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Sample records for reduced nitrate leaching

  1. Strategies to increase nitrogen use efficiency and reduce nitrate leaching in vegetable production in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruijter, de F.J.; Berge, ten H.F.M.; Smit, A.L.

    2010-01-01

    Environmental concern and legislation of fertilization requires strategies to increase nitrogen use efficiency and reduce nitrate leaching. Strategies can be fertilizer choice, timing of N availability and fertilizer placement. Rainfall in the experimental year 2007 was moderate and different

  2. Nitrate leaching index

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Nitrate Leaching Index is a rapid assessment tool that evaluates nitrate (NO3) leaching potential based on basic soil and climate information. It is the basis for many nutrient management planning efforts, but it has considerable limitations because of : 1) an oversimplification of the processes...

  3. Nitrate Leaching Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nitrate (NO3) leaching is a significant nitrogen (N) loss process for agriculture that must be managed to minimize NO3 enrichment of groundwater and surface waters. Managing NO3 leaching should involve the application of basic principles of understanding the site’s hydrologic cycle, avoiding excess ...

  4. Evaluating Nitrogen Management Options for Reducing Nitrate Leaching from Northeast U.S. Pastures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William L. Stout

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Substantial amounts of nitrate nitrogen NO3-N can leach from intensively grazed pasture in the northeast U.S. where there is about 30 cm of groundwater recharge, annually. Management options for reducing NO3-N leaching were evaluated for this environment using the Cornell Net Carbohydrate and Protein System Model and a recently developed nitrogen leaching index. Management options utilizing energy supplementation of grazing dairy cows could improve nitrogen efficiency within the cow, but would not necessarily reduce NO3-N leaching at the pasture scale if stocking rate was not controlled. The management option of using white clover to supply nitrogen to the pasture decreased NO3-N leaching, but produced less dry matter yield, which in turn reduced stocking rate. The economic returns of reducing NO3-N with these options need to be evaluated in light of milk prices and commodity and fertilizer nitrogen costs. At current prices and costs, the economic benefit from the energy supplementation options is substantial.

  5. Influence of soil and climate heterogeneity on the performance of economic instruments for reducing nitrate leaching from agriculture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peña-Haro, Salvador; García-Prats, Alberto; Pulido-Velazquez, Manuel

    2014-11-15

    Economic instruments can be used to control groundwater nitrate pollution due to the intensive use of fertilizers in agriculture. In order to test their efficiency on the reduction of nitrate leaching, we propose an approach based on the combined use of production and pollution functions to derive the impacts on the expected farmer response of these instruments. Some of the most important factors influencing nitrate leaching and crop yield are the type of soil and the climatic conditions. Crop yield and nitrate leaching responses to different soil and climatic conditions were classified by means of a cluster analysis, and crops located in different areas but with similar response were grouped for the analysis. We use a spatial economic optimization model to evaluate the potential of taxes on nitrogen fertilizers, water prices, and taxes on nitrate emissions to reduce nitrate pollution, as well as their economic impact in terms of social welfare and farmers' net benefits. The method was applied to the Mancha Oriental System (MOS) in Spain, a large area with different soil types and climatic conditions. We divided the study area into zones of homogeneous crop production and nitrate leaching properties. Results show spatially different responses of crop growth and nitrate leaching, proving how the cost-effectiveness of pollution control instruments is contingent upon the spatial heterogeneities of the problem. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Reducing nitrate leaching to groundwater in an intensive dairy farming system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verloop, J.; Boumans, L.J.M.; Keulen, van H.; Oenema, J.; Hilhorst, G.J.; Aarts, H.F.M.; Sebek, L.B.J.

    2006-01-01

    Dairy farming is one of the main contributors to nitrate leaching to groundwater, particularly on soils that are susceptible to leaching, such as light well-drained sandy soils. In the Netherlands, as in many other European countries, these soils are predominantly used for dairy farming. A prototype

  7. Nitrate accumulation and leaching potential reduced by coupled water and nitrogen management in the Huang-Huai-Hai Plain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ping; Zhang, Jiabao; Zhu, Anning; Li, Xiaopeng; Ma, Donghao; Xin, Xiuli; Zhang, Congzhi; Wu, Shengjun; Garland, Gina; Pereira, Engil Isadora Pujol

    2018-01-01

    Irrigation and nitrogen (N) fertilization in excess of crop requirements are responsible for substantial nitrate accumulation in the soil profile and contamination of groundwater by nitrate leaching during intensive agricultural production. In this on-farm field trial, we compared 16 different water and N treatments on nitrate accumulation and its distribution in the soil profile (0-180cm), nitrate leaching potential, and groundwater nitrate concentration within a summer-maize (Zea mays L.) and winter-wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) rotation system in the Huang-Huai-Hai Plain over five cropping cycles (2006-2010). The results indicated that nitrate remaining in the soil profile after crop harvest and nitrate concentration of soil solutions at two depths (80cm and 180cm) declined with increasing irrigation amounts and increased greatly with increasing N application rates, especially for seasonal N application rates higher than 190kgNha -1 . During the experimental period, continuous torrential rainfall was the main cause for nitrate leaching beyond the root zone (180cm), which could pose potential risks for contamination of groundwater. Nitrate concentration of groundwater varied from 0.2 to 2.9mgL -1 , which was lower than the limit of 10mgL -1 as the maximum safe level for drinking water. In view of the balance between grain production and environmental consequences, seasonal N application rates of 190kgNha -1 and 150kgNha -1 were recommended for winter wheat and summer maize, respectively. Irrigation to the field capacity of 0-40cm and 0-60cm soil depth could be appropriate for maize and wheat, respectively. Therefore, taking grain yields, mineral N accumulation in the soil profile, nitrate leaching potential, and groundwater quality into account, coupled water and N management could provide an opportunity to promote grain production while reducing negative environmental impacts in this region. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Policy Incentives for Reducing Nitrate Leaching in Agricultural Lands: A Case Study of Irrigation and Drainage Dorudzan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheikhzeinoddin, A.; Esmaeili, A.; Zibaei, M.

    2016-01-01

    Agricultural activities increasingly use water, fertilizers and pesticides, which may generate negative impacts on environment. Nowadays, nitrogen leaching from agricultural lands is a widespread global problem. Therefore, alternative land management practices such as nutrient management (rate, method and time of application), tillage operations (conservation and no-tillage), and irrigation management are routinely used to reduce non-point source pollution and improve water quality. In fact, a number of studies have illustrated the positive effects of best management practices on water and nutrient losses. The objective of this paper is to develop a bio-economic model and introducing the policy instrument for reducing nitrate from irrigation and drainage Dorudzan. We aim to identify ‘‘win–win’’ opportunities for improving farm profitability and reducing nitrate leaching.

  9. Controlled Drainage As Measure to Reduce Nitrate Leaching in a Wheat Cropping System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Børgesen, Christen Duus; Hvid, Søren Kolind; Thomsen, Ingrid Kaag

    2013-01-01

    for the growing crop, and nutrient exports are reduced. CD has been shown to diminish leaching losses of soluble nutrients. So far CD has only been tested for spring sown crops but widespread implementation on drained clayey soils would rely on its adaption to winter cereal production systems. A new project on CD...... applied at four winter cropped fields in Denmark investigates how effects of anaerobic conditions created by CD will affect chemical/biological processes in the submerged soil, root growth, crop production, and nutrient losses. Nitrification is expected to be retarded by wet soils during winter...

  10. Impact of weather variability on nitrate leaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Karl; Premrov, Alina; Hackett, Richard; Coxon, Catherine

    2016-04-01

    The loss of nitrate (NO3 - N) to water via leaching and overland flow contributes to eutrophication of freshwaters, transitional and near coastal waters with agriculture contributing significantly to nitrogen (N) loading to these water. Environmental regulations, such as the Nitrates and Water Framework Directives, have increased constraints on farmers to improve N management in regions at risk of NO3--N loss to water. In addition, farmers also have to manage their systems within a changing climate as the imapcts of climate change begin to impact resulting in more frequent extreme events such as floods and droughts. The objective of this study was to investigate the link between weather volatility and the concentration of leached NO3--N spring barley. Leaching was quantified under spring barley grown on a well-drained, gravelly sandy soil using ceramic cup samplers over 6 drainage years under the same farming practices and treatments. Soil solution NO3--N concentrations under spring barley grown by conventional inversion ploughing and reduced tillage were compared to weather parameters over the period. Weather was recorded at a national Met Eireann weather station on site. Soil solution NO3--N varied significantly between years. Within individual years NO3--N concentrations varied over the drainage season, with peak concentrations generally observed in the autumn time, decreasing thereafter. Under both treatments there was a three-fold difference in mean annual soil solution NO3--N concentration over the 6 years with no change in the agronomic practices (crop type, tillage type and fertiliser input). Soil solution nitrate concentrations were significantly influenced by weather parameters such as rainfall, effective drainage and soil moisture deficit. The impact of climate change in Ireland could lead to increased NO3--N loss to water further exacerbating eutrophication of sensitive estuaries. The increased impact on eutrophication of waters, related to climatic

  11. Review of Alternative Management Options of Vegetable Crop Residues to Reduce Nitrate Leaching in Intensive Vegetable Rotations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Agneessens

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Vegetable crop residues take a particular position relative to arable crops due to often large amounts of biomass with a N content up to 200 kg N ha−1 left behind on the field. An important amount of vegetable crops are harvested during late autumn and despite decreasing soil temperatures during autumn, high rates of N mineralization and nitrification still occur. Vegetable crop residues may lead to considerable N losses through leaching during winter and pose a threat to meeting water quality objectives. However, at the same time vegetable crop residues are a vital link in closing the nutrient and organic matter cycle of soils. Appropriate and sustainable management is needed to harness the full potential of vegetable crop residues. Two fundamentally different crop residue management strategies to reduce N losses during winter in intensive vegetable rotations are reviewed, namely (i on-field management options and modifications to crop rotations and (ii removal of crop residues, followed by a useful and profitable application.

  12. Nitrate leaching from short-hydroperiod floodplain soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Huber

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Numerous studies have shown the importance of riparian zones to reduce nitrate (NO3 contamination coming from adjacent agricultural land. Much less is known about nitrogen (N transformations and nitrate fluxes in riparian soils with short hydroperiods (1–3 days of inundation and there is no study that could show whether these soils are a N sink or source. Within a restored section of the Thur River in NE Switzerland, we measured nitrate concentrations in soil solutions as an indicator of the net nitrate production. Samples were collected along a quasi-successional gradient from frequently inundated gravel bars to an alluvial forest, at three different depths (10, 50 and 100 cm over a one-year period. Along this gradient we quantified N input (atmospheric deposition and sedimentation and N output (leaching to create a nitrogen balance and assess the risk of nitrate leaching from the unsaturated soil to the groundwater. Overall, the main factor explaining the differences in nitrate concentrations was the field capacity (FC. In subsoils with high FCs and VWC near FC, high nitrate concentrations were observed, often exceeding the Swiss and EU groundwater quality criterions of 400 and 800 μmol L−1, respectively. High sedimentation rates of river-derived nitrogen led to apparent N retention up to 200 kg N ha−1 yr−1 in the frequently inundated zones. By contrast, in the mature alluvial forest, nitrate leaching exceeded total N input most of the time. As a result of the large soil N pools, high amounts of nitrate were produced by nitrification and up to 94 kg N-NO3 ha−1 yr−1 were leached into the groundwater. Thus, during flooding when water fluxes are high, nitrate from soils can contribute up to 11% to the total nitrate load in groundwater.

  13. Nitrate leaching and pesticide use in energy crops

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Uffe

    2006-01-01

    Nitrate leaching measured below willow and miscanthus is very low from the established crops. Pesticide use in energy crops is low as well.......Nitrate leaching measured below willow and miscanthus is very low from the established crops. Pesticide use in energy crops is low as well....

  14. Nitrate Leaching, Yields and Carbon Sequestration after Noninversion Tillage, Catch Crops, and Straw Retention

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Elly Møller; Munkholm, Lars Juhl; Olesen, Jørgen E

    2015-01-01

    retention did not significantly increase yields, nor did it reduce leaching, while fodder radish (Raphanus sativus L.) as a catch crop was capable of reducing nitrate leaching to a low level. Thus, YSL of winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) was higher than for spring barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) grown after...

  15. Leaching of nitrate from temperate forests - effects of air pollution and forest management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gundersen, Per; Schmidt, Inger Kappel; Raulund-Rasmussen, Karsten

    2006-01-01

    deposition (> 8-10 kg ha(-1) a(-1)). We synthesized the current understanding of factors controlling N leaching in relation to three primary causes of N cycle disruption: (i) Increased N input (air pollution, fertilization, N-2 fixing plants). In European forests, elevated N deposition explains approximately...... half of the variability in N leaching, some of the remaining variability could be explained by differences in N availability or "N status". For coniferous forests, needle N content above 1.4% and (or) forest floor C:N ratio lower than 25 were thresholds for elevated nitrate leaching. At adjacent sites...... conifer forests receive higher N deposition and exhibit higher nitrate loss than deciduous forests; an exception is alder that shows substantial nitrate leaching through N fixation input. Fertilization with N poses limited risk to water quality, when applied to N-limited forests. (ii) Reduced plant uptake...

  16. Effects of grazing strategy on limiting nitrate leaching in grazed grass-clover pastures on coarse sandy soil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Elly Møller; Eriksen, Jørgen; Søegaard, Karen

    2012-01-01

    -term mean. The experiment was initiated in a 4-yr-old grass-clover sward in south Denmark. Three treatments were as follows grazing only (G), spring cut followed by grazing (CG) and both spring and autumn cuts with summer grazing (CGC). Nitrate leaching was calculated by extracting water isolates from 80 cm......Urinations of ruminants on grazed pastures increase the risk of nitrate leaching. The study investigated the effect of reducing the length of the grazing season on nitrate leaching from a coarse sandy, irrigated soil during 2006–2007 and 2007–2008. In both years, precipitation was above the long...... depth using ceramic suction cups. Because of considerable variation in measured nitrate concentrations, the 32 installed suction cups per treatment were insufficient to reveal differences between treatments. However, weighted nitrate leaching estimations for G, CG and CGC showed estimated mean nitrate N...

  17. Use of tensiometer for in situ measurement of nitrate leaching

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, K.; Reddy, M.R.

    1999-07-01

    In order to monitor nitrate leaching from non-point source pollution, this study used tensiometers to measure in situ nitrate concentration and soil-moisture potential. Instead of filling the tensiometers with pure water, the study filled the tensiometers with nitrate ionic strength adjuster (ISA, 1 M (NH{sub 4}){sub 2}SO{sub 4}). After the installation of the tensiometers at various depths along soil profiles, a portable pressure transducer was used to measure the soil moisture potential, and a nitrate electrode attached to an ion analyzer was used to measure the nitrate concentration in situ. The measurement was continuous and non-destructive. To test this method in the laboratory, eight bottles filled with pure sand were treated with known nitrate solutions, and a tensiometer was placed in each bottle. Measurements were taken every day for 30 days. Laboratory test showed a linear relationship between the known nitrate concentration and the tensiometer readings (R{sup 2} = 0.9990). Then a field test was conducted in a watermelon field with green manure mulch. Field data indicated a potential of nitrate leaching below the soil depth of 100 cm when crop uptake of nutrients was low.

  18. Impacts of management and climate change on nitrate leaching in a forested karst area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dirnböck, Thomas; Kobler, Johannes; Kraus, David; Grote, Rüdiger; Kiese, Ralf

    2016-01-01

    Forest management and climate change, directly or indirectly, affect drinking water resources, both in terms of quality and quantity. In this study in the Northern Limestone Alps in Austria we have chosen model calculations (LandscapeDNDC) in order to resolve the complex long-term interactions of management and climate change and their effect on nitrogen dynamics, and the consequences for nitrate leaching from forest soils into the karst groundwater. Our study highlights the dominant role of forest management in controlling nitrate leaching. Both clear-cut and shelterwood-cut disrupt the nitrogen cycle to an extent that causes peak concentrations and high fluxes into the seepage water. While this effect is well known, our modelling approach has revealed additional positive as well as negative impacts of the expected climatic changes on nitrate leaching. First, we show that peak nitrate concentrations during post-cutting periods were elevated under all climate scenarios. The maximal effects of climatic changes on nitrate concentration peaks were 20-24 mg L(-1) in 2090 with shelterwood or clear-cut management. Second, climate change significantly decreased the cumulative nitrate losses over full forest rotation periods (by 10-20%). The stronger the expected temperature increase and precipitation decrease (in summer), the lesser were the observed nitrate losses. However, mean annual seepage water nitrate concentrations and cumulative nitrate leaching were higher under continuous forest cover management than with shelterwood-cut and clear-cut systems. Watershed management can thus be adapted to climate change by either reducing peak concentrations or long-term loads of nitrate in the karst groundwater. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Estimating subsoil resistance to nitrate leaching from easily measurable pedological properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fábio Keiti Nakagawa

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Leaching of nitrate (NO3- can increase the groundwater concentration of this anion and reduce the agronomical effectiveness of nitrogen fertilizers. The main soil property inversely related to NO3- leaching is the anion exchange capacity (AEC, whose determination is however too time-consuming for being carried out in soil testing laboratories. For this reason, this study evaluated if more easily measurable soil properties could be used to estimate the resistance of subsoils to NO3- leaching. Samples from the subsurface layer (20-40 cm of 24 representative soils of São Paulo State were characterized for particle-size distribution and for chemical and electrochemical properties. The subsoil content of adsorbed NO3- was calculated from the difference between the NO3- contents extracted with 1 mol L-1 KCl and with water; furthermore, NO3- leaching was studied in miscible displacement experiments. The results of both adsorption and leaching experiments were consistent with the well-known role exerted by AEC on the nitrate behavior in weathered soils. Multiple regression analysis indicated that in subsoils with (i low values of remaining phosphorus (Prem, (ii low soil pH values measured in water (pH H2O, and (iii high pH values measured in 1 moL L-1 KCl (pH KCl, the amounts of surface positive charges tend to be greater. For this reason, NO3- leaching tends to be slower in these subsoils, even under saturated flow condition.

  20. Modeling nitrate leaching and optimizing water and nitrogen management under irrigated maize in desert oases in Northwestern China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Kelin; Li, Yong; Chen, Weiping; Chen, Deli; Wei, Yongping; Edis, Robert; Li, Baoguo; Huang, Yuanfang; Zhang, Yuanpei

    2010-01-01

    Understanding water and N transport through the soil profile is important for efficient irrigation and nutrient management to minimize nitrate leaching to the groundwater, and to promote agricultural sustainable development in desert oases. In this study, a process-based water and nitrogen management model (WNMM) was used to simulate soil water movement, nitrate transport, and crop growth (maize [Zea mays L.]) under desert oasis conditions in northwestern China. The model was calibrated and validated with a field experiment. The model simulation results showed that about 35% of total water input and 58% of the total N input were leached to <1.8 m depth under traditional management practice. Excessive irrigation and N fertilizer application, high nitrate concentration in the irrigation water, together with the sandy soil texture, resulted in large nitrate leaching. Nitrate leaching was significantly reduced under the improved management practice suggested by farm extension personnel; however, the water and nitrate inputs still far exceeded the crop requirements. More than 1700 scenarios combining various types of irrigation and fertilizer practices were simulated. Quantitative analysis was conducted to obtain the best management practices (BMPs) with simultaneous consideration of crop yield, water use efficiency, fertilizer N use efficiency, and nitrate leaching. The results indicated that the BMPs under the specific desert oasis conditions are to irrigate the maize with 600 mm of water in eight times with a single fertilizer application at a rate of 75 kg N ha(-1).

  1. Passivation of chalcopyrite during the leaching with sulphuric acid solution in presence of sodium nitrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sokić Miroslav D.

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work, the process of the chalcopyrite leaching in sulphuric acid solution was investigated. Sodium nitrate was used as oxidant in the leaching process. Chemical reactions of leaching and their thermodynamic possibilities are predicted based on the calculated Gibbs energies and analysis of E−pH diagrams. The negative values of the Gibbs energy show that all chemical reactions are thermodynamically feasible at atmospheric pressure and in a temperature range 25-90°C. At high electrode potential and low pH values, Cu2+, Fe2+ and Fe3+ ions exist in water solutions. The increase of temperature reduces the probability of Fe3+ ion existence in the system. The chalcopyrite concentrate, enriched in the “Rudnik” flotation plant, with 27.08% Cu, 25.12% Fe, 4.15% Zn and 2.28% Pb was used in the work. XRD and DTA analysis of the concentrate reveals that the sample contains mainly the chalcopyrite with small amount of sphalerite. For the description of the reaction of leaching process the leach residuals, obtained at different conditions, were chosen for XRD, TG/DTA and SEM/EDX analyses. The elemental sulphur and chalcopyrite phases identified in leach residuals confirm our prediction that the elemental sulphur is formed during the leaching process. Accordingly, elemental sulphur is the main product of the reaction, while a minor amount of sulphide sulphur is oxidized to sulphate during the leaching. The sulphur formed during the reaction was precipitated at the particle surfaces, and slowed down the leaching rate in the final stage of leaching process. In the initial stage, the reaction rate was controlled by the surface reaction. The mechanism, latter has been changed into a diffusion controlled one.

  2. Nitrate Leaching from Winter Cereal Cover Crops Using Undisturbed Soil-Column Lysimeters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meisinger, John J; Ricigliano, Kristin A

    2017-05-01

    Cover crops are important management practices for reducing nitrogen (N) leaching, especially in the Chesapeake Bay watershed, which is under total maximum daily load (TMDL) restraints. Winter cereals are common cool-season crops in the Bay watershed, but studies have not directly compared nitrate-N (NO-N) leaching losses from these species. A 3-yr cover crop lysimeter study was conducted in Beltsville, MD, to directly compare NO-N leaching from a commonly grown cultivar of barley ( L.), rye ( L.), and wheat ( L.), along with a no-cover control, using eight tension-drained undisturbed soil column lysimeters in a completely randomized design with two replicates. The lysimeters were configured to exclude runoff and to estimate NO-N leaching and flow-weighted NO-N concentration (FWNC). The temporal pattern of NO-N leaching showed a consistent highly significant ( leaching with cover crops compared with no cover but showed only small and periodically significant ( leaching was more affected by the quantity of establishment-season (mid-October to mid-December) precipitation than by cover crop species. For example, compared with no cover, winter cereal covers reduced NO-N leaching 95% in a dry year and 50% in wet years, with corresponding reductions in FWNC of 92 and 43%, respectively. These results are important for scientists, nutrient managers, and policymakers because they directly compare NO-N leaching from winter cereal covers and expand knowledge for developing management practices for winter cereals that can improve water quality and increase N efficiency in cropping systems. Copyright © by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America, Inc.

  3. The use of biochar to reduce nitrogen and potassium leaching from soil cultivated with maize

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W Widowati

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Nutrient leaching is often a problem especially in tropical areas with soil fertility constraints. This study aims to reveal the effect of biochars on leaching and uptake of nitrogen and potassium from degraded soils cultivated with maize. Each of three types of biochar originated from rice husk, wood, and coconut shell, was applied to the soil placed in PVC tube at four rates (0, 15, 30, and 45 t/ha. Maize was then planted in each pot. All pots received urea (135 kg N/ha, SP36 (36 kg P2O5/ha, and KCl (110 kg K2O/ha. Twelve treatments (three biochars and four application rates were arranged in a factorial randomized block design with three replicates. Results of the study showed interaction effects of biochar materials and biochar rates on nitrate leaching (except on day 1 to 30 and potassium, N uptake, and plant growth. On day 1-30, leaching of nitrate and potassium was reduced by biochar application. The lowest nitrate leaching was observed at rate of 45 t /ha of wood biochar, while application of 45 t coconut shell biochar / ha resulted in the highest K leaching. Beside, wood biochar resulted in a similar nitrate leaching with that of coconut shell biochar, but nitrate leaching increased with increasing rate of rice husk biochar on day 30-60. All biochar materials yielded similar potassium leaching at all rates. Application of 45 t rice husk biochar /ha resulted in the best maize growth.

  4. Kinetics and mechanism of sphalerite leaching by sodium nitrate in sulphuric acid solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sokić M.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Interest for application of hydrometallurgical processes in a processing of complex sulphide ores and concentrates has increased in recent years. Their application provides better metal recoveries and reduced emission of gaseous and toxic ageneses in the environment. The kinetics and mechanism of sphalerite leaching from complex sulphide concentrate with sulphuric acid and sodium nitrate solution at standard conditions was presented in this paper. The influences of temperature and time on the leaching degree of zinc were investigated and kinetic analysis of the process was accomplished. With temperature increasing from 60 to 90°C, the zinc leaching increased from 25.23% to 71.66% after 2 hours, i.e. from 59.40% to 99.83% after 4 hours. The selected kinetic model indicated that the diffusion through the product layer was the rate-controlling step during the sphalerite leaching. The activation energy was determined to be 55 kJ/mol in the temperature range 60-90°C. XRD, light microscopy and SEM/EDX analyses of the complex concentrate and leach residue confirmed formation of elemental sulphur and diffusion-controlled leaching mechanism.

  5. Land cover changes as a result of environmental restrictions on nitrate leaching in diary farming

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groeneveld, R.; Bouwman, L.; Kruitwagen, S.; Ierland, van E.

    2001-01-01

    Nitrate leaching forms an important environmental problem because it causes pollution of groundwater and surface water, and adds to already problematic eutrophication. This study analyses the impact of reductions in nitrate leaching on land cover decisions of dairy farms, of which the activities

  6. Influences of clinoptilolite and surfactant-modified clinoptilolite zeolite on nitrate leaching and plant growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malekian, Raheleh; Abedi-Koupai, Jahangir; Eslamian, Sayed Saeid

    2011-01-01

    The increasing demands for environmental protection and sustainable food production require an increase in the use of natural and non-toxic materials for agriculture. In this study, the feasibility of using surfactant-modified zeolite (SMZ) in comparison with zeolite clinoptilolite (Cp) application to reduce nitrate leaching and enhance crop growth was investigated. The effects of size (millimeter and nanometer) and application rate (20 g kg -1 and 60 g kg -1 ) of Cp and SMZ on nitrate leaching and crop response were also evaluated. Using soil lysimeters, it was determined that the maximum and mean nitrate concentration in the leachate of SMZ-amended soil were significantly (p 3 -N leached from SMZ- and Cp-amended lysimeters at the higher application rate (60 g kg -1 ) was approximately 26% and 22% lower, respectively, than that from the control system. The mean grain yield, grain nitrogen content, stover dry matter, and N uptake were significantly greater in Cp-amended than SMZ-amended lysimeters. There was no significant effect due to the particle size of the two soil amendments. The results implicitly suggest that plants may have a better response if Cp is used as a fertilizer carrier rather than SMZ when applied at a rate of 60 g kg -1 .

  7. Multiscale effects of management, environmental conditions, and land use on nitrate leaching in dairy farms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oenema, Jouke; Burgers, Saskia; Verloop, Koos; Hooijboer, Arno; Boumans, Leo; ten Berge, Hein

    2010-01-01

    Nitrate leaching in intensive grassland- and silage maize-based dairy farming systems on sandy soil is a main environmental concern. Here, statistical relationships are presented between management practices and environmental conditions and nitrate concentration in shallow groundwater (0.8 m depth) at farm, field, and point scales in The Netherlands, based on data collected in a participatory approach over a 7-yr period at one experimental and eight pilot commercial dairy farms on sandy soil. Farm milk production ranged from 10 to 24 Mg ha(-1). Soil and hydrological characteristics were derived from surveys and weather conditions from meteorological stations. Statistical analyses were performed with multiple regression models. Mean nitrate concentration at farm scale decreased from 79 mg L(-1) in 1999 to 63 in 2006, with average nitrate concentration in groundwater decreasing under grassland but increasing under maize land over the monitoring period. The effects of management practices on nitrate concentration varied with spatial scale. At farm scale, nitrogen surplus, grazing intensity, and the relative areas of grassland and maize land significantly contributed to explaining the variance in nitrate concentration in groundwater. Mean nitrate concentration was negatively correlated to the concentration of dissolved organic carbon in the shallow groundwater. At field scale, management practices and soil, hydrological, and climatic conditions significantly contributed to explaining the variance in nitrate concentration in groundwater under grassland and maize land. We conclude that, on these intensive dairy farms, additional measures are needed to comply with the European Union water quality standard in groundwater of 50 mg nitrate L(-1). The most promising measures are omitting fertilization of catch crops and reducing fertilization levels of first-year maize in the rotation.

  8. Nitrate leaching beneath a containerized nursery crop receiving trickle or overhead irrigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colangelo, D J; Brand, M H

    2001-01-01

    Container production of nursery crops is intensive and a potential source of nitrogen release to the environment. This study was conducted to determine if trickle irrigation could be used by container nursery producers as an alternative to standard overhead irrigation to reduce nitrogen release into the environment. The effect of overhead irrigation and trickle irrigation on leachate nitrate N concentration, flow-weighted nitrate N concentration, leachate volume, and plant growth was investigated using containerized rhododendron (Rhododendron catawbiense Michx. 'Album') supplied with a controlled-release fertilizer and grown outdoors on top of soil-monolith lysimeters. Leachate was collected over two growing seasons and overwinter periods, and natural precipitation was allowed as a component of the system. Precipitation accounted for 69% of the water entering the overhead-irrigated system and 80% of the water entering the trickle-irrigated system. Leachate from fertilized plants exceeded the USEPA limit of 10 mg L(-1) at several times and reached a maximum of 26 mg L(-1) with trickle irrigation. Average annual loss of nitrate N in leachate for fertilized treatments was 51.8 and 60.5 kg ha(-1) for the overhead and trickle treatments, respectively. Average annual flow-weighted concentration of nitrate N in leachate of fertilized plants was 7.2 mg L(-1) for overhead irrigation and 12.7 mg L(-1) for trickle irrigation. Trickle irrigation did not reduce the amount of nitrate N leached from nursery containers when compared with overhead irrigation because precipitation nullified the potential benefits of reduced leaching fractions and irrigation inputs provided under trickle irrigation.

  9. Nitrate leaching in an Andisol treated with different types of fertilizers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maeda, Morihiro; Zhao Bingzi; Ozaki, Yasuo; Yoneyama, Tadakatsu

    2003-01-01

    Nitrate leaching in upland fields under Japanese conditions may be reduced by substituting compost or slow-release fertilizer for readily available chemical fertilizer. - Nitrate (NO 3 ) leaching was studied in an Andisol treated with four N fertilizers (SC: swine compost, CU: coated urea, AN: ammonium N, or NF: no fertilizer) for 7 years. Sweet corn (Zea mays L.) was grown in summer, followed by Chinese cabbage (Brassica rapa L. var. amplexicaulis) or cabbage (Brassica oleracea L. var. capitata) in autumn each year. In chemical fertilizer plots treated with AN or CU, NO 3 -N concentrations in soil water at 1-m depth increased markedly in the summer of the second year and fluctuated between 30 and 60 mg l -1 . In the SC plot, NO 3 -N concentration started increasing in the fourth year, reaching the same level as in the AN and CU plots in the late period of the experiment. In the NF plot, NO 3 -N concentration was about 10 mg l -1 for the first 4 years and decreased to 5 mg l -1 . The potential NO 3 -N concentrations by an N and water balance equation satisfactorily predicted NO 3 -N concentration in the AN and CU plots, but substantially overestimated that in the SC plot, presumably because a large portion of N from SC first accumulated in soil in the organic form. Our results indicate that, under the Japanese climate (Asian monsoon), excessive N from chemical fertilizers applied to Andisols can cause substantial NO 3 leaching, while compost application is promising to establish high yields and low N leaching during a few years but would cause the same level of NO 3 leaching as in chemically fertilized plots over longer periods

  10. Identifying critical nitrogen application rate for maize yield and nitrate leaching in a Haplic Luvisol soil using the DNDC model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yitao; Wang, Hongyuan; Liu, Shen; Lei, Qiuliang; Liu, Jian; He, Jianqiang; Zhai, Limei; Ren, Tianzhi; Liu, Hongbin

    2015-05-01

    Identification of critical nitrogen (N) application rate can provide management supports for ensuring grain yield and reducing amount of nitrate leaching to ground water. A five-year (2008-2012) field lysimeter (1 m × 2 m × 1.2 m) experiment with three N treatments (0, 180 and 240 kg Nha(-1)) was conducted to quantify maize yields and amount of nitrate leaching from a Haplic Luvisol soil in the North China Plain. The experimental data were used to calibrate and validate the process-based model of Denitrification-Decomposition (DNDC). After this, the model was used to simulate maize yield production and amount of nitrate leaching under a series of N application rates and to identify critical N application rate based on acceptable yield and amount of nitrate leaching for this cropping system. The results of model calibration and validation indicated that the model could correctly simulate maize yield and amount of nitrate leaching, with satisfactory values of RMSE-observation standard deviation ratio, model efficiency and determination coefficient. The model simulations confirmed the measurements that N application increased maize yield compared with the control, but the high N rate (240 kg Nha(-1)) did not produce more yield than the low one (120 kg Nha(-1)), and that the amount of nitrate leaching increased with increasing N application rate. The simulation results suggested that the optimal N application rate was in a range between 150 and 240 kg ha(-1), which would keep the amount of nitrate leaching below 18.4 kg NO₃(-)-Nha(-1) and meanwhile maintain acceptable maize yield above 9410 kg ha(-1). Furthermore, 180 kg Nha(-1) produced the highest yields (9837 kg ha(-1)) and comparatively lower amount of nitrate leaching (10.0 kg NO₃(-)-Nha(-1)). This study will provide a valuable reference for determining optimal N application rate (or range) in other crop systems and regions in China. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Urban trees reduce nutrient leaching to groundwater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nidzgorski, Daniel A; Hobbie, Sarah E

    2016-07-01

    Many urban waterways suffer from excess nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P), feeding algal blooms, which cause lower water clarity and oxygen levels, bad odor and taste, and the loss of desirable species. Nutrient movement from land to water is likely to be influenced by urban vegetation, but there are few empirical studies addressing this. In this study, we examined whether or not urban trees can reduce nutrient leaching to groundwater, an important nutrient export pathway that has received less attention than stormwater. We characterized leaching beneath 33 trees of 14 species, and seven open turfgrass areas, across three city parks in Saint Paul, Minnesota, USA. We installed lysimeters at 60 cm depth to collect soil water approximately biweekly from July 2011 through October 2013, except during winter and drought periods, measured dissolved organic carbon (C), N, and P in soil water, and modeled water fluxes using the BROOK90 hydrologic model. We also measured soil nutrient pools (bulk C and N, KCl-extractable inorganic N, Brays-P), tree tissue nutrient concentrations (C, N, and P of green leaves, leaf litter, and roots), and canopy size parameters (leaf biomass, leaf area index) to explore correlations with nutrient leaching. Trees had similar or lower N leaching than turfgrass in 2012 but higher N leaching in 2013; trees reduced P leaching compared with turfgrass in both 2012 and 2013, with lower leaching under deciduous than evergreen trees. Scaling up our measurements to an urban subwatershed of the Mississippi River (~17 400 ha, containing ~1.5 million trees), we estimated that trees reduced P leaching to groundwater by 533 kg in 2012 (0.031 kg/ha or 3.1 kg/km 2 ) and 1201 kg in 2013 (0.069 kg/ha or 6.9 kg/km 2 ). Removing these same amounts of P using stormwater infrastructure would cost $2.2 million and $5.0 million per year (2012 and 2013 removal amounts, respectively). © 2016 by the Ecological Society of America.

  12. Regional planning and modelling of nitrate leaching in Denmark using DaisyGIS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Veihe, Anita; Jensen, Niels H.; Boegh, Eva

    Spatial deterministic simulation models such as DaisyGIS are increasingly being used for decision-making in European planning and there is a growing interest in using DaisyGIS as an administrative tool at the regional level in Denmark. This study evaluates the use of Daisy-GIS for nitrate leaching...... assessments based on nitrate leaching experiments carried out at the Marbjerg experimental site at Roskilde University....

  13. Nitrogen removal and nitrate leaching for two perennial, sod-based forage systems receiving dairy effluent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodard, Kenneth R; French, Edwin C; Sweat, Lewin A; Graetz, Donald A; Sollenberger, Lynn E; Macoon, Bisoondat; Portier, Kenneth M; Rymph, Stuart J; Wade, Brett L; Prine, Gordon M; Van Horn, Harold H

    2003-01-01

    In northern Florida, year-round forage systems are used in dairy effluent sprayfields to reduce nitrate leaching. Our purpose was to quantify forage N removal and monitor nitrate N (NO3(-)-N) concentration below the rooting zone for two perennial, sod-based, triple-cropping systems over four 12-mo cycles (1996-2000). The soil is an excessively drained Kershaw sand (thermic, uncoated Typic Quartzip-samment). Effluent N rates were 500, 690, and 910 kg ha(-1) per cycle. Differences in N removal between a corn (Zea mays L.)-bermudagrass (Cynodon spp.)-rye (Secale cereale L.) system (CBR) and corn-perennial peanut (Arachis glabrata Benth.)-rye system (CPR) were primarily related to the performance of the perennial forages. Nitrogen removal of corn (125-170 kg ha(-1)) and rye (62-90 kg ha(-1)) was relatively stable between systems and among cycles. The greatest N removal was measured for CBR in the first cycle (408 kg ha(-1)), with the bermudagrass removing an average of 191 kg N ha(-1). In later cycles, N removal for bermudagrass declined because dry matter (DM) yield declined. Yield and N removal of perennial peanut increased over the four cycles. Nitrate N concentrations below the rooting zone were lower for CBR than CPR in the first two cycles, but differences were inconsistent in the latter two. The CBR system maintained low NO3(-)-N leaching in the first cycle when the bermudagrass was the most productive; however, it was not a sustainable system for long-term prevention of NO3(-)-N leaching due to declining bermudagrass yield in subsequent cycles. For CPR, effluent N rates > or = 500 kg ha(-1) yr(-1) have the potential to negatively affect ground water quality.

  14. Multiscale Effects of Management, Environmental Conditions, and Land Use on Nitrate Leaching in Dairy Farms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oenema, J.; Burgers, S.L.G.E.; Verloop, J.; Hooijboer, A.; Boumans, L.; Berge, ten H.F.M.

    2010-01-01

    Nitrate leaching in intensive grassland- and silage maize-based dairy farming systems on sandy soil is a main environmental concern. Here, statistical relationships are presented between management practices and environmental conditions and nitrate concentration in shallow groundwater (0.8 m depth)

  15. Cover crops effect on farm benefits and nitrate leaching: linking economic and environmental analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabriel, José Luis; Vanclooster, Marnik; Garrido, Alberto; Quemada, Miguel

    2013-04-01

    Introducing cover crops interspersed with intensively fertilized crops in rotation has the potential to reduce nitrate leaching. However, despite the evident environmental services provided and the range of agronomic benefits documented in the literature, farmers' adoption of the technique is still limited because growing CC could lead to extra costs for the farm in three different forms: direct, indirect, and opportunity costs. Environmental studies are complex, and evaluating the indicators that are representative of the environmental impact of an agricultural system is a complicated task that is conducted by specialized groups and methodologies. Multidisciplinary studies may help to develop reliable approaches that would contribute to choosing the best agricultural strategies based on linking economic and environmental benefits. This study evaluates barley (Hordeum vulgare L., cv. Vanessa), vetch (Vicia villosa L., cv. Vereda) and rapeseed (Brassica napus L., cv. Licapo) as cover crops between maize, leaving the residue in the ground or selling it for animal feeding, and compares the economic and environmental results with respect to a typical maize-fallow rotation. Nitrate leaching for different weather conditions was calculated using the mechanistic-deterministic WAVE model, using the Richards equation parameterised with a conceptual model for the soil hydraulic properties for describing the water flow in the vadose zone, combined with field observed data. The economic impact was evaluated through stochastic (Monte-Carlo) simulation models of farms' profits using probability distribution functions of maize yield and cover crop biomass developed fitted with data collected from various field trials (during more than 5 years) and probability distribution functions of maize and different cover crop forage prices fitted from statistical sources. Stochastic dominance relationships are obtained to rank the most profitable strategies from a farm financial perspective

  16. Nitrate leaching from a potato field using adaptive network-based fuzzy inference system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shekofteh, Hosein; Afyuni, Majid M; Hajabbasi, Mohammad-Ali

    2013-01-01

    and to maximize nutrient use efficiency and production. Design and operation of a drip fertigation system requires understanding of nutrient leaching behavior in cases of shallow rooted crops such as potatoes which cannot extract nutrient from a lower soil depth. This study deals with neuro-fuzzy modeling......The conventional methods of application of nitrogen fertilizers might be responsible for the increased nitrate concentration in groundwater of areas dominated by irrigated agriculture. Appropriate water and nutrient management strategies are required to minimize groundwater pollution...... of nitrate (NO3) leaching from a potato field under a drip fertigation system. In the first part of the study, a two-dimensional solute transport model was used to simulate nitrate leaching from a sandy soil with varying emitter discharge rates and fertilizer doses. The results from the modeling were used...

  17. Effect of temperature and precipitation on nitrate leaching from organic cereal cropping systems in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jabloun, Mohamed; Schelde, Kirsten; Tao, F

    2015-01-01

    The effect of variation in seasonal temperature and precipitation on soil water nitrate (NO3single bondN) concentration and leaching from winter and spring cereals cropping systems was investigated over three consecutive four-year crop rotation cycles from 1997 to 2008 in an organic farming crop...... rotation experiment in Denmark. Three experimental sites, varying in climate and soil type from coarse sand to sandy loam, were investigated. The experiment included experimental treatments with different rotations, manure rate and cover crop, and soil nitrate concentrations was monitored using suction......N concentration for winter and spring cereals, respectively, and 68% and 77% of the variation in the square root transform of annual NO3single bondN leaching for winter and spring cereals, respectively. Nitrate concentration and leaching were shown to be site specific and driven by climatic factors and crop...

  18. Winter Cover Crop Effects on Nitrate Leaching in Subsurface Drainage as Simulated by RZWQM-DSSAT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malone, R. W.; Chu, X.; Ma, L.; Li, L.; Kaspar, T.; Jaynes, D.; Saseendran, S. A.; Thorp, K.; Yu, Q.

    2007-12-01

    Planting winter cover crops such as winter rye (Secale cereale L.) after corn and soybean harvest is one of the more promising practices to reduce nitrate loss to streams from tile drainage systems without negatively affecting production. Because availability of replicated tile-drained field data is limited and because use of cover crops to reduce nitrate loss has only been tested over a few years with limited environmental and management conditions, estimating the impacts of cover crops under the range of expected conditions is difficult. If properly tested against observed data, models can objectively estimate the relative effects of different weather conditions and agronomic practices (e.g., various N fertilizer application rates in conjunction with winter cover crops). In this study, an optimized winter wheat cover crop growth component was integrated into the calibrated RZWQM-DSSAT hybrid model and then we compare the observed and simulated effects of a winter cover crop on nitrate leaching losses in subsurface drainage water for a corn-soybean rotation with N fertilizer application rates over 225 kg N ha-1 in corn years. Annual observed and simulated flow-weighted average nitrate concentration (FWANC) in drainage from 2002 to 2005 for the cover crop treatments (CC) were 8.7 and 9.3 mg L-1 compared to 21.3 and 18.2 mg L-1 for no cover crop (CON). The resulting observed and simulated FWANC reductions due to CC were 59% and 49%. Simulations with the optimized model at various N fertilizer rates resulted in average annual drainage N loss differences between CC and CON to increase exponentially from 12 to 34 kg N ha-1 for rates of 11 to 261 kg N ha-1. The results suggest that RZWQM-DSSAT is a promising tool to estimate the relative effects of a winter crop under different conditions on nitrate loss in tile drains and that a winter cover crop can effectively reduce nitrate losses over a range of N fertilizer levels.

  19. Nitrate leaching from organic arable crop rotations is mostly determined by autumn field management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Askegaard, M; Olesen, Jørgen E; Rasmussen, Ilse Ankjær

    2011-01-01

    Two main challenges facing organic arable farming are the supply of nitrogen (N) to the crop and the control of perennial weeds. Nitrate leaching from different organic arable crop rotations was investigated over three consecutive four-year crop rotations in a field experiment at three locations....../volunteers had on avg. 30 kg N ha−1, and the largest N leaching losses were found after stubble cultivation (avg. 55 kg N ha−1). The N leaching losses increased with increasing number of autumn soil cultivations...

  20. Winter cover crops as a best management practice for reducing nitrogen leaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritter, W. F.; Scarborough, R. W.; Chirnside, A. E. M.

    1998-10-01

    The role of rye as a winter cover crop to reduce nitrate leaching was investigated over a three-year period on a loamy sand soil. A cover crop was planted after corn in the early fall and killed in late March or early April the following spring. No-tillage and conventional tillage systems were compared on large plots with irrigated corn. A replicated randomized block design experiment was conducted on small plots to evaluate a rye cover crop under no-tillage and conventional tillage and with commercial fertilizer, poultry manure and composted poultry manure as nitrogen fertilizer sources. Nitrogen uptake by the cover crop along with nitrate concentrations in groundwater and the soil profile (0-150 cm) were measured on the large plots. Soil nitrate concentrations and nitrogen uptake by the cover crop were measured on the small plots. There was no significant difference in nitrate concentrations in the groundwater or soil profile with and without a cover crop in either no-tillage or conventional tillage. Annual amounts of nitrate-N leached to the water-table varied from 136.0 to 190.1 kg/ha in 1989 and from 82.4 to 116.2 kg/ha in 1991. Nitrate leaching rates were somewhat lower with a cover crop in 1989, but not in 1990. There was no statistically significant difference in corn grain yields between the cover crop and non-cover crop treatments. The planting date and adequate rainfall are very important in maximizing nitrogen uptake in the fall with a rye cover crop. On the Delmarva Peninsula, the cover crop should probably be planted by October 1 to maximize nitrogen uptake rates in the fall. On loamy sand soils, rye winter cover crops cannot be counted on as a best management practice for reducing nitrate leaching in the Mid-Atlantic states.

  1. Nitrate leaching and nitrous oxide flux in urban forests and grasslands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peter M. Groffman; Candiss O. Williams; Richard V. Pouyat; Lawrence E. Band; Ian D. Yesilonis

    2009-01-01

    Urban landscapes contain a mix of land-use types with different patterns of nitrogen (N) cycling and export. We measured nitrate (NO3-) leaching and soil:atmosphere nitrous oxide (N2O) flux in four urban grassland and eight forested long-term study plots in the Baltimore, Maryland metropolitan area....

  2. Irrigation management for optimizing crop production and nitrate leaching on grassland

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hack-ten Broeke, M.J.D.

    2001-01-01

    Six supplementary irrigation management options for grazed grassland were defined and their effects on both agricultural production and nitrate leaching to the groundwater were studied. Data were available from the De Marke experimental farm for sustainable dairy farming. The calibrated and

  3. Integrated modelling of crop production and nitrate leaching with the Daisy model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Manevski, Kiril; Børgesen, Christen Duus; Li, Xiaoxin

    2016-01-01

    An integrated modelling strategy was designed and applied to the Soil-Vegetation-Atmosphere Transfer model Daisy for simulation of crop production and nitrate leaching under pedo-climatic and agronomic environment different than that of model original parameterisation. The points of significance...

  4. Nitrate leaching and residual effect in dairy crop rotations with grass-clover leys as influenced by sward age, grazing, cutting and fertilizer regimes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksen, Jørgen; Askegaard, Margrethe; Rasmussen, Jim

    2015-01-01

    Intensive dairy farming, with grass-arable crop rotations is challenged by low N use efficiency that may have adverse environmental consequences. We investigated nitrate leaching and N fertility effects of grass–clover leys for five years in two organic crop rotations with different grassland...... with the 2-yr-old leaching the most (36–46 kg N ha−1), and (4) high leaching (>50 kg N ha−1) with lupin and maize, where especially maize was consistently high in all five years (average 81 kg N ha−1). Great care should be taken during all phases of the dairy crop rotation where grasslands cause considerable...... build-up of fertility. With due care and the best management practice, nitrate leaching losses may be reduced to low levels....

  5. Modeling of Nitrate Leaching from a Potato Field using HYDRUS-2D

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shekofteh, Hosein; Afyuni, Majid; Hajabbasi, Mohammad Ali

    2013-01-01

    Excessive use of nitrogen (N) fertilizers is likely to be responsible for the increasing nitrate in groundwater. Thus, appropriate water and nutrient management is required to minimize groundwater pollution and to maximize the nutrient-use efficiency. In this study HYDRUS-2D software package...... was applied to simulate nitrate leaching from a drip-irrigated sandy agricultural soil for varying emitter discharges and various amounts of fertilizer. It was found that for small emitter discharge values free drainage increased significantly with increase in discharge, whereas the increase was leveled out...... at greater discharge values. Nitrate leaching increased with an increase in emitter discharge and amount of fertilizer, but the rate of increase was most significant for low emitter discharges. Based on the results, with regard to the selection of emitter discharge and the amount of appropriate fertilizer...

  6. Effect of Winter Cover Crops on Soil Nitrogen Availability, Corn Yield, and Nitrate Leaching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Kuo

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Biculture of nonlegumes and legumes could serve as cover crops for increasing main crop yield, while reducing NO3 leaching. This study, conducted from 1994 to 1999, determined the effect of monocultured cereal rye (Secale cereale L., annual ryegrass (Lolium multiflorum, and hairy vetch (Vicia villosa, and bicultured rye/vetch and ryegrass/vetch on N availability in soil, corn (Zea mays L. yield, and NO3-N leaching in a silt loam soil. The field had been in corn and cover crop rotation since 1987. In addition to the cover crop treatments, there were four N fertilizer rates (0, 67, 134, and 201 kg N ha-1, referred to as N0, N1, N2, and N3, respectively applied to corn. The experiment was a randomized split-block design with three replications for each treatment. Lysimeters were installed in 1987 at 0.75 m below the soil surface for leachate collection for the N0, N2, and N3 treatments. The result showed that vetch monoculture had the most influence on soil N availability and corn yield, followed by the bicultures. Rye or ryegrass monoculture had either no effect or an adverse effect on corn yield and soil N availability. Leachate NO3-N concentration was highest where vetch cover crop was planted regardless of N rates, which suggests that N mineralization of vetch N continued well into the fall and winter. Leachate NO3-N concentration increased with increasing N fertilizer rates and exceeded the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s drinking water standard of 10 mg N l�1 even at recommended N rate for corn in this region (coastal Pacific Northwest. In comparisons of the average NO3-N concentration during the period of high N leaching, monocultured rye and ryegrass or bicultured rye/vetch and ryegrass/vetch very effectively decreased N leaching in 1998 with dry fall weather. The amount of N available for leaching (determined based on the presidedress nitrate test, the amount of N fertilizer applied, and N uptake correlated well with average NO3

  7. Effect of winter cover crops on soil nitrogen availability, corn yield, and nitrate leaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, S; Huang, B; Bembenek, R

    2001-10-25

    Biculture of nonlegumes and legumes could serve as cover crops for increasing main crop yield, while reducing NO3 leaching. This study, conducted from 1994 to 1999, determined the effect of monocultured cereal rye (Secale cereale L.), annual ryegrass (Lolium multiflorum), and hairy vetch (Vicia villosa), and bicultured rye/vetch and ryegrass/vetch on N availability in soil, corn (Zea mays L.) yield, and NO3-N leaching in a silt loam soil. The field had been in corn and cover crop rotation since 1987. In addition to the cover crop treatments, there were four N fertilizer rates (0, 67, 134, and 201 kg N ha(-1), referred to as N0, N1, N2, and N3, respectively) applied to corn. The experiment was a randomized split-block design with three replications for each treatment. Lysimeters were installed in 1987 at 0.75 m below the soil surface for leachate collection for the N 0, N 2, and N 3 treatments. The result showed that vetch monoculture had the most influence on soil N availability and corn yield, followed by the bicultures. Rye or ryegrass monoculture had either no effect or an adverse effect on corn yield and soil N availability. Leachate NO3-N concentration was highest where vetch cover crop was planted regardless of N rates, which suggests that N mineralization of vetch N continued well into the fall and winter. Leachate NO3-N concentration increased with increasing N fertilizer rates and exceeded the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's drinking water standard of 10 mg N l(-1) even at recommended N rate for corn in this region (coastal Pacific Northwest). In comparisons of the average NO3-N concentration during the period of high N leaching, monocultured rye and ryegrass or bicultured rye/vetch and ryegrass/vetch very effectively decreased N leaching in 1998 with dry fall weather. The amount of N available for leaching (determined based on the presidedress nitrate test, the amount of N fertilizer applied, and N uptake) correlated well with average NO3-N during

  8. Water Leakage and Nitrate Leaching Characteristics in the Winter Wheat–Summer Maize Rotation System in the North China Plain under Different Irrigation and Fertilization Management Practices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shufeng Chen

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Field experiments were carried out in Huantai County from 2006 to 2008 to evaluate the effects of different nitrogen (N fertilization and irrigation management practices on water leakage and nitrate leaching in the dominant wheat–maize rotation system in the North China Plain (NCP. Two N fertilization (NF1, the traditional one; NF2, fertilization based on soil testing and two irrigation (IR1, the traditional one; IR2, irrigation based on real-time soil water content monitoring management practices were designed in the experiments. Water and nitrate amounts leaving the soil layer at a depth of 2.0 m below the soil surface were calculated and compared. Results showed that the IR2 effectively reduced water leakage and nitrate leaching amounts in the two-year period, especially in the winter wheat season. Less than 10 percent irrigation water could be saved in a dry winter wheat season, but about 60 percent could be saved in a wet winter wheat season. Besides, 58.8 percent nitrate under single NF2IR1 and 85.2 percent under NF2IR2 could be prevented from leaching. The IR2 should be considered as the best management practice to save groundwater resources and prevent nitrate from leaching. The amounts of N input play a great role in affecting nitrate concentrations in the soil solutions in the winter wheat–summer maize rotation system. The NF2 significantly reduced N inputs and should be encouraged in ordinary agricultural production. Thus, nitrate leaching and groundwater contamination could be alleviated, but timely N supplement might be needed under high precipitation condition.

  9. Nitrate leaching through soils and environmental considerations with special reference to recent work in the United Kingdom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wild, A.; Cameron, K.C.

    1980-01-01

    Results are given of field studies of leaching losses of nitrate from soils. Under normal climatic conditions most loss occurs during the winter months (October - March) when much of the residual nitrate is leached below the root zone. Following the use of recommended rates of fertilizer to arable crops, about 15% of the nitrogen is leached, but less than 10% is leached from grassland. There is no direct information on the losses after grassland has been ploughed, and very little on the variation of losses between years. The areas to be investigated before nitrate concentrations in drinking water can be predicted with any confidence are specified. After discussion of the possible health hazards from high nitrate concentrations in drinking water, a plea is made for a balance to be struck between the relatively small health hazard (in economic terms) and the substantially higher cost of keeping the nitrate concentration low. (author)

  10. Nitrate-Nitrogen Leaching and Modeling in Intensive Agriculture Farmland in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ligang; Xu, Jin

    2013-01-01

    Protecting water resources from nitrate-nitrogen (NO3-N) contamination is an important public health concern and a major national environmental issue in China. Loss of NO3-N in soils due to leaching is not only one of the most important problems in agriculture farming, but is also the main factor causing nitrogen pollution in aquatic environments. Three typical intensive agriculture farmlands in Jiangyin City in China are selected as a case study for NO3-N leaching and modeling in the soil profile. In this study, the transport and fate of NO3-N within the soil profile and nitrate leaching to drains were analyzed by comparing field data with the simulation results of the LEACHM model. Comparisons between measured and simulated data indicated that the NO3-N concentrations in the soil and nitrate leaching to drains are controlled by the fertilizer practice, the initial conditions and the rainfall depth and distribution. Moreover, the study reveals that the LEACHM model gives a fair description of the NO3-N dynamics in the soil and subsurface drainage at the field scale. It can also be concluded that the model after calibration is a useful tool to optimize as a function of the combination “climate-crop-soil-bottom boundary condition” the nitrogen application strategy resulting for the environment in an acceptable level of nitrate leaching. The findings in this paper help to demonstrate the distribution and migration of nitrogen in intensive agriculture farmlands, as well as to explore the mechanism of groundwater contamination resulting from agricultural activities. PMID:23983629

  11. Nitrate-Nitrogen Leaching and Modeling in Intensive Agriculture Farmland in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ligang Xu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Protecting water resources from nitrate-nitrogen (NO3-N contamination is an important public health concern and a major national environmental issue in China. Loss of NO3-N in soils due to leaching is not only one of the most important problems in agriculture farming, but is also the main factor causing nitrogen pollution in aquatic environments. Three typical intensive agriculture farmlands in Jiangyin City in China are selected as a case study for NO3-N leaching and modeling in the soil profile. In this study, the transport and fate of NO3-N within the soil profile and nitrate leaching to drains were analyzed by comparing field data with the simulation results of the LEACHM model. Comparisons between measured and simulated data indicated that the NO3-N concentrations in the soil and nitrate leaching to drains are controlled by the fertilizer practice, the initial conditions and the rainfall depth and distribution. Moreover, the study reveals that the LEACHM model gives a fair description of the NO3-N dynamics in the soil and subsurface drainage at the field scale. It can also be concluded that the model after calibration is a useful tool to optimize as a function of the combination “climate-crop-soil-bottom boundary condition” the nitrogen application strategy resulting for the environment in an acceptable level of nitrate leaching. The findings in this paper help to demonstrate the distribution and migration of nitrogen in intensive agriculture farmlands, as well as to explore the mechanism of groundwater contamination resulting from agricultural activities.

  12. Fertilizer source effects on phosphate and nitrate leaching through simulated golf greens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shuman, L.M.

    2003-01-01

    In general, more P than N leached from both field and greenhouse lysimeters. - Phosphorus and nitrogen leached from high-porosity golf greens can adversely affect surface water and groundwater quality. Greenhouse and field lysimeter experiments were carried out to determine the effects of eight fertilizer sources on P and N leaching from simulated golf greens. Phosphorus appeared in the leachate later than nitrate-N, and the highest concentrations were for the soluble 20-20-20 and the 16-25-12 starter fertilizers. The other six sources resulted in lower P concentrations. The soluble 20-20-20 and the 16-25-12 sources each resulted in 43% of the added P eluting in the leachate, whereas the others varied from 15 to 25%. For nitrate-N the lowest cumulative mass was for the controlled-release 13-13-13 and sulfur-coated urea. A higher percentage of applied P than applied N leached from both field and greenhouse lysimeters. However, the amounts of P leached for the field lysimeters were lower than for the greenhouse columns

  13. Quantifying long-term responses of crop yield and nitrate leaching in an intensive farmland using agro-eco-environmental model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Mei; Huo, Zailin; Zheng, Yanxia; Dai, Xiaoqin; Feng, Shaoyuan; Mao, Xiaomin

    2018-02-01

    Quantitatively ascertaining and analyzing long-term responses of crop yield and nitrate leaching on varying irrigation and fertilization treatments are focal points for guaranteeing crop yield and reducing nitrogen loss. The calibrated agricultural-hydrological RZWQM2 model was used to explore the long-term (2003-2013) transport processes of water and nitrogen and the nitrate leaching amount into groundwater in summer maize and winter wheat rotation field in typical intensive plant area in the North China Plain, Daxing district of Beijing. Simulation results showed that application rates of irrigation and nitrogen fertilizer have couple effects on crop yields and nitrogen leaching of root zone. When both the irrigation and fertilizer for summer maize and winter wheat were 400mm and 400kgNha -1 , respectively, nitrate leaching into groundwater accounted for 47.9% of application amount of nitrogen fertilizer. When application amount of irrigation is 200mm and fertilization is 200kgNha -1 , NUPE (nitrogen uptake efficiency), NUE (nitrogen use efficiency), NPFP (nitrogen partial factor productivity), and W pi (irrigation water productive efficiency) were in general higher than that under other irrigation and fertilization condition (irrigation from 104-400mm, fertilizer 104-400kgNha -1 ). Irrigation bigger than 200mm could shorten the response time of nitrate leaching in deeper soil layer in different irrigation treatment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Comparing annual and perennial crops for bioenergy production - influence on nitrate leaching and energy balance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pugesgaard, Siri; Schelde, Kirsten; Ugilt Larsen, Søren

    2015-01-01

    Production of energy crops is promoted as a means to mitigate global warming by decreasing dependency on fossil energy. However, agricultural production of bioenergy can have various environmental effects depending on the crop and production system. In a field trial initiated in 2008, nitrate...... concentration in soil water was measured below winter wheat, grass-clover and willow during three growing seasons. Crop water balances were modelled to estimate the amount of nitrate leached per hectare. In addition, dry matter yields and nitrogen (N) yields were measured, and N balances and energy balances...... was also measured in an old willow crop established in 1996 from which N leaching ranged from 6 to 27 kg ha−1 yr−1. Dry matter yields ranged between 5.9 and 14.8 Mg yr−1 with lowest yield in the newly established willow and the highest yield harvested in grass-clover. Grass-clover gave the highest net...

  15. The effects of large scale processing on caesium leaching from cemented simulant sodium nitrate waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, D.J.; Brown, D.J.

    1982-01-01

    The effects of large scale processing on the properties of cemented simulant sodium nitrate waste have been investigated. Leach tests have been performed on full-size drums, cores and laboratory samples of cement formulations containing Ordinary Portland Cement (OPC), Sulphate Resisting Portland Cement (SRPC) and a blended cement (90% ground granulated blast furnace slag/10% OPC). In addition, development of the cement hydration exotherms with time and the temperature distribution in 220 dm 3 samples have been followed. (author)

  16. Effect of organic amendments on nitrate leaching mitigation in a sandy loam soil of Shkodra district, Albania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erdona Demiraj

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available European lacustrine systems are frequently exposed to nitrate (NO3– pollution causing eutrophication processes. An example of these lakes is Shkodra Lake, a large, shallow lake shared by Albania and Montenegro, in the Balkans Peninsula. Shkodra Lake is a natural sink that collects NO3– from agricultural activities, widely diffused in the surrounding area. The additions of wheat straw and biochar have been suggested to increase soil NO3– retention of agricultural lands. To better understand the role of these two organic soil amendments in mitigating NO3– leaching from arable lands, a pot experiment using a representative sandy loam soil of the Skodra Lake basin was performed. More specifically, a greenhouse experiment with Lolium multiflorum L. and Zea mays L., was carried out for three months, to evaluate the concentrations of NO3–-N in leachate and the cumulative leaching losses of NO3–-N, after wheat straw (10 Mg ha–1 and biochar (10 Mg ha–1 soil addition, under the same rate of NPK fertiliser (300 kg ha–1. The effect of the two organic amendments on nitrate retention, was evaluated according to two methods: i Soil NO3–-N leaching with distilled water; and ii Soil NO3–-N extraction with 2M KCl. The leached NO3–-N and the Potentially Leachable NO3–-N (2M KCl extraction were respectively determined. N uptake by plants, as well as the Nitrogen Use Efficiency were also calculated. A retention effect on nitrate was found in Lolium multiflorum L. and wheat straw treatments compared to control, by reducing leached NO3–-N almost to 35%. In SBFL (soil+biochar+fertiliser+Lolium treatment, biochar effectively reduced the total amount of nitrate in leachate of 27% and 26% compared to SFL (soil+fertiliser+Lolium and SSFL (soil+straw+fertiliser+Lolium treatments, respectively. The potentially leachable NO3–-N was two to four times higher than the leached NO3–-N. The amount of potentially leachable NO3–-N per hectare ranged

  17. Evaluating Ecosystem Services for Reducing Groundwater Nitrate Contamination: Nitrate Attenuation in the Unsaturated and Saturated Zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, J.

    2013-12-01

    Nitrates are the most common type of groundwater contamination in agricultural regions. Environmental policies targeting nitrates have focused on input control (e.g., restricted fertilizer application), intermediate loads control (e.g., reduce nitrate leached from crop fields), and final loads control (e.g., reduce catchment nitrate loads). Nitrate loads can be affected by hydrological processes in both unsaturated and saturated zones. Although many of these processes have been extensively investigated in literature, they are commonly modeled as exogenous to farm management. A couple of recent studies by scientists from the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory show that in some situations nitrate attenuation processes in the unsaturated/saturated zone, particularly denitrification, can be intensified by certain management practices to mitigate nitrate loads. Therefore, these nitrate attenuation processes can be regarded as a set of ecosystem services that farmers can take advantage of to reduce their cost of complying with environmental policies. In this paper, a representative California dairy farm is used as a case study to show how such ecosystem attenuation services can be framed within the farm owner's decision-making framework as an option for reducing groundwater nitrate contamination. I develop an integrated dynamic model, where the farmer maximizes discounted net farm profit over multiple periods subject to environmental regulations. The model consists of three submodels: animal-waste-crop, hydrologic, and economic model. In addition to common choice variables such as irrigation, fertilization, and waste disposal options, the farmer can also endogenously choose from three water sources: surface water, deep groundwater (old groundwater in the deep aquifer that is not affected by farm effluent in the short term), and shallow groundwater (drainage water that can be recycled via capture wells at the downstream end of the farm). The capture wells not only

  18. Nitrate leaching in maize after cultivation of differently managed grass-clover leys on coarse sand in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Elly Møller; Eriksen, Jørgen

    2016-01-01

    When grass-clover leys have been ploughed nitrate leaching may increase. However, management of leys before or after ploughing may affect the leaching risk. We examined the effect of cultivating a six year ley, which the last two years had been treated differently (grazing only; spring cut follow...

  19. A Unified Experimental Approach for Estimation of Irrigationwater and Nitrate Leaching in Tree Crops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopmans, J. W.; Kandelous, M. M.; Moradi, A. B.

    2014-12-01

    Groundwater quality is specifically vulnerable in irrigated agricultural lands in California and many other(semi-)arid regions of the world. The routine application of nitrogen fertilizers with irrigation water in California is likely responsible for the high nitrate concentrations in groundwater, underlying much of its main agricultural areas. To optimize irrigation/fertigation practices, it is essential that irrigation and fertilizers are applied at the optimal concentration, place, and time to ensure maximum root uptake and minimize leaching losses to the groundwater. The applied irrigation water and dissolved fertilizer, as well as root growth and associated nitrate and water uptake, interact with soil properties and fertilizer source(s) in a complex manner that cannot easily be resolved. It is therefore that coupled experimental-modeling studies are required to allow for unraveling of the relevant complexities that result from typical field-wide spatial variations of soil texture and layering across farmer-managed fields. We present experimental approaches across a network of tree crop orchards in the San Joaquin Valley, that provide the necessary soil data of soil moisture, water potential and nitrate concentration to evaluate and optimize irrigation water management practices. Specifically, deep tensiometers were used to monitor in-situ continuous soil water potential gradients, for the purpose to compute leaching fluxes of water and nitrate at both the individual tree and field scale.

  20. Nitrate leaching as a confounding factor in chemical recovery from acidification in UK upland waters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Curtis, C.J.; Evans, C.D.; Helliwell, R.C.; Monteith, D.T.

    2005-01-01

    Over the period 1988-2002, data from 18 of the 22 lakes and streams in the UK Acid Waters Monitoring Network (AWMN) show clear trends of declining excess sulphate concentrations in response to reductions in sulphur deposition, but fewer trends in increasing pH or alkalinity. There has been no significant decline in the deposition of total nitrogen over the same period, and no sites show a trend in nitrate concentration. Peak nitrate concentrations have already surpassed excess sulphate on occasion in half of the AWMN sites. Furthermore, current understanding of terrestrial N saturation processes suggests that nitrate leaching from soils may increase, even under a constant N deposition load. Best-case projections indicate that nitrate will overtake sulphate as the major excess acid anion in many sites within 10 years, while worst-case predictions with steady-state models suggest that in the longer-term, nitrate could become the dominant excess acid anion in most of the UK. - With declining excess sulphate, nitrate will become the dominant agent of continued anthropogenic acidification in many UK upland waters within a decade

  1. Investigation of disposal of nitrate-bearing effluent from in-situ leaching process by natural evaporation in Yining uranium mine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Chongyuan; Li Weicai; Zhang Yutai; Gao Xizhen

    2000-01-01

    Experiments indicated, after lime neutralization and precipitation of nitrate-bearing effluent from in-situ leaching process, uranium concentration increase with the increasing of nitrate concentration. Only when nitrate concentration is <0.5 mg/L, uranium concentration can drop from 1.5-2.0 mg/L to about 1.0 mg/L. The permeability coefficient of soil is about 1.0-1.1 m/d in the place which is scheduled for building natural evaporation pool. After lime neutralization of nitrate-bearing effluent, it can drop to 0.03-0.01 m/d. Setting up water-proof layer in natural evaporation pool can reduce pollution of underground water by uranium, nitrate and ammonium

  2. Effect of irrigation and winery waste compost rates in nitrate leaching in vulnerable zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Requejo, Maria Isabel; Castellanos, Maria Teresa; Villena, Raquel; Ribas, Francisco; Jesús Cabello, Maria; Arce, Augusto; Cartagena, Maria Carmen

    2013-04-01

    The winery industry is widespread in Spain (3,610,000 tonnes of wine in 2010 (FAO, 2010)), and generates wastes characterized by a high content of organic matter, a notable content in macronutrients and low heavy-metals. These organic wastes could be used for agricultural purposes after a correct stabilization process (e.g. composting).The addition of these organic wastes requires a correct management, especially on semiarid cropped areas of central Spain where environmental degradation of water supplies with high N loads is observed. An integrated optimization of both applied compost dose and amount of irrigation is important to ensure optimum yields and minimum nitrate leaching losses. The purpose of this work was to study the effect of the application of winery waste compost as fertilizer in a melon crop cultivated with different drip irrigation rates. The field experiment was carried out in Ciudad Real, designated "vulnerable zone" by the "Nitrates Directive" 91/676/CEE. Melon crop has been traditionally cultivated in this area with high inputs of water and fertilizers, but no antecedents of application of winery wastes are known. Beside the control treatment (D0), three doses of compost were applied: 6.7 (D1), 13.3 (D2) and 20 T/ha(D3).Irrigation treatments consisted of applying a 100% ETc and an excess irrigation of 120% ETc. The soil was a shallow sandy-loam (Petrocalcic Palexeralfs), with 0.6 m depth and a discontinuous petrocalcic horizon between 0.6 and 0.7 m. Drainage and nitrate concentration on the soil solution were measured weekly to determine N leached during the crop period. Crop yield was also followed by harvesting plots when a significant number of fruits were fully matured. A comparison between nitrate leached and crop production among different treatments and irrigation rates are presented. Acknowledgements: This project has been supported by INIA-RTA2010-00110-C03-01.

  3. Nitrate leaching affected by management options with respect to urine-affected areas and groundwater levels for grazed grassland

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hack-ten Broeke, M.J.D.; Putten, van der A.H.J.

    1997-01-01

    Simulations were performed to quantify the effects of management options on nitrate leaching to the groundwater in grazed pastures. At the experimental farm for sustainable dairy farming ‘De Marke’, experimental data on soil water and nitrates were gathered for two fields during the years 1991–1995.

  4. No-tillage and fertilization management on crop yields and nitrate leaching in North China Plain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Manxiang; Liang, Tao; Wang, Lingqing; Zhou, Chenghu

    2015-01-01

    A field experiment was performed from 2003 to 2008 to evaluate the effects of tillage system and nitrogen management regimes on crop yields and nitrate leaching from the fluvo-aquic soil with a winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L.)–maize (Zea mays L.) double-cropping system. The tillage systems consisted of conventional tillage (CT) and no-tillage (NT). Three nitrogen management regimes were included: 270 kg N ha−1 of urea for wheat and 225 kg N ha−1 of urea for maize (U), 180 kg N ha−1 of urea and 90 kg N ha−1 of straw for wheat and 180 kg N of urea and 45 kg N ha−1 of straw for maize (S), 180 kg N ha−1 of urea and 90 kg N ha−1 of manure for wheat and 180 kg N ha−1 of urea and 45 kg N ha−1 of manure for maize (M). An array of tension-free pan lysimeters (50 cm × 75 cm) were installed (1.2 m deep) to measure water flow and -N movement. No significant effect of the N management regime on yields of winter wheat and maize grain was found in the 5-year rotation. Tillage systems had significant influences on -N leaching from the second year and thereafter interacted with N management regimes on -N loads during all maize seasons. The average yield-scaled -N leaching losses were in order of CTS leaching losses while sustaining crop grain yields. Considering the lower costs, NTS could be a potential alternative to decrease yield-scaled -N leaching losses and improve soil fertility while maintaining crop yield for the winter wheat–maize double-cropping systems in the North China Plain. PMID:25859321

  5. Utilizing on-farm best management practices: Managing Nitrate Leaching Using Evapotranspiration Based Irrigation Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaragosa, I.; Melton, F. S.; Dexter, J.; Post, K.; Haffa, A.; Kortman, S.; Spellenberg, R.; Cahn, M.

    2017-12-01

    In efforts to provide tools to allow farmers to optimize and quantify water usage and fertilizer applications, University of California Cooperative Extension (UCCE) developed the CropManage irrigation and nitrogen scheduling tool that provides real time evapotranspiration (ETc) based irrigation recommendations and fertilizer recommendations on a per field basis. CropManage incorporates satellite based estimates of fractional cover from web data services from the Satellite Irrigation Management Information Support (SIMS) system developed by NASA Ames Research Center in collaboration with California State University Monterey Bay (CSUMB). In this study, we conducted field trials to quantify the benefits of using these tools to support best management practices (BMPs) for irrigation and nutrient management in strawberries and lettuce in the Salinas Valley, California. We applied two different irrigation treatments based on full replacement (100%) of crop evapotranspiration (ETc), and irrigation at 130% of ETc replacement to approximate irrigation under business as usual irrigation management. Both field studies used a randomized block design with four replicates each. We used CropManage to calculate the 100% and 130% ETc replacement requirements prior to each irrigation event. We collected drainage volume and samples and analyzed them for 8500 to nitrate as (NO3-) concentrations. Experimental results for both strawberries and lettuce showed a significant decrease in the percentage of applied nitrogen leached for the 100% ETc replacement treatment against the 130% ETc replacement treatment. For strawberries, we observed that 24% of applied nitrogen was leached under the 100% ETc replacement treatment, versus 51% of applied nitrogen that was leached under the 130% ETc replacement treatment. For lettuce, we observe that 2% of the applied nitrogen leached bellow the soil profile, versus 6% of the applied nitrogen for the 130%ETc replacement treatment. In both experiments

  6. Nitrate Accumulation and Leaching in Surface and Ground Water Based on Simulated Rainfall Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hong; Gao, Jian-en; Li, Xing-hua; Zhang, Shao-long; Wang, Hong-jie

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the process of nitrate accumulation and leaching in surface and ground water, we conducted simulated rainfall experiments. The experiments were performed in areas of 5.3 m2 with bare slopes of 3° that were treated with two nitrogen fertilizer inputs, high (22.5 g/m2 NH4NO3) and control (no fertilizer), and subjected to 2 hours of rainfall, with. From the 1st to the 7th experiments, the same content of fertilizer mixed with soil was uniformly applied to the soil surface at 10 minutes before rainfall, and no fertilizer was applied for the 8th through 12th experiments. Initially, the time-series nitrate concentration in the surface flow quickly increased, and then it rapidly decreased and gradually stabilized at a low level during the fertilizer experiments. The nitrogen loss in the surface flow primarily occurred during the first 18.6 minutes of rainfall. For the continuous fertilizer experiments, the mean nitrate concentrations in the groundwater flow remained at less than 10 mg/L before the 5th experiment, and after the 7th experiment, these nitrate concentrations were greater than 10 mg/L throughout the process. The time-series process of the changing concentration in the groundwater flow exhibited the same parabolic trend for each fertilizer experiment. However, the time at which the nitrate concentration began to change lagged behind the start time of groundwater flow by approximately 0.94 hours on average. The experiments were also performed with no fertilizer. In these experiments, the mean nitrate concentration of groundwater initially increased continuously, and then, the process exhibited the same parabolic trend as the results of the fertilization experiments. The nitrate concentration decreased in the subsequent experiments. Eight days after the 12 rainfall experiments, 50.53% of the total nitrate applied remained in the experimental soil. Nitrate residues mainly existed at the surface and in the bottom soil layers, which represents a

  7. Nitrate leaching, direct and indirect nitrous oxide fluxes from sloping cropland in the purple soil area, southwestern China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Minghua; Zhu Bo; Butterbach-Bahl, Klaus; Wang Tao; Bergmann, Jessica; Brüggemann, Nicolas; Wang Zhenhua; Li Taikui; Kuang Fuhong

    2012-01-01

    This study provides a combined dataset on N loss pathways and fluxes from sloping cropland in the purple soil area, southwestern China. A lysimeter experiment was conducted to quantify nitrate leaching (May 2004–May 2010) and N 2 O emission (May 2009–May 2010) losses. Nitrate leaching was the dominant N loss pathway and annual leaching fluxes ranged from 19.2 to 53.4 kg N ha −1 , with significant differences between individual observation years (P 2 O emissions due to N fertilizer use were 1.72 ± 0.34 kg N ha −1 yr −1 , which corresponds to an emission factor of 0.58 ± 0.12%. However, indirect N 2 O emissions caused by nitrate leaching and surface runoff N losses, may contribute another 0.15–0.42 kg N ha −1 yr −1 . Our study shows that nitrate leaching lowered direct N 2 O emissions, highlighting the importance for a better understanding of the tradeoff between direct and indirect N 2 O emissions for the development of meaningful N 2 O emission strategies. - Highlights: ► High NO 3 − leaching losses lowered direct N 2 O emissions. ► Hydrological N losses induced un-neglected indirect N 2 O emissions. ► Considering both direct and indirect N 2 O emission is needed for reduction strategies. - High nitrate leaching losses from sloping croplands of purple soil are accompanied with reductions in direct N 2 O emissions and stimulations of indirect N 2 O emissions.

  8. Leaching Behavior of Slags from AN Old Lead Smelter in Chihuahua, Mexico: Metals, Chlorides, Nitrates, Sulfates and Tds Analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espejel-Garcia, D.; Wenglas-Lara, G.; Villalobos-Aragon, A.; Espejel-Garcia, V. V.

    2013-05-01

    Waste materials (such as, smelter slags, waste glass, tires, plastics, rubbish, ashes, etc.), have a large potential to substitute natural materials, reducing costs, especially for the construction industry. Smelter slags are resistant and have better compression strength values in comparison to natural aggregates, and generally are far beyond of what the standard ratios need to qualify a material as a good one for construction. But this material has a big problem within it: the existence of toxic elements and compounds in high concentrations, which means that water and soil contamination can be present after water infiltrates through this material; so we perform leaching experiments to characterize and measure the possible contamination under controlled conditions. To perform the slags-leaching experiments, we used an EA-NEN-7375-2004 tank test standard from Netherlands. This test was selected because to our knowledge it is the only one which allows the use of coarse material, as the one utilized in construction. The leaching experiments sampling was performed at different times: 6, 24, 168 and 360 hours, to compare the leachate concentration at the two different pH's values (5 and 8) selected to simulate real conditions. For the leaching experiments, the slags were mixed with natural road base material (gravel-sands from volcanic rocks) at different proportions of 30% and 50%. In order to understand the slags' leaching behavior, other experiments were carried out with the pure material, for both (slags and natural aggregates). After analyses by ICP-OES , the slags from this smelter in Chihuahua contain Pb (0.5 - 4 wt.%), Zn (15-35 wt.%) and As (0.6 wt.%), as well such as: bicarbonates, chlorides, nitrates, sulfates, Mg, K, Na, Ca and TDS. Based on the results of the leaching analyses, via atomic absorption technique, we conclude that Pb and As concentrations are provided by the slags, meanwhile, the bicarbonates, chlorides, Na and Ca are contributed by the road

  9. Effective mitigation of nitrate leaching and nitrous oxide emissions in intensive vegetable production systems using a nitrification inhibitor, dicyandiamide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cui, Min; Sun, Xuecheng; Hu, Chengxiao; Tan, Qiling; Zhao, Changsheng [Huazhong Agricultural Univ., Wuhan (China). Key Lab. of Subtropical Agricultural Resources and Environment; Di, Hong J. [Lincoln Univ., Christchurch (New Zealand). Center for Soil and Environment Research

    2011-07-15

    Vegetable production is one of the most intensive agricultural systems with high rates of nitrogen (N) fertilizer use and irrigation, conditions conducive for nitrate (NO{sub 3}{sup -}) leaching, and nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O) emissions. The objective of this study was to determine the effectiveness of a nitrification inhibitor, dicyandiamide (DCD), in decreasing NO{sub 3}{sup -} leaching and N{sub 2}O emissions in vegetable production systems. Twenty-four undisturbed soil monolith lysimeters (610 mm in diameter; 700 mm in depth; surface area, 0.29 m{sup 2}) with two different soils, Huangzongrang (alfisol) and Chaotu (fluvisols), were collected and installed in a field lysimeter facility in Central China under irrigated vegetable production conditions. Urea fertilizer was applied at 650 kg N ha{sup -1}, and DCD was applied at 10 kg ha{sup -1} to the lysimeters planted with three kinds of vegetables (capsicum, Capsicum annuum L.; amaranth, Amaranthus mangostanus L.; radish, Raphanus sativus L.). The results showed that DCD reduced NO3- leaching by 58.5% and 36.2% and N{sub 2}O emissions factor by 83.8% and 72.7% in the two soils. The average NO{sub 3}{sup -}-N concentration in the drainage water was decreased from 4.9 mg NL{sup -1} to 2.3 mg NL{sup -1} and from 4.4 mg NL{sup -1} to 3.3 mg NL{sup -1}, in the Huangzongrang and Chaotu soils, respectively. In addition to the environmental benefits, the use of DCD also increased the yields of capsicum and radish in alfisol soil significantly (P < 0.01); only the amaranth yield in fluvisol soil was declined (P < 0.01), and the other vegetables yields were not affected. Total N concentrations of the three vegetables were increased significantly (P < 0.01) with the application of DCD with urea compared with urea alone. These results showed that the nitrification inhibitor DCD has the potential to significantly reduce NO{sub 3}{sup -} leaching and N{sub 2}O emissions and to make vegetable farming more environmentally

  10. In what root-zone N concentration does nitrate start to leach significantly? A reasonable answer from modeling Mediterranean field data and closed root-zone experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurtzman, D.; Kanner, B.; Levy, Y.; Shapira, R. H.; Bar-Tal, A.

    2017-12-01

    Closed-root-zone experiments (e.g. pots, lyzimeters) reveal in many cases a mineral-nitrogen (N) concentration from which the root-N-uptake efficiency reduces significantly and nitrate leaching below the root-zone increases dramatically. A les-direct way to reveal this threshold concentration in agricultural fields is to calibrate N-transport models of the unsaturated zone to nitrate data of the deep samples (under the root-zone) by fitting the threshold concentration of the nitrate-uptake function. Independent research efforts of these two types in light soils where nitrate problems in underlying aquifers are common reviled: 1) that the threshold exists for most crops (filed, vegetables and orchards); 2) nice agreement on the threshold value between the two very different research methodologies; and 3) the threshold lies within 20-50 mg-N/L. Focusing on being below the threshold is a relatively simple aim in the way to maintain intensive agriculture with limited effects on the nitrate concentration in the underlying water resource. Our experience show that in some crops this threshold coincides with the end-of-rise of the N-yield curve (e.g. corn); in this case, it is relatively easy to convince farmers to fertilize below threshold. In other crops, although significant N is lost to leaching the crop can still use higher N concentration to increase yield (e.g. potato).

  11. Nitrate Leaching under Vegetable Fields above a Shallow Aquifer in Slovenia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zupanc, V.; Sturm, M.; Lojen, S.; Marsic-Kacjana, N.; Pintar, M.; Adu-Gyamfi, J.; Bracic-Zeleznik, B.; Urbanc, J.

    2012-01-01

    Shallow aquifers can be prone to nitrate pollution, especially in rural, high rainfall zones under intensive vegetable production, as well as in areas with urban and industrial pollution. Due to its mobility in the soil, nitrate is the most problematic pollutant in intensive agricultural production areas. The risk of nitrate leaching is closely related to the excessive application of organic and inorganic nitrogen (N) fertilizers and can occur at and after harvest, as well as during the crop cycle, because of excessive irrigation or heavy precipitation. The impact of agriculture on groundwater quality can be minimized through improved nitrogen and water management (irrigation) practices, which should be evaluated with regard to their production, polluting effects and cost effectiveness. Most of the Slovenian highly fertile arable lands occur on plains in the shallow groundwater recharge zones, and are used for intensive fresh vegetable production, an important source of income generation for the farmers. These shallow alluvial aquifers are, however, one of the country's most important sources of drinking water. This leads to a conflict of interest between drinking water resource protection and agricultural production. The common farming practice in Slovenia is to broadcast fertilizer applications which often results in extensive nitrate leaching. Thus nitrate management in agriculture is a contentious issue, as adequate nitrogen fertilization is required to ensure reasonable crop yields, yet excessive N fertilization can lead to groundwater pollution. Through an IAEA technical cooperation project SLO 5002 Protecting Groundwater and Soil Pollutants using Nuclear echniques, various irrigation, nitrogen and cropping system management strategies for the production of vegetables with a shorter growing period were assessed at a benchmark site in Slovenia during the years 2006 and 2007. Four irrigation and fertilization treatments were applied: (1) 50% drip irrigation of

  12. Effect of Winter Cover Crops on Soil Nitrogen Availability, Corn Yield, and Nitrate Leaching

    OpenAIRE

    Kuo, S.; Huang, B.; Bembenek, R.

    2001-01-01

    Biculture of nonlegumes and legumes could serve as cover crops for increasing main crop yield, while reducing NO3 leaching. This study, conducted from 1994 to 1999, determined the effect of monocultured cereal rye (Secale cereale L.), annual ryegrass (Lolium multiflorum), and hairy vetch (Vicia villosa), and bicultured rye/vetch and ryegrass/vetch on N availability in soil, corn (Zea mays L.) yield, and NO3-N leaching in a silt loam soil. The field had been in corn and cover crop rotation sin...

  13. Nitrate leaching from winter cereal cover crops using undisturbed soil-column lysimeters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cover crops are important management practices for reducing nitrogen (N) leaching in the Chesapeake Bay watershed, which is under Total Maximum Daily Load restraints. Cool-season annual grasses such as barley, rye, or wheat are common cover crops, but studies are needed to directly compare field ni...

  14. Nitrogen uptake, nitrate leaching and root development in winter-grown wheat and fodder radish

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munkholm, Lars Juhl; Hansen, Elly Møller; Thomsen, Ingrid Kaag

    2017-01-01

    Early seeding of winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) has been proposed as a means to reduce N leaching as an alternative to growing cover crops like fodder radish (Raphanus sativus L.). The objective of this study was to quantify the effect of winter wheat, seeded early and normally, and of fodder...

  15. Tradeoffs between Maize Silage Yield and Nitrate Leaching in a Mediterranean Nitrate-Vulnerable Zone under Current and Projected Climate Scenarios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basso, Bruno; Giola, Pietro; Dumont, Benjamin; Migliorati, Massimiliano De Antoni; Cammarano, Davide; Pruneddu, Giovanni; Giunta, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Future climatic changes may have profound impacts on cropping systems and affect the agronomic and environmental sustainability of current N management practices. The objectives of this work were to i) evaluate the ability of the SALUS crop model to reproduce experimental crop yield and soil nitrate dynamics results under different N fertilizer treatments in a farmer’s field, ii) use the SALUS model to estimate the impacts of different N fertilizer treatments on NO3- leaching under future climate scenarios generated by twenty nine different global circulation models, and iii) identify the management system that best minimizes NO3- leaching and maximizes yield under projected future climate conditions. A field experiment (maize-triticale rotation) was conducted in a nitrate vulnerable zone on the west coast of Sardinia, Italy to evaluate N management strategies that include urea fertilization (NMIN), conventional fertilization with dairy slurry and urea (CONV), and no fertilization (N0). An ensemble of 29 global circulation models (GCM) was used to simulate different climate scenarios for two Representative Circulation Pathways (RCP6.0 and RCP8.5) and evaluate potential nitrate leaching and biomass production in this region over the next 50 years. Data collected from two growing seasons showed that the SALUS model adequately simulated both nitrate leaching and crop yield, with a relative error that ranged between 0.4% and 13%. Nitrate losses under RCP8.5 were lower than under RCP6.0 only for NMIN. Accordingly, levels of plant N uptake, N use efficiency and biomass production were higher under RCP8.5 than RCP6.0. Simulations under both RCP scenarios indicated that the NMIN treatment demonstrated both the highest biomass production and NO3- losses. The newly proposed best management practice (BMP), developed from crop N uptake data, was identified as the optimal N fertilizer management practice since it minimized NO3- leaching and maximized biomass production over

  16. Nitrate leaching from sandy loam soils under a double-cropping forage system estimated from suction-probe measurements.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Trindade, H.; Coutinho, J.; Beusichem, van M.L.; Scholefield, D.; Moreira, N.

    1997-01-01

    Nitrate leaching from a double-cropping forage system was measured over a 2-year period (June 1994–May 1996) in the Northwest region of Portugal using ceramic cup samplers. The crops were grown for silage making and include maize (from May to September) and a winter crop (rest of the year)

  17. Global sensitivity and uncertainty analysis of the nitrate leaching and crop yield simulation under different water and nitrogen management practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agricultural system models have become important tools in studying water and nitrogen (N) dynamics, as well as crop growth, under different management practices. Complexity in input parameters often leads to significant uncertainty when simulating dynamic processes such as nitrate leaching or crop y...

  18. Optimising crop production and nitrate leaching in China: Measured and simulated effects of straw incorporation and nitrogen fertilisation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Manevski, Kiril; Børgesen, Christen Duus; Li, Xiaoxin

    2016-01-01

    model Daisy for estimating crop production and nitrate leaching from silty loam fields in the NCP. The main objectives were to: i) calibrate and validate Daisy for the NCP pedo-climate and field management conditions, and ii) use the calibrated model and the field data in a multi-response analyses...

  19. Nitrate Leaching From a Mountain Forest Ecosystem with Gleysols Subjected to Experimentally Increased N Deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schleppi, Patrick; Hagedorn, Frank; Providoli, Isabelle

    2004-01-01

    Nitrate leaching was measured over seven years of nitrogen (N) addition in a paired-catchment experiment in Alptal, central Switzerland (altitude: 1200 m, bulk N deposition: 12 kg ha -1 a -1 ). Two forested catchments (1500 m 2 each) dominated by Picea abies) were delimited by trenches in the Gleysols. NH 4 NO 3 was added to one of the catchments using sprinklers. During the first year, the N addition was labelled with 15 N. Additionally, soil N transformations were studied in replicated plots. Pre-treatment NO 3 - -N leaching was 4 kg ha -1 a -1 from both catchments, and remained between 2.5 and 4.8 kg ha -1 a -1 in the control catchment. The first year of treatment induced an additional leaching of 3.1 kg ha -1 , almost 90% of which was labelled with 15 N, indicating that it did not cycle through the large N pools of the ecosystem (soil organic matter and plants). These losses partly correspond to NO 3 - from precipitation bypassing the soil due to preferential flow. During rain or snowmelt events, NO 3 - concentration peaks as the water table is rising, indicating flushing from the soil. Nitrification occurs temporarily along the water flow paths in the soil and can be the source of NO 3 - flushing. Its isotopic signature however, shows that this release mainly affects recently applied N, stored only between runoff events or up to a few weeks. At first, the ecosystem retained 90% of the added N (2/3 in the soil), but NO 3 - losses increased from 10 to 30% within 7 yr, indicating that the ecosystem became progressively N saturated

  20. Rapid immobilisation and leaching of wet-deposited nitrate in upland organic soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, Chris D.; Norris, Dave; Ostle, Nick; Grant, Helen; Rowe, Edwin C.; Curtis, Chris J.; Reynolds, Brian

    2008-01-01

    Nitrate (NO 3 - ) is often observed in surface waters draining terrestrial ecosystems that remain strongly nitrogen (N) limited. It has been suggested that this occurs due to hydrological bypassing of soil or vegetation N retention, particularly during high flows. To test this hypothesis, artificial rain events were applied to 12 replicate soil blocks on a Welsh podzolic acid grassland hillslope, labelled with 15 N-enriched NO 3 - and a conservative bromide (Br - ) tracer. On average, 31% of tracer-labelled water was recovered within 4 h, mostly as mineral horizon lateral flow, indicating rapid vertical water transfer through the organic horizon via preferential flowpaths. However, on average only 6% of 15 N-labelled NO 3 - was recovered. Around 80% of added NO 3 - was thus rapidly immobilised, probably by microbial communities present on the surfaces of preferential flowpaths. Transitory exceedance of microbial N-uptake capacity during periods of high water and N flux may therefore provide a mechanism for NO 3 - leaching. - Nitrate retention occurs rapidly in organic soils along preferential flowpaths

  1. Nitrate leaching in a winter wheat-summer maize rotation on a calcareous soil as affected by nitrogen and straw management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Tao; Ju, Xiaotang; Yang, Hao

    2017-02-08

    Nitrate leaching is one of the most important pathways of nitrogen (N) loss which leads to groundwater contamination or surface water eutrophication. Clarifying the rates, controlling factors and characteristics of nitrate leaching is the pre-requisite for proposing effective mitigation strategies. We investigated the effects of interactions among chemical N fertilizer, straw and manure applications on nitrogen leaching in an intensively managed calcareous Fluvo-aquic soil with winter wheat-summer maize cropping rotations on the North China Plain from October 2010 to September 2013 using ceramic suction cups and seepage water calculations based on a long-term field experiment. Annual nitrate leaching reached 38-60 kg N ha -1 from conventional N managements, but declined by 32-71% due to optimum N, compost manure or municipal waste treatments, respectively. Nitrate leaching concentrated in the summer maize season, and fewer leaching events with high amounts are the characteristics of nitrate leaching in this region. Overuse of chemical N fertilizers, high net mineralization and nitrification, together with predominance of rainfall in the summer season with light soil texture are the main controlling factors responsible for the high nitrate leaching loss in this soil-crop-climatic system.

  2. Reducing the leachability of nitrate, phosphorus and heavy metals from soil using waste material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faridullah

    Full Text Available Abstract Contaminants like nitrate (NO3, phosphorus (P and heavy metals in water are often associated with agricultural activities. Various soil and water remediation techniques have been employed to reduce the risk associated with these contaminants. A study was conducted to examine the extent of leaching of heavy metals (Cd, Ni, Pb and Cr, NO3 and P. For this purpose sandy and silt loam soils were amended with different waste materials, namely wood ash, solid waste ash, vegetable waste, charcoal, and sawdust. The soils were saturated with wastewater. Irrespective of the waste applied, the pH and EC of the amended soils were found to be greater than the control. Charcoal, sawdust and wood ash significantly decreased heavy metals, nitrate and phosphorus concentrations in the leachate. Treatments were more efficient for reducing Ni than other heavy metals concentrations. Waste amendments differed for heavy metals during the process of leaching. Heavy metals in the soil were progressively depleted due to the successive leaching stages. This research suggests that waste material may act as an adsorbent for the above contaminants and can reduce their leachability in soils.

  3. The nitrate leached below maize root zone is available for deep-rooted wheat in winter wheat-summer maize rotation in the North China Plain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou Shunli [Key Laboratory of Crop Cultivation and Farming System, Ministry of Agriculture, College of Agronomy and Biotechnology, China Agricultural University, 2 West Yuanmingyuan Road, Beijing 100094 (China)], E-mail: zhoushl@cau.edu.cn; Wu Yongcheng [Key Laboratory of Crop Cultivation and Farming System, Ministry of Agriculture, College of Agronomy and Biotechnology, China Agricultural University, 2 West Yuanmingyuan Road, Beijing 100094 (China); College of Agronomy, Si Chuan Agricultural University, Yaan 625014 (China); Wang Zhimin [Key Laboratory of Crop Cultivation and Farming System, Ministry of Agriculture, College of Agronomy and Biotechnology, China Agricultural University, 2 West Yuanmingyuan Road, Beijing 100094 (China); Lu Laiqing; Wang Runzheng [Wuqiao Experimental Station, China Agricultural University, Hebei 061802 (China)

    2008-04-15

    In winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L.)-summer maize (Zea mays L.) rotation system in the North China Plain, maize roots do not extend beyond 1.2 m in the vertical soil profile, but wheat roots can reach up to 2.0 m. Increases in soil nitrate content at maize harvest and significant reductions after winter wheat harvest were observed in the 1.4-2.0 m depth under field conditions. The recovery of {sup 15}N isotope (calcium nitrate) from various (1.0, 1.2, 1.4, 1.6, 1.8 and 2.0 m) soil depths showed that deep-rooting winter wheat could use soil nitrate up to the 2.0 m depth. This accounted partially, for the reduced nitrate in the 1.4-2.0 m depth of the soil after harvest of wheat in the rotation system. - Deep-rooted wheat can recycle nitrate leached from maize root zone in winter wheat-summer maize rotation system.

  4. The nitrate leached below maize root zone is available for deep-rooted wheat in winter wheat-summer maize rotation in the North China Plain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Shunli; Wu Yongcheng; Wang Zhimin; Lu Laiqing; Wang Runzheng

    2008-01-01

    In winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L.)-summer maize (Zea mays L.) rotation system in the North China Plain, maize roots do not extend beyond 1.2 m in the vertical soil profile, but wheat roots can reach up to 2.0 m. Increases in soil nitrate content at maize harvest and significant reductions after winter wheat harvest were observed in the 1.4-2.0 m depth under field conditions. The recovery of 15 N isotope (calcium nitrate) from various (1.0, 1.2, 1.4, 1.6, 1.8 and 2.0 m) soil depths showed that deep-rooting winter wheat could use soil nitrate up to the 2.0 m depth. This accounted partially, for the reduced nitrate in the 1.4-2.0 m depth of the soil after harvest of wheat in the rotation system. - Deep-rooted wheat can recycle nitrate leached from maize root zone in winter wheat-summer maize rotation system

  5. Main means for reducing the production costs in process of leaching uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang Lang

    2000-01-01

    The production costs in process of leaching uranium have been reduced by controlling mixture ratio of crudes, milling particle size, liquid/solid mass ratio of leaching pulp, potential and residue acidity, and improving power equipment

  6. Integrated modelling of crop production and nitrate leaching with the Daisy model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manevski, Kiril; Børgesen, Christen D; Li, Xiaoxin; Andersen, Mathias N; Abrahamsen, Per; Hu, Chunsheng; Hansen, Søren

    2016-01-01

    An integrated modelling strategy was designed and applied to the Soil-Vegetation-Atmosphere Transfer model Daisy for simulation of crop production and nitrate leaching under pedo-climatic and agronomic environment different than that of model original parameterisation. The points of significance and caution in the strategy are: •Model preparation should include field data in detail due to the high complexity of the soil and the crop processes simulated with process-based model, and should reflect the study objectives. Inclusion of interactions between parameters in a sensitivity analysis results in better account for impacts on outputs of measured variables.•Model evaluation on several independent data sets increases robustness, at least on coarser time scales such as month or year. It produces a valuable platform for adaptation of the model to new crops or for the improvement of the existing parameters set. On daily time scale, validation for highly dynamic variables such as soil water transport remains challenging. •Model application is demonstrated with relevance for scientists and regional managers. The integrated modelling strategy is applicable for other process-based models similar to Daisy. It is envisaged that the strategy establishes model capability as a useful research/decision-making, and it increases knowledge transferability, reproducibility and traceability.

  7. Spatial analyses of cost efficient measures to reduce N-leaching

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Brian H.; Abildtrup, Jens; Ørum, Jens Erik

    (WFD). The analysis shows that the geographical position of the measures are very important in order to achieve the expected nutrient reduction. The current income varies a lot in the River basin and this might influence the choice of cost effective measures to reduce nutrient load. Furthermore a close......The Nitrate Directive has only been implemented satisfactorily in a few EU countries. The Commission have accepted the Danish implementation of the directive based on the Plan for the Aquatic Environment II. The costs of this plan has been calculated to 70 million € or 2,0 € per kg N in reduced...... leaching. The farmers have paid 60% of the costs. The paper then describes an example of a regional analysis covering the River Basin of Ringkøbing Fjord in Denmark, which indicates the type of calculations needed to find the measures and costs in order to comply with parts of the Water Framework Directive...

  8. Impact of irrigation-practices on nitrate-leaching to contaminate groundwater and its risk to rural community

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Latif, M.

    2003-01-01

    A study was conducted to investigate contamination of shallow groundwater by nitrogen fertilizers. Results of the study show that the concentration of nitrate-nitrogen varies from 0.03 to 3.25 mg/l in the water samples collected from the tile-drainage areas, which is much below the maximum permissible limit of 10 mg/l. The nitrate-nitrogen concentration exceeded the permissible limit in about 15% of the samples collected from outside the tile-drainage areas. In general, it is found that there is no danger of shallow groundwater pollution by nitrate if the agricultural drainage system (tile drains) is functioning well. In contrast to this, there are chances of groundwater pollution where there is no such drainage-system. Further, the analysis of the water-samples collected from hand pumps and tube wells indicates that nitrates accumulate in the top surface of groundwater, after their leaching with downward percolating water. For this reason, the concentration of nitrate was found a maximum in the shallower groundwater. It decreases rather sharply with increase in groundwater depth. Thus, it is safer to tap deeper groundwater to lesson the danger of pollution by nitrates for human health. Soil-samples were also collected from selected points, along with water samples. These results indicate that soil-texture has a significant impact on production of nitrates, as well as their leaching and subsequent pollution of groundwater. There is more risk of groundwater-pollution in areas occupied by coarse-textured material, containing more than 50 percent sand particles. (author)

  9. Nitrogen Fertilizer Rate and Crop Management Effects on Nitrate Leaching from an Agricultural Field in Central Pennsylvania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard H. Fox

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Eighteen pan lysimeters were installed at a depth of 1.2 m in a Hagerstown silt loam soil in a corn field in central Pennsylvania in 1988. In 1995, wick lysimeters were also installed at 1.2 m depth in the same access pits. Treatments have included N fertilizer rates, use of manure, crop rotation (continuous corn, corn-soybean, alfalfa-corn, and tillage (chisel plow-disk, no-till. The leachate data were used to evaluate a number of nitrate leaching models. Some of the highlights of the 11 years of results include the following: 1 growing corn without organic N inputs at the economic optimum N rate (EON resulted in NO3–-N concentrations of 15 to 20 mg l-1 in leachate; 2 use of manure or previous alfalfa crop as partial source of N also resulted in 15 to 20 mg l-1 of NO3–-N in leachate below corn at EON; 3 NO3–-N concentration in leachate below alfalfa was approximately 4 mg l-1; 4 NO3–-N concentration in leachate below soybeans following corn was influenced by fertilizer N rate applied to corn; 5 the mass of NO3–-N leached below corn at the EON rate averaged 90 kg N ha-1 (approx. 40% of fertilizer N applied at EON; 6 wick lysimeters collected approximately 100% of leachate vs. 40–50% collected by pan lysimeters. Coefficients of variation of the collected leachate volumes for both lysimeter types were similar; 7 tillage did not markedly affect nitrate leaching losses; 8 tested leaching models could accurately predict leachate volumes and could be calibrated to match nitrate leaching losses in calibration years, but only one model (SOILN accurately predicted nitrate leaching losses in the majority of validation treatment years. Apparent problems with tested models: there was difficulty estimating sizes of organic N pools and their transformation rates, and the models either did not include a macropore flow component or did not handle macropore flow well.

  10. Reducing uranium and thorium level in Zircon: effect of heat treatment on rate of leaching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meor Yusoff Meor Sulaiman

    2002-01-01

    Considerable amount of uranium and thorium are found in Malaysian zircon and the level is much higher than the minimum value adopted by many importing countries. Selective leaching had been applied as an important technique to reduce these elements. An initial study was carried out using hydrochloric acid leaching system but the result was not favourable. The rate of uranium and thorium leached can be further improved by introducing a heat pretreatment process prior to leaching (Author)

  11. Nitrogen removal and nitrate leaching for forage systems receiving dairy effluent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodard, Kenneth R; French, Edwin C; Sweat, Lewin A; Graetz, Donald A; Sollenberger, Lynn E; Macoon, Bisoondat; Portier, Kenneth M; Wade, Brett L; Rymph, Stuart J; Prine, Gordon M; Van Horn, Harold H

    2002-01-01

    Florida dairies need year-round forage systems that prevent loss of N to ground water from waste effluent sprayfields. Our purpose was to quantify forage N removal and monitor nitrate N (NO3(-)-N) concentrations in soil water below the rooting zone for two forage systems during four 12-mo cycles (1996-2000). Soil in the sprayfield is an excessively drained Kershaw sand (thermic, uncoated Typic Quartzipsamment). Over four cycles, average loading rates of effluent N were 500, 690, and 910 kg ha(-1) per cycle. Nitrogen removed by the bermudagrass (Cynodon spp.)-rye (Secale cereale L.) system (BR) during the first three cycles was 465 kg ha(-1) per cycle for the low loading rate, 528 kg ha(-1) for the medium rate, and 585 kg ha(-1) for the high. For the corn (Zea mays L.)-forage sorghum [Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench]-rye system (CSR), N removals were 320 kg ha(-1) per cycle for the low rate, 327 kg ha(-1) for the medium, and 378 kg ha(-1) for the high. The higher N removals for BR were attributed to higher N concentration in bermudagrass (18.1-24.2 g kg(-1)) than in corn and forage sorghum (10.3-14.7 g kg(-1)). Dry matter yield declined in the fourth cycle for bermudagrass but N removal continued to be higher for BR than CSR. The BR system was much more effective at preventing NO3(-)-N leaching. For CSR, NO3(-)-N levels in soil water (1.5 m below surface) increased steeply during the period between the harvest of one forage and canopy dosure of the next. Overall, the BR system was better than CSR at removing N from the soil and maintaining low NO3(-)-N concentrations below the rooting zone.

  12. Leaching of Carbothermic Reduced Titanium-bearing Blast Furnace Slag by Acid

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHEN Yulan; ZHANG Guohua; CHOU Kuochih

    2016-01-01

    The kinetics of the leaching of carbothermic reduced titanium-bearing blast furnace slag in Panzhihua Iron and Steel Company with acid system under atmosphere pressure was studied. The results show that the temperature and concentration have significant influence on leaching of carbothermic reduced titanium-bearing blast furnace slag by ac-id. The experimental data of leaching indicate that the shrinking core model with chemical reaction controlled process is most applicable for the acid leaching. The apparent activation energy can be estimated to be from 23 to 32 kJ/mol. Fur-thermore, the main products are TiC and SiO2 after leaching.

  13. Effects of cropping system and rates of nitrogen in animal slurry and mineral fertilizer on nitrate leaching from a sandy loam

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Ingrid Kaag; Hansen, Jørgen Frederik; Kjellerup, Viggo K.

    1993-01-01

    ammonium nitrate (CAN) or animal slurry according to recommended rates (1N) or 50% above recommended rates (1.5N). Compared with unfertilized crops, leaching of nitrate increased only slightly when 1N (CAN) was added. Successive annual additions of 1.5N (CAN) or IN and 1.5N (animal slurry) caused...

  14. Use of dolomite phosphate rock (DPR) fertilizers to reduce phosphorus leaching from sandy soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, G.C.; He, Z.L.; Stoffella, P.J.; Yang, X.E.; Yu, S.; Calvert, D.

    2006-01-01

    There is increasing concern over P leaching from sandy soils applied with water-soluble P fertilizers. Laboratory column leaching experiments were conducted to evaluate P leaching from a typical acidic sandy soil in Florida amended with DPR fertilizers developed from dolomite phosphate rock (DPR) and N-Viro soil. Ten leaching events were carried out at an interval of 7 days, with a total leaching volume of 1183 mm equivalent to the mean annual rainfall of this region during the period of 2001-2003. Leachates were collected and analyzed for total P and inorganic P. Phosphorus in the leachate was dominantly reactive, accounting for 67.7-99.9% of total P leached. Phosphorus leaching loss mainly occurred in the first three leaching events, accounting for 62.0-98.8% of the total P leached over the whole period. The percentage of P leached (in the total P added) from the soil amended with water-soluble P fertilizer was higher than those receiving the DPR fertilizers. The former was up to 96.6%, whereas the latter ranged from 0.3% to 3.8%. These results indicate that the use of N-Viro-based DPR fertilizers can reduce P leaching from sandy soils. - Fertilizers developed from dolomite phosphate rock (DPR) reduce phosphorus leaching from sandy soil

  15. Temporal and spatial variations in groundwater quality resulting from policy-induced reductions in nitrate leaching to the Rabis Creek aquifer, Denmark

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jessen, Søren; Engesgaard, Peter; Thorling, Lærke; Müller, Sascha; Leskelä, Jari; Postma, Dieke

    2016-04-01

    Twenty-five years of annual groundwater quality monitoring data from the sandy unconfined Rabis Creek aquifer were used to assess the effects of political actions aimed to reduce nitrate leaching to the aquifer. Data were collected from eight multilevel samplers along a ˜3 km transect, which follows the general direction of groundwater flow. Each multilevel sampler comprises 20 screens placed with a 1 m vertical distance from near the water table downwards. The transect covers areas of livestock, plantation & heath, and agriculture. The history of nitrate leaching to the aquifer was assessed using data from screens close to the water table of multilevel samplers placed within agricultural areas. According to these data, nitrate concentrations of infiltrating 'agricultural' water peaked at 2-3 mM (120-180 mg/L) in the year 1989, and then gradually decreased and stabilized at 0.25-1.0 mM (15-60 mg/L) from year 2000. Local farmers declare having used the maximum fertilization rate allowed during the period. The timing of the observed decrease therefore suggests a direct link to the political action plans implemented in the same period. Parallel to the development in nitrate leaching, although with a transport time lag, the average concentration of nitrate in the oxic zone of the aquifer was roughly halved between 2000 and 2013. As a response to political initiatives of the late 1980'ies, part of the area covering the aquifer was changed from agriculture to non-fertilized grass for livestock; the data shows that this effectively remediated the aquifer underneath in less than 20 years, to become nitrate-free and attain background sulfate levels. The oxidized and pyritic reduced zone of the aquifer is separated by a <1 m redoxcline. Denitrification by the pyrite releases sulfate that is retained down-gradient as a tracer for historical nitrate loading to the aquifer. Thus sulfate concentrations currently increase in the multilevel samplers positioned furthest down

  16. Ammonium, Nitrate, and Phosphate Sorption to and Solute Leaching from Biochars Prepared from Corn Stover ( L.) and Oak Wood ( spp.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollister, C Colin; Bisogni, James J; Lehmann, Johannes

    2013-01-01

    Biochar (BC) was evaluated for nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) removal from aqueous solution to quantify its nutrient pollution mitigation potential in agroecosystems. Sorption isotherms were prepared for solutions of ammonium (NH), nitrate (NO), and phosphate (PO-P) using BC of corn ( L.) and oak ( spp.) feedstock, each pyrolyzed at 350 and 550°C highest treatment temperature (HTT). Sorption experiments were performed on original BC as well as on BC that went through a water extraction pretreatment (denoted WX-BC). Ammonium sorption was observed for WX-Oak-BC and WX-Corn-BC, and Freundlich model linearization showed that a 200°C increase in HTT resulted in a 55% decrease in * values for WX-Oak-BC and a 69% decrease in * for WX-Corn-BC. Nitrate sorption was not observed for any BC. Removing metals by water extraction from WX-Oak-350 and WX-Oak-550 resulted in a 25 to 100% decrease in phosphate removal efficiency relative to original Oak-350 and Oak-550, respectively. No PO-P sorption was observed using any Corn-BC. Calcium (Ca) leached from BC produced at 550°C was 63 and 104% higher than from BC produced at 350°C for corn and oak, respectively. Leaching of P was two orders of magnitude lower in WX-Oak-BC than in WX-Corn-BC, concurrent with similar difference in magnesium (Mg). Nitrate and NH leaching from consecutive water extractions of all tested BCs was mostly below detection limits. Copyright © by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America, Inc.

  17. The role of Eh and pH in leaching Saskatchewan uranium ores with chloride and nitrate leaching systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nirdosh, I.; Muthuswami, S.V.

    1992-01-01

    The effects of solution E h and pH on the extractions of U, 230 Th, 226 Ra, As and Ni from two typical uranium ores from the province of Saskatchewan in Canada are discussed for the leachants ferric chloride, ferric nitrate, nitric acid and hydrochloric acid. It is concluded that E h > 700 mV and pH 230 Th extraction is more sensitive to solution pH than to E h whereas Ni extraction is sensitive mainly to the solution E h . Arsenic extraction is very sensitive to solution E h , and for a given E h , is high at pH 1.3. (orig.) [de

  18. Transformation of benzalkonium chloride under nitrate reducing conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tezel, Ulas; Pavlostathis, Spyros G

    2009-03-01

    The effect and transformation potential of benzalkonium chlorides (BAC) under nitrate reducing conditions were investigated at concentrations up to 100 mg/L in batch assays using a mixed, mesophilic (35 degrees C) methanogenic culture. Glucose was used as the carbon and energy source and the initial nitrate concentration was 70 mg N/L Dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonia (DNRA) and to dinitrogen (DNRN) were observed at BAC concentrations up to 25 mg/L At and above 50 mg BAC/L, DNRA was inhibited and DNRN was incomplete resulting in accumulation of nitrous oxide. Long-term inhibition of methanogenesis and accumulation of volatile fatty acids were observed at and above 50 mg BAC/L Over 99% of the added BAC was recovered from all cultures except the one amended with 100 mg BAC/L where 37% of the initially added BAC was transformed during the 100 day incubation period. Abiotic and biotic assays performed with 100 mg/L of BAC and 5 mM (in the liquid phase) of either nitrate, nitrite, or nitric oxide demonstrated that BAC transformation was abiotic and followed the modified Hofmann degradation pathway, i.e., bimolecular nucleophilic substitution with nitrite. Alkyl dimethyl amines (tertiary amines) were produced at equamolar levels to BAC transformed, but were not further degraded. This is the first report demonstrating the transformation of BAC under nitrate reducing conditions and elucidating the BAC transformation pathway.

  19. The influence of Glyceria maxima and nitrate input on the composition and nitrate metabolism of the dissimilatory nitrate-reducing bacterial community

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijburg, J.W.; Laanbroek, H.J.

    1997-01-01

    The influence of nitrate addition and the presence of Glyceria maxima (reed sweetgrass) on the composition and nitrate metabolism of the dissimilatory nitrate-reducing bacterial community was investigated. Anoxic freshwater sediment was incubated in pots with or without G. maxima and with or without

  20. The influence of Glyceria maxima and nitrate input on the composition and nitrate metabolism of the dissimilatory nitrate-reducing bacterial community

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijburg, J.W.; Laanbroek, H.J.

    1997-01-01

    The influence of nitrate addition and the presence of Glyceria maxima (reed sweetgrass) on the composition and nitrate metabolism of the dissimilatory nitrate-reducing bacterial community was investigated. Anoxic freshwater sediment was incubated in pots with or without G. maxima and with or

  1. Nitrate and sulfate reducers-retrievable number of bacteria and their activities in Indian waters

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    LokaBharathi, P.A.; Nair, S.; Chandramohan, D.

    Culturable heterotrophic, nitrate reducing and sulfate reducing bacteria (HB, NRB and SRB) were enumerated from 25, 50, 100 and 200 m depths at 15 stations and their potential activities viz. Nitrate reducing (NRA) and Sulfate reducing (SRA) were...

  2. Nitrogen gas emissions and nitrate leaching dynamics under different tillage practices based on data synthesis and process-based modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Y.; Ren, W.; Tao, B.; Zhu, X.

    2017-12-01

    Nitrogen losses from the agroecosystems have been of great concern to global changes due to the effects on global warming and water pollution in the form of nitrogen gas emissions (e.g., N2O) and mineral nitrogen leaching (e.g., NO3-), respectively. Conservation tillage, particularly no-tillage (NT), may enhance soil carbon sequestration, soil aggregation and moisture; therefore it has the potential of promoting N2O emissions and reducing NO3- leaching, comparing with conventional tillage (CT). However, associated processes are significantly affected by various factors, such as soil properties, climate, and crop types. How tillage management practices affect nitrogen transformations and fluxes is still far from clear, with inconsistent even opposite results from previous studies. To fill this knowledge gap, we quantitatively investigated gaseous and leaching nitrogen losses from NT and CT agroecosystems based on data synthesis and an improved process-based agroecosystem model. Our preliminary results suggest that NT management is more efficient in reducing NO3- leaching, and meanwhile it simultaneously increases N2O emissions by approximately 10% compared with CT. The effects of NT on N2O emissions and NO3- leaching are highly influenced by the placement of nitrogen fertilizer and are more pronounced in humid climate conditions. The effect of crop types is a less dominant factor in determining N2O and NO3- losses. Both our data synthesis and process-based modeling suggest that the enhanced carbon sequestration capacity from NT could be largely compromised by relevant NT-induced increases in N2O emissions. This study provides the comprehensive quantitative assessment of NT on the nitrogen emissions and leaching in agroecosystems. It provides scientific information for identifying proper management practices for ensuring food security and minimizing the adverse environmental impacts. The results also underscore the importance of suitable nitrogen management in the NT

  3. Catch crops as universal and effective method for reducing nitrogen leaching loss in spring cereal production: A meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valkama, Elena; Lemola, Riitta; Känkänen, Hannu; Turtola, Eila

    2016-04-01

    Sustainable farms produce adequate amounts of a high-quality product, protect their resources and are both environmentally friendly and economically profitable. Nitrogen (N) fertilization decisively influences the cereal yields as well as increases soil N balance (N input in fertilizer - N output in harvested yield), thereby leading to N losses to the environment. However, while N input reduction affects soil N balance, such approach would markedly reduce N leaching loss only in case of abnormally high N balances. As an alternative approach, the growing of catch crops aims to prevent nutrient leaching in autumn after harvest and during the following winter, but due to competition, catch crops may also reduce yields of the main crop. Although studies have explored the environmental effects of catch crops in cereal production in the Nordic countries (Denmark, Sweden, Finland and Norway) during the past 40 years, none has yet carried out a meta-analysis. We quantitatively summarized 35 studies on the effect of catch crops (non-legume and legume) undersown in spring cereals on N leaching loss or its risk as estimated by the content of soil nitrate N or its sum with ammonium in late autumn. The meta-analysis also included the grain yield and N content of spring cereals. To identify sources of variation, we studied the effects of soil texture and management (ploughing time, the amount of N applied, fertilizer type), as well as climatic (annual precipitation) and experimental conditions (duration of experiments, lysimeter vs. field experiments). Finally, we examined whether the results differed between the countries or over the decades. Compared to control groups with no catch crops, non-legume catch crops, mainly ryegrass species, reduced N leaching loss by 50% on average, and soil nitrate N or inorganic N by 35% in autumn. Italian ryegrass depleted soil N more effectively (by 60%) than did perennial ryegrass or Westerwolds ryegrass (by 25%). In contrast, legumes (white

  4. Nitrate Leaching From Grain Maize After Different Tillage Methods and Long/Short Term Cover Cropping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Elly Møller

    trial initiated in 1968 on a coarse sandy soil. The previous trial included spring sown crops undersown (with or without) perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne L.) as cover crop, two N-rates (90 and 120 kg N ha-1) and different tillage methods (shallow tillage and ploughing autumn or spring). With maize......) previous history of long-term cover cropping, ii) soil tillage methods, iii) N rates and iv) present short-term use of cover cropping in maize. Preliminary results from 2009 – 2011 suggest that leaching after a history of cover cropping tended to be higher than after no history of cover cropping......, but the effect was insignificant. The effect of tillage and previous N rates were also insignificant but the present use of cover crops had a small but significant decreasing effect on leaching compared to no cover cropping. The cover crop was well established in both years but grew less vigorously during autumn...

  5. Consequences of nitrate leaching following stem-only harvesting of Swedish forests are dependent on spatial scale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Futter, M.N., E-mail: martyn.futter@vatten.slu.s [Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Department of Environmental Assessment, SE 750 07 Uppsala (Sweden); Ring, E., E-mail: eva.ring@skogforsk.s [Skogforsk, Uppsala Science Park, SE 751 83 Uppsala (Sweden); Hoegbom, L., E-mail: lars.hogbom@skogforsk.s [Skogforsk, Uppsala Science Park, SE 751 83 Uppsala (Sweden); Entenmann, S., E-mail: steffen.entenmann@landespflege.uni-freiburg.d [University of Freiburg, Institute for Landscape Management, D - 79085 Freiburg (Germany); Bishop, K.H., E-mail: kevin.bishop@vatten.slu.s [Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Department of Environmental Assessment, SE 750 07 Uppsala (Sweden)

    2010-12-15

    Short-term increases in soil solution nitrate (NO{sub 3}{sup -}) concentration are often observed after forest harvest, even in N-limited systems. We model NO{sub 3}{sup -} leaching below the rooting zone as a function of site productivity. Using national forest inventories and published estimates of N attenuation in rivers and the riparian zone, we estimate effects of stem-only harvesting on NO{sub 3}{sup -} leaching to groundwater, surface waters and the marine environment. Stem-only harvesting is a minor contributor to NO{sub 3}{sup -} pollution of Swedish waters. Effects in surface waters are rapidly diluted downstream, but can be locally important for shallow well-waters as well as for the total amount of N reaching the sea. Harvesting adds approximately 8 Gg NO{sub 3}-N to soil waters in Sweden, with local concentrations up to 7 mg NO{sub 3}-N l{sup -1}. Of that, {approx}3.3 Gg reaches the marine environment. This is {approx}3% of the overall Swedish N load to the Baltic. - Forest harvesting in Sweden is a minor contributor to N pollution in the Baltic.

  6. Nitrate leaching from a potato field using fuzzy inference system combined with genetic algorithm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shekofteh, Hosein; Afyuni, Majid M; Hajabbasi, Mohammad-Ali

    2012-01-01

    in MFIS were tuned by Genetic Algorithm. The correlation coefficient, normalized root mean square error and relative mean absolute error percentage between the data obtained by HYDRUS-2D and the estimated values using MFIS model were 0.986, 0.086 and 2.38 respectively. It appears that MFIS can predict......The conventional application of nitrogen fertilizers via irrigation is likely to be responsible for the increased nitrate concentration in groundwater of areas dominated by irrigated agriculture. This requires appropriate water and nutrient management to minimize groundwater pollution...

  7. Water Table Management Reduces Tile Nitrate Loss in Continuous Corn and in a Soybean-Corn Rotation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Craig F. Drury

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Water table management systems can be designed to alleviate soil water excesses and deficits, as well as reduce nitrate leaching losses in tile discharge. With this in mind, a standard tile drainage (DR system was compared over 8 years (1991 to 1999 to a controlled tile drainage/subirrigation (CDS system on a low-slope (0.05 to 0.1% Brookston clay loam soil (Typic Argiaquoll in southwestern Ontario, Canada. In the CDS system, tile discharge was controlled to prevent excessive drainage, and water was pumped back up the tile lines (subirrigation to replenish the crop root zone during water deficit periods. In the first phase of the study (1991 to 1994, continuous corn (Zea mays, L. was grown with annual nitrogen (N fertilizer inputs as per local soil test recommendations. In the second phase (1995 to 1999, a soybean (Glycine max L., Merr.-corn rotation was used with N fertilizer added only during the two corn years. In Phase 1 when continuous corn was grown, CDS reduced total tile discharge by 26% and total nitrate loss in tile discharge by 55%, compared to DR. In addition, the 4-year flow weighted mean (FWM nitrate concentration in tile discharge exceeded the Canadian drinking water guideline (10 mg N l–1 under DR (11.4 mg N l–1, but not under CDS (7.0 mg N l–1. In Phase 2 during the soybean-corn rotation, CDS reduced total tile discharge by 38% and total nitrate loss in tile discharge by 66%, relative to DR. The 4-year FWM nitrate concentration during Phase 2 in tile discharge was below the drinking water guideline for both DR (7.3 mg N l–1 and CDS (4.0 mg N l–1. During both phases of the experiment, the CDS treatment caused only minor increases in nitrate loss in surface runoff relative to DR. Hence CDS decreased FWM nitrate concentrations, total drainage water loss, and total nitrate loss in tile discharge relative to DR. In addition, soybean-corn rotation reduced FWM nitrate concentrations and total nitrate loss in tile discharge

  8. Effect of Nutrient Management Planning on Crop Yield, Nitrate Leaching and Sediment Loading in Thomas Brook Watershed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amon-Armah, Frederick; Yiridoe, Emmanuel K.; Ahmad, Nafees H. M.; Hebb, Dale; Jamieson, Rob; Burton, David; Madani, Ali

    2013-11-01

    Government priorities on provincial Nutrient Management Planning (NMP) programs include improving the program effectiveness for environmental quality protection, and promoting more widespread adoption. Understanding the effect of NMP on both crop yield and key water-quality parameters in agricultural watersheds requires a comprehensive evaluation that takes into consideration important NMP attributes and location-specific farming conditions. This study applied the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) to investigate the effects of crop and rotation sequence, tillage type, and nutrient N application rate on crop yield and the associated groundwater leaching and sediment loss. The SWAT model was applied to the Thomas Brook Watershed, located in the most intensively managed agricultural region of Nova Scotia, Canada. Cropping systems evaluated included seven fertilizer application rates and two tillage systems (i.e., conventional tillage and no-till). The analysis reflected cropping systems commonly managed by farmers in the Annapolis Valley region, including grain corn-based and potato-based cropping systems, and a vegetable-horticulture system. ANOVA models were developed and used to assess the effects of crop management choices on crop yield and two water-quality parameters (i.e., leaching and sediment loading). Results suggest that existing recommended N-fertilizer rate can be reduced by 10-25 %, for grain crop production, to significantly lower leaching ( P > 0.05) while optimizing the crop yield. The analysis identified the nutrient N rates in combination with specific crops and rotation systems that can be used to manage leaching while balancing impacts on crop yields within the watershed.

  9. The influence of reduced tillage on water regime and nutrient leaching in a loamy soil

    OpenAIRE

    Baigys, Giedrius; Gaigalis, Kazimieras; Kutra, Ginutis

    2006-01-01

    The effect of tillage technologies and terms on soil moisture regime and nitrate leaching was studied in field trials carried out on 0.76-1.36-ha fields. The study site was arranged in Pikeliai village (Kėdainiai district). The soil prevailing in the study site is Endocalcari - Endohypogleic Cambisol, sandy light loam and sandy loam on deeper layers of sandy loam and sandy light loam. The arable horizon contains sandy light loam, which is characteristic of the soils prevailing in the Middle L...

  10. High-nitrate vegetable diet increases plasma nitrate and nitrite concentrations and reduces blood pressure in healthy women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashworth, Ann; Mitchell, Klaus; Blackwell, Jamie R; Vanhatalo, Anni; Jones, Andrew M

    2015-10-01

    Epidemiological studies suggest that green leafy vegetables, which are high in dietary nitrate, are protective against CVD such as stroke. High blood pressure (BP) is a major risk factor for stroke and inorganic nitrate has been shown to reduce BP. The objective of the present study was to test the hypothesis that diets containing high-nitrate (HN) vegetables would increase plasma nitrate and nitrite concentrations and reduce BP in healthy women. A randomized, crossover trial, where participants received HN vegetables (HN diet) or avoided HN vegetables (Control diet) for 1 week. Before and after each intervention, resting BP and plasma nitrate and nitrite concentrations were measured. University of Exeter, UK. Nineteen healthy women (mean age 20 (sd 2) years; mean BMI 22·5 (sd 3·8) kg/m2). The HN diet significantly increased plasma nitrate concentration (before HN diet: mean 24·4 (sd 5·6) µmol/l; after HN diet: mean 61·0 (sd 44·1) µmol/l, Pdiet: mean 98 (sd 91) nmol/l; after HN diet: mean 185 (sd 34) nmol/l, Pdiet. The HN diet significantly reduced resting systolic BP (before HN diet: mean 107 (sd 9) mmHg; after HN diet: mean 103 (sd 6) mmHg, Pdiet (before Control diet: mean 106 (sd 8) mmHg; after Control diet: mean 106 (sd 8) mmHg). Consumption of HN vegetables significantly increased plasma nitrate and nitrite concentrations and reduced BP in normotensive women.

  11. Effects of structural and textural grain characteristics on leaching of sulphide minerals from a polymetallic concentrate by sodium nitrate and sulphuric acid solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sokić Miroslav D.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the influence of structural and textural characteristics of sulfide minerals on their leaching from a polymetallic concentrate by sulfuric acid and sodium nitrate solution is presented. The starting material was Pb–Zn–Cu sulphide polymetallic concentrate enriched during the flotation of a polymetallic ore in the "Rudnik" flotation plant (Rudnik – Serbia. Leaching experiments were carried out in a closed glass reactor, which provides stable hermetic conditions and allows heating at constant temperature. Chemical, XRD, qualitative and quantitative microscopic and SEM/EDX analyses were used to characterizes samples of the polymetallic concentrate and leach residue. It was determined that chalcopyrite, sphalerite, galena, pyrrhotite and quartz were present in the polymetallic concentrate. The content of sulphide minerals was 69.5%, of which 60.9% occurred as liberated grains: 88.3% of chalcopyrite, 59.3% of sphalerite, 25.1% of galena and 51.6% of pirrhotite. The rest of chalcopyrite, sphalerite, galena and pirrhotite grains were in the forms of inclusions, impregnations, and simple and complex intergrowths. During the leaching process by sodium nitrate and sulphuric acid solution, it was shown previously that the leaching rate of sulphide minerals decreased with time while a part of the sulphide minerals remained in the leach residue. After leaching at 80°C for 120 min, the yields were 69.8, 82.7 and 67.1% for Cu, Zn and Fe, respectively. Lead, in the form of insoluble anglesite, remained in the leach residue. In addition to the anglesite, unleached sulfide minerals and quartz, elemental sulfur was found in the solid residue. The content of sulphide minerals was 35% of which 33.7% minerals occur independently. In specific, 54.7% of chalcopyrite, 31.9% of sphalerite, 8.2% of galena and 37.6% of pyrrhotite appear as separate grains with highly corroded surfaces. Therefore, the structural assembly of sulphide grains in the

  12. Reductive Leaching Kinetics of Low Grade Manganese Deposits in H2SO4 Solution Using Malonic Acid as Reducing Agent

    OpenAIRE

    Taysser Lasheen; S. A. Abu Elenein; W. A. Saleh; A. H Orabi; D. A Ismaiel

    2014-01-01

    A leaching process was developed to extract manganese and metal values from Alloga manganese concentrate. The preferential leaching process was achieved through reductive leaching in dilute sulfuric acid medium with malonic acid as the reducing agent. Leaching parameters were optimized as 1.0 M H2SO4, 10% malonic acid in solid/liquid ratio 1:10 for 90 min at 80 C and using ore ground to – 74 µm. Under these conditions, the leaching efficiency of manganese reaches 97%, whilst iron dissolution ...

  13. Reducing nitrogen leaching from fertilizers to surface waters: catchment specific indicators of economic benefits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Mikael Skou; Levin, Gregor; Odgaard, Mette Vestergaard

    2018-01-01

    We explore with impact pathway methodology the economic benefits of reducing nitrogen leaching to transitional surface waters, as expected for a proportionality test under the EU’s Water Framework Directive article 4. Ten different catchments is analyzed for a policy scenario where downstream dis...

  14. Impact of elevated nitrate on sulfate-reducing bacteria: A comparative study of Desulfovibrio vulgaris

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Q.; He, Z.; Joyner, D.C.; Joachimiak, M.; Price, M.N.; Yang, Z.K.; Yen, H.-C. B.; Hemme, C. L.; Chen, W.; Fields, M.; Stahl, D. A.; Keasling, J. D.; Keller, M.; Arkin, A. P.; Hazen, T. C.; Wall, J. D.; Zhou, J.

    2010-07-15

    Sulfate-reducing bacteria have been extensively studied for their potential in heavy-metal bioremediation. However, the occurrence of elevated nitrate in contaminated environments has been shown to inhibit sulfate reduction activity. Although the inhibition has been suggested to result from the competition with nitrate-reducing bacteria, the possibility of direct inhibition of sulfate reducers by elevated nitrate needs to be explored. Using Desulfovibrio vulgaris as a model sulfate-reducing bacterium, functional genomics analysis reveals that osmotic stress contributed to growth inhibition by nitrate as shown by the upregulation of the glycine/betaine transporter genes and the relief of nitrate inhibition by osmoprotectants. The observation that significant growth inhibition was effected by 70 mM NaNO{sub 3} but not by 70 mM NaCl suggests the presence of inhibitory mechanisms in addition to osmotic stress. The differential expression of genes characteristic of nitrite stress responses, such as the hybrid cluster protein gene, under nitrate stress condition further indicates that nitrate stress response by D. vulgaris was linked to components of both osmotic and nitrite stress responses. The involvement of the oxidative stress response pathway, however, might be the result of a more general stress response. Given the low similarities between the response profiles to nitrate and other stresses, less-defined stress response pathways could also be important in nitrate stress, which might involve the shift in energy metabolism. The involvement of nitrite stress response upon exposure to nitrate may provide detoxification mechanisms for nitrite, which is inhibitory to sulfate-reducing bacteria, produced by microbial nitrate reduction as a metabolic intermediate and may enhance the survival of sulfate-reducing bacteria in environments with elevated nitrate level.

  15. Isolation of a nitrate-reducing bacteria strain from oil field brine and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A nitrate-reducing bacteria (NRB) strain with vigorous growth, strong nitrate reduction ability, strain B9 2-1, was isolated from Suizhong36-1 oilfield, its routine identification and analysis of 16S rRNA and also the competitive inhibition experiments with the enrichment of sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) were carried out.

  16. Soil nitrate reducing processes drivers, mechanisms for spatial variation, and significance for nitrous oxide production

    OpenAIRE

    Giles, M.; Morley, N.; Baggs, E.M.; Daniell, T.J.

    2012-01-01

    The microbial processes of denitrification and dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium\\ud (DNRA) are two important nitrate reducing mechanisms in soil, which are responsible for\\ud the loss of nitrate (NO−\\ud 3 ) and production of the potent greenhouse gas, nitrous oxide (N2O).\\ud A number of factors are known to control these processes, including O2 concentrations and\\ud moisture content, N, C, pH, and the size and community structure of nitrate reducing organisms\\ud responsible for the ...

  17. Long term dynamics of nitrate concentrations and leaching losses in tile drainage water from cultivated clayey till at field scale

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ernstsen, Vibeke; Olsen, Preben; Rosenbom, Annette Elisabeth

    2014-01-01

    of application). Furthermore, the standard climatic conditions (e.g. temperature, precipitation) as well as soil moisture and temperature to a depth of approx. 2 meter were measured. Concentrations of nitrate in the drainage and groundwater, recharge of water through the drainage system as well as depth......Since 1985, several political agreements have been adopted to protect the aquatic environment and nature in Denmark. The farmers have repeatedly been ordered to reduce the consumption of nitrogen in their agricultural production. The reductions have been imposed nation-wide regardless of e.......g. climate, soil type and local hydraulic conditions. By the end of 2013, the Danish Commission of Nature and Agriculture issued a report which recommend that for the future protection of surface nitrogen regulations should be locally adapted, and if possible, at the level of field scale. This kind...

  18. Differential responses of nitrate reducer community size, structure, and activity to tillage systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chèneby, D; Brauman, A; Rabary, B; Philippot, L

    2009-05-01

    The main objective of this study was to determine how the size, structure, and activity of the nitrate reducer community were affected by adoption of a conservative tillage system as an alternative to conventional tillage. The experimental field, established in Madagascar in 1991, consists of plots subjected to conventional tillage or direct-seeding mulch-based cropping systems (DM), both amended with three different fertilization regimes. Comparisons of size, structure, and activity of the nitrate reducer community in samples collected from the top layer in 2005 and 2006 revealed that all characteristics of this functional community were affected by the tillage system, with increased nitrate reduction activity and numbers of nitrate reducers under DM. Nitrate reduction activity was also stimulated by combined organic and mineral fertilization but not by organic fertilization alone. In contrast, both negative and positive effects of combined organic and mineral fertilization on the size of the nitrate reducer community were observed. The size of the nitrate reducer community was a significant predictor of the nitrate reduction rates except in one treatment, which highlighted the inherent complexities in understanding the relationships the between size, diversity, and structure of functional microbial communities along environmental gradients.

  19. Metagenomic analysis of nitrate-reducing bacteria in the oral cavity: implications for nitric oxide homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyde, Embriette R; Andrade, Fernando; Vaksman, Zalman; Parthasarathy, Kavitha; Jiang, Hong; Parthasarathy, Deepa K; Torregrossa, Ashley C; Tribble, Gena; Kaplan, Heidi B; Petrosino, Joseph F; Bryan, Nathan S

    2014-01-01

    The microbiota of the human lower intestinal tract helps maintain healthy host physiology, for example through nutrient acquisition and bile acid recycling, but specific positive contributions of the oral microbiota to host health are not well established. Nitric oxide (NO) homeostasis is crucial to mammalian physiology. The recently described entero-salivary nitrate-nitrite-nitric oxide pathway has been shown to provide bioactive NO from dietary nitrate sources. Interestingly, this pathway is dependent upon oral nitrate-reducing bacteria, since humans lack this enzyme activity. This pathway appears to represent a newly recognized symbiosis between oral nitrate-reducing bacteria and their human hosts in which the bacteria provide nitrite and nitric oxide from nitrate reduction. Here we measure the nitrate-reducing capacity of tongue-scraping samples from six healthy human volunteers, and analyze metagenomes of the bacterial communities to identify bacteria contributing to nitrate reduction. We identified 14 candidate species, seven of which were not previously believed to contribute to nitrate reduction. We cultivated isolates of four candidate species in single- and mixed-species biofilms, revealing that they have substantial nitrate- and nitrite-reduction capabilities. Colonization by specific oral bacteria may thus contribute to host NO homeostasis by providing nitrite and nitric oxide. Conversely, the lack of specific nitrate-reducing communities may disrupt the nitrate-nitrite-nitric oxide pathway and lead to a state of NO insufficiency. These findings may also provide mechanistic evidence for the oral systemic link. Our results provide a possible new therapeutic target and paradigm for NO restoration in humans by specific oral bacteria.

  20. Metagenomic analysis of nitrate-reducing bacteria in the oral cavity: implications for nitric oxide homeostasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Embriette R Hyde

    Full Text Available The microbiota of the human lower intestinal tract helps maintain healthy host physiology, for example through nutrient acquisition and bile acid recycling, but specific positive contributions of the oral microbiota to host health are not well established. Nitric oxide (NO homeostasis is crucial to mammalian physiology. The recently described entero-salivary nitrate-nitrite-nitric oxide pathway has been shown to provide bioactive NO from dietary nitrate sources. Interestingly, this pathway is dependent upon oral nitrate-reducing bacteria, since humans lack this enzyme activity. This pathway appears to represent a newly recognized symbiosis between oral nitrate-reducing bacteria and their human hosts in which the bacteria provide nitrite and nitric oxide from nitrate reduction. Here we measure the nitrate-reducing capacity of tongue-scraping samples from six healthy human volunteers, and analyze metagenomes of the bacterial communities to identify bacteria contributing to nitrate reduction. We identified 14 candidate species, seven of which were not previously believed to contribute to nitrate reduction. We cultivated isolates of four candidate species in single- and mixed-species biofilms, revealing that they have substantial nitrate- and nitrite-reduction capabilities. Colonization by specific oral bacteria may thus contribute to host NO homeostasis by providing nitrite and nitric oxide. Conversely, the lack of specific nitrate-reducing communities may disrupt the nitrate-nitrite-nitric oxide pathway and lead to a state of NO insufficiency. These findings may also provide mechanistic evidence for the oral systemic link. Our results provide a possible new therapeutic target and paradigm for NO restoration in humans by specific oral bacteria.

  1. Nutrient cycling in a cropping system with potato, spring wheat, sugar beet, oats and nitrogen catch crops. II. Effect of catch crops on nitrate leaching in autumn and winter

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vos, J.; Putten, van der P.E.L.

    2004-01-01

    The Nitrate Directive of the European Union (EU) forces agriculture to reduce nitrate emission. The current study addressed nitrate emission and nitrate-N concentrations in leachate from cropping systems with and without the cultivation of catch crops (winter rye: Secale cereale L. and forage rape:

  2. Soil nitrate reducing processes – drivers, mechanisms for spatial variation, and significance for nitrous oxide production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giles, Madeline; Morley, Nicholas; Baggs, Elizabeth M.; Daniell, Tim J.

    2012-01-01

    The microbial processes of denitrification and dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium (DNRA) are two important nitrate reducing mechanisms in soil, which are responsible for the loss of nitrate (NO3−) and production of the potent greenhouse gas, nitrous oxide (N2O). A number of factors are known to control these processes, including O2 concentrations and moisture content, N, C, pH, and the size and community structure of nitrate reducing organisms responsible for the processes. There is an increasing understanding associated with many of these controls on flux through the nitrogen cycle in soil systems. However, there remains uncertainty about how the nitrate reducing communities are linked to environmental variables and the flux of products from these processes. The high spatial variability of environmental controls and microbial communities across small sub centimeter areas of soil may prove to be critical in determining why an understanding of the links between biotic and abiotic controls has proved elusive. This spatial effect is often overlooked as a driver of nitrate reducing processes. An increased knowledge of the effects of spatial heterogeneity in soil on nitrate reduction processes will be fundamental in understanding the drivers, location, and potential for N2O production from soils. PMID:23264770

  3. Soil nitrate reducing processes – drivers, mechanisms for spatial variation and significance for nitrous oxide production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madeline Eleanore Giles

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The microbial processes of denitrification and dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium (DNRA are two important nitrate reducing mechanisms in soil, which are responsible for the loss of nitrate (NO3-¬ and production of the potent greenhouse gas, nitrous oxide (N2O. A number of factors are known to control these processes, including O2 concentrations and moisture content, N, C, pH and the size and community structure of nitrate reducing organisms responsible for the processes. There is an increasing understanding associated with many of these controls on flux through the nitrogen cycle in soil systems. However, there remains uncertainty about how the nitrate reducing communities are linked to environmental variables and the flux of products from these processes. The high spatial variability of environmental controls and microbial communities across small sub cm areas of soil may prove to be critical in determining why an understanding of the links between biotic and abiotic controls has proved elusive. This spatial effect is often overlooked as a driver of nitrate reducing processes. An increased knowledge of the effects of spatial heterogeneity in soil on nitrate reduction processes will be fundamental in understanding the drivers, location and potential for N2O production from soils.

  4. Soil nitrate reducing processes - drivers, mechanisms for spatial variation, and significance for nitrous oxide production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giles, Madeline; Morley, Nicholas; Baggs, Elizabeth M; Daniell, Tim J

    2012-01-01

    The microbial processes of denitrification and dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium (DNRA) are two important nitrate reducing mechanisms in soil, which are responsible for the loss of nitrate ([Formula: see text]) and production of the potent greenhouse gas, nitrous oxide (N(2)O). A number of factors are known to control these processes, including O(2) concentrations and moisture content, N, C, pH, and the size and community structure of nitrate reducing organisms responsible for the processes. There is an increasing understanding associated with many of these controls on flux through the nitrogen cycle in soil systems. However, there remains uncertainty about how the nitrate reducing communities are linked to environmental variables and the flux of products from these processes. The high spatial variability of environmental controls and microbial communities across small sub centimeter areas of soil may prove to be critical in determining why an understanding of the links between biotic and abiotic controls has proved elusive. This spatial effect is often overlooked as a driver of nitrate reducing processes. An increased knowledge of the effects of spatial heterogeneity in soil on nitrate reduction processes will be fundamental in understanding the drivers, location, and potential for N(2)O production from soils.

  5. Effects of Mulching and Nitrogen on Soil Nitrate-N Distribution, Leaching and Nitrogen Use Efficiency of Maize (Zea mays L..

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiukang Wang

    Full Text Available Mulching and nitrogen are critical drivers of crop production for smallholders of the Loess Plateau in China. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of mulching and nitrogen fertilizer on the soil water content, soil nitrate-N content and vertical distribution in maize root-zone. The experiment was conducted over two consecutive years and used randomly assigned field plots with three replicates. The six treatments consisted of no fertilizer without plastic film (CK, plastic film mulching with no basal fertilizer and no top dressing (MN0, basal fertilizer with no top dressing and no mulching (BN1, plastic film mulching and basal fertilizer with no top dressing (MN1, basal fertilizer and top dressing with no mulching (BN2 and plastic film mulching with basal fertilizer and top dressing (MN2. In the top soil layers, the soil water content was a little high in the plastic film mulching than that without mulching. The mean soil water content from 0 to 40 cm without mulching were 3.35% lower than those measured in the corresponding mulching treatments in 31 days after sowing in 2012. The mulching treatment increased the soil nitrate-N content was observed in the 0-40-cm soil layers. The results indicate that high contents of soil nitrate-N were mainly distributed at 0-20-cm at 31 days after sowing in 2012, and the soil nitrate-N concentration in the MN2 treatment was 1.58 times higher than that did not receive fertilizer. The MN2 treatment greatly increased the soil nitrate-N content in the upper layer of soil (0-40-cm, and the mean soil nitrate-N content was increased nearly 50 mg kg-1 at 105 days after sowing compared with CK treatment in 2012. The soil nitrate-N leaching amount in MN1 treatment was 28.61% and 39.14% lower than BN1 treatment, and the mulch effect attained to 42.55% and 65.27% in MN2 lower than BN2 in both years. The yield increased with an increase in the basal fertilizer, top dressing and plastic film mulching, and

  6. The Abundance and Activity of Nitrate-Reducing Microbial Populations in Estuarine Sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardarelli, E.; Francis, C. A.

    2014-12-01

    Estuaries are productive ecosystems that ameliorate nutrient and metal contaminants from surficial water supplies. At the intersection of terrestrial and aquatic environments, estuarine sediments host major microbially-mediated geochemical transformations. These include denitrification (the conversion of nitrate to nitrous oxide and/or dinitrogen) and dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium (DNRA). Denitrification has historically been seen as the predominant nitrate attenuation process and functions as an effective sink for nitrate. DNRA has previously been believed to be a minor nitrate reduction process and transforms nitrate within the ecosystem to ammonium, a more biologically available N species. Recent studies have compared the two processes in coastal environments and determined fluctuating environmental conditions may suppress denitrification, supporting an increased role for DNRA in the N cycle. Nitrate availability and salinity are factors thought to influence the membership of the microbial communities present, and the nitrate reduction process that predominates. The aim of this study is to investigate how nitrate concentration and salinity alter the transcript abundances of N cycling functional gene markers for denitrification (nirK, nirS) and DNRA (nrfA) in estuarine sediments at the mouth of the hypernutrified Old Salinas River, CA. Short-term whole core incubations amended with artificial freshwater/artificial seawater (2 psu, 35 psu) and with varying NO3- concentrations (200mM, 2000mM) were conducted to assess the activity as well as the abundance of the nitrate-reducing microbial populations present. Gene expression of nirK, nirS, and nrfA at the conclusion of the incubations was quantified using reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR). High abundances of nirK, nirS, and nrfA under particular conditions coupled with the resulting geochemical data ultimately provides insight onto how the aforementioned factors

  7. Exchanges across land-water-scape boundaries in urban systems: strategies for reducing nitrate pollution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadenasso, M L; Pickett, S T A; Groffman, P M; Band, L E; Brush, G S; Galvin, M F; Grove, J M; Hagar, G; Marshall, V; McGrath, B P; O'Neil-Dunne, J P M; Stack, W P; Troy, A R

    2008-01-01

    Conservation in urban areas typically focuses on biodiversity and large green spaces. However, opportunities exist throughout urban areas to enhance ecological functions. An important function of urban landscapes is retaining nitrogen thereby reducing nitrate pollution to streams and coastal waters. Control of nonpoint nitrate pollution in urban areas was originally based on the documented importance of riparian zones in agricultural and forested ecosystems. The watershed and boundary frameworks have been used to guide stream research and a riparian conservation strategy to reduce nitrate pollution in urban streams. But is stream restoration and riparian-zone conservation enough? Data from the Baltimore Ecosystem Study and other urban stream research indicate that urban riparian zones do not necessarily prevent nitrate from entering, nor remove nitrate from, streams. Based on this insight, policy makers in Baltimore extended the conservation strategy throughout larger watersheds, attempting to restore functions that no longer took place in riparian boundaries. Two urban revitalization projects are presented as examples aimed at reducing nitrate pollution to stormwater, streams, and the Chesapeake Bay. An adaptive cycle of ecological urban design synthesizes the insights from the watershed and boundary frameworks, from new data, and from the conservation concerns of agencies and local communities. This urban example of conservation based on ameliorating nitrate water pollution extends the initial watershed-boundary approach along three dimensions: 1) from riparian to urban land-water-scapes; 2) from discrete engineering solutions to ecological design approaches; and 3) from structural solutions to inclusion of individual, household, and institutional behavior.

  8. In situ mobility of uranium in the presence of nitrate following sulfate-reducing conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paradis, Charles J; Jagadamma, Sindhu; Watson, David B; McKay, Larry D; Hazen, Terry C; Park, Melora; Istok, Jonathan D

    2016-04-01

    Reoxidation and mobilization of previously reduced and immobilized uranium by dissolved-phase oxidants poses a significant challenge for remediating uranium-contaminated groundwater. Preferential oxidation of reduced sulfur-bearing species, as opposed to reduced uranium-bearing species, has been demonstrated to limit the mobility of uranium at the laboratory scale yet field-scale investigations are lacking. In this study, the mobility of uranium in the presence of nitrate oxidant was investigated in a shallow groundwater system after establishing conditions conducive to uranium reduction and the formation of reduced sulfur-bearing species. A series of three injections of groundwater (200 L) containing U(VI) (5 μM) and amended with ethanol (40 mM) and sulfate (20 mM) were conducted in ten test wells in order to stimulate microbial-mediated reduction of uranium and the formation of reduced sulfur-bearing species. Simultaneous push-pull tests were then conducted in triplicate well clusters to investigate the mobility of U(VI) under three conditions: 1) high nitrate (120 mM), 2) high nitrate (120 mM) with ethanol (30 mM), and 3) low nitrate (2 mM) with ethanol (30 mM). Dilution-adjusted breakthrough curves of ethanol, nitrate, nitrite, sulfate, and U(VI) suggested that nitrate reduction was predominantly coupled to the oxidation of reduced-sulfur bearing species, as opposed to the reoxidation of U(IV), under all three conditions for the duration of the 36-day tests. The amount of sulfate, but not U(VI), recovered during the push-pull tests was substantially more than injected, relative to bromide tracer, under all three conditions and further suggested that reduced sulfur-bearing species were preferentially oxidized under nitrate-reducing conditions. However, some reoxidation of U(IV) was observed under nitrate-reducing conditions and in the absence of detectable nitrate and/or nitrite. This suggested that reduced sulfur-bearing species may not be fully effective at

  9. Impact of broadcasting a cereal rye or oat cover crop before corn and soybean harvest on nitrate leaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    The corn and soybean rotation in Iowa has no living plants taking up water and nutrients from crop maturity until planting, a period of over six months in most years. In many fields, this results in losses of nitrate in effluent from artificial drainage systems during this time. In a long-term fiel...

  10. Monetary valuation with impact pathway analysis: Benefits of reducing nitrate leaching in European Catchments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Mikael Skou; Hansen, Morten Søes; Carstensen, Jacob

    2011-01-01

    Integrated assessment frameworks which can account comprehensively for the benefits related to water quality improvements have not yet been established. The main challenge is to link economic valuation with hydrological data in an appropriate way.We here explore the so-called ‘impact pathway...... approach’ as a novel analytical method in the area ofwater management. It can identify site- and catchment-specific benefits associated with management measures by linking economic and hydrological data through consecutive modelling stages, allowing for monetization of specific end point effects...

  11. Anomalous electrical signals associated with microbial activity: Results from Iron and Nitrate-Reducing Columns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aaron, R. B.; Zheng, Q.; Flynn, P.; Singha, K.; Brantley, S.

    2008-12-01

    Three flow-through columns outfitted with Ag/AgCl electrodes were constructed to test the effects of different microbial processes on the geophysical measurements of self potential (SP), bulk electrical conductivity (σ b), and induced polarization (IP). The columns were filled with sieved, Fe-bearing subsurface sediment from the Delmarva Peninsula near Oyster, VA, inoculated (9:1 ratio) with a freshly-collected, shallow subsurface sediment from a wetland floodplain (Dorn Creek) near Madison, WI. Each of the columns was fed anoxic and sterile PIPES buffered artificial groundwater (PBAGW) containing different concentrations of acetate and nitrate. The medium fed to Column 1 (nitrate-reducing) was amended with 100 μM acetate and 2 mM nitrate. Column 2 (iron-reducing) was run with PBAGW containing 1.0 mM acetate and 0 mM nitrate. Column 3 (alternating redox state) was operated under conditions designed to alternately stimulate nitrate-reducing and iron-reducing populations to provide conditions, i.e., the presence of both nitrate and microbially-produced Fe(II), that would allow growth of nitrate-dependent Fe(II)-oxidizing populations. We operated Column 3 with a cycling strategy of 14-18 days of high C medium (1 mM acetate and 100 μ M nitrate) followed by 14-18 days of low C medium (100 μ M acetate and 2 mM nitrate). Effluent chemistry (NO3-, NO2-, NH4+, acetate, and Fe2+) was sampled daily for four months so as to be concurrent with the electrical measurements. We observed chemical evidence of iron reduction (dissolved [Fe(II)] = 0.2mM) in the effluent from the iron reduction and alternating redox columns. Chemical depletion of NO3- ([NO3-] ranged from 1 to 0.02mM), the production of NO2-, and possible production of NH4+ (0.2 mM) was observed in the nitrate reducing column as well as the alternating redox column. All three columns displayed loss of acetate as microbial activity progressed. σ b remained constant in the alternating redox column (~0.15 S

  12. Nitrate leaching, water-use efficiency and yield of corn with different irrigation and nitrogen management systems in coastal plains, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irrigation management for corn (Zea mays L.) production on the typical low water holding capacity soil of the southeastern USA needs to be improved to increase irrigation efficiency and reduce losses of nitrate from fields. A three-year (2012-2014) field study was conducted to compare the effects of...

  13. Thermophilic nitrate-reducing microorganisms prevent sulfate reduction in cold marine sediments incubated at high temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nepomnyashchaya, Yana; Rezende, Julia; Hubert, Casey

    2014-05-01

    Hydrogen sulphide produced during metabolism of sulphate-reducing microorganisms (SRM) is toxic, corrosive and causes detrimental oil reservoir souring. During secondary oil recovery, injecting oil reservoirs with seawater that is rich in sulphate and that also cools high temperature formations provides favourable growth conditions for SRM. Nitrate addition can prevent metabolism of SRM by stimulating nitrate-reducing microorganisms (NRM). The investigations of thermophilic NRM are needed to develop mechanisms to control the metabolism of SRM in high temperature oil field ecosystems. We therefore established a model system consisting of enrichment cultures of cold surface marine sediments from the Baltic Sea (Aarhus Bay) that were incubated at 60°C. Enrichments contained 25 mM nitrate and 40 mM sulphate as potential electron acceptors, and a mixture of the organic substrates acetate, lactate, propionate, butyrate (5 mM each) and yeast extract (0.01%) as potential carbon sources and electron donors. Slurries were incubated at 60°C both with and without initial pasteurization at 80°C for 2 hours. In the enrichments containing both nitrate and sulphate, the concentration of nitrate decreased indicating metabolic activity of NRM. After a four-hour lag phase the rate of nitrate reduction increased and the concentration of nitrate dropped to zero after 10 hours of incubation. The concentration of nitrite increased as the reduction of nitrate progressed and reached 16.3 mM after 12 hours, before being consumed and falling to 4.4 mM after 19-day of incubation. No evidence for sulphate reduction was observed in these cultures during the 19-day incubation period. In contrast, the concentration of sulphate decreased up to 50% after one week incubation in controls containing only sulphate but no nitrate. Similar sulfate reduction rates were seen in the pasteurized controls suggesting the presence of heat resistant SRM, whereas nitrate reduction rates were lower in the

  14. Laboratory investigation of microbiologically influenced corrosion of C1018 carbon steel by nitrate reducing bacterium Bacillus licheniformis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, Dake; Li, Yingchao; Song, Fengmei; Gu, Tingyue

    2013-01-01

    Nitrate injection is used to suppress reservoir souring in oil and gas fields caused by Sulfate Reducing Bacteria (SRB) through promotion of nitrate respiration by Nitrate Reducing Bacteria (NRB). However, it is not well publicized that nitrate reduction by NRB can cause Microbiologically Influenced Corrosion (MIC) because nitrate reduction coupled with iron oxidation is thermodynamically favorable. NRB benefits bioenergetically from this redox reaction under biocatalysis. This work showed that the Bacillus licheniformis biofilm, when grown as an NRB biofilm, caused a 14.5 μm maximum pit depth and 0.89 mg/cm 2 normalized weight loss against C1018 carbon steel in one-week lab tests

  15. Disentangling the rhizosphere effect on nitrate reducers and denitrifiers: insight into the role of root exudates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, S; Texier, S; Hallet, S; Bru, D; Dambreville, C; Chèneby, D; Bizouard, F; Germon, J C; Philippot, L

    2008-11-01

    To determine to which extent root-derived carbon contributes to the effects of plants on nitrate reducers and denitrifiers, four solutions containing different proportions of sugar, organic acids and amino acids mimicking maize root exudates were added daily to soil microcosms at a concentration of 150 microg C g(-1) of soil. Water-amended soils were used as controls. After 1 month, the size and structure of the nitrate reducer and denitrifier communities were analysed using the narG and napA, and the nirK, nirS and nosZ genes as molecular markers respectively. Addition of artificial root exudates (ARE) did not strongly affect the structure or the density of nitrate reducer and denitrifier communities whereas potential nitrate reductase and denitrification activities were stimulated by the addition of root exudates. An effect of ARE composition was also observed on N(2)O production with an N(2)O:(N(2)O + N(2)) ratio of 0.3 in microcosms amended with ARE containing 80% of sugar and of 1 in microcosms amended with ARE containing 40% of sugar. Our study indicated that ARE stimulated nitrate reduction or denitrification activity with increases in the range of those observed with the whole plant. Furthermore, we demonstrated that the composition of the ARE affected the nature of the end-product of denitrification and could thus have a putative impact on greenhouse gas emissions.

  16. Kinetics of Indigenous Nitrate Reducing Sulfide Oxidizing Activity in Microaerophilic Wastewater Biofilms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villahermosa, Desirée; Corzo, Alfonso; Garcia-Robledo, Emilio; González, Juan M.; Papaspyrou, Sokratis

    2016-01-01

    Nitrate decreases sulfide release in wastewater treatment plants (WWTP), but little is known on how it affects the microzonation and kinetics of related microbial processes within the biofilm. The effect of nitrate addition on these properties for sulfate reduction, sulfide oxidation, and oxygen respiration were studied with the use of microelectrodes in microaerophilic wastewater biofilms. Mass balance calaculations and community composition analysis were also performed. At basal WWTP conditions, the biofilm presented a double-layer system. The upper microaerophilic layer (~300 μm) showed low sulfide production (0.31 μmol cm-3 h-1) and oxygen consumption rates (0.01 μmol cm-3 h-1). The anoxic lower layer showed high sulfide production (2.7 μmol cm-3 h-1). Nitrate addition decreased net sulfide production rates, caused by an increase in sulfide oxidation rates (SOR) in the upper layer, rather than an inhibition of sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB). This suggests that the indigenous nitrate reducing-sulfide oxidizing bacteria (NR-SOB) were immediately activated by nitrate. The functional vertical structure of the biofilm changed to a triple-layer system, where the previously upper sulfide-producing layer in the absence of nitrate split into two new layers: 1) an upper sulfide-consuming layer, whose thickness is probably determined by the nitrate penetration depth within the biofilm, and 2) a middle layer producing sulfide at an even higher rate than in the absence of nitrate in some cases. Below these layers, the lower net sulfide-producing layer remained unaffected. Net SOR varied from 0.05 to 0.72 μmol cm-3 h-1 depending on nitrate and sulfate availability. Addition of low nitrate concentrations likely increased sulfate availability within the biofilm and resulted in an increase of both net sulfate reduction and net sulfide oxidation by overcoming sulfate diffusional limitation from the water phase and the strong coupling between SRB and NR-SOB syntrophic

  17. Kinetics of Indigenous Nitrate Reducing Sulfide Oxidizing Activity in Microaerophilic Wastewater Biofilms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Desirée Villahermosa

    Full Text Available Nitrate decreases sulfide release in wastewater treatment plants (WWTP, but little is known on how it affects the microzonation and kinetics of related microbial processes within the biofilm. The effect of nitrate addition on these properties for sulfate reduction, sulfide oxidation, and oxygen respiration were studied with the use of microelectrodes in microaerophilic wastewater biofilms. Mass balance calaculations and community composition analysis were also performed. At basal WWTP conditions, the biofilm presented a double-layer system. The upper microaerophilic layer (~300 μm showed low sulfide production (0.31 μmol cm-3 h-1 and oxygen consumption rates (0.01 μmol cm-3 h-1. The anoxic lower layer showed high sulfide production (2.7 μmol cm-3 h-1. Nitrate addition decreased net sulfide production rates, caused by an increase in sulfide oxidation rates (SOR in the upper layer, rather than an inhibition of sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB. This suggests that the indigenous nitrate reducing-sulfide oxidizing bacteria (NR-SOB were immediately activated by nitrate. The functional vertical structure of the biofilm changed to a triple-layer system, where the previously upper sulfide-producing layer in the absence of nitrate split into two new layers: 1 an upper sulfide-consuming layer, whose thickness is probably determined by the nitrate penetration depth within the biofilm, and 2 a middle layer producing sulfide at an even higher rate than in the absence of nitrate in some cases. Below these layers, the lower net sulfide-producing layer remained unaffected. Net SOR varied from 0.05 to 0.72 μmol cm-3 h-1 depending on nitrate and sulfate availability. Addition of low nitrate concentrations likely increased sulfate availability within the biofilm and resulted in an increase of both net sulfate reduction and net sulfide oxidation by overcoming sulfate diffusional limitation from the water phase and the strong coupling between SRB and NR

  18. Effect of nitrate, acetate and hydrogen on native perchlorate-reducing microbial communities and their activity in vadose soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nozawa-Inoue, Mamie; Jien, Mercy; Yang, Kun; Rolston, Dennis E.; Hristova, Krassimira R.; Scow, Kate M.

    2011-01-01

    Effect of nitrate, acetate and hydrogen on native perchlorate-reducing bacteria (PRB) was examined by conducting microcosm tests using vadose soil collected from a perchlorate-contaminated site. The rate of perchlorate reduction was enhanced by hydrogen amendment and inhibited by acetate amendment, compared to unamendment. Nitrate was reduced before perchlorate in all amendments. In hydrogen-amended and unamended soils, nitrate delayed perchlorate reduction, suggesting the PRB preferentially use nitrate as an electron acceptor. In contrast, nitrate eliminated the inhibitory effect of acetate amendment on perchlorate reduction and increased the rate and the extent, possibly because the preceding nitrate reduction/denitrification decreased the acetate concentration which was inhibitory to the native PRB. In hydrogen-amended and unamended soils, perchlorate reductase gene (pcrA) copies, representing PRB densities, increased with either perchlorate or nitrate reduction, suggesting either perchlorate or nitrate stimulates growth of the PRB. In contrast, in acetate-amended soil pcrA increased only when perchlorate was depleted: a large portion of the PRB may have not utilized nitrate in this amendment. Nitrate addition did not alter the distribution of the dominant pcrA clones in hydrogen-amended soil, likely because of the functional redundancy of PRB as nitrate-reducers/denitrifiers, whereas acetate selected different pcrA clones from those with hydrogen amendment. PMID:21284679

  19. Nitrate reduction in geologically heterogeneous catchments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Refsgaard, Jens Christian; Auken, Esben; Bamberg, Charlotte A.

    2014-01-01

    In order to fulfil the requirements of the EU Water Framework Directive nitrate load from agricultural areas to surface water in Denmark needs to be reduced by about 40%. The regulations imposed until now have been uniform, i.e. the same restrictions for all areas independent of the subsurface...... conditions. Studies have shown that on a national basis about 2/3 of the nitrate leaching from the root zone is reduced naturally, through denitrification, in the subsurface before reaching the streams. Therefore, it is more cost-effective to identify robust areas, where nitrate leaching through the root...... the entire catchment. However, as distributed models often do not include local scale hydrogeological heterogeneities, they are typically not able to make accurate predictions at scales smaller than they are calibrated. We present a framework for assessing nitrate reduction in the subsurface...

  20. Reduced rates of controlled-release fertilizer lower potential nitrogen leaching from a Wisconsin bare-root tree nursery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryosuke Fujinuma; Nick J. Balster; Hyung-Kyung. Lee

    2011-01-01

    Controlled-release fertilizer (CRF) typically increases nitrogen (N) fertilizer uptake and lowers N lost from the rooting zone via leaching. However, questions remain as to whether lower rates of CRF could further increase this efficiency, especially in sandy bare-root nurseries in Wisconsin. We hypothesized that: 1) a reduced CRF application at 60 percent of the...

  1. Leaching and accumulation of trace elements in sulfate reducing granular sludge under concomitant thermophilic and low pH conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gonzalez-Gil, G.; Lopes, S.I.C.; Saikaly, P.E.; Lens, P.N.L.

    2012-01-01

    The leaching and/or accumulation of trace elements in sulfate reducing granular sludge systems was investigated. Two thermophilic up-flow anaerobic sludge bed (UASB) reactors operated at pH 5 were fed with sucrose (4 g COD l(reactor)(-1) d(-1)) and sulfate at different COD/SO42- ratios. During the

  2. Nitrous Oxide Metabolism in Nitrate-Reducing Bacteria: Physiology and Regulatory Mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, M J; Simon, J; Rowley, G; Bedmar, E J; Richardson, D J; Gates, A J; Delgado, M J

    2016-01-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) is an important greenhouse gas (GHG) with substantial global warming potential and also contributes to ozone depletion through photochemical nitric oxide (NO) production in the stratosphere. The negative effects of N2O on climate and stratospheric ozone make N2O mitigation an international challenge. More than 60% of global N2O emissions are emitted from agricultural soils mainly due to the application of synthetic nitrogen-containing fertilizers. Thus, mitigation strategies must be developed which increase (or at least do not negatively impact) on agricultural efficiency whilst decrease the levels of N2O released. This aim is particularly important in the context of the ever expanding population and subsequent increased burden on the food chain. More than two-thirds of N2O emissions from soils can be attributed to bacterial and fungal denitrification and nitrification processes. In ammonia-oxidizing bacteria, N2O is formed through the oxidation of hydroxylamine to nitrite. In denitrifiers, nitrate is reduced to N2 via nitrite, NO and N2O production. In addition to denitrification, respiratory nitrate ammonification (also termed dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium) is another important nitrate-reducing mechanism in soil, responsible for the loss of nitrate and production of N2O from reduction of NO that is formed as a by-product of the reduction process. This review will synthesize our current understanding of the environmental, regulatory and biochemical control of N2O emissions by nitrate-reducing bacteria and point to new solutions for agricultural GHG mitigation. © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Microbial Degradation of Phenols and Aromatic Hydrocarbons in Creosote-contaminated Groundwater Under Nitrate-reducing Conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Flyvbjerg, John; Arvin, Erik; Jensen, Bjørn K.

    1993-01-01

    of toluene, 2,4-DMP, 3,4-DMP and p-cresol depended on nitrate or nitrite as electron acceptors. 40–80% of the nitrate consumed during degradation of the aromatic compounds was recovered as nitrite, and the consumption of nitrate was accompanied by a production of ATP. Stoichiometric calculations indicated......Batch experiments were carried out to investigate the biodegradation of phenols and aromatic hydrocarbons under anaerobic, nitrate-reducing conditions in groundwater from a creosote-contaminated site at Fredensborg, Denmark. The bacteria in the creosote-contaminated groundwater degraded a mixture...... that in addition to the phenols are toluene other carbon sources present in the groundwater contributed to the consumption of nitrate. If the groundwater was incubated under anaerobic conditions without nitrate, sulphate-reducing conditions evolved after ∼ 1 month at 20°C and ∼2 months at 10°C. In the sulphate...

  4. Nitrogen leaching: A crop rotation perspective on the effect of N surplus, field management and use of catch crops

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Notaris, Chiara; Rasmussen, Jim; Sørensen, Peter

    2018-01-01

    Components of the field nitrogen (N) balance (input and surplus) are often used to predict nitrate leaching from agricultural lands. However, management factors, such as use of catch crops, greatly affect the actual loss and are a key to reduce N leaching. The present study is based on the 4th cy...

  5. Biochar amendment reduces paddy soil nitrogen leaching but increases net global warming potential in Ningxia irrigation, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yongsheng; Liu, Yansui; Liu, Ruliang; Zhang, Aiping; Yang, Shiqi; Liu, Hongyuan; Zhou, Yang; Yang, Zhengli

    2017-05-09

    The efficacy of biochar as an environmentally friendly agent for non-point source and climate change mitigation remains uncertain. Our goal was to test the impact of biochar amendment on paddy rice nitrogen (N) uptake, soil N leaching, and soil CH 4 and N 2 O fluxes in northwest China. Biochar was applied at four rates (0, 4.5, 9 and13.5 t ha -1 yr -1 ). Biochar amendment significantly increased rice N uptake, soil total N concentration and the abundance of soil ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA), but it significantly reduced the soil NO 3 - -N concentration and soil bulk density. Biochar significantly reduced NO 3 - -N and NH 4 + -N leaching. The C2 and C3 treatments significantly increased the soil CH 4 flux and reduced the soil N 2 O flux, leading to significantly increased net global warming potential (GWP). Soil NO 3 - -N rather than NH 4 + -N was the key integrator of the soil CH 4 and N 2 O fluxes. Our results indicate that a shift in abundance of the AOA community and increased rice N uptake are closely linked to the reduced soil NO 3 - -N concentration under biochar amendment. Furthermore, soil NO 3 - -N availability plays an important role in regulating soil inorganic N leaching and net GWP in rice paddies in northwest China.

  6. Nitrate removal performance of Diaphorobacter nitroreducens using biodegradable plastics as the source of reducing power

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khan, S. T. [Department of Environmental and Life Sciences, Toyohashi University of Technology, Toyohashi 441-8580, Japan and Department of Zoology, College of Science, King Saud University, Riyadh (Saudi Arabia); Nagao, Y. [Department of Environmental and Life Sciences, Toyohashi University of Technology, Toyohashi 441-8580 (Japan); Hiraishi, A., E-mail: hiraishi@ens.tut.ac.jp [Department of Environmental and Life Sciences, Toyohashi University of Technology, Toyohashi 441-8580, Japan and Electronics-Inspired Interdisciplinary Research Institute (EIIRIS), Toyohashi University of Technology, Toyohashi 441-8580 (Japan)

    2015-02-27

    Strain NA10B{sup T} and other two strains of the denitrifying betaproteobacterium Diaphorobacter nitroreducens were studied for the performance of solid-phase denitrification (SPD) using poly(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyvalerate) (PHBV) and some other biodegradable plastics as the source of reducing power in wastewater treatment. Sequencing-batch SPD reactors with these organisms and PHBV granules or flakes as the substrate exhibited good nitrate removal performance. Vial tests using cultures from these parent reactors showed higher nitrate removal rates with PHBV granules (ca. 20 mg-NO{sub 3}{sup −}‐N g{sup −1} [dry wt cells] h{sup −1}) than with PHBV pellets and flakes. In continuous-flow SPD reactors using strain NA10B{sup T} and PHBV flakes, nitrate was not detected even at a loading rate of 21 mg-NO{sub 3}{sup −}‐N L{sup −1} h{sup −1}. This corresponded to a nitrate removal rate of 47 mg-NO{sub 3}{sup −}‐N g{sup −1} (dry wt cells) h{sup −1}. In the continuous-flow reactor, the transcription level of the phaZ gene, coding for PHB depolymerase, decreased with time, while that of the nosZ gene, involved in denitrificaiton, was relatively constant. These results suggest that the bioavailability of soluble metabolites as electron donor and carbon sources increases with time in the continuous-flow SPD process, thereby having much higher nitrate removal rates than the process with fresh PHBV as the substrate.

  7. Nitrate reducing bacterial activity in concrete cells of nuclear waste disposal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alquier, M.; Kassim, C.; Bertron, A.; Rafrafi, Y.; Sablayrolles, C.; Albrecht, A.; Erable, B.

    2013-07-01

    Leaching experiments of solid matrices (bitumen and cement pastes) have been first implemented to define the physicochemical conditions that microorganisms are likely to meet at the bitumen-concrete interface (see the paper of Bertron et al.). Of course, as might be suspected, the cement matrix imposes highly alkaline pH conditions (10 nitrate reduction in these extreme conditions of pH. The denitrifying activity of Halomonas desiderata was quantified in batch bioreactor in the presence of solid matrices and / or leachate from bitumen and cement matrices. Denitrification was relatively fast in the presence of cement matrix (<100 hours) and 2 to 3 times slower in the presence of bituminous matrix. Overall, the presence of solid cement promoted the kinetics of denitrification. The observation of solid surfaces at the end of the experiment revealed the presence of a biofilm of Halomonas desiderata on the cement paste surface. These attached bacteria showed a denitrifying activity comparable to planktonic bacterial culture. On the other side, no colonization of bitumen could be highlighted as either by SEM or epifluorescence microscopy. Now, we are currently developing a continuous experimental bioreactor which should allow us a more rational understanding of the bitumen-cement-microbe interactions.

  8. Nitrate reducing bacterial activity in concrete cells of nuclear waste disposal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albrecht A.

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Leaching experiments of solid matrices (bitumen and cement pastes have been first implemented to define the physicochemical conditions that microorganisms are likely to meet at the bitumen-concrete interface (see the paper of Bertron et al.. Of course, as might be suspected, the cement matrix imposes highly alkaline pH conditions (10 nitrate reduction in these extreme conditions of pH. The denitrifying activity of Halomonas desiderata was quantified in batch bioreactor in the presence of solid matrices and / or leachate from bitumen and cement matrices. Denitrification was relatively fast in the presence of cement matrix (<100 hours and 2 to 3 times slower in the presence of bituminous matrix. Overall, the presence of solid cement promoted the kinetics of denitrification. The observation of solid surfaces at the end of the experiment revealed the presence of a biofilm of Halomonas desiderata on the cement paste surface. These attached bacteria showed a denitrifying activity comparable to planktonic bacterial culture. On the other side, no colonization of bitumen could be highlighted as either by SEM or epifluorescence microscopy. Now, we are currently developing a continuous experimental bioreactor which should allow us a more rational understanding of the bitumen-cement-microbe interactions.

  9. Soil biota enhance agricultural sustainability by improving crop yield, nutrient uptake and reducing nitrogen leaching losses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bender, S.F.; van der Heijden, M.G.A.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/240923901

    2015-01-01

    Efficient resource use is a key factor for sustainable production and a necessity for meeting future global food demands. However, the factors that control resource use efficiency in agro-ecosystems are only partly understood. We investigated the influence of soil biota on nutrient leaching,

  10. Composting and gypsum amendment of broiler litter to reduce nutrient leaching loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Relative to fresh broiler litter, little is known about the dynamics of composted litter derived-nutrient in the ecosystem. In this study, the potential leaching losses of nutrients from compost relative to fresh broiler litter along with flue gas desulfurization (FGD gypsum), as a nutrient immobil...

  11. Anaerobic degradation of naphthalene by the mixed bacteria under nitrate reducing conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dou Junfeng; Liu Xiang; Ding Aizhong

    2009-01-01

    Mixed bacteria were enriched from soil samples contaminated with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). The anaerobic degradation characteristics by the enriched bacteria with different initial naphthalene concentrations were investigated under nitrate reducing conditions. The results showed that the mixed bacteria could degrade nearly all the naphthalene over the incubations of 25 days when the initial naphthalene concentration was below 30 mg/L. The degradation rates of naphthalene increased with increasing initial concentrations. A high naphthalene concentration of 30 mg/L did not inhibit neither on the bacterial growth nor on the naphthalene degradation ability. The accumulation of nitrite was occurred during the reduction of nitrate, and a nitrite concentration of 50 mg/L had no inhibition effect on the degradation of naphthalene. The calculation of electron balances revealed that most of the naphthalene was oxidized whereas a small proportion was used for cell synthesis.

  12. Conservation of nitrate during the fallow; Conservacion del nitrogeno durante el barbecho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jimenez Aguilar, M.

    2004-07-01

    We study the possibility to use the waste-water from olive oil mills, or woom to reduce the leaching, of nitrate during the fallow. The blocking in time that practice the woom about the nitrogen of soil we are suggest this study. We make use of woom dilute in water and we study the influence,as soon as the contained potassium, on the nitrogen leaching of two soils, loam and silt-clay loam. The irrigation of soils with woom dilute in water from ten to forty times prior to the autumnal rains to be worth for reducing the leaching of nitrate during the fallow. (Author) 21 refs.

  13. Acidification of pig slurry effects on ammonia and nitrous oxide emissions, nitrate leaching, and perennial ryegrass regrowth as estimated by N-urea flux

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sang Hyun Park

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective The present study aimed to assess the nitrogen (N use efficiency of acidified pig slurry for regrowth yield and its environmental impacts on perennial ryegrass swards. Methods The pH of digested pig slurry was adjusted to 5.0 or 7.0 by the addition of sulfuric acid and untreated as a control. The pig slurry urea of each treatment was labeled with 15N urea and applied at a rate of 200 kg N/ha immediately after cutting. Soil and herbage samples were collected at 7, 14, and 56 d of regrowth. The flux of pig slurry-N to regrowth yield and soil N mineralization were analyzed, and N losses via NH3, N2O emission and NO3− leaching were also estimated. Results The pH level of the applied slurry did not have a significant effect on herbage yield or N content of herbage at the end of regrowth, whereas the amount of N derived from pig slurry urea (NdfSU was higher in both herbage and soils in pH-controlled plots. The NH4+-N content and the amount of N derived from slurry urea into soil NH4+ fraction (NdfSU-NH4+ was significantly higher in in the pH 5 plot, whereas NO3− and NdfSU-NO3− were lower than in control plots over the entire regrowth period. Nitrification of NH4+-N was delayed in soil amended with acidified slurry. Compared to non-pH-controlled pig slurry (i.e. control plots, application of acidified slurry reduced NH3 emissions by 78.1%, N2O emissions by 78.9% and NO3− leaching by 17.81% over the course of the experiment. Conclusion Our results suggest that pig slurry acidification may represent an effective means of minimizing hazardous environmental impacts without depressing regrowth yield.

  14. Reducing Heavy Metal Element from Coal Bottom Ash by Using Citric Acid Leaching Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yahya Ahmad Asyari

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Coal ash is the residue that is produced during coal combustion for instance fly ash, bottom ash or boiler slag which was primarily produced from the combustion of coal. With growth in coal burning power station, huge amount of coal bottom ash (CBA considered as hazardous material which are normally disposed in an on-site disposal system without any commercialization purpose. Previous researchers have studied the extraction of silica from agricultural wastes such as palm ash and rice husk ash (RHA and CBA by using leaching treatment method. In this study, the weaker acid, citric acid solution was used to replace the strong acid in leaching treatment process. Result showed that the heavy metal content such as Copper (Cu, Zinc (Zn and Lead (Pb can be decrease. Meanwhile the silica can be extracted up to 44% from coal bottom ash using citric acid leaching treatment under the optimum reaction time of 60 minutes with solution temperature of 60°C and concentration of citric acid more than 2%.

  15. Seasonal variations of nitrate reducing and denitrifying bacteria utilizing hexadecane in Mandovi estuary, Goa, West Coast of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sousa, T.D.; Ingole, B.; Sousa, S.D.; Bhosle, S.

    > cfu/ml on minimal media containing hexadecane as the sole carbon source. Highest bacterial counts were obtained during the monsoons. 22% of bacteria capable of hexadecane utilization were nitrate reducing and 12% were denitrifying. 29...

  16. Simulating land management options to reduce nitrate pollution in an agricultural watershed dominated by an alluvial aquifer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerro, Itsasne; Antigüedad, Iñaki; Srinavasan, Raghavan; Sauvage, Sabine; Volk, Martin; Sanchez-Perez, José Miguel

    2014-01-01

    The study area (Alegria watershed, Basque Country, Northern Spain) considered here is influenced by an important alluvial aquifer that plays a significant role in nitrate pollution from agricultural land use and management practices. Nitrates are transported primarily from the soil to the river through the alluvial aquifer. The agricultural activity covers 75% of the watershed and is located in a nitrate-vulnerable zone. The main objective of the study was to find land management options for water pollution abatement by using model systems. In a first step, the SWAT model was applied to simulate discharge and nitrate load in stream flow at the outlet of the catchment for the period between October 2009 and June 2011. The LOADEST program was used to estimate the daily nitrate load from measured nitrate concentration. We achieved satisfactory simulation results for discharge and nitrate loads at monthly and daily time steps. The results revealed clear variations in the seasons: higher nitrate loads were achieved for winter (20,000 kg mo NO-N), and lower nitrate loads were simulated for the summer (model was used to evaluate the long-term effects of best management practices (BMPs) for a 50-yr period by maintaining actual agricultural practices, reducing fertilizer application by 20%, splitting applications (same total N but applied over the growing period), and reducing 20% of the applied fertilizer amount and splitting the fertilizer doses. The BMPs were evaluated on the basis of local experience and farmer interaction. Results showed that reducing fertilizer amounts by 20% could lead to a reduction of 50% of the number of days exceeding the nitrate concentration limit value (50 mg L) set by the European Water Framework Directive. Copyright © by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America, Inc.

  17. Leaching and accumulation of trace elements in sulfate reducing granular sludge under concomitant thermophilic and low pH conditions

    KAUST Repository

    Gonzalez-Gil, Graciela; Lopes, Sí lvia I C; Saikaly, Pascal; Lens, Piet Nl L

    2012-01-01

    The leaching and/or accumulation of trace elements in sulfate reducing granular sludge systems was investigated. Two thermophilic up-flow anaerobic sludge bed (UASB) reactors operated at pH 5 were fed with sucrose (4gCODl reactor -1d -1) and sulfate at different COD/SO 4 2- ratios. During the start-up of such acidogenic systems, an initial leaching of trace elements from the inoculum sludge occurred regardless of trace elements supplementation in the reactor influent. The granular sludge maintained the physical structure despite high Fe leaching. After start-up and nonetheless the acidic conditions, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Mo and Se were retained or accumulated by the sludge when added. Particularly, Ni and Co accumulated in the carbonates and exchangeable fractions ensuring potential bioavailability. Otherwise, the initial stock in the inoculum sludge sufficed to operate the process for nearly 1year without supplementation of trace elements and no significant sludge wash-out occurred. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd.

  18. Leaching and accumulation of trace elements in sulfate reducing granular sludge under concomitant thermophilic and low pH conditions

    KAUST Repository

    Gonzalez-Gil, Graciela

    2012-12-01

    The leaching and/or accumulation of trace elements in sulfate reducing granular sludge systems was investigated. Two thermophilic up-flow anaerobic sludge bed (UASB) reactors operated at pH 5 were fed with sucrose (4gCODl reactor -1d -1) and sulfate at different COD/SO 4 2- ratios. During the start-up of such acidogenic systems, an initial leaching of trace elements from the inoculum sludge occurred regardless of trace elements supplementation in the reactor influent. The granular sludge maintained the physical structure despite high Fe leaching. After start-up and nonetheless the acidic conditions, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Mo and Se were retained or accumulated by the sludge when added. Particularly, Ni and Co accumulated in the carbonates and exchangeable fractions ensuring potential bioavailability. Otherwise, the initial stock in the inoculum sludge sufficed to operate the process for nearly 1year without supplementation of trace elements and no significant sludge wash-out occurred. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd.

  19. Performance of waste-based amendments to reduce metal release from mine tailings: One-year leaching behaviour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, Luis; Gómez, Rocío; Sánchez, Virtudes; Villaseñor, José; Alonso-Azcárate, Jacinto

    2018-03-01

    A one-year leaching experiment has been conducted in order to assess the effectiveness of several amendments on metal immobilization in mine tailings from an old Pb/Zn mining area of Central Spain (San Quintín mine). Demineralized water was used as leaching solution, selecting doses equivalent to the annual rainfall conditions of the studied area. Columns with mine tailings without any amendment and others treated with 10% of sugar foam (SF), 15% of drinking water treatment sludge (DWS), 30% of paper mill sludge (PMS) and 15% of olive mill waste (OMW) were used. SF, DWS and PMS amendments increased the pH of leachates from values of approximately 4 to around neutrality. Additionally, the release of sulfate ions from the oxidation of pyritic residues was decreased in some extent by SF and DWS amendments. Metal leaching was effectively reduced by the amendments reaching overall decreases with respect to the unamended columns of 79-96% for Pb, 36-100% for Zn, 50-99% for Cu and 44-100% for Cd. The effect of the amendments in leachate pH, sulfate concentration and metal release from mine tailings was kept throughout the whole experimental period. Our results showed that the application of different organic and inorganic amendments based on by-products and waste materials may be a feasible alternative for the restoration of soils around abandoned metal mines. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Spatially differentiated strategies for reducing nitrate loads from agriculture in two Danish catchments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hashemi, Fatemeh; Olesen, Jørgen Eivind; Hansen, Anne Lausten

    2018-01-01

    Nutrient loss from agriculture is the largest source of diffuse water pollution in Denmark. To reduce nutrient loads a number of solutions have been implemented, but this has been insufficient to achieve the environmental objectives without unacceptable repercussions for agricultural production...... reducing the source loading or enhancing the natural reduction (denitrification) of N after it is leached from the root zone of agricultural crops. In this study, a new method of spatially differentiated analysis for two Danish catchments (Odense and Norsminde) was conducted that reach across...... the individual farms to achieve selected N-load reduction targets. It includes application of cover crops within current crop rotations, set-a-side application on high N-load areas, and changes in agricultural management based on maps of N-reduction available for two different spatial scales, considering soil...

  1. Effects of over-winter green cover on soil solution nitrate concentrations beneath tillage land.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Premrov, Alina; Coxon, Catherine E; Hackett, Richard; Kirwan, Laura; Richards, Karl G

    2014-02-01

    There is a growing need to reduce nitrogen losses from agricultural systems to increase food production while reducing negative environmental impacts. The efficacy of vegetation cover for reducing nitrate leaching in tillage systems during fallow periods has been widely investigated. Nitrate leaching reductions by natural regeneration (i.e. growth of weeds and crop volunteers) have been investigated to a lesser extent than reductions by planted cover crops. This study compares the efficacy of natural regeneration and a sown cover crop (mustard) relative to no vegetative cover under both a reduced tillage system and conventional plough-based system as potential mitigation measures for reducing over-winter soil solution nitrate concentrations. The study was conducted over three winter fallow seasons on well drained soil, highly susceptible to leaching, under temperate maritime climatic conditions. Mustard cover crop under both reduced tillage and conventional ploughing was observed to be an effective measure for significantly reducing nitrate concentrations. Natural regeneration under reduced tillage was found to significantly reduce the soil solution nitrate concentrations. This was not the case for the natural regeneration under conventional ploughing. The improved efficacy of natural regeneration under reduced tillage could be a consequence of potential stimulation of seedling germination by the autumn reduced tillage practices and improved over-winter plant growth. There was no significant effect of tillage practices on nitrate concentrations. This study shows that over winter covers of mustard and natural regeneration, under reduced tillage, are effective measures for reducing nitrate concentrations in free draining temperate soils. © 2013.

  2. Recovery TiO2 by leaching process of carbothermic reduced Kalimantan ilmenite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahyuningsih, S.; Sari, P. P.; Ramelan, A. H.

    2018-05-01

    Ilmenite naturally occurred in iron titanate (FeTiO3) minerals. The separation of natural ilmenite into TiO2 and Fe2O3 need to be explored to gain the high purity separation product. A new combination method named of carbothermic reduction, acidic-leaching and complexation by EDTA were proposed for separation TiO2 from Ilmenite. Roasting of ilmenite was carried out at 950 °C for 1 h by the addition of activated carbon with mass ratio of ilmenite : activated carbon =4:3. The carbothermic reduction was carried out to yield a high separation of initial content of ilmenite that will be easily to dissolve within hydrochloric acid solution in leaching process. The composition of ilmenite observed by X-Ray Fluoresences (XRF) changed after the carbothermic reduction process and the dominant content is TiO2 (57.56%). X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) of roasted ilmenite composed of decomposed product of ilmenite i.e. hematite (Fe2O3), TiO2 anatase, TiO2 rutile, and inorganic salt. The leaching of the roasted ilmenite has been done by sulphuric acid solution (6 M) to gain the titanyl sulphate solution. Separation of iron impurities of TiO2 gel from titanyl sulphate (TiOSO4) solution was conducted by complexation method using EDTA as a complexation agent. The characteristic of TiO2 obtained using XRD showed that TiO2 is anatase type and the percentage of TiO2 using XRF showed that TiO2 content of 86,03%.

  3. Fractionation of hydrogen isotopes by sulfate- and nitrate-reducing bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdalena Rose Osburn

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogen atoms from water and food are incorporated into biomass during cellular metabolism and biosynthesis, fractionating the isotopes of hydrogen –protium and deuterium –that are recorded in biomolecules. While these fractionations are often relatively constant in plants, large variations in the magnitude of fractionation are observed for many heterotrophic microbes utilizing different central metabolic pathways. The correlation between metabolism and lipid δ2H provides a potential basis for reconstructing environmental and ecological parameters, but the calibration dataset has thus far been limited mainly to aerobes. Here we report on the hydrogen isotopic fractionations of lipids produced by nitrate-respiring and sulfate-reducing bacteria. We observe only small differences in fractionation between oxygen- and nitrate-respiring growth conditions, with a typical pattern of variation between substrates that is broadly consistent with previously described trends. In contrast, fractionation by sulfate-reducing bacteria does not vary significantly between different substrates, even when autotrophic and heterotrophic growth conditions are compared. This result is in marked contrast to previously published observations and has significant implications for the interpretation of environmental hydrogen isotope data. We evaluate these trends in light of metabolic gene content of each strain, growth rate, and potential flux and reservoir-size effects of cellular hydrogen, but find no single variable that can account for the differences between nitrate- and sulfate-respiring bacteria. The emerging picture of bacterial hydrogen isotope fractionation is therefore more complex than the simple correspondence between δ2H and metabolic pathway previously understood from aerobes. Despite the complexity, the large signals and rich variability of observed lipid δ2H suggest much potential as an environmental recorder of metabolism.

  4. Fractionation of Hydrogen Isotopes by Sulfate- and Nitrate-Reducing Bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osburn, Magdalena R; Dawson, Katherine S; Fogel, Marilyn L; Sessions, Alex L

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen atoms from water and food are incorporated into biomass during cellular metabolism and biosynthesis, fractionating the isotopes of hydrogen-protium and deuterium-that are recorded in biomolecules. While these fractionations are often relatively constant in plants, large variations in the magnitude of fractionation are observed for many heterotrophic microbes utilizing different central metabolic pathways. The correlation between metabolism and lipid δ(2)H provides a potential basis for reconstructing environmental and ecological parameters, but the calibration dataset has thus far been limited mainly to aerobes. Here we report on the hydrogen isotopic fractionations of lipids produced by nitrate-respiring and sulfate-reducing bacteria. We observe only small differences in fractionation between oxygen- and nitrate-respiring growth conditions, with a typical pattern of variation between substrates that is broadly consistent with previously described trends. In contrast, fractionation by sulfate-reducing bacteria does not vary significantly between different substrates, even when autotrophic and heterotrophic growth conditions are compared. This result is in marked contrast to previously published observations and has significant implications for the interpretation of environmental hydrogen isotope data. We evaluate these trends in light of metabolic gene content of each strain, growth rate, and potential flux and reservoir-size effects of cellular hydrogen, but find no single variable that can account for the differences between nitrate- and sulfate-respiring bacteria. The emerging picture of bacterial hydrogen isotope fractionation is therefore more complex than the simple correspondence between δ(2)H and metabolic pathway previously understood from aerobes. Despite the complexity, the large signals and rich variability of observed lipid δ(2)H suggest much potential as an environmental recorder of metabolism.

  5. Reactions of the nitrate radical with a series og reduced organic sulfur-compounds in air

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    JENSEN, NR; HJORTH, J; LOHSE, C

    1992-01-01

    A 480 L evacuable reaction chamber, equipped with FT-IR spectroscopy on-line and ion chromatography off-line, has been used to study the gas phase reaction between the nitrate radical, NO3, and the reduced organic sulphur compounds CH3CH2SH, (CH3CH2)2S, (CH3CH2)2S2, and CH3CH2SCH3 in air. The pro......A 480 L evacuable reaction chamber, equipped with FT-IR spectroscopy on-line and ion chromatography off-line, has been used to study the gas phase reaction between the nitrate radical, NO3, and the reduced organic sulphur compounds CH3CH2SH, (CH3CH2)2S, (CH3CH2)2S2, and CH3CH2SCH3 in air......, and CH3SSCH3 lead to the conclusion that all these species, in the reaction with the NO3 radical, follow a similar degradation mechanism producing SO2, H2SO4, R-SO3H, R-CHO, and R-CH2ONO2, as the main reaction products. The inital step of the reaction of NO3 with R-S-R and R-S- H type (R = CH3, CH2CH3...

  6. Reducing nitrate loss in tile drainage water with cover crops and water-table management systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drury, C F; Tan, C S; Welacky, T W; Reynolds, W D; Zhang, T Q; Oloya, T O; McLaughlin, N B; Gaynor, J D

    2014-03-01

    Nitrate lost from agricultural soils is an economic cost to producers, an environmental concern when it enters rivers and lakes, and a health risk when it enters wells and aquifers used for drinking water. Planting a winter wheat cover crop (CC) and/or use of controlled tile drainage-subirrigation (CDS) may reduce losses of nitrate (NO) relative to no cover crop (NCC) and/or traditional unrestricted tile drainage (UTD). A 6-yr (1999-2005) corn-soybean study was conducted to determine the effectiveness of CC+CDS, CC+UTD, NCC+CDS, and NCC+UTD treatments for reducing NO loss. Flow volume and NO concentration in surface runoff and tile drainage were measured continuously, and CC reduced the 5-yr flow-weighted mean (FWM) NO concentration in tile drainage water by 21 to 38% and cumulative NO loss by 14 to 16% relative to NCC. Controlled tile drainage-subirrigation reduced FWM NO concentration by 15 to 33% and cumulative NO loss by 38 to 39% relative to UTD. When CC and CDS were combined, 5-yr cumulative FWM NO concentrations and loss in tile drainage were decreased by 47% (from 9.45 to 4.99 mg N L and from 102 to 53.6 kg N ha) relative to NCC+UTD. The reductions in runoff and concomitant increases in tile drainage under CC occurred primarily because of increases in near-surface soil hydraulic conductivity. Cover crops increased corn grain yields by 4 to 7% in 2004 increased 3-yr average soybean yields by 8 to 15%, whereas CDS did not affect corn or soybean yields over the 6 yr. The combined use of a cover crop and water-table management system was highly effective for reducing NO loss from cool, humid agricultural soils. Copyright © by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America, Inc.

  7. Profitability of Nitrification Inhibitors for Abatement of Nitrate Leaching on a Representative Dairy Farm in the Waikato Region of New Zealand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Upa H. Paragahawewa

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Direct policies for the management of nonpoint source pollution are difficult to apply given asymmetric information, spatial and temporal variability, and uncertainty. There is increasing awareness that these limitations may be overcome where profitable mitigation practices are broadly adopted by polluters. Nitrification inhibitors (chemicals applied to paddocks that retard the nitrification process in soils are a rare example of a mitigation practice that reduces pollutant loads and potentially increases farm profit through promoting pasture production. This study investigates their capacity to achieve both goals to inform policy makers and producers of their potential for simultaneously improving farm profit and water quality. With an assumed 10 percent increase in pasture production in response to nitrification inhibitor application, nitrification inhibitors are a profitable innovation because greater pasture production supports higher stocking rates. Nonetheless, their overall impact on farm profit is low, even when the cost of inhibitors or their impact on subsequent pasture production is substantially altered. However, inhibitors are found to be a critical mitigation practice for farmers posed with decreasing leaching loads to satisfy regulatory requirements. These findings suggest that, despite their shortcomings for nonpoint pollution regulation, direct policies appear to be the only way to motivate producers to account for their impact on environmental values given the current lack of profitable mitigations.

  8. Disguised as a Sulfate Reducer: Growth of the Deltaproteobacterium Desulfurivibrio alkaliphilus by Sulfide Oxidation with Nitrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorup, Casper; Schramm, Andreas; Findlay, Alyssa J; Finster, Kai W; Schreiber, Lars

    2017-07-18

    This study demonstrates that the deltaproteobacterium Desulfurivibrio alkaliphilus can grow chemolithotrophically by coupling sulfide oxidation to the dissimilatory reduction of nitrate and nitrite to ammonium. Key genes of known sulfide oxidation pathways are absent from the genome of D. alkaliphilus Instead, the genome contains all of the genes necessary for sulfate reduction, including a gene for a reductive-type dissimilatory bisulfite reductase (DSR). Despite this, growth by sulfate reduction was not observed. Transcriptomic analysis revealed a very high expression level of sulfate-reduction genes during growth by sulfide oxidation, while inhibition experiments with molybdate pointed to elemental sulfur/polysulfides as intermediates. Consequently, we propose that D. alkaliphilus initially oxidizes sulfide to elemental sulfur, which is then either disproportionated, or oxidized by a reversal of the sulfate reduction pathway. This is the first study providing evidence that a reductive-type DSR is involved in a sulfide oxidation pathway. Transcriptome sequencing further suggests that nitrate reduction to ammonium is performed by a novel type of periplasmic nitrate reductase and an unusual membrane-anchored nitrite reductase. IMPORTANCE Sulfide oxidation and sulfate reduction, the two major branches of the sulfur cycle, are usually ascribed to distinct sets of microbes with distinct diagnostic genes. Here we show a more complex picture, as D. alkaliphilus , with the genomic setup of a sulfate reducer, grows by sulfide oxidation. The high expression of genes typically involved in the sulfate reduction pathway suggests that these genes, including the reductive-type dissimilatory bisulfite reductases, are also involved in as-yet-unresolved sulfide oxidation pathways. Finally, D. alkaliphilus is closely related to cable bacteria, which grow by electrogenic sulfide oxidation. Since there are no pure cultures of cable bacteria, D. alkaliphilus may represent an

  9. Extent and causes of 3D spatial variations in potential N mineralization and the risk of ammonium and nitrate leaching from an N-impacted permanent grassland near York, UK

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riaz, Muhammad [Environment Department, University of York, Heslington Road, York, North Yorkshire YO10 5DD (United Kingdom)], E-mail: mr548@york.ac.uk; Mian, Ishaq A. [Environment Department, University of York, Heslington Road, York, North Yorkshire YO10 5DD (United Kingdom)], E-mail: iam501@york.ac.uk; Cresser, Malcolm S. [Environment Department, University of York, Heslington Road, York, North Yorkshire YO10 5DD (United Kingdom)], E-mail: msc5@york.ac.uk

    2008-12-15

    Changes in the dynamics of inorganic N species transformations with depth have been investigated for seven soil profiles from a nitrogen-impacted ancient grassland on a nature reserve outside York in the UK, using incubation experiments. In five of the profiles, both ammonification and nitrification are occurring below the rooting zone, probably partly in response to the low C:N ratio in the soils. This contributes to elevated nitrate concentrations found in an adjacent stream. Accumulation of ammonium during incubation in the sub-soils of these five profiles suggests a high probability of ammonium leaching down the profiles as ammonium inputs and outputs at a given depth approach equilibrium. This ammonium may also be nitrified at depth. However, in the two profiles with the most acidic surface horizons, net mineralization was negligible or negative; some initial ammonium-N and ammonium-N produced during incubation were nitrified, so the loss in ammonium-N was closely balanced by nitrate-N production. - Inorganic N species transformations in sub-soils of N-impacted acid grassland contribute to N leaching.

  10. Deforestation and leaching of nitrogen as nitrates into underground water in intertropical zones: The example of Cote d'Ivoire (the Ivory Coast)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faillat, J.P.; Rambaud, A.

    1991-01-01

    High nitrate contents (up to 200 mgl) has been observed in wells drilled into fractured aquifers lying beneath layers of weathered and decayed rock in the humid tropics where annual rainfall is over 1,000 mm and where there is no notable pollution. The source of the nitrates is linked mainly with localized deforestation by man

  11. Managing tile drainage, subirrigation, and nitrogen fertilization to enhance crop yields and reduce nitrate loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drury, C F; Tan, C S; Reynolds, W D; Welacky, T W; Oloya, T O; Gaynor, J D

    2009-01-01

    Improving field-crop use of fertilizer nitrogen is essential for protecting water quality and increasing crop yields. The objective of this study was to determine the effectiveness of controlled tile drainage (CD) and controlled tile drainage with subsurface irrigation (CDS) for mitigating off-field nitrate losses and enhancing crop yields. The CD and CDS systems were compared on a clay loam soil to traditional unrestricted tile drainage (UTD) under a corn (Zea Mays L.)-soybean (Glycine Max. (L.) Merr.) rotation at two nitrogen (N) fertilization rates (N1: 150 kg N ha(-1) applied to corn, no N applied to soybean; N2: 200 kg N ha(-1) applied to corn, 50 kg N ha(-1) applied to soybean). The N concentrations in tile flow events with the UTD treatment exceeded the provisional long-term aquatic life limit (LT-ALL) for freshwater (4.7 mg N L(-1)) 72% of the time at the N1 rate and 78% at the N2 rate, whereas only 24% of tile flow events at N1 and 40% at N2 exceeded the LT-ALL for the CDS treatment. Exceedances in N concentration for surface runoff and tile drainage were greater during the growing season than the non-growing season. At the N1 rate, CD and CDS reduced average annual N losses via tile drainage by 44 and 66%, respectively, relative to UTD. At the N2 rate, the average annual decreases in N loss were 31 and 68%, respectively. Crop yields from CDS were increased by an average of 2.8% relative to UTD at the N2 rate but were reduced by an average of 6.5% at the N1 rate. Hence, CD and CDS were effective for reducing average nitrate losses in tile drainage, but CDS increased average crop yields only when additional N fertilizer was applied.

  12. Urea plus nitrate pretreatment of rice and wheat straws enhances degradation and reduces methane production in in vitro ruminal culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiumin; Wang, Min; Wang, Rong; Ma, Zhiyuan; Long, Donglei; Mao, Hongxiang; Wen, Jiangnan; Bernard, Lukuyu A; Beauchemin, Karen A; Tan, Zhiliang

    2018-04-10

    Urea pretreatment of straw damages fiber structure, while nitrate supplementation of ruminal diets inhibits enteric methane production. The study examined the combined effects of these treatments on ruminal substrate biodegradation and methane production using an in vitro incubation system. Rice and wheat straws were pretreated with urea (40 g kg -1 straw dry matter, DM) and urea + ammonium nitrate (34 + 6 g kg -1 dry matter (DM), respectively), and each straw (control, urea, urea+nitrate) was used in batch culture incubations in three replications (runs). Urea pretreatment increased (P content (+17%) and in vitro DM degradation of rice straw, in comparison with control. Urea+nitrate pretreatment of rice and wheat straws had higher (P content, in vitro DM degradation and propionate molar proportion, and lower (P ruminal biodegradation, facilitate propionate production and reduce methane production from lignified straws. © 2018 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2018 Society of Chemical Industry.

  13. Sodium lauryl ether sulfate (SLES) degradation by nitrate-reducing bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulo, Ana M S; Aydin, Rozelin; Dimitrov, Mauricio R; Vreeling, Harm; Cavaleiro, Ana J; García-Encina, Pedro A; Stams, Alfons J M; Plugge, Caroline M

    2017-06-01

    The surfactant sodium lauryl ether sulfate (SLES) is widely used in the composition of detergents and frequently ends up in wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs). While aerobic SLES degradation is well studied, little is known about the fate of this compound in anoxic environments, such as denitrification tanks of WWTPs, nor about the bacteria involved in the anoxic biodegradation. Here, we used SLES as sole carbon and energy source, at concentrations ranging from 50 to 1000 mg L -1 , to enrich and isolate nitrate-reducing bacteria from activated sludge of a WWTP with the anaerobic-anoxic-oxic (A 2 /O) concept. In the 50 mg L -1 enrichment, Comamonas (50%), Pseudomonas (24%), and Alicycliphilus (12%) were present at higher relative abundance, while Pseudomonas (53%) became dominant in the 1000 mg L -1 enrichment. Aeromonas hydrophila strain S7, Pseudomonas stutzeri strain S8, and Pseudomonas nitroreducens strain S11 were isolated from the enriched cultures. Under denitrifying conditions, strains S8 and S11 degraded 500 mg L -1 SLES in less than 1 day, while strain S7 required more than 6 days. Strains S8 and S11 also showed a remarkable resistance to SLES, being able to grow and reduce nitrate with SLES concentrations up to 40 g L -1 . Strain S11 turned out to be the best anoxic SLES degrader, degrading up to 41% of 500 mg L -1 . The comparison between SLES anoxic and oxic degradation by strain S11 revealed differences in SLES cleavage, degradation, and sulfate accumulation; both ester and ether cleavage were probably employed in SLES anoxic degradation by strain S11.

  14. Effects of nitrate addition to a diet on fermentation and microbial populations in the rumen of goats, with special reference to Selenomonas ruminantium having the ability to reduce nitrate and nitrite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asanuma, Narito; Yokoyama, Shota; Hino, Tsuneo

    2015-04-01

    This study investigated the effects of dietary nitrate addition on ruminal fermentation characteristics and microbial populations in goats. The involvement of Selenomonas ruminantium in nitrate and nitrite reduction in the rumen was also examined. As the result of nitrate feeding, the total concentration of ruminal volatile fatty acids decreased, whereas the acetate : propionate ratio and the concentrations of ammonia and lactate increased. Populations of methanogens, protozoa and fungi, as estimated by real-time PCR, were greatly decreased as a result of nitrate inclusion in the diet. There was modest or little impact of nitrate on the populations of prevailing species or genus of bacteria in the rumen, whereas Streptococcus bovis and S. ruminantium significantly increased. Both the activities of nitrate reductase (NaR) and nitrite reductase (NiR) per total mass of ruminal bacteria were increased by nitrate feeding. Quantification of the genes encoding NaR and NiR by real-time PCR with primers specific for S. ruminantium showed that these genes were increased by feeding nitrate, suggesting that the growth of nitrate- and nitrite-reducing S. ruminantium is stimulated by nitrate addition. Thus, S. ruminantium is likely to play a major role in nitrate and nitrite reduction in the rumen. © 2014 Japanese Society of Animal Science.

  15. Biochar-enhanced composts reduce the potential leaching of nutrients and heavy metals and suppress plant-parasitic nematodes in excessively fertilized cucumber soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Yune; Gao, Yanming; Qi, Yanbin; Li, Jianshe

    2018-03-01

    Excessive fertilization is a common agricultural practice that has largely reduced soil nutrient retention capacity and led to nutrient leaching in China. To reduce nutrient leaching, in this study, we evaluated the application of biochar, compost, and biochar-compost on soil properties, leaching water quality, and cucumber plant growth in soils with different nutrient levels. In general, the concentrations of nutrients and heavy metals in leaching water were higher under high-nutrient conditions than under low-nutrient conditions. Both biochar and compost efficiently enhanced soil cation exchange capacity (CEC), water holding capacity (WHC), and microbial biomass carbon (MBC), nitrogen (MBN), and phosphorus (MBP), reduced the potential leaching of nutrients and heavy metals, and improved plant growth. The efficiency of biochar and compost in soil CEC, WHC, MBC, MBN, and MBP and plant growth was enhanced when applied jointly. In addition, biochar and biochar-enhanced compost efficiently suppressed plant-parasitic nematode infestation in a soil with high levels of both N and P. Our results suggest that biochar-enhanced compost can reduce the potential environmental risks in excessively fertilized vegetable soils.

  16. Effect of nitrate addition on the diversity and activity of sulfate-reducing prokaryotes in high-temperature oil production systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gittel, Antje; Wieczorek, Adam; Sørensen, Ketil

    Sulfate-reducing prokaryotes (SRP) producing hydrogen sulfide cause severe problems like microbial corrosion, souring and plugging in seawater-injected oil production systems. Adding nitrate to the injection water is a possible strategy to control the activity of SRP by favoring the growth of both...... heterotrophic, nitrate-reducing bacteria that outcompete SRP for substrates, and nitrate-reducing, sulfide-oxidizing bacteria (NR-SOB). To assess the effects of nitrate addition, microbial diversity (Bacteria, Archaea) and SRP activity were studied in the production waters of a nitrate-treated and a non...... their potential activity under pipeline (60°C), but not under oil reservoir conditions (80°C), indicating that the troublesome SRP were pipeline-derived. Consistent with the low amount of SRP, no activity could be shown for samples from the nitrate-treated system suggesting that SRP were inhibited by nitrate...

  17. Volume reducing and modifying of neutralized sludge from acid waste water treatment of uranium ore heap leaching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhong Pingru; Ding Tongsen; Gu Jianghan

    1997-01-01

    A process is worked out on the basis of traditional lime neutralization, viz. acid waste water from uranium ore heap leaching is treated by limestone and lime double neutralizing-sludge recycling. First, the waste water is reacted with cheaper limestone to precipitate some metal ions, such as Fe and Al, which form hydroxides at lower pH, and neutralize strong acid, then neutralized with lime to required pH value. The formed precipitate as sludge is steadily recycled in the process. The principal advantage of the process over lime neutralization process is that reagent cost saved by 1/3 and formed sludge volume decreased by 2/3. Besides, the performances of sludge filtrating and settling are improved. The mechanism of sludge volume reducing and modification is also investigated

  18. Transient exposure to oxygen or nitrate reveals ecophysiology of fermentative and sulfate-reducing benthic microbial populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saad, Sainab; Bhatnagar, Srijak; Tegetmeyer, Halina E; Geelhoed, Jeanine S; Strous, Marc; Ruff, S Emil

    2017-12-01

    For the anaerobic remineralization of organic matter in marine sediments, sulfate reduction coupled to fermentation plays a key role. Here, we enriched sulfate-reducing/fermentative communities from intertidal sediments under defined conditions in continuous culture. We transiently exposed the cultures to oxygen or nitrate twice daily and investigated the community response. Chemical measurements, provisional genomes and transcriptomic profiles revealed trophic networks of microbial populations. Sulfate reducers coexisted with facultative nitrate reducers or aerobes enabling the community to adjust to nitrate or oxygen pulses. Exposure to oxygen and nitrate impacted the community structure, but did not suppress fermentation or sulfate reduction as community functions, highlighting their stability under dynamic conditions. The most abundant sulfate reducer in all cultures, related to Desulfotignum balticum, appeared to have coupled both acetate- and hydrogen oxidation to sulfate reduction. We describe a novel representative of the widespread uncultured candidate phylum Fermentibacteria (formerly candidate division Hyd24-12). For this strictly anaerobic, obligate fermentative bacterium, we propose the name ' U Sabulitectum silens' and identify it as a partner of sulfate reducers in marine sediments. Overall, we provide insights into the function of fermentative, as well as sulfate-reducing microbial communities and their adaptation to a dynamic environment. © 2017 The Authors. Environmental Microbiology published by Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Transient exposure to oxygen or nitrate reveals ecophysiology of fermentative and sulfate‐reducing benthic microbial populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saad, Sainab; Bhatnagar, Srijak; Tegetmeyer, Halina E.; Geelhoed, Jeanine S.; Strous, Marc

    2017-01-01

    Summary For the anaerobic remineralization of organic matter in marine sediments, sulfate reduction coupled to fermentation plays a key role. Here, we enriched sulfate‐reducing/fermentative communities from intertidal sediments under defined conditions in continuous culture. We transiently exposed the cultures to oxygen or nitrate twice daily and investigated the community response. Chemical measurements, provisional genomes and transcriptomic profiles revealed trophic networks of microbial populations. Sulfate reducers coexisted with facultative nitrate reducers or aerobes enabling the community to adjust to nitrate or oxygen pulses. Exposure to oxygen and nitrate impacted the community structure, but did not suppress fermentation or sulfate reduction as community functions, highlighting their stability under dynamic conditions. The most abundant sulfate reducer in all cultures, related to Desulfotignum balticum, appeared to have coupled both acetate‐ and hydrogen oxidation to sulfate reduction. We describe a novel representative of the widespread uncultured candidate phylum Fermentibacteria (formerly candidate division Hyd24‐12). For this strictly anaerobic, obligate fermentative bacterium, we propose the name ‘USabulitectum silens’ and identify it as a partner of sulfate reducers in marine sediments. Overall, we provide insights into the function of fermentative, as well as sulfate‐reducing microbial communities and their adaptation to a dynamic environment. PMID:28836729

  20. Potential of nitrate addition to control the activity of sulfate-reducing prokaryotes in high-temperature oil production systems - a comparative study on a nitrate-treated and an untreated system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gittel, Antje; Sørensen, Ketil; Skovhus, Torben L.

    Sulfate-reducing prokaryotes (SRP) cause severe problems like microbial corrosion and reservoir souring in seawater-injected oil production systems. Adding nitrate to the injection water is applied to control SRP activity by favoring the growth of heterotrophic, nitrate-reducing bacteria (h......NRB) and nitrate-reducing, sulfide-oxidizing bacteria (NR-SOB). Microbial diversity, abundance of Bacteria, Archaea and sulfate-reducing prokaryotes (SRP) and the potential activity of SRP were studied in production water samples from a nitrate-treated and an untreated system. The reservoirs and the produced water......) and Desulfotomaculum (system with nitrate). In samples from the untreated site, the presence of active SRP was supported by demonstrating their activity (incubations with 35S-sulfate) and growth in batch cultures at pipeline temperature. No SRP activity was detected at reservoir temperature and in samples from...

  1. The effects of gamma irradiation on the leaching of reducing sugars, inorganic phosphate and enzymes from barley seeds during germination in water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurobane, I.; Yamaguchi, H.; Sander, C.; Nilan, R.A.

    1979-01-01

    Gamma irradiation enhanced the leaching of reducing sugars from barley seeds into the water in which the seeds were shaken. Treatments prior to shaking in water, such as overnight soaking in water at 5 0 C and subsequent germination in Petri dishes for 1 or 2 days at 20 0 C, showed pronounced effects on the leaching. The highest effect, which was obtained at 500 krad irradiation, was four times higher than that of the non-irradiated control. Gamma irradiation also stimulated the leaching of inorganic phosphate and slightly that of amylases from barley seeds. When seeds from which the embryos has been removed were shaken into water, no stimulating effect on the leaching of sugars was noted. These results, combined with the irradiation effect on the embryo, suggest that the stimulated leaching of reducing sugars is due to the extreme difference in sensitivity to gamma irradiation between the production of reducing sugars in the endosperm and the development and growth of the embryo. (author)

  2. Dietary nitrate does not reduce oxygen cost of exercise or improve muscle mitochondrial function in patients with mitochondrial myopathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nabben, M.; Schmitz, J.P.J.; Ciapaite, J.; le Clercq, C.M.P.; van Riel, N.A.; Haak, H.R.; Nicolay, K.; de Coo, I.F.M.; Smeets, H.; Praet, S.F.; van Loon, L.J.; Prompers, J.J.

    2017-01-01

    Muscle weakness and exercise intol erance negatively affect the quality of life of patients with mitochondrial myopathy. Short-term dietary nitrate supplementation has been shown to improve exercise performance and reduce oxygen cost of exercise in healthy humans and trained athletes. We

  3. Diversity of Nitrate-Reducing and Denitrifying Bacteria in a Marine Aquaculture Biofilter and their Response to Sulfide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krieger, Bärbel; Schwermer, Carsten U.; Rezakhani, Nastaran

    2006-01-01

    with Alphaproteobacteria but also including Beta- and Gammaproteobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Firmicutes, and Actinobacteria. The diversity of the isolates was compared to the cultivation-independent diversity of nitrate-reducing and denitrifying bacteria based on narG and nosZ as functional marker genes. Growth experiments...

  4. Biodegradation of phenols in a sandstone aquifer under aerobic conditions and mixed nitrate and iron reducing conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Broholm, Mette; Arvin, Erik

    2000-01-01

    in the groundwater. The potential for biodegradation of the phenols in the sandstone aquifer at the site has been investigated in laboratory microcosms under aerobic (oxygen amended) and mixed nitrate and iron reducing (nitrate enriched and unamended) anaerobic conditions, at a range of concentrations (low: similar...... to 5 mg 1(-1): high: similar to 60 mg 1(-1), and very high: similar to 600 mg 1(-1)) and in the presence of other organic coal-tar compounds (mono- and polyaromatic hydrocarbons (BTEXs and PAHs) and heterocyclic compounds (NSOs)) and ammonia liquor. Sandstone cores and groundwater for the microcosms...

  5. Disguised as a sulfate reducer: Growth of the Deltaproteobacterium Desulfurivibrio alkaliphilus by Sulfide Oxidation with Nitrate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorup, Casper; Schramm, Andreas; Findlay, Alyssa Jean Lehsau

    2017-01-01

    This study demonstrates that the deltaproteobacterium Desulfurivibrio alkaliphilus can grow chemolithotrophically by coupling sulfide oxidation to the dissimilatory reduction of nitrate and nitrite to ammonium. Key genes of known sulfide oxidation pathways are absent from the genome of D...... of the sulfate reduction pathway. This is the first study providing evidence that a reductive-type DSR is involved in a sulfide oxidation pathway. Transcriptome sequencing further suggests that nitrate reduction to ammonium is performed by a novel type of periplasmic nitrate reductase and an unusual membrane......-anchored nitrite reductase....

  6. Structure of hydrocarbonoclastic nitrate-reducing bacterial communities in bioturbated coastal marine sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stauffert, Magalie; Cravo-Laureau, Cristiana; Duran, Robert

    2014-09-01

    The organisation of denitrifying microorganisms in oil-polluted bioturbated sediments was investigated in mesocosms under conditions as closer as possible to that observed in the environment. Molecular and culture-dependent approaches revealed that denitrifying Gammaproteobacteria were abundant in oil-polluted and bioturbated sediments suggesting that they may play a key role in hydrocarbon degradation in the environment. T-RFLP and gene libraries analyses targeting nirS gene showed that denitrifying microbial communities structure was slightly affected by either the addition of Hediste diversicolor or crude oil revealing the metabolic versatility of denitrifying microorganisms. From oil-polluted sediments, distinct denitrifying hydrocarbonoclastic bacterial consortia were obtained by enrichment cultures on high molecular weight polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) (dibenzothiophene, fluoranthene, pyrene and chrysene) under nitrate-reducing conditions. Interestingly, molecular characterisation of the consortia showed that the denitrifying communities obtained from oiled microcosms with addition of H. diversicolor were different to that observed without H. diversicolor addition, especially with fluoranthene and chrysene revealing the bacterial diversity involved in the degradation of these PAHs. © 2014 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Combining Nitrilotriacetic Acid and Permeable Barriers for Enhanced Phytoextraction of Heavy Metals from Municipal Solid Waste Compost by and Reduced Metal Leaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Shulan; Jia, Lina; Duo, Lian

    2016-05-01

    Phytoextraction has the potential to remove heavy metals from contaminated soil, and chelants can be used to improve the capabilities of phytoextraction. However, environmentally persistent chelants can cause metal leaching and groundwater pollution. A column experiment was conducted to evaluate the viability of biodegradable nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA) to increase the uptake of heavy metals (Cd, Cr, Ni, Pb, Cu, and Zn) by L. in municipal solid waste (MSW) compost and to evaluate the effect of two permeable barrier materials, bone meal and crab shell, on metal leaching. The application of NTA significantly increased the concentrations and uptake of heavy metals in . The enhancement was more pronounced at higher dosages of NTA. In the 15 mmol kg NTA treatment using a crab shell barrier, the Cr and Ni concentrations in the plant shoots increased by approximately 8- and 10-fold, respectively, relative to the control. However, the addition of NTA also caused significant heavy metal leaching from the MSW compost. Bone meal and crab shell barriers positioned between the compost and the subsoil were effective in preventing metal leaching down through the soil profile by the retention of metals in the barrier. The application of a biodegradable chelant and the use of permeable barriers is a viable form of enhanced phytoextraction to increase the removal of metals and to reduce possible leaching. Copyright © by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America, Inc.

  8. Dissimilatory nitrogen reduction in intertidal sediments of a temperate estuary: small scale heterogeneity and novel nitrate-to-ammonium reducers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helen eDecleyre

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The estuarine nitrogen cycle can be substantially altered due to anthropogenic activities resulting in increased amounts of inorganic nitrogen (mainly nitrate. In the past, denitrification was considered to be the main ecosystem process removing reactive nitrogen from the estuarine ecosystem. However, recent reports on the contribution of dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium (DNRA to nitrogen removal in these systems indicated a similar or higher importance, although the ratio between both processes remains ambiguous. Compared to denitrification, DNRA has been underexplored for the last decades and the key organisms carrying out the process in marine environments are largely unknown. Hence, as a first step to better understand the interplay between denitrification, DNRA and reduction of nitrate to nitrite in estuarine sediments, nitrogen reduction potentials were determined in sediments of the Paulina polder mudflat (Westerschelde estuary. We observed high variability in dominant nitrogen removing processes over a short distance (1.6 m, with nitrous oxide, ammonium and nitrite production rates differing significantly between all sampling sites. Denitrification occurred at all sites, DNRA was either the dominant process (two out of five sites or absent, while nitrate reduction to nitrite was observed in most sites but never dominant. In addition, novel nitrate-to-ammonium reducers assigned to Thalassospira, Celeribacter and Halomonas, for which DNRA was thus far unreported, were isolated, with DNRA phenotype reconfirmed through nrfA gene amplification. This study demonstrates high small scale heterogeneity among dissimilatory nitrate reduction processes in estuarine sediments and provides novel marine DNRA organisms that represent valuable alternatives to the current model organisms.

  9. Dissimilatory nitrogen reduction in intertidal sediments of a temperate estuary: small scale heterogeneity and novel nitrate-to-ammonium reducers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decleyre, Helen; Heylen, Kim; Van Colen, Carl; Willems, Anne

    2015-01-01

    The estuarine nitrogen cycle can be substantially altered due to anthropogenic activities resulting in increased amounts of inorganic nitrogen (mainly nitrate). In the past, denitrification was considered to be the main ecosystem process removing reactive nitrogen from the estuarine ecosystem. However, recent reports on the contribution of dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium (DNRA) to nitrogen removal in these systems indicated a similar or higher importance, although the ratio between both processes remains ambiguous. Compared to denitrification, DNRA has been underexplored for the last decades and the key organisms carrying out the process in marine environments are largely unknown. Hence, as a first step to better understand the interplay between denitrification, DNRA and reduction of nitrate to nitrite in estuarine sediments, nitrogen reduction potentials were determined in sediments of the Paulina polder mudflat (Westerschelde estuary). We observed high variability in dominant nitrogen removing processes over a short distance (1.6 m), with nitrous oxide, ammonium and nitrite production rates differing significantly between all sampling sites. Denitrification occurred at all sites, DNRA was either the dominant process (two out of five sites) or absent, while nitrate reduction to nitrite was observed in most sites but never dominant. In addition, novel nitrate-to-ammonium reducers assigned to Thalassospira, Celeribacter, and Halomonas, for which DNRA was thus far unreported, were isolated, with DNRA phenotype reconfirmed through nrfA gene amplification. This study demonstrates high small scale heterogeneity among dissimilatory nitrate reduction processes in estuarine sediments and provides novel marine DNRA organisms that represent valuable alternatives to the current model organisms.

  10. Prokaryotic community structure and activity of sulfate reducers in production water from high-temperature oil reservoirs with and without nitrate treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gittel, Antje; Sørensen, Ketil; Skovhus, Torben L.

    2009-01-01

    Sulfate-reducing prokaryotes (SRP) cause severe problems like microbial corrosion and reservoir souring in seawater-injected oil production systems. One strategy to control SRP activity is the addition of nitrate to the injection water. Production waters from two adjacent, hot (80°C) oil reservoirs......, one with and one without nitrate treatment, were compared for prokaryotic community structure and activity of SRP. Bacterial and archaeal 16S rRNA gene analyses revealed higher prokaryotic abundance but lower diversity for the nitrate-treated field. The 16S rRNA gene clone libraries from both fields...... were dominated by sequences affiliated with Firmicutes (Bacteria) and Thermococcales (Archaea). Potential heterotrophic nitrate reducers (Deferribacterales) were exclusively found at the nitrate-treated field, possibly stimulated by nitrate addition. Quantitative PCR of dsrAB genes revealed...

  11. Management of Nitrate m Groundwater: A Simulation Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Ahmed

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Agriculture may cause nitrate and other chemicals to enter into groundwater systems. Nitrate in drinking water is considered a health hazard. A study was conducted to assess the extent of nitrate pollution of groundwater caused by agriculture and to evaluate the possibility of using the LEACHN model to manage nitrate entry into groundwater of agricultural areas of Al-Batinah, which is the most important agricultural region of Oman. Groundwater samples were collected and analyzed to assess the problem and to detect possible trends. Soil sampling and analyses were done to demonstrate the difference in the nitrate concentration in agricultural and non-agricultural soils. A questionnaire survey was conducted to gather information on agricultural practices, fertilizer input, and other possible sources of nitrate pollution. Results from the study show that 23% of groundwater samples have a concentration of nitrate-N concentration of 10 mg/l and 34% samples exceed 8 mg/l. Agricultural soils have higher levels of nitrate compared to non- agricultural soils. Results also demonstrate that nitrate levels in groundwater in Al-Batinah are rising. Application of the ‘LEACHN’ model demonstrated its suitability for use as a management tool to reduce nitrate leaching to groundwater by controlling fertilizer and water input.

  12. Quantifying Nitrate Leaching in Irrigated Wheat with Different Nitrogen Fertilization Strategies in an Alfisol Cuantificación de la Lixiviación de Nitratos en Trigo Regado con Diferentes Estrategias de Fertilización Nitrogenada en un Alfisol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelino Claret M

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Consumption of water contaminated with nitrates is associated with important health effects such as methemoglobinemia and gastric cancer. Intensive agriculture, which uses large quantities of N fertilizer, is the main source of nitrates in water systems. There are several strategies to reduce leaching and increase Nitrogen Use Efficiency (NUE. An experiment was conducted with spring wheat (Triticum aestivum L. under sprinkler irrigation (center pivot to determine if adjusted N applications using precision agriculture tools and plant demand resulted in a lower groundwater nitrate load. Evaluated treatments were: produced fertilization (Pr, precision agriculture (Pa, chlorophyll meter (Sm, and control without N (W/N. The ceramic capsule methodology was used to evaluate N leaching losses that were sampled after each irrigation (six and drainage water was also estimated. Differences among treatments in terms of N loss and grain yield were not significant (p > 0.05. However, N balance showed significant differences (p El consumo de agua contaminada con nitratos produce importantes efectos en la salud tales como metahemoglobinemia y cáncer gástrico. La agricultura intensiva es la principal fuente de nitratos en aguas superficiales y subterráneas. Hay varias estrategias para reducir lixiviación y aumentar la eficiencia de uso de N (NUE. Se realizó un experimento en trigo de primavera (Triticum aestivum L. bajo pivote central, con el objetivo de determinar si las aplicaciones ajustadas de N, mediante el uso de herramientas de agricultura de precisión y considerando la demanda de la planta, resultaban en una menor carga de nitratos para el agua subterránea. Se evaluaron los siguientes tratamientos: productor (Pr; agricultura de precisión (Pa, medidor de clorofila (Sm y sin N (W/N. Se utilizaron lisímetros para evaluar las pérdidas de N; se tomaron muestreas seis veces durante la temporada, evaluando además el agua de drenaje en cada riego. Las

  13. Transformation of vivianite by anaerobic nitrate-reducing iron-oxidizing bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miot, J; Benzerara, K; Morin, G; Bernard, S; Beyssac, O; Larquet, E; Kappler, A; Guyot, F

    2009-06-01

    In phosphate-rich environments, vivianite (Fe(II)(3)(PO(4))(2), 8H(2)O) is an important sink for dissolved Fe(II) and is considered as a very stable mineral due to its low solubility at neutral pH. In the present study, we report the mineralogical transformation of vivianite in cultures of the nitrate-reducing iron-oxidizing bacterial strain BoFeN1 in the presence of dissolved Fe(II). Vivianite was first transformed into a greenish phase consisting mostly of an amorphous mixed valence Fe-phosphate. This precipitate became progressively orange and the final product of iron oxidation consisted of an amorphous Fe(III)-phosphate. The sub-micrometer analysis by scanning transmission X-ray microscopy of the iron redox state in samples collected at different stages of the culture indicated that iron was progressively oxidized at the contact of the bacteria and at a distance from the cells in extracellular minerals. Iron oxidation in the extracellular minerals was delayed by a few days compared with cell-associated Fe-minerals. This led to strong differences of Fe redox in between these two types of minerals and finally to local heterogeneities of redox within the sample. In the absence of dissolved Fe(II), vivianite was not significantly transformed by BoFeN1. Whereas Fe(II) oxidation at the cell contact is most probably directly catalyzed by the bacteria, vivianite transformation at a distance from the cells might result from oxidation by nitrite. In addition, processes leading to the export of Fe(III) from bacterial oxidation sites to extracellular minerals are discussed including some involving colloids observed by cryo-transmission electron microscopy in the culture medium.

  14. Assessment of some straw-derived materials for reducing the leaching potential of Metribuzin residues in the soil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cara, Irina Gabriela, E-mail: coroirina@yahoo.com [“Ion Ionescu de la Brad” University of Agricultural Sciences and Veterinary Medicine, Faculty of Agriculture, 3M. Sadoveanu Alley, 700490 Iasi (Romania); Trincă, Lucia Carmen, E-mail: lctrinca@uaiasi.ro [“Ion Ionescu de la Brad” University of Agricultural Sciences and Veterinary Medicine, Faculty of Horticulture, 3 M. Sadoveanu Alley, 700490 Iasi (Romania); Trofin, Alina Elena, E-mail: aetrofin@yahoo.com [“Ion Ionescu de la Brad” University of Agricultural Sciences and Veterinary Medicine, Faculty of Horticulture, 3 M. Sadoveanu Alley, 700490 Iasi (Romania); Cazacu, Ana, E-mail: anagarlea@gmail.com [“Ion Ionescu de la Brad” University of Agricultural Sciences and Veterinary Medicine, Faculty of Horticulture, 3 M. Sadoveanu Alley, 700490 Iasi (Romania); Ţopa, Denis, E-mail: topadennis@yahoo.com [“Ion Ionescu de la Brad” University of Agricultural Sciences and Veterinary Medicine, Faculty of Agriculture, 3M. Sadoveanu Alley, 700490 Iasi (Romania); Peptu, Cătălina Anişoara, E-mail: catipeptu@yahoo.co.uk [“Gheorghe Asachi” Technical University of Iasi, Faculty of Chemical Engineering and Environmental Protection, 73 D. Mangeron Street, 700050 Iasi (Romania); Jităreanu, Gerard, E-mail: gerardj@uaiasi.ro [“Ion Ionescu de la Brad” University of Agricultural Sciences and Veterinary Medicine, Faculty of Agriculture, 3M. Sadoveanu Alley, 700490 Iasi (Romania)

    2015-12-15

    Highlights: • Surface characteristics of activated straw (wheat, corn, soybean) were assessed. • Modification methods to enhance materials sorption were presented. • Adsorption mechanism of metribuzin was revealed and discussed. - Abstract: Biomass (straw waste) can be used as raw to obtain materials for herbicide removal from wastewater. These by-products have some important advantages, being environmentally friendly, easily available, presenting low costs, and requiring little processing to increase their adsorptive capacity. In the present study, some materials derived from agricultural waste (wheat, corn and soybean straw) were investigated as potential adsorbents for metribuzin removal from aqueous solutions. The straw wastes were processed by grinding, mineralisation (850 °C) and KOH activation in order to improve their functional surface activity. The materials surface characteristics were investigated by scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy. The adsorbents capacity was evaluated using batch sorption tests and liquid chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry for herbicide determination. For adsorption isotherms, the equilibrium time considered was 3 h. The experimental adsorption data were modelled by Freundlich and Langmuir models. The activated straw and ash-derived materials from wheat, corn and soybean increased the adsorption capacity of metribuzin with an asymmetrical behaviour. Overall, our results sustain that activated ash-derived from straw and activated straw materials can be a valuable solution for reducing the leaching potential of metribuzin through soil.

  15. Assessment of some straw-derived materials for reducing the leaching potential of Metribuzin residues in the soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cara, Irina Gabriela; Trincă, Lucia Carmen; Trofin, Alina Elena; Cazacu, Ana; Ţopa, Denis; Peptu, Cătălina Anişoara; Jităreanu, Gerard

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Surface characteristics of activated straw (wheat, corn, soybean) were assessed. • Modification methods to enhance materials sorption were presented. • Adsorption mechanism of metribuzin was revealed and discussed. - Abstract: Biomass (straw waste) can be used as raw to obtain materials for herbicide removal from wastewater. These by-products have some important advantages, being environmentally friendly, easily available, presenting low costs, and requiring little processing to increase their adsorptive capacity. In the present study, some materials derived from agricultural waste (wheat, corn and soybean straw) were investigated as potential adsorbents for metribuzin removal from aqueous solutions. The straw wastes were processed by grinding, mineralisation (850 °C) and KOH activation in order to improve their functional surface activity. The materials surface characteristics were investigated by scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy. The adsorbents capacity was evaluated using batch sorption tests and liquid chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry for herbicide determination. For adsorption isotherms, the equilibrium time considered was 3 h. The experimental adsorption data were modelled by Freundlich and Langmuir models. The activated straw and ash-derived materials from wheat, corn and soybean increased the adsorption capacity of metribuzin with an asymmetrical behaviour. Overall, our results sustain that activated ash-derived from straw and activated straw materials can be a valuable solution for reducing the leaching potential of metribuzin through soil.

  16. Anaerobic biodegradation of nonylphenol in river sediment under nitrate- or sulfate-reducing conditions and associated bacterial community

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Zhao; Yang, Yuyin; Dai, Yu; Xie, Shuguang, E-mail: xiesg@pku.edu.cn

    2015-04-09

    Highlights: • NP biodegradation can occur under both nitrate- and sulfate-reducing conditions. • Anaerobic condition affects sediment bacterial diversity during NP biodegradation. • NP-degrading bacterial community structure varies under different anaerobic conditions. - Abstract: Nonylphenol (NP) is a commonly detected pollutant in aquatic ecosystem and can be harmful to aquatic organisms. Anaerobic degradation is of great importance for the clean-up of NP in sediment. However, information on anaerobic NP biodegradation in the environment is still very limited. The present study investigated the shift in bacterial community structure associated with NP degradation in river sediment microcosms under nitrate- or sulfate-reducing conditions. Nearly 80% of NP (100 mg kg{sup −1}) could be removed under these two anaerobic conditions after 90 or 110 days’ incubation. Illumina MiSeq sequencing analysis indicated that Proteobacteria, Firmicutes, Bacteroidetes and Chloroflexi became the dominant phylum groups with NP biodegradation. The proportion of Gammaproteobacteria, Deltaproteobacteria and Choloroflexi showed a marked increase in nitrate-reducing microcosm, while Gammaproteobacteria and Firmicutes in sulfate-reducing microcosm. Moreover, sediment bacterial diversity changed with NP biodegradation, which was dependent on type of electron acceptor.

  17. Plastic biofilm carrier after corn cobs reduces nitrate loading in laboratory denitrifying bioreactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nitrate-nitrogen removal rates can be increased substantially in denitrifying bioreactors with a corn cob bed medium compared to woodchips; however, additional organic carbon (C) is released into the effluent. This laboratory column experiment was conducted to test the performance of a post-bed cha...

  18. Dietary nitrate supplementation reduces methane emission in beef cattle fed sugarcane-based diets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hulshof, R.B.A.; Berndt, A.; Gerrits, W.J.J.; Dijkstra, J.; Zijderveld, van S.M.; Newbold, J.R.; Perdok, H.B.

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the effect of dietary nitrate on methane emission and rumen fermentation parameters in Nellore × Guzera (Bos indicus) beef cattle fed a sugarcane based diet. The experiment was conducted with 16 steers weighing 283 ± 49 kg (mean ± SD), 6 rumen cannulated

  19. Assessing the impacts of future climate conditions on the effectiveness of winter cover crops in reducing nitrate loads into the Chesapeake Bay Watersheds using SWAT model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winter cover crops (WCCs) have been widely implemented in the Coastal Plain of the Chesapeake Bay watershed (CBW) due to their high effectiveness at reducing nitrate loads. However, future climate conditions (FCCs) are expected to exacerbate water quality degradation in the CBW by increasing nitrat...

  20. Modelling the risk of nitrate leaching from two soils amended with five different biosolids Modelagem do risco de lixiviação de nitrato em dois solos tratados com cinco diferentes biossólidos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Studart Corrêa

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available High N concentrations in biosolids are one of the strongest reasons for their agricultural use. However, it is essential to understand the fate of N in soils treated with biosolids for both plant nutrition and managing the environmental risk of NO3--N leaching. This work aimed at evaluating the risk of NO3--N leaching from a Spodosol and an Oxisol, each one treated with 0.5-8.0 dry Mg ha-1 of fresh tertiary sewage sludge, composted biosolids, limed biosolids, heat-dried biosolids and solar-irradiated biosolids. Results indicated that under similar application rates NO3--N accumulated up to three times more in the 20 cm topsoil of the Oxisol than the Spodosol. However, a higher water content held at field capacity in the Oxisol compensated for the greater nitrate concentrations. A 20 % NO3--N loss from the root zone in the amended Oxisol could be expected. Depending on the biosolids type, 42 to 76 % of the NO3--N accumulated in the Spodosol could be expected to leach down from the amended 20 cm topsoil. NO3--N expected to leach from the Spodosol ranged from 0.8 (composted sludge to 3.5 times (limed sludge the amounts leaching from the Oxisol treated alike. Nevertheless, the risk of NO3--N groundwater contamination as a result of a single biosolids land application at 0.5-8.0 dry Mg ha-1 could be considered low.Concentrações altas de nitrogênio (N em biossólidos são uma das maiores razões para a utilização agronômica deles. Entretanto, é essencial entender o destino do N em solos tratados com biossólidos, tanto por motivos de nutrição vegetal quanto para manejar o risco ambiental representado pela lixiviação de nitrato. Este trabalho teve como objetivo avaliar o risco de lixiviação de nitrato em um Espodossolo e em um Latossolo, cada um tratado com doses de 0,5 a 8,0 Mg ha-1 de biossólido fresco, biossólido compostado, biossólido caleado, biossólido seco a calor e biossólido irradiado por sol. Os resultados mostraram que

  1. Optimization of an oil leaching process to reduce the level of dioxins and dioxin-like PCBs in fishmeal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oterhals, Åge; Kvamme, Bjørn

    2013-05-01

    Fishmeal produced from fish caught in polluted fishing areas might contain dioxins and dioxin-like polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) above maximum permitted levels (MPL) for use in feed. Decontamination of the fishmeal can be achieved by hexane extraction. The principal objective of this study was to optimize a more environmentally friendly alternative based on oil leaching of the moist presscake intermediate product during fishmeal manufacturing. A central composite design and response surface methodology was used to study the influence of the process variables temperature (T), presscake moisture content (MC) and leaching time (LT) on the decontamination process. A significant squared MC effect was observed, resulting in an optimum leaching rate at 27% MC. This corresponds to 5% improved dibenzo-p-dioxin/dibenzo furan (PCDD/F)-PCB toxic equivalent (TEQ) reduction compared to normal presscake (55% MC). The initial leaching rate was fast, with a TEQ reduction of 69% after only 2 min at 87 °C and 55% MC. Under the best experimental conditions (87 °C, 38% MC, 12 min LT) a TEQ reduction of 82% was achieved. Excess oil in the presscake after the leaching operation could be removed by use of a water washing step. No reduction in protein quality measured by mink digestibility could be observed. The results confirm that the oil leaching process is robust and offers easily achievable TEQ levels well below present MPLs based on process conditions normally used by the industry. Comparative effects on non-dioxin-like PCBs are expected. © 2012 Society of Chemical Industry.

  2. Chironomus plumosus larvae increase fluxes of denitrification products and diversity of nitrate-reducing bacteria in freshwater sediment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Morten; W. V. Kofoed, Michael; H. Larsen, Lone

    2014-01-01

    , respectively, which was mostly due to stimulation of sedimentary denitrification; incomplete denitrification in the guts accounted for up to 20% of the N2O efflux. Phylotype richness of the nitrate reductase gene narG was significantly higher in sediment with than without larvae. In the gut, 47 narG phylotypes...... were found expressed, which may contribute to higher phylotype richness in colonized sediment. In contrast, phylotype richness of the nitrous oxide reductase gene nosZ was unaffected by the presence of larvae and very few nosZ phylotypes were expressed in the gut. Gene abundance of neither narG, nor...... nosZ wasdifferent in sediments with and without larvae. Hence, C. plumosus increases activity and diversity, but not overall abundance of nitrate-reducing bacteria, probably by providing additional ecological niches in its burrow and gut....

  3. Disguised as a Sulfate Reducer: Growth of the Deltaproteobacterium Desulfurivibrio alkaliphilus by Sulfide Oxidation with Nitrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Casper Thorup

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available This study demonstrates that the deltaproteobacterium Desulfurivibrio alkaliphilus can grow chemolithotrophically by coupling sulfide oxidation to the dissimilatory reduction of nitrate and nitrite to ammonium. Key genes of known sulfide oxidation pathways are absent from the genome of D. alkaliphilus. Instead, the genome contains all of the genes necessary for sulfate reduction, including a gene for a reductive-type dissimilatory bisulfite reductase (DSR. Despite this, growth by sulfate reduction was not observed. Transcriptomic analysis revealed a very high expression level of sulfate-reduction genes during growth by sulfide oxidation, while inhibition experiments with molybdate pointed to elemental sulfur/polysulfides as intermediates. Consequently, we propose that D. alkaliphilus initially oxidizes sulfide to elemental sulfur, which is then either disproportionated, or oxidized by a reversal of the sulfate reduction pathway. This is the first study providing evidence that a reductive-type DSR is involved in a sulfide oxidation pathway. Transcriptome sequencing further suggests that nitrate reduction to ammonium is performed by a novel type of periplasmic nitrate reductase and an unusual membrane-anchored nitrite reductase.

  4. Rates of BTEX Biodegradation under Nitrate Reducing Conditions in Wetland Sediments Impacted by Contaminated Groundwater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, L. K.; McGuire, J. T.; Cozzarelli, I.; Smith, E. W.; Kneeshaw, T.

    2010-12-01

    Biodegradation rates are often controlled by dynamic interactions that occur at mixing interfaces between water masses of differing redox state. This study seeks to understand the controls on rates of BTEX (benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and m,p,o-xylenes) degradation at a mixing interface by using in-situ experiments to simulate contaminated aquifer water containing nitrate discharging to a methanogenic wetland. BTEX biodegradation was evaluated during “dry” conditions (2009) and “wet” conditions (2010) in a shallow wetland near Bemidji, MN using innovative in-situ microcosms (ISMs) to measure rates of change over 8 weeks (2009) and 9 weeks (2010). ISM samplers contained an inner chamber filled with wetland sediments that were allowed to incubate for 2 weeks. This chamber was then closed to the surrounding environment and amended with test solution composed of contaminated groundwater augmented with tracer (bromide), nitrate and BTEX spike. Analysis of ISM sediments suggests that nitrate reduction and biodegradation rates are a function of both mineralogical and microbiological controls. Loss of nitrate, interpreted as nitrate reduction, was observed in both the dry and wet years with reduction slightly faster in the dry year (2.21mg/L/day versus 1.59 mg/L/day). Nitrate reduction was likely coupled to oxidation of various electron donors present in the system, including not only BTEX but also naturally occurring labile organic matter (ex. acetate) and inorganic electron donors (ex. Fe2+). BTEX degradation rates were considerably higher during the “wet” year than the “dry” year, with the fastest rates occurring immediately following test solution additions. For example, in the first 2 days of the “wet” ISM experiments degradation rates were 57.97ug/L/day for Benzene, 73.24ug/L/day for Toluene, 12.37ug/L/day for Ethyl Benzene and 85.61ug/L/day for Xylene compared to an ISM from the dry year which had slower degradation rates of 2.83ug/L/day for

  5. Can nitrate contaminated groundwater be remediated by optimizing flood irrigation rate with high nitrate water in a desert oasis using the WHCNS model?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Hao; Qi, Zhiming; Hu, Kelin; Prasher, Shiv O; Zhang, Yuanpei

    2016-10-01

    Nitrate contamination of groundwater is an environmental concern in intensively cultivated desert oases where this polluted groundwater is in turn used as a major irrigation water resource. However, nitrate fluxes from root zone to groundwater are difficult to monitor in this complex system. The objectives of this study were to validate and apply the WHCNS (soil Water Heat Carbon Nitrogen Simulator) model to simulate water drainage and nitrate leaching under different irrigation and nitrogen (N) management practices, and to assess the utilization of groundwater nitrate as an approach to remediate nitrate contaminated groundwater while maintain crop yield. A two-year field experiment was conducted in a corn field irrigated with high nitrate groundwater (20 mg N L(-1)) in Alxa, Inner Mongolia, China. The experiment consisted of two irrigation treatments (Istd, standard, 750 mm per season; Icsv, conservation, 570 mm per season) factorially combined with two N fertilization treatments (Nstd, standard, 138 kg ha(-1); Ncsv, conservation, 92 kg ha(-1)). The validated results showed that the WHCNS model simulated values of crop dry matter, yield, soil water content and soil N concentration in soil profile all agreed well with the observed values. Compared to the standard water management (Istd), the simulated drainage and nitrate leaching decreased about 65% and 59%, respectively, under the conservation water management (Icsv). Nearly 55% of input N was lost by leaching under the IstdNstd and IstdNcsv treatments, compared to only 26% under the IcsvNstd and IcsvNcsv treatments. Simulations with more than 240 scenarios combing different levels of irrigation and fertilization indicated that irrigation was the main reason leading to the high risk of nitrate leaching, and the nitrate in irrigation groundwater can be best utilized without corn yield loss when the total irrigation was reduced from the current 750 mm to 491 mm. This reduced irrigation rate facilitated

  6. Bacterial Leaching

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    and studies microbial biotechnology and ... foundation for subsequent research into the role of microorgan- ... are more readily accesible, for example those in solution, rather .... Vat leaching as currently applied to oxide ores involves the.

  7. UV-irradiation and leaching in water reduce the toxicity of imidacloprid-contaminated leaves to the aquatic leaf-shredding amphipod Gammarus fossarum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Englert, Dominic; Zubrod, Jochen P; Neubauer, Christoph; Schulz, Ralf; Bundschuh, Mirco

    2018-05-01

    Systemic neonicotinoid insecticides such as imidacloprid are increasingly applied against insect pest infestations on forest trees. However, leaves falling from treated trees may reach nearby surface waters and potentially represent a neonicotinoid exposure source for aquatic invertebrates. Given imidacloprid's susceptibility towards photolysis and high water solubility, it was hypothesized that the leaves' toxicity might be modulated by UV-irradiation during decay on the forest floor, or by leaching and re-mobilization of the insecticide from leaves within the aquatic ecosystem. To test these hypotheses, the amphipod shredder Gammarus fossarum was fed (over 7 d; n = 30) with imidacloprid-contaminated black alder (Alnus glutinosa) leaves that had either been pre-treated (i.e., leached) in water for up to 7 d or UV-irradiated for 1 d (at intensities relevant during autumn in Central Europe) followed by a leaching duration of 1 d. Gammarids' feeding rate, serving as sublethal response variable, was reduced by up to 80% when consuming non-pretreated imidacloprid-contaminated leaves compared to imidacloprid-free leaves. Moreover, both leaching of imidacloprid from leaves (for 7 d) as well as UV-irradiation reduced the leaves' imidacloprid load (by 46 and 90%) thereby mitigating the effects on gammarids' feeding rate to levels comparable to the respective imidacloprid-free controls. Therefore, natural processes, such as UV-irradiation and re-mobilization of foliar insecticide residues in water, might be considered when evaluating the risks systemic insecticide applications in forests might pose for aquatic organisms in nearby streams. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Electron transfer mediators accelerated the microbiologically influence corrosion against carbon steel by nitrate reducing Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Ru; Yang, Dongqing; Xu, Dake; Gu, Tingyue

    2017-12-01

    Electron transfer is a rate-limiting step in microbiologically influenced corrosion (MIC) caused by microbes that utilize extracellular electrons. Cross-cell wall electron transfer is necessary to transport the electrons released from extracellular iron oxidation into the cytoplasm of cells. Electron transfer mediators were found to accelerate the MIC caused by sulfate reducing bacteria. However, there is no publication in the literature showing the effect of electron transfer mediators on MIC caused by nitrate reducing bacteria (NRB). This work demonstrated that the corrosion of anaerobic Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PAO1) grown as a nitrate reducing bacterium biofilm on C1018 carbon steel was enhanced by two electron transfer mediators, riboflavin and flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) separately during a 7-day incubation period. The addition of either 10ppm (w/w) (26.6μM) riboflavin or 10ppm (12.7μM) FAD did not increase planktonic cell counts, but they increased the maximum pit depth on carbon steel coupons considerably from 17.5μm to 24.4μm and 25.0μm, respectively. Riboflavin and FAD also increased the specific weight loss of carbon steel from 2.06mg/cm 2 to 2.34mg/cm 2 and 2.61mg/cm 2 , respectively. Linear polarization resistance, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and potentiodynamic polarization curves all corroborated the pitting and weight loss data. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Experimental additions of aluminum sulfate and ammonium nitrate to in situ mesocosms to reduce cyanobacterial biovolume and microcystin concentration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Ted D.; Wilhelm, Frank M.; Graham, Jennifer L.; Loftin, Keith A.

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that nitrogen additions to increase the total nitrogen:total phosphorus (TN:TP) ratio may reduce cyanobacterial biovolume and microcystin concentration in reservoirs. In systems where TP is >100 μg/L, however, nitrogen additions to increase the TN:TP ratio could cause ammonia, nitrate, or nitrite toxicity to terrestrial and aquatic organisms. Reducing phosphorus via aluminum sulfate (alum) may be needed prior to nitrogen additions aimed at increasing the TN:TP ratio. We experimentally tested this sequential management approach in large in situ mesocosms (70.7 m3) to examine effects on cyanobacteria and microcystin concentration. Because alum removes nutrients and most seston from the water column, alum treatment reduced both TN and TP, leaving post-treatment TN:TP ratios similar to pre-treatment ratios. Cyanobacterial biovolume was reduced after alum addition, but the percent composition (i.e., relative) cyanobacterial abundance remained unchanged. A single ammonium nitrate (nitrogen) addition increased the TN:TP ratio 7-fold. After the TN:TP ratio was >50 (by weight), cyanobacterial biovolume and abundance were reduced, and chrysophyte and cryptophyte biovolume and abundance increased compared to the alum treatment. Microcystin was not detectable until the TN:TP ratio was <50. Although both treatments reduced cyanobacteria, only the nitrogen treatment seemed to stimulate energy flow from primary producers to zooplankton, which suggests that combining alum and nitrogen treatments may be a viable in-lake management strategy to reduce cyanobacteria and possibly microcystin concentrations in high-phosphorus systems. Additional studies are needed to define best management practices before combined alum and nitrogen additions are implemented as a reservoir management strategy.

  10. Characterization and Potential Applications of a Selenium Nanoparticle Producing and Nitrate Reducing Bacterium Bacillus oryziterrae sp. nov.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Peng; Xiao, Ke-Qing; Wang, Hui-Jiao; Xu, Hao; Xu, Peng-Peng; Jia, Yan; Häggblom, Max M.; Zhu, Yong-Guan

    2016-09-01

    A novel nitrate- and selenite reducing bacterium strain ZYKT was isolated from a rice paddy soil in Dehong, Yunnan, China. Strain ZYKT is a facultative anaerobe and grows in up to 150, 000 ppm O2. The comparative genomics analysis of strain ZYKT implies that it shares more orthologues with B. subtilis subsp. subtilis NCIB 3610T (ANIm values, 85.4-86.7%) than with B. azotoformans NBRC 15712T (ANIm values, 84.4-84.7%), although B. azotoformans NBRC 15712T (96.3% 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity) is the closest Bacillus species according to 16S rRNA gene comparison. The major cellular fatty acids of strain ZYKT were iso-C14:0 (17.8%), iso-C15:0 (17.8%), and C16:0 (32.0%). The polar lipid profile consisted of phosphatidylethanolamine, diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylglycerol and an unidentified aminophospholipid. Based on physiological, biochemical and genotypic properties, the strain was considered to represent a novel species of the genus Bacillus, for which the name Bacillus oryziterrae sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is ZYKT (=DSM 26460T =CGMCC 1.5179T). Strain ZYKT can reduce nitrate to nitrite and ammonium and possesses metabolic genes for nitrate reduction including nar, nap and nrf. Biogenic selenium nanoparticles of strain ZYKT show a narrow size distribution and agree with the gaussian distribution. These selenium nanoparticles show significant dose-dependent inhibition of the lung cancer cell line H157, which suggests potential for application in cancer therapy.

  11. Nitrate limitation and ocean acidification interact with UV-B to reduce photosynthetic performance in the diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, W.; Gao, K.; Beardall, J.

    2015-04-01

    It has been proposed that ocean acidification (OA) will interact with other environmental factors to influence the overall impact of global change on biological systems. Accordingly we investigated the influence of nitrogen limitation and OA on the physiology of diatoms by growing the diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum Bohlin under elevated (1000 μatm; high CO2 - HC) or ambient (390 μatm; low CO2 - LC) levels of CO2 with replete (110 μmol L-1; high nitrate - HN) or reduced (10 μmol L-1; low nitrate - LN) levels of NO3- and subjecting the cells to solar radiation with or without UV irradiance to determine their susceptibility to UV radiation (UVR, 280-400 nm). Our results indicate that OA and UVB induced significantly higher inhibition of both the photosynthetic rate and quantum yield under LN than under HN conditions. UVA or/and UVB increased the cells' non-photochemical quenching (NPQ) regardless of the CO2 levels. Under LN and OA conditions, activity of superoxide dismutase and catalase activities were enhanced, along with the highest sensitivity to UVB and the lowest ratio of repair to damage of PSII. HC-grown cells showed a faster recovery rate of yield under HN but not under LN conditions. We conclude therefore that nutrient limitation makes cells more prone to the deleterious effects of UV radiation and that HC conditions (ocean acidification) exacerbate this effect. The finding that nitrate limitation and ocean acidification interact with UV-B to reduce photosynthetic performance of the diatom P. tricornutum implies that ocean primary production and the marine biological C pump will be affected by OA under multiple stressors.

  12. Biodegradation of ortho-Cresol by a Mixed Culture of Nitrate-Reducing Bacteria Growing On Toluene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Flyvbjerg, John; Jørgensen, Claus; Arvin, Erik

    1993-01-01

    A mixed culture of nitrate-reducing bacteria degraded o-cresol in the presence of toluene as a primary growth substrate. No degradation of o-cresol was observed in the absence of toluene or when the culture grew on p-cresol and 2,4-dimethylphenol. In batch cultures, the degradation of o-cresol st......A mixed culture of nitrate-reducing bacteria degraded o-cresol in the presence of toluene as a primary growth substrate. No degradation of o-cresol was observed in the absence of toluene or when the culture grew on p-cresol and 2,4-dimethylphenol. In batch cultures, the degradation of o...... of toluene metabolized, with an average yield of 0.47 mg of o-cresol degraded per mg of toluene metabolized. Experiments with (ring-U-14C)o-cresol indicated that about 73% of the carbon from degraded o-cresol was mineralized to CO-2 and about 23% was assimilated into biomass after the transient accumulation...

  13. Leaching mechanisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dougherty, D.R.; Colombo, P.

    1984-01-01

    Sufficient data are lacking to provide a basis for adequately assessing the long term leaching behavior of solidified low level radioactive waste forms in their disposal environment. Although the release of radioactivity from a waste form to an aqueous environment is recognized to be due to one or more mechanisms such as diffusion, dissolution, corrosion or ion exchange, the leaching mechanisms and the factors which control the leaching behavior of waste forms are not fully understood. This study will determine the prevailing mechanisms for a variety of selected LLW solidification agents which are being considered for use by defense and commercial generators and which will cover the broadest possible number of mechanisms. The investigation will proceed by the postulation of mathematical models representative of the prevailing mechanism(s) and the use of statistically designed experiments to test the actual leaching behavior of laborattory samples against the postulated representations. Maximum use of existing leach data in the literature will be made by incorporating literature results into a computerized data base along with the experimental results generated in this task

  14. Comparison of policies for controlling groundwater nitrate pollution from agriculture in the Eastern Mancha aquifer (Spain).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peña-Haro, S.; Llopis-Albert, C.; Pulido-Velazquez, M.; Stalder, A.; Garcia-Prats, A.; Henriquez-Dole, L.

    2012-04-01

    influences in the study area, spatially different responses of crop growth and nitrate leaching were obtained and different management areas were defined. The efficiency of the policies were measured in terms of reduction in nitrate leaching; however, is of interest to estimate the influence of the reduce nitrate leaching on the groundwater nitrate concentration. Furthermore, we introduced the nitrate leaching results from the different scenarios into a flow a transport model, in order to relate the nitrate leaching reduction with its influence upon nitrate concentrations in groundwater. The results show that fertilizer taxes are the most cost-effective measure. ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS The study has been partially supported by the European Community 7th Framework Project GENESIS (226536) on groundwater systems and from the Plan Nacional I+D+I 2008-2011 of the Spanish Ministry of Science and Innovation (subprojects CGL2009-13238-C02-01 and CGL2009-13238-C02-02).

  15. Cover cropping to reduce nitrate loss through subsurface drainage in the northern U.S. corn belt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strock, J S; Porter, P M; Russelle, M P

    2004-01-01

    Despite the use of best management practices for nitrogen (N) application rate and timing, significant losses of nitrate nitrogen (NO3(-)-N) in drainage discharge continue to occur from row crop cropping systems. Our objective was to determine whether a autumn-seeded winter rye (Secale cereale L.) cover crop following corn (Zea mays L.) would reduce NO3(-)-N losses through subsurface tile drainage in a corn-soybean [Glycine mar (L.) Merr.] cropping system in the northern Corn Belt (USA) in a moderately well-drained soil. Both phases of the corn-soybean rotation, with and without the winter rye cover crop following corn, were established in 1998 in a Normania clay loam (fine-loamy, mixed, mesic Aquic Haplustoll) soil at Lamberton, MN. Cover cropping did not affect subsequent soybean yield, but reduced drainage discharge, flow-weighted mean nitrate concentration (FWMNC), and NO3(-)-N loss relative to winter fallow, although the magnitude of the effect varied considerably with annual precipitation. Three-year average drainage discharge was lower with a winter rye cover crop than without (p = 0.06). Over three years, subsurface tile-drainage discharge was reduced 11% and NO3(-)-N loss was reduced 13% for a corn-soybean cropping system with a rye cover crop following corn than with no rye cover crop. We estimate that establishment of a winter rye cover crop after corn will be successful in one of four years in southwestern Minnesota. Cover cropping with rye has the potential to be an effective management tool for reducing NO3(-)-N loss from subsurface drainage discharge despite challenges to establishment and spring growth in the north-central USA.

  16. Cloning and nitrate induction of nitrate reductase mRNA

    OpenAIRE

    Cheng, Chi-Lien; Dewdney, Julia; Kleinhofs, Andris; Goodman, Howard M.

    1986-01-01

    Nitrate is the major source of nitrogen taken from the soil by higher plants but requires reduction to ammonia prior to incorporation into amino acids. The first enzyme in the reducing pathway is a nitrate-inducible enzyme, nitrate reductase (EC 1.6.6.1). A specific polyclonal antiserum raised against purified barley nitrate reductase has been used to immunoprecipitate in vivo labeled protein and in vitro translation products, demonstrating that nitrate induction increases nitrate reductase p...

  17. Protection of Nitrate-Reducing Fe(II)-Oxidizing Bacteria from UV Radiation by Biogenic Fe(III) Minerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauger, Tina; Konhauser, Kurt; Kappler, Andreas

    2016-04-01

    Due to the lack of an ozone layer in the Archean, ultraviolet radiation (UVR) reached early Earth's surface almost unattenuated; as a consequence, a terrestrial biosphere in the form of biological soil crusts would have been highly susceptible to lethal doses of irradiation. However, a self-produced external screen in the form of nanoparticular Fe(III) minerals could have effectively protected those early microorganisms. In this study, we use viability studies by quantifying colony-forming units (CFUs), as well as Fe(II) oxidation and nitrate reduction rates, to show that encrustation in biogenic and abiogenic Fe(III) minerals can protect a common soil bacteria such as the nitrate-reducing Fe(II)-oxidizing microorganisms Acidovorax sp. strain BoFeN1 and strain 2AN from harmful UVC radiation. Analysis of DNA damage by quantifying cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPD) confirmed the protecting effect by Fe(III) minerals. This study suggests that Fe(II)-oxidizing microorganisms, as would have grown in association with mafic and ultramafic soils/outcrops, would have been able to produce their own UV screen, enabling them to live in terrestrial habitats on early Earth.

  18. Leaching process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heinen, H.J.; McClelland, G.E.; Lindstrom, R.E.

    1982-01-01

    A gold and uranium ore is heap leached in accordance with the process comprising initial agglomeration of fines in the feed by means of a binding agent and cyanide solution. The lixiviant comprises a compatible mixture of sodium cyanide and sodium bicarbonate

  19. Leaching process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heinen, H J; McClelland, G E; Lindstrom, R E

    1982-10-18

    A gold and uranium ore is heap leached in accordance with the process comprising initial agglomeration of fines in the feed by means of a binding agent and cyanide solution. The lixiviant comprises a compatible mixture of sodium cyanide and sodium bicarbonate.

  20. Sorbent amendment as a remediation strategy to reduce PFAS mobility and leaching in a contaminated sandy soil from a Norwegian firefighting training facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hale, Sarah E; Arp, Hans Peter H; Slinde, Gøril Aasen; Wade, Emma Jane; Bjørseth, Kamilla; Breedveld, Gijs D; Straith, Bengt Fredrik; Moe, Kamilla Grotthing; Jartun, Morten; Høisæter, Åse

    2017-03-01

    Aqueous film-forming foams (AFFF) containing poly- and perfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) used for firefighting have led to the contamination of soil and water at training sites. The unique physicochemical properties of PFAS results in environmental persistency, threatening water quality and making remediation of such sites a necessity. This work investigated the role of sorbent amendment to PFAS contaminated soils in order to immobilise PFAS and reduce mobility and leaching to groundwater. Soil was sampled from a firefighting training facility at a Norwegian airport and total and leachable PFAS concentrations were quantified. Perfluorooctanesulfonic acid (PFOS) was the most dominant PFAS present in all soil samples (between 9 and 2600 μg/kg). Leaching was quantified using a one-step batch test with water (L/S 10). PFOS concentrations measured in leachate water ranged between 1.2 μg/L and 212 μg/L. Sorbent amendment (3%) was tested by adding activated carbon (AC), compost soil and montmorillonite to selected soils. The extent of immobilisation was quantified by measuring PFAS concentrations in leachate before and after amendment. Leaching was reduced between 94 and 99.9% for AC, between 29 and 34% for compost soil and between 28 and 40% for the montmorillonite amended samples. Sorbent + soil/water partitioning coefficients (K D ) were estimated following amendment and were around 8 L/kg for compost soil and montmorillonite amended soil and ranged from 1960 to 16,940 L/kg for AC amended soil. The remediation of AFFF impacted soil via immobilisation of PFAS following sorbent amendment with AC is promising as part of an overall remediation strategy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Effect of nitrate addition on prokaryotic diversity and the activity of sulfate-reducing prokaryotes in high-temperature oil production systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gittel, Antje; Wieczorek, Adam; Sørensen, Ketil

    Adding nitrate to injection water is a possible strategy to control the activity of sulfate-reducing prokaryotes (SRP) in oil production system. To assess the effects of nitrate addition, prokaryotic diversity (Bacteria, Archaea, SRP) and SRP activity were studied in the production waters......-treated site was additionally supported by demonstrating their potential activity at 58°C, indicating that the troublesome SRP were pipeline-derived. Consistent with the low frequency of SRP in the clone libraries, no activity could be shown for samples from the nitrate-treated system suggesting that SRP were...... inhibited by nitrate addition. Visualization and quantification of the identified troublesome prokaryotes and potential competitors using the CARD-FISH technique will be performed on production water from both sites....

  2. Assessing the impacts of future climate conditions on the effectiveness of winter cover crops in reducing nitrate loads into the Chesapeake Bay Watershed using SWAT model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sangchul; Sadeghi, Ali M.; Yeo, In-Young; McCarty, Gregory W.; Hively, W. Dean

    2017-01-01

    Winter cover crops (WCCs) have been widely implemented in the Coastal Plain of the Chesapeake Bay watershed (CBW) due to their high effectiveness at reducing nitrate loads. However, future climate conditions (FCCs) are expected to exacerbate water quality degradation in the CBW by increasing nitrate loads from agriculture. Accordingly, the question remains whether WCCs are sufficient to mitigate increased nutrient loads caused by FCCs. In this study, we assessed the impacts of FCCs on WCC nitrate reduction efficiency on the Coastal Plain of the CBW using Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) model. Three FCC scenarios (2085 – 2098) were prepared using General Circulation Models (GCMs), considering three Intergovernmnental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) Special Report on Emissions Scenarios (SRES) greenhouse gas emission scenarios. We also developed six representative WCC implementation scenarios based on the most commonly used planting dates and species of WCCs in this region. Simulation results showed that WCC biomass increased by ~ 58 % under FCC scenarios, due to climate conditions conducive to the WCC growth. Prior to implementing WCCs, annual nitrate loads increased by ~ 43 % under FCC scenarios compared to the baseline scenario (2001 – 2014). When WCCs were planted, annual nitrate loads were substantially reduced by ~ 48 % and WCC nitrate reduction efficiency water ~ 5 % higher under FCC scenarios relative to the baseline. The increase rate of WCC nitrate reduction efficiency varied by FCC scenarios and WCC planting methods. As CO2 concentration was higher and winters were warmer under FCC scenarios, WCCs had greater biomass and therefore showed higher nitrate reduction efficiency. In response to FCC scenarios, the performance of less effective WCC practices (e.g., barley, wheat, and late planting) under the baseline indicated ~ 14 % higher increase rate of nitrate reduction efficiency compared to ones with better effectiveness under the baseline (e

  3. Differential nitrate accumulation, nitrate reduction, nitrate reductase ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    However, the effects of potassium nitrate were higher than sodium nitrate, which was due to the positive effects of potassium on the enzyme activity, sugars transport, water and nutrient transport, protein synthesis and carbohydrate metabolism. In conclusion, potassium nitrate has better effect on the nitrate assimilatory ...

  4. Uranium extraction from high content chlorine leach liquor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fatemi, K.

    1998-01-01

    In this work uranium solution has been leached out by leaching process of uranium ores from Bandar-Ab bass port using sea water, since fresh water could not be available when it is processed in large scale. Two samples of different batches containing 11 and 20 gr./lit chlorine underwent two stages of precipitation by lead nitrate. As the result of this treatment the chlorine removed and its final concentration reduced to 530 p.p.m. which is well below allowances. Then, the uranium of this recent dechlorinated solu ton has been extracted by T.B.P. Uranium in organic phase was stripped out into inorganic phase by sodium carbonate and precipitated in a form of yellow cake and converted to U3o8. The total recovery of U, was well above 90% and the purity of the conc. U was better than 94%. The lead used at the beginning of the process was recovered for next use

  5. The Capability of Equisetum ramosissium and Typha angustifolia as Phytoremediation Agents to Reduce Nitrate-Phosphate Pollutants and Prevent Microcystis Blooming in Fresh Water Ecosystem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viky Vidayanti

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to find out the kind of hydromacrophyte composition having the highest capability to reduce nitrate-phosphate pollutant and Microcystis growth in phytoremediation media using Equisetum ramosissium, Typha angustifolia and the combination of both. Microcystis were obtained from Sutami reservoir, then being inoculated in a media grown by hydromacrophytes (E. ramosissium, T. angustifolia and both of the hydromacrophytes in the batch culture system. The number of Microcystis was counted every day within fifteen days. Abiotic factors were observe, including the concentration of nitrate using brucine-colorimetry method and orthophosphate (dissolved phosphate using stannous chloride-colorimetry method on day 0, 6th, 12th and 15th. The growth rate of Microcystis carrying capacity and orthophosphate-nitrate levels among treatments were analysed by ANOVA test. The results showed that E. ramosissium and T. angustifolia in mono and polyculture techniques had similar potentiality to reduce the nitrate and ortophosphate. The concentrations of nitrate and orthophosphate decreased over 70 % in the 6th day after incubation. All of the treatments were able to reduce the carrying capacity of Microcystis up to 46 % , but the growth rates were similar in all media, that is, around 97-170 cells/L/day.

  6. H2S Attenuates LPS-Induced Acute Lung Injury by Reducing Oxidative/Nitrative Stress and Inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong-Xia Zhang

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Hydrogen sulfide (H2S, known as the third endogenous gaseous transmitter, has received increasing attention because of its diverse effects, including angiogenesis, vascular relaxation and myocardial protection.We aimed to investigate the role of H2S in oxidative/nitrative stress and inflammation in acute lung injury (ALI induced by endotoxemia. Methods: Male ICR mice were divided in six groups: (1 Control group; (2 GYY4137treatment group; (3 L-NAME treatment group; (4 lipopolysaccharide (LPS treatment group; (5 LPS with GYY4137 treatment group; and (6 LPS with L-NAME treatment group. The lungs were analysed by histology, NO production in the mouse lungs determined by modified Griess (Sigma-Aldrich reaction, cytokine levels utilizing commercialkits, and protein abundance by Western blotting. Results: GYY4137, a slowly-releasing H2S donor, improved the histopathological changes in the lungs of endotoxemic mice. Treatment with NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME, a nitric oxide synthase (NOS inhibitor, increased anti-oxidant biomarkers such as thetotal antioxidant capacity (T-AOC and theactivities of catalase (CAT and superoxide dismutase (SOD but decreased a marker of peroxynitrite (ONOO- action and 3-nitrotyrosine (3-NT in endotoxemic lung. L-NAME administration also suppressed inflammation in endotoxemic lung, as evidenced by the decreased pulmonary levels of interleukin (IL-6, IL-8, and myeloperoxidase (MPO and the increased level of anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10. GYY4137 treatment reversed endotoxin-induced oxidative/nitrative stress, as evidenced by a decrease in malondialdehyde (MDA, hydrogenperoxide (H2O2 and 3-NT and an increase in the antioxidant biomarker ratio of reduced/oxidized glutathione(GSH/GSSG ratio and T-AOC, CAT and SOD activity. GYY4137 also attenuated endotoxin-induced lung inflammation. Moreover, treatment with GYY4137 inhibited inducible NOS (iNOS expression and nitric oxide (NO production in the

  7. The changing trend in nitrate concentrations in major aquifers due to historical nitrate loading from agricultural land across England and Wales from 1925 to 2150

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, L.; Stuart, M.E.; Lewis, M.A.; Ward, R.S.; Skirvin, D.; Naden, P.S.; Collins, A.L.; Ascott, M.J.

    2016-01-01

    Nitrate is necessary for agricultural productivity, but can cause considerable problems if released into aquatic systems. Agricultural land is the major source of nitrates in UK groundwater. Due to the long time-lag in the groundwater system, it could take decades for leached nitrate from the soil to discharge into freshwaters. However, this nitrate time-lag has rarely been considered in environmental water management. Against this background, this paper presents an approach to modelling groundwater nitrate at the national scale, to simulate the impacts of historical nitrate loading from agricultural land on the evolution of groundwater nitrate concentrations. An additional process-based component was constructed for the saturated zone of significant aquifers in England and Wales. This uses a simple flow model which requires modelled recharge values, together with published aquifer properties and thickness data. A spatially distributed and temporally variable nitrate input function was also introduced. The sensitivity of parameters was analysed using Monte Carlo simulations. The model was calibrated using national nitrate monitoring data. Time series of annual average nitrate concentrations along with annual spatially distributed nitrate concentration maps from 1925 to 2150 were generated for 28 selected aquifer zones. The results show that 16 aquifer zones have an increasing trend in nitrate concentration, while average nitrate concentrations in the remaining 12 are declining. The results are also indicative of the trend in the flux of groundwater nitrate entering rivers through baseflow. The model thus enables the magnitude and timescale of groundwater nitrate response to be factored into source apportionment tools and to be taken into account alongside current planning of land-management options for reducing nitrate losses. - Highlights: • An approach to modelling groundwater nitrate at the national scale is presented. • The long time-lag for nitrate in the

  8. The changing trend in nitrate concentrations in major aquifers due to historical nitrate loading from agricultural land across England and Wales from 1925 to 2150

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, L., E-mail: lei.wang@bgs.ac.uk [British Geological Survey, Keyworth, Nottingham NG12 5GG (United Kingdom); Stuart, M.E.; Lewis, M.A. [British Geological Survey, Maclean Building, Wallingford, Oxfordshire OX10 8BB (United Kingdom); Ward, R.S. [British Geological Survey, Keyworth, Nottingham NG12 5GG (United Kingdom); Skirvin, D. [ADAS UK Ltd., Pendeford House, Pendeford Business Park, Wobaston Road, Wolverhampton WV9 5AP (United Kingdom); Naden, P.S. [Centre for Ecology and Hydrology, Maclean Building, Wallingford, Oxfordshire OX10 8BB (United Kingdom); Collins, A.L. [Sustainable Soils and Grassland Systems Department, Rothamsted Research, North Wyke, Okehampton EX20 2SB (United Kingdom); Ascott, M.J. [British Geological Survey, Maclean Building, Wallingford, Oxfordshire OX10 8BB (United Kingdom)

    2016-01-15

    Nitrate is necessary for agricultural productivity, but can cause considerable problems if released into aquatic systems. Agricultural land is the major source of nitrates in UK groundwater. Due to the long time-lag in the groundwater system, it could take decades for leached nitrate from the soil to discharge into freshwaters. However, this nitrate time-lag has rarely been considered in environmental water management. Against this background, this paper presents an approach to modelling groundwater nitrate at the national scale, to simulate the impacts of historical nitrate loading from agricultural land on the evolution of groundwater nitrate concentrations. An additional process-based component was constructed for the saturated zone of significant aquifers in England and Wales. This uses a simple flow model which requires modelled recharge values, together with published aquifer properties and thickness data. A spatially distributed and temporally variable nitrate input function was also introduced. The sensitivity of parameters was analysed using Monte Carlo simulations. The model was calibrated using national nitrate monitoring data. Time series of annual average nitrate concentrations along with annual spatially distributed nitrate concentration maps from 1925 to 2150 were generated for 28 selected aquifer zones. The results show that 16 aquifer zones have an increasing trend in nitrate concentration, while average nitrate concentrations in the remaining 12 are declining. The results are also indicative of the trend in the flux of groundwater nitrate entering rivers through baseflow. The model thus enables the magnitude and timescale of groundwater nitrate response to be factored into source apportionment tools and to be taken into account alongside current planning of land-management options for reducing nitrate losses. - Highlights: • An approach to modelling groundwater nitrate at the national scale is presented. • The long time-lag for nitrate in the

  9. Effectiveness of oat and rye cover crops in reducing nitrate losses in drainage water

    Science.gov (United States)

    A significant portion of the NO3 from agricultural fields that contaminates surface waters in the Midwest Corn Belt is transported to streams or rivers by subsurface drainage systems or “tiles”. Previous research has shown that N fertilizer management alone is not sufficient for reducing NO3 concent...

  10. Ecotoxicological standard tests confirm beneficial effects of nitrate capture in organically coated grapewood biochar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haller, Andreas; Kammann, Claudia; Löhnertz, Otmar

    2017-04-01

    Due to the rising use of mineral N fertilizers and legume use in agriculture, the input of reactive N into the global N cycle has dramatically increased. Therefore new agricultural techniques that increase N use efficiency and reduce the loss of soil mineral N to surface and ground waters are urgently required. Pyrogenic carbon (biochar) produced from biomass may be used as a beneficial soil amendment to sequester carbon (C) in soils, increase soil fertility in the long term, and reduce environmental pollution such as nitrate leaching or N2O emissions. However, reduced nitrate leaching is not a constant finding when using biochar as a soil amendment and the mechanisms are poorly understood. To investigate if biochar is able to reduce nitrate pollution and its subsequent effects on soil and aquatic fauna, we conducted a series of experiments using standard ecotoxicological test methods: (1) the collembolan reproduction test (ISO 11267 (1999)), (2) the earthworm reproduction test (ISO 11268-2 (1998)), (3) the aquatic Daphnia acute test (ISO 6341 (1996)) and (4) a seedling emergence and growth test (ISO 11269-2 (2006)) also involving leaching events. For the tests grapewood biochar produced with a Kon-Tiki kiln (600-700°C) was used which had previously demonstrated nitrate capture; terrestrial tests were carried out with loamy sand standard soil 2.2 (LUFA-Speyer, Germany). The tests included the factors: (A) nitrate addition (using critical values for the test organisms) or no nitrate addition, (B) control (no biochar), pure biochar and organically-coated biochar. In the aquatic test (3), a nitrate amount which caused 50% of the Daphnia-immobilizing toxic nitrate concentration in leachates was applied to the soil or soil-biochar mixtures. Subsequently, soils were incubated overnight and leached on the next day, producing (in the control) the calculated nitrate concentrations. Daphnids were incubated for 48 hours. Test results without nitrate confirmed that soil

  11. Insights into Nitrate-Reducing Fe(II) Oxidation Mechanisms through Analysis of Cell-Mineral Associations, Cell Encrustation, and Mineralogy in the Chemolithoautotrophic Enrichment Culture KS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordhoff, M; Tominski, C; Halama, M; Byrne, J M; Obst, M; Kleindienst, S; Behrens, S; Kappler, A

    2017-07-01

    Most described nitrate-reducing Fe(II)-oxidizing bacteria (NRFeOB) are mixotrophic and depend on organic cosubstrates for growth. Encrustation of cells in Fe(III) minerals has been observed for mixotrophic NRFeOB but not for autotrophic phototrophic and microaerophilic Fe(II) oxidizers. So far, little is known about cell-mineral associations in the few existing autotrophic NRFeOB. Here, we investigate whether the designated autotrophic Fe(II)-oxidizing strain (closely related to Gallionella and Sideroxydans ) or the heterotrophic nitrate reducers that are present in the autotrophic nitrate-reducing Fe(II)-oxidizing enrichment culture KS form mineral crusts during Fe(II) oxidation under autotrophic and mixotrophic conditions. In the mixed culture, we found no significant encrustation of any of the cells both during autotrophic oxidation of 8 to 10 mM Fe(II) coupled to nitrate reduction and during cultivation under mixotrophic conditions with 8 to 10 mM Fe(II), 5 mM acetate, and 4 mM nitrate, where higher numbers of heterotrophic nitrate reducers were present. Two pure cultures of heterotrophic nitrate reducers ( Nocardioides and Rhodanobacter ) isolated from culture KS were analyzed under mixotrophic growth conditions. We found green rust formation, no cell encrustation, and only a few mineral particles on some cell surfaces with 5 mM Fe(II) and some encrustation with 10 mM Fe(II). Our findings suggest that enzymatic, autotrophic Fe(II) oxidation coupled to nitrate reduction forms poorly crystalline Fe(III) oxyhydroxides and proceeds without cellular encrustation while indirect Fe(II) oxidation via heterotrophic nitrate-reduction-derived nitrite can lead to green rust as an intermediate mineral and significant cell encrustation. The extent of encrustation caused by indirect Fe(II) oxidation by reactive nitrogen species depends on Fe(II) concentrations and is probably negligible under environmental conditions in most habitats. IMPORTANCE Most described nitrate-reducing

  12. Insights into Nitrate-Reducing Fe(II) Oxidation Mechanisms through Analysis of Cell-Mineral Associations, Cell Encrustation, and Mineralogy in the Chemolithoautotrophic Enrichment Culture KS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordhoff, M.; Tominski, C.; Halama, M.; Byrne, J. M.; Obst, M.; Behrens, S.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Most described nitrate-reducing Fe(II)-oxidizing bacteria (NRFeOB) are mixotrophic and depend on organic cosubstrates for growth. Encrustation of cells in Fe(III) minerals has been observed for mixotrophic NRFeOB but not for autotrophic phototrophic and microaerophilic Fe(II) oxidizers. So far, little is known about cell-mineral associations in the few existing autotrophic NRFeOB. Here, we investigate whether the designated autotrophic Fe(II)-oxidizing strain (closely related to Gallionella and Sideroxydans) or the heterotrophic nitrate reducers that are present in the autotrophic nitrate-reducing Fe(II)-oxidizing enrichment culture KS form mineral crusts during Fe(II) oxidation under autotrophic and mixotrophic conditions. In the mixed culture, we found no significant encrustation of any of the cells both during autotrophic oxidation of 8 to 10 mM Fe(II) coupled to nitrate reduction and during cultivation under mixotrophic conditions with 8 to 10 mM Fe(II), 5 mM acetate, and 4 mM nitrate, where higher numbers of heterotrophic nitrate reducers were present. Two pure cultures of heterotrophic nitrate reducers (Nocardioides and Rhodanobacter) isolated from culture KS were analyzed under mixotrophic growth conditions. We found green rust formation, no cell encrustation, and only a few mineral particles on some cell surfaces with 5 mM Fe(II) and some encrustation with 10 mM Fe(II). Our findings suggest that enzymatic, autotrophic Fe(II) oxidation coupled to nitrate reduction forms poorly crystalline Fe(III) oxyhydroxides and proceeds without cellular encrustation while indirect Fe(II) oxidation via heterotrophic nitrate-reduction-derived nitrite can lead to green rust as an intermediate mineral and significant cell encrustation. The extent of encrustation caused by indirect Fe(II) oxidation by reactive nitrogen species depends on Fe(II) concentrations and is probably negligible under environmental conditions in most habitats. IMPORTANCE Most described nitrate-reducing

  13. Rapid nutrient leaching to groundwater and surface water in clay soil areas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bronswijk, J.J.B.; Hamminga, W.; Oostindie, K.

    1995-01-01

    Nitrate leaching from agricultural soils has frequently led to concentrations above the EU drinking-water standard. Most data originate from sandy soils. In this experiment the mechanism and magnitude of nitrate leaching from grassland on a heavy claysoil were investigated. In an experimental field,

  14. Reactivity of nitrate and organic acids at the concrete–bitumen interface of a nuclear waste repository cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bertron, A., E-mail: bertron@insa-toulouse.fr [Université de Toulouse (France); UPS, INSA (France); LMDC (Laboratoire Matériaux et Durabilité des Constructions), 135, avenue de Rangueil, F-31 077, Toulouse Cedex 04 (France); Jacquemet, N. [Université de Toulouse (France); UPS, INSA (France); LMDC (Laboratoire Matériaux et Durabilité des Constructions), 135, avenue de Rangueil, F-31 077, Toulouse Cedex 04 (France); Erable, B. [Université de Toulouse (France); INPT, UPS (France); CNRS, Laboratoire de Génie Chimique, 4, Allée Emile Monso, F-31030 Toulouse (France); Sablayrolles, C. [Université de Toulouse (France); INP (France); LCA (Laboratoire de Chimie Agro-Industrielle), ENSIACET, 4 allée Emile Monso, BP 44 362, 31432 Toulouse Cedex 4 (France); INRA (France); LCA (Laboratoire de Chimie Agro-Industrielle), F-31029 Toulouse (France); Escadeillas, G. [Université de Toulouse (France); UPS, INSA (France); LMDC (Laboratoire Matériaux et Durabilité des Constructions), 135, avenue de Rangueil, F-31 077, Toulouse Cedex 04 (France); Albrecht, A. [Andra, 1-7, rue Jean-Monnet, 92298 Châtenay-Malabry (France)

    2014-03-01

    Highlights: • Interactions of cement paste and organic acid–nitrate solutions were investigated. • Cement leaching imposed alkaline pH (>10) very rapidly in the liquid media. • Acetic acid action on cement paste was similar to that of classical leaching. • Oxalic acid attack formed Ca-oxalate salts; organic matter in solution decreased. • Nitrate was stable under abiotic conditions and with organic matter. - Abstract: This study investigates the fate of nitrate and organic acids at the bitumen–concrete interface within repository cell for long-lived, intermediate-level, radioactive wastes. The interface was simulated by a multiphase system in which cementitious matrices (CEM V cement paste specimens) were exposed to bitumen model leachates consisting of nitrates and acetic acid with and without oxalic acid, chemical compounds likely to be released by bitumen. Leaching experiments were conducted with daily renewal of the solutions in order to accelerate reactions. The concentrations of anions (acetate, oxalate, nitrate, and nitrite) and cations (calcium, potassium) and the pH were monitored over time. Mineralogical changes of the cementitious matrices were analysed by XRD. The results confirmed the stability of nitrates in the abiotic conditions of the experiments. The action of acetic acid on the cementitious matrix was similar to that of ordinary leaching in the absence of organic acids (i.e. carried out with water or strong acids); no specific interaction was detected between acetate and cementitious cations. The reaction of oxalic acid with the cementitious phases led to the precipitation of calcium oxalate salts in the outer layer of the matrix. The concentration of oxalate was reduced by 65% inside the leaching medium.

  15. Salt and N leaching and soil accumulation due to cover cropping practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabriel, J. L.; Quemada, M.

    2012-04-01

    Nitrate leaching beyond the root zone can increase water contamination hazards and decrease crop available N. Cover crops used in spite of fallow are an alternative to reduce nitrate contamination in the vadose zone, because reducing drainage and soil mineral N accumulation. Cover crops can improve important characteristics in irrigated land as water retention capacity or soil aggregate stability. However, increasing evapotranspiration and consequent drainage below the root system reduction, could lead to soil salt accumulation. Salinity affects more than 80 million ha of arable land in many areas of the world, and one of the principal causes for yield reduction and even land degradation in the Mediterranean region. Few studies dealt with both problems at the same time. Therefore, it is necessary a long-term evaluation of the potential effect on soil salinity and nitrate leaching, in order to ensure that potential disadvantages that could originate from soil salt accumulation are compensated with all advantages of cover cropping. A study of the soil salinity and nitrate leaching was conducted during 4 years in a semiarid irrigated agricultural area of Central Spain. Three treatments were studied during the intercropping period of maize (Zea mays L.): barley (Hordeum vulgare L.), vetch (Vicia villosa L.) and fallow. Cover crops were killed in March allowing seeding of maize of the entire trial in April, and all treatments were irrigated and fertilised following the same procedure. Before sowing, and after harvesting maize and cover crops, soil salt and nitrate accumulation was determined along the soil profile. Soil analysis was conducted at six depths every 0.20 m in each plot in samples from four 0 to 1.2-m depth holes dug. The electrical conductivity of the saturated paste extract and soil mineral nitrogen was measured in each soil sample. A numerical model based on the Richards water balance equation was applied in order to calculate drainage at 1.2 m depth

  16. Comparison of leach results from field and laboratory prepared samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oblath, S.B.; Langton, C.A.

    1985-01-01

    The leach behavior of saltstone prepared in the laboratory agrees well with that from samples mixed in the field using the Littleford mixer. Leach rates of nitrates and cesium from the current reference formulation saltstone were compared. The laboratory samples were prepared using simulated salt solution; those in the field used Tank 50 decontaminated supernate. For both nitrate and cesium, the field and laboratory samples showed nearly identical leach rates for the first 30 to 50 days. For the remaining period of the test, the field samples showed higher leach rates with the maximum difference being less than a factor of three. Ruthenium and antimony were present in the Tank 50 supernate in known amounts. Antimony-125 was observed in the leachate and a fractional leach rate was calculated to be at least a factor of ten less than that of 137 Cs. No 106 Ru was observed in the leachate, and the release rate was not calculated. However, based on the detection limits for the analysis, the ruthenium leach rate must also be at least a factor of ten less than cesium. These data are the first measurements of the leach rates of Ru and Sb from saltstone. The nitrate leach rates for these samples were 5 x 10 -5 grams of nitrate per square cm per day after 100 days for the laboratory samples and after 200 days for the field samples. These values are consistent with the previously measured leach rates for reference formulation saltstone. The relative standard deviation in the leach rate is about 15% for the field samples, which all were produced from one batch of saltstone, and about 35% for the laboratory samples, which came from different batches. These are the first recorded estimates of the error in leach rates for saltstone

  17. Experimental study on bio-leaching of high sulphuric acid consumption uranium ore by adding sulphide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meng Yunsheng; Zheng Ying; Liu Hui; Cheng Hao; Zhou Lei; Liu Chao; Fan Baotuan; Li Jianhua

    2012-01-01

    In order to decrease acid consumption and increase leaching rate, an experiment on bio-leach-ing of low grade uranium ore by adding sulphide was done. Compared with conventional leaching method, the leaching rate of uranium is improved by 3% and the leaching period was reduced to 60 days from 90 days by bio-leaching method of adding sulphide. In order to decrease acid consumption with bio-leaching by adding sulphide obviously, robust bacteria to sulphide should be chosen. (authors)

  18. Perennial filter strips reduce nitrate levels in soil and shallow groundwater after grassland-to-cropland conversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiaobo Zhou; Matthew J. Helmers; Heidi Asbjornsen; Randy Kolka; Mark D. Tomer

    2010-01-01

    Many croplands planted to perennial grasses under the Conservation Reserve Program are being returned to crop production, and with potential consequences for water quality. The objective of this study was to quantify the impact of grassland-to-cropland conversion on nitrate-nitrogen (NO3-N) concentrations in soil and shallow groundwater and to...

  19. Characterization of nitrate-reducing and amino acid-using bacteria prominent in nitrotoxin-enriched equine cecal populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    In the present study, populations of equine cecal microbes enriched for enhanced rates of 3-nitro-1-propionic acid (NPA) or nitrate metabolism were diluted and cultured for NPA-metabolizing bacteria on a basal enrichment medium (BEM) or tryptose soy agar (TSA) medium supplemented with either 5 mM NP...

  20. Leaching of both calcium hydroxide and C-S-H from cement paste: Modeling the mechanical behavior

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carde, C.; Torrenti, J.M.; Francois, R.

    1996-01-01

    This paper deals with the effect of the leaching process of cement based materials on their mechanical properties. This process induces mainly a total leaching of Ca(OH) 2 and a progressive decalcification of C-S-H which leads to a gradient of C/S ratio in the leaching zone. In a previous work, the authors venture the hypothesis that the dissolution of calcium hydroxide was the essential parameter governing both decrease in strength and increase in porosity in the case of a paste sample made with an OPC cement which leads to a 20% content of calcium. In order to quantify the effect of the decrease of C/S ratio in C-S-H, the authors have performed experiments on paste samples with the admixture of silica fume to reduce the content of calcium hydroxide and thus emphasize the effect of C/S ratio decrease of the C-S-H. The leaching process was achieved by the use of a 50% concentrate solution of ammonium nitrate. Compression tests were conducted on micro-cylinder samples (10, 12, 14, 20 and 30 mm of diameter) because of the slow kinetics of degradation due to the leaching. The deterioration of the cement paste and the mortar exposed to the action of the ammonium nitrate was indicated by a peripheral zone of less resistance. The experimental results allow the modeling of the mechanical behavior of cement pastes in relation to the ratio of degraded area over total area of the sample A d /A t . The model thus defined allows separation of the effect of calcium hydroxide leaching and C-S-H leaching, and shows the importance of the first one. The current research program tries to characterize the deterioration of the mechanical properties of the concrete surrounding radioactive wastes, due to the water flow during storage

  1. Rapid nutrient leaching to groundwater and surface water in clay soil areas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bronswijk, J.J.B.; Hamminga, W.; Oostindie, K.

    1995-01-01

    The mechanism and magnitude of nitrate leaching from grassland on a heavy clay soil were investigated by measuring nitrogen input, and nitrate concentrations in groundwater and drain discharge for two years. A bromide tracer was applied to study solute transport mechanisms. Nitrate transport in the

  2. The nitrate time bomb : a numerical way to investigate nitrate storage and lag time in the unsaturated zone

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, L.; Butcher, A.S.; Stuart, M.E.; Gooddy, D.C.; Bloomfield, J.P.

    2013-01-01

    Nitrate pollution in groundwater, which is mainly from agricultural activities, remains an international problem. It threatens the environment, economics and human health. There is a rising trend in nitrate concentrations in many UK groundwater bodies. Research has shown it can take decades for leached nitrate from the soil to discharge into groundwater and surface water due to the ‘store’ of nitrate and its potentially long travel time in the unsaturated and satura...

  3. Effects of Leaching Behavior of Calcium Ions on Compression and Durability of Cement-Based Materials with Mineral Admixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, An; Chao, Sao-Jeng; Lin, Wei-Ting

    2013-01-01

    Leaching of calcium ions increases the porosity of cement-based materials, consequently resulting in a negative effect on durability since it provides an entry for aggressive harmful ions, causing reinforcing steel corrosion. This study investigates the effects of leaching behavior of calcium ions on the compression and durability of cement-based materials. Since the parameters influencing the leaching behavior of cement-based materials are unclear and diverse, this paper focuses on the influence of added mineral admixtures (fly ash, slag and silica fume) on the leaching behavior of calcium ions regarding compression and durability of cemented-based materials. Ammonium nitrate solution was used to accelerate the leaching process in this study. Scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction analysis, and thermogravimetric analysis were employed to analyze and compare the cement-based material compositions prior to and after calcium ion leaching. The experimental results show that the mineral admixtures reduce calcium hydroxide quantity and refine pore structure through pozzolanic reaction, thus enhancing the compressive strength and durability of cement-based materials. PMID:28809247

  4. Manipulation of nitrogen leaching from tea field soil using a Trichoderma viride biofertilizer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Shengjun; Zhou, Sining; Ma, Shuanglong; Jiang, Cancan; Wu, Shanghua; Bai, Zhihui; Zhuang, Guoqiang; Zhuang, Xuliang

    2017-12-01

    With the increasing use of chemical fertilizers, negative environmental impacts have greatly increased as a result from agricultural fields. The fungus Trichoderma viride used as a biofertilizer can efficiently reduce nitrous oxide (N 2 O) emissions from subtropical tea fields in southern China. In this paper, it was further found that T. viride biofertilizer could alleviate nitrogen (N) leaching in tea fields. Gross N leaching was 1.51 kg ha -1  year -1 with no external fertilizer input, but when 225 kg N ha -1  year -1 was applied, it increased to 12.38 kg ha -1  year -1 using T. viride biofertilizer but 53.46 kg ha -1  year -1 using urea. Stepwise linear regression analysis identified the factors responsible for N leaching to be soil nitrate concentration and soil interflow, simulated here using the water balance simulation model (WaSiM-ETH). Finally, mass-scale production of T. viride biofertilizer from waste reutilization using sweet potato starch wastewater and rice straw was found to be cost-effective and feasible. These procedures could be considered a best management practice to reduce N leaching from tea fields in subtropical areas of central China and to reduce pollution from other agricultural waste products.

  5. Use of long-term monitoring data to derive a relationship between nitrogen surplus and nitrate leaching for grassland and arable land on well-drained sandy soils in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fraters, Dico; Leeuwen, van Ton; Boumans, Leo; Reijs, Joan

    2015-01-01

    The decrease in nitrogen (N) use in agriculture led to improvement of upper groundwater quality in the Sand region of the Netherlands in the 1991–2009 period. However, still half of the farms exceeded the European nitrate standard for groundwater of 50 mg/l in the 2008–2011 period. To assure that

  6. Method of continuous pressure leaching of ores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fiala, P.; Baloun, S.; Polansky, M.

    1987-01-01

    Ore leaching, especially suspensions of ground ore or fine ore fractions from physical treatment was divided into two operations. The former, i.e., ore mixing with technical grade concentrated sulfuric acid proceeded in a separate mixer. The mixture was then transported into an autoclave where the actual leaching proceeded for 2 to 4 hours. The extracted mixture was discharged through the autoclave bottom. The leaching autoclave used can be without any inner structures. The separation of mixing from the actual leaching allows processing ores with high levels of clay components, increasing operating reliability of the facility, reducing consumption of special structural materials and energy, and increasing process efficiency. (E.S.)

  7. Taoshan uranium ore fields in situ blasting heap leaching rate influence factors to investigate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xie Wangnan; Dong Chunming

    2014-01-01

    Taoshan ore field ore in situ blasting heap leaching out build industrial test and production process, stope leaching rate and leaching cycle is large than that, after analysis, blasting method and cloth liquid way is to affect leaching rate and leaching cycle of the main factors. This paper holds that as far as possible using stratified deep hole blasting of squeezing up ways to reduce the building pile of in-situ leaching ore block rate; Adopting effective cloth tube way, increase the leaching agent and ore contact comprehensive; Introduction of bacterial leaching, and other means to improve leaching rate, shorten production cycle, etc to solve it. (authors)

  8. Mimicking microbial interactions under nitrate-reducing conditions in an anoxic bioreactor: enrichment of novel Nitrospirae bacteria distantly related to Thermodesulfovibrio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arshad, Arslan; Dalcin Martins, Paula; Frank, Jeroen; Jetten, Mike S M; Op den Camp, Huub J M; Welte, Cornelia U

    2017-12-01

    Microorganisms are main drivers of the sulfur, nitrogen and carbon biogeochemical cycles. These elemental cycles are interconnected by the activity of different guilds in sediments or wastewater treatment systems. Here, we investigated a nitrate-reducing microbial community in a laboratory-scale bioreactor model that closely mimicked estuary or brackish sediment conditions. The bioreactor simultaneously consumed sulfide, methane and ammonium at the expense of nitrate. Ammonium oxidation occurred solely by the activity of anammox bacteria identified as Candidatus Scalindua brodae and Ca. Kuenenia stuttgartiensis. Fifty-three percent of methane oxidation was catalyzed by archaea affiliated to Ca. Methanoperedens and 47% by Ca. Methylomirabilis bacteria. Sulfide oxidation was mainly shared between two proteobacterial groups. Interestingly, competition for nitrate did not lead to exclusion of one particular group. Metagenomic analysis showed that the most abundant taxonomic group was distantly related to Thermodesulfovibrio sp. (87-89% 16S rRNA gene identity, 52-54% average amino acid identity), representing a new family within the Nitrospirae phylum. A high quality draft genome of the new species was recovered, and analysis showed high metabolic versatility. Related microbial groups are found in diverse environments with sulfur, nitrogen and methane cycling, indicating that these novel Nitrospirae bacteria might contribute to biogeochemical cycling in natural habitats. © 2017 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Study of radionuclide leaching from the residues of K Basin sludge dissolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bechtold, D.B.

    1998-01-01

    The sludges remaining in the K Basins after removal of the spent N Reactor nuclear fuel will be conditioned for disposal. After conditioning, an acid-insoluble residue will remain that may require further leaching to properly condition it for disposal. This document presents a literature study to identify and recommend one or more chemical leaching treatments for laboratory testing, based on the likely compositions of the residues. The processes identified are a nitric acid cerate leach, a silver-catalyzed persulfate leach, a nitric hydrofluoric acid leach, an oxalic citric acid reactor decontamination leach, a nitric hydrochloric acid leach, a ammonium fluoride nitrate leach, and a HEOPA formate dehydesulfoxylate leach. All processes except the last two are recommended for testing in that order

  10. Analysis of factors affecting the effect of stope leaching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xie Wangnan; Dong Chunming

    2014-01-01

    The industrial test and industrial trial production of stope leaching were carried out at Taoshan orefield of Dabu deposit. The results of test and trial production showed obvious differences in leaching rate and leaching time. Compared with industrial trial production of stope leaching, the leaching rate of industrial test was higher, and leaching time was shorter. It was considered that the blasting method and liquid arrangement were the main factors affecting the leaching rate and leaching time according to analysis. So we put forward the following suggestions: the technique of deep hole slicing tight-face blasting was used to reduce the yield of lump ores, the effective liquid arrangement methods were adopted to make the lixiviant infiltrating throughout whole ore heap, and bacterial leaching was introduced. (authors)

  11. Perennial filter strips reduce nitrate levels in soil and shallow groundwater after grassland-to-cropland conversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xiaobo; Helmers, Matthew J; Asbjornsen, Heidi; Kolka, Randy; Tomer, Mark D

    2010-01-01

    Many croplands planted to perennial grasses under the Conservation Reserve Program are being returned to crop production, and with potential consequences for water quality. The objective of this study was to quantify the impact of grassland-to-cropland conversion on nitrate-nitrogen (NO3-N) concentrations in soil and shallow groundwater and to assess the potential for perennial filter strips (PFS) to mitigate increases in NO3-N levels. The study, conducted at the Neal Smith National Wildlife Refuge (NSNWR) in central Iowa, consisted of a balanced incomplete block design with 12 watersheds and four watershed-scale treatments having different proportions and topographic positions of PFS planted in native prairie grasses: 100% rowcrop, 10% PFS (toeslope position), 10% PFS (distributed on toe and as contour strips), and 20 PFS (distributed on toe and as contour strips). All treatments were established in fall 2006 on watersheds that were under bromegrass (Bromus L.) cover for at least 10 yr. Nonperennial areas were maintained under a no-till 2-yr corn (Zea mays L.)--soybean [Glycine max. (L.) Merr.] rotation since spring 2007. Suction lysimeter and shallow groundwater wells located at upslope and toeslope positions were sampled monthly during the growing season to determine NO3-N concentration from 2005 to 2008. The results indicated significant increases in NO3-N concentration in soil and groundwater following grassland-to-cropland conversion. Nitrate-nitrogen levels in the vadose zone and groundwater under PFS were lower compared with 100% cropland, with the most significant differences occurring at the toeslope position. During the years following conversion, PFS mitigated increases in subsurface nitrate, but long-term monitoring is needed to observe and understand the full response to land-use conversion.

  12. Efeito da aplicação de nitrato na redução biogênica de sulfeto sob diferentes concentrações iniciais de bactérias redutoras de nitrato e sulfato Effect of nitrate application on reduction of biogenic sulphide under different initial concentrations of nitrate and sulphate-reducing bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kally Alves de Sousa

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of sodium nitrate application in the reduction of biogenic sulphide was evaluated through a 2k complete factorial design, using as variable response the production of sulfide at intervals of incubation of 7, 14 and 28 days. The most effective condition for reducing the sulphide production (final concentrations from 0.4 to 1.6 mg S2- L-1 was obtained with an initial population of sulphate-reducing bacteria and nitrate-reducing bacteria of 10(4 MPN mL-1 and 427.5 mg L-1 nitrate. The results also suggested that the applications of nitrate to control the process of souring should follow a continuous scheme.

  13. Purification of alkali metal nitrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiorucci, Louis C.; Gregory, Kevin M.

    1985-05-14

    A process is disclosed for removing heavy metal contaminants from impure alkali metal nitrates containing them. The process comprises mixing the impure nitrates with sufficient water to form a concentrated aqueous solution of the impure nitrates, adjusting the pH of the resulting solution to within the range of between about 2 and about 7, adding sufficient reducing agent to react with heavy metal contaminants within said solution, adjusting the pH of the solution containing reducing agent to effect precipitation of heavy metal impurities and separating the solid impurities from the resulting purified aqueous solution of alkali metal nitrates. The resulting purified solution of alkali metal nitrates may be heated to evaporate water therefrom to produce purified molten alkali metal nitrate suitable for use as a heat transfer medium. If desired, the purified molten form may be granulated and cooled to form discrete solid particles of alkali metal nitrates.

  14. The Potential Research of Catch Crop in Decrease Soil Nitrate Under Greenhouse Vegetable Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    YIN Xing

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In order to clarify the impact of catch crops on greenhouse vegetable soil nitrate, explore the mechanism of barrier and controll soil nitrogen leaching losses in greenhouse, and provide a theoretical basis for control nitrogen leaching and prevention of groundwater pollution, this study selected the traditional greenhouse vegetable rotation system in North China plain as research subjects, using field situ remediation technologies on deep-root planting catch crops in the vegetable fallow period by sweet corn, Achyranthes bidentata and white Chrysanthemum. The results showed that: nitrogen content and nitrogen uptake of sweet corn and sweet corn with Achyranthes bidentata intercropping were the highest, respectively 20.11 t·hm-2, 19.62 t·hm-2 and 240.34 kg·hm-2, 287.56 kg·hm-2, significantly higher than white Chrysanthemum. The density of root length and root dry weight decreased with soil depth in the profiles, root length density was demonstrated in order as: intercropping sweet corn> sweet corn> white Chrysanthemum> intercropping Achyranthes bidentata blume. The reduction of NO3--N of sweet corn reached 907.87 kg·hm-2 in soil profile 0~200 cm, significantly higher than sweet corn and hyssop intercropping and white Chrysanthemums. In the interim period of vegetable crop rotation, planting catch crops could effectively reduce nitrate accumulation in the soil, control the soil profile nitrate leaching down.

  15. Thermochemical nitrate reduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cox, J.L.; Lilga, M.A.; Hallen, R.T.

    1992-09-01

    A series of preliminary experiments was conducted directed at thermochemically converting nitrate to nitrogen and water. Nitrates are a major constituent of the waste stored in the underground tanks on the Hanford Site, and the characteristics and effects of nitrate compounds on stabilization techniques must be considered before permanent disposal operations begin. For the thermochemical reduction experiments, six reducing agents (ammonia, formate, urea, glucose, methane, and hydrogen) were mixed separately with ∼3 wt% NO 3 - solutions in a buffered aqueous solution at high pH (13); ammonia and formate were also mixed at low pH (4). Reactions were conducted in an aqueous solution in a batch reactor at temperatures of 200 degrees C to 350 degrees C and pressures of 600 to 2800 psig. Both gas and liquid samples were analyzed. The specific components analyzed were nitrate, nitrite, nitrous oxide, nitrogen, and ammonia. Results of experimental runs showed the following order of nitrate reduction of the six reducing agents in basic solution: formate > glucose > urea > hydrogen > ammonia ∼ methane. Airnmonia was more effective under acidic conditions than basic conditions. Formate was also effective under acidic conditions. A more thorough, fundamental study appears warranted to provide additional data on the mechanism of nitrate reduction. Furthermore, an expanded data base and engineering feasibility study could be used to evaluate conversion conditions for promising reducing agents in more detail and identify new reducing agents with improved performance characteristics

  16. Comparative study of ageing, heat treatment and accelerated carbonation for stabilization of municipal solid waste incineration bottom ash in view of reducing regulated heavy metal/metalloid leaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Rafael M; Mertens, Gilles; Salman, Muhammad; Cizer, Özlem; Van Gerven, Tom

    2013-10-15

    This study compared the performance of four different approaches for stabilization of regulated heavy metal and metalloid leaching from municipal solid waste incineration bottom ash (MSWI-BA): (i) short term (three months) heap ageing, (ii) heat treatment, (iii) accelerated moist carbonation, and (iv) accelerated pressurized slurry carbonation. Two distinct types of MSWI-BA were tested in this study: one originating from a moving-grate furnace incineration operation treating exclusively household refuse (sample B), and another originating from a fluid-bed furnace incineration operation that treats a mixture of household and light industrial wastes (sample F). The most abundant elements in the ashes were Si (20-27 wt.%) and Ca (16-19 wt.%), followed by significant quantities of Fe, Al, Na, S, K, Mg, Ti, and Cl. The main crystalline substances present in the fresh ashes were Quartz, Calcite, Apatite, Anhydrite and Gehlenite, while the amorphous fraction ranged from 56 to 73 wt.%. The leaching values of all samples were compared to the Flemish (NEN 7343) and the Walloon (DIN 38414) regulations from Belgium. Batch leaching of the fresh ashes at natural pH showed that seven elements exceeded at least one regulatory limit (Ba, Cr, Cu, Mo, Pb, Se and Zn), and that both ashes had excess basicity (pH > 12). Accelerated carbonation achieved significant reduction in ash basicity (9.3-9.9); lower than ageing (10.5-12.2) and heat treatment (11.1-12.1). For sample B, there was little distinction between the leaching results of ageing and accelerated carbonation with respect to regulatory limits; however carbonation achieved comparatively lower leaching levels. Heat treatment was especially detrimental to the leaching of Cr. For sample F, ageing was ineffective and heat treatment had marginally better results, while accelerated carbonation delivered the most effective performance, with slurry carbonation meeting all DIN limits. Slurry carbonation was deemed the most

  17. Using environmental tracers to determine the relative importance of travel times in the unsaturated and saturated zones for the delay of nitrate reduction measures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerber, Christoph; Purtschert, Roland; Hunkeler, Daniel; Hug, Rainer; Sültenfuss, Jürgen

    2018-06-01

    Groundwater quality in many regions with intense agriculture has deteriorated due to the leaching of nitrate and other agricultural pollutants. Modified agricultural practices can reduce the input of nitrate to groundwater bodies, but it is crucial to determine the time span over which these measures become effective at reducing nitrate levels in pumping wells. Such estimates can be obtained from hydrogeological modeling or lumped-parameter models (LPM) in combination with environmental tracer data. Two challenges in such tracer-based estimates are (i) accounting for the different modes of transport in the unsaturated zone (USZ), and (ii) assessing uncertainties. Here we extend a recently published Bayesian inference scheme for simple LPMs to include an explicit USZ model and apply it to the Dünnerngäu aquifer, Switzerland. Compared to a previous estimate of travel times in the aquifer based on a 2D hydrogeological model, our approach provides a more accurate assessment of the dynamics of nitrate concentrations in the aquifer. We find that including tracer measurements (3H/3He, 85Kr, 39Ar, 4He) reduces uncertainty in nitrate predictions if nitrate time series at wells are not available or short, but does not necessarily lead to better predictions if long nitrate time series are available. Additionally, the combination of tracer data with nitrate time series allows for a separation of the travel times in the unsaturated and saturated zone.

  18. Alternative leaching processes for uranium ores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ring, R.J.

    1979-01-01

    Laboratory studies have been carried out to compare the extraction of uranium from Australian ores by conventional leaching in sulphuric acid with that obtained using hydrochloric acid and acidified ferric sulphate solutions. Leaching with hydrochloric acid achieved higher extractions of radium-226 but the extraction of uranium was reduced considerably. The use of acidified ferric sulphate solution reduced acid consumption by 20-40% without any detrimental effect on uranium extraction. The ferric ion, which is reduced during leaching, can be reoxidized and recycled after the addition of acid makeup. Hydrogen peroxide was found to be an effective oxidant in conventional sulphuric acid leaching. It is more expensive than alternative oxidants, but it is non-polluting, lesser quantities are required and acid consumption is reduced

  19. Optimizing conditions for an accelerated leach test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pietrzak, R.F.; Fuhrmann, M.; Heiser, J.; Franz, E.M.; Colombo, P.

    1988-01-01

    An accelerated leach test for low-level radioactive waste forms is being developed to provide, in a short time, data that can be extrapolated to long time periods. The approach is to provide experimental conditions that will accelerate leaching without changing the dominant release mechanism. Experimental efforts have focused on combining individual factors that have been observed to accelerate leaching. These include elevated temperature, increased leachant volume, and reduced specimen size. The response of diffusion coefficients to various acceleration factors have been evaluated and provide information on experimental parameters that need to be optimized to increase leach rates. Preliminary modeling using a diffusion mechanism (allowing for depletion) of a finite cylinder geometry indicates that during early portions of experiments (daily sampling intervals), leaching is diffusion controlled and more rapid than later in the same experiments (weekly or greater sampling intervals). For cement waste forms, this reduction in rate may be partially controlled by changes in physical structure and chemistry (sometimes related to environmental influences such as CO 2 ), but it is more likely associated with the duration of the sampling interval. By using a combination of mathematical modeling and by experimentally investigating various leach rate controlling factors, a more complete understanding of leaching processes is being developed. This, in turn, is leading to optimized accelerating conditions for a leach test

  20. Optimizing conditions for an accelerated leach test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pietrzak, R.F.; Fuhrmann, M.; Heiser, J.; Franz, E.M.; Colombo, P.

    1988-01-01

    An accelerated leach test for low-level radioactive waste forms is being developed to provide, in a short time, data that can be extrapolated to long time periods. The approach is to provide experimental conditions that will accelerate leaching without changing the dominant release mechanism. Experimental efforts have focused on combining individual factors that have been observed to accelerate leaching. These include elevated temperature, increased leachant volume, and reduced specimen size. The response of diffusion coefficients to various acceleration factors have been evaluated and provide information on experimental parameters that need to be optimized to increase leach rates. For example, these data show that large volumes of leachant are required when leaching portland cement waste forms at elevated temperatures because of high concentrations of dissolved species. Sr-85 leaching is particularly susceptible to suppression due to concentration effects while Cs-137 leaching is less so. Preliminary modeling using a diffusion mechanism (allowing for depletion) of a finite cylinder geometry indicates that during early portions of experiments (daily sampling intervals), leaching is diffusion controlled and more rapid than later in the same experiments (weekly or greater sampling intervals). For cement waste forms, this reduction in rate may be partially controlled by changes in physical structure and chemistry (sometimes related to environmental influences such as CO 2 ), but it is more likely associated with the duration of the sampling interval. 9 refs., 6 figs

  1. Heap leaching for uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    Denison Mines Ltd. is using two bacterial leaching processes to combat the high cost of extracting uranium from low grade ore in thin reefs. Both processes use thiobacillus ferro-oxidans, a bacterium that employs the oxidation of ferrous iron and sulphur as its source of energy for growth. The first method is flood leaching, in which ore is subjected to successive flood, drain and rest cycles. The second, trickle leaching, uses sprinklers to douse the broken muck continuously with leaching solution. In areas where grades are too low to justify the expense of hauling the ore to the surface, the company is using this biological process underground to recover uranium. In 1987 Denison recovered 840 000 lb of uranium through bacterial heap leaching. It plans to have biological in-place leaching contribute 25% of the total uranium production by 1990. (fig.)

  2. Sustaining elevated levels of nitrite in the oral cavity through consumption of nitrate-rich beetroot juice in young healthy adults reduces salivary pH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hohensinn, Barbara; Haselgrübler, Renate; Müller, Ulrike; Stadlbauer, Verena; Lanzerstorfer, Peter; Lirk, Gerald; Höglinger, Otmar; Weghuber, Julian

    2016-11-30

    Dietary inorganic nitrate (NO 3 - ) and its reduced forms nitrite (NO 2 - ) and nitric oxide (NO), respectively, are of critical importance for host defense in the oral cavity. High concentrations of salivary nitrate are linked to a lower prevalence of caries due to growth inhibition of cariogenic bacteria. In-vitro studies suggest that the formation of antimicrobial NO results in an increase of the pH preventing erosion of tooth enamel. The purpose of this study was to prove this effect in-vivo. In a randomized clinical study with 46 subjects we investigated whether NO 3 - rich beetroot juice exhibits a protective effect against caries by an increase of salivary pH. Our results show that, in comparison to a placebo group, consumption of beetroot juice that contains 4000 mg/L NO 3 - results in elevated levels of salivary NO 2 - , nitrite NO 3 - , and NO. Furthermore, we determined an increase of the mean pH of saliva from 7.0 to 7.5, confirming the anti-cariogenic effect of the used NO 3 - -rich beetroot juice. Taken together, we have found that NO 3 - -rich beetroot juice holds potential effects against dental caries by preventing acidification of human saliva. C-87-15 (Ethics Commissions of Upper Austria). Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Combination Therapy with Losartan and Pioglitazone Additively Reduces Renal Oxidative and Nitrative Stress Induced by Chronic High Fat, Sucrose, and Sodium Intake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiang Kong

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We recently showed that combination therapy with losartan and pioglitazone provided synergistic effects compared with monotherapy in improving lesions of renal structure and function in Sprague-Dawley rats fed with a high-fat, high-sodium diet and 20% sucrose solution. This study was designed to explore the underlying mechanisms of additive renoprotection provided by combination therapy. Losartan, pioglitazone, and their combination were orally administered for 8 weeks. The increased level of renal malondialdehyde and expression of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase subunit p47phox and nitrotyrosine as well as the decreased total superoxide dismutase activity and copper, zinc-superoxide dismutase expression were tangible evidence for the presence of oxidative and nitrative stress in the kidney of model rats. Treatment with both drugs, individually and in combination, improved these abnormal changes. Combination therapy showed synergistic effects in reducing malondialdehyde level, p47phox, and nitrotyrosine expression to almost the normal level compared with monotherapy. All these results suggest that the additive renoprotection provided by combination therapy might be attributed to a further reduction of oxidative and nitrative stress.

  4. Phosphorus, nitrogen, and radionuclide retention and leaching from a Joel sand amended with red mud/gypsum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McPharlin, L.R.; Jeffery, R.C.; Toussaint, L.F.; Cooper, M.

    1994-01-01

    The leaching of phosphorus (P), nitrogen (N), and radionuclides 232 Th, 226 Ra, 228 Ra, and 40 K from Joel sands amended with red mud/gypsum (RMG) at 9 rates (0, 2, 4, 8, 16, 32, 64, 128, and 256 t/ha) was measured using columns. Intense leaching conditions (34 mm/day for 12 days) and a high rate of applied P (320 kg/ha as superphosphate) and N (680 kg/ha as ammonium nitrate) were used to simulate extremes of irrigated vegetable production on the Swan Coastal Plain. Addition of the highest rate of RMG (256 t/ha) reduced leaching of fertiliser P and ammonium-nitrogen (NH4-N) by 85% and 50%, respectively, compared with 0 t/ha after 12 days. At 64 t RMG/ha P leaching was reduced 50% compared with 0 t/ha. Nitrate-nitrogen (NO3-N) leaching was not affected by addition of RMG. Reduced leaching of NH4-N was attributed to an increase in cation exchange capacity of the soil with the addition of RMG. Bicarbonate-extractable P in the soil increased with rate of RMG to >50 μg P/g soil at 256 t/ha. This indicates that soil testing of residual P could be used to reduce P inputs to vegetable crops after soils were amended with RMG. This would further reduce the impact of vegetable production on the water systems of the Swan Coastal Plain and extend the period of effectiveness of RMG amended soils. The increase in 232 Th specific activity in Joel sand amended with RMG was well below statutory limits even at the highest rate. Neither 40 K nor 226 Ra were detectable in RMG amended sands up to 256 t RMG/ha. There was no evidence of leaching of 226 Ra or 228 Ra at any rate of RMG. These results suggest that the use of RMG amendment on commercial horticultural properties on the Swan Coastal Plain could be feasible. 30 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs

  5. Composite of Cu metal nanoparticles-multiwall carbon nanotubes-reduced graphene oxide as a novel and high performance platform of the electrochemical sensor for simultaneous determination of nitrite and nitrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bagheri, Hasan; Hajian, Ali; Rezaei, Mosayeb; Shirzadmehr, Ali

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • An electrochemical sensor based on Cu metal nanoparticles-multiwall carbon nanotubes-reduced graphene oxide modified glassy carbon electrode was developed. • Simultaneous electrochemical determination of nitrate and nitrite by fabricated sensor was performed. • Modification improved the sensitivity and detection limit of the method. • It is a useful method for determining of nitrate and nitrite in various real samples. - Abstract: In the present research, we aimed to fabricate a novel electrochemical sensor based on Cu metal nanoparticles on the multiwall carbon nanotubes-reduced graphene oxide nanosheets (Cu/MWCNT/RGO) for individual and simultaneous determination of nitrite and nitrate ions. The morphology of the prepared nanocomposite on the surface of glassy carbon electrode (GCE) was characterized using various methods including scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. Under optimal experimental conditions, the modified GCE showed excellent catalytic activity toward the electro-reduction of nitrite and nitrate ions (pH = 3.0) with a significant increase in cathodic peak currents in comparison with the unmodified GCE. By square wave voltammetry (SWV) the fabricated sensor demonstrated wide dynamic concentration ranges from 0.1 to 75 μM with detection limits (3S_b/m) of 30 nM and 20 nM method for nitrite and nitrate ions, respectively. Furthermore, the applicability of the proposed modified electrode was demonstrated by measuring the concentration of nitrite and nitrate ions in the tap and mineral waters, sausages, salami, and cheese samples.

  6. How inhibiting nitrification affects nitrogen cycle and reduces ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    We conducted a meta-analysis of 103 nitrification inhibitor (NI) studies, and evaluated how NI application affects crop productivity and other ecosystem services in agricultural systems. Our results showed that, compared to conventional fertilizer practice, applications of NI along with nitrogen (N) fertilizer increased crop nitrogen use efficiency, crop yield, and altered the pathways and the amount of N loss to environment. NI application increased ammonia emission, but reduced nitrate leaching and nitrous oxide emission, which led to a reduction of 12.9% of the total N loss. The cost and benefit analysis showed that the economic benefit of reducing N’s environmental impacts offset the cost of NI. NI application could bring additional revenue of $163.72 ha-1 for a maize farm. Taken together, our findings show that NI application may create a win-win scenario that increases agricultural output, while reducing the negative impact on the environment. Policies that encourage NI application would reduce N’s environmental impacts. A group from Chinese Academy of Sciences, US EPA-ORD and North Carolina examined the net environmental and economic effects of nitrification inhibitors to reduce nitrate leaching associated with farm fertilizers. They conducted a meta-analysis of studies examining nitrification inhibitors, and found that NI application increased ammonia emission, but reduced nitrate leaching and nitrous oxide emission, which led to a reduction of 12.9

  7. N-15 tracing helps explaining N leaching losses from contrasting forest ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staelens, J.; Rütting, T.; Huygens, D.; Müller, C.; Verheyen, K.; Boeckx, P.

    2009-04-01

    Despite chronically enhanced nitrogen (N) deposition to forest ecosystems in Europe and NE America, considerable N retention by forests has been observed, reducing N leaching losses. Organic and mineral soil layers typically immobilize more N than the aboveground biomass, but it is unclear which factors determine N retention in forest ecoystems. However, this knowledge is crucial to assess the impact of changing anthropogenic N emissions on future N cycling and N loss of forests. For coniferous and deciduous forest stands at comparable sites, it is known that both N deposition onto the forest floor as well as N loss by leaching below the rooting zone are significantly higher in coniferous stands. In addition, the N loss in coniferous stands is often more enhanced than can be explained by the higher N input only. This suggests lower N retention by coniferous stands, and may be related to differences in litter and soil characteristics, microbial activity, and N uptake by plant roots. To test this hypothesis, we studied the effect of forest type on N retention using 15N tracing techniques: a field tracer experiment and a combination of in situ isotope pool dilution and a tracing model. The N dynamics were examined for two adjacent forest stands (pedunculate oak (Quercus robur L.) and Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.)) on a well-drained sandy soil and with a similar stand history, located in a region with high N deposition (Belgium). Input-output N budgets were established by quantifying atmospheric deposition and leaching below the rooting zone, and confirmed the above finding of higher N deposition and disproportionately higher N loss for the pine stand compared to the oak stand. First, the fate of inorganic N within the ecosystems was studied by spraying three pulses of dissolved 15N, either as ammonium or as nitrate, onto the forest floor in 12 plots of 25 m2. The organic and mineral soil layers, tree roots, soil water percolate, ferns, and tree foliage were sampled

  8. Fertilizer Induced Nitrate Pollution in RCW: Calibration of the DNDC Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Hailouch, E.; Hornberger, G.; Crane, J. W.

    2012-12-01

    Fertilizer is widely used among urban and suburban households due to the socially driven attention of homeowners to lawn appearance. With high nitrogen content, fertilizer considerably impacts the environment through the emission of the highly potent greenhouse gas nitrous oxide and the leaching of nitrate. Nitrate leaching is significantly important because fertilizer sourced nitrate that is partially leached into soil causes groundwater pollution. In an effort to model the effect of fertilizer application on the environment, the geochemical DeNitrification-DeComposition model (DNDC) was previously developed to quantitatively measure the effects of fertilizer use. The purpose of this study is to use this model more effectively on a large scale through a measurement based calibration. For this reason, leaching was measured and studied on 12 sites in the Richland Creek Watershed (RCW). Information about the fertilization and irrigation regimes of these sites was collected, along with lysimeter readings that gave nitrate fluxes in the soil. A study of the amount and variation in nitrate leaching with respect to the varying geographical locations, time of the year, and fertilization and irrigation regimes has lead to a better understanding of the driving forces behind nitrate leaching. Quantifying the influence of each of these parameters allows for a more accurate calibration of the model thus permitting use that extends beyond the RCW. Measurement of nitrate leaching on a statewide or nationwide level in turn will help guide efforts in the reduction of groundwater pollution caused by fertilizer.

  9. Immobilized waste leaching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suarez, A.A.

    1989-01-01

    The main mechanism by which the immobilized radioactive materials can return to biosphere is the leaching due to the intrusion of water into the repositories. Some mathematical models and experiments utilized to evaluate the leaching rates in different immobilization matrices are described. (author) [pt

  10. Nitrate glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirilenko, I.A.; Vinogradov, E.E.

    1977-01-01

    Experimental evidence on behaviour of nitrate glasses is reviewed in terms of relationships between the presence of water in vitrescent nitrate systems and the properties of the systems. The glasses considered belong to systems of Mg(NO 3 ) 2 - Nd(NO 3 ) 3 ; Hg(NO 3 ) 2 -Nd(NO 3 ) 3 ; NaNO 3 -Mg(NO 3 ) 2 -Nd(NO 3 ) 3 ; M-Zn(NO 3 ) 3 , where M is a mixture of 20% mass NaNO 3 and 80% mass Mg(NO 3 ) 2 , and Zn is a rare earth ion. Nitrate glass is shown to be a product of dehydration. Vitrification may be regarded as a resusl of formation of molecular complexes in the chain due to hydrogen bonds of two types, i.e. water-water, or water-nicrate group. Chain formation, along with low melting points of the nitrates, hinder crystallization of nitrate melts. Provided there is enough water, this results in vitrification

  11. In situ leaching of uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, B.

    1980-01-01

    A process is described for the in-situ leaching of uranium-containing ores employing an acidic leach liquor containing peroxymonosulphuric acid. Preferably, additionally, sulphuric acid is present in the leach liquor. (author)

  12. The impact of the Nitrates Directive on nitrogen emissions from agriculture in the EU-27 during 2000-2008.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velthof, G L; Lesschen, J P; Webb, J; Pietrzak, S; Miatkowski, Z; Pinto, M; Kros, J; Oenema, O

    2014-01-15

    A series of environmental policies have been implemented in the European Union (EU) to decrease nitrogen (N) emissions from agriculture. The Nitrates Directive (ND) is one of the main policies; it aims to reduce nitrate leaching from agriculture through a number of measures. A study was carried out to quantify the effects of the ND in the EU-27 on the leaching and runoff of nitrate (NO3(-)) to groundwater and surface waters, and on the emissions of ammonia (NH3), nitrous oxide (N2O), nitrogen oxides (NO(x)) and dinitrogen (N2) to the atmosphere. We formulated a scenario with and a scenario without implementation of the ND. The model MITERRA-Europe was used to calculate N emissions on a regional level in the EU-27 for the period 2000-2008. The calculated total N loss from agriculture in the EU-27 was 13 Mton N in 2008, with 53% as N2, 22% as NO3, 21% as NH3, 3% as N2O, and 1% as NO(x). The N emissions and leaching in the EU-27 slightly decreased in the period 2000-2008. Total emissions in the EU in 2008 were smaller with implementation of the ND than without the ND, by 3% for NH3, 6% for N2O, 9% for NO(x), and 16% for N leaching and runoff in 2008. However, regional differences were large. The lower emissions with ND were mainly due to the lower N inputs by fertilizers and manures. In conclusion, implementation of the ND decreased both N leaching losses to ground and surface waters, and gaseous emissions to the atmosphere. It is expected that the ND will result in a further decrease in N emissions in EU-27 in the near future, because the implementation of the measures for the ND is expected to become more strict. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Chlorination leaching of cadmium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lach, E.; Pajak, I.; Bojanowska, A.

    1978-01-01

    The results of the investigations on chlorination leaching of cadmium from dust coming from dry dust collector of sinter belt, that is leaching with water saturated with gaseous chlorine and leaching with solutions of ammonium chloride and sodium chloride were given. The optimum conditions for these processes were established. It was found, that the method of leaching in the presence of gaseous chlorine is more effective, as it allows to report into the solution over 90% cadmium contained in dust. Owing to technical difficulties, environmental protection and safety conditions more advantageous seems to be the use as leaching agent of the ammonium chloride solutions. When applying 20% NH 4 Cl and temperature of 60 0 C, the time of 2 hours and the ratio of solid to liquid of 1:5, 70% cadmium contained in the dust can be reported into the solution. (auth.)

  14. Transient exposure to oxygen or nitrate reveals ecophysiology of fermentative and sulfate-reducing benthic microbial populations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Saad, S.; Bhatnagar, S.; Tegetmeyer, H.E.; Geelhoed, J.S.; Strous, M.; Ruff, S.E.

    2017-01-01

    SummaryFor the anaerobic remineralization of organic matter inmarine sediments, sulfate reduction coupled to fer-mentation plays a key role. Here, we enriched sulfate-reducing/fermentative communities from intertidalsediments under defined conditions in continuousculture. We transiently exposed

  15. Catalyzed reduction of nitrate in aqueous solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haas, P.A.

    1994-08-01

    Sodium nitrate and other nitrate salts in wastes is a major source of difficulty for permanent disposal. Reduction of nitrate using aluminum metal has been demonstrated, but NH 3 , hydrazine, or organic compounds containing oxygen would be advantageous for reduction of nitrate in sodium nitrate solutions. Objective of this seed money study was to determine minimum conditions for reduction. Proposed procedure was batchwise heating of aqueous solutions in closed vessels with monitoring of temperatures and pressures. A simple, convenient apparatus and procedure were demonstrated for observing formation of gaseous products and collecting samples for analyses. The test conditions were 250 degree C and 1000 psi max. Any useful reduction of sodium nitrate to sodium hydroxide as the primary product was not found. The nitrate present at pHs 3 or NH 4 NO 3 is easily decomposed, and the effect of nitromethane at these low pHs was confirmed. When acetic acid or formic acid was added, 21 to 56% of the nitrate in sodium nitrate solutions was reduced by methanol or formaldehyde. With hydrazine and acetic acid, 73 % of the nitrate was decomposed to convert NaNO 3 to sodium acetate. With hydrazine and formic acid, 36% of the nitrate was decomposed. If these products are more acceptable for final disposal than sodium nitrate, the reagents are cheap and the conversion conditions would be practical for easy use. Ammonium acetate or formate salts did not significantly reduce nitrate in sodium nitrate solutions

  16. Assessment of nitrate export from a high elevation watershed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, E.M.; Nodvin, S.C.

    1991-01-01

    Nitrate leaching from forest soils can be detrimental to both the forest ecosystems and stream water quality. Nitrate moving through the soil transports plant nutrients and acidifying agents, hydrogen and aluminum, and can export them to streams. In the high elevation spruce-fir forests in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park (GRSM) nitrate has been found to be leaching from the rooting zone. Streams associated with these ecosystems are poorly buffered. Therefore rapid export of nitrate from the soils to the streams could lead to episodic acidification. The purpose of the Noland Divide watershed study is to assess the levels of nitrate export from the watershed to the streams and the potential impacts of the export to the ecosystem

  17. MITIGASI PELINDIAN NITRAT PADA TANAH INCEPTISOL MELALUI PEMANFAATAN BAHAN NITRAT INHIBITOR ALAMI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joko Pramono

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Mitigation of Nitrate Leaching in Inceptisol Soil Through the Use of Natural Nitrate Inhibitor ABSTRAK Pelindian NO3- merupakan salah satu mekanisme kehilangan N dalam aktivitas pertanian, yang dapat berdampak terhadap pencemaran lingkungan. Tujuan dari penelitian adalah untuk mengetahui penggunaan bahan alami sebagai nitrat inhibitor terhadap pelindian nitrat pada tanah Inceptisol. Pada penelitian ini diuji tiga jenis bahan nitrat inhibitor (NI alami yang berasal dari; serbuk biji Mimba (SBM, serbuk kulit kayu bakau (SKKB, dan serbuk daun kopi (SDK,yang dikombinasikan dengan tiga taraf dosis NI, yaitu: 20 %, 30 % dan 40 % dari urea yang diberikan, dan ditambah satu perlakuan kontrol tanpa NI. Bahan nitrat inhibitor diberikan bersama urea pada permukaan tanah dalam pot percobaan yang telah dibasahi dengan air suling. Hasil penelitian menunjukkan bahwa bahan NI yang berbeda memberikan respon terhadap penghambatan nitrifi kasi yang berbeda. Bahan NI yang berasal dari serbuk biji mimba memberikan tingkat penghambatan tertinggi sebesar (25,6 %, serbuk kulit kayu bakau sebesar (19,1 %, dan serbuk daun kopi sebesar 11,8 %. Bahan NI alami mampu menghambat nitrifi kasi melalui penghambatan pertumbuhan bakteri nitrifi kasi (pengoksida ammonium yang bersifat sementara pada kisaran 7-14 hari setelah aplikasi. Perlakuan berbagai bahan dan dosis NI mampu menekan pelindian nitrat rata-rata pada kisaran antara 56,6 sampai 62,8 % dan berbeda sangat nyata terhadap perlakuan kontrol tanpa NI. Bahan NI yang mampu menurunkan rata-rata pelindian nitrat pada pengamatan 14 hari setelah aplikasi tertinggi adalah SBM sebesar 74,15 %. Dosis optimal dua bahan NI terpilih yang menunjukkan kinerja penghambatan nitrifi kasi terbaik (SBM dan SKKB pada 7 hsa, masing-masing 18,30 % (R2 = 0,694 dan 21,67 % (R2=0.691 dari dosis urea yang diberikan. Kata kunci: Nitrifi kasi, nitrat inhibitor, pelindian nitrat ABSTRACT NO3 - leaching is one mechanism of N reduction in agricultural

  18. The reduction of nitrate, nitrite and hydroxylamine to ammonia by enzymes from Cucurbita pepo L. in the presence of reduced benzyl viologen as electron donor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cresswell, C. F.; Hageman, R. H.; Hewitt, E. J.; Hucklesby, D. P.

    1965-01-01

    1. Enzyme systems from Cucurbita pepo have been shown to catalyse the reduction of nitrite and hydroxylamine to ammonia in yields about 90–100%. 2. Reduced benzyl viologen serves as an efficient electron donor for both systems. Activity of the nitrite-reductase system is directly related to degree of dye reduction when expressed in terms of the function for oxidation–reduction potentials, but appears to decrease to negligible activity below about 9% dye reduction. 3. NADH and NADPH alone produce negligible nitrite loss, but NADPH can be linked to an endogenous diaphorase system to reduce nitrite to ammonia in the presence of catalytic amounts of benzyl viologen. 4. The NADH– or NADPH–nitrate-reductase system that is also present can accept electrons from reduced benzyl viologen, but shows relationships opposite to that for the nitrite-reductase system with regard to effect of degree of dye reduction on activity. The product of nitrate reduction may be nitrite alone, or nitrite and ammonia, or ammonia alone, according only to the degree of dye reduction. 5. The relative activities of nitrite-reductase and hydroxylamine-reductase systems show different relationships with degree of dye reduction and may become reversed in magnitude when effects of degree of dye reduction are tested over a suitable range. 6. Nitrite severely inhibits the rate of reduction of hydroxylamine without affecting the yield of ammonia as a percentage of total substrate loss, but hydroxylamine has a negligible effect on the activity of the nitrite-reductase system. 7. The apparent Km for nitrite (1 μm) is substantially less than that for hydroxylamine, for which variable values between 0·05 and 0·9mm (mean 0·51 mm) have been observed. 8. The apparent Km values for reduced benzyl viologen differ for the nitrite-reductase and hydroxylamine-reductase systems: 60 and 7·5 μm respectively. 9. It is concluded that free hydroxylamine may not be an intermediate in the reduction of nitrite

  19. Leaching of saltstones containing fly ash

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnes, M.W.; Roy, D.M.; Langton, C.A.

    1985-01-01

    Two types of fly ash were incorporated in saltstones designed for potential encapsulation of Savannah River Plant low level defense waste. These fly ashes have some cementitious properties while at the same time their presence in substitution for cement slows early hydration. Class C fly ash has a high calcium content and is considered cementitious; Class F fly ash has a low calcium content and is not classified as cementitious. Leach tests were performed and physical properties were measured for saltstones containing each class, to see the differences in the effect of the fly ashes. The four waste ions nitrate, nitrite, sodium and sulfate were shown to leach by diffusion. Effective diffusivities were determined for these ions. Data for nitrate, the most important species from the environmental point of view, are shown in Table A. Saltstones made with Class C fly ash have substantially lower leach rates than those made with Class F fly ash. The leach rates, and therefore the square roots of the effective diffusivities, have been found to be proportional to the pore surface area per unit volume (or the ratio of pore volume to pore radius), to the fraction of waste containing solution, and to the inverse of the fraction of calcium in the saltstone. Rates and diffusivities are not proportional to the water to cement ratio, because this number depends on whether the fly ash is counted as cementitious, as in Class C cement, or not cementitious, as in Class F cement. In fact the relatively small amount of calcium in Class F cement contributes to the cementitious properties overall, though not so much as Class C cement. 4 refs., 2 figs., 6 tabs

  20. Leaching from waste incineration bottom ashes treated in a rotary kiln

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hyks, Jiri; Nesterov, Igor; Mogensen, Erhardt

    2011-01-01

    Leaching from municipal solid waste incineration bottom ash treated in a rotary kiln was quantified using a combination of lab-scale leaching experiments and geochemical modelling. Thermal treatment in the rotary kiln had no significant effect on the leaching of Al, Ba, Ca, Mg, Si, Sr, Zn, sulfate...... the thermal treatment. Overall, rotary kiln thermal treatment of bottom ashes can be recommended to reduce the leaching of Cu, Pb, Cl and DOC; however, increased leaching of Cr and Mo should be expected....

  1. Vadose zone processes delay groundwater nitrate reduction response to BMP implementation as observed in paired cultivated vs. uncultivated potato rotation fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Y.; Nyiraneza, J.; Murray, B. J.; Chapman, S.; Malenica, A.; Parker, B.

    2017-12-01

    Nitrate leaching from crop production contributes to groundwater contamination and subsequent eutrophication of the receiving surface water. A study was conducted in a 7-ha potato-grain-forages rotation field in Prince Edward Island (PEI), Canada during 2011-2016 to link potato rotation practices and groundwater quality. The field consists of fine sandy loam soil and is underlain by 7-9 m of glacial till, which overlies the regional fractured ;red-bed; sandstone aquifer. The water table is generally located in overburden close to the bedrock interface. Field treatments included one field zone taken out of production in 2011 with the remaining zones kept under a conventional potato rotation. Agronomy data including crop tissue, soil, and tile-drain water quality were collected. Hydrogeology data including multilevel monitoring of groundwater nitrate and hydraulic head and data from rock coring for nitrate distribution in overburden and bedrock matrix were also collected. A significant amount of nitrate leached below the soil profile after potato plant kill (referred to as topkill) in 2011, most of it from fertilizer N. A high level of nitrate was also detected in the till vadose zone through coring in December 2012 and through multilevel groundwater sampling from January to May 2014 in both cultivated and uncultivated field zones. Groundwater nitrate concentrations increased for about 2.5 years after the overlying potato field was removed from production. Pressure-driven uniform flow processes dominate water and nitrate transport in the vadose zone, producing an apparently instant water table response but a delayed groundwater quality response to nitrate leaching events. These data suggest that the uniform flow dominated vadose zone in agricultural landscapes can cause the accumulation of a significant amount of nitrate originated from previous farming activities, and the long travel time of this legacy nitrate in the vadose zone can result in substantially delayed

  2. Effective removal of bromate in nitrate-reducing anoxic zones during managed aquifer recharge for drinking water treatment: Laboratory-scale simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Feifei; van Halem, Doris; Ding, Lei; Bai, Ying; Lekkerkerker-Teunissen, Karin; van der Hoek, Jan Peter

    2018-03-01

    The removal of bromate (BrO 3 - ) as a by-product of ozonation in subsequent managed aquifer recharge (MAR) systems, specifically in anoxic nitrate (NO 3 - )-reducing zones, has so far gained little attention. In this study, batch reactors and columns were used to explore the influence of NO 3 - and increased assimilable organic carbon (AOC) due to ozonation pre-treatment on BrO 3 - removal in MAR systems. 8 m column experiments were carried out for 10 months to investigate BrO 3 - behavior in anoxic NO 3 - -reducing zones of MAR systems. Anoxic batch experiments showed that an increase of AOC promoted microbial activity and corresponding BrO 3 - removal. A drastic increase of BrO 3 - biodegradation was observed in the sudden absence of NO 3 - in both batch reactors and columns, indicating that BrO 3 - and NO 3 - competed for biodegradation by denitrifying bacteria and NO 3 - was preferred as an electron acceptor under the simultaneous presence of NO 3 - and BrO 3 - . However, within 75 days' absence of NO 3 - in the anoxic column, BrO 3 - removal gradually decreased, indicating that the presence of NO 3 - is a precondition for denitrifying bacteria to reduce BrO 3 - in NO 3 - -reducing anoxic zones. In the 8 m anoxic column set-up (retention time 6 days), the BrO 3 - removal achieved levels as low as 1.3 μg/L, starting at 60 μg/L (98% removal). Taken together, BrO 3 - removal is likely to occur in vicinity of NO 3 - -reducing anoxic zones, so MAR systems following ozonation are potentially effective to remove BrO 3 - . Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  3. Bicarbonate leaching of uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mason, C.

    1998-01-01

    The alkaline leach process for extracting uranium from uranium ores is reviewed. This process is dependent on the chemistry of uranium and so is independent on the type of mining system (conventional, heap or in-situ) used. Particular reference is made to the geochemical conditions at Crownpoint. Some supporting data from studies using alkaline leach for remediation of uranium-contaminated sites is presented

  4. Bicarbonate leaching of uranium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mason, C.

    1998-12-31

    The alkaline leach process for extracting uranium from uranium ores is reviewed. This process is dependent on the chemistry of uranium and so is independent on the type of mining system (conventional, heap or in-situ) used. Particular reference is made to the geochemical conditions at Crownpoint. Some supporting data from studies using alkaline leach for remediation of uranium-contaminated sites is presented.

  5. The nitrate time bomb: a numerical way to investigate nitrate storage and lag time in the unsaturated zone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, L; Butcher, A S; Stuart, M E; Gooddy, D C; Bloomfield, J P

    2013-10-01

    Nitrate pollution in groundwater, which is mainly from agricultural activities, remains an international problem. It threatens the environment, economics and human health. There is a rising trend in nitrate concentrations in many UK groundwater bodies. Research has shown it can take decades for leached nitrate from the soil to discharge into groundwater and surface water due to the 'store' of nitrate and its potentially long travel time in the unsaturated and saturated zones. However, this time lag is rarely considered in current water nitrate management and policy development. The aim of this study was to develop a catchment-scale integrated numerical method to investigate the nitrate lag time in the groundwater system, and the Eden Valley, UK, was selected as a case study area. The method involves three models, namely the nitrate time bomb-a process-based model to simulate the nitrate transport in the unsaturated zone (USZ), GISGroundwater--a GISGroundwater flow model, and N-FM--a model to simulate the nitrate transport in the saturated zone. This study answers the scientific questions of when the nitrate currently in the groundwater was loaded into the unsaturated zones and eventually reached the water table; is the rising groundwater nitrate concentration in the study area caused by historic nitrate load; what caused the uneven distribution of groundwater nitrate concentration in the study area; and whether the historic peak nitrate loading has reached the water table in the area. The groundwater nitrate in the area was mainly from the 1980s to 2000s, whilst the groundwater nitrate in most of the source protection zones leached into the system during 1940s-1970s; the large and spatially variable thickness of the USZ is one of the major reasons for unevenly distributed groundwater nitrate concentrations in the study area; the peak nitrate loading around 1983 has affected most of the study area. For areas around the Bowscar, Beacon Edge, Low Plains, Nord Vue

  6. Mitigation of a nitrate reducing Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm and anaerobic biocorrosion using ciprofloxacin enhanced by D-tyrosine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Ru; Yang, Dongqing; Xu, Dake; Gu, Tingyue

    2017-07-31

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA) is a ubiquitous microbe. It can form recalcitrant biofilms in clinical and industrial settings. PA biofilms cause infections in patients. They also cause biocorrosion of medical implants. In this work, D-tyrosine (D-tyr) was investigated as an antimicrobial enhancer for ciprofloxacin (CIP) against a wild-type PA biofilm (strain PAO1) on C1018 carbon steel in a strictly anaerobic condition. Seven-day biofilm prevention test results demonstrated that 2 ppm (w/w) D-tyr enhanced 30 ppm CIP by achieving extra 2-log sessile cell reduction compared with the 30 ppm CIP alone treatment. The cocktail of 30 ppm CIP + 2 ppm D-tyr achieved similar efficacy as the 80 ppm CIP alone treatment in the biofilm prevention test. Results also indicated that the enhanced antimicrobial treatment reduced weight loss and pitting corrosion. In the 3-hour biofilm removal test, the cocktail of 80 ppm CIP + 5 ppm D-tyr achieved extra 1.5-log reduction in sessile cell count compared with the 80 ppm CIP alone treatment. The cocktail of 80 ppm CIP + 5 ppm D-tyr achieved better efficacy than the 150 ppm CIP alone treatment in the biofilm removal test.

  7. NITRATE POLLUTION IN SHALLOW GROUNDWATER OF A HARD ROCK REGION IN SOUTH CENTRAL INDIA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brindha, K.; Rajesh, R.; Murugan, R.; Elango, L.

    2009-12-01

    of the sources for nitrate in groundwater. The recharge of rainwater through the indiscriminately dumped animal wastes also adds to nitrate in groundwater. As the population of denitrifying microbes (Agrobacterium sp.) in the topsoil increased, the nitrate concentration in groundwater decreased. The wells in the investigated region have been demarcated into safe and unsafe wells for consumption of water with respect to nitrate. The quality of groundwater in this region must be improved by denitrifying the groundwater before using it for consumption. Reduced dependence on nitrogen-rich fertilizers can also lower the influx of nitrates to a large extent. As the dumping of animal waste is also a reason behind high nitrate in groundwater, it would be better to use them as a biofertilizer. Due to the detrimental biological effects of nitrate, treatment and prevention methods must be considered to protect groundwater aquifers from nitrate leaching. Moreover, it is also important to educate the local population about keeping their surroundings clean, alternate use of the animal waste (as fuel) and to follow hygienic sanitation practices.

  8. Main ways and suitable technologies of improving economic benefits for uranium ore heap leaching in China (the end)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guan Zibin

    2001-01-01

    Combining with practice of China's uranium ore heap leaching, the author proposes main ways and suitable technologies in the fields of emphasizing feasibility research, adopting strengthened technologies, improving equipment level, optimizing control technological factors and developing application range and so on, which include adopting acid-currying and ferric sulphate-trickle leaching process, bacteria heap leaching, countercurrent heap leaching, selecting advanced material of heap bottom, developing large mechanized heap construction equipment and methods, popularizing drip irrigation distributing solution, optimizing heap leaching process parameters, as well as developing recovery equipment suited to heap leaching, etc, in order to increase leaching rate, reduce heap leaching period and achieve more economic benefits

  9. Ammonium nitrate-potassium nitrate system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cady, H.H.

    1981-01-01

    A portion of the binary phase diagram for the system ammonium nitrate-potassium nitrate has been determined from -55/sup 0/C to 185/sup 0/C. Results are presented for the ammonium-nitrate-rich end of the system up to 30 wt% potassium nitrate.

  10. Composite of Cu metal nanoparticles-multiwall carbon nanotubes-reduced graphene oxide as a novel and high performance platform of the electrochemical sensor for simultaneous determination of nitrite and nitrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bagheri, Hasan, E-mail: h.bagheri@bmsu.ac.ir [Chemical Injuries Research Center, Baqiyatallah University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Hajian, Ali [Laboratory for Sensors, Department of Microsystems Engineering (IMTEK), University of Freiburg, Georges Köhler Allee 103, 79110 Freiburg (Germany); Rezaei, Mosayeb; Shirzadmehr, Ali [Young Researchers and Elite Club, Hamedan Branch, Islamic Azad University, Hamedan (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2017-02-15

    Highlights: • An electrochemical sensor based on Cu metal nanoparticles-multiwall carbon nanotubes-reduced graphene oxide modified glassy carbon electrode was developed. • Simultaneous electrochemical determination of nitrate and nitrite by fabricated sensor was performed. • Modification improved the sensitivity and detection limit of the method. • It is a useful method for determining of nitrate and nitrite in various real samples. - Abstract: In the present research, we aimed to fabricate a novel electrochemical sensor based on Cu metal nanoparticles on the multiwall carbon nanotubes-reduced graphene oxide nanosheets (Cu/MWCNT/RGO) for individual and simultaneous determination of nitrite and nitrate ions. The morphology of the prepared nanocomposite on the surface of glassy carbon electrode (GCE) was characterized using various methods including scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. Under optimal experimental conditions, the modified GCE showed excellent catalytic activity toward the electro-reduction of nitrite and nitrate ions (pH = 3.0) with a significant increase in cathodic peak currents in comparison with the unmodified GCE. By square wave voltammetry (SWV) the fabricated sensor demonstrated wide dynamic concentration ranges from 0.1 to 75 μM with detection limits (3S{sub b}/m) of 30 nM and 20 nM method for nitrite and nitrate ions, respectively. Furthermore, the applicability of the proposed modified electrode was demonstrated by measuring the concentration of nitrite and nitrate ions in the tap and mineral waters, sausages, salami, and cheese samples.

  11. Bio-reduction of free and laden perchlorate by the pure and mixed perchlorate reducing bacteria: Considering the pH and coexisting nitrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shang, Yanan; Wang, Ziyang; Xu, Xing; Gao, Baoyu; Ren, Zhongfei

    2018-08-01

    Pure bacteria cell (Azospira sp. KJ) and mixed perchlorate reducing bacteria (MPRB) were employed for decomposing the free perchlorate in water as well as the laden perchlorate on surface of quaternary ammonium wheat residuals (QAWR). Results indicated that perchlorate was decomposed by the Azospira sp. KJ prior to nitrate while MPRB was just the reverse. Bio-reduction of laden perchlorate by Azospira sp. KJ was optimal at pH 8.0. In contrast, bio-reduction of laden perchlorate by MPRB was optimal at pH 7.0. Generally, the rate of perchlorate reduction was controlled by the enzyme activity of PRB. In addition, perchlorate recovery (26.0 mg/g) onto bio-regenerated QAWR by MPRB was observed with a small decrease as compared with that (31.1 mg/g) by Azospira sp. KJ at first 48 h. Basically, this study is expected to offer some different ideas on bio-regeneration of perchlorate-saturated adsorbents using biological process, which may provide the economically alternative to conventional methods. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Constitutive expression of a putative high-affinity nitrate transporter in Nicotiana plumbaginifolia: evidence for post-transcriptional regulation by a reduced nitrogen source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraisier, V; Gojon, A; Tillard, P; Daniel-Vedele, F

    2000-08-01

    The NpNRT2.1 gene encodes a putative inducible component of the high-affinity nitrate (NO3-) uptake system in Nicotiana plumbaginifolia. Here we report functional and physiological analyses of transgenic plants expressing the NpNRT2.1 coding sequence fused to the CaMV 35S or rolD promoters. Irrespective of the level of NO3- supplied, NO3- contents were found to be remarkably similar in wild-type and transgenic plants. Under specific conditions (growth on 10 mM NO3-), the steady-state NpNRT2. 1 mRNA level resulting from the deregulated transgene expression was accompanied by an increase in 15NO3- influx measured in the low concentration range. This demonstrates for the first time that the NRT2.1 sequence codes a limiting element of the inducible high-affinity transport system. Both 15NO3- influx and mRNA levels decreased in the wild type after exposure to ammonium, in agreement with previous results from many species. Surprisingly, however, influx was also markedly decreased in transgenic plants, despite stable levels of transgene expression in independent transformants after ammonium addition. We conclude that the conditions associated with the supply of a reduced nitrogen source such as ammonium, or with the generation of a further downstream metabolite, probably exert a repressive effect on NO3- influx at both transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels.

  13. Glass leaching performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chick, L.A.; Turcotte, R.P.

    1983-05-01

    Current understanding of the leaching performance of high-level nuclear waste (HLW) glass is summarized. The empirical model of waste glass leaching behavior developed shows that at high water flow rates the glass leach rate is kinetically limited to a maximum value. At intermediate water flow rates, leaching is limited by the solution concentration of silica and decreases with decreasing water flow rates. Release of soluble elements is controlled by silica dissolution because silica forms the binding network of the glass. At low water flow rates, mass loss rates reach values controlled by formation rates of alteration minerals, or by diffusion of dissolution products through essentially stagnant water. The parameters reviewed with respect to their quantifiable influence on leaching behavior include temperature, pH, leachant composition, glass composition, thermal history, and radiation. Of these, temperature is most important since the rate of mass loss approximately doubles with each 10 0 C increase in dilute solutions. The pH has small effects within the 4 to 10 range. The chemical composition of the leachant is most important with regard to its influence on alteration product formation. Glass composition exhibits the largest effects at high flow rates where improved glasses leach from ten to thirty times slower than glass 76 to 68. The effects of the thermal history (devitrification) of the glass are not likely to be significant. Radiation effects are important primarily in that radiolysis can potentially drive pH values to less than 4. Radiation damage to the glass causes insignificant changes in leaching performance

  14. Evaluation of nitrate destruction methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, P.A.; Kurath, D.E.; Guenther, R.

    1993-01-01

    A wide variety of high nitrate-concentration aqueous mixed [radioactive and Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) hazardous] wastes are stored at various US Department of Energy (DOE) facilities. These wastes will ultimately be solidified for final disposal, although the waste acceptance criteria for the final waste form is still being determined. Because the nitrates in the wastes will normally increase the volume or reduce the integrity of all of the waste forms under consideration for final disposal, nitrate destruction before solidification of the waste will generally be beneficial. This report describes and evaluates various technologies that could be used to destroy the nitrates in the stored wastes. This work was funded by the Department of Energy's Office of Technology Development, through the Chemical/Physical Technology Support Group of the Mixed Waste Integrated Program. All the nitrate destruction technologies will require further development work before a facility could be designed and built to treat the majority of the stored wastes. Several of the technologies have particularly attractive features: the nitrate to ammonia and ceramic (NAC) process produces an insoluble waste form with a significant volume reduction, electrochemical reduction destroys nitrates without any chemical addition, and the hydrothermal process can simultaneously treat nitrates and organics in both acidic and alkaline wastes. These three technologies have been tested using lab-scale equipment and surrogate solutions. At their current state of development, it is not possible to predict which process will be the most beneficial for a particular waste stream

  15. Effects of elevated root zone CO2 and air temperature on photosynthetic gas exchange, nitrate uptake, and total reduced nitrogen content in aeroponically grown lettuce plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Jie; Austin, Paul T; Lee, Sing Kong

    2010-09-01

    Effects of elevated root zone (RZ) CO(2) and air temperature on photosynthesis, productivity, nitrate (NO(3)(-)), and total reduced nitrogen (N) content in aeroponically grown lettuce plants were studied. Three weeks after transplanting, four different RZ [CO(2)] concentrations [ambient (360 ppm) and elevated concentrations of 2000, 10,000, and 50,000 ppm] were imposed on plants grown at two air temperature regimes of 28 degrees C/22 degrees C (day/night) and 36 degrees C/30 degrees C. Photosynthetic CO(2) assimilation (A) and stomatal conductance (g(s)) increased with increasing photosynthetically active radiation (PAR). When grown at 28 degrees C/22 degrees C, all plants accumulated more biomass than at 36 degrees C/30 degrees C. When measured under a PAR >or=600 micromol m(-2) s(-1), elevated RZ [CO(2)] resulted in significantly higher A, lower g(s), and higher midday leaf relative water content in all plants. Under elevated RZ [CO(2)], the increase of biomass was greater in roots than in shoots, causing a lower shoot/root ratio. The percentage increase in growth under elevated RZ [CO(2)] was greater at 36 degrees C/30 degrees C although the total biomass was higher at 28 degrees C/22 degrees C. NO(3)(-) and total reduced N concentrations of shoot and root were significantly higher in all plants under elevated RZ [CO(2)] than under ambient RZ [CO(2)] of 360 ppm at both temperature regimes. At each RZ [CO(2)], NO(3)(-) and total reduced N concentration of shoots were greater at 28 degrees C/22 degrees C than at 36 degrees C/30 degrees C. At all RZ [CO(2)], roots of plants at 36 degrees C/30 degrees C had significantly higher NO(3)(-) and total reduced N concentrations than at 28 degrees C/22 degrees C. Since increased RZ [CO(2)] caused partial stomatal closure, maximal A and maximal g(s) were negatively correlated, with a unique relationship for each air temperature. However, across all RZ [CO(2)] and temperature treatments, there was a close correlation between

  16. Method of gradual acid leaching of uranium ores of silicate and aluminosilicate nature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bosina, B.; Krepelka, J.; Urban, P.; Kropacek, J.; Stransky, J.

    1987-01-01

    Leaching uranium ore pulp is divided into two stages. The first stage takes place without any addition of a leaching agent at elevated pressure and temperature. In the second stage, sulfuric acid is added to the pulp (50 to 1000 kg per tonne of ore) or an oxidation agent. Leaching then proceeds according to routine procedures. The procedure is used to advantage for silicate or aluminosilicate ores which contain uranium minerals which are difficult to leach, pyrite and reducing substances. The two stage leaching allows to use the technology of pressure leaching, reduces consumption of sulfuric acid and oxidation agents and still achieves the required reduction oxidation potential. (E.S.)

  17. Leaching of sodium carbonate cakes by nitric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Troyanker, L.S.; Nikonov, V.N.

    1977-01-01

    The interaction has been studied of soda cakes of fluorite-rare-earth concentrate with nitric acid. The effect of a number of factors on extraction of REE into a nitric solution has been considered: the final acidity of the pulp, the duration of leaching, and the ratio between solid and liquid phases. The effect of adding aluminium nitrate into the pulp has also been studied. It has been shown that three-stage counterflow leaching of soda cakes with nitric acid increases REE extraction approximately by 10%

  18. Assessment of activity of nitrate-reducing bacterial souring control; Avaliacao da atividade de bacterias redutoras de nitrato no controle de acidificacao de reservatorios de petroleo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sousa, Kally A. de; Cammarota, Magali C.; Servulo, Eliana F.C. [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Escola de Quimica

    2008-07-01

    The effect of nitrate addition in relation to NRB concentration was evaluated on biogenic H{sub 2}S generation in anaerobic microcosms with produced water. A 2{sup k} factorial experimental design was performed by using as response variables nitrate (NO{sub 3}{sup -}) and sulfate (SO{sub 4}{sup =}) consumption and nitrite (NO{sub 2}{sup -}) and sulfide (H{sub 2}S) production and as independent variables the SRB and NRB (10{sup 1} - 10{sup 7} MPN/mL) and NO{sub 3}{sup -} (127.5 - 727.5 mg/L) initial concentrations. Each condition was carried out under incubation at 30 deg C during 7, 14 and 28 days. The lowest sulfide production (0.4 - 0.8 mg/L) was achieved for 10{sup 4} MPN/mL of SRB and NRB and 427.5 mg/L nitrate. Also, a reduction of sulfide generation was obtained by nitrate addition when low SRB and NRB concentrations were established. In such condition, the produced sulfide is rather dependent of nitrate concentration. The increase of the NRB concentration has not resulted in the reduction of sulfide production, even when higher nitrate concentrations were used. (author)

  19. Nitrogen Deposition and Leaching from Two Forested Catchments in Southwest China — Preliminary Data and Research Needs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Larssen

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Increased nitrogen deposition has resulted in increased nitrogen pools and nitrogen leaching in European and North American forest soils. The development in Asia in general, and China in particular, suggests increased deposition of reduced nitrogen from changes in agricultural practices and of oxidized nitrogen from rapid growth of the transportation sector. Decreased nitrogen retention in forested areas in the future may cause increased NO3– leaching and, thus, acidification and eutrophication in surface waters. The differences in climate, ecosystems, land use, and deposition history make direct application of knowledge from studies in Europe and North America difficult. In Southwest China the potential for nitrogen mobilization from forest soils may be high because of the warm and humid climate, resulting in high decomposition rates of soil organic matter. However, there are very few data available for quantifying the suspected potential for increased nitrogen leaching in forest ecosystems. Here we present data from two forested catchments, dominated by Masson pine (Pinus massoniana, near Guiyang and Chongqing, respectively, in Southwest China. The present nitrogen deposition is moderate, estimated in the range from 10 to 40 kg N ha–1 year–1. The C/N ratios of the soils are generally below 15. Nitrate concentrations in soil water are rather variable in space, with highest values of several hundred microequivalents per liter. The turnover rate of nitrogen in the forest ecosystem is quite high compared to the atmospheric deposition rate. At present, nitrate runoff from the catchments is low and intermediate in Guiyang and Chongqing, respectively. More research is needed to improve our ability to predict future nitrogen leaching from subtropical Asian coniferous forests.

  20. Plant growth improvement mediated by nitrate capture in co-composted biochar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kammann, Claudia I.; Schmidt, Hans-Peter; Messerschmidt, Nicole; Linsel, Sebastian; Steffens, Diedrich; Müller, Christoph; Koyro, Hans-Werner; Conte, Pellegrino; Stephen, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    Soil amendment with pyrogenic carbon (biochar) is discussed as strategy to improve soil fertility to enable economic plus environmental benefits. In temperate soils, however, the use of pure biochar mostly has moderately-negative to -positive yield effects. Here we demonstrate that co-composting considerably promoted biochars’ positive effects, largely by nitrate (nutrient) capture and delivery. In a full-factorial growth study with Chenopodium quinoa, biomass yield increased up to 305% in a sandy-poor soil amended with 2% (w/w) co-composted biochar (BCcomp). Conversely, addition of 2% (w/w) untreated biochar (BCpure) decreased the biomass to 60% of the control. Growth-promoting (BCcomp) as well as growth-reducing (BCpure) effects were more pronounced at lower nutrient-supply levels. Electro-ultra filtration and sequential biochar-particle washing revealed that co-composted biochar was nutrient-enriched, particularly with the anions nitrate and phosphate. The captured nitrate in BCcomp was (1) only partly detectable with standard methods, (2) largely protected against leaching, (3) partly plant-available, and (4) did not stimulate N2O emissions. We hypothesize that surface ageing plus non-conventional ion-water bonding in micro- and nano-pores promoted nitrate capture in biochar particles. Amending (N-rich) bio-waste with biochar may enhance its agronomic value and reduce nutrient losses from bio-wastes and agricultural soils. PMID:26057083

  1. Plant growth improvement mediated by nitrate capture in co-composted biochar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kammann, Claudia I.; Schmidt, Hans-Peter; Messerschmidt, Nicole; Linsel, Sebastian; Steffens, Diedrich; Müller, Christoph; Koyro, Hans-Werner; Conte, Pellegrino; Stephen, Joseph

    2015-06-01

    Soil amendment with pyrogenic carbon (biochar) is discussed as strategy to improve soil fertility to enable economic plus environmental benefits. In temperate soils, however, the use of pure biochar mostly has moderately-negative to -positive yield effects. Here we demonstrate that co-composting considerably promoted biochars’ positive effects, largely by nitrate (nutrient) capture and delivery. In a full-factorial growth study with Chenopodium quinoa, biomass yield increased up to 305% in a sandy-poor soil amended with 2% (w/w) co-composted biochar (BCcomp). Conversely, addition of 2% (w/w) untreated biochar (BCpure) decreased the biomass to 60% of the control. Growth-promoting (BCcomp) as well as growth-reducing (BCpure) effects were more pronounced at lower nutrient-supply levels. Electro-ultra filtration and sequential biochar-particle washing revealed that co-composted biochar was nutrient-enriched, particularly with the anions nitrate and phosphate. The captured nitrate in BCcomp was (1) only partly detectable with standard methods, (2) largely protected against leaching, (3) partly plant-available, and (4) did not stimulate N2O emissions. We hypothesize that surface ageing plus non-conventional ion-water bonding in micro- and nano-pores promoted nitrate capture in biochar particles. Amending (N-rich) bio-waste with biochar may enhance its agronomic value and reduce nutrient losses from bio-wastes and agricultural soils.

  2. URANIUM LEACHING AND RECOVERY PROCESS

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClaine, L.A.

    1959-08-18

    A process is described for recovering uranium from carbonate leach solutions by precipitating uranium as a mixed oxidation state compound. Uranium is recovered by adding a quadrivalent uranium carbon;te solution to the carbonate solution, adjusting the pH to 13 or greater, and precipitating the uranium as a filterable mixed oxidation state compound. In the event vanadium occurs with the uranium, the vanadium is unaffected by the uranium precipitation step and remains in the carbonate solution. The uranium-free solution is electrolyzed in the cathode compartment of a mercury cathode diaphragm cell to reduce and precipitate the vanadium.

  3. Measurement of leached hulls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reilly, T.D.

    1979-07-01

    Leached hulls are the short lengths of fuel rod cladding and fuel element hardware which constitute a major waste product of a reprocessing plant employing a chop-and-leach head-end process. The small, undissolved fuel residue (0.1 to 1.0% of original fuel content) which is discarded with this waste must be measured for safeguards, material accountability, and process control reasons. This report gives a critical analysis of hull measurement techniques involving the analysis of fission product gamma rays, spontaneous fission neutrons from curium, and delayed neutron activation. Major emphasis is given to the measurement of 2186-keV gamma rays from 144 Ce-- 144 Pr. A detailed description of typical leached hull characteristics is presented at the beginning of the report. An extensive review of experience gained from existing hull measurement systems in the United Kingdom, France, Japan, Germany, Italy, and the United States is presented

  4. Aminoethyl nitrate – the novel super nitrate?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauersachs, Johann

    2009-01-01

    Long-term use of most organic nitrates is limited by development of tolerance, induction of oxidative stress and endothelial dysfunction. In this issue of the BJP, Schuhmacher et al. characterized a novel class of organic nitrates with amino moieties (aminoalkyl nitrates). Aminoethyl nitrate was identified as a novel organic mononitrate with high potency but devoid of induction of mitochondrial oxidative stress. Cross-tolerance to nitroglycerin or the endothelium-dependent agonist acetylcholine after in vivo treatment was not observed. Like all nitrates, aminoethyl nitrate induced vasorelaxation by activation of soluble guanylate cyclase. Thus, in contrast to the prevailing view, high potency in an organic nitrate is not necessarily accompanied by induction of oxidative stress or endothelial dysfunction. This work from Daiber's group is an important step forward in the understanding of nitrate bioactivation, tolerance phenomena and towards the development of better organic nitrates for clinical use. PMID:19732062

  5. Nitrate and Nitrogen Oxides: Sources, Health Effects and Their Remediation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakeem, Khalid Rehman; Sabir, Muhammad; Ozturk, Munir; Akhtar, Mohd Sayeed; Ibrahim, Faridah Hanum

    Increased use of nitrogenous (N) fertilizers in agriculture has significantly altered the global N-cycle because they release nitrogenous gases of environmental concerns. The emission of nitrous oxide (N 2 O) contributes to the global greenhouse gas accumulation and the stratospheric ozone depletion. In addition, it causes nitrate leaching problem deteriorating ground water quality. The nitrate toxicity has been reported in a number of studies showing the health hazards like methemoglobinemia in infants and is a potent cause of cancer. Despite these evident negative environmental as well as health impacts, consumption of N fertilizer cannot be reduced in view of the food security for the teeming growing world population. Various agronomic and genetic modifications have been practiced to tackle this problem. Some agronomic techniques adopted include split application of N, use of slow-release fertilizers, nitrification inhibitors and encouraging the use of organic manure over chemical fertilizers. As a matter of fact, the use of chemical means to remediate nitrate from the environment is very difficult and costly. Particularly, removal of nitrate from water is difficult task because it is chemically non-reactive in dilute aqueous solutions. Hence, the use of biological means for nitrate remediation offers a promising strategy to minimize the ill effects of nitrates and nitrites. One of the important goals to reduce N-fertilizer application can be effectively achieved by choosing N-efficient genotypes. This will ensure the optimum uptake of applied N in a balanced manner and exploring the molecular mechanisms for their uptake as well as metabolism in assimilatory pathways. The objectives of this paper are to evaluate the interrelations which exist in the terrestrial ecosystems between the plant type and characteristics of nutrient uptake and analyze the global consumption and demand for fertilizer nitrogen in relation to cereal production, evaluate the various

  6. Accelerated leach test development program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuhrmann, M.; Pietrzak, R.F.; Heiser, J.; Franz, E.M.; Colombo, P.

    1990-11-01

    In FY 1989, a draft accelerated leach test for solidified waste was written. Combined test conditions that accelerate leaching were validated through experimental and modeling efforts. A computer program was developed that calculates test results and models leaching mechanisms. This program allows the user to determine if diffusion controls leaching and, if this is the case, to make projections of releases. Leaching mechanisms other than diffusion (diffusion plus source term partitioning and solubility limited leaching) are included in the program is indicators of other processes that may control leaching. Leach test data are presented and modeling results are discussed for laboratory scale waste forms composed of portland cement containing sodium sulfate salt, portland cement containing incinerator ash, and vinyl ester-styrene containing sodium sulfate. 16 refs., 38 figs., 5 tabs

  7. Urananite leaching: literature survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grisham, G.F.; Bryant, E.A.; Williams, K.E.

    1979-04-01

    A literature survey was undertaken to provide background materials for a series of experiments involving the interaction of spent uranium dioxide fuel with various environments. Notes and references pertaining to the basic properties of UO/sub 2/ as produced and after reactor exposure are presented. The use of computerized literature searches is illustrated with specific topics related to leaching experiments. 57 references.

  8. Urananite leaching: literature survey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grisham, G.F.; Bryant, E.A.; Williams, K.E.

    1979-04-01

    A literature survey was undertaken to provide background materials for a series of experiments involving the interaction of spent uranium dioxide fuel with various environments. Notes and references pertaining to the basic properties of UO 2 as produced and after reactor exposure are presented. The use of computerized literature searches is illustrated with specific topics related to leaching experiments. 57 references

  9. Nitrate leaching from organic and conventional crop production farms

    OpenAIRE

    Olesen, J.E.; Berntsen, J.; Petersen, B.M.; Kristensen, I.S.

    2004-01-01

    Farm accounting data from the Institute of Food Economics and from Central Agricultural Registers in Denmark were used to define the import of nitrogen (N) to farmed fields on conventional and organic arable farms to 129 and 51 kg N ha-1 yr-1, respectively. Based on the recorded distribution of crops, a generalised crop rotation was defined for each of the two farming systems. The crop rotation for the organic farm had a high share of spring cereals and additionally 20% grass-clover in the ro...

  10. Recycling of spent lithium-ion battery cathode materials by ammoniacal leaching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ku, Heesuk; Jung, Yeojin; Jo, Minsang; Park, Sanghyuk; Kim, Sookyung; Yang, Donghyo; Rhee, Kangin; An, Eung-Mo; Sohn, Jeongsoo; Kwon, Kyungjung

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Ammoniacal leaching is used to recover spent Li-ion battery cathode materials. • Leaching agents consist of ammonia, ammonium sulfite and ammonium carbonate. • Ammonium sulfite is a reductant and ammonium carbonate acts as pH buffer. • Co and Cu can be fully leached while Mn and Al are not leached. • Co recovery via ammoniacal leaching is economical compared to acid leaching. - Abstract: As the production and consumption of lithium ion batteries (LIBs) increase, the recycling of spent LIBs appears inevitable from an environmental, economic and health viewpoint. The leaching behavior of Ni, Mn, Co, Al and Cu from treated cathode active materials, which are separated from a commercial LIB pack in hybrid electric vehicles, is investigated with ammoniacal leaching agents based on ammonia, ammonium carbonate and ammonium sulfite. Ammonium sulfite as a reductant is necessary to enhance leaching kinetics particularly in the ammoniacal leaching of Ni and Co. Ammonium carbonate can act as a pH buffer so that the pH of leaching solution changes little during leaching. Co and Cu can be fully leached out whereas Mn and Al are hardly leached and Ni shows a moderate leaching efficiency. It is confirmed that the cathode active materials are a composite of LiMn_2O_4, LiCo_xMn_yNi_zO_2_, Al_2O_3 and C while the leach residue is composed of LiNi_xMn_yCo_zO_2, LiMn_2O_4, Al_2O_3, MnCO_3 and Mn oxides. Co recovery via the ammoniacal leaching is believed to gain a competitive edge on convenitonal acid leaching both by reducing the sodium hydroxide expense for increasing the pH of leaching solution and by removing the separation steps of Mn and Al.

  11. Research on the effect of alkali roasting of copper dross on leaching rate of indium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dafang, Liu; Fan, Xingxiang; Shi, Yifeng; Yang, Kunbin

    2017-11-01

    The byproduct copper dross produced during refining crude lead was characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscope (SEM) and fluorescence spectrometer (XRF), which showed that copper dross mainly contained lead, copper, zinc, arsenic, antimony, bismuth, sulfur and a small amount of indium and silver etc. The mineralogical phase change of oxidation roasting of copper dross by adding sodium hydroxide was analyzed with the help of XRD and SEM. The effects of water leaching, ratio of sodium hydroxide, roasting time, and roasting temperature on leaching rate of indium were investigated mainly. The experimental results showed that phase of lead metal and sulfides of lead, copper and zinc disappeared after oxidation roasting of copper dross by adding sodium hydroxide, new phase of oxides of lead, copper, zinc and sodium salt of arsenic and antimony appeared. Water leaching could remove arsenic, and acid leaching residue obtained was then leached with acid. The leaching rate of indium was higher 6.98% compared with alkali roasting of copper dross-acid leaching. It showed that removing arsenic by water leaching and acid leaching could increase the leaching rate of indium and be beneficial to reducing subsequent acid consumption of extracting indium by acid leaching. The roasting temperature had a significant effect on the leaching rate of indium, and leaching rate of indium increased with the rise of roasting temperature. When roasting temperature ranged from 450°C to 600°C, leaching rate of indium increased significantly with the rise of roasting temperature. When roasting temperature rose from 450°C to 600°C, leaching rate of indium increased by 60.29%. The amount of sodium hydroxide had an significant effect on the leaching rate of indium, and the leaching of indium increased with the increase of the amount of sodium hydroxide, and the leaching rate of indium was obviously higher than that of copper dross blank roasting and acid leaching.

  12. Free-air CO2 enrichment (FACE) reduces the inhibitory effect of soil nitrate on N2 fixation of Pisum sativum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butterly, Clayton R; Armstrong, Roger; Chen, Deli; Tang, Caixian

    2016-01-01

    Additional carbohydrate supply resulting from enhanced photosynthesis under predicted future elevated CO2 is likely to increase symbiotic nitrogen (N) fixation in legumes. This study examined the interactive effects of atmospheric CO2 and nitrate (NO3(-)) concentration on the growth, nodulation and N fixation of field pea (Pisum sativum) in a semi-arid cropping system. Field pea was grown for 15 weeks in a Vertosol containing 5, 25, 50 or 90 mg NO3(-)-N kg(-1) under either ambient CO2 (aCO2; 390 ppm) or elevated CO2 (eCO2; 550 ppm) using free-air CO2 enrichment (SoilFACE). Under aCO2, field pea biomass was significantly lower at 5 mg NO3(-)-N kg(-1) than at 90 mg NO3(-)-N kg(-1) soil. However, increasing the soil N level significantly reduced nodulation of lateral roots but not the primary root, and nodules were significantly smaller, with 85% less nodule mass in the 90 NO3(-)-N kg(-1) than in the 5 mg NO3(-)-N kg(-1) treatment, highlighting the inhibitory effects of NO3(-). Field pea grown under eCO2 had greater biomass (approx. 30%) than those grown under aCO2, and was not affected by N level. Overall, the inhibitory effects of NO3(-) on nodulation and nodule mass appeared to be reduced under eCO2 compared with aCO2, although the effects of CO2 on root growth were not significant. Elevated CO2 alleviated the inhibitory effect of soil NO3(-) on nodulation and N2 fixation and is likely to lead to greater total N content of field pea growing under future elevated CO2 environments. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Annals of Botany Company. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Leaching of DOC, DN, and inorganic constituents from scrap tires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selbes, Meric; Yilmaz, Ozge; Khan, Abdul A; Karanfil, Tanju

    2015-11-01

    One concern for recycle and reuse of scrap tires is the leaching of tire constituents (organic and inorganic) with time, and their subsequent potential harmful impacts in environment. The main objective of this study was to examine the leaching of dissolved organic carbon (DOC), dissolved nitrogen (DN), and selected inorganic constituents from scrap tires. Different sizes of tire chips and crumb rubber were exposed to leaching solutions with pH's ranging from 3.0 to 10.0 for 28days. The leaching of DOC and DN were found to be higher for smaller size tire chips; however, the leaching of inorganic constituents was independent of the size. In general, basic pH conditions increased the leaching of DOC and DN, whereas acidic pH conditions led to elevated concentrations of metals. Leaching was minimal around the neutral pH values for all the monitored parameters. Analysis of the leaching rates showed that components associated with the rubbery portion of the tires (DOC, DN, zinc, calcium, magnesium, etc.) exhibited an initial rapid followed by a slow release. On the other hand, a constant rate of leaching was observed for iron and manganese, which are attributed to the metal wires present inside the tires. Although the total amounts that leached varied, the observed leaching rates were similar for all tire chip sizes and leaching solutions. Operation under neutral pH conditions, use of larger size tire chips, prewashing of tires, and removal of metal wires prior to application will reduce the impact of tire recycle and reuse. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. INTEGRATED BIOREACTOR SYSTEM FOR THE TREATMENT OF CYANIDE, METALS AND NITRATES IN MINE PROCESS WATER

    Science.gov (United States)

    An innovative biological process is described for the tratment of cyanide-, metals- and nitrate-contaminated mine process water. The technology was tested for its ability to detoxify cyanide and nitrate and to immobilize metals in wastewater from agitation cyanide leaching. A pil...

  15. Ultrasound augmented leaching of nickel sulfate in sulfuric acid and hydrogen peroxide media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Haoyu; Li, Shiwei; Peng, Jinhui; Srinivasakannan, Chandrasekar; Zhang, Libo; Yin, Shaohua

    2018-01-01

    A new method of preparation high purity nickel sulfate assisted by ultrasonic was studied. The process mechanism was analyzed by Inductively Coupled Plasma (ICP), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and Energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry (EDS).The reaction mechanisms of oxidizing leaching and ultrasonic leaching were explored, respectively. Results showed that ultrasonic treatment peel off the oxide film on the surface of nickel. The leachate under strongly agitated, the yield rate of nickel sulfate was accelerate. And the reaction area was increased by the cavitation effect, the liquid-solid reaction was promoted, and the activation energy was reduced. The leaching rate of nickel reached 46.29% by conventional leaching, which takes about 5h. Under the same conditions, the ultrasonic leaching rate reached 40%, only half of the conventional leaching time. Concentration of leaching agent, reaction temperature, ultrasonic power, leaching time had significant effect on the enhancement of the leaching reaction with ultrasonic radiation. The leaching rate of 60.41% under the optimum experiment conditions as follows: sulfuric acid concentration 30%, hydrogen peroxide 10%, leaching temperature 333K, ultrasonic power 200W and leaching time 4h. The kinetic study of the system was investigated, and the reaction rates of conventional leaching and ultrasonic leaching were controlled by diffusion, and the apparent activation energies were 16.2kJ/mol and 11.83kJ/mol. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  16. Surface Photochemistry of Adsorbed Nitrate: The Role of Adsorbed Water in the Formation of Reduced Nitrogen Species on α-Fe2O3 Particle Surfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nanayakkara, C.E.; Jayaweera, P.M.; Rubasinghege, G; Baltrusaitis, Jonas; Grassian, V.H.

    2014-01-01

    The surface photochemistry of nitrate, formed from nitric acid adsorption, on hematite (α-Fe2O3) particle surfaces under different environmental conditions is investigated using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Following exposure of α-Fe2O3 particle surfaces to gas-phase nitric acid, a peak

  17. In-situ uranium leaching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dotson, B.J.

    1986-01-01

    This invention provides a method for improving the recovery of mineral values from ore bodies subjected to in-situ leaching by controlling the flow behaviour of the leaching solution. In particular, the invention relates to an in-situ leaching operation employing a foam for mobility control of the leaching solution. A foam bank is either introduced into the ore bed or developed in-situ in the ore bed. The foam then becomes a diverting agent forcing the leaching fluid through the previously non-contacted regions of the deposit

  18. ALUMINUM AND CHROMIUM LEACHING WORKSHOP WHITEPAPER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCabe, D; Jeff Pike, J; Bill Wilmarth, B

    2007-01-01

    A workshop was held on January 23-24, 2007 to discuss the status of processes to leach constituents from High Level Waste (HLW) sludges at the Hanford and Savannah River Sites. The objective of the workshop was to examine the needs and requirements for the HLW flowsheet for each site, discuss the status of knowledge of the leaching processes, communicate the research plans, and identify opportunities for synergy to address knowledge gaps. The purpose of leaching of non-radioactive constituents from the sludge waste is to reduce the burden of material that must be vitrified in the HLW melter systems, resulting in reduced HLW glass waste volume, reduced disposal costs, shorter process schedules, and higher facility throughput rates. The leaching process is estimated to reduce the operating life cycle of SRS by seven years and decrease the number of HLW canisters to be disposed in the Repository by 1000 [Gillam et al., 2006]. Comparably at Hanford, the aluminum and chromium leaching processes are estimated to reduce the operating life cycle of the Waste Treatment Plant by 20 years and decrease the number of canisters to the Repository by 15,000-30,000 [Gilbert, 2007]. These leaching processes will save the Department of Energy (DOE) billions of dollars in clean up and disposal costs. The primary constituents targeted for removal by leaching are aluminum and chromium. It is desirable to have some aluminum in glass to improve its durability; however, too much aluminum can increase the sludge viscosity, glass viscosity, and reduce overall process throughput. Chromium leaching is necessary to prevent formation of crystalline compounds in the glass, but is only needed at Hanford because of differences in the sludge waste chemistry at the two sites. Improving glass formulations to increase tolerance of aluminum and chromium is another approach to decrease HLW glass volume. It is likely that an optimum condition can be found by both performing leaching and improving

  19. The EU Nitrates Directive: A European Approach to Combat Water Pollution from Agriculture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gert J. Monteny

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available From 1991 onward, the European Union (EU member states have had to comply with the Nitrates Directive. The aim of this directive is to sustainably protect ground and surface waters from pollution with nitrogen (nitrate originating from agriculture. Agriculture is, on an EU level, the largest single source of nitrate (runoff, leaching pollution, although households and industries also contribute to some extent. An important element in the directive is the reporting every 4 years on the monitoring of ground- and surface-water quality. Furthermore, all 15 member states are compelled to designate so-called Nitrate Vulnerable Zones (NVZs. These are regions where the nitrate concentrations in the groundwater amount to 50 mg/l or more. In addition to Codes of Good Agricultural Practice, valid on a countrywide basis and often consisting of voluntary-based measures, specific Action Programmes with mandatory measures have to be developed for the NVZs. The first reporting period ended in 1995. This paper describes the progress in member states’ compliance with the Nitrates Directive during the second period (1996–1999, with a focus on the agricultural practices and action pro- grammes. An evaluation of the member states’ reports shows that good progress is being made on the farmers’ awareness of the need to comply with EU regulations on the protection of the aquatic environment. Action programmes are valuable tools to enforce measures that lead to a reduction of the water pollution by agricultural activities. Regional projects show that significant improvements can be achieved (e.g., reduced fertiliser inputs while maintaining crop yields and thus maintaining the economic potential of agriculture.

  20. Nitrate transport and transformation processes in unsaturated porous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tindall, James A.; Petrusak, Robin L.; McMahon, Peter B.

    1995-01-01

    A series of experiments was conducted on two contrasting agricultural soils to observe the influence of soil texture, preferential flow, and plants on nitrate transport and denitrification under unsaturated conditions. Calcium nitrate fertilizer was applied to the surface of four large undisturbed soil cores (30 cm diameter by 40 cm height). Two of the cores were a structured clay obtained from central Missouri and two were an unstructured fine sand obtained from central Florida. The cores were irrigated daily and maintained at a matric potential of -20 kPa, representative of soil tension in the rooting zone of irrigated agricultural fields. Volumetric water content (θ), concentration of nitrate-N in the soil solution, and nitrous oxide flux at the surface, 10, 20, and 30 cm were monitored daily. Leaching loss of surface-applied N03− -N was significant in both the sand and the clay. In unplanted sand cores, almost all of the applied nitrate was leached below 30 cm within 10 days. Gaseous N loss owing to denitrification was no greater than 2% of the nitrate-N applied to the unplanted sand cores and, in general, was less than 1 %. Although leaching was somewhat retarded in the clay cores, about 60% of the applied nitrate-N was leached from the unplanted clay soil in 5–6 weeks. Under unsaturated conditions, the clay had little to no tendency to denitrify despite the greater moisture content of the clay and retarded leaching of nitrate in the clay. The planted sand cores had surprisingly large gaseous N loss owing to denitrification, as much as 17% of the nitrate-N. Results from both the clay and sand experiments show that the dynamics of nitrate transport and transformation in unsaturated soils are affected by small, localized variations in the soil moisture content profile, the gaseous diffusion coefficient of the soil, the rate at which the nitrate pulse passes through the soil, the solubility of N2O and N2 and the diffusion of the gasses through the soil

  1. Leach tests on grouts made with actual and trace metal-spiked synthetic phosphate/sulfate waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serne, R.J.; Martin, W.J.; LeGore, V.L.; Lindenmeier, C.W.; McLaurine, S.B.; Martin, P.F.C.; Lokken, R.O.

    1989-10-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory conducted experiments to produce empirical leach rate data for phosphate-sulfate waste (PSW) grout. Effective diffusivities were measured for various radionuclides ( 90 Sr, 99 Tc, 14 C, 129 I, 137 Cs, 60 Co, 54 Mn, and U), stable major components (NO 3 - , SO 4 2- , H 3 BO 3 , K and Na) and the trace constituents Ag, As, Cd, Hg, Pb, and Se. Two types of leach tests were used on samples of actual PSW grout and synthetic PSW grout: the American Nuclear Society (ANS) 16.1 intermittent replacement leach test and a static leach test. Grout produced from both synthetic and real PSW showed low leach rates for the trace metal constituents and most of the waste radionuclides. Many of the spiked trace metals and radionuclides were not detected in any leachates. None of the effluents contained measurable quantities of 137 Cs, 60 Co, 54 Mn, 109 Cd, 51 Cr, 210 Pb, 203 Hg, or As. For those trace species with detectable leach rates, 125 I appeared to have the greatest leach rate, followed by 99 Tc, 75 Se, and finally U, 14 C, and 110m Ag. Leach rates for nitrate are between those for I and Tc, but there is much scatter in the nitrate data because of the very low nitrate inventory. 32 refs., 6 figs., 15 tabs

  2. Leaching Mechanisms Program. Annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dougherty, D.; Colombo, P.; Doty, R.; Fuhrmann, M.

    1984-09-01

    The primary goal of this work is to determine the leaching mechanisms of a variety of matrix materials either in use or being considered for the solidification of low-level radioactive wastes by defense and commercial waste generators. Since this program is new and did not formally begin until May of FY 84, the results reported here are few and preliminary. Efforts were concentrated in the following activities: (1) The literature search for leaching data and proposed leaching models and mechanisms for low-level waste. (2) Data base development for leaching data being compiled from the literature and from the leaching experiments in this program. (3) The selection of solidification agents for the experimental part of the program. (4) Fabrication of leach samples and initiation of leach testing. 28 references, 9 figures, 4 tables

  3. Leaching materials from cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hodgson, T.D.; Jordan, T.W.J.

    1980-01-01

    A material is leached from a cavity by contacting the material with a liquid and subjecting the liquid to a number of pressure cycles, each pressure cycle involving a decrease in pressure to cause boiling of the liquid, followed by a rise in pressure to inhibit the boiling. The method may include the step of heating the liquid to a temperature near to its boiling point. The material may be nuclear fuel pellets or calcium carbonate pellets. (author)

  4. In situ analysis of microbial reduction of a nitrate plume in Opalinus clay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bleyen, N.; Smets, S.; Valcke, E.; Albrecht, A.; De Canniere, P.; Schwyn, B.; Wittebroodt, C.

    2012-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. In several countries, such as Belgium, France and Switzerland, clay formations are foreseen as the host rock for geological disposal of bituminized low-level and intermediate-level long-lived radioactive waste. Suitable clay formations exhibit favorable hydro-mechanical and geochemical characteristics, which are expected to retard the migration of leached radionuclides. Along with radionuclides, certain classes of bituminized radioactive waste may also contain high concentrations of NaNO 3 , dispersed into the hydrophobic bitumen matrix used to stabilize the waste. During and after saturation of the disposal gallery, this bituminized waste will start to take up water due to osmosis, resulting in the leaching of significant amounts of NaNO 3 and soluble organic bitumen degradation products (BDP) into the clay pore water. This nitrate plume could cause several geochemical and biochemical processes in the clay surrounding the waste disposal gallery, potentially affecting the barrier function of the host rock. To study these processes, an in situ experiment in the Opalinus Clay, named the Bitumen-Nitrate-Clay interaction (BN) experiment, is being performed at the Mont Terri Rock Laboratory (CH). The experiment consists of a vertical borehole rigged with a downhole equipment containing three packed-off intervals, each lined with a cylindrical sintered stainless steel filter screen to allow contact with the surrounding clay. Prior to the start of the tests, the intervals were injected with an artificial Opalinus Clay pore water, containing all major ions at pore water concentrations at Mont Terri, but no organic matter, and were equilibrated with the surrounding clay for ∼8 months. To ensure a continuous water flow during the tests, each interval is connected to a stainless steel water circulation unit, equipped with water sampling containers, circulation pumps and flow meters. In addition, to continuously monitor the

  5. Effects of iron-reducing bacteria and nitrate-reducing bacteria on the transformations of iron corrosion products, magnetite and siderite, formed at the surface of non-alloy steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Etique, Marjorie

    2014-01-01

    Radioactive waste is one of the major problems facing the nuclear industry. To circumvent this issue France plans to store vitrified high-level nuclear waste in a stainless steel container, placed into a non-alloy steel overpack, at a depth of 500 m in an argillaceous formation. The main iron corrosion products formed at the surface of the non-alloy steel are siderite (Fe II CO 3 ) and magnetite (Fe II Fe III 2 O 4 ). These compounds are formed in the anoxic conditions present in the nuclear waste repository and play a protective role against corrosion as a passive layer. This work aims to investigate the activity of nitrate-reducing bacteria (NRB, Klebsiella mobilis) and iron-reducing bacteria (IRB, Shewanella putrefaciens) during the transformation of siderite and magnetite, especially those involved in anoxic iron biogeochemical cycle. Klebsiella mobilis and Shewanella putrefaciens were first incubated with siderite or magnetite suspensions (high surface specific area) in order to exacerbate the microbial iron transformation, subsequently incubated with a magnetite/siderite film synthesized by anodic polarization at applied current density. The transformation of siderite and magnetite by direct or indirect microbial processes led to the formation of carbonated green rust (Fe II 4 Fe III 2 (OH) 12 CO 3 ). As a transient phase shared by several bacterial reactions involving Fe II and Fe III , this compound is the cornerstone of the anoxic iron biogeochemical cycle. The novelty of this thesis is the consideration of bacterial metabolisms of NRB and IRB often overlooked in bio-corrosion processes. (author) [fr

  6. Assessing the impact of changes in landuse and management practices on the diffuse pollution and retention of nitrate in a riparian floodplain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, Stefan; Jacobs, Joerg; Voss, Anja; Bronstert, Axel; Zehe, Erwin

    2008-01-15

    In many European lowland rivers and riparian floodplains diffuse nutrient pollution is causing a major risk for the surface waters and groundwater to not achieve a good status as demanded by the European Water Framework Directive. In order to delimit the impact of diffuse nutrient pollution substantial and often controversial changes in landuse and management are under discussion. In this study we investigate the impact of two complex scenarios considering changes in landuse and land management practices on the nitrate loads of a typical lowland stream and the riparian groundwater in the North German Plains. Therefore the impacts of both scenarios on the nitrate dynamics, the attenuation efficiency and the nitrate exchange between groundwater and surface water were investigated for a 998.1 km(2) riparian floodplain of the Lower and Central Havel River and compared with the current conditions. Both scenarios target a substantial improvement of the ecological conditions and the water quality in the research area but promote different typical riparian landscape functions and consider a different grade of economical and legal feasibility of the proposed measures. Scenario 1 focuses on the optimisation of conservation measures for all natural resources of the riparian floodplain, scenario 2 considers measures in order to restore a good status of the water bodies mainly. The IWAN model was setup for the simulation of water balance and nitrate dynamics of the floodplain for a perennial simulation period of the current landuse and management conditions and of the scenario assumptions. The proposed landuse and management changes result in reduced rates of nitrate leaching from the root zone into the riparian groundwater (85% for scenario 1, 43% for scenario 2). The net contributions of nitrate from the floodplain can be reduced substantially for both scenarios. In case of scenario 2 a decrease by 70% can be obtained. For scenario 1 the nitrate exfiltration rates to the

  7. Nitrates of rare earths

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komissarova, L.N.; Pushkina, L.Ya.

    1984-01-01

    The systematization of experimental data with account of the last achievements in the field of studying the RE nitrate properties is realized. The methods of production, solubility in aqueous solutions structure, thermodynamic characteristics and thermal stability of nitrate hydrates, RE anhydrous and basic nitrates are considered. The data on RE nirtrate complexing in aqueous solutions are given. Binary nitrates, nitrate solvates and RE nitrate adducts with organic compounds are described. The use of RE nitrates in the course of RE production, in the processes of separation and fine cleaning of RE preparations is considered

  8. Verifiable metamodels for nitrate losses to drains and groundwater in the Corn Belt, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolan, Bernard T.; Malone, Robert W.; Gronberg, Jo Ann M.; Thorp, K.R.; Ma, Liwang

    2012-01-01

    Nitrate leaching in the unsaturated zone poses a risk to groundwater, whereas nitrate in tile drainage is conveyed directly to streams. We developed metamodels (MMs) consisting of artificial neural networks to simplify and upscale mechanistic fate and transport models for prediction of nitrate losses by drains and leaching in the Corn Belt, USA. The two final MMs predicted nitrate concentration and flux, respectively, in the shallow subsurface. Because each MM considered both tile drainage and leaching, they represent an integrated approach to vulnerability assessment. The MMs used readily available data comprising farm fertilizer nitrogen (N), weather data, and soil properties as inputs; therefore, they were well suited for regional extrapolation. The MMs effectively related the outputs of the underlying mechanistic model (Root Zone Water Quality Model) to the inputs (R2 = 0.986 for the nitrate concentration MM). Predicted nitrate concentration was compared with measured nitrate in 38 samples of recently recharged groundwater, yielding a Pearson’s r of 0.466 (p = 0.003). Predicted nitrate generally was higher than that measured in groundwater, possibly as a result of the time-lag for modern recharge to reach well screens, denitrification in groundwater, or interception of recharge by tile drains. In a qualitative comparison, predicted nitrate concentration also compared favorably with results from a previous regression model that predicted total N in streams.

  9. Leaching of saltstone: Laboratory and field testing and mathematical modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grant, M.W.; Langton, C.A.; Oblath, S.B.; Pepper, D.W.; Wallace, R.M.; Wilhite, E.L.; Yau, W.W.F.

    1987-01-01

    A low-level alkaline salt solution will be a byproduct in the processing of high-level waste at the Savannah River Plant (SRP). This solution will be incorporated into a wasteform, saltstone, and disposed of in surface vaults. Laboratory and field leach testing and mathematical modeling have demonstrated the predictability of contaminant release from cement wasteforms. Saltstone disposal in surface vaults will meet the design objective, which is to meet drinking water standards in shallow groundwater at the disposal area boundary. Diffusion is the predominant mechanism for release of contaminants to the environment. Leach testing in unsaturated soil, at soil moisture levels above 1 wt %, has shown no difference in leach rate compared to leaching in distilled water. Field leach testing of three thirty-ton blocks of saltstone in lysimeters has been underway since January 1984. Mathematical models were applied to assess design features for saltstone disposal. One dimensional infinite-composite and semi-infinite analytical models were developed for assessing diffusion of nitrate from saltstone through a cement barrier. Numerical models, both finite element and finite difference, were validated by comparison of model predictions with the saltstone lysimeter results. Validated models were used to assess the long-term performance of the saltstone stored in surface vaults. The maximum concentrations of all contaminants released from saltstone to shallow groundwater are predicted to be below drinking water standards at the disposal area boundary. 5 refs., 11 figs., 5 tabs

  10. Challenges with nitrate therapy and nitrate tolerance: prevalence, prevention, and clinical relevance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thadani, Udho

    2014-08-01

    Nitrate therapy has been an effective treatment for ischemic heart disease for over 100 years. The anti-ischemic and exercise-promoting benefits of sublingually administered nitrates are well established. Nitroglycerin is indicated for the relief of an established attack of angina and for prophylactic use, but its effects are short lived. In an effort to increase the duration of beneficial effects, long-acting orally administered and topical applications of nitrates have been developed; however, following their continued or frequent daily use, patients soon develop tolerance to these long-acting nitrate preparations. Once tolerance develops, patients begin losing the protective effects of the long-acting nitrate therapy. By providing a nitrate-free interval, or declining nitrate levels at night, one can overcome or reduce the development of tolerance, but cannot provide 24-h anti-anginal and anti-ischemic protection. In addition, patients may be vulnerable to occurrence of rebound angina and myocardial ischemia during periods of absent nitrate levels at night and early hours of the morning, and worsening of exercise capacity prior to the morning dose of the medication. This has been a concern with nitroglycerin patches but not with oral formulations of isosorbide-5 mononitrates, and has not been adequately studied with isosorbide dinitrate. This paper describes problems associated with nitrate tolerance, reviews mechanisms by which nitrate tolerance and loss of efficacy develop, and presents strategies to avoid nitrate tolerance and maintain efficacy when using long-acting nitrate formulations.

  11. Recycling of spent lithium-ion battery cathode materials by ammoniacal leaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ku, Heesuk; Jung, Yeojin; Jo, Minsang; Park, Sanghyuk; Kim, Sookyung; Yang, Donghyo; Rhee, Kangin; An, Eung-Mo; Sohn, Jeongsoo; Kwon, Kyungjung

    2016-08-05

    As the production and consumption of lithium ion batteries (LIBs) increase, the recycling of spent LIBs appears inevitable from an environmental, economic and health viewpoint. The leaching behavior of Ni, Mn, Co, Al and Cu from treated cathode active materials, which are separated from a commercial LIB pack in hybrid electric vehicles, is investigated with ammoniacal leaching agents based on ammonia, ammonium carbonate and ammonium sulfite. Ammonium sulfite as a reductant is necessary to enhance leaching kinetics particularly in the ammoniacal leaching of Ni and Co. Ammonium carbonate can act as a pH buffer so that the pH of leaching solution changes little during leaching. Co and Cu can be fully leached out whereas Mn and Al are hardly leached and Ni shows a moderate leaching efficiency. It is confirmed that the cathode active materials are a composite of LiMn2O4, LiCoxMnyNizO2, Al2O3 and C while the leach residue is composed of LiNixMnyCozO2, LiMn2O4, Al2O3, MnCO3 and Mn oxides. Co recovery via the ammoniacal leaching is believed to gain a competitive edge on convenitonal acid leaching both by reducing the sodium hydroxide expense for increasing the pH of leaching solution and by removing the separation steps of Mn and Al. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Modelling the Long Term Leaching Behaviour of 137CS from Different Stabilized Waste Matrices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Kamash, A.M.

    2013-01-01

    Leaching characteristics of ''1''3''7Cs from immobilized waste matrices in different cement-based grouts have been assessed to investigate the influence of the additives on the leaching behavior of the solid waste matrices. The International Atomic Energy's Agency (IAEA) standard leach method has been employed to study the leach pattern of 137 Cs radionuclide from the immobilized waste form. The examination of the leaching data revealed that clay additives reduces the leach rate for the studied radionuclide. The controlling leaching mechanism has been studied and the transport parameters were calculated for all studied waste matrices. Simplified analytical models have been derived to predict the Cumulative Leach Fraction (CLF) of radionuclides over the studied experimental period. These simplified research models could be used as a screening tool to assess the performance of the waste matrix under repository conditions. (author)

  13. Gestion durable de l'azote au-delà de la seule problématique "nitrate"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bodson, B.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Sustainable use of nitrogen beyond the single "nitrate" issue. The aim of the sustainable management of nitrogen is to reduce dramatically the risk of nitrogen leaching into groundwater. Regulations and recommendations have resulted in a more judicious use of manure as a mineral fertilizer to benefit both the environment and farmers. Rehabilitating leguminous plants into our rotations and our forage areas needs to become a priority. These plants can partially substitute for imported soya and, at the same time, synthesize the free nitrogen available to plants. Management of intercropping and in particular of catch crops can no longer be limited to the single issue of nitrate in water. Integrated crop protection and risk reduction of greenhouse gas emissions also need to be taken into account and flexibility needs to be incorporated into the implementation of these intercropping rules.

  14. Automated analysis for nitrate by hydrazine reduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamphake, L J; Hannah, S A; Cohen, J M

    1967-01-01

    An automated procedure for the simultaneous determinations of nitrate and nitrite in water is presented. Nitrite initially present in the sample is determined by a conventional diazotization-coupling reaction. Nitrate in another portion of sample is quantitatively reduced with hydrazine sulfate to nitrite which is then determined by the same diazotization-coupling reaction. Subtracting the nitrite initially present in the sample from that after reduction yields nitrite equivalent to nitrate initially in the sample. The rate of analysis is 20 samples/hr. Applicable range of the described method is 0.05-10 mg/l nitrite or nitrate nitrogen; however, increased sensitivity can be obtained by suitable modifications.

  15. Composting-derived organic coating on biochar enhances its affinity to nitrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagemann, Nikolas; Joseph, Stephen; Conte, Pellegrino; Albu, Mihaela; Obst, Martin; Borch, Thomas; Orsetti, Silvia; Subdiaga, Edisson; Behrens, Sebastian; Kappler, Andreas

    2017-04-01

    Biochar is defined charcoal that is produced by the thermal treatment of biomass in the (partial) absence of oxygen (pyrolysis) for non-oxidative applications, especially in agriculture. Due to its high surface area and porous structure, it is suggested as a beneficial soil amendment to increase crop yields and to tailor biogeochemical cycles in agro-ecosystems to reduce both greenhouse gas emissions and nutrient leaching. While early research focused on single applications of large amounts of biochar (>10 t ha-1), economic and ecological boundaries as well as practical considerations and recent findings shifted the focus towards low-dose (˜1 t ha-1) and potentially repeated applications of nutrient-enriched biochars, i.e. biochar-based fertilizers in the root-zone. Thus, biochar must be "loaded" with nutrients prior to its use as a root-zone amendment. Co-composting is suggested as a superior method, as co-composted biochar was shown to promote plant growth and showed the desired slow release of nutrients such as nitrate ("nitrate capture", Kammann et al., 2015 SR5:11080). However, the underlying mechanisms are not understood and nitrate capture has been quantified only for isolated biochars but not for e.g. biochar-amended composts without prior separation of the biochar. In the present study, we used repeated extractions with 2 M KCl and found that up to 30% of the nitrate present in a biochar-amended compost is captured in biochar, although biochar was amended to the initial composting feedstock (manure) only at 4% (w/w). Additionally, we quantified nitrate capture by pristine biochar after soaking the biochar in NH4NO3 solution in the absence of any additional organic carbon and nitrate capture of separated co-composted biochar. Assuming pseudo-first order kinetics for biochar nitrate release, we found an increase of biochar's affinity to nitrate after co-composting. Spectro-microscopical investigations (scanning transmission electron microscopy with electron

  16. Nitrate contamination of groundwater and its countermeasures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitamura, Hisayoshi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2003-03-01

    The inevitable increases of food production and energy consumption with an increase in world population become main causes of an increase of nitrate load to the environment. Although nitrogen is essential for the growth of animal and plant as a constituent element of protein, excessive nitrate load to the environment contaminates groundwater resources used as drinking water and leads to seriously adverse effects on the health of man and livestock. In order to clarify the problem of nitrate contamination of groundwater and search a new trend of technology development from the viewpoint of environment remediation and protection, the present paper has reviewed adverse effects of nitrate on human health, the actual state of nitrogen cycle, several kinds of nitrate sources, measures for reducing nitrate level, etc. (author)

  17. Modeling the long-term fate of agricultural nitrate in groundwater in the San Joaquin Valley, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapelle, Francis H.; Campbell, Bruce G.; Widdowson, Mark A.; Landon, Mathew K.

    2013-01-01

    Nitrate contamination of groundwater systems used for human water supplies is a major environmental problem in many parts of the world. Fertilizers containing a variety of reduced nitrogen compounds are commonly added to soils to increase agricultural yields. But the amount of nitrogen added during fertilization typically exceeds the amount of nitrogen taken up by crops. Oxidation of reduced nitrogen compounds present in residual fertilizers can produce substantial amounts of nitrate which can be transported to the underlying water table. Because nitrate concentrations exceeding 10 mg/L in drinking water can have a variety of deleterious effects for humans, agriculturally derived nitrate contamination of groundwater can be a serious public health issue. The Central Valley aquifer of California accounts for 13 percent of all the groundwater withdrawals in the United States. The Central Valley, which includes the San Joaquin Valley, is one of the most productive agricultural areas in the world and much of this groundwater is used for crop irrigation. However, rapid urbanization has led to increasing groundwater withdrawals for municipal public water supplies. That, in turn, has led to concern about how contaminants associated with agricultural practices will affect the chemical quality of groundwater in the San Joaquin Valley. Crop fertilization with various forms of nitrogen-containing compounds can greatly increase agricultural yields. However, leaching of nitrate from soils due to irrigation has led to substantial nitrate contamination of shallow groundwater. That shallow nitrate-contaminated groundwater has been moving deeper into the Central Valley aquifer since the 1960s. Denitrification can be an important process limiting the mobility of nitrate in groundwater systems. However, substantial denitrification requires adequate sources of electron donors in order to drive the process. In many cases, dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and particulate organic carbon

  18. Leaching From Biomass Gasification Residues

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Allegrini, Elisa; Boldrin, Alessio; Polletini, A.

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the present work is to attain an overall characterization of solid residues from biomass gasification. Besides the determination of chemical and physical properties, the work was focused on the study of leaching behaviour. Compliance and pH-dependence leaching tests coupled with geoche......The aim of the present work is to attain an overall characterization of solid residues from biomass gasification. Besides the determination of chemical and physical properties, the work was focused on the study of leaching behaviour. Compliance and pH-dependence leaching tests coupled...

  19. Nitrate removal from alkaline high nitrate effluent by in situ generation of hydrogen using zinc dust

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rajagopal, S.; Chitra, S.; Paul, Biplob

    2016-01-01

    Alkaline radioactive low level waste generated in Nuclear Fuel Cycle contains substantial amount of nitrate and needs to be treated to meet Central Pollution Control Board discharge limits of 90 mg/L in marine coastal area. Several denitrification methods like chemical treatment, electrochemical reduction, biological denitrification, ion exchange, reverse osmosis, photochemical reduction etc are followed for removal of nitrate. In effluent treatment plants where chemical treatment is carried out, chemical denitrification can be easily adapted without any additional set up. Reducing agents like zinc and aluminum are suitable for reducing nitrate in alkaline solution. Study on denitrification with zinc dust was taken up in this work. Not much work has been done with zinc dust on reduction of nitrate to nitrogen in alkaline waste with high nitrate content. In the present work, nitrate is reduced by nascent hydrogen generated in situ, caused by reaction between zinc dust and sodium hydroxide

  20. A low-temperature process for the denitration of Hanford single-shell tank, nitrate-based waste utilizing the nitrate to ammonia and ceramic (NAC) or nitrate to ammonia and glass (NAG) process: Phase 2 report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mattus, A.J.; Walker, J.F. Jr.; Youngblood, E.L.; Farr, L.L.; Lee, D.D.; Dillow, T.A.; Tiegs, T.N.

    1994-12-01

    Continuing benchtop studies using Hanford single-shell tank (SST) simulants and actual Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) low-level waste (LLW), employing a new denitration process for converting nitrate to ammonia and ceramic (NAC), have conclusively shown that between 85 and 99% of the nitrate can be readily converted to gaseous ammonia. In this process, aluminum powders can be used to convert alkaline, nitrate-based supernate to ammonia and an aluminum oxide-sodium aluminate-based solid. The process may be able to use contaminated aluminum scrap metal from DOE sites to effect the conversion. The final, nitrate-free ceramic product can be pressed and sintered like other ceramics or silica and/or fluxing agents can be added to form a glassy ceramic or a flowable glass product. Based upon the starting volumes of 6.2 and 3.1 M sodium nitrate solution, volume reductions of 50 to 70% were obtained for the waste form produced. Sintered pellets produced from supernate from Melton Valley Storage Tanks (MVSTs) have been leached in accordance with the 16.1 leach test for the radioelements 85 Sr and 137 Cs. Despite lengthy counting times, 85 Sr could not be detected in the leachates. 137 Cs was only slightly above background and corresponded to a leach index of 12.2 to 13.7 after 8 months of leaching. Leach testing of unsintered and sintered reactor product spiked with hazardous metals proved that both sintered and unsintered product passed the Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) test. Design of the equipment and flowsheet for a pilot demonstration-scale system to prove the nitrate destruction portion of the NAC process and product formation is under way

  1. Sphaerotilus natans encrusted with nanoball-shaped Fe(III) oxide minerals formed by nitrate-reducing mixotrophic Fe(II) oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sunhwa; Kim, Dong-Hun; Lee, Ji-Hoon; Hur, Hor-Gil

    2014-10-01

    Ferrous iron has been known to function as an electron source for iron-oxidizing microorganisms in both anoxic and oxic environments. A diversity of bacteria has been known to oxidize both soluble and solid-phase Fe(II) forms coupled to the reduction of nitrate. Here, we show for the first time Fe(II) oxidation by Sphaerotilus natans strain DSM 6575(T) under mixotrophic condition. Sphaerotilus natans has been known to form a sheath structure enclosing long chains of rod-shaped cells, resulting in a thick biofilm formation under oxic conditions. Here, we also demonstrate that strain DSM 6575(T) grows mixotrophically with pyruvate, Fe(II) as electron donors and nitrate as an electron acceptor and single cells of strain DSM 6575(T) are dominant under anoxic conditions. Furthermore, strain DSM 6575(T) forms nanoball-shaped amorphous Fe(III) oxide minerals encrusting on the cell surfaces through the mixotrophic iron oxidation reaction under anoxic conditions. We propose that cell encrustation results from the indirect Fe(II) oxidation by biogenic nitrite during nitrate reduction and that causes the bacterial morphological change to individual rod-shaped single cells from filamentous sheath structures. This study extends the group of existing microorganisms capable of mixotrophic Fe(II) oxidation by a new strain, S. natans strain DSM 6575(T) , and could contribute to biogeochemical cycles of Fe and N in the environment. © 2014 The Authors. FEMS Microbiology Ecology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Federation of European Microbiological Societies.

  2. Nitrogen leaching from N limited forest ecosystems: the MERLIN model applied to Gårdsjön, Sweden

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. J. Kjønaas

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic deposition of inorganic nitrogen (N compounds from the atmosphere to forested ecosystems can alter the status of a forest ecosystem from N-limited towards N-rich, which may cause, among other things, increased leaching of inorganic N below the rooting zone. To assess the time aspects of excess N leaching, a process-oriented dynamic model, MERLIN (Model of Ecosystem Retention and Loss of Inorganic Nitrogen, was tested on an N-manipulated catchment at Gårdsjön, Sweden (NITREX project. Naturally generated mature Norway spruce dominates the catchment with Scots pine in drier areas. Since 1991, ammonium nitrate (NH4NO3 solution at a rate of about 35 kg N ha-1 yr-1 (250 mmol m-2 yr-1 has been sprinkled weekly, to simulate increased atmospheric N deposition. MERLIN describes C and N cycles, where rates of uptake and cycling between pools are governed by the C/N ratios of plant and soil pools. The model is calibrated through a hindcast period and then used to predict future trends. A major source of uncertainty in model calibration and prediction is the paucity of good historical information on the specific site and stand history over the hindcast period 1930 to 1990. The model is constrained poorly in an N-limited system. The final calibration, therefore, made use of the results from the 6-year N addition experiment. No independent data set was available to provide a test for the model calibration. The model suggests that most N deposition goes to the labile (LOM and refractory (ROM organic matter pools. Significant leaching is predicted to start as the C/N ratio in LOM is reduced from the 1990 value of 35 to <28. At ambient deposition levels, the system is capable of retaining virtually all incoming N over the next 50 years. Increased decomposition rates, however, could simulate nitrate leaching losses. The rate and capacity of N assimilation as well as the change in carbon dynamics are keys to ecosystem changes. Because the knowledge of

  3. Geopolymerization at moderate temperatures in the presence of nitrate anion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ofer-Rozovsky, E.; Katz, A.; Borojovich, E.J.C.; Nikolski, A.; Binyamini, A.; Arbel-Haddad, M.; Bar-Nes, G.

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, geo-polymers generated by alkali-activation of amorphous aluminosilicate sources are considered as an alternative immobilizing matrix for low-level radioactive wastes. Although such waste streams contain low concentration of radioactive species, they are often highly saline. The aim of the research project presented here was to study the effect of the high salt content on the formation and evolution of meta-kaolin-based geo-polymeric systems cured at moderate temperatures, i.e. at 40 Celsius degrees. Meta-kaolin was alkali-activated using NaOH solutions of varying concentrations, yielding H 2 O:OH - ratios of 5.5, 9.15, 13.75 and 27.5. Sodium nitrate, which is often found at high concentrations in radioactive waste streams, was added to the activation solutions. The geo-polymeric mixtures were designed so that the Na 2 O:Al 2 O 3 ratio obtained was 1.00 in nitrate-free systems, and 1.25 in nitrate-containing systems. The ratio between nitrate and hydroxide ions, [NO 3 - ]: [OH - ], was adjusted to 0.25. The samples were cured in sealed containers at 40 C. degrees for periods ranging from one week to 3 months. The products were characterized by X-Ray diffractometry and Fourier Transform Mid-Infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). Leaching tests were performed according to the American Nuclear Society procedure ANS-16.1. Ion Chromatography was used to determine the concentration of leached Na + and NO 3 - ions. The results demonstrate the influence of composition and curing times on the mineralogy of the geo-polymeric matrix. Various crystalline phases such as zeolite A, faujasite, and nitrate bearing phases, nitrate sodalite and nitrate cancrinite, were identified among the reaction products. The sequence of phase evolution in these geo-polymeric systems was elucidated. The fraction of sodium ions released from samples containing sodium nitrate during the leaching test was found to be lower than that from reference samples prepared without the nitrate salt

  4. Metal leaching from refinery waste hydroprocessing catalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marafi, Meena; Rana, Mohan S

    2018-05-18

    The present study aims to develop an eco-friendly methodology for the recovery of nickel (Ni), molybdenum (Mo), and vanadium (V) from the refinery waste spent hydroprocessing catalyst. The proposed process has two stages: the first stage is to separate alumina, while the second stage involves the separation of metal compounds. The effectiveness of leaching agents, such as NH 4 OH, (NH 4 ) 2 CO 3 , and (NH 4 ) 2 S 2 O 8 , for the extraction of Mo, V, Ni, and Al from the refinery spent catalyst has been reported as a function of reagent concentration (0.5 to 2.0 molar), leaching time (1 to 6 h), and temperature (35 to 60°C). The optimal leaching conditions were achieved to obtain the maximum recovery of Mo, Ni, and V metals. The effect of the mixture of multi-ammonium salts on the metal extraction was also studied, which showed an adverse effect for Ni and V, while marginal improvement was observed for Mo leaching. The ammonium salts can form soluble metal complexes, in which stability or solubility depends on the nature of ammonium salt and the reaction conditions. The extracted metals and support can be reused to synthesize a fresh hydroprocessing catalyst. The process will reduce the refinery waste and recover the expensive metals. Therefore, the process is not only important from an environmental point of view but also vital from an economic perspective.

  5. Leaching Test Relationships, Laboratory-to-Field Comparisons and Recommendations for Leaching Evaluation using the Leaching Environmental Assessment Framework (LEAF)

    Science.gov (United States)

    This report presents examples of the relationships between the results of laboratory leaching tests, as defined by the Leaching Environmental Assessment Framework (LEAF) or analogous international test methods, and leaching of constituents from a broad range of materials under di...

  6. Nitrate removal by electro-bioremediation technology in Korean soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Jeong-Hee; Maruthamuthu, Sundaram; Lee, Hyun-Goo; Ha, Tae-Hyun; Bae, Jeong-Hyo

    2009-01-01

    The nitrate concentration of surface has become a serious concern in agricultural industry through out the world. In the present study, nitrate was removed in the soil by employing electro-bioremediation, a hybrid technology of bioremediation and electrokinetics. The abundance of Bacillus spp. as nitrate reducing bacteria were isolated and identified from the soil sample collected from a greenhouse at Jinju City of Gyengsangnamdo, South Korea. The nitrate reducing bacterial species were identified by 16 s RNA sequencing technique. The efficiency of bacterial isolates on nitrate removal in broth was tested. The experiment was conducted in an electrokinetic (EK) cell by applying 20 V across the electrodes. The nitrate reducing bacteria (Bacillus spp.) were inoculated in the soil for nitrate removal process by the addition of necessary nutrient. The influence of nitrate reducers on electrokinetic process was also studied. The concentration of nitrate at anodic area of soil was higher when compared to cathode in electrokinetic system, while adding bacteria in EK (EK + bio) system, the nitrate concentration was almost nil in all the area of soil. The bacteria supplies electron from organic degradation (humic substances) and enhances NO 3 - reduction (denitrification). Experimental results showed that the electro-bio kinetic process viz. electroosmosis and physiological activity of bacteria reduced nitrate in soil environment effectively. Involvement of Bacillus spp. on nitrification was controlled by electrokinetics at cathode area by reduction of ammonium ions to nitrogen gas. The excellence of the combined electro-bio kinetics technology on nitrate removal is discussed.

  7. Modeled Wet Nitrate Deposition

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Modeled data on nitrate wet deposition was obtained from Dr. Jeff Grimm at Penn State Univ. Nitrate wet depostion causes acidification and eutrophication of surface...

  8. Leach and EP [extraction procedure] toxicity tests on grouted waste from Tank 106-AN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serne, R.J.; Martin, W.J.; Lokken, R.O.; LeGore, V.L.; Lindenmeier, C.W.; Martin, P.F.C.

    1989-09-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory is conducting laboratory experiments to produce leach rate data for various waste species that will be contained in grout at Hanford. In the work reported here, grout made from Tank 106-AN liquid waste was used to produce empirical leach rate data for several radionuclides ( 60 Co, 90 Sr, 99Tc, 129I, 137Cs, and 241 Am), stable major components (NO 3 - , NO 2 - , F, Cl, and Na), and trace metals (Cr, Mo, and Ni). Two types of tests were used to produce leach rate data: an intermittent replacement leach test (ANS 16.1 leach test) and a static leach test. Measured effective diffusivities of key species are as follows: 4 to 6 x 10 -8 cm 2 /sec for 99 Tc, 3 to 7 x 10 -8 cm 2 /sec for 129 I, 4 to 6 x 10 -9 cm 2 /sec for nitrate, and 6 to 7 x 10 -9 cm 2 /sec for nitrite. The leach indices of all species studied are above (more favorable than) the waste form criteria. The leach indices for 99 Tc and 129 I are 7.4 ± 1.2 and 7.6 ± 0.4, respectively, and are being further investigated in continuing studies of double-shell slurry feed grouts. An Extraction Procedure (EP) toxicity test was also conducted and the grouted water is considered nontoxic per this test protocol. 19 refs., 9 figs., 8 tabs

  9. 21 CFR 181.33 - Sodium nitrate and potassium nitrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Sodium nitrate and potassium nitrate. 181.33...-Sanctioned Food Ingredients § 181.33 Sodium nitrate and potassium nitrate. Sodium nitrate and potassium nitrate are subject to prior sanctions issued by the U.S. Department of Agriculture for use as sources of...

  10. Aluminum chloride restoration of in situ leached uranium ores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grant, D.C.; Burgman, M.A.

    1982-01-01

    During in situ uranium mining using ammonium bicarbonate lixiviant, the ammonium exchanges with cations on the ore's clay. After mining is complete, the ammonium may desorb into post-leach ground water. For the particular ore studied, other chemicals (i.e., uranium and selenium) which are mobilized during the leach process, have also been found in the post-leach ground water. Laboratory column tests, used to simulate the leaching process, have shown that aluminum chloride can rapidly remove ammonium from the ore and thus greatly reduce the subsequent ammonium leakage level into ground water. The aluminum chloride has also been found to reduce the leakage levels of uranium and selenium. In addition, the aluminum chloride treatment produces a rapid improvement in permeability

  11. Topsoil N-budget model in orchard farming to evaluate groundwater nitrate contamination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wijayanti, Yureana; Budihardjo, Kadarwati; Sakamoto, Yasushi; Setyandito, Oki

    2017-12-01

    A small scale field research was conducted in an orchard farming area in Kofu, Japan, where nitrate contamination was found in groundwater. The purpose of assessing the leaching of nitrate in this study is to understand the transformation and transport process of N-source in topsoil that leads to nitrate contamination of groundwater. In order to calculate N-budget in the soil, the model was utilized to predict the nitrogen leaching. In this res earch, the N-budget model was modified to evaluate influence of precipitation and application pattern of fertilizer and manure compost. The result shows that at the time before the addition of manure compost and fertilizer, about 75% of fertilizer leach from topsoil. Every month, the average remaining nitrate in soil from fertilizer and manure compost are 22% and 50%, respectively. The accumulation of this monthly manure compost nitrate, which stored in soil, should be carefully monitored. It could become the potential source of nitrate leaching to groundwater in the future.

  12. Model-Based Integration and Analysis of Biogeochemical and Isotopic Dynamics in a Nitrate-Polluted Pyritic Aquifer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, Y.C.; Prommer, H.; Slomp, C.P.; Broers, H.P.; van der Grift, B.; Passier, H.F.; Greskowiak, J.; Boettcher, M.E.; van Capellen, P.

    2013-01-01

    Leaching of nitrate from agricultural land to groundwater and the resulting nitrate pollution are a major environmental problem worldwide. Its impact is often mitigated in aquifers hosting sufficiently reactive reductants that can promote autotrophic denitrification. In the case of pyrite acting as

  13. Model-based integration and analysis of biogeochemical and isotopic dynamics in a nitrate-polluted pyritic aquifer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, Y.-C.; Prommer, H.; Broers, H.P.; Slomp, C.P.; Greskowiak, J.; Van Der Grift, B.; Van Cappellen, P.

    2013-01-01

    Leaching of nitrate from agricultural land to groundwater and the resulting nitrate pollution are a major environmental problem worldwide. Its impact is often mitigated in aquifers hosting sufficiently reactive reductants that can promote autotrophic denitrification. In the case of pyrite acting as

  14. Nitrate accumulation in spinach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steingröver, Eveliene Geertruda

    1986-01-01

    Leafy vegetables, like spinach, may contain high concentrations of nitrate. In the Netherlands, about 75% of mean daily intake of nitrate orginates from the consumption of vegatables. Hazards to human health are associated with the reduction of nitrate to nitrite. Acute nitrite poisoning causes

  15. Defining Effective Salt Leaching Regions Between Drains

    OpenAIRE

    ANAPALI, Ömer; ŞAHİN, Üstün; ÖZTAŞ, Taşkın; HANAY, Abdurrahman

    2014-01-01

    The application of sufficient amounts of leaching water by means of an effective method is very important in the management and reclamation of saline and sodic soils. Reclamation cannot be achieved with insufficient leaching water application, while excess water application may cause severe problems in soil. Knowledge of the leaching regions and intensities may help to control the amounts of leaching water through effective leaching methods in areas of limited leaching. This study was und...

  16. Effect of the leaching of calcium hydroxide from cement paste on mechanical and physical properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carde, C.; Francois, R.

    1997-01-01

    This paper deals with the effect of the leaching process of cement based materials on their mechanical and physical properties. In order to characterize this effect, the authors have performed experiments on cement paste samples. The leaching process was achieved by the use of a 50% concentrate solution of ammonium nitrate. Both compression tests and water porosity tests were conducted on micro-cylinder samples (10, 12, 14 and 20 mm of diameter) because of the slow kinetics of degradation due to the leaching. The deterioration of the cement paste and the mortar exposed to the action of the ammonium nitrate was manifested by a peripheral zone of less resistance. This process induces mainly a total leaching of Ca(OH) 2 and a progressive decalcification of C-S-H which leads to a gradient of C/S ratio in the leaching zone. Both mechanical tests and water porosity tests show that there is a linear variation of the loss of strength and the increase in porosity in relation to the ratio of degraded area over total area of the sample A d /A t . It means that both compressive resistance and water porosity of the leaching zone are constant whatever the size of the degraded zone and then whatever the time of exposure to the chemical attack. So the authors could venture the hypothesis that the dissolution of calcium hydroxide is the essential parameter governing both decrease in strength and increase in porosity

  17. Spatial assessment of animal manure spreading and groundwater nitrate pollution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberta Infascelli

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Nitrate concentration in groundwater has frequently been linked to non-point pollution. At the same time the existence of intensive agriculture and extremely intensive livestock activity increases the potential for nitrate pollution in shallow groundwater. Nitrate used in agriculture could cause adverse effects on human and animal health. In order to evaluate the groundwater nitrate pollution, and how it might evolve in time, it is essential to develop control systems and to improve policies and incentives aimed at controlling the amount of nitrate entering downstream water systems. The province of Caserta in southern Italy is characterized by high levels of animal manure loading. A comparison between manure nitrogen production and nitrate concentration in groundwater was carried out in this area, using geostatistical tools and spatial statistics. The results show a discrepancy between modelling of nitrate leaching and monitoring of the groundwater and, moreover, no spatial correlation between nitrogen production in livestock farms and nitrate concentration in groundwater, suggesting that producers are not following the regulatory procedures for the agronomic use of manure. The methodology developed in this paper could be applied also in other regions in which European Union fertilization plans are not adequately followed.

  18. Alkaline leaching of coal by the mechanochemical treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Turèániová ¼udmila

    1998-09-01

    Full Text Available The possibility of application of a new process GACL (Grinding and Aqueous Caustic Leaching for the reduction of mineral components in the brown coal Nováky was tested. The simultaneous grinding and chemical leaching enable us to extract 41 % total sulphur, 95 % arsenic and to reduce the ash content to 43 %. The process proceeds at the atmospheric pressure, temperature 90oC and in diluted NaOH solutions (5 %.

  19. Technique for in situ leach simulation of uranium ores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grant, D.C.; Seidel, D.C.; Nichols, I.L.

    1985-01-01

    In situ uranium mining offers the advantages of minimal environmental disturbance, low capital and operating costs, and reduced mining development time. It is becoming an increasingly attractive mining method for the recovery of uranium from secondary ore deposits. In order to better understand the process, a laboratory technique was developed and used to study and simulate both the chemical and physical phenomena occurring in ore bodies during in situ leaching. The laboratory simulation technique has been used to determine effects of leaching variables on permeability, uranium recovery, and post-leach aquifer restoration. This report describes the simulation system and testing procedure in sufficient detail to allow the construction of the system, and to perform the desired leaching tests. With construction of such a system, in situ leaching of a given ore using various leach conditions can be evaluated relatively rapidly in the laboratory. Not only could optimum leach conditions be selected for existing ore bodies, but also exploitation of new ore bodies could be accelerated. 8 references, 8 figures, 2 tables

  20. To accelerate technology of in situ leaching and heap leaching for mining mineral resources of China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luo Mei

    1999-01-01

    Recently, in situ leaching and heap leaching are the most advanced technology for mining low-grade mineral resources in the world. The author briefly expounds the basic concept and advantages of in situ leaching and heap leaching and deals with the main research content of the hydrometallurgical technology of in situ leaching and heap leaching, its development and present application at home and abroad. Having expounded the gap existing between China's technology of in situ leaching and heap leaching and the foreign technology, the author forecasts the prospects of accelerating the mining of China's mineral resources by using the technology of in situ leaching and heap leaching

  1. Physiology and interaction of nitrate and nitrite reduction in Staphylococcus carnosus.

    OpenAIRE

    Neubauer, H; Götz, F

    1996-01-01

    Staphylococcus carnosus reduces nitrate to ammonia in two steps. (i) Nitrate was taken up and reduced to nitrite, and nitrite was subsequently excreted. (ii) After depletion of nitrate, the accumulated nitrite was imported and reduced to ammonia, which again accumulated in the medium. The localization, energy gain, and induction of the nitrate and nitrite reductases in S. carnosus were characterized. Nitrate reductase seems to be a membrane-bound enzyme involved in respiratory energy conserva...

  2. Do nitrates differ?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fung, H.-L.

    1992-01-01

    1 The organic nitrates all share a common biochemical and physiological mechanism of action. 2 The organic nitrates differ substantially in their pharmacologic potency and pharmacokinetics. In vitro potency differences appear larger than the corresponding in vivo activities. 3 The duration of action of organic nitrates, after a single immediate-release dose, is governed by the pharmacokinetics of the drug. However, the duration of action of available sustained-release preparations, whatever the nitrate or formulation, is limited to about 12 h, due to the development of pharmacologic tolerance. 4 Nitrates do not appear to differ in their production of undesirable effects. PMID:1633079

  3. Nitrate pollution of groundwater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heaton, T.H.E.

    1986-01-01

    Concern about the possible health risks associated with the consumption of nitrate has led many countries, including South Africa, to propose that 10mg of nitrogen (as nitrate or nitrite) per liter should be the maximum allowable limit for domestic water supplies. Groundwater in certain parts of South Africa and Namibia contains nitrate in concentrations which exceed this limit. The CSIR's Natural Isotope Division has been studying the nitrogen isotope composition of the nitrate as an aid to investigation into the sources of this nitrate contamination

  4. Evaluation of nitrate pollution of groundwater in Mnasra region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marouane, B.; El hajjaji, S.; Dahchour, A.; Dousset, S.

    2012-01-01

    Gharb area is one of the most important agricultural regions in Morocco, where the application of fertilizers is conducted in many cases without any respect of standards. This situation may generate negative environmental impact in vulnerable areas such as Mnasra groundwater. Our study tends to evaluate the level of contamination by nitrate of groundwater in a Mnasra area. The results show that 80% of the sampled wells are highly concentrated in nitrates in comparison with the standard of WHO. Intensification of agriculture in the area associated to excessive fertilizer application, repeated applications, irrigation and rainfall are reasons for an increasing nitrates pollution of water resources. Leaching of nitrate to the groundwater should receive more attention for its potential high mobile propriety which could cause serious damages for the environment and negative impact to the health of population.

  5. Biochar can restrict N2O emissions and the risk of nitrogen leaching from an agricultural soil during the freeze-thaw period

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riitta Kettunen

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Freeze-thaw (FT events in soils can cause a burst of nitrous oxide (N2O and enhance N leaching during the spring-thaw event. We studied whether a soil amended with wood-derived (spruce chips biochar (10 tonnes ha-1, produced at rather low temperatures (400-450°C, could reduce the burst of N2O and the risk of N leaching from an agricultural soil after a FT event. A short-term laboratory experiment (4 weeks was conducted with 24 vegetated (Phleum pratense mesocosms (12 controls, 12 biochar-treated that had spent a dormant season in the dark at 15°C for two months after the growing season. N2O efflux to the atmosphere and ammonium (NH4+-N and nitrate (NO3-N in the percolated soil water were monitored before and after the FT event. N2O was monitored with the dark chamber method and analyzed using a gas chromatograph. We found that soil amended biochar can significantly diminish the burst of N2O after the soil FT event (by 61% just after FT event and substantially reduce the risk of NO3-N and NH4+-N leaching from the agricultural soil. Compared to the control, the decrement in concentrations of NO3-N and NH4+-N in water percolated through the biochar amended soil in the mesocosms was 58% and 22%, respectively.

  6. Leaching properties and chemical compositions of calcines produced at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Staples, B.A.; Paige, B.E.; Rhodes, D.W.; Wilding, M.W.

    1980-01-01

    No significant chemical differences were determined between retrieved and fresh calcine based on chemical and spectrochemical analyses. Little can be derived from the amounts of the radioisotopes present in the retrieved calcine samples other than the ratios of strontium-90 to cesium-137 are typical of aged fission product. The variations in concentrations of radionuclides within the composite samples of each bin also reflect the differences in compositions of waste solutions calcined. In general the leaching characteristics of both calcines by distilled water are similar. In both materials the radionuclides of cesium and strontium were selectively leached at significant rates, although cesium leached much more completely from the alumina calcine than from the zirconia calcine. Cesium and strontium are probably contained in both calcines as nitrate salts and also as fluoride salts in zirconia calcine, all of which are at least slightly soluble in water. Radionuclides of cerium, ruthenium, and plutonium in both calcines were highly resistant to leaching and leached at rates similar to or less than those of the matrix elements. These elements exist as polyvalent metal ions in the waste solutions before calcination and they probably form insoluble oxides and fluorides in the calcine. The relatively slow leaching of nitrate ion from zirconia calcine and radiocesium from both calcines suggests that the calcine matrix in some manner prevents complete or immediate contact of the soluble ions with water. Whether radiostrontium forms slightly fluoride salts or forms nitrate salts which are protected in the same manner as radiocesium is unknown. Nevertheless, selective leaching of cesium and strontim is retarded in some manner by the calcine matrix

  7. Development of an accelerated leaching method for incineration bottom ash correlated to toxicity characteristic leaching protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Shengxuan; Zhou, Xuedong; Ge, Liya; Ng, Sum Huan; Zhou, Xiaodong; Chang, Victor Wei-Chung

    2016-10-01

    Heavy metals and some metalloids are the most significant inorganic contaminants specified in toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP) in determining the safety of landfills or further utilization. As a consequence, a great deal of efforts had been made on the development of miniaturized analytical devices, such as Microchip Electrophoresis (ME) and μTAS for on-site testing of heavy metals and metalloids to prevent spreading of those pollutants or decrease the reutilization period of waste materials such as incineration bottom ash. However, the bottleneck lied in the long and tedious conventional TCLP that requires 18 h of leaching. Without accelerating the TCLP process, the on-site testing of the waste material leachates was impossible. In this study, therefore, a new accelerated leaching method (ALM) combining ultrasonic assisted leaching with tumbling was developed to reduce the total leaching time from 18 h to 30 min. After leaching, the concentrations of heavy metals and metalloids were determined with ICP-MS or ICP-optical emission spectroscopy. No statistical significance between ALM and TCLP was observed for most heavy metals (i.e., cobalt, manganese, mercury, molybdenum, nickel, silver, strontium, and tin) and metalloids (i.e., arsenic and selenium). For the heavy metals with statistical significance, correlation factors derived between ALM and TCLP were 0.56, 0.20, 0.037, and 0.019 for barium, cadmium, chromium, and lead, respectively. Combined with appropriate analytical techniques (e.g., ME), the ALM can be applied to rapidly prepare the incineration bottom ash samples as well as other environmental samples for on-site determination of heavy metals and metalloids. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Glass-surface area to solution-volume ratio and its implications to accelerated leach testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pederson, L.R.; Buckwalter, C.Q.; McVay, G.L.; Riddle, B.L.

    1982-10-01

    The value of glass surface area to solution volume ratio (SA/V) can strongly influence the leaching rate of PNL 76-68 glass. The leaching rate is largely governed by silicon solubility constraints. Silicic acid in solution reduced the elemental release of all glass components. No components are leached to depths greater than that of silicon. The presence of the reaction layer had no measurable effect on the rate of leaching. Accelerated leach testing is possible since PNL 76-68 glass leaching is solubility-controlled (except at very low SA/V values). A series of glasses leached with SA/V x time = constant will yield identical elemental release

  9. Ammonium nitrate explosion hazards

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Negovanović Milanka

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Ammonium nitrate (AN primarily is used as a fertilizer but it is also very important compound in the production of industrial explosives. The application of ammonium nitrate in the production of industrial explosives was related with the early era of Nobel dynamite and widely increased with the appearance of blasting agents such as ANFO and Slurry, in the middle of the last Century. Throughout the world millions of tons of ammonium nitrate are produced annually and handled without incident. Although ammonium nitrate generally is used safely, accidental explosions involving AN have high impact resulting in loss of lives and destruction of property. The paper presents the basic properties of ammonium nitrate as well as hazards in handling of ammonium nitrate in order to prevent accidents. Several accidents with explosions of ammonium nitrate resulted in catastrophic consequences are listed in the paper as examples of non-compliance with prescribed procedures.

  10. Disposal of leached residual in heap leaching by neutralization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Jingmin

    1993-01-01

    The disposal results of leached residual with lime are described. Using the ratio of residual to lime being 100 : 1 the ideal disposal results were obtained with the effluent of the neutralized residual close to neutral

  11. Economic leaching at Roessing Uranium Limited

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, C.C.

    1990-01-01

    In the fourteen years that Roessing Uranium Limited has been in production, the metallurgical operations and controls on the leaching plant have envolved through four basic stages. Initially, the emphasis was placed on the achievement of consistent plant operation by overcoming severe start-up difficulties. The second stage involved the attainment of the design operating targets and also the commissioning of the ferric-leaching reactors in order to achieve a ferric ion concentration of more than 3.0 g/l. Improvements in control then became the priority, with the emphasis on consistently achieving the target concentrations of ferric ions, total iron, and terminal acidity. The latest phase has concentrated on the optimization of costs by means of adjustments to the historically established operating parameters in order to achieve large savings on consumables while maintaining the leaching efficiencies. Apart from the obvious incentive of reducing costs in an inflationary economy and a depressed uranium market, impetus for this work was given by a change in the type of ore from the open pit, which has the effect of reducing the extraction efficiency while increasing the consumption of consumable materials. These problems and their solutions are discussed in detail, and the importance to cost-effective optimization of an accurate up-to-date cost-reporting structure is stressed. 9 figs., 2 tabs

  12. Mechanism for elevated temperature leaching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kenna, B.T.; Murphy, K.D.

    1979-01-01

    Long-term, elevated temperature leaching and subsequent electron microprobe analysis of simulated waste glass and ceramic materials have been completed. A cyclic leaching pattern was found in all systems over a 20-month period. It appears that the leaching of mobile ions by simple diffusional processes is modified by more complex chemical interactions. The release of immobile ions is primarily a function of their chemical interactions in the matrix which suggests that these ions may be complex species when released into solution. A mechanism is proposed which incorporates these ideas and the cyclic phenomenon observed

  13. Leaching of concrete : the leaching process : extrapolation of deterioration : effect on the structural stability

    OpenAIRE

    Fagerlund, Göran

    2000-01-01

    The leaching process when water attacks concrete, and the effect of leaching on the strength and durability of a concrete structure, is analysed theoretically. Technique for prediction of the future leaching and structural stability is outlined. The analysis is to a certain extent supported by data from literature. The leaching process is divided in five different types: 1: Pure surface leaching 2: Surface leaching involving erosion 3: Homogeneous leaching over the entire structure 4...

  14. Nitrate reduction in an unconfined sandy aquifer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Postma, Diederik Jan; Boesen, Carsten; Kristiansen, Henning

    1991-01-01

    of total dissolved ions in the NO3- free anoxic zone indicates the downward migration of contaminants and that active nitrate reduction is taking place. Nitrate is apparently reduced to N2 because both nitrite and ammonia are absent or found at very low concentrations. Possible electron donors......Nitrate distribution and reduction processes were investigated in an unconfined sandy aquifer of Quaternary age. Groundwater chemistry was studied in a series of eight multilevel samplers along a flow line, deriving water from both arable and forested land. Results show that plumes of nitrate...... processes of O2 and NO3- occur at rates that are fast compared to the rate of downward water transport. Nitrate-contaminated groundwater contains total contents of dissolved ions that are two to four times higher than in groundwater derived from the forested area. The persistence of the high content...

  15. Comparison of leaching tests and study of leaching mechanisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amarantos, S.G.; Papadokostaki, K.G.; Petropoulos, J.H.

    1985-10-01

    The present work is concerned first with the study of certain aspects of the leaching kinetics of Cs + and Sr ++ embedded in cement, as Cs 2 SO 4 and SrSO 4 , and in particular: (a) the comparative evaluation of leaching in (i) stagnant, (ii) stirred and (iii) continuously flowing (modified Soxhlet) water, (b) the effect of atmospheric CO 2 on elution, (c) the effect of temperature changes during leaching. Secondly, model kinetic studies were carried out using cellulose acetate incorporating SrSO 4 , CaSO 4 or NaCl. The main results obtained were: (1) Cs leaching rates were not significantly affected by the leaching method or by the presence of atmospheric CO 2 . The embedded Cs exists in relatively easily leachable and less rapidly leachable (most probably located within the gel regions) forms. (2) Elution of Sr is retarded by stagnant and infrequently renewed leachant (method (i)) and by the presence of atmospheric CO 2 ; leaching method (iii), which tends to minimize both of these effects, gave the highest elution rates. (3) The observed elution kinetics in the case of cellulose acetate-CaSO 4 or SrSO 4 conform to the Higuchi model, but a more elaborate theory is needed for the cellulose acetate-NaCl system. (author)

  16. LEACH-A: An Adaptive Method for Improving LEACH Protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianli ZHAO

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Energy has become one of the most important constraints on wireless sensor networks. Hence, many researchers in this field focus on how to design a routing protocol to prolong the lifetime of the network. The classical hierarchical protocols such as LEACH and LEACH-C have better performance in saving the energy consumption. However, the choosing strategy only based on the largest residue energy or shortest distance will still consume more energy. In this paper an adaptive routing protocol named “LEACH-A” which has an energy threshold E0 is proposed. If there are cluster nodes whose residual energy are greater than E0, the node of largest residual energy is selected to communicated with the base station; When all the cluster nodes energy are less than E0, the node nearest to the base station is select to communication with the base station. Simulations show that our improved protocol LEACH-A performs better than the LEACH and the LEACH-C.

  17. Effects of increased deposition of atmospheric nitrogen on an upland moor: leaching of N species and soil solution chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilkington, M G; Caporn, S J M; Carroll, J A; Cresswell, N; Lee, J A; Ashenden, T W; Brittain, S A; Reynolds, B; Emmett, B A

    2005-05-01

    This study was designed to investigate the leaching response of an upland moorland to long-term (10 yr) ammonium nitrate additions of 40, 80 and 120 kg N ha(-1) yr(-1) and to relate this response to other indications of potential system damage, such as acidification and cation displacement. Results showed increases in nitrate leaching only in response to high rates of N input, in excess of 96 and 136 kg total N input ha(-1) yr(-1) for the organic Oh horizon and mineral Eag horizon, respectively. Individual N additions did not alter ammonium leaching from either horizon and ammonium was completely retained by the mineral horizon. Leaching of dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) from the Oh horizon was increased by the addition of 40 kg N ha(-1) yr(-1), but in spite of increases, retention of total dissolved nitrogen reached a maximum of 92% and 95% of 80 kg added N ha(-1) yr(-1) in the Oh and Eag horizons, respectively. Calcium concentrations and calcium/aluminium ratios were decreased in the Eag horizon solution with significant acidification mainly in the Oh horizon leachate. Nitrate leaching is currently regarded as an early indication of N saturation in forest systems. Litter C:N ratios were significantly lowered but values remained above a threshold predicted to increase leaching of N in forests.

  18. Leaching behaviour of tritium from a hardened cement paste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuzuru, H.; Moriyama, N.; Ito, A.

    1979-01-01

    Leaching of tritium from a hardened cement paste into an aqueous phase has been studied to assess the safety of solidification of the tritiated liquid waste with cement. Leaching tests were carried out in accordance with the method recommended by the International Atomic Energy Agency. The leaching fraction was measured as functions of the waste-cement wt ratio (Wa/C), temperature of leachant and curing time. the tritium leachability of cements follows the order: alumina cement > Portland cement > slag cement. The fraction of tritium leached increases with increasing Wa/C and temperature and decreasing curing period. A deionized water as a leachant gives a slightly higher leachability than the synthetic sea water. The coating of the specimen surface with bitumen reduces the leachability to about 5% of its value for the specimen without coating. (author)

  19. Nitrate concentrations in soil solutions below Danish forests

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Callesen, Ingeborg; Raulund-Rasmussen, Karsten; Gundersen, Per

    1999-01-01

    leaching in relation to land-use, a national monitoring programme has established sampling routines in a 7x7 km grid including 111 points in forests. During winters of 1986-1993, soil samples were obtained from a depth of 0-25, 25-50, 50-75 and 75-100 cm. Nitrate concentrations in soil solutions were...... species. A few sites deviated radically from the general pattern of low concentrations. The elevated concentrations recorded there were probably caused by high levels of N deposition due to emission from local sources or temporal disruptions of the N cycle. The nitrate concentration in the soil solution...

  20. Next Generation of Leaching Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    A corresponding abstract has been cleared for this presentation. The four methods comprising the Leaching Environmental Assessment Framework are described along with the tools to support implementation of the more rigorous and accurate source terms that are developed using LEAF ...

  1. Heavy metal leaching from mine tailings as affected by plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, D.; Schwab, A.P.; Banks, M.K.

    1999-12-01

    A column experiment was conducted to determine the impact of soil cover and plants on heavy metal leaching from mine tailings and heavy metal contaminated soil. Columns made of PVC were constructed with 30 cm subsoil covered by 30 cm of mine tailings followed by 0, 30, or 60 cm subsoil covered by 30 cm of mine tailings followed by 0, 30, or 60 cm of clean topsoil. Two grasses, tall fescue (Festuca arundinacea Schreb.) and big bluestem (Andropogon gerardii), were grown in the columns. The columns were leached at a slow rate for 1 yr with a 0.001 M CaCl{sub 2} solution under unsaturated conditions. The presence of both tall fescue and big bluestem increased Zn and Cd concentrations in the leachate. Lead concentrations in leachates were not affected by the presence of plants. Although plants generally reduced the total amount of water leached, total mass of Zn and Cd leached generally was not impacted by plants. Total mass of Pb leached was positively correlated with total leachate collected from each column. Covering the mine tailings with 60 cm of topsoil increased the mass of Zn and Cd leached relative to no topsoil. When the subsoil was absent, Zn and Cd leaching increased by as much as 20-fold, verifying the ability of soil to act as a sink for metals. Mine tailing remediation by establishing vegetation can reduce Pb movement but may enhance short-term Cd and Zn leaching. However, the changes were relatively small and do not outweigh the benefits of using vegetation in mine tailings reclamation.

  2. 'Low-acid' sulfide oxidation using nitrate-enriched groundwater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donn, Michael; Boxall, Naomi; Reid, Nathan; Meakin, Rebecca; Gray, David; Kaksonen, Anna; Robson, Thomas; Shiers, Denis

    2016-04-01

    where pH remains neutral. The "low-acid" oxidation of sulfides with nitrate as an electron acceptor has been demonstrated at the laboratory scale. In 90-day microcosm respirometry experiments, we exposed a mixture of pulverized quartz and pyrite -rich ore to natural, high-nitrate groundwater and inoculated the microcosms with a culture of aerobic and anaerobic nitrate-dependent iron and sulfur-oxidising microorganisms, which were enriched from ore, groundwater and activated waste water. Incubations were performed under both oxic and anoxic conditions, in addition to abiotic controls. Initial results show that oxidation of the sulfides under nitrate-rich and microbially enhanced conditions does produce less acid than the same material under oxic conditions, and to some degree can match the models as long as oxygen ingress can be controlled. These results are the focus of further research into how this process can be enhanced and whether it can be applied in the field. Nitrate-driven oxidation of sulfides could potentially be used as a new approach to reduce acid generation and leaching of contaminants from waste dumps, in a passive or actively managed process designed to deplete and/or ameliorate (i.e. through surface passivation) the mineralogical hazard. Developing our understanding of biological aspects of these processes may also allow testing of longer-term "bio-caps" for various tailings and dump materials.

  3. Pressure leaching of chalcopyrite concentrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleksei, Kritskii; Kirill, Karimov; Stanislav, Naboichenko

    2018-05-01

    The results of chalcopyrite concentrate processing using low-temperature and high-temperature sulfuric acid pressure leaching are presented. A material of the following composition was used, 21.5 Cu, 0.1 Zn, 0.05 Pb, 0.04 Ni, 26.59 S, 24.52 Fe, 16.28 SiO2 (in wt.%). The influence of technological parameters on the degree of copper and iron extraction into the leach solution was studied in the wide range of values. The following conditions were suggested as the optimal for the high-temperature pressure leaching: t = 190 °C, PO2 = 0.5 MPa, CH2SO4 = 15 g/L, L:S = 6:1. At the mentioned parameters, it is possible to extract at least 98% Cu from concentrate into the leaching solution during 100 minutes. The following conditions were suggested as optimal for the low-temperature pressure leaching: t = 105 °C, PO2 = 1.3-1.5 MPa, CH2SO4 = 90 g/L, L:S = 10:1. At the mentioned parameters, it is possible to extract up to 83% Cu from the concentrate into the leach solution during 300-360 minutes.

  4. Stable isotope evidence for an atmospheric origin of desert nitrate deposits in northern Chile and southern California, U.S.A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böhlke, J.K.; Ericksen, G.E.; Revesz, K.

    1997-01-01

    Natural surficial accumulations of nitrate-rich salts in the Atacama Desert, northern Chile, and in the Death Valley region of the Mojave Desert, southern California, are well known, but despite many geologic and geochemical studies, the origins of the nitrates have remained controversial. N and O isotopes in nitrate, and S isotopes in coexisting soluble sulfate, were measured to determine if some proposed N sources could be supported or rejected, and to determine if the isotopic signature of these natural deposits could be used to distinguish them from various types of anthropogenic nitrate contamination that might be found in desert groundwaters. High-grade caliche-type nitrate deposits from both localities have ??15N values that range from -5 to +5???, but are mostly near 0???. Values of ??15N near 0??? are consistent with either bulk atmospheric N deposition or microbial N fixation as major sources of the N in the deposits. ??18O values of those desert nitrates with ??15N near 0??? range from about +31 to + 50??? (V-SMOW), significantly higher than that of atmospheric O2 (+ 23.5???). Such high values of ??18O are considered unlikely to result entirely from nitrification of reduced N, but rather resemble those of modern atmospheric nitrate in precipitation from some other localities. Assuming that limited modern atmospheric isotope data are applicable to the deposits, and allowing for nitrification of co-deposited ammonium, it is estimated that the fraction of the nitrate in the deposits that could be accounted for isotopically by atmospheric N deposition may be at least 20% and possibly as much as 100%. ??34S values are less diagnostic but could also be consistent with atmospheric components in some of the soluble sulfates associated with the deposits. The stable isotope data support the hypothesis that some high-grade caliche-type nitrate-rich salt deposits in some of the Earth's hyperarid deserts represent long-term accumulations of atmospheric deposition

  5. Uranous nitrate production using PtO2 catalyst and H2/H2 gas mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rao, K.S.; Shyamlal, R.; Narayanan, C.V.; Patil, A.R.; Ramanujam, A.; Kansra, V.P.; Balu, K.; Vaidya, V.N.

    2001-01-01

    The feasibility of producing near 100% uranous nitrate, the partitioning agent used in the spent fuel reprocessing by Purex process, by catalytically reducing uranyl nitrate with H 2 and H 2 gas mixtures was extensively studied. As near quantitative reduction of uranyl nitrate could be easily achieved in laboratory scale studies, pilot plant scale reduction of uranyl nitrate was also carried out and five litres of uranyl nitrate of 100 g/1 could be quantitatively reduced in one hour. (author)

  6. Global Patterns of Legacy Nitrate Storage in the Vadose Zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ascott, M.; Gooddy, D.; Wang, L.; Stuart, M.; Lewis, M.; Ward, R.; Binley, A. M.

    2017-12-01

    Global-scale nitrogen (N) budgets have been developed to quantify the impact of man's influence on the nitrogen cycle. However, these budgets often do not consider legacy effects such as accumulation of nitrate in the deep vadose zone. In this presentation we show that the vadose zone is an important store of nitrate which should be considered in future nitrogen budgets for effective policymaking. Using estimates of depth to groundwater and nitrate leaching for 1900-2000, we quantify for the first time the peak global storage of nitrate in the vadose zone, estimated as 605 - 1814 Teragrams (Tg). Estimates of nitrate storage are validated using previous national and basin scale estimates of N storage and observed groundwater nitrate data for North America and Europe. Nitrate accumulation per unit area is greatest in North America, China and Central and Eastern Europe where thick vadose zones are present and there is an extensive history of agriculture. In these areas the long solute travel time in the vadose zone means that the anticipated impact of changes in agricultural practices on groundwater quality may be substantially delayed. We argue that in these areas use of conventional nitrogen budget approaches is inappropriate and their continued use will lead to significant errors.

  7. Circuit Design for Sensor Detection Signal Conditioner Nitrate Content

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robeth Manurung

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Nitrate is one of macro nutrients very important for agriculture. The availability of nitrate in soil is limited because it is very easy to leaching by rain, therefore nitrate could be contaminated ground water by  over-process of fertilizer. This process could also produce inefficiency in agriculture if it happened continuesly without pre-analysis of farm field. The answer those problems, it is need to develop the ion sensor system to measure concentrations of nitrat in soil. The system is consist of nitrate ion sensor device, signal conditioning and data acquisition circuit. The design and fabrications of signal conditioning circuit which integrated into ion nitrate sensor system and will apply for agriculture. This sensor has been used amperometric with three electrodes configuration: working, reference  and auxiliarry; the ion senstive membrane has use conductive polymer. The screen printing technique has been choosen to fabricate electrodes and deposition technique for ion sensitive membrane is electropolymerization. The characterization of sensor has been conducted using nitrate standard solution with range of concentration between 1 µM–1 mM. The characterization has shown that sensor has a good response with cureent output between 2.8–4.71 µA, liniearity factor is 99.65% and time response 250 second.

  8. Experience with restoration of ore-bearing aquifers after in situ leach uranium mining

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yazikov, V.G.; Zabaznov, V.U.

    2002-01-01

    In many cases the most important environmental issue for in situ leach uranium mining technology is the impact on groundwater. Usually the greatest issue is the chemical condition of the ore bearing aquifer following the completion of leaching. Based on experience gained during post leach monitoring, it has been found that in properly selected sites the impact following leaching is greatly reduced because of the process of self restoration, otherwise known as natural attenuation. This paper provides ground water monitoring data from 1985 to 1997 following completion of leaching at the Irkol uranium deposit, Kazakhstan. It shows the evolution of the pH, and other chemical parameters over this period. The monitoring results demonstrate that at this site the process of natural attenuation appears to have effectively reduced the impact on groundwater at the site, as well as to keep contaminated leaching fluids from moving more than a few hundreds of metres from the wellfield. (author)

  9. Lateral spread affects nitrogen leaching from urine patches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cichota, Rogerio; Vogeler, Iris; Snow, Val; Shepherd, Mark; McAuliffe, Russell; Welten, Brendon

    2018-09-01

    Nitrate leaching from urine deposited by grazing animals is a critical constraint for sustainable dairy farming in New Zealand. While considerable progress has been made to understand the fate of nitrogen (N) under urine patches, little consideration has been given to the spread of urinary N beyond the wetted area. In this study, we modelled the lateral spread of nitrogen from the wetted area of a urine patch to the soil outside the patch using a combination of two process-based models (HYDRUS and APSIM). The simulations provided insights on the extent and temporal pattern for the redistribution of N in the soil following a urine deposition and enabled investigating the effect of lateral spread of urinary N on plant growth and N leaching. The APSIM simulation, using an implementation of a dispersion-diffusion function, was tested against experimental data from a field experiment conducted in spring on a well-drained soil. Depending on the geometry considered for the dispersion-diffusion function (plate or cylindrical) the area-averaged N leaching decreased by 8 and 37% compared with simulations without lateral N spread; this was due to additional N uptake from pasture on the edge area. A sensitivity analysis showed that area-averaged pasture growth was not greatly affected by the value of the dispersion factor used in the model, whereas N leaching was very sensitive. Thus, the need to account for the edge effect may depend on the objective of the simulations. The modelling results also showed that considering lateral spread of urinary N was sufficient to describe the experimental data, but plant root uptake across urine patch zones may still be relevant in other conditions. Although further work is needed for improving accuracy, the simulated and experimental results demonstrate that accounting for the edge effect is important for determining N leaching from urine-affected areas. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Groundwater restoration with in situ uranium leach mining

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charbeneau, R.J.

    1984-01-01

    In situ leach mining of uranium has developed into a major mining technology. Since 1975, when the first commercial mine was licensed in the United States, the percentage or uranium produced by in situ mining has steadily grown from 0.6 to 10 percent in 1980. Part of the reason for this growth is that in situ mining offers less initial capital investment, shorter start-up times, greater safety, and less labor than conventional mining methods. There is little disturbance of the surface terrain or surface waters, no mill tailings piles, and no large open pits, but in situ leaching mining does have environmental disadvantages. During the mining, large amounts of ground water are cirulated and there is some withdrawal from an area where aquifers constitute a major portion of the water supply for other purposes. When an ammonia-based leach system is used, the ammonium ion is introduced into an area where cation exchange on clays (and some production of nitrate) may occur. Also, injection of an oxidant with the leach solution causes valence and phase changes of indigenous elements such as As, Cu, Fe, Mo, Se, S, and V as well as U. Furthermore, the surrounding ground water can become contaminated by escape of the leach solution from the mining zone. This chapter presents an overview of the in situ mining technology, including uranium deposition, mining techniques, and ground water restoration alternatives. The latter part of the chapter covers the situation in South Texas. Economics and development of the industry, groundwater resources, regulation, and restoration activities are also reviewed

  11. Recycling of spent lithium-ion battery cathode materials by ammoniacal leaching

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ku, Heesuk; Jung, Yeojin; Jo, Minsang; Park, Sanghyuk [Department of Energy & Mineral Resources Engineering, Sejong University, Seoul 05006 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sookyung [Urban Mine Department, Korea Institute of Geoscience and Mineral Resources, 124 Gwahang-no, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Yang, Donghyo, E-mail: ydh@kigam.re.kr [Urban Mine Department, Korea Institute of Geoscience and Mineral Resources, 124 Gwahang-no, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Rhee, Kangin; An, Eung-Mo; Sohn, Jeongsoo [Urban Mine Department, Korea Institute of Geoscience and Mineral Resources, 124 Gwahang-no, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kwon, Kyungjung, E-mail: kfromberk@gmail.com [Department of Energy & Mineral Resources Engineering, Sejong University, Seoul 05006 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-08-05

    Highlights: • Ammoniacal leaching is used to recover spent Li-ion battery cathode materials. • Leaching agents consist of ammonia, ammonium sulfite and ammonium carbonate. • Ammonium sulfite is a reductant and ammonium carbonate acts as pH buffer. • Co and Cu can be fully leached while Mn and Al are not leached. • Co recovery via ammoniacal leaching is economical compared to acid leaching. - Abstract: As the production and consumption of lithium ion batteries (LIBs) increase, the recycling of spent LIBs appears inevitable from an environmental, economic and health viewpoint. The leaching behavior of Ni, Mn, Co, Al and Cu from treated cathode active materials, which are separated from a commercial LIB pack in hybrid electric vehicles, is investigated with ammoniacal leaching agents based on ammonia, ammonium carbonate and ammonium sulfite. Ammonium sulfite as a reductant is necessary to enhance leaching kinetics particularly in the ammoniacal leaching of Ni and Co. Ammonium carbonate can act as a pH buffer so that the pH of leaching solution changes little during leaching. Co and Cu can be fully leached out whereas Mn and Al are hardly leached and Ni shows a moderate leaching efficiency. It is confirmed that the cathode active materials are a composite of LiMn{sub 2}O{sub 4}, LiCo{sub x}Mn{sub y}Ni{sub z}O{sub 2,} Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and C while the leach residue is composed of LiNi{sub x}Mn{sub y}Co{sub z}O{sub 2}, LiMn{sub 2}O{sub 4}, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, MnCO{sub 3} and Mn oxides. Co recovery via the ammoniacal leaching is believed to gain a competitive edge on convenitonal acid leaching both by reducing the sodium hydroxide expense for increasing the pH of leaching solution and by removing the separation steps of Mn and Al.

  12. Nitrate reduction in geologically heterogeneous catchments — A framework for assessing the scale of predictive capability of hydrological models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Refsgaard, Jens Christian; Auken, Esben; Bamberg, Charlotte A.; Christensen, Britt S.B.; Clausen, Thomas; Dalgaard, Esben; Effersø, Flemming; Ernstsen, Vibeke; Gertz, Flemming; Hansen, Anne Lausten; He, Xin; Jacobsen, Brian H.; Jensen, Karsten Høgh; Jørgensen, Flemming; Jørgensen, Lisbeth Flindt; Koch, Julian; Nilsson, Bertel; Petersen, Christian; De Schepper, Guillaume; Schamper, Cyril

    2014-01-01

    In order to fulfil the requirements of the EU Water Framework Directive nitrate load from agricultural areas to surface water in Denmark needs to be reduced by about 40%. The regulations imposed until now have been uniform, i.e. the same restrictions for all areas independent of the subsurface conditions. Studies have shown that on a national basis about 2/3 of the nitrate leaching from the root zone is reduced naturally, through denitrification, in the subsurface before reaching the streams. Therefore, it is more cost-effective to identify robust areas, where nitrate leaching through the root zone is reduced in the saturated zone before reaching the streams, and vulnerable areas, where no subsurface reduction takes place, and then only impose regulations/restrictions on the vulnerable areas. Distributed hydrological models can make predictions at grid scale, i.e. at much smaller scale than the entire catchment. However, as distributed models often do not include local scale hydrogeological heterogeneities, they are typically not able to make accurate predictions at scales smaller than they are calibrated. We present a framework for assessing nitrate reduction in the subsurface and for assessing at which spatial scales modelling tools have predictive capabilities. A new instrument has been developed for airborne geophysical measurements, Mini-SkyTEM, dedicated to identifying geological structures and heterogeneities with horizontal and lateral resolutions of 30–50 m and 2 m, respectively, in the upper 30 m. The geological heterogeneity and uncertainty are further analysed by use of the geostatistical software TProGS by generating stochastic geological realisations that are soft conditioned against the geophysical data. Finally, the flow paths within the catchment are simulated by use of the MIKE SHE hydrological modelling system for each of the geological models generated by TProGS and the prediction uncertainty is characterised by the variance between the

  13. Nitrate reduction in geologically heterogeneous catchments — A framework for assessing the scale of predictive capability of hydrological models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Refsgaard, Jens Christian, E-mail: jcr@geus.dk [Geological Survey of Denmark and Greenland (GEUS) (Denmark); Auken, Esben [Department of Earth Sciences, Aarhus University (Denmark); Bamberg, Charlotte A. [City of Aarhus (Denmark); Christensen, Britt S.B. [Geological Survey of Denmark and Greenland (GEUS) (Denmark); Clausen, Thomas [DHI, Hørsholm (Denmark); Dalgaard, Esben [Department of Earth Sciences, Aarhus University (Denmark); Effersø, Flemming [SkyTEM Aps, Beder (Denmark); Ernstsen, Vibeke [Geological Survey of Denmark and Greenland (GEUS) (Denmark); Gertz, Flemming [Knowledge Center for Agriculture, Skejby (Denmark); Hansen, Anne Lausten [Department of Geosciences and Natural Resource Management, University of Copenhagen (Denmark); He, Xin [Geological Survey of Denmark and Greenland (GEUS) (Denmark); Jacobsen, Brian H. [Department of Food and Resource Economics, University of Copenhagen (Denmark); Jensen, Karsten Høgh [Department of Geosciences and Natural Resource Management, University of Copenhagen (Denmark); Jørgensen, Flemming; Jørgensen, Lisbeth Flindt [Geological Survey of Denmark and Greenland (GEUS) (Denmark); Koch, Julian [Department of Geosciences and Natural Resource Management, University of Copenhagen (Denmark); Nilsson, Bertel [Geological Survey of Denmark and Greenland (GEUS) (Denmark); Petersen, Christian [City of Odder (Denmark); De Schepper, Guillaume [Université Laval, Québec (Canada); Schamper, Cyril [Department of Earth Sciences, Aarhus University (Denmark); and others

    2014-01-01

    In order to fulfil the requirements of the EU Water Framework Directive nitrate load from agricultural areas to surface water in Denmark needs to be reduced by about 40%. The regulations imposed until now have been uniform, i.e. the same restrictions for all areas independent of the subsurface conditions. Studies have shown that on a national basis about 2/3 of the nitrate leaching from the root zone is reduced naturally, through denitrification, in the subsurface before reaching the streams. Therefore, it is more cost-effective to identify robust areas, where nitrate leaching through the root zone is reduced in the saturated zone before reaching the streams, and vulnerable areas, where no subsurface reduction takes place, and then only impose regulations/restrictions on the vulnerable areas. Distributed hydrological models can make predictions at grid scale, i.e. at much smaller scale than the entire catchment. However, as distributed models often do not include local scale hydrogeological heterogeneities, they are typically not able to make accurate predictions at scales smaller than they are calibrated. We present a framework for assessing nitrate reduction in the subsurface and for assessing at which spatial scales modelling tools have predictive capabilities. A new instrument has been developed for airborne geophysical measurements, Mini-SkyTEM, dedicated to identifying geological structures and heterogeneities with horizontal and lateral resolutions of 30–50 m and 2 m, respectively, in the upper 30 m. The geological heterogeneity and uncertainty are further analysed by use of the geostatistical software TProGS by generating stochastic geological realisations that are soft conditioned against the geophysical data. Finally, the flow paths within the catchment are simulated by use of the MIKE SHE hydrological modelling system for each of the geological models generated by TProGS and the prediction uncertainty is characterised by the variance between the

  14. Estimating Leaching Requirements for Barley Growth under Saline Irrigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Al-Busaidi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The utilization of marginal water resources for agriculture is receiving considerable attention. The lands irrigated with saline water are required to reduce salt accumulations through leaching and/or drainage practices. A field experiment was carried out to investigate the effect of saline irrigation and leaching fraction on barley (Hordeum vulgare L. growth. For this purpose highly saline water was diluted to the salinity levels of 3, 6 and 9 dS m-1 and applied by drip irrigation at 0.0, 0.15, 0.20 and 0.25 leaching fractions (LF. The results of the experiment showed that both quantity and quality of water regulated salts distribution within the soil in the following manner: a the salts were found higher near or immediate below the soil surface; b an enhanced LF carried more salts down the soil horizon but there was no significant difference in plant yield between different treatments of leaching fractions. Salinity of water significantly impaired barley growth. The good drainage of sandy soil enhanced the leaching process and minimized the differences between leaching fractions. The increment in saline treatments (3, 6 and 9 dS m-1 added more salts and stressed plant growth. However, the conjunctive use of marginal water at proportional LF could be effective in enhancing the yield potential of crops in water-scarce areas.

  15. Improving hydrolysis of food waste in a leach bed reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Browne, James D.; Allen, Eoin; Murphy, Jerry D., E-mail: jerry.murphy@ucc.ie

    2013-11-15

    Highlights: • This paper assesses leaching of food waste in a two phase digestion system. • Leaching is assessed with and without an upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB). • Without the UASB, low pH reduces hydrolysis, while increased flows increase leaching. • Inclusion of the UASB increases pH to optimal levels and greatly improves leaching. • The optimal conditions are suggested as low flow with connection to the UASB. - Abstract: This paper examines the rate of degradation of food waste in a leach bed reactor (LBR) under four different operating conditions. The effects of leachate recirculation at a low and high flow rate are examined with and without connection to an upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB). Two dilution rates of the effective volume of the leach bed reactors were investigated: 1 and 6 dilutions per LBR per day. The increase in dilution rate from 1 to 6 improved the destruction of volatile solids without connection to the UASB. However connection to the UASB greatly improved the destruction of volatile solids (by almost 60%) at the low recirculation rate of 1 dilution per day. The increase in volatile solids destruction with connection to the UASB was attributed to an increase in leachate pH and buffering capacity provided by recirculated effluent from the UASB to the leach beds. The destruction of volatile solids for both the low and high dilution rates was similar with connection to the UASB, giving 82% and 88% volatile solids destruction respectively. This suggests that the most efficient leaching condition is 1 dilution per day with connection to the UASB.

  16. Improving hydrolysis of food waste in a leach bed reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Browne, James D.; Allen, Eoin; Murphy, Jerry D.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • This paper assesses leaching of food waste in a two phase digestion system. • Leaching is assessed with and without an upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB). • Without the UASB, low pH reduces hydrolysis, while increased flows increase leaching. • Inclusion of the UASB increases pH to optimal levels and greatly improves leaching. • The optimal conditions are suggested as low flow with connection to the UASB. - Abstract: This paper examines the rate of degradation of food waste in a leach bed reactor (LBR) under four different operating conditions. The effects of leachate recirculation at a low and high flow rate are examined with and without connection to an upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB). Two dilution rates of the effective volume of the leach bed reactors were investigated: 1 and 6 dilutions per LBR per day. The increase in dilution rate from 1 to 6 improved the destruction of volatile solids without connection to the UASB. However connection to the UASB greatly improved the destruction of volatile solids (by almost 60%) at the low recirculation rate of 1 dilution per day. The increase in volatile solids destruction with connection to the UASB was attributed to an increase in leachate pH and buffering capacity provided by recirculated effluent from the UASB to the leach beds. The destruction of volatile solids for both the low and high dilution rates was similar with connection to the UASB, giving 82% and 88% volatile solids destruction respectively. This suggests that the most efficient leaching condition is 1 dilution per day with connection to the UASB

  17. Using rates of oxygen and nitrate reduction to map the subsurface distribution of groundwater denitrification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolbe, T.; De Dreuzy, J. R.; Abbott, B. W.; Aquilina, L.; Babey, T.; Green, C. T.; Fleckenstein, J. H.; Labasque, T.; Laverman, A.; Marçais, J.; Peiffer, S.; Thomas, Z.; Pinay, G.

    2017-12-01

    Widespread fertilizer application over the last 70 years has caused serious ecological and socioeconomic problems in aquatic and estuarine ecosystems. When surplus nitrogen leaches as nitrate (a major groundwater pollutant) to the aquifer, complex flow dynamics and naturally occurring degradation processes control its transport. Under the conditions of depleted oxygen and abundant electron donors, microorganisms reduce NO3- to N2 (denitrification). Denitrification rates vary over orders of magnitude among sites within the same aquifer, complicating estimation of denitrification capacity at the catchment scale. Because it is impractical or impossible to access the subsurface to directly quantify denitrification rates, reactivity is often assumed to occur continuous along flowlines, potentially resulting in substantial over- or underestimation of denitrification. Here we investigated denitrification in an unconfined crystalline aquifer in western France using a combination of common tracers (chlorofluorocarbons, O2, NO3-, and N2) measured in 16 wells to inform a time-based modeling approach. We found that spatially variable denitrification rates arise from the intersection of nitrate rich water with reactive zones defined by the abundance of electron donors (primarily pyrite). Furthermore, based on observed reaction rates of the sequential reduction of oxygen and nitrate, we present a general framework to estimate the location and intensity of the reactive zone in aquifers. Accounting for the vertical distribution of reaction rates results in large differences in estimations of net denitrification rates that assume homogeneous reactivity. This new framework provides a tractable approach for quantifying catchment and regional groundwater denitrification rates that could be used to improve estimation of groundwater resilience to nitrate pollution and develop more realistic management strategies.

  18. Speciation analysis and leaching behaviors of selected trace elements in spent SCR catalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Zejun; Wang, Lele; Tang, Hao; Sun, Zhijun; Liu, Wei; Sun, Yi; Su, Sheng; Hu, Song; Wang, Yi; Xu, Kai; Liu, Liang; Ling, Peng; Xiang, Jun

    2018-09-01

    This study investigated heavy metal chemical speciation and leaching behavior from a board-type spent selective catalytic reduction (SCR) catalyst containing high concentrations of vanadium, chromium, nickel, copper, zinc, and lead. A three-step sequential extraction method, standard toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP), and leaching characteristic tests have been performed. It was found that the mobility of six heavy metals in the spent SCR catalyst was significantly different. The mobility of the six heavy metals exhibited the following order: Ni > Zn > V > Cr > As > Cu. Meanwhile, TCLP test results revealed relatively high Zn and Cr leaching rate of 83.20% and 10.35%, respectively. It was found that leaching rate was positively correlated with available contents (sum of acid soluble, reducible and oxidizable fractions). Leaching characteristics tests indicated that pH substantially affected the leaching of these heavy metals. In particular, the leaching of Cr, Ni, Cu, and Zn was positively influenced by strong acid, while V and As were easily released in the presence of strong acid and strong alkali (pH 11). In terms of kinetics, the leaching of Cr, Ni, Cu, Zn, and As within the spent catalyst was dominated by erosion and dissolution processes, which were rapid reaction processes. V was released in large amounts within 1 h, but its leaching amount sharply decreased with time due to readsorption. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Agricultural nitrate pollution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anker, Helle Tegner

    2015-01-01

    Despite the passing of almost 25 years since the adoption of the EU Nitrates Directive, agricultural nitrate pollution remains a major concern in most EU Member States. This is also the case in Denmark, although a fairly strict regulatory regime has resulted in almost a 50 per cent reduction...

  20. Heavy Metal Leaching as Affected by Long-Time Organic Waste Fertilizer Application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lekfeldt, Jonas Duus Stevens; Holm, Peter E; Kjærgaard, Charlotte; Magid, Jakob

    2017-07-01

    The recycling of urban waste products as fertilizers in agriculture may introduce contaminants such as heavy metals into soil that may leach and contaminate groundwater. In the present study, we investigated the leaching of heavy metals from intact soil cores collected in the long-term agricultural field trial CRUCIAL. At the time of sampling, the equivalent of >100 yr of urban waste fertilizers following Danish legislation had been applied. The leaching of Cu was significantly increased in the treatments receiving organic waste products compared with the unfertilized control but remained below the permissible level following Danish drinking water guidelines. The leaching of Cu was controlled primarily by the topsoil Cu content and by the leaching of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) but at the same time significantly correlated with leaching of colloids in soils that had not received fertilizer or had received an organic fertilizer with a low concentration of Cu. The leaching of Zn, Cd, and Co was not significantly increased in urban waste-fertilized treatments. The leaching of Mo was elevated in accelerated waste treatments (both agricultural and urban), and the leaching of Mo was linked to the leaching of DOC. Since leaching of Cr and Pb was strongly linked to the level of colloid leaching, leaching of these metals was reduced in the urban waste treatments. Overall, the results presented should not raise concern regarding the agricultural use of urban waste products in agriculture as long as the relevant guidelines are followed. Copyright © by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America, Inc.

  1. Coupling between chemical degradation and mechanical behaviour of leached concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen, V.H.

    2005-10-01

    This work is in the context of the long term behavior of concrete employed in radioactive waste disposal. The objective is to study the coupled chemo-mechanical modelling of concrete. In the first part of this contribution, experimental investigations are described where the effects of the calcium leaching process of concrete on its mechanical properties are highlighted. An accelerated method has been chosen to perform this leaching process by using an ammonium nitrate solution. In the second part, we present a coupled phenomenological chemo-mechanical model that represents the degradation of concrete materials. On one hand, the chemical behavior is described by the simplified calcium leaching approach of cement paste and mortar. Then a homogenization approach using the asymptotic development is presented to take into account the influence of the presence of aggregates in concrete. And on the other hand, the mechanical part of the modelling is given. Here continuum damage mechanics is used to describe the mechanical degradation of concrete. The growth of inelastic strains observed during the mechanical tests is describes by means of a plastic like model. The model is established on the basis of the thermodynamics of irreversible processes framework. The coupled nonlinear problem at hand is addressed within the context of the finite element method. Finally, numerical simulations are compared with the experimental results for validation. (author)

  2. Increasing flux rate to shorten leaching period and ramp-up production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngantung, Billy; Agustin, Riska; Ravi'i

    2017-01-01

    J Resources Bolaang Mongondow (JBRM) has operated a dynamic heap leach in its Bakan Gold Mine since late 2013. After successfully surpassing its name plate capacity of 2.6 MT/annum in 2014, the clayey and transition ore become the next operational challenge. The presence of transition and clayey ore requires longer leaching period, hence reducing the leach pad capacity which then caused reduced production. Maintaining or even increasing production with such longer leaching ore types can be done by expanding the leach pad area which means an additional capital investment, and/or shortening the leaching cycle which compromise a portion of gold extraction. JBRM has been successfully increasing the leach pad production from 2.6 MT/annum to 3.8 MT/annum, whilst improving the gold extraction from around 70% to around 80%. This was achieved by managing the operation of the leach pad which is shortening the leach cycle by identifying and combining the optimal flux rate application versus the tonne processed in each cell, at no capital investment for expanding the cell capacity.

  3. NEXT GENERATION LEACHING TESTS FOR EVALUATING LEACHING OF INORGANIC CONSTITUENTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    In the U.S. as in other countries, there is increased interest in using industrial by-products as alternative or secondary materials, helping to conserve virgin or raw materials. The LEAF and associated test methods are being used to develop the source term for leaching or any i...

  4. Monitoring and Modeling the Fate and Transport of Nitrate in the Vadose Zone beneath a Suwannee River Basin Vegetable Farm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albert, M. A.; Graham, W. D.; Graetz, D.

    2002-05-01

    The Suwannee River basin has received much attention in recent years due to increased nitrogen levels in the groundwater-fed rivers of the basin that could seriously affect the welfare of this ecosystem. Nitrogen levels have increased from 0.1mg/l NO3-N to more than 5 mg/L NO3-N in many springs in the Suwannee Basin over the past 40 years. Nitrate concentrations in the Suwannee River itself have been increasing at the rate of .02 mg/L per year over the past 20 years. Suwannee River nitrate loads increase from 2300 kg/day to 6000 kg/day over a 33 mile stretch of the river between Dowling Park and Branford, Florida. Within this stretch of river, 89% of the nitrate loading appeared to come from the lower two-thirds, where agriculture is the dominant land use. The objective of this research is to monitor and model the impacts of alternative nutrient and water management practices on soil water quality, groundwater quality and crop yield at a commercial vegetable farm in the Suwannee River Basin. Groundwater monitoring wells, suction lysimeters, soil cores and TDR probes are used to monitor water and nitrogen transport at the site. Periodic plant biomass sampling is conducted to determine nitrogen uptake by the plants and to estimate crop yield. Field data show that two-thirds of the nitrogen applied to the spring 2001 potato crop leached to groundwater due to excessive irrigation and poor nitrogen uptake efficiency by the potatoes. The DSSAT35-Potato Crop model and the LEACHM vadose-zone model were calibrated for the spring 2001 potato crop and used to predict nitrogen leaching and crop yield for alternative management practices. Simulation results show that by reducing the duration of irrigation, reducing the fertilizer application rate, and improving the timing of fertilizer applications, nitrogen leaching can be reduced by approximately 50% while maintaining acceptable crop yields. Results of this project will ultimately be used to develop best management practices

  5. Effect of uniaxially pressing ordinary Portland cement pastes containing metal hydroxides on porosity, density, and leaching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheeseman, C.R.; Asavapisit, S.; Knight, J.

    1998-01-01

    Synthetic metal hydroxide wastes containing Zn and Pb have been mixed with partially hydrated cement and uniaxially pressed. The effect on porosity, pore size distribution, and bulk and skeletal densities has been characterized using mercury intrusion porosimetry. Ca(OH) 2 formation has been determined using differential thermal analysis and metal leaching has been assessed in a series of static leach tests completed on monolithic samples. Pressed solidified materials have increased density, reduced porosity, and reduced Ca(OH) 2 . They exhibit increased resistance to acid attack in terms of sample weight loss during leaching due to reduced release of alkalis. Leaching of Zn and Pb is primarily determined by pH. A peak observed in Zn leaching from pressed samples is due to the effect of changing leachate pH on the dominant Zn species present

  6. Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal species differ in their effect on nutrient leaching

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Köhl, Luise; van der Heijden, Marcel G A

    2016-01-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi have been shown to play a crucial role in nutrient cycling and can reduce nutrient losses after rain induced leaching events. It is still unclear whether nutrient leaching losses vary depending on the AM fungal taxa that are present in soil. Using experimental

  7. Open-Source Photometric System for Enzymatic Nitrate Quantification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittbrodt, B T; Squires, D A; Walbeck, J; Campbell, E; Campbell, W H; Pearce, J M

    2015-01-01

    Nitrate, the most oxidized form of nitrogen, is regulated to protect people and animals from harmful levels as there is a large over abundance due to anthropogenic factors. Widespread field testing for nitrate could begin to address the nitrate pollution problem, however, the Cadmium Reduction Method, the leading certified method to detect and quantify nitrate, demands the use of a toxic heavy metal. An alternative, the recently proposed Environmental Protection Agency Nitrate Reductase Nitrate-Nitrogen Analysis Method, eliminates this problem but requires an expensive proprietary spectrophotometer. The development of an inexpensive portable, handheld photometer will greatly expedite field nitrate analysis to combat pollution. To accomplish this goal, a methodology for the design, development, and technical validation of an improved open-source water testing platform capable of performing Nitrate Reductase Nitrate-Nitrogen Analysis Method. This approach is evaluated for its potential to i) eliminate the need for toxic chemicals in water testing for nitrate and nitrite, ii) reduce the cost of equipment to perform this method for measurement for water quality, and iii) make the method easier to carryout in the field. The device is able to perform as well as commercial proprietary systems for less than 15% of the cost for materials. This allows for greater access to the technology and the new, safer nitrate testing technique.

  8. Are nitrate exports in stream water linked to nitrogen fluxes in decomposing foliar litter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kathryn B. Piatek; Mary Beth. Adams

    2011-01-01

    The central hardwood forest receives some of the highest rates of atmospheric nitrogen (N) deposition, which results in nitrate leaching to surface waters. Immobilization of N in foliar litter during litter decomposition represents a potential mechanism for temporal retention of atmospherically deposited N in forest ecosystems. When litter N dynamics switch to the N-...

  9. Comparison of bromide and nitrate transport in the Bainsvlei soil of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Bromide is commonly used to simulate the movement of nitrate fertilisers through the soil profile. However, there exists no comparative evaluation of the leaching properties of Br- and NO3-_N under local soil and rainfall conditions at Bloemfontein. The purpose of this work was to conduct a field experiment to evaluate the ...

  10. Assessment and control of the gold leaching parameters at Kiena Mines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deschenes, G.; Fulton, M. [CANMET, Mining and Mineral Sciences Labs., Ottawa, Ontario (Canada); Lafontaine, M. [Kiena Mines, McWatters Mines Inc., Operation Val d' Or, Val d' Or, PQ (Canada)

    1999-07-01

    Kiena Mines process a free milling gold ore containing 4.21 g/t Au, 3.1% pyrite and 0.4% pyrrhotite. The throughput has been increased by 40% by tight control of the leaching parameters. The limiting factor of the process is the retention time in the leach circuit. A study was initiated to evaluate the level of control of parameters (grinding size, dissolved oxygen, pH, free cyanide and lead nitrate) to optimize the circuit efficiency. It was found that oxygen and lead nitrate addition are important to maintain gold extraction, while decreasing processing costs. The results indicated that some control levels could be modified. Some results are discussed in relation to models developed. An implementation strategy was elaborated. A decrease of reagent costs is expected after implementation of these changes. (author)

  11. Assessment and control of the gold leaching parameters at Kiena Mines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deschenes, G.; Fulton, M.; Lafontaine, M.

    1999-01-01

    Kiena Mines process a free milling gold ore containing 4.21 g/t Au, 3.1% pyrite and 0.4% pyrrhotite. The throughput has been increased by 40% by tight control of the leaching parameters. The limiting factor of the process is the retention time in the leach circuit. A study was initiated to evaluate the level of control of parameters (grinding size, dissolved oxygen, pH, free cyanide and lead nitrate) to optimize the circuit efficiency. It was found that oxygen and lead nitrate addition are important to maintain gold extraction, while decreasing processing costs. The results indicated that some control levels could be modified. Some results are discussed in relation to models developed. An implementation strategy was elaborated. A decrease of reagent costs is expected after implementation of these changes. (author)

  12. Evaluation of hydraulic conductivities of bentonite and rock under hyper alkaline and nitrate conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iriya, K.; Fujii, K.; Kubo, H.

    2002-02-01

    The chemical conditions of TRU waste repository were estimated as alkaline conditions effected by cementitious materials. And, some TRU wastes include soluble nitrate salt, we have to consider the repository conditions might be high ionic strength condition leaching of nitrate salt. In this study, experimental studies were carried out to evaluate hydraulic conductivities of bentonite and rock under hyper alkaline and nitrate conditions. The followings results were obtained for bentonite. 1) In the immersion experiments of bentonite in hyper alkaline fluids with and without nitrate, the disappearance of montmorillonite of bentonite was observed and CSH formation was found after 30 days. In hyper alkaline fluid with nitrate, minerals at θ=37 nm by XRD was identified. 2) Significant effects of hyper alkaline on hydraulic conductivity of compacted bentonite were not observed. However, hydraulic conductivities of hyper alkaline fluid with nitrate and ion exchanged bentonite increased. In hyper alkaline with nitrate, more higher hydraulic conductivities of exchanged bentonite were measured. The followings results were obtained for rock. 1) In the immersion experiments of crushed tuff in hyper alkaline fluids with and without nitrate, CSH and CASH phases were observed. 2) The hydraulic conductivity of tuff in hyper alkaline fluids decreased gradually. Finally, hyper alkaline flow in tuff stopped after 2 months and hyper alkaline flow with nitrate stopped shorter than without nitrate. In the results of analysis of tuff after experiment, we could identified secondary minerals, but we couldn't find the clogging evidence of pores in tuff by secondary minerals. (author)

  13. Multi-scale nitrate transport in a sandstone aquifer system under intensive agriculture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paradis, Daniel; Ballard, Jean-Marc; Lefebvre, René; Savard, Martine M.

    2018-03-01

    Nitrate transport in heterogeneous bedrock aquifers is influenced by mechanisms that operate at different spatial and temporal scales. To understand these mechanisms in a fractured sandstone aquifer with high porosity, a groundwater-flow and nitrate transport model—reproducing multiple hydraulic and chemical targets—was developed to explain the actual nitrate contamination observed in groundwater and surface water in a study area on Prince Edward Island, Canada. Simulations show that nitrate is leached to the aquifer year-round, with 61% coming from untransformed and transformed organic sources originating from fertilizers and manure. This nitrate reaches the more permeable shallow aquifer through fractures in weathered sandstone that represent only 1% of the total porosity (17%). Some of the nitrate reaches the underlying aquifer, which is less active in terms of groundwater flow, but most of it is drained to the main river. The river-water quality is controlled by the nitrate input from the shallow aquifer. Groundwater in the underlying aquifer, which has long residence times, is also largely influenced by the diffusion of nitrate in the porous sandstone matrix. Consequently, following a change of fertilizer application practices, water quality in domestic wells and the river would change rapidly due to the level of nitrate found in fractures, but a lag time of up to 20 years would be necessary to reach a steady level due to diffusion. This demonstrates the importance of understanding nitrate transport mechanisms when designing effective agricultural and water management plans to improve water quality.

  14. Intensified Vegetation Water Use due to Soil Calcium Leaching under Acid Deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanning, M.; Wang, L.; Scanlon, T. M.; Vadeboncoeur, M. A.; Adams, M. B.; Epstein, H. E.; Druckenbrod, D.

    2017-12-01

    Despite the important role vegetation plays in the global water cycle, the exact controls of vegetation water use, especially the role of soil biogeochemistry, remain elusive. Nitrate and sulfate deposition from fossil fuel burning has caused significant soil acidification, leading to the leaching of soil base cations. From a physiological perspective, plants require various soil cations as signaling and regulatory ions as well as integral parts of structural molecules; a depletion of soil cations can cause reduced productivity and abnormal responses to environmental change. A deficiency in calcium could also potentially prolong stomatal opening, leading to increased transpiration until enough calcium had been acquired to stimulate stomatal closure. Based on the plant physiology and the nature of acidic deposition, we hypothesize that depletion of the soil calcium supply, induced by acid deposition, would intensify vegetation water use at the watershed scale. We tested this hypothesis by analyzing a long-term and unique data set (1989-2012) of soil lysimeter data along with stream flow and evapotranspiration data at the Fernow Experimental Forest. We show that depletion of soil calcium by acid deposition can intensify vegetation water use ( 10% increase in evapotranspiration and depletion in soil water) for the first time. These results are critical to understanding future water availability, biogeochemical cycles, and surficial energy flux and may help reduce uncertainties in terrestrial biosphere models.

  15. Potential function of added minerals as nucleation sites and effect of humic substances on mineral formation by the nitrate-reducing Fe(II)-oxidizer Acidovorax sp. BoFeN1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dippon, Urs; Pantke, Claudia; Porsch, Katharina; Larese-Casanova, Phil; Kappler, Andreas

    2012-06-19

    The mobility of toxic metals and the transformation of organic pollutants in the environment are influenced and in many cases even controlled by iron minerals. Therefore knowing the factors influencing iron mineral formation and transformation by Fe(II)-oxidizing and Fe(III)-reducing bacteria is crucial for understanding the fate of contaminants and for the development of remediation technologies. In this study we followed mineral formation by the nitrate-reducing Fe(II)-oxidizing strain Acidovorax sp. BoFeN1 in the presence of the crystalline Fe(III) (oxyhydr)oxides goethite, magnetite and hematite added as potential nucleation sites. Mössbauer spectroscopy analysis of minerals precipitated by BoFeN1 in (57)Fe(II)-spiked microbial growth medium showed that goethite was formed in the absence of mineral additions as well as in the presence of goethite or hematite. The presence of magnetite minerals during Fe(II) oxidation induced the formation of magnetite in addition to goethite, while the addition of humic substances along with magnetite also led to goethite but no magnetite. This study showed that mineral formation not only depends on the aqueous geochemical conditions but can also be affected by the presence of mineral nucleation sites that initiate precipitation of the same underlying mineral phases.

  16. Is nitrate an endocrine active compound in fish?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mose, M. P.; Kinnberg, Karin Lund; Bjerregaard, Poul

    Nitrate and nitrite taken up into fish may be reduced to NO which is known to be a signalling compound in the organism contributing to the regulation of i.e. steroid synthesis. Exposure of male rats to nitrate and nitrite results in reduced plasma concentrations of testosterone (also nitrate...... concentrations around or below the limits for drinking water). Nitrate concentrations in streams may be elevated due to releases from agricultural practices. The effects of nitrate and nitrite on endocrine relevant endpoints were investigated in zebrafish (Danio rerio) and brown trout (Salmo trutta). Zebrafish...... were exposed to nitrate and nitrite from hatch to sexual maturation (60 d) and sex ratio and vitellogenin concentrations were determined. Juvenile brown trout were exposed in a short-term experiment and the concentrations of vitellogenin were determined. The sex ratio in zebrafish was not affected...

  17. Implementation of the Leaching Environmental Assessment Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    New leaching tests are available in the U.S. for developing more accurate source terms for use in fate and transport models. For beneficial use or disposal, the use of the leaching environmental assessment framework (LEAF) will provide leaching results that reflect field condit...

  18. Standard leach tests for nuclear waste materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strachan, D.M.; Barnes, B.O.; Turcotte, R.P.

    1980-01-01

    Five leach tests were conducted to study time-dependent leaching of waste forms (glass). The first four tests include temperature as a variable and the use of three standard leachants. Three of the tests are static and two are dynamic (flow). This paper discusses the waste-form leach tests and presents some representative data. 4 figures

  19. Photochemical reduction of uranyl nitrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duerksen, W.K.

    1993-10-20

    The photochemical reduction of uranyl nitrate solutions to tetravalent uranium was investigated as a means of producing uranium dioxide feed for the saltless direct oxide reduction (SDOR) process. At high uranium concentrations, reoxidation of U{sup +4} occurs rapidly. The kinetics of the nitric oxidation of tetravalent uranium depend on the concentrations of hydrogen ion, nitrate ion, nitrous acid, and tetravalent uranium in the same manner as was reported elsewhere for the nitrate oxidation of PU{sup +3}. Reaction rate data were successfully correlated with a mechanism in which nitrogen dioxide is the reactive intermediate. Addition of a nitrous acid scavenger suppresses the reoxidation reaction. An immersion reactor employing a mercury vapor lamp gave reduction times fast enough for routine production usage. Precipitation techniques for conversion of aqueous U(NO{sub 3}){sub 4} to hydrous UO{sub 2} were evaluated. Prolonged dewatering times tended to make the process time consuming. Use of 3- to 4-M aqueous NaOH gave the best dewatering times observed. Reoxidation of the UO{sub 2} by water of hydration was encountered, which required the drying process to be carried out under a reducing atmosphere.

  20. Pollution potential leaching index as a tool to assess water leaching risk of arsenic in excavated urban soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jining; Kosugi, Tomoya; Riya, Shohei; Hashimoto, Yohey; Hou, Hong; Terada, Akihiko; Hosomi, Masaaki

    2018-01-01

    Leaching of hazardous trace elements from excavated urban soils during construction of cities has received considerable attention in recent years in Japan. A new concept, the pollution potential leaching index (PPLI), was applied to assess the risk of arsenic (As) leaching from excavated soils. Sequential leaching tests (SLT) with two liquid-to-solid (L/S) ratios (10 and 20Lkg -1 ) were conducted to determine the PPLI values, which represent the critical cumulative L/S ratios at which the average As concentrations in the cumulative leachates are reduced to critical values (10 or 5µgL -1 ). Two models (a logarithmic function model and an empirical two-site first-order leaching model) were compared to estimate the PPLI values. The fractionations of As before and after SLT were extracted according to a five-step sequential extraction procedure. Ten alkaline excavated soils were obtained from different construction projects in Japan. Although their total As contents were low (from 6.75 to 79.4mgkg -1 ), the As leaching was not negligible. Different L/S ratios at each step of the SLT had little influence on the cumulative As release or PPLI values. Experimentally determined PPLI values were in agreement with those from model estimations. A five-step SLT with an L/S of 10Lkg -1 at each step, combined with a logarithmic function fitting was suggested for the easy estimation of PPLI. Results of the sequential extraction procedure showed that large portions of more labile As fractions (non-specifically and specifically sorbed fractions) were removed during long-term leaching and so were small, but non-negligible, portions of strongly bound As fractions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Probable leaching mechanisms for spent fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, R.; Katayama, Y.B.

    1981-01-01

    At the Pacific Northwest Laboratory, researchers in the Waste/Rock Interaction Technology Program are studying spent fuel as a possible waste form for the Office of Nuclear Waste Isolation. This paper presents probable leaching mechanisms for spent fuel and discusses current progress in identifying and understanding the leaching process. During the past year, experiments were begun to study the complex leaching mechanism of spent fuel. The initial work in this investigation was done with UO 2 , which provided the most information possible on the behavior of the spent-fuel matrix without encountering the very high radiation levels associated with spent fuel. Both single-crystal and polycrystalline UO 2 samples were used for this study, and techniques applicable to remote experimentation in a hot cell are being developed. The effects of radiation are being studied in terms of radiolysis of water and surface activation of the UO 2 . Dissolution behavior and kinetics of UO 2 were also investigated by electrochemical measurement techniques. These data will be correlated with those acquired when spent fuel is tested in a hot cell. Oxidation effects represent a major area of concern in evaluating the stability of spent fuel. Dissolution of UO 2 is greatly increased in an oxidizing solution because the dissolution is then controlled by the formation of hexavalent uranium. In solutions containing very low oxygen levels (i.e., reducing solutions), oxidation-induced dissolution may be possible via a previously oxidized surface, through exposure to air during storage, or by local oxidants such as O 2 and H 2 O 2 produced from radiolysis of water and radiation-activated UO 2 surfaces. The effects of oxidation not only increase the dissolution rate, but could lead to the disintegration of spent fuel into fine fragments

  2. RMDF leach-field decontamination. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carroll, J.W.; Marzec, J.M.; Stelle, A.M.

    1982-01-01

    The objective of the decontamination effort was to place the Radioactive Materials Disposal Facility (RMDF) leach field in a condition suitable for release for unrestricted use. Radioactively contaminated soil was excavated from the leach field to produce a condition of contamination as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA). The contaminated soil was boxed and shipped to an NRC-licensed burial site at Beatty, Nevada, and to the DOE burial site at Hanford, Washington. The soil excavation project successfully reduced the contamination level in the leach field to background levels, except for less than 0.6 mCi of Sr-90 and trace amounts of Cs-137 that are isolated in cracks in the bedrock. The cracks are greater than 10 ft below the surface and have been sealed with a bituminous asphalt mastic. A pathways analysis for radiation exposure to humans from the remaining radionuclides was performed, assuming intensive home gardening, and the results show that the total first year whole body dose equivalent would be about 0.1 mrem/year. This dose equivalent is a projection for the hypothetical ingestion of vegetables grown on the site. Assuming that an average adult consumes 64 kg of green leafy vegetables per year and that the entire yearly supply could be grown on the site, the amount of ingested Sr-90 and Cs-137 is calculated to be 1100 pCi/year and 200 pCi/year. This ingested quantity would produce a total first year whole body dose equivalent of 0.10 mrem, using the accepted soil-to-plant transfer factors of 0.0172 and 0.010 for Sr-90 and Cs-137, respectively. The whole body dose equivalent exposure value of 0.1 mrem/year is far below the tentative limit established by NRC of 5 mrem/year for areas released for unrestricted use

  3. Hydrometallurgical Process and Kinetics of Leaching Manganese from Semi-Oxidized Manganese Ores with Sucrose

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuhong Wang

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The extraction of manganese from a semi-oxidized manganese ore was investigated with sucrose as the reducing agent in dilute sulfuric acid medium. The kinetics of leaching manganese from the complex ore containing MnCO3 and MnO2 was also investigated. The effects of sucrose and sulfuric acid concentrations, leaching temperature and reaction time on the total Mn (TMn, MnO2 and MnCO3 leaching were investigated. Results showed that MnCO3 could more easily react with hydrogen ions than MnO2 in ores, and MnO2 decomposition could be advantageous for MnCO3 leaching. The leaching efficiencies of 91.8% for total Mn, 91.4% for MnO2 and 96.9% for MnCO3 were obtained under the following optimized conditions: 0.035 mol/L sucrose concentration, 5 mol/L sulfuric acid concentration, 60 min of reaction time and 363.2 K of leaching temperature. In addition, it was found that the leaching process of semi-oxidized manganese ore follows the shrinking core model and the leaching rate was controlled by chemical reaction and diffusion. The apparent activation energy of the total manganese, MnO2, and MnCO3 leaching were 40.83, 40.59, and 53.33 kJ·mol−1, respectively.

  4. Imouraren - uranium leaching tests and specificities with analcites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wattinne-Morice, A.; Belieres, M.

    2010-01-01

    Imouraren is a sedimentary uranium deposit (total > 150 000 tU, average U ~ 0.08 %), located in Niger (~ 100 km from Agadez). Uranium mineralization is trapped in sandstones and is widely oxidized (uranotyle, metatuyamunite), but a part remains reduced (pitchblende, uraninite). The sandstones have a peculiar mineralogical assemblage (analcite partly chloritized) which can affect uranium recovery. Several acid heap leaching tests have been completed to determine the most suitable process parameters. Microscopic studies and XRD analysis performed on fresh ore and on leached residue highlight the complex behavior of uranium and the associated mineralogical families during the tests. (author)

  5. Leaching behavior of various low-level waste solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, Akihiko; Ouchi, Yasuyoshi; Matsuzuru, Hideo; Wadachi, Yoshiki

    1985-01-01

    This report deals with the leaching of radioactive nuclides from low-level wastes solidified with cement, bitumen or plastics. Considerations are made on the effects of type of solidification matrix and waste; type, amount and exchange frequency of leachate; type and conditions of embedding soil; temperature and pressure; and secular deterioration. It is assumed that a waste composite is entirely immersed in leachate and that the amount of the leachate is large compared to the surface area of the waste. Cement solid is characterized by its high alkalinity and porosity while plastic and bitumen solids are dense and neutral. The content of waste in a composite is low for cement and high for plastics. It is generally high in bitumen solid though it should be reduced if the solid is likely to bulge. The leaching of 137 Cs from cement solid is slightly dependent on the waste-cement ratio while it increases with increasing waste content in the case of plastic or bitumen solid. For 60 Co, the leaching from cement solid depends on the alkalinity of the cement material used though it is not affected by the waste-cement ratio. In the case of plastics and bitumen, on the other hand, the pH value of the waste have some effects on the leaching of 60 Co; the leaching decreases with increasing pH. (Nogami, K.)

  6. Leaching and geochemical behavior of fired bricks containing coal wastes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taha, Yassine; Benzaazoua, Mostafa; Edahbi, Mohamed; Mansori, Mohammed; Hakkou, Rachid

    2018-03-01

    High amounts of mine wastes are continuously produced by the mining industry all over the world. Recycling possibility of some wastes in fired brick making has been investigated and showed promising results. However, little attention is given to the leaching behavior of mine wastes based fired bricks. The objective of this paper is to evaluate the geochemical behavior of fired bricks containing different types of coal wastes. The leachates were analyzed for their concentration of As, Ba, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Mo, Ni, Pb, Zn and sulfates using different leaching tests; namely Tank Leaching tests (NEN 7375), Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) and pH dependence test (EPA, 1313). The results showed that the release of constituents of potential interest was highly reduced after thermal treatment and were immobilized within the glassy matrix of the fired bricks. Moreover, it was also highlighted that the final pH of all fired samples changed and stabilized around 8-8.5 when the initial pH of leaching solution was in the range 2.5-11.5. The release of heavy metals and metalloids (As) tended to decrease with the increase of pH from acidic to alkaline solutions while Mo displayed a different trend. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Intensification Behavior of Mercury Ions on Gold Cyanide Leaching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiang Zhong

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Cyanidation is the main method used to extract gold from gold raw materials; however, a serious problem with this method is the low leaching rate. In order to improve gold leaching, the intensification behavior of mercury ions on gold cyanide leaching, for two types of materials, sulphide gold concentrate and oxide gold ore, was investigated. The results showed that mercury ions, with only a 10−5 M dosage, could significantly intensify leaching and gold recovery. The dissolution behavior of gold plate was also intensified by 10−5 M mercury ions. Microstructure analysis showed that mercury ions intensified the cyanidation corrosion of the gold surface, resulting in a loose structure, where a large number of deep ravines and raised particles were evident across the whole gold surface. The loose structure added contact surface between the gold and cyanide, and accelerated gold dissolution. Moreover, mercury ions obstructed the formation of insoluble products, such as AuCN, Au(OHCN, and Au(OHx, that lead to a passivation membrane on the gold surface, reducing contact between the gold and cyanide. These effects, brought about by mercury ions, change the structure and product of the gold surface during gold cyanidation and promote gold leaching.

  8. Galvanic enhancement for high pressure leaching of chalcopyrite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim D.H.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was conducted to evaluate the galvanic enhancement of the pressure oxidation (POX leaching of a chalcopyrite/chalcocite concentrate, which is believed to take place via a redox reaction. Cu recoveries of >90% could be achieved during POX leaching of this chalcopyrite/chalcocite concentrate at 200°C and 0.7 MPa initial oxygen pressure within 2h in a pressure reactor lined with titanium, which were 18-28% higher than for the same leaching using the teflon liner. A slow heating time seems to produce more sulphur coating, reducing the leaching performance, yielding much lower Cu recovery when the teflon lining was used, although this does not greatly affect the other case when the reactor was lined with titanium. The introduction of an electronic conductor, in this case the titanium surface, is believed to enhance this redox process, in which the oxidation of copper minerals and sulphur to sulphate at the anodic sites (mineral surface encountered during POX leaching takes place simultaneously with the reversible oxidation/reduction of the Fe2+/Fe3+couple and oxygen reduction on titanium.

  9. Genetic basis for nitrate resistance in Desulfovibrio strains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hannah eKorte

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Nitrate is an inhibitor of sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB. In petroleum production sites, amendments of nitrate and nitrite are used to prevent SRB production of sulfide that causes souring of oil wells. A better understanding of nitrate stress responses in the model SRB, Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough and Desulfovibrio alaskensis G20, will strengthen predictions of environmental outcomes. Nitrate inhibition of SRB has historically been considered to result from the generation of small amounts of nitrite, to which SRB are quite sensitive. Here we explored the possibility that nitrate might inhibit SRB by a mechanism other than through nitrite inhibition. We found that nitrate-stressed D. vulgaris cultures grown in lactate-sulfate conditions eventually grew in the presence of high concentrations of nitrate, and their resistance continued through several subcultures. Nitrate consumption was not detected over the course of the experiment, suggesting adaptation to nitrate. With high-throughput genetic approaches employing TnLE-seq for D. vulgaris and a pooled mutant library of D. alaskensis, we determined the fitness of many transposon mutants of both organisms in nitrate stress conditions. We found that several mutants, including homologs present in both strains, had a greatly increased ability to grow in the presence of nitrate but not nitrite. The mutated genes conferring nitrate resistance included the gene encoding the putative Rex transcriptional regulator (DVU0916/Dde_2702, as well as a cluster of genes (DVU0251-DVU0245/Dde_0597-Dde_0605 that is poorly annotated. Follow-up studies with individual D. vulgaris transposon and deletion mutants confirmed high-throughput results. We conclude that, in D. vulgaris and D. alaskensis, nitrate resistance in wild-type cultures is likely conferred by spontaneous mutations. Furthermore, the mechanisms that confer nitrate resistance may be different from those that confer nitrite resistance.

  10. Selective removal of chromium from sulphuric acid leach liquor of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... removed in multiple batch extractions from the leach liquor and titanium losses were minimal (< 1%). The chromium content of extracted solutions was reduced to less than 1 ppm and thermal hydrolysis of these solutions yielded white titanium(IV) oxide pigments that are suitable for use in the coatings pigment industry.

  11. Chemical characterization, leach, and adsorption studies of solidified low-level wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walter, M.B.; Serne, R.J.; Jones, T.L.; McLaurine, S.B.

    1986-12-01

    Laboratory and field leaching experiments are beig conducted by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) to investigate the performance of solidified low-level nuclear waste in a typical, arid, near-surface disposal site. Under PNL's Special Waste Form Lysimeters-Arid Program, a field test facility was constructed to monitor the leaching of commercial solidified waste. Laboratory experiments were conducted to investigate the leaching and adsorption characteristics of the waste forms in contact with soil. Liquid radioactive wastes solidified in cement, vinyl ester-styrene, and bitumen were obtained from commercial boiling water and pressurized water reactors, and buried in a field leaching facility on the Hanford site in southeastern Washington State. Batch leaching, soil column adsorption, and soil/waste form column experiments were conducted in the laboratory, using small-scale cement waste forms and Hanford site ground water. The purpose of these experiments is to evaluate the ability of laboratory leaching tests to predict leaching under actual field conditions and to determine which mechanisms (i.e., diffusion, solubility, adsorption) actually control the concentration of radionuclides in the soil surrounding the waste form. Chemical and radionuclide analyses performed on samples collected from the field and laboratory experiments indicate strong adsorption of /sup 134,137/Cs and 85 Sr onto the Hanford site sediment. Small amounts of 60 Co are leached from the waste forms as very mobile species. Some 60 Co migrated through the soil at the same rate as water. Chemical constituents present in the reactor waste streams also found at elevated levels in the field and laboratory leachates include sodium, sulfate, magnesium, and nitrate. Plausible solid phases that could be controlling some of the chemical and radionuclide concentrations in the leachate were identified using the MINTEQ geochemical computer code

  12. Commercial experimental on bacteria heap leaching of uranium ore from Caotaobei mining area in Ganzhou uranium mine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fan Baotuan; Meng Yunsheng; Liu Jian; Xiao Jinfeng; Chen Sencai; Cao Jianbo; Wu Yichang; Liu Chengwu

    2002-01-01

    The author presents the result of commercial experiment on bacteria heap leaching of uranium ore from Caotaobei mining area in Ganzhou Uranium Mine and summarizes the heap situation, installation of spraying and sprinkling devices, and operation management of continuous oxidizing tank of bio-membrane. The leaching rate is 92.95% and 91.88% respectively by liquid and residue measurement during 85 d bacterial leaching experiment. The acid consumption is 2.1% and the total liquid-solid ratio is 2.9 m 3 /t. Compared with conventional heap leaching, the time of bacteria heap leaching shorted about 75 d, the acid consumption reduced by 0.35% and the leaching rate improved by 2%. It is an optimize plan to reform the heap leaching technology for Caotaobei ore

  13. New technology of bio-heap leaching uranium ore and its industrial application in Ganzhou uranium mine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fan Baotuan; Meng Yunsheng; Liu Jian; Meng Jin; Li Weicai; Xiao Jinfeng; Chen Sencai; Du Yuhai; Huang Bin

    2006-10-01

    Bioleaching mechanism of uranium ore is discussed. Incubation and selection of new strain, biomembrane oxidizing tank--a kind of new equipment for bacteria culture and oxidation regeneration of leaching agent are also introduced. The results of industrial experiment and industrial production are summarized. Compared with conventional heap leaching, bioleaching period and acid amount are reduced, oxidant and leaching agent are saved, and uranium concentration in leaching solution is increased. It is the first time to realize industrial production by bio-heap leaching in Chinese uranium mine. New equipment-biomembrane oxidizing tank give the basis of bio-heap leaching industrial application. Bio-heap leaching process is an effective technique to reform technique of uranium mine and extract massive low-content uranium ore in China. (authors)

  14. Nitrate ammonification in mangrove soils: a hidden source of nitrite?

    KAUST Repository

    Balk, Melike; Laverman, Anniet M; Keuskamp, Joost A; Laanbroek, Hendrikus J

    2015-01-01

    Nitrate reduction is considered to be a minor microbial pathway in the oxidation of mangrove-derived organic matter due to a limited supply of nitrate in mangrove soils. At a limited availability of this electron acceptor compared to the supply of degradable carbon, nitrate ammonification is thought to be the preferential pathway of nitrate reduction. Mangrove forest mutually differ in their productivity, which may lead to different available carbon to nitrate ratios in their soil. Hence, nitrate ammonification is expected to be of more importance in high- compared to low-productive forests. The hypothesis was tested in flow-through reactors that contain undisturbed mangrove soils from high-productive Avicennia germinans and Rhizophora mangle forests in Florida and low-productive Avicennia marina forests in Saudi Arabia. Nitrate was undetectable in the soils from both regions. It was assumed that a legacy of nitrate ammonification would be reflected by a higher ammonium production from these soils upon the addition of nitrate. Unexpectedly, the soils from the low-productive forests in Saudi Arabia produced considerably more ammonium than the soils from the high-productive forests in Florida. Hence, other environmental factors than productivity must govern the selection of nitrate ammonification or denitrification. A rather intriguing observation was the 1:1 production of nitrite and ammonium during the consumption of nitrate, more or less independent from sampling region, location, sampling depth, mangrove species and from the absence or presence of additional degradable carbon. This 1:1 ratio points to a coupled production of ammonium and nitrite by one group of nitrate-reducing microorganisms. Such a production of nitrite will be hidden by the presence of active nitrite-reducing microorganisms under the nitrate-limited conditions of most mangrove forest soils.

  15. Nitrate ammonification in mangrove soils: a hidden source of nitrite?

    KAUST Repository

    Balk, Melike

    2015-03-02

    Nitrate reduction is considered to be a minor microbial pathway in the oxidation of mangrove-derived organic matter due to a limited supply of nitrate in mangrove soils. At a limited availability of this electron acceptor compared to the supply of degradable carbon, nitrate ammonification is thought to be the preferential pathway of nitrate reduction. Mangrove forest mutually differ in their productivity, which may lead to different available carbon to nitrate ratios in their soil. Hence, nitrate ammonification is expected to be of more importance in high- compared to low-productive forests. The hypothesis was tested in flow-through reactors that contain undisturbed mangrove soils from high-productive Avicennia germinans and Rhizophora mangle forests in Florida and low-productive Avicennia marina forests in Saudi Arabia. Nitrate was undetectable in the soils from both regions. It was assumed that a legacy of nitrate ammonification would be reflected by a higher ammonium production from these soils upon the addition of nitrate. Unexpectedly, the soils from the low-productive forests in Saudi Arabia produced considerably more ammonium than the soils from the high-productive forests in Florida. Hence, other environmental factors than productivity must govern the selection of nitrate ammonification or denitrification. A rather intriguing observation was the 1:1 production of nitrite and ammonium during the consumption of nitrate, more or less independent from sampling region, location, sampling depth, mangrove species and from the absence or presence of additional degradable carbon. This 1:1 ratio points to a coupled production of ammonium and nitrite by one group of nitrate-reducing microorganisms. Such a production of nitrite will be hidden by the presence of active nitrite-reducing microorganisms under the nitrate-limited conditions of most mangrove forest soils.

  16. Evaluation of hydraulic conductivities of bentonite and rock under hyper alkaline and nitrate conditions (3) (Summary)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iriya, Keishiro; Kubo, Hiroshi

    2004-02-01

    This report is the summary of JNC-TJ--8400-2005-002. 1) Circumstance of TRU waste repository shows alkaline condition due to leaching of cementitious materials. The waste containing significant soluble nitrate may changes ground water chemistry to high ion strength. Consolidation test and permeability test are carried out in order to as. exchanged with nitrate. It is noted that permeability of bentonite increased at from 40 to 200 times by cation exchange. 2) Permeability of hyper alkaline solution is almost same to water. Permeability of hyper alkaline solution with nitrates increased corresponding to rising ion strength. 3) The results of batch of column test were simulated. The model can explain clearly the results in short period. This can estimate leaching ratio and secondary minerals. The model can simulate the experimental results by two types of velocity theory on altering bentonite. (author)

  17. In situ biodenitrification of nitrate surface water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, G.C.; Ballew, M.B.

    1995-01-01

    The US Department of Energy's Weldon Spring Site Remedial Action Project has successfully operated a full-scale in situ biodenitrification system to treat water with elevated nitrate levels in abandoned raffinate pits. Bench- and pilot-scale studies were conducted to evaluate the feasibility of the process and to support its full-scale design and application. Bench testing evaluated variables that would influence development of an active denitrifying biological culture. The variables were carbon source, phosphate source, presence and absence of raffinate sludge, addition of a commercially available denitrifying microbial culture, and the use of a microbial growth medium. Nitrate levels were reduced from 750 mg/L NO 3 -N to below 10 mg/L NO 3 -N within 17 days. Pilot testing simulated the full-scale process to determine if nitrate levels could be reduced to less than 10 mg/L NO 3 -N when high levels are present below the sludge surface. Four separate test systems were examined along with two control systems. Nitrates were reduced from 1,200 mg/L NO 3 -N to below 2 mg/L NO 3 -N within 21 days. Full-scale operation has been initiated to denitrify 900,000-gal batches alternating between two 1-acre ponds. The process used commercially available calcium acetate solution and monosodium/disodium phosphate solution as a nutrient source for indigenous microorganisms to convert nitrates to molecular nitrogen and water

  18. Study the Effect of Intermittent and Continuous Ponding Depths by Using Different Heads to Leach Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nesrin J. AL-Mansori

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available As results of using water for irrigated lands in a random manner in a time of shortage main water resources, Experimental work carried out to study the effect of continuous and intermittent ponding depth on the leaching processes. Sandy soil used, sourced from Hilla / Al-Jameeya, at Hilla city. Sieve analysis and hydrometer testing used to identify the properties of the soil. A model used with dimensions of 30, 30 and, 70 cm, with two different heads of water. Shatt-Al-Hilla River samples used in the leaching process.   Chemical tests carried out before the leaching process to identify changes in the proprieties in both water and soil. Leachate collected from two soil columns drained into boxes and tests carried out every 30 minutes. After the leaching process was complete, the soil was re-tested. Chemical tests on soil samples and the collected water applied after leaching for 47.5 cm and 52.5cm heads. From the results،, it can be notice that electrical conductivity for the outlet discharge from soil samples decreased faster with time, then slowing down until the end of leaching process.  The same pattern can be seen for all soil properties. In continuous leaching, a large quantity of water is required over a short leaching period, the inverse true for intermittent leaching. All parameters reduce with time in continuous leaching in comparison to intermittent leaching but when the water level in the soil column compared, it can inferred that increasing the head will reduce all the parameters for soil.

  19. Leaching of arsenic, copper and chromium from thermally treated soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumpiene, Jurate; Nordmark, Désirée; Hamberg, Roger; Carabante, Ivan; Simanavičienė, Rūta; Aksamitauskas, Vladislovas Česlovas

    2016-12-01

    Thermal treatment, if properly performed, is an effective way of destroying organic compounds in contaminated soil, while impact on co-present inorganic contaminants varies depending on the element. Leaching of trace elements in thermally treated soil can be altered by co-combusting different types of materials. This study aimed at assessing changes in mobility of As, Cr and Cu in thermally treated soil as affected by addition of industrial by-products prior to soil combustion. Contaminated soil was mixed with either waste of gypsum boards, a steel processing residue (Fe 3 O 4 ), fly ash from wood and coal combustion or a steel abrasive (96.5% Fe 0 ). The mixes and unamended soil were thermally treated at 800 °C and divided into a fine fraction 0.125 mm to simulate particle separation occurring in thermal treatment plants. The impact of the treatment on element behaviour was assessed by a batch leaching test, X-ray absorption spectroscopy and dispersive X-ray spectrometry. The results suggest that thermal treatment is highly unfavourable for As contaminated soils as it increased both the As leaching in the fine particle size fraction and the mass of the fines (up to 92%). Soil amendment with Fe-containing compounds prior to the thermal treatment reduced As leaching to the levels acceptable for hazardous waste landfills, but only in the coarse fraction, which does not justify the usefulness of such treatment. Among the amendments used, gypsum most effectively reduced leaching of Cr and Cu in thermally treated soil and could be recommended for soils that do not contain As. Fly ash was the least effective amendment as it increased leaching of both Cr and As in majority of samples. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Effect of NaCl salinity on nitrate uptake in Plantago maritima L.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rubinigg, Michael; Posthumus, F.S; Elzenga, J.T.M.; Stulen, I.

    2005-01-01

    Exposure of plants to NaCl salinity reduces the rate of nitrate net uptake by the roots. Previous studies showed that this effect was due to a reduced nitrate influx, which could only partially be explained by a lower demand of nitrate for growth. In the present work we tested the hypothesis that

  1. Measurement of leach rates: a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mendel, J.E.

    1982-01-01

    A historical perspective of the techniques that can be used to measure the leach rate of radioactive waste forms is presented. The achievement of leach rates that are as low as possible has been an important goal ever since the development of solidification processes for liquid radioactive wastes began in the 1950's. Leach tests can be divided into two major categories, dynamic and static, based on whether or not the leachant in contact with the test specimen is changed during the course of the test. Both types of tests have been used extensively. The results of leach tests can be used to compare waste forms, and that has been a major purpose of leach data heretofore; increasingly, however, the data now are needed for predicting long-term leaching behavior during geologic disposal. This requirement is introducing new complexities into leach testing methodology. 3 figures, 2 tables

  2. Growing patterns to produce 'nitrate-free' lettuce (Lactuca sativa).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croitoru, Mircea Dumitru; Muntean, Daniela-Lucia; Fülöp, Ibolya; Modroiu, Adriana

    2015-01-01

    Vegetables can contain significant amounts of nitrate and, therefore, may pose health hazards to consumers by exceeding the accepted daily intake for nitrate. Different hydroponic growing patterns were examined in this work in order to obtain 'nitrate-free lettuces'. Growing lettuces on low nitrate content nutrient solution resulted in a significant decrease in lettuces' nitrate concentrations (1741 versus 39 mg kg(-1)), however the beneficial effect was cancelled out by an increase in the ambient temperature. Nitrate replacement with ammonium was associated with an important decrease of the lettuces' nitrate concentration (from 1896 to 14 mg kg(-1)) and survival rate. An economically feasible method to reduce nitrate concentrations was the removal of all inorganic nitrogen from the nutrient solution before the exponential growth phase. This method led to lettuces almost devoid of nitrate (10 mg kg(-1)). The dried mass and calcinated mass of lettuces, used as markers of lettuces' quality, were not influenced by this treatment, but a small reduction (18%, p < 0.05) in the fresh mass was recorded. The concentrations of nitrite in the lettuces and their modifications are also discussed in the paper. It is possible to obtain 'nitrate-free' lettuces in an economically feasible way.

  3. Trend towards reverse leach process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1975-01-01

    The South African gold mining industry is making notable strides in improving recovery methods for both gold and uranium with significant additions to profits because of higher efficiencies and reductions in costs in the recovery processes. The most notable step on the gold side recently is the adoption of the reverse leach process at Buffelsfontein and Western Deep Levels. This process was pioneered at Hartebeesfontein as far back as 1975 and when introduced there resulted in a two and a half per cent improvement in recovery efficiencies. The essence of reverse leaching under which the uranium is recovered before the gold is the fact that the gold partly coated with iron oxide or locked in uranite, is exposed to be recovered later by cyanidation

  4. Biochar feedstock and pyrolysis temperature effects on leachate: DOC characteristics and nitrate losses from a Brazilian Cerrado Arenosol mixed with agricultural waste biochars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speratti, Alicia B; Johnson, Mark S; Sousa, Heiriane Martins; Dalmagro, Higo J; Couto, Eduardo Guimarães

    2018-04-01

    Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) leached from Brazilian Cerrado Arenosols can lead to carbon (C) losses and lower soil fertility, while excessive nutrient, e.g. nitrate (NO 3 - ), leaching can potentially cause water contamination. As biochar has been shown to stabilize C and retain soil nutrients, a greenhouse experiment was conducted to test different biochars' contributions to DOC and NO 3 - leaching from a sandy soil. Biochars were made from four local agricultural waste feedstocks (cotton residue, swine manure, eucalyptus sawmill residue, sugarcane filtercake) pyrolysed at 400, 500 and 600 °C. Biochar was mixed with soil at 5% weight in pots and maize seeds planted. Leachate was collected weekly for six weeks and analyzed for DOC and NO 3 - concentrations, while fluorescence spectroscopy with parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC) was used to interpret DOC characteristics. Cotton and swine manure biochar treatments had higher DOC and NO 3 - losses than eucalyptus biochar, filtercake biochar, and control treatments. Cotton and swine manure biochar treatments at high temperatures lost mostly terrestrial, humified DOC, while swine manure, filtercake, and eucalyptus biochars at low temperatures lost mostly labile, microbially-derived DOC. Through the practical use of fluorescence spectroscopy, our study identified filtercake and eucalyptus biochars as most promising for retaining DOC and NO 3 - in a Cerrado Arenosol, potentially reducing stable C and nutrient losses. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Uranium leaching by fungal metabolite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Yongdong; Li Guangyue; Ding Dexin; Hu Nan

    2012-01-01

    To explore new means of bioleaching, one strain of high-yielding fungi-Aspergillus niger which could produce organic acids was separated and purified from soil samples of uranium mine. The influence of cultural temperature, initial pH value, inoculum sizes on its growth characteristics were carried out. And the tests of uranium leaching of metabolin of Aspergillus niger were operated. On these tests, the effects of metabolin of Aspergillus niger with different pH value produced in the diverse culture temperature on uranium leaching were investigated. The results show that this strain of Aspergillus niger can grow best under the following conditions: the temperature is 37℃, the initial pH value is 7.0, the inoculum sizes is 2% (the OD value of the spores solution is 0.06). The uranium extraction effects relative to the final pH value of the cultures. and the maximum leaching rates is 83.05% when the pH value is 2.3. (authors)

  6. High Nitrogen Fertilization of Tobacco Crop in Headwater Watershed Contaminates Subsurface and Well Waters with Nitrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. R. Kaiser

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Our hypothesis was that subsurface and well waters in watershed with shallow, stony soils, steep landscapes, and cropped to tobacco are contaminated by nitrate. Nitrate in soil solution was monitored in (0.20 m and below (0.5 m root zone with tension lysimeters, in five transects. Water from two wells (beneath tobacco field and in native forest used for human consumption was also analyzed for nitrate. Soil bulk density, porosity, and saturated hydraulic conductivity were evaluated. Soil physical and hydrological properties showed great variation at different landscape positions and soil depths. Soil coarse grain size, high porosity, and saturated hydraulic conductivity favored leaching nitrate. Nitrate in soil solution from tobacco fields was greater than in natural environment. Nitrate reached depths bellow rooting zone with values as high as 80 mg L−1 in tobacco plantation. Water well located below tobacco plantation had high nitrate concentration, sometimes above the critical limit of 10 mg L−1. Tobacco cropping causes significant water pollution by nitrate, posing risk to human health. A large amount of nitrogen fertilizers applied to tobacco and nitrate in subsurface waters demonstrate the unsustainability of tobacco production in small farming units on steeps slopes, with stony and shallow soils.

  7. Mutation of the Arabidopsis NRT1.5 nitrate transporter causes defective root-to-shoot nitrate transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Shan-Hua; Kuo, Hui-Fen; Canivenc, Geneviève; Lin, Choun-Sea; Lepetit, Marc; Hsu, Po-Kai; Tillard, Pascal; Lin, Huey-Ling; Wang, Ya-Yun; Tsai, Chyn-Bey; Gojon, Alain; Tsay, Yi-Fang

    2008-09-01

    Little is known about the molecular and regulatory mechanisms of long-distance nitrate transport in higher plants. NRT1.5 is one of the 53 Arabidopsis thaliana nitrate transporter NRT1 (Peptide Transporter PTR) genes, of which two members, NRT1.1 (CHL1 for Chlorate resistant 1) and NRT1.2, have been shown to be involved in nitrate uptake. Functional analysis of cRNA-injected Xenopus laevis oocytes showed that NRT1.5 is a low-affinity, pH-dependent bidirectional nitrate transporter. Subcellular localization in plant protoplasts and in planta promoter-beta-glucuronidase analysis, as well as in situ hybridization, showed that NRT1.5 is located in the plasma membrane and is expressed in root pericycle cells close to the xylem. Knockdown or knockout mutations of NRT1.5 reduced the amount of nitrate transported from the root to the shoot, suggesting that NRT1.5 participates in root xylem loading of nitrate. However, root-to-shoot nitrate transport was not completely eliminated in the NRT1.5 knockout mutant, and reduction of NRT1.5 in the nrt1.1 background did not affect root-to-shoot nitrate transport. These data suggest that, in addition to that involving NRT1.5, another mechanism is responsible for xylem loading of nitrate. Further analyses of the nrt1.5 mutants revealed a regulatory loop between nitrate and potassium at the xylem transport step.

  8. Nitrate ammonification in mangrove soils: A hidden source of nitrite?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melike eBalk

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Nitrate reduction is considered to be a minor microbial pathway in the oxidation of mangrove-derived organic matter due to a limited supply of nitrate in mangrove soils. At a limited availability of this electron acceptor compared to the supply of degradable carbon, nitrate ammonification is thought to be the preferential pathway of nitrate reduction. Mangrove forest mutually differ in their productivity, which may lead to different available carbon to nitrate ratios in their soil. Hence, nitrate ammonification is expected to be of more importance in high- compared to low-productive forests.The hypothesis was tested in flow-through reactors that contain undisturbed mangrove soils from high-productive Avicennia germinans and Rhizophora mangle forests in Florida and low-productive Avicennia marina forests in Saudi Arabia. Nitrate was undetectable in the soils from both regions. It was assumed that a legacy of nitrate ammonification would be reflected by a higher ammonium production from these soils upon the addition of nitrate. Unexpectedly, the soils from the low-productive forests in Saudi Arabia produced considerably more ammonium than the soils from the high-productive forests in Florida. Hence, other environmental factors than productivity must govern the selection of nitrate ammonification or denitrification. A rather intriguing observation was the 1:1 production of nitrite and ammonium during the consumption of nitrate, more or less independent from sampling region, location, sampling depth, mangrove species and from the absence or presence of additional degradable carbon. This 1:1 ratio points to a coupled production of ammonium and nitrite by one group of nitrate-reducing microorganisms. Such a production of nitrite will be hidden under the nitrate-limited conditions of most mangrove forest soils.

  9. [Mixture Leaching Remediation Technology of Arsenic Contaminated Soil].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xun-feng; Li, Xiao-ming; Chen, Can; Yang, Qi; Deng, Lin-jing; Xie, Wei-qiang; Zhong, Yui; Huang, Bin; Yang, Wei-qiang; Zhang, Zhi-bei

    2016-03-15

    Soil contamination of arsenic pollution has become a severely environmental issue, while soil leaching is an efficient method for remediation of arsenic-contaminated soil. In this study, batch tests were primarily conducted to select optimal mixture leaching combination. Firstly, five conventional reagents were selected and combined with each other. Secondly, the fractions were analyzed before and after the tests. Finally, to explore the feasibility of mixed leaching, three soils with different arsenic pollution levels were used to compare the leaching effect. Comparing with one-step washing, the two-step sequential washing with different reagents increased the arsenic removal efficiency. These results showed that the mixture of 4 h 0.5 mol · L⁻¹ NaOH + 4 h 0.1 mol · L⁻¹ EDTA was found to be practicable, which could enhance the removal rate of arsenic from 66.67% to 91.83%, and the concentration of arsenic in soil was decreased from 186 mg · kg⁻¹ to 15.2 mg · kg⁻¹. Furthermore, the results indicated that the distribution of fractions of arsenic in soil changed apparently after mixture leaching. Leaching process could significantly reduce the available contents of arsenic in soil. Moreover, the mixture of 0.5 mol · L⁻¹ NaOH + 0.1 mol L⁻¹ EDTA could well decrease the arsenic concentration in aluminum-type soils, while the mixture of 0.5 mol · L⁻¹ OX + 0.5 mol · L⁻¹ NaOH could well decrease the arsenic concentration in iron-type soils.

  10. Bacterial leaching of waste uranium materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbic, F F; Bracilović, D M; Krajincanić, B V; Lucić, J L

    1976-01-01

    The effect of ferrobacteria and thiobacteria on the leaching of waste uranium materials from which 70-80% of uranium was previously leached by classical chemical hydrometallurgical procedure has been investigated. The bacteria used are found in the ore and the mine water of Zletovska River locality, Yugoslavia. Parameters of biological leaching were examined in the laboratory. Leaching conditions were changed with the aim of increasing the amount of uranium leached. The effect of pyrite added to the waste materials before the beginning of leaching has also been examined. Uranium leaching is directly proportional to the composition and number of ferrobacteria and thiobacteria, and increased by almost twice the value obtained from the same starting materials without using bacteria. Increased sulphuric acid concentrations stimulate considerably the rate of leaching. Uranium leaching is increased up to 20% while sulphuric acid consumption is simultaneously decreased by the addition of pyrite. Uranium concentrations in starting waste materials used for leaching were extremely low (0.0278 and 0.372% U) but about 60% recovery of uranium was obtained, with relatively low consumption of sulphuric acid.

  11. Bacterial leaching of waste uranium materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barbic, F.F.; Bracilovic, D.M.; Krajincanic, B.V.; Lucic, J.L.

    1976-01-01

    The effect of ferrobacteria and thiobacteria on the leaching of waste uranium materials from which 70-80% of uranium was previously leached by classical chemical hydrometallurgical procedure has been investigated. The bacteria used are found in the ore and the mine water of Zletovska River locality, Yugoslavia. Parameters of biological leaching were examined in the laboratory. Leaching conditions were changed with the aim of increasing the amount of uranium leached. The effect of pyrite added to the waste materials before the beginning of leaching has also been examined. Uranium leaching is directly proportional to the composition and number of ferrobacteria and thiobacteria, and increased by almost twice the value obtained from the same starting materials without using bacteria. Increased sulphuric acid concentrations stimulate considerably the rate of leaching. Uranium leaching is increased up to 20% while sulphuric acid consumption is simultaneously decreased by the addition of pyrite. Uranium concentrations in starting waste materials used for leaching were extremely low (0.0278 and 0.0372% U) but about 60% recovery of uranium was obtained, with relatively low consumption of sulphuric acid. (author)

  12. Halomonas desiderata as a bacterial model to predict the possible biological nitrate reduction in concrete cells of nuclear waste disposals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alquier, Marjorie; Kassim, Caroline; Bertron, Alexandra; Sablayrolles, Caroline; Rafrafi, Yan; Albrecht, Achim; Erable, Benjamin

    2014-01-01

    After closure of a waste disposal cell in a repository for radioactive waste, resaturation is likely to cause the release of soluble species contained in cement and bituminous matrices, such as ionic species (nitrates, sulfates, calcium and alkaline ions, etc.), organic matter (mainly organic acids), or gases (from steel containers and reinforced concrete structures as well as from radiolysis within the waste packages). However, in the presence of nitrates in the near-field of waste, the waste cell can initiate oxidative conditions leading to enhanced mobility of redox-sensitive radionuclides (RN). In biotic conditions and in the presence of organic matter and/or hydrogen as electron donors, nitrates may be microbiologically reduced, allowing a return to reducing conditions that promote the safety of storage. Our work aims to analyze the possible microbial reactivity of nitrates at the bitumen - concrete interface in conditions as close as possible to radioactive waste storage conditions in order (i) to evaluate the nitrate reaction kinetics; (ii) to identify the by-products (NO2(-), NH4(+), N2, N2O, etc.); and (iii) to discriminate between the roles of planktonic bacteria and those adhering as a biofilm structure in the denitrifying activity. Leaching experiments on solid matrices (bitumen and cement pastes) were first implemented to define the physicochemical conditions that microorganisms are likely to meet at the bitumen-concrete interface, e.g. highly alkaline pH conditions (10 < pH < 11) imposed by the cement matrix. The screening of a range of anaerobic denitrifying bacterial strains led us to select Halomonas desiderata as a model bacterium capable of catalyzing the reaction of nitrate reduction in these particular conditions of pH. The denitrifying activity of H. desiderata was quantified in a batch bioreactor in the presence of solid matrices and/or leachate from bitumen and cement matrices. Denitrification was relatively fast in the presence of cement

  13. Reactivity of Metal Nitrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-07-20

    02NOCuOH Any mechanism suggested for the nitration of aromatic systems by titanium(IV) nitrate must take into account the observed similarity, in...occurs. -26- References 1. For recent reviews see (a) R. B. Moodie and K. Schofield, Accounts Chem. Res., 1976, 9, 287; (b) G. A. Olah and S. J. Kuhn...Ithaca, N.Y., 1969, Chapter VI; L. M. Stock, Prog. Phys. Org. Chem., 1976, 12, 21; J. G. Hoggett , R. B. Moodie, J. R. Penton, and K. Schofield

  14. Characterization of Tank 16H Annulus Samples Part II: Leaching Results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hay, M.; Reboul, S.

    2012-01-01

    The closure of Tank 16H will require removal of material from the annulus of the tank. Samples from Tank 16H annulus were characterized and tested to provide information to evaluate various alternatives for removing the annulus waste. The analysis found all four annulus samples to be composed mainly of Si, Na, and Al and lesser amounts of other elements. The XRD data indicate quartz (SiO 2 ) and sodium aluminum nitrate silicate hydrate (Na 8 (Al 6 Si 6 O 24 )(NO 3 ) 2 .4H 2 O) as the predominant crystalline mineral phases in the samples. The XRD data also indicate the presence of crystalline sodium nitrate (NaNO 3 ), sodium nitrite (NaNO 2 ), gibbsite (Al(OH) 3 ), hydrated sodium bicarbonate (Na 3 H(CO 3 ) 2 .2H 2 O), and muscovite (KAl 2 (AlSi 3 O 10 )(OH) 2 ). Based on the weight of solids remaining at the end of the test, the water leaching test results indicate 20-35% of the solids dissolved after three contacts with an approximately 3:1 volume of water at 45 C. The chemical analysis of the leachates and the XRD results of the remaining solids indicate sodium salts of nitrate, nitrite, sulfate, and possibly carbonate/bicarbonate make up the majority of the dissolved material. The majority of these salts were dissolved in the first water contact and simply diluted with each subsequent water contact. The water leaching removed large amounts of the uranium in two of the samples and approximately 1/3 of the 99 Tc from all four samples. Most of the other radionuclides analyzed showed low solubility in the water leaching test. The oxalic acid leaching test result indicate approximately 34-47% of the solids in the four annulus samples will dissolve after three contacts with an approximately 3:1 volume of acid to solids at 45 C. The same sodium salts found in the water leaching test comprise the majority of dissolved material in the oxalic acid leaching test. However, the oxalic acid was somewhat more effective in dissolving radionuclides than the water leach. In

  15. Leaching of metals from soil contaminated by mining activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yukselen, M A; Alpaslan, B

    2001-10-12

    Stabilization/solidification (s/s) is one of the most effective methods of dealing with heavy metal contaminated sites. The ability of lime and cement stabilization to immobilize Pb, Cu and Fe contained in a contaminated soil originating from an old mining and smelting area located along the Mediterranean Sea shore in northern Cyprus was investigated. The stabilization was evaluated by applying leaching tests. A series of tests were conducted to optimize the additive soil ratio for the best immobilization process. Additive/soil=1/15 (m/m) ratio was found to be the optimum for both lime and cement. Application of the US EPA toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP) on the soil samples treated with lime at additive/soil=1/15 (m/m) mixing ratios showed that Cu and Fe solubility was reduced at 94 and 90%, respectively. The results of cement treatment using the same ratio, reduced the solubility 48 and 71% for Cu and Fe, respectively. The Pb solubility was found to be below the regulatory limit of 5mg/l so no additive treatment was needed. The optimum additive/soil amount (1/15) was selected for more detailed column studies, that were carried out in the acidic pH range. According to the results of column leaching tests, it was found that, the degree of heavy metal leaching is highly dependent on pH.

  16. Study on extraction of uranium from clayey sandstone with floatation-leaching process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meng Guangshou; Zhao Manchang; Wu Peisheng; Song Wenlan; Li Wenxia.

    1985-01-01

    An improved floatation-leaching process is proposed to extract uranium from some clayey sandstone type of ore. By two-step flotation, the ground feed ore can be divided into three urani-ferous sections, i.e., the sulfidic concentrate carrying organic matter, the carbonate concentrate, and the tailings. The sulfidic concentrate is mixed with the tailings and then treated by acid-leaching with the result that 93% uranium extraction can be attained. The excess free acid of the leached slurry is further neutralized with the carbonate concentrate instead of lime commonly used. As a result, approximately 60% uranium extraction can be attained. As a whole, by the flotation-leaching process the acid consumption can be reduced from 200 kg/t down to < 80 kg/t and the uranium extraction can be raised from 85% to 90% as compared with the conventional acid-leaching process

  17. Leaching of manganese from electrolytic manganese residue by electro-reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shu, Jiancheng; Liu, Renlong; Liu, Zuohua; Chen, Hongliang; Tao, Changyuan

    2017-08-01

    In this study, an improved process for leaching manganese from electrolytic manganese residue (EMR) by electro-reduction was developed. The mechanisms of the electro-reduction leaching were investigated through X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, X-ray fluorescence, and Brunauer Emmett Teller. The results show that the electric field could change the surface charge distribution of EMR particles, and the high-valent manganese can be reduced by electric field. The leaching efficient of manganese reached 84.1% under the optimal leaching condition: 9.2 wt% H 2 SO 4 , current density of 25 mA/cm 2 , solid-to-liquid ratio of 1:5, and leaching time for 1 h. It is 37.9% higher than that attained without an electric field. Meanwhile, the manganese content in EMR decreased from 2.57% to 0.48%.

  18. Study on the effect of innovative leaching solvent on the oil removal for oily drilling cuttings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Long; Ma, Cha; Hao, Weiwei; Li, Mu; Huang, Zhao; Liu, Yushuang

    2018-02-01

    A new type of leaching solvent for oily drilling cuttings was developed, and the effect of leaching solvent on the oil removal for oily cuttings was investigated. The results indicated that the leaching solvent had good capacity of oil removal for oily cuttings, and the oil content of treated cuttings is less than 0.6%. The leaching solvent could be separated from the oil phase through distillation, and the recyclable solvent could be reused to treat other cuttings. Moreover, oil resources adsorbed on the oily cuttings could be recycled and reused to prepare new drilling fluids, so the drilling cost could be reduced greatly. As a result, the leaching solvent could treat the oily cuttings effectively, and recycle and reuse oil resources, and thus produce great economic benefits. It can play an essential role in safe drilling jobs and improvement of drilling efficiency in the future.

  19. Effect of biochar amendment on nitrate retention in a silty clay loam soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela Libutti

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Biochar incorporation into agricultural soils has been proposed as a strategy to decrease nutrient leaching. The present study was designed to assess the effect of biochar on nitrate retention in a silty clay loam soil. Biochar obtained from the pyrogasification of fir wood chips was applied to soil and tested in a range of laboratory sorption experiments. Four soil treatments were considered: soil only (control, soil with 2, 4 and 8% of biochar by mass. The Freundlich sorption isotherm model was used to fit the adsorbed amount of nitrate in the soil-biochar mixtures. The model performed very well in interpreting the experimental data according to a general linear regression (analysis of co-variance statistical approach. Nitrate retention in the soilbiochar mixtures was always higher than control, regardless the NO3 – concentration in the range of 0-400 mg L–1. Different sorption capacities and intensities were detected depending on the biochar application rate. The highest adsorption capacity was observed in the soils added with 2 and 4% of biochar, respectively. From the results obtained is possible to infer that nitrate retention is higher at lower biochar addition rate to soil (2 and 4% and at lower nitrate concentration in the soil water solution. These preliminary laboratory results suggest that biochar addition to a typical Mediterranean agricultural soil could be an effective management option to mitigate nitrate leaching.

  20. Relationship between nitrate reductase and nitrate uptake in phytoplankton in the Peru upwelling region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blasco, D.; MacIsaac, J.J.; Packard, T.T.; Dugdale, R.C.

    1984-01-01

    Nitrate reductase (NR) activity and 15 NO 3 - uptake in phytoplankton were compared under different environmental conditions on two cruises in the upwelling region off Peru. The NR activity and NO 3 - uptake rates responded differently to light and nutrients and the differences led to variations in the uptake: reductase ratio. Analysis of these variations suggests that the re-equilibration time of the two processes in response to environmental perturbation is an important source of variability. The nitrate uptake system responds faster than the nitrate reductase system. Considering these differences in response time the basic differences in the two processes, and the differences in their measurement, the authors conclude that the Nr activity measures the current nitrate-reducing potential, which reflects NO 3 - assimilation before the sampling time, while 15 NO 3 - uptake measures NO 3 - assimilation in the 6-h period following sampling

  1. Application of percolation leaching in Fuzhou uranium mine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang Lang; Wang Haita; He Jiangming

    2006-01-01

    In order to solve these problems such as high cost by conventional agitation leaching, low permeability and low leaching rate by heap leach, a percolation leaching method was developed. Two-year's production results show that leaching rate of uranium is up to 90% by this method. Compared with conventional agitation leaching, the power, sulfuric acid and lime consumption by the percolation leaching decreased by 60%, 27% and 77% respectively. (authors)

  2. Phase extraction equilibria in systems rare earth (3) nitrates-ammonium nitrate-water-trialkylmethylammonium nitrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pyartman, A.K.; Kopyrin, A.A.; Puzikov, E.A.

    1995-01-01

    The distribution of rare earth metals (3) between aqueous and organic phases in the systems rare earth metal (3) (praseodymium-lutetium (3), yttrium (3)) nitrate-ammonium nitrate-water-trialkylmethylammonium (kerosene diluent nitrate has been studied. It is shown that in organic phase di- and trisolvates of metals (3) with tralkylmethylammonium nitrate are formed. The influence of concentration of rare earth metal (3) nitrate and ammonium nitrate on the values of extraction concentrational constants has been ascertained: they decrease with increase in the ordinal number of lanthanide (3). 11 refs., 4 figs. 1 tab

  3. The structure of leached sodium borosilicate glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bunker, B.C.; Tallant, D.R.; Headley, T.J.; Turner, G.L.; Kirkpatrick, R.J.

    1988-01-01

    Raman spectroscopy, solid state 29 Si, 11 B, 17 O, and 23 Na nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy have been used to investigate how the structures of sodium borosilicate glasses change during leaching in water at pH 1, 9, and 12. Results show that the random network structure present prior to leaching is transformed into a network of small condensed ring structures and/or colloidal silica particles. The restructuring of leached glass can be rationalised on the basis of simple hydrolysis (depolymerisation) and condensation (repolymerisation) reactions involving Si-O-Si and Si-O-B bonds. The structural changes that occur during leaching influence the properties of the leached layer, including leaching kinetics, crazing and spalling, and slow crack growth. (author)

  4. The Danish Pesticide Leaching Assessment Programme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenbom, Annette Elisabeth; Brüsch, Walter Michael; Juhler, Rene K.

    In 1998, the Danish Parliament initiated the Pesticide Leaching Assessment Programme (PLAP), an intensive monitoring programme aimed at evaluating the leaching risk of pesticides under field conditions. The objective of the PLAP is to improve the scientific foundation for decision......-making in the Danish regulation of pesticides. The specific aim is to analyse whether pesticides applied in accordance with current regulations leach to groundwater in unacceptable concentrations. The programme currently evaluates the leaching risk of 41 pesticides and 40 degradation products at five agricultural......, thiamethoxam, tribenuronmethyl, and triasulfuron) did not leach during the 1999-2009 monitoring period. 13 of the applied pesticides exhibited pronounced leaching of the pesticide and/or their degradation product(-s) 1 m b.g.s. in yearly average concentrations exceeding 0.1 μg/l (maximum allowable...

  5. Quantifying nitrogen leaching response to fertilizer additions in China's cropland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao, Shuoshuo; Xu, Peng; Zhou, Feng; Yang, Hui; Zheng, Chunmiao; Cao, Wei; Tao, Shu; Piao, Shilong; Zhao, Yue; Ji, Xiaoyan; Shang, Ziyin

    2016-01-01

    Agricultural soils account for more than 50% of nitrogen leaching (L_N) to groundwater in China. When excess levels of nitrogen accumulate in groundwater, it poses a risk of adverse health effects. Despite this recognition, estimation of L_N from cropland soils in a broad spatial scale is still quite uncertain in China. The uncertainty of L_N primarily stems from the shape of nitrogen leaching response to fertilizer additions (N_r_a_t_e) and the role of environmental conditions. On the basis of 453 site-years at 51 sites across China, we explored the nonlinearity and variability of the response of L_N to N_r_a_t_e and developed an empirical statistical model to determine how environmental factors regulate the rate of N leaching (LR). The result shows that L_N-N_r_a_t_e relationship is convex for most crop types, and varies by local hydro-climates and soil organic carbon. Variability of air temperature explains a half (∼52%) of the spatial variation of LR. The results of model calibration and validation indicate that incorporating this empirical knowledge into a predictive model could accurately capture the variation in leaching and produce a reasonable upscaling from site to country. The fertilizer-induced L_N in 2008 for China's cropland were 0.88 ± 0.23 TgN (1σ), significantly lower than the linear or uniform model, as assumed by Food and Agriculture Organization and MITERRA-EUROPE models. These results also imply that future policy to reduce N leaching from cropland needs to consider environmental variability rather than solely attempt to reduce N_r_a_t_e. - Highlights: • L_N-N_r_a_t_e relationship is convex and varies by local hydro-climates and SOC. • Variability of temperature explains a half of spatial variation of N leaching rate. • L_N in 2008 were 0.88 ± 0.23 Tg, lower than the linear or uniform models. • Reducing L_N should consider background rather than decreasing N_r_a_t_e solely. - Variability of air temperature explains a half of

  6. COGEMA Experience in Uranous Nitrate Preparation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tison, E.; Bretault, Ph.

    2006-01-01

    Separation and purification of plutonium by PUREX process is based on a sequence of extraction and back extraction which requires reducing plutonium Pu IV (extractable form) into Pu III (inextractable form) Different reducers can be used to reduce Pu IV into Pu III. Early plants such as that for Magnox fuel at Sellafield used ferrous sulfamate while UP 1 at Marcoule used uranous sulfamate. These reducers are efficient and easy to prepare but generates ferric and/or sulphate ions and so complicates management of the wastes from the plutonium purification cycle. Recent plants such as UP3 and UP2 800 at La Hague, THORP at Sellafield, and RRP at Rokkasho Mura (currently under tests) use uranous nitrate (U IV) stabilized by hydrazinium nitrate (N 2 H 5 NO 3 ) and hydroxyl ammonium nitrate (HAN). In the French plants, uranous nitrate is used in U-Pu separation and alpha barrier and HAN is used in Pu purification. Compared to sulfamate, U IV does not generate extraneous chemical species and uranyl nitrate (U VI) generated by reducing Pu IV follows the main uranium stream. More over uranous nitrate is prepared from reprocessed purified uranyl nitrate taken at the outlet of the reprocessing plant. Hydrazine and HAN offer the advantage to be salt-free reagents. Uranous nitrate can be generated either by electrolysis or by catalytic hydrogenation process. Electrolytic process has been implemented in early plant UP 1 at Marcoule (when changing reducer from uranous sulfamate to uranous nitrate) and was used again in UP2 plant at La Hague. However, the electrolytic process presented several disadvantages such as a low conversion rate and problems associated with the use of mercury. Electrolysis cells with no mercury were developed for the Eurochemic plant in Belgium and then implemented in the first Japanese reprocessing plant in Tokai-Mura. But finally, in 1975, the electrolytic process was abandoned in favor of the catalytic hydrogenation process developed at La Hague. The

  7. Nitrogen management and nitrification inhibitor effects on nitrogen-15 urea: 2. Nitrogen leaching and balance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walters, D.T.; Malzer, G.L.

    1990-01-01

    Nitrification inhibitors (NI) may reduce N leaching losses, and should have the greatest effect on sandy soils where leaching potential is high. This study used 27 lysimeters to evaluate the effect of a NI, nitrapyrin [2-chloro-6(trichloromethyl) pyridine], on soil water percolation (SWP) and N leaching losses from an irrigated sandy loam soil (Typic Hapludoll) planted with corn (Zea mays L.), and monitor the fate of a single application of 15 N-enriched urea over a multiyear period. Urea was applied at 90 and 180 kg N ha -1 yr -1 for a 3-yr period, with and without NI, and with and without incorporation. Urea + NI reduced SWP between planting and silking in 2 out of 3 yr when growing degree days (GDD) were high. After silking, SWP was reduced when urea + NI was incorporated and leaching load was high. A twofold increase in N rate resulted in an average of 3.4 times more N leached over 3 yr. The NI influenced time of N loss but not total N loss. Leaching losses of fertilizer-derived N (FDN) were delayed 25 to 50d when urea + NI were incorporated. The leaching load required to reach the maximum rate of FDN loss was higher with urea + NI. Leaching losses of fertilizer N were three times greater when determined by the difference method than by isotope-ratio analysis. Differing results with these two calculations are attributed to isotope dilution with indigenous soil N as a result of microbial activity. Nitrification inhibitors may reduce the potential for nonpoint-source pollution by delaying NO 3 leaching, but will be most effective if coupled with proper N rates and conservative irrigation water management

  8. The leaching characteristics of vitrified slag

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Jinlong; Li, Yaojian; Tian, Junguo; Sheng, Hongzhi; Xu, Yongxiang

    2010-01-01

    Full Text: Plasma-arc technology was developed to fix the heavy metal of flying ash by the Institute of Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS-IMECH). A direct current (DC) experimental facility of 30 kW with plasma-arc technology was setup to form vitrified slag. The additives (CaO, SiO 2 ) were added into the reactor to form vitrified slag and fix the heavy metal (Cr, Pb), under dissimilar condition (long and short heating-up time, natural and water cooling). Vitrified slag was broken into different particle size, from 0.1 mm to 1 cm. The particles with different specific surface area were used to study the leaching of heavy metals in vitrified slag rate of speed. The pH value of leaching solution are from 2 to 12, the experiment was kept at different external temperature, from 4 degree Celsius to 70 degree celsius, for 1 week to 1 month. Heavy metal leaching concentration was used to measure the chemical stability of vitrified slag. The results show that the higher specific surface area, the higher heavy metal leaching concentration, but when the specific surface area reaches a certain value, little change in leaching concentration. The impact of temperature on leaching concentration was not significant, from 4 degree Celsius to 70 degree Celsius. The leaching concentration increases with decreasing of the pH value of leaching solution when the pH value of leaching solution less than 7, and little change in concentration increases with pH value when the pH value of leaching solution more than 7. Compared with the leaching concentration after 1 month, the leaching concentration after 1 week has not changed significantly. (Author)

  9. Waterproofing Materials for Ammonium Nitrate

    OpenAIRE

    R.S. Damse

    2004-01-01

    This study explores the possibility of overcoming the problem of hygroscopicity of ammonium nitrate by coating the particles with selected waterproofing materials. Gravimetric analysis ofthe samples of ammonium nitrate coated with eight different waterproofing materials, vis-a-vis, uncoated ammonium nitrate, were conducted at different relative humidity and exposuretime. The results indicate that mineral jelly is the promising waterproofing material for ammonium nitrate among the materials te...

  10. A New Generation of Leaching Tests – The Leaching Environmental Assessment Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Provides an overview of newly released leaching tests that provide a more accurate source term when estimating environmental release of metals and other constituents of potential concern (COPCs). The Leaching Environmental Assessment Framework (LEAF) methods have been (1) develo...

  11. Uranium extraction history using pressure leaching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fraser, K.S.; Thomas, K.G.

    2010-01-01

    Over the past 60 years of uranium process development only a few commercial uranium plants have adopted a pressure leaching process in their flowsheet. The selection of acid versus alkaline pressure leaching is related to the uranium and gangue mineralogy. Tetravalent (U"+"4) uranium has to be oxidized to hexavalent (U"+"6) uranium to be soluble. Refractory tetravalent uranium requires higher temperature and pressure, as practised in pressure leaching, for conversation to soluble hexavalent uranium. This paper chronicles the history of these uranium pressure leaching facilities over the past 60 years, with specific details of each design and operation. (author)

  12. A new Leaching System, Sheta Extractor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheta, M.E.

    2008-01-01

    Moving of crushed solid ores against leaching solution in a continuous countercurrent arises a true technical problem. This invented system introduces a practical solution for such problem. Inside the system, the crushed ore is driving against gravity, whereas the leaching solution moves in the opposite direction. Contact between the two phases occurs with gentle stirring. After contact, discharging of the processed phases takes place automatically out the system. The system was investigated for uranium leaching from a coarse grained fraction (+2 --- -- -30 mm) of uranium mineralized granite sample. Uranium leaching percent reached to nearly 50% using sulfuric acid

  13. Heap leaching procedure for the Uranium extraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shishahbore, M. R.

    2002-01-01

    Heap leaching of Uranium ores is currently in use in several countries. Before taking any decision for construction of heap in industrial scale, it is necessary to obtain the main factors that influence the heap leaching process, such as acid construction, acid solution flowrate, temperature of reaction, or size, ration of liquid to solid, permeability and suitable oxidant. To achieve the above parameters, small scale column leaching is usually recommended. In this project column leaching were carried out in 6 plexiglass column with 43.5 cm an height and 7.4 cm inner diameter. In each column closely 2.00 kg Uranium ore were leached by sulfuric acid. Leaching operation on Iranian ores from two different anomalies from the same area were investigated. In this project, six column were leached at different flowrate of eluent and effect of oxidant were investigated. Acid consumption were in the range of 60 - 144 kg per ton ore and recovery between 73.07% - 99.97%. Finally according to the results obtained, investigated that over are suitable to heap leaching technique. Al tough, to enforce of heap leaching project need to more experiments

  14. The Effect of Nitrate Levels and Harvest Times on Fe, Zn, Cu, and K, Concentrations and Nitrate Reductase Activity in Lettuce and Spinach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Gheshlaghi

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Leafy vegetables are considered as the main sources of nitrate in the human diet. In order to investigate the effect of nitrate levels and harvest times on nitrate accumulation, nitrate reductase activity, concentrations of Fe, Zn, Cu and K in Lettuce and Spinach and their relation to nitrate accumulation in these leafy vegetables, two harvest times (29 and 46 days after transplanting, two vegetable species of lettuce and spinach and two concentrations of nitrate (10 and 20 mM were used in a hydroponics greenhouse experiment with a completely randomized design and 3 replications. Modified Hoagland and Arnon nutrient solutions were used for the experiment. The results indicated that by increasing nitrate concentration of solution, nitrate accumulation in roots and shoots of lettuce and spinach increased significantly (P ≤ 0.05, and the same trend was observed for the nitrate reductase activity in the shoots of the two species. Increasing the nitrate concentrations of solution, reduced the shoot dry weight and the concentration of Fe and Cu in both species, where as it increased the K and Zn concentrations in the shoots of the two species in each both harvest times, the nitrate accumulation increased, but the nitrate reductase activity decreased in the shoots of the two species over the course of the growth. The Concentration of Fe, Cu and K decreased in the shoots of lettuce and the spinach with the time, despite the increase in Zn concentration in the shoots. The results also indicated that increasing nitrate concentrations of solution to the levels greater than the plant capacity for reduction and net uptake of nitrate, leads to the nitrate accumulation in the plants. Nitrate accumulation in plant tissue led to decreases in fresh shoot yield and Fe and Cu concentrations and nitrate reductase activities in both lettuce and spinach.

  15. Estimating soil solution nitrate concentration from dielectric spectra using PLS analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fast and reliable methods for in situ monitoring of soil nitrate-nitrogen concentration are vital for reducing nitrate-nitrogen losses to ground and surface waters from agricultural systems. While several studies have been done to indirectly estimate nitrate-nitrogen concentration from time domain s...

  16. Arsenic removal from alkaline leaching solution using Fe (III) precipitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yongliang; Lv, Cuicui; Xiao, Li; Fu, Guoyan; Liu, Ya; Ye, Shufeng; Chen, Yunfa

    2018-02-02

    The alkaline leaching solution from arsenic-containing gold concentrate contains a large amount of arsenate ions, which should be removed because it is harmful to the production process and to the environment. In this study, conventional Fe (III) precipitation was used to remove arsenic from the leaching solution. The precipitation reaction was carried out at the normal temperature, and the effects of pH value and Fe/As ratio on the arsenic removal were investigated. The results show that the removal rate of arsenic is distinctive at different pH values, and the effect is best within the pH range of 5.25-5.96. The removal rate can be further increased by increasing the ratio of Fe/As. When the pH = 5.25-5.96 and Fe/As > 1.8, the arsenic in the solution can be reduced to below 5 mg/L. However, the crystallinity of ferric arsenate is poor, and the particle size is small, most of which is about 1 μm. The leaching toxicity test shows the leaching toxicity of precipitates gradually decreased by the increase of Fe/As. The precipitates can be stored safely as the ratio of Fe/As exceeded 2.5.

  17. The treatments of soil Rirang by floatation and Acid leaching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kosim-Affandi; Umar-Sarip; Alwi, Guswita; Sri-Sudaryanto

    2000-01-01

    The treatments of soil Rirang by floatation and acid leaching has been carried out to increase high uranium concentrates of materials, separating associated economical minerals and to reduce the gangue minerals which bothering at chemical processing. The physical treatment has been done by ore preparation and floatation using oleic acid and p ine oil , 20 % of pulp at pH 9, condition time at 5 minutes and collections of float fraction was 10 minutes. The chemical processing has been done by dynamic leaching using H 2 SO 4 100 kg/ton, MnO 2 20 kg/ton, 50 % of solid with ore size - 65 mesh, temperature at 80 o C and time of leaching was 8 hours. The result of experiments is as follows : Physical treatment by floatation shown that the concentrates of U increased at sink fraction by (1.5 - 2) times against feed sample for all the samples, and in the float fraction the recovery of molybdenite separation is 58 - 81 % and rare earths is 57 - 80 %. The result of dynamic leaching is 76 - 91 %, and recovery uranium increasing from 81.02 % (mixture samples soil before floatation) to 91.16 % ( mixture samples of float fraction)

  18. Leaching characteristics of copper flotation waste before and after vitrification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coruh, Semra; Ergun, Osman Nuri

    2006-12-01

    Copper flotation waste from copper production using a pyrometallurgical process contains toxic metals such as Cu, Zn, Co and Pb. Because of the presence of trace amounts of these highly toxic metals, copper flotation waste contributes to environmental pollution. In this study, the leaching characteristics of copper flotation waste from the Black Sea Copper Works in Samsun, Turkey have been investigated before and after vitrification. Samples obtained from the factory were subjected to toxicity tests such as the extraction procedure toxicity test (EP Tox), the toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP) and the "method A" extraction procedure of the American Society of Testing and Materials. The leaching tests showed that the content of some elements in the waste before vitrification exceed the regulatory limits and cannot be disposed of in the present form. Therefore, a stabilization or inertization treatment is necessary prior to disposal. Vitrification was found to stabilize heavy metals in the copper flotation waste successfully and leaching of these metals was largely reduced. Therefore, vitrification can be an acceptable method for disposal of copper flotation waste.

  19. Scheduling of Irrigation and Leaching Requirements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amer Hassan Al-haddad

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Iraq depends mainly on Tigris and Euphrates Rivers to provide high percentage of agricultural water use for thousands years. At last years, Iraq is suffering from shortage in water resources due to global climate changes and unfair water politics of the neighboring countries, which affected the future of agriculture plans for irrigation, added to that the lack of developed systems of water management in the irrigation projects and improper allocation of irrigation water, which reduces water use efficiency and lead to losing irrigation water and decreasing in agricultural yield. This study aims at studying the usability of irrigation and leaching scheduling within the irrigating projects and putting a complete annual or seasonal irrigation program as a solution for the scarcity of irrigation water, the increase of irrigation efficiency, lessening the salinity in the projects and preparing an integral irrigation calendar through field measurements of soil physical properties and chemical for project selected and compared to the results of the irrigation scheduling and leaching with what is proposed by the designers. The process is accomplished by using