waves, which can give kicks up to 4000 kilometers per second to the merged black hole. The gravitational waves encode details of the spacetime dynamics and will soon be observed and studied by the Laser Interferometer Gravitational Wave Observatory and its international partners.

  12. Theory and Phenomenology of Space-Time Defects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabine Hossenfelder

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Whether or not space-time is fundamentally discrete is of central importance for the development of the theory of quantum gravity. If the fundamental description of spacetime is discrete, typically represented in terms of a graph or network, then the apparent smoothness of geometry on large scales should be imperfect—it should have defects. Here, we review a model for space-time defects and summarize the constraints on the prevalence of these defects that can be derived from observation.

  13. On the Folded Normal Distribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michail Tsagris

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The characteristic function of the folded normal distribution and its moment function are derived. The entropy of the folded normal distribution and the Kullback–Leibler from the normal and half normal distributions are approximated using Taylor series. The accuracy of the results are also assessed using different criteria. The maximum likelihood estimates and confidence intervals for the parameters are obtained using the asymptotic theory and bootstrap method. The coverage of the confidence intervals is also examined.

  14. Equi-Gaussian curvature folding

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Figure 10. Note that the graph Gf of any equi-Gaussian curvature of #nT 2 is a regular graph of valency 4. 2. References. [1] Farran H R, El-Kholy E and Robertson S A, Folding a surface to a polygon, Geometric. Dedicatiae 33 (1996) 255–266. [2] Zeen El-Deen M R, Cellular and fuzzy folding, Ph.D. thesis (Egypt: Tanta Univ.) ...

  15. Protein folding by motion planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Shawna; Song, Guang; Amato, Nancy M

    2005-11-09

    We investigate a novel approach for studying protein folding that has evolved from robotics motion planning techniques called probabilistic roadmap methods (PRMs). Our focus is to study issues related to the folding process, such as the formation of secondary and tertiary structures, assuming we know the native fold. A feature of our PRM-based framework is that the large sets of folding pathways in the roadmaps it produces, in just a few hours on a desktop PC, provide global information about the protein's energy landscape. This is an advantage over other simulation methods such as molecular dynamics or Monte Carlo methods which require more computation and produce only a single trajectory in each run. In our initial studies, we obtained encouraging results for several small proteins. In this paper, we investigate more sophisticated techniques for analyzing the folding pathways in our roadmaps. In addition to more formally revalidating our previous results, we present a case study showing that our technique captures known folding differences between the structurally similar proteins G and L.

  16. Protein folding by motion planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Shawna; Song, Guang; Amato, Nancy M.

    2005-12-01

    We investigate a novel approach for studying protein folding that has evolved from robotics motion planning techniques called probabilistic roadmap methods (PRMs). Our focus is to study issues related to the folding process, such as the formation of secondary and tertiary structures, assuming we know the native fold. A feature of our PRM-based framework is that the large sets of folding pathways in the roadmaps it produces, in just a few hours on a desktop PC, provide global information about the protein's energy landscape. This is an advantage over other simulation methods such as molecular dynamics or Monte Carlo methods which require more computation and produce only a single trajectory in each run. In our initial studies, we obtained encouraging results for several small proteins. In this paper, we investigate more sophisticated techniques for analyzing the folding pathways in our roadmaps. In addition to more formally revalidating our previous results, we present a case study showing that our technique captures known folding differences between the structurally similar proteins G and L. This research was supported in part by NSF CAREER Award CCR-9624315, NSF Grants ACI-9872126, EIA-9975018, EIA-0103742, EIA-9805823, ACR-0113971, CCR-0113974, EIA-9810937, EIA-0079874 and the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board grant ATP-000512-0261-2001. ST was supported in part by an NSF Graduate Research Fellowship. GS was supported in part by an IBM PhD Fellowship.

  17. Understanding refraction contrast using a comparison of absorption and refraction computed tomographic techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiebe, S.; Rhoades, G.; Wei, Z.; Rosenberg, A.; Belev, G.; Chapman, D.

    2013-05-01

    Refraction x-ray contrast is an imaging modality used primarily in a research setting at synchrotron facilities, which have a biomedical imaging research program. The most common method for exploiting refraction contrast is by using a technique called Diffraction Enhanced Imaging (DEI). The DEI apparatus allows the detection of refraction between two materials and produces a unique ''edge enhanced'' contrast appearance, very different from the traditional absorption x-ray imaging used in clinical radiology. In this paper we aim to explain the features of x-ray refraction contrast as a typical clinical radiologist would understand. Then a discussion regarding what needs to be considered in the interpretation of the refraction image takes place. Finally we present a discussion about the limitations of planar refraction imaging and the potential of DEI Computed Tomography. This is an original work that has not been submitted to any other source for publication. The authors have no commercial interests or conflicts of interest to disclose.

  18. Refractive surgery, optical aberrations, and visual performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Applegate, R A; Howland, H C

    1997-01-01

    Visual optics is taking on new clinical significance. Given that current refractive procedures can and do induce large amounts of higher order ocular aberration that often affects the patient's daily visual function and quality of life, we can no longer relegate the considerations of ocular aberrations to academic discussions. Instead, we need to move toward minimizing (not increasing) the eye's aberrations at the same time we are correcting the eye's spherical and cylindrical refractive error. These are exciting times in refractive surgery, which need to be tempered by the fact that after all the research, clinical, and marketing dust settles, the level to which we improve the quality of the retinal image will be guided by the trade-off between cost and the improvement in the quality of life that refractive surgery offers.

  19. Magnification and visual acuity in refractive surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Applegate, R A; Howland, H C

    1993-10-01

    In comparisons of retinal image size within the same eye before and after refractive surgery, a change in the plane of correction from the spectacle to the cornea induces a change in retinal magnification. Comparing retinal image size between eyes of different individuals, a change in the plane of correction as well as the type of ametropia (axial or refractive) interacts to change the retinal magnification. Consequently, comparing acuity before and after refractive surgery without considering the effects of retinal magnification can be misleading. Magnification effects can be large, accounting for a visual acuity increase of 1 line or more. Here we model the magnification induced by refractive surgery in various reference eyes and discuss implications in the context of current clinical trials.

  20. The refractive index of relic gravitons

    CERN Document Server

    Giovannini, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    The dynamical evolution of the refractive index of the tensor modes of the geometry produces a specific class of power spectra characterized by a blue (i.e. slightly increasing) slope which is directly determined by the competition of the slow-roll parameter and of the rate of variation of the refractive index. Throughout the conventional stages of the inflationary and post-inflationary evolution, the microwave background anisotropies measurements, the pulsar timing limits and the big-bang nucleosythesis constraints set stringent bounds on the refractive index and on its rate of variation. Within the physically allowed region of the parameter space the cosmic background of relic gravitons leads to a potentially large signal for the ground based detectors (in their advanced version) and for the proposed space-borne interferometers. Conversely, the lack of direct detection of the signal will set a qualitatively new bound on the dynamical variation of the refractive index.

  1. Influence of refractive correction on ocular dominance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakayama, Nanami; Kawamorita, Takushi; Uozato, Hiroshi

    2010-07-01

    We investigated the effects of refractive correction and refractive defocus on the assessment of sensory ocular dominance. In 25 healthy subjects (4 males and 21 females) aged between 20 and 31 years, a quantitative measurement of sensory ocular dominance was performed with refractive correction and the addition of a positive lens on the dominant eye. Sensory ocular dominance was measured with a chart using binocular rivalry targets. The reversal point changed after the addition of a +1.00 D lens on the dominant eye in all subjects. However, sighting ocular dominance and stereopsis did not change after the addition of a positive lens on the dominant eye ( P > 0:05, Wilcoxon test). These results suggest that refractive correction affects sensory ocular dominance, indicating the possible development of a new type of occlusion for amblyopia in the future.

  2. Isaac Newton and the astronomical refraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehn, Waldemar H

    2008-12-01

    In a short interval toward the end of 1694, Isaac Newton developed two mathematical models for the theory of the astronomical refraction and calculated two refraction tables, but did not publish his theory. Much effort has been expended, starting with Biot in 1836, in the attempt to identify the methods and equations that Newton used. In contrast to previous work, a closed form solution is identified for the refraction integral that reproduces the table for his first model (in which density decays linearly with elevation). The parameters of his second model, which includes the exponential variation of pressure in an isothermal atmosphere, have also been identified by reproducing his results. The implication is clear that in each case Newton had derived exactly the correct equations for the astronomical refraction; furthermore, he was the first to do so.

  3. Variation of corneal refractive index with hydration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Young L; Walsh, Joseph T Jr.; Goldstick, Thomas K; Glucksberg, Matthew R [Biomedical Engineering Department, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL 60208 (United States)

    2004-03-07

    We report the effect of changes in the corneal hydration on the refractive index of the cornea. Using optical coherence tomography (OCT), the geometrical thickness and the group refractive index of the bovine cornea were derived simultaneously as the corneal hydration was varied. The corneal hydration was then calculated from the corneal thickness. The group refractive index of the cornea increased non-linearly as the cornea dehydrated. In addition, a simple mathematical model was developed, based on the assumption that changes in corneal hydration occur only in the interfibrilar space with constant water content within the collagen fibrils. Good agreement between the experimental results and the mathematical model supports the assumption. The results also demonstrate that the measurement of refractive index is a quantitative indicator of corneal hydration.

  4. Wave Refraction Over Complex Nearshore Bathymetry

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Peak, Scott D

    2004-01-01

    .... Although linear spectral-refraction theory is used by the main operational forecasting centers in the world for these predictions, owing to a lack of field studies its accuracy in regions of complex...

  5. REFractions: The Representing Equivalent Fractions Game

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, Stephen I.

    2014-01-01

    Stephen Tucker presents a fractions game that addresses a range of fraction concepts including equivalence and computation. The REFractions game also improves students' fluency with representing, comparing and adding fractions.

  6. Advanced Refractive Effects Prediction System (AREPS)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Patterson, Wayne L

    2001-01-01

    ...), the world's first electromagnetic prediction system for shipboard use. Advances in research and technology have led to the replacement of IREPS with the Advanced Refractive Effects Prediction System (AREPS...

  7. Refraction Static Correction without Picking First Arrival Times

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chien-Ying Wang

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available A concept of differential delay time is proposed for refraction static correction without picking first arrival times in the CDP reflection data processing. This new method is a modification of the ABCD method; it uses cross-correlation to measure the first arrival time difference between signals received at stations B and C, instead of directly computing them from their picked times. By taking advantage of multiple-fold CDP data, we apply the "line-up trace" measurement of cross-correlations, which may alleviate the effect of data imperfections. The problem of refractor velocity variation has also been solved to a certain extent, which allows for a reliable delay time to be adequately estimated for each station and consequently the static correction value. A synthetic model and a real case with a severe weathered layer problem have been tested to evaluate the method. Stable and man age able computation processes have been explored to attain the maximum performance. The results are quite satisfactory. It should be possible to apply this method in rough areas with complicated refraction static problem, even in 3D cases.

  8. Myopia onset and role of peripheral refraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rotolo M

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Maurilia Rotolo,1,2 Giancarlo Montani,2 Raul Martin1,3 1Optometry Research Group, IOBA Eye Institute, School of Optometry, Universidad de Valladolid, Valladolid, Spain; 2Optics and Optometry, Corso di Ottica e Optometria, Universita del Salento, Lecce, Italy; 3Faculty of Health and Human Sciences, School of Health Professions, Plymouth University, Peninsula Allied Health Centre, Plymouth, UK Background: To determine the peripheral refraction characteristics related to 18-month changes in refraction in Caucasian (Mediterranean children.Methods: Non-cycloplegic peripheral refraction at 10° intervals over the central ±30° of horizontal visual field over 18 months (baseline, 12 months, and 18 months of follow-up was conducted in 50 healthy children who were 8 years old. Axial length (AL was also recorded. Relative peripheral refraction (RPR was calculated and eyes were divided into three study groups: non-myopic eyes, myopic eyes, and eyes that develop myopia.Results: Myopic eyes showed hyperopic RPR and emetropic and hyperopic eyes showed myopic RPR. Univariate analysis of variance did not find any statistically significant effect of peripheral refraction (F36=0.13; P=1.00 and RPR (F36=0.79; P=0.80 on myopia onset (eyes that developed myopia along the study. All the studied groups showed an increase of AL, without statistically significant differences between the studied groups (F6=0.09; P=0.99.Conclusion: Hyperopic relative peripheral shift change in eyes that develop myopia has been found with differences in RPR between myopic (hyperopic RPR and hyperopic or emmetropic eyes (with myopic RPR. The results suggest that RPR cannot predict development or progression of myopia in Caucasian (Mediterranean children and the efficacy in slowing myopia progression obtained with treatments that manipulate the peripheral refraction is not just driven with RPR. Keywords: myopia, refractive errors, myopia onset, peripheral refraction, relative peripheral

  9. IOL Power Calculation after Corneal Refractive Surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Maddalena De Bernardo; Luigi Capasso; Luisa Caliendo; Francesco Paolercio; Nicola Rosa

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. To describe the different formulas that try to overcome the problem of calculating the intraocular lens (IOL) power in patients that underwent corneal refractive surgery (CRS). Methods. A Pubmed literature search review of all published articles, on keyword associated with IOL power calculation and corneal refractive surgery, as well as the reference lists of retrieved articles, was performed. Results. A total of 33 peer reviewed articles dealing with methods that try to overcome the...

  10. Acoustic metasurface for refracted wave manipulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Li-Xiang; Yao, Yuan-Wei; Zhang, Xin; Wu, Fu-Gen; Dong, Hua-Feng; Mu, Zhong-Fei; Li, Jing-bo

    2018-02-01

    Here we present a design of a transmitted acoustic metasurface based on a single row of Helmholtz resonators with varying geometric parameters. The proposed metasurface can not only steer an acoustic beam as expected from the generalized Snell's law of refraction, but also exhibits various interesting properties and potential applications such as insulation of two quasi-intersecting transmitted sound waves, ultrasonic Bessel beam generator, frequency broadening effect of anomalous refraction and focusing.

  11. Influence of refraction on wind turbine noise

    OpenAIRE

    Makarewicz, Rufin

    2013-01-01

    A semi-empirical method is applied to calculate the time-average sound level of wind turbine noise generation and propagation. Both are affected by wind shear refraction. Under upwind conditions the partially ensonified zone separates the fully ensonified zone (close to the turbine) and the shadow zone (far away from the turbine). Refraction is described in terms of the wind speed linear profile fitted to the power law profile. The rotating blades are treated as a two-dimensional circular sou...

  12. Exploded representation of a refracting surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W.H. Heath

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The concept of the exploded refracting sur-face is useful in the optics of contact lenses and vision underwater. The purpose of this paper is to show how to represent a refracting surface as an exploded pair of surfaces separated by a gap of zero width.  The analysis is in terms of linear optics and allows for astigmatic and non-coaxial cases.

  13. Aspects of quantum field theory in curved space-time

    CERN Document Server

    Fulling, Stephen A

    1989-01-01

    The theory of quantum fields on curved spacetimes has attracted great attention since the discovery, by Stephen Hawking, of black-hole evaporation. It remains an important subject for the understanding of such contemporary topics as inflationary cosmology

  14. Generalized Timelike Mannheim Curves in Minkowski Space-Time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Akyig~it

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We give the definition of generalized timelike Mannheim curve in Minkowski space-time . The necessary and sufficient conditions for the generalized timelike Mannheim curve are obtained. We show some characterizations of generalized Mannheim curve.

  15. Exact solutions and spacetime singularities in nonlocal gravity

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Li, Yao-Dong; Modesto, Leonardo; Rachwał, Lesław

    2015-01-01

    .... We prove that maximally symmetric spacetimes are exact solutions in both classes, while in dimension higher than four we can also have Anti-de Sitter solutions in the presence of positive cosmological constant...

  16. Comparison of objective refraction in darkness to cycloplegic refraction: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasudevan, Balamurali; Ciuffreda, Kenneth J; Meehan, Kelly; Grk, Dejana; Cox, Misty

    2016-03-01

    The aim was to assess non-cycloplegic objective refraction in darkness using an open-field auto-refractor, and furthermore to compare it with distance cycloplegic subjective refraction and distance cycloplegic retinoscopy in the light, in children and young adults. Twenty-three, visually-normal, young-adults (46 eyes) ages 23 to 31 years, and five children (10 eyes) ages five to 12 years, participated in the study. The spherical component of their refraction ranged from -2.25 D to +3.75 D with a mean of +1.80 D, and a mean cylinder of -0.70 D. Three techniques were used to assess refractive error. An objective measure of the non-cycloplegic refractive state was obtained using an open-field autorefractor (WAM-5500) after five minutes in the dark to allow for dissipation of accommodative transients and relaxation of accommodation. In addition, both distance retinoscopy and subjective distance refraction were performed following cycloplegia (Cyclopentolate, 1%) using conventional clinical procedures. All measurements were obtained on the same day within a single session. The spherical component of the refraction was compared among the three techniques in both the children and adults. There was no significant difference in spherical refraction among the three techniques: non-cycloplegic objective refraction in the dark, distance cycloplegic retinoscopy and distance cycloplegic subjective refraction, in either the adults [F(2, 137) = 0.79, p = 0.45] or the children [F(2, 27) = 0.47, p = 0.62]. Mean difference in the spherical component between refraction in the dark and the cycloplegic distance retinoscopy was -0.34 D (r = 0.89) in the adults and +0.14 D (r = 0.96) in the children. The mean difference in spherical component between refraction in the dark and the cycloplegic distance subjective refraction was -0.25 D (r = 0.92) in the adults and -0.05 D (r = 0.95) in the children. Comparison of the spherical refractive component between the three techniques was not

  17. Reflective and refractive objects for mixed reality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knecht, Martin; Traxler, Christoph; Winklhofer, Christoph; Wimmer, Michael

    2013-04-01

    In this paper, we present a novel rendering method which integrates reflective or refractive objects into a differential instant radiosity (DIR) framework usable for mixed-reality (MR) applications. This kind of objects are very special from the light interaction point of view, as they reflect and refract incident rays. Therefore they may cause high-frequency lighting effects known as caustics. Using instant-radiosity (IR) methods to approximate these high-frequency lighting effects would require a large amount of virtual point lights (VPLs) and is therefore not desirable due to real-time constraints. Instead, our approach combines differential instant radiosity with three other methods. One method handles more accurate reflections compared to simple cubemaps by using impostors. Another method is able to calculate two refractions in real-time, and the third method uses small quads to create caustic effects. Our proposed method replaces parts in light paths that belong to reflective or refractive objects using these three methods and thus tightly integrates into DIR. In contrast to previous methods which introduce reflective or refractive objects into MR scenarios, our method produces caustics that also emit additional indirect light. The method runs at real-time frame rates, and the results show that reflective and refractive objects with caustics improve the overall impression for MR scenarios.

  18. Refractive index contrast in porous silicon multilayers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nava, R.; Mora, M.B. de la; Tagueena-Martinez, J. [Centro de Investigacion en Energia, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Temixco, Morelos (Mexico); Rio, J.A. del [Centro de Investigacion en Energia, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Temixco, Morelos (Mexico); Centro Morelense de Innovacion y Transferencia Tecnologica, Consejo de Ciencia y Tecnologia del Estado de Morelos (Mexico)

    2009-07-15

    Two of the most important properties of a porous silicon multilayer for photonic applications are flat interfaces and a relative large refractive index contrast between layers in the optical wavelength range. In this work, we studied the effect of the current density and HF electrolyte concentration on the refractive index of porous silicon. With the purpose of increasing the refractive index contrast in a multilayer, the refractive index of porous silicon produced at low current was studied in detail. The current density applied to produce the low porosity layers was limited in order to keep the electrolyte flow through the multilayer structure and to avoid deformation of layer interfaces. We found that an electrolyte composed of hydrofluoric acid, ethanol and glycerin in a ratio of 3:7:1 gives a refractive index contrast around 1.3/2.8 at 600 nm. Several multilayer structures with this refractive index contrast were fabricated, such as dielectric Bragg mirrors and microcavities. Reflectance spectra of the structures show the photonic quality of porous silicon multilayers produced under these electrochemical conditions. (copyright 2009 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  19. Analogue transformation acoustics and the compression of spacetime

    OpenAIRE

    García Meca, Carlos; Carloni, Sante; Barceló, Carlos; Jannes, Gil Georges Paul; Sánchez-Dehesa Moreno-Cid, José; Martínez Abietar, Alejandro José

    2014-01-01

    A recently developed technique known as analogue transformation acoustics has allowed the extension of the transformational paradigm to general spacetime transformations under which the acoustic equations are not form invariant. In this paper, we review the fundamentals of analogue transformation acoustics and show how this technique can be applied to build a device that increases the density of events within a given spacetime region by simultaneously compressing space and t...

  20. Clocks, computers, black holes, spacetime foam, and holographic principle

    OpenAIRE

    Ng, Y. Jack

    2000-01-01

    What do simple clocks, simple computers, black holes, space-time foam, and holographic principle have in common? I will show that the physics behind them is inter-related, linking together our concepts of information, gravity, and quantum uncertainty. Thus, the physics that sets the limits to computation and clock precision also yields Hawking radiation of black holes and the holographic principle. Moreover, the latter two strongly imply that space-time undergoes much larger quantum fluctuati...

  1. The Spacetime Memory of Geometric Phases and Quantum Computing

    CERN Document Server

    Binder, B

    2002-01-01

    Spacetime memory is defined with a holonomic approach to information processing, where multi-state stability is introduced by a non-linear phase-locked loop. Geometric phases serve as the carrier of physical information and geometric memory (of orientation) given by a path integral measure of curvature that is periodically refreshed. Regarding the resulting spin-orbit coupling and gauge field, the geometric nature of spacetime memory suggests to assign intrinsic computational properties to the electromagnetic field.

  2. Inextendibilty of the Maximal Global Hyperbolic Development in Electrogowdy spacetimes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nungesser Ernesto

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The problem of determinism in General Relativity appears even if one assumes that the spacetime is globally hyperbolic, i.e. that it contains a hypersurface that is intersected by any causal curve exactly once. The strong cosmic censorship hypothesis is essentially the hypothesis that General Relativity is a predictable theory and thus a crucial issue in Classical General Relativity. We sketch here the proof for the case of Electrogowdy spacetimes.

  3. Visualizing Flat Spacetime: Viewing Optical versus Special Relativistic Effects

    CERN Document Server

    Black, Don V; Wessel, F; Pajarola, R; Kuester, F

    2012-01-01

    A simple visual representation of Minkowski spacetime appropriate for a student with a background in geometry and algebra is presented. Minkowski spacetime can be modeled with a Euclidean 4-space to yield accurate visualizations as predicted by special relativity theory. The contributions of relativistic aberration as compared to classical pre-relativistic aberration to the geometry are discussed in the context of its visual representation.

  4. refractive errors among secondary school students in isuikwuato ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Eyamba

    (Preshel & Prevent Blindness America 2002). Blurred vision from refractive error can be corrected with eye glasses or contact lenses. The appropriate eye glasses or contact lense is determined by refraction – determination of the refractive errors of the eye and correction by lenses. Refraction. Optometry consists of placing ...

  5. Hopf-algebra description of noncommutative-spacetime symmetries

    CERN Document Server

    Agostini, A; D'Andrea, F; Andrea, Francesco D'

    2003-01-01

    In the study of certain noncommutative versions of Minkowski spacetime there is still a large ambiguity concerning the characterization of their symmetries. Adopting as our case study the kappaMinkowski noncommutative space-time, on which a large literature is already available, we propose a line of analysis of noncommutative-spacetime symmetries that relies on the introduction of a Weyl map (connecting a given function in the noncommutative Minkowski with a corresponding function in commutative Minkowski) and of a compatible notion of integration in the noncommutative spacetime. We confirm (and we establish more robustly) previous suggestions that the commutative-spacetime notion of Lie-algebra symmetries must be replaced, in the noncommutative-spacetime context, by the one of Hopf-algebra symmetries. We prove that in kappaMinkowski it is possible to construct an action which is invariant under a Poincare-like Hopf algebra of symmetries with 10 generators, in which the noncommutativity length scale has the r...

  6. Is an objective refraction optimised using the visual Strehl ratio better than a subjective refraction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hastings, Gareth D; Marsack, Jason D; Nguyen, Lan Chi; Cheng, Han; Applegate, Raymond A

    2017-05-01

    To prospectively examine whether using the visual image quality metric, visual Strehl (VSX), to optimise objective refraction from wavefront error measurements can provide equivalent or better visual performance than subjective refraction and which refraction is preferred in free viewing. Subjective refractions and wavefront aberrations were measured on 40 visually-normal eyes of 20 subjects, through natural and dilated pupils. For each eye a sphere, cylinder, and axis prescription was also objectively determined that optimised visual image quality (VSX) for the measured wavefront error. High contrast (HC) and low contrast (LC) logMAR visual acuity (VA) and short-term monocular distance vision preference were recorded and compared between the VSX-objective and subjective prescriptions both undilated and dilated. For 36 myopic eyes, clinically equivalent (and not statistically different) HC VA was provided with both the objective and subjective refractions (undilated mean ± S.D. was -0.06 ± 0.04 with both refractions; dilated was -0.05 ± 0.04 with the objective, and -0.05 ± 0.05 with the subjective refraction). LC logMAR VA provided by the objective refraction was also clinically equivalent and not statistically different to that provided by the subjective refraction through both natural and dilated pupils for myopic eyes. In free viewing the objective prescription was preferred over the subjective by 72% of myopic eyes when not dilated. For four habitually undercorrected high hyperopic eyes, the VSX-objective refraction was more positive in spherical power and VA poorer than with the subjective refraction. A method of simultaneously optimising sphere, cylinder, and axis from wavefront error measurements, using the visual image quality metric VSX, is described. In myopic subjects, visual performance, as measured by HC and LC VA, with this VSX-objective refraction was found equivalent to that provided by subjective refraction, and was typically preferred

  7. Linkage analysis of quantitative refraction and refractive errors in the Beaver Dam Eye Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Alison P; Duggal, Priya; Lee, Kristine E; Cheng, Ching-Yu; Klein, Ronald; Bailey-Wilson, Joan E; Klein, Barbara E K

    2011-07-13

    Refraction, as measured by spherical equivalent, is the need for an external lens to focus images on the retina. While genetic factors play an important role in the development of refractive errors, few susceptibility genes have been identified. However, several regions of linkage have been reported for myopia (2q, 4q, 7q, 12q, 17q, 18p, 22q, and Xq) and for quantitative refraction (1p, 3q, 4q, 7p, 8p, and 11p). To replicate previously identified linkage peaks and to identify novel loci that influence quantitative refraction and refractive errors, linkage analysis of spherical equivalent, myopia, and hyperopia in the Beaver Dam Eye Study was performed. Nonparametric, sibling-pair, genome-wide linkage analyses of refraction (spherical equivalent adjusted for age, education, and nuclear sclerosis), myopia and hyperopia in 834 sibling pairs within 486 extended pedigrees were performed. Suggestive evidence of linkage was found for hyperopia on chromosome 3, region q26 (empiric P = 5.34 × 10(-4)), a region that had shown significant genome-wide evidence of linkage to refraction and some evidence of linkage to hyperopia. In addition, the analysis replicated previously reported genome-wide significant linkages to 22q11 of adjusted refraction and myopia (empiric P = 4.43 × 10(-3) and 1.48 × 10(-3), respectively) and to 7p15 of refraction (empiric P = 9.43 × 10(-4)). Evidence was also found of linkage to refraction on 7q36 (empiric P = 2.32 × 10(-3)), a region previously linked to high myopia. The findings provide further evidence that genes controlling refractive errors are located on 3q26, 7p15, 7p36, and 22q11.

  8. Radiophonosurgery of vocal fold nodules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ragab, Sameh M

    2009-12-01

    To describe the current support in the literature for radiophonosurgery in cases of vocal fold nodules. Radiophonosurgery is a recent innovation in the field of laryngeal surgery. It is emerging as a reliable and practical method for treating benign superficial vocal fold lesions that is increasingly becoming popular. It induces an excellent subjective and objective improvement in voice parameters. Histologically, it produces unremarkable lateral thermal damage and char penetration, which is quite crucial in a functional surgery such as in phonosurgery. Well designed probes are still lacking in the market. Radiophonosurgery provides a new approach for patients with vocal fold nodules. It combines the advantages of both cold knife and laser phonosurgery and is easy, well tolerated, precise and effective with excellent tactile and hemostatic properties.

  9. Deformed space-time transformations in Mercury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardone, F.; Albertini, G.; Bassani, D.; Cherubini, G.; Guerriero, E.; Mignani, R.; Monti, M.; Petrucci, A.; Ridolfi, F.; Rosada, A.; Rosetto, F.; Sala, V.; Santoro, E.; Spera, G.

    2017-09-01

    A mole of Mercury was suitably treated by ultrasound in order to generate in it the same conditions of local Lorentz invariance violation that were generated in a sonicated cylindrical bar of AISI 304 steel and that are the cause of neutron emission during the sonication. After 3 min, part of the mercury turned into a solid material which turned out to contain isotopes having a different mass (higher and lower) with respect to the isotopes already present in the initial material (mercury). These transformations in the atomic weight without gamma production above the background are brought about during Deformed Space-Time reactions. We present the results of the analyses performed on samples taken from the transformation product. The analyses have been done in two groups, the first one using five different analytical techniques: ICP-OES, XRF, ESEM-EDS, ICP-MS, INAA. In the second group of analyses, we used only two techniques: INAA and ICP-MS. The second group of analyses confirmed the occurring of the transformations in mercury.

  10. Leptogenesis from loop effects in curved spacetime

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McDonald, Jamie I.; Shore, Graham M. [Department of Physics, Swansea University,Singleton Park, Swansea, SA2 8PP (United Kingdom)

    2016-04-05

    We describe a new mechanism — radiatively-induced gravitational leptogenesis — for generating the matter-antimatter asymmetry of the Universe. We show how quantum loop effects in C and CP violating theories cause matter and antimatter to propagate differently in the presence of gravity, and prove this is forbidden in flat space by CPT and translation symmetry. This generates a curvature-dependent chemical potential for leptons, allowing a matter-antimatter asymmetry to be generated in thermal equilibrium in the early Universe. The time-dependent dynamics necessary for leptogenesis is provided by the interaction of the virtual self-energy cloud of the leptons with the expanding curved spacetime background, which violates the strong equivalence principle and allows a distinction between matter and antimatter. We show here how this mechanism is realised in a particular BSM theory, the see-saw model, where the quantum loops involve the heavy sterile neutrinos responsible for light neutrino masses. We demonstrate by explicit computation of the relevant two-loop Feynman diagrams how the size of the radiative corrections relevant for leptogenesis becomes enhanced by increasing the mass hierarchy of the sterile neutrinos, and show how the induced lepton asymmetry may be sufficiently large to play an important rôle in determining the baryon-to-photon ratio of the Universe.

  11. Leptogenesis from loop effects in curved spacetime

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Jamie I.; Shore, Graham M.

    2016-04-01

    We describe a new mechanism — radiatively-induced gravitational leptogenesis — for generating the matter-antimatter asymmetry of the Universe. We show how quantum loop effects in C and CP violating theories cause matter and antimatter to propagate differently in the presence of gravity, and prove this is forbidden in flat space by CPT and translation symmetry. This generates a curvature-dependent chemical potential for leptons, allowing a matter-antimatter asymmetry to be generated in thermal equilibrium in the early Universe. The time-dependent dynamics necessary for leptogenesis is provided by the interaction of the virtual self-energy cloud of the leptons with the expanding curved spacetime background, which violates the strong equivalence principle and allows a distinction between matter and antimatter. We show here how this mechanism is realised in a particular BSM theory, the see-saw model, where the quantum loops involve the heavy sterile neutrinos responsible for light neutrino masses. We demonstrate by explicit computation of the relevant two-loop Feynman diagrams how the size of the radiative corrections relevant for leptogenesis becomes enhanced by increasing the mass hierarchy of the sterile neutrinos, and show how the induced lepton asymmetry may be sufficiently large to play an important rôle in determining the baryon-to-photon ratio of the Universe.

  12. NoFold: RNA structure clustering without folding or alignment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middleton, Sarah A; Kim, Junhyong

    2014-11-01

    Structures that recur across multiple different transcripts, called structure motifs, often perform a similar function-for example, recruiting a specific RNA-binding protein that then regulates translation, splicing, or subcellular localization. Identifying common motifs between coregulated transcripts may therefore yield significant insight into their binding partners and mechanism of regulation. However, as most methods for clustering structures are based on folding individual sequences or doing many pairwise alignments, this results in a tradeoff between speed and accuracy that can be problematic for large-scale data sets. Here we describe a novel method for comparing and characterizing RNA secondary structures that does not require folding or pairwise alignment of the input sequences. Our method uses the idea of constructing a distance function between two objects by their respective distances to a collection of empirical examples or models, which in our case consists of 1973 Rfam family covariance models. Using this as a basis for measuring structural similarity, we developed a clustering pipeline called NoFold to automatically identify and annotate structure motifs within large sequence data sets. We demonstrate that NoFold can simultaneously identify multiple structure motifs with an average sensitivity of 0.80 and precision of 0.98 and generally exceeds the performance of existing methods. We also perform a cross-validation analysis of the entire set of Rfam families, achieving an average sensitivity of 0.57. We apply NoFold to identify motifs enriched in dendritically localized transcripts and report 213 enriched motifs, including both known and novel structures. © 2014 Middleton and Kim; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press for the RNA Society.

  13. Surgical options for correction of refractive error following cataract surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Abdelghany, Ahmed A.; Alio, Jorge L.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Refractive errors are frequently found following cataract surgery and refractive lens exchange. Accurate biometric analysis, selection and calculation of the adequate intraocular lens (IOL) and modern techniques for cataract surgery all contribute to achieving the goal of cataract surgery as a refractive procedure with no refractive error. However, in spite of all these advances, residual refractive error still occasionally occurs after cataract surgery and laser in situ keratomileusi...

  14. Interferometric Methods of Measuring Refractive Indices and Double-Refraction of Fibres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamza, A. A.; El-Kader, H. I. Abd

    1986-01-01

    Presents two methods used to measure the refractive indices and double-refraction of fibers. Experiments are described, with one involving the use of Pluta microscope in the double-beam interference technique, the other employing the multiple-beam technique. Immersion liquids are discussed that can be used in the experiments. (TW)

  15. Trends in refractive surgery at an academic center: 2007-2009

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuo Irene C

    2011-05-01

    proportion of high myopes, however, decreased (p = 0.05. The proportions of types of procedure changed, with an increase in the proportion of PRK between 2007 and 2009 (p = 0.02. The mean age of patients did not change [42.4 ± 14.4 (standard deviation years in 2007 vs. 39.6 ± 14.5 years in 2009; p = 0.4]. Astigmatism-correcting IOL and presbyopia-correcting IOL volumes increased 15-fold and three-fold, respectively, between 2007 and 2009. Conclusions Volume of excimer laser refractive surgery decreased by at least 30% between 2007 and 2009. No significant change in mean age or in the distribution of refractive error was seen, although the proportion of high myopes decreased between summer quarters of 2007 and 2009. PRK gained as a proportion of total cases. Premium IOL volume increased, but still comprised a very small proportion of total IOL volume.

  16. Use of Protein Folding Reagents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wingfield, Paul T.

    2016-01-01

    The reagents and methods for purification of the most commonly used denaturants guanidine hydrochloride (guanidine-HCl) and urea are described. Other protein denaturants and reagents used to fold proteins are briefly mentioned. Sulfhydryl reagents (reducing agents) and “oxido-shuffling” (or oxidative regeneration) systems are also described. PMID:18429069

  17. Predicting RNA pseudoknot folding thermodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Song; Chen, Shi-Jie

    2006-01-01

    Based on the experimentally determined atomic coordinates for RNA helices and the self-avoiding walks of the P (phosphate) and C4 (carbon) atoms in the diamond lattice for the polynucleotide loop conformations, we derive a set of conformational entropy parameters for RNA pseudoknots. Based on the entropy parameters, we develop a folding thermodynamics model that enables us to compute the sequence-specific RNA pseudoknot folding free energy landscape and thermodynamics. The model is validated through extensive experimental tests both for the native structures and for the folding thermodynamics. The model predicts strong sequence-dependent helix-loop competitions in the pseudoknot stability and the resultant conformational switches between different hairpin and pseudoknot structures. For instance, for the pseudoknot domain of human telomerase RNA, a native-like and a misfolded hairpin intermediates are found to coexist on the (equilibrium) folding pathways, and the interplay between the stabilities of these intermediates causes the conformational switch that may underlie a human telomerase disease. PMID:16709732

  18. Cryogenic Refractive Index of Heraeus Homosil Glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Kevin H.; Quijada, Manuel A.; Leviton, Douglas B.

    2017-01-01

    This paper reports measurements of the refractive index of Homosil (Heraeus) over the wavelength range of 0.343.16 m and temperature range of 120335 K. These measurements were performed by using the Cryogenic High Accuracy Refraction Measuring System (CHARMS) facility at the NASAs Goddard Space Flight Center. These measurements were in support of an integrated Structural-Thermal-Optical-Performance (STOP) model that was developed for a field-widened Michelson interferometer that is being built and tested for the High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL) project at the NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC). The cryogenic refractive index measurements were required in order to account for the highly sensitivity performance of the HSRL instrument to changes in refractive index with temperature, temperature gradients, thermal expansion, and deformation due to mounting stresses. A dense coverage of the absolute refractive index over the aforementioned wavelength and temperature ranges was used to determine the thermo-optic coefficient (dndT) and dispersion relation (dnd) as a function of wavelength and temperature. Our measurements of Homosil will be compared with measurements of other glasses from the fused silica family studied in CHARMS as well as measurements reported elsewhere in literature.

  19. [Refractive changes after Descemet membrane endothelial keratoplasty].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Röck, T; Bartz-Schmidt, K U; Röck, D; Yoeruek, E

    2014-01-01

    Penetrating keratoplasty has different refractive disadvantages in contrast to posterior lamellar keratoplasty. For example, a decentered corneal trephination and a tilted trephination or unevenly tightened corneal sutures can cause an uncontrolled high astigmatism as well as a refractive change. Also the postoperative refraction may change over time as a result of wound healing, suture loosening or suture removal. The aim of this retrospective study was to investigate a possible refractive change after Descemet membrane endothelial keratoplasty (DMEK). A total of 139 pseudophakic eyes from 125 patients with endothelial decompensation had undergone DMEK surgery at the Tübingen Eye Clinic. After a mean postoperative time of 13.15 ± 2.98 months after DMEK discreet mean changes in the spherical equivalent of + 0.37 ± 0.87 diopters and the cylinder to - 0.45 ± 0.57 diopters were observed. The mean central corneal thickness decreased from 670 ± 70 µm to 544 ± 55 µm. In conclusion after DMEK a discreet induced hyperopic refractive shift due to the reversal of stromal swelling was observed.

  20. Computational modeling of corneal refractive surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrera Fernandez, Delia; Niazy, Abdel-Salam M.; Kurtz, Ronald M.; Djotyan, Gagik P.; Juhasz, Tibor

    2004-07-01

    A finite element method was used to study the biomechanical behavior of the cornea and its response to refractive surgery when stiffness inhomogeneities varying with depth are considered. Side-by-side comparisons of different constitutive laws that have been commonly used to model refractive surgery were also performed. To facilitate the comparison, the material property constants were identified from the same experimental data, which were obtained from mechanical tests on corneal strips and membrane inflation experiments. We then validated the resulting model by comparing computed refractive power changes with clinical results. The model developed provides a much more predictable refractive outcome when the stiffness inhomogeneities of the cornea and nonlinearities of the deformations are included in the finite element simulations. Thus, it can be stated that the inhomogeneous model is a more accurate representation of the corneal material properties in order to model the biomechanical effects of refractive surgery. The simulations also revealed that the para-central and peripheral parts of the cornea deformed less in response to pressure loading compared to the central cornea and the limbus. Furthermore, the deformations in response to pressure loading predicted by the non-homogeneous and nonlinear model, showed that the para-central region is mechanically enhanced in the meridional direction. This result is in agreement with the experimentally documented regional differences reported in the literature by other investigators.

  1. [Retinal detachment in various myopic refractions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alimanović-Halilović, Emina

    2009-01-01

    The basic aim of this study was to find the group of "critical" myopic refraction with the highest occurrence of retinal detachment. In the study, 180 myopic eyes were analyzed. Upon the targeted ophthalmological anamnesis, definition of the objective refraction, and indirect binocular ophthalmoscopy, we analyzed the distribution of retinal detachment and the area affected in relation to refraction. All the eyes were divided into groups according to the refraction height. Average age of our patients ranged from 48.43 to 51.60 years with SD from 13.88 to 18.45. We did not find a statistically significant difference for a certain age. The study covered 102 (56.6%) male and 78 (43.3%) female patients. The highest occurrence of retinal detachment was found in Refraction Group from 3.5 to 7.49 dsph, total 21 (11.6%). The retinal detachments usually affected 2/4 or 3/4 of the eye fundus surface respectively.

  2. Emergent spacetime in stochastically evolving dimensions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Afshordi, Niayesh [Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics, 31 Caroline St. N., Waterloo, ON, N2L 2Y5 (Canada); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, ON, N2L 3G1 (Canada); HEPCOS, Department of Physics, SUNY at Buffalo, Buffalo, NY 14260-1500 (United States); Stojkovic, Dejan, E-mail: ds77@buffalo.edu [Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics, 31 Caroline St. N., Waterloo, ON, N2L 2Y5 (Canada); HEPCOS, Department of Physics, SUNY at Buffalo, Buffalo, NY 14260-1500 (United States)

    2014-12-12

    Changing the dimensionality of the space–time at the smallest and largest distances has manifold theoretical advantages. If the space is lower dimensional in the high energy regime, then there are no ultraviolet divergencies in field theories, it is possible to quantize gravity, and the theory of matter plus gravity is free of divergencies or renormalizable. If the space is higher dimensional at cosmological scales, then some cosmological problems (including the cosmological constant problem) can be attacked from a completely new perspective. In this paper, we construct an explicit model of “evolving dimensions” in which the dimensions open up as the temperature of the universe drops. We adopt the string theory framework in which the dimensions are fields that live on the string worldsheet, and add temperature dependent mass terms for them. At the Big Bang, all the dimensions are very heavy and are not excited. As the universe cools down, dimensions open up one by one. Thus, the dimensionality of the space we live in depends on the energy or temperature that we are probing. In particular, we provide a kinematic Brandenberger–Vafa argument for how a discrete causal set, and eventually a continuum (3+1)-dim spacetime along with Einstein gravity emerges in the Infrared from the worldsheet action. The (3+1)-dim Planck mass and the string scale become directly related, without any compactification. Amongst other predictions, we argue that LHC might be blind to new physics even if it comes at the TeV scale. In contrast, cosmic ray experiments, especially those that can register the very beginning of the shower, and collisions with high multiplicity and density of particles, might be sensitive to the dimensional cross-over.

  3. Emergent spacetime in stochastically evolving dimensions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niayesh Afshordi

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Changing the dimensionality of the space–time at the smallest and largest distances has manifold theoretical advantages. If the space is lower dimensional in the high energy regime, then there are no ultraviolet divergencies in field theories, it is possible to quantize gravity, and the theory of matter plus gravity is free of divergencies or renormalizable. If the space is higher dimensional at cosmological scales, then some cosmological problems (including the cosmological constant problem can be attacked from a completely new perspective. In this paper, we construct an explicit model of “evolving dimensions” in which the dimensions open up as the temperature of the universe drops. We adopt the string theory framework in which the dimensions are fields that live on the string worldsheet, and add temperature dependent mass terms for them. At the Big Bang, all the dimensions are very heavy and are not excited. As the universe cools down, dimensions open up one by one. Thus, the dimensionality of the space we live in depends on the energy or temperature that we are probing. In particular, we provide a kinematic Brandenberger–Vafa argument for how a discrete causal set, and eventually a continuum (3+1-dim spacetime along with Einstein gravity emerges in the Infrared from the worldsheet action. The (3+1-dim Planck mass and the string scale become directly related, without any compactification. Amongst other predictions, we argue that LHC might be blind to new physics even if it comes at the TeV scale. In contrast, cosmic ray experiments, especially those that can register the very beginning of the shower, and collisions with high multiplicity and density of particles, might be sensitive to the dimensional cross-over.

  4. The Mond Limit from Spacetime Scale Invariance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milgrom, Mordehai

    2009-06-01

    The modified Newtonian dynamics (MOND) limit is shown to follow from a requirement of spacetime scale invariance of the equations of motion for nonrelativistic, purely gravitational systems, i.e., invariance of the equations of motion under (t, r) → (λt, λr) in the limit a 0 → ∞. It is suggested that this should replace the definition of the MOND limit based on the low-acceleration behavior of a Newtonian-MOND interpolating function. In this way, the salient, deep-MOND results—asymptotically flat rotation curves, the mass-rotational-speed relation (baryonic Tully-Fisher relation), the Faber-Jackson relation, etc.,—follow from a symmetry principle. For example, asymptotic flatness of rotation curves reflects the fact that radii change under scaling, while velocities do not. I then comment on the interpretation of the deep-MOND limit as one of "zero mass": rest masses, whose presence obstructs scaling symmetry, become negligible compared to the "phantom," dynamical masses—those that some would attribute to dark matter. Unlike the former masses, the latter transform in a way that is consistent with the symmetry. Finally, I discuss the putative MOND-cosmology connection in light of another, previously known symmetry of the deep-MOND limit. In particular, it is suggested that MOND is related to the asymptotic de Sitter geometry of our universe. It is conjectured, for example that in an exact de Sitter cosmos, deep-MOND physics would exactly apply to local systems. I also point out, in this connection, the possible relevance of a de Sitter-conformal-field-theory (dS/CFT) duality.

  5. Unravelling Lorentz Covariance and the Spacetime Formalism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cahill R. T.

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available We report the discovery of an exact mapping from Galilean time and space coordinates to Minkowski spacetime coordinates, showing that Lorentz covariance and the space- time construct are consistent with the existence of a dynamical 3-space, and “absolute motion”. We illustrate this mapping first with the standard theory of sound, as vibra- tions of a medium, which itself may be undergoing fluid motion, and which is covari- ant under Galilean coordinate transformations. By introducing a different non-physical class of space and time coordinates it may be cast into a form that is covariant under “Lorentz transformations” wherein the speed of sound is now the “invariant speed”. If this latter formalism were taken as fundamental and complete we would be lead to the introduction of a pseudo-Riemannian “spacetime” description of sound, with a metric characterised by an “invariant speed of sound”. This analysis is an allegory for the development of 20th century physics, but where the Lorentz covariant Maxwell equa- tions were constructed first, and the Galilean form was later constructed by Hertz, but ignored. It is shown that the Lorentz covariance of the Maxwell equations only occurs because of the use of non-physical space and time coordinates. The use of this class of coordinates has confounded 20th century physics, and resulted in the existence of a “flowing” dynamical 3-space being overlooked. The discovery of the dynamics of this 3-space has lead to the derivation of an extended gravity theory as a quantum effect, and confirmed by numerous experiments and observations

  6. Refraction indices of spatially nonuniform magnetic systems and nanostructures from the first principles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pozhar, Liudmila A.

    2010-05-01

    An equilibrium two-time temperature Green's function (TTGF)-based, quantum statistical mechanical approach has been used to derive from the first principles an explicit expression for the tensor of "local" refraction indices of spatially nonuniform systems in weak external electromagnetic (EM) fields in the linear approximation with regard to the field magnitudes. Written in terms of the TTGF-based, first-principle tensorial dielectric and magnetic susceptibilities, the obtained formula for the local tensor of refraction indices (TRI) is applicable to any system, including individual nanoscale objects, such as quantum dots and wires, magnetic nanostructures, composite materials, or spatially nonuniform, bulk magnetic materials. An explicit expression for the space-time Fourier transform (STFT) of the dielectric susceptibility tensor used in TRI is derived in terms of STFTs of the charge density—charge density TTGFs, while the corresponding STFT of the magnetic susceptibility tensor also includes STFTs of the microcurrent—microcurrent TTGFs. The STFTs of the equilibrium TTGFs featuring in the susceptibilities, and thus necessary to calculate TRI, can be obtained by equilibrium quantum statistical mechanical means, modeling and simulations, or from experimental data. Two TRI regimes of significant interest for applications that can be realized in spatially inhomogeneous magnetic systems have been identified.

  7. Refractive surgery: what patients need to know.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsanevaki, Vikentia J; Tuft, Stephen J

    2007-01-01

    Most procedures to treat refractive error are based on laser surgery, but other techniques are available. We review the relative advantages and the risk associated with the different surgical options. Laser refractive surgery is now a safe and effective alternative to glasses or contact lenses. Because refractive surgery is an area of rapidly developing technology, the relative benefits of the different surgical options remain uncertain. AREAS TO DEVELOP RESEARCH: Controlled trials are needed to provide better guidance as to the relative merits of the different surgical options. Better interventions are required to minimize the biological response after laser surface treatment to eliminate the need for mechanical cutting of a flap for laser in situ keratomileusis. An effective surgical treatment for presbyopia is awaited.

  8. Refraction of microwave signals by water vapor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldfinger, A. D.

    1980-01-01

    Tropospheric water vapor causes a refractive path length effect which is typically 5-10% of the 'dry' tropospheric effect and as large as several meters at elevation angles below 5 deg. The vertical water vapor profile is quite variable, and measurements of intensive atmospheric parameters such as temperature and humidity limited to the surface do not adequately predict the refractive effect. It is suggested that a water vapor refraction model that is a function of the amount of precipitable water alone can be successful at low elevation angles. From an extensive study of numerical ray tracings through radiosonde balloon data, such a model has been constructed. The model predicts the effect at all latitudes and elevation angles between 2 and 10 deg to an accuracy of better than 4% (11 cm at 3 deg elevation angle).

  9. Seismic refraction analysis: the path forward

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haines, Seth S.; Zelt, Colin; Doll, William

    2012-01-01

    Seismic Refraction Methods: Unleashing the Potential and Understanding the Limitations; Tucson, Arizona, 29 March 2012 A workshop focused on seismic refraction methods took place on 29 May 2012, associated with the 2012 Symposium on the Application of Geophysics to Engineering and Environmental Problems. This workshop was convened to assess the current state of the science and discuss paths forward, with a primary focus on near-surface problems but with an eye on all applications. The agenda included talks on these topics from a number of experts interspersed with discussion and a dedicated discussion period to finish the day. Discussion proved lively at times, and workshop participants delved into many topics central to seismic refraction work.

  10. Negative refraction angular characterization in one-dimensional photonic crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lugo, Jesus Eduardo; Doti, Rafael; Faubert, Jocelyn

    2011-04-06

    Photonic crystals are artificial structures that have periodic dielectric components with different refractive indices. Under certain conditions, they abnormally refract the light, a phenomenon called negative refraction. Here we experimentally characterize negative refraction in a one dimensional photonic crystal structure; near the low frequency edge of the fourth photonic bandgap. We compare the experimental results with current theory and a theory based on the group velocity developed here. We also analytically derived the negative refraction correctness condition that gives the angular region where negative refraction occurs. By using standard photonic techniques we experimentally determined the relationship between incidence and negative refraction angles and found the negative refraction range by applying the correctness condition. In order to compare both theories with experimental results an output refraction correction was utilized. The correction uses Snell's law and an effective refractive index based on two effective dielectric constants. We found good agreement between experiment and both theories in the negative refraction zone. Since both theories and the experimental observations agreed well in the negative refraction region, we can use both negative refraction theories plus the output correction to predict negative refraction angles. This can be very useful from a practical point of view for space filtering applications such as a photonic demultiplexer or for sensing applications.

  11. Refractive error may influence mesopic pupil size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cakmak, Hasan Basri; Cagil, Nurullah; Simavli, Huseyin; Duzen, Betul; Simsek, Saban

    2010-02-01

    To identify factors which affect mesopic pupil diameter in refractive surgery patients. This retrospective study was performed at the 1st Ophthalmology Clinic in Ankara Ataturk Training and Research Hospital, Ankara, Turkey. Medical records of 412 refractive surgery candidates who applied between 2006 and 2008 were reviewed. Detailed ophthalmological examination data were obtained from medical records. Pupil size measurements were performed with a COAS Ocular Wavefront analyzer in mesopic conditions. Relationship between mesopic pupil diameter and age, sex, spherical refractive error (D), magnitude of astigmatism (D), type of astigmatism, spherical equivalent, and average keratometry were analyzed by means of univariate and multivariate regression analyses. Mean mesopic pupil diameter was 6.19 +/- 0.88 mm. Mean pupil diameter (mean +/- standard deviation) was 5.70 +/- 1.01 in hypermetropia, 6.04 +/- 0.79 mm in mixed astigmatism, and 6.33 +/- 0.82 mm in myopia. The difference in mean mesopic pupil diameters between myopes and hypermetropes was statistically significant (p = 0.001). However, differences with regard to mean pupil diameters between myopes and mixed astigmatism (p = 0.660) and between hypermetropes and mixed astigmatism (p = 0.109) were not significant. Mean pupil diameter was 6.00 +/- 0.99 mm in against the rule astigmatism, 5.96 +/- 0.84 mm in oblique astigmatism, and 6.27 +/- 0.84 mm in with the rule astigmatism. Mean mesopic pupil diameter in with the rule astigmatism group was higher than oblique astigmatism group. Spherical refractive error (r = -0.213, p = 0.001), cylindrical refractive error (0.197, p = 0.001), and age (r = -0.341, p = 0.001) showed correlation with pupil diameter. This study showed that age and magnitude of both spherical and cylindrical refractive error are the most determinative factors on mesopic pupil size.

  12. Unitarity and causality in generalized quantum mechanics for nonchronal spacetimes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartle, James B.

    1994-06-01

    Spacetime must be foliable by spacelike surfaces for the quantum mechanics of matter fields to be formulated in terms of a unitarily evolving state vector defined on spacelike surfaces. When a spacetime possesses nonchronal regions which cannot be foliated by spacelike surfaces, as in the case of spacetimes with closed timelike curves, a more general formulation of quantum mechanics is required. In such generalizations the transition matrix between alternatives on two spacelike surfaces lying in regions of spacetime where foliating families can be defined may be nonunitary if a nonchronal region lies between them. This paper describes a sum-over-histories generalized quantum mechanics whose probabilities consistently obey the rules of probability theory even in the presence of such nonunitarity. The usual notion of state on a spacelike surface is lost in this generalization. Anomalies such as nonconservation of energy or ``Everett phones'' that are exhibited by some generalizations of quantum mechanics are not found in this one. However, the generalization is acausal in the sense that the existence of nonchronal regions of spacetime in the future can affect the probabilities of alternatives today and signaling outside the light cone is possible. The detectability of nonunitary evolution and violations of causality in measurement situations are briefly considered.

  13. Protein folding and wring resonances

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bohr, Jakob; Bohr, Henrik; Brunak, Søren

    1997-01-01

    The polypeptide chain of a protein is shown to obey topological contraints which enable long range excitations in the form of wring modes of the protein backbone. Wring modes of proteins of specific lengths can therefore resonate with molecular modes present in the cell. It is suggested...... that protein folding takes place when the amplitude of a wring excitation becomes so large that it is energetically favorable to bend the protein backbone. The condition under which such structural transformations can occur is found, and it is shown that both cold and hot denaturation (the unfolding...... of proteins) are natural consequences of the suggested wring mode model. Native (folded) proteins are found to possess an intrinsic standing wring mode....

  14. Refractive index of air: 3. The roles of CO2, H2O, and refractivity virials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciddor, Philip E

    2002-04-20

    The author's recent studies of the refractive index of air are extended, and several assumptions made therein are further examined. It is shown that the alternative dispersion equations for CO2, which are due to Edlen [Metrologia 2, 71 (1966)] and Old et al. [J. Opt. Soc. Am. 61, 89 (1971)] result in differences of less than 2 x 10(-9) in the phase refractive index and less than 3 x 10(-9) in the group refractive index for current and predicted concentrations of CO2. However, because the dispersion equation given by Old et al. is consistent with experimental data in the near infrared, it is preferable to the equation used by Edlen, which is valid only in the ultraviolet and the visible. The classical measurement by Barrell and Sears [Philos. Trans. R. Soc. London Ser. A 238, 1 (1939)] on the refractivity of moist air is shown to have some procedural errors in addition to the one discussed by Birch and Downs [Metrologia 30, 155 (1993)]. It is shown that for normal atmospheric conditions the higher refractivity virial coefficients related to the Lorentz-Lorenz relation are adequately incorporated into the empirically determined first refractivity virial. As a guide to users the practical limits to the calculation of the refractive index of the atmosphere that result from the uncertainties in the measurement of the various atmospheric parameters are summarized.

  15. Wave-vector and polarization dependence of conical refraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turpin, A; Loiko, Yu V; Kalkandjiev, T K; Tomizawa, H; Mompart, J

    2013-02-25

    We experimentally address the wave-vector and polarization dependence of the internal conical refraction phenomenon by demonstrating that an input light beam of elliptical transverse profile refracts into two beams after passing along one of the optic axes of a biaxial crystal, i.e. it exhibits double refraction instead of refracting conically. Such double refraction is investigated by the independent rotation of a linear polarizer and a cylindrical lens. Expressions to describe the position and the intensity pattern of the refracted beams are presented and applied to predict the intensity pattern for an axicon beam propagating along the optic axis of a biaxial crystal.

  16. Force generation by titin folding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mártonfalvi, Zsolt; Bianco, Pasquale; Naftz, Katalin; Ferenczy, György G; Kellermayer, Miklós

    2017-07-01

    Titin is a giant protein that provides elasticity to muscle. As the sarcomere is stretched, titin extends hierarchically according to the mechanics of its segments. Whether titin's globular domains unfold during this process and how such unfolded domains might contribute to muscle contractility are strongly debated. To explore the force-dependent folding mechanisms, here we manipulated skeletal-muscle titin molecules with high-resolution optical tweezers. In force-clamp mode, after quenching the force (force trace contained rapid fluctuations and a gradual increase of average force, indicating that titin can develop force via dynamic transitions between its structural states en route to the native conformation. In 4 M urea, which destabilizes H-bonds hence the consolidated native domain structure, the net force increase disappeared but the fluctuations persisted. Thus, whereas net force generation is caused by the ensemble folding of the elastically-coupled domains, force fluctuations arise due to a dynamic equilibrium between unfolded and molten-globule states. Monte-Carlo simulations incorporating a compact molten-globule intermediate in the folding landscape recovered all features of our nanomechanics results. The ensemble molten-globule dynamics delivers significant added contractility that may assist sarcomere mechanics, and it may reduce the dissipative energy loss associated with titin unfolding/refolding during muscle contraction/relaxation cycles. © 2017 The Protein Society.

  17. Integrating Whispering Gallery Mode Refractive Index Sensing with Capillary Electrophoresis Separations Using Phase Sensitive Detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Daniel C; Dunn, Robert C

    2016-01-19

    Whispering gallery mode (WGM) resonators are small, radially symmetric dielectrics that recirculate light through continuous total internal reflection. High-Q resonances are observed that shift in response to changes in surrounding refractive index, leading to many applications in label-free sensing. Surface binding measurements with WGM resonators have demonstrated competitive analytical detection metrics compared to other sensing schemes. Similar figures of merit for detecting bulk refractive index changes, however, have proven more challenging. This has limited their use in applications such as capillary electrophoresis (CE), where their compact footprint and refractive index sensitivity offers advantages in nondestructive, universal detection. Here we couple WGM detection with CE by introducing a modulation scheme to improve detection limits. Phase sensitive WGM (PS-WGM) detection is developed to monitor real-time shifts in the WGM spectrum due to changes in surrounding refractive index. We directly compare phase sensitive detection with spectral measurements normally used to track WGM shifts. We report an improvement in detection limits by almost 300-fold using the PS-WGM method. The integrated CE with PS-WGM approach is demonstrated by detecting the separation of a three-component mixture of cations (Na(+), Li(+), and K(+)).

  18. Accuracy of refractive outcomes in myopic and hyperopic laser in situ keratomileusis: Manifest versus aberrometric refraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinstein, Dan Z; Morral, Merce; Gobbe, Marine; Archer, Timothy J

    2012-11-01

    To compare the achieved refractive accuracy of laser in situ keratomileusis (LASIK) performed based on manifest refraction with the predicted accuracy that would have been achieved using WASCA aberrometric refraction with and without Seidel correction factor for sphere. London Vision Clinic, London, United Kingdom. Comparative case series. Myopic eyes and hyperopic eyes had LASIK based on manifest refraction. Two aberrometric refractions were obtained preoperatively: Seidel, which includes spherical aberration in the sphere calculation, and non-Seidel. Bland-Altman plots were used to show the agreement between aberrometric and manifest refractions. Predicted LASIK outcomes had aberrometric refraction been used were modeled by shifting the postoperative manifest refraction by the vector difference between the preoperative manifest and aberrometric refractions. This study included 869 myopic eyes and 413 hyperopic eyes. The mean differences (manifest minus aberrometric) in spherical equivalent were +0.03 diopters (D) ± 0.48 (SD) (Seidel aberrometric) and +0.45 ± 0.42 D (non-Seidel aberrometric) for myopia and -0.20 ± 0.39 D and +0.39 ± 0.34 D, respectively, for hyperopia. The mean differences in cylinder magnitude were -0.10 ± 0.27 D and 0.00 ± 0.25 D, respectively. The percentage of eyes within ±0.50 D of the attempted correction was 81% (manifest), 70% (Seidel), and 67% (non-Seidel) for myopia and 71% (manifest), 61% (Seidel), and 64% (non-Seidel) for hyperopia. The achieved refractive accuracy by manifest refraction was better than the predicted accuracy had Seidel or non-Seidel aberrometric refractions been used for surgical planning. Using the Seidel method improved the accuracy in myopic eyes but not in hyperopic eyes. Dr. Reinstein is a consultant to Carl Zeiss Meditec AG and has a proprietary interest in the Artemis technology (Arcscan Inc., Morrison, Colorado, USA) through patents administered by the Cornell Center for Technology Enterprise and

  19. Complex fold patterns developed by progressive deformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carreras, Jordi; Druguet, Elena

    2017-04-01

    Folds arise from shortening instabilities in rocks containing layers with contrasting viscosities or bearing mechanical anisotropies. A complete understanding of this fact requires a three-dimensional approach, because of the variable geometrical relations between strain and kinematic tensors and the surfaces subjected to folding. This is especially common in progressive non-coaxial flow, under which folds become unstable, leading to fold hinge curvature, axial surface curvature or both. The resulting complex fold patterns generated by progressive folding can be morphologically indistinguishable from interference patterns produced by the superposition of two fold systems, and a detailed 3-D analysis is needed to distinguish between them. This study is focused on complex fold shapes arisen from progressive single deformations. Examples can be grouped into: (i) non-cylindrical (or non-cylindroidal) folds and (ii) folds with non-planar axial surfaces (or non-plane folds). In both cases, hinge lines and axial surfaces can display up to a 180° curvature. Hinge line curvature leads to the development of sheath folds, while axial surface curvature leads to the development of polyclinal folds, being these cylindroidal if the hinges remain straight. The two end-member situations (sheath folds and polyclinal folds) are illustrated using examples from the Variscan Cap de Creus massif (Eastern Pyrenees). Fold Hinge rotation and development of sheath folds In simple shear zones, folds commonly nucleate with hinges at a high angle to the shear direction and progressively rotate towards parallelism with the shear/extension direction, giving rise to sheath folds. Axial surfaces also change in attitude with increasing strain, becoming parallel to the shear plane. Development of polyclinal folds with strongly curved axial surfaces A peculiar complex fold pattern consists of strongly curved axial surfaces but straight hinges. This folding type is opposed to sheath folds where axial

  20. The Local and Global Geometrical Aspects of the Twin Paradox in Static Spacetimes: I.nobreakspace {}Three Spherically Symmetric Spacetimes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokołowski, L. M.; Golda, Z. A.

    We investigate local and global properties of timelike geodesics in three static spherically symmetric spacetimes. These properties are of its own mathematical relevance and provide a solution of the physical `twin paradox' problem. The latter means that we focus our studies on the search of the longest timelike geodesics between two given points. Due to problems with solving the geodesic deviation equation we restrict our investigations to radial and circular (if exist) geodesics. On these curves we find general Jacobi vector fields, determine by means of them sequences of conjugate points and with the aid of the comoving coordinate system and the spherical symmetry we determine the cut points. These notions identify segments of radial and circular gepdesics which are locally or globally of maximal length. In de Sitter spacetime all geodesics are globally maximal. In CAdS and Bertotti--Robinson spacetimes the radial geodesics which infinitely many times oscillate between antipodal points in the space contain infinite number of equally separated conjugate points and there are no other cut points. Yet in these two spacetimes each outgoing or ingoing radial geodesic which does not cross the centre is globally of maximal length. Circular geodesics exist only in CAdS spacetime and contain an infinite sequence of equally separated conjugate points. The geodesic curves which intersect the circular ones at these points may either belong to the two-surface $\\theta=\\pi/2$ or lie outside it.

  1. Discrete causal theory emergent spacetime and the causal metric hypothesis

    CERN Document Server

    Dribus, Benjamin F

    2017-01-01

    This book evaluates and suggests potentially critical improvements to causal set theory, one of the best-motivated approaches to the outstanding problems of fundamental physics. Spacetime structure is of central importance to physics beyond general relativity and the standard model. The causal metric hypothesis treats causal relations as the basis of this structure. The book develops the consequences of this hypothesis under the assumption of a fundamental scale, with smooth spacetime geometry viewed as emergent. This approach resembles causal set theory, but differs in important ways; for example, the relative viewpoint, emphasizing relations between pairs of events, and relationships between pairs of histories, is central. The book culminates in a dynamical law for quantum spacetime, derived via generalized path summation.

  2. Derivation of Electromagnetism from the Elastodynamics of the Spacetime Continuum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Millette P. A.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available We derive Electromagnetism from the Elastodynamics of the Spacetime Continuum based on the identification of the theory’s antisymmetric rotation tensor with the elec- tromagnetic field-strength tensor. The theory provides a physical explanation of the electromagnetic potential, which arises from transverse ( shearing displacements of the spacetime continuum, in contrast to mass which arises from longitudinal (dilatational displacements. In addition, the theory provides a physical explanation of the current density four-vector, as the 4-gradient of the volume dilatation of the spacetime con- tinuum. The Lorentz condition is obtained directly from the theory. In addition, we obtain a generalization of Electromagnetism for the situation where a volume force is present, in the general non-macroscopic case. Maxwell’s equations are found to remain unchanged, but the current density has an additional term proportional to the volume force.

  3. Conformal geodesics in spherically symmetric vacuum spacetimes with cosmological constant

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Parrado Gómez-Lobo, A.; Gasperín, E.; Valiente Kroon, J. A.

    2018-02-01

    An analysis of conformal geodesics in the Schwarzschild–de Sitter and Schwarzschild–anti-de Sitter families of spacetimes is given. For both families of spacetimes we show that initial data on a spacelike hypersurface can be given such that the congruence of conformal geodesics arising from this data cover the whole maximal extension of canonical conformal representations of the spacetimes without forming caustic points. For the Schwarzschild–de Sitter family, the resulting congruence can be used to obtain global conformal Gaussian systems of coordinates of the conformal representation. In the case of the Schwarzschild–anti-de Sitter family, the natural parameter of the curves only covers a restricted time span so that these global conformal Gaussian systems do not exist.

  4. Dislocations in the Spacetime Continuum: Framework for Quantum Physics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Millette P. A.

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper provides a framework for the physical description of physical processes at the quantum level based on dislocations in the spacetime continuum within STCED (Spacetime Continuum Elastodynamics. In this framework, photon and particle self- energies and interactions are mediated by the strain energy density of the dislocations, replacing the role played by virtual particles in QED. We postulate that the spacetime continuum has a granularity characterized by a length b 0 corresponding to the smallest STC elementary Burgers dislocation-displacement vector. Screw dislocations corre- sponding to transverse displacements are identified with photons, and edge dislocations corresponding to longitudinal displacements are identified with particles. Mixed dislo- cations give rise to wave-particle duality. The strain energy density of the dislocations are calculated and proposed to explain the QED problem of mass renormalization.

  5. Quantum field theory in curved spacetime and black hole thermodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Wald, Robert M

    1994-01-01

    In this book, Robert Wald provides a coherent, pedagogical introduction to the formulation of quantum field theory in curved spacetime. He begins with a treatment of the ordinary one-dimensional quantum harmonic oscillator, progresses through the construction of quantum field theory in flat spacetime to possible constructions of quantum field theory in curved spacetime, and, ultimately, to an algebraic formulation of the theory. In his presentation, Wald disentangles essential features of the theory from inessential ones (such as a particle interpretation) and clarifies relationships between various approaches to the formulation of the theory. He also provides a comprehensive, up-to-date account of the Unruh effect, the Hawking effect, and some of its ramifications. In particular, the subject of black hole thermodynamics, which remains an active area of research, is treated in depth. This book will be accessible to students and researchers who have had introductory courses in general relativity and quantum f...

  6. Quantum nonlocality, and the end of classical space-time

    CERN Document Server

    Banerjee, Shreya; Singh, T P

    2016-01-01

    Quantum non-local correlations and the acausal, spooky action at a distance suggest a discord between quantum theory and special relativity. We propose a resolution for this discord by first observing that there is a problem of time in quantum theory. There should exist a reformulation of quantum theory which does not refer to classical time. Such a reformulation is obtained by suggesting that space-time is fundamentally non-commutative. Quantum theory without classical time is the equilibrium statistical thermodynamics of the underlying non-commutative relativity. Stochastic fluctuations about equilibrium give rise to the classical limit and ordinary space-time geometry. However, measurement on an entangled state can be correctly described only in the underlying non-commutative space-time, where there is no causality violation, nor a spooky action at a distance.

  7. IR finite graviton propagators in de Sitter spacetime

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faizal, Mir [University of Lethbridge, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Lethbridge, AB (Canada); Upadhyay, Sudhaker; Mandal, Bhabani Prasad [Banaras Hindu University, Department of Physics, Varanasi (India)

    2016-04-15

    The graviton propagator diverges in certain gauges in de Sitter spacetime. We address this problem in this work by generalizing the infinitesimal BRST transformations in de Sitter spacetime to finite field-dependent BRST (FFBRST) transformations. These FFBRST transformations are a symmetry of the classical action, but they do not leave the path integral measure invariant for the graviton theory in de Sitter spacetime. Due to the non-trivial Jacobian of such a finite transformation the path integral measure changes and hence the FFBRST transformation is capable of relating theories in two different gauges. We explicitly construct the FFBRST transformation which relates the theory with a diverging graviton two-point function to a theory with an infrared finite graviton. The FFBRST transformation thus establishes that the divergence in a graviton two-point function may be only a gauge artifact. (orig.)

  8. Generalized Poincare algebras, Hopf algebras and {kappa}-Minkowski spacetime

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kovacevic, D., E-mail: domagoj.kovacevic@fer.hr [Faculty of Electrical Engineering and Computing, Unska 3, HR-10000 Zagreb (Croatia); Meljanac, S., E-mail: meljanac@irb.hr [Rudjer Boskovic Institute, Bijenicka c. 54, HR-10002 Zagreb (Croatia); Pachol, A., E-mail: pachol@raunvis.hi.is [Science Institute, University of Iceland, Dunhaga 3, 107 Reykjavik (Iceland); Strajn, R., E-mail: rina.strajn@gmail.com [Rudjer Boskovic Institute, Bijenicka c. 54, HR-10002 Zagreb (Croatia)

    2012-05-01

    We propose a generalized description for the {kappa}-Poincare-Hopf algebra as a symmetry quantum group of underlying {kappa}-Minkowski spacetime. We investigate all the possible implementations of (deformed) Lorentz algebras which are compatible with the given choice of {kappa}-Minkowski algebra realization. For the given realization of {kappa}-Minkowski spacetime there is a unique {kappa}-Poincare-Hopf algebra with undeformed Lorentz algebra. We have constructed a three-parameter family of deformed Lorentz generators with {kappa}-Poincare algebras which are related to {kappa}-Poincare-Hopf algebra with undeformed Lorentz algebra. Known bases of {kappa}-Poincare-Hopf algebra are obtained as special cases. Also deformation of igl(4) Hopf algebra compatible with the {kappa}-Minkowski spacetime is presented. Some physical applications are briefly discussed.

  9. Space-Time Coding over Fading Channels with Stable Noise

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, Junghoon

    2011-01-01

    This paper addresses the performance of space-time coding over fading channels with impulsive noise which is known to accurately capture network interference. We use the symmetric alpha stable noise distribution and adopt two models which assume dependent and independent noise components across receive antennas. We derive pairwise error probability (PEP) of orthogonal space-time block codes (STBC) with a benchmark genie-aided receiver (GAR), or the minimum distance receiver (MDR) which is optimal in the Gaussian case. For general space-time codes we propose a maximum-likelihood (ML) receiver, and its approximation at high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). The resulting asymptotically optimal receiver (AOR) does not depend on noise parameters and is computationally simple. Monte-Carlo simulations are used to supplement our analytical results and compare the performance of the receivers.

  10. On the theory of Killing orbits in spacetime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, G. S.

    2003-09-01

    This paper gives a theoretical discussion of the orbits and isotropies which arise in a spacetime which admits a Lie algebra of Killing vector fields. The submanifold structure of the orbits is explored together with their induced Killing vector structure. A general decomposition of a spacetime in terms of the nature and dimension of its orbits is given and the concept of stability and instability for orbits introduced. A general relation is shown linking the dimensions of the Killing algebra, the orbits and the isotropies. The well-behaved nature of 'stable' orbits and the possible misbehaviour of the 'unstable' ones is pointed out and, in particular, the fact that independent Killing vector fields in spacetime may not induce independent Killing vector fields on unstable orbits. Several examples are presented to exhibit these features. Finally, an appendix is given which revisits and attempts to clarify the well-known theorem of Fubini on the dimension of Killing orbits.

  11. Green-Schwarz superstring on doubled-yet-gauged spacetime

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jeong-Hyuck [Department of Physics, Sogang University,35 Baekbeom-ro, Mapo-gu, Seoul 04107 (Korea, Republic of); B.W. Lee Center for Fields, Gravity and Strings, Institute for Basic Science,Daejeon 34047 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-11-02

    We construct a world-sheet action for Green-Schwarz superstring in terms of doubled-yet-gauged spacetime coordinates. For an arbitrarily curved NS-NS background, the action possesses O(10,10) T-duality, Spin(1,9)×Spin(9,1) Lorentz symmetry, coordinate gauge symmetry, spacetime doubled-yet-gauged diffeomorphisms, world-sheet diffeomorphisms and Weyl symmetry. Further, restricted to flat backgrounds, it enjoys maximal spacetime supersymmetry and kappa-symmetry. After the auxiliary coordinate gauge symmetry potential being integrated out, our action can consistently reduce to the original undoubled Green-Schwarz action. Thanks to the twofold spin groups, the action is unique: it is specific choices of the NS-NS backgrounds that distinguish IIA or IIB, as well as lead to non-Riemannian or non-relativistic superstring a la Gomis-Ooguri which might deserve the nomenclature, type IIC.

  12. Modified Theories of Gravitation behind the Spacetime Deformation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gagik Ter-Kazarian

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In the framework of proposed theory of spacetime deformation/distortion, we have a way to deform the spacetime through a nontrivial choice of the distortion-complex, displaying different connections, which may reveal different post-Riemannian spacetime structures as corollary. We extend this theory to address, in particular, the gauge model of the most general metric-affine gravity carrying both nontrivial torsion and nonmetricity. This model is constructed in the framework of the first order Lagrangian expressed in terms of the gauge potentials and their first derivatives. The equations of the standard theory, which have no propagating modes for torsion, can be equivalently replaced in modified framework by the modified equations, which in the limit of reducing the affine group leads to the modified Einstein-Cartan theory with dynamical torsion and beyond. In testing the modified framework for various particular cases, we use the Lagrange multipliers for extinguishing nonmetricity and torsion.

  13. MEST- avoid next extinction by a space-time effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Dayong

    2013-03-01

    Sun's companion-dark hole seasonal took its dark comets belt and much dark matter to impact near our earth. And some of them probability hit on our earth. So this model kept and triggered periodic mass extinctions on our earth every 25 to 27 million years. After every impaction, many dark comets with very special tilted orbits were arrested and lurked in solar system. When the dark hole-Tyche goes near the solar system again, they will impact near planets. The Tyche, dark comet and Oort Cloud have their space-time center. Because the space-time are frequency and amplitude square of wave. Because the wave (space-time) can make a field, and gas has more wave and fluctuate. So they like dense gas ball and a dark dense field. They can absorb the space-time and wave. So they are ``dark'' like the dark matter which can break genetic codes of our lives by a dark space-time effect. So the upcoming next impaction will cause current ``biodiversity loss.'' The dark matter can change dead plants and animals to coal, oil and natural gas which are used as energy, but break our living environment. According to our experiments, which consciousness can use thought waves remotely to change their systemic model between Electron Clouds and electron holes of P-N Junction and can change output voltages of solar cells by a life information technology and a space-time effect, we hope to find a new method to the orbit of the Tyche to avoid next extinction. (see Dayong Cao, BAPS.2011.APR.K1.17 and BAPS.2012.MAR.P33.14) Support by AEEA

  14. Revisiting Special Relativity: A Natural Algebraic Alternative to Minkowski Spacetime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chappell, James M.; Iqbal, Azhar; Iannella, Nicolangelo; Abbott, Derek

    2012-01-01

    Minkowski famously introduced the concept of a space-time continuum in 1908, merging the three dimensions of space with an imaginary time dimension , with the unit imaginary producing the correct spacetime distance , and the results of Einstein’s then recently developed theory of special relativity, thus providing an explanation for Einstein’s theory in terms of the structure of space and time. As an alternative to a planar Minkowski space-time of two space dimensions and one time dimension, we replace the unit imaginary , with the Clifford bivector for the plane that also squares to minus one, but which can be included without the addition of an extra dimension, as it is an integral part of the real Cartesian plane with the orthonormal basis and . We find that with this model of planar spacetime, using a two-dimensional Clifford multivector, the spacetime metric and the Lorentz transformations follow immediately as properties of the algebra. This also leads to momentum and energy being represented as components of a multivector and we give a new efficient derivation of Compton’s scattering formula, and a simple formulation of Dirac’s and Maxwell’s equations. Based on the mathematical structure of the multivector, we produce a semi-classical model of massive particles, which can then be viewed as the origin of the Minkowski spacetime structure and thus a deeper explanation for relativistic effects. We also find a new perspective on the nature of time, which is now given a precise mathematical definition as the bivector of the plane. PMID:23300566

  15. Revisiting special relativity: a natural algebraic alternative to Minkowski spacetime.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chappell, James M; Iqbal, Azhar; Iannella, Nicolangelo; Abbott, Derek

    2012-01-01

    Minkowski famously introduced the concept of a space-time continuum in 1908, merging the three dimensions of space with an imaginary time dimension [Formula: see text], with the unit imaginary producing the correct spacetime distance [Formula: see text], and the results of Einstein's then recently developed theory of special relativity, thus providing an explanation for Einstein's theory in terms of the structure of space and time. As an alternative to a planar Minkowski space-time of two space dimensions and one time dimension, we replace the unit imaginary [Formula: see text], with the Clifford bivector [Formula: see text] for the plane that also squares to minus one, but which can be included without the addition of an extra dimension, as it is an integral part of the real Cartesian plane with the orthonormal basis [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text]. We find that with this model of planar spacetime, using a two-dimensional Clifford multivector, the spacetime metric and the Lorentz transformations follow immediately as properties of the algebra. This also leads to momentum and energy being represented as components of a multivector and we give a new efficient derivation of Compton's scattering formula, and a simple formulation of Dirac's and Maxwell's equations. Based on the mathematical structure of the multivector, we produce a semi-classical model of massive particles, which can then be viewed as the origin of the Minkowski spacetime structure and thus a deeper explanation for relativistic effects. We also find a new perspective on the nature of time, which is now given a precise mathematical definition as the bivector of the plane.

  16. Revisiting special relativity: a natural algebraic alternative to Minkowski spacetime.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James M Chappell

    Full Text Available Minkowski famously introduced the concept of a space-time continuum in 1908, merging the three dimensions of space with an imaginary time dimension [Formula: see text], with the unit imaginary producing the correct spacetime distance [Formula: see text], and the results of Einstein's then recently developed theory of special relativity, thus providing an explanation for Einstein's theory in terms of the structure of space and time. As an alternative to a planar Minkowski space-time of two space dimensions and one time dimension, we replace the unit imaginary [Formula: see text], with the Clifford bivector [Formula: see text] for the plane that also squares to minus one, but which can be included without the addition of an extra dimension, as it is an integral part of the real Cartesian plane with the orthonormal basis [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text]. We find that with this model of planar spacetime, using a two-dimensional Clifford multivector, the spacetime metric and the Lorentz transformations follow immediately as properties of the algebra. This also leads to momentum and energy being represented as components of a multivector and we give a new efficient derivation of Compton's scattering formula, and a simple formulation of Dirac's and Maxwell's equations. Based on the mathematical structure of the multivector, we produce a semi-classical model of massive particles, which can then be viewed as the origin of the Minkowski spacetime structure and thus a deeper explanation for relativistic effects. We also find a new perspective on the nature of time, which is now given a precise mathematical definition as the bivector of the plane.

  17. Space-Time Diffeomorphisms in Noncommutative Gauge Theories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Román Juarez

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available In previous work [Rosenbaum M. et al., J. Phys. A: Math. Theor. 40 (2007, 10367–10382] we have shown how for canonical parametrized field theories, where space-time is placed on the same footing as the other fields in the theory, the representation of space-time diffeomorphisms provides a very convenient scheme for analyzing the induced twisted deformation of these diffeomorphisms, as a result of the space-time noncommutativity. However, for gauge field theories (and of course also for canonical geometrodynamics where the Poisson brackets of the constraints explicitely depend on the embedding variables, this Poisson algebra cannot be connected directly with a representation of the complete Lie algebra of space-time diffeomorphisms, because not all the field variables turn out to have a dynamical character [Isham C.J., Kuchar K.V., Ann. Physics 164 (1985, 288–315, 316–333]. Nonetheless, such an homomorphic mapping can be recuperated by first modifying the original action and then adding additional constraints in the formalism in order to retrieve the original theory, as shown by Kuchar and Stone for the case of the parametrized Maxwell field in [Kuchar K.V., Stone S.L., Classical Quantum Gravity 4 (1987, 319–328]. Making use of a combination of all of these ideas, we are therefore able to apply our canonical reparametrization approach in order to derive the deformed Lie algebra of the noncommutative space-time diffeomorphisms as well as to consider how gauge transformations act on the twisted algebras of gauge and particle fields. Thus, hopefully, adding clarification on some outstanding issues in the literature concerning the symmetries for gauge theories in noncommutative space-times.

  18. The Mode Solution of the Wave Equation in Kasner Spacetimes and Redshift

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petersen, Oliver Lindblad, E-mail: lindblad@uni-potsdam.de [Universität Potsdam, Institut für Mathematik (Germany)

    2016-12-15

    We study the mode solution to the Cauchy problem of the scalar wave equation □φ = 0 in Kasner spacetimes. As a first result, we give the explicit mode solution in axisymmetric Kasner spacetimes, of which flat Kasner spacetimes are special cases. Furthermore, we give the small and large time asymptotics of the modes in general Kasner spacetimes. Generically, the modes in non-flat Kasner spacetimes grow logarithmically for small times, while the modes in flat Kasner spacetimes stay bounded for small times. For large times, however, the modes in general Kasner spacetimes oscillate with a polynomially decreasing amplitude. This gives a notion of large time frequency of the modes, which we use to model the wavelength of light rays in Kasner spacetimes. We show that the redshift one obtains in this way actually coincides with the usual cosmological redshift.

  19. Scheimpflug imaging for laser refractive surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambrósio, Renato; Valbon, Bruno F; Faria-Correia, Fernando; Ramos, Isaac; Luz, Allan

    2013-07-01

    To review the principles and clinical applications of Scheimpflug corneal and anterior segment imaging with special relevance for laser refractive surgery. Computerized Scheimpflug imaging has been used for corneal and anterior segment tomography (CASTm) in different commercially available instruments. Such approach computes the three-dimensional image of the cornea and anterior segment, enabling the characterization of elevation and curvature of the front and back surfaces of the cornea, pachymetric mapping, calculation of the total corneal refractive power and anterior segment biometry. CASTm represents a major evolution for corneal and anterior segment analysis, beyond front surface corneal topography and single point central corneal thickness measurements. This approach enhances the diagnostic abilities for screening ectasia risk as well as for planning, evaluating the results, managing complications of refractive procedures, and selecting intraocular lens power, type, and design. In addition, dynamic Scheimpflug imaging has been recently introduced for in-vivo corneal biomechanical measurements and has also been used for anterior segment imaging of femtocataract surgery. Scheimpflug imaging has an important role for laser refractive surgery with different applications, which continuously improve due to advances in technology.

  20. Topography-guided laser refractive surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holland, Simon; Lin, David T C; Tan, Johnson C H

    2013-07-01

    Topography-guided laser refractive surgery regularizes the front corneal surface irregularities to achieve the desired refractive outcome. This is particularly applicable in highly aberrated corneas, where wavefront aberrometry is often not possible. This article aims to review the recently published results of topography-guided ablations in normal regular corneas, highly aberrated corneas, and its application in conjunction with collagen cross-linking (CXL) in cases of keratectasia. Topography-guided laser ablation is increasingly used with good efficacy and safety outcomes in highly aberrated corneas with irregular astigmatism. These include eyes with refractive surgery complications including postlaser in-situ keratomileusis ectasia, decentered ablation, small optical zones, asymmetrical astigmatism, and postradial keratectomy astigmatism. Further indications are for postkeratoplasty astigmatism and keratoconus. Simultaneous topography-guided ablations with CXL in keratectasia have been promising, both in addressing the surface irregularities and progressive nature of the conditions. Topography-guided laser refractive surgery is proving to be effective and well tolerated in the visual rehabilitation of highly aberrated eyes, with increasing predictability based on the recent research.

  1. The Index of Refraction of Seawater

    Science.gov (United States)

    1976-01-01

    performed their uiesuremerts or presented their results in a manner which, at least superficially , was incompatible with those provided iy others. A...index of refraction of seawater as a function of temperatura and chlorinity was Undertaken by Utterback, Thompson, and Thomas (1934) wh: conducted

  2. REFRACTIVE ERROR STATUS IN BAYELSA STATE, NIGERIA

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    LIVINGSTON

    as economic cost to the family and government. Smith and Smith have estimated that the annual worldwide ... A recent national survey in Pakistan has reported that refractive error is the commonest cause of moderate ... 21,100km . The major occupations in the State are fishing, farming, palm oil milling, lumbering, palm.

  3. Wave refraction studies off Agonda beach (Goa)

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Krishnakumar, V.; Pathak, M.C.; Kotnala, K.L.

    Analysis of wave refraction and longshore current has been carried out for a narrow strip off the shores of Agonda (Goa, India). Zones with high wave energy and rip currents have been demarcated. It is found from the analysis that the southern part...

  4. [Innovations in refractive laser surgery 2014].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seiler, T

    2014-06-01

    Within less than 30 years refractive laser surgery has been developed from an experimental technique to one of the most frequently applied procedures in ophthalmology worldwide. Regarding the success rate of refractive results, myopia correction has reached a level (95% within ± 0.5 D) that is comparable to manifest refraction so that there is not much room for improvement. The most recently developed technique is femtosecond laser lenticule extraction which was introduced in 2007 in Germany. Early clinical results were very promising but the awaited bilateral comparative studies are still lacking. Although new laser types that will be able to provide improved profiles are on the horizon, the problem of reoperations has not yet been solved. Topography-guided ablation is notoriously plagued by undercorrection so that topography-guided treatment is planned as a two step-procedure. The reason for the undercorrection is the leveling effect of the epithelium. The evolution of refractive surgery has slowed down during the last years, however, some important innovations are at the advent.

  5. Characterising refractive index dispersion in chalcogenide glasses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fang, Y.; Sojka, L.; Jayasuriya, D.

    2016-01-01

    Much effort has been devoted to the study of glasses that contain the chalcogen elements (sulfur, selenium and tellurium) for photonics' applications out to MIR wavelengths. In this paper we describe some techniques for determining the refractive index dispersion characteristics of these glasses...

  6. Measurements of photoinduced refractive index changes in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Measurements of photoinduced refractive index changes in bacteriorhodopsin films. RAVINDER KUMAR BANYAL and B RAGHAVENDRA PRASAD. Indian Institute of Astrophysics, Sarjapur Road, Koramangala, Bangalore 560 034, India. E-mail: brp@iiap.res.in. MS received 12 December 2005; revised 6 November 2006; ...

  7. 37 REFRACTIVE ERROR BLINDNESS IN YENAGOA, BAYELSA ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    blindness, while in India 7 with a prevalence of 0.21%, myopia was the commonest cause of blindness. Refractive error blindness has a profound effect on the quality of life of its sufferers leading to poor performance in schools and other career opportunities. It also reduces productivity in the workforce, creating enormous ...

  8. Refractive index of the fly rhabdomere

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beersma, D.G.M.; Hoenders, B.J.; Huiser, A.M.J.; Toorn, P. van

    1982-01-01

    The refractive index and the diameter of the fly rhabdomere were determined by comparing the experimental results derived from interference microscopy with the results of a theoretical study on the scattering of plane waves by a homogeneous, isotropic cylindrical dielectric rod. It was found that

  9. Revisiting quantum mechanics on non-commutative space-time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nandi, Partha; Pal, Sayan Kumar; Bose, Aritra N.; Chakraborty, Biswajit

    2017-11-01

    We construct an effective commutative Schrödinger equation in Moyal space-time in (1 + 1) -dimension where both t and x are operator-valued and satisfy [ t ˆ , x ˆ ] = iθ. Beginning with a time-reparametrised invariant form of an action we identify the actions of various space-time coordinates and their conjugate momenta on quantum states, represented by Hilbert-Schmidt operators. Since time is also regarded as a configuration space variable, we show how an 'induced' inner product can be extracted, so that an appropriate probabilistic interpretation is obtained. We then discuss several other applications of the formalism developed so far.

  10. Holographic analysis of dispersive pupils in space--time optics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calatroni, J.; Vienot, J.C.

    1981-06-01

    Extension of space--time optics to objects whose transparency is a function of the temporal frequency v = c/lambda is examined. Considering the effects of such stationary pupils on white light waves, they are called temporal pupils. It is shown that simultaneous encoding both in the space and time frequency domains is required to record pupil parameters. The space-time impulse response and transfer functions are calculated for a dispersive nonabsorbent material. An experimental method providing holographic recording of the dispersion curve of any transparent material is presented.

  11. Raychaudhuri equation and singularity theorems in Finsler spacetimes

    CERN Document Server

    Minguzzi, E

    2015-01-01

    The Raychaudhuri equation and its consequences for chronality are studied in the context of Finsler spacetimes. It is proved that all the notable singularity theorems of Lorentzian geometry extend to the Finslerian domain, e.g. Hawking's, Penrose's, Hawking and Penrose's, Geroch's, Gannon's, Tipler's, Kriele's, Topological Censorship's, and so on. It is argued that all the notable results in causality theory connected to achronal sets, future sets, domains of dependence, limit curve theorems, length functional, Lorentzian distance, geodesic connectedness, extend to the Finslerian domain. Results concerning the spacetime asymptotic structure and horizons differentiability are also included.

  12. Three-generation neutrino oscillations in curved spacetime

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Yu-Hao, E-mail: yhzhang1994@gmail.com; Li, Xue-Qian, E-mail: lixq@nankai.edu.cn

    2016-10-15

    Three-generation MSW effect in curved spacetime is studied and a brief discussion on the gravitational correction to the neutrino self-energy is given. The modified mixing parameters and corresponding conversion probabilities of neutrinos after traveling through celestial objects of constant densities are obtained. The method to distinguish between the normal hierarchy and inverted hierarchy is discussed in this framework. Due to the gravitational redshift of energy, in some extreme situations, the resonance energy of neutrinos might be shifted noticeably and the gravitational effect on the self-energy of neutrino becomes significant at the vicinities of spacetime singularities.

  13. Axion particle production in a laser-induced dynamical spacetime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wadud, M. A.; King, B.; Bingham, R.; Gregori, G.

    2018-02-01

    We consider the dynamics of a charged particle (e.g., an electron) oscillating in a laser field in flat spacetime and describe it in terms of the variable mass metric. By applying Einstein's equivalence principle, we show that, after representing the electron motion in a time-dependent manner, the variable mass metric takes the form of the Friedmann-Lemaître-Robertson-Walker metric. We quantize a pseudo-scalar field in this spacetime and derive the production rate of electrically neutral, spinless particles. We show that this approach can provide an alternative experimental method to axion searches.

  14. On Boundedness of Entropy of Photon Gas in Noncommutative Spacetime

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazi Ashraful Alam

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Entropy bound for the photon gas in a noncommutative (NC spacetime where phase space is with compact spatial momentum space, previously studied by Nozari et al., has been reexamined with the correct distribution function. While Nozari et al. have employed Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution function to investigate thermodynamic properties of photon gas, we have employed the correct distribution function, that is, Bose-Einstein distribution function. No such entropy bound is observed if Bose-Einstein distribution is employed to solve the partition function. As a result, the reported analogy between thermodynamics of photon gas in such NC spacetime and Bekenstein-Hawking entropy of black holes should be disregarded.

  15. BPS Wilson loops in Minkowski spacetime and Euclidean space

    OpenAIRE

    Ouyang, Hao; Wu, Jun-Bao; Zhang, Jia-ju

    2015-01-01

    We give evidence that spacelike BPS Wilson loops do not exist in Minkowski spacetime. We show that spacelike Wilson loops in Minkowski spacetime cannot preserve any supersymmetries, in $d = 4$ $\\mathcal N = 4$ super Yang-Mills theory, $d = 3$ $\\mathcal N = 2$ super Chern-Simons-matter theory, and $d = 3$ $\\mathcal N = 6$ Aharony-Bergman-Jafferis-Maldacena theory. We not only show this using infinite straight lines and circles as examples, but also we give proofs for general curves. We attribu...

  16. Space-time modeling of electricity spot prices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abate, Girum Dagnachew; Haldrup, Niels

    In this paper we derive a space-time model for electricity spot prices. A general spatial Durbin model that incorporates the temporal as well as spatial lags of spot prices is presented. Joint modeling of space-time effects is necessarily important when prices and loads are determined in a network...... of power exchange areas. We use data from the Nord Pool electricity power exchange area bidding markets. Different spatial weight matrices are considered to capture the structure of the spatial dependence process across different bidding markets and statistical tests show significant spatial dependence...

  17. Spinning scalar solitons in anti-de Sitter spacetime

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radu, Eugen, E-mail: eugen.radu@uni-oldenburg.de [Institut fuer Physik, Universitaet Oldenburg, Postfach 2503, D-26111 Oldenburg (Germany); Subagyo, Bintoro [Institut fuer Physik, Universitaet Oldenburg, Postfach 2503, D-26111 Oldenburg (Germany)

    2012-10-31

    We present spinning Q-balls and boson stars in four-dimensional anti-de Sitter spacetime. These are smooth, horizonless solutions for gravity coupled to a massive complex scalar field with a harmonic dependence on time and the azimuthal angle. Similar to the flat spacetime configurations, the angular momentum is quantized. We find that a class of solutions with a self-interaction potential has a limit corresponding to static solitons with axial symmetry only. An exact solution describing spherically symmetric Q-balls in a fixed AdS background is also discussed.

  18. Noise kernels of stochastic gravity in conformally-flat spacetimes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, H. T.; Hu, B. L.

    2015-03-01

    The central object in the theory of semiclassical stochastic gravity is the noise kernel, which is the symmetric two point correlation function of the stress-energy tensor. Using the corresponding Wightman functions in Minkowski, Einstein and open Einstein spaces, we construct the noise kernels of a conformally coupled scalar field in these spacetimes. From them we show that the noise kernels in conformally-flat spacetimes, including the Friedmann-Robertson-Walker universes, can be obtained in closed analytic forms by using a combination of conformal and coordinate transformations.

  19. Nonspherically Symmetric Collapse in Asymptotically AdS Spacetimes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bantilan, Hans; Figueras, Pau; Kunesch, Markus; Romatschke, Paul

    2017-11-01

    We numerically simulate gravitational collapse in asymptotically anti-de Sitter spacetimes away from spherical symmetry. Starting from initial data sourced by a massless real scalar field, we solve the Einstein equations with a negative cosmological constant in five spacetime dimensions and obtain a family of nonspherically symmetric solutions, including those that form two distinct black holes on the axis. We find that these configurations collapse faster than spherically symmetric ones of the same mass and radial compactness. Similarly, they require less mass to collapse within a fixed time.

  20. Covariant information-density cutoff in curved space-time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kempf, Achim

    2004-06-04

    In information theory, the link between continuous information and discrete information is established through well-known sampling theorems. Sampling theory explains, for example, how frequency-filtered music signals are reconstructible perfectly from discrete samples. In this Letter, sampling theory is generalized to pseudo-Riemannian manifolds. This provides a new set of mathematical tools for the study of space-time at the Planck scale: theories formulated on a differentiable space-time manifold can be equivalent to lattice theories. There is a close connection to generalized uncertainty relations which have appeared in string theory and other studies of quantum gravity.

  1. Deformed Space-Time of the Piezonuclear Emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardone, F.; Calbucci, V.; Albertini, G.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, an experimental verification of the relationship between the deformed Minkowsky space-time and the piezonuclear emission has been obtained by testing several cylindrical steel bars cyclically loaded in a mechanical fatigue machine. During the compression cycles, α-particles have been both detected by a ZnS(Ag) scintillator and a Geiger counter. Taking into account the theory of the deformed special relativity, we report that the emission only occurs after a specific value of energy is overcome. This value is strictly related to the weak and strong nuclear interactions, which in turn define the regions of Minkowsky and non-Minkowsky space-time.

  2. Synovial folds in equine articular process joints

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Line Nymann; Berg, Lise Charlotte; Markussen, Bo

    2013-01-01

    Cervical synovial folds have been suggested as a potential cause of neck pain in humans. Little is known about the extent and characteristics of cervical synovial folds in horses.......Cervical synovial folds have been suggested as a potential cause of neck pain in humans. Little is known about the extent and characteristics of cervical synovial folds in horses....

  3. The local and global geometrical aspects of the twin paradox in static spacetimes: I. Three spherically symmetric spacetimes

    CERN Document Server

    Sokołowski, Leszek M

    2014-01-01

    We investigate local and global properties of timelike geodesics in three static spherically symmetric spacetimes. These properties are of its own mathematical relevance and provide a solution of the physical `twin paradox' problem. The latter means that we focus our studies on the search of the longest timelike geodesics between two given points. Due to problems with solving the geodesic deviation equation we restrict our investigations to radial and circular (if exist) geodesics. On these curves we find general Jacobi vector fields, determine by means of them sequences of conjugate points and with the aid of the comoving coordinate system and the spherical symmetry we determine the cut points. These notions identify segments of radial and circular gepdesics which are locally or globally of maximal length. In de Sitter spacetime all geodesics are globally maximal. In CAdS and Bertotti--Robinson spacetimes the radial geodesics which infinitely many times oscillate between antipodal points in the space contain...

  4. Effects of myopic spectacle correction and radial refractive gradient spectacles on peripheral refraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabernero, Juan; Vazquez, Daniel; Seidemann, Anne; Uttenweiler, Dietmar; Schaeffel, Frank

    2009-08-01

    The recent observation that central refractive development might be controlled by the refractive errors in the periphery, also in primates, revived the interest in the peripheral optics of the eye. We optimized an eccentric photorefractor to measure the peripheral refractive error in the vertical pupil meridian over the horizontal visual field (from -45 degrees to 45 degrees ), with and without myopic spectacle correction. Furthermore, a newly designed radial refractive gradient lens (RRG lens) that induces increasing myopia in all radial directions from the center was tested. We found that for the geometry of our measurement setup conventional spectacles induced significant relative hyperopia in the periphery, although its magnitude varied greatly among different spectacle designs and subjects. In contrast, the newly designed RRG lens induced relative peripheral myopia. These results are of interest to analyze the effect that different optical corrections might have on the emmetropization process.

  5. [IOL power calculation after refractive surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabsilber, T M; Auffarth, G U

    2010-08-01

    Cataract surgery is evolving more and more into a refractive procedure with high expectations in terms of visual rehabilitation. Especially patients presenting after previous Excimer laser corneal surgery are used to being independent from glasses. Unfortunately, some of these patients showed unexpected hyperopic surprises after cataract surgery in the past. The changes of corneal radii and keratometer index as well as the inaccurate prediction of the postoperative intraocular lens (IOL) position using different formulas were determined as error sources which led to a reduced IOL power calculation in dioptres. Several methods have been proposed to solve this problem which can be divided in two groups. On the one hand, there are methods that depend on refraction and biometry values before the initial treatment (e. g., clinical history, Feiz-Mannis, double-K, adjusted effective refractive power [EffRadj]-, cornea bypass/Wake Forest methods as well as correction factors to adjust K-values) and on the other hand procedures that only need current pre-cataract surgery measurements (e. g., contact lens method, corneal topography systems, ray tracing, aphakic refraction technique, correction factors to adjust K-values and new formulas including Haigis-L or BESSt and recently a novel pachymetry method). This review describes these procedures and analyses their strengths and weaknesses. The number of presented methods emphasises already that no perfect solution has been determined so far that would be valid for every patient. Some methods do provide a good predictability; however, individual deviations can occur. In general, it is advisable to inform the patient about the higher risk for an inaccurate IOL power calculation. It can be helpful to compare the results of different methods indicating the importance to provide all required individual data by the refractive surgeon already. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart, New York.

  6. Temporally resolved refractive index structure parameter measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henriksson, Markus; Forsling, Robin

    2017-09-01

    The refractive index structure parameter is the most common measure of optical turbulence. It is defined as a statistical quantity for the Kolmogorov spectrum energy cascade of turbulent eddies of different sizes. As such it is formally assumed to be constant in time and space. However, the large scale variation with the diurnal cycle, with altitude or with terrain characteristics is well known. The ensemble average in the definition of the refractive index structure parameter is thus assumed to be applied over a restricted region in space and time. The question of how large volume is needed to determine the refractive index structure parameter and on how short temporal scales it can vary has not received significant attention. To study the temporal variation we have used two independent measurement systems to measure the path-averaged refractive index structure parameter over a 171 m path at 1 m above ground with higher than 1 Hz temporal resolution. One measurement system uses the differential angle-of-arrival of an array of LEDs. The other system measures the scintillation of a single path laser beam using a photon counting system, with time correlation of picosecond pulses for simultaneous measurement of signal and background and with temporal autocorrelation-based variance determination to separate turbulence related scintillations from shot noise. The data shows excellent agreement between the two measurement systems on second level temporal variation, giving confidence in that the measured values show true variation of the refractive index structure parameter. Large scale variation of up to two orders of magnitude can be coupled to solar insolation on this partly cloudy day. High frequency variations that are consistent between the systems used show factor two changes at time scales below one second.

  7. Refractive outcomes after multifocal intraocular lens exchange.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Eric J; Sajjad, Ahmar; Montes de Oca, Ildamaris; Koch, Douglas D; Wang, Li; Weikert, Mitchell P; Al-Mohtaseb, Zaina N

    2017-06-01

    To evaluate the refractive outcomes after multifocal intraocular lens (IOL) exchange. Cullen Eye Institute, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas, USA. Retrospective case series. Patients had multifocal IOL explantation followed by IOL implantation. Outcome measures included type of IOL, surgical indication, corrected distance visual acuity (CDVA), and refractive prediction error. The study comprised 29 patients (35 eyes). The types of IOLs implanted after multifocal IOL explantation included in-the-bag IOLs (74%), iris-sutured IOLs (6%), sulcus-fixated IOLs with optic capture (9%), sulcus-fixated IOLs without optic capture (9%), and anterior chamber IOLs (3%). The surgical indication for exchange included blurred vision (60%), photic phenomena (57%), photophobia (9%), loss of contrast sensitivity (3%), and multiple complaints (29%). The CDVA was 20/40 or better in 94% of eyes before the exchange and 100% of eyes after the exchange (P = .12). The mean refractive prediction error significantly decreased from 0.22 ± 0.81 diopter (D) before the exchange to -0.09 ± 0.53 D after the exchange (P < .05). The median absolute refractive prediction error significantly decreased from 0.43 D before the exchange to 0.23 D after the exchange (P < .05). Multifocal IOL exchange can be performed safely with good visual outcomes using different types of IOLs. A lower refractive prediction error and a higher likelihood of 20/40 or better vision can be achieved with the implantation of the second IOL compared with the original multifocal IOL, regardless of the final IOL position. Copyright © 2017 ASCRS and ESCRS. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Correcting Indigenous Australians' refractive error and presbyopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anjou, Mitchell D; Boudville, Andrea I; Taylor, Hugh R

    2013-01-01

    This paper aims to identify the barriers and solutions for refractive error and presbyopia vision correction for Indigenous Australians. A qualitative study, using semistructured interviews, focus groups, stakeholder workshops and consultation, conducted in community, private practice, hospital, non-government organization and government settings. Five hundred and thirty-one people participated in consultations. Data were collected at 21 sites across Australia. Semistructured interviews were conducted with 289 people working in Indigenous health and eye care sectors; focus group discussions with 81 community members; stakeholder workshops involving 86 individuals; and separate meetings with 75 people. Barriers were identified through thematic analysis and policy solutions developed through iterative consultation. Barriers and solutions to remedy Indigenous Australians' uncorrected refractive error and presbyopia. Indigenous Australians' uncorrected refractive error and presbyopia can be eliminated through improvement of primary care identification and referral of people with poor vision, increased availability of optometry services in Aboriginal Health Services, introduction of a nationally consistent Indigenous subsidized spectacle scheme and proper coordination, promotion and monitoring of these services. The refractive error and presbyopia correction needs of Indigenous Australians are immediately treatable by the simple provision of glasses. The workforce capacity exists to provide the eye exams to prescribe glasses and the cost is modest. What is required is identification of patients with refractive needs within community, referral to accessible optometry services, a good supply system for appropriate and affordable glasses and the coordination and integration of this service within a broader eye care system. © 2012 The Authors. Clinical and Experimental Ophthalmology © 2012 Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Ophthalmologists.

  9. Bodies Folded in Migrant Crypts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Galis, Vasilis; Tzokas, Spyros; Tympas, Aristotle

    2016-01-01

    and human migrants generates a dis/abled subject. In this context, dis/ability may be a cause or consequence of migration, both in physical/material (the folding of bodies in the crypt) and cultural/semiotic terms, and may become a barrier to accessing protection, to entering and/or crossing a country......, and to performing mobility in general. Dis/ability and migration have not been associated in the literature. We adopt an analytical symmetry between humans and non-humans, in this case between bodies and crypts. By suggesting an infected, ambivalent, and hybrid approach to the human subject, the body...

  10. Comparison of tropicamide and cyclopentolate for cycloplegic refractions in myopic adult refractive surgery patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmeister, Elizabeth M; Kaupp, Sandor E; Schallhorn, Steven C

    2005-04-01

    To compare tropicamide 1%, a shorter-acting cycloplegic agent, with cyclopentolate 1% for cycloplegic refractions in adult refractive surgery patients. Navy Refractive Surgery Center, Ophthalmology, Naval Medical Center, San Diego, California. The study was prospective, single center, with randomized sequencing of cycloplegic agent; each patient received both agents. Thirty consecutive myopic adult refractive surgery patients (mean age 35.4 years) participated. A complete preoperative examination, including cycloplegic refraction, was obtained twice, 1 week apart. The patient and the examiner were masked to the medication. Main outcome measures included cycloplegic and manifest refractions, best corrected distance acuity, near-point accommodation, pupil diameters, and subjective appraisal of experience with cycloplegic agents. Twenty-eight of 30 patients completed both examinations. Both eyes were measured, but comparisons were limited to right and left eyes, independently. No statistically significant difference was found between the tropicamide and cyclopentolate cycloplegic refractions (mean difference in MSE +/- SD, OD=0.054 +/- 0.214 diopters (D), t=1.33, P=.10; OS=0.054 +/- 0.253 D, t=1.12, P=.14). Five eyes of 3 patients had a difference of 0.50 D or greater between the 2 agents; less myopia with cyclopentolate. Near-point testing revealed less residual accommodation with cyclopentolate (difference in MSE, OD=-0.27 +/- 0.51 D, t=2.68, P=.006; OS=-0.32 +/- 0.49 D, t=3.46, P=.001). Subjectively, 24 of 28 (86%) patients preferred tropicamide, 1 (4%) preferred cyclopentolate, and 3 (10%) had no preference. There was no statistically significant difference in mean cycloplegic refractions. Cyclopentolate was more effective than tropicamide in reducing accommodative amplitude in adult myopes (near-point testing). Patients strongly preferred tropicamide.

  11. Delivering refractive error services: primary eye care centres and outreach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kovin Naidoo

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Addressing refractive errors, the second major cause of preventable blindness, is now a priority for eye care programmes.Although a simple pair of spectacles will correct refractive error, there exists a high prevalence of uncorrected refractive error. This is due in large part to the cost and inaccessibility of refraction and spectacle dispensing services, which are usually offered only at secondary and tertiary eye care centres.

  12. A new derivation of the conformally flat stationary cyclic non-circular spacetimes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ayon-Beato, Eloy [Departamento de Fisica, Facultad de Fisica e Inteligencia Artificial, Universidad Veracruzana, 91000 Xalapa, Veracruz (Mexico); Campuzano, Cuauhtemoc [Departamento de Fisica, Facultad de Fisica e Inteligencia Artificial, Universidad Veracruzana, 91000 Xalapa, Veracruz (Mexico); GarcIa, Alberto [Department of Physics, University of California, Davis, CA 95616 (United States)

    2007-11-15

    We present an alternative way to derive the conformally flat stationary cyclic non-circular spacetimes. We show that there is no room for stationary axisymmetric non-circular axisymmetric spacetimes. We reproduce the well know results for this sort of spacetimes recently reported in [1].

  13. Gravity Probe B: Examining Einstein's Spacetime with Gyroscopes. An Educator's Guide with Activities in Space Science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Range, Shannon K'doah; Mullins, Jennifer

    This teaching guide introduces a relativity gyroscope experiment aiming to test two unverified predictions of Albert Einstein's general theory of relativity. An introduction to the theory includes the following sections: (1) "Spacetime, Curved Spacetime, and Frame-Dragging"; (2) "'Seeing' Spacetime with Gyroscopes"; (3)…

  14. Complete Classification of Cylindrically Symmetric Static Spacetimes and the Corresponding Conservation Laws

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farhad Ali

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we find the Noether symmetries of the Lagrangian of cylindrically symmetric static spacetimes. Using this approach we recover all cylindrically symmetric static spacetimes appeared in the classification by isometries and homotheties. We give different classes of cylindrically symmetric static spacetimes along with the Noether symmetries of the corresponding Lagrangians and conservation laws.

  15. Parser for protein folding units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holm, L; Sander, C

    1994-07-01

    General patterns of protein structural organization have emerged from studies of hundreds of structures elucidated by X-ray crystallography and nuclear magnetic resonance. Structural units are commonly identified by visual inspection of molecular models using qualitative criteria. Here, we propose an algorithm for identification of structural units by objective, quantitative criteria based on atomic interactions. The underlying physical concept is maximal interactions within each unit and minimal interaction between units (domains). In a simple harmonic approximation, interdomain dynamics is determined by the strength of the interface and the distribution of masses. The most likely domain decomposition involves units with the most correlated motion, or largest interdomain fluctuation time. The decomposition of a convoluted 3-D structure is complicated by the possibility that the chain can cross over several times between units. Grouping the residues by solving an eigenvalue problem for the contact matrix reduces the problem to a one-dimensional search for all reasonable trial bisections. Recursive bisection yields a tree of putative folding units. Simple physical criteria are used to identify units that could exist by themselves. The units so defined closely correspond to crystallographers' notion of structural domains. The results are useful for the analysis of folding principles, for modular protein design and for protein engineering.

  16. Refractive Changes Induced by Strabismus Corrective Surgery in Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mezad-Koursh, Daphna; Leshno, Ari; Ziv-Baran, Tomer; Stolovitch, Chaim

    2017-01-01

    Purpose. To investigate refractive changes after strabismus correction procedures among adults. Methods. Retrospective chart review of adult patients who had horizontal recti muscles surgery with preoperative and postoperative cycloplegic refraction measurements. The preoperative refraction was mathematically subtracted from the postoperative refraction, and the induced refractive changes were statistically analyzed. Vector analysis was used to examine the magnitude of the toric change. The proportion of clinically significant refractive change was evaluated as well. Results. Thirty-one eyes from 22 subjects met the criteria and were included in the final analysis. A significant postoperative refractive change of the spherical equivalent towards myopia and a change of the astigmatism in the with-the-rule direction were observed. In a subset of 9 cases a third cycloplegic refraction measurement demonstrated stable refraction compared to the 1-month postoperative measurement. In 10 cases of single eye surgery, significant refractive changes were observed only in the operated side when compared to the sound eye. The induced surgical refractive change was of clinical significance (≥0.5 D) in 11 eyes of 9 patients (40.9% of patients). Conclusions. Refractive changes are a significant side effect of horizontal strabismus corrective surgery among adults. Therefore, patients should be informed about it prior to surgery and should be rerefracted in the postoperative period.

  17. Refractive Changes Induced by Strabismus Corrective Surgery in Adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daphna Mezad-Koursh

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To investigate refractive changes after strabismus correction procedures among adults. Methods. Retrospective chart review of adult patients who had horizontal recti muscles surgery with preoperative and postoperative cycloplegic refraction measurements. The preoperative refraction was mathematically subtracted from the postoperative refraction, and the induced refractive changes were statistically analyzed. Vector analysis was used to examine the magnitude of the toric change. The proportion of clinically significant refractive change was evaluated as well. Results. Thirty-one eyes from 22 subjects met the criteria and were included in the final analysis. A significant postoperative refractive change of the spherical equivalent towards myopia and a change of the astigmatism in the with-the-rule direction were observed. In a subset of 9 cases a third cycloplegic refraction measurement demonstrated stable refraction compared to the 1-month postoperative measurement. In 10 cases of single eye surgery, significant refractive changes were observed only in the operated side when compared to the sound eye. The induced surgical refractive change was of clinical significance (≥0.5 D in 11 eyes of 9 patients (40.9% of patients. Conclusions. Refractive changes are a significant side effect of horizontal strabismus corrective surgery among adults. Therefore, patients should be informed about it prior to surgery and should be rerefracted in the postoperative period.

  18. Prevalence of myopia amongst patients with refractive error in

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    REFRACTIVE ERROR IN THE KUMASI METROPOLIS OF. GHANA. 1N. Y. Koomson, 2S. Y. Lartey, and 3K. ... The study concludes that myopia is the most common refractive error that is pre- sented for refraction in the eye facilities in ... mine the causes, risk factors, distribution, prevalence and incidence of myopia. Results.

  19. Refractive Error Status In Bayelsa State, Nigeria | Koroye-Egbe ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Refractive errors affect the whole spectrum of the population without regard to age, gender, race and ethnic group. Uncorrected refractive errors have severe consequences for the individual, family and society.Records showthat no study documenting the distribution of refractive errors in Bayelsa State had been carried out.

  20. Pattern Of Refractive Errors Among Computer Users In A Nigerian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Refractive error is a common cause of ocular morbidity. Computer use is associated with eye strain which may be due to refractive errors. Objective: To ascertain the prevalence and pattern of refractive errors among computer users. Method: A cross-sectional survey of 560 computer users in Enugu urban, ...

  1. Refractive Error Status in Bayelsa State, Nigeria | Koroye-Egbe ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Refractive errors affect the whole spectrum of the population without regard to age, gender, race and ethnic group. Uncorrected refractive errors have severe consequences for the individual, family and society. This study , is the first of its kind, to document the distribution of refractive errors in Bayelsa State.

  2. Refractive errors in presbyopic patients in Kano, Nigeria | Lawan ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The study is a retrospective review of the pattern of refractive errors in presbyopic patients seen in the eye clinic from January to December, 2009. Patients and Methods: The clinic refraction register was used to retrieve the case folders of all patients refracted during the review period. Information extracted ...

  3. ABC of multi-fractal spacetimes and fractional sea turtles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calcagni, Gianluca

    2016-04-01

    We clarify what it means to have a spacetime fractal geometry in quantum gravity and show that its properties differ from those of usual fractals. A weak and a strong definition of multi-scale and multi-fractal spacetimes are given together with a sketch of the landscape of multi-scale theories of gravitation. Then, in the context of the fractional theory with q-derivatives, we explore the consequences of living in a multi-fractal spacetime. To illustrate the behavior of a non-relativistic body, we take the entertaining example of a sea turtle. We show that, when only the time direction is fractal, sea turtles swim at a faster speed than in an ordinary world, while they swim at a slower speed if only the spatial directions are fractal. The latter type of geometry is the one most commonly found in quantum gravity. For time-like fractals, relativistic objects can exceed the speed of light, but strongly so only if their size is smaller than the range of particle-physics interactions. We also find new results about log-oscillating measures, the measure presentation and their role in physical observations and in future extensions to nowhere-differentiable stochastic spacetimes.

  4. ABC of multi-fractal spacetimes and fractional sea turtles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calcagni, Gianluca [Instituto de Estructura de la Materia, CSIC, Madrid (Spain)

    2016-04-15

    We clarify what it means to have a spacetime fractal geometry in quantum gravity and show that its properties differ from those of usual fractals. A weak and a strong definition of multi-scale and multi-fractal spacetimes are given together with a sketch of the landscape of multi-scale theories of gravitation. Then, in the context of the fractional theory with q-derivatives, we explore the consequences of living in a multi-fractal spacetime. To illustrate the behavior of a non-relativistic body, we take the entertaining example of a sea turtle. We show that, when only the time direction is fractal, sea turtles swim at a faster speed than in an ordinary world, while they swim at a slower speed if only the spatial directions are fractal. The latter type of geometry is the one most commonly found in quantum gravity. For time-like fractals, relativistic objects can exceed the speed of light, but strongly so only if their size is smaller than the range of particle-physics interactions. We also find new results about log-oscillating measures, the measure presentation and their role in physical observations and in future extensions to nowhere-differentiable stochastic spacetimes. (orig.)

  5. Eigenvalue Problem of Scalar Fields in BTZ Black Hole Spacetime

    OpenAIRE

    Kuwata, Maiko; Kenmoku, Masakatsu; Shigemoto, Kazuyasu

    2008-01-01

    We studied the eigenvalue problem of scalar fields in the (2+1)-dimensional BTZ black hole spacetime. The Dirichlet boundary condition at infinity and the Dirichlet or the Neumann boundary condition at the horizon are imposed. Eigenvalues for normal modes are characterized by the principal quantum number $(0

  6. On the enigmatic – A true constant of spacetime

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The situation remained ambiguous and it was left to one's taste to include it or not until the quantum vacuum fluctuations were considered which relative to flat spacetime have the same form for the stress tensor as . That is how it gets slated against the Planck length and to the annoying mismatch of 120 orders of magnitude.

  7. Charged anisotropic star on paraboloidal space-time

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The charged anisotropic star on paraboloidal space-time is reported by choosing a particular form of radial pressure and electric field intensity. The non-singular solution of Einstein–Maxwell system of equation has been derived and it is shown that the model satisfies all the physical plausibility conditions. It is observed that ...

  8. Symmetries of Particle Physics: Space-time and Local Gauge ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    GENERAL I ARTICLE. Symmetries of Particle Physics: Space-time and. Local Gauge Symmetries. Sourendu Gupta works on the physics of matter under extreme conditions. He works at the Tata. Institute of Fundamental. Research, Mumbai. Figure 1. Experiment and theory feed on each other. Sourendu Gupta. Introduction.

  9. Space-time design of the public city

    CERN Document Server

    Thomaier, Susanne; Könecke, Benjamin; Zedda, Roberto; Stabilini, Stefano

    2013-01-01

    Time has become an increasingly important topic in urban studies and urban planning. The spatial-temporal interplay is not only of relevance for the theory of urban development and urban politics, but also for urban planning and governance. The space-time approach focuses on the human being with its various habits and routines in the city. Understanding and taking those habits into account in urban planning and public policies offers a new way to improve the quality of life in our cities. Adapting the supply and accessibility of public spaces and services to the inhabitants’ space-time needs calls for an integrated approach to the physical design of urban space and to the organization of cities. In the last two decades the body of practical and theoretical work on urban space-time topics has grown substantially. The book offers a state of the art overview of the theoretical reasoning, the development of new analytical tools, and practical experience of the space-time design of public cities in major Europea...

  10. On synchronization of clocks in general space-times

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. R. H Khajehpour

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available   Einstein and transport synchronizations of infinitesimally spaced and distant clocks are considered in a general Riemannian space-time. It is shown that infinitesimally spaced clocks can always be synchronized. In general one can not find observers for whom distant clock are Einstein synchronized but transport synchronized observers do always exit. Whenever both procedures are possible, they are equivalent.

  11. Space-Time Fractional DKP Equation and Its Solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouzid, N.; Merad, M.

    2017-05-01

    In this paper, a fractional Hamiltonian formulation for Duffin-Kemmer-Petiau' (DKP) fields is presented and, as done in the framework of the Lagrangian formalism, the fractional DKP equation is deduced. The space-time fractional DKP equation is then solved for both scalar and vectorial cases. The wave functions obtained are expressed in terms of Mittag-Leffler function.

  12. IDEAL characterization of isometry classes of FLRW and inflationary spacetimes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canepa, Giovanni; Dappiaggi, Claudio; Khavkine, Igor

    2018-02-01

    In general relativity, an IDEAL (Intrinsic, Deductive, Explicit, ALgorithmic) characterization of a reference spacetime metric g 0 consists of a set of tensorial equations T[g]  =  0, constructed covariantly out of the metric g, its Riemann curvature and their derivatives, that are satisfied if and only if g is locally isometric to the reference spacetime metric g 0. The same notion can be extended to also include scalar or tensor fields, where the equations T[g, φ]=0 are allowed to also depend on the extra fields ϕ. We give the first IDEAL characterization of cosmological FLRW spacetimes, with and without a dynamical scalar (inflaton) field. We restrict our attention to what we call regular geometries, which uniformly satisfy certain identities or inequalities. They roughly split into the following natural special cases: constant curvature spacetime, Einstein static universe, and flat or curved spatial slices. We also briefly comment on how the solution of this problem has implications, in general relativity and inflation theory, for the construction of local gauge invariant observables for linear cosmological perturbations and for stability analysis.

  13. Symmetries of Particle Physics: Space-time and Local Gauge ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 6; Issue 2. Symmetries of Particle Physics: Space-time and Local Gauge Symmetries. Sourendu Gupta. General Article Volume 6 Issue 2 February 2001 pp 29-38. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  14. Noncommutative geometry, symmetries and quantum structure of space-time

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Govindarajan, T R [Institute of Mathematical Sciences, CIT Campus, Taramani, Chennai 600113 (India); Gupta, Kumar S [Theory Division, Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, 1/AF Bidhannagar, Kolkata 700064 (India); Harikumar, E [School of Physics, University of Hyderabad, Hyderabad 500046 (India); Meljanac, S, E-mail: trg@imsc.res.in, E-mail: kumars.gupta@saha.ac.in, E-mail: harisp@uohyd.ernet.in, E-mail: meljanac@irb.hr [Rudjer Botkovic Institute, Bijenicka c.54, HR-10002 Zagreb (Croatia)

    2011-07-08

    We discuss how space-time noncommutativity affects the symmetry groups and particle statistics. Assuming that statistics is superselected under a symmetry transformation, we argue that the corresponding flip operator must be twisted. It is argued that the twisted statistics naturally leads to a deformed oscillator algebra for scalar fields in such a background.

  15. Paraboloidal Space-Times and Relativistic Models of Strange Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jotania, Kanti; Tikekar, Ramesh

    The objective of this paper is to find out the suitability of an ansatz similar to that suggested by Vaidya-Tikekar, but prescribing paraboloidal geometry for the 3-space of the interior space-time of a relativistic spherical star in describing a family of physically viable models of superdense stars like Her X-1, SAX, and X-ray brust.

  16. Holographic reconstruction and renormalization in asymptotically Ricci-flat spacetimes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Caldeira Costa, R.N.

    2012-01-01

    In this work we elaborate on an extension of the AdS/CFT framework to a sub-class of gravitational theories with vanishing cosmological constant. By building on earlier ideas, we construct a correspondence between Ricci-flat spacetimes admitting asymptotically hyperbolic hypersurfaces and a family

  17. Topology and incompleteness for 2+1-dimensional cosmological spacetimes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fajman, David

    2017-06-01

    We study the long-time behavior of the Einstein flow coupled to matter on 2-dimensional surfaces. We consider massless matter models such as collisionless matter composed of massless particles, massless scalar fields and radiation fluids and show that the maximal globally hyperbolic development of homogeneous and isotropic initial data on the 2-sphere is geodesically incomplete in both time directions, i.e. the spacetime recollapses. This behavior also holds for open sets of initial data. In particular, we construct classes of recollapsing 2+1-dimensional spacetimes with spherical spatial topology which provide evidence for a closed universe recollapse conjecture for massless matter models in 2+1 dimensions. Furthermore, we construct solutions with toroidal and higher genus topology for the massless matter fields, which in both cases are future complete. The spacetimes with toroidal topology are 2+1-dimensional analogies of the Einstein-de Sitter model. In addition, we point out a general relation between the energy-momentum tensor and the Kretschmann scalar in 2+1 dimensions and use it to infer strong cosmic censorship for all these models. In view of this relation, we also recall corresponding models containing massive particles, constructed in a previous work and determine the nature of their initial singularities. We conclude that the global structure of non-vacuum cosmological spacetimes in 2+1 dimensions is determined by the mass of particles and—in the homogeneous and isotropic setting studied here—verifies strong cosmic censorship.

  18. On Spacetimes with Given Kinematical Invariants: Construction and Examples

    OpenAIRE

    Plaue, M.; Scherfner, M.; Sousa Jr, L. A. M. de

    2008-01-01

    We present a useful method for the construction of cosmological models by solving the differential equations arising from calculating the kinematical invariants (shear, rotation, expansion and acceleration) of an observer field in proper time description. As an application of our method we present two generalizations of the G\\"odel spacetime that follow naturally from our approach.

  19. Baseline-dependent neutrino oscillations in asymmetrically-warped spacetimes

    CERN Document Server

    Hollenberg, S; Pas, H; Weiler, J T

    2010-01-01

    We study the possibility to explain the LSND anomaly by means of resonant active-sterile neutrino oscillations in an asymmetrically-warped spacetime. In such extra-dimensional scenarios sterile neutrinos take shortcuts through the extra dimension, which results in new types of resonances in the oscillation probability.

  20. Linear bosonic and fermionic quantum gauge theories on curved spacetimes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hack, Thomas-Paul [Hamburg Univ. (Germany). 2. Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik; Schenkel, Alexander [Bergische Univ., Wuppertal (Germany). Fachgruppe Physik

    2012-05-15

    We develop a general setting for the quantization of linear bosonic and fermionic field theories subject to local gauge invariance and show how standard examples such as linearized Yang-Mills theory and linearized general relativity fit into this framework. Our construction always leads to a well-defined and gauge-invariant quantum field algebra, the centre and representations of this algebra, however, have to be analysed on a case-by-case basis. We discuss an example of a fermionic gauge field theory where the necessary conditions for the existence of Hilbert space representations are not met on any spacetime. On the other hand, we prove that these conditions are met for the Rarita-Schwinger gauge field in linearized pure N=1 supergravity on certain spacetimes, including asymptotically flat spacetimes and classes of spacetimes with compact Cauchy surfaces. We also present an explicit example of a supergravity background on which the Rarita-Schwinger gauge field can not be consistently quantized.

  1. Quantum Spacetime: Mimicry of Paths and Black Holes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spaans, Marco

    Since its inception, general relativity has been unreceptive to a marriage with the quantum aspects of our universe. Following the ideas of Einstein, one may pursue an approach that allows spacetime itself to take center stage. The quantum properties of matter are then carried by the dynamics of

  2. Asymptotic symmetries in de Sitter and inflationary spacetimes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ferreira, Ricardo J. Z.; Sandora, McCullen; Sloth, Martin S.

    2017-01-01

    Soft gravitons produced by the expansion of de Sitter can be viewed as the Nambu-Goldstone bosons of spontaneously broken asymptotic symmetries of the de Sitter spacetime. We explicitly construct the associated charges, and show that acting with the charges on the vacuum creates a new state...

  3. New spacetime superalgebras and their Kač-Moody extension

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergshoeff, Eric; Sezgin, Ergin

    1989-01-01

    We present new spacetime algebras whose existence is due to special I'-matrix identities which are also necessary for the existence of super p-branes. They contain a pth-rank antisymmetric tensor, and a (p-1)-rank antisymmetric tensor-spinor generator. Furthermore the translations do not commute

  4. Spacetime scale-invariance and the super p-brane

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergshoeff, E.; London, L.A.J.; Townsend, P.K.

    1992-01-01

    We generalize to p-dimensional extended objects and type II superstrings a recently proposed Green-Schwarz type I superstring action in which the tension T emerges as an integration constant of the equations of motion. The action is spacetime scale-invariant but its equations of motion are

  5. Zen and the Art of Space-Time Manufacturing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bertolami Orfeu

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available We present a general discussion about the so-called emergent properties and discuss whether space-time and gravity can be regarded as emergent features of underlying more fundamental structures. Finally, we discuss some ideas about the multiverse, and speculate on how our universe might arise from the multiverse.

  6. Holographic Refraction and the Measurement of Spherical Ametropia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Nicholas Hoai Nam

    2016-10-01

    To evaluate the performance of a holographic logMAR chart for the subjective spherical refraction of the human eye. Bland-Altman analysis was used to assess the level of agreement between subjective spherical refraction using the holographic logMAR chart and conventional autorefraction and subjective spherical refraction. The 95% limits of agreement (LoA) were calculated between holographic refraction and the two standard methods (subjective and autorefraction). Holographic refraction has a lower mean spherical refraction when compared to conventional refraction (LoA 0.11 ± 0.65 D) and when compared to autorefraction (LoA 0.36 ± 0.77 D). After correcting for systemic bias, this is comparable between autorefraction and conventional subjective refraction (LoA 0.45 ± 0.79 D). After correcting for differences in vergence distance and chromatic aberration between holographic and conventional refraction, approximately 65% (group 1) of measurements between holography and conventional subjective refraction were similar (MD = 0.13 D, SD = 0.00 D). The remaining 35% (group 2) had a mean difference of 0.45 D (SD = 0.12 D) between the two subjective methods. Descriptive statistics showed group 2's mean age (21 years, SD = 13 years) was considerably lower than group 1's mean age (41 years, SD = 17), suggesting accommodation may have a role in the greater mean difference of group 2. Overall, holographic refraction has good agreement with conventional refraction and is a viable alternative for spherical subjective refraction. A larger bias between holographic and conventional refraction was found in younger subjects than older subjects, suggesting an association between accommodation and myopic over-correction during holographic refraction.

  7. Bodies Folded in Migrant Crypts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Galis, Vasilis; Tzokas, Spyros; Tympas, Aristotle

    2016-01-01

    This article considers media narratives that suggest that hiding in trucks, buses, and other vehicles to cross borders has, in fact, been a common practice in the context of migration to, and within, Europe. We aim to problematize how the tension between the materiality of bordering practices...... and human migrants generates a dis/abled subject. In this context, dis/ability may be a cause or consequence of migration, both in physical/material (the folding of bodies in the crypt) and cultural/semiotic terms, and may become a barrier to accessing protection, to entering and/or crossing a country......-crypt traveling border challenges the essentialist dichotomies between technology and biology, disability and impairment. The articles and reports upon which we rely were collected through extensive searches of databases/archives of online newspapers and news websites....

  8. Joint space-time geostatistical model for air quality surveillance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, A.; Soares, A.; Pereira, M. J.

    2009-04-01

    Air pollution and peoples' generalized concern about air quality are, nowadays, considered to be a global problem. Although the introduction of rigid air pollution regulations has reduced pollution from industry and power stations, the growing number of cars on the road poses a new pollution problem. Considering the characteristics of the atmospheric circulation and also the residence times of certain pollutants in the atmosphere, a generalized and growing interest on air quality issues led to research intensification and publication of several articles with quite different levels of scientific depth. As most natural phenomena, air quality can be seen as a space-time process, where space-time relationships have usually quite different characteristics and levels of uncertainty. As a result, the simultaneous integration of space and time is not an easy task to perform. This problem is overcome by a variety of methodologies. The use of stochastic models and neural networks to characterize space-time dispersion of air quality is becoming a common practice. The main objective of this work is to produce an air quality model which allows forecasting critical concentration episodes of a certain pollutant by means of a hybrid approach, based on the combined use of neural network models and stochastic simulations. A stochastic simulation of the spatial component with a space-time trend model is proposed to characterize critical situations, taking into account data from the past and a space-time trend from the recent past. To identify near future critical episodes, predicted values from neural networks are used at each monitoring station. In this paper, we describe the design of a hybrid forecasting tool for ambient NO2 concentrations in Lisbon, Portugal.

  9. Laser refractive surgery: a review and current status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Qiushi; Keates, Richard H.; Hill, Richard A.; Berns, Michael W.

    1995-03-01

    The aim of corneal refractive surgery is to modify the anterior surface of the cornea for the correction of myopia, hyperopia, and astigmatism. The air-tear film interface is a powerful refractive surface. Small changes in the curvature can induce large shifts in refractive power. The exquisite nature of laser-tissue interaction with corneal tissue allows successful application of lasers for refractive surgery. Numerous systems have been developed for clinical applications. An overview is provided of the current clinical and research status of laser refractive surgery.

  10. Mechanical methods in refractive corneal surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, F; Kruse, H; Schüler, A

    1993-08-01

    Keratorefractive surgery has developed rapidly over the past decade. For patients with aphakia, however, posterior chamber lenses are safer and more predictable than refractive corneal surgery; myopia is the greatest challenge to this type of surgery. No technique as yet has an accuracy that is adequate for the general treatment of myopia. Keratotomy is the most common procedure currently performed for the correction of mild myopia and astigmatism. Results are less accurate and less stable with myopic than with aphakic epikeratoplasty. Although it is technically more difficult, keratomileusis seems to be more predictable than epikeratophakia. Nonfreeze lamellar corneal surgery accelerates wound healing. Synthetic lenses and ring-shaped implants are also being developed to modify corneal refraction. Current research is directed toward laser stromal keratomileusis on discs that are removed from the cornea using a microkeratome.

  11. Managing residual refractive error after cataract surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sáles, Christopher S; Manche, Edward E

    2015-06-01

    We present a review of keratorefractive and intraocular approaches to managing residual astigmatic and spherical refractive error after cataract surgery, including laser in situ keratomileusis (LASIK), photorefractive keratectomy (PRK), arcuate keratotomy, intraocular lens (IOL) exchange, piggyback IOLs, and light-adjustable IOLs. Currently available literature suggests that laser vision correction, whether LASIK or PRK, yields more effective and predictable outcomes than intraocular surgery. Piggyback IOLs with a rounded-edge profile implanted in the sulcus may be superior to IOL exchange, but both options present potential risks that likely outweigh the refractive benefits except in cases with large residual spherical errors. The light-adjustable IOL may provide an ideal treatment to pseudophakic ametropia by obviating the need for secondary invasive procedures after cataract surgery, but it is not widely available nor has it been sufficiently studied. Copyright © 2015 ASCRS and ESCRS. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Effective spectral dispersion of refractive index modulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vojtíšek, Petr; Květoň, Milan; Richter, Ivan

    2017-04-01

    For diffraction effects inside photopolymer materials, which act as volume diffraction systems (e.g. gratings), refractive index modulation is one of the key parameters. Due to its importance it is necessary to study this parameter from many perspectives, one of which is its value for different spectral components, i.e. its spectral dispersion. In this paper, we discuss this property and present an approach to experimental and numerical extraction and analysis (via rigorous coupled wave analysis and Cauchy’s empirical relation) of the effective dispersion of refractive index modulation based on an analysis of transmittance maps measured in an angular-spectral plane. It is indicated that the inclusion of dispersion leads to a significantly better description of the real grating behavior (which is often necessary in various design implementations of diffraction gratings) and that this estimation can be carried out for all the diffraction orders present.

  13. Space-Time Chip Equalization for Maximum Diversity Space-Time Block Coded DS-CDMA Downlink Transmission

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leus, G.; Petré, F.; Moonen, M.

    2004-01-01

    In the downlink of DS-CDMA, frequency-selectivity destroys the orthogonality of the user signals and introduces multiuser interference (MUI). Space-time chip equalization is an efficient tool to restore the orthogonality of the user signals and suppress the MUI. Furthermore, multiple-input

  14. Nanofocusing Refractive X-Ray Lenses

    OpenAIRE

    Boye, Pit

    2010-01-01

    This thesis is concerned with the optimization and development of the production of nanofocusing refractive x-ray lenses. These optics made of either silicon or diamond are well-suited for high resolution x-ray microscopy. The goal of this work is the design of a reproducible manufacturing process which allows the production of silicon lenses with high precision, high quality and high piece number. Furthermore a process for the production of diamond lenses is to be developed and established. ...

  15. Electromagnetic diffraction theory of refractive axicon lenses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yangyundou; Yan, Shenggang; Friberg, Ari T; Kuebel, David; Visser, Taco D

    2017-07-01

    We study the field that is produced by a paraxial refractive axicon lens. The results from geometrical optics, scalar wave optics, and electromagnetic diffraction theory are compared. In particular, the axial intensity, the on-axis effective wavelength, the transverse intensity, and the far-zone field are examined. A rigorous electromagnetic diffraction analysis shows that the state of polarization of the incident beam strongly affects the transverse intensity distribution, but not the intensity distribution in the far zone.

  16. Lens Design Using Group Indices of Refraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughan, A. H.

    1995-01-01

    An approach to lens design is described in which the ratio of the group velocity to the speed of light (the group index) in glass is used, in conjunction with the more familiar phase index of refraction, to control certain chromatic properties of a system of thin lenses in contact. The first-order design of thin-lens systems is illustrated by examples incorporating the methods described.

  17. Effective spectral dispersion of refractive index modulation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vojtíšek, Petr; Květoň, M.; Richter, I.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 19, č. 4 (2017), č. článku 045603. ISSN 2040-8978 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1206 Institutional support: RVO:61389021 Keywords : volume gratings * holography * dispersion * refractive index modulation Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 1.741, year: 2016 http://iopscience.iop.org/article/10.1088/2040-8986/aa6092/meta

  18. The ionospheric refraction at 38 MHz.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milogradov-Turin, J.

    The investigation of the observed shift of the North Polar Spur (NPS) at the 38 MHz survey of Milogradov-Turin and Smith (1973) in respect to the position of the NPS on the survey at 408 MHz convolved to the same resolution (Haslam and Salter 1977) has shown that there is no dependence of the NPS position on frequency and that the ionospheric refraction should be larger than believed.

  19. Characterising refractive index dispersion in chalcogenide glasses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fang, Y.; Sojka, L.; Jayasuriya, D.

    2016-01-01

    Much effort has been devoted to the study of glasses that contain the chalcogen elements (sulfur, selenium and tellurium) for photonics' applications out to MIR wavelengths. In this paper we describe some techniques for determining the refractive index dispersion characteristics of these glasses....... Knowledge of material dispersion is critical in delivering step-index fibres including with high numerical aperture for mid-infrared supercontinuum generation....

  20. Effects of Refractive Errors on Visual Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmet Akça

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: The purpose of our study is to evaluate the effects of refractive errors on functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI of visual cortex. METHODS: We performed a prospective study. The study included 13 patients with refractive error (group 1 and 30 emetropic volunteers (group 2. Group 2 was also subgrouped as 20-32 years old (young and over 45 years old (old to analyse accomodation effect. fMRI data were acquired with a block design paradigm with 3 Tesla MR system. In both groups, images initially were acquired in normal refractive state. fMRI was performed again in both groups during refractive error. Activation areas on visual cortex were calculated as square centimeter. Total activated areas on visual cortex was compared between normal refractive state and induced/ uncorrected refractive error. RESULTS: In group 1, activation areas of visual cortex during uncorrected refractive error revealed significantly decrease compared with activation areas during corrected refractive error (p=0.001. In group 2, induced myopia resulted significant decrease in activation areas compared with normal refractive state. Decrease in activation areas were significant both in 2 and 4 diopters (D of myopia compared with normal refractive state (p=0.003, p<0.001 respectively. Both in young and old subgroup, activation areas were significantly decreased during induced myopia. We revealed no difference between young and old subgroups. DISCUSSION AND CONCLUSION: The refractive errors have a clear effect on fMRI of visual cortex. Thus, to a

  1. Refractive surgery and the glaucoma patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrivastava, Anurag; Madu, Assumpta; Schultz, Jeffrey

    2011-07-01

    Patients considering corneal refractive surgery undergo extensive preoperative testing, but current protocols may not address the management of glaucoma appropriately. This review outlines the current body of literature on the diagnostic and management challenges that exist in the treatment of glaucoma patients undergoing laser ablative surgery, and makes recommendations to improve current perioperative protocols. As permanent structural alterations to the cornea after laser-assisted in-situ keratomileusis surgery make Goldmann applanation tonometry inaccurate, the advent of new diagnostic modalities and recommendations to accurately measure postoperative intraocular pressure (IOP) and subtle damage to the optic nerve have been further analyzed and tested. As IOP is the only modifiable risk factor in the treatment of glaucoma to date, traditional diagnostic and treatment algorithms may not be appropriate for refractive surgery patients. Glaucoma remains a relative contraindication to refractive procedures, but as new diagnostic modalities emerge, our ability to diagnose and manage these patients may improve. More uniform recommendations need to be implemented to improve our long-term management of these patients.

  2. Fulfilling the promise of laser refractive surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawless, Michael A; Potvin, Richard J

    2006-11-01

    To review the characteristics required to perform accurate and precise laser refractive surgery relative to the current state of the art and the technology improvements needed in the future. The general characteristics for laser refractive surgery are identified and their relative contributions to a successful result considered. For each characteristic, the degree to which improvements in technology are likely to improve results is discussed. The environment (surgeon, site), technology (laser, aberrometer), and patient are identified as key factors affecting results. Although aberrometers appear to be clinically sufficient, improvements in laser beam characteristics and delivery should improve system consistency. Current registration technology may be a factor in variability from patient to patient, but the greatest contribution in this regard would appear to be patient biomechanical and healing response factors. Wavefront-guided laser refractive surgery has demonstrated an ability to be better than conventional surgery. Improvements in laser technology, registration technology, and biomechanical diagnostics are expected to further improve results. These potential improvements are expected to reduce variability and suggest that the final potential of this technology has not yet been realized.

  3. Refractive surgery: the future of perfect vision?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fong, C S

    2007-08-01

    The history of refractive eye surgery is recent, but has seen rapid advancement. Older technologies, such as radial keratectomy, had the problem of overcorrection and epithelial complications. Newer technologies, such as photorefractive keratectomy, laser-assisted in-situ keratomileusis (LASIK) and laser-assisted subepithelial keratomileusis (LASEK), which require the use of laser, has revolutionised eye surgery. However, there are complications, such as corneal hazing, postoperative pain, regression, and poorer correction for high myopes. If not contraindicated, wavefront analysis and femtosecond laser are useful adjuncts to laser photoablation for better visual results. Wavefront analysis improves the precision of laser photoablation by measuring the individual's wavefront aberrations, while femtosecond laser offers an instrument-free means of creating the corneal hinge. Lastly, implantation of intraocular lenses, with or without extraction of the crystalline lens, provides an alternative to laser photoablation for the treatment of high myopia. Clear lens exchange offers refractive correction to presbyopes and people with cataracts. However, complications, such as endothelial cell loss, cataract formation and retinal detachment, exist. In conclusion, refractive eye surgery provides an alternative to wearing spectacles or contact lenses. However, potential patients must be warned of the complications and long-term effects on the eyes.

  4. Refraction contrast in X-ray imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Keyrilaeinen, J; Suortti, P

    2002-01-01

    A two-crystal diffractometer in the non-dispersive configuration is used for measurement of the effects of refraction in weakly absorbing test objects. Characteristic K alpha sub 1 radiation from a fine-focus X-ray tube with Mo anode is used. The probing beam is about 70 mu m wide and 3 mm high. The sample is placed between the monochromator and analyzer, and it is scanned through the beam. The analyzer is tuned to reflect at the low-angle slope, at the top, or at the high-angle slope of the rocking curve, when the sample is not in the beam. Refraction changes the angle of incidence on the analyzer causing changes in intensity. The observed intensity distributions are exactly reproduced by a calculation, where only the effects of refraction are included. The effects of in-beam interference are negligible or very small, which is also verified by changing the distance between the object and the detector.

  5. Electron refraction at lateral atomic interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abd El-Fattah, Z. M.; Kher-Elden, M. A.; Yassin, O.; El-Okr, M. M.; Ortega, J. E.; García de Abajo, F. J.

    2017-11-01

    We present theoretical simulations of electron refraction at the lateral atomic interface between a "homogeneous" Cu(111) surface and the "nanostructured" one-monolayer (ML) Ag/Cu(111) dislocation lattice. Calculations are performed for electron binding energies barely below the 1 ML Ag/Cu(111) M ¯ -point gap (binding energy EB = 53 meV, below the Fermi level) and slightly above its Γ ¯ -point energy (EB = 160 meV), both characterized by isotropic/circular constant energy surfaces. Using plane-wave-expansion and boundary-element methods, we show that electron refraction occurs at the interface, the Snell law is obeyed, and a total internal reflection occurs beyond the critical angle. Additionally, a weak negative refraction is observed for EB = 53 meV electron energy at beam incidence higher than the critical angle. Such an interesting observation stems from the interface phase-matching and momentum conservation with the umklapp bands at the second Brillouin zone of the dislocation lattice. The present analysis is not restricted to our Cu-Ag/Cu model system but can be readily extended to technologically relevant interfaces with spin-polarized, highly featured, and anisotropic constant energy contours, such as those characteristic for Rashba systems and topological insulators.

  6. 3D super-virtual refraction interferometry

    KAUST Repository

    Lu, Kai

    2014-08-05

    Super-virtual refraction interferometry enhances the signal-to-noise ratio of far-offset refractions. However, when applied to 3D cases, traditional 2D SVI suffers because the stationary positions of the source-receiver pairs might be any place along the recording plane, not just along a receiver line. Moreover, the effect of enhancing the SNR can be limited because of the limitations in the number of survey lines, irregular line geometries, and azimuthal range of arrivals. We have developed a 3D SVI method to overcome these problems. By integrating along the source or receiver lines, the cross-correlation or the convolution result of a trace pair with the source or receiver at the stationary position can be calculated without the requirement of knowing the stationary locations. In addition, the amplitudes of the cross-correlation and convolution results are largely strengthened by integration, which is helpful to further enhance the SNR. In this paper, both synthetic and field data examples are presented, demonstrating that the super-virtual refractions generated by our method have accurate traveltimes and much improved SNR.

  7. Surgical options for correction of refractive error following cataract surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelghany, Ahmed A; Alio, Jorge L

    2014-01-01

    Refractive errors are frequently found following cataract surgery and refractive lens exchange. Accurate biometric analysis, selection and calculation of the adequate intraocular lens (IOL) and modern techniques for cataract surgery all contribute to achieving the goal of cataract surgery as a refractive procedure with no refractive error. However, in spite of all these advances, residual refractive error still occasionally occurs after cataract surgery and laser in situ keratomileusis (LASIK) can be considered the most accurate method for its correction. Lens-based procedures, such as IOL exchange or piggyback lens implantation are also possible alternatives especially in cases with extreme ametropia, corneal abnormalities, or in situations where excimer laser is unavailable. In our review, we have found that piggyback IOL is safer and more accurate than IOL exchange. Our aim is to provide a review of the recent literature regarding target refraction and residual refractive error in cataract surgery.

  8. Nanofocusing refractive X-ray lenses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boye, Pit

    2010-02-05

    This thesis is concerned with the optimization and development of the production of nanofocusing refractive X-ray lenses. These optics made of either silicon or diamond are well-suited for high resolution X-ray microscopy. The goal of this work is the design of a reproducible manufacturing process which allows the production of silicon lenses with high precision, high quality and high piece number. Furthermore a process for the production of diamond lenses is to be developed and established. In this work, the theoretical basics of X-rays and their interaction with matter are described. Especially, aspects of synchrotron radiation are emphasized. Important in X-ray microscopy are the different optics. The details, advantages and disadvantages, in particular those of refractive lenses are given. To achieve small X-ray beams well beyond the 100 nm range a small focal length is required. This is achieved in refractive lenses by moving to a compact lens design where several single lenses are stacked behind each other. The, so-called nanofocusing refractive lenses (NFLs) have a parabolic cylindrical shape with lateral structure sizes in the micrometer range. NFLs are produced by using micro-machining techniques. These micro-fabrication processes and technologies are introduced. The results of the optimization and the final fabrication process for silicon lenses are presented. Subsequently, two experiments that are exemplary for the use of NFLs, are introduced. The rst one employs a high-resolution scanning fluorescence mapping of a geological sample, and the second one is a coherent x-ray diffraction imaging (CXDI) experiment. CXDI is able to reconstruct the illuminated object from recorded coherent diffraction patterns. In a scanning mode, referred to as ptychography, this method is even able to reconstruct the illumination and the object simultaneously. Especially the reconstructed illumination and the possibility of computed propagation of the wave field along the

  9. Understanding Protein Non-Folding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uversky, Vladimir N.; Dunker, A. Keith

    2010-01-01

    This review describes the family of intrinsically disordered proteins, members of which fail to form rigid 3-D structures under physiological conditions, either along their entire lengths or only in localized regions. Instead, these intriguing proteins/regions exist as dynamic ensembles within which atom positions and backbone Ramachandran angles exhibit extreme temporal fluctuations without specific equilibrium values. Many of these intrinsically disordered proteins are known to carry out important biological functions which, in fact, depend on the absence of specific 3-D structure. The existence of such proteins does not fit the prevailing structure-function paradigm, which states that unique 3-D structure is a prerequisite to function. Thus, the protein structure-function paradigm has to be expanded to include intrinsically disordered proteins and alternative relationships among protein sequence, structure, and function. This shift in the paradigm represents a major breakthrough for biochemistry, biophysics and molecular biology, as it opens new levels of understanding with regard to the complex life of proteins. This review will try to answer the following questions: How were intrinsically disordered proteins discovered? Why don't these proteins fold? What is so special about intrinsic disorder? What are the functional advantages of disordered proteins/regions? What is the functional repertoire of these proteins? What are the relationships between intrinsically disordered proteins and human diseases? PMID:20117254

  10. Kinetic hysteresis in collagen folding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizuno, Kazunori; Boudko, Sergei P; Engel, Jürgen; Bächinger, Hans Peter

    2010-06-16

    The triple helix of collagen shows a steep unfolding transition upon heating, whereas less steep and more gradual refolding is observed upon cooling. The shape of the hysteresis loop depends on the rate of temperature change as well as the peptide concentration. Experimental heating and cooling rates are usually much faster than rates of unfolding and refolding. In this work, collagen model peptides were used to study hysteresis quantitatively. Their unfolding and refolding profiles were recorded at different heating and cooling rates, and at different peptide concentrations. Data were fitted assuming kinetic mechanisms in which three chains combine to a helix with or without an intermediate that acts as a nucleus. A quantitative fit was achieved with the same kinetic model for the forward and backward reactions. Transitions of exogenously trimerized collagen models were also analyzed with a simplified kinetic mechanism. It follows that true equilibrium transitions can only be measured at high concentrations of polypeptide chains with slow scanning rates, for example, 0.1 degrees C/h at 0.25 mM peptide concentration of (Gly-Pro-Pro)(10). (Gly-Pro-4(R)Hyp)(10) folds approximately 2000 times faster than (Gly-Pro-Pro)(10). This was explained by a more stable nucleus, whereas the rate of propagation was almost equal. The analysis presented here can be used to derive kinetic and thermodynamic data for collagenous and other systems with kinetically controlled hysteresis. (c) 2010 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Influence of accommodation and refractive status on the peripheral refractive profile

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background: To determine, objectively and non-invasively, whether changes in accommodative demand modify differentially the peripheral refraction in emmetropic and myopic human eyes. Methods: Forty subjects (19 male, 21 female) aged 20 to 30 years (mean?SD: 22.7?2.8 years), twenty-one emmetropes (mean spherical equivalent refractive error [MSE]?SD: -0.13?0.29D) and 19 myopes (MSE?SD: -2.95?1.76D) participated in the study. Ametropia was corrected with soft ...

  12. EDITORIAL: Sensitive structures: refractive indices in nanotechnology Sensitive structures: refractive indices in nanotechnology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demming, Anna

    2012-12-01

    Refractive index effects using nanoscale systems are frequently applied in new imaging, sensing and even visibility cloaking technology. In this issue, researchers in Japan use simulations and experiments to describe the confinement of optical vortices in nanoscale fin structures and the sensitivity of these systems to the refractive index of the surrounding media [1]. The effects of refraction as light rays pass between different media were recorded as long ago as the first century AD, by Ptolemy [2]. Over the following centuries the phenomena inspired Ibn Sahl in 984 [3], Thomas Harriot in 1602 [4], Willebrord Snellius in 1621 [5] and Rene Descartes in 1637 [6] to independently derive the more accurate and elegant equation for refraction so familiar to us today. Recent studies of the interactions between light and matter continue to reveal a wealth of phenomena that originate in the effects of the refractive indices of materials. Nanostructures can be used to manipulate conditions that affect the refractive indices of materials, such as temperature. A E Aliev et al at the University of Texas reported a striking demonstration of temperature-dependent refractive index effects using a free-standing, highly aligned carbon nanotube aerogel sheet [7]. They used the extremely low thermal capacitance and high heat transfer ability of transparent carbon nanotube sheets to enable high-frequency modulation of the sheet temperature over an enormous temperature range. The resulting sharp, rapidly changing gradient of the refractive index in the surrounding liquid or gas makes objects seem to disappear and can be used for visibility cloaking. Light-matter interaction resonances, where light is confined at the nanoscale, can be extremely sensitive to changes in the refractive index of the surrounding media [8], even allowing single-molecule detection [9]. Plasmons, the collective oscillations of electrons in response to incident light, are a typical example. Researchers at Rice

  13. Anatomy and Histology of an Epicanthal Fold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jae Woo; Hwang, Kun

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study is to elucidate the precise anatomical and histological detail of the epicanthal fold.Thirty-two hemifaces of 16 Korean adult cadavers were used in this study (30 hemifaces with an epicanthal fold, 2 without an epicanthal fold). In 2 patients who had an epicanthoplasty, the epicanthal folds were sampled.In a dissection, the periorbital skin and subcutaneous tissues were removed and the epicanthal fold was observed in relation to each part of the orbicularis oculi muscle. Specimens including the epicanthal fold were embeddedin in paraffin, sectioned at 10 um, and stained with Hematoxylin-Eosin. The horizontal section in the level of the paplebral fissure was made and the prepared slides were observed under a light microscope.In the specimens without an epicanthal fold, no connection between the upper preseptal muscle and the lower preseptal muscle was found. In the specimens with an epicanthal fold, a connection of the upper preseptal muscle to the lower preseptal muscle was observed. It was present in all 15 hemifaces (100%). There was no connection between the pretarsal muscles. In a horizontal section, the epicanthal fold was composed of 3 compartments: an outer skin lining, a core structure, and an innerskin lining. The core structure was mainly composed of muscular fibers and fibrotic tissue and they were intermingled.Surgeons should be aware of the anatomical details of an epicanthal fold. In removing or reconstructing an epicanthal fold, the fibromuscular core band should also be removed or reconstructed.

  14. Interplay between the folding mechanism and binding modes in folding coupled to binding processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Rajendra; De Sancho, David; Muñoz, Victor

    2017-11-01

    Proteins that fold upon binding to their partners exhibit complex binding behavior such as induced-fit. But the connections between the folding mechanism and the binding mode remain unknown. Here we focus on the high affinity complex between the physiologically and marginally unstable, fast folder PSBD and the E1 subunit of pyruvate dehydrogenase. Using coarse-grained simulations we investigate the binding to E1 of a partially disordered PSBD under two folding scenarios: two-state and downhill. Our simulations show that induced-fit binding requires that PSBD folds-unfolds in the downhill folding regime. In contrast, a two-state folding PSBD must fold completely before it binds. The reason is that effective coupling between folding and binding involves partially folded conformations, which are only sufficiently populated under the downhill folding regime. Our results establish a direct mechanistic link between complex binding and downhill folding, supporting the idea that PSBD operates functionally as a conformational rheostat.

  15. Past and present of corneal refractive surgery: a retrospective study of long-term results after photorefractive keratectomy and a prospective study of refractive lenticule extraction

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Vestergaard, Anders Højslet

    2014-01-01

    Surgical correction of refractive errors is becoming increasingly popular. In the 1990s, the excimer laser revolutionized the field of corneal refractive surgery with PRK and LASIK, and lately refractive lenticule extraction (ReLEx...

  16. Emergence of Space-Time from Topologically Homogeneous Causal Networks

    CERN Document Server

    D'Ariano, Giacomo Mauro

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we study the emergence of Minkowski space-time from a causal network. Differently from previous approaches, we require the network to be topologically homogeneous, so that the metric is derived from pure event-counting. Emergence from events has an operational motivation in requiring that every physical quantity---including space-time---be defined through precise measurement procedures. Topological homogeneity is a requirement for having space-time metric emergent from the pure topology of causal connections, whereas physically corresponds to the universality of the physical law. We analyze in detail the case of 1+1 dimension. Coordinate systems are established via an Einsteinian protocol, and lead to a digital version of the Lorentz transformations. In a computational analogy, the foliation construction can also be regarded as the synchronization with a global clock of the calls to independent subroutines (corresponding to the causally independent events) in a parallel distributed computation, ...

  17. Hamiltonian Dynamics of Doubly-Foliable Space-Times

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cecília Gergely

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The 2 + 1 + 1 decomposition of space-time is useful in monitoring the temporal evolution of gravitational perturbations/waves in space-times with a spatial direction singled-out by symmetries. Such an approach based on a perpendicular double foliation has been employed in the framework of dark matter and dark energy-motivated scalar-tensor gravitational theories for the discussion of the odd sector perturbations of spherically-symmetric gravity. For the even sector, however, the perpendicularity has to be suppressed in order to allow for suitable gauge freedom, recovering the 10th metric variable. The 2 + 1 + 1 decomposition of the Einstein–Hilbert action leads to the identification of the canonical pairs, the Hamiltonian and momentum constraints. Hamiltonian dynamics is then derived via Poisson brackets.

  18. Deformed Spacetime Geometrizing Interactions in Four and Five Dimensions

    CERN Document Server

    Cardone, Fabio

    2007-01-01

    This volume provides a detailed discussion of the mathematical aspects and the physical applications of a new geometrical structure of space-time, based on a generalization ("deformation") of the usual Minkowski space, as supposed to be endowed with a metric whose coefficients depend on the energy. Such a formalism (Deformed Special Relativity, DSR) allows one to account for breakdown of local Lorentz invariance in the usual, special-relativistic meaning (however, Lorentz invariance is recovered in a generalized sense) to provide an effective geometrical description of the four fundamental interactions (electromagnetic, weak, strong and gravitational) Moreover, the four-dimensional energy-dependent space-time is just a manifestation of a larger, five-dimensional space in which energy plays the role of a fifth (non-compactified) dimension. This new five-dimensional scheme (Deformed Relativity in Five Dimensions, DR5) represents a true generalization of the usual Kaluza-Klein (KK) formalism. The mathematical pr...

  19. Relativistic tidal effects in non standard Kerr space-time

    CERN Document Server

    Maselli, Andrea; Laguna, Pablo

    2016-01-01

    Astrophysical phenomena involving massive black holes (BHs) in close binaries are expected to leave detectable signatures in the electromagnetic and gravitational-wave spectrum. Such imprints may provide precious information to probe the space-time around rotating BHs, and to reveal new insights on the nature of gravity in the strong-field regime. To support this observational window it is crucial to develop suitable tests to verify the predictions of General Relativity (GR). In this framework, the metric recently proposed by Johannsen and Psaltis parametrises strong field deviations from a Kerr space-time in a theory-independent way. In the following, we make use of this approach to describe the tidal field produced by spinning BHs. We compute the gravito-magnetic and gravito-electric tidal tensors for particles moving on equatorial circular geodesics, comparing our results with those obtained in the standard GR scenario. Our calculations show significant differences even for distances far form the last stab...

  20. Observables and dispersion relations in κ-Minkowski spacetime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aschieri, Paolo; Borowiec, Andrzej; Pachoł, Anna

    2017-10-01

    We revisit the notion of quantum Lie algebra of symmetries of a noncommutative spacetime, its elements are shown to be the generators of infinitesimal transformations and are naturally identified with physical observables. Wave equations on noncommutative spaces are derived from a quantum Hodge star operator. This general noncommutative geometry construction is then exemplified in the case of κ-Minkowski spacetime. The corresponding quantum Poincaré-Weyl Lie algebra of in-finitesimal translations, rotations and dilatations is obtained. The d'Alembert wave operator coincides with the quadratic Casimir of quantum translations and it is deformed as in Deformed Special Relativity theories. Also momenta (infinitesimal quantum translations) are deformed, and correspondingly the Einstein-Planck relation and the de Broglie one. The energy-momentum relations (dispersion relations) are consequently deduced. These results complement those of the phenomenological literature on the subject.

  1. Curvatronics with bilayer graphene in an effective $4D$ spacetime

    CERN Document Server

    Cariglia, M; Perali, A

    2016-01-01

    We show that in AB stacked bilayer graphene low energy excitations around the semimetallic points are described by massless, four dimensional Dirac fermions. There is an effective reconstruction of the 4 dimensional spacetime, including in particular the dimension perpendicular to the sheet, that arises dynamically from the physical graphene sheet and the interactions experienced by the carriers. The effective spacetime is the Eisenhart-Duval lift of the dynamics experienced by Galilei invariant L\\'evy-Leblond spin $\\frac{1}{2}$ particles near the Dirac points. We find that changing the intrinsic curvature of the bilayer sheet induces a change in the energy level of the electronic bands, switching from a conducting regime for negative curvature to an insulating one when curvature is positive. In particular, curving graphene bilayers allows opening or closing the energy gap between conduction and valence bands, a key effect for electronic devices. Thus using curvature as a tunable parameter opens the way for t...

  2. Emergent Space-Time via a Geometric Renormalization Method

    CERN Document Server

    Rastgoo, Saeed

    2016-01-01

    We present a purely geometric renormalization scheme for metric spaces (including uncolored graphs), which consists of a coarse graining and a rescaling operation on such spaces. The coarse graining is based on the concept of quasi-isometry, which yields a sequence of discrete coarse grained spaces each having a continuum limit under the rescaling operation. We provide criteria under which such sequences do converge within a superspace of metric spaces, or may constitute the basin of attraction of a common continuum limit, which hopefully, may represent our space-time continuum. We discuss some of the properties of these coarse grained spaces as well as their continuum limits, such as scale invariance and metric similarity, and show that different layers of spacetime can carry different distance functions while being homeomorphic. Important tools in this analysis are the Gromov-Hausdorff distance functional for general metric spaces and the growth degree of graphs or networks. The whole construction is in the...

  3. Unsupervised Action Classification Using Space-Time Link Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feris Rogerio

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We address the problem of unsupervised discovery of action classes in video data. Different from all existing methods thus far proposed for this task, we present a space-time link analysis approach which consistently matches or exceeds the performance of traditional unsupervised action categorization methods in various datasets. Our method is inspired by the recent success of link analysis techniques in the image domain. By applying these techniques in the space-time domain, we are able to naturally take into account the spatiotemporal relationships between the video features, while leveraging the power of graph matching for action classification. We present a comprehensive set of experiments demonstrating that our approach is capable of handling cluttered backgrounds, activities with subtle movements, and video data from moving cameras. State-of-the-art results are reported on standard datasets. We also demonstrate our method in a compelling surveillance application with the goal of avoiding fraud in retail stores.

  4. Unsupervised action classification using space-time link analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Haowei; Feris, Rogerio; Krüger, Volker

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we address the problem of unsupervised discovery of action classes in video data. Different from all existing methods thus far proposed for this task, we present a space-time link analysis approach which matches the performance of traditional unsupervised action categorization methods...... in a standard dataset. Our method is inspired by the recent success of link analysis techniques in the image domain. By applying these techniques in the space-time domain, we are able to naturally take into account the spatio-temporal relationships between the video features, while leveraging the power of graph...... matching for action classification. We present an experiment to demonstrate that our approach is capable of handling cluttered backgrounds, activities with subtle movements, and video data from moving cameras....

  5. Space-Time Foam may Violate the Principle of Equivalence

    CERN Document Server

    Ellis, Jonathan Richard; Nanopoulos, Dimitri V; Sakharov, Alexander S; Ellis, John

    2004-01-01

    The interactions of different particle species with the foamy space-time fluctuations expected in quantum gravity theories may not be universal, in which case different types of energetic particles may violate Lorentz invariance by varying amounts, violating the equivalence principle. We illustrate this possibility in two different models of space-time foam based on D-particle fluctuations in either flat Minkowski space or a stack of intersecting D-branes. Both models suggest that Lorentz invariance could be violated for energetic particles that do not carry conserved charges, such as photons, whereas charged particles such electrons would propagate in a Lorentz-inavariant way. The D-brane model further suggests that gluon propagation might violate Lorentz invariance, but not neutrinos. We argue that these conclusions hold at both the tree (lowest-genus) and loop (higher-genus) levels, and discuss their implications for the phenomenology of quantum gravity.

  6. Spacetime foam induced collective bundling of intense fields

    CERN Document Server

    Oniga, Teodora

    2016-01-01

    The influence of spacetime foam on a broad class of bosonic fields with arbitrary numbers of particles in the low energy regime is investigated. Based on recently formulated general description of open quantum gravitational systems, we analyse the propagation of scalar, electromagnetic, and gravitational waves on both long and short time scales with respect to their mean frequencies. For the long time propagation, the Markov approximation is employed that neglects the effects of initial conditions of these waves. In this case, despite intuitively expected decoherence and dissipation from the noisy spacetime, we show that such phenomena turn out to be completely suppressed for scalar bosons, photons, and gravitons, which are coupled to gravity but otherwise free. The short time effects are then recovered through the transient non-Markovian evolution. Focusing on scalar bosons in initially incoherent states, we find that the resulting quantum dissipation depend strongly on the distribution of the particle momen...

  7. Interference Cancellation Using Space-Time Processing and Precoding Design

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Feng

    2013-01-01

    Interference Cancellation Using Space-Time Processing and Precoding Design introduces original design methods to achieve interference cancellation, low-complexity decoding and full diversity for a series of multi-user systems. In multi-user environments, co-channel interference will diminish the performance of wireless communications systems. In this book, we investigate how to design robust space-time codes and pre-coders to suppress the co-channel interference when multiple antennas are available.   This book offers a valuable reference work for graduate students, academic researchers and engineers who are interested in interference cancellation in wireless communications. Rigorous performance analysis and various simulation illustrations are included for each design method.   Dr. Feng Li is a scientific researcher at Cornell University.

  8. Role of spacetime boundaries in a vierbein formulation of gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oshita, Naritaka; Wu, Yi-Peng

    2017-08-01

    Einstein's vierbein formulation of general relativity based on the notion of distant parallelism (teleparallelism) naturally introduces a covariant surface term in addition to the Einstein-Hilbert action. We investigate the action principle in teleparallelism with the existence of spacetime boundaries and find that the covariant surface term exactly eliminates all the unwanted surface terms that reside in the metric formulation of general relativity, in the role of a Gibbons-Hawking-York (GHY) term. The identity of such a covariant GHY term is further confirmed by the recovery of the correct black hole entropy from the free energy due to the spacetime boundary. These results indicate that the vierbein formulation of gravity generally exhibits a well-posed action principle and readily admits the path-integral approach to quantization.

  9. A nonlinear dynamics for the scalar field in Randers spacetime

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, J.E.G. [Universidade Federal do Cariri (UFCA), Instituto de formação de professores, Rua Olegário Emídio de Araújo, Brejo Santo, CE, 63.260.000 (Brazil); Maluf, R.V. [Universidade Federal do Ceará (UFC), Departamento de Física, Campus do Pici, Fortaleza, CE, C.P. 6030, 60455-760 (Brazil); Almeida, C.A.S., E-mail: carlos@fisica.ufc.br [Universidade Federal do Ceará (UFC), Departamento de Física, Campus do Pici, Fortaleza, CE, C.P. 6030, 60455-760 (Brazil)

    2017-03-10

    We investigate the properties of a real scalar field in the Finslerian Randers spacetime, where the local Lorentz violation is driven by a geometrical background vector. We propose a dynamics for the scalar field by a minimal coupling of the scalar field and the Finsler metric. The coupling is intrinsically defined on the Randers spacetime, and it leads to a non-canonical kinetic term for the scalar field. The nonlinear dynamics can be split into a linear and nonlinear regimes, which depend perturbatively on the even and odd powers of the Lorentz-violating parameter, respectively. We analyze the plane-waves solutions and the modified dispersion relations, and it turns out that the spectrum is free of tachyons up to second-order.

  10. Equivalence Principles, Spacetime Structure and the Cosmic Connection

    CERN Document Server

    Ni, Wei-Tou

    2015-01-01

    After reviewing the meaning of various equivalence principles and the structure of electrodynamics, we give a fairly detailed account of the construction of the light cone and a core metric from the equivalence principle for the photon (no birefringence, no polarization rotation and no amplification/attenuation in propagation) in the framework of linear electrodynamics using cosmic connections/observations as empirical support. The cosmic nonbirefringent propagation of photons independent of energy and polarization verifies the Galileo Equivalence Principle [Universality of Propagation] for photons/electromagnetic wave packets in spacetime. This nonbirefringence constrains the spacetime constitutive tensor to high precision to a core metric form with an axion degree and a dilaton degree of freedom. Thus comes the metric with axion and dilation. Constraints on axion and dilaton from astrophysical/cosmic propagation are reviewed. E\\"otv\\"os-type experiments, Hughes-Drever-type experiments, redshift experiments ...

  11. A computational approach to the twin paradox in curved spacetime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fung, Kenneth K. H.; Clark, Hamish A.; Lewis, Geraint F.; Wu, Xiaofeng

    2016-09-01

    Despite being a major component in the teaching of special relativity, the twin ‘paradox’ is generally not examined in courses on general relativity. Due to the complexity of analytical solutions to the problem, the paradox is often neglected entirely, and students are left with an incomplete understanding of the relativistic behaviour of time. This article outlines a project, undertaken by undergraduate physics students at the University of Sydney, in which a novel computational method was derived in order to predict the time experienced by a twin following a number of paths between two given spacetime coordinates. By utilising this method, it is possible to make clear to students that following a geodesic in curved spacetime does not always result in the greatest experienced proper time.

  12. A computational approach to the twin paradox in curved spacetime

    CERN Document Server

    Fung, Kenneth K H; Lewis, Geraint F; Wu, Xiaofeng

    2016-01-01

    Despite being a major component in the teaching of special relativity, the twin `paradox' is generally not examined in courses on general relativity. Due to the complexity of analytical solutions to the problem, the paradox is often neglected entirely, and students are left with an incomplete understanding of the relativistic behaviour of time. This article outlines a project, undertaken by undergraduate physics students at the University of Sydney, in which a novel computational method was derived in order to predict the time experienced by a twin following a number of paths between two given spacetime coordinates. By utilising this method, it is possible to make clear to students that following a geodesic in curved spacetime does not always result in the greatest experienced proper time.

  13. Intertial Frame Dragging in an Acoustic Analogue spacetime

    CERN Document Server

    Chakraborty, Chandrachur; Majumdar, Parthasarathi

    2015-01-01

    We report an incipient exploration of the Lense-Thirring precession effect in a rotating {\\it acoustic analogue black hole} spacetime. An exact formula is deduced for the precession frequency of a gyroscope due to inertial frame dragging, close to the ergosphere of a `Draining Bathtub' acoustic spacetime which has been studied extensively for acoustic Hawking radiation of phonons and also for `superresonance'. The formula is verified by embedding the two dimensional spatial (acoustic) geometry into a three dimensional one where the similarity with standard Lense-Thirring precession results within a strong gravity framework is well known. Prospects of experimental detection of this new `fixed-metric' effect in acoustic geometries, are briefly discussed.

  14. Convexity and the Euclidean Metric of Space-Time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolaos Kalogeropoulos

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available We address the reasons why the “Wick-rotated”, positive-definite, space-time metric obeys the Pythagorean theorem. An answer is proposed based on the convexity and smoothness properties of the functional spaces purporting to provide the kinematic framework of approaches to quantum gravity. We employ moduli of convexity and smoothness which are eventually extremized by Hilbert spaces. We point out the potential physical significance that functional analytical dualities play in this framework. Following the spirit of the variational principles employed in classical and quantum Physics, such Hilbert spaces dominate in a generalized functional integral approach. The metric of space-time is induced by the inner product of such Hilbert spaces.

  15. Asymptotically Lifshitz spacetimes with universal horizons in (1 +2 ) dimensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, Sayandeb; Bhattacharyya, Jishnu; Mattingly, David; Roberson, Matthew

    2016-03-01

    Hořava gravity theory possesses global Lifshitz space as a solution and has been conjectured to provide a natural framework for Lifshitz holography. We derive the conditions on the two-derivative Hořava gravity Lagrangian that are necessary for static, asymptotically Lifshitz spacetimes with flat transverse dimensions to contain a universal horizon, which plays a similar thermodynamic role as the Killing horizon in general relativity. Specializing to z =2 in 1 +2 dimensions, we then numerically construct such regular solutions over the whole spacetime. We calculate the mass for these solutions and show that, unlike the asymptotically anti-de Sitter case, the first law applied to the universal horizon is straightforwardly compatible with a thermodynamic interpretation.

  16. Pre-Big Bang, space-time structure, asymptotic Universe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gonzalez-Mestres Luis

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Planck and other recent data in Cosmology and Particle Physics can open the way to controversial analyses concerning the early Universe and its possible ultimate origin. Alternatives to standard cosmology include pre-Big Bang approaches, new space-time geometries and new ultimate constituents of matter. Basic issues related to a possible new cosmology along these lines clearly deserve further exploration. The Planck collaboration reports an age of the Universe t close to 13.8 Gyr and a present ratio H between relative speeds and distances at cosmic scale around 67.3 km/s/Mpc. The product of these two measured quantities is then slightly below 1 (about 0.95, while it can be exactly 1 in the absence of matter and cosmological constant in patterns based on the spinorial space-time we have considered in previous papers. In this description of space-time we first suggested in 1996-97, the cosmic time t is given by the modulus of a SU(2 spinor and the Lundmark-Lemaître-Hubble (LLH expansion law turns out to be of purely geometric origin previous to any introduction of standard matter and relativity. Such a fundamental geometry, inspired by the role of half-integer spin in Particle Physics, may reflect an equilibrium between the dynamics of the ultimate constituents of matter and the deep structure of space and time. Taking into account the observed cosmic acceleration, the present situation suggests that the value of 1 can be a natural asymptotic limit for the product H t in the long-term evolution of our Universe up to possible small corrections. In the presence of a spinorial space-time geometry, no ad hoc combination of dark matter and dark energy would in any case be needed to get an acceptable value of H and an evolution of the Universe compatible with observation. The use of a spinorial space-time naturally leads to unconventional properties for the space curvature term in Friedmann-like equations. It therefore suggests a major modification of

  17. On fractal space-time and fractional calculus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hu Yue

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper gives an explanation of fractional calculus in fractal space-time. On observable scales, continuum models can be used, however, when the scale tends to a smaller threshold, a fractional model has to be adopted to describe phenomena in micro/nano structure. A time-fractional Fornberg-Whitham equation is used as an example to elucidate the physical meaning of the fractional order, and its solution process is given by the fractional complex transform.

  18. Space-time Vector Supersymmetry and Massive Spinning Particle

    CERN Document Server

    Casalbuoni, Roberto; Kamimura, Kiyoshi; Longhi, Giorgio

    2008-01-01

    We construct the action of a relativistic spinning particle from a non-linear realization of a space-time odd vector extension of the Poincar\\'e group. For particular values of the parameters appearing in the lagrangian the model has a gauge world-line supersymmetry.{As a consequence of this local symmetry there are BPS solutions in the model preserving 1/5 of the supersymmetries.} A supersymmetric invariant quantization produces two decoupled 4d Dirac equations.

  19. Singularity in Gravitational Collapse of Plane Symmetric Charged Vaidya Spacetime

    CERN Document Server

    Sharif, M

    2010-01-01

    We study the final outcome of gravitational collapse resulting from the plane symmetric charged Vaidya spacetime. Using the field equations, we show that the weak energy condition is always satisfied by collapsing fluid. It is found that the singularity formed is naked. The strength of singularity is also investigated by using Nolan's method. This turns out to be a strong curvature singularity in Tipler's sense and hence provides a counter example to the cosmic censorship hypothesis.

  20. Thermodynamics in Higher Dimensional Vaidya Space-Time

    OpenAIRE

    Debnath, Ujjal

    2012-01-01

    In this work, we have considered the Vaidya spacetime in null radiating fluid with perfect fluid in higher dimension and have found the solution for barotropic fluid. We have shown that the Einstein's field equations can be obtained from Unified first law i.e., field equations and unified first law are equivalent. The first law of thermodynamics has also been constructed by Unified first law. From this, the variation of entropy function has been derived on the horizon. The variation of entrop...

  1. Supersymmetric Rotating Black Hole in a Compactified Spacetime

    OpenAIRE

    Maeda, Kei-ichi; Ohta, Nobuyoshi; Tanabe, Makoto

    2006-01-01

    We construct a supersymmetric rotating black hole with asymptotically flat four-dimensional spacetime times a circle, by superposing an infinite number of BMPV black hole solutions at the same distance in one direction. The near horizon structure is the same as that of the five-dimensional BMPV black hole. The rotation of this black hole can exceed the Kerr bound in general relativity ($q\\equiv a/G_4 M=1$), if the size is small.

  2. Mass Formulae for Broken Supersymmetry in Curved Space-Time

    CERN Document Server

    Ferrara, Sergio

    2016-01-01

    We derive the mass formulae for ${\\cal N}=1$, $D=4$ matter-coupled Supergravity for broken (and unbroken) Supersymmetry in curved space-time. These formulae are applicable to de Sitter configurations as is the case for inflation. For unbroken Supersymmetry in anti-de Sitter (AdS) one gets the mass relations modified by the AdS curvature. We compute the mass relations both for the potential and its derivative non-vanishing.

  3. Quantum physics, relativity and complex spacetime towards a new synthesis

    CERN Document Server

    Kaiser, Gerald

    1990-01-01

    A new synthesis of the principles of quantum mechanics and Relativity is proposed in the context of complex differential geometry. The positivity of the energy implies that wave functions and fields can be extended to complex spacetime, and it is shown that this complexification has a solid physical interpretation as an extended phase space. The extended fields can be said to be realistic wavelet transforms of the original fields. A new, algebraic theory of wavelets is developed.

  4. Analytical Solution of Generalized Space-Time Fractional Cable Equation

    OpenAIRE

    Ram K. Saxena; Zivorad Tomovski; Trifce Sandev

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we consider generalized space-time fractional cable equation in presence of external source. By using the Fourier-Laplace transform we obtain the Green function in terms of infinite series in H-functions. The fractional moments of the fundamental solution are derived and their asymptotic behavior in the short and long time limit is analyzed. Some previously obtained results are compared with those presented in this paper. By using the Bernstein characterization theorem we find ...

  5. Spinning gauged boson stars in anti-de Sitter spacetime

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kichakova, Olga; Kunz, Jutta; Radu, Eugen

    2014-01-20

    We study axially symmetric solutions of the Einstein–Maxwell–Klein–Gordon equations describing spinning gauged boson stars in a (3+1)-dimensional asymptotically AdS spacetime. These smooth horizonless solutions possess an electric charge and a magnetic dipole moment, their angular momentum being proportional to the electric charge. A special class of solutions with a self-interacting scalar field, corresponding to static axially symmetric solitons with a nonzero magnetic dipole moment, is also investigated.

  6. Physical constraints on causality-violating spacetimes in general relativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janca, Andrew Joseph

    The theoretical possibility of global causality violation has long been a problem within general relativity, for there exists a large number of model spacetimes known to admit closed time-like curves, trajectories allowing a timelike observer to return to some point in her own past. However, nearly all such known models have some unphysical feature. These physicality issues rendered causality-violation to the status of an interesting but safely theoretical problem until twenty years ago, when the appearance of a new type of causality-violating model spacetime and the subsequent proliferation of new models admitting closed timelike curves forced the attention of the community to the issue, and made causality violation and its possible physical consequences an active area of research within general relativity. This paper focuses on some of the older causality-violating spacetimes which model matter sources with cylindrical symmetry. By describing how cylindrically-symmetric solutions can be embedded within a spatially bounded and physically realistic body which outwardly has the symmetry of a torus or ring, it is shown that the chief problem of physical plausibility which these older solutions possess can be resolved. The intention is to make these models active candidates for consideration in future experiments to test general relativity's prediction that causality violation is a phenomenon that could be observed in the real world. Attending chapters describe physical systems other than rotating objects that can alter a local observer's experience of time to a substantial extent, including an electrically-charged massive shell slowing time in its interior (though not affecting causality) and a class of trajectories in the Reissner-Nordstrom background that could in principle allow a timelike observer to reverse her personal arrow of time relative to other observers in the spacetime as a whole. The paper concludes with a discussion of one of the plausibility problems

  7. Vaidya spacetime for Galileon gravity's rainbow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rudra, Prabir, E-mail: prudra.math@gmail.com [Department of Mathematics, Asutosh College, Kolkata, 700 026 (India); Faizal, Mir, E-mail: mirfaizalmir@gmail.com [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Lethbridge, Lethbridge, Alberta, T1K 3M4 (Canada); Ali, Ahmed Farag, E-mail: ahmed.ali@fsc.bu.edu.eg [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Benha University, Benha, 13518 (Egypt)

    2016-08-15

    In this paper, we analyze Vaidya spacetime with an energy dependent metric in Galileon gravity's rainbow. This will be done using the rainbow functions which are motivated from the results obtained in loop quantum gravity approach and noncommutative geometry. We will investigate the Gravitational collapse in this Galileon gravity's rainbow. We will discuss the behavior of singularities formed from the gravitational collapse in this rainbow deformed Galileon gravity.

  8. The matter-antimatter interpretation of Kerr spacetime

    OpenAIRE

    Villata, M.

    2014-01-01

    Repulsive gravity is not very popular in physics. However, one comes across it in at least two main occurrences in general relativity: in the negative-$r$ region of Kerr spacetime, and as the result of the gravitational interaction between matter and antimatter, when the latter is assumed to be CPT-transformed matter. Here we show how these two independent developments of general relativity are perfectly consistent in predicting gravitational repulsion and how the above Kerr negative-$r$ regi...

  9. Semianalytic Solution of Space-Time Fractional Diffusion Equation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Elsaid

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We study the space-time fractional diffusion equation with spatial Riesz-Feller fractional derivative and Caputo fractional time derivative. The continuation of the solution of this fractional equation to the solution of the corresponding integer order equation is proved. The series solution of this problem is obtained via the optimal homotopy analysis method (OHAM. Numerical simulations are presented to validate the method and to show the effect of changing the fractional derivative parameters on the solution behavior.

  10. Constrained field theories on spherically symmetric spacetimes with horizons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Karan; Lahiri, Amitabha; Ghosh, Suman

    2017-02-01

    We apply the Dirac-Bergmann algorithm for the analysis of constraints to gauge theories defined on spherically symmetric black hole backgrounds. We find that the constraints for a given theory are modified on such spacetimes through the presence of additional contributions from the horizon. As a concrete example, we consider the Maxwell field on a black hole background, and determine the role of the horizon contributions on the dynamics of the theory.

  11. Karma or Immortality: Can Religion Influence Space-Time Mappings?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Heng; Cao, Yu

    2018-01-09

    People implicitly associate the "past" and "future" with "front" and "back" in their minds according to their cultural attitudes toward time. As the temporal focus hypothesis (TFH) proposes, future-oriented people tend to think about time according to the future-in-front mapping, whereas past-oriented people tend to think about time according to the past-in-front mapping (de la Fuente, Santiago, Román, Dumitrache, & Casasanto, 2014). Whereas previous studies have demonstrated that culture exerts an important influence on people's implicit spatializations of time, we focus specifically on religion, a prominent layer of culture, as potential additional influence on space-time mappings. In Experiment 1 and 2, we observed a difference between the two religious groups, with Buddhists being more past-focused and more frequently conceptualizing the past as ahead of them and the future as behind them, and Taoists more future-focused and exhibiting the opposite space-time mapping. In Experiment 3, we administered a religion prime, in which Buddhists were randomly assigned to visualize the picture of the Buddhas of the Past (Buddha Dipamkara) or the Future (Buddha Maitreya). Results showed that the pictorial icon of Dipamkara increased participants' tendency to conceptualize the past as in front of them. In contrast, the pictorial icon of Maitreya caused a dramatic increase in the rate of future-in-front responses. In Experiment 4, the causal effect of religion on implicit space-time mappings was replicated in atheists. Taken together, these findings provide converging evidence for the hypothesized causal role of religion for temporal focus in determining space-time mappings. Copyright © 2018 Cognitive Science Society, Inc.

  12. Bayesian inversion of refraction seismic traveltime data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryberg, T.; Haberland, Ch

    2018-03-01

    We apply a Bayesian Markov chain Monte Carlo (McMC) formalism to the inversion of refraction seismic, traveltime data sets to derive 2-D velocity models below linear arrays (i.e. profiles) of sources and seismic receivers. Typical refraction data sets, especially when using the far-offset observations, are known as having experimental geometries which are very poor, highly ill-posed and far from being ideal. As a consequence, the structural resolution quickly degrades with depth. Conventional inversion techniques, based on regularization, potentially suffer from the choice of appropriate inversion parameters (i.e. number and distribution of cells, starting velocity models, damping and smoothing constraints, data noise level, etc.) and only local model space exploration. McMC techniques are used for exhaustive sampling of the model space without the need of prior knowledge (or assumptions) of inversion parameters, resulting in a large number of models fitting the observations. Statistical analysis of these models allows to derive an average (reference) solution and its standard deviation, thus providing uncertainty estimates of the inversion result. The highly non-linear character of the inversion problem, mainly caused by the experiment geometry, does not allow to derive a reference solution and error map by a simply averaging procedure. We present a modified averaging technique, which excludes parts of the prior distribution in the posterior values due to poor ray coverage, thus providing reliable estimates of inversion model properties even in those parts of the models. The model is discretized by a set of Voronoi polygons (with constant slowness cells) or a triangulated mesh (with interpolation within the triangles). Forward traveltime calculations are performed by a fast, finite-difference-based eikonal solver. The method is applied to a data set from a refraction seismic survey from Northern Namibia and compared to conventional tomography. An inversion test

  13. Super-virtual refraction interferometry: Theory

    KAUST Repository

    Bharadwaj, Pawan

    2011-01-01

    Inverting for the subsurface velocity distribution by refraction traveltime tomography is a well-accepted imaging method by both the exploration and earthquake seismology communities. A significant drawback, however, is that the recorded traces become noisier with increasing offset from the source position, and so prevents accurate picking of traveltimes in far-offset traces. To enhance the signal-to-noise ratio of the far-offset traces, we present the theory of super-virtual refraction interferometry where the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of far-offset head-wave arrivals can be theoretically increased by a factor proportional to N; here, N is the number of receiver and source positions associated with the recording and generation of the head-wave arrival. There are two steps to this methodology: correlation and summation of the data to generate traces with virtual head-wave arrivals, followed by the convolution of the data with the virtual traces to create traces with super-virtual head-wave arrivals. This method is valid for any medium that generates head-wave arrivals. There are at least three significant benefits to this methodology: 1). enhanced SNR of far-offset traces so the first-arrival traveltimes of the noisy far-offset traces can be more reliably picked to extend the useful aperture of data, 2). the SNR of head waves in a trace that arrive after the first arrival can be enhanced for accurate traveltime picking and subsequent inversion by traveltime tomography, and 3). common receiver-pair gathers can be analyzed to detect the presence of diving waves in the first arrivals, which can be used to assess the nature of the refracting boundary. © 2011 Society of Exploration Geophysicists.

  14. Refractive Index of Black and Green Liquors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. A. Avramenko

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Lack of reliable data on the optical properties of black and green liquors complicates control of their composition in technological process of sulphate cellulose production. In this regard the paper presents measurement results of refraction index of black liquors n (k,t at concentration in solutions of bone-dry solids up to k = 70% and at temperatures t = 10-90 °C, as well as in green liquors n(C,t at the total alkalinity of C = 0-250 g/l and in the same temperature range. All samples of solutions of black and green liquors were provided by Segezha Pulp and Paper Mill and certified in factory laboratory. Measurements were taken by means of the laboratory Abbe refractometer (URL-1, digital refractometer "Expert pro", goniometer spectrometer GS-5, and ultra-violet spectrophotometer as well. The work also presents optical D density spectra in the ultra-violet region of the wavelengths for the samples of a green liquor and main mineral component to form it, i.e. Na2S (sodium sulphide. To calculate dispersion of n (λ in the visible spectral range, here a Lorentz single-oscillator model was used. The paper discusses study results of dispersive dependence of refraction index in green liquors with various concentration and chemical components of n (λ, C forming them at t = 20°C. Computing and experimental dependences of n (λ had not only good qualitative, but also quite satisfactory quantitative compliance. The work also describes main mineral components defining optical properties in these liquors. Given here data on concentration and temperature dependences of a refraction index in black n(k,t and green n(C,t liquors have been never published before. These data are of essential interest to control soda recovery technologies in manufacturing sulphate cellulose. The received results can be also used to tune and calibrate modern domestic and foreign industrial refractometers.

  15. Experimental Constraints of the Exotic Shearing of Space-Time

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richardson, Jonathan William [Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States)

    2016-08-01

    The Holometer program is a search for rst experimental evidence that space-time has quantum structure. The detector consists of a pair of co-located 40-m power-recycled interferometers whose outputs are read out synchronously at 50 MHz, achieving sensitivity to spatiallycorrelated uctuations in dierential position on time scales shorter than the light-crossing time of the instruments. Unlike gravitational wave interferometers, which time-resolve transient geometrical disturbances in the spatial background, the Holometer is searching for a universal, stationary quantization noise of the background itself. This dissertation presents the nal results of the Holometer Phase I search, an experiment congured for sensitivity to exotic coherent shearing uctuations of space-time. Measurements of high-frequency cross-spectra of the interferometer signals obtain sensitivity to spatially-correlated eects far exceeding any previous measurement, in a broad frequency band extending to 7.6 MHz, twice the inverse light-crossing time of the apparatus. This measurement is the statistical aggregation of 2.1 petabytes of 2-byte dierential position measurements obtained over a month-long exposure time. At 3 signicance, it places an upper limit on the coherence scale of spatial shear two orders of magnitude below the Planck length. The result demonstrates the viability of this novel spatially-correlated interferometric detection technique to reach unprecedented sensitivity to coherent deviations of space-time from classicality, opening the door for direct experimental tests of theories of relational quantum gravity.

  16. Relativistic Positioning System in Perturbed Space-time

    CERN Document Server

    Kostić, Uroš; Gomboc, Andreja

    2015-01-01

    We present a variant of a Global Navigation Satellite System called a Relativistic Positioning System (RPS), which is based on emission coordinates. We modelled the RPS dynamics in a space-time around Earth, described by a perturbed Schwarzschild metric, where we included the perturbations due to Earth multipoles (up to the 6th), the Moon, the Sun, Venus, Jupiter, solid tide, ocean tide, and Kerr rotation effect. The exchange of signals between the satellites and a user was calculated using a ray-tracing method in the Schwarzschild space-time. We find that positioning in a perturbed space-time is feasible and is highly accurate already with standard numerical procedures: the positioning algorithms used to transform between the emission and the Schwarzschild coordinates of the user are very accurate and time efficient -- on a laptop it takes 0.04 s to determine the user's spatial and time coordinates with a relative accuracy of $10^{-28}-10^{-26}$ and $10^{-32}-10^{-30}$, respectively.

  17. Review of software for space-time disease surveillance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Colin; Nelson, Trisalyn A

    2010-03-12

    Disease surveillance makes use of information technology at almost every stage of the process, from data collection and collation, through to analysis and dissemination. Automated data collection systems enable near-real time analysis of incoming data. This context places a heavy burden on software used for space-time surveillance. In this paper, we review software programs capable of space-time disease surveillance analysis, and outline some of their salient features, shortcomings, and usability. Programs with space-time methods were selected for inclusion, limiting our review to ClusterSeer, SaTScan, GeoSurveillance and the Surveillance package for R. We structure the review around stages of analysis: preprocessing, analysis, technical issues, and output. Simulated data were used to review each of the software packages. SaTScan was found to be the best equipped package for use in an automated surveillance system. ClusterSeer is more suited to data exploration, and learning about the different methods of statistical surveillance.

  18. Geodesic flows in a charged black hole spacetime with quintessence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nandan, Hemwati [Gurukul Kangri Vishwavidyalaya, Department of Physics, Haridwar, Uttarakhand (India); Uniyal, Rashmi [Gurukul Kangri Vishwavidyalaya, Department of Physics, Haridwar, Uttarakhand (India); Government Degree College, Department of Physics, Tehri Garhwal, Uttarakhand (India)

    2017-08-15

    We investigate the evolution of timelike geodesic congruences, in the background of a charged black hole spacetime surrounded by quintessence. The Raychaudhuri equations for three kinematical quantities namely the expansion scalar, shear and rotation along the geodesic flows in such spacetime are obtained and solved numerically. We have also analysed both the weak and the strong energy conditions for the focussing of timelike geodesic congruences. The effect of the normalisation constant (α) and the equation of state parameter (ε) on the evolution of the expansion scalar is discussed, for the congruences with and without an initial shear and rotation. It is observed that there always exists a critical value of the initial expansion below which we have focussing with smaller values of the normalisation constant and the equation of state parameter. As the corresponding values of both of these parameters are increased, no geodesic focussing is observed. The results obtained are then compared with those of the Reissner Nordstroem and Schwarzschild black hole spacetimes as well as their de Sitter black hole analogues accordingly. (orig.)

  19. Classification of non-Riemannian doubled-yet-gauged spacetime

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morand, Kevin [Universidad Andres Bello, Departamento de Ciencias Fisicas, Santiago de Chile (Chile); Universidad Tecnica Federico Santa Maria, Centro Cientifico-Tecnologico de Valparaiso, Departamento de Fisica, Valparaiso (Chile); Park, Jeong-Hyuck [Sogang University, Department of Physics, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Institute for Basic Science (IBS), Center for Theoretical Physics of the Universe, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-10-15

    Assuming O(D,D) covariant fields as the 'fundamental' variables, double field theory can accommodate novel geometries where a Riemannian metric cannot be defined, even locally. Here we present a complete classification of such non-Riemannian spacetimes in terms of two non-negative integers, (n, anti n), 0 ≤ n + anti n ≤ D. Upon these backgrounds, strings become chiral and anti-chiral over n and anti n directions, respectively, while particles and strings are frozen over the n + anti n directions. In particular, we identify (0, 0) as Riemannian manifolds, (1, 0) as non-relativistic spacetime, (1, 1) as Gomis-Ooguri non-relativistic string, (D-1, 0) as ultra-relativistic Carroll geometry, and (D, 0) as Siegel's chiral string. Combined with a covariant Kaluza-Klein ansatz which we further spell, (0, 1) leads to Newton-Cartan gravity. Alternative to the conventional string compactifications on small manifolds, non-Riemannian spacetime such as D = 10, (3, 3) may open a new scheme for the dimensional reduction from ten to four. (orig.)

  20. Renormalized spacetime is two-dimensional at the Planck scale

    CERN Document Server

    Padmanabhan, T; Kothawala, Dawood

    2015-01-01

    Quantum field theory distinguishes between the bare variables -- which we introduce in the Lagrangian -- and the renormalized variables which incorporate the effects of interactions. This suggests that the renormalized, physical, metric tensor of spacetime (and all the geometrical quantities derived from it) will also be different from the bare, classical, metric tensor in terms of which the bare gravitational Lagrangian is expressed. We provide a physical ansatz to relate the renormalized metric tensor to the bare metric tensor such that the spacetime acquires a zero-point-length $\\ell _{0}$ of the order of the Planck length $L_{P}$. This prescription leads to several remarkable consequences. In particular, the Euclidean volume $V_D(\\ell,\\ell _{0})$ in a $D$-dimensional spacetime of a region of size $\\ell $ scales as $V_D(\\ell, \\ell_{0}) \\propto \\ell _{0}^{D-2} \\ell^2$ when $\\ell \\sim \\ell _{0}$, while it reduces to the standard result $V_D(\\ell,\\ell _{0}) \\propto \\ell^D$ at large scales ($\\ell \\gg \\ell _{0}...

  1. Testing the local spacetime dynamics by heliospheric radiocommunication methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H.-J. Fahr

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available According to general relativistic theories, cosmological spacetime is dynamic. This prediction is in excellent agreement with the huge majority of astronomical observations on large cosmic scales, especially the observations of cosmological redshifts of distant galaxies. However, on scales of heliospheric distances, verifications of general relativistic effects are based on Schwarzschild metric tests or kinetical corrections, such as the perihelion motion of Mercury, photon deflection at the Sun and gravitational photon redshifts in central gravity fields. As we will show in this paper, there is, however, a chance to detect new cosmologically relevant features on heliospheric scales by careful study of photon propagations in the local spacetime metrics, based on red- or blueshifts as a clear, but up to now overlooked, signature of the local spacetime dynamics. Thus, we propose the challenging possibility of carrying out experiments of cosmological relevance by simply using high-precision radio tracking of heliospheric spaceprobes, as already practised in cases like Pioneer-10/11, Galileo and Ulysses.

  2. Asymptotically simple spacetimes and mass loss due to gravitational waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saw, Vee-Liem

    The cosmological constant Λ used to be a freedom in Einstein’s theory of general relativity (GR), where one had a proclivity to set it to zero purely for convenience. The signs of Λ or Λ being zero would describe universes with different properties. For instance, the conformal structure of spacetime directly depends on Λ: null infinity ℐ is a spacelike, null, or timelike hypersurface, if Λ > 0, Λ = 0, or Λ 0 in Einstein’s theory of GR. A quantity that depends on the conformal structure of spacetime, especially on the nature of ℐ, is the Bondi mass which in turn dictates the mass loss of an isolated gravitating system due to energy carried away by gravitational waves. This problem of extending the Bondi mass to a universe with Λ > 0 has spawned intense research activity over the past several years. Some aspects include a closer inspection on the conformal properties, working with linearization, attempts using a Hamiltonian formulation based on “linearized” asymptotic symmetries, as well as obtaining the general asymptotic solutions of de Sitter-like spacetimes. We consolidate on the progress thus far from the various approaches that have been undertaken, as well as discuss the current open problems and possible directions in this area.

  3. Landau quantization in the spinning cosmic string spacetime

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muniz, C.R., E-mail: celiomuniz@yahoo.com [Grupo de Física Teórica (GFT), Universidade Estadual do Ceará, UECE-FECLI, Iguatu-CE (Brazil); Bezerra, V.B. [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal da Paraíba, Caixa Postal 5008, CEP 58051-970, João Pessoa-PB (Brazil); Cunha, M.S. [Grupo de Física Teórica (GFT), Universidade Estadual do Ceará-UECE, CEP 60740-000, Fortaleza-CE (Brazil)

    2014-11-15

    We analyze the quantum phenomenon arising from the interaction of a spinless charged particle with a rotating cosmic string, under the action of a static and uniform magnetic field parallel to the string. We calculate the energy levels of the particle in the non-relativistic approach, showing how these energies depend on the parameters involved in the problem. In order to do this, we solve the time independent Schrödinger equation in the geometry of the spinning cosmic string, taking into account that the coupling between the rotation of the spacetime and the angular momentum of the particle is very weak, such that makes sense to apply the Schrödinger equation in a curved background whose metric has an off diagonal term which involves time and space. It is also assumed that the particle orbits sufficiently far from the boundary of the region of closed timelike curves which exist around this topological defect. Finally, we find the Landau levels of the particle in the presence of a spinning cosmic string endowed with internal structure, i.e., having a finite width and uniformly filled with both material and vacuum energies. - Highlights: • Solution of the wave equation characterizing the problem. • Energy levels of the particle in spacetime of the structureless string. • Expression for an analogous of the quadratic Zeeman effect. • Energy levels of the particle in spacetime of the string with internal structure. • Evidence of the string structure by the internal existence of the vacuum energy.

  4. A stochastic space-time model for intermittent precipitation occurrences

    KAUST Repository

    Sun, Ying

    2016-01-28

    Modeling a precipitation field is challenging due to its intermittent and highly scale-dependent nature. Motivated by the features of high-frequency precipitation data from a network of rain gauges, we propose a threshold space-time t random field (tRF) model for 15-minute precipitation occurrences. This model is constructed through a space-time Gaussian random field (GRF) with random scaling varying along time or space and time. It can be viewed as a generalization of the purely spatial tRF, and has a hierarchical representation that allows for Bayesian interpretation. Developing appropriate tools for evaluating precipitation models is a crucial part of the model-building process, and we focus on evaluating whether models can produce the observed conditional dry and rain probabilities given that some set of neighboring sites all have rain or all have no rain. These conditional probabilities show that the proposed space-time model has noticeable improvements in some characteristics of joint rainfall occurrences for the data we have considered.

  5. Cosmic microwave background and inflation in multi-fractional spacetimes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calcagni, Gianluca [Instituto de Estructura de la Materia,CSIC, Serrano 121, 28006 Madrid (Spain); Kuroyanagi, Sachiko [Department of Physics, Nagoya University,Chikusa, Nagoya 464-8602 (Japan); Institute for Advanced Research, Nagoya University,Chikusa, Nagoya 464-8602 (Japan); Tsujikawa, Shinji [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Tokyo University of Science,1-3, Kagurazaka, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 162-8601 (Japan)

    2016-08-18

    We use FIRAS and Planck 2015 data to place observational bounds on inflationary scenarios in multi-fractional spacetimes with q-derivatives. While a power-law expansion in the geometric time coordinate is subject to the usual constraints from the tensor-to-scalar ratio, model-independent best fits of the black-body and scalar spectra yield upper limits on the free parameters of the multi-fractal measure of the theory. When the measure describing the fractal spacetime geometry is non-oscillating, information on the CMB black-body spectrum places constraints on the theory independent from but weaker than those obtained from the Standard Model, astrophysical gravitational waves and gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). When log oscillations are included and the measure describes a discrete fractal spacetime at microscopic scales, we obtain the first observational constraints on the amplitudes of such oscillations and find, in general, strong constraints on the multi-scale geometry and on the dimension of space. These results complete the scan and reduction of the parameter space of the theory. Black-body bounds are obtained also for the theory with weighted derivatives.

  6. Spacetime Causal Structure and Dimension from Horismotic Relation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. C. Stoica

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A reflexive relation on a set can be a starting point in defining the causal structure of a spacetime in General Relativity and other relativistic theories of gravity. If we identify this relation as the relation between lightlike separated events (the horismos relation, we can construct in a natural way the entire causal structure: causal and chronological relations, causal curves, and a topology. By imposing a simple additional condition, the structure gains a definite number of dimensions. This construction works with both continuous and discrete spacetimes. The dimensionality is obtained also in the discrete case, so this approach can be suited to prove the fundamental conjecture of causal sets. Other simple conditions lead to a differentiable manifold with a conformal structure (the metric up to a scaling factor as in Lorentzian manifolds. This structure provides a simple and general reconstruction of the spacetime in relativistic theories of gravity, which normally requires topological structure, differential structure, and geometric structure (which decomposes in the conformal structure, giving the causal relations and the volume element. Motivations for such a reconstruction come from relativistic theories of gravity, where the conformal structure is important, from the problem of singularities, and from Quantum Gravity, where various discretization methods are pursued, particularly in the causal sets approach.

  7. Pseudo-Finslerian Space-Times and Multirefringence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skákala, Jozef; Visser, Matt

    Ongoing searches for a quantum theory of gravity have repeatedly led to the suggestion that space-time might ultimately be anisotropic (Finsler-like) and/or exhibit multirefringence (multiple signal cones). Multiple (and even anisotropic) signal cones can be easily dealt with in a unified manner, by writing down a single Fresnel equation to simultaneously encode all signal cones in an even-handed manner. Once one gets off the signal cone and attempts to construct a full multirefringent space-time metric the situation becomes more problematic. In the multirefringent case we shall report a significant no-go result: in multirefringent models there is no simple or compelling way to construct any unifying notion of pseudo-Finsler space-time metric, different from a monorefringenent model, where the signal cone structure plus a conformal factor completely specifies the full pseudo-Riemannian metric. To throw some light on this situation we use an analog model where both anisotropy and multirefringence occur simultaneously: biaxial birefringent crystal. But the significance of our results extends beyond the optical framework in which (purely for pedagogical reasons) we are working, and has implications for any attempt at introducing multirefringence and intrinsic anisotropies to any model of quantum gravity that has a low energy manifold-like limit.

  8. Momentum density of spacetime and the gravitational dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padmanabhan, T.

    2016-01-01

    I introduce a covariant four-vector G^a[v], which can be interpreted as the momentum density attributed to the spacetime geometry by an observer with velocity v^a, and describe its properties: (a) Demanding that the total momentum of matter plus geometry is conserved for all observers, leads to the gravitational field equations. Thus, how matter curves spacetime is entirely determined by this principle of momentum conservation. (b) The G^a[v] can be related to the gravitational Lagrangian in a manner similar to the usual definition of Hamiltonian in, say, classical mechanics. (c) Geodesic observers in a spacetime will find that the conserved total momentum vanishes on-shell. (d) The on-shell, conserved, total energy in a region of space, as measured by comoving observers, will be equal to the total heat energy of the boundary surface. (e) The off-shell gravitational energy in a region will be the sum of the ADM energy in the bulk plus the thermal energy of the boundary. These results suggest that G^a[v] can be a useful physical quantity to probe the gravitational theories.

  9. On the performance of diagonal lattice space-time codes

    KAUST Repository

    Abediseid, Walid

    2013-11-01

    There has been tremendous work done on designing space-time codes for the quasi-static multiple-input multiple output (MIMO) channel. All the coding design up-to-date focuses on either high-performance, high rates, low complexity encoding and decoding, or targeting a combination of these criteria [1]-[9]. In this paper, we analyze in details the performance limits of diagonal lattice space-time codes under lattice decoding. We present both lower and upper bounds on the average decoding error probability. We first derive a new closed-form expression for the lower bound using the so-called sphere lower bound. This bound presents the ultimate performance limit a diagonal lattice space-time code can achieve at any signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). The upper bound is then derived using the union-bound which demonstrates how the average error probability can be minimized by maximizing the minimum product distance of the code. Combining both the lower and the upper bounds on the average error probability yields a simple upper bound on the the minimum product distance that any (complex) lattice code can achieve. At high-SNR regime, we discuss the outage performance of such codes and provide the achievable diversity-multiplexing tradeoff under lattice decoding. © 2013 IEEE.

  10. On the theory of Killing orbits in spacetime

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hall, G S [Department of Mathematical Sciences, University of Aberdeen, Aberdeen AB24 3UE, Scotland (United Kingdom)

    2003-09-21

    This paper gives a theoretical discussion of the orbits and isotropies which arise in a spacetime which admits a Lie algebra of Killing vector fields. The submanifold structure of the orbits is explored together with their induced Killing vector structure. A general decomposition of a spacetime in terms of the nature and dimension of its orbits is given and the concept of stability and instability for orbits introduced. A general relation is shown linking the dimensions of the Killing algebra, the orbits and the isotropies. The well-behaved nature of 'stable' orbits and the possible misbehaviour of the 'unstable' ones is pointed out and, in particular, the fact that independent Killing vector fields in spacetime may not induce independent Killing vector fields on unstable orbits. Several examples are presented to exhibit these features. Finally, an appendix is given which revisits and attempts to clarify the well-known theorem of Fubini on the dimension of Killing orbits.

  11. Femtosecond laser in refractive and cataract surgeries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han-Han Liu

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available In the past few years, 9 unique laser platforms have been brought to the market. As femtosecond (FS laser-assisted ophthalmic surgery potentially improves patient safety and visual outcomes, this new technology indeed provides ophthalmologists a reliable new option. But this new technology also poses a range of new clinical and financial challenges for surgeons. We provide an overview of the evolution of FS laser technology for use in refractive and cataract surgeries. This review describes the available laser platforms and mainly focuses on discussing the development of ophthalmic surgery technologies.

  12. Materials for refractive x-ray optics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lund, M W

    1997-01-01

    An X-ray lens using refraction has been proposed by Tomie, and demonstrated for 14 keV X-rays by Snigirev et al. This type of lens is made from a series of very weak lens elements. I calculate the properties of such lenses constructed of various chemical elements and compounds over the range of 1 to 30 keV. In general, I find that X-ray optics made from low density, low Z materials have the widest useful apertures, but require more lens elements than denser and higher Z materials.

  13. Reduced alphabet for protein folding prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jitao T; Wang, Titi; Huang, Shanran R; Li, Xin

    2015-04-01

    What are the key building blocks that would have been needed to construct complex protein folds? This is an important issue for understanding protein folding mechanism and guiding de novo protein design. Twenty naturally occurring amino acids and eight secondary structures consist of a 28-letter alphabet to determine folding kinetics and mechanism. Here we predict folding kinetic rates of proteins from many reduced alphabets. We find that a reduced alphabet of 10 letters achieves good correlation with folding rates, close to the one achieved by full 28-letter alphabet. Many other reduced alphabets are not significantly correlated to folding rates. The finding suggests that not all amino acids and secondary structures are equally important for protein folding. The foldable sequence of a protein could be designed using at least 10 folding units, which can either promote or inhibit protein folding. Reducing alphabet cardinality without losing key folding kinetic information opens the door to potentially faster machine learning and data mining applications in protein structure prediction, sequence alignment and protein design. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Kinetic partitioning mechanism of HDV ribozyme folding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Jiawen; Gong, Sha; Wang, Yujie; Zhang, Wenbing, E-mail: wbzhang@whu.edu.cn [Department of Physics, Wuhan University, Wuhan, Hubei 430072 (China)

    2014-01-14

    RNA folding kinetics is directly tied to RNA biological functions. We introduce here a new approach for predicting the folding kinetics of RNA secondary structure with pseudoknots. This approach is based on our previous established helix-based method for predicting the folding kinetics of RNA secondary structure. In this approach, the transition rates for an elementary step: (1) formation, (2) disruption of a helix stem, and (3) helix formation with concomitant partial melting of an incompatible helix, are calculated with the free energy landscape. The folding kinetics of the Hepatitis delta virus (HDV) ribozyme and the mutated sequences are studied with this method. The folding pathways are identified by recursive searching the states with high net flux-in(out) population starting from the native state. The theory results are in good agreement with that of the experiments. The results indicate that the bi-phasic folding kinetics for the wt HDV sequence is ascribed to the kinetic partitioning mechanism: Part of the population will quickly fold to the native state along the fast pathway, while another part of the population will fold along the slow pathway, in which the population is trapped in a non-native state. Single mutation not only changes the folding rate but also the folding pathway.

  15. Early folding intermediate of ribonuclease A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Udgaonkar, J.B.; Baldwin, R.L. (Stanford Univ., CA (United States))

    1990-11-01

    Pulsed hydrogen exchange ({sup 2}H-{sup 1}H) is used to characterize the folding process of ribonuclease A (disulfide bonds intact). The results show one principal early folding intermediate (K{sub 1}), which is formed rapidly after the start of folding and whose proton-exchange properties change with the time of folding. All probes that are hydrogen bonded within the {Beta}-sheet of native ribonuclease A are protected in I{sub 1}. Thus, the results suggest that the {beta}-sheet is formed rapidly and cooperatively. The initial protection factors of probes in the {beta}-sheet are between 10 and 100, but they increase with time of folding and exceed 1,000 at 400 msec from the start of folding. Thus, the {beta}-sheet is only moderately stable when it is first formed, but subsequent events stabilize it, possibly through interactions involving hydrophobic side chains. The large protection factors of the {beta}-sheet probes in an early folding intermediate are unexpected and remarkable. Probes in the three {alpha}-helices are fewer in number and give less accurate data than the {beta}-strand probes. The folding kinetics expected for a simple sequential model of folding are outlined. An important difference between the observed and predicted behavior is that the early folding intermediate is not fully populated when it is first formed.

  16. Validity of automated refraction after segmented refractive multifocal intraocular lens implantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albarrán-Diego, César; Muñoz, Gonzalo; Rohrweck, Stephanie; García-Lázaro, Santiago; Albero, José Ricardo

    2017-01-01

    AIM To evaluate the clinical utility of automated refraction (AR) and keratometry (KR) compared with subjective or manifest refraction (MR) after cataract or refractive lens exchange surgery with implantation of Lentis Mplus X (Oculentis GmbH) refractive multifocal intraocular lens (IOL). METHODS Eighty-six eyes implanted with the Lentis Mplus X multifocal IOL were included. MR was performed in all patients followed by three consecutive AR measurements using the Topcon KR-8000 autorefractor. Assessment of repeatability of consecutive AR before and after dilation with phenylephrine 10%, and comparison of the AR and KR with MR using vector analysis were performed at 3mo follow-up. RESULTS Analysis showed excellent repeatability of the AR measurements. Linear regression of AR versus MR showed good correlation for sphere and spherical equivalent, whereas the correlation for astigmatism was low. The mean difference AR-MR was -1.28±0.29 diopters (D) for sphere. Astigmatism showed better correlation between KR and MR. CONCLUSION We suggest AR sphere plus 1.25 D and the KR cylinder as the starting point for MR in eyes with a Lentis Mplus X multifocal IOL. If AR measurements are equal to MR, decentration of the IOL should be suspected. PMID:29181318

  17. Intraocular lens power calculation following laser refractive surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Hodge,Christopher; McAlinden, Colm; Lawless, Michael; Chan, Colin; Sutton,Gerard; Martin, Aifric

    2015-01-01

    Refractive outcomes following cataract surgery in patients that have previously undergone laser refractive surgery have traditionally been underwhelming. This is related to several key issues including the preoperative assessment (keratometry) and intraocular lens power calculations. Peer-reviewed literature is overwhelmed by the influx of methodology to manipulate the corneal or intraocular lens (IOL) powers following refractive surgery. This would suggest that the optimal derivative formula...

  18. DISTRIBUTION OF REFRACTIVE INDEX AND CHROMATIC DISPERSION OF THE CORNEA

    OpenAIRE

    渡邉, 千博

    1999-01-01

    Many refractive surgeries of the cornea (radial keratotomy RK, photore- fractive keratectomy PRK, laser in situ keratomileusis LASIK) are done routinely in an increasing number of patients in many countries. However, few analyses of the cornea related to the corneal configuration change and refractive index distribution, which affect the postoperative visual outcomes, have been reported. We have analyzed the refractive index and chromatic dispersion of the cornea as a function of the temperat...

  19. Autonomous satellite navigation using starlight refraction angle measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ning, Xiaolin; Wang, Longhua; Bai, Xinbei; Fang, Jiancheng

    2013-05-01

    An on-board autonomous navigation capability is required to reduce the operation costs and enhance the navigation performance of future satellites. Autonomous navigation by stellar refraction is a type of autonomous celestial navigation method that uses high-accuracy star sensors instead of Earth sensors to provide information regarding Earth's horizon. In previous studies, the refraction apparent height has typically been used for such navigation. However, the apparent height cannot be measured directly by a star sensor and can only be calculated by the refraction angle and an atmospheric refraction model. Therefore, additional errors are introduced by the uncertainty and nonlinearity of atmospheric refraction models, which result in reduced navigation accuracy and reliability. A new navigation method based on the direct measurement of the refraction angle is proposed to solve this problem. Techniques for the determination of the refraction angle are introduced, and a measurement model for the refraction angle is established. The method is tested and validated by simulations. When the starlight refraction height ranges from 20 to 50 km, a positioning accuracy of better than 100 m can be achieved for a low-Earth-orbit (LEO) satellite using the refraction angle, while the positioning accuracy of the traditional method using the apparent height is worse than 500 m under the same conditions. Furthermore, an analysis of the factors that affect navigation accuracy, including the measurement accuracy of the refraction angle, the number of visible refracted stars per orbit and the installation azimuth of star sensor, is presented. This method is highly recommended for small satellites in particular, as no additional hardware besides two star sensors is required.

  20. Effect of single vision soft contact lenses on peripheral refraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Pauline; Fan, Yvonne; Oh, Kelly; Trac, Kevin; Zhang, Frank; Swarbrick, Helen

    2012-07-01

    To investigate changes in peripheral refraction with under-, full, and over-correction of central refraction with commercially available single vision soft contact lenses (SCLs) in young myopic adults. Thirty-four myopic adult subjects were fitted with Proclear Sphere SCLs to under-correct (+0.75 DS), fully correct, and over-correct (-0.75 DS) their manifest central refractive error. Central and peripheral refraction were measured with no lens wear and subsequently with different levels of SCL central refractive error correction. The uncorrected refractive error was myopic at all locations along the horizontal meridian. Peripheral refraction was relatively hyperopic compared to center at 30 and 35° in the temporal visual field (VF) in low myopes and at 30 and 35° in the temporal VF and 10, 30, and 35° in the nasal VF in moderate myopes. All levels of SCL correction caused a hyperopic shift in refraction at all locations in the horizontal VF. The smallest hyperopic shift was demonstrated with under-correction followed by full correction and then by over-correction of central refractive error. An increase in relative peripheral hyperopia was measured with full correction SCLs compared with no correction in both low and moderate myopes. However, no difference in relative peripheral refraction profiles were found between under-, full, and over-correction. Under-, full, and over-correction of central refractive error with single vision SCLs caused a hyperopic shift in both central and peripheral refraction at all positions in the horizontal meridian. All levels of SCL correction caused the peripheral retina, which initially experienced absolute myopic defocus at baseline with no correction, to experience absolute hyperopic defocus. This peripheral hyperopia may be a possible cause of myopia progression reported with different types and levels of myopia correction.