WorldWideScience

Sample records for reducing volatile organic

  1. Effects of rigorous emission controls on reducing ambient volatile organic compounds in Beijing, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jing; Wu, Rongrong; Li, Yaqi; Hao, Yufang; Xie, Shaodong; Zeng, Liming

    2016-07-01

    102 volatile organic compound (VOC) species were measured online using a gas chromatography-mass spectrometry/flame ionization detector (GC-MS/FID) at an urban site in Beijing in 11 August to 3 September 2015, when a series of rigorous air quality control measures were implemented in Beijing city and neighbouring provinces. Positive matrix factorization (PMF) was applied to identify emission sources from 1h averaged values of VOC data. Based on the online VOC data and the PMF analysis results, the effectiveness of different control measures were investigated. The PMF results were compared with an emission inventory data. Results show that the rigorous air quality restrictions implemented were successful. The averaged ambient VOC mixing ratios during the emission control period and non-control period were 27.53 and 45.42ppbv, respectively. The mixing ratios of total VOC during the control period were reduced by 40%. Alkanes were the most abundant chemical group in the two periods, followed by oxygenated volatile organic compounds (OVOCs). Almost all quantified VOC species decreased during the control period. Tracers of industrial sources and vehicle exhaust reduced most, including some halocarbons, esters and aromatics. Eight sources were resolved by online PMF analysis for ambient VOCs in Beijing. Contributions of those sources varied significantly during the control and non-control period. Compared with the values before control, contributions of vehicle-related sources were most reduced, followed by solvent utilization. Reductions of vehicle-related sources, solvent utilization, secondary formation, fuel combustion, and biogenic were responsible for 65%, 19%, 10%, 5%, and 1% of the reductions in ambient VOCs. Both PMF results and emission inventory data indicated that the control measure on traffic was very effective in reducing ambient VOCs in Beijing, with the emission reductions of about 50%. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Gas-shell-encapsulation of Activated Carbon to Reduce Fouling and Increase the Efficacy of Volatile Organic Compound Removal

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poortinga, Albert T.; Rijn, van Cees J.M.

    2017-01-01

    A method to encapsulate activated carbon particles is presented that reduces fouling of these particles with Natural Organic Matter (NOM) to preserve their adsorption capacity for Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) from water in the presence of NOM. The encapsulation method uses an oil-in-water

  3. Improving the Sustainability of Office Partition Manufacturing: Balancing Options for Reducing Emissions of Volatile Organic Compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc A. Rosen

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Options are examined to improve the sustainability of office partition manufacturing by reducing volatile organic compounds (VOC emissions. Base VOC emissions for a typical plant are estimated using a mass balance approach. Pollution prevention and sustainability measures are assessed using realistic criteria and weightings. Sustainability has been considered from an industry perspective, considering factors like economics, environmental impact, quality, health and safety. Through a case study, it is demonstrated that several advantageous options are available for reducing VOC emissions in manufacturing office furniture partitions, and thereby enhancing the sustainability of that industrial operation. The measures deemed most viable include implementing several best management practices, not painting of non-visible parts, switching gluing processes, recycling solvent and modifying attachments. The results are intended to be balanced so as to improve their acceptability and adoptability by industry. It appears that it would be advantageous for manufacturers of office panels to evaluate the feasibility of these measures and to implement the most appropriate. The results are likely extendable to other operations in the wood furniture industry, and would improve their sustainability.

  4. Reduced Magmatic Volatiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirschmann, M. M.; Withers, A. C.; Ardia, P.; Stanley, B. D.; Foley, N.

    2012-12-01

    Volatiles in Earth's upper mantle are dominated by H2O and CO2, but under more reduced conditions likely deeper in the mantle, other volatile species may be important or dominant. However, the speciation, solubilities, and effect on physical properties of reduced magmatic volatiles are poorly constrained. Here we summarize results from an experimental campaign to better understand reduced volatiles in magmas. Experiments emphasize spectroscopic and SIMS characterization of dissolved species in experiments for which fluid fugacities are known, thereby facilitating thermodynamic parameterization. Experimental determinations of molecular H2 solubility in basaltic and andesitic liquids show concentrations that are proportional to H2 fugacity. Because H2 increases with fH2 whereas dissolved H2O increases with fH2O1/2, the relative importance of H2 increases with pressure and for more hydrous magmas. At 1 GPa and IW-1, solubility in basalt reaches 0.3 wt.% (equivalent to 2.7 wt.% H2O). Solubilities at pressures of the deep upper mantle have not been explored experimentally (as is also true for H2O and CO2), but H2 could become the dominant hydrous species at 400 km and deeper, and so deep hydrous melts may have chiefly H2 rather than H2O or OH. Experiments suggest an extremely low partial specific density (0.18 kg/m3) for dissolved H2 at low pressure, and so appreciable dissolved H2 in melt atop the 410 km discontinuity or in the lower mantle may promote positive buoyancy. Solubilities of reduced C-species remain poorly known. In contrast to results in Na2O-SiO2 liquids (Mysen et al., 2009), experiments with a haplobasaltic liquid at controlled CH4 fugacities indicated very small (<0.05 wt.%) CH4 solubilities even at very reduced conditions (reduced conditions and in

  5. Reducing Emissions of Volatile Organic Compounds - Final Report - 08/15/1997 - 02/14/2001

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stensel, H. David; Strand, Stuart E.

    2001-03-14

    The overall objective of this research was to determine if the shallow suspended growth reactor (SSGR) could provide sufficient treatment performance of organic and reduced sulfur (TRS) compounds, at 50 C to meet the EPA ''cluster rule'' regulatory limits. The biodegradation of a mixture of organic compounds that could be present in pulp and paper high volume low concentration gas streams was evaluated at 50 C in a bench-scale SSGR. The removal of methanol was followed in particular, and was mathematically modeled to evaluate the effect of process design and operating parameters on methanol removal. Additional tests were performed to obtain mass transfer and biodegradation kinetic parameters for the model. The acclimation of microbial populations capable of degrading TRS compounds from various seed sources was studied in batch reactors at 30 and 50 C. The degradation of TRS compounds in bench-scale SSGR was studied at 20-50 C. Also, the biodegradation kinetic and mass transfer coefficients for alpha-terpinene and gamma-terpinene were studied. Finally, a pilot plant was constructed and operated at Simpson pulp and paper mill in Tacoma, WA.

  6. Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... their MCLs: Organic Chemicals U.S. Geology Survey's National Water-Quality Assessment (NAWQA) Program Information on VOCs in Water ... Waste, and Cleanup Lead Mold Pesticides Radon Science Water A-Z Index Laws & Regulations By Business Sector By Topic Compliance ...

  7. Factors affecting the volatilization of volatile organic compounds from wastewater

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junya Intamanee

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to understand the influence of the wind speed (U10cm, water depth (h and suspended solids (SS on mass transfer coefficient (KOLa of volatile organic compounds (VOCs volatilized from wastewater. The novelty of this work is not the method used to determine KOLa but rather the use of actual wastewater instead of pure water as previously reported. The influence of U10cm, h, and SS on KOLa was performed using a volatilization tank with the volume of 100-350 L. Methyl Ethyl Ketone (MEK was selected as a representative of VOCs investigated here in. The results revealed that the relationship between KOLa and the wind speeds falls into two regimes with a break at the wind speed of 2.4 m/s. At U10cm 2.4 m/s, KOLa increased more rapidly. The relationship between KOLa and U10cm was also linear but has a distinctly higher slope. For the KOLa dependency on water depth, the KOLa decreased significantly with increasing water depth up to a certain water depth after that the increase in water depth had small effect on KOLa. The suspended solids in wastewater also played an important role on KOLa. Increased SS resulted in a significant reduction of KOLa over the investigated range of SS. Finally, the comparison between KOLa obtained from wastewater and that of pure water revealed that KOLa from wastewater were much lower than that of pure water which was pronounced at high wind speed and at small water depth. This was due the presence of organic mass in wastewater which provided a barrier to mass transfer and reduced the degree of turbulence in the water body resulting in low volatilization rate and thus KOLa. From these results, the mass transfer model for predicting VOCs emission from wastewater should be developed based on the volatilization of VOCs from wastewater rather than that from pure water.

  8. atmospheric volatile organic compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. R. Koss

    2016-07-01

    organic compounds (VOCs that cannot be ionized with H3O+ ions (e.g., in a PTR-MS or H3O+ CIMS instrument. Here we describe the adaptation of a high-resolution time-of-flight H3O+ CIMS instrument to use NO+ primary ion chemistry. We evaluate the NO+ technique with respect to compound specificity, sensitivity, and VOC species measured compared to H3O+. The evaluation is established by a series of experiments including laboratory investigation using a gas-chromatography (GC interface, in situ measurement of urban air using a GC interface, and direct in situ measurement of urban air. The main findings are that (1 NO+ is useful for isomerically resolved measurements of carbonyl species; (2 NO+ can achieve sensitive detection of small (C4–C8 branched alkanes but is not unambiguous for most; and (3 compound-specific measurement of some alkanes, especially isopentane, methylpentane, and high-mass (C12–C15 n-alkanes, is possible with NO+. We also demonstrate fast in situ chemically specific measurements of C12 to C15 alkanes in ambient air.

  9. Volatile organic compound sensor system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schabron, John F.; Rovani, Jr., Joseph F.; Bomstad, Theresa M.; Sorini-Wong, Susan S.; Wong, Gregory K.

    2011-03-01

    Generally, this invention relates to the development of field monitoring methodology for new substances and sensing chemical warfare agents (CWAs) and terrorist substances. It also relates to a portable test kit which may be utilized to measure concentrations of halogenated volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the field. Specifically it relates to systems for reliably field sensing the potential presence of such items while also distinguishing them from other elements potentially present. It also relates to overall systems and processes for sensing, reacting, and responding to an indicated presence of such substance, including modifications of existing halogenated sensors and arrayed sensing systems and methods.

  10. Volatile organic compound sensor system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schabron, John F [Laramie, WY; Rovani, Jr., Joseph F.; Bomstad, Theresa M [Laramie, WY; Sorini-Wong, Susan S [Laramie, WY

    2009-02-10

    Generally, this invention relates to the development of field monitoring methodology for new substances and sensing chemical warfare agents (CWAs) and terrorist substances. It also relates to a portable test kit which may be utilized to measure concentrations of halogenated volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the field. Specifically it relates to systems for reliably field sensing the potential presence of such items while also distinguishing them from other elements potentially present. It also relates to overall systems and processes for sensing, reacting, and responding to an indicated presence of such substance, including modifications of existing halogenated sensors and arrayed sensing systems and methods.

  11. A plan to reduce volatile organic compound emissions from consumer products in Canada (excluding windshield washer fluid and surface coatings) : final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-12-01

    This report highlights the recommendations made by the Canadian Council of Ministers of the Environment for the development of a guideline to provide a means by which to reduce (VOC) emissions from consumer products (excluding windshield washer fluid and surface coatings) in Canada. VOCs and nitrogen oxides react photochemically in the presence of sunlight to create ground-level ozone, a primary component of urban smog which has a detrimental effect on human health, agricultural crops and building materials. In recent years, most urban areas of Canada have shown an annual increase in the maximum acceptable air quality levels for ground level ozone. Reducing emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from consumer products was first suggested in 1990 by the Canadian Council of Ministers of the Environment in phase one of their program entitled the 'Management plan for nitrogen oxides and volatile organic compounds'. Phase 2 of the program was implemented in 1997 to harmonize the emissions reduction program with the United States Environmental Protection Agency regulations. The Canadian Environmental Protection Agency (CEPA) recommended the following control options: (1) a CEPA guideline should be developed which states the maximum VOC and high-volatility organic compound (HVOC) content in Canadian consumer products including hair care products, herbicides, insecticides, air fresheners, deodorants, fungicides, surface cleaners, fragrance products, anti-microbial agents, laundry products and automotive detailing products. These limits should be identical to those found in the 1998 U.S. Final Rule for Consumer Products, (2) the CEPA guideline should require that records specifying VOC content in weight-per cent be maintained for a period of three years, (3) the CEPA guideline should include a declaration procedure for Canadian importers and manufacturers of consumer products to report to Environment Canada regarding the VOC content of their products, and

  12. Nanostructure and Volatile Organic Compounds Sensing Properties of α-Fe2O3/Reduced Graphene Oxide Nanocomposite Derived by Spray Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zolghadr, S.; Kimiagar, S.; Khojier, K.

    2017-12-01

    This paper investigates the α-Fe2O3/reduced graphene oxide (rGO) nanocomposite as a volatile organic compounds (VOCs) sensor. The α-Fe2O3/reduced graphene oxide nanocomposites of about 370 nm thickness were synthesized by a spray method with different rGO contents (3%, 4%, and 5%) on SiO2/Si substrates. The samples were structurally and morphologically characterized by x-ray diffraction, and field emission scanning electron microscopy. These analyses showed that an increase in rGO content decreases the crystallinity of the samples. In order to study the VOCs sensing properties, the sensitivity and selectivity of the samples were tested with different VOCs vapors including ethanol, methanol, toluene, benzene, and formic acid in the temperature range of 200-400°C. The results show that the α-Fe2O3/rGO nanocomposites are more selective to ethanol than the other vapors, while an increase in rGO content decreases the sensitivity of the samples. The α-Fe2O3/rGO (3%)-based ethanol sensor also shows a good stability with respect to relative humidity in the range of 20-50% with a 1-ppm detection limit at the operating temperature of 280°C.

  13. Volatile organic compound emissions from silage systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    As a precursor to smog, emission of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) to the atmosphere is an environmental concern in some regions. The major source from farms is silage, with emissions coming from the silo face, mixing wagon, and feed bunk. The major compounds emitted are alcohols with other impor...

  14. Characterisation of selected volatile organic compounds in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    kshale

    2013-05-15

    May 15, 2013 ... Isidorov VA, Vinogorova VT, Rafalowski K (2003). HS-SPME analysis of volatile organic compounds of coniferous needle litter. Atm. Environ. 37:4645-4650. Jespersen L (2003). Occurrence and taxonomic characteristics of strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae predominant in African indigenous fermented ...

  15. Volatile organic compounds and oxides of nitrogen. Further emission reductions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Froste, H. [comp.

    1996-12-31

    This report presents the current status in relation to achievement of the Swedish Environmental target set by Parliament to reduce emission of volatile organic compounds by 50 per cent between 1988 and 2000. It also instructed the Agency to formulate proposed measures to achieve a 50 per cent reduction of emission of nitrogen oxides between 1985 and 2005. The report presents an overall account of emission trends for volatile organic compounds (from all sectors) and nitrogen oxides (from the industry sector) and steps proposed to achieve further emission reductions. 43 refs

  16. Reducing ammonia volatilization from compound fertilizers ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ammonia volatilization is a direct loss of available nitrogen in agriculture. The objective of this study was to determine the effect of amending NPK fertilizer with different rates of clinoptilolite zeolite on ammonia volatilization, soil exchangeable ammonium, and available nitrate. Seven treatments evaluated were: 250 g soil ...

  17. Urea coated with oxidized charcoal reduces ammonia volatilization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diogo Mendes de Paiva

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Urea is the most consumed nitrogen fertilizer in the world. However, its agronomic and economic efficiency is reduced by the volatilization of NH3, which can reach 78 % of the applied nitrogen. The coating of urea granules with acidic compounds obtained by charcoal oxidation has the potential to reduce the volatilization, due to the acidic character, the high buffering capacity and CEC. This work aimed to evaluate the effect of HNO3-oxidized carbon on the control of NH3 volatilization. These compounds were obtained by oxidation of Eucalyptus grandis charcoal, produced at charring temperatures of 350 and 450 ºC, with 4.5 mol L-1 HNO3. The charcoal was oxidized by solubilization in acidic or alkaline medium, similar to the procedure of soil organic matter fractionation (CHox350 and CHox450. CHox was characterized by C, H, O, N contents and their respective atomic relations, by the ratio E4 (absorbance 465 nm by E6 (absorbance 665 nm, and by active acidity and total acidity (CEC. The inhibitory effect of CHox on the urease activity of Canavalia ensiformis was assessed in vitro. The NH3 volatilization from urea was evaluated with and without coating of oxidized charcoal (U-CHox350 or U-CHox450 in a closed system with continuous air flow. The pH of both CHox was near 2.0, but the total acidity of CHox350 was higher, 72 % of which was attributed to carboxylic groups. The variation in the ionization constants of CHox350 was also greater. The low E4/E6 ratios characterize the high stability of the compounds in CHox. CHox did not inhibit the urease activity in vitro, although the maximum volatilization peak from U-CHox450 and U-CHox350 occurred 24 h after that observed for uncoated urea. The lowest volatilization rate was observed for U-CHox350 as well as a 43 % lower total amount of NH3 volatilized than from uncoated urea.

  18. Visual indicator for trace organic volatiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakow, Neal A; Wendland, Michael S; Trend, John E; Poirier, Richard J; Paolucci, Dora M; Maki, Stephen P; Lyons, Christopher S; Swierczek, Mary J

    2010-03-16

    We describe herein a novel approach for visual indication of trace organic vapors. The sensor utilizes a microporous material within a visual thin film transducer to produce changes in color upon exposure to a very wide range of volatile organic compounds. Visual indication at 5 parts per million (ppm) is demonstrated, with optoelectronic detection achieved to below 50 parts per billion (ppb). Through a thoughtful design of the sensor, we are able to avoid interference from water vapor, a critical attribute needed for practical application.

  19. Volatile and semivolatile organic compounds in laboratory ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speciated volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and organic fine particulate matter (PM2.5) mass emission factors were determined from laboratory peat fire experiments. Peat samples originated from two wildlife reserves located near the coast of North Carolina, U.S. Gas and particulate organics were quantified by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry and by high pressure liquid chromatography. Hazardous air pollutants (HAPs) accounted for a large fraction (~60 %) of the speciated VOC emissions from peat burning, including large contributions of acetaldehyde, formaldehyde, benzene, toluene, and chloromethane. Speciated organic PM2.5 mass was dominated by the following compound classes: organic acids, levoglucosan, n-alkanes, and n-alkenes. Emission factors for PM2.5 organic acids including n-alkanoic acids, n-alkenoic acids, n-alkanedioic acids, and aromatic acids were reported for the first time for peat burning, representing the largest fraction of organic carbon (OC) mass (11-12 %) of all speciated compound classes measured in this work. Levoglucosan contributed 2-3 % of the OC mass, while methoxyphenols represented 0.2-0.3 % of the OC mass on a carbon mass basis. Retene was the most abundant particulate phase polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon. Total HAP VOC and particulate polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon emissions from a 2008 peat wildfire in North Carolina were estimated, suggesting that peat fires can contribute a large fraction of state-wide HAP emissions. This p

  20. Characterisation of selected volatile organic compounds in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    GCMS), was used to identify volatile compounds at three different temperatures. Fifty volatile compounds, inclusive of 14 acids, 14 alcohols, and 22 esters were identified and quantified in the two brands of indigenous banana beer samples. Only 12 ...

  1. Nitrate radicals and biogenic volatile organic compounds ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oxidation of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOC) by the nitrate radical (NO3) represents one of the important interactions between anthropogenic emissions related to combustion and natural emissions from the biosphere. This interaction has been recognized for more than 3 decades, during which time a large body of research has emerged from laboratory, field, and modeling studies. NO3-BVOC reactions influence air quality, climate and visibility through regional and global budgets for reactive nitrogen (particularly organic nitrates), ozone, and organic aerosol. Despite its long history of research and the significance of this topic in atmospheric chemistry, a number of important uncertainties remain. These include an incomplete understanding of the rates, mechanisms, and organic aerosol yields for NO3-BVOC reactions, lack of constraints on the role of heterogeneous oxidative processes associated with the NO3 radical, the difficulty of characterizing the spatial distributions of BVOC and NO3 within the poorly mixed nocturnal atmosphere, and the challenge of constructing appropriate boundary layer schemes and non-photochemical mechanisms for use in state-of-the-art chemical transport and chemistry–climate models. This review is the result of a workshop of the same title held at the Georgia Institute of Technology in June 2015. The first half of the review summarizes the current literature on NO3-BVOC chemistry, with a particular focus on recent advances in

  2. The network of plants volatile organic compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vivaldo, Gianna; Masi, Elisa; Taiti, Cosimo; Caldarelli, Guido; Mancuso, Stefano

    2017-09-08

    Plants emission of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) is involved in a wide class of ecological functions, as VOCs play a crucial role in plants interactions with biotic and abiotic factors. Accordingly, they vary widely across species and underpin differences in ecological strategy. In this paper, VOCs spontaneously emitted by 109 plant species (belonging to 56 different families) have been qualitatively and quantitatively analysed in order to provide an alternative classification of plants species. In particular, by using bipartite networks methodology from Complex Network Theory, and through the application of community detection algorithms, we show that is possible to classify species according to chemical classes such as terpenes and sulfur compounds. Such complex network analysis allows to uncover hidden plants relationships related to their evolutionary and adaptation to the environment story.

  3. Biogenic volatile organic compounds and plant competition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kegge, Wouter; Pierik, Ronald

    2010-03-01

    One of the most important factors to shape plant communities is competition between plants, which impacts on the availability of environmental factors such as light, nutrients and water. In response to these environmental parameters, plants adjust the emission of many different biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs). BVOCs can also elicit responses in neighbouring plants, thus constituting a platform for plant-plant interactions. Here, we review the relationship between BVOC emissions and competition among neighbouring plants. Recent progress indicates that BVOCs can act both as allelochemicals and as neighbour detection signals. It is suggested that BVOCs provide information about neighbouring competitors, such as their identity or growth rate, that classic neighbour detection signals cannot provide. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. 40 CFR 60.452 - Standard for volatile organic compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Standard for volatile organic compounds. 60.452 Section 60.452 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... Industrial Surface Coating: Large Appliances § 60.452 Standard for volatile organic compounds. On or after...

  5. 40 CFR 60.492 - Standards for volatile organic compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Beverage Can Surface Coating Industry § 60.492 Standards for volatile organic compounds. On or after the... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Standards for volatile organic compounds. 60.492 Section 60.492 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR...

  6. 40 CFR 60.722 - Standards for volatile organic compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... volatile organic compounds. (a) Each owner or operator of any affected facility which is subject to the... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Standards for volatile organic compounds. 60.722 Section 60.722 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR...

  7. 40 CFR 60.602 - Standard for volatile organic compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Standard for volatile organic compounds. 60.602 Section 60.602 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... Synthetic Fiber Production Facilities § 60.602 Standard for volatile organic compounds. On and after the...

  8. 40 CFR 60.392 - Standards for volatile organic compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Automobile and Light Duty Truck Surface Coating Operations § 60.392 Standards for volatile organic compounds... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Standards for volatile organic compounds 60.392 Section 60.392 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR...

  9. 40 CFR 60.432 - Standard for volatile organic compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Standard for volatile organic compounds. 60.432 Section 60.432 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... Graphic Arts Industry: Publication Rotogravure Printing § 60.432 Standard for volatile organic compounds...

  10. 40 CFR 60.542 - Standards for volatile organic compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Rubber Tire Manufacturing Industry § 60.542 Standards for volatile organic compounds. (a) On and after... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Standards for volatile organic compounds. 60.542 Section 60.542 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR...

  11. 40 CFR 60.582 - Standard for volatile organic compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Standard for volatile organic compounds. 60.582 Section 60.582 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... Flexible Vinyl and Urethane Coating and Printing § 60.582 Standard for volatile organic compounds. (a) On...

  12. 40 CFR 60.712 - Standards for volatile organic compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Magnetic Tape Coating Facilities § 60.712 Standards for volatile organic compounds. Each owner or operator... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Standards for volatile organic compounds. 60.712 Section 60.712 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR...

  13. 40 CFR 60.622 - Standards for volatile organic compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Petroleum Dry Cleaners § 60.622 Standards for volatile organic compounds. (a) Each affected petroleum... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Standards for volatile organic compounds. 60.622 Section 60.622 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR...

  14. 40 CFR 60.442 - Standard for volatile organic compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Standard for volatile organic compounds... Pressure Sensitive Tape and Label Surface Coating Operations § 60.442 Standard for volatile organic compounds. (a) On and after the date on which the performance test required by § 60.8 has been completed...

  15. 40 CFR 60.462 - Standards for volatile organic compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Coil Surface Coating § 60.462 Standards for volatile organic compounds. (a) On and after the date on... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Standards for volatile organic compounds. 60.462 Section 60.462 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR...

  16. 40 CFR 60.742 - Standards for volatile organic compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Polymeric Coating of Supporting Substrates Facilities § 60.742 Standards for volatile organic compounds. (a... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Standards for volatile organic compounds. 60.742 Section 60.742 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR...

  17. Spatial variation of volatile organic compounds and carbon ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study assessed variations of ambient volatile organic compounds and carbon monoxide (CO) levels in Blantyre City, Malawi. Volatile organic compounds and carbon monoxide measurement was done using the Multi-Gas Monitor between August and December, 2010. Rapid urbanization and lack of standard ...

  18. Determination of Volatile Organic Compounds in Selected Strains of Cyanobacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Milovanović

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Microalgal biomass can be used in creating various functional food and feed products, but certain species of microalgae and cyanobacteria are known to produce various compounds causing off-flavour. In this work, we investigated selected cyanobacterial strains of Spirulina, Anabaena, and Nostoc genera originating from Serbia, with the aim of determining the chemical profile of volatile organic compounds produced by these organisms. Additionally, the influence of nitrogen level during growth on the production of volatile compounds was investigated for Nostoc and Anabaena strains. In addition, multivariate techniques, namely, principal component analysis (PCA and hierarchical cluster analysis (HCA, were used for making distinction among different microalgal strains. The results show that the main volatile compounds in these species are medium chain length alkanes, but other odorous compounds such as 2-methylisoborneol (0.51–4.48%, 2-pentylfuran (0.72–8.98%, β-cyclocitral (0.00–1.17%, and β-ionone (1.15–2.72% were also detected in the samples. Addition of nitrogen to growth medium was shown to negatively affect the production of 2-methylisoborneol, while geosmin was not detected in any of the analyzed samples, which indicates that the manipulation of growth conditions may be useful in reducing levels of some unwanted odor-causing components.

  19. Volatile organic compounds emitted byTrichodermaspecies mediate plant growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Samantha; Yap, Melanie; Behringer, Gregory; Hung, Richard; Bennett, Joan W

    2016-01-01

    Many Trichoderma species are applied as biofungicides and biofertilizers to agricultural soils to enhance crop growth. These filamentous fungi have the ability to reduce plant diseases and promote plant growth and productivity through overlapping modes of action including induced systemic resistance, antibiosis, enhanced nutrient efficiency, and myco-parasitism. Trichoderma species are prolific producers of many small metabolites with antifungal, antibacterial, and anticancer properties. Volatile metabolites of Trichoderma also have the ability to induce resistance to plant pathogens leading to improved plant health. In this study, Arabidopsis plants were exposed to mixtures of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emitted by growing cultures of Trichoderma from 20 strains, representing 11 different Trichoderma species. We identified nine Trichoderma strains that produced plant growth promoting VOCs. Exposure to mixtures of VOCs emitted by these strains increased plant biomass (37.1-41.6 %) and chlorophyll content (82.5-89.3 %). Trichoderma volatile-mediated changes in plant growth were strain- and species-specific. VOCs emitted by T . pseudokoningii (CBS 130756) were associated with the greatest Arabidopsis growth promotion. One strain, T. atroviride (CBS 01-209), in our screen decreased growth (50.5 %) and chlorophyll production (13.1 %). Similarly, tomatoes exposed to VOCs from T. viride (BBA 70239) showed a significant increase in plant biomass (>99 %), larger plant size, and significant development of lateral roots. We also observed that the tomato plant growths were dependent on the duration of the volatile exposure. A GC-MS analysis of VOCs from Trichoderma strains identified more than 141 unique compounds including several unknown sesquiterpenes, diterpenes, and tetraterpenes. Plants grown in the presence of fungal VOCs emitted by different species and strains of Trichoderma exhibited a range of effects. This study demonstrates that the blend of volatiles

  20. Volatile Organic Compound Analysis in Istanbul

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ćapraz, Ö.; Deniz, A.; Öztürk, A.; Incecik, S.; Toros, H.; Coşkun, M.

    2012-04-01

    Volatile Organic Compound Analysis in Istanbul Ö. Çapraz1, A. Deniz1,3, A. Ozturk2, S. Incecik1, H. Toros1 and, M. Coskun1 (1) Istanbul Technical University, Faculty of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Department of Meteorology, 34469, Maslak, Istanbul, Turkey. (2) Istanbul Technical University, Faculty of Chemical and Metallurgical, Chemical Engineering, 34469, Maslak, Istanbul, Turkey. (3) Marmara Clean Air Center, Ministry of Environment and Urbanization, Nişantaşı, 34365, İstanbul, Turkey. One of the major problems of megacities is air pollution. Therefore, investigations of air quality are increasing and supported by many institutions in recent years. Air pollution in Istanbul contains many components that originate from a wide range of industrial, heating, motor vehicle, and natural emissions sources. VOC, originating mainly from automobile exhaust, secondhand smoke and building materials, are one of these compounds containing some thousands of chemicals. In spite of the risks to human health, relatively little is known about the levels of VOC in Istanbul. In this study, ambient air quality measurements of 32 VOCs including hydrocarbons, halogenated hydrocarbons and carbonyls were conducted in Kağıthane (Golden Horn) region in Istanbul during the winter season of 2011 in order to develop the necessary scientific framework for the subsequent developments. Kağıthane creek valley is the source part of the Golden Horn and one of the most polluted locations in Istanbul due to its topographical form and pollutant sources in the region. In this valley, horizontal and vertical atmospheric motions are very weak. The target compounds most commonly found were benzene, toluene, xylene and ethyl benzene. Concentrations of total hydrocarbons ranged between 1.0 and 10.0 parts per billion, by volume (ppbv). Ambient air levels of halogenated hydrocarbons appeared to exhibit unique spatial variations and no single factor seemed to explain trends for this group of

  1. 76 FR 18893 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Ohio; Volatile Organic Compound...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-06

    ... volatile organic compound (VOC) rule. These rule revisions specify compliance dates for subject facilities... approved offset lithographic and letterpress printing volatile organic compound (VOC) rule for approval... ``Control of volatile organic compound emissions from offset lithographic printing and letterpress printing...

  2. Quantifying commuter exposures to volatile organic compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kayne, Ashleigh

    Motor-vehicles can be a predominant source of air pollution in cities. Traffic-related air pollution is often unavoidable for people who live in populous areas. Commuters may have high exposures to traffic-related air pollution as they are close to vehicle tailpipes. Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are one class of air pollutants of concern because exposure to VOCs carries risk for adverse health effects. Specific VOCs of interest for this work include benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes (BTEX), which are often found in gasoline and combustion products. Although methods exist to measure time-integrated personal exposures to BTEX, there are few practical methods to measure a commuter's time-resolved BTEX exposure which could identify peak exposures that could be concealed with a time-integrated measurement. This study evaluated the ability of a photoionization detector (PID) to measure commuters' exposure to BTEX using Tenax TA samples as a reference and quantified the difference in BTEX exposure between cyclists and drivers with windows open and closed. To determine the suitability of two measurement methods (PID and Tenax TA) for use in this study, the precision, linearity, and limits of detection (LODs) for both the PID and Tenax TA measurement methods were determined in the laboratory with standard BTEX calibration gases. Volunteers commuted from their homes to their work places by cycling or driving while wearing a personal exposure backpack containing a collocated PID and Tenax TA sampler. Volunteers completed a survey and indicated if the windows in their vehicle were open or closed. Comparing pairs of exposure data from the Tenax TA and PID sampling methods determined the suitability of the PID to measure the BTEX exposures of commuters. The difference between BTEX exposures of cyclists and drivers with windows open and closed in Fort Collins was determined. Both the PID and Tenax TA measurement methods were precise and linear when evaluated in the

  3. Emissions and Secondary Organic Aerosol Production from Semivolatile and Intermediate Volatility Organic Compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, A. L.; Presto, A. A.; Miracolo, M. A.; Donahue, N. M.; Kroll, J. H.; Worsnop, D. R.

    2008-12-01

    Organic aerosols are a highly-dynamic system dominated by both variable gas-particle partitioning and chemical evolution. Important classes of organics include semivolatile and intermediate volatility organic compounds (SVOC and IVOC, respectively). SVOCs are compounds that exist in both the gas and particle phases at typical atmospheric conditions while IVOC are low-volatility vapors that exist exclusively in the gas phase. Both classes have saturation concentrations that are orders of magnitude lower than volatile organic compounds (VOC) that are the traditional subjects of atmosphere chemistry, such as monoterpenes, alkyl benzenes, etc. The SVOC and IVOC are poorly represented for in current atmospheric chemistry models. Source testing indicates that SVOC and IVOC emissions from biomass combustion, diesel engines and other sources exceed the primary organic aerosol emissions; thus the oxidation of these vapors could serve as a significant source of organic aerosol in the atmosphere. The formation of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) from the reactions between OH radicals and SVOCs and IVOCs was investigated in the Carnegie Mellon University smog chamber. Experiments were conducted with n-alkanes and emission surrogates (diesel fuel and lubricating oil). SVOC oxidation produces oxidized organic aerosol but little new organic aerosol mass. This behavior can be explained by the coupled effects of partitioning and aging. Oxidation of SVOC vapors creates low volatility species that partition into the condensed phase; this oxidation also reduces the SVOC vapor concentration which, in turn, requires particle-phase SVOC to evaporate to maintain phase equilibrium. In contrast, oxidation of IVOC results in sustained production of SOA consistent with a reaction with relatively slow kinetics and high mass yield. Aerosol Mass Spectrometer data indicates that the SOA formed from IVOC has a mass spectrum that is quite similar to the oxygenated organic aerosol factor observed in

  4. Biogenic volatile organic compounds - small is beautiful

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owen, S. M.; Asensio, D.; Li, Q.; Penuelas, J.

    2012-12-01

    While canopy and regional scale flux measurements of biogenic volatile organic compounds (bVOCs) are essential to obtain an integrated picture of total compound reaching the atmosphere, many fascinating and important emission details are waiting to be discovered at smaller scales, in different ecological and functional compartments. We concentrate on bVOCs below ground to allelopathy. A gradient of monoterpene concentration was found in soil around Pinus sylvestris and Pinus halepensis, decreasing with distance from the tree. Some compounds (α-pinene, sabinene, humulene and caryophyllene) in mineral soil were linearly correlated with the total amount of each compound in the overlying litter, indicating that litter might be the dominant source of these compounds. However, α-pinene did not fall within the correlation, indicating a source other than litter, probably root exudates. We also show that rhizosphere bVOCs can be a carbon source for soil microbes. In a horizontal gradient from Populus tremula trees, microbes closest to the tree trunk were better enzymatically equipped to metabolise labeled monoterpene substrate. Monoterpenes can also increase the degradation rate in soil of the persistant organic pollutants, likely acting as analogues for the cometabo-lism of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) Flowers of a ginger species (Alpinia kwangsiensis) and a fig species (Ficus hispida) showed different bVOC signals pre- and post pollination. For Ficus hispida, there are three floral stages of a fig-wasp dependency mechanism: receptive, post pollinator and interfloral. Of 28 compounds detected, transcaryophyllene with trans-β-farnesene were the most important at the receptor stage, trans-caryophyllene was the most abundant at the post-pollinator stage, and isoprene was the most abundant in the interfloral stage. Alpinia kwangsiensis presents two morphologies for the reproductive parts of the flower. The "anaflexistyle" morphology has the flower style lowered in the

  5. Volatile and semivolatile organic compounds in laboratory peat fire emissions

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Supporting information Tables S3 and S4 list emission factors in g/kg of speciated volatile and particulate organic compounds emitted from peat burning. Peat samples...

  6. Total volatile organic compounds (TVOC) in indoor air quality investigations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mølhave, L.; Clausen, Geo; Berglund, B.

    1997-01-01

    The amount of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in indoor air, usually called TVOC (total volatile organic compounds), has been measured using different definitions and techniques which yield different results. This report recommends a definition of TVOC referring to a specified range of VOCs...... for characterizing indoor pollution and for improving source control as required from the points of view of health, comfort, energy efficiency and sustainability. (C) Indoor Air (1997)....

  7. Effect of traffic restriction on reducing ambient volatile organic compounds (VOCs): Observation-based evaluation during a traffic restriction drill in Guangzhou, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xinyu; Zhang, Yanli; Yang, Weiqiang; Huang, Zuzhao; Wang, Yujun; Zhang, Zhou; He, Quanfu; Lü, Sujun; Huang, Zhonghui; Bi, Xinhui; Wang, Xinming

    2017-07-01

    Traffic restriction (TR) is a widely adopted control measure in case of heavy air pollution particularly in urban areas, yet it is hard to evaluate the effect of TR on reducing VOC emissions based on monitoring data since ambient VOC mixing ratios are influenced not only by source emissions but also by meteorological conditions and atmospheric degradation. Here we collected air samples for analysis of VOCs before, during and after a TR drill carried out in Guangzhou in September 2010 at both a roadside and a rooftop (∼50 m above the ground) site. TR measures mainly included the ;odd-even license; rule and banning high-emitting ;yellow label; vehicles. The mixing ratios of non-methane hydrocarbons (NMHCs) did not show significant changes at the roadside site with total NMHCs of 39.0 ± 11.8 ppbv during non-TR period and 39.1 ± 14.8 ppbv during TR period, whereas total NMHCs decreased from 30.4 ± 14.3 ppbv during the non-TR period to 22.1 ± 10.6 ppbv during the TR period at rooftop site. However, the ratios of methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE), benzene and toluene against carbon monoxide (MTBE/CO, T/CO and B/CO) at the both sampling sites dropped significantly. The ratios of toluene to benzene (T/B) instead increased significantly. Changes in these ratios all consistently indicated reduced input from traffic emissions particularly gasoline vehicles. Source attribution by positive matrix factorization (PMF) confirmed that during the TR period gasoline vehicles contributed less VOCs in percentages while industrial sources, biomass burning and LPG shared larger percentages. Assuming that emissions from industrial sources remained unchanged during the TR and non-TR periods, we further used the PMF-retrieved contribution percentages to deduce the reduction rate of traffic-related VOC emissions, and obtained a reduction rate of 31% based on monitoring data at the roadside site and of 34% based on the monitoring data at the rooftop site. Considering VOC emissions from all

  8. Biodiversity of volatile organic compounds from five French ferns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fons, Françoise; Froissard, Didier; Bessière, Jean-Marie; Buatois, Bruno; Rapior, Sylvie

    2010-10-01

    Five French ferns belonging to different families were investigated for volatile organic compounds (VOC) by GC-MS using organic solvent extraction. Fifty-five VOC biosynthesized from the shikimic, lipidic and terpenic pathways including monoterpenes, sesquiterpenes and carotenoid-type compounds were identified. The main volatile compound of Adiantum capillus-veneris L. (Pteridaceae) was (E)-2-decenal with a plastic or "stink bug" odor. The volatile profiles of Athyrium filix-femina (L.) Roth (Woodsiaceae) and Blechnum spicant (L.) Roth (Blechnaceae) showed similarities, with small amounts of isoprenoids and the same main volatile compounds, i.e., 2-phenylethanal (odor of lilac and hyacinth) and 1-octen-3-ol (mushroom-like odor). The main volatile compound of Dryopteris filix-mas (L.) Schott (Dryopteridaceae) was (E)-nerolidol with a woody or fresh bark note. Polyketides, as acylfilicinic acids, were mainly identified in this fern. Oreopteris limbosperma (Bellardi ex. All.) J. Holub (Thelypteridaceae), well-known for its lemon smell, contained the highest biodiversity of VOC. Eighty percent of the volatiles was issued from the terpenic pathway. The main volatiles were (E)-nerolidol, alpha-terpineol, beta-caryophyllene and other minor monoterpenes (for example, linalool, pinenes, limonene, and gamma-terpinen-7-al). It was also the fern with the highest number of carotenoid-type derivatives, which were identified in large amounts. Our results were of great interest underlying new industrial valorisation for ferns based on their broad spectrum of volatiles.

  9. Biosynthesis, function and metabolic engineering of plant volatile organic compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudareva, Natalia; Klempien, Antje; Muhlemann, Joëlle K; Kaplan, Ian

    2013-04-01

    Plants synthesize an amazing diversity of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) that facilitate interactions with their environment, from attracting pollinators and seed dispersers to protecting themselves from pathogens, parasites and herbivores. Recent progress in -omics technologies resulted in the isolation of genes encoding enzymes responsible for the biosynthesis of many volatiles and contributed to our understanding of regulatory mechanisms involved in VOC formation. In this review, we largely focus on the biosynthesis and regulation of plant volatiles, the involvement of floral volatiles in plant reproduction as well as their contribution to plant biodiversity and applications in agriculture via crop-pollinator interactions. In addition, metabolic engineering approaches for both the improvement of plant defense and pollinator attraction are discussed in light of methodological constraints and ecological complications that limit the transition of crops with modified volatile profiles from research laboratories to real-world implementation. © 2013 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2013 New Phytologist Trust.

  10. Fate of Volatile Organic Compounds in Constructed Wastewater Treatment Wetlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keefe, S.H.; Barber, L.B.; Runkel, R.L.; Ryan, J.N.

    2004-01-01

    The fate of volatile organic compounds was evaluated in a wastewater-dependent constructed wetland near Phoenix, AZ, using field measurements and solute transport modeling. Numerically based volatilization rates were determined using inverse modeling techniques and hydraulic parameters established by sodium bromide tracer experiments. Theoretical volatilization rates were calculated from the two-film method incorporating physicochemical properties and environmental conditions. Additional analyses were conducted using graphically determined volatilization rates based on field measurements. Transport (with first-order removal) simulations were performed using a range of volatilization rates and were evaluated with respect to field concentrations. The inverse and two-film reactive transport simulations demonstrated excellent agreement with measured concentrations for 1,4-dichlorobenzene, tetrachloroethene, dichloromethane, and trichloromethane and fair agreement for dibromochloromethane, bromo-dichloromethane, and toluene. Wetland removal efficiencies from inlet to outlet ranged from 63% to 87% for target compounds.

  11. Organic and volatile elements in the solar system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Remusat L.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Chondrites and comets have accreted primitive materials from the early solar system. Those materials include organics, water and other volatile components. The most primitive chondrites and comets have undergone few modifications on their respective parent bodies and can deliver to laboratories components that were present at the origin of the protosolar nebula. Here I present a review of the organic material and volatile components that have been studied in the most primitive chondrites, and the last data from the stardust mission about the cometary record. This paper focuses on materials that can be studied in laboratories, by mass spectrometry, ion probes or organic chemistry techniques.

  12. Volatile and semivolatile organic compounds in laboratory peat fire emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speciated volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and organic fine particulate matter (PM2.5) mass emission factors were determined from laboratory peat fire experiments. Peat samples originated from two wildlife reserves located near the coast of North Carolina, U.S. Gas and particula...

  13. A large source of low-volatility secondary organic aerosol

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ehn, Mikael; Thornton, Joel A.; Kleist, Einhard

    2014-01-01

    Forests emit large quantities of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) to the atmosphere. Their condensable oxidation products can form secondary organic aerosol, a significant and ubiquitous component of atmospheric aerosol, which is known to affect the Earth's radiation balance by scattering solar...... the oxidation of VOCs, in particular the terpene α-pinene, under atmospherically relevant conditions in chamber experiments. We find that a direct pathway leads from several biogenic VOCs, such as monoterpenes, to the formation of large amounts of extremely low-volatility vapours. These vapours form......-volatility vapours can enhance, or even dominate, the formation and growth of aerosol particles over forested regions, providing a missing link between biogenic VOCs and their conversion to aerosol particles. Our findings could help to improve assessments of biosphere-aerosol-climate feedback mechanisms, and the air...

  14. 76 FR 41086 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Ohio; Volatile Organic Compound...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-13

    ...) a new rule for the control of volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions from reinforced plastic..., Reporting and recordkeeping requirements, Volatile organic compounds. Dated: June 24, 2011. Susan Hedman... Organic Compound Reinforced Plastic Composites Production Operations Rule AGENCY: Environmental Protection...

  15. Volatility of secondary organic aerosol during OH radical induced ageing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Salo

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate oxidation of SOA formed from ozonolysis of α-pinene and limonene by hydroxyl radicals. This paper focuses on changes of particle volatility, using a Volatility Tandem DMA (VTDMA set-up, in order to explain and elucidate the mechanism behind atmospheric ageing of the organic aerosol. The experiments were conducted at the AIDA chamber facility of Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT in Karlsruhe and at the SAPHIR chamber of Forchungzentrum Jülich (FZJ in Jülich. A fresh SOA was produced from ozonolysis of α-pinene or limonene and then aged by enhanced OH exposure. As an OH radical source in the AIDA-chamber the ozonolysis of tetramethylethylene (TME was used while in the SAPHIR-chamber the OH was produced by natural light photochemistry. A general feature is that SOA produced from ozonolysis of α-pinene and limonene initially was rather volatile and becomes less volatile with time in the ozonolysis part of the experiment. Inducing OH chemistry or adding a new portion of precursors made the SOA more volatile due to addition of new semi-volatile material to the aged aerosol. The effect of OH chemistry was less pronounced in high concentration and low temperature experiments when lower relative amounts of semi-volatile material were available in the gas phase. Conclusions drawn from the changes in volatility were confirmed by comparison with the measured and modelled chemical composition of the aerosol phase. Three quantified products from the α-pinene oxidation; pinonic acid, pinic acid and methylbutanetricarboxylic acid (MBTCA were used to probe the processes influencing aerosol volatility. A major conclusion from the work is that the OH induced ageing can be attributed to gas phase oxidation of products produced in the primary SOA formation process and that there was no indication on significant bulk or surface reactions. The presented results, thus, strongly emphasise

  16. Novel collection method for volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from dogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Host derived chemical cues are an important aspect of arthropod attraction to potential hosts. Host cues that act over longer distances include CO2, heat, and water vapor, while cues such as volatile organic compounds (VOCs) act over closer distances. Domestic dogs are important hosts for disease cy...

  17. Screening for emphysema via exhaled volatile organic compounds.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cristescu, S.M.; Gietema, H.A.; Blanchet, L.M.; Kruitwagen, C.L.J.J.; Munnik, P.; Klaveren, R.J.J. van; Lammers, J.W.; Buydens, L.; Harren, F.J.M.; Zanen, P.

    2011-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD)/emphysema risk groups are well defined and screening allows for early identification of disease. The capability of exhaled volatile organic compounds (VOCs) to detect emphysema, as found by computed tomography (CT) in current and former heavy smokers

  18. Screening for emphysema via exhaled volatile organic compounds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.M. Cristescu (S.); H.A. Gietema (Hester); L. Blanchet (Lionel); C.L.J.J. Kruitwagen (Cas); P. Munnik (P.); R.J. van Klaveren (Rob); J.-W.J. Lammers (Jan-Willem); L.M.C. Buydens (Lutgarde); F.J.M. Harren (F. J M); P. Zanen (Pieter)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractChronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD)/emphysema risk groups are well defined and screening allows for early identification of disease. The capability of exhaled volatile organic compounds (VOCs) to detect emphysema, as found by computed tomography (CT) in current and former heavy

  19. Volatile organic compounds of whole grain soft winter wheat

    Science.gov (United States)

    The aroma from volatile organic compounds (VOCs) is an indicator of grain soundness and also an important quality attribute of grain foods. To identify the inherent VOCs of wheat grain unaffected by fungal infestation and other extrinsic factors, grains of nine soft wheat varieties were collected at...

  20. Transport and Fate of Volatile Organic Chemical in Soils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Lis Wollesen

    Recently much attention has been paid to the behavior of volatile organic chemicals (VOCs) in the environment. This is due to the fact that the environmental pollution with these hazardous chemicals has drastically increased during the last decades. The present study is limited to consider...

  1. Influence of volatile organic compounds on Fusarium graminearum mycotoxin production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are involved in a diverse range of ecological interactions. Due to their low molecular weight, lipophilic nature, and high vapor pressure at ambient temperatures, they can serve as airborne signaling molecules that are capable of mediating inter and intraspecies com...

  2. Air quality status of volatile organic compounds in health and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Volatile organic compounds are considered to be air toxins that affect human health. They have great influence on the troposphere because they affect the formation of ozone. Ambient air samples were collected from indoor and outdoor of five health and financial institution microenvironments. Passive sampling method with ...

  3. Quantifying the volatility of organic aerosol in the southeastern US

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Provat K.; Khlystov, Andrey; Yahya, Khairunnisa; Zhang, Yang; Xu, Lu; Ng, Nga L.; Grieshop, Andrew P.

    2017-01-01

    The volatility of organic aerosols (OA) has emerged as a property of primary importance in understanding their atmospheric life cycle, and thus abundance and transport. However, quantitative estimates of the thermodynamic (volatility, water solubility) and kinetic parameters dictating ambient-OA gas-particle partitioning, such as saturation concentrations (C∗), enthalpy of evaporation (ΔHvap), and evaporation coefficient (γe), are highly uncertain. Here, we present measurements of ambient-OA volatility at two sites in the southeastern US, one at a rural setting in Alabama dominated by biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) as part of the Southern Oxidant and Aerosol Study (SOAS) in June-July 2013, and another at a more anthropogenically influenced urban location in North Carolina during October-November 2013. These measurements applied a dual-thermodenuder (TD) system, in which temperature and residence times are varied in parallel to constrain equilibrium and kinetic aerosol volatility properties. Gas-particle partitioning parameters were determined via evaporation kinetic model fits to the dual-TD observations. OA volatility parameter values derived from both datasets were similar despite the fact that measurements were collected in distinct settings and seasons. The OA volatility distributions also did not vary dramatically over the campaign period or strongly correlate with OA components identified via positive matrix factorization of aerosol mass spectrometer data. A large portion (40-70 %) of measured ambient OA at both sites was composed of very-low-volatility organics (C∗ ≤ 0.1 µg m-3). An effective ΔHvap of bulk OA of ˜ 80-100 kJ mol-1 and a γe value of ˜ 0.5 best describe the evaporation observed in the TDs. This range of ΔHvap values is substantially higher than that typically assumed for simulating OA in atmospheric models (30-40 kJ mol-1). TD data indicate that γe is on the order of 0.1 to 0.5, indicating that repartitioning

  4. Volatile Organic Compunds (Environmental Health Student Portal)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Pesticides Climate Change Climate Change Home What is Climate Change ... organic compounds ( VOCs ) are chemicals that evaporate from a solid or liquid form at room temperature. Some VOCs exist naturally in the environment. Others are manufactured (made by people) and put ...

  5. Size-dependence of volatile and semi-volatile organic carbon content in phytoplankton cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio eRuiz-Halpern

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The content of volatile and semivolatile organic compounds (VOC and SOC, measured as exchangeable dissolved organic carbon (EDOC, was quantified in 9 phytoplanktonic species that spanned 4 orders of magnitude in cell volume, by disrupting the cells and quantifying the gaseous organic carbon released. EDOC content varied 4 orders of magnitude, from 0.0015 to 14.12 pg C cell-1 in the species studied and increased linearly with increasing phytoplankton cell volume following the equation EDOC (pg C cell-1 = -2.35 x cellular volume (CV, µm3 cell-1 0.90 (± 0.3, with a slope (0.90 not different from 1 indicating a constant increase in volatile carbon as the cell size of phytoplankton increased. The percentage of EDOC relative to total cellular carbon was small but varied 20 fold from 0.28 % to 5.17 %, and no obvious taxonomic pattern in the content of EDOC was appreciable for the species tested. The cell release rate of EDOC is small compared to the amount of carbon in the cell and difficult to capture. Nonetheless, the results point to a potential flux of volatile and semivolatile phytoplankton-derived organic carbon to the atmosphere that has been largely underestimated and deserves further attention in the future.

  6. Volatile organic compound emission profiles of four common arctic plants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vedel-Petersen, Ida; Schollert, Michelle; Nymand, Josephine

    2015-01-01

    The biogenic volatile organic compound (BVOC) emissions from plants impact atmosphere and climate. The species-specific emissions, and thereby the atmospheric impact, of many plant species are still unknown. Knowledge of BVOC emission from arctic plants is particularly limited. The vast area...... hermaphroditum, Salix glauca, Salix arctophila and Betula nana using the dynamic enclosure technique and collection of volatiles in adsorbent cartridges, analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Sampling occurred three times: in late June/early July, in mid-July and in early August. E. hermaphroditum...

  7. Nanostructured Polypyrrole-Based Ammonia and Volatile Organic Compound Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milena Šetka

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this review is to summarize the recent progress in the fabrication of efficient nanostructured polymer-based sensors with special focus on polypyrrole. The correlation between physico-chemical parameters, mainly morphology of various polypyrrole nanostructures, and their sensitivity towards selected gas and volatile organic compounds (VOC is provided. The different approaches of polypyrrole modification with other functional materials are also discussed. With respect to possible sensors application in medicine, namely in the diagnosis of diseases via the detection of volatile biomarkers from human breath, the sensor interaction with humidity is described as well. The major attention is paid to analytes such as ammonia and various alcohols.

  8. Nanostructured Polypyrrole-Based Ammonia and Volatile Organic Compound Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Šetka, Milena; Drbohlavová, Jana; Hubálek, Jaromír

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this review is to summarize the recent progress in the fabrication of efficient nanostructured polymer-based sensors with special focus on polypyrrole. The correlation between physico-chemical parameters, mainly morphology of various polypyrrole nanostructures, and their sensitivity towards selected gas and volatile organic compounds (VOC) is provided. The different approaches of polypyrrole modification with other functional materials are also discussed. With respect to possible sensors application in medicine, namely in the diagnosis of diseases via the detection of volatile biomarkers from human breath, the sensor interaction with humidity is described as well. The major attention is paid to analytes such as ammonia and various alcohols. PMID:28287435

  9. Nanostructured Polypyrrole-Based Ammonia and Volatile Organic Compound Sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Šetka, Milena; Drbohlavová, Jana; Hubálek, Jaromír

    2017-03-10

    The aim of this review is to summarize the recent progress in the fabrication of efficient nanostructured polymer-based sensors with special focus on polypyrrole. The correlation between physico-chemical parameters, mainly morphology of various polypyrrole nanostructures, and their sensitivity towards selected gas and volatile organic compounds (VOC) is provided. The different approaches of polypyrrole modification with other functional materials are also discussed. With respect to possible sensors application in medicine, namely in the diagnosis of diseases via the detection of volatile biomarkers from human breath, the sensor interaction with humidity is described as well. The major attention is paid to analytes such as ammonia and various alcohols.

  10. Quantitative estimates of the volatility of ambient organic aerosol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. D. Cappa

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Measurements of the sensitivity of organic aerosol (OA, and its components mass to changes in temperature were recently reported by Huffman et al.~(2009 using a tandem thermodenuder-aerosol mass spectrometer (TD-AMS system in Mexico City and the Los Angeles area. Here, we use these measurements to derive quantitative estimates of aerosol volatility within the framework of absorptive partitioning theory using a kinetic model of aerosol evaporation in the TD. OA volatility distributions (or "basis-sets" are determined using several assumptions as to the enthalpy of vaporization (ΔHvap. We present two definitions of "non-volatile OA," one being a global and one a local definition. Based on these definitions, our analysis indicates that a substantial fraction of the organic aerosol is comprised of non-volatile components that will not evaporate under any atmospheric conditions; on the order of 50–80% when the most realistic ΔHvap assumptions are considered. The sensitivity of the total OA mass to dilution and ambient changes in temperature has been assessed for the various ΔHvap assumptions. The temperature sensitivity is relatively independent of the particular ΔHvap assumptions whereas dilution sensitivity is found to be greatest for the low (ΔHvap = 50 kJ/mol and lowest for the high (ΔHvap = 150 kJ/mol assumptions. This difference arises from the high ΔHvap assumptions yielding volatility distributions with a greater fraction of non-volatile material than the low ΔHvap assumptions. If the observations are fit using a 1 or 2-component model the sensitivity of the OA to dilution is unrealistically high. An empirical method introduced by Faulhaber et al. (2009 has also been used to independently estimate a volatility distribution for the ambient OA and is found to give results consistent with the

  11. Collection, speciation and aerosol modelling for volatile organic compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman-Rendall, Kevin Alan Scott

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are collected on the integrated organic gas and particle sampler (IOGAPS) to measure particle loss and collection efficiency. Particle loss increases with increasing flow rate while collection efficiency is a function of alkane volatility. Unresolved complex mixtures (UCMs) are then analyzed and quantified using the novel technique supersonic molecular beam gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (SMB-GC/MS), to develop accurate inputs in modelling the formation of secondary organic aerosol (SOA). Alkanes were segregated by carbon number (NC), number of double bond equivalents (NDBE), and chemical structure. With the most explicit compositional knowledge to date, these mixtures were modelled for their affinity towards formation of SOA. Unsaturated alkanes formed the most and relatively equal amounts of aerosol based on their degree of unsaturation while branched species formed the least. Increasing specificity in chemical structure led to increased computational demands while only general structural motifs were needed to form an accurate picture of aerosol formation.

  12. A large source of low-volatility secondary organic aerosol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehn, Mikael; Thornton, Joel A; Kleist, Einhard; Sipilä, Mikko; Junninen, Heikki; Pullinen, Iida; Springer, Monika; Rubach, Florian; Tillmann, Ralf; Lee, Ben; Lopez-Hilfiker, Felipe; Andres, Stefanie; Acir, Ismail-Hakki; Rissanen, Matti; Jokinen, Tuija; Schobesberger, Siegfried; Kangasluoma, Juha; Kontkanen, Jenni; Nieminen, Tuomo; Kurtén, Theo; Nielsen, Lasse B; Jørgensen, Solvejg; Kjaergaard, Henrik G; Canagaratna, Manjula; Maso, Miikka Dal; Berndt, Torsten; Petäjä, Tuukka; Wahner, Andreas; Kerminen, Veli-Matti; Kulmala, Markku; Worsnop, Douglas R; Wildt, Jürgen; Mentel, Thomas F

    2014-02-27

    Forests emit large quantities of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) to the atmosphere. Their condensable oxidation products can form secondary organic aerosol, a significant and ubiquitous component of atmospheric aerosol, which is known to affect the Earth's radiation balance by scattering solar radiation and by acting as cloud condensation nuclei. The quantitative assessment of such climate effects remains hampered by a number of factors, including an incomplete understanding of how biogenic VOCs contribute to the formation of atmospheric secondary organic aerosol. The growth of newly formed particles from sizes of less than three nanometres up to the sizes of cloud condensation nuclei (about one hundred nanometres) in many continental ecosystems requires abundant, essentially non-volatile organic vapours, but the sources and compositions of such vapours remain unknown. Here we investigate the oxidation of VOCs, in particular the terpene α-pinene, under atmospherically relevant conditions in chamber experiments. We find that a direct pathway leads from several biogenic VOCs, such as monoterpenes, to the formation of large amounts of extremely low-volatility vapours. These vapours form at significant mass yield in the gas phase and condense irreversibly onto aerosol surfaces to produce secondary organic aerosol, helping to explain the discrepancy between the observed atmospheric burden of secondary organic aerosol and that reported by many model studies. We further demonstrate how these low-volatility vapours can enhance, or even dominate, the formation and growth of aerosol particles over forested regions, providing a missing link between biogenic VOCs and their conversion to aerosol particles. Our findings could help to improve assessments of biosphere-aerosol-climate feedback mechanisms, and the air quality and climate effects of biogenic emissions generally.

  13. Volatile organic compounds in fourteen U.S. retail stores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nirlo, E L; Crain, N; Corsi, R L; Siegel, J A

    2014-10-01

    Retail buildings have a potential for both short-term (customer) and long-term (occupational) exposure to indoor pollutants. However, little is known about volatile organic compound (VOC) concentrations in the retail sector and influencing factors, such as ventilation, in-store activities, and store type. We measured VOC concentrations and ventilation rates in 14 retail stores in Texas and Pennsylvania. With the exception of formaldehyde and acetaldehyde, VOCs were present in retail stores at concentrations well below health guidelines. Indoor formaldehyde concentrations ranged from 4.6 ppb to 67 ppb. The two mid-sized grocery stores in the sample had the highest levels of ethanol and acetaldehyde, with concentrations up to 2.6 ppm and 92 ppb, respectively, possibly due to the preparation of dough and baking activities. Indoor-to-outdoor concentration ratios indicated that indoor sources were the main contributors to indoor VOC concentrations for the majority of compounds. There was no strong correlation between ventilation and VOC concentrations across all stores. However, increasing the air exchange rates at two stores led to lower indoor VOC concentrations, suggesting that ventilation can be used to reduce concentrations for some specific stores. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Increase in volatilization of organic compounds using air sparging through addition in alcohol in a soil-water system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Huan-Ping; Hsieh, Lin-Han Chiang; Tran, Hai Nguyen

    2018-02-15

    This study developed a novel method to promote the remediation efficiency of air sparging. According to the enhanced-volatilization theory presented in this study, selected alcohols added to groundwater can highly enhance the volatilization amounts of organic compounds with high Henry's law constants. In this study, the target organic compounds consisted of n-hexane, n-heptane, benzene, toluene, 1,1,2-trichloroethane, and tetrachloroethene. n-pentanol, n-hexanol, and n-heptanol were used to examine the changes in the volatilization amounts of organic compounds in the given period. Two types of soils with high and low organic matter were applied to evaluate the transport of organic compounds in the soil-water system. The volatilization amounts of the organic compounds increased with increasing alcohol concentrations. The volatilization amounts of the test organic compounds exhibited a decreasing order: n-heptanol>n-hexanol>n-pentanol. When 10mg/L n-heptanol was added to the system, the maximum volatilization enhancement rate was 18-fold higher than that in distilled water. Samples of soil with high organic matter might reduce the volatilization amounts by a factor of 5-10. In the present study, the optimal removal efficiency for aromatic compounds was approximately 98%. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. 75 FR 82363 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; Ohio; Volatile Organic Compound Emission...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-30

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 52 Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; Ohio; Volatile Organic Compound... printing volatile organic compound (VOC) rule for approval into the Ohio State Implementation Plan (SIP..., Volatile organic compounds. Dated: December 17, 2010. Bharat Mathur, Acting Regional Administrator, Region...

  16. 75 FR 24404 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Indiana; Volatile Organic Compound...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-05

    ... approved volatile organic compound (VOC) automobile refinishing rules to all persons in Indiana who sell or..., Volatile organic compounds. Dated: March 31, 2010. Walter W. Kovalick Jr., Acting Regional Administrator... revisions extend the applicability of Indiana's approved volatile organic compound (VOC) automobile...

  17. 75 FR 57390 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; Alabama: Volatile Organic Compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-21

    ... definition of ``volatile organic compounds'' (VOCs) found at Alabama Administrative Code (AAC) section 335-3... recordkeeping requirements, Volatile organic compounds. Dated: September 3, 2010. A. Stanley Meiburg, Acting... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 52 Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; Alabama: Volatile Organic...

  18. 75 FR 8246 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Indiana; Volatile Organic Compound...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-24

    ... Plan (SIP) several volatile organic compound (VOC) control rules. The purpose of these rules is to... requirements, Volatile organic compounds. Dated: January 14, 2010. Walter W. Kovalick Jr., Acting Regional... several volatile organic compound rules for approval into the Indiana State Implementation Plan for the...

  19. Volatile organic emissions from the distillation and pyrolysis of vegetation

    OpenAIRE

    Greenberg, J. P.; Friedli, H.; Guenther, A. B.; Hanson, D.; Harley, P.; Karl, T.

    2005-01-01

    International audience; Leaf and woody plant tissue (Pinus ponderosa, Eucalyptus saligna, Quercus gambelli, Saccharum officinarum and Oriza sativa) were heated from 30 to 300°C and volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions were identified and quantified. Major VOC emissions were acetic acid, furylaldehyde, methyl acetate, pyrazine, terpenes, 2,3-butadione, phenol and methanol, as well as smaller emissions of furan, acetone, acetaldehyde, acetonitrile and benzaldehyde. Total VOC emissions from...

  20. Marine Vibrio Species Produce the Volatile Organic Compound Acetone

    OpenAIRE

    Nemecek-Marshall, M.; Wojciechowski, C.; Kuzma, J.; Silver, G. M.; Fall, R.

    1995-01-01

    While screening aerobic, heterotrophic marine bacteria for production of volatile organic compounds, we found that a group of isolates produced substantial amounts of acetone. Acetone production was confirmed by gas chromatography, gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, and high-performance liquid chromatography. The major acetone producers were identified as nonclinical Vibrio species. Acetone production was maximal in the stationary phase of growth and was stimulated by addition of l-leucine...

  1. Methods in Plant Foliar Volatile Organic Compounds Research

    OpenAIRE

    Materić, Dušan; Bruhn, Dan; Turner, Claire; Morgan, Geraint; Mason, N.; Gauci, Vincent

    2015-01-01

    Plants are a major atmospheric source of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). These secondary metabolic products protect plants from high-temperature stress, mediate in plant?plant and plant?insect communication, and affect our climate globally. The main challenges in plant foliar VOC research are accurate sampling, the inherent reactivity of some VOC compounds that makes them hard to detect directly, and their low concentrations. Plant VOC research relies on analytical techniques for trace gas...

  2. New graphene fiber coating for volatile organic compounds analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, GuoJuan; Guo, XiaoXi; Wang, ShuLing; Wang, XueLan; Zhou, YanPing; Xu, Hui

    2014-10-15

    In the work, a novel graphene-based solid phase microextraction-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry method was developed for the analysis of trace amount of volatile organic compounds in human exhaled breath vapor. The graphene fiber coating was prepared by a one-step hydrothermal reduction reaction. The fiber with porous and wrinkled structure exhibited excellent extraction efficiency toward eight studied volatile organic compounds (two n-alkanes, five n-aldehydes and one aromatic compound). Meanwhile, remarkable thermal and mechanical stability, long lifespan and low cost were also obtained for the fiber. Under the optimal conditions, the developed method provided low limits of detection (1.0-4.5ngL(-1)), satisfactory reproducibility (3.8-13.8%) and acceptable recoveries (93-122%). The method was applied successfully to the analysis of breath samples of lung cancer patients and healthy individuals. The unique advantage of this approach includes simple setup, non-invasive analysis, cost-efficient and sufficient sensitivity. The proposed method supply us a new possibility to monitor volatile organic compounds in human exhaled breath samples. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Diffusivity measurements of volatile organics in levitated viscous aerosol particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastelberger, Sandra; Krieger, Ulrich K.; Luo, Beiping; Peter, Thomas

    2017-07-01

    Field measurements indicating that atmospheric secondary organic aerosol (SOA) particles can be present in a highly viscous, glassy state have spurred numerous studies addressing low diffusivities of water in glassy aerosols. The focus of these studies is on kinetic limitations of hygroscopic growth and the plasticizing effect of water. In contrast, much less is known about diffusion limitations of organic molecules and oxidants in viscous matrices. These may affect atmospheric chemistry and gas-particle partitioning of complex mixtures with constituents of different volatility. In this study, we quantify the diffusivity of a volatile organic in a viscous matrix. Evaporation of single particles generated from an aqueous solution of sucrose and small amounts of volatile tetraethylene glycol (PEG-4) is investigated in an electrodynamic balance at controlled relative humidity (RH) and temperature. The evaporative loss of PEG-4 as determined by Mie resonance spectroscopy is used in conjunction with a radially resolved diffusion model to retrieve translational diffusion coefficients of PEG-4. Comparison of the experimentally derived diffusivities with viscosity estimates for the ternary system reveals a breakdown of the Stokes-Einstein relationship, which has often been invoked to infer diffusivity from viscosity. The evaporation of PEG-4 shows pronounced RH and temperature dependencies and is severely depressed for RH ≲ 30 %, corresponding to diffusivities pollutant molecules such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs).

  4. Volatile and semivolatile organic compounds in laboratory peat fire emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Ingrid J.; Black, Robert R.; Geron, Chris D.; Aurell, Johanna; Hays, Michael D.; Preston, William T.; Gullett, Brian K.

    2016-05-01

    In this study, volatile and semi-volatile organic compound (VOCs and SVOCs) mass emission factors were determined from laboratory peat fire experiments. The peat samples originated from two National Wildlife Refuges on the coastal plain of North Carolina, U.S.A. Gas- and particle-phase organic compounds were quantified by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and by high pressure liquid chromatography. Hazardous air pollutants (HAPs) accounted for a large fraction (∼60%) of the speciated VOC emissions from peat burning, including large contributions of acetaldehyde, formaldehyde, benzene, toluene, and chloromethane. In the fine particle mass (PM2.5), the following organic compound classes were dominant: organic acids, levoglucosan, n-alkanes, and n-alkenes. Emission factors for the organic acids in PM2.5 including n-alkanoic acids, n-alkenoic acids, n-alkanedioic acids, and aromatic acids were reported for the first time for peat burning, representing the largest fraction of organic carbon (OC) mass (11-12%) of all speciated compound classes measured in this work. Levoglucosan contributed to 2-3% of the OC mass, while methoxyphenols represented 0.2-0.3% of the OC mass on a carbon mass basis. Retene was the most abundant particulate phase polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH). Total HAP VOC and particulate PAH emissions from a 2008 peat wildfire in North Carolina were estimated, suggesting that peat fires can contribute a large fraction of state-wide HAP emissions.

  5. Peat fires and air quality: volatile organic compounds and particulates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blake, D; Hinwood, A L; Horwitz, P

    2009-07-01

    There are numerous localized peat deposits on the Swan Coastal Plain, an urban and rural bioregion otherwise dominated by wetland ecosystems in southwestern Australia. Hydrological change is significant in the bioregion: urban development encroaches on wetlands, groundwater extraction provides the city population with most of its water, and rainfall declines will not recharge aquifers in the future. The wetland processes which contribute to the formation of these peat deposits have therefore changed and are becoming vulnerable to fire events with residents increasingly exposed to peat smoke. There is an imperative to characterise this peat smoke to determine if exposures are harmful or toxic, and opportunities to do so in this setting arise due to the absence of bushfire smoke which has confounded other international studies. We have measured volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and particulate concentrations from an opportunistic assessment of two peat fires. SUMMA canister grab samples and a portable GCMS were used to determine the VOCs with high 1h benzene concentrations of 16 and 30 ppm v/v. PM10 and PM2.5 particulate data were collected using an Osiris continuous analyser with 24h concentrations recorded at varying time periods (within a 5 months timeframe) ranging from 1h maximums of between 23-37 microgm(-3) for PM10 and 50.5-106 microgm(-3) for PM2.5. While the 24h averages were generally below national air quality standards, elevated 1h concentrations were observed on numerous occasions and on most days. Given the proximity of residential development to many peat deposits, a drying climate and the increased risk of arson in peri-urban environments, the health impacts of exposure to peat smoke need to be determined and if necessary measures developed to prevent exposure (which would include maintaining wetland sediment integrity so as to reduce its vulnerability to fire).

  6. Exposure to volatile organic compounds in healthcare settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeBouf, Ryan F; Virji, M Abbas; Saito, Rena; Henneberger, Paul K; Simcox, Nancy; Stefaniak, Aleksandr B

    2014-09-01

    To identify and summarise volatile organic compound (VOC) exposure profiles of healthcare occupations. Personal (n=143) and mobile area (n=207) evacuated canisters were collected and analysed by a gas chromatograph/mass spectrometer to assess exposures to 14 VOCs among 14 healthcare occupations in five hospitals. Participants were volunteers identified by their supervisors. Summary statistics were calculated by occupation. Principal component analysis (PCA) was used to reduce the 14 analyte inputs to five orthogonal factors and identify occupations that were associated with these factors. Linear regressions were used to assess the association between personal and mobile area samples. Exposure profiles differed among occupations; ethanol had the highest geometric mean (GM) among nursing assistants (∼4900 and ∼1900 µg/m(3), personal and area), and 2-propanol had the highest GM among medical equipment preparers (∼4600 and ∼2000 µg/m(3), personal and area). The highest total personal VOC exposures were among nursing assistants (∼9200 µg/m(3)), licensed practical nurses (∼8700 µg/m(3)) and medical equipment preparers (∼7900 µg/m(3)). The influence of the PCA factors developed from personal exposure estimates varied by occupation, which enabled a comparative assessment of occupations. For example, factor 1, indicative of solvent use, was positively correlated with clinical laboratory and floor stripping/waxing occupations and tasks. Overall, a significant correlation was observed (r=0.88) between matched personal and mobile area samples, but varied considerably by analyte (r=0.23-0.64). Healthcare workers are exposed to a variety of chemicals that vary with the activities and products used during activities. These VOC profiles are useful for estimating exposures for occupational hazard ranking for industrial hygienists as well as epidemiological studies. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already

  7. Bias-reduced estimation of long memory stochastic volatility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frederiksen, Per; Nielsen, Morten Ørregaard

    We propose to use a variant of the local polynomial Whittle estimator to estimate the memory parameter in volatility for long memory stochastic volatility models with potential nonstation- arity in the volatility process. We show that the estimator is asymptotically normal and capable of obtainin...... bias reduction as well as a rate of convergence arbitrarily close to the parametric rate, n1=2. A Monte Carlo study is conducted to support the theoretical results, and an analysis of daily exchange rates demonstrates the empirical usefulness of the estimators....

  8. Gas-phase photocatalytic oxidation of volatile organic compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kachina, A.

    2008-07-01

    Substances emitted into the atmosphere by human activities in urban and industrial areas cause environmental problems such as air quality degradation, respiratory diseases, climate change, global warming, and stratospheric ozone depletion. Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are major air pollutants, emitted largely by industry, transportation and households. Many VOCs are toxic, and some are considered to be carcinogenic, mutagenic, or teratogenic. A wide spectrum of VOCs is readily oxidized photocatalytically. Photocatalytic oxidation (PCO) over titanium dioxide may present a potential alternative to air treatment strategies currently in use, such as adsorption and thermal treatment, due to its advantageous activity under ambient conditions, although higher but still mild temperatures may also be applied. The objective of the present research was to disclose routes of chemical reactions, estimate the kinetics and the sensitivity of gas-phase PCO to reaction conditions in respect of air pollutants containing heteroatoms in their molecules. Deactivation of the photocatalyst and restoration of its activity was also taken under consideration to assess the practical possibility of the application of PCO to the treatment of air polluted with VOCs. UV-irradiated titanium dioxide was selected as a photocatalyst for its chemical inertness, non-toxic character and low cost. In the present work Degussa P25 TiO{sub 2} photocatalyst was mostly used. In transient studies platinized TiO{sub 2} was also studied. The experimental research into PCO of following VOCs was undertaken: - methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) as the basic oxygenated motor fuel additive and, thus, a major non-biodegradable pollutant of groundwater; - tert-butyl alcohol (TBA) as the primary product of MTBE hydrolysis and PCO; - ethyl mercaptan (ethanethiol) as one of the reduced sulphur pungent air pollutants in the pulp-and-paper industry; - methylamine (MA) and dimethylamine (DMA) as the amino compounds often

  9. Are Some Fungal Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs Mycotoxins?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joan W. Bennett

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Volatile organic compounds (VOCs are carbon-compounds that easily evaporate at room temperature. Toxins are biologically produced poisons; mycotoxins are those toxins produced by microscopic fungi. All fungi emit blends of VOCs; the qualitative and quantitative composition of these volatile blends varies with the species of fungus and the environmental situation in which the fungus is grown. These fungal VOCs, produced as mixtures of alcohols, aldehydes, acids, ethers, esters, ketones, terpenes, thiols and their derivatives, are responsible for the characteristic moldy odors associated with damp indoor spaces. There is increasing experimental evidence that some of these VOCs have toxic properties. Laboratory tests in mammalian tissue culture and Drosophila melanogaster have shown that many single VOCs, as well as mixtures of VOCs emitted by growing fungi, have toxic effects. This paper describes the pros and cons of categorizing toxigenic fungal VOCs as mycotoxins, uses genomic data to expand on the definition of mycotoxin, and summarizes some of the linguistic and other conventions that can create barriers to communication between the scientists who study VOCs and those who study toxins. We propose that “volatoxin” might be a useful term to describe biogenic volatile compounds with toxigenic properties.

  10. Are Some Fungal Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) Mycotoxins?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Joan W; Inamdar, Arati A

    2015-09-22

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are carbon-compounds that easily evaporate at room temperature. Toxins are biologically produced poisons; mycotoxins are those toxins produced by microscopic fungi. All fungi emit blends of VOCs; the qualitative and quantitative composition of these volatile blends varies with the species of fungus and the environmental situation in which the fungus is grown. These fungal VOCs, produced as mixtures of alcohols, aldehydes, acids, ethers, esters, ketones, terpenes, thiols and their derivatives, are responsible for the characteristic moldy odors associated with damp indoor spaces. There is increasing experimental evidence that some of these VOCs have toxic properties. Laboratory tests in mammalian tissue culture and Drosophila melanogaster have shown that many single VOCs, as well as mixtures of VOCs emitted by growing fungi, have toxic effects. This paper describes the pros and cons of categorizing toxigenic fungal VOCs as mycotoxins, uses genomic data to expand on the definition of mycotoxin, and summarizes some of the linguistic and other conventions that can create barriers to communication between the scientists who study VOCs and those who study toxins. We propose that "volatoxin" might be a useful term to describe biogenic volatile compounds with toxigenic properties.

  11. Can volatile organic compounds be markers of sea salt?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Isabel; Coimbra, Manuel A; Barros, António S; Marriott, Philip J; Rocha, Sílvia M

    2015-02-15

    Sea salt is a handmade food product that is obtained by evaporation of seawater in saltpans. During the crystallisation process, organic compounds from surroundings can be incorporated into sea salt crystals. The aim of this study is to search for potential volatile markers of sea salt. Thus, sea salts from seven north-east Atlantic Ocean locations (France, Portugal, Continental Spain, Canary Islands, and Cape Verde) were analysed by headspace solid-phase microextraction combined with comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography-time-of-flight mass spectrometry. A total of 165 compounds were detected, ranging from 32 to 71 compounds per salt. The volatile composition revealed the variability and individuality of each salt, and a set of ten compounds were detected in all samples. From these, seven are carotenoid-derived compounds that can be associated with the typical natural surroundings of ocean hypersaline environment. These ten compounds are proposed as potential volatile markers of sea salt. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Are Some Fungal Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) Mycotoxins?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Joan W.; Inamdar, Arati A.

    2015-01-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are carbon-compounds that easily evaporate at room temperature. Toxins are biologically produced poisons; mycotoxins are those toxins produced by microscopic fungi. All fungi emit blends of VOCs; the qualitative and quantitative composition of these volatile blends varies with the species of fungus and the environmental situation in which the fungus is grown. These fungal VOCs, produced as mixtures of alcohols, aldehydes, acids, ethers, esters, ketones, terpenes, thiols and their derivatives, are responsible for the characteristic moldy odors associated with damp indoor spaces. There is increasing experimental evidence that some of these VOCs have toxic properties. Laboratory tests in mammalian tissue culture and Drosophila melanogaster have shown that many single VOCs, as well as mixtures of VOCs emitted by growing fungi, have toxic effects. This paper describes the pros and cons of categorizing toxigenic fungal VOCs as mycotoxins, uses genomic data to expand on the definition of mycotoxin, and summarizes some of the linguistic and other conventions that can create barriers to communication between the scientists who study VOCs and those who study toxins. We propose that “volatoxin” might be a useful term to describe biogenic volatile compounds with toxigenic properties. PMID:26402705

  13. Volatile organic compounds in the unsaturated zone from radioactive wastes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Ronald J.; Andraski, Brian J.; Stonestrom, David A.; Luo, Wentai

    2012-01-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are often comingled with low-level radioactive wastes (LLRW), but little is known about subsurface VOC emanations from LLRW landfills. The current study systematically quantified VOCs associated with LLRW over an 11-yr period at the USGS Amargosa Desert Research Site (ADRS) in southwestern Nevada. Unsaturated-zone gas samples of VOCs were collected by adsorption on resin cartridges and analyzed by thermal desorption and GC/MS. Sixty of 87 VOC method analytes were detected in the 110-m-thick unsaturated zone surrounding a LLRW disposal facility. Chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) were detected in 100% of samples collected. Chlorofluorocarbons are powerful greenhouse gases, deplete stratospheric ozone, and are likely released from LLRW facilities worldwide. Soil-gas samples collected from a depth of 24 m and a horizontal distance 100 m south of the nearest waste-disposal trench contained >60,000 ppbv total VOCs, including >37,000 ppbv CFCs. Extensive sampling in the shallow unsaturated zone (0–2 m deep) identified areas where total VOC concentrations exceeded 5000 ppbv at the 1.5-m depth. Volatile organic compound concentrations exceeded background levels up to 300 m from the facility. Maximum vertical diffusive fluxes of total VOCs were estimated to be 1 g m-2 yr-1. Volatile organic compound distributions were similar but not identical to those previously determined for tritium and elemental mercury. To our knowledge, this study is the first to characterize the unsaturated zone distribution of VOCs emanating from a LLRW landfill. Our results may help explain anomalous transport of radionuclides at the ADRS and elsewhere.

  14. Synthesis of Carbon Nanotubes and Volatile Organic Compounds Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sobri S.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work, the adsorption effect of volatile organic compounds (chloroacetophenone, acetonitrile and hexane towards the change of resistance of CNTs pellet as sensor signal was investigated. CNTs used in this research were synthesized using Floating Catalyst – Chemical Vapor Deposition (FC-CVD method in optimum condition. The synthesized CNTs were characterized using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM, Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM and Raman Spectroscopy. The variation of resistance changes towards the tested gases were recorded using a multimeter. CNTs sensor pellet showed good responses towards the tested gases, however, the sensitivity, response time and recovery time of sensor pellet need to be optimized.

  15. Volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions during malting and beer manufacture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Nigel B.; Costigan, Gavin T.; Swannell, Richard P. J.; Woodfield, Michael J.

    Estimates have been made of the amounts of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) released during different stages of beer manufacture. The estimates are based on recent measurements and plant specification data supplied by manufacturers. Data were obtained for three main manufacturing processes (malting, wort processing and fermentation) for three commercial beer types. Some data on the speciation of emitted compounds have been obtained. Based on these measurements, an estimate of the total unabated VOC emission. from the U.K. brewing industry was calculated as 3.5 kta -1, over 95% of which was generated during barley malting. This value does not include any correction for air pollution control.

  16. Colorimetric Polydiacetylene-Aerogel Detector for Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolai, Susmita; Bhunia, Susanta Kumar; Beglaryan, Stella S; Kolusheva, Sofiya; Zeiri, Leila; Jelinek, Raz

    2017-01-25

    A new hybrid system comprising polydiacetylene (PDA), a chromatic conjugated polymer, embedded within aerogel pores has been constructed. The PDA-aerogel powder underwent dramatic color changes in the presence of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), facilitated through infiltration of the gas molecules into the highly porous aerogel matrix and their interactions with the aerogel-embedded PDA units. The PDA-aerogel composite exhibited rapid color/fluorescence response and enhanced signals upon exposure to low VOC concentrations. Encapsulation of PDA derivatives displaying different headgroups within the aerogel produced distinct VOC-dependent color transformations, forming a PDA-aerogel "artificial nose".

  17. Global simulation of aromatic volatile organic compounds in the atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrera Perez, David; Taraborrelli, Domenico; Pozzer, Andrea

    2015-04-01

    Among the large number of chemical compounds in the atmosphere, the organic group plays a key role in the tropospheric chemistry. Specifically the subgroup called aromatics is of great interest. Aromatics are the predominant trace gases in urban areas due to high emissions, primarily by vehicle exhausts and fuel evaporation. They are also present in areas where biofuel is used (i.e residential wood burning). Emissions of aromatic compounds are a substantial fraction of the total emissions of the volatile organic compounds (VOC). Impact of aromatics on human health is very important, as they do not only contribute to the ozone formation in the urban environment, but they are also highly toxic themselves, especially in the case of benzene which is able to trigger a range of illness under long exposure, and of nitro-phenols which cause detrimental for humans and vegetation even at very low concentrations. The aim of this work is to assess the atmospheric impacts of aromatic compounds on the global scale. The main goals are: lifetime and budget estimation, mixing ratios distribution, net effect on ozone production and OH loss for the most emitted aromatic compounds (benzene, toluene, xylenes, ethylbenzene, styrene and trimethylbenzenes). For this purpose, we use the numerical chemistry and climate simulation ECHAM/MESSy Atmospheric Chemistry (EMAC) model to build the global atmospheric budget for the most emitted and predominant aromatic compounds in the atmosphere. A set of emissions was prepared in order to include biomass burning, vegetation and anthropogenic sources of aromatics into the model. A chemical mechanism based on the Master Chemical Mechanism (MCM) was developed to describe the chemical oxidation in the gas phase of these aromatic compounds. MCM have been reduced in terms of number of chemical equation and species in order to make it affordable in a 3D model. Additionally other features have been added, for instance the production of HONO via ortho

  18. Volatile organic compounds associated with Plasmodium falciparum infection in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correa, Ricardo; Coronado, Lorena M; Garrido, Anette C; Durant-Archibold, Armando A; Spadafora, Carmenza

    2017-05-02

    In order to identify new ways to prevent transmission of vector-borne diseases such as malaria, efforts have been made to understand how insects are attracted to humans. Vector-host interaction studies have shown that several volatile compounds play an important role in attracting mosquitoes to human targets. A headspace solid-phase micro-extraction/gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (HSPME GC-MS) analysis of the volatile organic composition of extracellular vesicles (EVs) and supernatants of ultracentrifugation (SNUs) was carried out in Plasmodium falciparum-infected cultures with high and low parasitemias. A list of 18 volatile organic compounds (VOCs) was obtained from the EVs of both infected and uninfected RBCs with 1,2,3-Propanetriol, diacetate (diacetin) increased in the infected EVs, regardless of the parasitemia of the culture. The supernatant analysis, however, gave off 56 VOCs, with pentane 2,2,4-trimethyl being present in all the SNUs of uninfected erythrocytes but absent from the parasite-infected ones. Standing out in this study was hexanal, a reported insect attractant, which was the only VOC present in all samples from SNUs from infected erythrocytes and absent from uninfected ones, suggesting that it originates during parasite infection. The hexanal compound, reportedly a low-level component found in healthy human samples such as breath and plasma, had not been found in previous analyses of P. falciparum-infected patients or cultures. This compound has been reported as an Anopheles gambiae attractant in plants. While the compound could be produced during infection by the malaria parasite in human erythrocytes, the A. gambiae attraction could be used by the parasite as a strategy for transmission.

  19. Modeling organic aerosols in a megacity: Potential contribution of semi-volatile and intermediate volatility primary organic compounds to secondary organic aerosol formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hodzic, A.; Kleinman, L.; Jimenez, J. L.; Madronich, S.; Canagaratna, M. R.; DeCarlo, P. F.; Fast, J.

    2010-06-01

    It has been established that observed local and regional levels of secondary organic aerosols (SOA) in polluted areas cannot be explained by the oxidation and partitioning of anthropogenic and biogenic VOC precursors, at least using current mechanisms and parameterizations. In this study, the 3-D regional air quality model CHIMERE is applied to estimate the potential contribution to SOA formation of recently identified semi-volatile and intermediate volatility organic precursors (S/IVOC) in and around Mexico City for the MILAGRO field experiment during March 2006. The model has been updated to include explicitly the volatility distribution of primary organic aerosols (POA), their gas-particle partitioning and the gas-phase oxidation of the vapors. Two recently proposed parameterizations, those of Robinson et al. (2007) ('ROB') and Grieshop et al. (2009) ('GRI') are compared and evaluated against surface and aircraft measurements. The 3-D model results are assessed by comparing with the concentrations of OA components from Positive Matrix Factorization of Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (AMS) data, and for the first time also with oxygen-to-carbon ratios derived from high-resolution AMS measurements. The results show a substantial enhancement in predicted SOA concentrations (2-4 times) with respect to the previously published base case without S/IVOCs (Hodzic et al., 2009), both within and downwind of the city leading to much reduced discrepancies with the total OA measurements. Model improvements in OA predictions are associated with the better-captured SOA magnitude and diurnal variability. The predicted production from anthropogenic and biomass burning S/IVOC represents 40-60% of the total measured SOA at the surface during the day and is somewhat larger than that from commonly measured aromatic VOCs, especially at the T1 site at the edge of the city. The SOA production from the continued multi-generation S/IVOC oxidation products continues actively

  20. Modeling organic aerosols in a megacity: potential contribution of semi-volatile and intermediate volatility primary organic compounds to secondary organic aerosol formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Hodzic

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available It has been established that observed local and regional levels of secondary organic aerosols (SOA in polluted areas cannot be explained by the oxidation and partitioning of anthropogenic and biogenic VOC precursors, at least using current mechanisms and parameterizations. In this study, the 3-D regional air quality model CHIMERE is applied to estimate the potential contribution to SOA formation of recently identified semi-volatile and intermediate volatility organic precursors (S/IVOC in and around Mexico City for the MILAGRO field experiment during March 2006. The model has been updated to include explicitly the volatility distribution of primary organic aerosols (POA, their gas-particle partitioning and the gas-phase oxidation of the vapors. Two recently proposed parameterizations, those of Robinson et al. (2007 ("ROB" and Grieshop et al. (2009 ("GRI" are compared and evaluated against surface and aircraft measurements. The 3-D model results are assessed by comparing with the concentrations of OA components from Positive Matrix Factorization of Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (AMS data, and for the first time also with oxygen-to-carbon ratios derived from high-resolution AMS measurements. The results show a substantial enhancement in predicted SOA concentrations (2–4 times with respect to the previously published base case without S/IVOCs (Hodzic et al., 2009, both within and downwind of the city leading to much reduced discrepancies with the total OA measurements. Model improvements in OA predictions are associated with the better-captured SOA magnitude and diurnal variability. The predicted production from anthropogenic and biomass burning S/IVOC represents 40–60% of the total measured SOA at the surface during the day and is somewhat larger than that from commonly measured aromatic VOCs, especially at the T1 site at the edge of the city. The SOA production from the continued multi-generation S/IVOC oxidation products continues actively

  1. Modeling organic aerosols in a megacity: potential contribution of semi-volatile and intermediate volatility primary organic compounds to secondary organic aerosol formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hodzic, Alma; Jimenez, Jose L.; Madronich, Sasha; Canagaratna, M. R.; DeCarlo, Peter F.; Kleinman, Lawrence I.; Fast, Jerome D.

    2010-06-21

    It has been established that observed local and regional levels of secondary organic aerosols (SOA) in polluted areas cannot be explained by the oxidation and partitioning of traditional anthropogenic and biogenic VOC precursors. In this study, the 3D regional air quality model CHIMERE is applied to quantify the contribution to SOA formation of recently identified semi-volatile and intermediate volatility organic vapors (S/IVOC) in and around Mexico City for the MILAGRO field experiment during March 2006. The model has been updated to explicitly include the volatility distribution of primary organic aerosols (POA), their gas-particle partitioning and the gas-phase oxidation of the vapors. Two recently proposed parameterizations, those of Robinson et al. (2007) ("ROB") and Grieshop et al. (2009) ("GRI") are compared and evaluated against surface and aircraft measurements. For the first time, 3D model results are assessed by comparing with the concentrations of OA components from Positive Matrix Factorization of Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (AMS) data, but also against and oxygen-to-carbon ratios derived from high-resolution AMS measurements. The results show a substantial enhancement in predicted SOA concentrations (3-6 times) with respect to the previously published base case without S/IVOCs (Hodzic et al., 2009), both within and downwind of the city leading to much reduced discrepancies with the total OA measurements. The predicted anthropogenic POA levels are found to agree within 20% with the observed HOA concentrations for both the ROB and GRI simulations, consistent with the interpretation of the emissions inventory by previous studies. The impact of biomass burning POA within the city is underestimated in comparison to the AMS BBOA, presumably due to insufficient nighttime smoldering emissions. Model improvements in OA predictions are associated with the better-captured SOA magnitude and diurnal variability. The production from anthropogenic and biomass burning

  2. Assessment of volatile organic compounds in surface water at Canal Creek, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland, November 1999-September 2000

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phelan, Daniel J.; Olsen, Lisa D.; Senus, Michael P.; Spencer, Tracey A.

    2001-01-01

    .84 kilograms per day), or 674 pounds per year. Volatile organic compounds that reach the Gunpowder River become substantially diluted. Although natural-attenuation processes in the study area such as biodegradation are highly effective at reducing contaminant concentration in ground water before it discharges to the creek, natural attenuation is not 100 percent effective at all locations or under all tidal, seasonal, and climatic conditions as indicated by detection of volatile organic compounds in Canal Creek.

  3. Efficiency of urease and nitrification inhibitors in reducing ammonia volatilization from diverse nitrogen fertilizers applied to different soil types and wheat straw mulching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    San Francisco, Sara; Urrutia, Oscar; Martin, Vincent; Peristeropoulos, Angelos; Garcia-Mina, Jose Maria

    2011-07-01

    Some authors suggest that the absence of tillage in agricultural soils might have an influence on the efficiency of nitrogen applied in the soil surface. In this study we investigate the influence of no-tillage and soil characteristics on the efficiency of a urease inhibitor (N-(n-butyl)thiophosphoric triamide, NBPT) and a nitrification inhibitor (diciandiamide, DCD) in decreasing ammonia volatilization from urea and ammonium nitrate (AN), respectively. The results indicate that ammonia volatilization in soils amended with urea was significantly higher than in those fertilized with AN. Likewise, the main soil factors affecting ammonia volatilization from urea are clay and sand soil contents. While clay impedes ammonia volatilization, sand favours it. The presence of organic residues on soil surface (no-tillage) tends to increase ammonia volatilization from urea, although this fact depended on soil type. The presence of NBPT in urea fertilizer significantly reduced soil ammonia volatilization. This action of NBPT was negatively affected by acid soil pH and favoured by soil clay content. The presence of organic residues on soil surface amended with urea increased ammonia volatilization, and was particularly high in sandy compared with clay soils. Application of NBPT reduced ammonia volatilization although its efficiency is reduced in acid soils. Concerning AN fertilization, there were no differences in ammonia volatilization with or without DCD in no-tillage soils. Copyright © 2011 Society of Chemical Industry.

  4. Diagnosing gastrointestinal illnesses using fecal headspace volatile organic compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Daniel K; Leggett, Cadman L; Wang, Kenneth K

    2016-01-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emitted from stool are the components of the smell of stool representing the end products of microbial activity and metabolism that can be used to diagnose disease. Despite the abundance of hydrogen, carbon dioxide, and methane that have already been identified in human flatus, the small portion of trace gases making up the VOCs emitted from stool include organic acids, alcohols, esters, heterocyclic compounds, aldehydes, ketones, and alkanes, among others. These are the gases that vary among individuals in sickness and in health, in dietary changes, and in gut microbial activity. Electronic nose devices are analytical and pattern recognition platforms that can utilize mass spectrometry or electrochemical sensors to detect these VOCs in gas samples. When paired with machine-learning and pattern recognition algorithms, this can identify patterns of VOCs, and thus patterns of smell, that can be used to identify disease states. In this review, we provide a clinical background of VOC identification, electronic nose development, and review gastroenterology applications toward diagnosing disease by the volatile headspace analysis of stool. PMID:26819529

  5. Identification of volatile organic compounds in human cerumen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prokop-Prigge, Katharine A; Thaler, Erica; Wysocki, Charles J; Preti, George

    2014-03-15

    We report here the initial examination of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emanating from human earwax (cerumen). Recent studies link a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in the adenosine triphosphate (ATP) binding cassette, sub-family C, member 11 gene (ABCC11) to the production of different types of axillary odorants and cerumen. ABCC11 encodes an ATP-driven efflux pump protein that plays an important function in ceruminous apocrine glands of the auditory canal and the secretion of axillary odor precursors. The type of cerumen and underarm odor produced by East Asians differ markedly from that produced by non-Asians. In this initial report we find that both groups emit many of the same VOCs but differ significantly in the amounts produced. The principal odorants are volatile organic C2-to-C6 acids. The physical appearance of cerumen from the two groups also matches previously reported ethnic differences, viz., cerumen from East Asians appears dry and white while that from non-Asians is typically wet and yellowish-brown. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Diagnosing gastrointestinal illnesses using fecal headspace volatile organic compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Daniel K; Leggett, Cadman L; Wang, Kenneth K

    2016-01-28

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emitted from stool are the components of the smell of stool representing the end products of microbial activity and metabolism that can be used to diagnose disease. Despite the abundance of hydrogen, carbon dioxide, and methane that have already been identified in human flatus, the small portion of trace gases making up the VOCs emitted from stool include organic acids, alcohols, esters, heterocyclic compounds, aldehydes, ketones, and alkanes, among others. These are the gases that vary among individuals in sickness and in health, in dietary changes, and in gut microbial activity. Electronic nose devices are analytical and pattern recognition platforms that can utilize mass spectrometry or electrochemical sensors to detect these VOCs in gas samples. When paired with machine-learning and pattern recognition algorithms, this can identify patterns of VOCs, and thus patterns of smell, that can be used to identify disease states. In this review, we provide a clinical background of VOC identification, electronic nose development, and review gastroenterology applications toward diagnosing disease by the volatile headspace analysis of stool.

  7. Recent methods for the determination of volatile and non-volatile organic compounds in natural and purified drinking water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruchet, A; Legrand, M F; Arpino, P; Dilettato, D

    1991-01-02

    Four analytical protocols for the extraction and preconcentration of organic residues in natural or purified drinking water were investigated and compared: closed loop stripping analysis; simultaneous extraction-distillation; purge and trap analysis; continuous liquid-liquid extraction. Organic extracts were submitted to a variety of separation and identification techniques. Volatiles were determined by conventional capillary column gas chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry, using triple-stage quadrupole instruments. Non-volatile and thermally labile molecules were investigated by several different techniques (high-temperature gas chromatography, capillary column supercritical fluid chromatography, pyrolysis gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, thermospray liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry and conventional fast-atom bombardment with tandem mass spectrometry). Several samples recently examined in the laboratory provide examples of this multitechnique approach for a more complete knowledge of the organic carbon distribution in water-dissolved organic matter, taking into account organic substances with widely different volatilities, polarities and thermal stabilities.

  8. The Self-Reducing Pellet Production from Organic Household Waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nogueira, Alberto; Takano, Cyro; Mourão, Marcelo; Pillihuaman, Adolfo

    The organic household waste has a growing disposal problem, requiring costly disposal systems. It is necessary to find new applications for these materials; one could be the steelmaking raw material production. In this paper is studied the development of self-reducing pellets from the organic waste pyrolysis, where is generated carbon and condensable and non-condensable volatiles. Non-condensable volatiles were burned and condensable volatiles were recovered. The resulting tar was mixed with iron ore, coal powder and flux (CaO), to then be pelletized together. Compression, falls and tumbler tests were conducted to characterize the pellets before and after heat treatment and reduction processes. The reduction curve and their physical and morphological characterization were measured. The results were as was expected, the fluidized coal create sufficient adhesion that pellets earned resistance with an equivalent resistance of common pellets, showing a good feasibility of this process.

  9. Emission of Biogenic Volatile Organic Compounds in the Arctic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindwall, Frida

    Emissions of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) from arctic ecosystems are scarcely studied and the effect of climate change on BVOC emissions even less so. BVOCs are emitted from all living organisms and play a role for atmospheric chemistry. The major part of BVOCs derives from plants...... growing seasons, low temperatures and low statured plants, occurs at twice the speed of the global average. Changes in temperature and precipitation patterns have consequences for soil, plant species distribution, plant biomass and reproductive success. Emission and production of BVOCs are temperature...... that canopy surfaces temperatures should be used in BVOC models instead of air temperatures obtained from weather stations. BVOC emissions will likely increase significantly in a future warmer climate due to the direct effect of temperature, but also due to the indirect effect of more plants biomass. Thus...

  10. Volatile anaesthetics added to cardiopulmonary bypass are associated with reduced cardiac troponin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bignami, Elena; Guarnieri, Marcello; Pieri, Marina; De Simone, Francesco; Rodriguez, Alcira; Cassarà, Luigi; Lembo, Rosalba; Landoni, Giovanni; Zangrillo, Alberto

    2017-10-01

    Every year, over 1 million cardiac surgical procedures are performed all over the world. Reducing myocardial necrosis could have strong implications in postoperative clinical outcomes. Volatile anaesthetics have cardiac protective properties in the perioperative period of cardiac surgery. However, little data exists on the administration of volatile agents during cardiopulmonary bypass. The aim of this study was to assess if volatile anaesthetics administration during cardiopulmonary bypass reduces cardiac troponin release after cardiac surgery. We retrospectively analysed data from 942 patients who underwent cardiac surgery in a teaching hospital. The only difference between the groups was the management of anaesthesia during CPB. The volatile group received sevoflurane or desflurane while the control group received a combination of propofol infusion and fentanyl boluses. Patients who received volatile anaesthetics during cardiopulmonary bypass (n=314) were propensity-matched 1:2 with patients who did not receive volatile anaesthetics during CPB (n=628). We found a reduction in peak postoperative troponin I, from 7.8 ng/ml (4.8-13.1) in the non-volatile group to 6.8 ng/ml (3.7-11.8) in the volatile group (p=0.013), with no differences in mortality [2 (0.6%) in the volatile group and 2 (0.3%) in the non-volatile group (p=0.6)]. Adding volatile anaesthetics during cardiopulmonary bypass was associated with reduced peak postoperative troponin levels. Larger studies are required to confirm our data and to assess the effect of volatile agents on survival.

  11. Reducing Fuel Volatility - An Additional Benefit From Blending Bio-fuels?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bailis, R.E.; Koeb, B.S.; Sanders, M.W.J.L.

    Oil price volatility harms economic growth. Diversifying into different fuel types can mitigate this effect by reducing volatility in fuel prices. Producing bio-fuels may thus have additional benefits in terms of avoided damage to macro-economic growth. In this study we investigate trends and

  12. First Characterisation of Volatile Organic Compounds Emitted by Banana Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berhal, Chadi; De Clerck, Caroline; Fauconnier, Marie-Laure; Levicek, Carolina; Boullis, Antoine; Kaddes, Amine; Jijakli, Haïssam M.; Verheggen, François; Massart, Sébastien

    2017-01-01

    Banana (Musa sp.) ranks fourth in term of worldwide fruit production, and has economical and nutritional key values. The Cavendish cultivars correspond to more than 90% of the production of dessert banana while cooking cultivars are widely consumed locally around the banana belt production area. Many plants, if not all, produce Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) as a means of communication with their environment. Although flower and fruit VOCs have been studied for banana, the VOCs produced by the plant have never been identified despite their importance in plant health and development. A volatile collection methodology was optimized to improve the sensitivity and reproducibility of VOCs analysis from banana plants. We have identified 11 VOCs for the Cavendish, mainly (E,E)-α-farnesene (87.90 ± 11.28 ng/μl), methyl salicylate (33.82 ± 14.29) and 6-methyl-5-hepten-2-one (29.60 ± 11.66), and 14 VOCs for the Pacific Plantain cultivar, mainly (Z,E)-α-farnesene (799.64 ± 503.15), (E,E)-α-farnesene (571.24 ± 381.70) and (E) β ocimene (241.76 ± 158.49). This exploratory study paves the way for an in-depth characterisation of VOCs emitted by Musa plants. PMID:28508885

  13. First Characterisation of Volatile Organic Compounds Emitted by Banana Plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berhal, Chadi; De Clerck, Caroline; Fauconnier, Marie-Laure; Levicek, Carolina; Boullis, Antoine; Kaddes, Amine; Jijakli, Haïssam M; Verheggen, François; Massart, Sébastien

    2017-05-16

    Banana (Musa sp.) ranks fourth in term of worldwide fruit production, and has economical and nutritional key values. The Cavendish cultivars correspond to more than 90% of the production of dessert banana while cooking cultivars are widely consumed locally around the banana belt production area. Many plants, if not all, produce Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) as a means of communication with their environment. Although flower and fruit VOCs have been studied for banana, the VOCs produced by the plant have never been identified despite their importance in plant health and development. A volatile collection methodology was optimized to improve the sensitivity and reproducibility of VOCs analysis from banana plants. We have identified 11 VOCs for the Cavendish, mainly (E,E)-α-farnesene (87.90 ± 11.28 ng/μl), methyl salicylate (33.82 ± 14.29) and 6-methyl-5-hepten-2-one (29.60 ± 11.66), and 14 VOCs for the Pacific Plantain cultivar, mainly (Z,E)-α-farnesene (799.64 ± 503.15), (E,E)-α-farnesene (571.24 ± 381.70) and (E) β ocimene (241.76 ± 158.49). This exploratory study paves the way for an in-depth characterisation of VOCs emitted by Musa plants.

  14. Evaluation of fungicidal activity and identification of volatile organic compounds released by Trichoderma viride

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Diana Cristina Sinuco León; Andrés Camilo Pérez Cortés; Nubia Carmenza Moreno Sarmiento

    2017-01-01

    ... processing.Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are a biologically relevant class of secondary metabolites, since they are suspected of playing a crucial role in the communication between microorganisms...

  15. 40 CFR 60.112b - Standard for volatile organic compounds (VOC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Standard for volatile organic compounds... for Volatile Organic Liquid Storage Vessels (Including Petroleum Liquid Storage Vessels) for Which... organic compounds (VOC). (a) The owner or operator of each storage vessel either with a design capacity...

  16. 78 FR 78726 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Indiana; Volatile Organic Compound...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-27

    ..., Volatile organic compounds. Dated: December 6, 2013. Susan Hedman, Regional Administrator, Region 5. 40 CFR... Organic Compound Emission Control Measures for Industrial Solvent Cleaning for Northwest Indiana AGENCY... approving a request from the Indiana Department of Environmental Management to revise its volatile organic...

  17. Nitrate radicals and biogenic volatile organic compounds: oxidation, mechanisms, and organic aerosol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oxidation of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOC) by the nitrate radical (NO3) represents one of the important interactions between anthropogenic emissions related to combustion and natural emissions from the biosphere. This interaction has been recognized for more than 3 d...

  18. [Definition and Control Indicators of Volatile Organic Compounds in China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Mei; Zou, Lan; Li, Xiao-qian; Che, Fei; Zhao, Guo-hua; Li, Gang; Zhang, Guo-ning

    2015-09-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are the most complex of a wide range of pollutants that harms human health and ecological environment. However, various countries around the world differ on its definition and control indicators. Its definition, control indicators and monitoring methods of our country and local standards were also different. Based on detailed analysis of the definitions and control indicators of VOCs, the recommendations were proposed: the definition of VOCs should be different according to the different concerns between "air quality management" and "pollution emissions management"; base on different control way from production source, technological process, terminal emission, total discharge control, the control indicators system consists of 10 indicators; to formulate industry VOCs emissions standards, the most effective control way and indicators should be chosen according to characteristics of production process, way of VOCs emissions and possible control measures, etc.

  19. Detection of volatile organic compounds using surface enhanced Raman scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, A S; Maiti, A; Ileri, N; Bora, M; Larson, C C; Britten, J A; Bond, T C

    2012-03-22

    The authors present the detection of volatile organic compounds directly in their vapor phase by surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) substrates based on lithographically-defined two-dimensional rectangular array of nanopillars. The type of nanopillars is known as the tapered pillars. For the tapered pillars, SERS enhancement arises from the nanofocusing effect due to the sharp tip on top. SERS experiments were carried out on these substrates using various concentrations of toluene vapor. The results show that SERS signal from a toluene vapor concentration of ppm level can be achieved, and the toluene vapor can be detected within minutes of exposing the SERS substrate to the vapor. A simple adsorption model is developed which gives results matching the experimental data. The results also show promising potential for the use of these substrates in environmental monitoring of gases and vapors.

  20. Catabolism of volatile organic compounds influences plant survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oikawa, Patricia Y; Lerdau, Manuel T

    2013-12-01

    Plants emit a diverse array of phytogenic volatile organic compounds (VOCs). The production and emission of VOCs has been an important area of research for decades. However, recent research has revealed the importance of VOC catabolism by plants and VOC degradation in the atmosphere for plant growth and survival. Specifically, VOC catabolism and degradation have implications for plant C balance, tolerance to environmental stress, plant signaling, and plant-atmosphere interactions. Here we review recent advances in our understanding of VOC catabolism and degradation, propose experiments for investigating VOC catabolism, and suggest ways to incorporate catabolism into VOC emission models. Improving our knowledge of VOC catabolism and degradation is crucial for understanding plant metabolism and predicting plant survival in polluted environments. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. [Binding of Volatile Organic Compounds to Edible Biopolymers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misharina, T A; Terenina, M B; Krikunova, N I; Medvedeva, I B

    2016-01-01

    Capillary gas chromatography was used to study the influence of the composition and structure of different edible polymers (polysaccharides, vegetable fibers, and animal protein gelatin) on the binding of essential oil components. The retention of volatile organic compounds on biopolymers was shown to depend on their molecule structure and the presence, type, and position of a functional group. The maximum extent of the binding was observed for nonpolar terpene and sesquiterpene hydrocarbons, and the minimum extent was observed for alcohols. The components of essential oils were adsorbed due mostly to hydrophobic interactions. It was shown that the composition and structure of a compound, its physico-chemical state, and the presence of functional groups influence the binding. Gum arabic and guar gum were found to bind nonpolar compounds to a maximum and minimum extent, respectively. It was demonstrated the minimum adsorption ability of locust bean gum with respect to all studied compounds.

  2. Volatile Organic Compound Optical Fiber Sensors: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco J. Arregui

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Volatile organic compound (VOC detection is a topic of growing interest withapplications in diverse fields, ranging from environmental uses to the food or chemicalindustries. Optical fiber VOC sensors offering new and interesting properties whichovercame some of the inconveniences found on traditional gas sensors appeared over twodecades ago. Thanks to its minimum invasive nature and the advantages that optical fiberoffers such as light weight, passive nature, low attenuation and the possibility ofmultiplexing, among others, these sensors are a real alternative to electronic ones inelectrically noisy environments where electronic sensors cannot operate correctly. In thepresent work, a classification of these devices has been made according to the sensingmechanism and taking also into account the sensing materials or the different methods offabrication. In addition, some solutions already implemented for the detection of VOCsusing optical fiber sensors will be described with detail.

  3. Flux Measurements of Volatile Organic Compounds from an Urban Landscape

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Velasco, E.; Lamb, Brian K.; Pressley, S.; Allwine, Eugene J.; Westberg, Halvor; Jobson, B Tom T.; Alexander, M. Lizabeth; Prazeller, Peter; Molina, Luisa; Molina, Mario J.

    2005-10-19

    Direct measurements of volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions that include all anthropogenic and biogenic emission sources in urban areas are a missing requirement to evaluate emission inventories and constrain current photochemical modelling practices. Here we demonstrate the use of micrometeorological techniques coupled with fast-response sensors to measure urban VOC fluxes from a neighborhood of Mexico City, where the spatial variability of surface cover and roughness is high. Fluxes of olefins, methanol, acetone, toluene and C2-benzenes were measured and compared with the local gridded emission inventory. VOC fluxes exhibited a clear diurnal pattern with a strong relationship to vehicular traffic. Recent photochemical modeling results suggest that VOC emissions are significantly underestimated in Mexico City1, but the measured VOC fluxes described here indicate that the official emission inventory2 is essentially correct. Thus, other explanations are needed to explain the photochemical modelling results.

  4. Microtrapping of volatile organic compounds with carbon nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaudhery Mustansar Hussain

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Micro-sorbent traps referred to as microtraps serve as integrated concentration-injection devices for continuousmonitoring in gas phase streams. The application of carbon nanotubes as unique sorbents for the fabrication of microtrapsfor the nano-scale adsorption/desorption of volatile organic molecules is presented in this paper. The microtrap applicationrequires high adsorption capacity as well as easy desorbability; the latter being critical for injection mode of these integrateddevices. The micro-sorbent characteristics of single and multi-walled carbon nanotubes for gas phase adsorption/desorptionof several volatile organic compounds like DCM, ethanol and benzene etc. has been studied. The nonporous nature of carbonnanotubes (CNTs eliminates the mass transfer resistance related to diffusion into pore structures, thus allowing easydesorbability. At the same time, their high aspect ratios lead to large breakthrough volumes. As compared to a commercialsorbent carbopackTM, the breakthrough volume was as much as an order of magnitude higher in the CNTs, while the higherrate of desorption measured as the peak width at half height of the desorption band was found nearly eight times lower (i.e.,0.26 seconds with SWNT and 1.89 seconds with carbopackTM. The trapping and desorption characteristics of single andmulti walled nanotubes were found to be comparable. We also found that the presence of disordered carbon impurities,which could be removed by controlled oxidative annealing, could greatly degrade the performance of CNTs. This researchhas suggested that CNTs can be used in micro-sorbent traps and surprisingly enhance the efficiency of the integrated concentration-injection devices. Consequently, this will open the doors to the application of high-capacity, CNTs-based sorbentsas a better alternative to conventional sorbent in continuous monitoring devices.

  5. Crude glycerol combustion: Particulate, acrolein, and other volatile organic emissions

    KAUST Repository

    Steinmetz, Scott

    2013-01-01

    Crude glycerol is an abundant by-product of biodiesel production. As volumes of this potential waste grow, there is increasing interest in developing new value added uses. One possible use, as a boiler fuel for process heating, offers added advantages of energy integration and fossil fuel substitution. However, challenges to the use of crude glycerol as a boiler fuel include its low energy density, high viscosity, and high autoignition temperature. We have previously shown that a refractory-lined, high swirl burner can overcome challenges related to flame ignition and stability. However, critical issues related to ash behavior and the possible formation of acrolein remained. The work presented here indicates that the presence of dissolved catalysts used during the esterification and transesterification processes results in extremely large amounts of inorganic species in the crude glycerol. For the fuels examined here, the result is a submicron fly ash comprised primarily of sodium carbonates, phosphates, and sulfates. These particles report to a well-developed accumulation mode (0.3-0.7 μm diameter), indicating extensive ash vaporization and particle formation via nucleation, condensation, and coagulation. Particle mass emissions were between 2 and 4 g/m3. These results indicate that glycerol containing soluble catalyst is not suitable as a boiler fuel. Fortunately, process improvements are currently addressing this issue. Additionally, acrolein is of concern due to its toxicity, and is known to be formed from the low temperature thermal decomposition of glycerol. Currently, there is no known reliable method for measuring acrolein in sources. Acrolein and emissions of other volatile organic compounds were characterized through the use of a SUMMA canister-based sampling method followed by GC-MS analysis designed for ambient measurements. Results indicate crude glycerol combustion produces relatively small amounts of acrolein (∼15 ppbv) and other volatile organic

  6. Heterogeneous reactions of volatile organic compounds in the atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Xiaoli; Zhao, Yue; Chen, Zhongming; Huang, Dao

    2013-04-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are of central importance in the atmosphere because of their close relation to air quality and climate change. As a significant sink for VOCs, the fate of VOCs via heterogeneous reactions may explain the big gap between field and model studies. These reactions play as yet unclear but potentially crucial role in atmospheric processes. In order to better evaluate this reaction pathway, we present the first specific review for the progress of heterogeneous reaction studies on VOCs, including carbonyl compounds, organic acids, alcohols, and so on. Our review focuses on the processes for heterogeneous reactions of VOCs under varying experimental conditions, as well as their implications for trace gas and HOx budget, secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation, physicochemical properties of aerosols, and human health. Finally, we propose the future direction for laboratory studies of heterogeneous chemistry of VOCs that should be carried out under more atmospherically relevant conditions, with a special emphasis on the effects of relative humidity and illumination, the multicomponent reaction systems, and reactivity of aged and authentic particles. In particular, more reliable uptake coefficients, based on the abundant elaborate laboratory studies, appropriate calibration, and logical choice criterion, are urgently required in atmospheric models.

  7. Application of horizontal spiral coil heat exchanger for volatile organic compounds (VOC) emission control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deshpande, P M; Dawande, S D

    2013-04-01

    The petroleum products have wide range of volatility and are required to be stored in bulk. The evaporation losses are significant and it is a economic as well as environmental concern, since evaporative losses of petroleum products cause increased VOC in ambient air. Control of these losses poses a major problem for the storage tank designers. Ever rising cost of petroleum products further adds to the gravity of the problem. Condensation is one of the technologies for reducing volatile organic compounds emissions. Condensation is effected by condenser, which is basically a heat exchanger and the heat exchanger configuration plays an important role. The horizontal spiral coil heat exchanger is a promising configuration that finds an application in VOC control. This paper attempts to understand underlying causes of emissions and analyse the option of horizontal spiral coil heat exchanger as vent condenser.

  8. Organics, Isotopes, and Volatiles in Gale Crater Sedimentary Rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahaffy, P. R.

    2016-12-01

    Solid samples analyzed by the Curiosity rover on the long traverse from the Gale crater floor to the flanks of Mt. Sharp spread a range of environments from fluvial to lacustrine to eolian, and span 100 m of stratigraphic thickness. The diverse chemical and isotopic composition of organic compounds and inorganic volatiles revealed in these samples analyzed over a period of more than 2 Mars years is described with an emphasis on the search for organics, the chemical environments and physical-chemical processes that respectively preserve or destroy organics, and unexpectedly large variations in H, S, and Cl isotopes. In addition to a set of aromatic and aliphatic chorine containing organic compounds thermally released from the Cumberland mudstone drilled early in the mission compounds [Freissinet et al., 2015], additional S-containing organics have been identified in the Mojave drill sample in the Pahrump Hills section that was characterized in detail over a 5 month period. This set of S and Cl containing compounds is definitively identified by gas chromatograph mass spectrometer (GCMS) analyses. In addition, fragments of other organic compounds are evident in the evolved gas analysis (EGA) experiments implemented by the Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) instrument and utilization of SAM's derivatization agent has revealed the presence of high molecular weight compounds. Two factors complicate the search for organic compounds preserved from ancient Mars. First the nearly ubiquitous oxychlorine compounds such as perchlorates decompose on heating in the SAM ovens in the EGA experiments and there is evidence that the hot O2 released combusts organic compounds to produce CO2. Secondly, the cosmic radiation that penetrates through the thin Mars atmosphere meters into the surface transforms near surface organic compounds over time. Fortunately, the SAM mass spectrometer can measure spallogenic (3He and 21Ne) and neutron-capture (36Ar) noble gases to secure an estimate of the

  9. 40 CFR 60.112a - Standard for volatile organic compounds (VOC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Standard for volatile organic compounds (VOC). 60.112a Section 60.112a Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED... Commenced After May 18, 1978, and Prior to July 23, 1984 § 60.112a Standard for volatile organic compounds...

  10. 40 CFR 60.312 - Standard for volatile organic compounds (VOC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Standard for volatile organic compounds (VOC). 60.312 Section 60.312 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... Surface Coating of Metal Furniture § 60.312 Standard for volatile organic compounds (VOC). (a) On and...

  11. 40 CFR 60.112 - Standard for volatile organic compounds (VOC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Standard for volatile organic compounds (VOC). 60.112 Section 60.112 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... After June 11, 1973, and Prior to May 19, 1978 § 60.112 Standard for volatile organic compounds (VOC...

  12. 75 FR 57412 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans Alabama: Volatile Organic Compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-21

    ... ``volatile organic compounds'' (VOCs) found at Alabama Administrative Code section 335-3-1-.02(gggg... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 52 Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans Alabama: Volatile Organic Compounds AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Proposed rule. SUMMARY: EPA is proposing to...

  13. 40 CFR 60.542a - Alternate standard for volatile organic compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Rubber Tire Manufacturing Industry § 60.542a Alternate standard for volatile organic compounds. (a) On... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Alternate standard for volatile organic compounds. 60.542a Section 60.542a Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR...

  14. 78 FR 11119 - Air Quality: Revision to Definition of Volatile Organic Compounds-Exclusion of trans

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-15

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 51 RIN 2060-AQ38 Air Quality: Revision to Definition of Volatile Organic Compounds...: Proposed rule. SUMMARY: The EPA is proposing to revise the definition of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) for purposes of preparing state implementation plans (SIPs) to attain the national ambient air quality...

  15. Catalytic oxidation of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) - A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamal, Muhammad Shahzad; Razzak, Shaikh A.; Hossain, Mohammad M.

    2016-09-01

    Emission of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) is one of the major contributors to air pollution. The main sources of VOCs are petroleum refineries, fuel combustions, chemical industries, decomposition in the biosphere and biomass, pharmaceutical plants, automobile industries, textile manufacturers, solvents processes, cleaning products, printing presses, insulating materials, office supplies, printers etc. The most common VOCs are halogenated compounds, aldehydes, alcohols, ketones, aromatic compounds, and ethers. High concentrations of these VOCs can cause irritations, nausea, dizziness, and headaches. Some VOCs are also carcinogenic for both humans and animals. Therefore, it is crucial to minimize the emission of VOCs. Among the available technologies, the catalytic oxidation of VOCs is the most popular because of its versatility of handling a range of organic emissions under mild operating conditions. Due to that fact, there are numerous research initiatives focused on developing advanced technologies for the catalytic destruction of VOCs. This review discusses recent developments in catalytic systems for the destruction of VOCs. Review also describes various VOCs and their sources of emission, mechanisms of catalytic destruction, the causes of catalyst deactivation, and catalyst regeneration methods.

  16. [Research advances on volatile organic compounds emission inventory of plants].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Jun-Fei; Li, Yan-Ming

    2013-12-01

    Reference to relative literatures in recent years, model building and calculation on volatile organic compound (VOC) emission inventory of plants were summarized in different spatial scales, the total annual VOC emission amounts from Vegetation in China are in the range from 12.4 Tg x a(-1) to 28.4 Tg x a(-1). For garden plants in Beijing, the annual VOC emissions are approximately 38 500 tons C in 2000. Furthermore, in order to determine reduction strategies for Beijing urban atmospheric major pollutants, the contribution of garden plant VOC emissions to the ozone and secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation was presented, compared to garden plant in the same period, the largest contribution to ozone formation comes from aromatic hydrocarbons and olefin which are exhausted from anthropogenic activity, besides, the aromatic hydrocarbons exhausted from anthropogenic activity is also a main contribution source for the potential formation of SOA. In the meantime, it is suggested to focus on emission control of VOCs which are emitted from urban anthropogenic sources.

  17. Analysis of volatile organic compounds in compost samples: A potential tool to determine appropriate composting time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Fengxiang; Pan, Zaifa; Hong, Chunlai; Wang, Weiping; Chen, Xiaoyang; Xue, Zhiyong; Yao, Yanlai

    2016-12-01

    Changes in volatile organic compound contents in compost samples during pig manure composting were studied using a headspace, solid-phase micro-extraction method (HS-SPME) followed by gas chromatography with mass spectrometric detection (GC/MS). Parameters affecting the SPME procedure were optimized as follows: the coating was carbon molecular sieve/polydimethylsiloxane (CAR/PDMS) fiber, the temperature was 60°C and the time was 30min. Under these conditions, 87 compounds were identified from 17 composting samples. Most of the volatile components could only be detected before day 22. However, benzenes, alkanes and alkenes increased and eventually stabilized after day 22. Phenol and acid substances, which are important factors for compost quality, were almost undetectable on day 39 in natural compost (NC) samples and on day 13 in maggot-treated compost (MC) samples. Our results indicate that the approach can be effectively used to determine the composting times by analysis of volatile substances in compost samples. An appropriate composting time not only ensures the quality of compost and reduces the loss of composting material but also reduces the generation of hazardous substances. The appropriate composting times for MC and NC were approximately 22days and 40days, respectively, during the summer in Zhejiang. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Arctic Vegetation under Climate Change – Biogenic Volatile Organic Compound Emissions and Leaf Anatomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schollert, Michelle

    Biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) emitted from terrestrial vegetation are highly reactive non-methane hydrocarbons which participate in oxidative reactions in the atmosphere prolonging the lifetime of methane and contribute to the formation of secondary organic aerosols. The BVOC...

  19. Simultaneous Microwave Extraction and Separation of Volatile and Non-Volatile Organic Compounds of Boldo Leaves. From Lab to Industrial Scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loïc Petigny

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Microwave extraction and separation has been used to increase the concentration of the extract compared to the conventional method with the same solid/liquid ratio, reducing extraction time and separate at the same time Volatile Organic Compounds (VOC from non-Volatile Organic Compounds (NVOC of boldo leaves. As preliminary study, a response surface method has been used to optimize the extraction of soluble material and the separation of VOC from the plant in laboratory scale. The results from the statistical analysis revealed that the optimized conditions were: microwave power 200 W, extraction time 56 min and solid liquid ratio of 7.5% of plants in water. Lab scale optimized microwave method is compared to conventional distillation, and requires a power/mass ratio of 0.4 W/g of water engaged. This power/mass ratio is kept in order to upscale from lab to pilot plant.

  20. Datasets used in the manuscript titled "Nitrate radicals and biogenic volatile organic compounds: oxidation, mechanisms and organic aerosol"

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This dataset documents that all of the data used in the manuscript "Nitrate radicals and biogenic volatile organic compounds: oxidation, mechanisms, and organic...

  1. Influence of volatile organic compounds of varnish-and-paint materials on the workers organism on the industrial enterprises

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Г.І. Архіпова

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available In article describes the reasons of air contamination in working area of endustrial enterprises, defines main ways of incoming and mechanism of action of volatile organic compounds of paintwork material on the organisms of workers.

  2. Volatility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Sánchez

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The action consists of moving with small kicks a tin of cola refresh -without Brand-from a point of the city up to other one. During the path I avoid bollards, the slope differences between sidewalks, pedestrians, parked motorcycles, etc. Volatility wants to say exactly that the money is getting lost. That the money is losing by gentlemen and by ladies who are neither financial sharks, nor big businessmen… or similarly, but ingenuous people, as you or as me, who walk down the street.

  3. [Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emitted from large furniture].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka-Kagawa, Toshiko; Furuta, Mitsuko; Shibatsuji, Masayoshi; Jinno, Hideto; Nishimura, Tetsuji

    2011-01-01

    Indoor air pollution by volatile organic compounds (VOCs), which may cause a hazardous influence on human being such as sick building (sick house) syndrome, has become a serious problem. In this study, VOCs emitted from nine pieces of home furniture, three sets of dining tables, three sets of chest of drawers and three sofas, were analyzed as potential sources of indoor air pollution by large chamber test method (JIS A 1911). Based on the emission rates of total VOC (TVOC), the impacts on the indoor TVOC was estimated by the sample model with a volume of 20 m3 and ventilation frequency of 0.5 times/h. The estimated TVOC increment values were exceeded the provisional target value for indoor air (400 microg/m3) in three sets of dining tables, one set of chest of drawer and one sofa. The estimated increment of formaldehyde were exceeded the guideline value (100 microg/m3) in one set of dining table, two sets of chest of drawers and one sofa. These results revealed that VOC emissions from furniture may influence significantly indoor air quality. Also, in this study, to establish the alternative method for large chamber test methods, emission rates from representative three parts of furniture unit were evaluated using the small chamber and emission rate from full-sized furniture was predicted. Emission rates of TVOC and formaldehyde predicted by small chamber test were 3-46% and 6-252% of the data obtained using large chamber test, respectively.

  4. Characterization of volatile organic chemical emissions from carpet cushions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaeffer, V.H.; Bhooshan, B.; Chen, S.B.; Sonenthal, J.S. [Consumer Product Safety Commission, Washington, DC (United States); Hodgson, A.T. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1996-09-01

    The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission is investigating chemical emissions from carpet systems in order to determine whether the emissions may be responsible for the numerous health complaints associated with carpet installation. As part of this effort, a study was conducted to identify and quantify volatile organic compounds (VOCs) released into the air by five major product types of new carpet cushions. Cushion samples were tested in small-volume dynamic chambers over a six-hour exposure period. Airborne VOCs collected on multisorbent samplers were identified using sensitive gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. A separate chamber method was developed to screen polyurethane cushions for emissions of toluene diisocyanates (TDI). Over 100 VOCs, spanning a broad range of chemical classes, were emitted from 17 carpet cushions. The pattern of emitted VOCs varied between and among product types, which reflects probable differences in manufacturing processes and ingredients. No significant quantities of TDI or formaldehyde were released by any cushions. Emission profiles were characterized for total VOCs and for the predominant individual VOCs. As a group, the synthetic fiber cushion samples emitted the lowest quantities of VOCs. Cushion samples purchased from carpet retailers released lesser amounts of VOCs than samples of the same cushion types obtained directly from the manufacturing mills. 11 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  5. Measurements of volatile organic compounds over West Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. G. Murphy

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we describe measurements of volatile organic compounds (VOC made using a Proton Transfer Reaction Mass Spectrometer (PTR-MS aboard the UK Facility for Atmospheric Airborne Measurements during the African Monsoon Multidisciplinary Analyses (AMMA campaign. Observations were made during approximately 85 h of flying time between 17 July and 17 August 2006, above an area between 4° N and 18° N and 3° W and 4° E, encompassing ocean, mosaic forest, and the Sahel desert. High time resolution observations of counts at mass to charge (m/z ratios of 42, 59, 69, 71, and 79 were used to calculate mixing ratios of acetonitrile, acetone, isoprene, the sum of methyl vinyl ketone and methacrolein, and benzene respectively using laboratory-derived humidity-dependent calibration factors. Strong spatial associations between vegetation and isoprene and its oxidation products were observed in the boundary layer, consistent with biogenic emissions followed by rapid atmospheric oxidation. Acetonitrile, benzene, and acetone were all enhanced in airmasses which had been heavily influenced by biomass burning. Benzene and acetone were also elevated in airmasses with urban influence from cities such as Lagos, Cotonou, and Niamey. The observations provide evidence that both deep convection and mixing associated with fair-weather cumulus were responsible for vertical redistribution of VOC emitted from the surface. Profiles over the ocean showed a depletion of acetone in the marine boundary layer, but no significant decrease for acetonitrile.

  6. Emission of volatile organic compounds from Portuguese eucalyptus forests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nunes, T.V.; Pio, C.A. [Universidade de Aveiro (Portugal). Dept. de Ambiente e Ordenamento

    2001-07-01

    Emission to the atmosphere of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) by Eucalyptus globulus was studied in the laboratory with young specimen, and in the field with adult trees. Eucalyptus emits both monoterpenes and isoprene. The leaves of young trees emit at higher rates than the leaves of adult trees. The emission of isoprene is highly predominant during the day. The emission of isoprene is dependent on temperature and solar radiation. The emission rate follows the Guenther algorithm if a based emission factor of 32 {mu}gg{sub dw} {sup -1}h{sup -1} is used, increasing with temperature, to a maximum at 40{sup o}C. At higher temperatures there is a decrease in the emission rate. The main C{sub 10} emitted is 1,8-cineol. Cineol emissions increase exponentially with temperature, and are also seasonally dependent. Application of the emission algorithm to the Portuguese eucalyptus forests shows that during summer isoprene and monoterpene emissions by eucalyptus are of the same order of anthropogenic VOC production. Furthermore, in certain regions, in the center-north of Portugal, where eucalyptus forests are predominant, isoprene emissions can reach an order of magnitude higher than anthropogenic production of VOCs during daytime periods in July and August. (Author)

  7. Novel collection method for volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holderman, Chris J; Kaufman, Phillip E; Booth, Matthew M; Bernier, Ulrich R

    2017-09-01

    Host derived chemical cues are an important aspect of arthropod attraction to potential hosts. Host cues that act over longer distances include CO2, heat, and water vapor, while cues such as volatile organic compounds (VOCs) act over closer distances. Domestic dogs are important hosts for disease cycles that include dog heartworm disease vectored by mosquitoes, however the host VOCs utilized by vectors are not well known. Herein we present a novel method that sampled VOCs from a dog host. A Tenax TD stainless steel tube was held near a dog's fur and skin, which collected VOCs that were later desorbed and tentatively identified using a gas chromatograph-mass spectrospectrometer (GC-MS). Background air chemicals were subtracted from the dog sample, resulting in 182 differentiated compounds, a majority of which were identified by ionization fragmentation patterns. Four dogs were sampled and shared 41 of the identified chemicals. VOCs were representative of aliphatics, aromatics, aldehydes, alcohols and carboxylic acids. This chemical characterization method has the potential to identify both individuals and breeds of dogs in addition to other potential uses such as disease diagnosis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Effect of volatile organic compounds from bacteria on nematodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, You-Yao; Lu, Hao; Wang, Xin; Zhang, Ke-Qin; Li, Guo-Hong

    2015-09-01

    The five studied bacterial strains could produce volatile organic compounds (VOCs) that kill nematodes. Based on their 16S rRNA sequences, these strains were identified as Pseudochrobactrum saccharolyticum, Wautersiella falsenii, Proteus hauseri, Arthrobacter nicotianae, and Achromobacter xylosoxidans. The bacterial VOCs were extracted using solid-phase micro-extraction (SPME) and subsequently identified by GC/MS analysis. The VOCs covered a wide range of aldehydes, ketones, alkyls, alcohols, alkenes, esters, alkynes, acids, ethers, as well as heterocyclic and phenolic compounds. Among the 53 VOCs identified, 19 candidates, produced by different bacteria, were selected to test their nematicidal activity (NA) against Caenorhabditis elegans and Meloidogyne incognita. The seven compounds with the highest NAs were acetophenone, S-methyl thiobutyrate, dimethyl disulfide, ethyl 3,3-dimethylacrylate, nonan-2-one, 1-methoxy-4-methylbenzene, and butyl isovalerate. Among them, S-methyl thiobutyrate showed a stronger NA than the commercial insecticide dimethyl disulfide. It was reported for the first time here that the five bacterial strains as well as S-methyl thiobutyrate, ethyl 3,3-dimethylacrylate, 1-methoxy-4-methylbenzene, and butyl isovalerate possess NA. These strains and compounds might provide new insights in the search for novel nematicides. Copyright © 2015 Verlag Helvetica Chimica Acta AG, Zürich.

  9. Volatile organic emissions from the distillation and pyrolysis of vegetation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. P. Greenberg

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Leaf and woody plant tissue (Pinus ponderosa, Eucalyptus saligna, Quercus gambelli, Saccharum officinarum and Oriza sativa were heated from 30 to 300°C and volatile organic compound (VOC emissions were identified and quantified. Major VOC emissions were mostly oxygenated and included acetic acid, furylaldehyde, acetol, pyrazine, terpenes, 2,3-butadione, phenol and methanol, as well as smaller emissions of furan, acetone, acetaldehyde, acetonitrile and benzaldehyde. Total VOC emissions from distillation and pyrolysis were on the order of 10 gC/kgC dry weight of vegetation, as much as 33% and 44% of CO2 emissions (gC(VOC/gC(CO2 measured during the same experiments, in air and nitrogen atmospheres, respectively. The emissions are similar in identity and quantity to those from smoldering combustion of woody tissue and of different character than those evolved during flaming combustion. VOC emissions from the distillation of pools and endothermic pyrolysis under low turbulence conditions may produce flammable concentrations near leaves and may facilitate the propagation of wildfires. VOC emissions from charcoal production are also related to distillation and pyrolysis; the emissions of the highly reactive VOCs from production are as large as the carbon monoxide emissions.

  10. Volatile organic emissions from the distillation and pyrolysis of vegetation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenberg, J. P.; Friedli, H.; Guenther, A. B.; Hanson, D.; Harley, P.; Karl, T.

    2005-09-01

    Leaf and woody plant tissue (Pinus ponderosa, Eucalyptus saligna, Quercus gambelli, Saccharum officinarum and Oriza sativa) were heated from 30 to 300°C and volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions were identified and quantified. Major VOC emissions were acetic acid, furylaldehyde, methyl acetate, pyrazine, terpenes, 2,3-butadione, phenol and methanol, as well as smaller emissions of furan, acetone, acetaldehyde, acetonitrile and benzaldehyde. Total VOC emissions from distillation and pyrolysis were on the order of 10 mgC/gC dry weight of vegetation, as much as 33% and 44% of CO2 emissions (gC(VOC)/gC(CO2)) measured during the same experiments, in air and nitrogen atmospheres, respectively. The emissions are similar in identity and quantity to those from smoldering combustion of woody tissue and of different character than those evolved during flaming combustion. VOC emissions from the distillation of pools and the pyrolysis of vegetation heated under low turbulence conditions produces concentrations near leaves that reach the lower limits of flammability and the emissions may be important in the propagation of wildfires. VOC emissions from charcoal production are also related to distillation and pyrolysis; the emissions of the highly reactive VOCs from production are as large as the carbon monoxide emissions.

  11. Measurements of volatile organic compounds over West Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, J. G.; Oram, D. E.; Reeves, C. E.

    2010-06-01

    In this paper we describe measurements of volatile organic compounds (VOC) made using a Proton Transfer Reaction Mass Spectrometer (PTR-MS) aboard the UK Facility for Atmospheric Airborne Measurements during the African Monsoon Multidisciplinary Analyses (AMMA) campaign. Observations were made during approximately 85 h of flying time between 17 July and 17 August 2006, above an area between 4° N and 18° N and 3° W and 4° E, encompassing ocean, mosaic forest, and the Sahel desert. High time resolution observations of counts at mass to charge (m/z) ratios of 42, 59, 69, 71, and 79 were used to calculate mixing ratios of acetonitrile, acetone, isoprene, the sum of methyl vinyl ketone and methacrolein, and benzene respectively using laboratory-derived humidity-dependent calibration factors. Strong spatial associations between vegetation and isoprene and its oxidation products were observed in the boundary layer, consistent with biogenic emissions followed by rapid atmospheric oxidation. Acetonitrile, benzene, and acetone were all enhanced in airmasses which had been heavily influenced by biomass burning. Benzene and acetone were also elevated in airmasses with urban influence from cities such as Lagos, Cotonou, and Niamey. The observations provide evidence that both deep convection and mixing associated with fair-weather cumulus were responsible for vertical redistribution of VOC emitted from the surface. Profiles over the ocean showed a depletion of acetone in the marine boundary layer, but no significant decrease for acetonitrile.

  12. Volatile organic compounds adsorption using different types of adsorbent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pimanmes Chanayotha

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Adsorbents were synthesized from coconut shell, coal and coke by pyrolysis followed by chemical activation process. These synthesized materials were used as adsorbents in adsorption test to determine the amount of volatile organic compounds (VOCs namely, 2-Hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA, Octamethylcyclotetrasiloxane and Alkanes standard solution (C8-C20. The adsorption capacities of both synthesized adsorbents and commercial grade adsorbents (Carbotrap™ B and Carbotrap™ C were also compared. It was found that adsorbent A402, which was produced from coconut shell, activated with 40% (wt. potassium hydroxide and at activating temperature of 800°C for 1 hr, could adsorb higher amount of both HEMA and Octamethylcyclotetrasiloxane than other synthesized adsorbents. The maximum adsorption capacity of adsorbent A402 in adsorbing HEMA and Octamethylcyclotetrasiloxane were 77.87% and 50.82% respectively. These adsorption capabilities were 79.73% and 70.07% of the adsorption capacity of the commercial adsorbent Carbotrap™ B respectively. All three types of the synthesized adsorbent (A402, C302, C402 showed the capability to adsorb alkanes standard solution through the range of C8-C20 . However, their adsorption capacities were high in a specific range of C10-C11. The result from the isotherm plot was indicated that surface adsorption of synthesized adsorbent was isotherm type I while the surface adsorption of commercial adsorbent was isotherm type III.

  13. Methods in plant foliar volatile organic compounds research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Materić, Dušan; Bruhn, Dan; Turner, Claire; Morgan, Geraint; Mason, Nigel; Gauci, Vincent

    2015-12-01

    Plants are a major atmospheric source of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). These secondary metabolic products protect plants from high-temperature stress, mediate in plant-plant and plant-insect communication, and affect our climate globally. The main challenges in plant foliar VOC research are accurate sampling, the inherent reactivity of some VOC compounds that makes them hard to detect directly, and their low concentrations. Plant VOC research relies on analytical techniques for trace gas analysis, usually based on gas chromatography and soft chemical ionization mass spectrometry. Until now, these techniques (especially the latter one) have been developed and used primarily by physicists and analytical scientists, who have used them in a wide range of scientific research areas (e.g., aroma, disease biomarkers, hazardous compound detection, atmospheric chemistry). The interdisciplinary nature of plant foliar VOC research has recently attracted the attention of biologists, bringing them into the field of applied environmental analytical sciences. In this paper, we review the sampling methods and available analytical techniques used in plant foliar VOC research to provide a comprehensive resource that will allow biologists moving into the field to choose the most appropriate approach for their studies.

  14. Constituents of volatile organic compounds of evaporating essential oil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Hua-Hsien; Chiang, Hsiu-Mei; Lo, Cho-Ching; Chen, Ching-Yen; Chiang, Hung-Lung

    2009-12-01

    Essential oils containing aromatic compounds can affect air quality when used indoors. Five typical and popular essential oils—rose, lemon, rosemary, tea tree and lavender—were investigated in terms of composition, thermal characteristics, volatile organic compound (VOC) constituents, and emission factors. The activation energy was 6.3-8.6 kcal mol -1, the reaction order was in the range of 0.6-0.8, and the frequency factor was 0.01-0.24 min -1. Toluene, 1,2,3-trimethylbenzene, 1,2,4-trimethylbenzene, n-undecane, p-diethylbenzene and m-diethylbenzene were the predominant VOCs of evaporating gas of essential oils at 40 °C. In addition, n-undecane, p-diethylbenzene, 1,2,4-trimethylbenzene, m-diethylbenzene, and 1,2,3-trimethylbenzene revealed high emission factors during the thermogravimetric (TG) analysis procedures. The sequence of the emission factors of 52 VOCs (137-173 mg g -1) was rose ≈ rosemary > tea tree ≈ lemon ≈ lavender. The VOC group fraction of the emission factor of aromatics was 62-78%, paraffins were 21-37% and olefins were less than 1.5% during the TG process. Some unhealthy VOCs such as benzene and toluene were measured at low temperature; they reveal the potential effect on indoor air quality and human health.

  15. Environment and Pollution Management of Pollution Volatile Organic Compounds in Cluj-Napoca

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Florean

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Pollution negative influences the environmental, human health, buildings and increase the production of waste. We are currently witnessing pollution and degradation in some cases irreversible, of the environment. Environmental issues are extremely complex and cover all sectors. Worldwide, industrial pollution strategies necessary to reduce emissions to the atmosphere hydrocarbons, volatile organic compounds (VOCs and other polluants in urban areas. The highest concentrations of volatile organic compounds of more than 80 mg/m3 occur in densely populated areas. The latest data reported in the residential area of Cluj-Napoca values did not exceed 20 m /m3. However peaks reported VOC concentrations, depending on the season, exceeding the upper limit that according to Law. 104/2011 is 75 μ/m3. It was identified due to increase annual mean concentration of VOCs as, in particular, road traffic exceeding sanitary standards on the main traffic routes within the city. In this paper the results obtained after carrying out an analysis of the average VOC concentration recorded in the city Cluj-Napoca as a result of car traffic. They were pursued average concentrations of VOCs resulting from the combustion of liquid fuels, petrol and diesel type. Analyzing the results obtained are proposed solutions for reducing VOC emissions. The rule under which these solutions have been proposed to reduce the concentration of VOCs took into account the possibility implementation and maintenance costs thereof.

  16. Volatile fatty acid cycling in organic-rich marine sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sansone, Francis J.; Martens, Christopher S.

    1982-09-01

    Volatile fatty acid (VFA) apparent turnover rates were determined by measuring whole sediment VFA concentrations and the corresponding reaction rate constants. The following ranges of VFA concentrations were measured in Cape Lookout Bight, N.C. sediments (μmole·l s-1): acetate 54-660, propionate 1-24, butyrate iso-butyrate <0.5-6. Apparent turnover rates measured over a one-year period ranged from 18-600 μmole·l s-1·h -1 for acetate and 0.7-7 μmole·l s-1·h -1 for the carboxyl carbon of propionate. Methane production was observed only with acetate and only in sulfatedepleted sediments; total acetate turnover attained approximately the same maximum value in both sulfate-reducing and sulfate-depleted sediments. Apparent turnover rates for acetate and propionate appeared to be controlled by similar factors: in sulfate-reducing (surface) sediments the turnover rates were stimulated by autumn storm-mediated deposition/resuspension events; in deeper sulfate-depleted sediments the turnover rates followed changes in the ambient temperature. Changes in VFA poolsizes were proportionally much larger than changes in corresponding rate constants. The ratio of CO 2 to CH 4 produced from acetate vs. depth suggested that non-methanogenic bacteria accounted for 60% of the acetate turnover in sulfate-depleted sediments. VFA concentrations were much lower in N.C. continental slope mud than in Cape Lookout sediments; acetate was the only VFA detectable throughout the top 40 cm of the slope sediments. The estimated production rate of CO 2 from acetate decreased rapidly with depth. The surface rate was approximately 20 times less than that measured at similar temperatures in sulfate-reducing Cape Lookout sediments.

  17. Volatile organic compounds emissions from gasoline and diesel powered vehicle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mugica, V [Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Vega, E; Sanchez, G; Reyes, E; Arriaga, J. L [Instituto Mexicano del Petroleo, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Chow, J; Watson, J; Egami, R [Desert Research Institute, Reno, NV (United States)

    2001-01-01

    In this research, volatile organic compound emissions were characterized from gasoline and diesel vehicles. Sampling campaigns in the Metropolitan Area of Mexico City were designed and carried out in tunnels, crossroads, and truck and bus terminals. The samples were analyzed with gas chromatography getting more than 250 different compounds, being more or less 60 of them the 80% of all the emissions. The most abundant are the two carbon compounds, as a result of the combustion, and compounds related to fuels compositions, like isopentane, xylenes, toluene among others. The profiles obtained in tunnels and crossroads were very similar with the exception of the 3 and 4 carbon compounds, which were found in bigger proportion in the profiles at crossroads. This may probably be due to the blend with the ambient air. The profiles corresponding to trucks and buses have a smaller content of two carbon compounds and a bigger content of xylenes, toluene and ethylbenzene. The variations in the proportions of the compounds allow differentiating the profiles of vehicles using gasoline and diesel. [Spanish] En este trabajo se caracterizaron las emisiones de compuestos organicos volatiles provenientes de vehiculos a gasolina y a diesel. Para ello, se disenaron diversas campanas de muestreo en la zona Metropolitana de la Ciudad de Mexico, en tuneles, cruceros y estaciones de camiones de carga y autobuses. Las muestras se analizaron con cromatografia, de gases obteniendose mas de 250 compuestos distintos, de los cuales aproximadamente 60 corresponden a mas del 80% de las emisiones. Los compuestos mas abundantes son los de dos carbonos, resultado de la combustion, y 4 carbonos que se encontraron en mayor proporcion en los perfiles de cruceros, lo cual se debe probablemente a la mezcla con el aire ambiente. Los perfiles correspondientes a camiones de carga y autobuses tienen un menor contenido de compuestos de dos carbonos y un mayor contenido de xilenos, tolueno y etilbenceno. Estas

  18. Non-methane biogenic volatile organic compound emissions from boreal peatland microcosms under warming and water table drawdown

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Faubert, P; Tiiva, P; Nakam, TA

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Boreal peatlands have significant emissions of non-methane biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs). Climate warming is expected to affect these ecosystems both directly, with increasing temperature, and indirectly, through water table drawdown following increased evapotranspiration. We...... emission and decrease in reactive BVOC emissions, which could reduce the cooling effect induced by the lower formation rate of secondary organic aerosols, both contribute to increased radiative forcing....

  19. Microcantilever sensors coated with a sensitive polyaniline layer for detecting volatile organic compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steffens, C; Leite, F L; Manzoli, A; Sandovall, R D; Fatibello, O; Herrmann, P S P

    2014-09-01

    This paper describes a silicon cantilever sensor coated with a conducting polymer layer. The mechanical response (deflection) of the bimaterial (the coated microcantilever) was investigated under the influence of several volatile compounds-methanol, ethanol, acetone, propanol, dichloroethane, toluene and benzene. The variations in the deflection of the coated and uncoated microcantilevers when exposed to volatile organic compounds were evaluated, and the results indicated that the highest sensitivity was obtained with the coated microcantilever and methanol. The uncoated microcantilever was not sensitive to the volatile organic compounds. An increase in the concentration of the volatile organic compound resulted in higher deflections of the microcantilever sensor. The sensor responses were reversible, sensible, rapid and proportional to the volatile concentration.

  20. Reducing Fuel Volatility. An Additional Benefit From Blending Bio-fuels?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bailis, R. [Yale School of Forestry and Environmental Studies, 195 Prospect Street, New Haven, CT 06511 (United States); Koebl, B.S. [Utrecht University, Science Technology and Society, Budapestlaan 6, 3584 CD Utrecht (Netherlands); Sanders, M. [Utrecht University, Utrecht School of Economics, Janskerkhof 12, 3512 BL Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2011-02-15

    Oil price volatility harms economic growth. Diversifying into different fuel types can mitigate this effect by reducing volatility in fuel prices. Producing bio-fuels may thus have additional benefits in terms of avoided damage to macro-economic growth. In this study we investigate trends and patterns in the determinants of a volatility gain in order to provide an estimate of the tendency and the size of the volatility gain in the future. The accumulated avoided loss from blending gasoline with 20 percent ethanol-fuel estimated for the US economy amounts to 795 bn. USD between 2010 and 2019 with growing tendency. An amount that should be considered in cost-benefit analysis of bio-fuels.

  1. Volatility of organic aerosol and its components in the megacity of Paris

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Paciga

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Using a mass transfer model and the volatility basis set, we estimate the volatility distribution for the organic aerosol (OA components during summer and winter in Paris, France as part of the collaborative project MEGAPOLI. The concentrations of the OA components as a function of temperature were measured combining data from a thermodenuder and an aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS with Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF analysis. The hydrocarbon-like organic aerosol (HOA had similar volatility distributions for the summer and winter campaigns with half of the material in the saturation concentration bin of 10 µg m−3 and another 35–40 % consisting of low and extremely low volatility organic compounds (LVOCs with effective saturation concentrations C* of 10−3–0.1 µg m−3 and ELVOCs C* less or equal than 10−4 µg m−3, respectively. The winter cooking OA (COA was more than an order of magnitude less volatile than the summer COA. The low-volatility oxygenated OA (LV-OOA factor detected in the summer had the lowest volatility of all the derived factors and consisted almost exclusively of ELVOCs. The volatility for the semi-volatile oxygenated OA (SV-OOA was significantly higher than that of the LV-OOA, containing both semi-volatile organic components (SVOCs with C* in the 1–100 µg m−3 range and LVOCs. The oxygenated OA (OOA factor in winter consisted of SVOCs (45 %, LVOCs (25 % and ELVOCs (30 %. The volatility of marine OA (MOA was higher than that of the other factors containing around 60 % SVOCs. The biomass burning OA (BBOA factor contained components with a wide range of volatilities with significant contributions from both SVOCs (50 % and LVOCs (30 %. Finally, combining the bulk average O : C ratios and volatility distributions of the various factors, our results are placed into the two-dimensional volatility basis set (2D-VBS framework. The OA factors cover a broad spectrum of volatilities with no direct

  2. Removal of volatile organic compounds by natural materials during composting of poultry litter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turan, N G; Akdemir, A; Ergun, O N

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study was to reduce volatile organic compounds (VOCs) produced during composting of poultry litter. The natural zeolite, expanded perlite, pumice and expanded vermiculite as the natural materials were used for the reducing of VOCs. Composting was performed in a laboratory scale in-vessel composting plant. Poultry litter was composted for 100 d with volumetric ratio of natural materials:poultry litter of 1:10. The VOCs were tested using the FT-IR method by VOCs analyzer. Studies showed that VOCs generation was the greatest in the control treatment without any natural materials. The natural materials significantly reduced VOCs. At the end of the processes, removal efficiency was 79.73% for NZ treatment, 54.59% for EP treatment, 88.22% for P treatment and 61.53% for EV treatment. Potential of removal for VOCs on poultry litter matrix using natural materials was in order of: P>NZ>EV>EP.

  3. Development of the colorimetric sensor array for detection of explosives and volatile organic compounds in air

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kostesha, Natalie; Alstrøm, Tommy Sonne; Johnsen, C

    2010-01-01

    In the framework of the research project 'Xsense' at the Technical University of Denmark (DTU) we are developing a simple colorimetric sensor array which can be useful in detection of explosives like DNT and TNT, and identification of volatile organic compounds in the presence of water vapor in air...... a color difference map which gives a unique fingerprint for each explosive and volatile organic compound. Such sensing technology can be used to screen for relevant explosives in a complex background as well as to distinguish mixtures of volatile organic compounds distributed in gas phase. This sensor...... array is inexpensive, and can potentially be produced as single use disposable....

  4. Biochar application reduce ammonia volatilization in a soil-plant system: A closed chamber experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandal, Sanchita; Donner, Erica; Smith, Euan; Lombi, Enzo

    2017-04-01

    Ammonia (NH3) volatilization is considered as one of the major mechanisms responsible for the loss of nitrogen (N) from soil-plant systems worldwide. About 10-30% of N can be lost as NH3 volatilization, which constitutes a significant economic loss. In recent years carbon-based materials such as biochar have created a great research interest because of their ability to increase soil fertility by reducing nutrient loss and pollutants bioavailability in soil. Most of the studies so far have investigated how biochar addition can reduce NH3 volatilization from soils but less information is available for soil-plant systems. In this research, wheat plants (Triticum aestivum, variety: Calingiri) were grown in a calcareous soil (pH 8, calcarosol) inside a closed chamber system to assess both ammonia volatilization and plant N uptake. In this specialized glass chamber air was passed through an inlet where the flow rate was maintained using an air pump (3.5 L min-1). The air outlet was passed through a sulphuric acid trap which was used to capture the volatilized NH3 from the chamber. Plants were watered using the inlet to maintain 50% field capacity throughout the incubation. Two different biochar samples were used in this study: a poultry manure biochar (PM-BC) and a green waste compost biochar (GW-BC) produced at 250 ˚C. Five different application rates were tested (0, 0.5, 1, 1.5, and 2%). The soil was mixed with biochar samples, water, N, P, K, Ca, Mg, and S for one week before sowing. After one week of germination, plants were transferred to the chamber for further three weeks incubation for NH3 volatilization measurement. The study identified that biochar application reduced the NH3 volatilization and increase the plant biomass. Biochar application at 0.5 and 2% decreased the NH3 volatilization by 36 and 48% respectively. The N uptake of the plants also increased from 2.9 to 28% at 0.5 and 2% application rates respectively. The dry biomass of the plant also increased

  5. Recovery of reducing sugars and volatile fatty acids from cornstalk at different hydrothermal treatment severity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Zhangbing; Liu, Zhidan; Zhang, Yuanhui; Li, Baoming; Lu, Haifeng; Duan, Na; Si, Buchun; Shen, Ruixia; Lu, Jianwen

    2016-01-01

    This study focused on the degradation of cornstalk and recovery of reducing sugars and volatile fatty acids (VFAs) at different hydrothermal treatment severity (HTS) (4.17-8.28, 190-320°C). The highest recovery of reducing sugars and VFAs reached 92.39% of aqueous products, equal to 34.79% based on dry biomass (HTS, 6.31). GC-MS and HPLC identified that the aqueous contained furfural (0.35-2.88 g/L) and 5-hydroxymethyl furfural (0-0.85 g/L) besides reducing sugars and VFAs. Hemicellulose and cellulose were completely degraded at a HTS of 5.70 and 7.60, respectively. SEM analysis showed that cornstalk was gradually changed from rigid and highly ordered fibrils to molten and grainy structure as HTS increased. FT-IR and TGA revealed the significant changes of organic groups for cornstalk before and after hydrothermal treatment at different HTS. Hydrothermal treatment might be promising for providing feedstocks suitable for biohythane production. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Diagnosing Tibetan pollutant sources via volatile organic compound observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hongyan; He, Qiusheng; Song, Qi; Chen, Laiguo; Song, Yongjia; Wang, Yuhang; Lin, Kui; Xu, Zhencheng; Shao, Min

    2017-10-01

    Atmospheric transport of black carbon (BC) from surrounding areas has been shown to impact the Tibetan environment, and clarifying the geographical source and receptor regions is crucial for providing guidance for mitigation actions. In this study, 10 trace volatile organic compounds (VOCs) sampled across Tibet are chosen as proxies to diagnose source regions and related transport of pollutants to Tibet. The levels of these VOCs in Tibet are higher than those in the Arctic and Antarctic regions but much lower than those observed at many remote and background sites in Asia. The highest VOC level is observed in the eastern region, followed by the southern region and the northern region. A positive matrix factorization (PMF) model found that three factors-industry, biomass burning, and traffic-present different spatial distributions, which indicates that different zones of Tibet are influenced by different VOC sources. The average age of the air masses in the northern and eastern regions is estimated to be 3.5 and 2.8 days using the ratio of toluene to benzene, respectively, which indicates the foreign transport of VOC species to those regions. Back-trajectory analyses show that the Afghanistan-Pakistan-Tajikistan region, Indo-Gangetic Plain (IGP), and Meghalaya-Myanmar region could transport industrial VOCs to different zones of Tibet from west to east. The agricultural bases in northern India could transport biomass burning-related VOCs to the middle-northern and eastern zones of Tibet. High traffic along the unique national roads in Tibet is associated with emissions from local sources and neighboring areas. Our study proposes international joint-control efforts and targeted actions to mitigate the climatic changes and effects associated with VOCs in Tibet, which is a climate sensitive region and an important source of global water.

  7. Urinary Volatile Organic Compounds for the Detection of Prostate Cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanzeela Khalid

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to investigate volatile organic compounds (VOCs emanating from urine samples to determine whether they can be used to classify samples into those from prostate cancer and non-cancer groups. Participants were men referred for a trans-rectal ultrasound-guided prostate biopsy because of an elevated prostate specific antigen (PSA level or abnormal findings on digital rectal examination. Urine samples were collected from patients with prostate cancer (n = 59 and cancer-free controls (n = 43, on the day of their biopsy, prior to their procedure. VOCs from the headspace of basified urine samples were extracted using solid-phase micro-extraction and analysed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. Classifiers were developed using Random Forest (RF and Linear Discriminant Analysis (LDA classification techniques. PSA alone had an accuracy of 62-64% in these samples. A model based on 4 VOCs, 2,6-dimethyl-7-octen-2-ol, pentanal, 3-octanone, and 2-octanone, was marginally more accurate 63-65%. When combined, PSA level and these four VOCs had mean accuracies of 74% and 65%, using RF and LDA, respectively. With repeated double cross-validation, the mean accuracies fell to 71% and 65%, using RF and LDA, respectively. Results from VOC profiling of urine headspace are encouraging and suggest that there are other metabolomic avenues worth exploring which could help improve the stratification of men at risk of prostate cancer. This study also adds to our knowledge on the profile of compounds found in basified urine, from controls and cancer patients, which is useful information for future studies comparing the urine from patients with other disease states.

  8. Stable carbon isotope ratios of ambient aromatic volatile organic compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Kornilova

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Measurements of mixing ratios and stable carbon isotope ratios of aromatic volatile organic compounds (VOC in the atmosphere were made in Toronto (Canada in 2009 and 2010. Consistent with the kinetic isotope effect for reactions of aromatic VOC with the OH radical the observed stable carbon isotope ratios are on average significantly heavier than the isotope ratios of their emissions. The change of carbon isotope ratio between emission and observation is used to determine the extent of photochemical processing (photochemical age,  ∫ [OH]dt of the different VOC. It is found that  ∫ [OH]dt of different VOC depends strongly on the VOC reactivity. This demonstrates that for this set of observations the assumption of a uniform  ∫ [OH]dt for VOC with different reactivity is not justified and that the observed values for  ∫ [OH]dt are the result of mixing of VOC from air masses with different values for  ∫ [OH]dt. Based on comparison between carbon isotope ratios and VOC concentration ratios it is also found that the varying influence of sources with different VOC emission ratios has a larger impact on VOC concentration ratios than photochemical processing. It is concluded that for this data set the use of VOC concentration ratios to determine  ∫ [OH]dt would result in values for  ∫ [OH]dt inconsistent with carbon isotope ratios and that the concept of a uniform  ∫ [OH]dt for an air mass has to be replaced by the concept of individual values of an average  ∫ [OH]dt for VOC with different reactivity.

  9. Can exhaled volatile organic compounds predict asthma exacerbations in children?

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Vliet, Dillys; Smolinska, Agnieszka; Jöbsis, Quirijn; Rosias, Philippe; Muris, Jean; Dallinga, Jan; Dompeling, Edward; van Schooten, Frederik-Jan

    2017-03-01

    Asthma control does not yet meet the goals of asthma management guidelines. Non-invasive monitoring of airway inflammation may help to improve the level of asthma control in children. (1) To identify a set of exhaled volatile organic compounds (VOCs) that is most predictive for an asthma exacerbation in children. (2) To elucidate the chemical identity of predictive biomarkers. In a one-year prospective observational study, 96 asthmatic children participated . During clinical visits at 2 month intervals, asthma control, fractional exhaled nitric oxide, lung function (FEV1, FEV1/VC) and VOCs in exhaled breath were determined by means of gas chromatography time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Random Forrest classification modeling was used to select predictive VOCs, followed by plotting of receiver operating characteristic-curves (ROC-curves). An inverse relationship was found between the predictive power of a set of VOCs and the time between sampling of exhaled breath and the onset of exacerbation. The sensitivity and specificity of the model predicting exacerbations 14 days after sampling were 88% and 75%, respectively. The area under the ROC-curve was 90%. The sensitivity for prediction of asthma exacerbations within 21 days after sampling was 63%. In total, 7 VOCs were selected for the classification model: 3 aldehydes, 1 hydrocarbon, 1 ketone, 1 aromatic compound, and 1 unidentified VOC. VOCs in exhaled breath showed potential for predicting asthma exacerbations in children within 14 days after sampling. Before using this in clinical practice, the validity of predicting asthma exacerbations should be studied in a larger cohort.

  10. Semi-volatile organic pollutants in Jordanian surface water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yahya R. Tahboub

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Jordan relies heavily on rainwater stored in reservoirs because it has extremely limited alternative water resources. These reservoirs are essential for drinking water and irrigation, so monitoring their water quality is extremely important. In this study we monitored 55 semi-volatile organic chemicals (SVOCs in monthly samples from the Zarqa River and three reservoirs between April and August 2010, and also screened the samples for non-target pollutants. Twelve SVOCs were detected and quantified at King Talal Dam followed by ten at Zarqa River and four each at Wadi Al-Arab and Mujib dams. Phenol and phthalate esters were detected at wide range concentrations (0.01–25 μg/L in all water samples. Phenol has the highest level at the Zarqa River (18.5 ± 5.5 μg/L followed by King Talal (12.5 ± 2.5 μg/L and Wadi Al-Arab (2.5 ± 0.63 μg/L. Phthalate esters (total were detected at the Zarqa River, King Talal, Wadi Al-Arab, and Mujib dams at levels 3.85, 3.75, 1.03 and 0.12 μg/L. Other contaminants, including polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs, were detected at low concentrations in the King Talal Dam reservoir and Zarqa River samples. Two non-targeted phosphate plasticizers, tri-n-butylphosphate and tris(2-chloroethylphosphate were identified in the July and August Zarqa River samples. A comparison study reveals that SVOC pollution of surface water in Jordan is within acceptable international limits, but long-term monitoring programs should be implemented.

  11. Volatile organic compounds in ventilated critical care patients: a systematic evaluation of cofactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hüppe, Tobias; Lorenz, Dominik; Wachowiak, Mario; Maurer, Felix; Meiser, Andreas; Groesdonk, Heinrich; Fink, Tobias; Sessler, Daniel I; Kreuer, Sascha

    2017-08-22

    Expired gas (exhalome) analysis of ventilated critical ill patients can be used for drug monitoring and biomarker diagnostics. However, it remains unclear to what extent volatile organic compounds are present in gases from intensive care ventilators, gas cylinders, central hospital gas supplies, and ambient air. We therefore systematically evaluated background volatiles in inspired gas and their influence on the exhalome. We used multi-capillary column ion-mobility spectrometry (MCC-IMS) breath analysis in five mechanically ventilated critical care patients, each over a period of 12 h. We also evaluated volatile organic compounds in inspired gas provided by intensive care ventilators, in compressed air and oxygen from the central gas supply and cylinders, and in the ambient air of an intensive care unit. Volatiles detectable in both inspired and exhaled gas with patient-to-inspired gas ratios compounds. A total of 76 unique MCC-IMS signals were detected, with 39 being identified volatile compounds: 73 signals were from the exhalome, 12 were identified in inspired gas from critical care ventilators, and 34 were from ambient air. Five volatile compounds were identified from the central gas supply, four from compressed air, and 17 from compressed oxygen. We observed seven contaminating volatiles with patient-to-inspired gas ratios Volatile organic compounds can be present in gas from central hospital supplies, compressed gas tanks, and ventilators. Accurate assessment of the exhalome in critical care patients thus requires frequent profiling of inspired gases and appropriate normalisation of the expired signals.

  12. Volatile organic compound (VOC) determination in working atmospheres; Determinacion de compuestos organicos volatiles (VOC) en ambiente laboral

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blass A, Georgina; Panama T, Luz A; Corrales C, Deyanira [Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas, Cuernavaca, Morelos (Mexico)

    2003-07-01

    The present work describes, in a synthesized way, the implementation and application of procedures based on the normativity related to the subject of the volatile organic compounds (Volatile Organic Compounds VOC), that allow to sample, quantify and evaluate the present contamination in the working atmosphere of a refinery due to the fugitive emissions of VOC and other substances. In accordance with the corresponding normativity, more than 189 organic compounds denominated dangerous air polluting agents (Hazardous Air Pollutants, HAP) can be found in a working atmosphere, but they are the 11 main HAP that can be found in a refinery. In the present article the work made for the sampling and quantification of 5 of the 11 dangerous polluting agents of the air: benzene, toluene, xylene, iso-octane and naphthalene. [Spanish] El presente trabajo describe, de manera sintetizada, la implementacion y aplicacion de procedimientos basados en la normatividad relacionada al tema de los compuestos organicos volatiles (Volatil Organic Compounds, VOC), que permiten muestrear, cuantificar y evaluar la contaminacion presente en el ambiente laboral de una refineria debido a las emisiones fugitivas de VOC y otras sustancias. De acuerdo con la normatividad correspondiente, mas de 189 compuestos organicos denominados contaminantes peligrosos del aire (Hazardous Air Pollutants, HAP), pueden ser encontrados en un ambiente laboral, pero son 11 los principales HAP que pueden ser hallados en una refineria. En el presente articulo se informa el trabajo realizado para el muestreo y cuantificacion de 5 de los 11 contaminantes peligrosos del aire: benceno, tolueno, xileno, iso-octano y naftaleno.

  13. PERTURBATION OF VOLTAGE-SENSITIVE CALCIUM FUNCTION IN PHEOCHROMOCYTOMA CELLS BY VOLATILE ORGANIC SOLVENTS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volatile organic solvents such as toluene (TOL) and trichloroethylene perturb nervous system function and share characteristic effects with other central nervous system depressants such as anesthetic gasses, ethanol, benzodiazepines and barbiturates. Recently, mechanistic studies...

  14. Volatile Organic Compounds Sensing Using Optical Fibre Long Period Grating with Mesoporous Nano-Scale Coating

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hromadka, Jiri; Korposh, Sergiy; Partridge, Matthew; James, Stephen; Davis, Frank; Crump, Derrick; Tatam, Ralph

    2017-01-01

      A long period grating (LPG) modified with a mesoporous film infused with a calixarene as a functional compound was employed for the detection of individual volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and their mixtures...

  15. Factors that influence the volatile organic compound content in human breath

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blanchet, L.; Smolinska, Agnieszka; Baranska, Agnieszka; Tigchelaar-Feenstra, E.; Swertz, M.; Zhernakova, A.; Dallinga, J. W.; Wijmenga, C.; van Schooten, Frederik J.

    Background. Thousands of endogenous and exogenous volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are excreted in each breath. Inflammatory and deviant metabolic processes affect the level of endogeneous VOCs, which can serve as specific biomarkers for clinical diagnosis and disease monitoring. Important issues

  16. Analysis of breath volatile organic compounds as a screening tool for detection of Tuberculosis in cattle

    Science.gov (United States)

    • Keywords: bovine tuberculosis; Mycobacterium bovis; breath analysis; volatile organic compound; gas chromatography; mass spectrometry; NaNose • Introduction: This presentation describes two studies exploring the use of breath VOCs to identify Mycobacterium bovis infection in cattle. • Methods: ...

  17. Fact Sheets for the Architectural Coating Rule for Volatile Organic Compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page contains an August 1998 fact sheet with information regarding the National Volatile Organic Compounds Emission Standards for Architectural Coatings Rule. This page also contains information on applicability and compliance for this rule.

  18. Multiscale Modelling Approach for a Fungal Biofilter Unit for the Hydrophobic Abatement of Volatile Organic Compounds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vergara-Fernández, A.; Rebolledo-Castro, J.; Morales Rodriguez, Ricardo

    2011-01-01

    Currently, biofiltration has become a viable and potential alternative for the treatment of airstreams with low concentrations of hydrophobic volatile organic compounds (VOCs), which can employ to this end, diverse microorganisms (such as, bacteria, fungal or microbial consortia, etc.) growing...

  19. Promotion of plant growth by Pseudomonas fluorescens strain SS101 via novel volatile organic compounds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Park, Yong-Soon; Dutta, Swarnalee; Ann, Mina; Raaijmakers, Jos M.; Park, Kyungseok

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) play key roles in modulating plant growth and induced systemic resistance (ISR) to pathogens. Despite their significance, the physiological functions of the specific VOCs produced by Pseudomonas fluorescens

  20. Indoor Semi-volatile Organic Compounds (i-SVOC) Version 1.0

    Science.gov (United States)

    i-SVOC Version 1.0 is a general-purpose software application for dynamic modeling of the emission, transport, sorption, and distribution of semi-volatile organic compounds (SVOCs) in indoor environments.

  1. Screening of natural organic volatiles from Prunus mahaleb L. honey: coumarin and vomifoliol as nonspecific biomarkers

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jerković, Igor; Marijanović, Zvonimir; Staver, Mladenka Malenica

    2011-01-01

    ...) were used for the analysis of Prunus mahaleb L. honey samples. Screening was focused toward chemical composition of natural organic volatiles to determine if it is useful as a method of determining honey-sourcing...

  2. VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUND EMISSION RATES FROM MIXED DECIDUOUS AND CONIFEROUS FORESTS IN NORTHERN WISCONSIN, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biogenic emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOC) from forests play an important role in regulating the atmospheric trace gas composition including global tropospheric ozone concentrations. However, more information is needed on VOC emission rates from different forest regio...

  3. PERTURBATION OF VOLTAGE-SENSITIVE Ca2+ CHANNEL FUNCTION BY VOLATILE ORGANIC SOLVENTS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    The mechanisms underlying the acute neurophysiological and behavioral effects of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) remain to be elucidated. However, the function of neuronal ion channels is perturbed by VOCs. The present study examined effects of toluene (TOL), trichloroethylene ...

  4. Evaluation of the Effect of Two Volatile Organic Compounds on Barley Pathogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amine Kaddes

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to determine the effect of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs on some pathogens, these VOCs were emitted during interactions of barley with Fusarium culmorum Schltdl and/or Cochliobolus sativus Shoemaker, two common root rot pathogens. Our work shows that two organic esters: methyl propanoate (MP and methyl prop-2-enoate (MA significantly reduced the development of fungi in vitro. Additional tests showed that the esters significantly inhibited spore germination of these pathogens. The activity of these VOCs on a wide range of fungal and bacterial pathogens was also tested in vitro and showed inhibitory action. The effect of the VOCs on infected barley seeds also showed plantlets growing without disease symptoms. MA and MP seem to have potential value as alternative plant protection compounds against barley bioagressors.

  5. Air ionization as a control technology for off-gas emissions of volatile organic compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ki-Hyun; Szulejko, Jan E; Kumar, Pawan; Kwon, Eilhann E; Adelodun, Adedeji A; Reddy, Police Anil Kumar

    2017-06-01

    High energy electron-impact ionizers have found applications mainly in industry to reduce off-gas emissions from waste gas streams at low cost and high efficiency because of their ability to oxidize many airborne organic pollutants (e.g., volatile organic compounds (VOCs)) to CO2 and H2O. Applications of air ionizers in indoor air quality management are limited due to poor removal efficiency and production of noxious side products, e.g., ozone (O3). In this paper, we provide a critical evaluation of the pollutant removal performance of air ionizing system through comprehensive review of the literature. In particular, we focus on removal of VOCs and odorants. We also discuss the generation of unwanted air ionization byproducts such as O3, NOx, and VOC oxidation intermediates that limit the use of air-ionizers in indoor air quality management. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  6. Fabrication of flexible, all-reduced graphene oxide non-volatile memory devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Juqing; Yin, Zongyou; Cao, Xiehong; Zhao, Fei; Wang, Lianhui; Huang, Wei; Zhang, Hua

    2013-01-11

    A flexible, all reduced graphene oxide non-volatile memory device, with lightly reduced GO as an active layer and highly reduced GO as both top and bottom electrodes, is fabricated by a full-solution process and its performance is characterized. It provides a convenient method to construct other all-carbon devices. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. A Push-Pull Test to Measure Volatilization Fluxes of Organic Pollutants without Flux Chambers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, M. C.; Jaffe, P. R.

    2011-12-01

    Volatilization of organic contaminants is a potentially significant removal mechanism from wetlands, but field measurements are scarce and the physiochemical controls on volatilization from wetland soils remain poorly understood. It has been established that volatilization rates of certain pollutants are enhanced by vegetation and are strongly correlated with evapotranspiration (ET). These observations rely on flux chambers measurements, which are characterized by significant uncertainty due the chamber's effects on the meteorological variables around the plant and consequent impact on the biophysical processes governing ET and plant uptake of soil contaminants. Here we present data from a mesocosm study using a modified single-well push-pull test to measure in-situ volatilization rates from inundated soils vegetated with the wetland macrophytes Scirpus acutus and Typha latifolia, as well as from unplanted soil. This new method uses a test solution containing the volatile tracers sulfur hexafluoride (SF6), helium (He), and dichlorodifluoromethane (CFC-12) to estimate first-order volatilization rates and examine the relationship between physiochemical properties and volatilization rates. The test also yields an estimate for the volume of subsurface gas bubbles, which is used to derive a retardation factor for the effect of interphase partitioning on the estimation of kinetic parameters. We evaluate models to partition observed fluxes into different pathways for plant-mediated volatilization: transpirational uptake and consequent volatilization, and gas-phase diffusion through porous root aerenchyma. Those models are then used to scale tracer-derived volatilization fluxes to priority organic pollutants including benzene, trichloroethylene, and vinyl chloride. We also discuss the implementation of this method at field scales to estimate volatilization as a component of phytoremediation applications.

  8. The Venus flytrap attracts insects by the release of volatile organic compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreuzwieser, Jürgen; Scheerer, Ursel; Kruse, Jörg; Burzlaff, Tim; Honsel, Anne; Alfarraj, Saleh; Georgiev, Plamen; Schnitzler, Jörg-Peter; Ghirardo, Andrea; Kreuzer, Ines; Hedrich, Rainer; Rennenberg, Heinz

    2014-02-01

    Does Dionaea muscipula, the Venus flytrap, use a particular mechanism to attract animal prey? This question was raised by Charles Darwin 140 years ago, but it remains unanswered. This study tested the hypothesis that Dionaea releases volatile organic compounds (VOCs) to allure prey insects. For this purpose, olfactory choice bioassays were performed to elucidate if Dionaea attracts Drosophila melanogaster. The VOCs emitted by the plant were further analysed by GC-MS and proton transfer reaction-mass spectrometry (PTR-MS). The bioassays documented that Drosophila was strongly attracted by the carnivorous plant. Over 60 VOCs, including terpenes, benzenoids, and aliphatics, were emitted by Dionaea, predominantly in the light. This work further tested whether attraction of animal prey is affected by the nutritional status of the plant. For this purpose, Dionaea plants were fed with insect biomass to improve plant N status. However, although such feeding altered the VOC emission pattern by reducing terpene release, the attraction of Drosophila was not affected. From these results it is concluded that Dionaea attracts insects on the basis of food smell mimicry because the scent released has strong similarity to the bouquet of fruits and plant flowers. Such a volatile blend is emitted to attract insects searching for food to visit the deadly capture organ of the Venus flytrap.

  9. Volatile Organic Compound Investigation Results, 300 Area, Hanford Site, Washington

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peterson, Robert E.; Williams, Bruce A.; Smith, Ronald M.

    2008-07-07

    Unexpectedly high concentrations of volatile organic compounds (VOC) were discovered while drilling in the unconfined aquifer beneath the Hanford Site’s 300 Area during 2006. The discovery involved an interval of relatively finer-grained sediment within the unconfined aquifer, an interval that is not sampled by routine groundwater monitoring. Although VOC contamination in the unconfined aquifer has been identified and monitored, the concentrations of newly discovered contamination are much higher than encountered previously, with some new results significantly higher than the drinking water standards. The primary contaminant is trichloroethene, with lesser amounts of tetrachloroethene. Both chemicals were used extensively as degreasing agents during the fuels fabrication process. A biological degradation product of these chemicals, 1,2-dichloroethene, was also detected. To further define the nature and extent of this contamination, additional characterization drilling was undertaken during 2007. Four locations were drilled to supplement the information obtained at four locations drilled during the earlier investigation in 2006. The results of the combined drilling indicate that the newly discovered contamination is limited to a relatively finer-grained interval of Ringold Formation sediment within the unconfined aquifer. The extent of this contamination appears to be the area immediately east and south of the former South Process Pond. Samples collected from the finer-grained sediment at locations along the shoreline confirm the presence of the contamination near the groundwater/river interface. Contamination was not detected in river water that flows over the area where the river channel potentially incises the finer-grained interval of aquifer sediment. The source for this contamination is not readily apparent. A search of historical documents and the Hanford Waste Information Data System did not provide definitive clues as to waste disposal operations and

  10. Volatile organic compound emission factors from roadside measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawashima, Hiroto; Minami, Shigeki; Hanai, Yoshimichi; Fushimi, Akihiro

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) play a significant role in the generation of urban photochemical smog. In addition, some VOCs, such as benzene, are harmful to human health. In Japan, motor vehicles are the dominant source of VOCs. Therefore, it is important to determine the emission of VOCs from vehicles in order to estimate human risk and the production mechanisms of photochemical smog. In this study, we estimated emission factors with a methodology that considered the following points: (1) real-world emissions, (2) individual VOCs, (3) low vehicle speeds, (4) low investigation cost, and (5) user-friendly methodology. Samples were collected approximately 5 m from each side of National Route No. 467 in Kanagawa Prefecture, Japan. Sampling consisted of twelve 1-h sampling periods at three points on three dates: 21 February 2003 (7:00-19:00), 13 May 2003 (7:00-19:00), and 13 September 2003 (8:00-20:00). The samples were analyzed using GC/FID and GC/MS. In addition, information on vehicle types, traffic volumes, and weather conditions was collected from beside the road. Emission factors of individual VOCs were estimated from the measured data by running the CALINE4 dispersion model as an inverse model. The average speed of all vehicles was 22 km h -1; 81.3% of all vehicles were light-duty vehicles, 12.3% were heavy-duty vehicles, and 6.5% were motorcycles. We estimated the emission factors of 34 individual VOCs. The emission factors for all vehicles combined averaged over all sampling days ranged from 0.25 to 51 mg vehicle -1 km -1. The emission factors of benzene and toluene were 5.2 and 17 mg vehicle -1 km -1, respectively. In addition, the estimated emission factors were compared with those estimated from other recent studies. The emission factors for light-duty vehicles (LDVs), heavy-duty vehicles (HDVs), and motorcycles separately were also estimated by using a non-negative least squares method. However, these emission factors were found to be unreliable for

  11. Spatial variation of volatile organic compounds and carbon ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    GREG

    2013-05-12

    May 12, 2013 ... Rapid urbanization in developing countries has led to increased air pollution due to increased vehicular and industrial emissions (Fenger, 1999; Akimoto, 2003). Examples of atmospheric pollutants include volatile orga- nic compounds (VOCs) and carbon monoxide (CO). The use of fossil fuels (for example ...

  12. Multipass membrane air-stripping (MAS) for removing volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from surfactant micellar solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Hefa; Hu, Yuanan; Luo, Jian; Sabatini, David A

    2009-10-30

    Air-stripping is one of the most effective technologies for removing volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from surfactant solutions, although the presence of surfactant poses some unique challenges. This study evaluated the effect of a mixed surfactant system on the apparent Henry's law constant of tetrachloroethylene (PCE) and the efficiency of PCE removal from surfactant solutions using a lab-scale hollow fiber membrane contactor. Results show that the presence of surfactant significantly reduced the apparent Henry's law constant of PCE, and the reduction was proportional to the total surfactant concentration. PCE removal efficiency by membrane air-stripping (MAS) decreased as the surfactant system transitioned from solubilization to supersolubilization. Besides significantly reducing the apparent volatility of VOCs, the presence of surfactant brings additional mass transfer resistance in air-stripping, which makes it difficult to achieve high levels of contaminant removal, even at very high air/liquid (A/L) ratios. In contrast, multipass/multistage MAS operated at low A/L ratios could achieve near 100% contaminant removal because of less mass transfer limitation during each stripping pass/stage. Experimental results, together with model calculations demonstrate multipass (and multistage) air-stripping as a cost-effective alternative for removing VOCs from surfactant micellar solutions compared to the options of using large air strippers or operating at high A/L ratios.

  13. Volatilization of low vapor pressure--volatile organic compounds (LVP-VOCs) during three cleaning products-associated activities: Potential contributions to ozone formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Hyeong-Moo; McKone, Thomas E; Bennett, Deborah H

    2016-06-01

    There have been many studies to reduce ozone formation mostly from volatile organic compound (VOC) sources. However, the role of low vapor pressure (LVP)-VOCs from consumer products remains mostly unexplored and unaddressed. This study explores the impact of high production volume LVP-VOCs on ozone formation from three cleaning products-associated activities (dishwashing, clothes washing, and surface cleaning). We develop a model framework to account for the portion available for ozone formation during the use phase and from the down-the-drain disposal. We apply experimental studies that measured emission rates or models that were developed for estimating emission rates of organic compounds during the use phase. Then, the fraction volatilized (fvolatilized) and the fraction disposed down the drain (fdown-the-drain) are multiplied by the portion available for ozone formation for releases to the outdoor air (fO3|volatilized) and down-the-drain (fO3|down-the-drain), respectively. Overall, for chemicals used in three specific cleaning-product uses, fvolatilized is less than 0.6% for all studied LVP-VOCs. Because greater than 99.4% of compounds are disposed of down the drain during the use phase, when combined with fO3|volatilized and fO3|down-the-drain, the portion available for ozone formation from the direct releases to outdoor air and the down-the-drain disposal is less than 0.4% and 0.2%, respectively. The results from this study indicate that the impact of the studied LVP-VOCs on ozone formation is very sensitive to what occurs during the use phase and suggest the need for future research on experimental work at the point of use. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Volatility of source apportioned wintertime organic aerosol in the city of Athens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louvaris, Evangelos E.; Florou, Kalliopi; Karnezi, Eleni; Papanastasiou, Dimitrios K.; Gkatzelis, Georgios I.; Pandis, Spyros N.

    2017-06-01

    The volatility distribution of ambient organic aerosol (OA) and its components was measured during the winter of 2013 in the city of Athens combining a thermodenuder (TD) and a High Resolution Time-of-Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS). Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF) analysis of both the ambient and the thermodenuder AMS-spectra resulted in a four-factor solution for the OA, namely: hydrocarbon-like OA (HOA), biomass burning OA (BBOA), cooking OA (COA), and oxygenated OA (OOA). The thermograms of the four factors were analyzed and the corresponding volatility distributions were estimated using the volatility basis set (VBS). All four factors included compounds with a wide range of effective volatilities from 10 to less than 10-4 μg m-3 at 298 K. Almost 40% of the HOA consisted of low-volatility organic compounds (LVOCs) with the semi-volatile compounds (SVOCs) representing roughly 30%, while the remaining 30% consisted of extremely low volatility organic compounds (ELVOCs). BBOA was more volatile than the HOA factor on average, with 10% ELVOCs, 40% LVOCs, and 50% SVOCs. 10% of the COA consisted of ELVOCs, another 65% LVOCs, and 50% SVOCs. Finally, the OOA was the least volatile factor and included 40% ELVOCs, 25% LVOCs, and 35% SVOCs. Combining the volatility distributions and the O:C ratios of the various factors, we placed our results in the 2D-VBS analysis framework of Donahue et al. (2012). HOA and BBOA are in the expected region but also include an ELVOC component. COA is in similar range as HOA, but on average is half an order of magnitude more volatile. The OOA in these wintertime conditions had a moderate O:C ratio and included both semi-volatile and extremely low volatility components. The above results are sensitive to the assumed values of the effective vaporization enthalpy and the accommodation coefficient. A reduction of the accommodation coefficient by an order of magnitude or the reduction of the vaporization enthalpy by 20 kJ mol-1

  15. Geographical traceability of Italian white truffle (Tuber magnatum Pico) by the analysis of volatile organic compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gioacchini, Anna Maria; Menotta, Michele; Guescini, Michele; Saltarelli, Roberta; Ceccaroli, Paola; Amicucci, Antonella; Barbieri, Elena; Giomaro, Giovanna; Stocchi, Vilberto

    2008-10-01

    Results are presented that were obtained on the geographic traceability of the white truffle Tuber magnatum Pico. Solid-phase microextraction coupled to gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (SPME-GC/MS) was employed to characterize the volatile profile of T. magnatum white truffle produced in seven geographical areas of Italy. The main components of the volatile fraction were identified using SPME-GC/MS. Significant differences in the proportion of volatile constituents from truffles of different geographical areas were detected. The results suggest that, besides genetic factors, environmental conditions influence the formation of volatile organic compounds. The mass spectra of the volatile fraction of the samples were used as fingerprints to characterize the geographical origin. Next, stepwise factorial discriminant analysis afforded a limited number of characteristic fragment ions that allowed a geographical classification of the truffles studied.

  16. RT-MATRIX: Measuring Total Organic Carbon by Photocatalytic Oxidation of Volatile Organic Compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) inevitably accumulate in enclosed habitats such as the International Space Station and the Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV) as a result of human metabolism, material off-gassing, and leaking equipment. Some VOCs can negatively affect the quality of the crew's life, health, and performance; and consequently, the success of the mission. Air quality must be closely monitored to ensure a safe living and working environment. Currently, there is no reliable air quality monitoring system that meets NASA's stringent requirements for power, mass, volume, or performance. The ultimate objective of the project -- the development of a Real-Time, Miniaturized, Autonomous Total Risk Indicator System (RT.MATRIX).is to provide a portable, dual-function sensing system that simultaneously determines total organic carbon (TOC) and individual contaminants in air streams.

  17. Growth promotion of Lactuca sativa in response to volatile organic compounds emitted from diverse bacterial species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fincheira, Paola; Venthur, Herbert; Mutis, Ana; Parada, Maribel; Quiroz, Andrés

    2016-12-01

    Agrochemicals are currently used in horticulture to increase crop production. Nevertheless, their indiscriminate use is a relevant issue for environmental and legal aspects. Alternative tools for reducing fertilizers and synthetic phytohormones are being investigated, such as the use of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) as growth inducers. Some soil bacteria, such as Pseudomonas and Bacillus, stimulate Arabidopsis and tobacco growth by releasing VOCs, but their effects on vegetables have not been investigated. Lactuca sativa was used as model vegetable to investigate bacterial VOCs as growth inducers. We selected 10 bacteria strains, belonging to Bacillus, Staphylococcus and Serratia genera that are able to produce 3-hydroxy-2-butanone (acetoin), a compound with proven growth promoting activity. Two-day old-seedlings of L. sativa were exposed to VOCs emitted by the selected bacteria grown in different media cultures for 7 days. The results showed that the VOCs released from the bacteria elicited an increase in the number of lateral roots, dry weight, root growth and shoot length, depending on the media used. Three Bacillus strains, BCT53, BCT9 and BCT4, were selected according to its their growth inducing capacity. The BCT9 strain elicited the greatest increases in dry weight and primary root length when L. sativa seedlings were subjected to a 10-day experiment. Finally, because acetoin only stimulated root growth, we suggest that other volatiles could be responsible for the growth promotion of L. sativa. In conclusion, our results strongly suggest that bacteria volatiles can be used as growth-inducers as alternative or complementary strategies for application in horticulture species. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  18. Can ornamental potted plants remove volatile organic compounds from indoor air? - a review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dela Cruz, Majbrit; Christensen, Jan H.; Thomsen, Jane Dyrhauge

    2014-01-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are found in indoor air, and many of these can affect human health (e.g. formaldehyde and benzene are carcinogenic). Plants affect the levels of VOCs in indoor environments, thus they represent a potential green solution for improving indoor air quality...... that at the same time can improve human health. This article reviews scientific studies of plants' ability to remove VOCs from indoor air. The focus of the review is on pathways of VOC removal by the plants and factors affecting the efficiency and rate of VOC removal by plants. Laboratory based studies indicate...... that plant induced removal of VOCs is a combination of direct (e.g. absorption) and indirect (e.g. biotransformation by microorganisms) mechanisms. They also demonstrate that plants' rate of reducing the level of VOCs is influenced by a number of factors such as plant species, light intensity and VOC...

  19. Current Challenges in Volatile Organic Compounds Analysis as Potential Biomarkers of Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamila Schmidt

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available An early diagnosis and appropriate treatment are crucial in reducing mortality among people suffering from cancer. There is a lack of characteristic early clinical symptoms in most forms of cancer, which highlights the importance of investigating new methods for its early detection. One of the most promising methods is the analysis of volatile organic compounds (VOCs. VOCs are a diverse group of carbon-based chemicals that are present in exhaled breath and biofluids and may be collected from the headspace of these matrices. Different patterns of VOCs have been correlated with various diseases, cancer among them. Studies have also shown that cancer cells in vitro produce or consume specific VOCs that can serve as potential biomarkers that differentiate them from noncancerous cells. This review identifies the current challenges in the investigation of VOCs as potential cancer biomarkers, by the critical evaluation of available matrices for the in vivo and in vitro approaches in this field and by comparison of the main extraction and detection techniques that have been applied to date in this area of study. It also summarises complementary in vivo, ex vivo, and in vitro studies conducted to date in order to try to identify volatile biomarkers of cancer.

  20. Current Challenges in Volatile Organic Compounds Analysis as Potential Biomarkers of Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Kamila; Podmore, Ian

    2015-01-01

    An early diagnosis and appropriate treatment are crucial in reducing mortality among people suffering from cancer. There is a lack of characteristic early clinical symptoms in most forms of cancer, which highlights the importance of investigating new methods for its early detection. One of the most promising methods is the analysis of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). VOCs are a diverse group of carbon-based chemicals that are present in exhaled breath and biofluids and may be collected from the headspace of these matrices. Different patterns of VOCs have been correlated with various diseases, cancer among them. Studies have also shown that cancer cells in vitro produce or consume specific VOCs that can serve as potential biomarkers that differentiate them from noncancerous cells. This review identifies the current challenges in the investigation of VOCs as potential cancer biomarkers, by the critical evaluation of available matrices for the in vivo and in vitro approaches in this field and by comparison of the main extraction and detection techniques that have been applied to date in this area of study. It also summarises complementary in vivo, ex vivo, and in vitro studies conducted to date in order to try to identify volatile biomarkers of cancer. PMID:26317039

  1. Enantiomer distribution of major chiral volatile organic compounds in selected types of herbal honeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pažitná, Alexandra; Džúrová, Jana; Spánik, Ivan

    2014-10-01

    In this article, volatile organic compounds in 14 honey samples (rosemary, eucalyptus, orange, thyme, sage, and lavender) were identified. Volatile organic compounds were extracted using a solid phase microextraction method followed by gas chromatography connected with mass spectrometry analysis. The studied honey samples were compared based on their volatile organic compounds composition. In total, more than 180 compounds were detected in the studied samples. The detected compounds belong to various chemical classes such as terpenes, alcohols, acids, aldehydes, ketones, esters, norisoprenoids, benzene and furane derivatives, and organic compounds containing sulfur and nitrogen heteroatom. Ten chiral compounds (linalool, trans-linalool oxide, cis-linalool oxide, 4-terpineol, α-terpineol, hotrienol, and four stereoisomers of lilac aldehydes) were selected for further chiral separation. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. The Atmospheric Oxidation of Volatile Organic Compounds Through Hydrogen Shift Reactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knap, Hasse Christian

    In this thesis the unimolecular hydrogen transfer reactions (H-shift) in peroxy and acyl peroxy radicals derived from the atmospheric oxidation of volatile organic compounds (VOC) have been investigated. A unimolecular isomerization reaction where a hydrogen atom is moved internally within...... the reaction rate constants of the H-shift reactions. The autoxidation of volatile organic compounds is an important oxidation mechanism that produces secondary organic aerosols (SOA) and recycles hydroxyl (OH) radicals. The autoxidation cycle produces a second generation peroxy radical (OOQOOH) through...

  3. Volatility dependence of Henry's law constants of condensable organics: Application to estimate depositional loss of secondary organic aerosols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodzic, A.; Aumont, B.; Knote, C.; Lee-Taylor, J.; Madronich, S.; Tyndall, G.

    2014-07-01

    The water solubility of oxidation intermediates of volatile organic compounds that can condense to form secondary organic aerosol (SOA) is largely unconstrained in current chemistry-climate models. We apply the Generator of Explicit Chemistry and Kinetics of Organics in the Atmosphere to calculate Henry's law constants for these intermediate species. Results show a strong negative correlation between Henry's law constants and saturation vapor pressures. Details depend on precursor species, extent of photochemical processing, and NOx levels. Henry's law constants as a function of volatility are made available over a wide range of vapor pressures for use in 3-D models. In an application using the Weather Research and Forecasting model coupled with Chemistry (WRF-Chem) over the U.S. in summer, we find that dry (and wet) deposition of condensable organic vapors leads to major reductions in SOA, decreasing surface concentrations by ~50% (10%) for biogenic and ~40% (6%) for short chain anthropogenic precursors under the considered volatility conditions.

  4. Volatile Organic Compounds in the Breath of Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma Patients: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartwig, Stefan; Raguse, Jan D; Pfitzner, Dorothee; Preissner, Robert; Paris, Sebastian; Preissner, Saskia

    2017-12-01

    Objective To assess the feasibility of detecting signature volatile organic compounds in the breath of patients with oral squamous cell carcinoma. Study Design Prospective cohort pilot study. Setting University hospital. Subjects and Methods Using gas chromatography and mass spectrometry, emitted volatile organic compounds in the breath of patients before and after curative surgery (n = 10) were compared with those of healthy subjects (n = 4). It was hypothesized that certain volatile organic compounds disappear after surgical therapy. A characteristic signature of these compounds for diseased patients was compiled and validated. Results Breath analyses revealed 125 volatile organic compounds in patients with oral cancer. A signature of 8 compounds that were characteristic for patients with oral cancer could be detected: 3 from this group presented were absent after surgery. Conclusion The presented results confirmed the hypothesis of an absence of cancer-associated volatile organic compounds in the breath after therapy. In this pilot study, we proved the feasibility of this test approach. Further studies should be initiated to establish protocols for usage in a clinical setting.

  5. 78 FR 11583 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans Tennessee: Revisions to Volatile Organic...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-19

    ... Organic Compound Definition AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Direct final rule... compounds excluded from the definition of ``Volatile Organic Compound'' (VOC). EPA is approving this SIP... is placed in the public docket and made available on the Internet. If you submit an electronic...

  6. Monitoring Volatile Organic Tank Waste Using Cermet Microsensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edward G. Gatliff, Ph.D.; Laura R. Skubal, Ph.D.; Michael C. Vogt, Ph.D.

    2006-03-13

    Presently, very few inexpensive technologies exist in the marketplace that can determine the contents of tank waste or monitor the chemistry of tank constituents in near-real time. The research addressed this problem by developing and assessing ceramic-metallic based microsensors for determining the constituents of a liquid organic storage tank by examining the gases in the headspace of the tank. Overall, the WBO and YSZ sensors responded well to the chemicals in this study. Responses to various concentrations were distinguishable visually. This is a clear indication that pattern recognition tools will be effective in resolving the constituents and concentrations. In tests, such as the test with acetophenone, one sensor, the WBO sensor is not extremely effective. However, the other sensor, the YSZ sensor, is effective in resolving the concentrations. This supports the need to use an array of sensors, as one sensor may be reactive to a compound while another may not. In the course of this research, several interesting phenomena surfaced. New sensors, that were fabricated but not used in a contaminant gas, seemed to function more effectively and predictably if a ?conditioning? step was imposed upon them prior to use in square wave voltammetry. A conditioning step consists of running cyclic voltammetry prior to running square wave voltammetry. This step tends to ?cleanse? the sensor surface by providing a full -1.0 V to +1.0V sweep and both oxidizing and reducing compounds on the sensor surface. [Note: squarewave voltammetry will simply oxidize or reduce compounds ? it will not induce both reactions.] This sweep is essential for recovery between samples.

  7. A four-fold interpenetrated metal-organic framework as a fluorescent sensor for volatile organic compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xiaoyu; Li, Yang; Chang, Ze; Chen, Long; Bu, Xian-He

    2016-10-14

    A four-fold interpenetrated three dimensional (3D) metal-organic framework, [Cd2(tppe)(bpdc)2(H2O)]·solvent (1), was synthesized with a tetraphenylethene (TPE)-based ligand, 1,1,2,2-tetrakis(4-(pyridin-4-yl)phenyl)ethene (TPPE). This complex exhibits intense blue luminescence and is sensitive to toxic volatile organic compounds (VOCs).

  8. Volatile organic compounds released by blowfly larvae and pupae: new perspectives in forensic entomology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frederickx, C; Dekeirsschieter, J; Brostaux, Y; Wathelet, J-P; Verheggen, F J; Haubruge, E

    2012-06-10

    To evaluate postmortem intervals (PMIs), one should take into account the determined age of necrophagous flies present on the cadaver. However, PMI determination needs further improvement, and rapid and accurate approaches have therefore to be developed. While previous studies have focussed on insect cuticular hydrocarbons, here we explore the volatile profile released by larvae and pupae of Calliphora vicina Robineau-Desvoidy (Diptera: Calliphoridae). We monitored changes in volatile compounds daily, by headspace solid-phase microextraction, followed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Branched and unbranched hydrocarbons, alcohols, esters and acids were identified, and the volatile profile was shown to vary, in both composition and quantity, with the age of the larva/pupa under investigation. We concluded, based on the analysis of the released volatile organic compounds, that it is possible to increase the accuracy of the estimated PMI, through improved estimation of the age of blowflies present on the cadaver. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Antifungal activity of volatile organic compounds from Streptomyces alboflavus TD-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Changlu; Wang, Zhifang; Qiao, Xi; Li, Zhenjing; Li, Fengjuan; Chen, Mianhua; Wang, Yurong; Huang, Yufang; Cui, Haiyan

    2013-04-01

    Streptomyces sp. TD-1 was identified as Streptomyces alboflavus based on its morphological characteristics, physiological properties, and 16S rDNA gene sequence analysis. The antifungal activity of the volatile-producing S. alboflavus TD-1 was investigated. Results showed that volatiles generated by S. alboflavus TD-1 inhibited storage fungi Fusarium moniliforme Sheldon, Aspergillus flavus, Aspergillus ochraceus, Aspergillus niger, and Penicillum citrinum in vitro. GC/MS analysis revealed that 27 kinds of volatile organic compounds were identified from the volatiles of S. alboflavus TD-1 mycelia, among which the most abundant compound was 2-methylisoborneol. Dimethyl disulfide was proved to have antifungal activity against F. moniliforme by fumigation in vitro. © 2013 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Modeling the mass transfer of semi-volatile organics in combustion aerosols

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Odum, J.R.; Kamens, R.M. [Univ. of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC (United States). Dept. of Environmental Sciences and Engineering

    1994-12-31

    The atmospheric transport and fate of airborne organic compounds are highly dependent upon which phase or phases (i.e., gas or particle or gas/particle) the compound exists. Recently Rounds and Pankow developed a radial pore-diffusion model to simulate the mass transfer of semi-volatile organics in and out of combustion aerosols. Preliminary results from their model and other recent discoveries suggest that many types of combustion aerosols may be coated with a liquid organic layer and that diffusion of semi-volatile organics through this layer impedes rapid mass transfer of these compounds. Therefore a radial diffusion model was developed to describe the mass transfer of semi-volatile organics into and out of combustion aerosols. The model combustion aerosol consists of a solid carbon core that is surrounded by a viscous, liquid-like, organic layer. Diffusion takes place only within the organic layer and is controlled by mass transfer at the particle surface. Modeling of semi-volatiles requires the tuning of two separate parameters: a diffusion coefficient and a surface mass transfer coefficient. Preliminary testing of the model on the uptake of deuterated pyrene by diesel exhaust aerosol at 25 C suggests that diffusion coefficients for PAH are on the order of 10{sup {minus}15} cm{sup 2}/sec and that surface mass transfer coefficients for pyrene are on the order of 10{sup {minus}9} cm/sec.

  11. Nitrate radicals and biogenic volatile organic compounds: oxidation, mechanisms, and organic aerosol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Nga Lee; Brown, Steven S.; Archibald, Alexander T.; Atlas, Elliot; Cohen, Ronald C.; Crowley, John N.; Day, Douglas A.; Donahue, Neil M.; Fry, Juliane L.; Fuchs, Hendrik; Griffin, Robert J.; Guzman, Marcelo I.; Herrmann, Hartmut; Hodzic, Alma; Iinuma, Yoshiteru; Jimenez, José L.; Kiendler-Scharr, Astrid; Lee, Ben H.; Luecken, Deborah J.; Mao, Jingqiu; McLaren, Robert; Mutzel, Anke; Osthoff, Hans D.; Ouyang, Bin; Picquet-Varrault, Benedicte; Platt, Ulrich; Pye, Havala O. T.; Rudich, Yinon; Schwantes, Rebecca H.; Shiraiwa, Manabu; Stutz, Jochen; Thornton, Joel A.; Tilgner, Andreas; Williams, Brent J.; Zaveri, Rahul A.

    2017-02-01

    Oxidation of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOC) by the nitrate radical (NO3) represents one of the important interactions between anthropogenic emissions related to combustion and natural emissions from the biosphere. This interaction has been recognized for more than 3 decades, during which time a large body of research has emerged from laboratory, field, and modeling studies. NO3-BVOC reactions influence air quality, climate and visibility through regional and global budgets for reactive nitrogen (particularly organic nitrates), ozone, and organic aerosol. Despite its long history of research and the significance of this topic in atmospheric chemistry, a number of important uncertainties remain. These include an incomplete understanding of the rates, mechanisms, and organic aerosol yields for NO3-BVOC reactions, lack of constraints on the role of heterogeneous oxidative processes associated with the NO3 radical, the difficulty of characterizing the spatial distributions of BVOC and NO3 within the poorly mixed nocturnal atmosphere, and the challenge of constructing appropriate boundary layer schemes and non-photochemical mechanisms for use in state-of-the-art chemical transport and chemistry-climate models. This review is the result of a workshop of the same title held at the Georgia Institute of Technology in June 2015. The first half of the review summarizes the current literature on NO3-BVOC chemistry, with a particular focus on recent advances in instrumentation and models, and in organic nitrate and secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation chemistry. Building on this current understanding, the second half of the review outlines impacts of NO3-BVOC chemistry on air quality and climate, and suggests critical research needs to better constrain this interaction to improve the predictive capabilities of atmospheric models.

  12. Nitrate radicals and biogenic volatile organic compounds: oxidation, mechanisms, and organic aerosol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ng, Nga Lee; Brown, Steven S.; Archibald, Alexander T.; Atlas, Elliot; Cohen, Ronald C.; Crowley, John N.; Day, Douglas A.; Donahue, Neil M.; Fry, Juliane L.; Fuchs, Hendrik; Griffin, Robert J.; Guzman, Marcelo I.; Herrmann, Hartmut; Hodzic, Alma; Iinuma, Yoshiteru; Jimenez, José L.; Kiendler-Scharr, Astrid; Lee, Ben H.; Luecken, Deborah J.; Mao, Jingqiu; McLaren, Robert; Mutzel, Anke; Osthoff, Hans D.; Ouyang, Bin; Picquet-Varrault, Benedicte; Platt, Ulrich; Pye, Havala O. T.; Rudich, Yinon; Schwantes, Rebecca H.; Shiraiwa, Manabu; Stutz, Jochen; Thornton, Joel A.; Tilgner, Andreas; Williams, Brent J.; Zaveri, Rahul A.

    2017-01-01

    Oxidation of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOC) by the nitrate radical (NO3) represents one of the important interactions between anthropogenic emissions related to combustion and natural emissions from the biosphere. This interaction has been recognized for more than 3 decades, during which time a large body of research has emerged from laboratory, field, and modeling studies. NO3-BVOC reactions influence air quality, climate and visibility through regional and global budgets for reactive nitrogen (particularly organic nitrates), ozone, and organic aerosol. Despite its long history of research and the significance of this topic in atmospheric chemistry, a number of important uncertainties remain. These include an incomplete understanding of the rates, mechanisms, and organic aerosol yields for NO3-BVOC reactions, lack of constraints on the role of heterogeneous oxidative processes associated with the NO3 radical, the difficulty of characterizing the spatial distributions of BVOC and NO3 within the poorly mixed nocturnal atmosphere, and the challenge of constructing appropriate boundary layer schemes and non-photochemical mechanisms for use in state-of-the-art chemical transport and chemistry–climate models.

    This review is the result of a workshop of the same title held at the Georgia Institute of Technology in June 2015. The first half of the review summarizes the current literature on NO3-BVOC chemistry, with a particular focus on recent advances in instrumentation and models, and in organic nitrate and secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation chemistry. Building on this current understanding, the second half of the review outlines impacts of NO3-BVOC chemistry on air quality and climate, and suggests critical research needs to better constrain this interaction to improve the predictive capabilities of atmospheric models.

  13. Photodegradation of Secondary Organic Aerosol Particles as a Source of Small, Oxygenated Volatile Organic Compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malecha, Kurtis T; Nizkorodov, Sergey A

    2016-09-20

    We investigated the photodegradation of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) particles by near-UV radiation and photoproduction of oxygenated volatile organic compounds (OVOCs) from various types of SOA. We used a smog chamber to generate SOA from α-pinene, guaiacol, isoprene, tetradecane, and 1,3,5-trimethylbenzene under high-NOx, low-NOx, or ozone oxidation conditions. The SOA particles were collected on a substrate, and the resulting material was exposed to several mW of near-UV radiation (λ ∼ 300 nm) from a light-emitting diode. Various OVOCs, including acetic acid, formic acid, acetaldehyde, and acetone were observed during photodegradation, and their SOA-mass-normalized fluxes were estimated with a Proton Transfer Reaction Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometer (PTR-ToF-MS). All the SOA, with the exception of guaiacol SOA, emitted OVOCs upon irradiation. Based on the measured OVOC emission rates, we estimate that SOA particles would lose at least ∼1% of their mass over a 24 h period during summertime conditions in Los Angeles, California. This condensed-phase photochemical process may produce a few Tg/year of gaseous formic acid, the amount comparable to its primary sources. The condensed-phase SOA photodegradation processes could therefore measurably affect the budgets of both particulate and gaseous atmospheric organic compounds on a global scale.

  14. Extraction optimization and pixel-based chemometric analysis of semi-volatile organic compounds in groundwater

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Peter; Tomasi, Giorgio; Kristensen, Mette

    2017-01-01

    Semi-volatile organic compounds (semi-VOCs) are found in complex mixtures, and at low concentrations in groundwater. Chemical fingerprint analysis of groundwater is therefore challenging, as it is necessary to obtain high enrichment factors for compounds with a wide range of properties. In this s......Semi-volatile organic compounds (semi-VOCs) are found in complex mixtures, and at low concentrations in groundwater. Chemical fingerprint analysis of groundwater is therefore challenging, as it is necessary to obtain high enrichment factors for compounds with a wide range of properties...

  15. Sensory and Physiological Effects on Humans of Combined Exposures to Air Temperatures and Volatile Organic Compounds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mølhave, Lars; Liu, Zunyong; Jørgensen, Anne Hempel

    1993-01-01

    Ten healthy humans were exposed to combinations of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and air temperature (0 mg/m3 and 10 mg/m3 of a mixture of 22 volatile organic compounds and 18, 22 and 26° C). Previously demonstrated effects of VOCs and thermal exposures were replicated. For the first time nasal...... cross-sectional areas and nasal volumes, as measured by acoustic rhinometry, were shown to decrease with decreasing temperature and increasing VOC exposure. Temperature and pollutant exposures affected air quality, the need for more ventilation, skin humidity on the forehead, sweating, acute sensory...... indoor air concentrations of VOCs should depend on room air temperature....

  16. A two-dimensional volatility basis set: 1. organic-aerosol mixing thermodynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. M. Donahue

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available We develop the thermodynamic underpinnings of a two-dimensional volatility basis set (2D-VBS employing saturation mass concentration (Co and the oxygen content (O:C to describe volatility, mixing thermodynamics, and chemical evolution of organic aerosol. The work addresses a simple question: "Can we reasonably constrain organic-aerosol composition in the atmosphere based on only two measurable organic properties, volatility and the extent of oxygenation?" This is an extension of our earlier one-dimensional approach employing volatility only (C* = γ Co, where γ is an activity coefficient. Using available constraints on bulk organic-aerosol composition, we argue that one can reasonably predict the composition of organics (carbon, oxygen and hydrogen numbers given a location in the Co – O:C space. Further, we argue that we can constrain the activity coefficients at various locations in this space based on the O:C of the organic aerosol.

  17. A Monte-Carlo Analysis of Organic Volatility with Aerosol Microphysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Chloe; Tsigaridis, Kostas; Bauer, Susanne E.

    2017-04-01

    A newly developed box model, MATRIX-VBS, includes the volatility-basis set (VBS) framework in an aerosol microphysical scheme MATRIX (Multiconfiguration Aerosol TRacker of mIXing state), which resolves aerosol mass and number concentrations and aerosol mixing state. The new scheme advanced the representation of organic aerosols in models by improving the traditional and simplistic treatment of organic aerosols as non-volatile and with a fixed size distribution. Further development includes adding the condensation of organics on coarse mode aerosols - dust and sea salt, thus making all organics in the system semi-volatile. To test and simplify the model, a Monte-Carlo analysis is performed to pin point which processes affect organics the most under varied chemical and meteorological conditions. Since the model's parameterizations have the ability to capture a very wide range of conditions, all possible scenarios on Earth across the whole parameter space, including temperature, humidity, location, emissions and oxidant levels, are examined. The Monte-Carlo simulations provide quantitative information on the sensitivity of the newly developed model and help us understand how organics are affecting the size distribution, mixing state and volatility distribution at varying levels of meteorological conditions and pollution levels. In addition, these simulations give information on which parameters play a critical role in the aerosol distribution and evolution in the atmosphere and which do not, that will facilitate the simplification of the box model, an important step in its implementation in the global model GISS ModelE as a module.

  18. Development of a New Manure Amendment for Reducing Ammonia Volatilization and Phosphorus Runoff from Poultry Litter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Philip A

    2016-07-01

    Treating poultry litter with alum is a best management practice that reduces phosphorus (P) runoff and ammonia (NH) emissions. However, alum prices have increased substantially during the past decade. The goal of this research was to develop inexpensive manure amendments that are as effective as alum in reducing NH volatilization and P runoff. Sixteen amendments were developed using mixtures of alum mud, bauxite ore, sulfuric acid, liquid alum, and water. Alum mud is the residual left over from alum manufacture when produced by reacting bauxite with sulfuric acid. A laboratory NH volatilization study was conducted using 11 treatments: untreated poultry litter, poultry litter treated with liquid or dry alum, or eight new mixtures. All of the litter amendments tested resulted in significantly lower NH volatilization than untreated litter. Dry and liquid alum reduced NH losses by 86 and 75%, respectively. The eight new litter amendments reduced NH losses from 62 to 73% compared with untreated litter, which was not significantly different from liquid alum; the three most effective mixtures were not significantly different from dry alum. Water-extractable P (WEP) was significantly reduced by all of the amendments, three of which resulted in significantly lower WEP than dry alum. The most promising new amendments were mixtures of alum mud, bauxite, and sulfuric acid. The potential impact of these amendments could be enormous because they could be produced for less than half the price of alum while being as effective in reducing NH emissions and P runoff. Copyright © by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America, Inc.

  19. Volatile organic compounds emitted from fungal-rotting beech (Fagus sylvatica)

    OpenAIRE

    Thakeow, Prodepran; Weißbecker, Bernhard; Schütz, Stefan

    2008-01-01

    Chemo-communication is an important mode of interaction within ecosystem. The living organism in the ecosystem can deliver signals to conspecifics, to co-organisms, and unintentionally to their enemies, by emitting the volatile organic compounds (VOCs) to the atmosphere. There are some insect-fungi-associations displaying interesting relationships. For example, some bark beetle species (PAINE et al. 1997) introduce fungi into the conifers during the attack process. Fungi take advantage by ass...

  20. Secondary organic aerosol formation from intermediate-volatility organic compounds: cyclic, linear, and branched alkanes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tkacik, Daniel S; Presto, Albert A; Donahue, Neil M; Robinson, Allen L

    2012-08-21

    Intermediate volatility organic compounds (IVOCs) are an important class of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) precursors that have not been traditionally included in chemical transport models. A challenge is that the vast majority of IVOCs cannot be speciated using traditional gas chromatography-based techniques; instead they are classified as an unresolved complex mixture (UCM) that is presumably made up of a complex mixture of branched and cyclic alkanes. To better understand SOA formation from IVOCs, a series of smog chamber experiments was conducted with different alkanes, including cyclic, branched, and linear compounds. The experiments focused on freshly formed SOA from hydroxyl (OH) radical-initiated reactions under high-NO(x) conditions at typical atmospheric organic aerosol concentrations (C(OA)). SOA yields from cyclic alkanes were comparable to yields from linear alkanes three to four carbons larger in size. For alkanes with equivalent carbon numbers, branched alkanes had the lowest SOA mass yields, ranging between 0.05 and 0.08 at a C(OA) of 15 μg m(-3). The SOA yield of branched alkanes also depends on the methyl branch position on the carbon backbone. High-resolution aerosol mass spectrometer data indicate that the SOA oxygen-to-carbon ratios were largely controlled by the carbon number of the precursor compound. Depending on the precursor size, the mass spectrum of SOA produced from IVOCs is similar to the semivolatile-oxygenated and hydrocarbon-like organic aerosol factors derived from ambient data. Using the new yield data, we estimated SOA formation potential from diesel exhaust and predict the contribution from UCM vapors to be nearly four times larger than the contribution from single-ring aromatics and comparable to that of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons after several hours of oxidation at typical atmospheric conditions. Therefore, SOA from IVOCs may be an important contributor to urban OA and should be included in SOA models; the yield data

  1. Removal of volatile organic compounds using amphiphilic cyclodextrin-coated polypropylene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lumholdt, Ludmilla; Fourmentin, Sophie; Nielsen, Thorbjørn T; Larsen, Kim L

    2014-01-01

    Polypropylene nonwovens were functionalised using a self-assembled, amphiphilic cyclodextrin coating and the potential for water purification by removal of pollutants was studied. As benzene is one of the problematic compounds in the Water Framework Directive, six volatile organic compounds (benzene and five benzene-based substances) were chosen as model compounds. The compounds were tested as a mixture in order to provide a more realistic situation since the wastewater will be a complex mixture containing multiple pollutants. The volatile organic compounds are known to form stable inclusion complexes with cyclodextrins. Six different amphiphilic cyclodextrin derivatives were synthesised in order to elucidate whether or not the uptake abilities of the coating depend on the structure of the derivative. Headspace gas chromatography was used for quantification of the uptake exploiting the volatile nature of benzene and its derivatives. The capacity was shown to increase beyond the expected stoichiometries of guest-host complexes with ratios of up to 16:1.

  2. Emission of volatile organic compounds from silage: Compounds, sources, and implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafner, Sasha D.; Howard, Cody; Muck, Richard E.; Franco, Roberta B.; Montes, Felipe; Green, Peter G.; Mitloehner, Frank; Trabue, Steven L.; Rotz, C. Alan

    2013-10-01

    Silage, fermented cattle feed, has recently been identified as a significant source of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) to the atmosphere. A small number of studies have measured VOC emission from silage, but not enough is known about the processes involved to accurately quantify emission rates and identify practices that could reduce emissions. Through a literature review, we have focused on identifying the most important compounds emitted from corn silage (the most common type of silage in the US) and the sources of these compounds by quantifying their production and emission potential in silage and describing production pathways. We reviewed measurements of VOC emission from silage and assessed the importance of individual silage VOCs through a quantitative analysis of VOC concentrations within silage. Measurements of VOC emission from silage and VOCs present within silage indicated that alcohols generally make the largest contribution to emission from corn silage, in terms of mass emitted and potential ozone formation. Ethanol is the dominant alcohol in corn silage; excluding acids, it makes up more than half of the mean mass of VOCs present. Acids, primarily acetic acid, may be important when emission is high and all VOCs are nearly depleted by emission. Aldehydes and esters, which are more volatile than acids and alcohols, are important when exposure is short, limiting emission of more abundant but less volatile compounds. Variability in silage VOC concentrations is very high; for most alcohols and acids, tolerance intervals indicate that 25% of silages have concentrations a factor of two away from median values, and possibly much further. This observation suggests that management practices can significantly influence VOC concentrations. Variability also makes prediction of emissions difficult. The most important acids, alcohols, and aldehydes present in silage are probably produced by bacteria (and, in the case of ethanol, yeasts) during fermentation and

  3. Development of leaching tests for non-volatile organic contaminants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roskam, G.D.; Comans, R.N.J. [Energy Research Centre of the Netherlands (ECN), Petten (Netherlands)

    2002-07-01

    The objective of our research was to investigate the processes that control the leaching of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), a group of organic contaminants with an aqueous solubility that varies over more than 5 orders of magnitude. The obtained insight in the leaching processes is used as the basis for an ''availability'' leaching test that is intended to indicate the maximum amount of the organic contaminants that can be leached from soil or waste materials. This presentation is largely based on work performed in the framework of two EU projects on the development of leaching tests for organic contaminants, and on groundwater risk assessment at contaminated sites. (orig.)

  4. Volatile fatty acids production from sewage organic matter by combined bioflocculation and anaerobic fermentation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khiewwijit, R.; Keesman, K.J.; Rijnaarts, H.H.M.; Temmink, B.G.

    2015-01-01

    This work aims at exploring the feasibility of a combined process bioflocculation to concentrate sewage organic matter and anaerobic fermentation to produce volatile fatty acids (VFA). Bioflocculation, using a high-loaded aerobic membrane bioreactor (HL-MBR), was operated at an HRT of 1 h and an SRT

  5. Treatment of volatile organic contaminants in a vertical flow filter: Relevance of different removal processes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Biase, C.; Reger, D.; Schmidt, A.; Jechalke, S.; Reiche, N.; Martínez-Lavanchy, P.M.; Rosell, M.; Van Afferden, M.; Maier, U.; Oswald, S.E.; Thullner, M.

    2011-01-01

    Vertical flow filters and vertical flow constructed wetlands are established wastewater treatment systems and have also been proposed for the treatment of contaminated groundwater. This study investigates the removal processes of volatile organic compounds in a pilot-scale vertical flow filter.

  6. Emission of volatile organic compounds during composting of municipal solid wastes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komilis, Dimitris P; Ham, Robert K; Park, Jae K

    2004-04-01

    The objective of this study was to identify and quantify volatile and semi-volatile organic compounds (VOCs) produced during composting of the organic fraction of municipal solid wastes (MSW). A laboratory experiment was conducted using organic components of MSW that were decomposed under controlled aerobic conditions. Mixed paper primarily produced alkylated benzenes, alcohols and alkanes. Yard wastes primarily produced terpenes, alkylated benzenes, ketones and alkanes, while food wastes primarily produced sulfides, acids and alcohols. Among 13 aromatic VOCs found in MSW composting facilities, toluene, ethylbenzene, 1,4-dichlorobenzene, p-isopropyl toluene, and naphthalene were in the largest amounts. Unseeded mixed paper, seeded mixed paper, seeded yard wastes, unseeded yard wastes, seeded food wastes and unseeded food wastes produced approximately 6.5, 6.1, 2.1, 0.83, 2.5 and 0.33 mg of 13 volatile and semi-volatile aromatic organic compounds combined, respectively, per dry kg. All VOCs were emitted early during the composting process and their production rates decreased with time at thermophilic temperatures.

  7. Early Detection of Necrotizing Enterocolitis by Fecal Volatile Organic Compounds Analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Meij, Tim G. J.; van der Schee, Marc P. C.; Berkhout, Daan J. C.; van de Velde, Mirjam E.; Jansen, Anna E.; Kramer, Boris W.; van Weissenbruch, Mirjam M.; van Kaam, Anton H.; Andriessen, Peter; van Goudoever, Johannes B.; Niemarkt, Hendrik J.; de Boer, Nanne K. H.

    2015-01-01

    To test the hypothesis that fecal volatile organic compounds (VOCs) analysis by electronic nose (eNose) allows for early detection of necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC). In 3 neonatal intensive care units, fecal samples of infants born at gestational age ≤ 30 weeks were collected daily, up to the 28th

  8. EXTRACTION METHODS FOR RECOVERY OF VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS FROM FORTIFIED DRY SOILS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recovery of 8 volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from dry soils, each fortified at 800 ng/g soil, was studied in relation to the extraction method and time of extraction. Extraction procedures studied on desiccator-dried soils were modifications of EPA low-and high-level purge-and...

  9. BIOGENIC VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUND EMISSIONS FROM A LOWLAND TROPICAL WET FOREST IN COSTA RICA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twenty common plant species were screened for emissions of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCS) at a lowland tropical wet forest site in Costa Rica. Ten of the species. examined emitted substantial quantities of isoprene. These species accounted for 35-50% of the total bas...

  10. Volatile organic compound emmission rates from mixed deciduous and coniferous foest in Northern Wisconsin, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    J. G. Isebrands; A. B. Guenther; P. Harley; D. Helmig; L. Klinger; L. Vierling; P. Zimmerman; C. Geron

    1999-01-01

    Biogenic emissions of volatile organic compounds {VOC) from forests play an important role in regulating the atmospheric trace gas composition including global tropospheric ozone concentrations. However, more information is needed on VOC emission rates from different forest regions of the world to understand regional and global impacts and to implement possible...

  11. Microbial Volatile Organic Compound Emissions from Stachybotrys chartarum growing on Gypsum Wallboard and Ceiling tile

    Science.gov (United States)

    This study compared seven toxigenic strains of S. chartarum found in water-damaged buildings to characterize the microbial volatile organic compound (MVOC) emissions profile while growing on gypsum wallboard (W) and ceiling tile (C) coupons. The inoculated coupons with their sub...

  12. Effects of organic solutes properties on the volatilization processes from water solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chung-Kung; Chao, Huan-Ping; Lee, Jiunn-Fwu

    2004-01-01

    Effects of organic solutes properties, including Henry's law constant (H), molecular weight (M), molar volume at normal boiling point (Vb), and solubility (S), on the usefulness of rate estimation by reference to a reference substance (i.e., reference substance concept) and on the evaporation rate were investigated by measuring the volatilization rate constant of organic solutes under different environmental conditions, including mixing and surfactants. It was found that if benzene was used as a reference substance, the ratio of the solute rate to that of benzene (F) becomes insensitive to water mixing, whether the solute possessed high or low Henry's law constant. In the presence of surfactants, however, the F value changes sharply as the solute solubility decreases. For benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes (BTEX), the F values are essentially constant irrespective of the presence of other chemicals (including organic compounds, surfactants, and salinity) and of the variation in temperature. On the other hand, the volatilization rates are closely related to molecular weight (solubility) in the existence of mixing (surfactants). Three different approaches, i.e., mass-transport theory, modified Knudsen equation, and reaction rate concept, were used to evaluate the dependence of solute volatilization rates on solute properties. It was concluded that the interaction between solute properties and environmental parameters might play a key role in the volatilization process of organic solutes under different environmental conditions.

  13. VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS AS BREATH BIOMARKERS FOR ACTIVE AND PASSIVE SMOKING

    Science.gov (United States)

    Real-time breath measurement technology was used to investigate the suitability of some volatile organic compounds (VOCs) to serve as breath biomarkers for active and passive smoking and to measure actual exposures and resulting breath concentrations for persons exposed to toba...

  14. Determination of source contributions to ambient volatile organic compound concentrations in Berlin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thijsse, T.R.; Oss, R.F. van; Lenschow, P.

    1999-01-01

    During three measuring campaigns in June, July, and August 1996, volatile organic compound (VOC) concentrations were measured at a rural background site, a city residential site, and a street site in Berlin. In addition, samples were taken near relevant sources of VOCs. The measurements covered the

  15. Process engineering versus product engineering - A case study on volatile organic compounds removal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Coutinho, João A.P.; Vilela, T.; Pereira, P.

    2005-01-01

    Three solutions for removing the dangerous volatile organic compound (VOC) xylene from an industrial coating process are presented and compared. Two of them are based on classical process engineering principles, i.e., development of separation-cleaning methods such as incineration and adsorption...

  16. Modeling emissions of volatile organic compounds from silage storages and feed lanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    An initial volatile organic compound (VOC) emission model for silage sources, developed using experimental data from previous studies, was incorporated into the Integrated Farm System Model (IFSM), a whole-farm simulation model used to assess the performance, environmental impacts, and economics of ...

  17. Sensory eye irritation in humans exposed to mixtures of volatile organic compounds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hempel-Jørgensen, Anne Hempel; Kjærgaard, Søren K.; Mølhave, Lars

    1999-01-01

    Eight subjects participated in a controlled eyes-only exposure study of human sensory irritation in ocular mucosal tissue. The authors investigated dose-response properties and the additive effects of three mixtures of volatile organic compounds. The dose-response relationships for these mixtures...

  18. A quick screening method for sorption effects of volatile organic compounds on indoor materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wal, J.F. van der

    1998-01-01

    Sorption effects of a number of combinations of indoor materials and volatile organic compounds have been investigated. A limited number of experiments have been conducted to investigate the influence of parameters such as the adsorption time, the desorption time, the concentration of the pollutants

  19. Signals of speciation: Volatile organic compounds resolve closely related sagebrush taxa, suggesting their importance in evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deidre M. Jaeger; Justin B. Runyon; Bryce A. Richardson

    2016-01-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) play important roles in the environmental adaptation and fitness of plants. Comparison of the qualitative and quantitative differences in VOCs among closely related taxa and assessing the effects of environment on their emissions are important steps to deducing VOC function and evolutionary importance.

  20. Emission of volatile organic compounds as affected by rate of application of cattle manure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beef cattle manure can serve as a valuable nutrient source for crop production. However, emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) following land application may pose a potential off-site odor concern. This study was conducted to evaluate the effects of land application method, N- application...

  1. Profiling of volatile organic compounds produced by clinical Aspergillus isolates using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gerritsen, M. G.; Brinkman, P.; Escobar, N.; Bos, L. D.; de Heer, K.; Meijer, M.; Janssen, H.-G.; de Cock, H.; Wösten, H. A. B.; Visser, C. E.; van Oers, M. H. J.; Sterk, P. J.

    2017-01-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in exhaled breath may identify the presence of invasive pulmonary aspergillosis. We aimed to detect VOC profiles emitted by in vitro cultured, clinical Aspergillus isolates using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Three clinical Aspergillus isolates and a

  2. Analysis of selected volatile organic compounds at background level in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ntsasa, Napo; Tshilongo, James; Lekoto, Goitsemang

    2017-04-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOC) are measured globally at urban air pollution monitoring and background level at specific locations such as the Cape Point station. The urban pollution monitoring is legislated at government level; however, the background levels are scientific outputs of the World Meteorological Organisation Global Atmospheric Watch program (WMO/GAW). The Cape Point is a key station in the Southern Hemisphere which monitors greenhouse gases and halocarbons, with reported for over the past decade. The Cape Point station does not have the measurement capability VOC's currently. A joint research between the Cape Point station and the National Metrology Institute of South Africa (NMISA) objective is to perform qualitative and quantitative analysis of volatile organic compounds listed in the GAW program. NMISA is responsible for development, maintain and disseminate primary reference gas mixtures which are directly traceable to the International System of Units (SI) The results of some volatile organic compounds which where sampled in high pressure gas cylinders will be presented. The analysis of samples was performed on the gas chromatography with flame ionisation detector and mass selective detector (GC-FID/MSD) with a dedicate cryogenic pre-concentrator system. Keywords: volatile organic compounds, gas chromatography, pre-concentrator

  3. 40 CFR 60.502 - Standard for Volatile Organic Compound (VOC) emissions from bulk gasoline terminals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... (VOC) emissions from bulk gasoline terminals. 60.502 Section 60.502 Protection of Environment... SOURCES Standards of Performance for Bulk Gasoline Terminals § 60.502 Standard for Volatile Organic Compound (VOC) emissions from bulk gasoline terminals. On and after the date on which § 60.8(a) requires a...

  4. Atmospheric volatile organic compounds (VOC) at a remote tropical forest site in central Amazonia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kessermeier, J.; Kuhn, U.; Wolf, A.; Andreae, P.; Ciccioli, P.; Brancaleoni, E.; Frattoni, M.; Ganzeveld, L.N.; Guenther, J.; Greenberg, J.P.; Castro Vasconcellos, De P.; Tavares, T.; Artaxo, P.

    2000-01-01

    According to recent assessments, tropical woodlands contribute about half of all global natural non-methane volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions. Large uncertainties exist especially about fluxes of compounds other than isoprene and monoterpenes. During the Large-Scale Biosphere/Atmosphere

  5. ISOTOPIC (14C) AND CHEMICAL COMPOSITION OF ATMOSPHERIC VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUND FRACTIONS - PRECURSORS TO OZONE FORMATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atmospheric volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are an important factor in the production of ozone near ground level [3]. Many hydrocarbons originate from auto exhaust. However, a number of VOCs, e.g., isoprene, are known to be natural in origin. To develop reliable models for un...

  6. SCREENING PROCESSED MILK FOR VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS USING VACUUM DISTILLATION/GAS CHROMATOGRAPHY/MASS SPECTROMETRY

    Science.gov (United States)

    An adaptation of Office of Solid Waste and Emergency Response' Test Methods for Evaluating Solid Waste Physical/Chemical Methods (SW-846) method 8261 to analyze milk for an expanded list of volatile organic compounds is presented. The milk matriz exhibits a strong affinity for o...

  7. BIOGENIC VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUND EMISSIONS FROM DESERT VEGETATION OF THE SOUTHWESTERN U.S.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thirteen common plant species in the Mojave and Sonoran Desert regions of the western United States were tested for emissions of biogenic non-methane volatile organic compounds (BVOCs). Only two of the species examined emitted isoprene at rates of 10 µgCg−1 ...

  8. Pilot study: volatile organic compounds as a diagnostic marker for head and neck tumors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schmutzhard, Joachim; Rieder, Josef; Deibl, Martina; Schwentner, Ilona M.; Schmid, Stefan; Lirk, Philip; Abraham, Irene; Gunkel, Andreas R.

    2008-01-01

    In the last decade, the analysis of volatile organic compounds (VOC) has undergone a rapid development. In this pilot study, patients with HNSCC were tested with a proton transfer reaction-mass spectrometry in order to establish a minimal invasive screening method. Overall in a period of 2 years, 22

  9. Electrospun Polyurethane Fibers for Absorption of Volatile Organic Compounds from Air

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scholten, E.; Bromberg, L.; Rutledge, G.C.; Hatton, T.A.

    2011-01-01

    Electrospun polyurethane fibers for removal of volatile organic compounds (VOC) from air with rapid VOC absorption and desorption have been developed. Polyurethanes based on 4,4-methylenebis(phenylisocyanate) (MDI) and aliphatic isophorone diisocyanate as the hard segments and butanediol and

  10. MODELING OF MULTICOMPONENT PERVAPORATION FOR REMOVAL OF VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS FROM WATER

    Science.gov (United States)

    A resistance-in-series model was used to study the pervaporation of multiple volatile organic compounds (VOCs)-water mixtures. Permeation experiments were carried out for four membranes: poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS), polyether-block-polyamides (PEBA), polyurethane (PUR) and sil...

  11. OPTIMIZATION OF MULTICOMPONENT PERVAPORATION FOR REMOVAL OF VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS FROM WATER

    Science.gov (United States)

    Optimal operation of a hollow fiber membrane module for pervaporative removal of multicomponent volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from wastewater was studied. A shell-and-tube heat-exchange type of hollow fiber module was considered for treatment of a wastewater containing toluen...

  12. Cold Temperature and Biodiesel Fuel Effects on Speciated Emissions of Volatile Organic Compounds from Diesel Trucks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speciated volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were measured in diesel exhaust from three medium heavy-duty trucks equipped with modern aftertreatment technologies. Emissions testing was conducted on a chassis dynamometer at two ambient temperatures (-6.7°C and 21.7°C) operating on ...

  13. MEASUREMENTS OF VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS AND PARTICLES DURING APPLICATION OF LATEX PAINT WITH AN AIRLESS SPRAYER

    Science.gov (United States)

    The paper discusses experiments, conducted at EPA's Indoor Air Quality Research House, to measure airborne concentrations of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and particles during and following the spray-application of latex wall paint. (NOTE: Paint may be applied indoors by a v...

  14. Comparison of receptor models for source apportionment of volatile organic compounds in Beijing, China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song Yu; Dai Wei [Department of Environmental Sciences, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Shao Min [State Joint Key Laboratory of Environmental Simulation and Pollution Control, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)], E-mail: mshao@pku.edu.cn; Liu Ying; Lu Sihua [State Joint Key Laboratory of Environmental Simulation and Pollution Control, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Kuster, William; Goldan, Paul [Chemical Sciences Division, NOAA Earth System Research Laboratory, Boulder, CO 80305 (United States)

    2008-11-15

    Identifying the sources of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) is key to reducing ground-level ozone and secondary organic aerosols (SOAs). Several receptor models have been developed to apportion sources, but an intercomparison of these models had not been performed for VOCs in China. In the present study, we compared VOC sources based on chemical mass balance (CMB), UNMIX, and positive matrix factorization (PMF) models. Gasoline-related sources, petrochemical production, and liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) were identified by all three models as the major contributors, with UNMIX and PMF producing quite similar results. The contributions of gasoline-related sources and LPG estimated by the CMB model were higher, and petrochemical emissions were lower than in the UNMIX and PMF results, possibly because the VOC profiles used in the CMB model were for fresh emissions and the profiles extracted from ambient measurements by the two-factor analysis models were 'aged'. - VOCs sources were similar for three models with CMB showing a higher estimate for vehicles.

  15. Modeling organic aerosols in a megacity: comparison of simple and complex representations of the volatility basis set approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Shrivastava

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The Weather Research and Forecasting model coupled with chemistry (WRF-Chem is modified to include a volatility basis set (VBS treatment of secondary organic aerosol formation. The VBS approach, coupled with SAPRC-99 gas-phase chemistry mechanism, is used to model gas-particle partitioning and multiple generations of gas-phase oxidation of organic vapors. In addition to the detailed 9-species VBS, a simplified mechanism using 2 volatility species (2-species VBS is developed and tested for similarity to the 9-species VBS in terms of both mass and oxygen-to-carbon ratios of organic aerosols in the atmosphere. WRF-Chem results are evaluated against field measurements of organic aerosols collected during the MILAGRO 2006 campaign in the vicinity of Mexico City. The simplified 2-species mechanism reduces the computational cost by a factor of 2 as compared to 9-species VBS. Both ground site and aircraft measurements suggest that the 9-species and 2-species VBS predictions of total organic aerosol mass as well as individual organic aerosol components including primary, secondary, and biomass burning are comparable in magnitude. In addition, oxygen-to-carbon ratio predictions from both approaches agree within 25 %, providing evidence that the 2-species VBS is well suited to represent the complex evolution of organic aerosols. Model sensitivity to amount of anthropogenic semi-volatile and intermediate volatility (S/IVOC precursor emissions is also examined by doubling the default emissions. Both the emission cases significantly under-predict primary organic aerosols in the city center and along aircraft flight transects. Secondary organic aerosols are predicted reasonably well along flight tracks surrounding the city, but are consistently over-predicted downwind of the city. Also, oxygen-to-carbon ratio predictions are significantly improved compared to prior studies by adding 15 % oxygen mass per generation of oxidation; however, all modeling cases

  16. Modeling Organic Aerosols in a Megacity: Comparison of Simple and Complex Representations of the Volatility Basis Set Approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shrivastava, ManishKumar B.; Fast, Jerome D.; Easter, Richard C.; Gustafson, William I.; Zaveri, Rahul A.; Jimenez, Jose L.; Saide, Pablo; Hodzic, Alma

    2011-07-13

    The Weather Research and Forecasting model coupled with chemistry (WRF-Chem) is modified to include a volatility basis set (VBS) treatment of secondary organic aerosol formation. The VBS approach, coupled with SAPRC-99 gas-phase chemistry mechanism, is used to model gas-particle partitioning and multiple generations of gas-phase oxidation of organic vapors. In addition to the detailed 9-species VBS, a simplified mechanism using 2 volatility species (2-species VBS) is developed and tested for similarity to the 9-species VBS in terms of both mass and oxygen-to-carbon ratios of organic aerosols in the atmosphere. WRF-Chem results are evaluated against field measurements of organic aerosols collected during the MILAGRO 2006 campaign in the vicinity of Mexico City. The simplified 2-species mechanism reduces the computational cost by a factor of 2 as compared to 9-species VBS. Both ground site and aircraft measurements suggest that the 9-species and 2-species VBS predictions of total organic aerosol mass as well as individual organic aerosol components including primary, secondary, and biomass burning are comparable in magnitude. In addition, oxygen-to-carbon ratio predictions from both approaches agree within 25%, providing evidence that the 2-species VBS is well suited to represent the complex evolution of organic aerosols. Model sensitivity to amount of anthropogenic semi-volatile and intermediate volatility (S/IVOC) precursor emissions is also examined by doubling the default emissions. Both the emission cases significantly under-predict primary organic aerosols in the city center and along aircraft flight transects. Secondary organic aerosols are predicted reasonably well along flight tracks surrounding the city, but are consistently over-predicted downwind of the city. Also, oxygen-to-carbon ratio predictions are significantly improved compared to prior studies by adding 15% oxygen mass per generation of oxidation; however, all modeling cases still under

  17. Market-oriented ethanol and corn-trade policies can reduce climate-induced US corn price volatility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Monika; Hertel, Thomas; Diffenbaugh, Noah

    2014-05-01

    Agriculture is closely affected by climate. Over the past decade, biofuels have emerged as another important factor shaping the agricultural sector. We ask whether the presence of the US ethanol sector can play a role in moderating increases in US corn price variability, projected to occur in response to near-term global warming. Our findings suggest that the answer to this question depends heavily on the underlying forces shaping the ethanol industry. If mandate-driven, there is little doubt that the presence of the corn-ethanol sector will exacerbate price volatility. However, if market-driven, then the emergence of the corn-ethanol sector can be a double-edged sword for corn price volatility, possibly cushioning the impact of increased climate driven supply volatility, but also inheriting volatility from the newly integrated energy markets via crude oil price fluctuations. We find that empirically the former effect dominates, reducing price volatility by 27%. In contrast, mandates on ethanol production increase future price volatility by 54% in under future climate after 2020. We also consider the potential for liberalized international corn trade to cushion corn price volatility in the US. Our results suggest that allowing corn to move freely internationally serves to reduce the impact of near-term climate change on US corn price volatility by 8%.

  18. Molecular corridors and parameterizations of volatility in the chemical evolution of organic aerosols

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Li

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The formation and aging of organic aerosols (OA proceed through multiple steps of chemical reaction and mass transport in the gas and particle phases, which is challenging for the interpretation of field measurements and laboratory experiments as well as accurate representation of OA evolution in atmospheric aerosol models. Based on data from over 30 000 compounds, we show that organic compounds with a wide variety of functional groups fall into molecular corridors, characterized by a tight inverse correlation between molar mass and volatility. We developed parameterizations to predict the saturation mass concentration of organic compounds containing oxygen, nitrogen, and sulfur from the elemental composition that can be measured by soft-ionization high-resolution mass spectrometry. Field measurement data from new particle formation events, biomass burning, cloud/fog processing, and indoor environments were mapped into molecular corridors to characterize the chemical nature of the observed OA components. We found that less-oxidized indoor OA are constrained to a corridor of low molar mass and high volatility, whereas highly oxygenated compounds in atmospheric water extend to high molar mass and low volatility. Among the nitrogen- and sulfur-containing compounds identified in atmospheric aerosols, amines tend to exhibit low molar mass and high volatility, whereas organonitrates and organosulfates follow high O : C corridors extending to high molar mass and low volatility. We suggest that the consideration of molar mass and molecular corridors can help to constrain volatility and particle-phase state in the modeling of OA particularly for nitrogen- and sulfur-containing compounds.

  19. Volatile organic compound emissions during hot-pressing of southern pine particleboard : panel size effects and trade-off between press time and temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenlong Wang; Douglas J. Gardner; Melissa G.D. Baumann

    2002-01-01

    In previous research, it was shown that decreasing either press temperature or press time generally resulted in decreased volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions during the hot-pressing of southern pine particleboard. However, because it is impossible to reduce both pressing time and temperature while maintaining panel physical and mechanical properties, this study...

  20. Estimation of the volatility distribution of organic aerosol combining thermodenuder and isothermal dilution measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. E. Louvaris

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available A method is developed following the work of Grieshop et al. (2009 for the determination of the organic aerosol (OA volatility distribution combining thermodenuder (TD and isothermal dilution measurements. The approach was tested in experiments that were conducted in a smog chamber using organic aerosol (OA produced during meat charbroiling. A TD was operated at temperatures ranging from 25 to 250 °C with a 14 s centerline residence time coupled to a high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS and a scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS. In parallel, a dilution chamber filled with clean air was used to dilute isothermally the aerosol of the larger chamber by approximately a factor of 10. The OA mass fraction remaining was measured as a function of temperature in the TD and as a function of time in the isothermal dilution chamber. These two sets of measurements were used together to estimate the volatility distribution of the OA and its effective vaporization enthalpy and accommodation coefficient. In the isothermal dilution experiments approximately 20 % of the OA evaporated within 15 min. Almost all the OA evaporated in the TD at approximately 200 °C. The resulting volatility distributions suggested that around 60–75 % of the cooking OA (COA at concentrations around 500 µg m−3 consisted of low-volatility organic compounds (LVOCs, 20–30 % of semivolatile organic compounds (SVOCs, and around 10 % of intermediate-volatility organic compounds (IVOCs. The estimated effective vaporization enthalpy of COA was 100 ± 20 kJ mol−1 and the effective accommodation coefficient was 0.06–0.07. Addition of the dilution measurements to the TD data results in a lower uncertainty of the estimated vaporization enthalpy as well as the SVOC content of the OA.

  1. Estimation of the volatility distribution of organic aerosol combining thermodenuder and isothermal dilution measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louvaris, Evangelos E.; Karnezi, Eleni; Kostenidou, Evangelia; Kaltsonoudis, Christos; Pandis, Spyros N.

    2017-10-01

    A method is developed following the work of Grieshop et al. (2009) for the determination of the organic aerosol (OA) volatility distribution combining thermodenuder (TD) and isothermal dilution measurements. The approach was tested in experiments that were conducted in a smog chamber using organic aerosol (OA) produced during meat charbroiling. A TD was operated at temperatures ranging from 25 to 250 °C with a 14 s centerline residence time coupled to a high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS) and a scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS). In parallel, a dilution chamber filled with clean air was used to dilute isothermally the aerosol of the larger chamber by approximately a factor of 10. The OA mass fraction remaining was measured as a function of temperature in the TD and as a function of time in the isothermal dilution chamber. These two sets of measurements were used together to estimate the volatility distribution of the OA and its effective vaporization enthalpy and accommodation coefficient. In the isothermal dilution experiments approximately 20 % of the OA evaporated within 15 min. Almost all the OA evaporated in the TD at approximately 200 °C. The resulting volatility distributions suggested that around 60-75 % of the cooking OA (COA) at concentrations around 500 µg m-3 consisted of low-volatility organic compounds (LVOCs), 20-30 % of semivolatile organic compounds (SVOCs), and around 10 % of intermediate-volatility organic compounds (IVOCs). The estimated effective vaporization enthalpy of COA was 100 ± 20 kJ mol-1 and the effective accommodation coefficient was 0.06-0.07. Addition of the dilution measurements to the TD data results in a lower uncertainty of the estimated vaporization enthalpy as well as the SVOC content of the OA.

  2. Systemic Resistance Induced by Volatile Organic Compounds Emitted by Plant Growth-Promoting Fungi in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naznin, Hushna Ara; Kiyohara, Daigo; Kimura, Minako; Miyazawa, Mitsuo; Shimizu, Masafumi; Hyakumachi, Mitsuro

    2014-01-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOC) were extracted and identified from plant growth-promoting fungi (PGPF), Phoma sp., Cladosporium sp. and Ampelomyces sp., using gas chromatography–mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Among the three VOC extracted, two VOC blends (emitted from Ampelomyces sp. and Cladosporium sp.) significantly reduced disease severity in Arabidopsis plants against Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 (Pst). Subsequently, m-cresol and methyl benzoate (MeBA) were identified as major active volatile compounds from Ampelomyces sp. and Cladosporium sp., respectively, and found to elicit induced systemic resistance (ISR) against the pathogen. Molecular signaling for disease suppression by the VOC were investigated by treating different mutants and transgenic Arabidopsis plants impaired in salicylic acid (SA) or Jasmonic acid (JA)/ethylene (ET) signaling pathways with m-cresol and MeBA followed by challenge inoculation with Pst. Results show that the level of protection was significantly lower when JA/ET-impaired mutants were treated with MeBA, and in SA-, and JA/ET-disrupted mutants after m-cresol treatment, indicating the involvement of these signal transduction pathways in the ISR primed by the volatiles. Analysis of defense-related genes by real-time qRT-PCR showed that both the SA-and JA-signaling pathways combine in the m-cresol signaling of ISR, whereas MeBA is mainly involved in the JA-signaling pathway with partial recruitment of SA-signals. The ET-signaling pathway was not employed in ISR by the volatiles. Therefore, this study identified two novel volatile components capable of eliciting ISR that may be promising candidates in biological control strategy to protect plants from diseases. PMID:24475190

  3. Systemic resistance induced by volatile organic compounds emitted by plant growth-promoting fungi in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hushna Ara Naznin

    Full Text Available Volatile organic compounds (VOC were extracted and identified from plant growth-promoting fungi (PGPF, Phoma sp., Cladosporium sp. and Ampelomyces sp., using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS. Among the three VOC extracted, two VOC blends (emitted from Ampelomyces sp. and Cladosporium sp. significantly reduced disease severity in Arabidopsis plants against Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 (Pst. Subsequently, m-cresol and methyl benzoate (MeBA were identified as major active volatile compounds from Ampelomyces sp. and Cladosporium sp., respectively, and found to elicit induced systemic resistance (ISR against the pathogen. Molecular signaling for disease suppression by the VOC were investigated by treating different mutants and transgenic Arabidopsis plants impaired in salicylic acid (SA or Jasmonic acid (JA/ethylene (ET signaling pathways with m-cresol and MeBA followed by challenge inoculation with Pst. Results show that the level of protection was significantly lower when JA/ET-impaired mutants were treated with MeBA, and in SA-, and JA/ET-disrupted mutants after m-cresol treatment, indicating the involvement of these signal transduction pathways in the ISR primed by the volatiles. Analysis of defense-related genes by real-time qRT-PCR showed that both the SA-and JA-signaling pathways combine in the m-cresol signaling of ISR, whereas MeBA is mainly involved in the JA-signaling pathway with partial recruitment of SA-signals. The ET-signaling pathway was not employed in ISR by the volatiles. Therefore, this study identified two novel volatile components capable of eliciting ISR that may be promising candidates in biological control strategy to protect plants from diseases.

  4. Systemic resistance induced by volatile organic compounds emitted by plant growth-promoting fungi in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naznin, Hushna Ara; Kiyohara, Daigo; Kimura, Minako; Miyazawa, Mitsuo; Shimizu, Masafumi; Hyakumachi, Mitsuro

    2014-01-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOC) were extracted and identified from plant growth-promoting fungi (PGPF), Phoma sp., Cladosporium sp. and Ampelomyces sp., using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Among the three VOC extracted, two VOC blends (emitted from Ampelomyces sp. and Cladosporium sp.) significantly reduced disease severity in Arabidopsis plants against Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 (Pst). Subsequently, m-cresol and methyl benzoate (MeBA) were identified as major active volatile compounds from Ampelomyces sp. and Cladosporium sp., respectively, and found to elicit induced systemic resistance (ISR) against the pathogen. Molecular signaling for disease suppression by the VOC were investigated by treating different mutants and transgenic Arabidopsis plants impaired in salicylic acid (SA) or Jasmonic acid (JA)/ethylene (ET) signaling pathways with m-cresol and MeBA followed by challenge inoculation with Pst. Results show that the level of protection was significantly lower when JA/ET-impaired mutants were treated with MeBA, and in SA-, and JA/ET-disrupted mutants after m-cresol treatment, indicating the involvement of these signal transduction pathways in the ISR primed by the volatiles. Analysis of defense-related genes by real-time qRT-PCR showed that both the SA-and JA-signaling pathways combine in the m-cresol signaling of ISR, whereas MeBA is mainly involved in the JA-signaling pathway with partial recruitment of SA-signals. The ET-signaling pathway was not employed in ISR by the volatiles. Therefore, this study identified two novel volatile components capable of eliciting ISR that may be promising candidates in biological control strategy to protect plants from diseases.

  5. Increasing NBPT rates to reduce ammonia volatilization losses from urea applied over sugarcane straw

    OpenAIRE

    Acácio Bezerra de Mira

    2016-01-01

    Urea is the main nitrogen (N) fertilizer used worldwide, but N losses in the form of ammonia (NH3) is a major problem when this fertilizer is topdressed over crop residues. The treatment of urea with N-(n-butyl) thiophosphoric triamide (NBPT) decreases the activity of urease enzyme and volatilization losses in many crops. However, the amount of straw over the soil in green cane trash blanketing (GCTB) systems affect the effectiveness of NBPT-treated urea in reducing NH3 losses. The hypothesis...

  6. Differentiating a Diverse Range of Volatile Organic Compounds with Polyfluorophore Sensors Built on a DNA Scaffold

    OpenAIRE

    Samain, Florent; Dai, Nan; Kool, Eric T.

    2010-01-01

    Oligodeoxyfluorosides (ODFs) are short DNA-like oligomers in which DNA bases are replaced with fluorophores. A preliminary study reported that some sequences of ODFs were able to respond to a few organic small molecules in the vapor phase, giving a change in fluorescence. Here we follow up on this finding by investigating a larger range of volatile organic analytes, and a considerably larger set of sensors. A library of tetramer ODFs of 2401 different sequences was prepared using combinatoria...

  7. Volatile compounds from organic and conventional passion fruit (Passiflora edulis F. Flavicarpa pulp

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Serrão Macoris

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The volatile compositions from organic and conventional passion fruit pulps produced in Brazil were investigated. The pulps were also physicochemically characterized. The volatile compounds from the headspace of the passion fruit pulp were stripped to a Porapak Q trap for 2 hours; they were eluted with 300 µL of dichloromethane, separated by gas chromatography/flame ionisation detection and identified through gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. Both pulps conformed to the requirements of the Brazilian legislation, indicating they were suitable to be industrialized and consumed. A total of 77 compounds were detected in the headspace of the passion fruit pulps - 60 of which were identified, comprising 91% of the total chromatogram area. The major compounds were the following: ethyl butanoate, 52% and 57% of the total relative area of the chromatogram for the organic and conventional passion fruit pulps, respectively; ethyl hexanoate, 22% and 9%, respectively; and hexyl butanoate, 2% and 5%, respectively. The aroma of the organic passion fruit pulp is mainly related to the following volatile compounds: ethyl hexanoate, methyl hexanoate, β-myrcene and D-limonene. The conventional passion fruit pulp presented methyl butanoate, butyl acetate, hexanal, 1-butanol, butyl butanoate, trans-3-hexenyl acetate, cis-3-hexen-1-ol, butyl hexanoate, hexyl butanoate, 3-hexenyl butanoate and 3-hexenyl hexanoate as the main volatile compounds for aroma.

  8. Effects of NOx on the volatility of secondary organic aerosol from isoprene photooxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Lu; Kollman, Matthew S.; Song, Chen; Shilling, John E.; Ng, L. N.

    2014-01-28

    The effects of NOx on the volatility of the secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formed from isoprene photooxidation are investigated in environmental chamber experiments. Two types of experiments are performed. In HO2-dominant experiments, organic peroxy radicals (RO2) primarily react with HO2. In mixed experiments, RO2 reacts through multiple pathways. The volatility and oxidation state of isoprene SOA is sensitive to and displays a non-linear dependence on NOx levels. When initial NO/isoprene ratio is approximately 3 (ppbv:ppbv), SOA are shown to be most oxidized and least volatile, associated with the highest SOA yield. A High-Resolution Time-of-Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS) is applied to characterize the key chemical properties of aerosols. While the composition of SOA in mixed experiments does not change substantially over time, SOA become less volatile and more oxidized as oxidation progresses in HO2-dominant experiments. Analysis of the SOA composition suggests that the further reactions of organic peroxides and alcohols may produce carboxylic acids, which might play a strong role in SOA aging.

  9. Ozone and secondary organic aerosol formation potential from anthropogenic volatile organic compounds emissions in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Wenjing; Zhao, Bin; Wang, Shuxiao; Hao, Jiming

    2017-03-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are major precursors for ozone and secondary organic aerosol (SOA), both of which greatly harm human health and significantly affect the Earth's climate. We simultaneously estimated ozone and SOA formation from anthropogenic VOCs emissions in China by employing photochemical ozone creation potential (POCP) values and SOA yields. We gave special attention to large molecular species and adopted the SOA yield curves from latest smog chamber experiments. The estimation shows that alkylbenzenes are greatest contributors to both ozone and SOA formation (36.0% and 51.6%, respectively), while toluene and xylenes are largest contributing individual VOCs. Industry solvent use, industry process and domestic combustion are three sectors with the largest contributions to both ozone (24.7%, 23.0% and 17.8%, respectively) and SOA (22.9%, 34.6% and 19.6%, respectively) formation. In terms of the formation potential per unit VOCs emission, ozone is sensitive to open biomass burning, transportation, and domestic solvent use, and SOA is sensitive to industry process, domestic solvent use, and domestic combustion. Biomass stoves, paint application in industrial protection and buildings, adhesives application are key individual sources to ozone and SOA formation, whether measured by total contribution or contribution per unit VOCs emission. The results imply that current VOCs control policies should be extended to cover most important industrial sources, and the control measures for biomass stoves should be tightened. Finally, discrepant VOCs control policies should be implemented in different regions based on their ozone/aerosol concentration levels and dominant emission sources for ozone and SOA formation potential. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  10. A two-dimensional volatility basis set – Part 2: Diagnostics of organic-aerosol evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. M. Donahue

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We discuss the use of a two-dimensional volatility-oxidation space (2-D-VBS to describe organic-aerosol chemical evolution. The space is built around two coordinates, volatility and the degree of oxidation, both of which can be constrained observationally or specified for known molecules. Earlier work presented the thermodynamics of organics forming the foundation of this 2-D-VBS, allowing us to define the average composition (C, H, and O of organics, including organic aerosol (OA based on volatility and oxidation state. Here we discuss how we can analyze experimental data, using the 2-D-VBS to gain fundamental insight into organic-aerosol chemistry. We first present a well-understood "traditional" secondary organic aerosol (SOA system – SOA from α-pinene + ozone, and then turn to two examples of "non-traditional" SOA formation – SOA from wood smoke and dilute diesel-engine emissions. Finally, we discuss the broader implications of this analysis.

  11. Age matters: the effects of volatile organic compounds emitted by Trichoderma atroviride on plant growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Samantha; Hung, Richard; Yap, Melanie; Bennett, Joan W

    2015-06-01

    Studying the effects of microbial volatile organic compounds (VOCs) on plant growth is challenging because the production of volatiles depends on many environmental factors. Adding to this complexity, the method of volatile exposure itself can lead to different responses in plants and may account for some of the contrasting results. In this work, we present an improved experimental design, a plate-within-a-plate method, to study the effects of VOCs produced by filamentous fungi. We demonstrate that the plant growth response to VOCs is dependent on the age of the plant and fungal cultures. Plants exposed to volatiles emitted by 5-day-old Trichoderma atroviride for 14 days exhibited inhibition, while plants exposed to other exposure conditions had growth promotion or no significant change. Using GC-MS, we compared fungal volatile emission of 5-day-old and 14-day-old T. atroviride. As the fungi aged, a few compounds were no longer detected, but 24 new compounds were discovered.

  12. Remove volatile organic compounds (VOCs) with membrane separation techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lin; Weng, Huan-xin; Chen, Huan-lin; Gao, Cong-jie

    2002-04-01

    Membrane separation, a new technology for removing VOCs including pervaporation, vapor permeation, membrane contactor, and membrane bioreactor was presented. Comparing with traditional techniques, these special techniques are an efficient and energy-saving technology. Vapor permeation can be applied to recovery of organic solvents from exhaust streams. Membrane contactor could be used for removing or recovering VOCs from air or wastewater. Pervaporation and vapor permeation are viable methods for removing VOCs from wastewater to yield a VOC concentrate which could either be destroyed by conventional means, or be recycled for reuse.

  13. Scalable printed electronics: an organic decoder addressing ferroelectric non-volatile memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Tse Nga; Schwartz, David E; Lavery, Leah L; Whiting, Gregory L; Russo, Beverly; Krusor, Brent; Veres, Janos; Bröms, Per; Herlogsson, Lars; Alam, Naveed; Hagel, Olle; Nilsson, Jakob; Karlsson, Christer

    2012-01-01

    Scalable circuits of organic logic and memory are realized using all-additive printing processes. A 3-bit organic complementary decoder is fabricated and used to read and write non-volatile, rewritable ferroelectric memory. The decoder-memory array is patterned by inkjet and gravure printing on flexible plastics. Simulation models for the organic transistors are developed, enabling circuit designs tolerant of the variations in printed devices. We explain the key design rules in fabrication of complex printed circuits and elucidate the performance requirements of materials and devices for reliable organic digital logic.

  14. Scalable printed electronics: an organic decoder addressing ferroelectric non-volatile memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Tse Nga; Schwartz, David E.; Lavery, Leah L.; Whiting, Gregory L.; Russo, Beverly; Krusor, Brent; Veres, Janos; Bröms, Per; Herlogsson, Lars; Alam, Naveed; Hagel, Olle; Nilsson, Jakob; Karlsson, Christer

    2012-01-01

    Scalable circuits of organic logic and memory are realized using all-additive printing processes. A 3-bit organic complementary decoder is fabricated and used to read and write non-volatile, rewritable ferroelectric memory. The decoder-memory array is patterned by inkjet and gravure printing on flexible plastics. Simulation models for the organic transistors are developed, enabling circuit designs tolerant of the variations in printed devices. We explain the key design rules in fabrication of complex printed circuits and elucidate the performance requirements of materials and devices for reliable organic digital logic. PMID:22900143

  15. MATRIX-VBS (v1.0): implementing an evolving organic aerosol volatility in an aerosol microphysics model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Chloe Y.; Tsigaridis, Kostas; Bauer, Susanne E.

    2017-02-01

    The gas-particle partitioning and chemical aging of semi-volatile organic aerosol are presented in a newly developed box model scheme, where its effect on the growth, composition, and mixing state of particles is examined. The volatility-basis set (VBS) framework is implemented into the aerosol microphysical scheme MATRIX (Multiconfiguration Aerosol TRacker of mIXing state), which resolves mass and number aerosol concentrations and in multiple mixing-state classes. The new scheme, MATRIX-VBS, has the potential to significantly advance the representation of organic aerosols in Earth system models by improving upon the conventional representation as non-volatile particulate organic matter, often also with an assumed fixed size distribution. We present results from idealized cases representing Beijing, Mexico City, a Finnish forest, and a southeastern US forest, and investigate the evolution of mass concentrations and volatility distributions for organic species across the gas and particle phases, as well as assessing their mixing state among aerosol populations. Emitted semi-volatile primary organic aerosols evaporate almost completely in the intermediate-volatility range, while they remain in the particle phase in the low-volatility range. Their volatility distribution at any point in time depends on the applied emission factors, oxidation by OH radicals, and temperature. We also compare against parallel simulations with the original scheme, which represented only the particulate and non-volatile component of the organic aerosol, examining how differently the condensed-phase organic matter is distributed across the mixing states in the model. The results demonstrate the importance of representing organic aerosol as a semi-volatile aerosol, and explicitly calculating the partitioning of organic species between the gas and particulate phases.

  16. MATRIX-VBS (v1.0): Implementing an Evolving Organic Aerosol Volatility in an Aerosol Microphysics Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Chloe Y.; Tsigaridis, Kostas; Bauer, Susanne E.

    2017-01-01

    The gas-particle partitioning and chemical aging of semi-volatile organic aerosol are presented in a newly developed box model scheme, where its effect on the growth, composition, and mixing state of particles is examined. The volatility-basis set (VBS) framework is implemented into the aerosol microphysical scheme MATRIX (Multiconfiguration Aerosol TRacker of mIXing state), which resolves mass and number aerosol concentrations and in multiple mixing-state classes. The new scheme, MATRIX-VBS, has the potential to significantly advance the representation of organic aerosols in Earth system models by improving upon the conventional representation as non-volatile particulate organic matter, often also with an assumed fixed size distribution. We present results from idealized cases representing Beijing, Mexico City, a Finnish forest, and a southeastern US forest, and investigate the evolution of mass concentrations and volatility distributions for organic species across the gas and particle phases, as well as assessing their mixing state among aerosol populations. Emitted semi-volatile primary organic aerosols evaporate almost completely in the intermediate-volatility range, while they remain in the particle phase in the low-volatility range. Their volatility distribution at any point in time depends on the applied emission factors, oxidation by OH radicals, and temperature. We also compare against parallel simulations with the original scheme, which represented only the particulate and non-volatile component of the organic aerosol, examining how differently the condensed-phase organic matter is distributed across the mixing states in the model. The results demonstrate the importance of representing organic aerosol as a semi-volatile aerosol, and explicitly calculating the partitioning of organic species between the gas and particulate phases.

  17. Organic Aerosol Volatility Parameterizations and Their Impact on Atmospheric Composition and Climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsigaridis, Konsta; Bauer, Susanne E.

    2015-01-01

    Despite their importance and ubiquity in the atmosphere, organic aerosols are still very poorly parameterized in global models. This can be explained by two reasons: first, a very large number of unconstrained parameters are involved in accurate parameterizations, and second, a detailed description of semi-volatile organics is computationally very expensive. Even organic aerosol properties that are known to play a major role in the atmosphere, namely volatility and aging, are poorly resolved in global models, if at all. Studies with different models and different parameterizations have not been conclusive on whether the additional complexity improves model simulations, but the added diversity of the different host models used adds an unnecessary degree of variability in the evaluation of results that obscures solid conclusions.

  18. Validation of thermodesorption method for analysis of semi-volatile organic compounds adsorbed on wafer surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayeck, Nathalie; Gligorovski, Sasho; Poulet, Irène; Wortham, Henri

    2014-05-01

    To prevent the degradation of the device characteristics it is important to detect the organic contaminants adsorbed on the wafers. In this respect, a reliable qualitative and quantitative analytical method for analysis of semi-volatile organic compounds which can adsorb on wafer surfaces is of paramount importance. Here, we present a new analytical method based on Wafer Outgassing System (WOS) coupled to Automated Thermal Desorber-Gas chromatography-Mass spectrometry (ATD-GC-MS) to identify and quantify volatile and semi-volatile organic compounds from 6", 8" and 12" wafers. WOS technique allows the desorption of organic compounds from one side of the wafers. This method was tested on three important airborne contaminants in cleanroom i.e. tris-(2-chloroethyl) phosphate (TCEP), tris-(2-chloroisopropyl) phosphate (TCPP) and diethyl phthalate (DEP). In addition, we validated this method for the analysis and quantification of DEP, TCEP and TCPP and we estimated the backside organic contamination which may contribute to the front side of the contaminated wafers. We are demonstrating that WOS/ATD-GC-MS is a suitable and highly efficient technique for desorption and quantitative analysis of organophosphorous compounds and phthalate ester which could be found on the wafer surface. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Measurements of chlorinated volatile organic compounds emitted from office printers and photocopiers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalska, Joanna; Szewczyńska, Małgorzata; Pośniak, Małgorzata

    2015-04-01

    Office devices can release volatile organic compounds (VOCs) partly generated by toners and inks, as well as particles of paper. The aim of the presented study is to identify indoor emissions of volatile halogenated organic compounds into the office workspace environment. Mixtures of organic pollutants emitted by seven office devices, i.e. printers and copiers, were analyzed by taking samples in laboratory conditions during the operation of these appliances. Tests of volatile organic compound emissions from selected office devices were conducted in a simulated environment (test chamber). Samples of VOCs were collected using three-layered thermal desorption tubes. Separation and identification of organic pollutant emissions were made using thermal desorption combined with gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry. Test chamber studies indicated that operation of the office printer and copier would contribute to the significant concentration level of VOCs in typical office indoor air. Among the determined volatile halogenated compounds, only chlorinated organic compounds were identified, inter alia: trichloroethylene - carcinogenic - and tetrachloroethylene - possibly carcinogenic to human. The results show that daily exposure of an office worker to chemical factors released by the tested printing and copying units can be variable in terms of concentrations of VOCs. The highest emissions in the test chamber during printing were measured for ethylbenzene up to 41.3 μg m(-3), xylenes up to 40.5 μg m(-3) and in case of halogenated compounds the highest concentration for chlorobenzene was 6.48 μg m(-3). The study included the comparison of chamber concentrations and unit-specific emission rates of selected VOCs and the identified halogenated compounds. The highest amount of total VOCs was emitted while copying with device D and was rated above 1235 μg m(-3) and 8400 μg unit(-1) h(-1) on average.

  20. A Monte-Carlo Analysis of Organic Aerosol Volatility with Aerosol Microphysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, C. Y.; Tsigaridis, K.; Bauer, S. E.

    2016-12-01

    A newly developed box model scheme, MATRIX-VBS, includes the volatility-basis set (VBS) framework in an aerosol microphysical scheme MATRIX (Multiconfiguration Aerosol TRacker of mIXing state), which resolves aerosol mass and number concentrations and aerosol mixing state. The new scheme advanced the representation of organic aerosols in Earth system models by improving the traditional and simplistic treatment of organic aerosols as non-volatile and with a fixed size distribution. Further development includes adding the condensation of organics on coarse mode aerosols - dust and sea salt, thus making all organics in the system semi-volatile. To test and simplify the model, a Monte-Carlo analysis is performed to pin point which processes affect organics the most under which chemical and meteorological conditions. Since the model's parameterizations have the ability to capture a very wide range of conditions, from very clean to very polluted and for a wide range of meteorological conditions, all possible scenarios on Earth across the whole parameter space, including temperature, location, emissions and oxidant levels, are examined. The Monte-Carlo simulations provide quantitative information on the sensitivity of the newly developed model and help us understand how organics are affecting the size distribution, mixing state and volatility distribution at varying levels of meteorological conditions and pollution levels. In addition, these simulations give information on which parameters play a critical role in the aerosol distribution and evolution in the atmosphere and which do not, that will facilitate the simplification of the box model, an important step in its implementation in the global model.

  1. Model studies of volatile diesel exhaust particle formation: organic vapours involved in nucleation and growth?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirjola, L.; Karl, M.; Rönkkö, T.; Arnold, F.

    2015-02-01

    High concentration of volatile nucleation mode particles (NUP) formed in the atmosphere during exhaust cools and dilutes have hazardous health effects and impair visibility in urban areas. Nucleation mechanisms in diesel exhaust are only poorly understood. We performed model studies using two sectional aerosol dynamics process models AEROFOR and MAFOR on the formation of particles in the exhaust of a diesel engine, equipped with an oxidative after-treatment system and running with low fuel sulphur content (FSC), under laboratory sampling conditions where the dilution system mimics real-world conditions. Different nucleation mechanisms were tested; based on the measured gaseous sulphuric acid (GSA) and non-volatile core and soot particle number concentrations of the raw exhaust, the model simulations showed that the best agreement between model predictions and measurements in terms of particle number size distribution was obtained by barrierless heteromolecular homogeneous nucleation between GSA and semi-volatile organic vapour (for example adipic acid) combined with the homogeneous nucleation of GSA alone. Major growth of the particles was predicted to occur by the same organic vapour at concentrations of (1-2) ×1012cm-3. The pre-existing core and soot mode concentrations had opposite trend on the NUP formation, and maximum NUP formation was predicted if a diesel particle filter (DPF) was used. On the other hand, NUP formation was ceased if the GSA concentration was less than 1010cm-3 which suggests, based on the measurements, the usage of biofuel to prevent volatile particles in diesel exhaust.

  2. Analysis of Organic Volatile Flavor Compounds in Fermented Stinky Tofu Using SPME with Different Fiber Coatings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Guan

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The organic volatile flavor compounds in fermented stinky tofu (FST were studied using SPME-GC/MS. A total of 39 volatile compounds were identified, including nine esters, seven alcohols, five alkenes, four sulfides, three heterocycles, three carboxylic acids, three ketones, two aldehydes, one phenol, one amine and one ether. These compounds were determined by MS, and conformed by comparison of the retention times of the separated constituents with those of authentic samples and by comparison of retention indexes (RIs of separated constituents with the RIs reported in the literature. The predominant volatile compound in FST was indole, followed by dimethyl trisulfide, phenol, dimethyl disulfide and dimethyl tetrasulfide. In order to find a better extraction time, the extraction times was optimized for each type of SPME fiber; the results show that the best extraction time for Carboxen/PDMS is 60 min, for PDMS/DVB 30 min, for DVB/CAR/PDMS 60 min and for PDMS 75 min. Of the four fibers used in this work, Carboxen/PDMS is found to be the most suitable to extract the organic volatile flavor compounds in fermented stinky tofu.

  3. Detection of semi-volatile organic compounds in permeable ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abstract The Edison Environmental Center (EEC) has a research and demonstration permeable parking lot comprised of three different permeable systems: permeable asphalt, porous concrete and interlocking concrete permeable pavers. Water quality and quantity analysis has been ongoing since January, 2010. This paper describes a subset of the water quality analysis, analysis of semivolatile organic compounds (SVOCs) to determine if hydrocarbons were in water infiltrated through the permeable surfaces. SVOCs were analyzed in samples collected from 11 dates over a 3 year period, from 2/8/2010 to 4/1/2013.Results are broadly divided into three categories: 42 chemicals were never detected; 12 chemicals (11 chemical test) were detected at a rate of less than 10% or less; and 22 chemicals were detected at a frequency of 10% or greater (ranging from 10% to 66.5% detections). Fundamental and exploratory statistical analyses were performed on these latter analyses results by grouping results by surface type. The statistical analyses were limited due to low frequency of detections and dilutions of samples which impacted detection limits. The infiltrate data through three permeable surfaces were analyzed as non-parametric data by the Kaplan-Meier estimation method for fundamental statistics; there were some statistically observable difference in concentration between pavement types when using Tarone-Ware Comparison Hypothesis Test. Additionally Spearman Rank order non-parame

  4. Sensitivity Enhancement of Metal-Oxide Chemical Sensors for Volatile Organic Compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, John F.

    Metal-oxide chemical sensor technology has been praised as a cheap and efficient method of detecting both reducing and oxidizing gases depending on the metal-oxide's carrier type. The research conducted in this thesis explored methods of enhancing the sensitivity of an n-type metal-oxide material (indium tin oxide, ITO) to a volatile organic compound (VOC) through changes in both device and testing characteristics. Two methods of testing prototype sensors were developed which consisted of short and long-term exposure to ethanol at different temperatures and concentrations. Maximum sensitivity at 2000 ppm was achieved in devices with thin, annealed metal-oxide layers with a high temperature of operation; this sensitivity measurement was achieved using a prolonged exposure test with 100-nm of annealed ITO at an operating temperature of 360°C and yielded a sensitivity of 32.5%. A fabrication process consisting of two lift-off processes for the metal-oxide and contact metal was developed to create the prototype devices. Preliminary characterization on the metal-oxide materials confirmed its thickness, crystallinity / crystal structure, and grain size. In addition to the electrical tests, a future work chemical sensor was thermally and electrically simulated using SolidWorks and Silvaco Atlas, respectively; a proposed fabrication process of the device is also presented, along with a basic outline of future work experiments to further study sensitivity enhancements through other metal-oxide materials, noble catalytic metals, device architecture, and signal processing of proposed electrical testing.

  5. Impact of biogas digesters on cookhouse volatile organic compound exposure for rural Kenyan farmwomen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dohoo, Carolyn; Read Guernsey, Judith; Gibson, Mark D; VanLeeuwen, John

    2015-01-01

    Women living on rural Kenyan smallholder dairy farms burn wood as biofuel in family cookhouses. Unventilated biofuel combustion produces harmful levels of respirable particles and volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions in indoor environments. Biogas digesters, which can generate high methane-content biogas from livestock manure composting were recently installed on 31 farms. The study objectives were to compare VOC exposure profiles for women cooking on farms with and without biogas digesters, and to compare seasonal variations in VOC exposures for those women cooking with biogas. Participants (n=31 biogas farms, n=31 referent farms) wore passive thermal desorption VOC sampling tubes and recorded cookhouse fuel use on time activity sheets for 7 days. Women using biogas spent significantly less time (mean=509 min/week) exposed to cookhouse wood smoke compared with the referent group (mean=1122 min/week) (Pbiogas cookhouses were significantly lower than in referent cookhouses, even after Bonferroni correction. The composition of VOC species was also significantly different, reflecting the different fuel sources. Biogas digester technologies have great potential for reducing exposure to wood smoke VOCs in low-income countries.

  6. Cold temperature and biodiesel fuel effects on speciated emissions of volatile organic compounds from diesel trucks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Ingrid J; Hays, Michael D; Snow, Richard; Faircloth, James; George, Barbara J; Long, Thomas; Baldauf, Richard W

    2014-12-16

    Speciated volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were measured in diesel exhaust from three heavy-duty trucks equipped with modern aftertreatment technologies. Emissions testing was conducted on a chassis dynamometer at two ambient temperatures (-7 and 22 °C) operating on two fuels (ultra low sulfur diesel and 20% soy biodiesel blend) over three driving cycles: cold start, warm start and heavy-duty urban dynamometer driving cycle. VOCs were measured separately for each drive cycle. Carbonyls such as formaldehyde and acetaldehyde dominated VOC emissions, making up ∼ 72% of the sum of the speciated VOC emissions (∑VOCs) overall. Biodiesel use led to minor reductions in aromatics and variable changes in carbonyls. Cold temperature and cold start conditions caused dramatic enhancements in VOC emissions, mostly carbonyls, compared to the warmer temperature and other drive cycles, respectively. Different 2007+ aftertreatment technologies involving catalyst regeneration led to significant modifications of VOC emissions that were compound-specific and highly dependent on test conditions. A comparison of this work with emission rates from different diesel engines under various test conditions showed that these newer technologies resulted in lower emission rates of aromatic compounds. However, emissions of other toxic partial combustion products such as carbonyls were not reduced in the modern diesel vehicles tested.

  7. Can ornamental potted plants remove volatile organic compounds from indoor air? A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dela Cruz, Majbrit; Christensen, Jan H; Thomsen, Jane Dyrhauge; Müller, Renate

    2014-12-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are found in indoor air, and many of these can affect human health (e.g. formaldehyde and benzene are carcinogenic). Plants affect the levels of VOCs in indoor environments, thus they represent a potential green solution for improving indoor air quality that at the same time can improve human health. This article reviews scientific studies of plants' ability to remove VOCs from indoor air. The focus of the review is on pathways of VOC removal by the plants and factors affecting the efficiency and rate of VOC removal by plants. Laboratory based studies indicate that plant induced removal of VOCs is a combination of direct (e.g. absorption) and indirect (e.g. biotransformation by microorganisms) mechanisms. They also demonstrate that plants' rate of reducing the level of VOCs is influenced by a number of factors such as plant species, light intensity and VOC concentration. For instance, an increase in light intensity has in some studies been shown to lead to an increase in removal of a pollutant. Studies conducted in real-life settings such as offices and homes are few and show mixed results.

  8. Modelling the volatile and organic content of Enceladus' ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sotin, Christophe; Lunine, Jonathan

    2015-04-01

    A variety of Cassini data on Enceladus suggest that the jets of material spraying out of the south polar region of this Saturnian moon are connected to a regional or global ocean below an icy crust -- an ocean in contact with a rocky core [1, 2, 3]. In this study we construct models of the mineralogical and elemental composition of Enceladus' rocky core so as to predict the abundance of species that may provide more detail on the extent of hydrothermal evolution of the ocean and its interaction with the rocky core. Using equations of state of the relevant material, the models are made consistent with the values of the gravity coefficients [1]. We investigate the amount of organic molecules (amino acids and fatty acids) as well as the amount of 40Ar that could be present in Enceladus' deep ocean and, therefore, in the icy grains expelled into space. Some models show that the conditions in Enceladus rocky core can be very similar to those existing in the Earth's oceanic crust, suggesting that all of Enceladus rocky core would have been leached over the age of the solar system. The amount of 40Ar dissolved in the ocean provides constraints on the amount of K in the building blocks of Enceladus, the amount of leaching of the silicate fraction, and the extent of the ocean. Based on chondritic abundances for K, we have calculated that the total potential of 40Ar is about 5.6x1012 kg. We also investigate the amount of organic material that would have been concentrated in the ocean. The Murchison meteorite contains about 60 ppm of amino acids, mainly glycine [4]. Assuming that all the rocky core has been leached by water, the modelled concentration of amino acids exceeds 150 ppm. Carboxylic acids were detected in the Asuka carbonaceous chondrites in Antarctica with values, for example, of 90 nmol/g of benzoic acid. Assuming this value, about 35 ppm of benzoic acid would be present in Enceladus' ocean. The concentrations are larger if the ocean is not global, but rather

  9. Extinction of fish-shaped marine reptiles associated with reduced evolutionary rates and global environmental volatility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Valentin; Bardet, Nathalie; Benson, Roger B J; Arkhangelsky, Maxim S; Friedman, Matt

    2016-03-08

    Despite their profound adaptations to the aquatic realm and their apparent success throughout the Triassic and the Jurassic, ichthyosaurs became extinct roughly 30 million years before the end-Cretaceous mass extinction. Current hypotheses for this early demise involve relatively minor biotic events, but are at odds with recent understanding of the ichthyosaur fossil record. Here, we show that ichthyosaurs maintained high but diminishing richness and disparity throughout the Early Cretaceous. The last ichthyosaurs are characterized by reduced rates of origination and phenotypic evolution and their elevated extinction rates correlate with increased environmental volatility. In addition, we find that ichthyosaurs suffered from a profound Early Cenomanian extinction that reduced their ecological diversity, likely contributing to their final extinction at the end of the Cenomanian. Our results support a growing body of evidence revealing that global environmental change resulted in a major, temporally staggered turnover event that profoundly reorganized marine ecosystems during the Cenomanian.

  10. A microfluidic device for open loop stripping of volatile organic compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cvetković, Benjamin Z; Dittrich, Petra S

    2013-03-01

    The detection of volatile organic compounds is of great importance for assessing the quality of water. In this contribution, we describe a miniaturized stripping device that allows fast online detection of organic solvents in water. The core component is a glass microfluidic chip that facilitates the creation of an annular-flowing stream of water and nitrogen gas. Volatile compounds are transferred efficiently from the water into the gas phase along the microfluidic pathway at room temperature within less than 5 s. Before exiting the microchip, the liquid phase is separated from the enriched gas phase by incorporating side capillaries through which the hydrophilic water phase is withdrawn. The gas phase is conveniently collected at the outlet reservoir by tubing. Finally, a semiconductor gas sensor analyzes the concentration of (volatile) organic compounds in the nitrogen gas. The operation and use of the stripping device is demonstrated for the organic solvents THF, 1-propanol, toluene, ethylbenzene, benzaldehyde, and methanol. The mobile, inexpensive, and continuously operating system with liquid flow rates in the low range of microliters per minute can be connected to other detectors or implemented in chemical production line for process control.

  11. Reducing health risk assigned to organic emissions from a chemical weapons incinerator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laman, David M; Weiler, B Douglas; Skeen, Rodney S

    2013-03-01

    Organic emissions from a chemical weapons incinerator have been characterized with an improved set of analytical methods to reduce the human health risk assigned to operations of the facility. A gas chromatography/mass selective detection method with substantially reduced detection limits has been used in conjunction with scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry and Fourier transform infrared microscopy to improve the speciation of semi-volatile and non-volatile organics emitted from the incinerator. The reduced detection limits have allowed a significant reduction in the assumed polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) and aminobiphenyl (ABP) emission rates used as inputs to the human health risk assessment for the incinerator. A mean factor of 17 decrease in assigned human health risk is realized for six common local exposure scenarios as a result of the reduced PAH and ABP detection limits.

  12. Preliminary evaluation of selected in situ remediation technologies for Volatile Organic Compound contamination at Arid sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lenhard, R.J.; Gerber, M.A.; Amonette, J.E.

    1992-10-01

    To support the Volatile Organic Compounds-Arid Site (VOC-Arid) Integrated Demonstration (ID) in its technical, logistical, institutional, and economical testing of emerging environmental management and restoration technologies. Pacific Northwest Laboratory(a) is evaluating several in situ remediation technologies for possible inclusion in the demonstration. The evaluations are made with respect to the initial focus of the VOC-Arid ID: the carbon tetrachloride contamination at the Hanford Site, where it was disposed to the vadose zone along with other volatile and nonvolatile organic wastes. heavy metals, acids. and radionuclides. The purposes of this report are (1) to identify candidate in situ technologies for inclusion in the program, (2) to evaluate the candidate technologies based on their potential applicability to VOC contamination at arid sites and geologic conditions representative of the ID host site (i.e., Hanford Site), and (3) to prioritize those technologies for future US Department of Energy (DOE) support.

  13. Simulating the oxygen content of ambient organic aerosol with the 2D volatility basis set

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. N. Murphy

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available A module predicting the oxidation state of organic aerosol (OA has been developed using the two-dimensional volatility basis set (2D-VBS framework. This model is an extension of the 1D-VBS framework and tracks saturation concentration and oxygen content of organic species during their atmospheric lifetime. The host model, a one-dimensional Lagrangian transport model, is used to simulate air parcels arriving at Finokalia, Greece during the Finokalia Aerosol Measurement Experiment in May 2008 (FAME-08. Extensive observations were collected during this campaign using an aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS and a thermodenuder to determine the chemical composition and volatility, respectively, of the ambient OA. Although there are several uncertain model parameters, the consistently high oxygen content of OA measured during FAME-08 (O:C = 0.8 can help constrain these parameters and elucidate OA formation and aging processes that are necessary for achieving the high degree of oxygenation observed. The base-case model reproduces observed OA mass concentrations (measured mean = 3.1 μg m−3, predicted mean = 3.3 μg m−3 and O:C (predicted O:C = 0.78 accurately. A suite of sensitivity studies explore uncertainties due to (1 the anthropogenic secondary OA (SOA aging rate constant, (2 assumed enthalpies of vaporization, (3 the volatility change and number of oxygen atoms added for each generation of aging, (4 heterogeneous chemistry, (5 the oxidation state of the first generation of compounds formed from SOA precursor oxidation, and (6 biogenic SOA aging. Perturbations in most of these parameters do impact the ability of the model to predict O:C well throughout the simulation period. By comparing measurements of the O:C from FAME-08, several sensitivity cases including a high oxygenation case, a low oxygenation case, and biogenic SOA aging case are found to unreasonably depict OA aging, keeping in mind that this study does not consider

  14. Anodic alumina coating for extraction of volatile organic compounds in human exhaled breath vapor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, GuoJuan; Zou, LiangYuan; Xu, Hui

    2015-01-01

    The objective of the study is to develop a facile and highly sensitive solid phase microextraction-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry method for the analysis of volatile organic compounds in human exhaled breath vapor. For the purpose, a highly ordered nanoporous anodic alumina coating was prepared by a two-step anodic oxidization method based on aluminum substrate. To have a good knowledge of the fiber, some features were characterized and the results indicate that the coating has several advantages, including excellent chemical and thermal stability, high mechanical strength, large surface area and good extraction performance. In addition, some parameters related to extraction efficiency were also studied. Under the optimal conditions, the coating was used to quantitatively extract volatile organic compounds. Good linearity and wide linear range were obtained with correlation coefficients (R(2)) ranging from 0.9933 to 0.9999. The detection limits of benzene homologues, aldehydes and ketones were between 0.7 and 3.4 ng L(-1). Relative standard deviations (n=5) ranged from 1.8 to 15.0%. Satisfied recovery (89-115%) was obtained at two spiked concentration levels. Finally, the developed method was successfully applied for the analysis of volatile organic compounds in human exhaled vapor samples of lung cancer patients and the controls, and the results were statistically analyzed with Independent-Sample T Test. The proposed method exhibits some outstanding merits, including convenience, non-invasion, low cost and sensitivity. It provides a potential tool for rapid detection of volatile organic compounds in human exhaled breath. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Analysis of Volatile Organic Compounds in a Controlled Environment: Ethylene Gas Measurement Studies on Radish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Suk Bin

    2001-01-01

    Volatile organic compound(VOC), ethylene gas, was characterized and quantified by GC/FID. 20-50 ppb levels were detected during the growth stages of radish. SPME could be a good analytical tool for the purpose. Low temperature trapping method using dry ice/diethyl ether and liquid nitrogen bath was recommended for the sampling process for GC/PID and GC/MS analysis.

  16. Understanding Exposures to Volatile and Semivolatile Organic Compounds in Indoor Environments

    OpenAIRE

    Parthasarathy, Srinandini

    2016-01-01

    Humans spend most of their time indoors, in residences and commercial buildings. In this thesis, I evaluate exposures to volatile (VOCs) and semivolatile organic compounds (SVOCs) in indoor environments. I use a combination of literature review and evaluation, mechanistic modeling, and skin-wipe collection and analysis to develop an understanding of the role of indoor air as an exposure medium for inhalation and passive dermal uptake of pollutants. This dissertation explores three related res...

  17. Performance specifications for technology development: Application for characterization of volatile organic compounds in the environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carpenter, S.E.; Doskey, P.V.; Erickson, M.D.; Lindahl, P.C.

    1994-07-01

    This report contains information about technology development for the monitoring and remediation of environmental pollution caused by the release of volatile organic compounds. Topics discussed include: performance specification processes, gas chromatography, mass spectrometer, fiber-optic chemical sensors, infrared spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, piezoelectric sensors and electrochemical sensors. These methods are analyzed for their cost efficiency, accuracy, and the ability to meet the needs of the customer.

  18. Exploratory Research - Using Volatile Organic Compounds to Separate Heterotrophic and Autotrophic Forest Soil Respiration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roberts, Scott D [Mississippi State Univ., Mississippi State, MS (United States)

    2015-02-09

    The initial focus of this project was to develop a method to partition soil respiration into its components (autotrophic, heterotrophic etc.) using the fingerprint of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from soils. We were able to identify 63 different VOCs in our study; however, due to technical difficulties we were unable to take reliable measurements in order to test our hypotheses and develop this method. In the end, we changed the objectives of the project. Our new objectives were to characterize the effects of species and soil moisture regime on the composition of soil organic matter. We utilized the soils from the greenhouse experiment we had established for the soil VOC study and determined the lignin biomarker profiles of each of the treatments. We found that moisture had a significant effect on the carbon content of the soils with the low moisture treatments having higher carbon content than the high moisture treatments. We found that the relative yield of syringyl phenols (SP), ligin (Lig), and substituted fatty acids (SFA) were elevated in deciduous planted pots and reduced in conifer planted pots relative to plant-free treatments. Our results suggest nuttall oak preserved lignin and SFA, while loblolly pine lost lignin and SFA similarly to the plant free treatments. Since we did not find that the carbon concentrations of the soils were different between the species, nuttall oak probably replaced more native soil carbon than loblolly pine. This suggests that relative to loblolly pine, nuttall oak is a priming species. Since priming may impact soil carbon pools more than temperature or moisture, determining which species are priming species may facilitate an understanding of the interaction that land use and climate change may have on soil carbon pools.

  19. Volatile organic compounds of Thai honeys produced from several floral sources by different honey bee species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pattamayutanon, Praetinee; Angeli, Sergio; Thakeow, Prodpran; Abraham, John; Disayathanoowat, Terd; Chantawannakul, Panuwan

    2017-01-01

    The volatile organic compounds (VOCs) of four monofloral and one multifloral of Thai honeys produced by Apis cerana, Apis dorsata and Apis mellifera were analyzed by headspace solid-phase microextraction (HS-SPME) followed by gas chromatography and mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The floral sources were longan, sunflower, coffee, wild flowers (wild) and lychee. Honey originating from longan had more VOCs than all other floral sources. Sunflower honey had the least numbers of VOCs. cis-Linalool oxide, trans-linalool oxide, ho-trienol, and furan-2,5-dicarbaldehyde were present in all the honeys studied, independent of their floral origin. Interestingly, 2-phenylacetaldehyde was detected in all honey sample except longan honey produced by A. cerana. Thirty-two VOCs were identified as possible floral markers. After validating differences in honey volatiles from different floral sources and honeybee species, the results suggest that differences in quality and quantity of honey volatiles are influenced by both floral source and honeybee species. The group of honey volatiles detected from A. cerana was completely different from those of A. mellifera and A. dorsata. VOCs could therefore be applied as chemical markers of honeys and may reflect preferences of shared floral sources amongst different honeybee species.

  20. Biocide effects of volatile organic compounds produced by potential biocontrol rhizobacteria on Sclerotinia sclerotiorum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annalisa eGiorgio

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Six rhizobacteria isolated from common bean and able to protect bean plants from the common bacterial blight causal agent, were in vitro evaluated for their potential antifungal effects toward different plant pathogenic fungi, mostly soil-borne. By dual culture assays, the above bacteria resulted producing diffusible and volatile metabolites which inhibited the growth of the majority of the pathogens under study. In particular, the latter substances highly affected the mycelium growth of Sclerotinia sclerotiorum strains, one of which was selected for further studies either on mycelium or sclerotia.Gas chromatographic analysis of the bacterial volatiles led to the identification of an array of volatile organic compounds (VOCs. Time course studies showed the modification of the VOCs profile along a period of 5 days. In order to evaluate the single detected VOC effects on fungal growth, some of the pure compounds were tested on S. sclerotiorum mycelium and their minimal inhibitory quantities were determined. Similarly, the minimal inhibitory quantities on sclerotia germination were also defined. Moreover, observations by light and transmission electron microscopes highlighted hyphae cytoplasm granulation and ultrastructural alterations at cell organelles, mostly membranes, mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum. The membranes appeared one of the primary targets of bacterial volatiles, as confirmed by haemolytic activity observed for the majority of pure VOCs. However, of interest is the alteration observed on mitochondria as well.

  1. Emission rates of selected volatile organic compounds from skin of healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mochalski, Paweł; King, Julian; Unterkofler, Karl; Hinterhuber, Hartmann; Amann, Anton

    2014-05-15

    Gas chromatography with mass spectrometric detection (GC-MS) coupled with solid phase micro-extraction as pre-concentration method (SPME) was applied to identify and quantify volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emitted by human skin. A total of 64 C4-C10 compounds were quantified in skin emanation of 31 healthy volunteers. Amongst them aldehydes and hydrocarbons were the predominant chemical families with eighteen and seventeen species, respectively. Apart from these, there were eight ketones, six heterocyclic compounds, six terpenes, four esters, two alcohols, two volatile sulphur compounds, and one nitrile. The observed median emission rates ranged from 0.55 to 4,790 fmol cm(-2)min(-1). Within this set of analytes three volatiles; acetone, 6-methyl-5-hepten-2-one, and acetaldehyde exhibited especially high emission rates exceeding 100 fmol cm(-2)min(-1). Thirty-three volatiles were highly present in skin emanation with incidence rates over 80%. These species can be considered as potential markers of human presence, which could be used for early location of entrapped victims during Urban Search and Rescue Operations (USaR). Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Analysis of volatile organic compound from Elaeis guineensis inflorescences planted on different soil types in Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhamad Fahmi, M. H.; Ahmad Bukhary, A. K.; Norma, H.; Idris, A. B.

    2016-11-01

    The main attractant compound for Eleidobius kamerunicus to male spikelet Elaeis guineensis (oil palm) were determined by analyzing volatile organic compound extracted from E. guineenses inflorescences planted on different soil types namely peat soil, clay soil and sandy soil. Anthesizing male oil palm inflorescences were randomly choosen from palm aged between 4-5 years old age. Extraction of the volatiles from the oil palm inflorescences were performed by Accelerated Solvent Extraction method (ASE). The extracted volatile compound were determined by using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Out of ten identified compound, estragole was found to be a major compound in sandy soil (37.49%), clay soil (30.71%) and peat soil (27.79%). Other compound such as 9,12-octadecadieonic acid and n-hexadecanoic acid were found as major compound in peat soil (27.18%) and (7.45%); sandy soil (14.15 %) and (9.31%); and clay soil (30.23%) and (4.99%). This study shows that estragole was the predominant volatile compound detected in oil palm inflorescences with highly concentrated in palm planted in sandy soil type.

  3. Improved exposure estimation in soil screening and cleanup criteria for volatile organic chemicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeVaull, George E

    2017-09-01

    Soil cleanup criteria define acceptable concentrations of organic chemical constituents for exposed humans. These criteria sum the estimated soil exposure over multiple pathways. Assumptions for ingestion, dermal contact, and dust exposure generally presume a chemical persists in surface soils at a constant concentration level for the entire exposure duration. For volatile chemicals, this is an unrealistic assumption. A calculation method is presented for surficial soil criteria that include volatile depletion of chemical for these uptake pathways. The depletion estimates compare favorably with measured concentration profiles and with field measurements of soil concentration. Corresponding volatilization estimates compare favorably with measured data for a wide range of volatile and semivolatile chemicals, including instances with and without the presence of a mixed-chemical residual phase. Selected examples show application of the revised factors in estimating screening levels for benzene in surficial soils. Integr Environ Assess Manag 2017;13:861-869. © 2017 The Authors. Integrated Environmental Assessment and Management published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of Society of Environmental Toxicology & Chemistry (SETAC). © 2017 The Authors. Integrated Environmental Assessment and Management published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of Society of Environmental Toxicology & Chemistry (SETAC).

  4. Air monitoring for volatile organic compounds at the Pilot Plant Complex, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneider, J.F.; O`Neill, H.J.; Raphaelian, L.A.; Tomczyk, N.A.; Sytsma, L.F.; Cohut, V.J.; Cobo, H.A.; O`Reilly, D.P.; Zimmerman, R.E.

    1995-03-01

    The US Army`s Aberdeen Proving Ground has been a test site for a variety of munitions, including chemical warfare agents (CWA). The Pilot Plant Complex (PPC) at Aberdeen was the site of development, manufacture, storage, and disposal of CWA. Deterioration of the buildings and violations of environmental laws led to closure of the complex in 1986. Since that time, all equipment, piping, and conduit in the buildings have been removed. The buildings have been declared free of surface CWA contamination as a result of air sampling using the military system. However, no air sampling has been done to determine if other hazardous volatile organic compounds are present in the PPC, although a wide range of toxic and/or hazardous materials other than CWA was used in the PPC. The assumption has been that the air in the PPC is not hazardous. The purpose of this air-monitoring study was to screen the indoor air in the PPC to confirm the assumption that the air does not contain volatile organic contaminants at levels that would endanger persons in the buildings. A secondary purpose was to identify any potential sources of volatile organic contaminants that need to be monitored in subsequent sampling efforts.

  5. Detection of volatile organic compounds indicative of human presence in the air.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwak, Jae; Geier, Brian A; Fan, Maomian; Gogate, Sanjay A; Rinehardt, Sage A; Watts, Brandy S; Grigsby, Claude C; Ott, Darrin K

    2015-07-01

    Volatile organic compounds were collected and analyzed from a variety of indoor and outdoor air samples to test whether human-derived compounds can be readily detected in the air and if they can be associated with human occupancy or presence. Compounds were captured with thermal desorption tubes and then analyzed by gas chromatography with mass spectrometry. Isoprene, a major volatile organic compound in exhaled breath, was shown to be the best indicator of human presence. Acetone, another major breath-borne compound, was higher in unoccupied or minimally occupied areas than in human-occupied areas, indicating that its majority may be derived from exogenous sources. The association of endogenous skin-derived compounds with human occupancy was not significant. In contrast, numerous compounds that are found in foods and consumer products were detected at elevated levels in the occupied areas. Our results revealed that isoprene and many exogenous volatile organic compounds consumed by humans are emitted at levels sufficient for detection in the air, which may be indicative of human presence. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. [Estimation and forecast of volatile organic compounds emitted from paint uses in China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Wei; Wang, Shu-xiao; Hao, Ji-ming

    2009-10-15

    Based on the current consumptions and forecast consumptions of paints in China, using the volatile organic compounds (VOC) contents of paints calculated as emission factors, an emission inventory model was established to calculate provincial, sector-specific, and species-specific VOC emissions during 2005-2020. The results indicated that the VOC amount emitted from paint use was 1883 kt in 2005, of which aromatics, alcohol compounds, ester compounds, ether compounds and ketone compounds were the main species. The maximum incremental reactivity (MIR,O3/VOC) of VOC emitted in 2005 was about 3.6 g/kg, and the toxic VOC accounted for 31% of the total in weight. The VOC emissions would increase to 5673 kt in 2020 if there were no further control policies and actions taken. Therefore, it is essential to implement the VOC emission control from paint uses as soon as possible. Two control scenarios were developed to evaluate the potential of VOC emission reductions. In 2020, VOC emissions from paint uses might be controlled at 3 519 kt through the improvement of paints quality to the level of that in developed countries in 1990s and installation of waste gas treatment equipments in newly-built factories. VOC emissions could be further reduced to 2243 kt if the quality of decorative paint and wood paint would be improved to the current level of that in developed countries and all factories install waste gas treatment equipments. All these control measures also helpe to reduce the toxicity and atmospheric oxidation reactivity of VOC emissions.

  7. Studying the fate of non-volatile organic compounds in a commercial plasma air purifier

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmid, Stefan [ETH Zürich, Department of Chemistry and Applied Biosciences, CH-8093 Zürich (Switzerland); Seiler, Cornelia; Gerecke, Andreas C. [Swiss Federal Laboratories for Material Science and Technology (EMPA), CH-8600 Dübendorf (Switzerland); Hächler, Herbert [University of Zürich, Institute for Food Safety and Hygiene, National Centre for Enteropathogenic Bacteria and Listeria (NENT), CH-8057 Zürich (Switzerland); Hilbi, Hubert [Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München Max von Pettenkofer-Institut, D-80336 München (Germany); Frey, Joachim [University of Bern, Institute for Veterinary Bacteriology, CH-3001 Bern (Switzerland); Weidmann, Simon; Meier, Lukas; Berchtold, Christian [ETH Zürich, Department of Chemistry and Applied Biosciences, CH-8093 Zürich (Switzerland); Zenobi, Renato, E-mail: zenobi@org.chem.ethz.ch [ETH Zürich, Department of Chemistry and Applied Biosciences, CH-8093 Zürich (Switzerland)

    2013-07-15

    Highlights: • Degradation of environmental toxins, a protein, and bioparticles were studied. • A commercial air purifier based on a cold plasma was used. • Passage through the device reduced the concentration of the compounds/particles. • Deposition inside the plasma air purifier was the main removal process. -- Abstract: Degradation of non-volatile organic compounds–environmental toxins (methyltriclosane and phenanthrene), bovine serum albumin, as well as bioparticles (Legionella pneumophila, Bacillus subtilis, and Bacillus anthracis)–in a commercially available plasma air purifier based on a cold plasma was studied in detail, focusing on its efficiency and on the resulting degradation products. This system is capable of handling air flow velocities of up to 3.0 m s{sup −1} (3200 L min{sup −1}), much higher than other plasma-based reactors described in the literature, which generally are limited to air flow rates below 10 L min{sup −1}. Mass balance studies consistently indicated a reduction in concentration of the compounds/particles after passage through the plasma air purifier, 31% for phenanthrene, 17% for methyltriclosane, and 80% for bovine serum albumin. L. pneumophila did not survive passage through the plasma air purifier, and cell counts of aerosolized spores of B. subtilis and B. anthracis were reduced by 26- and 15-fold, depending on whether it was run at 10 Hz or 50 Hz, respectively. However rather than chemical degradation, deposition on the inner surfaces of the plasma air purifier occured. Our interpretation is that putative “degradation” efficiencies were largely due to electrostatic precipitation rather than to decomposition into smaller molecules.

  8. A Reduced Form Framework for Modeling Volatility of Speculative Prices based on Realized Variation Measures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Torben G.; Bollerslev, Tim; Huang, Xin

    into the continuous sample path variance, the variation arising from discontinuous jumps that occur during the trading day, as well as the overnight return variance. Our empirical results, based on long samples of high-frequency equity and bond futures returns, suggest that the dynamic dependencies in the daily......Building on realized variance and bi-power variation measures constructed from high-frequency financial prices, we propose a simple reduced form framework for effectively incorporating intraday data into the modeling of daily return volatility. We decompose the total daily return variability...... continuous sample path variability is well described by an approximate long-memory HAR-GARCH model, while the overnight returns may be modelled by an augmented GARCH type structure. The dynamic dependencies in the non-parametrically identified significant jumps appear to be well described by the combination...

  9. Development of an In-Fiber Nanocavity Towards Detection of Volatile Organic Gases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco J. Arregui

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available A fiber optic sensor for Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs detection has beendeveloped and characterized for some organic gasses. The sensor is based on a novelvapochromic material, which is able to change its optical properties in presence of organicvapors in a reversely way. A nano Fabry Perot is constructed onto a cleaved ended opticalfiber pigtail by Electrostatic Self Assembly method (ESA, doping this structure with thevapochromic material. Employing a reflection scheme, a change in the intensity modulatedreflected signal at 850 nm have been registered. The response of the sensor has beenevaluated for five different VOCs, and a deeper study has been made for vapors of threedifferent alcohols.

  10. The human volatilome: volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in exhaled breath, skin emanations, urine, feces and saliva.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amann, Anton; Costello, Ben de Lacy; Miekisch, Wolfram; Schubert, Jochen; Buszewski, Bogusław; Pleil, Joachim; Ratcliffe, Norman; Risby, Terence

    2014-09-01

    Breath analysis is a young field of research with its roots in antiquity. Antoine Lavoisier discovered carbon dioxide in exhaled breath during the period 1777-1783, Wilhelm (Vilém) Petters discovered acetone in breath in 1857 and Johannes Müller reported the first quantitative measurements of acetone in 1898. A recent review reported 1765 volatile compounds appearing in exhaled breath, skin emanations, urine, saliva, human breast milk, blood and feces. For a large number of compounds, real-time analysis of exhaled breath or skin emanations has been performed, e.g., during exertion of effort on a stationary bicycle or during sleep. Volatile compounds in exhaled breath, which record historical exposure, are called the 'exposome'. Changes in biogenic volatile organic compound concentrations can be used to mirror metabolic or (patho)physiological processes in the whole body or blood concentrations of drugs (e.g. propofol) in clinical settings-even during artificial ventilation or during surgery. Also compounds released by bacterial strains like Pseudomonas aeruginosa or Streptococcus pneumonia could be very interesting. Methyl methacrylate (CAS 80-62-6), for example, was observed in the headspace of Streptococcus pneumonia in concentrations up to 1420 ppb. Fecal volatiles have been implicated in differentiating certain infectious bowel diseases such as Clostridium difficile, Campylobacter, Salmonella and Cholera. They have also been used to differentiate other non-infectious conditions such as irritable bowel syndrome and inflammatory bowel disease. In addition, alterations in urine volatiles have been used to detect urinary tract infections, bladder, prostate and other cancers. Peroxidation of lipids and other biomolecules by reactive oxygen species produce volatile compounds like ethane and 1-pentane. Noninvasive detection and therapeutic monitoring of oxidative stress would be highly desirable in autoimmunological, neurological, inflammatory diseases and cancer

  11. Removal of volatile organic compounds using amphiphilic cyclodextrin-coated polypropylene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ludmilla Lumholdt

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Polypropylene nonwovens were functionalised using a self-assembled, amphiphilic cyclodextrin coating and the potential for water purification by removal of pollutants was studied. As benzene is one of the problematic compounds in the Water Framework Directive, six volatile organic compounds (benzene and five benzene-based substances were chosen as model compounds. The compounds were tested as a mixture in order to provide a more realistic situation since the wastewater will be a complex mixture containing multiple pollutants. The volatile organic compounds are known to form stable inclusion complexes with cyclodextrins. Six different amphiphilic cyclodextrin derivatives were synthesised in order to elucidate whether or not the uptake abilities of the coating depend on the structure of the derivative. Headspace gas chromatography was used for quantification of the uptake exploiting the volatile nature of benzene and its derivatives. The capacity was shown to increase beyond the expected stoichiometries of guest–host complexes with ratios of up to 16:1.

  12. [Rapid determination of volatile organic compounds in workplace air by protable gas chromatography-mass spectrometer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, H B; Su, C J; Tang, H F; Ruan, Z; Liu, D H; Wang, H; Qian, Y L

    2017-10-20

    Objective: To establish a method for rapid determination of 47 volatile organic compounds in the air of workplace using portable gas chromatography-mass spectrometer(GC-MS). Methods: The mixed standard gas with different concentration levels was made by using the static gas distribution method with the high purity nitrogen as dilution gas. The samples were injected into the GC-MS by a hand-held probe. Retention time and characteristic ion were used for qualitative analysis,and the internal standard method was usd for quantitation. Results: The 47 poisonous substances were separated and determined well. The linear range of this method was 0.2-16.0 mg/m(3),and the relative standard deviation of 45 volatile ovganic compounds was 3.8%-15.8%. The average recovery was 79.3%-119.0%. Conclusion: The method is simple,accurate,sensitive,has good separation effect,short analysis period, can be used for qualitative and quantitative analysis of volatile organic compounds in the workplace, and also supports the rapid identification and detection of occupational hazards.

  13. Analysis of build-up of heavy metals and volatile organics on urban roads in gold coast, Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahbub, Parvez; Goonetilleke, Ashantha; Ayoko, Godwin A; Egodawatta, Prasanna; Yigitcanlar, Tan

    2011-01-01

    Urban water quality can be significantly impaired by the build-up of pollutants such as heavy metals and volatile organics on urban road surfaces due to vehicular traffic. Any control strategy for the mitigation of traffic related build-up of heavy metals and volatile organic pollutants should be based on the knowledge of their build-up processes. In the study discussed in this paper, the outcomes of a detailed experimental investigation into build-up processes of heavy metals and volatile organics are presented. It was found that traffic parameters such as average daily traffic, volume over capacity ratio and surface texture depth had similar strong correlations with the build-up of heavy metals and volatile organics. Multicriteria decision analyses revealed that that the 1-74 microm particulate fraction of total suspended solids (TSS) could be regarded as a surrogate indicator for particulate heavy metals in build-up and this same fraction of total organic carbon could be regarded as a surrogate indicator for particulate volatile organics build-up. In terms of pollutants affinity, TSS was found to be the predominant parameter for particulate heavy metals build-up and total dissolved solids was found to be the predominant parameter for the potential dissolved particulate fraction in heavy metals buildup. It was also found that land use did not play a significant role in the build-up of traffic generated heavy metals and volatile organics.

  14. Analysis of Volatile Organic Compounds in Air Contained in Canisters by Method TO-15, SOP No. HW-31 Revision 6

    Science.gov (United States)

    This document is designed to offer the data reviewer guidance in determining the validity of analytical data from the analysis of Volatile Organic Compounds in air samples taken in canisters and analyzed by method TO-15.

  15. VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS FROM VEGETATION IN SOUTHERN YUNNAN PROVINCE, CHINA: EMISSION RATES AND SOME POTENTIAL REGIONAL IMPLICATIONS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little information is currently available regarding emissions of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) in southern Asia. To address the need for BVOC emission estimates in regional atmospheric chemistry simulations, 95 common plant species were screened for emissions of BVO...

  16. Volatility and hygroscopicity of aging secondary organic aerosol in a smog chamber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Tritscher

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The evolution of secondary organic aerosols (SOA during (photo-chemical aging processes was investigated in a smog chamber. Fresh SOA from ozonolysis of 10 to 40 ppb α-pinene was formed followed by aging with OH radicals. The particles' volatility and hygroscopicity (expressed as volume fraction remaining (VFR and hygroscopicity parameter κ were measured in parallel with a volatility and hygroscopicity tandem differential mobility analyzer (V/H-TDMA. An aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS was used for the chemical characterization of the aerosol. These measurements were used as sensitive parameters to reveal the mechanisms possibly responsible for the changes in the SOA composition during aging. A change of VFR and/or κ during processing of atmospheric aerosols may occur either by addition of SOA mass (by condensation or by a change of SOA composition leading to different aerosol properties. The latter may occur either by heterogeneous reactions on the surface of the SOA particles, by condensed phase reactions like oligomerization or by an evaporation – gas-phase oxidation – recondensation cycle. The condensation mechanism showed to be dominant when there is a substantial change in the aerosol mass by addition of new molecules to the aerosol phase with time. Experiments could be divided into four periods based on the temporal evolution (qualitative changes of VFR, κ and organic mass: O3 induced condensation, ripening, and OH induced chemical aging first with substantial mass gain and then without significant mass gain.

    During the O3 induced condensation the particles' volatility decreased (increasing VFR while the hygroscopicity increased. Thereafter, in the course of ripening volatility continued to decrease, but hygroscopicity stayed roughly constant. After exposing the SOA to OH radicals an OH induced chemical aging with substantial mass gain started resulting in the production of at least 50 % more SOA mass

  17. Volatile organic compounds and Photobacterium phosphoreum associated with spoilage of modified-atmosphere-packaged raw pork

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nieminen, Timo T.; Dalgaard, Paw; Björkroth, Johanna

    2016-01-01

    Accumulation of volatile organic compounds was monitored in association with sensory quality, bacterial concentrations and culture-independent microbial community analyses in raw pork loin and pork collar during storage under high-oxygen modified atmosphere at +4°C. Of the 48 volatile compounds...... detected in the pork samples, the levels of acetoin, diacetyl and 3-methyl-1-butanol had the highest correlations with the sensory scores and bacterial concentrations. These compounds accumulated in all of the four monitored lots of non-sterile pork but not in the sterilized pork during chilled storage...... with high proportion of Photobacterium spp. were associated with accumulation of acetoin, diacetyl and 3-methyl-1-butanol in meat, but these compounds did not explain all the off-odors reported in sensory analyses....

  18. Responses of Lucilia sericata Meigen (Diptera: Calliphoridae) to cadaveric volatile organic compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frederickx, Christine; Dekeirsschieter, Jessica; Verheggen, Francois J; Haubruge, Eric

    2012-03-01

    Flies of the Calliphoridae Family are the most forensically important insects because of their abundance on the decedent during the first minutes following death. Necrophagous insects are attracted at a distance by a decomposing body, through the use of volatile chemical cues. We tested the possible attractive role of some volatile organic chemicals (VOCs) released by decaying cadavers, on male and female of Lucilia sericata Meigen (Diptera: Calliphoridae). Two complementary approaches were used. Electroantennography (EAG) allowed identifying the semiochemicals that are detected by the olfactory system of L. sericata. Dose-response tests with EAG showed that dimethyl disulfide (DMDS) and butan-1-ol elicited the highest responses. Behavioral assays showed that, among the VOCs tested, DMDS and butan-1-ol are attractive for L. sericata, while the other VOCs are repulsive or do not cause any behavior. Our results may have potential implications in a better understanding of attractiveness of blowflies toward a corpse. © 2011 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  19. Study of the influence of temperature the venting depollution process of soils contaminated with volatile organic compounds

    OpenAIRE

    GABRIELA-ALINA BRUSTUREAN; JEAN CARRÉ; DELIA PERJU; TEODOR TODINCA

    2006-01-01

    Venting is one of the most used in situ remediation methods for unsaturated soils contaiminated with volatile organic compounds (VOC). The development of mathematical models and their validation by means of experimental results allowed the identification of the main parameters which influence the soil depollution process. The influence of temperature on the venting depollution process of soils polluted with volatile organic compounds was studied in this investigation. It was found that the de...

  20. Use of manganese oxide and activated carbon fibers for removing a particle, volatile organic compound or ozone from a gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidheswaran, Meera A.; Destaillats, Hugo; Fisk, William J.

    2016-08-30

    The present invention provides for a device for reducing a volatile organic compound (VOC) content of a gas comprising a manganese oxide (MnO.sub.x) catalyst. The manganese oxide (MnO.sub.x) catalyst is capable of catalyzing formaldehyde at room temperature, with complete conversion, to CO.sub.2 and water vapor. The manganese oxide (MnO.sub.x) catalyst itself is not consumed by the reaction of formaldehyde into CO.sub.2 and water vapor. The present invention also provides for a device for reducing or removing a particle, a VOC and/or ozone from a gas comprising an activated carbon filter (ACF) on a media that is capable of being periodically regenerated.

  1. Volatile organic compounds and risk of asthma and allergy: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulugbek B. Nurmatov

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Volatile organic compounds (VOCs are ubiquitous domestic pollutants. Their role in asthma/allergy development and exacerbations is uncertain. This systematic review investigated whether domestic VOC exposure increases the risk of developing and/or exacerbating asthma and allergic disorders. We systematically searched 11 databases and three trial repositories, and contacted an international panel of experts to identify published and unpublished experimental and epidemiological studies. 8455 potentially relevant studies were identified; 852 papers were removed after de-duplication, leaving 7603 unique papers that were screened. Of these, 278 were reviewed in detail and 53 satisfied the inclusion criteria. Critical appraisal of the included studies indicated an overall lack of high-quality evidence and substantial risk of bias in this body of knowledge. Aromatics (i.e. benzenes, toluenes and xylenes and formaldehyde were the main VOC classes studied, both in relation to the development and exacerbations of asthma and allergy. Approximately equal numbers of studies reported that exposure increased risks and that exposure was not associated with any detrimental effects. The available evidence implicating domestic VOC exposure in the risk of developing and/or exacerbating asthma and allergy is of poor quality and inconsistent. Prospective, preferably experimental studies, investigating the impact of reducing/eliminating exposure to VOC, are now needed in order to generate a more definitive evidence base to inform policy and clinical deliberations in relation to the management of the now substantial sections of the population who are either at risk of developing asthma/allergy or living with established disease.

  2. Quantile regression of indoor air concentrations of volatile organic compounds (VOC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlink, Uwe; Thiem, Alexander; Kohajda, Tibor; Richter, Matthias; Strebel, Kathrin

    2010-08-15

    There are many factors determining the concentration of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in indoor air. On the basis of 601 population-based measurements we develop an explicit exposure model that includes factors, such as renovation, furniture, flat size, smoking, and education level of the occupants. As a novel method for the evaluation of concentrations of indoor air pollutants we use quantile regression, which has the advantages of robustness against non-Gaussian distributions (and outliers) and can adjust for unbalanced frequencies of observations. The applied bi- and multivariate quantile regressions provide (1) the VOC burden that is representative for the population of Leipzig, Germany, and (2) an inter-comparison of the effects of the studied factors and their levels. As a result, we find strong evidence for factors of general impact on most VOC components, such as the season, flooring, the type of the room, and the size of the apartment. Other impact factors are very specific to the VOC components. For example, wooden flooring (parquet) and new furniture increase the concentration of terpenes as well as the modifying factors high education and sampling in the child's room. Smokers ventilate their flats in an extent that in general reduces the VOC concentrations, except for benzene (contained in tobacco smoke), which is still higher in smoking than in non-smoking flats. Very often dampness is associated with an increased VOC burden in indoor air. An investigation of mixtures emphasises a high burden of co-occurring terpenes in very small and very large apartments. Copyright 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Decreasing concentrations of volatile organic compounds (VOC) emitted following home renovations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbarth, O; Matysik, S

    2010-04-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOC) play an important role indoors since they have been linked to health symptoms and disorders. Particularly, after renovation activities, high indoor VOC concentrations have been observed. The study will give an indication, for the first time under real conditions, of the to-be-expected time frame for renovation-derived indoor pollution decreases when the exposure to it will reach a reference level. The decrease in the concentrations of investigated 26 VOC after renovations was assessed under real-life situations. Both the daily VOC concentration was measured by active sampling for 30 days in selected homes which had undergone various renovations and, as part of an epidemiologic study, the same VOC were collected monthly using passive samplers in 243 homes. An exponential function was used to interpret the concentration decay. The average time range which has to elapse following renovation activities before a guideline value or reference load is reached showed a time range between 2 and 8 weeks. This waiting time had at least be applicable to public buildings and institutions (especially relevant in case of nurseries, playschools etc.) with increasingly being implemented in private homes as well. Practical Implications After renovation an optimal waiting period had to be up to 60 days before the rooms will be used again. Fourteen days are possible, but increased ventilation is recommended. These had to be applicable at least for public buildings used by risk groups like young children. Renovations had to be carried out in summer season to ensure optimal ventilation to reduce the waiting time.

  4. Effects of volatile organic compounds from Streptomyces albulus NJZJSA2 on growth of two fungal pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yuncheng; Yuan, Jun; E, Yaoyao; Raza, Waseem; Shen, Qirong; Huang, Qiwei

    2015-09-01

    A Streptomyces albulus strain NJZJSA2 was isolated from the forest soil sample of Tzu-chin Mountain (Nanjing China) and identified based on its morphological and physiological properties and 16S rDNA gene sequence analysis. The strain S. albulus NJZJSA2 was evaluated for the production of antifungal volatile organic compounds (VOCs) against two fungal pathogens. Results showed that the VOCs generated by S. albulus NJZJSA2 inhibited mycelial growth of Sclerotinia sclerotiorum (SS) and Fusarium oxysporum (FO) by 100 and 56.3%, respectively. The germination of SS sclerotia and FO conidia was completely inhibited in the presence of VOCs produced by S. albulus NJZJSA2 in vitro. In soil, the VOCs delayed the germination of SS sclerotia and inhibited the germination of FO conidia for 45 days. The strain S. albulus NJZJSA2 was able to produce 13 VOCs based on GC/MS analyses. Among those, six compounds were purchased and used for the antifungal activity assay. Three relatively abundant VOCs, 4-methoxystyrene, 2-pentylfuran, and anisole were proved to have antifungal activity. Microscopy analysis showed that the pathogen hyphae were shriveled and damaged after treatment with 4-methoxystyrene. These results suggest that the S. albulus strain NJZJSA2 produce VOCs that not only reduce the growth of SS and FO, but also significantly inhibit the SS sclerotia and FO conidia. The results are useful for the better understanding of biocontrol mechanisms by S. albulus strains and will help to improve the biological control efficiency of lethal plant diseases. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Low concentration volatile organic pollutants removal in combined adsorber-desorber-catalytic reactor system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arsenijević Zorana

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The removal of volatile organic compounds (VOCs from numerous emission sources is of crucial importance due to more rigorous demands on air quality. Different technologies can be used to treat the VOCs from effluent gases: absorption, physical adsorption, open flame combustion, thermal and catalytic incineration. Their appropriateness for the specific process depends on several factors such as efficiency, energy consumption, secondary pollution, capital investments etc. The distinctive features of the catalytic combustion are high efficiency and selectivity toward be­nign products, low energy consumption and absence of secondary polluti­on. The supported noble catalysts are widely used for catalytic incineration due to their low ignition temperatures and high thermal and chemical stability. In our combined system adsorption and desorption are applied in the spouted bed with draft tube (SBDT unit. The annular zone, loaded with sorbent, was divided in adsorption and desorption section. Draft tube enabled sorbent recirculation between sections. Combustion of desorbed gases to CO2 and water vapor are realized in additive catalytic reactor. This integrated device provided low concentrations VOCs removal with reduced energy consumption. Experiments were conducted on a pilot unit of 220 m3/h nominal capacity. The sorbent was activated carbon, type K81/B - Trayal Corporation, Krusevac. A sphere shaped commercial Pt/Al2O3 catalyst with "egg-shell" macro-distribution was used for the investigation of xylene deep oxidation. Within this paper the investigations of removal of xylene vapors, a typical pollutant in production of liquid pesticides, in combined adsorber/desorber/catalytic reactor system is presented.

  6. Volatile organic compounds enhance allergic airway inflammation in an experimental mouse model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulrike Bönisch

    Full Text Available Epidemiological studies suggest an association between exposure to volatile organic compounds (VOCs and adverse allergic and respiratory symptoms. However, whether VOCs exhibit a causal role as adjuvants in asthma development remains unclear.To investigate the effect of VOC exposure on the development of allergic airway inflammation Balb/c mice were exposed to VOCs emitted by new polyvinylchloride (PVC flooring, sensitized with ovalbumin (OVA and characterized in acute and chronic murine asthma models. Furthermore, prevalent evaporated VOCs were analyzed and mice were exposed to selected single VOCs.Exposure of mice to PVC flooring increased eosinophilic lung inflammation and OVA-specific IgE serum levels compared to un-exposed control mice. The increased inflammation was associated with elevated levels of Th2-cytokines. Long-term exposure to PVC flooring exacerbated chronic airway inflammation. VOCs with the highest concentrations emitted by new PVC flooring were N-methyl-2-pyrrolidone (NMP and 2,2,4-trimethyl-1,3-pentanediol diisobutyrate (TXIB. Exposure to NMP or TXIB also increased the allergic immune response in OVA-sensitized mice. In vitro or in vivo exposure to NMP or TXIB reduced IL-12 production in maturing dendritic cells (DCs and enhanced airway inflammation after adoptive DC transfer into Balb/c mice. At higher concentrations both VOCs induced oxidative stress demonstrated by increased isoprostane and glutathione-S-transferase-pi1 protein levels in the lung of non-sensitized mice. Treatment of PVC flooring-exposed mice with N-acetylcysteine prevented the VOC-induced increase of airway inflammation.Our results demonstrate that exposure to VOCs may increase the allergic immune response by interfering with DC function and by inducing oxidative stress and has therefore to be considerate as risk factor for the development of allergic diseases.

  7. Position for determining gas phase volatile organic compound concentrations in transuranic waste containers. Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Connolly, M.J.; Liekhus, K.J. [Lockheed Idaho Technologies Co., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Djordjevic, S.M.; Loehr, C.A.; Spangler, L.R. [Benchmark Environmental Corp., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1995-08-01

    In the conditional no-migration determination (NMD) for the test phase of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) imposed certain conditions on the US Department of Energy (DOE) regarding gas phase volatile organic compound (VOC) concentrations in the void space of transuranic (TRU) waste containers. Specifically, the EPA required the DOE to ensure that each waste container has no layer of confinement that contains flammable mixtures of gases or mixtures of gases that could become flammable when mixed with air. The EPA also required that sampling of the headspace of waste containers outside inner layers of confinement be representative of the entire void space of the container. The EPA stated that all layers of confinement in a container would have to be sampled until DOE can demonstrate to the EPA that sampling of all layers is either unnecessary or can be safely reduced. A test program was conducted at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) to demonstrate that the gas phase VOC concentration in the void space of each layer of confinement in vented drums can be estimated from measured drum headspace using a theoretical transport model and that sampling of each layer of confinement is unnecessary. This report summarizes the studies performed in the INEL test program and extends them for the purpose of developing a methodology for determining gas phase VOC concentrations in both vented and unvented TRU waste containers. The methodology specifies conditions under which waste drum headspace gases can be said to be representative of drum gases as a whole and describes a method for predicting drum concentrations in situations where the headspace concentration is not representative. The methodology addresses the approach for determining the drum VOC gas content for two purposes: operational period drum handling and operational period no-migration calculations.

  8. Position for determining gas-phase volatile organic compound concentrations in transuranic waste containers. Revision 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Connolly, M.J.; Liekhus, K.J. [Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies Co., Idaho Falls, ID (United States). Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Lab.; Djordjevic, S.M.; Loehr, C.A.; Spangler, L.R. [Benchmark Environmental Corp. (United States)

    1998-06-01

    In the conditional no-migration determination (NMD) for the test phase of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) imposed certain conditions on the US Department of Energy (DOE) regarding gas phase volatile organic compound (VOC) concentrations in the void space of transuranic (TRU) waste containers. Specifically, the EPA required the DOE to ensure that each waste container has no layer of confinement that contains flammable mixtures of gases or mixtures of gases that could become flammable when mixed with air. The EPA also required that sampling of the headspace of waste containers outside inner layers of confinement be representative of the entire void space of the container. The EPA stated that all layers of confinement in a container would have to be sampled until DOE can demonstrate to the EPA that sampling of all layers is either unnecessary or can be safely reduced. A test program was conducted at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) to demonstrate that the gas phase VOC concentration in the void space of each layer of confinement in vented drums can be estimated from measured drum headspace using a theoretical transport model and that sampling of each layer of confinement is unnecessary. This report summarizes the studies performed in the INEEL test program and extends them for the purpose of developing a methodology for determining gas phase VOC concentrations in both vented and unvented TRU waste containers. The methodology specifies conditions under which waste drum headspace gases can be said to be representative of drum gases as a whole and describes a method for predicting drum concentrations in situations where the headspace concentration is not representative. The methodology addresses the approach for determining the drum VOC gas content for two purposes: operational period drum handling and operational period no-migration calculations.

  9. Volatile organic chemical emissions from structural insulated panel (SIP) materials and implications for indoor air quality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hodgson, Alfred T.

    2003-09-01

    The emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from structural insulated panel (SIP) materials were investigated. Specimens of newly produced SIPs and associated panel adhesives were obtained from two relatively large manufacturers. Additionally, specimens of the oriented strand board (OSB) used as the inner and outer sheathing and the extruded polystyrene core for the SIP were obtained from one manufacturer. Using small-scale chambers, emissions of formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, acetic acid and other VOCs from SIPs, OSB and polystyrene were measured over a period of four months and from the adhesives over two months. SIP specimens overlaid by gypsum board panels were also tested over four months. The predominant VOCs emitted by the SIPs included acetic acid, pentanal, hexanal and styrene. The emissions of formaldehyde and acetaldehyde were relatively low. Acetic acid and the aldehydes derived from the OSB, while styrene derived from the polystyrene. One of the SIPs emitted toluene and methyl acetate. The adhesives primarily emitted a mixture of hydrocarbons. The emission rates of most VOCs from the SIP/gypsum board assemblies were approximately the same or higher than their respective emission rates from the unfinished SIPs. Modeling using VOC emission factors obtained for the SIP/gypsum board assemblies demonstrated the potential for SIP materials to degrade indoor air quality in houses. A field study to investigate VOC concentrations and emission rates in SIP houses relative to closely matched conventionally constructed houses is necessary to determine the actual impacts of SIPs. If significant impacts are observed, to it may be desirable to develop control measures to reduce the emissions of VOCs from SIPs, such as the substitution of lower emitting materials or the use of vapor diffusion barriers.

  10. Characterization of non-methane volatile organic compounds at swine facilities in eastern North Carolina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blunden, Jessica; Aneja, Viney P.; Lonneman, William A.

    Samples were collected and analyzed in a field study to characterize C 2-C 12 volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emitted at five swine facilities in Eastern North Carolina between April 2002 and February 2003. Two sites employed conventional lagoon and field spray technologies, while three sites utilized various alternative waste treatment technologies in an effort to substantially reduce gaseous compound emissions, odor, and pathogens from these swine facilities. More than 100 compounds, including various paraffins, olefins, aromatics, ethers, alcohols, aldehydes, ketones, halogenated hydrocarbons, phenols, and sulfides were positively identified and quantified by Gas Chromatographic/Flame Ionization Detection (GC/FID) analysis and confirmed by Gas Chromatographic/Mass Spectrometry (GC/MS). GC/MS analysis of one particularly complex sample collected assisted in providing identification and retention times for 17 sulfur-type VOCs including dimethyl sulfide, dimethyl disulfide, and dimethyl trisulfide as well as many other VOCs. Highest VOC concentration levels measured at each of the facilities were near the hog barn ventilation fans. Total measured VOCs at the hog barns were typically dominated by oxygenated hydrocarbons (HCs), i.e., ethanol, methanol, acetaldehyde, and acetone. These compounds, in addition to other oxygenated VOCs measured at the various sites, generally represented ˜37-73% of net total measured VOCs that were emitted from the hog barns at the various sites. Dimethyl sulfide and dimethyl disulfide, both recognized as malodorous compounds, were determined to have higher concentration levels at the barns than the background at every farm sampled with the exception of one farm during the warm sampling season.

  11. Detection, Composition and Treatment of Volatile Organic Compounds from Waste Treatment Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antoni Sánchez

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Environmental policies at the European and global level support the diversion of wastes from landfills for their treatment in different facilities. Organic waste is mainly treated or valorized through composting, anaerobic digestion or a combination of both treatments. Thus, there are an increasing number of waste treatment plants using this type of biological treatment. During waste handling and biological decomposition steps a number of gaseous compounds are generated or removed from the organic matrix and emitted. Different families of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOC can be found in these emissions. Many of these compounds are also sources of odor nuisance. In fact, odors are the main source of complaints and social impacts of any waste treatment plant. This work presents a summary of the main types of VOC emitted in organic waste treatment facilities and the methods used to detect and quantify these compounds, together with the treatment methods applied to gaseous emissions commonly used in composting and anaerobic digestion facilities.

  12. Detection, composition and treatment of volatile organic compounds from waste treatment plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Font, Xavier; Artola, Adriana; Sánchez, Antoni

    2011-01-01

    Environmental policies at the European and global level support the diversion of wastes from landfills for their treatment in different facilities. Organic waste is mainly treated or valorized through composting, anaerobic digestion or a combination of both treatments. Thus, there are an increasing number of waste treatment plants using this type of biological treatment. During waste handling and biological decomposition steps a number of gaseous compounds are generated or removed from the organic matrix and emitted. Different families of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOC) can be found in these emissions. Many of these compounds are also sources of odor nuisance. In fact, odors are the main source of complaints and social impacts of any waste treatment plant. This work presents a summary of the main types of VOC emitted in organic waste treatment facilities and the methods used to detect and quantify these compounds, together with the treatment methods applied to gaseous emissions commonly used in composting and anaerobic digestion facilities.

  13. (Semi)volatile organic compounds and microbiological entities in snow during OASIS Barrow 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ariya, P.; Kos, G.

    2009-12-01

    Gregor Kos (1), Nafissa Adechina (2), Dwayne Lutchmann (2) , Roya Mortazavi, and Parisa Ariya* (1), (2) (1) McGill University, Department of Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences, 805 Sherbrooke Street West, Montreal, Quebec, H3A 2K6, Canada (2) McGill University, Department of Chemistry, 801 Sherbrooke Street West, Montreal, Quebec, H3A 2K6, Canada an active medium for the deposition of (semi-)volatile (bio)organic compounds. We collected surface snow samples during the OASIS Barrow campaign in March 2009 for analysis of semi-volatile organic compounds using solid phase microextraction and gas chromatography with mass spectrometric detection (SPME-GC/MS). Additioal gab samples were taken for analysis of non-methane hydrocarbons in air. More over, we analyzed for microbial species in air and snow. Identifed organic compounds covered a wide range of functionalities andmolecular weigts, including oxygenated reactive speces such as aldehydes (e.g., hexanal to decanal), alcohols (e.g., hexanol, octanol) and aromatic species (e.g., methyl- and ethylbenzenes). Quantification data for selected aromatic species are presented with concentrations in the upper ng/L range. We will present our preliminary data on microbiological species, and will discuss the potential mplications of the results for organic snow chemistry.

  14. The role of low-volatility organic compounds in initial particle growth in the atmosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tröstl, Jasmin; Chuang, Wayne K; Gordon, Hamish; Heinritzi, Martin; Yan, Chao; Molteni, Ugo; Ahlm, Lars; Frege, Carla; Bianchi, Federico; Wagner, Robert; Simon, Mario; Lehtipalo, Katrianne; Williamson, Christina; Craven, Jill S; Duplissy, Jonathan; Adamov, Alexey; Almeida, Joao; Bernhammer, Anne-Kathrin; Breitenlechner, Martin; Brilke, Sophia; Dias, Antònio; Ehrhart, Sebastian; Flagan, Richard C; Franchin, Alessandro; Fuchs, Claudia; Guida, Roberto; Gysel, Martin; Hansel, Armin; Hoyle, Christopher R; Jokinen, Tuija; Junninen, Heikki; Kangasluoma, Juha; Keskinen, Helmi; Kim, Jaeseok; Krapf, Manuel; Kürten, Andreas; Laaksonen, Ari; Lawler, Michael; Leiminger, Markus; Mathot, Serge; Möhler, Ottmar; Nieminen, Tuomo; Onnela, Antti; Petäjä, Tuukka; Piel, Felix M; Miettinen, Pasi; Rissanen, Matti P; Rondo, Linda; Sarnela, Nina; Schobesberger, Siegfried; Sengupta, Kamalika; Sipilä, Mikko; Smith, James N; Steiner, Gerhard; Tomè, Antònio; Virtanen, Annele; Wagner, Andrea C; Weingartner, Ernest; Wimmer, Daniela; Winkler, Paul M; Ye, Penglin; Carslaw, Kenneth S; Curtius, Joachim; Dommen, Josef; Kirkby, Jasper; Kulmala, Markku; Riipinen, Ilona; Worsnop, Douglas R; Donahue, Neil M; Baltensperger, Urs

    2016-05-26

    About half of present-day cloud condensation nuclei originate from atmospheric nucleation, frequently appearing as a burst of new particles near midday. Atmospheric observations show that the growth rate of new particles often accelerates when the diameter of the particles is between one and ten nanometres. In this critical size range, new particles are most likely to be lost by coagulation with pre-existing particles, thereby failing to form new cloud condensation nuclei that are typically 50 to 100 nanometres across. Sulfuric acid vapour is often involved in nucleation but is too scarce to explain most subsequent growth, leaving organic vapours as the most plausible alternative, at least in the planetary boundary layer. Although recent studies predict that low-volatility organic vapours contribute during initial growth, direct evidence has been lacking. The accelerating growth may result from increased photolytic production of condensable organic species in the afternoon, and the presence of a possible Kelvin (curvature) effect, which inhibits organic vapour condensation on the smallest particles (the nano-Köhler theory), has so far remained ambiguous. Here we present experiments performed in a large chamber under atmospheric conditions that investigate the role of organic vapours in the initial growth of nucleated organic particles in the absence of inorganic acids and bases such as sulfuric acid or ammonia and amines, respectively. Using data from the same set of experiments, it has been shown that organic vapours alone can drive nucleation. We focus on the growth of nucleated particles and find that the organic vapours that drive initial growth have extremely low volatilities (saturation concentration less than 10(-4.5) micrograms per cubic metre). As the particles increase in size and the Kelvin barrier falls, subsequent growth is primarily due to more abundant organic vapours of slightly higher volatility (saturation concentrations of 10(-4.5) to 10

  15. Methodology for the detection of contamination by hydrocarbons and further soil sampling for volatile and semi-volatile organic enrichment in former petrol stations, SE Spain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosa María Rosales Aranda

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The optimal detection and quantification of contamination plumes in soil and groundwater by petroleum organic compounds, gasoline and diesel, is critical for the reclamation of hydrocarbons contaminated soil at petrol stations. Through this study it has been achieved a sampling stage optimization in these scenarios by means of the location of potential contamination areas before sampling with the application of the 2D electrical resistivity tomography method, a geophysical non destructive technique based on resistivity measurements in soils. After the detection of hydrocarbons contaminated areas, boreholes with continuous coring were performed in a petrol station located in Murcia Region (Spain. The drillholes reached depths down to 10 m and soil samples were taken from each meter of the drilling. The optimization in the soil samples handling and storage, for both volatile and semi-volatile organic compounds determinations, was achieved by designing a soil sampler to minimize volatilization losses and in order to avoid the manual contact with the environmental samples during the sampling. The preservation of soil samples was performed according to Europe regulations and US Environmental Protection Agency recommendations into two kinds of glass vials. Moreover, it has been taken into account the determination techniques to quantify the hydrocarbon pollution based on Gas Chromatography with different detectors and headspace technique to reach a liquid-gas equilibrium for volatile analyses.

  16. Screening analysis of volatile organic contaminants in commercial inorganic coagulants used for drinking water treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petri, Michael; Jiang, Jia-Qian; Maier, Matthias

    2009-10-01

    A method for quality screening is suggested to detect volatile impurities in inorganic coagulants that are used for drinking water treatment. Static headspace gas chromatography with mass spectrometry detection (HS-GCMS) is sensitive and selective to detect volatiles in low concentrations. This study has discovered that volatile organic impurities are detectable in ferric and aluminium-based coagulants which are used for drinking water treatment. For ferric chloride, 2-propanol was detected at a level of 17-24 microg ml(-1), acetone at 0.7-1.7 microg ml(-1), 1,1,1-trichloroacetone at 0.02-0.04 microg ml(-1), trichloromethane at 0.01-0.02 microg ml(-1) and toluene at 0.01-0.12 microg ml(-1). For ferric chloride sulfate, acetone was detected at a level of 0.12 microg ml(-1), 1,1,1-trichloroacetone at 0.06-0.08 microg ml(-1), trichloromethane at 0.13-0.23 microg ml(-1), bromodichloromethane at 0.04-0.06 microg ml(-1) and dibromochloromethane at 0.04-0.05 microg ml(-1). For aluminium hydroxide chloride, only trichloromethane was detectable, but below the method detection limits (MDL). Although the concentrations of these impurities in commercial coagulants are low, this observation is important and should have impact on water industries for them to pay attention to the chemicals they are using for drinking water production.

  17. Development and validation of a portable gas phase standard generation and calibration system for volatile organic compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    P. Veres; J. B. Gilman; J. M. Roberts; W. C. Kuster; C. Warneke; I. R. Burling; J. de Gouw

    2010-01-01

    We report on the development of an accurate, portable, dynamic calibration system for volatile organic compounds (VOCs). The Mobile Organic Carbon Calibration System (MOCCS) combines the production of gas-phase VOC standards using permeation or diffusion sources with quantitative total organic carbon (TOC) conversion on a palladium surface to CO2 in the presence of...

  18. Characteristics of volatile organic compounds emission profiles from hot road bitumens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boczkaj, Grzegorz; Przyjazny, Andrzej; Kamiński, Marian

    2014-07-01

    A procedure for the investigation and comparison of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emission profiles to the atmosphere from road bitumens with various degrees of oxidation is proposed. The procedure makes use of headspace analysis and gas chromatography with universal as well as selective detection, including gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The studies revealed that so-called vacuum residue, which is the main component of the charge, contains variable VOC concentrations, from trace to relatively high ones, depending on the extent of thermal cracking in the boiler of the vacuum distillation column. The VOC content in the oxidation product, so-called oxidized paving bitumen, is similarly varied. There are major differences in VOC emission profiles between vacuum residue and oxidized bitumens undergoing thermal cracking. The VOC content in oxidized bitumens, which did not undergo thermal cracking, increases with the degree of oxidation of bitumens. The studies revealed that the total VOC content increases from about 120 ppm for the raw vacuum residue to about 1900 ppm for so-called bitumen 35/50. The amount of volatile sulfur compounds (VSCs) in the volatile fraction of fumes of oxidized bitumens increases with the degree of oxidation of bitumen and constitutes from 0.34% to 3.66% (w/w). The contribution of volatile nitrogen compounds (VNCs) to total VOC content remains constant for the investigated types of bitumens (from 0.16 to 0.28% (w/w) of total VOCs). The results of these studies can also find use during the selection of appropriate bitumen additives to minimize their malodorousness. The obtained data append the existing knowledge on VOC emission from oxidized bitumens. They should be included in reports on the environmental impact of facilities in which hot bitumen binders are used. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Direct Push Groundwater Circulation Wells for Remediation of BTEX and Volatile Organics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borden, R.C.; Cherry, R.S.

    2000-09-30

    Direct push groundwater circulation wells (DP-GCW) are a promising technology for remediation of groundwater contaminated with dissolved hydrocarbons and chlorinated solvents. In these wells, groundwater is withdrawn from the formation at the bottom of the well, aerated and vapor stripped and injected back into the formation at or above the water table. Previous field studies have shown that: (a) GCWs can circulate significant volumes of groundwater; and (b) GCWs can effectively remove volatile compounds and add oxygen. In this work, we describe the development and field-testing of a system of DP-GCWs for remediation of volatile organics such as benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and toluene (BTEX). The GCWs were constructed with No. 20 slotted well screen (2.4 cm ID) and natural sand pack extending from 1.5 to 8.2 m below grade. Air is introduced {approximately}7.5 m below grade via 0.6 cm tubing. Approximately 15% of the vertical length of the air supply tubing is wrapped in tangled mesh polypropylene geonet drainage fabric to provide surface area for biological growth and precipitation of oxidized iron. These materials were selected to allow rapid installation of the GCWs using 3.8 cm direct push Geoprobe{reg_sign} rods, greatly reducing well installation costs. Laboratory testing of these sparged wells and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling showed that these wells, although they used only about 1 L/min of air, could circulate about 1 L/min of water through the surrounding aquifer. This flow was sufficient to capture all of a flowing contaminant if the wells are sufficiently closely together, about 1 meter on center depending on the air flow rate supplied, in a line across the plume. The CFD work showed the details of this ability to capture, and also showed that unforeseen heterogeneities in the aquifer such as a gradient of permeability or a thin impermeable layer (such as a clay layer) did not prevent the system from working largely as intended. The

  20. Direct Push Groundwater Circulation Wells for Remediation of BTEX and Volatile Organics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borden, R. E.; Cherry, Robert Stephen

    2000-09-01

    Direct push groundwater circulation wells (DP-GCW) are a promising technology for remediation of groundwater contaminated with dissolved hydrocarbons and chlorinated solvents. In these wells, groundwater is withdrawn from the formation at the bottom of the well, aerated and vapor stripped and injected back into the formation at or above the water table. Previous field studies have shown that: (a) GCWs can circulate significant volumes of groundwater; and (b) GCWs can effectively remove volatile compounds and add oxygen. In this work, we describe the development and field-testing of a system of DP-GCWs for remediation of volatile organics such as benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and toluene (BTEX). The GCWs were constructed with No. 20 slotted well screen (2.4 cm ID) and natural sand pack extending from 1.5 to 8.2 m below grade. Air is introduced ~7.5 m below grade via 0.6 cm tubing. Approximately 15% of the vertical length of the air supply tubing is wrapped in tangled mesh polypropylene geonet drainage fabric to provide surface area for biological growth and precipitation of oxidized iron. These materials were selected to allow rapid installation of the GCWs using 3.8 cm direct push Geoprobe® rods, greatly reducing well installation costs. Laboratory testing of these sparged wells and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling showed that these wells, although they used only about 1 L/min of air, could circulate about 1 L/min of water through the surrounding aquifer. This flow was sufficient to capture all of a flowing contaminant if the wells are sufficiently closely together, about 1 meter on center depending on the air flow rate supplied, in a line across the plume. The CFD work showed the details of this ability to capture, and also showed that unforeseen heterogeneities in the aquifer such as a gradient of permeability or a thin impermeable layer (such as a clay layer) did not prevent the system from working largely as intended. The system was tested in a

  1. Volatile organic compound emissions from arctic vegetation highly responsive to experimental warming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinnan, Riikka; Kramshøj, Magnus; Lindwall, Frida; Schollert, Michelle; Svendsen, Sarah H.; Valolahti, Hanna

    2017-04-01

    Arctic areas are experiencing amplified climate warming that proceeds twice as fast as the global temperature increase. The increasing temperature is already causing evident alterations, e.g. changes in the vegetation cover as well as thawing of permafrost. Climate warming and the concomitant biotic and abiotic changes are likely to have strong direct and indirect effects on emission of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from arctic vegetation. We used long-term field manipulation experiments in the Subarctic, Low Arctic and High Arctic to assess effects of climate change on VOC emissions from vegetation communities. In these experiments, we applied passive warming with open-top chambers alone and in combination with other experimental treatments in well-replicated experimental designs. Volatile emissions were sampled in situ by drawing air from plant enclosures and custom-built chambers into adsorbent cartridges, which were analyzed by thermal desorption and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry in laboratory. Emission increases by a factor of 2-5 were observed under experimental warming by only a few degrees, and the strong response seems universal for dry, mesic and wet ecosystems. In some cases, these vegetation community level responses were partly due to warming-induced increases in the VOC-emitting plant biomass, changes in species composition and the following increase in the amount of leaf litter (Valolahti et al. 2015). In other cases, the responses appeared before any vegetation changes took place (Lindwall et al. 2016) or even despite a decrease in plant biomass (Kramshøj et al. 2016). VOC emissions from arctic ecosystems seem more responsive to experimental warming than other ecosystem processes. We can thus expect large increases in future VOC emissions from this area due to the direct effects of temperature increase, and due to increasing plant biomass and a longer growing season. References Kramshøj M., Vedel-Petersen I., Schollert M., Rinnan

  2. Off-season biogenic volatile organic compound emissions from heath mesocosms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rinnan, Riikka; Gierth, Diana; Bilde, Merete

    2013-01-01

    Biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) affect both atmospheric processes and ecological interactions. Our primary aim was to differentiate between BVOC emissions from above- and belowground plant parts and heath soil outside the growing season. The second aim was to assess emissions from...... herbivory, mimicked by cutting the plants. Mesocosms from a temperate Deschampsia flexuosa-dominated heath ecosystem and a subarctic mixed heath ecosystem were either left intact, the aboveground vegetation was cut, or all plant parts (including roots) were removed. For 3-5 weeks, BVOC emissions were...

  3. Micro- and Nanostructured Metal Oxide Chemical Sensors for Volatile Organic Compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alim, M. A.; Penn, B. G.; Currie, J. R., Jr.; Batra, A. K.; Aggarwal, M. D.

    2008-01-01

    Aeronautic and space applications warrant the development of chemical sensors which operate in a variety of environments. This technical memorandum incorporates various kinds of chemical sensors and ways to improve their performance. The results of exploratory investigation of the binary composite polycrystalline thick-films such as SnO2-WO3, SnO2-In2O3, SnO2-ZnO for the detection of volatile organic compound (isopropanol) are reported. A short review of the present status of the new types of nanostructured sensors such as nanobelts, nanorods, nanotube, etc. based on metal oxides is presented.

  4. Indoor air quality of public places in Mumbai, India in terms of volatile organic compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Anjali; Devotta, Sukumar

    2007-10-01

    Indoor air quality at nine locations viz. food courts, restaurant, bar, conference room, office and theater, which can be classified as public places have been monitored for Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) content. Forty VOCs have been identified and one fourth of these are classified as Hazardous Air Pollutants. Levels of most VOCs are observed to be below the guideline values for public places and offices, as adopted by Hong Kong. Consumer goods are found to be predominant source of chlorinated VOCs in indoor air. Levels of benzene and carbon tetrachlorides were observed to be above the guideline values at all the locations. Effect of ozonisation on Total VOC concentrations have also been studied.

  5. Fecal volatile organic compounds: a novel, cheaper method of diagnosing inflammatory bowel disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Probert, Chris S J; Reade, Sophie; Ahmed, Iftikhar

    2014-09-01

    The investigation of a novel, cheaper method of diagnosing inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is an area of active research. Recently, investigations into the metabolomic profile of IBD patients and animal models of colitis compared to healthy controls has begun to receive considerable attention and correlations between the fecal volatile organic compound (VOC) metabolome and IBD is merging. Patients and clinicians have often reported a change in odor of feces during relapse of IBD. Therefore, this article will focus specifically on the fecal VOC metabolome and its potential role in identifying a novel diagnostic method for IBD.

  6. Extended Research on Detection of Deception Using Volatile Organic Compound (VOC) Emissions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Center for Human Reliability Studies

    2006-06-01

    A system that captures and analyzes volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions from skin surfaces may offer a viable alternative method to the polygraph instrument currently in use for detecting deception in U.S. government settings. Like the involuntary autonomic central nervous system response data gathered during polygraph testing, VOC emissions from the skin may provide data that can be used to detect stress caused by deception. Detecting VOCs, then, may present a noninvasive, non-intrusive method for observing, recording, and quantifying evidence of stress or emotional change.

  7. Fiber-optic multi-sensor array for detection of low concentration volatile organic compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Md Rajibur Rahaman; Kang, Byoung-Ho; Lee, Sang-Won; Kim, Su-Hwan; Yeom, Se-Hyuk; Lee, Seung-Ha; Kang, Shin-Won

    2013-08-26

    In this paper, we proposed a new type high sensitive volatile organic compounds (VOCs) gas sensor array that is based on the pulse width modulation technique. Four different types of solvatochromic dyes and two different types of polymers, were used to make the five different types of sensing membranes. These were deposited on the five side-polished optical fibers by a spin coater to make the five different sensing elements of the array. In order to ascertain the effectiveness of the sensors, five VOC gases were tested. Finally, principal component analysis (PCA) has been used to discriminates different types of VOCs.

  8. Strong Fluorescent Smart Organogel as a Dual Sensing Material for Volatile Acid and Organic Amine Vapors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Pengchong; Yao, Boqi; Wang, Panpan; Gong, Peng; Zhang, Zhenqi; Lu, Ran

    2015-11-23

    An L-phenylalanine derivative (C12PhBPCP) consisting of a strong emission fluorophore with benzoxazole and cyano groups is designed and synthesized to realize dual responses to volatile acid and organic amine vapors. The photophysical properties and self-assembly of the said derivative in the gel phase are also studied. C12PhBPCP can gelate organic solvents and self-assemble into 1 D nanofibers in the gels. UV/Vis absorption spectral results show H-aggregate formation during gelation, which indicates strong exciton coupling between fluorophores. Both wet gel and xerogel emit strong green fluorescence because the cyano group suppresses fluorescence quenching in the self-assemblies. Moreover, the xerogel film with strong green fluorescence can be used as a dual chemosensor for quantitative detection of volatile acid and organic amine vapors with fast response times and low detection limits owing to its large surface area and amplified fluorescence quenching. The detection limits are 796 ppt and 25 ppb for gaseous aniline and trifluoroacetic acid (TFA), respectively. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. A Prototype Sensor for In Situ Sensing of Fine Particulate Matter and Volatile Organic Compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chee-Loon Ng

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Air pollution exposure causes seven million deaths per year, according to the World Health Organization. Possessing knowledge of air quality and sources of air pollution is crucial for managing air pollution and providing early warning so that a swift counteractive response can be carried out. An optical prototype sensor (AtmOptic capable of scattering and absorbance measurements has been developed to target in situ sensing of fine particulate matter (PM2.5 and volatile organic compounds (VOCs. For particulate matter testing, a test chamber was constructed and the emission of PM2.5 from incense burning inside the chamber was measured using the AtmOptic. The weight of PM2.5 particles was collected and measured with a filter to determine their concentration and the sensor signal-to-concentration correlation. The results of the AtmOptic were also compared and found to trend well with the Dylos DC 1100 Pro air quality monitor. The absorbance spectrum of VOCs emitted from various laboratory chemicals and household products as well as a two chemical mixtures were recorded. The quantification was demonstrated, using toluene as an example, by calibrating the AtmOptic with compressed gas standards containing VOCs at different concentrations. The results demonstrated the sensor capabilities in measuring PM2.5 and volatile organic compounds.

  10. CONTRIBUTION OF SEMI-VOLATILE ORGANIC MATERIAL TO AMBIENT PM2.5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delbert J. Eatough; William K. Modey; Rebecca Sizemore; Michael Simpson

    2004-04-01

    Both annual 24-h average and seasonal diurnal samples collected at NETL during the research program have been analyzed. The fine particulate components determined include PM{sub 2.5} mass, ammonium sulfate, ammonium nitrate, elemental and organic carbonaceous material and trace elements. The analysis of the nitrate and organic material includes both the identification of nonvolatile material retained by the particle collection filter and semi-volatile material lost from the particles during sample collection. The results obtained in these analyses indicate that both the semivolatile and nonvolatile organic material in the fine particles sampled at the NETL site originate from mobile emissions in the local area. However, the majority of the nonvolatile material is associated with primary emissions and the majority of the semi-volatile material is secondary, being formed from photochemical processes in the atmosphere. In contrast, the fine particulate sulfate does not originate from the local area but is transported into the study region, mostly from sources in the Ohio River Valley. These observations have been supported by both detailed meteorological and apportionment analysis of the data.

  11. Removal of Indoor Volatile Organic Compounds via Photocatalytic Oxidation: A Short Review and Prospect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Huang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Volatile organic compounds (VOCs are ubiquitous in indoor environments. Inhalation of VOCs can cause irritation, difficulty breathing, and nausea, and damage the central nervous system as well as other organs. Formaldehyde is a particularly important VOC as it is even a carcinogen. Removal of VOCs is thus critical to control indoor air quality (IAQ. Photocatalytic oxidation has demonstrated feasibility to remove toxic VOCs and formaldehyde from indoor environments. The technique is highly-chemical stable, inexpensive, non-toxic, and capable of removing a wide variety of organics under light irradiation. In this paper, we review and summarize the traditional air cleaning methods and current photocatalytic oxidation approaches in both of VOCs and formaldehyde degradation in indoor environments. Influencing factors such as temperature, relative humidity, deactivation and reactivations of the photocatalyst are discussed. Aspects of the application of the photocatalytic technique to improve the IAQ are suggested.

  12. The role of low-volatility organic compounds in initial particle growth in the atmosphere

    CERN Document Server

    Tröstl, Jasmin; Gordon, Hamish; Heinritzi, Martin; Yan, Chao; Molteni, Ugo; Ahlm, Lars; Frege, Carla; Bianchi, Federico; Wagner, Robert; Simon, Mario; Lehtipalo, Katrianne; Williamson, Christina; Craven, Jill S; Duplissy, Jonathan; Adamov, Alexey; Almeida, Joao; Bernhammer, Anne-Kathrin; Breitenlechner, Martin; Brilke, Sophia; Dias, Antònio; Ehrhart, Sebastian; Flagan, Richard C; Franchin, Alessandro; Fuchs, Claudia; Guida, Roberto; Gysel, Martin; Hansel, Armin; Hoyle, Christopher R; Jokinen, Tuija; Junninen, Heikki; Kangasluoma, Juha; Keskinen, Helmi; Kim, Jaeseok; Krapf, Manuel; Kürten, Andreas; Laaksonen, Ari; Lawler, Michael; Leiminger, Markus; Mathot, Serge; Möhler, Ottmar; Nieminen, Tuomo; Onnela, Antti; Petäjä, Tuukka; Piel, Felix M; Miettinen, Pasi; Rissanen, Matti P; Rondo, Linda; Sarnela, Nina; Schobesberger, Siegfried; Sengupta, Kamalika; Sipilä, Mikko; Smith, James; Steiner, Gerhard; Tomè, Antònio; Virtanen, Annele; Wagner, Andrea C; Weingartner, Ernest; Wimmer, Daniela; Winkler, Paul M; Ye, Penglin; Carslaw, Kenneth S; Curtius, Joachim; Dommen, Josef; Kirkby, Jasper; Kulmala, Markku; Riipinen, Ilona; Worsnop, Douglas R; Donahue, Neil M; Baltensperger, Urs

    2016-01-01

    About half of present-day cloud condensation nuclei originate from atmospheric nucleation, frequently appearing as a burst of new particles near midday. Atmospheric observations show that the growth rate of new particles often accelerates when the diameter of the particles is between one and ten nanometres. In this critical size range, new particles are most likely to be lost by coagulation with pre-existing particles, thereby failing to form new cloud condensation nuclei that are typically 50 to 100 nanometres across. Sulfuric acid vapour is often involved in nucleation but is too scarce to explain most subsequent growth, leaving organic vapours as the most plausible alternative, at least in the planetary boundary layer. Although recent studies predict that low-volatility organic vapours contribute during initial growth, direct evidence has been lacking. The accelerating growth may result from increased photolytic production of condensable organic species in the afternoon, and the presence of a possible Kelv...

  13. A process-based emission model of volatile organic compounds from silage sources on farms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonifacio, H. F.; Rotz, C. A.; Hafner, S. D.; Montes, F.; Cohen, M.; Mitloehner, F. M.

    2017-03-01

    Silage on dairy farms can emit large amounts of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), a precursor in the formation of tropospheric ozone. Because of the challenges associated with direct measurements, process-based modeling is another approach for estimating emissions of air pollutants from sources such as those from dairy farms. A process-based model for predicting VOC emissions from silage was developed and incorporated into the Integrated Farm System Model (IFSM, v. 4.3), a whole-farm simulation of crop, dairy, and beef production systems. The performance of the IFSM silage VOC emission model was evaluated using ethanol and methanol emissions measured from conventional silage piles (CSP), silage bags (SB), total mixed rations (TMR), and loose corn silage (LCS) at a commercial dairy farm in central California. With transport coefficients for ethanol refined using experimental data from our previous studies, the model performed well in simulating ethanol emission from CSP, TMR, and LCS; its lower performance for SB could be attributed to possible changes in face conditions of SB after silage removal that are not represented in the current model. For methanol emission, lack of experimental data for refinement likely caused the underprediction for CSP and SB whereas the overprediction observed for TMR can be explained as uncertainty in measurements. Despite these limitations, the model is a valuable tool for comparing silage management options and evaluating their relative effects on the overall performance, economics, and environmental impacts of farm production. As a component of IFSM, the silage VOC emission model was used to simulate a representative dairy farm in central California. The simulation showed most silage VOC emissions were from feed lying in feed lanes and not from the exposed face of silage storages. This suggests that mitigation efforts, particularly in areas prone to ozone non-attainment status, should focus on reducing emissions during feeding. For

  14. Volatile Reduced Sulfur Compounds: Detection and Quantification in a Stratified Freshwater Lake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mylon, S. E.; Hu, H.; Benoit, G.

    2003-12-01

    It is now generally recognized that volatile reduced sulfur compounds (VRSCs), including hydrogen sulfide (H2S), carbon disulfide (CS2), methyl sulfide (MS), dimethyl sulfide (DMS), and dimethyl disulfide (DMDS) are significant constituents for atmospheric sulfur. Therefore, they play an important role in large-scale sulfur cycling. To date these compounds have been thoroughly investigated and quantified in open oceans and coastal marine environments. Additionally the export of VRSCs from marine surface waters to the atmosphere may implicate these compounds in global climate regulation. While current literature focuses on the biogeochemistry of VRSCs in marine systems, a comprehensive understanding of the global biogeochemistry of VRSCs necessitates more rigorous studies in freshwater environments. We will present concentration profiles of VRSCs in Linsley Pond, a stratified freshwater lake in Branford, CT. We developed an extremely sensitive methods for VSRCS measurements that relies on a purge-trap system coupled to gas chromatography with a pulsed flame photometric detector (PFPD). Using this method, we sampled Linsley Pond weekly to bimonthly during the initial stages of stratification in the spring and during mixing in the fall. Influence of the oxidation/reduction potential in the aquatic environment on the distribution of VRSCs over the complete water column and possible sources of VRSCs were also investigated.

  15. Development of a fast GC/MS-system for airborne measurements of Volatile Organic Compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenk, Ann-Kathrin; Wegener, Robert; Hofzumahaus, Andreas; Wahner, Andreas

    2010-05-01

    Volatile Organic Compounds (VOC) determine the radical chemistry of the atmosphere. They can serve both as sources, or sinks for radicals. Mass spectrometry linked to gas chromatography (GC/MS) is a widespread technique in environmental analysis since it can be used to separate and analyze any compound which can be evaporated and pass the analytical column with very high precision and a good sensitivity. The use of special chromatographic phases and long capillary columns enables the quantification of a wide range of compounds with little interference from other sample constituents. An in situ GC/MS consists in principle of three compartments, 1) a preconcentration unit where the sample is extracted from the air, focussed onto a small volume and volatilized, 2) a chromatographic system where the analytes are separated on the analytical column and 3) a mass spectrometer where the compounds are ionized and detected. VOC have to be preconcentrated due to their low concentration level and in order to get enough sensitivity for analysis. The aim of this project was to develop an in situ GC/MS system to analyze volatile Nonmethane Hydrocarbons (NMHC) and Oxygenated Volatile Organic Compounds (OVOC) for the High Altitude and LOng Range Research Aircraft (HALO). In contrast to other analytical instruments a GC/MS works discontinuously. The preconcentration unit is either heated up when the compounds are volatilized or cooled down when substances are adsorbed. The same is true for the GC oven. It is heated up when the compounds are separated or it is cooled down to be ready for the next injection. On a system with a single GC oven, these processes will inevitably lengthen the whole analytical procedure. To speed up the analytical process the GC/MS system described here was equipped with two GC ovens and two adsorption units. While the components are adsorbed in one adsorption unit, in the other unit the components are desorbed and transferred to the GC unit. The second GC

  16. Modelling of organic aerosols over Europe (2002–2007 using a volatility basis set (VBS framework: application of different assumptions regarding the formation of secondary organic aerosol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. E. Yttri

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available A new organic aerosol module has been implemented into the EMEP chemical transport model. Four different volatility basis set (VBS schemes have been tested in long-term simulations for Europe, covering the six years 2002–2007. Different assumptions regarding partitioning of primary organic aerosol and aging of primary semi-volatile and intermediate volatility organic carbon (S/IVOC species and secondary organic aerosol (SOA have been explored. Model results are compared to filter measurements, aerosol mass spectrometry (AMS data and source apportionment studies, as well as to other model studies. The present study indicates that many different sources contribute significantly to organic aerosol in Europe. Biogenic and anthropogenic SOA, residential wood combustion and vegetation fire emissions may all contribute more than 10% each over substantial parts of Europe. This study shows smaller contributions from biogenic SOA to organic aerosol in Europe than earlier work, but relatively greater anthropogenic SOA. Simple VBS based organic aerosol models can give reasonably good results for summer conditions but more observational studies are needed to constrain the VBS parameterisations and to help improve emission inventories. The volatility distribution of primary emissions is one important issue for further work. Emissions of volatile organic compounds from biogenic sources are also highly uncertain and need further validation. We can not reproduce winter levels of organic aerosol in Europe, and there are many indications that the present emission inventories substantially underestimate emissions from residential wood combustion in large parts of Europe.

  17. Model studies of volatile diesel exhaust particle formation: are organic vapours involved in nucleation and growth?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirjola, L.; Karl, M.; Rönkkö, T.; Arnold, F.

    2015-09-01

    A high concentration of volatile nucleation mode particles (NUP) formed in the atmosphere when the exhaust cools and dilutes has hazardous health effects and it impairs the visibility in urban areas. Nucleation mechanisms in diesel exhaust are only poorly understood. We performed model studies using two sectional aerosol dynamics process models AEROFOR and MAFOR on the formation of particles in the exhaust of a diesel engine, equipped with an oxidative after-treatment system and running with low fuel sulfur content (FSC) fuel, under laboratory sampling conditions where the dilution system mimics real-world conditions. Different nucleation mechanisms were tested. Based on the measured gaseous sulfuric acid (GSA) and non-volatile core and soot particle number concentrations of the raw exhaust, the model simulations showed that the best agreement between model predictions and measurements in terms of particle number size distribution was obtained by barrier-free heteromolecular homogeneous nucleation between the GSA and a semi-volatile organic vapour combined with the homogeneous nucleation of GSA alone. Major growth of the particles was predicted to occur due to the similar organic vapour at concentrations of (1-2) × 1012 cm-3. The pre-existing core and soot mode concentrations had an opposite trend on the NUP formation, and the maximum NUP formation was predicted if a diesel particle filter (DPF) was used. On the other hand, the model predicted that the NUP formation ceased if the GSA concentration in the raw exhaust was less than 1010 cm-3, which was the case when biofuel was used.

  18. Microbial communities related to volatile organic compound emission in automobile air conditioning units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diekmann, Nina; Burghartz, Melanie; Remus, Lars; Kaufholz, Anna-Lena; Nawrath, Thorben; Rohde, Manfred; Schulz, Stefan; Roselius, Louisa; Schaper, Jörg; Mamber, Oliver; Jahn, Dieter; Jahn, Martina

    2013-10-01

    During operation of mobile air conditioning (MAC) systems in automobiles, malodours can occur. We studied the microbial communities found on contaminated heat exchanger fins of 45 evaporators from car MAC systems which were operated in seven different regions of the world and identified corresponding volatile organic compounds. Collected biofilms were examined by scanning electron microscopy and fluorescent in situ hybridization. The detected bacteria were loosely attached to the metal surface. Further analyses of the bacteria using PCR-based single-strand conformation polymorphism and sequencing of isolated 16S rRNA gene fragments identified highly divergent microbial communities with multiple members of the Alphaproteobacteriales, Methylobacteria were the prevalent bacteria. In addition, Sphingomonadales, Burkholderiales, Bacillales, Alcanivorax spp. and Stenotrophomonas spp. were found among many others depending on the location the evaporators were operated. Interestingly, typical pathogenic bacteria related to air conditioning systems including Legionella spp. were not found. In order to determine the nature of the chemical compounds produced by the bacteria, the volatile organic compounds were examined by closed loop stripping analysis and identified by combined gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. Sulphur compounds, i.e. di-, tri- and multiple sulphides, acetylthiazole, aromatic compounds and diverse substituted pyrazines were detected. Mathematical clustering of the determined microbial community structures against their origin identified a European/American/Arabic cluster versus two mainly tropical Asian clusters. Interestingly, clustering of the determined volatiles against the origin of the corresponding MAC revealed a highly similar pattern. A close relationship of microbial community structure and resulting malodours to the climate and air quality at the location of MAC operation was concluded.

  19. Volatile Organic Compounds from Native Potato-associated Pseudomonas as Potential Anti-oomycete Agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Vrieze, Mout; Pandey, Piyush; Bucheli, Thomas D.; Varadarajan, Adithi R.; Ahrens, Christian H.; Weisskopf, Laure; Bailly, Aurélien

    2015-01-01

    The plant kingdom represents a prominent biodiversity island for microbes that associate with the below- or aboveground organs of vegetal species. Both the root and the leaf represent interfaces where dynamic biological interactions influence plant life. Beside well-studied communication strategies based on soluble compounds and protein effectors, bacteria were recently shown to interact both with host plants and other microbial species through the emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Focusing on the potato late blight-causing agent Phytophthora infestans, this work addresses the potential role of the bacterial volatilome in suppressing plant diseases. In a previous study, we isolated and identified a large collection of strains with anti-Phytophthora potential from both the phyllosphere and the rhizosphere of potato. Here we report the characterization and quantification of their emissions of biogenic volatiles, comparing 16 Pseudomonas strains differing in (i) origin of isolation (phyllosphere vs. rhizosphere), (ii) in vitro inhibition of P. infestans growth and sporulation behavior, and (iii) protective effects against late blight on potato leaf disks. We systematically tested the pharmacological inhibitory activity of core and strain-specific single compounds against P. infestans mycelial growth and sporangial behavior in order to identify key effective candidate molecules present in the complex natural VOCs blends. We envisage the plant bacterial microbiome as a reservoir for functional VOCs and establish the basis for finding the primary enzymatic toolset that enables the production of active components of the volatile bouquet in plant-associated bacteria. Comprehension of these functional interspecies interactions will open perspectives for the sustainable control of plant diseases in forthcoming agriculture. PMID:26635763

  20. Inhalation risk assessment of exposure to the selected volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emitted from the facilities of a steel plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, Hung L; Lin, Wen H; Lai, Jim S; Wang, Wei C

    2010-09-01

    Concentrations of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were investigated in the workplace air of four processes: sintering, cokemaking, hot forming, and cold forming in an integrated iron and steel plant. In addition, the cancer risk was measured for workers in these 4 processes. Seven VOCs (chloroform, carbon tetrachloride, 1,1,2-trichloroethane, trichloroethylene, tetrachloroethylene, benzene, and ethylbenzene) were selected for cancer risk measurement. Trichloroethylene concentrations are high in the 4 processes, and carbon tetrachloride and tetrachloroethylene concentrations are high in both the cold and hot forming processes. The sequence of the total cancer risk of the 7 species was as follows: cokemaking > sintering > cold forming congruent with hot forming. About 66-93% of the cancer risk of the four processes was caused by trichloroethylene. The cancer risks (3.7 x 10(-3)-30 x 10(-3)) of the average VOC concentrations suggest that improvement of workplace air quality and protection of workers are necessary to reduce cancer risks.

  1. Volatile Organic Compounds Emissions from Luculia pinceana Flower and Its Changes at Different Stages of Flower Development

    OpenAIRE

    Yuying Li; Hong Ma; Youming Wan; Taiqiang Li; Xiuxian Liu; Zhenghai Sun; Zhenghong Li

    2016-01-01

    Luculia plants are famed ornamental plants with sweetly fragrant flowers, of which L. pinceana Hooker, found primarily in Yunnan Province, China, has the widest distribution. Solid phase microextraction-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (SPME-GC-MS) was employed to identify the volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emitted from different flower development stages of L. pinceana for the evaluation of floral volatile polymorphism. Peak areas were normalized as percentages and used to determine t...

  2. Car indoor air pollution by volatile organic compounds and aldehydes in Japan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kouichi Tatsu

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Fifty-five organic substances including volatile organic compounds (VOCs and aldehydes present in indoor air were measured from 24 car cabins in Japan. A screening-level risk assessment was also performed. Acetaldehyde (3.81–36.0 μg/m3, formaldehyde (3.26–26.7 μg/m3, n-tetradecane (below the method quantification limit (organic compounds originated from the car interior materials. Total volatile organic compound (TVOC concentrations in 14 car cabins (58% of all car cabins exceeded the advisable values established by the Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare of Japan (400 μg/m3. The highest TVOC concentration (1136 μg/m3 was found in a new car (only one month since its purchase date. Nevertheless, TVOC concentrations exceeded the advisable value even for cars purchased over 10 years ago. Hazard quotients (HQs for formaldehyde obtained using measured median and highest concentrations in both exposure scenarios for occupational use (residential time in a car cabin was assumed to be 8 h were higher than that expected, a threshold indicative of potential adverse effects. Under the same exposure scenarios, HQ values for all other organic compounds remained below this threshold.

  3. Functional improvement of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to reduce volatile acidity in wine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Zongli; Walkey, Christopher J; Madilao, Lufiani L; Measday, Vivien; Van Vuuren, Hennie J J

    2013-08-01

    Control of volatile acidity (VA) is a major issue for wine quality. In this study, we investigated the production of VA by a deletion mutant of the fermentation stress response gene AAF1 in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Fermentations were carried out in commercial Chardonnay grape must to mimic industrial wine-making conditions. We demonstrated that a wine yeast strain deleted for AAF1 reduced acetic acid levels in wine by up to 39.2% without increasing the acetaldehyde levels, revealing a potential for industrial application. Deletion of the cytosolic aldehyde dehydrogenase gene ALD6 also reduced acetic acid levels dramatically, but increased the acetaldehyde levels by 41.4%, which is not desired by the wine industry. By comparison, ALD4 and the AAF1 paralog RSF2 had no effects on acetic acid production in wine. Deletion of AAF1 was detrimental to the growth of ald6Δ and ald4Δald6Δ mutants, but had no effect on acetic acid production. Overexpression of AAF1 dramatically increased acetic acid levels in wine in an Ald6p-dependent manner, indicating that Aaf1p regulates acetic acid production mainly via Ald6p. Overexpression of AAF1 in an ald4Δald6Δ strain produced significantly more acetic acid in wine than the ald4Δald6Δ mutant, suggesting that Aaf1p may also regulate acetic acid synthesis independently of Ald4p and Ald6p. © 2013 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Measurements of Volatile Organic Compounds in a Newly Built Daycare Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noguchi, Miyuki; Mizukoshi, Atsushi; Yanagisawa, Yukio; Yamasaki, Akihiro

    2016-07-21

    We measured temporal changes in concentrations of total volatile organic compounds (TVOCs) and individual volatile organic compounds in a newly built daycare center. The temporal changes of the TVOC concentrations were monitored with a photo ionization detector (PID), and indoor air was sampled and analyzed by Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry (GC/MS) and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) to determine the concentrations of the constituent VOCs. The measurements were performed just after completion of the building and again 3 months after completion. The TVOC concentration exceeded 1000 µg·m(-3) for all the sampling locations just after completion of building, and decreased almost one tenth after 3 months, to below the guideline values of the TVOC in Japan at 400 µg·m(-3). The concentrations of the target VOCs of which the indoor concentrations are regulated in Japan were below the guideline values for all the cases. The air-exchange rates were determined based on the temporal changes of the TVOC concentrations, and it was found that the countermeasure to increase the air exchange rate successfully decrease the TVOC concentration level in the rooms.

  5. Measurements of Volatile Organic Compounds in a Newly Built Daycare Center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miyuki Noguchi

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available We measured temporal changes in concentrations of total volatile organic compounds (TVOCs and individual volatile organic compounds in a newly built daycare center. The temporal changes of the TVOC concentrations were monitored with a photo ionization detector (PID, and indoor air was sampled and analyzed by Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry (GC/MS and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC to determine the concentrations of the constituent VOCs. The measurements were performed just after completion of the building and again 3 months after completion. The TVOC concentration exceeded 1000 µg·m−3 for all the sampling locations just after completion of building, and decreased almost one tenth after 3 months, to below the guideline values of the TVOC in Japan at 400 µg·m−3. The concentrations of the target VOCs of which the indoor concentrations are regulated in Japan were below the guideline values for all the cases. The air-exchange rates were determined based on the temporal changes of the TVOC concentrations, and it was found that the countermeasure to increase the air exchange rate successfully decrease the TVOC concentration level in the rooms.

  6. Native Fluorescence Detection Methods and Detectors for Naphthalene and/or Other Volatile Organic Compound Vapors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hug, William F. (Inventor); Bhartia, Rohit (Inventor); Reid, Ray D. (Inventor); Lane, Arthur L. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    Naphthalene, benzene, toluene, xylene, and other volatile organic compounds have been identified as serious health hazards. This is especially true for personnel working with JP8 jet fuel and other fuels containing naphthalene as well as other hazardous volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Embodiments of the invention are directed to methods and apparatus for near-real-time in-situ detection and accumulated dose measurement of exposure to naphthalene vapor and other hazardous gaseous VOCs. The methods and apparatus employ excitation of fluorophors native or endogenous to compounds of interest using light sources emitting in the ultraviolet below 300 nm and measurement of native fluorescence emissions in distinct wavebands above the excitation wavelength. The apparatus of some embodiments are cell-phone-sized sensor/dosimeter "badges" to be worn by personnel potentially exposed to naphthalene or other hazardous VOCs. The badge sensor of some embodiments provides both real time detection and data logging of exposure to naphthalene or other VOCs of interest from which both instantaneous and accumulated dose can be determined. The badges employ a new native fluorescence based detection method to identify and differentiate VOCs. The particular focus of some embodiments are the detection and identification of naphthalene while other embodiments are directed to detection and identification of other VOCs like aromatic hydrocarbons such as benzene, toluene, and xylene.

  7. Metal-organic molecular device for non-volatile memory storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radha, B.; Sagade, Abhay A.; Kulkarni, G. U.

    2014-08-01

    Non-volatile memory devices have been of immense research interest for their use in active memory storage in powered off-state of electronic chips. In literature, various molecules and metal compounds have been investigated in this regard. Molecular memory devices are particularly attractive as they offer the ease of storing multiple memory states in a unique way and also represent ubiquitous choice for miniaturized devices. However, molecules are fragile and thus the device breakdown at nominal voltages during repeated cycles hinders their practical applicability. Here, in this report, a synergetic combination of an organic molecule and an inorganic metal, i.e., a metal-organic complex, namely, palladium hexadecylthiolate is investigated for memory device characteristics. Palladium hexadecylthiolate following partial thermolysis is converted to a molecular nanocomposite of Pd(II), Pd(0), and long chain hydrocarbons, which is shown to exhibit non-volatile memory characteristics with exceptional stability and retention. The devices are all solution-processed and the memory action stems from filament formation across the pre-formed cracks in the nanocomposite film.

  8. Adsorptive performance of chromium-containing ordered mesoporous silica on volatile organic compounds (VOCs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianwei Fan

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Volatile organic compounds (VOCs are the primary poisonous emissions into the atmosphere in natural gas exploitation and disposing process. The adsorption method has been widely applied in actual production because of its good features such as low cost, low energy consumption, flexible devices needed, etc. The commonly used adsorbents like activated carbon, silicon molecular sieves and so on are not only susceptible to plugging or spontaneous combustion but difficult to be recycled. In view of this, a new adsorbent (CrSBA15 was made by the co-assembly method to synthesize the ordered mesoporous silica materials with different amounts of chromium to eliminate VOCs. This new adsorbent was characterized by small-angle-X-ray scattering (SAXS, nitrogen adsorption/desorption, scanning electron microscopy (SEM, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM. Its adsorption performance to eliminate VOCs (toluene, benzene, cyclohexane and ethyl acetate used as typical pollutants was also tested systematically. Research results indicate that this new adsorbent of CrSBA-15(30, with the silicon/chromium ration being 30, owns the maximum micropore volume, and shows a higher adsorption performance in eliminating toluene, benzene, cyclohexane and ethyl acetate. Besides, it is cost-effective and much easier to be recycled than the activated carbon. In conclusion, CrSBA-15(30 is a good adsorbent to eliminate VOCs with broad application prospects. Keywords: Mesoporous materials, Silicon dioxide, Synthesis, Adsorption, Volatile organic compounds (VOCs, Recyclability, Energy saving

  9. Ambient volatile organic compound (VOC) concentrations around a petrochemical complex and a petroleum refinery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cetin, Eylem; Odabasi, Mustafa; Seyfioglu, Remzi

    2003-08-01

    Air samples were collected between September 2000 and September 2001 in Izmir, Turkey at three sampling sites located around a petrochemical complex and an oil refinery to measure ambient volatile organic compound (VOC) concentrations. VOC concentrations were 4-20-fold higher than those measured at a suburban site in Izmir, Turkey. Ethylene dichloride, a leaded gasoline additive used in petroleum refining and an intermediate product of the vinyl chloride process in the petrochemical complex, was the most abundant volatile organic compound, followed by ethyl alcohol and acetone. Evaluations based on wind direction clearly indicated that ambient VOC concentrations measured were affected by the refinery and petrochemical complex emissions. VOC concentrations showed seasonal variations at all sampling sites. Concentrations were highest in summer, followed by autumn, probably due to increased evaporation of VOCs from fugitive sources as a result of higher temperatures. VOC concentrations generally increased with temperature and wind speed. Temperature and wind speed together explained 1-60% of the variability in VOC concentrations. The variability in ambient VOC concentrations that could not be explained by temperature and wind speed can be attributed to the effect of other factors (i.e. wind direction, other VOC sources).

  10. Levels and source apportionment of volatile organic compounds in southwestern area of Mexico City

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodolfo Sosa, E. [Centro de Ciencias de la Atmosfera, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Circuito Exterior, Ciudad Universitaria, C.P. 04510, D.F. (Mexico); Humberto Bravo, A. [Centro de Ciencias de la Atmosfera, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Circuito Exterior, Ciudad Universitaria, C.P. 04510, D.F. (Mexico)], E-mail: hbravo@servidor.unam.mx; Violeta Mugica, A. [Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana, Azcapotzalco, D.F. (Mexico); Pablo Sanchez, A. [Centro de Ciencias de la Atmosfera, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Circuito Exterior, Ciudad Universitaria, C.P. 04510, D.F. (Mexico); Emma Bueno, L. [Centro Nacional de Investigacion y Capacitacion Ambiental, Instituto Nacional de Ecologia (Mexico); Krupa, Sagar [Department of Plant Pathology, University of Minnesota, St. Paul, MN 55108 (United States)

    2009-03-15

    Thirteen volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were quantified at three sites in southwestern Mexico City from July 2000 to February 2001. High concentrations of different VOCs were found at a Gasoline refueling station (GS), a Condominium area (CA), and at University Center for Atmospheric Sciences (CAS). The most abundant VOCs at CA and CAS were propane, n-butane, toluene, acetylene and pentane. In comparison, at GS the most abundant were toluene, pentane, propane, n-butane, and acetylene. Benzene, a known carcinogenic compound had average levels of 28, 35 and 250 ppbC at CAS, CA, and GS respectively. The main contributing sources of the measured VOCs at CA and CAS were the handling and management of LP (Liquid Propane) gas, vehicle exhaust, asphalt works, and use of solvents. At GS almost all of the VOCs came from vehicle exhaust and fuel evaporation, although components of LP gas were also present. Based on the overall results possible abatement strategies are discussed. - Volatile organic compounds were quantified in order to perform their source apportionment in southwestern area of Mexico City.

  11. Measurements of Volatile Organic Compounds in a Newly Built Daycare Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noguchi, Miyuki; Mizukoshi, Atsushi; Yanagisawa, Yukio; Yamasaki, Akihiro

    2016-01-01

    We measured temporal changes in concentrations of total volatile organic compounds (TVOCs) and individual volatile organic compounds in a newly built daycare center. The temporal changes of the TVOC concentrations were monitored with a photo ionization detector (PID), and indoor air was sampled and analyzed by Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry (GC/MS) and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) to determine the concentrations of the constituent VOCs. The measurements were performed just after completion of the building and again 3 months after completion. The TVOC concentration exceeded 1000 µg·m−3 for all the sampling locations just after completion of building, and decreased almost one tenth after 3 months, to below the guideline values of the TVOC in Japan at 400 µg·m−3. The concentrations of the target VOCs of which the indoor concentrations are regulated in Japan were below the guideline values for all the cases. The air-exchange rates were determined based on the temporal changes of the TVOC concentrations, and it was found that the countermeasure to increase the air exchange rate successfully decrease the TVOC concentration level in the rooms. PMID:27455290

  12. Research on release rate of volatile organic compounds in typical vessel cabin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZHANG Jinlan

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available [Objectives] Volatile Organic Compounds (VOC should be efficiently controlled in vessel cabins to ensure the crew's health and navigation safety. As an important parameter, research on release rate of VOCs in cabins is required. [Methods] This paper develops a method to investigate this parameter of a ship's cabin based on methods used in other closed indoor environments. A typical vessel cabin is sampled with Tenax TA tubes and analyzed by Automated Thermal Desorption-Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry (ATD-GC/MS. The lumped mode is used and the release rate of Benzene, Toluene, Ethylbenzene and Xylene (BTEX, the typical representatives of VOCs, is obtained both in closed and ventilated conditions. [Results] The results show that the content of xylene and Total Volatile Organic Compounds (TVOC exceed the indoor environment standards in ventilated conditions. The BTEX release rate is similar in both conditions except for the benzene. [Conclusions] This research builds a method to measure the release rate of VOCs, providing references for pollution character evaluation and ventilation and purification system design.

  13. Distribution of Total Volatile Organic Compounds at taxi drivers in Tehran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyyed Mohammad Javad Golhosseini

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Air pollution is currently the most serious environmental health threat worldwide. Volatile Organic Compounds (VOC are considered as the main effective factors in causing air pollution. Vehicles are among the major sources which emit these compounds, so it seems that automobiles’ microenvironment is one of the places where people are exposed to high concentration of VOC. Evaluating the exposure amount of Total Volatile Organic Compounds (TVOC can indeed be used as an indicator to estimate the amount of exposure to every individual VOC. This study was conducted on the concentration of TVOC inside Tehran taxies for a period of one year. For this purpose, a real time instrument equipped with photo-ionization detector (PID was used. Consequently, the highest and the lowest measured TVOC in taxies equaled 3.33 ppm and 0.72 ppm, respectively. In addition, the arithmetic mean of TVOC concentration was 1.77±0.53 ppm inside the examined taxies. In this study, the parameters like measurement time, climate and vehicle conditions were found to have significant effect on the amount of exposure to TVOC.

  14. Airborne fungal volatile organic compounds in rural and urban dwellings: detection of mould contamination in 94 homes determined by visual inspection and airborne fungal volatile organic compounds method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moularat, Stéphane; Hulin, Marion; Robine, Enric; Annesi-Maesano, Isabella; Caillaud, Denis

    2011-05-01

    Moulds can both degrade the materials and structures they colonise and contribute to the appearance of symptoms and diseases in the inhabitants of contaminated dwellings. Only few data have compared the levels of contamination in urban and rural environments and the results are not consistent. The aim of this study was to use a fungal contamination index, based on the detection of specific Microbial Volatile Organic Compounds (MVOC), to determine the exposure to moulds of individuals living in urban and rural dwellings. For this purpose, 94 dwellings (47 in an urban setting in Clermont-Ferrand and 47 in rural areas of the Auvergne region, France) were studied. By demonstrating marked disparities between the proportion of visible contamination (19%) and that of active, visible and/or hidden contamination (59%) and the fact that almost all visible contamination was identified by MVOC, we were able to show that use of the index seemed relevant to confirm the actual presence of fungal contamination in a dwelling. Furthermore, it was possible to demonstrate a relationship between moulds and the presence of water on surfaces (condensation, infiltrations, water damage, etc.). A higher proportion of positive fungal contamination index in rural homes was observed compared to the proportion in urban ones (68% versus 49%; p<0.05). Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Speciation of volatile organic compound emissions for regional air quality modeling of particulate matter and ozone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makar, P. A.; Moran, M. D.; Scholtz, M. T.; Taylor, A.

    2003-01-01

    A new classification scheme for the speciation of organic compound emissions for use in air quality models is described. The scheme uses 81 organic compound classes to preserve both net gas-phase reactivity and particulate matter (PM) formation potential. Chemical structure, vapor pressure, hydroxyl radical (OH) reactivity, freezing point/boiling point, and solubility data were used to create the 81 compound classes. Volatile, semivolatile, and nonvolatile organic compounds are included. The new classification scheme has been used in conjunction with the Canadian Emissions Processing System (CEPS) to process 1990 gas-phase and particle-phase organic compound emissions data for summer and winter conditions for a domain covering much of eastern North America. A simple postprocessing model was used to analyze the speciated organic emissions in terms of both gas-phase reactivity and potential to form organic PM. Previously unresolved compound classes that may have a significant impact on ozone formation include biogenic high-reactivity esters and internal C6-8 alkene-alcohols and anthropogenic ethanol and propanol. Organic radical production associated with anthropogenic organic compound emissions may be 1 or more orders of magnitude more important than biogenic-associated production in northern United States and Canadian cities, and a factor of 3 more important in southern U.S. cities. Previously unresolved organic compound classes such as low vapour pressure PAHs, anthropogenic diacids, dialkyl phthalates, and high carbon number alkanes may have a significant impact on organic particle formation. Primary organic particles (poorly characterized in national emissions databases) dominate total organic particle concentrations, followed by secondary formation and primary gas-particle partitioning. The influence of the assumed initial aerosol water concentration on subsequent thermodynamic calculations suggests that hydrophobic and hydrophilic compounds may form external

  16. The determination of botanical origin of honeys based on enantiomer distribution of chiral volatile organic compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Špánik, Ivan; Pažitná, Alexandra; Šiška, Peter; Szolcsányi, Peter

    2014-09-01

    The enantiomer ratios of chiral volatile organic compounds in rapeseed, chestnut, orange, acacia, sunflower and linden honeys were determined by multi-dimensional gas chromatography using solid phase microextraction (SPME) as a sample pre-treatment procedure. Linalool oxides, linalool and hotrienol were present at the highest concentration levels, while significantly lower amounts of α-terpineol, 4-terpineol and all isomers of lilac aldehydes were found in all studied samples. On the other hand, enantiomer distribution of some chiral organic compounds in honey depends on their botanical origin. The significant differences in enantiomer ratio of linalool were observed for rapeseed honey that allows us to distinguish this type of honey from the other ones. The enantiomer ratios of lilac aldehydes were useful for distinguishing of orange and acacia honey from other studied monofloral honeys. Similarly, different enantiomer ratio of 4-terpineol was found for sunflower honeys. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Analysis of microbial volatile organic compounds produced by wood-decay fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konuma, Rumi; Umezawa, Kiwamu; Mizukoshi, Atsushi; Kawarada, Kensuke; Yoshida, Makoto

    2015-09-01

    Microbial volatile organic compounds (MVOCs) produced by the brown-rot fungus Fomitopsis palustris and white-rot fungus Trametes versicolor grown on wood chip and potato dextrose agar were analyzed by GC-MS. In total, 110 organic compounds were identified as MVOCs. Among them, only 23 were MVOCs commonly observed in both types of fungi, indicating that the fungi have differential MVOC expression profiles. In addition, F. palustris and T. versicolor produced 38 and 22 MVOCs, respectively, which were detected only after cultivation on wood chip. This suggests that the fungi specifically released these MVOCs when degrading the cell-wall structure of the wood. Time course analysis of MVOC emission showed that both types of fungi produced the majority of MVOCs during the active phase of wood degradation. As both fungi produced specific MVOCs in the course of wood degradation indicates the possibility of the application of MVOCs as detection markers for wood-decay fungus existing in woody materials.

  18. Volatile organic compounds and trace metal level in some beers collected from Romanian market

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voica, Cezara; Kovacs, Melinda; Vadan, Marius

    2013-11-01

    Beer is one of the most popular beverages at worldwide level. Through this study fifteen different types of beer collected from Romanian market were analysed in order to evaluate their mineral, trace element as well the their organic content. Importance of such characterization of beer samples is supported by the fact that their chemical composition can affect both taste and stability of beer, as well the consumer health. Minerals and trace elements analysis were performed on ICP-MS while organic compounds analysis was done through GC-MS. Through ICP-MS analysis, elements as Ca, Na, K and Mg were evidenced at mgṡkg-1 order while elements as Cr, Ba, Co, Ni were detected at lower level. After GC-MS analysis the major volatile compounds that were detected belong to alcohols namely ethanol, propanol, isobutanol, isoamyl alcohol and linalool. Selected fatty acids and esters were evidenced also in the studied beer samples.

  19. Microlayer source of oxygenated volatile organic compounds in the summertime marine Arctic boundary layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mungall, Emma L; Abbatt, Jonathan P D; Wentzell, Jeremy J B; Lee, Alex K Y; Thomas, Jennie L; Blais, Marjolaine; Gosselin, Michel; Miller, Lisa A; Papakyriakou, Tim; Willis, Megan D; Liggio, John

    2017-06-13

    Summertime Arctic shipboard observations of oxygenated volatile organic compounds (OVOCs) such as organic acids, key precursors of climatically active secondary organic aerosol (SOA), are consistent with a novel source of OVOCs to the marine boundary layer via chemistry at the sea surface microlayer. Although this source has been studied in a laboratory setting, organic acid emissions from the sea surface microlayer have not previously been observed in ambient marine environments. Correlations between measurements of OVOCs, including high levels of formic acid, in the atmosphere (measured by an online high-resolution time-of-flight mass spectrometer) and dissolved organic matter in the ocean point to a marine source for the measured OVOCs. That this source is photomediated is indicated by correlations between the diurnal cycles of the OVOC measurements and solar radiation. In contrast, the OVOCs do not correlate with levels of isoprene, monoterpenes, or dimethyl sulfide. Results from box model calculations are consistent with heterogeneous chemistry as the source of the measured OVOCs. As sea ice retreats and dissolved organic carbon inputs to the Arctic increase, the impact of this source on the summer Arctic atmosphere is likely to increase. Globally, this source should be assessed in other marine environments to quantify its impact on OVOC and SOA burdens in the atmosphere, and ultimately on climate.

  20. Emissions of volatile organic compounds from hybrid poplar depend on CO2 concentration and genotype

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eller, A. S.; de Gouw, J. A.; Monson, R. K.

    2010-12-01

    Hybrid poplar is a fast-growing tree species that is likely to be an important source of biomass for the production of cellulose-based biofuels and may influence regional atmospheric chemistry through the emission of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). We used proton-transfer reaction mass spectrometry to measure VOC emissions from the leaves of four different hybrid poplar genotypes grown under ambient (400 ppm) and elevated (650 ppm) carbon dioxide concentration (CO2). The purpose of this experiment was to determine whether VOC emissions are different among genotypes and whether these emissions are likely to change as atmospheric CO2 rises. Methanol and isoprene made up over 90% of the VOC emissions and were strongly dependent on leaf age, with young leaves producing primarily methanol and switching to isoprene production as they matured. Monoterpene emissions were small, but tended to be higher in young leaves. Plants grown under elevated CO2 emitted smaller quantities of both methanol and isoprene, but the magnitude of the effect was dependent on genotype. Isoprene emission rates from mature leaves dropped from ~35 to ~28 nmol m-2 s-1 when plants were grown under elevated CO2. Emissions from individuals grown under ambient CO2 varied more based on genotype than those grown under elevated CO2, which means that we might expect smaller differences between genotypes in the future. Genotype and CO2 also affected how much carbon (C) individuals allocated to the production of VOCs. The emission rate of C from VOCs was 0.5 - 2% of the rate at which C was assimilated via net photosynthesis. The % C emitted was strongly related to genotype; clones from crosses between Populus deltoides and P. trichocarpa (T x D) allocated a greater % of their C to VOC emissions than clones from crosses of P. deltoids and P. nigra (D x N). Individuals from all four genotypes allocated a smaller % of their C to the emission of VOCs when they were grown under elevated CO2. These results

  1. Characteristics of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from the evaporative emissions of modern passenger cars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Tingting; Yue, Xin; Chai, Fahe; Hu, Jingnan; Lai, Yitu; He, Liqang; Zhu, Rencheng

    2017-02-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from vehicle evaporative emissions contribute substantially to photochemical air pollution. Yet, few studies of the characteristics of VOCs emitted from vehicle evaporative emissions have been published. We investigate the characteristics of 57 VOCs in hot soak, 24 h diurnal and 48 h diurnal emissions by applying the Sealed Housing Evaporative Determination unit (SHED) test to three modern passenger cars (one US Tier 2 and two China IV vehicles) using two different types of gasoline. The characteristics of the VOCs from the hot soak, 24 h diurnal and 48 h diurnal emissions were different due to their different emission mechanisms. In the hot soak emissions, toluene, isopentane/n-pentane, and 2,2,4-trimethylpentane were dominant species. In the 24 h and 48 h diurnal emissions, isopentane and n-pentane were dominant species. Toluene was the third most dominant component in the 24 h diurnal emissions but decreased by a mass of 42%-80% in the 48 h diurnal emissions. In the hot soak, 24 h diurnal and 48 h diurnal emissions, alkanes were generally the dominant hydrocarbons, followed by aromatics and olefins. However, owing to different evaporative emission mechanisms, the weight percentages of the aromatic hydrocarbons decreased and the weight percentages of the alkanes increased from the hot soak test to the 24 h diurnal and 48 h diurnal tests for each vehicle. The dominant contributors to the ozone formation potentials (OFPs) were also different in the hot soak, 24 h diurnal and 48 h diurnal emissions. The OFPs (g O3/g VOC) of the hot soak emissions were higher than those of the 24 h and 48 h diurnal emissions. In addition, the combined effect of decreasing the olefin and aromatic contents of gasoline on vehicle evaporative emissions was investigated. The aromatics all decreased substantially in the hot soak, 24 h and 48 h diurnal emissions, and the total masses of the VOCs and OFPs decreased, with the greatest reduction occurring in

  2. Volatile organic compound fluxes and concentrations in London (ClearfLo)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valach, Amy; Langford, Ben; Nemitz, Eiko; MacKenzie, Rob; Hewitt, Nick

    2014-05-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from anthropogenic sources such as fuel combustion or evaporative emissions can directly and indirectly affect human health. Some VOCs, such as benzene and 1,3- butadiene are carcinogens. These and other VOCs contribute to the formation of ozone (O3) and aerosol particles, which have effects on human health and the radiative balance of the atmosphere. Although in the UK VOC emissions are subject to control under European Commission Directive 2008/50/EC and emission reducing technologies have been implemented, urban air pollution remains a concern. Urban air quality is likely to remain a priority since currently >50% of the global population live in urban areas with trends in urbanization and population migration predicted to increase. The ClearfLo project is a large multi-institutional consortium funded by the UK Natural Environment Research Council (NERC) and provides integrated measurements of meteorology, gas phase and particulate composition of the atmosphere over London. Both long term and IOP measurements were made at street and elevated locations at a range of sites across London and its surroundings during 2011 and 2012. Mixing ratios of a selection of nine VOCs were measured using a high sensitivity proton transfer reaction-mass spectrometer (PTR-MS) at a ground level urban background (North Kensington) and kerbside (Marylebone Road) site during the winter IOP. VOC fluxes were measured by virtually disjunct eddy covariance (vDEC) at an elevated urban site (King's College Strand) in Aug-Dec 2012. Our results for the first IOP showed that most of the selected compound concentrations depended on traffic emissions, although there was a marked difference between the urban background and kerbside sites. We identified some temperature effects on VOC concentrations. We also present the first analyses of VOC flux measurements over London. Preliminary analyses indicate most compounds associated with vehicle emissions closely

  3. Integrated metabolome and transcriptome analysis of Magnolia champaca identifies biosynthetic pathways for floral volatile organic compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhandapani, Savitha; Jin, Jingjing; Sridhar, Vishweshwaran; Sarojam, Rajani; Chua, Nam-Hai; Jang, In-Cheol

    2017-06-14

    Magnolia champaca, commonly known as champak is a well-known tree due to its highly fragrant flowers. Champak floral scent is attributed to a complex mix of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). These aromatic flowers are widely used in flavors and fragrances industry. Despite its commercial importance, the VOC biosynthesis pathways in these flowers are largely unknown. Here, we combine metabolite and RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) analyses of fully opened champak flowers to discover the active VOC biosynthesis pathways as well as floral scent-related genes. Volatile collection by headspace method and analysis by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) identified a total of 43 VOCs from fully opened champak flowers, of which 46.9% were terpenoids, 38.9% were volatile esters and 5.2% belonged to phenylpropanoids/benzenoids. Sequencing and de novo assembly of champak flower transcriptome yielded 47,688 non-redundant unigenes. Transcriptome assembly was validated using standard polymerase chain reaction (PCR) based approach for randomly selected unigenes. The detailed profiles of VOCs led to the discovery of pathways and genes involved in floral scent biosynthesis from RNA-seq data. Analysis of expression levels of many floral-scent biosynthesis-related unigenes in flowers and leaves showed that most of them were expressed higher in flowers than in leaf tissues. Moreover, our metabolite-guided transcriptomics, in vitro and in vivo enzyme assays and transgenic studies identified (R)-linalool synthase that is essential for the production of major VOCs of champak flowers, (R)-linalool and linalool oxides. As our study is the first report on transcriptome analysis of Magnolia champaca, this transcriptome dataset that serves as an important public information for functional genomics will not only facilitate better understanding of ecological functions of champak floral VOCs, but also provide biotechnological targets for sustainable production of champak floral scent.

  4. Phytotoxic and antimicrobial activity of volatile and semi-volatile organic compounds from the endophyte Hypoxylon anthochroum strain Blaci isolated from Bursera lancifolia (Burseraceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulloa-Benítez, Á; Medina-Romero, Y M; Sánchez-Fernández, R E; Lappe-Oliveras, P; Roque-Flores, G; Duarte Lisci, G; Herrera Suárez, T; Macías-Rubalcava, M L

    2016-08-01

    To evaluate the phytotoxic, antifungal and antioomycete activity; and, determine the chemical composition of the volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and semi-volatile metabolites produced by the endophyte Hypoxylon anthochroum strain Blaci isolated from Bursera lancifolia. Based on its macro- and micro-morphological features, the strain Blaci was identified as Nodulisporium sp.; partial analysis of its ITS1-5.8-ITS2 ribosomal gene sequence revealed the identity of the teleomorphic stage of the fungus as H. anthochroum. Phytotoxic and antimicrobial activities of VOCs, and culture medium and mycelium organic extracts from H. anthochroum Blaci were determined by simple and multiple antagonism bioassays, and gas phase and agar dilution bioassays respectively. The volatile and semi-volatile metabolites were identified by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. VOCs from a 5-day H. anthochroum strain Blaci culture caused the inhibition of seed germination, root elongation and seedling respiration on Amaranthus hypochondriacus, Panicum miliaceum, Trifolium pratense and Medicago sativa. In addition, extracts, phenylethyl alcohol and eucalyptol main compounds present in the VOCs and extract displayed a high phytotoxic activity, inhibiting the three physiological processes on the four test plants in a concentration-dependent manner. The results revealed that H. anthochroum strain Blaci produces a mixture of VOCs. These VOCs showed a strong phytotoxic activity on seed germination, root elongation, and seedling respiration of four plants and slightly affected the growth of phytopathogenic fungi and oomycetes. Also, the culture medium and mycelium extracts of H. anthochroum showed a high phytotoxic activity on the four test plants and, generally, the culture medium extract was more phytotoxic than the mycelium extracts. This work firstly reports the phytotoxic activity of volatile and semi-volatile compounds produced by the endophyte H. anthochroum strain Blaci on seed

  5. Elevated carbon dioxide reduces emission of herbivore-induced volatiles in Zea mays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Block, Anna; Vaughan, Martha M; Christensen, Shawn A; Alborn, Hans T; Tumlinson, James H

    2017-09-01

    Terpene volatiles produced by sweet corn (Zea mays) upon infestation with pests such as beet armyworm (Spodoptera exigua) function as part of an indirect defence mechanism by attracting parasitoid wasps; yet little is known about the impact of climate change on this form of plant defence. To investigate how a central component of climate change affects indirect defence, we measured herbivore-induced volatile emissions in plants grown under elevated carbon dioxide (CO 2 ). We found that S. exigua infested or elicitor-treated Z. mays grown at elevated CO 2 had decreased emission of its major sesquiterpene, (E)-β-caryophyllene and two homoterpenes, (3E)-4,8-dimethyl-1,3,7-nonatriene and (3E,7E)-4,8,12-trimethyl-1,3,7,11-tridecatetraene. In contrast, inside the leaves, elicitor-induced (E)-β-caryophyllene hyper-accumulated at elevated CO 2 , while levels of homoterpenes were unaffected. Furthermore, gene expression analysis revealed that the induction of terpene synthase genes following treatment was lower in plants grown at elevated CO 2 . Our data indicate that elevated CO 2 leads both to a repression of volatile synthesis at the transcriptional level and to limitation of volatile release through effects of CO 2 on stomatal conductance. These findings suggest that elevated CO 2 may alter the ability of Z. mays to utilize volatile terpenes to mediate indirect defenses. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Leaf level emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOC) from some Amazonian and Mediterranean plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bracho-Nunez, A.; Knothe, N. M.; Welter, S.; Staudt, M.; Costa, W. R.; Liberato, M. A. R.; Piedade, M. T. F.; Kesselmeier, J.

    2012-11-01

    As volatile organic compounds (VOCs) significantly affect atmospheric chemistry (oxidative capacity) and physics (secondary organic aerosol formation and effects), emission inventories defining regional and global biogenic VOC emission strengths are important. The aim of this work was to achieve a description of VOC emissions from poorly described tropical vegetation to be compared with the quite well investigated and highly heterogeneous emissions from Mediterranean vegetation. For this task, common plant species of both ecosystems were investigated. Sixteen plant species from the Mediterranean area, which is known for its special diversity in VOC emitting plant species, were chosen. In contrast, little information is currently available regarding emissions of VOCs from tropical tree species at the leaf level. Twelve plant species from different environments of the Amazon basin, i.e. Terra firme, Várzea and Igapó, were screened for emission of VOCs at leaf level with a branch enclosure system. Analysis of the volatile organics was performed online by a proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometer (PTR-MS) and offline by collection on adsorbent tubes and subsequent gas chromatographic analysis. Isoprene was quantitatively the most dominant compound emitted followed by monoterpenes, methanol and acetone. Most of the Mediterranean species emitted a variety of monoterpenes, whereas only five tropical species were monoterpene emitters exhibiting a quite conservative emission pattern (α-pinene > limonene > sabinene > β-pinene). Mediterranean plants showed additional emissions of sesquiterpenes, whereas in the case of plants from the Amazon region no sesquiterpenes were detected probably due to a lack of sensitivity in the measuring systems. On the other hand methanol emissions, an indicator of growth, were common in most of the tropical and Mediterranean species. A few species from both ecosystems showed acetone emissions. The observed heterogeneous emissions

  7. Leaf level emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOC from some Amazonian and Mediterranean plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Bracho-Nunez

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Emission inventories defining regional and global biogenic volatile organic compounds (VOC emission strengths are needed to determine the impact of VOC on atmospheric chemistry (oxidative capacity and physics (secondary organic aerosol formation and effects. The aim of this work was to contribute with measurements of tree species from the poorly described tropical vegetation in direct comparison with the quite well-investigated, highly heterogeneous emissions from Mediterranean vegetation. VOC emission from sixteen plant species from the Mediterranean area were compared with twelve plant species from different environments of the Amazon basin by an emission screening at leaf level using branch enclosures. Analysis of the volatile organics was performed online by a proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometer (PTR-MS and offline by collection on adsorbent tubes and subsequent gas chromatographic analysis. Isoprene was the most dominant compound emitted followed by monoterpenes, methanol and acetone. The average loss rates of VOC carbon in relation to the net CO2 assimilation were found below 4% and indicating normal unstressed plant behavior. Most of the Mediterranean species emitted a large variety of monoterpenes, whereas only five tropical species were identified as monoterpene emitters exhibiting a quite conservative emission pattern (α-pinene < limonene < sabinene < ß-pinene. Mediterranean plants showed additional emissions of sesquiterpenes. In the case of Amazonian plants no sesquiterpenes were detected. However, missing of sesquiterpenes may also be due to a lack of sensitivity of the measuring systems. Furthermore, our screening activities cover only 1% of tree species of such tropical areas as estimated based on recent biodiversity reports. Methanol emissions, an indicator of growth, were found to be common in most of the tropical and Mediterranean species. A few species from both ecosystems showed acetone emissions. The observed

  8. Carbon functionalized mesoporous silica-based gas sensors for indoor volatile organic compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yupu; Chen, Junchen; Li, Wei; Shen, Dengke; Zhao, Yujuan; Pal, Manas; Yu, Haijun; Tu, Bo; Zhao, Dongyuan

    2016-09-01

    Indoor organic gaseous pollution is a global health problem, which seriously threats the health and life of human all over the world. Hence, it is important to fabricate new sensing materials with high sensitivity and efficiency for indoor volatile organic compounds. In this study, a series of ordered mesoporous silica-based nanocomposites with uniform carbon coatings on the internal surface of silica mesopore channels were synthesized through a simple template-carbonization strategy. The obtained mesoporous silica-carbon nanocomposites not only possess ordered mesostructures, high surface areas (up to ∼759m(2)g(-1)), large and tunable pore sizes (2.6-10.2nm), but also have the improved hydrophobicity and anti-interference capability to environmental humidity. The sensing performances of the mesoporous silica-carbon nanocomposites to volatile organic compounds, such as ethylbenzene, methylbenzene, benzene, methanol, acetone, formaldehyde, dichloromethane and tetrahydrofuran, were systematically investigated. The relationships between the sensing performances and their properties, including mesostructures, surface areas, pore sizes, carbon contents and surface hydrophilic/hydrophobic interactions, have been achieved. The mesoporous silica-carbon nanocomposites with hexagonal mesostructure exhibit outstanding performance at room temperature to benzene and acetone with high responses, short response (2-3s) and recovery (16-19s) time, strong anti-interference to environmental humidity, and long-term stability (less than ∼5% loss of the frequency shifts after 42days). Therefore, the obtained mesoporous silica-carbon nanocomposites have a hopeful prospect in the field of environmental air quality monitoring. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Gas-liquid partitioning of halogenated volatile organic compounds in aqueous cyclodextrin solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ondo, Daniel; Barankova, Eva [Department of Physical Chemistry, Institute of Chemical Technology, Technicka 5, 166 28 Prague 6 (Czech Republic); Dohnal, Vladimir, E-mail: dohnalv@vscht.cz [Department of Physical Chemistry, Institute of Chemical Technology, Technicka 5, 166 28 Prague 6 (Czech Republic)

    2011-08-15

    Highlights: > Binding of halogenated VOCs with cyclodextrins examined through g-l partitioning. > Complex stabilities reflect host-guest size matching and hydrophobic interaction. > Presence of halogens in the guest molecule stabilizes the binding. > Thermodynamic origin of the binding varies greatly among the systems studied. > Results obey the guest-CD global enthalpy-entropy compensation relationship. - Abstract: Gas-liquid partitioning coefficients (K{sub GL}) were measured for halogenated volatile organic compounds (VOCs), namely 1-chlorobutane, methoxyflurane, pentafluoropropan-1-ol, heptafluorobutan-1-ol, {alpha},{alpha},{alpha}-trifluorotoluene, and toluene in aqueous solutions of natural {alpha}-, {beta}-, and {gamma}-cyclodextrins (CDs) at temperatures from (273.35 to 326.35) K employing the techniques of headspace gas chromatography and inert gas stripping. The binding constants of the 1:1 inclusion complex formation between the VOCs and CDs were evaluated from the depression of the VOCs volatility as a function of CD concentration. The host-guest size matching and the hydrophobic interaction concept were used to rationalize the observed widely different affinity of the VOC-CD pairs to form the inclusion complex. The enthalpic and entropic component of the standard Gibbs free energy of complex formation as derived from the temperature dependence of the binding constant indicate the thermodynamic origin of the binding to vary greatly among the systems studied, but follow the global enthalpy-entropy compensation relationships reported previously in the literature.

  10. Plant Growth Promotion by Volatile Organic Compounds Produced by Bacillus subtilis SYST2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tahir, Hafiz A. S.; Gu, Qin; Wu, Huijun; Raza, Waseem; Hanif, Alwina; Wu, Liming; Colman, Massawe V.; Gao, Xuewen

    2017-01-01

    Bacterial volatiles play a significant role in promoting plant growth by regulating the synthesis or metabolism of phytohormones. In vitro and growth chamber experiments were conducted to investigate the effect of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) produced by the plant growth promoting rhizobacterium Bacillus subtilis strain SYST2 on hormone regulation and growth promotion in tomato plants. We observed a significant increase in plant biomass under both experimental conditions; we observed an increase in photosynthesis and in the endogenous contents of gibberellin, auxin, and cytokinin, while a decrease in ethylene levels was noted. VOCs emitted by SYST2 were identified through gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis. Of 11 VOCs tested in glass jars containing plants in test tubes, only two, albuterol and 1,3-propanediole, were found to promote plant growth. Furthermore, tomato plants showed differential expression of genes involved in auxin (SlIAA1. SlIAA3), gibberellin (GA20ox-1), cytokinin (SlCKX1), expansin (Exp2, Exp9. Exp 18), and ethylene (ACO1) biosynthesis or metabolism in roots and leaves in response to B. subtilis SYST2 VOCs. Our findings suggest that SYST2-derived VOCs promote plant growth by triggering growth hormone activity, and provide new insights into the mechanism of plant growth promotion by bacterial VOCs. PMID:28223976

  11. Clinical Application of Volatile Organic Compound Analysis for Detecting Infectious Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanda, Ranjan; Chakraborty, Trinad

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY This review article introduces the significance of testing of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in clinical samples and summarizes important features of some of the technologies. Compared to other human diseases such as cancer, studies on VOC analysis in cases of infectious diseases are limited. Here, we have described results of studies which have used some of the appropriate technologies to evaluate VOC biomarkers and biomarker profiles associated with infections. The publications reviewed include important infections of the respiratory tract, gastrointestinal tract, urinary tract, and nasal cavity. The results highlight the use of VOC biomarker profiles resulting from certain infectious diseases in discriminating between infected and healthy subjects. Infection-related VOC profiles measured in exhaled breath as well as from headspaces of feces or urine samples are a source of information with respect to disease detection. The volatiles emitted in clinical matrices may on the one hand represent metabolites of the infecting pathogen or on the other hand reflect pathogen-induced host responses or, indeed, a combination of both. Because exhaled-breath samples are easy to collect and online instruments are commercially available, VOC analysis in exhaled breath appears to be a promising tool for noninvasive detection and monitoring of infectious diseases. PMID:23824368

  12. Hydrothermally carbonized plant materials: patterns of volatile organic compounds detected by gas chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Roland; Dorgerloh, Ute; Helmis, Mario; Mumme, Jan; Diakité, Mamadou; Nehls, Irene

    2013-02-01

    The nature and concentrations of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in chars generated by hydrothermal carbonization (HTC) is of concern considering their application as soil amendment. Therefore, the presence of VOCs in solid HTC products obtained from wheat straw, biogas digestate and four woody materials was investigated using headspace gas chromatography. A variety of potentially harmful benzenic, phenolic and furanic volatiles along with various aldehydes and ketones were identified in feedstock- and temperature-specific patterns. The total amount of VOCs observed after equilibration between headspace and char samples produced at 270°C ranged between 2000 and 16,000μg/g (0.2-1.6wt.%). Depending on feedstock 50-9000μg/g of benzenes and 300-1800μg/g of phenols were observed. Substances potentially harmful to soil ecology such as benzofurans (200-800μg/g) and p-cymene (up to 6000μg/g in pine wood char) exhibited concentrations that suggest restrained application of fresh hydrochar as soil amendment or for water purification. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Determination of volatile organic compounds responsible for flavour in cooked river buffalo meat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Di Luccia

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Flavour is an important consumer attractive that directly influences the success of food products on the market. The determination of odorous molecules and their identification allows to useful knowledge for producers to valorise their own products. Buffalo meat has a different chemical composition from pork and beef and requires some cautions in cooking and processing. This work aims at the identification of volatile molecules responsible for flavours in river buffalo meat. The determination was carried out by solid phase micro-extraction (SPME technique and analysed by gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (GC-MS. The most relevant results were the higher odorous impact of buffalo meat and the higher content of sulphide compounds responsible for wild aroma respect to pork and beef. These results were obtained comparing the total area of peaks detected in every chromatogram. We have also found significant differences concerning the contents of pentadecane, 1-hexanol-2 ethyl, butanoic acid, furano-2-penthyl. The origin of volatile organic compounds and their influence on the river buffalo aromas were discussed.

  14. A Compendium of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) Released By Human Cell Lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filipiak, Wojciech; Mochalski, Pawel; Filipiak, Anna; Ager, Clemens; Cumeras, Raquel; Davis, Cristina E.; Agapiou, Agapios; Unterkofler, Karl; Troppmair, Jakob

    2016-01-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) offer unique insights into ongoing biochemical processes in healthy and diseased humans. Yet, their diagnostic use is hampered by the limited understanding of their biochemical or cellular origin and their frequently unclear link to the underlying diseases. Major advancements are expected from the analyses of human primary cells, cell lines and cultures of microorganisms. In this review, a database of 125 reliably identified VOCs previously reported for human healthy and diseased cells was assembled and their potential origin is discussed. The majority of them have also been observed in studies with other human matrices (breath, urine, saliva, feces, blood, skin emanations). Moreover, continuing improvements of qualitative and quantitative analyses, based on the recommendations of the ISO-11843 guidelines, are suggested for the necessary standardization of analytical procedures and better comparability of results. The data provided contribute to arriving at a more complete human volatilome and suggest potential volatile biomarkers for future validation. Dedication: This review is dedicated to the memory of Prof. Dr. Anton Amann, who sadly passed away on January 6, 2015. He was motivator and motor for the field of breath research. PMID:27160536

  15. Volatile organic compounds and Photobacterium phosphoreum associated with spoilage of modified-atmosphere-packaged raw pork.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieminen, Timo T; Dalgaard, Paw; Björkroth, Johanna

    2016-02-02

    Accumulation of volatile organic compounds was monitored in association with sensory quality, bacterial concentrations and culture-independent microbial community analyses in raw pork loin and pork collar during storage under high-oxygen modified atmosphere at +4 °C. Of the 48 volatile compounds detected in the pork samples, the levels of acetoin, diacetyl and 3-methyl-1-butanol had the highest correlations with the sensory scores and bacterial concentrations. These compounds accumulated in all of the four monitored lots of non-sterile pork but not in the sterilized pork during chilled storage. According to the culture-dependent and culture-independent characterization of bacterial communities, Brochothrix thermosphacta, lactic acid bacteria (Carnobacterium, Lactobacillus, Lactococcus, Leuconostoc, Weissella) and Photobacterium spp. predominated in pork samples. Photobacterium spp., typically not associated with spoilage of meat, were detected also in 8 of the 11 retail packages of pork investigated subsequently. Eleven isolates from the pork samples were shown to belong to Photobacterium phosphoreum by phenotypic tests and sequencing of the 16S rRNA and gyrB gene fragments. Off-odors in pork samples with high proportion of Photobacterium spp. were associated with accumulation of acetoin, diacetyl and 3-methyl-1-butanol in meat, but these compounds did not explain all the off-odors reported in sensory analyses. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. In-tube extraction for enrichment of volatile organic hydrocarbons from aqueous samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jochmann, Maik A; Yuan, Xue; Schilling, Beat; Schmidt, Torsten C

    2008-02-01

    In-tube extraction (ITEX) is a novel solventless extraction technique in which a headspace syringe with a needle body filled with a sorbent (here: Tenax TA) is used. The analytes are extracted from sample headspace by dynamic extraction. The needle body is surrounded by a separate heater, which is used for thermal desorption of analytes into the injection port of a GC system. We report here for the first time the optimization and evaluation of a fully automated analytical method based on ITEX. As target analytes, 19 common groundwater contaminants such as halogenated volatiles and monoaromatic compounds have been chosen. Method related parameters such as extraction temperature, number of extraction cycles, extraction and desorption volume as well as extraction and desorption flow rates were investigated in detail. The linear dynamic range of the ITEX method ranged over six orders of magnitude between 0.028 microg/L and 1218 microg/L with linear correlation coefficients between 0.990 and 0.998 for the investigated compounds. Method detection limits for monoaromatic compounds were between 28 ng/L (ethylbenzene) and 68 ng/L (1,2,4-trimethylbenzene). For halogenated volatile organic compounds, method detection limits between 48 ng/L (chloroform) and 799 ng/L (dichloromethane) were obtained. The precision of the method with external calibration was between 3.1% (chloroform ethylbenzene) and 7.4% (1,2,3-trimethylbenzene).

  17. Influence of volatile organic compounds emitted by Pseudomonas and Serratia strains on Agrobacterium tumefaciens biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plyuta, Vladimir; Lipasova, Valentina; Popova, Alexandra; Koksharova, Olga; Kuznetsov, Alexander; Szegedi, Erno; Chernin, Leonid; Khmel, Inessa

    2016-07-01

    The ability to form biofilms plays an important role in bacteria-host interactions, including plant pathogenicity. In this work, we investigated the action of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) produced by rhizospheric strains of Pseudomonas chlororaphis 449, Pseudomonas fluorescens B-4117, Serratia plymuthica IC1270, as well as Serratia proteamaculans strain 94, isolated from spoiled meat, on biofilms formation by three strains of Agrobacterium tumefaciens which are causative agents of crown-gall disease in a wide range of plants. In dual culture assays, the pool of volatiles emitted by the tested Pseudomonas and Serratia strains suppressed the formation of biofilms of A. tumefaciens strains grown on polycarbonate membrane filters and killed Agrobacterium cells in mature biofilms. The individual VOCs produced by the tested Pseudomonas strains, that is, ketones (2-nonanone, 2-heptanone, 2-undecanone), and dimethyl disulfide (DMDS) produced by Serratia strains, were shown to kill A. tumefaciens cells in mature biofilms and suppress their formation. The data obtained in this study suggest an additional potential of some ketones and DMDS as protectors of plants against A. tumefaciens strains, whose virulence is associated with the formation of biofilms on the infected plants. © 2016 APMIS. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Release of volatile organic compounds (VOCs from the lung cancer cell line CALU-1 in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schubert Jochen

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim of this work was to confirm the existence of volatile organic compounds (VOCs specifically released or consumed by lung cancer cells. Methods 50 million cells of the human non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC cell line CALU-1 were incubated in a sealed fermenter for 4 h or over night (18 hours. Then air samples from the headspace of the culture vessel were collected and preconcentrated by adsorption on solid sorbents with subsequent thermodesorption and analysis by means of gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC-MS. Identification of altogether 60 compounds in GCMS measurement was done not only by spectral library match, but also by determination of retention times established with calibration mixtures of the respective pure compounds. Results The results showed a significant increase in the concentrations of 2,3,3-trimethylpentane, 2,3,5-trimethylhexane, 2,4-dimethylheptane and 4-methyloctane in the headspace of CALU-1 cell culture as compared to medium controls after 18 h. Decreased concentrations after 18 h of incubation were found for acetaldehyde, 3-methylbutanal, butyl acetate, acetonitrile, acrolein, methacrolein, 2-methylpropanal, 2-butanone, 2-methoxy-2-methylpropane, 2-ethoxy-2-methylpropane, and hexanal. Conclusion Our findings demonstrate that certain volatile compounds can be cancer-cell derived and thus indicative of the presence of a tumor, whereas other compounds are not released but seem to be consumed by CALU-1 cells.

  19. Screening of Natural Organic Volatiles from Prunus mahaleb L. Honey: Coumarin and Vomifoliol as Nonspecific Biomarkers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mladenka Malenica Staver

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Headspace solid-phase microextraction (HS-SPME; PDMS/DVB fibre and ultrasonic solvent extraction (USE; solvent A: pentane and diethyl ether (1:2 v/v, solvent B: dichloromethane followed by gas chromatography and mass spectrometry (GC, GC-MS were used for the analysis of Prunus mahaleb L. honey samples. Screening was focused toward chemical composition of natural organic volatiles to determine if it is useful as a method of determining honey-sourcing. A total of 34 compounds were identified in the headspace and 49 in the extracts that included terpenes, norisoprenoids and benzene derivatives, followed by minor percentages of aliphatic compounds and furan derivatives. High vomifoliol percentages (10.7%–24.2% in both extracts (dominant in solvent B and coumarin (0.3%–2.4% from the extracts (more abundant in solvent A and headspace (0.9%–1.8% were considered characteristic for P. mahaleb honey and highlighted as potential nonspecific biomarkers of the honey’s botanical origin. In addition, comparison with P. mahaleb flowers, leaves, bark and wood volatiles from our previous research revealed common compounds among norisoprenoids and benzene derivatives.

  20. Plant Growth Promotion by Volatile Organic Compounds Produced by Bacillus subtilis SYST2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tahir, Hafiz A S; Gu, Qin; Wu, Huijun; Raza, Waseem; Hanif, Alwina; Wu, Liming; Colman, Massawe V; Gao, Xuewen

    2017-01-01

    Bacterial volatiles play a significant role in promoting plant growth by regulating the synthesis or metabolism of phytohormones. In vitro and growth chamber experiments were conducted to investigate the effect of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) produced by the plant growth promoting rhizobacterium Bacillus subtilis strain SYST2 on hormone regulation and growth promotion in tomato plants. We observed a significant increase in plant biomass under both experimental conditions; we observed an increase in photosynthesis and in the endogenous contents of gibberellin, auxin, and cytokinin, while a decrease in ethylene levels was noted. VOCs emitted by SYST2 were identified through gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis. Of 11 VOCs tested in glass jars containing plants in test tubes, only two, albuterol and 1,3-propanediole, were found to promote plant growth. Furthermore, tomato plants showed differential expression of genes involved in auxin (SlIAA1. SlIAA3), gibberellin (GA20ox-1), cytokinin (SlCKX1), expansin (Exp2, Exp9. Exp 18), and ethylene (ACO1) biosynthesis or metabolism in roots and leaves in response to B. subtilis SYST2 VOCs. Our findings suggest that SYST2-derived VOCs promote plant growth by triggering growth hormone activity, and provide new insights into the mechanism of plant growth promotion by bacterial VOCs.

  1. Microextraction techniques for the determination of volatile and semivolatile organic compounds from plants: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Cui; Wang, Juan; Li, Donghao

    2013-10-17

    Vegetables and fruits are necessary for human health, and traditional Chinese medicine that uses plant materials can cure diseases. Thus, understanding the composition of plant matrix has gained increased attention in recent years. Since plant matrix is very complex, the extraction, separation and quantitation of these chemicals are challenging. In this review we focus on the microextraction techniques used in the determination of volatile and semivolatile organic compounds (such as esters, alcohols, aldehydes, hydrocarbons, ketones, terpenes, sesquiterpene, phenols, acids, plant secondary metabolites and pesticides) from plants (e.g., fruits, vegetables, medicinal plants, tree leaves, etc.). These microextraction techniques include: solid phase microextraction (SPME), stir-bar sorptive extraction (SBSE), single drop microextraction (SDME), hollow fiber liquid phase microextraction (HF-LPME), dispersive liquid liquid microextraction (DLLME), and gas purge microsyringe extraction (GP-MSE). We have taken into consideration papers published from 2008 to the end of January 2013, and provided critical and interpretative review on these techniques, and formulated future trends in microextraction for the determination of volatile and semivolatile compounds from plants. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Potential hazard of volatile organic compounds contained in household spray products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Md Mahmudur; Kim, Ki-Hyun

    2014-03-01

    To assess the exposure levels of hazardous volatile pollutants released from common household spray products, a total of 10 spray products consisting of six body spray and four air spray products have been investigated. The body spray products included insect repellents (two different products), medicated patch, deodorant, hair spray, and humectant, whereas the air spray products included two different insecticides (mosquito and/or cockroach), antibacterial spray, and air freshener. The main objective of this study was to measure concentrations of 15 model volatile organic compounds (VOCs) using GC/MS coupled with a thermal desorber. In addition, up to 34 ‘compounds lacking authentic standards or surrogates (CLASS)' were also quantified based on the effective carbon number (ECN) theory. According to our analysis, the most common indoor pollutants like benzene, toluene, styrene, methyl ethyl ketone, and butyl acetate have been detected frequently in the majority of spray products with the concentration range of 5.3-125 mg L-1. If one assumes that the amount of spray products released into air reaches the 0.3 mL level for a given space size of 5 m3, the risk factor is expected to exceed the carcinogenic risk level set for benzene (10-5) by the U.S. EPA.

  3. Characteristics of volatile organic compounds produced from five pathogenic bacteria by headspace-solid phase micro-extraction/gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Juan; Tang, Junni; Shi, Hui; Tang, Cheng; Zhang, Rong

    2017-03-01

    The characteristics of volatile compounds from five different bacterial species, Escherichia coli O157:H7, Salmonella Enteritidis, Shigella flexneri, Staphylococcus aureus, and Listeria monocytogenes, growing, respectively, in trypticase soy broth were monitored by headspace solid-phase micro-extraction/gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The results showed that most volatile organic compounds (VOCs) of five pathogens started to increase after the sixth to tenth hour. Methyl ketones and long chain alcohols were representative volatiles for three Gram-negative bacteria. The especially high production of indole was characterized to E. coli O157:H7. The production of 3-hydroxy-2-butanone was indicative of the presence of two Gram-positive bacteria. Both 3-methyl-butanoic acid and 3-methyl-butanal were unique biomarkers for S. aureus. The population dynamics of individual pathogen could be monitored using the accumulation of VOCs correlated with its growth. And these five pathogens could be distinguishable though principle component analysis of 18 volatile metabolites. Moreover, the mixed culture of S. aureus and E. coli O157:H7 was also investigated. The levels of 3-methyl-butanal and 3-methyl-butanoic acid were largely reduced; while the level of indole almost unchanged and correlated with E. coli O157:H7 growth very well. The characteristics of volatiles from the five foodborne pathogens could lay a fundamental basis for further research into pathogen contamination control by detecting volatile signatures of pathogens. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Predicting the lifetime of organic vapor cartridges exposed to volatile organic compound mixtures using a partial differential equations model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vuong, François; Chauveau, Romain; Grevillot, Georges; Marsteau, Stéphanie; Silvente, Eric; Vallieres, Cécile

    2016-09-01

    In this study, equilibria, breakthrough curves, and breakthrough times were predicted for three binary mixtures of four volatile organic compounds (VOCs) using a model based on partial differential equations of dynamic adsorption coupling a mass balance, a simple Linear Driving Force (LDF) hypothesis to describe the kinetics, and the well-known Extended-Langmuir (EL) equilibrium model. The model aims to predict with a limited complexity, the BTCs of respirator cartridges exposed to binary vapor mixtures from equilibria and kinetics data obtained from single component. In the model, multicomponent mass transfer was simplified to use only single dynamic adsorption data. The EL expression used in this study predicted equilibria with relatively good accuracy for acetone/ethanol and ethanol/cyclohexane mixtures, but the prediction of cyclohexane uptake when mixed with heptane is less satisfactory. The BTCs given by the model were compared to experimental BTCs to determine the accuracy of the model and the impact of the approximation on mass transfer coefficients. From BTCs, breakthrough times at 10% of the exposure concentration t10% were determined. All t10% were predicted within 20% of the experimental values, and 63% of the breakthrough times were predicted within a 10% error. This study demonstrated that a simple mass balance combined with kinetic approximations is sufficient to predict lifetime for respirator cartridges exposed to VOC mixtures. It also showed that a commonly adopted approach to describe multicomponent adsorption based on volatility of VOC rather than adsorption equilibrium greatly overestimated the breakthrough times.

  5. [Study of volatile organic compounds of fresh allium species using headspace combined with surface-enhanced Raman scattering].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Si, Min-Zhen; Zhang, De-Qing; Liu, Ren-Ming

    2014-09-01

    In order to identify volatile organic compounds of fresh plants at room temperature and avoid sample pretreatment and extractions which can be labor intensive, garlic, Chinese chives and scallion were chopped into pieces. Then some of them were placed in the headspace vial and sealed. The gases were drawn from the vial with a syringe and were injected very slowly into Ag colloids for test using R-3000 portable Raman spectrometer. The spectra of volatile organic compounds of allium species, fresh garlic, Chinese chive and shallot plants were successfully.recorded for the first time. For garlic high intensity bands are present at 307, 399, 569, 711, 1,182, 1,287, 1,397 and 1,622 cm(-1). For Chinese chives the high intensity band is present at 672 cm(-1). Low intensity bands are present at 274, 412, 575, 1,185, 1,289, 1,396, 1,618 cm(-1). For shallot high intensity bands are present at 693 cm(-1). Lower intensity bands are present at 372, 888, 1,023 cm(-1). Low intensity bands are present at 1,088, 1,211 and 1,322 cm(-1). The SERS of diallyl disulfide, allyl methyl sulfide and 1-propanethiol in liquid state and gas state were also obtained. The main volatile organic compound of fresh garlic, Chinese chive and shallot are diallyl disulfide, allyl methyl sulfide and 1-propanethiol respectively, and the volatile organic compound of fresh onion, scallion, shallot and chive are all 1-propanethiol. The presented results illustrate that combining headspace and SERS is a powerful tool for volatile organic compound analysis in fresh plants. The volatile organic compound can be detected in fresh plant samples directly and quickly without extraction.

  6. Volatile sulfur production by pig cecal bacteria in batch culture and screening inhibitors of sulfate reducing bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arakawa, T; Ishikawa, Y; Ushida, K

    2000-08-01

    We studied the effects of specific inhibitors of methanogenesis (2-bromoethane sulfonate, BES) and sulfate reduction (sodium molybdate) on volatile sulfur production in batch cultures of pig cecal bacteria. The volatile sulfur concentration in headspace gas was determined by flame-photometric detector gas chromatography. BES stimulated production of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) and methanethiol, and sodium molybdate completely inhibited the production of these volatile sulfur compounds. The results indicated that dissimilate sulfate reduction is mainly responsible for volatile sulfur production in the hindgut. Therefore the extracts of herbs, food colors, and aroma chemicals were tested for their inhibitory effects on H2S production by a dissimilatory sulfate-reducing bacteria. Desulfovibrio desulfuricans DSM642. H2S was measured by the chromatography of the headspace gas, using a flame photometric detector. Of 306 herbal extracts tested, 69 extracts from 38 herbs inhibited H2S production at 1.0 mg/mL. Sisymbrium officinale (hedge mustard) was the most potent inhibitor. Six pigments inhibited H2S release. Erythrosine and rose bengal showed inhibitory effects at 0.01 mg/mL. Peppermint oil and 96 aroma chemicals were assayed for their effects on H2S release. Thirty-two aroma chemicals suppressed H2S production at 0.1 mg/mL, and camphene, 1-decanol, and 2-nonanone were effective at 0.01 mg/mL.

  7. Concentrations and flux measurements of volatile organic compounds (VOC) in boreal forest soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mäki, Mari; Aaltonen, Hermanni; Heinonsalo, Jussi; Hellén, Heidi; Pumpanen, Jukka; Bäck, Jaana

    2017-04-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOC) impact soil processes as VOCs transmit signals between roots and rhizosphere (Ditengou et al., 2015), VOCs can regulate microbial activity (Asensio et al., 2012), and VOCs can also promote root growth (Hung et al., 2012). Belowground concentrations of VOCs have not been measured in situ and for this reason, knowledge of how different soil organisms such as roots, rhizosphere and decomposers contribute to VOC production is limited. The aim of this study was to determine and quantify VOC fluxes and concentrations of different horizons from boreal forest soil. The VOC concentrations and fluxes were measured from Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris) forest soil at the SMEAR II station in southern Finland from 21th of April to 2nd of December in 2016. VOC fluxes were measured using dynamic (flow-through) chambers from five soil collars placed on five different locations. VOC concentrations were also measured in each location from four different soil horizons with the measurement depth 1-107 cm. VOCs were collected from underground gas collectors into the Tenax-Carbopack-B adsorbent tubes using portable pumps ( 100 ml min-1). The VOC concentrations and fluxes of isoprene, 11 monoterpenes, 13 sesquiterpenes and different oxygenated VOCs were measured. Sample tubes were analyzed using thermal desorption-gas chromatograph-mass spectrometry (TD-GC-MS). Soil temperature and soil water content were continuously monitored for each soil horizon. Our preliminary results show that the primary source of VOCs is organic soil layer and the contribution of mineral soil to the VOC formation is minor. VOC fluxes and concentrations were dominated by monoterpenes such as α-pinene, camphene, β-pinene, and Δ3-carene. Monoterpene concentration is almost 10-fold in organic soil compared to the deeper soil layers. However, the highest VOC fluxes on the soil surface were measured in October, whereas the monoterpene concentrations in organic soil were highest in July

  8. Arctic emissions of biogenic volatile organic compounds – from plants, litter and soils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svendsen, Sarah Hagel

    Significant amounts of biogenic volatile organic compounds are emitted from terrestrial ecosystems. These emissions may influence the atmospheric chemistry and the climate. Climate warming will be most pronounced in the Arctic and this will likely have a large effect on the BVOC emissions from...... in adsorbent cartridges and analyzed using gas chromatography–mass spectrometry. Ecosystem BVOC emissions were highly dominated by terpenoids but the composition of terpenoids differed between different plant species. Litter emissions were less dominated by terpenoids than the ecosystem emissions, however...... they still constituted approximately 50 % of the total emissions. I suggested that the litter emissions derived both from microbial soil processes and from stores inside the litter tissue and that the relative importance of these two sources were plant species specific. Furthermore, emissions of non...

  9. Seasonal variances in bacterial microbiota and volatile organic compounds in raw milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nalepa, Beata; Olszewska, Magdalena Anna; Markiewicz, Lidia Hanna

    2018-02-21

    The aim of this study was to define the composition of microbiota and the volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in samples of raw milk collected for 22 months between 2012 and 2014 originated from north-eastern region of Poland. The results revealed that the VOCs profile changed with respect to the season of milk collection, and milk collected in autumn was characterized by a higher content of acetic acid (C2), propionic acid (C3) and valeric acid (C5), whereas spring was characterized by a frequent presence of acetone (Ac), ethanol (Et) and ethyl acetate (EtAc). Bacterial species composition changed considerably within the tested period and some bacterial species/groups occurred seasonally, e.g. L. helveticus (summer), L. casei (winter). The results show usefulness of the applied techniques (PCR-DGGE and HS-GC) and data analysis (PCA, correlation coefficients) methods in characterizing the raw milk quality intended for dairy production.

  10. Utilization of Volatile Organic Compounds as an Alternative for Destructive Abatement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satu Ojala

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The treatment of volatile organic compounds (VOC emissions is a necessity of today. The catalytic treatment has already proven to be environmentally and economically sound technology for the total oxidation of the VOCs. However, in certain cases, it may also become economical to utilize these emissions in some profitable way. Currently, the most common way to utilize the VOC emissions is their use in energy production. However, interesting possibilities are arising from the usage of VOCs in hydrogen and syngas production. Production of chemicals from VOC emissions is still mainly at the research stage. However, few commercial examples exist. This review will summarize the commercially existing VOC utilization possibilities, present the utilization applications that are in the research stage and introduce some novel ideas related to the catalytic utilization possibilities of the VOC emissions. In general, there exist a vast number of possibilities for VOC utilization via different catalytic processes, which creates also a good research potential for the future.

  11. Doubled volatile organic compound emissions from subarctic tundra under simulated climate warming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Faubert, Patrick; Tiiva, Paivi; Rinnan, Åsmund

    2010-01-01

    • Biogenic volatile organic compound (BVOC) emissions from arctic ecosystems are important in view of their role in global atmospheric chemistry and unknown feedbacks to global warming. These cold ecosystems are hotspots of climate warming, which will be more severe here than averaged over...... the globe. We assess the effects of climatic warming on non-methane BVOC emissions from a subarctic heath. • We performed ecosystem-based chamber measurements and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analyses of the BVOCs collected on adsorbent over two growing seasons at a wet subarctic tundra...... of a focus on BVOC emissions during climate change. The observed changes have implications for ecological interactions and feedback effects on climate change via impacts on aerosol formation and indirect greenhouse effects....

  12. A Novel Wireless Wearable Volatile Organic Compound (VOC Monitoring Device with Disposable Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yue Deng

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available A novel portable wireless volatile organic compound (VOC monitoring device with disposable sensors is presented. The device is miniaturized, light, easy-to-use, and cost-effective. Different field tests have been carried out to identify the operational, analytical, and functional performance of the device and its sensors. The device was compared to a commercial photo-ionization detector, gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, and carbon monoxide detector. In addition, environmental operational conditions, such as barometric change, temperature change and wind conditions were also tested to evaluate the device performance. The multiple comparisons and tests indicate that the proposed VOC device is adequate to characterize personal exposure in many real-world scenarios and is applicable for personal daily use.

  13. A Novel Wireless Wearable Volatile Organic Compound (VOC) Monitoring Device with Disposable Sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Yue; Chen, Cheng; Xian, Xiaojun; Tsow, Francis; Verma, Gaurav; McConnell, Rob; Fruin, Scott; Tao, Nongjian; Forzani, Erica S

    2016-12-03

    A novel portable wireless volatile organic compound (VOC) monitoring device with disposable sensors is presented. The device is miniaturized, light, easy-to-use, and cost-effective. Different field tests have been carried out to identify the operational, analytical, and functional performance of the device and its sensors. The device was compared to a commercial photo-ionization detector, gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, and carbon monoxide detector. In addition, environmental operational conditions, such as barometric change, temperature change and wind conditions were also tested to evaluate the device performance. The multiple comparisons and tests indicate that the proposed VOC device is adequate to characterize personal exposure in many real-world scenarios and is applicable for personal daily use.

  14. The Use of Amberlite Adsorbents for Green Chromatography Determination of Volatile Organic Compounds in Air

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Juan-Peiró

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Passive samplers have been widely used for volatile organic compounds determination. Following the green chemistry tendency of the direct determination of adsorbed compounds in membrane-based devices through using head space direct chromatography analysis, this work has evaluated the use of Amberlite XAD-2, XAD-4, and XAD-16 adsorbents as a filling material for passive samplers. Direct analysis of the membranes by HS-GC-MS involves a solvent-free method avoiding any sample treatment. For exposed membranes, recoveries ranged from 10% to 203%, depending on the compound and adsorbent used. The limit of the detection values ranged from 1 to 140 ng per sampler. Acceptable precision and sensitivity levels were obtained for the XAD resins assayed.

  15. Volatile organic compounds in the indoor air of normal and sick houses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostiainen, Risto

    Over 200 volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were identified by thermal desorption/gas chromatography/mass spectrometry in the indoor air of 26 houses. The most common VOCs were alkylbenzenes, alkanes, terpenes, aliphatic aldehydes, and some chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbons. Forty eight compounds were selected for quantitative analysis on the basis of their prevalence, toxicity, carcinogenicity and mutagenicity. The selected compounds were quantified in 50 normal houses and 38 sick houses, in which people complained about the odor or they had symptoms, which resembled the Sick Building Syndrome. The concentrations of the VOCs exceeded normal level more often in the sick than in the normal houses. Aromatic hydrocarbons, terpenes, some alkylcyclohexanes, 1,1,1-trichloroethane, and tetrachloroetliene occurred most often with increased concentrations in the sick houses.

  16. Hydrogen Safety Project chemical analysis support task: Window ``C`` volatile organic analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gillespie, B.M.; Stromatt, R.W.; Ross, G.A.; Hoope, E.A.

    1992-01-01

    This data package contains the results obtained by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) staff in the characterization of samples for the 101-SY Hydrogen Safety Project. The samples were submitted for analysis by Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) under the Technical Project Plan (TPP) 17667 and the Quality Assurance Plan MCS-027. They came from a core taken during Window ``C`` after the May 1991 gas release event. The analytical procedures required for analysis were defined in the Test Instructions (TI) prepared by the PNL 101-SY Analytical Chemistry Laboratory (ACL) Project Management Office in accordance with the TPP and the QA Plan. The requested analysis for these samples was volatile organic analysis. The quality control (QC) requirements for each sample are defined in the Test Instructions for each sample. The QC requirements outlined in the procedures and requested in the WHC statement of work were followed.

  17. Hydrogen Safety Project chemical analysis support task: Window C'' volatile organic analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gillespie, B.M.; Stromatt, R.W.; Ross, G.A.; Hoope, E.A.

    1992-01-01

    This data package contains the results obtained by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) staff in the characterization of samples for the 101-SY Hydrogen Safety Project. The samples were submitted for analysis by Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) under the Technical Project Plan (TPP) 17667 and the Quality Assurance Plan MCS-027. They came from a core taken during Window C'' after the May 1991 gas release event. The analytical procedures required for analysis were defined in the Test Instructions (TI) prepared by the PNL 101-SY Analytical Chemistry Laboratory (ACL) Project Management Office in accordance with the TPP and the QA Plan. The requested analysis for these samples was volatile organic analysis. The quality control (QC) requirements for each sample are defined in the Test Instructions for each sample. The QC requirements outlined in the procedures and requested in the WHC statement of work were followed.

  18. Modeling the performance limits of novel microcantilever heaters for volatile organic compound detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahangir, Ifat; Koley, Goutam

    2017-01-01

    We present a theoretical model estimating the performance limits of novel AlGaN/GaN heterostructure based microcantilever heater sensors to perform advanced volatile organic compound (VOC) detection and mixture analysis. Operating without any specific surface functionalization or treatment; these devices utilize the strong surface polarization of AlGaN as well as the unique device geometries, to perform selective detection of analytes based on their latent heat of evaporation and molecular dipole moment over a wide concentration range. The presented model incorporates heat transfer, Joule heating, thermal expansion and evaporative heat loss mechanisms, to predict device behaviors such as temperature profiles and sensing performance limits under various steady-state and transient test conditions. In addition, the versatility of the proposed model enables us to successfully predict the capability of the device to perform mixture analysis, and provides guidelines to further optimize the device properties to achieve a limit of detection in sub-ppm concentration.

  19. Analytical modelling of stable isotope fractionation of volatile organic compounds in the unsaturated zone

    CERN Document Server

    Bouchard, D; Höhener, P; Hunkeler, D; 10.1016/j.jconhyd.2010.09.006

    2011-01-01

    Analytical models were developed that simulate stable isotope ratios of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) near a point source contamination in the unsaturated zone. The models describe diffusive transport of VOCs, biodegradation and source ageing. The mass transport is governed by Fick's law for diffusion, and the equation for reactive transport of VOCs in the soil gas phase was solved for different source geometries and for different boundary conditions. Model results were compared to experimental data from a one-dimensional laboratory column and a radial-symmetric field experiment, and the comparison yielded a satisfying agreement. The model results clearly illustrate the significant isotope fractionation by gas-phase diffusion under transient state conditions. This leads to an initial depletion of heavy isotopes with increasing distance from the source. The isotope evolution of the source is governed by the combined effects of isotope fractionation due to vaporization, diffusion and biodegradation. The net...

  20. Volatile organic compounds generated by cultures of bacteria and viruses associated with respiratory infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abd El Qader, Amir; Lieberman, David; Shemer Avni, Yonat; Svobodin, Natali; Lazarovitch, Tsilia; Sagi, Orli; Zeiri, Yehuda

    2015-12-01

    Respiratory infections (RI) can be viral or bacterial in origin. In either case, the invasion of the pathogen results in production and release of various volatile organic compounds (VOCs). The present study examines the VOCs released from cultures of five viruses (influenza A, influenza B, adenovirus, respiratory syncitial virus and parainfluenza 1 virus), three bacteria (Moraxella catarrhalis, Haemophilus influenzae and Legionella pneumophila) and Mycoplasma pneumoniae isolated colonies. Our results demonstrate the involvement of inflammation-induced VOCs. Two significant VOCs were identified as associated with infectious bacterial activity, heptane and methylcyclohexane. These two VOCs have been linked in previous studies to oxidative stress effects. In order to distinguish between bacterial and viral positive cultures, we performed principal component analysis including peak identity (retention time) and VOC concentration (i.e. area under the peak) revealing 1-hexanol and 1-heptadecene to be good predictors. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. Very volatile organic compounds: an understudied class of indoor air pollutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salthammer, T

    2016-02-01

    Very volatile organic compounds (VVOCs), as categorized by the WHO, are an important subgroup of indoor pollutants and cover a wide spectrum of chemical substances. Some VVOCs are components of products commonly used indoors, some result from chemical reactions and some are reactive precursors of secondary products. Nevertheless, there is still no clear and internationally accepted definition of VVOCs. Current approaches are based on the boiling point, and the saturation vapor pressure or refer to analytical procedures. A significant problem is that many airborne VVOCs cannot be routinely analyzed by the usually applied technique of sampling on Tenax TA® followed by thermal desorption GC/MS or by DNPH-sampling/HPLC/UV. Some VVOCs are therefore often neglected in indoor-related studies. However, VVOCs are of high significance for indoor air quality assessment and there is need for their broader consideration in measurement campaigns and material emission testing. © 2014 The Authors. Indoor Air published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Volatile compounds emission and health risk assessment during composting of organic fraction of municipal solid waste

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mustafa, Muhammad Farooq; Liu, Yanjun; Duan, Zhenhan

    2017-01-01

    Degradation of mechanically sorted organic fraction (MSOF) of municipal solid waste in composting facilities is among the major contributors of volatile compounds (VCs) generation and emission, causes nuisance problems and health risks on site as well as in the vicinages. The aim of current study...... was to determine the seasonal (summer and winter) variation and human health risk assessment of VCs in the ambient air of different processing units in MSOF at composting plant in China. Average concentration of VCs was 58.50 and 138.03 mg/m3 in summer and winter respectively. Oxygenated compounds were found...... attention should be made to minimize cumulative non-carcinogenic and carcinogenic risk as people are well exposed to mixture of compounds, not to individual....

  3. Volatile organic compounds in the strongly fragrant fern genus Melpomene (Polypodiaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessler, M; Connor, E; Lehnert, M

    2015-03-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are common among plants, both as attractants for pollinators and as defence against herbivores. While much studied among flowering plants, the prevalence and function of VOCs among ferns is little known. Using headspace sorption and gas chromatography, we analysed the VOCs of dried specimens of six species of grammitid fern (Polypodiaceae), including two species of the genus Melpomene, which is characterised by a distinctive sweet smell. We identified 38 VOCs, including 22 not previously recorded among ferns. The two species of Melpomene had distinct VOC cocktails, including 12 substances not found in the other four studied genera, mainly involving fatty acid derivatives (FADs) and aromatics. We propose that these VOCs have, at least in part, a function in herbivore defence, but note that the VOC bouquet of Melpomene is distinct from that typically found in angiosperms. © 2014 German Botanical Society and The Royal Botanical Society of the Netherlands.

  4. Determination of chlorinated volatile organic compounds in polyamine epichlorohydrin solution by headspace gas chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Ning; Wan, Xiao-Fang; Chai, Xin-Sheng; Chen, Run-Quan

    2017-05-05

    This study demonstrated a headspace gas chromatographic (HS-GC) method for the determination of residual epichlorohydrin (ECH) and the by-product 1,3-dichloro-2-propanol (DCP) in polyamine epichlorohydrin (PAE) solution. It was based on the vapor-liquid phase equilibrium of these analytes at 60°C for 30min in a closed headspace sample vial before GC measurement. It was found that matrix of the PAE solution had the effect on the headspace equilibrium of these species and therefore a standard addition must be applied in the method validation. The results showed that the present method has a good measurement precision (RSD volatile organic compounds in the commercial PAE resin solutions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Technology projects for characterization--monitoring of volatile organic compounds (VOCs)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Junk, G.A.; Haas, W.J. Jr.

    1992-07-01

    One hundred thirty technology project titles related to the characterization of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) at an arid site are listed alphabetically by first contact person in a master compilation that includes phone numbers, addresses, keywords, and short descriptions. Separate tables are presented for 62 field-demonstrated, 36 laboratory-demonstrated, and 35 developing technology projects. The technology projects in each of these three categories are also prioritized in separate summary tables. Additional tables are presented for a number of other categorizations of the technology projects: In Situ; Fiberoptic; Mass Spectrometer; Optical Spectroscopy; Raman or SERS; Ion Mobility or Acoustic; Associated; and Commercial. Four lists of contact person names are provided so details concerning the projects that deal with sampling, and VOCs in gases, waters, and soils (sediments) can be obtained. Finally, seven wide-ranging conclusions based on observations and experiences during this work are presented.

  6. Microporous Polyamide Membranes for Molecular Sieving of Nitrogen from Volatile Organic Compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Haoli; Tao, Fei; Liu, Quan; Zong, Chunxin; Yang, Wenchao; Cao, Xingzhong; Jin, Wanqin; Xu, Nanping

    2017-05-15

    Microporous polymer membranes continue to receive tremendous attention for energy-efficient gas separation processes owing to their high separation performances. A new network microporous polyamide membrane with good molecular-sieving performance for the separation of N2 from a volatile organic compound (VOC) mixture is described. Triple-substituted triptycene was used as the main monomer to form a fisherman's net-shaped polymer, which readily forms a composite membrane by solution casting. This membrane exhibited outstanding separation performance and good stability for the molecular-sieving separation of N2 over VOCs such as cyclohexane. The rejection rate of the membrane reached 99.2 % with 2098 Barrer N2 permeability at 24 °C under 4 kPa. This approach promotes development of microporous membranes for separation of condensable gases. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. [Environmental monitoring of volatile organic compounds and metallic elements in two analysis laboratories].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergonzi, Roberto; De Palma, Giuseppe; Apostoli, Pietro

    2011-01-01

    Environmental monitoring of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in analytical chemistry laboratories is somewhat tricky because exposure levels are highly variable and the number of toxic compounds, often used in combination, may be very high. This study was designed to evaluate airborne levels of VOCs and metallic elements associated to inhalable dusts in two Italian labs. The airborne levels of VOCs and elements fell well below the occupational exposure limit values recorded in the Italian law (D.lgs. 81/2008, Allegato XXXVIII) and the TLV-TWA from the list of American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists. The determination of measurable levels of toxic and potentially carcinogenic compounds in office rooms may be of interest for personnel not specifically engaged to handle chemicals.

  8. A Reduced Reaction Scheme for Volatile Nitrogen Conversion in Coal Combustion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Lars Saaby; Glarborg, Peter; Dam-Johansen, Kim

    1998-01-01

    In pulverised coal flames, the most important volatile nitrogen component forming NOx is HCN. To be able to model the nitrogen chemistry in coal flames it is necessary to have an adequate model for HCN oxidation. The present work was concerned with developing a model for HCN/NH3/NO conversion bas...

  9. Elevated carbon dioxide reduces emission of herbivore induced volatiles in Zea mays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terpene volatiles produced by sweet corn (Zea mays) upon infestation with pests such as beet armyworm (Spodoptera exigua) function as part of an indirect defense mechanism by attracting parasitoid wasps; yet little is known about the impact of atmospheric changes on this form of plant defense. To in...

  10. Human reactions to a mixture of indoor air volatile organic compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kjærgaard, Søren K.; Mølhave, Lars; Pedersen, Ole F.

    A controlled experimental study of human reactions to a mixture of 22 volatile organic compounds often found in indoor air was performed in a climate chamber. Twenty-one healthy subjects were compared with a group of 14 subjects suffering from the 'sick building syndrome' (SBS subjects), i.e. having symptoms related to the indoor environment (irritated mucous membranes, headache, etc.) as defined by WHO in 1982. In groups of 4 these subjects were exposed during two successive periods to either 0 and 0 mg m -3, 25 and 0 mg m -3, or 0 and 25 mg m -3; 25 mg m -3 is equivalent to the highest concentrations expected in a new building. The study was double blinded, and a latin square design was used to balance out effects of day in the week and season. Both groups reacted subjectively to the air reporting worse odor, worse indoor air quality as defined by the subject, and more irritated mucous membranes in eye, throat and nose than in the clean environment. A tendency to a stronger response was seen among the SBS subjects. Objective measures indicated among others an exposure related reduction in lung function among SBS subjects. Both groups had an increased number of polymorphonuclear leucocytes in tear fluid as a result of exposure. This was not seen for nasal secretions. Psychological performance tests indicated an exposure related diminished ability to learn. In conclusion, the experiment indicates that exposure to volatile organic compounds in low concentrations as seen in new houses causes both subjective complaints and objective signs in normal healty subjects; but more so in subjects from the sick building syndrome.

  11. Evaporation losses and dispersion of volatile organic compounds from tank farms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howari, Fares M

    2015-05-01

    The present study is an application of a Gaussian dispersion model to evaluate volatilization losses from tank farms. It reports methodology to estimate evaporation losses of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from organic liquid in storage tanks. This study used fixed roof and floating roof equations for breathing and working losses. Total loss, the breathing loss, vapor pressure, molecular weight of the product, tank diameter, diurnal temperature, paint factor, tank capacity, and number of turnovers were considered and factored in the calculation. AERMOD and ALOHA softwares were used to simulate the dispersion of VOCs under normal and accidental scenarios. For the modeling purposes, meteorological data such as annual average ambient temperature, annual average atmospheric pressure, daily minimum ambient temperature, daily maximum ambient temperature, solar insulation factor, and average wind speed were included as input in the calculation and modeling activities. The study took place in Sharjah Emirate in United Arab Emirates, which borders Dubai to the south and Ajman to the north, and the three form a conurbation. The reported method was used to estimate evaporation losses for baseline and hypothetical leak scenarios. Results of this research show that liquid storage tanks in the study area emit a low concentration of VOC under the studied and assumed conditions, e.g., new tanks with high performance sealing as well as the noted earlier climatic conditions. The dispersion of those concentrations is controlled by the prevailing wind direction. The predicted VOCs concentrations were within the range of the measured VOCs values in air. The study found that the spatial distributions of the predicted concentration attenuate with time and distance. Under the reported accidental spill scenario, the Gaussian model indicates that the danger area starts within the zone of less than 10 m. The danger area is subjected to flame pockets, and the VOC concentrations in this

  12. Exhaled volatile organic compounds for phenotyping chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: a cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Basanta Maria

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Non-invasive phenotyping of chronic respiratory diseases would be highly beneficial in the personalised medicine of the future. Volatile organic compounds can be measured in the exhaled breath and may be produced or altered by disease processes. We investigated whether distinct patterns of these compounds were present in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD and clinically relevant disease phenotypes. Methods Breath samples from 39 COPD subjects and 32 healthy controls were collected and analysed using gas chromatography time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Subjects with COPD also underwent sputum induction. Discriminatory compounds were identified by univariate logistic regression followed by multivariate analysis: 1. principal component analysis; 2. multivariate logistic regression; 3. receiver operating characteristic (ROC analysis. Results Comparing COPD versus healthy controls, principal component analysis clustered the 20 best-discriminating compounds into four components explaining 71% of the variance. Multivariate logistic regression constructed an optimised model using two components with an accuracy of 69%. The model had 85% sensitivity, 50% specificity and ROC area under the curve of 0.74. Analysis of COPD subgroups showed the method could classify COPD subjects with far greater accuracy. Models were constructed which classified subjects with ≥2% sputum eosinophilia with ROC area under the curve of 0.94 and those having frequent exacerbations 0.95. Potential biomarkers correlated to clinical variables were identified in each subgroup. Conclusion The exhaled breath volatile organic compound profile discriminated between COPD and healthy controls and identified clinically relevant COPD subgroups. If these findings are validated in prospective cohorts, they may have diagnostic and management value in this disease.

  13. Simultaneous analysis of phytohormones, phytotoxins, and volatile organic compounds in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmelz, Eric A; Engelberth, Juergen; Alborn, Hans T; O'Donnell, Phillip; Sammons, Matt; Toshima, Hiroaki; Tumlinson, James H

    2003-09-02

    Phytohormones regulate the protective responses of plants against both biotic and abiotic stresses by means of synergistic or antagonistic actions referred to as signaling crosstalk. A bottleneck in crosstalk research is the quantification of numerous interacting phytohormones and regulators. The chemical analysis of salicylic acid, jasmonic acid, indole-3-acetic acid, and abscisic acid is typically achieved by using separate and complex methodologies. Moreover, pathogen-produced phytohormone mimics, such as the phytotoxin coronatine (COR), have not been directly quantified in plant tissues. We address these problems by using a simple preparation and a GC-MS-based metabolic profiling approach. Plant tissue is extracted in aqueous 1-propanol and mixed with dichloromethane. Carboxylic acids present in the organic layer are methylated by using trimethylsilyldiazomethane; analytes are volatilized under heat, collected on a polymeric absorbent, and eluted with solvent into a sample vial. Analytes are separated by using gas chromatography and quantified by using chemical-ionization mass spectrometry that produces predominantly [M+H]+ parent ions. We use this technique to examine levels of COR, phytohormones, and volatile organic compounds in model systems, including Arabidopsis thaliana during infection with Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000, corn (Zea mays) under herbivory by corn earworm (Helicoverpa zea), tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) after mechanical damage, and tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum) during drought stress. Numerous complex changes induced by pathogen infection, including the accumulation of COR, salicylic acid, jasmonic acid, indole-3-acetic acid, and abscisic acid illustrate the potential and simplicity of this approach in quantifying signaling crosstalk interactions that occur at the level of synthesis and accumulation.

  14. Volatile organic compound production and consumption by microbial plankton communities on the NOAA WACS cruise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giovannoni, S. J.; Halsey, K.; Thrash, J. C.; De Gouw, J. A.; Graus, M.

    2013-12-01

    Information about biological sources and sinks of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the ocean surface could result in a better understanding of the underlying causes of variation in air/sea VOC fluxes, and potentially could alter predictions about the impact of climate change on ocean surface ecology and air/sea interactions. The goal of this work was to measure rates of biological production, oxidation and assimilation of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) by microbial plankton communities along the WACS cruise transect from Boston to Bermuda in August 2013. Tangential flow filtration was used to concentrate microbial plankton communities for incubation in environmentally controlled dynamic stripping chambers under simulated ocean surface layer conditions. Gas streams exiting the chambers were monitored in real time with proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS). In separate experiments aliquots of plankton suspensions were incubated with 14C-methanol, 14C-TMAO, and 14C-pyruvate, and the assimilation of 14C into biomass and the production of 14C-CO2 were measured. Results showed that the highly productive George's Bank plankton community has a high capacity for methanol and trimethylamine oxide (TMAO) oxidation. Biomass was estimated by counting cells. The rate of incorporation of methanol-carbon into biomass was only 21% of the rate of methanol oxidation to CO2. Similar results were observed for TMAO. These experiments also allowed estimates of kinetic constants for both compounds. The half-saturation constants (Ks) for methanol oxidation were similar in natural populations collected at George's Bank and the Sargasso Sea (12.8 and 9.9 μM, respectively). Interestingly, the Ks values for TMAO oxidation were an order of magnitude lower than for methanol in plankton communities sampled from both sites (0.5 and 0.3 μM, respectively). These results provide additional evidence that microbial plankton have a high capacity for oxidation of these low

  15. Measurement and estimated health risks of volatile organic compounds and polychlorinated biphenyls in air at the Hanford Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patton, G.W.; Cooper, A.T.; Blanton, M.L.

    1994-10-01

    A variety of radioactive and nonradioactive chemicals have been released in effluent streams and discharged to waste disposal facilities during the nuclear materials production period at the Hanford Site. Extensive environmental surveillance for radioactive materials has occurred at Hanford; however, only limited information is available on the types and concentrations of organic pollutants potentially present. This report describes work performed to provide the Hanford Site Surface Environmental Surveillance Project with representative air concentration data for volatile organic compounds and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). US Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) volatile organic compound sampling methods evaluated for Hanford Site use were carbon-based adsorbent traps (TO-2) and Summa air canisters (TO-14). Polychlorinated biphenyls were sampled using USEPA method (TO-4), which uses glass fiber filters and polyurethane foam adsorbent beds to collect the PCBs. This report also presents results for environmental surveillance samples collected for volatile organic compound and PCB analyses from 1990 to 1993. All measured air concentrations of volatile organic compounds and PCBs were well below applicable maximum allowable concentration standards for air contaminants. Because of the lack of ambient air concentration standards, a conservative estimate is provided of the potential human health impacts from exposure to the ambient air concentrations measured on the Hanford Site.

  16. Determination of volatile halogenated organic compounds in the tropical terrestrial ecosystem

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quintana, A.; Lopez-Garriga, J. [Univ. of Puerto Rico, Mayaguez (Puerto Rico)

    1995-12-01

    Volatile Halogenated Organic Compounds are discharged into our biosphere by plants, marine organisms, fungi and by other natural processes. Due to the high rate of evaporation of the tropical terrestrial ecosystem, the production of VHOC by fungi, higher plants and other organisms may be one of the most important sources of the total amount of VHOC released to the atmosphere from biogenic origin. The main goal of this research was to determine the VHOC`s released to the surroundings from biogenic origin in the tropical terrestrial ecosystem. Using vacuum distillation with cryogenic trapping and a thermal desorption unit coupled to a GC-ECD, we found that samples of air, water and soil contains 36.418 ng/L, 0.222 ng/mL and 9.156 ng/g (wet) of chloroform. Microorganisms such as the Actinomycetes and Halobacterium salinarium were also analyzed for VHOC`S contents. Carbontetrachloride, 1,1-dichloroethene, dichlorodifluoromethane, trichlorofluoromethane and other VHOC`S of environmental importance were determined. This is the first time that the presence of VHOC`S is reported in pure cultured bacteria.

  17. Sniffing on microbes: diverse roles of microbial volatile organic compounds in plant health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bitas, Vasileios; Kim, Hye-Seon; Bennett, Joan W; Kang, Seogchan

    2013-08-01

    Secreted proteins and metabolites play diverse and critical roles in organismal and organism-environment interactions. Volatile organic compounds (VOC) can travel far from the point of production through the atmosphere, porous soils, and liquid, making them ideal info-chemicals for mediating both short- and long-distance intercellular and organismal interactions. Critical ecological roles for animal- and plant-derived VOC in directing animal behaviors and for VOC as a language for plant-to-plant communication and regulators of various physiological processes have been well documented. Similarly, microbial VOC appear to be involved in antagonism, mutualism, intra- and interspecies regulation of cellular and developmental processes, and modification of their surrounding environments. However, the available knowledge of how microbial VOC affect other organisms is very limited. Evidence supporting diverse roles of microbial VOC with the focus on their impact on plant health is reviewed here. Given the vast diversity of microbes in nature and the critical importance of microbial communities associated with plants for their ecology and fitness, systematic exploration of microbial VOC and characterization of their biological functions and ecological roles will likely uncover novel mechanisms for controlling diverse biological processes critical to plant health and will also offer tangible practical benefits in addressing agricultural and environmental problems.

  18. The Amazonian Floodplains, an ecotype with challenging questions on volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kesselmeier, J.

    2012-12-01

    Volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions are affected by a variety of biotic and abiotic factors such as light intensity, temperature, CO2 and drought. Another factor usually overlooked but very important for the tropical rainforest in Amazonia is regular flooding. According to recent estimates, the total Amazonian floodplain area easily ranges up to 700,000 km^2, including whitewater river floodplains (várzea) blackwater regions (igapó) and further clearwater regions. Regarding the total Amazonian wetlands the area sums up to more than 2.000.000 km^2, i.e. 30% of Amazonia. To survive the flooding periods causing anoxic conditions for the root system of up to several months, vegetation has developed several morphological, anatomical and physiological strategies. One is to switch over the root metabolism to fermentation, thus producing ethanol as one of the main products. Ethanol is a toxic metabolite which is transported into the leaves by the transpiration stream. From there it can either be directly emitted into the atmosphere, or can be re-metabolized to acetaldehyde and/or acetate. All of these compounds are volatile enough to be partly released into the atmosphere. We observed emissions of ethanol, acetaldehyde and acetic acid under root anoxia. Furthermore, plant stress induced by flooding also affected leaf primary physiological processes as well as other VOC emissions such as the release of isoprenoids and other volatiles. For example, Hevea spruceana could be identified as a monoterpene emitting tree species behaving differently upon anoxia depending on the origin, with increasing emissions of the species from igapó and decreasing with the corresponding species from várzea. Contrasting such short term inundations, studies of VOC emissions under long term conditions (2-3 months) did not confirm the ethanol/acetaldehyde emissions, whereas emissions of other VOC species decreased considerably. These results demonstrate that the transfer of our knowledge

  19. Surface and boundary layer exchanges of volatile organic compounds, nitrogen oxides and ozone during the GABRIEL campaign

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ganzeveld, L.N.; Eerdekens, G.; Feig, G.; Vilà-Guerau de Arellano, J.

    2008-01-01

    We present an evaluation of sources, sinks and turbulent transport of nitrogen oxides, ozone and volatile organic compounds (VOC) in the boundary layer over French Guyana and Suriname during the October 2005 GABRIEL campaign by simulating observations with a single-column chemistry and climate model

  20. Canopy light cues affect emission of constitutive and methyl jasmonate-induced volatile organic compounds in Arabidopsis thaliana

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kegge, W.; Weldegergis, B.T.; Soler, R.; Vergeer-van Eijk, M.H.; Dicke, M.; Voesenek, L.A.C.J.; Pierik, R.

    2013-01-01

    The effects of plant competition for light on the emission of plant volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were studied by investigating how different light qualities that occur in dense vegetation affect the emission of constitutive and methyl-jasmonate-induced VOCs. Arabidopsis thaliana Columbia

  1. 40 CFR Table 1 to Subpart B of... - Volatile Organic Compound (VOC) Content Limits for Automobile Refinish Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Volatile Organic Compound (VOC) Content... Compound (VOC) Content Limits for Automobile Refinish Coatings Coating category Grams VOC per liter Pounds VOC per gallon a Pretreatment wash primers 780 6.5 Primers/primer surfacers 580 4.8 Primer sealers 550...

  2. Operation of a catalytic reverse flow reactor for the purification of air contamined with volatile organic compounds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Beld, L.; van de Beld, L.; Westerterp, K.R.

    1997-01-01

    Catalytic oxidation in a reverse flow reactor is an attractive process for the decontamination of air polluted with volatile organic compounds (VOCs). In this paper several aspects of operating this type of reactor for air purification under strongly varying conditions will be discussed. For a

  3. Screening of microbial volatile organic compounds for detection of disease in cattle: development of lab-scale method

    Science.gov (United States)

    The quest to find unique marker volatile organic compounds (VOCs) associated with human, livestock and wildlife diseases (Ellis et al., 2014) requires development of diagnostic non-invasive point-of-care tools and field surveillance technologies and strategies. The objective of this research was to ...

  4. Application of ion-selective electrodes for the microdetermination of chlorine and bromine in volatile organic compounds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Potman, W.; Dahmen, E.A.M.F.

    1972-01-01

    A method is described for the determination of chlorine and bromine in mg samples of highly halogenated volatile organic compounds. The samples are introduced into the combustion system by injection and burnt in a stream of oxygen at 1000° over platinum and quartz. The combustion gases are absorbed

  5. Theoretical study on volatile organic compound removal and energy performance of a novel heat pump assisted solid desiccant cooling system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nie, Jinzhe; Fang, Lei; Zhang, Ge

    2015-01-01

    A theoretical model was established for predicting the volatile organic compound (VOC) removal and energy performance of a novel heat pump assisted solid desiccant cooling system (HP-SDC). The HP-SDC was proposed based on the combination of desiccant rotor with heat pump, and was designed...

  6. Field measurements of perceived air quality and concentration of volatile organic compounds in four offices of the university building

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolarik, Jakub; Toftum, Jørn; Kabrhel, M.

    2015-01-01

    to investigate the perceived air quality, sensory pollution load and concentration of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) in the offices. As the refurbishment comprised also installation of demand controlled ventilation (DCV), its influence on the perceived air quality was also tested. Measurements comprised...

  7. Volatile Organic Compound (VOC) emissions from feedlot pen surface materials as affected by within pen location, moisture, and temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    A laboratory study was conducted to evaluate the effects of pen location, moisture, and temperature on emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOC) from surface materials obtained from feedlot pens where beef cattle were fed a diet containing 30% wet distillers grain plus solubles. Surface material...

  8. Headspace GC-MS Analysis of Halogenated Volatile Organic Compounds in Aqueous Samples: An Experiment for General Chemistry Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, John W.; Fabbri, Cindy E.

    2012-01-01

    Analysis of halogenated volatile organic compounds (HVOCs) by GC-MS demonstrates the use of instrumentation in the environmental analysis of pollutant molecules and enhances student understanding of stable isotopes in nature. In this experiment, students separated and identified several HVOCs that have been implicated as industrial groundwater…

  9. The influence of temperature on the emission of volatile organic compounds from PVC flooring, carpet, and paint

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wal, J.F. van der; Hoogeveen, A.W.; Wouda, P.

    1997-01-01

    The influence of temperature on the emission rate of volatile organic compounds (VOC) from four indoor materials was investigated in a small dynamic test chamber. The materials investigated were two carpets, a PVC flooring and a paint; the temperature range investigated was 23-50°C. The general

  10. Estimating exposure to volatile organic compounds from municipal water-supply systems: use of a better computational model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aral, M M; Maslia, M L; Ulirsch, G V; Reyes, J J

    1996-01-01

    The Southington, Connecticut, water-supply system is characterized by a distribution network that contains more than 1 700 pipeline segments of varying diameters and construction materials, more than 186 mi (299 km) of pipe, 9 groundwater extraction wells capable of pumping more than 4 700 gal/min (0.2965 m3/s), and 3 municipal reservoirs. Volatile organic compounds, which contaminated the underlying groundwater reservoir during the 1970s, contaminated the water-supply system and exposed the town's residents to volatile organic chemicals. We applied a computational model to the water-supply system to characterize and quantify the distribution of volatile organic compounds in the pipelines, from which we estimated the demographic distribution of potential exposure to the town's residents. Based on results from modeling analyses, we concluded the following: (a) exposure to volatile organic compound contamination may vary significantly from one census block to another, even when these census blocks are adjacent to each other within a specified radius; (b) maximum spatial spread of contamination in a water-distribution system may not occur under peak demand conditions, and, therefore, maximum spatial distribution of the exposed population also may not correspond to peak demand conditions, and (c) use of the proposed computational model allows for a more refined and rigorous methodology with which to estimate census-block-level contamination for exposure assessment and epidemiologic investigations.

  11. CONTROL OF VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS BY AN AC ENERGIZED FERROELECTRIC PELLET REACTOR AND A PULSED CORONA REACTOR

    Science.gov (United States)

    The paper gives results of a study to develop baseline engineering data to demonstrate the feasibility of application of plasma reactors to the destruction of various volatile organic compounds at ppm levels. Two laboratory-scale reactors, an alternating current energized ferroel...

  12. 78 FR 9823 - Air Quality: Revision to Definition of Volatile Organic Compounds-Exclusion of a Group of Four...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-12

    ... of Risk to Human Health or the Environment D. Conclusion III. Public Comments IV. Final Action V...: Consultation and Coordination with Indian Tribal Governments G. Executive Order 13045: Protection of Children... Ozone Reactivity Scales for Volatile Organic Compositions,'' Journal of the Air & Waste Management...

  13. CHARACTERIZATION OF LOW-VOC LATEX PAINTS: VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUND CONTENT, VOC AND ALDEHYDE EMISSIONS, AND PAINT PERFORMANCE

    Science.gov (United States)

    The report gives results of laboratory tests to evaluate commercially available latex paints advertised as "low-odor," "low-VOC (volatile organic compound)," or "no-VOC." Measurements were performed to quantify the total content of VOCs in the paints...

  14. VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUND EMISSIONS FROM LATEX PAINT-PART 2. TEST HOUSE STUDIES AND INDOOR AIR QUALITY (IAQ) MODELING

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emission models developed using small chamber data were combined with an Indoor Air Quality (IAQ) model to analyze the impact of volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions from latex paint on indoor environments. Test house experiments were conducted to verify the IAQ model's pred...

  15. Volatile organic compounds at oil and natural gas production well pads in Colorado and Texas using passive samplers

    Science.gov (United States)

    A pilot study was conducted in application of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Methods 325A/B variant for monitoring volatile organic compounds (VOCs) near two oil and natural gas (ONG) production well pads in the Texas Barnett Shale formation and Colorado Denver&nd...

  16. Ambient ionization and direct identification of volatile organic compounds with microwave-induced plasma mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dandan; Tian, Yong-Hui; Zhao, Zhongjun; Li, Wenwen; Duan, Yixiang

    2015-02-01

    An innovative method of volatile organic compounds analysis by using microwave-induced plasma ionization (MIPI) source in combination with an ambient ion trap mass spectrometer is presented here. Using MIPI for direct sample vapor, analysis was achieved without any sample preparation or subsequent heating. The relative abundance of the target compounds can be obtained almost instantly within a few seconds. The ionization processes of different volatile compounds was optimized, and the limits of detection were identified in the range of 0.15-4.5 pptv or 0.73-8.80 pg ml(-1). The relative standard deviation (RSD) is in the range of 4-14%, while correlation coefficients of the working curves (R(2)) are better than 0.98. The new method possesses advantages of ease operation, time-saving, high sensitivity and inexpensive setup. In addition, the ionization processes of short n-alkane chains were investigated with the MIPI technique, and a unique [M + 13](+) was detected, which has not been reported in detail by any other related ionization techniques. An ionization mechanism was proposed on the basis of the experimental results obtained in this work and available information in literatures, in which the n-alkanes in the plasma environment possibly generate protonated cyclopentadiene [M - 5](+) or alkyl-substituted analogues as well as hydrous ions [M + 13](+) and [M + 13 + 18](+), as shown in Scheme 1 in the main text. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. Toxic volatile organic compounds in environmental tobacco smoke: Emission factors for modeling exposures of California populations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daisey, J.M.; Mahanama, K.R.R.; Hodgson, A.T. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)

    1994-10-01

    The primary objective of this study was to measure emission factors for selected toxic air contaminants in environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) using a room-sized environmental chamber. The emissions of 23 volatile organic compounds (VOCs), including, 1,3-butadiene, three aldehydes and two vapor-phase N-nitrosamines were determined for six commercial brands of cigarettes and reference cigarette 1R4F. The commercial brands were selected to represent 62.5% of the cigarettes smoked in California. For each brand, three cigarettes were machine smoked in the chamber. The experiments were conducted over four hours to investigate the effects of aging. Emission factors of the target compounds were also determined for sidestream smoke (SS). For almost all target compounds, the ETS emission factors were significantly higher than the corresponding SS values probably due to less favorable combustion conditions and wall losses in the SS apparatus. Where valid comparisons could be made, the ETS emission factors were generally in good agreement with the literature. Therefore, the ETS emission factors, rather than the SS values, are recommended for use in models to estimate population exposures from this source. The variabilities in the emission factors ({mu}g/cigarette) of the selected toxic air contaminants among brands, expressed as coefficients of variation, were 16 to 29%. Therefore, emissions among brands were Generally similar. Differences among brands were related to the smoked lengths of the cigarettes and the masses of consumed tobacco. Mentholation and whether a cigarette was classified as light or regular did not significantly affect emissions. Aging was determined not to be a significant factor for the target compounds. There were, however, deposition losses of the less volatile compounds to chamber surfaces.

  18. Volatile organic compounds obtained by in vitro callus cultivation of Plectranthus ornatus Codd. (Lamiaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passinho-Soares, Helna C; Meira, Paloma R; David, Juceni P; Mesquita, Paulo R R; do Vale, Ademir E; de M Rodrigues, Frederico; de P Pereira, Pedro A; de Santana, José Raniere F; de Oliveira, Fabio S; de Andrade, Jailson B; David, Jorge M

    2013-08-26

    Plectranthus spp (Lamiaceae) are plants of economic importance because they are sources of aromatic essential oils and are also cultivated and several species of this genus are used as folk medicines. This paper describes the effects of different concentrations of the 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) and 1-naphthaleneacetic acid (NAA) on the induction of callus from nodal segments of Plectranthus ornatus Codd and in the production of volatile organic compounds (monoterpenes and sesquiterpenes). The 20 and 40 day calli were subjected to solid phase micro extraction (HS-SPME) and submitted to GCMS analysis. Variations in VOCs between the samples were observed and, a direct relationship was observed between of the major constituent detected (α-terpinyl acetate) and the monoterpenes α-thujene, α-pinene, β-pinene, camphene, sabinene and α-limonene that were present in the volatile fractions. Besides α-terpinyl acetate, isobornyl acetate and α-limonene were also major constituents. Variations were observed in VOCs in the analyzed periods. The best cultivation media for the production of VOCs was found to be MS0 (control). Moderate success was achieved by treatment with 2.68 µM and 5:37 µM NAA (Group 2). With 2,4-D (9.0 µM), only the presence of α-terpinyl acetate and isocumene were detected and, with 2.26 µM of 2,4-D was produced mainly α-terpinyl acetate, α-thujene and β-caryophyllene (16.2%). The VOC profiles present in P. ornatus were interpreted using PCA and HCA. The results permitted us to determine the best cultivation media for VOC production and, the PCA and HCA analysis allowed us to recognize four groups among the different treatments from the compounds identified in this set of treatments.

  19. Volatile Organic Compounds Obtained by in Vitro Callus Cultivation of Plectranthus ornatus Codd. (Lamiaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio S. de Oliveira

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Plectranthus spp (Lamiaceae are plants of economic importance because they are sources of aromatic essential oils and are also cultivated and several species of this genus are used as folk medicines. This paper describes the effects of different concentrations of the 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D and 1-naphthaleneacetic acid (NAA on the induction of callus from nodal segments of Plectranthus ornatus Codd and in the production of volatile organic compounds (monoterpenes and sesquiterpenes. The 20 and 40 day calli were subjected to solid phase micro extraction (HS-SPME and submitted to GCMS analysis. Variations in VOCs between the samples were observed and, a direct relationship was observed between of the major constituent detected (α-terpinyl acetate and the monoterpenes α-thujene, α-pinene, β-pinene, camphene, sabinene and α-limonene that were present in the volatile fractions. Besides α-terpinyl acetate, isobornyl acetate and α-limonene were also major constituents. Variations were observed in VOCs in the analyzed periods. The best cultivation media for the production of VOCs was found to be MS0 (control. Moderate success was achieved by treatment with 2.68 µM and 5:37 µM NAA (Group 2. With 2,4-D (9.0 µM, only the presence of α-terpinyl acetate and isocumene were detected and, with 2.26 µM of 2,4-D was produced mainly α-terpinyl acetate, α-thujene and β-caryophyllene (16.2%. The VOC profiles present in P. ornatus were interpreted using PCA and HCA. The results permitted us to determine the best cultivation media for VOC production and, the PCA and HCA analysis allowed us to recognize four groups among the different treatments from the compounds identified in this set of treatments.

  20. Volatile organics off-gassed among tobacco-exposed clothing fabrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chien, Yeh-Chung; Chang, Cheng-Ping; Liu, Zheng-Zhe

    2011-10-15

    This work evaluates the characteristics of short-term release of volatile and semi-volatile organic chemicals from clothing fabrics that are exposed to environmental tobacco smoke (ETS). Various fabrics were concurrently exposed to ETS in a controlled facility, and the chemicals off-gassed were sampled using solid phase micro-extraction coupled with GC/MS analysis. Toluene-reference concentration (TRC) was calculated for nine selected chemicals and compared. The number of chemicals identified from ETS-exposed fabrics ranged from 13 (polyester and acetate) to 32 (linen). All fabrics off-gassed formaldehyde, tetradecanoic acid and n-hexadecanoic acid, while seven out of eight fabrics emitted furfural, benzonitrile, naphthalene and decanal. Natural fibers of plant origin (cotton and linen) off-gassed higher concentrations (TRC>100 μg/l) of chemicals that have low molecular weight (~100 or less) than did natural fibers of animal origin (wool and silk) and synthetic fibers. Conversely, wool and silk off-gassed more chemicals that are of high molecular weight (>200), such as TDA (TRC>100 μg/l) and n-HDA (TRC>500 μg/l), than did other fabrics. Fabric structure (for a particular material) significantly affects chemical off-gassing. Cotton typically used for polo shirt (knitted) off-gassed significantly (p<0.05) higher TRC for chemicals with molecular weight of ~100 (such as furfural) than did other cottons of woven style. The dyeing of fabric (white vs. black) had a limited effect on emission, while increasing contact time with ETS increased the intensity of chemical emissions. The mean TRC for cotton exposed for 12 min was nearly doubled than those exposed for 8min, but no difference existed for polyester. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  1. Comparative Toxicity of Combined Particle and Semi-Volatile Organic Fractions of Gasoline and Diesel Emissions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mauderly, Joe; Seagrave, JeanClare; McDonald, Jacob; Gigliotti,Andrew; Nikula, Kristen; Seilkop, Steven; Gurevich, Michael

    2002-08-25

    Little is known about the relative health hazards presented by emissions from in-use gasoline and diesel engines. Adverse health effects have been ascribed to engine emissions on the basis of: (1) the presence of known toxic agents in emissions; (2) high-dose animal and bacterial mutagenicity tests; and (3) studies indicating gradients of health effects with proximity to roadways. Most attention has been given to the particulate fraction of emissions; little attention has been given to the semi-volatile organic fraction. However, the semi-volatile fraction overlaps the particulate fraction in composition and is always present in the vicinity of fresh emissions. Although the potential health effects of diesel emissions have been frequently studied and debated during the past 20 years (EPA, 2002), relatively little attention has been given to the toxicity of emissions from gasoline engines. In view of the considerable progress in cleaning up diesel emissions, it would be useful to compare the toxicity of emissions from contemporary on-road diesel technology with that of emissions from the in-use gasoline fleet that is well-accepted by the public. It would also be useful to have a set of validated tests for rapid, cost-effective comparisons of the toxicity of emission samples, both for comparisons among competing technologies (e.g., diesel, gasoline, natural gas) and for determining the impacts of new fuel, engine, and after-treatment strategies on toxicity. The Office of Heavy Vehicle Technologies has sponsored research aimed at developing and applying rapid-response toxicity tests for collected emission samples (Seagrave et al., 2000). This report presents selected results from that work, which is being published in much greater detail in the peer-reviewed literature (Seagrave et al., 2002).

  2. FIELD SCREENING FOR HALOGENATED VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS: THE NEW X-WAND HVOC SCREENING DEVICE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John F. Schabron; Susan S. Sorini; Joseph F. Rovani Jr

    2006-03-01

    Western Research Institute (WRI) has developed new methodology and a test kit to screen soil or water samples for halogenated volatile organic compounds (HVOCs) in the field. The technology has been designated the X-Wand{trademark} screening tool. The new device uses a heated diode sensor that is commonly used to detect leaks of refrigerants from air conditioners, freezers, and refrigerators. This sensor is selective to halogens. It does not respond to volatile aromatic hydrocarbons, such as those in gasoline, and it is not affected by high humidity. In the current work, the heated diode leak detectors were modified further to provide units with rapid response and enhanced sensitivity. The limit of detection for trichloroethylene TCE in air is 0.1 mg/m{sup 3} (S/N = 2). The response to other HVOCS relative to TCE is similar. Variability between sensors and changes in a particular sensor over time can be compensated for by normalizing sensor readings to a maximum sensor reading at 1,000 mg/m{sup 3} TCE. The soil TCE screening method was expanded to include application to water samples. Assuming complete vaporization, the detection limit for TCE in soil is about 1 ug/kg (ppb) for a 25-g sample in an 8-oz jar. The detection limit for TCE in water is about 1 ug/L (ppb) for a 25-mL sample in an 8-oz jar. This is comparable to quantitation limits of EPA GC/MS laboratory methods. A draft ASTM method for screening TCE contaminated soils using a heated diode sensor was successfully submitted for concurrent main committee and subcommittee balloting in ASTM Committee D 34 on Waste Management. The method was approved as ASTM D 7203-05, Standard Test Method for Screening Trichloroethylene (TCE)-Contaminated Soil Using a Heated Diode Sensor.

  3. Insect herbivore feeding and their excretion contribute to volatile organic compounds emission to the atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zebelo, S.; Gnavi, G.; Bertea, C.; Bossi, S.; Andrea, O.; Cordero, C.; Rubiolo, P.; Bicchi, C.; Maffei, M.

    2011-12-01

    Secondary plant metabolites play an important role in insect plant interactions. The Lamiaceae family, especially Mentha species, accumulate secondary plant metabolites in their glandular trichomes, mainly mono and sesquiterpenes. Here we show that mint plants respond to herbivory by changing the quality and quantity of leaf secondary plant metabolite components. The volatiles from herbivore damaged, mechanical damage and healthy plant were collected by HS-SPME and analyzed by GC-MS. Plants with the same treatment were kept for genomic analysis. Total RNA was extracted from the above specified treatments. The terpenoid quantitative gene expressions (qPCR) were then assayed. Upon herbivory, M. aquatica synthesizes and emits (+)-menthofuran and the other major monoterpene (+)-pulegone emitted by healthy and mechanically damaged plants. Herbivory was found to up-regulate the expression of genes involved in terpenoid biosynthesis. The increased emission of (+)-menthofuran was correlated with the upregulation of (+)-menthofuran synthase. In addition we analysed the VOC composition of C. herbacea frass from insects feeding on Mentha aquatica. VOCs were sampled by HS-SPME and analyzed by GCxGC-qMS, and the results compared through quantitative comparative analysis of 2D chromatographic data. Most terpenoids from M. aquatica were completely catabolized by C. herbacea and were absent in the frass volatile fraction. On the other hand, the monoterpene 1,8-cineole was oxidized and frass yielded several new hydroxy-1,8-cineoles, among which 2α-OH-, 3α-OH-, 3β-OH- and 9-OH-1,8-cineole. The role of VOC emitted during herbivory and frass excretion on secondary organic aerosol formation is discussed.

  4. Investigation of volatile organic biomarkers derived from Plasmodium falciparum in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wong Rina PM

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There remains a need for techniques that improve the sensitive detection of viable Plasmodium falciparum as part of diagnosis and therapeutic monitoring in clinical studies and usual-care management of malaria infections. A non-invasive breath test based on P. falciparum-associated specific volatile organic compounds (VOCs could fill this gap and provide insights into parasite metabolism and pathogenicity. The aim of this study was to determine whether VOCs are present in the headspace above in vitro P. falciparum cultures. Methods A novel, custom-designed apparatus was developed to enable efficient headspace sampling of infected and non-infected cultures. Conditions were optimized to support cultures of high parasitaemia (>20% to improve the potential detection of parasite-specific VOCs. A number of techniques for VOC analysis were investigated including solid phase micro-extraction using two different polarity fibres, and purge and trap/thermal desorption, each coupled to gas chromatography–mass spectrometry. Each experiment and analysis method was performed at least on two occasions. VOCs were identified by comparing their mass spectra against commercial mass spectral libraries. Results No unique malarial-specific VOCs could be detected relative to those in the control red blood cell cultures. This could reflect sequestration of VOCs into cell membranes and/or culture media but solvent extractions of supernatants and cell lysates using hexane, dichloromethane and ethyl acetate also showed no obvious difference compared to control non-parasitized cultures. Conclusions Future in vivo studies analysing the breath of patients with severe malaria who are harbouring a parasite biomass that is significantly greater than achievable in vitro may yet reveal specific clinically-useful volatile chemical biomarkers.

  5. Measurements of semi-volatile organic compounds in settled dust: influence of storage temperature and duration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanchard, O; Mercier, F; Ramalho, O; Mandin, C; Le Bot, B; Glorennec, P

    2014-04-01

    Indoor dust samples cannot always be analyzed immediately after collection. However, little information is currently available on how storage conditions may affect measurements. This study was designed to determine how sample storage conditions may affect the concentration of semi-volatile organic compounds (SVOCs) in the dust. A composite dust was prepared using a Standard Reference Material (SRM 2585) with real indoor dust samples. The composite dust was stored in various types of packaging, at different temperatures (-18°C, 5°C, 20°C, and 35°C), and in different light conditions. The concentration of SVOCs was measured after various storage durations. No effect on SVOC concentrations was observed for the composite dust stored in an amber glass vial at -18°C for 36 months. At 5°C, 20°C, and 35°C, losses occurred for the more volatile compounds. The experimental storage conditions clearly showed that temperature and duration affected the concentrations of SVOCs in the composite dust. The type of packaging material (polyethylene zip bag or polyethylene garbage bag) did not seem to have a systematic effect on the preservation of SVOCs in the composite dust. Maximum storage duration times are proposed for each compound at various temperatures. For most compounds, samples can be stored for 2 months at 20°C. For samples that cannot be analyzed immediately, we recommend to store them in the dark at -18°C to ensure a good recovery of all tested compounds. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Groundwater geochemical and selected volatile organic compound data, Operable Unit 1, Naval Undersea Warfare Center, Division Keyport, Washington, June 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huffman, Raegan L.; Frans, L.M.

    2012-01-01

    Previous investigations indicate that concentrations of chlorinated volatile organic compounds are substantial in groundwater beneath the 9-acre former landfill at Operable Unit 1, Naval Undersea Warfare Center, Division Keyport, Washington. Phytoremediation combined with ongoing natural attenuation processes was the preferred remedy selected by the U.S. Navy, as specified in the Record of Decision for the site. The U.S. Navy planted two hybrid poplar plantations on the landfill in spring 1999 to remove and to control the migration of chlorinated volatile organic compounds in shallow groundwater. The U.S. Geological Survey has continued to monitor groundwater geochemistry to ensure that conditions remain favorable for contaminant biodegradation as specified in the Record of Decision. This report presents groundwater geochemical and selected volatile organic compound data collected at Operable Unit 1 by the U.S. Geological Survey during June 20-22, 2011, in support of long-term monitoring for natural attenuation. In 2011, groundwater samples were collected from 13 wells and 9 piezometers. Samples from all wells and piezometers were analyzed for redox sensitive constituents and dissolved gases, and samples from 5 of 13 wells and all piezometers also were analyzed for chlorinated volatile organic compounds. Concentrations of redox sensitive constituents measured in 2011 were consistent with previous years, with dissolved oxygen concentrations all at 0.4 milligram per liter or less; little to no detectable nitrate; abundant dissolved manganese, iron, and methane; and commonly detected sulfide. The reductive declorination byproducts - methane, ethane, and ethene - were either not detected in samples collected from the upgradient wells in the landfill and the upper aquifer beneath the northern phytoremediation plantation or were detected at concentrations less than those measured in 2010. Chlorinated volatile organic compound concentrations in 2011 at most piezometers

  7. Differentiating a diverse range of volatile organic compounds with polyfluorophore sensors built on a DNA scaffold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samain, Florent; Dai, Nan; Kool, Eric T

    2011-01-03

    Oligodeoxyfluorosides (ODFs) are short DNA-like oligomers in which DNA bases are replaced with fluorophores. A preliminary study reported that some sequences of ODFs were able to respond to a few organic small molecules in the vapor phase, giving a change in fluorescence. Here, we follow up on this finding by investigating a larger range of volatile organic analytes, and a considerably larger set of sensors. A library of tetramer ODFs of 2401 different sequences was prepared by using combinatorial methods, and was screened in air for fluorescence responses to a set of ten different volatile organics, including multiple aromatic and aliphatic compounds, acids and bases, varied functional groups, and closely related structures. Nineteen responding sensors were selected and characterized. These sensors were cross-screened against all ten analytes, and responses were measured qualitatively (by changes in color and intensity) and quantitatively (by measuring ΔR, ΔG, and ΔB values averaged over five to six sensor beads; R=red, G=green, B=blue). The results show that sensor responses were diverse, with a single sensor responding differently to as many as eight of the ten analytes; multiple classes of responses were seen, including quenching, lighting-up, and varied shifts in wavelength. Responses were strong, with raw ΔR, ΔG, and ΔB values of as high as >200 on a 256-unit scale and unamplified changes in many cases apparent to the naked eye. Sensors were identified that could distinguish clearly between even very closely related compounds such as acrolein and acrylonitrile. Statistical methods were applied to select a small set of four sensors that, as a pattern response, could distinguish between all ten analytes with high confidence. Sequence analysis of the full set of sensors suggested that sequence/order of the monomer components, and not merely composition, was highly important in the responses. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. 78 FR 23149 - Air Quality: Revision to Definition of Volatile Organic Compounds-Exclusion of trans 1-chloro-3,3...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-18

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 51 RIN 2060-AQ38 Air Quality: Revision to Definition of Volatile Organic Compounds...: Withdrawal of direct final rule. SUMMARY: EPA published a direct final rule, Air Quality: Revision to Definition of Volatile Organic Compounds--Exclusion of trans 1-chloro- 3,3,3-trifluoroprop-1-ene , on...

  9. Performance evaluation of volatile organic compounds by antagonistic yeasts immobilized on hydrogel spheres against gray, green and blue postharvest decays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parafati, Lucia; Vitale, Alessandro; Restuccia, Cristina; Cirvilleri, Gabriella

    2017-05-01

    Wickerhamomyces anomalus, Metschnikowia pulcherrima, Aureobasidium pullulans and Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeasts were tested for their ability to survive and synthesize antifungal volatile organic compounds (VOCs) both in vitro and in vivo conditions when immobilized on commercial hydrogel spheres. The results showed a good survival of all yeasts on hydrogel spheres up to 10 days of incubation. Moreover, VOCs produced in vitro by tested yeasts inhibited Botrytis cinerea, Penicillium digitatum and P. italicum radial growth and conidial germination, with the highest antagonistic activity reported for W. anomalus and A. pullulans strains. Experimental in vivo trials performed on strawberry and mandarin fruits proved the ability of VOCs to reduce significantly postharvest decays on artificially wounded tissues. Comprehensively, the best efficacy was detected for W. anomalus, which totally inhibited gray mold decay on strawberry fruits and significantly reduced green mold infections on mandarin fruits. On the other hand, blue mold decay on mandarin fruits was more effectively managed by A. pullulans VOCs. Accordingly, hydrogel spheres used as a support for VOC-generating yeasts could open a new way for the employment of this polymeric material as a bio-emitter in postharvest packaging. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Anaerobic fermentation of organic solid wastes: volatile fatty acid production and separation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yesil, H; Tugtas, A E; Bayrakdar, A; Calli, B

    2014-01-01

    Anaerobic fermentation of organic municipal solid waste was investigated using a leach-bed reactor (LBR) to assess the volatile fatty acid (VFA) production efficiency. The leachate recycle rate in the LBR affected the VFA composition of the leachate. A six-fold increase in the recycle rate resulted in an increase of the acetic acid fraction of leachate from 24.7 to 43.0%. The separation of VFAs via leachate replacement resulted in higher total VFA production. VFA separation from synthetic VFA mix and leachate of a fermented organic waste was assessed via a counter-current flow polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) membrane contactor. Acetic and propionic acid permeation fluxes of 13.12 and 14.21 g/m(2).h were obtained at low feed pH values when a synthetic VFA mix was used as a feed solution. The highest selectivity was obtained for caproic acid compared to that of other VFAs when synthetic VFA mix or leachate was used as a feed solution. High pH values and the presence of suspended solids in the leachate adversely affected the permeation rate.

  11. Biochar for volatile organic compound (VOC) removal: Sorption performance and governing mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xueyang; Gao, Bin; Zheng, Yulin; Hu, Xin; Creamer, Anne Elise; Annable, Michael D; Li, Yuncong

    2017-12-01

    Sorption is one of the most efficient and low cost strategies for volatile organic compound (VOC) removal, but VOC sorption by biochar has seen limited research. In this work, gas phase sorption experiments were conducted to determine the sorption potential and mechanisms of VOCs onto biochar. A total of 15 biochars produced from 5 common feedstocks at 300, 450, and 600°C were evaluated as sorbents. Three common VOCs (acetone, cyclohexane, and toluene) were chosen as sorbates. The results showed that all the tested biochars had VOC sorption capacity in the range of 5.58-91.2mgg-1. The sorption capacities were mainly influenced by both the surface area of biochar and its noncarbonized organic matter content. The vapor sorption process was exothermic, and the removal of VOCs by the biochars decreased with increasing feedstock temperature. Both the physical adsorption and partition mechanisms played important roles in controlling the VOC removal by the biochars. Biochar maintained its VOC removal ability after five consecutive sorption-desorption cycles, which indicated good reusability. Findings of this work suggest that biochar is a promising alternative sorbent for gaseous VOC removal. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Proteomic response of the phytopathogen Phyllosticta citricarpa to antimicrobial volatile organic compounds from Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fialho, Mauricio Batista; de Andrade, Alexander; Bonatto, José Matheus Camargo; Salvato, Fernanda; Labate, Carlos Alberto; Pascholati, Sérgio Florentino

    2016-02-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) released by Saccharomyces cerevisiae inhibit plant pathogens, including the filamentous fungus Phyllosticta citricarpa, causal agent of citrus black spot. VOCs mediate relevant interactions between organisms in nature, and antimicrobial VOCs are promising, environmentally safer fumigants to control phytopathogens. As the mechanisms by which VOCs inhibit microorganisms are not well characterized, we evaluated the proteomic response in P. citricarpa after exposure for 12h to a reconstituted mixture of VOCs (alcohols and esters) originally identified in S. cerevisiae. Total protein was extracted and separated by 2D-PAGE, and differentially expressed proteins were identified by LC-MS/MS. About 600 proteins were detected, of which 29 were downregulated and 11 were upregulated. These proteins are involved in metabolism, genetic information processing, cellular processes, and transport. Enzymes related to energy-generating pathways, particularly glycolysis and the tricarboxylic acid cycle, were the most strongly affected. Thus, the data indicate that antimicrobial VOCs interfere with essential metabolic pathways in P. citricarpa to prevent fungal growth. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  13. Malodorous volatile organic sulfur compounds: Sources, sinks and significance in inland waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Susan B; Jüttner, Friedrich

    2017-03-01

    Volatile Organic Sulfur Compounds (VOSCs) are instrumental in global S-cycling and greenhouse gas production. VOSCs occur across a diversity of inland waters, and with widespread eutrophication and climate change, are increasingly linked with malodours in organic-rich waterbodies and drinking-water supplies. Compared with marine systems, the role of VOSCs in biogeochemical processes is far less well characterized for inland waters, and often involves different physicochemical and biological processes. This review provides an updated synthesis of VOSCs in inland waters, focusing on compounds known to cause malodours. We examine the major limnological and biochemical processes involved in the formation and degradation of alkylthiols, dialkylsulfides, dialkylpolysulfides, and other organosulfur compounds under different oxygen, salinity and mixing regimes, and key phototropic and heterotrophic microbial producers and degraders (bacteria, cyanobacteria, and algae) in these environs. The data show VOSC levels which vary significantly, sometimes far exceeding human odor thresholds, generated by a diversity of biota, biochemical pathways, enzymes and precursors. We also draw attention to major issues in sampling and analytical artifacts which bias and preclude comparisons among studies, and highlight significant knowledge gaps that need addressing with careful, appropriate methods to provide a more robust understanding of the potential effects of continued global development.

  14. Natural attenuation of chlorinated volatile organic compounds in a freshwater tidal wetland, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorah, Michelle M.; Olsen, Lisa D.; Smith, Barrett L.; Johnson, Mark A.; Fleck, William B.

    1997-01-01

    Ground-water contaminant plumes that are flowing toward or currently discharging to wetland areas present unique remediation problems because of the hydrologic connections between ground water and surface water and the sensitive habitats in wetlands. Because wetlands typically have a large diversity of microorganisms and redox conditions that could enhance biodegradation, they are ideal environments for natural attenuation of organic contaminants, which is a treatment method that would leave the ecosystem largely undisturbed and be cost effective. During 1992-97, the U.S. Geological Survey investigated the natural attenuation of chlorinated volatile organic compounds (VOC's) in a contaminant plume that discharges from a sand aquifer to a freshwater tidal wetland along the West Branch Canal Creek at Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland. Characterization of the hydrogeology and geochemistry along flowpaths in the wetland area and determination of the occurrence and rates of biodegradation and sorption show that natural attenuation could be a feasible remediation method for the contaminant plume that extends along the West Branch Canal Creek.

  15. Volatile organic compound mediated interactions at the plant-microbe interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junker, Robert R; Tholl, Dorothea

    2013-07-01

    Microorganisms colonize the surfaces of plant roots, leaves, and flowers known as the rhizosphere, phyllosphere, and anthosphere. These spheres differ largely in a number of factors that may determine the ability of microbes to establish themselves and to grow in these habitats. In this article, we focus on volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emitted by plants, and we discuss their effects on microbial colonizers, with an emphasis on bacteria. We present examples of how growth-inhibiting properties and mechanisms of VOCs such as terpenoids, benzenoid compounds, aliphatics, and sulfur containing compounds prevent bacterial colonization at different spheres, in antagonism with their role as carbon-sources that support the growth of different bacterial taxa. The notion that VOCs represent important factors that define bacterial niches is further supported by results for representatives of two bacterial genera that occupy strongly diverging niches based on scent emissions of different plant species and organs. Bacteria are known to either positively or negatively affect plant fitness and to interfere with plant-animal interactions. Thus, bacteria and other microbes may select for VOCs, enabling plants to control microbial colonizers on their surfaces, thereby promoting the growth of mutualists and preventing the establishment of detrimental microbes.

  16. Plant volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in ozone (O3) polluted atmospheres: the ecological effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, Delia M; Blande, James D; Souza, Silvia R; Nerg, Anne-Marja; Holopainen, Jarmo K

    2010-01-01

    Tropospheric ozone (O3) is an important secondary air pollutant formed as a result of photochemical reactions between primary pollutants, such as nitrogen oxides (NOx), and volatile organic compounds (VOCs). O3 concentrations in the lower atmosphere (troposphere) are predicted to continue increasing as a result of anthropogenic activity, which will impact strongly on wild and cultivated plants. O3 affects photosynthesis and induces the development of visible foliar injuries, which are the result of genetically controlled programmed cell death. It also activates many plant defense responses, including the emission of phytogenic VOCs. Plant emitted VOCs play a role in many eco-physiological functions. Besides protecting the plant from abiotic stresses (high temperatures and oxidative stress) and biotic stressors (competing plants, micro- and macroorganisms), they drive multitrophic interactions between plants, herbivores and their natural enemies e.g., predators and parasitoids as well as interactions between plants (plant-to-plant communication). In addition, VOCs have an important role in atmospheric chemistry. They are O3 precursors, but at the same time are readily oxidized by O3, thus resulting in a series of new compounds that include secondary organic aerosols (SOAs). Here, we review the effects of O3 on plants and their VOC emissions. We also review the state of current knowledge on the effects of ozone on ecological interactions based on VOC signaling, and propose further research directions.

  17. Assessment of semi-volatile organic compounds in drinking water sources in Jiangsu, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yifeng; Jia, Yongzhi; Lu, Xiwu

    2013-08-01

    Many xenobiotic compounds, especially organic pollutants in drinking water, can cause threats to human health and natural ecosystems. The ability to predict the level of pollutants and identify their source is crucial for the design of pollutant risk reduction plans. In this study, 25 semi-volatile organic compounds (SVOCs) were assessed at 16 monitoring sites of drinking water sources in Jiangsu, east China, to evaluate water quality conditions and source of pollutants. Four multivariate statistical techniques were used for this analysis. The correlation test indicated that 25 SVOCs parameters variables had a significant spatial variability (Psources, i.e., agricultural residual pesticides, industrial sewage, water transportation vehicles and miscellaneous sources, were responsible for the presence of SVOCs in the drinking water sites examined, accounting for 89.6% of the total variance in the dataset. The analysis of site similarity showed that 16 sites could be divided into high, moderate, and low pollutant level groups at (D(link)/D(max))×25water sources. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Factorization methods applied to characterize the sources of volatile organic compounds in Montreal, Quebec

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eugeniusz Porada

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The study objective was to assemble emission characteristics of the sources of the ambient volatile organic compounds (VOCs and to elaborate methods of organizing them into the sources’ chemical profiles. Material and Methods: The UNMIX – sensor modeling method from the U.S. Environment Protection Agency (EPA – was used to process the VOC concentration data acquired over the years 2000–2009 for 175 VOC species in 4 air quality monitoring stations in Montreal, Quebec. Results: The method enabled to assess VOC emissions from the typically distributed sources existing in urban environment and VOC occurrences characterizing the local, or point-like, sources. The distributed sources were inextricably associated with hydrocarbons from exhaust, heavier hydrocarbons from contaminated urban soil, fugitive evaporations of gasoline and liquefied petroleum gases (LPG, leakage from the industrial and commercial use of solvents, and the inert, ozone depleting gases permeating urban atmosphere. The sources’ profiles were charted involving 60–120 VOC species per source. Spatial distribution of the sources was examined. Conclusions: The UNMIX application and the source profiling methods, by building robust chemical profiles of VOC sources, provided information that can be used to assign the measured VOC emissions to physical sources. This, in turn, provides means of assessing the impact of environmental policies, on one hand, and of industrial activities on the other hand on VOC air pollution.

  19. Diurnal and seasonal variability of gasoline-related volatile organic compound emissions in Riverside, California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gentner, Drew R; Harley, Robert A; Miller, Angela M; Goldstein, Allen H

    2009-06-15

    On- and off-road mobile sources are the dominant contributors to urban anthropogenic volatile organic compound (AVOC) emissions. Analyses of gasoline samples from California for both summer and winter indicate significant differences in liquid fuel and vapor chemical composition due to intentional seasonal adjustments. Ambient concentrations of 55 VOCs were measured via in situ gas chromatography in the 2005 Study of Organic Aerosols at Riverside (SOAR) during both summer and fall. A chemical mass balance analysis was used to differentiate vapor pressure-driven VOC emissions from other motor vehicle-related emissions such as tailpipe exhaust. Overall, fuel vapor emissions accounted for 31 +/- 2% of gasoline-related VOC in Riverside; California's emission factor model similarly estimates 31% of gasoline-related VOC emissions are fuel vapor. The diurnal pattern of vapor pressure-driven VOC source contributions is relatively stable around 10 microg/m3, while whole gasoline (i.e., tailpipe) contributions peak at approximately 60 microg/m3 during the morning commute. There is no peak in whole gasoline source contributions during the afternoon, due to rapid dilution associated with high mixing heights and wind speeds in the Riverside area. The relationship between estimated gasoline-related VOC and observed carbon monoxide concentrations in this study is similar to California's 2005 emission inventory; we calculated a VOC to CO mass ratio of 0.086 +/- 0.006 (95% CI) compared to 0.097 in the emission inventory for all gasoline-related sources.

  20. Reactive oxidation products promote secondary organic aerosol formation from green leaf volatiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. F. Hamilton

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Green leaf volatiles (GLVs are an important group of chemicals released by vegetation which have emission fluxes that can be significantly increased when plants are damaged or stressed. A series of simulation chamber experiments has been conducted at the European Photoreactor in Valencia, Spain, to investigate secondary organic aerosol (SOA formation from the atmospheric oxidation of the major GLVs cis-3-hexenylacetate and cis-3-hexen-1-ol. Liquid chromatography-ion trap mass spectrometry was used to identify chemical species present in the SOA. Cis-3-hexen-1-ol proved to be a more efficient SOA precursor due to the high reactivity of its first generation oxidation product, 3-hydroxypropanal, which can hydrate and undergo further reactions with other aldehydes resulting in SOA dominated by higher molecular weight oligomers. The lower SOA yields produced from cis-3-hexenylacetate are attributed to the acetate functionality, which inhibits oligomer formation in the particle phase. Based on observed SOA yields and best estimates of global emissions, these compounds may be calculated to be a substantial unidentified global source of SOA, contributing 1–5 TgC yr−1, equivalent to around a third of that predicted from isoprene. Molecular characterization of the SOA, combined with organic mechanistic information, has provided evidence that the formation of organic aerosols from GLVs is closely related to the reactivity of their first generation atmospheric oxidation products, and indicates that this may be a simple parameter that could be used in assessing the aerosol formation potential for other unstudied organic compounds in the atmosphere.

  1. Effect of a fungal infection on the profile of volatile organic compounds emitted by plant roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiers, M; Lognay, G; Wathelet, J P; Fauconnier, M L; Jijakli, M H

    2012-01-01

    It is known since few years that the aerial and underground parts of the plants emit volatile organic compounds (VOCs) that can interact with other organisms of the environment. They are involved in the attraction of seed dispersers and pollinators, the repellence of enemies via direct or indirect mechanisms and the induction of defence systems in other parts of the same plant or in other plants in the vicinity (Dudareva et al., 2006). It has been shown previously that the VOCs spectrum emitted by plants hardly depends on their physiological state (Kant et al., 2009). However those phenomenons were poorly studied at the edaphic level. Thus, the Rhizovol project, a multidisciplinary project in Gembloux Agro-Bio Tech was set up to study the emissions of VOCs by plant roots and their interactions with other organisms of the rhizosphere. As a partner of this project, the Plant Pathology Unit of Gembloux Agro-Bio Tech chose to study the effect of a fungal infection on the profile of VOCs emitted by plant roots, based on three model organisms, barley (Hordeum vulgare L.), since it is a major crop in Belgium that can suffer a large range of aggressions, and two pathogenic fungi, Cochliobolus sativus and Fusarium culmorum, responsible for root and foot rots and seedling blight on cereals (Wiese, 1977). Later in the development, C. sativus produces elongate brown-black lesions (spot blotch) and F. culmorum induces head blight and produces mycotoxins that make the grain unsuitable for consumption (Nielsen et al., 2011). The objective of this work was to identify the VOCs emitted during the dual interactions between barley roots and a pathogenic fungus. The study was performed in two steps; first, the independent analyses of the VOCs emitted by each of the partners (C. sativus, F. culmorum and healthy barley roots), then the analyses of the VOCs spectrum emitted during dual interactions.

  2. Aerogel volatiles concentrator and analyzer (AVCA) - Collection and concentration of trace volatile organics in aerogel for spectroscopic detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsapin, A.; Jones, S.; Petkov, M.; Borchardt, D.; Anderson, M.

    2017-03-01

    A study was conducted to determine the efficacy of using silica aerogel to collect and concentrate ambient trace organics for spectroscopic analysis. Silica aerogel was exposed to atmospheres containing trace amounts of polycyclic aromatic and aliphatic hydrocarbons. The organics present were concentrated in the aerogels by factors varying from 10 to more than 1000 over the levels found in the atmospheres, depending on the specific organic present. Since silica aerogel is transparent over a wide range of optical and near infrared wavelengths, UV-induced fluorescence, Raman and infrared spectroscopies were used to detect and identify the organics collected by the aerogel. Measurements were conducted to determine the sensitivity of these spectroscopic methods for determining organics concentrated by aerogels and the effectiveness of this method for identifying systems containing multiple organic species. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were added to simulated Mars regolith and then vaporized by modest heating in the presence of aerogel. The aerogels adsorbed and concentrated the PAHs, which were detected by induced fluorescence and Raman and FTIR spectroscopies.

  3. Adsorption of volatile organic compounds by metal-organic frameworks MIL-101: influence of molecular size and shape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Kun; Sun, Qian; Xue, Feng; Lin, Daohui

    2011-11-15

    Adsorption of gaseous volatile organic compounds (VOCs) on metal-organic frameworks MIL-101, a novel porous adsorbent with extremely large Langmuir surface area of 5870 m(2)/g and pore volume of 1.85 cm(3)/g, and the influence of VOC molecular size and shape on adsorption were investigated in this study. We observed that MIL-101 is a potential superior adsorbent for the sorptive removal of VOCs including polar acetone and nonpolar benzene, toluene, ethylbeznene, and xylenes. MIL-101 is of higher adsorption capacities for all selected VOCs than zeolite, activated carbon and other reported adsorbents. Adsorption of VOCs on MIL-101 is captured by a pore filling mechanism, showing the size and shape selectivity of VOC molecules. These prove to be a negative linear relationship between the volume adsorption capacities of VOCs and their molecular cross-sectional area values. Most VOC molecules, such as acetone, benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and p-xylene, enter into MIL-101 pores with the planes having the minimum diameters. However, m-xylene and o-xylene may fill into the pores with the planes having the maximum diameters because of the preferred interaction of MIL-101 with the two methyl groups of adsorbate molecules. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Sawdust biochar application to rice paddy field: reduced nitrogen loss in floodwater accompanied with increased NH3 volatilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Yanfang; Sun, Haijun; Xue, Lihong; Wang, Yueman; Yang, Linzhang; Shi, Weiming; Xing, Baoshan

    2018-01-06

    Sawdust biochar (SDB) was for the first time applied to rice paddy field to evaluate its effects on potential nitrogen (N) runoff and ammonia (NH3) volatilization losses in a soil column experimental system. Results showed that total N concentration of surface floodwater under SDB treatments was reduced by 7.29-35.16, 16.34-32.35, and 12.21-28.12% after three split N fertilizations, respectively. Particularly, NH4+-N was decreased by 11.84-27.08, 14.29-36.50, and 2.97-19.64%, respectively. However, SDB addition has no significant influence on NO3--N concentration. Meanwhile, SDB application increased NH4+-N and total N content of top (0-15 cm) soil. Furthermore, these SDB-induced influences were more pronounced for 3 wt% SDB treatments. SDB treatments recorded 3.56-5.78 kg ha-1 higher NH3 volatilization than urea control treatment, which was attributed to the elevated pH values of floodwater and top soil induced by SDB. Fortunately, the yield-scale NH3 volatilization was not increased dramatically.

  5. The role of volatile organic compounds in the assessment of indoor air quality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johansson, Ingegerd [Royal Inst. of Tech., Stockholm (Sweden). Dept. of Chemistry and Karolinska Inst., Stockholm (Sweden). Inst. of Environmental Medicine

    1999-07-01

    The main aim of this thesis is to assess and evaluate the relevance of air pollutants, especially volatile organic compounds (VOC), for indoor air quality (IAQ) in non industrial environments. Another attempt is to find out whether indoor-air VOC may be linked to human health and sensory effects. The experiments included the development of a method to sample and analyze VOC in indoor air (adsorptive sampling/ gas chromatographic separation/mass spectrometric identification) as well as the application of this method in studies of adsorption/desorption of VOC in building materials and ventilation systems, and the occurrence and behavior of VOC in healthy and sick buildings. The method developed is well suited for indoor air VOC analysis, especially for the fine division in temporal intervals needed for the assessment of VOC in occupied rooms. The empirical results show that there is a continuous interplay, regarding VOC and semi volatile organic compounds (SVOC), between indoor materials and indoor air, between ventilation components and supply air, as well as among indoor materials. The results also show that there is an accumulation indoors of outdoor compounds, that are brought indoors by ventilation supply or by materials, such as clothes. Comparatively new statistical pattern analyses were applied to data obtained from indoor air VOC analyses in different locations in a sick and a healthy preschool. The results indicate that this approach may offer an opportunity to distinguish among different buildings and among different locations within buildings with regard to the indoor air composition of VOC. Although promising, further studies of the link between chemical pattern and sensory effects are needed. In a psychophysical experiment, it was shown that formaldehyde at the very low concentrations typical for indoor-air VOC could reliably be scaled with regard to perceived intensity and sensory detection thresholds be determined. Two methods of formaldehyde

  6. Determination of Volatile Organic Compounds in Fourty Five Salvia Species by Thermal Desorption-GC-MS Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seda Damla Hatipoglu

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Volatile organic compounds (VOC from dried aerial parts (flowers, leafs, leafy branches and stems of fourty five Salvia species, harvested from different regions of Turkey, were determined using thermal desorption technique coupled to gas chromatography-mass spectrometer (TD-GC-MS. Total percentages of the detected volatile organic compounds of the Salvia species ranged from 70.30 to 99.65% . Total yield of VOC was found to be highly variable among Salvia species, and the percentage of each component also exhibited high variation. While sesquiterpene hydrocarbons represented 0.90-45.02% of the volatile organic compounds, the others were found to be monoterpene hydrocarbons 0.00-32.25%, monoterpenoids 0.94- 53.60%, sesquiterpenoids 0.00- 31.45% and hydrocarbons and derivatives 2.99-46.87%. The rest of the composition consisted of diterpene alcohols, fatty acids, phenolics and triterpenes. In total, 108 volatile compounds were identified from studied 45 Anatolian Salvia species.

  7. Origin and variability in volatile organic compounds observed at an Eastern Mediterranean background site (Cyprus)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debevec, Cécile; Sauvage, Stéphane; Gros, Valérie; Sciare, Jean; Pikridas, Michael; Stavroulas, Iasonas; Salameh, Thérèse; Leonardis, Thierry; Gaudion, Vincent; Depelchin, Laurence; Fronval, Isabelle; Sarda-Esteve, Roland; Baisnée, Dominique; Bonsang, Bernard; Savvides, Chrysanthos; Vrekoussis, Mihalis; Locoge, Nadine

    2017-09-01

    More than 7000 atmospheric measurements of over 60 C2 - C16 volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were conducted at a background site in Cyprus during a 1-month intensive field campaign held in March 2015. This exhaustive dataset consisted of primary anthropogenic and biogenic VOCs, including a wide range of source-specific tracers, and oxygenated VOCs (with various origins) that were measured online by flame ionization detection-gas chromatography and proton transfer mass spectrometry. Online submicron aerosol chemical composition was performed in parallel using an aerosol mass spectrometer. This study presents the high temporal variability in VOCs and their associated sources. A preliminary analysis of their time series was performed on the basis of independent tracers (NO, CO, black carbon), meteorological data and the clustering of air mass trajectories. Biogenic compounds were mainly attributed to a local origin and showed compound-specific diurnal cycles such as a daily maximum for isoprene and a nighttime maximum for monoterpenes. Anthropogenic VOCs as well as oxygenated VOCs displayed higher mixing ratios under the influence of continental air masses (i.e., western Asia), indicating that long-range transport significantly contributed to the VOC levels in the area. Source apportionment was then conducted on a database of 20 VOCs (or grouped VOCs) using a source receptor model. The positive matrix factorization and concentration field analyses were hence conducted to identify and characterize covariation factors of VOCs that were representative of primary emissions as well as chemical transformation processes. A six-factor PMF solution was selected, namely two primary biogenic factors (relative contribution of 43 % to the total mass of VOCs) for different types of emitting vegetation; three anthropogenic factors (short-lived combustion source, evaporative sources, industrial and evaporative sources; 21 % all together), identified as being either of local origin

  8. Microbial volatile organic compounds in the air of moldy and mold-free indoor environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schleibinger, H; Laussmann, D; Bornehag, C-G; Eis, D; Rueden, H

    2008-04-01

    A single-blinded study was performed to analyze whether indoor environments with and without mold infestation differ significantly in microbial volatile organic compounds (MVOC) concentrations. Air sampling for MVOC was performed in 40 dwellings with evident mold damage and in 44 dwellings, where mold damage was excluded after a thorough investigation. The characteristics of the dwellings, climatic parameters, airborne particles and air exchange rates (AER) were recorded. The parameters mold status, characteristics of the interiors and measured climatic parameters were included in the multiple regression model. The results show no significant association between most of the analyzed MVOC and the mold status. Only the compounds 2-methyl-1-butanol and 1-octen-3-ol indicated a statistically significant, but weak association with the mold status. However, the concentrations of the so-called MVOC were mainly influenced by other indoor factors. 2-Methylfuran and 3-methylfuran, often used as main indicators for mold damage, had a highly significant correlation with the smoking status. These compounds were also significantly correlated with the humidity and the AER. The compounds 3-methyl-1-butanol, 2-hexanone, 3-heptanone and dimethyl disulfide were weakly correlated with the recorded parameters, the humidity being the strongest influencing factor. Only 2-methyl-1-butanol and 1-octen-3-ol showed a statistically significant association with the mold status; however, only a small portion (10% in this case) of the total variability could be explained by the predictor mold status; they do not qualify as indicator compounds, because such minor correlations lead to a too excessive part of incorrect classifications, meaning that the diagnostic sensitivity and specificity of these compounds are too low. The assumption that mold infestations might be detected by microbial VOC emissions must be considered with great reservation. The major part of the total variability of the

  9. Chemical evolution of volatile organic compounds in the outflow of the Mexico City Metropolitan area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Apel, Eric; Emmons, L.; Karl, Thomas G.; Flocke, Frank M.; Hills, A. J.; Madronich, Sasha; Lee-Taylor, J.; Fried, Alan; Weibring, P.; Walega, J.; Richter, Dirk; Tie, X.; Mauldin, L.; Campos, Teresa; Weinheimer, Andrew J.; Knapp, David; Sive, B.; Kleinman, Lawrence I.; Springston, S.; Zaveri, Rahul A.; Ortega, John V.; Voss, Paul B.; Blake, D. R.; Baker, Angela K.; Warneke, Carsten; Welsh-Bon, Daniel; de Gouw, Joost A.; Zheng, J.; Zhang, Renyi; Rudolph, Jochen; Junkermann, W.; Riemer, D.

    2010-01-01

    The volatile organic compound (VOC) distribution in the Mexico City Metropolitan Area (MCMA) and its evolution as it is uplifted and transported out of the MCMA basin was studied during the 2006 MILAGRO/MIRAGE-Mex field campaign. The results show that in the morning hours in the city center, the VOC distribution is dominated by non-methane hydrocarbons (NMHCs) but with a substantial contribution from oxygenated volatile organic compounds (OVOCs), predominantly from primary emissions. Alkanes account for a large part of the NMHC distribution in terms of mixing ratios. In terms of reactivity, NMHCs also dominate overall, especially in the morning hours. However, in the afternoon, as the boundary layer lifts and air is mixed and aged within the basin, the distribution changes as secondary products are formed. The WRF-Chem (Weather Research and Forecasting with Chemistry) model and MOZART (Model for Ozone and Related chemical Tracers) were able to reproduce the general features of the daytime cycle of the VOC OH reactivity distribution showing that NMHCs dominate the distribution except in the afternoon hours and that the VOC OH reactivity peaks in the early morning due to high morning emissions from the city into a shallow boundary layer. The WRF-Chem and MOZART models showed higher reactivity than the experimental data during the nighttime cycle, perhaps indicating problems with the modeled nighttime boundary layer height. In addition, a plume was studied in which air was advected out of the MCMA and intercepted downwind with the DOE G1 on March 18 and the NCAR C130 one day later on March 19. A number of identical species measured aboard each aircraft gave insight into the chemical evolution of the plume as it aged and was transported as far as 1000 km downwind. Ozone and many OVOCs were photochemically produced in the plume. The WRF-Chem and MOZART models were used to examine the spatial and temporal extent of the March 19 plume and to help interpret the OH

  10. Chemical evolution of volatile organic compounds in the outflow of the Mexico City Metropolitan area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Apel, E.; Springston, S.; Karl, T.; Emmons, L.; Flocke, F.; Hills, A. J.; Madronich, S.; Lee-Taylor, J.; Fried, A.; Weibring, P.; Walega, J.; Richter, D., Tie, X.; Mauldin, L.; Campos, T.; Sive, B.; Kleinman, L.; Springston, S., Zaveri, R.; deGouw, J.; Zheng, J.; Zhang, R.; Rudolph, J.; Junkermann, W.; Riemer, D. D.

    2009-11-01

    The volatile organic compound (VOC) distribution in the Mexico City Metropolitan Area (MCMA) and its evolution as it is uplifted and transported out of the MCMA basin was studied during the 2006 MILAGRO/MIRAGE-Mex field campaign. The results show that in the morning hours in the city center, the VOC distribution is dominated by non-methane hydrocarbons (NMHCs) but with a substantial contribution from oxygenated volatile organic compounds (OVOCs), predominantly from primary emissions. Alkanes account for a large part of the NMHC distribution in terms of mixing ratios. In terms of reactivity, NMHCs also dominate overall, especially in the morning hours. However, in the afternoon, as the boundary layer lifts and air is mixed and aged within the basin, the distribution changes as secondary products are formed. The WRF-Chem (Weather Research and Forecasting with Chemistry) model and MOZART (Model for Ozone and Related chemical Tracers) were able to reproduce the general features of the daytime cycle of the VOC OH reactivity distribution showing that NMHCs dominate the distribution except in the afternoon hours and that the VOC OH reactivity peaks in the early morning due to high morning emissions from the city into a shallow boundary layer. The WRF-Chem and MOZART models showed higher reactivity than the experimental data during the nighttime cycle, perhaps indicating problems with the modeled nighttime boundary layer height. In addition, a plume was studied in which air was advected out of the MCMA and intercepted downwind with the DOE G1 on 18 March and the NCAR C130 one day later on 19 March. A number of identical species measured aboard each aircraft gave insight into the chemical evolution of the plume as it aged and was transported as far as 1000 km downwind. Ozone and many OVOCs were photochemically produced in the plume. The WRF-Chem and MOZART models were used to examine the spatial and temporal extent of the 19 March plume and to help interpret the OH

  11. CCN activity and volatility of β-caryophyllene secondary organic aerosol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Frosch

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available In a series of smog chamber experiments, the cloud condensation nuclei (CCN activity of secondary organic aerosol (SOA generated from ozonolysis of β-caryophyllene was characterized by determining the CCN derived hygroscopicity parameter, κCCN, from experimental data. Two types of CCN counters, operating at different temperatures, were used. The effect of semi-volatile organic compounds on the CCN activity of SOA was studied using a thermodenuder.

    Overall, SOA was only slightly CCN active (with κCCN in the range 0.001–0.16, and in dark experiments with no OH scavenger present, κCCN decreased when particles were sent through the thermodenuder (with a temperature up to 50 °C.

    SOA was generated under different experimental conditions: In some experiments, an OH scavenger (2-butanol was added. SOA from these experiments was less CCN active than SOA produced in experiments without an OH scavenger (i.e. where OH was produced during ozonolysis. In other experiments, lights were turned on, either without or with the addition of HONO (OH source. This led to the formation of more CCN active SOA.

    SOA was aged up to 30 h through exposure to ozone and (in experiments with no OH scavenger present to OH. In all experiments, the derived κCCN consistently increased with time after initial injection of β-caryophyllene, showing that chemical ageing increases the CCN activity of β-caryophyllene SOA. κCCN was also observed to depend on supersaturation, which was explained either as an evaporation artifact from semi-volatile SOA (only observed in experiments lacking light exposure or, alternatively, by effects related to chemical composition depending on dry particle size.

    Using the method of Threshold Droplet Growth Analysis it was also concluded that the activation kinetics of the SOA do not differ significantly from calibration ammonium sulphate aerosol for

  12. Chemical evolution of volatile organic compounds in the outflow of the Mexico City Metropolitan area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. C. Apel

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The volatile organic compound (VOC distribution in the Mexico City Metropolitan Area (MCMA and its evolution as it is uplifted and transported out of the MCMA basin was studied during the 2006 MILAGRO/MIRAGE-Mex field campaign. The results show that in the morning hours in the city center, the VOC distribution is dominated by non-methane hydrocarbons (NMHCs but with a substantial contribution from oxygenated volatile organic compounds (OVOCs, predominantly from primary emissions. Alkanes account for a large part of the NMHC distribution in terms of mixing ratios. In terms of reactivity, NMHCs also dominate overall, especially in the morning hours. However, in the afternoon, as the boundary layer lifts and air is mixed and aged within the basin, the distribution changes as secondary products are formed. The WRF-Chem (Weather Research and Forecasting with Chemistry model and MOZART (Model for Ozone and Related chemical Tracers were able to approximate the observed MCMA daytime patterns and absolute values of the VOC OH reactivity. The MOZART model is also in agreement with observations showing that NMHCs dominate the reactivity distribution except in the afternoon hours. The WRF-Chem and MOZART models showed higher reactivity than the experimental data during the nighttime cycle, perhaps indicating problems with the modeled nighttime boundary layer height.

    A northeast transport event was studied in which air originating in the MCMA was intercepted aloft with the Department of Energy (DOE G1 on 18 March and downwind with the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR C130 one day later on 19 March. A number of identical species measured aboard each aircraft gave insight into the chemical evolution of the plume as it aged and was transported as far as 1000 km downwind; ozone was shown to be photochemically produced in the plume. The WRF-Chem and MOZART models were used to examine the spatial extent and temporal evolution of the plume

  13. Productions of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) in Surface Waters from Reactions with Atmospheric Ozone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopkins, Frances; Bell, Thomas; Yang, Mingxi

    2017-04-01

    Ozone (O3) is a key atmospheric oxidant, greenhouse gas and air pollutant. In marine environments, some atmospheric ozone is lost by reactions with aqueous compounds (e.g. dissolved organic material, DOM, dimethyl sulfide, DMS, and iodide) near the sea surface. These reactions also lead to formations of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Removal of O3 by the ocean remains a large uncertainty in global and regional chemical transport models, hampering coastal air quality forecasts. To better understand the role of the ocean in controlling O3 concentrations in the coastal marine atmosphere, we designed and implemented a series of laboratory experiments whereby ambient surface seawater was bubbled with O3-enriched, VOC-free air in a custom-made glass bubble equilibration system. Gas phase concentrations of a range of VOCs were monitored continuously over the mass range m/z 33 - 137 at the outflow of the bubble equilibrator by a proton transfer reaction - mass spectrometer (PTR-MS). Gas phase O3 was also measured at the input and output of the equilibrator to monitor the uptake due to reactions with dissolved compounds in seawater. We observed consistent productions of a variety of VOCs upon reaction with O3, notably isoprene, aldehydes, and ketones. Aqueous DMS is rapidly removed from the reactions with O3. To test the importance of dissolved organic matter precursors, we added increasing (milliliter) volumes of Emiliania huxleyi culture to the equilibrator filled with aged seawater, and observed significant linear increases in gas phase concentrations of a number of VOCs. Reactions between DOM and O3 at the sea-air interface represent a potentially significant source of VOCs in marine air and a sink of atmospheric O3.

  14. Hydroxyl radical reactions with volatile organic compounds under simulated tropospheric conditions: tropospheric lifetimes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Semadeni, M.

    1994-01-01

    Kinetic investigations of the hydroxyl radical reaction with volatile organic compounds (VOC) are important to estimate the potential of VOCs in air pollution. The temperature dependence of the rate coefficients of the hydroxyl radical reaction with members of two classes of organic compounds have been measured under simulated tropospheric conditions using a competitive technique rebuilt in this laboratory. A thermostat flow reactor was employed, which was specially constructed to investigate gas-phase reactions under atmospheric pressure. The hydroxyl radical reactions of the organic test compounds have been measured in the presence of given reference compounds over the temperature range (273-373) K using GC/FID. The rate coefficients obtained in the present study range from 11-42x10[sup -12] cm[sup 3] molecule[sup -1] s[sup -1] and from 1-52x10[sup -12] cm[sup 3] molecule[sup -1] s[sup -1] for the following ethers and aromatic compounds respectively: diethyl ether, methyl n-butyl ether, ethyl n-butyl ether, di-n-butyl ether, di-n-pentyl ether and benzene, toluene, benzaldehyde, phenol, o-cresol, m-cresol, p-cresol, arranged according to their increasing reactivity within their class. The temperature dependence of the hydroxyl radical with methyl n-butyl ether, di-n-butyl ether, m-cresol, p-cresol and benzaldehyde have been determined for the first time in this study. The Arrhenius parameters obtained confirm the negative temperature dependence often observed in this type of reaction. The results of the present study show, that the experimental system employed can provide accurate kinetic data and discrepancies occurred in previous studies have been resolved. (author) figs., tabs., refs.

  15. Long-term stability measurements of low concentration Volatile Organic Compound gas mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Nick; Amico di Meane, Elena; Brewer, Paul; Ferracci, Valerio; Corbel, Marivon; Worton, David

    2017-04-01

    VOCs (Volatile Organic Compounds) are a class of compounds with significant influence on the atmosphere due to their large anthropogenic and biogenic emission sources. VOC emissions have a significant impact on the atmospheric hydroxyl budget and nitrogen reservoir species, while also contributing indirectly to the production of tropospheric ozone and secondary organic aerosol. However, the global budget of many of these species are poorly constrained. Moreover, the World Meteorological Organization's (WMO) Global Atmosphere Watch (GAW) have set challenging data quality objectives for atmospheric monitoring programmes for these classes of traceable VOCs, despite the lack of available stable gas standards. The Key-VOCs Joint Research Project is an ongoing three-year collaboration with the aim of improving the measurement infrastructure of important atmospheric VOCs by providing traceable and comparable reference gas standards and by validating new measurement systems in support of the air monitoring networks. It focuses on VOC compounds that are regulated by European legislation, that are relevant for indoor air monitoring and for air quality and climate monitoring programmes like the VOC programme established by the WMO GAW and the European Monitoring and Evaluation Programme (EMEP). These VOCs include formaldehyde, oxy[genated]-VOCs (acetone, ethanol and methanol) and terpenes (a-pinene, 1,8-cineole, δ-3-carene and R-limonene). Here we present the results of a novel long term stability study for low concentration formaldehyde, oxy-VOC and terpenes gas mixtures produced by the Key-VOCs consortium with discussion regarding the implementation of improved preparation techniques and the use of novel cylinder passivation chemistries to guarantee mixture stability.

  16. Expression of terpene synthase genes associated with the formation of volatiles in different organs of Vitis vinifera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matarese, Fabiola; Cuzzola, Angela; Scalabrelli, Giancarlo; D'Onofrio, Claudio

    2014-09-01

    Plants produce a plethora of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) which are important in determining the quality and nutraceutical properties of horticultural food products, including the taste and aroma of wine. Given that some of the most prevalent grape aroma constituents are terpenoids, we investigated the possible variations in the relative expression of terpene synthase (TPS) genes that depend on the organ. We thus analysed mature leaves, young leaves, stems, young stems, roots, rachis, tendrils, peduncles, bud flowers, flowers and berries of cv Moscato bianco in terms of their VOC content and the expression of 23 TPS genes. In terms of the volatile characterization of the organs by SPME/GC-MS analysis, flower buds and open flowers appeared to be clearly distinct from all the other organs analysed in terms of their high VOC concentration. Qualitatively detected VOCs clearly separated all the vegetative organs from flowers and berries, then the roots and rachis from other vegetative organs and flowers from berries, which confirms the specialization in volatile production among different organs. Our real-time RT-PCR results revealed that the majority of TPS genes analysed exhibited detectable transcripts in all the organs investigated, while only some were found to be expressed specifically in one or just a few organs. In most cases, we found that the known products of the in vitro assay of VvTPS enzymes corresponded well to the terpenes found in the organs in which the encoding gene was expressed, as in the case of (E)-β-caryophyllene synthases, α-terpineol synthase and α-farnesene synthase. In addition, we found groups of homologous TPS genes, such as (E)-β-caryophyllene and β-ocimene synthases, expressed distinctively in the various tissues. This thus confirmed the subfunctionalization events and a specialization on the basis of the organs in which they are mostly expressed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Analysis of volatile organic compounds emitted by plant growth-promoting fungus Phoma sp. GS8-3 for growth promotion effects on tobacco.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naznin, Hushna Ara; Kimura, Minako; Miyazawa, Mitsuo; Hyakumachi, Mitsuro

    2013-01-01

    We extracted volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emitted by a plant growth-promoting fungus (PGPF) Phoma sp. GS8-3 by gas chromatography and identified them by mass spectrometry. All of the identified compounds belonged to C4-C8 hydrocarbons. Volatiles varied in number and quantity by the culture period of the fungus (in days). 2-Methyl-propanol and 3-methyl-butanol formed the main components of the volatile blends for all the culture periods of fungus. Growth-promoting effects of the identified synthetic compounds were analyzed individually and in blends using tobacco plants. We found that the mixture of volatiles extracted from 3-day-old culture showed significant growth promotion in tobacco in vitro. The volatile blend showed better growth promotion at lower than higher concentrations. Our results confirm the potential role of volatile organic compounds in the mechanism of growth enhancement by GS8-3.

  18. Electrospun Polyurethane/Loess Powder Hybrids and Their Absorption of Volatile Organic Compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Cong Ge

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the effects of composite electrospun polyurethane (PU/loess powder (LP fibers for absorption of volatile organic compounds (VOCs from air. PU films containing different amounts of LP (0, 10, 30, and 50 wt% LP with respect to PU nanoparticles (NPs were analyzed using FE-SEM, FTIR, and XRD experimental analyzers. Electron microscopy and spectroscopy indicated that the proper content of LP NPs is homogeneous dispersion in a polymer matrix. In addition, 50 wt% of LP results in a higher concentration spinning nanosuspension that leads to some agglomeration on the film surface. The chloroform, benzene, and toluene (VOCs absorption capacity of PU/LP composite films showed a trend of toluene > benzene > chloroform. The highest VOC absorption capacity was found with PU composite mats containing 30 wt% LP NPs. The high VOC absorption capacity of PU/LP composite films can be used to remove VOCs from a new house or car.

  19. Modeling Human Exposure Levels to Airborne Volatile Organic Compounds by the Hebei Spirit Oil Spill

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jong Ho; Kwak, Byoung Kyu; Ha, Mina; Cheong, Hae-Kwan

    2012-01-01

    Objectives The goal was to model and quantify the atmospheric concentrations of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) as the result of the Hebei Spirit oil spill, and to predict whether the exposure levels were abnormally high or not. Methods We developed a model for calculating the airborne concentration of VOCs that are produced in an oil spill accident. The model was applied to a practical situation, namely the Hebei Spirit oil spill. The accuracy of the model was verified by comparing the results with previous observation data. The concentrations were compared with the currently used air quality standards. Results Evaporation was found to be 10- to 1,000-fold higher than the emissions produced from a surrounding industrial complex. The modeled concentrations for benzene failed to meet current labor environmental standards, and the concentration of benzene, toluene, ortho- meta- para-xylene were higher than the values specified by air quality standards and guideline values on the ocean. The concentrations of total VOCs were much higher than indoor environmental criteria for the entire Taean area for a few days. Conclusions The extent of airborne exposure was clearly not the same as that for normal conditions. PMID:22468262

  20. Volatile Organic Compound (VOC measurements in the Pearl River Delta (PRD region, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-chung Chang

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available We measured levels of ambient volatile organic compounds (VOCs at seven sites in the Pearl River Delta (PRD region of China during the Air Quality Monitoring Campaign spanning 4 October to 3 November 2004. Two of the sites, Guangzhou (GZ and Xinken (XK, were intensive sites at which we collected multiple daily canister samples. The observations reported here provide a look at the VOC distribution, speciation, and photochemical implications in the PRD region. Alkanes constituted the largest percentage (>40% in mixing ratios of the quantified VOCs at six sites; the exception was one major industrial site that was dominated by aromatics (about 52%. Highly elevated VOC levels occurred at GZ during two pollution episodes; however, the chemical composition of VOCs did not exhibit noticeable changes during these episodes. We calculated the OH loss rate to estimate the chemical reactivity of all VOCs. Of the anthropogenic VOCs, alkenes played a predominant role in VOC reactivity at GZ, whereas the contributions of reactive aromatics were more important at XK. Our preliminary analysis of the VOC correlations suggests that the ambient VOCs at GZ came directly from local sources (i.e., automobiles; those at XK were influenced by both local emissions and transportation of air mass from upwind areas.