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Sample records for red cell storage

  1. Red cell hemolysis during processing and storage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sawant R

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Apart from the visual assessment, measurement of plasma hemoglobin in the supernatant from red cell units provides an objective measure of the extent of hemolysis during storage. Study Design and Methods: Packed red cells (N=50, 25 units each in triple (CPD-A1 and SAGM and quadruple (CPD-A1 and ADSOL blood bags were evaluated for plasma hemoglobin by the tetramethylbenzidiene (TMB method on day 1, 7, 14, 21 and 28 of collection. The hemoglobin, hematocrit, MCV, LDH and potassium levels were also noted. Whole blood units (N=25 were used as controls. Results: Hemolysis increased in all the stored red cell units. Plasma hemoglobin increased significantly in the first week of storage. The hemolysis, LDH and potassium levels were found to be significantly higher in the red cell units harvested from the triple blood bags. However, on day 28 of storage, free hemoglobin in all the red cell units was much below the 0.8% hemolysis. Conclusion: Hemolysis of the red cells increases due to processing and during storage and is maximum during the first week. Adequate process control and proper storage facilities should be ensured to minimize the hemolysis of red cells during processing and storage.

  2. [Promising technologies of packed red blood cells production and storage].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maksimov, A G; Golota, A S; Krassiĭ, A B

    2013-10-01

    The current article is dedicated to promising technologies of packed red blood cells production and storage. The following new technical approaches are presented: (1) erythrocytes storage in strict anaerobic argon-hydrogen environment, (2) lyophilization of erythrocyte suspension by its atomization in nitrogen gas, (3) lyophilization of erythrocytes by directional freezing under the influence of radio frequency radiation, (4) automated pharming of antigen free packed red blood cells from progenitor cell directly at the battlefield.

  3. Prolonged storage of packed red blood cells for blood transfusion.

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    Martí-Carvajal, Arturo J; Simancas-Racines, Daniel; Peña-González, Barbra S

    2015-07-14

    A blood transfusion is an acute intervention, used to address life- and health-threatening conditions on a short-term basis. Packed red blood cells are most often used for blood transfusion. Sometimes blood is transfused after prolonged storage but there is continuing debate as to whether transfusion of 'older' blood is as beneficial as transfusion of 'fresher' blood. To assess the clinical benefits and harms of prolonged storage of packed red blood cells, in comparison with fresh, on recipients of blood transfusion. We ran the search on 1st May 2014. We searched the Cochrane Injuries Group Specialized Register, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL, The Cochrane Library), MEDLINE (OvidSP), Embase (OvidSP), CINAHL (EBSCO Host) and two other databases. We also searched clinical trials registers and screened reference lists of the retrieved publications and reviews. We updated this search in June 2015 but these results have not yet been incorporated. Randomised clinical trials including participants assessed as requiring red blood cell transfusion were eligible for inclusion. Prolonged storage was defined as red blood cells stored for ≥ 21 days in a blood bank. We did not apply limits regarding the duration of follow-up, or country where the study took place. We excluded trials where patients received a combination of short- and long-stored blood products, and also trials without a clear definition of prolonged storage. We independently performed study selection, risk of bias assessment and data extraction by at least two review authors. The major outcomes were death from any cause, transfusion-related acute lung injury, and adverse events. We estimated relative risk for dichotomous outcomes. We measured statistical heterogeneity using I(2). We used a random-effects model to synthesise the findings. We identified three randomised clinical trials, involving a total of 120 participants, comparing packed red blood cells with ≥ 21 days storage

  4. Duration of red blood cell storage and inflammatory marker generation

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    Sut, Caroline; Tariket, Sofiane; Chou, Ming Li; Garraud, Olivier; Laradi, Sandrine; Hamzeh-Cognasse, Hind; Seghatchian, Jerard; Burnouf, Thierry; Cognasse, Fabrice

    2017-01-01

    Red blood cell (RBC) transfusion is a life-saving treatment for several pathologies. RBCs for transfusion are stored refrigerated in a preservative solution, which extends their shelf-life for up to 42 days. During storage, the RBCs endure abundant physicochemical changes, named RBC storage lesions, which affect the overall quality standard, the functional integrity and in vivo survival of the transfused RBCs. Some of the changes occurring in the early stages of the storage period (for approximately two weeks) are reversible but become irreversible later on as the storage is extended. In this review, we aim to decipher the duration of RBC storage and inflammatory marker generation. This phenomenon is included as one of the causes of transfusion-related immunomodulation (TRIM), an emerging concept developed to potentially elucidate numerous clinical observations that suggest that RBC transfusion is associated with increased inflammatory events or effects with clinical consequence. PMID:28263172

  5. The red cell storage lesion(s): of dogs and men

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    Klein, Harvey G.

    2017-01-01

    The advent of preservative solutions permitted refrigerated storage of red blood cells. However, the convenience of having red blood cell inventories was accompanied by a disadvantage. Red cells undergo numerous physical and metabolic changes during cold storage, the “storage lesion(s)”. Whereas controlled clinical trials have not confirmed the clinical importance of such changes, ethical and operational issues have prevented careful study of the oldest stored red blood cells. Suggestions of toxicity from meta-analyses motivated us to develop pre-clinical canine models to compare the freshest vs the oldest red blood cells. Our model of canine pneumonia with red blood cell transfusion indicated that the oldest red blood cells increased mortality, that the severity of pneumonia is important, but that the dose of transfused red blood cells is not. Washing the oldest red blood cells reduces mortality by removing senescent cells and remnants, whereas washing fresher cells increases mortality by damaging the red blood cell membrane. An opposite effect was found in a model of haemorrhagic shock with reperfusion injury. Physiological studies indicate that release of iron from old cells is a primary mechanism of toxicity during infection, whereas scavenging of cell-free haemoglobin may be beneficial during reperfusion injury. Intravenous iron appears to have toxicity equivalent to old red blood cells in the pneumonia model, suggesting that intravenous iron and old red blood cells should be administered with caution to infected patients. PMID:28263166

  6. Squeezing red blood cells on an optical waveguide to monitor cell deformability during blood storage.

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    Ahluwalia, Balpreet Singh; McCourt, Peter; Oteiza, Ana; Wilkinson, James S; Huser, Thomas R; Hellesø, Olav Gaute

    2015-01-07

    Red blood cells squeeze through micro-capillaries as part of blood circulation in the body. The deformability of red blood cells is thus critical for blood circulation. In this work, we report a method to optically squeeze red blood cells using the evanescent field present on top of a planar waveguide chip. The optical forces from a narrow waveguide are used to squeeze red blood cells to a size comparable to the waveguide width. Optical forces and pressure distributions on the cells are numerically computed to explain the squeezing process. The proposed technique is used to quantify the loss of blood deformability that occurs during blood storage lesion. Squeezing red blood cells using waveguides is a sensitive technique and works simultaneously on several cells, making the method suitable for monitoring stored blood.

  7. Effect of Packed Red Blood Cell Cryopreservation on Development of the Storage Lesion and Inflammation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-01

    liquid storage on development of the biochemical, metabolic, and morphologic changes collectively known as the red blood cell storage lesion is unknown...adjunct to standard blood banking techniques. The post-thaw characteristics are markedly different than fresh packed red blood cells, and the...Drug Administration currently restricts their use to 14 days after thawing. The effect of longer term liquid storage on development of the

  8. Storage time of red blood cells and mortality of transfusion recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middelburg, Rutger A; van de Watering, Leo M G; Briët, Ernest; van der Bom, Johanna G

    2013-01-01

    Storage of red cells and the associated storage lesion have been suggested to contribute to adverse clinical outcomes. The aim of this study was to investigate whether increasing storage time of red cells is associated with mortality of recipients. From all patients who received red cell transfusions between January 2005 and May 2009, in the Leiden University Medical Center, we selected those who received only-young or only-old red cells, defined as below or above the median storage time. Mortality was compared in a Cox regression model. Subsequently, similar comparisons were made between subgroups with increasing contrast between old and young red cells. Among adult patients, after correction for potential confounders, the hazard ratio of death within 1 year after receiving red cells stored for more than 17 days compared with 17 days or less was 0.98 (95% confidence interval, 0.83-1.2). With increasing contrast, the hazard ratio decreased to 0.56 (95% confidence interval, 0.32-0.97) for red cells stored for more than 24 days compared with less than 10 days. In contrast to what has previously been suggested, we find an almost 2-fold increase in mortality rate after the transfusion of fresh red cells compared with old red cells. Results dependent on analyses chosen and previous studies may not have used optimal analyses. The tendency to demand ever-fresher blood could actually be detrimental for at least some patient groups.

  9. Red cell concentrates of hemochromatosis patients comply with the storage guidelines for transfusion purposes.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luten, M.; Roerdinkholder-Stoelwinder, B.; Rombout-Sestrienkova, E.; Grip, W.J. de; Bos, H.J.; Bosman, G.J.C.G.M.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Therapeutic phlebotomy is the preferred treatment for iron overload associated with hemochromatosis. In the Netherlands, red blood cell concentrates (RCCs) from hemochromatosis patients are not used for transfusion purposes. In this study, their storage performance was compared with that

  10. Red cell concentrates of hemochromatosis patients comply with the storage guidelines for transfusion purposes.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luten, M.; Roerdinkholder-Stoelwinder, B.; Rombout-Sestrienkova, E.; Grip, W.J. de; Bos, H.J.; Bosman, G.J.C.G.M.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Therapeutic phlebotomy is the preferred treatment for iron overload associated with hemochromatosis. In the Netherlands, red blood cell concentrates (RCCs) from hemochromatosis patients are not used for transfusion purposes. In this study, their storage performance was compared with that

  11. Duration of red blood cell storage and survival of transfused patients (CME)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Edgren, Gustaf; Kamper-Jørgensen, Mads; Eloranta, Sandra;

    2010-01-01

    Disquieting reports of increased complication and death rates after transfusions of red blood cells (RBCs) stored for more than 14 days prompted us to perform an observational retrospective cohort study of mortality in relation to storage time.......Disquieting reports of increased complication and death rates after transfusions of red blood cells (RBCs) stored for more than 14 days prompted us to perform an observational retrospective cohort study of mortality in relation to storage time....

  12. Biochemical Storage Lesions Occurring in Nonirradiated and Irradiated Red Blood Cells: A Brief Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Adams

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Red blood cells undergo a series of biochemical fluctuations during 35–42-day storage period at 1°C to 6°C. The sodium/potassium pump is immobilised causing a decrease in intracellular potassium with an increase in cytoplasmic sodium levels, glucose levels decline, and acidosis occurs as a result of low pH levels. The frailty of stored erythrocytes triggers the formation of haemoglobin-containing microparticles and the release of cell-free haemoglobin which may add to transfusion difficulties. Lipid peroxidation, oxidative stress to band 3 structures, and other morphological and structural molecular changes also occur leading to spheroechinocytes and osmotic fragility. These changes that transpire in the red cells during the storage period are referred to as “storage lesions.” It is well documented that gamma irradiation exacerbates storage lesions and the reports of increased potassium levels leading to adverse reactions observed in neonates and infants have been of particular concern. There are, however, remarkably few systematic studies comparing the in vitro storage lesions of irradiated and nonirradiated red cell concentrates and it has been suggested that the impact of storage lesions on leucocyte reduced red blood cell concentrate (RBCC is incomplete. The review examines storage lesions in red blood cells and their adverse effects in reference to blood transfusion.

  13. Safe extension of red blood cell storage life at 4{degree}C

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    Bitensky, M.; Yoshida, Tatsuro

    1996-04-01

    The project sought to develop methods to extend the storage life of red blood cells. Extended storage would allow donor to self or autologous transfusion, expand and stabilize the blood supply, reduce the cost of medical care and eliminate the risk of transfusion related infections, including a spectrum of hepatitides (A, B and C) and HIV. The putative cause of red blood cell spoilage at 4 C has been identified as oxidative membrane damage resulting from deoxyhemoglobin and its denaturation products including hemichrome, hemin and Fe{sup 3+}. Trials with carbon monoxide, which is a stabilizer of hemoglobin, have produced striking improvement of red blood cell diagnostics for cells stored at 4 C. Carbonmonoxy hemoglobin is readily converted to oxyhemoglobin by light in the presence of oxygen. These findings have generated a working model and an approach to identify the best protocols for optimal red cell storage and hemoglobin regeneration.

  14. Vesicles generated during storage of red cells are rich in the lipid raft marker stomatin.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Salzer, U.; Zhu, R.; Luten, M.; Isobe, H.; Pastushenko, V.; Perkmann, T.; Hinterdorfer, P.; Bosman, G.J.C.G.M.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The release of vesicles by red blood cells (RBCs) occurs in vivo and in vitro under various conditions. Vesiculation also takes place during RBC storage and results in the accumulation of vesicles in RBC units. The membrane protein composition of the storage-associated vesicles has not b

  15. Vesicles generated during storage of red cells are rich in the lipid raft marker stomatin.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Salzer, U.; Zhu, R.; Luten, M.; Isobe, H.; Pastushenko, V.; Perkmann, T.; Hinterdorfer, P.; Bosman, G.J.C.G.M.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The release of vesicles by red blood cells (RBCs) occurs in vivo and in vitro under various conditions. Vesiculation also takes place during RBC storage and results in the accumulation of vesicles in RBC units. The membrane protein composition of the storage-associated vesicles has not

  16. Storage-induced increase in biomarkers of oxidative stress and inflammation in red blood cell components

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kücükakin, Bülent; Kocak, Volkan; Lykkesfeldt, Jens;

    2011-01-01

    Background. Transfusion of blood components may increase the risk of complications in relation to surgery. During storage, red blood cells (RBCs) undergo structural and functional changes that may reduce function and viability after transfusion. The aim of the study was to evaluate the quality...

  17. The involvement of cation leaks in the storage lesion of red blood cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna F Flatt

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Stored blood components are a critical life-saving tool provided to patients by health services worldwide. Red cells may be stored for up to 42 days, allowing for efficient blood bank inventory management, but with prolonged storage comes an unwanted side-effect known as the ‘storage lesion’, which has been implicated in poorer patient outcomes. This lesion is comprised of a number of processes that are inter-dependent. Metabolic changes include a reduction in glycolysis and ATP production after the first week of storage. This leads to an accumulation of lactate and drop in pH. Longer term damage may be done by the consequent reduction in anti-oxidant enzymes, which contributes to protein and lipid oxidation via reactive oxygen species. The oxidative damage to the cytoskeleton and membrane is involved in increased vesiculation and loss of cation gradients across the membrane. The irreversible damage caused by extensive membrane loss via vesiculation alongside dehydration is likely to result in immediate splenic sequestration of these dense, spherocytic cells. Although often overlooked in the literature, the loss of the cation gradient in stored cells will be considered in more depth in this review as well as the possible effects it may have on other elements of the storage lesion. It has now become clear that blood donors can exhibit quite large variations in the properties of their red cells, including microvesicle production and the rate of cation leak. Further study of stored red blood cells from donors known to have a high or low-rate of cation leak will shed more light on the relationship between cation gradients and the manifestation of the various elements of the storage lesion.

  18. Erythropoietin reduces storage lesions and decreases apoptosis indices in blood bank red blood cells

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    Penuela, Oscar Andrés; Palomino, Fernando; Gómez, Lina Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Background Recent evidence shows a selective destruction of the youngest circulating red blood cells (neocytolysis) trigged by a drop in erythropoietin levels. Objective The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of recombinant human erythropoietin beta on the red blood cell storage lesion and apoptosis indices under blood bank conditions. Methods Each one of ten red blood cell units preserved in additive solution 5 was divided in two volumes of 100 mL and assigned to one of two groups: erythropoietin (addition of 665 IU of recombinant human erythropoietin) and control (isotonic buffer solution was added). The pharmacokinetic parameters of erythropoietin were estimated and the following parameters were measured weekly, for six weeks: Immunoreactive erythropoietin, hemolysis, percentage of non-discocytes, adenosine triphosphate, glucose, lactate, lactate dehydrogenase, and annexin-V/esterase activity. The t-test or Wilcoxon's test was used for statistical analysis with significance being set for a p-value 6 weeks under blood bank conditions, with persistent supernatant concentrations of erythropoietin during the entire storage period. Adenosine triphosphate was higher in the Erythropoietin Group in Week 6 (4.19 ± 0.05 μmol/L vs. 3.53 ± 0.02 μmol/L; p-value = 0.009). The number of viable cells in the Erythropoietin Group was higher than in the Control Group (77% ± 3.8% vs. 71% ± 2.3%; p-value <0.05), while the number of apoptotic cells was lower (9.4% ± 0.3% vs. 22% ± 0.8%; p-value <0.05). Conclusions Under standard blood bank conditions, an important proportion of red blood cells satisfy the criteria of apoptosis. Recombinant human erythropoietin beta seems to improve storage lesion parameters and mitigate apoptosis. PMID:26969770

  19. Enhancing uniformity and overall quality of red cell concentrate with anaerobic storage

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    Yoshida, Tatsuro; Blair, Abbejane; D'Alessandro, Angelo; Nemkov, Travis; Dioguardi, Michael; Silliman, Christopher C.; Dunham, Andrew

    2017-01-01

    Background Recent research focused on understanding stored red blood cell (RBC) quality has demonstrated high variability in measures of RBC function and health across units. Studies have historically linked this high variability to variations in processing, storage method, and age. More recently, a large number of studies have focused on differences in donor demographics, donor iron sufficiency, and genetic predisposition of the donor to poor storage, particularly through mechanisms of accelerated oxidative damage. A study was undertaken to evaluate a potential additional source of unit to unit variation in stored RBC: the role of variable percent oxygen saturation (%SO2) levels on blood quality parameters during storage. Materials and methods %SO2 data from 492 LR-RBC/AS-3 units used for internal and external collaborative research was included in the analysis. Whole blood units were processed into red blood cells, AS-3 added, leucocyte reduced, in compliance with American Association of Blood Banks guidelines. LR-RBC/AS-3 products were subsequently analysed for %SO2 levels within 3–24 hours of phlebotomy using a co-oximeter. Separately, to evaluate the impact of pre-storage as well as increasing levels of %SO2 during storage, a pool-and-split study was performed. Four units of LR-RBC/AS-3 were split 6 ways; “as is” (control), hyperoxygenated to more than 90%, and four levels of pre-storage %SO2. The units were periodically sampled up to 42 days and analysed for %SO2, pCO2, methaemoglobin, ATP, 2,3-BPG as well as with the metabolomics workflow. Results The measured mean %SO2 in LR-RBC/AS-3 within 24 hours of collection was 45.9±17.5% with (32.7–61.0 IQR). %SO2 in all products increased to approximately 95–100% in three weeks. Measured blood quality parameters including ATP, % haemolysis, methaemoglobin, oxidised lipids, and GSH/GSSG indicated suppressed cellular metabolism and increased red cell degradation in response to higher %SO2 levels. Discussion

  20. Deformability of Red Blood Cells and Correlation with ATP Content during Storage as Leukocyte-Depleted Whole Blood.

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    Karger, Ralf; Lukow, Christian; Kretschmer, Volker

    2012-08-01

    BACKGROUND: Storage duration of red cells has been associated with increased morbidity and mortality following transfusion. This association has been attributed to the loss of deformability of stored red cells leading to deterioration of microvascular perfusion. ATP content is considered a critical determinant of the deformability of stored red cells. METHODS: ATP content and deformability were determined after storage for up to 49 days in 40 leukocyte-depleted whole blood units. Red cell deformability was determined using a laser-assisted optical rotational cell analyzer (LORCA( (®) )) employing shear stress (SS) ranging from 0.3 to 30 Pa. Deformability was expressed as the elongation index (EI). EI was correlated with ATP content. RESULTS: ATP content decreased from 3.5 to 1.7 ?mol/g hemoglobin. EI increased from 0.03 to 0.05 at an SS of 0.3 Pa, and decreased from 0.62 to 0.59 at an SS of 30 Pa. Correlation coefficient (r) of ATP vs. EI at 0.3 Pa ranged from -0.17 to +0.15 during storage. At 30 Pa, r ranged from -0.03 to +0.45. Correlation increased with storage irrespective of SS, and increased with SS irrespective of storage. CONCLUSIONS: ATP content is not a valid surrogate marker for red cell deformability and may not reflect in vivo survival of stored red cells.

  1. Red blood cell storage time and transfusion: current practice, concerns and future perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Roa, María; del Carmen Vicente-Ayuso, María; Bobes, Alejandro M.; Pedraza, Alexandra C.; González-Fernández, Ataúlfo; Martín, María Paz; Sáez, Isabel; Seghatchian, Jerard; Gutiérrez, Laura

    2017-01-01

    Red blood cells (RBCs) units are the most requested transfusion product worldwide. Indications for transfusion include symptomatic anaemia, acute sickle cell crisis, and acute blood loss of more than 30% of the blood volume, with the aim of restoring tissue oxygen delivery. However, stored RBCs from donors are not a qualitative equal product, and, in many ways, this is a matter of concern in the transfusion practice. Besides donor-to-donor variation, the storage time influences the RBC unit at the qualitative level, as RBCs age in the storage bag and are exposed to the so-called storage lesion. Several studies have shown that the storage lesion leads to post-transfusion enhanced clearance, plasma transferrin saturation, nitric oxide scavenging and/or immunomodulation with potential unwanted transfusion-related clinical outcomes, such as acute lung injury or higher mortality rate. While, to date, several studies have claimed the risk or deleterious effects of “old” vs “young” RBC transfusion regimes, it is still a matter of debate, and consideration should be taken of the clinical context. Transfusion-dependent patients may benefit from transfusion with “young” RBC units, as it assures longer inter-transfusion periods, while transfusion with “old” RBC units is not itself harmful. Unbiased Omics approaches are being applied to the characterisation of RBC through storage, to better understand the (patho)physiological role of microparticles (MPs) that are found naturally, and also on stored RBC units. Perhaps RBC storage time is not an accurate surrogate for RBC quality and there is a need to establish which parameters do indeed reflect optimal efficacy and safety. A better Omics characterisation of components of “young” and “old” RBC units, including MPs, donor and recipient, might lead to the development of new therapies, including the use of engineered RBCs or MPs as cell-based drug delivering tools, or cost-effective personalised transfusion

  2. Length of Storage of Red Blood Cells and Patient Survival After Blood Transfusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halmin, Märit; Rostgaard, Klaus; Lee, Brian K

    2017-01-01

    Background: Possible negative effects, including increased mortality, among persons who receive stored red blood cells (RBCs) have recently garnered considerable attention. Despite many studies, including 4 randomized trials, no consensus exists. Objective: To study the association between...... received transfusions from 2003 to 2012. Measurements: Patients were followed from first blood transfusion. Relative and absolute risks for death in 30 days or 1 year in relation to length of RBC storage were assessed by using 3 independent analytic approaches. All analyses were conducted by using Cox...... proportional hazards regression. Results: Regardless of the analytic approach, no association was found between the length of RBC storage and mortality. The difference in 30-day cumulative mortality between patients receiving blood stored for 30 to 42 days and those receiving blood stored for 10 to 19 days...

  3. Nanodefects of membranes cause destruction of packed red blood cells during long-term storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kozlova, Elena, E-mail: waterlake@mail.ru [V.A. Negovsky Scientific Research Institute of General Reanimatology, Moscow (Russian Federation); I.M. Sechenov First Moscow State Medical University, Moscow (Russian Federation); Chernysh, Aleksandr [V.A. Negovsky Scientific Research Institute of General Reanimatology, Moscow (Russian Federation); I.M. Sechenov First Moscow State Medical University, Moscow (Russian Federation); Moroz, Victor; Sergunova, Victoria; Gudkova, Olga; Kuzovlev, Artem [V.A. Negovsky Scientific Research Institute of General Reanimatology, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2015-10-01

    Packed red blood cells (PRBC) are used for blood transfusion. PRBC were stored for 30 days under 4 °C in hermetic blood bags with CPD anticoagulant-preservative solution. Hematocrit was 50–55%. The distortions of PRBC membranes nanostructure and cells morphology during storage were studied by atomic force microscopy. Basic measurements were performed at the day 2, 6, 9, 16, 23 and 30 of storage and additionally 2–3 days after it. Topological defects occurred on RBC membranes by day 9. They appeared as domains with grain-like structures (“grains”) sized up to 200 nm. These domains were appeared in almost all cells. Later these domains merged and formed large defects on cells. It was the formation of domains with the “grains” which was onset process leading eventually to destruction of PRBC. Possible mechanisms of transformation of PRBC and their membrane are related to the alterations of spectrin cytoskeleton. During this storage period potassium ions and lactat concentrations increased, pH decreased, intracellular concentration of reduced glutathione diminished in the preservative solution. Changes of PRBC morphology were detected within the entire period of PRBC storage. Discocytes predominated at the days 1 and 2. By day 30 PRBC transformed into irreversible echinocytes and spheroechinocytes. Study of defects of membranes nanostructure may form the basis of assessing the quality of the stored PRBC. This method may allow to work out the best recommendations for blood transfusion. - Highlights: • Domains with “grains” are formed on membranes surface on 9–16 days of PRBC storage. • The development of domains is the reason of irreversible changes of PRBC structure. • The origin of domains is the consequence of alterations of spectrin cytoskeleton. • Study of nanostructure may form basis of assessing the quality of the stored PRBC.

  4. Structural Changes in the Surface of Red Blood Cell Membranes during Long-Term Donor Blood Storage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Moroz

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to study changes in the surface of red blood cell membranes of donor blood at the macro- and ultrastructural level during its storage for 30 days and to evaluate the functional state of the red blood cell membrane during the whole storage period. Material and methods. The investigation was conducted on human whole blood and packed red blood cells placed in the specialized packs containing the preservative CPDA-1, by using calibrated electroporation and atomic force microscopy and measuring plasma pH. Conclusion. The long-term, up to 30-day, storage of whole blood and packed red blood cells at 4°C was attended by lower plasma pH and increased hemolysis rate constant during calibrated electroporation and by the development of oxidative processes. The hemolysis rate constant was also higher in the packed red blood cells than that in the whole blood. On days 5—6, the membrane structure showed defects that developed, as the blood was stored, and caused irreversible cell membrane damage by day 30. Key words: donor blood, red blood cell membranes, atomic force microscopy.

  5. Cryopreserved red blood cells for pediatric transfusion. Frozen storage of small aliquots in polyvinyl chloride (PVC) plastic bags.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valeri, C R; Valeri, D A; Gray, A; Melaragno, A J; Vecchione, J J; Dennis, R C; Emerson, C P

    1981-01-01

    Human nonrejuvenated and rejuvenated red bood cells were prepared for cryopreservation and subsequent pediatric transfusion. Glycerol was added to the red blood cells in the primary polyvinyl chloride plastic collection bag to achieve a concentration of 40 per cent W/V. The red blood cells were concentrated by centrifugation, and the supernatant glycerol was discarded. Each glycerolized unit was divided into four equal aliquots in the individual 600-ml bags of a dry quadruple polyvinyl chloride plastic system, and each aliquot was frozen and stored at -80 C. After thawing, sodium chloride solutions were used to wash the aliquots in the IBM Blood Processor 2991-1 or 2991-2 or the Haemonetics Blood Processor 115, and the washed aliquots were stored in a sodium chloride-glucose-phosphate solution at 4 C for 24 hours. Freeze-thaw recovery of the red blood cells was about 97 per cent, and freeze-thaw-wash recovery was about 84 per cent. Twenty-four-hour posttransfusion survival values were about 92 per cent for both nonrejuvenated and indated-rejuvenated red blood cells. Nonrejuvenated red blood cells, those frozen within three to five days of collection without biochemical modification, had normal oxygen transport function at the time of transfusion; rejuvenated red blood cells, those biochemically treated with PIGPA Solution A after three to five days of storage at 4 C, had improved oxygen transport function at the time of transfusion.

  6. Is red blood cell rheology preserved during routine blood bank storage?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Henkelman, Sandra; Dijkstra-Tiekstra, Margriet J.; de Wildt-Eggen, Janny; Graaff, Reindert; Rakhorst, Gerhard; van Oeveren, Willem

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Red blood cell (RBC) units stored for more than 2 weeks at 4 degrees C are currently considered of impaired quality. This opinion has primarily been based on altered RBC rheologic properties (i.e., enhanced aggregability, reduced deformability, and elevated endothelial cell interaction),

  7. Is red blood cell rheology preserved during routine blood bank storage?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Henkelman, Sandra; Dijkstra-Tiekstra, Margriet J.; de Wildt-Eggen, Janny; Graaff, Reindert; Rakhorst, Gerhard; van Oeveren, Willem

    BACKGROUND: Red blood cell (RBC) units stored for more than 2 weeks at 4 degrees C are currently considered of impaired quality. This opinion has primarily been based on altered RBC rheologic properties (i.e., enhanced aggregability, reduced deformability, and elevated endothelial cell interaction),

  8. Storage and survival of red blood cells with elevated sodium levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallas, C H; Harris, A S; Wetherall, N T

    1982-01-01

    Approximately 25 percent of black blood donors have an elevated red blood cell (RBC) sodium (Nai) level compared with white donors. This elevation results in a significant increase in the mean Nai from black (9.00 +/- 2.96 mmoles/l RBC) as compared to white blood donors (7.04 +/- 1.48 mmoles/l RBC, p less than 0.001). Red blood cells from four black donors with mean Nai levels of 15 +/- 2.8 mmoles/l RBC were stored for 35 days in citrate-phosphate-dextrose-adenine and compared to that of four donors with normal levels of Nai. Serial measurements of red blood cell adenosine triphosphate, diphosphoglycerate, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, pyruvic kinase, lactate production rates, and intracellular cations showed no differences between the two donor groups. Furthermore, the mean 24-hour posttransfusion survival was not significantly different for the high Nai group (83.2 +/- 5.6%) as compared with the control group (82.3 +/- 6.9%). Based on this study, it is not necessary to eliminate individuals with an elevated red blood cell Nai level as blood donors.

  9. Cell surface alterations during blood-storage characterized by artificial aggregation of washed red blood cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hessel, E; Lerche, D

    1985-01-01

    Aggregation measurement of washed human erythrocytes (RBC) were carried out in a NaCl-PBS solution under laminar shear conditions. Artificial aggregation of fresh and stored erythrocytes was caused by decreased pH and reduced ionic strength and characterized by collision efficiency alpha. Generally, the collision efficiency alpha of stored erythrocytes rises with the increased storage time. Such an aggregation technique might be useful to detect and quantify changes of the membrane and/or the surface structure due to aging and/or storage.

  10. Red cell storage age policy for patients with sickle cell disease: A survey of transfusion service directors in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karafin, Matthew S; Singavi, Arun K; Irani, Mehraboon S; Puca, Kathleen E; Baumann Kreuziger, Lisa; Simpson, Pippa; Field, Joshua J

    2016-02-01

    In patients with sickle cell disease (SCD), the effects of the red cell storage lesion are not well defined. The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence of transfusion services that limit red cell units by storage age for patients with SCD. We developed a 22 question survey of transfusion service director opinions and their corresponding blood bank policies. Target subjects were systematically identified on the AABB website. Responses were recorded in SurveyMonkey and summarized using standard statistical techniques. Ninety transfusion service directors responded to the survey. Response rate was 22%. Only 23% of respondents had storage age policies in place for patients with SCD, even though 36% of respondents consider older units to be potentially harmful in this patient population. Of those with a policy, a less-than 15 day storage age requirement was most often used (75%), but practices varied, and most respondents (65%) agreed that evidence-based guidelines regarding storage age are needed for patients with SCD. Policies, practices and opinions about the risks of older units for patients with SCD vary. As patients with SCD may have unique susceptibilities to features of the red cell storage lesion, prospective studies in this population are needed to determine best practice.

  11. Effect of red blood cell storage time on markers of hemolysis and inflammation in transfused very low birth weight infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalhan, Tamara G; Bateman, David A; Bowker, Rakhee M; Hod, Eldad A; Kashyap, Sudha

    2017-07-24

    Prolonged storage of transfused red blood cells (RBCs) is associated with hemolysis in healthy adults and inflammation in animal models. We aimed to determine whether storage duration affects markers of hemolysis (e.g., serum bilirubin, iron, and non-transferrin-bound iron (NTBI)) and inflammation (e.g., interleukin (IL)-8 and monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP)-1) in transfused very low birth weight (VLBW) infants. Blood samples from 23 independent transfusion events were collected by heel stick before and 2-6 h after transfusion. Serum iron, total bilirubin, NTBI, and MCP-1 levels were significantly increased after transfusion of RBCs (P<0.05 for each comparison). The storage age of transfused RBCs positively correlated with increases in NTBI following transfusion (P<0.001; R(2)=0.44). No associations between storage duration and changes in the other analytes were observed. Transfusion of RBCs into VLBW infants is associated with increased markers of hemolysis and the inflammatory chemokine MCP-1. RBC storage duration only correlated with increases in NTBI levels following transfusion. NTBI was only observed in healthy adults following 35 days of storage; however, this study suggests that VLBW infants are potentially more susceptible to producing this pathological form of iron, with increased levels observed after transfusion of only 20-day old RBCs.Pediatric Research accepted article preview online, 24 July 2017. doi:10.1038/pr.2017.177.

  12. Effect of blood bank storage on the rheological properties of male and female donor red blood cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daly, Amanda; Raval, Jay S; Waters, Jonathan H; Yazer, Mark H; Kameneva, Marina V

    2014-01-01

    It was previously demonstrated that red blood cell (RBC) deformability progressively decreases during storage along with other changes in RBC mechanical properties. Recently, we reported that the magnitude of changes in RBC mechanical fragility associated with blood bank storage in a variety of additive solutions was strongly dependent on the donor gender [15]. Yet, the potential dependence of changes in the deformability and relaxation time of stored blood bank RBCs on donor gender is not known. The objective of this study was to determine the effects of donor gender and blood bank storage on RBC deformability and relaxation time through the measurement of RBC suspension viscoelasticity. Packed RBC units preserved in AS-5 solution from 12 male and 12 female donors (three from each ABO group) were obtained from the local blood center and tested at 1, 4 and 7 weeks of storage at 1-6°C. At each time point, samples were aseptically removed from RBC units and hematocrit was adjusted to 40% before assessment of cell suspension viscoelasticity. RBC suspensions from both genders demonstrated progressive increases (p blood bank storage may reduce tissue perfusion and RBC lifespan in patients receiving blood bank RBCs.

  13. Red blood cell engineering in stroma and serum/plasma-free conditions and long term storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyun Ok; Baek, Eun Jung

    2012-01-01

    In vitro generation of artificial red blood cells (RBCs) is very important to overcome insufficient and unsafe blood supply. Despite recent progresses in RBCs engineering from several stem cell sources, none of them could succeed in generation of functional RBCs in the absence of serum/plasma and feeder cells. Without the elimination of serum and plasma, human RBC engineering in a large scale is impossible, especially for the future bioreactor system. Using an appropriate combination of cost-effective and safe reagents, the present study demonstrated the terminal maturation of hematopoietic stem cells into enucleated RBCs, which were functional comparable to donated human RBCs. Surprisingly, the viability of erythroid cells was higher in our serum- and feeder-free culture condition than in the previous serum-added condition. This was possible by supplementation with vitamin C in media and hypothermic conditions. Also, our report firstly presents the storability of artificial RBCs, which possibility is essential for clinical application. In summary, our report demonstrates engineering of human applicable RBCs with a dramatically enhanced viability and shelf-life in both serum- and stroma-free conditions. This innovative culture technology could contribute to the realization of the large-scale pharming of human RBCs using bioreactor systems.

  14. Nitric Oxide Scavenging by Red Cell Microparticles

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Chen; Zhao, Weixin; George J Christ; Gladwin, Mark T.; Kim-Shapiro, Daniel B.

    2013-01-01

    Red cell microparticles form during the storage of red blood cells and in diseases associated with red cell breakdown and asplenia, including hemolytic anemias such as sickle cell disease. These small phospholipid vesicles that are derived from red blood cells have been implicated in the pathogenesis of transfusion of aged stored blood and hemolytic diseases, via activation of the hemostatic system and effects on nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability. Red cell microparticles react with the import...

  15. Storage time of intraoperative transfused allogeneic red blood cells is not associated with new-onset postoperative atrial fibrillation in cardiac surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gu, Jiwei; Skals, Regitze Kuhr; Torp-Pedersen, Christian

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Allogeneic red blood cell (RBC) transfusion has been associated with new-onset postoperative atrial fibrillation (POAF) following cardiac surgery. Prolonged storage time of RBC may increase the risk. The primary aim of the study was to evaluate whether the storage time of RBC is assoc......BACKGROUND: Allogeneic red blood cell (RBC) transfusion has been associated with new-onset postoperative atrial fibrillation (POAF) following cardiac surgery. Prolonged storage time of RBC may increase the risk. The primary aim of the study was to evaluate whether the storage time of RBC...... is associated with development of POAF. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Pre-, per- and postoperative data were retrieved from the Western Denmark Heart Registry and local blood banks regarding patients who underwent coronary artery bypass surgery, valve surgery or combined procedures in Aalborg or Aarhus University...

  16. An improved red blood cell additive solution maintains 2,3-diphosphoglycerate and adenosine triphosphate levels by an enhancing effect on phosphofructokinase activity during cold storage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P. Burger; H. Korsten; D. de Korte; E. Rombout; R. van Bruggen; A.J. Verhoeven

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Current additive solutions (ASs) for red blood cells (RBCs) do not maintain constant 2,3-diphosphoglycerate (DPG) and adenosine triphosphate (ATP) levels during cold storage We have previously shown that with a new AS called phosphate-adenine-glucose-guanosine-gluconate-mannitol (PAGGGM)

  17. Red blood cell production

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to one part of the body or another. Red blood cells are an important element of blood. Their job ... is carried to and eliminated by the lungs. Red blood cells are formed in the red bone marrow of ...

  18. Measuring cell surface area and deformability of individual human red blood cells over blood storage using quantitative phase imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hyunjoo; Lee, Sangyun; Ji, Misuk; Kim, Kyoohyun; Son, Yonghak; Jang, Seongsoo; Park, Yongkeun

    2016-10-01

    The functionality and viability of stored human red blood cells (RBCs) is an important clinical issue in transfusions. To systematically investigate changes in stored whole blood, the hematological properties of individual RBCs were quantified in blood samples stored for various periods with and without a preservation solution called citrate phosphate dextrose adenine-1 (CPDA-1). With 3-D quantitative phase imaging techniques, the optical measurements for 3-D refractive index (RI) distributions and membrane fluctuations were done at the individual cell level. From the optical measurements, the morphological (volume, surface area and sphericity), biochemical (hemoglobin content and concentration), and mechanical parameters (dynamic membrane fluctuation) were simultaneously quantified to investigate the functionalities and progressive alterations of stored RBCs. Our results show that stored RBCs without CPDA-1 had a dramatic morphological transformation from discocytes to spherocytes within two weeks which was accompanied by significant decreases in cell deformability and cell surface area, and increases in sphericity. However, the stored RBCs with CPDA-1 maintained their morphology and deformability for up to 6 weeks.

  19. Quantitative investigation of red blood cell three-dimensional geometric and chemical changes in the storage lesion using digital holographic microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaferzadeh, Keyvan; Moon, Inkyu

    2015-11-01

    Quantitative phase information obtained by digital holographic microscopy (DHM) can provide new insight into the functions and morphology of single red blood cells (RBCs). Since the functionality of a RBC is related to its three-dimensional (3-D) shape, quantitative 3-D geometric changes induced by storage time can help hematologists realize its optimal functionality period. We quantitatively investigate RBC 3-D geometric changes in the storage lesion using DHM. Our experimental results show that the substantial geometric transformation of the biconcave-shaped RBCs to the spherocyte occurs due to RBC storage lesion. This transformation leads to progressive loss of cell surface area, surface-to-volume ratio, and functionality of RBCs. Furthermore, our quantitative analysis shows that there are significant correlations between chemical and morphological properties of RBCs.

  20. Pathogen inactivation of whole blood and red cell components: an overview of concept, design, developments, criteria of acceptability and storage lesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seghatchian, Jerard; Putter, Jeffrey S

    2013-10-01

    Multilayer preventative strategies have been instituted to enhance transfusion safety for patients in need of critical blood components. Presently blood safety is at its highest levels, with the implementation of precautionary/preventative measures against vCJD, bacterial and viral contamination of the blood supply. The implementation of these strategies together with advances in automation and computerization led to significant improvements in standardisation for transfusion practices. These include validation, verification, adherence to GLP and GMP and other regulatory requirements. In most European countries, universal prestorage leukodepletion is routine practice. In France proactive pathogen inactivation treatments [PITs] have been implemented emphasizing patient safety. This at least conceptually reduces the risk of transfusing viable WBCs, emerging bacteria and viruses, all with potential transfusion complications. In the UK, prion removal filters for red cell products are used selectively for special groups of patients. Some research establishments are exploring the potential impact of pathogen inactivation of whole blood or red cell components, using the new generation of S-303 PIT and the prion removal filters in combination. It needs to be determined whether such a combined strategy, applied synergistically, enhances red cell transfusion safety without compromising the overall criteria of acceptability. It is necessary to critically examine the impact of a new generation of PIT technologies, which may exacerbate the red cell storage lesion and cause the development of undesirable antibodies in the recipient. The development of innovative laboratory tools is vital to study impacts of these measures on the quality of stored blood and their clinical outcome. The ultimate aim of red cell transfusion is to provide oxygen enriched red blood cells to the microcirculations and tissues. Definitive studies are needed to establish the potential unforeseen negative

  1. Nitric oxide scavenging by red cell microparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chen; Zhao, Weixin; Christ, George J; Gladwin, Mark T; Kim-Shapiro, Daniel B

    2013-12-01

    Red cell microparticles form during the storage of red blood cells and in diseases associated with red cell breakdown and asplenia, including hemolytic anemias such as sickle cell disease. These small phospholipid vesicles that are derived from red blood cells have been implicated in the pathogenesis of transfusion of aged stored blood and hemolytic diseases, via activation of the hemostatic system and effects on nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability. Red cell microparticles react with the important signaling molecule NO almost as fast as cell-free hemoglobin, about 1000 times faster than red-cell-encapsulated hemoglobin. The degree to which this fast reaction with NO by red cell microparticles influences NO bioavailability depends on several factors that are explored here. In the context of stored blood preserved in ADSOL, we find that both cell-free hemoglobin and red cell microparticles increase as a function of duration of storage, and the proportion of extra erythrocytic hemoglobin in the red cell microparticle fraction is about 20% throughout storage. Normalized by hemoglobin concentration, the NO-scavenging ability of cell-free hemoglobin is slightly higher than that of red cell microparticles as determined by a chemiluminescence NO-scavenging assay. Computational simulations show that the degree to which red cell microparticles scavenge NO will depend substantially on whether they enter the cell-free zone next to the endothelial cells. Single-microvessel myography experiments performed under laminar flow conditions demonstrate that microparticles significantly enter the cell-free zone and inhibit acetylcholine, endothelial-dependent, and NO-dependent vasodilation. Taken together, these data suggest that as little as 5 μM hemoglobin in red cell microparticles, an amount formed after the infusion of one unit of aged stored packed red blood cells, has the potential to reduce NO bioavailability and impair endothelial-dependent vasodilation.

  2. No early effect of storage time of transfused red blood cells on fatigue and plasma cytokines in patients with anaemia from non-acute gastrointestinal bleeding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mynster, Tommie; Dziegiel, Morten H; Kofoed, Kristian

    2007-01-01

    scale. Clinical observations and blood samples were obtained before transfusion was started, and were repeated 2-8 h after transfusion of the 2nd unit. Measured plasma parameters included IL- 1ß, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, IL-12 and TNF-a. Results: There were no significant differences between group S and L (ns...... relieved self-estimated fatigue, independent of blood storage time. Thrombocyte count decreased after transfusion, probably due to dilution by transfused blood. Aged red cells may not, or only sparsely, directly trigger the interleukin cascade....

  3. High Red Blood Cell Count

    Science.gov (United States)

    Symptoms High red blood cell count By Mayo Clinic Staff A high red blood cell count is an increase in oxygen-carrying cells in your bloodstream. Red blood cells transport oxygen from your lungs to tissues throughout ...

  4. Adaption to High Altitude: An Evaluation of the Storage Quality of Suspended Red Blood Cells Prepared from the Whole Blood of Tibetan Plateau Migrants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui Zhong

    Full Text Available Hypoxia has been reported to cause the significant enhancement of hemoglobin (Hb and hematocrit (Hct, which stabilizes at relatively high levels after an individual ascends to a high altitude. However, the quality of the suspended red blood cells (SRBCs obtained from individuals at high altitudes such as Tibetan plateau migrants after storage has not been studied. In this study, we compared the storage quality of SRBCs prepared from Tibetan plateau and Deyang lowland populations by adding a normal volume of mannitol-adenine-phosphate (MAP, which is a common additive solution used in blood storage in Asian countries. The storage cell characteristics were examined on days 1, 7, 14 and 35.We found higher Hct and Hb levels and viscosity in the high altitude samples. The metabolic rates, including those for electrolytes and lactate, were higher in plateau SRBCs than in lowland SRBCs; these findings were consistent with the higher osmotic fragility and hemolysis of plateau SRBCs throughout the entire storage period. In addition, the reduction rates of 2,3-diphosphoglycerate (2,3-DPG and oxygen tension to attain 50% oxygen saturation of Hb (P50 in plateau SRBCs were higher than those in lowland SRBCs, and the oxygen delivering capacity in plateau SRBCs was weaker than that in lowland SRBCs. We concluded that the storage quality of plateau SRBCs was inferior to that of lowland SRBCs when using the same concentration of MAP. We suggested that the optimal formula, including the MAP concentration or even a new additive solution, to store the plateau SRBCs must be assessed and regulated.

  5. The study of changes of biophysical properties of red blood cells in storage in erythrocyte-containing solutions using atomic force microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lamzin I.M.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Currently the departments of quality control of blood centers evaluate the suitability for clinical use of erythrocyte-containing solutions indirectly by routine methods of the determination of hemoglobin concentration, hematocrit level, or hemolysis at the end of the period of storing. These methods can not directly characterize the state of membranes of preserved erythrocytes. The aim of the work is to study the changes of elasticity and surface potential of membranes of red blood cells of erythrocyte-containing solutions in storage for 35 days. Material and Methods. Two series of dry cytological preparations (smears of erythrocytes have been investigated. The first group consisted of 8 samples of erythrocyte-containing solutions prepared on the day of preservation, and the second group included 20 samples prepared after the long term storage for 35 days at t=+4°C. Blood was stored in bags of «Baxter» company (USA conserving with «CPDA-1». For atomic force microscopy five typical erythrocytes were selected and their elasticity was measured at 9 points of the membrane of each erythrocyte. Total number of measurements was 1296. Results. Average value of Young's modulus of the first group of samples was 1,81±0,02 (M±m KPa. The second group showed 3,22±0,02 KPa statistically higher (p<0,001. The increase of the surface potential of erythrocyte membranes over the storage period was found. Conclusion. A statistically significant increase of the average value of Young's modulus of erythrocytes indicated the decrease in the elasticity of the cell membrane during their storage in erythrocyte-containing solutions under standard temperature conditions and could be used as a criterion for quality assessment.

  6. Red blood cells, multiple sickle cells (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sickle cell anemia is an inherited disorder in which abnormal hemoglobin (the red pigment inside red blood cells) is produced. The abnormal hemoglobin causes red blood cells to assume a sickle shape, like the ones seen in this photomicrograph.

  7. Storage of cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Katharine A

    2011-01-01

    The successful storage of cell lines depends upon many factors, including the condition of the cells to be frozen and the experience of the operator. Attempting to freeze down unhealthy, contaminated or poorly labelled cells can have huge implications for a research laboratory. This chapter outlines the importance of good record keeping, vigilant monitoring, aseptic technique, and high-quality reagents in the successful storage and downstream propagation of cell lines.

  8. Rare red blood cell abnormalities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Zwieten, R.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this thesis is to give insight in the process of diagnosing rare red blood cell defects, to clarify the relation of a defect with cell function and to extend, in this respect, our knowledge about normal red cell function and biochemistry. It is possible to categorize different red cell ab

  9. Phthalate Esters Used as Plasticizers in Packed Red Blood Cell Storage Bags May Lead to Progressive Toxin Exposure and the Release of Pro-Inflammatory Cytokines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonard T. Rael

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Phthalate esters (PE's are plasticizers used to soften PVC-based medical devices. PE's are the most abundant man-made pollutants and increase the risk of developing an allergic respiratory disease or a malignancy. The leaching of PE's in donated packed red blood cells (PRBC during storage was assessed. PRBC transfusion bags containing CPD/AS-1 (ADSOL buffer were analyzed. Samples were collected on storage day 1 and day 42. Two PE's, di-(2-ethylhexyl phthalate (DEHP and mono-(2-ethylhexyl phthalate (MEHP, were measured by liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (LCMS. Interleukin-8 (IL-8 was measured by standard ELISA techniques. DEHP significantly increased from 34.3 µM (±20.0 SD on day 1 to 433.2 µM (±131.2 SD on day 42, a 12.6-fold increase. Similarly, MEHP significantly increased from 3.7 µM (±2.8 SD on day 1 to 74.0 µM (±19.1 SD on day 42, a 20.2-fold increase. Also, DEHP and MEHP increased the release of IL-8 from human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC. The transfusion of older units of PRBC could lead to an accumulation of PE's possibly resulting in inflammation and other effects. This accumulation could be exacerbated due to the decreased metabolism of PE's since trauma patients have a lower esterase activity, the enzymes responsible for metabolizing PE's. The effect of oxidative stress caused by PE's is discussed as a potential mechanism for increases in inflammation caused by older units of PRBC.

  10. Red Blood Cell Antibody Identification

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ID, RBC; RBC Ab ID Formal name: Red Blood Cell Antibody Identification Related tests: Direct Antiglobulin Test ; RBC ... I should know? How is it used? Red blood cell (RBC) antibody identification is used as a follow- ...

  11. The Popularization and Application of Cold Storage Red Blood Cells or Whole Blood at -80 ℃ of the Rh(D) Negative Patients in Surgical Operation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    余忠清; 胡丽华; 韩敏; 饶神宗; 罗成伟

    2002-01-01

    Summary: The efficiency of cold storage red blood cells (CSRBC) or whole blood at -80 ℃ used in 27 Rh(D) negative patients during surgical operation was reported. The Rh(D) negative patients re-ceived the transfusion of CSRBC or whole blood stored at -80 ℃ for 180 to 360 days. The changes in the indexes, such as blood TB, DB, K+, Na+, BUN, Cr, urine protein (URPO), UOB, Hb,HCT, serum total protein, relative to hemolytic reaction and blood volume before and after transfu sion were observed. The results showed that after transfusion of CSRBC or whole blood 27 cases were negative for urine protein and UOB, and the levels of BUN and Cr were normal (P>0. 05). Blood TB, DB, Hb, and HCT were increased, while pH, blood K+ and blood Na+ was normal with the difference being not significant before and after operation (P> 0. 05). Plasma protein was decreased,but there was no significant difference before and after operation (P>0.05). It was suggested that CSRBC or whole blood at -80 ℃ could be safely infused to the Rh (D) negative patients without side effects during the surgical operation.

  12. Red blood cells, sickle cell (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sickle cell anemia is an inherited blood disease in which the red blood cells produce abnormal pigment (hemoglobin). ... abnormal hemoglobin causes deformity of the red blood cells into crescent or sickle-shapes, as seen in this photomicrograph.

  13. Pediatric red cell disorders and pure red cell aplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkins, Sherrie L

    2004-12-01

    Anemia in children may arise from a wide variety of pathogenetic mechanisms that include congenital and acquired disorders. Often the diagnostic considerations include disorders that are not seen commonly in adults and lifelong disorders that arise in children and persist throughout life. Consideration of diverse causes of anemia such as red cell membrane disorders, red cell enzymopathies, congenital dyserythropoietic anemias, congenital sideroblastic anemias, and hereditary pure red cell aplasia (Diamond-Blackfan anemia), as well as infectious causes such as parvovirus B19 infection, often is required when diagnosing anemia in an infant or young child. Knowledge of these entities that are important causes of anemia in the pediatric population, including clinical manifestations and laboratory workup, will aid in recognition of the specific disease entities and effective workup of pediatric red cell disorders.

  14. The study of changes of biophysical properties of red blood cells in storage in erythrocyte-containing solutions using atomic force microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Lamzin I.M.; Khayrullin R.М.

    2014-01-01

    Currently the departments of quality control of blood centers evaluate the suitability for clinical use of erythrocyte-containing solutions indirectly by routine methods of the determination of hemoglobin concentration, hematocrit level, or hemolysis at the end of the period of storing. These methods can not directly characterize the state of membranes of preserved erythrocytes. The aim of the work is to study the changes of elasticity and surface potential of membranes of red blood cells of ...

  15. Disorders of red cell membrane

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    An, Xiuli; Mohandas, Narla

    2008-01-01

    Summary Studies during the last three decades have enabled the development of detailed molecular insights into the structural basis of altered function in various inherited red cell membrane disorders...

  16. Red blood cells, spherocytosis (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spherocytosis is a hereditary disorder of the red blood cells (RBCs), which may be associated with a mild anemia. Typically, the affected RBCs are small, spherically shaped, and lack the light centers seen ...

  17. Metabolic pathways that correlate with post-transfusion circulation of stored murine red blood cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Wolski, Karen; Fu, Xiaoyoun; Dumont, Larry J; Roback, John D; Waterman, Hayley; Odem-Davis, Katherine; Howie, Heather L; Zimring, James C

    2016-05-01

    Transfusion of red blood cells is a very common inpatient procedure, with more than 1 in 70 people in the USA receiving a red blood cell transfusion annually. However, stored red blood cells are a non-uniform product, based upon donor-to-donor variation in red blood cell storage biology. While thousands of biological parameters change in red blood cells over storage, it has remained unclear which changes correlate with function of the red blood cells, as opposed to being co-incidental changes. In the current report, a murine model of red blood cell storage/transfusion is applied across 13 genetically distinct mouse strains and combined with high resolution metabolomics to identify metabolic changes that correlated with red blood cell circulation post storage. Oxidation in general, and peroxidation of lipids in particular, emerged as changes that correlated with extreme statistical significance, including generation of dicarboxylic acids and monohydroxy fatty acids. In addition, differences in anti-oxidant pathways known to regulate oxidative stress on lipid membranes were identified. Finally, metabolites were identified that differed at the time the blood was harvested, and predict how the red blood cells perform after storage, allowing the potential to screen donors at time of collection. Together, these findings map out a new landscape in understanding metabolic changes during red blood cell storage as they relate to red blood cell circulation.

  18. Cryopreserved packed red blood cells in surgical patients: past, present, and future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Alex; Kim, Young; Hoehn, Richard; Jernigan, Peter; Pritts, Timothy

    2016-09-08

    Since the advent of anticoagulation and component storage of human blood products, allogeneic red blood cell transfusion has been one of the most common practices in modern medicine. Efforts to reduce the biochemical effects of storage, collectively known as the red blood cell storage lesion, and prolong the storage duration have led to numerous advancements in erythrocyte storage solutions. Cryopreservation and frozen storage of red blood cells in glycerol have been successfully utilised by many civilian and military institutions worldwide. Through progressive improvements in liquid storage of erythrocytes in novel storage solutions, the logistical need for cryopreserved red blood cells in the civilian setting has diminished. A growing body of current literature is focused on the clinical consequences of packed red blood cell age. Modern cryopreservation techniques show promise as a cost-effective method to ameliorate the negative effect of the red blood cell storage lesion, while meeting the technical and logistical needs of both civilian and military medicine. This review outlines the history of red blood cell cryopreservation, the clinical impact of red cell storage, and highlights the current literature on frozen blood and its impact on modern transfusion.

  19. Red cell metabolism studies on Skylab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mengel, C. E.

    1977-01-01

    Blood samples from Spacelab crewmembers were studied for possible environment effects on red cell components. Analysis involved peroxidation of red cell lipids, enzymes of red cell metabolism, and levels of 2,3-diphosphoglyceric acid and adenosine triphosphate. Results show that there is no evidence of lipid peroxidation, that biochemical effect known to be associated with irreversible red cell damage. Changes observed in glycolytic intermediates and enzymes cannot be directly implicated as indicating evidence of red cell damage.

  20. Red cell metabolism studies on Skylab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mengel, C. E.

    1977-01-01

    Blood samples from Spacelab crewmembers were studied for possible environment effects on red cell components. Analysis involved peroxidation of red cell lipids, enzymes of red cell metabolism, and levels of 2,3-diphosphoglyceric acid and adenosine triphosphate. Results show that there is no evidence of lipid peroxidation, that biochemical effect known to be associated with irreversible red cell damage. Changes observed in glycolytic intermediates and enzymes cannot be directly implicated as indicating evidence of red cell damage.

  1. Utilization and quality of cryopreserved red blood cells in transfusion medicine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Henkelman, S.; Noorman, F.; Badloe, J. F.; Lagerberg, J. W. M.

    2015-01-01

    Cryopreserved (frozen) red blood cells have been used in transfusion medicine since the Vietnam war. The main method to freeze the red blood cells is by usage of glycerol. Although the usage of cryopreserved red blood cells was promising due to the prolonged storage time and the limited cellular det

  2. The effects of non-leukoreduced red blood cell transfusions on microcirculation in mixed surgical patients.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ayhan, B.; Yuruk, K.; Koene, S.; Sahin, A.; Ince, C.; Aypar, U.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The impact of the storage process on oxygen-carrying properties of red blood cells and the efficacy of red blood cell (RBC) transfusions concerning tissue oxygenation remain an issue of debate in transfusion medicine. Storage time and leukocyte content probably interact since longer stor

  3. Red Cell Distribution Width

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... used to diagnose: Other blood disorders such as thalassemia , an inherited disease that can cause severe anemia ... cold hands and feet A family history of thalassemia, sickle cell anemia or other inherited blood disorder ...

  4. First successful automated red cell exchange (erythrocytapheresis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    First successful automated red cell exchange (erythrocytapheresis) in ... PROMOTING ACCESS TO AFRICAN RESEARCH ... Hematopoietic Stem cell Transplantation (HSCT) remains the only curative therapy for Sickle Cell Disease (SCD).

  5. Red cell DAMPs and inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendonça, Rafaela; Silveira, Angélica A A; Conran, Nicola

    2016-09-01

    Intravascular hemolysis, or the destruction of red blood cells in the circulation, can occur in numerous diseases, including the acquired hemolytic anemias, sickle cell disease and β-thalassemia, as well as during some transfusion reactions, preeclampsia and infections, such as those caused by malaria or Clostridium perfringens. Hemolysis results in the release of large quantities of red cell damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) into the circulation, which, if not neutralized by innate protective mechanisms, have the potential to activate multiple inflammatory pathways. One of the major red cell DAMPs, heme, is able to activate converging inflammatory pathways, such as toll-like receptor signaling, neutrophil extracellular trap formation and inflammasome formation, suggesting that this DAMP both activates and amplifies inflammation. Other potent DAMPs that may be released by the erythrocytes upon their rupture include heat shock proteins (Hsp), such as Hsp70, interleukin-33 and Adenosine 5' triphosphate. As such, hemolysis represents a major inflammatory mechanism that potentially contributes to the clinical manifestations that have been associated with the hemolytic diseases, such as pulmonary hypertension and leg ulcers, and likely plays a role in specific complications of sickle cell disease such as endothelial activation, vaso-occlusive processes and tissue injury.

  6. Red blood cells intended for transfusion : quality criteria revisited

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hogman, CF; Meryman, HT

    2006-01-01

    Great variation exists with respect to viability and function of fresh and stored red blood cells (RBCs) as well as of the contents of RBC hemoglobin (Hb) in individual units. Improved technology is available for the preparation as well as the storage of RBCs. The authors raise the question whether

  7. Phosphatidylserine exposure on stored red blood cells as a parameter for donor-dependent variation in product quality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dinkla, S.; Peppelman, M.; Raadt, J. van der; Atsma, F.; Novotny, V.M.J.; Kraaij, M.G.J. van; Joosten, I.; Bosman, G.J.C.G.M.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Exposure of phosphatidylserine on the outside of red blood cells contributes to recognition and removal of old and damaged cells. The fraction of phosphatidylserine-exposing red blood cells varies between donors, and increases in red blood cell concentrates during storage. The susceptibi

  8. Utilization and quality of cryopreserved red blood cells in transfusion medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henkelman, S; Noorman, F; Badloe, J F; Lagerberg, J W M

    2015-02-01

    Cryopreserved (frozen) red blood cells have been used in transfusion medicine since the Vietnam war. The main method to freeze the red blood cells is by usage of glycerol. Although the usage of cryopreserved red blood cells was promising due to the prolonged storage time and the limited cellular deterioration at subzero temperatures, its usage have been hampered due to the more complex and labour intensive procedure and the limited shelf life of thawed products. Since the FDA approval of a closed (de) glycerolization procedure in 2002, allowing a prolonged postthaw storage of red blood cells up to 21 days at 2-6°C, cryopreserved red blood cells have become a more utilized blood product. Currently, cryopreserved red blood cells are mainly used in military operations and to stock red blood cells with rare phenotypes. Yet, cryopreserved red blood cells could also be useful to replenish temporary blood shortages, to prolong storage time before autologous transfusion and for IgA-deficient patients. This review describes the main methods to cryopreserve red blood cells, explores the quality of this blood product and highlights clinical settings in which cryopreserved red blood cells are or could be utilized.

  9. Pure red cell aplasia and associated thymoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristian Rosu

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Pure red cell aplasia is a rare cause of anemia, caused by an absence of red blood cell precursors in the bone marrow. It is usually a paraneoplastic syndrome, associated most commonly with large-cell granular lymphocyte leukemia but also thymoma. For patients who present both pure red cell aplasia and thymoma, thymectomy leads to an initial remission of the aplasia in 30% of cases. However, sustained remission may require the addition of medications such as corticosteroids, cyclospo­rine, or cyclophosphamide. We present a case of pure red cell aplasia associated with a thymoma in an otherwise healthy 80 year-old woman.

  10. Inflight Assay of Red Blood Cell Deformability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingram, M.; Paglia, D. E.; Eckstein, E. C.; Frazer, R. E.

    1985-01-01

    Studies on Soviet and American astronauts have demonstrated that red blood cell production is altered in response to low gravity (g) environment. This is associated with changes in individual red cells including increased mean cell volume and altered membrane deformability. During long orbital missions, there is a tendency for the red cell mass deficit to be at least partly corrected although the cell shape anomalies are not. Data currently available suggest that the observed decrease in red cell mass is the result of sudden suppression of erythropoieses and that the recovery trend observed during long missions reflects re-establishment of erythropoietic homeostasis at a "set point" for the red cell mass that is slightly below the normal level at 1 g.

  11. Red blood cell alloimmunization after blood transfusion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schonewille, Henk

    2008-01-01

    Current pretransfusion policy requires the patients’ serum to be tested for the presence of irregular red blood cell antibodies. In case of an antibody, red blood cells lacking the corresponding antigen are transfused after an antiglobulin crossmatch. The aim of the studies in this thesis is primari

  12. Red blood cell decreases of microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, P. C.

    1985-01-01

    Postflight decreases in red blood cell mass (RBCM) have regularly been recorded after exposure to microgravity. These 5-25 percent decreases do not relate to the mission duration, workload, caloric intake or to the type of spacecraft used. The decrease is accompanied by normal red cell survivals, increased ferritin levels, normal radioactive iron studies, and increases in mean red blood cell volume. Comparable decreases in red blood cell mass are not found after bed rest, a commonly used simulation of the microgravity state. Inhibited bone marrow erythropoiesis has not been proven to date, although reticulocyte numbers in the peripheral circulation are decreased about 50 percent. To date, the cause of the microgravity induced decreases in RBCM is unknown. Increased splenic trapping of circulating red blood cells seem the most logical way to explain the results obtained.

  13. Red cell membrane: past, present, and future

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mohandas, Narla; Gallagher, Patrick G

    2008-01-01

    .... The non-nucleated red cell is unique among human cell type in that the plasma membrane, its only structural component, accounts for all of its diverse antigenic, transport, and mechanical characteristics...

  14. 21 CFR 640.10 - Red Blood Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Red Blood Cells. 640.10 Section 640.10 Food and... ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR HUMAN BLOOD AND BLOOD PRODUCTS Red Blood Cells § 640.10 Red Blood Cells. The proper name of this product shall be Red Blood Cells. The product is defined as red blood cells remaining...

  15. Current issues relating to the transfusion of stored red blood cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimrin, A B; Hess, J R

    2009-02-01

    The development of blood storage systems allowed donation and transfusion to be separated in time and space. This separation has permitted the regionalization of donor services with subsequent economies of scale and improvements in the quality and availability of blood products. However, the availability of storage raises the question of how long blood products can and should be stored and how long they are safe and effective. The efficacy of red blood cells was originally measured as the increment in haematocrit and safety began with typing and the effort to reduce the risk of bacterial contamination. Appreciation of a growing list of storage lesions of red blood cells has developed with our increasing understanding of red blood cell physiology and our experience with red blood cell transfusion. However, other than frank haemolysis, rare episodes of bacterial contamination and overgrowth, the reduction of oxygen-carrying capacity associated with the failure of some transfused cells to circulate, and the toxicity of lysophospholipids released from membrane breakdown, storage-induced lesions have not had obvious correlations with safety or efficacy. The safety of red blood cell storage has also been approached in retrospective epidemiologic studies of transfused patients, but the results are frequently biased by the fact that sicker patients are transfused more often and blood banks do not issue blood products in a random order. Several large prospective studies of the safety of stored red blood cells are planned.

  16. Cell biology of fat storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Paul; Spiegelman, Bruce M

    2016-08-15

    The worldwide epidemic of obesity and type 2 diabetes has greatly increased interest in the biology and physiology of adipose tissues. Adipose (fat) cells are specialized for the storage of energy in the form of triglycerides, but research in the last few decades has shown that fat cells also play a critical role in sensing and responding to changes in systemic energy balance. White fat cells secrete important hormone-like molecules such as leptin, adiponectin, and adipsin to influence processes such as food intake, insulin sensitivity, and insulin secretion. Brown fat, on the other hand, dissipates chemical energy in the form of heat, thereby defending against hypothermia, obesity, and diabetes. It is now appreciated that there are two distinct types of thermogenic fat cells, termed brown and beige adipocytes. In addition to these distinct properties of fat cells, adipocytes exist within adipose tissue, where they are in dynamic communication with immune cells and closely influenced by innervation and blood supply. This review is intended to serve as an introduction to adipose cell biology and to familiarize the reader with how these cell types play a role in metabolic disease and, perhaps, as targets for therapeutic development.

  17. Content changes of reactive oxygen species and malonaldehyde in suspended red blood cells without leukocyte during storage%去白细胞悬浮红细胞制剂储存过程中活性氧族及丙二醛含量变化

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王素玲; 何天博; 韩卫; 王切; 何路军

    2015-01-01

    去白细胞悬浮红细胞制剂储存损伤的重要原因.%Objective To investigate the changes of reactive oxygen species (ROS) concentration and malonaldehyde (MDA) concentration in suspended red blood cells without leukocyte during storage.Methods From May 2013 to June 2013,6 bags of suspended red blood cells without leukocyte which were prepared at Hebei Blood Center were collected in this study by random sampling method.On day 0,day 7,day 14,day 28 and day 42 of storage,the expression of ROS in suspended red blood cells without leukocyte were observed by fluorescent probe 2',7'-dichlorofluorescin diacetate (DCFH-DA) incubation method,the ROS concentration and MDA concentration in suspended red blood cells without leukocyte were also detected.Correlation analysis between the ROS concentration,MDA concentration in suspended red blood cells without leukocyte and storage time was carried out,respectively.Correlation analysis between the MDA concentration and ROS concentration in suspended red blood cells without leukocyte after storage was carried out.Results ① With the extension of storage time,fluorescence intensity of suspended red blood cells without leukocyte incubated with fluorescent probe DCFH-DA was significantly enhanced.② On day 0,day 7,day 14,day 28 and day 42 after storage,ROS concentration in suspended red blood cells without leukocyte showed a significant increasing trend.Concentration of ROS in suspended red blood cells without leukocyte on day 42 was significantly higher than that of day 0,day 7,day 14 and day 28 (P<0.01,0.05,0.05,0.05).There was a positive correlation between the ROS concentration in suspended red blood cells without leukocyte and storage time(r=0.898,P<0.01).③ On day 0,day 7,day 14,day 28and day 42 after storage,MDA concentration in suspended red blood cells without leukocyte showed a significant increasing trend,MDA concentration in suspended red blood cells without leukocyte on day 42 was significantly higher than

  18. Human spleen and red blood cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pivkin, Igor; Peng, Zhangli; Karniadakis, George; Buffet, Pierre; Dao, Ming

    2016-11-01

    Spleen plays multiple roles in the human body. Among them is removal of old and altered red blood cells (RBCs), which is done by filtering cells through the endothelial slits, small micron-sized openings. There is currently no experimental technique available that allows us to observe RBC passage through the slits. It was previously noticed that people without a spleen have less deformable red blood cells, indicating that the spleen may play a role in defining the size and shape of red blood cells. We used detailed RBC model implemented within the Dissipative Particle Dynamics (DPD) simulation framework to study the filter function of the spleen. Our results demonstrate that spleen indeed plays major role in defining the size and shape of the healthy human red blood cells.

  19. Malaria and human red blood cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohandas, Narla; An, Xiuli

    2012-11-01

    Invasion by the malaria parasite, Plasmodium falciparum, brings about extensive changes in the host red cells. These include loss of the normal discoid shape, increased rigidity of the membrane, elevated permeability to a wide variety of ionic and other species and increased adhesiveness, most notably to endothelial surfaces. These effects facilitate survival of the parasite within the host cell and tend to increase the virulence of disease that includes cerebral malaria and anemia. Numerous proteins secreted by the internalized parasite and interacting with red cell membrane proteins are responsible for the changes occurring to the host cell. Anemia, a serious clinical manifestation of malaria, is due to increased destruction of both infected and uninfected red cells due to membrane alterations, as well as ineffective erythropoiesis. There is very good evidence that various red cell disorders including hemoglobinopathies and hereditary ovalocytosis decrease the virulence of disease following parasite infection. A number of mechanism(s) are likely responsible for the protective effect of various red cell abnormalities including decreased invasion, impaired intraerythrocytic development of the parasites and altered interaction between exported parasite proteins and the red cell membrane skeleton.

  20. Diphenylhydantoin-induced pure red cell aplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusia, Usha; Malhotra, Purnima; Joshi, Panul

    2006-01-01

    Pure red cell aplasia is an uncommon complication of diphenylhydantoin therapy. It has not been reported in Indian literature. Awareness of the entity helps in establishing the cause of anaemia in these patients and alerts the physicians to the need of comprehensive haematological monitoring in these patients. A case of 58-year-old male who developed pure red cell aplasia following three months of diphenylhydantoin therapy is reported here.

  1. Autoimmune Lymphoproliferative Syndrome with Red Cell Aplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meena, K R; Bisht, Supriya; Tamaria, K C

    2015-12-01

    Autoimmune Lymphoproliferative Syndrome (ALPS) is a rare inherited disorder of abnormal lymphocyte apoptosis, leading to chronic lymphoproliferation. It presents as lymphadenopathy, hepatosplenomegaly and autoimmune phenomena. Pure red cell aplasia is characterized by normochromic normocytic anemia, reticulocytopenia, and absence of erythroblasts from a normal bone marrow. Only few lymphoproliferative disorders have been associated with erythroid aplasia. The authors are reporting a case of ALPS associated with red cell aplasia in a 7-y-old girl.

  2. Phosphatidylserine exposure and red cell viability in red cell aging and in hemolytic anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boas, Franz Edward; Forman, Linda; Beutler, Ernest

    1998-01-01

    Phosphatidylserine (PS) normally localizes to the inner leaflet of cell membranes but becomes exposed in abnormal or apoptotic cells, signaling macrophages to ingest them. Along similar lines, it seemed possible that the removal of red cells from circulation because of normal aging or in hemolytic anemias might be triggered by PS exposure. To investigate the role of PS exposure in normal red cell aging, we used N-hydroxysuccinimide-biotin to tag rabbit red cells in vivo, then used phycoerythrin-streptavidin to label the biotinylated cells, and annexin V-fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) to detect the exposed PS. Flow cytometric analysis of these cells drawn at 10-day intervals up to 70 days after biotinylation indicated that older, biotinylated cells expose more PS. Furthermore, our data match a simple model of red cell senescence that assumes both an age-dependent destruction of senescent red cells preceded by several hours of PS exposure and a random destruction of red cells without PS exposure. By using this model, we demonstrated that the exposure of PS parallels the rate at which biotinylated red cells are removed from circulation. On the other hand, using an annexin V-FITC label and flow cytometry demonstrates that exposed PS does not cause the reduced red cell life span of patients with hemolytic anemia, with the possible exception of those with unstable hemoglobins or sickle cell anemia. Thus, in some cases PS exposure on the cell surface may signal the removal of red cells from circulation, but in other cases some other signal must trigger the sequestration of cells. PMID:9501218

  3. 21 CFR 864.8540 - Red cell lysing reagent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Red cell lysing reagent. 864.8540 Section 864.8540...) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Reagents § 864.8540 Red cell lysing reagent. (a) Identification. A red cell lysing reagent is a device used to lyse (destroy) red blood cells...

  4. 21 CFR 864.5300 - Red cell indices device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Red cell indices device. 864.5300 Section 864.5300....5300 Red cell indices device. (a) Identification. A red cell indices device, usually part of a larger... corpuscular hemoglobin (MCH), and the mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration (MCHC). The red cell...

  5. Hydrogen storage and integrated fuel cell assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Karl J.

    2010-08-24

    Hydrogen is stored in materials that absorb and desorb hydrogen with temperature dependent rates. A housing is provided that allows for the storage of one or more types of hydrogen-storage materials in close thermal proximity to a fuel cell stack. This arrangement, which includes alternating fuel cell stack and hydrogen-storage units, allows for close thermal matching of the hydrogen storage material and the fuel cell stack. Also, the present invention allows for tailoring of the hydrogen delivery by mixing different materials in one unit. Thermal insulation alternatively allows for a highly efficient unit. Individual power modules including one fuel cell stack surrounded by a pair of hydrogen-storage units allows for distribution of power throughout a vehicle or other electric power consuming devices.

  6. Primitive red alga Cyanidioschyzon merolae accumulates storage glucan and triacylglycerol under nitrogen depletion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takusagawa, Mari; Nakajima, Yohei; Saito, Takafumi; Misumi, Osami

    2016-07-14

    Most microalgae accumulate neutral lipids, including triacylglycerol (TAG), into spherical structures called lipid bodies (LBs) under environmental stress conditions such as nutrient depletion. In green algae, starch accumulation precedes TAG accumulation, and the starch is thought to be a substrate for TAG synthesis. However, the relationship between TAG synthesis and the starch content in red algae, as well as how TAG accumulation is regulated, is unclear. In this study, we cultured the primitive red alga Cyanidioschyzon merolae under nitrogen-depleted conditions, and monitored the formation of starch granules (SGs) and LBs using microscopy. SGs stained with potassium iodide were observed at 24 h; however, LBs stained specifically with BODIPY 493/503 were observed after 48 h. Quantitative analysis of neutral sugar and cytomorphological semi-quantitative analysis of TAG accumulation also supported these results. Thus, the accumulation of starch occurred and preceded the accumulation of TAG in cells of C. merolae. However, TAG accumulation was not accompanied by a decrease in the starch content, suggesting that the starch is a major carbon storage sink, at least under nitrogen-depleted conditions. Quantitative real-time PCR revealed that the mRNA levels of genes involved in starch and TAG synthesis rarely changed during the culture period, suggesting that starch and TAG synthesis in C. merolae are not controlled through gene transcription but at other stages, such as translation and/or enzymatic activity.

  7. Polymer/hemoglobin assemblies: biodegradable oxygen carriers for artificial red blood cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Taihang; Jing, Xiabin; Huang, Yubin

    2011-07-07

    In routine clinical procedures, blood transfusion is now suffering from the defects of the blood products, like cross-matching, short storage time and virus infection. Various blood substitutes have been designed by researchers through continual efforts. With recent progress in nanotechnology, new types of artificial red blood cells with cellular structure are available. This article aims to describe some artificial red blood cells which encapsulate or conjugate hemoglobin molecules through various approaches, especially the nanoscale self-assembly technique, to mitigate the adverse effects of free hemoglobin molecules. These types of artificial red blood cell systems, which make use of biodegradable polymers as matrix materials, show advantages over the traditional types.

  8. Genomic Typing of Red Cell Antigens

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-01

    Antigen‐Matched  Red  Cells  for  Sickle  Cell  Anemia   Patients  Using  Molecular Typing to Augment Testing: Meghan Delaney, Prashant Gaur, Askale...Antigen‐Matched Red Cells for Sickle Cell  Anemia  Patients  Using Molecular Typing to Augment Testing: AABB (poster) 2009.  Background: Patients with sickle...not used. Delivery of a  healthy female  neonate  was uneventful. The serologic studies showed the mother and baby’s  phenotypes as O and AB

  9. Red cells and rouleaux in shear flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldsmith, H L

    1966-09-16

    The rotation and deformation of human red cells and linear aggregates (rouleaux) in dilute plasma suspension were observed in Poiseuille and Couette flow. Single lunideform-led erythrocyte. s and roluleauix rotated in orbits predicted by theory for rigid spheroids. Bending of rouleaux occurred at orientations at which compressive forces act on the particles and the degree of flexibility increased with the number of cells in linear array.

  10. Enzyme-inhibitor mediated red cell labelling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ackery, D.M.; Singh, J.; Wyeth, P. (Southampton Univ. (UK). Dept. of Chemistry)

    Red blood cells contain 90% of the body's enzyme carbonic anhydrase to which aromatic sulphonamide inhibitors bind tightly. P-iodo-benzene sulphonamide (PIBS) is a lipophilic inhibitor which would afford rapid cell labelling. Radioiodinated PIBS was prepared, in high yield, by radio ion exchange in the presence of ammonium sulphate. After intravenous injection of /sup 131/I-PIBS the radiolabel was found in the blood pool.

  11. Nickel hydrogen battery cell storage matrix test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, James R.; Dodson, Gary W.

    1993-01-01

    Test were conducted to evaluate post storage performance of nickel hydrogen cells with various design variables, the most significant being nickel precharge versus hydrogen precharge. Test procedures and results are presented in outline and graphic form.

  12. Evaluation of an additive solution for preservation of canine red blood cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wardrop, K J; Owen, T J; Meyers, K M

    1994-01-01

    The effect of an additive preservative solution on canine red blood cell posttransfusion viability (PTV) and on selected canine red blood cell biochemical parameters was studied. One unit (450 mL) of blood was collected from 6 clinically normal dogs into the anticoagulant citrate phosphate dextrose, centrifuged, and the plasma removed. The red blood cells were then suspended in 100 mL of a saline, adenine, dextrose, and mannitol solution and stored at 4 degrees C. Aliquots were removed for study at 1, 10, 20, 30, 37, and 44 days. The 24-hour PTV of autologous red blood cells was determined using a sodium chromate (51Cr) label. Red blood cell concentrations of 2,3-diphosphoglycerate (2,3-DPG), adenosine-5'-triphosphate (ATP), and pH were also determined. Canine red blood cell PTV, pH, ATP, and 2,3-DPG concentrations decreased during storage (P Food and Drug Administration (FDA) minimum standard for human red blood cells, the PTV was substandard in 75% of the day 44 units. The FDA standard was exceeded in 83% of the day 37 units. It was concluded that 37-day-old canine red blood cells preserved with a saline, adenine, dextrose, and mannitol solution are of acceptable quality for transfusion.

  13. Single-cell measurement of red blood cell oxygen affinity

    CERN Document Server

    Caprio, Di; Higgins, John M; Schonbrun, Ethan

    2015-01-01

    Oxygen is transported throughout the body by hemoglobin in red blood cells. While the oxygen affinity of blood is well understood and is routinely assessed in patients by pulse oximetry, variability at the single-cell level has not been previously measured. In contrast, single-cell measurements of red blood cell volume and hemoglobin concentration are taken millions of times per day by clinical hematology analyzers and are important factors in determining the health of the hematologic system. To better understand the variability and determinants of oxygen affinity on a cellular level, we have developed a system that quantifies the oxygen saturation, cell volume and hemoglobin concentration for individual red blood cells in high-throughput. We find that the variability in single-cell saturation peaks at an oxygen partial pressure of 2.5%, which corresponds to the maximum slope of the oxygen-hemoglobin dissociation curve. In addition, single-cell oxygen affinity is positively correlated with hemoglobin concentr...

  14. Pure Red Cell Aplasia Caused by Acute Hepatitis A

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Tae Heon; Oh, Suk Joong; Hong, Soojung; Lee, Kyu Bek; Park, Hyosoon; Woo, Hee-Yeon

    2011-01-01

    Pure red cell aplasia is characterized as a normocytic anemia associated with reticulocytopenia and the absence of erythroblasts in the bone marrow. Pure red cell aplasia can be induced by various causes such as thymoma, connective tissue disease, viral infection, lymphoma, and adverse drug reactions. There have been only a few reports of pure red cell aplasia associated with acute viral hepatitis A. In Korea, no case of pure red cell aplasia caused by acute hepatitis A has yet been reported....

  15. Risk of Abnormal Red Blood Cell to Get Malarial Infection

    OpenAIRE

    Viroj Wiwanitkit

    2008-01-01

    Malarial infection in red blood cell disorder is an interesting topic in tropical medicine. In this work, the author proposes a new idea on the physical property of red blood cell and risk for getting malarial infection. The study on scenario of red blood cell disorders is performed. Conclusively, the author found that physical property of red blood cell is an important determinant for getting malarial infection

  16. 21 CFR 864.8185 - Calibrator for red cell and white cell counting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Calibrator for red cell and white cell counting... Calibrator for red cell and white cell counting. (a) Identification. A calibrator for red cell and white cell counting is a device that resembles red or white blood cells and that is used to set instruments...

  17. 21 CFR 660.30 - Reagent Red Blood Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Reagent Red Blood Cells. 660.30 Section 660.30...) BIOLOGICS ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR DIAGNOSTIC SUBSTANCES FOR LABORATORY TESTS Reagent Red Blood Cells § 660.30 Reagent Red Blood Cells. (a) Proper name and definition. The proper name of the product shall be...

  18. 21 CFR 864.7100 - Red blood cell enzyme assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Red blood cell enzyme assay. 864.7100 Section 864...) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Kits and Packages § 864.7100 Red blood cell enzyme assay. (a) Identification. Red blood cell enzyme assay is a device used to measure the activity...

  19. Acquired pure red cell aplasia in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sujata R Dafale

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Acquired Pure Red Cell Aplasia (PRCA is a rare occurrence in children.This is a case of an eight year old girl child who developed acquired PRCA secondary to long term intake of sodium Valproate. This case is reported to review the causes of PRCA in children and to reconsider the use of drugs of longer duration in children and adults.

  20. Neocytolysis: physiological down-regulator of red-cell mass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfrey, C. P.; Rice, L.; Udden, M. M.; Driscoll, T. B.

    1997-01-01

    It is usually considered that red-cell mass is controlled by erythropoietin-driven bone marrow red-cell production, and no physiological mechanisms can shorten survival of circulating red cells. In adapting to acute plethora in microgravity, astronauts' red-cell mass falls too rapidly to be explained by diminished red-cell production. Ferrokinetics show no early decline in erythropolesis, but red cells radiolabelled 12 days before launch survive normally. Selective destruction of the youngest circulating red cells-a process we call neocytolysis-is the only plausible explanation. A fall in erythropoietin below a threshold is likely to initiate neocytolysis, probably by influencing surface-adhesion molecules. Recognition of neocytolysis will require re-examination of the pathophysiology and treatment of several blood disorders, including the anaemia of renal disease.

  1. Neocytolysis: physiological down-regulator of red-cell mass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfrey, C. P.; Rice, L.; Udden, M. M.; Driscoll, T. B.

    1997-01-01

    It is usually considered that red-cell mass is controlled by erythropoietin-driven bone marrow red-cell production, and no physiological mechanisms can shorten survival of circulating red cells. In adapting to acute plethora in microgravity, astronauts' red-cell mass falls too rapidly to be explained by diminished red-cell production. Ferrokinetics show no early decline in erythropolesis, but red cells radiolabelled 12 days before launch survive normally. Selective destruction of the youngest circulating red cells-a process we call neocytolysis-is the only plausible explanation. A fall in erythropoietin below a threshold is likely to initiate neocytolysis, probably by influencing surface-adhesion molecules. Recognition of neocytolysis will require re-examination of the pathophysiology and treatment of several blood disorders, including the anaemia of renal disease.

  2. Chemical and microbiological analysis of red wines during storage at different temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Attila Kántor

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Overall, chemical and microbiological analyses are very important for the quality of wine during and after winemaking process. One of the most important factors during wine storage is the temperature of storage. During storage of red wines in tanks, barrique barrels or glass bottles underway many physical, chemical and biochemical changes, which have significant influence for the stabilize of taste, scent, colour and general character of wine. The aim of our study we used two different wines, specifically Cabernet Sauvignon and Blaufränkisch and chemically and microbiologically analysed these wines during storage at different temperatures. These wines were bottled in 2011 and 2013. We stored these samples at different temperatures. The first four samples were stored at 6-8°C in refrigerator, and the next four were stored at 20-25°C in room temperature. We had together eight wine samples. We had determined in all wine samples sequentially the free and total sulphur dioxide content, ethyl-alcohol content, extract, sugars, total and volatile acids. The wine sample Cabernet Sauvignon 2011 at 6-8°C had content 12,14% ethyl-alcohol, 2.3% sugars, 5.6% total acids, 0,444 g.L-1 volatile acids, 25.6 g.L-1 extract, 8 mg.L-1 free SO2 and 18 mg.L-1total SO2. The wine sample Cabernet Sauvignon 2011 at 20-25°C had content 12,05% ethyl-alcohol, 2.4% sugars, 5.6% total acids, 0,456 g.L-1 volatile acids, 27.4 g.L-1extract, 6 mg.L-1 free SO2 and 18 mg.L-1total SO2.The wine sample Cabernet Sauvignon 2013 at 6-8°C had content 11,98% ethyl-alcohol, 1.8% sugars, 5.9% total acids, 0,324 g.L-1 volatile acids, 25.7 g.L-1extract, 24 mg.L-1 free SO2 and 42 mg.L-1total SO2. The wine sample Cabernet Sauvignon 2013 at 20-25°C had content 11,98% ethyl-alcohol, 1.8% sugars, 5.9% total acids, 0,324 g.L-1 volatile acids, 25.7 g.L-1 extract, 24 mg.L-1 free SO2 and 42 mg.L-1total SO2.These results were collected from one measuring, but we had results from three measuring

  3. Effects of Aged Stored Autologous Red Blood Cells on Human Endothelial Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanias, Tamir; Triulzi, Darrel; Donadee, Chenell; Barge, Suchitra; Badlam, Jessica; Jain, Shilpa; Belanger, Andrea M.; Kim-Shapiro, Daniel B.

    2015-01-01

    Rationale: A major abnormality that characterizes the red cellstorage lesion” is increased hemolysis and reduced red cell lifespan after infusion. Low levels of intravascular hemolysis after transfusion of aged stored red cells disrupt nitric oxide (NO) bioavailabity, via accelerated NO scavenging reaction with cell-free plasma hemoglobin. The degree of intravascular hemolysis post-transfusion and effects on endothelial-dependent vasodilation responses to acetylcholine have not been fully characterized in humans. Objectives: To evaluate the effects of blood aged to the limits of Food and Drug Administration–approved storage time on the human microcirculation and endothelial function. Methods: Eighteen healthy individuals donated 1 U of leukopheresed red cells, divided and autologously transfused into the forearm brachial artery 5 and 42 days after blood donation. Blood samples were obtained from stored blood bag supernatants and the antecubital vein of the infusion arm. Forearm blood flow measurements were performed using strain-gauge plethysmography during transfusion, followed by testing of endothelium-dependent blood flow with increasing doses of intraarterial acetylcholine. Measurements and Main Results: We demonstrate that aged stored blood has higher levels of arginase-1 and cell-free plasma hemoglobin. Compared with 5-day blood, the transfusion of 42-day packed red cells decreases acetylcholine-dependent forearm blood flows. Intravascular venous levels of arginase-1 and cell-free plasma hemoglobin increase immediately after red cell transfusion, with more significant increases observed after infusion of 42-day-old blood. Conclusions: We demonstrate that the transfusion of blood at the limits of Food and Drug Administration–approved storage has a significant effect on the forearm circulation and impairs endothelial function. Clinical trial registered with www.clinicaltrials.gov (NCT 01137656) PMID:26222884

  4. Perioperative Red Blood Cell Transfusion: What We Do Not Know

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chong Lei; Li-Ze Xiong

    2015-01-01

    Objective:Blood transfusion saves lives but may also increase the risk of injury.The objective of this review was to evaluate the possible adverse effects related to transfusion of red blood cell (RBC) concentrates stored for prolonged periods.Data Sources:The data used in this review were mainly from PubMed articles published in English up to February 2015.Study Selection:Clinical and basic research articles were selected according to their relevance to this topic.Results:The ex vivo changes to RBC that occur during storage are collectively called storage lesion.It is still inconclusive if transfusion of RBC with storage lesion has clinical relevance.Multiple ongoing prospective randomized controlled trials are aimed to clarify this clinical issue.It was observed that the adverse events related to stored RBC transfusion were prominent in certain patient populations,including trauma,critical care,pediatric,and cardiac surgery patients,which leads to the investigation of underlying mechanisms.It is demonstrated that free hemoglobin toxicity,decreasing of nitric oxide bioavailability,and free iron-induced increasing of inflammation may play an important role in this process.Conclusion:It is still unclear whether transfusion of older RBC has adverse effects,and if so,which factors determine such clinical effects.However,considering the magnitude of transfusion and the widespread medical significance,potential preventive strategies should be considered,especially for the susceptible recipients.

  5. The Assessment of Red Beet as a Natural Colorant, and Evaluation of Quality Properties of Emulsified Pork Sausage Containing Red Beet Powder during Cold Storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Sang-Keun; Choi, Jung-Seok; Moon, Sung-Sil; Jeong, Jin-Yeon; Kim, Gap-Don

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess red beet as a natural colorant in emulsified pork sausage and to investigate the effect of red beet on quality characteristics of emulsified pork sausage during 20 d of cold storage. Red beet was prepared as a powder and a substitute with sodium nitrite at 0.5% and 1.0% levels in emulsified pork sausage. Red beet significantly increased the moisture content and pH (psausage decreased by the addition of red beet powder (p0.05). Texture and 2-thiobabituric acid reactive substance were also not affected by red beet addition (p>0.05). Therefore, red beet could be a good natural colorant in emulsified pork sausage but it needs additional processing, such as betalain concentration and extraction as a juice, to be used as an antioxidant in meat products.

  6. Enzymes and membrane proteins of ADSOL-preserved red blood cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Sueli Soares Leonart

    2000-03-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: The preservative solution ADSOL (adenine, dextrose, sorbitol, sodium chloride and mannitol maintains red cell viability for blood trans-fusion for 6 weeks. It would be useful to know about its preservation qualities over longer periods. OBJECTIVE: To determine some red cell biochemical parameters for peri-ods of up to 14 weeks in order to determine whether the red cell metabo-lism integrity would justify further studies aiming at increasing red cell preservation and viability. DESIGN: Biochemical evaluation designed to study red cell preservation. SETTING: São Paulo University erythrocyte metabolism referral center. SAMPLE: Six normal blood donors from the University Hospital of the Universidade Federal do Paraná, Curitiba, Brazil. MAIN MEASUREMENTS: Weekly assay of erythrocyte adenosine-5´-triphosphate (ATP, 2,3-diphosphoglycerate (2,3DPG, hexokinase (HX, phosphofructokinase (PFK, pyruvate kinase (PK, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G-6-PD, 6-phosphogluconic dehydrogenase (6-PGD, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPD, glutathione reduc-tase (GR, glutathione peroxidase (GSHPx, plasma sodium and potas-sium, blood pH, and membrane proteins of red cells preserved in ADSOL were studied during storage for 14 weeks storage. RESULTS: During ADSOL preservation, erythrocyte ATP concentration decreased 60% after 5 weeks, and 90% after 10 weeks; the pH fell from 6.8 to 6.4 by the 14th week. 2,3-DPG concentration was stable during the first week, but fell 90% after 3 weeks and was exhausted after 5 weeks. By the end of the 5th week, an activity decrease of 16-30% for Hx, GAPD, GR, G-6-PD and 6-PGD, 35% for PFK and GSHPx, and 45% for PK were observed. Thereafter, a uniform 10% decay was observed for all enzymes up to the 14th week. The red blood cell membrane pro-teins did not show significant alterations in polyacrylamide gel electro-phoresis (SDS-PAGE during the 14 weeks. CONCLUSION: Although the blood viability was shown to be poor

  7. Fuel Cells and Electrochemical Energy Storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sammells, Anthony F.

    1983-01-01

    Discusses the nature of phosphoric acid, molten carbonate, and solid oxide fuel cells and major features and types of batteries used for electrical energy storage. Includes two tables presenting comparison of major battery features and summary of major material problems in the sodium-sulfur and lithium-alloy metal sulfide batteries. (JN)

  8. Hereditary spherocytosis, elliptocytosis, and other red cell membrane disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Da Costa, Lydie; Galimand, Julie; Fenneteau, Odile; Mohandas, Narla

    2013-07-01

    Hereditary spherocytosis and elliptocytosis are the two most common inherited red cell membrane disorders resulting from mutations in genes encoding various red cell membrane and skeletal proteins. Red cell membrane, a composite structure composed of lipid bilayer linked to spectrin-based membrane skeleton is responsible for the unique features of flexibility and mechanical stability of the cell. Defects in various proteins involved in linking the lipid bilayer to membrane skeleton result in loss in membrane cohesion leading to surface area loss and hereditary spherocytosis while defects in proteins involved in lateral interactions of the spectrin-based skeleton lead to decreased mechanical stability, membrane fragmentation and hereditary elliptocytosis. The disease severity is primarily dependent on the extent of membrane surface area loss. Both these diseases can be readily diagnosed by various laboratory approaches that include red blood cell cytology, flow cytometry, ektacytometry, electrophoresis of the red cell membrane proteins, and mutational analysis of gene encoding red cell membrane proteins.

  9. Deep coverage mouse red blood cell proteome: a first comparison with the human red blood cell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pasini, Erica M; Kirkegaard, Morten; Salerno, Doris

    2008-01-01

    Mice have close genetic/physiological relationships to humans, breed rapidly, and can be genetically modified, making them the most used mammal in biomedical research. Because the red blood cell (RBC) is the sole gas transporter in vertebrates, diseases of the RBC are frequently severe; much...

  10. Mechanosensing Dynamics of Red blood Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Jiandi

    2015-11-01

    Mechanical stress-induced deformation of human red blood cells (RBCs) plays important physiopathological roles in oxygen delivery, blood rheology, transfusion, and malaria. Recent studies demonstrate that, in response to mechanical deformation, RBCs release adenosine-5'-triphosphate (ATP), suggesting the existence of mechanotransductive pathways in RBCs. Most importantly, the released ATP from RBCs regulates vascular tone and impaired release of ATP from RBCs has been linked to diseases such as type II diabetes and cystic fibrosis. To date, however, the mechanisms of mechanotransductive release of ATP from RBCs remain unclear. Given that RBCs experience shear stresses continuously during the circulation cycle and the released ATP plays a central role in vascular physiopathology, understanding the mechanotransductive release of ATP from RBCs will provide not only fundamental insights to the role of RBCs in vascular homeostasis but also novel therapeutic strategies for red cell dysfunction and vascular disease. This talk describes the main research in my group on integrating microfluidic-based approaches to study the mechanosensing dynamics of RBCs. Specifically, I will introduce a micro?uidic approach that can probe the dynamics of shear-induced ATP release from RBCs with millisecond resolution and provide quantitative understandings of the mechanosensitive ATP release processes in RBCs. Furthermore, I will also describe our recent findings about the roles of the Piezo1 channel, a newly discovered mechanosensitive cation channel in the mechanotransductive ATP release in RBCs. Last, possible functions of RBCs in the regulation of cerebral blood flow will be discussed.

  11. Red blood cell clusters in Poiseuille flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghigliotti, Giovanni; Selmi, Hassib; Misbah, Chaouqi; Elasmi, Lassaad

    2011-11-01

    We present 2D numerical simulations of sets of vesicles (closed bags of a lipid bilayer membrane) in a parabolic flow, a setup that mimics red blood cells (RBCs) in the microvasculature. Vesicles, submitted to sole hydrodynamical interactions, are found to form aggregates (clusters) of finite size. The existence of a maximal cluster size is pointed out and characterized as a function of the flow intensity and the swelling ratio of the vesicles. Moreover bigger clusters move at lower velocity, a fact that may prove of physiological interest. These results quantify previous observations of the inhomogeneous distribution of RBCs in vivo (Gaehtgens et al., Blood Cells 6 - 1980). An interpretation of the phenomenon is put forward based on the presence of boli (vortices) between vesicles. Both the results and the explanation can be transposed to the three-dimensional case.

  12. Influence of bottle storage time on colour, phenolic composition and sensory properties of sweet red wines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marquez, Ana; Serratosa, Maria P; Merida, Julieta

    2014-03-01

    Changes in colour and phenolic composition in sweet red wines made from Merlot, Syrah and Tempranillo grapes were studied in order to assess the influence of bottle storage over a period of 12months. For this purpose, wine colour parameters, sensory analysis and concentrations of monomeric anthocyanins, pyranoanthocyanins, methylmethine-mediated condensation adducts, flavan3-ol derivatives and flavonols were measured. Hue increased and red colours decreased with the storage time, particularly over the first 3months. The concentrations of low molecular weight flavan-3-ol derivatives decreased with time due to the effect of their conversion into tannins of high molecular weight. In addition, the glycosylated flavonols decreased through hydrolysis to give the corresponding aglycones. Overall, the concentration of phenolic compounds decreased markedly with storage time, whereas the antioxidant activity in the wines remained constant throughout. A panel of expert tasters judged the colour, aroma and flavour of all initial and final wines to be acceptable. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Quality indicators and shelf life of red octopus (Octopus maya in chilling storage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariel GULLIAN-KLANIAN

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract There are no precedents concerning the quality of Octopus maya during chilled storage. This study evaluated the shelf life of the red octopus in chilling storage (4oC and the correlation of the sensory quality index with microbiological counting and the biochemical indicators (hypoxanthine, histamine and volatile amines. A total of 112 whole raw octopi (average weight of 896 g were randomly selected from seven batches and exposed to 4°C for 18, 24, 48, 72, 84, 96, and 100 h. The histamine concentration (91.7%, followed by the counts of psychrotrophic bacteria (5.5% and hypoxanthine (2.2%, were the predictors from the redundancy analysis that better explained the changes taking place during the chilling hours. After 72 h of chilling, the microbial count was determined to be log 4.7 CFU/g, and the octopus samples were classified as B quality (minor sensory quality defects based on the sensory quality scale. Although the samples were not classified as unacceptable at 100 h of refrigeration by the sensory index, the level of histamine reached the defect action level (5 mg/100 g as ruled by the International Food Safety Authorities. The shelf life of the red octopus in chilling storage was predicted to be 119 h.

  14. Red blood cell transfusion in septic shock

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosland, Ragnhild G; Hagen, Marte U; Haase, Nicolai

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Treating anaemia with red blood cell (RBC) transfusion is frequent, but controversial, in patients with septic shock. Therefore we assessed characteristics and outcome associated with RBC transfusion in this group of high risk patients. METHODS: We did a prospective cohort study at 7...... general intensive care units (ICUs) including all adult patients with septic shock in a 5-month period. RESULTS: Ninety-five of the 213 included patients (45%) received median 3 (interquartile range 2-5) RBC units during shock. The median pre-transfusion haemoglobin level was 8.1 (7.4-8.9) g....../dl and independent of shock day and bleeding. Patients with cardiovascular disease were transfused at higher haemoglobin levels. Transfused patients had higher Simplified Acute Physiology Score (SAPS) II (56 (45-69) vs. 48 (37-61), p = 0.0005), more bleeding episodes, lower haemoglobin levels days 1 to 5, higher...

  15. Dynamics of Red Cells in Spleen: How Does Vesiculation Happen?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Qiang; Salehyar, Sara; Cabrales, Pedro; Asaro, Robert

    2016-11-01

    Vesiculation of red blood cells as a result of local separation between lipid bilayer and cytoskeleton is known to happen in vivo, most likely inside spleen where they sustain large mechanical loads during the passage through venus slits. There is, however, little knowledge about the detailed scenario and condition. We address this question via a fluid-cell interaction model by coupling a multiscale model of the cell membrane (including molecular details) with a fluid dynamics model based on boundary-integral equations. A numerical flow channel is created where the cell is driven through a narrow slit by pressure (imitating the transit through venus slits in spleen). The concentration is the occurrence of large dissociation (negative) pressure between the skeleton/membrane connection that promotes separation, a precursor of vesicle formation. Critical levels for the negative pressure are estimated using published data. By following the maximum range of pressure, we conclude that for vesiculation to happen there must be biochemical influences (e.g. binding of degraded haemoglobin) that significantly reduce effective attachment density. This is consistent with reported trends in vesiculation that are believed to occur in cases of various hereditary anemias and during blood storage. Our findings also suggest the criticality of understanding the biochemical phenomena involved with cytoskeleton/membrane attachment.

  16. Fuel cell energy storage for Space Station enhancement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stedman, J. K.

    1990-01-01

    Viewgraphs on fuel cell energy storage for space station enhancement are presented. Topics covered include: power profile; solar dynamic power system; photovoltaic battery; space station energy demands; orbiter fuel cell power plant; space station energy storage; fuel cell system modularity; energy storage system development; and survival power supply.

  17. Growth and replication of red rain cells at 121°C and their red fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gangappa, Rajkumar; Wickramasinghe, Chandra; Wainwright, Milton; Kumar, A. Santhosh; Louis, Godfrey

    2010-09-01

    We have shown that the red cells found in the Red Rain (which fell on Kerala, India, in 2001) survive and grow after incubation for periods of up to two hours at 121°C . Under these conditions daughter cells appear within the original mother cells and the number of cells in the samples increases with length of exposure to 121°C. No such increase in cells occurs at room temperature, suggesting that the increase in daughter cells is brought about by exposure of the Red Rain cells to high temperatures. This is an independent confirmation of results reported earlier by two of the present authors, claiming that the cells can replicate under high pressure at temperatures upto 300°C. The flourescence behaviour of the red cells is shown to be in remarkable correspondence with the extended red emission observed in the Red Rectagle planetary nebula and other galactic and extragalactic dust clouds, suggesting, though not proving an extraterrestrial origin.

  18. Growth and replication of red rain cells at 121 oC and their red fluorescence

    CERN Document Server

    Gangappa, Rajkumar; Wainwright, Milton; Kumar, A Santhosh; Louis, Godfrey

    2010-01-01

    We have shown that the red cells found in the Red Rain (which fell on Kerala, India, in 2001) survive and grow after incubation for periods of up to two hours at 121 oC . Under these conditions daughter cells appear within the original mother cells and the number of cells in the samples increases with length of exposure to 121 oC. No such increase in cells occurs at room temperature, suggesting that the increase in daughter cells is brought about by exposure of the Red Rain cells to high temperatures. This is an independent confirmation of results reported earlier by two of the present authors, claiming that the cells can replicate under high pressure at temperatures up to 300 oC. The flourescence behaviour of the red cells is shown to be in remarkable correspondence with the extended red emission observed in the Red Rectangle planetary nebula and other galactic and extragalactic dust clouds, suggesting, though not proving, an extraterrestrial origin.

  19. The homeostasis of Plasmodium falciparum-infected red blood cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jakob M A Mauritz

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available The asexual reproduction cycle of Plasmodium falciparum, the parasite responsible for severe malaria, occurs within red blood cells. A merozoite invades a red cell in the circulation, develops and multiplies, and after about 48 hours ruptures the host cell, releasing 15-32 merozoites ready to invade new red blood cells. During this cycle, the parasite increases the host cell permeability so much that when similar permeabilization was simulated on uninfected red cells, lysis occurred before approximately 48 h. So how could infected cells, with a growing parasite inside, prevent lysis before the parasite has completed its developmental cycle? A mathematical model of the homeostasis of infected red cells suggested that it is the wasteful consumption of host cell hemoglobin that prevents early lysis by the progressive reduction in the colloid-osmotic pressure within the host (the colloid-osmotic hypothesis. However, two critical model predictions, that infected cells would swell to near prelytic sphericity and that the hemoglobin concentration would become progressively reduced, remained controversial. In this paper, we are able for the first time to correlate model predictions with recent experimental data in the literature and explore the fine details of the homeostasis of infected red blood cells during five model-defined periods of parasite development. The conclusions suggest that infected red cells do reach proximity to lytic rupture regardless of their actual volume, thus requiring a progressive reduction in their hemoglobin concentration to prevent premature lysis.

  20. Double red cell concentrates -in vitro quality after delayed refrigeration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, S; Bekoe, Y; Uddin, S; Beard, M; Cardigan, R

    2010-10-01

    Automated collection of red cell concentrates (RCC) presents a number of potential advantages to donors, blood services and recipients, and allows the collection of finished components from sites that are remote from a blood centre. However, data are lacking on how long the collected RCC may be stored at ambient temperature prior to their final storage at 4 °C. In this study, the Haemonetics Cymbal device was used to collect RCC using citrate, phosphate and dextrose (CPD-50) anticoagulant. A total of 10 procedures each yielded two leucodepleted RCC in saline, adenine, glucose and mannitol (SAGM) additive solution. One of each pair of RCC was kept warm in an insulated transport bag for 8 h and the other for 6 h. In vitro assessments of the quality of the RCC were made during subsequent 42-day storage of the RCC at 2-6 °C, and compared with reference data. All collected RCC were within UK and European limits for volume, haematocrit and haemoglobin content. Haemolysis was within specification at Day 42 and was no different in RCC held warm for 6 or 8 hours, but tended to be higher than reference data from whole blood derived RCC. ATP, 2,3 DPG and supernatant potassium levels were all similar in RCC held warm for 6 or 8 hours and reference data. We conclude that the Cymbal device may be used to collect two RCC in SAGM, and the in vitro assessment indicates that RCC may be stored without refrigeration for up to 8 h following collection, prior to final storage at 4 °C.

  1. Red cell alloimmunisation in patients with different types of infections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Evers, Dorothea; van der Bom, Johanna G; Tijmensen, Janneke; Middelburg, Rutger A; de Haas, Masja; Zalpuri, Saurabh; de Vooght, Karen M K; van de Kerkhof, Daan; Visser, Otto; Péquériaux, Nathalie C V; Hudig, Francisca; Zwaginga, Jaap Jan

    2016-01-01

    Red cell alloantigen exposure can cause alloantibody-associated morbidity. Murine models have suggested that inflammation modulates red cell alloimmunisation. This study quantifies alloimmunisation risks during infectious episodes in humans. We performed a multicentre case-control study within a sou

  2. Red cell alloimmunisation in patients with different types of infections.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Evers, D.; Bom, J.G. Van Der; Tijmensen, J.; Middelburg, R.A.; Haas, M. de; Zalpuri, S.; Vooght, K.M. De; Kerkhof, D. van de; Visser, O; Pequeriaux, N.C.V.; Hudig, F.; Zwaginga, J.J.

    2016-01-01

    Red cell alloantigen exposure can cause alloantibody-associated morbidity. Murine models have suggested that inflammation modulates red cell alloimmunisation. This study quantifies alloimmunisation risks during infectious episodes in humans. We performed a multicentre case-control study within a sou

  3. Control of red blood cell mass during spaceflight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, H. W.; Alfrey, C. P.; Driscoll, T. B.; Smith, S. M.; Nyquist, L. E.

    1996-01-01

    Data are reviewed from twenty-two astronauts from seven space missions in a study of red blood cell mass. The data show that decreased red cell mass in all astronauts exposed to space for more than nine days, although the actual dynamics of mass changes varies with flight duration. Possible mechanisms for these changes, including alterations in erythropoietin levels, are discussed.

  4. Red blood cells in sports: Effects of exercise and training on oxygen supply by red blood cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heimo eMairbäurl

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available During exercise the cardiovascular system has to warrant substrate supply to working muscle. The main function of red blood cells in exercise is the transport of O2 from the lungs to the tissues and the delivery of metabolically produced CO2 to the lungs for expiration. Hemoglobin also contributes to the blood’s buffering capacity, and ATP and NO release from red blood cells contributes to vasodilation and improved blood flow to working muscle. These functions require adequate amounts of red blood cells in circulation. Trained athletes, particularly in endurance sports, have a decreased hematocrit, which is sometimes called sports anemia. This is not anemia in a clinical sense because athletes have in fact an increased total mass of red blood cells and hemoglobin in circulation relative to sedentary individuals. The slight decrease in hematocrit by training is brought about by an increased plasma volume. The mechanisms that increase total red blood cell mass by training are not understood fully. Despite stimulated erythropoiesis, exercise can decrease the red blood cell mass by intravascular hemolysis mainly of senescent red blood cells, which is caused by mechanical rupture when red blood cells pass through capillaries in contracting muscles, and by compression of red cells e.g. in foot soles during running or in hand palms in weightlifters. Together, these adjustments cause a decrease in the average age of the population of circulating red blood cells in trained athletes. These younger red cells are characterized by improved oxygen release and deformability, both of which also improve tissue oxygen supply during exercise.

  5. Red blood cell vesiculation in hereditary hemolytic anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alaarg, Amr; Schiffelers, Raymond M.; van Solinge, Wouter W.; van Wijk, Richard

    2013-01-01

    Hereditary hemolytic anemia encompasses a heterogeneous group of anemias characterized by decreased red blood cell survival because of inherited membrane, enzyme, or hemoglobin disorders. Affected red blood cells are more fragile, less deformable, and more susceptible to shear stress and oxidative damage, and show increased vesiculation. Red blood cells, as essentially all cells, constitutively release phospholipid extracellular vesicles in vivo and in vitro in a process known as vesiculation. These extracellular vesicles comprise a heterogeneous group of vesicles of different sizes and intracellular origins. They are described in literature as exosomes if they originate from multi-vesicular bodies, or as microvesicles when formed by a one-step budding process directly from the plasma membrane. Extracellular vesicles contain a multitude of bioactive molecules that are implicated in intercellular communication and in different biological and pathophysiological processes. Mature red blood cells release in principle only microvesicles. In hereditary hemolytic anemias, the underlying molecular defect affects and determines red blood cell vesiculation, resulting in shedding microvesicles of different compositions and concentrations. Despite extensive research into red blood cell biochemistry and physiology, little is known about red cell deformability and vesiculation in hereditary hemolytic anemias, and the associated pathophysiological role is incompletely assessed. In this review, we discuss recent progress in understanding extracellular vesicles biology, with focus on red blood cell vesiculation. Also, we review recent scientific findings on the molecular defects of hereditary hemolytic anemias, and their correlation with red blood cell deformability and vesiculation. Integrating bio-analytical findings on abnormalities of red blood cells and their microvesicles will be critical for a better understanding of the pathophysiology of hereditary hemolytic anemias. PMID

  6. Red blood cell vesiculation in hereditary hemolytic anemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amr eAlaarg

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Hereditary hemolytic anemia encompasses a heterogeneous group of anemias characterised by decreased red blood cell survival because of inherited membrane, enzyme, or hemoglobin disorders. Affected red blood cells are more fragile, less deformable, and more susceptible to shear stress and oxidative damage, and show increased vesiculation. Red blood cells, as essentially all cells, constitutively release phospholipid extracellular vesicles in vivo and in vitro in a process known as vesiculation. These extracellular vesicles comprise a heterogeneous group of vesicles of different sizes and intracellular origins. They are described in literature as exosomes if they originate from multi-vesicular bodies, or as microvesicles when formed by a one-step budding process directly from the plasma membrane. Extracellular vesicles contain a multitude of bioactive molecules that are implicated in intercellular communication and in different biological and pathophysiological processes. Mature red blood cells release in principle only microvesicles. In hereditary hemolytic anemias, the underlying molecular defect affects and determines red blood cell vesiculation, resulting in shedding microvesicles of different compositions and concentrations. Despite extensive research into red blood cell biochemistry and physiology, little is known about red cell deformability and vesiculation in hereditary hemolytic anemias, and the associated pathophysiological role is incompletely asessed. In this review, we discuss recent progress in understanding extracellular vesicles biology, with focus on red blood cell vesiculation. Also, we review recent scientific findings on the molecular defects of hereditary hemolytic anemias, and their correlation with red blood cell deformability and vesiculation. Integrating bio-analytical findings on abnormalities of red blood cells and their microvesicles will be critical for a better understanding of the pathophysiology of hereditary

  7. Red blood cell vesiculation in hereditary hemolytic anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alaarg, Amr; Schiffelers, Raymond M; van Solinge, Wouter W; van Wijk, Richard

    2013-12-13

    Hereditary hemolytic anemia encompasses a heterogeneous group of anemias characterized by decreased red blood cell survival because of inherited membrane, enzyme, or hemoglobin disorders. Affected red blood cells are more fragile, less deformable, and more susceptible to shear stress and oxidative damage, and show increased vesiculation. Red blood cells, as essentially all cells, constitutively release phospholipid extracellular vesicles in vivo and in vitro in a process known as vesiculation. These extracellular vesicles comprise a heterogeneous group of vesicles of different sizes and intracellular origins. They are described in literature as exosomes if they originate from multi-vesicular bodies, or as microvesicles when formed by a one-step budding process directly from the plasma membrane. Extracellular vesicles contain a multitude of bioactive molecules that are implicated in intercellular communication and in different biological and pathophysiological processes. Mature red blood cells release in principle only microvesicles. In hereditary hemolytic anemias, the underlying molecular defect affects and determines red blood cell vesiculation, resulting in shedding microvesicles of different compositions and concentrations. Despite extensive research into red blood cell biochemistry and physiology, little is known about red cell deformability and vesiculation in hereditary hemolytic anemias, and the associated pathophysiological role is incompletely assessed. In this review, we discuss recent progress in understanding extracellular vesicles biology, with focus on red blood cell vesiculation. Also, we review recent scientific findings on the molecular defects of hereditary hemolytic anemias, and their correlation with red blood cell deformability and vesiculation. Integrating bio-analytical findings on abnormalities of red blood cells and their microvesicles will be critical for a better understanding of the pathophysiology of hereditary hemolytic anemias.

  8. Red blood cells in retinal vascular disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, Rupesh; Sherwood, Joseph; Chhablani, Jay; Ricchariya, Ashutosh; Kim, Sangho; Jones, Philip H; Balabani, Stavroula; Shima, David

    2016-01-01

    Microvascular circulation plays a vital role in regulating physiological functions, such as vascular resistance, and maintaining organ health. Pathologies such as hypertension, diabetes, or hematologic diseases affect the microcirculation posing a significant risk to human health. The retinal vasculature provides a unique window for non-invasive visualisation of the human circulation in vivo and retinal vascular image analysis has been established to predict the development of both clinical and subclinical cardiovascular, metabolic, renal and retinal disease in epidemiologic studies. Blood viscosity which was otherwise thought to play a negligible role in determining blood flow based on Poiseuille's law up to the 1970s has now been shown to play an equally if not a more important role in controlling microcirculation and quantifying blood flow. Understanding the hemodynamics/rheology of the microcirculation and its changes in diseased states remains a challenging task; this is due to the particulate nature of blood, the mechanical properties of the cells (such as deformability and aggregability) and the complex architecture of the microvasculature. In our review, we have tried to postulate a possible role of red blood cell (RBC) biomechanical properties and laid down future framework for research related to hemorrheological aspects of blood in patients with retinal vascular disorders.

  9. Natural Antioxidants Improve Red Blood Cell “Survival” in Non-Leukoreduced Blood Samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuliya V Kucherenko

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Blood collected in an anticoagulant can be kept refrigerated in an unmodified state within 5 - 6 weeks. Oxidative damage is considered to be a one of the major factors contributing to the development of storage lesions. Lipid and membrane proteins oxidation results in changes in cation gradients that affect the cell survival. Aim: In the present study we used the natural antioxidants and ion channels blockers (L-carnosine, spermine, phloretin and their mixtures to prolong “survival” of red blood cells (RBCs, measured as the lack of PS exposure and cell hemolysis, in the Alsever's preservative solution upon hypothermic storage. Results: We show that the mixture of carnosine (20 mM, spermine (20 µM and phloretin (100 µM effectively blunted phosphatidylserine (PS exposure, Ca2+ accumulation and RBCs hemolysis in non-leukoreduced low (∼2% hematocrit samples after 36 days of storage as well as after 1 day of post-storage incubation of the stored cells in physiological saline solution. In addition, a slight but significant decrease in PS exposure was observed in non-leukoreduced high (∼20% hematocrit samples after 36 days of storage with the mixture of substances. Conclusion: We conclude that the use of the mixture of natural antioxidants (carnosine, spermine, and phloretin as an additive to blood preservative solution provides better RBCs storage and “survival”.

  10. Heritability of glutathione and related metabolites in stored red blood cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van 't Erve, Thomas J; Doskey, Claire M; Wagner, Brett A; Hess, John R; Darbro, Benjamin W; Ryckman, Kelli K; Murray, Jeffrey C; Raife, Thomas J; Buettner, Garry R

    2014-11-01

    Red blood cells (RBCs) collected for transfusion deteriorate during storage. This deterioration is termed the "RBC storage lesion." There is increasing concern over the safety, therapeutic efficacy, and toxicity of transfusing longer-stored units of blood. The severity of the RBC storage lesion is dependent on storage time and varies markedly between individuals. Oxidative damage is considered a significant factor in the development of the RBC storage lesion. In this study, the variability during storage and heritability of antioxidants and metabolites central to RBC integrity and function were investigated. In a classic twin study, we determined the heritability of glutathione (GSH), glutathione disulfide (GSSG), the status of the GSSG,2H(+)/2GSH couple (Ehc), and total glutathione (tGSH) in donated RBCs over 56 days of storage. Intracellular GSH and GSSG concentrations both decrease during storage (median net loss of 0.52 ± 0.63 mM (median ± SD) and 0.032 ± 0.107 mM, respectively, over 42 days). Taking into account the decline in pH, Ehc became more positive (oxidized) during storage (median net increase of 35 ± 16 mV). In our study population heritability estimates for GSH, GSSG, tGSH, and Ehc measured over 56 days of storage are 79, 60, 67, and, 75%, respectively. We conclude that susceptibility of stored RBCs to oxidative injury due to variations in the GSH redox buffer is highly variable among individual donors and strongly heritable. Identifying the genes that regulate the storage-related changes in this redox buffer could lead to the development of new methods to minimize the RBC storage lesion.

  11. Flood inundation extent in storage cell mode

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    G.; Farahi; Saeed; Reza; Khodashenas; B.; Ghahraman; K.; Esmaeeli

    2009-01-01

    An understanding of floodplain processes in general and floodplains flooding in particular are vital issues for river engineers and managers. Insufficient observations of flood inundation extent and the infrequent nature of flood inundation necessitate some sort of predictive tools. In this paper flood inundation extent has been simulated by HEC-RAS software in two storage cell and normal modes and capabilities and limitations of the two models have been determined by comparing simulated and observed flood inundation extent which occurred in the study area on Feb 4th, 2004.

  12. Flood inundation extent in storage cell mode

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    G.Farahi; Saeed Reza Khodashenas; B.Ghahraman; K.Esmaeeli

    2009-01-01

    An understanding of floodplaln processes In general and floodplains flooding in particular are vital issues for river engineers and managers.Insufficient observations of flood inundation extent and the infrequent nature of flood inundation necessitate some sort of predictive tools.In this paper flood in-undation extent has been simulated by HEC-RAS software in two storage cell and normal modes and capabilities and limitations of the two models have been determined by comparing simulated and ob-served flood inundation extent which occurred in the study area on Feb 4th, 2004.

  13. Abnormal red cell structure and function in neuroacanthocytosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judith C A Cluitmans

    Full Text Available Panthothenate kinase-associated neurodegeneration (PKAN belongs to a group of hereditary neurodegenerative disorders known as neuroacanthocytosis (NA. This genetically heterogeneous group of diseases is characterized by degeneration of neurons in the basal ganglia and by the presence of deformed red blood cells with thorny protrusions, acanthocytes, in the circulation.The goal of our study is to elucidate the molecular mechanisms underlying this aberrant red cell morphology and the corresponding functional consequences. This could shed light on the etiology of the neurodegeneration.We performed a qualitative and semi-quantitative morphological, immunofluorescent, biochemical and functional analysis of the red cells of several patients with PKAN and, for the first time, of the red cells of their family members.We show that the blood of patients with PKAN contains not only variable numbers of acanthocytes, but also a wide range of other misshapen red cells. Immunofluorescent and immunoblot analyses suggest an altered membrane organization, rather than quantitative changes in protein expression. Strikingly, these changes are not limited to the red blood cells of PKAN patients, but are also present in the red cells of heterozygous carriers without neurological problems. Furthermore, changes are not only present in acanthocytes, but also in other red cells, including discocytes. The patients' cells, however, are more fragile, as observed in a spleen-mimicking device.These morphological, molecular and functional characteristics of red cells in patients with PKAN and their family members offer new tools for diagnosis and present a window into the pathophysiology of neuroacanthocytosis.

  14. Electrochemical Red Blood Cell Counting: One at a Time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sepunaru, Lior; Sokolov, Stanislav V; Holter, Jennifer; Young, Neil P; Compton, Richard G

    2016-08-08

    We demonstrate that the concentration of a red blood cell solution under physiological conditions can be determined by electrochemical voltammetry. The magnitude of the oxygen reduction currents produced at an edge-plane pyrolytic graphite electrode was diagnosed analytically at concentrations suitable for a point-of-care test device. The currents could be further enhanced when the solution of red blood cells was exposed to hydrogen peroxide. We show that the enhanced signal can be used to detect red blood cells at a single entity level. The method presented relies on the catalytic activity of red blood cells towards hydrogen peroxide and on surface-induced haemolysis. Each single cell activity is expressed as current spikes decaying within a few seconds back to the background current. The frequency of such current spikes is proportional to the concentration of cells in solution.

  15. Lack of Erythropoietic Inhibitory Effect of Serum From Patients with Congenital Pure Red Cell Aplasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geller, Gary; And Others

    1975-01-01

    Serum of five children ages 1 to 19 months with congenital pure red cell aplasia (incomplete or defective development of red blood cells) was injected in normal mice to determine possible inhibition of red blood cell formulating stimulants. (CL)

  16. Red cell exchange: special focus on sickle cell disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Haewon C

    2014-12-05

    The primary function of red blood cells (RBCs) is to deliver oxygen from the lungs to tissues. Tissue hypoxia occurs when the oxygen-carrying capacity of RBCs is compromised due primarily to 3 causes: (1) a reduction in circulating RBC mass, (2) an increase in circulating RBC mass, or (3) abnormal hemoglobin (Hb) that either does not sufficiently release oxygen to tissues (high-oxygen-affinity hemoglobin) or occludes the microvasculature due to deformed RBCs (sickled RBCs). To improve oxygenation in patients with reduced or increased RBC mass, RBC administration (simple transfusion) or RBC removal (RBC depletion) is performed, respectively. However, for patients with abnormal Hb, RBCs containing abnormal Hb are removed and replaced by healthy volunteer donor RBCs by red cell exchange (RCE). RCE can be performed by manual exchange or by automated exchange using a blood cell separator (erythrocytapheresis). In this review, indications for RCE in sickle cell disease using the evidence-based American Society for Apheresis categories(1) are presented and the rationale for RCE in each disorder are discussed. Simple transfusion versus RCE and manual RCE versus automated RCE are compared. Finally, this review briefly presents some of the challenges of performing erythrocytapheresis in small children and discusses various choices for central venous access during RCE.(2.)

  17. Microfluidic Device for Continuous Magnetophoretic Separation of Red Blood Cells

    CERN Document Server

    Iliescu, Ciprian; Avram, Marioara; Xu, G; Avram, Andrei

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents a microfluidic device for magnetophoretic separation red blood cells from blood under contionous flow. The separation method consist of continous flow of a blood sample (diluted in PBS) through a microfluidic channel which presents on the bottom "dots" of feromagnetic layer. By appling a magnetic field perpendicular on the flowing direction, the feromagnetic "dots" generates a gradient of magnetic field which amplifies the magnetic force. As a result, the red blood cells are captured on the bottom of the microfluidic channel while the rest of the blood is collected at the outlet. Experimental results show that an average of 95 % of red blood cells are trapped in the device

  18. Compartmentalized storage tank for electrochemical cell system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piecuch, Benjamin Michael (Inventor); Dalton, Luke Thomas (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A compartmentalized storage tank is disclosed. The compartmentalized storage tank includes a housing, a first fluid storage section disposed within the housing, a second fluid storage section disposed within the housing, the first and second fluid storage sections being separated by a movable divider, and a constant force spring. The constant force spring is disposed between the housing and the movable divider to exert a constant force on the movable divider to cause a pressure P1 in the first fluid storage section to be greater than a pressure P2 in the second fluid storage section, thereby defining a pressure differential.

  19. Dysferlin and other non-red cell proteins accumulate in the red cell membrane of Diamond-Blackfan Anemia patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esther N Pesciotta

    Full Text Available Diamond Blackfan Anemia (DBA is a congenital anemia usually caused by diverse mutations in ribosomal proteins. Although the genetics of DBA are well characterized, the mechanisms that lead to macrocytic anemia remain unclear. We systematically analyzed the proteomes of red blood cell membranes from multiple DBA patients to determine whether abnormalities in protein translation or erythropoiesis contribute to the observed macrocytosis or alterations in the mature red blood cell membrane. In depth proteome analysis of red cell membranes enabled highly reproducible identification and quantitative comparisons of 1100 or more proteins. These comparisons revealed clear differences between red cell membrane proteomes in DBA patients and healthy controls that were consistent across DBA patients with different ribosomal gene mutations. Proteins exhibiting changes in abundance included those known to be increased in DBA such as fetal hemoglobin and a number of proteins not normally found in mature red cell membranes, including proteins involved in the major histocompatibility complex class I pathway. Most striking was the presence of dysferlin in the red blood cell membranes of DBA patients but absent in healthy controls. Immunoblot validation using red cell membranes isolated from additional DBA patients and healthy controls confirmed a distinct membrane protein signature specific to patients with DBA.

  20. Automated red blood cell analysis compared with routine red blood cell morphology by smear review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr.Poonam Radadiya

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The RBC histogram is an integral part of automated haematology analysis and is now routinely available on all automated cell counters. This histogram and other associated complete blood count (CBC parameters have been found abnormal in various haematological conditions and may provide major clues in the diagnosis and management of significant red cell disorders. Performing manual blood smears is important to ensure the quality of blood count results and to make presumptive diagnosis. In this article we have taken 100 samples for comparative study between RBC histograms obtained by automated haematology analyzer with peripheral blood smear. This article discusses some morphological features of dimorphism and the ensuing characteristic changes in their RBC histograms.

  1. Neonatal management and outcome in red cell alloimmunization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smits-Wintjens, Vivianne Elise Huberta Johanna

    2012-01-01

    In this thesis, several studies on neonatal red cell alloimmune hemolytic disease are presented, including various management options, associated complications and co-morbidities and the short-term and long-term outcome of children with Rhesus hemolytic disease.

  2. Acquired pure red cell aplasia in a child.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharma R

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Primary acquired pure red cell aplasia is a rare occurrence in childhood. An eleven-year old boy presented to us with pallor, which required multiple packed red cell transfusions. He did not have hepatosplenomegaly, jaundice or lymphadenopathy. Bone marrow examination revealed the diagnosis of pure red cell aplasia. All possible investigations were done to exclude secondary causes of pure red cell aplasia. No secondary cause was found on investigations. Rheumatoid factor and anti-nuclear antibodies were positive. He was started on oral steroids, to which he did not respond. He was then given cyclosporine A. Response to cyclosporine was dramatic and the child now does not require any transfusions.

  3. Neonatal management and outcome in red cell alloimmunization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smits-Wintjens, Vivianne Elise Huberta Johanna

    2012-01-01

    In this thesis, several studies on neonatal red cell alloimmune hemolytic disease are presented, including various management options, associated complications and co-morbidities and the short-term and long-term outcome of children with Rhesus hemolytic disease.

  4. Optical tweezers as a new biomedical tool to measure zeta potential of stored red blood cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego C N Silva

    Full Text Available During storage, red blood cells (RBCs for transfusion purposes suffer progressive deterioration. Sialylated glycoproteins of the RBC membrane are responsible for a negatively charged surface which creates a repulsive electrical zeta potential. These charges help prevent the interaction between RBCs and other cells, and especially among each RBCs. Reports in the literature have stated that RBCs sialylated glycoproteins can be sensitive to enzymes released by leukocyte degranulation. Thus, the aim of this study was, by using an optical tweezers as a biomedical tool, to measure the zeta potential in standard RBCs units and in leukocyte reduced RBC units (collected in CPD-SAGM during storage. Optical tweezers is a sensitive tool that uses light for measuring cell biophysical properties which are important for clinical and research purposes. This is the first study to analyze RBCs membrane charges during storage. In addition, we herein also measured the elasticity of RBCs also collected in CPD-SAGM. In conclusion, the zeta potential decreased 42% and cells were 134% less deformable at the end of storage. The zeta potential from leukodepleted units had a similar profile when compared to units stored without leukoreduction, indicating that leukocyte lyses were not responsible for the zeta potential decay. Flow cytometry measurements of reactive oxygen species suggested that this decay is due to membrane oxidative damages. These results show that measurements of zeta potentials provide new insights about RBCs storage lesion for transfusion purposes.

  5. Mechanisms Linking Red Blood Cell Disorders and Cardiovascular Diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Ioana Mozos

    2015-01-01

    The present paper aims to review the main pathophysiological links between red blood cell disorders and cardiovascular diseases, provides a brief description of the latest studies in this area, and considers implications for clinical practice and therapy. Anemia is associated with a special risk in proatherosclerotic conditions and heart disease and became a new therapeutic target. Guidelines must be updated for the management of patients with red blood cell disorders and cardiovascular dise...

  6. Research progress on the red cell diseases in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YUE Lan-zhu; SHAO Zong-hong

    2012-01-01

    In recent years,there have been lots of progresses in the studies on red cell diseases in China,especially bone marrow failure diseases including immune-related pancytopenia,aplastic anemia,myelodysplastic syndrome,and paroxymal nocturnal hemoglobinuria.Numerous laboratory experiments as well as clinical researches have been carried out by Chinese hematologists,which brought about much clearer pathogenesis,more rational diagnosis methods and more effective therapies for red cell diseases.

  7. Elastic thickness compressibilty of the red cell membrane.

    OpenAIRE

    Heinrich, V; Ritchie, K; Mohandas, N; Evans, E.

    2001-01-01

    We have used an ultrasensitive force probe and optical interferometry to examine the thickness compressibility of the red cell membrane in situ. Pushed into the centers of washed-white red cell ghosts lying on a coverglass, the height of the microsphere-probe tip relative to its closest approach on the adjacent glass surface revealed the apparent material thickness, which began at approximately 90 nm per membrane upon detection of contact (force approximately 1-2 pN). With further impingement...

  8. ENTREPRENEURIAL OPPORTUNITIES IN FOOD PROCESSING UNITS (WITH SPECIAL REFERENCES TO BYADGI RED CHILLI COLD STORAGE UNITS IN THE KARNATAKA STATE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. ISHWARA

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available After the green revolution, we are now ushering in the evergreen revolution in the country; food processing is an evergreen activity. It is the key to the agricultural sector. In this paper an attempt has been made to study the workings of food processing units with special references to Red Chilli Cold Storage units in the Byadgi district of Karnataka State. Byadgi has been famous for Red Chilli since the days it’s of antiquity. The vast and extensive market yard in Byadagi taluk is famous as the second largest Red Chilli dealing market in the country. However, the most common and recurring problem faced by the farmer is inability to store enough red chilli from one harvest to another. Red chilli that was locally abundant for only a short period of time had to be stored against times of scarcity. In recent years, due to Oleoresin, demand for Red Chilli has grow from other countries like Sri Lanka, Bangladesh, America, Europe, Nepal, Indonesia, Mexico etc. The study reveals that all the cold storage units of the study area have been using vapour compression refrigeration system or method. All entrepreneurs have satisfied with their turnover and profit and they are in a good economic position. Even though the average turnover and profits are increased, few units have shown negligible amount of decrease in turnover and profit. This is due to the competition from increasing number of cold storages and early established units. The cold storages of the study area have been storing Red chilli, Chilli seeds, Chilli powder, Tamarind, Jeera, Dania, Turmeric, Sunflower, Zinger, Channa, Flower seeds etc,. But the 80 per cent of the each cold storage is filled by the red chilli this is due to the existence of vast and extensivered chilli market yard in the Byadgi. There is no business without problems. In the same way the entrepreneurs who are chosen for the study are facing a few problems in their business like skilled labour, technical and management

  9. Net haemoglobin increase from reinfusion of refrigerated vs. frozen red blood cells after autologous blood transfusions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ashenden, M; Mørkeberg, Jakob Sehested

    2011-01-01

    objective was to examine which storage procedure yielded the largest increase in circulating haemoglobin after reinfusion compared to baseline. MATERIALS AND METHODS  Equal volumes of blood from 15 men were withdrawn and stored either frozen or refrigerated as packed red blood cells. Serial measures...... freezing. Nevertheless, frozen storage allowed haemoglobin to fully recover before reinfusion, while the haemoglobin was 10% lower in the refrigerated group compared with baseline. After reinfusion, the haemoglobin levels were 11·5% higher than the baseline values in the group reinfused with frozen blood......, while for the refrigerated group, haemoglobin levels were only 5·2% higher than baseline. CONCLUSION  The relatively larger recovery from anaemia in the frozen group during storage more than compensated for the larger loss of haemoglobin during freezing and resulted in a larger net gain in haemoglobin...

  10. Red Blood Cell Transfusions in Greece: Results of a Survey of Red Blood Cell Use in 2013

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serena Valsami

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Greece is ranked as the second highest consumer of blood components in Europe. For an effective transfusion system and in order to reduce variability of transfusion practice by implementing evidence-based transfusion guidelines it is necessary to study and monitor blood management strategies. Our study was conducted in order to evaluate the use of red blood cell units (RBC-U in nationwide scale mapping parameters that contribute to their proper management in Greece. Materials and Methods: The survey was conducted by the Working Committee of Transfusion Medicine&Apheresis of the Hellenic Society of Hematology from January to December 2013. The collected data included the number, ABO/D blood group, patients’ department, and storage age of RBC-U transfused. Results: The number of RBC-U evaluated was 103,702 (17.77% out of 583,457 RBC-U transfused in Greece in 2013. RBC-U transfused by hospital department (mean percentage was as follows: Surgery 29.34%, Internal Medicine 29.48%, Oncology/Hematology 14.65%, Thalassemia 8.87%, Intensive Care Unit 6.55%, Nephrology 1.78%, Obstetrics/Gynecology 1.46%, Neonatal&Pediatric 0.31%, Private Hospitals 8.57%. RBC-U distribution according to ABO/D blood group was: A: 39.02%, B: 12.41%, AB: 5.16%, O: 43.41%, D+: 87.99%, D-: 12.01%. The majority of RBC-U (62.46% was transfused in the first 15 days of storage, 25.24% at 16 to 28 days, and 12.28% at 29-42 days. Conclusion: Despite a high intercenter variability in RBC transfusions, surgical and internal medicine patients were the most common groups of patients transfused with an increasing rate for internal medicine patients. The majority of RBC-U were transfused within the first 15 days of storage, which is possibly the consequence of blood supply insufficiency leading to the direct use of fresh blood. Benchmarking transfusion activity may help to decrease the inappropriate use of blood products, reduce the cost of care, and optimize the use of the

  11. A role for activated endothelial cells in red blood cell clearance: implications for vasopathology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fens, Marcel H A M; van Wijk, Richard; Andringa, Grietje

    2012-01-01

    Background Phosphatidylserine exposure by red blood cells is acknowledged as a signal that initiates phagocytic removal of the cells from the circulation. Several disorders and conditions are known to induce phosphatidylserine exposure. Removal of phosphatidylserine-exposing red blood cells gener...... cells play a role in red blood cell clearance in vivo. Significant erythrophagocytosis can induce endothelial cell loss, which may contribute to vasopathological effects as seen, for instance, in sickle cell disease.......Background Phosphatidylserine exposure by red blood cells is acknowledged as a signal that initiates phagocytic removal of the cells from the circulation. Several disorders and conditions are known to induce phosphatidylserine exposure. Removal of phosphatidylserine-exposing red blood cells...... generally occurs by macrophages in the spleen and liver. Previously, however, we have shown that endothelial cells are also capable of erythrophagocytosis. Key players in the erythrophagocytosis by endothelial cells appeared to be lactadherin and αv-integrin. Phagocytosis via the phosphatidylserine...

  12. Quantification of depletion-induced adhesion of Red Blood Cells

    CERN Document Server

    Steffen, Patrick; Wagner, Christian

    2012-01-01

    Red blood cells (RBC) are known to form aggregates in the forms of rouleaux due to the presence of plasma proteins under physiological conditions. Rouleaux formation can be also induced in vitro by the addition of macromolecules to the RBC solution. Current data on the adhesion strength between red blood cells in their natural discocyte shapes mostly rely on indirect measurements like flow chamber experiments, but on the single cell level data is lacking. Here we present measurements on the dextran induced aggregation of red blood cells by use of atomic force microscopy based single cell force spectroscopy (SCFS). The effects of dextran concentration and molecular weight on the interaction energy of adhering RBCs was determined. The results are in good agreement with a model based on the depletion effect and former experimental studies.

  13. Radiolabeled red blood cells: status, problems, and prospects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Srivastava, S.C.

    1983-01-01

    Radionuclidic labels for red cells can be divided into two main categories - cohort or pulse labels, and random labels. The random labels are incorporated into circulating cells of all ages and the labeling process is usually carried out in vitro. The red cell labels in predominant use involve random labeling and employ technetium-99m, chromium-51, indium-111, and gallium-68, roughly in that order. The extent of usefulness depends on the properties of the label such as the half-life, decay mode, and in-vivo stability, etc. Labeled cells can be used for red cell survival measurements when the half-life of the radionuclide is sufficiently long. The major portion of this article deals with random labels.

  14. Quercetin and isorhamnetin in sweet and red cultivars of onion (Allium cepa L.) at harvest, after field curing, heat treatment, and storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsson, Marie E; Gustavsson, Karl-Erik; Vågen, Ingunn M

    2010-02-24

    Effects of heat treatment and storage on quercetin and isorhamnetin content, major and minor components of isorhamnetin, and quercetin glucosides and aglycone, were investigated in onion (Allium cepa L.). The sweet onion 'Recorra' and red onions 'Hyred' and 'Red Baron' were cultivated in the south part of Norway and thereafter stored for eight months. The onions were either not field dried, but stored directly, or field dried and then stored, or field dried and then heat treated before storage. Neither storage nor heat treatment caused any major differences in total flavonol content in the investigated sweet onion as well as in the red onion cultivars. The two major quercetin glucosides differed in their changes in content during storage; quercetin-4'-glucoside did not show any consistent changes during storage in the two red cultivars, independent of treatment, whereas quercetin-3,4'-diglucoside increased significantly by 30 or 51%, respectively, during storage in 'Hyred' and 'Red Baron' in the 24 h heat treated onions. Isorhamnetin-4'-glucoside, which might possibly be of special interest from a human health point of view, was present at 2-3 times higher amount in the sweet onion cultivar than in the two red cultivars. Some of the quercetin glucosides present at lower concentrations, isorhamnetin-3,4'-diglucoside, quercetin-3,7,4'-triglucoside, and quercetin-7,4'-diglucoside, increased during storage in all treatments in both 'Hyred' and 'Red Baron', though sometimes a decrease was found at the end of storage.

  15. Correlation between enzyme activity and substrate storage in a cell culture model system for Gaucher disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schueler, U H; Kolter, T; Kaneski, C R; Zirzow, G C; Sandhoff, K; Brady, R O

    2004-01-01

    Gaucher disease, the most common sphingolipidosis, is caused by a decreased activity of glucosylceramide beta-glucosidase, resulting in the accumulation of glucosylceramide in macrophage-derived cells known as Gaucher cells. Much of the storage material is thought to originate from the turnover of cell membranes, such as phagocytosed red and white blood cells. In this study, an in vitro model of Gaucher disease was developed by treating the murine macrophage cell line J774 with a specific inhibitor of glucosylceramide beta-glucosidase, conduritol B-epoxide, and feeding red blood cell ghosts, in order to mimic the disease state. It was found in this model system that glucosylceramide beta-glucosidase activity could be reduced to about 11-15% of the normal control level before increased storage of glucosylceramide occurred. This in vitro system allows insight into the correlation between enzyme activity and lipid storage as predicted by the theory of residual enzyme activity that was proposed by Conzelmann and Sandhoff.

  16. Pure Red Cell Aplasia Following Interleukin-2 Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janice P. Dutcher MD

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available A 61-year-old woman with metastatic renal cell carcinoma underwent systemic treatment with high-dose interleukin-2 (IL-2. Anemia requiring transfusion of 1 unit of packed red blood cells (PRBCs was required during the second week of IL-2 therapy. One month following completion of high-dose IL-2 treatment, she was hospitalized for severe, symptomatic anemia and received 5 units of PRBCs. She was referred back for evaluation. A complete hematologic evaluation was performed including antiviral serology, evaluation for hemolysis, complete iron studies, and finally bone marrow aspiration and biopsy. The diagnosis was pure red cell aplasia, and no inciting viral cause could be ascertained. She required PRBCs for 5 months following IL-2 therapy. It was concluded that IL-2 was the cause of her red cell aplasia. This subsequently resolved spontaneously, and she had normal hemoglobin and hematocrit, respectively, 1 and 2 years after treatment.

  17. Mechanisms Linking Red Blood Cell Disorders and Cardiovascular Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioana Mozos

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The present paper aims to review the main pathophysiological links between red blood cell disorders and cardiovascular diseases, provides a brief description of the latest studies in this area, and considers implications for clinical practice and therapy. Anemia is associated with a special risk in proatherosclerotic conditions and heart disease and became a new therapeutic target. Guidelines must be updated for the management of patients with red blood cell disorders and cardiovascular diseases, and targets for hemoglobin level should be established. Risk scores in several cardiovascular diseases should include red blood cell count and RDW. Complete blood count and hemorheological parameters represent useful, inexpensive, widely available tools for the management and prognosis of patients with coronary heart disease, heart failure, hypertension, arrhythmias, and stroke. Hypoxia and iron accumulation cause the most important cardiovascular effects of sickle cell disease and thalassemia. Patients with congenital chronic hemolytic anemia undergoing splenectomy should be monitored, considering thromboembolic and cardiovascular risk.

  18. Mechanisms linking red blood cell disorders and cardiovascular diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mozos, Ioana

    2015-01-01

    The present paper aims to review the main pathophysiological links between red blood cell disorders and cardiovascular diseases, provides a brief description of the latest studies in this area, and considers implications for clinical practice and therapy. Anemia is associated with a special risk in proatherosclerotic conditions and heart disease and became a new therapeutic target. Guidelines must be updated for the management of patients with red blood cell disorders and cardiovascular diseases, and targets for hemoglobin level should be established. Risk scores in several cardiovascular diseases should include red blood cell count and RDW. Complete blood count and hemorheological parameters represent useful, inexpensive, widely available tools for the management and prognosis of patients with coronary heart disease, heart failure, hypertension, arrhythmias, and stroke. Hypoxia and iron accumulation cause the most important cardiovascular effects of sickle cell disease and thalassemia. Patients with congenital chronic hemolytic anemia undergoing splenectomy should be monitored, considering thromboembolic and cardiovascular risk.

  19. Cobalt uptake and binding in human red blood cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsen, Lars Ole; Brown, Anthony M; Harbak, Henrik

    2011-01-01

    The basal uptake and cytoplasmic binding of cobalt was studied in human red cells using (57)Co as tracer. The basal uptake is linear with time, at a rate of about 10 µmol (l cells)(-1) h(-1) at 100 µM [Co(2+)](o), and is almost irreversible, as there is hardly any efflux into excess EDTA. Ionophore...

  20. Micronuclei in red blood cells of armored catfish Hypostomus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SERVER

    2008-04-03

    Apr 3, 2008 ... 1Centro Universitário Metodista - Porto Alegre - RS –Brazil. 2Department of ... 2,000 red blood cells of animals subjected to treatment, it was possible to observe 8.25 ± 0.02% cells .... The social impact of this contamination of.

  1. Challenges for red blood cell biomarker discovery through proteomics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barasa, B.A.; Slijper, M.

    2014-01-01

    Red blood cells are rather unique body cells, since they have lost all organelles when mature, which results in lack of potential to replace proteins that have lost their function. They maintain only a few pathways for obtaining energy and reducing power for the key functions they need to fulfill. T

  2. Computational Biomechanics of Human Red Blood Cells in Hematological Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xuejin; Li, He; Chang, Hung-Yu; Lykotrafitis, George; Em Karniadakis, George

    2017-02-01

    We review recent advances in multiscale modeling of the biomechanical characteristics of red blood cells (RBCs) in hematological diseases, and their relevance to the structure and dynamics of defective RBCs. We highlight examples of successful simulations of blood disorders including malaria and other hereditary disorders, such as sickle-cell anemia, spherocytosis, and elliptocytosis.

  3. Challenges for red blood cell biomarker discovery through proteomics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barasa, B.A.; Slijper, M.

    2014-01-01

    Red blood cells are rather unique body cells, since they have lost all organelles when mature, which results in lack of potential to replace proteins that have lost their function. They maintain only a few pathways for obtaining energy and reducing power for the key functions they need to fulfill. T

  4. Quantification of Cell-Free DNA in Red Blood Cell Units in Different Whole Blood Processing Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew W. Shih

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Whole blood donations in Canada are processed by either the red cell filtration (RCF or whole blood filtration (WBF methods, where leukoreduction is potentially delayed in WBF. Fresh WBF red blood cells (RBCs have been associated with increased in-hospital mortality after transfusion. Cell-free DNA (cfDNA is released by neutrophils prior to leukoreduction, degraded during RBC storage, and is associated with adverse patient outcomes. We explored cfDNA levels in RBCs prepared by RCF and WBF and different storage durations. Methods. Equal numbers of fresh (stored ≤14 days and older RBCs were sampled. cfDNA was quantified by spectrophotometry and PicoGreen. Separate regression models determined the association with processing method and storage duration and their interaction on cfDNA. Results. cfDNA in 120 RBC units (73 RCF, 47 WBF were measured. Using PicoGreen, WBF units overall had higher cfDNA than RCF units (p=0.0010; fresh WBF units had higher cfDNA than fresh RCF units (p=0.0093. Using spectrophotometry, fresh RBC units overall had higher cfDNA than older units (p=0.0031; fresh WBF RBCs had higher cfDNA than older RCF RBCs (p=0.024. Conclusion. Higher cfDNA in fresh WBF was observed compared to older RCF blood. Further study is required for association with patient outcomes.

  5. Computational modeling of red blood cells: A symplectic integration algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiller, Ulf D.; Ladd, Anthony J. C.

    2010-03-01

    Red blood cells can undergo shape transformations that impact the rheological properties of blood. Computational models have to account for the deformability and red blood cells are often modeled as elastically deformable objects. We present a symplectic integration algorithm for deformable objects. The surface is represented by a set of marker points obtained by surface triangulation, along with a set of fiber vectors that describe the orientation of the material plane. The various elastic energies are formulated in terms of these variables and the equations of motion are obtained by exact differentiation of a discretized Hamiltonian. The integration algorithm preserves the Hamiltonian structure and leads to highly accurate energy conservation, hence he method is expected to be more stable than conventional finite element methods. We apply the algorithm to simulate the shape dynamics of red blood cells.

  6. Effect of storage media on human periodontal ligament cell apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamorro, Mónica M; Regan, John D; Opperman, Lynne A; Kramer, Phillip R

    2008-02-01

    The ability of storage media to preserve periodontal ligament (PDL) cell vitality has been previously evaluated. However, the mechanisms by which different storage conditions alter the functional status of PDL cells have not been determined. The purpose of the present study was to investigate, in vitro, the level of programed cell death or apoptosis in a population of PDL cells following storage under different conditions. Primary human PDL cells were plated into 24-well-culture plates and allowed to attach for 24 h. Cells were then exposed for 1 h to milk, Hank's balanced salt solution (HBSS), Soft Wear contact lens solution or Gatorade at room temperature or on ice. Culture medium was used as a negative control. Apoptosis was evaluated at 24, 48, and 72 h after treatment on quadruplicate samples by using the ST 160 ApopTag Fluorescein Direct In Situ Detection Kit. The total number of cells and the total number of apoptotic cells were counted. The results indicated that at 24 and 72 h, PDL treated with Gatorade and the contact lens solution displayed the highest percentages of apoptotic cells when compared with the other treatment groups at room temperature. Overall, cells treated on ice showed significantly lower levels of apoptosis when compared with treatments at room temperature. In conclusion, the results indicated that apoptosis plays a major role in cell death in cells treated with Gatorade and contact lens solutions in comparison to other storage solutions and that storage on ice can inhibit programed cell death.

  7. Photoacoustic response of suspended and hemolyzed red blood cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Ratan K.; Karmakar, Subhajit; Roy, Madhusudan

    2013-07-01

    The effect of confinement of hemoglobin molecules on photoacoustic (PA) signal is studied experimentally. The PA amplitudes for samples with suspended red blood cells (SRBCs) and hemolyzed red blood cells (HRBCs) were found to be comparable at each hematocrit for 532 nm illumination. The difference between the corresponding amplitudes increased with increasing hematocrit for 1064 nm irradiation. For example, the PA amplitude for the SRBCs was about 260% higher than that of the HRBCs at 40% hematocrit. This observation may help to develop a PA method detecting hemolysis noninvasively.

  8. Deep coverage mouse red blood cell proteome: a first comparison with the human red blood cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasini, Erica M; Kirkegaard, Morten; Salerno, Doris; Mortensen, Peter; Mann, Matthias; Thomas, Alan W

    2008-07-01

    Mice have close genetic/physiological relationships to humans, breed rapidly, and can be genetically modified, making them the most used mammal in biomedical research. Because the red blood cell (RBC) is the sole gas transporter in vertebrates, diseases of the RBC are frequently severe; much research has therefore focused on RBC and cardiovascular disorders of mouse and humans. RBCs also host malaria parasites. Recently we presented an in-depth proteome for the human RBC. Here we present directly comparable data for the mouse RBC as membrane-only, soluble-only, and combined membrane-bound/soluble proteomes (comprising, respectively, 247, 232, and 165 proteins). All proteins were identified, validated, and categorized in terms of subcellular localization, protein family, and function, and in comparison with the human RBC, were classified as orthologs, family-related, or unique. Splice isoforms were identified, and polypeptides migrating with anomalous apparent molecular weights were grouped into putatively ubiquitinated or partially degraded complexes. Overall there was close concordance between mouse and human proteomes, confirming the unexpected RBC complexity. Several novel findings in the human proteome have been confirmed here. This comparison sheds light on several open issues in RBC biology and provides a departure point for more comprehensive understanding of RBC function.

  9. Nutritional value and physicochemical properties of red deer and wild boar meat after frozen storage under vacuum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariusz FLOREK

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the present research was the comparison of physicochemical properties of red deer and wild boar meat frozen under vacuum for 60 days and then cold stored during 7 days. The research material included vacuum-packed, frozen and stored for 60 days skeletal muscles from shoulder (deboned retail cut of red deer (n=9 and wild boar (n=9. Following thawing, muscles were removed from the packaging and then cold stored 7 days. Measurements of physicochemical properties as follow: pH and electrical conductivity (1, 2, 3 and 7 d, CIE L*a*b* colour characteristics, parameters of water holding capacity and shear force test (1 and 7 d were determined. The proximate composition of meat (contents of moisture, ash, protein and fat, as well water:protein ratio, energy value and nutritional quality index (NQI for protein and fat were calculated. Red deer meat showed significantly (P0.05 lower content of fat and higher NQI for protein compared to wild boar. Muscles of both species stored for 3 d following thawing displayed pH below 6.0, and similar colour characteristics. However, cold storage significantly (P0.05 influenced the increase of lightness (L* and decrease of redness (a*. Venison stored up to 7 d following thawing indicated significantly (P0.05 lower water holding capacity (higher cooking loss and free water amount. Meat of wild boar was significantly (P0.05 tougher (higher shear force and shear energy than red deer. Although, the improvement of tenderness for meat of both species during cold storage was not observed up to 7 d following thawing, the red deer meat should be considered “tender”, and wild boar “intermediate”. The assessment of the nutritional value and physicochemical properties of retail elements from frozen venison indicate their high quality, fulfilling criterions for fresh meat in culinary and processing purposes.

  10. Fermented red ginseng extract inhibits cancer cell proliferation and viability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Jisun; Jeon, Seong Bin; Lee, Yuri; Lee, Hyeji; Kim, Ju; Kwon, Bo Ra; Yu, Kang-Yeol; Cha, Jeong-Dan; Hwang, Seung-Mi; Choi, Kyung-Min; Jeong, Yong-Seob

    2015-04-01

    Red ginseng (Panax ginseng C.A. Meyer) is the most widely recognized medicinal herb due to its remedial effects in various disorders, such as cancers, diabetes, and heart problems. In this study, we investigated the anticancer effect of fermented red ginseng extract (f-RGE; provided by Jeonju Biomaterials Institute, Jeonju, South Korea) in a parallel comparison with the effect of nonfermented red ginseng extract (nf-RGE; control) on several cancer cell lines--MCF-7 breast cancer cells, HepG2 hepatocellular carcinoma cells, and reprogrammed MCF-7 cells (mimicking cancer stem cells). Cells were cultured at various concentrations of RGE (from 0.5 up to 5 mg/mL) and their viabilities and proliferative properties were examined. Our data demonstrate the following: (1) nf-RGE inhibited cell viability at ≥1 mg/mL for MCF-7 cells and ≥2 mg/mL for HepG2 cells, (2) in the presence of a carcinogenic agent, 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA), nf-RGE treatment in combination with paclitaxel synergistically decreased MCF-7 as well as HepG2 cell viability, (3) f-RGE (which contained a greater level of Rg3 content) more effectively decreased the viability of MCF-7 and HepG2 cells compared to nf-RGE, and (4) f-RGE appeared more potent for inhibiting cancerous differentiation of reprogrammed MCF-7 cells in a synergistic fashion with paclitaxel, especially in the presence of TPA, compared to nf-RGE. These findings suggest that f-RGE treatment may be more effective for decreasing cancer cell survival by inducing apoptotic cell death and also presumably for preventing cancer stem cell differentiation compared to nf-RGE.

  11. Deoxygenation affects tyrosine phosphoproteome of red cell membrane from patients with sickle cell disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siciliano, Angela; Turrini, Franco; Bertoldi, Mariarita; Matte, Alessandro; Pantaleo, Antonella; Olivieri, Oliviero; De Franceschi, Lucia

    2010-04-15

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is a worldwide distributed hereditary red cell disorder related to the production of a defective form of hemoglobin, hemoglobin S (HbS). One of the hallmarks of SCD is the presence of dense, dehydrate highly adhesive sickle red blood cells (RBCs) that result from persistent membrane damage associated with HbS polymerization, abnormal activation of membrane cation transports and generation of distorted and rigid red cells with membrane perturbation and cytoskeleton dysfunction. Although modulation of phosphorylation state of the proteins from membrane and cytoskeleton networks has been proposed to participate in red cell homeostasis, much still remains to be investigated in normal and diseased red cells. Here, we report that tyrosine (Tyr-) phosphoproteome of sickle red cells was different from normal controls and was affected by deoxygenation. We found proteins, p55 and band 4.1, from the junctional complex, differently Tyr-phosphorylated in SCD RBCs compared to normal RBCs under normoxia and modulated by deoxygenation, while band 4.2 was similarly Tyr-phosphorylated in both conditions. In SCD RBCs we identified the phosphopeptides for protein 4.1R located in the protein FERM domain (Tyr-13) and for alpha-spectrin located near or in a linker region (Tyr-422 and Tyr-1498) involving protein areas crucial for their functions in the context of red cell membrane properties, suggesting that Tyr-phosphorylation may be part of the events involved in maintaining membrane mechanical stability in SCD red cells.

  12. Non-invasive spectroscopy of transfusable red blood cells stored inside sealed plastic blood-bags.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckley, K; Atkins, C G; Chen, D; Schulze, H G; Devine, D V; Blades, M W; Turner, R F B

    2016-03-07

    After being separated from (donated) whole blood, red blood cells are suspended in specially formulated additive solutions and stored (at 4 °C) in polyvinyl chloride (PVC) blood-bags until they are needed for transfusion. With time, the prepared red cell concentrate (RCC) is known to undergo biochemical changes that lower effectiveness of the transfusion, and thus regulations are in place that limit the storage period to 42 days. At present, RCC is not subjected to analytical testing prior to transfusion. In this study, we use Spatially Offset Raman Spectroscopy (SORS) to probe, non-invasively, the biochemistry of RCC inside sealed blood-bags. The retrieved spectra compare well with conventional Raman spectra (of sampled aliquots) and are dominated by features associated with hemoglobin. In addition to the analytical demonstration that SORS can be used to retrieve RCC spectra from standard clinical blood-bags without breaking the sterility of the system, the data reveal interesting detail about the oxygenation-state of the stored cells themselves, namely that some blood-bags unexpectedly contain measurable amounts of deoxygenated hemoglobin after weeks of storage. The demonstration that chemical information can be obtained non-invasively using spectroscopy will enable new studies of RCC degeneration, and points the way to a Raman-based instrument for quality-control in a blood-bank or hospital setting.

  13. Role of Complement in Red Cell Dysfunction in Trauma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-01

    such as in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), complement fragments deposit on the surface of red blood cells (RBC), which limits their...reporting burden for this collection of information is estimated to average 1 hour per response, including the time for reviewing instructions...searching existing data sources, gathering and maintaining the data needed, and completing and reviewing this collection of information . Send comments

  14. The effects of cryopreservation on red blood cell rheologic properties

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Henkelman, Sandra; Lagerberg, Johan W. M.; Graaff, Reindert; Rakhorst, Gerhard; van Oeveren, Willem

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In transfusion medicine, frozen red blood cells (RBCs) are an alternative for liquid-stored RBCs. Little is known about the rheologic properties (i.e., aggregability and deformability) of thawed RBCs. In this study the rheologic properties of high-glycerol frozen RBCs and postthaw stored

  15. Hypoxia, hormones, and red blood cell function in chick embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dragon, Stefanie; Baumann, Rosemarie

    2003-04-01

    The red blood cell function of avian embryos is regulated by cAMP. Adenosine A(2A) and beta-adrenergic receptor activation during hypoxic conditions cause changes in the hemoglobin oxygen affinity and CO(2) transport. Furthermore, experimental evidence suggests a general involvement of cAMP in terminal differentiation of avian erythroblasts.

  16. Red blood cell transfusion during septic shock in the ICU

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perner, A; Smith, S H; Carlsen, S

    2012-01-01

    Transfusion of red blood cells (RBCs) remains controversial in patients with septic shock, but current practice is unknown. Our aim was to evaluate RBC transfusion practice in septic shock in the intensive care unit (ICU), and patient characteristics and outcome associated with RBC transfusion....

  17. Spatial distributions of red blood cells significantly alter local haemodynamics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph M Sherwood

    Full Text Available Although bulk changes in red blood cell concentration between vessels have been well characterised, local distributions are generally overlooked. Red blood cells aggregate, deform and migrate within vessels, forming heterogeneous distributions which have considerable effect on local haemodynamics. The present study reports data on the local distribution of human red blood cells in a sequentially bifurcating microchannel, representing the branching geometry of the microvasculature. Imaging methodologies with simple extrapolations are used to infer three dimensional, time-averaged velocity and haematocrit distributions under a range of flow conditions. Strong correlation between the bluntness of the velocity and haematocrit profiles in the parent branch of the geometry is observed and red blood cell aggregation has a notable effect on the observed trends. The two branches of the first bifurcation show similar characteristics in terms of the shapes of the profiles and the extent of plasma skimming, despite the difference in geometric configuration. In the second bifurcation, considerable asymmetry between the branches in the plasma skimming relationship is observed, and elucidated by considering individual haematocrit profiles. The results of the study highlight the importance of considering local haematocrit distributions in the analysis of blood flow and could lead to more accurate computational models of blood flow in microvascular networks. The experimental approaches developed in this work provide a foundation for further examining the characteristics of microhaemodynamics.

  18. Hereditary red cell membrane disorders and laboratory diagnostic testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, M-J; Zanella, A

    2013-06-01

    This overview describes two groups of nonimmune hereditary hemolytic anemias caused by defects in membrane proteins located in distinct layers of the red cell membrane. Hereditary spherocytosis (HS), hereditary elliptocytosis (HE), and hereditary pyropoikilocytosis (HPP) represent disorders of the red cell cytoskeleton. Hereditary stomatocytoses represents disorders of cation permeability in the red cell membrane. The current laboratory screening tests for HS are the osmotic fragility test, acid glycerol lysis time test (AGLT), cryohemolysis test, and eosin-5'-maleimide (EMA)-binding test. For atypical HS, SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of erythrocyte membrane proteins is carried out to confirm the diagnosis. The diagnosis of HE/HPP is based on abnormal red cell morphology and the detection of protein 4.1R deficiency or spectrin variants using gel electrophoresis. None of screening tests can detect all HS cases. Some testing centers (a survey of 25 laboratories) use a combination of tests (e.g., AGLT and EMA). No specific screening test for hereditary stomatocytoses is available. The preliminary diagnosis is based on presenting a compensated hemolytic anemia, macrocytosis, and a temperature or time dependent pseudohyperkalemia in some patients. Both the EMA-binding test and the osmotic fragility test may help in differential diagnosis of HS and hereditary stomatocytosis.

  19. Red blood cell antibodies in pregnancy and their clinical consequences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordvall, Maria; Dziegiel, Morten Hanefeld; Hegaard, Hanne Kristine;

    2009-01-01

    The objective was to determine clinical consequences of various specificities for the infant/fetus. The population was patients referred between 1998 and 2005 to the tertiary center because of detected red blood cell (RBC) alloimmunization. Altogether 455 infants were delivered by 390 alloimmunized...

  20. Alterations of red blood cell metabolome in overhydrated hereditary stomatocytosis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Darghouth, D.; Koehl, B.; Heilier, J.F.; Madalinski, G.; Bovee, P.H.; Bosman, G.J.C.G.M.; Delaunay, J.; Junot, C.; Romeo, P.H.

    2011-01-01

    Overhydrated hereditary stomatocytosis, clinically characterized by hemolytic anemia, is a rare disorder of the erythrocyte membrane permeability to monovalent cations, associated with mutations in the Rh-associated glycoprotein gene. We assessed the red blood cell metabolome of 4 patients with this

  1. Sodium renders endothelial cells sticky for red blood cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hans eOberleithner

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Negative charges in the glycocalyx of red blood cells (RBC and vascular endothelial cells (EC facilitate frictionless blood flow through blood vessels. Na+ selectively shields these charges controlling surface electronegativity. The question was addressed whether the ambient Na+ concentration controls RBC-EC interaction. Using atomic force microscopy (AFM adhesion forces between RBC and endothelial glycocalyx were quantified. A single RBC, mounted on an AFM cantilever, was brought in physical contact with the endothelial surface and then pulled off. Adhesion forces were quantified (i after enzymatic removal of negative charges in the glycocalyx, (ii under different ambient Na+ and (iii after applying the intracellular aldosterone receptor antagonist spironolactone. Removal of negative surface charges increases RBC-EC interaction forces. A stepwise increase of ambient Na+ from 133 to 140 mM does not affect them. However, beyond 140 mM Na+ adhesion forces increase sharply (10% increase of adhesion force per 1 mM increase of Na+. Spironolactone prevents this response. It is concluded that negative charges reduce adhesion between RBC and EC. Ambient Na+ concentration determines the availability of free negative charges. Na+ concentrations in the low physiological range (below 140 mM allow sufficient amounts of vacant negative charges so that adhesion of RBC to the endothelial surface is small. In contrast, Na+ in the high physiological range (beyond 140 mM saturates the remaining negative surface charges thus increasing adhesion. Aldosterone receptor blockade by spironolactone prevents Na+ induced RBC adhesion to the endothelial glycocalyx. Extrapolation of in vitro experiments to in vivo conditions leads to the hypothesis that high sodium intake is likely to increase the incidence of thrombotic events.

  2. Sodium renders endothelial cells sticky for red blood cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oberleithner, Hans; Wälte, Mike; Kusche-Vihrog, Kristina

    2015-01-01

    Negative charges in the glycocalyx of red blood cells (RBC) and vascular endothelial cells (EC) facilitate frictionless blood flow through blood vessels. Na(+) selectively shields these charges controlling surface electronegativity. The question was addressed whether the ambient Na(+) concentration controls RBC-EC interaction. Using atomic force microscopy (AFM) adhesion forces between RBC and endothelial glycocalyx were quantified. A single RBC, mounted on an AFM cantilever, was brought in physical contact with the endothelial surface and then pulled off. Adhesion forces were quantified (i) after enzymatic removal of negative charges in the glycocalyx, (ii) under different ambient Na(+) and (iii) after applying the intracellular aldosterone receptor antagonist spironolactone. Removal of negative surface charges increases RBC-EC interaction forces. A stepwise increase of ambient Na(+) from 133 to 140 mM does not affect them. However, beyond 140 mM Na(+) adhesion forces increase sharply (10% increase of adhesion force per 1 mM increase of Na(+)). Spironolactone prevents this response. It is concluded that negative charges reduce adhesion between RBC and EC. Ambient Na(+) concentration determines the availability of free negative charges. Na(+) concentrations in the low physiological range (below 140 mM) allow sufficient amounts of vacant negative charges so that adhesion of RBC to the endothelial surface is small. In contrast, Na(+) in the high physiological range (beyond 140 mM) saturates the remaining negative surface charges thus increasing adhesion. Aldosterone receptor blockade by spironolactone prevents Na(+) induced RBC adhesion to the endothelial glycocalyx. Extrapolation of in vitro experiments to in vivo conditions leads to the hypothesis that high sodium intake is likely to increase the incidence of thrombotic events.

  3. Oxidative modifications of glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase regulate metabolic reprogramming of stored red blood cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reisz, Julie A; Wither, Matthew J; Dzieciatkowska, Monika; Nemkov, Travis; Issaian, Aaron; Yoshida, Tatsuro; Dunham, Andrew J; Hill, Ryan C; Hansen, Kirk C; D'Alessandro, Angelo

    2016-09-22

    Glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) plays a key regulatory function in glucose oxidation by mediating fluxes through glycolysis or the pentose phosphate pathway (PPP) in an oxidative stress-dependent fashion. Previous studies documented metabolic reprogramming in stored red blood cells (RBCs) and oxidation of GAPDH at functional residues upon exposure to pro-oxidants diamide and H2O2 Here we hypothesize that routine storage of erythrocyte concentrates promotes metabolic modulation of stored RBCs by targeting functional thiol residues of GAPDH. Progressive increases in PPP/glycolysis ratios were determined via metabolic flux analysis after spiking (13)C1,2,3-glucose in erythrocyte concentrates stored in Additive Solution-3 under blood bank conditions for up to 42 days. Proteomics analyses revealed a storage-dependent oxidation of GAPDH at functional Cys152, 156, 247, and His179. Activity loss by oxidation occurred with increasing storage duration and was progressively irreversible. Irreversibly oxidized GAPDH accumulated in stored erythrocyte membranes and supernatants through storage day 42. By combining state-of-the-art ultra-high-pressure liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry metabolic flux analysis with redox and switch-tag proteomics, we identify for the first time ex vivo functionally relevant reversible and irreversible (sulfinic acid; Cys to dehydroalanine) oxidations of GAPDH without exogenous supplementation of excess pro-oxidant compounds in clinically relevant blood products. Oxidative and metabolic lesions, exacerbated by storage under hyperoxic conditions, were ameliorated by hypoxic storage. Storage-dependent reversible oxidation of GAPDH represents a mechanistic adaptation in stored erythrocytes to promote PPP activation and generate reducing equivalents. Removal of irreversibly oxidized, functionally compromised GAPDH identifies enhanced vesiculation as a self-protective mechanism in ex vivo aging erythrocytes.

  4. Macromolecular Dynamics in Red Blood Cells Investigated Using Neutron Spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Stadler, Andreas Maximilian; Demmel, Franz; Artmann, Gerhard; 10.1098/rsif.2010.0306

    2011-01-01

    We present neutron scattering measurements on the dynamics of hemoglobin (Hb) in human red blood cells in vivo. Global and internal Hb dynamics were measured in the ps to ns time- and {\\AA} length-scale using quasielastic neutron backscattering spectroscopy. We observed the cross-over from global Hb short-time to long-time self-diffusion. Both short- and long-time diffusion coefficients agree quantitatively with predicted values from hydrodynamic theory of non-charged hard-sphere suspensions when a bound water fraction of around 0.23g H2O/ g Hb is taken into account. The higher amount of water in the cells facilitates internal protein fluctuations in the ps time-scale when compared to fully hydrated Hb powder. Slower internal dynamics of Hb in red blood cells in the ns time-range were found to be rather similar to results obtained with fully hydrated protein powders, solutions and E. coli cells.

  5. Aggregation of Red Blood Cells: From Rouleaux to Clot Formation

    CERN Document Server

    Wagner, C; Svetina, S

    2013-01-01

    Red blood cells are known to form aggregates in the form of rouleaux. This aggregation process is believed to be reversible, but there is still no full understanding on the binding mechanism. There are at least two competing models, based either on bridging or on depletion. We review recent experimental results on the single cell level and theoretical analyses of the depletion model and of the influence of the cell shape on the binding strength. Another important aggregation mechanism is caused by activation of platelets. This leads to clot formation which is life saving in the case of wound healing but also a major cause of death in the case of a thrombus induced stroke. We review historical and recent results on the participation of red blood cells in clot formation.

  6. Engineering of red cells of Arabidopsis thaliana and comparative genome-wide gene expression analysis of red cells versus wild-type cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Ming-Zhu; Xie, De-Yu

    2011-04-01

    We report metabolic engineering of Arabidopsis red cells and genome-wide gene expression analysis associated with anthocyanin biosynthesis and other metabolic pathways between red cells and wild-type (WT) cells. Red cells of A. thaliana were engineered for the first time from the leaves of production of anthocyanin pigment 1-Dominant (pap1-D). These red cells produced seven anthocyanin molecules including a new one that was characterized by LC-MS analysis. Wild-type cells established as a control did not produce anthocyanins. A genome-wide microarray analysis revealed that nearly 66 and 65% of genes in the genome were expressed in the red cells and wild-type cells, respectively. In comparison with the WT cells, 3.2% of expressed genes in the red cells were differentially expressed. The expression levels of 14 genes involved in the biosynthetic pathway of anthocyanin were significantly higher in the red cells than in the WT cells. Microarray and RT-PCR analyses demonstrated that the TTG1-GL3/TT8-PAP1 complex regulated the biosynthesis of anthocyanins. Furthermore, most of the genes with significant differential expression levels in the red cells versus the WT cells were characterized with diverse biochemical functions, many of which were mapped to different metabolic pathways (e.g., ribosomal protein biosynthesis, photosynthesis, glycolysis, glyoxylate metabolism, and plant secondary metabolisms) or organelles (e.g., chloroplast). We suggest that the difference in gene expression profiles between the two cell lines likely results from cell types, the overexpression of PAP1, and the high metabolic flux toward anthocyanins.

  7. Red blood cell and iron metabolism during space flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Scott M.

    2002-01-01

    Space flight anemia is a widely recognized phenomenon in astronauts. Reduction in circulating red blood cells and plasma volume results in a 10% to 15% decrement in circulatory volume. This effect appears to be a normal physiologic adaptation to weightlessness and results from the removal of newly released blood cells from the circulation. Iron availability increases, and (in the few subjects studied) iron stores increase during long-duration space flight. The consequences of these changes are not fully understood.

  8. Shear stress-induced improvement of red blood cell deformability

    OpenAIRE

    Meram, Ece; Yılmaz, Bahar D.; Bas, Ceren; Atac, Nazlı; Yalçın, Ö.; Başkurt, Oguz K.; Meiselman, Herbert J.

    2013-01-01

    Classically, it is known that red blood cell (RBC) deformability is determined by the geometric and material properties of these cells. Experimental evidence accumulated during the last decade has introduced the concept of active regulation of RBC deformability. This regulation is mainly related to altered associations between membrane skeletal proteins and integral proteins, with the latter serving to anchor the skeleton to the lipid matrix. It has been hypothesized that shear stress induces...

  9. 赤泥堆场岩溶渗漏治理%Treatment of karst seepage in red mud storage site

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴松明

    2014-01-01

    Seepage is always a problem in red mud storage site.Seepage is inevitable in red mud storage site of karst area because of karst fissures and conduits,and the seepage-proofing treatment is a complicated and systematic project.Strongly alkaline (pH of solution ≥12)liquids or solids will have worse effect on envi-ronment if the fluid waste is seeped.The comprehensive seepage-proofing treatment methods of karst seep-age conduits in red mud storage site include vertical curtain grouting,in-site aven plugging and red mud blan-keting.The comparison of permeability of strata and water quality at outflow points before and after grou-ting shows that the seepage-proofing treatment is effective.%渗漏问题一直是赤泥堆场的一个难题。在岩溶地区的赤泥堆场,因岩溶裂隙管道的存在,渗漏的产生是必然的,而防渗处理又是一个比较复杂、系统的工程。而对堆存强碱性(溶液的 pH 值≥12)液、固体物的堆场,若发生废液外渗,其对环境的危害及影响都较大。对赤泥堆场岩溶渗漏通道采取垂直帷幕注浆、场内封堵落水洞、赤泥铺盖等综合防渗措施进行治理,通过灌浆前后地层的渗透性对比和泉点水质监测,结果表明防渗治理的效果很好。

  10. Mechanopathology of red blood cell diseases—Why mechanics matters

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    During the onset of a disease a cell may experience alterations in both the composition and organization of its cellular and molecular structures.These alterations may eventually lead to changes in its geometrical and mechanical properties such as cell size and shape,deformability and adhesion.As such,knowing how diseased cells respond to mechanical forces can reveal ways by which they differ from healthy ones.Here,we will present biomechanistic insights into red blood cell related diseases that manifest...

  11. Backward elastic light scattering of malaria infected red blood cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seungjun; Lu, Wei

    2011-08-01

    We investigated the backward light scattering pattern of healthy and malaria (Plasmodium falciparum) parasitized red blood cells. The spectrum could clearly distinguish between predominant ring stage infected blood cells and healthy blood cells. Further, we found that infected samples mixed with different stages of P. falciparum showed different signals, suggesting that even variance in parasite stages could also be detected by the spectrum. These results together with the backward scattering technique suggest the potential of non-invasive diagnosis of malaria through light scattering of blood cells near the surface of human body, such as using eyes or skin surface.

  12. Characterization of dsRed2-positive cells in the doublecortin-dsRed2 transgenic adult rat retina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trost, A; Schroedl, F; Marschallinger, J; Rivera, F J; Bogner, B; Runge, C; Couillard-Despres, S; Aigner, L; Reitsamer, H A

    2014-12-01

    Doublecortin (DCX) is predominantly expressed in neuronal precursor cells and young immature neurons of the developing and adult brain, where it is involved in neuronal differentiation, migration and plasticity. Moreover, its expression pattern reflects neurogenesis, and transgenic DCX promoter-driven reporter models have been previously used to investigate adult neurogenesis. In this study, we characterize dsRed2 reporter protein-expressing cells in the adult retina of the transgenic DCX promoter-dsRed2 rat model, with the aim to identify cells with putative neurogenic activity. Additionally, we confirmed the expression of the dsRed2 protein in DCX-expressing cells in the adult hippocampal dentate gyrus. Adult DCX-dsRed2 rat retinas were analyzed by immunohistochemistry for expression of DCX, NF200, Brn3a, Sox2, NeuN, calbindin, calretinin, PKC-a, Otx2, ChAT, PSA-NCAM and the glial markers GFAP and CRALBP, followed by confocal laser-scanning microscopy. In addition, brain sections of transgenic rats were analyzed for dsRed2 expression and co-localization with DCX, NeuN, GFAP and Sox2 in the cortex and dentate gyrus. Endogenous DCX expression in the adult retina was confined to horizontal cells, and these cells co-expressed the DCX promoter-driven dsRed2 reporter protein. In addition, we encountered dsRed2 expression in various other cell types in the retina: retinal ganglion cells (RGCs), a subpopulation of amacrine cells, a minority of bipolar cells and in perivascular cells. Since also RGCs expressed dsRed2, the DCX-dsRed2 rat model might offer a useful tool to study RGCs in vivo under various conditions. Müller glial cells, which have previously been identified as cells with stem cell features and with neurogenic potential, did express neither endogenous DCX nor the dsRed2 reporter. However, and surprisingly, we identified a perivascular glial cell type expressing the dsRed2 reporter, enmeshed with the glia/stem cell marker GFAP and colocalizing with the

  13. Energy storage in ultrathin solid oxide fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Overmeere, Quentin; Kerman, Kian; Ramanathan, Shriram

    2012-07-11

    The power output of hydrogen fuel cells quickly decreases to zero if the fuel supply is interrupted. We demonstrate thin film solid oxide fuel cells with nanostructured vanadium oxide anodes that generate power for significantly longer time than reference porous platinum anode thin film solid oxide fuel cells when the fuel supply is interrupted. The charge storage mechanism was investigated quantitatively with likely identified contributions from the oxidation of the vanadium oxide anode, its hydrogen storage properties, and different oxygen concentration at the electrodes. Fuel cells capable of storing charge even for short periods of time could contribute to ultraminiaturization of power sources for mobile energy.

  14. Membranotropic photobiomodulation on red blood cell deformability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Gang-Yue; Zhao, Yan-Ping; Liu, Timon C.; Liu, Song-Hao

    2007-05-01

    To assess modulation of laser on erythrocyte permeability and deformability via cell morphology changes, healthy human echinocytes with shrinking size and high plasmic viscosity due to cellular dehydration were treated with 1 mW, 2 mW, 3 mW, and 5 mW laser power exposure respectively. Image analyzing system on single intact erythrocyte was applied for measuring comprehensive cell morphological parameters (surface area, external membrane perimeter, circle index and elongation index) that were determined by the modulation of erythrocyte water permeability and deformability to detect relationship between erythrocyte water permeability alteration and deformability. Our preliminary experiment showed that exposure under light dose of 5 mW for 5 min could induce more active erythrocyte swelling and deformation. water channel aquaporin-1(AQP-1) was inhibited by the incubation of HgCl II in the presence and absence of 5 mW laser irradiation. The result suggested that osmotic water permeability is a primary factor in the procedure of erythrocyte deformability. In addition, no modulation of laser(5mW) on erythrocyte deformability had been found when the echinocytes were cultured with GDP-β-S (G protein inhibitor).

  15. Properties of donated red blood cell components from patients with hereditary hemochromatosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sut, Caroline; Hamzeh-Cognasse, Hind; Laradi, Sandrine; Bost, Vincent; Aubrège, Christine; Acquart, Sophie; Vignal, Martine; Boutahar, Nadia; Arthaud, Charles Antoine; Ange Eyraud, Marie; Pozzetto, Bruno; Tiberghien, Pierre; Garraud, Olivier; Cognasse, Fabrice

    2017-01-01

    Red blood cells (RBCs) contain large amounts of iron, and periodic therapeutic phlebotomy is thus the main treatment for hereditary hemochromatosis (HH). However, the donation of therapeutic phlebotomy products from asymptomatic patients for transfusion purposes remains controversial. In this study, we compared the quality of RBCs obtained from HH patients with those of non-HH RBCs, within the allowed 42-day storage period. RBCs were obtained from HH patient donors and random regular blood donors by whole blood collection. RBCs were stored for up to 42 days, according to national regulations and standard blood bank conditions in France. The following variables were assessed: hematologic and biochemical results, RBC membrane and soluble inflammatory markers, and the proinflammatory potential of HH RBC supernatant toward endothelial cells in an in vitro model. There were no major differences between the two groups in terms of biophysical, biochemical, or soluble immunomodulatory factors. However, we observed small but significant differences in changes in RBC membrane proteins during storage, including increased phosphatidylserine expression and decreased hemolysis in HH compared with normal RBCs. However, there were no differences in terms of bioactivity of soluble immunomodulatory factors in the RBC supernatant during storage between HH and control donors, as determined by their effects on endothelial cells in vitro. These in vitro studies suggest that RBCs from HH patients appear, while exhibiting subtle differences, to be suitable for transfusion purposes according to currently accepted criteria. © 2016 AABB.

  16. Partitioning of red blood cell aggregates in bifurcating microscale flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaliviotis, E.; Sherwood, J. M.; Balabani, S.

    2017-03-01

    Microvascular flows are often considered to be free of red blood cell aggregates, however, recent studies have demonstrated that aggregates are present throughout the microvasculature, affecting cell distribution and blood perfusion. This work reports on the spatial distribution of red blood cell aggregates in a T-shaped bifurcation on the scale of a large microvessel. Non-aggregating and aggregating human red blood cell suspensions were studied for a range of flow splits in the daughter branches of the bifurcation. Aggregate sizes were determined using image processing. The mean aggregate size was marginally increased in the daughter branches for a range of flow rates, mainly due to the lower shear conditions and the close cell and aggregate proximity therein. A counterintuitive decrease in the mean aggregate size was apparent in the lower flow rate branches. This was attributed to the existence of regions depleted by aggregates of certain sizes in the parent branch, and to the change in the exact flow split location in the T-junction with flow ratio. The findings of the present investigation may have significant implications for microvascular flows and may help explain why the effects of physiological RBC aggregation are not deleterious in terms of in vivo vascular resistance.

  17. Temperature-dependent haemolytic propensity of CPDA-1 stored red blood cells vs whole blood - Red cell fragility as donor signature on blood units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tzounakas, Vassilis L; Anastasiadi, Alkmini T; Karadimas, Dimitrios G; Zeqo, Redisa A; Georgatzakou, Hara T; Pappa, Olga D; Papatzitze, Olga A; Stamoulis, Konstantinos E; Papassideri, Issidora S; Antonelou, Marianna H; Kriebardis, Anastasios G

    2017-09-01

    To preserve cellular integrity and avoid bacterial growth, storage and transfer of blood and blood products follow strict guidelines in terms of temperature control. We evaluated the impact of ineligible warming of whole blood donations on the quality of blood components. One-hundred and twenty units of whole blood (WB) from eligible blood donors were collected in CPDA-1 and stored at 4±2 °C. During shipment to the blood processing centre, a gradual warming up to 17 °C was recorded within a period of less than eight hours. The warmed units were processed to packed red blood cells (PRBCs) or stored as WB units at 4±2 °C. In-bag haemolysis, osmotic fragility (mean corpuscular fragility, MCF) and bacterial growth were assessed in blood and blood components throughout the storage period. Normal basal and early storage levels of haemolysis were recorded in both PRBC and WB units. Thereafter, PRBCs exhibited higher average in-bag haemolysis and MCF index compared to the WB units throughout the storage. Moreover, 14.3 and 52.4% of the PRBC units exceeded the upper permissible limit of 0.8% haemolysis at the middle (1.220±0.269%) or late (1.754±0.866%) storage period, respectively. MCF index was similar in all PRBCs at the middle of storage but significantly lower in the non-haemolysed compared to the haemolysed units of PRBCs on the last days. The fragility of stored RBCs was proportional to the donor-related values of day 2 samples (r=0.861, punits of PRBCs. Transient, gradient warming of whole blood from 4 to 17 °C led to increased incidence of in-bag haemolysis in PRBC but not in WB units. Haemolysis is a multi-parametric phenotype of stored blood, and MCF is a donor-related and highly dynamic measure that can, in part, predict the storage lesion.

  18. Comparison of frozen versus desiccated reference human red blood cells for hemagglutination assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, David; Schierts, Jennifer; Zimmerman, Zea; Gadsden, Isaac; Bruttig, Stephen

    2009-10-01

    Red blood cells (RBCs) are commonly used fresh or stored in frozen format for identification of patients' antibodies and serologic specificity of such antibodies at reference laboratories. However, maintaining a large pool of fresh RBCs is impossible in a blood-banking environment and blood in frozen format poses a logistic disadvantage in terms of accessibility, maintenance cost, safety, and sample recovery. This study explores an alternative, desiccation storage method for RBCs to provide a reagent that supports greater utilization and flexibility for reference laboratories. RBCs from five donors were used in the study. RBCs were processed and kept in either frozen or desiccated format. Study variables for either the frozen or the desiccated cells included cell recovery as quantified by cell counts, gross microscopic examination, and hemagglutination assays. The mean percentage of cell recovery for thawed and washed frozen RBCs was 20% versus 50% for rehydrated and washed desiccated RBCs. Microscopic examination of thawed cells from the frozen preparation showed cells with irregular shapes, a sharp contrast when compared with rehydrated cells from the desiccated preparation, where cells are mostly intact, smooth surface, and biconcave in structure. Cells in both preparations performed well in manual agglutination tests. Desiccation preservation of RBCs provides a somewhat better RBC recovery and cell structure stability, while maintaining the necessary antigen-antibody reactions for cell surface markers, which will allow desiccated RBCs to be archived in blood collecting and processing reference laboratories.

  19. Cell Registration and Flickering Detection for the Complexity Analysis of Red Blood Cell Dynamics with GSM Exposure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Tong-ning; ZHANG Chen; LV Bin; YANG Lei

    2015-01-01

    Red blood cells (RBC)' flickering present the dynamic properties of the cytomembrane. Its complexity could be used for aging analysis or the evaluation for the storage quality. The flickering activity is a kind of reversible perpendicular motion of the specified pixel. Therefore, the complexity analysis depends on the reliable detection of temporal variation for the gray-scale values from each pixel of the cells. In this paper, we improved our previous work on the screening of the horizontal drifted cells with a surface based on cell registration method and the effect of GSM exposure to the dynamic properties of the RBCs in terms of multi-scale sample entropy was presented in the paper.

  20. Nature of the elements transporting long-chain fatty acids through the red cell membrane

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bojesen, Inge Norby; Bojesen, Eigil

    1998-01-01

    Docosahexaenoic acid, linoleic acid, red cell membrane, transporting elements, transport kinetics, fatty acid transport......Docosahexaenoic acid, linoleic acid, red cell membrane, transporting elements, transport kinetics, fatty acid transport...

  1. A method for making a storage cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanakhasi, K.; Ivaki, T.

    1983-03-17

    The electrode unit is placed in a tank and water is poured into it until the electrodes are completely submerged. A liquid is poured in from above which is a solution of a synthetic resin of the polyvinylchloride type in a solvent insoluble in water of the tetrahydrofurane type. The solvent spreads along the surface of the water. The resin is removed, hardening and forming a porous layer on the wave shaped coagulated flakes. Then the liquid is poured off, passing through the pores of the resin layer. The water is replaced by an electrolyte. The layer of resin prevent splashing and excess evaporation of the electrolyte. A plug with a catalyst for recombining the gases formed in the storage device may be installed additionally in the storage device.

  2. Effect of reconstructive vascular surgery on red cell deformability--preliminary results.

    OpenAIRE

    Irwin, S. T.; Rocks, M J; McGuigan, J. A.; Patterson, C C; Morris, T. C.; O'Reilly, M J

    1983-01-01

    Using a simple filtration method, red cell deformability was measured in healthy control subjects and in patients with peripheral vascular disease. Impaired red cell deformability was demonstrated in patients with rest pain or gangrene and in patients with intermittent claudication. An improvement in red cell deformability was demonstrated after successful reconstructive vascular surgery in both patient groups. An improvement in red cell deformability was demonstrated in patients undergoing m...

  3. Multiscale Modeling of Red Blood Cells Squeezing through Submicron Slits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Zhangli; Lu, Huijie

    2016-11-01

    A multiscale model is applied to study the dynamics of healthy red blood cells (RBCs), RBCs in hereditary spherocytosis, and sickle cell disease squeezing through submicron slits. This study is motivated by the mechanical filtration of RBCs by inter-endothelial slits in the spleen. First, the model is validated by comparing the simulation results with experiments. Secondly, the deformation of the cytoskeleton in healthy RBCs is investigated. Thirdly, the mechanisms of damage in hereditary spherocytosis are investigated. Finally, the effects of cytoplasm and membrane viscosities, especially in sickle cell disease, are examined. The simulations results provided guidance for future experiments to explore the dynamics of RBCs under extreme deformation.

  4. Photodynamic treatment of red blood cell concentrates for virus inactivation enhances red blood cell aggregation: protection with antioxidants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Hur, E; Barshtein, G; Chen, S; Yedgar, S

    1997-10-01

    Photodynamic treatment (PDT) using phthalocyanines and red light appears to be a promising procedure for decontamination of red blood cell (RBC) concentrates for transfusion. A possible complication of this treatment may be induced aggregation of RBC. The production of RBC aggregates was measured with a novel computerized cell flow properties analyzer (CFA). The PDT of RBC concentrates with sulfonated aluminum phthalocyanine (AIPcS4) and the silicon phthalocyanine Pc 4 under virucidal conditions markedly enhanced RBC aggregation and higher shear stress was required to disperse these aggregates. The clusters of cells were huge and abnormally shaped, unlike the rouleaux formed by untreated RBC. This aggregation was prevented when a mixture of antioxidants was included during PDT. Addition of the antioxidants after PDT reduced aggregation only partially. It is concluded that inclusion of antioxidants during PDT of RBC concentrates prior to transfusion may reduce or eliminate the hemodynamic risk that the virucidal treatment may present to the recipient.

  5. Unchanged binding of /sup 99/Molybdenum to red cell membrane proteins in hereditary spherocytosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marik, T.; Kselikova, M.; Bibr, B.; Brabec, V.; Lener, J. (Ceskoslovenska Akademie Ved, Prague. Ustav Nuklearni Biologie a Radiochemie; Institut Hygieny a Epidemiologie, Prague (Czechoslovakia))

    1983-01-01

    The interaction of /sup 99/Mo with red cell membrane proteins was found specific for spectrin both in normal red cells and those of hereditary spherocytosis. In addition, no significant quantitative differences were observed in labelling patterns between these two types of red cells, thus indicating no major alterations in the spectrin molecules of hereditary spherocytosis.

  6. Red-blood-cell alloimmunisation in relation to antigens' exposure and their immunogenicity: a cohort study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Evers, D.; Middelburg, R.A.; Haas, M. de; Zalpuri, S.; Vooght, K.M. De; Kerkhof, D. van de; Visser, O; Pequeriaux, N.C.V.; Hudig, F.; Schonewille, H.; Zwaginga, J.J.; Bom, J.G. Van Der

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Matching donor red blood cells based on recipient antigens prevents alloimmunisation. Knowledge about the immunogenicity of red-blood-cell antigens can help optimise risk-adapted matching strategies. We set out to assess the immunogenicity of red-blood-cell antigens. METHODS: In an incid

  7. Online biomedical resources for malaria-related red cell disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piel, Frédéric B; Howes, Rosalind E; Nyangiri, Oscar A; Moyes, Catherine L; Williams, Thomas N; Weatherall, David J; Hay, Simon I

    2013-07-01

    Warnings about the expected increase of the global public health burden of malaria-related red cell disorders are accruing. Past and present epidemiological data are necessary to track spatial and temporal changes in the frequencies of these genetic disorders. A number of open access biomedical databases including data on malaria-related red cell disorders have been launched over the last two decades. Here, we review the content of these databases, most of which focus on genetic diversity, and we describe a new epidemiological resource developed by the Malaria Atlas Project. To tackle upcoming public health challenges, the integration of epidemiological and genetic data is important. As many countries are considering implementing national screening programs, strategies to make such data more accessible are also needed.

  8. Color contrast of red blood cells on solid substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paiziev, Adkham A.

    2013-02-01

    In present study we developed the new method of colour visualization of red blood cells without using any chemical staining. The method based on physical phenomena a white light interference on thin transparent films. It is shown that in the case of thin human blood smears colour interference contrast occurs on solid polished substrates. The best contrast shows substrates with maximal refractive index (Mo, W, Si). These materials have been selected as substrate instead of ordinary microscopic slide in reflected light microscopy. It is shown that reflection of incident white light from blood cell surface and boundary cell-substrate generate two coherent lights. The second one (object signal) after passing through red blood cell gathers additional phase and after interference interaction with reference signal (light reflected from outer cell surface) enables cell image in colour. Number of blood smears of healthy persons (control) and patients who were diagnosed with cancer are presented. It is concluded that the offered method may be used as an effective diagnostic tool to detect early stage blood cells lesion by its interference painting in white light. Offered method may be used in research laboratories, hospitals, diagnostic centres, emergency medicine and other as complementary diagnostic tool to present convenient optical and electron microscopy technique.

  9. Studying the effect of storage conditions on the metabolite content of red wine using HILIC LC-MS based metabolomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arapitsas, Panagiotis; Corte, Anna Della; Gika, Helen; Narduzzi, Luca; Mattivi, Fulvio; Theodoridis, Georgios

    2016-04-15

    The main aim of this work was to develop an untargeted normal phase LC-MS method, starting from a targeted method already validated for the analysis of 135 polar metabolites. Since the LC instrument and column were the same, most of the chromatographic conditions remained identical, while the adaptations focused on maintaining the ionic strength of the eluents constant. The sample preparation was simplified and the effectiveness of LC-MS for long batches was evaluated, in order to record the maximum number of metabolites with good chromatographic resolution and the best MS stability and accuracy. The method was applied to study the influence of storage conditions on wine composition. Slightly sub-optimum storage conditions had a major impact on the polar metabolite fingerprint of the red wines analysed and the markers revealed included phenolics, vitamins and metabolites indentified in wine for the first time (4-amino-heptanedioic acid and its ethyl ester).

  10. Characterization of red blood cells (RBCs) using dual Brillouin/Raman micro-spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Zhaokai; Bustamante-Lopez, Sandra C.; Yakovlev, Vladislav V.; Meissner, Kenith E.

    2016-04-01

    Erythrocytes, or red blood cells, transport oxygen to and carbon dioxide from the body's tissues and organs. Red blood cell mechanical properties are altered in a number of diseases such as sickle cell anaemia and malaria. Additionally, mechanically modified red blood cell ghosts are being considered as a long-term, biocompatible carrier for drug delivery and for blood analyte sensing. Brillouin spectroscopy enables viscoelastic characterization of samples at the microscale. In this report, Brillouin spectroscopy is applied to characterize the mechanical properties of red blood cells and red blood cell ghosts.

  11. In-vitro red blood cell partitioning of doxycycline

    OpenAIRE

    P.V. Deshmukh; Badgujar, P.C.; Gatne, M.M.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: In-vitro red blood cell (RBC) partitioning of doxycycline was studied to determine whether doxycycline penetrates RBC and its concentration was assayed keeping in view its high lipophilicity. Materials and Methods: Standardization of doxycycline was performed in whole blood and plasma of cattle by microbiological assay using Bacillus subtillis ATCC 6633 as indicator organizm. Actual concentration of the drug was obtained by comparing zone inhibition with standard graph and the exte...

  12. Pure Red Cell Aplasia with Adult Onset Still's Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Nicholas Robillard; Paul Nguyen; Robert Wistaff; Mikhael Laskine

    2013-01-01

    Adult Onset Still’s Disease (AOSD) is a rare inflammatory syndrome mostly seen in young adults. Known for its wide range of clinical manifestations, AOSD often presents with nonremitting systemic signs and symptoms. Many rare case associations have been described with AOSD, but only few with pure red cell aplasia (PRCA). We are presenting a fourth known case of a young female adult with AOSD and PRCA in the literature.

  13. Hydrogen Fuel Cells and Storage Technology: Fundamental Research for Optimization of Hydrogen Storage and Utilization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perret, Bob; Heske, Clemens; Nadavalath, Balakrishnan; Cornelius, Andrew; Hatchett, David; Bae, Chusung; Pang, Tao; Kim, Eunja; Hemmers, Oliver

    2011-03-28

    Design and development of improved low-cost hydrogen fuel cell catalytic materials and high-capacity hydrogenn storage media are paramount to enabling the hydrogen economy. Presently, effective and durable catalysts are mostly precious metals in pure or alloyed form and their high cost inhibits fuel cell applications. Similarly, materials that meet on-board hydrogen storage targets within total mass and volumetric constraints are yet to be found. Both hydrogen storage performance and cost-effective fuel cell designs are intimately linked to the electronic structure, morphology and cost of the chosen materials. The FCAST Project combined theoretical and experimental studies of electronic structure, chemical bonding, and hydrogen adsorption/desorption characteristics of a number of different nanomaterials and metal clusters to develop better fundamental understanding of hydrogen storage in solid state matrices. Additional experimental studies quantified the hydrogen storage properties of synthesized polyaniline(PANI)/Pd composites. Such conducting polymers are especially interesting because of their high intrinsic electron density and the ability to dope the materials with protons, anions, and metal species. Earlier work produced contradictory results: one study reported 7% to 8% hydrogen uptake while a second study reported zero hydrogen uptake. Cost and durability of fuel cell systems are crucial factors in their affordability. Limits on operating temperature, loss of catalytic reactivity and degradation of proton exchange membranes are factors that affect system durability and contribute to operational costs. More cost effective fuel cell components were sought through studies of the physical and chemical nature of catalyst performance, characterization of oxidation and reduction processes on system surfaces. Additional development effort resulted in a new hydrocarbon-based high-performance sulfonated proton exchange membrane (PEM) that can be manufactured at low

  14. RED BLOOD CELL ABNORMALITIES IN DECOMPENSATED CHRONIC LIVER DISEASE (DCLD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anbazhagan

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Liver plays an important role in normal erythropoiesis, especially in formation and destruction of RBC’s. Chronic liver diseases are frequently associated with hematological abnormalities. Anemia of diverge etiology occurs in about 75% patients with DCLD ( 36. This can ultimately culminate in grave complications. AIM OF THE STUDY: To detect various abnormalities in Red Blood Cells and to assess the type of anemia in DCLD. METHODS: The study was conducted in 50 patients of DCLD, in Meenakshi Medical College. A detailed History, clinical examination and also Ultrasound Abdomen, GI endoscopy to establish DCLD and complete Red Blood Cell assessment was done. RESULTS AND OBSERVATION : Among the 50 patients, 40 patients (80% had anemia and only 10 pts had normal h emoglobin above 13 gms%. About 15 patients (30% had severe Anemia of less than 6 gm%. Among the 40 patients, 25 patients had normocytic normochronic anemia, 10 patients had microcytic anemia, and 4 patients had macrocytosis and only one had dimorphic anem ia. CONCLUSION : Most common Red Blood Cell abnormality in DCLD is anemia (80% and most common anemia is normochronic normocytic anemia (62.5%, while microcytic anemia and macrocytosis were common among females and Alcoholics, respectively

  15. Hemoglobin Aggregation in Single Red Blood Cells of Sickle Cell Anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishio, Izumi; Tanaka, Toyoichi; Sun, Shao-Tang; Imanishi, Yuri; Tsuyoshi Ohnishi, S.

    1983-06-01

    A laser light scattering technique was used to observe the extent of hemoglobin aggregation in solitary red blood cells of sickle cell anemia. Hemoglobin aggregation was confirmed in deoxygenated cells. The light scattering technique can also be applied to cytoplasmic studies of any biological cell.

  16. Training the next generation analyst using red cell analytics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Meghan N.; Graham, Jacob L.

    2016-05-01

    We have seen significant change in the study and practice of human reasoning in recent years from both a theoretical and methodological perspective. Ubiquitous communication coupled with advances in computing and a plethora of analytic support tools have created a push for instantaneous reporting and analysis. This notion is particularly prevalent in law enforcement, emergency services and the intelligence community (IC), where commanders (and their civilian leadership) expect not only a birds' eye view of operations as they occur, but a play-by-play analysis of operational effectiveness. This paper explores the use of Red Cell Analytics (RCA) as pedagogy to train the next-gen analyst. A group of Penn State students in the College of Information Sciences and Technology at the University Park campus of The Pennsylvania State University have been practicing Red Team Analysis since 2008. RCA draws heavily from the military application of the same concept, except student RCA problems are typically on non-military in nature. RCA students utilize a suite of analytic tools and methods to explore and develop red-cell tactics, techniques and procedures (TTPs), and apply their tradecraft across a broad threat spectrum, from student-life issues to threats to national security. The strength of RCA is not always realized by the solution but by the exploration of the analytic pathway. This paper describes the concept and use of red cell analytics to teach and promote the use of structured analytic techniques, analytic writing and critical thinking in the area of security and risk and intelligence training.

  17. Optimization of Storage Temperature for Cultured ARPE-19 Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lara Pasovic

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The establishment of future retinal pigment epithelium (RPE replacement therapy is partly dependent on the availability of tissue-engineered RPE cells, which may be enhanced by the development of suitable storage methods for RPE. This study investigates the effect of different storage temperatures on the viability, morphology, and phenotype of cultured RPE. Methods. ARPE-19 cells were cultured under standard conditions and stored in HEPES-buffered MEM at nine temperatures (4°C, 8°C, 12°C, 16°C, 20°C, 24°C, 28°C, 32°C, and 37°C for seven days. Viability and phenotype were assessed by a microplate fluorometer and epifluorescence microscopy, while morphology was analyzed by scanning electron microscopy. Results. The percentage of viable cells preserved after storage was highest in the 16°C group (48.7%±9.8%; P<0.01 compared to 4°C, 8°C, and 24°C–37°C; P<0.05 compared to 12°C. Ultrastructure was best preserved at 12°C, 16°C, and 20°C. Expression of actin, ZO-1, PCNA, caspase-3, and RPE65 was maintained after storage at 16°C compared to control cells that were not stored. Conclusion. Out of nine temperatures tested between 4°C and 37°C, storage at 12°C, 16°C, and 20°C was optimal for maintenance of RPE cell viability, morphology, and phenotype. The preservation of RPE cells is critically dependent on storage temperature.

  18. Quality of Red Blood Cells Isolated from Umbilical Cord Blood Stored at Room Temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariia Zhurova

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Red blood cells (RBCs from cord blood contain fetal hemoglobin that is predominant in newborns and, therefore, may be more appropriate for neonatal transfusions than currently transfused adult RBCs. Post-collection, cord blood can be stored at room temperature for several days before it is processed for stem cells isolation, with little known about how these conditions affect currently discarded RBCs. The present study examined the effect of the duration cord blood spent at room temperature and other cord blood characteristics on cord RBC quality. RBCs were tested immediately after their isolation from cord blood using a broad panel of quality assays. No significant decrease in cord RBC quality was observed during the first 65 hours of storage at room temperature. The ratio of cord blood to anticoagulant was associated with RBC quality and needs to be optimized in future. This knowledge will assist in future development of cord RBC transfusion product.

  19. Dealcoholated red wine induces autophagic and apoptotic cell death in an osteosarcoma cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tedesco, I; Russo, M; Bilotto, S; Spagnuolo, C; Scognamiglio, A; Palumbo, R; Nappo, A; Iacomino, G; Moio, L; Russo, G L

    2013-10-01

    Until recently, the supposed preventive effects of red wine against cardiovascular diseases, the so-called "French Paradox", has been associated to its antioxidant properties. The interest in the anticancer capacity of polyphenols present in red wine strongly increased consequently to the enormous number of studies on resveratrol. In this study, using lyophilized red wine, we present evidence that its anticancer effect in a cellular model is mediated by apoptotic and autophagic cell death. Using a human osteosarcoma cell line, U2Os, we found that the lyophilized red wine was cytotoxic in a dose-dependent manner with a maximum effect in the range of 100-200 μg/ml equivalents of gallic acid. A mixed phenotype of types I/II cell death was evidenced by means of specific assays following treatment of U2Os with lyophilized red wine, e.g., autophagy and apoptosis. We found that cell death induced by lyophilized red wine proceeded through a mechanism independent from its anti-oxidant activity and involving the inhibition of PI3K/Akt kinase signaling. Considering the relative low concentration of each single bioactive compound in lyophilized red wine, our study suggests the activation of synergistic mechanism able to inhibit growth in malignant cells.

  20. Red blood cell folate vitamer distribution in healthy subjects is determined by the methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase C677T polymorphism and by the total folate status

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smulders, Y.M.; Smith, D.E.C.; Kok, R.M.; Teerlink, T.; Gellekink, H.; Vaes, W.H.J.; Stehouwer, C.D.A.; Jakobs, C.

    2007-01-01

    Background: Red blood cells (RBCs) represent a storage pool for folate. In contrast to plasma, RBC folate can appear in different biochemical isoforms. So far, only the methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) 677 TT genotype has been identified as a determinant of RBC folate vitamer

  1. Cold storage and cryopreservation of tick cell lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lallinger Gertrud

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tick cell lines are now available from fifteen ixodid and argasid species of medical and veterinary importance. However, some tick cell lines can be difficult to cryopreserve, and improved protocols for short- and long-term low temperature storage will greatly enhance their use as tools in tick and tick-borne pathogen research. In the present study, different protocols were evaluated for cold storage and cryopreservation of tick cell lines derived from Rhipicephalus (Boophilus decoloratus, Rhipicephalus (Boophilus microplus, Ixodes ricinus and Ixodes scapularis. For short-term cold storage, cells were kept under refrigeration at 6°C for 15, 30 and 45 days. For cryopreservation in liquid nitrogen, use of a sucrose-phosphate-glutamate freezing buffer (SPG as cryoprotectant was compared with dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO supplemented with sucrose. Cell viability was determined by the trypan blue exclusion test and cell morphology was evaluated in Giemsa-stained cytocentrifuge smears. Results Cold storage at 6°C for up to 30 days was successful in preserving R. (B. microplus, R. (B. decoloratus, I. ricinus and I. scapularis cell lines; lines from the latter three species could be easily re-cultivated after 45 days under refrigeration. While cell lines from all four tick species cryopreserved with 6% DMSO were successfully resuscitated, the R. (B. decoloratus cells did not survive freezing in SPG and of the other three species, only the R. (B. microplus cells resumed growth during the observation period. Conclusions This constitutes the first report on successful short-term refrigeration of cells derived from R. (B. decoloratus, R. (B. microplus, and I. ricinus, and use of SPG as an alternative to DMSO for cryopreservation, thus making an important contribution to more reliable and convenient tick cell culture maintenance.

  2. Hydrogen Storage Needs for Early Motive Fuel Cell Markets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurtz, J.; Ainscough, C.; Simpson, L.; Caton, M.

    2012-11-01

    The National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NREL) objective for this project is to identify performance needs for onboard energy storage of early motive fuel cell markets by working with end users, manufacturers, and experts. The performance needs analysis is combined with a hydrogen storage technology gap analysis to provide the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Fuel Cell Technologies Program with information about the needs and gaps that can be used to focus research and development activities that are capable of supporting market growth.

  3. Flow of Red Blood Cells in Stenosed Microvessels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vahidkhah, Koohyar; Balogh, Peter; Bagchi, Prosenjit

    2016-06-01

    A computational study is presented on the flow of deformable red blood cells in stenosed microvessels. It is observed that the Fahraeus-Lindqvist effect is significantly enhanced due to the presence of a stenosis. The apparent viscosity of blood is observed to increase by several folds when compared to non-stenosed vessels. An asymmetric distribution of the red blood cells, caused by geometric focusing in stenosed vessels, is observed to play a major role in the enhancement. The asymmetry in cell distribution also results in an asymmetry in average velocity and wall shear stress along the length of the stenosis. The discrete motion of the cells causes large time-dependent fluctuations in flow properties. The root-mean-square of flow rate fluctuations could be an order of magnitude higher than that in non-stenosed vessels. Several folds increase in Eulerian velocity fluctuation is also observed in the vicinity of the stenosis. Surprisingly, a transient flow reversal is observed upstream a stenosis but not downstream. The asymmetry and fluctuations in flow quantities and the flow reversal would not occur in absence of the cells. It is concluded that the flow physics and its physiological consequences are significantly different in micro- versus macrovascular stenosis.

  4. Evaluation of Stem Cell-Derived Red Blood Cells as a Transfusion Product Using a Novel Animal Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Sandeep N; Gelderman, Monique P; Lewis, Emily M A; Farrel, John; Wood, Francine; Strader, Michael Brad; Alayash, Abdu I; Vostal, Jaroslav G

    2016-01-01

    Reliance on volunteer blood donors can lead to transfusion product shortages, and current liquid storage of red blood cells (RBCs) is associated with biochemical changes over time, known as 'the storage lesion'. Thus, there is a need for alternative sources of transfusable RBCs to supplement conventional blood donations. Extracorporeal production of stem cell-derived RBCs (stemRBCs) is a potential and yet untapped source of fresh, transfusable RBCs. A number of groups have attempted RBC differentiation from CD34+ cells. However, it is still unclear whether these stemRBCs could eventually be effective substitutes for traditional RBCs due to potential differences in oxygen carrying capacity, viability, deformability, and other critical parameters. We have generated ex vivo stemRBCs from primary human cord blood CD34+ cells and compared them to donor-derived RBCs based on a number of in vitro parameters. In vivo, we assessed stemRBC circulation kinetics in an animal model of transfusion and oxygen delivery in a mouse model of exercise performance. Our novel, chronically anemic, SCID mouse model can evaluate the potential of stemRBCs to deliver oxygen to tissues (muscle) under resting and exercise-induced hypoxic conditions. Based on our data, stem cell-derived RBCs have a similar biochemical profile compared to donor-derived RBCs. While certain key differences remain between donor-derived RBCs and stemRBCs, the ability of stemRBCs to deliver oxygen in a living organism provides support for further development as a transfusion product.

  5. The effect of gamma radiation on the lipid profile of irradiated red blood cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maia, Grazielle Aparecida Silva; Renó, Cristiane de Oliveira; Medina, Jorge Mansur; Silveira, Alan Barbosa da; Mignaco, Julio Alberto; Atella, Georgia Correa; Cortes, Vanessa Faria; Barbosa, Leandro Augusto; Santos, Hérica de Lima

    2014-05-01

    An investigation into the effects of irradiation and of the storage time on aging and quality are a relevant issue to ensure the safety and the efficiency of irradiation in the prevention of transfusion-associated graft-versus-host disease (TA-GVHD). In this work, the biochemical properties and alterations presented by erythrocyte membranes, up to 28-days post-irradiation, with a dose of 25 Gy, were studied as a function of storage and post-irradiation time. There was a considerable variation in the total of phospholipid content, when comparing the control and irradiated samples, mostly from the third day onwards; and at the same time, the effect occurred as a function on the storage time of blood bags. The levels of total cholesterol decreased 3-9 days after irradiation. TBARS levels were increased after irradiation and 7 days of storage, but no increment of catalase activity was observed after the irradiation. Furthermore, the protein profile was maintained throughout the irradiation and storage time, until the 21st day, with the presence of a protein fragmentation band of around 28 kDa on the 28th day. In conclusion, although gamma irradiation is the main agent for the prevention of TA-GVHD, a better understanding of the physical and biochemical properties of erythrocytes are necessary to better assess their viability, and to be able to issue more secure recommendations on the shelf life of blood bags, and the safe use of the irradiated red cells therein.

  6. Magnetic Cobalt Ferrite Nanocrystals For an Energy Storage Concentration Cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Qilin; Patel, Ketan; Donatelli, Greg; Ren, Shenqiang

    2016-08-22

    Energy-storage concentration cells are based on the concentration gradient of redox-active reactants; the increased entropy is transformed into electric energy as the concentration gradient reaches equilibrium between two half cells. A recyclable and flow-controlled magnetic electrolyte concentration cell is now presented. The hybrid inorganic-organic nanocrystal-based electrolyte, consisting of molecular redox-active ligands adsorbed on the surface of magnetic nanocrystals, leads to a magnetic-field-driven concentration gradient of redox molecules. The energy storage performance of concentration cells is dictated by magnetic characteristics of cobalt ferrite nanocrystal carriers. The enhanced conductivity and kinetics of redox-active electrolytes could further induce a sharp concentration gradient to improve the energy density and voltage switching of magnetic electrolyte concentration cells. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Trapping red blood cells in living animals using optical tweezers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Min-Cheng; Wei, Xun-Bin; Zhou, Jin-Hua; Wang, Zi-Qiang; Li, Yin-Mei

    2013-01-01

    The recent development of non-invasive imaging techniques has enabled the visualization of molecular events underlying cellular processes in live cells. Although microscopic objects can be readily manipulated at the cellular level, additional physiological insight is likely to be gained by manipulation of cells in vivo, which has not been achieved so far. Here we use infrared optical tweezers to trap and manipulate red blood cells within subdermal capillaries in living mice. We realize a non-contact micro-operation that results in the clearing of a blocked microvessel. Furthermore, we estimate the optical trap stiffness in the capillary. Our work expands the application of optical tweezers to the study of live cell dynamics in animals.

  8. Of macrophages and red blood cells; a complex love story.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Djuna Zoe de Back

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Macrophages tightly control the production and clearance of red blood cells (RBC. During steady state haematopoiesis, approximately 1010 red blood cells are produced per hour within erythroblastic islands in humans. In these erythroblastic islands, resident bone marrow macrophages provide erythroblasts with interactions that are essential for erythroid development. New evidence suggests that not only under homeostasis but also under stress conditions, macrophages play an important role in promoting erythropoiesis. Once RBC have matured, these cells remain in circulation for about 120 days. At the end of their life span, RBC are cleared by macrophages residing in the spleen and the liver. Current theories about the removal of senescent RBC and the essential role of macrophages will be discussed as well as the role of macrophages in facilitating the removal of damaged cellular content from the RBC. In this review we will provide an overview on the role of macrophages in the regulation of RBC production, maintenance and clearance. In addition, we will discuss the interactions between these two cell types during transfer of immune complexes and pathogens from RBC to macrophages.

  9. Metabolic profiling of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells during proliferation and differentiation into red blood cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daud, Hasbullah; Browne, Susan; Al-Majmaie, Rasoul; Murphy, William; Al-Rubeai, Mohamed

    2016-01-25

    An understanding of the metabolic profile of cell proliferation and differentiation should support the optimization of culture conditions for hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell (HSPC) proliferation, differentiation, and maturation into red blood cells. We have evaluated the key metabolic parameters during each phase of HSPC culture for red blood cell production in serum-supplemented (SS) and serum-free (SF) conditions. A simultaneous decrease in growth rate, total protein content, cell size, and the percentage of cells in the S/G2 phase of cell cycle, as well as an increase in the percentage of cells with a CD71(-)/GpA(+) surface marker profile, indicates HSPC differentiation into red blood cells. Compared with proliferating HSPCs, differentiating HSPCs showed significantly lower glucose and glutamine consumption rates, lactate and ammonia production rates, and amino acid consumption and production rates in both SS and SF conditions. Furthermore, extracellular acidification was associated with late proliferation phase, suggesting a reduced cellular metabolic rate during the transition from proliferation to differentiation. Under both SS and SF conditions, cells demonstrated a high metabolic rate with a mixed metabolism of both glycolysis and oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) in early and late proliferation, an increased dependence on OXPHOS activity during differentiation, and a shift to glycolytic metabolism only during maturation phase. These changes indicate that cell metabolism may have an important impact on the ability of HSPCs to proliferate and differentiate into red blood cells.

  10. Capacity recovery after storage negatively precharged nickel hydrogen cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowery, John E.

    1993-01-01

    Tests were conducted to investigate the recovery of capacity lost during open circuit storage of negatively precharged nickel hydrogen batteries. Four Eagle Picher RNH-90-3 cells were used in the tests. Recovery procedures and test results are presented in outline and graphic form.

  11. Capacitive Bioanodes Enable Renewable Energy Storage in Microbial Fuel Cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deeke, A.; Sleutels, T.H.J.A.; Hamelers, H.V.M.; Buisman, C.J.N.

    2012-01-01

    We developed an integrated system for storage of renewable electricity in a microbial fuel cell (MFC). The system contained a capacitive electrode that was inserted into the anodic compartment of an MFC to form a capacitive bioanode. This capacitive bioanode was compared with a noncapacitive

  12. Path dependence of lithium ion cells aging under storage conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Laisuo; Zhang, Jianbo; Huang, Jun; Ge, Hao; Li, Zhe; Xie, Fengchao; Liaw, Bor Yann

    2016-05-01

    This work investigates path dependence of lithium ion cells that are stored under static and non-static conditions. In the static storage tests, the levels of temperature and state of charge (SOC) are kept constant. The results of 12 tests from a combination of three temperatures and four SOCs show that, as expected, the cell ages faster at higher temperature and higher SOC. However, the cell aging mode, while consistent for all the evaluated temperatures, is different at 95% SOC from that at lower SOCs. In the non-static storage tests, the levels of temperature and SOC vary with time during the test process. The effect of the sequence of stress levels on cell aging is studied statistically using the statistical method of analysis of variation (ANOVA). It is found that cell capacity fade is path independent of both SOC and temperature, while cell resistance increase is path dependent on SOC and path independent of temperature. Finally, rate-based empirical aging models are adopted to fit the cell aging in the static storage tests. The aging model for capacity fade is demonstrated to be applicable to the non-static tests with errors between -3% and +3% for all the tested conditions over 180 days.

  13. A method to collect, store and issue multiple aliquots of packed red blood cells for neonatal transfusions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strauss, R G; Villhauer, P J; Cordle, D G

    1995-01-01

    Premature neonates require multiple red blood cell (RBC) transfusions. Single-donor programs have been proposed as a means to limit donor exposures, but methods must be developed to collect, store long-term and issue multiple aliquots of RBCs from a single donor. We evaluated a method by which RBCs could be collected, leukocyte depleted, repeatedly centrifuged for issuance as multiple small aliquots of high-hematocrit cells and then resuspended for continued storage throughout 42 days. The quality of RBCs handled by the method were compared to cells stored in standard fashion. Leakage of intracellular potassium, hemoglobin and lactic dehydrogenase into the extracellular fluid from RBCs processed by either method was comparable-indicating maintenance of RBC integrity. Multiple cultures, taken throughout the period of storage, were sterile to document that extensive handling did not introduce contamination. This new method appears promising as a means to provide RBCs for neonates.

  14. Pathogen Inactivation of red cells: challenges and opportunities

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Stephen J. Wagner

    2006-01-01

    @@ Introduction Virus inactivation methods for blood have been explored as a means to further reduce the risk from tested agents and to decrease the risk of emerging or variant agents for whom no deferral or effective screening methods are available. Although inactivation methods promise to reduce transfusion-related infectious disease risk, these methods are not perfect. Most techniques for pathogen reduction will not kill bacterial spores, or inactivate bacterial endotoxin, prion protein, or certain non-enveloped viruses whose tightly packed capsid proteins prevent access of the virucidal agent to its nucleic acid target. In addition,various inactivation methods have been known to decrease blood cell yield, affect blood cell recovery or survival, and may pose risk to recipients or blood center workers. My presentation today will review two methods for pathogen inactivation of red cells.

  15. Manipulation on human red blood cells with femtosecond optical tweezers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ming Zhou; Haifeng Yang; Jianke Di; Enlan Zhao

    2008-01-01

    Different types of femtosecond optical tweezers have become a powerful tool in the modern biological field. However, how to control the irregular targets, including biological cells, using femtosecond optical tweezers remains to be explored. In this study, human red blood cells (hRBCs) are manipulated with femtosecond optical tweezers, and their states under different laser powers are investigated. The results indicate that optical potential traps only can capture the edge of hRBCs under the laser power from 1.4 to 2.8 mW, while it can make hRBCs turn over with the laser power more than 2.8 roW. It is suggested that femtosecond optical tweezers could not only manipulate biological cells, but also subtly control its states by adjusting the laser power.

  16. Copper(II) complexes encapsulated in human red blood cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonomo, R P; De Flora, A; Rizzarelli, E; Santoro, A M; Tabbí, G; Tonetti, M

    1995-09-01

    Copper(II) complexes were encapsulated in human red blood cells in order to test their possible use as antioxidant drugs by virtue of their labile character. ESR spectroscopy was used to verify whether encapsulation in red blood cells leads to the modification of such complexes. With copper(II) complexes bound to dipeptides or tripeptides, an interaction with hemoglobin was found to be present, the hemoglobin having a strong coordinative site formed by four nitrogen donor atoms. Instead, with copper(II) complexes with TAD or PheANN3, which have the greatest stability. ESR spectra always showed the original species. Only the copper(II) complex with GHL gave rise to a complicated behavior, which contained signals from iron(III) species probably coming from oxidative processes. Encapsulation of all copper(II) complexes in erythrocytes caused a slight oxidative stress, compared to the unloaded and to the native cells. However, no significant differences were observed in the major metabolic properties (GSH, glycolytic rate, hexose monophosphate shunt, Ca(2+)-ATPase) of erythrocytes loaded with different copper(II) complexes, with the exception of methemoglobin levels, which were markedly increased in the case of [Cu(GHL)H-1] compared to [Cu(TAD)]. This latter finding suggests that methemoglobin formation can be affected by the type of complex used for encapsulation, depending on the direct interaction of the copper(II) complex with hemoglobin.

  17. Structural analysis of red blood cell aggregates under shear flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chesnutt, J K W; Marshall, J S

    2010-03-01

    A set of measures of red blood cell (RBC) aggregates are developed and applied to examine the aggregate structure under plane shear and channel flows. Some of these measures are based on averages over the set of red blood cells which are in contact with each other at a given time. Other measures are developed by first fitting an ellipse to the planar projection of the aggregate, and then examining the area and aspect ratio of the fit ellipse as well as the orientations of constituent RBCs with respect to the fit ellipse axes. The aggregate structural measures are illustrated using a new mesoscale computational model for blood cell transport, collision and adhesion. The sensitivity of this model to change in adhesive surface energy density and shear rate on the aggregate structure is examined. It is found that the mesoscale model predictions exhibit reasonable agreement with experimental and theoretical data for blood flow in plane shear and channel flows. The new structural measures are used to examine the differences between predictions of two- and three-dimensional computations of the aggregate formation, showing that two-dimensional computations retain some of the important aspects of three-dimensional computations.

  18. Diagnosis and epidemiology of red blood cell enzyme disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Van Wijk

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The red blood cell possess an active metabolic machinery that provides the cell with energy to pump ions against electrochemical gradients, to maintain its shape, to keep hemoglobin iron in the reduced (ferrous form, and to maintain enzyme and hemoglobin sulfhydryl groups. The main source of metabolic energy comes from glucose. Glucose is metabolized through the glycolytic pathway and through the hexose monophosphate shunt. Glycolysis catabolizes glucose to pyruvate and lactate, which represent the end products of glucose metabolism in the erythrocyte. Adenosine diphosphate (ADP is phosphorylated to adenosine triphosphate (ATP, and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+ is reduced to NADH in glycolysis. 2,3- Bisphosphoglycerate, an important regulator of the oxygen affinity of hemoglobin, is generated during glycolysis by the Rapoport-Luebering shunt. The hexose monophosphate shunt oxidizes glucose-6-phosphate, reducing NADP+ to reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH. The red cell lacks the capacity for de novo purine synthesis but has a salvage pathway that permits synthesis of purine nucleotides from purine bases...

  19. The nature of multiphoton fluorescence from red blood cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saytashev, Ilyas; Murphy, Michael; Osseiran, Sam; Spence, Dana M.; Evans, Conor L.; Dantus, Marcos

    2016-03-01

    We report on the nature of multiphoton excited fluorescence observed from human erythrocytes (red blood cells RBC's) and their "ghosts" following 800nm sub-15 fs excitation. The detected optical signal is assigned as two-photon excited fluorescence from hemoglobin. Our findings are supported by wavelength-resolved fluorescence lifetime decay measurements using time-correlated single photon counting system from RBC's, their ghosts as well as in vitro samples of various fluorophores including riboflavin, NADH, NAD(P)H, hemoglobin. We find that low-energy and short-duration pulses allow two-photon imaging of RBC's, but longer more intense pulses lead to their destruction.

  20. General coarse-grained red blood cell models: I. Mechanics

    OpenAIRE

    FEDOSOV, DMITRY A.; Caswell, Bruce; Karniadakis, George E.

    2009-01-01

    We present a rigorous procedure to derive coarse-grained red blood cell (RBC) models, which lead to accurate mechanical properties of realistic RBCs. Based on a semi-analytic theory linear and non-linear elastic properties of the RBC membrane can be matched with those obtained in optical tweezers stretching experiments. In addition, we develop a nearly stress-free model which avoids a number of pitfalls of existing RBC models, such as non-biconcave equilibrium shape and dependence of RBC mech...

  1. Swinging of red blood cells under shear flow

    CERN Document Server

    Abkarian, M; Viallat, A; Abkarian, Manouk; Faivre, Magalie; Viallat, Annie

    2007-01-01

    We reveal that under moderate shear stress (of the order of 0.1 Pa) red blood cells present an oscillation of their inclination (swinging) superimposed to the long-observed steady tanktreading (TT) motion. A model based on a fluid ellipsoid surrounded by a visco-elastic membrane initially unstrained (shape memory) predicts all observed features of the motion: an increase of both swinging amplitude and period (1/2 the TT period) upon decreasing the shear stress, a shear stress-triggered transition towards a narrow shear stress-range intermittent regime of successive swinging and tumbling, and a pure tumbling motion at lower shear stress-values.

  2. Bacterial glycosidases for the production of universal red blood cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Qiyong P; Sulzenbacher, Gerlind; Yuan, Huaiping;

    2007-01-01

    Enzymatic removal of blood group ABO antigens to develop universal red blood cells (RBCs) was a pioneering vision originally proposed more than 25 years ago. Although the feasibility of this approach was demonstrated in clinical trials for group B RBCs, a major obstacle in translating...... of the alpha-N-acetylgalactosaminidase family reveals an unusual catalytic mechanism involving NAD+. The enzymatic conversion processes we describe hold promise for achieving the goal of producing universal RBCs, which would improve the blood supply while enhancing the safety of clinical transfusions....

  3. Manipulation of microparticles and red blood cells using optoelectronic tweezers

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R S Verma; R Dasgupta; N Kumar; S Ahlawat; A Uppal; P K Gupta

    2014-02-01

    We report the development of an optoelectronic tweezers set-up which works by lightinduced dielectrophoresis mechanism to manipulate microparticles. We used thermal evaporation technique for coating the organic polymer, titanium oxide phthalocyanine (TiOPc), as a photoconductive layer on ITO-coated glass slide. Compare to the conventional optical tweezers, the technique requires optical power in W range and provides a manipulation area of a few mm2. The set-up was used to manipulate the polystyrene microspheres and red blood cells (RBCs). The RBCs could be attracted or repelled by varying the frequency of the applied AC bias.

  4. THE PURE RED BLOOD CELL APLASIA IN RENAL TRANSPLANT RECIPIENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. T. Dzumabaeva

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The pure red blood cell aplasia of renal transplant recipients caused by parvovirus B19 (PB19 is characterized by persistent anemia which resistant to erythropoietin therapy, lack of reticulocytes, bone marrow hypoplasia, and clinically accompanied by severe recurrent bacterial, fungal and viral infection. In case of reactivation PB19 it is necessarv, first of all, eliminate the causes activation of this virus and to cancel or reduce the dose of drugs which depressed the normal hematopoiesis germs, thus to reduce the pancytopenia associating complications in this population. 

  5. Energy Storage: Batteries and Fuel Cells for Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzo, Michelle A.; Miller, Thomas B.; Hoberecht, Mark A.; Baumann, Eric D.

    2007-01-01

    NASA's Vision for Exploration requires safe, human-rated, energy storage technologies with high energy density, high specific energy and the ability to perform in a variety of unique environments. The Exploration Technology Development Program is currently supporting the development of battery and fuel cell systems that address these critical technology areas. Specific technology efforts that advance these systems and optimize their operation in various space environments are addressed in this overview of the Energy Storage Technology Development Project. These technologies will support a new generation of more affordable, more reliable, and more effective space systems.

  6. [Red Blood Cells Raman Spectroscopy Comparison of Type Two Diabetes Patients and Rats].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lei; Liu, Gui-dong; Mu, Xin; Xiao, Hong-bin; Qi, Chao; Zhang, Si-qi; Niu Wen-ying; Jiang, Guang-kun; Feng, Yue-nan; Bian, Jing-qi

    2015-10-01

    By using confocal Raman spectroscopy, Raman spectra were measured in normal rat red blood cells, normal human red blood cells, STZ induced diabetetic rats red blood cells, Alloxan induced diabetetic rats red blood cells and human type 2 diabetes red blood cells. Then principal component analysis (PCA) with support vector machine (SVM) classifier was used for data analysis, and then the distance between classes was used to judge the degree of close to two kinds of rat model with type 2 diabetes. The results found significant differences in the Raman spectra of red blood cell in diabetic and normal red blood cells. To diabetic red blood cells, the peak in the amide VI C=O deformation vibration band is obvious, and amide V N-H deformation vibration band spectral lines appear deviation. Belong to phospholipid fatty acyl C-C skeleton, the 1 130 cm(-1) spectral line is enhanced and the 1 088 cm(-1) spectral line is abated, which show diabetes red cell membrane permeability increased. Raman spectra of PCA combined with SVM can well separate 5 types of red blood cells. Classifier test results show that the classification accuracy is up to 100%. Through the class distance between the two induced method and human type 2 diabetes, it is found that STZ induced model is more close to human type 2 diabetes. In conclusion, Raman spectroscopy can be used for diagnosis of diabetes and rats STZ induced diabetes method is closer to human type 2 diabetes.

  7. Changes in properties of starch isolated from whole rice grains with brown, black, and red pericarp after storage at different temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziegler, Valmor; Ferreira, Cristiano Dietrich; Goebel, Jorge Tiago Schwanz; El Halal, Shanise Lisie Mello; Santetti, Gabriela Soster; Gutkoski, Luiz Carlos; Zavareze, Elessandra da Rosa; Elias, Moacir Cardoso

    2017-02-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the physicochemical, morphological, crystallinity, thermal, and pasting properties of starches isolated from rice grains with brown, black, and red pericarp. Starch was isolated from the rice grains at initial storage time, and after 6months of storage at different storage temperatures (16, 24, 32 and 40°C). Starch isolated from the grains stored for 6months at 40°C showed darker coloration, surface deformation of granules, and a significant reduction in the extraction yield, final viscosity, enthalpy, and crystallinity, independent of the grain pericarp coloration. The time and storage temperature not influence the swelling power and solubility of starch isolated from grains with brown pericarp, while for the grains with black and red pericarp there was reduction in swelling power and solubility of starches isolated of grains stored at 40°C. Grains stored at 16°C showed minimum changes in starch properties.

  8. The influence of platelets, plasma and red blood cells on functional haemostatic assays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bochsen, Louise; Johansson, Pär I.; Kristensen, Annemarie Thuri

    2011-01-01

    and combined, influenced the two methodologically different assays, thrombelastography (TEG) and impedance aggregometry (Multiplate). Platelet-rich plasma (200 × 10/l) or pure plasma (0 platelets), with and without added red blood cells (RBCs), hematocrit 0, 0.15 or 0.29, were produced in vitro from platelet...... concentrates, fresh frozen plasma and stored RBC. Pure platelets were investigated by removing plasma components from platelet concentrates by diafiltration against the platelet storage solution Intersol. Plasma was readded by diafiltration against plasma in Intersol. Haemostatic function was evaluated by TEG...... and Multiplate. In the TEG, increasing amounts of RBC reduced clot strength and clot kinetics (α-angle), most markedly in plasma/RBC without platelets. In contrast, RBC in a platelet concentrate matrix enhanced Multiplate aggregation in response to weak agonists (ADP and arachidonic acid). Furthermore, removing...

  9. Cobalt uptake and binding in human red blood cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonsen, Lars Ole; Brown, Anthony M; Harbak, Henrik; Kristensen, Berit I; Bennekou, Poul

    2011-04-15

    The basal uptake and cytoplasmic binding of cobalt was studied in human red cells using (57)Co as tracer. The basal uptake is linear with time, at a rate of about 10 μmol (l cells)(-1) h(-1) at 100 μM [Co(2+)](o), and is almost irreversible, as there is hardly any efflux into excess EDTA. Ionophore A23187 mediates a rapid equilibration of Co(2+) across the cell membrane leading to a marked accumulation, reflecting effective cytoplasmic buffering. The fraction (α(Co)) of total cell cobalt being present as free, ionized Co(2+) is estimated at α(Co)=0.01 from the equilibrium distribution of cobalt, and also from the initial slope of the cobalt buffering curve. The cobalt accumulation is similar in fed and ATP-depleted cells. The buffering curve for [Co(T)](c) can be fitted by a Michaelis type function with B(max)=24 mmol (l cells)(-1) and half-saturation at 240 μM [Co(2+)](c). The tracer influx curves are adequately fitted by single exponentials, whereas the net influx curves all require at least double exponential fits, probably due to non-stationary A23187 kinetics. The rate of tracer influx decreases with increasing cobalt concentration, and increases with delayed addition of (57)Co tracer during net uptake. This might be explained by an 'auto-inhibition' by cobalt. The kinetics for A23187-mediated net and tracer influx of (54)Mn is very similar to that of (57)Co, whereas the net influx of (65)Zn can be fitted by single exponentials. In cobalt-loaded cells the cobalt is partly reversibly bound, being releasable by excess extracellular EGTA in the presence of A23187, and partly tightly bound, remaining in the cells even at high ionophore concentrations. The tightly bound fraction builds up over time, and is larger and develops earlier in fed cells compared to ATP-depleted cells. However, all cell cobalt appears to exchange with (57)Co during tracer influx. It is speculated that oxidation of Co(2+) to Co(3+) could lead to the high affinity binding. Tight binding

  10. In vitro combinations of red blood cell, plasma and platelet components evaluated by thromboelastography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agren, Anna; Edgren, Gustaf; Kardell, Malin; Ostlund, Anders; Wikman, Agneta Taune

    2014-10-01

    Thromboelastography is increasingly used to evaluate coagulation in massively bleeding patients. The aim of this study was to investigate how different combinations of blood components affect in vitro whole blood clotting measured by thromboelastography. Packed red blood cells, plasma and platelets from fresh and old blood components were mixed in vitro, in proportions of 4:4:1, 5:5:2, 8:4:1 and 2:1:0, and analysed with thromboelastography. For the ratio 4:4:1 the experiment was done at both 37 °C and 32 °C. Thromboelastography curves were within normal reference values for the blood component proportions of 4:4:1 and 5:5:2. For 8:4:1, the angle and maximal amplitude were reduced below normal values, indicating low levels of fibrinogen and/or platelets. For the 2:1:0 proportion, all parameters were affected resulting in severely impaired in vitro clot formation. The reaction-time, reflecting the coagulation factor-dependent, initial clot formation, was slightly increased at a low temperature. Prolonged storage of the components did not affect the curve. With the introduction of guidelines on the management of massive bleeding it is important to have tools for the assessment of the new protocols. In vitro evaluation of mixtures of packed red blood cells, plasma and platelets by thromboelastography may be relevant in the prediction of in vivo clot formation and haemostasis.

  11. Carboxylated nanodiamond and re-oxygenation process of gamma irradiated red blood cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Acosta-Elias, M. [Doctorado en Nanotecnologia, Universidad de Sonora (Mexico); Sarabia-Sainz, A.; Silva-Campa, E.; Angulo-Molina, A.; Soto-Puebla, D.; Barboza-Flores, M.; Melendrez, R.; Alvarez-Garcia, S.; Pedroza-Montero, M. [Departamento de Investigacion en Fisica, Universidad de Sonora, Hermosillo (Mexico); Pedroso-Santana, S. [Doctorado en Ciencias (Fisica), Universidad de Sonora, Hermosillo (Mexico); Santacruz-Gomez, K.; Castaneda, B. [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad de Sonora, Hermosillo (Mexico)

    2015-11-15

    Nanodiamonds (NDs) possess exceptional physical, chemical, and biological properties, which make them suitable for potential biomedical applications. They are biocompatible and their usefulness as effective Raman/fluorescence probes for labeling as well as for drug delivery has been demonstrated. Related to their biocompatibility, the interaction between NDs and red blood cells (RBCs) is of great interest. In this work, the influence of carboxylated NDs (cNDs) in the re-oxygenation capability of both γ-irradiated and stored RBCs was studied. The standard 25 Gy γ dose recommended to prevent transfusion associated graft-versus-host disease was used. A 5-day maximum storage time was used to evaluate the ''storage lesion''. The hemoglobin (Hb) oxygenation state was assessed by Raman microspectroscopy and the morphologic changes on cells were tracked by optical imaging. Our results show that irradiated RBCs have a better re-oxygenation capability and morphological recovery when they are in presence of cNDs. (copyright 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  12. Red Fluorescent Carbon Nanoparticle-Based Cell Imaging Probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Haydar; Bhunia, Susanta Kumar; Dalal, Chumki; Jana, Nikhil R

    2016-04-13

    Fluorescent carbon nanoparticle-based probes with tunable visible emission are biocompatible, environment friendly and most suitable for various biomedical applications. However, synthesis of red fluorescent carbon nanoparticles and their transformation into functional nanoparticles are very challenging. Here we report red fluorescent carbon nanoparticle-based nanobioconjugates of nanoparticles are synthesized via high temperature colloid-chemical approach and transformed into water-soluble functional nanoparticles via coating with amphiphilic polymer followed by covalent linking with desired biomolecules. Following this approach, carbon nanoparticles are functionalized with polyethylene glycol, primary amine, glucose, arginine, histidine, biotin and folic acid. These functional nanoparticles can be excited with blue/green light (i.e., 400-550 nm) to capture their emission spanning from 550 to 750 nm. Arginine and folic acid functionalized nanoparticles have been demonstrated as fluorescent cell labels where blue and green excitation has been used for imaging of labeled cells. The presented method can be extended for the development of carbon nanoparticle-based other bioimaging probes.

  13. Acetylsalicylic acid and morphology of red blood cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacques Natan Grinapel Frydman

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available This work evaluated the effect of in vitro and in vivo treatment with ASA on the morphology of the red blood cells. Blood samples or Wistar rats were treated with ASA for one hour. Blood samples or animals treated with saline were used as control group. Blood smears were prepared, fixed, stained and the qualitative and quantitative morphology of red blood cells were evaluated under optical microscopy. Data showed that the in vitro treatment for one hour with ASA at higher dose used significantly (pEste trabalho avaliou o efeito do tratamento in vitro e in vivo com AAS na morfologia dos eritrócitos. Amostras de sangue ou ratos Wistar foram tratadas com AAS por uma hora. Amostras sangüíneas ou animais tratados com salina foram utilizados como grupos controle. Distensões de sangue foram preparadas, fixadas, coradas e a análise morfológica qualitativa e quantitativa dos eritrócitos foi realizada em microscópio óptico. Os dados mostraram que o tratamento in vitro por uma hora com AAS na maior dose utilizada modificou significativamente (p<0.05 a relação perímetro/área dos eritrócitos. Não foram obtidas alterações morfológicas com o tratamento in vivo. O uso do AAS em doses altas poderia interferir na forma dos eritrócitos.

  14. Geometric localization of thermal fluctuations in red blood cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Arthur A; Bhaduri, Basanta; Popescu, Gabriel; Levine, Alex J

    2017-02-27

    The thermal fluctuations of membranes and nanoscale shells affect their mechanical characteristics. Whereas these fluctuations are well understood for flat membranes, curved shells show anomalous behavior due to the geometric coupling between in-plane elasticity and out-of-plane bending. Using conventional shallow shell theory in combination with equilibrium statistical physics we theoretically demonstrate that thermalized shells containing regions of negative Gaussian curvature naturally develop anomalously large fluctuations. Moreover, the existence of special curves, "singular lines," leads to a breakdown of linear membrane theory. As a result, these geometric curves effectively partition the cell into regions whose fluctuations are only weakly coupled. We validate these predictions using high-resolution microscopy of human red blood cells (RBCs) as a case study. Our observations show geometry-dependent localization of thermal fluctuations consistent with our theoretical modeling, demonstrating the efficacy in combining shell theory with equilibrium statistical physics for describing the thermalized morphology of cellular membranes.

  15. Geometric localization of thermal fluctuations in red blood cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Arthur A.; Bhaduri, Basanta; Popescu, Gabriel; Levine, Alex J.

    2017-01-01

    The thermal fluctuations of membranes and nanoscale shells affect their mechanical characteristics. Whereas these fluctuations are well understood for flat membranes, curved shells show anomalous behavior due to the geometric coupling between in-plane elasticity and out-of-plane bending. Using conventional shallow shell theory in combination with equilibrium statistical physics we theoretically demonstrate that thermalized shells containing regions of negative Gaussian curvature naturally develop anomalously large fluctuations. Moreover, the existence of special curves, “singular lines,” leads to a breakdown of linear membrane theory. As a result, these geometric curves effectively partition the cell into regions whose fluctuations are only weakly coupled. We validate these predictions using high-resolution microscopy of human red blood cells (RBCs) as a case study. Our observations show geometry-dependent localization of thermal fluctuations consistent with our theoretical modeling, demonstrating the efficacy in combining shell theory with equilibrium statistical physics for describing the thermalized morphology of cellular membranes. PMID:28242681

  16. Transfusion of Red Blood Cells to Patients with Sepsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Yi-Ling; Han, Shih-Tsung; Li, Chih-Huang; Wu, Chin-Chieh; Chen, Kuan-Fu

    2017-09-11

    Sepsis is one of the major causes of death worldwide, and is the host response to infection which renders our organs malfunctioning. Insufficient tissue perfusion and oxygen delivery have been implicated in the pathogenesis of sepsis-related organ dysfunction, making transfusion of packed red blood cells (pRBCs) a reasonable treatment modality. However, clinical trials have generated controversial results. Even the notion that transfused pRBCs increase the oxygen-carrying capacity of blood has been challenged. Meanwhile, during sepsis, the ability of our tissues to utilize oxygen may also be reduced, and the increased blood concentrations of lactate may be the results of strong inflammation and excessive catecholamine release, rather than impaired cell respiration. Leukodepleted pRBCs more consistently demonstrated improvement in microcirculation, and the increase in blood viscosity brought about by pRBC transfusion helps maintain functional capillary density. A restrictive strategy of pRBC transfusion is recommended in treating septic patients.

  17. From stem cell to erythroblast: regulation of red cell production at multiple levels by multiple hormones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lodish, Harvey; Flygare, Johan; Chou, Song

    2010-07-01

    This article reviews the regulation of production of red blood cells at several levels: (1) the ability of erythropoietin and adhesion to a fibronectin matrix to stimulate the rapid production of red cells by inducing terminal proliferation and differentiation of committed erythroid CFU-E progenitors; (2) the regulated expansion of the pool of earlier BFU-E erythroid progenitors by glucocorticoids and other factors that occurs during chronic anemia or inflammation; and (3) the expansion of thehematopoietic cell pool to produce more progenitors of all hematopoietic lineages.

  18. DETERMINANTS OF RED-BLOOD-CELL DEFORMABILITY IN RELATION TO CELL AGE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    BOSCH, FH; WERRE, JM; ROERDINKHOLDERSTOELWINDER, B; HULS, T; WILLEKENS, FLA; WICHERS, G; HALIE, MR

    1994-01-01

    Red blood cell (RBC) deformability was determined with an ektacytometer in fractions separated on the basis of differences in cell volume or density. Deformability was measured with ektacytometry (rpm-scan and osmo-scan). We studied three groups of RBC fractions:l. By counterflow centrifugation we o

  19. Stretching and relaxation of malaria-infected red blood cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Ting; Phan-Thien, Nhan; Khoo, Boo Cheong; Lim, Chwee Teck

    2013-09-03

    The invasion of red blood cells (RBCs) by malaria parasites is a complex dynamic process, in which the infected RBCs gradually lose their deformability and their ability to recover their original shape is greatly reduced with the maturation of the parasites. In this work, we developed two types of cell model, one with an included parasite, and the other without an included parasite. The former is a representation of real malaria-infected RBCs, in which the parasite is treated as a rigid body. In the latter, where the parasite is absent, the membrane modulus and viscosity are elevated so as to produce the same features present in the parasite model. In both cases, the cell membrane is modeled as a viscoelastic triangular network connected by wormlike chains. We studied the transient behaviors of stretching deformation and shape relaxation of malaria-infected RBCs based on these two models and found that both models can generate results in agreement with those of previously published studies. With the parasite maturation, the shape deformation becomes smaller and smaller due to increasing cell rigidity, whereas the shape relaxation time becomes longer and longer due to the cell's reduced ability to recover its original shape.

  20. Measuring skewness of red blood cell deformability distribution by laser ektacytometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nikitin, S Yu; Priezzhev, A V; Lugovtsov, A E [International Laser Center, M. V. Lomonosov Moscow State University, Moscow (Russian Federation); Ustinov, V D [M. V. Lomonosov Moscow State University, Faculty of Computational Mathematics and Cybernetics, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2014-08-31

    An algorithm is proposed for measuring the parameters of red blood cell deformability distribution based on laser diffractometry of red blood cells in shear flow (ektacytometry). The algorithm is tested on specially prepared samples of rat blood. In these experiments we succeeded in measuring the mean deformability, deformability variance and skewness of red blood cell deformability distribution with errors of 10%, 15% and 35%, respectively. (laser biophotonics)

  1. Research opportunities in loss of red blood cell mass in space flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talbot, J. M.; Fisher, K. D.

    1985-01-01

    Decreases of red blood cell mass and plasma volume have been observed consistently following manned space flights. Losses of red cell mass by United States astronauts have averaged 10 to 15% (range: 2 to 21%). Based on postflight estimates of total hemoglobin, Soviet cosmonauts engaged in space missions lasting from 1 to 7 months have exhibited somewhat greater losses. Restoration of red cell mass requires from 4 to 6 weeks following return to Earth, regardless of the duration of space flight.

  2. Measurement of interaction forces between red blood cells in aggregates by optical tweezers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maklygin, A Yu; Priezzhev, A V; Karmenian, A; Nikitin, Sergei Yu; Obolenskii, I S; Lugovtsov, Andrei E; Kisun Li

    2012-06-30

    We have fabricated double-beam optical tweezers and demonstrated the possibility of their use for measuring the interaction forces between red blood cells (erythrocytes). It has been established experimentally that prolonged trapping of red blood cells in a tightly focused laser beam does not cause any visible changes in their shape or size. We have measured the interaction between red blood cells in the aggregate, deformed by optical tweezers.

  3. Salidroside as a Novel Protective Agent to Improve Red Blood Cell Cryopreservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alotaibi, Noha A S; Slater, Nigel K H; Rahmoune, Hassan

    2016-01-01

    Glycerol and trehalose have been widely examined as protective agents in the cryopreservation of red blood cells (RBCs). However, the effectiveness of these reagents alone on cell viability is moderate. Here, the addition of salidroside attenuated oxidative damage of sheep RBCs prior to and post cryostorage. The supplementation of salidroside to the cryopreservation media containing 10% glycerol improved RBC survival by approximately 61.1±4.8% vs 37.9±4.6%. A smaller effect was seen in RBCs cryopreserved in 300 mM trehalose where the addition of salidroside improved survival by 7.6±0.3%. Furthermore, the addition of salidroside to cold storage solution demonstrated a significant reduction of haemolysis after 4 days for RBCs loaded with either glycerol or trehalose, compared to cells incubated without salidroside. RBCs survival was 2-fold greater following freezing in trehalose, compared with glycerol. After 10 days, salidroside enabled a lower haemolysis of 16.7±1.3% compared to 29.0±8.4% for cells incubated without salidroside. However, salidroside had no effect on RBCs which had been frozen in glycerol as the resulting haemolysis rate by day 10 was approximately 60%. Salidroside increased glutathione reductase activity and decreased lactate dehydrogenase activity. Furthermore, it led to reduced carbonylation of proteins in both glycerol and trehalose loaded cells. Finally, no effect on lipid peroxidation was found in the glycerol loaded RBCs although this was reduced in RBCs loaded with trehalose and salidroside. The present findings confirm the potential use of salidroside as a novel protective agent in cryopreservation and refrigerated storage of sheep RBCs.

  4. Chitosan-based nanocoatings for hypothermic storage of living cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulwan, Maria; Antosiak-Iwańska, Magdalena; Godlewska, Ewa; Granicka, Ludomira; Zapotoczny, Szczepan; Nowakowska, Maria

    2013-11-01

    The formation of ultrathin chitosan-based nanocoating on HL-60 model cells and their protective function in hypothermic storage are presented. HL-60 cells are encapsulated in ultrathin shells by adsorbing cationic and anionic chitosan derivatives in a stepwise, layer-by-layer, procedure carried out in an aqueous medium under mild conditions. The chitosan-based films are also deposited on model lipid bilayer and the interactions are studied using ellipsometry and atomic force microscopy. The cells covered with the chitosan-based films and stored at 4 °C for 24 h express viability comparable to that of the control sample incubated at 37 °C, while the unprotected cells stored under the same conditions do not show viability. It is shown that the chitosan-based shell protects HL-60 cells against damaging effect of hypothermic storage. Such nanocoatings provide protection, mechanical stability, and support the cell membrane, while ensuring penetration of small molecules such as nutrients/gases what is essential for cell viability.

  5. Red blood cells serve as intravascular carriers of myeloperoxidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adam, Matti; Gajdova, Silvie; Kolarova, Hana; Kubala, Lukas; Lau, Denise; Geisler, Anne; Ravekes, Thorben; Rudolph, Volker; Tsao, Philip S; Blankenberg, Stefan; Baldus, Stephan; Klinke, Anna

    2014-09-01

    Myeloperoxidase (MPO) is a heme enzyme abundantly expressed in polymorphonuclear neutrophils. MPO is enzymatically capable of catalyzing the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and the consumption of nitric oxide (NO). Thus MPO has both potent microbicidal and, upon binding to the vessel wall, pro-inflammatory properties. Interestingly, MPO - a highly cationic protein - has been shown to bind to both endothelial cells and leukocyte membranes. Given the anionic surface charge of red blood cells, we investigated binding of MPO to erythrocytes. Red blood cells (RBCs) derived from patients with elevated MPO plasma levels showed significantly higher amounts of MPO by flow cytometry and ELISA than healthy controls. Heparin-induced MPO-release from patient-derived RBCs was significantly increased compared to controls. Ex vivo experiments revealed dose and time dependency for MPO-RBC binding, and immunofluorescence staining as well as confocal microscopy localized MPO-RBC interaction to the erythrocyte plasma membrane. NO-consumption by RBC-membrane fragments (erythrocyte "ghosts") increased with incrementally greater concentrations of MPO during incubation, indicating preserved catalytic MPO activity. In vivo infusion of MPO-loaded RBCs into C57BL/6J mice increased local MPO tissue concentrations in liver, spleen, lung, and heart tissue as well as within the cardiac vasculature. Further, NO-dependent relaxation of aortic rings was altered by RBC bound-MPO and systemic vascular resistance significantly increased after infusion of MPO-loaded RBCs into mice. In summary, we find that MPO binds to RBC membranes in vitro and in vivo, is transported by RBCs to remote sites in mice, and affects endothelial function as well as systemic vascular resistance. RBCs may avidly bind circulating MPO, and act as carriers of this leukocyte-derived enzyme.

  6. Induced pluripotent stem cell models of lysosomal storage disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel K. Borger

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs have provided new opportunities to explore the cell biology and pathophysiology of human diseases, and the lysosomal storage disorder research community has been quick to adopt this technology. Patient-derived iPSC models have been generated for a number of lysosomal storage disorders, including Gaucher disease, Pompe disease, Fabry disease, metachromatic leukodystrophy, the neuronal ceroid lipofuscinoses, Niemann-Pick types A and C1, and several of the mucopolysaccharidoses. Here, we review the strategies employed for reprogramming and differentiation, as well as insights into disease etiology gleaned from the currently available models. Examples are provided to illustrate how iPSC-derived models can be employed to develop new therapeutic strategies for these disorders. We also discuss how models of these rare diseases could contribute to an enhanced understanding of more common neurodegenerative disorders such as Parkinson’s disease, and discuss key challenges and opportunities in this area of research.

  7. Haemoglobin and red cell counts in leptospirosis patients infected with different serovars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott Benjamin Craig

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction The aim of the study was to compare haemoglobin and red cell counts between patients known to be infected with a range of leptospiral serovars. Methods The study retrospectively compared the haemoglobin and red cell count results from the first blood samples taken from 207 patients at presentation to a Queensland Health hospital. Results Significant differences were observed in haemoglobin and red cell counts in those infected with Leptospira interrogans serovars Szwajizak and Canicola when compared with most of the other serovars. Conclusions These findings suggest that haemoglobin and red cell counts may be useful in differentiating leptospiral serovars in leptospirosis patients.

  8. Red cell or serum folate: what to do in clinical practice?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrell, Christopher-John L; Kirsch, Susanne H; Herrmann, Markus

    2013-03-01

    Folate deficiency has been linked to diverse clinical manifestations and despite the importance of accurate assessment of folate status, the best test for routine use is uncertain. Both serum and red cell folate assays are widely available in clinical laboratories; however, red cell folate is the more time-consuming and costly test. This review sought to evaluate whether the red cell assay demonstrated superior performance characteristics to justify these disadvantages. Red cell folate, but not serum folate, measurements demonstrated analytical variation due to sample pre-treatment parameters, oxygen saturation of haemoglobin and haematocrit. Neither marker was clearly superior in characterising deficiency but serum folate more frequently showed the higher correlation with homocysteine, a sensitive marker of deficiency. Similarly, both serum and red cell folate were shown to increase in response to folic acid supplementation. However, serum folate generally gave the greater response and was able to distinguish different supplementation doses. The C677T polymorphism of methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase alters the distribution of folate forms in red cells and may thereby cause further analytical variability in routine red cell folate assays. Overall, serum folate is cheaper and faster to perform than red cell folate, is influenced by fewer analytical variables and provides an assessment of folate status that may be superior to red cell folate.

  9. The novel role of peroxiredoxin-2 in red cell membrane protein homeostasis and senescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matté, Alessandro; Pantaleo, Antonella; Ferru, Emanuela; Turrini, Franco; Bertoldi, Mariarita; Lupo, Francesca; Siciliano, Angela; Ho Zoon, Chae; De Franceschi, Lucia

    2014-11-01

    Peroxiredoxin-2 (Prx2), a typical two-cysteine peroxiredoxin, is the third most abundant protein in red cells. Although progress has been made in the functional characterization of Prx2, its role in red cell membrane protein homeostasis is still under investigation. Here, we studied Prx2(-/-) mouse red cells. The absence of Prx2 promotes (i) activation of the oxidative-induced Syk pathway; (ii) increased band 3 Tyr phosphorylation, with clustered band 3; and (iii) increased heat shock protein (HSP27 and HSP70) membrane translocation. This was associated with enhanced in vitro erythrophagocytosis of Prx2(-/-) red cells and reduced Prx2(-/-) red cell survival, indicating the possible role of Prx2 membrane recruitment in red cell aging and in the clearance of oxidized hemoglobin and damaged proteins through microparticles. Indeed, we observed an increased release of microparticles from Prx2(-/-) mouse red cells. The mass spectrometric analysis of erythroid microparticles found hemoglobin chains, membrane proteins, and HSPs. To test these findings, we treated Prx2(-/-) mice with antioxidants in vivo. We observed that N-acetylcysteine reduced (i) Syk activation, (ii) band 3 clusterization, (iii) HSP27 membrane association, and (iv) erythroid microparticle release, resulting in increased Prx2(-/-) mouse red cell survival. Thus, we propose that Prx2 may play a cytoprotective role in red cell membrane protein homeostasis and senescence.

  10. Modified atmosphere packaging (MAP) impacts on organic Chinese red raspberry (Rubus idaeus L.) fruit on quality and active components over postharvest storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    The objective of this study was to evaluate modified atmosphere packaging (MAP) impacts on market quality and actives preservation of organic Chinese red raspberry (Rubus idaeus L.) fruit over postharvest storage. Fruit were harvested, cooled, and sorted for uniform maturity and quality. Fruit were ...

  11. Hydrogen-Oxygen PEM Regenerative Fuel Cell Energy Storage System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bents, David J.; Scullin, Vincent J.; Chang, Bei-Jiann; Johnson, Donald W.; Garcia, Christopher P.

    2005-01-01

    An introduction to the closed cycle hydrogen-oxygen polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) regenerative fuel cell (RFC), recently constructed at NASA Glenn Research Center, is presented. Illustrated with explanatory graphics and figures, this report outlines the engineering motivations for the RFC as a solar energy storage device, the system requirements, layout and hardware detail of the RFC unit at NASA Glenn, the construction history, and test experience accumulated to date with this unit.

  12. Red blood cell alloimmunization is influenced by recipient inflammatory state at time of transfusion in patients with sickle cell disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fasano, Ross M; Booth, Garrett S; Miles, Megan; Du, Liping; Koyama, Tatsuki; Meier, Emily Riehm; Luban, Naomi L C

    2015-01-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) patients are at increased risk of red blood cell (RBC) alloimmunization. Recipient inflammatory state at time of transfusion has been shown to regulate alloimmunization in murine models, but evidence is lacking in SCD patients. We retrospectively studied a cohort of alloimmunized SCD patients to determine the influence of pro-inflammatory SCD-related complications at time of transfusion on alloimmunization. For each transfusion, the presence of pro-inflammatory state, degree of RBC antigen matching, unit age, storage solution and alloantibody detection date were ascertained. Transfusion-associated pro-inflammatory events were compared between transfusions resulting and not resulting in new alloantibodies. Univariate analysis and multivariate logistic regression were performed. Fifty-two patients received 3166 pre-storage leuco-reduced transfusions of which 128 resulted in alloantibodies. Transfusions during inflammatory events were associated with increased alloantibody risk on univariate and multivariate analysis; acute chest syndrome and vaso-occlusive crisis showed strongest associations with alloimmunization. Increased antigen matching demonstrated a protective effect on alloimmunization (univariate and multivariate analysis). Although an association was seen between citrate-phosphate-dextrose (adenine) stored units and alloimmunization on univariate analysis, no effect was found on multivariate analysis. Identifying recipient pro-inflammatory states at time of transfusion that promote alloimmunization can impact RBC unit selection decisions for SCD patients at risk for alloimmunization.

  13. Axial dispersion in flowing red blood cell suspensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podgorski, Thomas; Losserand, Sylvain; Coupier, Gwennou

    2016-11-01

    A key parameter in blood microcirculation is the transit time of red blood cells (RBCs) through an organ, which can influence the efficiency of gas exchange and oxygen availability. A large dispersion of this transit time is observed in vivo and is partly due to the axial dispersion in the flowing suspension. In the classic Taylor-Aris example of a solute flowing in a tube, the combination of molecular diffusion and parabolic velocity profile leads to enhanced axial dispersion. In suspensions of non-Brownian deformable bodies such as RBCs, axial dispersion is governed by a combination of shear induced migration and shear-induced diffusion arising from hydrodynamic interactions. We revisit this problem in the case of RBC pulses flowing in a microchannel and show that the axial dispersion of the pulse eventually saturates with a final extension that depends directly on RBC mechanical properties. The result is especially interesting in the dilute limit since the final pulse length depends only on the channel width, exponent of the migration law and dimensionless migration velocity. In continuous flow, the dispersion of transit times is the result of complex cell-cell and cell-wall interactions and is strongy influenced by the polydispersity of the blood sample. The authors acknowledge support from LabEx TEC21 and CNES.

  14. Minimal RED Cell Pairs Markedly Improve Electrode Kinetics and Power Production in Microbial Reverse Electrodialysis Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Cusick, Roland D.

    2013-12-17

    Power production from microbial reverse electrodialysis cell (MRC) electrodes is substantially improved compared to microbial fuel cells (MFCs) by using ammonium bicarbonate (AmB) solutions in multiple RED cell pair stacks and the cathode chamber. Reducing the number of RED membranes pairs while maintaining enhanced electrode performance could help to reduce capital costs. We show here that using only a single RED cell pair (CP), created by operating the cathode in concentrated AmB, dramatically increased power production normalized to cathode area from both acetate (Acetate: from 0.9 to 3.1 W/m 2-cat) and wastewater (WW: 0.3 to 1.7 W/m2), by reducing solution and charge transfer resistances at the cathode. A second RED cell pair increased RED stack potential and reduced anode charge transfer resistance, further increasing power production (Acetate: 4.2 W/m2; WW: 1.9 W/m2). By maintaining near optimal electrode power production with fewer membranes, power densities normalized to total membrane area for the 1-CP (Acetate: 3.1 W/m2-mem; WW: 1.7 W/m2) and 2-CP (Acetate: 1.3 W/m2-mem; WW: 0.6 W/m2) reactors were much higher than previous MRCs (0.3-0.5 W/m2-mem with acetate). While operating at peak power, the rate of wastewater COD removal, normalized to reactor volume, was 30-50 times higher in 1-CP and 2-CP MRCs than that in a single chamber MFC. These findings show that even a single cell pair AmB RED stack can significantly enhance electrical power production and wastewater treatment. © 2013 American Chemical Society.

  15. Minimal RED cell pairs markedly improve electrode kinetics and power production in microbial reverse electrodialysis cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cusick, Roland D; Hatzell, Marta; Zhang, Fang; Logan, Bruce E

    2013-12-17

    Power production from microbial reverse electrodialysis cell (MRC) electrodes is substantially improved compared to microbial fuel cells (MFCs) by using ammonium bicarbonate (AmB) solutions in multiple RED cell pair stacks and the cathode chamber. Reducing the number of RED membranes pairs while maintaining enhanced electrode performance could help to reduce capital costs. We show here that using only a single RED cell pair (CP), created by operating the cathode in concentrated AmB, dramatically increased power production normalized to cathode area from both acetate (Acetate: from 0.9 to 3.1 W/m(2)-cat) and wastewater (WW: 0.3 to 1.7 W/m(2)), by reducing solution and charge transfer resistances at the cathode. A second RED cell pair increased RED stack potential and reduced anode charge transfer resistance, further increasing power production (Acetate: 4.2 W/m(2); WW: 1.9 W/m(2)). By maintaining near optimal electrode power production with fewer membranes, power densities normalized to total membrane area for the 1-CP (Acetate: 3.1 W/m(2)-mem; WW: 1.7 W/m(2)) and 2-CP (Acetate: 1.3 W/m(2)-mem; WW: 0.6 W/m(2)) reactors were much higher than previous MRCs (0.3-0.5 W/m(2)-mem with acetate). While operating at peak power, the rate of wastewater COD removal, normalized to reactor volume, was 30-50 times higher in 1-CP and 2-CP MRCs than that in a single chamber MFC. These findings show that even a single cell pair AmB RED stack can significantly enhance electrical power production and wastewater treatment.

  16. Capacitive bioanodes enable renewable energy storage in microbial fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deeke, Alexandra; Sleutels, Tom H J A; Hamelers, Hubertus V M; Buisman, Cees J N

    2012-03-20

    We developed an integrated system for storage of renewable electricity in a microbial fuel cell (MFC). The system contained a capacitive electrode that was inserted into the anodic compartment of an MFC to form a capacitive bioanode. This capacitive bioanode was compared with a noncapacitive bioanode on the basis of performance and storage capacity. The performance and storage capacity were investigated during polarization curves and charge-discharge experiments. During polarization curves the capacitive electrode reached a maximum current density of 1.02 ± 0.04 A/m(2), whereas the noncapacitive electrode reached a current density output of only 0.79 ± 0.03 A/m(2). During the charge-discharge experiment with 5 min of charging and 20 min of discharging, the capacitive electrode was able to store a total of 22,831 C/m(2), whereas the noncapacitive electrode was only able to store 12,195 C/m(2). Regarding the charge recovery of each electrode, the capacitive electrode was able to recover 52.9% more charge during each charge-discharge experiment compared with the noncapacitive electrode. The capacitive electrode outperformed the noncapacitive electrode throughout each charge-discharge experiment. With a capacitive electrode it is possible to use the MFC simultaneously for production and storage of renewable electricity.

  17. Restrictive versus liberal transfusion strategy for red blood cell transfusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holst, Lars B; Petersen, Marie W; Haase, Nicolai;

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To compare the benefit and harm of restrictive versus liberal transfusion strategies to guide red blood cell transfusions. DESIGN: Systematic review with meta-analyses and trial sequential analyses of randomised clinical trials. DATA SOURCES: Cochrane central register of controlled...... trials, SilverPlatter Medline (1950 to date), SilverPlatter Embase (1980 to date), and Science Citation Index Expanded (1900 to present). Reference lists of identified trials and other systematic reviews were assessed, and authors and experts in transfusion were contacted to identify additional trials....... TRIAL SELECTION: Published and unpublished randomised clinical trials that evaluated a restrictive compared with a liberal transfusion strategy in adults or children, irrespective of language, blinding procedure, publication status, or sample size. DATA EXTRACTION: Two authors independently screened...

  18. Magnetic nanoparticle effects on the red blood cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Creanga, D E; Nadejde, C; Curecheriu, L [' Al. I. Cuza' University, Faculty of Physics, 11A Blvd. Carol I, Iasi (Romania)], E-mail: dorinacreanga@yahoo.com; Culea, M [' Babes Bolyai' University, Cluj-Napoca (Romania); Oancea, S [University of Veterinary Medicine ' I. Ionescu de la Brad' , Iasi (Romania); Racuciu, M [' Lucian Blaga' University, Sibiu (Romania)

    2009-05-01

    In vitro tests on magnetite colloidal nanoparticles effects upon animal red blood cells were carried out. Magnetite cores were stabilized with citric acid in the form of biocompatible magnetic fluid administrated in different dilutions in the whole blood samples. The hemolysis extent was found increased up to 2.75 in horse blood and respectively up to 2.81 in the dog blood. The electronic transitions assigned to the heme group were found shifted with about 500 cm{sup -1} or, respectively, affected by supplementary vibronic structures. The Raman vibrations assigned to oxyhemoglobin were much diminished in intensity probably due to the bonding of OH group from citrate shell to the heme iron ion.

  19. Magnetic nanoparticle effects on the red blood cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creangă, D. E.; Culea, M.; Nădejde, C.; Oancea, S.; Curecheriu, L.; Racuciu, M.

    2009-05-01

    In vitro tests on magnetite colloidal nanoparticles effects upon animal red blood cells were carried out. Magnetite cores were stabilized with citric acid in the form of biocompatible magnetic fluid administrated in different dilutions in the whole blood samples. The hemolysis extent was found increased up to 2.75 in horse blood and respectively up to 2.81 in the dog blood. The electronic transitions assigned to the heme group were found shifted with about 500 cm-1 or, respectively, affected by supplementary vibronic structures. The Raman vibrations assigned to oxyhemoglobin were much diminished in intensity probably due to the bonding of OH group from citrate shell to the heme iron ion.

  20. Red blood cell sodium transport in patients with cirrhosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Ulrik Lütken; Kiszka-Kanowitz, Marianne; Bendtsen, Flemming

    2016-01-01

    Patients with advanced cirrhosis have abnormal sodium homoeostasis. The study was undertaken to quantify the sodium transport across the plasma membrane of red blood cells (RBC) in patients with cirrhosis. RBC efflux and influx of sodium were studied in vitro with tracer (22) Na(+) according...... to linear kinetics in 24 patients with cirrhosis and 14 healthy controls. The sodium efflux was modified by ouabain (O), furosemide (F) and a combination of O and F (O + F). RBC sodium was significantly decreased (4·6 versus control 6·3 mmol l(-1) , Psodium (r = 0·57, P......sodium efflux was higher in patients with cirrhosis (+46%, Psodium buffers showed that the F-insensitive sodium efflux was twice as high in cirrhosis as in controls (P = 0...

  1. Simulation of red blood cell aggregation in shear flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, B; Bascom, P A; Cobbold, R S

    1997-01-01

    A simulation model has been developed for red blood cell (RBC) aggregation in shear flow. It is based on a description of the collision rates of RBC, the probability of particles sticking together, and the breakage of aggregates by shear forces. The influence of shear rate, hematocrit, aggregate fractal dimension, and binding strength on aggregation kinetics were investigated and compared to other theoretical and experimental results. The model was used to simulate blood flow in a long large diameter tube under steady flow conditions at low Reynolds numbers. The time and spatial distribution of the state of aggregation are shown to be in qualitative agreement with previous B-mode ultrasound studies in which a central region of low echogenicity was noted. It is suggested that the model can provide a basis for interpreting prior measurements of ultrasound echogenicity and may help relate them to the local state of aggregation.

  2. Considerations of red blood cell molecular testing in transfusion medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svensson, Annika M; Delaney, Meghan

    2015-01-01

    The field of transfusion medicine is on the threshold of a paradigm shift, as the technology for genotyping of red blood cell antigens, including US FDA-approved arrays, is now moving into standard practice. Access to cost-efficient, high-resolution genotyping has the potential to increase the quality of care by decreasing the risk for alloimmunization and incompatible transfusions in individuals on long-term blood transfusion protocols, including patient groups with hemoglobinopathies and other chronic diseases. Current and future applications of molecular methods in transfusion medicine and blood banking are discussed, with emphasis on indications for genotyping in various clinical scenarios. Furthermore, limitations of the current gold standard methodology and serology, as well as of contemporary molecular methodology, are examined.

  3. Mobility Enhancement of Red Blood Cells with Biopolymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tahara, Daiki; Oikawa, Noriko; Kurita, Rei

    2016-03-01

    Adhesion of red blood cells (RBC) to substrates are one of crucial problems for a blood clot. Here we investigate the mobility of RBC between two glass substrates in saline with polymer systems. We find that RBCs are adhered to the glass substrate with PEG, however the mobility steeply increases with fibrinogen and dextran, which are biopolymers. We also find that the mobility affects an aggregation dynamics of RBCs, which is related with diseases such as influenza, blood clot and so on. The Brownian motion helps to increase probability of contact with each other and to find a more stable condition of the aggregation. Thus the biopolymers play important roles not only for preventing the adhesion but also for the aggregation.

  4. Stretching Behavior of Red Blood Cells at High Strain Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mancuso, Jordan; Ristenpart, William

    2016-11-01

    Most work on the mechanical behavior of red blood cells (RBCs) has focused on simple shear flows. Relatively little work has examined RBC deformations in the physiologically important extensional flow that occurs at the entrance to a constriction. In particular, previous work suggests that RBCs rapidly stretch out and then retract upon entering the constriction, but to date no model predicts this behavior for the extremely high strain rates typically experienced there. In this work, we use high speed video to perform systematic measurements of the dynamic stretching behavior of RBCs as they enter a microfluidic constriction. We demonstrate that a simple viscoelastic model captures the observed stretching dynamics, up to strain rates as high as 1000 s-1. The results indicate that the effective elastic modulus of the RBC membrane at these strain rates is an order of magnitude larger than moduli measured by micropipette aspiration or other low strain rate techniques.

  5. Pure red cell aplasia following autoimmune hemolytic anemia: An enigma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Saha

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A 26-year-old previously healthy female presented with a 6-month history of anemia. The laboratory findings revealed hemolytic anemia and direct antiglobulin test was positive. With a diagnosis of autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA, prednisolone was started but was ineffective after 1 month of therapy. A bone marrow trephine biopsy revealed pure red cell aplasia (PRCA showing severe erythroid hypoplasia. The case was considered PRCA following AIHA. This combination without clear underlying disease is rare. Human parvovirus B19 infection was not detected in the marrow aspirate during reticulocytopenia. The patient received azathioprine, and PRCA improved but significant hemolysis was once again documented with a high reticulocyte count. The short time interval between AIHA and PRCA phase suggested an increased possibility of the evolution of a single disease.

  6. Pure red cell aplasia following autoimmune hemolytic anemia: an enigma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, M; Ray, S; Kundu, S; Chakrabarti, P

    2013-01-01

    A 26-year-old previously healthy female presented with a 6-month history of anemia. The laboratory findings revealed hemolytic anemia and direct antiglobulin test was positive. With a diagnosis of autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA), prednisolone was started but was ineffective after 1 month of therapy. A bone marrow trephine biopsy revealed pure red cell aplasia (PRCA) showing severe erythroid hypoplasia. The case was considered PRCA following AIHA. This combination without clear underlying disease is rare. Human parvovirus B19 infection was not detected in the marrow aspirate during reticulocytopenia. The patient received azathioprine, and PRCA improved but significant hemolysis was once again documented with a high reticulocyte count. The short time interval between AIHA and PRCA phase suggested an increased possibility of the evolution of a single disease.

  7. Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia and Red Blood Cell Autoantibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quist, Erin; Koepsell, Scott

    2015-11-01

    Autoimmune hemolytic anemia is a rare disorder caused by autoreactive red blood cell (RBC) antibodies that destroy RBCs. Although autoimmune hemolytic anemia is rare, RBC autoantibodies are encountered frequently and can complicate transfusion workups, impede RBC alloantibody identification, delay distribution of compatible units, have variable clinical significance that ranges from benign to life-threatening, and may signal an underlying disease or disorder. In this review, we discuss the common presenting features of RBC autoantibodies, laboratory findings, ancillary studies that help the pathologist investigate the clinical significance of autoantibodies, and how to provide appropriate patient care and consultation for clinical colleagues. Pathologists must be mindful of, and knowledgeable about, this entity because it not only allows for direct clinical management but also can afford an opportunity to preemptively treat an otherwise silent malignancy or disorder.

  8. P2X and P2Y receptor signaling in red blood cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sluyter, Ronald

    2015-01-01

    Purinergic signaling involves the activation of cell surface P1 and P2 receptors by extracellular nucleosides and nucleotides such as adenosine and adenosine triphosphate (ATP), respectively. P2 receptors comprise P2X and P2Y receptors, and have well-established roles in leukocyte and platelet biology. Emerging evidence indicates important roles for these receptors in red blood cells. P2 receptor activation stimulates a number of signaling pathways in progenitor red blood cells resulting in microparticle release, reactive oxygen species formation, and apoptosis. Likewise, activation of P2 receptors in mature red blood cells stimulates signaling pathways mediating volume regulation, eicosanoid release, phosphatidylserine exposure, hemolysis, impaired ATP release, and susceptibility or resistance to infection. This review summarizes the distribution of P2 receptors in red blood cells, and outlines the functions of P2 receptor signaling in these cells and its implications in red blood cell biology.

  9. P2X and P2Y receptor signaling in red blood cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronald eSluyter

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Purinergic signaling involves the activation of cell surface P1 and P2 receptors by extracellular nucleosides and nucleotides such as adenosine and adenosine triphosphate (ATP, respectively. P2 receptors comprise P2X and P2Y receptors, and have well-established roles in leukocyte and platelet biology. Emerging evidence indicates important roles for these receptors in red blood cells. P2 receptor activation stimulates a number of signaling pathways in progenitor red blood cells resulting in microparticle release, reactive oxygen species formation and apoptosis. Likewise, activation of P2 receptors in mature red blood cells stimulates signaling pathways mediating volume regulation, eicosanoid release, phosphatidylserine exposure, hemolysis, impaired ATP release, and susceptibility or resistance to infection. This review summarizes the distribution of P2 receptors in red blood cells, and outlines the functions of P2 receptor signaling in these cells and its implications in red blood cell biology.

  10. The Evaluation of Red Cell Distribution Width in Chronic Hemodialysis Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hikmet Tekce

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Red cell distribution width (RDW has been used as a marker of iron deficiency; however, it is accepted as a marker of cardiovascular survival. We aimed to study RDW levels in hemodialysis (HD patients and the association between RDW and inflammatory, nutritional, and volume markers. Methods. We included 296 HD patients with sufficient iron storage and without anemia or hypervolemia. We grouped patients into four groups according to clinical parameters, albumin, and C-reactive protein (CRP. Results. The lowest RDW levels were found in group 1 (13.2%. Although RDW of group 2 was higher than that of group 1, it was still in normal range (14.7% versus 13.2%, P=0.028. RDW levels of groups 3 (17.8% and 4 (18.5% were significantly higher than those of groups 1 and 2 and above normal range. A positive correlation was detected between RDW and HD duration, interdialytic weight gain (IDWG, serum phosphate, and CRP levels and a negative correlation was detected with serum albumin. HD duration, CRP, IDWG, and serum albumin have been found as independent predictors of RDW elevation. Conclusions. Results of the present study reflect adverse effects of inflammation, malnutrition, and excess IDWG on RDW elevation in an HD study cohort with sufficient iron storage and without anemia and hypervolemia.

  11. Effects of irradiation on red cells stored in CPDA-1 and CPD-ADSOL (AS-1)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeter, E.K.; Gadsden, R.H.; Cate J 4 (Medical University of South Carolina, Department of Pathology/Laboratory Medicine, Charleston (USA))

    1991-05-01

    Red blood cells (pRBC) collected in citrate, phosphate, dextrose, adenine-formula 1 (CPDA-1) and citrate, phosphate, dextrose-adenine, manitol saline solution (CPD-ADSOL (AS-1)) anticoagulants are increasingly being stored for variable periods in transfusion service inventories following irradiation. While anecdotal reports of increased K+ following irradiation and storage have recently appeared in the literature, concomitant in vitro biochemical changes resulting from differences in anticoagulants have not been reported. Utilizing two venipunctures, two units each of 225 mL of blood from five volunteers were collected in anticoagulant-adjusted CPDA-1 and AS-1 bags. Within two hours of collection, each unit was equally divided. One of each pair was irradiated (2000 rads). Samples were analyzed on Days 0, 1, 3, 7, and every seven days to expiration. Irradiation resulted in a 2.3 fold increase in K+ during the first seven days of storage for both anticoagulants, although significantly greater K+ levels were observed in the CPDA-1 pairs compared to the AS-1 pairs. Comparison of glucose utilization, plasma free hemoglobin, 2,3-diphosphoglycerate (2,3-DPG) and lactate dehydrogenase between control and irradiated CPDA-1 and AS-1 pairs and between anticoagulants were documented.

  12. Clinical utility of flow cytometry in the study of erythropoiesis and nonclonal red cell disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chesney, Alden; Good, David; Reis, Marciano

    2011-01-01

    Erythropoiesis involves proliferation and differentiation of small population of hematopoietic stem cells resident in the bone marrow into mature red blood cells. The determination of the cellular composition of the blood is a valuable tool in the diagnosis of diseases and monitoring of therapy. Flow cytometric analysis is increasingly being used to characterize the heterogeneous cell populations present in the blood and the hematopoietic cell differentiation and maturation pathways of the bone marrow. Here we discuss the role of flow cytometry in the study of erythropoiesis and nonclonal red blood cell disorders. First, we discuss flow cytometric analysis of reticulocytes. Next, we review salient quantitative methods that can be used for detection of fetal-maternal hemorrhage (FMH). We also discuss flow cytometric analysis of high hemoglobin F (HbF) in Sickle Cell Disease (SCD), hereditary spherocytosis (HS), red cell survival and red cell volume. We conclude by discussing cell cycle of erythroid cells.

  13. [Molecular basis of red blood cell adhesion to endothelium].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wautier, J-L; Wautier, M-P

    2011-01-01

    The extent of red blood cell adhesion is correlated with the incidence of vascular complications and the severity of the disease. Patients with sickle cell anemia (HbSS) experience vasoocclusive episodes. The adhesion of RBCs from HbSS patients is increased and related to VLA-4 exposure, which binds to vascular cell adhesion molecule (VCAM-1). Inter Cellular Adhesion Molecule (ICAM-1), CD31, CD36 and glycans are potential receptors for PfEMP1 of RBCs parasited by plasmodium falciparum. The incidence of vascular complications is very high in patients with diabetes mellitus. RBC adhesion is increased and statistically correlated with the severity of the angiopathy. Glycation of RBC membrane proteins is responsible for binding to the receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE). Polycythemia Vera (PV) is the most frequent myeloproliferative disorder and characterized by a high occurrence of thrombosis of mesenteric and cerebral vessels. PV is due to a mutation of the Janus kinase 2 (JAK2 V617F). This mutation stimulates erythropoiesis and is the cause of Lu/BCAM (CD239) phosphorylation, which potentiated the interaction with laminin alpha 5. The couple laminin alpha 5 endothelial and phosphorylated Lu/BCAM explained the increased adhesion of RBCs from patients PV to endothelium.

  14. A multiscale model for red blood cell mechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, Dirk

    2010-02-01

    The objective of this article is the derivation of a continuum model for mechanics of red blood cells via multiscale analysis. On the microscopic level, we consider realistic discrete models in terms of energy functionals defined on networks/lattices. Using concepts of Gamma-convergence, convergence results as well as explicit homogenisation formulae are derived. Based on a characterisation via energy functionals, appropriate macroscopic stress-strain relationships (constitutive equations) can be determined. Further, mechanical moduli of the derived macroscopic continuum model are directly related to microscopic moduli. As a test case we consider optical tweezers experiments, one of the most common experiments to study mechanical properties of cells. Our simulations of the derived continuum model are based on finite element methods and account explicitly for membrane mechanics and its coupling with bulk mechanics. Since the discretisation of the continuum model can be chosen freely, rather than it is given by the topology of the microscopic cytoskeletal network, the approach allows a significant reduction of computational efforts. Our approach is highly flexible and can be generalised to many other cell models, also including biochemical control.

  15. Why does the mammalian red blood cell have aquaporins?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuchel, Philip W; Benga, Gheorghe

    2005-11-01

    Aquaporins are now known to mediate the rapid exchange of water across the plasma membranes of diverse cell types. This exchange has been studied and kinetically characterized in red blood cells (erythrocytes; RBC) from many animal species. In recent years, a favoured method has been one based on NMR spectroscopy. Despite knowledge of their molecular structure the physiological raison d' etre of aquaporins in RBCs is still only speculated upon. Here, we present two hypotheses that account for the fact that the exchange of water is so fast in RBCs. The first is denoted the "oscillating sieve" hypothesis and it posits that known membrane undulations at frequencies up to 30 Hz with displacements up to 0.3 microm are energetically favoured by the high water permeability of the membrane. The second denoted the "water displacement" hypothesis is based on the known rapid exchange across the RBC membrane of ions such as Cl- and HCO3- and solutes such as glucose, all of whose molecular volumes are significantly greater than that of water. The ideas are generalizable to other cell types and organelles.

  16. Manipulation of red blood cells with electric field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saboonchi, Hossain; Esmaeeli, Asghar

    2009-11-01

    Manipulation of bioparticles and macromolecules is the central task in many biological and biotechnological processes. The current methods for physical manipulation takes advantage of different forces such as acoustic, centrifugal, magnetic, electromagnetic, and electric forces, as well as using optical tweezers or filtration. Among all these methods, however, the electrical forces are particularly attractive because of their favorable scale up with the system size which makes them well-suited for miniaturization. Currently the electric field is used for transportation, poration, fusion, rotation, and separation of biological cells. The aim of the current research is to gain fundamental understanding of the effect of electric field on the human red blood cells (RBCs) using direct numerical simulation. A front tracking/finite difference technique is used to solve the fluid flow and electric field equations, where the fluid in the cell and the blood (plasma) is modeled as Newtonian and incompressible, and the interface separating the two is treated as an elastic membrane. The behavior of RBCs is investigated as a function of the controlling parameters of the problem such as the strength of the electric field.

  17. Pure Red Cell Aplasia and Lymphoproliferative Disorders: An Infrequent Association

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Efthymia Vlachaki

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Pure red cell aplasia (PRCA is a rare bone marrow failure syndrome defined by a progressive normocytic anaemia and reticulocytopenia without leukocytopenia and thrombocytopenia. Secondary PRCA can be associated with various haematological disorders, such as chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL or non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL. The aim of the present review is to investigate the infrequent association between PRCA and lymphoproliferative disorders. PRCA might precede the appearance of lymphoma, may present simultaneously with the lymphoid neoplastic disease, or might appear following the lymphomatic disorder. Possible pathophysiological molecular mechanisms to explain the rare association between PRCA and lymphoproliferative disorders are reported. Most cases of PRCA are presumed to be autoimmune mediated by antibodies against either erythroblasts or erythropoietin, by T-cells secreting factors selectively inhibiting erythroid colonies in the bone marrow or by NK cells directly lysing erythroblasts. Finally, focus is given to the therapeutical approach, as several treatment regimens have failed for PRCA. Immunosuppressive therapy and/or chemotherapy are effective for improving anaemia in the majority of patients with lymphoma-associated PRCA. Further investigation is required to define the pathophysiology of PRCA at a molecular level and to provide convincing evidence why it might appear as a rare complication of lymphoproliferative disorders.

  18. Pure red cell aplasia and lymphoproliferative disorders: an infrequent association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlachaki, Efthymia; Diamantidis, Michael D; Klonizakis, Philippos; Haralambidou-Vranitsa, Styliani; Ioannidou-Papagiannaki, Elizabeth; Klonizakis, Ioannis

    2012-01-01

    Pure red cell aplasia (PRCA) is a rare bone marrow failure syndrome defined by a progressive normocytic anaemia and reticulocytopenia without leukocytopenia and thrombocytopenia. Secondary PRCA can be associated with various haematological disorders, such as chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL) or non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL). The aim of the present review is to investigate the infrequent association between PRCA and lymphoproliferative disorders. PRCA might precede the appearance of lymphoma, may present simultaneously with the lymphoid neoplastic disease, or might appear following the lymphomatic disorder. Possible pathophysiological molecular mechanisms to explain the rare association between PRCA and lymphoproliferative disorders are reported. Most cases of PRCA are presumed to be autoimmune mediated by antibodies against either erythroblasts or erythropoietin, by T-cells secreting factors selectively inhibiting erythroid colonies in the bone marrow or by NK cells directly lysing erythroblasts. Finally, focus is given to the therapeutical approach, as several treatment regimens have failed for PRCA. Immunosuppressive therapy and/or chemotherapy are effective for improving anaemia in the majority of patients with lymphoma-associated PRCA. Further investigation is required to define the pathophysiology of PRCA at a molecular level and to provide convincing evidence why it might appear as a rare complication of lymphoproliferative disorders.

  19. Peripheral red blood cell split chimerism as a consequence of intramedullary selective apoptosis of recipient red blood cells in a case of sickle cell disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marziali, Marco; Isgrò, Antonella; Sodani, Pietro; Gaziev, Javid; Fraboni, Daniela; Paciaroni, Katia; Gallucci, Cristiano; Alfieri, Cecilia; Roveda, Andrea; De Angelis, Gioia; Cardarelli, Luisa; Ribersani, Michela; Andreani, Marco; Lucarelli, Guido

    2014-01-01

    Allogeneic cellular gene therapy through hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is the only radical cure for congenital hemoglobinopathies like thalassemia and sickle cell anemia. Persistent mixed hematopoietic chimerism (PMC) has been described in thalassemia and sickle cell anemia. Here, we describe the clinical course of a 6-year-old girl who had received bone marrow transplant for sickle cell anemia. After the transplant, the patient showed 36% donor hematopoietic stem cells in the bone marrow, whereas in the peripheral blood there was evidence of 80% circulating donor red blood cells (RBC). The analysis of apoptosis at the Bone Marrow level suggests that Fas might contribute to the cell death of host erythroid precursors. The increase in NK cells and the regulatory T cell population observed in this patient suggests that these cells might contribute to the condition of mixed chimerism.

  20. Peripheral Red Blood Cell Split Chimerism as a Consequence of Intramedullary Selective Apoptosis of Recipient Red Blood Cells in a Case of Sickle Cell Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Marziali

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Allogeneic cellular gene therapy through hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is the only radical cure for congenital hemoglobinopathies like thalassemia and sickle cell anemia. Persistent mixed hematopoietic chimerism (PMC has been described in thalassemia and sickle cell anemia. Here, we describe the clinical course of a 6-year-old girl who had received bone marrow transplant for sickle cell anemia. After the transplant, the patient showed 36% donor hematopoietic stem cells in the bone marrow, whereas in the peripheral blood there was evidence of 80%  circulating donor red blood cells (RBC. The analysis of apoptosis at the Bone Marrow  level suggests that Fas might contribute to the cell death of host erythroid precursors. The increase in NK cells and the regulatory T cell population observed in this patient suggests that these cells might contribute to the condition of mixed chimerism.

  1. Vehicular hydrogen storage using lightweight tanks (regenerative fuel cell systems)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitlitsky, F; Myers, B; Weisberg, A H

    1999-06-01

    Energy storage systems with extremely high specific energy (>400 Wh/kg) have been designed that use lightweight tankage to contain the gases generated by reversible (unitized) regenerative fuel cells (URFCs). Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) will leverage work for aerospace applications supported by other sponsors (including BMDO, NASA, and USAF) to develop URFC systems for transportation and utility applications. Lightweight tankage is important for primary fuel cell powered vehicles that use on-board storage of hydrogen. Lightweight pressure vessels with state-of-the-art performance factors were designed, and prototypes are being fabricated to meet the DOE 2000 goals (4000 Wh/kg, 12% hydrogen by weight, 700 Wh/liter, and $20/kWh in high volume production). These pressure vessels use technologies that are easily adopted by industrial partners. Advanced liners provide permeation barriers for gas storage and are mandrels for composite overwrap. URFCs are important to the efficient use of hydrogen as a transportation fuel and enabler of renewable energy. H{sub 2}/halogen URFCs may be advantageous for stationary applications whereas H{sub 2}/O{sub 2} or H{sub 2}/air URFCs are advantageous for vehicular applications. URFC research and development is required to improve performance (efficiency), reduce catalyst loading, understand engineering operation, and integrate systems. LLNL has the experimental equipment and advanced URFC membrane electrode assemblies (some with reduced catalyst loading) for evaluating commercial hardware (not funded by DOE in FY1999).

  2. Red wine triggers cell death and thioredoxin reductase inhibition: effects beyond resveratrol and SIRT1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallenborg, Karolina; Vlachos, Pinelopi; Eriksson, Sofi; Huijbregts, Lukas; Arnér, Elias S J; Joseph, Bertrand; Hermanson, Ola

    2009-05-01

    Red wine contains antioxidants and is at moderate amounts believed to exert certain positive health effects. Resveratrol is one of the most studied antioxidants in red wine and has been suggested to activate the longevity- and metabolism-associated histone deacetylase SIRT1. Here we show that relatively low concentrations of resveratrol (0.5-3 microM) specifically inhibited neuronal differentiation of neural stem cells in a SIRT1-dependent manner whereas higher concentrations of resveratrol (> or =10 microM) induced a SIRT1-independent cell death. Surprisingly, using a cell based assay, we found that small amounts of red wine (1-5% v/v)--but not white wine--induced a massive and rapid cell death of various cell types, including neural stem cells and several cancer cell lines. This red wine-induced cell death was ethanol-, SIRT1- and resveratrol-independent but associated with increased oxidative stress and inhibition of thioredoxin reductase (TrxR) activity. The TrxR inhibition correlated with the red color (absorbance at 520 nm) of the wines demonstrating that pigment components of red wine can exert profound cellular effects. Our results unveil important roles for SIRT1 and TrxR in resveratrol and red wine-mediated effects on progenitor and cancer cells, and demonstrate that cellular responses to red wine may be more complex than generally appreciated.

  3. Red Blood Cell Susceptibility to Pneumolysin: CORRELATION WITH MEMBRANE BIOCHEMICAL AND PHYSICAL PROPERTIES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bokori-Brown, Monika; Petrov, Peter G; Khafaji, Mawya A; Mughal, Muhammad K; Naylor, Claire E; Shore, Angela C; Gooding, Kim M; Casanova, Francesco; Mitchell, Tim J; Titball, Richard W; Winlove, C Peter

    2016-05-06

    This study investigated the effect of the biochemical and biophysical properties of the plasma membrane as well as membrane morphology on the susceptibility of human red blood cells to the cholesterol-dependent cytolysin pneumolysin, a key virulence factor of Streptococcus pneumoniae, using single cell studies. We show a correlation between the physical properties of the membrane (bending rigidity and surface and dipole electrostatic potentials) and the susceptibility of red blood cells to pneumolysin-induced hemolysis. We demonstrate that biochemical modifications of the membrane induced by oxidative stress, lipid scrambling, and artificial cell aging modulate the cell response to the toxin. We provide evidence that the diversity of response to pneumolysin in diabetic red blood cells correlates with levels of glycated hemoglobin and that the mechanical properties of the red blood cell plasma membrane are altered in diabetes. Finally, we show that diabetic red blood cells are more resistant to pneumolysin and the related toxin perfringolysin O relative to healthy red blood cells. Taken together, these studies indicate that the diversity of cell response to pneumolysin within a population of human red blood cells is influenced by the biophysical and biochemical status of the plasma membrane and the chemical and/or oxidative stress pre-history of the cell.

  4. Red blood cells and thrombin generation in sickle cell disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whelihan, Matthew F; Lim, Ming Y; Key, Nigel S

    2014-05-01

    The prothrombotic nature of sickle cell disease (SCD) is evidenced by the chronically elevated levels of almost all coagulation activation biomarkers, and an increased incidence of certain thrombotic events, including venous thromboembolism. Numerous studies have attempted to define the extent and elucidate the mechanism of the observed increase in thrombin generation in SCD patients in vivo. In general, these studies were performed using thrombin generation assays in platelet poor or platelet rich plasma and showed little difference in endogenous thrombin potential between the SCD cohort and healthy matched controls. In SCD, erythrocytes and monocytes have been demonstrated to exhibit procoagulant characteristics. Thus, the absence of these cellular components in standard thrombin generation assays may fail to reflect global hypercoagulability in the whole blood of patients with SCD. We were therefore surprised to see no difference in net thrombin generation in tissue factor-initiated initiated clotting of whole blood from patients with SCD. However, we are continuing to reconcile these seemingly disparate observations by slight modifications of the whole blood model that include alternative coagulation triggers and a re-examination of the net thrombin generation when the protein/protein S system is simultaneously interrogated.

  5. Sperm storage in the spermatheca of the red-back salamander, Plethodon cinereus (Amphibia: Plethodontidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sever, D M

    1997-11-01

    In northern Indiana, the mating season of Plethodon cinereus occurs after hibernation from March until June, when oviposition begins. During the mating season, a female stores sperm in its spermatheca, a compound tubular gland in the roof of the cloaca. The apical cytoplasm of the spermathecal epithelium is filled with large secretory vacuoles whose product is released while sperm are stored. Females induced to oviposit in June and July by injections of human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) still retain much sperm 1 month after oviposition, but secretory vacuoles are absent in all specimens sacrificed in July and August. Instead, some sperm are embedded in the spermathecal epithelium with resultant spermiophagy involving lysosomes. A female sacrificed in September 2 months after oviposition possesses scant sperm, but spermiophagy alone does not seem extensive enough to account for the decrease in sperm numbers. Females sacrificed in October prior to hibernation lack sperm in their spermathecae; some secretory vacuoles are present, but they are not as numerous or as enlarged as in specimens collected in March and May. Inter- and intrafamilial differences in the cytology of sperm storage may not be phyletically informative at the family level but related to species-specific reproductive adaptations.

  6. NHE-1 sequence and expression in toad, snake and fish red blood cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Steffen Nyegaard; Wang, Tobias; Kristensen, Torsten

    Red blood cells (RBC) from reptiles appear not to express regulatory volume increase (RVI) upon shrinkage (Kristensen et al., 2008). In other vertebrates, the RVI response is primarily mediated by activation of the Na+/H+ exchanger (NHE-1) and we, therefore decided to investigate whether red cell...

  7. Preoperative factors associated with red blood cell transfusion in hip fracture patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Christian Medom; Jørgensen, Henrik Løvendahl; Norgaard, Astrid

    2014-01-01

    Red blood cell (RBC) transfusion is a frequently used treatment in patients admitted with a fractured hip, but the use remains an area of much debate. The aim of this study was to determine preoperative factors associated with the risk of receiving a red blood cell transfusion in hip fracture...

  8. Quantification of the fraction poorly deformable red blood cells using ektacytometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Streekstra, G.J.; Dobbe, J.G.G.; Hoekstra, A.G.

    2010-01-01

    We describe a method to obtain the fraction of poorly deformable red blood cells in a blood sample from the intensity pattern in an ektacytometer. In an ektacytometer red blood cells are transformed into ellipsoids by a shear flow between two transparent cylinders. The intensity pattern, due to a la

  9. Potential of Reversible Solid Oxide Cells as Electricity Storage System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Di Giorgio

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Electrical energy storage (EES systems allow shifting the time of electric power generation from that of consumption, and they are expected to play a major role in future electric grids where the share of intermittent renewable energy systems (RES, and especially solar and wind power plants, is planned to increase. No commercially available technology complies with all the required specifications for an efficient and reliable EES system. Reversible solid oxide cells (ReSOC working in both fuel cell and electrolysis modes could be a cost effective and highly efficient EES, but are not yet ready for the market. In fact, using the system in fuel cell mode produces high temperature heat that can be recovered during electrolysis, when a heat source is necessary. Before ReSOCs can be used as EES systems, many problems have to be solved. This paper presents a new ReSOC concept, where the thermal energy produced during fuel cell mode is stored as sensible or latent heat, respectively, in a high density and high specific heat material and in a phase change material (PCM and used during electrolysis operation. The study of two different storage concepts is performed using a lumped parameters ReSOC stack model coupled with a suitable balance of plant. The optimal roundtrip efficiency calculated for both of the configurations studied is not far from 70% and results from a trade-off between the stack roundtrip efficiency and the energy consumed by the auxiliary power systems.

  10. Small molecule ice recrystallization inhibitors enable freezing of human red blood cells with reduced glycerol concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capicciotti, Chantelle J; Kurach, Jayme D R; Turner, Tracey R; Mancini, Ross S; Acker, Jason P; Ben, Robert N

    2015-04-08

    In North America, red blood cells (RBCs) are cryopreserved in a clinical setting using high glycerol concentrations (40% w/v) with slow cooling rates (~1°C/min) prior to storage at -80°C, while European protocols use reduced glycerol concentrations with rapid freezing rates. After thawing and prior to transfusion, glycerol must be removed to avoid intravascular hemolysis. This is a time consuming process requiring specialized equipment. Small molecule ice recrystallization inhibitors (IRIs) such as β-PMP-Glc and β-pBrPh-Glc have the ability to prevent ice recrystallization, a process that contributes to cellular injury and decreased cell viability after cryopreservation. Herein, we report that addition of 110 mM β-PMP-Glc or 30 mM β-pBrPh-Glc to a 15% glycerol solution increases post-thaw RBC integrity by 30-50% using slow cooling rates and emphasize the potential of small molecule IRIs for the preservation of cells.

  11. On the shape memory of red blood cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordasco, Daniel; Bagchi, Prosenjit

    2017-04-01

    Red blood cells (RBCs) undergo remarkably large deformations when subjected to external forces but return to their biconcave discoid resting shape as the forces are withdrawn. In many experiments, such as when RBCs are subjected to a shear flow and undergo the tank-treading motion, the membrane elements are also displaced from their original (resting) locations along the cell surface with respect to the cell axis, in addition to the cell being deformed. A shape memory is said to exist if after the flow is stopped the RBC regains its biconcave shape and the membrane elements also return to their original locations. The shape memory of RBCs was demonstrated by Fischer ["Shape memory of human red blood cells," Biophys. J. 86, 3304-3313 (2004)] using shear flow go-and-stop experiments. Optical tweezer and micropipette based stretch-relaxation experiments do not reveal the complete shape memory because while the RBC may be deformed, the membrane elements are not significantly displaced from their original locations with respect to the cell axis. Here we present the first three-dimensional computational study predicting the complete shape memory of RBCs using shear flow go-and-stop simulations. The influence of different parameters, namely, membrane shear elasticity and bending rigidity, membrane viscosity, cytoplasmic and suspending fluid viscosity, as well as different stress-free states of the RBC is studied. For all cases, the RBCs always exhibit shape memory. The complete recovery of the RBC in shear flow go-and-stop simulations occurs over a time that is orders of magnitude longer than that for optical tweezer and micropipette based relaxations. The response is also observed to be more complex and composed of widely disparate time scales as opposed to only one time scale that characterizes the optical tweezer and micropipette based relaxations. We observe that the recovery occurs in three phases: a rapid compression of the RBC immediately after the flow is stopped

  12. The relationship between stroke mortality and red blood cell parameters.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamidreza Hatamian

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Several factors influence on the outcome of ischemic stroke. The aim of this study was determination the relationship between stroke mortality and red blood cell parameters.This cross-sectional study was conducted from 2011 July to June 2012. For all patients with ischemic stroke in middle cerebral artery (MCA territory, the cell blood count test was performed. We recorded their mortality on the 1(st week and the 1(st month after ischemic stroke. Data analysis was performed using t-test, χ(2, Mann-Whitney U-test, logistic regression and receiver operating characteristic curve in SPSS for Windows 19.0.A total of 98 subjects (45.9% men and 54.1% women with the mean age of 71.0 ± 13.9 years were assessed, while 67.3% of them were anemic. The prevalence of 1(st week mortality among anemic and non-anemic patients was 40.9% and 34.4% (P = 0.534. The prevalence of mortality after 1(st week till 1(st month was 19.6% and 21.0% respectively (P = 0.636. In univariant analysis, only 1(st month mortality had a significant relationship with red blood cell (RBC count (P = 0.022. However, the result of logistic regression model showed that RBC (P = 0.012 and mean corpuscular volume (MCV (P = 0.021 remained as predictors of the 1(st week and the 1(st month mortality (P = 0.011 and P = 0.090 respectively. The best cutoff point of RBC for the prediction of the 1(st week mortality with 44.7% specificity and 69.5% sensitivity was estimated 4.07 million/μl and for the 1(st month mortality with 46.6% specificity and 72.2% sensitivity was estimated 4.16 million/μl.The RBC count and MCV are independent predictors of ischemic stroke short-term mortality.

  13. Red cell distribution width in type 2 diabetic patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nada AM

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Aml Mohamed Nada Department of Internal Medicine, Unit of Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism, Faculty of Medicine, Mansoura University, Mansoura, Egypt Objective: To study the indices of some elements of the complete blood count, in type 2 diabetic patients, in comparison with nondiabetic healthy controls; and to find out the effects of glycemic control and different medications on these indices. To the best of our knowledge, this study is novel in our environment and will serve as a foundation for other researchers in this field. Methods: This retrospective study included 260 type 2 diabetic patients on treatment and 44 healthy control subjects. Sex, age, weight, height, blood pressure, complete blood count, fasting plasma glucose, hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c, and lipid profile data, were available for all of the study population. For diabetic patients, data on duration of diabetes and all medications were also available. Results: Red cell distribution width (RDW was significantly higher in diabetic patients than in control subjects (P=0.008. It was also higher in patients with uncontrolled glycemia (HbA1c >7% than those with good control (HbA1c ≤7%; P=0.035. Mean platelet volume (MPV was comparable in both diabetic patients and healthy controls (P=0.238. RDW and MPV did not significantly correlate with fasting plasma glucose, HbA1c, or duration of diabetes. Both aspirin and clopidogrel did not show a significant effect on MPV. Both insulin and oral hypoglycemic agents did not show a significant effect on RDW, mean corpuscular volume, MPV, platelet count, or white blood cell count. Diabetic patients treated with indapamide or the combined thiazides and angiotensin receptor blockers showed no significant difference in RDW when compared with the control subjects. Conclusion: RDW, which is recently considered as an inflammatory marker with a significant predictive value of mortality in diseased and healthy populations, is significantly higher in

  14. Measurement of posttransfusion red cell survival with the biotin label.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mock, Donald M; Widness, John A; Veng-Pedersen, Peter; Strauss, Ronald G; Cancelas, Jose A; Cohen, Robert M; Lindsell, Christopher J; Franco, Robert S

    2014-07-01

    The goal of this review is to summarize and critically assess information concerning the biotin method to label red blood cells (RBC) for use in studies of RBC and transfusion biology-information that will prove useful to a broad audience of clinicians and scientists. A review of RBC biology, with emphasis on RBC senescence and in vivo survival, is included, followed by an analysis of the advantages and disadvantages of biotin-labeled RBC (BioRBC) for measuring circulating RBC volume, posttransfusion RBC recovery, RBC life span, and RBC age-dependent properties. The advantages of BioRBC over (51)Cr RBC labeling, the current reference method, are discussed. Because the biotin method is straightforward and robust, including the ability to follow the entire life spans of multiple RBC populations concurrently in the same subject, BioRBC offers distinct advantages for studying RBC biology and physiology, particularly RBC survival. The method for biotin labeling, validation of the method, and application of BioRBCs to studies of sickle cell disease, diabetes, and anemia of prematurity are reviewed. Studies documenting the safe use of BioRBC are reviewed; unanswered questions requiring future studies, remaining concerns, and regulatory barriers to broader application of BioRBC including adoption as a new reference method are also presented.

  15. Dynamics of Red Blood Cells through submicronic splenic slits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helfer, Emmanuele; Gambhire, Priya; Atwell, Scott; Bedu, Frederic; Ozerov, Igor; Viallat, Annie; Charrier, Anne; Badens, Catherine; Centre de reference Thalassemie, Badens Team; Physics; Engineering of Living Systems Team

    2016-11-01

    Red Blood Cells (RBCs) are periodically monitored for changes in their deformability by the spleen, and are entrapped and destroyed if unable to pass through the splenic interendothelial slits (IESs). In particular, in sickle cell disease (SCD), where hemoglobin form fibers inside the RBCs, and in hereditary spherocytosis (HS), where RBCs are more spherical and membrane-cytoskekeleton bonds are weakened, the loss of RBC deformability leads to spleen dysfunction. By combining photolithography and anisotropic wet etching techniques, we developed a new on-chip PDMS device with channels replicating the submicronic physiological dimensions of IESs to study the mechanisms of deformation of the RBCs during their passage through these biomimetic slits. For the first time, with HS RBCs, we show the disruption of the links between the RBC membrane and the underlying spectrin network. In the case of SCD RBCs we show the appearance of a tip at the front of the RBC with a longer time relaxation due to the increased cytoplasmic viscosity. This work has been carried out thanks to the support of the A*MIDEX project (n° ANR-11-IDEX-0001-02) funded by the «Investissements d'Avenir». French Government program, managed by ANR.

  16. Invasive thymoma with pure red cell aplasia and amegakaryocytic thrombocytopenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takuya Onuki

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available We here describe a case involving a 67-yearold female patient who was referred to our hospital due to severe anemia (hemoglobin, 5.0 g/dL, thrombocytopenia (platelet count, 0.6×104/μL, and a mediastinal shadow with calcification noted on X-ray. On admission, an anterior mediastinal tumor was detected, and bone marrow biopsy revealed few megakaryocytes and severely reduced numbers of erythroid cells. The diagnosis was thymoma with pure red cell aplasia (PRCA and acquired amegakaryocytic thrombocytopenia (AAMT. On Day 8 of admission, the patient received immunosuppressive therapy together with cyclosporine for the 2 severe hematologic diseases, which were stabilized within 2 months. Subsequently, total thymectomy was performed. The diagnosis of the tumor invading the left lung was invasive thymoma, Masaoka- Koga stage III. The histological diagnosis was World Health Organization type AB. Thymoma accompanied with PRCA and AAMT is very rare, and, based on our case, immunotherapeutic therapy for the hematologic disorders should precede surgical intervention.

  17. Intracellular trehalose improves the survival of human red blood cells by freeze-drying

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HE Hui; LIU Baolin; HUA Zezhao; LI Chuan; WU Zhengzheng

    2007-01-01

    Freeze-drying of human red blood cells has a potential important application for blood transfusion.The aim of this study was to investigate the effects ofintracellular trehalose on the survival of red blood cells after freeze-drying and rehydration.Fresh red blood cells were incubated in trehalose solutions of various concentrations at 37℃ for 7 h following freeze-drying.Polyvinylpyrrolidone,Trehalose,sodium citrate,and human serum albumin were used as extracellular protective agents for the freeze-drying of red blood cells.The results indicated that the intracellular trehalose concentration was increased with increasing concentration of extracellular trehalose solution,and the maximum concen tration of intracellular trehalose reached 35 mmol/L.The viability of freeze-dried red blood cells increased with the increment of intracellular trehalose concentration.

  18. Characterization of Microvesicles Released from Human Red Blood Cells

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    Duc Bach Nguyen

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Extracellular vesicles (EVs are spherical fragments of cell membrane released from various cell types under physiological as well as pathological conditions. Based on their size and origin, EVs are classified as exosome, microvesicles (MVs and apoptotic bodies. Recently, the release of MVs from human red blood cells (RBCs under different conditions has been reported. MVs are released by outward budding and fission of the plasma membrane. However, the outward budding process itself, the release of MVs and the physical properties of these MVs have not been well investigated. The aim of this study is to investigate the formation process, isolation and characterization of MVs released from RBCs under conditions of stimulating Ca2+ uptake and activation of protein kinase C. Methods: Experiments were performed based on single cell fluorescence imaging, fluorescence activated cell sorter/flow cytometer (FACS, scanning electron microscopy (SEM, atomic force microscopy (AFM and dynamic light scattering (DLS. The released MVs were collected by differential centrifugation and characterized in both their size and zeta potential. Results: Treatment of RBCs with 4-bromo-A23187 (positive control, lysophosphatidic acid (LPA, or phorbol-12 myristate-13 acetate (PMA in the presence of 2 mM extracellular Ca2+ led to an alteration of cell volume and cell morphology. In stimulated RBCs, exposure of phosphatidylserine (PS and formation of MVs were observed by using annexin V-FITC. The shedding of MVs was also observed in the case of PMA treatment in the absence of Ca2+, especially under the transmitted bright field illumination. By using SEM, AFM and DLS the morphology and size of stimulated RBCs, MVs were characterized. The sizes of the two populations of MVs were 205.8 ± 51.4 nm and 125.6 ± 31.4 nm, respectively. Adhesion of stimulated RBCs and MVs was observed. The zeta potential of MVs was determined in the range from - 40 mV to - 10 m

  19. Autophagic vesicles on mature human reticulocytes explain phosphatidylserine-positive red cells in sickle cell disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mankelow, Tosti J; Griffiths, Rebecca E; Trompeter, Sara; Flatt, Joanna F; Cogan, Nicola M; Massey, Edwin J; Anstee, David J

    2015-10-08

    During maturation to an erythrocyte, a reticulocyte must eliminate any residual organelles and reduce its surface area and volume. Here we show this involves a novel process whereby large, intact, inside-out phosphatidylserine (PS)-exposed autophagic vesicles are extruded. Cell surface PS is a well-characterized apoptotic signal initiating phagocytosis. In peripheral blood from patients after splenectomy or in patients with sickle cell disease (SCD), the number of circulating red cells exposing PS on their surface is elevated. We show that in these patients PS is present on the cell surface of red cells in large (∼1.4 µm) discrete areas corresponding to autophagic vesicles. The autophagic vesicles found on reticulocytes are identical to those observed on red cells from splenectomized individuals and patients with SCD. Our data suggest the increased thrombotic risk associated with splenectomy, and patients with hemoglobinopathies is a possible consequence of increased levels of circulating mature reticulocytes expressing inside-out PS-exposed autophagic vesicles because of asplenia.

  20. Red blood cell transfusion in preterm neonates: current perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chirico G

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Gaetano ChiricoNeonatology and Neonatal Intensive Care Unit, Children Hospital, Spedali Civili, Brescia, ItalyAbstract: Preterm neonates, especially very low birth weight infants, remain a category of patients with high transfusion needs; about 90% of those with <1,000 g birth weight may be transfused several times during their hospital stay. However, neonatal red blood cells (RBC transfusion is not without risks. In addition to well-known adverse events, several severe side effects have been observed unique to preterm infants, such as transfusion-related acute gut injury, intraventricular hemorrhage, and increased mortality risk. It is therefore important to reduce the frequency of RBC transfusion in critically ill neonates, by delayed clamping or milking the umbilical cord, using residual cord blood for initial laboratory investigations, reducing phlebotomy losses, determining transfusion guidelines, and ensuring the most appropriate nutrition, with the optimal supplementation of iron, folic acid, and vitamins. Ideally, RBC transfusion should be tailored to the individual requirements of the single infant. However, many controversies still remain, and the decision on whether to transfuse or not is often made on an empirical basis. Recently, a few clinical trials have been performed with the aim to compare the risk/benefit ratio of restrictive versus liberal transfusion criteria. No significant differences in short-term outcomes were observed, suggesting that the restrictive criteria may reduce the need for transfusion and the related side effects. Neurodevelopmental long-term outcome seemed more favorable in the liberal group at first evaluation, especially for boys, and significantly better in the restrictive group at a later clinical investigation. Magnetic resonance imaging scans, performed at an average age of 12 years, showed that intracranial volume was substantially smaller in the liberal group compared with controls. When sex effects

  1. Evaluation of the impact of initial red wine composition on changes in color and anthocyanin content during bottle storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avizcuri, José-Miguel; Sáenz-Navajas, María-Pilar; Echávarri, José-Federico; Ferreira, Vicente; Fernández-Zurbano, Purificación

    2016-12-15

    Sixteen commercial red wines, selected to cover a different range of color and total polyphenols index (TPI), were stored at 25°C during 6months under controlled and different oxygen additions (0, 1.1, 3.1, 10.6 and 30.4mgL(-1)) during the bottling process. Changes in color and the anthocyanic composition were evaluated using transmittance spectra and UPLC-MS-UV/Vis respectively. Results reveal a general pattern in the evolution of wines. However, different patterns of evolution related to initial wine composition, especially to TPI, were observed. Wines with higher TPI had a lower evolution, whereas wines with lower TPI showed a higher evolution and greater variability in behavior. In general, oxygen seemed to accelerate all changes observed during aging although the oxygen effect was more limited than the effect of the storage time. These results are relevant for wine experts and help explain the evolution of wine at the bottling stage.

  2. Assessment of environmental risk for red mud storage facility in China: a case study in Shandong Province.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Zhi-Chao; Ma, Shu-Hua; Zheng, Shi-Li; Zhang, Yi; Liang, Yan

    2016-06-01

    Red mud storage facility (RM-SF) pollution remains a serious problem in China mainly due to the RM's huge quantity, little recyclability, and high alkalinity. And, there is also a risk of dam failure because almost all RM-SFs are processed by damming. In order to address this challenge and improve the level of risk management, it is necessary to evaluate the environmental risk of RM-SFs systematically. So, this paper firstly designs a comprehensive evaluation index system with a three-level evaluation index in the terms of RM characteristics, RM-SF characteristics, ambient environment of RM-SF, the management of RM-SF, and the application aspect of RM by the analytic hierarchy process (AHP) method. Then, a case of RM-SF from a typical alumina production enterprise is studied according to this system, as is assisted by several experts from different fields when determining the weights of all indicators. The results show that the risk of selected RM-SF primarily depends on the former factors, that is, RM and RM-SF characteristics, while the contributions of the other factors are quite smaller.

  3. Key changes in wine aroma active compounds during bottle storage of Spanish red wines under different oxygen levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Vicente; Bueno, Mónica; Franco-Luesma, Ernesto; Culleré, Laura; Fernández-Zurbano, Purificación

    2014-10-15

    Samples from 16 Spanish red wines have been stored for 6 months at 25 °C under different levels of oxygen (0-56 mg/L). Amino acids, metals, and phenolic compounds were analyzed and related to the production or depletion of key oxidation- and reduction-related aroma compounds. Oxidation brings about sensory-relevant increases in Strecker aldehydes, 1-octen-3-one, and vanillin. Formation of Strecker aldehydes correlates to the wine content on the corresponding amino acid precursor, Zn, and caffeic acid ethyl ester and negatively to some flavonols and anthocyanin derivatives. Formation of most carbonyls correlates to wine-combined SO2, suggesting that part of the increments are the result of the release of aldehydes forming bisulfite combinations once SO2 is oxidized. Methanethiol (MeSH) and dimethylsulfide (DMS), but not H2S levels, increase during storage. MeSH increments correlate to methionine levels and proanthocyanidins and negatively to resveratrol and aluminum. H2S, MeSH, and DMS levels all decreased with oxidation, and for the latter two, there are important effects of Mn and pH, respectively.

  4. Theoretical models for near forward light scattering by a Plasmodium falciparum infected red blood cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, S. K.

    2012-12-01

    A number of experimental elastic light scattering studies have been performed in the past few years with the aim of developing automated in vivo tools for differentiating a healthy red blood cell from a Plasmodium falciparum infected cell. This paper examines some theoretical aspects of the problem. An attempt has been made to simulate the scattering patterns of healthy as well as infected individual red blood cells. Two models, namely, a homogeneous sphere model and a coated sphere model have been considered. The scattering patterns predicted by these models are examined. A possible method for discriminating infected red blood cells from healthy ones has been suggested.

  5. Elevated red blood cell distribution width is associated with intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vural Yilmaz, Zehra; Gencosmanoglu Turkmen, Gulenay; Daglar, Korkut; Yılmaz, Elif; Kara, Ozgur; Uygur, Dilek

    2017-01-01

    Intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy is the most common pregnancy specific liver disease and related with adverse maternal and perinatal outcome. Red blood cell distribution width, an anisocytosis marker in a complete blood count, has been used as an inflammation marker in various diseases. However the association of red blood cell distribution width with intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy is unknown. We aimed to evaluate the relationship between red blood cell distribution width and intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy. Ninety pregnant women with intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy and ninety healthy pregnant women were included in the study. Their clinical and laboratory characteristics including red blood cell distribution width, liver function tests, fasting and postprandial bile acid concentrations were analyzed. Serum red blood cell distribution width cell levels were significantly higher in pregnants with intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy than healthy pregnants. We also demonstrated that red blood cell distribution Width levels were higher in severe disease than mild disease and was significantly correlated with fasting and postprandial bile acid concentration in intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy group. Our study showed that red blood cell distribution width, an easy and inexpensive marker; were associated with intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy and can be used as a diagnostic and prognostic marker in intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy.

  6. Perturbation of red blood cell membrane rigidity by extracellular ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulitschke, M; Nash, G B; Anstee, D J; Tanner, M J; Gratzer, W B

    1995-07-01

    It is known that binding of extracellular antibodies against the major sialoglycoprotein, glycophorin A, reduced the deformability of the red blood cell membrane. This has been taken to result from new or altered interactions between the glycophorin A and the membrane skeleton. We have shown by means of the micropipette aspiration technique that antibodies against the preponderant transmembrane protein, band 3, induce similar effects. A definite but much smaller reduction in elasticity of the membrane is engendered by univalent Fab fragments of the anti-band 3 antibodies. By examining cells genetically devoid of glycophorin A or containing a variant of this constituent, truncated at the inner membrane surface, we have shown that the anti-band 3 antibodies do not act through the band 3-associated glycophorin A. We examined the effect of anti-glycophorin A antibodies on homozygous Wr(a+b-) cells, in which an amino acid replacement in band 3 annihilates the Wright b (Wrb) epitope (comprising sequence elements of glycophorin A and band 3) and thus, by implication disrupts or perturbs the band 3-glycophorin A interaction; these cells show a much smaller response to an anti-glycophorin A antibody than do normal controls. We infer that in this case anti-glycophorin A antibodies exert their rigidifying effect through the associated band 3. Another anti-glycophorin A antibody, directed against an epitope remote from the membrane surface, however, increases the rigidity of both Wr(a+b-) and normal cells. This implies that not all antibodies act in the same manner in modifying the membrane mechanical properties. The effect exerted by anti-band 3 antibodies appears not to be transmitted through the band 3-ankyrin-spectrin pathway because the rigidifying effect of the intact antibody persists at alkaline pH, at which there is evidence that the ankyrin-band 3 link is largely dissociated. The large difference between the effects of saturating concentrations of the divalent and

  7. Pharmacology of the human red cell voltage-dependent cation channel Part I. Activation by clotrimazole and analogues

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barksmann, Trine Lyberth; Kristensen, Berit I.; Christophersen, Palle.

    2004-01-01

    Human red cells, Nonselective voltage dependent cation channel, NSVDC channel, Gárdos channel blockers, NSVDC channel activators......Human red cells, Nonselective voltage dependent cation channel, NSVDC channel, Gárdos channel blockers, NSVDC channel activators...

  8. Transfusion of leukocyte-depleted red blood cells is not a risk factor for nosocomial infections in critically ill children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Wal, Judith; van Heerde, Marc; Markhorst, Dick G.; Kneyber, Martin C. J.

    Objectives: Transfusion of red blood cells is increasingly linked with adverse outcomes in critically ill children. We tested the hypothesis that leukocyte-depleted red blood cell transfusions were independently associated with increased development of bloodstream infections, ventilator-associated

  9. Amyloid β levels in human red blood cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takehiro Kiko

    Full Text Available UNLABELLED: Amyloid β-peptide (Aβ is hypothesized to play a key role by oxidatively impairing the capacity of red blood cells (RBCs to deliver oxygen to the brain. These processes are implicated in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD. Although plasma Aβ has been investigated thoroughly, the presence and distribution of Aβ in human RBCs are still unclear. In this study, we quantitated Aβ40 and Aβ42 in human RBCs with ELISA assays, and provided evidence that significant amounts of Aβ could be detected in RBCs and that the RBC Aβ levels increased with aging. The RBC Aβ levels increased with aging. On the other hand, providing an antioxidant supplement (astaxanthin, a polar carotenoid to humans was found to decrease RBC Aβ as well as oxidative stress marker levels. These results suggest that plasma Aβ40 and Aβ42 bind to RBCs (possibly with aging, implying a pathogenic role of RBC Aβ. Moreover, the data indicate that RBC Aβ40 and Aβ42 may constitute biomarkers of AD. As a preventive strategy, therapeutic application of astaxanthin as an Aβ-lowering agent in RBCs could be considered as a possible anti-dementia agent. TRIAL REGISTRATION: Controlled-Trials.com ISRCTN42483402.

  10. Red blood cell lifespan, erythropoiesis and hemoglobin control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruse, Anja; Uehlinger, Dominik E; Gotch, Frank; Kotanko, Peter; Levin, Nathan W

    2008-01-01

    Erythropoietin (EPO) and iron deficiency as causes of anemia in patients with limited renal function or end-stage renal disease are well addressed. The concomitant impairment of red blood cell (RBC) survival has been largely neglected. Properties of the uremic environment like inflammation, increased oxidative stress and uremic toxins seem to be responsible for the premature changes in RBC membrane and cytoskeleton. The exposure of antigenic sites and breakdown of the phosphatidylserine asymmetry promote RBC phagocytosis. While the individual response to treatment with EPO-stimulating agents (ESA) depends on both the RBC's lifespan and the production rate, uniform dosing algorithms do not meet that demand. The clinical use of mathematical models predicting ESA-induced changes in hematocrit might be greatly improved once independent estimates of RBC production rate and/or lifespan become available, thus making the concomitant estimation of both parameters unnecessary. Since heme breakdown by the hemoxygenase pathway results in carbon monoxide (CO) which is exhaled, a simple CO breath test has been used to calculate hemoglobin turnover and therefore RBC survival and lifespan. Future research will have to be done to validate and implement this method in patients with kidney failure. This will result in new insights into RBC kinetics in renal patients. Eventually, these findings are expected to improve our understanding of the hemoglobin variability in response to ESA.

  11. Human red blood cells deformed under thermal fluid flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foo, Ji-Jinn; Chan, Vincent; Feng, Zhi-Qin; Liu, Kuo-Kang

    2006-03-01

    The flow-induced mechanical deformation of a human red blood cell (RBC) during thermal transition between room temperature and 42.0 degrees C is interrogated by laser tweezer experiments. Based on the experimental geometry of the deformed RBC, the surface stresses are determined with the aid of computational fluid dynamics simulation. It is found that the RBC is more deformable while heating through 37.0 degrees C to 42.0 degrees C, especially at a higher flow velocity due to a thermal-fluid effect. More importantly, the degree of RBC deformation is irreversible and becomes softer, and finally reaches a plateau (at a uniform flow velocity U > 60 microm s(-1)) after the heat treatment, which is similar to a strain-hardening dominated process. In addition, computational simulated stress is found to be dependent on the progression of thermotropic phase transition. Overall, the current study provides new insights into the highly coupled temperature and hydrodynamic effects on the biomechanical properties of human erythrocyte in a model hydrodynamic flow system.

  12. Red cell pyruvate kinase deficiency in Southern Sardinia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perseu, L; Giagu, N; Satta, S; Sollaino, M C; Congiu, R; Galanello, R

    2010-12-15

    Pyruvate kinase (PK) deficiency is the most frequent red cell enzymatic defect responsible for hereditary non-spherocytic hemolytic anemia. The clinical picture is quite variable and the reasons of this variability have been only partially clarified. We report the clinical description and the extended molecular analysis in 3 PK deficient patients with clinical phenotype of variable severity. We studied the clinical and hematological aspects of 3 patients and analyzed the following genes: pyruvate kinase-R, glucose-6-phosphate-dehydrogenase, α-globin, uridindiphosphoglucuronil transferase and HFE. One patient (A) with a severe clinical picture resulted homozygote for exon 8 nt994A substitution, the other 2 (brothers) were compound heterozygotes for exon 8 nt994A and exon 11 nt1456T mutation. One of the two brothers with a more severe phenotype coinherited also had G6PD deficiency, while both had microcytosis due to the homozygosity for the non-deletional form of α-thalassemia ATG→ACG substitution at the initiation codon of the alpha2 globin gene. Our results suggest that extended molecular analysis is useful for studying how several interacting gene mutations contribute to the clinical variability of pyruvate kinase deficiency.

  13. Some technetium complexes for labelling red blood cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Emery, M.F.

    1988-01-01

    A new approach to produce technetium labelled red blood cells, used routinely in diagnostic nuclear medicine, is reported. The enzyme Carbonic Anhydrase (CA), present in erythrocytes, is strongly inhibited by primary aromatic sulphonamides, which bind at the enzyme active site. Three types of ligand able to coordinate to technetium and suitable for modification to include a primary aromatic sulphonamide group were studied; bis(thiosemicarbazones), Schiff bases and some propylene amine oximes. The experimental conditions needed to label the ligands were determined. Both the thiosemicarbazone and propyleneamine oxime derivatives were labelled, but under no conditions attempted were the Schiff bases complexed by Technetium. The two major isozymes of Human Carbonic Anhydrase, HCA I and HCA II, were isolated from blood. The strength of binding of the free ligands SET, PN130 and PN135 with each of the isozymes was measured and expressed as the Dissociation Constant K{sub d}. The rate of uptake of the technetium complexes into washed RBCs and whole blood was measured and found to be much slower in whole blood. The biodistribution of both TcPN130 and TcPN135 in rats was determined and scintigraphic images for the TcPN130 complex were recorded. Attempts to synthesise the Tc-99 analogues on the milligram scale to allow chemical characterisation of these complexes were unsuccessful. (author).

  14. Characterization of Red Blood Cells with Multiwavelength Transmission Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yulia M. Serebrennikova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Multiwavelength transmission (MWT spectroscopy was applied to the investigation of the morphological parameters and composition of red blood cells (RBCs. The MWT spectra were quantitatively analyzed with a Mie theory based interpretation model modified to incorporate the effects of the nonsphericity and orientation of RBCs. The MWT spectra of the healthy and anemic samples were investigated for the RBC indices in open and blinded studies. When MWT performance was evaluated against a standard reference system, very good agreement between two methods, with R2>0.85 for all indices studied, was demonstrated. The RBC morphological parameters were used to characterize three types of anemia and to draw an association between RBC morphology and anemia severity. The MWT spectra of RBCs infected with malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum at different life cycle stages were analyzed for RBC morphological parameters. The changes in the RBC volume, surface area, aspect ratio, and hemoglobin composition were used to trace the morphological and compositional alterations in the infected RBCs occurring with parasites’ development and to provide insights into parasite-host interactions. The MWT method was shown to be reliable for determination of the RBC morphological parameters and to be valuable for identification of the RBC pathologic changes and disease states.

  15. Aggregation of red blood cells in patients with Gaucher disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adar, Tomer; Ben-Ami, Ronen; Elstein, Deborah; Zimran, Ari; Berliner, Shlomo; Yedgar, Saul; Barshtein, Gershon

    2006-08-01

    Gaucher disease is associated with increased red blood cell (RBC) aggregation, but the pathophysiological significance of this phenomenon and its correlation with disease manifestations are unclear. RBC aggregation was evaluated in 43 patients with Gaucher disease and 53 healthy controls. Dynamic RBC aggregation was examined in a narrow-gap flow chamber at varying shear stress. Compared with the controls, RBC aggregation in Gaucher disease was increased by 25%. Comparison of RBC aggregation in autologous plasma and in dextran (500 kDa) showed an increase both in plasma-dependent (extrinsic) and -independent (intrinsic) RBC aggregation. Subgroup analysis revealed that increased RBC aggregation was limited to patients with an intact spleen. RBC aggregation in patients did not correlate with plasma fibrinogen concentration, disease severity, enzyme replacement therapy or genotype. We conclude that RBC aggregation is increased in patients with Gaucher disease and an intact spleen, possibly reflecting the accumulation of glucocerebroside and other substances in the plasma and RBC membranes of these patients. Our results do not support a role for RBC aggregation in the pathogenesis of vascular complications of Gaucher disease.

  16. Zeroing in on red blood cell unit expiry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayyalil, Fathima; Irwin, Greg; Ross, Bryony; Manolis, Michael; Enjeti, Anoop K

    2017-09-20

    Expiry of red blood cell (RBC) units is a significant contributor to wastage of precious voluntary donations. Effective strategies aimed at optimal resource utilization are required to minimize wastage. This retrospective study analyzed the strategic measures implemented to reduce expiry of RBC units in an Australian tertiary regional hospital. The measures, which included inventory rearrangement, effective stock rotation, and the number of emergency courier services required during a 24-month period, were evaluated. There was no wastage of RBC units due to expiry over the 12 months after policy changes. Before these changes, approximately half of RBC wastage (261/511) was due to expiry. The total number of transfusions remained constant in this period and there was no increase in the use of emergency couriers. Policy changes implemented were decreasing the RBC inventory level by one-third and effective stock rotation and using a computerized system to link the transfusion services across the area. Effective stock rotation resulted in a reduction in older blood (>28 days) received in the main laboratory rotated from peripheral hospitals, down from 6%-41% to 0%-2.5%. Age-related expiry of blood products is preventable and can be significantly reduced by improving practices in the pathology service. This study provides proof of principle for "zero tolerance for RBC unit expiry" across a large networked blood banking service. © 2017 The Authors Transfusion published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of AABB.

  17. The Quality Assessment of Stored Red Blood Cells Probed Using Atomic-Force Microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. M. Lamzin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available At the moment the suitability of stored red blood cells (sRBC for transfusion is checked by routine methods such as haemoglobin estimation and the level of haemolysis. These methods cannot characterize directly the quality of the membranes of sRBC. The aim of this work is to assess the quality of sRBC based on such criteria as the membrane’s stiffness and the size and the form of sRBC. Materials and Methods. We have investigated 5 series of dry cytosmears of the sRBC which had been kept in blood bank in a period from 1 to 35 days. After AFM imaging, in every specimen, 5 RBC were chosen at random; the diameter, the height, and the stiffness were measured on each of them. Results. The present study shows high increase of the mean values of YM and height of RBC after 35 days of storage and decrease of the mean values of their diameter. Conclusion. Statistically significant high increase of the mean values of YM indicates the decrease of the elasticity of the cells in the course of storing of the RBC. This parameter along with the morphological characteristics can be used as criterion for assessment of applicability of the sRBC for blood transfusion.

  18. The quality assessment of stored red blood cells probed using atomic-force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamzin, I M; Khayrullin, R M

    2014-01-01

    At the moment the suitability of stored red blood cells (sRBC) for transfusion is checked by routine methods such as haemoglobin estimation and the level of haemolysis. These methods cannot characterize directly the quality of the membranes of sRBC. The aim of this work is to assess the quality of sRBC based on such criteria as the membrane's stiffness and the size and the form of sRBC. Materials and Methods. We have investigated 5 series of dry cytosmears of the sRBC which had been kept in blood bank in a period from 1 to 35 days. After AFM imaging, in every specimen, 5 RBC were chosen at random; the diameter, the height, and the stiffness were measured on each of them. Results. The present study shows high increase of the mean values of YM and height of RBC after 35 days of storage and decrease of the mean values of their diameter. Conclusion. Statistically significant high increase of the mean values of YM indicates the decrease of the elasticity of the cells in the course of storing of the RBC. This parameter along with the morphological characteristics can be used as criterion for assessment of applicability of the sRBC for blood transfusion.

  19. From Lysosomal Storage Diseases to NKT Cell Activation and Back

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Cátia S.; Ribeiro, Helena; Macedo, M. Fatima

    2017-01-01

    Lysosomal storage diseases (LSDs) are inherited metabolic disorders characterized by the accumulation of different types of substrates in the lysosome. With a multisystemic involvement, LSDs often present a very broad clinical spectrum. In many LSDs, alterations of the immune system were described. Special emphasis was given to Natural Killer T (NKT) cells, a population of lipid-specific T cells that is activated by lipid antigens bound to CD1d (cluster of differentiation 1 d) molecules at the surface of antigen-presenting cells. These cells have important functions in cancer, infection, and autoimmunity and were altered in a variety of LSDs’ mouse models. In some cases, the observed decrease was attributed to defects in either lipid antigen availability, trafficking, processing, or loading in CD1d. Here, we review the current knowledge about NKT cells in the context of LSDs, including the alterations detected, the proposed mechanisms to explain these defects, and the relevance of these findings for disease pathology. Furthermore, the effect of enzyme replacement therapy on NKT cells is also discussed. PMID:28245613

  20. From Lysosomal Storage Diseases to NKT Cell Activation and Back

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cátia S. Pereira

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Lysosomal storage diseases (LSDs are inherited metabolic disorders characterized by the accumulation of different types of substrates in the lysosome. With a multisystemic involvement, LSDs often present a very broad clinical spectrum. In many LSDs, alterations of the immune system were described. Special emphasis was given to Natural Killer T (NKT cells, a population of lipid-specific T cells that is activated by lipid antigens bound to CD1d (cluster of differentiation 1 d molecules at the surface of antigen-presenting cells. These cells have important functions in cancer, infection, and autoimmunity and were altered in a variety of LSDs’ mouse models. In some cases, the observed decrease was attributed to defects in either lipid antigen availability, trafficking, processing, or loading in CD1d. Here, we review the current knowledge about NKT cells in the context of LSDs, including the alterations detected, the proposed mechanisms to explain these defects, and the relevance of these findings for disease pathology. Furthermore, the effect of enzyme replacement therapy on NKT cells is also discussed.

  1. An innovative shape equation to quantify the morphological characteristics of parasitized red blood cells by Plasmodium falciparum and Plasmodium vivax.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimi, Alireza; Navidbakhsh, Mahdi; Motevalli Haghi, Afsaneh; Faghihi, Shahab

    2013-04-01

    The morphology of red blood cells is affected significantly during maturation of malaria parasites, Plasmodium falciparum and Plasmodium vivax. A novel shape equation is presented that defines shape of parasitized red blood cells by P. falciparum (Pf-red blood cells) and P. vivax (Pv-red blood cells) at four stages of infection. The Giemsa-stained thin blood films are prepared using blood samples collected from healthy donors, patients having P. falciparum and P. vivax malaria. The diameter and thickness of healthy red blood cells plus Pf-red blood cells and Pv-red blood cells at each stage of infection are measured from their optical images using Olysia and Scanning Probe Image Processor softwares, respectively. Using diameters and thicknesses of parasitized red blood cells, a shape equation is fitted and relative two-dimensional shapes are plotted using MATHEMATICA. The shape of Pf-red blood cell drastically changes at ring stage as its thickness increases by 82%, while Pv-red blood cell remains biconcave (30% increase in thickness). By trophozoite and subsequent schizont stage, the Pf-red blood cell entirely loses its biconcave shape and becomes near spherical (diameter and thickness of ~8 µm). The Pv-red blood cell remains biconcave throughout the parasite development even though its volume increases. These results could have practical use for faster diagnosis, prediction, and treatment of human malaria and sickle-cell diseases.

  2. Spiral Phyllotaxis Pattern in an Animal Cell: A Fluid- Driven Mechanism for Red Cell Echinocytosis and Programmed Cell Death

    OpenAIRE

    Lofthouse, J. T.

    2004-01-01

    This paper demonstrates that the pattern of lipid spiculesthat emerge on the surface of red blood cells in the classic 'Discocyte to Echinocyte' shape change is a generative spiral, and presents a qualitative, fluid- driven mechanism for their production, compatible with the work of Douady and Couder. Implications for the dynamics of cell growth, plant cell phyllotaxy, programmed cell death and gravity sensitivity are explained in terms of a new qualitative model of cellular fluid dynamics.

  3. Thermometry of red blood cell concentrate: magnetic resonance decoding warm up process.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gert Reiter

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Temperature is a key measure in human red blood cell concentrate (RBC quality control. A precise description of transient temperature distributions in RBC units removed from steady storage exposed to ambient temperature is at present unknown. Magnetic resonance thermometry was employed to visualize and analyse RBC warm up processes, to describe time courses of RBC mean, surface and core temperatures by an analytical model, and to determine and investigate corresponding model parameters. METHODS: Warm-up processes of 47 RBC units stored at 1-6°C and exposed to 21.25°C ambient temperature were investigated by proton resonance frequency thermometry. Temperature distributions were visualized and analysed with dedicated software allowing derivation of RBC mean, surface and core temperature-time courses during warm up. Time-dependence of mean temperature was assumed to fulfil a lumped capacitive model of heat transfer. Time courses of relative surface and core temperature changes to ambient temperature were similarly assumed to follow shifted exponential decays characterized by a time constant and a relative time shift, respectively. RESULTS: The lumped capacitive model of heat transfer and shifted exponential decays described time-dependence of mean, surface and core temperatures close to perfect (mean R(2 were 0.999±0.001, 0.996±0.004 and 0.998±0.002, respectively. Mean time constants were τmean = 55.3±3.7 min, τsurface = 41.4±2.9 min and τcore = 76.8±7.1 min, mean relative time shifts were Δsurface = 0.07±0.02 and Δcore = 0.04±0.01. None of the constants correlated significantly with temperature differences between ambient and storage temperature. CONCLUSION: Lumped capacitive model of heat transfer and shifted exponential decays represent simple analytical formulas to describe transient mean, surface and core temperatures of RBC during warm up, which might be a helpful tool in RBC temperature monitoring

  4. Prevention of pure red cell aplasia after major or bidirectional ABO blood group incompatible hematopoietic stem cell transplantation by pretransplant reduction of host anti-donor isoagglutinins

    OpenAIRE

    Stussi, G.; Halter, J; Bucheli, E; Valli, P V; Seebach, L; Gmür, J; Gratwohl, A; Passweg, J. R.; Seebach, J.D.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Persistent anti-donor isoagglutinins after major ABO blood group incompatible hematopoietic stem cell transplantation may cause delayed red blood cell engraftment and post-transplant pure red cell aplasia. DESIGN AND METHODS: We investigated the effect of pretransplant anti-donor isoagglutinin reduction by in vivo absorption and/or plasmapheresis on the incidence of pure red cell aplasia and the time to red blood cell engraftment in 153 hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipient...

  5. The mode of action of some antibiotics on red blood cell membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaskó, K; Shagina, L V; Györgyi, S; Lev, A A

    1986-12-01

    Data are presented on the interaction of gramicidin, primycin and valinomycin with red blood cell membranes and compared with those obtained for artificial lipid bilayer membranes. The channel forming antibiotics gramicidin and primycin show specific kinetic behaviour in living cell membranes. It could be shown that the penetration of these antibiotics into the red blood cell membrane is a cooperative process resulting in the occurrence of aggregates in the lipid lattice of the membrane.

  6. Enhancement of heat transfer in red cell suspensions in vitro experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, R T; Tiruvaloor, N R

    1989-05-01

    New data on laminar heat convection with red cell suspensions have been gathered for both heating and cooling. When compared to data for the suspending medium alone, it is apparent that the red cells enhance laminar heat transfer when Pe greater than 4. This is probably due to particle movements. These new data disagree with earlier studies which indicated no enhancement of heat transfer for blood cell suspensions. The data do agree with previous correlations for enhanced thermal transport in sheared suspensions.

  7. Macromolecular depletion modulates the binding of red blood cells to activated endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yang; Koo, Stephanie; Lin, Cheryl Shuyi; Neu, Björn

    2010-09-01

    Adhesion of red blood cells (RBCs) to endothelial cells (ECs) is usually insignificant but an enhanced adhesion has been observed in various diseases associated with vascular complications. This abnormal adhesion under pathological conditions such as sickle cell disease has been correlated with increased levels of various plasma proteins but the detailed underlying mechanism(s) remains unclear. Usually it is assumed that the proadhesive effects of plasma proteins originate from ligand interactions cross-linking receptors on adjacent cells, but explicit results detailing binding sites or receptors for some proteins (e.g., fibrinogen) on either RBC or EC surfaces that would support this model are missing. In this study, the authors tested whether there is an alternative mechanism. Their results demonstrate that dextran 2 MDa promotes the adhesion of normal RBCs to thrombin-activated ECs and that this effect becomes more pronounced with increasing thrombin concentration or with prolonged thrombin incubation time. It is concluded that depletion interaction originating from nonadsorbing macromolecules (i.e., dextran) can modulate the adhesion of red blood cells to thrombin-activated EC. This study thereby suggests macromolecular depletion as an alternative mechanism for the adhesion-promoting effects of nonadsorbing plasma proteins. These findings should not only aid in getting a better understanding of diseases associated with vascular complications but should also have many potential applications in biomedical or biotechnological areas that require the control of cell-cell or cell surface interactions.

  8. Photodynamic effects of protoporphyrin on the architecture of erythrocyte membranes in protoporphyria and in normal red blood cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goeij, A.F.P.M.; Vergaert, P.H.J.Th ver; Steveninck, J. van

    1975-01-01

    Protoporphyrin causes a photodynamic damage of the red blood cell membrane. After illumination of red blood cells in the presence of protoporphyrin three effects can be observed: 1. 1. Red blood cell membranes show particle aggregation on the outer and inner fracture face, as seen in freeze-etch e

  9. Quantitative absorption cytometry for measuring red blood cell hemoglobin mass and volume.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schonbrun, Ethan; Malka, Roy; Di Caprio, Giuseppe; Schaak, Diane; Higgins, John M

    2014-04-01

    We present an optical system, called the quantitative absorption cytometer (QAC), to measure the volume and hemoglobin mass of red blood cells flowing through a microfluidic channel. In contrast to clinical hematology analyzers, where cells are sphered in order for both volume and hemoglobin to be measured accurately, the QAC measures cells in their normal physiological shape. Human red blood cells are suspended in a refractive index-matching absorbing buffer, driven through a microfluidic channel, and imaged using a transmission light microscope onto a color camera. A red and a blue LED illuminate cells and images at each color are used to independently retrieve cell volume and hemoglobin mass. This system shows good agreement with red blood cell indices retrieved by a clinical hematology analyzer and in fact measures a smaller coefficient of variation of hemoglobin concentration. In addition to cell indices, the QAC returns height and mass maps of each measured cell. These quantitative images are valuable for analyzing the detailed morphology of individual cells as well as statistical outliers found in the data. We also measured red blood cells in hypertonic and hypotonic buffers to quantify the correlation between volume and hemoglobin mass under osmotic stress. Because this method is invariant to cell shape, even extremely nonspherical cells in hypertonic buffers can be measured accurately.

  10. Ex-vivo expansion of red blood cells: how real for transfusion in humans?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Migliaccio, Anna Rita; Masselli, Elena; Varricchio, Lilian; Whitsett, Carolyn

    2012-03-01

    Blood transfusion is indispensable for modern medicine. In developed countries, the blood supply is adequate and safe but blood for alloimmunized patients is often unavailable. Concerns are increasing that donations may become inadequate in the future as the population ages prompting a search for alternative transfusion products. Improvements in culture conditions and proof-of-principle studies in animal models have suggested that ex-vivo expanded red cells may represent such a product. Compared to other cell therapies transfusion poses the unique challenge of requiring great cell doses (2.5×10(12) cells vs 10(7) cells). Although production of such cell numbers is theoretically possible, current technologies generate red cells in numbers sufficient only for safety studies. It is conceived that by the time these studies will be completed, technical barriers to mass cell production will have been eliminated making transfusion with ex-vivo generated red cells a reality.

  11. Tc-99m-labeled red blood cells for the measurement of red cell mass in newborn infants: concise communication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Linderkamp, O.; Betke, K.; Fendel, H.; Klemm, J.; Lorenzen, K.; Riegel, K.P.

    1980-07-01

    In vitro and in vivo investigations were performed to examine the binding of Tc-99m to neonatal red blood cells (RBC). Labeling efficiency was about 90%, and unbound Tc-99m less than 3% after one washing, in premature and full-term newborns and in children. Thus presence of high percentages of fetal hemoglobin (Hb F) did not influence the labeling of RBCs with Tc-99m. RBCs of 11 newborns were hemolysed and the distribution of Tc-99m on RBC components was analyzed. Although Hb F percentage averaged (60.0 +- 8.10)% (s.d.), only (11.9 +- 3.7)% of Tc-99m was bound by Hb F, whereas (45.0 +- 6.1)% was associated with Hb A. RBC membranes bound (13.7 +- 4.3)% and (29.3 +- 4.0)% were found unbound in hemolysates. These results indicate that Tc-99m preferentially binds to beta chains. In vivo equilibration of Tc-99m RBCs and of albumin labeled with Evans blue was investigated in five newborn infants. Tc-99m RBCs were stable in each case during the first hour after injection. Elution of Tc-99m from RBCs was (3.4 +- 1.5)% per h. Body-to-venous hematocrit ratio averaged 0.86 +- 0.03.

  12. Regulation of red blood cell deformability is independent of red blood cell-nitric oxide synthase under hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grau, Marijke; Lauten, Alexander; Hoeppener, Steffen; Goebel, Bjoern; Brenig, Julian; Jung, Christian; Bloch, Wilhelm; Suhr, Frank

    2016-09-12

    The aim was to study impacts of mild to severe hypoxia on human red blood cell (RBC)-nitric oxide synthase (NOS)-dependent NO production, protein S-nitrosylation and deformability.Ambient air oxygen concentration of 12 healthy subjects was step-wisely reduced from 20.95% to 16.21%, 12.35%, 10% and back to 20.95%. Additional in vitro experiments involved purging of blood (±sodium nitrite) with gas mixtures corresponding to in vivo intervention.Vital and hypoxia-associated parameters showed physiological adaptation to changing demands. Activation of RBC-NOS decreased with increasing hypoxia. RBC deformability, which is influenced by RBC-NOS activation, decreased under mild hypoxia, but surprisingly increased at severe hypoxia in vivo and in vitro. This was causatively induced by nitrite reduction to NO which increased S-nitrosylation of RBC α- and β-spectrins -a critical step to improve RBC deformability. The addition of sodium nitrite prevented decreases of RBC deformability under hypoxia by sustaining S-nitrosylation of spectrins suggesting compensatory mechanisms of non-RBC-NOS-produced NO.The results first time indicate a direct link between maintenance of RBC deformability under severe hypoxia by non-enzymatic NO production because RBC-NOS activation is reduced. These data improve our understanding of physiological mechanisms supporting adequate blood and, thus, oxygen supply to different tissues under severe hypoxia.

  13. Rheological properties of RBC in the microcirculation of mammalian skeletal muscle. [red blood cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehrenberg, M. H.

    1974-01-01

    In the investigation the established technique of direct microscopic viewing was combined with the use of a closed circuit television system and cinematography. The red cell flow patterns in all capillaries were found to be oscillatory with characteristic cycle frequencies and amplitudes for all concentrations of inspired oxygen greater than 8%. Generally, there was a transient decrease in mean flow rate with increasing severity of hypoxia, with a gradual return toward control values. Red cell flow patterns are discussed along with questions of red cell configuration.

  14. Red blood cells transfusions in oncological patients treated with radio- and chemoterapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antić Ana

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Anemia is one of the most frequent hematology disorders in patients with malignant diseases. It has a great influence on reduction of the quality of life, so it requires early diagnosis and an adequate treatment. The aim of this study was to present and analyze the treatment of anemia using red blood cell transfusions in patients with malignancies, to analyze adequate use of red blood cell transfusions according to hemoglobin concentration, and also the influence of the treatment of malignant disease on the level of anemia and use of red blood cells transfusion. Methods. This retrospective analysis included the data on the use of red blood cells in Oncological Clinic of Clinical Center Niš in a period from the 1st January 2008 to the 31st December 2008. Results. None of the patients received the whole blood. In this period, 735 patients received 1,006 units of red blood cells (red blood cell concentrate, resuspended, washed, filtered. An average use of red blood cell transfusion was 1.37 unit per oncological patient who received transfusion. The use of red blood cell units was adequate (87.60% of patients received transfusion of red cells when Hgb < 80 g/L. During radio- and chemotherapy we noticed a decrease of hematological parameter values. The patients of the experimental group were dependant on red blood cells transfusion. Statistically, a significant decrease of hemoglobin level was observed in patients treated only with radiotherapy who are the greatest consumers of red blood cells. Two patients were registered who more likely to have febrile nonhemolytic transfusion reactions. Posttransfusion alloimmunization occurred in 0.68% of the patients. Conclusion. The use of red blood cells in oncological patients is in compliance with the up to date tendencies and recommendations published in clinical guidelines. For the purpose of efficient transfusion support in patients with malignant diseases, we have to follow the newest

  15. The influence of far-red light on attributes of green bell pepper fruits (Capsicum annuum l. during storage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anca MIHALY COZMUTA

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Green bell peppers fruits, stored for 1 month at 8oC and 455% relative humidity in Far-Red light (FRL and darkness respectively, were investigated in terms of physical, chemical and microbiological parameters. The exposure to FRL slows down the water loss from fruits by stimulating the surface wax biosynthesis into a higher specific amount and hydrophobic nature and reducing the apertures, diameters of the pericarp cells, intercellular walls and dermal layer thicknesses. The higher level of catalase enzyme in the FRL-exposed fruits resulted in lower chilling injury index in comparison with the one in fruits exposed to darkness. FRL has favorable effect on chlorophyll and carotenoids accumulation rates. The multiplication of yeasts and molds on the surface of FRL-exposed bell peppers was significantly delayed as compared to the multiplication on the surface of the darkness-exposed bell peppers.

  16. A fuel cell energy storage system for Space Station extravehicular activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosso, Matthew J., Jr.; Adlhart, Otto J.; Marmolejo, Jose A.

    1988-01-01

    The development of a fuel cell energy storage system for the Space Station Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) is discussed. The ion-exchange membrane fuel cell uses hydrogen stored as a metal hydride. Several features of the hydrogen-oxygen fuel cell are examined, including its construction, hydrogen storage, hydride recharge, water heat, water removal, and operational parameters.

  17. Current topics in red cell biology: report on the Red Cell Special Interest Group meeting held at NHS Blood and Transplant Bristol on 30 October 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bullock, T; Bruce, L J; Ridgwell, K

    2016-08-01

    The Red Cell Special Interest Group (SIG) meeting, hosted by the British Blood Transfusion Society, provides an annual forum for the presentation of UK- and European-based red cell research. The 2015 meeting was held on Friday 30 October at the National Health Service Blood & Transplant (NHSBT) facility in Filton, Bristol and provided an exciting and varied programme on the themes of erythropoiesis, malaria biology and pathophysiology and red cells properties in stress and disease. Ten speakers presented on these topics over the course of one day. The meeting was well attended by over 90 delegates. Posters were presented during the lunch break, and abstracts from the posters are published at the end of this issue.

  18. Red blood cell components: time to revisit the sources of variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sparrow, Rosemary L

    2017-03-01

    Quality and safety of red blood cell (RBC) components is managed by screening of donors and strict regulatory controls of blood collection, processing and storage procedures. Despite these efforts, variations in RBC component quality exist as exemplified by the wide range in storage-induced haemolysis. This article provides a brief overview of the variables that contribute or potentially contribute to the quality of stored RBC components, including blood collection, processing, and donor-related variables. Particular focus is made on donor health and lifestyle factors that are not specifically screened and may impact on the physicobiochemical properties of RBCs and their storability. Inflammatory and oxidative stress states may be especially relevant as RBCs are susceptible to oxidative injury. Few studies have investigated the effect of specific donor-related variables on the quality of stored RBC components. Donor-related variables may be unaccounted confounders in the "age of blood" clinical studies that compared outcomes following transfusion of fresher or longer-stored RBC components. The conclusion is drawn that the blood donor is the greatest source of RBC component variability and the least "regulated" aspect of blood component production. It is proposed that more research is needed to better understand the connection between donor-related variables and quality consistency of stored RBC components. This could be very important given the impact of modern lifestyles that sees escalating rates of non-communicable health conditions that are associated with increased oxidative stress, such as hypertension, obesity and diabetes in children and adults, as well as an ageing population in many countries. The effect of these changes to global health and population demographics will impact on blood donor panels, and without significant new research, the consequences on the quality of stored blood components and transfusion outcomes are unknown.

  19. Red cell properties after different modes of blood transportation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asya Makhro

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Transportation of blood samples is unavoidable for assessment of specific parameters in blood of patients with rare anemias, blood doping testing or for research purposes. Despite the awareness that shipment may substantially alter multiple parameters, no study of that extend has been performed to assess these changes and optimize shipment conditions to reduce transportation-related artifacts. Here we investigate the changes in multiple parameters in blood of healthy donors over 72 hours of simulated shipment conditions. Three different anticoagulants (K3EDTA, Sodium Heparin and citrate-based CPDA for two temperatures (4oC and room temperature were tested to define the optimal transportation conditions. Parameters measured cover common cytology and biochemistry parameters (complete blood count, hematocrit, morphological examination, red blood cell (RBC volume, ion content and density, membrane properties and stability (hemolysis, osmotic fragility, membrane heat stability, patch-clamp investigations and formation of micro vesicles, Ca2+ handling, RBC metabolism, activity of numerous enzymes and O2 transport capacity. Our findings indicate that individual sets of parameter may require different shipment settings (anticoagulants, temperature. Most of the parameters except for ion (Na+, K+, Ca2+ handling and, possibly, reticulocytes counts, tend to favor transportation at 4oC. Whereas plasma and intraerythrocytic Ca2+ cannot be accurately measured in the presence of chelators such as citrate and EDTA, majority of Ca2+-dependent parameters are stabilized in CPDA samples. Even in blood samples from healthy donors transported using optimized shipment protocol the majority of parameters were stable within 24 hours, the condition that may not hold for the samples of patients with rare anemias. This implies for the as short as possible shipping using fast courier services to the closest expert laboratory at reach. Mobile laboratories or the travel of the

  20. Vesiculation of healthy and defective red blood cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, He; Lykotrafitis, George

    2015-07-01

    Vesiculation of mature red blood cells (RBCs) contributes to removal of defective patches of the erythrocyte membrane. In blood disorders, which are related to defects in proteins of the RBC membrane, vesiculation of the plasma membrane is intensified. Several hypotheses have been proposed to explain RBC vesiculation but the exact underlying mechanisms and what determines the sizes of the vesicles are still not completely understood. In this work, we apply a two-component coarse-grained molecular dynamics RBC membrane model to study how RBC vesiculation is controlled by the membrane spontaneous curvature and by lateral compression of the membrane. Our simulation results show that the formation of small homogeneous vesicles with a diameter less than 40 nm can be attributed to a large spontaneous curvature of membrane domains. On the other hand, compression on the membrane can cause the formation of vesicles with heterogeneous composition and with sizes comparable with the size of the cytoskeleton corral. When spontaneous curvature and lateral compression are simultaneously considered, the compression on the membrane tends to facilitate formation of vesicles originating from curved membrane domains. We also simulate vesiculation of RBCs with membrane defects connected to hereditary elliptocytosis (HE) and to hereditary spherocytosis (HS). When the vertical connectivity between the lipid bilayer and the membrane skeleton is elevated, as in normal RBCs, multiple vesicles are shed from the compressed membrane with diameters similar to the cytoskeleton corral size. In HS RBCs, where the connectivity between the lipid bilayer and the cytoskeleton is reduced, larger-size vesicles are released under the same compression ratio as in normal RBCs. Lastly, we find that vesicles released from HE RBCs can contain cytoskeletal filaments due to fragmentation of the membrane skeleton while vesicles released from the HS RBCs are depleted of cytoskeletal filaments.

  1. Flow structures and red blood cell dynamics in arteriole of dilated or constricted cross section.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gambaruto, Alberto M

    2016-07-26

    Vessel with 'circular' or 'star-shaped' cross sections are studied, representing respectively dilated or constricted cases where endothelial cells smoothly line or bulge into the lumen. Computational haemodynamics simulations are carried out on idealised periodic arteriole-sized vessels, with red blood cell 'tube' hematocrit value=24%. A further simulation of a single red blood cell serves for comparison purposes. The bulk motion of the red blood cells reproduces well-known effects, including the presence of a cell-free layer and the apparent shear-thinning non-Newtonian rheology. The velocity flow field is analysed in a Lagrangian reference frame, relative to any given red blood cell, hence removing the bulk coaxial motion and highlighting instead the complex secondary flow patterns. An aggregate formation becomes apparent, continuously rearranging and dynamic, brought about by the inter-cellular fluid mechanics interactions and the deformability properties of the cells. The secondary flow field induces a vacillating radial migration of the red blood cells. At different radial locations, the red blood cells express different residence times, orientation and shape. The shear stresses exerted by the flow on the vessel wall are influenced by the motion of red blood cells, despite the presence of the cell-free layer. Spatial (and temporal) variations of wall shear stress patters are observed, especially for the 'circular' vessel. The 'star-shaped' vessel bears considerable stress at the protruding endothelial cell crests, where the stress vectors are coaxially aligned. The bulging endothelial cells hence regularise the transmission of stresses on the vessel wall.

  2. Red blood cells from induced pluripotent stem cells: hurdles and developments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazurier, Christelle; Douay, Luc; Lapillonne, Hélène

    2011-07-01

    In the context of chronic blood supply difficulties, generating cultured red blood cells (cRBCs) in vitro after amplification of stem cells makes sense. This review will focus on the recent findings about the generation of erythroid cells from induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells and deals with the hurdles and next developments that will occur. The most proliferative source of stem cells for generating cRBCs is the cord blood, but this source is limited in terms of hematopoietic stem cells and dependent on donations. Pluripotent stem cells are thus the best candidates and potential sources of cRBCs. Critical advances have led towards the in-vitro production of functional RBCs from iPS cells in the last few years. Because iPS cells can proliferate indefinitely and can be selected for a phenotype of interest, they are potential candidates to organize complementary sources of RBCs for transfusion. Proof of concept of generating cRBCs from iPS cells has been performed, but the procedures need to be optimized to lead to clinical application in blood transfusion. Several crucial points remain to be resolved. Notably these include the choice of the initial cell type to generate iPS cells, the method of reprogramming, that is, to ensure the safety of iPS cells as clinical grade, the optimization of erythrocyte differentiation, and the definition of good manufacturing practice (GMP) conditions for industrial production.

  3. Correction: Large-scale electricity storage utilizing reversible solid oxide cells combined with underground storage of CO2 and CH4

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Søren Højgaard; Graves, Christopher R.; Mogensen, Mogens Bjerg

    2017-01-01

    Correction for ‘Large-scale electricity storage utilizing reversible solid oxide cells combined with underground storage of CO2 and CH4’ by S. H. Jensen et al., Energy Environ. Sci., 2015, 8, 2471–2479.......Correction for ‘Large-scale electricity storage utilizing reversible solid oxide cells combined with underground storage of CO2 and CH4’ by S. H. Jensen et al., Energy Environ. Sci., 2015, 8, 2471–2479....

  4. Proteomic analysis identifies differentially expressed proteins after red propolis treatment in Hep-2 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frozza, Caroline Olivieri da Silva; Ribeiro, Tanara da Silva; Gambato, Gabriela; Menti, Caroline; Moura, Sidnei; Pinto, Paulo Marcos; Staats, Charley Christian; Padilha, Francine Ferreira; Begnini, Karine Rech; de Leon, Priscila Marques Moura; Borsuk, Sibele; Savegnago, Lucielli; Dellagostin, Odir; Collares, Tiago; Seixas, Fabiana Kömmling; Henriques, João Antonio Pêgas; Roesch-Ely, Mariana

    2014-01-01

    Here we investigated alterations in the protein profile of Hep-2 treated with red propolis using two-dimensional electrophoresis associated to mass spectrometry and apoptotic rates of cells treated with and without red propolis extracts through TUNEL and Annexin-V assays. A total of 325 spots were manually excised from the two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and 177 proteins were identified using LC-MS-MS. Among all proteins identified that presented differential expression, most were down-regulated in presence of red propolis extract at a concentration of 120 μg/mL (IC50): GRP78, PRDX2, LDHB, VIM and TUBA1A. Only two up-regulated proteins were identified in this study in the non-cytotoxic (6 μg/mL) red propolis treated group: RPLP0 and RAD23B. TUNEL staining assay showed a markedly increase in the mid- to late-stage apoptosis of Hep-2 cells induced by red propolis at concentrations of 60 and 120 μg/mL when compared with non-treated cells. The increase of late apoptosis was confirmed by in situ Annexin-V analysis in which red propolis extract induced late apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner. The differences in tumor cell protein profiles warrant further investigations including isolation of major bioactive compounds of red propolis in different cell lines using proteomics and molecular tests to validate the protein expression here observed. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. From artificial red blood cells, oxygen carriers, and oxygen therapeutics to artificial cells, nanomedicine, and beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Thomas M S

    2012-06-01

    The first experimental artificial red blood cells have all three major functions of red blood cells (rbc). However, the first practical one is a simple polyhemoglobin (PolyHb) that only has an oxygen-carrying function. This is now in routine clinical use in South Africa and Russia. An oxygen carrier with antioxidant functions, PolyHb-catalase-superoxide dismutase, can fulfill two of the three functions of rbc. Even more complete is one with all three functions of rbc in the form of PolyHb-catalase-superoxide dismutase-carbonic anhydrase. The most advanced ones are nanodimension artificial rbc with either PEG-lipid membrane or PEG-PLA polymer membrane. Extensions into oxygen therapeutics include a PolyHb-tyrosinase that suppresses the growth of melanoma in a mice model. Another is a PolyHb-fibrinogen that is an oxygen carrier with platelet-like function. Research has now extended well beyond the original research on artificial rbc into many areas of artificial cells. These include nanoparticles, nanotubules, lipid vesicles, liposomes, polymer-tethered lipid vesicles, polymersomes, microcapsules, bioencapsulation, nanocapules, macroencapsulation, synthetic cells, and others. These are being used in nanotechnology, nanomedicine, regenerative medicine, enzyme/gene therapy, cell/stem cell therapy, biotechnology, drug delivery, hemoperfusion, nanosensers, and even by some groups in agriculture, industry, aquatic culture, nanocomputers, and nanorobotics.

  6. [Production of mature red blood cell by using peripheral blood mononuclear cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Yan-Jun; Liu, Jiang; Zhang, Ke-Ying; Shang, Xiao-Yan; Li, Wei; Wang, Li-Jun; Liu, Na; Wang, Lin; Cui, Shuang; Ni, Lei; Zhao, Bo-Tao; Wang, Dong-Mei; Gao, Song-Ming; Zhang, Zhi-Xin

    2014-10-01

    Most protocols for in vitro producing red blood cells (RBC) use the CD34(+) cells or embryonic stem cells from cord blood, bone marrow or peripheral blood as the start materials. This study was purposed to produce the mature RBC in vitro by using peripheral blood mononuclear cells as start material. The peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMNC) were isolated from buffy coat after blood leukapheresis, the mature red blood cells (RBC) were prepared by a 4-step culture protocol. The results showed that after culture by inducing with the different sets of cytokines and supporting by mouse MS-5 cell line, the expansion of PBMNC reached about 1000 folds at the end of the culture. About 90% of cultured RBC were enucleated mature cells which had the comparable morphological characteristics with normal RBC. Colony-forming assays showed that this culture system could stimulate the proliferation of progenitors in PBMNC and differentiate into erythroid cells. The structure and function analysis indicated that the mean cell volume of in vitro cultured RBC was 118 ± 4 fl, which was slight larger than that of normal RBC (80-100 fl); the mean cell hemoglobin was 36 ± 1.2 pg, which was slight higher than that of normal RBC (27-31 pg); the maximal deformation index was 0.46, which approachs level of normal RBC; the glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase and pyrurvate kinase levels was consistant with young RBC. It is concluded that PBMNC are feasble, convenient and low-cost source for producing cultured RBC and this culture system is suitable to generate the RBC from PBMNC.

  7. Biosignatures of Kerala red rain cells: Implications in understanding their origin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gangappa, R.; Thomas, M.; Hogg, S.

    2013-09-01

    The red rain that fell over Kerala, southern India (2001-2012) was characterised by the red pigmented particles. Earlier proposal claiming that these are known algal bloom blown from trees (Sampath et al, 2001; DiGregorio, 2007) has been studied by us and disproved. Also, further investigation reporting their extraordinary properties including a suggestion that they lack DNA (Louis and Kumar 2003; 2006; 2008) has been invalidated (Gangappa and Hogg, 2013). However, their claim regarding the growth and replication of these cells at 300ºC needs more investigation if it is to gain acceptance. Current study provide evidences regarding the biological properties of Kerala red rain cells to gain insights into environmental conditions from which they may have originated. Combined with various research strategies and high resolution instruments, we have demonstrated the following interesting properties of Kerala red rain cells: (1) unusually thick external envelope enclosing the central core; (2)stability of red pigment at temperatures about 100ºC and pH variations; (3) absence of eukaryotic ultrastructures; (4) possible replication at 121ºC with nanostructures (possible daughter cells) having similar morphological features inside the large mother cells at such high temperature. They contain high percentage of carbon, iron, silicon and aluminum and often enclosed in a silicon rich biofilms. Further investigation shows that the positive detection of DNA in these cells was possible only after the complete removal of red pigment, thereby providing an explanation for the negative outcome of earlier studies in this regard. Moreover, evidences are shown to support that these cells contain high amounts of UV absorbing compounds, porphyrin complexes and possible scytonemin. Kerala red rain cells may prove to be polyextermophiles belonging to prokaryotes and may have possibly originated from the environment containing above mentioned chemical elements, high energy UV exposure and

  8. The negative regulation of red cell mass by neocytolysis: physiologic and pathophysiologic manifestations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, Lawrence; Alfrey, Clarence P

    2005-01-01

    We have uncovered a physiologic process which negatively regulates the red cell mass by selectively hemolyzing young circulating red blood cells. This allows fine control of the number of circulating red blood cells under steady-state conditions and relatively rapid adaptation to new environments. Neocytolysis is initiated by a fall in erythropoietin levels, so this hormone remains the major regulator of red cell mass both with anemia and with red cell excess. Physiologic situations in which there is increased neocytolysis include the emergence of newborns from the hypoxic uterine environment and the descent of polycythemic high-altitude dwellers to sea level. The process first became apparent while investigating the mechanism of the anemia that invariably occurs after spaceflight. Astronauts experience acute central plethora on entering microgravity resulting in erythropoietin suppression and neocytolysis, but the reduced blood volume and red cell mass become suddenly maladaptive on re-entry to earth's gravity. The pathologic erythropoietin deficiency of renal disease precipitates neocytolysis, which explains the prolongation of red cell survival consistently resulting from erythropoietin therapy and points to optimally efficient erythropoietin dosing schedules. Implications should extend to a number of other physiologic and pathologic situations including polycythemias, hemolytic anemias, 'blood-doping' by elite athletes, and oxygen therapy. It is likely that erythropoietin influences endothelial cells which in turn signal reticuloendothelial phagocytes to destroy or permit the survival of young red cells marked by surface molecules. Ongoing studies to identify the molecular targets and cytokine intermediaries should facilitate detection, dissection and eventual therapeutic manipulation of the process. Copyright (c) 2005 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  9. The influence of platelets, plasma and red blood cells on functional haemostatic assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bochsen, Louise; Johansson, Pär I; Kristensen, Annemarie T; Daugaard, Gedske; Ostrowski, Sisse R

    2011-04-01

    Functional whole blood haemostatic assays are used increasingly to guide transfusion therapy and monitor medical treatment and are also applied for in-vitro evaluations of the haemostatic potential of stored platelets. We investigated how the cellular and plasmatic elements, both isolated and combined, influenced the two methodologically different assays, thrombelastography (TEG) and impedance aggregometry (Multiplate). Platelet-rich plasma (200 × 10/l) or pure plasma (0 platelets), with and without added red blood cells (RBCs), hematocrit 0, 0.15 or 0.29, were produced in vitro from platelet concentrates, fresh frozen plasma and stored RBC. Pure platelets were investigated by removing plasma components from platelet concentrates by diafiltration against the platelet storage solution Intersol. Plasma was readded by diafiltration against plasma in Intersol. Haemostatic function was evaluated by TEG and Multiplate. In the TEG, increasing amounts of RBC reduced clot strength and clot kinetics (α-angle), most markedly in plasma/RBC without platelets. In contrast, RBC in a platelet concentrate matrix enhanced Multiplate aggregation in response to weak agonists (ADP and arachidonic acid). Furthermore, removing plasma from platelet concentrates eliminated the TEG response and diminished the Multiplate aggregation response, but readding plasma to the pure platelet concentrates restored the response. Each of the elements in whole blood, plasma, platelets and RBC, affected the Multiplate and TEG results differently. The results emphasize that the concentrations of all cellular and plasmatic components in whole blood should be taken into account when interpreting results obtained by TEG and multiplate.

  10. Modular Energy Storage System for Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, Janice [Magna International, Rochester Mills, MI (United States)

    2010-08-27

    The objective of the project is to develop technologies, specifically power electronics, energy storage electronics and controls that provide efficient and effective energy management between electrically powered devices in alternative energy vehicles plug-in electric vehicles, hybrid vehicles, range extended vehicles, and hydrogen-based fuel cell vehicles. The in-depth research into the complex interactions between the lower and higher voltage systems from data obtained via modeling, bench testing and instrumented vehicle data will allow an optimum system to be developed from a performance, cost, weight and size perspective. The subsystems are designed for modularity so that they may be used with different propulsion and energy delivery systems. This approach will allow expansion into new alternative energy vehicle markets.

  11. Recurrent thymoma with stiff-person syndrome and pure red blood cell aplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Rei; Kaji, Masahiro; Horiuchi, Sho; Miyahara, Naofumi; Hino, Yumi; Suemasu, Keiichi

    2014-05-01

    Stiff-person syndrome (formerly known as stiff-man syndrome) is a very rare autoimmune and neurogenic disorder, thought to present as a paraneoplastic variant in association with thymoma. Pure red blood cell aplasia is also a paraneoplastic disorder associated with thymoma. Although separate cases of stiff-person syndrome and pure red blood cell aplasia have been reported, we describe here what is to our knowledge the first case of recurrent thymoma with both stiff-person syndrome and pure red blood cell aplasia. We describe the successful treatment of the neurogenic symptoms of stiff-person syndrome and the progressive anemia associated with pure red blood cell aplasia by tumor excision.

  12. Safety Evaluation of Hemoglobin-Albumin Cluster "HemoAct" as a Red Blood Cell Substitute

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Haruki, Risa; Kimura, Takuya; Iwasaki, Hitomi; Yamada, Kana; Kamiyama, Ikuo; Kohno, Mitsutomo; Taguchi, Kazuaki; Nagao, Saori; Maruyama, Toru; Otagiri, Masaki; Komatsu, Teruyuki

    2015-01-01

    A hemoglobin (Hb) wrapped covalently by human serum albumins (HSAs), a core-shell structured hemoglobin-albumin cluster designated as "HemoAct", is an O2-carrier designed for use as a red blood cell (RBC) substitute...

  13. Isolation of a Kell-reactive protein from red cell membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallas, C; Simon, R; Sharpe, M A; Byler, C

    1986-01-01

    A red cell membrane protein which exhibits Kell blood group antigen activity has been identified with a purified anti-Kell bound to a Protein-A agarose column and eluting with lithium diiodosalicylate (LIS). Although anti-Kell as well as the Kell-reactive membrane protein were eluted from the column, the eluate was capable of reducing the titer of added anti-Kell from 64 to 4. In addition, the eluate was shown to possess Kell reactivity by binding I125 Protein A after incubation with anti-Kell. Electrophoresis (SDS gel polyacrylamide 5-20% gradient) showed a band at approximately 90,000 daltons when solubilized membranes from Kell-positive red cells were used but not when membranes from dithiothreitol- and papain-treated Kell-positive red cells or Kell-negative red cells were used. A band isolated with unreduced conditions was capable of neutralizing anti-Kell.

  14. Acute iatrogenic polycythemia induced by massive red blood cell transfusion during subtotal abdominal colectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Chiapaikeo

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available A 46 year old man was transfused ten units of packed red blood cells during subtotal colectomy after intraoperative point-of-care testing values demonstrated hemoglobin values less than seven grams per deciliter (g/dL. A post-operative hemoglobin analyzed in a standard hematologic laboratory revealed a hemoglobin value of 27.8 g/dL. He underwent emergent red blood cell depletion therapy which decreased his hemoglobin to 7.5 g/dL. The physiologic consequences of iatrogenic polycythemia caused by massive transfusion during major abdominal surgery must take into account the fluid shifts that interplay between the osmotic load, viscosity of blood, and postoperative third spacing of fluid. Treatment of acute iatrogenic polycythemia can be effectively accomplished by red blood cell depletion therapy. However, fluid shifts caused by massive transfusion followed by rapid red cell depletion produce a unique physiologic state that is without a well-described algorithm for management.

  15. Generation of red blood cells from human embryonic/induced pluripotent stem cells for blood transfusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebihara, Yasuhiro; Ma, Feng; Tsuji, Kohichiro

    2012-06-01

    Red blood cell (RBC) transfusion is necessary for many patients with emergency or hematological disorders. However, to date the supply of RBCs remains labile and dependent on voluntary donations. In addition, the transmission of infectious disease via blood transfusion from unspecified donors remains a risk. Establishing a large quantity of safe RBCs would help to address this issue. Human embryonic stem (hES) cells and the recently established human induced pluripotent stem (hiPS) cells represent potentially unlimited sources of donor-free RBCs for blood transfusion, as they can proliferate indefinitely in vitro. Extensive research has been done to efficiently generate transfusable RBCs from hES/iPS cells. Nevertheless, a number of challenges must be overcome before the clinical usage of hES/iPS cell-derived RBCs can become a reality.

  16. Biomechanics and biorheology of red blood cells in sickle cell anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xuejin; Dao, Ming; Lykotrafitis, George; Karniadakis, George Em

    2017-01-01

    Sickle cell anemia (SCA) is an inherited blood disorder that causes painful crises due to vaso-occlusion of small blood vessels. The primary cause of the clinical phenotype of SCA is the intracellular polymerization of sickle hemoglobin resulting in sickling of red blood cells (RBCs) in deoxygenated conditions. In this review, we discuss the biomechanical and biorheological characteristics of sickle RBCs and sickle blood as well as their implications toward a better understanding of the pathophysiology and pathogenesis of SCA. Additionally, we highlight the adhesive heterogeneity of RBCs in SCA and their specific contribution to vaso-occlusive crisis. PMID:27876368

  17. Biomechanics and biorheology of red blood cells in sickle cell anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xuejin; Dao, Ming; Lykotrafitis, George; Karniadakis, George Em

    2017-01-04

    Sickle cell anemia (SCA) is an inherited blood disorder that causes painful crises due to vaso-occlusion of small blood vessels. The primary cause of the clinical phenotype of SCA is the intracellular polymerization of sickle hemoglobin resulting in sickling of red blood cells (RBCs) in deoxygenated conditions. In this review, we discuss the biomechanical and biorheological characteristics of sickle RBCs and sickle blood as well as their implications toward a better understanding of the pathophysiology and pathogenesis of SCA. Additionally, we highlight the adhesive heterogeneity of RBCs in SCA and their specific contribution to vaso-occlusive crisis.

  18. A micro-scale simulation of red blood cell passage through symmetric and asymmetric bifurcated vessels

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Tong; Xing, Zhongwen

    2016-01-01

    Blood exhibits a heterogeneous nature of hematocrit, velocity, and effective viscosity in microcapillaries. Microvascular bifurcations have a significant influence on the distribution of the blood cells and blood flow behavior. This paper presents a simulation study performed on the two-dimensionalmotions and deformation of multiple red blood cells in microvessels with diverging and converging bifurcations. Fluid dynamics and membrane mechanics were incorporated. Effects of cell shape, hematocrit, and deformability of the cell membrane on rheological behavior of the red blood cells and the hemodynamics have been investigated. It was shown that the blood entering the daughter branch with a higher flow rate tended to receive disproportionally more cells. The results also demonstrate that red blood cells in microvessels experienced lateral migration in the parent channel and blunted velocity profiles in both straight section and daughter branches, and this effect was influenced by the shape and the initial posit...

  19. Neutral red uptake assay for the estimation of cell viability/cytotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Repetto, Guillermo; del Peso, Ana; Zurita, Jorge L

    2008-01-01

    The neutral red uptake assay provides a quantitative estimation of the number of viable cells in a culture. It is one of the most used cytotoxicity tests with many biomedical and environmental applications. It is based on the ability of viable cells to incorporate and bind the supravital dye neutral red in the lysosomes. Most primary cells and cell lines from diverse origin may be successfully used. Cells are seeded in 96-well tissue culture plates and are treated for the appropriate period. The plates are then incubated for 2 h with a medium containing neutral red. The cells are subsequently washed, the dye is extracted in each well and the absorbance is read using a spectrophotometer. The procedure is cheaper and more sensitive than other cytotoxicity tests (tetrazolium salts, enzyme leakage or protein content). Once the cells have been treated, the assay can be completed in <3 h.

  20. Pure red cell aplasia in a simultaneous pancreas-kidney transplantation patient: inside the erythroblast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Labbadia

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available A case of pure red cell aplasia in a simultaneous kidney-pancreas transplant recipient on immunosuppressive therapy is reported here. The patient presented with anemia unresponsive to erythropoietin treatment. Bone marrow cytomorphology was highly suggestive of parvovirus pure red cell aplasia, which was confirmed with serology and polymerase chain reaction positive for parvovirus B19 DNA in peripheral blood. After the administration of intravenous immunoglobulin the anemia improved with a rising number of the reticulocytes.

  1. [Acute hepatitis-associated pure red cell aplasia: a case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Della Loggia, Paolo; Cremonini, Laura

    2002-12-01

    After a holiday in Egypt, a 57-year-old caucasian woman developed acute hepatitis A. The illness seemed initially to have a benign course, with a decreasing trend of hepatic enzymes and an apparent recovery. Three weeks later a relapse occurred. Recurrence of symptoms and aminotransferase elevation were associated with severe anemia; a hyporegenerative anemia was diagnosed and all laboratory findings were consistent with pure red cell aplasia. The haematologic disorder was successfully treated with red cell transfusion and glucocorticoids.

  2. Dynamical Modes of Deformed Red Blood Cells and Lipid Vesicles in Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noguchi, H.

    Red blood cells and lipid vesicles exhibit rich behaivor in flows.Their dynamics were studied using a particle-based hydrodynamic simulation method, multi-particle collision dynamics. Rupture of lipid vesicles in simple shear flow was simulated by meshless membrane model. Several shape transitions of lipid vesicles and red blood cells are induced by flows. Transition of a lipid vesicle from budded to prolate shapes with increasing shear rate and ordered alignments of deformed elastic vesicles in high density are presented.

  3. Estimated red blood cell thickness in microcytic anemia due to iron deficiency anemia and thalassemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viroj Wiwanitkit

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available "nAnemia is one of the most common hematological disorders that are still the present in all countries around the world. Microcytic anemia is a specific kind of anemia presenting with small red blood cell. In this paper, the author discusses on the estimated red blood cell thickness, a new proposed parameter, comparing between that of iron deficiency anemia and thalassemia and further extrapolate on the clinical implication.

  4. Anesthetic management of a pregnant patient with a pure red cell aplasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Channabasavaraj S Sanikop

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Pure red cell disorder is an uncommon disorder in which maturation arrest occurs in the maturation of erythrocytes. Erythroblats are virtually absent in the bone marrow. Surgery poses a very high-risk for these patients because of the several complications that can occur in the perioperative period. In this case report, we report a pregnant patient with a pure red cell aplasia who was optimized pre-operatively and underwent cesarean section under sub-arachnoid block.

  5. Seventy-five genetic loci influencing the human red blood cell

    OpenAIRE

    van der Harst, Pim; Zhang, Weihua; Mateo Leach, Irene; Rendon, Augusto; Verweij, Niek; Sehmi, Joban; Dirk S Paul; Elling, Ulrich; Allayee, Hooman; Li, Xinzhong; Radhakrishnan, Aparna; Tan, Sian-Tsung; Voss, Katrin; Weichenberger, Christian X.; Albers, Cornelis A

    2012-01-01

    Anaemia is a chief determinant of global ill health, contributing to cognitive impairment, growth retardation and impaired physical capacity. To understand further the genetic factors influencing red blood cells, we carried out a genome-wide association study of haemoglobin concentration and related parameters in up to 135,367 individuals. Here we identify 75 independent genetic loci associated with one or more red blood cell phenotypes at P < 10(-8), which together explain 4-9% of the phe...

  6. The role of red cell distribution width as a marker in inflammatory bowel disease

    OpenAIRE

    Arhan, Mehmet; ÖNAL, İbrahim Koral; Taş, Adnan; KURT, Mevlüt; Kalkan, İsmail Hakkı

    2011-01-01

    To determine whether red cell distribution width could be used for the assessment of disease activity in patients with inflammatory bowel disease. Materials and methods: A total of 165 patients with inflammatory bowel disease (105 ulcerative colitis; 60 Crohn's disease) and 43 healthy blood donors were included in this retrospective study in a tertiary care setting. The medical records of the patients were reviewed to note clinical activity indices, red cell distribution width, serum C ...

  7. Mechanical and electrical properties of red blood cells using optical tweezers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontes, A.; Barjas Castro, M. L.; Brandão, M. M.; Fernandes, H. P.; Thomaz, A. A.; Huruta, R. R.; Pozzo, L. Y.; Barbosa, L. C.; Costa, F. F.; Saad, S. T. O.; Cesar, C. L.

    2011-04-01

    Optical tweezers are a very sensitive tool, based on photon momentum transfer, for individual, cell by cell, manipulation and measurements, which can be applied to obtain important properties of erythrocytes for clinical and research purposes. Mechanical and electrical properties of erythrocytes are critical parameters for stored cells in transfusion centers, immunohematological tests performed in transfusional routines and in blood diseases. In this work, we showed methods, based on optical tweezers, to study red blood cells and applied them to measure apparent overall elasticity, apparent membrane viscosity, zeta potential, thickness of the double layer of electrical charges and adhesion in red blood cells.

  8. Removal of antibodies from red cells: Comparison of three elution methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahul Katharia

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Direct antiglobulin test (DAT is the most common test done in immunohematology lab, which detects immunoglobulin and fragments of complement attached to the red blood cells. These coated red blood cells are difficult to accurately phenotype, which may be required for selection of appropriate unit of red blood cells for transfusion. Aims: We have studied the efficacy of various elution methods in removing the antibodies coating the red cells and their impact on different blood group antigen activity. Materials and Methods: Patient samples sent for serological evaluation of autoimmune hemolysis were included in the study. DAT and Indirect antiglobulin test (IAT were performed using gel cards (ID system, DiaMed Switzerland. Antibody coated red cells, either by in-vivo or in-vitro sensitization, were used to assess the outcome of three elution methods. Results: Out of 93 DAT positive samples already sensitized in vivo, 28 (30 % samples became DAT negative post elution using either of three methods, while 36 (38.8% showed reduction in strength of reaction, whereas in 29 (31.2% there was no change in strength of reaction. Similarly, out of the 17 samples prepared by in vitro sensitization, 12 samples became completely negative after glycine-HCl/EDTA elution, 9 and 5 samples became negative after heat elution and chloroquine diphosphate elution methods, respectively. Conclusion: On comparative analysis glycine-HCl/EDTA elution method was better than the other two methods and can be used for eluting immunoglobulins from intact red cells.

  9. Rare hereditary red blood cell enzymopathies associated with hemolytic anemia - pathophysiology, clinical aspects, and laboratory diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koralkova, P; van Solinge, W W; van Wijk, R

    2014-06-01

    Hereditary red blood cell enzymopathies are genetic disorders affecting genes encoding red blood cell enzymes. They cause a specific type of anemia designated hereditary nonspherocytic hemolytic anemia (HNSHA). Enzymopathies affect cellular metabolism, which, in the red cell, mainly consists of anaerobic glycolysis, the hexose monophosphate shunt, glutathione metabolism, and nucleotide metabolism. Enzymopathies are commonly associated with normocytic normochromic hemolytic anemia. In contrast to other hereditary red cell disorders such as membrane disorders or hemoglobinopathies, the morphology of the red blood cell shows no specific abnormalities. Diagnosis is based on detection of reduced specific enzyme activity and molecular characterization of the defect on the DNA level. The most common enzyme disorders are deficiencies of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) and pyruvate kinase (PK). However, there are a number of other enzyme disorders, often much less known, causing HNSHA. These disorders are rare and often underdiagnosed, and the purpose of this review. In this brief review, we provide an overview of clinically relevant enzymes, their function in red cell metabolism, and key aspects of laboratory diagnosis.

  10. An effect of glycoprotein IIb/IIIa inhibitors on the kinetics of red blood cells aggregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokolova, Irina A; Muravyov, Alexei V; Khokhlova, Maria D; Rikova, Sofya Yu; Lyubin, Evgeny V; Gafarova, Marina A; Skryabina, Maria N; Fedyanin, Angrey A; Kryukova, Darya V; Shahnazarov, Alexander A

    2014-01-01

    The reversible aggregation of red blood cells (RBCs) continues to be of the basic science and clinical interest. Recently it has been reported about a specific binding between fibrinogen and unknown erythrocyte glycoprotein receptors. The aim of this study was to investigate whether the red blood cell aggregation (RBCA) include the cell-cell interaction using the membrane receptors that bind such ligands as fibrinogen or fibronectin. To test this hypothesis the RBCs were incubated with monafram - the drug of the monoclonal antibodies against glycoprotein (GP) IIb/IIIa, with the GPIIb-IIIa receptor antagonist tirofiban, epifibatide and with the fibrinogen inhibiting peptide. It has been found that the RBC incubation with monafram resulted in a marked RBCA decrease mainly in persons with high level of aggregation. Another research session has shown that RBC incubation with fibronectin was accompanied by a significant RBCA rise. The monafram addition to red cell incubation medium resulted in a significant RBCA lowering. The cell incubation with tirofiban and epifibatide issued in RBCA decrease. The similar results were obtained when RBCs were incubated with the fibrinogen inhibiting peptide. Although monafram, tirofiban, eptifibatide and the fibrinogen inhibiting peptide were related to fibrinogen function they didn't inhibit RBCA completely. Therefore, under moderate and low red blood cell aggregation the cell binding is probably related to nonspecific mode. It seems evident that the specific and nonspecific modes of red blood cell aggregate formation could co-exist. Additional theoretical and experimental investigations in this area are needed.

  11. An overview of unresolved inherent problems associated with red cell transfusion and potential use of artificial oxygen carriers and ECO-RBC: current status/future trends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seghatchian, Jerard; de Sousa, Gracinda

    2007-12-01

    This manuscript deals with why we need alternatives to liquid stored RBC highlighting some of the unresolved inherent problems related to red cell storage lesion and their potential impacts on the clinical outcomes and transfusion complications. The promise of several potential alternatives to red cell transfusions such as: Perfluorocarbon; Modified Hb-based oxygen carriers and newer design of Hb-based oxygen carriers are reviewed. It is noteworthy to say that since the first introduction of these oxygen carriers, almost five decades ago, the only successful drive has been to prepare safer and more convenient oxygen carriers, for enhancing the quality of life of recipients and their usage, either as substitutes to red cell transfusion or even as the bridge, remains patchy. Moreover, as new products with better characteristics become available the older products from the competitors are withdrawn. Finally, the current progress on universal RBC, known as ECO-cells is highlighted and, in the future perspectives, some of the current efforts in making the red cells transfusion safer and more efficacious are briefly addressed.

  12. Red light-induced redox reactions in cells observed with TEMPO.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichler, Maor; Lavi, Ronit; Friedmann, Harry; Shainberg, Asher; Lubart, Rachel

    2007-06-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the wavelength dependence of light-induced redox reactions in cells, particularly whether there is any contribution by red wavelengths. An additional aim was to assess the potential of 2,2,6,6-tetramethyl piperidine-N-oxyl (TEMPO) as a tool for measuring these redox reactions. Visible light has been shown to affect cells, and redox reactions, which have been detected previously using spin traps, have been proposed as a mechanism. However, there is little evidence that red light, which is used in most such experiments, is redox active in cells. Redox activity was observed by measuring the decay of the electron paramagnetic resonance signal of TEMPO that occurs in the presence of illuminated cells. Color filters were used to generate blue, green, and red light, and the decay resulting from these wavelengths was compared to the decay caused by white light. Shorter wavelengths have a considerably stronger effect than longer wavelengths, although red light has some effect. Creation of reactive oxygen species by red light was confirmed with the spin trap 5,5-dimethyl-1-pyrroline-N-oxide (DMPO). Red light can induce redox reactions in illuminated cells. However, shorter wavelengths are more efficient in this regard. In addition, TEMPO was found to be a more sensitive probe than DMPO for detecting light-induced cellular redox reactions.

  13. Targeted Application of Human Genetic Variation Can Improve Red Blood Cell Production from Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giani, Felix C; Fiorini, Claudia; Wakabayashi, Aoi; Ludwig, Leif S; Salem, Rany M; Jobaliya, Chintan D; Regan, Stephanie N; Ulirsch, Jacob C; Liang, Ge; Steinberg-Shemer, Orna; Guo, Michael H; Esko, Tõnu; Tong, Wei; Brugnara, Carlo; Hirschhorn, Joel N; Weiss, Mitchell J; Zon, Leonard I; Chou, Stella T; French, Deborah L; Musunuru, Kiran; Sankaran, Vijay G

    2016-01-07

    Multipotent and pluripotent stem cells are potential sources for cell and tissue replacement therapies. For example, stem cell-derived red blood cells (RBCs) are a potential alternative to donated blood, but yield and quality remain a challenge. Here, we show that application of insight from human population genetic studies can enhance RBC production from stem cells. The SH2B3 gene encodes a negative regulator of cytokine signaling and naturally occurring loss-of-function variants in this gene increase RBC counts in vivo. Targeted suppression of SH2B3 in primary human hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells enhanced the maturation and overall yield of in-vitro-derived RBCs. Moreover, inactivation of SH2B3 by CRISPR/Cas9 genome editing in human pluripotent stem cells allowed enhanced erythroid cell expansion with preserved differentiation. Our findings therefore highlight the potential for combining human genome variation studies with genome editing approaches to improve cell and tissue production for regenerative medicine.

  14. Reflectance confocal microscopy of red blood cells: simulation and experiment (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeidan, Adel; Yeheskely-Hayon, Daniella; Minai, Limor; Yelin, Dvir

    2016-03-01

    The properties of red blood cells are a remarkable indicator of the body's physiological condition; their density could indicate anemia or polycythemia, their absorption spectrum correlates with blood oxygenation, and their morphology is highly sensitive to various pathologic states including iron deficiency, ovalocytosis, and sickle cell disease. Therefore, measuring the morphology of red blood cells is important for clinical diagnosis, providing valuable indications on a patient's health. In this work, we simulated the appearance of normal red blood cells under a reflectance confocal microscope and discovered unique relations between the cells' morphological parameters and the resulting characteristic interference patterns. The simulation results showed good agreement with in vitro reflectance confocal images of red blood cells, acquired using spectrally encoded flow cytometry (SEFC) that imaged the cells during linear flow and without artificial staining. By matching the simulated patterns to the SEFC images of the cells, the cells' three-dimensional shapes were evaluated and their volumes were calculated. Potential applications include measurement of the mean corpuscular volume, cell morphological abnormalities, cell stiffness under mechanical stimuli, and the detection of various hematological diseases.

  15. Early alterations of red blood cell rheology in critically ill patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reggiori, Giulia; Occhipinti, Giovanna; De Gasperi, Andrea; Vincent, Jean-Louis; Piagnerelli, Michael

    2009-12-01

    To investigate red blood cell rheology in a large intensive care unit population on admission, and to assess the possible influence of comorbidities on the rheology. : Prospective study. Medico-surgical intensive care unit with 31 beds. All intensive care unit admissions during a 5-month period and 20 healthy volunteers. Blood sampling. A total of 196 intensive care patients (160 without and 36 with sepsis) and 20 healthy volunteers were studied. Red blood cell rheology (deformability and aggregation) was assessed ex vivo using the laser-assisted optical rotational cell analyzer (LORCA; Mechatronics Instruments BV, AN Zwaag, Netherlands) within the first 24 hrs after intensive care unit admission. Red blood cell deformability was determined by the elongation index in relation to the shear stress (0.3 to 50 Pa) applied on the red blood cell membrane surface. Aggregation was assessed by the aggregation index. Septic patients were more likely to have anemia, coagulation abnormalities, and comorbidities than were nonseptic patients. Red blood cell deformability was significantly altered in septic compared to nonseptic patients and volunteers for the majority of shear stress rates studied. The aggregation index was greater in septic patients than in volunteers (67.9% [54.7-73.5] vs. 61.8% [58.2-68.4]; p < .05). Only sepsis and hematologic disease influenced the elongation index (both p < .01). Other comorbidities, like cancer, diabetes mellitus, cirrhosis, and terminal renal failure, had no effect on the elongation index. Aggregation index was related to the degree of organ failure (Sequential Organ Failure Assessment score), the red blood cell count, and fibrinogen concentrations. Early alterations of red blood cell rheology are common in intensive care unit patients, especially in those with sepsis. Comorbidities (other than hematologic diseases) do not significantly influence these abnormalities. These alterations could contribute to the microcirculatory alterations

  16. Packed red blood cells are an abundant and proximate potential source of nitric oxide synthase inhibition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles F Zwemer

    Full Text Available We determined, for packed red blood cells (PRBC and fresh frozen plasma, the maximum content, and ability to release the endogenous nitric oxide synthase (NOS inhibitors asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA and monomethylarginine (LNMMA.ADMA and LNMMA are near equipotent NOS inhibitors forming blood's total NOS inhibitory content. The balance between removal from, and addition to plasma determines their free concentrations. Removal from plasma is by well-characterized specific hydrolases while formation is restricted to posttranslational protein methylation. When released into plasma they can readily enter endothelial cells and inhibit NOS. Fresh rat and human whole blood contain substantial protein incorporated ADMA however; the maximum content of ADMA and LNMMA in PRBC and fresh frozen plasma has not been determined.We measured total (free and protein incorporated ADMA and LNMMA content in PRBCs and fresh frozen plasma, as well as their incubation induced release, using HPLC with fluorescence detection. We tested the hypothesis that PRBC and fresh frozen plasma contain substantial inhibitory methylarginines that can be released chemically by complete in vitro acid hydrolysis or physiologically at 37°C by enzymatic blood proteolysis.In vitro strong-acid-hydrolysis revealed a large PRBC reservoir of ADMA (54.5 ± 9.7 µM and LNMMA (58.9 ± 28.9 μM that persisted over 42-d at 6° or -80°C. In vitro 5h incubation at 37°C nearly doubled free ADMA and LNMMNA concentration from PRBCs while no change was detected in fresh frozen plasma.The compelling physiological ramifications are that regardless of storage age, 1 PRBCs can rapidly release pathologically relevant quantities of ADMA and LNMMA when incubated and 2 PRBCs have a protein-incorporated inhibitory methylarginines reservoir 100 times that of normal free inhibitory methylarginines in blood and thus could represent a clinically relevant and proximate risk for iatrogenic NOS inhibition upon

  17. Detection of Plasmodium falciparum-infected red blood cells by optical stretching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauritz, Jakob M. A.; Tiffert, Teresa; Seear, Rachel; Lautenschläger, Franziska; Esposito, Alessandro; Lew, Virgilio L.; Guck, Jochen; Kaminski, Clemens F.

    2010-05-01

    We present the application of a microfluidic optical cell stretcher to measure the elasticity of malaria-infected red blood cells. The measurements confirm an increase in host cell rigidity during the maturation of the parasite Plasmodium falciparum. The device combines the selectivity and sensitivity of single-cell elasticity measurements with a throughput that is higher than conventional single-cell techniques. The method has potential to detect early stages of infection with excellent sensitivity and high speed.

  18. Membrane rigidity of red blood cells parasitized by different strains of Plasmodium falciparum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulitschke, M; Nash, G B

    1993-11-01

    Changes in the structure of parasitized red blood cells may influence their ability to circulate. We have used a micropipette technique to examine the effects of invasion and maturation of Plasmodium falciparum on the membrane rigidity of red blood cells. In the presence of immature, ring form parasites from different laboratory strains, membrane rigidity remained unchanged as compared with uninfected red cells. However, development of more mature pigmented trophozoites caused a marked increase in membrane rigidity. Parasites from knobless strains caused a less-pronounced increase than parasites from knob-positive strains. Using closely synchronized cultures, the dependence of membrane rigidity on parasite maturation was studied in more detail for selected knob-positive and knobless strains. Over a period of 12 hours, while trophozoites developed into schizonts, no further rigidification of the red cell membrane occurred. The increase in membrane rigidity, occurring with the initial development of pigmented trophozoites, may be related to insertion of neoantigens into the red cell surface or modification of native membrane proteins that also occur at this time. In contrast to others, we found no effect of parasite-culture supernatant, harvested at different stages, on the rigidity of uninfected cells exposed to it. Interstrain variation of membrane rigidity could influence pathophysiology in several ways: by promoting margination and cytoadherence of knob-positive strains in the microcirculation, by modulating clearance of parasitized cells by the reticuloendothelial system, and by influencing ischemic complications of severe falciparum malaria.

  19. Optically-driven red blood cell rotor in linearly polarized laser tweezers

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Manas Khan; Samarendra K Mohanty; A K Sood

    2005-11-01

    We have constructed a dual trap optical tweezers set-up around an inverted microscope where both the traps can be independently controlled and manipulated in all the three dimensions. Here we report our observations on rotation of red blood cells (RBCs) in a linearly polarized optical trap. Red blood cells deform and become twisted in hypertonic phosphate buffer saline and when trapped, experience an unbalanced radiation pressure force. The torque generated from the unbalanced force causes the trapped RBC to rotate. Addition of Ca++ ions in the solution, keeping the osmolarity same, makes the cell membranes stiffer and the cells deform less. Thus the speed of rotation of the red blood cells can be controlled, as less deformation and in turn less asymmetry in shape produces less torque under the radiation pressure resulting in slower rotation at the same laser power.

  20. Hyperforin changes the zinc-storage capacities of brain cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibon, Julien; Richaud, Pierre; Bouron, Alexandre

    2011-12-01

    In vitro and in vivo experiments were carried out to investigate the consequences on brain cells of a chronic treatment with hyperforin, a plant extract known to dissipate the mitochondrial membrane potential and to release Zn(2+) and Ca(2+) from these organelles. Dissociated cortical neurons were grown in a culture medium supplemented with 1 μM hyperforin. Live-cell imaging experiments with the fluorescent probes FluoZin-3 and Fluo-4 show that a 3 day-hyperforin treatment diminishes the size of the hyperforin-sensitive pools of Ca(2+) and Zn(2+) whereas it increases the size of the DTDP-sensitive pool of Zn(2+) without affecting the ionomycin-sensitive pool of Ca(2+). When assayed by quantitative PCR the levels of mRNA coding for metallothioneins (MTs) I, II and III were increased in cortical neurons after a 3 day-hyperforin treatment. This was prevented by the zinc chelator TPEN, indicating that the plant extract controls the expression of MTs in a zinc-dependent manner. Brains of adult mice who received a daily injection (i.p.) of hyperforin (4 mg/kg/day) for 4 weeks had a higher sulphur content than control animals. They also exhibited an enhanced expression of the genes coding for MTs. However, the long-term treatment did not affect the brain levels of calcium and zinc. Based on these results showing that hyperforin influences the size of the internal pools of Zn(2+), the expression of MTs and the brain cellular sulphur content, it is proposed that hyperforin changes the Zn-storage capacity of brain cells and interferes with their thiol status.

  1. Transdifferentiation of Human Hair Follicle Mesenchymal Stem Cells into Red Blood Cells by OCT4

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhijing Liu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Shortage of red blood cells (RBCs, erythrocytes can have potentially life-threatening consequences for rare or unusual blood type patients with massive blood loss resulting from various conditions. Erythrocytes have been derived from human pluripotent stem cells (PSCs, but the risk of potential tumorigenicity cannot be ignored, and a majority of these cells produced from PSCs express embryonic ε- and fetal γ-globins with little or no adult β-globin and remain nucleated. Here we report a method to generate erythrocytes from human hair follicle mesenchymal stem cells (hHFMSCs by enforcing OCT4 gene expression and cytokine stimulation. Cells generated from hHFMSCs expressed mainly the adult β-globin chain with minimum level of the fetal γ-globin chain. Furthermore, these cells also underwent multiple maturation events and formed enucleated erythrocytes with a biconcave disc shape. Gene expression analyses showed that OCT4 regulated the expression of genes associated with both pluripotency and erythroid development during hHFMSC transdifferentiation toward erythroid cells. These findings show that mature erythrocytes can be generated from adult somatic cells, which may serve as an alternative source of RBCs for potential autologous transfusion.

  2. In-vitro stem cell derived red blood cells for transfusion: are we there yet?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyun Ok

    2014-03-01

    To date, the use of red blood cells (RBCs) produced from stem cells in vitro has not proved practical for routine transfusion. However, the perpetual and widespread shortage of blood products, problems related to transfusion-transmitted infections, and new emerging pathogens elicit an increasing demand for artificial blood. Worldwide efforts to achieve the goal of RBC production through stem cell research have received vast attention; however, problems with large-scale production and cost effectiveness have yet to prove practical usefulness. Some progress has been made, though, as cord blood stem cells and embryonic stem cells have shown an ability to differentiate and proliferate, and induced pluripotent stem cells have been shown to be an unlimited source for RBC production. However, transfusion of stem cell-derived RBCs still presents a number of challenges to overcome. This paper will summarize an up to date account of research and advances in stem cell-derived RBCs, delineate our laboratory protocol in producing RBCs from cord blood, and introduce the technological developments and limitations to current RBC production practices.

  3. Red blood cell: from its mechanics to its motion in shear flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viallat, A; Abkarian, M

    2014-06-01

    There is a number of publications on red blood cell deformability, that is, on the remarkable cell ability to change its shape in response to an external force and to pass through the narrowest blood capillaries and splenic sinuses. Cell deformability is postulated to be a major determinant of impaired perfusion, increase of blood viscosity, and occlusion in microvessels. Current deformability tests like ektacytometry measure global parameters, related to shape changes at the whole cell scale. Despite strong advances in our understanding of the molecular organization of red blood cells, the relationships between the rheology of each element of the cell composite structure, the global deformability tests, and the cell behavior in microflows are still not elucidated. This review describes recent advances in the description of the dynamics of red blood cells in shear flow and in the mechanistic understanding of this dynamics at the scale of the constitutive rheological and structural elements of the cell. These developments could open up new horizons for the determination of red blood cell mechanical parameters by analyzing their motion under low shear flows.

  4. EFFECT OF ELECTROACUPUNCTURE ON RED BLOOD CELL IMMUNE AND T-CELL SUBGROUP IN THE RAT

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高巍; 黄裕新; 陈洪; 孙大勇; 张洪新

    2000-01-01

    In the present study, the effect of electroacupuncture (EA) on immune system was observed in the rat by using micro- whole blood direct immunofluorescence Staining assay to detect changes of the peripheral blood T lymphocyte subgroup and employing red blood cell (RBC) C3b receptor- yeast rosette test and red blood cell-IC rosette test to analyze erythrocytic immune function. Resuits showed that after EA of “Zusanli” (ST 36), CD4+, RBC-C3bRR and RBC-ICR in the peripheral blood of the normal rats increased significantly while CDs+ had no any considerable changes and a positive correlation between CD~ and RBC-C3bRR was found. In immtttaosuppression model rats, the values of CD4+ and RBC-C3bRR were obviously lower than those of the normal control group while CD8+ had no any striking changes; but after EA treatment, there were no evident differences between EAgroup and normal control group in the above-mentioned indexes. There were also no any significant differences between non-acupoint group and normal control group in those indexes. Results suggest that EA of “Zusanli” (ST 36) can raise T cell immune function and RBC adhesion function in both normal rats and immunosuppression model rats, both of which present a positive correlation.

  5. EFFECT OF ELECTROACUPUNCTURE ON RED BLOOD CELL IMMUNE AND T-CELL SUBGROUP IN THE RAT

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GaoWei; HuangYuxin; ChenHong; SunDayong; ZhangHongxin

    2000-01-01

    In the present study, the effect of electroacupuncture (EA) on immune system was observed in the rat by using micro- whole blood direct immunofluoreseence Staining assay to detect changes of the peripheral blood T lymphocyte subgroup and employing red blood cell (RBC) C3b receptor- yeast rosette test and red blood cell-IC rosette test to analyze erythroeytic immune function. Results showed that after EA of “Zusanli” (ST 36), CD4+, RBC-C3bRR and RBC-ICR in the peripheral blood of the normal rats increased significantly while CD8+ had no any considerable changes and a positive correlation between CD4+ and RBC-C3bRR was found. In immuoosuppression model rats, the values of CD4+ and RBC-C3bRR were obviously lower than those of the normal control group while CD8+ had no any striking changes; but after EA treatment, there were no evident differences between EA group and normal control group in the above-mentioned indexes. There were also no any significant differences between non-acupoint group and normal control group in those indexes. Results suggest that EA of “Zusanli” (ST 36) can raise T cell immune function and RBC adhesion function in both normal rats and immunosuppression model rats, both of which present a positive correlation.

  6. Fragmented red cells reference range (Sysmex XN(®) automated blood cell counter).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesesve, Jean-François; Daigney, Amandine; Henry, Sylvain; Speyer, Elodie

    2015-01-01

    Fragmented red cells (FRCs) is a new parameter automatedly determined by recent blood cell counters. Their count might be of interest because FRCs are supposed to reflect schistocytes counts measured on a stained peripheral blood smear observed under the microscope. But FRCs depend from the technical procedure used to detect them and thus reference ranges are device-dependent. The XN-9000(®) is one of the last model from Sysmex series. We aimed to establish reference range for FRCs, from 2389 controls. The mean ± SD was 0.32% ± 0.81, the median 0.02% (95% confidence interval ot the mean: 0.29-0.35%). We observed that the percentage of red blood cells with less than 17 pg of hemoglobin content (Hypo-He) was correlated to FRC increase, Hypo-He increase resulting in spurious FRCs majoration. FRCs reference range should be useful for: 1) laboratory staff in order to select which blood smears to check optically; 2) Sysmex company to set-up more optimal rules proposed with the counter (automated making of blood smear).

  7. EVALUATION OF ANAEMIA USING RED CELL AND RETICULOCYTE PARAMETERS USING AUTOMATED HAEMATOLOGY ANALYSER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vidyadhar Rao

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Use of current models of Automated Haematology Analysers help in calculating the haemoglobin contents of the mature Red cells, Reticulocytes and percentages of Microcytic and hypochromic Red cells. This has helped the clinician in reaching early diagnosis and management of Different haemopoietic disorders like Iron Deficiency Anaemia, Thalassaemia and anaemia of chronic diseases. AIM This study is conducted using an Automated Haematology Analyser to evaluate anaemia using the Red Cell and Reticulocyte parameters. Three types of anaemia were evaluated; iron deficiency anaemia, anaemia of long duration and anaemia associated with chronic disease and Iron deficiency. MATERIALS AND METHODS The blood samples were collected from 287 adult patients with anaemia differentiated depending upon their iron status, haemoglobinopathies and inflammatory activity. Iron deficiency anaemia (n=132, anaemia of long duration (ACD, (n=97 and anaemia associated with chronic disease with iron deficiency (ACD Combi, (n=58. Microcytic Red cells, hypochromic red cells percentage and levels of haemoglobin in reticulocytes and matured RBCs were calculated. The accuracy of the parameters was analysed using receiver operating characteristic analyser to differentiate between the types of anaemia. OBSERVATIONS AND RESULTS There was no difference in parameters between the iron deficiency group or anaemia associated with chronic disease and iron deficiency. The hypochromic red cells percentage was the best parameter in differentiating anaemia of chronic disease with or without absolute iron deficiency with a sensitivity of 72.7% and a specificity of 70.4%. CONCLUSIONS The parameters of red cells and reticulocytes were of reasonably good indicators in differentiating the absolute iron deficiency anaemia with chronic disease.

  8. Relationship between red cell distribution width and early renal injury in patients with gestational diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Dong; Zhao, Jiangtao; Jian, Liguo; Ding, Tongbin; Liu, Shichao

    2016-09-01

    Previous studies found that red cell distribution width was related to adverse cardiovascular events. However, few studies reported the relationship between red cell distribution width and early-stage renal injury in pregnant women with gestational diabetes mellitus. Using a cross-sectional design, 334 pregnant women with gestational diabetes mellitus were enrolled according to the criterion of inclusion and exclusion. Demographic and clinical examination data were collected. Depended on the urine albumin, study population were divided into case group (n = 118) and control group (n = 216). Compared with control group, the case group tend to be higher red cell distribution width level (13.6 ± 0.9 vs.12.5 ± 0.6, p red cell distribution width was positively associated with albuminuria creatinine ratio (r = 0.567, p red cell distribution width was still associated with early-stage renal injury after adjusting for many other potential cofounders. Compared with the first quartile, the risk ratio of the second, the third and the fourth quartile were 1.38 (95%CI: 1.06-1.80), 1.57 (95%CI: 1.21-2.97), 2.71 (95%CI: 2.08-3.54), respectively. Besides, systolic blood pressure, estimated glomerular filtration rate, uric acid and blood urea nitrogen were also significantly associated with renal injury in gestational diabetes mellitus patients. The elevated red cell distribution width level might be a predictor of early-stage renal injury in pregnant women with gestational diabetes mellitus. As an easy and routine examination index, red cell distribution width may provide better clinical guidance when combined with other important indices.

  9. A Review of RedOx Cycling of Solid Oxide Fuel Cells Anode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Van herle

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Solid oxide fuel cells are able to convert fuels, including hydrocarbons, to electricity with an unbeatable efficiency even for small systems. One of the main limitations for long-term utilization is the reduction-oxidation cycling (RedOx cycles of the nickel-based anodes. This paper will review the effects and parameters influencing RedOx cycles of the Ni-ceramic anode. Second, solutions for RedOx instability are reviewed in the patent and open scientific literature. The solutions are described from the point of view of the system, stack design, cell design, new materials and microstructure optimization. Finally, a brief synthesis on RedOx cycling of Ni-based anode supports for standard and optimized microstructures is depicted.

  10. Lidocaine action and conformational changes in cytoskeletal protein network in human red blood cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishiguchi, E; Hamada, N; Shindo, J

    1995-11-03

    The mechanism of action of lidocaine, which is commonly used clinically as a local anesthetic, was studied in human red blood cells. The influx of [14C]lidocaine through the cell membrane induced reversible transformation of human red blood cells from discocytes to stomatocytes. This change in shape depended on the lidocaine concentration and required both ATP and carbonic anhydrase. The lidocaine-induced shape change occurred as a result of spectrin aggregation, which altered the intracellular environment of the human red blood cells, mediated by carbonic anhydrase and activation of vacuolar type H(+)-ATPase (V-ATPase). Lidocaine controlled the influx of 22Na into the human red blood cells in a concentration-dependent manner. When incubated in media containing 6-chloro-9-[(4-diethylamino)-1-methyl-butyl]amino-2-methoxyacridine (mepacrine), an inhibitor of Na+ channels, human red blood cells changed shape from discocytes to stomatocytes and the intracellular pH decreased. This phenomenon was very similar to the shape change induced by lidocaine. These results suggest that the mode of action of lidocaine is related to a conformational change in the cytoskeletal protein network.

  11. Red cell parameters in infant and children from the Arabian Peninsula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mekaini, Lolowa A Al; Denic, Srdjan; Jabri, Omar N Al; Narchi, Hassib; Souid, Abdul-Kader; Al-Hammadi, Suleiman

    2015-01-01

    α+-Thalassemia trait and iron deficiency anemia are frequent causes of microcytosis and a common diagnostic challenge in Arabian children. In this study, their prevalences and effects on the red cell parameters were evaluated in 28,457 children aged one day to 6 years. α+-Thalassemia trait was considered to be present when mean cell volume (MCV) was iron deficiency anemia when red cell distribution width (RDW) was >14.5%. The prevalence of α+-thalassemia trait was 15.7% (502/3,191), which was similar to previously reported values for adults (9-14%). Iron deficiency anemia peaked at 7 months (53%) and then declined at a rate of 8% per year. The nadirs of red blood cell count (RBC) and hemoglobin concentration (Hb) occurred at two months of age (physiological anemia). Subsequently, Hb increased at a rate similar to that of MCV, demonstrating the two processes are coupled. The third percentile MCV in children older than 3 months was ≤64 fL, which was significantly lower than that in European children. The third percentile Hb, on the other hand, was similar to that in European children. Thus, α+-thalassemia trait and iron deficiency anemia are exceptionally frequent in Arabian children and their red cell indices are considerably different from European-based norms. Careful interpretation of red cell parameters is required for the evaluation of microcytic anemia in Arabian children.

  12. The evolution of pretransfusion testing: from agglutination to solid-phase red cell adherence tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plapp, F V; Sinor, L T; Rachel, J M

    1989-01-01

    Hospital transfusion services and blood centers still use manual hemagglutination tests for most of their serological procedures. Automation of hemagglutination reactions has proven to be difficult, primarily because hemagglutination lacks an objective endpoint which can be easily interpreted by inexpensive instruments. Alternatively, solid-phase red cell adherence assays for ABO cell and serum grouping, Rh typing, red cell and platelet antibody screening, red cell and platelet crossmatching, IgA deficiency screening, hepatitis B surface antigen, and HIV antibody screening have been developed. The performance of these assays compares favorably with current hemagglutination and enzyme immunoassay methods. All of these tests share a common objective endpoint of adherence or nonadherence of indicator red cells. This uniformity allows easy interpretation of results visually, spectrophotometrically, or by image analysis. The latter technique has the potential to revolutionize the reading and interpretation of all agglutination tests. Solid-phase red cell adherence tests in microplates are ideal for batch processing large numbers of specimens. However, adherence tests are not restricted to this format. Therefore, blood grouping dipsticks have been produced, which permit testing of individual blood samples even outside of the laboratory.

  13. Neocytolysis on descent from altitude: a newly recognized mechanism for the control of red cell mass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, L.; Ruiz, W.; Driscoll, T.; Whitley, C. E.; Tapia, R.; Hachey, D. L.; Gonzales, G. F.; Alfrey, C. P.

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Studies of space-flight anemia have uncovered a physiologic process, neocytolysis, by which young red blood cells are selectively hemolyzed, allowing rapid adaptation when red cell mass is excessive for a new environment. OBJECTIVES: 1) To confirm that neocytolysis occurs in another situation of acute plethora-when high-altitude dwellers with polycythemia descend to sea level; and 2) to clarify the role of erythropoietin suppression. DESIGN: Prospective observational and interventional study. SETTING: Cerro de Pasco (4380 m) and Lima (sea level), Peru. PARTICIPANTS: Nine volunteers with polycythemia. INTERVENTIONS: Volunteers were transported to sea level; three received low-dose erythropoietin. MEASUREMENTS: Changes in red cell mass, hematocrit, hemoglobin concentration, reticulocyte count, ferritin level, serum erythropoietin, and enrichment of administered(13)C in heme. RESULTS: In six participants, red cell mass decreased by 7% to 10% within a few days of descent; this decrease was mirrored by a rapid increase in serum ferritin level. Reticulocyte production did not decrease, a finding that establishes a hemolytic mechanism.(13)C changes in circulating heme were consistent with hemolysis of young cells. Erythropoietin was suppressed, and administration of exogenous erythropoietin prevented the changes in red cell mass, serum ferritin level, and(13)C-heme. CONCLUSIONS: Neocytolysis and the role of erythropoietin are confirmed in persons with polycythemia who descend from high altitude. This may have implications that extend beyond space and altitude medicine to renal disease and other situations of erythropoietin suppression, hemolysis, and polycythemia.

  14. [Simplified preparation of test-red blood cells for ABO blood grouping in a laboratory in Madagascar].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasamiravaka, T; Andrianarivelo, A M; Ramarison, G; Rakoto-Alson, A O; Rasamindrakotroka, A

    2011-10-01

    To ensure self-sufficiency and lower costs associated with reagent red blood cells, some medical laboratories produce their own test-red blood cells for plasma ABO blood grouping. However, given the vital importance of blood goup testing, it is essential to verify the reliability of these cells. The purpose of this study was to assess the quality of laboratory-made ABO test-red blood cells. This study comparing house made and commercially available test-red blood cells was carried out at the Medical Biology Training and Research Laboratory in Madagascar. This laboratory is attended by people wishing to obtain their blood group card. In this population, no discrepancy was found between the red cell and plasma tests. Comparison of test-red blood cells with commercially available reagent red blood cells showed no difference in reactivity in the first four days of conservation. However a decrease in the reactivity of house made cells appeared on the 5th day. House made red blood cells are costless than commercially available reagent red blood cells mainly due to the simplified method of preparation. However, since laboratory-made cells progressivley lose antigenic reactivity quicly, production must be repeated regularly and good internal quality control is necessary to ensure reliability.

  15. Impact of short-term liquid storage on human CD133(+) stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lux, Cornelia A; Mark, Peter; Klopsch, Christian; Laupheimer, Michael; Tu-Rapp, Hoang; Li, Wenzhong; Ma, Nan; Steinhoff, Gustav; David, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Stem cell transplantation is a viable strategy for regenerative medicine. However, it is inevitable to have cells undergo storage for several hours or days due to processing and transportation. Therefore, it is crucial to have rigidly controlled conditions ensuring the therapeutic benefit of isolated stem cells. In the present study, we investigated the impact of short-term storage on human CD133(+) cells. CD133(+) cells were isolated from human bone marrow and kept at standardized nonfreezing storage conditions for up to 72 h. Cell viability (apoptosis/necrosis) and expression of CD133 and CXCR4 were analyzed by flow cytometry. Metabolic activity was determined using an MTT assay; colony-forming ability, as well as endothelial-like differentiation, was further evaluated. A qRT-PCR array was employed to investigate the expression of stemness genes. CD133 and CXCR4 expressions were preserved at all time points. After 30 h, cell number and metabolic activity decreased, although no significant changes were detected in cell viability and proliferation as well as endothelial-like differentiation. Cell viability and proliferation decreased significantly only after 72 h of storage. Our results indicate that storage of isolated human CD133(+) bone marrow stem cells in liquid allows for high viability and functionality. However, storage time should be limited in order to avoid cell loss.

  16. Ion channels in human red blood cell membrane: actors or relics?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Serge L Y; Bouyer, Guillaume; Cueff, Anne; Egée, Stéphane; Glogowska, Edyta; Ollivaux, Céline

    2011-04-15

    During the past three decades, electrophysiological studies revealed that human red blood cell membrane is endowed with a large variety of ion channels. The physiological role of these channels, if any, remains unclear; they do not participate in red cell homeostasis which is rather based on the almost total absence of cationic permeability and minute anionic conductance. They seem to be inactive in the "resting cell." However, when activated experimentally, ion channels can lead to a very high single cell conductance and potentially induce disorders, with the major risks of fast dehydration and dissipation of gradients. Could there be physiological conditions under which the red cell needs to activate these high conductances, or are ion channels relics of a function lost in anucleated cells? It has been demonstrated that they play a key role in diseases such as sickle cell anemia or malaria. This short overview of ion channels identified to-date in the human red cell membrane is an attempt to propose a dynamic role for these channels in circulating cells in health and disease.

  17. Red oil A5 inhibits proliferation and induces apoptosis in pancreatic cancer cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mi-Lian Dong; Xian-Zhong Ding; Thomas E. Adrian

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To study the effect of red oil A5 on pancreatic cancer cells and its possible mechanisms.METHODS: Effect of different concentrations of red oil A5on proliferation of three pancreatic cancer cell lines, AsPC-1,MiaPaCa-2 and S2013, was measured by 3H-methyl thymidine incorporation. Time-dependent effects of 1:32 000 red oil A5 on proliferation of three pancreatic cancer cell lines, were also measured by 3H-methyl thymidine incorporation, and Time-course effects of 1:32 000 red oil A5 on cell number.The cells were counted by Z1-Coulter Counter. Fiowcytometric analysis of cellular DNA content in the control and red oil A5 treated AsPC-1, MiaPaCa-2 and S2013 cells,were stained with propidium iodide. TUNEL assay of red oil A5-induced pancreatic cancer cell apoptosis was performed.Western blotting of the cytochrome c protein in AsPC-1,MiaPaCa-2 and S2013 cells treated 24 hours with 1:32 000red oil A5 was performed. Proteins in cytosolic fraction and in mitochondria fraction were extracted. Proteins extracted from each sample were electrophoresed on SDS-PAGE gels and then were transferred to nitrocellulose membranes.Cytochrome c was identified using a monoclonal cytochrome c antibody. Western blotting of the caspase-3 protein in AsPC-1, MliaPaCa-2 and S2013 cells treated with 1:32 000 red oil A5 for 24 hours was carried out. Proteins in whole cellular lysates were electrophoresed on SDS-PAGE gels and then transferred to nitrocellulose membranes. Caspase-3 was identified using a specific antibody. Western blotting of polyADP ribose polymerase (PARP) protein in AsPC-1, MiaPaCa2 and S2013 cells treated with 1:32 000 red oil A5 for 24 hours was performed. Proteins in whole cellular lysates were separated by electrophoresis on SDS-PAGE gels and then transferred to nitrocellulose membranes. PARP was identified by using a monoclonal antibody.RESULTS: Red oil A5 caused dose- and time-dependent inhibition of pancreatic cancer cell proliferation. Propidium iodide DNA staining

  18. Production of embryonic and fetal-like red blood cells from human induced pluripotent stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chan-Jung; Mitra, Koyel; Koya, Mariko; Velho, Michelle; Desprat, Romain; Lenz, Jack; Bouhassira, Eric E

    2011-01-01

    We have previously shown that human embryonic stem cells can be differentiated into embryonic and fetal type of red blood cells that sequentially express three types of hemoglobins recapitulating early human erythropoiesis. We report here that we have produced iPS from three somatic cell types: adult skin fibroblasts as well as embryonic and fetal mesenchymal stem cells. We show that regardless of the age of the donor cells, the iPS produced are fully reprogrammed into a pluripotent state that is undistinguishable from that of hESCs by low and high-throughput expression and detailed analysis of globin expression patterns by HPLC. This suggests that reprogramming with the four original Yamanaka pluripotency factors leads to complete erasure of all functionally important epigenetic marks associated with erythroid differentiation regardless of the age or the tissue type of the donor cells, at least as detected in these assays. The ability to produce large number of erythroid cells with embryonic and fetal-like characteristics is likely to have many translational applications.

  19. Production of embryonic and fetal-like red blood cells from human induced pluripotent stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chan-Jung Chang

    Full Text Available We have previously shown that human embryonic stem cells can be differentiated into embryonic and fetal type of red blood cells that sequentially express three types of hemoglobins recapitulating early human erythropoiesis. We report here that we have produced iPS from three somatic cell types: adult skin fibroblasts as well as embryonic and fetal mesenchymal stem cells. We show that regardless of the age of the donor cells, the iPS produced are fully reprogrammed into a pluripotent state that is undistinguishable from that of hESCs by low and high-throughput expression and detailed analysis of globin expression patterns by HPLC. This suggests that reprogramming with the four original Yamanaka pluripotency factors leads to complete erasure of all functionally important epigenetic marks associated with erythroid differentiation regardless of the age or the tissue type of the donor cells, at least as detected in these assays. The ability to produce large number of erythroid cells with embryonic and fetal-like characteristics is likely to have many translational applications.

  20. Red blood cell cluster separation from digital images for use in sickle cell disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Hidalgo, Manuel; Guerrero-Peña, F A; Herold-García, S; Jaume-I-Capó, Antoni; Marrero-Fernández, P D

    2015-07-01

    The study of cell morphology is an important aspect of the diagnosis of some diseases, such as sickle cell disease, because red blood cell deformation is caused by these diseases. Due to the elongated shape of the erythrocyte, ellipse adjustment and concave point detection are applied widely to images of peripheral blood samples, including during the detection of cells that are partially occluded in the clusters generated by the sample preparation process. In the present study, we propose a method for the analysis of the shape of erythrocytes in peripheral blood smear samples of sickle cell disease, which uses ellipse adjustments and a new algorithm for detecting notable points. Furthermore, we apply a set of constraints that allow the elimination of significant image preprocessing steps proposed in previous studies. We used three types of images to validate our method: artificial images, which were automatically generated in a random manner using a computer code; real images from peripheral blood smear sample images that contained normal and elongated erythrocytes; and synthetic images generated from real isolated cells. Using the proposed method, the efficiency of detecting the two types of objects in the three image types exceeded 99.00%, 98.00%, and 99.35%, respectively. These efficiency levels were superior to the results obtained with previously proposed methods using the same database, which is available at http://erythrocytesidb.uib.es/. This method can be extended to clusters of several cells and it requires no user inputs.

  1. Composition of suberin-associated waxes from the subterranean storage organs of seven plants : Parsnip, carrot, rutabaga, turnip, red beet, sweet potato and potato.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espelie, K E; Sadek, N Z; Kolattukudy, P E

    1980-10-01

    The waxes associated with the suberin in the periderm of the underground storage organs of parsnip (Pastinaca sativa L.), carrot (Daucus carota L.), rutabaga (Brassica napobrassica Mill.), turnip (Brassica rapa L.), red beet (Beta vulgaris L.), sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas L.) and potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) were isolated, fractionated into hydrocarbon, wax ester, free fatty alcohol and free fatty acid fractions, and analyzed by combined gas chromatography and mass spectrometry. The amount of wax extracted from the periderm of the storage organs ranged from 2 to 32 μg/cm(2). The hydrocarbons from the suberin layer have a broader chain-length distribution, a predominance of shorter carbon chains, and a higher proportion of even-numbered carbon chains than the leaf alkanes from the same plants. The major components of the free and esterified fatty alcohols and fatty acids have an even number of carbon atoms, and are similar in chain-length distribution to their counterparts found covalently attached to the suberin polymers; however, these suberin components are shorter in chain length than their cuticular analogues from the leaves. Also extracted from the storage organs were polar components which included fatty alcohols and fatty acids in a conjugated form, and ω-hydroxy acids and dicarboxylic acids. Evidence is presented that removal of the wax from the periderm of whole storage organs results in a decrease in diffusion resistance to moisture.

  2. Numerical simulation of red blood cell suspensions behind a moving interface in a capillary

    CERN Document Server

    Zhao, Shihai

    2013-01-01

    Computational modeling and simulation are presented on the motion of red blood cells behind a moving interface in a capillary. The methodology is based on an immersed boundary method and the skeleton structure of the red blood cell (RBC) membrane is modeled as a spring network. The computational domain is moving with either a designated RBC or an interface in an infinitely long two-dimensional channel with an undisturbed flow field in front of the domain. The tanking-treading and the inclination angle of a cell in a simple shear flow are briefly discussed for the validation purpose. We then present the results of the motion of red blood cells behind a moving interface in a capillary, which show that the RBCs with higher velocity than the interface speed form a concentrated slug behind the interface.

  3. Coarse-Grained Molecular Dynamics Simulation of a Red Blood Cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Li-Guo; Wu, Heng-An; Zhou, Xiao-Zhou; Wang, Xiu-Xi

    2010-02-01

    A worm-like chain model based on a spectrin network is employed to study the biomechanics of red blood cells. Coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations are performed to obtain a stable configuration free of external loadings. We also discuss the influence of two parameters: the average bending modulus and the persistence length. The change in shape of a malaria-infected red blood cell can contribute to the change in its molecular-based structure. As the persistence length of the membrane network in the infected red blood cell decreases, the deformability decreases and the biconcave shape is destroyed. The numerical results are comparable with previously reported experimental results. The coarse-grained model can be used to study the relationship between macro-mechanical properties and molecular-scale structures of cells.

  4. GPU-accelerated Red Blood Cells Simulations with Transport Dissipative Particle Dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Blumers, Ansel L; Li, Zhen; Li, Xuejin; Karniadakis, George E

    2016-01-01

    Mesoscopic numerical simulations provide a unique approach for the quantification of the chemical influences on red blood cell functionalities. The transport Dissipative Particles Dynamics (tDPD) method can lead to such effective multiscale simulations due to its ability to simultaneously capture mesoscopic advection, diffusion, and reaction. In this paper, we present a GPU-accelerated red blood cell simulation package based on a tDPD adaptation of our red blood cell model, which can correctly recover the cell membrane viscosity, elasticity, bending stiffness, and cross-membrane chemical transport. The package essentially processes all computational workloads in parallel by GPU, and it incorporates multi-stream scheduling and non-blocking MPI communications to improve inter-node scalability. Our code is validated for accuracy and compared against the CPU counterpart for speed. Strong scaling and weak scaling are also presented to characterizes scalability. We observe a speedup of 10.1 on one GPU over all 16 c...

  5. Non-tuberculous Mycobacteriosis with T-cell Lymphoma in a Red Panda (Ailurus fulgens).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuke, N; Hirai, T; Makimura, N; Goto, Y; Habibi, W A; Ito, S; Trang, N T; Koshino, K; Takeda, M; Yamaguchi, R

    2016-01-01

    A 9-year-old male red panda (Ailurus fulgens) became emaciated and died. Necropsy examination revealed systemic lymphadenomegaly. The liver, lungs and left kidney contained multifocal yellow nodules. Microscopical examination revealed granulomatous inflammation in the liver, lungs, kidney, spleen and lymph nodes, with numerous acid-fast bacilli. Sequencing of genetic material isolated from the tissues classified the pathogen as Mycobacterium gastri. Lymphoma was found in the liver, lungs, kidney and lymph nodes. The neoplastic cells were strongly labelled for expression of CD3, Ki67 and proliferating cell nuclear antigen by immunohistochemistry. This is the first report of M. gastri infection with T-cell lymphoma in a red panda.

  6. Theoretical and experimental study of electroporation of red blood cells using MEMS technology

    KAUST Repository

    Deng, Peigang

    2010-01-01

    A theoretical and experimental study of electroporation (EP) of red blood cells (RBCs) was presented in this paper. With additional strain energy, an energy-based model of an electropore induced on a RBC\\'s membrane at different electric fields was proposed to predict the critical EP electric field strength. In addition, EP experiments with red blood cells at single-cell level was carried out on a micro EP chip. The measured critical EP electric field strengths are in agreement with the numerical predictions. ©2010 IEEE.

  7. Morphological and biochemical characterization of mitochondria in Torpedo red blood cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pica, A; Scacco, S; Papa, F; De Nitto, E; Papa, S

    2001-02-01

    A study is presented on the morphology and respiratory functions of mitochondria from Torpedo marmorata red blood cells. In vivo staining of red blood cells and transmission electron microscopy showed the existence of a considerable number of vital and orthodox mitochondria which decreased from young erythroblasts to mature erythrocytes from 60-50 to 30-20 per cell. In erythrocytes mitochondria exhibited a canonical, functional respiratory chain. The content and activity of cytochromes in erythrocytes were, however, significantly lower as compared to mammalian tissues.

  8. Analysis of Hereditary Elliptocytosis with Decreased Binding of Eosin-5-maleimide to Red Blood Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shin-ichiro Suemori

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Flow cytometric test for analyzing the eosin-5-maleimide (EMA binding to red blood cells has been believed to be a specific method for diagnosing hereditary spherocytosis (HS. However, it has been reported that diseases other than HS, such as hereditary pyropoikilocytosis (HPP and Southeast Asian ovalocytosis (SAO, which are forms in the category of hereditary elliptocytosis (HE, show decreased EMA binding to red blood cells. We analyzed EMA binding to red blood cells in 101 healthy control subjects and 42 HS patients and obtained a mean channel fluorescence (MCF cut-off value of 36.4 (sensitivity 0.97, specificity 0.95. Using this method, we also analyzed 12 HE patients. Among them, four HE patients showed the MCF at or below the cut-off value. It indicates that some HE patients have decreased EMA binding to red blood cells. Two of these four HE patients were classified as common HE, and two were spherocytic HE with reduced spectrin. This study demonstrates that, in addition to patients with HPP or SAO, some HE patients have decreased EMA binding to red blood cells.

  9. Seventy-five genetic loci influencing the human red blood cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Harst, Pim; Zhang, Weihua; Leach, Irene Mateo; Rendon, Augusto; Verweij, Niek; Sehmi, Joban; Paul, Dirk S.; Elling, Ulrich; Allayee, Hooman; Li, Xinzhong; Radhakrishnan, Aparna; Tan, Sian-Tsung; Voss, Katrin; Weichenberger, Christian X.; Albers, Cornelis A.; Al-Hussani, Abtehale; Asselbergs, Folkert W.; Ciullo, Marina; Danjou, Fabrice; Dina, Christian; Esko, Tõnu; Evans, David M.; Franke, Lude; Gögele, Martin; Hartiala, Jaana; Hersch, Micha; Holm, Hilma; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Kanoni, Stavroula; Kleber, Marcus E.; Lagou, Vasiliki; Langenberg, Claudia; Lopez, Lorna M.; Lyytikäinen, Leo-Pekka; Melander, Olle; Murgia, Federico; Nolte, Ilja M.; O’Reilly, Paul F.; Padmanabhan, Sandosh; Parsa, Afshin; Pirastu, Nicola; Porcu, Eleonora; Portas, Laura; Prokopenko, Inga; Ried, Janina S.; Shin, So-Youn; Tang, Clara S.; Teumer, Alexander; Traglia, Michela; Ulivi, Sheila; Westra, Harm-Jan; Yang, Jian; Zhao, Jing Hua; Anni, Franco; Abdellaoui, Abdel; Attwood, Antony; Balkau, Beverley; Bandinelli, Stefania; Bastardot, François; Benyamin, Beben; Boehm, Bernhard O.; Cookson, William O.; Das, Debashish; de Bakker, Paul I. W.; de Boer, Rudolf A.; de Geus, Eco J. C.; de Moor, Marleen H.; Dimitriou, Maria; Domingues, Francisco S.; Döring, Angela; Engström, Gunnar; Eyjolfsson, Gudmundur Ingi; Ferrucci, Luigi; Fischer, Krista; Galanello, Renzo; Garner, Stephen F.; Genser, Bernd; Gibson, Quince D.; Girotto, Giorgia; Gudbjartsson, Daniel Fannar; Harris, Sarah E.; Hartikainen, Anna-Liisa; Hastie, Claire E.; Hedblad, Bo; Illig, Thomas; Jolley, Jennifer; Kähönen, Mika; Kema, Ido P.; Kemp, John P.; Liang, Liming; Lloyd-Jones, Heather; Loos, Ruth J. F.; Meacham, Stuart; Medland, Sarah E.; Meisinger, Christa; Memari, Yasin; Mihailov, Evelin; Miller, Kathy; Moffatt, Miriam F.; Nauck, Matthias; Novatchkova, Maria; Nutile, Teresa; Olafsson, Isleifur; Onundarson, Pall T.; Parracciani, Debora; Penninx, Brenda W.; Perseu, Lucia; Piga, Antonio; Pistis, Giorgio; Pouta, Anneli; Puc, Ursula; Raitakari, Olli; Ring, Susan M.; Robino, Antonietta; Ruggiero, Daniela; Ruokonen, Aimo; Saint-Pierre, Aude; Sala, Cinzia; Salumets, Andres; Sambrook, Jennifer; Schepers, Hein; Schmidt, Carsten Oliver; Silljé, Herman H. W.; Sladek, Rob; Smit, Johannes H.; Starr, John M.; Stephens, Jonathan; Sulem, Patrick; Tanaka, Toshiko; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Tragante, Vinicius; van Gilst, Wiek H.; van Pelt, L. Joost; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J.; Völker, Uwe; Whitfield, John B.; Willemsen, Gonneke; Winkelmann, Bernhard R.; Wirnsberger, Gerald; Algra, Ale; Cucca, Francesco; d’Adamo, Adamo Pio; Danesh, John; Deary, Ian J.; Dominiczak, Anna F.; Elliott, Paul; Fortina, Paolo; Froguel, Philippe; Gasparini, Paolo; Greinacher, Andreas; Hazen, Stanley L.; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Khaw, Kay Tee; Lehtimäki, Terho; Maerz, Winfried; Martin, Nicholas G.; Metspalu, Andres; Mitchell, Braxton D.; Montgomery, Grant W.; Moore, Carmel; Navis, Gerjan; Pirastu, Mario; Pramstaller, Peter P.; Ramirez-Solis, Ramiro; Schadt, Eric; Scott, James; Shuldiner, Alan R.; Smith, George Davey; Smith, J. Gustav; Snieder, Harold; Sorice, Rossella; Spector, Tim D.; Stefansson, Kari; Stumvoll, Michael; Wilson Tang, W. H.; Toniolo, Daniela; Tönjes, Anke; Visscher, Peter M.; Vollenweider, Peter; Wareham, Nicholas J.; Wolffenbuttel, Bruce H. R.; Boomsma, Dorret I.; Beckmann, Jacques S.; Dedoussis, George V.; Deloukas, Panos; Ferreira, Manuel A.; Sanna, Serena; Uda, Manuela; Hicks, Andrew A.; Penninger, Josef Martin; Gieger, Christian; Kooner, Jaspal S.; Ouwehand, Willem H.; Soranzo, Nicole; Chambers, John C

    2013-01-01

    Anaemia is a chief determinant of globalill health, contributing to cognitive impairment, growth retardation and impaired physical capacity. To understand further the genetic factors influencing red blood cells, we carried out a genome-wide association study of haemoglobin concentration and related parameters in up to 135,367 individuals. Here we identify 75 independent genetic loci associated with one or more red blood cell phenotypes at P <10−8, which together explain 4–9% of the phenotypic variance per trait. Using expression quantitative trait loci and bioinformatic strategies, we identify 121 candidate genes enriched in functions relevant to red blood cell biology. The candidate genes are expressed preferentially in red blood cell precursors, and 43 have haematopoietic phenotypes in Mus musculus or Drosophila melanogaster. Through open-chromatin and coding-variant analyses we identify potential causal genetic variants at 41 loci. Our findings provide extensive new insights into genetic mechanisms and biological pathways controlling red blood cell formation and function. PMID:23222517

  10. Analysis of Hereditary Elliptocytosis with Decreased Binding of Eosin-5-maleimide to Red Blood Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suemori, Shin-ichiro; Wada, Hideho; Nakanishi, Hidekazu; Tsujioka, Takayuki; Sugihara, Takashi; Tohyama, Kaoru

    2015-01-01

    Flow cytometric test for analyzing the eosin-5-maleimide (EMA) binding to red blood cells has been believed to be a specific method for diagnosing hereditary spherocytosis (HS). However, it has been reported that diseases other than HS, such as hereditary pyropoikilocytosis (HPP) and Southeast Asian ovalocytosis (SAO), which are forms in the category of hereditary elliptocytosis (HE), show decreased EMA binding to red blood cells. We analyzed EMA binding to red blood cells in 101 healthy control subjects and 42 HS patients and obtained a mean channel fluorescence (MCF) cut-off value of 36.4 (sensitivity 0.97, specificity 0.95). Using this method, we also analyzed 12 HE patients. Among them, four HE patients showed the MCF at or below the cut-off value. It indicates that some HE patients have decreased EMA binding to red blood cells. Two of these four HE patients were classified as common HE, and two were spherocytic HE with reduced spectrin. This study demonstrates that, in addition to patients with HPP or SAO, some HE patients have decreased EMA binding to red blood cells.

  11. Seventy-five genetic loci influencing the human red blood cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Harst, Pim; Zhang, Weihua; Mateo Leach, Irene; Rendon, Augusto; Verweij, Niek; Sehmi, Joban; Paul, Dirk S; Elling, Ulrich; Allayee, Hooman; Li, Xinzhong; Radhakrishnan, Aparna; Tan, Sian-Tsung; Voss, Katrin; Weichenberger, Christian X; Albers, Cornelis A; Al-Hussani, Abtehale; Asselbergs, Folkert W; Ciullo, Marina; Danjou, Fabrice; Dina, Christian; Esko, Tõnu; Evans, David M; Franke, Lude; Gögele, Martin; Hartiala, Jaana; Hersch, Micha; Holm, Hilma; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Kanoni, Stavroula; Kleber, Marcus E; Lagou, Vasiliki; Langenberg, Claudia; Lopez, Lorna M; Lyytikäinen, Leo-Pekka; Melander, Olle; Murgia, Federico; Nolte, Ilja M; O'Reilly, Paul F; Padmanabhan, Sandosh; Parsa, Afshin; Pirastu, Nicola; Porcu, Eleonora; Portas, Laura; Prokopenko, Inga; Ried, Janina S; Shin, So-Youn; Tang, Clara S; Teumer, Alexander; Traglia, Michela; Ulivi, Sheila; Westra, Harm-Jan; Yang, Jian; Zhao, Jing Hua; Anni, Franco; Abdellaoui, Abdel; Attwood, Antony; Balkau, Beverley; Bandinelli, Stefania; Bastardot, François; Benyamin, Beben; Boehm, Bernhard O; Cookson, William O; Das, Debashish; de Bakker, Paul I W; de Boer, Rudolf A; de Geus, Eco J C; de Moor, Marleen H; Dimitriou, Maria; Domingues, Francisco S; Döring, Angela; Engström, Gunnar; Eyjolfsson, Gudmundur Ingi; Ferrucci, Luigi; Fischer, Krista; Galanello, Renzo; Garner, Stephen F; Genser, Bernd; Gibson, Quince D; Girotto, Giorgia; Gudbjartsson, Daniel Fannar; Harris, Sarah E; Hartikainen, Anna-Liisa; Hastie, Claire E; Hedblad, Bo; Illig, Thomas; Jolley, Jennifer; Kähönen, Mika; Kema, Ido P; Kemp, John P; Liang, Liming; Lloyd-Jones, Heather; Loos, Ruth J F; Meacham, Stuart; Medland, Sarah E; Meisinger, Christa; Memari, Yasin; Mihailov, Evelin; Miller, Kathy; Moffatt, Miriam F; Nauck, Matthias; Novatchkova, Maria; Nutile, Teresa; Olafsson, Isleifur; Onundarson, Pall T; Parracciani, Debora; Penninx, Brenda W; Perseu, Lucia; Piga, Antonio; Pistis, Giorgio; Pouta, Anneli; Puc, Ursula; Raitakari, Olli; Ring, Susan M; Robino, Antonietta; Ruggiero, Daniela; Ruokonen, Aimo; Saint-Pierre, Aude; Sala, Cinzia; Salumets, Andres; Sambrook, Jennifer; Schepers, Hein; Schmidt, Carsten Oliver; Silljé, Herman H W; Sladek, Rob; Smit, Johannes H; Starr, John M; Stephens, Jonathan; Sulem, Patrick; Tanaka, Toshiko; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Tragante, Vinicius; van Gilst, Wiek H; van Pelt, L Joost; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J; Völker, Uwe; Whitfield, John B; Willemsen, Gonneke; Winkelmann, Bernhard R; Wirnsberger, Gerald; Algra, Ale; Cucca, Francesco; d'Adamo, Adamo Pio; Danesh, John; Deary, Ian J; Dominiczak, Anna F; Elliott, Paul; Fortina, Paolo; Froguel, Philippe; Gasparini, Paolo; Greinacher, Andreas; Hazen, Stanley L; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Khaw, Kay Tee; Lehtimäki, Terho; Maerz, Winfried; Martin, Nicholas G; Metspalu, Andres; Mitchell, Braxton D; Montgomery, Grant W; Moore, Carmel; Navis, Gerjan; Pirastu, Mario; Pramstaller, Peter P; Ramirez-Solis, Ramiro; Schadt, Eric; Scott, James; Shuldiner, Alan R; Smith, George Davey; Smith, J Gustav; Snieder, Harold; Sorice, Rossella; Spector, Tim D; Stefansson, Kari; Stumvoll, Michael; Tang, W H Wilson; Toniolo, Daniela; Tönjes, Anke; Visscher, Peter M; Vollenweider, Peter; Wareham, Nicholas J; Wolffenbuttel, Bruce H R; Boomsma, Dorret I; Beckmann, Jacques S; Dedoussis, George V; Deloukas, Panos; Ferreira, Manuel A; Sanna, Serena; Uda, Manuela; Hicks, Andrew A; Penninger, Josef Martin; Gieger, Christian; Kooner, Jaspal S; Ouwehand, Willem H; Soranzo, Nicole; Chambers, John C

    2012-12-20

    Anaemia is a chief determinant of global ill health, contributing to cognitive impairment, growth retardation and impaired physical capacity. To understand further the genetic factors influencing red blood cells, we carried out a genome-wide association study of haemoglobin concentration and related parameters in up to 135,367 individuals. Here we identify 75 independent genetic loci associated with one or more red blood cell phenotypes at P < 10(-8), which together explain 4-9% of the phenotypic variance per trait. Using expression quantitative trait loci and bioinformatic strategies, we identify 121 candidate genes enriched in functions relevant to red blood cell biology. The candidate genes are expressed preferentially in red blood cell precursors, and 43 have haematopoietic phenotypes in Mus musculus or Drosophila melanogaster. Through open-chromatin and coding-variant analyses we identify potential causal genetic variants at 41 loci. Our findings provide extensive new insights into genetic mechanisms and biological pathways controlling red blood cell formation and function.

  12. Low red blood cell levels of deglycating enzymes incolorectal cancer patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Maria Notarnicola; Maria Gabriella Caruso; Valeria Tutino; Vito Guerra; Giovanni Misciagna

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To investigate Glyoxalase Ⅰ and fructosamine-3- kinase (FN3K) activity in red blood cells from patients with colorectal adenomas and cancer.METHODS: Thirty three consecutive subjects with one or more histologically confirmed colorectal adenomatous polyps, 16 colorectal cancer patients and a group of 11 control subjects with normal colonoscopy were included in the study. Glyoxalase Ⅰ and FN3K activities were measured in red blood cells using a spectrophotometric and radiometric assay, respectively.RESULTS: A significant reduction in both Glyoxalase Ⅰ and FN3K activity was detected in patients with tumors compared to patients with adenomas and the controls. Erythrocyte Glyoxalase Ⅰ activity in colorectal cancer was approximately 6 times lower than that detected in patients with adenoma (0.022 ± 0.01 mmol/min per milliliter vs 0.128 ± 0.19 mmol/min per milliliter of red blood cells, P = 0.003, Tukey's test). FN3K activity in red blood cells from patients with colon cancer was approximately 2 times lower than that detected in adenomapatients (19.55 ± 6.4 pmol/min per milliliter vs 38.6 ± 31.7 pmol/min per milliliter of red blood cells, P = 0.04, Tukey's test).CONCLUSION: These findings suggest that deglycating enzymes may be involved in the malignant transformation of colon mucosa.

  13. RETREATMENT WITH FLUDARABINE AND CYCLOSPORINE FOR ONE CASE OF REFRACTORY PURE RED CELL APLASIA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guang-sheng He; Xiang Zhang; De-pei Wu; Ai-ning Sun; Miao Miao; Xiu-li Wang; Zheng-ming Jin

    2008-01-01

    @@ MANY cases of pure red cell aplasia (PRCA) were mediated by over-function of immune cells, and responded well to immunosuppres-sive therapy.1 Sometimes refractory cases also arose. Fludara-bine is an analogue of adenosine resistant to deamination which is widely used for B-chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) and other hematological malignancies.

  14. Passive transport pathways for Ca2+ and Co2+ in human red blood cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsen, Lars Ole; Harbak, Henrik; Bennekou, Poul

    2011-01-01

    The passive transport of calcium and cobalt and their interference were studied in human red cells using (45)Ca and (57)Co as tracers. In ATP-depleted cells, with the ATP concentration reduced to about 1µM, the progress curve for (45)Ca uptake at 1mM rapidly levels off with time, consistent...

  15. Deformation of Two-Dimensional Nonuniform-Membrane Red Blood Cells Simulated by a Lattice Boltzmann Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Hua-Bing; JIN Li; QIU Bing

    2008-01-01

    To study two-dimensional red blood cells deforming in a shear flow with the membrane nonuniform on the rigidity and mass, the membrane is discretized into equilength segments. The fluid inside and outside the red blood cell is simulated by the D2Q9 lattice Boltzmann model and the hydrodynamic forces exerted on the membrane from the inner and outer of the red blood cell are calculated by a stress-integration method. Through the global deviation from the curvature of uniform-membrane, we find that when the membrane is nonuniform on the rigidity, the deviation first decreases with the time increases and implies that the terminal profile of the red blood cell is static. To a red blood cell with the mass nonuniform on the membrane, the deviation becomes more large, and the mass distribution affects the profile of the two sides of the flattened red blood cell in a shear flow.

  16. Microvascular blood flow resistance: Role of red blood cell migration and dispersion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katanov, Dinar; Gompper, Gerhard; Fedosov, Dmitry A

    2015-05-01

    Microvascular blood flow resistance has a strong impact on cardiovascular function and tissue perfusion. The flow resistance in microcirculation is governed by flow behavior of blood through a complex network of vessels, where the distribution of red blood cells across vessel cross-sections may be significantly distorted at vessel bifurcations and junctions. In this paper, the development of blood flow and its resistance starting from a dispersed configuration of red blood cells is investigated in simulations for different hematocrit levels, flow rates, vessel diameters, and aggregation interactions between red blood cells. Initially dispersed red blood cells migrate toward the vessel center leading to the formation of a cell-free layer near the wall and to a decrease of the flow resistance. The development of cell-free layer appears to be nearly universal when scaled with a characteristic shear rate of the flow. The universality allows an estimation of the length of a vessel required for full flow development, lc ≲ 25D, for vessel diameters in the range 10 μm red blood cell dispersion at vessel bifurcations and junctions on the flow resistance may be significant in vessels which are shorter or comparable to the length lc. Aggregation interactions between red blood cells generally lead to a reduction of blood flow resistance. The simulations are performed using the same viscosity for both external and internal fluids and the RBC membrane viscosity is not considered; however, we discuss how the viscosity contrast may affect the results. Finally, we develop a simple theoretical model which is able to describe the converged cell-free-layer thickness at steady-state flow with respect to flow rate. The model is based on the balance between a lift force on red blood cells due to cell-wall hydrodynamic interactions and shear-induced effective pressure due to cell-cell interactions in flow. We expect that these results can also be used to better understand the flow

  17. Alterations in cell surface area and deformability of individual human red blood cells in stored blood

    CERN Document Server

    Park, HyunJoo; Lee, SangYun; Kim, Kyoohyun; Sohn, Yong-Hak; Jang, Seongsoo; Park, YongKeun

    2015-01-01

    The functionality and viability of stored human red blood cells (RBCs) is an important clinical issue in transfusion. To systematically investigate changes in stored whole blood, the hematological properties of individual RBCs were quantified in blood samples stored for various periods with and without a preservation solution called CPDA-1. With 3-D quantitative phase imaging techniques, the optical measurements of the 3-D refractive index (RI) distributions and membrane fluctuations were done at the individual cell level. From the optical measurements, the morphological (volume, surface area and sphericity), biochemical (hemoglobin content and concentration), and mechanical parameters (dynamic membrane fluctuation) were simultaneously quantified to investigate the functionalities and their progressive alterations in stored RBCs. Our results show that the stored RBCs without CPDA-1 had a dramatic morphological transformation from discocytes to spherocytes within 2 weeks which was accompanied with significant ...

  18. Role of Calcium in Phosphatidylserine Externalisation in Red Blood Cells from Sickle Cell Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erwin Weiss

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Phosphatidylserine exposure occurs in red blood cells (RBCs from sickle cell disease (SCD patients and is increased by deoxygenation. The mechanisms responsible remain unclear. RBCs from SCD patients also have elevated cation permeability, and, in particular, a deoxygenation-induced cation conductance which mediates Ca2+ entry, providing an obvious link with phosphatidylserine exposure. The role of Ca2+ was investigated using FITC-labelled annexin. Results confirmed high phosphatidylserine exposure in RBCs from SCD patients increasing upon deoxygenation. When deoxygenated, phosphatidylserine exposure was further elevated as extracellular [Ca2+] was increased. This effect was inhibited by dipyridamole, intracellular Ca2+ chelation, and Gardos channel inhibition. Phosphatidylserine exposure was reduced in high K+ saline. Ca2+ levels required to elicit phosphatidylserine exposure were in the low micromolar range. Findings are consistent with Ca2+ entry through the deoxygenation-induced pathway (Psickle, activating the Gardos channel. [Ca2+] required for phosphatidylserine scrambling are in the range achievable in vivo.

  19. Data on how several physiological parameters of stored red blood cells are similar in glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficient and sufficient donors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vassilis L. Tzounakas

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This article contains data on the variation in several physiological parameters of red blood cells (RBCs donated by eligible glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD deficient donors during storage in standard blood bank conditions compared to control, G6PD sufficient (G6PD+ cells. Intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS generation, cell fragility and membrane exovesiculation were measured in RBCs throughout the storage period, with or without stimulation by oxidants, supplementation of N-acetylcysteine and energy depletion, following incubation of stored cells for 24 h at 37 °C. Apart from cell characteristics, the total or uric acid-dependent antioxidant capacity of the supernatant in addition to extracellular potassium concentration was determined in RBC units. Finally, procoagulant activity and protein carbonylation levels were measured in the microparticles population. Further information can be found in “Glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficient subjects may be better “storers” than donors of red blood cells” [1].

  20. CHARACTERIZATION OF ENU-INDUCED MUTATIONS IN RED BLOOD CELL STRUCTURAL PROTEINS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katrina Kildey

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Murine models with modified gene function as a result of N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU mutagenesis have been used to study phenotypes resulting from genetic change. This study investigated genetic factors associated with red blood cell (RBC physiology and structural integrity that may impact on blood component storage and transfusion outcome. Forward and reverse genetic approaches were employed with pedigrees of ENU-treated mice using a homozygous recessive breeding strategy. In a “forward genetic” approach, pedigree selection was based upon identification of an altered phenotype followed by exome sequencing to identify a causative mutation. In a second strategy, a “reverse genetic” approach based on selection of pedigrees with mutations in genes of interest was utilised and, following breeding to homozygosity, phenotype assessed. Thirty-three pedigrees were screened by the forward genetic approach. One pedigree demonstrated reticulocytosis, microcytic anaemia and thrombocytosis. Exome sequencing revealed a novel single nucleotide variation (SNV in Ank1 encoding the RBC structural protein ankyrin-1 and the pedigree was designated Ank1EX34. The reticulocytosis and microcytic anaemia observed in the Ank1EX34 pedigree were similar to clinical features of hereditary spherocytosis in humans. For the reverse genetic approach three pedigrees with different point mutations in Spnb1 encoding RBC protein spectrin-1β, and one pedigree with a mutation in Epb4.1, encoding band 4.1 were selected for study. When bred to homozygosity two of the spectrin-1β pedigrees (a, b demonstrated increased RBC count, haemoglobin (Hb and haematocrit (HCT. The third Spnb1 mutation (spectrin-1β c and mutation in Epb4.1 (band 4.1 did not significantly affect the haematological phenotype, despite these two mutations having a PolyPhen score predicting the mutation may be damaging. Exome sequencing allows rapid identification of causative mutations and development of

  1. Arterio-venous flow between monochorionic twins determined during intra-uterine transfusion. Nonlinear decay of adult red blood cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gemert, Martin J C van; Wijngaard, Jeroen P H M van den [Laser Centre and Department of Obstetrics, Academic Medical Centre, University of Amsterdam, Meibergdreef 9, 1105 AZ Amsterdam (Netherlands); Pasman, Suzanne A; Vandenbussche, Frank P H A [Division of Fetal Medicine, Department of Obstetrics, Leiden University Medical Centre, Leiden (Netherlands); Lopriore, Enrico [Division of Neonatology, Department of Pediatrics, Leiden University Medical Centre, Leiden (Netherlands)], E-mail: m.j.vangemert@amc.uva.nl

    2008-07-07

    Recently, we derived equations relating the flow of adult red blood cells through a placental arterio-venous anastomosis with intra-uterine and post-natal measured adult hemoglobin concentrations. In this letter, we re-derived the equations, now including a more realistic nonlinear decay of adult red blood cells, and re-evaluated the measurement accuracy of the arterio-venous flow and the lifetime of the red blood cells. (letter to the editor)

  2. Electrical properties of the red blood cell membrane and immunohematological investigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heloise Pöckel Fernandes

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Hemagglutination is widely used in transfusion medicine and depends on several factors including antigens, antibodies, electrical properties of red blood cells and the environment of the reaction. Intermolecular forces are involved in agglutination with cell clumping occurring when the aggregation force is greater than the force of repulsion. Repulsive force is generated by negative charges on the red blood cell surface that occur due to the presence of the carboxyl group of sialic acids in the cell membrane; these charges create a repulsive electric zeta potential between cells. In transfusion services, specific solutions are used to improve hemagglutination, including enzymes that reduce the negative charge of red blood cells, LISS which improves the binding of antibodies to antigens and macromolecules that decrease the distance between erythrocytes. The specificity and sensitivity of immunohematological reactions depend directly on the appropriate use of these solutions. Knowledge of the electrical properties of red blood cells and of the action of enhancement solutions can contribute to the immunohematology practice in transfusion services.

  3. Getting into the flow: Red cells go on a roll, two-component vesicles swing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viallat, Annie; Dupire, Jules; Khelloufi, Kamel; Al Halifa, Al Hair; Adhesion and Inflammation Team

    2013-11-01

    Red blood cells are soft capsules. Under shear flow, their two known motions were ``tumbling'' and ``swinging-tank treading,'' depending on cell mechanics and flow conditions. We reveal new wobbling regimes, among which the ``rolling'' regime, where red cells move as wheels on a road. We show, by coupling two video-microscopy approaches providing multi-directional cell pictures that the orientation of cells flipping into the flow is determined by the shear rate. Rolling permits to avoid energetically costly cellular deformations and is a true signature of the cytoskeleton elasticity. We highlight two transient dynamics: an intermittent regime during the ``tank-treading-to-flipping'' transition and a Frisbee-like ``spinning'' regime during the ``rolling-to-tank-treading'' transition. We find that the biconcave red cell shape is very stable under moderate shear stresses, and we interpret this result in terms of shape memory and elastic buckling. Finally, we generate lipid vesicles with a shape memory by using two lipids with different bending rigidities. These vesicles swing in shear flow similarly to red blood cells but their non-axisymmetric stress-free shape changes the periodicity of the motion and induces specific features.

  4. How should the optical tweezers experiment be used to characterize the red blood cell membrane mechanics?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigüenza, Julien; Mendez, Simon; Nicoud, Franck

    2017-05-03

    Stretching red blood cells using optical tweezers is a way to characterize the mechanical properties of their membrane by measuring the size of the cell in the direction of the stretching (axial diameter) and perpendicularly (transverse diameter). Recently, such data have been used in numerous publications to validate solvers dedicated to the computation of red blood cell dynamics under flow. In the present study, different mechanical models are used to simulate the stretching of red blood cells by optical tweezers. Results first show that the mechanical moduli of the membranes have to be adjusted as a function of the model used. In addition, by assessing the area dilation of the cells, the axial and transverse diameters measured in optical tweezers experiments are found to be insufficient to discriminate between models relevant to red blood cells or not. At last, it is shown that other quantities such as the height or the profile of the cell should be preferred for validation purposes since they are more sensitive to the membrane model.

  5. Rudimentary study on humanization of porcine red blood cells: Enzymatic removal of galactose-α1,3-galactose antigen from porcine red blood cell

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    The serological and biochemical characterization of porcine red blood cells (pRBCs) are similar to human red blood cells. Porcine erythrocytes are considered as an alternative source for human blood transfusion. But there exist galactose-α1,3-galactose antigens (Galα1,3Galβ1, 4GalNAc-R, abbreviated αGal antigen) on pRBCs, which can induce anti-(Gal antibodies in human serum. The (Galepitopes are the major antigen responsible for hyperacute rejection in xenotransfusion. In this study, recombined soybean α-galactosidase (rSα-GalE) was usedto remove the (Gal antigens from pPRCs for humanization. The results showed that (Gal antigen was cleared by rSα-GalE and the structure and function of rSα-GalE treated pRBC were normal.

  6. Effects of red wine on ochratoxin A toxicity in intestinal Caco-2/TC7 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranaldi, G; Mancini, E; Ferruzza, S; Sambuy, Y; Perozzi, G

    2007-03-01

    Ochratoxin A (OTA) is found in a variety of foods and beverages, including red wine. OTA was reported to be nephrotoxic, immunotoxic, hepatotoxic and a potential carcinogen, with yet uncharacterized mechanisms. Consumption of contaminated wines might contribute up to 13% of OTA daily human intake. Potentially chronic exposure has therefore raised public health concern. OTA toxicity in the presence of de-alcoholated red wine was investigated in human intestinal Caco-2/TC7 cells, differentiated on filter supports, by measuring tight junction (TJ) permeability, morphological alterations of TJ proteins and occurrence of apoptosis. Cells were treated with OTA, in the presence of de-alcoholated red wine, for 48h and the ability to recover from the effects of OTA was evaluated after 24h in complete medium. OTA treatment increased TJ permeability and caused intracellular redistribution of claudin-4. However, cells were able to restore permeability and correct localization of claudin-4 following 24h recovery. Conversely, in the presence of red wine, OTA produced faster and irreversible increase in TJ permeability, intracellular delocalization of claudin-4 and extensive apoptosis. Our results point at a possible synergy between OTA and some red wine components, such as polyphenols, in the induction of apoptotic cell death.

  7. Making the case for direct hydrogen storage in fuel cell vehicles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    James, B.D.; Thomas, C.E.; Baum, G.N.; Lomas, F.D. Jr.; Kuhn, I.F. Jr. [Directed Technologies, Inc., Arlington, VA (United States)

    1997-12-31

    Three obstacles to the introduction of direct hydrogen fuel cell vehicles are often states: (1) inadequate onboard hydrogen storage leading to limited vehicle range; (2) lack of an hydrogen infrastructure, and (3) cost of the entire fuel cell system. This paper will address the first point with analysis of the problem/proposed solutions for the remaining two obstacles addressed in other papers. Results of a recent study conducted by Directed Technologies Inc. will be briefly presented. The study, as part of Ford Motor Company/DOE PEM Fuel Cell Program, examines multiple pure hydrogen onboard storage systems on the basis of weight, volume, cost, and complexity. Compressed gas, liquid, carbon adsorption, and metal hydride storage are all examined with compressed hydrogen storage at 5,000 psia being judged the lowest-risk, highest benefit, near-term option. These results are combined with recent fuel cell vehicle drive cycle simulations to estimate the onboard hydrogen storage requirement for full vehicle range (380 miles on the combined Federal driving schedule). The results indicate that a PNGV-like vehicle using powertrain weights and performance realistically available by the 2004 PNGV target data can achieve approximate fuel economy equivalent to 100 mpg on gasoline (100 mpg{sub eq}) and requires storage of approximately 3.6 kg hydrogen for full vehicle storage quantity allows 5,000 psia onboard storage without altering the vehicle exterior lines or appreciably encroaching on the passenger or trunk compartments.

  8. Modeling and Nonlinear Control of Fuel Cell / Supercapacitor Hybrid Energy Storage System for Electric Vehicles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    El Fadil, Hassan; Giri, Fouad; Guerrero, Josep M.

    2014-01-01

    This paper deals with the problem of controlling hybrid energy storage system (HESS) for electric vehicle. The storage system consists of a fuel cell (FC), serving as the main power source, and a supercapacitor (SC), serving as an auxiliary power source. It also contains a power block for energy...

  9. Treatment of pure red-cell aplasia with cyclosporine in a renal transplant patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yildirim, Rahsan; Bilen, Yusuf; Keles, Mustafa; Uyanik, Abdullah; Gokbulut, Puren; Aydinli, Bulent

    2013-02-01

    Acquired pure red-cell aplasia is a rare disorder that can be either idiopathic or associated with certain autoimmune diseases, pregnancy, lymphoproliferative disorders, nutritional deficiencies, or medicines. We present a deceased-donor renal transplant patient who developed pure red-cell aplasia associated with mycophenolate mofetil or tacrolimus and was treated with cyclosporine. A 20-year-old woman was transplanted from a deceased donor 1 month earlier and presented to us with symptoms of fatigue, prostration, and palpitation. The results of a laboratory examination revealed anemia. A diagnostic work-up resulted in a diagnosis of pure red-cell aplasia. Mycophenolate mofetil was discontinued. Tacrolimus also was replaced with cyclosporine 2 months after mycophenolate mofetil was halted because of a lack of improvement in anemia. Three months later, her anemia improved with cyclosporine. Starting cyclosporine instead of tacrolimus or mycophenolate mofetil showed good improvement in our patient within 6 months of therapy.

  10. Hyperkalemia caused by rapid red cell transfusion and the potassium absorption filter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasuhiko Imashuku

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of transient hyperkalemia during hysterectomy after cesarean section, due to preoperatively undiagnosed placenta accreta that caused unforeseen massive hemorrhage and required rapid red cell transfusion. Hyperkalemia-induced by rapid red cell transfusion is a well-known severe complication of transfusion; however, in patients with sudden massive hemorrhage, rapid red cell transfusion is necessary to save their life. In such cases, it is extremely important to monitor serum potassium levels. For an emergency situation, a system should be developed to ensure sufficient preparation for immediate transfusion and laboratory tests. Furthermore, sufficient stock of preparations to treat hyperkalemia, such as calcium preparations, diuretics, glucose, and insulin is required. Moreover, a transfusion filter that absorbs potassium has been developed and is now available for clinical use in Japan. The filter is easy to use and beneficial, and should be prepared when it is available.

  11. Geometrical Aspects During Formation of Compact Aggregates of Red Blood Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cardoso A.V.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available In the past forty years considerable progress has been achieved on the knowledge of human blood as a non-Newtonian shear-thinning suspension, whose initial state, that is at rest (stasis or at very low shear rates, has a gel-like internal structure which is destroyed as shear stress increases. The main goal of this communication is to describe the role of geometrical aspects during RBC (red blood cell aggregate formation, growth and compaction on naturally aggregate (porcine blood and non-aggregate (bovine blood samples. We consider how these aspects coupled with tension equilibrium are decisive to transform red cell linear roleaux to three-dimensional aggregates or clusters. Geometrical aspects are also crucial on the compaction of red blood cell aggregates. These densely packed aggregates could precipitate out of blood- either as dangerous deposits on arterial walls, or as clots which travel in suspension until they block some crucial capillary.

  12. Membrane transport of anandamide through resealed human red blood cell membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bojesen, I.N.; Hansen, Harald S.

    2005-01-01

    The use of resealed red blood cell membranes (ghosts) allows the study of the transport of a compound in a nonmetabolizing system with a biological membrane. Transmembrane movements of anandamide (N-arachidonoylethanolamine, arachidonoylethanolamide) have been studied by exchange efflux experiments...... at 0°C and pH 7.3 with albumin-free and albumin-filled human red blood cell ghosts. The efflux kinetics is biexponential and is analyzed in terms of compartment models. The distribution of anandamide on the membrane inner to outer leaflet pools is determined to be 0.275 ± 0.023, and the rate constant...... of unidirectional flux from inside to outside is 0.361 ± 0.023 s. The rate constant of unidirectional flux from the membrane to BSA in the medium ([BSA]) increases with the square root of [BSA] in accordance with the theory of an unstirred layer around ghosts. Anandamide passed through the red blood cell membrane...

  13. The plasma protein fibrinogen stabilizes clusters of red blood cells in microcapillary flows

    CERN Document Server

    Brust, M; Thiebaud, M; Flormann, D; Verdier, C; Kaestner, L; Laschke, M W; Selmi, H; Benyoussef, A; Podgorski, T; Coupier, G; Misbah, C; Wagner, C

    2014-01-01

    The supply of oxygen and nutrients and the disposal of metabolic waste in the organs depend strongly on how blood, especially red blood cells, flow through the microvascular network. Macromolecular plasma proteins such as fibrinogen cause red blood cells to form large aggregates, called rouleaux, which are usually assumed to be disaggregated in the circulation due to the shear forces present in bulk flow. This leads to the assumption that rouleaux formation is only relevant in the venule network and in arterioles at low shear rates or stasis. Thanks to an excellent agreement between combined experimental and numerical approaches, we show that despite the large shear rates present in microcapillaries, the presence of either fibrinogen or the synthetic polymer dextran leads to an enhanced formation of robust clusters of red blood cells, even at haematocrits as low as 1%. Robust aggregates are shown to exist in microcapillaries even for fibrinogen concentrations within the healthy physiological range. These pers...

  14. Red cell volume with changes in plasma osmolarity during maximal exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Beaumont, W.

    1973-01-01

    The volume of the red cell in vivo was measured during acute changes in plasma osmolarity evoked through short (6 to 8 min) maximal exercise in six male volunteer subjects. Simultaneous measurements of mean corpuscular red cell volume (MCV), hematocrit, blood hemoglobin, mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration (MCHC), and plasma osmolarity showed that there was no change in the MCV or MCHC with a concomitant rise of nearly 6% in plasma osmolarity. Apparently, in vivo, the volume of the red cell in exercising healthy human subjects does not change measurably, in spite of significant changes in osmotic pressure of the surrounding medium. Consequently, it is not justified to correct postexercise hematocrit measurements for changes in plasma osmolarity.

  15. Anti-Erythropoietin Antibody Associated Pure Red Cell Aplasia Resolved after Liver Transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annie K. Hung

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Patients undergoing antiviral therapy for chronic hepatitis C often develop anemia secondary to ribavirin and interferon. Recombinant erythropoietin has been used to improve anemia associated with antiviral therapy and to minimize dose reductions, which are associated with decreased rates of sustained virologic response. A rare potential side effect of recombinant erythropoietin is anti-erythropoietin antibody associated pure red cell aplasia. In chronic kidney disease patients with this entity, there have been good outcomes associated with renal transplant and subsequent immunosuppression. In this case, a chronic liver disease patient developed anti-erythropoietin associated pure red cell aplasia and recovered after liver transplantation and immunosuppression. It is unclear whether it is the transplanted organ, the subsequent immunosuppression, or the combination that contributed to the response. In conclusion, anti-erythropoietin associated pure red cell aplasia is a serious complication of erythropoietin therapy, but this entity should not be considered a contraindication for solid organ transplantation.

  16. Analysis of red blood cell aggregation in cardio-pulmonary bypass (CPB) surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graaff, R; Gu, Y J; Boonstra, P W; van Oeveren, W; Rakhorst, G

    2004-06-01

    Not much is known about red cell aggregation during cardio-pulmonary bypass surgery (CPB). Blood samples from 19 patients undergoing CPB were anticoagulated with EDTA. Hematocrit was adjusted to 40%. A red blood cell aggregometer (LORCA) measured changes in light reflection from each blood sample after cessation of the rotation, and calculated an aggregation index (AI). Reflection measurements were stored. Because LORCA software failed for 87 of 171 samples, we developed new software, and applied it to the stored reflection measurements. This software failed only in 7 out of 171 cases and showed that all LORCA failures occurred for AI CPB and recovered to 37.1 +/- 13.5 at day 1. It is concluded that the new software can be used to study decreased red cell aggregation during CPB.

  17. Dynamics of red blood cells and vesicles in microchannels of oscillating width.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braunmüller, S; Schmid, L; Franke, T

    2011-05-11

    We have studied the dynamics of red blood cells and fluid lipid vesicles in hydrodynamic flow fields created by microchannels with periodically varying channel width. For red blood cells we find a transition from a regime with oscillating tilt angle and fixed shape to a regime with oscillating shape with increasing flow velocity. We have determined the crossover to occur at a critical ratio L(y)/v(m) ≈ 2.2 × 10⁻³ s with channel width L(y) and red blood cell velocity v(m). These oscillations are superposed by shape transitions from a discocyte to a slipper shape at low velocities and a slipper to parachute transition at high flow velocities.

  18. Computer Simulation Study of Collective Phenomena in Dense Suspensions of Red Blood Cells under Shear

    CERN Document Server

    Krüger, Timm

    2012-01-01

    The rheology of dense red blood cell suspensions is investigated via computer simulations based on the lattice Boltzmann, the immersed boundary, and the finite element methods. The red blood cells are treated as extended and deformable particles immersed in the ambient fluid. In the first part of the work, the numerical model and strategies for stress evaluation are discussed. In the second part, the behavior of the suspensions in simple shear flow is studied for different volume fractions, particle deformabilities, and shear rates. Shear thinning behavior is recovered. The existence of a shear-induced transition from a tumbling to a tank-treading motion is demonstrated. The transition can be parameterized by a single quantity, namely the effective capillary number. It is the ratio of the suspension stress and the characteristic particle membrane stress. At the transition point, a strong increase in the orientational order of the red blood cells and a significant decrease of the particle diffusivity are obser...

  19. Carbonic anhydrase activity in the red blood cells of sea level and high altitude natives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamboa, J; Caceda, R; Gamboa, A; Monge-C, C

    2000-01-01

    Red blood cell carbonic anhydrase (CA) activity has not been studied in high altitude natives. Because CA is an intraerythocytic enzyme and high altitude natives are polycythemic, it is important to know if the activity of CA per red cell volume is different from that of their sea level counterparts. Blood was collected from healthy subjects living in Lima (150m) and from twelve subjects from Cerro de Pasco (4330m), and hematocrit and carbonic anhydrase activity were measured. As expected, the high altitude natives had significantly higher hematocrits than the sea level controls (p = 0.0002). No difference in the CA activity per milliliter of red cells was found between the two populations. There was no correlation between the hematocrit and CA activity.

  20. Red cell volume with changes in plasma osmolarity during maximal exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Beaumont, W.

    1973-01-01

    The volume of the red cell in vivo was measured during acute changes in plasma osmolarity evoked through short (6 to 8 min) maximal exercise in six male volunteer subjects. Simultaneous measurements of mean corpuscular red cell volume (MCV), hematocrit, blood hemoglobin, mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration (MCHC), and plasma osmolarity showed that there was no change in the MCV or MCHC with a concomitant rise of nearly 6% in plasma osmolarity. Apparently, in vivo, the volume of the red cell in exercising healthy human subjects does not change measurably, in spite of significant changes in osmotic pressure of the surrounding medium. Consequently, it is not justified to correct postexercise hematocrit measurements for changes in plasma osmolarity.

  1. Hyperkalemia caused by rapid red cell transfusion and the potassium absorption filter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imashuku, Yasuhiko; Kitagawa, Hirotoshi; Mizuno, Takayoshi; Fukushima, Yutaka

    2017-01-01

    We report a case of transient hyperkalemia during hysterectomy after cesarean section, due to preoperatively undiagnosed placenta accreta that caused unforeseen massive hemorrhage and required rapid red cell transfusion. Hyperkalemia-induced by rapid red cell transfusion is a well-known severe complication of transfusion; however, in patients with sudden massive hemorrhage, rapid red cell transfusion is necessary to save their life. In such cases, it is extremely important to monitor serum potassium levels. For an emergency situation, a system should be developed to ensure sufficient preparation for immediate transfusion and laboratory tests. Furthermore, sufficient stock of preparations to treat hyperkalemia, such as calcium preparations, diuretics, glucose, and insulin is required. Moreover, a transfusion filter that absorbs potassium has been developed and is now available for clinical use in Japan. The filter is easy to use and beneficial, and should be prepared when it is available. PMID:28217070

  2. Detecting Newcastle disease virus in combination of RT-PCR with red blood cell absorption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Chengqian

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR has limited sensitivity when treating complicated samples, such as feces, waste-water in farms, and nucleic acids, protein rich tissue samples, all the factors may interfere with the sensitivity of PCR test or generate false results. In this study, we developed a sensitive RT-PCR, combination of red blood cell adsorption, for detecting Newcastle disease virus (NDV. One pair of primers which was highly homologous to three NDV pathotypes was designed according to the consensus nucleocapsid protein (NP gene sequence. To eliminate the interfere of microbes and toxic substances, we concentrated and purified NDV from varied samples utilizing the ability of NDV binding red blood cells (RBCs. The RT-PCR coupled with red blood cell adsorption was much more sensitive in comparison with regular RT-PCR. The approach could also be used to detect other viruses with the property of hemagglutination, such as influenza viruses.

  3. Local membrane deformations activate Ca2+-dependent K+ and anionic currents in intact human red blood cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dyrda, Agnieszka; Cytlak, Urszula; Ciuraszkiewicz, Anna;

    2010-01-01

    -activated transient PCa observed here under local membrane deformation is a likely contributor to the Ca(2+)-mediated effects observed during the normal aging process of red blood cells, and to the increased Ca(2+) content of red cells in certain hereditary anemias such as thalassemia and sickle cell anemia....

  4. Red blood cell and leukocyte alloimmunization in patients awaiting kidney transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Silvia Fernandes Ribeiro; Ferreira, Gláucia Maria; da Silva, Sonia Leite; Alves, Tânia Maria de Oliveira; Ribeiro, Ilana Farias; Ribeiro, Thyciana Rodrigues; Cavalcante, Maria do Carmo Serpa

    2013-01-01

    Objective To determine the rates of red blood cell and leukocyte alloimmunization in patients with chronic kidney disease awaiting kidney transplantation. Methods In this cross-sectional and prospective study, the serum of 393 chronic kidney disease patients on a transplant waiting list in Ceará, Northeastern Brazil were tested for red cell and leukocyte antibodies. In addition, demographic, clinical and laboratory data were collected. Results The average age in the sample of 393 patients was 34.1 ± 14 years. Slightly more than half (208; 52.9%) were male. The average numbers of transfusions and gestations were 3.1 ± 3.3 and 1.6 ± 6, respectively. One third (33.6%) were alloimmunized: 78% with leukocyte antibodies, 9.1% with red cell antibodies and 12.9% with both. Red cell antibodies were detected in 29 cases (7.4%), 17 of whom were women, who had received more transfusions than the males (p-value < 0.0001). The most frequently detected red cell antibodies belonged to the Rh (24.1%) and Kell (13.8%) blood group systems. Leukocyte antibodies were detected in 30.5% of cases, 83 of whom were women, who had received more transfusions than the males (p-value < 0.0001) and were more reactive to panel reactive antibodies (p-value < 0.0001). The mean alloreactivity to panel reactive antibodies was 47.7 ± 31.2%. Conclusion Chronic kidney disease patients on the transplant waiting list in Ceará, Brazil, display high rates of red cell (7.4%) and leukocyte (30.5%) alloimmunization. In this sample, alloimmunization was significantly associated with the number of transfusions and gender. PMID:23904808

  5. Impact of red blood cell transfusion on global and regional measures of oxygenation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberson, Russell S; Bennett-Guerrero, Elliott

    2012-01-01

    Anemia is common in critically ill patients. Although the goal of transfusion of red blood cells is to increase oxygen-carrying capacity, there are contradictory results about whether red blood cell transfusion to treat moderate anemia (e.g., hemoglobin 7-10 g/dL) improves tissue oxygenation or changes outcomes. Whereas increasing levels of anemia eventually lead to a level of critical oxygen delivery, increased cardiac output and oxygen extraction are homeostatic mechanisms the body uses to prevent a state of dysoxia in the setting of diminished oxygen delivery due to anemia. In order for cardiac output to increase in the face of anemia, normovolemia must be maintained. Transfusion of red blood cells increases blood viscosity, which may actually decrease cardiac output (barring a state of hypovolemia prior to transfusion). Studies have generally shown that transfusion of red blood cells fails to increase oxygen uptake unless oxygen uptake/oxygen delivery dependency exists (e.g., severe anemia or strenuous exercise). Recently, near-infrared spectroscopy, which approximates the hemoglobin saturation of venous blood, has been used to investigate whether transfusion of red blood cells increases tissue oxygenation in regional tissue beds (e.g., brain, peripheral skeletal muscle). These studies have generally shown increases in near-infrared spectroscopy derived measurements of tissue oxygenation following transfusion. Studies evaluating the effect of transfusion on the microcirculation have shown that transfusion increases the functional capillary density. This article will review fundamental aspects of oxygen delivery and extraction, and the effects of red blood cell transfusion on tissue oxygenation as well as the microcirculation.

  6. Comparative studies on storage cells in tardigrades during starvation and anhydrobiosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andy REUNER, Steffen HENGHERR, Franz Brümmer, Ralph O. SCHILL

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The impact of starvation and anhydrobiosis on the number and size of the storage cells in the tardigrade species Milnesium tardigradum, Paramacrobiotus tonollii and Macrobiotus sapiens was investigated to gain more insight on the energetic side of anhydrobiosis. Storage cells are free floating cells within the body cavity of tardigrades and are presumed to store and release energy in form of glycogen, protein and fat to maintain a constant nutrient regime for the other tissues. The body size of the animals was not correlated with the size of the storage cells, however, M. tardigradum the largest species analysed also had the largest storage cells. A reduction in the size of the storage cells is apparent in all three species after seven days of starvation. A seven-day period of anhydrobiosis leads to a decrease in cell size in M. tardigradum but not in P. tonollii and M. sapiens. Although M. sapiens was raised on green algae, and M. tardigradum and P. tonollii were fed with rotifers and nematodes this difference in nourishment was not reflected in the response of the storage cells to anhydrobiosis [Current Zoology 56 (2: 259–263, 2010].

  7. Generation of red blood cells from human induced pluripotent stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dias, Jessica; Gumenyuk, Marina; Kang, HyunJun; Vodyanik, Maxim; Yu, Junying; Thomson, James A; Slukvin, Igor I

    2011-09-01

    Differentiation of human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) and embryonic stem cells (hESCs) into the erythroid lineage of cells offers a novel opportunity to study erythroid development, regulation of globin switching, drug testing, and modeling of red blood cell (RBC) diseases in vitro. Here we describe an approach for the efficient generation of RBCs from hiPSC/hESCs using an OP9 coculture system to induce hematopoietic differentiation followed by selective expansion of erythroid cells in serum-free media with erythropoiesis-supporting cytokines. We showed that fibroblast-derived transgenic hiPSCs generated using lentivirus-based vectors and transgene-free hiPSCs generated using episomal vectors can be differentiated into RBCs with an efficiency similar to that of H1 hESCs. Erythroid cultures established with this approach consisted of an essentially pure population of CD235a(+)CD45(-) leukocyte-free RBCs with robust expansion potential and long life span (up to 90 days). Similar to hESCs, hiPSC-derived RBCs expressed predominately fetal γ and embryonic ɛ globins, indicating complete reprogramming of β-globin locus following transition of fibroblasts to the pluripotent state. Although β-globin expression was detected in hiPSC/hESC-derived erythroid cells, its expression was substantially lower than the embryonic and fetal globins. Overall, these results demonstrate the feasibility of large-scale production of erythroid cells from fibroblast-derived hiPSCs, as has been described for hESCs. Since RBCs generated from transgene-free hiPSCs lack genomic integration and background expression of reprogramming genes, they would be a preferable cell source for modeling of diseases and for gene function studies.

  8. Rheology of red blood cells under flow in highly confined microchannels: I. effect of elasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lázaro, Guillermo R; Hernández-Machado, Aurora; Pagonabarraga, Ignacio

    2014-10-07

    We analyze the rheology of dilute red blood cell suspensions in pressure driven flows at low Reynolds number, in terms of the morphologies and elasticity of the cells. We focus on narrow channels of width similar to the cell diameter, when the interactions with the walls dominate the cell dynamics. The suspension presents a shear-thinning behaviour, with a Newtonian-behaviour at low shear rates, an intermediate region of strong decay of the suspension viscosity, and an asymptotic regime at high shear rates in which the effective viscosity converges to that of the solvent. We identify the relevant aspects of cell elasticity that contribute to the rheological response of blood at high confinement. In a second paper, we will explore the focusing of red blood cells while flowing at high shear rates and how this effect is controlled by the geometry of the channel.

  9. Evidence for the formation of endothelin by lysed red blood cells from endogenous precursor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tippler, B; Herbst, C; Simmet, T

    1994-12-12

    The release of endothelin from various blood cell fractions was investigated. Human as well as rat blood cell fractions homogenized by sonification were incubated in buffer for up to 60 min. Neither in platelet nor leukocyte homogenates from either species could immunoreactive endothelin be detected. In contrast, homogenates of red blood cells from both species showed a rapid and time-dependent rise of immunoreactive endothelin levels, reaching a peak at 15 min and decreasing thereafter. However, at time point 0 no immunoreactive endothelin could be detected. Reverse phase high performance liquid chromatography showed immunoreactive endothelin to consist of endothelin-1 as well as big endothelin-1. The release of immunoreactive endothelin in human and rat homogenates was concentration-dependently inhibited by the protease inhibitors, leupeptin, phosphoramidon, chymostatin and pepstatin A in order of increasing potency. Intact red blood cells did not incorporate [125I]endothelin-1 nor did they transform exogenous big endothelin-1 to endothelin-1. However, haemolysis of red blood cells with hypotonic saline (0.2%) or incubation with pore-forming staphylococcal alpha-toxin induced the release of immunoreactive endothelin into the buffer samples. Thus, apart from the indirect vasoconstrictor, haemoglobin, red blood cells can also liberate the direct vasoconstrictor, endothelin, a finding expected to be of considerable pathophysiological significance.

  10. Dual effects of Ginkgo biloba leaf extract on human red blood cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Jing; Lin, Juan; Li, Jing; Zhang, Jian-Hong; Sun, Xue-Min; Zeng, Cheng-Ming

    2009-02-01

    Extracts from the leaves of Ginkgo biloba have been used in Chinese medicine for thousands of years. Today, various standardized preparations from G. biloba leaf extract have been developed. G. biloba leaf extract, which contains flavonoids and terpenoids as the major biologically active components, has become one of the most popular and commonly used herbal remedies due to its wide spectrum of beneficial effects on health. In this study, we investigated the effects of G. biloba leaf extract on the properties of human red blood cells in the presence and absence of amyloid peptide (Abeta25-35), peroxide and hypotonic stress. The results suggest that G. biloba leaf extract has a dual action, both protective and disruptive, on red blood cells, depending on whether an exogenous stress is present. G. biloba leaf extract has a protective role on red blood cells against Abeta- and hypotonic pressure-induced haemolysis, peroxide-induced lipoperoxidation, as well as glutathione consumption and methaemoglobin formation. On the other hand, G. biloba leaf extract also exhibited damage to red blood cells by increasing cell fragility, changing cellular morphology and inducing glutathione consumption and methaemoglobin formation, especially when applied at high doses. These anti- and pro-oxidative activities of polyphenolic substances are thought to be involved in the dual function of G. biloba leaf extract. The results of this study suggest that high doses of herbal remedies and dietary supplements can be toxic to cells.

  11. Antitumor activity of Brazilian red propolis fractions against Hep-2 cancer cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frozza, Caroline Olivieri da Silva; Santos, Denis Amilton; Rufatto, Luciane Corbellini; Minetto, Luciane; Scariot, Fernando Joel; Echeverrigaray, Sergio; Pich, Claus Tröger; Moura, Sidnei; Padilha, Francine Ferreira; Borsuk, Sibele; Savegnago, Lucielli; Collares, Tiago; Seixas, Fabiana Kömmling; Dellagostin, Odir; Roesch-Ely, Mariana; Henriques, João Antonio Pêgas

    2017-07-01

    Continuous increases in the rates of tumor diseases have highlighted the need for identification of novel and inexpensive antitumor agents from natural sources. In this study, we investigated the effects of enriched fraction from hydroalcoholic Brazilian red propolis extract against Hep-2 cancer cell line. Initially 201 fractions were arranged in 12 groups according to their chromatographic characteristics (A-L). After an in vitro cell viability screening, J and L were further selected as promising enriched fractions for this study. The chemical characterization was performed and Biochanin A, Formononetin, and Liquiritigenin compounds were quantified. Through MTT viability assay and morphological changes observed by Giemsa and DAPI staining, the results showed that red propolis inhibited cancer cells growth. Flow cytometry results indicated effects that were partly mediated through programmed cell death as confirmed by externalization of phosphatidylserine, DNA cleaved assay, increase at SUB G1-G0 phase in cell cycle analysis and loss of mitochondrial membrane potential. In conclusion, our results demonstrated that red propolis enriched fractions promoted apoptotic effects in human cancer cells through the mechanisms involving mitochondrial perturbation. Therefore, red propolis fractions contain candidate agents for adjuvant cancer treatment, which further studies should elucidate the comprehensive mechanistic pathways. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. Characterizations of individual human red blood cells from patients with diabetes mellitus (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, SangYun; Jang, Seongsoo; Park, HyunJoo; Park, YongKeun

    2016-03-01

    We systematically measure the morphological, biochemical, and biomechanical properties of individual human red blood cells (RBCs) from patients with diabetes mellitus using quantitative phase imaging technique to characterize the diabetic red cells with respect to those of the healthy. The 3-D refractive index tomograms and 2-D dynamic membrane fluctuation maps of individual RBCs are reconstructed from a set of the retrieved complex optical fields at various laser incidence angles using the Common-path diffraction optical tomography, from which volume, surface area, sphericity, hemoglobin (Hb) concentration, Hb content, and membrane fluctuation are obtained simultaneously. The correlative relations among the retrieved red cell indices of diabetic and healthy RBCs are also investigated with capabilities of individual cell measurement. As expected, there are no significant alterations in morphologies (cellular volumes, surface area, and sphericity) between diabetic and healthy RBCs. However, despite the minute mean corpuscular Hb differences in cell blood count datasheet, the measured Hb concentrations and Hb contents of diabetic RBCs are statistically higher than those of healthy RBCs, which might be related to the glycation of Hb molecules by hyperglycemia. Meanwhile, the membrane fluctuations of diabetic RBCs are clearly diminished compared to healthy red cells, implying the significantly decreased RBC deformability. In particular, it seems that the membrane fluctuations have mild negative relationships with the reported HbA1c levels.

  13. Red blood cell glutathione peroxidase activity in female nulligravid and pregnant rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martino Guglielmo

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The alterations of the glutathione peroxidase enzyme complex system occur in physiological conditions such as aging and oxidative stress consequent to strenuous exercise. Methods Authors optimize the spectrophotometric method to measure glutathione peroxidase activity in rat red blood cell membranes. Results The optimization, when applied to age paired rats, both nulligravid and pregnant, shows that pregnancy induces, at seventeen d of pregnancy, an increase of both reactive oxygen substance concentration in red blood cells and membrane glutathione peroxidase activity. Conclusion The glutathione peroxidase increase in erythrocyte membranes is induced by systemic oxidative stress long lasting rat pregnancy.

  14. New diffractometric equations and data processing algorithm for laser ektacytometry of red blood cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikitin, S. Yu.; Ustinov, V. D.; Yurchuk, Yu. S.; Lugovtsov, A. E.; Lin, M. D.; Priezzhev, A. V.

    2016-07-01

    The problem of measuring the deformability of red blood cells in shear flow by laser diffractometry (ektacytometry) is considered. New diffractometric equations are obtained, which relate the parameters of the diffraction pattern to the characteristics of the erythrocyte ensemble, such as mean deformability as well as width and asymmetry of the erythrocytes distribution in deformability. A feature of these equations is that they include only geometric parameters of the diffraction pattern but do not contain its energy parameters. Basing on these equations, we propose a new data processing algorithm for the laser ektacytometry of red blood cells.

  15. Erythrokinetics: quantitative measurements of red cell production and destruction in normal subjects and patients with anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giblett, Eloise R; Coleman, Daniel H; Pirzio-Biroli, Giacomo; Donohue, Dennis M; Motulsky, Arno G; Finch, Clement A

    2016-03-17

    To study erythropoiesis and anemia, one must have a firm foundation of indices that accurately measure red blood cell production and destruction. This paper, authored by hematology legends Arno G. Motulsky and Clement A. Finch, provides that foundation. Using methods that would not be approved in today's environment, the authors studied a cohort of normal healthy patients and an equal number of patients with different forms of anemia. The results confirm a reciprocal model of red cell production and destruction, show that anemia can be the result of either underproduction (a regenerative anemia or ineffective erythropoiesis) or increased destruction, and define parameters for distinguishing these 2 possibilities that are still widely used today.

  16. Bone marrow transplantation for CVID-like humoral immune deficiency associated with red cell aplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayour, Elias J; Mousallem, Talal; Van Mater, David; Wang, Endi; Martin, Paul; Buckley, Rebecca H; Barfield, Raymond C

    2016-10-01

    Patients with common variable immunodeficiency (CVID) have a higher incidence of autoimmune disease, which may mark the disease onset; however, anemia secondary to pure red cell aplasia is an uncommon presenting feature. Here, we describe a case of CVID-like humoral immune deficiency in a child who initially presented with red cell aplasia and ultimately developed progressive bone marrow failure. Although bone marrow transplantation (BMT) has been associated with high mortality in CVID, our patient was successfully treated with a matched sibling BMT and engrafted with >98% donor chimerism and the development of normal antibody titers to diphtheria and tetanus toxoids. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Evolution of phenolic composition of red wine during vinification and storage and its contribution to wine sensory properties and antioxidant activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Baoshan; Neves, Ana C; Fernandes, Tiago A; Fernandes, Ana L; Mateus, Nuno; De Freitas, Vítor; Leandro, Conceição; Spranger, Maria I

    2011-06-22

    The objective of this work was to study the evolution of the phenolic composition of red wine during vinification and storage and its relationship with some sensory properties (astringency and bitterness) and antioxidant activities. Thus, red wine was made by a classic vinification method with Castelão and Tinta Miúda grapes (Vitis vinifera L.) harvested at maturity (3:2; w/w). Samples were taken at 2 and 7 days of maceration, at second racking, at the time of bottling and at 6 and 14 months after bottling. The total polyphenols extract (TPx) in each sample was isolated by column chromatography. The phenolic composition (anthocyanins and proanthocyanidins), in vitro antioxidant activity, and sensory property (astringency, bitterness) of the isolated TPx from different winemaking stages were evaluated through high-performance liquid chromatography-diode array detection, 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhidrazyl radical test, ferric reducing antioxidant power assay, total phenolic index, MWI (polyphenol molecular weight index), TSA (tannin specific activity), and sensory panel tasting. The results showed that the phenolic composition of red wine varied significantly during winemaking. The intensity of astringency (IA) and the intensity bitterness (IB) of the isolated TPx from different winemaking stages increased from 2 days of maceration until second racking and then decreased. Furthermore, MWI and TSA are positively correlated with IA and IB. The in vitro antioxidant activity of the isolated TPx from different winemaking stages maintained unchanged after alcoholic fermentation, which was independent of the variation of phenolic composition and sensory properties.

  18. Nutritional value and physicochemical properties of red deer and wild boar meat after frozen storage under vacuum

    OpenAIRE

    Mariusz FLOREK; Piotr SKAŁECKI; Domaradzki, Piotr; WOLAN, Łukasz; Małgorzata RYSZKOWSKA-SIWKO

    2017-01-01

    The objective of the present research was the comparison of physicochemical properties of red deer and wild boar meat frozen under vacuum for 60 days and then cold stored during 7 days. The research material included vacuum-packed, frozen and stored for 60 days skeletal muscles from shoulder (deboned retail cut) of red deer (n=9) and wild boar (n=9). Following thawing, muscles were removed from the packaging and then cold stored 7 days. Measurements of physicochemical properties as follow: pH...

  19. Freezing point of Xinjiang red globe grape during the storage period%新疆红提葡萄贮藏期冰点研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    冯悦悦; 李喜宏; 邵重晓; 刘海东

    2012-01-01

    以新疆红提葡萄为实验材料,研究冰点及其与可溶性固形物含量(SSC)和pH等的相关性,为红提葡萄安全低温保鲜提供理论依据。结果表明:红提葡萄冰点温度与SSC呈极显著负相关,但是,随着贮藏期延长,多糖、双糖、蛋白质等降解为小分子可溶性物质,或果实含水量降低,即使SSC相同,贮藏后期冰点也低于前期;冰点与pH呈显著负相关,含水量越大,冰点越高。%Xinjiang red globe grape was used to assay the correlation of freezing point, soluble solids content(SSC) and pH,to provide a theoretical basis for the safety low-temperature preservation of red globe grape.The results showed that the freezing point and SSC were significantly negative correlated. As the storage passed, polysaccharides, disaccharides and proteins degraded to some small soluble molecules, or water content reduced,which lead to the freezing point of pre-storage was higher than the post-storage even if the SSC were the same.The freezing point and pH were significantly negative correlated. The greater water content was, the higher the freezing point was.

  20. Anti-invasive activity against cancer cells of phytochemicals in red jasmine rice (Oryza sativa L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pintha, Komsak; Yodkeeree, Supachai; Pitchakarn, Pornsirit; Limtrakul, Pornngarm

    2014-01-01

    Red rice contains pharmacological substances including phenolics, oryzanol, tocotrienol and tocopherol. Recently, red rice extract has been employed as a source of antioxidants for inhibition of tumor growth. This study was carried out to evaluate the anti-invasion effects of red rice extract fractions on cancer cells. It was found that at 100 μg/ml of crude ethanolic extract (CEE), hexane fraction (Hex) and dichloromethane fraction (DCM) could reduce HT1080 and MDA-MB-231 cancer cell invasion. Hex and DCM revealed higher potency levels than CEE, whereas an ethyl acetate fraction (EtOAc) had no effect. Gelatin zymography revealed that Hex decreased the secretion and activity of matrix metalloproteinase-2 and -9 (MMP-2 and-9). In contrast, the DCM fraction exhibited slightly effect on MMPs secretion and had no effect on MMPs activity. Collagenase activity was significantly inhibited by the Hex and DCM fractions. High amounts of γ-oryzanol and γ-tocotrienol were found in the Hex and DCM fractions and demonstrated an anti-invasion property. On the other hand, proanthocyanidin was detected only in the CEE fraction and reduced MDA-MB-231 cells invasion property. These observations suggest that proanthocyanidin, γ-oryzanol and γ-tocotrienol in the red rice fractions might be responsible for the anti invasion activity. The red rice extract may have a potential to serve as a food-derived chemotherapeutic agent for cancer patients.

  1. Cold storage of rat hepatocyte suspensions for one week in a customized cold storage solution--preservation of cell attachment and metabolism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gesine Pless-Petig

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND & AIMS: Primary hepatocytes are of great importance for basic research as well as cell transplantation. However, their stability, especially in suspension, is very low. This feature severely compromises storage and shipment. Based on previous studies with adherent cells, we here assessed cold storage injury in rat hepatocyte suspensions and aimed to find a cold storage solution that preserves viability, attachment ability and functionality of these cells. METHODS: Rat hepatocyte suspensions were stored in cell culture medium, organ preservation solutions and modified TiProtec solutions at 4°C for one week. Viability and cell volume were determined by flow cytometry. Thereafter, cells were seeded and density and metabolic capacity (reductive metabolism, forskolin-induced glucose release, urea production of adherent cells were assessed. RESULTS: Cold storage injury in hepatocyte suspensions became evident as cell death occurring during cold storage or rewarming or as loss of attachment ability. Cell death during cold storage was not dependent on cell swelling and was almost completely inhibited in the presence of glycine and L-alanine. Cell attachment could be greatly improved by use of chloride-poor solutions and addition of iron chelators. Using a chloride-poor, potassium-rich storage solution containing glycine, alanine and iron chelators, cultures with 75% of the density of control cultures and with practically normal cell metabolism could be obtained after one week of cold storage. CONCLUSION: In the solution presented here, cold storage injury of hepatocyte suspensions, differing from that of adherent hepatocytes, was effectively inhibited. The components which acted on the different injurious processes were identified.

  2. Controlled lecithin release from a hierarchical architecture on blood-contacting surface to reduce hemolysis of stored red blood cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Qiang; Fan, Qunfu; Ye, Wei; Hou, Jianwen; Wong, Shing-Chung; Xu, Xiaodong; Yin, Jinghua

    2014-06-25

    Hemolysis of red blood cells (RBCs) caused by implant devices in vivo and nonpolyvinyl chloride containers for RBC preservation in vitro has recently gained much attention. To develop blood-contacting biomaterials with long-term antihemolysis capability, we present a facile method to construct a hydrophilic, 3D hierarchical architecture on the surface of styrene-b-(ethylene-co-butylene)-b-styrene elastomer (SEBS) with poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO)/lecithin nano/microfibers. The strategy is based on electrospinning of PEO/lecithin fibers onto the surface of poly [poly(ethylene glycol) methyl ether methacrylate] [P(PEGMEMA)]-modified SEBS, which renders SEBS suitable for RBC storage in vitro. We demonstrate that the constructed 3D architecture is composed of hydrophilic micro- and nanofibers, which transforms to hydrogel networks immediately in blood; the controlled release of lecithin is achieved by gradual dissolution of PEO/lecithin hydrogels, and the interaction of lecithin with RBCs maintains the membrane flexibility and normal RBC shape. Thus, the blood-contacting surface reduces both mechanical and oxidative damage to RBC membranes, resulting in low hemolysis of preserved RBCs. This work not only paves new way to fabricate high hemocompatible biomaterials for RBC storage in vitro, but provides basic principles to design and develop antihemolysis biomaterials for implantation in vivo.

  3. Spontaneous Packaging and Hypothermic Storage of Mammalian Cells with a Cell-Membrane-Mimetic Polymer Hydrogel in a Microchip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yan; Mawatari, Kazuma; Konno, Tomohiro; Kitamori, Takehiko; Ishihara, Kazuhiko

    2015-10-21

    Currently, continuous culture/passage and cryopreservation are two major, well-established methods to provide cultivated mammalian cells for experiments in laboratories. Due to the lack of flexibility, however, both laboratory-oriented methods are unable to meet the need for rapidly growing cell-based applications, which require cell supply in a variety of occasions outside of laboratories. Herein, we report spontaneous packaging and hypothermic storage of mammalian cells under refrigerated (4 °C) and ambient conditions (25 °C) using a cell-membrane-mimetic methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine (MPC) polymer hydrogel incorporated within a glass microchip. Its capability for hypothermic storage of cells was comparatively evaluated over 16 days. The results reveal that the cytocompatible MPC polymer hydrogel, in combination with the microchip structure, enabled hypothermic storage of cells with quite high viability, high intracellular esterase activity, maintained cell membrane integrity, and small morphological change for more than 1 week at 4 °C and at least 4 days at 25 °C. Furthermore, the stored cells could be released from the hydrogel and exhibited the ability to adhere to a surface and achieve confluence under standard cell culture conditions. Both hypothermic storage conditions are ordinary flexible conditions which can be easily established in places outside of laboratories. Therefore, cell packaging and storage using the hydrogel incorporated within the microchip would be a promising miniature and portable solution for flexible supply and delivery of small amounts of cells from bench to bedside.

  4. Investigating the fluid mechanics behind red blood cell-induced lateral platelet motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowl Erickson, Lindsay; Fogelson, Aaron

    2009-11-01

    Platelets play an essential role in blood clotting; they adhere to damaged tissue and release chemicals that activate other platelets. Yet in order to adhere, platelets must first come into contact with the injured vessel wall. Under arterial flow conditions, platelets have an enhanced concentration near blood vessel walls. This non-uniform cell distribution depends on the fluid dynamics of blood as a heterogeneous medium. We use a parallelized lattice Boltzmann-immersed boundary method to solve the flow dynamics of red cells and platelets in a periodic 2D vessel with no-slip boundary conditions. Red cells are treated as biconcave immersed boundary objects with isotropic Skalak membrane tension and an internal viscosity five times that of the surrounding plasma. Using this method we analyze the influence of shear rate, hematocrit, and red cell membrane properties on lateral platelet motion. We find that the effective diffusion of platelets is significantly lower near the vessel wall compared to the center of the vessel. Insight gained from this work could lead to significant improvements to current models for platelet adhesion where the presence of red blood cells is neglected due to computational intensity.

  5. Protective effects of red wine flavonols on 4-hydroxynonenal-induced apoptosis in PC12 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Young Jin; Kang, Nam Joo; Lee, Ki Won; Lee, Hyong Joo

    2009-08-01

    There is accumulating evidence that a moderate consumption of red wine has health benefits, such as the inhibition of neurodegenerative diseases. Although this is generally attributed to resveratrol, the protective mechanisms and the active substance(s) remain unclear. We examined whether and how red wine extract (RWE) and red wine flavonols quercetin and myricetin inhibited 4-hydroxynonenal (HNE)-induced apoptosis of rat pheochromocytoma PC12 cells. RWE attenuated HNE-induced PC12 cell death in a dose-dependent manner. HNE induced cleavage of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase, which is involved in DNA repair in the nucleus, and this was inhibited by RWE treatment. Treatment with RWE also inhibited HNE-induced nuclear condensation in PC12 cells. Data of 2',7'-dichlorofluorescin diacetate showed that RWE protected against apoptosis of PC12 cells by attenuating intracellular reactive oxygen species. The cytoprotective effects on HNE-induced cell death were stronger for quercetin and myricetin than for resveratrol. HNE-induced nuclear condensation was attenuated by quercetin and myricetin. These results suggest that the neuroprotective potential of red wine is attributable to flavonols rather than to resveratrol.

  6. Red cell antibodies and low ionic strength: a study with enzyme-linked antiglobulin test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leikola, J; Perkins, H A

    1980-01-01

    Alloantibody uptake on red blood cells was quantified with an accurate and reproducible enzyme-linked antiglobulin test. The uptake of anti-D, anti-Fy2 and anti-JK3 was markedly accelerated by low ionic strength salt solution (LISS) with a final ionic strength of 0.05 M. Near maximum uptake occurred within ten minutes at room temperature which corresponded to 60 minutes in saline at 37 C. Papain treatment of red blood cells increased the amount of anti-D bound, and there was no difference whether or not the papain-treated cells were suspended in LISS. In contrast, the uptake of IgG anti-A and anti-Leb was not accelerated by LISS, nor did LISS increase the rate of binding of antiblogulin to IgG antibody-coated red blood cells. We suggest this may be explained by the fact that the ABH and Lewis antigens (as well as bound IgG antibodies) extend beyond the "ionic cloud" surrounding the red blood cell. Antibody binding in the presence of albumin was approximately the same as in saline; but if the albumin was first dialyzed against LISS, the reaction was markedly accelerated and the final antibody uptake somewhat higher than in LISS alone.

  7. Low-level red laser therapy alters effects of ultraviolet C radiation on Escherichia coli cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Canuto, K.S.; Guimaraes, O.R.; Geller, M. [Centro Universitario Serra dos Orgaos, Teresopolis, RJ (Brazil). Centro de Ciencias da Saude; Sergio, L.P.S. [Instituto de Biologia Roberto Alcantara Gomes, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Departamento de Biofisica e Biometria; Paoli, F. [Universidade Federal de Juiz de Fora (UFJF), Juiz de Fora, MG (Brazil). Departamento de Morfologia; Fonseca, A.S., E-mail: adnfonseca@ig.com.br [Universidade Federal do Estado do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Departamento de Ciencias Fisiologicas

    2015-10-15

    Low-level lasers are used at low power densities and doses according to clinical protocols supplied with laser devices or based on professional practice. Although use of these lasers is increasing in many countries, the molecular mechanisms involved in effects of low-level lasers, mainly on DNA, are controversial. In this study, we evaluated the effects of low-level red lasers on survival, filamentation, and morphology of Escherichia coli cells that were exposed to ultraviolet C (UVC) radiation. Exponential and stationary wild-type and uvrA-deficient E. coli cells were exposed to a low-level red laser and in sequence to UVC radiation. Bacterial survival was evaluated to determine the laser protection factor (ratio between the number of viable cells after exposure to the red laser and UVC and the number of viable cells after exposure to UVC). Bacterial filaments were counted to obtain the percentage of filamentation. Area-perimeter ratios were calculated for evaluation of cellular morphology. Experiments were carried out in duplicate and the results are reported as the means of three independent assays. Pre-exposure to a red laser protected wild-type and uvrA-deficient E. coli cells against the lethal effect of UVC radiation, and increased the percentage of filamentation and the area-perimeter ratio, depending on UVC fluence and physiological conditions in the cells. Therapeutic, low-level red laser radiation can induce DNA lesions at a sub-lethal level. Consequences to cells and tissues should be considered when clinical protocols based on this laser are carried out. (author)

  8. Low-level red laser therapy alters effects of ultraviolet C radiation on Escherichia coli cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K.S. Canuto

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Low-level lasers are used at low power densities and doses according to clinical protocols supplied with laser devices or based on professional practice. Although use of these lasers is increasing in many countries, the molecular mechanisms involved in effects of low-level lasers, mainly on DNA, are controversial. In this study, we evaluated the effects of low-level red lasers on survival, filamentation, and morphology of Escherichia coli cells that were exposed to ultraviolet C (UVC radiation. Exponential and stationary wild-type and uvrA-deficient E. coli cells were exposed to a low-level red laser and in sequence to UVC radiation. Bacterial survival was evaluated to determine the laser protection factor (ratio between the number of viable cells after exposure to the red laser and UVC and the number of viable cells after exposure to UVC. Bacterial filaments were counted to obtain the percentage of filamentation. Area-perimeter ratios were calculated for evaluation of cellular morphology. Experiments were carried out in duplicate and the results are reported as the means of three independent assays. Pre-exposure to a red laser protected wild-type and uvrA-deficient E. coli cells against the lethal effect of UVC radiation, and increased the percentage of filamentation and the area-perimeter ratio, depending on UVC fluence and physiological conditions in the cells. Therapeutic, low-level red laser radiation can induce DNA lesions at a sub-lethal level. Consequences to cells and tissues should be considered when clinical protocols based on this laser are carried out.

  9. Shear induced diffusion in a red blood cell suspension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podgorski, Thomas; Grandchamp, Xavier; Srivastav, Aparna; Coupier, Gwennou

    2012-11-01

    In the microcirculation, blood exhibits an inhomogeneous structure which results in the well know Fahraeus-Lindqvist effect : the apparent viscosity decreases when the diameter of the capillary decreases due to the formation of a marginal cell depletion layer (known as plasma skimming). This structure is a consequence of several phenomena, which include i) the migration of cells aways from walls due to lift forces and gradients of shear and ii) shear induced diffusion due to collisions and interactions among cells. We investigated these phenomena through experiments in simple shear and microchannel flows, with dilute suspensions of vesicles and blood cells. Pairwise interactions between suspended objects result in non-linear and flow-dependent diffusion, whose properties have been measured in different experiments for vesicles and blood cells. The injection of a sheet of concentrated blood cell suspension in a microchannel with a rectangular cross-section allows, through the measurement of its widening along the channel, to measure the diffusivity of blood cells, both in the local plane of shear and in the vorticity direction.

  10. Super-capacitors as an energy storage for fuel cell automotive hybrid electrical system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thounthong, P.; Rael, St.; Davat, B. [Institut National Polytechnique, GREEN-INPL-CNRS (UMR 7037), 54 - Vandoeuvre les Nancy (France)

    2004-07-01

    The design, implementation and testing of a purely super-capacitors energy storage system for automotive system having a fuel cell as main source are presented. The system employs a super-capacitive storage device, composed of six components (3500 F, 2.5 V, 400 A) associated in series. This device is connected to automotive 42 V DC bus by a 2-quadrant DC-DC converter. The control structure of the system is realised by means of analogical and digital control. The experimental results show that super-capacitors are suitable as energy storage device for fuel cell automotive electrical system. (authors)

  11. High temperature solid oxide regenerative fuel cell for solar photovoltaic energy storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bents, David J.

    1987-01-01

    A hydrogen-oxygen regenerative fuel cell energy storage system based on high temperature solid oxide fuel cell technology is discussed which has application to darkside energy storage for solar photovoltaics. The forward and reverse operating cycles are described, and heat flow, mass, and energy balance data are presented to characterize the system's performance and the variation of performance with changing reactant storage pressure. The present system weighs less than nickel hydrogen battery systems after 0.7 darkside operation, and it maintains a specific weight advantage over radioisotope generators for discharge periods up to 72 hours.

  12. High temperature solid oxide regenerative fuel cell for solar photovoltaic energy storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bents, David J.

    1987-01-01

    A hydrogen-oxygen regenerative fuel cell energy storage system based on high temperature solid oxide fuel cell technology is discussed which has application to darkside energy storage for solar photovoltaics. The forward and reverse operating cycles are described, and heat flow, mass, and energy balance data are presented to characterize the system's performance and the variation of performance with changing reactant storage pressure. The present system weighs less than nickel hydrogen battery systems after 0.7 darkside operation, and it maintains a specific weight advantage over radioisotope generators for discharge periods up to 72 hours.

  13. Certain Red Blood Cell Indices of Maternal and Umbilical Cord ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Uche

    umbilical cord packed cell volume and haemoglobin concentration in our locality. Keywords: Umbilical ... parasitaemia, or had premature delivery, history of haemorheological ... labour (immediately after delivery) by clamping and cutting the ...

  14. Effect of Haimiding on the functioning of red cell membrane of FC and H22 tumor-bearing mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu-Bin Ji; Shi-Yong Gao; Wei-Ping Cheng

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To study the effect of Haimiding on the functioning of red cell membrane of FC and H22 tumor-bearing mice.METHODS: The membrane fluidity of red cells is measured with DPH fluorescence probe as a marker; the amount of red cell membrane proteins is measured using polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis; the amount of sialic acid (SA) on the surface of red cell membrane and the sealability of these cells are measured using colorimetric analysis.RESULTS: Haimiding can lower the membrane fluidity of red cells in tumor-bearing mice and the amount of their membrane proteins, while increasing the amount of sialic acid in the membrane of red cells in these mice and enhancing the ability of the membrane of their red cells to reseal.CONCLUSION: The anti-tumor effect of Haimiding on tumorbearing mice is due to its ability to improve and restore the functions of the membrane of their red cell and to enhance the immune effect of the organisms.

  15. Simulation of Deformation and Aggregation of Two Red Blood Cells in a Stenosed Microvessel by Dissipative Particle Dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Lanlan; Liu, Yang; Chen, Shuo; Fu, Bingmei

    2016-12-01

    The motion of two red blood cells in a stenosed microvessel was simulated using dissipative particle dynamics. The effects of intercellular interaction, red blood cell deformability and the initial cell orientation on the deformation and aggregation of the RBCs and on the flow resistance were investigated. The red blood cell membrane was treated as a three-dimensional coarse-grained network model and the intercellular interaction was modeled by the Morse potential based on a depletion-mediated assumption. It is shown that the flow resistance increases dramatically when the red blood cells enter into the stenosis and decreases rapidly as RBCs move away from the stenosis. Particularly, for a pair of stiffer red blood cells with the initial inclination angle of 90°, the maximum value of the flow resistance is larger; while a higher flow resistance can also come from a stronger aggregation. For a pair of stiffer red blood cells moving parallel to the main flow, when their positions are closer to the vessel wall at the upstream of the stenosis, the flow resistance increases due to the migration to the vessel center at the stenosis. In addition, for a pair of red blood cells with the initial inclination angle of 0°, the flow resistance from the aggregate formed by a pair of red blood cells with a larger deformation is higher.

  16. Heme oxygenase-1 deficiency alters erythroblastic island formation, steady-state erythropoiesis and red blood cell lifespan in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraser, Stuart T; Midwinter, Robyn G; Coupland, Lucy A; Kong, Stephanie; Berger, Birgit S; Yeo, Jia Hao; Andrade, Osvaldo Cooley; Cromer, Deborah; Suarna, Cacang; Lam, Magda; Maghzal, Ghassan J; Chong, Beng H; Parish, Christopher R; Stocker, Roland

    2015-05-01

    Heme oxygenase-1 is critical for iron recycling during red blood cell turnover, whereas its impact on steady-state erythropoiesis and red blood cell lifespan is not known. We show here that in 8- to 14-week old mice, heme oxygenase-1 deficiency adversely affects steady-state erythropoiesis in the bone marrow. This is manifested by a decrease in Ter-119(+)-erythroid cells, abnormal adhesion molecule expression on macrophages and erythroid cells, and a greatly diminished ability to form erythroblastic islands. Compared with wild-type animals, red blood cell size and hemoglobin content are decreased, while the number of circulating red blood cells is increased in heme oxygenase-1 deficient mice, overall leading to microcytic anemia. Heme oxygenase-1 deficiency increases oxidative stress in circulating red blood cells and greatly decreases the frequency of macrophages expressing the phosphatidylserine receptor Tim4 in bone marrow, spleen and liver. Heme oxygenase-1 deficiency increases spleen weight and Ter119(+)-erythroid cells in the spleen, although α4β1-integrin expression by these cells and splenic macrophages positive for vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 are both decreased. Red blood cell lifespan is prolonged in heme oxygenase-1 deficient mice compared with wild-type mice. Our findings suggest that while macrophages and relevant receptors required for red blood cell formation and removal are substantially depleted in heme oxygenase-1 deficient mice, the extent of anemia in these mice may be ameliorated by the prolonged lifespan of their oxidatively stressed erythrocytes.

  17. Dynamic quantitative microscopy and nanoscopy of red blood cells in sickle cell disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaked, Natan T.; Satterwhite, Lisa L.; Telen, Marilyn J.; Truskey, George A.; Wax, Adam

    2012-03-01

    We have applied wide-field digital interferometric techniques to quantitatively image sickle red blood cells (RBCs) [1] in a noncontact label-free manner, and measure the nanometer-scale fluctuations in their thickness as an indication of their stiffness. The technique can simultaneously measure the fluctuations for multiple spatial points on the RBC and thus yields a map describing the stiffness of each RBC in the field of view. Using this map, the local rigidity regions of the RBC are evaluated quantitatively. Since wide-field digital interferometry is a quantitative holographic imaging technique rather than one-point measurement, it can be used to simultaneously evaluate cell transverse morphology plus thickness in addition to its stiffness profile. Using this technique, we examine the morphology and dynamics of RBCs from individuals who suffer from sickle cell disease, and find that the sickle RBCs are significantly stiffer than healthy RBCs. Furthermore, we show that the technique is sensitive enough to distinguish various classes of sickle RBCs, including sickle RBCs with visibly-normal morphology, compared to the stiffer crescent-shaped sickle RBCs.

  18. Low-level red laser therapy alters effects of ultraviolet C radiation on Escherichia coli cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canuto, K S; Sergio, L P S; Guimarães, O R; Geller, M; Paoli, F; Fonseca, A S

    2015-10-01

    Low-level lasers are used at low power densities and doses according to clinical protocols supplied with laser devices or based on professional practice. Although use of these lasers is increasing in many countries, the molecular mechanisms involved in effects of low-level lasers, mainly on DNA, are controversial. In this study, we evaluated the effects of low-level red lasers on survival, filamentation, and morphology of Escherichia colicells that were exposed to ultraviolet C (UVC) radiation. Exponential and stationary wild-type and uvrA-deficientE. coli cells were exposed to a low-level red laser and in sequence to UVC radiation. Bacterial survival was evaluated to determine the laser protection factor (ratio between the number of viable cells after exposure to the red laser and UVC and the number of viable cells after exposure to UVC). Bacterial filaments were counted to obtain the percentage of filamentation. Area-perimeter ratios were calculated for evaluation of cellular morphology. Experiments were carried out in duplicate and the results are reported as the means of three independent assays. Pre-exposure to a red laser protected wild-type and uvrA-deficient E. coli cells against the lethal effect of UVC radiation, and increased the percentage of filamentation and the area-perimeter ratio, depending on UVC fluence and physiological conditions in the cells. Therapeutic, low-level red laser radiation can induce DNA lesions at a sub-lethal level. Consequences to cells and tissues should be considered when clinical protocols based on this laser are carried out.

  19. FRET imaging of hemoglobin concentration in Plasmodium falciparum-infected red cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Esposito

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: During its intraerythrocytic asexual reproduction cycle Plasmodium falciparum consumes up to 80% of the host cell hemoglobin, in large excess over its metabolic needs. A model of the homeostasis of falciparum-infected red blood cells suggested an explanation based on the need to reduce the colloid-osmotic pressure within the host cell to prevent its premature lysis. Critical for this hypothesis was that the hemoglobin concentration within the host cell be progressively reduced from the trophozoite stage onwards. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The experiments reported here were designed to test this hypothesis by direct measurements of the hemoglobin concentration in live, infected red cells. We developed a novel, non-invasive method to quantify the hemoglobin concentration in single cells, based on Förster resonance energy transfer between hemoglobin molecules and the fluorophore calcein. Fluorescence lifetime imaging allowed the quantitative mapping of the hemoglobin concentration within the cells. The average fluorescence lifetimes of uninfected cohorts was 270+/-30 ps (mean+/-SD; N = 45. In the cytoplasm of infected cells the fluorescence lifetime of calcein ranged from 290+/-20 ps for cells with ring stage parasites to 590+/-13 ps and 1050+/-60 ps for cells with young trophozoites and late stage trophozoite/early schizonts, respectively. This was equivalent to reductions in hemoglobin concentration spanning the range from 7.3 to 2.3 mM, in line with the model predictions. An unexpected ancillary finding was the existence of a microdomain under the host cell membrane with reduced calcein quenching by hemoglobin in cells with mature trophozoite stage parasites. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The results support the predictions of the colloid-osmotic hypothesis and provide a better understanding of the homeostasis of malaria-infected red cells. In addition, they revealed the existence of a distinct peripheral microdomain in the host

  20. Morphological Features of Red Blood Cells in Patients with Severe Concomitant Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Moroz

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to reveal changes in the structure and shape of red blood cells depending on blood loss (BL volume in patients with severe concomitant injury (SCI. Subjects and methods. Eighteen patients (9 men, 9 women aged 48.6±16.1 years who had sustained severe concomitant mechanical injury (CMI with different BL volumes and hemodynamic disorders were examined. According to the volume of BL, the patients were divided into two groups: 1 7 victims with a BL volume of < 750 ml (5.7±1.9 ml/kg, grade 1 BL; 2 11 victims with a BL volume of > 2000 ml (37.5±5.1 ml/kg, grade 4 BL. A comparison group consisted of 5 apparently healthy volunteers whose mean age was 26.4±2.7 years. The shapes and sizes of red blood cells were examined by light optical and atomic force microscopy (AFM. To study the composition of red blood cells, ten microliters of whole blood were applied to the slides and red blood cell monolayers were prepared using a V-sampler. The membrane surface was scanned by semicontact resonance AFM. The investigators used NSGL 01-A cantilevers with a resonance frequency in the range of 80200 kHz, a probe radius of 10 nm, 512 and 1024 scanning points, and 100X100 ^m and 10X10 ^m scanning fields. Planar and 3D images were obtained. Results. Calculation of 1000 cells by light optical microscopy and AFM showed significantly different counts of macro- and microcytes in the comparison group. The 100X100-^m field exhibited the following types of red blood cells: discocytes (97.9±1.5% and 96±5%, echinocytes (2.1±0.9% and 3±1%, and squamous cells (0.1±0.02% and 1±0.5%. Within the first 24 hours after injury, the victim group displayed lower normocyte counts and higher counts of macrocytes and microcytes than the control group. AFM in the 100X100-^m field revealed that the victims with SMI when admitted to an intensive care unit exhibited a significant decrease in the counts of discocytes counts and increases in those of echinocytes, stomatocytes