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Sample records for redux-mycobacterium avium subspecies

  1. Cloning and molecular characterisation of resuscitation promoting factor-like gene from Mycobacterium avium subspecies avium

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    R Kavitha

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Resuscitation promoting factor (Rpf-like gene of Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis has been known to stimulate the growth of mycobacteria and enhances the recovery of replicating cells from non-replicating phases. The objective of the study was to produce recombinant rpf-like protein of M. avium subspecies avium protein for purification and physico-chemical characterisation. Materials and Methods: The identified rpf gene of M. avium subspecies avium was cloned, subcloned, sequenced and expressed in Escherichia coli expression system for the production of the recombinant protein. The expressed recombinant Rpf protein was confirmed by Western blot and the extract was purified to yield a pure recombinant protein. Results: An rpf-like gene of 675 bp size in the M. avium subspecies avium was identified. This gene was expressed and the recombinant Rpf weighed 65 kDa as confirmed by Western blot. The M. avium recombinant Rpf protein was extracted under denatured conditions and purified yielding a recombinant protein with >90% purity. Conclusions: Identification, cloning, sequencing and expression of a rpf-like gene from M. avium suggest that RpfA is present in this species also, which might be involved in reactivation phenomenon in this high-risk pathogen.

  2. Genome-wide sequence variations among Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis.

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    Chung-Yi eHsu

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (M. ap, the causative agent of Johne’s disease (JD, infects many farmed ruminants, wildlife animals and humans. To better understand the molecular pathogenesis of these infections, we analyzed the whole genome sequences of several M. ap and M. avium subspecies avium (M. avium strains isolated from various hosts and environments. Using Next-generation sequencing technology, all 6 M. ap isolates showed a high percentage of homology (98% to the reference genome sequence of M. ap K-10 isolated from cattle. However, 2 M. avium isolates (DT 78 and Env 77 showed significant sequence diversity from the reference strain M. avium 104. The genomes of M. avium isolates DT 78 and Env 77 exhibited only 87% and 40% homology, respectively, to the M. avium 104 reference genome. Within the M. ap isolates, genomic rearrangements (insertions/deletions, Indels were not detected, and only unique single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs were observed among the 6 M. ap strains. While most of the SNPs (~100 in M. ap genomes were non-synonymous, a total of ~ 6000 SNPs were detected among M. avium genomes, most of them were synonymous suggesting a differential selective pressure between M. ap and M. avium isolates. In addition, SNPs-based phylo-genomic analysis showed that isolates from goat and Oryx are closely related to the cattle (K-10 strain while the human isolate (M. ap 4B is closely related to the environmental strains, indicating environmental source to human infections. Overall, SNPs were the most common variations among M. ap isolates while SNPs in addition to Indels were prevalent among M. avium isolates. Genomic variations will be useful in designing host-specific markers for the analysis of mycobacterial evolution and for developing novel diagnostics directed against Johne’s disease in animals.

  3. Mycobacterium avium subspecies impair dendritic cell maturation.

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    Basler, Tina; Brumshagen, Christina; Beineke, Andreas; Goethe, Ralph; Bäumer, Wolfgang

    2013-10-01

    Mycobacterium avium ssp. paratuberculosis (MAP) causes Johne's disease, a chronic, granulomatous enteritis of ruminants. Dendritic cells (DC) of the gut are ideally placed to combat invading mycobacteria; however, little is known about their interaction with MAP. Here, we investigated the interaction of MAP and the closely related M. avium ssp. avium (MAA) with murine DC and the effect of infected macrophages on DC maturation. The infection of DC with MAP or MAA induced DC maturation, which differed to that of LPS as maturation was accompanied by higher production of IL-10 and lower production of IL-12. Treatment of maturing DC with supernatants from mycobacteria-infected macrophages resulted in impaired DC maturation, leading to a semi-mature, tolerogenic DC phenotype expressing low levels of MHCII, CD86 and TNF-α after LPS stimulation. Though the cells were not completely differentiated they responded with an increased IL-10 and a decreased IL-12 production. Using recombinant cytokines we provide evidence that the semi-mature DC phenotype results from a combination of secreted cytokines and released antigenic mycobacterial components of the infected macrophage. Our results indicate that MAP and MAA are able to subvert DC function directly by infecting and indirectly via the milieu created by infected macrophages.

  4. Activation of macrophages and interference with CD4+ T-cell stimulation by Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis and Mycobacterium avium subspecies avium.

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    Zur Lage, Susanne; Goethe, Ralph; Darji, Ayub; Valentin-Weigand, Peter; Weiss, Siegfried

    2003-01-01

    Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (M. ptb) and M. avium subspecies avium (M. avium) are closely related but exhibit significant differences in their interaction with the host immune system. The macrophage line, J774, was infected with M. ptb and M. avium and analysed for cytokine production and stimulatory capacity towards antigen-specific CD4+ T cells. Under all conditions J774 cells were activated to produce proinflammatory cytokines. No influence on the expression of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II, intracellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), B7.1, B7.2 or CD40 was found. However, the antigen-specific stimulatory capacity of J774 cells for a CD4+ T-cell line was significantly inhibited after infection with M. ptb, but not with M. avium. When a T-cell hybridoma expressing a T-cell receptor identical to that of the T-cell line was used, this inhibition was not observed, suggesting that costimulation which is essential for the CD4+ T-cell line is influenced by the pathogenic bacterium M. ptb.

  5. A novel multi-antigen virally vectored vaccine against Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis.

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    Tim J Bull

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis causes systemic infection and chronic intestinal inflammation in many species including primates. Humans are exposed through milk and from sources of environmental contamination. Hitherto, the only vaccines available against Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis have been limited to veterinary use and comprised attenuated or killed organisms. METHODS: We developed a vaccine comprising a fusion construct designated HAV, containing components of two secreted and two cell surface Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis proteins. HAV was transformed into DNA, human Adenovirus 5 (Ad5 and Modified Vaccinia Ankara (MVA delivery vectors. Full length expression of the predicted 95 kDa fusion protein was confirmed. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Vaccination of naïve and Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis infected C57BL/6 mice using DNA-prime/MVA-boost or Ad5-prime/MVA-boost protocols was highly immunogenic resulting in significant IFN-gamma ELISPOT responses by splenocytes against recombinant vaccine antigens and a range of HAV specific peptides. This included strong recognition of a T-cell epitope GFAEINPIA located near the C-terminus of the fusion protein. Antibody responses to recombinant vaccine antigens and HAV specific peptides but not GFAEINPIA, also occurred. No immune recognition of vaccine antigens occurred in any sham vaccinated Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis infected mice. Vaccination using either protocol significantly attenuated pre-existing Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis infection measured by qPCR in spleen and liver and the Ad5-prime/MVA-boost protocol also conferred some protection against subsequent challenge. No adverse effects of vaccination occurred in any of the mice. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: A range of modern veterinary and clinical vaccines for the treatment and prevention of disease caused by Mycobacterium avium

  6. Detection of Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis in Drinking Water and Biofilms Using Quantitative PCR

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    Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP) causes Johne’s disease in domestic animals and has been implicated in Crohn’s disease in humans. This bacterium is a slow growing, gram-positive, acid-fast organism which can be difficult to culture from the environment. For ...

  7. Mycobacterium avium subspecies induce differential expression of pro-inflammatory mediators in a murine macrophage model: evidence for enhanced pathogenicity of Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis.

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    Basler, Tina; Geffers, Robert; Weiss, Siegfried; Valentin-Weigand, Peter; Goethe, Ralph

    2008-01-01

    Mycobacterium avium subspecies (ssp.) paratuberculosis (MAP) is the etiological agent of paratuberculosis, a chronic, non-treatable granulomatous enteritis of ruminants. MAP is the only mycobacterium affecting the intestinal tract, which is of interest since it is presently the most favoured pathogen linked to Crohn's disease (CD) in humans due to its frequent detection in CD tissues. MAP is genetically closely related to other M. avium ssp. such as M. avium ssp. avium (MAA) and M. avium ssp. hominissuis (MAH) which can cause mycobacteriosis in animals and immunocompromised humans. We have recently shown that murine macrophage cell lines represent suitable systems to analyse M. avium ssp. patho-mechanisms and could show that MAP, but not MAA, specifically inhibited the antigen-specific stimulatory capacity for CD4(+) T-cells. In the present study, we compared gene expression profiles of murine RAW264.7 macrophages in response to infections with MAP or MAA using murine high-density oligonucleotide Affymetrix microarrays. A comparison of MAP and MAA infection revealed 17 differentially expressed genes. They were expressed at a much lower level in MAP-infected macrophages than in MAA-infected macrophages. Among these were the genes for IL-1beta, IL-1alpha, CXCL2, PTGS2 (COX2), lipocalin (LCN2) and TNF, which are important pro-inflammatory factors. The microarray data were confirmed for selected genes by quantitative real-time reverse transcription PCR and, by protein array analyses and ELISA. Similar to MAA, infection with MAH also showed robust induction of IL-1beta, CXCL2, COX2, LCN2 and TNF. Taken together, our results from M. avium ssp.-infected murine macrophages provide evidence that MAP in contrast to MAA and MAH specifically suppresses the pro-inflammatory defence mechanisms of infected macrophages.

  8. Immunoreactivity of protein tyrosine phosphatase A (PtpA) in sera from sheep infected with Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis.

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    Gurung, Ratna B; Begg, Douglas J; Purdie, Auriol C; Bach, Horacio; Whittington, Richard J

    2014-07-15

    Evasion of host defense mechanisms and survival inside infected host macrophages are features of pathogenic mycobacteria including Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis, the causative agent of Johne's disease in ruminants. Protein tyrosine phosphatase A (PtpA) has been identified as a secreted protein critical for survival of mycobacteria within infected macrophages. The host may mount an immune response to such secreted proteins. In this study, the humoral immune response to purified recombinant M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis PtpA was investigated using sera from a cohort of sheep infected with M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis and compared with uninfected healthy controls. A significantly higher level of reactivity to PtpA was observed in sera collected from M. avium subspecies paratuberculosis infected sheep when compared to those from uninfected healthy controls. PtpA could be a potential candidate antigen for detection of humoral immune responses in sheep infected with M. avium subspecies paratuberculosis.

  9. Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis infects and multiplies in enteric glial cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To establish the role of enteric glial cells duringinfection with Mycobacterium avium subspeciesparatuberculosis (MAP) in Crohn's disease.METHODS: In order to establish the role of enteric glial cells during infection with M. avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP) in Crohn's disease, Map adhesion experiments on enteric glial cells were performed as well as expression analysis of Map sigma factors during infection.RESULTS: In this study, for the first time, we found a high affinity of MAP to enteric glial cells and we analyzed the expression of MAP sigma factors under different conditions of growth.CONCLUSION: The fact that Map showed a high affinity to the glial cells raises concerns about the complicated etiology of the Crohn's disease. Elucidation of the mechanisms whereby inflammation alters enteric neural control of gut functions may lead to novel treatments for Crohn's disease.

  10. Facts, myths and hypotheses on the zoonotic nature of Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis.

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    Atreya, Raja; Bülte, Michael; Gerlach, Gerald-F; Goethe, Ralph; Hornef, Mathias W; Köhler, Heike; Meens, Jochen; Möbius, Petra; Roeb, Elke; Weiss, Siegfried

    2014-10-01

    Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP) is the causative agent of paratuberculosis (Johne's disease [JD]), a chronic granulomatous enteritis in ruminants. JD is one of the most widespread bacterial diseases of domestic animals with significant economic impact. The histopathological picture of JD resembles that of Crohn's disease (CD), a human chronic inflammatory bowel disease of still unresolved aetiology. An aetiological relevance of MAP for CD has been proposed. This and the ambiguity of other published epidemiological findings raise the question whether MAP represents a zoonotic agent. In this review, we will discuss evidence that MAP has zoonotic capacity.

  11. Isolation of Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis Reactive T-cells from Intestinal Biopsies of Crohn's Disease Patients

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    Crohn’s disease (CD) is a chronic granulomatous inflammation of the intestine. The etiology is still unknown. One hypothesis is that CD is caused by infection with Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP) in genetically predisposed individuals. MAP causes a similar disease in ruminants,...

  12. CD4 T Cells From Intestinal Biopsies of Crohn's Disease Patients React to Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis

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    The role of Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP) in Crohn’s disease (CD) remains controversial. One issue that has been raised is the lack of data showing a cellular immune response to MAP. Earlier studies have mostly focused on responses in peripheral blood which have several limit...

  13. Can Immune Response Mechanisms Explain the Fecal Shedding Patterns of Cattle Infected with Mycobacterium avium Subspecies paratuberculosis?

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    Gesham, Magombedze; Shigetoshi, Eda; Koets, A.P.

    2016-01-01

    Johne’s disease (JD) is a chronic disease in ruminants and is caused by infection with Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP). At late stages of the disease, MAP bacilli are shed via feces excretion and in turn create the potential for oral-fecal transmission. The role of the host imm

  14. Characterization of the inflammatory phenotype of Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis using a novel cell culture passage model

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    Understanding the pathogenic mechanisms and host responses to Johne’s disease, a chronic enteritis of ruminants caused by Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP), is complicated by the multifaceted disease progression, late-onset host reaction, and the lack of ex vivo infection models ...

  15. The thioamides methimazole and thiourea inhibit growth of M. avium Subspecies paratuberculosis in culture.

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    Robert J Greenstein

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Thyrotoxicosis is conceptualized as an "autoimmune" disease with no accepted infectious etiology. There are increasingly compelling data that another "autoimmune" affliction, Crohn disease, may be caused by Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP. Like M. tb, MAP is systemic. We hypothesized that some cases of thyrotoxicosis may be initiated by a MAP infection. Because other thioamides treat tuberculosis, leprosy and M. avium complex, we hypothesized that a mode of action of some thioamide anti-thyrotoxicosis medications may include MAP growth inhibition. METHODS: The effect of the thioamides, thiourea, methimazole and 6-propo-2-thiouracil (6-PTU were studied in radiometric Bactec culture, on ten strains of three mycobacterial species (six of MAP, two of M. avium and two of M. tb. complex. Data are presented as "cumulative growth index," (cGI or "percent decrease in cumulative GI" (%-DeltacGI. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Methimazole was the most effective thioamide at inhibiting MAP growth. At 128microg/ml: MAP UCF-4; 65%-DeltacGI & MAP ATCC 19698; 90%-DeltacGI. Thiourea inhibited MAP "Ben" maximally; 70%-DeltacGI. Neither methimazole nor thiourea inhibited M. avium or M. tb. at the doses tested. 6-PTU has no inhibition on any strain studied, although a structurally analogous control, 5-PTU, was the most inhibitory thioamide tested. SIGNIFICANCE: We show inhibition of MAP growth by the thioamides, thiourea and methimazole in culture. These data are compatible with the hypothesis that these thioamides may have anti-prokaryotic in addition to their well-established eukaryotic actions in thyrotoxic individuals.

  16. DETEKSI MYCOBACTERIUM AVIUM SUBSPECIES PARATUBERCULOSIS PADA SUSU FORMULA LANJUTAN DI BOGOR [Detection of Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis Formula Milk in Bogor

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    Widagdo Sri Nugroho1,2

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP becomes a public health concern in developed countries which is usually associated to Crohn’s disease (CD in human. The disease shows similarities in clinical signs and pathology characteristic with John’s disease (JD in ruminants which is infected by MAP. Researchers in Europe, USA, and Australia detected MAP in their dairy products and showed the relationship among MAP, CD, and JD. Meanwhile Indonesia imported milk and milk products from those countries to cover the national demand. This situation keeps MAP as potential-problem in national dairy herd and human health in the future. The aim of this study was to detect MAP in the formla milk for todler. Fifty samples from five established milk producers were taken on August 2006 at the supermarket in Bogor. Two seperate diagnostic methods were used parallel in this study i.e.: polymerase chain reaction method (PCR with insertion sequence F 57 as the primer and the Mycobacterial Growth Indicator Tube (MGIT. Neither MAP grew in MGIT after 20 weeks of incubation period but 5 samples were found positive by nested PCR. Although there was no evidence weather MAP grew from the samples in this study, the comprehensive and sustainable studies on MAP should be carried out with more extensive and varied samples, as well as in human to provide data on MAP in Indonesia.

  17. Disinfection of Mycobacterium avium subspecies hominissuis in drinking tap water using ultraviolet germicidal irradiation.

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    Schiavano, Giuditta Fiorella; De Santi, Mauro; Sisti, Maurizio; Amagliani, Giulia; Brandi, Giorgio

    2017-09-01

    Nontuberculous mycobacteria are resistant to conventional water treatments, and are opportunistic human pathogen, particularly in hospitalized patients. The aim of this investigation was to assess the effectiveness of an ultraviolet UV-C lamp treatment against Mycobacterium avium subspecies hominissuis in drinking tap water. Ultraviolet treatments (0 - 192 mJ/cm(2)) were performed using UV lamp immerged onto cylindrical glass tubes containing artificially contaminated water. The results showed that susceptibility to UV varied considerably according to the strains and the diameter of the tube. With a dose of 32 mJ/cm(2), a significant inactivation (pUV disinfection of drinking water. In conclusion, it may be difficult to standardize a UV dose for the elimination of waterborne mycobacteria.

  18. Seroprevalence of Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis in Korean black goats (Capra hircus aegagrus).

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    Lee, Kyung Woo; Jung, Byeong Yeal; Moon, Oun Kyoung; Yang, Dong Kun; Lee, Su Hwa; Kim, Ji Yeon; Kweon, Chang Hee

    2006-12-01

    In total, 582 sera from 116 black goat herds were analyzed by a commercially available ELISA kit to monitor the seroprevalence of Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (Mpt) in Korean black goats (Capra hircus aegagrus). The mean number of goats sampled per herd was 5.11, 4.66, and 5.38 for the northern, central, and southern regions of Korea, respectively. The apparent regional prevalence of Mpt was estimated at 18.2-38.2% and 4.6-15.3% for herds and goats, respectively. The Mpt-positive goats were predominantly detected in the south (n=28), compared to either the northern (n=9) or central (n=11) regions (chi=14.459, P<0.05). Our findings indicate that Mpt is prevalent among the goat population, but regional variation exists.

  19. Mycobacterium avium Subspecies paratuberculosis Recombinant Proteins Modulate Antimycobacterial Functions of Bovine Macrophages.

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    Bannantine, John P; Stabel, Judith R; Laws, Elizabeth; D Cardieri, Maria Clara; Souza, Cleverson D

    2015-01-01

    It has been shown that Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (M. paratuberculosis) activates the Mitogen Activated Protein Kinase (MAPK) p38 pathway, yet it is unclear which components of M. paratuberculosis are involved in the process. Therefore, a set of 42 M. paratuberculosis recombinant proteins expressed from coding sequences annotated as lipoproteins were screened for their ability to induce IL-10 expression, an indicator of MAPKp38 activation, in bovine monocyte-derived macrophages. A recombinant lipoprotein, designated as MAP3837c, was among a group of 6 proteins that strongly induced IL-10 gene transcription in bovine macrophages, averaging a 3.1-fold increase compared to non-stimulated macrophages. However, a parallel increase in expression of IL-12 and TNF-α was only observed in macrophages exposed to a subset of these 6 proteins. Selected recombinant proteins were further analyzed for their ability to enhance survival of M. avium within bovine macrophages as measured by recovered viable bacteria and nitrite production. All 6 IL-10 inducing MAP recombinant proteins along with M. paratuberculosis cells significantly enhanced phosphorylation of MAPK-p38 in bovine macrophages. Although these proteins are likely not post translationally lipidated in E. coli and thus is a limitation in this study, these results form the foundation of how the protein component of the lipoprotein interacts with the immune system. Collectively, these data reveal M. paratuberculosis proteins that might play a role in MAPK-p38 pathway activation and hence in survival of this organism within bovine macrophages.

  20. Causation of Crohn’s Disease by Mycobacterium avium Subspecies Paratuberculosis

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    John Hermon-Taylor

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP is a member of the M avium complex (MAC. It differs genetically from other MAC in having 14 to 18 copies of IS900 and a single cassette of DNA involved in the biosynthesis of surface carbohydrate. Unlike other MAC, MAP is a specific cause of chronic inflammation of the intestine in many animal species, including primates. The disease ranges from pluribacillary to paucimicrobial, with chronic granulomatous inflammation like leprosy in humans. MAP infection can persist for years without causing clinical disease. The herd prevalence of MAP infection in Western Europe and North America is reported in the range 21% to 54%. These subclinically infected animals shed MAP in their milk and onto pastures. MAP is more robust than tuberculosis, and the risk that is conveyed to human populations in retail milk and in domestic water supplies is high. MAP is harboured in the ileocolonic mucosa of a proportion of normal people and can be detected in a high proportion of full thickness samples of inflamed Crohn’s disease gut by improved culture systems and IS900 polymerase chain reaction if the correct methods are used. MAP in Crohn’s disease is present in a protease-resistant nonbacillary form, can evade immune recognition and probably causes an immune dysregulation. As with other MAC, MAP is resistant to most standard antituberculous drugs. Treatment of Crohn’s disease with combinations of drugs more active against MAC such as rifabutin and clarithromycin can bring about a profound improvement and, in a few cases, apparent disease eradication. New drugs as well as effective MAP vaccines for animals and humans are needed. The problems caused by MAP constitute a public health issue of tragic proportions for which a range of remedial measures are urgently needed.

  1. Mycobacterium avium Subspecies paratuberculosis Recombinant Proteins Modulate Antimycobacterial Functions of Bovine Macrophages.

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    John P Bannantine

    Full Text Available It has been shown that Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (M. paratuberculosis activates the Mitogen Activated Protein Kinase (MAPK p38 pathway, yet it is unclear which components of M. paratuberculosis are involved in the process. Therefore, a set of 42 M. paratuberculosis recombinant proteins expressed from coding sequences annotated as lipoproteins were screened for their ability to induce IL-10 expression, an indicator of MAPKp38 activation, in bovine monocyte-derived macrophages. A recombinant lipoprotein, designated as MAP3837c, was among a group of 6 proteins that strongly induced IL-10 gene transcription in bovine macrophages, averaging a 3.1-fold increase compared to non-stimulated macrophages. However, a parallel increase in expression of IL-12 and TNF-α was only observed in macrophages exposed to a subset of these 6 proteins. Selected recombinant proteins were further analyzed for their ability to enhance survival of M. avium within bovine macrophages as measured by recovered viable bacteria and nitrite production. All 6 IL-10 inducing MAP recombinant proteins along with M. paratuberculosis cells significantly enhanced phosphorylation of MAPK-p38 in bovine macrophages. Although these proteins are likely not post translationally lipidated in E. coli and thus is a limitation in this study, these results form the foundation of how the protein component of the lipoprotein interacts with the immune system. Collectively, these data reveal M. paratuberculosis proteins that might play a role in MAPK-p38 pathway activation and hence in survival of this organism within bovine macrophages.

  2. Inter- and Intra-subtype genotypic differences that differentiate Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis strains

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    Biet Franck

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (Map is the aetiological agent of Johne’s disease or paratuberculosis and is included within the Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC. Map strains are of two major types often referred to as ‘Sheep’ or ‘S-type’ and ‘Cattle’ or ‘C-type’. With the advent of more discriminatory typing techniques it has been possible to further classify the S-type strains into two groups referred to as Type I and Type III. This study was undertaken to genotype a large panel of S-type small ruminant isolates from different hosts and geographical origins and to compare them with a large panel of well documented C-type isolates to assess the genetic diversity of these strain types. Methods used included Mycobacterial Interspersed Repetitive Units - Variable-Number Tandem Repeat analysis (MIRU-VNTR, analysis of Large Sequence Polymorphisms by PCR (LSP analysis, Single Nucleotide Polymorphism (SNP analysis of gyr genes, Pulsed-Field Gel Electrophoresis (PFGE and Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism analysis coupled with hybridization to IS900 (IS900-RFLP analysis. Results The presence of LSPA4 and absence of LSPA20 was confirmed in all 24 Map S-type strains analysed. SNPs within the gyr genes divided the S-type strains into types I and III. Twenty four PFGE multiplex profiles and eleven different IS900-RFLP profiles were identified among the S-type isolates, some of them not previously published. Both PFGE and IS900-RFLP segregated the S-type strains into types I and III and the results concurred with those of the gyr SNP analysis. Nine MIRU-VNTR genotypes were identified in these isolates. MIRU-VNTR analysis differentiated Map strains from other members of Mycobacterium avium Complex, and Map S-type from C-type but not type I from III. Pigmented Map isolates were found of type I or III. Conclusion This is the largest panel of S-type strains investigated to date. The S-type strains

  3. Ecology and genomic features of infection with Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis in Egypt.

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    Amin, Adel S; Hsu, Chung-Yi; Darwish, Samah F; Ghosh, Pallab; AbdEl-Fatah, Eman M; Behour, Tahani S; Talaat, Adel M

    2015-04-01

    Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (M. paratuberculosis) is the causative agent of paratuberculosis, or Johne's disease, in cattle, with potential involvement in cases of Crohn's disease in humans. Johne's disease is found worldwide and is economically important for both beef and dairy industries. In an effort to characterize this important infection in Egypt, we analysed the ecological and genomic features of recent isolates of M. paratuberculosis. In this report, we examined 26 Holstein dairy herds distributed throughout Egypt, from 2010 to 2013. Using PCR analysis of faecal samples, we estimated a mean herd-level prevalence of 65.4 %, with animal-level infection that reached a mean of 13.6 % among animals suffering from diarrhoea. Whole genome sequencing of field isolates identified numerous single nucleotide polymorphisms among field isolates relative to the standard M. paratuberculosis K10 genome. Interestingly, the virulence of M. paratuberculosis isolates from Egypt revealed diverse virulence phenotypes in the murine model of paratuberculosis, with significant differences in tissue colonization, particularly during the chronic stage of infection. Overall, our analysis confirmed that Johne's disease is a newly identified problem in Egypt and indicated that M. paratuberculosis has potentially diverse genotypes that impact its virulence. Further ecological mapping and genomic analysis of M. paratuberculosis will enhance our understanding of the transmission and evolutionary dynamics of this pathogen under natural field conditions.

  4. Isolation and characterization of a novel bacteriophage against Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis.

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    Basra, Simone; Anany, Hany; Brovko, Lioubov; Kropinski, Andrew M; Griffiths, Mansel W

    2014-10-01

    Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP), the causative agent of Johne's disease, has a doubling time of 24 hours, making rapid detection very difficult. Mycobacteriophages can be used in the detection of disease-causing mycobacteria such as MAP. Isolation and sequencing the genomes of lytic MAP bacteriophages are important preliminary steps towards designing phage-based rapid detection assays for this bacterium. A simple optimized protocol was developed to allow reproducible production of confluent growth of MAP on plates within four to six weeks of incubation at 30 °C. This protocol was applied to the screening of environmental and fecal samples for bacteriophages inhibiting the growth of MAP. As a result, a lytic phage, vB_MapS_FF47, was isolated from bovine feces. FF47 contains a double-stranded DNA genome ~48 kb in length with 73 protein coding sequences. It does not carry temperate or known virulence genes. This phage was shown to be most closely related to Mycobacterium phage Muddy, isolated in South Africa, and Gordonia phage GTE2; however, it could not infect any of the tested Gordonia, Rhodococcus, or Nocardia spp. that GTE2 could. The protocols that were developed for growth and phage isolation have potential applications in a high-throughput screening for compounds inhibiting the growth of MAP. This work describes the first time that a phage was isolated against M. paratuberculosis.

  5. Establishing Caenorhabditis elegans as a model for Mycobacterium avium subspecies hominissuis infection and intestinal colonization.

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    Everman, Jamie L; Ziaie, Navid R; Bechler, Jessica; Bermudez, Luiz E

    2015-09-24

    The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans has become a model system for studying the disease interaction between pathogens and the host. To determine whether the transparent nematode could serve as a useful model for Mycobacterium avium subspecies hominissuis (MAH) infection of the intestinal tract, worms were fed MAH and assayed for the effects of the bacterial infection on the worm. It was observed during feeding that viable MAH increases in the intestinal lumen in a time dependent manner. Ingestion of MAH was deemed non-toxic to worms as MAH-fed populations have similar survival curves to those fed E. coli strain OP50. Pulse-chase analysis using E. coli strain OP50 revealed that MAH colonize the intestinal tract, as viable MAH remain within the intestine after the assay. Visualization of intestinal MAH using histology and transmission electron microscopy demonstrates that MAH localizes to the intestinal lumen, as well as establishes direct contact with intestinal epithelium. Bacterial colonization appears to have a detrimental effect on the microvilli of the intestinal epithelial cells. The MAH ΔGPL/4B2 strain with a mutation in glycopeptidolipid production is deficient in binding to human epithelial cells (HEp-2), as well as deficient in its ability to bind to and colonize the intestinal tract of C. elegans as efficiently as wild-type MAH. These data indicate the C. elegans may serve as a useful model system for MAH pathogenesis and in determining the mechanisms used by MAH during infection and colonization of the intestinal epithelium.

  6. Attenuated strains of Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis as vaccine candidates against Johne's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Settles, Erik W; Kink, John A; Talaat, Adel

    2014-04-11

    Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (M. paratuberculosis) is the causative agent of Johne's disease in ruminants. Johne's disease has a severe economic impact on the dairy industry in the USA and worldwide. In an effort to combat this disease, we screened several transposon mutants that were attenuated in the murine model of paratuberculosis for the potential use as live attenuated vaccines. Using the murine model, two vaccine candidates (pgs1360, pgs3965 with mutations of fabG2_2 and umaA1, respectively) were at or below the limit of detection for tissue colonization suggesting their low level persistence and hence safety. Prior to challenge, both candidates induced a M. paratuberculosis-specific IFN-γ, an indication of eliciting cell-mediated immunity. Following challenge with a virulent strain of M. paratuberculosis, the two vaccine candidates significantly reduced bacterial colonization in organs with reduced histological scores compared to control animals. In addition, one of the vaccine candidates (pgs3965) also induced IL-17a, a cytokine associated with protective immunity in mycobacterial infection. Our analysis suggested that the pgs3965 vaccine candidate is a potential live-attenuated vaccine that could be tested further in ruminant models of paratuberculosis. The analysis also validated our screening strategy to identify effective vaccine candidates against intracellular pathogens.

  7. Detection of Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis of dairy cows in Bogor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Widagdo Sri Nugroho

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Johne’s disease (JD or partuberculosis is a chronic granulomatous enteritis in ruminants caused by infection of Mycobacterium avium paratuberculosis subspecies (MAP. The disease has been detected serologically in Indonesia. It’s potential to spread to other herds and could create great economic losses. The objectives of current study were to detect MAP in milk and faeces of dairy cows as well as to evaluate the association between farm management factors and presence of the bacteria in dairy cows in Bogor. The sample size was calculated using the formula to detect disease with the prevalence assumed to be 5% using 95% significant level. Milk and faeces samples were taken from 62 dairy cows which were suspected as suffering from MAP infection. Detection of MAP was done by isolation in Herrold’ egg yolk medium with mycobactin J (HEYMj, acid-fast bacilli Ziehl-Neelsen staining, PCR IS900 and F57. Biochemical test to confirm M. tuberculosis presence was also conducted. Fifteen isolates of Mycobacterium sp. were found from the faeces samples but not from the corresponding milk samples. However, conventional PCR conducted on the isolate as well as the milk samples, gave negative results. Biochemical test proved that all Mycobacterium sp. isolates were not M. tuberculosis. This study indicated the prevalence of MAP in Bogor was less than 5%. These findings should be continued by observational study to achieve the comprehensive information at the cattle and herd level. Bovine Tuberculosis monitoring should be done also to protect dairy herd and food safety for the community.

  8. Establishing Caenorhabditis elegans as a model for Mycobacterium avium subspecies hominissuis infection and intestinal colonization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamie L. Everman

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans has become a model system for studying the disease interaction between pathogens and the host. To determine whether the transparent nematode could serve as a useful model for Mycobacterium avium subspecies hominissuis (MAH infection of the intestinal tract, worms were fed MAH and assayed for the effects of the bacterial infection on the worm. It was observed during feeding that viable MAH increases in the intestinal lumen in a time dependent manner. Ingestion of MAH was deemed non-toxic to worms as MAH-fed populations have similar survival curves to those fed E. coli strain OP50. Pulse-chase analysis using E. coli strain OP50 revealed that MAH colonize the intestinal tract, as viable MAH remain within the intestine after the assay. Visualization of intestinal MAH using histology and transmission electron microscopy demonstrates that MAH localizes to the intestinal lumen, as well as establishes direct contact with intestinal epithelium. Bacterial colonization appears to have a detrimental effect on the microvilli of the intestinal epithelial cells. The MAH ΔGPL/4B2 strain with a mutation in glycopeptidolipid production is deficient in binding to human epithelial cells (HEp-2, as well as deficient in its ability to bind to and colonize the intestinal tract of C. elegans as efficiently as wild-type MAH. These data indicate the C. elegans may serve as a useful model system for MAH pathogenesis and in determining the mechanisms used by MAH during infection and colonization of the intestinal epithelium.

  9. Exploring the zoonotic potential of Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis through comparative genomics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James W Wynne

    Full Text Available A comparative genomics approach was utilised to compare the genomes of Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP isolated from early onset paediatric Crohn's disease (CD patients as well as Johne's diseased animals. Draft genome sequences were produced for MAP isolates derived from four CD patients, one ulcerative colitis (UC patient, and two non-inflammatory bowel disease (IBD control individuals using Illumina sequencing, complemented by comparative genome hybridisation (CGH. MAP isolates derived from two bovine and one ovine host were also subjected to whole genome sequencing and CGH. All seven human derived MAP isolates were highly genetically similar and clustered together with one bovine type isolate following phylogenetic analysis. Three other sequenced isolates (including the reference bovine derived isolate K10 were genetically distinct. The human isolates contained two large tandem duplications, the organisations of which were confirmed by PCR. Designated vGI-17 and vGI-18 these duplications spanned 63 and 109 open reading frames, respectively. PCR screening of over 30 additional MAP isolates (3 human derived, 27 animal derived and one environmental isolate confirmed that vGI-17 and vGI-18 are common across many isolates. Quantitative real-time PCR of vGI-17 demonstrated that the proportion of cells containing the vGI-17 duplication varied between 0.01 to 15% amongst isolates with human isolates containing a higher proportion of vGI-17 compared to most animal isolates. These findings suggest these duplications are transient genomic rearrangements. We hypothesise that the over-representation of vGI-17 in human derived MAP strains may enhance their ability to infect or persist within a human host by increasing genome redundancy and conferring crude regulation of protein expression across biologically important regions.

  10. A Rational Framework for Evaluating the Next Generation of Vaccines Against Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John eBannantine

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Since the early 1980s, several investigations have focused on developing a vaccine against Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP, the causative agent of Johne’s disease in cattle and sheep. These studies used whole-cell inactivated vaccines that have proven useful in limiting disease progression, but have not prevented infection. In contrast, modified live vaccines that invoke a Th1 type immune response, may improve protection against infection. Spurred by recent advances in the ability to create defined knockouts in MAP, several independent laboratories have developed modified live vaccine candidates by transpositional mutation of virulence and metabolic genes in MAP. In order to accelerate the process of identification and comparative evaluation of the most promising modified live MAP vaccine candidates, members of a multi-institutional USDA-funded research consortium, the Johne’s disease integrated program (JDIP, met to establish a standardized testing platform using agreed upon protocols. A total of 22 candidates vaccine strains developed in five independent laboratories in the United States and New Zealand voluntarily entered into a double blind stage gated trial pipeline. In Phase I, the survival characteristics of each candidate were determined in bovine macrophages. Attenuated strains moved to Phase II, where tissue colonization of C57/BL6 mice were evaluated in a challenge model. In Phase III, five promising candidates from Phase I and II were evaluated for their ability to reduce fecal shedding, tissue colonization and pathology in a baby goat challenge model. Formation of a multi-institutional consortium for vaccine strain evaluation has revealed insights for the implementation of vaccine trials for Johne’s disease and other animal pathogens. We conclude by suggesting the best way forward based on this 3-phase trial experience and challenge the rationale for use of a macrophage-to-mouse-to native host pipeline for

  11. A rational framework for evaluating the next generation of vaccines against Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bannantine, John P; Hines, Murray E; Bermudez, Luiz E; Talaat, Adel M; Sreevatsan, Srinand; Stabel, Judith R; Chang, Yung-Fu; Coussens, Paul M; Barletta, Raúl G; Davis, William C; Collins, Desmond M; Gröhn, Yrjö T; Kapur, Vivek

    2014-01-01

    Since the early 1980s, several investigations have focused on developing a vaccine against Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP), the causative agent of Johne's disease in cattle and sheep. These studies used whole-cell inactivated vaccines that have proven useful in limiting disease progression, but have not prevented infection. In contrast, modified live vaccines that invoke a Th1 type immune response, may improve protection against infection. Spurred by recent advances in the ability to create defined knockouts in MAP, several independent laboratories have developed modified live vaccine candidates by transpositional mutation of virulence and metabolic genes in MAP. In order to accelerate the process of identification and comparative evaluation of the most promising modified live MAP vaccine candidates, members of a multi-institutional USDA-funded research consortium, the Johne's disease integrated program (JDIP), met to establish a standardized testing platform using agreed upon protocols. A total of 22 candidates vaccine strains developed in five independent laboratories in the United States and New Zealand voluntarily entered into a double blind stage gated trial pipeline. In Phase I, the survival characteristics of each candidate were determined in bovine macrophages. Attenuated strains moved to Phase II, where tissue colonization of C57/BL6 mice were evaluated in a challenge model. In Phase III, five promising candidates from Phase I and II were evaluated for their ability to reduce fecal shedding, tissue colonization and pathology in a baby goat challenge model. Formation of a multi-institutional consortium for vaccine strain evaluation has revealed insights for the implementation of vaccine trials for Johne's disease and other animal pathogens. We conclude by suggesting the best way forward based on this 3-phase trial experience and challenge the rationale for use of a macrophage-to-mouse-to native host pipeline for MAP vaccine development.

  12. Host responses to persistent Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis infection in surgically isolated bovine ileal segments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charavaryamath, Chandrashekhar; Gonzalez-Cano, Patricia; Fries, Patrick; Gomis, Susantha; Doig, Kimberley; Scruten, Erin; Potter, Andrew; Napper, Scott; Griebel, Philip J

    2013-02-01

    A lack of appropriate disease models has limited our understanding of the pathogenesis of persistent enteric infections with Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis. A model was developed for the controlled delivery of a defined dose of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis to surgically isolated ileal segments in newborn calves. The stable intestinal segments enabled the characterization of host responses to persistent M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis infections after a 9-month period, including an analysis of local mucosal immune responses relative to an adjacent uninfected intestinal compartment. M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis remained localized at the initial site of intestinal infection and was not detected by PCR in the mesenteric lymph node. M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis-specific T cell proliferative responses included both CD4 and γδ T cell receptor (γδTcR) T cell responses in the draining mesenteric lymph node. The levels of CD8(+) and γδTcR(+) T cells increased significantly (P avium subsp. paratuberculosis-specific tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and gamma interferon secretion by lamina propria leukocytes was also significantly (P avium subsp. paratuberculosis infection. In conclusion, surgically isolated ileal segments provided a model system for the establishment of a persistent and localized enteric M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis infection in cattle and facilitated the analysis of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis-specific changes in mucosal leukocyte phenotype and function. The accumulation of DC subpopulations in the lamina propria suggests that further investigation of mucosal DCs may provide insight into host responses to M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis infection and improve vaccine strategies to prevent M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis infection.

  13. Full genome sequence of a Danish isolate of Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis, strain Ejlskov2007

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Afzal, Mamuna; Abidi, Soad; Mikkelsen, Heidi

    , consisting of 4317 unique gene families. Comparison with M. avium paratuberculosis strain K10 revealed only 3436 genes in common (~70%). We have used GenomeAtlases to show conserved (and unique) regions along the Ejlskov2007 chromosome, compared to 2 other Mycobacterium avium sequenced genomes. Pan-genome...

  14. Susceptibility to paratuberculosis infection in cattle is associated withsingle nucleotide polymorphisms in Toll-like receptor 2 which modulate immune responses against Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koets, A; Santema, W; Oostenriik, D;

    2010-01-01

    Paratuberculosis is a chronic intestinal infection in ruminants, caused by Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (Map). To study the role of host genetics in disease susceptibility, the Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) gene, selected based on its potential role in immunity to mycobacterial i...

  15. Detection of mycobacteria, Mycobacterium avium subspecies, and Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex by a novel tetraplex real-time PCR assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sevilla, Iker A; Molina, Elena; Elguezabal, Natalia; Pérez, Valentín; Garrido, Joseba M; Juste, Ramón A

    2015-03-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex, Mycobacterium avium, and many other nontuberculous mycobacteria are worldwide distributed microorganisms of major medical and veterinary importance. Considering the growing epidemiologic significance of wildlife-livestock-human interrelation, developing rapid detection tools of high specificity and sensitivity is vital to assess their presence and accelerate the process of diagnosing mycobacteriosis. Here we describe the development and evaluation of a novel tetraplex real-time PCR for simultaneous detection of Mycobacterium genus, M. avium subspecies, and M. tuberculosis complex in an internally monitored single assay. The method was evaluated using DNA from mycobacterial (n = 38) and nonmycobacterial (n = 28) strains, tissues spiked with different CFU amounts of three mycobacterial species (n = 57), archival clinical samples (n = 233), and strains isolated from various hosts (n = 147). The minimum detectable DNA amount per reaction was 50 fg for M. bovis BCG and M. kansasii and 5 fg for M. avium subsp. hominissuis. When spiked samples were analyzed, the method consistently detected as few as 100 to 1,000 mycobacterial CFU per gram. The sensitivity and specificity values for the panel of clinical samples were 97.5 and 100% using a verified culture-based method as the reference method. The assays performed on clinical isolates confirmed these results. This PCR was able to identify M. avium and M. tuberculosis complex in the same sample in one reaction. In conclusion, the tetraplex real-time PCR we designed represents a highly specific and sensitive tool for the detection and identification of mycobacteria in routine laboratory diagnosis with potential additional uses.

  16. Bayesian kriging of seroprevalence to Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis and Neospora caninum in Alberta beef and dairy cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, James A; Scott, H Morgan

    2007-12-01

    Identifying spatial patterns of risk is important in the study of diseases with ecologic causes. Furthermore, relatively complex hierarchical modeling is required to determine how factors that are organized across levels interact, such as how an ecologic cause interacts with farm management and with animal characteristics. The objective of this study was to map the risk for Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP - the causative agent of Johne's disease) and Neospora caninum (NC - the cause of neosporosis) infections in Alberta beef and dairy cattle. This objective utilized Bayesian generalized linear kriging to partition herd effects into a portion attributable to location and a portion that was independent of location. Seropositivity to NC in beef cattle showed strong support for spatial covariance, suggesting that ecologic causes were important for beef cattle but not dairy cattle. There was little evidence of spatial covariance for MAP seropositivity in either beef or dairy cattle.

  17. Possible transmission of Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis through potable water: lessons from an urban cluster of Crohn's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierce Ellen S

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A "cluster" of patients refers to the geographic proximity of unrelated patients with the same disease and suggests a common environmental cause for that disease. Clusters of patients with Crohn's disease have been linked to the presence of an infectious microorganism in unpasteurized milk and cheese, untreated water supplied by wells or springs, animal manure used as fertilizer for family vegetable gardens, and bodies of water contaminated by agricultural runoff. Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP is the suspected cause of Crohn's disease. MAP causes a disease in dairy cows and other animals that is similar to Crohn's disease, called Johne's ('Yo-knees' disease or paratuberculosis. Dairy cows with Johne's disease secrete MAP into their milk and excrete MAP into their feces. MAP is present in untreated water such as well water, in bodies of water contaminated by agricultural runoff, and in unpasteurized milk and cheese. The "treatment" of "tap" water to make it "drinkable" or "potable" by the processes of sedimentation, filtration and chlorination has little to no effect on MAP. MAP is so resistant to chlorine disinfection that such disinfection actually selects for its growth. Other subspecies of Mycobacterium avium grow in biofilms present on tap water pipes. Despite the documented presence of MAP in tap water and its probable growth on tap water pipes, clusters of Crohn's disease have not previously been described in relationship to tap water pipes supplying patients' homes. This report describes three unrelated individuals who lived on the same block along a street in a midwestern American city and developed Crohn's disease within four years of each other in the 1960's. A common tap water pipe supplied their homes. This is the first reported cluster of Crohn's disease possibly linked to fully treated drinking water, and is consistent with previously reported clusters of Crohn's disease linked to an infectious

  18. Genomic Characterization of the Vaccinal Strain of Mycobacterium Avium Subspecies Paratuberculosis (MAP 316F by MIRU-VNTR

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    Zahra Ebrahim (MSc

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objective: Paratuberculosis is a chronic granulomatous enteritis of ruminants caused by Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP. this study aimed to characterize the genome of the MAP 316F strain. Methods: The MAP 316F strain was subjected to the PCR-F57 and PCR-IS900 experiments in order to ensure its identity as MAP. This was followed by application of the Thibault genotyping system consisting of eight loci including 292, x3, 25, 47, 3, 7, 10 and 32. Required genomic material for all experiments was prepared using the simple method of boiling. Gel electrophoresis findings related to the typing PCRs were backed by sequencing of amplification products. Results: In PCR amplification, eight products with the size of 300, 298, 350, 217, 208, 203, 803 and 649 bp were detected at 292, X3, 25, 47, 3, 7, 10 and 32 loci, holding 3, 2, 3, 3, 2, 2, 2 and 8 copies of TRs at these loci, respectively. Conclusion: This genomic pattern is matched with that of the MAP 316F vaccine strain from the French Merial company and also the MAP K10 fully-sequenced strain. Keywords: Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis, Genomics, Genotyping techniques, Strain

  19. Search for Mycobacterium avium Subspecies paratuberculosis Antigens for the Diagnosis of Paratuberculosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mon, M.L.; Vale, M.; Baschetti, G.; Alvarado Pinedo, F.; Gioffre, A.; Traveria, G.; Willemsen, P.; Bakker, D.; Romano, M.I.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate a wide panel of antigens of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) to select candidates for the diagnosis of paratuberculosis (PTB). A total of 54 recombinant proteins were spotted onto nitrocellulose membranes and exposed to sera from animals with

  20. Cellular and humoral immune responses in sheep vaccinated with candidate antigens MAP2698c and MAP3567 from Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis

    OpenAIRE

    Ratna eGurung; Auriol ePurdie; Richard eWhittington; Douglas eBegg

    2014-01-01

    Control of Johne's disease, caused by Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP) in ruminants using commercially available vaccine reduces production losses, mortality, fecal shedding and histopathological lesions but does not provide complete protection from infection and interferes with serological diagnosis of Johne's disease and bovine tuberculosis. At this time no recombinant antigens have been found to provide superior protection compared to whole killed or live-attenuated MA...

  1. Relatedness of Mycobacterium avium subspecies hominissuis clinical isolates of human and porcine origins assessed by MLVA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leão, Célia; Canto, Ana; Machado, Diana; Sanches, Ilda Santos; Couto, Isabel; Viveiros, Miguel; Inácio, João; Botelho, Ana

    2014-09-17

    Mycobacterium avium subsp. hominissuis (MAH) is an important opportunistic pathogen, infecting humans and animals, notably pigs. Several methods have been used to characterize MAH strains. RFLP and PFGE typing techniques have been used as standard methods but are technically demanding. In contrast, the analysis of VNTR loci is a simpler, affordable and highly reliable PCR-based technique, allowing a numerical and reproductive digitalization of typing data. In this study, the analysis of Mycobacterium avium tandem repeats (MATRs) loci was adapted to evaluate the genetic diversity of epidemiological unrelated MAH clinical strains of human (n=28) and porcine (n=69) origins, collected from diverse geographical regions across mainland Portugal. These MAH isolates were found to be genetically diverse and genotypes are randomly distributed across the country. Some of the human strains shared identical VNTR profiles with porcine isolates. Our study shows that the VNTR genotyping using selected MATR loci is a useful analysis technique for assessing the genetic diversity of MAH isolates from Portugal. This typing method could be successfully applied in other countries toward the implementation of a worldwide open-access database of MATR-VNTR profiles of MAH isolates, allowing a better assessment of the global epidemiology traits of this important pathogenic species.

  2. Current status of Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis infection in animals & humans in India: What needs to be done?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajay Vir Singh

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP has emerged as a major health problem for domestic livestock and human beings. Reduced per animal productivity of domestic livestock seriously impacts the economics of dairy farming globally. High to very high bioload of MAP in domestic livestock and also in the human population has been reported from north India. Presence of live MAP bacilli in commercial supplies of raw and pasteurized milk and milk products indicates its public health significance. MAP is not inactivated during pasteurization, therefore, entering into human food chain daily. Recovery of MAP from patients with inflammatory bowel disease or Crohn's disease and animal healthcare workers suffering with chronic gastrointestinal problems indicate a close association of MAP with a number of chronic and other diseases affecting human health. Higher bioload of MAP in the animals increases the risk of exposure to the human population with MAP. This review summarizes the current status of MAP infection in animals as well as in human beings and also highlights the prospects of effective management and control of disease in animals to reduce the risk of exposure to human population.

  3. Comparison of fecal pooling methods and DNA extraction kits for the detection of Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mita, Akiko; Mori, Yasuyuki; Nakagawa, Tetsuo; Tasaki, Tomoko; Utiyama, Katsuo; Mori, Hitomi

    2016-02-01

    The aim of the study was to develop a sensitive method using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) with pooled fecal samples for the screening of Johne's disease (JD). Manufacturer-specified and our new pooling method in combination with five commercial kits for DNA extraction and purification were compared. Different volumes of pooled fecal suspensions were tested, and the results were compared for individual samples and three pool sizes (5, 10, and 50 samples); each of the fecal suspensions, which were prepared from healthy dairy and beef cattle was spiked with 0, 10, 100, or 1000 cultured Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP) organisms or was mixed with fecal suspensions from experimentally infected cattle. The MAP DNA detection proportion with our pooling method in combination with Johne-Spin kit (Fasmac, Japan) was 100% for all models and all pool sizes, except for the low shedder model with a pool size of 50. There was no loss of sensitivity in pools of 10 subjects or less by using the new method. These results suggest that new method is a sensitive, practical, and cost-effective screening test for the detection of MAP-infected cattle and the monitoring of JD-free herds.

  4. Genetic diversity of Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis and the influence of strain type on infection and pathogenesis: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevenson, Karen

    2015-06-19

    Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (Map) is an important pathogen that causes a chronic, progressive granulomatous enteritis known as Johne's disease or paratuberculosis. The disease is endemic in many parts of the world and responsible for considerable losses to the livestock and associated industries. Diagnosis and control are problematic, due mostly to the long incubation period of the disease when infected animals show no clinical signs and are difficult to detect, and the ability of the organism to survive and persist in the environment. The existence of phenotypically distinct strains of Map has been known since the 1930s but the genetic differentiation of Map strain types has been challenging and only recent technologies have proven sufficiently discriminative for strain comparisons, tracing the sources of infection and epidemiological studies. It is important to understand the differences that exist between Map strains and how they influence both development and transmission of disease. This information is required to develop improved diagnostics and effective vaccines for controlling Johne's disease. Here I review the current classification of Map strain types, the sources of the genetic variability within strains, growth characteristics and epidemiological traits associated with strain type and the influence of strain type on infection and pathogenicity.

  5. Transcriptional analysis of diverse strains Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis in primary bovine monocyte derived macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xiaochun; Tu, Zheng J; Coussens, Paul M; Kapur, Vivek; Janagama, Harish; Naser, Saleh; Sreevatsan, Srinand

    2008-10-01

    In this study we analyzed the macrophage-induced gene expression of three diverse genotypes of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP). Using selective capture of transcribed sequences (SCOTS) on three genotypically diverse MAP isolates from cattle, human, and sheep exposed to primary bovine monocyte derived macrophages for 48 h and 120 h we created and sequenced six cDNA libraries. Sequence annotations revealed that the cattle isolate up-regulated 27 and 241 genes; the human isolate up-regulated 22 and 53 genes, and the sheep isolate up-regulated 35 and 358 genes, at the two time points respectively. Thirteen to thirty-three percent of the genes identified did not have any annotated function. Despite variations in the genes identified, the patterns of expression fell into overlapping cellular functions as inferred by pathway analysis. For example, 10-12% of the genes expressed by all three strains at each time point were associated with cell-wall biosynthesis. All three strains of MAP studied up-regulated genes in pathways that combat oxidative stress, metabolic and nutritional starvation, and cell survival. Taken together, this comparative transcriptional analysis suggests that diverse MAP genotypes respond with similar modus operandi for survival in the host.

  6. Short communication: Viable Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis in retail artisanal Coalho cheese from Northeastern Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faria, A C S; Schwarz, D G G; Carvalho, I A; Rocha, B B; De Carvalho Castro, K N; Silva, M R; Moreira, M A S

    2014-07-01

    Mycobacterium avium ssp. paratuberculosis (MAP) is the etiologic agent of paratuberculosis and it potentially plays a role in Crohn's disease. In humans, the main route of transmission of MAP might be the intake of contaminated milk and dairy products. Considering that MAP has already been detected in many types of cheese in different counties, and that Coalho cheese is an important dairy product in northeastern Brazil, the aim of this study was to report the first detection of MAP in retail Coalho cheese in Brazil by PCR and culture. Of 30 retail Coalho cheese samples, 3 (10%) amplified fragments of a similar size to that expected (626 bp) were obtained and viable MAP was recovered by culture from 1 (3.3%) sample. The DNA from the positive culture sample was sequenced and showed 99% identity with the insertion sequence IS900 deposited in GenBank. It was possible to identify the presence of MAP-specific DNA in the analyzed samples for the first time in Brazil, and to recover viable cells from retail Coalho cheese.

  7. Short communication: effect of homogenization on heat inactivation of Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis in milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammer, P; Kiesner, C; Walte, H-G C

    2014-01-01

    Mycobacterium avium ssp. paratuberculosis (MAP) can be present in cow milk and low numbers may survive high-temperature, short-time (HTST) pasteurization. Although HTST treatment leads to inactivation of at least 5 log10 cycles, it might become necessary to enhance the efficacy of HTST by additional treatments such as homogenization if the debate about the role of MAP in Crohn's disease of humans concludes that MAP is a zoonotic agent. This study aimed to determine whether disrupting the clumps of MAP in milk by homogenization during the heat treatment process would enhance the inactivation of MAP. We used HTST pasteurization in a continuous-flow pilot-plant pasteurizer and evaluated the effect of upstream, downstream, and in-hold homogenization on inactivation of MAP. Reduction of MAP at 72°C with a holding time of 28s was between 3.7 and 6.9 log10 cycles, with an overall mean of 5.5 log10 cycles. None of the 3 homogenization modes applied showed a statistically significant additional effect on the inactivation of MAP during HTST treatment.

  8. Search for Mycobacterium avium Subspecies paratuberculosis Antigens for the Diagnosis of Paratuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Laura Mon

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate a wide panel of antigens of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP to select candidates for the diagnosis of paratuberculosis (PTB. A total of 54 recombinant proteins were spotted onto nitrocellulose membranes and exposed to sera from animals with PTB (n=25, healthy animals (n=10, and animals experimentally infected with M. bovis (n=8. This initial screening allowed us to select seven antigens: MAP 2513, MAP 1693, MAP 2020, MAP 0038, MAP 1272, MAP 0209c, and MAP 0210c, which reacted with sera from animals with PTB and showed little cross-reactivity with sera from healthy animals and animals experimentally infected with M. bovis. The second step was to evaluate the antigen cocktail of these seven antigens by ELISA. For this evaluation, we used sera from animals with PTB (n=25, healthy animals (n=26, and animals experimentally infected with M. bovis (n=17. Using ELISA, the cocktail of the seven selected MAP antigens reacted with sera from 18 of the 25 animals with PTB and did not exhibit cross-reactivity with healthy animals and only low reactivity with animals with bovine tuberculosis. The combined application of these antigens could form part of a test which may help in the diagnosis of PTB.

  9. Cytokine responses of bovine macrophages to diverse clinical Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis strains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coussens Paul

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP, the causative agent of Johne's disease (JD persistently infects and survives within the host macrophages. While it is established that substantial genotypic variation exists among MAP, evidence for the correlates that associate specific MAP genotypes with clinical or sub-clinical disease phenotypes is presently unknown. Thus we studied strain differences in intracellular MAP survival and host responses in a bovine monocyte derived macrophage (MDM system. Results Intracellular survival studies showed that a bovine MAP isolate (B1018 and a human MAP isolate (Hu6 persisted in relatively higher numbers when compared with a sheep MAP isolate (S7565 at 24-hr, 48-hr and 96-hr post infection (PI. MDMs stimulated with B1018 up-regulated IL-10 at the transcript level and down-regulated TNFα at the protein and transcript levels compared with stimulations by the S7565 and Hu6. MDMs infected with Hu6 showed a down regulatory pattern of IL-10 and TNFα compared to stimulations by S7565. Cells stimulated with B1018 and Hu6 had low levels of matrix metalloprotease-3 (MMP3 and high levels of tissue inhibitor of metalloprotease-1 (TIMP1 at 96-hr PI relative to MDMs stimulated by S7565. Conclusion Taken together, results suggest that the bovine (B1018 and the human (Hu6 MAP isolates lead to anti-inflammatory and anti-invasive pathways in the macrophage environment whereas the sheep (S7565 MAP isolate induces a pro-inflammatory pathway. Thus the infecting strain genotype may play a role in polarizing the host immune responses and dictate the clinicopathological outcomes in this economically important disease.

  10. Intestinal infection following aerosol challenge of calves with Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eisenberg Susanne WF

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A challenge experiment was performed to investigate whether administration of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP via the respiratory route leads to MAP infection in calves. Eighteen calves from test negative dams were randomly allocated to four groups. Six calves were challenged with MAP nasally and six calves were challenged by transtracheal injection; three orally challenged calves served as positive controls, and three non challenged calves as negative controls. The challenge was performed as a nine-fold trickle dose, 107 CFU in total. Blood and faecal samples were collected frequently. Calves were euthanized three months post-challenge and extensively sampled. Blood samples were tested for the presence of antibodies and interferon gamma producing cells by ELISA. Faecal and tissue samples were cultured in a liquid culture system and the presence of MAP was confirmed by IS900 realtime PCR. Fourteen out of fifteen calves had no MAP antibody response. The negative controls remained negative; all positive controls became infected. Two nasally challenged calves showed a Purified Protein Derivative Avian (PPDA specific interferon gamma response. In all nasally challenged calves, MAP positive intestinal samples were detected. In three calves of the nasal group MAP positive retropharyngeal lymph nodes or tonsils were detected. In all calves of the transtracheal group MAP positive intestinal tissues were detected as well and three had a MAP positive tracheobronchial lymph node. These findings indicate that inhalation of MAP aerosols can result in infection. These experimental results may be relevant for transmission under field conditions since viable MAP has been detected in dust on commercial dairy farms.

  11. Sardinian Type 1 diabetes patients, Transthyretin and Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis infection

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    Masala Speranza

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP is the cause of Johne’s disease, an enteric granulomatous disease. Recently, MAP has been associated with different autoimmune diseases such as Crohn’s disease, type 1 diabetes (T1D and multiple sclerosis. Transthyretin (TTR is a plasma transport protein for thyroid hormone and forms a complex with retinol-binding protein. Reduced TTR plasma levels in MAP infected ovines have been reported. TTR exerts also a functional role in the pancreas promoting insulin release and protecting β-cells from death. Our objective was to identify a protein that could be used as a diagnostic marker of T1D for determining disease progression and monitoring at-risk patients. We postulate that serological TTR levels would be reduced in T1D MAP exposed patients. Our hypothesis is based on the observation of cases of T1D patients with decreased TTR levels beside the reduced TTR plasma levels in ovines with Johne’s disease. We quantified the plasma protein levels of TTR in 50 people with T1D and 51 age-matched healthy controls (HCs by means of enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA. Findings Our pilot study showed that plasma TTR levels were not significantly lower/higher in T1D Sardinian cases compared to the HCs. Conclusion These preliminary data indicate that plasma TTR may not be a good candidate biomarker for T1D diagnosis and further studies to elucidate the possible link are needed.

  12. Genome-wide analysis of the emerging infection with Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis in the Arabian camels (Camelus dromedarius.

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    Pallab Ghosh

    Full Text Available Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (M. ap is the causative agent of paratuberculosis or Johne's disease (JD in herbivores with potential involvement in cases of Crohn's disease in humans. JD is spread worldwide and is economically important for both beef and dairy industries. Generally, pathogenic ovine strains (M. ap-S are mainly found in sheep while bovine strains (M. ap-C infect other ruminants (e.g. cattle, goat, deer, as well as sheep. In an effort to characterize this emerging infection in dromedary/Arabian camels, we successfully cultured M. ap from several samples collected from infected camels suffering from chronic, intermittent diarrhea suggestive of JD. Gene-based typing of isolates indicated that all isolates belong to sheep lineage of strains of M. ap (M. ap-S, suggesting a putative transmission from infected sheep herds. Screening sheep and goat herds associated with camels identified the circulation of this type in sheep but not goats. The current genome-wide analysis recognizes these camel isolates as a sub-lineage of the sheep strain with a significant number of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs between sheep and camel isolates (∼1000 SNPs. Such polymorphism could represent geographical differences among isolates or host adaptation of M. ap during camel infection. To our knowledge, this is the first attempt to examine the genomic basis of this emerging infection in camels with implications on the evolution of this important pathogen. The sequenced genomes of M. ap isolates from camels will further assist our efforts to understand JD pathogenesis and the dynamic of disease transmission across animal species.

  13. Examination of Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis mixed genotype infections in dairy animals using a whole genome sequencing approach

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    Fraser W. Davidson

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Many pathogenic mycobacteria are known to cause severe disease in humans and animals. M. avium subspecies paratuberculosis (Map is the causative agent of Johne’s disease—a chronic wasting disease affecting ruminants such as cattle and sheep, responsible for significant economic losses in the dairy and beef industries. Due to the lack of treatment options or effective vaccines, mitigating losses can be difficult. In addition, the early stages of Map infection may occur in asymptomatic hosts that continue to shed viable bacteria in their faeces, leading to the infection of other healthy animals. Using multi-locus short sequence repeat (ML-SSR analysis we previously reported that individual Johne’s positive dairy cattle from farms across the island of Newfoundland were infected by Map with multiple SSR-types simultaneously. The occurrence of multiple mixed genotype infections has the potential to change pathogen and disease dynamics as well as reduce the efficacy of treatments and vaccines. Therefore, we conducted whole genome sequencing (WGS and single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP analysis on a subset of these isolates for a more in-depth examination. We also implemented a PCR assay using two discriminatory SNPs and demonstrated the incidence of a mixed infection by three genotypically diverse Map isolates in a single animal. In addition, results show that WGS and SNP analysis can provide a better understanding of the relationship between Map isolates from individual and different animals. In the future such studies on the occurrence of mixed genotype infections could potentially lead to the identification of variable pathogenicity of different genotypes and allow for better tracking of Map isolates for epidemiological studies.

  14. Genotype profiles of Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis isolates recovered from animals, commercial milk, and human beings in North India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, S V; Sohal, J S; Singh, P K; Singh, A V

    2009-09-01

    To understand the genetic diversity of Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP) isolates recovered from domestic and wild ruminants, commercial milk, and human beings in North India. Genotyping of MAP isolates (N=117) recovered from animals, commercial milk, and human beings in different regions of North India between 1998 and 2007 was carried out using IS1311 PCR-restriction enzyme analysis (REA) and short sequence repeat (SSR) typing (G and GGT repeat loci). Of the 117 MAP isolates recovered from North India, bison-type was the predominant (83.8%) genotype followed by cattle-type (16.2%). Bison-type was the exclusive genotype recovered from goats, sheep, buffaloes, and blue bulls. However, both bison-type and cattle-type genotypes were recovered from cattle, humans, and commercial bovine milk samples. The relative distribution of the two genotypes was different in the different regions. Bison-type was the major genotype at the Central Institute for Research on Goats (CIRG), Akos, Ajmer, and Mathura, whereas, cattle-type was the major genotype from New Delhi and Agra. SSR typing of these isolates revealed that all MAP bison-type isolates had an identical profile (7g4ggt) with respect to G and GGT repeat SSR loci. In this study the sheep-type genotype was not found in North India. This study is the first from India to report the presence of two kinds of MAP genotypes (cattle-type and bison-type). However, non-reporting of the sheep-type genotype may not mean that it is absent in North India; the use of multiple culture media to recover MAP from clinical samples for future investigations is advised.

  15. Presence of intestinal Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP DNA is not associated with altered MMP expression in ulcerative colitis

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    Halwe Jörg M

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP is suspected to be a causative agent in human Crohn's disease (CD. Recent evidence suggests that pathogenic mycobacteria and MAP can induce the expression of Matrix Metalloproteinases (MMP, which are the main proteases in the pathogenesis of mucosal ulcerations in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD. Within this study we assessed the prevalence of intestinal MAP specific DNA in patients with Crohn's disease, ulcerative colitis (UC, and healthy controls. We further analysed regulation patterns of MMPs in mucosal tissues of UC patients with and without intestinal MAP DNA detection. Methods Colonic biopsy samples were obtained from 63 Norwegian and German IBD patients and 21 healthy controls. RNA was quantified by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR to study MMP gene expression in both pathological and healthy mucosal specimens. The presence of MAP DNA in colonic mucosa was examined using MAP specific PCR. Results MAP DNA was detected in 20% of UC patients and 33% of healthy controls but only in 7% of patients with CD. UC patients treated with corticosteroids exhibited a significantly increased frequency of intestinal MAP DNA compared to those not receiving corticosteroids. Expression of MMP-1, -2, -7, -9, -13, -19, -28 and TNF-α did not differ between UC patients with presence of intestinal MAP DNA compared to those without. MMP-2, MMP-9 and MMP-13 were significantly decreased in UC patients receiving corticosteroids. Conclusions The presence of intestinal MAP specific DNA is not associated with altered MMP expression in UC in vivo. Corticosteroids are associated with increased detection of intestinal MAP DNA and decreased expression of certain MMPs. Frequent detection of MAP DNA in healthy controls might be attributable to the wide environmental distribution of MAP and its presence in the food-chain.

  16. Examination of Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis mixed genotype infections in dairy animals using a whole genome sequencing approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, Fraser W; Ahlstrom, Christina; De Buck, Jeroen; Whitney, Hugh G; Tahlan, Kapil

    2016-01-01

    Many pathogenic mycobacteria are known to cause severe disease in humans and animals. M. avium subspecies paratuberculosis (Map) is the causative agent of Johne's disease-a chronic wasting disease affecting ruminants such as cattle and sheep, responsible for significant economic losses in the dairy and beef industries. Due to the lack of treatment options or effective vaccines, mitigating losses can be difficult. In addition, the early stages of Map infection may occur in asymptomatic hosts that continue to shed viable bacteria in their faeces, leading to the infection of other healthy animals. Using multi-locus short sequence repeat (ML-SSR) analysis we previously reported that individual Johne's positive dairy cattle from farms across the island of Newfoundland were infected by Map with multiple SSR-types simultaneously. The occurrence of multiple mixed genotype infections has the potential to change pathogen and disease dynamics as well as reduce the efficacy of treatments and vaccines. Therefore, we conducted whole genome sequencing (WGS) and single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) analysis on a subset of these isolates for a more in-depth examination. We also implemented a PCR assay using two discriminatory SNPs and demonstrated the incidence of a mixed infection by three genotypically diverse Map isolates in a single animal. In addition, results show that WGS and SNP analysis can provide a better understanding of the relationship between Map isolates from individual and different animals. In the future such studies on the occurrence of mixed genotype infections could potentially lead to the identification of variable pathogenicity of different genotypes and allow for better tracking of Map isolates for epidemiological studies.

  17. Occurrence of Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis and Neospora caninum in Alberta cow-calf operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pruvot, M; Kutz, S; Barkema, H W; De Buck, J; Orsel, K

    2014-11-01

    Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) and Neospora caninum (NC) are two pathogens causing important production limiting diseases in the cattle industry. Significant impacts of MAP and NC have been reported on dairy cattle herds, but little is known about the importance, risk factors and transmission patterns in western Canadian cow-calf herds. In this cross-sectional study, the prevalence of MAP and NC infection in southwest Alberta cow-calf herds was estimated, risk factors for NC were identified, and the reproductive impacts of the two pathogens were assessed. Blood and fecal samples were collected from 840 cows on 28 cow-calf operations. Individual cow and herd management information was collected by self-administered questionnaires and one-on-one interviews. Bayesian estimates of the true prevalence of MAP and NC were computed, and bivariable and multivariable statistical analysis were done to assess the association between the NC serological status and ranch management risk factors, and the clinical effects of the two pathogens. Bayesian estimates of true prevalence indicated that 20% (95% probability interval: 8-38%) of herds had at least one MAP-positive cow, with a within-herd prevalence in positive herds of 22% (8-45%). From the Bayesian posterior distributions of NC prevalence, the median herd-level prevalence was 66% (33-95%) with 10% (4-21%) cow-level prevalence in positive herds. Multivariable analysis indicated that introducing purchased animals in the herd might increase the risk of NC. The negative association of NC with proper carcass disposal and presence of horses on ranch (possibly in relation to herd monitoring and guarding activities), may suggest the importance of wild carnivores in the dynamics of this pathogen in the study area. We also observed an association between MAP and NC serological status and the number of abortions. Additional studies should be done to further examine specific risk factors for MAP and NC, assess the

  18. Economic analysis of Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis vaccines in dairy herds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, J; Tauer, L W; Schukken, Y H; Gómez, M I; Smith, R L; Lu, Z; Grohn, Y T

    2012-04-01

    Johne's disease, or paratuberculosis, is a chronic infectious enteric disease of ruminants, caused by infection with Mycobacterium avium ssp. paratuberculosis (MAP). Given the absence of a fail-safe method of prevention or a cure, Johne's disease can inflict significant economic loss on the US dairy industry, with an estimated annual cost of over $200 million. Currently available MAP control strategies include management measures to improve hygiene, culling MAP serologic- or fecal-positive adult cows, and vaccination. Although the 2 first control strategies have been reported to be effective in reducing the incidence of MAP infection, the changes in herd management needed to conduct these control strategies require significant effort on the part of the dairy producer. On the other hand, vaccination is relatively simple to apply and requires minor changes in herd management. Despite these advantages, only 5% of US dairy operations use vaccination to control MAP. This low level of adoption of this technology is due to limited information on its cost-effectiveness and efficacy and some important inherent drawbacks associated with current MAP vaccines. This study investigates the epidemiological effect and economic values of MAP vaccines in various stages of development. We create scenarios for the potential epidemiological effects of MAP vaccines, and then estimate economically justifiable monetary values at which vaccines become economically beneficial to dairy producers such that a net present value (NPV) of a farm's net cash flow can be higher than the NPV of a farm using no control or alternative nonvaccine controls. Any vaccination with either low or high efficacy considered in this study yielded a higher NPV compared with a no MAP control. Moreover, high-efficacy vaccines generated an even higher NPV compared with alternative controls, making vaccination economically attractive. Two high-efficacy vaccines were particularly effective in MAP control and NPV

  19. Lama glama con signología y lesiones compatibles con paratuberculosis causadas por Mycobacterium avium subespecie avium Lama glama with signology and lesion compatible with paratuberculosis and injuries caused by Mycobacterium avium subspecies avium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.C Jorge

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Los camélidos sudamericanos (CS incluyen cuatro especies, guanaco, vicuña, alpaca y llama (Lama glama. En Argentina las llamas eran consideradas fauna y actualmente ganado, revalorizando su carne, fibra, cueros y pieles, también son un medio de subsistencia. Los CS son susceptibles a las enfermedades ocasionadas por micobacterias. El diagnóstico presuntivo se realiza por los signos clínicos y los hallazgos de necropsia y se confirma por técnicas bacteriológicas, moleculares e histopatología. El objetivo de este trabajo es describir un caso clínico con signos compatibles de paratuberculosis y el diagnóstico de laboratorio en una llama en cautiverio perteneciente a un zoológico de Olavarría, Provincia de Buenos Aires. En la necropsia se observaron lesiones granulomatosas en yeyuno, íleon y linfonodos mesentéricos compatibles con paratuberculosis, en los frotis directos y en la histopatología se observaron bacilos ácido-alcohol resistentes en cluster. Se confirmó la presencia de Mycobacterium avium subespecie avium por bacteriología y por PCR fue detectada la IS1245 característica de este agente, no detectando la IS900 correspondiente a Mycobacterium avium subespecie paratuberculosis. Esto permitió arribar al diagnóstico etiológico, combinando técnicas, de un caso de enteritis granulomatosa en llamas causado por Mycobacterium avium subespecie avium con signología y lesiones compatibles con paratuberculosis.Guanaco, vicuña, alpaca and llama (Lama glama are also known as Sudamerican camelids (SC. In Argentina llama was considered non profitable wildlife specie but now it is considered a mean for surviving because their meat, wool, leather and skin is valuable. SC are susceptible hosts of mycobacterial infections. A presumptive diagnosis is based on clinical and necropsy findings and is confirmed with bacterial isolation, molecular identification and histopathology. The objective of this publication is to describe a clinical

  20. Genome-wide association analysis and genomic prediction of Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis infection in US Jersey cattle.

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    Yalda Zare

    Full Text Available Paratuberculosis (Johne's disease, an enteric disorder in ruminants caused by Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP, causes economic losses in excess of $200 million annually to the US dairy industry. To identify genomic regions underlying susceptibility to MAP infection in Jersey cattle, a case-control genome-wide association study (GWAS was performed. Blood and fecal samples were collected from ∼ 5,000 mature cows in 30 commercial Jersey herds from across the US. Discovery data consisted of 450 cases and 439 controls genotyped with the Illumina BovineSNP50 BeadChip. Cases were animals with positive ELISA and fecal culture (FC results. Controls were animals negative to both ELISA and FC tests that matched cases on birth date and herd. Validation data consisted of 180 animals including 90 cases (positive to FC and 90 controls (negative to ELISA and FC, selected from discovery herds and genotyped by Illumina BovineLD BeadChip (∼ 7K SNPs. Two analytical approaches were used: single-marker GWAS using the GRAMMAR-GC method and Bayesian variable selection (Bayes C using GenSel software. GRAMMAR-GC identified one SNP on BTA7 at 68 megabases (Mb surpassing a significance threshold of 5 × 10(-5. ARS-BFGL-NGS-11887 on BTA23 (27.7 Mb accounted for the highest percentage of genetic variance (3.3% in the Bayes C analysis. SNPs identified in common by GRAMMAR-GC and Bayes C in both discovery and combined data were mapped to BTA23 (27, 29 and 44 Mb, 3 (100, 101, 106 and 107 Mb and 17 (57 Mb. Correspondence between results of GRAMMAR-GC and Bayes C was high (70-80% of most significant SNPs in common. These SNPs could potentially be associated with causal variants underlying susceptibility to MAP infection in Jersey cattle. Predictive performance of the model developed by Bayes C for prediction of infection status of animals in validation set was low (55% probability of correct ranking of paired case and control samples.

  1. The other way around: probiotic Lactobacillus acidophilus NP51 restrict progression of Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP) infection in Balb/c mice via activiation of CD8 alpha+ immune cell-mediated immunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    The objective of this study was to examine the immune-modulating effects of feeding a novel probiotic Lactobacillus acidophilus strain NP51 to specific pathogen-free Balb/c mice challenged with Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP), the causative agent of Johne’s disease (JD) in rumi...

  2. The other way around: Probiotic lactobacillus acidophilus NP51 restricts progression of Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP) infection in Balb/c mice through activation of CD8+ T cell-mediated immunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    The objective of this study was to examine immune effects of feeding novel probiotic Lactobacillus acidophilus strain NP51 to specific pathogen-free Balb/c mice challenged with Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP), the causative agent of Johne’s disease (JD). We hypothesized that fe...

  3. Comparative transcriptional analysis of human macrophages exposed to animal and human isolates of Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis with diverse genotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motiwala, Alifiya S; Janagama, Harish K; Paustian, Michael L; Zhu, Xiaochun; Bannantine, John P; Kapur, Vivek; Sreevatsan, Srinand

    2006-11-01

    Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis is the causative agent of Johne's disease in animals and has been hypothesized to be associated with Crohn's disease in humans. Recently, M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis isolates recovered from Crohn's disease patients were shown to have limited diversity, implying the existence of human disease-associated genotypes and strain sharing with animals (A. H. Ghadiali et al., J. Clin. Microbiol. 42:5345-5348, 2004). To explore whether these genotypic differences or similarities among human and animal isolates translated to functionally significant attributes such as variance in host preference and/or difference in magnitude of infections, we performed a global scale analysis of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis isolates that were representative of different genotypes and host species using DNA microarrays. Genome-wide characterization of the transcriptional changes was carried out using a human monocytic cell line (THP-1 cells) in response to different genotypes of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis isolates recovered from various hosts. We identified several differentially expressed genes during early intracellular infection, including those involved in common canonical pathways such as NF-kappaB, interleukin-6 (IL-6), mitogen-activated protein kinase/extracellular signal-regulated kinase, and Jun N-terminal protein kinase signaling, as well as genes involved in T helper type 1 (Th1) responses (such as CCL5 ligand) and those that encode several proinflammatory cytokines and chemokine receptors. The cattle and human isolates of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis, regardless of their short sequence repeat (SSR) genotype, induced similar global gene expression patterns in THP-1 cells. They differentially regulated genes necessary for cell survival without causing major alterations in proinflammatory genes. In contrast, the sheep isolates representing diverse SSR genotypes closely resembled the global gene expression pattern of an M

  4. No evidence that wild red deer (Cervus elaphus) on the Iberian Peninsula are a reservoir of Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carta, T; Martin-Hernando, M P; Boadella, M; Fernández-de-Mera, I G; Balseiro, A; Sevilla, I A; Vicente, J; Maio, E; Vieira-Pinto, M; Alvarez, J; Pérez-de-la-Lastra, J M; Garrido, J; Gortazar, C

    2012-06-01

    The potential role of red deer (Cervus elaphus) as a reservoir of Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP) infection is largely unknown. A total of 332 wild red deer were investigated using post-mortem examination, bacteriology and serology. Only three animals (1.12%) were found to have lesions on histopathological examination and no MAP bacteria were recovered on culture. The results suggest it is unlikely that wild red deer make a significant contribution to the maintenance of MAP infection in the region. The cross-reactivity of the ELISAs used indicates this diagnostic modality is ineffective in the detection of MAP infection in this species. The implications of these results for the control of this important pathogen in both livestock and wildlife are discussed.

  5. Evaluation of 'cattle' and 'Indian Bison' type antigens of Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis for diagnosis of bovine Johne's disease using 'indigenous ELISA' and AGPT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pahangchopi, Donna; Singh, Ran Vir; Singh, Shoor Vir; Das, Paritosh; Sharma, Deepak; Sardana, Tarun; Kumar, Naveen; Chaubey, Kundan Kumar; Gupta, Saurabh

    2014-12-01

    Two antigens ('cattle' type and 'Indian Bison' type) of Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis were evaluated for diagnosis of Johne's disease (JD) in a gaushala (cattle herd). Of the 160 cows of Sahiwal and Hariana breeds screened, 81 (50.6%) tested positive in ELISA and 66 (41.8%) in AGPT test. Using the two antigens, 33.5% tested positive in both the tests while 41.1% tested negative. Exclusively, only 8.2% tested positive in ELISA while 17.1% tested positive in AGPT. Two antigens together detected 58.9% prevalence of MAP in the gaushala. Individually, indigenous ELISA using antigen from native source of MAP proved superior to AGPT in the diagnosis of JD in cows.

  6. Differences in intermittent and continuous fecal shedding patterns between natural and experimental Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis infections in cattle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mitchell, R.M.; Schukken, Ynte; Koets, A.P.; Weber, Maarten; Bakker, D.; Stabel, Judy; Whitlock, R.H.; Louzoun, Yoram

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to study shedding patterns of cows infected with Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP). While multiple single farm studies of MAP dynamics were reported, there is not large scale meta-analysis of both natural and experimental infections. Large difference in

  7. Improved Culture Medium (TiKa) for Mycobacterium avium Subspecies Paratuberculosis (MAP) Matches qPCR Sensitivity and Reveals Significant Proportions of Non-viable MAP in Lymphoid Tissue of Vaccinated MAP Challenged Animals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bull, Tim J.; Munshil, Tulika; Melvang, Heidi Mikkelsen

    2017-01-01

    The quantitative detection of viable pathogen load is an important tool in determining the degree of infection in animals and contamination of foodstuffs. Current conventional culture methods are limited in their ability to determine these levels in Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis......Ka culture equates well with qPCR and provides important evidence that accuracy in estimating viable MAP load using DNA tests alone may vary significantly between samples of mucosal and lymphatic origin....

  8. Risk factors for the introduction and within-herd transmission of Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP infection on 59 Irish dairy herds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cashman W

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Since 1994, Irish cattle have been exposed to greater risks of acquiring Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP infection as a consequence of the importation of over 70,000 animals from continental Europe. In recent years, there has been an increase in the number of reported clinical cases of paratuberculosis in Ireland. This study examines the prevalence of factors that promote the introduction and within-herd transmission of Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP on selected Irish dairy farms in the Cork region, and the association between these factors and the results of MAP screening tests on milk sock filter residue (MFR. A total of 59 dairy farms, selected using non-random methods but apparently free of endemic paratuberculosis, were enrolled into the study. A questionnaire was used to collect data about risk factors for MAP introduction and transmission. The MFR was assessed on six occasions over 24 months for the presence of MAP, using culture and immunomagnetic separation prior to polymerase chain reaction (IMS-PCR. Furthermore, blood samples from all entire male and female animals over one year of age in 20 herds were tested by ELISA. Eighteen (31% farms had operated as closed herds since 1994, 28 (47% had purchased from multiple sources and 14 (24% had either direct or indirect (progeny contact with imported animals. Milk and colostrum were mixed on 51% of farms, while 88% of farms fed pooled milk. Thirty (51% herds tested negative to MFR culture and IMS-PCR, 12 (20% were MFR culture positive, 26 (44% were IMS-PCR positive and seven (12% were both culture and IMS-PCR positive. The probability of a positive MFR culture was significantly associated with reduced attendance at calving, and with increased use of individual calf pens and increased (but not significantly if mulitiple suckling was practised. There was poor agreement between MFR culture and MFR IMS-PCR results, but moderate agreement

  9. Serologic tests for detecting antibodies against Mycobacterium bovis and Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis in Eurasian wild boar (Sus scrofa scrofa).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boadella, Mariana; Lyashchenko, Konstantin; Greenwald, Reena; Esfandiari, Javan; Jaroso, Raquel; Carta, Tania; Garrido, Joseba M; Vicente, Joaquín; de la Fuente, José; Gortázar, Christian

    2011-01-01

    New tools to detect exposure of free-range Eurasian wild boar (Sus scrofa scrofa) to pathogenic mycobacteria would be valuable for improved disease surveillance and wildlife management. Two hundred sera from wild boar of known Mycobacterium bovis infection status were used to evaluate test suitability for the detection of antibodies against M. bovis and Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (or cross-reacting members of the M. avium complex). Two traditional enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays were evaluated using M. bovis purified protein derivative (bPPD) and paratuberculosis protoplasmatic antigen 3 (PPA3) as antigens, respectively, and a new point-of-care test format for bovine tuberculosis (bTB) that uses the innovative dual-path platform (DPP TB) test. The effect of individual factors (sex, age, lesions) on the diagnostic performance of the serologic tests was also determined. Although the DPP had a sensitivity of 89.6% and a specificity of 90.4%, for bPPD, the sensitivity was 79.2% and the specificity 100%. Both tests had a kappa agreement of 0.80. Sixty-five of 68 (95.6%) wild boar sera with antibodies against the PPA3 antigen corresponded to known M. bovis-infected wild boar. Significant differences were not observed in the bPPD and DPP readings among lesion categories or between age classes. A slight sex-related difference in sensitivity toward males in the DPP was found, but it was not detected in the bPPD enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The results support the use of antibody-based diagnostic tests for both large-scale and individual bTB testing of Eurasian wild boar and suggest that wild boar cannot be used as sentinels for infections caused by M. avium complex members.

  10. OCCURRENCE OF MYCOBACTERIUM AVIUM SUBSPECIES PARATUBERCULOSIS IN FREE-RANGING WILDLIFE SPECIES AND IN THE ENVIRONMENT OF SOUTHERN CHILE

    OpenAIRE

    SALGADO ALFARO, MIGUEL ANGEL

    2010-01-01

    Mycobacterium avium subp. paratuberculosis (Map) es el agente causal de la paratuberculosis, que es una enfermedad bacteriana catacterizada por una enteritis granulomatosa, diarrea, pérdida de peso corporal y muerte. Esta presente en todo el mundo y es responsable de importantes pérdidas económicas para la ganadería mundial. Los hospederos afectados primariamente son los rumiantes domésticos como los bovinos, ovinos y caprinos, sin embargo, paratuberculosis también se ha descrito en ...

  11. OCCURRENCE OF MYCOBACTERIUM AVIUM SUBSPECIES PARATUBERCULOSIS IN FREE-RANGING WILDLIFE SPECIES AND IN THE ENVIRONMENT OF SOUTHERN CHILE

    OpenAIRE

    SALGADO ALFARO; MIGUEL ANGEL

    2010-01-01

    Mycobacterium avium subp. paratuberculosis (Map) es el agente causal de la paratuberculosis, que es una enfermedad bacteriana catacterizada por una enteritis granulomatosa, diarrea, pérdida de peso corporal y muerte. Esta presente en todo el mundo y es responsable de importantes pérdidas económicas para la ganadería mundial. Los hospederos afectados primariamente son los rumiantes domésticos como los bovinos, ovinos y caprinos, sin embargo, paratuberculosis también se ha descrito en hospe...

  12. Molecular epidemiology of Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis: IS900 PCR identification and IS1311 polymorphism analysis from ruminants in the Punjab region of India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, P; Filia, G; Singh, S V; Patil, P K; Ravi Kumar, G V P P S; Sandhu, K S

    2011-03-01

    Johne's disease is chronic granulomatous infectious enteritis of animals caused by Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis. A total of 153 animals from 19 dairy farms, 2 gaushalas (unproductive-animal rehabilitation centers), 2 goat and 2 sheep farms from different districts of the Punjab region were selected on the basis of clinical signs of disease. All samples from cattle (n=86), buffalo (n=34), goat (n=25) and sheep (n=26) were subjected to Ziehl-Neelsen staining and DNA extraction by a freeze and thaw method. Ziehl-Neelsen staining detected 71% samples positive for acid-fast bacilli whereas IS900 PCR detected 55% positive for Map DNA. IS1311 PCR-REA analysis of IS900 positive samples revealed 'Bison' type as the most prevalent (82%) genotype of Map, infecting all domestic ruminants. 'Cattle' type was present in a minority of cases (15%) from cattle, buffaloes and goats. This is the first report of 'Cattle' type Map from buffalo and goat species in India. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Mycobacterium avium Subspecies paratuberculosis and Bovine Leukemia Virus Seroprevalence and Associated Risk Factors in Commercial Dairy and Beef Cattle in Northern and Northeastern China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Wu-Wen; Lv, Wen-Fa; Cong, Wei; Meng, Qing-Feng; Wang, Chun-Feng; Shan, Xiao-Feng; Qian, Ai-Dong

    2015-01-01

    Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP) and bovine leukemia virus (BLV) are important pathogens, commonly responsible for economical loss to cattle farms all over the world, yet their epidemiology in commercial dairy and beef cattle in China is still unknown. Thus, from September 2013 to December 2014, a large-scale seroprevalence study was conducted to determine the seroprevalence and identify herd-level risk factors associated with MAP and BLV infection. The source sample was 3674 cattle from 113 herds in northern and northeastern China. Antibodies against MAP and BLV were detected using ELISA tests. At animal-level, the seroprevalence of antibodies against MAP and BLV was 11.79% (433/3674) and 18.29% (672/3674), respectively. At herd-level, the seroprevalence of antibodies against MAP and BLV was 20.35% and 21.24% (24/113), respectively. Herd size was identified to be associated with MAP infection while herd size and presence of cattle introduced from other farms were significantly associated with BLV infection. Further research is needed to confirm these findings and improve the knowledge of the epidemiology of these two pathogens in these regions and elsewhere in China.

  14. Molecular identification and characterization of Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis in free living non-human primate (Rhesus macaques) from North India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, S V; Singh, A V; Singh, P K; Kumar, A; Singh, B

    2011-05-01

    In recent years, Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP) has emerged as major animal pathogen with significant zoonotic concerns, worldwide. MAP infection is endemic in domestic and wild ruminant population in India. However, information on MAP infection in free ranging animal species and non human primates is limited. Present study aimed to estimate the status of MAP infection in free living Rhesus macaques suffering with multiple clinical conditions (coughing and loose stool). A total of 25 stool samples were collected from six colonies of Rhesus macaques from Mathura region (North India) and screened for the presence of MAP, using microscopic examination and IS900 PCR, directly from stool samples. PCR positive DNA samples were further genotyped using IS1311 PCR-restriction enzyme analysis. Of the 25 stool samples, 10 (40.0%) and 2 (8.0%) were positive for MAP using microscopic examination and direct IS900 PCR, respectively. IS900 PCR positive DNA samples were genotyped as 'Indian Bison type', which is a major MAP genotype infecting domestic and wild ruminant species and human beings in India. Prevalence of MAP in Rhesus macaques (Indian monkeys) was moderately high and confirmed interspecies sharing of MAP between domestic livestock and non-human primates. Presence of MAP in non-human primates, support the etiological role of MAP in inflammatory bowel disease patients. Indian monkeys may serve as model for understanding the role of non-human primates in sustenance, transmission and pathogenesis of MAP infection.

  15. Cellular and humoral immune responses in sheep vaccinated with candidate antigens MAP2698c and MAP3567 from Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurung, Ratna B; Purdie, Auriol C; Whittington, Richard J; Begg, Douglas J

    2014-01-01

    Control of Johne's disease, caused by Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP) in ruminants using commercially available vaccine reduces production losses, mortality, fecal shedding and histopathological lesions but does not provide complete protection from infection and interferes with serological diagnosis of Johne's disease and bovine tuberculosis. At this time no recombinant antigens have been found to provide superior protection compared to whole killed or live-attenuated MAP vaccines. Therefore, there is a need to evaluate more candidate MAP antigens. In this study recombinant MAP antigens MAP2698c and MAP3567 were formulated with four different MONTANIDE™ (ISA 50V2, 61VG, 71VG, and 201VG) adjuvants and evaluated for their ability to produce specific immune responses in vaccinated sheep. The cellular immune response was measured with an interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) release assay and the humoral immune response was measured by antibody detection enzyme linked immunosorbent assay. Recombinant vaccine formulation with the antigen MAP2698c and MONTANIDE™ ISA 201VG adjuvant produced strong whole-MAP as well as MAP2698c-specific IFN-γ responses in a high proportion of the vaccinated sheep. The formulation caused less severe injection site lesions in comparison to other formulations. The findings from this study suggest that the MAP2698c + 201VG should be evaluated in a challenge trial to determine the efficacy of this vaccine candidate.

  16. XML Genetic Structure of SSR1 & SSR2 loci from Iranian Mycobacterium Avium Subspecies Paratuberculosis Isolates by a Short Sequence Repeat Analysis Approach

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    Aida Chalesh (MSc

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objective: Paratuberculosis has been repeatedly reported from Iranian ruminant herds. The extrem fastidious nature of Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculsos hinders genomic diversity studies of the pathogen. Short Sequence Repeat analysis is one of the genome-based approches recently developed to overcome this difficulty. In this study we describe the application of SSR genotyping on three Iranian MAP type strains plus the III & V vaccinal strain. Methods: All the bacteria were examined by PCR-F57 and PCR-IS900 experiments in order to authenticate their identity as MAP. SSR genotyping using SSR1 & SSR2 loci was conducted according to the Amonsin method. PCR amplicons were sequenced to guarantee the accuracy of findings. Results: At SSR1 locus two allels were identified, a larger allel of 770 bp and a smaller allel of 763 bp long. At SSR2 only a single allele, 800 bp long, was detected. Two Iranian bovine and ovine MAP isolates along with the vaccinal III & V strain shared a single SSR1/SSR2 pattern while a different SSR1/SSR2 was represented by the third (caprine Iranian MAP isolate. Conclusion: While finding a shared SSR type between the two Iranian MAP isolates and the III & V strain might represent a mutual ancestral background but this has to be assessed through further studies. Detection of two SSR genotypes between three Iranian type strains is likely a reflection of more MAP clones in Iran.

  17. Efficacy of 'indigenous vaccine' using native 'Indian bison type' genotype of Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis for the control of clinical Johne's disease in an organized goat herd.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, K; Chandel, B S; Chauhan, H C; Dadawala, A; Singh, S V; Singh, P K

    2013-06-01

    Therapeutic efficacy of a new 'Indigenous vaccine' prepared from native highly pathogenic 'Indian Bison Type' genotype of Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP) of goat origin has been evaluated with respect to control of clinical Johne's disease in naturally infected Mehsana breed of goat in North Gujarat. Fifty goats from Sheep and Goats Research Station, Sardarkrushinagar Dantiwada Agricultural University, Sardarkrushinagar, were randomly divided into 2 groups viz.,'Vaccinated'(n = 35) and 'Control'(n = 15). After vaccination, goats were monitored for physical condition, morbidity, mortality, body weights, shedding of MAP in feces, internal condition, gross lesions and humoral immune responses up to 120 days (at each interval of 30 days). At the end of 120 days trial, there was marked overall improvement in physical condition and body weights of vaccinated goats as compared to 'Control' goats. Vaccinated goats gained significantly (P vaccinated goats were positive for MAP DNA in faecal PCR and blood PCR before vaccination. However, all were found as negative at 120 days post vaccination (DPV). Overall vaccine exhibited effective in restriction of MAP infection and significant improvement in production parameters and reduction in mortality and morbidity due to JD. The trial in the herd will be continued.

  18. Antibodies against invasive phenotype-specific antigens increase Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis translocation across a polarized epithelial cell model and enhance killing by bovine macrophages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Everman, Jamie L.; Bermudez, Luiz E.

    2015-01-01

    Johne's disease, caused by Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP), is a severe chronic enteritis which affects large populations of ruminants globally. Prevention strategies to combat the spread of Johne's disease among cattle herds involve adhering to strict calving practices to ensure young susceptible animals do not come in contact with MAP-contaminated colostrum, milk, or fecal material. Unfortunately, the current vaccination options available are associated with high cost and suboptimal efficacy. To more successfully combat the spread of Johne's disease to young calves, an efficient method of protection is needed. In this study, we examined passive immunization as a mode of introducing protective antibodies against MAP to prevent the passage of the bacterium to young animals via colostrum and milk. Utilizing the infectious MAP phenotype developed after bacterial exposure to milk, we demonstrate that in vitro opsonization with serum from Johne's-positive cattle results in enhanced translocation across a bovine MDBK polarized epithelial cell monolayer. Furthermore, immune serum opsonization of MAP results in a rapid host cell-mediated killing by bovine macrophages in an oxidative-, nitrosative-, and extracellular DNA trap-independent manner. This study illustrates that antibody opsonization of MAP expressing an infectious phenotype leads to the killing of the bacterium during the initial stage of macrophage infection. PMID:26301206

  19. Cellular and humoral immune responses in sheep vaccinated with candidate antigens MAP2698c and MAP3567 from Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ratna eGurung

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Control of Johne’s disease, caused by Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP in ruminants using commercially available vaccine reduces production losses, mortality, faecal shedding and histopathological lesions but does not provide complete protection from infection and interferes with serological diagnosis of Johne’s disease and bovine tuberculosis. At this time no recombinant antigens have been found to provide superior protection compared to whole killed or live-attenuated MAP vaccines. Therefore, there is a need to evaluate more candidate MAP antigens. In this study recombinant MAP antigens MAP2698c and MAP3567 were formulated with four different MONTANIDE (ISA 50V2, 61VG, 71VG and 201VG adjuvants and evaluated for their ability to produce specific immune responses in vaccinated sheep. The cellular immune response was measured with an interferon-gamma (IFN-γ release assay and the humoral immune response was measured by antibody detection enzyme linked immunosorbent assay. Recombinant vaccine formulation with the antigen MAP2698c and MONTANIDE ISA 201VG adjuvant produced strong whole-MAP as well as MAP2698c-specific IFN-γ responses in a high proportion of the vaccinated sheep. The formulation caused less severe injection site lesions in comparison to other formulations. The findings from this study suggest that the MAP2698c + 201VG should be evaluated in a challenge trial to determine the efficacy of this vaccine candidate.

  20. Cellular and humoral immune responses in sheep vaccinated with candidate antigens MAP2698c and MAP3567 from Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurung, Ratna B.; Purdie, Auriol C.; Whittington, Richard J.; Begg, Douglas J.

    2014-01-01

    Control of Johne's disease, caused by Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP) in ruminants using commercially available vaccine reduces production losses, mortality, fecal shedding and histopathological lesions but does not provide complete protection from infection and interferes with serological diagnosis of Johne's disease and bovine tuberculosis. At this time no recombinant antigens have been found to provide superior protection compared to whole killed or live-attenuated MAP vaccines. Therefore, there is a need to evaluate more candidate MAP antigens. In this study recombinant MAP antigens MAP2698c and MAP3567 were formulated with four different MONTANIDE™ (ISA 50V2, 61VG, 71VG, and 201VG) adjuvants and evaluated for their ability to produce specific immune responses in vaccinated sheep. The cellular immune response was measured with an interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) release assay and the humoral immune response was measured by antibody detection enzyme linked immunosorbent assay. Recombinant vaccine formulation with the antigen MAP2698c and MONTANIDE™ ISA 201VG adjuvant produced strong whole-MAP as well as MAP2698c-specific IFN-γ responses in a high proportion of the vaccinated sheep. The formulation caused less severe injection site lesions in comparison to other formulations. The findings from this study suggest that the MAP2698c + 201VG should be evaluated in a challenge trial to determine the efficacy of this vaccine candidate. PMID:25077074

  1. Goat milk as a non-invasive sample for confirmation of Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis by IS900 PCR

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    Bharathy Sukumar

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP causes Johne's disease (JD in cattle, sheep, goats and other ruminants, and Crohn’s disease in humans. MAPs are shed to external environment through feces and milk. The present study was aimed to evaluate the utility of milk as a non-invasive sample in stage II MAP infections in goats using IS900 polymerase chain reaction (PCR and sequencing analysis. A total of 32 milk samples from lactating does were collected. Within these 32 milk samples, 15 were collected from pre-confirmed JD positive goats. By IS900 PCR, all the 15 (100% known JD positive goat milk samples revealed the presence of MAP. However, no unknown goat was identified as MAP positive. The results of this study established the usefulness of milk as a non-invasive sample in screening and confirmation of stage II MAP infection in goats.

  2. Higher non-return rate associated with Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis infection at early stage in Holstein dairy cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcé, C; Beaudeau, F; Bareille, N; Seegers, H; Fourichon, C

    2009-03-15

    The effects of infection by Mycobacterium avium paratuberculosis (Map) on dairy cows are poorly documented and quite controversial. This retrospective study aimed at quantifying the variation in non-return to service of Holstein dairy cows according to their Map-infection status. Three different statuses were defined based on both individual and herd tests results: ELISA positive cow, all tests negative cow in a negative herd and all tests negative cow in a positive herd. Whatever the age at Map testing, the status was attributed to a cow from its first lactation onwards. Non-return to service was determined at 200 days after first and second services. The study was performed from 1999 to 2007 on 185,950 AI from 48,914 cows in early stage of the infection in 1069 herds by logistic regression controlling for known factors influencing non-return rate. Non-return rate was higher for infected cows compared to negative cows from negative herds (RR of 1.10 or +3.9 points of % of non-return rate). The effect was significant for parities 1 and 2 (RR of 1.11 and 1.12, respectively) but not for higher ones. This effect was lower when comparing positive cows to negative cows in the same herds but relative risks were still above 1. The hypothesis that the effect of Map on non-return depends upon the stage of infection is formulated.

  3. Proteome-scale identification of outer membrane proteins in Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis using a structure based combined hierarchical approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rana, Aarti; Rub, Abdur; Akhter, Yusuf

    2014-07-29

    Outer membrane proteins (OMPs) in eubacteria have several important roles, which range from membrane transport to the host-pathogen interactions. These are directly involved in pathogen attachment, entry and activation of several pathogen-induced signaling cascades in the cell. The cardinal structural features of OMPs include the presence of a β-barrel, a signal peptide and the absence of the transmembrane helix. This is the first report on proteome-wide identification of OMPs of ruminant pathogen, Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP). The complete proteome of MAP was analyzed using a pipeline of algorithms, which screens the amino acid sequences and structural features shared by OMPs in other bacteria. Secondary structure of these proteins is also analyzed and scores are calculated for amphiphilic β-strands. From the set of 588 exported proteins, 264 proteins are predicted to be inner membrane proteins while 83 proteins are identified as potential OMPs in MAP. Finally, this study identified 57 proteins as top candidates, on the basis of computed isoelectric points, as the core set of OMPs. Significantly, the resulting data for OMPs are not only useful in designing novel vaccines but may also open avenues for the development of early serodiagnostic tools for MAP.

  4. Evaluation of eight live attenuated vaccine candidates for protection against challenge with virulent Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bannantine, John P; Everman, Jamie L; Rose, Sasha J; Babrak, Lmar; Katani, Robab; Barletta, Raúl G; Talaat, Adel M; Gröhn, Yrjö T; Chang, Yung-Fu; Kapur, Vivek; Bermudez, Luiz E

    2014-01-01

    Johne's disease is caused by Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP), which results in serious economic losses worldwide in farmed livestock such as cattle, sheep, and goats. To control this disease, an effective vaccine with minimal adverse effects is needed. In order to identify a live vaccine for Johne's disease, we evaluated eight attenuated mutant strains of MAP using a C57BL/6 mouse model. The persistence of the vaccine candidates was measured at 6, 12, and 18 weeks post vaccination. Only strains 320, 321, and 329 colonized both the liver and spleens up until the 12-week time point. The remaining five mutants showed no survival in those tissues, indicating their complete attenuation in the mouse model. The candidate vaccine strains demonstrated different levels of protection based on colonization of the challenge strain in liver and spleen tissues at 12 and 18 weeks post vaccination. Based on total MAP burden in both tissues at both time points, strain 315 (MAP1566::Tn5370) was the most protective whereas strain 318 (intergenic Tn5367 insertion between MAP0282c and MAP0283c) had the most colonization. Mice vaccinated with an undiluted commercial vaccine preparation displayed the highest bacterial burden as well as enlarged spleens indicative of a strong infection. Selected vaccine strains that showed promise in the mouse model were moved forward into a goat challenge model. The results suggest that the mouse trial, as conducted, may have a relatively poor predictive value for protection in a ruminant host such as goats.

  5. Linking chronic infection and autoimmune diseases: Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis, SLC11A1 polymorphisms and type-1 diabetes mellitus.

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    Daniela Paccagnini

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The etiology of type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM is still unknown; numerous studies are performed to unravel the environmental factors involved in triggering the disease. SLC11A1 is a membrane transporter that is expressed in late endosomes of antigen presenting cells involved in the immunopathogenic events leading to T1DM. Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP has been reported to be a possible trigger in the development of T1DM. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Fifty nine T1DM patients and 79 healthy controls were genotyped for 9 polymorphisms of SLC11A1 gene, and screened for the presence of MAP by PCR. Differences in genotype frequency were evaluated for both T1DM patients and controls. We found a polymorphism in the SLC11A1 gene (274C/T associated to type 1 diabetic patients and not to controls. The presence of MAP DNA was also significantly associated with T1DM patients and not with controls. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The 274C/T SCL11A1 polymorphism was found to be associated with T1DM as well as the presence of MAP DNA in blood. Since MAP persists within macrophages and it is also processed by dendritic cells, further studies are necessary to evaluate if mutant forms of SLC11A1 alter the processing or presentation of MAP antigens triggering thereby an autoimmune response in T1DM patients.

  6. Analysis of the bovine monocyte-derived macrophage response to Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis infection using RNA-seq

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    Maura E Casey

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Johne’s disease, caused by infection with Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis, (MAP, is a chronic intestinal disease of ruminants with serious economic consequences for cattle production in the United States and elsewhere. During infection, MAP bacilli are phagocytosed and subvert host macrophage processes, resulting in subclinical infections that can lead to immunopathology and dissemination of disease. Analysis of the host macrophage transcriptome during infection can therefore shed light on the molecular mechanisms and host-pathogen interplay associated with Johne’s disease. Here we describe results of an in vitro study of the bovine monocyte-derived macrophage (MDM transcriptome response during MAP infection using RNA-seq. MDM were obtained from seven age- and sex-matched Holstein-Friesian cattle and were infected with MAP across a six-hour infection time course with non-infected controls. We observed 245 and 574 differentially expressed genes in MAP-infected versus non-infected control samples (adjusted P value ≤ 0.05 at 2 and 6 hours post-infection, respectively. Functional analyses of these differentially expressed genes, including biological pathway enrichment, highlighted potential functional roles for genes that have not been previously described in the host response to infection with MAP bacilli. In addition, differential expression of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokine genes, such as those associated with the IL-10 signaling pathway, and other immune-related genes that encode proteins involved in the bovine macrophage response to MAP infection emphasize the balance between protective host immunity and bacilli survival and proliferation. Systematic comparisons of RNA-seq gene expression results with Affymetrix® microarray data generated from the same experimental samples also demonstrated that RNA-seq represents a superior technology for studying host transcriptional responses to intracellular infection.

  7. Evaluation of eight live attenuated vaccine candidates for protection against challenge with virulent Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John P Bannantine

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Johne’s disease is caused by Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP, which results in serious economic losses worldwide in farmed livestock such as cattle, sheep and goats. To control this disease, an effective vaccine with minimal adverse effects is needed. In order to identify a live vaccine for Johne’s disease, we evaluated eight attenuated mutant strains of MAP using a C57BL/6 mouse model. The persistence of the vaccine candidates was measured at 6, 12, and 18 weeks post vaccination. Only strains 320, 321 and 329 colonized both the liver and spleens up until the 12-week time point. The remaining five mutants showed no survival in those tissues, indicating their complete attenuation in the mouse model. The candidate vaccine strains demonstrated different levels of protection based on colonization of the challenge strain in liver and spleen tissues at 12 and 18 weeks post vaccination. Based on total MAP burden in both tissues at both time points, strain 315 (MAP1566::Tn5370 was the most protective whereas strain 318 (intergenic Tn5367 insertion between MAP0282c and MAP0283c had the most colonization. Mice vaccinated with an undiluted commercial vaccine preparation displayed the highest bacterial burden as well as enlarged spleens indicative of a strong infection. Selected vaccine strains that showed promise in the mouse model were moved forward into a goat challenge model. The results suggest that the mouse trial, as conducted, may have a relatively poor predictive value for protection in a ruminant host such as goats.

  8. Competition for antigen between Th1 and Th2 responses determines the timing of the immune response switch during Mycobaterium avium subspecies paratuberulosis infection in ruminants.

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    Gesham Magombedze

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Johne's disease (JD, a persistent and slow progressing infection of ruminants such as cows and sheep, is caused by slow replicating bacilli Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP infecting macrophages in the gut. Infected animals initially mount a cell-mediated CD4 T cell response against MAP which is characterized by the production of interferon gamma (Th1 response. Over time, Th1 response diminishes in most animals and antibody response to MAP antigens becomes dominant (Th2 response. The switch from Th1 to Th2 response occurs concomitantly with disease progression and shedding of the bacteria in feces. Mechanisms controlling this Th1/Th2 switch remain poorly understood. Because Th1 and Th2 responses are known to cross-inhibit each other, it is unclear why initially strong Th1 response is lost over time. Using a novel mathematical model of the immune response to MAP infection we show that the ability of extracellular bacteria to persist outside of macrophages naturally leads to switch of the cellular response to antibody production. Several additional mechanisms may also contribute to the timing of the Th1/Th2 switch including the rate of proliferation of Th1/Th2 responses at the site of infection, efficiency at which immune responses cross-inhibit each other, and the rate at which Th1 response becomes exhausted over time. Our basic model reasonably well explains four different kinetic patterns of the Th1/Th2 responses in MAP-infected sheep by variability in the initial bacterial dose and the efficiency of the MAP-specific T cell responses. Taken together, our novel mathematical model identifies factors of bacterial and host origin that drive kinetics of the immune response to MAP and provides the basis for testing the impact of vaccination or early treatment on the duration of infection.

  9. On the Prevalence of M. avium Subspecies paratuberculosis DNA in the Blood of Healthy Individuals and Patients with Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juste, Ramon A.; Elguezabal, Natalia; Garrido, Joseba M.; Pavon, Andres; Geijo, Maria V.; Sevilla, Iker; Cabriada, Jose-Luis; Tejada, Angel; García-Campos, Francisco; Casado, Roberto; Ochotorena, Itziar; Izeta, Ander; Greenstein, Robert J.

    2008-01-01

    Background Mycobacteria, such as M. leprae and M. tuberculosis infect billions of humans. However, because of appropriate immune responses and antibiotic therapy, overt mycobacterial diseases occur far less frequently. M. avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP) causes Johne's disease in ruminants, an affliction evocative of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Several agents used to treat IBD (5-ASA, methotrexate, azathioprine and its metabolite 6-MP) have recently been shown to be antiMAP antibiotics. We herein evaluate the prevalence of MAP DNA in healthy individuals and compare them with IBD patients on antiMAP antibiotics. Methods We studied 100 healthy individuals (90 blood donors) and 246 patients with IBD. IS900 MAP DNA was identified using a nested primer PCR in the buffy coat of blood. Positive signal was confirmed as MAP by DNA sequence analysis. PCR positive results frequencies were compared according to medications used. Significance was accepted at p<0.05. Results 47% (47/100) healthy controls and 16% (40/246) IBD patients were IS900 positive (p<0.0001). MAP DNA was identified in 17% of 143 patients receiving mesalamine and 6% of 16 receiving sulfasalazine. None of the IBD patients receiving methotrexate (n = 9), 6-MP (n = 3), ciprofloxacin (n = 5) or Tacrolimus® (n = 3) had MAP DNA detectable in their blood. Discussion We found a disquietingly large percentage of healthy individuals have MAP DNA in their blood, the significance of which remains to be determined. Counter-intuitively, the incidence of MAP DNA was significantly lower in patients with IBD. Agents with the most potent in vitro antiMAP activity were associated with clearance of blood MAP DNA. We posit that the use antiMAP antibiotics was responsible for the decreased prevalence of MAP DNA in patients with IBD. PMID:18596984

  10. Genome-wide association study to identify chromosomal regions associated with antibody response to Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis in milk of Dutch Holstein-Friesians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Hulzen, K J E; Schopen, G C B; van Arendonk, J A M; Nielen, M; Koets, A P; Schrooten, C; Heuven, H C M

    2012-05-01

    Heritability of susceptibility to Johne's disease in cattle has been shown to vary from 0.041 to 0.159. Although the presence of genetic variation involved in susceptibility to Johne's disease has been demonstrated, the understanding of genes contributing to the genetic variance is far from complete. The objective of this study was to contribute to further understanding of genetic variation involved in susceptibility to Johne's disease by identifying associated chromosomal regions using a genome-wide association approach. Log-transformed ELISA test results of 265,290 individual Holstein-Friesian cows from 3,927 herds from the Netherlands were analyzed to obtain sire estimated breeding values for Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP)-specific antibody response in milk using a sire-maternal grandsire model with fixed effects for parity, year of birth, lactation stage, and herd; a covariate for milk yield on test day; and random effects for sire, maternal grandsire, and error. For 192 sires with estimated breeding values with a minimum reliability of 70%, single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) typing was conducted by a multiple SNP analysis with a random polygenic effect fitting 37,869 SNP simultaneously. Five SNP associated with MAP-specific antibody response in milk were identified distributed over 4 chromosomal regions (chromosome 4, 15, 18, and 28). Thirteen putative SNP associated with MAP-specific antibody response in milk were identified distributed over 10 chromosomes (chromosome 4, 14, 16, 18, 19, 20, 21, 26, 27, and 29). This knowledge contributes to the current understanding of genetic variation involved in Johne's disease susceptibility and facilitates control of Johne's disease and improvement of health status by breeding.

  11. Genetic variation for infection status as determined by a specific antibody response against Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis in milk of Dutch dairy goats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Hulzen, K J E; Koets, A P; Nielen, M; Hoeboer, J; van Arendonk, J A M; Heuven, H C M

    2012-10-01

    Classical control strategies based on management restrictions to reduce transmission, culling of infected goats, and vaccination have not been able to eradicate Johne's disease from infected herds. Selective breeding for less susceptibility to disease may be a useful additional tool to contribute to control of the disease. The aim of this study was to estimate genetic variation and heritability for infection status as determined by a specific antibody response against Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis in milk of Dutch dairy goats. Milk samples from 950 goats were tested for antibodies specific to Johne's disease by ELISA on 5 consecutive test days, with a time interval of around 3 mo. Test results were coded as infected or not infected according to the instructions of the manufacturer. Heritability of infection status was estimated for 3 data sets to determine the effect of repeated sampling: only test results obtained on the first test day (first-test); the maximum test result of each animal obtained on 1 of the 5 test days (max-test); and all test results per animal, with a maximum of 5 consecutive samplings (all-test). Data sets first-test and max-test were analyzed with a sire model with fixed effects for year of birth and stage of lactation, and random effects for sire and error. For data set all-test, an additional permanent environment effect was included in the model. The estimated heritability on the underlying scale ranged from 0.12 in data set first-test, to 0.09 in data set max-test, to 0.07 in data set all-test.

  12. PCR Inhibition of a Quantitative PCR for Detection of Mycobacterium avium Subspecies Paratuberculosis DNA in Feces: Diagnostic Implications and Potential Solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acharya, Kamal R; Dhand, Navneet K; Whittington, Richard J; Plain, Karren M

    2017-01-01

    Molecular tests such as polymerase chain reaction (PCR) are increasingly being applied for the diagnosis of Johne's disease, a chronic intestinal infection of ruminants caused by Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP). Feces, as the primary test sample, presents challenges in terms of effective DNA isolation, with potential for PCR inhibition and ultimately for reduced analytical and diagnostic sensitivity. However, limited evidence is available regarding the magnitude and diagnostic implications of PCR inhibition for the detection of MAP in feces. This study aimed to investigate the presence and diagnostic implications of PCR inhibition in a quantitative PCR assay for MAP (High-throughput Johne's test) to investigate the characteristics of samples prone to inhibition and to identify measures that can be taken to overcome this. In a study of fecal samples derived from a high prevalence, endemically infected cattle herd, 19.94% of fecal DNA extracts showed some evidence of inhibition. Relief of inhibition by a five-fold dilution of the DNA extract led to an average increase in quantification of DNA by 3.3-fold that consequently increased test sensitivity of the qPCR from 55 to 80% compared to fecal culture. DNA extracts with higher DNA and protein content had 19.33 and 10.94 times higher odds of showing inhibition, respectively. The results suggest that the current test protocol is sensitive for herd level diagnosis of Johne's disease but that test sensitivity and individual level diagnosis could be enhanced by relief of PCR inhibition, achieved by five-fold dilution of the DNA extract. Furthermore, qualitative and quantitative parameters derived from absorbance measures of DNA extracts could be useful for prediction of inhibitory fecal samples.

  13. On the prevalence of M. avium subspecies paratuberculosis DNA in the blood of healthy individuals and patients with inflammatory bowel disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramon A Juste

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Mycobacteria, such as M. leprae and M. tuberculosis infect billions of humans. However, because of appropriate immune responses and antibiotic therapy, overt mycobacterial diseases occur far less frequently. M. avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP causes Johne's disease in ruminants, an affliction evocative of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD. Several agents used to treat IBD (5-ASA, methotrexate, azathioprine and its metabolite 6-MP have recently been shown to be antiMAP antibiotics. We herein evaluate the prevalence of MAP DNA in healthy individuals and compare them with IBD patients on antiMAP antibiotics. METHODS: We studied 100 healthy individuals (90 blood donors and 246 patients with IBD. IS900 MAP DNA was identified using a nested primer PCR in the buffy coat of blood. Positive signal was confirmed as MAP by DNA sequence analysis. PCR positive results frequencies were compared according to medications used. Significance was accepted at p<0.05. RESULTS: 47% (47/100 healthy controls and 16% (40/246 IBD patients were IS900 positive (p<0.0001. MAP DNA was identified in 17% of 143 patients receiving mesalamine and 6% of 16 receiving sulfasalazine. None of the IBD patients receiving methotrexate (n = 9, 6-MP (n = 3, ciprofloxacin (n = 5 or Tacrolimus (n = 3 had MAP DNA detectable in their blood. DISCUSSION: We found a disquietingly large percentage of healthy individuals have MAP DNA in their blood, the significance of which remains to be determined. Counter-intuitively, the incidence of MAP DNA was significantly lower in patients with IBD. Agents with the most potent in vitro antiMAP activity were associated with clearance of blood MAP DNA. We posit that the use antiMAP antibiotics was responsible for the decreased prevalence of MAP DNA in patients with IBD.

  14. PCR Inhibition of a Quantitative PCR for Detection of Mycobacterium avium Subspecies Paratuberculosis DNA in Feces: Diagnostic Implications and Potential Solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acharya, Kamal R.; Dhand, Navneet K.; Whittington, Richard J.; Plain, Karren M.

    2017-01-01

    Molecular tests such as polymerase chain reaction (PCR) are increasingly being applied for the diagnosis of Johne’s disease, a chronic intestinal infection of ruminants caused by Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP). Feces, as the primary test sample, presents challenges in terms of effective DNA isolation, with potential for PCR inhibition and ultimately for reduced analytical and diagnostic sensitivity. However, limited evidence is available regarding the magnitude and diagnostic implications of PCR inhibition for the detection of MAP in feces. This study aimed to investigate the presence and diagnostic implications of PCR inhibition in a quantitative PCR assay for MAP (High-throughput Johne’s test) to investigate the characteristics of samples prone to inhibition and to identify measures that can be taken to overcome this. In a study of fecal samples derived from a high prevalence, endemically infected cattle herd, 19.94% of fecal DNA extracts showed some evidence of inhibition. Relief of inhibition by a five-fold dilution of the DNA extract led to an average increase in quantification of DNA by 3.3-fold that consequently increased test sensitivity of the qPCR from 55 to 80% compared to fecal culture. DNA extracts with higher DNA and protein content had 19.33 and 10.94 times higher odds of showing inhibition, respectively. The results suggest that the current test protocol is sensitive for herd level diagnosis of Johne’s disease but that test sensitivity and individual level diagnosis could be enhanced by relief of PCR inhibition, achieved by five-fold dilution of the DNA extract. Furthermore, qualitative and quantitative parameters derived from absorbance measures of DNA extracts could be useful for prediction of inhibitory fecal samples. PMID:28210245

  15. Early infection dynamics after experimental challenge with Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis in calves reveal limited calf-to-calf transmission and no impact of Hsp70 vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santema, Wiebren J; Poot, Jacqueline; Segers, Ruud P A M; Van den Hoff, Daniëlle J P; Rutten, Victor P M G; Koets, Ad P

    2012-11-19

    Efficient control of bovine paratuberculosis is hampered by lack of a vaccine. The purpose of this study was to evaluate efficacy of a candidate vaccine, consisting of recombinant Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP) Hsp70 with DDA adjuvant, in calves experimentally infected with MAP. Four groups of 14 animals each were used. Animals in group 1 and 2 were all vaccinated with Hsp70/DDA at day 0, 84, 168 and 357, and those in group 3 and 4 were non-vaccinated controls. In each group half (n=7) of the animals were challenged and the remaining half served as contacts. Blood and fecal samples were collected at three week intervals until day 588, and subsequently all animals were subjected to necropsy. The primary outcomes assessed were fecal culture (FC) of MAP, tissue colonization of MAP, and transmission of infection to contact animals. The kinetics of MAP shedding in feces of challenged animals showed a peak around 130 days post-challenge, irrespective of vaccination status. At necropsy no differences in the level of tissue colonization between vaccinated animals and controls were observed in the challenged groups. Only one contact animal (non-vaccinated) was positive at necropsy, indicating limited to no transmission within groups. These findings indicate that Hsp70/DDA vaccination does not influence early infection dynamics after experimental infection. However, early shedding of MAP in calves did not result in efficient transmission of infection to contact animals. The latter implies that introduction of an infected calf in a cohort of susceptibles has limited consequences for spread of infection.

  16. Immunity, safety and protection of an Adenovirus 5 prime--Modified Vaccinia virus Ankara boost subunit vaccine against Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis infection in calves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bull, Tim J; Vrettou, Christina; Linedale, Richard; McGuinnes, Catherine; Strain, Sam; McNair, Jim; Gilbert, Sarah C; Hope, Jayne C

    2014-10-29

    Vaccination is the most cost effective control measure for Johne's disease caused by Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP) but currently available whole cell killed formulations have limited efficacy and are incompatible with the diagnosis of bovine tuberculosis by tuberculin skin test. We have evaluated the utility of a viral delivery regimen of non-replicative human Adenovirus 5 and Modified Vaccinia virus Ankara recombinant for early entry MAP specific antigens (HAV) to show protection against challenge in a calf model and extensively screened for differential immunological markers associated with protection. We have shown that HAV vaccination was well tolerated, could be detected using a differentiation of infected and vaccinated animals (DIVA) test, showed no cross-reactivity with tuberculin and provided a degree of protection against challenge evidenced by a lack of faecal shedding in vaccinated animals that persisted throughout the 7 month infection period. Calves given HAV vaccination had significant priming and boosting of MAP derived antigen (PPD-J) specific CD4+, CD8+ IFN-γ producing T-cell populations and, upon challenge, developed early specific Th17 related immune responses, enhanced IFN-γ responses and retained a high MAP killing capacity in blood. During later phases post MAP challenge, PPD-J antigen specific IFN-γ and Th17 responses in HAV vaccinated animals corresponded with improvements in peripheral bacteraemia. By contrast a lack of IFN-γ, induction of FoxP3+ T cells and increased IL-1β and IL-10 secretion were indicative of progressive infection in Sham vaccinated animals. We conclude that HAV vaccination shows excellent promise as a new tool for improving control of MAP infection in cattle.

  17. Detection of Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis specific IS900 insertion sequences in bulk-tank milk samples obtained from different regions throughout Switzerland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephan Roger

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Since Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP was isolated from intestinal tissue of a human patient suffering Crohn's disease, a controversial discussion exists whether MAP have a role in the etiology of Crohn's disease or not. Raw milk may be a potential vehicle for the transmission of MAP to human population. In a previous paper, we have demonstrated that MAP are found in raw milk samples obtained from a defined region in Switzerland. The aim of this work is to collect data about the prevalence of MAP specific IS900 insertion sequence in bulk-tank milk samples in different regions of Switzerland. Furthermore, we examined eventual correlation between the presence of MAP and the somatic cell counts, the total colony counts and the presence of Enterobacteriaceae. Results 273 (19.7% of the 1384 examined bulk-tank milk samples tested IS900 PCR-positive. The prevalence, however, in the different regions of Switzerland shows significant differences and ranged from 1.7% to 49.2%. Furthermore, there were no statistically significant (p >> 0.05 differences between the somatic cell counts and the total colony counts of PCR-positive and PCR-negative milk samples. Enterobacteriaceae occur as often in IS900 PCR-positive as in PCR-negative milk samples. Conclusion This is the first study, which investigates the prevalence of MAP in bulk-tank milk samples all over Switzerland and infers the herd-level prevalence of MAP infection in dairy herds. The prevalence of 19.7% IS900 PCR-positive bulk-milk samples shows a wide distribution of subclinical MAP-infections in dairy stock in Switzerland. MAP can therefore often be transmitted to humans by raw milk consumption.

  18. 'Bio-load' and bio-type profiles of Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis infection in the domestic livestock population endemic for Johne's disease: a survey of 28 years (1985-2013) in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, S V; Singh, P K; Singh, A V; Sohal, J S; Kumar, N; Chaubey, K K; Gupta, S; Rawat, K D; Kumar, A; Bhatia, A K; Srivastav, A K; Dhama, K

    2014-08-01

    Bio-load and bio-profile of Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis was studied in the domestic livestock population of the country. Of the 23,429 farm and farmer's animals screened, average bio-load was 23.3% (Period of study; 28 years for goats; 13 years for sheep, cattle and buffaloes). Species-wise, bio-load was 20.1, 32.7, 39.3 and 28.3% in goats, sheep, cattle and buffaloes, respectively. Bio-load was significantly lower in time period A (P livestock species and the geographical zone.

  19. Occurrence of Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis across host species and European countries with evidence for transmission between wildlife and domestic ruminants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    May Linda

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (Map causes an infectious chronic enteritis (paratuberculosis or Johne's disease principally of ruminants. The epidemiology of Map is poorly understood, particularly with respect to the role of wildlife reservoirs and the controversial issue of zoonotic potential (Crohn's disease. Genotypic discrimination of Map isolates is pivotal to descriptive epidemiology and resolving these issues. This study was undertaken to determine the genetic diversity of Map, enhance our understanding of the host range and distribution and assess the potential for interspecies transmission. Results 164 Map isolates from seven European countries representing 19 different host species were genotyped by standardized IS900 - restriction fragment length polymorphism (IS900-RFLP, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE, amplified fragment length polymorphisms (AFLP and mycobacterial interspersed repeat unit-variable number tandem repeat (MIRU-VNTR analyses. Six PstI and 17 BstEII IS900-RFLP, 31 multiplex [SnaBI-SpeI] PFGE profiles and 23 MIRU-VNTR profiles were detected. AFLP gave insufficient discrimination of isolates for meaningful genetic analysis. Point estimates for Simpson's index of diversity calculated for the individual typing techniques were in the range of 0.636 to 0.664 but a combination of all three methods increased the discriminating power to 0.879, sufficient for investigating transmission dynamics. Two predominant strain types were detected across Europe with all three typing techniques. Evidence for interspecies transmission between wildlife and domestic ruminants on the same property was demonstrated in four cases, between wildlife species on the same property in two cases and between different species of domestic livestock on one property. Conclusion The results of this study showed that it is necessary to use multiple genotyping techniques targeting different sources of genetic

  20. Application of IS1311 locus 2 PCR-REA assay for the specific detection of ′Bison type′ Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis isolates of Indian origin

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    Ajay Vir Singh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background & objectives: Of the three major genotypes of Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP, ′Bison type′ is most prevalent genotype in the domestic livestock species of the country, and has also been recovered from patients suffering from Crohn′s disease. Recently, a new assay based on IS1311 locus 2 PCR- restriction endonuclease analysis (REA was designed to distinguish between ′Indian Bison type′ and non-Indian genotypes. The present study investigated discriminatory potential of this new assay while screening of a panel of MAP isolates of diverse genotypes and from different geographical regions. Methods: A total of 53 mycobacterial isolates (41 MAP and 12 mycobacterium other than MAP, three MAP genomic DNA and 36 MAP positive faecal DNA samples from different livestock species (cattle, buffaloes, goat, sheep and bison and geographical regions (India, Canada, USA, Spain and Portugal were included in the study. The extracted DNA samples (n=92 were analyzed for the presence of MAP specific sequences (IS900, ISMav 2 and HspX using PCR. DNA samples were further subjected to genotype differentiation using IS1311 PCR-REA and IS1311 L2 PCR-REA methods. Results: All the DNA samples (except DNA from non-MAP mycobacterial isolates were positive for all the three MAP specific sequences based PCRs. IS1311 PCR-REA showed that MAP DNA samples of Indian origin belonged to ′Bison type′. Whereas, of the total 19 non-Indian MAP DNA samples, 2, 15 and 2 were genotyped as ′Bison type′, ′Cattle type′ and ′Sheep type′, respectively. IS1311 L2 PCR-REA method showed different restriction profiles of ′Bison type′ genotype as compared to non-Indian DNA samples. Interpretation & conclusions: IS1311 L2 PCR-REA method successfully discriminated ′Indian Bison type′ from other non-Indian genotypes and showed potential to be future epidemiological tool and for genotyping of MAP isolates.

  1. The investigation of the truncated mbtA gene within the mycobactin cluster of Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis as a novel diagnostic marker for real-time PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Kruijf, Marcel; Coffey, Aidan; O'Mahony, Jim

    2017-05-01

    The inability of Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP) to produce endogenous mycobactin in-vitro is most likely due to the presence of a truncated mbtA gene within the mycobactin cluster of MAP. The main goal of this study was to investigate this unique mbtA truncation as a potential novel PCR diagnostic marker for MAP. Novel primers were designed that were located within the truncated region and the contiguous MAP2179 gene. Primers were evaluated against non-MAP isolates and no amplicons were generated. The detection limit of this mbtA-MAP2179 target was evaluated using a range of MAP DNA concentrations, MAP inoculated faecal material and 20 MAP isolates. The performance of mbtA-MAP2179 was compared to the established f57 target. The detection limits recorded for MAP K-10 DNA and from MAP K-10 inoculated faecal samples were 0.34pg and 10(4)CFU/g respectively for both f57 and mbtA-MAP2179. A detection limit of 10(3)CFU/g was recorded for both targets, but not achieved consistently. The detection limit of MAP from inoculated faecal material was successful at 10(3)CFU/g for mbtA-MAP2179 when FAM probe real-time PCR was used. A MAP cell concentration of 10(2)CFU/g was detected successfully, but again not consistently achieved. All 20 mycobacterial isolates were successfully identified as MAP by f57 and mbtA-MAP2179. Interestingly, the mbtA-MAP2179 real-time PCR assay resulted in the formation of a unique melting curve profile that contained two melting curve peaks rather than one single peak. This melting curve phenomenon was attributed towards the asymmetrical GC% distribution within the mbtA-MAP2179 amplicon. This study investigated the implementation of the mbtA-MAP2179 target as a novel diagnostic marker and the detection limits obtained with mbtA-MAP2179 were comparable to the established f57 target, making the mbtA-MAP2179 an adequate confirmatory target. Moreover, the mbtA-MAP2179 target could be implemented in multiplex real-time PCR assays and

  2. Intracellular fate of Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis in monocytes from normal and infected, interferon-responsive cows as determined by a radiometric method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, B Y; Czuprynski, C J; Collins, M T

    1999-01-01

    The ability of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis to survive in bovine monocytes was studied using radiometric (BACTEC) culture, standard plate counting and microscopic counting of acid-fast stained monocyte monolayers. Results of microscopic counts sharply contrasted with results of viable counts determined both by plate counting and radiometric counting. We observed an early phase (the first 6 d after in vitro infection) of intracellular bacillary growth, followed by a later phase of mycobacteriostasis or killing (up to 12 d after in vitro infection) in monocytes from non-infected cows. The data suggest that multiplication and death of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis occur simultaneously in bovine monocytes infected in vitro. Using the BACTEC method, we compared the ability of bovine monocytes from normal cows and cows infected with M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis and showing evidence of a strong Thl-like cellular immune response to ingest and inhibit the intracellular growth of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis. There was a trend toward greater phagocytosis and faster killing of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis by monocytes from the infected, immune responder cows. However, the observed numbers of viable M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis at each time after monocyte infection were not significantly different between normal and infected cows.

  3. Dam Mycobacterium avium subspecies parartuberculosis (MAP) infection status does not predetermine calves for future shedding when raised in a contaminated environment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eisenberg, S.W.F.; Rutten, Victor P.M.G.; Koets, A.P.

    2015-01-01

    Uptake of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) by calves in the first days of life from colostrum, milk and faeces is regarded an important moment of transmission. The objective of this study was to quantify the
    association between the MAP status of dams as determined by the presenc

  4. Immunological detection of sheep experimentally infected with strains of Mycobacterium avium subspecies containing insertion sequence IS901/IS902 and a 40 kDa protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klausen, Joan; Perez, V.; Giese, Steen Bjørck

    1997-01-01

    A monoclonal antibody raised against a 40 kDa protein present in certain M. avium strains (IS901/IS902 positive) was used for developing a blocking ELISA. Sera from experimentally infected sheep were evaluated by indirect ELISA, AGID and blocking ELISA. The blocking assay proved to be highly spec...

  5. Mycobacterium avium Subspecies paratuberculosis Infection in Cases of Irritable Bowel Syndrome and Comparison with Crohn's Disease and Johne's Disease: Common Neural and Immune Pathogenicities▿

    OpenAIRE

    Scanu, Antonio M.; Bull, Tim J; Cannas, Sara; Sanderson, Jeremy D.; Sechi, Leonardo A; Dettori, Giuseppe; Zanetti, Stefania; Hermon-Taylor, John

    2007-01-01

    Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis causes Johne's disease, a systemic infection and chronic inflammation of the intestine that affects many species, including primates. Infection is widespread in livestock, and human populations are exposed. Johne's disease is associated with immune dysregulation, with involvement of the enteric nervous system overlapping with features of irritable bowel syndrome in humans. The present study was designed to look for an association between Mycobacteri...

  6. Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis isolates from sheep and goats show reduced persistence in bovine macrophages than cattle, bison, deer and wild boar strains regardless of genotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abendaño, Naiara; Sevilla, Iker A; Prieto, José Miguel; Garrido, Joseba M; Juste, Ramon A; Alonso-Hearn, Marta

    2013-05-03

    Assessment of the virulence of isolates of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (Map) exhibiting distinct genotypes and isolated from different hosts may help to clarify the degree to which clinical manifestations of the disease in cattle can be attributed to bacterial or to host factors. The objective of this study was to test the ability of 10 isolates of Map representing distinct genotypes and isolated from domestic (cattle, sheep, and goat), and wildlife animal species (fallow deer, deer, wild boar, and bison) to enter and grow in bovine macrophages. The isolates were previously typed using IS1311 PCR followed by restriction endonuclease analysis into types C, S or B. Intracellular growth of the isolates in a bovine macrophage-like cell line (BoMac) and in primary bovine monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM) was evaluated by quantification of CFU numbers in the initial inoculum and inside of the host cells at 2h and 7 d p.i. using an automatic liquid culture system (Bactec MGIT 960). Individual data illustrated that growth was less variable in BoMac than in MDM cells. All the isolates from goat and sheep hosts persisted within BoMac cells in lower CFU numbers than the other tested isolates after 7 days of infection regardless of genotype. In addition, BoMac cells exhibited differential inflammatory, apoptotic and destructive responses when infected with a bovine or an ovine isolate; which correlated with the differential survival of these strains within BoMac cells. Our results indicated that the survival of the tested Map isolates within bovine macrophages is associated with the specific host from which the isolates were initially isolated.

  7. Detection of Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis in tie-stall dairy herds using a standardized environmental sampling technique and targeted pooled samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arango-Sabogal, Juan C; Côté, Geneviève; Paré, Julie; Labrecque, Olivia; Roy, Jean-Philippe; Buczinski, Sébastien; Doré, Elizabeth; Fairbrother, Julie H; Bissonnette, Nathalie; Wellemans, Vincent; Fecteau, Gilles

    2016-07-01

    Mycobacterium avium ssp. paratuberculosis (MAP) is the etiologic agent of Johne's disease, a chronic contagious enteritis of ruminants that causes major economic losses. Several studies, most involving large free-stall herds, have found environmental sampling to be a suitable method for detecting MAP-infected herds. In eastern Canada, where small tie-stall herds are predominant, certain conditions and management practices may influence the survival and transmission of MAP and recovery (isolation). Our objective was to estimate the performance of a standardized environmental and targeted pooled sampling technique for the detection of MAP-infected tie-stall dairy herds. Twenty-four farms (19 MAP-infected and 5 non-infected) were enrolled, but only 20 were visited twice in the same year, to collect 7 environmental samples and 2 pooled samples (sick cows and cows with poor body condition). Concurrent individual sampling of all adult cows in the herds was also carried out. Isolation of MAP was achieved using the MGIT Para TB culture media and the BACTEC 960 detection system. Overall, MAP was isolated in 7% of the environmental cultures. The sensitivity of the environmental culture was 44% [95% confidence interval (CI): 20% to 70%] when combining results from 2 different herd visits and 32% (95% CI: 13% to 57%) when results from only 1 random herd visit were used. The best sampling strategy was to combine samples from the manure pit, gutter, sick cows, and cows with poor body condition. The standardized environmental sampling technique and the targeted pooled samples presented in this study is an alternative sampling strategy to costly individual cultures for detecting MAP-infected tie-stall dairies. Repeated samplings may improve the detection of MAP-infected herds.

  8. Bayesian validation of a serum and milk ELISA for antibodies against Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis in Greek dairy goats across lactation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelidou, E; Kostoulas, P; Leontides, L

    2014-02-01

    We validated a commercial (Idexx Pourquier, Montpellier, France) serum and milk indirect ELISA that detects antibodies against Mycobacterium avium ssp. paratuberculosis (MAP) in Greek dairy goats. Each goat was sampled 4 times, starting from kidding and covering early, mid, and late lactation. A total of 1,268 paired milk (or colostrum) and serum samples were collected during the 7-mo lactation period. Bayesian latent class models, which allow for the continuous interpretation of test results, were used to derive the distribution of the serum and milk ELISA response for healthy and MAP-infected individuals at each lactation stage. Both serum and milk ELISA, in all lactation stages, had average and similar overall discriminatory ability as measured by the area under the curve (AUC). For each test, the smallest overlap between the distribution of the healthy and MAP-infected does was in late lactation. At this stage, the AUC was 0.89 (95% credible interval: 0.70; 0.98) and 0.92 (0.74; 0.99) for the milk and serum ELISA, respectively. Both tests had comparable sensitivities and specificities at the recommended cutoffs across lactation. Lowering the cutoffs led to an increase in sensitivity without serious loss in specificity. In conclusion, the milk ELISA was as accurate as the serum ELISA. Therefore, it could serve as the diagnostic tool of choice, especially during the implementation of MAP control programs that require frequent testing, because milk sampling is a noninvasive, rapid, and easy process. Copyright © 2014 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. The diagnostic performance of an antibody enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay using serum and colostrum to determine the disease status of a Jersey dairy herd infected with Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenvey, Caitlin J; Reichel, Michael P; Cockcroft, Peter D

    2016-01-01

    Colostrum may have the ability to improve the diagnostic accuracy of some tests when compared to serum for important livestock diseases because of the high concentrations of immunoglobulins present within this sample type. The ELISA for Johne's disease is one such test, as it suffers from low sensitivity when testing serum samples collected during the subclinical stage of infection. Blood and colostrum samples were collected from 34 Jersey dairy cows and tested for antibodies against Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP) by ELISA. Fecal samples were also collected and tested by a high-throughput Johne's polymerase chain reaction (HT-J PCR) assay and fecal culture (FC), with the latter being used as the reference test. A receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was performed, and the area under the curve (AUC) was calculated. The HT-J PCR and FC results were also compared. Of the 34 cows in this study, 4 had FC results consistent with MAP infection. The HT-J PCR did not identify any FC-positive cows. Using a 1:20 dilution and sample-to-positive (S/P) ratio cutoff threshold of 0.15, the relative sensitivity values of both serum (AUC 0. 56) and colostrum (AUC 0.63) were 0%. With lower sample dilutions, the relative sensitivity values of serum were 0% (1:2, AUC 0.62; 1:5, AUC 0.55); however, the relative sensitivity value of colostrum was 75% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 19-99%) at a dilution of 1:5, S/P ratio cutoff threshold of 0.15, and AUC of 0.73 (95% CI: 0.55-0.87). The testing of colostrum samples for MAP-specific antibodies by ELISA may provide improved identification of animals in the early stages of infection with MAP when compared with serum samples.

  10. Detection of serum antibodies cross-reacting with Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis and beta-cell antigen zinc transporter 8 homologous peptides in patients with high-risk proliferative diabetic retinopathy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Pinna

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: MAP3865c, a Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP cell membrane protein, has a relevant sequence homology with zinc transporter 8 (ZnT8, a beta-cell membrane protein involved in Zn++ transportation. Recently, antibodies recognizing MAP3865c epitopes have been shown to cross-react with ZnT8 in type 1 diabetes patients. The purpose of this study was to detect antibodies against MAP3865c peptides in patients with high-risk proliferative diabetic retinopathy and speculate on whether they may somehow be involved in the pathogenesis of this severe retinal disorder. METHODS: Blood samples were obtained from 62 type 1 and 80 type 2 diabetes patients with high-risk proliferative diabetic retinopathy and 81 healthy controls. Antibodies against 6 highly immunogenic MAP3865c peptides were detected by indirect ELISA. RESULTS: Type 1 diabetes patients had significantly higher rates of positive antibodies than controls. Conversely, no statistically significant differences were found between type 2 diabetes patients and controls. After categorization of type 1 diabetes patients into two groups, one with positive, the other with negative antibodies, we found that they had similar mean visual acuity (∼ 0.6 and identical rates of vitreous hemorrhage (28.6%. Conversely, Hashimoto's thyroiditis prevalence was 4/13 (30.7% in the positive antibody group and 1/49 (2% in the negative antibody group, a statistically significant difference (P = 0.016. CONCLUSIONS: This study confirmed that type 1 diabetes patients have significantly higher rates of positive antibodies against MAP/ZnT8 peptides, but failed to find a correlation between the presence of these antibodies and the severity degree of high-risk proliferative diabetic retinopathy. The significantly higher prevalence of Hashimoto's disease among type 1 diabetes patients with positive antibodies might suggest a possible common environmental trigger for these conditions.

  11. Improved Culture Medium (TiKa) for Mycobacterium avium Subspecies Paratuberculosis (MAP) Matches qPCR Sensitivity and Reveals Significant Proportions of Non-viable MAP in Lymphoid Tissue of Vaccinated MAP Challenged Animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bull, Tim J; Munshi, Tulika; Mikkelsen, Heidi; Hartmann, Sofie B; Sørensen, Maria R; Garcia, Joanna S; Lopez-Perez, Paula M; Hofmann, Sven; Hilpert, Kai; Jungersen, Gregers

    2016-01-01

    The quantitative detection of viable pathogen load is an important tool in determining the degree of infection in animals and contamination of foodstuffs. Current conventional culture methods are limited in their ability to determine these levels in Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP) due to slow growth, clumping and low recoverability issues. The principle goal of this study was to evaluate a novel culturing process (TiKa) with unique ability to stimulate MAP growth from low sample loads and dilutions. We demonstrate it was able to stimulate a mean 29-fold increase in recoverability and an improved sensitivity of up to three logs when compared with conventional culture. Using TiKa culture, MAP clumping was minimal and produced visible colonies in half the time required by standard culture methods. Parallel quantitative evaluation of the TiKa culture approach and qPCR on MAP loads in tissue and gut mucosal samples from a MAP vaccine-challenge study, showed good correlations between colony counts (cfu) and qPCR derived genome equivalents (Geq) over a large range of loads with a 30% greater sensitivity for TiKa culture approach at low loads (two logs). Furthermore, the relative fold changes in Geq and cfu from the TiKa culture approach suggests that non-mucosal tissue loads from MAP infected animals contained a reduced proportion of non-viable MAP (mean 19-fold) which was reduced significantly further (mean 190-fold) in vaccinated "reactor" calves. This study shows TiKa culture equates well with qPCR and provides important evidence that accuracy in estimating viable MAP load using DNA tests alone may vary significantly between samples of mucosal and lymphatic origin.

  12. CD4⁺ T-cells, γδ T-cells and B-cells are associated with lack of vaccine protection in Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Silva, Kumudika; M Plain, Karren; J Begg, Douglas; C Purdie, Auriol; J Whittington, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Vaccination is one of the strategies used to control the spread of Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP) infection in livestock. Gudair(®) is a widely-used vaccine in sheep and goats and is the only vaccine approved for use in sheep in Australia and New Zealand. This vaccine reduces mortality due to MAP-infection by up to 90% but some sheep remain infectious by shedding MAP in faeces, despite vaccination. In this study, using an experimental infection model in sheep, our aim was to assess differences in immune parameters between vaccinated MAP-exposed sheep in which the vaccine was effective compared to those in which it failed to protect against infection. We assessed immune parameters such as MAP-specific IFNγ, IL-10 and lymphocyte proliferative responses and serum antibody levels. At the end of the trial, 72% of non-vaccinated sheep and 24% of vaccinated sheep were infected, as defined by the detection of viable MAP in intestinal tissues when the trial was terminated at 49 weeks post exposure. There were significant differences in the proliferation of CD4(+), B and γδ T-cells over time in vaccinated sheep in which the vaccine failed to protect against infection compared to the non-infected vaccinated sheep. There were no significant differences in the IFNγ response or serum antibody levels between the vaccinated infected and vaccinated non-infected sheep. These results emphasise the importance of specific lymphocyte subsets in protecting against MAP-infection, especially in vaccinated sheep, and that immune parameters other than the commonly used IFNγ and antibody tests are required when assessing vaccine efficacy.

  13. Estimation of flock/herd-level true Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis prevalence on sheep, beef cattle and deer farms in New Zealand using a novel Bayesian model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verdugo, Cristobal; Jones, Geoff; Johnson, Wes; Wilson, Peter; Stringer, Lesley; Heuer, Cord

    2014-12-01

    The study aimed to estimate the national- and island-level flock/herd true prevalence (HTP) of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) infection in pastoral farmed sheep, beef cattle and deer in New Zealand. A random sample of 238 single- or multi-species farms was selected from a postal surveyed population of 1940 farms. The sample included 162 sheep flocks, 116 beef cattle and 99 deer herds from seven of 16 geographical regions. Twenty animals from each species present on farm were randomly selected for blood and faecal sampling. Pooled faecal culture testing was conducted using a single pool (sheep flocks) or two pools (beef cattle/deer herds) of 20 and 10 samples per pool, respectively. To increase flock/herd-level sensitivity, sera from all 20 animals from culture negative flocks/herds were individually tested by Pourquier(®) ELISA (sheep and cattle) or Paralisa™ (deer). Results were adjusted for sensitivity and specificity of diagnostic tests using a novel Bayesian latent class model. Outcomes were adjusted by their sampling fractions to obtain HTP estimates at national level. For each species, the posterior probability (POPR) of HTP differences between New Zealand North (NI) and South (SI) Islands was obtained. Across all species, 69% of farms had at least one species test positive. Sheep flocks had the highest HTP estimate (76%, posterior probability interval (PPI) 70-81%), followed by deer (46%, PPI 38-55%) and beef herds (42%, PPI 35-50%). Differences were observed between the two main islands of New Zealand, with higher HTP in sheep and beef cattle flocks/herds in the NI. Sheep flock HTP was 80% in the NI compared with 70% (POPR=0.96) in the SI, while the HTP for beef cattle was 44% in the NI and 38% in the SI (POPR=0.80). Conversely, deer HTP was higher in the SI (54%) than the NI (33%, POPR=0.99). Infection with MAP is endemic at high prevalence in sheep, beef cattle and deer flocks/herds across New Zealand.

  14. Dam Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP) infection status does not predetermine calves for future shedding when raised in a contaminated environment: a cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenberg, Susanne W F; Rutten, Victor P M G; Koets, Ad P

    2015-06-19

    Uptake of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) by calves in the first days of life from colostrum, milk and faeces is regarded an important moment of transmission. The objective of this study was to quantify the association between the MAP status of dams as determined by the presence of MAP DNA and antibody in colostrum and that of DNA in faeces and the environment with subsequent MAP shedding of their daughters. A cohort of 117 dam-daughter pairs giving birth/being born on eight commercial dairy farms with endemic paratuberculosis was followed where colostrum, faecal and environmental samples (dust) were analysed for the presence of MAP using an IS900 real-time PCR. Antibodies in colostrum were measured by ELISA. Analysis of dust samples showed that on all farms environmental MAP exposure occurred continuously. In significantly more colostrum samples (48%) MAP DNA was detected compared to faecal samples (37%). MAP specific antibodies were present in 34% of the colostrum samples. In total MAP DNA was present in faecal samples of 41% of the daughters at least once during the sampling period. The association between faecal shedding in the offspring and the dam MAP status defined by MAP PCR on colostrum, MAP PCR on faeces or ELISA on colostrum was determined by an exact cox regression analysis for discrete data. The model indicated that the hazard for faecal shedding in daughters born to MAP positive dams was not significantly different compared to daughters born to MAP negative dams. When born to a dam with DNA positive faeces the HR was 1.05 (CI 0.6; 1.8) and with DNA positive colostrum the HR was 1.17 (CI 0.6; 2.3). When dam status was defined by a combination of both PCR outcomes (faeces and colostrum) and the ELISA outcome the HR was 1.26 (CI 0.9; 1.9). Therefore, this study indicates that neither the presence of MAP DNA in colostrum, MAP DNA in faeces nor the presence of MAP antibodies in colostrum of the dam significantly influences the hazard of

  15. Evaluation of two absorbed enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays and a complement fixation test as replacements for fecal culture in the detection of cows shedding Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kalis, CHJ; Hesselink, JW; van Maanen, C; Collins, MT; Barkema, H.W.

    2002-01-01

    Control of paratuberculosis in dairy herds is based on preventing the transmission of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (Mptb) from cows to calves by management measures, supported by removal of cows excreting these bacteria by the fecal route (Mptb shedders). Fecal culture is the most acc

  16. Antigenic Profiles of Recombinant Proteins from Mycobacterium avium subsp paratuberculosis in Sheep with Johne's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Methods to improve the ELISA test to detect Mycobacterium avium subsp paratuberculosis have been explored over several years. Previously, selected recombinant proteins of M. avium subspecies paratuberculosis were found to be immunogenic in cattle with Johne’s disease. In the present study, antibo...

  17. MYCOBACTERIUM AVIUM AS AN ACTUAL PATHOGEN OF HUMAN MYCOBACTERIOSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. A. Starkova

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. Mycobacteriosis is an infectious disease of animals and humans caused by non-tuberculosis mycobacteria including M. avium complex. Despite the fact that the transmission of M. avium from human to human has not been proved, and mycobacteriosis has been sporadic, the number of cases of disseminated forms of disease caused by M. avium among HIV-positive patients during the last ten years was increasing. Limited knowledge about the structure of M. avium population in Russia and the lack of simple methods for the microbiological diagnosis make difficult the epidemiological monitoring of mycobacteriosis. This facilitates the use of modern, efficient molecular genetic methods for the species and subspecies identification and typing of M. avium. Thus, the detection of mobile element IS901, restriction fragment polymorphism analysis of hsp65 gene and IS1245 allow the detection and subspecies identification of M. avium. The study of genomic polymorphisms of bacterial strains for the assessment of M. avium population structure became feasible due to a complex of molecular techniques: VNTR-typing, IS1245-and IS1311-RFLP-typing.

  18. Pengembangan Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay Paratuberkulosis dengan Antigen Protoplasmik Mycobacterium avium Subspecies Paratuberculosis Isolat Lapang (DEVELOPMENT OF PARATUBERCULOSIS ENZYME-LINKED IMMUNO-SORBENT ASSAY WITH PROTOPLASMIC ANTIGEN OF MYCO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahmat Setya Adji

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA is a serological test method most widely used for thediagnosis of paratuberculosis, because it has a better sensitivity compared to other serological test.Protoplasmic antigen (PPA or cellular extract is still the main choice for the diagnosis of paratuberkulosisdevelopment. The aim of research was to use the PPA Mycobacterium avium subspeciesparatuberculosis(MAP field isolates for the development of paratuberculosis ELISA (ELISA PPA-L. As many as 322cattle sera (300 negative and 22 positive were tested using this method and compared with IDEXXcommercial kit. The sensitivity and specificity of ELISA PPA-L test results were 68.18% and 97.0%,whereas for the IDEXX kit were 63.64% and 97.33%respectively. ELISA PPA-L had higher sensitivity andlower specificity compared to the IDEXX commercial kit. ELISA test using protoplasmic antigen of MAPfield isolates has good ability for paratuberculosis serological test and can be used for screening test of thedisease in Indonesia.

  19. Sero-prevalence of bovine Johne's disease in buffaloes and cattle population of North India using indigenous ELISA kit based on native Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis 'Bison type' genotype of goat origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, S V; Singh, A V; Singh, R; Sharma, S; Shukla, N; Misra, S; Singh, P K; Sohal, J S; Kumar, H; Patil, P K; Misra, P; Sandhu, K S

    2008-09-01

    Present pilot study is the first attempt in the country to estimate sero-prevalence of Bovine Johne's disease (BJD) by screening cattle and buffaloes representing large population belonging to farmer's and farm herds in the home tracts (Uttar Pradesh (UP) and Punjab) of Hariana cattle and Murrah buffaloes in North India. Indigenous and in-house plate ELISA kit (using protoplasmic antigen from native Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis 'Bison type' strain of goat origin), originally developed for goats and sheep was standardized in bovines and used for screening. For this study, 33 villages of south and west UP were randomly selected and surveyed from 2001 to 2003. There were 7943 farmer's families having 38,251 livestock, including cattle, buffaloes, goats and sheep (per family 4.8% livestock). Numerically, buffaloes and cattle were 54.7% and 22.1%, respectively. Serum samples were collected from 726 animals (4.2% of 16, 981 livestock with 4375 farmer's families) located in 33 randomly surveyed villages. Serum samples (699), submitted to Epidemiology Department of Veterinary College (Punjab Agricultural University, Ludhiana), in the year 2004 by farmer's and organized farm herds (Buffaloes, 372, Cattle, 327), were screened by this ELISA kit. Soluble protoplasmic antigen was prepared from Map (S 5) 'Bison type' strain isolated from a terminally sick goat with Johne's disease. Of the total 1425 bovine (Buffaloes and cattle) serum samples screened using indigenous ELISA kit, sero-prevalence of Johne's disease was 29.0% (28.6% in buffalo and 29.8% in cattle) in Northern India. State-wise sero-prevalence was 31.9% and 23.3% in UP and Punjab, respectively. In UP, of the 601 randomly sampled buffaloes, sero-prevalence was 40.3% (16.6% in young and 40.9% adults) and 25.5% (10.5% in young and 26.3% adults) in south and west UP, respectively. Of the 125 cattle screened, sero-prevalence was 42.6% (nil in young and 44.4% adults) and 30.0% (nil in young and 30.6% adults

  20. Lymphadenitis in children is caused by Mycobacterium avium hominissuis and not related to ‘bird tuberculosis’

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Haas, P. E. W.; Lindeboom, J. A.; Kuijper, E. J.; van Soolingen, D.

    2008-01-01

    Mycobacterium avium is the most commonly encountered mycobacterium species among non-Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (nontuberculous mycobacteria) isolates worldwide and frequently causes lymphadenitis in children. During a multi-centre study in The Netherlands that was performed to determine the optimal treatment for mycobacterial lymphadenitis, concern was expressed in the media about the possible role of birds as sources of these M. avium infections, referred to as ‘bird tuberculosis.’ To examine the involvement of birds in mycobacterial lymphadenitis, 34 M. avium isolates from lymphadenitis cases were subjected to IS1245 restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) typing. This genotyping method enables the distinction of the subspecies M. avium subsp. hominissuis and the ‘bird-type’ M. avium spp. avium. Highly variable RFLP patterns were found among the lymphadenitis M. avium isolates, and all belonged to the M. avium hominissuis subspecies. A relation to pet birds in the etiology of mycobacterial lymphadenitis could not be established, and the source of the infections may be environmental. PMID:18320245

  1. Tuberculosis in Birds: Insights into the Mycobacterium avium Infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuldeep Dhama

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Tuberculosis, a List B disease of World Organization for Animal Health, caused by M. avium or M. genavense predominantly affects poultry and pet or captive birds. Clinical manifestations in birds include emaciation, depression and diarrhea along with marked atrophy of breast muscle. Unlike tuberculosis in animals and man, lesions in lungs are rare. Tubercular nodules can be seen in liver, spleen, intestine and bone marrow. Granulomatous lesion without calcification is a prominent feature. The disease is a rarity in organized poultry sector due to improved farm practices, but occurs in zoo aviaries. Molecular techniques like polymerase chain reaction combined with restriction fragment length polymorphism and gene probes aid in rapid identification and characterization of mycobacteria subspecies, and overcome disadvantages of conventional methods which are slow, labour intensive and may at times fail to produce precise results. M. avium subsp. avium with genotype IS901+ and IS1245+ causes infections in animals and human beings too. The bacterium causes sensitivity in cattle to the tuberculin test. The paper discusses in brief the M. avium infection in birds, its importance in a zoonotic perspective, and outlines conventional and novel strategies for its diagnosis, prevention and eradication in domestic/pet birds and humans alike.

  2. Prevention of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) infection in Balb/c mice by feeding probiotic Lactobacillus acidophilus NP-51

    Science.gov (United States)

    The objective of this study was to examine effects of feeding Lactobacillus acidophilus strain NP51 to mice challenged with Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP), the causative agent of Johne’s disease. We hypothesized that feeding NP51 would increase Th-1 responses and decrease prog...

  3. Prevention of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis Infection in BALB/c Mice by Feeding Lactobacillus acidophilus Strain NP-51

    Science.gov (United States)

    The immune responses of 390 BALB/c mice fed the probiotic Lactobacillus acidophilus strain NP51® and infected with Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP) were evaluated in a 6-month trial. Mice were randomized to nine treatment groups fed either viable- or heat-killed NP51 and inocula...

  4. Research progress in nursing subspecialization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fang Wang; Li Yuan; Zhen-Zhen Xiong; Rao Li

    2016-01-01

    With the rapid development of medical departments in recent years, nursing subspecialization has increased in prominence and performance. This highly subspecialized division of labor system not only improves the quality of nursing care but also promotes the development of nursing science. Today, developing nursing subspecialization has become the direction and strategy for the development of clinical nursing practice in many countries.

  5. Mycobacterium avium subsp. Paratuberculosis (MAP) as a modifying factor in Crohn's disease.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Sibartie, Shomik

    2010-02-01

    Crohn\\'s disease (CD) is a multifactorial syndrome with genetic and environmental contributions. Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP) has been frequently isolated from mucosal tissues of patients with CD but the cellular immune response to this bacterium has been poorly described. Our aim was to examine the influence of MAP on T-cell proliferation and cytokine responses in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD).

  6. The Effect of Mycobacterium avium Complex Infections on Routine Mycobacterium bovis Diagnostic Tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claire Barry

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Bovine tuberculosis (bTB is diagnosed in naturally infected populations exposed to a wide variety of other pathogens. This study describes the cell-mediated immune responses of cattle exposed to Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (Map and Mycobacterium avium subspecies avium with particular reference to routine antefmortem Mycobacterium bovis diagnostic tests. The IFN-γ released in response to stimulated blood was found to peak later in the Map-exposed group and was more sustained when compared to the Maa-exposed group. There was a very close correlation between the responses to the purified protein derivatives (PPD used for stimulation (PPDa, PPDb, and PPDj with PPDa and PPDj most closely correlated. On occasion, in the Map-infected cattle, PPDb-biased responses were seen compared to PPDa suggesting that some Map-infected cattle could be misclassified as M. bovis infected using this test with these reagents. This bias was not seen when PPDj was used. SICCT results were consistent with the respective infections and all calves would have been classed skin test negative.

  7. Increasing the ex vivo antigen-specific IFN-γ production in subpopulations of T cells and NKp46+ cells by anti-CD28, anti-CD49d and recombinant IL-12 costimulation in cattle vaccinated with recombinant proteins from Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakur, Aneesh; Riber, Ulla; Davis, William C; Jungersen, Gregers

    2013-10-01

    T cells, which encounter specific antigen (Ag), require additional signals to mount a functional immune response. Here, we demonstrate activation of signal 2, by anti-CD28 mAb (aCD28) and other costimulatory molecules (aCD49d, aCD5), and signal 3, by recombinant IL-12, enhance Ag-specific IFN-γ secretion by CD4, CD8, γδ T cells and NK cells. Age matched male jersey calves, experimentally infected with Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP), were vaccinated with a cocktail of recombinant MAP proteins or left unvaccinated. Vaccine induced ex vivo recall responses were measured through Ag-specific IFN-γ production by ELISA and flow cytometry. There was a significant increase in production of IFN-γ by T cell subsets or NKp46+ cells cultured in the presence of Ag and aCD28/aCD49d. The increase was accompanied by an increase in the integrated median fluorescence intensity (iMFI) of activated T cells. Addition of rIL-12 induced a significant additive effect leading to a maximum increase in responder frequency of Ag-specific T cell subsets or NKp46+ cells with a heavy bias toward IFN-γ production by CD4 T cells. We provide the first description of using aCD28/aCD49d costimulation to potentiate an Ag-specific increase in the production of IFN-γ in bovine immunology. The study also shows the degree of signaling in T cells is regulated by the costimulatory environment.

  8. Immunogenicity of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis specific peptides for inclusion in a subunit vaccine against paratuberculosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, Heidi; Tollefsen, S.; Olsen, I.;

    efficacies. The main problem with available vaccines is their interference with surveillance and diagnosis of bovine tuberculosis and paratuberculosis. Our ultimate aim is to develop a subunit vaccine consisting of selected MAP peptides, which allow differentiation of infected from vaccinated animals. Here......Paratuberculosis in ruminants is caused by an infection with Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP) and is a chronic disease characterized by granulomatous enteritis. Available vaccines against paratuberculosis consist of variations of whole bacteria with adjuvant showing various...... and are immunogenic. In the near future, a panel of selected peptides will be tested for efficacy as a vaccine against paratuberculosis with calves or goats experimentally infected with MAP....

  9. Mycobacterium avium in a shower linked to pulmonary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falkinham, Joseph O; Iseman, Michael D; de Haas, Petra; van Soolingen, Dick

    2008-06-01

    Mycobacterium avium was isolated from hot and cold water samples and from sediment (biofilm) collected from the showerhead in the home of a woman with M. avium pulmonary disease lacking known M. avium risk factors. IS1245/IS1311 DNA fingerprinting demonstrated that M. avium isolates from the hot and cold water and showerhead sediment demonstrated a clonal relationship with the patient's M. avium isolate. The data provide evidence that showers may serve as sources of infection by waterborne M. avium.

  10. Drug susceptibility testing of Mycobacterium Avium subsp. Avium isolates from naturally infected domestic pigeons to avian tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaveh Parvandar

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: We suggest drug susceptibility testing for more nontuberculous mycobateria, particularly M. avium complex isolated from infected birds and humans, as well as molecular basics of drug sensitivity in order to detect resistance genes of pathogenic M. avium subsp. avium.

  11. Apa antigen of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis as a target for species-specific immunodetection of the bacteria in infected tissues of cattle with paratuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, Giliane S; Rodrigues, Ana Bárbara F; Gioffré, Andrea; Romano, Maria I; Carvalho, Eulógio C Q; Ventura, Thatiana L B; Lasunskaia, Elena B

    2011-09-15

    Comparative genomics of Mycobacterium spp. have revealed conservative genes and respective proteins differently expressed in mycobacteria that could be used as targets for the species-specific immunodiagnostics. The alanine and proline-rich antigen Apa is a mycobacterial protein that present significant variability in primary sequence length and composition between members of M. avium and M. tuberculosis complexes. In this study, the recombinant Apa protein encoded by the MAP1569/ModD gene of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis (Map) was used to generate a panel of monoclonal antibodies which were shown to recognize the most important veterinary pathogens of the M. avium complex, specifically Map and M. avium subsp. hominissuis, and which did not cross-react with M. bovis or M. tuberculosis. The produced antibodies were demonstrated to be a useful tool for the species-specific immunofluorescence or immunohistochemical detection of Map in experimentally infected cell cultures or intestinal tissues from cattle with bovine paratuberculosis and, additionally, they may be employed for the discrimination of pathogenic M. avium subspecies via Western blotting. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Generalism in modern subspecializing medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levi, Marcel

    2017-04-01

    Medicine is currently developing at a breath holding pace. Diseases and medical conditions for which no remedy was available only a few years ago, can now be treated or even completely cured. However, this advancement of medicine comes with increasing complexity in many situations. This article discusses how we have to adapt our health care organization and our work as physicians to better cope with the new challenges of the enormous advancement of medicine, with a specific focus on internal medicine. If we want our patients to obtain maximal benefit of the progress in biomedical knowledge and the ensuing improved clinical outcomes in many areas we need to further focus and concentrate complex medical care in a team-based approach. In addition, we need to match increasing subspecialization with an attitude of generalism, both in our clinical work and in our teaching and training programs. Copyright © 2017 European Federation of Internal Medicine. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Characterization of gene expression profiles to chronic infection with Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Melvang, Heidi Mikkelsen; Grønbæk, Betina Chemnitz; Brogaard, Louise

    -vaccinated infected controls (n=2). From each calf, 7 intestinal tissue samples and 3 lymph node samples, collected at 10 months of age, were used for cDNA synthesis. Expression of a total of 37 selected genes including inflammatory, Th1 and Th17 related genes were explored. The results showed that Map infection......, as expected, leads to increased expression of local IFN-γ. Expression of IL-10 also increased as a result of Map infection, and this increase was more correlated to the amount of Map than IFN-γ, indicating a shift towards a regulatory environment as infection progress. Th17-mediated immune responses were...

  14. Detection of Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis in surgicalpathology blocks from patients with Crohn's disease in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jun Cheng; Tim Bull; Nazira Sumar; Joe Sheridan; Peter Dalton; John Hermon-Taylor

    2000-01-01

    AIM To determine whether MAP can be detected in archival paraffin embedded full thickness samples ofintestinal tissue from patients in China with Crohn's disease (CD), ulcerative colitis (UC), and in controlsubjects (NIBD) having surgery for bowel cancer.METHODS Optimized procedures for the removal of paraffin, recovery of tissue and access to MAP DNA,followed by MAP-specific nested IS900 PCR. Confirmation of specific amplification by Southern blotting andDNA sequencing.RESULTS IS900 PCR positive tests identified MAP in 9 (69%) of 13 CD, 1 of 3 UC and 2 (14%) of 14NIBD in the presence of correctly reporting positive and negative sample and reagent control reactions. DNAsequence analysis of the 298bp IS900 PCR amplification product from MAP in 2 Chinese CD patientsdemonstrated 99% homology with the GenBank IS900 sequence accession number X16293.CONCLUSION Although larger numbers of Chinese samples need to be studied, these initial results areconsistent with an exposure of human populations in China to MAP, and an involvement of this pathogen inchronic inflammation of the intestine of the Crohn's disease type. The results are in agreement with similarpositive studies reported from China, from Western Europe and elsewhere.

  15. Effect of herd prevalence on heritability estimates of antibody response to Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hulzen, van K.J.E.; Nielen, M.; Koets, A.P.; Jong, de G.; Arendonk, van J.A.M.; Heuven, H.C.M.

    2011-01-01

    Worldwide, classical control strategies based on hygiene and culling of infected animals have been implemented to eradicate Johne's disease. Breeding for disease resistance may be a useful additional tool to control the disease. The aim of this study was to estimate genetic parameters for the presen

  16. Effects of the probiotic Lactobacillus animalis in murine Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karunasena Enusha

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background MAP is a suspected zoonotic pathogen and the causative agent of Johne’s Disease in cattle and other ruminant animals. With over $1 billion dollars in loss to the dairy industry due to Johne’s Disease, efforts to eliminate or reduce MAP from cattle are of importance. The purpose of this study was to determine if daily intake of probiotics could eliminate or reduce Johne’s Disease associated symptoms and pathogenesis by MAP. Post infection, animals are often asymptomatic carriers with limited shedding of the pathogen, proving early detection to be difficult. Disease and symptoms often appear 3–4 years after infection with antibiotic treatment proving ineffective. Symptoms include chronic gastrointestinal inflammation leading to severe weight-loss from poor feed and water intake cause a wasting disease. These symptoms are similar to those found in individuals with Crohn’s Disease (CD; MAP has been implicated by not proven to be the causative agent of CD. Probiotics administered to livestock animals, including dairy and beef cattle have demonstrated improvements in cattle performance and health. Our objectives included determining the benefits of Lactobacillus animalis (strain name: NP-51 in MAP infected BALB/c mice by evaluating systemic and gastrointestinal response by the host and gut microbiota. Male and female animals were fed 1×106 CFU/g probiotics in sterile, powdered mouse chow daily and infected with 1 × 107 CFU/ml MAP and compared to controls. Animals were evaluated for 180 days to assess acute and chronic stages of disease, with sample collection from animals every 45 days. MAP concentrations from liver and intestinal tissues were examined using real time-PCR methods and the expression of key inflammatory markers were measured during MAP infection (interferon-gamma [IFN-Υ], Interleukin-1α, IL-12, IL-10, IL-6, and Tumor necrosis factor alpha [TNF-α]. Results Our results demonstrate administration of probiotics reduces production of IFN-Υ and IL-6 while increasing TNF-α and IL-17 in chronic disease; healthful immune responses that reduce chronic inflammation associated to MAP infection. Conclusions We observed that the immune system’s response in the presence of probiotics to MAP contributes towards host health by influencing the activity of the immune system and gut microbial populations.

  17. SUBSPECIALIZATION IN THE FIELD OF ORTHOPAEDIC SURGERY

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    orthopaedic department had made a decision to institute subspecialty practices. ... Dentistry was the earliest discipline to separate .... pathology. In 2011, the Northshore-LIJ health system ... enough numbers to support subspecialized services.

  18. Comparison of Variable-Number Tandem-Repeat Markers typing and IS1245 Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism fingerprinting of Mycobacterium avium subsp. hominissuis from human and porcine origins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marttila Harri

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Animal mycobacterioses are regarded as a potential zoonotic risk and cause economical losses world wide. M. avium subsp. hominissuis is a slow-growing subspecies found in mycobacterial infected humans and pigs and therefore rapid and discriminatory typing methods are needed for epidemiological studies. The genetic similarity of M. avium subsp. hominissuis from human and porcine origins using two different typing methods have not been studied earlier. The objective of this study was to compare the IS1245 RFLP pattern and MIRU-VNTR typing to study the genetic relatedness of M. avium strains isolated from slaughter pigs and humans in Finland with regard to public health aspects. Methods A novel PCR-based genotyping method, variable number tandem repeat (VNTR typing of eight mycobacterial interspersed repetitive units (MIRUs, was evaluated for its ability to characterize Finnish Mycobacterium avium subsp. hominissuis strains isolated from pigs (n = 16 and humans (n = 13 and the results were compared with those obtained by the conventional IS1245 RFLP method. Results The MIRU-VNTR results showed a discriminatory index (DI of 0,92 and the IS1245 RFLP resulted in DI 0,98. The combined DI for both methods was 0,98. The MIRU-VNTR test has the advantages of being simple, reproducible, non-subjective, which makes it suitable for large-scale screening of M. avium strains. Conclusions Both typing methods demonstrated a high degree of similarity between the strains of human and porcine origin. The parallel application of the methods adds epidemiological value to the comparison of the strains and their origins. The present approach and results support the hypothesis that there is a common source of M. avium subsp. hominissuis infection for pigs and humans or alternatively one species may be the infective source to the other.

  19. Investigation of Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) in Australian commercial milk using qPCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adhikari, Shraddha; Caro Tohme, Tanya; Whiley, Harriet

    2017-02-01

    This technical research communication describes the first study to use quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) to investigate the presence of Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) in Australian pasteurised milk. MAC is the most common NTM responsible for human illnesses and includes M. avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP). MAC is a causative agent of lymphadenitis in children, with contaminated food and water considered as a likely source. As such the presence of MAC in milk would have public health significance. MAP has been linked to Crohn's disease and is also the causative agent of Johne's disease in cattle. Previous studies have detected MAP in pasteurised milk from Brazil, India, Czech Republic, USA, Argentina, UK, Iran, Ireland and the United Kingdom. This study investigated a total of 180 commercially available Australian pasteurised milk samples which were tested for MAC DNA in triplicate using PCR. All samples were negative for MAC DNA. An additional 14 milk samples were tested, incubated for 3 weeks at 37 °C to potentially increase the concentration of any viable MAC that may be present and then retested. All samples were again negative for MAC DNA. This could be due to concentrations below the limit of detection, limited sample size or could be reflective of the Australian biosecurity control protocols and surveillance of Johne's disease in ruminant animals.

  20. Three subspecies of Pelargonium laevigatum (Geraniaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. M. van Wyk (née Schoken

    1995-12-01

    Full Text Available Pelargonium laevigatum (L. f. Willd. is a variable species. The macromorphology, anatomy of the leaves, chromosome numbers and geographical distribution of the species were studied, and it is concluded that three subspecies should be distinguished. The subsp. diversifolium (Wendl. Schonken stat. nov. and subsp. oxyphyllum (DC. Schonken stat. nov. were originally described as species. A key to identify the three subspecies, a distribution map. and illustrations of the macromor- phological characters as well as anatomical features of the leaves, are provided.

  1. Serodiagnosis of Mycobacterium avium infections in pigs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wisselink, H.J.; Smits, C.B.; Oorburg, D.; Soolingen, D.; Overduin, P.; Maneschijn-Bonsing, J.G.; Stockhofe, N.; Buys-Bergen, H.; Engel, B.; Urlings, B.A.P.; Jelle, E.R.; Thole, J.E.R.

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study is the development and evaluation of a serodiagnostic assay for Mycobacterium avium (MA). After screening MA lipid fractions in an ELISA format, a polar lipid fraction was selected as antigen because of its superior recognition by serum antibodies in experimentally infected

  2. Mycobacterium avium subsp. avium found in raptors exposed to infected domestic fowl.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kriz, Petr; Kaevska, Marija; Bartejsova, Iva; Pavlik, Ivo

    2013-09-01

    We report a case of a falcon breeding facility, where raptors (both diurnal and nocturnal) were raised in contact with domestic fowl (Gallus gallus f. domesticus) infected by Mycobacterium avium subsp. avium. Fecal and environmental samples from 20 raptors and four common ravens (Corvus corax) were collected. Mycobacterium a. avium DNA was detected in feces of four raptors (bald eagle [Haliaeetus leucocephalus], eagle owl [Bubo bubo], barn owl [Tyto alba], and little owl [Athene noctua]) using triplex quantitative real-time PCR. As both the flock of domestic fowl and one of the infected raptors had the same origin (zoological collection), they might have had a common source of colonization/infection. However, the detection of M. a. avium in feces of three other raptors may point at transmission of the agent between the birds in the facility. Contact of raptors with domestic fowl infected by M. a. avium may pose a risk for transmission of the infection for them; however, raptors from the falcon breeding facility seemed to be relatively resistant to the infection.

  3. A Subinhibitory Concentration of Clarithromycin Inhibits Mycobacterium avium Biofilm Formation

    OpenAIRE

    2004-01-01

    Mycobacterium avium causes disseminated infection in immunosuppressed individuals and lung infection in patients with chronic lung diseases. M. avium forms biofilm in the environment and possibly in human airways. Antibiotics with activity against the bacterium could inhibit biofilm formation. Clarithromycin inhibits biofilm formation but has no activity against established biofilm.

  4. Formulation of indomethacin emulsion using biopolymer of Prunus avium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Shivangi; Dabral, Prashant; Rana, Vinod; Upadhaya, Kumud; Bhardwaj

    2012-03-01

    The aim of the investigation was to formulate Indomethacin Emulsion using Bio-polymer as Emulsifier. Different batches of emulsions were prepared by varying concentration of biopolymer prunus avium. Based evaluation of the prepared polymers, a conclusion can be drawn that in the Prunus avium bio-material can serve as a promising film forming agent for formulating various drug.

  5. Formulation of indomethacin emulsion using biopolymer of Prunus avium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shivangi Verma

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the investigation was to formulate Indomethacin Emulsion using Bio-polymer as Emulsifier. Different batches of emulsions were prepared by varying concentration of biopolymer prunus avium. Based evaluation of the prepared polymers, a conclusion can be drawn that in the Prunus avium bio-material can serve as a promising film forming agent for formulating various drug.

  6. Differential proteome analysis of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis grown in vitro and isolated from cases of clinical Johne's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weigoldt, Mathias; Meens, Jochen; Doll, Klaus; Fritsch, Isabel; Möbius, Petra; Goethe, Ralph; Gerlach, Gerald F

    2011-02-01

    Bovine Johne's disease (paratuberculosis), caused by Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis, poses a significant economic problem to the beef and dairy industry worldwide. Despite its relevance, however, pathogenesis of Johne's disease is still only partially resolved. Since mycobacterial membrane proteins expressed during infection are likely to play an important role in pathogenesis, membrane-enriched fractions, namely mucosa-derived membranes (MDM) and culture-derived membranes (CDM), of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis from three cows with clinical paratuberculosis were investigated. An initial analysis by 2D difference gel electrophoresis (2D DIGE) and MALDI-TOF-MS analysis revealed four differentially expressed proteins with only one predicted membrane protein. Due to this limited outcome, membrane preparations were subjected to a tube-gel trypsin digestion and investigated by using nanoflow-liquid-chromatography-coupled tandem MS. Based on this approach a total of 212 proteins were detected in MDM including 32 proteins of bovine origin; 275 proteins were detected in CDM; 59 % of MDM and CDM proteins were predicted to be membrane-associated. A total of 130 of the proteins were detected in both MDM and CDM and 48 predicted membrane proteins were detected in MDM from at least two cows. Four of these proteins were not detected in CDM, implying differential expression in the host. All membrane-associated proteins, especially the four identified as being differentially expressed, might be relevant targets for further analyses into the pathogenesis of bovine paratuberculosis.

  7. Drug susceptibility testing of Mycobacterium Avium subsp. Avium isolates from naturally infected domestic pigeons to avian tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parvandar, Kaveh; Mayahi, Mansour; Mosavari, Nader; Pajoohi, Reza Aref

    2016-12-01

    Avian tuberculosis is one of the most important infections affecting most species of birds. Several mycobacterial species have been identified causing avian tuberculosis, and the organisms confirmed most frequently are Mycobacterium avium and Mycobacterium genavense. Any species of birds can be infected with M. avium. Generally, domesticated fowl or captive wild birds are affected more frequently than those living in the wild. M. avium can not only infect all species of birds, but can also infect some domesticated mammals to cause disease, usually with localized lesion. In immunocompetent individuals, M. avium complex isolates produce localized soft tissue infections, including chronic pulmonary infections in the elderly and cervical lymphadenitis in children, but rarely any disseminated disease. In patients infected with HIV and AIDS or in other immunocompromised individuals, M. avium complex isolates frequently cause severe systemic infections. The importance of avian tuberculosis and the risk of its zoonotic spread motivated our interest to determine the drug susceptibility testing of M. avium subsp. avium isolates from naturally infected domestic pigeons to avian tuberculosis. Based on their clinical signs, 80 pigeons suspected with avian tuberculosis were subjected to the study. Out of the 51 identified isolates, 20 M. avium subsp. avium were subjected to the test. Drug susceptibly testing was performed according to the guidelines by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and using proportional method. In the drug susceptibility testing, all isolates were resistant to streptomycin, kanamycin, ethionamide, and thiophene carboxylic acid hydrazide. Additionally, 3, 2, and 1 isolates were susceptible to isoniazid, rifampin, and ethambutol, respectively. To date, no study has documented the drug susceptibility testing of M. avium isolates from infected birds to avian tuberculosis. Pigeons are extensively kept in urban and rural areas for homing and racing

  8. Subspecies specific RAPD markers in rice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The cultivated rice (Oryza sativa L.) is known to contain two major subspecies, indica (O. sativa L. ssp. indica) and japonica (O. sativa L. ssp. japonica). The indica and japonica differentiation resulted in significance of hybrid sterility and hybrid breakdown, which are barriers of gene flow between the two major subgene pools within O. sativa. Traditional classification of indica and japonica germplasm based on isozymes. Here, we report the identification of several random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) markers that have alleles specific in indica or japonica varieties and thus provide a quick and accurate tool to distinguish japonica lines from indica ones.

  9. Winter distribution of willow flycatcher subspecies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paxton, E.H.; Unitt, P.; Sogge, M.K.; Whitfield, M.; Keim, P.

    2011-01-01

    Documenting how different regions across a species' breeding and nonbreeding range are linked via migratory movements is the first step in understanding how events in one region can influence events in others and is critical to identifying conservation threats throughout a migratory animal's annual cycle. We combined two studies that evaluated migratory connectivity in the Willow Flycatcher (Empidonax traillii), one using mitochondrial DNA sequences from 172 flycatchers sampled throughout their winter range, and another which examined morphological characteristics of 68 museum specimens collected in the winter range. Our results indicate that the four subspecies occupy distinct but overlapping regions of the winter range. Connectivity between specific breeding and winter grounds appears to be moderate to strong, with distributions that suggest migration patterns of both the chain and leap-frog types connecting the breeding and nonbreeding grounds. The Pacific lowlands of Costa Rica appear to be a key winter location for the endangered Southwestern Willow Flycatcher (E. t. extimus), although other countries in Central America may also be important for the subspecies. ?? The Cooper Ornithological Society 2011.

  10. Polymorphism analysis of csd gene in six Apis mellifera subspecies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zilong; Liu, Zhiyong; Wu, Xiaobo; Yan, Weiyu; Zeng, Zhijiang

    2012-03-01

    The complementary sex determination (csd) gene is the primary gene determining the gender of honey bees (Apis spp). In this study we analyzed the polymorphism of csd gene in six Apis mellifera subspecies. The genomic region 3 of csd gene in these six A. mellifera was cloned, and identified. A total of 79 haplotypes were obtained from these six subspecies. Analysis showed that region 3 of csd gene has a high level of polymorphism in all the six A. mellifera subspecies. The A. m. anatolica subspecies has a slightly higher nucleotide diversity (π) than other subspecies, while the π values showed no significant difference among the other five subspecies. The phylogenetic tree showed that all the csd haplotypes from different A. mellifera subspecies are scattered throughout the tree, without forming six different clades. Population differentiation analysis showed that there are significant genetic differentiations among some of the subspecies. The NJ phylogenetic tree showed that the A. m. caucasica and A. m. carnica have the closest relationship, followed by A. m. ssp, A. m. ligustica, A. m. carpatica and A. m. anatolica that were gathered in the tree in turn.

  11. Surveillance of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis in dairy herds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weber, M.F.

    2009-01-01

    In this thesis, the potential for improvements in surveillance of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (Map) infection and paratuberculosis in dairy herds was investigated, leading to a reduction in surveillance costs whilst continuing to meet specific quality targets. In particular, differen

  12. Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis and multiple sclerosis in Sardinian patients: epidemiology and clinical features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frau, J; Cossu, D; Coghe, G; Lorefice, L; Fenu, G; Melis, M; Paccagnini, D; Sardu, C; Murru, M R; Tranquilli, S; Marrosu, M G; Sechi, L A; Cocco, E

    2013-10-01

    Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP) is an infectious factor recently found in association with multiple sclerosis (MS) in Sardinia. The objectives of this study were to confirm this association and evaluate its role in clinical features. A total of 436 patients and 264 healthy controls (HCs) were included. We examined the blood of each individual for MAPDNA and MAP2694 antibodies using IS900-specific PCR and ELISA, respectively. Differences in MAP presence between the MS group and HCs were evaluated. In MS patients, we considered: gender, age, age at onset, duration of disease, course, EDSS, therapy, relapse/steroids at study time, and oligoclonal bands (OBs). MAPDNA and MAP2694 antibodies were detected in 68 MS and six HCs (p = 1.14 × 10(-11)), and 123 MS and 10 HCs (p = 2.59 × 10(-23)), respectively. OBs were found with reduced frequency in MAP-positive patients (OR = 0.52; p = 0.02). MAP2694 antibodies were detected more in patients receiving MS treatments (OR = 2.26; p = 0.01), and MAPDNA in subjects on steroids (OR = 2.65; p = 0.02). Our study confirmed the association of MAP and MS in Sardinia. The low OB frequency in MAP patients suggests a peripheral role as a trigger in autoimmunity. MAP positivity might be influenced by steroids and MS therapy. Studies in other populations are needed to confirm the role of MAP in MS.

  13. Mycobacterium avium complex--the role of potable water in disease transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whiley, H; Keegan, A; Giglio, S; Bentham, R

    2012-08-01

    Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) is a group of opportunistic pathogens of major public health concern. It is responsible for a wide spectrum of disease dependent on subspecies, route of infection and patients pre-existing conditions. Presently, there is limited research on the incidence of MAC infection that considers both pulmonary and other clinical manifestations. MAC has been isolated from various terrestrial and aquatic environments including natural waters, engineered water systems and soils. Identifying the specific environmental sources responsible for human infection is essential in minimizing disease prevalence. This paper reviews current literature and case studies regarding the wide spectrum of disease caused by MAC and the role of potable water in disease transmission. Potable water was recognized as a putative pathway for MAC infection. Contaminated potable water sources associated with human infection included warm water distribution systems, showers, faucets, household drinking water, swimming pools and hot tub spas. MAC can maintain long-term contamination of potable water sources through its high resistance to disinfectants, association with biofilms and intracellular parasitism of free-living protozoa. Further research is required to investigate the efficiency of water treatment processes against MAC and into construction and maintenance of warm water distribution systems and the role they play in MAC proliferation. No claim to Australian Government works Journal of Applied Microbiology © 2012 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  14. Chlorine, Chloramine, Chlorine Dioxide, and Ozone Susceptibility of Mycobacterium avium

    OpenAIRE

    Taylor, Robert H; Falkinham, Joseph O.; Norton, Cheryl D.; LeChevallier, Mark W.

    2000-01-01

    Environmental and patient isolates of Mycobacterium avium were resistant to chlorine, monochloramine, chlorine dioxide, and ozone. For chlorine, the product of the disinfectant concentration (in parts per million) and the time (in minutes) to 99.9% inactivation for five M. avium strains ranged from 51 to 204. Chlorine susceptibility of cells was the same in washed cultures containing aggregates and in reduced aggregate fractions lacking aggregates. Cells of the more slowly growing strains wer...

  15. Comparative Evaluation of Different Test Combinations for Diagnosis of Mycobacterium avium Subspecies paratuberculosis Infecting Dairy Herds in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajni Garg

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A total of 355 cows were sampled (serum, n=315; faeces, n=355; milk, n=209 from dairy farms located in the Punjab state of India. Faeces and serum/milk samples were screened by acid fast staining and “indigenous ELISA,” respectively. IS900 PCR was used to screen faeces and milk samples. Bio-load of MAP in dairy cows was 36.9, 15.6, 16.3, and 14.4%, using microscopy, serum ELISA, milk ELISA and milk PCR, respectively. Estimated kappa values between different test combinations: serum and milk ELISA, faecal microscopy and faecal PCR, milk ELISA and milk PCR, faecal PCR and serum ELISA were 0.325, 0.241, 0.682, and 0.677, respectively. Estimation of the relative sensitivity and specificity of different tests in the present study indicated that “serum ELISA” and “milk ELISA” were good screening tests, add “milk PCR” was “confirmatory test” for MAP infection. Combination of milk ELISA with milk PCR may be adopted as a model strategy for screening and diagnosis of JD in lactating/dairy cattle herds in Indian conditions.

  16. Genotyping of Mycobacterium avium subsp. avium isolates from naturally infected lofts of domestic pigeons by IS901 RFLP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K Parvandar Asadollahi

    2015-01-01

    In conclusion: It is suggested that more DNA fingerprinting tests for non-tuberculous Mycobacteria, particularly M. avium complex isolated from infected birds and humans, be conducted to find the source of their infections.

  17. Blood parasites, body condition, and wing length in two subspecies of yellow wagtail (Motacilla flava) during migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shurulinkov, Peter; Chakarov, Nayden; Daskalova, Girgina

    2012-05-01

    Blood parasites of migrating yellow wagtails of two subspecies--Motacilla flava feldegg and Motacilla flava flava-were studied on a sample of 473 birds caught in spring and autumn periods in Bulgaria. We controlled eight "migration waves" (flocks captured in different evenings) of yellow wagtails for four parameters--average body mass, average fat level, average wing length, and average prevalence of different hematozoan species. Gametocytes or meronts of a total of six species of hematozoa belonging to three genera were identified-Haemoproteus motacillae, Haemoproteus anthi, Plasmodium relictum, Plasmodium subpraecox, Plasmodium cathemerium, and Tryponosoma avium. Mixed infections were detected in 31 cases, of which 14 were of H. anthi/H. motacillae type. Parasite species composition was similar in the two studied subspecies of M. flava. We did not find any significant differences in the overall infection prevalence or number of infecting parasites between M. f. flava and M. f. feldegg. Parasite prevalence and the number of co-infecting parasites in spring were much higher than in fall. Season had a strong influence on the prevalence of H. anthi and H. motacillae, and for both, there was a marginally significant interaction between subspecies and season, but not a season-independent influence of subspecies. Males of M. f. feldegg had a significantly higher overall blood parasite prevalence and prevalence of H. anthi than females. Sex-related differences in the prevalence of other parasites were not significant. Migration waves of yellow wagtails differed in overall infection status and in H. motacillae prevalence, but not for H. anthi prevalence. We also found significant differences in fat score, weight, and wing length between the studied migration waves of the yellow wagtails. Fat scores of birds infected with different hematozoa were lower compared with those of the non-infected birds. This only marginally was true for body weight and was not the case for wing

  18. Hemolysin as a Virulence Factor for Systemic Infection with Isolates of Mycobacterium avium Complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maslow, Joel N.; Dawson, David; Carlin, Elizabeth A.; Holland, Steven M.

    1999-01-01

    Isolates of the Mycobacterium avium complex were examined for hemolysin expression. Only invasive isolates of M. avium were observed to be hemolytic (P < 0.001), with activity the greatest for isolates of serovars 4 and 8. Thus, M. avium hemolysin appears to represent a virulence factor necessary for invasive disease. PMID:9889239

  19. Molecular characterization of Spanish Prunus avium plus trees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Fernandez-Cruz

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Aim of the study: The Breeding Program of wild cherry (Prunus avium developed by Lourizán Forest Research Center (NW Spain, aims for the creation of the Main Breeding Population, that is formed by a large number of plus trees and for obtaining an Elite Population generated from controlled crosses of a number of plus trees selected by, at least, one trait of economic importance. The aim of this study was to genotype 131 accessions of Prunus avium plus trees, included in the breeding program.Area of study: The Prunus avium plus trees are located in the North, Northwest and Central Spain.Material and Methods: The Prunus avium plus trees were genotyped with nine microsatellites. Several genetic parameters were calculated. Genetic data were analyzed with STRUCTURE and the genetic distance between the plus trees were calculated.Main results: A total of 122 multilocus genotypes were detected. Several accessions with the same genotype were identified, which could be due to clonality or to labelling errors. The nine microsatellites are useful for identifying individuals because the combined probability of identity was low (PI = 5.19X10-9. Bayesian methods detected two genetic clusters in the sampled plus trees.Research highlights: The unique genotypes identified in this work are suitable for being included in the elite breeding population for economic traits.Keywords: Prunus avium; breeding program; microsatellite; genetic distance.

  20. Effects of polysaccharide on chicks co-infected with Bordetella avium and Avian leukosis virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Fanxia; Xue, Cong; Wu, Cun; Zhao, Xue; Qu, Tinghe; He, Xiaohua; Guo, Zhongkun; Zhu, Ruiliang

    2014-08-30

    Chicks' co-infection with immunosuppressive virus and bacteria seriously threaten the development of the poultry industry. In this study, a model was established in which chicks were injected with either subgroup B ALV (ALV-B)+Bordetella avium (B. avium), or ALV-B+B. avium+Taishan Pinus massoniana pollen polysaccharide (TPPPS), or B. avium only, or B. avium+TPPPS. The data showed that the group injected with ALV-B and B. avium exhibited significant inhibition of the immune function and therefore increased pathogenicity compared with the group injected with B. avium-only. Application of TPPPS effectively alleviated immunosuppression, and body weights increased sharply in the TPPPS groups compared with non-TPPPS groups. To some extent, TPPPS may reduce the proliferation of ALV-B. These results suggest that Pinus pollen polysaccharides are beneficial treating co-infections with immunosuppressive virus and bacteria and therefore have potential for development into safe and effective immunoregulator.

  1. Genotyping of Mycobacterium avium subsp. avium isolates from naturally infected lofts of domestic pigeons in Ahvaz by IS901 RFLP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaveh Parvandar Asadollahi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Avian tuberculosis is one of the most important infections affecting most species of birds.Mycobacterium avium can not only infect all species of birds, but also infect some domesticated mammals.The most crucial aspect of control and eradication scheme is identification of infection sources and transmission routs. Mo- lecular techniques such as restriction fragment length polymorphism and pulse field gel electrophoresis have been shown to be much more discriminatory and suitable for use in the epidemiological study.Materials and Methods: Eighty suspected pigeons to avian tuberculosis based on their clinical signs, were subjected to the study. Forty Mycobacterium avium subsp. avium isolates out of a total of 51 identified isolates were subjected to the test.Results: IS901-RFLP using Pvu II was successfully conducted and produced 7 patterns. The majority of isolates (60% were RFLP type PI.1. This type was the most similar type to standard strain. However, all the patterns obtained in this study were different from the standard strain.Conclusion: The result of this study indicate that these isolates probably are limited to Khuzestan region. We recommend DNA fingerprinting differentiation of non tuberculous Mycobacteria particularly Mycobacterium avium complex isolated from infected birds and human to possibly find source of infections. Keywords: Mycobacterium avium, RFLP, polymorphism, avian tuberculosis

  2. Chlorine, Chloramine, Chlorine Dioxide, and Ozone Susceptibility of Mycobacterium avium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Robert H.; Falkinham, Joseph O.; Norton, Cheryl D.; LeChevallier, Mark W.

    2000-01-01

    Environmental and patient isolates of Mycobacterium avium were resistant to chlorine, monochloramine, chlorine dioxide, and ozone. For chlorine, the product of the disinfectant concentration (in parts per million) and the time (in minutes) to 99.9% inactivation for five M. avium strains ranged from 51 to 204. Chlorine susceptibility of cells was the same in washed cultures containing aggregates and in reduced aggregate fractions lacking aggregates. Cells of the more slowly growing strains were more resistant to chlorine than were cells of the more rapidly growing strains. Water-grown cells were 10-fold more resistant than medium-grown cells. Disinfectant resistance may be one factor promoting the persistence of M. avium in drinking water. PMID:10742264

  3. Spectrophotometry of Artemisia tridentata to quantitatively determine subspecies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Bryce; Boyd, Alicia; Tobiasson, Tanner; Germino, Matthew

    2017-01-01

    Ecological restoration is predicated on our abilities to discern plant taxa. Taxonomic identification is a first step in ensuring that plants are appropriately adapted to the site. An example of the need to identify taxonomic differences comes from big sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata). This species is composed of three predominant subspecies occupying distinct environmental niches, but overlap and hybridization are common in ecotones. Restoration of A. tridentata largely occurs using wildland collected seed, but there is uncertainty in the identification of subspecies or mix of subspecies from seed collections. Laboratory techniques that can determine subspecies composition would be desirable to ensure that subspecies match the restoration site environment. In this study, we use spectrophotometry to quantify chemical differences in the water-soluble compound, coumarin. Ultraviolet (UV) absorbance of A. tridentata subsp. vaseyana showed distinct differences among A.t. tridentata and wyomingensis. No UV absorbance differences were detected between A.t. tridentata and wyomingensis. Analyses of samples from > 600 plants growing in two common gardens showed that UV absorbance was unaffected by environment. Moreover, plant tissues (leaves and seed chaff) explained only a small amount of the variance. UV fluorescence of water-eluted plant tissue has been used for many years to indicate A.t. vaseyana; however, interpretation has been subjective. Use of spectrophotometry to acquire UV absorbance provides empirical results that can be used in seed testing laboratories using the seed chaff present with the seed to certify A. tridentata subspecies composition. On the basis of our methods, UV absorbance values 3.1 would indicate either A.t. tridentata or wyomingensis. UV absorbance values between 2.7 and 3.1 would indicate a mixture of A.t. vaseyana and the other two subspecies.

  4. Experimental infection of Eurasian wild boar with Mycobacterium avium subsp. avium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrido, J M; Vicente, J; Carrasco-García, R; Galindo, R C; Minguijón, E; Ballesteros, C; Aranaz, A; Romero, B; Sevilla, I; Juste, R; de la Fuente, J; Gortazar, C

    2010-07-29

    The Eurasian wild boar (Sus scrofa) is increasingly relevant as a host for several pathogenic mycobacteria. We aimed to characterize the first experimental Mycobacterium avium subsp. avium (MAA) infection in wild boar in order to describe the lesions and the immune response as compared to uninfected controls. Twelve 1-4-month-old wild boar piglets were housed in class III bio-containment facilities. Four concentrations of MAA suspension were used: 10, 10(2) and 10(4) mycobacteria (2 animals each, oropharyngeal route) and 2.5 x 10(6) mycobacteria (2 animals each by the oropharyngeal and nasal routes). No clinical signs were observed and pathology evidenced a low pathogenicity of this MAA strain for this particular host. Bacteriological and pathological evidence of successful infection after experimental inoculation was found for the group challenged with 2.5 x 10(6) mycobacteria. These four wild boar showed a positive IFN-gamma response to the avian PPD and the real-time RT-PCR data revealed that three genes, complement component C3, IFN-gamma and RANTES, were significantly down regulated in infected animals. These results were similar to those found in naturally and experimentally M. bovis-infected wild boar and may constitute biomarkers of mycobacterial infection in this species.

  5. Cryopreservation of Prunus avium L. embryogenic tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grenier-de March, Ghislaine; de Boucaud, Marie-Therese; Chmielarz, Pawel

    2005-01-01

    Embryogenic tissues from wild cherry (Prunus avium L.) were successfully cryopreserved by using a one-step freezing procedure. Cryoprotection consisted of a pretreatment on solid medium with increasing sucrose concentrations (0.25 M for 1 day, 0.5 M for 1 day, 0.75 M for 2 days, and 1.0 M for 3 days), followed by air desiccation to about 20 percent moisture content (fresh weight basis). This method was compared with a pretreatment on solid medium containing 5 percent DMSO and 2 percent proline, followed by immersion in a modified PVS2 cryoprotective solution. Pretreatment on solid medium with increasing concentrations of sucrose led to regrowth of frozen embryogenic tissues, and after 6 weeks of culture, growth was comparable to that of non-dehydrated and non-frozen tissues. By contrast, no regrowth was observed when embryogenic tissues were submitted to the solid/liquid pretreatment with DMSO/proline and a modified PVS2 solution.

  6. A single or multistage mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis subunit vaccine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2014-01-01

    The present invention provides one or more immunogenic polypeptides for use in a preventive or therapeutic vaccine against latent or active infection in a human or animal caused by a Mycobacterium species, e.g. Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis. Furthermore a single or multi-phase vaccine...... comprising the one or more immunogenic polypeptides is provided for administration for the prevention or treatment of infection with a Mycobacterium species, e.g. Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis. Additionally, nucleic acid vaccines, capable of in vivo expression of the multi-phase vaccine...

  7. Transcriptional Profiling of Ileocecal Valve of Holstein Dairy Cows Infected with Mycobacterium avium subsp. Paratuberculosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Randy J Hempel

    Full Text Available Johne's disease is a chronic infection of the small intestine caused by Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP, an intracellular bacterium. The events of pathogen survival within the host cell(s, chronic inflammation and the progression from asymptomatic subclinical stage to an advanced clinical stage of infection, are poorly understood. This study examines gene expression in the ileocecal valve (ICV of Holstein dairy cows at different stages of MAP infection. The ICV is known to be a primary site of MAP colonization and provides an ideal location to identify genes that are relevant to the progression of this disease. RNA was prepared from ICV tissues and RNA-Seq was used to compare gene transcription between clinical, subclinical, and uninfected control animals. Interpretation of the gene expression data was performed using pathway analysis and gene ontology categories containing multiple differentially expressed genes. Results demonstrated that many of the pathways that had strong differential gene expression between uninfected control and clinical cows were related to the immune system, such as the T- and B-cell receptor signaling, apoptosis, NOD-like receptor signaling, and leukocyte transendothelial migration pathways. In contrast, the comparison of gene transcription between control and subclinical cows identified pathways that were primarily involved in metabolism. The results from the comparison between clinical and subclinical animals indicate recruitment of neutrophils, up regulation of lysosomal peptidases, increase in immune cell transendothelial migration, and modifications of the extracelluar matrix. This study provides important insight into how cattle respond to a natural MAP infection at the gene transcription level within a key target tissue for infection.

  8. Transcriptional Profiling of Ileocecal Valve of Holstein Dairy Cows Infected with Mycobacterium avium subsp. Paratuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hempel, Randy J; Bannantine, John P; Stabel, Judith R

    2016-01-01

    Johne's disease is a chronic infection of the small intestine caused by Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP), an intracellular bacterium. The events of pathogen survival within the host cell(s), chronic inflammation and the progression from asymptomatic subclinical stage to an advanced clinical stage of infection, are poorly understood. This study examines gene expression in the ileocecal valve (ICV) of Holstein dairy cows at different stages of MAP infection. The ICV is known to be a primary site of MAP colonization and provides an ideal location to identify genes that are relevant to the progression of this disease. RNA was prepared from ICV tissues and RNA-Seq was used to compare gene transcription between clinical, subclinical, and uninfected control animals. Interpretation of the gene expression data was performed using pathway analysis and gene ontology categories containing multiple differentially expressed genes. Results demonstrated that many of the pathways that had strong differential gene expression between uninfected control and clinical cows were related to the immune system, such as the T- and B-cell receptor signaling, apoptosis, NOD-like receptor signaling, and leukocyte transendothelial migration pathways. In contrast, the comparison of gene transcription between control and subclinical cows identified pathways that were primarily involved in metabolism. The results from the comparison between clinical and subclinical animals indicate recruitment of neutrophils, up regulation of lysosomal peptidases, increase in immune cell transendothelial migration, and modifications of the extracelluar matrix. This study provides important insight into how cattle respond to a natural MAP infection at the gene transcription level within a key target tissue for infection.

  9. Evaluation of immunodominant proteins of Mycobacterium avium paratuberculosis cell wall by Western blot analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashemi, Maryam; Madani, Rasool; Razmi, Nematollah

    2014-04-01

    Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (M. paratuberculosis) is a slow growing mycobactin, whose dependence on mycobacterial species is known to be the causative agent of Johne's disease (paratuberculosis) in all species of domestic ruminants worldwide. The organism is transmitted via close contact, ingestion, or transplacentally from mother to fetus and occurs commonly in grazing domestic animals. Johne's disease (JD) is characterized by gradual weight loss, decreased milk production, and diarrhea due to the chronic, progressive, granulomatous enteritis and lymphadenitis. The disease can cause serious economic damage to the dairy industry due to the loss of milk production and early culling of infected animals. In recent years, researchers have focused on the identification of a specific antigen of M. paratuberculosis to use in diagnosis test and preparation of effective vaccine. The goal of this study is evaluation of the immunodominant proteins of M. paratuberculosis cell wall. The amount of protein was determined with a Lowry assay (22.68 μg/100 μL). For production of polyclonal antibody against proteins of M. paratuberculosis cell wall, a New Zealand white rabbit was immunized with antigen and Freund's adjuvant. After immunization, the rabbit was bled to produce enriched serum. Antibodies were purified from serum with ion exchange chromatography. In the Ouchterlony test, the reactions between antigen and antibodies were seen in dilutions of one quarter for serum, one quarter for Ig, and one half for IgG by clear precipitation lines due to the well immunization of the rabbit. Electrophoresis and Western blot analysis were used and subsequently a sharp band appeared in nitrocellulose paper; these bands were about 25, 37, 50, 75, and 150 kDa molecular weight, which indicated immunodominant proteins.

  10. Disseminated Mycobacterium avium complex in an immunocompetent host

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph M Yabes

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Disseminated Mycobacterium avium complex (DMAC has historically been described in the immunocompromised. The current epidemiologic research suggests that the incidence of nontuberculous mycobacterial infections is increasing. We present a case of DMAC infection manifesting as hepatic granulomas in a 35-year-old immunocompetent female. This case suggests DMAC infection in a patient without traditional epidemiological risk factors.

  11. Involvement of Stat1 in the Phagocytosis of M. avium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabrina Dominici

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Mycobacterium avium is an intracellular pathogen preferentially infecting human macrophages where they activate the JAK/STAT1 pathway. This activation enhances the survival of infected cells, but, at the same time, makes macrophages optimal targets for drugs development against p-tyr701stat1. In this study, we demonstrate that the fast and transient activity of the JAK/STAT1 pathway occurs immediately after macrophages internalization of heat-killed M. avium or inert particles. Furthermore, we show that a persistent Stat1 pathway activation occurs only when an intracellular M. avium infection is established in macrophages. These results strongly indicate different mechanisms of p-tyr701Stat1 activation. In particular, here we report findings aiming at explaining the short-time enhancement of p-tyr701Stat1 and shows its predominant relationship with FcγRs engagement during the internalization process. Furthermore, we demonstrate that opsonized live M. avium is phagocytosed by macrophages involving membrane receptors not related with JAK/STAT1 signalling pathway. On the contrary, heat-inactivated bacilli or latex particles seem to be internalized only after involvement of FcγRs and subsequent Stat1 phosphorylation.

  12. The complete mitochondrial DNA genome of a greater horseshoe bat subspecies, Rhinolophus ferrumequinum quelpartis (Chiroptera: Rhinolophidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Kwang Bae; Kim, Ji Young; Kim, Hye Ri; Cho, Jae Youl; Park, Yung Chul

    2013-02-01

    There are two subspecies of Rhinolophus ferrumequinum currently recognized in South Korea. The Korean greater horseshoe bat subspecies, Rhinolophus ferrumequinum quelpartis, is distributed only in Jeju Island. The complete mitochondrial genome of the island subspecies was determined and revealed 99.7% similarity to the mainland subspecies Rhinolophus ferrumequinum korai. If d-loop region is excluded, similarity of the two genomes was 99.9%.

  13. Induction of matrix metalloproteinases and TLR2 and 6 in murine colon after oral exposure to Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roderfeld, Martin; Koc, Arzu; Rath, Timo; Blöcher, Sonja; Tschuschner, Annette; Akineden, Ömer; Fischer, Marta; von Gerlach, Susanne; Goethe, Ralph; Eckelt, Elke; Meens, Jochen; Bülte, Michael; Basler, Tina; Roeb, Elke

    2012-06-01

    Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP) is suspected to be a causative agent in Crohn's disease. Recent evidence suggests that MAP can induce the expression of Matrix Metalloproteinases (MMPs), which are the main proteases in the pathogenesis of mucosal ulcerations in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Within the present study, we analysed whether oral MAP exposure can induce colonic MMP expression in vivo. In MAP exposed mice MAP and spheroplasts were visualized in intramucosal leukocyte aggregates. MAP exposed mice exhibited a higher colonic expression of Mmp-2, -9, -13, -14, Timp-1, Tlr2, Tlr6, Il-1β, and Tnf-α. Cell clusters of MMP-9 positive cells adjacent to intramucosal leukocyte aggregates and CD45(+) leukocytes were identified as the major cellular sources of MMP-9. Enhanced TLR2 expression was visualized on the luminal side of colonic enterocytes. Although MAP exposure did not lead to macroscopic intestinal inflammation, the observed MAP spheroplasts in intramucosal leukocyte aggregates together with increased colonic expression of toll-like receptors, pro-inflammatory cytokines, and MMPs upon MAP exposure represents a part of the host immune response towards MAP.

  14. Serum BAFF levels, Methypredsinolone therapy, Epstein-Barr Virus and Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis infection in Multiple Sclerosis patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mameli, Giuseppe; Cocco, Eleonora; Frau, Jessica; Arru, Giannina; Caggiu, Elisa; Marrosu, Maria Giovanna; Sechi, Leonardo A.

    2016-01-01

    Elevated B lymphocyte activating factor BAFF levels have been reported in multiple sclerosis (MS) patients; moreover, disease-modifying treatments (DMT) have shown to influence blood BAFF levels in MS patients, although the significance of these changes is still controversial. In addition, BAFF levels were reported increased during infectious diseases. In our study, we wanted to investigate on the serum BAFF concentrations correlated to the antibody response against Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP), Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) and their human homologous epitopes in MS and in patients affected with other neurological diseases (OND), divided in Inflammatory Neurological Diseases (IND), Non Inflammatory Neurological Diseases (NIND) and Undetermined Neurological Diseases (UND), in comparison to healthy controls (HCs). Our results confirmed a statistically significant high BAFF levels in MS and IND patients in comparison to HCs but not NIND and UND patients. Interestingly, BAFF levels were inversely proportional to antibodies level against EBV and MAP peptides and the BAFF levels significantly decreased in MS patients after methylprednisolone therapy. These results implicate that lower circulating BAFF concentrations were present in MS patients with humoral response against MAP and EBV. In conclusion MS patients with no IgGs against EBV and MAP may support the hypothesis that elevated blood BAFF levels could be associated with a more stable disease. PMID:27383531

  15. Pangenome and taxonomic analysis of Salmonella enterica subspecies enterica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmonella enterica subspecies enterica (S. enterica ssp. I) contains almost all the major pathogens in this genus. We sequenced 354 new S. enterica ssp. I genomes using paired end 100 base reads to ~80-fold coverage. These genomes were chosen to maximize genetic diversity, representing at least 100...

  16. Psychology Baccalaureates at Work: Major Area Subspecializations, Earnings, and Occupations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajecki, D. W.

    2012-01-01

    A Census Bureau national survey identified baccalaureates aged up to 64 years having major area subspecializations labeled "psychology," "industrial/organizational (I/O) psychology," and "counseling psychology." Median 2009 earnings of all such types of baccalaureate psychology alumni were well below the distribution mean of the 153 fields in the…

  17. An inter-subspecies hybrid rice--Liangyou-Peijiu

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    @@ Liangyou-Peijiu (65002), an inter-subspecies hybrid, was bred in Jiangsu Acad of Agri Sci (JAAS) by two-line method. The female was a low-temperature-sensitive sterile line, Pei'ai 64s (japonica), and the male was 9311.

  18. Psychology Baccalaureates at Work: Major Area Subspecializations, Earnings, and Occupations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajecki, D. W.

    2012-01-01

    A Census Bureau national survey identified baccalaureates aged up to 64 years having major area subspecializations labeled "psychology," "industrial/organizational (I/O) psychology," and "counseling psychology." Median 2009 earnings of all such types of baccalaureate psychology alumni were well below the distribution mean of the 153 fields in the…

  19. Molecular verification of the subspecies status of the Mauritanian Spoonbill

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Piersma, T.; van der Velde, M.; El-Hacen, E.M.; Lok, T.; Overdijk, O.; El-Hacen, E.M.

    2012-01-01

    Piersma T., van der Velde M., El-Hacen E.M., Lok T. & Overdijk O. 2012. Molecular verification of the subspecies status of the Mauritanian Spoonbill Plata lea leucorodia balsaci. Ardea 100: 131-136. In 1974 R. de Naurois and F. Roux proposed that the distinct morphology of Eurasian Spoonbills Plata

  20. Fate of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis in Swiss Hard and Semihard Cheese Manufactured from Raw Milk

    OpenAIRE

    Spahr, U.; Schafroth, K.

    2001-01-01

    Raw milk was artificially contaminated with declumped cells of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis at a concentration of 104 to 105 CFU/ml and was used to manufacture model hard (Swiss Emmentaler) and semihard (Swiss Tisliter) cheese. Two different strains of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis were tested, and for each strain, two model hard and semihard cheeses were produced. The survival of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis cells was monitored over a ripening period of 120 days by plat...

  1. Palynological characteristics of the heterostylous subspecies of Linum mucronatum Bertol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Talebi, S. M.

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Linum mucronatum is a heterostylous species from sect. Syllinum with four subspecies in Iran. The present study examines palynological characteristics of the heterostylous subspecies of Linum mucronatum, pollen characters of brevistylous individuals (pins as well as longistylous individuals (thrums of these plants by scanning electron microscope and light microscope using the prolonged acetolysis procedure. Sixteen qualitative and quantitative characters were investigated. Pollen equatorial shapes varied between pin and thrum individuals of each subspecies with the exception of L. mucronatum subsp. assyriacum. Pollen sculptures varied between pin and thrum samples of each subspecies and were seen in the gemmate, clavate and baculate shapes. In addition, quantitative palynological characters differed between plants and ANOVA test showed significant variations for traits such as equatorial length, colpi width and apocolpium diameter. Hetrostylous individuals of each subspecies were separated from others in the UPGMA tree and also in the PCO and PCA plots. This study confirmed variations in pollen features between pin and thrum individuals of each subspecies.Linum mucronatum es una especie con heterostilia, que pertenece a la sección Syllinum del género Linum, y tiene cuatro subespecies en Irán. En el presente estudio se examinan las características palinológicas de las subespecies heterostilas de Linum mucronatum Bertol., así como los caracteres polínicos de individuos de los morfos brevistilo (pin y longistilo (thrum de estas plantas, mediante microscopía electrónica de scanning y microscopía óptica usando el método de acetolisis prolongada. Se estudiaron un total de 16 caracteres cualitativos y cuantitativos. La forma ecuatorial del polen varía entre los morfos pin y thrum en todas las subspecies, excepto en L. mucronatum subsp. assyriacum. La ornamentación también varía entre las muestras de morfos pin y thrum de cada subespecie

  2. Variable agreement among experts regarding Mycobacterium avium complex lung disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marras, Theodore K; Prevots, D Rebecca; Jamieson, Frances B; Winthrop, Kevin L

    2015-02-01

    Data regarding many clinical aspects of pulmonary Mycobacterium avium complex (pMAC) are lacking. Guidelines rely substantially upon expert opinion, integrated through face-to-face meetings, variably weighting individual opinions. We surveyed North American non-tuberculous mycobacteria experts regarding clinical aspects of pMAC using Delphi methods. Nineteen of 26 invited experts (73%) responded, with extensive variability. Convergence could not be reached for most questions. Respondents described extensive uncertainty around specific issues. Findings underscore urgent need for more research.

  3. Mycobacterium avium-intracellulare: a rare cause of subacromial bursitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Raj; Tuckett, John; Hide, Geoff; Dildey, Petra; Karsandas, Alvin

    2015-01-01

    Septic subacromial bursitis is an uncommon disorder with only a few reported cases in the literature. The most common causative organism is Staphylococcus aureus. We report the case of a 61-year-old female with a septic subacromial bursitis where the causative organism was found to be Mycobacterium avium-intracellulare (MAI). The diagnosis was only made following a biopsy, and we use this case to highlight the importance of recognising the need to consider a biopsy and aspiration in atypical situations.

  4. Effect of Prunus avium roots on river bank strong.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bibalani, Ghassem Habibi; Bazhrang, Zia; Mohsenifar, Hani; Shibaei, Naeime; Joodi, Lila

    2008-04-15

    A pulling effect by side roots is one way in which roots help to side in-plane strong of a little depth soil mass. In contrast to the effect of vertically-enlarge roots, whereby soil is strengthened by an increase in its shear strength, the pulling effect strengthens the soil by increasing the tensile strength of the rooted soil zone. To verify whether or not a pulling effect exists in the root system of Prunus avium in the Roudsar, North Iran and to study the importance and size of this effect, a direct in situ test was led at a site in the Chaboksar Forests. The results from the site showed that, in the surface soil (0-30 cm), Side roots can provide a pull force of up to 490-712 N (Newtons) over a vertical cross-section area of 20-50 cm2, or an enhance in the pulling stability of the rooted soil by about 48.1%. The test results suggest that, together with the Prunus avium vertical roots, which keep the little depth rooted soil zone to the deep and more stable soil mass, the side roots of the Prunus avium, with their pulling effect, are able to make less against little depth instability in the forest slopes, such as little depth slide, to a certain degree.

  5. Genome Sequences for Multiple Clavibacter Strains from Different Subspecies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiang Sean; Yuan, Xiaoli Kat

    2017-09-21

    The Gram-positive genus Clavibacter harbors economically important plant pathogens infecting a variety of agricultural crops, such as potato, tomato, corn, barley, etc. Here, we report five new genome sequences, those of strains CFIA-Cs3N, CFIA-CsR14, LMG 3663(T), LMG 7333(T), and ATCC 33566(T), from different subspecies of Clavibacter michiganensis All these genomic data will be used for reclassification and niche-adapted feature comparisons. © Crown copyright 2017.

  6. A new Consolida subspecies from Anatolia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Misirdali, H.

    1990-12-01

    Full Text Available A new subspecies from Anatolia. Consolida hellespontica (Boiss. Chater subsp. rosea Misirdali & Ilarslan subsp. nova, is described.

    [ca] Es descriu una nova subspècie d'Anatòlia, Consolida hellespontica (Boiss. Chater subsp. rosea Misirdali & Ilarslan subsp. nova

  7. Range-Wide Snow Leopard Phylogeography Supports Three Subspecies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janecka, Jan E; Zhang, Yuguang; Li, Diqiang; Munkhtsog, Bariushaa; Bayaraa, Munkhtsog; Galsandorj, Naranbaatar; Wangchuk, Tshewang R; Karmacharya, Dibesh; Li, Juan; Lu, Zhi; Uulu, Kubanychbek Zhumabai; Gaur, Ajay; Kumar, Satish; Kumar, Kesav; Hussain, Shafqat; Muhammad, Ghulam; Jevit, Matthew; Hacker, Charlotte; Burger, Pamela; Wultsch, Claudia; Janecka, Mary J; Helgen, Kristofer; Murphy, William J; Jackson, Rodney

    2017-09-01

    The snow leopard, Panthera uncia, is an elusive high-altitude specialist that inhabits vast, inaccessible habitat across Asia. We conducted the first range-wide genetic assessment of snow leopards based on noninvasive scat surveys. Thirty-three microsatellites were genotyped and a total of 683 bp of mitochondrial DNA sequenced in 70 individuals. Snow leopards exhibited low genetic diversity at microsatellites (AN = 5.8, HO = 0.433, HE = 0.568), virtually no mtDNA variation, and underwent a bottleneck in the Holocene (∼8000 years ago) coinciding with increased temperatures, precipitation, and upward treeline shift in the Tibetan Plateau. Multiple analyses supported 3 primary genetic clusters: (1) Northern (the Altai region), (2) Central (core Himalaya and Tibetan Plateau), and (3) Western (Tian Shan, Pamir, trans-Himalaya regions). Accordingly, we recognize 3 subspecies, Panthera uncia irbis (Northern group), Panthera uncia uncia (Western group), and Panthera uncia uncioides (Central group) based upon genetic distinctness, low levels of admixture, unambiguous population assignment, and geographic separation. The patterns of variation were consistent with desert-basin "barrier effects" of the Gobi isolating the northern subspecies (Mongolia), and the trans-Himalaya dividing the central (Qinghai, Tibet, Bhutan, and Nepal) and western subspecies (India, Pakistan, Tajikistan, and Kyrgyzstan). Hierarchical Bayesian clustering analysis revealed additional subdivision into a minimum of 6 proposed management units: western Mongolia, southern Mongolia, Tian Shan, Pamir-Himalaya, Tibet-Himalaya, and Qinghai, with spatial autocorrelation suggesting potential connectivity by dispersing individuals up to ∼400 km. We provide a foundation for global conservation of snow leopard subspecies, and set the stage for in-depth landscape genetics and genomic studies. © The American Genetic Association 2017. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. Roles for Cell Wall Glycopeptidolipid in Surface Adherence and Planktonic Dispersal of Mycobacterium avium

    Science.gov (United States)

    The opportunistic pathogen Mycobacterium avium is a significant inhabitant of biofilms in drinking water distribution systems. M. avium expresses on its cell surface serovar-specific glycopeptidolipids (ssGPLs). Studies have implicated the core GPL in biofilm formation by M. aviu...

  9. Isolation of mycobacteria other than Mycobacterium avium from porcine lymph nodes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ingen, van J.; Wisselink, H.J.; Solt-Smits, van C.B.; Boeree, M.J.; Soolingen, D.

    2010-01-01

    Mycobacterium avium causes lymphadenitis in pigs. This presents an economical burden, as these pigs meat is considered inappropriate for consumption. In humans, lymphadenitis due to nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) primarily affects children and is caused by a variety of NTM, though M. avium

  10. Isolation of mycobacteria other than Mycobacterium avium from porcine lymph nodes.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ingen, J. van; Wisselink, H.J.; Solt-Smits, C.B. van; Boeree, M.J.; Soolingen, D. van

    2010-01-01

    Mycobacterium avium causes lymphadenitis in pigs. This presents an economical burden, as these pigs meat is considered inappropriate for consumption. In humans, lymphadenitis due to nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) primarily affects children and is caused by a variety of NTM, though M. avium

  11. Draft Genome Sequence of Bordetella avium Nh1210, an Outbreak Strain of Lockjaw Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, Luisa Z; Knöbl, Terezinha; Grespan, André A; Felizardo, Maria R; Gomes, Cleise R; Ferreira, Thais S P; Xavier de Oliveira, Maria Gabriela; Myriantheus, Livia; Moreno, Andrea Micke

    2015-03-12

    Bordetella avium is a highly contagious bacterium that infects the upper respiratory tract of birds. B. avium Nh1210 is an outbreak strain of lockjaw syndrome in juvenile cockatiel chicks (Nymphicus hollandicus). Here, we report the draft genome sequence of strain Nh1210. Copyright © 2015 Moreno et al.

  12. Use of restriction fragment length polymorphism as a genetic marker for typing Mycobacterium avium strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roiz, M P; Palenque, E; Guerrero, C; Garcia, M J

    1995-05-01

    Restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) was used to study 75 clinical isolates identified as Mycobacterium avium. Two repetitive insertion sequences, IS1311 and IS900, were used as DNA probes. Although less than 25% of isolates showed RFLP patterns with IS900, all strains gave banding patterns with IS1311. M. avium strains isolated from patients with AIDS exhibited marked polymorphism with both probes.

  13. Ubiquity of Polynucleobacter necessarius subspecies asymbioticus results from ecological diversification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jezbera, Jan; Jezberová, Jitka; Brandt, Ulrike; Hahn, Martin W

    2011-04-01

    The subspecies Polynucleobacter necessarius asymbioticus (> 99% 16S rRNA similarity) has a cosmopolitan distribution and a ubiquitous occurrence in lentic freshwater habitats. We tested if the observed ubiquity of these free-living planktonic freshwater bacteria results from a euryoecious (generalist) adaptation of P. n. asymbioticus strains, or from ecological diversification within the subspecies. We developed a reverse line blot hybridization assay enabling the cultivation-independent detection of 13 groups within the subspecies in environmental samples. A set of 121 lentic freshwater habitats, spanning a broad variety of habitat types (e.g. pH levels ranging from 3.8 to 8.5) was investigated for the presence of these 13 P. n. asymbioticus groups. Statistical analyses of the reverse line blot hybridization detections revealed pronounced differences in habitat preferences of several of the groups. Their preferences differed regarding pH, conductivity, dissolved organic carbon and oxygen concentration of habitats. For some groups, differences in environmental preferences resulted even in complete niche separation between them. The revealed differences in habitat preferences suggest that the previously reported ubiquity of P. n. asymbioticus results from ecological diversification within the taxon and not from generalist adaptation of strains.

  14. Climate rather than geography separates two European honeybee subspecies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coroian, Cristian O; Muñoz, Irene; Schlüns, Ellen A; Paniti-Teleky, Orsolya R; Erler, Silvio; Furdui, Emilia M; Mărghitaş, Liviu A; Dezmirean, Daniel S; Schlüns, Helge; de la Rúa, Pilar; Moritz, Robin F A

    2014-05-01

    Both climatic and geographical factors play an important role for the biogeographical distribution of species. The Carpathian mountain ridge has been suggested as a natural geographical divide between the two honeybee subspecies Apis mellifera carnica and A. m. macedonica. We sampled one worker from one colony each at 138 traditional apiaries located across the Carpathians spanning from the Hungarian plains to the Danube delta. All samples were sequenced at the mitochondrial tRNA(Leu)-cox2 intergenic region and genotyped at twelve microsatellite loci. The Carpathians had only limited impact on the biogeography because both subspecies were abundant on either side of the mountain ridge. In contrast, subspecies differentiation strongly correlated with the various temperature zones in Romania. A. m. carnica is more abundant in regions with the mean average temperature below 9 °C, whereas A. m. macedonica honeybees are more frequent in regions with mean temperatures above 9 °C. This range selection may have impact on the future biogeography in the light of anticipated global climatic changes.

  15. Mycobacterium avium-intracellulare cellulitis occurring with septic arthritis after joint injection: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murdoch David M

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cellulitis caused by Mycobacterium avium-intracellulare has rarely been described. Mycobacterium avium-intracellulare is a rare cause of septic arthritis after intra-articular injection, though the causative role of injection is difficult to ascertain in such cases. Case presentation A 57-year-old with rheumatoid arthritis treated with prednisone and azathioprine developed bilateral painful degenerative shoulder arthritis. After corticosteroid injections into both acromioclavicular joints, he developed bilateral cellulitis centered over the injection sites. Skin biopsy showed non-caseating granulomas, and culture grew Mycobacterium avium-intracellulare. Joint aspiration also revealed Mycobacterium avium-intracellulare infection. Conclusion Although rare, skin and joint infections caused by Mycobacterium avium-intracellulare should be considered in any immunocompromised host, particularly after intra-articular injection. Stains for acid-fast bacilli may be negative in pathologic samples even in the presence of infection; cultures of tissue specimens should always be obtained.

  16. Distribution of IS901 in strains of Mycobacterium avium complex from swine by using IS901-detecting primers that discriminate between M. avium and Mycobacterium intracellulare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimori, K; Eguchi, M; Nakaoka, Y; Onodera, Y; Ito, T; Tanaka, K

    1995-08-01

    The presence of the mycobacterial insertion sequence IS901 was studied by PCR with reference strains of Mycobacterium avium complex; 122 veterinary strains of mycobacteria, mainly M. avium complex, isolated from swine; and 15 clinical strains. Four kinds of DNA extraction methods for PCR were compared. Use of the commercial extraction matrix allowed for the faster and easier preparation of PCR-amplifiable DNA than use of NaOH heating extraction or sodium dodecyl sulfate extraction of pretreated mycobacteria. It also provided more effective protection than boiling extraction against the destruction of DNA. Four reference strains of serovars 1 to 3 possessed IS901. Nine reference strains of serovars 1, 4 to 6, 8 to 11, and 21 possessed only IS901 insertion sites. A novel PCR product was found in the other reference strains of serovars 7, 12 to 17, 19, and 20 and two clinical strains of serovar 15. It is suggested that the primers that amplified the insertion portion of IS901 divided the M. avium complex into M. avium, Mycobacterium intracellulare, and other mycobacteria. None of the 110 strains of M. avium complex isolated from swine possessed IS901. It is suggested that the absence of IS901 might be characteristic of swine-derived strains of M. avium complex.

  17. Relationship between Crohn's disease, infection with Mycobacterium a vium subspecies paratuberculosis and SLC11A1 gene polymorphisms in Sardinian patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Leonardo A Sechi; Maria Gazouli; Lee E Sieswerda; Paola Molicotti; Niyaz Ahmed; John Ikonomopoulos; Antonio M Scanu; Daniela Paccagnini; Stefania Zanetti

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To study the association between Crohn's disease (CD),Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP), and genetic factors by examining the role of natural resistance-associated macrophage protein 1 (NRAMP1) gene polymorphisms (now SLC11A1) in Sardinian patients with CD and controls.METHODS: Thirty-seven CD patients and 34 controls with no inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) were recruited at the University of Sassari after giving written consent. Six SCL11A1 polymorphisms previously reported to be the most significantly associated with IBD were searched.M. paratuberculosis was identified by IS900PCR and sequencing. Logistic regression was used to calculate odds ratios (OR) for the associations among CD,presence of MAP, and 6 loci described above.RESULTS: For the first time, a strong association was observed between polymorphisms at NRAMP1 locus 823C/T and CD. While CD was strongly associated with both NRAMP1 and MAP, NRAMP1 polymorphisms and MAP themselves were not correlated.CONCLUSION: Combined with previous work on the NOD2/CARD15 gene, it is clear that the interplay of genetic, infectious, and immunologic factors in the etiologyof CD is complex.

  18. Systems Analysis of Early Host Gene Expression Provides Clues for Transient Mycobacterium avium ssp avium vs. Persistent Mycobacterium avium ssp paratuberculosis Intestinal Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khare, Sangeeta; Drake, Kenneth L; Lawhon, Sara D; Nunes, Jairo E S; Figueiredo, Josely F; Rossetti, Carlos A; Gull, Tamara; Everts, Robin E; Lewin, Harris A; Adams, Leslie Garry

    It has long been a quest in ruminants to understand how two very similar mycobacterial species, Mycobacterium avium ssp. paratuberculosis (MAP) and Mycobacterium avium ssp. avium (MAA) lead to either a chronic persistent infection or a rapid-transient infection, respectively. Here, we hypothesized that when the host immune response is activated by MAP or MAA, the outcome of the infection depends on the early activation of signaling molecules and host temporal gene expression. To test our hypothesis, ligated jejuno-ileal loops including Peyer's patches in neonatal calves were inoculated with PBS, MAP, or MAA. A temporal analysis of the host transcriptome profile was conducted at several times post-infection (0.5, 1, 2, 4, 8 and 12 hours). When comparing the transcriptional responses of calves infected with the MAA versus MAP, discordant patterns of mucosal expression were clearly evident, and the numbers of unique transcripts altered were moderately less for MAA-infected tissue than were mucosal tissues infected with the MAP. To interpret these complex data, changes in the gene expression were further analyzed by dynamic Bayesian analysis. Bayesian network modeling identified mechanistic genes, gene-to-gene relationships, pathways and Gene Ontologies (GO) biological processes that are involved in specific cell activation during infection. MAP and MAA had significant different pathway perturbation at 0.5 and 12 hours post inoculation. Inverse processes were observed between MAP and MAA response for epithelial cell proliferation, negative regulation of chemotaxis, cell-cell adhesion mediated by integrin and regulation of cytokine-mediated signaling. MAP inoculated tissue had significantly lower expression of phagocytosis receptors such as mannose receptor and complement receptors. This study reveals that perturbation of genes and cellular pathways during MAP infection resulted in host evasion by mucosal membrane barrier weakening to access entry in the ileum

  19. Subspecies in Przewalski's gazelle Procapra przewalskii and its conservation implication

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MARDAN Turghan; JIANG ZhiGang; GROVES Colin P; YANG Ji; FANG HongXia

    2013-01-01

    Przewalski's gazelle Procapra przewalskii is an endangered species endemic to China.A question remains about subspecific variation in this species.Skulls of Przewalski's gazelle collected from its current remnant ranges around the Qinghai Lake in combination with those collected prior to the 20th century were measured and analyzed using Hierarchical Cluster Analysis in order to clarify the question.Unexpectedly,P.p.diversicornis,extirpated from its historic range,has spread to the Qinghai Lake region where it has replaced nominotypical P.p.przewalskii and is now restricted to a few small isolated populations around the lake.We discuss the causes of this unexpected replacement.In this study,we discuss the possibility of a new form,possibly a new subspecies,in the Guide Basin,adjacent to Qinghai Lake; it is unclear whether the new form has long existed and was only discovered in recent years,or whether it evolved in recent times due to the geographical isolation and anthropogenic landscape features.The study sheds light on the processes of microevolution and subspeciation in Procapra przewalskii,and based on the findings,we propose measures for conservation strategies for Przewalski's gazelle.

  20. Surviving within the amoebal exocyst: the Mycobacterium avium complex paradigm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Drancourt Michel

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Most of environmental mycobacteria have been previously demonstrated to resist free-living amoeba with subsequent increased virulence and resistance to antibiotics and biocides. The Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC comprises of environmental organisms that inhabit a wide variety of ecological niches and exhibit a significant degree of genetic variability. We herein studied the intra-ameobal location of all members of the MAC as model organisms for environmental mycobacteria. Results Type strains for M. avium, Mycobacterium intracellulare, Mycobacterium chimaera, Mycobacterium colombiense, Mycobacterium arosiense, Mycobacterium marseillense, Mycobacterium timonense and Mycobacterium bouchedurhonense were co-cultivated with the free-living amoeba Acanthamoeba polyphaga strain Linc-AP1. Microscopic analyses demonstrated the engulfment and replication of mycobacteria into vacuoles of A. polyphaga trophozoites. Mycobacteria were further entrapped within amoebal cysts, and survived encystment as demonstrated by subculturing. Electron microscopy observations show that, three days after entrapment into A. polyphaga cysts, all MAC members typically resided within the exocyst. Conclusions Combined with published data, these observations indicate that mycobacteria are unique among amoeba-resistant bacteria, in residing within the exocyst.

  1. Four new subspecies of birds from the Moluccas and New Guinea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mees, G.F.

    1964-01-01

    Routine examination of the bird collections of the Rijksmuseum van Natuurlijke Historie reveals, from time to time, the presence of unnamed subspecies. Four of these, from the Moluccas and from New Guinea, are described here. I am well aware that the detached description of some new subspecies is no

  2. Four new subspecies of birds from the Moluccas and New Guinea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mees, G.F.

    1964-01-01

    Routine examination of the bird collections of the Rijksmuseum van Natuurlijke Historie reveals, from time to time, the presence of unnamed subspecies. Four of these, from the Moluccas and from New Guinea, are described here. I am well aware that the detached description of some new subspecies is no

  3. Epidemiology and Ecology of Opportunistic Premise Plumbing Pathogens: Legionella pneumophila, Mycobacterium avium, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    BACKGROUND: Legionella pneumophila, Mycobacterium avium, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa are opportunistic premise plumbing pathogens (OPPPs) that persist and grow in household plumbing, habitats they share with humans. Infections caused by these OPPPs involve individuals with preexis...

  4. AMPLIFIED FRAGMENT LENGTH POLYMORPHISM ANALYSIS OF MYCOBACTERIUM AVIUM COMPLEX ISOLATES RECOVERED FROM SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fine-scale genotyping methods are necessary in order to identify possible sources of human exposure to opportunistic pathogens belonging to the Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC). In this study, amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) analysis was evaluated for fingerprintin...

  5. Epidemiology and Ecology of Opportunistic Premise Plumbing Pathogens: Legionella pneumophila, Mycobacterium avium, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    BACKGROUND: Legionella pneumophila, Mycobacterium avium, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa are opportunistic premise plumbing pathogens (OPPPs) that persist and grow in household plumbing, habitats they share with humans. Infections caused by these OPPPs involve individuals with preexis...

  6. Evidence of a pro-apoptotic effect of specific antibodies in a bovine macrophage model of infection with Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jolly, Ana; Lompardía, Silvina; Hajos, Silvia E; Mundo, Silvia L

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP) is the causative agent of Johne's disease (JD), a chronic granulomatous enteritis in ruminants. Understanding the protective immune response following infection is crucial to improve the diagnosis and the development of vaccines against this disease. The goal of this work was to assess whether specific antibodies were able to modulate the macrophage response to MAP infection by evaluating apoptosis and TNF-α secretion in an in vitro model. Sera from healthy (n=2), MAP-infected (n=3) and lipoarabinomannan (LAM)-immunized (n=3) bovines were evaluated. LAM was chosen as immunogen due to its relevant role in mycobacterial pathogenesis. We demonstrated by two different techniques (Acridine Orange/Ethidium Bromide microscopy and Annexin V/7-Amino-Actinomycin D flow cytometry) that the immune sera from both, MAP-infected and LAM-immunized bovines, significantly increased macrophage apoptosis in infected cultures. Comparable levels of apoptosis were detected when MAP was pre-incubated with purified specific antibodies instead of whole serum. Furthermore, this effect was accompanied by a significantly higher secretion of TNF-α. These results strongly suggest that specific antibodies could limit the impact of MAP on the apoptosis of bovine cells. This work would contribute to elucidate the role of the specific antibody response in bovine JD and its prevention.

  7. Effect of lipoarabinomannan from Mycobacterium avium subsp avium in Freund’s incomplete adjuvant on the immune response of cattle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.B. Colavecchia

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to determine whether lipoarabinomannan (LAM, in combination with Freund’s incomplete adjuvant (FIA, was able to improve cell-mediated and antibody-mediated immune responses against ovalbumin (OVA in cattle. Twenty-three calves were assigned to four treatment groups, which were subcutaneously immunized with either OVA plus FIA, OVA plus FIA and LAM from Mycobacterium avium subsp avium, FIA plus LAM, or FIA alone. Lymphoproliferation, IFN-γ production and cell subpopulations on peripheral blood mononuclear cells before and 15 days after treatment were evaluated. Delayed hypersensitivity was evaluated on day 57. Specific humoral immune response was measured by ELISA. Inoculation with LAM induced higher levels of lymphoproliferation and IFN-γ production in response to ConA and OVA (P < 0.05. Specific antibody titers were similar in both OVA-immunized groups. Interestingly, our results showed that the use of LAM in vaccine preparations improved specific cell immune response evaluated by lymphoproliferation and IFN-γ production by at least 50 and 25%, respectively, in cattle without interfering with tuberculosis and paratuberculosis diagnosis.

  8. Use of restriction fragment length polymorphism as a genetic marker for typing Mycobacterium avium strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roiz, M P; Palenque, E; Guerrero, C; Garcia, M J

    1995-01-01

    Restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) was used to study 75 clinical isolates identified as Mycobacterium avium. Two repetitive insertion sequences, IS1311 and IS900, were used as DNA probes. Although less than 25% of isolates showed RFLP patterns with IS900, all strains gave banding patterns with IS1311. M. avium strains isolated from patients with AIDS exhibited marked polymorphism with both probes. PMID:7615764

  9. Infection by Mycobacterium avium intracellulare in AIDS: endoscopic duodenal appearance mimicking Whipple's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vázquez-Iglesias, J L; Yañez, J; Durana, J; Arnal, F

    1988-09-01

    We report the case of a 24-year-old woman who presented with diarrhea, weight loss and abdominal lymph node enlargement. A diagnosis of infection by Mycobacterium avium intracellulare with a clinical picture similar to Whipple's disease was established. The endoscopic study of the duodenum revealed multiple yellow nodules that became confluent in the second portion, entirely replacing the normal mucosa. These endoscopic findings have not been described previously in intestinal infection by Mycobacterium avium intracellulare.

  10. Bordetella avium Causes Induction of Apoptosis and Nitric Oxide Synthase in Turkey Tracheal Explant Cultures

    OpenAIRE

    Miyamoto, David M.; Ruff, Kristin; Beach, Nathan M.; Dorsey-Oresto, Angella; Masters, Isaac; Temple, Louise M.

    2011-01-01

    Bordetellosis is an upper respiratory disease of turkeys caused by Bordetella avium in which the bacteria attach specifically to ciliated respiratory epithelial cells. Little is known about the mechanisms of pathogenesis of this disease, which has a negative impact in the commercial turkey industry. In this study, we produced a novel explant organ culture system that was able to successfully reproduce pathogenesis of B. avium in vitro, using tracheal tissue derived from 26 day-old turkey embr...

  11. Expression library immunization confers protection against Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huntley, J F; Stabel, J R; Paustian, M L; Reinhardt, T A; Bannantine, J P

    2005-10-01

    Currently, paratuberculosis vaccines are comprised of crude whole-cell preparations of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis. Although effective in reducing clinical disease and fecal shedding, these vaccines have severe disadvantages as well, including seroconversion of vaccinated animals and granulomatous lesions at the site of vaccination. DNA vaccines can offer an alternative approach that may be safer and elicit more protective responses. In an effort to identify protective M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis sequences, a genomic DNA expression library was generated and subdivided into pools of clones (approximately 1,500 clones/pool). The clone pools were evaluated to determine DNA vaccine efficacy by immunizing mice via gene gun delivery and challenging them with live, virulent M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis. Four clone pools resulted in a significant reduction in the amount of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis recovered from mouse tissues compared to mice immunized with other clone pools and nonvaccinated, infected control mice. One of the protective clone pools was further partitioned into 10 clone arrays of 108 clones each, and four clone arrays provided significant protection from both spleen and mesenteric lymph node colonization by M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis. The nucleotide sequence of each clone present in the protective pools was determined, and coding region functions were predicted by computer analysis. Comparison of the protective clone array sequences implicated 26 antigens that may be responsible for protection in mice. This study is the first study to demonstrate protection against M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis infection with expression library immunization.

  12. Characterization of clinical and environmental Mycobacterium avium spp. isolates and their interaction with human macrophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evelyn Guirado

    Full Text Available Members of the Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC are naturally occurring bacteria in the environment. A link has been suggested between M. avium strains in drinking water and clinical isolates from infected individuals. There is a need to develop new screening methodologies that can identify specific virulence properties of M. avium isolates found in water that predict a level of risk to exposed individuals. In this work we have characterized 15 clinical and environmental M. avium spp. isolates provided by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA to improve our understanding of the key processes involved in the binding, uptake and survival of these isolates in primary human macrophages. M. avium serovar 8 was predominant among the isolates studied. Different amounts and exposure of mannose-capped lipoarabinomannan (ManLAM and glycopeptidolipids (GPLs, both major mycobacterial virulence factors, were found among the isolates studied. Reference clinical isolate 104 serovar 1 and clinical isolates 11 and 14 serovar 8 showed an increased association with macrophages. Serum opsonization increased the cell association and survival at 2 h post infection for all isolates. However, only the clinical isolates 104 and 3 among those tested showed an increased growth in primary human macrophages. The other isolates varied in their survival in these cells. Thus we conclude that the amounts of cell envelope ManLAM and GPL, as well as GPL serovar specificity are not the only important bacterial factors for dictating the early interactions of M. avium with human macrophages.

  13. Maximum growth rate of Mycobacterium avium in continuous culture or chronically infected BALB/c mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, C M; Taylor, M A; Dennis, M W

    1987-01-01

    Mycobacterium avium is a human pathogen which may cause either chronic or disseminated disease and the organism exhibits a slow rate of growth. This study provides information on the growth rate of the organism in chronically infected mice and its maximal growth rate in vitro. M. avium was grown in continuous culture, limited for nitrogen with 0.5 mM ammonium chloride and dilution rates that ranged from 0.054 to 0.153 h-1. The steady-state concentration of ammonia nitrogen and M. avium cells for each dilution rate were determined. The bacterial saturation constant for growth-limiting ammonia was 0.29 mM (4 micrograms nitrogen/ml) and, from this, the maximal growth rate for M. avium was estimated to be 0.206 h-1 or a doubling time of 3.4 h. BALB/c mice were infected intravenously with 3 x 10(6) colony-forming units and a chronic infection resulted, typical of virulent M. avium strains. During a period of 3 months, the number of mycobacteria remained constant in the lungs, but increased 30-fold and 8,900-fold, respectively, in the spleen and mesenteric lymph nodes. The latter increase appeared to be due to proliferation in situ. The generation time of M. avium in the mesenteric lymph nodes was estimated to be 7 days.

  14. LCD array and IS900 efficiency in relation to traditional diagnostic techniques for diagnosis of Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis in cattle in Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    ElSayed, Mohamed Sabry Abd ElRaheam

    2014-06-01

    This study aimed to compare traditional tests (Johnin test, fecal staining and fecal culture) with advanced laboratory tests (ELISA, LCD array and IS900 PCR) for detection of Johne's disease. A total of 365 Holstein-Friesian dairy cattle (40 express profuse diarrhea unresponsive to treatment and 325 contacting them) tested with Johnin test, blood collected for ELISA and fecal samples for fecal staining as well as fecal culture, application of LCD array and PCR using IS900 on DNA extracted from Mycobacterium paratuberculosis bacilli (from feces and culture). Johnin test was 40/40 (100%) and 25/325 (7.69%), fecal staining was 13 (37.1%) and 2 (50%), ELISA was 35/40 (87.5%) and 4/25 (16%) for clinical cattle and apparently healthy contacting them respectively. Isolation was 12/13 (92.3%) of the (Johnin test +ve, ELISA +ve and Acid Fast Bacilli +ve) from the clinically positive cattle and 1/2 (50%) of the (Johnin test +ve, ELISA +ve and Acid Fast Bacilli +ve) from apparently healthy contacting them while LCD array and IS900 gave 100% confirming the isolation results. In conclusion, LCD array depending on 16S RNA and DNA hybridization with specific probes for detection of M. paratuberculosis are fast, sensitive and labor-saving when combined with IS900.

  15. Genome-wide association study to identify chromosomal regions associated with antibody response to Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis in milk of Dutch Holstein-Friesians

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hulzen, van K.J.E.; Schopen, G.C.B.; Arendonk, van J.A.M.; Nielen, M.; Koets, A.P.; Schrooten, C.; Heuven, H.C.M.

    2012-01-01

    Heritability of susceptibility to Johne's disease in cattle has been shown to vary from 0.041 to 0.159. Although the presence of genetic variation involved in susceptibility to Johne's disease has been demonstrated, the understanding of genes contributing to the genetic variance is far from complete

  16. Direct production losses and treatment costs from bovine viral diarrhoea virus, bovine leukosis virus, Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis, and Neospora caninum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Junwook; VanLeeuwen, John A; Weersink, Alfons; Keefe, Gregory P

    2002-09-30

    Our purpose was to determine direct production losses (milk loss, premature voluntary culling and reduced slaughter value, mortaliy loss, and abortion and reproductive loss) and treatmetn costs (veterinary services, medication cost, and extra farm labour cost) due to four infectious diseases in the maritime provinces of Canada: bovine viral diarrhoea (BVD), enzootic bovine leukosis (EBL), Johne's Disease (JD), and neosporosis. We used a partial-budget model, and incorporated risk and sensitivity analyses to identify the effects of uncertainty on costs. Total annual costs for an average, infected, 50 cow herd were: JD$ 2472; BVD$ 2421; neosporosis $ 2304; EBL$ 806. The stochastic nature of the proportion of infected herds and prevalence of infection within a herd were used to estimate probability distributions for these ex post costs. For all diseases, these distributions were right skewed. A sensitivity analysis showed the largest effect on costs was due to milk yield effects. For example, changing milk production loss from 0 to 5% for BVD increased the costs for the disease by 266%.

  17. Genetic variation for infection status as determined by a specific antibody response against Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis in milk of Dutch dairy goats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hulzen, K.J.E. van; Koets, A.P.; Nielen, M.; Hoeboer, J.; Arendonk, J.A. van; Heuven, H.C.

    2012-01-01

    Classical control strategies based on management restrictions to reduce transmission, culling of infected goats, and vaccination have not been able to eradicate Johne's disease from infected herds. Selective breeding for less susceptibility to disease may be a useful additional tool to contribute to

  18. Genetic variation for infection status as determined by a specific antibody response against Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis in milk of Dutch dairy goats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hulzen, van K.J.E.; Koets, A.P.; Nielen, M.; Hoeboer, J.; Arendonk, van J.A.M.

    2012-01-01

    Classical control strategies based on management restrictions to reduce transmission, culling of infected goats, and vaccination have not been able to eradicate Johne’s disease from infected herds. Selective breeding for less susceptibility to disease may be a useful additional tool to contribute to

  19. Correlation between rpoB gene mutation in Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis and clinical rifabutin and rifampicin resistance for treatment of Crohn's disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Daniel R Beckler; Sammer Elwasila; George Ghobrial; John F Valentine; Saleh A Naser

    2008-01-01

    AIM:To investigate overlapping regions of the rpoB gene previously involved with rifamycin resistance in M.tubercu/osis and seek correlation between rpoB mutations in clinical MAP strains with susceptibility to RIF and RFB.METHODS:We designed a molecular-based PCR method for the evaluation of rifabutin (RFB) and rifampicin (RIF)resistance based on probable determinant regions within the rpoB gene of MAP,including the 81 bp variable site located between nucleotides 1363 and 1443.The minimum inhibitory concentration (NIC) for RIF was also determined against 11 NAP isolates in attempt to seek correlation with rpoB sequences.RESULTS:We determined that MAP strain 18 had an IVlIC of>30 mg/L and≤5 mg/L for RIF and RFB respectively,and a significant and novel rpoB mutation C1367T,compared to an MIC of≤1.0 mg/L for both drugs in the wild type MAP.The 30-fold increase in the MIC was a direct result of the rpoB mutation C1367T,which caused an amino acid change Thr456 to Ile456 in the drug's binding site.In addition,MAP strain 185 contained five silent rpoB mutations and exhibited an MIC comparable to the wild-type.Moreover,our in vitro selected mutation in MAP strain UCF5 resulted in the generation of a new resistant strain (UCF5-RIF16r)that possessed T1442C rpoB mutation and an MIC>30 mg/L and>10 mg/L for RIF and RFB respectively.Sequencing of the entire rpoB gene in lAP strains UCF4,18,and UCF5-RIF16r revealed an rpoB mutation A2284C further downstream of the 81 bp variable region in UCF4,accounting for observed slight increase in NIC.In addition,no other significant mutations were found in strains 18 and UCF-RIF16r.CONCLUSION:The data clearly illustrates that clinical and in vitro-selected MAP mutants with rpoB mutations result in resistance to RIF and RFB,and that a single amino acid change in the beta subunit may have a significant impact on RIF resistance.Unconventional drug susceptibility testing such as our molecular approach will be beneficial for evaluation of antibiotic effectiveness.This molecular approach may also serve as a model for other drugs used for treatment of MAP infections.

  20. Genetic variation and heritability of the antibody response to Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis in Danish Hostein cows

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Hanne; Nielsen, Søren Saxmose; Berg, Peer

    2004-01-01

    , the estimated heritability was 0.091. To evaluate whether intrauterine infection could be reflected in the OD, variation among 2715 dam-daughter or maternal sister groups was also estimated. Variation in this data was nonsignificant, possibly because only very few clinical cases or end-stage cows, i.e., heavy...

  1. Mitogenomics reveals two subspecies in Coelomactra antiquata (Mollusca: Bivalvia).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Xueping; Shen, Xin; Zhao, Nana; Tian, Mei; Liang, Meng; Hao, Jue; Cheng, Hanliang; Yan, Binlun; Dong, Zhiguo; Zhu, Xiaoling

    2013-04-01

    The mitochondrial genome sequence of Coelomactra antiquata (Mollusca: Bivalvia) in Zhangzhou (zz-mtDNA) was fully sequenced and compared with that in Rizhao (rz-mtDNA) in this study. A tRNA (tRNA (Met) ) located between tRNA (Ala) and cox1 genes was identified in zz-mtDNA but not in rz-mtDNA. The largest non-coding region (NCR; MNR) contained 11 copies 99nt tandem repeat sequences exclusively in rz-mtDNA, while the second largest NCR with 400 bp between tRNA (Ala) and tRNA (Met) in zz-mtDNA was absent in rz-mtDNA. Secondary structures of ZZ and RZ C. antiquata rRNAs are significantly different. The mitochondrial genomic characteristics clearly indicate that there are at least two subspecies in C. antiquata.

  2. Clinical differences of influenza subspecies among hospitalized children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acar, Manolya; Sütçü, Murat; Aktürk, Hacer; Törün, Selda Hançerli; Uysalol, Metin; Meşe, Sevim; Salman, Nuran; Somer, Ayper

    2017-03-01

    Clinical findings, mortality, and morbidity rates differ among influenza subspecies. Awareness of these differences will lead physicians to choose the proper diagnostic and therapeutic strategies and to foresee possible complications. The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical differences of influenza subspecies among hospitalized children. Hospitalized children with proven influenza infection by polymerase chain reaction on nasopharyngeal swab specimens in our clinic, between December 2013 and March 2016, were enrolled. These children were divided into 3 groups as Influenza A/H1N1 (n=42), Influenza A/H3N2 (n=23), and Influenza B (n=35). The median age of the children was 51.5 months (range, 3-204 months). The most common presenting symptoms were fever (n=83), cough (n=58), and difficulty in breathing (n=25). The most common non-respiratory findings were lymphadenopathy (n=18) and gastrointestinal system involvement (n=17). Sixty-two percent of the patients (n=62) had chronic diseases. H1N1 and H3N2 were significantly more common among patients with chronic neurologic disorders and renal failure, respectively. Leukopenia (n=32) and thrombocytopenia (n=22) were the most common pathologic laboratory findings. Neutropenia, elevated CRP levels, and antibiotic use were significantly more common among patients with H1N1 infection. Seven patients were transferred to the intensive care unit with diagnoses of acute respiratory distress syndrome (n=4), encephalitis (n=2), and bronchiolitis (n=1). Two patients with chronic diseases and H1N1 infection died secondary to acute respiratory distress syndrome. Influenza A/H1N1 infection represented more severe clinical disease.

  3. Emphysematous pyometra secondary to Enterococcus avium infection in a dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, An-Chi; Cheng, Ching-Chang; Wang, Hsien-Chi; Lee, Wei-Ming; Shyu, Ching-Lin; Lin, Cheng-Chung; Chen, Kuan-Sheng

    2016-06-16

    A 5-year-old female intact Mastiff dog was presented with a history of vaginal discharge for 1 day. Physical examination revealed a sanguineo-purulent vaginal discharge and systemic inflammatory response syndrome. Abdominal radiographs showed several dilated and gas- filled tubular loops. The differential diagnoses included emphysematous pyometra or small intestinal mechanical ileus. Surgical exploration of the abdomen demonstrated a severely dilated and gas-filled uterus, and emphysematous pyometra was confirmed. The patient's clinical signs resolved after ovariohysterectomy. Histopathology revealed mild endometrial cystic hyperplasia with infiltration of inflammatory cells in the superficial endometrial epithelia. Enterococcus avium, an α-hemolytic gram-positive coccus, was isolated from the uterus. This paper highlights the radiographic features of emphysematous pyometra and a pathogen that has never been reported to be associated with canine pyometra previously.

  4. Disseminated Mycobacterium avium complex infection in an immunocompetent pregnant woman

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Woo

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Disseminated mycobacterium avium complex (MAC occurs mainly in immunocompromised hosts, which is associated with abnormal cellular immunity. Case presentation A 26-year-old pregnant woman presented with fever and general weakness. Miliary lung nodules were noted on chest X-ray. Under the impression of miliary tuberculosis, anti-tuberculosis medication was administered. However, the patient was not improved. Further work-up demonstrated MAC in the sputum and placenta. The patient was treated successfully with clarithromycin-based combination regimen. Conclusion This appears to be the first case of disseminated MAC in an otherwise healthy pregnant woman. Clinicians should be alert for the diagnosis of MAC infection in diverse clinical conditions.

  5. Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase in cherry (Prunus avium L.) fruit during development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Robert P; Battistelli, Alberto; Moscatello, Stefano; Chen, Zhi-Hui; Leegood, Richard C; Famiani, Franco

    2011-11-01

    In this study the abundance and location of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) was determined in the flesh and skin of the sweet cherry (Prunus avium L.) cultivar Durone Nero II during development. PEPCK was not present in young fruit but appeared in both tissues as the fruit increased in size. In these there was no net dissimilation of malic acid, which accounts for the bulk of their organic acid contents when PEPCK was present. To assist in understanding the function of PEPCK, the abundance of a number of other enzymes was determined. These enzymes were aspartate aminotransferase (AspAT), glutamine synthetase (GS), phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC), pyruvate, orthophosphate dikinase (PPDK), and ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (rubisco). A potential role for PEPCK in the regulation of pH and the utilization of malate in gluconeogenesis in the flesh and skin of cherries is presented.

  6. Influence of cultivar and processing on cherry (Prunus avium) allergenicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Primavesi, L; Brenna, O V; Pompei, C; Pravettoni, V; Farioli, L; Pastorello, E A

    2006-12-27

    Oral allergy syndrome is an immediate food allergic event that affects lips, mouth, and pharynx, is often triggered by fruits and vegetables, and may be associated with pollinosis. Here, we report on the allergenic pattern of different varieties of cherry (Prunus avium) and results obtained by applying several technological processes to the selected varieties. Whole cherries were submitted to chemical peeling, thermal treatment, and syruping processes, and the relative protein extracts were analyzed by in vitro (sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and immunoblotting analysis) and in vivo tests (skin prick test). Electrophoretic analyses demonstrated that there was no marked difference among cherry cultivars. Chemical peeling successfully removed Pru av 3, a lipid transfer protein (LTP) responsible for oral allergy syndrome in patients without pollinosis, leading to the industrial production of cherry hypoallergenic derivatives. Furthermore, the syruping process removed almost all allergenic proteins to whom patients with pollinosis are responsive. In vivo tests confirmed electrophoretic results.

  7. Morphometric and molecular differentiation between quetzal subspecies of Pharomachrus mocinno (Trogoniformes: Trogonidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solórzano, Sofía; Oyama, Ken

    2010-03-01

    The resplendent Quetzal (Pharomachrus mocinno) is an endemic Mesoamerican bird species of conservation concern. Within this species, the subspecies P. m. costaricensis and P. m. mocinno, have been recognized by apparent morphometric differences; however, presently there is no sufficient data for confirmation. We analyzed eight morphometric attributes of the body from 41 quetzals: body length, tarsus and cord wing, as well as the length, wide and depth of the bill, body weight; and in the case of the males, the length of the long upper-tail cover feathers. We used multivariate analyses to discriminate morphometric differences between subspecies and contrasted each morphometric attribute between and within subspecies with paired non-parametric Wilcoxon test. In order to review the intraspecific taxonomic status of this bird, we added phylogenetic analysis, and genetic divergence and differentiation based on nucleotide variations in four sequences of mtDNA. The nucleotide variation was estimated in control region, subunit NDH6, and tRNAGlu and tRNAPhe in 26 quetzals from eight localities distributed in five countries. We estimated the genetic divergence and differentiation between subspecies according to a mutation-drift equilibrium model. We obtained the best mutation nucleotide model following the procedure implemented in model test program. We constructed the phylogenetic relationships between subspecies by maximum parsimony and maximum likelihood using PAUP, as well as with Bayesian statistics. The multivariate analyses showed two different morphometric groups, and individuals clustered according to the subspecies that they belong. The paired comparisons between subspecies showed strong differences in most of the attributes analyzed. Along the four mtDNA sequences, we identified 32 nucleotide positions that have a particular nucleotide according to the quetzals subspecies. The genetic divergence and the differentiation was strong and markedly showed two groups

  8. Zoonotic aspects of Mycobacterium bovis and Mycobacterium avium-intracellulare complex (MAC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biet, Franck; Boschiroli, Maria Laura; Thorel, Marie Françoise; Guilloteau, Laurence A

    2005-01-01

    Pathogens that are transmitted between the environment, wildlife, livestock and humans represent major challenges for the protection of human and domestic animal health, the economic sustainability of agriculture, and the conservation of wildlife. Among such pathogens, the genus Mycobacterium is well represented by M. bovis, the etiological agent of bovine tuberculosis, M. avium ssp. paratuberculosis (Map) the etiological agent of Johne disease, M. avium ssp. avium (Maa) and in a few common cases by other emergent environmental mycobacteria. Epidemiologic surveys performed in Europe, North America and New Zealand have demonstrated the existence and importance of environmental and wildlife reservoirs of mycobacterial infections that limit the attempts of disease control programmes. The aim of this review is to examine the zoonotic aspects of mycobacteria transmitted from the environment and wildlife. This work is focused on the species of two main groups of mycobacteria classified as important pathogens for humans and animals: first, M. bovis, the causative agent of bovine tuberculosis, which belongs to the M. tuberculosis complex and has a broad host range including wildlife, captive wildlife, domestic livestock, non-human primates and humans; the second group examined, is the M. avium-intracellulare complex (MAC) which includes M. avium ssp. avium causing major health problems in AIDS patients and M. avium ssp. paratuberculosis the etiological agent of Johne disease in cattle and identified in patients with Crohn disease. MAC agents, in addition to a broad host range, are environmental mycobacteria found in numerous biotopes including the soil, water, aerosols, protozoa, deep litter and fresh tropical vegetation. This review examines the possible reservoirs of these pathogens in the environment and in wildlife, their role as sources of infection in humans and animals and their health impact on humans. The possibilities of control and management programmes for

  9. Relationship between Presence of Cows with Milk Positive for Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis-Specific Antibody by Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay and Viable M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis in Dust in Cattle Barns

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eisenberg, S.W.F.; Chuchaisangrat, R.; Nielen, M.; Koets, A.P.

    2013-01-01

    Paratuberculosis, or Johne’s disease, in cattle is caused by Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis, which has recently been suspected to be transmitted through dust. This longitudinal study on eight commercial M. avium subsp. paratuberculosispositive dairy farms studied the relationship betwee

  10. Mercury in Nelson's Sparrow Subspecies at Breeding Sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winder, Virginia L.; Emslie, Steven D.

    2012-01-01

    Background Mercury is a persistent, biomagnifying contaminant that can cause negative effects on ecosystems. Marshes are often areas of relatively high mercury methylation and bioaccumulation. Nelson's Sparrows (Ammodramus nelsoni) use marsh habitats year-round and have been documented to exhibit tissue mercury concentrations that exceed negative effects thresholds. We sought to further characterize the potential risk of Nelson's Sparrows to mercury exposure by sampling individuals from sites within the range of each of its subspecies. Methodology/Principal Findings From 2009 to 2011, we captured adult Nelson's Sparrows at sites within the breeding range of each subspecies (A. n. nelsoni: Grand Forks and Upham, North Dakota; A. n. alterus: Moosonee, Ontario; and A. n. subvirgatus: Grand Manan Island, New Brunswick) and sampled breast feathers, the first primary feather (P1), and blood for total mercury analysis. Mean blood mercury in nelsoni individuals captured near Grand Forks ranged from 0.84±0.37 to 1.65±1.02 SD ppm among years, between 2.0 and 4.9 times as high as concentrations at the other sites (Pmercury did not vary among sites within a given sampling year (site means ranged from 0.98±0.69 to 2.71±2.93 ppm). Mean P1 mercury in alterus (2.96±1.84 ppm fw) was significantly lower than in any other sampled population (5.25±2.24–6.77±3.51 ppm; P≤0.03). Conclusions/Significance Our study further characterized mercury in Nelson's Sparrows near Grand Forks; we documented localized and potentially harmful mercury concentrations, indicating that this area may represent a biological mercury hotspot. This finding warrants further research to determine if wildlife populations of conservation or recreational interest in this area may be experiencing negative effects due to mercury exposure. We present preliminary conclusions about the risk of each sampled population to mercury exposure. PMID:22384194

  11. Mercury in Nelson's Sparrow subspecies at breeding sites.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Virginia L Winder

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Mercury is a persistent, biomagnifying contaminant that can cause negative effects on ecosystems. Marshes are often areas of relatively high mercury methylation and bioaccumulation. Nelson's Sparrows (Ammodramus nelsoni use marsh habitats year-round and have been documented to exhibit tissue mercury concentrations that exceed negative effects thresholds. We sought to further characterize the potential risk of Nelson's Sparrows to mercury exposure by sampling individuals from sites within the range of each of its subspecies. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: From 2009 to 2011, we captured adult Nelson's Sparrows at sites within the breeding range of each subspecies (A. n. nelsoni: Grand Forks and Upham, North Dakota; A. n. alterus: Moosonee, Ontario; and A. n. subvirgatus: Grand Manan Island, New Brunswick and sampled breast feathers, the first primary feather (P1, and blood for total mercury analysis. Mean blood mercury in nelsoni individuals captured near Grand Forks ranged from 0.84 ± 0.37 to 1.65 ± 1.02 SD ppm among years, between 2.0 and 4.9 times as high as concentrations at the other sites (P<0.01. Breast feather mercury did not vary among sites within a given sampling year (site means ranged from 0.98 ± 0.69 to 2.71 ± 2.93 ppm. Mean P1 mercury in alterus (2.96 ± 1.84 ppm fw was significantly lower than in any other sampled population (5.25 ± 2.24-6.77 ± 3.51 ppm; P ≤ 0.03. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our study further characterized mercury in Nelson's Sparrows near Grand Forks; we documented localized and potentially harmful mercury concentrations, indicating that this area may represent a biological mercury hotspot. This finding warrants further research to determine if wildlife populations of conservation or recreational interest in this area may be experiencing negative effects due to mercury exposure. We present preliminary conclusions about the risk of each sampled population to mercury exposure.

  12. Characterization of the fibronectin-attachment protein of Mycobacterium avium reveals a fibronectin-binding motif conserved among mycobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schorey, J S; Holsti, M A; Ratliff, T L; Allen, P M; Brown, E J

    1996-07-01

    Mycobacterium avium is an intracellular pathogen and a major opportunistic infectious agent observed in patients with acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS). Evidence suggests that the initial portal of infection by M. avium is often the gastrointestinal tract. However, the mechanism by which the M. avium crosses the epithelial barrier is unclear. A possible mechanism is suggested by the ability of M. avium to bind fibronectin, an extracellular matrix protein that is a virulence factor for several extracellular pathogenic bacteria which bind to mucosal surfaces. To further characterize fibronectin binding by M. avium, we have cloned the M. avium fibronectin-attachment protein (FAP). The M. avium FAP (FAP-A) has an unusually large number of Pro and Ala residues (40% overall) and is 50% identical to FAP of both Mycobacterium leprae and Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Using recombinant FAP-A and FAP-A peptides, we show that two non-continuous regions in FAP-A bind fibronectin. Peptides from these regions and homologous sequences from M. leprae FAP inhibit fibronectin binding by both M. avium and Mycobacterium bovis Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG). These regions have no homology to eukaryotic fibronectin-binding proteins and are only distantly related to fibronectin-binding peptides of Gram-positive bacteria. Nevertheless, these fibronectin-binding regions are highly conserved among the mycobacterial FAPs, suggesting an essential function for this interaction in mycobacteria infection of their metazoan hosts.

  13. Assessing the effectiveness of low-pressure ultraviolet light for inactivating Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) micro-organisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aims: To assess low-pressure ultraviolet light (LP-UV) inactivation kinetics of Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) strains in a water matrix using collimated beam apparatus. Methods and Results: Strains of M. avium (n = 3) and Mycobacterium intracellulare (n = 2) were exposed t...

  14. Assessing the effectiveness of low-pressure ultraviolet light for inactivating Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) micro-organisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aims: To assess low-pressure ultraviolet light (LP-UV) inactivation kinetics of Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) strains in a water matrix using collimated beam apparatus. Methods and Results: Strains of M. avium (n = 3) and Mycobacterium intracellulare (n = 2) were exposed t...

  15. Concomitant Mycobacterium avium infection and Hodgkin's disease in a lymph node from an HIV-negative child.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Armas, Yaxsier; Capó, Virginia; González, Ida; Mederos, Lilian; Díaz, Raúl; de Waard, Jacobus H; Rodríguez, Alberto; García, Yarmila; Cabanas, Ricardo

    2011-03-01

    We report a case of an immunocompetent child with simultaneously an infection with Mycobacterium avium and Hodgkin's disease in a cervical lymph node. A positive PCR result for M. avium on a biopsy of the lymph node directed the definitive diagnosis for both etiologies and avoided a possible dissemination of this infection after chemotherapy was started.

  16. Efecto de la infección de Mycobacterium avium paratuberculosis en la producción de anticuerpos bovinos Effect of the infection with Mycobacterium avium paratuberculosis on the production of bovine antibodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B Fernández

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available La paratuberculosis es una enfermedad granulomatosa crónica intestinal, causada por Mycobacterium avium subespecie paratuberculosis, que afecta a los rumiantes. El objetivo del trabajo fue caracterizar la respuesta inmune humoral sistémica y local de bovinos infectados. Se estudiaron once bovinos, seis infectados (asintomáticos, sintomáticos y terminales y cinco controles. Se determinaron los niveles de inmunoglobulinas totales y se cuantificaron los subisotipos de IgG específicos a paratuberculosis en suero y materia fecal por ELISA. Los niveles de inmunoglobulinas totales en sueros fueron similares. Sin embargo, se evidenciaron aumentos significativos de IgM e IgG totales, e IgG-específica en materia fecal de los sintomáticos. La IgG1 específica fue predominante en sueros de bovinos sintomáticos y terminales. La IgG3 fue la inmunoglobulina específica de mayor cantidad detectada tanto en suero como en materia fecal de los asintomáticos. Nuestros resultados muestran que la infección no afecta la producción de inmunoglobulinas totales. El aumento de inmunoglobulinas en materia fecal podría relacionarse con la lesión de la mucosa intestinal. El predominio de IgG1 se corresponde con el cambio de perfil a Th2 en el periodo sintomático. El hallazgo de incrementos de IgG3 específica en asintomáticos sugiere el estudio de este isotipo para poder mejorar su identificación.Paratuberculosis, caused by Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis, is a chronic granulomatous enteric disease affecting ruminants. Our aim was to characterize systemic and local humoral responses of infected cows. Eleven cows were studied: six naturally infected (asymptomatic, symptomatic and terminal and five control. Total IgM and IgG and paratuberculosis-specific IgG subisotypes, from feces and serum, were assessed by ELISA. No differences were detected on the levels of total immunoglobulins in sera. Symptomatic cows showed significative higher level of

  17. Yaws: 110 years after Castellani's discovery of Treponema pallidum subspecies pertenue

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Stamm, Lola V

    2015-01-01

    .... The etiological agent of yaws, Treponema pallidum subspecies pertenue (T. pertenue), was discovered by Aldo Castellani in 1905 shortly after Schaudinn and Hoffmann discovered the etiological agent of syphilis...

  18. A NEW SUBSPECIES OF SATYRIUM TITUS (LYCAENIDAE: THECLINAE) FROM SOUTH CENTRAL NEW MEXICO

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Holland, R

    2010-01-01

    .... of southern New Mexico. This is the only mountain range in New Mexico isolated long enough to have evolved endemic subspecies of Lepidoptera--my Antiquity Formula places its time of separation from the nearest area...

  19. KatG protein: A novel marker for differential diagnosis of Myobacterium avium complex infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gupta K

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Biochemical or nucleic acid based diagnostic techniques for MAC infection are unsatisfactory. This study aims to identify and evaluate M. avium secretory protein(s of diagnostic potential, so as to develop a rapid and simple method for diagnosis of MAC infection. Material and Methods: Initially, a specific protein band of ~80-85 kDa was recognised by differential immunoblotting; which was subjected to anion exchange column chromatography for purification of proteins. After fractionisation using SDS-PAGE and electroelution, blast search was carried out. Further immunoreactivity studies were done with M. avium and Mtb infected mice sera. Clinical utilisation of separated protein was evaluated by conducting indirect ELISA with serum samples from mycobacterial infected patients. Results: A specific 81.6 kDa protein, shown to be catalase-peroxidase protein (KatG by blast search was separated. Immunoreactivity studies of purified KatG proteins with mice sera confirmed it to be specific for M. avium infection. Indirect ELISA with patient samples further confirmed it to be M. avium infection specific. Conclusion: KatG protein is specifically recognised by MAC patients and can be used as a marker for simple and rapid ELISA based tests for differential diagnosis of M. avium infection.

  20. Comparative genomics of Clavibacter michiganensis subspecies, pathogens of important agricultural crops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tambong, James T

    2017-01-01

    Subspecies of Clavibacter michiganensis are important phytobacterial pathogens causing devastating diseases in several agricultural crops. The genome organizations of these pathogens are poorly understood. Here, the complete genomes of 5 subspecies (C. michiganensis subsp. michiganensis, Cmi; C. michiganensis subsp. sepedonicus, Cms; C. michiganensis subsp. nebraskensis, Cmn; C. michiganensis subsp. insidiosus, Cmi and C. michiganensis subsp. capsici, Cmc) were analyzed. This study assessed the taxonomic position of the subspecies based on 16S rRNA and genome-based DNA homology and concludes that there is ample evidence to elevate some of the subspecies to species-level. Comparative genomics analysis indicated distinct genomic features evident on the DNA structural atlases and annotation features. Based on orthologous gene analysis, about 2300 CDSs are shared across all the subspecies; and Cms showed the highest number of subspecies-specific CDS, most of which are mobile elements suggesting that Cms could be more prone to translocation of foreign genes. Cms and Cmi had the highest number of pseudogenes, an indication of potential degenerating genomes. The stress response factors that may be involved in cold/heat shock, detoxification, oxidative stress, osmoregulation, and carbon utilization are outlined. For example, the wco-cluster encoding for extracellular polysaccharide II is highly conserved while the sucrose-6-phosphate hydrolase that catalyzes the hydrolysis of sucrose-6-phosphate yielding glucose-6-phosphate and fructose is highly divergent. A unique second form of the enzyme is only present in Cmn NCPPB 2581. Also, twenty-eight plasmid-borne CDSs in the other subspecies were found to have homologues in the chromosomal genome of Cmn which is known not to carry plasmids. These CDSs include pathogenesis-related factors such as Endocellulases E1 and Beta-glucosidase. The results presented here provide an insight of the functional organization of the genomes of

  1. Population structure of honey bees in the Carpathian Basin (Hungary) confirms introgression from surrounding subspecies

    OpenAIRE

    Péntek‐Zakar, Erika; Oleksa, Andrzej; Borowik, Tomasz; Kusza,Szilvia

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Carniolan honey bees (Apis mellifera carnica) are considered as an indigenous subspecies in Hungary adapted to most of the ecological and climatic conditions in this area. However, during the last decades Hungarian beekeepers have recognized morphological signs of the Italian honey bee (Apis mellifera ligustica). As the natural distribution of the honey bee subspecies can be affected by the importation of honey bee queens or by natural gene flow, we aimed at determining the genetic s...

  2. A TaqMan-PCR protocol for quantification and differentiation of the phytopathogenic Clavibacter michiganensis subspecies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bach, H-J; Jessen, I; Schloter, M; Munch, J C

    2003-01-01

    Real-time TaqMan-PCR assays were developed for detection, differentiation and absolute quantification of the pathogenic subspecies of Clavibacter michiganensis (Cm) in one single PCR run. The designed primer pair, targeting intergenic sequences of the rRNA operon (ITS) common in all subspecies, was suitable for the amplification of the expected 223-nt DNA fragments of all subspecies. Closely related bacteria were completely discriminated, except of Rathayibacter iranicus, from which weak PCR product bands appeared on agarose gel after 35 PCR cycles. Sufficient specificity of PCR detection was reached by introduction of the additional subspecies specific probes used in TaqMan-PCR. Only Cm species were detected and there was clear differentiation among the subspecies C. michiganensis sepedonicus (Cms), C. michiganensis michiganensis (Cmm), C. michiganensis nebraskensis (Cmn), C. michiganensis insidiosus (Cmi) and C. michiganensis tessellarius (Cmt). The TaqMan assays were optimized to enable a simultaneous quantification of each subspecies. Validity is shown by comparison with cell counts.

  3. Molecular heterogeneity in major urinary proteins of Mus musculus subspecies: potential candidates involved in speciation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurst, Jane L.; Beynon, Robert J.; Armstrong, Stuart D.; Davidson, Amanda J.; Roberts, Sarah A.; Gómez-Baena, Guadalupe; Smadja, Carole M.; Ganem, Guila

    2017-01-01

    When hybridisation carries a cost, natural selection is predicted to favour evolution of traits that allow assortative mating (reinforcement). Incipient speciation between the two European house mouse subspecies, Mus musculus domesticus and M.m.musculus, sharing a hybrid zone, provides an opportunity to understand evolution of assortative mating at a molecular level. Mouse urine odours allow subspecific mate discrimination, with assortative preferences evident in the hybrid zone but not in allopatry. Here we assess the potential of MUPs (major urinary proteins) as candidates for signal divergence by comparing MUP expression in urine samples from the Danish hybrid zone border (contact) and from allopatric populations. Mass spectrometric characterisation identified novel MUPs in both subspecies involving mostly new combinations of amino acid changes previously observed in M.m.domesticus. The subspecies expressed distinct MUP signatures, with most MUPs expressed by only one subspecies. Expression of at least eight MUPs showed significant subspecies divergence both in allopatry and contact zone. Another seven MUPs showed divergence in expression between the subspecies only in the contact zone, consistent with divergence by reinforcement. These proteins are candidates for the semiochemical barrier to hybridisation, providing an opportunity to characterise the nature and evolution of a putative species recognition signal. PMID:28337988

  4. Detecting local establishment strategies of wild cherry (Prunus avium L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregorius Hans-Rolf

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Backround P. avium, a pioneer tree species that colonizes early forest successional stages, is assumed to require an effective strategy allowing stably repeatable rounds of local establishment, dispersal and local extinction. Consequently, the early replacement of cherry by climax tree species makes the establishment of several local generations very unlikely, especially in central European continuous cover forests. This has to be seen in connection with the mixed reproduction system involving asexual reproduction as a complementary adaptational strategy. Tests of the local establishment of wild cherry must therefore consider the possibility of first generation establishment via seedling recruitment potentially followed by an asexual generation (root suckering. Successful establishment can therefore be determined only among adult individuals with the option of detecting vegetative reproduction at these stages. To test the implied suggestion about local establishment strategies of wild cherry, nuclear microsatellites were used to analyse patterns of asexual propagation among adult stages that have been subjected to one of two major types of forest management. These management types, the historical "coppice with standards system" (CWS and the "high forest system" (HFS, can be reasonably assumed to have affected the reproduction system of P. avium. Results Clear differences were found in the reproduction pattern between two stands representing the two forest management types: 1 Clonal propagation is observed in both management systems, but with a distinctly higher frequency in the CWS. Hence, sexual recruitment as a first local generation is followed by a second asexual generation in both, whereas in the CWS there is evidence for an additional clonal generation. 2 The estimation of amounts of clonal reproduction critically depends on the assumptions about multilocus gene associations. This is revealed by the application of newly developed

  5. Evaluation of a bovine antibody test for diagnosing Mycobacterium avium complex in patients with cystic fibrosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qvist, Tavs; Pressler, Tacjana; Katzenstein, Terese L;

    2017-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The aim of this study was to test a commercial bovine enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for investigating antibody activity against Mycobacterium avium complex. METHODS: All patients at the Copenhagen Cystic Fibrosis (CF) Center who had culture for nontuberculous mycobacteria...... before and after culture conversion was performed in case patients. RESULTS: Out of 286 included subjects, six had clinical M. avium complex pulmonary disease at the time of sera sampling. These patients presented with higher antibody test values (P-value ... at ruling out pulmonary disease. Screening sera from patients with CF could guide clinicians to focus attention on patients at higher risk of M. avium complex pulmonary disease. Pediatr Pulmonol. 2016; 9999:XX-XX. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc....

  6. Virulence and molecular aspects of Bordetella avium isolated from cockatiel chicks (Nymphicus hollandicus) in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grespan, A; Camera, O; Knöbl, T; Gomes, C R; Felizardo, M R; Ferreira, T S P; Gobbi, D D S; Moreno, M; Sanches, A A; Ferreira, C S A; Ferreira, A J P; Moreno, A M

    2012-12-07

    Bordetella avium is an opportunistic pathogen that presents tropism for ciliated epithelia, leading to upper respiratory tract disease in turkeys. This agent has also been associated with Lockjaw Syndrome in psittacine birds, but literatures describing the importance of this agent in such species are rare. The purpose of the present study was to report the first outbreak of B. avium infection in juvenile cockatiels demonstrating the Lockjaw Syndrome in Brazil and to investigate the antimicrobial resistance profile and phenotypic and genotypic characteristics of these strains. Surprising, the strains obtained from five infected cockatiel chicks from three different breeders from different Brazilian states showed a clonal relationship using the Pulsed Field Gel Electrophoresis and Single Enzyme Amplified Fragment Length Polymorphism techniques. The virulence potentials of the B. avium strains were assessed using tracheal adherence and cytotoxic effects on a VERO cell monolayer. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Crystal structure of sulfotransferase STF9 from Mycobacterium avium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hossain, Md Murad; Moriizumi, Yuuji; Tanaka, Shotaro; Kimura, Makoto; Kakuta, Yoshimitsu

    2012-02-01

    Sulfotransferases catalyze the sulfate conjugation of a wide variety of endogenous and exogenous molecules. Human pathogenic mycobacteria produce numerous sulfated molecules including sulfolipids which are well related to the virulence of several strains. The genome of Mycobacterium avium encodes eight putative sulfotransferases (stf1, stf4-stf10). Among them, STF9 shows higher similarity to human heparan sulfate 3-O-sulfotransferase isoforms than to the bacterial STs. Here, we determined the crystal structure of sulfotransferase STF9 in complex with a sulfate ion and palmitic acid at a resolution of 2.6 Å. STF9 has a spherical structure utilizing the classical sulfotransferase fold. STF9 exclusively possesses three N-terminal α-helices (α1, α2, α3) parallel to the 3'-phosphoadenosine-5'-phosphosulfate (PAPS) binding motif. The sulfate ion binds to the PAPS binding structural motif and the palmitic acid molecule binds in the deep cleft of the predicted substrate binding site suggesting the nature of endogenous acceptor substrate of STF9 resembles palmitic acid. The substrate binding site is covered by a flexible loop which may have involvement in endogenous substrate recognition. Based on the mutational study (Hossain et al., Mol Cell Biochem 350:155-162; 2011) and structural resemblance of STF9-sulfate ion-palmitic acid complex to the hHS3OST3 complex with PAP (3'-phosphoadenosine-5'-phosphate) and an acceptor sugar chain, Glu170 and Arg96 are appeared to be catalytic residues in STF9 sulfuryl transfer mechanism.

  8. Control of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis infection in agricultural species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, D J; Benedictus, G

    2001-04-01

    Paratuberculosis or Johne's disease is a chronic intestinal disease caused by Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis, which continues to spread in agricultural species. Control of paratuberculosis is challenging and should not be underestimated. Due to the long incubation period of the infection, disease is largely subclinical in domesticated livestock. Hence, direct effects on animal productivity and welfare are often masked and may appear insufficient to justify large investments in control programmes by individual farmers, livestock industries or governments. Furthermore, in some countries the main effects of the disease are indirect, resulting from the impact of market discrimination against herds and flocks known to be infected, or from the control measures enforced to reduce transmission. In such circumstances, producers may be unwilling to co-operate with surveillance that may detect infection in herds or flocks. As control programmes are rarely successful in eliminating the infection from a herd or flock in the short term without an aggressive and costly programme, financial and community support assists producers to deal with the challenge. Successful prevention and control depends on animal health authorities and livestock industries acquiring a good understanding of the nature and epidemiology of infection, and of the application of tools for diagnosis and control. Building support for control programmes under the leadership of the affected livestock industries is critical, as programmes are unlikely to be successful without ongoing political will, supported by funding for research, surveillance and control.

  9. Description of a Novel Adhesin of Mycobacterium avium Subsp. paratuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Noelia Viale

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The binding and ingestion of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP by host cells are fibronectin (FN dependent. In several species of mycobacteria, a specific family of proteins allows the attachment and internalization of these bacteria by epithelial cells through interaction with FN. Thus, the identification of adhesion molecules is essential to understand the pathogenesis of MAP. The aim of this study was to identify and characterize FN binding cell wall proteins of MAP. We searched for conserved adhesins within a large panel of surface immunogenic proteins of MAP and investigated a possible interaction with FN. For this purpose, a cell wall protein fraction was obtained and resolved by 2D electrophoresis. The immunoreactive spots were identified by MALDI-TOF MS and a homology search was performed. We selected elongation factor Tu (EF-Tu as candidate for further studies. We demonstrated the FN-binding capability of EF-Tu using a ligand blot assay and also confirmed the interaction with FN in a dose-dependent manner by ELISA. The dissociation constant of EF-Tu was determined by surface plasmon resonance and displayed values within the μM range. These data support the hypothesis that this protein could be involved in the interaction of MAP with epithelial cells through FN binding.

  10. Ascorbic acid metabolism during sweet cherry (Prunus avium) fruit development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Dong; Zhu, Tingting; Ni, Zhiyou; Lin, Lijin; Tang, Yi; Wang, Zhihui; Wang, Xun; Wang, Jin; Lv, Xiulan; Xia, Hui

    2017-01-01

    To elucidate metabolism of ascorbic acid (AsA) in sweet cherry fruit (Prunus avium 'Hongdeng'), we quantified AsA concentration, cloned sequences involved in AsA metabolism and investigated their mRNA expression levels, and determined the activity levels of selected enzymes during fruit development and maturation. We found that AsA concentration was highest at the petal-fall period (0 days after anthesis) and decreased progressively during ripening, but with a slight increase at maturity. AsA did nevertheless continue to accumulate over time because of the increase in fruit fresh weight. Full-length cDNAs of 10 genes involved in the L-galactose pathway of AsA biosynthesis and 10 involved in recycling were obtained. Gene expression patterns of GDP-L-galactose phosphorylase (GGP2), L-galactono-1, 4-lactone dehydrogenase (GalLDH), ascorbate peroxidase (APX3), ascorbate oxidase (AO2), glutathione reductase (GR1), and dehydroascorbate reductase (DHAR1) were in accordance with the AsA concentration pattern during fruit development, indicating that genes involved in ascorbic acid biosynthesis, degradation, and recycling worked in concert to regulate ascorbic acid accumulation in sweet cherry fruit.

  11. Organic Turkey Flocks: A Reservoir of Streptococcus gallolyticus subspecies gallolyticus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jochen Schulz

    Full Text Available Streptococcus gallolyticus subspecies gallolyticus (S. gallolyticus can colonise the gastrointestinal tract of humans and animals and is known to cause similar infections in both humans and animals. Data about the spread or prevalence in farm animals are missing. In this study, Trypton Soya Agar was modified to a selective medium enabling the isolation and quantification of S. gallolyticus from faecal samples. The bacterium was observed in 82 out of 91 faecal samples obtained from 18 different organic turkey flocks. The prevalence of shedding birds was estimated by the number of positive fresh droppings and reached up to 100% on most farms. Furthermore, for the first time S. gallolyticus was quantified in faeces from poultry flocks. The median of colony forming units (CFU per gramme faeces was 3.6 x 10(5 CFU/g. Typing of one isolate from each positive faecal sample by multilocus sequence typing delivered 24 sequence types (STs. Most of the isolates belonged to the clonal complex CC58. The same STs of this complex were detected in up to six different flocks. Partly, these flocks were located in various regions and stocked with varying breeding lines. Regarding the biochemical profiles of the same STs from different farms, the results did not contradict a spread of specific STs in the organic turkey production. Moreover, checking the pubMLST database revealed that STs found in this study were also found in other animal species and in humans. The high detection rate and the number of S. gallolyticus in turkey faeces indicate that this bacterium probably belongs to the common microbiota of the gastrointestinal tract of turkeys from organic flocks. Furthermore, the findings of this study support the suggestion of a possible interspecies transmission.

  12. Complete Remission of Minimal Change Disease Following an Improvement of Lung Mycobacterium avium Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamashiro, Aoi; Uchida, Takahiro; Ito, Seigo; Oshima, Naoki; Oda, Takashi; Kumagai, Hiroo

    A 46-year-old woman suddenly developed peripheral edema. Her massive proteinuria, hypoproteinemia, and renal biopsy findings yielded the diagnosis of minimal change disease (MCD). In addition, lung Mycobacterium avium infection was diagnosed according to a positive culture of her bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. The lung lesion was improved by anti-nontuberculous mycobacteria therapy. Surprisingly, her proteinuria also gradually decreased and she attained complete remission of MCD without any immunosuppressive therapy. She has subsequently remained in complete remission. We herein report an interesting case of MCD with lung Mycobacterium avium infection, suggesting a causal relationship among infection, immune system abnormality, and MCD/nephrotic syndrome.

  13. PD-L2 induction on dendritic cells exposed to Mycobacterium avium downregulates BCG-specific T cell response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendoza-Coronel, Elizabeth; Camacho-Sandoval, Rosa; Bonifaz, Laura C; López-Vidal, Yolanda

    2011-01-01

    The exposure to certain species of Nontuberculous Mycobacteria (NTM) can modulate the immune response induced by Mycobacterium bovis BCG. Mycobacterium avium has been postulated as a weak inducer of dendritic cell (DC) maturation. However, how the DC exposure to M. avium could contribute to the modulation of a BCG-specific CD4+ T cell response and the molecules involved remain unknown. Here, we exposed bone marrow-derived DCs (BMDCs) to M. avium either prior to exposure to BCG or as a unique stimulus. We found that M. avium induces high expression of PD-L2 (B7-DC) in BMDCs. This was dependent on IL-10 production through the TLR2-p38 MAPK signaling pathway. Exposure to M. avium prior to BCG results in BMDCs that do not express co-stimulatory molecules and pro-inflammatory cytokines, while the expression of PD-L2 and IL-10 was maintained. BMDCs exposed to M. avium impaired the activation of BCG-specific T cells through the PD-1: PD-L interaction. This suggests that a M. avium-induced phenotype in DCs might be implicated in the induction of mechanisms of tolerance that could impact the T cell response induced by BCG vaccination.

  14. Detection of Bordetella avium by TaqMan real-time PCR in tracheal swabs from wildlife birds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenzel, T; Pestka, D; Tykałowski, B; Śmiałek, M; Koncicki, A; Bancerz-Kisiel, A

    2017-03-28

    Bordetella avium, the causing agent of bordetellosis, a highly contagious infection of the respiratory tract in young poultry, causes significant losses in poultry farming throughout the world. Wildlife birds can be a reservoir of various pathogens that infect farm animals. For this reason the studies were conducted to estimate the prevalence of Bordetella avium in wildlife birds in Poland. Tracheal swab samples were collected from 650 birds representing 27 species. The bacterial DNA was isolated directly from the swabs and screened for Bordetella avium by TaqMan real-time PCR. The assay specificity was evaluated by testing DNA isolated from 8 other bacteria that can be present in avian respiratory tract, and there was no amplification from non-Bordetella avium agents. Test sensitivity was determined by preparing standard tenfold serial dilutions of DNA isolated from positive control. The assay revealed to be sensitive, with detection limit of approximately 4.07x10^2 copies of Bordetella avium DNA. The genetic material of Bordetella avium was found in 54.54% of common pheasants, in 9.09% of Eurasian coots, in 3.22% of black-headed gulls and in 2.77% of mallard ducks. The results of this study point to low prevalence of Bordetella avium infections in wildlife birds. The results also show that described molecular assay proved to be suitable for the rapid diagnosis of bordetellosis in the routine diagnostic laboratory.

  15. Bioactive components of Prunus avium L. black gold (red cherry) and Prunus avium L. stark gold (white cherry) juices, wines and vinegars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budak, Nilgün H

    2017-01-01

    Cherries are one of the most popular fruits, characterized by attractive colour, firmness, appearance and delicious tastes. Cherries are consumed fresh as well as in jams, wine, dried, candy and other processed products. Cherries vary in antioxidant properties and phenolic substances. The aim of the study was to determine the effects of ethanol and acetic acid fermentation on total antioxidant activities and phenolic substances of cherry juice. Total investigation of solids, pH, soluble solids, phenolic substances, ORAC and TEAC of Prunus avium L. cherry juices, macerated cherries wine, and vinegars were analyzed. All samples had 300.1-854.79 mg GAE/L of total phenolic contents, and 6.62-17.97 µmol/mL of ORAC values, and 1.5-5.5 mmol/mL of TEAC. Chlorogenic acid was present in the highest amount P. avium L. black gold vinegar.

  16. Subspecies genetic assignments of worldwide captive tigers increase conservation value of captive populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Shu-Jin; Johnson, Warren E; Martenson, Janice; Antunes, Agostinho; Martelli, Paolo; Uphyrkina, Olga; Traylor-Holzer, Kathy; Smith, James L D; O'Brien, Stephen J

    2008-04-22

    Tigers (Panthera tigris) are disappearing rapidly from the wild, from over 100,000 in the 1900s to as few as 3000. Javan (P.t. sondaica), Bali (P.t. balica), and Caspian (P.t. virgata) subspecies are extinct, whereas the South China tiger (P.t. amoyensis) persists only in zoos. By contrast, captive tigers are flourishing, with 15,000-20,000 individuals worldwide, outnumbering their wild relatives five to seven times. We assessed subspecies genetic ancestry of 105 captive tigers from 14 countries and regions by using Bayesian analysis and diagnostic genetic markers defined by a prior analysis of 134 voucher tigers of significant genetic distinctiveness. We assigned 49 tigers to one of five subspecies (Bengal P.t. tigris, Sumatran P.t. sumatrae, Indochinese P.t. corbetti, Amur P.t. altaica, and Malayan P.t. jacksoni tigers) and determined 52 had admixed subspecies origins. The tested captive tigers retain appreciable genomic diversity unobserved in their wild counterparts, perhaps a consequence of large population size, century-long introduction of new founders, and managed-breeding strategies to retain genetic variability. Assessment of verified subspecies ancestry offers a powerful tool that, if applied to tigers of uncertain background, may considerably increase the number of purebred tigers suitable for conservation management.

  17. A new subspecies of Nitokra affinis Gurney, 1927 (Copepoda, Harpacticoida) from the Caribbean coast of Colombia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuentes-Reinés, Juan M.; Suárez-Morales, Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Plankton samples from Laguna Navio Quebrado, La Guajira, northern Colombia, yielded male and female specimens of an harpacticoid copepod that was first identified as the widely distributed species Nitokra affinis Gurney, 1927 for which at least four subspecies have been described from different geographic areas. A more detailed examination of the Colombian specimens revealed that it differs from the other morphs so far considered as subspecies. The Colombian specimens differ from the other four known subspecies in the following aspects: (1) rostrum with long projection, (2) relatively long exopod of P1, almost as long as first endopodal segment, (3) endopodal and exopodal rami of P2 equally long, (4) a reduced number of endopodal setal elements of the male P5. It also differs from N. a. californica Lang in details of the ornamentation of the urosomites. Descriptions and illustrations of this new subspecies, the first one described from the Neotropical region, are presented together with a key to the five known subspecies of Nitokra affinis. As in many other cases of presumedly widespread species of harpacticoids, it is possible that N. affinis represents a species complex with more restricted distributional patterns, a notion that certainly deserves further study. PMID:24574850

  18. The Mycobacterium avium ssp. paratuberculosis specific mptD gene is required for maintenance of the metabolic homeostasis necessary for full virulence in mouse infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meißner, Thorsten; Eckelt, Elke; Basler, Tina; Meens, Jochen; Heinzmann, Julia; Suwandi, Abdulhadi; Oelemann, Walter M R; Trenkamp, Sandra; Holst, Otto; Weiss, Siegfried; Bunk, Boyke; Spröer, Cathrin; Gerlach, Gerald-F; Goethe, Ralph

    2014-01-01

    Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP) causes Johne's disease, a chronic granulomatous enteritis in ruminants. Furthermore, infections of humans with MAP have been reported and a possible association with Crohn's disease and diabetes type I is currently discussed. MAP owns large sequence polymorphisms (LSPs) that were exclusively found in this mycobacteria species. The relevance of these LSPs in the pathobiology of MAP is still unclear. The mptD gene (MAP3733c) of MAP belongs to a small group of functionally uncharacterized genes, which are not present in any other sequenced mycobacteria species. mptD is part of a predicted operon (mptABCDEF), encoding a putative ATP binding cassette-transporter, located on the MAP-specific LSP14. In the present study, we generated an mptD knockout strain (MAPΔmptD) by specialized transduction. In order to investigate the potential role of mptD in the host, we performed infection experiments with macrophages. By this, we observed a significantly reduced cell number of MAPΔmptD early after infection, indicating that the mutant was hampered with respect to adaptation to the early macrophage environment. This important role of mptD was supported in mouse infection experiments where MAPΔmptD was significantly attenuated after peritoneal challenge. Metabolic profiling was performed to determine the cause for the reduced virulence and identified profound metabolic disorders especially in the lipid metabolism of MAPΔmptD. Overall our data revealed the mptD gene to be an important factor for the metabolic adaptation of MAP required for persistence in the host.

  19. Antibodies recognizing Mycobacterium avium paratuberculosis epitopes cross-react with the beta-cell antigen ZnT8 in Sardinian type 1 diabetic patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Speranza Masala

    Full Text Available The environmental factors at play in the pathogenesis of type 1 diabetes (T1D remain enigmatic. Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP is transmitted from dairy herds to humans through food contamination. MAP causes an asymptomatic infection that is highly prevalent in Sardinian T1D patients compared with type 2 diabetes (T2D and healthy controls. Moreover, MAP elicits humoral responses against several mycobacterial proteins. We asked whether antibodies (Abs against one of these proteins, namely MAP3865c, which displays a sequence homology with the β-cell protein zinc transporter 8 (ZnT8 could be cross-reactive with ZnT8 epitopes. To this end, Ab responses against MAP3865c were analyzed in Sardinian T1D, T2D and healthy subjects using an enzymatic immunoassay. Abs against MAP3865c recognized two immunodominant transmembrane epitopes in 52-65% of T1D patients, but only in 5-7% of T2D and 3-5% of healthy controls. There was a linear correlation between titers of anti-MAP3865c and anti-ZnT8 Abs targeting these two homologous epitopes, and pre-incubation of sera with ZnT8 epitope peptides blocked binding to the corresponding MAP3865c peptides. These results demonstrate that Abs recognizing MAP3865c epitopes cross-react with ZnT8, possibly underlying a molecular mimicry mechanism, which may precipitate T1D in MAP-infected individuals.

  20. Mycobacterium avium-intracellulare infection during HIV disease. Persisting problems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Manfredi

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Still in the era of combined antiretroviral therapy, late recognition of HIV disease or lack of sufficient immune recovery pose HIV-infected patients at risk to develop opportunistic infections by nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM, which are environmental organisms commonly retrieved in soil and superficial waters.Among these microorganisms, the most frequent is represented by Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC. Health care professionals who face HIV-infected patients should suspect disseminated mycobacterial disease when a deep immunodeficiency is present, (a CD4+ lymphocyte count below 50 cells/μL often associated with constitutional signs and symptoms, and non-specific laboratory abnormalities. Mycobacterial culture of peripheral blood is a reliable technique for diagnosing disseminated disease. Among drugs active against NTM, as well as some anti-tubercular compounds, the rifampin derivative rifabutin, and some novel fluoroquinolones, the availability of macrolides, has greatly contributed to improve both prophylaxis and treatment outcome of disseminated MAC infections. Although multiple questions remain about which regimens may be regarded as optimal, general recommendations can be expressed on the ground of existing evidences.Treatment should begin with associated clarithromycin (or azithromycin, plus ethambutol and rifabutin (with the rifabutin dose depending on other concomitant medications that might result in drug-drug interactions.A combined three-drug regimen is preferred for patients who cannot be prescribed an effective antiretroviral regimen immediately. Patients with a CD4+ lymphocyte count below 50 cells/μL, who do not have clinical evidence of active mycobacterial disease, should receive a primary prophylaxis with either clarithromycin or azithromycin, with or without rifabutin.

  1. Interaction between Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis and environmental protozoa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rowe Michael T

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Interactions between Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (Map and free-living protozoa in water are likely to occur in nature. The potential impact of ingestion of Map by two naturally occurring Acanthamoeba spp. on this pathogen's survival and chlorine resistance was investigated. Results Between 4.6 and 9.1% of spiked populations of three Map strains (NCTC 8578, B2 and ATCC 19698, which had been added at a multiplicity of infection of 10:1, were ingested by Acanthamoeba castellanii CCAP 1501/1B and A. polyphaga CCAP 1501/3B during co-culture for 3 h at 25°C. Map cells were observed to be present within the vacuoles of the amoebae by acid-fast staining. During extended co-culture of Map NCTC 8578 at 25°C for 24 d with both A. castellanii and A. polyphaga Map numbers did not change significantly during the first 7 days of incubation, however a 1–1.5 log10 increase in Map numbers was observed between days 7 and 24 within both Acanthamoeba spp. Ingested Map cells were shown to be more resistant to chlorine inactivation than free Map. Exposure to 2 μg/ml chlorine for 30 min resulted in a log10 reduction of 0.94 in ingested Map but a log10 reduction of 1.73 in free Map (p Conclusion This study demonstrated that ingestion of Map by and survival and multiplication of Map within Acanthamoeba spp. is possible, and that Map cells ingested by amoebae are more resistant to inactivation by chlorine than free Map cells. These findings have implications with respect to the efficacy of chlorination applied to Map infected surface waters.

  2. IL-32 expression in the airway epithelial cells of patients with Mycobacterium avium complex lung disease.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bai, X.; Ovrutsky, A.R.; Kartalija, M.; Chmura, K.; Kamali, A.; Honda, J.R.; Oberley-Deegan, R.E.; Dinarello, C.A.; Crapo, J.D.; Chang, L.Y.; Chan, E.D.

    2011-01-01

    Lung disease due to Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) organisms is increasing. A greater understanding of the host immune response to MAC organisms will provide a foundation to develop novel therapies for these recalcitrant infections. IL-32 is a newly described pro-inflammatory cytokine that enhanc

  3. The relative frequency of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Mycobacterium avium infections in HIV positive patients, Ahvaz, Iran

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Khosravi AD; Alavi SM; Hashemzade M; Abasi E; Seghatoleslami S

    2012-01-01

    Objective:To estimate the prevalence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tuberculosis) and Mycobacterium avium (M. avium) infections in HIV-positive patients suspected to have pulmonary and extrapulmonary mycobacterial co-infection using PCR technique. Methods:Totally 50 samples comprising sputum, pleural fluid and CSF taken from HIV positive patients suspected to have mycobacterial infection, were processed. The demographic information and results of acid fast staining and culture were recorded for each patient. The PCR for detecting of M. tuberculosis comprised of specific primers targeting IS6110 gene sequence. For detecting of M. avium, PCR with primers that amplifies the mig gene were used. Results:From 50 samples processed, 45 were sputum (90%), 3 pleural fluid (6%) and 2 CSF (4%). In total, 8 (16%) were culture positive, 7 had positive acid fast staining (14%) and 13 samples (26%) were positive using PCR technique. All the positive samples were sputum and belonged to patients with pulmonary infection. Of these, 9 were positive for M. tuberculosis (69.2%) and 4 were identified as M. avium (30.8%), which 2 out of 13 positive samples showed mixed infections by both mycobacteria. Conclusions:The PCR shows the highest detection rate (26%) of mycobacteria compared with culture and acid fast staining. The majority of infections were with M. tuberculosis (18%) and this shows the importance of this mycobacterial co-infection in HIV positive patients in the region of study.

  4. Modeling of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis dynamics in a dairy herd : An individual based approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Al-Mamun, Mohammad A; Smith, Rebecca L; Schukken, Ynte H; Gröhn, Yrjö T

    2016-01-01

    In the dairy industry, Johne's disease (JD), caused by Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) is one of the major investigated diseases. To date, researchers have suggested some control strategies for JD, such as test-and-cull based herd management, isolated calf rearing management, and v

  5. CD4 T Cell Dependent Colitis Exacerbation Following Re-Exposure of Mycobacterium avium ssp. paratuberculosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suwandi, Abdulhadi; Bargen, Imke; Pils, Marina C.; Krey, Martina; Zur Lage, Susanne; Singh, Anurag K.; Basler, Tina; Falk, Christine S.; Seidler, Ursula; Hornef, Mathias W.; Goethe, Ralph; Weiss, Siegfried

    2017-01-01

    Mycobacterium avium ssp. paratuberculosis (MAP) is the causative agent of Johne's disease (JD), a chronic inflammatory bowel disease of cattle characterized by intermittent to chronic diarrhea. In addition, MAP has been isolated from Crohn's disease (CD) patients. The impact of MAP on severity of clinical symptoms in JD as well as its role in CD are yet unknown. We have previously shown that MAP is able to colonize inflamed enteric tissue and to exacerbate the inflammatory tissue response (Suwandi et al., 2014). In the present study, we analyzed how repeated MAP administration influences the course of dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-induced colitis. In comparison to mice exposed to DSS or MAP only, repeated exposure of DSS-treated mice to MAP (DSS/MAP) revealed a significantly enhanced clinical score, reduction of colon length as well as severe CD4+ T cell infiltration into the colonic lamina propria. Functional analysis identified a critical role of CD4+ T cells in the MAP-induced disease exacerbation. Additionally, altered immune responses were observed when closely related mycobacteria species such as M. avium ssp. avium and M. avium ssp. hominissuis were administered. These data reveal the specific ability of MAP to aggravate intestinal inflammation and clinical symptoms. Overall, this phenotype is compatible with similar disease promoting capabilites of MAP in JD and CD.

  6. Genome Sequence of the "Indian Bison Type" Biotype of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis Strain S5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Shoor Vir; Kumar, Naveen; Singh, Shree Narayan; Bhattacharya, Tapas; Sohal, Jagdip Singh; Singh, Pravin Kumar; Singh, Ajay Vir; Singh, Brajesh; Chaubey, Kundan Kumar; Gupta, Saurabh; Sharma, Nitu; Kumar, Shailesh; Raghava, Gajendra Pal Singh

    2013-01-01

    We report the 4.79-Mb genome sequence of the "Indian Bison Type" biotype of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis strain S5, isolated from a terminally sick Jamunapari goat at the CIRG (Central Institute for Research on Goats) farm in India. This draft genome will help in studying novelties of this biotype, which is widely distributed in animals and human beings in India.

  7. CD4 T Cell Dependent Colitis Exacerbation Following Re-Exposure of Mycobacterium avium ssp. paratuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suwandi, Abdulhadi; Bargen, Imke; Pils, Marina C; Krey, Martina; Zur Lage, Susanne; Singh, Anurag K; Basler, Tina; Falk, Christine S; Seidler, Ursula; Hornef, Mathias W; Goethe, Ralph; Weiss, Siegfried

    2017-01-01

    Mycobacterium avium ssp. paratuberculosis (MAP) is the causative agent of Johne's disease (JD), a chronic inflammatory bowel disease of cattle characterized by intermittent to chronic diarrhea. In addition, MAP has been isolated from Crohn's disease (CD) patients. The impact of MAP on severity of clinical symptoms in JD as well as its role in CD are yet unknown. We have previously shown that MAP is able to colonize inflamed enteric tissue and to exacerbate the inflammatory tissue response (Suwandi et al., 2014). In the present study, we analyzed how repeated MAP administration influences the course of dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-induced colitis. In comparison to mice exposed to DSS or MAP only, repeated exposure of DSS-treated mice to MAP (DSS/MAP) revealed a significantly enhanced clinical score, reduction of colon length as well as severe CD4(+) T cell infiltration into the colonic lamina propria. Functional analysis identified a critical role of CD4(+) T cells in the MAP-induced disease exacerbation. Additionally, altered immune responses were observed when closely related mycobacteria species such as M. avium ssp. avium and M. avium ssp. hominissuis were administered. These data reveal the specific ability of MAP to aggravate intestinal inflammation and clinical symptoms. Overall, this phenotype is compatible with similar disease promoting capabilites of MAP in JD and CD.

  8. Cutaneous infection caused by Mycobacterium avium after an aesthetic abdominoplasty: Case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aline Rodrigues

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available The present study reports an extremely rare complication followinga cosmetic abdominoplasty. A skin infection caused byMycobacterium avium was manifested as multiple skin nodules inthe abdominal flap that were clinically and surgically treated. Theauthors report the case and its clinical course, and present acorrelation with the literature.

  9. Comparison of fecal DNA extraction kits for the detection of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fecal culture is considered the gold standard for the diagnosis of paratuberculosis, however, PCR for the detection of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) in fecal material is widely used today, having demonstrated great sensitivity and specificity. To insure the most efficient and rep...

  10. Molecular Analysis of Mycobacterium avium Isolates by Using Pulsed-Field Gel Electrophoresis and PCR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pestel-Caron, Martine; Graff, Gabriel; Berthelot, Gilles; Pons, Jean-Louis; Lemeland, Jean-François

    1999-01-01

    Genetic relationships among 46 isolates of Mycobacterium avium recovered from 37 patients in a 2,500-bed hospital from 1993 to 1998 were assessed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and PCR amplification of genomic sequences located between the repetitive elements IS1245 and IS1311. Each technique enabled the identification of 27 to 32 different patterns among the 46 isolates, confirming that the genetic heterogeneity of M. avium strains is high in a given community. Furthermore, this retrospective analysis of sporadic isolates allowed us (i) to suggest the existence of two remanent strains in our region, (ii) to raise the question of the possibility of nosocomial acquisition of M. avium strains, and (iii) to document laboratory contamination. The methods applied in the present study were found to be useful for the typing of M. avium isolates. In general, both methods yielded similar results for both related and unrelated isolates. However, the isolates in five of the six PCR clusters were distributed among two to three PFGE patterns, suggesting that this PCR-based method may have limitations for the analysis of strains with low insertion sequence copy numbers or for resolution of extended epidemiologic relationships. PMID:10405383

  11. Kirsipuu (Prunus avium) : [luuletused] / R. W. Stedingh ; tlk. ja saatesõna: Jüri Talvet

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Stedingh, R. W.

    2003-01-01

    Sisu: Kirsipuu (Prunus avium) ; Rubus spectabilis ; Rododendron (Rhododendron macrophyllum) ; Lysuchitum americanum ; Tulp (Tulipa gesneriana) ; Kanada hani (Branta canadensis) ; Metsorava pärastlõuna (Sciurus carolinensis) ; Ohakalind (Spinus tristis) ; Shakespeare'i mälestusmärk (kogust "Stanley pargi süit")

  12. Lymphoproliferative and gamma interferon responses to stress-regulated Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis recombinant proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johne’s disease in ruminants is a chronic infection of the intestines caused by Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis. Economic losses associated with Johne’s disease arise due to premature culling, reduced production of milk and wool and mortalities. The disease is characterised by a long inc...

  13. Prevalence of Mycobacterium avium in Slaughter Pigs Based on Serological Monitoring Results and Bacteriological Validation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hiller, A.; Oorburg, D.; Wisselink, H.J.; Solt-Smits, van C.B.; Urlings, H.A.P.; Klein, G.; Schulze Althoff, G.; Heres, L.

    2013-01-01

    Mycobacterium avium (MA) is a potential food safety hazard in pigs. Blood samples of slaughtered pigs in the Netherlands and Germany were tested for the presence of MA antibodies to estimate the serological prevalence in the tested population. In the Dutch and German population 1.0% and 1.7% samples

  14. Sensitive detection of Myobacterium avium subsp paratuberculosis in bovine semen by real-time PCR

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Herthnek, D.; Englund, S.; Willemsen, P.T.J.; Bolske, G.

    2006-01-01

    Aims: To develop a fast and sensitive protocol for detection of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) in bovine semen and to make a critical evaluation of the analytical sensitivity. Methods and Results: Processed semen was spiked with known amounts of MAP. Semen from different bulls as

  15. THE EFFECT OF TEMPERATURE ON THE GROWTH OF MYCOBACTERIUM AVIUM COMPLEX (MAC) ORGANISMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    MAC organisms are able to grow, persist, and colonize in water distribution systems and may amplify in hospital hot water systems. This study examined the response of MAC organisms (M. avium, M. intracellulare, and MX) to a range of temperatures commonly associated with drinking...

  16. Bordetella avium causes induction of apoptosis and nitric oxide synthase in turkey tracheal explant cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyamoto, David M; Ruff, Kristin; Beach, Nathan M; Stockwell, Stephanie B; Dorsey-Oresto, Angella; Masters, Isaac; Temple, Louise M

    2011-09-01

    Bordetellosis is an upper respiratory disease of turkeys caused by Bordetella avium in which the bacteria attach specifically to ciliated respiratory epithelial cells. Little is known about the mechanisms of pathogenesis of this disease, which has a negative impact in the commercial turkey industry. In this study, we produced a novel explant organ culture system that was able to successfully reproduce pathogenesis of B. avium in vitro, using tracheal tissue derived from 26 day-old turkey embryos. Treatment of the explants with whole cells of B. avium virulent strain 197N and culture supernatant, but not lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or tracheal cytotoxin (TCT), specifically induced apoptosis in ciliated cells, as shown by annexin V and TUNEL staining. LPS and TCT are known virulence factors of Bordetella pertussis, the causative agent of whooping cough. Treatment with whole cells of B. avium and LPS specifically induced NO response in ciliated cells, shown by uNOS staining and diaphorase activity. The explant system is being used as a model to elucidate specific molecules responsible for the symptoms of bordetellosis.

  17. Kirsipuu (Prunus avium) : [luuletused] / R. W. Stedingh ; tlk. ja saatesõna: Jüri Talvet

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Stedingh, R. W.

    2003-01-01

    Sisu: Kirsipuu (Prunus avium) ; Rubus spectabilis ; Rododendron (Rhododendron macrophyllum) ; Lysuchitum americanum ; Tulp (Tulipa gesneriana) ; Kanada hani (Branta canadensis) ; Metsorava pärastlõuna (Sciurus carolinensis) ; Ohakalind (Spinus tristis) ; Shakespeare'i mälestusmärk (kogust "Stanley pargi süit")

  18. THE EFFECT OF TEMPERATURE ON THE GROWTH OF MYCOBACTERIUM AVIUM COMPLEX (MAC) ORGANISMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    MAC organisms are able to grow, persist, and colonize in water distribution systems and may amplify in hospital hot water systems. This study examined the response of MAC organisms (M. avium, M. intracellulare, and MX) to a range of temperatures commonly associated with drinking...

  19. Genetic analysis of Mycobacterium avium complex strains used for producing purified protein derivatives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Semret, M.; Bakker, D.; Smart, N.; Olsen, I.; Haslov, K.; Behr, M.A.

    2006-01-01

    For over a century, purified protein derivatives (PPD) have been used to detect mycobacterial infections in humans and livestock. Among these, reagents to detect infections by Mycobacterium avium complex organisms have been produced, but the utility of these reagents has not been clearly established

  20. Detection of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis in milk from clinically affected cows by PCR and culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Giese, Steen Bjørck; Ahrens, Peter

    2000-01-01

    Milk and faeces samples from cows with clinical symptoms of paratuberculosis were examined for the presence of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (M. paratuberculosis) by culture and PCR. M. paratuberculosis was cultivated in variable numbers from faeces or intestinal mucosa in eight of 11...

  1. Detection of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis in Milk from Clinically Affected Cows by PCR and culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Giese, Steen Bjørck; Ahrens, Peter

    1999-01-01

    Milk and faecal samples from cows with clinical symptoms of paratuberculosis were examined for the presence of Mycobacterium avium subsp.paratuberculosis (M. a. paratuberculosis) by culture and PCR. M. a. paratuberculosis was isolated in varied numbers from faeces or intestinal mucosa in 8 of 11...

  2. Evaluation of a PCR assay for identification and differentiation of Campylobacter fetus subspecies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hum, S.; Quinn, K.; Brunner, J.

    1997-01-01

    Objective To evaluate a polymerase chain reaction assay for identification of Campylobacter fetus and differentiation of the defined subspecies. Design Characterisation of bacterial strains by traditional phenotyping, polymerase chain reaction, a probabilistic identification scheme and macrorestr......Objective To evaluate a polymerase chain reaction assay for identification of Campylobacter fetus and differentiation of the defined subspecies. Design Characterisation of bacterial strains by traditional phenotyping, polymerase chain reaction, a probabilistic identification scheme...... and macrorestriction profiling using pulsed field gel electrophoresis. Procedure The results of identification of 99 bacterial strains as determined by conventional phenotyping or by polymerase chain reaction were compared. Two of these were type strains of C fetus subsp fetus and C fetus subsp venerealis......; the remaining strains were field isolates putatively identified as C fetus. In cases where the subspecies identity was disputed, isolates were identified by means of a probabilistic identification scheme and by macrorestriction profiling. Results The agreement between strain identities initially suggested...

  3. Seed-associated subspecies of the genus Clavibacter are clearly distinguishable from Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. michiganensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasuhara-Bell, Jarred; Alvarez, Anne M

    2015-03-01

    The genus Clavibacter contains one recognized species, Clavibacter michiganensis. Clavibacter michiganensis is subdivided into subspecies based on host specificity and bacteriological characteristics, with Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. michiganensis causing bacterial canker of tomato. Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. michiganensis is often spread through contaminated seed leading to outbreaks of bacterial canker in tomato production areas worldwide. The frequent occurrence of non-pathogenic Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. michiganensis-like bacteria (CMB) is a concern for seed producers because Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. michiganensis is a quarantine organism and detection of a non-pathogenic variant may result in destruction of an otherwise healthy seed lot. A thorough biological and genetic characterization of these seed-associated CMB strains was performed using standard biochemical tests, cell wall analyses, metabolic profiling using Biolog, and single-gene and multilocus sequence analyses. Combined, these tests revealed two distinct populations of seed-associated members of the genus Clavibacter that differed from each other, as well as from all other described subspecies of Clavibacter michiganensis. DNA-DNA hybridization values are 70 % or higher, justifying placement into the single recognized species, C. michiganensis, but other analyses justify separate subspecies designations. Additionally, strains belonging to the genus Clavibacter isolated from pepper also represent a distinct population and warrant separate subspecies designation. On the basis of these data we propose subspecies designations for separate non-pathogenic subpopulations of Clavibacter michiganensis: Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. californiensis subsp. nov. and Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. chilensis subsp. nov. for seed-associated strains represented by C55(T) ( = ATCC BAA-2691(T) = CFBP 8216(T)) and ZUM3936(T) ( = ATCC BAA-2690(T) = CFBP 8217(T

  4. Genetic subspecies diversity of the chimpanzee CD4 virus-receptor gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvilsom, Christina; Carlsen, Frands; Siegismund, Hans R;

    2008-01-01

    Chimpanzees are naturally and asymptomatically infected by simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV). Pathogenic properties of SIV/HIV vary and differences in susceptibility and pathogenicity of SIV/HIV depend in part on host-specific factors such as virus-receptor/co-receptor interactions. Since CD4...... plays a primary role in virus binding and since SIVcpz have been found only in two African chimpanzee subspecies, we characterized the genetic diversity of CD4 receptors in all four recognized subspecies of chimpanzees. We found noticeable variation in the first variable region V1 of CD4 and in intron...

  5. Efficacy of novel lipid-formulated whole bacterial cell vaccines against Mycobacterium avium subsp paratuberculosis in sheep

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Griffin, J.F.T.; Hughes, A.D.; Liggett, S.; Farquhar, P.A.; Mackintosh, C.G.; Bakker, D.

    2009-01-01

    Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis [MAP], the Causative agent of enteric Johne's disease, incurs significant economic losses to the livestock industry. Prophylactic vaccination can be employed as a control means, however mineral oil-based vaccines Currently in practice have limited

  6. [Distribution of PRA patterns of clinical isolates of the Mycobacterium avium complex from Spain and South America].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murcia, Martha Isabel; Leao, Sylvia Cardoso; Ritacco, Viviana; Palenque, Elia; de Oliveira, Rosangela Siqueira; Reniero, Ana; Menendez, Maria Carmen; Telles, María Alice da Silva; Hadad, David Jamil; Barrera, Lucía; García, María Jesús

    2004-06-01

    Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) infections are the most frequent systemic infections associated with advanced AIDS. DNA probes for accurate identification of mycobacteria are available but are very expensive in many Latin American settings. Consequently, most Latin American diagnostic laboratories employ inaccurate and outdated tests for mycobacteria identification. Therefore, PCR restriction analysis (PRA) of the hsp65 gene was evaluated for the identification of 163 MAC human isolates originated from Spain and South America. The predominant PRA type in each country was: M. avium type I in Argentina (23/42, 55%) and Brazil (48/72, 67%), M. avium type II in Spain (18/26, 69%) and M. avium type III in Colombia (10/23, 43%). The Colombia frequency is noteworthy, since the PRA type III was quite infrequent in the other three countries. Furthermore, its presence has not been reported outside the Americas. The advantages and disadvantages of PRA in diagnostic mycobacteriology are discussed.

  7. Structure and amount of genetic variation at minisatellite loci within the subspecies complex of Phoca vitulina (the harbour seal)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kappe, A.L.; Bijlsma, R.; Osterhaus, ADME; van Delden, W.; van de Zande, L.

    The structure and amount of genetic variation within and between three subspecies of the harbour seal Phoca vitulina was assessed by multilocus DNA fingerprinting. Bandsharing similarity indicates that the subspecies Phoca vitulina richarhsi (Alaska, East Pacific) is clearly separated from the other

  8. 76 FR 61531 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; 90-Day Finding on a Petition To List 10 Subspecies...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-04

    ... Butterflies as Threatened or Endangered With Critical Habitat; Proposed Rule #0;#0;Federal Register / Vol. 76... To List 10 Subspecies of Great Basin Butterflies as Threatened or Endangered With Critical Habitat... petition to list 10 subspecies of Great Basin butterflies in Nevada and California as threatened or...

  9. First report of a left ventricular assist device infection caused by Staphylococcus schleiferi subspecies coagulans: a coagulase-positive organism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thibodeau, Evangeline; Boucher, Helen; Denofrio, David; Pham, Duc Thinh; Snydman, David

    2012-09-01

    Staphylococcus schleiferi subspecies coagulans is often misclassified as S. aureus given the production of a pseudocoagulase turning the tube coagulase test positive. It is therefore infrequently reported in the literature. We describe the first case of S. schleiferi subspecies coagulans left ventricular assist device infection in a patient awaiting heart transplantation.

  10. Structure and amount of genetic variation at minisatellite loci within the subspecies complex of Phoca vitulina (the harbour seal)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kappe, A.L.; Bijlsma, R.; Osterhaus, ADME; van Delden, W.; van de Zande, L.

    1997-01-01

    The structure and amount of genetic variation within and between three subspecies of the harbour seal Phoca vitulina was assessed by multilocus DNA fingerprinting. Bandsharing similarity indicates that the subspecies Phoca vitulina richarhsi (Alaska, East Pacific) is clearly separated from the other

  11. The bush-cricket Isophya kraussii (Orthoptera: Phaneropteridae): bioacoustics, distribution and description of a new subspecies from Romania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iorgu, Ionuţ Ştefan; Heller, Klaus-Gerhard

    2013-01-01

    Isophya kraussii Brunner von Wattenwyl, 1878, one of the widest spread bush-crickets within this genus, is confirmed to be present east of the Carpathian Mountains. Based on acoustic analysis and morphological characters, the populations from NE Romania are considered to belong to a different subspecies, I. kraussii moldavica ssp. n. A map with distribution of both subspecies is presented.

  12. Structure and amount of genetic variation at minisatellite loci within the subspecies complex of Phoca vitulina (the harbour seal).

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.L. Kappe; R. Bijlsma; A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert); W. van Delden; L. van de Zande

    1997-01-01

    textabstractThe structure and amount of genetic variation within and between three subspecies of the harbour seal Phoca vitulina was assessed by multilocus DNA fingerprinting. Bandsharing similarity indicates that the subspecies Phoca vitulina richardsi (Alaska, East Pacific) is clearly separated fr

  13. Typing of clinical Mycobacterium avium complex strains cultured during a 2-year period in Denmark by using IS1245

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bauer, Jeanett; Andersen, Åse B.; Askgaard, Dorthe;

    1999-01-01

    In the present study restriction fragment length polymorphism analyses with the recently described insertion sequence IS1245 as a probe was performed with clinical Mycobacterium avium complex strains cultured in Denmark during a 2-year period. The overall aim of the study was to disclose potential...... as potting soil) and veterinary samples were found to contain viable M avium isolates belonging to genotypes also found in humans....

  14. Palatal Actinomycosis and Kaposi Sarcoma in an HIV-Infected Subject with Disseminated Mycobacterium avium-intracellulare Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuria Ablanedo-Terrazas

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Actinomyces and Mycobacterium avium-intracellulare are facultative intracellular organisms, members of the bacterial order actinomycetales. Although Actinomyces can behave as copathogen when anatomic barriers are compromised, its coinfection with Mycobacterium avium-intracellulare has not previously been reported. We present the first reported case of palatal actinomycosis co-infection with disseminated MAC, in an HIV-infected subject with Kaposi sarcoma and diabetes. We discuss the pathogenesis of the complex condition of this subject.

  15. A Comparative Study of Detection of Bordetella avium Antibodies in Turkeys by ELISA, SPAT, and AGID Test

    OpenAIRE

    TÜRKYILMAZ, Süheyla; TÜRKYILMAZ, Kenan; KAYA, Osman

    2006-01-01

    The aims of this study were to develop a serum plate agglutination test (SPAT) antigen and agar gel immunodiffusion (AGID) test antigen for the serological detection of turkeys that have been exposed to Bordetella avium; to compare the sensitivity of commercial enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) with SPAT, and AGID test, and to survey B. avium antibodies in turkey flocks in Aydın, Turkey. For these purposes, serum samples collected from 300 turkeys were examined by ELISA, SPAT, and AGI...

  16. Application of the C18-Carboxypropylbetaine Specimen Processing Method to Recovery of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis from Ruminant Tissue Specimens

    OpenAIRE

    Thornton, Charles G.; MacLellan, Kerry M.; Judith R Stabel; Carothers, Christine; Whitlock, Robert H.; Passen, Selvin

    2002-01-01

    The causative agent of Johne's disease is Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis. This is a chronic, debilitating gastrointestinal disorder that affects ruminants and is responsible for significant economic loss. The specimen processing method that combines C18-carboxypropylbetaine (CB-18) treatment and lytic enzyme decontamination has been shown to improve the diagnosis of mycobacterioses. This processing method was applied to the isolation of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis from rumin...

  17. Evaluation of molecular assays for identification Campylobacter fetus species and subspecies and development of a C. fetus specific real-time PCR assay

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Graaf-van Bloois, van der L.; Bergen, van M.A.P.; Wal, van der F.J.; Boer, de A.G.; Duim, B.; Schmidt, T.; Wagenaar, J.A.

    2013-01-01

    Phenotypic differentiation between Campylobacter fetus (C. fetus) subspecies fetus and C. fetus subspecies venerealis is hampered by poor reliability and reproducibility of biochemical assays. AFLP (amplified fragment length polymorphism) and MLST (multilocus sequence typing) are the molecular

  18. Efficacy of Various Pasteurization Time-Temperature Conditions in Combination with Homogenization on Inactivation of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis in Milk

    OpenAIRE

    Grant, Irene R.; Williams, Alan G.; Rowe, Michael T.; Muir, D. Donald

    2005-01-01

    The effect of various pasteurization time-temperature conditions with and without homogenization on the viability of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis was investigated using a pilot-scale commercial high-temperature, short-time (HTST) pasteurizer and raw milk spiked with 101 to 105 M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis cells/ml. Viable M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis was cultured from 27 (3.3%) of 816 pasteurized milk samples overall, 5 on Herrold's egg yolk medium and 22 by BACTEC cult...

  19. A new subspecies of Accipiter virgatus (Temminck) from Flores, Lesser Sunda Islands, Indonesia (Aves: Accipitridae)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mees, G.F.

    1984-01-01

    A new subspecies of Accipiter virgatus (Temminck) is described from Flores (Lesser Sunda Islands). In addition some notes are given on the distribution of A. virgatus in south-eastern Burma and adjacent parts of Thailand, supplementary to an earlier paper (Mees, 1981).

  20. Molecular variation of Trypanosoma brucei subspecies as revealed by AFLP fingerprinting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Agbo, E.E.C.; Majiwa, P.A.O.; Claassen, H.J.H.M.; Pas, te M.F.W.

    2002-01-01

    Genetic analysis of Trypanosoma spp. depends on the detection of variation between strains. We have used the amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) technique to develop a convenient and reliable method for genetic characterization of Trypanosome (sub)species. AFLP accesses multiple

  1. Inference of purifying and positive selection in three subspecies of chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes) from exome sequencing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bataillon, Thomas; Duan, Jinjie; Hvilsom, Christina;

    2015-01-01

    We study genome-wide nucleotide diversity in three subspecies of extant chimpanzees using exome capture. After strict filtering, SNVs and indels were called and genotyped for >50% of exons at a mean coverage of 35x per individual. Central chimpanzees (P. t. troglodytes) are the most polymorphic (...

  2. Over de taxonomische plaats en de variabiliteit van de subspecies van Lotus corniculatus L. in Nederland

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vries, de Willie

    1972-01-01

    As a result of an investigation on the variability in morphology, anatomy and cytology in relation to ecological behaviour of the subspecies of Lotus corniculatus L. in the Netherlands, we found subsp. corniculatus as an ecological-plastic taxon with a number of modifications. In subsp. tenuis we co

  3. Campylobacter fetus subspecies contain conserved type IV secretion systems on multiple genomic islands and plasmids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Graaf-Van Bloois, Van Der Linda; Miller, William G.; Yee, Emma; Wagenaar, Jaap A.

    2016-01-01

    The features contributing to differences in pathogenicity of the Campylobacter fetus subspecies are unknown. Putative factors involved in pathogenesis are located in genomic islands that encode a type IV secretion system (T4SS) and fic domain (filamentation induced by cyclic AMP) proteins, which

  4. Inconsistency of Phenotypic and Genomic Characteristics of Campylobacter fetus Subspecies Requires Reevaluation of Current Diagnostics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Graaf-van Bloois, Linda|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/336455798; Miller, William G; Yee, Emma; Rijnsburger, Martine; Wagenaar, Jaap A|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/126613354; Duim, Birgitta|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/143855352

    2014-01-01

    Classifications of the Campylobacter fetus subspecies fetus and venerealis were first described in 1959 and were based on the source of isolation (intestinal versus genital) and the ability of the strains to proliferate in the genital tract of cows. Two phenotypic assays (1% glycine tolerance and

  5. Streptococcus equi subspecies zooepidemicus Infections in Humans by Zoonotic Transmission from Horses

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2013-06-12

    Dr. Mike Miller reads an abridged version of the Emerging Infectious Diseases’ article, Streptococcus equi subspecies zooepidemicus Infections in Humans by Zoonotic Transmission from Horses.  Created: 6/12/2013 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 7/3/2013.

  6. Source level estimation of two blue whale subspecies in southwestern Indian Ocean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samaran, Flore; Guinet, Christophe; Adam, Olivier; Motsch, Jean-François; Cansi, Yves

    2010-06-01

    Blue whales produce intense, stereotypic low frequency calls that are particularly well suited for transmission over long distances. Because these calls vary geographically, they can be used to gain insight into subspecies distribution. In the Southwestern Indian Ocean, acoustic data from a triad of calibrated hydrophones maintained by the International Monitoring System provided data on blue whale calls from two subspecies: Antarctic and pygmy blue whales. Using time difference of arrival and least-squares hyperbolic methods, the range and location of calling whales were determined. By using received level of calls and propagation modeling, call source levels of both subspecies were estimated. The average call source level was estimated to 179+/-5 dB re 1 microPa(rms) at 1 m over the 17-30 Hz band for Antarctic blue whale and 174+/-1 dB re 1 microPa(rms) at 1 m over the 17-50 Hz band for pygmy blue whale. According to previous estimates, slight variations in the source level could be due to inter-individual differences, inter-subspecies variations and the calculation method. These are the first reported source level estimations for blue whales in the Indian Ocean. Such data are critical to estimate detection ranges of calling blue whales.

  7. Chronological enumeration of nominal species and subspecies of Corydoras (Pisces, Siluriformes, Callichthyidae)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijssen, H.; Isbrücker, I.J.H.

    1979-01-01

    A complete list of species and subspecies accepted as members of the genus Corydoras Lacépède, 1803, is given. They are arranged in chronological order. Invalid specific names are followed by their senior synonym. Nomina nuda are listed separately. A bibliography covering all publications containing

  8. Multivariate analysis of morphological diversity among closely related Daucus species and subspecies in Tunisia

    Science.gov (United States)

    The genus Daucus includes about 20-25 species worldwide. Northern Africa represents a major center of diversity of Daucus, with Tunisia thought to contain 11 species and seven subspecies. We assessed morphological diversity from a Daucus germplasm collection of 103 accessions at the National Gene Ba...

  9. Salmonella enterica Subspecies diarizonae Maxillary Sinusitis in a Snake Handler: First Report

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we report the first case of reptile-associated maxillary sinusitis due to Salmonella enterica subspecies diarizonae in a snake handler and the third case of salmonella-associated sinusitis worldwide. The case highlights the potential of respiratory transmission and atypical salmonellosis presentations.

  10. Subtyping of Salmonella enterica subspecies I using single nucleotide polymorphisms in adenylate cyclase (cyaA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Methods to rapidly identify serotypes of Salmonella enterica subspecies I are of vital importance for protecting the safety of food. To supplement the serotyping method dkgB-linked intergenic sequence ribotyping (ISR), single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were characterized within adenylate cyclas...

  11. Hybridization between subspecies of waterbuck (Kobus ellipsiprymnus) in zones of overlap with limited introgression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lorenzen, Eline D; Simonsen, Bo T; Kat, Pieter W

    2006-01-01

    if the intermediate populations are the results of hybridization. In total, 186 individuals from 11 localities were analysed. A high degree of genetic differentiation was found between subspecies, although this was most evident from the microsatellite data. Hybridization was suggested in the phenotypically...

  12. Differentiation of Bifidobacterium longum subspecies longum and infantis by quantitative PCR using functional gene targets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blair Lawley

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Background Members of the genus Bifidobacterium are abundant in the feces of babies during the exclusively-milk-diet period of life. Bifidobacterium longum is reported to be a common member of the infant fecal microbiota. However, B. longum is composed of three subspecies, two of which are represented in the bowel microbiota (B. longum subsp. longum; B. longum subsp. infantis. B. longum subspecies are not differentiated in many studies, so that their prevalence and relative abundances are not accurately known. This may largely be due to difficulty in assigning subspecies identity using DNA sequences of 16S rRNA or tuf genes that are commonly used in bacterial taxonomy. Methods We developed a qPCR method targeting the sialidase gene (subsp. infantis and sugar kinase gene (subsp. longum to differentiate the subspecies using specific primers and probes. Specificity of the primers/probes was tested by in silico, pangenomic search, and using DNA from standard cultures of bifidobacterial species. The utility of the method was further examined using DNA from feces that had been collected from infants inhabiting various geographical regions. Results A pangenomic search of the NCBI genomic database showed that the PCR primers/probes targeted only the respective genes of the two subspecies. The primers/probes showed total specificity when tested against DNA extracted from the gold standard strains (type cultures of bifidobacterial species detected in infant feces. Use of the qPCR method with DNA extracted from the feces of infants of different ages, delivery method and nutrition, showed that subsp. infantis was detectable (0–32.4% prevalence in the feces of Australian (n = 90, South-East Asian (n = 24, and Chinese babies (n = 91, but in all cases at low abundance (<0.01–4.6% compared to subsp. longum (0.1–33.7% abundance; 21.4–100% prevalence. Discussion Our qPCR method differentiates B. longum subspecies longum and infantis using

  13. Population structure of honey bees in the Carpathian Basin (Hungary) confirms introgression from surrounding subspecies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Péntek-Zakar, Erika; Oleksa, Andrzej; Borowik, Tomasz; Kusza, Szilvia

    2015-12-01

    Carniolan honey bees (Apis mellifera carnica) are considered as an indigenous subspecies in Hungary adapted to most of the ecological and climatic conditions in this area. However, during the last decades Hungarian beekeepers have recognized morphological signs of the Italian honey bee (Apis mellifera ligustica). As the natural distribution of the honey bee subspecies can be affected by the importation of honey bee queens or by natural gene flow, we aimed at determining the genetic structure and characteristics of the local honey bee population using molecular markers. All together, 48 Hungarian and 84 foreign (Italian, Polish, Spanish, Liberian) pupae and/or workers were used for mitochondrial DNA analysis. Additionally, 53 sequences corresponding to 10 subspecies and the Buckfast hybrid were downloaded from GenBank. For the nuclear analysis, 236 Hungarian and 106 foreign honey bees were genotyped using nine microsatellites. Heterozygosity values, population-specific alleles, FST values, principal coordinate analysis, assignment tests, structure analysis, and dendrograms were calculated. Haplotype and nucleotide diversity values showed moderate values. We found that one haplotype (H9) was dominant in Hungary. The presence of the black honey bee (Apis mellifera mellifera) was negligible, but a few individuals resembling other subspecies were identified. We proved that the Hungarian honey bee population is nearly homogeneous but also demonstrated introgression from the foreign subspecies. Both mitochondrial DNA and microsatellite analyses corroborated the observations of the beekeepers. Molecular analyses suggested that Carniolan honey bee in Hungary is slightly affected by Italian and black honey bee introgression. Genetic differences were detected between Polish and Hungarian Carniolan honey bee populations, suggesting the existence of at least two different gene pools within A. m. carnica.

  14. Investigating concordance among genetic data, subspecies circumscriptions and hostplant use in the nymphalid butterfly Polygonia faunus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ullasa Kodandaramaiah

    Full Text Available Subspecies are commonly used taxonomic units to formally describe intraspecific geographic variation in morphological traits. However, the concept of subspecies is not clearly defined, and there is little agreement about what they represent in terms of evolutionary units, and whether they can be used as reliably useful units in conservation, evolutionary theory and taxonomy. We here investigate whether the morphologically well-characterized subspecies in the North American butterfly Polygonia faunus are supported by genetic data from mitochondrial sequences and eight microsatellite loci. We also investigate the phylogeographic structure of P. faunus and test whether similarities in host-plant use among populations are related to genetic similarity. Neither the nuclear nor the mitochondrial data corroborated subspecies groupings. We found three well defined genetic clusters corresponding to California, Arizona and (New Mexico+Colorado. There was little structuring among the remaining populations, probably due to gene flow across populations. We found no support for the hypothesis that similarities in host use are related to genetic proximity. The results indicate that the species underwent a recent rapid expansion, probably from two glacial refugia in western North America. The mitochondrial haplotype network indicates at least two independent expansion phases into eastern North America. Our results clearly demonstrate that subspecies in P. faunus do not conform to the structuring of genetic variation. More studies on insects and other invertebrates are needed to better understand the scope of this phenomenon. The results of this study will be crucial in designing further experiments to understand the evolution of hostplant utilization in this species.

  15. Island Evolution and Systematic Revision of Comoran Snakes: Why and When Subspecies Still Make Sense

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawlitschek, Oliver; Nagy, Zoltán T.; Glaw, Frank

    2012-01-01

    Species delimitation and species concepts have been a matter of debate among biodiversity researchers in the last decades, resulting in integrative taxonomy approaches and the use of modern species concepts, such as the phylogenetic, evolutionary or general lineage species concepts. The discussion of subspecies status and concepts has been addressed much less extensively, with some researchers completely refraining from recognizing subspecies. However, allopatric insular populations that are particularly differentiated have traditionally been assigned subspecies status. We studied the molecular phylogeny and morphology of endemic Comoran tree snakes of the genus Lycodryas. Taking an integrative taxonomic approach, we used the concept of independent lines of evidence to discriminate between evidence for specific and subspecific status. Molecular (mtDNA) and morphological data provided sufficient evidence to support four different taxa within Comoran Lycodryas. In a revision of this group, we propose two species, each with two subspecies. We present a discussion of the strong sexual dichromatism unique to Comoran Lycodryas within the genus and related genera that may be explained by sexual selection in combination with the absence of major predators. Then, we discuss the effects of insular evolution and the “island rule” on morphological traits in Comoran Lycodryas and in Liophidium mayottensis, another snake endemic to the Comoros. The absence of larger-bodied snakes may have promoted an increase in body size and the number of dorsal scale rows in these species. Finally, we discuss the subspecies concept, its applications and its significance for integrative taxonomy and for limiting taxonomic inflation. We emphasize that taxon descriptions should be based on an integrative approach using several lines of evidence, preferably in combination with statements on the underlying species concepts or operational criteria, to increase the objectivity and comparability

  16. Island evolution and systematic revision of Comoran snakes: why and when subspecies still make sense.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliver Hawlitschek

    Full Text Available Species delimitation and species concepts have been a matter of debate among biodiversity researchers in the last decades, resulting in integrative taxonomy approaches and the use of modern species concepts, such as the phylogenetic, evolutionary or general lineage species concepts. The discussion of subspecies status and concepts has been addressed much less extensively, with some researchers completely refraining from recognizing subspecies. However, allopatric insular populations that are particularly differentiated have traditionally been assigned subspecies status. We studied the molecular phylogeny and morphology of endemic Comoran tree snakes of the genus Lycodryas. Taking an integrative taxonomic approach, we used the concept of independent lines of evidence to discriminate between evidence for specific and subspecific status. Molecular (mtDNA and morphological data provided sufficient evidence to support four different taxa within Comoran Lycodryas. In a revision of this group, we propose two species, each with two subspecies. We present a discussion of the strong sexual dichromatism unique to Comoran Lycodryas within the genus and related genera that may be explained by sexual selection in combination with the absence of major predators. Then, we discuss the effects of insular evolution and the "island rule" on morphological traits in Comoran Lycodryas and in Liophidium mayottensis, another snake endemic to the Comoros. The absence of larger-bodied snakes may have promoted an increase in body size and the number of dorsal scale rows in these species. Finally, we discuss the subspecies concept, its applications and its significance for integrative taxonomy and for limiting taxonomic inflation. We emphasize that taxon descriptions should be based on an integrative approach using several lines of evidence, preferably in combination with statements on the underlying species concepts or operational criteria, to increase the objectivity and

  17. Island evolution and systematic revision of Comoran snakes: why and when subspecies still make sense.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawlitschek, Oliver; Nagy, Zoltán T; Glaw, Frank

    2012-01-01

    Species delimitation and species concepts have been a matter of debate among biodiversity researchers in the last decades, resulting in integrative taxonomy approaches and the use of modern species concepts, such as the phylogenetic, evolutionary or general lineage species concepts. The discussion of subspecies status and concepts has been addressed much less extensively, with some researchers completely refraining from recognizing subspecies. However, allopatric insular populations that are particularly differentiated have traditionally been assigned subspecies status. We studied the molecular phylogeny and morphology of endemic Comoran tree snakes of the genus Lycodryas. Taking an integrative taxonomic approach, we used the concept of independent lines of evidence to discriminate between evidence for specific and subspecific status. Molecular (mtDNA) and morphological data provided sufficient evidence to support four different taxa within Comoran Lycodryas. In a revision of this group, we propose two species, each with two subspecies. We present a discussion of the strong sexual dichromatism unique to Comoran Lycodryas within the genus and related genera that may be explained by sexual selection in combination with the absence of major predators. Then, we discuss the effects of insular evolution and the "island rule" on morphological traits in Comoran Lycodryas and in Liophidium mayottensis, another snake endemic to the Comoros. The absence of larger-bodied snakes may have promoted an increase in body size and the number of dorsal scale rows in these species. Finally, we discuss the subspecies concept, its applications and its significance for integrative taxonomy and for limiting taxonomic inflation. We emphasize that taxon descriptions should be based on an integrative approach using several lines of evidence, preferably in combination with statements on the underlying species concepts or operational criteria, to increase the objectivity and comparability of

  18. PCR-RFLP analysis of mitochondrial DNA ND5/6 region among 3 subspecies of common carp (Cyprinus carpio L.) and its application to genetic discrimination of subspecies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    Mitochondrial DNA ND5/6 region was studied by PCR-RFLP analysis among ten representative strains belonging to three subspecies (Cyprinus carpio carpio, Cyprinus carpio haematopterus and Cyprinus carpio rubrofuscus) of common carp (Cyprinus carpio L.). A total of 2.4 kb fragment was amplified and subjected to restriction endonuclease analysis with nine restriction endonucleases subsequently. The results indicated that each subspecies owned one hyplotype and four restriction enzymes (DdeⅠ, HaeⅢ, TaqⅠand MboⅠ) produced diagnostic restriction sites which could be used for discriminating the three subspecies and as molecular genetic markers for assistant selective breeding of common carp.

  19. MIRU-VNTR genotype diversity and indications of homoplasy in M. avium strains isolated from humans and slaughter pigs in Latvia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalvisa, Adrija; Tsirogiannis, Constantinos; Silamikelis, Ivars; Skenders, Girts; Broka, Lonija; Zirnitis, Agris; Jansone, Inta; Ranka, Renate

    2016-09-01

    Diseases which are caused by non-tuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) are an increasing problem in the developed countries. In Latvia, one of the most clinically important members of NTM is Mycobacterium avium (M. avium), an opportunistic pathogen which has been isolated from several lung disease patients and tissue samples of slaughter pigs. This study was designed to characterize the genetic diversity of the M. avium isolates in Latvia and to compare the distribution of genotypic patterns among humans and pigs. Eleven (Hall and Salipante, 2010) clinical M. avium samples, isolated from patients of Center of Tuberculosis and Lung Diseases (years 2003-2010), and 32 isolates from pig necrotic mesenterial lymph nodes in different regions (years 2003-2007) were analyzed. The majority (42 of 43) of samples were identified as M. avium subsp. hominissuis; one porcine isolate belonged to M. avium subsp. avium. MIRU-VNTR genotyping revealed 13 distinct genotypes, among which nine genotype patterns, including M. avium subsp. avium isolate, were newly identified. IS1245 RFLP fingerprinting of 25 M. avium subsp. hominissuis samples yielded 17 different IS1245 RFLP patterns, allowing an efficient discrimination of isolates. Clusters of identical RFLP profiles were observed within host species, geographical locations and time frame of several years. Additional in silico analysis on simulated MIRU-VNTR genotype population datasets showed that the MIRU-VNTR pattern similarity could partly arise due to probabilistic increase of acquiring homoplasy among subpopulations, thus the similar MIRU-VNTR profiles of M. avium strains even in close geographical proximity should be interpreted with caution.

  20. Disseminated mycobacteriosis manifesting as paraplegia in two Parma wallabies (Macropus parma) naturally exposed to Mycobacterium avium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robveille, Cynthia; Albaric, Olivier; Gaide, Nicolas; Abadie, Jérome

    2015-11-01

    Two captive female Parma wallabies (Macropus parma) died after a history of flaccid paraplegia. On postmortem examination, granulomatous and suppurative osteomyelitis involving the left ischium and the lumbosacral region, with meningeal extension at the cauda equina, and caseonecrotic mastitis were the most significant changes. Multiple small nodules in the liver and spleen, and an enlargement of some lymph nodes with central caseous necrosis were also observed. Microscopically, a disseminated granulomatous inflammation with numerous multinucleate giant cells was seen. Numerous acid-fast bacilli were detected in macrophages, in multinucleated giant cells, and free in the central necrosis and suppurative exudate. After culture, polymerase chain reaction assays were carried out to detect the 65-kDa heat shock protein (Hsp65) and insertion sequences (IS)1245 and IS900. The causative agent was identified as Mycobacterium avium subsp. avium.

  1. Molecular differentiation of Pantoea stewartii subsp. indologenes from subspecies stewartii and identification of new isolates from maize seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehring, I; Wensing, A; Gernold, M; Wiedemann, W; Coplin, D L; Geider, K

    2014-06-01

    Assays to detect Pantoea stewartii from maize seeds should include differentiation of P. stewartii subsp. stewartii and P. stewartii subsp. indologenes. Previously published PCR primers for the identification of P. stewartii subsp. stewartii amplified signals from both subspecies using both conventional and quantitative PCR. In MALDI-TOF mass spectroscopy analysis with the Biotyper software (Bruker), subspecies stewartii and indologenes produced identical score values. Analysis against the Biotyper database produced similar score values for both subspecies. From the subtyping methods provided by the Biotyper software, only composite correlation indexing (CCI) separated both groups. By alignment of 16S rRNA sequences, no subspecies distinction was possible. To develop new techniques for the separation of these subspecies, the partial sequences of several housekeeping genes were compared. The type strains of the two subspecies showed characteristic single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the genes galE, glmS and recA. Other reference strains of P. stewartii subsp. stewartii followed the same nucleotide pattern, whereas known P. stewartii subsp. indologenes strains were different. Based on single-nucleotide polymorphisms in galE and recA, PCR primers were created to separate the subspecies by stepdown PCR analysis. Two putative P. stewartii strains were isolated from imported maize seeds. They were not virulent on maize seedlings, were positive in the indole assay with Kovacs reagent and identified as P. stewartii subsp. indologenes. The subspecies-specific PCR primers confirmed they were subspecies indologenes. By stepdown PCR, P. stewartii subsp. indologenes can be differentiated from P. stewartii subsp. stewartii. A possible detection of P. stewartii subsp. stewartii, the causative agent of Stewart's wilt of maize, in plant material by immunological or molecular assays must exclude contamination with P. stewartii subsp. indologenes, which would create

  2. Mycobacterium avium complex augments macrophage HIV-1 production and increases CCR5 expression

    OpenAIRE

    1998-01-01

    Infection with HIV-1 results in pronounced immune suppression and susceptibility to opportunistic infections (OI). Reciprocally, OI augment HIV-1 replication. As we have shown for Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) and Pneumocystis carinii, macrophages infected with opportunistic pathogens and within lymphoid tissues containing OI, exhibit striking levels of viral replication. To explore potential underlying mechanisms for increased HIV-1 replication associated with coinfection, blood monocyte...

  3. First report of MIRU-VNTR genotyping of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis isolates from Egypt

    OpenAIRE

    A. Fawzy; Fayed, A.; Youssef, H; El-Sayed, A.; Zschöck, M.

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) is the causative agent of Johne’s disease, an economically important disease in ruminants worldwide. It was first isolated in Egypt in 2005. Since then, the pathogen has been detected in different Egyptian provinces. In order to trace the source of infection, genotyping using simple methods of high discriminatory power such as mycobacterial interspersed repetitive unit-variable number tandem repeats (MIRU-VNTR) were carried out in different co...

  4. Inhibitory activity of lipid fractions myobacterium avium complex against macrophage respiratory burst

    OpenAIRE

    Shimizu, Toshiaki; 冨岡, 治明

    1998-01-01

    To explore possible mechanisms of the resistance of Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) intracellular parasites to the antimicrobial activity of macrophages (MΦs), effects of the lipid components of these parasites on the MΦ respiratory burst were investigated. In this study, the MΦ respiratory burst was measured by luminoldependent chemiluminescence generated through the peroxidase-mediated halogenation reaction in murine peritoneal MΦs in response to phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) triggering...

  5. Microaggregate-associated protein involved in invasion of epithelial cells by Mycobacterium avium subsp. hominissuis

    OpenAIRE

    Babrak, Lmar; Danelishvili, Lia; Sasha J. Rose; Bermudez, Luiz E.

    2015-01-01

    The environmental opportunistic pathogen Mycobacterium avium subsp hominissuis (MAH), a member of the nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) cluster, causes respiratory as well as disseminated disease in patients such as those with chronic respiratory illnesses or AIDS. Currently, there is no effective method to prevent NTM respiratory infections. The formation of mycobacterial microaggregates comprises of phenotypic changes that lead to efficient adherence and invasion of the respiratory mucosa i...

  6. Illegitimate recombination: an efficient method for random mutagenesis in Mycobacterium avium subsp. hominissuis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khattak, Faisal Asghar; Kumar, Ashutosh; Kamal, Elisabeth; Kunisch, Ralph; Lewin, Astrid

    2012-09-11

    The genus Mycobacterium (M.) comprises highly pathogenic bacteria such as M. tuberculosis as well as environmental opportunistic bacteria called non-tuberculous mycobacteria (NTM). While the incidence of tuberculosis is declining in the developed world, infection rates by NTM are increasing. NTM are ubiquitous and have been isolated from soil, natural water sources, tap water, biofilms, aerosols, dust and sawdust. Lung infections as well as lymphadenitis are most often caused by M. avium subsp. hominissuis (MAH), which is considered to be among the clinically most important NTM. Only few virulence genes from M. avium have been defined among other things due to difficulties in generating M. avium mutants. More efforts in developing new methods for mutagenesis of M. avium and identification of virulence-associated genes are therefore needed. We developed a random mutagenesis method based on illegitimate recombination and integration of a Hygromycin-resistance marker. Screening for mutations possibly affecting virulence was performed by monitoring of pH resistance, colony morphology, cytokine induction in infected macrophages and intracellular persistence. Out of 50 randomly chosen Hygromycin-resistant colonies, four revealed to be affected in virulence-related traits. The mutated genes were MAV_4334 (nitroreductase family protein), MAV_5106 (phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase), MAV_1778 (GTP-binding protein LepA) and MAV_3128 (lysyl-tRNA synthetase LysS). We established a random mutagenesis method for MAH that can be easily carried out and combined it with a set of phenotypic screening methods for the identification of virulence-associated mutants. By this method, four new MAH genes were identified that may be involved in virulence.

  7. Illegitimate recombination: An efficient method for random mutagenesis in Mycobacterium avium subsp. hominissuis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khattak Faisal

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The genus Mycobacterium (M. comprises highly pathogenic bacteria such as M. tuberculosis as well as environmental opportunistic bacteria called non-tuberculous mycobacteria (NTM. While the incidence of tuberculosis is declining in the developed world, infection rates by NTM are increasing. NTM are ubiquitous and have been isolated from soil, natural water sources, tap water, biofilms, aerosols, dust and sawdust. Lung infections as well as lymphadenitis are most often caused by M. avium subsp. hominissuis (MAH, which is considered to be among the clinically most important NTM. Only few virulence genes from M. avium have been defined among other things due to difficulties in generating M. avium mutants. More efforts in developing new methods for mutagenesis of M. avium and identification of virulence-associated genes are therefore needed. Results We developed a random mutagenesis method based on illegitimate recombination and integration of a Hygromycin-resistance marker. Screening for mutations possibly affecting virulence was performed by monitoring of pH resistance, colony morphology, cytokine induction in infected macrophages and intracellular persistence. Out of 50 randomly chosen Hygromycin-resistant colonies, four revealed to be affected in virulence-related traits. The mutated genes were MAV_4334 (nitroreductase family protein, MAV_5106 (phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase, MAV_1778 (GTP-binding protein LepA and MAV_3128 (lysyl-tRNA synthetase LysS. Conclusions We established a random mutagenesis method for MAH that can be easily carried out and combined it with a set of phenotypic screening methods for the identification of virulence-associated mutants. By this method, four new MAH genes were identified that may be involved in virulence.

  8. Prediction of Quinolone Activity against Mycobacterium avium by Molecular Topology and Virtual Computational Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gozalbes, Rafael; Brun-Pascaud, Monique; García-Domenech, Ramon; Gálvez, Jorge; Girard, Pierre-Marie; Doucet, Jean-Pierre; Derouin, Francis

    2000-01-01

    We conducted a quantitative structure-activity relationship study using a database of 158 quinolones previously tested against Mycobacterium avium-M. intracellulare complex in order to develop a model capable of predicting the activity of new quinolones against the M. avium-M. intracellulare complex in vitro. Topological indices were used as structural descriptors and were related to anti-M. avium-M. intracellulare complex activity by using the linear discriminant analysis (LDA) statistical technique. The discriminant equation thus obtained correctly classified 137 of the 158 quinolones, including 37 of a test group of 44 randomly chosen compounds. This model was then applied to 24 quinolones, including recently developed fluoroquinolones, whose MICs were subsequently determined in vitro by using the Alamar blue microplate assay; the biological results confirmed the model's predictions. The MICs of these 24 quinolones were then treated by multilinear regression (MLR) to establish a model capable of classifying them according to their in vitro activities. Using this model, a good correlation between measured and predicted MICs was found (r2 = 0.88; r2cv [cross-validation correlation] = 0.82). Moxifloxacin, sparfloxacin, and gatifloxacin were the most potent against the M. avium- M. intracellulare complex, with MICs of 0.2, 0.4, and 0.9 μg/ml, respectively. Finally, virtual modifications of these three drugs were evaluated in LDA and MLR models in order to determine the importance of different substituents in their activity. We conclude that the combination of molecular-topology methods, LDA, and MLR provides an excellent tool for the design of new quinolone structures with enhanced activity. PMID:10991858

  9. Isolation of flavonoids from the heartwood and resin of Prunus avium and some preliminary biological investigations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNulty, James; Nair, Jerald J; Bollareddy, Endreddy; Keskar, Kunal; Thorat, Amol; Crankshaw, Denis J; Holloway, Alison C; Khan, Ghaznia; Wright, Gerard D; Ejim, Linda

    2009-12-01

    An investigation of the constituents in heartwood and resin of Prunus avium is reported. A mini-library of structurally diverse flavanones and flavones was screened for human cytochrome P450 1A1, 3A4 and 19 (aromatase) inhibition, and for antifungal activity against a panel of pathogenic fungi. The defensive role of these natural plant flavonoids as antifungal phytoalexins and phytoanticipins is discussed.

  10. Effective heat inactivation of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis in raw milk contaminated with naturally infected feces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rademaker, Jan L W; Vissers, Marc M M; Te Giffel, Meike C

    2007-07-01

    The effectiveness of high-temperature, short holding time (HTST) pasteurization and homogenization with respect to inactivation of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis was evaluated quantitatively. This allowed a detailed determination of inactivation kinetics. High concentrations of feces from cows with clinical symptoms of Johne's disease were used to contaminate raw milk in order to realistically mimic possible incidents most closely. Final M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis concentrations varying from 10(2) to 3.5 x 10(5) cells per ml raw milk were used. Heat treatments including industrial HTST were simulated on a pilot scale with 22 different time-temperature combinations, including 60 to 90 degrees C at holding (mean residence) times of 6 to 15 s. Following 72 degrees C and a holding time of 6 s, 70 degrees C for 10 and 15 s, or under more stringent conditions, no viable M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis cells were recovered, resulting in >4.2- to >7.1-fold reductions, depending on the original inoculum concentrations. Inactivation kinetic modeling of 69 quantitative data points yielded an E(a) of 305,635 J/mol and an lnk(0) of 107.2, corresponding to a D value of 1.2 s at 72 degrees C and a Z value of 7.7 degrees C. Homogenization did not significantly affect the inactivation. The conclusion can be drawn that HTST pasteurization conditions equal to 15 s at > or =72 degrees C result in a more-than-sevenfold reduction of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis.

  11. A distinctive new subspecies of Scytalopus griseicollis (Aves, Passeriformes, Rhinocryptidae) from the northern Eastern Cordillera of Colombia and Venezuela

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avendaño, Jorge Enrique; Donegan, Thomas M.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract We describe a new subspecies of Pale-bellied Tapaculo Scytalopus griseicollis from the northern Eastern Cordillera of Colombia and Venezuela. This form differs diagnosably in plumage from described subspecies Scytalopus griseicollis griseicollis and Scytalopus griseicollis gilesi and from the latter in tail length. It is also differentiated non-diagnosably in voice from both these populations. Ecological niche modelling analysis suggests that the new subspecies is restricted to the Andean montane forest and páramo north of both the arid Chicamocha valley and the Sierra Nevada del Cocuy. PMID:26085800

  12. Association between Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis infection and culling in dairy cattle herds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Arrazuría

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study was designed to analyse the causes for culling in dairy herds with different Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis infection status and to compare these causes with those observed over the general dairy cattle population. During 2009, causes for culling were registered in two different groups of farms: (1 farms with seropositive cows for three consecutive years (2007-2009 but where Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis has not been isolated from any of the fecal samples collected and (2 farms with Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis seropositive cows for three consecutive years (2007-2009 and where the bacteria has been isolated from at least one fecal sample. Causes for animal loss were compared between both groups and between them and the general dairy cattle population by means of regression analysis. The distribution of culling reasons was different between infected herds (both bacteriologically positive and negative and the general population. The percentage of losses seemed to be higher in infected herds from the first parity on. The most remarkable difference among groups was observed in losses due to "death/urgent slaughter".

  13. Prunus avium: nuclear DNA study in wild populations and sweet cherry cultivars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guarino, Carmine; Santoro, Simona; De Simone, Luciana; Cipriani, Guido

    2009-04-01

    The PCR-SSR technique was used to detect nuclear DNA diversity in five wild populations of Prunus avium from deciduous forests in Italy, Slovenia, and Croatia and 87 sweet cherry accessions from different geographical areas that have been maintained in the sweet cherry collection in Italy. This sweet cherry collection includes local accessions from the Campania Region as well as accessions from different countries. Twenty-eight microsatellites, previously developed in this species, generated polymorphic amplification products. Between 2 and 14 alleles were revealed for the polymorphic loci studied, with the expected heterozygosity ranging from 0.045 to 0.831. The total probability of identity was 56.94 x 10-18. A model-based Bayesian clustering analysis identified nine distinct gene pools in cultivated P. avium. The probability that wild populations were assigned to cultivated gene pools indicated that three gene pools accounted for the genomic origin of 53% of P. avium sampled. A dendrogram was generated using UPGMA (unweighted pair group method with arithmetic averages) based on Nei genetic distance analysis. This dendrogram classified most of the genotypes into one major group with an additional group of five accessions. The results indicate that this set of SSRs is highly informative, and they are discussed in terms of the implications for sweet cherry characterization.

  14. Genetic relationships between diploid and allotetraploid cherry species (Prunus avium, Prunus x gondouinii and Prunus cerasus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavaud, M; Zanetto, A; David, J L; Laigret, F; Dirlewanger, E

    2004-12-01

    Prunus avium L. (diploid, AA, 2n=2x=16), Prunus cerasus L. (allotetraploid, AAFF, 2n=4x=32) species, and their hybrid Prunus x gondouinii Rehd., constitute the most widely cultivated cherry tree species. P. cerasus is supposed to be an hybrid species produced by the union of unreduced P. avium gametes and normal P. fruticosa gametes. A continuum of morphological traits between these three species makes their assignation difficult. The aim of this paper is to study the genetic relationships between tetraploid and diploid cherry species. In all, 114 genotypes belonging to these species were analyzed using 75 AFLP markers. The coordinates of these genotypes on the first axis of a correspondence analysis allowed us to clearly distinguish each species, to identify misclassifications and to assign unknown genotypes to one species. We showed that there are specific alleles in P. cerasus, which are not present in the A genome of P. avium and which probably come from the F genome of P. cerasus. The frequencies of each marker in the A and the F genomes were estimated in order to identify A and F specific markers. We discuss the utility of these specific markers for finding the origin of the A and F genomes in the allopolyploid species.

  15. Radioprotection of Swiss albino mice by Prunus avium with special reference to hematopoietic system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sisodia, Rashmi; Singh, Smita; Mundotiya, Chaturbhuj; Meghnani, Ekta; Srivastava, Preeti

    2011-01-01

    Prunus avium (family Rosaceae) has been used ethnomedicinally for the treatment of many diseases,but its radioprotective efficacy has hardly been explored. Presence of high anthocyanin content and phenolic compound with good antioxidative capacity has been reported by researchers. Its radioprotective effect against 5, 7, 10, and 12 Gygamma radiation was evaluated by 30 day survival assay. Regression analysis yielded LD(50/30) 5.81 and 9.43Gy for irradiated only and (P. avium fruit extract) PAE + radiation groups, respectively. The dose reduction factor was computed as 1.62. For biochemical and hematological studies, Swiss albino mice were divided into four groups: (i) control (vehicle treated), (ii) PAE treated (450 mg kg/day for 15 consequetive days), (iii) irradiated (5 Gy), and (4) PAE + irradiated. The irradiation of animals resulted in a significant elevation of lipid peroxidation and depletion in glutathione and protein levels in blood serum and spleen, which could be significantly checked by administration of PAE. Radiation-induced deficit in blood sugar, cholesterol, and hematological constituents could also be modulated by supplementation of PAE before and after irradiation. The possible prophylactic and therapeutic action noted by P. avium against radiation induced metabolic disorders may be due to synergistic action of various antioxidants, minerals, vitamins, etc., present in the fruit. Further mechanistic studies aimed at identifying the role of major ingredients in the extract are needed.

  16. Acute toxicity effects of Prunus avium fruit extract and selection of optimum dose against radiation exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sisodia, Rashmi; Sharma, K; Singh, Smita

    2009-01-01

    The objective of the study was to evaluate the acute toxicity of different doses of the methanolic extract of the fruit pulp of Prunus avium (family Rosaceae), which is used ethno-medicinally for the treatment of various diseases, and to find out the optimal dose of Prunus avium extract against 10 Gy gamma-radiation exposure. To test acute toxicity in mice, different doses of PAE (Prunus avium fruit extract) were given orally for 15 consecutive days, after which the animals were observed for another 15 days; the LD50/15 of the methanolic extract was calculated to be 4.947 gm/kg body weight (b.wt). In optimum dose selection against radiation exposure, oral administration of 450 mg/kg b.wt/d of PAE for 15 consecutive days before exposure to 10 Gy of gamma-radiation was found to afford maximum protection in terms of body weight and survivability of the mice in comparison to other doses.

  17. Comparative genomic characterization of Francisella tularensis strains belonging to low and high virulence subspecies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mia D Champion

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Tularemia is a geographically widespread, severely debilitating, and occasionally lethal disease in humans. It is caused by infection by a gram-negative bacterium, Francisella tularensis. In order to better understand its potency as an etiological agent as well as its potential as a biological weapon, we have completed draft assemblies and report the first complete genomic characterization of five strains belonging to the following different Francisella subspecies (subsp.: the F. tularensis subsp. tularensis FSC033, F. tularensis subsp. holarctica FSC257 and FSC022, and F. tularensis subsp. novicida GA99-3548 and GA99-3549 strains. Here, we report the sequencing of these strains and comparative genomic analysis with recently available public Francisella sequences, including the rare F. tularensis subsp. mediasiatica FSC147 strain isolate from the Central Asian Region. We report evidence for the occurrence of large-scale rearrangement events in strains of the holarctica subspecies, supporting previous proposals that further phylogenetic subdivisions of the Type B clade are likely. We also find a significant enrichment of disrupted or absent ORFs proximal to predicted breakpoints in the FSC022 strain, including a genetic component of the Type I restriction-modification defense system. Many of the pseudogenes identified are also disrupted in the closely related rarely human pathogenic F. tularensis subsp. mediasiatica FSC147 strain, including modulator of drug activity B (mdaB (FTT0961, which encodes a known NADPH quinone reductase involved in oxidative stress resistance. We have also identified genes exhibiting sequence similarity to effectors of the Type III (T3SS and components of the Type IV secretion systems (T4SS. One of the genes, msrA2 (FTT1797c, is disrupted in F. tularensis subsp. mediasiatica and has recently been shown to mediate bacterial pathogen survival in host organisms. Our findings suggest that in addition to the duplication of

  18. Isolamento de cepas de Mycobacterium avium em búfalos abatidos para consumo Mycobacterium avium complex in water buffaloes slaughtered for consumption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José de Arimatéa Freitas

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available Duas cepas micobacterianas, isoladas no parênquima pulmonar e linfonodo apical de búfalos abatidos para consumo, procedentes de criatórios localizados na Ilha de Marajó (PA e submetidas à identificação segundo ensaios recomendados para o gênero Mycobacterium, foram identificadas como pertencentes ao complexo Mycobacterium avium. Apresentaram-se considerações relativas à associação desses organismos com a Aids -- e o papel dos alimentos nessa associação --, discutindo-se o impacto que a condição de germes oportunistas das espécies desse complexo têm na pandemia do HIV, assim como o risco potencial representado pelas infecções produzidas nos animais.Two mycobacterium strains isolated from lung tissue and apical lymph nodes of slaughtered water buffaloes were biochemically analyzed and identified as Mycobacterium avium complex strains. Association between these microorganisms and the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, and the potential risk posed by eating infected animals and their products, was discussed.

  19. Yaws: 110 years after Castellani's discovery of Treponema pallidum subspecies pertenue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stamm, Lola V

    2015-07-01

    Yaws is a neglected infectious disease that affects mostly children and adolescents living in poor, rural communities in humid, tropical areas of Africa, southeast Asia, and the Pacific Islands. The etiological agent of yaws, Treponema pallidum subspecies pertenue (T. pertenue), was discovered by Aldo Castellani in 1905 shortly after Schaudinn and Hoffmann discovered the etiological agent of syphilis, T. pallidum subspecies pallidum. The discovery of T. pertenue enabled the development of animal models and the identification of an effective antibiotic treatment (i.e., penicillin) for yaws. A World Health Organization (WHO) mass treatment campaign from 1952 to 1964 reduced the global burden of yaws by 95%, but failed to eradicate this disease. Today, 110 years after Castellani's discovery of T. pertenue, yaws is again targeted for eradication. Recent advances in the treatment and diagnosis of yaws improve the likelihood of success this time. However, several challenges must be overcome to make the goal of yaws eradication attainable.

  20. Responses to playback of different subspecies songs in the Reed Bunting (Emberiza s. schoeniclus)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matessi, Giuliano; Dabelsteen, Torben; Pilastro, A.

    2000-01-01

    Populations of Reed Buntings Emberiza schoeniclus in the western Palearctic are classified in two major subspecies groups according to morphology: northern migratory schoeniclus and Mediterranean resident intermedia. Songs of the two groups differ mainly in complexity and syllable structure, with...

  1. A new subspecies of Chamaea fasciata (Wrentit) from Oregon (Aves: Timaliinae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Browning, M. Ralph

    1992-01-01

    Geographic variation in plumage color of Chamaea fasciata (Wrentit) from northern California and southern Oregon is related to climate. A new subspecies, Chamaea fasciata margra, is described from a disjunct population of southern interior Oregon. Colonization of C. fasciata in interior Oregon was perhaps from birds crossing coniferous forests via isolated balds of Ceonothus. Recent increases of Wrentits in interior Oregon may be in response to habitat alterations (deforestation, fires) and concurrent global warming.

  2. MORPHOLOGICAL AND ANATOMICAL STUDY ON ENDEMIC CROCUS OLIVIERI GAY SUBSP. ISTANBULENSIS MATHEW SUBSPECIES (IRIDACEAE

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    Kadriye Yetişen

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available In this study, morphological and anatomical properties of Crocus olivieri Gay subsp. istanbulensis Mathew were investigated. Cross-sections of root, scape and leaf parts of the plant were examined anddemonstrated by photographs. Most of the anatomical properties are similar to the other member of Iridaceae family. Sclerenchyma groups were observed around to leaf vascular bundle. Morphological and anatomical findings compared with other two subspecies of Crocus olivieri.

  3. Presence and distribution of two sub-species of Eurema agave (Lepidoptera, Pieridae in Costa Rica

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    Jim Cordoba-Alfaro

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Austin (1992 reported Eurema a. agave (Cramer 1775 to the Caribbean of Costa Rica. However, he actually had found E. a. millerorum, described by Bousquets & Luis-Martinez (1987 for the Caribbean of Mexico. The presence of Eurema a. agave is confirmed on this paper with information of specimens collected in the Pacific and Atlantic slopes of Costa Rica. Aspects on distribution of both subspecies are included.

  4. Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis: presencia en los alimentos y su relación con la enfermedad de Crohn Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis in food and its relationship with Crohn's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Cirone

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available La paratuberculosis o enfermedad de Johne es una enteritis crónica producida por Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis, que afecta a bovinos y a otras especies. En la Argentina se ha caracterizado en rodeos bovinos y de ciervos, con aislamientos tipificados en distintos patrones genéticos. M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis ha sido vinculado en humanos con una inflamación crónica del intestino, denominada enfermedad de Crohn. Existen evidencias clínicas y experimentales que relacionan a M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis con la enfermedad en el humano, mediante su detección por PCR y por cultivo a partir de biopsias de órganos, de leche materna y de sangre de pacientes afectados. La leche y sus subproductos serían posibles fuentes de infección y se ha sugerido que M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis resistiría las condiciones de pasteurización. Diversos trabajos de investigación demostraron que esta micobacteria podría estar presente en leches comercializadas en diversos países, como Reino Unido, Estados Unidos, República Checa, y también en la Argentina. La presencia de M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis en productos lácteos y agua de consumo ha sido relacionada con la resistencia del microorganismo tanto a los procesos de elaboración como a los factores climáticos adversos, lo que enfatiza el rol de los alimentos y del agua como vías de transmisión al humano. Las investigaciones en curso podrían ratificar el riesgo y las implicancias de la exposición del humano a M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis a través de los alimentos y del agua contaminados, para determinar la importancia de la paratuberculosis como enfermedad zoonótica.Paratuberculosis or Johne's disease is a chronic enteritis of the cattle and other small ruminant animals caused by Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis. In Argentina, the strains were characterized in beef and dairy cattle and deer in different genetic patterns by molecular tools. M. avium

  5. A morphological review of subspecies of the Asian box turtle, Cuora amboinensis (Testudines, Geomydidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernst, Carl H.; Laemmerzahl, Arndt F.; Lovich, Jeffrey E.

    2016-01-01

    The turtle Cuora amboinensis has an extensive distribution covering most of southern mainland Asia, Indonesia, and extending to the Philippine Islands. Unlike many species, C. amboinensis occurs on both sides of Wallace's Line separating Asian and Australian flora and fauna. Four subspecies are currently recognized; Cuora a. kamaroma (southern continental Asia, Java and the northern Philippines [introduced]), C. a. lineata (Kachin Province, Myanmar [Burma] and adjacent Yunnan Province, China), C. a. couro (Sumatra, Java, Sumbawa, and adjacent smaller Indonesian islands); and C. a. amboinensis (Moluccas, Sulawesi, Philippines). Five pattern and 33 morphological characters were examined for variation in 691 individuals from throughout the species' range. Our analyses suggest that only two presently recognized subspecies are valid: amboinensis andkamaroma. Neither couro nor lineata are supported by our analysis. We recommend that C. a. couroshould be synonymized with the species C. amboinensis and C. a. lineata with the subspecies C. a. kamaroma.

  6. Population genetics and evaluation of genetic evidence for subspecies in the Semipalmated Sandpiper (Calidris pusilla)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Mark P.; Gratto-Trevor, Cheri; Haig, Susan M.; Mizrahi, David S.; Mitchell, Melanie M.; Mullins, Thomas D.

    2013-01-01

    Semipalmated Sandpipers (Calidris pusilla) are among the most common North American shorebirds. Breeding in Arctic North America, this species displays regional differences in migratory pathways and possesses longitudinal bill length variation. Previous investigations suggested that genetic structure may occur within Semipalmated Sandpipers and that three subspecies corresponding to western, central, and eastern breeding groups exist. In this study, mitochondrial control region sequences and nuclear microsatellite loci were used to analyze DNA of birds (microsatellites: n = 120; mtDNA: n = 114) sampled from seven North American locations. Analyses designed to quantify genetic structure and diversity patterns, evaluate genetic evidence for population size changes, and determine if genetic data support the existence of Semipalmated Sandpiper subspecies were performed. Genetic structure based only on the mtDNA data was observed, whereas the microsatellite loci provided no evidence of genetic differentiation. Differentiation among locations and regions reflected allele frequency differences rather than separate phylogenetic groups, and similar levels of genetic diversity were noted. Combined, the two data sets provided no evidence to support the existence of subspecies and were not useful for determining migratory connectivity between breeding sites and wintering grounds. Birds from western and central groups displayed signatures of population expansions, whereas the eastern group was more consistent with a stable overall population. Results of this analysis suggest that the eastern group was the source of individuals that colonized the central and western regions currently utilized by Semipalmated Sandpipers.

  7. Ecotype evolution in Glossina palpalis subspecies, major vectors of sleeping sickness.

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    Thierry De Meeûs

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The role of environmental factors in driving adaptive trajectories of living organisms is still being debated. This is even more important to understand when dealing with important neglected diseases and their vectors. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this paper, we analysed genetic divergence, computed from seven microsatellite loci, of 614 tsetse flies (Glossina palpalis gambiensis and Glossina palpalis palpalis, major vectors of animal and human trypanosomes from 28 sites of West and Central Africa. We found that the two subspecies are so divergent that they deserve the species status. Controlling for geographic and time distances that separate these samples, which have a significant effect, we found that G. p. gambiensis from different landscapes (Niayes of Senegal, savannah and coastal environments were significantly genetically different and thus represent different ecotypes or subspecies. We also confirm that G. p. palpalis from Ivory Coast, Cameroon and DRC are strongly divergent. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These results provide an opportunity to examine whether new tsetse fly ecotypes might display different behaviour, dispersal patterns, host preferences and vectorial capacities. This work also urges a revision of taxonomic status of Glossina palpalis subspecies and highlights again how fast ecological divergence can be, especially in host-parasite-vector systems.

  8. Genome comparison of Candida orthopsilosis clinical strains reveals the existence of hybrids between two distinct subspecies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pryszcz, Leszek P; Németh, Tibor; Gácser, Attila; Gabaldón, Toni

    2014-05-01

    The Candida parapsilosis species complex comprises a group of emerging human pathogens of varying virulence. This complex was recently subdivided into three different species: C. parapsilosis sensu stricto, C. metapsilosis, and C. orthopsilosis. Within the latter, at least two clearly distinct subspecies seem to be present among clinical isolates (Type 1 and Type 2). To gain insight into the genomic differences between these subspecies, we undertook the sequencing of a clinical isolate classified as Type 1 and compared it with the available sequence of a Type 2 clinical strain. Unexpectedly, the analysis of the newly sequenced strain revealed a highly heterozygous genome, which we show to be the consequence of a hybridization event between both identified subspecies. This implicitly suggests that C. orthopsilosis is able to mate, a so-far unanswered question. The resulting hybrid shows a chimeric genome that maintains a similar gene dosage from both parental lineages and displays ongoing loss of heterozygosity. Several of the differences found between the gene content in both strains relate to virulent-related families, with the hybrid strain presenting a higher copy number of genes coding for efflux pumps or secreted lipases. Remarkably, two clinical strains isolated from distant geographical locations (Texas and Singapore) are descendants of the same hybrid line, raising the intriguing possibility of a relationship between the hybridization event and the global spread of a virulent clone.

  9. Chimpanzee subspecies and ‘robust’ australopithecine holotypes, in the context of comments by Darwin

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    S. Prat

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available On the basis of comparative anatomy (including chimpanzees, gorillas and other primates, Darwin1 suggested that Africa was the continent from which ‘progenitors’ of humankind evolved. Hominin fossils from this continent proved him correct. We present the results of morphometric analyses based on cranial data obtained from chimpanzee taxa currently recognised as distinct subspecies, namely Pan troglodytes troglodytes and Pan troglodytes schweinfurthii, as well as Pan paniscus (bonobo. Our objective was to use a morphometric technique2 to quantify the degree of similarity between pairs of specimens, in the context of a statistical (probabilistic definition of a species.3–5 Results obtained from great apes, including two subspecies of chimpanzee, were assessed in relation to same-scale comparisons between the holotypes of ‘robust’ australopithecine (Plio-Pleistocene hominin taxa which have traditionally been distinguished at a species level, notably Paranthropus robustus from South Africa, and Paranthropus (Australopithecus/ Zinjanthropus boisei from East Africa. The question arises as to whether the holotypes of these two taxa, TM 1517 from Kromdraai6 and OH 5 from Olduvai,7 respectively, are different at the subspecies rather than at the species level.

  10. Mitogenomic phylogenetics of fin whales (Balaenoptera physalus spp.: genetic evidence for revision of subspecies.

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    Frederick I Archer

    Full Text Available There are three described subspecies of fin whales (Balaenoptera physalus: B. p. physalus Linnaeus, 1758 in the Northern Hemisphere, B. p. quoyi Fischer, 1829 in the Southern Hemisphere, and a recently described pygmy form, B. p. patachonica Burmeister, 1865. The discrete distribution in the North Pacific and North Atlantic raises the question of whether a single Northern Hemisphere subspecies is valid. We assess phylogenetic patterns using ~16 K base pairs of the complete mitogenome for 154 fin whales from the North Pacific, North Atlantic--including the Mediterranean Sea--and Southern Hemisphere. A Bayesian tree of the resulting 136 haplotypes revealed several well-supported clades representing each ocean basin, with no haplotypes shared among ocean basins. The North Atlantic haplotypes (n = 12 form a sister clade to those from the Southern Hemisphere (n = 42. The estimated time to most recent common ancestor (TMRCA for this Atlantic/Southern Hemisphere clade and 81 of the 97 samples from the North Pacific was approximately 2 Ma. 14 of the remaining North Pacific samples formed a well-supported clade within the Southern Hemisphere. The TMRCA for this node suggests that at least one female from the Southern Hemisphere immigrated to the North Pacific approximately 0.37 Ma. These results provide strong evidence that North Pacific and North Atlantic fin whales should not be considered the same subspecies, and suggest the need for revision of the global taxonomy of the species.

  11. Volumetric determination of apolipoprotein stoichiometry of circulating HDL subspecies1[S

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segrest, Jere P.; Cheung, Marian C.; Jones, Martin K.

    2013-01-01

    Although HDL is inversely correlated with coronary heart disease, elevated HDL-cholesterol is not always protective. Additionally, HDL has biological functions that transcend any antiatherogenic role: shotgun proteomics show that HDL particles contain 84 proteins (latest count), many correlating with antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties of HDL. ApoA-I has been suggested to serve as a platform for the assembly of these protein components on HDL with specific functions - the HDL proteome. However, the stoichiometry of apoA-I in HDL subspecies is poorly understood. Here we use a combination of immunoaffinity chromatography data and volumetric analysis to evaluate the size and stoichiometry of LpA-I and LpA-I,A-II particles. We conclude that there are three major LpA-I subspecies: two major particles, HDL[4] in the HDL3 size range (d = 85.0 ± 1.2 Å) and HDL[7] in the HDL2 size range (d = 108.5 ± 3.8 Å) with apoA-I stoichiometries of 3 and 4, respectively, and a small minor particle, HDL[1] (d = 73.8 ± 2.1Å) with an apoA-I stoichiometry of 2. Additionally, we conclude that the molar ratio of apolipoprotein to surface lipid is significantly higher in circulating HDL subspecies than in reconstituted spherical HDL particles, presumably reflecting a lack of phospholipid transfer protein in reconstitution protocols. PMID:23883582

  12. Associations of anthropometry and lifestyle factors with HDL subspecies according to apolipoprotein C-III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Manja; Furtado, Jeremy D; Jiang, Gordon Z; Gray, Brianna E; Cai, Tianxi; Sacks, Frank; Tjønneland, Anne; Overvad, Kim; Jensen, Majken K

    2017-06-01

    The presence of apoC-III on HDL impairs HDL's inverse association with coronary heart disease (CHD). Little is known about modifiable factors explaining variation in HDL subspecies defined according to apoC-III. The aim was to investigate cross-sectional associations of anthropometry and lifestyle with HDL subspecies in 3,631 participants from the Diet, Cancer, and Health study originally selected for a case-cohort study (36% women; age 50-65 years) who were all free of CHD. Greater adiposity and less activity were associated with higher HDL containing apoC-III and lower HDL lacking apoC-III. Per each 15 cm higher waist circumference, the level of HDL containing apoC-III was 2.8% higher (95% CI: 0.4, 5.3; P = 0.024) and the level of HDL not containing apoC-III was 4.7% lower (95% CI: -6.0, -3.4; P = HDL containing apoC-III and 0.5% higher (95% CI: 0.1, 1.0; P = 0.029) HDL lacking apoC-III. Lower alcohol consumption was associated with lower HDL lacking apoC-III (percent difference per 15 g/day: 1.58 (95% CI: 0.84, 2.32; P = HDL subspecies profile. Copyright © 2017 by the American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  13. Geographical distribution and ecological features of the great gerbil subspecies in the main zoonotic cutaneous leishmaniasis foci in Iran

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mohammad Reza Abai; Mohammad Ali Oshaghi; Leila Tajedin; Yavar Rassi; Amir Ahmad Akhavan

    2010-01-01

    Objective:To reveal subspecies composition ofRhombomy opimus (R. opimus) in Iran. Methods: In this study, field specimens of the gerbil were collected from all its geographical rang in northeast and central parts of Iran and identified on basis of morphological characteristics.Results: Results revealed presence of two subspecies ofR. opimus sodalis andR. opimussargadensisin the country. The first subspecies with brown to hazel-nut color and a size bigger than a typicalR. opimuswas found only in Golestan province, an isolated colony which is located in plains of north slopes of Alborz Chain Mountains of the country, connected with the Turkmenistan. The subspecies ofR. opimussargadensiswith a yellowish color and similar size as a typicalR. opimus was found in all other areas of the great gerbil distribution in Iran. There was a distinct topographic difference but similar ectoparasites between colonies of the two subspecies in the study area.Conclusions: Further ecological and genetic investigations are required for more detailed description of theR. opimus subspecies range and structure. TheR. opimus-Phlebotomus papatasi-Leishmaniamajor association and theZCL severity and outcome in hosts are discussed.

  14. Building a DNA barcode reference library for the true butterflies (Lepidoptera) of Peninsula Malaysia: what about the subspecies?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, John-James; Sing, Kong-Wah; Sofian-Azirun, Mohd

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to build a DNA barcode reference library for the true butterflies of Peninsula Malaysia and assess the value of attaching subspecies names to DNA barcode records. A new DNA barcode library was constructed with butterflies from the Museum of Zoology, University of Malaya collection. The library was analysed in conjunction with publicly available DNA barcodes from other Asia-Pacific localities to test the ability of the DNA barcodes to discriminate species and subspecies. Analyses confirmed the capacity of the new DNA barcode reference library to distinguish the vast majority of species (92%) and revealed that most subspecies possessed unique DNA barcodes (84%). In some cases conspecific subspecies exhibited genetic distances between their DNA barcodes that are typically seen between species, and these were often taxa that have previously been regarded as full species. Subspecies designations as shorthand for geographically and morphologically differentiated groups provide a useful heuristic for assessing how such groups correlate with clustering patterns of DNA barcodes, especially as the number of DNA barcodes per species in reference libraries increases. Our study demonstrates the value in attaching subspecies names to DNA barcode records as they can reveal a history of taxonomic concepts and expose important units of biodiversity.

  15. Resposta imune específica de bovinos experimentalmente sensibilizados com inóculos inativados de Mycobacterium bovis e Mycobacterium avium Specific immune response of cattle to experimental sensibilization by inactivated Mycobacterium bovis and Mycobacterium avium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robson F.C. Almeida

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available O diagnóstico presuntivo da tuberculose bovina é baseado na análise da resposta imune celular a antígenos micobacterianos. Procedeu-se à simulação experimental de sensibilização por Mycobacterium bovis e Mycobacterium avium inativados em bovinos a fim de acompanhar a resposta imune a partir do teste cervical comparativo e da evolução da produção específica de interferon-gama, além de identificar a interferência de reações inespecíficas por M. avium nos resultados dos testes. Verificou-se que os animais desencadearam resposta de hipersensibilidade tardia contra os bacilos inativados, e que ambos os testes diagnósticos da tuberculose bovina foram eficientes na identificação dos animais sensibilizados com M. bovis e na discriminação das reações geradas pela inoculação dos bovinos com M. avium.The presumptive diagnosis of bovine tuberculosis is based on analysis of the immune response to micobacterial antigens. This experimental simulation of sensibilization by Mycobacterium bovis and Mycobacterium avium in cattle aimed to verify the immune response by both the cervical comparative test and the evolution of the specific production of gamma-interferon, and also to identify interference of unspecified reactions by M. avium on the test results. The results support that the experimental animals started a response of delayed hypersensitivity to the inactivated bacilli, and that both diagnostic tests for bovine tuberculosis were efficient for the identification of animals sensitized with M. bovis and for discrimination of reactions generated by inoculation of cattle with M. avium.

  16. Replication and long-term persistence of bovine and human strains of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis within Acanthamoeba polyphaga.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mura, Manuela; Bull, Tim J; Evans, Hugh; Sidi-Boumedine, Karim; McMinn, Liz; Rhodes, Glenn; Pickup, Roger; Hermon-Taylor, John

    2006-01-01

    Free-living protists are ubiquitous in the environment and form a potential reservoir for the persistence of animal and human pathogens. Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis is the cause of Johne's disease, a systemic infection accompanied by chronic inflammation of the intestine that affects many animals, including primates. Most humans with Crohn's disease are infected with this chronic enteric pathogen. Subclinical infection with M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis is widespread in domestic livestock. Infected animals excrete large numbers of robust organisms into the environment, but little is known about their ability to replicate and persist in protists. In the present study we fed laboratory cultures of Acanthamoeba polyphaga with bovine and human strains of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis. Real-time PCR showed that the numbers of the pathogens fell over the first 4 to 8 days and recovered by 12 to 16 days. Encystment of the amoebic cultures after 4 weeks resulted in a 2-log reduction in the level of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis, which returned to the original level by 24 weeks. Extracts of resection samples of human gut from 39 patients undergoing abdominal surgery were fed to cultures of A. polyphaga. M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis detected by nested IS900 PCR with amplicon sequencing and visualized by IS900 in situ hybridization and auramine-rhodamine staining was found in cultures derived from 13 of the patients and was still present in the cultures after almost 4 years of incubation. Control cultures were negative. M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis has the potential for long-term persistence in environmental protists.

  17. Persistence of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis at a Farm-Scale Biogas Plant Supplied with Manure from Paratuberculosis-Affected Dairy Cattle▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slana, I.; Pribylova, R.; Kralova, A.; Pavlik, I.

    2011-01-01

    In this study, products from all steps of anaerobic digestion at a farm-scale biogas plant supplied with manure from paratuberculosis-affected dairy cattle were examined and quantified for the presence of the causal agent of paratuberculosis, Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis, using culture and quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR). Viable M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis cells were detected using culture in fermentors for up to 2 months; the presence of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis DNA (101 cells/g) was demonstrated in all anaerobic fermentors and digestate 16 months after initiation of work at a biogas plant, using IS900 qPCR. F57 qPCR was able to detect M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis DNA (102 cells/g) at up to 12 months. According to these results, a fermentation process that extended beyond 2 months removed all viable M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis cells and therefore rendered its product M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis free. However, M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis DNA was found during all the examined periods (more than 1 year), which could be explained by either residual DNA being released from dead cells or by the presence of viable cells whose amount was under the limit of cultivability. As the latter hypothesis cannot be excluded, the safety of the final products of digestion used for fertilization or animal bedding cannot be defined, and further investigation is necessary to confirm or refute this risk. PMID:21398476

  18. PRESENCE OF MYCOBACTERIUM AVIUM SUBSP. PARATUBERCULOSIS IN ALPACAS (LAMA PACOS) INHABITING THE CHILEAN ALTIPLANO.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salgado, Miguel; Sevilla, Iker; Rios, Carolina; Crossley, Jorge; Tejeda, Carlos; Manning, Elizabeth

    2016-03-01

    Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) is the etiologic agent of paratuberculosis. The organism causes disease in both domestically managed and wild ruminant species. South American camelids have a long, shared history with indigenous people in the Andes. Over the last few decades, increasing numbers of alpacas were exported to numerous countries outside South America. No paratuberculosis surveillance has been reported for these source herds. In this study, individual fecal samples from 85 adult alpacas were collected from six separate herds in the Chilean Altiplano. A ParaTB mycobacterial growth indicator tube (MGIT) liquid culture of each individual fecal sample, followed by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) protocol was used for confirmation. DNA extracts from a subset of confirmed MAP isolates were subjected to mycobacterial interspersed repetitive units-variable number of tandem repeats (MIRU-VNTR) typing. Fifteen alpaca were fecal culture test-positive. Five false-positive culture samples were negative on PCR analysis for Mycobacterium avium subsp. avium (MAA), Mycobacterium bovis (M. bovis), and the 16 S rDNA gene. Three MAP isolates subset-tested belonged to the same MIRU-VNTR type, showing four repeats for TR292 (locus 1) in contrast to the three repeats typical of the MAP reference strain K10. The number of repeats found in the remaining loci was identical to that of the K10 strain. It is not known how nor when MAP was introduced into the alpaca population in the Chilean Altiplano. The most plausible hypothesis to explain the presence of MAP in these indigenous populations is transmission by contact with infected domestic small ruminant species that may on occasion share pastures or range with alpacas. Isolation of this mycobacterial pathogen from such a remote region suggests that MAP has found its way beyond the confines of intensively managed domestic agriculture premises.

  19. Threatened and endangered subspecies with vulnerable ecological traits Also have high susceptibility to sea level rise and habitat fragmentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benscoter, Allison M.; Reece, Joshua S.; Noss, Reed F.; Brandt, Laura B.; Mazzotti, Frank J.; Romañach, Stephanie S.; Watling, James I.

    2013-01-01

    The presence of multiple interacting threats to biodiversity and the increasing rate of species extinction make it critical to prioritize management efforts on species and communities that maximize conservation success. We implemented a multi-step approach that coupled vulnerability assessments evaluating threats to Florida taxa such as climate change, sea-level rise, and habitat fragmentation with in-depth literature surveys of taxon-specific ecological traits. The vulnerability, adaptive capacity, and ecological traits of 12 threatened and endangered subspecies were compared to non-listed subspecies of the same parent species. Overall, the threatened and endangered subspecies showed high vulnerability and low adaptive capacity, in particular to sea level rise and habitat fragmentation. They also exhibited larger home ranges and greater dispersal limitation compared to non-endangered subspecies, which may inhibit their ability to track changing climate in fragmented landscapes. There was evidence for lower reproductive capacity in some of the threatened or endangered taxa, but not for most. Taxa located in the Florida Keys or in other low coastal areas were most vulnerable to sea level rise, and also showed low levels of adaptive capacity, indicating they may have a lower probability of conservation success. Our analysis of at-risk subspecies and closely related non-endangered subspecies demonstrates that ecological traits help to explain observed differences in vulnerability and adaptive capacity. This study points to the importance of assessing the relative contributions of multiple threats and evaluating conservation value at the species (or subspecies) level when resources are limited and several factors affect conservation success.

  20. Threatened and endangered subspecies with vulnerable ecological traits also have high susceptibility to sea level rise and habitat fragmentation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allison M Benscoter

    Full Text Available The presence of multiple interacting threats to biodiversity and the increasing rate of species extinction make it critical to prioritize management efforts on species and communities that maximize conservation success. We implemented a multi-step approach that coupled vulnerability assessments evaluating threats to Florida taxa such as climate change, sea-level rise, and habitat fragmentation with in-depth literature surveys of taxon-specific ecological traits. The vulnerability, adaptive capacity, and ecological traits of 12 threatened and endangered subspecies were compared to non-listed subspecies of the same parent species. Overall, the threatened and endangered subspecies showed high vulnerability and low adaptive capacity, in particular to sea level rise and habitat fragmentation. They also exhibited larger home ranges and greater dispersal limitation compared to non-endangered subspecies, which may inhibit their ability to track changing climate in fragmented landscapes. There was evidence for lower reproductive capacity in some of the threatened or endangered taxa, but not for most. Taxa located in the Florida Keys or in other low coastal areas were most vulnerable to sea level rise, and also showed low levels of adaptive capacity, indicating they may have a lower probability of conservation success. Our analysis of at-risk subspecies and closely related non-endangered subspecies demonstrates that ecological traits help to explain observed differences in vulnerability and adaptive capacity. This study points to the importance of assessing the relative contributions of multiple threats and evaluating conservation value at the species (or subspecies level when resources are limited and several factors affect conservation success.

  1. Hybridization of Southern Hemisphere blue whale subspecies and a sympatric area off Antarctica: impacts of whaling or climate change?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attard, Catherine R M; Beheregaray, Luciano B; Jenner, K Curt S; Gill, Peter C; Jenner, Micheline-Nicole; Morrice, Margaret G; Robertson, Kelly M; Möller, Luciana M

    2012-12-01

    Understanding the degree of genetic exchange between subspecies and populations is vital for the appropriate management of endangered species. Blue whales (Balaenoptera musculus) have two recognized Southern Hemisphere subspecies that show differences in geographic distribution, morphology, vocalizations and genetics. During the austral summer feeding season, the Antarctic blue whale (B. m. intermedia) is found in polar waters and the pygmy blue whale (B. m. brevicauda) in temperate waters. Here, we genetically analyzed samples collected during the feeding season to report on several cases of hybridization between the two recognized blue whale Southern Hemisphere subspecies in a previously unconfirmed sympatric area off Antarctica. This means the pygmy blue whales using waters off Antarctica may migrate and then breed during the austral winter with the Antarctic subspecies. Alternatively, the subspecies may interbreed off Antarctica outside the expected austral winter breeding season. The genetically estimated recent migration rates from the pygmy to Antarctic subspecies were greater than estimates of evolutionary migration rates and previous estimates based on morphology of whaling catches. This discrepancy may be due to differences in the methods or an increase in the proportion of pygmy blue whales off Antarctica within the last four decades. Potential causes for the latter are whaling, anthropogenic climate change or a combination of these and may have led to hybridization between the subspecies. Our findings challenge the current knowledge about the breeding behaviour of the world's largest animal and provide key information that can be incorporated into management and conservation practices for this endangered species. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  2. Threatened and endangered subspecies with vulnerable ecological traits also have high susceptibility to sea level rise and habitat fragmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benscoter, Allison M; Reece, Joshua S; Noss, Reed F; Brandt, Laura A; Mazzotti, Frank J; Romañach, Stephanie S; Watling, James I

    2013-01-01

    The presence of multiple interacting threats to biodiversity and the increasing rate of species extinction make it critical to prioritize management efforts on species and communities that maximize conservation success. We implemented a multi-step approach that coupled vulnerability assessments evaluating threats to Florida taxa such as climate change, sea-level rise, and habitat fragmentation with in-depth literature surveys of taxon-specific ecological traits. The vulnerability, adaptive capacity, and ecological traits of 12 threatened and endangered subspecies were compared to non-listed subspecies of the same parent species. Overall, the threatened and endangered subspecies showed high vulnerability and low adaptive capacity, in particular to sea level rise and habitat fragmentation. They also exhibited larger home ranges and greater dispersal limitation compared to non-endangered subspecies, which may inhibit their ability to track changing climate in fragmented landscapes. There was evidence for lower reproductive capacity in some of the threatened or endangered taxa, but not for most. Taxa located in the Florida Keys or in other low coastal areas were most vulnerable to sea level rise, and also showed low levels of adaptive capacity, indicating they may have a lower probability of conservation success. Our analysis of at-risk subspecies and closely related non-endangered subspecies demonstrates that ecological traits help to explain observed differences in vulnerability and adaptive capacity. This study points to the importance of assessing the relative contributions of multiple threats and evaluating conservation value at the species (or subspecies) level when resources are limited and several factors affect conservation success.

  3. Investigación de Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis en leche ultrapasteurizada para consumo humano Research of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis in ultrapasteurized milk for human consumption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. G Magnano

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Actualmente se vincula al Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis como potencial agente etiológico implicado en la enfermedad de Crohn en humanos. Una de las vías de ingreso sería a través de la ingestión de leche contaminada. El objetivo fue evaluar la presencia de Map en leche comercial homogeneizada y ultrapasteurizada para consumo humano en supermercados de la ciudad de Río Cuarto, Córdoba, Argentina. Se muestrearon 98 envases de 1 litro de leche entera homogeneizada y ultrapasteurizada de seis marcas comerciales. Previa descontaminación con el método de Cornell modificado, se sembraron en medio de cultivo Herrold con y sin micobactina. Todas las muestras fueron negativas. Como posibles causas de estos resultados se discuten: el origen de la leche y su probable muy baja carga de micobacterias, la eficacia de la pasteurización, el proceso en el laboratorio, entre otras.Currently, Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis is linked to Crohn's disease in humans as a potential etiologic agent. One route of infection to be considered is by the ingestion of contaminated milk. The objective of the present work was to evaluate Map's presence in commercial homogenized and ultrapasteurized milk for human consumption in supermarkets in the city of Río Cuarto, Córdoba, Argentina. Ninety eight packages of 1 liter of entire, homogenized and ultrapasteurized milk of six commercial brands were sampled. After decontamination by the modified Cornell's method, the samples were cultured in Herrold's medium with and without micobactin. All samples were negative. Possible causes of this result such as the origin of the milk and its probable very low amount of micobacterias, the efficiency of the pasteurization, the processing in the laboratory, among others are here discussed.

  4. Mean effective sensitivity for Mycobacterium avium subsp paratuberculosis infection in cattle herds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkeby, Carsten; Græsbøll, Kaare; Hisham Beshara Halasa, Tariq;

    2015-01-01

    Background: Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) infections in cattle are generally challenging to detect and cost-effective test strategies are consequently difficult to identify. MAP-specific antibody ELISAs for milk and serum are relatively inexpensive, but their utility...... within and between groups, and in some groups we found a bimodal distribution of MES. Dairy herds generally showed higher MES than non-dairy herds. Dairy herds in a control programme for paratuberculosis showed a MES similar to all other dairy herds from which animals >2.0 years were tested (both groups...

  5. Apparent prevalence of beef carcasses contaminated with Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis sampled from Danish slaughter cattle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Okura, Hisako; Toft, Nils; Pozzato, Nicola

    2011-01-01

    Presence of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) in beef has been reported as a public health concern because asymptomatically infected cattle may contain MAP in tissues that are used for human consumption. Associations between MAP carcasses contamination and animal characteristics...... of two dairy cows were positive by culture whereas 4% of the animals were estimated with =10¿CFU/gram muscle based on realtime PCR. Age was found to be associated with carcass contamination with MAP. The observed viable MAP prevalence in beef carcasses was low. However, detection of MAP and MAP DNA...... in muscle tissues suggested that bacteremia occurred in slaughtered cattle....

  6. Cutaneous gallium uptake in patients with AIDS with mycobacterium avium-intracellulare septicemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allwright, S.J.; Chapman, P.R.; Antico, V.F.; Gruenewald, S.M.

    1988-07-01

    Gallium imaging is increasingly being used for the early detection of complications in patients with AIDS. A 26-year-old homosexual man who was HIV antibody positive underwent gallium imaging for investigation of possible Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia. Widespread cutaneous focal uptake was seen, which was subsequently shown to be due to mycobacterium avium-intracellulare (MAI) septicemia. This case demonstrates the importance of whole body imaging rather than imaging target areas only, the utility of gallium imaging in aiding the early detection of clinically unsuspected disease, and shows a new pattern of gallium uptake in disseminated MAI infection.

  7. Characterisation of an ELISA detecting immunoglobulin G to Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis in bovine colostrum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zervens, Lisa Marie-Louise; Nielsen, Søren Saxmose; Jungersen, Gregers

    2013-01-01

    Although colostrum has been used to detect specific immunoglobulin (Ig) G to Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) in cattle, confounding, non-specific reactions can be a problem. The objectives of this study were to determine the proportion of non-specific ELISA reactions in samples...... of colostrum taken between 0 and 4days-in-milk (DIM), and to assess the probability of an animal testing positive for MAP specific IgG over this time-period. Non-specific reactions were found in 3/365 (0.8%) of samples. The odds of an animal testing positive on day of calving were 130 times higher than at 4...

  8. What Role Does Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis Play in Crohn's Disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bach, Horacio

    2015-02-01

    Crohn's disease (CD) is a chronic, debilitating inflammatory bowel disease with no etiological agent yet identified. Studies have demonstrated that the bacterium Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) is present in a high percentage of CD patients. Although MAP has been isolated from human specimens, current techniques fail to show the presence of MAP in 100 % of tissues or biopsies obtained from CD patient lesions, and thus MAP cannot meet Koch's postulate as the etiological agent of CD. In this report, the effect of genetic and immune factors as well as the presence of MAP as a potential environmental factor is analyzed.

  9. [A case of environmental infection with pulmonary Mycobacterium avium complex disease from a residential bathroom of a patient suggested by variable-number tandem-repeat typing of Mycobacterium avium tandem repeat loci].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taga, Shu; Niimi, Masaki; Kurokawa, Kazuhiro; Nakagawa, Taku; Ogawa, Kenji

    2012-05-01

    A 63-year-old woman was referred to our hospital because of bilateral infiltrations and nodular opacities in her chest radiograph taken in the mass radiography screening in September 2010. The chest computed tomography showed patchy infiltrations with bronchiectasis in the lower lung fields on both sides. She was diagnosed with pulmonary Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) disease based on the bacteria recovered from the sputum and the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. To elucidate an environmental MAC source, we investigated her home, and isolated M. avium and M. gordonae from the bathtub and shower tap, respectively, in her residential bathroom. Analysis of the hsp65-PRA variants digested with BamHI and some insertion sequences showed that the clinical strains recovered from sputum and strains from the bathtub were M. avium subsp. hominissuis. A dendrogram of the Mycobacterium avium tandem repeat loci variable-number tandem-repeat (MATR-VNTR) analysis of the MAC strains showed that the bathtub strains formed a polyclonal colonization, and that 1 of the 5 MATR-VNTR patterns was identical to the corresponding pattern of the sputum strain from the patient. In conclusion, we believe that the residential bathroom of the patient was the environmental source of her pulmonary MAC disease, as has been previously reported.

  10. Distribution of serotypes, IS901 and a 40 kDa protein in Mycobacterium avium complex strains isolated from man and animals in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klausen, J.; Giese, Steen Bjørck; Fuursted, K.;

    1997-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to characterize all strains of the Mycobacterium avium complex isolated in Denmark in 1993. A total of 141 M. avium complex strains (86 from man, 38 from animals, and 17 from peat) were analysed by serotyping, ELISA specific for a 40 kDa protein, and IS901-specific...... prevalent serotypes among strains isolated from peat were serotype 4 (29%) and serotype 9 (18%). There was a concurrent appearance of IS901 and p40 in all strains. Only M. avium complex strains isolated from animals, and belonging to serotype 1 or serotype 2, contained the IS901/p40 markers. The different...

  11. Gene flow, subspecies composition, and dengue virus-2 susceptibility among Aedes aegypti collections in Senegal.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massamba Sylla

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Aedes aegypti, the "yellow fever mosquito", is the primary vector to humans of the four serotypes of dengue viruses (DENV1-4 and yellow fever virus (YFV and is a known vector of Chikungunya virus. There are two recognized subspecies of Ae. aegypti sensu latu (s.l.: the presumed ancestral form, Ae. aegypti formosus (Aaf, a primarily sylvan mosquito in sub-Saharan Africa, and Ae. aegypti aegypti (Aaa, found globally in tropical and subtropical regions typically in association with humans. The designation of Ae. aegypti s.l. subspecies arose from observations made in East Africa in the late 1950s that the frequency of pale "forms" of Ae. aegypti was higher in populations in and around human dwellings than in those of the nearby bush. But few studies have been made of Ae. aegypti s.l. in West Africa. To address this deficiency we have been studying the population genetics, subspecies composition and vector competence for DENV-2 of Ae. aegypti s.l. in Senegal. METHODS AND FINDINGS: A population genetic analysis of gene flow was conducted among 1,040 Aedes aegypti s.l. from 19 collections distributed across the five phytogeographic regions of Senegal. Adults lacking pale scales on their first abdominal tergite were classified as Aedes aegypti formosus (Aaf following the original description of the subspecies and the remainder were classified as Aedes aegypti aegypti (Aaa. There was a clear northwest-southeast cline in the abundance of Aaa and Aaf. Collections from the northern Sahelian region contained only Aaa while southern Forest gallery collections contained only Aaf. The two subspecies occurred in sympatry in four collections north of the Gambia in the central Savannah region and Aaa was a minor component of two collections from the Forest gallery area. Mosquitoes from 11 collections were orally challenged with DENV-2 virus. In agreement with the early literature, Aaf had significantly lower vector competence than Aaa. Among pure Aaa

  12. Morpho- biochemical evaluation of Brassica rapa sub-species for salt tolerance

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    Jan Sohail Ahmad

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Salt stress is one of the key abiotic stresses that affect both the qualitative and quantitative characters of many Brassica rapa sub-species by disturbing its normal morphobiochemical processes. Therefore, the present research work was designed to study the effect of different NaCl events (0, 50,100 and 150 mmol on morphological and biochemical characters and to screen salt tolerant genotypes among brown, yellow and toria types of B. rapa sub-species. The plants were grown in test tubes with addition of four level of NaCl (0, 50,100 and 150 mmol. The effect of salinity on shoot and root length, shoot/ root fresh and dry weight, relative water content (RWC, proline and chlorophyll a, b, a+b contents was recorded after 4 weeks of sowing. The genotype 22861 (brown type showed excellent morphological and biochemical performance at all stress levels followed by Toria-Sathi and Toria-A respectively as compared to Check variety TS-1. The genotype 26158 (yellow type gave very poor performance and retard growth. The %RWC values and chlorophyll a, b and a+b contents were decreased several folds with the increase of salt concentration. While, the proline contents was increased with raising of salt stress. The brown and toria types showed maximum tolerance to salt stress at early germination stages as compare to yellows one. The present study will serve as model to develop quick salt tolerant genotypes among different plant sub-species against salt stress.

  13. Subspecies delineation amid phenotypic, geographic and genetic discordance in a songbird.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Jennifer; Lovette, Irby J; Winder, Virginia; Elphick, Chris S; Olsen, Brian J; Shriver, Gregory; Kovach, Adrienne I

    2017-03-01

    Understanding the processes that drive divergence within and among species is a long-standing goal in evolutionary biology. Traditional approaches to assessing differentiation rely on phenotypes to identify intra- and interspecific variation, but many species express subtle morphological gradients in which boundaries among forms are unclear. This intraspecific variation may be driven by differential adaptation to local conditions and may thereby reflect the evolutionary potential within a species. Here, we combine genetic and morphological data to evaluate intraspecific variation within the Nelson's (Ammodramus nelsoni) and salt marsh (Ammodramus caudacutus) sparrow complex, a group with populations that span considerable geographic distributions and a habitat gradient. We evaluated genetic structure among and within five putative subspecies of A. nelsoni and A. caudacutus using a reduced-representation sequencing approach to generate a panel of 1929 SNPs among 69 individuals. Although we detected morphological differences among some groups, individuals sorted along a continuous phenotypic gradient. In contrast, the genetic data identified three distinct clusters corresponding to populations that inhabit coastal salt marsh, interior freshwater marsh and coastal brackish-water marsh habitats. These patterns support the current species-level recognition but do not match the subspecies-level taxonomy within each species-a finding which may have important conservation implications. We identified loci exhibiting patterns of elevated divergence among and within these species, indicating a role for local selective pressures in driving patterns of differentiation across the complex. We conclude that this evidence for adaptive variation among subspecies warrants the consideration of evolutionary potential and genetic novelty when identifying conservation units for this group. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Morphometric and molecular differentiation between quetzal subspecies of Pharomachrus mocinno (Trogoniformes: Trogonidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sofía Solórzano

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The resplendent Quetzal (Pharomachrus mocinno is an endemic Mesoamerican bird species of conservation concern. Within this species, the subspecies P. m. costaricensis and P. m. mocinno, have been recognized by apparent morphometric differences; however, presently there is no sufficient data for confirmation. We analyzed eight morphometric attributes of the body from 41 quetzals: body length, tarsus and cord wing, as well as the length, wide and depth of the bill, body weight; and in the case of the males, the length of the long upper-tail cover feathers. We used multivariate analyses to discriminate morphometric differences between subspecies and contrasted each morphometric attribute between and within subspecies with paired non-parametric Wilcoxon test. In order to review the intraspecific taxonomic status of this bird, we added phylogenetic analysis, and genetic divergence and differentiation based on nucleotide variations in four sequences of mtDNA. The nucleotide variation was estimated in control region, subunit NDH6, and tRNA Glu and tRNA Phe in 26 quetzals from eight localities distributed in five countries. We estimated the genetic divergence and differentiation between subspecies according to a mutation-drift equilibrium model. We obtained the best mutation nucleotide model following the procedure implemented in model test program. We constructed the phylogenetic relationships between subspecies by maximum parsimony and maximum likelihood using PAUP, as well as with Bayesian statistics. The multivariate analyses showed two different morphometric groups, and individuals clustered according to the subspecies that they belong. The paired comparisons between subspecies showed strong differences in most of the attributes analyzed. Along the four mtDNA sequences, we identified 32 nucleotide positions that have a particular nucleotide according to the quetzals subspecies. The genetic divergence and the differentiation was strong and markedly

  15. Identical metabolic rate and thermal conductance in Rock Sandpiper (Calidris ptilocnemis) subspecies with contrasting nonbreeding life histories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruthrauff, Daniel R.; Dekinga, Anne; Gill, Robert E.; Piersma, Theunis

    2013-01-01

    Closely related species or subspecies can exhibit metabolic differences that reflect site-specific environmental conditions. Whether such differences represent fixed traits or flexible adjustments to local conditions, however, is difficult to predict across taxa. The nominate race of Rock Sandpiper (Calidris ptilocnemis) exhibits the most northerly nonbreeding distribution of any shorebird in the North Pacific, being common during winter in cold, dark locations as far north as upper Cook Inlet, Alaska (61°N). By contrast, the tschuktschorum subspecies migrates to sites ranging from about 59°N to more benign locations as far south as ~37°N. These distributional extremes exert contrasting energetic demands, and we measured common metabolic parameters in the two subspecies held under identical laboratory conditions to determine whether differences in these parameters are reflected by their nonbreeding life histories. Basal metabolic rate and thermal conductance did not differ between subspecies, and the subspecies had a similar metabolic response to temperatures below their thermoneutral zone. Relatively low thermal conductance values may, however, reflect intrinsic metabolic adaptations to northerly latitudes. In the absence of differences in basic metabolic parameters, the two subspecies’ nonbreeding distributions will likely be more strongly influenced by adaptations to regional variation in ecological factors such as prey density, prey quality, and foraging habitat.

  16. Effect of ecological environments on subspecies characteristics and economic traits in filial generations of cross between indica and japonica rice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hai XU; Wenfu CHEN; Hongguang LIU; Chunjie ZHU; Li YANG; Yanhua GUO; Jiayu WANG; Qianhua YANG; Zhengjin XU; Jiakui ZHENG

    2008-01-01

    Two recombinant inbred lines (RILs) populations, RILSA derived from the cross between "Zhongyouzao8" (indica) and "Toyonihiki" (japonica) rice cultivars, and RILSB derived from the cross between "Qishanzhan" (indica) and "Akihikari" (japonica) rice cultivars, were grown in Liaoning and Sichuan Provinces, China to understand the effects of ecological environments on the subspecies characteristics and economic traits in filial generations of cross between indica and japonica. The results showed that both the subspecies characteristics and economic traits changed significantly. The effects of ecological environments on Cheng's index and six subspecies characteristics were different on the basis of populations or characteristics. The distribution of Cheng's index in RILSA was japonicalinous in Liaoning and Sichuan. The distribution of Cheng's index in RILSB approached to normal distribution in Liaoning, but it wasjaponicalinous in Sichuan. As a whole, the two populations were more japonicalious in Sichuan than in Liaoning. The panicle number, seed setting rate and per-thousand-grain weight were decreased significantly in Sichuan. The grain number per panicle showed no significant change. A significant positive correlation was found between Cheng's index and the economic traits, including six subspe-cies traits. It suggested that the reason that the filial genera-tion of cross between indica and japonica in northern China showed japonieanous subspecies characteristics might be the artificial selection by breeders on the economic traits. In addition, indica-japonica differentiation and the relationship with ecological environments were discussed.

  17. Molecular phylogenetics of the white-lipped peccary (Tayassu pecari) did not confirm morphological subspecies in northwestern South America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-García, M; Pinedo-Castro, M; Luengas-Villamil, K; Vergara, C; Rodriguez, J A; Shostell, J M

    2015-05-22

    We sequenced the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) control region of 59 peccaries (44 white-lipped peccaries, Tayassu pecari, and 15 collared peccaries, Pecari tajacu). We also genotyped 3 DNA microsatellites from 78 white-lipped peccaries representing the 4 putative morphological subspecies (i.e., spiradens, aequatoris, pecari, and albirostris) present in northwestern South America (i.e., Colombia, Ecuador, Peru, and Bolivia). Our results showed: 1) the estimated diversity of the mtDNA control region in the T. pecari population was extremely high, whereas the average genetic diversity for the microsatellites was medium to high and similar to that observed in European pig breeds; 2) there was no significant genetic heterogeneity among the quoted putative morphological subspecies at the mitochondrial marker, but we did detect significant (although relatively small) genetic heterogeneity using microsatellites, indicating that T. pecari albirostris is a uniquely differentiated group; and 3) the phylogenetic mtDNA trees showed that haplotypes were intermixed independent of their "a priori" subspecies classification. In addition, the microsatellite assignation analyses yielded low percentages of well-classified individuals when the analysis considered the geographic morphology of the subspecies. Thus, the molecular results do not support the putative morphological subspecies of T. pecari in northwestern South America. Finally, our results did not detect clear historical demographic changes using the mtDNA control region sequences. These genetic results are discussed in the context of the ecological and social characteristics of T. pecari.

  18. Genetic relationships among some subspecies of the Peregrine Falcon (Falco peregrinus L.), inferred from mitochondrial DNA control-region sequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Clayton M.; Sonsthagen, Sarah A.; Sage, George K.; Anderson, Clifford; Talbot, Sandra L.

    2013-01-01

    The ability to successfully colonize and persist in diverse environments likely requires broad morphological and behavioral plasticity and adaptability, and this may partly explain why the Peregrine Falcon (Falco peregrinus) exhibits a large range of morphological characteristics across their global distribution. Regional and local differences within Peregrine Falcons were sufficiently variable that ∼75 subspecies have been described; many were subsumed, and currently 19 are generally recognized. We used sequence information from the control region of the mitochondrial genome to test for concordance between genetic structure and representatives of 12 current subspecies and from two areas where subspecies distributions overlap. Haplotypes were broadly shared among subspecies, and all geographic locales shared a widely distributed common haplotype (FalconCR2). Haplotypes were distributed in a star-like phylogeny, consistent with rapid expansion of a recently derived species, with observed genetic patterns congruent with incomplete lineage sorting and/or differential rates of evolution on morphology and neutral genetic characters. Hierarchical analyses of molecular variance did not uncover genetic partitioning at the continental level, despite strong population-level structure (FST = 0.228). Similar analyses found weak partitioning, albeit significant, among subspecies (FCT = 0.138). All reconstructions placed the hierofalcons' (Gyrfalcon [F. rusticolus] and Saker Falcon [F. cherrug]) haplotypes in a well-supported clade either basal or unresolved with respect to the Peregrine Falcon. In addition, haplotypes representing Taita Falcon (F. fasciinucha) were placed within the Peregrine Falcon clade.

  19. Evolution of Compatibility Range in the Rice-Magnaporthe oryzae System: An Uneven Distribution of R Genes Between Rice Subspecies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallet, Romain; Fontaine, Colin; Bonnot, François; Milazzo, Joëlle; Tertois, Christophe; Adreit, Henri; Ravigné, Virginie; Fournier, Elisabeth; Tharreau, Didier

    2016-04-01

    Efficient strategies for limiting the impact of pathogens on crops require a good understanding of the factors underlying the evolution of compatibility range for the pathogens and host plants, i.e., the set of host genotypes that a particular pathogen genotype can infect and the set of pathogen genotypes that can infect a particular host genotype. Until now, little is known about the evolutionary and ecological factors driving compatibility ranges in systems implicating crop plants. We studied the evolution of host and pathogen compatibility ranges for rice blast disease, which is caused by the ascomycete Magnaporthe oryzae. We challenged 61 rice varieties from three rice subspecies with 31 strains of M. oryzae collected worldwide from all major known genetic groups. We determined the compatibility range of each plant variety and pathogen genotype and the severity of each plant-pathogen interaction. Compatibility ranges differed between rice subspecies, with the most resistant subspecies selecting for pathogens with broader compatibility ranges and the least resistant subspecies selecting for pathogens with narrower compatibility ranges. These results are consistent with a nested distribution of R genes between rice subspecies.

  20. Campylobacter fetus subspecies: Comparative genomics and prediction of potential virulence targets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ali, Amjad; Soares, Siomar C.; Santos, Anderson R.

    2012-01-01

    The genus Campylobacter contains pathogens causing a wide range of diseases, targeting both humans and animals. Among them, the Campylobacter fetus subspecies fetus and venerealis deserve special attention, as they are the etiological agents of human bacterial gastroenteritis and bovine genital...... in an island specific for C. fetus subsp. venerealis. The genomic variations and potential core and unique virulence factors characterized in this study would lead to better insight into the species virulence and to more efficient use of the candidates for antibiotic, drug and vaccine development....

  1. USE OF A NATURAL DYE FROM SERRATIA MARCESCENS SUBSPECIES MARCESCENS IN DYEING OF TEXTILE FABRICS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravindra Adivarekar

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available A strain of Serratia marcescens subspecies marcescens capable of producing a novel rose red pigment with a mass of 112 Da has been isolated from Mahim Mangroove soil. Studies regarding the growth conditions of bacteria, partial characterization of the produced pigment and use of this rose red pigment to dye natural fabrics has been studied and described. Dyeing of wool, cotton and silk fabrics with this rose red microbial pigment as natural dye indicated that the colour strength values and the dye uptake were high with satisfactory fastness properties of the dyed fabric.

  2. Two new subspecies of Erigeron uniflorus L. (Asteraceae from Northern Spain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Foley, Michael J.Y

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available Two new subspecies of Erigeron uniflorus L. are described from montane áreas of N Spain. These are E. uniflorus subsp. picoeuropaeanus M.J.Y. Foley, subsp. nov., and E. uniflorus subsp. subacaulis MJ.Y. Foley, subsp. nov.Se describen dos Subespecies nuevas de Erigeron uniflorus L. procedentes de áreas montañosas del N de España. Son E. uniflorus subsp. Picoeuropaeanus MJ.Y. Foley, subsp. nov. , y E. uniflorus subsp. subacaulis M.J.Y. Foley, subsp. nov.

  3. Transcriptome characterization and polymorphism detection between subspecies of big sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cronn Richard C

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Big sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata is one of the most widely distributed and ecologically important shrub species in western North America. This species serves as a critical habitat and food resource for many animals and invertebrates. Habitat loss due to a combination of disturbances followed by establishment of invasive plant species is a serious threat to big sagebrush ecosystem sustainability. Lack of genomic data has limited our understanding of the evolutionary history and ecological adaptation in this species. Here, we report on the sequencing of expressed sequence tags (ESTs and detection of single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP and simple sequence repeat (SSR markers in subspecies of big sagebrush. Results cDNA of A. tridentata sspp. tridentata and vaseyana were normalized and sequenced using the 454 GS FLX Titanium pyrosequencing technology. Assembly of the reads resulted in 20,357 contig consensus sequences in ssp. tridentata and 20,250 contigs in ssp. vaseyana. A BLASTx search against the non-redundant (NR protein database using 29,541 consensus sequences obtained from a combined assembly resulted in 21,436 sequences with significant blast alignments (≤ 1e-15. A total of 20,952 SNPs and 119 polymorphic SSRs were detected between the two subspecies. SNPs were validated through various methods including sequence capture. Validation of SNPs in different individuals uncovered a high level of nucleotide variation in EST sequences. EST sequences of a third, tetraploid subspecies (ssp. wyomingensis obtained by Illumina sequencing were mapped to the consensus sequences of the combined 454 EST assembly. Approximately one-third of the SNPs between sspp. tridentata and vaseyana identified in the combined assembly were also polymorphic within the two geographically distant ssp. wyomingensis samples. Conclusion We have produced a large EST dataset for Artemisia tridentata, which contains a large sample of the big sagebrush

  4. Morganella morganii , subspecies morganii, biogroup A: An unusual causative pathogen of brain abscess

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asha B Patil

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Morganella morganii is a gram negative aerobe , found often as intestinal commensal. It is commonly implicated in Urinary tract infections and pyogenic infections, but rarely causes CNS infections especially brain abscess. There are very few published reports of Morganella morganii as a causative pathogen in brain abscess. High index of suspicion of this pathogen is important in cases of brain abscess secondary to otogenic infections. This paper reports an unusual case of Morganella morganii, subspecies morganii, biogroup A Brain abscess .The paper also reviews other infections caused by Morganell morganii.

  5. Morganella morganii, subspecies morganii, biogroup A: An unusual causative pathogen of brain abscess.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, Asha B; Nadagir, Shobha D; Lakshminarayana, Sa; Syeda, Fasiha M

    2012-09-01

    Morganella morganii is a gram negative aerobe , found often as intestinal commensal. It is commonly implicated in Urinary tract infections and pyogenic infections, but rarely causes CNS infections especially brain abscess. There are very few published reports of Morganella morganii as a causative pathogen in brain abscess. High index of suspicion of this pathogen is important in cases of brain abscess secondary to otogenic infections. This paper reports an unusual case of Morganella morganii, subspecies morganii, biogroup A Brain abscess. The paper also reviews other infections caused by Morganell morganii.

  6. A 38-kilobase pathogenicity island specific for Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis encodes cell surface proteins expressed in the host.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stratmann, Janin; Strommenger, Birgit; Goethe, Ralph; Dohmann, Karen; Gerlach, Gerald-F; Stevenson, Karen; Li, Ling-Ling; Zhang, Qing; Kapur, Vivek; Bull, Tim J

    2004-03-01

    We have used representational difference analysis to identify a novel Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis-specific ABC transporter operon (mpt), which comprises six open reading frames designated mptA to -F and is immediately preceded by two putative Fur boxes. Functional genomics revealed that the mpt operon is flanked on one end by a fep cluster encoding proteins involved in the uptake of Fe(3+) and on the other end by a sid cluster encoding non-ribosome-dependent heterocyclic siderophore synthases. Together these genes form a 38-kb M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis-specific locus flanked by an insertion sequence similar to IS1110. Expression studies using Western blot analyses showed that MptC is present in the envelope fraction of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis. The MptD protein was shown to be surface exposed, using a specific phage (fMptD) isolated from a phage-peptide library, by differential screening of Mycobacterium smegmatis transformants. The phage fMptD-derived peptide could be used in a peptide-mediated capture PCR with milk from infected dairy herds, thereby showing surface-exposed expression of the MptD protein in the host. Together, these data suggest that the 38-kb locus constitutes an M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis pathogenicity island.

  7. Killing of mycobacterium avium by lactoferricin peptides: improved activity of arginine- and D-amino-acid-containing molecules

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Silva, T.; Magalhães, B.; Maia, S.; Gomes, P.; Nazmi, K.; Bolscher, J.G.M.; Rodriques, P.N.; Bastos, M.; Gomes, M.S.

    2014-01-01

    Mycobacterium avium causes respiratory disease in susceptible individuals, as well as disseminated infections in immunocompromised hosts, being an important cause of morbidity and mortality among these populations. Current therapies consist of a combination of antibiotics taken for at least 6 months

  8. Shedding of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis into milk and colostrum of naturally infected dairy cows over complete lactation cycles

    Science.gov (United States)

    The primary mode of transmission of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) is fecal-oral. However, MAP is also shed into the milk and colostrum of infected cows. The objective of this study was to identify if an association exists between stage of MAP infection and days in lactation with ...

  9. Optimization of methods for the detection of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis in milk and colostrum of naturally infected dairy cows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) is primarily shed into the feces but it has also been isolated from the milk and colostrum of cows. Because of this, there exists concern about transfer of the organism from dam to calf and about the prevalence of MAP in the milk supply. The prevalen...

  10. Comparison of fecal DNA extraction kits for the detection of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis by polymerase chain reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culture of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) from feces has been considered the gold standard for the diagnosis of paratuberculosis for many years. However, direct fecal PCR is becoming more widely used today, demonstrating similar sensitivity and specificity to culture. To ensure ef...

  11. Novel antigens for detection of cell mediated immune responses to Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis infection in cattle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, Heidi; Aagaard, Claus; Nielsen, Søren Saxmose;

    2011-01-01

    Paratuberculosis is a chronic infection of the intestine of ruminants caused by Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP). Early stage MAP infection can be detected by measuring specific cell mediated immune responses, using the whole blood interferon-γ (IFN-γ) assay. Available IFN-γ assa...

  12. Potentiating day-old blood samples for detection of interferon-gamma responses following infection with Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, Heidi; Nielsen, Søren Saxmose; Jungersen, Gregers

    The interferon gamma (IFN-γ) test measuring specific cell-mediated immune responses in whole blood can be used for diagnosis at an early stage of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) infection. A major obstacle for the practical use of IFN-γ testing is the recommended maximum 8 hour...

  13. Use of Novel Recombinant Antigens in the Interferon Gamma Assay for Detection of Mycobacterium Avium Subsp. Paratuberculosis Infection in Cattle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, Heidi; Aagaard, Claus; Nielsen, Søren Saxmose;

    Early stage Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) infection can be detected by measuring antigen specific cell mediated immune responses by the interferon gamma (IFN-γ) assay. Available IFN-γ assay use purified protein derivate of Johnin (PPDj) leading to low specificity. The objectives...

  14. Use of novel recombinant antigens in the interferon gamma assay for detection of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis infection in cattle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, Heidi; Aagaard, C.; Nielsen, Søren Saxmose;

    2012-01-01

    Early stage Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) infection may be detected by measuring antigen specific cell-mediated immune responses by the interferon-gamma (IFN-¿) assay. Available IFN-¿ assay use purified protein derivate of Johnin (PPDj) leading to low specificity. The objectives...

  15. Association between milk antibody and interferon-gamma responses in cattle from Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis infected herds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, Heidi; Jungersen, Gregers; Nielsen, Søren Saxmose

    2009-01-01

    Paratuberculosis is a chronic infection of ruminants caused by Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP). It is possible to detect infection with paratuberculosis at different stages of disease by means of various diagnostic test strategies. The objective of the present study was to evalu...

  16. Middle-aged to elderly women have a higher asymptomatic infection rate with Mycobacterium avium complex, regardless of body habitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimura, Tomoyasu; Fujita-Suzuki, Yukiko; Mori, Masaaki; Carpenter, Stephen M; Fujiwara, Hiroshi; Uwamino, Yoshifumi; Tamizu, Eiko; Yano, Ikuya; Kawabe, Hiroshi; Hasegawa, Naoki

    2016-04-01

    Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) pulmonary disease is prevalent in middle-aged to elderly women with a thin body habitus. By comparing the rate of serologically diagnosed asymptomatic MAC infection and body mass index among 1033 healthy subjects, we find that middle-aged to elderly women became infected with MAC, regardless of their body habitus.

  17. Culture and molecular method for detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex and Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis in milk and dairy products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messelhäusser, U; Kämpf, P; Hörmansdorfer, S; Wagner, B; Schalch, B; Busch, U; Höller, C; Wallner, P; Barth, G; Rampp, A

    2012-01-01

    A combined molecular and cultural method for the detection of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTBC) and Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis was developed and tested with artificially contaminated milk and dairy products. Results indicate that the method can be used for a reliable detection as a basis for first risk assessments.

  18. The effects of progressing and nonprogressing Mycobacterium avium ssp. paratuberculosis infection on milk production in dairy cows

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smith, Rebecca L.; Gröhn, Y. T.; Pradhan, A. K.; Whitlock, R. H.; Van Kessel, J. S.; Smith, J. M.; Wolfgang, D. R.; Schukken, Y. H.

    2016-01-01

    Longitudinal data from 3 commercial dairy herds in the northeast United States, collected from 2004 to 2011, were analyzed to determine the effect of Mycobacterium avium ssp. paratuberculosis (MAP) infection status and progression path on milk production. Disease status, as indicated by MAP test res

  19. Isolated Endobronchial Mycobacterium avium Disease Associated with Lobar Atelectasis in an Immunocompetent Young Adult: A Case Report and Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hye In; Kim, Ji Won; Kim, Jun Young; Kim, Young Nam; Kim, Jin Hae; Jeong, Byeong-Ho; Chung, Myung Jin; Koh, Won-Jung

    2015-10-01

    The prevalence of lung diseases caused by nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) is increasing worldwide. Unlike pulmonary tuberculosis, endobronchial NTM diseases are very rare with the majority of cases reported in patients with human immunodeficiency virus infection and acquired immune deficiency syndrome. We reported a rare case of endobronchial Mycobacterium avium disease associated with lobar atelectasis in a young immunocompetent patient and reviewed the relevant iterature.

  20. Comparative analysis of the genomes of clinical isolates of Mycobacterium avium subsp. hominissuis regarding virulence-related genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeffrey, Brendan; Rose, Sasha J; Gilbert, Kerrigan; Lewis, Matthew; Bermudez, Luiz E

    2017-07-01

    Mycobacterium avium subsp. hominissuis is a member of the M. avium complex, a heterogeneous group of bacteria that cause lung infection in immunocompetent patients or disseminated infection in patients with immunosuppression. The bacteria belonging to this complex have variable virulence, depending on the strain considered, and therefore a representative of the most common clinical phenotype was analysed. The genomic sequences of four M. avium subsp. hominissuis isolates obtained from clinical specimens were completed. Mav101, Mav100 and MavA5 were isolated from the blood of patients with AIDS. MavA5 was disseminated from the lung, while Mav3388 was isolated from the lungs of a patient with chronic lung disease. The sequences were annotated using the published Mav104 genome as a blueprint. Functional and virulence analyses of the sequences were carried out. Mice studies comparing the virulence of the strains were performed. Findings showed that while Mav101 was very similar to Mav104, there were numerous differences between Mav104 and the remaining strains at nucleotide and predicted protein levels. The presence of genes associated with biofilm formation and several known virulence-related genes were sometimes differentially present among the isolates, suggesting overlapping functions by different genetic determinants. The sequences provided important information about M. avium heterogenicity and evolution as a pathogen. The limitation is the lack of understanding on possible overlapping functions of genes/proteins.

  1. Efficacy of novel lipid-formulated whole bacterial cell vaccines against Mycobacterium avium subsp paratuberculosis in sheep

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Griffin, J.F.T.; Hughes, A.D.; Liggett, S.; Farquhar, P.A.; Mackintosh, C.G.; Bakker, D.

    2009-01-01

    Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis [MAP], the Causative agent of enteric Johne's disease, incurs significant economic losses to the livestock industry. Prophylactic vaccination can be employed as a control means, however mineral oil-based vaccines Currently in practice have limited efficacy

  2. Seed washing, exogenous application of gibberellic acid, and cold stratification enhance the germination of sweet cherry (Prunus avium L.) seed

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Javanmard, T.; Zamani, Z.; Keshavarz Afshar, R.; Hashemi, M.; Struik, P.C.

    2014-01-01

    Seed germination in sweet cherry (Prunus avium L.) is a slow and lengthy process which has delayed breeding efforts. In this study, seed from ripe fruit of the sweet cherry cultivar ‘Lambert’ were collected and, after removing the endocarp, various dormancy-breaking treatments such as seed washing,

  3. Occurrence of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis in milk at dairy cattle farms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Okura, Hisako; Toft, Nils; Nielsen, Søren Saxmose

    2012-01-01

    Presence of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) in milk for human consumption is a concern due to its possible relationship with Crohn’s disease in humans. Pasteurization effectively reduces the MAP load by four to five logs, but the efficacy depends on the MAP concentration, which...

  4. Rapid assessment of the viability of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis cells after heat treatment, using an optimized phage amplification assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foddai, Antonio; Elliott, Christopher T; Grant, Irene R

    2010-03-01

    Thermal inactivation experiments were carried out to assess the utility of a recently optimized phage amplification assay to accurately enumerate viable Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis cells in milk. Ultra-heat-treated (UHT) whole milk was spiked with large numbers of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis organisms (10(6) to 10(7) CFU/ml) and dispensed in 100-microl aliquots in thin-walled 200-microl PCR tubes. A Primus 96 advanced thermal cycler (Peqlab, Erlangen, Germany) was used to achieve the following time and temperature treatments: (i) 63 degrees C for 3, 6, and 9 min; (ii) 68 degrees C for 20, 40, and 60 s; and (iii) 72 degrees C for 5, 10, 15, and 25 s. After thermal stress, the number of surviving M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis cells was assessed by both phage amplification assay and culture on Herrold's egg yolk medium (HEYM). A high correlation between PFU/ml and CFU/ml counts was observed for both unheated (r(2) = 0.943) and heated (r(2) = 0.971) M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis cells. D and z values obtained using the two types of counts were not significantly different (P > 0.05). The D(68 degrees C), mean D(63 degrees C), and D(72 degrees C) for four M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis strains were 81.8, 9.8, and 4.2 s, respectively, yielding a mean z value of 6.9 degrees C. Complete inactivation of 10(6) to 10(7) CFU of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis/ml milk was not observed for any of the time-temperature combinations studied; 5.2- to 6.6-log(10) reductions in numbers were achieved depending on the temperature and time. Nonlinear thermal inactivation kinetics were consistently observed for this bacterium. This study confirms that the optimized phage assay can be employed in place of conventional culture on HEYM to speed up the acquisition of results (48 h instead of a minimum of 6 weeks) for inactivation experiments involving M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis-spiked samples.

  5. Molecular cloning, expression, and functional analysis of a predicted sulfotransferase STF9 from Mycobacterium avium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hossain, Md Murad; Moriizumi, Yuuji; Tanaka, Shotaro; Kimura, Makoto; Kakuta, Yoshimitsu

    2011-04-01

    Sulfotransferases catalyze the transfer of sulfate group from para-nitrophenyl sulfate (pNPS) or 3'-phosphoadenosine-5'-phosphosulfate (PAPS) onto acceptor molecules in the biosynthesis of sulfate esters. Human pathogenic mycobacteria are known to produce numerous sulfated molecules on their cell surface which have been implicated as important mediators in host-pathogen interactions. The open reading frame stf9, a predicted homologue of sulfotransferase in the Mycobacterium avium genomic data, was cloned and over expressed in Escherichia coli. The recombinant STF9 conserved the characteristic PAPS binding motif of sulfotransferase and was purified as a 44 kDa soluble protein which exhibited transfer of sulfate group from pNPS (K (m) 1.34 mM, V (max) 7.56 nmol/min/mg) onto 3'-phosphoadenosine-5'-phosphate (K (m) 0.24 mM, V (max) 10.36 nmol/min/mg). The recombinant STF9 protein was also capable of transferring sulfate group from PAPS onto certain acceptor substrates in E. coli, and showed binding affinity to the PAP-agarose resin, supporting the sulfotransferase activity of the recombinant STF9 protein. This is the first report of molecular evidence for sulfotransferase activity of a protein from M. avium. Mutation of Arg96 to Ala and Glu170 to Ala abolishes sulfotransferase activity, indicating the importance of Arg96 and Glu170 in STF9 activity catalysis.

  6. Mycobacterium avium subsp. hominissuis Infection in Swine Associated with Peat Used for Bedding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tone Bjordal Johansen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Mycobacterium avium subsp. hominissuis is an environmental bacterium causing opportunistic infections in swine, resulting in economic losses. Additionally, the zoonotic aspect of such infections is of concern. In the southeastern region of Norway in 2009 and 2010, an increase in condemnation of pig carcasses with tuberculous lesions was seen at the meat inspection. The use of peat as bedding in the herds was suspected to be a common factor, and a project examining pigs and environmental samples from the herds was initiated. Lesions detected at meat inspection in pigs originating from 15 herds were sampled. Environmental samples including peat from six of the herds and from three peat production facilities were additionally collected. Samples were analysed by culture and isolates genotyped by MLVA analysis. Mycobacterium avium subsp. hominissuis was detected in 35 out of 46 pigs, in 16 out of 20 samples of peat, and in one sample of sawdust. MLVA analysis demonstrated identical isolates from peat and pigs within the same farms. Polyclonal infection was demonstrated by analysis of multiple isolates from the same pig. To conclude, the increase in condemnation of porcine carcasses at slaughter due to mycobacteriosis seemed to be related to untreated peat used as bedding.

  7. A photoelectrocatalytic process that disinfects water contaminated with Mycobacterium kansasii and Mycobacterium avium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brugnera, Michelle Fernanda; Miyata, Marcelo; Zocolo, Guilherme Julião; Leite, Clarice Queico Fujimura; Zanoni, Maria Valnice Boldrin

    2013-11-01

    Nontuberculous mycobacteria are resistant to conventional water treatment; indeed, they have been recovered from a wide variety of environmental sources. Here, we applied the photoelectrocatalytic technique using a Ti/TiO2-Ag photoanode to inactivate mycobacteria. For a mycobacteria population of 5 × 10(8) CFU mL(-1), we achieved 99.9 and 99.8% inactivation of Mycobacterium kansasii and Mycobacterium avium with rate constant of 6.2 × 10(-3) and 4.2 × 10(-3) min(-1), respectively, after 240 min. We compared the proposed method with the photolytic and photocatalytic methods. Using a mycobacteria population of 7.5 × 10(4) CFU mL(-1), the proposed Ti/TiO2-Ag photoanode elicited total mycobacteria inactivation within 3 min of treatment; the presence of Ag nanoparticles in the electrode provided 1.5 larger degradation rate constant as compared with the Ti/TiO2 anode (1.75 × 10(-2) for M. kansassi and 1.98 × 10(-2) for M. avium). We monitored the degradation of the metabolites released during cellular lysis by TOC removal, sugar release, chromatography, and mass spectrometry measurements; photoelectrocatalysis and Ti/TiO2-Ag photoanodes furnished the best results.

  8. Capsular arabinomannans from Mycobacterium avium with morphotype-specific structural differences but identical biological activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittkowski, Manon; Mittelstädt, Jessica; Brandau, Sven; Reiling, Norbert; Lindner, Buko; Torrelles, Jordi; Brennan, Patrick J; Holst, Otto

    2007-06-29

    The capsules of two colony morphotypes of Mycobacterium avium strain 2151 were investigated, i.e. the virulent smooth-transparent (SmT1) and the nonvirulent smooth-opaque (SmO) types. From both morphotypes we separated a nonacylated arabinomannan (AM) from an acylated polysaccharide fraction by affinity chromatography, of which the AMs were structurally characterized. The AMs from the virulent morphotype, in contrast to that from the nonvirulent form, possessed a larger mannan chain and a shorter arabinan chain. Incubation of murine bone marrow-derived macrophages and human dendritic cells showed that the acylated polysaccharide fractions were potent inducers of tumor necrosis factor-alpha, interleukin-12, and interleukin-10 compared with nonacylated AMs, which led to only a marginal cytokine release. Further in vitro experiments showed that both the acylated polysaccharide fractions and the nonacylated AMs were able to induce in vitro anti-tumor cytotoxicity of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Thus, morphotype-specific structural differences in the capsular AMs of M. avium do not correlate with biological activity; however, their acylation is a prerequisite for effective stimulation of murine macrophages and human dendritic cells.

  9. In vitro anti-Mycobacterium avium activities of quinolones: predicted active structures and mechanistic considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klopman, G; Li, J Y; Wang, S; Pearson, A J; Chang, K; Jacobs, M R; Bajaksouzian, S; Ellner, J J

    1994-08-01

    The relationship between the structures of quinolones and their anti-Mycobacterium avium activities has been previously derived by using the Multiple Computer-Automated Structure Evaluation program. A number of substructural constraints required to overcome the resistance of most of the strains have been identified. Nineteen new quinolones which qualify under these substructural requirements were identified by the program and subsequently tested. The results show that the substructural attributes identified by the program produced a successful a priori prediction of the anti-M. avium activities of the new quinolones. All 19 quinolones were found to be active, and 4 of them are as active or better than ciprofloxacin. With these new quinolones, the updated multiple computer-automated structure evaluation program structure-activity relationship analysis has helped to uncover additional information about the nature of the substituents at the C5 and C7 positions needed for optimal inhibitory activity. A possible explanation of drug resistance based on the observation of suicide inactivation of bacterial cytochrome P-450 by the cyclopropylamine moiety has also been proposed and is discussed in this report. Furthermore, we confirm the view that the amount of the uncharged form present in a neutral pH solution plays a crucial role in the drug's penetration ability.

  10. Coexistent Pseudogout and Mycobacterium avium-intracellulare Septic Arthritis in a Patient with HIV and ESRD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wais Afzal

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Pseudogout is a crystal-induced arthropathy characterized by the deposition of calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate (CPPD crystals in synovial fluid, menisci, or articular cartilage. Although not very common, this entity can be seen in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD. Septic arthritis due to Mycobacterium avium-intracellulare (MAI is a rare entity that can affect immunocompromised patients such as those with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS or those who are on immunosuppressive drugs. Here, we describe a 51-year-old female who presented with fever, right knee pain, swelling, warmth, and decreased range of motion for several days. The initial assessment was consistent with pseudogout, with negative bacterial and fungal cultures. However, due to high white blood cell (WBC count in the synovial fluid analysis, she was empirically started on intravenous (IV vancomycin and piperacillin-tazobactam and discharged on IV vancomycin and cefepime, while acid-fast bacilli (AFB culture was still in process. Seventeen days later, AFB culture grew Mycobacterium avium-intracellulare (MAI, and she was readmitted for relevant management. This case illustrates that septic arthritis due to MAI should be considered in the differential diagnosis of septic arthritis in immunocompromised patients.

  11. Antibody recognition to secreted proteins of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis in sera from infected ruminants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pradenas, M; Jara, M C; Hernández, N; Zambrano, A; Collins, M T; Kruze, J

    2009-09-18

    Two liquid culture media to obtain secreted proteins of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis at different incubation periods were evaluated. Middlebrook 7H9-OADC (7H9) and Watson-Reid (WR) broths were inoculated with a field strain of M. paratuberculosis and growth curves determined using nonlinear regression analysis. Most culture filtrate (CF) proteins were of low molecular weight and reacted strongly against sera from cultured-positive cases of paratuberculosis. CF proteins obtained in WR yielded a higher number of bands and were detected earlier than those obtained from 7H9. A high degree of variability in CF protein immunoreactivity was seen among infected animals. Sera from cattle with clinical paratuberculosis or heavy fecal shedders of M. paratuberculosis reacted more intensively and to more CF proteins than did sera from other infected cattle. Immunoblots showed differences in antibody binding to CF proteins when sera were absorbed with M. avium but not with others environmental mycobacteria. Immunoblots with sera from infected goats and a sheep showed reactivity with proteins of 32, 33 and 46kDa both before and after the sera were absorbed with M. phlei. Antibodies found in serum of infected deer reacted with CF proteins in a similar way as did for cattle. These results suggest that a pool of CF proteins of M. paratuberculosis could be good candidates as antigens for serodiagnosis of paratuberculosis.

  12. Hyperhydricity of Prunus avium shoots cultured on gelrite: a controlled stress response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franck, Thierry; Kevers, Claire; Gaspar, Thomas; Dommes, Jacques; Deby, Carol; Greimers, Roland; Serteyn, Didier; Deby-Dupont, Ginette

    2004-06-01

    Hyperhydricity is a physiological disorder frequently affecting shoots vegetatively propagated in vitro. Hyperhydric shoots are characterised by a translucent aspect due to a chlorophyll deficiency, a not very developed cell wall and a high water content. Hyperhydricity of Prunus avium shoots was expressed in vitro in one multiplication cycle by replacing the gelling agent agar (normal shoots: NS) by gelrite (hyperhydric shoots: HS). P. avium shoots evolving towards the hyperhydric state produced higher amounts of ethylene, polyamines (PAs) and proline, which are substances considered as stress markers. A higher activity of glutathione peroxidase (GPX; EC 1.11.1.9), involved in organic hydroperoxide elimination, suggested an increased production of these compounds in HS. The unchanged free fatty acid composition indicated no HS membrane damages compared to NS. The ploidy level of HS nuclei was not affected, but the bigger size and the lower percentage of nuclei during the S phase suggested a slowing down of the cell cycle. The results argued for a stress response of the HS, but no signs of oxidative damages of lipid membrane and nucleus were observed. The discussion points out paradoxical results in a classical analysis of stress and suggests an alternative way of defense mechanisms in HS, involving homeostatic regulation and controlled degradation processes to maintain integrity and vital functions of the cell.

  13. Detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Mycobacterium avium Complexes by Real-Time PCR in Bovine Milk from Brazilian Dairy Farms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezerra, André Vinícius Andrade; Dos Reis, Emily Marques; Rodrigues, Rogério Oliveira; Cenci, Alexander; Cerva, Cristine; Mayer, Fabiana Quoos

    2015-05-01

    Foodborne diseases are a public health problem worldwide. The consumption of contaminated raw milk has been recognized as a major cause of transmission of bovine tuberculosis to humans. Other mycobacteria that may be present in raw milk and may cause diseases are those belonging to the Mycobacterium avium complex. In this study, molecular biology tools were applied to investigate raw milk contamination with Mycobacterium spp. in family dairy farms from Rio Grande do Sul, southern Brazil. Furthermore, different variables related to the source of the milk, herd characteristics, and management were evaluated for their effect on milk contamination. Five hundred and two samples were analyzed, of which 354 were from the Northwest region (102 farms with samples from 93 bulk tanks and 261 animals) and 148 from the South region of the state (22 farms with samples from 23 bulk tanks and 125 animals). Among them, 10 (1.99%) and 7 (1.39%) were positive for Mycobacterium tuberculosis (9 confirmed as Mycobacterium bovis) and M. avium complexes, respectively. There was no difference in the frequencies of positive samples between the regions or the sample sources. Of the positive samples, 4 were collected from a bulk tank (1 positive for M. avium and 3 for M. tuberculosis). Moreover, 1 sample was positive concomitantly for M. tuberculosis and M. avium complexes. On risk analysis, no variable was associated with raw milk contamination by M. tuberculosis complex species. However, washing the udders of all animals and drying them with paper towels were weakly classified as risk factors for M. avium contamination. Positive samples were obtained from both animals and bulk tanks, which emphasizes the importance of tuberculosis control programs and provides evidence that milk monitoring can be used as a control practice. Moreover, the findings of this study reinforce the need for awareness of the problems of raw milk consumption among the general population.

  14. Application of a multiplex PCR assay for Campylobacter fetus detection and subspecies differentiation in uncultured samples of aborted bovine fetuses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iraola, Gregorio; Hernández, Martín; Calleros, Lucía; Paolicchi, Fernando; Silveyra, Silvia; Velilla, Alejandra; Carretto, Luis; Rodríguez, Eliana; Pérez, Ruben

    2012-12-01

    Campylobacter (C.) fetus (epsilonproteobacteria) is an important veterinary pathogen. This species is currently divided into C. fetus subspecies (subsp.) fetus (Cff) and C. fetus subsp. venerealis (Cfv). Cfv is the causative agent of bovine genital Campylobacteriosis, an infectious disease that leads to severe reproductive problems in cattle worldwide. Cff is a more general pathogen that causes reproductive problems mainly in sheep although cattle can also be affected. Here we describe a multiplex PCR method to detect C. fetus and differentiate between subspecies in a single step. The assay was standardized using cultured strains and successfully used to analyze the abomasal liquid of aborted bovine fetuses without any pre-enrichment step. Results of our assay were completely consistent with those of traditional bacteriological diagnostic methods. Furthermore, the multiplex PCR technique we developed may be easily adopted by any molecular diagnostic laboratory as a complementary tool for detecting C. fetus subspecies and obtaining epidemiological information about abortion events in cattle.

  15. Two new subspecies of the leaf-tailed gecko Phyllurus ossa (Lacertilia: Carphodactylidae) from mid-eastern Queensland, Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couper, Patrick; Hoskin, Conrad J

    2013-01-01

    Following the discovery of a new population of Phyllurus ossa on Whitsunday Island in the Cumberland Island Group, eastern Queensland, we conducted both genetic and morphological analyses to assess differences between all known populations. The analyses revealed three genetically distinct, morphologically diagnosable, geographical units. The differences are such that we recognise these as subspecies: Phyllurus ossa ossa restricted to the Mt Ossa/Mt Pelion/ Mt Charlton/ St Helens Gap area; P. ossa hobsoni subsp. nov. on Mt Dryander and in the Conway Range and P. ossa tamoya subsp. nov. currently only known from Whitsunday Island. There are now 11 recognised taxa in Phyllurus. The three P. ossa subspecies are narrowly distributed and closely associated with exposed rock in low to mid-elevation vine forests. Their current distributions are shaped by past climate change that progressively contracted and fragmented the distribution of rainforests in eastern Australia. The recognition of these subspecies has land management/conservation implications.

  16. Karyotypic evolution of ribosomal sites in buffalo subspecies and their crossbreed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiago Marafiga Degrandi

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Domestic buffaloes are divided into two group based on cytogenetic characteristics and habitats: the "river buffaloes" with 2n = 50 and the "swamp buffaloes", 2n = 48. Nevertheless, their hybrids are viable, fertile and identified by a 2n = 49. In order to have a better characterization of these different cytotypes of buffaloes, and considering that NOR-bearing chromosomes are involved in the rearrangements responsible for the karyotypic differences, we applied silver staining (Ag-NOR and performed fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH experiments using 18S rDNA as probe. Metaphases were obtained through blood lymphocyte culture of 21 individuals, including river, swamp and hybrid cytotypes. Ag-NOR staining revealed active NORs on six chromosome pairs (3p, 4p, 6, 21, 23, 24 in the river buffaloes, whereas the swamp buffaloes presented only five NOR-bearing pairs (4p, 6, 20, 22, 23. The F1 crossbreed had 11 chromosomes with active NORs, indicating expression of both parental chromosomes. FISH analysis confirmed the numerical divergence identified with Ag-NOR. This result is explained by the loss of the NOR located on chromosome 4p in the river buffalo, which is involved in the tandem fusion with chromosome 9 in this subspecies. A comparison with the ancestral cattle karyotype suggests that the NOR found on the 3p of the river buffalo may have originated from a duplication of ribosomal genes, resulting in the formation of new NOR sites in this subspecies.

  17. The Clavibacter michiganensis subspecies: molecular investigation of gram-positive bacterial plant pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichenlaub, Rudolf; Gartemann, Karl-Heinz

    2011-01-01

    Clavibacter michiganensis subspecies are actinomycete plant pathogens residing mainly in the xylem vessels that infect economically important host plants. In the Clavibacter subspecies michiganensis and sepedonicus, infecting tomato and potato, respectively, essential factors for disease induction are plasmid encoded and loss of the virulence plasmids converts these biotrophic pathogens into endophytes. The genes responsible for successful colonization of the host plant, including evasion/suppression of plant defense reactions, are chromosomally encoded. Several serine proteases seem to be involved in colonization. They are secreted by Clavibacter, but their targets remain unknown. A type 3 secretion system (T3SS) translocating effectors into the plant cells is absent in these gram-positive pathogens. With the development of the modern 'omics technologies for RNA and proteins based on the known genome sequences, a new phase in the investigation of the mechanisms of plant pathogenicity has begun to allow the genome-wide investigation of the Clavibacter-host interaction. Copyright © 2011 by Annual Reviews. All rights reserved.

  18. Electrocardiography in two subspecies of manatee (Trichechus manatus latirostris and T. m. manatus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegal-Willott, Jessica; Estrada, Amara; Bonde, Robert; Wong, Arthur; Estrada, Daniel J; Harr, Kendal

    2006-12-01

    Electrocardiographic (ECG) measurements were recorded in two subspecies of awake, apparently healthy, wild manatees (Trichechus manatus latirostris and T. m. manatus) undergoing routine field examinations in Florida and Belize. Six unsedated juveniles (dependent and independent calves) and 6 adults were restrained in ventral recumbency for ECG measurements. Six lead ECGs were recorded for all manatees and the following parameters were determined: heart rate and rhythm; P, QRS, and T wave morphology, amplitude, and duration; and mean electrical axis (MEA). Statistical differences using a t-test for equality of means were determined. No statistical difference was seen based on sex or subspecies of manatees in the above measured criteria. Statistical differences existed in heart rate (P = 0.047), P wave duration (P = 0.019), PR interval (P = 0.025), and MEA (P = 0.021) between adult manatees and calves. Our findings revealed normal sinus rhythms, no detectable arrhythmias, prolonged PR and QT intervals, prolonged P wave duration, and small R wave amplitude as compared with cetacea and other marine mammals. This paper documents the techniques for and baseline recordings of ECGs in juvenile and adult free-living manatees. It also demonstrates that continual assessment of cardiac electrical activity in the awake manatee can be completed and can be used to aid veterinarians and biologists in routine health assessment, during procedures, and in detecting the presence of cardiac disease or dysfunction.

  19. PREVALENCE OF MYCOPLASMA CAPRICOLUM SUBSPECIES CAPRICOLUM AND MYCOPLASMA PUTREFACIENS IN GOATS IN PISHIN DISTRICT OF BALOCHISTAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. AWAN, F. ABBAS, M. YASINZAI1, R. A. J. NICHOLAS2, S. BABAR, R. D. AYLING2, M. A. ATTIQUE AND Z. AHMED

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Several Mycoplasma species cause serious and economically important diseases in goats world-wide. Forty goat flocks in the Pishin district of Balochistan province of Pakistan were examined for the clinical cases of contagious caprine pleuropneumonia (CCPP during 2008. Thirty goats suspected for CCPP on the basis of respiratory symptoms were euthanized for post mortem examination, microbiological and molecular studies. Two types of Mycoplasma species were isolated and identified by biochemical and growth inhibition (GI tests and polymerase chain reaction (PCR. Mycoplasma capricolum subspecies capricolum was isolated from 12(40% of the nasal swabs and 12(40% of the respective lung cultures, whereas 2(6.7% Mycoplasma putrefaciens (Mp isolates from nasal swab and lung cultures and 1(3.3% from liver and intestine cultures were recovered. We report probably for the very first time the isolation and identification of Mycoplasma capricolum subspecies capricolum (Mcc and Mp from the nasal swabs and lungs of goats with respiratory problems in Pishin district of Balochistan. Experimental studies to reproduce pneumonia or pleuropneumonia by Mcc and Mp organisms in susceptible goats or other laboratory animal models are further needed.

  20. Molecular Detection of Persistent Francisella tularensis Subspecies holarctica in Natural Waters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Broman

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Tularemia, caused by the bacterium Francisella tularensis, where F. tularensis subspecies holarctica has long been the cause of endemic disease in parts of northern Sweden. Despite this, our understanding of the natural life-cycle of the organism is still limited. During three years, we collected surface water samples (n=341 and sediment samples (n=245 in two areas in Sweden with endemic tularemia. Real-time PCR screening demonstrated the presence of F. tularenis lpnA sequences in 108 (32% and 48 (20% of the samples, respectively. The 16S rRNA sequences from those samples all grouped to the species F. tularensis. Analysis of the FtM19InDel region of lpnA-positive samples from selected sampling points confirmed the presence of F. tularensis subspecies holarctica-specific sequences. These sequences were detected in water sampled during both outbreak and nonoutbreak years. Our results indicate that diverse F. tularensis-like organisms, including F. tularensis subsp. holarctica, persist in natural waters and sediments in the investigated areas with endemic tularemia.

  1. Population Genetics of Seaside Sparrow (Ammodramus maritimus) Subspecies along the Gulf of Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woltmann, Stefan; Stouffer, Philip C.; Bergeon Burns, Christine M.; Woodrey, Mark S.; Cashner, Mollie F.; Taylor, Sabrina S.

    2014-01-01

    Seaside Sparrows (Ammodramus maritimus) along the Gulf of Mexico are currently recognized as four subspecies, including taxa in Florida (A. m. juncicola and A. m. peninsulae) and southern Texas (Ammodramus m. sennetti), plus a widespread taxon between them (A. m. fisheri). We examined population genetic structure of this “Gulf Coast” clade using microsatellite and mtDNA data. Results of Bayesian analyses (Structure, GeneLand) of microsatellite data from nine locations do not entirely align with current subspecific taxonomy. Ammodramus m. sennetti from southern Texas is significantly differentiated from all other populations, but we found evidence of an admixture zone with A. m. fisheri near Corpus Christi. The two subspecies along the northern Gulf Coast of Florida are significantly differentiated from both A. m. sennetti and A. m. fisheri, but are not distinct from each other. We found a weak signal of isolation by distance within A. m. fisheri, indicating this population is not entirely panmictic throughout its range. Although continued conservation concern is warranted for all populations along the Gulf Coast, A. m. fisheri appears to be more secure than the far smaller populations in south Texas and the northern Florida Gulf Coast. In particular, the most genetically distinct populations, those in Texas south of Corpus Christi, occupy unique habitats within a very small geographic range. PMID:25412194

  2. Bacteremia with an iliopsoas abscess and osteomyelitis of the femoral head caused by Enterococcus avium in a patient with end-stage kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okada, Akira; Hangai, Mika; Oda, Toshimi

    2015-01-01

    A 70-year-old man on hemodialysis for end-stage kidney disease due to polycystic kidney disease presented with hip pain on extension and a high C-reactive protein level. Further examinations revealed an iliopsoas abscess and femoral head osteomyelitis caused by Enterococcus avium (E. avium) detected in blood and pus cultures. Complete resolution of the infection with ampicillin-resistant E. avium required six months of vancomycin therapy and two surgical drainage procedures. There have been no previous case reports in which both blood and abscess cultures confirmed E. avium infection. Careful attention should be paid to the detection of non-specific symptoms in patients on hemodialysis, with blood cultures being essential in such cases.

  3. Treatment with antibiotics is detrimental to the recovery of viable Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis cultured from milk and colostrum of dairy cows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antibiotic cocktails are frequently used as secondary decontaminants prior to the culture of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP). This study investigated whether secondary incubation with an antibiotic cocktail containing vancomycin, nalidixic acid, and amphotericin B after primary exp...

  4. Immunoregulatory effects of Taishan Pinus massoniana pollen polysaccharide on chicks co-infected with avian leukosis virus and Bordetella avium early in ovo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Fanxia; Xue, Cong; Wu, Cun; Zhao, Xue; Qu, Tinghe; He, Xiaohua; Guo, Zhongkun; Zhu, Ruiliang

    2014-04-01

    In recent years, co-infection of chicken embryos with immunosuppressive viruses and bacteria occurs with an annually increasing frequency. Consequently, studies on new and safe immunoregulators, especially plant polysaccharides, have become a popular topic in the poultry industry. In the present study, we selected 300 specific pathogen free embryonated eggs, which were injected with subgroup B avian leukosis virus (ALV-B) and Bordetella avium (B. avium) to establish an artificial co-infection model. The chicks that hatched from these co-infected embryonated eggs were treated with Taishan Pinus massoniana pollen polysaccharide (TPPPS). Results indicated that relevant indices in the co-infection group were significantly lower than that in B. avium-only group. Furthermore, pathogenicity of B. avium was exacerbated, with the chicks exhibiting decreased body weights. The TPPPS groups exhibited gradual improvements in immune function and developmental status. Therefore, in terms of improving immunologic function and production performance, TPPPS could be used as immunoregulator for immune responses.

  5. Satellite tracking of the migratory pathways of the first-year Lesser Black-backed Gulls Larus fuscus departing from the breeding grounds of different subspecies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pütz, Klemens; Rahbek, Carsten; Saurola, Pertti

    2007-01-01

    study group. First-year birds from the Danish intermedius subspecies migrated either southwest along the coast of the North Sea or through central Europe to Algeria. By contrast, first-year birds from the Finnish fuscus subspecies migrated on a south-southeastern course towards Ukraine and the Bosporus...

  6. Isolation of Bartonella henselae and Two New Bartonella Subspecies, Bartonellakoehlerae Subspecies boulouisii subsp. nov. and Bartonella koehlerae Subspecies bothieri subsp. nov. from Free-Ranging Californian Mountain Lions and Bobcats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chomel, Bruno B; Molia, Sophie; Kasten, Rickie W; Borgo, Gina M; Stuckey, Matthew J; Maruyama, Soichi; Chang, Chao-Chin; Haddad, Nadia; Koehler, Jane E

    2016-01-01

    Domestic cats are the natural reservoir of Bartonella henselae, B. clarridgeiae and B. koehlerae. To determine the role of wild felids in the epidemiology of Bartonella infections, blood was collected from 14 free-ranging California mountain lions (Puma concolor) and 19 bobcats (Lynx rufus). Bartonella spp. were isolated from four (29%) mountain lions and seven (37%) bobcats. These isolates were characterized using growth characteristics, biochemical reactions, molecular techniques, including PCR-RFLP of selected genes or interspacer region, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), partial sequencing of several genes, and DNA-DNA hybridization. Two isolates were identical to B. henselae genotype II. All other isolates were distinguished from B. henselae and B. koehlerae by PCR-RFLP of the gltA gene using endonucleases HhaI, TaqI and AciI, with the latter two discriminating between the mountain lion and the bobcat isolates. These two novel isolates displayed specific PFGE profiles distinct from B. henselae, B. koehlerae and B. clarridgeiae. Sequences of amplified gene fragments from the three mountain lion and six bobcat isolates were closely related to, but distinct from, B. henselae and B. koehlerae. Finally, DNA-DNA hybridization studies demonstrated that the mountain lion and bobcat strains are most closely related to B. koehlerae. We propose naming the mountain lion isolates B. koehlerae subsp. boulouisii subsp. nov. (type strain: L-42-94), and the bobcat isolates B. koehlerae subsp. bothieri subsp. nov. (type strain: L-17-96), and to emend B. koehlerae as B. koehlerae subsp. koehlerae. The mode of transmission and the zoonotic potential of these new Bartonella subspecies remain to be determined.

  7. Production and proteomic characterisation of purified protein derivative from Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wynne James W

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Effective diagnosis of Johne's disease (JD, particularly at the stage of early subclinical infection, remains one of the greatest challenges for the control of JD worldwide. The IFN-γ test of cell mediated immunity is currently one of the most suitable diagnostics for subclinical infections, however a major limitation of this test is the lack of a standardised purified protein derivative (PPD antigen (also referred to as Johnin PPD or PPDj. While attempting to replace PPDj with more specific individual antigens is an attractive proposition, bacterial culture derived PPDj remains the most effective antigen preparation for the diagnosis of subclinical JD. It may be possible to increase the reproducibility and specificity of PPDj preparations by further characterising and standardising the PPDj production. Results Using a standardised protocol, five in-house preparations of PPDj were prepared from cultures of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP. Compared to PPDs obtained from other institutes/laboratories, these preparations appeared to perform similarly well in the IFN-γ test. Although the broad proteomic composition of all PPDj preparations was remarkably similar, the absolute abundance of individual proteins varied markedly between preparations. All PPDj preparations contained common immunogenic proteins which were also observed in PPD preparations from Mycobacterium avium subsp. avium (PPDa and Mycobacterium bovis (PPDb. Temporal difference in protein secretion of in vitro cultured MAP was observed between 20 and 34 weeks suggesting that the age of MAP culture used for PPDj preparations may markedly influence PPDj composition. Conclusions This study describes a protocol for the production of PPDj and its subsequent proteomic characterisation. The broad proteomic composition of different preparations of PPDj was, for the most part, highly similar. Compositional differences between PPDj preparations were found

  8. Clofazimine Prevents the Regrowth of Mycobacterium abscessus and Mycobacterium avium Type Strains Exposed to Amikacin and Clarithromycin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferro, Beatriz E.; Meletiadis, Joseph; Wattenberg, Melanie; de Jong, Arjan; van Soolingen, Dick; Mouton, Johan W.

    2015-01-01

    Multidrug therapy is a standard practice when treating infections by nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM), but few treatment options exist. We conducted this study to define the drug-drug interaction between clofazimine and both amikacin and clarithromycin and its contribution to NTM treatment. Mycobacterium abscessus and Mycobacterium avium type strains were used. Time-kill assays for clofazimine alone and combined with amikacin or clarithromycin were performed at concentrations of 0.25× to 2× MIC. Pharmacodynamic interactions were assessed by response surface model of Bliss independence (RSBI) and isobolographic analysis of Loewe additivity (ISLA), calculating the percentage of statistically significant Bliss interactions and interaction indices (I), respectively. Monte Carlo simulations with predicted human lung concentrations were used to calculate target attainment rates for combination and monotherapy regimens. Clofazimine alone was bacteriostatic for both NTM. Clofazimine-amikacin was synergistic against M. abscessus (I = 0.41; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.29 to 0.55) and M. avium (I = 0.027; 95% CI, 0.007 to 0.048). Based on RSBI analysis, synergistic interactions of 28.4 to 29.0% and 23.2 to 56.7% were observed at 1× to 2× MIC and 0.25× to 2× MIC for M. abscessus and M. avium, respectively. Clofazimine-clarithromycin was also synergistic against M. abscessus (I = 0.53; 95% CI, 0.35 to 0.72) and M. avium (I = 0.16; 95% CI, 0.04 to 0.35), RSBI analysis showed 23.5% and 23.3 to 53.3% at 2× MIC and 0.25× to 0.5× MIC for M. abscessus and M. avium, respectively. Clofazimine prevented the regrowth observed with amikacin or clarithromycin alone. Target attainment rates of combination regimens were >60% higher than those of monotherapy regimens for M. abscessus and M. avium. The combination of clofazimine with amikacin or clarithromycin was synergistic in vitro. This suggests a potential role for clofazimine in treatment regimens that warrants further

  9. Application of the C(18)-carboxypropylbetaine specimen processing method to recovery of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis from ruminant tissue specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornton, Charles G; MacLellan, Kerry M; Stabel, Judith R; Carothers, Christine; Whitlock, Robert H; Passen, Selvin

    2002-05-01

    The causative agent of Johne's disease is Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis. This is a chronic, debilitating gastrointestinal disorder that affects ruminants and is responsible for significant economic loss. The specimen processing method that combines C(18)-carboxypropylbetaine (CB-18) treatment and lytic enzyme decontamination has been shown to improve the diagnosis of mycobacterioses. This processing method was applied to the isolation of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis from ruminant tissue samples. The BACTEC 12B liquid culture system was used but was supplemented with 1% egg yolk emulsion, 4 microg of mycobactin J, and 0.5% pyruvate (12B/EMP) for use in conjunction with this method. The final concentration of antibiotics used was 10 microg of vancomycin, 30 microg of amphotericin B, and 20 microg of nalidixic acid (VAN) per ml. A 7H10-based solid medium was also used that included mycobactin J, pyruvate, and VAN but excluded the egg yolk emulsion (7H10/MPV). Several M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis isolates were examined during the evaluation of this processing method. It was observed that treatment with lytic enzymes stimulated the growth of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis; however, the growth of one isolate was markedly inhibited due to the presence of vancomycin. Subsequently, the vancomycin concentration in the VAN formulation was reduced to 2 microg/ml. A blinded panel of 60 previously characterized tissue samples from bovine and bison were then processed and analyzed by smear and culture. Historically, 31 and 37 specimens were classified as positive by histology and culture, respectively. The overall sensitivity and specificity of smear relative to culture following CB-18 processing were 97.6 and 89.5%, respectively. The 12B/EMP/VAN liquid culture system recovered M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis from 39 specimens, whereas 7H10/MPV and Herrold's egg yolk media recovered M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis from 26 and 16 specimens, respectively

  10. Management factors related to seroprevalences to bovine viral-diarrhoea virus, bovine-leukosis virus, Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis, and Neospora caninum in dairy herds in the Canadian Maritimes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Junwook; VanLeeuwen, John A; Weersink, Alfons; Keefe, Gregory P

    2002-09-10

    Bovine viral-diarrhoea (BVD), enzootic bovine leukosis (EBL), Johne's disease (JD), and neosporosis lower on-farm productivity, reduce export competitiveness, and increase consumer concerns regarding safety. Our purpose was to examine the relationship between 27 control practices and the estimated true seroprevalences for these four diseases for 2604 cattle in 90 dairy herds in the Maritimes provinces of Canada. Overall, 37.8, 20.4, 3.4, and 19.2% of all sampled cattle were truly exposed to the agents of BVD, EBL, JD, and neosporosis, respectively. The median within-herd true prevalences were 0, 9.3, 0, and 12.3%, respectively. Factor analysis reduced the 27 control practices to two highly correlated factors. Tobit-regression analyses determined that vaccination practices were associated with reduced prevalence of exposure for Bovine viral-diarrhoea and EBL. Also, farms that tended to purchase their dairy animals were associated with higher seroprevalence for Johnes' disease. Neither of these two factors was associated with the seroprevalence of Neospora caninum infection. The few routine biosecurity measures that were investigated in this study were generally not related to the seroprevalences of these farms.

  11. Therapeutic Effects of a New “Indigenous Vaccine” Developed Using Novel Native “Indian Bison Type” Genotype of Mycobacterium avium Subspecies paratuberculosis for the Control of Clinical Johne's Disease in Naturally Infected Goatherds in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. V. Singh

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Therapeutic efficacy of an “Indigenous vaccine” has been evaluated with respect to a commercial vaccine (Gudair, Spain, for the control of clinical Johne's disease (JD in naturally infected goatherds. Seventy-one goats (JD positive were randomly divided into 3 groups (“Bison”, “Gudair” and “Sham-immunized”. After vaccination, goats were monitored for physical condition, morbidity, mortality, body weights, shedding of M. paratuberculosis (MAP in feces, internal condition and lesions, as well as humoral and cell-mediated immune responses for 210 days. Study showed marked overall improvement in physical condition of vaccinated goats and average body weight gain was significantly higher (P<.05 in “Bison” group as compared to “Sham-immunized” goats. Mortality due to JD was significantly (P<.05 lower in vaccinated groups than in “sham-immunized”. Morbidity rates (due to diarrhea and weakness were lower in “Bison” group as compared to other groups. Died goats from vaccinated groups showed regression of gross JD lesions and regeneration of fat layer around visceral organs while “Sham-immunized” goats exhibited frank lesions. Vaccinated goats had higher protective CMI response and also higher antibody titer for the trial period as compared to “Sham immunized”. Both vaccines also reduced shedding of MAP in feces significantly (P<.05. Though the two vaccines effectively restricted the severity of clinical symptoms of JD, however “Indigenous vaccine” was superior in many respects.

  12. Two new species and one new subspecies of the South American catfish genus Corydoras (Pisces, Siluriformes, Callichthyidae)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijssen, H.

    1971-01-01

    This paper contains descriptions and figures of two new species of Corydoras Lacépède, 1803, C. weitzmani from Peru, and C. blochi from Guyana, Brazil, and Venezuela. The latter species is represented by two subspecies, C. blochi blochi from the Amazonas, Branco, Orinoco, and Essequibo drainages, an

  13. Inconsistency of phenotypic and genomic characteristics of Campylobacter fetus subspecies requires re-evaluation of current diagnostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Classification of the Campylobacter fetus subspecies fetus and venerealis was first described in 1959 and was based on the source of isolation (intestinal vs genital) and the ability of the strains to proliferate in cows. Two phenotypic assays (1% glycine tolerance and H2S production) were described...

  14. Identical metabolic rate and thermal conductance in Rock Sandpiper (Calidris ptilocnemis) subspecies with contrasting nonbreeding life histories

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruthrauff, Dan; Dekinga, Anne; Gill, Robert E.; Piersma, Theunis

    2013-01-01

    Closely related species or subspecies can exhibit metabolic differences that reflect site-specific environmental conditions. Whether such differences represent fixed traits or flexible adjustments to local conditions, however, is difficult to predict across taxa. The nominate race of Rock Sandpiper

  15. Systematic Notes on Asian Birds. 64. The range of the Chinese Nuthatch Sitta villosa and an evaluation of subspecies validity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nazarenko, A.A.

    2006-01-01

    A critical analysis of the literature regarding Sitta villosa and the examination of specimens has shown that the range of this species is divisible into three main areas. These are well separated and each population is best treated as a valid subspecies, although for corea, the easternmost populati

  16. A global assessment of the conservation status of the nominate subspecies of Eurasian oystercatcher (Haematopus ostralegus ostralegus)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van de Pol, M.; Atkinson, P.W.; Blew, J.; Duriez, O.P.M.; Ens, B.J.; Hälterlein, B.; Hötker, H.; Laursen, K.; Oosterbeek, K.H.; Petersen, A.; Thorup, O.; Tjørve, K.; Triplet, P.; Yésou, P.

    2014-01-01

    The nominate subspecies of Eurasian Oystercatchers Haematopus ostralegus ostralegus is the most abundant of all oystercatchers and the best studied. The main breeding and wintering areas are centered on the North Sea, but the distribution covers the European Atlantic coast to as far south as Ghana

  17. Description of a new species and subspecies of Idalus Walker from Costa Rica, Honduras and Guatemala (Lepidoptera, Erebidae, Arctiinae, Arctiini)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinoza, Bernardo A.; Janzen, Daniel H.; Winnie Hallwachs;  J. Bolling Sullivan

    2013-01-01

    Abstract A new species and subspecies of Idalus Walker are described from Costa Rica, Honduras and Guatemala. Images of males and females and their genitalia are provided. Locality information and distribution maps for Costa Rica and for Guatemala are included. The biology and phylogeny of Idalus are discussed. PMID:23730178

  18. Description of a new species and subspecies of Idalus Walker from Costa Rica, Honduras and Guatemala (Lepidoptera, Erebidae, Arctiinae, Arctiini)

    OpenAIRE

    Bernardo Espinoza Sanabria; Daniel Janzen; Winnie Hallwachs; J. Bolling Sullivan

    2013-01-01

    Abstract A new species and subspecies of Idalus Walker are described from Costa Rica, Honduras and Guatemala. Images of males and females and their genitalia are provided. Locality information and distribution maps for Costa Rica and for Guatemala are included. The biology and phylogeny of Idalus are discussed.

  19. Similar local, but different systemic, metabolomics responses of closely related pine subspecies to folivory by caterpillars of the processionary moth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rivas-Ubach, A. [Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA USA; CSIC, Global Ecology Unit CREAF-CEAB-CSIC-UAB, Cerdanyola del Vallès, Catalonia Spain; Cerdanyola del Vallès, CREAF, Catalonia Spain; Sardans, J. [CSIC, Global Ecology Unit CREAF-CEAB-CSIC-UAB, Cerdanyola del Vallès, Catalonia Spain; Cerdanyola del Vallès, CREAF, Catalonia Spain; Hódar, J. A. [Grupo de Ecología Terrestre, Departamento de Biología Animal y Ecología, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Granada, Granada Spain; Garcia-Porta, J. [Institute of Evolutionary Biology, CSIC-Universitat Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona Spain; Guenther, A. [Department of Earth System Science, University of California, Irvine CA USA; Global Change Research Centre, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Brno Czech Republic; Oravec, M. [Global Change Research Centre, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Brno Czech Republic; Urban, O. [Global Change Research Centre, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Brno Czech Republic; Peñuelas, J. [CSIC, Global Ecology Unit CREAF-CEAB-CSIC-UAB, Cerdanyola del Vallès, Catalonia Spain; Cerdanyola del Vallès, CREAF, Catalonia Spain; Leiss, K.

    2016-05-16

    Plants respond locally and systemically to herbivore attack. Most of the research conducted on plant-herbivore relationships at elemental and molecular levels have focused on nutrients or/and certain molecular compounds or specific families of defensive metabolites showing that herbivores tend to select plant individuals or species with higher nutrient concentrations and to avoid those with higher levels of phenolics and terpenes. Unfortunately, the defensive role of phenolics in conifers is still unclear. We performed stoichiometric and metabolomics, local and systemic, analyses in two subspecies of Pinus sylvestris under the herbivorous attack by the caterpillars of the pine processionary moth, an important pest in the Mediterranean Basin. Herbivorous attack was not associated with any of the elements analyzed. Both pine subspecies responded locally to folivory mainly by increasing the concentrations of various terpenes and phenolics. Systemic responses differed between subspecies and most of the metabolites presented intermediate concentrations between those of the affected parts and unattacked trees. Contrary as usually thought, foliar nutrient concentrations did not show to be a main factor of an alleged plant selection by adult female processionary moths for oviposition. Local increases in phenolics were more associated with antioxidant function for protection against oxidative damage produced by folivory. On the other hand, terpenes were directly related to defense against herbivores. Herbivory attack produced a general systemic shift in pines, including both primary and secondary metabolisms, that was, however, less intense and chemically different from the local responses. Subspecies responded similarly locally but differently to folivory at systemic level.

  20. Use of intron-exonic marker in assessment of genetic diversity of two subspecies of Thymus daenensis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Ismaili

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Study of genetic diversity in medicinal plant is very important for improvement and evolutionary variations. In this study, assessment of genetic diversity in two subspecies of Thymus daenensis was evaluated, using intron-exonic markers. Thirty primers produced 633 polymorphic bands (98% polymorphism. The highest polymorphic information content (PIC included ISJ5 and ISJ9 primers and the lowest PIC also included IT15-32 primer. The highest marker index (MI produced by IT10-6 primer. Results of Analysis of Molecular Variance (AMOVA showed that intra-sub specific variation was more than inter-sub specific variation. Dendrogram obtained from Cluster analysis, using NTSYS-pc software and UPGMA method based on Dice's similarity matrix, divided accessions into 4 groups. The maximum range of genetic similarity was observed between two accessions of sub-species daenensis. Two accessions of Fars and Semnan formed a separate group. Results showed that clustering based on molecular data and principal coordinate analysis had a medium alignment. Grouping based on cluster analysis also could separate two subspecies of Thymus daenensis. Results obtained from this study showed that intron-exonic markers had an effective potential in assessment of genetic relationships between the two sub-species of daenensis.

  1. Streptococcus dysgalactiae subsp. equisimilis Isolated From Infections in Dogs and Humans: Are Current Subspecies Identification Criteria accurate?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciszewski, Marcin; Zegarski, Kamil; Szewczyk, Eligia M

    2016-11-01

    Streptococcus dysgalactiae is a pyogenic species pathogenic both for humans and animals. Until recently, it has been considered an exclusive animal pathogen causing infections in wild as well as domestic animals. Currently, human infections are being reported with increasing frequency, and their clinical picture is often similar to the ones caused by Streptococcus pyogenes. Due to the fact that S. dysgalactiae is a heterogeneous species, it was divided into two subspecies: S. dysgalactiae subsp. equisimilis (SDSE) and S. dysgalactiae subsp. dysgalactiae (SDSD). The first differentiation criterion, described in 1996, was based on strain isolation source. Currently applied criteria, published in 1998, are based on hemolysis type and Lancefield group classification. In this study, we compared subspecies identification results for 36 strains isolated from clinical cases both in humans and animals. Species differentiation was based on two previously described criteria as well as MALDI-TOF and genetic analyses: RISA and 16S rRNA genes sequencing. Antimicrobial susceptibility profiles were also determined according to CLSI guidelines. The results presented in our study suggest that the subspecies differentiation criteria previously described in the above two literature positions seem to be inaccurate in analyzed group of strains, the hemolysis type on blood agar, and Lancefield classification should not be here longer considered as criteria in subspecies identification. The antimicrobial susceptibility tests indicate emerging of multiresistant human SDSE strains resistant also to vancomycin, linezolid and tigecycline, which might pose a substantial problem in treatment.

  2. DNA barcoding of gypsy moths from China (Lepidoptera: Erebidae) reveals new haplotypes and divergence patterns within gypsy moth subspecies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang Chen; Youqing Luo; Melody A. Keena; Ying Wu; Peng Wu; Juan Shi

    2015-01-01

    The gypsy moth from Asia (two subspecies) is considered a greater threat to North America than European gypsy moth, because of a broader host range and females being capable of flight. Variation within and among gypsy moths from China (nine locations), one of the native countries of Asian gypsy moth, were compared using DNA barcode sequences (658 bp of mtDNA cytochrome...

  3. Mycobacterium avium-related epizootic in free-ranging lesser flamingos in Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kock, N D; Kock, R A; Wambua, J; Kamau, G J; Mohan, K

    1999-04-01

    An epizootic in free-ranging lesser flamingos (Phoeniconaias minor) in Kenya resulted in more than 18,500 deaths from August through mid-November 1993. Disease was concentrated along the shores of Rift Valley Lakes Bogoria and Nakuru (Kenya) and did not involve any of the other avian or mammalian species frequenting the lakes. Coincidental to the outbreak was a bloom of algae on Lake Bogoria, toxins from which were first suspected to be causative. Discrete necrotic and granulomatous lesions were often noted in spleen and liver, and Mycobacterium avium serovar I was isolated from both organs. Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa also were often recovered in pure culture from liver. Gross and histopathological evaluation of the cases disclosed signs of acute sepsis and also chronic, potentially life-threatening lesions of mycobacteriosis, primarily involving the spleen and liver. Lesions typical for algae toxicosis were not seen in any birds. Deaths were attributed to septicemia complicated in those affected, by mycobacteriosis.

  4. Apparent Prevalence of Beef Carcasses Contaminated with Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis Sampled from Danish Slaughter Cattle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hisako Okura

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Presence of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP in beef has been reported as a public health concern because asymptomatically infected cattle may contain MAP in tissues that are used for human consumption. Associations between MAP carcasses contamination and animal characteristics such as age, breed, production type, and carcass classification were assessed. Cheek muscles from 501 carcasses were sampled cross-sectionally at a Danish abattoir and tested for presence of viable MAP and MAP DNA by bacterial culture and IS900 realtime PCR, respectively. Cheek muscle tissues from carcasses of two dairy cows were positive by culture whereas 4% of the animals were estimated with ≥10 CFU/gram muscle based on realtime PCR. Age was found to be associated with carcass contamination with MAP. The observed viable MAP prevalence in beef carcasses was low. However, detection of MAP and MAP DNA in muscle tissues suggested that bacteremia occurred in slaughtered cattle.

  5. Effect of pH on the in vitro potency of clarithromycin against Mycobacterium avium complex.

    OpenAIRE

    Truffot-Pernot, C; Ji, B; Grosset, J

    1991-01-01

    Employing 7H11 agar medium at pH 6.6, the MICs of clarithromycin for 50% (MIC50) and 90% (MIC90) of 19 strains of Mycobacterium avium complex were 8 and 16 micrograms/ml, respectively. However, the MICs were 2 to 3 log2 dilutions lower in the 7H11 medium adjusted to pH 7.4, and the MICs on 10% OADC (oleic acid-albumin-dextrose-catalase)-enriched Mueller-Hinton agar at pH 7.3 were also 2 log2 dilutions lower than those measured on 7H11 agar at pH 6.6. Therefore, clarithromycin is more active a...

  6. Identification and comparative analysis of a genomic island in Mycobacterium avium subsp. hominissuis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahiri, Annesha; Sanchini, Andrea; Semmler, Torsten; Schäfer, Hubert; Lewin, Astrid

    2014-11-03

    Mycobacterium avium subsp. hominissuis (MAH) is an environmental bacterium causing opportunistic infections. The objective of this study was to identify flexible genome regions in MAH isolated from different sources. By comparing five complete and draft MAH genomes we identified a genomic island conferring additional flexibility to the MAH genomes. The island was absent in one of the five strains and had sizes between 16.37 and 84.85kb in the four other strains. The genes present in the islands differed among strains and included phage- and plasmid-derived genes, integrase genes, hypothetical genes, and virulence-associated genes like mmpL or mce genes. Copyright © 2014 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. The international epidemiology of disseminated Mycobacterium avium complex infection in AIDS. International MAC Study Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fordham von Reyn, C; Arbeit, R D; Tosteson, A N; Ristola, M A; Barber, T W; Waddell, R; Sox, C H; Brindle, R J; Gilks, C F; Ranki, A; Bartholomew, C; Edwards, J; Falkinham, J O; O'Connor, G T

    1996-08-01

    To determine rates of disseminated Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) infection among AIDS patients in developed and developing countries, and to determine whether different rates reflect differences in exposure or immunity, or both. Prospective cohort study. University hospitals and outpatient AIDS programs. HIV-infected subjects with CD4 counts or = 5 mm were present in 20% of patients from Kenya compared to 1% at other sites (P swimming in an indoor pool, history of bronchoscopy, regular consumption of raw or partially cooked fish/shellfish and treatment with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor. Rates of disseminated MAC in AIDS are higher in developed than developing countries and are due to both differences in exposure and differences in immunity. These data provide a rationale for prevention of MAC through both active immunization and reduction in exposure to the organism.

  8. Disseminated Mycobacterium avium complex disease in a patient with left ventricular assist device (Heart Mate II).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordioli, Maddalena; Del Bravo, Paola; Rigo, Fabio; Azzini, Anna Maria; Merighi, Mara; Forni, Alberto; Concia, Ercole

    2015-09-01

    Although disseminated Mycobacterium avium complex disease occurs mainly in immunocompromised hosts, especially HIV-infected patients in the last stage of the disease (AIDS), this condition is still rare in immunocompetent subjects. We report the case of a Caucasian man who received a left ventricular assist device two years before as a bridge to heart transplantation, that began to present signs and symptoms of mycobacterial infection. The diagnostic work-up we performed showed the presence of Mycobacterium intracellulare in lungs and both peripherical and bone marrow blood. Although evaluated, we found no abnormalities in the patient's immune system that can be related to mycobacterial infection. The beginning of a specific therapy made the patient slowly improve and further nuclear medicine assay (PET-TC) showed a good reduction in radio-labelled drug captation.

  9. Analysis of wild sweet cherry (Prunus avium L. germplasm diversity in south-east Serbia

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    Mratinić Evica

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Ten wild growing sweet cherry (Prunus avium L. genotypes from South-East Serbia with different fruit skin color were analyzed for its phenological, morphological and chemical traits. Agronomic evaluation of germplasm accessions revealed considerable diversity among different accessions for all the characters studied. The analysis of variance revealed significant differences among all genotypes for almost all examined properties. Cluster analysis showed adequate grouping of wild sweet cherry genotypes according to pomological characterization and distinguished them into two distinct groups. The first group had two subgroups and consisted of seven genotypes, while the second one included only three accessions. Despite of the significant differences among genotypes, the total concentration of phenols made a clear separation between the clusters. The level of genetic diversity in these wild sweet cherry genotypes is very high and therefore these trees are useful sources of variability for attributes studied and can be employed in further breeding programs or conservation.

  10. Genetic diversity in wild sweet cherries (Prunus avium) in Turkey revealed by SSR markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ercisli, S; Agar, G; Yildirim, N; Duralija, B; Vokurka, A; Karlidag, H

    2011-06-21

    Wild sweet cherry (Prunus avium) trees are abundant in the northern part of Turkey, including the Coruh Valley. We analyzed 18 wild sweet cherry genotypes collected from diverse environments in the upper Coruh Valley in Turkey to determine genetic variation, using 10 SSR primers. These SSR primers generated 46 alleles; the number of alleles per primer ranged from 3 to 7, with a mean of 4.6. The primer PS12A02 gave the highest number of polymorphic bands (N = 7), while CPSCT010, UDAp-401 and UDAp-404 gave the lowest number (N = 3). Seven groups were separated in the dendrogram, although most of the genotypes did not cluster according to phenological and morphological traits. This level of genetic diversity in these wild sweet cherry genotypes is very high and therefore these trees would be useful as breeders for crosses between cultivated sweet cherry and wild genotypes.

  11. Rapid susceptibility testing of Mycobacterium avium complex and Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolated from AIDS patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhople, Arvind M.

    1994-01-01

    In ominous projections issued by both U.S. Public Health Service and the World Health Organization, the epidemic of HIV infection will continue to rise more rapidly worldwide than predicted earlier. The AIDS patients are susceptible to diseases called opportunistic infections of which tuberculosis and Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) infection are most common. This has created an urgent need to uncover new drugs for the treatment of these infections. In the seventies, NASA scientists at Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD, had adopted a biochemical indicator, adenosine triphosphate (ATP), to detect presence of life in extraterrestrial space. We proposed to develop ATP assay technique to determine sensitivity of antibacterial compounds against MAC and M. tuberculosis.

  12. Detection of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis by a Direct In Situ PCR Method

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    Fernando Delgado

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In situ detection of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis is useful for diagnosis and research of paratuberculosis. The aim of this paper was to detect this agent in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue samples by a direct in situ PCR. The technique was performed on ileum or ileocaecal lymph node samples from 8 naturally infected cattle and 1 healthy calf, by using p89 and p92 primers for amplification of IS900 sequence. Moderate positive signal was detected in all positive samples and not in negative control, but tissues resulted were affected in many cases due to the enzymatic treatment and the high temperature exposition. Although the technique was useful for Map detection, the signal was lower than immunohistochemistry probably because of the fixation process. In one case, signal was higher, which might be due to the detection of spheroplasts. Thus, the described method should be recommended when others resulted negative or for spheroplasts detection.

  13. Isolamento de cepas de Mycobacterium avium em búfalos abatidos para consumo

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    Freitas José de Arimatéa

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Duas cepas micobacterianas, isoladas no parênquima pulmonar e linfonodo apical de búfalos abatidos para consumo, procedentes de criatórios localizados na Ilha de Marajó (PA e submetidas à identificação segundo ensaios recomendados para o gênero Mycobacterium, foram identificadas como pertencentes ao complexo Mycobacterium avium. Apresentaram-se considerações relativas à associação desses organismos com a Aids -- e o papel dos alimentos nessa associação --, discutindo-se o impacto que a condição de germes oportunistas das espécies desse complexo têm na pandemia do HIV, assim como o risco potencial representado pelas infecções produzidas nos animais.

  14. Mycobacterium avium complex pulmonary disease: characteristics and treatment in an Irish patient cohort.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Judge, EP

    2016-04-01

    The prevalence of Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) pulmonary disease is increasing globally. However, reliable national and international data relating to its epidemiology and management is lacking. During the period 2003-2014, MAC was isolated from the pulmonary samples of 75 patients at the Irish Mycobacteria Reference Laboratory (IMRL). Most patients (42, 56%) had underlying pulmonary disease, and 37 (49%) had clinical\\/radiographic characteristics consistent with MAC pulmonary disease. However, only 18 patients (24%) fulfilled internationally accepted criteria for diagnosis\\/treatment of this disease. Treatment was started in 13 (72%) of these cases, which is similar to internationally published treatment rates. The diagnosis of significant MAC pulmonary disease can be difficult, and treatment is not always warranted even when diagnostic criteria are met.

  15. Utilization of a ts-sacB selection system for the generation of a Mycobacterium avium serovar-8 specific glycopeptidolipid allelic exchange mutant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irani, Vida R; Lee, Sun-Hwa; Eckstein, Torsten M; Inamine, Julia M; Belisle, John T; Maslow, Joel N

    2004-01-01

    Background Mycobacterium avium are ubiquitous environmental organisms and a cause of disseminated infection in patients with end-stage AIDS. The glycopeptidolipids (GPL) of M. avium are proposed to participate in the pathogenesis of this organism, however, establishment of a clear role for GPL in disease production has been limited by the inability to genetically manipulate M. avium. Methods To be able to study the role of the GPL in M. avium pathogenesis, a ts-sacB selection system, not previously used in M. avium, was employed as a means to achieve homologous recombination for the rhamnosyltransferase (rtfA) gene of a pathogenic serovar 8 strain of M. avium to prevent addition of serovar-specific sugars to rhamnose of the fatty acyl-peptide backbone of GPL. The genotype of the resultant rtfA mutant was confirmed by polymerase chain reaction and southern hybridization. Disruption in the proximal sugar of the haptenic oligosaccharide resulted in the loss of serovar specific GPL with no change in the pattern of non-serovar specific GPL moieties as shown by thin layer chromatography and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. Complementation of wild type (wt) rtfA in trans through an integrative plasmid restored serovar-8 specific GPL expression identical to wt serovar 8 parent strain. Results In this study, we affirm our results that rtfA encodes an enzyme responsible for the transfer of Rha to 6d-Tal and provide evidence of a second allelic exchange mutagenesis system suitable for M. avium. Conclusion We report the second allelic exchange system for M. avium utilizing ts-sacB as double-negative and xylE as positive counter-selection markers, respectively. This system of allelic exchange would be especially useful for M. avium strains that demonstrate significant isoniazid (INH) resistance despite transformation with katG. Through the construction of mutants in GPL or other mycobacterial components, their roles in M. avium pathogenesis, biosynthesis, or drug

  16. Utilization of a ts-sacB selection system for the generation of a Mycobacterium avium serovar-8 specific glycopeptidolipid allelic exchange mutant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belisle John T

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mycobacterium avium are ubiquitous environmental organisms and a cause of disseminated infection in patients with end-stage AIDS. The glycopeptidolipids (GPL of M. avium are proposed to participate in the pathogenesis of this organism, however, establishment of a clear role for GPL in disease production has been limited by the inability to genetically manipulate M. avium. Methods To be able to study the role of the GPL in M. avium pathogenesis, a ts-sacB selection system, not previously used in M. avium, was employed as a means to achieve homologous recombination for the rhamnosyltransferase (rtfA gene of a pathogenic serovar 8 strain of M. avium to prevent addition of serovar-specific sugars to rhamnose of the fatty acyl-peptide backbone of GPL. The genotype of the resultant rtfA mutant was confirmed by polymerase chain reaction and southern hybridization. Disruption in the proximal sugar of the haptenic oligosaccharide resulted in the loss of serovar specific GPL with no change in the pattern of non-serovar specific GPL moieties as shown by thin layer chromatography and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. Complementation of wild type (wt rtfA in trans through an integrative plasmid restored serovar-8 specific GPL expression identical to wt serovar 8 parent strain. Results In this study, we affirm our results that rtfA encodes an enzyme responsible for the transfer of Rha to 6d-Tal and provide evidence of a second allelic exchange mutagenesis system suitable for M. avium. Conclusion We report the second allelic exchange system for M. avium utilizing ts-sacB as double-negative and xylE as positive counter-selection markers, respectively. This system of allelic exchange would be especially useful for M. avium strains that demonstrate significant isoniazid (INH resistance despite transformation with katG. Through the construction of mutants in GPL or other mycobacterial components, their roles in M. avium pathogenesis

  17. Life history attributes of Arizona Grasshopper Sparrow (Ammodramus savannarum ammolegus) and comparisons with other North American subspecies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruth, Janet M.

    2017-01-01

    Ammodramus savannarum ammolegus—commonly referred to as the Arizona Grasshopper Sparrow—occurs in the desert and plains grasslands of southeastern Arizona, southwestern New Mexico, and northern Sonora, Mexico. Although a subspecies of conservation concern, this is the first intensive study of its life history and breeding ecology, providing baseline data and facilitating comparisons with other North American Grasshopper Sparrow subspecies. Specifically, I found A. s. ammolegus males generally weighed less than other subspecies (16.0 ± 0.8 g) but with intermediate exposed culmen length (11.6 ± 0.5 mm) and wing chord length similar to the other two migratory subspecies (62.7 ± 1.5 mm). Territory size for A. s. ammolegus was 0.72 ± 0.37 ha, with some variation between sites and among years, possibly indicating variation in habitat quality across spatial and temporal scales. The return rate for A. s. ammolegus males was 39.2%. Nest initiation for A. s. ammolegus was early to mid-July after the monsoons had begun. Domed nests were constructed on the ground, primarily under native bunch grasses, and frequently with a tunnel extending beyond the nest rim, with nest openings oriented north. Clutch size was 3.97 ± 0.68, with no evidence of Brown-headed Cowbird (Molothrus ater) nest parasitism. Extreme climate factors in the arid Southwest may have affected the life history and morphology of A. s. ammolegus as compared to other subspecies, influencing body size and mass, culmen length, breeding phenology, and nest orientation. Other geographic variation occurred in return rates, clutch size, and nest parasitism rates. The baseline data for A. s. ammolegus obtained in this study will inform future taxonomic and ecological studies as well as conservation planning. Comparisons of A. s. ammolegus morphometrics with those of other subspecies will assist field biologists in distinguishing among subspecies where they overlap, especially on wintering grounds.

  18. Experimental infection of cats with Afipia felis and various Bartonella species or subspecies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chomel, Bruno B; Kasten, Rickie W; Stuckey, Matthew J; Breitschwerdt, Edward B; Maggi, Ricardo G; Henn, Jennifer B; Koehler, Jane E; Chang, Chao-chin

    2014-08-27

    Based upon prior studies, domestic cats have been shown to be the natural reservoir for Bartonella henselae, Bartonella clarridgeiae and Bartonella koehlerae. However, other Bartonella species, such as Bartonella vinsonii subsp. berkhoffii, Bartonella quintana or Bartonella bovis (ex weissii) have been either isolated from or Bartonella DNA sequences PCR amplified and sequenced. In the late 1980s, before B. henselae was confirmed as the etiological agent of cat scratch disease, Afipia felis had been proposed as the causative agent. In order to determine the feline susceptibility to A. felis, B. vinsonii subsp. berkhoffii, Bartonella rochalimae, B. quintana or B. bovis, we sought to detect the presence of bacteremia and seroconversion in experimentally-inoculated cats. Most of the cats seroconverted, but only the cats inoculated with B. rochalimae became bacteremic, indicating that cats are not natural hosts of A. felis or the other Bartonella species or subspecies tested in this study.

  19. Purulent meningoventriculitis caused by Streptococcus equi subspecies zooepidemicus in a snow leopard (Panthera uncia).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, R; Nakamura, S; Hori, H; Kato, Y; Une, Y

    2012-01-01

    Streptococcus equi subspecies zooepidemicus (SEZ) is a zoonotic pathogen that causes respiratory tract infections in man and animals. SEZ infections are very rare in felids. This report describes purulent meningoventriculitis caused by SEZ in an approximately 16-year-old male snow leopard (Panthera uncia). The animal exhibited neurological signs and died 1 month after their onset. On necropsy examination, the surface blood vessels of the brain were swollen and there was an increased volume and turbidity of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Microscopically, suppurative inflammation accompanied by gram-positive cocci was observed in the meninges and near the ventricles. SEZ was isolated from the brain tissue and CSF. This is the first report of infection with SEZ in a felid other than a domestic cat. This animal had not had direct contact with horses, but it had been fed horse flesh that may have been the source of infection.

  20. A Case of Disseminated Infection Caused by Streptococcus equi Subspecies zooepidemicus

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    Marie-France Poulin

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Human infections with Streptococcus equi subspecies zooepidemicus, a group C streptococcus, are very rare and are generally associated with contact with horses, and consumption of unpasteurized milk products, goat cheese or pork. In most cases S zooepidemicus leads to fulminant infections. The case of a middle-aged woman who had sporadic contact with horses is described in the present report. She developed a bacteremia with severe and extensive complications that included meningitis, mitral endocarditis and blindness due to bilateral endophthalmitis. To the authors’ knowledge, this is the first reported case of an endophthalmitis due to S zooepidemicus. Because of a penicillin allergy, the patient was treated with ceftriaxone and rifampin over six weeks and survived. The present case report highlights the severe complications associated with S zooepidemicus infection.

  1. Host responses to the pathogen Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis and beneficial microbes exhibit host sex specificity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karunasena, Enusha; McMahon, K Wyatt; Chang, David; Brashears, Mindy M

    2014-08-01

    Differences between microbial pathogenesis in male and female hosts are well characterized in disease conditions connected to sexual transmission. However, limited biological insight is available on variances attributed to sex specificity in host-microbe interactions, and it is most often a minimized variable outside these transmission events. In this work, we studied two gut microbes-a pathogen, Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis, and a probiotic, Lactobacillus animalis NP-51-and the interaction between each agent and the male and female gastrointestinal systems. This trial was conducted in BALB/c mice (n=5 per experimental group and per sex at a given time point), with analysis at four time points over 180 days. Host responses to M.avium subsp. paratuberculosis and L. animalis were sensitive to sex. Cytokines that were significantly different (P ≤ 0.05) betweenthe sexes included interleukin-1α/β (IL-1α/β), IL-17, IL-6, IL-10, IL-12, and gamma interferon (IFN-) and were dependent on experimental conditions. However, granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), and IL-13/23 showed no sex specificity. A metabolomics study indicated a 0.5- to 2.0-fold (log2 scale) increase in short-chain fatty acids (butyrate and acetate) in males and greater increases in o-phosphocholine or histidine from female colon tissues; variances distinct to each sex were observed with age or long-term probiotic consumption. Two genera, Staphylococcus and Roseburia, were consistently overrepresented in females compared to males; other species were specific to one sex but fluctuated depending on experimental conditions. The differences observed suggest that male and female gut tissues and microbiota respond to newly introduced microorganisms differently and that gut-associated microorganisms with host immune system responses and metabolic activity are supported by biology distinct to the host sex.

  2. Fabrication of a Novel Conductometric Biosensor for Detecting Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis Antibodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven Bolin

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Johne’s disease (JD is one of the most costly bacterial diseases in cattle. In the U.S., economic losses from the disease have been estimated to exceed $1,500,000,000 per year, mainly from the effects of reduced milk production. Current diagnostic tests for JD are laboratory based and many of those tests require specialized equipment and training. Development of rapid and inexpensive diagnostic assays, which are adapted for point-ofcare applications, would aid in the control of JD. In this study, a polyaniline (Pani-based conductometric biosensor, in an immunomigration format, was fabricated for the detection of serum antibody (IgG against the causal organism of JD, Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP. Immobilized Mycobacterium avium purified proteins in the capture membrane were used to detect MAP IgG, previously bound with Pani/anti-bovine IgG* conjugate in the conjugate membrane. After detection, the Pani in the sandwiched captured complex bridges an electrical circuit between the silver electrodes, flanking the capture membrane. The electrical conductance, caused by Pani, was measured as drop in electrical resistance. Testing of the biosensor with known JD positive and negative serum samples demonstrated a significant difference in the mean resistance observed between the groups. This proof-of-concept study demonstrated that a conductometric biosensor could detect MAP IgG in 2 minutes. The biosensor’s speed of detection and the equipment involved would, among other things, support its application towards the various point-ofcare opportunities aimed at JD management and control.

  3. Mycobacterium avium Possesses Extracellular DNA that Contributes to Biofilm Formation, Structural Integrity, and Tolerance to Antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Sasha J; Babrak, Lmar M; Bermudez, Luiz E

    2015-01-01

    Mycobacterium avium subsp. hominissuis is an opportunistic pathogen that is associated with biofilm-related infections of the respiratory tract and is difficult to treat. In recent years, extracellular DNA (eDNA) has been found to be a major component of bacterial biofilms, including many pathogens involved in biofilm-associated infections. To date, eDNA has not been described as a component of mycobacterial biofilms. In this study, we identified and characterized eDNA in a high biofilm-producing strain of Mycobacterium avium subsp. hominissuis (MAH). In addition, we surveyed for presence of eDNA in various MAH strains and other nontuberculous mycobacteria. Biofilms of MAH A5 (high biofilm-producing strain) and MAH 104 (reference strain) were established at 22°C and 37°C on abiotic surfaces. Acellular biofilm matrix and supernatant from MAH A5 7 day-old biofilms both possess abundant eDNA, however very little eDNA was found in MAH 104 biofilms. A survey of MAH clinical isolates and other clinically relevant nontuberculous mycobacterial species revealed many species and strains that also produce eDNA. RAPD analysis demonstrated that eDNA resembles genomic DNA. Treatment with DNase I reduced the biomass of MAH A5 biofilms when added upon biofilm formation or to an already established biofilm both on abiotic surfaces and on top of human pharyngeal epithelial cells. Furthermore, co-treatment of an established biofilm with DNase 1 and either moxifloxacin or clarithromycin significantly increased the susceptibility of the bacteria within the biofilm to these clinically used antimicrobials. Collectively, our results describe an additional matrix component of mycobacterial biofilms and a potential new target to help treat biofilm-associated nontuberculous mycobacterial infections.

  4. GENETIC DIVERSITY OF SOME IRANIAN SWEET CHERRY (PRUNUS AVIUM) CULTIVARS USING MICROSATELLITE MARKERS AND MORPHOLOGICAL TRAITS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farsad, A; Esna-Ashari, M

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to characterize 23 important Iranian sweet cherry (Prunus avium) cultivars collected from different provinces of Iran and 1 foreign cultivar, which was used as control, considered for breeding programs by using 21 microsatellite markers and 27 morphological traits. In sweet cherry (Prunus avium) accessions, leaf, fruit, and stone morphological characters were evaluated during two consecutive years. The study revealed a high variability in the set of evaluated sweet cherry accessions. The majority of important correlations were determined among variables representing fruit and leaf size and variables related to color. Cluster analysis distinguished sweet cherry accessions into two distinct groups. Principal component analysis (PCA) of qualitative and quantitative morphological parameters explained over 86.59% of total variability in the first seven axes. In PCA, leaf traits such as leaf length and width, and fruit traits such as length, width, and weight, and fruit flesh and juice color were predominant in the first two components, indicating that they were useful for the assessment of sweet cherry germplasm characterization. Out of 21 SSR markers, 16 were polymorphic, producing 177 alleles that varied from 4 to 16 alleles (9.35 on average) with a mean heterozygosity value of 0.82 that produced successful amplifications and revealed DNA polymorphisms. Allele size varied from 95 to 290 bp. Cluster analyses showed that the studied sweet cherry genotypes were classified intofive main groups based mainly on their species characteristics and SSR data. In general, our results did not show a clear structuring of genetic variability within the Iranian diffusion area of sweet cherry, so it was not possible to draw any indications on regions of provenance delimitation. The results of this study contribute to a better understanding of sweet cherry genetic variations in Iran, thus making for more efficient programs aimed at preserving biodiversity and

  5. Effects of elevated CO[sub 2] on growth and chloroplast proteins in Prunus avium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilkins, D.; Oosten, J.-J. van; Besford, R.T. (Horticulture Research International, Littlehampton, Sussex (United Kingdom))

    1994-01-01

    A study was conducted of the growth response of Prunus avium L. Stella (wild cherry) to elevated CO[sub 2]. The associated changes in photosynthetic machinery of the leaf tissue were characterized. Self-pollinated seedlings and mature cuttings (clones) from the same parent plant of P. avium were grown for two consecutive growing seasons (about 60 days each) in ambient or elevated CO[sub 2] with high or low nutrient supply. The degree of acclimation of leaf biochemistry and growth response to elevated CO[sub 2] depended on the plant material (seedling or mature cutting) and nutrient supply. There was little or no growth response to elevated CO[sub 2] in seedlings or cuttings in the low nutrient supply treatments, whereas in both seasons, there was a strongly positive growth response to elevated CO[sub 2] in seedlings and cuttings in the high nutrient supply regimes, resulting in increases in the root/shoot ratio and in carbon allocation to the roots. In contrast, the protein content and activity of ribulose-1,5-biophosphate carboxylase-oxygenase (Rubisco, EC 4.1.1.39) were down regulated in elevated CO[sub 2]. The loss of Rubisco on an area basis in plants in the elevated CO[sub 2] treatments was compensated for at the canopy level by increased leaf area. The loss of Rubisco protein was accompanied by decreases in the contents of chlorophyll and the thylakoid membrane proteins D[sub 1], D[sub 2] and cytochrome f, which are involved in light harvesting and photo-electron transport. It is concluded that in the medium- to long-term, the initial stimulation of biomass production by elevated CO[sub 2] may be increasingly offset by a lower photosynthetic capacity per unit leaf area in perennial plants. 27 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  6. [A new subspecies of Heraclides androgeus (Lepidoptera: Papilionidae) and its biogeographical aspects].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas-Fernández, Isabel; Luis-Martínez, Armando; Llorente-Bousquets, Jorge

    2013-06-01

    A new subspecies of Heraclides androgeus (Lepidoptera: Papilionidae) and its biogeographical aspects. Heraclides androgeus epidaurus was described and illustrated by Godman & Salvin in 1890 based on specimens obtained in Veracruz, indicating that their distribution encompassed both the Pacific and Atlantic sides of Mexico. Later authors commented that there were morphological differences between the male wings from both populations. We analyzed, described and nominated Heraclides androgeus reyesorum ssp. nov. Vargas, Llorente & Luis distributed in the Mexican Pacific coast, based on 62 specimens, and compared it with H a. epidaurus from the Gulf of Mexico, based on more than 200 specimens housed at UNAM: Museo de Zoología, Facultad de Ciencias and the Colección Nacional de Insectos of the Instituto de Biologia, as well as some collections from the USA. The main characters were the width of the yellow and black bands on forewings in males, which had a significant difference between the populations of both sides of Mexico, although some characters were variable and showed partial overlap. In the hindwings, the differences were the extent of the subterminal lunules in dorsal and ventral view. We also analyzed the male genitalia, finding notorious differences in both sclerotic processes of the harpe. Subspecific differences between females refer to the brightness and extent of green spots on the hindwings and the extent of lunules in the ventral view. The greatest abundance of H. a. reyesorum ssp. nov. was in the tropical deciduous forest, with gallery forest and in the lower range of the cloud forest, present at altitudes of 500-800 m and 1000-1 750 m, respectively. We discussed the pattern of endemism due to historical vicariant processes and explain the presence of the new subspecies of H. androgeus and other taxa of specific level.

  7. Subspecies of Hypolepis rugosula (Dennstaedtiaceae; Pteridophyta around the world: morphological and biogeographic perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Bond Schwartsburd

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The "Hypolepis rugosula complex" has been the subject of great debate among pteridologists: some have considered H. rugosula a single subcosmopolitan (or circum-Antarctic species, whereas others have considered it a species-complex, encompassing several species. In the 1920s and 1930s, four geographically distinct varietiesof H. rugosula were recognized. In this work, we present a new taxonomy (with new combinations and statuses, as well as typification and full synonymy, together with complete distribution data for the species, with an infraspecific classification based on morphological and biogeographic perspectives. Hypolepis rugosula occurs in southern temperate regions and high-elevation tropical regions of the Americas, Africa (including Madagascar, Oceania and the Philippines, as well as in some isolated oceanic volcanic islands (e.g., Saint Helena and Tristan da Cunha. Here, 15 geographically distinct subspecies are recognized. All subspecies are geographically segregated from each other, except in New Zealand, where two occur sympatrically-possibly due to two different arrival and colonization times. Four patterns of "indument" (referring to catenate and glandular hairs collectively are distinguished. Different lineages are successful in their respective habitats; we observed two lineages with different ploidy levels (tetraploid and octoploid. Although long-distance dispersal is the best explanation for the extant distribution of H. rugosula;we do not exclude vicariance as a possible explanation for their occurrence on the land masses that were once united as Gondwana. Therefore, we are assuming that a fern species could remain unchanged for more than 70 Myr, and we are adopting the refugia theory, albeit with a different focus.

  8. Seasonal and geographic variation of southern blue whale subspecies in the Indian Ocean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samaran, Flore; Stafford, Kathleen M; Branch, Trevor A; Gedamke, Jason; Royer, Jean-Yves; Dziak, Robert P; Guinet, Christophe

    2013-01-01

    Understanding the seasonal movements and distribution patterns of migratory species over ocean basin scales is vital for appropriate conservation and management measures. However, assessing populations over remote regions is challenging, particularly if they are rare. Blue whales (Balaenoptera musculus spp) are an endangered species found in the Southern and Indian Oceans. Here two recognized subspecies of blue whales and, based on passive acoustic monitoring, four "acoustic populations" occur. Three of these are pygmy blue whale (B.m. brevicauda) populations while the fourth is the Antarctic blue whale (B.m. intermedia). Past whaling catches have dramatically reduced their numbers but recent acoustic recordings show that these oceans are still important habitat for blue whales. Presently little is known about the seasonal movements and degree of overlap of these four populations, particularly in the central Indian Ocean. We examined the geographic and seasonal occurrence of different blue whale acoustic populations using one year of passive acoustic recording from three sites located at different latitudes in the Indian Ocean. The vocalizations of the different blue whale subspecies and acoustic populations were recorded seasonally in different regions. For some call types and locations, there was spatial and temporal overlap, particularly between Antarctic and different pygmy blue whale acoustic populations. Except on the southernmost hydrophone, all three pygmy blue whale acoustic populations were found at different sites or during different seasons, which further suggests that these populations are generally geographically distinct. This unusual blue whale diversity in sub-Antarctic and sub-tropical waters indicates the importance of the area for blue whales in these former whaling grounds.

  9. Demographic histories and genetic diversities of Fennoscandian marine and landlocked ringed seal subspecies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyman, Tommi; Valtonen, Mia; Aspi, Jouni; Ruokonen, Minna; Kunnasranta, Mervi; Palo, Jukka U

    2014-09-01

    Island populations are on average smaller, genetically less diverse, and at a higher risk to go extinct than mainland populations. Low genetic diversity may elevate extinction probability, but the genetic component of the risk can be affected by the mode of diversity loss, which, in turn, is connected to the demographic history of the population. Here, we examined the history of genetic erosion in three Fennoscandian ringed seal subspecies, of which one inhabits the Baltic Sea 'mainland' and two the 'aquatic islands' composed of Lake Saimaa in Finland and Lake Ladoga in Russia. Both lakes were colonized by marine seals after their formation c. 9500 years ago, but Lake Ladoga is larger and more contiguous than Lake Saimaa. All three populations suffered dramatic declines during the 20th century, but the bottleneck was particularly severe in Lake Saimaa. Data from 17 microsatellite loci and mitochondrial control-region sequences show that Saimaa ringed seals have lost most of the genetic diversity present in their Baltic ancestors, while the Ladoga population has experienced only minor reductions. Using Approximate Bayesian computing analyses, we show that the genetic uniformity of the Saimaa subspecies derives from an extended founder event and subsequent slow erosion, rather than from the recent bottleneck. This suggests that the population has persisted for nearly 10,000 years despite having low genetic variation. The relatively high diversity of the Ladoga population appears to result from a high number of initial colonizers and a high post-colonization population size, but possibly also by a shorter isolation period and/or occasional gene flow from the Baltic Sea.

  10. Seasonal and geographic variation of southern blue whale subspecies in the Indian Ocean.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flore Samaran

    Full Text Available Understanding the seasonal movements and distribution patterns of migratory species over ocean basin scales is vital for appropriate conservation and management measures. However, assessing populations over remote regions is challenging, particularly if they are rare. Blue whales (Balaenoptera musculus spp are an endangered species found in the Southern and Indian Oceans. Here two recognized subspecies of blue whales and, based on passive acoustic monitoring, four "acoustic populations" occur. Three of these are pygmy blue whale (B.m. brevicauda populations while the fourth is the Antarctic blue whale (B.m. intermedia. Past whaling catches have dramatically reduced their numbers but recent acoustic recordings show that these oceans are still important habitat for blue whales. Presently little is known about the seasonal movements and degree of overlap of these four populations, particularly in the central Indian Ocean. We examined the geographic and seasonal occurrence of different blue whale acoustic populations using one year of passive acoustic recording from three sites located at different latitudes in the Indian Ocean. The vocalizations of the different blue whale subspecies and acoustic populations were recorded seasonally in different regions. For some call types and locations, there was spatial and temporal overlap, particularly between Antarctic and different pygmy blue whale acoustic populations. Except on the southernmost hydrophone, all three pygmy blue whale acoustic populations were found at different sites or during different seasons, which further suggests that these populations are generally geographically distinct. This unusual blue whale diversity in sub-Antarctic and sub-tropical waters indicates the importance of the area for blue whales in these former whaling grounds.

  11. Sequencing and comparative genome analysis of two pathogenic Streptococcus gallolyticus subspecies: genome plasticity, adaptation and virulence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I-Hsuan Lin

    Full Text Available Streptococcus gallolyticus infections in humans are often associated with bacteremia, infective endocarditis and colon cancers. The disease manifestations are different depending on the subspecies of S. gallolyticus causing the infection. Here, we present the complete genomes of S. gallolyticus ATCC 43143 (biotype I and S. pasteurianus ATCC 43144 (biotype II.2. The genomic differences between the two biotypes were characterized with comparative genomic analyses. The chromosome of ATCC 43143 and ATCC 43144 are 2,36 and 2,10 Mb in length and encode 2246 and 1869 CDS respectively. The organization and genomic contents of both genomes were most similar to the recently published S. gallolyticus UCN34, where 2073 (92% and 1607 (86% of the ATCC 43143 and ATCC 43144 CDS were conserved in UCN34 respectively. There are around 600 CDS conserved in all Streptococcus genomes, indicating the Streptococcus genus has a small core-genome (constitute around 30% of total CDS and substantial evolutionary plasticity. We identified eight and five regions of genome plasticity in ATCC 43143 and ATCC 43144 respectively. Within these regions, several proteins were recognized to contribute to the fitness and virulence of each of the two subspecies. We have also predicted putative cell-surface associated proteins that could play a role in adherence to host tissues, leading to persistent infections causing sub-acute and chronic diseases in humans. This study showed evidence that the S. gallolyticus still possesses genes making it suitable in a rumen environment, whereas the ability for S. pasteurianus to live in rumen is reduced. The genome heterogeneity and genetic diversity among the two biotypes, especially membrane and lipoproteins, most likely contribute to the differences in the pathogenesis of the two S. gallolyticus biotypes and the type of disease an infected patient eventually develops.

  12. Rapid differentiation of Francisella species and subspecies by fluorescent in situ hybridization targeting the 23S rRNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trebesius Karlheinz

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Francisella (F. tularensis is the causative agent of tularemia. Due to its low infectious dose, ease of dissemination and high case fatality rate, F. tularensis was the subject in diverse biological weapons programs and is among the top six agents with high potential if misused in bioterrorism. Microbiological diagnosis is cumbersome and time-consuming. Methods for the direct detection of the pathogen (immunofluorescence, PCR have been developed but are restricted to reference laboratories. Results The complete 23S rRNA genes of representative strains of F. philomiragia and all subspecies of F. tularensis were sequenced. Single nucleotide polymorphisms on species and subspecies level were confirmed by partial amplification and sequencing of 24 additional strains. Fluorescent In Situ Hybridization (FISH assays were established using species- and subspecies-specific probes. Different FISH protocols allowed the positive identification of all 4 F. philomiragia strains, and more than 40 F. tularensis strains tested. By combination of different probes, it was possible to differentiate the F. tularensis subspecies holarctica, tularensis, mediasiatica and novicida. No cross reactivity with strains of 71 clinically relevant bacterial species was observed. FISH was also successfully applied to detect different F. tularensis strains in infected cells or tissue samples. In blood culture systems spiked with F. tularensis, bacterial cells of different subspecies could be separated within single samples. Conclusion We could show that FISH targeting the 23S rRNA gene is a rapid and versatile method for the identification and differentiation of F. tularensis isolates from both laboratory cultures and clinical samples.

  13. Novel antigens used to detect cell-mediated immune responses over time in Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis infected cattle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, Heidi; Aagaard, Claus; Nielsen, Søren Saxmose

    at third sampling. The resulted showed that PPDj detect a high percentage as MAP positive animals, as this crude antigen mixture is expected to induce non-specific IFN-γ production. However, the tested latency antigens, some secreted proteins and some peptides of the ESAT-6 family detected a comparable......-6 family and 10 hypothetical proteins: 4 latency proteins, 3 secreted proteins, 2 proteins not present in Mycobacterium avium subsp. avium (MAA) and 1 from an immunological hot spot region. To determine variation of IFN-γ responses, three repeated tests was done with 4 and 5 week intervals...... high percentage of animals as MAP positives. By combining novel antigens higher specificity might be obtained....

  14. Characterization of the intracellular survival of Mycobacterium avium ssp. paratuberculosis: phagosomal pH and fusogenicity in J774 macrophages compared with other mycobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuehnel, M P; Goethe, R; Habermann, A; Mueller, E; Rohde, M; Griffiths, G; Valentin-Weigand, P

    2001-08-01

    The phagosomes containing viable pathogenic mycobacteria, such as Mycobacterium (M.) tuberculosis and Mycobacterium avium ssp. avium (M. avium), are known to be limited in their ability to both acidify and fuse with late (but not early) endocytic organelles. Here, we analysed the pH and fusogenicity of phagosomes containing M. avium ssp. paratuberculosis (M. ptb), the causative agent of paratuberculosis in ruminants. Using the murine J774 macrophage cell line, we compared viable and heat-killed M. ptb and, in addition, viable or dead M. avium, as well as two non-pathogenic mycobacteria, Mycobacterium smegmatis and Mycobacterium gordonae. Electron microscopic analysis revealed that M. ptb persisted intracellularly in phagosomes for up to 15 days. The phagosomes containing live M. ptb and M. avium were significantly reduced in their ability to acquire some markers for the endocytic pathway, such as internalized calcein, BSA-gold or the membrane protein Lamp 2. However, they were almost completely accessible to 70 kDa fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-dextran and Lamp 1. Overall, the phagosomes containing dead pathogenic mycobacteria behaved similarly to the ones containing live non-pathogenic mycobacteria in all experiments. Using FITC-dextran in a novel fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS)-based method, we could also show that the bulk of endocytic compartments, including phagosomes, were only very mildly acidified to approximately pH 6.3 over at least 72 h in J774 cells infected with live M. ptb and M. avium. In contrast, J774 cells treated with heat-killed M. ptb or BSA-coated latex beads showed substantial acidification of the phagosome/endocytic compartments to a pH value of approximately 5.2. After infection with M. smegmatis and M. gordonae, acidification was initially (1-5 h after infection) inhibited, but increased after longer infection to levels similar to those with dead mycobacteria.

  15. Efficacy of various pasteurization time-temperature conditions in combination with homogenization on inactivation of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis in milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Irene R; Williams, Alan G; Rowe, Michael T; Muir, D Donald

    2005-06-01

    The effect of various pasteurization time-temperature conditions with and without homogenization on the viability of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis was investigated using a pilot-scale commercial high-temperature, short-time (HTST) pasteurizer and raw milk spiked with 10(1) to 10(5) M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis cells/ml. Viable M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis was cultured from 27 (3.3%) of 816 pasteurized milk samples overall, 5 on Herrold's egg yolk medium and 22 by BACTEC culture. Therefore, in 96.7% of samples, M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis had been completely inactivated by HTST pasteurization, alone or in combination with homogenization. Heat treatments incorporating homogenization at 2,500 lb/in2, applied upstream (as a separate process) or in hold (at the start of a holding section), resulted in significantly fewer culture-positive samples than pasteurization treatments without homogenization (P homogenization was estimated to be 4.0 to 5.2 log10. The impact of homogenization on clump size distribution in M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis broth suspensions was subsequently assessed using a Mastersizer X spectrometer. These experiments demonstrated that large clumps of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis cells were reduced to single-cell or "miniclump" status by homogenization at 2,500 lb/in2. Consequently, when HTST pasteurization was being applied to homogenized milk, the M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis cells would have been present as predominantly declumped cells, which may possibly explain the greater inactivation achieved by the combination of pasteurization and homogenization.

  16. Typing of Human Mycobacterium avium Isolates in Italy by IS1245-Based Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lari, Nicoletta; Cavallini, Michela; Rindi, Laura; Iona, Elisabetta; Fattorini, Lanfranco; Garzelli, Carlo

    1998-01-01

    All but 2 of 63 Mycobacterium avium isolates from distinct geographic areas of Italy exhibited markedly polymorphic, multibanded IS1245 restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) patterns; 2 isolates showed the low-number banding pattern typical of bird isolates. By computer analysis, 41 distinct IS1245 patterns and 10 clusters of essentially identical strains were detected; 40% of the 63 isolates showed genetic relatedness, suggesting the existence of a predominant AIDS-associated IS1245 RFLP pattern. PMID:9817900

  17. Identification of (+)-erythro-mefloquine as an active enantiomer with greater efficacy than mefloquine against Mycobacterium avium infection in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bermudez, Luiz E; Inderlied, Clark B; Kolonoski, Peter; Chee, Christopher B; Aralar, Priscilla; Petrofsky, Mary; Parman, Toufan; Green, Carol E; Lewin, Anita H; Ellis, William Y; Young, Lowell S

    2012-08-01

    Infection caused by Mycobacterium avium is common in AIDS patients who do not receive treatment with highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) or who develop resistance to anti-HIV therapy. Mefloquine, a racemic mixture used for malaria prophylaxis and treatment, is bactericidal against M. avium in mice. MICs of (+)-erythro-, (-)-erythro-, (+)-threo-, and (-)-threo-mefloquine were 32 μg/ml, 32 μg/ml, 64 μg/ml, and 64 μg/ml, respectively. The postantibiotic effect for (+)-erythro-mefloquine was 36 h (MIC) and 41 h for a concentration of 4× MIC. The mefloquine postantibiotic effect was 25 h (MIC and 4× MIC). After baseline infection was established (7 days), the (+)- and (-)-isomers of the diastereomeric threo- and erythro-α-(2-piperidyl)-2,8-bis(trifluoromethyl)-4-quinolinemethanol were individually used to orally treat C57BL/6 bg(+)/bg(+) beige mice that were infected intravenously with M. avium. Mice were also treated with commercial mefloquine and diluent as controls. After 4 weeks of treatment, the mice were harvested, and the number of bacteria in spleen and liver was determined. Mice receiving (+)- or (-)-threo-mefloquine or (-)-erythro-mefloquine had numbers of bacterial load in tissues similar to those of untreated control mice at 4 weeks. Commercial mefloquine had a bactericidal effect. However, mice given the (+)-erythro-enantiomer for 4 weeks had a significantly greater reduction of bacterial load than those given mefloquine. Thus, (+)-erythro-mefloquine is the active enantiomer of mefloquine against M. avium and perhaps other mycobacteria.

  18. The clinical efficacy of a clarithromycin-based regimen for Mycobacterium avium complex disease: A nationwide post-marketing study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadota, Jun-Ichi; Kurashima, Atsuyuki; Suzuki, Katsuhiro

    2017-05-01

    The revised 2007 American Thoracic Society/Infectious Diseases Society of America statement recommend clarithromycin-based combination therapy for treatment of Mycobacterium avium complex lung disease and stipulates approximately 1 year of continuous treatment after bacilli negative conversion. However, supporting data are insufficient. Our objective was to obtain data on the clinical outcome of clarithromycin-based daily regimens by conducting a nationwide retrospective post-marketing study of M. avium complex lung disease. In accordance with the Japanese guidelines, patients were enrolled in this survey according to their chest radiographic findings and microbiologic test results. They were treated with a multidrug regimen including clarithromycin, rifampicin, and ethambutol (clarithromycin-based regimen) until bacilli negative conversion, and the treatment was continued for approximately 1 year after the initial conversion. Data were collected before administration, at the time of bacilli negative conversion, at the end of treatment, and at 6 months after the end of treatment. Of the 466 subjects enrolled in the study, 271 patients who received clarithromycin at 800 mg/day underwent evaluation for M. avium complex disease. The final bacilli negative conversion rate in those patients was 94.7%. The bacteriological relapse rate was 5.0% (5/100 patients). Bacteriological relapse was noted in patients treated for less than 15 months after conversion. No life-threatening or serious adverse drug reactions were observed. This study demonstrated that a clarithromycin-based daily regimen can yield a high bacteriological conversion rate in M. avium complex disease. After conversion, treatment for less than 15 months might be insufficient to prevent bacteriological relapse. Copyright © 2017 Japanese Society of Chemotherapy and The Japanese Association for Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Response to Switch from Intermittent Therapy to Daily Therapy for Refractory Nodular Bronchiectatic Mycobacterium avium Complex Lung Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Koh, Won-Jung; Jeong, Byeong-Ho; Jeon, Kyeongman; Park, Hye Yun; Kim, Su-Young; Huh, Hee Jae; Ki, Chang-Seok; Lee, Nam Yong; Shin, Sung Jae; Daley, Charles L.

    2015-01-01

    Intermittent three-times-weekly antibiotic therapy is recommended for the initial treatment of patients with noncavitary nodular bronchiectatic Mycobacterium avium complex lung disease. Although some experts recommend switching from intermittent to daily therapy for patients whose sputum has persistent positive cultures after intermittent therapy, the clinical efficacy of these modifications is unknown. Of 20 patients whose sputum had persistent positive cultures after 12 months of intermitte...

  20. Subspecies identification of Chimpanzees Pan troglodytes (Primates: Hominidae from the National Zoo of the Metropolitan Park of Santiago, Chile, using mitochondrial DNA sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.A. Vega

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Natural populations of Chimpanzees Pan troglodytes are declining because of hunting and illegal live animal trafficking. Four subspecies of Chimpanzee have been reported: Pan troglodytes troglodytes, P.t. schweinfurthii, P.t. verus and P.t. ellioti, which have remained geographically separated by natural barriers such as the rivers Niger, Sanaga and Ubangi in central Africa. Sequence analysis of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA has been used for the determination of these subspecies, which indirectly can also suggest their geographic origin. It was decided to identify the subspecies and the geographic origin of three captive chimpanzees of the National Zoo of the Metropolitan Park of Santiago (Chile, by analyzing their mitochondrial DNA. DNA was extracted from the saliva of three adult chimpanzees (two males and one female. After the analysis of sequences of the mitochondrial hypervariable region (HVI, a phylogenetic tree was constructed using mitochondrial sequences of known Pan troglodytes subspecies. Molecular phylogeny analysis revealed that the chimpanzees are likely to belong to three different subspecies: P.t. schweinfurthii, P.t. verus and P.t. troglodytes. Identification of subspecies of the three chimpanzees of the National Zoo of the Metropolitan Park of Santiago (Chile was possible due to mtDNA analysis. Future identification of chimpanzees will allow the development of a studbook for the chimpanzee subspecies in other Latin American zoos.

  1. Residual effects of Mycobacterium avium infection on susceptibility of sheep to copper toxicity and efficacy of treatment with tetrathiomolybdate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suttle, N F

    2012-07-07

    Posthaemolytic copper poisoning (post-HCP) in one of six, one-year-old, uninfected sheep (group O) on a Mycobacterium avium experiment prompted an evaluation of copper status and hepatotoxicity in 17 surviving cohorts. Group O had higher mean plasma Cu and δ-glutamyl transferase (GGT) activity and more variable bile acid (BA) concentrations and glutamate dehydrogenase activities (GDH) than two groups infected with M avium soon after birth. Ammonium tetrathiomolybdate (TTM; 3 x 1.7 mg/kg LW) was given subcutaneously over seven days and the pelleted, complete diet replaced by hay, low in copper. Plasma BA immediately declined and was followed by GDH, but erythrocyte superoxide dismutase activity (ESOD) became severely inhibited and took 18 days to recover. Plasma BA and GDH rose sharply after 18 days in uninfected sheep and they became hypercupraemic. TTM treatment was repeated from day 42 and had removed all group differences by day 110 but only after further inhibition of ESOD. M avium infections probably lessened the severity of pre-HCP by reducing copper retention but may predispose grazing livestock to hypocupraemia. The capacity of TTM to reduce liver Cu has probably been overestimated and side effects on cuproenzyme activity underestimated.

  2. Mycobacterium avium MAV2052 protein induces apoptosis in murine macrophage cells through Toll-like receptor 4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kang-In; Choi, Han-Gyu; Son, Yeo-Jin; Whang, Jake; Kim, Kwangwook; Jeon, Heat Sal; Park, Hye-Soo; Back, Yong Woo; Choi, Seunga; Kim, Seong-Woo; Choi, Chul Hee; Kim, Hwa-Jung

    2016-04-01

    Mycobacterium avium and its sonic extracts induce apoptosis in macrophages. However, little is known about the M. avium components regulating macrophage apoptosis. In this study, using multidimensional fractionation, we identified MAV2052 protein, which induced macrophage apoptosis in M. avium culture filtrates. The recombinant MAV2052 induced macrophage apoptosis in a caspase-dependent manner. The loss of mitochondrial transmembrane potential (ΔΨm), mitochondrial translocation of Bax, and release of cytochrome c from mitochondria were observed in macrophages treated with MAV2052. Further, reactive oxygen species (ROS) production was required for the apoptosis induced by MAV2052. In addition, ROS and mitogen-activated protein kinases were involved in MAV2052-mediated TNF-α and IL-6 production. ROS-mediated activation of apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 1 (ASK1)-JNK pathway was a major signaling pathway for MAV2052-induced apoptosis. Moreover, MAV2052 bound to Toll-like receptor (TLR) 4 molecule and MAV2052-induced ROS production, ΔΨm loss, and apoptosis were all significantly reduced in TLR4(-/-) macrophages. Altogether, our results suggest that MAV2052 induces apoptotic cell death through TLR4 dependent ROS production and JNK pathway in murine macrophages.

  3. Virulence-related Mycobacterium avium subsp hominissuis MAV_2928 gene is associated with vacuole remodeling in macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vogt Steven

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mycobacterium avium subsp hominissuis (previously Mycobacterium avium subsp avium is an environmental organism associated with opportunistic infections in humans. Mycobacterium hominissuis infects and replicates within mononuclear phagocytes. Previous study characterized an attenuated mutant in which the PPE gene (MAV_2928 homologous to Rv1787 was inactivated. This mutant, in contrast to the wild-type bacterium, was shown both to have impaired the ability to replicate within macrophages and to have prevented phagosome/lysosome fusion. Results MAV_2928 gene is primarily upregulated upon phagocytosis. The transcriptional profile of macrophages infected with the wild-type bacterium and the mutant were examined using DNA microarray, which showed that the two bacteria interact uniquely with mononuclear phagocytes. Based on the results, it was hypothesized that the phagosome environment and vacuole membrane of the wild-type bacterium might differ from the mutant. Wild-type bacterium phagosomes expressed a number of proteins different from those infected with the mutant. Proteins on the phagosomes were confirmed by fluorescence microscopy and Western blot. The environment in the phagosome of macrophages infected with the mutant differed from the environment of vacuoles with M. hominissuis wild-type in the concentration of zinc, manganese, calcium and potassium. Conclusion The results suggest that the MAV_2928 gene/operon might participate in the establishment of bacterial intracellular environment in macrophages.

  4. Photonic Biosensor Assays to Detect and Distinguish Subspecies of Francisella tularensis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas J. Inzana

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The application of photonic biosensor assays to diagnose the category-A select agent Francisella tularensis was investigated. Both interferometric and long period fiber grating sensing structures were successfully demonstrated; both these sensors are capable of detecting the optical changes induced by either immunological binding or DNA hybridization. Detection was made possible by the attachment of DNA probes or immunoglobulins (IgG directly to the fiber surface via layer-by-layer electrostatic self-assembly. An optical fiber biosensor was tested using a standard transmission mode long period fiber grating of length 15 mm and period 260 µm, and coated with the IgG fraction of antiserum to F. tularensis. The IgG was deposited onto the optical fiber surface in a nanostructured film, and the resulting refractive index change was measured using spectroscopic ellipsometry. The presence of F. tularensis was detected from the decrease of peak wavelength caused by binding of specific antigen. Detection and differentiation of F. tularensis subspecies tularensis (type A strain TI0902 and subspecies holarctica (type B strain LVS was further accomplished using a single-mode multi-cavity fiber Fabry-Perot interferometric sensor. These sensors were prepared by depositing seven polymer bilayers onto the fiber tip followed by attaching one of two DNA probes: (a a 101-bp probe from the yhhW gene unique to type-A strains, or (b a 117-bp probe of the lpnA gene, common to both type-A and type-B strains. The yhhW probe was reactive with the type-A, but not the type-B strain. Probe lpnA was reactive with both type-A and type-B strains. Nanogram quantities of the target DNA could be detected, highlighting the sensitivity of this method for DNA detection without the use of PCR. The DNA probe reacted with 100% homologous target DNA, but did not react with sequences containing 2-bp mismatches, indicating the high specificity of the assay. These assays will fill an

  5. Subspecies characteristics in filial generation of cross between indica and japonica rice under different environments

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Hai; LIU Hongguang; YANG Li; ZHU Chunjie; WANG Jiayu; YANG Qianhua; XU Zhengjin; ZHENG Jiakui

    2007-01-01

    The recombinant inbred lines (RILs) population derived from the cross between "Zhongyouzao8" (hsien or indica) and "Fengjin" (keng or japonica) was grown in Liaoning and Sichuan Provinces to compare the subspecies characteristics under different environments.The results showed that the distribution of Cheng's index was japonicalinous.The population was more japonicalinous in Sichuan than that in Liaoning as a whole.Further analysis indicated that indiea and indica-cline in Sichuan were more indicalinous than those in Liaoning,japonica and japonica-cline in Sichuan were more japonicalinous than those in Liaoning.The effects of environment on six characteristics of Cheng's index were different because of different characters,as well as on the correlations between the six characters,the Cheng's index and the vascular bundle traits.For example,the length of the first and second rachis and leaf pubescence were more japoniealinous in Sichuan than in Liaoning,while the length/width ratio of spikelets and glume color at heading time were more indicalinous in Sichuan than in Liaoning.The vascular bundle characteristics of RILs in different environments changed remarkably.The number of large vascular bundles in panicle neck was less in Sichuan than in Liaoning,while the number of small vascular bundles in panicle neck and second top stem was greater in Sichuan than in Liaoning.The ratio of large to small vascular bundles in panicle neck decreased and the ratio of large vascular bundles between the second top stem and panicle neck increased in Sichuan.Though total trend was the vascular bundle ratio of large to small in indica was greater than that in japonica and the ratio of large vascular bundles in indica was less than that in japonica,it is not appropriate that the vascular bundle ratio of large to small and the ratio of large vascular bundles are regarded as the parameters for subspecies classification in rice.The vascular bundles characteristics from typical indica or

  6. Characterization of new IS elements and studies of their dispersion in two subspecies of Leifsonia xyli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monteiro-Vitorello Claudia B

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Leifsonia xyli is a xylem-inhabiting bacterial species comprised of two subspecies: L. xyli subsp. xyli (Lxx and L. xyli subsp. cynodontis (Lxc. Lxx is the causal agent of ratoon stunting disease in sugarcane commercial fields and Lxc colonizes the xylem of several grasses causing either mild or no symptoms of disease. The completely sequenced genome of Lxx provided insights into its biology and pathogenicity. Since IS elements are largely reported as an important source of bacterial genome diversification and nothing is known about their role in chromosome architecture of L. xyli, a comparative analysis of Lxc and Lxx elements was performed. Results Sample sequencing of Lxc genome and comparative analysis with Lxx complete DNA sequence revealed a variable number of IS transposable elements acting upon genomic diversity. A detailed characterization of Lxc IS elements and a comparative review with IS elements of Lxx are presented. Each genome showed a unique set of elements although related to same IS families when considering features such as similarity among transposases, inverted and direct repeats, and element size. Most of the Lxc and Lxx IS families assigned were reported to maintain transposition at low levels using translation regulatory mechanisms, consistent with our in silico analysis. Some of the IS elements were found associated with rearrangements and specific regions of each genome. Differences were also found in the effect of IS elements upon insertion, although none of the elements were preferentially associated with gene disruption. A survey of transposases among genomes of Actinobacteria showed no correlation between phylogenetic relatedness and distribution of IS families. By using Southern hybridization, we suggested that diversification of Lxc isolates is also mediated by insertion sequences in probably recent events. Conclusion Collectively our data indicate that transposable elements are involved in

  7. Chronic proliferative rhinitis associated with Salmonella enterica subspecies diarizonae serovar 61:k:1, 5, (7) in sheep in Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacasta, D; Ferrer, L M; Ramos, J J; Bueso, J P; Borobia, M; Ruiz de Arcaute, M; Figueras, L; González-Sainz, J M; De Las Heras, M

    2012-11-01

    A chronic proliferative rhinitis in sheep associated with Salmonella enterica subspecies diarizonae serovar 61:k:1, 5, (7) is described. Ten adult sheep from eight traditionally managed Rasa Aragonesa flocks located in Aragon (Spain) were studied. Clinical signs began with bilateral thick mucus nasal discharge, wheezing and snoring and progressed to partial or complete obstruction of the nostrils. Necropsy examination revealed swollen ventral nasal turbinates with a roughened mucosal surface partially covered by small polyps. Histopathology revealed chronic proliferative rhinitis with a predominant population of neutrophils that infiltrated the mucosal epithelium. Plasma cells and macrophages were present in the lamina propria. Organisms expressing Salmonella antigen immunohistochemically were detected within epithelial cells. Salmonella enterica subspecies diarizonae serovar 61:k:1, 5, (7) was isolated as a sole microorganism from nasal swabs taken from five animals. The implication of finding this bacterium in various diseases in sheep and its role as a potential zoonosis are discussed.

  8. Molecular phylogeny of Acer monspessulanum L. subspecies from Iran inferred using the ITS region of nuclear ribosomal DNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HANIF KHADEMI

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. Khademi H, Mehregan I, Assadi M, Nejadsatari T, Zarre S. 2015. Molecular phylogeny of Acer monspessulanum L. subspecies from Iran inferred using the ITS region of nuclear ribosomal DNA. Biodiversitas 17: 16-23. This study was carried out on the Acer monspessulanum complex growing wild in Iran. Internal transcribed spacer (ITS sequences for 75 samples representing five different subspecies of Acer monspessulanum were analyzed. Beside this, 86 previously published ITS sequences from GenBank were used to test the monophyly of the complex worldwide. Phylogenetic analyses were conducted using Bayesian inference and maximum parsimony. The results indicate that most samples of A. monspessulanum species from Iran were part of a monophyletic clade with 8 samples of A. ibericum from Georgia, A. hyrcanum from Iran and one of A. sempervirens from Greece (PP= 1; BS= 79%. Our results indicate that use of morphological characteristics coupled with molecular data will be most effective.

  9. Rapid and accurate identification of Streptococcus equi subspecies by MALDI-TOF MS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kudirkiene, Egle; Welker, Martin; Knudsen, Nanna Reumert

    2015-01-01

    phenotypic and sequence similarity between three subspecies their discrimination remains difficult. In this study, we aimed to design and validate a novel, Superspectra based, MALDI-TOF MS approach for reliable, rapid and cost-effective identification of SEE and SEZ, the most frequent S. equi subspecies.......3±7.5%). This result may be attributed to the highly clonal population structure of SEE, as opposed to the diversity of SEZ seen in horses. Importantly strains with atypical colony appearance both within SEE and SEZ did not affect correct identification of the strains by MALDI-TOF MS. Atypical colony variants...... with spectra analyses using the SARAMIS database. Additionally, first results on subtyping of SEZ indicated that a more refined discrimination, for example for epidemiological surveys, may be possible...

  10. Studies on Olividae. III. Notes on Oliva bulowi Sowerby, 1888. Description of a novel subspecies Oliva bulowi phuketensis

    OpenAIRE

    Tursch, B.; Germain, L.; Greifeneder, D.

    1986-01-01

    A novel subspecies Oliva bulowi phuketensis so far known from South-West Thailand and Andaman Islands, is described. Problems of allometry and colour pattern dimorphism in juvenile Oliva bulowi are discussed.

  11. Four new species and one new subspecies of Asteroidea (Echinodermata) collected by the “Siboga” Expedition in the Indo-Malayan region

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aziz, Aznam; Jangoux, Michel

    1985-01-01

    Four new species and one new subspecies of asteroids collected by the “Siboga” Expedition in the Indo-Malayan region are described. They are deep-water species belonging to the families Goniasteridae, Solasteridae, Ganeriidae, Asteriidae and Brisingidae.

  12. Infection Sources of a Common Non-tuberculous Mycobacterial Pathogen, Mycobacterium avium Complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishiuchi, Yukiko; Iwamoto, Tomotada; Maruyama, Fumito

    2017-01-01

    Numerous studies have revealed a continuous increase in the worldwide incidence and prevalence of non-tuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) diseases, especially pulmonary Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) diseases. Although it is not clear why NTM diseases have been increasing, one possibility is an increase of mycobacterial infection sources in the environment. Thus, in this review, we focused on the infection sources of pathogenic NTM, especially MAC. The environmental niches for MAC include water, soil, and dust. The formation of aerosols containing NTM arising from shower water, soil, and pool water implies that these niches can be infection sources. Furthermore, genotyping has shown that clinical isolates are identical to environmental ones from household tap water, bathrooms, potting soil, and garden soil. Therefore, to prevent and treat MAC diseases, it is essential to identify the infection sources for these organisms, because patients with these diseases often suffer from reinfections and recurrent infections with them. In the environmental sources, MAC and other NTM organisms can form biofilms, survive within amoebae, and exist in a free-living state. Mycobacterial communities are also likely to occur in these infection sources in households. Water distribution systems are a transmission route from natural water reservoirs to household tap water. Other infection sources include areas with frequent human contact, such as soil and bathrooms, indicating that individuals may carry NTM organisms that concomitantly attach to their household belongings. To explore the mechanisms associated with the global spread of infection and MAC transmission routes, an epidemiological population-wide genotyping survey would be very useful. A good example of the power of genotyping comes from M. avium subsp. hominissuis, where close genetic relatedness was found between isolates of it from European patients and pigs in Japan and Europe, implying global transmission of this bacterium

  13. The Species versus Subspecies Conundrum: Quantitative Delimitation from Integrating Multiple Data Types within a Single Bayesian Approach in Hercules Beetles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jen-Pan; Knowles, L Lacey

    2016-07-01

    With the recent attention and focus on quantitative methods for species delimitation, an overlooked but equally important issue regards what has actually been delimited. This study investigates the apparent arbitrariness of some taxonomic distinctions, and in particular how species and subspecies are assigned. Specifically, we use a recently developed Bayesian model-based approach to show that in the Hercules beetles (genus Dynastes) there is no statistical difference in the probability that putative taxa represent different species, irrespective of whether they were given species or subspecies designations. By considering multiple data types, as opposed to relying exclusively on genetic data alone, we also show that both previously recognized species and subspecies represent a variety of points along the speciation spectrum (i.e., previously recognized species are not systematically further along the continuum than subspecies). For example, based on evolutionary models of divergence, some taxa are statistically distinguishable on more than one axis of differentiation (e.g., along both phenotypic and genetic dimensions), whereas other taxa can only be delimited statistically from a single data type. Because both phenotypic and genetic data are analyzed in a common Bayesian framework, our study provides a framework for investigating whether disagreements in species boundaries among data types reflect (i) actual discordance with the actual history of lineage splitting, or instead (ii) differences among data types in the amount of time required for differentiation to become apparent among the delimited taxa. We discuss what the answers to these questions imply about what characters are used to delimit species, as well as the diverse processes involved in the origin and maintenance of species boundaries. With this in mind, we then reflect more generally on how quantitative methods for species delimitation are used to assign taxonomic status. © The Author(s) 2015

  14. Activation of persistent Streptococcus equi subspecies zooepidemicus in mares with subclinical endometritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Morten Rønn; Skive, Bolette; Christoffersen, Mette

    2015-01-01

    Endometritis in horses caused by Streptococcus equi subspecies zooepidemicus (S. zooepidemicus) may be underdiagnosed due to traditional diagnostic methods lacking sensitivity and specificity. We serendipitously identified a bacterial growth medium (bActivate) that appeared capable of inducing...... penicillin resistance, but seemed to tolerate the antimicrobial due to dormancy. This is, to our knowledge, the first description of controlled growth induction of dormant bacteria from a subclinical infection. Moreover we demonstrated how endometritis can origin from a reservoir of dormant bacteria residing...

  15. Exogenous Methyl Jasmonate and Salicylic Acid Induce Subspecies-Specific Patterns of Glucosinolate Accumulation and Gene Expression in Brassica oleracea L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Go-Eun Yi

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Glucosinolates have anti-carcinogenic properties. In the recent decades, the genetics of glucosinolate biosynthesis has been widely studied, however, the expression of specific genes involved in glucosinolate biosynthesis under exogenous phytohormone treatment has not been explored at the subspecies level in Brassica oleracea. Such data are vital for strategies aimed at selective exploitation of glucosinolate profiles. This study quantified the expression of 38 glucosinolate biosynthesis-related genes in three B. oleracea subspecies, namely cabbage, broccoli and kale, and catalogued associations between gene expression and increased contents of individual glucosinolates under methyl jasmonate (MeJA and salicylic acid (SA treatments. Glucosinolate accumulation and gene expression in response to phytohormone elicitation was subspecies specific. For instance, cabbage leaves showed enhanced accumulation of the aliphatic glucoiberin, progoitrin, sinigrin and indolic neoglucobrassicin under both MeJA and SA treatment. MeJA treatment induced strikingly higher accumulation of glucobrassicin (GBS in cabbage and kale and of neoglucobrassicin (NGBS in broccoli compared to controls. Notably higher expression of ST5a (Bol026200, CYP81F1 (Bol028913, Bol028914 and CYP81F4 genes was associated with significantly higher GBS accumulation under MeJA treatment compared to controls in all three subspecies. CYP81F4 genes, trans-activated by MYB34 genes, were expressed at remarkably high levels in all three subspecies under MeJA treatment, which also induced in higher indolic NGBS accumulation in all three subspecies. Remarkably higher expression of MYB28 (Bol036286, ST5b, ST5c, AOP2, FMOGS-OX5 (Bol031350 and GSL-OH (Bol033373 was associated with much higher contents of aliphatic glucosinolates in kale leaves compared to the other two subspecies. The genes expressed highly could be utilized in strategies to selectively increase glucosinolate compounds in B. oleracea

  16. Comparison of 16S ribosomal RNA genes in Clavibacter michiganensis subspecies with other coryneform bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, X; De Boer, S H

    1995-10-01

    Nearly complete sequences (97-99%) of the 16S rRNA genes were determined for type strains of Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. michiganensis, Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. insidiosus, Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. sepedonicus, and Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. nebraskensis. The four subspecies had less than 1% dissimilarity in their 16S rRNA genes. Comparative studies indicated that the C. michiganensis subsp. shared relatively high homology with the 16S rRNA gene of Clavibacter xyli. Further comparison with representatives of other Gram-positive coryneform and related bacteria with high G+C% values showed that this group of bacteria was subdivided into three clusters. One cluster consisted of the Clavibacter michiganensis subsp., Clavibacter xyli, Arthrobacter globiformis, Arthrobacter simplex, and Frankia sp.; another cluster consisted of members of the corynebacteria-mycobacteria-nocardia (CMN) group of Mycobacteriaceae including Tsukamurella paurometabolum; and Propionibacterium freudenreichii alone formed a unique cluster, which was remote from other coryneform bacteria analyzed. The three clusters may reflect a systematic rank higher than the genus level among these bacteria.

  17. Carbohydrate and ethane release with Erwinia carotovora subspecies betavasculorum--induced necrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuykendall, L David; Hunter, William J

    2008-02-01

    Erwinia carotovora subspecies betavasculorum, also known as E. betavasculorum and Pectobacterium betavasculorum, is a soil bacterium that has the capacity to cause root rot necrosis of sugarbeets. The qualitatively different pathogenicity exhibited by the virulent E. carotovora strain and two avirulent strains, a Citrobacter sp. and an Enterobacter cloacae, was examined using digital analysis of photographic evidence of necrosis as well as for carbohydrate, ethane, and ethylene release compared with uninoculated potato tuber slices. Visual scoring of necrosis was superior to digital analysis of photographs. The release of carbohydrates and ethane from potato tuber slices inoculated with the soft rot necrosis-causing Erwinia was significantly greater than that of potato tuber slices that had not been inoculated or that had been inoculated with the nonpathogenic E. cloacae and Citrobacter sp. strains. Interestingly, ethylene production from potato slices left uninoculated or inoculated with the nonpathogenic Citrobacter strain was 5- to 10-fold higher than with potato slices inoculated with the pathogenic Erwinia strain. These findings suggest that (1) carbohydrate release might be a useful measure of the degree of pathogenesis, or relative virulence; and that (2) bacterial suppression of ethylene formation may be a critical step in root rot disease formation.

  18. A new subspecies of sea snake, Hydrophis platurus xanthos, from Golfo Dulce, Costa Rica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brooke L. Bessesen

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available We describe a distinctive new subspecies of sea snake from the occasionally anoxic inner-basin waters of Golfo Dulce, Costa Rica, based on combined data garnered between 2010 and 2017 for 154 specimens, 123 free-ranging and 31 museum-held. The yellow sea snake, Hydrophis platurus xanthos Bessesen & Galbreath, subsp. n., is diagnosed by a notably smaller body size and nearly uniform yellow coloration, which contrasts with the black and yellow striae and tail spots or bands typical of the species. Within the modest geographic range (circa 320 km2, nearly all specimens possess both diagnostic character states. Bathymetrics appear to restrict genetic flow between this allopatric population and conspecifics in the broader Eastern Pacific. In perspicuous contrast to typical H. platurus, H. p. xanthos shows no association with drift lines, and feeds at night in turbulent waters, assuming a sinusoidal ambush posture never previously reported for the species. This evolutionarily significant unit (ESU warrants taxonomic recognition and active protection.

  19. Genome-wide disruption of gene expression in allopolyploids but not hybrids of rice subspecies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Chunming; Bai, Yan; Lin, Xiuyun; Zhao, Na; Hu, Lanjuan; Gong, Zhiyun; Wendel, Jonathan F; Liu, Bao

    2014-05-01

    Hybridization and polyploidization are prominent processes in plant evolution. Hybrids and allopolyploids typically exhibit radically altered gene expression patterns relative to their parents, a phenomenon termed "transcriptomic shock." To distinguish the effects of hybridization from polyploidization on coregulation of divergent alleles, we analyzed expression of parental copies (homoeologs) of 11,608 genes using RNA-seq-based transcriptome profiling in reciprocal hybrids and tetraploids constructed from subspecies japonica and indica of Asian rice (Oryza sativa L.). The diploid hybrids and their derived allopolyploids differ dramatically in morphology, despite having the same suite of genes and genic proportions. Allelic and homoeolog-specific transcripts were unequivocally diagnosed in the hybrids and tetraploids based on parent-specific SNPs. Compared with the in silico hybrid (parental mix), the range of progenitor expression divergence was significantly reduced in both reciprocally generated F1 hybrids, presumably due to the ameliorating effects of a common trans environment on divergent cis-factors. In contrast, parental expression differences were greatly elaborated at the polyploid level, which we propose is a consequence of stoichiometric disruptions associated with the numerous chromosomal packaging and volumetric changes accompanying nascent polyploidy. We speculate that the emergent property of "whole genome doubling" has repercussions that reverberate throughout the transcriptome and downstream, ultimately generating altered phenotypes. This perspective may yield insight into the nature of adaptation and the origin of evolutionary novelty accompanying polyploidy.

  20. A study on Maruca vitrata infestation of Yard-long beans (Vigna unguiculata subspecies sesquipedalis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayasinghe, R C; Premachandra, W T S Dammini; Neilson, Roy

    2015-09-01

    Globally, Maruca vitrata (Geyer) is a serious yield constraint on food legumes including Yard-long bean (Vigna unguiculata subspecies sesquipedalis). However, there is a dearth of information on its damage potential, distribution and population dynamics in Yard-long beans. In the present study, the level of M. vitrata larval infestation on flowers and pods of Yard-long beans in Sri Lanka was determined with respect to three consecutive cropping seasons, Yala, Off and Maha. Results indicated that larval infestation and abundance varied with developmental stage of flowers and pods, cropping season and their combined interactive effects. Flowers of Yard-long beans were more prone to M. vitrata larval attack compared to pods. Abundance and level of infestation of M. vitrata varied with plant parts, having a ranking of flower buds (highest) > open flowers > mature pods > immature pods (lowest). Peak infestation was observed six and eight weeks after planting on flowers and pods, respectively. Among the three cropping seasons, M. vitrata infestation was found to be higher during Maha and Off seasons compared to Yala. The findings of this study contribute to the identified knowledge gap regarding the field biology of an acknowledged important pest, M. vitrata, in a previously understudied crop in Sri Lanka.