WorldWideScience

Sample records for reconstructed holographic images

  1. Holographic images reconstructed from GMR-based fringe pattern

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kikuchi Hiroshi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We have developed a magneto-optical spatial light modulator (MOSLM using giant magneto-resistance (GMR structures for realizing a holographic three-dimensional (3D display. For practical applications, reconstructed image of hologram consisting of GMR structures should be investigated in order to study the feasibility of the MOSLM. In this study, we fabricated a hologram with GMR based fringe-pattern and demonstrated a reconstructed image. A fringe-pattern convolving a crossshaped image was calculated by a conventional binary computer generated hologram (CGH technique. The CGH-pattern has 2,048 × 2,048 with 5 μm pixel pitch. The GMR stack consists of a Tb-Fe-Co/CoFe pinned layer, a Ag spacer, a Gd-Fe free layer for light modulation, and a Ru capping layer, was deposited by dc-magnetron sputtering. The GMR hologram was formed using photo-lithography and Krion milling processes, followed by the deposition of a Tb-Fe-Co reference layer with large coercivity and the same Kerr-rotation angle compared to the free layer, and a lift-off process. The reconstructed image of the ON-state was clearly observed and successfully distinguished from the OFF-state by switching the magnetization direction of the free-layer with an external magnetic field. These results indicate the possibility of realizing a holographic 3D display by the MOSLM using the GMR structures.

  2. Image improvement and three-dimensional reconstruction using holographic image processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stroke, G. W.; Halioua, M.; Thon, F.; Willasch, D. H.

    1977-01-01

    Holographic computing principles make possible image improvement and synthesis in many cases of current scientific and engineering interest. Examples are given for the improvement of resolution in electron microscopy and 3-D reconstruction in electron microscopy and X-ray crystallography, following an analysis of optical versus digital computing in such applications.

  3. Single-shot full resolution region-of-interest (ROI) reconstruction in image plane digital holographic microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Mandeep; Khare, Kedar

    2018-05-01

    We describe a numerical processing technique that allows single-shot region-of-interest (ROI) reconstruction in image plane digital holographic microscopy with full pixel resolution. The ROI reconstruction is modelled as an optimization problem where the cost function to be minimized consists of an L2-norm squared data fitting term and a modified Huber penalty term that are minimized alternately in an adaptive fashion. The technique can provide full pixel resolution complex-valued images of the selected ROI which is not possible to achieve with the commonly used Fourier transform method. The technique can facilitate holographic reconstruction of individual cells of interest from a large field-of-view digital holographic microscopy data. The complementary phase information in addition to the usual absorption information already available in the form of bright field microscopy can make the methodology attractive to the biomedical user community.

  4. Plane wave analysis of coherent holographic image reconstruction by phase transfer (CHIRPT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field, Jeffrey J; Winters, David G; Bartels, Randy A

    2015-11-01

    Fluorescent imaging plays a critical role in a myriad of scientific endeavors, particularly in the biological sciences. Three-dimensional imaging of fluorescent intensity often requires serial data acquisition, that is, voxel-by-voxel collection of fluorescent light emitted throughout the specimen with a nonimaging single-element detector. While nonimaging fluorescence detection offers some measure of scattering robustness, the rate at which dynamic specimens can be imaged is severely limited. Other fluorescent imaging techniques utilize imaging detection to enhance collection rates. A notable example is light-sheet fluorescence microscopy, also known as selective-plane illumination microscopy, which illuminates a large region within the specimen and collects emitted fluorescent light at an angle either perpendicular or oblique to the illumination light sheet. Unfortunately, scattering of the emitted fluorescent light can cause blurring of the collected images in highly turbid biological media. We recently introduced an imaging technique called coherent holographic image reconstruction by phase transfer (CHIRPT) that combines light-sheet-like illumination with nonimaging fluorescent light detection. By combining the speed of light-sheet illumination with the scattering robustness of nonimaging detection, CHIRPT is poised to have a dramatic impact on biological imaging, particularly for in vivo preparations. Here we present the mathematical formalism for CHIRPT imaging under spatially coherent illumination and present experimental data that verifies the theoretical model.

  5. The research of Digital Holographic Object Wave Field Reconstruction in Image and Object Space

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Jun-Chang; PENG Zu-Jie; FU Yun-Chang

    2011-01-01

    @@ For conveniently detecting objects of different sizes using digital holography, usual measurements employ the object wave transformed by an optical system with different magnifications to fit charge coupled devices (CCDs), then the object field reconstruction involves the diffraction calculation of the optic wave passing through the optical system.We propose two methods to reconstruct the object field.The one is that, when the object is imaging in an image space in which we reconstruct the image of the object field, the object field can be expressed according to the object-image relationship.The other is that, when the object field reaching CCD is imaged in an object space in which we reconstruct the object field, the optical system is described by introducing matrix optics in this paper.The reconstruction formulae which easily use classic diffraction integral are derived.Finally, experimental verifications are also accomplished.%For conveniently detecting objects of different sizes using digital holography, usual measurements employ the object wave transformed by an optical system with different magnifications to fit charge coupled devices (CCDs), then the object Reid reconstruction involves the diffraction calculation of the optic wave passing through the optical system. We propose two methods to reconstruct the object field. The one is that, when the object is imaging in an image space in which we reconstruct the image of the object field, the object field can be expressed according to the object-image relationship. The other is that, when the object field reaching CCD is imaged in an object space in which we reconstruct the object field, the optical system is described by introducing matrix optics in this paper. The reconstruction formulae which easily use classic diffraction integral are derived. Finally, experimental verifications are also accomplished.

  6. Proton beam writing for producing holographic images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ow, Y.S.; Breese, M.B.H.; Bettiol, A.A.

    2009-01-01

    This work reports on the writing of computer generated hologram diffraction patterns using focused 2 MeV proton beam irradiation. These patterns were designed using a ray tracing algorithm and written directly into a thick polymethylmethacrylate layer. When the developed holographic pattern was illuminated with a 650 nm laser it produced a good reconstructed image. This work provides means of forming high-resolution, high aspect ratio holographic images in polymers for applications in data storage using switchable holography.

  7. Prospects of linear reconstruction in atomic resolution electron holographic tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krehl, Jonas; Lubk, Axel

    2015-01-01

    Tomography commonly requires a linear relation between the measured signal and the underlying specimen property; for Electron Holographic Tomography this is given by the Phase Grating Approximation (PGA). While largely valid at medium resolution, discrepancies arise at high resolution imaging conditions. We set out to investigate the artefacts that are produced if the reconstruction still assumes the PGA even with an atomic resolution tilt series. To forego experimental difficulties the holographic tilt series was simulated. The reconstructed electric potential clearly shows peaks at the positions of the atoms. These peaks have characterisitic deformations, which can be traced back to the defocus a particular atom has in the holograms of the tilt series. Exchanging an atom for one of a different atomic number results in a significant change in the reconstructed potential that is well contained within the atom's peak. - Highlights: • We simulate a holographic tilt series of a nanocrystal with atomic resolution. • Using PGA-based Holographic Tomography we reconstruct the atomic structure. • The reconstruction shows characteristic artefacts, chiefly caused by defocus. • Changing one atom's Z produces a well localised in the reconstruction

  8. Prospects of linear reconstruction in atomic resolution electron holographic tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krehl, Jonas, E-mail: Jonas.Krehl@triebenberg.de; Lubk, Axel

    2015-03-15

    Tomography commonly requires a linear relation between the measured signal and the underlying specimen property; for Electron Holographic Tomography this is given by the Phase Grating Approximation (PGA). While largely valid at medium resolution, discrepancies arise at high resolution imaging conditions. We set out to investigate the artefacts that are produced if the reconstruction still assumes the PGA even with an atomic resolution tilt series. To forego experimental difficulties the holographic tilt series was simulated. The reconstructed electric potential clearly shows peaks at the positions of the atoms. These peaks have characterisitic deformations, which can be traced back to the defocus a particular atom has in the holograms of the tilt series. Exchanging an atom for one of a different atomic number results in a significant change in the reconstructed potential that is well contained within the atom's peak. - Highlights: • We simulate a holographic tilt series of a nanocrystal with atomic resolution. • Using PGA-based Holographic Tomography we reconstruct the atomic structure. • The reconstruction shows characteristic artefacts, chiefly caused by defocus. • Changing one atom's Z produces a well localised in the reconstruction.

  9. Digital holographic reconstruction detection of localized corrosion arising from scratches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LIANG WANG

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available In this study, electrochemical methods and the digital holographic reconstruction technique were combined to detect the localized scratch-induced corrosion process of Alloy 690 in 0.50 mol dm-3 H2SO4 containing 0.10 mol dm-3 NaCl. The numerical reconstruction method has been proved to be an effective technique to detect changes of solution concentration. One can obtain direct information from the reconstructed images and capture subtle more revealing changes. It provides a method to detect localized corrosion arising from scratches.

  10. Holographic bulk reconstruction with α' corrections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Shubho R.; Sarkar, Debajyoti

    2017-10-01

    We outline a holographic recipe to reconstruct α' corrections to anti-de Sitter (AdS) (quantum) gravity from an underlying CFT in the strictly planar limit (N →∞ ). Assuming that the boundary CFT can be solved in principle to all orders of the 't Hooft coupling λ , for scalar primary operators, the λ-1 expansion of the conformal dimensions can be mapped to higher curvature corrections of the dual bulk scalar field action. Furthermore, for the metric perturbations in the bulk, the AdS /CFT operator-field isomorphism forces these corrections to be of the Lovelock type. We demonstrate this by reconstructing the coefficient of the leading Lovelock correction, also known as the Gauss-Bonnet term in a bulk AdS gravity action using the expression of stress-tensor two-point function up to subleading order in λ-1.

  11. High quality digital holographic reconstruction on analog film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelsen, B.; Hartmann, P.

    2017-05-01

    High quality real-time digital holographic reconstruction, i.e. at 30 Hz frame rates, has been at the forefront of research and has been hailed as the holy grail of display systems. While these efforts have produced a fascinating array of computer algorithms and technology, many applications of reconstructing high quality digital holograms do not require such high frame rates. In fact, applications such as 3D holographic lithography even require a stationary mask. Typical devices used for digital hologram reconstruction are based on spatial-light-modulator technology and this technology is great for reconstructing arbitrary holograms on the fly; however, it lacks the high spatial resolution achievable by its analog counterpart, holographic film. Analog holographic film is therefore the method of choice for reconstructing highquality static holograms. The challenge lies in taking a static, high-quality digitally calculated hologram and effectively writing it to holographic film. We have developed a theoretical system based on a tunable phase plate, an intensity adjustable high-coherence laser and a slip-stick based piezo rotation stage to effectively produce a digitally calculated hologram on analog film. The configuration reproduces the individual components, both the amplitude and phase, of the hologram in the Fourier domain. These Fourier components are then individually written on the holographic film after interfering with a reference beam. The system is analogous to writing angularly multiplexed plane waves with individual component phase control.

  12. Magnonic holographic imaging of magnetic microstructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gutierrez, D.; Chiang, H.; Bhowmick, T.; Volodchenkov, A.D.; Ranjbar, M.; Liu, G.; Jiang, C.; Warren, C. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of California - Riverside, Riverside, CA 92521 (United States); Khivintsev, Y.; Filimonov, Y. [Kotelnikov Institute of Radioengineering and Electronics of Russian Academy of Sciences, Saratov Branch, Saratov 410019 (Russian Federation); Saratov State University, Saratov 410012 (Russian Federation); Garay, J.; Lake, R.; Balandin, A.A. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of California - Riverside, Riverside, CA 92521 (United States); Khitun, A., E-mail: akhitun@engr.ucr.edu [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of California - Riverside, Riverside, CA 92521 (United States)

    2017-04-15

    We propose and demonstrate a technique for magnetic microstructure imaging via their interaction with propagating spin waves. In this approach, the object of interest is placed on top of a magnetic testbed made of material with low spin wave damping. There are micro-antennas incorporated in the testbed. Two of these antennas are used for spin wave excitation while another one is used for the detecting of inductive voltage produced by the interfering spin waves. The measurements are repeated for different phase differences between the spin wave generating antennas which is equivalent to changing the angle of illumination. The collected data appear as a 3D plot – the holographic image of the object. We present experimental data showing magnonic holographic images of a low-coercivity Si/Co sample, a high-coercivity sample made of SrFe{sub 12}O{sub 19} and a diamagnetic copper sample. We also present images of the three samples consisting of a different amount of SrFe{sub 12}O{sub 19} powder. The imaging was accomplished on a Y{sub 3}Fe{sub 2}(FeO{sub 4}){sub 3} testbed at room temperature. The obtained data reveal the unique magnonic signatures of the objects. Experimental data is complemented by the results of numerical modeling, which qualitatively explain the characteristic features of the images. Potentially, magnonic holographic imaging may complement existing techniques and be utilized for non-destructive in-situ magnetic object characterization. The fundamental physical limits of this approach are also discussed. - Highlights: • A technique for magnetic microstructure imaging via their interaction with propagating spin waves is proposed. • In this technique, magnetic structures appear as 3D objects. • Several holographic images of magnetic microstructures are presented.

  13. Magnonic holographic imaging of magnetic microstructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutierrez, D.; Chiang, H.; Bhowmick, T.; Volodchenkov, A. D.; Ranjbar, M.; Liu, G.; Jiang, C.; Warren, C.; Khivintsev, Y.; Filimonov, Y.; Garay, J.; Lake, R.; Balandin, A. A.; Khitun, A.

    2017-04-01

    We propose and demonstrate a technique for magnetic microstructure imaging via their interaction with propagating spin waves. In this approach, the object of interest is placed on top of a magnetic testbed made of material with low spin wave damping. There are micro-antennas incorporated in the testbed. Two of these antennas are used for spin wave excitation while another one is used for the detecting of inductive voltage produced by the interfering spin waves. The measurements are repeated for different phase differences between the spin wave generating antennas which is equivalent to changing the angle of illumination. The collected data appear as a 3D plot - the holographic image of the object. We present experimental data showing magnonic holographic images of a low-coercivity Si/Co sample, a high-coercivity sample made of SrFe12O19 and a diamagnetic copper sample. We also present images of the three samples consisting of a different amount of SrFe12O19 powder. The imaging was accomplished on a Y3Fe2(FeO4)3 testbed at room temperature. The obtained data reveal the unique magnonic signatures of the objects. Experimental data is complemented by the results of numerical modeling, which qualitatively explain the characteristic features of the images. Potentially, magnonic holographic imaging may complement existing techniques and be utilized for non-destructive in-situ magnetic object characterization. The fundamental physical limits of this approach are also discussed.

  14. COMPARISON OF HOLOGRAPHIC AND ITERATIVE METHODS FOR AMPLITUDE OBJECT RECONSTRUCTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. A. Shevkunov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Experimental comparison of four methods for the wavefront reconstruction is presented. We considered two iterative and two holographic methods with different mathematical models and algorithms for recovery. The first two of these methods do not use a reference wave recording scheme that reduces requirements for stability of the installation. A major role in phase information reconstruction by such methods is played by a set of spatial intensity distributions, which are recorded as the recording matrix is being moved along the optical axis. The obtained data are used consistently for wavefront reconstruction using an iterative procedure. In the course of this procedure numerical distribution of the wavefront between the planes is performed. Thus, phase information of the wavefront is stored in every plane and calculated amplitude distributions are replaced for the measured ones in these planes. In the first of the compared methods, a two-dimensional Fresnel transform and iterative calculation in the object plane are used as a mathematical model. In the second approach, an angular spectrum method is used for numerical wavefront propagation, and the iterative calculation is carried out only between closely located planes of data registration. Two digital holography methods, based on the usage of the reference wave in the recording scheme and differing from each other by numerical reconstruction algorithm of digital holograms, are compared with the first two methods. The comparison proved that the iterative method based on 2D Fresnel transform gives results comparable with the result of common holographic method with the Fourier-filtering. It is shown that holographic method for reconstructing of the object complex amplitude in the process of the object amplitude reduction is the best among considered ones.

  15. Holographic Particle Image Velocimetry and its Application in Engine Development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coupland, J M; Garner, C P; Alcock, R D; Halliwell, N A

    2006-01-01

    This paper reviews Holographic Particle Image Velocimetry (HPIV) as a means to make three-component velocity measurements throughout a three-dimensional flow-field of interest. A simplified treatment of three-dimensional scalar wave propagation is outlined and subsequently used to illustrate the principles of complex correlation analysis. It is shown that this type of analysis provides the three-dimensional correlation of the propagating, monochromatic fields recorded by the hologram. A similar approach is used to analyse the Object Conjugate Reconstruction (OCR) technique to resolve directional ambiguity by introducing an artificial image shift to the reconstructed particle images. An example of how these methods are used together to measure the instantaneous flow fields within a motored Diesel engine is then described

  16. Digital Holographic Capture and Optoelectronic Reconstruction for 3D Displays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damien P. Kelly

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The application of digital holography as a viable solution to 3D capture and display technology is examined. A review of the current state of the field is presented in which some of the major challenges involved in a digital holographic solution are highlighted. These challenges include (i the removal of the DC and conjugate image terms, which are features of the holographic recording process, (ii the reduction of speckle noise, a characteristic of a coherent imaging process, (iii increasing the angular range of perspective of digital holograms (iv and replaying captured and/or processed digital holograms using spatial light modulators. Each of these challenges are examined theoretically and several solutions are put forward. Experimental results are presented that demonstrate the validity of the theoretical solutions.

  17. Petrov classification and holographic reconstruction of spacetime

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gath, Jakob [Centre de Physique Théorique, Ecole Polytechnique, CNRS UMR 7644,91128 Palaiseau Cedex (France); Mukhopadhyay, Ayan [Department of Physics, University of Crete,Heraklion 71003 (Greece); Petkou, Anastasios C. [Department of Physics, Institute of Theoretical Physics,Aristotle University of Thessaloniki,54124, Thessaloniki (Greece); Petropoulos, P. Marios [Centre de Physique Théorique, Ecole Polytechnique, CNRS UMR 7644,91128 Palaiseau Cedex (France); Siampos, Konstantinos [Albert Einstein Center for Fundamental Physics,Institute for Theoretical Physics, Bern University, Sidlerstrasse 5, 3012 Bern (Switzerland)

    2015-09-01

    Using the asymptotic form of the bulk Weyl tensor, we present an explicit approach that allows us to reconstruct exact four-dimensional Einstein spacetimes which are algebraically special with respect to Petrov’s classification. If the boundary metric supports a traceless, symmetric and conserved complex rank-two tensor, which is related to the boundary Cotton and energy-momentum tensors, and if the hydrodynamic congruence is shearless, then the bulk metric is exactly resummed and captures modes that stand beyond the hydrodynamic derivative expansion. We illustrate the method when the congruence has zero vorticity, leading to the Robinson-Trautman spacetimes of arbitrary Petrov class, and quote the case of non-vanishing vorticity, which captures the Plebański-Demiański Petrov D family.

  18. Quantitative measurement of holographic image quality using Adobe Photoshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wesly, E

    2013-01-01

    Measurement of the characteristics of image holograms in regards to diffraction efficiency and signal to noise ratio are demonstrated, using readily available digital cameras and image editing software. Illustrations and case studies, using currently available holographic recording materials, are presented.

  19. Quantitative measurement of holographic image quality using Adobe Photoshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wesly, E.

    2013-02-01

    Measurement of the characteristics of image holograms in regards to diffraction efficiency and signal to noise ratio are demonstrated, using readily available digital cameras and image editing software. Illustrations and case studies, using currently available holographic recording materials, are presented.

  20. All-dielectric meta-holograms with holographic images transforming longitudinally

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Qiu; Xu, Quan; Zhang, Xueqian; Tian, Chunxiu; Xu, Yuehong; Gu, Jianqiang; Tian, Zhen; Ouyang, Chunmei; Zhang, Xixiang; Han, Jiaguang; Zhang, Weili

    2017-01-01

    Metasurfaces are unique subwavelength geometries capable of engineering electromagnetic waves at will, delivering new opportunities for holography. Most previous meta-holograms, so-called phase-only meta-holograms, modulate only the amplitude distribution of a virtual object, and require optimizing techniques to improve the image quality. However, the phase distribution of the reconstructed image is usually overlooked in previous studies, leading to inevitable information loss. Here, we demonstrate all-dielectric meta-holograms that allow tailoring of both the phase and amplitude distributions of virtual objects. Several longitudinal manipulations of the holographic images are theoretically and experimentally demonstrated, including shifting, stretching, and rotating, enabling a large depth of focus. Furthermore, a new meta-hologram with a three-dimensional holographic design method is demonstrated with an even enhanced depth of focus. The proposed meta-holograms offer more freedom in holographic design and open new avenues for designing complex three-dimensional holography.

  1. All-dielectric meta-holograms with holographic images transforming longitudinally

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Qiu

    2017-11-22

    Metasurfaces are unique subwavelength geometries capable of engineering electromagnetic waves at will, delivering new opportunities for holography. Most previous meta-holograms, so-called phase-only meta-holograms, modulate only the amplitude distribution of a virtual object, and require optimizing techniques to improve the image quality. However, the phase distribution of the reconstructed image is usually overlooked in previous studies, leading to inevitable information loss. Here, we demonstrate all-dielectric meta-holograms that allow tailoring of both the phase and amplitude distributions of virtual objects. Several longitudinal manipulations of the holographic images are theoretically and experimentally demonstrated, including shifting, stretching, and rotating, enabling a large depth of focus. Furthermore, a new meta-hologram with a three-dimensional holographic design method is demonstrated with an even enhanced depth of focus. The proposed meta-holograms offer more freedom in holographic design and open new avenues for designing complex three-dimensional holography.

  2. Quantitative phase imaging with scanning holographic microscopy: an experimental assesment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tada Yoshitaka

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This paper demonstrates experimentally how quantitative phase information can be obtained in scanning holographic microscopy. Scanning holography can operate in both coherent and incoherent modes, simultaneously if desired, with different detector geometries. A spatially integrating detector provides an incoherent hologram of the object's intensity distribution (absorption and/or fluorescence, for example, while a point detector in a conjugate plane of the pupil provides a coherent hologram of the object's complex amplitude, from which a quantitative measure of its phase distribution can be extracted. The possibility of capturing simultaneously holograms of three-dimensional specimens, leading to three-dimensional reconstructions with absorption contrast, reflectance contrast, fluorescence contrast, as was previously demonstrated, and quantitative phase contrast, as shown here for the first time, opens up new avenues for multimodal imaging in biological studies.

  3. Analysis of reconstructed interference fields in digital holographic interferometry using the polynomial phase transform

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorthi, Sai Siva; Rastogi, Pramod

    2009-01-01

    A noisy wrapped phase map is the end-output of commonly employed phase estimation methods in digital holographic interferometry. Hence filtering and unwrapping are necessary to obtain continuous phase distributions. This paper introduces a new approach for phase estimation in digital holographic interferometry using the polynomial phase transform. The proposed approach directly provides an accurate estimation of the unwrapped phase distribution from a noisy reconstructed interference field, thereby bypassing cumbersome and error-prone filtering and 2D phase unwrapping procedures

  4. Synthesis method from low-coherence digital holograms for improvement of image quality in holographic display.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Yutaka; Nomura, Takanori

    2013-06-01

    In holographic displays, it is undesirable to observe the speckle noises with the reconstructed images. A method for improvement of reconstructed image quality by synthesizing low-coherence digital holograms is proposed. It is possible to obtain speckleless reconstruction of holograms due to low-coherence digital holography. An image sensor records low-coherence digital holograms, and the holograms are synthesized by computational calculation. Two approaches, the threshold-processing and the picking-a-peak methods, are proposed in order to reduce random noise of low-coherence digital holograms. The reconstructed image quality by the proposed methods is compared with the case of high-coherence digital holography. Quantitative evaluation is given to confirm the proposed methods. In addition, the visual evaluation by 15 people is also shown.

  5. Circularly polarized antennas for active holographic imaging through barriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMakin, Douglas L [Richland, WA; Severtsen, Ronald H [Richland, WA; Lechelt, Wayne M [West Richland, WA; Prince, James M [Kennewick, WA

    2011-07-26

    Circularly-polarized antennas and their methods of use for active holographic imaging through barriers. The antennas are dielectrically loaded to optimally match the dielectric constant of the barrier through which images are to be produced. The dielectric loading helps to remove barrier-front surface reflections and to couple electromagnetic energy into the barrier.

  6. Imaging and Measuring Electron Beam Dose Distributions Using Holographic Interferometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miller, Arne; McLaughlin, W. L.

    1975-01-01

    Holographic interferometry was used to image and measure ionizing radiation depth-dose and isodose distributions in transparent liquids. Both broad and narrowly collimated electron beams from accelerators (2–10 MeV) provided short irradiation times of 30 ns to 0.6 s. Holographic images...... and measurements of absorbed dose distributions were achieved in liquids of various densities and thermal properties and in water layers thinner than the electron range and with backings of materials of various densities and atomic numbers. The lowest detectable dose in some liquids was of the order of a few k......Rad. The precision limits of the measurement of dose were found to be ±4%. The procedure was simple and the holographic equipment stable and compact, thus allowing experimentation under routine laboratory conditions and limited space....

  7. Improvement of image quality of holographic projection on tilted plane using iterative algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Hui; Cao, Axiu; Wang, Jiazhou; Zhang, Man; Deng, Qiling

    2017-12-01

    Holographic image projection on tilted plane has an important application prospect. In this paper, we propose a method to compute the phase-only hologram that can reconstruct a clear image on tilted plane. By adding a constant phase to the target image of the inclined plane, the corresponding light field distribution on the plane that is parallel to the hologram plane is derived through the titled diffraction calculation. Then the phase distribution of the hologram is obtained by the iterative algorithm with amplitude and phase constrain. Simulation and optical experiment are performed to show the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  8. Image Reconstruction. Chapter 13

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nuyts, J. [Department of Nuclear Medicine and Medical Imaging Research Center, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Leuven (Belgium); Matej, S. [Medical Image Processing Group, Department of Radiology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2014-12-15

    This chapter discusses how 2‑D or 3‑D images of tracer distribution can be reconstructed from a series of so-called projection images acquired with a gamma camera or a positron emission tomography (PET) system [13.1]. This is often called an ‘inverse problem’. The reconstruction is the inverse of the acquisition. The reconstruction is called an inverse problem because making software to compute the true tracer distribution from the acquired data turns out to be more difficult than the ‘forward’ direction, i.e. making software to simulate the acquisition. There are basically two approaches to image reconstruction: analytical reconstruction and iterative reconstruction. The analytical approach is based on mathematical inversion, yielding efficient, non-iterative reconstruction algorithms. In the iterative approach, the reconstruction problem is reduced to computing a finite number of image values from a finite number of measurements. That simplification enables the use of iterative instead of mathematical inversion. Iterative inversion tends to require more computer power, but it can cope with more complex (and hopefully more accurate) models of the acquisition process.

  9. Reconstructing an interacting holographic polytropic gas model in a non-flat FRW universe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karami, K; Abdolmaleki, A

    2010-01-01

    We study the correspondence between the interacting holographic dark energy and the polytropic gas model of dark energy in a non-flat FRW universe. This correspondence allows one to reconstruct the potential and the dynamics for the scalar field of the polytropic model, which describe accelerated expansion of the universe.

  10. Reconstructing an interacting holographic polytropic gas model in a non-flat FRW universe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karami, K; Abdolmaleki, A, E-mail: KKarami@uok.ac.i [Department of Physics, University of Kurdistan, Pasdaran Street, Sanandaj (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2010-05-01

    We study the correspondence between the interacting holographic dark energy and the polytropic gas model of dark energy in a non-flat FRW universe. This correspondence allows one to reconstruct the potential and the dynamics for the scalar field of the polytropic model, which describe accelerated expansion of the universe.

  11. Overview of image reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marr, R.B.

    1980-04-01

    Image reconstruction (or computerized tomography, etc.) is any process whereby a function, f, on R/sup n/ is estimated from empirical data pertaining to its integrals, ∫f(x) dx, for some collection of hyperplanes of dimension k < n. The paper begins with background information on how image reconstruction problems have arisen in practice, and describes some of the application areas of past or current interest; these include radioastronomy, optics, radiology and nuclear medicine, electron microscopy, acoustical imaging, geophysical tomography, nondestructive testing, and NMR zeugmatography. Then the various reconstruction algorithms are discussed in five classes: summation, or simple back-projection; convolution, or filtered back-projection; Fourier and other functional transforms; orthogonal function series expansion; and iterative methods. Certain more technical mathematical aspects of image reconstruction are considered from the standpoint of uniqueness, consistency, and stability of solution. The paper concludes by presenting certain open problems. 73 references

  12. Accurate reconstruction in digital holographic microscopy using antialiasing shift-invariant contourlet transform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaolei; Zhang, Xiangchao; Xu, Min; Zhang, Hao; Jiang, Xiangqian

    2018-03-01

    The measurement of microstructured components is a challenging task in optical engineering. Digital holographic microscopy has attracted intensive attention due to its remarkable capability of measuring complex surfaces. However, speckles arise in the recorded interferometric holograms, and they will degrade the reconstructed wavefronts. Existing speckle removal methods suffer from the problems of frequency aliasing and phase distortions. A reconstruction method based on the antialiasing shift-invariant contourlet transform (ASCT) is developed. Salient edges and corners have sparse representations in the transform domain of ASCT, and speckles can be recognized and removed effectively. As subsampling in the scale and directional filtering schemes is avoided, the problems of frequency aliasing and phase distortions occurring in the conventional multiscale transforms can be effectively overcome, thereby improving the accuracy of wavefront reconstruction. As a result, the proposed method is promising for the digital holographic measurement of complex structures.

  13. Digital Holographic Microscopy: Quantitative Phase Imaging and Applications in Live Cell Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemper, Björn; Langehanenberg, Patrik; Kosmeier, Sebastian; Schlichthaber, Frank; Remmersmann, Christian; von Bally, Gert; Rommel, Christina; Dierker, Christian; Schnekenburger, Jürgen

    The analysis of complex processes in living cells creates a high demand for fast and label-free methods for online monitoring. Widely used fluorescence methods require specific labeling and are often restricted to chemically fixated samples. Thus, methods that offer label-free and minimally invasive detection of live cell processes and cell state alterations are of particular interest. In combination with light microscopy, digital holography provides label-free, multi-focus quantitative phase imaging of living cells. In overview, several methods for digital holographic microscopy (DHM) are presented. First, different experimental setups for the recording of digital holograms and the modular integration of DHM into common microscopes are described. Then the numerical processing of digitally captured holograms is explained. This includes the description of spatial and temporal phase shifting techniques, spatial filtering based reconstruction, holographic autofocusing, and the evaluation of self-interference holograms. Furthermore, the usage of partial coherent light and multi-wavelength approaches is discussed. Finally, potentials of digital holographic microscopy for quantitative cell imaging are illustrated by results from selected applications. It is shown that DHM can be used for automated tracking of migrating cells and cell thickness monitoring as well as for refractive index determination of cells and particles. Moreover, the use of DHM for label-free analysis in fluidics and micro-injection monitoring is demonstrated. The results show that DHM is a highly relevant method that allows novel insights in dynamic cell biology, with applications in cancer research and for drugs and toxicity testing.

  14. Phase-image-based content-addressable holographic data storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    John, Renu; Joseph, Joby; Singh, Kehar

    2004-03-01

    We propose and demonstrate the use of phase images for content-addressable holographic data storage. Use of binary phase-based data pages with 0 and π phase changes, produces uniform spectral distribution at the Fourier plane. The absence of strong DC component at the Fourier plane and more intensity of higher order spatial frequencies facilitate better recording of higher spatial frequencies, and improves the discrimination capability of the content-addressable memory. This improves the results of the associative recall in a holographic memory system, and can give low number of false hits even for small search arguments. The phase-modulated pixels also provide an opportunity of subtraction among data pixels leading to better discrimination between similar data pages.

  15. Coherent imaging with incoherent light in digital holographic microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chmelik, Radim

    2012-01-01

    Digital holographic microscope (DHM) allows for imaging with a quantitative phase contrast. In this way it becomes an important instrument, a completely non-invasive tool for a contrast intravital observation of living cells and a cell drymass density distribution measurement. A serious drawback of current DHMs is highly coherent illumination which makes the lateral resolution worse and impairs the image quality by a coherence noise and a parasitic interference. An uncompromising solution to this problem can be found in the Leith concept of incoherent holography. An off-axis hologram can be formed with arbitrary degree of light coherence in systems equipped with an achromatic interferometer and thus the resolution and the image quality typical for an incoherent-light wide-field microscopy can be achieved. In addition, advanced imaging modes based on limited coherence can be utilized. The typical example is a coherence-gating effect which provides a finite axial resolution and makes DHM image similar to that of a confocal microscope. These possibilities were described theoretically using the formalism of three-dimensional coherent transfer functions and proved experimentally by the coherence-controlled holographic microscope which is DHM based on the Leith achromatic interferometer. Quantitative-phase-contrast imaging is demonstrated with incoherent light by the living cancer cells observation and their motility evaluation. The coherence-gating effect was proved by imaging of model samples through a scattering layer and living cells inside an opalescent medium.

  16. Recent advances in photorefractivity of poly(4-diphenylaminostyrene) composites: Wavelength dependence and dynamic holographic images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsujimura, Sho; Kinashi, Kenji; Sakai, Wataru; Tsutsumi, Naoto

    2014-08-01

    To expand upon our previous report [Appl. Phys. Express 5, 064101 (2012) 064101], we provide here the modified poly(4-diphenylaminostyrene) (PDAS)-based photorefractive (PR) device on the basis of wavelength dependency, and demonstrate dynamic holographic images by using the PDAS-based PR device under the obtained appropriate conditions. The PR devices containing the triphenylamine unit have potential application to dynamic holographic images, which will be useful for real-time holographic displays.

  17. Automated red blood cells extraction from holographic images using fully convolutional neural networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Faliu; Moon, Inkyu; Javidi, Bahram

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we present two models for automatically extracting red blood cells (RBCs) from RBCs holographic images based on a deep learning fully convolutional neural network (FCN) algorithm. The first model, called FCN-1, only uses the FCN algorithm to carry out RBCs prediction, whereas the second model, called FCN-2, combines the FCN approach with the marker-controlled watershed transform segmentation scheme to achieve RBCs extraction. Both models achieve good segmentation accuracy. In addition, the second model has much better performance in terms of cell separation than traditional segmentation methods. In the proposed methods, the RBCs phase images are first numerically reconstructed from RBCs holograms recorded with off-axis digital holographic microscopy. Then, some RBCs phase images are manually segmented and used as training data to fine-tune the FCN. Finally, each pixel in new input RBCs phase images is predicted into either foreground or background using the trained FCN models. The RBCs prediction result from the first model is the final segmentation result, whereas the result from the second model is used as the internal markers of the marker-controlled transform algorithm for further segmentation. Experimental results show that the given schemes can automatically extract RBCs from RBCs phase images and much better RBCs separation results are obtained when the FCN technique is combined with the marker-controlled watershed segmentation algorithm. PMID:29082078

  18. Holographic atom imaging from experimental photoelectron angular distribution patterns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terminello, L.J.; Lapiano-Smith, D.A.; Barton, J.J.; Shirley, D.A.

    1993-11-01

    One of the most challenging areas of materials research is the imaging of technologically relevant materials with microscopic and atomic-scale resolution. As part of the development of these methods, near-surface atoms in single crystals were imaged using core-level photoelectron holograms. The angle-dependent electron diffraction patterns that constitute an electron hologram were two-dimensionally transformed to create a three dimensional, real-space image of the neighboring scattering atoms. They have made use of a multiple-wavenumber, phased-summing method to improve the atom imaging capabilities of experimental photoelectron holography using the Cu(001) and Pt(111) prototype systems. These studies are performed to evaluate the potential of holographic atom imaging methods as structural probes of unknown materials

  19. Reconstructing interacting entropy-corrected holographic scalar field models of dark energy in the non-flat universe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karami, K; Khaledian, M S [Department of Physics, University of Kurdistan, Pasdaran Street, Sanandaj (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Jamil, Mubasher, E-mail: KKarami@uok.ac.ir, E-mail: MS.Khaledian@uok.ac.ir, E-mail: mjamil@camp.nust.edu.pk [Center for Advanced Mathematics and Physics (CAMP), National University of Sciences and Technology (NUST), Islamabad (Pakistan)

    2011-02-15

    Here we consider the entropy-corrected version of the holographic dark energy (DE) model in the non-flat universe. We obtain the equation of state parameter in the presence of interaction between DE and dark matter. Moreover, we reconstruct the potential and the dynamics of the quintessence, tachyon, K-essence and dilaton scalar field models according to the evolutionary behavior of the interacting entropy-corrected holographic DE model.

  20. Computational hologram synthesis and representation on spatial light modulators for real-time 3D holographic imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reichelt, Stephan; Leister, Norbert

    2013-01-01

    In dynamic computer-generated holography that utilizes spatial light modulators, both hologram synthesis and hologram representation are essential in terms of fast computation and high reconstruction quality. For hologram synthesis, i.e. the computation step, Fresnel transform based or point-source based raytracing methods can be applied. In the encoding step, the complex wave-field has to be optimally represented by the SLM with its given modulation capability. For proper hologram reconstruction that implies a simultaneous and independent amplitude and phase modulation of the input wave-field by the SLM. In this paper, we discuss full complex hologram representation methods on SLMs by considering inherent SLM parameter such as modulation type and bit depth on their reconstruction performance such as diffraction efficiency and SNR. We review the three implementation schemes of Burckhardt amplitude-only representation, phase-only macro-pixel representation, and two-phase interference representation. Besides the optical performance we address their hardware complexity and required computational load. Finally, we experimentally demonstrate holographic reconstructions of different representation schemes as obtained by functional prototypes utilizing SeeReal's viewing-window holographic display technology. The proposed hardware implementations enable a fast encoding of complex-valued hologram data and thus will pave the way for commercial real-time holographic 3D imaging in the near future.

  1. Holographic particle image velocimetry using Bacteriorhodopsin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koek, W.D.

    2006-01-01

    To gain better insight into the behaviour of turbulent flow there is a demand for a practical measurement instrument to perform three-dimensional flow measurements. Holography is a three-dimensional imaging technique, and as such is ideally suited for this purpose. Because flow media (such as water

  2. Human genome sequencing with direct x-ray holographic imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rhodes, C.K.

    1993-01-01

    Direct holographic imaging of biological materials is widely applicable to the study of the structure, properties and action of genetic material. This particular application involves the sequencing of the human genome where prospective genomic imaging technology is composed of three subtechnologies, name an x-ray holographic camera, suitable chemistry and enzymology for the preparation of tagged DNA samples, and the illuminator in the form of an x-ray laser. We report appropriate x-ray camera, embodied by the instrument developed by MCR, is available and that suitable chemical and enzymatic procedures exist for the preparation of the necessary tagged DNA strands. Concerning the future development of the x-ray illuminator. We find that a practical small scale x-ray light source is indeed feasible. This outcome requires the use of unconventional physical processes in order to achieve the necessary power-compression in the amplifying medium. The understanding of these new physical mechanisms is developing rapidly. Importantly, although the x-ray source does not currently exist, the understanding of these new physical mechanisms is developing rapidly and the research has established the basic scaling laws that will determine the properties of the x-ray illuminator. When this x-ray source becomes available, an extremely rapid and cost effective instrument for 3-D imaging of biological materials can be applied to a wide range of biological structural assays, including the base-pair sequencing of the human genome and many questions regarding its higher levels of organization

  3. Digital hologram transformations for RGB color holographic display with independent image magnification and translation in 3D.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makowski, Piotr L; Zaperty, Weronika; Kozacki, Tomasz

    2018-01-01

    A new framework for in-plane transformations of digital holograms (DHs) is proposed, which provides improved control over basic geometrical features of holographic images reconstructed optically in full color. The method is based on a Fourier hologram equivalent of the adaptive affine transformation technique [Opt. Express18, 8806 (2010)OPEXFF1094-408710.1364/OE.18.008806]. The solution includes four elementary geometrical transformations that can be performed independently on a full-color 3D image reconstructed from an RGB hologram: (i) transverse magnification; (ii) axial translation with minimized distortion; (iii) transverse translation; and (iv) viewing angle rotation. The independent character of transformations (i) and (ii) constitutes the main result of the work and plays a double role: (1) it simplifies synchronization of color components of the RGB image in the presence of mismatch between capture and display parameters; (2) provides improved control over position and size of the projected image, particularly the axial position, which opens new possibilities for efficient animation of holographic content. The approximate character of the operations (i) and (ii) is examined both analytically and experimentally using an RGB circular holographic display system. Additionally, a complex animation built from a single wide-aperture RGB Fourier hologram is presented to demonstrate full capabilities of the developed toolset.

  4. System and carrier for optical images and holographic information recording

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andries, A.; Bivol, V.; Iovu, M

    2002-01-01

    The invention relates to the semiconducting silverless photography, in particular to the technique for optical information recording and may be used in microphotography for manifacture of microfiches, microfilms, storage disks, i the multiplication and copying technique, in holography, in micro- and optoelectronics, cinematography etc. The system for optical images and holographic information recording includes an optical exposure system, an information carrier , containing a dielectric substrate with the first electrode, a photosensitive element and the second electrode, arranged in consecutive order, a constant and impulse voltage source, a means for climbing and movement of the information carrier, a control unit for connection of the voltage source to the electroconducting strate, a personal computer, connected to the control unit of the recording modes ,to the exposure system and the information carrier, an electrooptical transparency, connected to the computer by means of the matching unit. The carrier for optical images and holographic information recording contains a dielectric substrate, a photosensitive element formed of a layer of the vitreous chalcogenic semiconductor and a layer of the crystalline or amorphous semiconductor, forming a heterojunction, the photosensitive element is arranged between two electrodes , one of which is made transparent , in such case rge layer of the vitreous chalcogenic semiconductor comes into contact with the superior transparent electrode, subjected to exposure

  5. Fourier transform digital holographic adaptive optics imaging system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Changgeng; Yu, Xiao; Kim, Myung K.

    2013-01-01

    A Fourier transform digital holographic adaptive optics imaging system and its basic principles are proposed. The CCD is put at the exact Fourier transform plane of the pupil of the eye lens. The spherical curvature introduced by the optics except the eye lens itself is eliminated. The CCD is also at image plane of the target. The point-spread function of the system is directly recorded, making it easier to determine the correct guide-star hologram. Also, the light signal will be stronger at the CCD, especially for phase-aberration sensing. Numerical propagation is avoided. The sensor aperture has nothing to do with the resolution and the possibility of using low coherence or incoherent illumination is opened. The system becomes more efficient and flexible. Although it is intended for ophthalmic use, it also shows potential application in microscopy. The robustness and feasibility of this compact system are demonstrated by simulations and experiments using scattering objects. PMID:23262541

  6. On the use of holographic interferometry in deformation analysis with additional degrees of freedom during the reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schumann, W.; Dubas, M.

    1978-01-01

    In holographic interferometry with two reconstructed wavefronts, additional flexibility is obtained when the fringes may be modified. This is achieved during the reconstruction by moving part of the optical arrangement. First, the equation relating the optical path difference to the displacement and the fringe control parameters and, secondly, those relating the derivative of the optical path difference to the strain and the rotation are worked out and their practical use is discussed. (orig.) [de

  7. A review on noise suppression and aberration compensation in holographic particle image velocimetry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K.F. Tamrin

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Understanding three-dimensional (3D fluid flow behaviour is undeniably crucial in improving performance and efficiency in a wide range of applications in engineering and medical fields. Holographic particle image velocimetry (HPIV is a potential tool to probe and characterize complex flow dynamics since it is a truly three-dimensional three-component measurement technique. The technique relies on the coherent light scattered by small seeding particles that are assumed to faithfully follow the flow for subsequent reconstruction of the same the event afterward. However, extraction of useful 3D displacement data from these particle images is usually aggravated by noise and aberration which are inherent within the optical system. Noise and aberration have been considered as major hurdles in HPIV in obtaining accurate particle image identification and its corresponding 3D position. Major contributions to noise include zero-order diffraction, out-of-focus particles, virtual image and emulsion grain scattering. Noise suppression is crucial to ensure that particle image can be distinctly differentiated from background noise while aberration compensation forms particle image with high integrity. This paper reviews a number of HPIV configurations that have been proposed to address these issues, summarizes the key findings and outlines a basis for follow-on research.

  8. Laser-induced fluorescence imaging of subsurface tissue structures with a volume holographic spatial-spectral imaging system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Yuan; Gelsinger-Austin, Paul J; Watson, Jonathan M; Barbastathis, George; Barton, Jennifer K; Kostuk, Raymond K

    2008-09-15

    A three-dimensional imaging system incorporating multiplexed holographic gratings to visualize fluorescence tissue structures is presented. Holographic gratings formed in volume recording materials such as a phenanthrenquinone poly(methyl methacrylate) photopolymer have narrowband angular and spectral transmittance filtering properties that enable obtaining spatial-spectral information within an object. We demonstrate this imaging system's ability to obtain multiple depth-resolved fluorescence images simultaneously.

  9. Model-based magnetization retrieval from holographic phase images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Röder, Falk, E-mail: f.roeder@hzdr.de [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Institut für Ionenstrahlphysik und Materialforschung, Bautzner Landstr. 400, D-01328 Dresden (Germany); Triebenberg Labor, Institut für Strukturphysik, Technische Universität Dresden, D-01062 Dresden (Germany); Vogel, Karin [Triebenberg Labor, Institut für Strukturphysik, Technische Universität Dresden, D-01062 Dresden (Germany); Wolf, Daniel [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Institut für Ionenstrahlphysik und Materialforschung, Bautzner Landstr. 400, D-01328 Dresden (Germany); Triebenberg Labor, Institut für Strukturphysik, Technische Universität Dresden, D-01062 Dresden (Germany); Hellwig, Olav [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Institut für Ionenstrahlphysik und Materialforschung, Bautzner Landstr. 400, D-01328 Dresden (Germany); AG Magnetische Funktionsmaterialien, Institut für Physik, Technische Universität Chemnitz, D-09126 Chemnitz (Germany); HGST, A Western Digital Company, 3403 Yerba Buena Rd., San Jose, CA 95135 (United States); Wee, Sung Hun [HGST, A Western Digital Company, 3403 Yerba Buena Rd., San Jose, CA 95135 (United States); Wicht, Sebastian; Rellinghaus, Bernd [IFW Dresden, Institute for Metallic Materials, P.O. Box 270116, D-01171 Dresden (Germany)

    2017-05-15

    The phase shift of the electron wave is a useful measure for the projected magnetic flux density of magnetic objects at the nanometer scale. More important for materials science, however, is the knowledge about the magnetization in a magnetic nano-structure. As demonstrated here, a dominating presence of stray fields prohibits a direct interpretation of the phase in terms of magnetization modulus and direction. We therefore present a model-based approach for retrieving the magnetization by considering the projected shape of the nano-structure and assuming a homogeneous magnetization therein. We apply this method to FePt nano-islands epitaxially grown on a SrTiO{sub 3} substrate, which indicates an inclination of their magnetization direction relative to the structural easy magnetic [001] axis. By means of this real-world example, we discuss prospects and limits of this approach. - Highlights: • Retrieval of the magnetization from holographic phase images. • Magnetostatic model constructed for a magnetic nano-structure. • Decomposition into homogeneously magnetized components. • Discretization of a each component by elementary cuboids. • Analytic solution for the phase of a magnetized cuboid considered. • Fitting a set of magnetization vectors to experimental phase images.

  10. Holographic observation of magnetic resonance image CT of intracranial tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwata, Kinjiro; Watanabe, Saburo; Yuasa, Hiromi; Yamada, Takahisa; Hoshino, Daisaku; Suzuki, Masane; Saito, Takayuki.

    1987-01-01

    In 1975, we developed a new method of 3-dimensional observation of CT pictures using Gabor's holography principle. In this study, we are reporting our experience with the multi-tomogram holography using magnetic resonance image CT in order to reconstruct 3-dimensional viewing of the central nervous system and intracranial lesions. (J.P.N.)

  11. Evaluation of pulsed laser holograms of flashing sprays by digital image processing and holographic particle image velocimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feldmann, O.; Gebhard, P.; Mayinger, F.

    1998-01-01

    This study deals with the application of the pulsed laser holography and the digital image processing in the analysis of flashing sprays. Both the information about the macroscopic structures of a spray, such as the breakup-length and the spray-angle, and about its microscopic structures, such as the number, the size, and the location of the generated droplets is stored three-dimensionally on a single pulsed hologram. In addition to that, the velocity of the droplets can be obtained from double pulsed holograms. In every experiment, two holograms are taken, resulting in two three-dimensional reconstructions of the test section, seen from different directions. These reconstructions are scanned by video-cameras with a small depth of field and subdivided into several two-dimensional images. These images are digitized and binarized, and the information about the droplets depicted sharply on each image is saved. In case of a double pulsed hologram, a Fourier-analysis based algorithm creates a search volume to determine the droplets' second position and thus their velocity in each view. A stereo matching modulus correlates both views and determines the position and/or the velocity of each droplet highly accurate. The applicability of the employed holographic technique and the filtering and correlating moduli is proven by the presented results. (author)

  12. Tomographic image reconstruction using training images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Soltani, Sara; Andersen, Martin Skovgaard; Hansen, Per Christian

    2017-01-01

    We describe and examine an algorithm for tomographic image reconstruction where prior knowledge about the solution is available in the form of training images. We first construct a non-negative dictionary based on prototype elements from the training images; this problem is formulated within...

  13. Living on the edge: a toy model for holographic reconstruction of algebras with centers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donnelly, William; Marolf, Donald; Michel, Ben; Wien, Jason [Department of Physics, University of California,Santa Barbara, CA 93106 (United States)

    2017-04-18

    We generalize the Pastawski-Yoshida-Harlow-Preskill (HaPPY) holographic quantum error-correcting code to provide a toy model for bulk gauge fields or linearized gravitons. The key new elements are the introduction of degrees of freedom on the links (edges) of the associated tensor network and their connection to further copies of the HaPPY code by an appropriate isometry. The result is a model in which boundary regions allow the reconstruction of bulk algebras with central elements living on the interior edges of the (greedy) entanglement wedge, and where these central elements can also be reconstructed from complementary boundary regions. In addition, the entropy of boundary regions receives both Ryu-Takayanagi-like contributions and further corrections that model the ((δArea)/(4G{sub N})) term of Faulkner, Lewkowycz, and Maldacena. Comparison with Yang-Mills theory then suggests that this ((δArea)/(4G{sub N})) term can be reinterpreted as a part of the bulk entropy of gravitons under an appropriate extension of the physical bulk Hilbert space.

  14. Living on the edge: a toy model for holographic reconstruction of algebras with centers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donnelly, William; Marolf, Donald; Michel, Ben; Wien, Jason

    2017-01-01

    We generalize the Pastawski-Yoshida-Harlow-Preskill (HaPPY) holographic quantum error-correcting code to provide a toy model for bulk gauge fields or linearized gravitons. The key new elements are the introduction of degrees of freedom on the links (edges) of the associated tensor network and their connection to further copies of the HaPPY code by an appropriate isometry. The result is a model in which boundary regions allow the reconstruction of bulk algebras with central elements living on the interior edges of the (greedy) entanglement wedge, and where these central elements can also be reconstructed from complementary boundary regions. In addition, the entropy of boundary regions receives both Ryu-Takayanagi-like contributions and further corrections that model the ((δArea)/(4G N )) term of Faulkner, Lewkowycz, and Maldacena. Comparison with Yang-Mills theory then suggests that this ((δArea)/(4G N )) term can be reinterpreted as a part of the bulk entropy of gravitons under an appropriate extension of the physical bulk Hilbert space.

  15. Holographic storage of three-dimensional image and data using photopolymer and polymer dispersed liquid crystal films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao Hong-Yue; Liu Pan; Zeng Chao; Yao Qiu-Xiang; Zheng Zhiqiang; Liu Jicheng; Zheng Huadong; Yu Ying-Jie; Zeng Zhen-Xiang; Sun Tao

    2016-01-01

    We present holographic storage of three-dimensional (3D) images and data in a photopolymer film without any applied electric field. Its absorption and diffraction efficiency are measured, and reflective analog hologram of real object and image of digital information are recorded in the films. The photopolymer is compared with polymer dispersed liquid crystals as holographic materials. Besides holographic diffraction efficiency of the former is little lower than that of the latter, this work demonstrates that the photopolymer is more suitable for analog hologram and big data permanent storage because of its high definition and no need of high voltage electric field. Therefore, our study proposes a potential holographic storage material to apply in large size static 3D holographic displays, including analog hologram displays, digital hologram prints, and holographic disks. (special topic)

  16. High quality 3D shape reconstruction via digital refocusing and pupil apodization in multi-wavelength holographic interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Li

    Multi-wavelength holographic interferometry (MWHI) has good potential for evolving into a high quality 3D shape reconstruction technique. There are several remaining challenges, including I) depth-of-field limitation, leading to axial dimension inaccuracy of out-of-focus objects; and 2) smearing from shiny smooth objects to their dark dull neighbors, generating fake measurements within the dark area. This research is motivated by the goal of developing an advanced optical metrology system that provides accurate 3D profiles for target object or objects of axial dimension larger than the depth-of-field, and for objects with dramatically different surface conditions. The idea of employing digital refocusing in MWHI has been proposed as a solution to the depth-of-field limitation. One the one hand, traditional single wavelength refocusing formula is revised to reduce sensitivity to wavelength error. Investigation over real example demonstrates promising accuracy and repeatability of reconstructed 3D profiles. On the other hand, a phase contrast based focus detection criterion is developed especially for MWHI, which overcomes the problem of phase unwrapping. The combination for these two innovations gives birth to a systematic strategy of acquiring high quality 3D profiles. Following the first phase contrast based focus detection step, interferometric distance measurement by MWHI is implemented as a next step to conduct relative focus detection with high accuracy. This strategy results in +/-100mm 3D profile with micron level axial accuracy, which is not available in traditional extended focus image (EFI) solutions. Pupil apodization has been implemented to address the second challenge of smearing. The process of reflective rough surface inspection has been mathematically modeled, which explains the origin of stray light and the necessity of replacing hard-edged pupil with one of gradually attenuating transmission (apodization). Metrics to optimize pupil types and

  17. Acoustical holographic recording with coherent optical read-out and image processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, H. K.

    1980-10-01

    New acoustic holographic wave memory devices have been designed for real-time in-situ recording applications. The basic operating principles of these devices and experimental results through the use of some of the prototypes of the devices are presented. Recording media used in the device include thermoplastic resin, Crisco vegetable oil, and Wilson corn oil. In addition, nonlinear coherent optical image processing techniques including equidensitometry, A-D conversion, and pseudo-color, all based on the new contact screen technique, are discussed with regard to the enhancement of the normally poor-resolved acoustical holographic images.

  18. Giga-pixel lensfree holographic microscopy and tomography using color image sensors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serhan O Isikman

    Full Text Available We report Giga-pixel lensfree holographic microscopy and tomography using color sensor-arrays such as CMOS imagers that exhibit Bayer color filter patterns. Without physically removing these color filters coated on the sensor chip, we synthesize pixel super-resolved lensfree holograms, which are then reconstructed to achieve ~350 nm lateral resolution, corresponding to a numerical aperture of ~0.8, across a field-of-view of ~20.5 mm(2. This constitutes a digital image with ~0.7 Billion effective pixels in both amplitude and phase channels (i.e., ~1.4 Giga-pixels total. Furthermore, by changing the illumination angle (e.g., ± 50° and scanning a partially-coherent light source across two orthogonal axes, super-resolved images of the same specimen from different viewing angles are created, which are then digitally combined to synthesize tomographic images of the object. Using this dual-axis lensfree tomographic imager running on a color sensor-chip, we achieve a 3D spatial resolution of ~0.35 µm × 0.35 µm × ~2 µm, in x, y and z, respectively, creating an effective voxel size of ~0.03 µm(3 across a sample volume of ~5 mm(3, which is equivalent to >150 Billion voxels. We demonstrate the proof-of-concept of this lensfree optical tomographic microscopy platform on a color CMOS image sensor by creating tomograms of micro-particles as well as a wild-type C. elegans nematode.

  19. Colour reconstruction of underwater images

    OpenAIRE

    Hoth, Julian; Kowalczyk, Wojciech

    2017-01-01

    Objects look very different in the underwater environment compared to their appearance in sunlight. Images with correct colouring simplify the detection of underwater objects and may allow the use of visual SLAM algorithms developed for land-based robots underwater. Hence, image processing is required. Current algorithms focus on the colour reconstruction of scenery at diving depth where different colours can still be distinguished. At greater depth this is not the case. In this study it is i...

  20. Image recovery from defocused 2D fluorescent images in multimodal digital holographic microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quan, Xiangyu; Matoba, Osamu; Awatsuji, Yasuhiro

    2017-05-01

    A technique of three-dimensional (3D) intensity retrieval from defocused, two-dimensional (2D) fluorescent images in the multimodal digital holographic microscopy (DHM) is proposed. In the multimodal DHM, 3D phase and 2D fluorescence distributions are obtained simultaneously by an integrated system of an off-axis DHM and a conventional epifluorescence microscopy, respectively. This gives us more information of the target; however, defocused fluorescent images are observed due to the short depth of field. In this Letter, we propose a method to recover the defocused images based on the phase compensation and backpropagation from the defocused plane to the focused plane using the distance information that is obtained from a 3D phase distribution. By applying Zernike polynomial phase correction, we brought back the fluorescence intensity to the focused imaging planes. The experimental demonstration using fluorescent beads is presented, and the expected applications are suggested.

  1. Effect of spatial coherence of LED sources on image resolution in holographic displays

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pourreza Ghoushchi, Vahid; Aas, Mehdi; Ulusoy, Erdem; Ürey, Hakan

    2017-01-01

    Holographic Displays (HDs) provide 3D images with all natural depth cues via computer generated holograms (CGHs) implemented on spatial light modulators (SLMs). HDs are coherent light processing systems based on interference and diffraction, thus they generally use laser light. However, laser

  2. Study of image reconstruction for terahertz indirect holography with quasi-optics receiver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Xiang; Li, Chao; Fang, Guangyou

    2013-06-01

    In this paper, an indirect holographic image reconstruction algorithm was studied for terahertz imaging with a quasi-optics receiver. Based on the combination of the reciprocity principle and modified quasi-optics theory, analytical expressions of the received spatial power distribution and its spectrum are obtained for the interference pattern of target wave and reference wave. These results clearly give the quantitative relationship between imaging quality and the parameters of a Gaussian beam, which provides a good criterion for terahertz quasi-optics transceivers design in terahertz off-axis holographic imagers. To validate the effectiveness of the proposed analysis method, some imaging results with a 0.3 THz prototype system are shown based on electromagnetic simulation.

  3. Ultra wide band radar holographic imaging of buried waste at DOE sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collins, H.D.; Gribble, R.P.; Hall, T.E.; Lechelt, W.M.

    1995-04-01

    Ultra wideband linear array holography is a unique real-time imaging technique for in-situ inspection of buried waste at various DOE sites. The array can be mounted on various platforms such as crane booms, pickup trucks, ATVs, and scanned generating ''3-D'' subsurface images in real time. Inspection speeds are 0.5 to 2 meters/sec, if the image is viewed in real time, greater for off-line processing. The Ground Penetrating Holographic (GPH) system developed for inspection of DOE sites employs two 32element arrays of tapered-slot antenna operating at 5-GHz and 2.5-GHz center frequencies. The GPH system, which is mounted on a small trailer with a computer image processor, display, and power supply, is capable of imaging a wide swath (1 to 2 meters) with its linear arrays. The lower frequency array will be used at INEL (for greater depth penetration) because of high soil attenuation. Recent holographic ''3-D'' images of buried waste container lids and dielectrics obtained in Hanford sand and INEL soils at various depths graphically illustrate the unique image resolution capabilities of the system. Experimental results using the 5-GHz array will be presented showing the excellent holographic image quality of various subsurface targets in sand and INEL soil

  4. Extended wavelet transformation to digital holographic reconstruction: application to the elliptical, astigmatic Gaussian beams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remacha, Clément; Coëtmellec, Sébastien; Brunel, Marc; Lebrun, Denis

    2013-02-01

    Wavelet analysis provides an efficient tool in numerous signal processing problems and has been implemented in optical processing techniques, such as in-line holography. This paper proposes an improvement of this tool for the case of an elliptical, astigmatic Gaussian (AEG) beam. We show that this mathematical operator allows reconstructing an image of a spherical particle without compression of the reconstructed image, which increases the accuracy of the 3D location of particles and of their size measurement. To validate the performance of this operator we have studied the diffraction pattern produced by a particle illuminated by an AEG beam. This study used mutual intensity propagation, and the particle is defined as a chirped Gaussian sum. The proposed technique was applied and the experimental results are presented.

  5. Carrier for registration of optical images and holographic information

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andries, A.; Bivol, V.; Iovu, M.

    2000-01-01

    The invention relates to the field of registration of optical information including the holographic one and may be used in the holography, cinematography, micro- and optical electronics, computer engineering. Summary of the invention consists in, that in the carrier containing a dielectric substrate on which there are placed in sequence the first electrode, photoinjection substrate, registration substrate of the chalcogenide vitreous semiconductor and the second electrode, the photoinjection substrate is fabricated of the monocrystalline germanium of the n-type conductivity and the relation of the registration substrate conductivity, during illumination to the photoinjection substrate conductivity in darkness is 0,001. The technical result consists in increasing the carrier photosensibility and in diffraction effectiveness of the information registered on the carrier

  6. Method for position emission mammography image reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Mark Frederick

    2004-10-12

    An image reconstruction method comprising accepting coincidence datat from either a data file or in real time from a pair of detector heads, culling event data that is outside a desired energy range, optionally saving the desired data for each detector position or for each pair of detector pixels on the two detector heads, and then reconstructing the image either by backprojection image reconstruction or by iterative image reconstruction. In the backprojection image reconstruction mode, rays are traced between centers of lines of response (LOR's), counts are then either allocated by nearest pixel interpolation or allocated by an overlap method and then corrected for geometric effects and attenuation and the data file updated. If the iterative image reconstruction option is selected, one implementation is to compute a grid Siddon retracing, and to perform maximum likelihood expectation maiximization (MLEM) computed by either: a) tracing parallel rays between subpixels on opposite detector heads; or b) tracing rays between randomized endpoint locations on opposite detector heads.

  7. An external interface for processing 3-D holographic and X-ray images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jueptner, W.; Kreis, T.

    1989-01-01

    The aim of the ESPRIT project 898 is the development of an external interface system, that links physically generated 3-D images to inspection and analysis procedures. While this has to be a general and flexible system, it is used in this project for holographic interferograms and X-ray radiographs for applications in areas such as real time testing and inspection and 3-D measurment. For this task, optical and electronic methods have to be combined in order to extract the relevant information from multiple 3-D images. A further aim of the project is the automation of the holographic interferometry and the X-ray radioscopy for on-line testing in the manufacturing process. (orig./HP)

  8. Tomographic image reconstruction using Artificial Neural Networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paschalis, P.; Giokaris, N.D.; Karabarbounis, A.; Loudos, G.K.; Maintas, D.; Papanicolas, C.N.; Spanoudaki, V.; Tsoumpas, Ch.; Stiliaris, E.

    2004-01-01

    A new image reconstruction technique based on the usage of an Artificial Neural Network (ANN) is presented. The most crucial factor in designing such a reconstruction system is the network architecture and the number of the input projections needed to reconstruct the image. Although the training phase requires a large amount of input samples and a considerable CPU time, the trained network is characterized by simplicity and quick response. The performance of this ANN is tested using several image patterns. It is intended to be used together with a phantom rotating table and the γ-camera of IASA for SPECT image reconstruction

  9. Optoelectronic Computer Architecture Development for Image Reconstruction

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Forber, Richard

    1996-01-01

    .... Specifically, we collaborated with UCSD and ERIM on the development of an optically augmented electronic computer for high speed inverse transform calculations to enable real time image reconstruction...

  10. Accurate reconstruction in digital holographic microscopy using Fresnel dual-tree complex wavelet transform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaolei; Zhang, Xiangchao; Yuan, He; Zhang, Hao; Xu, Min

    2018-02-01

    Digital holography is a promising measurement method in the fields of bio-medicine and micro-electronics. But the captured images of digital holography are severely polluted by the speckle noise because of optical scattering and diffraction. Via analyzing the properties of Fresnel diffraction and the topographies of micro-structures, a novel reconstruction method based on the dual-tree complex wavelet transform (DT-CWT) is proposed. This algorithm is shiftinvariant and capable of obtaining sparse representations for the diffracted signals of salient features, thus it is well suited for multiresolution processing of the interferometric holograms of directional morphologies. An explicit representation of orthogonal Fresnel DT-CWT bases and a specific filtering method are developed. This method can effectively remove the speckle noise without destroying the salient features. Finally, the proposed reconstruction method is compared with the conventional Fresnel diffraction integration and Fresnel wavelet transform with compressive sensing methods to validate its remarkable superiority on the aspects of topography reconstruction and speckle removal.

  11. EIT image reconstruction with four dimensional regularization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Tao; Soleimani, Manuchehr; Adler, Andy

    2008-09-01

    Electrical impedance tomography (EIT) reconstructs internal impedance images of the body from electrical measurements on body surface. The temporal resolution of EIT data can be very high, although the spatial resolution of the images is relatively low. Most EIT reconstruction algorithms calculate images from data frames independently, although data are actually highly correlated especially in high speed EIT systems. This paper proposes a 4-D EIT image reconstruction for functional EIT. The new approach is developed to directly use prior models of the temporal correlations among images and 3-D spatial correlations among image elements. A fast algorithm is also developed to reconstruct the regularized images. Image reconstruction is posed in terms of an augmented image and measurement vector which are concatenated from a specific number of previous and future frames. The reconstruction is then based on an augmented regularization matrix which reflects the a priori constraints on temporal and 3-D spatial correlations of image elements. A temporal factor reflecting the relative strength of the image correlation is objectively calculated from measurement data. Results show that image reconstruction models which account for inter-element correlations, in both space and time, show improved resolution and noise performance, in comparison to simpler image models.

  12. Holographic Imaging of Evolving Laser-Plasma Structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Downer, Michael [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States); Shvets, G. [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States)

    2014-07-31

    sprinting animal. The object modifies the probe, imprinting information about its structure. Meanwhile, our “reference” probe co-propagates ahead of the object, free of its influence. After the interaction, object and reference combine to record a hologram. For technical reasons, our recording device is a spectrometer (a frequency-measuring device), hence the name “frequency-domain” holography. We read the hologram electronically to obtain a “snapshot” of the object’s average structure as it transits the medium. Our published work shows numerous snapshots of electron density waves (“laser wakes”) in ionized gas (“plasma”), analogous to a water wake behind a boat. Such waves are the basis of tabletop particle accelerators, in which charged particles surf on the light-speed wave, gaining energy. Comparing our snapshots to computer simulations deepens understanding of laser wakes. FDH takes snapshots of objects that are quasi-static --- i.e. like Muybridge’s horse standing still on a treadmill. If the object changes shape, FDH images blur, as when a subject moves while a camera shutter is open. Many laser-generated objects of interest do evolve as they propagate. To overcome this limit of FDH, we developed .... (2) Frequency-Domain Tomography (FDT). In FDT, 5 to 10 probe pulses are fired simultaneously across the object’s path at different angles, like a crossfire of bullets. The object imprints a “streaked” record of its evolution on each probe, which we record as in FDH, then recover a multi-frame “movie” of the object’s evolving structure using algorithms of computerized tomography. When propagation distance exceeds a few millimeters, reconstructed FDT images distort. This is because the lenses that image probes to detector have limited depth of field, like cameras that cannot focus simultaneously on both nearby and distant objects. But some laser-generated objects of interest propagate over meters. For these applications we developed

  13. High-speed reconstruction of compressed images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Jerome R., Jr.; Moore, Stephen M.

    1990-07-01

    A compression scheme is described that allows high-definition radiological images with greater than 8-bit intensity resolution to be represented by 8-bit pixels. Reconstruction of the images with their original intensity resolution can be carried out by means of a pipeline architecture suitable for compact, high-speed implementation. A reconstruction system is described that can be fabricated according to this approach and placed between an 8-bit display buffer and the display's video system thereby allowing contrast control of images at video rates. Results for 50 CR chest images are described showing that error-free reconstruction of the original 10-bit CR images can be achieved.

  14. Iterative image reconstruction in ECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chintu Chen; Ordonez, C.E.; Wernick, M.N.; Aarsvold, J.N.; Gunter, D.L.; Wong, W.H.; Kapp, O.H.; Xiaolong Ouyang; Levenson, M.; Metz, C.E.

    1992-01-01

    A series of preliminary studies has been performed in the authors laboratories to explore the use of a priori information in Bayesian image restoration and reconstruction. One piece of a priori information is the fact that intensities of neighboring pixels tend to be similar if they belong to the same region within which similar tissue characteristics are exhibited. this property of local continuity can be modeled by the use of Gibbs priors, as first suggested by German and Geman. In their investigation, they also included line sites between each pair of neighboring pixels in the Gibbs prior and used discrete binary numbers to indicate the absence or presence of boundaries between regions. These two features of the a priori model permit averaging within boundaries of homogeneous regions to alleviate the degradation caused by Poisson noise. with the use of this Gibbs prior in combination with the technique of stochastic relaxation, German and Geman demonstrated that noise levels can be reduced significantly in 2-D image restoration. They have developed a Bayesian method that utilizes a Gibbs prior to describe the spatial correlation of neighboring regions and takes into account the effect of limited spatial resolution as well. The statistical framework of the proposed approach is based on the data augmentation scheme suggested by Tanner and Wong. Briefly outlined here, this Bayesian method is based on Geman and Geman's approach

  15. Sparse Image Reconstruction in Computed Tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Jakob Sauer

    In recent years, increased focus on the potentially harmful effects of x-ray computed tomography (CT) scans, such as radiation-induced cancer, has motivated research on new low-dose imaging techniques. Sparse image reconstruction methods, as studied for instance in the field of compressed sensing...... applications. This thesis takes a systematic approach toward establishing quantitative understanding of conditions for sparse reconstruction to work well in CT. A general framework for analyzing sparse reconstruction methods in CT is introduced and two sets of computational tools are proposed: 1...... contributions to a general set of computational characterization tools. Thus, the thesis contributions help advance sparse reconstruction methods toward routine use in...

  16. Reconstruction of Undersampled Atomic Force Microscopy Images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Tobias Lindstrøm; Arildsen, Thomas; Østergaard, Jan

    2013-01-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is one of the most advanced tools for high-resolution imaging and manipulation of nanoscale matter. Unfortunately, standard AFM imaging requires a timescale on the order of seconds to minutes to acquire an image which makes it complicated to observe dynamic processes....... Moreover, it is often required to take several images before a relevant observation region is identified. In this paper we show how to significantly reduce the image acquisition time by undersampling. The reconstruction of an undersampled AFM image can be viewed as an inpainting, interpolating problem...... should be reconstructed using interpolation....

  17. Reconstructing an f(R) model from holographic dark energy: using the observational evidence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saaidi, Kh; Aghamohammadi, A

    2012-01-01

    We investigate the correspondence relation between f(R) gravity and an interacting holographic dark energy (HDE). By obtaining the conditions needed for some observational evidence such as positive acceleration expansion of the Universe, crossing the phantom divide line and validity of the thermodynamics second law in an interacting HDE model and corresponding it with the f(R) model of gravity, we find a viable f(R) model that can explain the present Universe. We also obtain the explicit evolutionary forms of the corresponding scalar field, potential and scale factor of the Universe. (paper)

  18. Holographic Reconstruction of Photoelectron Diffraction and Its Circular Dichroism for Local Structure Probing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsui, Fumihiko; Matsushita, Tomohiro; Daimon, Hiroshi

    2018-06-01

    The local atomic structure around a specific element atom can be recorded as a photoelectron diffraction pattern. Forward focusing peaks and diffraction rings around them indicate the directions and distances from the photoelectron emitting atom to the surrounding atoms. The state-of-the-art holography reconstruction algorithm enables us to image the local atomic arrangement around the excited atom in a real space. By using circularly polarized light as an excitation source, the angular momentum transfer from the light to the photoelectron induces parallax shifts in these diffraction patterns. As a result, stereographic images of atomic arrangements are obtained. These diffraction patterns can be used as atomic-site-resolved probes for local electronic structure investigation in combination with spectroscopy techniques. Direct three-dimensional atomic structure visualization and site-specific electronic property analysis methods are reviewed. Furthermore, circular dichroism was also found in valence photoelectron and Auger electron diffraction patterns. The investigation of these new phenomena provides hints for the development of new techniques for local structure probing.

  19. Medical image reconstruction. A conceptual tutorial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeng, Gengsheng Lawrence

    2010-01-01

    ''Medical Image Reconstruction: A Conceptual Tutorial'' introduces the classical and modern image reconstruction technologies, such as two-dimensional (2D) parallel-beam and fan-beam imaging, three-dimensional (3D) parallel ray, parallel plane, and cone-beam imaging. This book presents both analytical and iterative methods of these technologies and their applications in X-ray CT (computed tomography), SPECT (single photon emission computed tomography), PET (positron emission tomography), and MRI (magnetic resonance imaging). Contemporary research results in exact region-of-interest (ROI) reconstruction with truncated projections, Katsevich's cone-beam filtered backprojection algorithm, and reconstruction with highly undersampled data with l 0 -minimization are also included. (orig.)

  20. Algorithms for reconstructing images for industrial applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopes, R.T.; Crispim, V.R.

    1986-01-01

    Several algorithms for reconstructing objects from their projections are being studied in our Laboratory, for industrial applications. Such algorithms are useful locating the position and shape of different composition of materials in the object. A Comparative study of two algorithms is made. The two investigated algorithsm are: The MART (Multiplicative - Algebraic Reconstruction Technique) and the Convolution Method. The comparison are carried out from the point view of the quality of the image reconstructed, number of views and cost. (Author) [pt

  1. Extended focused imaging and depth map reconstruction in optical scanning holography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Zhenbo; Chen, Ni; Lam, Edmund Y

    2016-02-10

    In conventional microscopy, specimens lying within the depth of field are clearly recorded whereas other parts are blurry. Although digital holographic microscopy allows post-processing on holograms to reconstruct multifocus images, it suffers from defocus noise as a traditional microscope in numerical reconstruction. In this paper, we demonstrate a method that can achieve extended focused imaging (EFI) and reconstruct a depth map (DM) of three-dimensional (3D) objects. We first use a depth-from-focus algorithm to create a DM for each pixel based on entropy minimization. Then we show how to achieve EFI of the whole 3D scene computationally. Simulation and experimental results involving objects with multiple axial sections are presented to validate the proposed approach.

  2. Optimized computational imaging methods for small-target sensing in lens-free holographic microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Zhen; Engle, Isaiah; Garan, Jacob; Melzer, Jeffrey E.; McLeod, Euan

    2018-02-01

    Lens-free holographic microscopy is a promising diagnostic approach because it is cost-effective, compact, and suitable for point-of-care applications, while providing high resolution together with an ultra-large field-of-view. It has been applied to biomedical sensing, where larger targets like eukaryotic cells, bacteria, or viruses can be directly imaged without labels, and smaller targets like proteins or DNA strands can be detected via scattering labels like micro- or nano-spheres. Automated image processing routines can count objects and infer target concentrations. In these sensing applications, sensitivity and specificity are critically affected by image resolution and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). Pixel super-resolution approaches have been shown to boost resolution and SNR by synthesizing a high-resolution image from multiple, partially redundant, low-resolution images. However, there are several computational methods that can be used to synthesize the high-resolution image, and previously, it has been unclear which methods work best for the particular case of small-particle sensing. Here, we quantify the SNR achieved in small-particle sensing using regularized gradient-descent optimization method, where the regularization is based on cardinal-neighbor differences, Bayer-pattern noise reduction, or sparsity in the image. In particular, we find that gradient-descent with sparsity-based regularization works best for small-particle sensing. These computational approaches were evaluated on images acquired using a lens-free microscope that we assembled from an off-the-shelf LED array and color image sensor. Compared to other lens-free imaging systems, our hardware integration, calibration, and sample preparation are particularly simple. We believe our results will help to enable the best performance in lens-free holographic sensing.

  3. Parallel Algorithm for Reconstruction of TAC Images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vidal Gimeno, V.

    2012-01-01

    The algebraic reconstruction methods are based on solving a system of linear equations. In a previous study, was used and showed as the PETSc library, was and is a scientific computing tool, which facilitates and enables the optimal use of a computer system in the image reconstruction process.

  4. Holographic Optical Data Storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timucin, Dogan A.; Downie, John D.; Norvig, Peter (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Although the basic idea may be traced back to the earlier X-ray diffraction studies of Sir W. L. Bragg, the holographic method as we know it was invented by D. Gabor in 1948 as a two-step lensless imaging technique to enhance the resolution of electron microscopy, for which he received the 1971 Nobel Prize in physics. The distinctive feature of holography is the recording of the object phase variations that carry the depth information, which is lost in conventional photography where only the intensity (= squared amplitude) distribution of an object is captured. Since all photosensitive media necessarily respond to the intensity incident upon them, an ingenious way had to be found to convert object phase into intensity variations, and Gabor achieved this by introducing a coherent reference wave along with the object wave during exposure. Gabor's in-line recording scheme, however, required the object in question to be largely transmissive, and could provide only marginal image quality due to unwanted terms simultaneously reconstructed along with the desired wavefront. Further handicapped by the lack of a strong coherent light source, optical holography thus seemed fated to remain just another scientific curiosity, until the field was revolutionized in the early 1960s by some major breakthroughs: the proposition and demonstration of the laser principle, the introduction of off-axis holography, and the invention of volume holography. Consequently, the remainder of that decade saw an exponential growth in research on theory, practice, and applications of holography. Today, holography not only boasts a wide variety of scientific and technical applications (e.g., holographic interferometry for strain, vibration, and flow analysis, microscopy and high-resolution imagery, imaging through distorting media, optical interconnects, holographic optical elements, optical neural networks, three-dimensional displays, data storage, etc.), but has become a prominent am advertising

  5. Speeding up image reconstruction in computed tomography

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2018-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) is a technique for imaging cross-sections of an object using X-ray measurements taken from different angles. In last decades a significant progress has happened there: today advanced algorithms allow fast image reconstruction and obtaining high-quality images even with missing or dirty data, modern detectors provide high resolution without increasing radiation dose, and high-performance multi-core computing devices are there to help us solving such tasks even faster. I will start with CT basics, then briefly present existing classes of reconstruction algorithms and their differences. After that I will proceed to employing distinctive architectural features of modern multi-core devices (CPUs and GPUs) and popular program interfaces (OpenMP, MPI, CUDA, OpenCL) for developing effective parallel realizations of image reconstruction algorithms. Decreasing full reconstruction time from long hours up to minutes or even seconds has a revolutionary impact in diagnostic medicine and industria...

  6. Parallel CT image reconstruction based on GPUs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flores, Liubov A.; Vidal, Vicent; Mayo, Patricia; Rodenas, Francisco; Verdú, Gumersindo

    2014-01-01

    In X-ray computed tomography (CT) iterative methods are more suitable for the reconstruction of images with high contrast and precision in noisy conditions from a small number of projections. However, in practice, these methods are not widely used due to the high computational cost of their implementation. Nowadays technology provides the possibility to reduce effectively this drawback. It is the goal of this work to develop a fast GPU-based algorithm to reconstruct high quality images from under sampled and noisy projection data. - Highlights: • We developed GPU-based iterative algorithm to reconstruct images. • Iterative algorithms are capable to reconstruct images from under sampled set of projections. • The computer cost of the implementation of the developed algorithm is low. • The efficiency of the algorithm increases for the large scale problems

  7. Micro patterned surfaces: an effective tool for long term digital holographic microscopy cell imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mues, Sarah; Lilge, Inga; Schönherr, Holger; Kemper, Björn; Schnekenburger, Jürgen

    2017-02-01

    The major problem of Digital Holographic Microscopy (DHM) long term live cell imaging is that over time most of the tracked cells move out of the image area and other ones move in. Therefore, most of the cells are lost for the evaluation of individual cellular processes. Here, we present an effective solution for this crucial problem of long-term microscopic live cell analysis. We have generated functionalized slides containing areas of 250 μm per 200 μm. These micropatterned biointerfaces consist of passivating polyaclrylamide brushes (PAAm). Inner areas are backfilled with octadecanthiol (ODT), which allows cell attachment. The fouling properties of these surfaces are highly controllable and therefore the defined areas designed for the size our microscopic image areas were effective in keeping all cells inside the rectangles over the selected imaging period.

  8. Apparatus and method using a holographic optical element for converting a spectral distribution to image points

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGill, Matthew J. (Inventor); Scott, Vibart S. (Inventor); Marzouk, Marzouk (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A holographic optical element transforms a spectral distribution of light to image points. The element comprises areas, each of which acts as a separate lens to image the light incident in its area to an image point. Each area contains the recorded hologram of a point source object. The image points can be made to lie in a line in the same focal plane so as to align with a linear array detector. A version of the element has been developed that has concentric equal areas to match the circular fringe pattern of a Fabry-Perot interferometer. The element has high transmission efficiency, and when coupled with high quantum efficiency solid state detectors, provides an efficient photon-collecting detection system. The element may be used as part of the detection system in a direct detection Doppler lidar system or multiple field of view lidar system.

  9. Enhanced depth-of-field of an integral imaging microscope using a bifocal holographic optical element-micro lens array.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Ki-Chul; Lim, Young-Tae; Shin, Chang-Won; Erdenebat, Munkh-Uchral; Hwang, Jae-Moon; Kim, Nam

    2017-08-15

    We propose and implement an integral imaging microscope with extended depth-of-field (DoF) using a bifocal holographic micro lens array (MLA). The properties of the two MLAs are switched via peristrophic multiplexing, where different properties of the MLA are recorded onto the single holographic optical element (HOE). The recorded MLA properties are perpendicular to each other: after the first mode is recorded, the HOE is rotated by 90° clockwise, and the second mode is recorded. The experimental results confirm that the DoF of the integral imaging microscopy system is extended successfully by using the bifocal MLA.

  10. Reconstruction Algorithms in Undersampled AFM Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arildsen, Thomas; Oxvig, Christian Schou; Pedersen, Patrick Steffen

    2016-01-01

    This paper provides a study of spatial undersampling in atomic force microscopy (AFM) imaging followed by different image reconstruction techniques based on sparse approximation as well as interpolation. The main reasons for using undersampling is that it reduces the path length and thereby...... the scanning time as well as the amount of interaction between the AFM probe and the specimen. It can easily be applied on conventional AFM hardware. Due to undersampling, it is then necessary to further process the acquired image in order to reconstruct an approximation of the image. Based on real AFM cell...... images, our simulations reveal that using a simple raster scanning pattern in combination with conventional image interpolation performs very well. Moreover, this combination enables a reduction by a factor 10 of the scanning time while retaining an average reconstruction quality around 36 dB PSNR...

  11. 3D Reconstruction of NMR Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Izak

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper introduces experiment of 3D reconstruction NMR images scanned from magnetic resonance device. There are described methods which can be used for 3D reconstruction magnetic resonance images in biomedical application. The main idea is based on marching cubes algorithm. For this task was chosen sophistication method by program Vision Assistant, which is a part of program LabVIEW.

  12. Fast parallel algorithm for CT image reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores, Liubov A; Vidal, Vicent; Mayo, Patricia; Rodenas, Francisco; Verdú, Gumersindo

    2012-01-01

    In X-ray computed tomography (CT) the X rays are used to obtain the projection data needed to generate an image of the inside of an object. The image can be generated with different techniques. Iterative methods are more suitable for the reconstruction of images with high contrast and precision in noisy conditions and from a small number of projections. Their use may be important in portable scanners for their functionality in emergency situations. However, in practice, these methods are not widely used due to the high computational cost of their implementation. In this work we analyze iterative parallel image reconstruction with the Portable Extensive Toolkit for Scientific computation (PETSc).

  13. Photoacoustic image reconstruction via deep learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antholzer, Stephan; Haltmeier, Markus; Nuster, Robert; Schwab, Johannes

    2018-02-01

    Applying standard algorithms to sparse data problems in photoacoustic tomography (PAT) yields low-quality images containing severe under-sampling artifacts. To some extent, these artifacts can be reduced by iterative image reconstruction algorithms which allow to include prior knowledge such as smoothness, total variation (TV) or sparsity constraints. These algorithms tend to be time consuming as the forward and adjoint problems have to be solved repeatedly. Further, iterative algorithms have additional drawbacks. For example, the reconstruction quality strongly depends on a-priori model assumptions about the objects to be recovered, which are often not strictly satisfied in practical applications. To overcome these issues, in this paper, we develop direct and efficient reconstruction algorithms based on deep learning. As opposed to iterative algorithms, we apply a convolutional neural network, whose parameters are trained before the reconstruction process based on a set of training data. For actual image reconstruction, a single evaluation of the trained network yields the desired result. Our presented numerical results (using two different network architectures) demonstrate that the proposed deep learning approach reconstructs images with a quality comparable to state of the art iterative reconstruction methods.

  14. MR image reconstruction via guided filter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Heyan; Yang, Hang; Wang, Kang

    2018-04-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) reconstruction from the smallest possible set of Fourier samples has been a difficult problem in medical imaging field. In our paper, we present a new approach based on a guided filter for efficient MRI recovery algorithm. The guided filter is an edge-preserving smoothing operator and has better behaviors near edges than the bilateral filter. Our reconstruction method is consist of two steps. First, we propose two cost functions which could be computed efficiently and thus obtain two different images. Second, the guided filter is used with these two obtained images for efficient edge-preserving filtering, and one image is used as the guidance image, the other one is used as a filtered image in the guided filter. In our reconstruction algorithm, we can obtain more details by introducing guided filter. We compare our reconstruction algorithm with some competitive MRI reconstruction techniques in terms of PSNR and visual quality. Simulation results are given to show the performance of our new method.

  15. Photoacoustic image reconstruction: a quantitative analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sperl, Jonathan I.; Zell, Karin; Menzenbach, Peter; Haisch, Christoph; Ketzer, Stephan; Marquart, Markus; Koenig, Hartmut; Vogel, Mika W.

    2007-07-01

    Photoacoustic imaging is a promising new way to generate unprecedented contrast in ultrasound diagnostic imaging. It differs from other medical imaging approaches, in that it provides spatially resolved information about optical absorption of targeted tissue structures. Because the data acquisition process deviates from standard clinical ultrasound, choice of the proper image reconstruction method is crucial for successful application of the technique. In the literature, multiple approaches have been advocated, and the purpose of this paper is to compare four reconstruction techniques. Thereby, we focused on resolution limits, stability, reconstruction speed, and SNR. We generated experimental and simulated data and reconstructed images of the pressure distribution using four different methods: delay-and-sum (DnS), circular backprojection (CBP), generalized 2D Hough transform (HTA), and Fourier transform (FTA). All methods were able to depict the point sources properly. DnS and CBP produce blurred images containing typical superposition artifacts. The HTA provides excellent SNR and allows a good point source separation. The FTA is the fastest and shows the best FWHM. In our study, we found the FTA to show the best overall performance. It allows a very fast and theoretically exact reconstruction. Only a hardware-implemented DnS might be faster and enable real-time imaging. A commercial system may also perform several methods to fully utilize the new contrast mechanism and guarantee optimal resolution and fidelity.

  16. Image scale measurement with correlation filters in a volume holographic optical correlator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Tianxiang; Cao, Liangcai; He, Qingsheng; Jin, Guofan

    2013-08-01

    A search engine containing various target images or different part of a large scene area is of great use for many applications, including object detection, biometric recognition, and image registration. The input image captured in realtime is compared with all the template images in the search engine. A volume holographic correlator is one type of these search engines. It performs thousands of comparisons among the images at a super high speed, with the correlation task accomplishing mainly in optics. However, the inputted target image always contains scale variation to the filtering template images. At the time, the correlation values cannot properly reflect the similarity of the images. It is essential to estimate and eliminate the scale variation of the inputted target image. There are three domains for performing the scale measurement, as spatial, spectral and time domains. Most methods dealing with the scale factor are based on the spatial or the spectral domains. In this paper, a method with the time domain is proposed to measure the scale factor of the input image. It is called a time-sequential scaled method. The method utilizes the relationship between the scale variation and the correlation value of two images. It sends a few artificially scaled input images to compare with the template images. The correlation value increases and decreases with the increasing of the scale factor at the intervals of 0.8~1 and 1~1.2, respectively. The original scale of the input image can be measured by estimating the largest correlation value through correlating the artificially scaled input image with the template images. The measurement range for the scale can be 0.8~4.8. Scale factor beyond 1.2 is measured by scaling the input image at the factor of 1/2, 1/3 and 1/4, correlating the artificially scaled input image with the template images, and estimating the new corresponding scale factor inside 0.8~1.2.

  17. Exploiting the speckle-correlation scattering matrix for a compact reference-free holographic image sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, KyeoReh; Park, YongKeun

    2016-10-31

    The word 'holography' means a drawing that contains all of the information for light-both amplitude and wavefront. However, because of the insufficient bandwidth of current electronics, the direct measurement of the wavefront of light has not yet been achieved. Though reference-field-assisted interferometric methods have been utilized in numerous applications, introducing a reference field raises several fundamental and practical issues. Here we demonstrate a reference-free holographic image sensor. To achieve this, we propose a speckle-correlation scattering matrix approach; light-field information passing through a thin disordered layer is recorded and retrieved from a single-shot recording of speckle intensity patterns. Self-interference via diffusive scattering enables access to impinging light-field information, when light transport in the diffusive layer is precisely calibrated. As a proof-of-concept, we demonstrate direct holographic measurements of three-dimensional optical fields using a compact device consisting of a regular image sensor and a diffusor.

  18. Heuristic optimization in penumbral image for high resolution reconstructed image

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azuma, R.; Nozaki, S.; Fujioka, S.; Chen, Y. W.; Namihira, Y.

    2010-01-01

    Penumbral imaging is a technique which uses the fact that spatial information can be recovered from the shadow or penumbra that an unknown source casts through a simple large circular aperture. The size of the penumbral image on the detector can be mathematically determined as its aperture size, object size, and magnification. Conventional reconstruction methods are very sensitive to noise. On the other hand, the heuristic reconstruction method is very tolerant of noise. However, the aperture size influences the accuracy and resolution of the reconstructed image. In this article, we propose the optimization of the aperture size for the neutron penumbral imaging.

  19. Computational acceleration for MR image reconstruction in partially parallel imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Xiaojing; Chen, Yunmei; Huang, Feng

    2011-05-01

    In this paper, we present a fast numerical algorithm for solving total variation and l(1) (TVL1) based image reconstruction with application in partially parallel magnetic resonance imaging. Our algorithm uses variable splitting method to reduce computational cost. Moreover, the Barzilai-Borwein step size selection method is adopted in our algorithm for much faster convergence. Experimental results on clinical partially parallel imaging data demonstrate that the proposed algorithm requires much fewer iterations and/or less computational cost than recently developed operator splitting and Bregman operator splitting methods, which can deal with a general sensing matrix in reconstruction framework, to get similar or even better quality of reconstructed images.

  20. 3-D image reconstruction in radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grangeat, P.

    1999-01-01

    In this course, we present highlights on fully 3-D image reconstruction algorithms used in 3-D X-ray Computed Tomography (3-D-CT) and 3-D Rotational Radiography (3-D-RR). We first consider the case of spiral CT with a one-row detector. Starting from the 2-D fan-beam inversion formula for a circular trajectory, we introduce spiral CT 3-D image reconstruction algorithm using axial interpolation for each transverse slice. In order to improve the X-ray detection efficiency and to speed the acquisition process, the future is to use multi-row detectors associated with small angle cone-beam geometry. The generalization of the 2-D fan-beam image reconstruction algorithm to cone beam defined direct inversion formula referred as Feldkamp's algorithm for a circular trajectory and Wang's algorithm for a spiral trajectory. However, large area detectors does exist such as Radiological Image Intensifiers or in a near future solid state detectors. To get a larger zoom effect, it defines a cone-beam geometry associated with a large aperture angle. For this case, we introduce indirect image reconstruction algorithm by plane re-binning in the Radon domain. We will present some results from a prototype MORPHOMETER device using the RADON reconstruction software. Lastly, we consider the special case of 3-D Rotational Digital Subtraction Angiography with a restricted number of views. We introduce constraint optimization algorithm using quadratic, entropic or half-quadratic constraints. Generalized ART (Algebraic Reconstruction Technique) iterative reconstruction algorithm can be derived from the Bregman algorithm. We present reconstructed vascular trees from a prototype MORPHOMETER device. (author)

  1. A combinational fast algorithm for image reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Zhongquan

    1987-01-01

    A combinational fast algorithm has been developed in order to increase the speed of reconstruction. First, an interpolation method based on B-spline functions is used in image reconstruction. Next, the influence of the boundary conditions assumed here on the interpolation of filtered projections and on the image reconstruction is discussed. It is shown that this boundary condition has almost no influence on the image in the central region of the image space, because the error of interpolation rapidly decreases by a factor of ten in shifting two pixels from the edge toward the center. In addition, a fast algorithm for computing the detecting angle has been used with the mentioned interpolation algorithm, and the cost for detecting angle computaton is reduced by a factor of two. The implementation results show that in the same subjective and objective fidelity, the computational cost for the interpolation using this algorithm is about one-twelfth of the conventional algorithm

  2. New holographic reconstruction of scalar-field dark-energy models in the framework of chameleon Brans-Dicke cosmology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chattopadhyay, Surajit; Pasqua, Antonio; Khurshudyan, Martiros

    2014-01-01

    Motivated by the work of Yang et al. (Mod. Phys. Lett. A 26:191, 2011), we report on a study of the new holographic dark energy (NHDE) model with energy density given by ρ D = (3φ 2 )/(4ω)(μH 2 + νH) in the framework of chameleon Brans-Dicke cosmology. We have studied the correspondence between the quintessence, the DBI-essence, and the tachyon scalar-field models with the NHDE model in the framework of chameleon Brans-Dicke cosmology. Deriving an expression of the Hubble parameter H and, accordingly, ρ D in the context of chameleon Brans-Dicke chameleon cosmology, we have reconstructed the potentials and dynamics for these scalar-field models. Furthermore, we have examined the stability for the obtained solutions of the crossing of the phantom divide under a quantum correction of massless conformally invariant fields, and we have seen that the quantum correction could be small when the phantom crossing occurs and the obtained solutions of the phantom crossing could be stable under the quantum correction. It has also been noted that the potential increases as the matter. chameleon coupling gets stronger with the evolution of the universe. (orig.)

  3. New holographic reconstruction of scalar-field dark-energy models in the framework of chameleon Brans-Dicke cosmology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chattopadhyay, Surajit [Pailan College of Management and Technology, Kolkata (India); Pasqua, Antonio [University of Trieste, Department of Physics, Trieste (Italy); Khurshudyan, Martiros [Yerevan State University, Department of Theoretical Physics, Yerevan (Armenia); Potsdam-Golm Science Park, Max Planck Institute of Colloids and Interfaces, Potsdam (Germany)

    2014-09-15

    Motivated by the work of Yang et al. (Mod. Phys. Lett. A 26:191, 2011), we report on a study of the new holographic dark energy (NHDE) model with energy density given by ρ{sub D} = (3φ{sup 2})/(4ω)(μH{sup 2} + νH) in the framework of chameleon Brans-Dicke cosmology. We have studied the correspondence between the quintessence, the DBI-essence, and the tachyon scalar-field models with the NHDE model in the framework of chameleon Brans-Dicke cosmology. Deriving an expression of the Hubble parameter H and, accordingly, ρ{sub D} in the context of chameleon Brans-Dicke chameleon cosmology, we have reconstructed the potentials and dynamics for these scalar-field models. Furthermore, we have examined the stability for the obtained solutions of the crossing of the phantom divide under a quantum correction of massless conformally invariant fields, and we have seen that the quantum correction could be small when the phantom crossing occurs and the obtained solutions of the phantom crossing could be stable under the quantum correction. It has also been noted that the potential increases as the matter. chameleon coupling gets stronger with the evolution of the universe. (orig.)

  4. Applications of quantitative time lapse holographic imaging to the development of complex pharmaceutical nano formulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luther, Ed; Mendes, Livia; Pan, Jiayi; Costa, Daniel; Sarisozen, Can; Torchilin, Vladimir

    2018-02-01

    We rely on in vitro cellular cultures to evaluate the effects of the components of multifunctional nano-based formulations under development. We employ an incubator-adapted, label-free holographic imaging cytometer HoloMonitor M4® (Phase Holographic Imaging, Lund, Sweden) to obtain multi-day time-lapse sequences at 5- minute intervals. An automated stage allows hand-free acquisition of multiple fields of view. Our system is based on the Mach-Zehnder interferometry principle to create interference patterns which are deconvolved to produce images of the optical thickness of the field of view. These images are automatically segmented resulting in a full complement of quantitative morphological features, such as optical volume, thickness, and area amongst many others. Precise XY cell locations and the time of acquisition are also recorded. Visualization is best achieved by novel 4-Dimensional plots, where XY position is plotted overtime time (Z-directions) and cell-thickness is coded as color or gray scale brightness. Fundamental events of interest, i.e., cells undergoing mitosis or mitotic dysfunction, cell death, cell-to-cell interactions, motility are discernable. We use both 2D and 3D models of the tumor microenvironment. We report our new analysis method to track feature changes over time based on a 4-sample version of the Kolmogorov-Smirnov test. Feature A is compared to Control A, and Feature B is compared to Control B to give a 2D probability plot of the feature changes over time. As a result, we efficiently obtain vectors quantifying feature changes over time in various sample conditions, i.e., changing compound concentrations or multi-compound combinations.

  5. Image reconstruction methods in positron tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Townsend, D.W.; Defrise, M.

    1993-01-01

    In the two decades since the introduction of the X-ray scanner into radiology, medical imaging techniques have become widely established as essential tools in the diagnosis of disease. As a consequence of recent technological and mathematical advances, the non-invasive, three-dimensional imaging of internal organs such as the brain and the heart is now possible, not only for anatomical investigations using X-ray but also for studies which explore the functional status of the body using positron-emitting radioisotopes. This report reviews the historical and physical basis of medical imaging techniques using positron-emitting radioisotopes. Mathematical methods which enable three-dimensional distributions of radioisotopes to be reconstructed from projection data (sinograms) acquired by detectors suitably positioned around the patient are discussed. The extension of conventional two-dimensional tomographic reconstruction algorithms to fully three-dimensional reconstruction is described in detail. (orig.)

  6. Research of ART method in CT image reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Zhipeng; Cong Peng; Wu Haifeng

    2005-01-01

    This paper studied Algebraic Reconstruction Technique (ART) in CT image reconstruction. Discussed the ray number influence on image quality. And the adopting of smooth method got high quality CT image. (authors)

  7. Image reconstruction under non-Gaussian noise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sciacchitano, Federica

    During acquisition and transmission, images are often blurred and corrupted by noise. One of the fundamental tasks of image processing is to reconstruct the clean image from a degraded version. The process of recovering the original image from the data is an example of inverse problem. Due...... to the ill-posedness of the problem, the simple inversion of the degradation model does not give any good reconstructions. Therefore, to deal with the ill-posedness it is necessary to use some prior information on the solution or the model and the Bayesian approach. Additive Gaussian noise has been......D thesis intends to solve some of the many open questions for image restoration under non-Gaussian noise. The two main kinds of noise studied in this PhD project are the impulse noise and the Cauchy noise. Impulse noise is due to for instance the malfunctioning pixel elements in the camera sensors, errors...

  8. Proton computed tomography images with algebraic reconstruction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruzzi, M. [Physics and Astronomy Department, University of Florence, Florence (Italy); Civinini, C.; Scaringella, M. [INFN - Florence Division, Florence (Italy); Bonanno, D. [INFN - Catania Division, Catania (Italy); Brianzi, M. [INFN - Florence Division, Florence (Italy); Carpinelli, M. [INFN - Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Catania (Italy); Chemistry and Pharmacy Department, University of Sassari, Sassari (Italy); Cirrone, G.A.P.; Cuttone, G. [INFN - Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Catania (Italy); Presti, D. Lo [INFN - Catania Division, Catania (Italy); Physics and Astronomy Department, University of Catania, Catania (Italy); Maccioni, G. [INFN – Cagliari Division, Cagliari (Italy); Pallotta, S. [INFN - Florence Division, Florence (Italy); Department of Biomedical, Experimental and Clinical Sciences, University of Florence, Florence (Italy); SOD Fisica Medica, Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria Careggi, Firenze (Italy); Randazzo, N. [INFN - Catania Division, Catania (Italy); Romano, F. [INFN - Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Catania (Italy); Sipala, V. [INFN - Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Catania (Italy); Chemistry and Pharmacy Department, University of Sassari, Sassari (Italy); Talamonti, C. [INFN - Florence Division, Florence (Italy); Department of Biomedical, Experimental and Clinical Sciences, University of Florence, Florence (Italy); SOD Fisica Medica, Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria Careggi, Firenze (Italy); Vanzi, E. [Fisica Sanitaria, Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria Senese, Siena (Italy)

    2017-02-11

    A prototype of proton Computed Tomography (pCT) system for hadron-therapy has been manufactured and tested in a 175 MeV proton beam with a non-homogeneous phantom designed to simulate high-contrast material. BI-SART reconstruction algorithms have been implemented with GPU parallelism, taking into account of most likely paths of protons in matter. Reconstructed tomography images with density resolutions r.m.s. down to ~1% and spatial resolutions <1 mm, achieved within processing times of ~15′ for a 512×512 pixels image prove that this technique will be beneficial if used instead of X-CT in hadron-therapy.

  9. Accelerated Compressed Sensing Based CT Image Reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashemi, SayedMasoud; Beheshti, Soosan; Gill, Patrick R; Paul, Narinder S; Cobbold, Richard S C

    2015-01-01

    In X-ray computed tomography (CT) an important objective is to reduce the radiation dose without significantly degrading the image quality. Compressed sensing (CS) enables the radiation dose to be reduced by producing diagnostic images from a limited number of projections. However, conventional CS-based algorithms are computationally intensive and time-consuming. We propose a new algorithm that accelerates the CS-based reconstruction by using a fast pseudopolar Fourier based Radon transform and rebinning the diverging fan beams to parallel beams. The reconstruction process is analyzed using a maximum-a-posterior approach, which is transformed into a weighted CS problem. The weights involved in the proposed model are calculated based on the statistical characteristics of the reconstruction process, which is formulated in terms of the measurement noise and rebinning interpolation error. Therefore, the proposed method not only accelerates the reconstruction, but also removes the rebinning and interpolation errors. Simulation results are shown for phantoms and a patient. For example, a 512 × 512 Shepp-Logan phantom when reconstructed from 128 rebinned projections using a conventional CS method had 10% error, whereas with the proposed method the reconstruction error was less than 1%. Moreover, computation times of less than 30 sec were obtained using a standard desktop computer without numerical optimization.

  10. Accelerated Compressed Sensing Based CT Image Reconstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SayedMasoud Hashemi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In X-ray computed tomography (CT an important objective is to reduce the radiation dose without significantly degrading the image quality. Compressed sensing (CS enables the radiation dose to be reduced by producing diagnostic images from a limited number of projections. However, conventional CS-based algorithms are computationally intensive and time-consuming. We propose a new algorithm that accelerates the CS-based reconstruction by using a fast pseudopolar Fourier based Radon transform and rebinning the diverging fan beams to parallel beams. The reconstruction process is analyzed using a maximum-a-posterior approach, which is transformed into a weighted CS problem. The weights involved in the proposed model are calculated based on the statistical characteristics of the reconstruction process, which is formulated in terms of the measurement noise and rebinning interpolation error. Therefore, the proposed method not only accelerates the reconstruction, but also removes the rebinning and interpolation errors. Simulation results are shown for phantoms and a patient. For example, a 512 × 512 Shepp-Logan phantom when reconstructed from 128 rebinned projections using a conventional CS method had 10% error, whereas with the proposed method the reconstruction error was less than 1%. Moreover, computation times of less than 30 sec were obtained using a standard desktop computer without numerical optimization.

  11. Challenges in using GPUs for the real-time reconstruction of digital hologram images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hobson, P R; Nebrensky, J J; D, I

    2013-01-01

    In-line holography has recently made the transition from silver-halide based recording media, with laser reconstruction, to recording with large-area pixel detectors and computer-based reconstruction. This form of holographic imaging is an established technique for the study of fine particulates, such as cloud or fuel droplets, marine plankton and alluvial sediments, and enables a true 3D object field to be recorded at high resolution over a considerable depth. The move to digital holography promises rapid, if not instantaneous, feedback as it avoids the need for the time-consuming chemical development of plates or film film and a dedicated replay system, but with the growing use of video-rate holographic recording, and the desire to reconstruct fully every frame, the computational challenge becomes considerable. To replay a digital hologram a 2D FFT must be calculated for every depth slice desired in the replayed image volume. A typical hologram of ∼100 μm particles over a depth of a few hundred millimetres will require O(10 3 ) 2D FFT operations to be performed on a hologram of typically a few million pixels. In this paper we discuss the technical challenges in converting our existing reconstruction code to make efficient use of NVIDIA CUDA-based GPU cards and show how near real-time video slice reconstruction can be obtained with holograms as large as 4096 by 4096 pixels. Our performance to date for a number of different NVIDIA GPU running under both Linux and Microsoft Windows is presented. The recent availability of GPU on portable computers is discussed and a new code for interactive replay of digital holograms is presented.

  12. On an image reconstruction method for ECT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasamoto, Akira; Suzuki, Takayuki; Nishimura, Yoshihiro

    2007-04-01

    An image by Eddy Current Testing(ECT) is a blurred image to original flaw shape. In order to reconstruct fine flaw image, a new image reconstruction method has been proposed. This method is based on an assumption that a very simple relationship between measured data and source were described by a convolution of response function and flaw shape. This assumption leads to a simple inverse analysis method with deconvolution.In this method, Point Spread Function (PSF) and Line Spread Function(LSF) play a key role in deconvolution processing. This study proposes a simple data processing to determine PSF and LSF from ECT data of machined hole and line flaw. In order to verify its validity, ECT data for SUS316 plate(200x200x10mm) with artificial machined hole and notch flaw had been acquired by differential coil type sensors(produced by ZETEC Inc). Those data were analyzed by the proposed method. The proposed method restored sharp discrete multiple hole image from interfered data by multiple holes. Also the estimated width of line flaw has been much improved compared with original experimental data. Although proposed inverse analysis strategy is simple and easy to implement, its validity to holes and line flaw have been shown by many results that much finer image than original image have been reconstructed.

  13. 3D EIT image reconstruction with GREIT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grychtol, Bartłomiej; Müller, Beat; Adler, Andy

    2016-06-01

    Most applications of thoracic EIT use a single plane of electrodes on the chest from which a transverse image 'slice' is calculated. However, interpretation of EIT images is made difficult by the large region above and below the electrode plane to which EIT is sensitive. Volumetric EIT images using two (or more) electrode planes should help compensate, but are little used currently. The Graz consensus reconstruction algorithm for EIT (GREIT) has become popular in lung EIT. One shortcoming of the original formulation of GREIT is its restriction to reconstruction onto a 2D planar image. We present an extension of the GREIT algorithm to 3D and develop open-source tools to evaluate its performance as a function of the choice of stimulation and measurement pattern. Results show 3D GREIT using two electrode layers has significantly more uniform sensitivity profiles through the chest region. Overall, the advantages of 3D EIT are compelling.

  14. Reconstructing building mass models from UAV images

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Minglei; Nan, Liangliang; Smith, Neil; Wonka, Peter

    2015-01-01

    We present an automatic reconstruction pipeline for large scale urban scenes from aerial images captured by a camera mounted on an unmanned aerial vehicle. Using state-of-the-art Structure from Motion and Multi-View Stereo algorithms, we first

  15. Connections model for tomographic images reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodrigues, R.G.S.; Pela, C.A.; Roque, S.F. A.C.

    1998-01-01

    This paper shows an artificial neural network with an adequately topology for tomographic image reconstruction. The associated error function is derived and the learning algorithm is make. The simulated results are presented and demonstrate the existence of a generalized solution for nets with linear activation function. (Author)

  16. Non-Cartesian parallel imaging reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Katherine L; Hamilton, Jesse I; Griswold, Mark A; Gulani, Vikas; Seiberlich, Nicole

    2014-11-01

    Non-Cartesian parallel imaging has played an important role in reducing data acquisition time in MRI. The use of non-Cartesian trajectories can enable more efficient coverage of k-space, which can be leveraged to reduce scan times. These trajectories can be undersampled to achieve even faster scan times, but the resulting images may contain aliasing artifacts. Just as Cartesian parallel imaging can be used to reconstruct images from undersampled Cartesian data, non-Cartesian parallel imaging methods can mitigate aliasing artifacts by using additional spatial encoding information in the form of the nonhomogeneous sensitivities of multi-coil phased arrays. This review will begin with an overview of non-Cartesian k-space trajectories and their sampling properties, followed by an in-depth discussion of several selected non-Cartesian parallel imaging algorithms. Three representative non-Cartesian parallel imaging methods will be described, including Conjugate Gradient SENSE (CG SENSE), non-Cartesian generalized autocalibrating partially parallel acquisition (GRAPPA), and Iterative Self-Consistent Parallel Imaging Reconstruction (SPIRiT). After a discussion of these three techniques, several potential promising clinical applications of non-Cartesian parallel imaging will be covered. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. An elementary research on wireless transmission of holographic 3D moving pictures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takano, Kunihiko; Sato, Koki; Endo, Takaya; Asano, Hiroaki; Fukuzawa, Atsuo; Asai, Kikuo

    2009-05-01

    In this paper, a transmitting process of a sequence of holograms describing 3D moving objects over the communicating wireless-network system is presented. A sequence of holograms involves holograms is transformed into a bit stream data, and then it is transmitted over the wireless LAN and Bluetooth. It is shown that applying this technique, holographic data of 3D moving object is transmitted in high quality and a relatively good reconstruction of holographic images is performed.

  18. 3-D Reconstruction From Satellite Images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Denver, Troelz

    1999-01-01

    of planetary surfaces, but other purposes is considered as well. The system performance is measured with respect to the precision and the time consumption.The reconstruction process is divided into four major areas: Acquisition, calibration, matching/reconstruction and presentation. Each of these areas...... are treated individually. A detailed treatment of various lens distortions is required, in order to correct for these problems. This subject is included in the acquisition part. In the calibration part, the perspective distortion is removed from the images. Most attention has been paid to the matching problem...

  19. Challenges in using GPUs for the reconstruction of digital hologram images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reid, I D; Nebrensky, J J; Hobson, P R

    2012-01-01

    In-line holographic imaging is used for small particulates, such as cloud or spray droplets, marine plankton, and alluvial sediments, and enables a true 3D object field to be recorded at high resolution over a considerable depth. To reconstruct a digital hologram a 2D FFT must be calculated for every depth slice desired in the replayed image volume. A typical in-line hologram of ∼ 100 micrometre-sized particles over a depth of a few hundred millimetres will require O(1000) 2D FFT operations to be performed on an hologram of typically a few million pixels. In previous work we have reported on our experiences with reconstruction on a computational grid. In this paper we discuss the technical challenges in making efficient use of the NVIDIA Tesla and Fermi GPU systems and show how our reconstruction code was optimised for near real-time video slice reconstruction with holograms as large as 4K by 4K pixels. We also consider the implications for grid and cloud computing approaches to hologram replay, and the extent to which a GPU can replace these approaches, when the important step of locating focussed objects within a reconstructed volume is included.

  20. The shifting appearance/disappearance of holographic images and the dynamic ontology of perceptual and cognitive processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boissonnet, Philippe

    2013-02-01

    The French philosopher M Merleau-Ponty captured the dynamic of perception with his idea of the intertwining of perceiver and perceived. Light is what links them. In the case of holographic images, not only is spatial and colour perception the pure product of light, but this light information is always in the process of self-construction with our eyes, according to our movements and the point of view adopted. According to the aesthetic reception of a work of art, Holographic images vary greatly from those of cinema, photography and even every kind of digital 3D animation. This particular image's status truly makes perceptually apparent the "co-emergence" of light and our gaze. But holography never misleads us with respect to the precarious nature of our perceptions. We have no illusion as to the limits of our empirical understanding of the perceived reality. Holography, like our knowledge of the visible, thus brings to light the phenomenon of reality's "co-constitution" and contributes to a dynamic ontology of perceptual and cognitive processes. The cognitivist Francico Varela defines this as the paradigm of enaction,i which I will adapt and apply to the appearance/disappearance context of holographic images to bring out their affinities on a metaphorical level.

  1. Hot embossing holographic images in BOPP shrink films through large-area roll-to-roll nanoimprint lithography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, Menglin; Lin, Shiwei, E-mail: linsw@hainu.edu.cn; Jiang, Wenkai; Pan, Nengqian

    2014-08-30

    Highlights: • High-quality holographic images were replicated in large-area shrink film. • Surface morphology evolution was analyzed in films embossed at different temperatures. • Optical, mechanical, and thermal characteristics were systematically analyzed. - Abstract: Diffraction grating-based holographic images have been successfully replicated in biaxially oriented polypropylene (BOPP) shrink films through large-area roll-to-roll nanoimprint technique. Such hot embossing of holographic images on BOPP films represents a promising means of creating novel security features in packaging applications. The major limitation of the high-quality replication is the relatively large thermal shrinkage of BOPP shrink film. However, although an appropriate shrinkage is demanded after embossing, over-shrinking not only causes distortion in embossed images, but also reduces the various properties of BOPP shrink films mainly due to the disappearance of orientation. The effects of embossing temperature on the mechanical, thermal and optical properties as well as polymer surface morphologies were systematically analyzed. The results show that the optimal process parameters are listed as follows: the embossing temperature at 104–110 °C, embossing force 6 kg/cm{sup 2} and film speed 32 m/min. The variation in flow behavior of polymer surface during hot embossing process is highly dependent on the temperature. In addition, the adhesion from the direct contact between the rubber press roller and polymer surfaces is suggested to cause the serious optical properties failure.

  2. Reconstructing building mass models from UAV images

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Minglei

    2015-07-26

    We present an automatic reconstruction pipeline for large scale urban scenes from aerial images captured by a camera mounted on an unmanned aerial vehicle. Using state-of-the-art Structure from Motion and Multi-View Stereo algorithms, we first generate a dense point cloud from the aerial images. Based on the statistical analysis of the footprint grid of the buildings, the point cloud is classified into different categories (i.e., buildings, ground, trees, and others). Roof structures are extracted for each individual building using Markov random field optimization. Then, a contour refinement algorithm based on pivot point detection is utilized to refine the contour of patches. Finally, polygonal mesh models are extracted from the refined contours. Experiments on various scenes as well as comparisons with state-of-the-art reconstruction methods demonstrate the effectiveness and robustness of the proposed method.

  3. Sequential processing of quantitative phase images for the study of cell behaviour in real-time digital holographic microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zikmund, T; Kvasnica, L; Týč, M; Křížová, A; Colláková, J; Chmelík, R

    2014-11-01

    Transmitted light holographic microscopy is particularly used for quantitative phase imaging of transparent microscopic objects such as living cells. The study of the cell is based on extraction of the dynamic data on cell behaviour from the time-lapse sequence of the phase images. However, the phase images are affected by the phase aberrations that make the analysis particularly difficult. This is because the phase deformation is prone to change during long-term experiments. Here, we present a novel algorithm for sequential processing of living cells phase images in a time-lapse sequence. The algorithm compensates for the deformation of a phase image using weighted least-squares surface fitting. Moreover, it identifies and segments the individual cells in the phase image. All these procedures are performed automatically and applied immediately after obtaining every single phase image. This property of the algorithm is important for real-time cell quantitative phase imaging and instantaneous control of the course of the experiment by playback of the recorded sequence up to actual time. Such operator's intervention is a forerunner of process automation derived from image analysis. The efficiency of the propounded algorithm is demonstrated on images of rat fibrosarcoma cells using an off-axis holographic microscope. © 2014 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2014 Royal Microscopical Society.

  4. GPU acceleration towards real-time image reconstruction in 3D tomographic diffractive microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailleul, J.; Simon, B.; Debailleul, M.; Liu, H.; Haeberlé, O.

    2012-06-01

    Phase microscopy techniques regained interest in allowing for the observation of unprepared specimens with excellent temporal resolution. Tomographic diffractive microscopy is an extension of holographic microscopy which permits 3D observations with a finer resolution than incoherent light microscopes. Specimens are imaged by a series of 2D holograms: their accumulation progressively fills the range of frequencies of the specimen in Fourier space. A 3D inverse FFT eventually provides a spatial image of the specimen. Consequently, acquisition then reconstruction are mandatory to produce an image that could prelude real-time control of the observed specimen. The MIPS Laboratory has built a tomographic diffractive microscope with an unsurpassed 130nm resolution but a low imaging speed - no less than one minute. Afterwards, a high-end PC reconstructs the 3D image in 20 seconds. We now expect an interactive system providing preview images during the acquisition for monitoring purposes. We first present a prototype implementing this solution on CPU: acquisition and reconstruction are tied in a producer-consumer scheme, sharing common data into CPU memory. Then we present a prototype dispatching some reconstruction tasks to GPU in order to take advantage of SIMDparallelization for FFT and higher bandwidth for filtering operations. The CPU scheme takes 6 seconds for a 3D image update while the GPU scheme can go down to 2 or > 1 seconds depending on the GPU class. This opens opportunities for 4D imaging of living organisms or crystallization processes. We also consider the relevance of GPU for 3D image interaction in our specific conditions.

  5. Off-axis low coherence digital holographic interferometry for quantitative phase imaging with an LED

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Rongli; Wang, Fan; Hu, Xiaoying; Yang, Wenqian

    2017-11-01

    Off-axis digital holographic interferometry with the light source of a light emitting diode (LED) is presented and its application for quantitative phase imaging in a large range with low noise is demonstrated. The scheme is implemented in a grating based Mach-Zehnder interferometer. To achieve off-axis interferometry, firstly, the collimated beam emitted from an LED is diffracted into multiple orders by a grating and they are split into two copies by a beam splitter; secondly, in the object arm the zero order of one copy is filtered in the Fourier plane and is reshaped to illuminate the sample, while in the reference arm one of its first order of another copy is selected to serve as the reference beam, and then an off-axis hologram can be obtained at the image plane. The main advantage stemming from an LED illumination is its high spatial phase resolution, due to the subdued speckle effect. The off-axis geometry enables one-shot recording of the hologram in the millisecond scale. The utility of the proposed setup is illustrated with measurements of a resolution target and part of a wing of green-lacewing, and dynamic evaporation process of an ethanol film.

  6. Electromagnetic holographic sensitivity field of two-phase flow in horizontal wells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Kuo; Wu, Xi-Ling; Yan, Jing-Fu; Cai, Jia-Tie

    2017-03-01

    Electromagnetic holographic data are characterized by two modes, suggesting that image reconstruction requires a dual-mode sensitivity field as well. We analyze an electromagnetic holographic field based on tomography theory and Radon inverse transform to derive the expression of the electromagnetic holographic sensitivity field (EMHSF). Then, we apply the EMHSF calculated by using finite-element methods to flow simulations and holographic imaging. The results suggest that the EMHSF based on the partial derivative of radius of the complex electric potential φ is closely linked to the Radon inverse transform and encompasses the sensitivities of the amplitude and phase data. The flow images obtained with inversion using EMHSF better agree with the actual flow patterns. The EMHSF overcomes the limitations of traditional single-mode sensitivity fields.

  7. Homotopy Based Reconstruction from Acoustic Images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sharma, Ojaswa

    of the inherent arrangement. The problem of reconstruction from arbitrary cross sections is a generic problem and is also shown to be solved here using the mathematical tool of continuous deformations. As part of a complete processing, segmentation using level set methods is explored for acoustic images and fast...... GPU (Graphics Processing Unit) based methods are suggested for a streaming computation on large volumes of data. Validation of results for acoustic images is not straightforward due to unavailability of ground truth. Accuracy figures for the suggested methods are provided using phantom object...

  8. Image reconstruction of dynamic infrared single-pixel imaging system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Qi; Jiang, Yilin; Wang, Haiyan; Guo, Limin

    2018-03-01

    Single-pixel imaging technique has recently received much attention. Most of the current single-pixel imaging is aimed at relatively static targets or the imaging system is fixed, which is limited by the number of measurements received through the single detector. In this paper, we proposed a novel dynamic compressive imaging method to solve the imaging problem, where exists imaging system motion behavior, for the infrared (IR) rosette scanning system. The relationship between adjacent target images and scene is analyzed under different system movement scenarios. These relationships are used to build dynamic compressive imaging models. Simulation results demonstrate that the proposed method can improve the reconstruction quality of IR image and enhance the contrast between the target and the background in the presence of system movement.

  9. Image-reconstruction methods in positron tomography

    CERN Document Server

    Townsend, David W; CERN. Geneva

    1993-01-01

    Physics and mathematics for medical imaging In the two decades since the introduction of the X-ray scanner into radiology, medical imaging techniques have become widely established as essential tools in the diagnosis of disease. As a consequence of recent technological and mathematical advances, the non-invasive, three-dimensional imaging of internal organs such as the brain and the heart is now possible, not only for anatomical investigations using X-rays but also for studies which explore the functional status of the body using positron-emitting radioisotopes and nuclear magnetic resonance. Mathematical methods which enable three-dimentional distributions to be reconstructed from projection data acquired by radiation detectors suitably positioned around the patient will be described in detail. The lectures will trace the development of medical imaging from simpleradiographs to the present-day non-invasive measurement of in vivo boichemistry. Powerful techniques to correlate anatomy and function that are cur...

  10. Three-dimensional reconstruction of CT images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watanabe, Toshiaki; Kattoh, Keiichi; Kawakami, Genichiroh; Igami, Isao; Mariya, Yasushi; Nakamura, Yasuhiko; Saitoh, Yohko; Tamura, Koreroku; Shinozaki, Tatsuyo

    1986-09-01

    Computed tomography (CT) has the ability to provide sensitive visualization of organs and lesions. Owing to the nature of CT to be transaxial images, a structure which is greater than a certain size appears as several serial CT images. Consequently each observer must reconstruct those images into a three-dimensional (3-D) form mentally. It has been supposed to be of great use if such a 3-D form can be described as a definite figure. A new computer program has been developed which can produce 3-D figures from the profiles of organs and lesions on CT images using spline curves. The figures obtained through this method are regarded to have practical applications.

  11. Simulated annealing image reconstruction for positron emission tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sundermann, E; Lemahieu, I; Desmedt, P [Department of Electronics and Information Systems, University of Ghent, St. Pietersnieuwstraat 41, B-9000 Ghent, Belgium (Belgium)

    1994-12-31

    In Positron Emission Tomography (PET) images have to be reconstructed from moisy projection data. The noise on the PET data can be modeled by a Poison distribution. In this paper, we present the results of using the simulated annealing technique to reconstruct PET images. Various parameter settings of the simulated annealing algorithm are discussed and optimized. The reconstructed images are of good quality and high contrast, in comparison to other reconstruction techniques. (authors). 11 refs., 2 figs.

  12. Simulated annealing image reconstruction for positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sundermann, E.; Lemahieu, I.; Desmedt, P.

    1994-01-01

    In Positron Emission Tomography (PET) images have to be reconstructed from moisy projection data. The noise on the PET data can be modeled by a Poison distribution. In this paper, we present the results of using the simulated annealing technique to reconstruct PET images. Various parameter settings of the simulated annealing algorithm are discussed and optimized. The reconstructed images are of good quality and high contrast, in comparison to other reconstruction techniques. (authors)

  13. Image reconstruction. Application to transverse axial tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aubry, Florent.

    1977-09-01

    A method of computerized tridimensional image reconstruction from their projection, especially in the computerized transverse axial tomography is suggested. First, the different techniques actually developped and presented in the literature are analyzed. Then, the equipment used is briefly described. The reconstruction algorithm developped is presented. This algorithm is based on the convolution method, well adapted to the real conditions of exploitation. It is an extension of SHEPP and LOGAN's algorithm. A correction of the self absorption and of the detector's response is proposed. Finally, the first results obtained which are satisfactory are given. The simplicity of the method which does not need a too long computation time makes possible the implementation of the algorithm on a mini-computer [fr

  14. Reconstruction of Novel Viewpoint Image Using GRNN

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李战委; 孙济洲; 张志强

    2003-01-01

    A neural-statistical approach to the reconstruction of novel viewpoint image using general regression neural networks(GRNN) is presented. Different color value will be obtained by watching the same surface point of an object from different viewpoints due to specular reflection, and the difference is related to the position of viewpoint. The relationship between the position of viewpoint and the color of image is non-linear, neural network is introduced to make curve fitting, where the inputs of neural network are only a few calibrated images with obvious specular reflection. By training the neural network, network model is obtained. By inputing an arbitrary virtual viewpoint to the model, the image of the virtual viewpoint can be computed. By using the method presented here, novel viewpoint image with photo-realistic property can be obtained, especially images with obvious specular reflection can accurately be generated. The method is an image-based rendering method, geometric model of the scene and position of lighting are not needed.

  15. Acoustical holographic Siamese image technique for imaging radial cracks in reactor piping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collins, H.D.; Gribble, R.P.

    1985-04-01

    This paper describes a unique technique (i.e., ''Siamese imaging'') for imaging quasi-vertical defects in reactor pipe weldments. The Siamese image is a bi-symmetrical view of the inner surface defect. Image construction geometry consists of two probes (i.e., source/receiver) operating either from opposite sides or the same side of the defect to be imaged. As the probes are scanned across a lower surface connected defect, they encounter two images - first the normal upright image and then the inverted image. The final integrated image consists of two images connected along their baselines, thus we call it a ''Siamese image.'' The experimental imaging results on simulated and natural cracks in reactor piping weldments graphically illustrate this unique technique. Excellent images of mechanical fatique and thermal cracks were obtained on ferritic and austenitic piping

  16. Three-dimensional motion-picture imaging of dynamic object by parallel-phase-shifting digital holographic microscopy using an inverted magnification optical system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuda, Takahito; Shinomura, Masato; Xia, Peng; Awatsuji, Yasuhiro; Nishio, Kenzo; Matoba, Osamu

    2017-04-01

    We constructed a parallel-phase-shifting digital holographic microscopy (PPSDHM) system using an inverted magnification optical system, and succeeded in three-dimensional (3D) motion-picture imaging for 3D displacement of a microscopic object. In the PPSDHM system, the inverted and afocal magnification optical system consisted of a microscope objective (16.56 mm focal length and 0.25 numerical aperture) and a convex lens (300 mm focal length and 82 mm aperture diameter). A polarization-imaging camera was used to record multiple phase-shifted holograms with a single-shot exposure. We recorded an alum crystal, sinking down in aqueous solution of alum, by the constructed PPSDHM system at 60 frames/s for about 20 s and reconstructed high-quality 3D motion-picture image of the crystal. Then, we calculated amounts of displacement of the crystal from the amounts in the focus plane and the magnifications of the magnification optical system, and obtained the 3D trajectory of the crystal by that amounts.

  17. Prior image constrained image reconstruction in emerging computed tomography applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunner, Stephen T.

    Advances have been made in computed tomography (CT), especially in the past five years, by incorporating prior images into the image reconstruction process. In this dissertation, we investigate prior image constrained image reconstruction in three emerging CT applications: dual-energy CT, multi-energy photon-counting CT, and cone-beam CT in image-guided radiation therapy. First, we investigate the application of Prior Image Constrained Compressed Sensing (PICCS) in dual-energy CT, which has been called "one of the hottest research areas in CT." Phantom and animal studies are conducted using a state-of-the-art 64-slice GE Discovery 750 HD CT scanner to investigate the extent to which PICCS can enable radiation dose reduction in material density and virtual monochromatic imaging. Second, we extend the application of PICCS from dual-energy CT to multi-energy photon-counting CT, which has been called "one of the 12 topics in CT to be critical in the next decade." Numerical simulations are conducted to generate multiple energy bin images for a photon-counting CT acquisition and to investigate the extent to which PICCS can enable radiation dose efficiency improvement. Third, we investigate the performance of a newly proposed prior image constrained scatter correction technique to correct scatter-induced shading artifacts in cone-beam CT, which, when used in image-guided radiation therapy procedures, can assist in patient localization, and potentially, dose verification and adaptive radiation therapy. Phantom studies are conducted using a Varian 2100 EX system with an on-board imager to investigate the extent to which the prior image constrained scatter correction technique can mitigate scatter-induced shading artifacts in cone-beam CT. Results show that these prior image constrained image reconstruction techniques can reduce radiation dose in dual-energy CT by 50% in phantom and animal studies in material density and virtual monochromatic imaging, can lead to radiation

  18. Optimized Quasi-Interpolators for Image Reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sacht, Leonardo; Nehab, Diego

    2015-12-01

    We propose new quasi-interpolators for the continuous reconstruction of sampled images, combining a narrowly supported piecewise-polynomial kernel and an efficient digital filter. In other words, our quasi-interpolators fit within the generalized sampling framework and are straightforward to use. We go against standard practice and optimize for approximation quality over the entire Nyquist range, rather than focusing exclusively on the asymptotic behavior as the sample spacing goes to zero. In contrast to previous work, we jointly optimize with respect to all degrees of freedom available in both the kernel and the digital filter. We consider linear, quadratic, and cubic schemes, offering different tradeoffs between quality and computational cost. Experiments with compounded rotations and translations over a range of input images confirm that, due to the additional degrees of freedom and the more realistic objective function, our new quasi-interpolators perform better than the state of the art, at a similar computational cost.

  19. Digital Double-Pulse Holographic Interferometry for Vibration Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H.J. Tiziani

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available Different arrangements for double-pulsed holographic and speckle interferometry for vibration analysis will be described. Experimental results obtained with films (classical holographic interferometry and CCD cameras (digital holographic interferometry as storage materials are presented. In digital holography, two separate holograms of an object under test are recorded within a few microseconds using a CCD camera and are stored in a frame grabber. The phases of the two reconstructed wave fields are calculated from the complex amplitudes. The deformation is obtained from the phase difference. In the case of electronic speckle pattern interferometry (or image plane hologram, the phase can be calculated by using the sinusoid-fitting method. In the case of digital holographic interferometry, the phase is obtained by digital reconstruction of the complex amplitudes of the wave fronts. Using three directions of illumination and one direction of observation, all the information necessary for the reconstruction of the 3-dimensional deformation vector can be recorded at the same time. Applications of the method for measuring rotating objects are discussed where a derotator needs to be used.

  20. Reconstructions of f(T) gravity from entropy-corrected holographic and new agegraphic dark energy models in power-law and logarithmic versions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saha, Pameli; Debnath, Ujjal [Indian Institute of Engineering Science and Technology, Department of Mathematics, Howrah (India)

    2016-09-15

    Here, we peruse cosmological usage of the most promising candidates of dark energy in the framework of f(T) gravity theory where T represents the torsion scalar teleparallel gravity. We reconstruct the different f(T) modified gravity models in the spatially flat Friedmann-Robertson-Walker universe according to entropy-corrected versions of the holographic and new agegraphic dark energy models in power-law and logarithmic corrections, which describe an accelerated expansion history of the universe. We conclude that the equation of state parameter of the entropy-corrected models can transit from the quintessence state to the phantom regime as indicated by recent observations or can lie entirely in the phantom region. Also, using these models, we investigate the different areas of the stability with the help of the squared speed of sound. (orig.)

  1. Image reconstruction design of industrial CT instrument for teaching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zou Yongning; Cai Yufang

    2009-01-01

    Industrial CT instrument for teaching is applied to teaching and study in field of physics and radiology major, image reconstruction is an important part of software on CT instrument. The paper expatiate on CT physical theory and first generation CT reconstruction algorithm, describe scan process of industrial CT instrument for teaching; analyze image artifact as result of displacement of rotation center, implement method of center displacement correcting, design and complete image reconstruction software, application shows that reconstructed image is very clear and qualitatively high. (authors)

  2. Sparse BLIP: BLind Iterative Parallel imaging reconstruction using compressed sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    She, Huajun; Chen, Rong-Rong; Liang, Dong; DiBella, Edward V R; Ying, Leslie

    2014-02-01

    To develop a sensitivity-based parallel imaging reconstruction method to reconstruct iteratively both the coil sensitivities and MR image simultaneously based on their prior information. Parallel magnetic resonance imaging reconstruction problem can be formulated as a multichannel sampling problem where solutions are sought analytically. However, the channel functions given by the coil sensitivities in parallel imaging are not known exactly and the estimation error usually leads to artifacts. In this study, we propose a new reconstruction algorithm, termed Sparse BLind Iterative Parallel, for blind iterative parallel imaging reconstruction using compressed sensing. The proposed algorithm reconstructs both the sensitivity functions and the image simultaneously from undersampled data. It enforces the sparseness constraint in the image as done in compressed sensing, but is different from compressed sensing in that the sensing matrix is unknown and additional constraint is enforced on the sensitivities as well. Both phantom and in vivo imaging experiments were carried out with retrospective undersampling to evaluate the performance of the proposed method. Experiments show improvement in Sparse BLind Iterative Parallel reconstruction when compared with Sparse SENSE, JSENSE, IRGN-TV, and L1-SPIRiT reconstructions with the same number of measurements. The proposed Sparse BLind Iterative Parallel algorithm reduces the reconstruction errors when compared to the state-of-the-art parallel imaging methods. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Blind compressed sensing image reconstruction based on alternating direction method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qinan; Guo, Shuxu

    2018-04-01

    In order to solve the problem of how to reconstruct the original image under the condition of unknown sparse basis, this paper proposes an image reconstruction method based on blind compressed sensing model. In this model, the image signal is regarded as the product of a sparse coefficient matrix and a dictionary matrix. Based on the existing blind compressed sensing theory, the optimal solution is solved by the alternative minimization method. The proposed method solves the problem that the sparse basis in compressed sensing is difficult to represent, which restrains the noise and improves the quality of reconstructed image. This method ensures that the blind compressed sensing theory has a unique solution and can recover the reconstructed original image signal from a complex environment with a stronger self-adaptability. The experimental results show that the image reconstruction algorithm based on blind compressed sensing proposed in this paper can recover high quality image signals under the condition of under-sampling.

  4. Image reconstruction by domain-transform manifold learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Bo; Liu, Jeremiah Z.; Cauley, Stephen F.; Rosen, Bruce R.; Rosen, Matthew S.

    2018-03-01

    Image reconstruction is essential for imaging applications across the physical and life sciences, including optical and radar systems, magnetic resonance imaging, X-ray computed tomography, positron emission tomography, ultrasound imaging and radio astronomy. During image acquisition, the sensor encodes an intermediate representation of an object in the sensor domain, which is subsequently reconstructed into an image by an inversion of the encoding function. Image reconstruction is challenging because analytic knowledge of the exact inverse transform may not exist a priori, especially in the presence of sensor non-idealities and noise. Thus, the standard reconstruction approach involves approximating the inverse function with multiple ad hoc stages in a signal processing chain, the composition of which depends on the details of each acquisition strategy, and often requires expert parameter tuning to optimize reconstruction performance. Here we present a unified framework for image reconstruction—automated transform by manifold approximation (AUTOMAP)—which recasts image reconstruction as a data-driven supervised learning task that allows a mapping between the sensor and the image domain to emerge from an appropriate corpus of training data. We implement AUTOMAP with a deep neural network and exhibit its flexibility in learning reconstruction transforms for various magnetic resonance imaging acquisition strategies, using the same network architecture and hyperparameters. We further demonstrate that manifold learning during training results in sparse representations of domain transforms along low-dimensional data manifolds, and observe superior immunity to noise and a reduction in reconstruction artefacts compared with conventional handcrafted reconstruction methods. In addition to improving the reconstruction performance of existing acquisition methodologies, we anticipate that AUTOMAP and other learned reconstruction approaches will accelerate the development

  5. Holographic memories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ramanujam, P.S.; Berg, R.H.; Hvilsted, Søren

    1999-01-01

    A Two-dimensional holographic memory for archival storage is described. Assuming a coherent transfer function, an A4 page can be stored at high resolution in an area of 1 mm(2). Recently developed side-chain liquid crystalline azobenzene polyesters are found to be suitable media for holographic...

  6. A fast image reconstruction technique based on ART

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Shunli; Zhang Dinghua; Wang Kai; Huang Kuidong; Li Weibin

    2007-01-01

    Algebraic Reconstruction Technique (ART) is an iterative method for image reconstruction. Improving its reconstruction speed has been one of the important researching aspects of ART. For the simplified weight coefficients reconstruction model of ART, a fast grid traverse algorithm is proposed, which can determine the grid index by simple operations such as addition, subtraction and comparison. Since the weight coefficients are calculated at real time during iteration, large amount of storage is saved and the reconstruction speed is greatly increased. Experimental results show that the new algorithm is very effective and the reconstruction speed is improved about 10 times compared with the traditional algorithm. (authors)

  7. Photogrammetric 3D reconstruction using mobile imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritsch, Dieter; Syll, Miguel

    2015-03-01

    In our paper we demonstrate the development of an Android Application (AndroidSfM) for photogrammetric 3D reconstruction that works on smartphones and tablets likewise. The photos are taken with mobile devices, and can thereafter directly be calibrated using standard calibration algorithms of photogrammetry and computer vision, on that device. Due to still limited computing resources on mobile devices, a client-server handshake using Dropbox transfers the photos to the sever to run AndroidSfM for the pose estimation of all photos by Structure-from-Motion and, thereafter, uses the oriented bunch of photos for dense point cloud estimation by dense image matching algorithms. The result is transferred back to the mobile device for visualization and ad-hoc on-screen measurements.

  8. Reconstruction from gamma radiography and ultrasonic images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gautier, S.; Lavayssiere, B.; Idier, J.; Mohammad-Djafari, A.

    1998-02-01

    This work deals with the three-dimensional reconstruction from gamma radiographic and ultrasonic images. Such an issue belongs to the field of data fusion since the data provide complementary information. The two sets of data are independently related to two sets of parameters: gamma ray attenuation and ultrasonic reflectivity. The fusion problem is addressed in a Bayesian framework; the kingpin of the task is then to define a joint a priori model for both attenuation and reflectivity. Thus, the developing of this model and the entailed joint estimation constitute the principal contribution of this work. The results of real data treatments demonstrate the validity of this method as compared to a sequential approach of the two sets of data

  9. Problems on holographic imaging technique and adapt lasers for bubble chambers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bjelkhagen, H.

    1982-01-01

    Different types of holographic recording technique for bubble chambers are presented and compared. The influence of turbulence on resolution is discussed as well as the demand on laser equipment. Experiments on a test model of HOLEBC using a pulsed ruby laser are also presented. (orig.)

  10. Holographic kinetic k-essence model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cruz, Norman [Departamento de Fisica, Facultad de Ciencia, Universidad de Santiago de Chile, Casilla 307, Santiago (Chile)], E-mail: ncruz@lauca.usach.cl; Gonzalez-Diaz, Pedro F.; Rozas-Fernandez, Alberto [Colina de los Chopos, Instituto de Fisica Fundamental, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, Serrano 121, 28006 Madrid (Spain)], E-mail: a.rozas@cfmac.csic.es; Sanchez, Guillermo [Departamento de Matematica y Ciencia de la Computacion, Facultad de Ciencia, Universidad de Santiago de Chile, Casilla 307, Santiago (Chile)], E-mail: gsanchez@usach.cl

    2009-08-31

    We consider a connection between the holographic dark energy density and the kinetic k-essence energy density in a flat FRW universe. With the choice c{>=}1, the holographic dark energy can be described by a kinetic k-essence scalar field in a certain way. In this Letter we show this kinetic k-essential description of the holographic dark energy with c{>=}1 and reconstruct the kinetic k-essence function F(X)

  11. Model-Based Reconstructive Elasticity Imaging Using Ultrasound

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salavat R. Aglyamov

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Elasticity imaging is a reconstructive imaging technique where tissue motion in response to mechanical excitation is measured using modern imaging systems, and the estimated displacements are then used to reconstruct the spatial distribution of Young's modulus. Here we present an ultrasound elasticity imaging method that utilizes the model-based technique for Young's modulus reconstruction. Based on the geometry of the imaged object, only one axial component of the strain tensor is used. The numerical implementation of the method is highly efficient because the reconstruction is based on an analytic solution of the forward elastic problem. The model-based approach is illustrated using two potential clinical applications: differentiation of liver hemangioma and staging of deep venous thrombosis. Overall, these studies demonstrate that model-based reconstructive elasticity imaging can be used in applications where the geometry of the object and the surrounding tissue is somewhat known and certain assumptions about the pathology can be made.

  12. An efficient algorithm for MR image reconstruction and compression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Hang; Rosenfeld, D.; Braun, M.; Yan, Hong

    1992-01-01

    In magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), the original data are sampled in the spatial frequency domain. The sampled data thus constitute a set of discrete Fourier transform (DFT) coefficients. The image is usually reconstructed by taking inverse DFT. The image data may then be efficiently compressed using the discrete cosine transform (DCT). A method of using DCT to treat the sampled data is presented which combines two procedures, image reconstruction and data compression. This method may be particularly useful in medical picture archiving and communication systems where both image reconstruction and compression are important issues. 11 refs., 3 figs

  13. TREE STEM RECONSTRUCTION USING VERTICAL FISHEYE IMAGES: A PRELIMINARY STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Berveglieri

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available A preliminary study was conducted to assess a tree stem reconstruction technique with panoramic images taken with fisheye lenses. The concept is similar to the Structure from Motion (SfM technique, but the acquisition and data preparation rely on fisheye cameras to generate a vertical image sequence with height variations of the camera station. Each vertical image is rectified to four vertical planes, producing horizontal lateral views. The stems in the lateral view are rectified to the same scale in the image sequence to facilitate image matching. Using bundle adjustment, the stems are reconstructed, enabling later measurement and extraction of several attributes. The 3D reconstruction was performed with the proposed technique and compared with SfM. The preliminary results showed that the stems were correctly reconstructed by using the lateral virtual images generated from the vertical fisheye images and with the advantage of using fewer images and taken from one single station.

  14. Superiority of CT imaging reconstruction on Linux OS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin Shaochun; Yan Xufeng; Wu Tengfang; Luo Xiaomei; Cai Huasong

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To compare the speed of CT reconstruction using the Linux and Windows OS. Methods: Shepp-Logan head phantom in different pixel size was projected to obtain the sinogram by using the inverse Fourier transformation, filtered back projection and Radon transformation on both Linux and Windows OS. Results: CT image reconstruction using the Linux operating system was significantly better and more efficient than Windows. Conclusion: CT image reconstruction using the Linux operating system is more efficient. (authors)

  15. 3D Reconstruction of NMR Images by LabVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter IZAK

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper introduces the experiment of 3D reconstruction NMR images via virtual instrumentation - LabVIEW. The main idea is based on marching cubes algorithm and image processing implemented by module of Vision assistant. The two dimensional images shot by the magnetic resonance device provide information about the surface properties of human body. There is implemented algorithm which can be used for 3D reconstruction of magnetic resonance images in biomedical application.

  16. Reconstruction of Optical Thickness from Hoffman Modulation Contrast Images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Niels Holm; Sporring, Jon; Nielsen, Mads

    2003-01-01

    Hoffman microscopy imaging systems are part of numerous fertility clinics world-wide. We discuss the physics of the Hoffman imaging system from optical thickness to image intensity, implement a simple, yet fast, reconstruction algorithm using Fast Fourier Transformation and discuss the usability...... of the method on a number of cells from a human embryo. Novelty is identifying the non-linearity of a typical Hoffman imaging system, and the application of Fourier Transformation to reconstruct the optical thickness....

  17. High resolution x-ray lensless imaging by differential holographic encoding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, D.; Guizar-Sicairos, M.; Wu, B.; Scherz, A.; Acremann, Y.; Tylisczcak, T.; Fischer, P.; Friedenberger, N.; Ollefs, K.; Farle, M.; Fienup, J. R.; Stohr, J.

    2009-11-02

    X-ray free electron lasers (X-FEL{sub s}) will soon offer femtosecond pulses of laterally coherent x-rays with sufficient intensity to record single-shot coherent scattering patterns for nanoscale imaging. Pulse trains created by splitand-delay techniques even open the door for cinematography on unprecedented nanometer length and femtosecond time scales. A key to real space ultrafast motion pictures is fast and reliable inversion of the recorded reciprocal space scattering patterns. Here we for the first time demonstrate in the x-ray regime the power of a novel technique for lensless high resolution imaging, previously suggested by Guizar-Sicairos and Fienup termed holography with extended reference by autocorrelation linear differential operation, HERALD0. We have achieved superior resolution over conventional x-ray Fourier transform holography (FTH) without sacrifices in SNR or significant increase in algorithmic complexity. By combining images obtained from individual sharp features on an extended reference, we further show that the resolution can be even extended beyond the reference fabrication limits. Direct comparison to iterative phase retrieval image reconstruction and images recorded with stateof- the-art zone plate microscopes is presented. Our results demonstrate the power of HERALDO as a favorable candidate for robust inversion of single-shot coherent scattering patterns.

  18. High-Resolution X-Ray Lensless Imaging by Differential Holographic Encoding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Diling [Stanford Univ., CA (United States). Dept. of Applied Physics; SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States). Stanford Inst. for Material and Energy Science; Guizar-Sicairos, Manuel [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Inst. of Optics; Wu, Benny [Stanford Univ., CA (United States). Dept. of Applied Physics; SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States). Stanford Inst. for Material and Energy Science; Scherz, Andreas [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States). Stanford Inst. for Material and Energy Science; Acremann, Yves [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States). Photon Ultrafast Laser Science and Engineering Inst. (PULSE); Tyliszczak, Tolek [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Advanced Light Source (ALS); Fischer, Peter [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Center for X-ray Optics; Friedenberger, Nina [Universitat Duisburg-Essen (Germany). Dept. of Physics and Center for Nanointegration Duisburg-Essen (CeNIDE); Ollefs, Katharina [Universitat Duisburg-Essen (Germany). Dept. of Physics and Center for Nanointegration Duisburg-Essen (CeNIDE); Farle, Michael [Universitat Duisburg-Essen (Germany). Dept. of Physics and Center for Nanointegration Duisburg-Essen (CeNIDE); Fienup, James R. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Inst. of Optics; Stöhr, Joachim [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States). Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS)

    2010-07-01

    X-ray free electron lasers (X-FELs) will soon offer femtosecond pulses of laterally coherent x-rays with sufficient intensity to record single-shot coherent scattering patterns for nanoscale imaging. Pulse trains created by split and- delay techniques even open the door for cinematography on unprecedented nanometer length and femtosecond time scales. A key to real space ultrafast motion pictures is fast and reliable inversion of the recorded reciprocal space scattering patterns. Here we for the first time demonstrate in the x-ray regime the power of a novel technique for lensless high resolution imaging, previously suggested by Guizar-Sicairos and Fienup termed holography with extended reference by autocorrelation linear differential operation, HERALD0. We have achieved superior resolution over conventional x-ray Fourier transform holography (FTH) without sacrifices in SNR or significant increase in algorithmic complexity. By combining images obtained from individual sharp features on an extended reference, we further show that the resolution can be even extended beyond the reference fabrication limits. Direct comparison to iterative phase retrieval image reconstruction and images recorded with state of-the-art zone plate microscopes is presented. Our results demonstrate the power of HERALDO as a favorable candidate for robust inversion of single-shot coherent scattering patterns.

  19. 3D reconstruction based on light field images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dong; Wu, Chunhong; Liu, Yunluo; Fu, Dongmei

    2018-04-01

    This paper proposed a method of reconstructing three-dimensional (3D) scene from two light field images capture by Lytro illium. The work was carried out by first extracting the sub-aperture images from light field images and using the scale-invariant feature transform (SIFT) for feature registration on the selected sub-aperture images. Structure from motion (SFM) algorithm is further used on the registration completed sub-aperture images to reconstruct the three-dimensional scene. 3D sparse point cloud was obtained in the end. The method shows that the 3D reconstruction can be implemented by only two light field camera captures, rather than at least a dozen times captures by traditional cameras. This can effectively solve the time-consuming, laborious issues for 3D reconstruction based on traditional digital cameras, to achieve a more rapid, convenient and accurate reconstruction.

  20. The infrared imaging spectrograph (IRIS) for TMT: volume phase holographic grating performance testing and discussion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shaojie; Meyer, Elliot; Wright, Shelley A.; Moore, Anna M.; Larkin, James E.; Maire, Jerome; Mieda, Etsuko; Simard, Luc

    2014-07-01

    Maximizing the grating efficiency is a key goal for the first light instrument IRIS (Infrared Imaging Spectrograph) currently being designed to sample the diffraction limit of the TMT (Thirty Meter Telescope). Volume Phase Holographic (VPH) gratings have been shown to offer extremely high efficiencies that approach 100% for high line frequencies (i.e., 600 to 6000l/mm), which has been applicable for astronomical optical spectrographs. However, VPH gratings have been less exploited in the near-infrared, particularly for gratings that have lower line frequencies. Given their potential to offer high throughputs and low scattered light, VPH gratings are being explored for IRIS as a potential dispersing element in the spectrograph. Our team has procured near-infrared gratings from two separate vendors. We have two gratings with the specifications needed for IRIS current design: 1.51-1.82μm (H-band) to produce a spectral resolution of 4000 and 1.19-1.37μm (J-band) to produce a spectral resolution of 8000. The center wavelengths for each grating are 1.629μm and 1.27μm, and the groove densities are 177l/mm and 440l/mm for H-band R=4000 and J-band R=8000, respectively. We directly measure the efficiencies in the lab and find that the peak efficiencies of these two types of gratings are quite good with a peak efficiency of ~88% at the Bragg angle in both TM and TE modes at H-band, and 90.23% in TM mode, 79.91% in TE mode at J-band for the best vendor. We determine the drop in efficiency off the Bragg angle, with a 20-23% decrease in efficiency at H-band when 2.5° deviation from the Bragg angle, and 25%-28% decrease at J-band when 5° deviation from the Bragg angle.

  1. Reconstructed Image Spatial Resolution of Multiple Coincidences Compton Imager

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreyev, Andriy; Sitek, Arkadiusz; Celler, Anna

    2010-02-01

    We study the multiple coincidences Compton imager (MCCI) which is based on a simultaneous acquisition of several photons emitted in cascade from a single nuclear decay. Theoretically, this technique should provide a major improvement in localization of a single radioactive source as compared to a standard Compton camera. In this work, we investigated the performance and limitations of MCCI using Monte Carlo computer simulations. Spatial resolutions of the reconstructed point source have been studied as a function of the MCCI parameters, including geometrical dimensions and detector characteristics such as materials, energy and spatial resolutions.

  2. Low dose reconstruction algorithm for differential phase contrast imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhentian; Huang, Zhifeng; Zhang, Li; Chen, Zhiqiang; Kang, Kejun; Yin, Hongxia; Wang, Zhenchang; Marco, Stampanoni

    2011-01-01

    Differential phase contrast imaging computed tomography (DPCI-CT) is a novel x-ray inspection method to reconstruct the distribution of refraction index rather than the attenuation coefficient in weakly absorbing samples. In this paper, we propose an iterative reconstruction algorithm for DPCI-CT which benefits from the new compressed sensing theory. We first realize a differential algebraic reconstruction technique (DART) by discretizing the projection process of the differential phase contrast imaging into a linear partial derivative matrix. In this way the compressed sensing reconstruction problem of DPCI reconstruction can be transformed to a resolved problem in the transmission imaging CT. Our algorithm has the potential to reconstruct the refraction index distribution of the sample from highly undersampled projection data. Thus it can significantly reduce the dose and inspection time. The proposed algorithm has been validated by numerical simulations and actual experiments.

  3. Longitudinal and transverse digital image reconstruction with a tomographic scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pickens, D.R.; Price, R.R.; Erickson, J.J.; Patton, J.A.; Partain, C.L.; Rollo, F.D.

    1981-01-01

    A Siemens Gammasonics PHO/CON-192 Multiplane Imager is interfaced to a digital computer for the purpose of performing tomographic reconstructions from the data collected during a single scan. Data from the two moving gamma cameras as well as camera position information are sent to the computer by an interface designed in the authors' laboratory. Backprojection reconstruction is implemented by the computer. Longitudinal images in whole-body format as well as smaller formats are reconstructed for up to six planes simultaneously from the list mode data. Transverse reconstructions are demonstrated for 201 T1 myocardial scans. Post-reconstruction deconvolution processing to remove the blur artifact (characteristic of focal plane tomography) is applied to a multiplane phantom. Digital data acquisition of data and reconstruction of images are practical, and can extend the usefulness of the machine when compared with the film output (author)

  4. Gadgetron: An Open Source Framework for Medical Image Reconstruction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Michael Schacht; Sørensen, Thomas Sangild

    2013-01-01

    This work presents a new open source framework for medical image reconstruction called the “Gadgetron.” The framework implements a flexible system for creating streaming data processing pipelines where data pass through a series of modules or “Gadgets” from raw data to reconstructed images...... with a set of dedicated toolboxes in shared libraries for medical image reconstruction. This includes generic toolboxes for data-parallel (e.g., GPU-based) execution of compute-intensive components. The basic framework architecture is independent of medical imaging modality, but this article focuses on its...

  5. Examining live cell cultures during apoptosis by digital holographic phase imaging and Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khmaladze, Alexander

    2017-11-01

    Cellular apoptosis is a unique, organized series of events, leading to programmed cell death. In this work, we present a combined digital holography/Raman spectroscopy technique to study live cell cultures during apoptosis. Digital holographic microscopy measurements of live cell cultures yield information about cell shape and volume, changes to which are indicative of alterations in cell cycle and initiation of cell death mechanisms. Raman spectroscopic measurements provide complementary information about cells, such as protein, lipid and nucleic acid content, and the spectral signatures associated with structural changes in molecules. Our work indicates that the chemical changes in proteins, which were detected by Raman measurements, preceded morphological changes, which were seen with digital holographic microscopy.

  6. Image plane digital holographic microscope for the inspection of ferroelectric single crystals.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Psota, Pavel; Mokrý, Pavel; Lédl, Vít; Vojtíšek, Petr

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 55, č. 12 (2016), č. článku 121731. ISSN 0091-3286 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-32228S Institutional support: RVO:61389021 Keywords : Digital holography * barium titanate * domain pattern * ferroelectric crystals * holographic microscopy Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering Impact factor: 1.082, year: 2016 http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/1.OE.55.12.121731

  7. High resolution imaging of particle interactions in a large bubble chamber using holographic techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akbari, Homaira.

    1988-01-01

    Particle interactions were recorded holographically in a large volume of the 15-foot Bubble Chamber at Fermilab. This cryogenic bubble chamber was filled with a heavy Neon-Hydrogen mixture and was exposed to a wideband neutrino beam with mean energy of 150 GeV. The use of holography in combination with conventional photography provides a powerful tool for direct detection of short-lived particles. Holography gives a high resolution over a large depth of field which can not be achieved with conventional photography. A high-power pulsed ruby laser was used as the holographic light source. Since short pulses of some 50 ns duration at the required energy were found to give rise to boiling during the chamber's expansion, a reduction of the instantaneous power at a given energy was required to suppress this unwanted after-effect. This was achieved by developing a unique technique for stretching the pulses using an electro-optic feedback loop. One hundred thousand holograms were produced during a wide-band neutrino experiment (E-632, 1985) using a dark-field holographic system. Analysis of a sample of holograms shows a resolution of 150 μm was achieved in an ovoidal shape fiducial volume of 0.48 m 3 % of the 14 m 3 total fiducial volume of the chamber

  8. Resolution enhancement of holographic printer using a hogel overlapping method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Keehoon; Park, Soon-gi; Yeom, Jiwoon; Kim, Jonghyun; Chen, Ni; Pyun, Kyungsuk; Choi, Chilsung; Kim, Sunil; An, Jungkwuen; Lee, Hong-Seok; Chung, U-in; Lee, Byoungho

    2013-06-17

    We propose a hogel overlapping method for the holographic printer to enhance the lateral resolution of holographic stereograms. The hogel size is directly related to the lateral resolution of the holographic stereogram. Our analysis by computer simulation shows that there is a limit to decreasing the hogel size while printing holographic stereograms. Instead of reducing the size of hogel, the lateral resolution of holographic stereograms can be enhanced by printing overlapped hogels, which makes it possible to take advantage of multiplexing property of the volume hologram. We built a holographic printer, and recorded two holographic stereograms using the conventional and proposed overlapping methods. The images and movies of the holographic stereograms experimentally captured were compared between the conventional and proposed methods. The experimental results confirm that the proposed hogel overlapping method improves the lateral resolution of holographic stereograms compared to the conventional holographic printing method.

  9. Reconstruction CT imaging of the hypopharynx and the larynx

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okuno, Tetsuji; Fujimura, Akiko; Murakami, Yasushi; Shiga, Hayao

    1986-01-01

    The multiplanar reconstruction CT imaging of the hypopharynx and the larynx was performed on a total of 20 cases: 8 with laryngeal carcinomas, 6 with hypopharyngeal carcinomas, 4 with vocal cord paralyses due to various causes, 1 with laryngeal amyloidosis, 1 with inflammatory granuloma of the hypopharynx. Coronal, segittal, and parasagittal reconstruction images were obtained from either 1 or 2 mm overlapping axial scans with 4 or 5 mm slice thickness (3 cases) using 5 sec scan times during queit breathing. In 15 cases with coronal reconstruction imaging, the anatomical derangements of the laryngopharyngeal structures especially along the undersurface of the true vocal cord to the false cord level, the lateral wall of the pyriform sinus, and the paraglottic space were demonstrated more clearly than the axial CT imaging. In 5 cases with sagittal reconstruction imaging, the vertical extension of the lesions through the anterior commisure was more clearly depicted than the axial CT imaging. In 8 cases with parasagittal reconstruction imaging, which is along the vocal fold or across the aryepiglottic fold, pathological changes along the aryepiglottic fold, the arytenoid-corniculate cartilage complex, and the tip of the pyriform sinus were more clearly demonstrated than the axial CT imaging. In determining the feasibility of conservation surgery of the larynx and the hypopharynx, reconstruction CT imaging is recommended as the diagnostic procedure of a choice, which would supplement the findings of the routine axial CT imaging. (author)

  10. Ultra-Fast Image Reconstruction of Tomosynthesis Mammography Using GPU.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arefan, D; Talebpour, A; Ahmadinejhad, N; Kamali Asl, A

    2015-06-01

    Digital Breast Tomosynthesis (DBT) is a technology that creates three dimensional (3D) images of breast tissue. Tomosynthesis mammography detects lesions that are not detectable with other imaging systems. If image reconstruction time is in the order of seconds, we can use Tomosynthesis systems to perform Tomosynthesis-guided Interventional procedures. This research has been designed to study ultra-fast image reconstruction technique for Tomosynthesis Mammography systems using Graphics Processing Unit (GPU). At first, projections of Tomosynthesis mammography have been simulated. In order to produce Tomosynthesis projections, it has been designed a 3D breast phantom from empirical data. It is based on MRI data in its natural form. Then, projections have been created from 3D breast phantom. The image reconstruction algorithm based on FBP was programmed with C++ language in two methods using central processing unit (CPU) card and the Graphics Processing Unit (GPU). It calculated the time of image reconstruction in two kinds of programming (using CPU and GPU).

  11. Quantitative phase-digital holographic microscopy: a new imaging modality to identify original cellular biomarkers of diseases

    KAUST Repository

    Marquet, P.

    2016-05-03

    Quantitative phase microscopy (QPM) has recently emerged as a powerful label-free technique in the field of living cell imaging allowing to non-invasively measure with a nanometric axial sensitivity cell structure and dynamics. Since the phase retardation of a light wave when transmitted through the observed cells, namely the quantitative phase signal (QPS), is sensitive to both cellular thickness and intracellular refractive index related to the cellular content, its accurate analysis allows to derive various cell parameters and monitor specific cell processes, which are very likely to identify new cell biomarkers. Specifically, quantitative phase-digital holographic microscopy (QP-DHM), thanks to its numerical flexibility facilitating parallelization and automation processes, represents an appealing imaging modality to both identify original cellular biomarkers of diseases as well to explore the underlying pathophysiological processes.

  12. The holographic universe

    CERN Document Server

    Talbot, Michael

    1991-01-01

    'There is evidence to suggest that our world and everything in it - from snowflakes to maple trees to falling stars and spinning electrons - are only ghostly images, projections from a level of reality literally beyond both space and time.' This is the astonishing idea behind the holographic theory of the universe, pioneered by two eminent thinkers: physicist David Bohm, a former protege of Albert Einstein, and quantum physicist Karl Pribram. The holographic theory of the universe encompasses consciousness and reality as we know them, but can also explain such hitherto unexplained phenomena as telepathy, out-of-body experiences and even miraculous healing. In this remarkable book, Michael Talbot reveals the extraordinary depth and power of the holographic theory of the universe, illustrating how it makes sense of the entire range of experiences within our universe - and in other universes beyond our own.

  13. Optimization of the alpha image reconstruction. An iterative CT-image reconstruction with well-defined image quality metrics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lebedev, Sergej; Sawall, Stefan; Knaup, Michael; Kachelriess, Marc

    2017-01-01

    Optimization of the AIR-algorithm for improved convergence and performance. TThe AIR method is an iterative algorithm for CT image reconstruction. As a result of its linearity with respect to the basis images, the AIR algorithm possesses well defined, regular image quality metrics, e.g. point spread function (PSF) or modulation transfer function (MTF), unlike other iterative reconstruction algorithms. The AIR algorithm computes weighting images α to blend between a set of basis images that preferably have mutually exclusive properties, e.g. high spatial resolution or low noise. The optimized algorithm uses an approach that alternates between the optimization of rawdata fidelity using an OSSART like update and regularization using gradient descent, as opposed to the initially proposed AIR using a straightforward gradient descent implementation. A regularization strength for a given task is chosen by formulating a requirement for the noise reduction and checking whether it is fulfilled for different regularization strengths, while monitoring the spatial resolution using the voxel-wise defined modulation transfer function for the AIR image. The optimized algorithm computes similar images in a shorter time compared to the initial gradient descent implementation of AIR. The result can be influenced by multiple parameters that can be narrowed down to a relatively simple framework to compute high quality images. The AIR images, for instance, can have at least a 50% lower noise level compared to the sharpest basis image, while the spatial resolution is mostly maintained. The optimization improves performance by a factor of 6, while maintaining image quality. Furthermore, it was demonstrated that the spatial resolution for AIR can be determined using regular image quality metrics, given smooth weighting images. This is not possible for other iterative reconstructions as a result of their non linearity. A simple set of parameters for the algorithm is discussed that provides

  14. Optimization of the alpha image reconstruction. An iterative CT-image reconstruction with well-defined image quality metrics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lebedev, Sergej; Sawall, Stefan; Knaup, Michael; Kachelriess, Marc [German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg (Germany).

    2017-10-01

    Optimization of the AIR-algorithm for improved convergence and performance. TThe AIR method is an iterative algorithm for CT image reconstruction. As a result of its linearity with respect to the basis images, the AIR algorithm possesses well defined, regular image quality metrics, e.g. point spread function (PSF) or modulation transfer function (MTF), unlike other iterative reconstruction algorithms. The AIR algorithm computes weighting images α to blend between a set of basis images that preferably have mutually exclusive properties, e.g. high spatial resolution or low noise. The optimized algorithm uses an approach that alternates between the optimization of rawdata fidelity using an OSSART like update and regularization using gradient descent, as opposed to the initially proposed AIR using a straightforward gradient descent implementation. A regularization strength for a given task is chosen by formulating a requirement for the noise reduction and checking whether it is fulfilled for different regularization strengths, while monitoring the spatial resolution using the voxel-wise defined modulation transfer function for the AIR image. The optimized algorithm computes similar images in a shorter time compared to the initial gradient descent implementation of AIR. The result can be influenced by multiple parameters that can be narrowed down to a relatively simple framework to compute high quality images. The AIR images, for instance, can have at least a 50% lower noise level compared to the sharpest basis image, while the spatial resolution is mostly maintained. The optimization improves performance by a factor of 6, while maintaining image quality. Furthermore, it was demonstrated that the spatial resolution for AIR can be determined using regular image quality metrics, given smooth weighting images. This is not possible for other iterative reconstructions as a result of their non linearity. A simple set of parameters for the algorithm is discussed that provides

  15. Reconstruction of a ring applicator using CT imaging: impact of the reconstruction method and applicator orientation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hellebust, Taran Paulsen; Tanderup, Kari; Bergstrand, Eva Stabell

    2007-01-01

    in multiplanar reconstructed images (MPR) and (3) library plans, using pre-defined applicator geometry (LIB). The doses to the lead pellets were calculated. The relative standard deviation (SD) for all reconstruction methods was less than 3.7% in the dose points. The relative SD for the LIB method...

  16. Fine Metal Mask 3-Dimensional Measurement by using Scanning Digital Holographic Microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Sanghoon; Yu, Younghun

    2018-04-01

    For three-dimensional microscopy, fast and high axial resolution are very important. Extending the depth of field for digital holographic is necessary for three-dimensional measurements of thick samples. We propose an optical sectioning method for optical scanning digital holography that is performed in the frequency domain by spatial filtering of a reconstructed amplitude image. We established a scanning dual-wavelength off-axis digital holographic microscope to measure samples that exhibit a large amount of coherent noise and a thickness larger than the depth of focus of the objective lens. As a demonstration, we performed a three-dimensional measurement of a fine metal mask with a reconstructed sectional phase image and filtering with a reconstructed amplitude image.

  17. Simbol-X Formation Flight and Image Reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Civitani, M.; Djalal, S.; Le Duigou, J. M.; La Marle, O.; Chipaux, R.

    2009-05-01

    Simbol-X is the first operational mission relying on two satellites flying in formation. The dynamics of the telescope, due to the formation flight concept, raises a variety of problematic, like image reconstruction, that can be better evaluated via a simulation tools. We present here the first results obtained with Simulos, simulation tool aimed to study the relative spacecrafts navigation and the weight of the different parameters in image reconstruction and telescope performance evaluation. The simulation relies on attitude and formation flight sensors models, formation flight dynamics and control, mirror model and focal plane model, while the image reconstruction is based on the Line of Sight (LOS) concept.

  18. Radionuclide imaging with coded apertures and three-dimensional image reconstruction from focal-plane tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, L.T.

    1976-05-01

    Two techniques for radionuclide imaging and reconstruction have been studied;; both are used for improvement of depth resolution. The first technique is called coded aperture imaging, which is a technique of tomographic imaging. The second technique is a special 3-D image reconstruction method which is introduced as an improvement to the so called focal-plane tomography

  19. Simultaneous maximum a posteriori longitudinal PET image reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Sam; Reader, Andrew J.

    2017-09-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is frequently used to monitor functional changes that occur over extended time scales, for example in longitudinal oncology PET protocols that include routine clinical follow-up scans to assess the efficacy of a course of treatment. In these contexts PET datasets are currently reconstructed into images using single-dataset reconstruction methods. Inspired by recently proposed joint PET-MR reconstruction methods, we propose to reconstruct longitudinal datasets simultaneously by using a joint penalty term in order to exploit the high degree of similarity between longitudinal images. We achieved this by penalising voxel-wise differences between pairs of longitudinal PET images in a one-step-late maximum a posteriori (MAP) fashion, resulting in the MAP simultaneous longitudinal reconstruction (SLR) method. The proposed method reduced reconstruction errors and visually improved images relative to standard maximum likelihood expectation-maximisation (ML-EM) in simulated 2D longitudinal brain tumour scans. In reconstructions of split real 3D data with inserted simulated tumours, noise across images reconstructed with MAP-SLR was reduced to levels equivalent to doubling the number of detected counts when using ML-EM. Furthermore, quantification of tumour activities was largely preserved over a variety of longitudinal tumour changes, including changes in size and activity, with larger changes inducing larger biases relative to standard ML-EM reconstructions. Similar improvements were observed for a range of counts levels, demonstrating the robustness of the method when used with a single penalty strength. The results suggest that longitudinal regularisation is a simple but effective method of improving reconstructed PET images without using resolution degrading priors.

  20. Simple and fast spectral domain algorithm for quantitative phase imaging of living cells with digital holographic microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Junwei; Yao, Baoli; Ketelhut, Steffi; Kemper, Björn

    2017-02-01

    The modular combination of optical microscopes with digital holographic microscopy (DHM) has been proven to be a powerful tool for quantitative live cell imaging. The introduction of condenser and different microscope objectives (MO) simplifies the usage of the technique and makes it easier to measure different kinds of specimens with different magnifications. However, the high flexibility of illumination and imaging also causes variable phase aberrations that need to be eliminated for high resolution quantitative phase imaging. The existent phase aberrations compensation methods either require add additional elements into the reference arm or need specimen free reference areas or separate reference holograms to build up suitable digital phase masks. These inherent requirements make them unpractical for usage with highly variable illumination and imaging systems and prevent on-line monitoring of living cells. In this paper, we present a simple numerical method for phase aberration compensation based on the analysis of holograms in spatial frequency domain with capabilities for on-line quantitative phase imaging. From a single shot off-axis hologram, the whole phase aberration can be eliminated automatically without numerical fitting or pre-knowledge of the setup. The capabilities and robustness for quantitative phase imaging of living cancer cells are demonstrated.

  1. Design and calibration of a digital Fourier holographic microscope for particle sizing via goniometry and optical scatter imaging in transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Vincent M; Jacques, Steven L

    2016-06-13

    Goniometry and optical scatter imaging have been used for optical determination of particle size based upon optical scattering. Polystyrene microspheres in suspension serve as a standard for system validation purposes. The design and calibration of a digital Fourier holographic microscope (DFHM) are reported. Of crucial importance is the appropriate scaling of scattering angle space in the conjugate Fourier plane. A detailed description of this calibration process is described. Spatial filtering of the acquired digital hologram to use photons scattered within a restricted angular range produces an image. A pair of images, one using photons narrowly scattered within 8 - 15° (LNA), and one using photons broadly scattered within 8 - 39° (HNA), are produced. An image based on the ratio of these two images, OSIR = HNA/LNA, following Boustany et al. (2002), yields a 2D Optical Scatter Image (OSI) whose contrast is based on the angular dependence of photon scattering and is sensitive to the microsphere size, especially in the 0.5-1.0µm range. Goniometric results are also given for polystyrene microspheres in suspension as additional proof of principle for particle sizing via the DFHM.

  2. Surface Reconstruction and Image Enhancement via $L^1$-Minimization

    KAUST Repository

    Dobrev, Veselin

    2010-01-01

    A surface reconstruction technique based on minimization of the total variation of the gradient is introduced. Convergence of the method is established, and an interior-point algorithm solving the associated linear programming problem is introduced. The reconstruction algorithm is illustrated on various test cases including natural and urban terrain data, and enhancement oflow-resolution or aliased images. Copyright © by SIAM.

  3. Sparsity-based multi-height phase recovery in holographic microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivenson, Yair; Wu, Yichen; Wang, Hongda; Zhang, Yibo; Feizi, Alborz; Ozcan, Aydogan

    2016-11-01

    High-resolution imaging of densely connected samples such as pathology slides using digital in-line holographic microscopy requires the acquisition of several holograms, e.g., at >6-8 different sample-to-sensor distances, to achieve robust phase recovery and coherent imaging of specimen. Reducing the number of these holographic measurements would normally result in reconstruction artifacts and loss of image quality, which would be detrimental especially for biomedical and diagnostics-related applications. Inspired by the fact that most natural images are sparse in some domain, here we introduce a sparsity-based phase reconstruction technique implemented in wavelet domain to achieve at least 2-fold reduction in the number of holographic measurements for coherent imaging of densely connected samples with minimal impact on the reconstructed image quality, quantified using a structural similarity index. We demonstrated the success of this approach by imaging Papanicolaou smears and breast cancer tissue slides over a large field-of-view of ~20 mm2 using 2 in-line holograms that are acquired at different sample-to-sensor distances and processed using sparsity-based multi-height phase recovery. This new phase recovery approach that makes use of sparsity can also be extended to other coherent imaging schemes, involving e.g., multiple illumination angles or wavelengths to increase the throughput and speed of coherent imaging.

  4. Sparsity-based multi-height phase recovery in holographic microscopy

    KAUST Repository

    Rivenson, Yair

    2016-11-30

    High-resolution imaging of densely connected samples such as pathology slides using digital in-line holographic microscopy requires the acquisition of several holograms, e.g., at >6–8 different sample-to-sensor distances, to achieve robust phase recovery and coherent imaging of specimen. Reducing the number of these holographic measurements would normally result in reconstruction artifacts and loss of image quality, which would be detrimental especially for biomedical and diagnostics-related applications. Inspired by the fact that most natural images are sparse in some domain, here we introduce a sparsity-based phase reconstruction technique implemented in wavelet domain to achieve at least 2-fold reduction in the number of holographic measurements for coherent imaging of densely connected samples with minimal impact on the reconstructed image quality, quantified using a structural similarity index. We demonstrated the success of this approach by imaging Papanicolaou smears and breast cancer tissue slides over a large field-of-view of ~20 mm2 using 2 in-line holograms that are acquired at different sample-to-sensor distances and processed using sparsity-based multi-height phase recovery. This new phase recovery approach that makes use of sparsity can also be extended to other coherent imaging schemes, involving e.g., multiple illumination angles or wavelengths to increase the throughput and speed of coherent imaging.

  5. Fast implementations of reconstruction-based scatter compensation in fully 3D SPECT image reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kadrmas, Dan J.; Karimi, Seemeen S.; Frey, Eric C.; Tsui, Benjamin M.W.

    1998-01-01

    Accurate scatter compensation in SPECT can be performed by modelling the scatter response function during the reconstruction process. This method is called reconstruction-based scatter compensation (RBSC). It has been shown that RBSC has a number of advantages over other methods of compensating for scatter, but using RBSC for fully 3D compensation has resulted in prohibitively long reconstruction times. In this work we propose two new methods that can be used in conjunction with existing methods to achieve marked reductions in RBSC reconstruction times. The first method, coarse-grid scatter modelling, significantly accelerates the scatter model by exploiting the fact that scatter is dominated by low-frequency information. The second method, intermittent RBSC, further accelerates the reconstruction process by limiting the number of iterations during which scatter is modelled. The fast implementations were evaluated using a Monte Carlo simulated experiment of the 3D MCAT phantom with 99m Tc tracer, and also using experimentally acquired data with 201 Tl tracer. Results indicated that these fast methods can reconstruct, with fully 3D compensation, images very similar to those obtained using standard RBSC methods, and in reconstruction times that are an order of magnitude shorter. Using these methods, fully 3D iterative reconstruction with RBSC can be performed well within the realm of clinically realistic times (under 10 minutes for 64x64x24 image reconstruction). (author)

  6. Reconstruction of a ring applicator using CT imaging: impact of the reconstruction method and applicator orientation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hellebust, Taran Paulsen; Tanderup, Kari; Bergstrand, Eva Stabell; Knutsen, Bjoern Helge; Roeislien, Jo; Olsen, Dag Rune

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate whether the method of applicator reconstruction and/or the applicator orientation influence the dose calculation to points around the applicator for brachytherapy of cervical cancer with CT-based treatment planning. A phantom, containing a fixed ring applicator set and six lead pellets representing dose points, was used. The phantom was CT scanned with the ring applicator at four different angles related to the image plane. In each scan the applicator was reconstructed by three methods: (1) direct reconstruction in each image (DR) (2) reconstruction in multiplanar reconstructed images (MPR) and (3) library plans, using pre-defined applicator geometry (LIB). The doses to the lead pellets were calculated. The relative standard deviation (SD) for all reconstruction methods was less than 3.7% in the dose points. The relative SD for the LIB method was significantly lower (p < 0.05) than for the DR and MPR methods for all but two points. All applicator orientations had similar dose calculation reproducibility. Using library plans for applicator reconstruction gives the most reproducible dose calculation. However, with restrictive guidelines for applicator reconstruction the uncertainties for all methods are low compared to other factors influencing the accuracy of brachytherapy

  7. Compressively sampled MR image reconstruction using generalized thresholding iterative algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elahi, Sana; kaleem, Muhammad; Omer, Hammad

    2018-01-01

    Compressed sensing (CS) is an emerging area of interest in Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI). CS is used for the reconstruction of the images from a very limited number of samples in k-space. This significantly reduces the MRI data acquisition time. One important requirement for signal recovery in CS is the use of an appropriate non-linear reconstruction algorithm. It is a challenging task to choose a reconstruction algorithm that would accurately reconstruct the MR images from the under-sampled k-space data. Various algorithms have been used to solve the system of non-linear equations for better image quality and reconstruction speed in CS. In the recent past, iterative soft thresholding algorithm (ISTA) has been introduced in CS-MRI. This algorithm directly cancels the incoherent artifacts produced because of the undersampling in k -space. This paper introduces an improved iterative algorithm based on p -thresholding technique for CS-MRI image reconstruction. The use of p -thresholding function promotes sparsity in the image which is a key factor for CS based image reconstruction. The p -thresholding based iterative algorithm is a modification of ISTA, and minimizes non-convex functions. It has been shown that the proposed p -thresholding iterative algorithm can be used effectively to recover fully sampled image from the under-sampled data in MRI. The performance of the proposed method is verified using simulated and actual MRI data taken at St. Mary's Hospital, London. The quality of the reconstructed images is measured in terms of peak signal-to-noise ratio (PSNR), artifact power (AP), and structural similarity index measure (SSIM). The proposed approach shows improved performance when compared to other iterative algorithms based on log thresholding, soft thresholding and hard thresholding techniques at different reduction factors.

  8. Linking Neurons to Network Function and Behavior by Two-Photon Holographic Optogenetics and Volumetric Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dal Maschio, Marco; Donovan, Joseph C; Helmbrecht, Thomas O; Baier, Herwig

    2017-05-17

    We introduce a flexible method for high-resolution interrogation of circuit function, which combines simultaneous 3D two-photon stimulation of multiple targeted neurons, volumetric functional imaging, and quantitative behavioral tracking. This integrated approach was applied to dissect how an ensemble of premotor neurons in the larval zebrafish brain drives a basic motor program, the bending of the tail. We developed an iterative photostimulation strategy to identify minimal subsets of channelrhodopsin (ChR2)-expressing neurons that are sufficient to initiate tail movements. At the same time, the induced network activity was recorded by multiplane GCaMP6 imaging across the brain. From this dataset, we computationally identified activity patterns associated with distinct components of the elicited behavior and characterized the contributions of individual neurons. Using photoactivatable GFP (paGFP), we extended our protocol to visualize single functionally identified neurons and reconstruct their morphologies. Together, this toolkit enables linking behavior to circuit activity with unprecedented resolution. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Hiding a Covert Digital Image by Assembling the RSA Encryption Method and the Binary Encoding Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuang Tsan Lin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The Rivest-Shamir-Adleman (RSA encryption method and the binary encoding method are assembled to form a hybrid hiding method to hide a covert digital image into a dot-matrix holographic image. First, the RSA encryption method is used to transform the covert image to form a RSA encryption data string. Then, all the elements of the RSA encryption data string are transferred into binary data. Finally, the binary data are encoded into the dot-matrix holographic image. The pixels of the dot-matrix holographic image contain seven groups of codes used for reconstructing the covert image. The seven groups of codes are identification codes, covert-image dimension codes, covert-image graylevel codes, pre-RSA bit number codes, RSA key codes, post-RSA bit number codes, and information codes. The reconstructed covert image derived from the dot-matrix holographic image and the original covert image are exactly the same.

  10. Algorithms for Reconstruction of Undersampled Atomic Force Microscopy Images Supplementary Material

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2017-01-01

    Two Jupyter Notebooks showcasing reconstructions of undersampled atomic force microscopy images. The reconstructions were obtained using a variety of interpolation and reconstruction methods.......Two Jupyter Notebooks showcasing reconstructions of undersampled atomic force microscopy images. The reconstructions were obtained using a variety of interpolation and reconstruction methods....

  11. A Kalman filter technique applied for medical image reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goliaei, S.; Ghorshi, S.; Manzuri, M. T.; Mortazavi, M.

    2011-01-01

    Medical images contain information about vital organic tissues inside of human body and are widely used for diagnoses of disease or for surgical purposes. Image reconstruction is essential for medical images for some applications such as suppression of noise or de-blurring the image in order to provide images with better quality and contrast. Due to vital rule of image reconstruction in medical sciences the corresponding algorithms with better efficiency and higher speed is desirable. Most algorithms in image reconstruction are operated on frequency domain such as the most popular one known as filtered back projection. In this paper we introduce a Kalman filter technique which is operated in time domain for medical image reconstruction. Results indicated that as the number of projection increases in both normal collected ray sum and the collected ray sum corrupted by noise the quality of reconstructed image becomes better in terms of contract and transparency. It is also seen that as the number of projection increases the error index decreases.

  12. CT Image Reconstruction in a Low Dimensional Manifold

    OpenAIRE

    Cong, Wenxiang; Wang, Ge; Yang, Qingsong; Hsieh, Jiang; Li, Jia; Lai, Rongjie

    2017-01-01

    Regularization methods are commonly used in X-ray CT image reconstruction. Different regularization methods reflect the characterization of different prior knowledge of images. In a recent work, a new regularization method called a low-dimensional manifold model (LDMM) is investigated to characterize the low-dimensional patch manifold structure of natural images, where the manifold dimensionality characterizes structural information of an image. In this paper, we propose a CT image reconstruc...

  13. Time-of-flight PET image reconstruction using origin ensembles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wülker, Christian; Sitek, Arkadiusz; Prevrhal, Sven

    2015-03-01

    The origin ensemble (OE) algorithm is a novel statistical method for minimum-mean-square-error (MMSE) reconstruction of emission tomography data. This method allows one to perform reconstruction entirely in the image domain, i.e. without the use of forward and backprojection operations. We have investigated the OE algorithm in the context of list-mode (LM) time-of-flight (TOF) PET reconstruction. In this paper, we provide a general introduction to MMSE reconstruction, and a statistically rigorous derivation of the OE algorithm. We show how to efficiently incorporate TOF information into the reconstruction process, and how to correct for random coincidences and scattered events. To examine the feasibility of LM-TOF MMSE reconstruction with the OE algorithm, we applied MMSE-OE and standard maximum-likelihood expectation-maximization (ML-EM) reconstruction to LM-TOF phantom data with a count number typically registered in clinical PET examinations. We analyzed the convergence behavior of the OE algorithm, and compared reconstruction time and image quality to that of the EM algorithm. In summary, during the reconstruction process, MMSE-OE contrast recovery (CRV) remained approximately the same, while background variability (BV) gradually decreased with an increasing number of OE iterations. The final MMSE-OE images exhibited lower BV and a slightly lower CRV than the corresponding ML-EM images. The reconstruction time of the OE algorithm was approximately 1.3 times longer. At the same time, the OE algorithm can inherently provide a comprehensive statistical characterization of the acquired data. This characterization can be utilized for further data processing, e.g. in kinetic analysis and image registration, making the OE algorithm a promising approach in a variety of applications.

  14. A study of transverse image reconstruction with digital subtraction angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakamoto, Kiyoshi; Kotoura, Noriko; Terasawa, Yuuji; Oda, Masahiko; Gotou, Hiroshi; Nasada, Toshiya; Tanooka, Masao

    1995-01-01

    For digital subtraction angiography (DSA) with C-type equipment, it is possible to radiate an X-ray during rotation and to collect data at different angular settings. We tried to reconstruct transverse image from data obtained by scanning DSA images at different angular settings. 88 projection data were obtained by rotating the object at 180deg during radiation. Reconstruction was made using the convolution method with pixel value distribution for each projection. Similarly, the image quality of the reconstructed images were compared with the unsubtracted and subtracted ones. In case a part object was outside the calculating region, artifacts were generally produced. However, the artifacts were reduced by subtracting the background from the image. In addition, the cupping phenomenon caused by beam hardening was relaxed and high-quality imaging could be achieved. This method will become even more effective, if we will use it with selective angiography in which the limited area is enhanced. (author)

  15. Simulation study of two-energy X-ray fluorescence holograms reconstruction algorithm to remove twin images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xie Honglan; Hu Wen; Luo Hongxin; Deng Biao; Du Guohao; Xue Yanling; Chen Rongchang; Shi Shaomeng; Xiao Tiqiao

    2008-01-01

    Unlike traditional outside-source holography, X-ray fluorescence holography is carded out with fluorescent atoms in a sample as source light for holographic imaging. With the method, three-dimensional arrangement of atoms into crystals can be observed obviously. However, just like traditional outside-source holography, X-ray fluorescence holography suffers from the inherent twin-image problem, too. With a 27-Fe-atoms cubic lattice as model, we discuss in this paper influence of the photon energy of incident source in removing twin images in reconstructed atomic images by numerical simulation and reconstruction with two-energy X-ray fluorescence holography. The results indicate that incident X-rays of nearer energies have better effect of removing twin images. In the detector of X-ray holography, minimum difference of the two incident energies depends on energy resolution of the monochromator and detector, and for inside source X-ray holography, minimum difference of the two incident energies depends on difference of two neighboring fluorescent energies emitting from the element and energy resolution of detector. The spatial resolution of atomic images increases with the incident energies. This is important for experiments of X-ray fluorescence holography, which is being developed on Shanghai Synchrotron Radiation Facility. (authors)

  16. Optical studies in the holographic ground station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Workman, Gary L.

    1991-01-01

    The Holographic Group System (HGS) Facility in rooms 22 & 123, Building 4708 has been developed to provide for ground based research in determining pre-flight parameters and analyzing the results from space experiments. The University of Alabama, Huntsville (UAH) has researched the analysis aspects of the HGS and reports their findings here. Some of the results presented here also occur in the Facility Operating Procedure (FOP), which contains instructions for power up, operation, and powerdown of the Fluid Experiment System (FES) Holographic Ground System (HGS) Test Facility for the purpose of optically recording fluid and/or crystal behavior in a test article during ground based testing through the construction of holograms and recording of videotape. The alignment of the optical bench components, holographic reconstruction and and microscopy alignment sections were also included in the document for continuity even though they are not used until after optical recording of the test article) setup of support subsystems and the Automated Holography System (AHS) computer. The HGS provides optical recording and monitoring during GCEL runs or development testing of potential FES flight hardware or software. This recording/monitoring can be via 70mm holographic film, standard videotape, or digitized images on computer disk. All optical bench functions necessary to construct holograms will be under the control of the AHS personal computer (PC). These include type of exposure, time intervals between exposures, exposure length, film frame identification, film advancement, film platen evacuation and repressurization, light source diffuser introduction, and control of realtime video monitoring. The completed sequence of hologram types (single exposure, diffuse double exposure, etc.) and their time of occurrence can be displayed, printed, or stored on floppy disk posttest for the user.

  17. Super-Resolution Image Reconstruction Applied to Medical Ultrasound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Michael

    Ultrasound is the preferred imaging modality for many diagnostic applications due to its real-time image reconstruction and low cost. Nonetheless, conventional ultrasound is not used in many applications because of limited spatial resolution and soft tissue contrast. Most commercial ultrasound systems reconstruct images using a simple delay-and-sum architecture on receive, which is fast and robust but does not utilize all information available in the raw data. Recently, more sophisticated image reconstruction methods have been developed that make use of far more information in the raw data to improve resolution and contrast. One such method is the Time-Domain Optimized Near-Field Estimator (TONE), which employs a maximum a priori estimation to solve a highly underdetermined problem, given a well-defined system model. TONE has been shown to significantly improve both the contrast and resolution of ultrasound images when compared to conventional methods. However, TONE's lack of robustness to variations from the system model and extremely high computational cost hinder it from being readily adopted in clinical scanners. This dissertation aims to reduce the impact of TONE's shortcomings, transforming it from an academic construct to a clinically viable image reconstruction algorithm. By altering the system model from a collection of individual hypothetical scatterers to a collection of weighted, diffuse regions, dTONE is able to achieve much greater robustness to modeling errors. A method for efficient parallelization of dTONE is presented that reduces reconstruction time by more than an order of magnitude with little loss in image fidelity. An alternative reconstruction algorithm, called qTONE, is also developed and is able to reduce reconstruction times by another two orders of magnitude while simultaneously improving image contrast. Each of these methods for improving TONE are presented, their limitations are explored, and all are used in concert to reconstruct in

  18. Robust sparse image reconstruction of radio interferometric observations with PURIFY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratley, Luke; McEwen, Jason D.; d'Avezac, Mayeul; Carrillo, Rafael E.; Onose, Alexandru; Wiaux, Yves

    2018-01-01

    Next-generation radio interferometers, such as the Square Kilometre Array, will revolutionize our understanding of the Universe through their unprecedented sensitivity and resolution. However, to realize these goals significant challenges in image and data processing need to be overcome. The standard methods in radio interferometry for reconstructing images, such as CLEAN, have served the community well over the last few decades and have survived largely because they are pragmatic. However, they produce reconstructed interferometric images that are limited in quality and scalability for big data. In this work, we apply and evaluate alternative interferometric reconstruction methods that make use of state-of-the-art sparse image reconstruction algorithms motivated by compressive sensing, which have been implemented in the PURIFY software package. In particular, we implement and apply the proximal alternating direction method of multipliers algorithm presented in a recent article. First, we assess the impact of the interpolation kernel used to perform gridding and degridding on sparse image reconstruction. We find that the Kaiser-Bessel interpolation kernel performs as well as prolate spheroidal wave functions while providing a computational saving and an analytic form. Secondly, we apply PURIFY to real interferometric observations from the Very Large Array and the Australia Telescope Compact Array and find that images recovered by PURIFY are of higher quality than those recovered by CLEAN. Thirdly, we discuss how PURIFY reconstructions exhibit additional advantages over those recovered by CLEAN. The latest version of PURIFY, with developments presented in this work, is made publicly available.

  19. High spatial resolution CT image reconstruction using parallel computing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yin Yin; Liu Li; Sun Gongxing

    2003-01-01

    Using the PC cluster system with 16 dual CPU nodes, we accelerate the FBP and OR-OSEM reconstruction of high spatial resolution image (2048 x 2048). Based on the number of projections, we rewrite the reconstruction algorithms into parallel format and dispatch the tasks to each CPU. By parallel computing, the speedup factor is roughly equal to the number of CPUs, which can be up to about 25 times when 25 CPUs used. This technique is very suitable for real-time high spatial resolution CT image reconstruction. (authors)

  20. Application of Super-Resolution Image Reconstruction to Digital Holography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Shuqun

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe a new application of super-resolution image reconstruction to digital holography which is a technique for three-dimensional information recording and reconstruction. Digital holography has suffered from the low resolution of CCD sensors, which significantly limits the size of objects that can be recorded. The existing solution to this problem is to use optics to bandlimit the object to be recorded, which can cause the loss of details. Here super-resolution image reconstruction is proposed to be applied in enhancing the spatial resolution of digital holograms. By introducing a global camera translation before sampling, a high-resolution hologram can be reconstructed from a set of undersampled hologram images. This permits the recording of larger objects and reduces the distance between the object and the hologram. Practical results from real and simulated holograms are presented to demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed technique.

  1. Fingerprint image reconstruction for swipe sensor using Predictive Overlap Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mardiansyah Ahmad Zafrullah

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Swipe sensor is one of many biometric authentication sensor types that widely applied to embedded devices. The sensor produces an overlap on every pixel block of the image, so the picture requires a reconstruction process before heading to the feature extraction process. Conventional reconstruction methods require extensive computation, causing difficult to apply to embedded devices that have limited computing process. In this paper, image reconstruction is proposed using predictive overlap method, which determines the image block shift from the previous set of change data. The experiments were performed using 36 images generated by a swipe sensor with 128 x 8 pixels size of the area, where each image has an overlap in each block. The results reveal computation can increase up to 86.44% compared with conventional methods, with accuracy decreasing to 0.008% in average.

  2. Quantitative reconstruction from a single diffraction-enhanced image

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paganin, D.M.; Lewis, R.A.; Kitchen, M.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: We develop an algorithm for using a single diffraction-enhanced image (DEI) to obtain a quantitative reconstruction of the projected thickness of a single-material sample which is embedded within a substrate of approximately constant thickness. This algorithm is used to quantitatively map inclusions in a breast phantom, from a single synchrotron DEI image. In particular, the reconstructed images quantitatively represent the projected thickness in the bulk of the sample, in contrast to DEI images which greatly emphasise sharp edges (high spatial frequencies). In the context of an ultimate aim of improved methods for breast cancer detection, the reconstructions are potentially of greater diagnostic value compared to the DEI data. Lastly, we point out that the methods of analysis presented here are also applicable to the quantitative analysis of differential interference contrast (DIC) images

  3. Matrix-based image reconstruction methods for tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Llacer, J.; Meng, J.D.

    1984-10-01

    Matrix methods of image reconstruction have not been used, in general, because of the large size of practical matrices, ill condition upon inversion and the success of Fourier-based techniques. An exception is the work that has been done at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory for imaging with accelerated radioactive ions. An extension of that work into more general imaging problems shows that, with a correct formulation of the problem, positron tomography with ring geometries results in well behaved matrices which can be used for image reconstruction with no distortion of the point response in the field of view and flexibility in the design of the instrument. Maximum Likelihood Estimator methods of reconstruction, which use the system matrices tailored to specific instruments and do not need matrix inversion, are shown to result in good preliminary images. A parallel processing computer structure based on multiple inexpensive microprocessors is proposed as a system to implement the matrix-MLE methods. 14 references, 7 figures

  4. Three dimensional image reconstruction in the Fourier domain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stearns, C.W.; Chesler, D.A.; Brownell, G.L.

    1987-01-01

    Filtered backprojection reconstruction algorithms are based upon the relationship between the Fourier transform of the imaged object and the Fourier transforms of its projections. A new reconstruction algorithm has been developed which performs the image assembly operation in Fourier space, rather than in image space by backprojection. This represents a significant decrease in the number of operations required to assemble the image. The new Fourier domain algorithm has resolution comparable to the filtered backprojection algorithm, and, after correction by a pointwise multiplication, demonstrates proper recovery throughout image space. Although originally intended for three-dimensional imaging applications, the Fourier domain algorithm can also be developed for two-dimensional imaging applications such as planar positron imaging systems

  5. Photoelectron holography with improved image reconstruction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsushita, Tomohiro, E-mail: matusita@spring8.or.j [Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Institute (JASRI), SPring-8, 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo-cho, Sayo-gun Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan); Matsui, Fumihiko; Daimon, Hiroshi [Nara Institute of Science and Technology (NAIST), 8916-5 Takayama, Ikoma, Nara 630-0192 (Japan); Hayashi, Kouichi [Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan)

    2010-05-15

    Electron holography is a type of atomic structural analysis, and it has unique features such as element selectivity and the ability to analyze the structure around an impurity in a crystal. In this paper, we introduce the measurement system, electron holograms, a theory for the recording process of an electron hologram, and a theory for the reconstruction algorithm. We describe photoelectron holograms, Auger electron holograms, and the inverse mode of an electron hologram. The reconstruction algorithm, scattering pattern extraction algorithm (SPEA), the SPEA with maximum entropy method (SPEA-MEM), and SPEA-MEM with translational operation are also described.

  6. Photoelectron holography with improved image reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsushita, Tomohiro; Matsui, Fumihiko; Daimon, Hiroshi; Hayashi, Kouichi

    2010-01-01

    Electron holography is a type of atomic structural analysis, and it has unique features such as element selectivity and the ability to analyze the structure around an impurity in a crystal. In this paper, we introduce the measurement system, electron holograms, a theory for the recording process of an electron hologram, and a theory for the reconstruction algorithm. We describe photoelectron holograms, Auger electron holograms, and the inverse mode of an electron hologram. The reconstruction algorithm, scattering pattern extraction algorithm (SPEA), the SPEA with maximum entropy method (SPEA-MEM), and SPEA-MEM with translational operation are also described.

  7. Experimental research of digital holographic microscopic measuring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xueliang; Chen, Feifei; Li, Jicheng

    2013-06-01

    Digital holography is a new imaging technique, which is developed on the base of optical holography, Digital processing, and Computer techniques. It is using CCD instead of the conventional silver to record hologram, and then reproducing the 3D contour of the object by the way of computer simulation. Compared with the traditional optical holographic, the whole process is of simple measuring, lower production cost, faster the imaging speed, and with the advantages of non-contact real-time measurement. At present, it can be used in the fields of the morphology detection of tiny objects, micro deformation analysis, and biological cells shape measurement. It is one of the research hot spot at home and abroad. This paper introduced the basic principles and relevant theories about the optical holography and Digital holography, and researched the basic questions which influence the reproduce images in the process of recording and reconstructing of the digital holographic microcopy. In order to get a clear digital hologram, by analyzing the optical system structure, we discussed the recording distance and of the hologram. On the base of the theoretical studies, we established a measurement and analyzed the experimental conditions, then adjusted them to the system. To achieve a precise measurement of tiny object in three-dimension, we measured MEMS micro device for example, and obtained the reproduction three-dimensional contour, realized the three dimensional profile measurement of tiny object. According to the experiment results consider: analysis the reference factors between the zero-order term and a pair of twin-images by the choice of the object light and the reference light and the distance of the recording and reconstructing and the characteristics of reconstruction light on the measurement, the measurement errors were analyzed. The research result shows that the device owns certain reliability.

  8. Holographic optical security systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fagan, William F.

    1990-06-01

    One of the most successful applications of Holography,in recent years,has been its use as an optical security technique.Indeed the general public's awareness of holograms has been greatly enhanced by the incorporation of holographic elements into the VISA and MASTERCHARGE credit cards.Optical techniques related to Holography,are also being used to protect the currencies of several countries against the counterfeiter. The mass production of high quality holographic images is by no means a trivial task as a considerable degree of expertise is required together with an optical laboratory and embossing machinery.This paper will present an overview of the principal holographic and related optical techniques used for security purposes.Worldwide, over thirty companies are involved in the production of security elements utilising holographic and related optical technologies.Counterfeiting of many products is a major criminal activity with severe consequences not only for the manufacturer but for the public in general as defective automobile parts,aircraft components,and pharmaceutical products, to cite only a few of the more prominent examples,have at one time or another been illegally copied.

  9. Fast Dictionary-Based Reconstruction for Diffusion Spectrum Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilgic, Berkin; Chatnuntawech, Itthi; Setsompop, Kawin; Cauley, Stephen F.; Yendiki, Anastasia; Wald, Lawrence L.; Adalsteinsson, Elfar

    2015-01-01

    Diffusion Spectrum Imaging (DSI) reveals detailed local diffusion properties at the expense of substantially long imaging times. It is possible to accelerate acquisition by undersampling in q-space, followed by image reconstruction that exploits prior knowledge on the diffusion probability density functions (pdfs). Previously proposed methods impose this prior in the form of sparsity under wavelet and total variation (TV) transforms, or under adaptive dictionaries that are trained on example datasets to maximize the sparsity of the representation. These compressed sensing (CS) methods require full-brain processing times on the order of hours using Matlab running on a workstation. This work presents two dictionary-based reconstruction techniques that use analytical solutions, and are two orders of magnitude faster than the previously proposed dictionary-based CS approach. The first method generates a dictionary from the training data using Principal Component Analysis (PCA), and performs the reconstruction in the PCA space. The second proposed method applies reconstruction using pseudoinverse with Tikhonov regularization with respect to a dictionary. This dictionary can either be obtained using the K-SVD algorithm, or it can simply be the training dataset of pdfs without any training. All of the proposed methods achieve reconstruction times on the order of seconds per imaging slice, and have reconstruction quality comparable to that of dictionary-based CS algorithm. PMID:23846466

  10. Fast dictionary-based reconstruction for diffusion spectrum imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilgic, Berkin; Chatnuntawech, Itthi; Setsompop, Kawin; Cauley, Stephen F; Yendiki, Anastasia; Wald, Lawrence L; Adalsteinsson, Elfar

    2013-11-01

    Diffusion spectrum imaging reveals detailed local diffusion properties at the expense of substantially long imaging times. It is possible to accelerate acquisition by undersampling in q-space, followed by image reconstruction that exploits prior knowledge on the diffusion probability density functions (pdfs). Previously proposed methods impose this prior in the form of sparsity under wavelet and total variation transforms, or under adaptive dictionaries that are trained on example datasets to maximize the sparsity of the representation. These compressed sensing (CS) methods require full-brain processing times on the order of hours using MATLAB running on a workstation. This work presents two dictionary-based reconstruction techniques that use analytical solutions, and are two orders of magnitude faster than the previously proposed dictionary-based CS approach. The first method generates a dictionary from the training data using principal component analysis (PCA), and performs the reconstruction in the PCA space. The second proposed method applies reconstruction using pseudoinverse with Tikhonov regularization with respect to a dictionary. This dictionary can either be obtained using the K-SVD algorithm, or it can simply be the training dataset of pdfs without any training. All of the proposed methods achieve reconstruction times on the order of seconds per imaging slice, and have reconstruction quality comparable to that of dictionary-based CS algorithm.

  11. Convergence of iterative image reconstruction algorithms for Digital Breast Tomosynthesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sidky, Emil; Jørgensen, Jakob Heide; Pan, Xiaochuan

    2012-01-01

    Most iterative image reconstruction algorithms are based on some form of optimization, such as minimization of a data-fidelity term plus an image regularizing penalty term. While achieving the solution of these optimization problems may not directly be clinically relevant, accurate optimization s...

  12. Analytic 3D image reconstruction using all detected events

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kinahan, P.E.; Rogers, J.G.

    1988-11-01

    We present the results of testing a previously presented algorithm for three-dimensional image reconstruction that uses all gamma-ray coincidence events detected by a PET volume-imaging scanner. By using two iterations of an analytic filter-backprojection method, the algorithm is not constrained by the requirement of a spatially invariant detector point spread function, which limits normal analytic techniques. Removing this constraint allows the incorporation of all detected events, regardless of orientation, which improves the statistical quality of the final reconstructed image

  13. Three-dimensional image reconstruction. I. Determination of pattern orientation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blankenbecler, Richard

    2004-01-01

    The problem of determining the Euler angles of a randomly oriented three-dimensional (3D) object from its 2D Fraunhofer diffraction patterns is discussed. This problem arises in the reconstruction of a positive semidefinite 3D object using oversampling techniques. In such a problem, the data consist of a measured set of magnitudes from 2D tomographic images of the object at several unknown orientations. After the orientation angles are determined, the object itself can then be reconstructed by a variety of methods using oversampling, the magnitude data from the 2D images, physical constraints on the image, and then iteration to determine the phases

  14. Few-view image reconstruction with dual dictionaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Yang; Zhao Jun; Wang Ge

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we formulate the problem of computed tomography (CT) under sparsity and few-view constraints, and propose a novel algorithm for image reconstruction from few-view data utilizing the simultaneous algebraic reconstruction technique (SART) coupled with dictionary learning, sparse representation and total variation (TV) minimization on two interconnected levels. The main feature of our algorithm is the use of two dictionaries: a transitional dictionary for atom matching and a global dictionary for image updating. The atoms in the global and transitional dictionaries represent the image patches from high-quality and low-quality CT images, respectively. Experiments with simulated and real projections were performed to evaluate and validate the proposed algorithm. The results reconstructed using the proposed approach are significantly better than those using either SART or SART–TV. (paper)

  15. Bayesian image reconstruction for improving detection performance of muon tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guobao; Schultz, Larry J; Qi, Jinyi

    2009-05-01

    Muon tomography is a novel technology that is being developed for detecting high-Z materials in vehicles or cargo containers. Maximum likelihood methods have been developed for reconstructing the scattering density image from muon measurements. However, the instability of maximum likelihood estimation often results in noisy images and low detectability of high-Z targets. In this paper, we propose using regularization to improve the image quality of muon tomography. We formulate the muon reconstruction problem in a Bayesian framework by introducing a prior distribution on scattering density images. An iterative shrinkage algorithm is derived to maximize the log posterior distribution. At each iteration, the algorithm obtains the maximum a posteriori update by shrinking an unregularized maximum likelihood update. Inverse quadratic shrinkage functions are derived for generalized Laplacian priors and inverse cubic shrinkage functions are derived for generalized Gaussian priors. Receiver operating characteristic studies using simulated data demonstrate that the Bayesian reconstruction can greatly improve the detection performance of muon tomography.

  16. Evaluation of aortocoronary bypass graft patency by reconstructed CT image

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawakita, Seizaburo; Koide, Takashi; Saito, Yoshio; Yamamoto, Tadao; Iwasaki, Tadaaki

    1982-01-01

    Ten patients were examined in the period of three months from January to March 1981. The patients were operated from 1 month to 7 years before CT. A bypass to the left anterior descending artery (LAD) was grafted in 10 cases, 2 to the right coronary artery (RCA), 4 to an obtuse marginal artery (OM), and 1 to a diagonal artery. Image reconstruction was performed in 10 cases by using an image analytical computer Evaluskop. Appropriate planes for reconstruction were selected by trial and error methods upon observation of CT images. When gained picture of a graft course coincided with surgical records or angiography, the work of building images was concluded. On cross section, grafts to LAD were visualized in all 10 cases: 9 in the entire course and 1 in a proximal part of the graft. Two to RCA, 4 to OM and 1 to a diagonal were also successfully visualized. Reconstruction of graft images succeeded in 9 grafts of 6 cases. The course of a graft could be pursued from the proximal to the distal end adjacent to the cardiac chamber. The picture of a bypass to LAD was visualized in 6 of 10 grafts. Two bypass to RCA could be depicted, and 1 to OM was also found. However 3 to OM and 1 to a diagonal failed to be visualized throughout their courses in reconstructed images. I think that the causes of faillure mainly depended upon the course of the graft. When a graft was running arc-like surrounding the heart chamber, it was very difficult to depict its entire length in reconstructed images, though the graft could be detected in cross sections. These preliminary studies indicated that reconstruction of CT images had some benefits for the pursuit of graft courses. (J.P.N.)

  17. A neural network image reconstruction technique for electrical impedance tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adler, A.; Guardo, R.

    1994-01-01

    Reconstruction of Images in Electrical Impedance Tomography requires the solution of a nonlinear inverse problem on noisy data. This problem is typically ill-conditioned and requires either simplifying assumptions or regularization based on a priori knowledge. This paper presents a reconstruction algorithm using neural network techniques which calculates a linear approximation of the inverse problem directly from finite element simulations of the forward problem. This inverse is adapted to the geometry of the medium and the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) used during network training. Results show good conductivity reconstruction where measurement SNR is similar to the training conditions. The advantages of this method are its conceptual simplicity and ease of implementation, and the ability to control the compromise between the noise performance and resolution of the image reconstruction

  18. Biologically inspired EM image alignment and neural reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knowles-Barley, Seymour; Butcher, Nancy J; Meinertzhagen, Ian A; Armstrong, J Douglas

    2011-08-15

    Three-dimensional reconstruction of consecutive serial-section transmission electron microscopy (ssTEM) images of neural tissue currently requires many hours of manual tracing and annotation. Several computational techniques have already been applied to ssTEM images to facilitate 3D reconstruction and ease this burden. Here, we present an alternative computational approach for ssTEM image analysis. We have used biologically inspired receptive fields as a basis for a ridge detection algorithm to identify cell membranes, synaptic contacts and mitochondria. Detected line segments are used to improve alignment between consecutive images and we have joined small segments of membrane into cell surfaces using a dynamic programming algorithm similar to the Needleman-Wunsch and Smith-Waterman DNA sequence alignment procedures. A shortest path-based approach has been used to close edges and achieve image segmentation. Partial reconstructions were automatically generated and used as a basis for semi-automatic reconstruction of neural tissue. The accuracy of partial reconstructions was evaluated and 96% of membrane could be identified at the cost of 13% false positive detections. An open-source reference implementation is available in the Supplementary information. seymour.kb@ed.ac.uk; douglas.armstrong@ed.ac.uk Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

  19. Prospective regularization design in prior-image-based reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dang, Hao; Siewerdsen, Jeffrey H; Stayman, J Webster

    2015-01-01

    Prior-image-based reconstruction (PIBR) methods leveraging patient-specific anatomical information from previous imaging studies and/or sequences have demonstrated dramatic improvements in dose utilization and image quality for low-fidelity data. However, a proper balance of information from the prior images and information from the measurements is required (e.g. through careful tuning of regularization parameters). Inappropriate selection of reconstruction parameters can lead to detrimental effects including false structures and failure to improve image quality. Traditional methods based on heuristics are subject to error and sub-optimal solutions, while exhaustive searches require a large number of computationally intensive image reconstructions. In this work, we propose a novel method that prospectively estimates the optimal amount of prior image information for accurate admission of specific anatomical changes in PIBR without performing full image reconstructions. This method leverages an analytical approximation to the implicitly defined PIBR estimator, and introduces a predictive performance metric leveraging this analytical form and knowledge of a particular presumed anatomical change whose accurate reconstruction is sought. Additionally, since model-based PIBR approaches tend to be space-variant, a spatially varying prior image strength map is proposed to optimally admit changes everywhere in the image (eliminating the need to know change locations a priori). Studies were conducted in both an ellipse phantom and a realistic thorax phantom emulating a lung nodule surveillance scenario. The proposed method demonstrated accurate estimation of the optimal prior image strength while achieving a substantial computational speedup (about a factor of 20) compared to traditional exhaustive search. Moreover, the use of the proposed prior strength map in PIBR demonstrated accurate reconstruction of anatomical changes without foreknowledge of change locations in

  20. Image interface in Java for tomographic reconstruction in nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrade, M.A.; Silva, A.M. Marques da

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this study is to implement a software for tomographic reconstruction of SPECT data from Nuclear Medicine with a flexible interface design, cross-platform, written in Java. Validation tests were performed based on SPECT simulated data. The results showed that the implemented algorithms and filters agree with the theoretical context. We intend to extend the system by implementing additional tomographic reconstruction techniques and Java threads, in order to provide simultaneously image processing. (author)

  1. Image Reconstruction For Bioluminescence Tomography From Partial Measurement

    OpenAIRE

    Jiang, M.; Zhou, T.; Cheng, J. T.; Cong, W. X.; Wang, Ge

    2007-01-01

    The bioluminescence tomography is a novel molecular imaging technology for small animal studies. Known reconstruction methods require the completely measured data on the external surface, although only partially measured data is available in practice. In this work, we formulate a mathematical model for BLT from partial data and generalize our previous results on the solution uniqueness to the partial data case. Then we extend two of our reconstruction methods for BLT to this case. The first m...

  2. Demosaicing and Superresolution for Color Filter Array via Residual Image Reconstruction and Sparse Representation

    OpenAIRE

    Sun, Guangling

    2012-01-01

    A framework of demosaicing and superresolution for color filter array (CFA) via residual image reconstruction and sparse representation is presented.Given the intermediate image produced by certain demosaicing and interpolation technique, a residual image between the final reconstruction image and the intermediate image is reconstructed using sparse representation.The final reconstruction image has richer edges and details than that of the intermediate image. Specifically, a generic dictionar...

  3. Reconstructing flaw image using dataset of full matrix capture technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Tae Hun; Kim, Yong Sik; Lee, Jeong Seok [KHNP Central Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-02-15

    A conventional phased array ultrasonic system offers the ability to steer an ultrasonic beam by applying independent time delays of individual elements in the array and produce an ultrasonic image. In contrast, full matrix capture (FMC) is a data acquisition process that collects a complete matrix of A-scans from every possible independent transmit-receive combination in a phased array transducer and makes it possible to reconstruct various images that cannot be produced by conventional phased array with the post processing as well as images equivalent to a conventional phased array image. In this paper, a basic algorithm based on the LLL mode total focusing method (TFM) that can image crack type flaws is described. And this technique was applied to reconstruct flaw images from the FMC dataset obtained from the experiments and ultrasonic simulation.

  4. Image reconstruction in computerized tomography using the convolution method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira Rebelo, A.M. de.

    1984-03-01

    In the present work an algoritin was derived, using the analytical convolution method (filtered back-projection) for two-dimensional or three-dimensional image reconstruction in computerized tomography applied to non-destructive testing and to the medical use. This mathematical model is based on the analytical Fourier transform method for image reconstruction. This model consists of a discontinuous system formed by an NxN array of cells (pixels). The attenuation in the object under study of a colimated gamma ray beam has been determined for various positions and incidence angles (projections) in terms of the interaction of the beam with the intercepted pixels. The contribution of each pixel to beam attenuation was determined using the weight function W ij which was used for simulated tests. Simulated tests using standard objects with attenuation coefficients in the range of 0,2 to 0,7 cm -1 were carried out using cell arrays of up to 25x25. One application was carried out in the medical area simulating image reconstruction of an arm phantom with attenuation coefficients in the range of 0,2 to 0,5 cm -1 using cell arrays of 41x41. The simulated results show that, in objects with a great number of interfaces and great variations of attenuation coefficients at these interfaces, a good reconstruction is obtained with the number of projections equal to the reconstruction matrix dimension. A good reconstruction is otherwise obtained with fewer projections. (author) [pt

  5. Near-Field Three-Dimensional Planar Millimeter-Wave Holographic Imaging by Using Frequency Scaling Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ye Zhang

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a fast three-dimensional (3-D frequency scaling algorithm (FSA with large depth of focus is presented for near-field planar millimeter-wave (MMW holographic imaging. Considering the cross-range range coupling term which is neglected in the conventional range migration algorithm (RMA, we propose an algorithm performing the range cell migration correction for de-chirped signals without interpolation by using a 3-D frequency scaling operation. First, to deal with the cross-range range coupling term, a 3-D frequency scaling operator is derived to eliminate the space variation of range cell migration. Then, a range migration correction factor is performed to compensate for the residual range cell migration. Finally, the imaging results are obtained by matched filtering in the cross-range direction. Compared with the conventional RMA, the proposed algorithm is comparable in accuracy but more efficient by using only chirp multiplications and fast Fourier transforms (FFTs. The algorithm has been tested with satisfying results by both simulation and experiment.

  6. Isotope specific resolution recovery image reconstruction in high resolution PET imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Kotasidis Fotis A.; Kotasidis Fotis A.; Angelis Georgios I.; Anton-Rodriguez Jose; Matthews Julian C.; Reader Andrew J.; Reader Andrew J.; Zaidi Habib; Zaidi Habib; Zaidi Habib

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Measuring and incorporating a scanner specific point spread function (PSF) within image reconstruction has been shown to improve spatial resolution in PET. However due to the short half life of clinically used isotopes other long lived isotopes not used in clinical practice are used to perform the PSF measurements. As such non optimal PSF models that do not correspond to those needed for the data to be reconstructed are used within resolution modeling (RM) image reconstruction usuall...

  7. 3D widefield light microscope image reconstruction without dyes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larkin, S.; Larson, J.; Holmes, C.; Vaicik, M.; Turturro, M.; Jurkevich, A.; Sinha, S.; Ezashi, T.; Papavasiliou, G.; Brey, E.; Holmes, T.

    2015-03-01

    3D image reconstruction using light microscope modalities without exogenous contrast agents is proposed and investigated as an approach to produce 3D images of biological samples for live imaging applications. Multimodality and multispectral imaging, used in concert with this 3D optical sectioning approach is also proposed as a way to further produce contrast that could be specific to components in the sample. The methods avoid usage of contrast agents. Contrast agents, such as fluorescent or absorbing dyes, can be toxic to cells or alter cell behavior. Current modes of producing 3D image sets from a light microscope, such as 3D deconvolution algorithms and confocal microscopy generally require contrast agents. Zernike phase contrast (ZPC), transmitted light brightfield (TLB), darkfield microscopy and others can produce contrast without dyes. Some of these modalities have not previously benefitted from 3D image reconstruction algorithms, however. The 3D image reconstruction algorithm is based on an underlying physical model of scattering potential, expressed as the sample's 3D absorption and phase quantities. The algorithm is based upon optimizing an objective function - the I-divergence - while solving for the 3D absorption and phase quantities. Unlike typical deconvolution algorithms, each microscope modality, such as ZPC or TLB, produces two output image sets instead of one. Contrast in the displayed image and 3D renderings is further enabled by treating the multispectral/multimodal data as a feature set in a mathematical formulation that uses the principal component method of statistics.

  8. Techniques for the reconstruction of two-dimensional images from projections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sauthoff, N.R.; Von Goeler, S.

    1978-08-01

    Several plasma diagnostics techniques measure the line integrals of quantities such as densities and optical, ultraviolet, and X-ray emission. Some approaches for reconstructing the local quantities from their line integrals, based on methods utilized in computerized tomography, electron microscopy, holographic interferometry, and radio astromony, are derived and presented. Results for the special cases with source functions posessing helical symmetry--ranging from DNA to MHD--are emphasized

  9. Reconstruction of CT images by the Bayes- back projection method

    CERN Document Server

    Haruyama, M; Takase, M; Tobita, H

    2002-01-01

    In the course of research on quantitative assay of non-destructive measurement of radioactive waste, the have developed a unique program based on the Bayesian theory for reconstruction of transmission computed tomography (TCT) image. The reconstruction of cross-section images in the CT technology usually employs the Filtered Back Projection method. The new imaging reconstruction program reported here is based on the Bayesian Back Projection method, and it has a function of iterative improvement images by every step of measurement. Namely, this method has the capability of prompt display of a cross-section image corresponding to each angled projection data from every measurement. Hence, it is possible to observe an improved cross-section view by reflecting each projection data in almost real time. From the basic theory of Baysian Back Projection method, it can be not only applied to CT types of 1st, 2nd, and 3rd generation. This reported deals with a reconstruction program of cross-section images in the CT of ...

  10. Ultra-Fast Image Reconstruction of Tomosynthesis Mammography Using GPU

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arefan D

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Digital Breast Tomosynthesis (DBT is a technology that creates three dimensional (3D images of breast tissue. Tomosynthesis mammography detects lesions that are not detectable with other imaging systems. If image reconstruction time is in the order of seconds, we can use Tomosynthesis systems to perform Tomosynthesis-guided Interventional procedures. This research has been designed to study ultra-fast image reconstruction technique for Tomosynthesis Mammography systems using Graphics Processing Unit (GPU. At first, projections of Tomosynthesis mammography have been simulated. In order to produce Tomosynthesis projections, it has been designed a 3D breast phantom from empirical data. It is based on MRI data in its natural form. Then, projections have been created from 3D breast phantom. The image reconstruction algorithm based on FBP was programmed with C++ language in two methods using central processing unit (CPU card and the Graphics Processing Unit (GPU. It calculated the time of image reconstruction in two kinds of programming (using CPU and GPU.

  11. Image reconstruction technique using projection data from neutron tomography system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waleed Abd el Bar

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Neutron tomography is a very powerful technique for nondestructive evaluation of heavy industrial components as well as for soft hydrogenous materials enclosed in heavy metals which are usually difficult to image using X-rays. Due to the properties of the image acquisition system, the projection images are distorted by several artifacts, and these reduce the quality of the reconstruction. In order to eliminate these harmful effects the projection images should be corrected before reconstruction. This paper gives a description of a filter back projection (FBP technique, which is used for reconstruction of projected data obtained from transmission measurements by neutron tomography system We demonstrated the use of spatial Discrete Fourier Transform (DFT and the 2D Inverse DFT in the formulation of the method, and outlined the theory of reconstruction of a 2D neutron image from a sequence of 1D projections taken at different angles between 0 and π in MATLAB environment. Projections are generated by applying the Radon transform to the original image at different angles.

  12. Optical image reconstruction using DC data: simulations and experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huabei Jiang; Paulsen, K.D.; Oesterberg, U.L.

    1996-01-01

    In this paper, we explore optical image formation using a diffusion approximation of light propagation in tissue which is modelled with a finite-element method for optically heterogeneous media. We demonstrate successful image reconstruction based on absolute experimental DC data obtained with a continuous wave 633 nm He-Ne laser system and a 751 nm diode laser system in laboratory phantoms having two optically distinct regions. The experimental systems used exploit a tomographic type of data collection scheme that provides information from which a spatially variable optical property map is deduced. Reconstruction of scattering coefficient only and simultaneous reconstruction of both scattering and absorption profiles in tissue-like phantoms are obtained from measured and simulated data. Images with different contrast levels between the heterogeneity and the background are also reported and the results show that although it is possible to obtain qualitative visual information on the location and size of a heterogeneity, it may not be possible to quantitatively resolve contrast levels or optical properties using reconstructions from DC data only. Sensitivity of image reconstruction to noise in the measurement data is investigated through simulations. The application of boundary constraints has also been addressed. (author)

  13. Block Compressed Sensing of Images Using Adaptive Granular Reconstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ran Li

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In the framework of block Compressed Sensing (CS, the reconstruction algorithm based on the Smoothed Projected Landweber (SPL iteration can achieve the better rate-distortion performance with a low computational complexity, especially for using the Principle Components Analysis (PCA to perform the adaptive hard-thresholding shrinkage. However, during learning the PCA matrix, it affects the reconstruction performance of Landweber iteration to neglect the stationary local structural characteristic of image. To solve the above problem, this paper firstly uses the Granular Computing (GrC to decompose an image into several granules depending on the structural features of patches. Then, we perform the PCA to learn the sparse representation basis corresponding to each granule. Finally, the hard-thresholding shrinkage is employed to remove the noises in patches. The patches in granule have the stationary local structural characteristic, so that our method can effectively improve the performance of hard-thresholding shrinkage. Experimental results indicate that the reconstructed image by the proposed algorithm has better objective quality when compared with several traditional ones. The edge and texture details in the reconstructed image are better preserved, which guarantees the better visual quality. Besides, our method has still a low computational complexity of reconstruction.

  14. Adaptive nonseparable vector lifting scheme for digital holographic data compression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Yafei; Kaaniche, Mounir; Pesquet-Popescu, Béatrice; Dufaux, Frédéric

    2015-01-01

    Holographic data play a crucial role in recent three-dimensional imaging as well as microscopic applications. As a result, huge amounts of storage capacity will be involved for this kind of data. Therefore, it becomes necessary to develop efficient hologram compression schemes for storage and transmission purposes. In this paper, we focus on the shifted distance information, obtained by the phase-shifting algorithm, where two sets of difference data need to be encoded. More precisely, a nonseparable vector lifting scheme is investigated in order to exploit the two-dimensional characteristics of the holographic contents. Simulations performed on different digital holograms have shown the effectiveness of the proposed method in terms of bitrate saving and quality of object reconstruction.

  15. Imaging the effect of hemoglobin on properties of RBCs using common-path digital holographic microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joglekar, M.; Shah, H.; Trivedi, V.; Mahajan, S.; Chhaniwal, V.; Leitgeb, R.; Javidi, B.; Anand, A.

    2017-07-01

    Adequate supply of oxygen to the body is the most essential requirement. In vertebrate species this function is performed by Hemoglobin contained in red blood cells. The mass concentration of the Hb determines the oxygen carrying capacity of the blood. Thus it becomes necessary to determine its concentration in the blood, which helps in monitoring the health of a person. If the amount of Hb crosses certain range, then it is considered critical. As the Hb constitutes upto 96% of red blood cells dry content, it would be interesting to examine various physical and mechanical parameters of RBCs which depends upon its concentration. Various diseases bring about significant variation in the amount of hemoglobin which may alter certain parameters of the RBC such as surface area, volume, membrane fluctuation etc. The study of the variations of these parameters may be helpful in determining Hb content which will reflect the state of health of a human body leading to disease diagnosis. Any increase or decrease in the amount of Hb will change the density and hence the optical thickness of the RBCs, which affects the cell membrane and thereby changing its mechanical and physical properties. Here we describe the use of lateral shearing digital holographic microscope for quantifying the cell parameters for studying the change in biophysical properties of cells due to variation in hemoglobin concentration.

  16. Alpha image reconstruction (AIR): A new iterative CT image reconstruction approach using voxel-wise alpha blending

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hofmann, Christian; Sawall, Stefan; Knaup, Michael; Kachelrieß, Marc

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Iterative image reconstruction gains more and more interest in clinical routine, as it promises to reduce image noise (and thereby patient dose), to reduce artifacts, or to improve spatial resolution. Among vendors and researchers, however, there is no consensus of how to best achieve these aims. The general approach is to incorporatea priori knowledge into iterative image reconstruction, for example, by adding additional constraints to the cost function, which penalize variations between neighboring voxels. However, this approach to regularization in general poses a resolution noise trade-off because the stronger the regularization, and thus the noise reduction, the stronger the loss of spatial resolution and thus loss of anatomical detail. The authors propose a method which tries to improve this trade-off. The proposed reconstruction algorithm is called alpha image reconstruction (AIR). One starts with generating basis images, which emphasize certain desired image properties, like high resolution or low noise. The AIR algorithm reconstructs voxel-specific weighting coefficients that are applied to combine the basis images. By combining the desired properties of each basis image, one can generate an image with lower noise and maintained high contrast resolution thus improving the resolution noise trade-off. Methods: All simulations and reconstructions are performed in native fan-beam geometry. A water phantom with resolution bar patterns and low contrast disks is simulated. A filtered backprojection (FBP) reconstruction with a Ram-Lak kernel is used as a reference reconstruction. The results of AIR are compared against the FBP results and against a penalized weighted least squares reconstruction which uses total variation as regularization. The simulations are based on the geometry of the Siemens Somatom Definition Flash scanner. To quantitatively assess image quality, the authors analyze line profiles through resolution patterns to define a contrast

  17. Adaptive reconstructions for magnetic resonance imaging of moving organs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lohezic, Maelene

    2011-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a valuable tool for the clinical diagnosis for brain imaging as well as cardiac and abdominal imaging. For instance, MRI is the only modality that enables the visualization and characterization myocardial edema. However, motion remains a challenging problem for cardiac MRI. Breathing as well as cardiac beating have to be carefully handled during patient examination. Moreover they limit the achievable temporal and spatial resolution of the images. In this work an approach that takes these physiological motions into account during image reconstruction process has been proposed. It allows performing cardiac examination while breathing freely. First, an iterative reconstruction algorithm, that compensates motion estimated from a motion model constrained by physiological signals, is applied to morphological cardiac imaging. A semi-automatic method for edema detection has been tested on reconstructed images. It has also been associated with an adaptive acquisition strategy which enables free-breathing end-systolic imaging. This reconstruction has then been extended to the assessment of transverse relaxation times T2, which is used for myocardial edema characterization. The proposed method, ARTEMIS, enables free-breathing T2 mapping without additional acquisition time. The proposed free breathing approaches take advantage of physiological signals to estimate the motion that occurs during MR acquisitions. Several solutions have been tested to measure this information. Among them, accelerometer-based external sensors allow local measurements at several locations. Another approach consists in the use of k-space based measurements, which are 'embedded' inside the MRI pulse sequence (navigator) and prevent from the requirement of additional recording hardware. Hence, several adaptive reconstruction algorithms were developed to obtain diagnostic information from free breathing acquisitions. These works allow performing efficient and accurate

  18. Improving parallel imaging by jointly reconstructing multi-contrast data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilgic, Berkin; Kim, Tae Hyung; Liao, Congyu; Manhard, Mary Kate; Wald, Lawrence L; Haldar, Justin P; Setsompop, Kawin

    2018-08-01

    To develop parallel imaging techniques that simultaneously exploit coil sensitivity encoding, image phase prior information, similarities across multiple images, and complementary k-space sampling for highly accelerated data acquisition. We introduce joint virtual coil (JVC)-generalized autocalibrating partially parallel acquisitions (GRAPPA) to jointly reconstruct data acquired with different contrast preparations, and show its application in 2D, 3D, and simultaneous multi-slice (SMS) acquisitions. We extend the joint parallel imaging concept to exploit limited support and smooth phase constraints through Joint (J-) LORAKS formulation. J-LORAKS allows joint parallel imaging from limited autocalibration signal region, as well as permitting partial Fourier sampling and calibrationless reconstruction. We demonstrate highly accelerated 2D balanced steady-state free precession with phase cycling, SMS multi-echo spin echo, 3D multi-echo magnetization-prepared rapid gradient echo, and multi-echo gradient recalled echo acquisitions in vivo. Compared to conventional GRAPPA, proposed joint acquisition/reconstruction techniques provide more than 2-fold reduction in reconstruction error. JVC-GRAPPA takes advantage of additional spatial encoding from phase information and image similarity, and employs different sampling patterns across acquisitions. J-LORAKS achieves a more parsimonious low-rank representation of local k-space by considering multiple images as additional coils. Both approaches provide dramatic improvement in artifact and noise mitigation over conventional single-contrast parallel imaging reconstruction. Magn Reson Med 80:619-632, 2018. © 2018 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2018 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  19. Filter and slice thickness selection in SPECT image reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivanovic, M.; Weber, D.A.; Wilson, G.A.; O'Mara, R.E.

    1985-01-01

    The choice of filter and slice thickness in SPECT image reconstruction as function of activity and linear and angular sampling were investigated in phantom and patient imaging studies. Reconstructed transverse and longitudinal spatial resolution of the system were measured using a line source in a water filled phantom. Phantom studies included measurements of the Data Spectrum phantom; clinical studies included tomographic procedures in 40 patients undergoing imaging of the temporomandibular joint. Slices of the phantom and patient images were evaluated for spatial of the phantom and patient images were evaluated for spatial resolution, noise, and image quality. Major findings include; spatial resolution and image quality improve with increasing linear sampling frequencies over the range of 4-8 mm/p in the phantom images, best spatial resolution and image quality in clinical images were observed at a linear sampling frequency of 6mm/p, Shepp and Logan filter gives the best spatial resolution for phantom studies at the lowest linear sampling frequency; smoothed Shepp and Logan filter provides best quality images without loss of resolution at higher frequencies and, spatial resolution and image quality improve with increased angular sampling frequency in the phantom at 40 c/p but appear to be independent of angular sampling frequency at 400 c/p

  20. Image Reconstruction Algorithm For Electrical Capacitance Tomography (ECT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arko

    2001-01-01

    ). Most image reconstruction algorithms for electrical capacitance tomography (ECT) use sensitivity maps as weighting factors. The computation is fast, involving a simple multiply-and- accumulate (MAC) operation, but the resulting image suffers from blurring due to the soft-field effect of the sensor. This paper presents a low cost iterative method employing proportional thresholding, which improves image quality dramatically. The strategy for implementation, computational cost, and achievable speed is examined when using a personal computer (PC) and Digital Signal Processor (DSP). For PC implementation, Watcom C++ 10.6 and Visual C++ 5.0 compilers were used. The experimental results are compared to the images reconstructed by commercially available software. The new algorithm improves the image quality significantly at a cost of a few iterations. This technique can be readily exploited for online applications

  1. Silhouette-based approach of 3D image reconstruction for automated image acquisition using robotic arm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azhar, N.; Saad, W. H. M.; Manap, N. A.; Saad, N. M.; Syafeeza, A. R.

    2017-06-01

    This study presents the approach of 3D image reconstruction using an autonomous robotic arm for the image acquisition process. A low cost of the automated imaging platform is created using a pair of G15 servo motor connected in series to an Arduino UNO as a main microcontroller. Two sets of sequential images were obtained using different projection angle of the camera. The silhouette-based approach is used in this study for 3D reconstruction from the sequential images captured from several different angles of the object. Other than that, an analysis based on the effect of different number of sequential images on the accuracy of 3D model reconstruction was also carried out with a fixed projection angle of the camera. The effecting elements in the 3D reconstruction are discussed and the overall result of the analysis is concluded according to the prototype of imaging platform.

  2. Blockwise conjugate gradient methods for image reconstruction in volumetric CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, W; Titley-Peloquin, D; Soleimani, M

    2012-11-01

    Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) enables volumetric image reconstruction from 2D projection data and plays an important role in image guided radiation therapy (IGRT). Filtered back projection is still the most frequently used algorithm in applications. The algorithm discretizes the scanning process (forward projection) into a system of linear equations, which must then be solved to recover images from measured projection data. The conjugate gradients (CG) algorithm and its variants can be used to solve (possibly regularized) linear systems of equations Ax=b and linear least squares problems minx∥b-Ax∥2, especially when the matrix A is very large and sparse. Their applications can be found in a general CT context, but in tomography problems (e.g. CBCT reconstruction) they have not widely been used. Hence, CBCT reconstruction using the CG-type algorithm LSQR was implemented and studied in this paper. In CBCT reconstruction, the main computational challenge is that the matrix A usually is very large, and storing it in full requires an amount of memory well beyond the reach of commodity computers. Because of these memory capacity constraints, only a small fraction of the weighting matrix A is typically used, leading to a poor reconstruction. In this paper, to overcome this difficulty, the matrix A is partitioned and stored blockwise, and blockwise matrix-vector multiplications are implemented within LSQR. This implementation allows us to use the full weighting matrix A for CBCT reconstruction without further enhancing computer standards. Tikhonov regularization can also be implemented in this fashion, and can produce significant improvement in the reconstructed images. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Development of computed tomography system and image reconstruction algorithm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khairiah Yazid; Mohd Ashhar Khalid; Azaman Ahmad; Khairul Anuar Mohd Salleh; Ab Razak Hamzah

    2006-01-01

    Computed tomography is one of the most advanced and powerful nondestructive inspection techniques, which is currently used in many different industries. In several CT systems, detection has been by combination of an X-ray image intensifier and charge -coupled device (CCD) camera or by using line array detector. The recent development of X-ray flat panel detector has made fast CT imaging feasible and practical. Therefore this paper explained the arrangement of a new detection system which is using the existing high resolution (127 μm pixel size) flat panel detector in MINT and the image reconstruction technique developed. The aim of the project is to develop a prototype flat panel detector based CT imaging system for NDE. The prototype consisted of an X-ray tube, a flat panel detector system, a rotation table and a computer system to control the sample motion and image acquisition. Hence this project is divided to two major tasks, firstly to develop image reconstruction algorithm and secondly to integrate X-ray imaging components into one CT system. The image reconstruction algorithm using filtered back-projection method is developed and compared to other techniques. The MATLAB program is the tools used for the simulations and computations for this project. (Author)

  4. Dictionary Approaches to Image Compression and Reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziyad, Nigel A.; Gilmore, Erwin T.; Chouikha, Mohamed F.

    1998-01-01

    This paper proposes using a collection of parameterized waveforms, known as a dictionary, for the purpose of medical image compression. These waveforms, denoted as phi(sub gamma), are discrete time signals, where gamma represents the dictionary index. A dictionary with a collection of these waveforms is typically complete or overcomplete. Given such a dictionary, the goal is to obtain a representation image based on the dictionary. We examine the effectiveness of applying Basis Pursuit (BP), Best Orthogonal Basis (BOB), Matching Pursuits (MP), and the Method of Frames (MOF) methods for the compression of digitized radiological images with a wavelet-packet dictionary. The performance of these algorithms is studied for medical images with and without additive noise.

  5. System and method for three-dimensional image reconstruction using an absolute orientation sensor

    KAUST Repository

    Giancola, Silvio; Ghanem, Bernard; Schneider, Jens; Wonka, Peter

    2018-01-01

    A three-dimensional image reconstruction system includes an image capture device, an inertial measurement unit (IMU), and an image processor. The image capture device captures image data. The inertial measurement unit (IMU) is affixed to the image

  6. Joint model of motion and anatomy for PET image reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qiao Feng; Pan Tinsu; Clark, John W. Jr.; Mawlawi, Osama

    2007-01-01

    Anatomy-based positron emission tomography (PET) image enhancement techniques have been shown to have the potential for improving PET image quality. However, these techniques assume an accurate alignment between the anatomical and the functional images, which is not always valid when imaging the chest due to respiratory motion. In this article, we present a joint model of both motion and anatomical information by integrating a motion-incorporated PET imaging system model with an anatomy-based maximum a posteriori image reconstruction algorithm. The mismatched anatomical information due to motion can thus be effectively utilized through this joint model. A computer simulation and a phantom study were conducted to assess the efficacy of the joint model, whereby motion and anatomical information were either modeled separately or combined. The reconstructed images in each case were compared to corresponding reference images obtained using a quadratic image prior based maximum a posteriori reconstruction algorithm for quantitative accuracy. Results of these studies indicated that while modeling anatomical information or motion alone improved the PET image quantitation accuracy, a larger improvement in accuracy was achieved when using the joint model. In the computer simulation study and using similar image noise levels, the improvement in quantitation accuracy compared to the reference images was 5.3% and 19.8% when using anatomical or motion information alone, respectively, and 35.5% when using the joint model. In the phantom study, these results were 5.6%, 5.8%, and 19.8%, respectively. These results suggest that motion compensation is important in order to effectively utilize anatomical information in chest imaging using PET. The joint motion-anatomy model presented in this paper provides a promising solution to this problem

  7. Cryo-EM Structure Determination Using Segmented Helical Image Reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fromm, S A; Sachse, C

    2016-01-01

    Treating helices as single-particle-like segments followed by helical image reconstruction has become the method of choice for high-resolution structure determination of well-ordered helical viruses as well as flexible filaments. In this review, we will illustrate how the combination of latest hardware developments with optimized image processing routines have led to a series of near-atomic resolution structures of helical assemblies. Originally, the treatment of helices as a sequence of segments followed by Fourier-Bessel reconstruction revealed the potential to determine near-atomic resolution structures from helical specimens. In the meantime, real-space image processing of helices in a stack of single particles was developed and enabled the structure determination of specimens that resisted classical Fourier helical reconstruction and also facilitated high-resolution structure determination. Despite the progress in real-space analysis, the combination of Fourier and real-space processing is still commonly used to better estimate the symmetry parameters as the imposition of the correct helical symmetry is essential for high-resolution structure determination. Recent hardware advancement by the introduction of direct electron detectors has significantly enhanced the image quality and together with improved image processing procedures has made segmented helical reconstruction a very productive cryo-EM structure determination method. © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. CT image reconstruction system based on hardware implementation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, Hamilton P. da; Evseev, Ivan; Schelin, Hugo R.; Paschuk, Sergei A.; Milhoretto, Edney; Setti, Joao A.P.; Zibetti, Marcelo; Hormaza, Joel M.; Lopes, Ricardo T.

    2009-01-01

    Full text: The timing factor is very important for medical imaging systems, which can nowadays be synchronized by vital human signals, like heartbeats or breath. The use of hardware implemented devices in such a system has advantages considering the high speed of information treatment combined with arbitrary low cost on the market. This article refers to a hardware system which is based on electronic programmable logic called FPGA, model Cyclone II from ALTERA Corporation. The hardware was implemented on the UP3 ALTERA Kit. A partially connected neural network with unitary weights was programmed. The system was tested with 60 topographic projections, 100 points in each, of the Shepp and Logan phantom created by MATLAB. The main restriction was found to be the memory size available on the device: the dynamic range of reconstructed image was limited to 0 65535. Also, the normalization factor must be observed in order to do not saturate the image during the reconstruction and filtering process. The test shows a principal possibility to build CT image reconstruction systems for any reasonable amount of input data by arranging the parallel work of the hardware units like we have tested. However, further studies are necessary for better understanding of the error propagation from topographic projections to reconstructed image within the implemented method. (author)

  9. PET image reconstruction: mean, variance, and optimal minimax criterion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Huafeng; Guo, Min; Gao, Fei; Shi, Pengcheng; Xue, Liying; Nie, Jing

    2015-01-01

    Given the noise nature of positron emission tomography (PET) measurements, it is critical to know the image quality and reliability as well as expected radioactivity map (mean image) for both qualitative interpretation and quantitative analysis. While existing efforts have often been devoted to providing only the reconstructed mean image, we present a unified framework for joint estimation of the mean and corresponding variance of the radioactivity map based on an efficient optimal min–max criterion. The proposed framework formulates the PET image reconstruction problem to be a transformation from system uncertainties to estimation errors, where the minimax criterion is adopted to minimize the estimation errors with possibly maximized system uncertainties. The estimation errors, in the form of a covariance matrix, express the measurement uncertainties in a complete way. The framework is then optimized by ∞-norm optimization and solved with the corresponding H ∞ filter. Unlike conventional statistical reconstruction algorithms, that rely on the statistical modeling methods of the measurement data or noise, the proposed joint estimation stands from the point of view of signal energies and can handle from imperfect statistical assumptions to even no a priori statistical assumptions. The performance and accuracy of reconstructed mean and variance images are validated using Monte Carlo simulations. Experiments on phantom scans with a small animal PET scanner and real patient scans are also conducted for assessment of clinical potential. (paper)

  10. Angular multiplexing holograms of four images recorded on photopolymer films with recording-film-thickness-dependent holographic characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osabe, Keiichi; Kawai, Kotaro

    2017-03-01

    In this study, angular multiplexing hologram recording photopolymer films were studied experimentally. The films contained acrylamide as a monomer, eosin Y as a sensitizer, and triethanolamine as a promoter in a polyvinyl alcohol matrix. In order to determine the appropriate thickness of the photopolymer films for angular multiplexing, photopolymer films with thicknesses of 29-503 μm were exposed to two intersecting beams of a YVO laser at a wavelength of 532 nm to form a holographic grating with a spatial frequency of 653 line/mm. The diffraction efficiencies as a function of the incident angle of reconstruction were measured. A narrow angular bandwidth and high diffraction efficiency are required for angular multiplexing; hence, we define the Q value, which is the diffraction efficiency divided by half the bandwidth. The Q value of the films depended on the thickness of the films, and was calculated based on the measured diffraction efficiencies. The Q value of a 297-μm-thick film was the highest of the all films. Therefore, the angular multiplexing experiments were conducted using 300-μm-thick films. In the angular multiplexing experiments, the object beam transmitted by a square aperture was focused by a Fourier transform lens and interfered with a reference beam. The maximum order of angular multiplexing was four. The signal intensity that corresponds to the squared-aperture transmission and the noise intensity that corresponds to transmission without the square aperture were measured. The signal intensities decreased as the order of angular multiplexing increased, and the noise intensities were not dependent on the order of angular multiplexing.

  11. Software for 3D diagnostic image reconstruction and analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taton, G.; Rokita, E.; Sierzega, M.; Klek, S.; Kulig, J.; Urbanik, A.

    2005-01-01

    Recent advances in computer technologies have opened new frontiers in medical diagnostics. Interesting possibilities are the use of three-dimensional (3D) imaging and the combination of images from different modalities. Software prepared in our laboratories devoted to 3D image reconstruction and analysis from computed tomography and ultrasonography is presented. In developing our software it was assumed that it should be applicable in standard medical practice, i.e. it should work effectively with a PC. An additional feature is the possibility of combining 3D images from different modalities. The reconstruction and data processing can be conducted using a standard PC, so low investment costs result in the introduction of advanced and useful diagnostic possibilities. The program was tested on a PC using DICOM data from computed tomography and TIFF files obtained from a 3D ultrasound system. The results of the anthropomorphic phantom and patient data were taken into consideration. A new approach was used to achieve spatial correlation of two independently obtained 3D images. The method relies on the use of four pairs of markers within the regions under consideration. The user selects the markers manually and the computer calculates the transformations necessary for coupling the images. The main software feature is the possibility of 3D image reconstruction from a series of two-dimensional (2D) images. The reconstructed 3D image can be: (1) viewed with the most popular methods of 3D image viewing, (2) filtered and processed to improve image quality, (3) analyzed quantitatively (geometrical measurements), and (4) coupled with another, independently acquired 3D image. The reconstructed and processed 3D image can be stored at every stage of image processing. The overall software performance was good considering the relatively low costs of the hardware used and the huge data sets processed. The program can be freely used and tested (source code and program available at

  12. Parametric image reconstruction using spectral analysis of PET projection data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meikle, Steven R.; Matthews, Julian C.; Cunningham, Vincent J.; Bailey, Dale L.; Livieratos, Lefteris; Jones, Terry; Price, Pat

    1998-01-01

    Spectral analysis is a general modelling approach that enables calculation of parametric images from reconstructed tracer kinetic data independent of an assumed compartmental structure. We investigated the validity of applying spectral analysis directly to projection data motivated by the advantages that: (i) the number of reconstructions is reduced by an order of magnitude and (ii) iterative reconstruction becomes practical which may improve signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). A dynamic software phantom with typical 2-[ 11 C]thymidine kinetics was used to compare projection-based and image-based methods and to assess bias-variance trade-offs using iterative expectation maximization (EM) reconstruction. We found that the two approaches are not exactly equivalent due to properties of the non-negative least-squares algorithm. However, the differences are small ( 1 and, to a lesser extent, VD). The optimal number of EM iterations was 15-30 with up to a two-fold improvement in SNR over filtered back projection. We conclude that projection-based spectral analysis with EM reconstruction yields accurate parametric images with high SNR and has potential application to a wide range of positron emission tomography ligands. (author)

  13. Generalized Fourier slice theorem for cone-beam image reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Shuang-Ren; Jiang, Dazong; Yang, Kevin; Yang, Kang

    2015-01-01

    The cone-beam reconstruction theory has been proposed by Kirillov in 1961, Tuy in 1983, Feldkamp in 1984, Smith in 1985, Pierre Grangeat in 1990. The Fourier slice theorem is proposed by Bracewell 1956, which leads to the Fourier image reconstruction method for parallel-beam geometry. The Fourier slice theorem is extended to fan-beam geometry by Zhao in 1993 and 1995. By combining the above mentioned cone-beam image reconstruction theory and the above mentioned Fourier slice theory of fan-beam geometry, the Fourier slice theorem in cone-beam geometry is proposed by Zhao 1995 in short conference publication. This article offers the details of the derivation and implementation of this Fourier slice theorem for cone-beam geometry. Especially the problem of the reconstruction from Fourier domain has been overcome, which is that the value of in the origin of Fourier space is 0/0. The 0/0 type of limit is proper handled. As examples, the implementation results for the single circle and two perpendicular circle source orbits are shown. In the cone-beam reconstruction if a interpolation process is considered, the number of the calculations for the generalized Fourier slice theorem algorithm is O(N^4), which is close to the filtered back-projection method, here N is the image size of 1-dimension. However the interpolation process can be avoid, in that case the number of the calculations is O(N5).

  14. Dynamic PET Image reconstruction for parametric imaging using the HYPR kernel method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, Benjamin; Qi, Jinyi; Badawi, Ramsey D.; Wang, Guobao

    2017-03-01

    Dynamic PET image reconstruction is a challenging problem because of the ill-conditioned nature of PET and the lowcounting statistics resulted from short time-frames in dynamic imaging. The kernel method for image reconstruction has been developed to improve image reconstruction of low-count PET data by incorporating prior information derived from high-count composite data. In contrast to most of the existing regularization-based methods, the kernel method embeds image prior information in the forward projection model and does not require an explicit regularization term in the reconstruction formula. Inspired by the existing highly constrained back-projection (HYPR) algorithm for dynamic PET image denoising, we propose in this work a new type of kernel that is simpler to implement and further improves the kernel-based dynamic PET image reconstruction. Our evaluation study using a physical phantom scan with synthetic FDG tracer kinetics has demonstrated that the new HYPR kernel-based reconstruction can achieve a better region-of-interest (ROI) bias versus standard deviation trade-off for dynamic PET parametric imaging than the post-reconstruction HYPR denoising method and the previously used nonlocal-means kernel.

  15. The influence of image reconstruction algorithms on linear thorax EIT image analysis of ventilation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, Zhanqi; Möller, Knut; Frerichs, Inéz; Pulletz, Sven; Müller-Lisse, Ullrich

    2014-01-01

    Analysis methods of electrical impedance tomography (EIT) images based on different reconstruction algorithms were examined. EIT measurements were performed on eight mechanically ventilated patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome. A maneuver with step increase of airway pressure was performed. EIT raw data were reconstructed offline with (1) filtered back-projection (BP); (2) the Dräger algorithm based on linearized Newton–Raphson (DR); (3) the GREIT (Graz consensus reconstruction algorithm for EIT) reconstruction algorithm with a circular forward model (GR C ) and (4) GREIT with individual thorax geometry (GR T ). Individual thorax contours were automatically determined from the routine computed tomography images. Five indices were calculated on the resulting EIT images respectively: (a) the ratio between tidal and deep inflation impedance changes; (b) tidal impedance changes in the right and left lungs; (c) center of gravity; (d) the global inhomogeneity index and (e) ventilation delay at mid-dorsal regions. No significant differences were found in all examined indices among the four reconstruction algorithms (p > 0.2, Kruskal–Wallis test). The examined algorithms used for EIT image reconstruction do not influence the selected indices derived from the EIT image analysis. Indices that validated for images with one reconstruction algorithm are also valid for other reconstruction algorithms. (paper)

  16. The influence of image reconstruction algorithms on linear thorax EIT image analysis of ventilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Zhanqi; Frerichs, Inéz; Pulletz, Sven; Müller-Lisse, Ullrich; Möller, Knut

    2014-06-01

    Analysis methods of electrical impedance tomography (EIT) images based on different reconstruction algorithms were examined. EIT measurements were performed on eight mechanically ventilated patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome. A maneuver with step increase of airway pressure was performed. EIT raw data were reconstructed offline with (1) filtered back-projection (BP); (2) the Dräger algorithm based on linearized Newton-Raphson (DR); (3) the GREIT (Graz consensus reconstruction algorithm for EIT) reconstruction algorithm with a circular forward model (GR(C)) and (4) GREIT with individual thorax geometry (GR(T)). Individual thorax contours were automatically determined from the routine computed tomography images. Five indices were calculated on the resulting EIT images respectively: (a) the ratio between tidal and deep inflation impedance changes; (b) tidal impedance changes in the right and left lungs; (c) center of gravity; (d) the global inhomogeneity index and (e) ventilation delay at mid-dorsal regions. No significant differences were found in all examined indices among the four reconstruction algorithms (p > 0.2, Kruskal-Wallis test). The examined algorithms used for EIT image reconstruction do not influence the selected indices derived from the EIT image analysis. Indices that validated for images with one reconstruction algorithm are also valid for other reconstruction algorithms.

  17. Image Reconstruction of Metal Pipe in Electrical Resistance Tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzanna RIDZUAN AW

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper demonstrates a Linear Back Projection (LBP algorithm based on the reconstruction of conductivity distributions to identify different sizes and locations of bubble phantoms in a metal pipe. Both forward and inverse problems are discussed. Reconstructed images of the phantoms under test conditions are presented. From the results, it was justified that the sensitivity maps of the conducting boundary strategy can be applied successfully in identifying the location for the phantom of interest using LBP algorithm. Additionally, the number and spatial distribution of the bubble phantoms can be clearly distinguished at any location in the pipeline. It was also shown that the reconstructed images agree well with the bubble phantoms.

  18. The feasibility of images reconstructed with the method of sieves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veklerov, E.; Llacer, J.

    1990-01-01

    The concept of sieves has been applied with the maximum likelihood estimator (MLE) to image reconstruction. While it makes it possible to recover smooth images consistent with the data, the degree of smoothness provided by it is arbitrary. It is shown that the concept of feasibility is able to resolve this arbitrariness. By varying the values of parameters determining the degree of smoothness, one can generate images on both sides of the feasibility region, as well as within the region. Feasible images recovered by using different sieve parameters are compared with feasible results of other procedures. One- and two-dimensional examples using both simulated and real data sets are considered

  19. Intelligent holographic databases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbastathis, George

    Memory is a key component of intelligence. In the human brain, physical structure and functionality jointly provide diverse memory modalities at multiple time scales. How could we engineer artificial memories with similar faculties? In this thesis, we attack both hardware and algorithmic aspects of this problem. A good part is devoted to holographic memory architectures, because they meet high capacity and parallelism requirements. We develop and fully characterize shift multiplexing, a novel storage method that simplifies disk head design for holographic disks. We develop and optimize the design of compact refreshable holographic random access memories, showing several ways that 1 Tbit can be stored holographically in volume less than 1 m3, with surface density more than 20 times higher than conventional silicon DRAM integrated circuits. To address the issue of photorefractive volatility, we further develop the two-lambda (dual wavelength) method for shift multiplexing, and combine electrical fixing with angle multiplexing to demonstrate 1,000 multiplexed fixed holograms. Finally, we propose a noise model and an information theoretic metric to optimize the imaging system of a holographic memory, in terms of storage density and error rate. Motivated by the problem of interfacing sensors and memories to a complex system with limited computational resources, we construct a computer game of Desert Survival, built as a high-dimensional non-stationary virtual environment in a competitive setting. The efficacy of episodic learning, implemented as a reinforced Nearest Neighbor scheme, and the probability of winning against a control opponent improve significantly by concentrating the algorithmic effort to the virtual desert neighborhood that emerges as most significant at any time. The generalized computational model combines the autonomous neural network and von Neumann paradigms through a compact, dynamic central representation, which contains the most salient features

  20. Electron image reconstruction of helical protein assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cremers, A.F.M.

    1980-01-01

    The analysis of projections of large ordered biological systems obtained by electron microscopy of negatively stained specimens is described. The biological structures amenable to this approach are constructed from a large number of identical protein molecules, which are arranged according to helical symmetry. Electron images of these structures generally contain sufficient information in order to calculate a three-dimensional density map. (Auth.)

  1. Single Image Super Resolution via Sparse Reconstruction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kruithof, M.C.; Eekeren, A.W.M. van; Dijk, J.; Schutte, K.

    2012-01-01

    High resolution sensors are required for recognition purposes. Low resolution sensors, however, are still widely used. Software can be used to increase the resolution of such sensors. One way of increasing the resolution of the images produced is using multi-frame super resolution algorithms.

  2. Realise : reconstruction of reality from image sequences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leymarie, F.; de la Fortelle, A.; Koenderink, Jan J.; Kappers, A. M L; Stavridi, M.; van Ginneken, B.; Muller, S.; Krake, S.; Faugeras, O.; Robert, L.; Gauclin, C.; Laveau, S.; Zeller, C.; Anon,

    1996-01-01

    REALISE has for principal goals to extract from sequences of images, acquired with a moving camera, information necessary for determining the 3D (CAD-like) structure of a real-life scene together with information about the radiometric signatures of surfaces bounding the extracted 3D objects (e.g.

  3. Fluorescence Image Segmentation by using Digitally Reconstructed Fluorescence Images

    OpenAIRE

    Blumer, Clemens; Vivien, Cyprien; Oertner, Thomas G; Vetter, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    In biological experiments fluorescence imaging is used to image living and stimulated neurons. But the analysis of fluorescence images is a difficult task. It is not possible to conclude the shape of an object from fluorescence images alone. Therefore, it is not feasible to get good manual segmented nor ground truth data from fluorescence images. Supervised learning approaches are not possible without training data. To overcome this issues we propose to synthesize fluorescence images and call...

  4. RECONSTRUCTION OF HUMAN LUNG MORPHOLOGY MODELS FROM MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reconstruction of Human Lung Morphology Models from Magnetic Resonance ImagesT. B. Martonen (Experimental Toxicology Division, U.S. EPA, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709) and K. K. Isaacs (School of Public Health, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27514)

  5. Use of a model for 3D image reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delageniere, S.; Grangeat, P.

    1991-01-01

    We propose a software for 3D image reconstruction in transmission tomography. This software is based on the use of a model and of the RADON algorithm developed at LETI. The introduction of a markovian model helps us to enhance contrast and straitened the natural transitions existing in the objects studied, whereas standard transform methods smoothe them

  6. Image quality of multiplanar reconstruction of pulmonary CT scans using adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honda, O; Yanagawa, M; Inoue, A; Kikuyama, A; Yoshida, S; Sumikawa, H; Tobino, K; Koyama, M; Tomiyama, N

    2011-04-01

    We investigated the image quality of multiplanar reconstruction (MPR) using adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR). Inflated and fixed lungs were scanned with a garnet detector CT in high-resolution mode (HR mode) or non-high-resolution (HR) mode, and MPR images were then reconstructed. Observers compared 15 MPR images of ASIR (40%) and ASIR (80%) with those of ASIR (0%), and assessed image quality using a visual five-point scale (1, definitely inferior; 5, definitely superior), with particular emphasis on normal pulmonary structures, artefacts, noise and overall image quality. The mean overall image quality scores in HR mode were 3.67 with ASIR (40%) and 4.97 with ASIR (80%). Those in non-HR mode were 3.27 with ASIR (40%) and 3.90 with ASIR (80%). The mean artefact scores in HR mode were 3.13 with ASIR (40%) and 3.63 with ASIR (80%), but those in non-HR mode were 2.87 with ASIR (40%) and 2.53 with ASIR (80%). The mean scores of the other parameters were greater than 3, whereas those in HR mode were higher than those in non-HR mode. There were significant differences between ASIR (40%) and ASIR (80%) in overall image quality (pASIR did not suppress the severe artefacts of contrast medium. In general, MPR image quality with ASIR (80%) was superior to that with ASIR (40%). However, there was an increased incidence of artefacts by ASIR when CT images were obtained in non-HR mode.

  7. Bayesian PET image reconstruction incorporating anato-functional joint entropy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang Jing; Rahmim, Arman

    2009-01-01

    We developed a maximum a posterior (MAP) reconstruction method for positron emission tomography (PET) image reconstruction incorporating magnetic resonance (MR) image information, with the joint entropy between the PET and MR image features serving as the regularization constraint. A non-parametric method was used to estimate the joint probability density of the PET and MR images. Using realistically simulated PET and MR human brain phantoms, the quantitative performance of the proposed algorithm was investigated. Incorporation of the anatomic information via this technique, after parameter optimization, was seen to dramatically improve the noise versus bias tradeoff in every region of interest, compared to the result from using conventional MAP reconstruction. In particular, hot lesions in the FDG PET image, which had no anatomical correspondence in the MR image, also had improved contrast versus noise tradeoff. Corrections were made to figures 3, 4 and 6, and to the second paragraph of section 3.1 on 13 November 2009. The corrected electronic version is identical to the print version.

  8. An automated 3D reconstruction method of UAV images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jun; Wang, He; Liu, Xiaoyang; Li, Feng; Sun, Guangtong; Song, Ping

    2015-10-01

    In this paper a novel fully automated 3D reconstruction approach based on low-altitude unmanned aerial vehicle system (UAVs) images will be presented, which does not require previous camera calibration or any other external prior knowledge. Dense 3D point clouds are generated by integrating orderly feature extraction, image matching, structure from motion (SfM) and multi-view stereo (MVS) algorithms, overcoming many of the cost, time limitations of rigorous photogrammetry techniques. An image topology analysis strategy is introduced to speed up large scene reconstruction by taking advantage of the flight-control data acquired by UAV. Image topology map can significantly reduce the running time of feature matching by limiting the combination of images. A high-resolution digital surface model of the study area is produced base on UAV point clouds by constructing the triangular irregular network. Experimental results show that the proposed approach is robust and feasible for automatic 3D reconstruction of low-altitude UAV images, and has great potential for the acquisition of spatial information at large scales mapping, especially suitable for rapid response and precise modelling in disaster emergency.

  9. Improvement of Quality of Reconstructed Images in Multi-Frame Fresnel Digital Holography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiao-Wei, Lu; Jing-Zhen, Li; Hong-Yi, Chen

    2010-01-01

    A modified reconstruction algorithm to improve the quality of reconstructed images of multi-frame Fresnel digital holography is presented. When the reference beams are plane or spherical waves with azimuth encoding, by introducing two spherical wave factors, images can be reconstructed with only one time Fourier transform. In numerical simulation, this algorithm could simplify the reconstruction process and improve the signal-to-noise ratio of the reconstructed images. In single-frame reconstruction experiments, the accurate reconstructed image is obtained with this simplified algorithm

  10. Terahertz Imaging for Biomedical Applications Pattern Recognition and Tomographic Reconstruction

    CERN Document Server

    Yin, Xiaoxia; Abbott, Derek

    2012-01-01

    Terahertz Imaging for Biomedical Applications: Pattern Recognition and Tomographic Reconstruction presents the necessary algorithms needed to assist screening, diagnosis, and treatment, and these algorithms will play a critical role in the accurate detection of abnormalities present in biomedical imaging. Terahertz biomedical imaging has become an area of interest due to its ability to simultaneously acquire both image and spectral information. Terahertz imaging systems are being commercialized with an increasing number of trials performed in a biomedical setting. Terahertz tomographic imaging and detection technology contributes to the ability to identify opaque objects with clear boundaries,and would be useful to both in vivo and ex vivo environments. This book also: Introduces terahertz radiation techniques and provides a number of topical examples of signal and image processing, as well as machine learning Presents the most recent developments in an emerging field, terahertz radiation Utilizes new methods...

  11. Three-dimensional reconstruction of functional brain images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inoue, Masato; Shoji, Kazuhiko; Kojima, Hisayoshi; Hirano, Shigeru; Naito, Yasushi; Honjo, Iwao

    1999-01-01

    We consider PET (positron emission tomography) measurement with SPM (Statistical Parametric Mapping) analysis to be one of the most useful methods to identify activated areas of the brain involved in language processing. SPM is an effective analytical method that detects markedly activated areas over the whole brain. However, with the conventional presentations of these functional brain images, such as horizontal slices, three directional projection, or brain surface coloring, makes understanding and interpreting the positional relationships among various brain areas difficult. Therefore, we developed three-dimensionally reconstructed images from these functional brain images to improve the interpretation. The subjects were 12 normal volunteers. The following three types of images were constructed: routine images by SPM, three-dimensional static images, and three-dimensional dynamic images, after PET images were analyzed by SPM during daily dialog listening. The creation of images of both the three-dimensional static and dynamic types employed the volume rendering method by VTK (The Visualization Toolkit). Since the functional brain images did not include original brain images, we synthesized SPM and MRI brain images by self-made C++ programs. The three-dimensional dynamic images were made by sequencing static images with available software. Images of both the three-dimensional static and dynamic types were processed by a personal computer system. Our newly created images showed clearer positional relationships among activated brain areas compared to the conventional method. To date, functional brain images have been employed in fields such as neurology or neurosurgery, however, these images may be useful even in the field of otorhinolaryngology, to assess hearing and speech. Exact three-dimensional images based on functional brain images are important for exact and intuitive interpretation, and may lead to new developments in brain science. Currently, the surface

  12. Three-dimensional reconstruction of functional brain images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inoue, Masato; Shoji, Kazuhiko; Kojima, Hisayoshi; Hirano, Shigeru; Naito, Yasushi; Honjo, Iwao [Kyoto Univ. (Japan)

    1999-08-01

    We consider PET (positron emission tomography) measurement with SPM (Statistical Parametric Mapping) analysis to be one of the most useful methods to identify activated areas of the brain involved in language processing. SPM is an effective analytical method that detects markedly activated areas over the whole brain. However, with the conventional presentations of these functional brain images, such as horizontal slices, three directional projection, or brain surface coloring, makes understanding and interpreting the positional relationships among various brain areas difficult. Therefore, we developed three-dimensionally reconstructed images from these functional brain images to improve the interpretation. The subjects were 12 normal volunteers. The following three types of images were constructed: routine images by SPM, three-dimensional static images, and three-dimensional dynamic images, after PET images were analyzed by SPM during daily dialog listening. The creation of images of both the three-dimensional static and dynamic types employed the volume rendering method by VTK (The Visualization Toolkit). Since the functional brain images did not include original brain images, we synthesized SPM and MRI brain images by self-made C++ programs. The three-dimensional dynamic images were made by sequencing static images with available software. Images of both the three-dimensional static and dynamic types were processed by a personal computer system. Our newly created images showed clearer positional relationships among activated brain areas compared to the conventional method. To date, functional brain images have been employed in fields such as neurology or neurosurgery, however, these images may be useful even in the field of otorhinolaryngology, to assess hearing and speech. Exact three-dimensional images based on functional brain images are important for exact and intuitive interpretation, and may lead to new developments in brain science. Currently, the surface

  13. Sparse Reconstruction Schemes for Nonlinear Electromagnetic Imaging

    KAUST Repository

    Desmal, Abdulla

    2016-03-01

    Electromagnetic imaging is the problem of determining material properties from scattered fields measured away from the domain under investigation. Solving this inverse problem is a challenging task because (i) it is ill-posed due to the presence of (smoothing) integral operators used in the representation of scattered fields in terms of material properties, and scattered fields are obtained at a finite set of points through noisy measurements; and (ii) it is nonlinear simply due the fact that scattered fields are nonlinear functions of the material properties. The work described in this thesis tackles the ill-posedness of the electromagnetic imaging problem using sparsity-based regularization techniques, which assume that the scatterer(s) occupy only a small fraction of the investigation domain. More specifically, four novel imaging methods are formulated and implemented. (i) Sparsity-regularized Born iterative method iteratively linearizes the nonlinear inverse scattering problem and each linear problem is regularized using an improved iterative shrinkage algorithm enforcing the sparsity constraint. (ii) Sparsity-regularized nonlinear inexact Newton method calls for the solution of a linear system involving the Frechet derivative matrix of the forward scattering operator at every iteration step. For faster convergence, the solution of this matrix system is regularized under the sparsity constraint and preconditioned by leveling the matrix singular values. (iii) Sparsity-regularized nonlinear Tikhonov method directly solves the nonlinear minimization problem using Landweber iterations, where a thresholding function is applied at every iteration step to enforce the sparsity constraint. (iv) This last scheme is accelerated using a projected steepest descent method when it is applied to three-dimensional investigation domains. Projection replaces the thresholding operation and enforces the sparsity constraint. Numerical experiments, which are carried out using

  14. A novel data processing technique for image reconstruction of penumbral imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Hongwei; Li, Hongyun; Xu, Zeping; Song, Guzhou; Zhang, Faqiang; Zhou, Lin

    2011-06-01

    CT image reconstruction technique was applied to the data processing of the penumbral imaging. Compared with other traditional processing techniques for penumbral coded pinhole image such as Wiener, Lucy-Richardson and blind technique, this approach is brand new. In this method, the coded aperture processing method was used for the first time independent to the point spread function of the image diagnostic system. In this way, the technical obstacles was overcome in the traditional coded pinhole image processing caused by the uncertainty of point spread function of the image diagnostic system. Then based on the theoretical study, the simulation of penumbral imaging and image reconstruction was carried out to provide fairly good results. While in the visible light experiment, the point source of light was used to irradiate a 5mm×5mm object after diffuse scattering and volume scattering. The penumbral imaging was made with aperture size of ~20mm. Finally, the CT image reconstruction technique was used for image reconstruction to provide a fairly good reconstruction result.

  15. Scattering calculation and image reconstruction using elevation-focused beams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, David P; Astheimer, Jeffrey P; Waag, Robert C

    2009-05-01

    Pressure scattered by cylindrical and spherical objects with elevation-focused illumination and reception has been analytically calculated, and corresponding cross sections have been reconstructed with a two-dimensional algorithm. Elevation focusing was used to elucidate constraints on quantitative imaging of three-dimensional objects with two-dimensional algorithms. Focused illumination and reception are represented by angular spectra of plane waves that were efficiently computed using a Fourier interpolation method to maintain the same angles for all temporal frequencies. Reconstructions were formed using an eigenfunction method with multiple frequencies, phase compensation, and iteration. The results show that the scattered pressure reduces to a two-dimensional expression, and two-dimensional algorithms are applicable when the region of a three-dimensional object within an elevation-focused beam is approximately constant in elevation. The results also show that energy scattered out of the reception aperture by objects contained within the focused beam can result in the reconstructed values of attenuation slope being greater than true values at the boundary of the object. Reconstructed sound speed images, however, appear to be relatively unaffected by the loss in scattered energy. The broad conclusion that can be drawn from these results is that two-dimensional reconstructions require compensation to account for uncaptured three-dimensional scattering.

  16. Three-dimensional image reconstruction from stereo DSA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakamoto, Kiyoshi; Kotoura, Noriko; Umehara, Takayoshi; Yamada, Eiji; Inaba, Tomohiro; Itou, Hiroshi

    1999-01-01

    The technique of interventional radiology has spread rapidly in recent years, and three-dimensional information from blood vessel images is being sought to enhance examinations. Stereo digital subtraction angiography (DSA) and rotational DSA were developed for that purpose. However, it is difficult with stereo DSA to observe the image pair during examination and to obtain positional information on blood vessels. Further, the exposure dose is increased in rotational DSA when many mask images need to be collected, and the patient is required to hold his or her breath for a long duration. We therefore devised a technique to construct three-dimensional blood vessel images by employing geometrical information extracted from stereo DSA images using the right and left images. We used a judgment method based on the correlation coefficient, although we had to extract an equal blood vessel from the right and left images to determine the three-dimensional coordinates of the blood vessel. The reconstructed three-dimensional blood vessels were projected from various angles, again by using a virtual focus, and new images were created. These image groups were displayed as rotational images by the animation display function incorporated in the DSA device. This system can observe blood vessel images of the same phase at a free angle, although the image quality is inferior to that of rotational DSA. In addition, because collection of the mask images is reduced, exposure dose can be decreased. Further, the system offers enhanced safety because no mechanical movement of the imaging system is involved. (author)

  17. Image quality of iterative reconstruction in cranial CT imaging: comparison of model-based iterative reconstruction (MBIR) and adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASiR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Notohamiprodjo, S; Deak, Z; Meurer, F; Maertz, F; Mueck, F G; Geyer, L L; Wirth, S

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare cranial CT (CCT) image quality (IQ) of the MBIR algorithm with standard iterative reconstruction (ASiR). In this institutional review board (IRB)-approved study, raw data sets of 100 unenhanced CCT examinations (120 kV, 50-260 mAs, 20 mm collimation, 0.984 pitch) were reconstructed with both ASiR and MBIR. Signal-to-noise (SNR) and contrast-to-noise (CNR) were calculated from attenuation values measured in caudate nucleus, frontal white matter, anterior ventricle horn, fourth ventricle, and pons. Two radiologists, who were blinded to the reconstruction algorithms, evaluated anonymized multiplanar reformations of 2.5 mm with respect to depiction of different parenchymal structures and impact of artefacts on IQ with a five-point scale (0: unacceptable, 1: less than average, 2: average, 3: above average, 4: excellent). MBIR decreased artefacts more effectively than ASiR (p ASiR was 2 (p ASiR (p ASiR. As CCT is an examination that is frequently required, the use of MBIR may allow for substantial reduction of radiation exposure caused by medical diagnostics. • Model-Based iterative reconstruction (MBIR) effectively decreased artefacts in cranial CT. • MBIR reconstructed images were rated with significantly higher scores for image quality. • Model-Based iterative reconstruction may allow reduced-dose diagnostic examination protocols.

  18. Optimized 3D Street Scene Reconstruction from Driving Recorder Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongjun Zhang

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents an automatic region detection based method to reconstruct street scenes from driving recorder images. The driving recorder in this paper is a dashboard camera that collects images while the motor vehicle is moving. An enormous number of moving vehicles are included in the collected data because the typical recorders are often mounted in the front of moving vehicles and face the forward direction, which can make matching points on vehicles and guardrails unreliable. Believing that utilizing these image data can reduce street scene reconstruction and updating costs because of their low price, wide use, and extensive shooting coverage, we therefore proposed a new method, which is called the Mask automatic detecting method, to improve the structure results from the motion reconstruction. Note that we define vehicle and guardrail regions as “mask” in this paper since the features on them should be masked out to avoid poor matches. After removing the feature points in our new method, the camera poses and sparse 3D points that are reconstructed with the remaining matches. Our contrast experiments with the typical pipeline of structure from motion (SfM reconstruction methods, such as Photosynth and VisualSFM, demonstrated that the Mask decreased the root-mean-square error (RMSE of the pairwise matching results, which led to more accurate recovering results from the camera-relative poses. Removing features from the Mask also increased the accuracy of point clouds by nearly 30%–40% and corrected the problems of the typical methods on repeatedly reconstructing several buildings when there was only one target building.

  19. Holographic Phonons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alberte, Lasma; Ammon, Martin; Jiménez-Alba, Amadeo; Baggioli, Matteo; Pujolàs, Oriol

    2018-04-01

    We present a class of holographic massive gravity models that realize a spontaneous breaking of translational symmetry—they exhibit transverse phonon modes whose speed relates to the elastic shear modulus according to elasticity theory. Massive gravity theories thus emerge as versatile and convenient theories to model generic types of translational symmetry breaking: explicit, spontaneous, and a mixture of both. The nature of the breaking is encoded in the radial dependence of the graviton mass. As an application of the model, we compute the temperature dependence of the shear modulus and find that it features a glasslike melting transition.

  20. Analyser-based phase contrast image reconstruction using geometrical optics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitchen, M J; Pavlov, K M; Siu, K K W; Menk, R H; Tromba, G; Lewis, R A

    2007-01-01

    Analyser-based phase contrast imaging can provide radiographs of exceptional contrast at high resolution (<100 μm), whilst quantitative phase and attenuation information can be extracted using just two images when the approximations of geometrical optics are satisfied. Analytical phase retrieval can be performed by fitting the analyser rocking curve with a symmetric Pearson type VII function. The Pearson VII function provided at least a 10% better fit to experimentally measured rocking curves than linear or Gaussian functions. A test phantom, a hollow nylon cylinder, was imaged at 20 keV using a Si(1 1 1) analyser at the ELETTRA synchrotron radiation facility. Our phase retrieval method yielded a more accurate object reconstruction than methods based on a linear fit to the rocking curve. Where reconstructions failed to map expected values, calculations of the Takagi number permitted distinction between the violation of the geometrical optics conditions and the failure of curve fitting procedures. The need for synchronized object/detector translation stages was removed by using a large, divergent beam and imaging the object in segments. Our image acquisition and reconstruction procedure enables quantitative phase retrieval for systems with a divergent source and accounts for imperfections in the analyser

  1. Robust linearized image reconstruction for multifrequency EIT of the breast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boverman, Gregory; Kao, Tzu-Jen; Kulkarni, Rujuta; Kim, Bong Seok; Isaacson, David; Saulnier, Gary J; Newell, Jonathan C

    2008-10-01

    Electrical impedance tomography (EIT) is a developing imaging modality that is beginning to show promise for detecting and characterizing tumors in the breast. At Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, we have developed a combined EIT-tomosynthesis system that allows for the coregistered and simultaneous analysis of the breast using EIT and X-ray imaging. A significant challenge in EIT is the design of computationally efficient image reconstruction algorithms which are robust to various forms of model mismatch. Specifically, we have implemented a scaling procedure that is robust to the presence of a thin highly-resistive layer of skin at the boundary of the breast and we have developed an algorithm to detect and exclude from the image reconstruction electrodes that are in poor contact with the breast. In our initial clinical studies, it has been difficult to ensure that all electrodes make adequate contact with the breast, and thus procedures for the use of data sets containing poorly contacting electrodes are particularly important. We also present a novel, efficient method to compute the Jacobian matrix for our linearized image reconstruction algorithm by reducing the computation of the sensitivity for each voxel to a quadratic form. Initial clinical results are presented, showing the potential of our algorithms to detect and localize breast tumors.

  2. Development of Image Reconstruction Algorithms in electrical Capacitance Tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandez Marron, J. L.; Alberdi Primicia, J.; Barcala Riveira, J. M.

    2007-01-01

    The Electrical Capacitance Tomography (ECT) has not obtained a good development in order to be used at industrial level. That is due first to difficulties in the measurement of very little capacitances (in the range of femto farads) and second to the problem of reconstruction on- line of the images. This problem is due also to the small numbers of electrodes (maximum 16), that made the usual algorithms of reconstruction has many errors. In this work it is described a new purely geometrical method that could be used for this purpose. (Author) 4 refs

  3. 3D Tomographic Image Reconstruction using CUDA C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dominguez, J. S.; Assis, J. T.; Oliveira, L. F. de

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents the study and implementation of a software for three dimensional reconstruction of images obtained with a tomographic system using the capabilities of Graphic Processing Units(GPU). The reconstruction by filtered back-projection method was developed using the CUDA C, for maximum utilization of the processing capabilities of GPUs to solve computational problems with large computational cost and highly parallelizable. It was discussed the potential of GPUs and shown its advantages to solving this kind of problems. The results in terms of runtime will be compared with non-parallelized implementations and must show a great reduction of processing time. (Author)

  4. Scattering Correction For Image Reconstruction In Flash Radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao, Liangzhi; Wang, Mengqi; Wu, Hongchun; Liu, Zhouyu; Cheng, Yuxiong; Zhang, Hongbo

    2013-01-01

    Scattered photons cause blurring and distortions in flash radiography, reducing the accuracy of image reconstruction significantly. The effect of the scattered photons is taken into account and an iterative deduction of the scattered photons is proposed to amend the scattering effect for image restoration. In order to deduct the scattering contribution, the flux of scattered photons is estimated as the sum of two components. The single scattered component is calculated accurately together with the uncollided flux along the characteristic ray, while the multiple scattered component is evaluated using correction coefficients pre-obtained from Monte Carlo simulations.The arbitrary geometry pretreatment and ray tracing are carried out based on the customization of AutoCAD. With the above model, an Iterative Procedure for image restORation code, IPOR, is developed. Numerical results demonstrate that the IPOR code is much more accurate than the direct reconstruction solution without scattering correction and it has a very high computational efficiency

  5. Scattering Correction For Image Reconstruction In Flash Radiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cao, Liangzhi; Wang, Mengqi; Wu, Hongchun; Liu, Zhouyu; Cheng, Yuxiong; Zhang, Hongbo [Xi' an Jiaotong Univ., Xi' an (China)

    2013-08-15

    Scattered photons cause blurring and distortions in flash radiography, reducing the accuracy of image reconstruction significantly. The effect of the scattered photons is taken into account and an iterative deduction of the scattered photons is proposed to amend the scattering effect for image restoration. In order to deduct the scattering contribution, the flux of scattered photons is estimated as the sum of two components. The single scattered component is calculated accurately together with the uncollided flux along the characteristic ray, while the multiple scattered component is evaluated using correction coefficients pre-obtained from Monte Carlo simulations.The arbitrary geometry pretreatment and ray tracing are carried out based on the customization of AutoCAD. With the above model, an Iterative Procedure for image restORation code, IPOR, is developed. Numerical results demonstrate that the IPOR code is much more accurate than the direct reconstruction solution without scattering correction and it has a very high computational efficiency.

  6. Tomographic Image Reconstruction Using Training Images with Matrix and Tensor Formulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Soltani, Sara

    the image resolution compared to a classical reconstruction method such as Filtered Back Projection (FBP). Some priors for the tomographic reconstruction take the form of cross-section images of similar objects, providing a set of the so-called training images, that hold the key to the structural......Reducing X-ray exposure while maintaining the image quality is a major challenge in computed tomography (CT); since the imperfect data produced from the few view and/or low intensity projections results in low-quality images that are suffering from severe artifacts when using conventional...... information about the solution. The training images must be reliable and application-specific. This PhD project aims at providing a mathematical and computational framework for the use of training sets as non-parametric priors for the solution in tomographic image reconstruction. Through an unsupervised...

  7. Monte-Carlo simulations and image reconstruction for novel imaging scenarios in emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gillam, John E.; Rafecas, Magdalena

    2016-01-01

    Emission imaging incorporates both the development of dedicated devices for data acquisition as well as algorithms for recovering images from that data. Emission tomography is an indirect approach to imaging. The effect of device modification on the final image can be understood through both the way in which data are gathered, using simulation, and the way in which the image is formed from that data, or image reconstruction. When developing novel devices, systems and imaging tasks, accurate simulation and image reconstruction allow performance to be estimated, and in some cases optimized, using computational methods before or during the process of physical construction. However, there are a vast range of approaches, algorithms and pre-existing computational tools that can be exploited and the choices made will affect the accuracy of the in silico results and quality of the reconstructed images. On the one hand, should important physical effects be neglected in either the simulation or reconstruction steps, specific enhancements provided by novel devices may not be represented in the results. On the other hand, over-modeling of device characteristics in either step leads to large computational overheads that can confound timely results. Here, a range of simulation methodologies and toolkits are discussed, as well as reconstruction algorithms that may be employed in emission imaging. The relative advantages and disadvantages of a range of options are highlighted using specific examples from current research scenarios.

  8. Monte-Carlo simulations and image reconstruction for novel imaging scenarios in emission tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gillam, John E. [The University of Sydney, Faculty of Health Sciences and The Brain and Mind Centre, Camperdown (Australia); Rafecas, Magdalena, E-mail: rafecas@imt.uni-luebeck.de [University of Lubeck, Institute of Medical Engineering, Ratzeburger Allee 160, 23538 Lübeck (Germany)

    2016-02-11

    Emission imaging incorporates both the development of dedicated devices for data acquisition as well as algorithms for recovering images from that data. Emission tomography is an indirect approach to imaging. The effect of device modification on the final image can be understood through both the way in which data are gathered, using simulation, and the way in which the image is formed from that data, or image reconstruction. When developing novel devices, systems and imaging tasks, accurate simulation and image reconstruction allow performance to be estimated, and in some cases optimized, using computational methods before or during the process of physical construction. However, there are a vast range of approaches, algorithms and pre-existing computational tools that can be exploited and the choices made will affect the accuracy of the in silico results and quality of the reconstructed images. On the one hand, should important physical effects be neglected in either the simulation or reconstruction steps, specific enhancements provided by novel devices may not be represented in the results. On the other hand, over-modeling of device characteristics in either step leads to large computational overheads that can confound timely results. Here, a range of simulation methodologies and toolkits are discussed, as well as reconstruction algorithms that may be employed in emission imaging. The relative advantages and disadvantages of a range of options are highlighted using specific examples from current research scenarios.

  9. SIRFING: Sparse Image Reconstruction For INterferometry using GPUs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cranmer, Miles; Garsden, Hugh; Mitchell, Daniel A.; Greenhill, Lincoln

    2018-01-01

    We present a deconvolution code for radio interferometric imaging based on the compressed sensing algorithms in Garsden et al. (2015). Being computationally intensive, compressed sensing is ripe for parallelization over GPUs. Our compressed sensing implementation generates images using wavelets, and we have ported the underlying wavelet library to CUDA, targeting the spline filter reconstruction part of the algorithm. The speedup achieved is almost an order of magnitude. The code is modular but is also being integrated into the calibration and imaging pipeline in use by the LEDA project at the Long Wavelength Array (LWA) as well as by the Murchinson Widefield Array (MWA).

  10. The SRT reconstruction algorithm for semiquantification in PET imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kastis, George A., E-mail: gkastis@academyofathens.gr [Research Center of Mathematics, Academy of Athens, Athens 11527 (Greece); Gaitanis, Anastasios [Biomedical Research Foundation of the Academy of Athens (BRFAA), Athens 11527 (Greece); Samartzis, Alexandros P. [Nuclear Medicine Department, Evangelismos General Hospital, Athens 10676 (Greece); Fokas, Athanasios S. [Department of Applied Mathematics and Theoretical Physics, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB30WA, United Kingdom and Research Center of Mathematics, Academy of Athens, Athens 11527 (Greece)

    2015-10-15

    Purpose: The spline reconstruction technique (SRT) is a new, fast algorithm based on a novel numerical implementation of an analytic representation of the inverse Radon transform. The mathematical details of this algorithm and comparisons with filtered backprojection were presented earlier in the literature. In this study, the authors present a comparison between SRT and the ordered-subsets expectation–maximization (OSEM) algorithm for determining contrast and semiquantitative indices of {sup 18}F-FDG uptake. Methods: The authors implemented SRT in the software for tomographic image reconstruction (STIR) open-source platform and evaluated this technique using simulated and real sinograms obtained from the GE Discovery ST positron emission tomography/computer tomography scanner. All simulations and reconstructions were performed in STIR. For OSEM, the authors used the clinical protocol of their scanner, namely, 21 subsets and two iterations. The authors also examined images at one, four, six, and ten iterations. For the simulation studies, the authors analyzed an image-quality phantom with cold and hot lesions. Two different versions of the phantom were employed at two different hot-sphere lesion-to-background ratios (LBRs), namely, 2:1 and 4:1. For each noiseless sinogram, 20 Poisson realizations were created at five different noise levels. In addition to making visual comparisons of the reconstructed images, the authors determined contrast and bias as a function of the background image roughness (IR). For the real-data studies, sinograms of an image-quality phantom simulating the human torso were employed. The authors determined contrast and LBR as a function of the background IR. Finally, the authors present plots of contrast as a function of IR after smoothing each reconstructed image with Gaussian filters of six different sizes. Statistical significance was determined by employing the Wilcoxon rank-sum test. Results: In both simulated and real studies, SRT

  11. The SRT reconstruction algorithm for semiquantification in PET imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kastis, George A.; Gaitanis, Anastasios; Samartzis, Alexandros P.; Fokas, Athanasios S.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The spline reconstruction technique (SRT) is a new, fast algorithm based on a novel numerical implementation of an analytic representation of the inverse Radon transform. The mathematical details of this algorithm and comparisons with filtered backprojection were presented earlier in the literature. In this study, the authors present a comparison between SRT and the ordered-subsets expectation–maximization (OSEM) algorithm for determining contrast and semiquantitative indices of 18 F-FDG uptake. Methods: The authors implemented SRT in the software for tomographic image reconstruction (STIR) open-source platform and evaluated this technique using simulated and real sinograms obtained from the GE Discovery ST positron emission tomography/computer tomography scanner. All simulations and reconstructions were performed in STIR. For OSEM, the authors used the clinical protocol of their scanner, namely, 21 subsets and two iterations. The authors also examined images at one, four, six, and ten iterations. For the simulation studies, the authors analyzed an image-quality phantom with cold and hot lesions. Two different versions of the phantom were employed at two different hot-sphere lesion-to-background ratios (LBRs), namely, 2:1 and 4:1. For each noiseless sinogram, 20 Poisson realizations were created at five different noise levels. In addition to making visual comparisons of the reconstructed images, the authors determined contrast and bias as a function of the background image roughness (IR). For the real-data studies, sinograms of an image-quality phantom simulating the human torso were employed. The authors determined contrast and LBR as a function of the background IR. Finally, the authors present plots of contrast as a function of IR after smoothing each reconstructed image with Gaussian filters of six different sizes. Statistical significance was determined by employing the Wilcoxon rank-sum test. Results: In both simulated and real studies, SRT

  12. Cellular Dynamics Revealed by Digital Holographic Microscopy☆

    KAUST Repository

    Marquet, P.; Depeursinge, Christian; Jourdain, P.

    2016-01-01

    Digital holographic microscopy (DHM) is a new optical method that provides, without the use of any contrast agent, real-time, three-dimensional images of transparent living cells, with an axial sensitivity of a few tens of nanometers. They result from the hologram numerical reconstruction process, which permits a sub wavelength calculation of the phase shift, produced on the transmitted wave front, by the optically probed cells, namely the quantitative phase signal (QPS). Specifically, in addition to measurements of cellular surface morphometry and intracellular refractive index (RI), various biophysical cellular parameters including dry mass, absolute volume, membrane fluctuations at the nanoscale and biomechanical properties, transmembrane water permeability as swell as current, can be derived from the QPS. This article presents how quantitative phase DHM (QP-DHM) can explored cell dynamics at the nanoscale with a special attention to both the study of neuronal dynamics and the optical resolution of local neuronal network.

  13. Cellular Dynamics Revealed by Digital Holographic Microscopy☆

    KAUST Repository

    Marquet, P.

    2016-11-22

    Digital holographic microscopy (DHM) is a new optical method that provides, without the use of any contrast agent, real-time, three-dimensional images of transparent living cells, with an axial sensitivity of a few tens of nanometers. They result from the hologram numerical reconstruction process, which permits a sub wavelength calculation of the phase shift, produced on the transmitted wave front, by the optically probed cells, namely the quantitative phase signal (QPS). Specifically, in addition to measurements of cellular surface morphometry and intracellular refractive index (RI), various biophysical cellular parameters including dry mass, absolute volume, membrane fluctuations at the nanoscale and biomechanical properties, transmembrane water permeability as swell as current, can be derived from the QPS. This article presents how quantitative phase DHM (QP-DHM) can explored cell dynamics at the nanoscale with a special attention to both the study of neuronal dynamics and the optical resolution of local neuronal network.

  14. LOR-interleaving image reconstruction for PET imaging with fractional-crystal collimation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Yusheng; Matej, Samuel; Karp, Joel S; Metzler, Scott D

    2015-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) has become an important modality in medical and molecular imaging. However, in most PET applications, the resolution is still mainly limited by the physical crystal sizes or the detector’s intrinsic spatial resolution. To achieve images with better spatial resolution in a central region of interest (ROI), we have previously proposed using collimation in PET scanners. The collimator is designed to partially mask detector crystals to detect lines of response (LORs) within fractional crystals. A sequence of collimator-encoded LORs is measured with different collimation configurations. This novel collimated scanner geometry makes the reconstruction problem challenging, as both detector and collimator effects need to be modeled to reconstruct high-resolution images from collimated LORs. In this paper, we present a LOR-interleaving (LORI) algorithm, which incorporates these effects and has the advantage of reusing existing reconstruction software, to reconstruct high-resolution images for PET with fractional-crystal collimation. We also develop a 3D ray-tracing model incorporating both the collimator and crystal penetration for simulations and reconstructions of the collimated PET. By registering the collimator-encoded LORs with the collimator configurations, high-resolution LORs are restored based on the modeled transfer matrices using the non-negative least-squares method and EM algorithm. The resolution-enhanced images are then reconstructed from the high-resolution LORs using the MLEM or OSEM algorithm. For validation, we applied the LORI method to a small-animal PET scanner, A-PET, with a specially designed collimator. We demonstrate through simulated reconstructions with a hot-rod phantom and MOBY phantom that the LORI reconstructions can substantially improve spatial resolution and quantification compared to the uncollimated reconstructions. The LORI algorithm is crucial to improve overall image quality of collimated PET, which

  15. D Reconstruction from Uav-Based Hyperspectral Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, L.; Xu, L.; Peng, J.

    2018-04-01

    Reconstructing the 3D profile from a set of UAV-based images can obtain hyperspectral information, as well as the 3D coordinate of any point on the profile. Our images are captured from the Cubert UHD185 (UHD) hyperspectral camera, which is a new type of high-speed onboard imaging spectrometer. And it can get both hyperspectral image and panchromatic image simultaneously. The panchromatic image have a higher spatial resolution than hyperspectral image, but each hyperspectral image provides considerable information on the spatial spectral distribution of the object. Thus there is an opportunity to derive a high quality 3D point cloud from panchromatic image and considerable spectral information from hyperspectral image. The purpose of this paper is to introduce our processing chain that derives a database which can provide hyperspectral information and 3D position of each point. First, We adopt a free and open-source software, Visual SFM which is based on structure from motion (SFM) algorithm, to recover 3D point cloud from panchromatic image. And then get spectral information of each point from hyperspectral image by a self-developed program written in MATLAB. The production can be used to support further research and applications.

  16. Holographic Aquaculture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ian, Richard; King, Elisabeth

    1988-01-01

    Proposed is an exploratory study to verify the feasibility of an inexpensive micro-climate control system for both marine and freshwater pond and tank aquaculture, offering good control over water temperature, incident light flux, and bandwidth, combined with good energy efficiency. The proposed control system utilizes some familiar components of passive solar design, together with a new holographic glazing system which is currently being developed by, and proprietary to Advanced Environmental Research Group (AERG). The use of solar algae ponds and tanks to warm and purify water for fish and attached macroscopic marine algae culture is an ancient and effective technique, but limited seasonally and geographically by the availability of sunlight. Holographic Diffracting Structures (HDSs) can be made which passively track, accept and/or reject sunlight from a wide range of altitude and azimuth angles, and redirect and distribute light energy as desired (either directly or indirectly over water surface in an enclosed, insulated structure), effectively increasing insolation values by accepting sunlight which would not otherwise enter the structure.

  17. Comparison of power spectra for tomosynthesis projections and reconstructed images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Engstrom, Emma; Reiser, Ingrid; Nishikawa, Robert

    2009-01-01

    Burgess et al. [Med. Phys. 28, 419-437 (2001)] showed that the power spectrum of mammographic breast background follows a power law and that lesion detectability is affected by the power-law exponent β which measures the amount of structure in the background. Following the study of Burgess et al., the authors measured and compared the power-law exponent of mammographic backgrounds in tomosynthesis projections and reconstructed slices to investigate the effect of tomosynthesis imaging on background structure. Our data set consisted of 55 patient cases. For each case, regions of interest (ROIs) were extracted from both projection images and reconstructed slices. The periodogram of each ROI was computed by taking the squared modulus of the Fourier transform of the ROI. The power-law exponent was determined for each periodogram and averaged across all ROIs extracted from all projections or reconstructed slices for each patient data set. For the projections, the mean β averaged across the 55 cases was 3.06 (standard deviation of 0.21), while it was 2.87 (0.24) for the corresponding reconstructions. The difference in β for a given patient between the projection ROIs and the reconstructed ROIs averaged across the 55 cases was 0.194, which was statistically significant (p<0.001). The 95% CI for the difference between the mean value of β for the projections and reconstructions was [0.170, 0.218]. The results are consistent with the observation that the amount of breast structure in the tomosynthesis slice is reduced compared to projection mammography and that this may lead to improved lesion detectability.

  18. Graph-cut based discrete-valued image reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuysuzoglu, Ahmet; Karl, W Clem; Stojanovic, Ivana; Castañòn, David; Ünlü, M Selim

    2015-05-01

    Efficient graph-cut methods have been used with great success for labeling and denoising problems occurring in computer vision. Unfortunately, the presence of linear image mappings has prevented the use of these techniques in most discrete-amplitude image reconstruction problems. In this paper, we develop a graph-cut based framework for the direct solution of discrete amplitude linear image reconstruction problems cast as regularized energy function minimizations. We first analyze the structure of discrete linear inverse problem cost functions to show that the obstacle to the application of graph-cut methods to their solution is the variable mixing caused by the presence of the linear sensing operator. We then propose to use a surrogate energy functional that overcomes the challenges imposed by the sensing operator yet can be utilized efficiently in existing graph-cut frameworks. We use this surrogate energy functional to devise a monotonic iterative algorithm for the solution of discrete valued inverse problems. We first provide experiments using local convolutional operators and show the robustness of the proposed technique to noise and stability to changes in regularization parameter. Then we focus on nonlocal, tomographic examples where we consider limited-angle data problems. We compare our technique with state-of-the-art discrete and continuous image reconstruction techniques. Experiments show that the proposed method outperforms state-of-the-art techniques in challenging scenarios involving discrete valued unknowns.

  19. Missing data reconstruction using Gaussian mixture models for fingerprint images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agaian, Sos S.; Yeole, Rushikesh D.; Rao, Shishir P.; Mulawka, Marzena; Troy, Mike; Reinecke, Gary

    2016-05-01

    Publisher's Note: This paper, originally published on 25 May 2016, was replaced with a revised version on 16 June 2016. If you downloaded the original PDF, but are unable to access the revision, please contact SPIE Digital Library Customer Service for assistance. One of the most important areas in biometrics is matching partial fingerprints in fingerprint databases. Recently, significant progress has been made in designing fingerprint identification systems for missing fingerprint information. However, a dependable reconstruction of fingerprint images still remains challenging due to the complexity and the ill-posed nature of the problem. In this article, both binary and gray-level images are reconstructed. This paper also presents a new similarity score to evaluate the performance of the reconstructed binary image. The offered fingerprint image identification system can be automated and extended to numerous other security applications such as postmortem fingerprints, forensic science, investigations, artificial intelligence, robotics, all-access control, and financial security, as well as for the verification of firearm purchasers, driver license applicants, etc.

  20. GPU based Monte Carlo for PET image reconstruction: parameter optimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cserkaszky, Á; Légrády, D.; Wirth, A.; Bükki, T.; Patay, G.

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents the optimization of a fully Monte Carlo (MC) based iterative image reconstruction of Positron Emission Tomography (PET) measurements. With our MC re- construction method all the physical effects in a PET system are taken into account thus superior image quality is achieved in exchange for increased computational effort. The method is feasible because we utilize the enormous processing power of Graphical Processing Units (GPUs) to solve the inherently parallel problem of photon transport. The MC approach regards the simulated positron decays as samples in mathematical sums required in the iterative reconstruction algorithm, so to complement the fast architecture, our work of optimization focuses on the number of simulated positron decays required to obtain sufficient image quality. We have achieved significant results in determining the optimal number of samples for arbitrary measurement data, this allows to achieve the best image quality with the least possible computational effort. Based on this research recommendations can be given for effective partitioning of computational effort into the iterations in limited time reconstructions. (author)

  1. Hierarchical Bayesian sparse image reconstruction with application to MRFM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobigeon, Nicolas; Hero, Alfred O; Tourneret, Jean-Yves

    2009-09-01

    This paper presents a hierarchical Bayesian model to reconstruct sparse images when the observations are obtained from linear transformations and corrupted by an additive white Gaussian noise. Our hierarchical Bayes model is well suited to such naturally sparse image applications as it seamlessly accounts for properties such as sparsity and positivity of the image via appropriate Bayes priors. We propose a prior that is based on a weighted mixture of a positive exponential distribution and a mass at zero. The prior has hyperparameters that are tuned automatically by marginalization over the hierarchical Bayesian model. To overcome the complexity of the posterior distribution, a Gibbs sampling strategy is proposed. The Gibbs samples can be used to estimate the image to be recovered, e.g., by maximizing the estimated posterior distribution. In our fully Bayesian approach, the posteriors of all the parameters are available. Thus, our algorithm provides more information than other previously proposed sparse reconstruction methods that only give a point estimate. The performance of the proposed hierarchical Bayesian sparse reconstruction method is illustrated on synthetic data and real data collected from a tobacco virus sample using a prototype MRFM instrument.

  2. Tomographic image reconstruction and rendering with texture-mapping hardware

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azevedo, S.G.; Cabral, B.K.; Foran, J.

    1994-07-01

    The image reconstruction problem, also known as the inverse Radon transform, for x-ray computed tomography (CT) is found in numerous applications in medicine and industry. The most common algorithm used in these cases is filtered backprojection (FBP), which, while a simple procedure, is time-consuming for large images on any type of computational engine. Specially-designed, dedicated parallel processors are commonly used in medical CT scanners, whose results are then passed to graphics workstation for rendering and analysis. However, a fast direct FBP algorithm can be implemented on modern texture-mapping hardware in current high-end workstation platforms. This is done by casting the FBP algorithm as an image warping operation with summing. Texture-mapping hardware, such as that on the Silicon Graphics Reality Engine (TM), shows around 600 times speedup of backprojection over a CPU-based implementation (a 100 Mhz R4400 in this case). This technique has the further advantages of flexibility and rapid programming. In addition, the same hardware can be used for both image reconstruction and for volumetric rendering. The techniques can also be used to accelerate iterative reconstruction algorithms. The hardware architecture also allows more complex operations than straight-ray backprojection if they are required, including fan-beam, cone-beam, and curved ray paths, with little or no speed penalties

  3. Image reconstruction from limited angle Compton camera data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomitani, T.; Hirasawa, M.

    2002-01-01

    The Compton camera is used for imaging the distributions of γ ray direction in a γ ray telescope for astrophysics and for imaging radioisotope distributions in nuclear medicine without the need for collimators. The integration of γ rays on a cone is measured with the camera, so that some sort of inversion method is needed. Parra found an analytical inversion algorithm based on spherical harmonics expansion of projection data. His algorithm is applicable to the full set of projection data. In this paper, six possible reconstruction algorithms that allow image reconstruction from projections with a finite range of scattering angles are investigated. Four algorithms have instability problems and two others are practical. However, the variance of the reconstructed image diverges in these two cases, so that window functions are introduced with which the variance becomes finite at a cost of spatial resolution. These two algorithms are compared in terms of variance. The algorithm based on the inversion of the summed back-projection is superior to the algorithm based on the inversion of the summed projection. (author)

  4. Complications of anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Papakonstantinou, Olympia; Chung, Christine B.; Chanchairujira, Kullanuch; Resnick, Donald L. [Department of Radiology, Veterans Affairs Medical Center, University of California, 3350 La Jolla Village Dr., San Diego, CA 92161 (United States)

    2003-05-01

    Arthroscopic reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) using autografts or allografts is being performed with increasing frequency, particularly in young athletes. Although the procedure is generally well tolerated, with good success rates, early and late complications have been documented. As clinical manifestations of graft complications are often non-specific and plain radiographs cannot directly visualize the graft and the adjacent soft tissues, MR imaging has a definite role in the diagnosis of complications after ACL reconstruction and may direct subsequent therapeutic management. Our purpose is to review the normal MR imaging of the ACL graft and present the MR imaging findings of a wide spectrum of complications after ACL reconstruction, such as graft impingement, graft rupture, cystic degeneration of the graft, postoperative infection of the knee, diffuse and localized (i.e., cyclops lesion) arthrofibrosis, and associated donor site abnormalities. Awareness of the MR imaging findings of complications as well as the normal appearances of the normal ACL graft is essential for correct interpretation. (orig.)

  5. Complications of anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Papakonstantinou, Olympia; Chung, Christine B.; Chanchairujira, Kullanuch; Resnick, Donald L.

    2003-01-01

    Arthroscopic reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) using autografts or allografts is being performed with increasing frequency, particularly in young athletes. Although the procedure is generally well tolerated, with good success rates, early and late complications have been documented. As clinical manifestations of graft complications are often non-specific and plain radiographs cannot directly visualize the graft and the adjacent soft tissues, MR imaging has a definite role in the diagnosis of complications after ACL reconstruction and may direct subsequent therapeutic management. Our purpose is to review the normal MR imaging of the ACL graft and present the MR imaging findings of a wide spectrum of complications after ACL reconstruction, such as graft impingement, graft rupture, cystic degeneration of the graft, postoperative infection of the knee, diffuse and localized (i.e., cyclops lesion) arthrofibrosis, and associated donor site abnormalities. Awareness of the MR imaging findings of complications as well as the normal appearances of the normal ACL graft is essential for correct interpretation. (orig.)

  6. Analyser-based phase contrast image reconstruction using geometrical optics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitchen, M J; Pavlov, K M; Siu, K K W; Menk, R H; Tromba, G; Lewis, R A

    2007-07-21

    Analyser-based phase contrast imaging can provide radiographs of exceptional contrast at high resolution (geometrical optics are satisfied. Analytical phase retrieval can be performed by fitting the analyser rocking curve with a symmetric Pearson type VII function. The Pearson VII function provided at least a 10% better fit to experimentally measured rocking curves than linear or Gaussian functions. A test phantom, a hollow nylon cylinder, was imaged at 20 keV using a Si(1 1 1) analyser at the ELETTRA synchrotron radiation facility. Our phase retrieval method yielded a more accurate object reconstruction than methods based on a linear fit to the rocking curve. Where reconstructions failed to map expected values, calculations of the Takagi number permitted distinction between the violation of the geometrical optics conditions and the failure of curve fitting procedures. The need for synchronized object/detector translation stages was removed by using a large, divergent beam and imaging the object in segments. Our image acquisition and reconstruction procedure enables quantitative phase retrieval for systems with a divergent source and accounts for imperfections in the analyser.

  7. Penalised Maximum Likelihood Simultaneous Longitudinal PET Image Reconstruction with Difference-Image Priors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Sam; Reader, Andrew J

    2018-04-26

    Many clinical contexts require the acquisition of multiple positron emission tomography (PET) scans of a single subject, for example to observe and quantify changes in functional behaviour in tumours after treatment in oncology. Typically, the datasets from each of these scans are reconstructed individually, without exploiting the similarities between them. We have recently shown that sharing information between longitudinal PET datasets by penalising voxel-wise differences during image reconstruction can improve reconstructed images by reducing background noise and increasing the contrast-to-noise ratio of high activity lesions. Here we present two additional novel longitudinal difference-image priors and evaluate their performance using 2D simulation studies and a 3D real dataset case study. We have previously proposed a simultaneous difference-image-based penalised maximum likelihood (PML) longitudinal image reconstruction method that encourages sparse difference images (DS-PML), and in this work we propose two further novel prior terms. The priors are designed to encourage longitudinal images with corresponding differences which have i) low entropy (DE-PML), and ii) high sparsity in their spatial gradients (DTV-PML). These two new priors and the originally proposed longitudinal prior were applied to 2D simulated treatment response [ 18 F]fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) brain tumour datasets and compared to standard maximum likelihood expectation-maximisation (MLEM) reconstructions. These 2D simulation studies explored the effects of penalty strengths, tumour behaviour, and inter-scan coupling on reconstructed images. Finally, a real two-scan longitudinal data series acquired from a head and neck cancer patient was reconstructed with the proposed methods and the results compared to standard reconstruction methods. Using any of the three priors with an appropriate penalty strength produced images with noise levels equivalent to those seen when using standard

  8. Micro patterned surfaces allow long-term digital holographic microscopy live cell imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mues, Sarah; Lilge, Inga; Schönherr, Holger; Kemper, Björn; Schnekenburger, Jürgen

    2017-07-01

    During long-term imaging, cells move out of the field of view. We have generated functionalized substrates containing rectangular areas, which were capable in keeping cells over the whole observation period.

  9. An efficient simultaneous reconstruction technique for tomographic particle image velocimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkinson, Callum; Soria, Julio

    2009-10-01

    To date, Tomo-PIV has involved the use of the multiplicative algebraic reconstruction technique (MART), where the intensity of each 3D voxel is iteratively corrected to satisfy one recorded projection, or pixel intensity, at a time. This results in reconstruction times of multiple hours for each velocity field and requires considerable computer memory in order to store the associated weighting coefficients and intensity values for each point in the volume. In this paper, a rapid and less memory intensive reconstruction algorithm is presented based on a multiplicative line-of-sight (MLOS) estimation that determines possible particle locations in the volume, followed by simultaneous iterative correction. Reconstructions of simulated images are presented for two simultaneous algorithms (SART and SMART) as well as the now standard MART algorithm, which indicate that the same accuracy as MART can be achieved 5.5 times faster or 77 times faster with 15 times less memory if the processing and storage of the weighting matrix is considered. Application of MLOS-SMART and MART to a turbulent boundary layer at Re θ = 2200 using a 4 camera Tomo-PIV system with a volume of 1,000 × 1,000 × 160 voxels is discussed. Results indicate improvements in reconstruction speed of 15 times that of MART with precalculated weighting matrix, or 65 times if calculation of the weighting matrix is considered. Furthermore the memory needed to store a large weighting matrix and volume intensity is reduced by almost 40 times in this case.

  10. Reconstruction of hyperspectral image using matting model for classification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Weiying; Li, Yunsong; Ge, Chiru

    2016-05-01

    Although hyperspectral images (HSIs) captured by satellites provide much information in spectral regions, some bands are redundant or have large amounts of noise, which are not suitable for image analysis. To address this problem, we introduce a method for reconstructing the HSI with noise reduction and contrast enhancement using a matting model for the first time. The matting model refers to each spectral band of an HSI that can be decomposed into three components, i.e., alpha channel, spectral foreground, and spectral background. First, one spectral band of an HSI with more refined information than most other bands is selected, and is referred to as an alpha channel of the HSI to estimate the hyperspectral foreground and hyperspectral background. Finally, a combination operation is applied to reconstruct the HSI. In addition, the support vector machine (SVM) classifier and three sparsity-based classifiers, i.e., orthogonal matching pursuit (OMP), simultaneous OMP, and OMP based on first-order neighborhood system weighted classifiers, are utilized on the reconstructed HSI and the original HSI to verify the effectiveness of the proposed method. Specifically, using the reconstructed HSI, the average accuracy of the SVM classifier can be improved by as much as 19%.

  11. Parallel MR image reconstruction using augmented Lagrangian methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramani, Sathish; Fessler, Jeffrey A

    2011-03-01

    Magnetic resonance image (MRI) reconstruction using SENSitivity Encoding (SENSE) requires regularization to suppress noise and aliasing effects. Edge-preserving and sparsity-based regularization criteria can improve image quality, but they demand computation-intensive nonlinear optimization. In this paper, we present novel methods for regularized MRI reconstruction from undersampled sensitivity encoded data--SENSE-reconstruction--using the augmented Lagrangian (AL) framework for solving large-scale constrained optimization problems. We first formulate regularized SENSE-reconstruction as an unconstrained optimization task and then convert it to a set of (equivalent) constrained problems using variable splitting. We then attack these constrained versions in an AL framework using an alternating minimization method, leading to algorithms that can be implemented easily. The proposed methods are applicable to a general class of regularizers that includes popular edge-preserving (e.g., total-variation) and sparsity-promoting (e.g., l(1)-norm of wavelet coefficients) criteria and combinations thereof. Numerical experiments with synthetic and in vivo human data illustrate that the proposed AL algorithms converge faster than both general-purpose optimization algorithms such as nonlinear conjugate gradient (NCG) and state-of-the-art MFISTA.

  12. Digital filtering and reconstruction of coded aperture images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tobin, K.W. Jr.

    1987-01-01

    The real-time neutron radiography facility at the University of Virginia has been used for both transmission radiography and computed tomography. Recently, a coded aperture system has been developed to permit the extraction of three dimensional information from a low intensity field of radiation scattered by an extended object. Short wave-length radiations (e.g. neutrons) are not easily image because of the difficulties in achieving diffraction and refraction with a conventional lens imaging system. By using a coded aperture approach, an imaging system has been developed that records and reconstructs an object from an intensity distribution. This system has a signal-to-noise ratio that is proportional to the total open area of the aperture making it ideal for imaging with a limiting intensity radiation field. The main goal of this research was to develope and implement the digital methods and theory necessary for the reconstruction process. Several real-time video systems, attached to an Intellect-100 image processor, a DEC PDP-11 micro-computer, and a Convex-1 parallel processing mainframe were employed. This system, coupled with theoretical extensions and improvements, allowed for retrieval of information previously unobtainable by earlier optical methods. The effect of thermal noise, shot noise, and aperture related artifacts were examined so that new digital filtering techniques could be constructed and implemented. Results of image data filtering prior to and following the reconstruction process are reported. Improvements related to the different signal processing methods are emphasized. The application and advantages of this imaging technique to the field of non-destructive testing are also discussed

  13. PHOTOGRAMMETRIC 3D BUILDING RECONSTRUCTION FROM THERMAL IMAGES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Maset

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper addresses the problem of 3D building reconstruction from thermal infrared (TIR images. We show that a commercial Computer Vision software can be used to automatically orient sequences of TIR images taken from an Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV and to generate 3D point clouds, without requiring any GNSS/INS data about position and attitude of the images nor camera calibration parameters. Moreover, we propose a procedure based on Iterative Closest Point (ICP algorithm to create a model that combines high resolution and geometric accuracy of RGB images with the thermal information deriving from TIR images. The process can be carried out entirely by the aforesaid software in a simple and efficient way.

  14. 3D Point Cloud Reconstruction from Single Plenoptic Image

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Murgia

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Novel plenoptic cameras sample the light field crossing the main camera lens. The information available in a plenoptic image must be processed, in order to create the depth map of the scene from a single camera shot. In this paper a novel algorithm, for the reconstruction of 3D point cloud of the scene from a single plenoptic image, taken with a consumer plenoptic camera, is proposed. Experimental analysis is conducted on several test images, and results are compared with state of the art methodologies. The results are very promising, as the quality of the 3D point cloud from plenoptic image, is comparable with the quality obtained with current non-plenoptic methodologies, that necessitate more than one image.

  15. Moving through a multiplex holographic scene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mrongovius, Martina

    2013-02-01

    This paper explores how movement can be used as a compositional element in installations of multiplex holograms. My holographic images are created from montages of hand-held video and photo-sequences. These spatially dynamic compositions are visually complex but anchored to landmarks and hints of the capturing process - such as the appearance of the photographer's shadow - to establish a sense of connection to the holographic scene. Moving around in front of the hologram, the viewer animates the holographic scene. A perception of motion then results from the viewer's bodily awareness of physical motion and the visual reading of dynamics within the scene or movement of perspective through a virtual suggestion of space. By linking and transforming the physical motion of the viewer with the visual animation, the viewer's bodily awareness - including proprioception, balance and orientation - play into the holographic composition. How multiplex holography can be a tool for exploring coupled, cross-referenced and transformed perceptions of movement is demonstrated with a number of holographic image installations. Through this process I expanded my creative composition practice to consider how dynamic and spatial scenes can be conveyed through the fragmented view of a multiplex hologram. This body of work was developed through an installation art practice and was the basis of my recently completed doctoral thesis: 'The Emergent Holographic Scene — compositions of movement and affect using multiplex holographic images'.

  16. Stokes image reconstruction for two-color microgrid polarization imaging systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemaster, Daniel A

    2011-07-18

    The Air Force Research Laboratory has developed a new microgrid polarization imaging system capable of simultaneously reconstructing linear Stokes parameter images in two colors on a single focal plane array. In this paper, an effective method for extracting Stokes images is presented for this type of camera system. It is also shown that correlations between the color bands can be exploited to significantly increase overall spatial resolution. Test data is used to show the advantages of this approach over bilinear interpolation. The bounds (in terms of available reconstruction bandwidth) on image resolution are also provided.

  17. Model-based microwave image reconstruction: simulations and experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ciocan, Razvan; Jiang Huabei

    2004-01-01

    We describe an integrated microwave imaging system that can provide spatial maps of dielectric properties of heterogeneous media with tomographically collected data. The hardware system (800-1200 MHz) was built based on a lock-in amplifier with 16 fixed antennas. The reconstruction algorithm was implemented using a Newton iterative method with combined Marquardt-Tikhonov regularizations. System performance was evaluated using heterogeneous media mimicking human breast tissue. Finite element method coupled with the Bayliss and Turkel radiation boundary conditions were applied to compute the electric field distribution in the heterogeneous media of interest. The results show that inclusions embedded in a 76-diameter background medium can be quantitatively reconstructed from both simulated and experimental data. Quantitative analysis of the microwave images obtained suggests that an inclusion of 14 mm in diameter is the smallest object that can be fully characterized presently using experimental data, while objects as small as 10 mm in diameter can be quantitatively resolved with simulated data

  18. A maximum entropy reconstruction technique for tomographic particle image velocimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bilsky, A V; Lozhkin, V A; Markovich, D M; Tokarev, M P

    2013-01-01

    This paper studies a novel approach for reducing tomographic PIV computational complexity. The proposed approach is an algebraic reconstruction technique, termed MENT (maximum entropy). This technique computes the three-dimensional light intensity distribution several times faster than SMART, using at least ten times less memory. Additionally, the reconstruction quality remains nearly the same as with SMART. This paper presents the theoretical computation performance comparison for MENT, SMART and MART, followed by validation using synthetic particle images. Both the theoretical assessment and validation of synthetic images demonstrate significant computational time reduction. The data processing accuracy of MENT was compared to that of SMART in a slot jet experiment. A comparison of the average velocity profiles shows a high level of agreement between the results obtained with MENT and those obtained with SMART. (paper)

  19. Enhancement of the optical image with a DC blocked spiral holographic pattern

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, Sung-In; Lee, Jung-Kyun; Song, Dong-Hoon; Choi, Dae-Sik; Ko, Do-Kyeong

    2011-01-01

    A modification of microscopy using a spiral phase plate, which enhanced the optical image by blocking the DC part of the object spectrum is presented. In conventional differential-interference-contrast microscopy, enhancement of optical images is achieved by interference of mutual coherent beams which experience different optical phases. This method increases the contrast of the optical image compared to normal microscopy, but the image still has some blurring around the edge of the sample. Our modification consists of placing a DC blocking region on an optical spatial filter, which allows us to achieve a sharp edge compared to the conventional one. By patterning the grating of the circular area in the center with a different direction (π/4 in our case), we could redirect the DC part of the Fourier component that passed through the center of the phase plate. By eliminating the DC part of the object spectrum, we could get a highly enhanced image and clearly observed the inside of the cheek cell, which was invisible otherwise.

  20. Dual-source CT coronary imaging in heart transplant recipients: image quality and optimal reconstruction interval

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bastarrika, Gorka; Arraiza, Maria; Pueyo, Jesus C.; Cecco, Carlo N. de; Ubilla, Matias; Mastrobuoni, Stefano; Rabago, Gregorio

    2008-01-01

    The image quality and optimal reconstruction interval for coronary arteries in heart transplant recipients undergoing non-invasive dual-source computed tomography (DSCT) coronary angiography was evaluated. Twenty consecutive heart transplant recipients who underwent DSCT coronary angiography were included (19 male, one female; mean age 63.1±10.7 years). Data sets were reconstructed in 5% steps from 30% to 80% of the R-R interval. Two blinded independent observers assessed the image quality of each coronary segments using a five-point scale (from 0 = not evaluative to 4=excellent quality). A total of 289 coronary segments in 20 heart transplant recipients were evaluated. Mean heart rate during the scan was 89.1±10.4 bpm. At the best reconstruction interval, diagnostic image quality (score ≥2) was obtained in 93.4% of the coronary segments (270/289) with a mean image quality score of 3.04± 0.63. Systolic reconstruction intervals provided better image quality scores than diastolic reconstruction intervals (overall mean quality scores obtained with the systolic and diastolic reconstructions 3.03±1.06 and 2.73±1.11, respectively; P<0.001). Different systolic reconstruction intervals (35%, 40%, 45% of RR interval) did not yield to significant differences in image quality scores for the coronary segments (P=0.74). Reconstructions obtained at the systolic phase of the cardiac cycle allowed excellent diagnostic image quality coronary angiograms in heart transplant recipients undergoing DSCT coronary angiography. (orig.)

  1. Volume holographic memory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cornelia Denz

    2000-05-01

    Full Text Available Volume holography represents a promising alternative to existing storage technologies. Its parallel data storage leads to high capacities combined with short access times and high transfer rates. The design and realization of a compact volume holographic storage demonstrator is presented. The technique of phase-coded multiplexing implemented to superimpose many data pages in a single location enables to store up to 480 holograms per storage location without any moving parts. Results of analog and digital data storage are shown and real time optical image processing is demonstrated.

  2. GPU based Monte Carlo for PET image reconstruction: detector modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Légrády; Cserkaszky, Á; Lantos, J.; Patay, G.; Bükki, T.

    2011-01-01

    Monte Carlo (MC) calculations and Graphical Processing Units (GPUs) are almost like the dedicated hardware designed for the specific task given the similarities between visible light transport and neutral particle trajectories. A GPU based MC gamma transport code has been developed for Positron Emission Tomography iterative image reconstruction calculating the projection from unknowns to data at each iteration step taking into account the full physics of the system. This paper describes the simplified scintillation detector modeling and its effect on convergence. (author)

  3. Image reconstruction using Monte Carlo simulation and artificial neural networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emert, F.; Missimner, J.; Blass, W.; Rodriguez, A.

    1997-01-01

    PET data sets are subject to two types of distortions during acquisition: the imperfect response of the scanner and attenuation and scattering in the active distribution. In addition, the reconstruction of voxel images from the line projections composing a data set can introduce artifacts. Monte Carlo simulation provides a means for modeling the distortions and artificial neural networks a method for correcting for them as well as minimizing artifacts. (author) figs., tab., refs

  4. Total variation superiorized conjugate gradient method for image reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zibetti, Marcelo V. W.; Lin, Chuan; Herman, Gabor T.

    2018-03-01

    The conjugate gradient (CG) method is commonly used for the relatively-rapid solution of least squares problems. In image reconstruction, the problem can be ill-posed and also contaminated by noise; due to this, approaches such as regularization should be utilized. Total variation (TV) is a useful regularization penalty, frequently utilized in image reconstruction for generating images with sharp edges. When a non-quadratic norm is selected for regularization, as is the case for TV, then it is no longer possible to use CG. Non-linear CG is an alternative, but it does not share the efficiency that CG shows with least squares and methods such as fast iterative shrinkage-thresholding algorithms (FISTA) are preferred for problems with TV norm. A different approach to including prior information is superiorization. In this paper it is shown that the conjugate gradient method can be superiorized. Five different CG variants are proposed, including preconditioned CG. The CG methods superiorized by the total variation norm are presented and their performance in image reconstruction is demonstrated. It is illustrated that some of the proposed variants of the superiorized CG method can produce reconstructions of superior quality to those produced by FISTA and in less computational time, due to the speed of the original CG for least squares problems. In the Appendix we examine the behavior of one of the superiorized CG methods (we call it S-CG); one of its input parameters is a positive number ɛ. It is proved that, for any given ɛ that is greater than the half-squared-residual for the least squares solution, S-CG terminates in a finite number of steps with an output for which the half-squared-residual is less than or equal to ɛ. Importantly, it is also the case that the output will have a lower value of TV than what would be provided by unsuperiorized CG for the same value ɛ of the half-squared residual.

  5. Fan beam image reconstruction with generalized Fourier slice theorem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Shuangren; Yang, Kang; Yang, Kevin

    2014-01-01

    For parallel beam geometry the Fourier reconstruction works via the Fourier slice theorem (or central slice theorem, projection slice theorem). For fan beam situation, Fourier slice can be extended to a generalized Fourier slice theorem (GFST) for fan-beam image reconstruction. We have briefly introduced this method in a conference. This paper reintroduces the GFST method for fan beam geometry in details. The GFST method can be described as following: the Fourier plane is filled by adding up the contributions from all fanbeam projections individually; thereby the values in the Fourier plane are directly calculated for Cartesian coordinates such avoiding the interpolation from polar to Cartesian coordinates in the Fourier domain; inverse fast Fourier transform is applied to the image in Fourier plane and leads to a reconstructed image in spacial domain. The reconstructed image is compared between the result of the GFST method and the result from the filtered backprojection (FBP) method. The major differences of the GFST and the FBP methods are: (1) The interpolation process are at different data sets. The interpolation of the GFST method is at projection data. The interpolation of the FBP method is at filtered projection data. (2) The filtering process are done in different places. The filtering process of the GFST is at Fourier domain. The filtering process of the FBP method is the ramp filter which is done at projections. The resolution of ramp filter is variable with different location but the filter in the Fourier domain lead to resolution invariable with location. One advantage of the GFST method over the FBP method is in short scan situation, an exact solution can be obtained with the GFST method, but it can not be obtained with the FBP method. The calculation of both the GFST and the FBP methods are at O(N^3), where N is the number of pixel in one dimension.

  6. Multiplexing storage using angular variation in a transmission holographic polymer dispersed liquid crystal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Eun-Hee; Jung, Yeon-Gil, E-mail: jungyg@changwon.ac.kr

    2015-12-01

    Simultaneous angular multiplexing of transmission gratings in a holographic polymer dispersed liquid crystal (HPDLC) film as a function of resin and film compositions, irradiation intensity, and cell thickness has been studied by exposing the material to three coherent laser beams. It was found that the diffraction efficiency monotonically increases with irradiation intensity and cell gap, whereas a maximum of 43% is obtained at specific compositions of trimethylolpropane triacrylate (TMPTA)/N-vinylpyrrolidone (NVP) = 8/1 and polymer/LC = 65/35. The multiplexed gratings have been captured using SEM imaging and the reconstructed images using a charge-coupled device camera, showing successful reconstructed images of gratings. - Highlights: • Multiplex images were well recorded using simultaneous angular method. • The periodic structures of the LC and polymer regions were well prepared. • The angular selectivity was variable nevertheless fabrication by three beams. • The images were successfully reconstructed in gratings of same spot.

  7. Multiplexing storage using angular variation in a transmission holographic polymer dispersed liquid crystal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Eun-Hee; Jung, Yeon-Gil

    2015-01-01

    Simultaneous angular multiplexing of transmission gratings in a holographic polymer dispersed liquid crystal (HPDLC) film as a function of resin and film compositions, irradiation intensity, and cell thickness has been studied by exposing the material to three coherent laser beams. It was found that the diffraction efficiency monotonically increases with irradiation intensity and cell gap, whereas a maximum of 43% is obtained at specific compositions of trimethylolpropane triacrylate (TMPTA)/N-vinylpyrrolidone (NVP) = 8/1 and polymer/LC = 65/35. The multiplexed gratings have been captured using SEM imaging and the reconstructed images using a charge-coupled device camera, showing successful reconstructed images of gratings. - Highlights: • Multiplex images were well recorded using simultaneous angular method. • The periodic structures of the LC and polymer regions were well prepared. • The angular selectivity was variable nevertheless fabrication by three beams. • The images were successfully reconstructed in gratings of same spot.

  8. Three-Dimensional Identification of Microorganisms Using a Digital Holographic Microscope

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ning Wu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports a method for three-dimensional (3D analysis of shift-invariant pattern recognition and applies to holographic images digitally reconstructed from holographic microscopes. It is shown that the sequential application of a 2D filter to the plane-by-plane reconstruction of an optical field is exactly equivalent to the application of a more general filter with a 3D impulse response. We show that any 3D filters with arbitrary impulse response can be implemented in this way. This type of processing is applied to the two-class problem of distinguishing different types of bacteria. It is shown that the proposed technique can be easily implemented using a modified microscope to develop a powerful and cost-effective system with great potential for biological screening.

  9. Holographic method for site-resolved detection of a 2D array of ultracold atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Daniel Kai; Deissler, Benjamin; Limmer, Wolfgang; Hecker Denschlag, Johannes

    2016-08-01

    We propose a novel approach to site-resolved detection of a 2D gas of ultracold atoms in an optical lattice. A near-resonant laser beam is coherently scattered by the atomic array, and after passing a lens its interference pattern is holographically recorded by superimposing it with a reference laser beam on a CCD chip. Fourier transformation of the recorded intensity pattern reconstructs the atomic distribution in the lattice with single-site resolution. The holographic detection method requires only about two hundred scattered photons per atom in order to achieve a high reconstruction fidelity of 99.9 %. Therefore, additional cooling during detection might not be necessary even for light atomic elements such as lithium. Furthermore, first investigations suggest that small aberrations of the lens can be post-corrected in imaging processing.

  10. The evolution of phase holographic imaging from a research idea to publicly traded company

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egelberg, Peter

    2018-02-01

    Recognizing the value and unmet need for label-free kinetic cell analysis, Phase Holograhic Imaging defines its market segment as automated, easy to use and affordable time-lapse cytometry. The process of developing new technology, meeting customer expectations, sources of corporate funding and R&D adjustments prompted by field experience will be reviewed. Additionally, it is discussed how relevant biological information can be extracted from a sequence of quantitative phase images, with negligible user assistance and parameter tweaking, to simultaneously provide cell culture characteristics such as cell growth rate, viability, division rate, mitosis duration, phagocytosis rate, migration, motility and cell-cell adherence without requiring any artificial cell manipulation.

  11. The gridding method for image reconstruction by Fourier transformation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schomberg, H.; Timmer, J.

    1995-01-01

    This paper explores a computational method for reconstructing an n-dimensional signal f from a sampled version of its Fourier transform f. The method involves a window function w and proceeds in three steps. First, the convolution g = w * f is computed numerically on a Cartesian grid, using the available samples of f. Then, g = wf is computed via the inverse discrete Fourier transform, and finally f is obtained as g/w. Due to the smoothing effect of the convolution, evaluating w * f is much less error prone than merely interpolating f. The method was originally devised for image reconstruction in radio astronomy, but is actually applicable to a broad range of reconstructive imaging methods, including magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography. In particular, it provides a fast and accurate alternative to the filtered backprojection. The basic method has several variants with other applications, such as the equidistant resampling of arbitrarily sampled signals or the fast computation of the Radon (Hough) transform

  12. Ultrafast Holographic Image Recording by Single Shot Femtosecond Spectral Hole Burning

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rebane, Aleksander

    2001-01-01

    .... This allowed us to record image holograms with 150-fs duration pulses without need to accumulate the SHB effect from many exposures. Results of this research show that it is possible to perform optical recording of data in frequency-domain on ultrafast time scale. These results can be used also as a new diagnostic tool for femtosecond dynamics in various ultrafast optical interactions.

  13. X-ray holographic imaging of magnetic order in meander domain structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaouen Nicolas

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We performed x-ray holography experiments using synchrotron radiation. By analyzing the scattering of coherent circularly polarized x-rays tuned at the Co-2p resonance, we imaged perpendicular magnetic domains in a Co/Pd multilayer. We compare results obtained for continuous and laterally confined films.

  14. Enhanced imaging of microcalcifications in digital breast tomosynthesis through improved image-reconstruction algorithms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sidky, Emil Y.; Pan Xiaochuan; Reiser, Ingrid S.; Nishikawa, Robert M.; Moore, Richard H.; Kopans, Daniel B.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The authors develop a practical, iterative algorithm for image-reconstruction in undersampled tomographic systems, such as digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT). Methods: The algorithm controls image regularity by minimizing the image total p variation (TpV), a function that reduces to the total variation when p=1.0 or the image roughness when p=2.0. Constraints on the image, such as image positivity and estimated projection-data tolerance, are enforced by projection onto convex sets. The fact that the tomographic system is undersampled translates to the mathematical property that many widely varied resultant volumes may correspond to a given data tolerance. Thus the application of image regularity serves two purposes: (1) Reduction in the number of resultant volumes out of those allowed by fixing the data tolerance, finding the minimum image TpV for fixed data tolerance, and (2) traditional regularization, sacrificing data fidelity for higher image regularity. The present algorithm allows for this dual role of image regularity in undersampled tomography. Results: The proposed image-reconstruction algorithm is applied to three clinical DBT data sets. The DBT cases include one with microcalcifications and two with masses. Conclusions: Results indicate that there may be a substantial advantage in using the present image-reconstruction algorithm for microcalcification imaging.

  15. Optimization of PET image quality by means of 3D data acquisition and iterative image reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doll, J.; Zaers, J.; Trojan, H.; Bellemann, M.E.; Adam, L.E.; Haberkorn, U.; Brix, G.

    1998-01-01

    The experiments were performed at the latest-generation whole-body PET system ECAT EXACT HR + . For 2D data acquisition, a collimator of thin tungsten septa was positioned in the field-of-view. Prior to image reconstruction, the measured 3D data were sorted into 2D sinograms by using the Fourier rebinning (FORE) algorithm developed by M. Defrise. The standard filtered backprojection (FBP) method and an optimized ML/EM algorithm with overrelaxation for accelerated convergence were employed for image reconstruction. The spatial resolution of both methods as well as the convergence and noise properties of the ML/EM algorithm were studied in phantom measurements. Furthermore, patient data were acquired in the 2D mode as well as in the 3D mode and reconstructed with both techniques. At the same spatial resolution, the ML/EM-reconstructed images showed fewer and less prominent artefacts than the FBP-reconstructed images. The resulting improved detail conspicuously was achieved for the data acquired in the 2D mode as well as in the 3D mode. The best image quality was obtained by iterative 2D reconstruction of 3D data sets which were previously rebinned into 2D sinograms with help of the FORE algorithm. The phantom measurements revealed that 50 iteration steps with the otpimized ML/EM algorithm were sufficient to keep the relative quantitation error below 5%. (orig./MG) [de

  16. Specialized Color Targets for Spectral Reflectance Reconstruction of Magnified Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruschwitz, Jennifer D. T.

    Digital images are used almost exclusively instead of film to capture visual information across many scientific fields. The colorimetric color representation within these digital images can be relayed from the digital counts produced by the camera with the use of a known color target. In image capture of magnified images, there is currently no reliable color target that can be used at multiple magnifications and give the user a solid understanding of the color ground truth within those images. The first part of this dissertation included the design, fabrication, and testing of a color target produced with optical interference coated microlenses for use in an off-axis illumination, compound microscope. An ideal target was designed to increase the color gamut for colorimetric imaging and provide the necessary "Block Dye" spectral reflectance profiles across the visible spectrum to reduce the number of color patches necessary for multiple filter imaging systems that rely on statistical models for spectral reflectance reconstruction. There are other scientific disciplines that can benefit from a specialized color target to determine the color ground truth in their magnified images and perform spectral estimation. Not every discipline has the luxury of having a multi-filter imaging system. The second part of this dissertation developed two unique ways of using an interference coated color mirror target: one that relies on multiple light-source angles, and one that leverages a dynamic color change with time. The source multi-angle technique would be used for the microelectronic discipline where the reconstructed spectral reflectance would be used to determine a dielectric film thickness on a silicon substrate, and the time varying technique would be used for a biomedical example to determine the thickness of human tear film.

  17. Fast nonconvex nonsmooth minimization methods for image restoration and reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolova, Mila; Ng, Michael K; Tam, Chi-Pan

    2010-12-01

    Nonconvex nonsmooth regularization has advantages over convex regularization for restoring images with neat edges. However, its practical interest used to be limited by the difficulty of the computational stage which requires a nonconvex nonsmooth minimization. In this paper, we deal with nonconvex nonsmooth minimization methods for image restoration and reconstruction. Our theoretical results show that the solution of the nonconvex nonsmooth minimization problem is composed of constant regions surrounded by closed contours and neat edges. The main goal of this paper is to develop fast minimization algorithms to solve the nonconvex nonsmooth minimization problem. Our experimental results show that the effectiveness and efficiency of the proposed algorithms.

  18. Task-based optimization of image reconstruction in breast CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, Adrian A.; Sidky, Emil Y.; Pan, Xiaochuan

    2014-03-01

    We demonstrate a task-based assessment of image quality in dedicated breast CT in order to optimize the number of projection views acquired. The methodology we employ is based on the Hotelling Observer (HO) and its associated metrics. We consider two tasks: the Rayleigh task of discerning between two resolvable objects and a single larger object, and the signal detection task of classifying an image as belonging to either a signalpresent or signal-absent hypothesis. HO SNR values are computed for 50, 100, 200, 500, and 1000 projection view images, with the total imaging radiation dose held constant. We use the conventional fan-beam FBP algorithm and investigate the effect of varying the width of a Hanning window used in the reconstruction, since this affects both the noise properties of the image and the under-sampling artifacts which can arise in the case of sparse-view acquisitions. Our results demonstrate that fewer projection views should be used in order to increase HO performance, which in this case constitutes an upper-bound on human observer performance. However, the impact on HO SNR of using fewer projection views, each with a higher dose, is not as significant as the impact of employing regularization in the FBP reconstruction through a Hanning filter.

  19. Multi-view Multi-sparsity Kernel Reconstruction for Multi-class Image Classification

    KAUST Repository

    Zhu, Xiaofeng; Xie, Qing; Zhu, Yonghua; Liu, Xingyi; Zhang, Shichao

    2015-01-01

    This paper addresses the problem of multi-class image classification by proposing a novel multi-view multi-sparsity kernel reconstruction (MMKR for short) model. Given images (including test images and training images) representing with multiple

  20. Adjustable liquid aperture to eliminate undesirable light in holographic projection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Di; Liu, Chao; Li, Lei; Zhou, Xin; Wang, Qiong-Hua

    2016-02-08

    In this paper, we propose an adjustable liquid aperture to eliminate the undesirable light in a holographic projection. The aperture is based on hydrodynamic actuation. A chamber is formed with a cylindrical tube. A black droplet is filled in the sidewall of the cylinder tube and the outside space is the transparent oil which is immiscible with the black droplet. An ultrathin glass sheet is attached on the bottom substrate of the device and a black shading film is secured to the central area of the glass sheet. By changing the volume of the black droplet, the black droplet will move to the middle or sidewall due to hydrodynamic actuation, so the device can be used as an adjustable aperture. A divergent spherical wave and a solid lens are used to separate the focus planes of the reconstructed image and diffraction beams induced by the liquid crystal on silicon in the holographic projection. Then the aperture is used to eliminate the diffraction beams by adjusting the size of the liquid aperture and the holographic projection does not have undesirable light.

  1. Effects of illumination on image reconstruction via Fourier ptychography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Xinrui; Sinzinger, Stefan

    2017-12-01

    The Fourier ptychographic microscopy (FPM) technique provides high-resolution images by combining a traditional imaging system, e.g. a microscope or a 4f-imaging system, with a multiplexing illumination system, e.g. an LED array and numerical image processing for enhanced image reconstruction. In order to numerically combine images that are captured under varying illumination angles, an iterative phase-retrieval algorithm is often applied. However, in practice, the performance of the FPM algorithm degrades due to the imperfections of the optical system, the image noise caused by the camera, etc. To eliminate the influence of the aberrations of the imaging system, an embedded pupil function recovery (EPRY)-FPM algorithm has been proposed [Opt. Express 22, 4960-4972 (2014)]. In this paper, we study how the performance of FPM and EPRY-FPM algorithms are affected by imperfections of the illumination system using both numerical simulations and experiments. The investigated imperfections include varying and non-uniform intensities, and wavefront aberrations. Our study shows that the aberrations of the illumination system significantly affect the performance of both FPM and EPRY-FPM algorithms. Hence, in practice, aberrations in the illumination system gain significant influence on the resulting image quality.

  2. Sub-Angstrom microscopy through incoherent imaging and image reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pennycook, S.J.; Jesson, D.E.; Chisholm, M.F.; Ferridge, A.G.; Seddon, M.J.

    1992-03-01

    Z-contrast scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) with a high-angle annular detector breaks the coherence of the imaging process, and provides an incoherent image of a crystal projection. Even in the presence of strong dynamical diffraction, the image can be accurately described as a convolution between an object function, sharply peaked at the projected atomic sites, and the probe intensity profile. Such an image can be inverted intuitively without the need for model structures, and therefore provides the important capability to reveal unanticipated interfacial arrangements. It represents a direct image of the crystal projection, revealing the location of the atomic columns and their relative high-angle scattering power. Since no phase is associated with a peak in the object function or the contrast transfer function, extension to higher resolution is also straightforward. Image restoration techniques such as maximum entropy, in conjunction with the 1.3 Angstrom probe anticipated for a 300 kV STEM, appear to provide a simple and robust route to the achievement of sub-Angstrom resolution electron microscopy

  3. Multiresolution 3-D reconstruction from side-scan sonar images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coiras, Enrique; Petillot, Yvan; Lane, David M

    2007-02-01

    In this paper, a new method for the estimation of seabed elevation maps from side-scan sonar images is presented. The side-scan image formation process is represented by a Lambertian diffuse model, which is then inverted by a multiresolution optimization procedure inspired by expectation-maximization to account for the characteristics of the imaged seafloor region. On convergence of the model, approximations for seabed reflectivity, side-scan beam pattern, and seabed altitude are obtained. The performance of the system is evaluated against a real structure of known dimensions. Reconstruction results for images acquired by different sonar sensors are presented. Applications to augmented reality for the simulation of targets in sonar imagery are also discussed.

  4. Off-axis holographic laser speckle contrast imaging of blood vessels in tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdurashitov, Arkady; Bragina, Olga; Sindeeva, Olga; Sergey, Sindeev; Semyachkina-Glushkovskaya, Oxana V.; Tuchin, Valery V.

    2017-09-01

    Laser speckle contrast imaging (LSCI) has become one of the most common tools for functional imaging in tissues. Incomplete theoretical description and sophisticated interpretation of measurement results are completely sidelined by a low-cost and simple hardware, fastness, consistent results, and repeatability. In addition to the relatively low measuring volume with around 700 μm of the probing depth for the visible spectral range of illumination, there is no depth selectivity in conventional LSCI configuration; furthermore, in a case of high NA objective, the actual penetration depth of light in tissues is greater than depth of field (DOF) of an imaging system. Thus, the information about these out-of-focus regions persists in the recorded frames but cannot be retrieved due to intensity-based registration method. We propose a simple modification of LSCI system based on the off-axis holography to introduce after-registration refocusing ability to overcome both depth-selectivity and DOF problems as well as to get the potential possibility of producing a cross-section view of the specimen.

  5. Mach's holographic principle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khoury, Justin; Parikh, Maulik

    2009-01-01

    Mach's principle is the proposition that inertial frames are determined by matter. We put forth and implement a precise correspondence between matter and geometry that realizes Mach's principle. Einstein's equations are not modified and no selection principle is applied to their solutions; Mach's principle is realized wholly within Einstein's general theory of relativity. The key insight is the observation that, in addition to bulk matter, one can also add boundary matter. Given a space-time, and thus the inertial frames, we can read off both boundary and bulk stress tensors, thereby relating matter and geometry. We consider some global conditions that are necessary for the space-time to be reconstructible, in principle, from bulk and boundary matter. Our framework is similar to that of the black hole membrane paradigm and, in asymptotically anti-de Sitter space-times, is consistent with holographic duality.

  6. Qualitative and quantitative analysis of reconstructed images using projections with noises

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopes, R.T.; Assis, J.T. de

    1988-01-01

    The reconstruction of a two-dimencional image from one-dimensional projections in an analytic algorithm ''convolution method'' is simulated on a microcomputer. In this work it was analysed the effects caused in the reconstructed image in function of the number of projections and noise level added to the projection data. Qualitative and quantitative (distortion and image noise) comparison were done with the original image and the reconstructed images. (author) [pt

  7. Isotope specific resolution recovery image reconstruction in high resolution PET imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kotasidis, Fotis A. [Division of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Geneva University Hospital, CH-1211 Geneva, Switzerland and Wolfson Molecular Imaging Centre, MAHSC, University of Manchester, M20 3LJ, Manchester (United Kingdom); Angelis, Georgios I. [Faculty of Health Sciences, Brain and Mind Research Institute, University of Sydney, NSW 2006, Sydney (Australia); Anton-Rodriguez, Jose; Matthews, Julian C. [Wolfson Molecular Imaging Centre, MAHSC, University of Manchester, Manchester M20 3LJ (United Kingdom); Reader, Andrew J. [Montreal Neurological Institute, McGill University, Montreal QC H3A 2B4, Canada and Department of Biomedical Engineering, Division of Imaging Sciences and Biomedical Engineering, King' s College London, St. Thomas’ Hospital, London SE1 7EH (United Kingdom); Zaidi, Habib [Division of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Geneva University Hospital, CH-1211 Geneva (Switzerland); Geneva Neuroscience Centre, Geneva University, CH-1205 Geneva (Switzerland); Department of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, PO Box 30 001, Groningen 9700 RB (Netherlands)

    2014-05-15

    Purpose: Measuring and incorporating a scanner-specific point spread function (PSF) within image reconstruction has been shown to improve spatial resolution in PET. However, due to the short half-life of clinically used isotopes, other long-lived isotopes not used in clinical practice are used to perform the PSF measurements. As such, non-optimal PSF models that do not correspond to those needed for the data to be reconstructed are used within resolution modeling (RM) image reconstruction, usually underestimating the true PSF owing to the difference in positron range. In high resolution brain and preclinical imaging, this effect is of particular importance since the PSFs become more positron range limited and isotope-specific PSFs can help maximize the performance benefit from using resolution recovery image reconstruction algorithms. Methods: In this work, the authors used a printing technique to simultaneously measure multiple point sources on the High Resolution Research Tomograph (HRRT), and the authors demonstrated the feasibility of deriving isotope-dependent system matrices from fluorine-18 and carbon-11 point sources. Furthermore, the authors evaluated the impact of incorporating them within RM image reconstruction, using carbon-11 phantom and clinical datasets on the HRRT. Results: The results obtained using these two isotopes illustrate that even small differences in positron range can result in different PSF maps, leading to further improvements in contrast recovery when used in image reconstruction. The difference is more pronounced in the centre of the field-of-view where the full width at half maximum (FWHM) from the positron range has a larger contribution to the overall FWHM compared to the edge where the parallax error dominates the overall FWHM. Conclusions: Based on the proposed methodology, measured isotope-specific and spatially variant PSFs can be reliably derived and used for improved spatial resolution and variance performance in resolution

  8. Isotope specific resolution recovery image reconstruction in high resolution PET imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kotasidis, Fotis A.; Angelis, Georgios I.; Anton-Rodriguez, Jose; Matthews, Julian C.; Reader, Andrew J.; Zaidi, Habib

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Measuring and incorporating a scanner-specific point spread function (PSF) within image reconstruction has been shown to improve spatial resolution in PET. However, due to the short half-life of clinically used isotopes, other long-lived isotopes not used in clinical practice are used to perform the PSF measurements. As such, non-optimal PSF models that do not correspond to those needed for the data to be reconstructed are used within resolution modeling (RM) image reconstruction, usually underestimating the true PSF owing to the difference in positron range. In high resolution brain and preclinical imaging, this effect is of particular importance since the PSFs become more positron range limited and isotope-specific PSFs can help maximize the performance benefit from using resolution recovery image reconstruction algorithms. Methods: In this work, the authors used a printing technique to simultaneously measure multiple point sources on the High Resolution Research Tomograph (HRRT), and the authors demonstrated the feasibility of deriving isotope-dependent system matrices from fluorine-18 and carbon-11 point sources. Furthermore, the authors evaluated the impact of incorporating them within RM image reconstruction, using carbon-11 phantom and clinical datasets on the HRRT. Results: The results obtained using these two isotopes illustrate that even small differences in positron range can result in different PSF maps, leading to further improvements in contrast recovery when used in image reconstruction. The difference is more pronounced in the centre of the field-of-view where the full width at half maximum (FWHM) from the positron range has a larger contribution to the overall FWHM compared to the edge where the parallax error dominates the overall FWHM. Conclusions: Based on the proposed methodology, measured isotope-specific and spatially variant PSFs can be reliably derived and used for improved spatial resolution and variance performance in resolution

  9. Isotope specific resolution recovery image reconstruction in high resolution PET imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotasidis, Fotis A; Angelis, Georgios I; Anton-Rodriguez, Jose; Matthews, Julian C; Reader, Andrew J; Zaidi, Habib

    2014-05-01

    Measuring and incorporating a scanner-specific point spread function (PSF) within image reconstruction has been shown to improve spatial resolution in PET. However, due to the short half-life of clinically used isotopes, other long-lived isotopes not used in clinical practice are used to perform the PSF measurements. As such, non-optimal PSF models that do not correspond to those needed for the data to be reconstructed are used within resolution modeling (RM) image reconstruction, usually underestimating the true PSF owing to the difference in positron range. In high resolution brain and preclinical imaging, this effect is of particular importance since the PSFs become more positron range limited and isotope-specific PSFs can help maximize the performance benefit from using resolution recovery image reconstruction algorithms. In this work, the authors used a printing technique to simultaneously measure multiple point sources on the High Resolution Research Tomograph (HRRT), and the authors demonstrated the feasibility of deriving isotope-dependent system matrices from fluorine-18 and carbon-11 point sources. Furthermore, the authors evaluated the impact of incorporating them within RM image reconstruction, using carbon-11 phantom and clinical datasets on the HRRT. The results obtained using these two isotopes illustrate that even small differences in positron range can result in different PSF maps, leading to further improvements in contrast recovery when used in image reconstruction. The difference is more pronounced in the centre of the field-of-view where the full width at half maximum (FWHM) from the positron range has a larger contribution to the overall FWHM compared to the edge where the parallax error dominates the overall FWHM. Based on the proposed methodology, measured isotope-specific and spatially variant PSFs can be reliably derived and used for improved spatial resolution and variance performance in resolution recovery image reconstruction. The

  10. Image-reconstruction algorithms for positron-emission tomography systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, S.N.C.

    1982-01-01

    The positional uncertainty in the time-of-flight measurement of a positron-emission tomography system is modelled as a Gaussian distributed random variable and the image is assumed to be piecewise constant on a rectilinear lattice. A reconstruction algorithm using maximum-likelihood estimation is derived for the situation in which time-of-flight data are sorted as the most-likely-position array. The algorithm is formulated as a linear system described by a nonseparable, block-banded, Toeplitz matrix, and a sine-transform technique is used to implement this algorithm efficiently. The reconstruction algorithms for both the most-likely-position array and the confidence-weighted array are described by similar equations, hence similar linear systems can be used to described the reconstruction algorithm for a discrete, confidence-weighted array, when the matrix and the entries in the data array are properly identified. It is found that the mean square-error depends on the ratio of the full width at half the maximum of time-of-flight measurement over the size of a pixel. When other parameters are fixed, the larger the pixel size, the smaller is the mean square-error. In the study of resolution, parameters that affect the impulse response of time-of-flight reconstruction algorithms are identified. It is found that the larger the pixel size, the larger is the standard deviation of the impulse response. This shows that small mean square-error and fine resolution are two contradictory requirements

  11. Pragmatic fully 3D image reconstruction for the MiCES mouse imaging PET scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Kisung; Kinahan, Paul E; Fessler, Jeffrey A; Miyaoka, Robert S; Janes, Marie; Lewellen, Tom K

    2004-01-01

    We present a pragmatic approach to image reconstruction for data from the micro crystal elements system (MiCES) fully 3D mouse imaging positron emission tomography (PET) scanner under construction at the University of Washington. Our approach is modelled on fully 3D image reconstruction used in clinical PET scanners, which is based on Fourier rebinning (FORE) followed by 2D iterative image reconstruction using ordered-subsets expectation-maximization (OSEM). The use of iterative methods allows modelling of physical effects (e.g., statistical noise, detector blurring, attenuation, etc), while FORE accelerates the reconstruction process by reducing the fully 3D data to a stacked set of independent 2D sinograms. Previous investigations have indicated that non-stationary detector point-spread response effects, which are typically ignored for clinical imaging, significantly impact image quality for the MiCES scanner geometry. To model the effect of non-stationary detector blurring (DB) in the FORE+OSEM(DB) algorithm, we have added a factorized system matrix to the ASPIRE reconstruction library. Initial results indicate that the proposed approach produces an improvement in resolution without an undue increase in noise and without a significant increase in the computational burden. The impact on task performance, however, remains to be evaluated

  12. Structure Assisted Compressed Sensing Reconstruction of Undersampled AFM Images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oxvig, Christian Schou; Arildsen, Thomas; Larsen, Torben

    2017-01-01

    reconstruction algorithms that enables the use of our proposed structure model in the reconstruction process. Through a large set of reconstructions, the general reconstruction capability improvement achievable using our structured model is shown both quantitatively and qualitatively. Specifically, our...

  13. 3D surface reconstruction using optical flow for medical imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weng, Nan; Yang, Yee-Hong; Pierson, R.

    1996-01-01

    The recovery of a 3D model from a sequence of 2D images is very useful in medical image analysis. Image sequences obtained from the relative motion between the object and the camera or the scanner contain more 3D information than a single image. Methods to visualize the computed tomograms can be divided into two approaches: the surface rendering approach and the volume rendering approach. A new surface rendering method using optical flow is proposed. Optical flow is the apparent motion in the image plane produced by the projection of the real 3D motion onto 2D image. In this paper, the object remains stationary while the scanner undergoes translational motion. The 3D motion of an object can be recovered from the optical flow field using additional constraints. By extracting the surface information from 3D motion, it is possible to get an accurate 3D model of the object. Both synthetic and real image sequences have been used to illustrate the feasibility of the proposed method. The experimental results suggest that the proposed method is suitable for the reconstruction of 3D models from ultrasound medical images as well as other computed tomograms

  14. Simultaneous reconstruction and segmentation for dynamic SPECT imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burger, Martin; Rossmanith, Carolin; Zhang, Xiaoqun

    2016-01-01

    This work deals with the reconstruction of dynamic images that incorporate characteristic dynamics in certain subregions, as arising for the kinetics of many tracers in emission tomography (SPECT, PET). We make use of a basis function approach for the unknown tracer concentration by assuming that the region of interest can be divided into subregions with spatially constant concentration curves. Applying a regularised variational framework reminiscent of the Chan-Vese model for image segmentation we simultaneously reconstruct both the labelling functions of the subregions as well as the subconcentrations within each region. Our particular focus is on applications in SPECT with the Poisson noise model, resulting in a Kullback–Leibler data fidelity in the variational approach. We present a detailed analysis of the proposed variational model and prove existence of minimisers as well as error estimates. The latter apply to a more general class of problems and generalise existing results in literature since we deal with a nonlinear forward operator and a nonquadratic data fidelity. A computational algorithm based on alternating minimisation and splitting techniques is developed for the solution of the problem and tested on appropriately designed synthetic data sets. For those we compare the results to those of standard EM reconstructions and investigate the effects of Poisson noise in the data. (paper)

  15. Image reconstruction methods for the PBX-M pinhole camera

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holland, A.; Powell, E.T.; Fonck, R.J.

    1990-03-01

    This paper describes two methods which have been used to reconstruct the soft x-ray emission profile of the PBX-M tokamak from the projected images recorded by the PBX-M pinhole camera. Both methods must accurately represent the shape of the reconstructed profile while also providing a degree of immunity to noise in the data. The first method is a simple least squares fit to the data. This has the advantage of being fast and small, and thus easily implemented on the PDP-11 computer used to control the video digitizer for the pinhole camera. The second method involves the application of a maximum entropy algorithm to an overdetermined system. This has the advantage of allowing the use of a default profile. This profile contains additional knowledge about the plasma shape which can be obtained from equilibrium fits to the external magnetic measurements. Additionally the reconstruction is guaranteed positive, and the fit to the data can be relaxed by specifying both the amount and distribution of noise in the image. The algorithm described has the advantage of being considerably faster, for an overdetermined system, than the usual Lagrange multiplier approach to finding the maximum entropy solution. 13 refs., 24 figs

  16. A filtering approach to image reconstruction in 3D SPECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bronnikov, Andrei V.

    2000-01-01

    We present a new approach to three-dimensional (3D) image reconstruction using analytical inversion of the exponential divergent beam transform, which can serve as a mathematical model for cone-beam 3D SPECT imaging. We apply a circular cone-beam scan and assume constant attenuation inside a convex area with a known boundary, which is satisfactory in brain imaging. The reconstruction problem is reduced to an image restoration problem characterized by a shift-variant point spread function which is given analytically. The method requires two computation steps: backprojection and filtering. The modulation transfer function (MTF) of the filter is derived by means of an original methodology using the 2D Laplace transform. The filter is implemented in the frequency domain and requires 2D Fourier transform of transverse slices. In order to obtain a shift-invariant cone-beam projection-backprojection operator we resort to an approximation, assuming that the collimator has a relatively large focal length. Nevertheless, numerical experiments demonstrate surprisingly good results for detectors with relatively short focal lengths. The use of a wavelet-based filtering algorithm greatly improves the stability to Poisson noise. (author)

  17. Application of DIRI dynamic infrared imaging in reconstructive surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawlowski, Marek; Wang, Chengpu; Jin, Feng; Salvitti, Matthew; Tenorio, Xavier

    2006-04-01

    We have developed the BioScanIR System based on QWIP (Quantum Well Infrared Photodetector). Data collected by this sensor are processed using the DIRI (Dynamic Infrared Imaging) algorithms. The combination of DIRI data processing methods with the unique characteristics of the QWIP sensor permit the creation of a new imaging modality capable of detecting minute changes in temperature at the surface of the tissue and organs associated with blood perfusion due to certain diseases such as cancer, vascular disease and diabetes. The BioScanIR System has been successfully applied in reconstructive surgery to localize donor flap feeding vessels (perforators) during the pre-surgical planning stage. The device is also used in post-surgical monitoring of skin flap perfusion. Since the BioScanIR is mobile; it can be moved to the bedside for such monitoring. In comparison to other modalities, the BioScanIR can localize perforators in a single, 20 seconds scan with definitive results available in minutes. The algorithms used include (FFT) Fast Fourier Transformation, motion artifact correction, spectral analysis and thermal image scaling. The BioScanIR is completely non-invasive and non-toxic, requires no exogenous contrast agents and is free of ionizing radiation. In addition to reconstructive surgery applications, the BioScanIR has shown promise as a useful functional imaging modality in neurosurgery, drug discovery in pre-clinical animal models, wound healing and peripheral vascular disease management.

  18. Improved proton computed tomography by dual modality image reconstruction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansen, David C., E-mail: dch@ki.au.dk; Bassler, Niels [Experimental Clinical Oncology, Aarhus University, 8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); Petersen, Jørgen Breede Baltzer [Medical Physics, Aarhus University Hospital, 8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); Sørensen, Thomas Sangild [Computer Science, Aarhus University, 8000 Aarhus C, Denmark and Clinical Medicine, Aarhus University, 8200 Aarhus N (Denmark)

    2014-03-15

    Purpose: Proton computed tomography (CT) is a promising image modality for improving the stopping power estimates and dose calculations for particle therapy. However, the finite range of about 33 cm of water of most commercial proton therapy systems limits the sites that can be scanned from a full 360° rotation. In this paper the authors propose a method to overcome the problem using a dual modality reconstruction (DMR) combining the proton data with a cone-beam x-ray prior. Methods: A Catphan 600 phantom was scanned using a cone beam x-ray CT scanner. A digital replica of the phantom was created in the Monte Carlo code Geant4 and a 360° proton CT scan was simulated, storing the entrance and exit position and momentum vector of every proton. Proton CT images were reconstructed using a varying number of angles from the scan. The proton CT images were reconstructed using a constrained nonlinear conjugate gradient algorithm, minimizing total variation and the x-ray CT prior while remaining consistent with the proton projection data. The proton histories were reconstructed along curved cubic-spline paths. Results: The spatial resolution of the cone beam CT prior was retained for the fully sampled case and the 90° interval case, with the MTF = 0.5 (modulation transfer function) ranging from 5.22 to 5.65 linepairs/cm. In the 45° interval case, the MTF = 0.5 dropped to 3.91 linepairs/cm For the fully sampled DMR, the maximal root mean square (RMS) error was 0.006 in units of relative stopping power. For the limited angle cases the maximal RMS error was 0.18, an almost five-fold improvement over the cone beam CT estimate. Conclusions: Dual modality reconstruction yields the high spatial resolution of cone beam x-ray CT while maintaining the improved stopping power estimation of proton CT. In the case of limited angles, the use of prior image proton CT greatly improves the resolution and stopping power estimate, but does not fully achieve the quality of a 360

  19. Improved proton computed tomography by dual modality image reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansen, David C.; Bassler, Niels; Petersen, Jørgen Breede Baltzer; Sørensen, Thomas Sangild

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Proton computed tomography (CT) is a promising image modality for improving the stopping power estimates and dose calculations for particle therapy. However, the finite range of about 33 cm of water of most commercial proton therapy systems limits the sites that can be scanned from a full 360° rotation. In this paper the authors propose a method to overcome the problem using a dual modality reconstruction (DMR) combining the proton data with a cone-beam x-ray prior. Methods: A Catphan 600 phantom was scanned using a cone beam x-ray CT scanner. A digital replica of the phantom was created in the Monte Carlo code Geant4 and a 360° proton CT scan was simulated, storing the entrance and exit position and momentum vector of every proton. Proton CT images were reconstructed using a varying number of angles from the scan. The proton CT images were reconstructed using a constrained nonlinear conjugate gradient algorithm, minimizing total variation and the x-ray CT prior while remaining consistent with the proton projection data. The proton histories were reconstructed along curved cubic-spline paths. Results: The spatial resolution of the cone beam CT prior was retained for the fully sampled case and the 90° interval case, with the MTF = 0.5 (modulation transfer function) ranging from 5.22 to 5.65 linepairs/cm. In the 45° interval case, the MTF = 0.5 dropped to 3.91 linepairs/cm For the fully sampled DMR, the maximal root mean square (RMS) error was 0.006 in units of relative stopping power. For the limited angle cases the maximal RMS error was 0.18, an almost five-fold improvement over the cone beam CT estimate. Conclusions: Dual modality reconstruction yields the high spatial resolution of cone beam x-ray CT while maintaining the improved stopping power estimation of proton CT. In the case of limited angles, the use of prior image proton CT greatly improves the resolution and stopping power estimate, but does not fully achieve the quality of a 360

  20. Label free imaging of cell-substrate contacts by holographic total internal reflection microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandracchia, Biagio; Gennari, Oriella; Marchesano, Valentina; Paturzo, Melania; Ferraro, Pietro

    2017-09-01

    The study of cell adhesion contacts is pivotal to understand cell mechanics and interaction at substrates or chemical and physical stimuli. We designed and built a HoloTIR microscope for label-free quantitative phase imaging of total internal reflection. Here we show for the first time that HoloTIR is a good choice for label-free study of focal contacts and of cell/substrate interaction as its sensitivity is enhanced in comparison with standard TIR microscopy. Finally, the simplicity of implementation and relative low cost, due to the requirement of less optical components, make HoloTIR a reasonable alternative, or even an addition, to TIRF microscopy for mapping cell/substratum topography. As a proof of concept, we studied the formation of focal contacts of fibroblasts on three substrates with different levels of affinity for cell adhesion. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Clinical applications of imaging reconstruction by virtual sonography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mori, Akihiro; Oohashi, Noritsugu; Maruyama, Takako; Tatebe, Hideharu; Fushimi, Nobutoshi; Asano, Takayuki; Inoue, Hiroshi; Okuno, Masataka

    2008-01-01

    One of the pitfalls in managing multiple liver tumors is the difficulty in identifying individual tumors on ultrasonography. Computed tomography (CT)-assisted virtual sonography has been shown to improve sonographic diagnosis, however it requires additional equipment and software. We have developed a simple reconstruction method of virtual sonography (SRVS). We reconstructed SRVS mimicking ultrasonographic images, utilizing a workstation software attached to a multi-detector row CT system without any additional program. We have performed SRVS in 32 patients with 41 liver tumors that could hardly be identify on ultrasonography. SRVS assisted the identification of malignant form non-pathologic ones and thereby contributed to the appropriate clinical strategy including radiofrequency ablation (RFA) (18 tumors), liver biopsy (2 tumors), other therapies (4 tumors) and follow-up (17 tumors). We have developed virtual sonography using conventional CT software. SRVS seems useful in the clinical practice in managing liver tumors. (author)

  2. Image reconstruction from multiple fan-beam projections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jelinek, J.; Overton, T.R.

    1984-01-01

    Special-purpose third-generation fan-beam CT systems can be greatly simplified by limiting the number of detectors, but this requires a different mode of data collection to provide a set of projections appropriate to the required spatial resolution in the reconstructed image. Repeated rotation of the source-detector fan, combined with shift of the detector array and perhaps offset of the source with respect to the fan's axis after each 360 0 rotation(cycle), provides a fairly general pattern of projection space filling. The authors' investigated the problem of optimal data-collection geometry for a multiple-rotation fan-beam scanner and of corresponding reconstruction algorithm

  3. Use of an object model in three dimensional image reconstruction. Application in medical imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delageniere-Guillot, S.

    1993-02-01

    Threedimensional image reconstruction from projections corresponds to a set of techniques which give information on the inner structure of the studied object. These techniques are mainly used in medical imaging or in non destructive evaluation. Image reconstruction is an ill-posed problem. So the inversion has to be regularized. This thesis deals with the introduction of a priori information within the reconstruction algorithm. The knowledge is introduced through an object model. The proposed scheme is applied to the medical domain for cone beam geometry. We address two specific problems. First, we study the reconstruction of high contrast objects. This can be applied to bony morphology (bone/soft tissue) or to angiography (vascular structures opacified by injection of contrast agent). With noisy projections, the filtering steps of standard methods tend to smooth the natural transitions of the investigated object. In order to regularize the reconstruction but to keep contrast, we introduce a model of classes which involves the Markov random fields theory. We develop a reconstruction scheme: analytic reconstruction-reprojection. Then, we address the case of an object changing during the acquisition. This can be applied to angiography when the contrast agent is moving through the vascular tree. The problem is then stated as a dynamic reconstruction. We define an evolution AR model and we use an algebraic reconstruction method. We represent the object at a particular moment as an intermediary state between the state of the object at the beginning and at the end of the acquisition. We test both methods on simulated and real data, and we prove how the use of an a priori model can improve the results. (author)

  4. Holographic interferometry using a digital photo-camera

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sekanina, H.; Hledik, S.

    2001-01-01

    The possibilities of running digital holographic interferometry using commonly available compact digital zoom photo-cameras are studied. The recently developed holographic setup, suitable especially for digital photo-cameras equipped with an un detachable object lens, is used. The method described enables a simple and straightforward way of both recording and reconstructing of a digital holographic interferograms. The feasibility of the new method is verified by digital reconstruction of the interferograms acquired, using a numerical code based on the fast Fourier transform. Experimental results obtained are presented and discussed. (authors)

  5. A new reconstruction strategy for image improvement in pinhole SPECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeniya, Tsutomu; Watabe, Hiroshi; Kim, Kyeong Min; Teramoto, Noboru; Hayashi, Takuya; Iida, Hidehiro; Aoi, Toshiyuki; Sohlberg, Antti; Kudo, Hiroyuki

    2004-01-01

    Pinhole single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) is able to provide information on the biodistribution of several radioligands in small laboratory animals, but has limitations associated with non-uniform spatial resolution or axial blurring. We have hypothesised that this blurring is due to incompleteness of the projection data acquired by a single circular pinhole orbit, and have evaluated a new strategy for accurate image reconstruction with better spatial resolution uniformity. A pinhole SPECT system using two circular orbits and a dedicated three-dimensional ordered subsets expectation maximisation (3D-OSEM) reconstruction method were developed. In this system, not the camera but the object rotates, and the two orbits are at 90 and 45 relative to the object's axis. This system satisfies Tuy's condition, and is thus able to provide complete data for 3D pinhole SPECT reconstruction within the whole field of view (FOV). To evaluate this system, a series of experiments was carried out using a multiple-disk phantom filled with 99m Tc solution. The feasibility of the proposed method for small animal imaging was tested with a mouse bone study using 99m Tc-hydroxymethylene diphosphonate. Feldkamp's filtered back-projection (FBP) method and the 3D-OSEM method were applied to these data sets, and the visual and statistical properties were examined. Axial blurring, which was still visible at the edge of the FOV even after applying the conventional 3D-OSEM instead of FBP for single-orbit data, was not visible after application of 3D-OSEM using two-orbit data. 3D-OSEM using two-orbit data dramatically reduced the resolution non-uniformity and statistical noise, and also demonstrated considerably better image quality in the mouse scan. This system may be of use in quantitative assessment of bio-physiological functions in small animals. (orig.)

  6. Level-set-based reconstruction algorithm for EIT lung images: first clinical results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahmati, Peyman; Soleimani, Manuchehr; Pulletz, Sven; Frerichs, Inéz; Adler, Andy

    2012-05-01

    We show the first clinical results using the level-set-based reconstruction algorithm for electrical impedance tomography (EIT) data. The level-set-based reconstruction method (LSRM) allows the reconstruction of non-smooth interfaces between image regions, which are typically smoothed by traditional voxel-based reconstruction methods (VBRMs). We develop a time difference formulation of the LSRM for 2D images. The proposed reconstruction method is applied to reconstruct clinical EIT data of a slow flow inflation pressure-volume manoeuvre in lung-healthy and adult lung-injury patients. Images from the LSRM and the VBRM are compared. The results show comparable reconstructed images, but with an improved ability to reconstruct sharp conductivity changes in the distribution of lung ventilation using the LSRM.

  7. Level-set-based reconstruction algorithm for EIT lung images: first clinical results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rahmati, Peyman; Adler, Andy; Soleimani, Manuchehr; Pulletz, Sven; Frerichs, Inéz

    2012-01-01

    We show the first clinical results using the level-set-based reconstruction algorithm for electrical impedance tomography (EIT) data. The level-set-based reconstruction method (LSRM) allows the reconstruction of non-smooth interfaces between image regions, which are typically smoothed by traditional voxel-based reconstruction methods (VBRMs). We develop a time difference formulation of the LSRM for 2D images. The proposed reconstruction method is applied to reconstruct clinical EIT data of a slow flow inflation pressure–volume manoeuvre in lung-healthy and adult lung-injury patients. Images from the LSRM and the VBRM are compared. The results show comparable reconstructed images, but with an improved ability to reconstruct sharp conductivity changes in the distribution of lung ventilation using the LSRM. (paper)

  8. A New Approach for Speckle Reduction in Holographic 3D printer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Utsugi, Takeru; Yamaguchi, Masahiro

    2013-01-01

    A Holographic 3D printer produces a high quality 3D image reproduced by a full-color, full-parallax holographic stereogram with high-density light-ray recording. But speckle-pattern noise localized behind the reconstructed image is causing a loss of the display quality. This noise is originated from the speckle generated by a diffuser for equalizing the intensity distribution of the object light on the recording medium. We analyze some conventional ways for speckle reduction using a band-limited diffuser, and it is found that these ways cannot reduce the noise sufficiently. Then we propose two methods, one introduces a moving diffuser and the other introduces multiple exposures and a digital diffuser called as 4L-PRPS.

  9. Fast MR image reconstruction for partially parallel imaging with arbitrary k-space trajectories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Xiaojing; Chen, Yunmei; Lin, Wei; Huang, Feng

    2011-03-01

    Both acquisition and reconstruction speed are crucial for magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in clinical applications. In this paper, we present a fast reconstruction algorithm for SENSE in partially parallel MR imaging with arbitrary k-space trajectories. The proposed method is a combination of variable splitting, the classical penalty technique and the optimal gradient method. Variable splitting and the penalty technique reformulate the SENSE model with sparsity regularization as an unconstrained minimization problem, which can be solved by alternating two simple minimizations: One is the total variation and wavelet based denoising that can be quickly solved by several recent numerical methods, whereas the other one involves a linear inversion which is solved by the optimal first order gradient method in our algorithm to significantly improve the performance. Comparisons with several recent parallel imaging algorithms indicate that the proposed method significantly improves the computation efficiency and achieves state-of-the-art reconstruction quality.

  10. Influence of image reconstruction methods on statistical parametric mapping of brain PET images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yin Dayi; Chen Yingmao; Yao Shulin; Shao Mingzhe; Yin Ling; Tian Jiahe; Cui Hongyan

    2007-01-01

    Objective: Statistic parametric mapping (SPM) was widely recognized as an useful tool in brain function study. The aim of this study was to investigate if imaging reconstruction algorithm of PET images could influence SPM of brain. Methods: PET imaging of whole brain was performed in six normal volunteers. Each volunteer had two scans with true and false acupuncturing. The PET scans were reconstructed using ordered subsets expectation maximization (OSEM) and filtered back projection (FBP) with 3 varied parameters respectively. The images were realigned, normalized and smoothed using SPM program. The difference between true and false acupuncture scans was tested using a matched pair t test at every voxel. Results: (1) SPM corrected multiple comparison (P corrected uncorrected <0.001): SPM derived from the images with different reconstruction method were different. The largest difference, in number and position of the activated voxels, was noticed between FBP and OSEM re- construction algorithm. Conclusions: The method of PET image reconstruction could influence the results of SPM uncorrected multiple comparison. Attention should be paid when the conclusion was drawn using SPM uncorrected multiple comparison. (authors)

  11. Sparse/Low Rank Constrained Reconstruction for Dynamic PET Imaging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xingjian Yu

    Full Text Available In dynamic Positron Emission Tomography (PET, an estimate of the radio activity concentration is obtained from a series of frames of sinogram data taken at ranging in duration from 10 seconds to minutes under some criteria. So far, all the well-known reconstruction algorithms require known data statistical properties. It limits the speed of data acquisition, besides, it is unable to afford the separated information about the structure and the variation of shape and rate of metabolism which play a major role in improving the visualization of contrast for some requirement of the diagnosing in application. This paper presents a novel low rank-based activity map reconstruction scheme from emission sinograms of dynamic PET, termed as SLCR representing Sparse/Low Rank Constrained Reconstruction for Dynamic PET Imaging. In this method, the stationary background is formulated as a low rank component while variations between successive frames are abstracted to the sparse. The resulting nuclear norm and l1 norm related minimization problem can also be efficiently solved by many recently developed numerical methods. In this paper, the linearized alternating direction method is applied. The effectiveness of the proposed scheme is illustrated on three data sets.

  12. Review of quantitative phase-digital holographic microscopy: promising novel imaging technique to resolve neuronal network activity and identify cellular biomarkers of psychiatric disorders

    KAUST Repository

    Marquet, Pierre

    2014-09-22

    Quantitative phase microscopy (QPM) has recently emerged as a new powerful quantitative imaging technique well suited to noninvasively explore a transparent specimen with a nanometric axial sensitivity. In this review, we expose the recent developments of quantitative phase-digital holographic microscopy (QP-DHM). Quantitative phase-digital holographic microscopy (QP-DHM) represents an important and efficient quantitative phase method to explore cell structure and dynamics. In a second part, the most relevant QPM applications in the field of cell biology are summarized. A particular emphasis is placed on the original biological information, which can be derived from the quantitative phase signal. In a third part, recent applications obtained, with QP-DHM in the field of cellular neuroscience, namely the possibility to optically resolve neuronal network activity and spine dynamics, are presented. Furthermore, potential applications of QPM related to psychiatry through the identification of new and original cell biomarkers that, when combined with a range of other biomarkers, could significantly contribute to the determination of high risk developmental trajectories for psychiatric disorders, are discussed.

  13. Quantitative image reconstruction for total-body PET imaging using the 2-meter long EXPLORER scanner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xuezhu; Zhou, Jian; Cherry, Simon R.; Badawi, Ramsey D.; Qi, Jinyi

    2017-03-01

    The EXPLORER project aims to build a 2 meter long total-body PET scanner, which will provide extremely high sensitivity for imaging the entire human body. It will possess a range of capabilities currently unavailable to state-of-the-art clinical PET scanners with a limited axial field-of-view. The huge number of lines-of-response (LORs) of the EXPLORER poses a challenge to the data handling and image reconstruction. The objective of this study is to develop a quantitative image reconstruction method for the EXPLORER and compare its performance with current whole-body scanners. Fully 3D image reconstruction was performed using time-of-flight list-mode data with parallel computation. To recover the resolution loss caused by the parallax error between crystal pairs at a large axial ring difference or transaxial radial offset, we applied an image domain resolution model estimated from point source data. To evaluate the image quality, we conducted computer simulations using the SimSET Monte-Carlo toolkit and XCAT 2.0 anthropomorphic phantom to mimic a 20 min whole-body PET scan with an injection of 25 MBq 18F-FDG. We compare the performance of the EXPLORER with a current clinical scanner that has an axial FOV of 22 cm. The comparison results demonstrated superior image quality from the EXPLORER with a 6.9-fold reduction in noise standard deviation comparing with multi-bed imaging using the clinical scanner.

  14. Evaluation of imaging protocol for ECT based on CS image reconstruction algorithm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Xiaolin; Yun Mingkai; Cao Xuexiang; Liu Shuangquan; Wang Lu; Huang Xianchao; Wei Long

    2014-01-01

    Single-photon emission computerized tomography and positron emission tomography are essential medical imaging tools, for which the sampling angle number and scan time should be carefully chosen to give a good compromise between image quality and radiopharmaceutical dose. In this study, the image quality of different acquisition protocols was evaluated via varied angle number and count number per angle with Monte Carlo simulation data. It was shown that, when similar imaging counts were used, the factor of acquisition counts was more important than that of the sampling number in emission computerized tomography. To further reduce the activity requirement and the scan duration, an iterative image reconstruction algorithm for limited-view and low-dose tomography based on compressed sensing theory has been developed. The total variation regulation was added to the reconstruction process to improve the signal to noise Ratio and reduce artifacts caused by the limited angle sampling. Maximization of the maximum likelihood of the estimated image and the measured data and minimization of the total variation of the image are alternatively implemented. By using this advanced algorithm, the reconstruction process is able to achieve image quality matching or exceed that of normal scans with only half of the injection radiopharmaceutical dose. (authors)

  15. Reconstruction algorithm medical imaging DRR; Algoritmo de construccion de imagenes medicas DRR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Estrada Espinosa, J. C.

    2013-07-01

    The method of reconstruction for digital radiographic Imaging (DRR), is based on two orthogonal images, on the dorsal and lateral decubitus position of the simulation. DRR images are reconstructed with an algorithm that simulates running a conventional X-ray, a single rendition team, beam emitted is not divergent, in this case, the rays are considered to be parallel in the image reconstruction DRR, for this purpose, it is necessary to use all the values of the units (HU) hounsfield of each voxel in all axial cuts that form the study TC, finally obtaining the reconstructed image DRR performing a transformation from 3D to 2D. (Author)

  16. The traveltime holographic principle

    KAUST Repository

    Huang, Y.; Schuster, Gerard T.

    2014-01-01

    Fermat's interferometric principle is used to compute interior transmission traveltimes τpq from exterior transmission traveltimes τsp and τsq. Here, the exterior traveltimes are computed for sources s on a boundary B that encloses a volume V of interior points p and q. Once the exterior traveltimes are computed, no further ray tracing is needed to calculate the interior times τpq. Therefore this interferometric approach can be more efficient than explicitly computing interior traveltimes τpq by ray tracing. Moreover, the memory requirement of the traveltimes is reduced by one dimension, because the boundary B is of one fewer dimension than the volume V. An application of this approach is demonstrated with interbed multiple (IM) elimination. Here, the IMs in the observed data are predicted from the migration image and are subsequently removed by adaptive subtraction. This prediction is enabled by the knowledge of interior transmission traveltimes τpq computed according to Fermat's interferometric principle. We denote this principle as the ‘traveltime holographic principle’, by analogy with the holographic principle in cosmology where information in a volume is encoded on the region's boundary.

  17. The traveltime holographic principle

    KAUST Repository

    Huang, Y.

    2014-11-06

    Fermat\\'s interferometric principle is used to compute interior transmission traveltimes τpq from exterior transmission traveltimes τsp and τsq. Here, the exterior traveltimes are computed for sources s on a boundary B that encloses a volume V of interior points p and q. Once the exterior traveltimes are computed, no further ray tracing is needed to calculate the interior times τpq. Therefore this interferometric approach can be more efficient than explicitly computing interior traveltimes τpq by ray tracing. Moreover, the memory requirement of the traveltimes is reduced by one dimension, because the boundary B is of one fewer dimension than the volume V. An application of this approach is demonstrated with interbed multiple (IM) elimination. Here, the IMs in the observed data are predicted from the migration image and are subsequently removed by adaptive subtraction. This prediction is enabled by the knowledge of interior transmission traveltimes τpq computed according to Fermat\\'s interferometric principle. We denote this principle as the ‘traveltime holographic principle’, by analogy with the holographic principle in cosmology where information in a volume is encoded on the region\\'s boundary.

  18. The traveltime holographic principle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yunsong; Schuster, Gerard T.

    2015-01-01

    Fermat's interferometric principle is used to compute interior transmission traveltimes τpq from exterior transmission traveltimes τsp and τsq. Here, the exterior traveltimes are computed for sources s on a boundary B that encloses a volume V of interior points p and q. Once the exterior traveltimes are computed, no further ray tracing is needed to calculate the interior times τpq. Therefore this interferometric approach can be more efficient than explicitly computing interior traveltimes τpq by ray tracing. Moreover, the memory requirement of the traveltimes is reduced by one dimension, because the boundary B is of one fewer dimension than the volume V. An application of this approach is demonstrated with interbed multiple (IM) elimination. Here, the IMs in the observed data are predicted from the migration image and are subsequently removed by adaptive subtraction. This prediction is enabled by the knowledge of interior transmission traveltimes τpq computed according to Fermat's interferometric principle. We denote this principle as the `traveltime holographic principle', by analogy with the holographic principle in cosmology where information in a volume is encoded on the region's boundary.

  19. Accelerating image reconstruction in three-dimensional optoacoustic tomography on graphics processing units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kun; Huang, Chao; Kao, Yu-Jiun; Chou, Cheng-Ying; Oraevsky, Alexander A; Anastasio, Mark A

    2013-02-01

    Optoacoustic tomography (OAT) is inherently a three-dimensional (3D) inverse problem. However, most studies of OAT image reconstruction still employ two-dimensional imaging models. One important reason is because 3D image reconstruction is computationally burdensome. The aim of this work is to accelerate existing image reconstruction algorithms for 3D OAT by use of parallel programming techniques. Parallelization strategies are proposed to accelerate a filtered backprojection (FBP) algorithm and two different pairs of projection/backprojection operations that correspond to two different numerical imaging models. The algorithms are designed to fully exploit the parallel computing power of graphics processing units (GPUs). In order to evaluate the parallelization strategies for the projection/backprojection pairs, an iterative image reconstruction algorithm is implemented. Computer simulation and experimental studies are conducted to investigate the computational efficiency and numerical accuracy of the developed algorithms. The GPU implementations improve the computational efficiency by factors of 1000, 125, and 250 for the FBP algorithm and the two pairs of projection/backprojection operators, respectively. Accurate images are reconstructed by use of the FBP and iterative image reconstruction algorithms from both computer-simulated and experimental data. Parallelization strategies for 3D OAT image reconstruction are proposed for the first time. These GPU-based implementations significantly reduce the computational time for 3D image reconstruction, complementing our earlier work on 3D OAT iterative image reconstruction.

  20. Maximum entropy reconstructions for crystallographic imaging; Cristallographie et reconstruction d`images par maximum d`entropie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Papoular, R

    1997-07-01

    The Fourier Transform is of central importance to Crystallography since it allows the visualization in real space of tridimensional scattering densities pertaining to physical systems from diffraction data (powder or single-crystal diffraction, using x-rays, neutrons, electrons or else). In turn, this visualization makes it possible to model and parametrize these systems, the crystal structures of which are eventually refined by Least-Squares techniques (e.g., the Rietveld method in the case of Powder Diffraction). The Maximum Entropy Method (sometimes called MEM or MaxEnt) is a general imaging technique, related to solving ill-conditioned inverse problems. It is ideally suited for tackling undetermined systems of linear questions (for which the number of variables is much larger than the number of equations). It is already being applied successfully in Astronomy, Radioastronomy and Medical Imaging. The advantages of using MAXIMUM Entropy over conventional Fourier and `difference Fourier` syntheses stem from the following facts: MaxEnt takes the experimental error bars into account; MaxEnt incorporate Prior Knowledge (e.g., the positivity of the scattering density in some instances); MaxEnt allows density reconstructions from incompletely phased data, as well as from overlapping Bragg reflections; MaxEnt substantially reduces truncation errors to which conventional experimental Fourier reconstructions are usually prone. The principles of Maximum Entropy imaging as applied to Crystallography are first presented. The method is then illustrated by a detailed example specific to Neutron Diffraction: the search for proton in solids. (author). 17 refs.

  1. Computed Tomography Image Quality Evaluation of a New Iterative Reconstruction Algorithm in the Abdomen (Adaptive Statistical Iterative Reconstruction-V) a Comparison With Model-Based Iterative Reconstruction, Adaptive Statistical Iterative Reconstruction, and Filtered Back Projection Reconstructions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodenberger, Martin H; Wagner-Bartak, Nicolaus A; Gupta, Shiva; Liu, Xinming; Yap, Ramon Q; Sun, Jia; Tamm, Eric P; Jensen, Corey T

    The purpose of this study was to compare abdominopelvic computed tomography images reconstructed with adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction-V (ASIR-V) with model-based iterative reconstruction (Veo 3.0), ASIR, and filtered back projection (FBP). Abdominopelvic computed tomography scans for 36 patients (26 males and 10 females) were reconstructed using FBP, ASIR (80%), Veo 3.0, and ASIR-V (30%, 60%, 90%). Mean ± SD patient age was 32 ± 10 years with mean ± SD body mass index of 26.9 ± 4.4 kg/m. Images were reviewed by 2 independent readers in a blinded, randomized fashion. Hounsfield unit, noise, and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) values were calculated for each reconstruction algorithm for further comparison. Phantom evaluation of low-contrast detectability (LCD) and high-contrast resolution was performed. Adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction-V 30%, ASIR-V 60%, and ASIR 80% were generally superior qualitatively compared with ASIR-V 90%, Veo 3.0, and FBP (P ASIR-V 60% with respective CNR values of 5.54 ± 2.39, 8.78 ± 3.15, and 3.49 ± 1.77 (P ASIR 80% had the best and worst spatial resolution, respectively. Adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction-V 30% and ASIR-V 60% provided the best combination of qualitative and quantitative performance. Adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction 80% was equivalent qualitatively, but demonstrated inferior spatial resolution and LCD.

  2. Characterization of the Micro-shell Surface Using Holographic Measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sandras, F.; Hermerel, C.; Choux, A.; Merillot, P.; Pin, G.; Jeannot, L. [CEA Valduc, Dept Rech Mat Nucl, Serv Microcibles, 21 - Is-sur-Tille (France)

    2009-05-15

    To characterize the shape, the quality, and the roughness of micro-shells, typically used technologies are scanning electron microscopy, scanning interferometric microscopy, or atomic force microscopy. One of the drawbacks of these techniques is that they are generally slow because of their scanning process. Digital holographic microscopy technology is an innovation that can offer ability adapted to these studies. It captures holograms instead of intensity images, as done by conventional microscopes. The holograms are then digitally interpreted (10 per second) to reconstruct a double image, one for the intensity and another one for the phase. Using a rotation axis, the bump counting for the complete micro-shell surface is possible with a very high speed. Using an image stitching software, mapping can be done in a few minutes. Wavelets such as 'Mexican hat' are used to model the bumps. Each bump can then be characterized on the map by its position, diameter, and height. (authors)

  3. Reconstruction, Processing and Display of 3D-Images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lenz, R.

    1986-01-01

    In the last few years a number of methods have been developed which can produce true 3D images, volumes of density values. We review two of these techniques (confocal microscopy and X-ray tomography) which were used in the reconstruction of some of our images. The other images came from transmission electron microscopes, gammacameras and magnetic resonance scanners. A new algorithm is suggested which uses projection onto convex sets to improve the depth resolution in the microscopy case. Since we use a TV-monitor as display device we have to project 3D volumes to 2D images. We use the following type of projections: reprojections, range images, colorcoded depth and shaded surface displays. Shaded surface displays use the surface gradient to compute the gray value in the projection. We describe how this gradient can be computed from the range image and from the original density volume. Normally we compute a whole series of projections where the volume is rotated some degrees between two projections. In a separate display session we can display these images in stereo and motion. We describe how noise reduction filters, gray value transformations, geometric manipulations, gradient filters, texture filters and binary techniques can be used to remove uninteresting points from the volume. Finally, a filter design strategy is developed which is based on the optimal basis function approach by Hummel. We show that for a large class of patterns, in images of arbitrary dimensions, the optimal basis functions are rotation-invariant operators as introduced by Danielsson in the 2D case. We also describe how the orientation of a pattern can be computed from its feature vector. (With 107 refs.) (author)

  4. Poisson image reconstruction with Hessian Schatten-norm regularization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefkimmiatis, Stamatios; Unser, Michael

    2013-11-01

    Poisson inverse problems arise in many modern imaging applications, including biomedical and astronomical ones. The main challenge is to obtain an estimate of the underlying image from a set of measurements degraded by a linear operator and further corrupted by Poisson noise. In this paper, we propose an efficient framework for Poisson image reconstruction, under a regularization approach, which depends on matrix-valued regularization operators. In particular, the employed regularizers involve the Hessian as the regularization operator and Schatten matrix norms as the potential functions. For the solution of the problem, we propose two optimization algorithms that are specifically tailored to the Poisson nature of the noise. These algorithms are based on an augmented-Lagrangian formulation of the problem and correspond to two variants of the alternating direction method of multipliers. Further, we derive a link that relates the proximal map of an l(p) norm with the proximal map of a Schatten matrix norm of order p. This link plays a key role in the development of one of the proposed algorithms. Finally, we provide experimental results on natural and biological images for the task of Poisson image deblurring and demonstrate the practical relevance and effectiveness of the proposed framework.

  5. Accelerated Computing in Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Real-Time Imaging Using Nonlinear Inverse Reconstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian Schaetz

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To develop generic optimization strategies for image reconstruction using graphical processing units (GPUs in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI and to exemplarily report on our experience with a highly accelerated implementation of the nonlinear inversion (NLINV algorithm for dynamic MRI with high frame rates. Methods. The NLINV algorithm is optimized and ported to run on a multi-GPU single-node server. The algorithm is mapped to multiple GPUs by decomposing the data domain along the channel dimension. Furthermore, the algorithm is decomposed along the temporal domain by relaxing a temporal regularization constraint, allowing the algorithm to work on multiple frames in parallel. Finally, an autotuning method is presented that is capable of combining different decomposition variants to achieve optimal algorithm performance in different imaging scenarios. Results. The algorithm is successfully ported to a multi-GPU system and allows online image reconstruction with high frame rates. Real-time reconstruction with low latency and frame rates up to 30 frames per second is demonstrated. Conclusion. Novel parallel decomposition methods are presented which are applicable to many iterative algorithms for dynamic MRI. Using these methods to parallelize the NLINV algorithm on multiple GPUs, it is possible to achieve online image reconstruction with high frame rates.

  6. Model-based image reconstruction for four-dimensional PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Tianfang; Thorndyke, Brian; Schreibmann, Eduard; Yang Yong; Xing Lei

    2006-01-01

    Positron emission tonography (PET) is useful in diagnosis and radiation treatment planning for a variety of cancers. For patients with cancers in thoracic or upper abdominal region, the respiratory motion produces large distortions in the tumor shape and size, affecting the accuracy in both diagnosis and treatment. Four-dimensional (4D) (gated) PET aims to reduce the motion artifacts and to provide accurate measurement of the tumor volume and the tracer concentration. A major issue in 4D PET is the lack of statistics. Since the collected photons are divided into several frames in the 4D PET scan, the quality of each reconstructed frame degrades as the number of frames increases. The increased noise in each frame heavily degrades the quantitative accuracy of the PET imaging. In this work, we propose a method to enhance the performance of 4D PET by developing a new technique of 4D PET reconstruction with incorporation of an organ motion model derived from 4D-CT images. The method is based on the well-known maximum-likelihood expectation-maximization (ML-EM) algorithm. During the processes of forward- and backward-projection in the ML-EM iterations, all projection data acquired at different phases are combined together to update the emission map with the aid of deformable model, the statistics is therefore greatly improved. The proposed algorithm was first evaluated with computer simulations using a mathematical dynamic phantom. Experiment with a moving physical phantom was then carried out to demonstrate the accuracy of the proposed method and the increase of signal-to-noise ratio over three-dimensional PET. Finally, the 4D PET reconstruction was applied to a patient case

  7. Compositional-prior-guided image reconstruction algorithm for multi-modality imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Qianqian; Moore, Richard H.; Kopans, Daniel B.; Boas, David A.

    2010-01-01

    The development of effective multi-modality imaging methods typically requires an efficient information fusion model, particularly when combining structural images with a complementary imaging modality that provides functional information. We propose a composition-based image segmentation method for X-ray digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) and a structural-prior-guided image reconstruction for a combined DBT and diffuse optical tomography (DOT) breast imaging system. Using the 3D DBT images from 31 clinically measured healthy breasts, we create an empirical relationship between the X-ray intensities for adipose and fibroglandular tissue. We use this relationship to then segment another 58 healthy breast DBT images from 29 subjects into compositional maps of different tissue types. For each breast, we build a weighted-graph in the compositional space and construct a regularization matrix to incorporate the structural priors into a finite-element-based DOT image reconstruction. Use of the compositional priors enables us to fuse tissue anatomy into optical images with less restriction than when using a binary segmentation. This allows us to recover the image contrast captured by DOT but not by DBT. We show that it is possible to fine-tune the strength of the structural priors by changing a single regularization parameter. By estimating the optical properties for adipose and fibroglandular tissue using the proposed algorithm, we found the results are comparable or superior to those estimated with expert-segmentations, but does not involve the time-consuming manual selection of regions-of-interest. PMID:21258460

  8. Image Reconstruction and Evaluation: Applications on Micro-Surfaces and Lenna Image Representation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Mayyas

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This article develops algorithms for the characterization and the visualization of micro-scale features using a small number of sample points, with the goal of mitigating the measurement shortcomings, which are often destructive or time consuming. The popular measurement techniques that are used in imaging of micro-surfaces include the 3D stylus or interferometric profilometry and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM, where both could represent the micro-surface characteristics in terms of 3D dimensional topology and greyscale image, respectively. Such images could be highly dense; therefore, traditional image processing techniques might be computationally expensive. We implement the algorithms in several case studies to rapidly examine the microscopic features of micro-surface of Microelectromechanical System (MEMS, and then we validate the results using a popular greyscale image; i.e., “Lenna” image. The contributions of this research include: First, development of local and global algorithm based on modified Thin Plate Spline (TPS model to reconstruct high resolution images of the micro-surface’s topography, and its derivatives using low resolution images. Second, development of a bending energy algorithm from our modified TPS model for filtering out image defects. Finally, development of a computationally efficient technique, referred to as Windowing, which combines TPS and Linear Sequential Estimation (LSE methods, to enhance the visualization of images. The Windowing technique allows rapid image reconstruction based on the reduction of inverse problem.

  9. An Optimized Method for Terrain Reconstruction Based on Descent Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Xinchao

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available An optimization method is proposed to perform high-accuracy terrain reconstruction of the landing area of Chang’e III. First, feature matching is conducted using geometric model constraints. Then, the initial terrain is obtained and the initial normal vector of each point is solved on the basis of the initial terrain. By changing the vector around the initial normal vector in small steps a set of new vectors is obtained. By combining these vectors with the direction of light and camera, the functions are set up on the basis of a surface reflection model. Then, a series of gray values is derived by solving the equations. The new optimized vector is recorded when the obtained gray value is closest to the corresponding pixel. Finally, the optimized terrain is obtained after iteration of the vector field. Experiments were conducted using the laboratory images and descent images of Chang’e III. The results showed that the performance of the proposed method was better than that of the classical feature matching method. It can provide a reference for terrain reconstruction of the landing area in subsequent moon exploration missions.

  10. Iterative feature refinement for accurate undersampled MR image reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shanshan; Liu, Jianbo; Liu, Qiegen; Ying, Leslie; Liu, Xin; Zheng, Hairong; Liang, Dong

    2016-05-01

    Accelerating MR scan is of great significance for clinical, research and advanced applications, and one main effort to achieve this is the utilization of compressed sensing (CS) theory. Nevertheless, the existing CSMRI approaches still have limitations such as fine structure loss or high computational complexity. This paper proposes a novel iterative feature refinement (IFR) module for accurate MR image reconstruction from undersampled K-space data. Integrating IFR with CSMRI which is equipped with fixed transforms, we develop an IFR-CS method to restore meaningful structures and details that are originally discarded without introducing too much additional complexity. Specifically, the proposed IFR-CS is realized with three iterative steps, namely sparsity-promoting denoising, feature refinement and Tikhonov regularization. Experimental results on both simulated and in vivo MR datasets have shown that the proposed module has a strong capability to capture image details, and that IFR-CS is comparable and even superior to other state-of-the-art reconstruction approaches.

  11. Iterative feature refinement for accurate undersampled MR image reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Shanshan; Liu, Jianbo; Liu, Xin; Zheng, Hairong; Liang, Dong; Liu, Qiegen; Ying, Leslie

    2016-01-01

    Accelerating MR scan is of great significance for clinical, research and advanced applications, and one main effort to achieve this is the utilization of compressed sensing (CS) theory. Nevertheless, the existing CSMRI approaches still have limitations such as fine structure loss or high computational complexity. This paper proposes a novel iterative feature refinement (IFR) module for accurate MR image reconstruction from undersampled K-space data. Integrating IFR with CSMRI which is equipped with fixed transforms, we develop an IFR-CS method to restore meaningful structures and details that are originally discarded without introducing too much additional complexity. Specifically, the proposed IFR-CS is realized with three iterative steps, namely sparsity-promoting denoising, feature refinement and Tikhonov regularization. Experimental results on both simulated and in vivo MR datasets have shown that the proposed module has a strong capability to capture image details, and that IFR-CS is comparable and even superior to other state-of-the-art reconstruction approaches. (paper)

  12. MR imaging of the augmented and reconstructed breast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivanov, V.; Kirova, G.

    2013-01-01

    Full text: Introduction: Various diagnostic methods are used to assess the changes in both the integrity of the implant, and the fibrous capsule of breast parenchyma. MRI has advantages over other diagnostic methods providing high tissue contrast, multi-faceted imaging and lack of ionizing radiation. What you will learn: MRI evaluation of breast augmentation approaches and their complications, MRI assessment of disease with malignant and benign characteristics in patients with breast implants, MRI assessment of breast reconstruction with autologous tissue. Discussion: Mammography after augmentation and reconstructive mammoplasty is hampered by the deformation of the breast parenchyma of the implant and the reduced compression. Postoperative scarring is also difficult to assess. MRI evaluation of implant rupture is accurate using the findings specific to it - linguine sign, teardrop sign or siliconomas. According to Gorczyca et al. MRI has a sensitivity 94% and specificity 97% in the evaluation of rupture. MRI mammography is highly sensitive - between 90 and 95%, in the detection of malignant, but it has limited specificity, which is its disadvantage. Malignant lesions can be represented as fibroadenomas, postoperative and inflammatory changes. Conclusion: Difficulties in the diagnosis of rupture of the implant, the primary and recurrent carcinoma based on clinical examination and inconclusive data from mammography and ultrasound imaging make MRI the method of choice in the evaluation of patients with breast implants

  13. Simple concept for a wide-field lensless digital holographic microscope using a laser diode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adinda-Ougba A.

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Wide-field, lensless digital holographic microscopy is a new microscopic imaging technique for telemedicine and for resource limited setting [1]. In this contribution we propose a very simple wide-field lensless digital holographic microscope using a laser diode. It is based on in-line digital holography which is capable to provide amplitude and phase images of a sample resulting from numerical reconstruction. The numerical reconstruction consists of the angular spectrum propagation method together with a phase retrieval algorithm. Amplitude and phase images of the sample with a resolution of ∽2 µm and with ∽24 mm2 field of view are obtained. We evaluate our setup by imaging first the 1951 USAF resolution test chart to verify the resolution. Second, we record holograms of blood smear and diatoms. The individual specimen can be easily identified after the numerical reconstruction. Our system is a very simple, compact and low-cost possibility of realizing a microscope capable of imaging biological samples. The availability of the phase provide topographic information of the sample extending the application of this system to be not only for biological sample but also for transparent microstructure. It is suitable for fault detection, shape and roughness measurements of these structures.

  14. Ex-vivo holographic microscopy and spectroscopic analysis of head and neck cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holler, Stephen; Wurtz, Robert; Auyeung, Kelsey; Auyeung, Kris; Paspaley-Grbavac, Milan; Mulroe, Brigid; Sobrero, Maximiliano; Miles, Brett

    2015-03-01

    Optical probes to identify tumor margins in vivo would greatly reduce the time, effort and complexity in the surgical removal of malignant tissue in head and neck cancers. Current approaches involve visual microscopy of stained tissue samples to determine cancer margins, which results in the excision of excess of tissue to assure complete removal of the cancer. Such surgical procedures and follow-on chemotherapy can adversely affect the patient's recovery and subsequent quality of life. In order to reduce the complexity of the process and minimize adverse effects on the patient, we investigate ex vivo tissue samples (stained and unstained) using digital holographic microscopy in conjunction with spectroscopic analyses (reflectance and transmission spectroscopy) in order to determine label-free, optically identifiable characteristic features that may ultimately be used for in vivo processing of cancerous tissues. The tissue samples studied were squamous cell carcinomas and associated controls from patients of varying age, gender and race. Holographic microscopic imaging scans across both cancerous and non-cancerous tissue samples yielded amplitude and phase reconstructions that were correlated with spectral signatures. Though the holographic reconstructions and measured spectra indicate variations even among the same class of tissue, preliminary results indicate the existence of some discriminating features. Further analyses are presently underway to further this work and extract additional information from the imaging and spectral data that may prove useful for in vivo surgical identification.

  15. A Convex Formulation for Magnetic Particle Imaging X-Space Reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konkle, Justin J; Goodwill, Patrick W; Hensley, Daniel W; Orendorff, Ryan D; Lustig, Michael; Conolly, Steven M

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic Particle Imaging (mpi) is an emerging imaging modality with exceptional promise for clinical applications in rapid angiography, cell therapy tracking, cancer imaging, and inflammation imaging. Recent publications have demonstrated quantitative mpi across rat sized fields of view with x-space reconstruction methods. Critical to any medical imaging technology is the reliability and accuracy of image reconstruction. Because the average value of the mpi signal is lost during direct-feedthrough signal filtering, mpi reconstruction algorithms must recover this zero-frequency value. Prior x-space mpi recovery techniques were limited to 1d approaches which could introduce artifacts when reconstructing a 3d image. In this paper, we formulate x-space reconstruction as a 3d convex optimization problem and apply robust a priori knowledge of image smoothness and non-negativity to reduce non-physical banding and haze artifacts. We conclude with a discussion of the powerful extensibility of the presented formulation for future applications.

  16. Fully three-dimensional image reconstruction in radiology and nuclear medicine. Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2011-07-01

    The proceedings of the meeting on ''fully three-dimensional image reconstruction in radiology and nuclear medicine'' covers contributions on the following topics: CT imaging, PET imaging, fidelity; iterative and few-view CT, CT-analytical; PET/SPECT Compton analytical; doses - spectral methods; phase contrast; compressed sensing- sparse reconstruction; special issues; motion - cardiac.

  17. Computed tomography imaging with the Adaptive Statistical Iterative Reconstruction (ASIR) algorithm: dependence of image quality on the blending level of reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barca, Patrizio; Giannelli, Marco; Fantacci, Maria Evelina; Caramella, Davide

    2018-06-01

    Computed tomography (CT) is a useful and widely employed imaging technique, which represents the largest source of population exposure to ionizing radiation in industrialized countries. Adaptive Statistical Iterative Reconstruction (ASIR) is an iterative reconstruction algorithm with the potential to allow reduction of radiation exposure while preserving diagnostic information. The aim of this phantom study was to assess the performance of ASIR, in terms of a number of image quality indices, when different reconstruction blending levels are employed. CT images of the Catphan-504 phantom were reconstructed using conventional filtered back-projection (FBP) and ASIR with reconstruction blending levels of 20, 40, 60, 80, and 100%. Noise, noise power spectrum (NPS), contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and modulation transfer function (MTF) were estimated for different scanning parameters and contrast objects. Noise decreased and CNR increased non-linearly up to 50 and 100%, respectively, with increasing blending level of reconstruction. Also, ASIR has proven to modify the NPS curve shape. The MTF of ASIR reconstructed images depended on tube load/contrast and decreased with increasing blending level of reconstruction. In particular, for low radiation exposure and low contrast acquisitions, ASIR showed lower performance than FBP, in terms of spatial resolution for all blending levels of reconstruction. CT image quality varies substantially with the blending level of reconstruction. ASIR has the potential to reduce noise whilst maintaining diagnostic information in low radiation exposure CT imaging. Given the opposite variation of CNR and spatial resolution with the blending level of reconstruction, it is recommended to use an optimal value of this parameter for each specific clinical application.

  18. 1024 matrix image reconstruction: usefulness in high resolution chest CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, Sun Young; Chung, Myung Jin; Chong, Se Min; Sung, Yon Mi; Lee, Kyung Soo

    2006-01-01

    We tried to evaluate whether high resolution chest CT with a 1,024 matrix has a significant advantage in image quality compared to a 512 matrix. Each set of 512 and 1024 matrix high resolution chest CT scans with both 0.625 mm and 1.25 mm slice thickness were obtained from 26 patients. Seventy locations that contained twenty-four low density lesions without sharp boundary such as emphysema, and forty-six sharp linear densities such as linear fibrosis were selected; these were randomly displayed on a five mega pixel LCD monitor. All the images were masked for information concerning the matrix size and slice thickness. Two chest radiologists scored the image quality of each ar rowed lesion as follows: (1) undistinguishable, (2) poorly distinguishable, (3) fairly distinguishable, (4) well visible and (5) excellently visible. The scores were compared from the aspects of matrix size, slice thickness and the different observers by using ANOVA tests. The average and standard deviation of image quality were 3.09 (± .92) for the 0.625 mm x 512 matrix, 3.16 (± .84) for the 0.625 mm x 1024 matrix, 2.49 (± 1.02) for the 1.25 mm x 512 matrix, and 2.35 (± 1.02) for the 1.25 mm x 1024 matrix, respectively. The image quality on both matrices of the high resolution chest CT scans with a 0.625 mm slice thickness was significantly better than that on the 1.25 mm slice thickness (ρ < 0.001). However, the image quality on the 1024 matrix high resolution chest CT scans was not significantly different from that on the 512 matrix high resolution chest CT scans (ρ = 0.678). The interobserver variation between the two observers was not significant (ρ = 0.691). We think that 1024 matrix image reconstruction for high resolution chest CT may not be clinical useful

  19. Images from the Mind: BCI image reconstruction based on Rapid Serial Visual Presentations of polygon primitives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luís F Seoane

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available We provide a proof of concept for an EEG-based reconstruction of a visual image which is on a user's mind. Our approach is based on the Rapid Serial Visual Presentation (RSVP of polygon primitives and Brain-Computer Interface (BCI technology. In an experimental setup, subjects were presented bursts of polygons: some of them contributed to building a target image (because they matched the shape and/or color of the target while some of them did not. The presentation of the contributing polygons triggered attention-related EEG patterns. These Event Related Potentials (ERPs could be determined using BCI classification and could be matched to the stimuli that elicited them. These stimuli (i.e. the ERP-correlated polygons were accumulated in the display until a satisfactory reconstruction of the target image was reached. As more polygons were accumulated, finer visual details were attained resulting in more challenging classification tasks. In our experiments, we observe an average classification accuracy of around 75%. An in-depth investigation suggests that many of the misclassifications were not misinterpretations of the BCI concerning the users' intent, but rather caused by ambiguous polygons that could contribute to reconstruct several different images. When we put our BCI-image reconstruction in perspective with other RSVP BCI paradigms, there is large room for improvement both in speed and accuracy. These results invite us to be optimistic. They open a plethora of possibilities to explore non-invasive BCIs for image reconstruction both in healthy and impaired subjects and, accordingly, suggest interesting recreational and clinical applications.

  20. Brief review of image reconstruction methods for imaging in nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murayama, Hideo

    1999-01-01

    Emission computed tomography (ECT) has as its major emphasis the quantitative determination of the moment to moment changes in the chemistry and flow physiology of injected or inhaled compounds labeled with radioactive atoms in a human body. The major difference lies in the fact that ECT seeks to describe the location and intensity of sources of emitted photons in an attenuating medium whereas transmission X-ray computed tomography (TCT) seeks to determine the distribution of the attenuating medium. A second important difference between ECT and TCT is that of available statistics. ECT statistics are low because each photon without control in emitting direction must be detected and analyzed, not as in TCT. The following sections review the historical development of image reconstruction methods for imaging in nuclear medicine, relevant intrinsic concepts for image reconstruction on ECT, and current status of volume imaging as well as a unique approach on iterative techniques for ECT. (author). 130 refs

  1. First results of genetic algorithm application in ML image reconstruction in emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smolik, W.

    1999-01-01

    This paper concerns application of genetic algorithm in maximum likelihood image reconstruction in emission tomography. The example of genetic algorithm for image reconstruction is presented. The genetic algorithm was based on the typical genetic scheme modified due to the nature of solved problem. The convergence of algorithm was examined. The different adaption functions, selection and crossover methods were verified. The algorithm was tested on simulated SPECT data. The obtained results of image reconstruction are discussed. (author)

  2. Numerical processing of ultrasonic holographic data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langenberg, K.J.; Kiefer, R.; Wosnitza, M.; Schmitz, V.; Fraunhofer-Gesellschaft zur Foerderung der Angewandten Forschung e.V., Saarbruecken

    1980-01-01

    Reconstructing ultrasonic holographic data numerically, the well-known Fresnel approximation is a first step in evaluating the Rayleigh-Sommerfeld diffraction formula, that is to say, a one- or two-dimensional Fourier-transform of the holographic data multiplied by a complex phase factor has to be computed. The present contribution investigates the relation between flaw depth and aperture size yielding the more advantageous use of the spatial frequency approach where the advantage is in terms of the number of samples and hence computation time in evaluating Fourier transforms numerically. (orig.) [de

  3. Real-time wideband holographic surveillance system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheen, D.M.; Collins, H.D.; Hall, T.E.; McMakin, D.L.; Gribble, R.P.; Severtsen, R.H.; Prince, J.M.; Reid, L.D.

    1996-09-17

    A wideband holographic surveillance system including a transceiver for generating a plurality of electromagnetic waves; antenna for transmitting the electromagnetic waves toward a target at a plurality of predetermined positions in space; the transceiver also receiving and converting electromagnetic waves reflected from the target to electrical signals at a plurality of predetermined positions in space; a computer for processing the electrical signals to obtain signals corresponding to a holographic reconstruction of the target; and a display for displaying the processed information to determine nature of the target. The computer has instructions to apply a three dimensional backward wave algorithm. 28 figs.

  4. Comparison of clinical and physics scoring of PET images when image reconstruction parameters are varied

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walsh, C.; Johnston, C.; Sheehy, N.; Reilly, G. O.

    2013-01-01

    In this study the quantitative and qualitative image quality (IQ) measurements with clinical judgement of IQ in positron emission tomography (PET) were compared. The limitations of IQ metrics and the proposed criteria of acceptability for PET scanners are discussed. Phantom and patient images were reconstructed using seven different iterative reconstruction protocols. For each reconstructed set of images, IQ was scored based both on the visual analysis and on the quantitative metrics. The quantitative physics metrics did not rank the reconstruction protocols in the same order as the clinicians' scoring of perceived IQ (R s = -0.54). Better agreement was achieved when comparing the clinical perception of IQ to the physicist's visual assessment of IQ in the phantom images (R s = +0.59). The closest agreement was seen between the quantitative physics metrics and the measurement of the standard uptake values (SUVs) in small tumours (R s = +0.92). Given the disparity between the clinical perception of IQ and the physics metrics a cautious approach to use of IQ measurements for determining suspension levels is warranted. (authors)

  5. Isotope specific resolution recovery image reconstruction in high resolution PET imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kotasidis, Fotis A.; Angelis, Georgios I.; Anton-Rodriguez, Jose; Matthews, Julian C.; Reader, Andrew J.; Zaidi, Habib

    Purpose: Measuring and incorporating a scanner-specific point spread function (PSF) within image reconstruction has been shown to improve spatial resolution in PET. However, due to the short half-life of clinically used isotopes, other long-lived isotopes not used in clinical practice are used to

  6. [Study on the Effects and Compensation Effect of Recording Parameters Error on Imaging Performance of Holographic Grating in On-Line Spectral Diagnose].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yan-xiu; Bayanheshig; Yang, Shuo; Zhao, Xu-long; Wu, Na; Li, Wen-hao

    2016-03-01

    To making the high resolution grating, a numerical calculation was used to analyze the effect of recording parameters on groove density, focal curve and imaging performance of the grating and their compensation. Based on Fermat' s principle, light path function and aberration, the effect on imaging performance of the grating was analyzed. In the case of fixed using parameters, the error of the recording angle has a greater influence on imaging performance, therefore the gain of the weight of recording angle can improve the accuracy of the recording angle values in the optimization; recording distance has little influence on imaging performance; the relative errors of recording parameters cause the change of imaging performance of the grating; the results indicate that recording parameter errors can be compensated by adjusting its corresponding parameter. The study can give theoretical guidance to the fabrication for high resolution varied-line-space plane holographic grating in on-line spectral diagnostic and reduce the alignment difficulty by analyze the main error effect the imaging performance and propose the compensation method.

  7. 2-D Fused Image Reconstruction approach for Microwave Tomography: a theoretical assessment using FDTD Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bindu, G; Semenov, S

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes an efficient two-dimensional fused image reconstruction approach for Microwave Tomography (MWT). Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD) models were created for a viable MWT experimental system having the transceivers modelled using thin wire approximation with resistive voltage sources. Born Iterative and Distorted Born Iterative methods have been employed for image reconstruction with the extremity imaging being done using a differential imaging technique. The forward solver in the imaging algorithm employs the FDTD method of solving the time domain Maxwell's equations with the regularisation parameter computed using a stochastic approach. The algorithm is tested with 10% noise inclusion and successful image reconstruction has been shown implying its robustness.

  8. Time Reversal Reconstruction Algorithm Based on PSO Optimized SVM Interpolation for Photoacoustic Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingjian Sun

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Photoacoustic imaging is an innovative imaging technique to image biomedical tissues. The time reversal reconstruction algorithm in which a numerical model of the acoustic forward problem is run backwards in time is widely used. In the paper, a time reversal reconstruction algorithm based on particle swarm optimization (PSO optimized support vector machine (SVM interpolation method is proposed for photoacoustics imaging. Numerical results show that the reconstructed images of the proposed algorithm are more accurate than those of the nearest neighbor interpolation, linear interpolation, and cubic convolution interpolation based time reversal algorithm, which can provide higher imaging quality by using significantly fewer measurement positions or scanning times.

  9. Separating twin images and locating the center of a microparticle in dense suspensions using correlations among reconstructed fields of two parallel holograms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, Hangjian; Katz, Joseph

    2014-09-20

    This paper deals with two issues affecting the application of digital holographic microscopy (DHM) for measuring the spatial distribution of particles in a dense suspension, namely discriminating between real and virtual images and accurate detection of the particle center. Previous methods to separate real and virtual fields have involved applications of multiple phase-shifted holograms, combining reconstructed fields of multiple axially displaced holograms, and analysis of intensity distributions of weakly scattering objects. Here, we introduce a simple approach based on simultaneously recording two in-line holograms, whose planes are separated by a short distance from each other. This distance is chosen to be longer than the elongated trace of the particle. During reconstruction, the real images overlap, whereas the virtual images are displaced by twice the distance between hologram planes. Data analysis is based on correlating the spatial intensity distributions of the two reconstructed fields to measure displacement between traces. This method has been implemented for both synthetic particles and a dense suspension of 2 μm particles. The correlation analysis readily discriminates between real and virtual images of a sample containing more than 1300 particles. Consequently, we can now implement DHM for three-dimensional tracking of particles when the hologram plane is located inside the sample volume. Spatial correlations within the same reconstructed field are also used to improve the detection of the axial location of the particle center, extending previously introduced procedures to suspensions of microscopic particles. For each cross section within a particle trace, we sum the correlations among intensity distributions in all planes located symmetrically on both sides of the section. This cumulative correlation has a sharp peak at the particle center. Using both synthetic and recorded particle fields, we show that the uncertainty in localizing the axial

  10. MO-C-18A-01: Advances in Model-Based 3D Image Reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, G; Pan, X; Stayman, J; Samei, E

    2014-01-01

    Recent years have seen the emergence of CT image reconstruction techniques that exploit physical models of the imaging system, photon statistics, and even the patient to achieve improved 3D image quality and/or reduction of radiation dose. With numerous advantages in comparison to conventional 3D filtered backprojection, such techniques bring a variety of challenges as well, including: a demanding computational load associated with sophisticated forward models and iterative optimization methods; nonlinearity and nonstationarity in image quality characteristics; a complex dependency on multiple free parameters; and the need to understand how best to incorporate prior information (including patient-specific prior images) within the reconstruction process. The advantages, however, are even greater – for example: improved image quality; reduced dose; robustness to noise and artifacts; task-specific reconstruction protocols; suitability to novel CT imaging platforms and noncircular orbits; and incorporation of known characteristics of the imager and patient that are conventionally discarded. This symposium features experts in 3D image reconstruction, image quality assessment, and the translation of such methods to emerging clinical applications. Dr. Chen will address novel methods for the incorporation of prior information in 3D and 4D CT reconstruction techniques. Dr. Pan will show recent advances in optimization-based reconstruction that enable potential reduction of dose and sampling requirements. Dr. Stayman will describe a “task-based imaging” approach that leverages models of the imaging system and patient in combination with a specification of the imaging task to optimize both the acquisition and reconstruction process. Dr. Samei will describe the development of methods for image quality assessment in such nonlinear reconstruction techniques and the use of these methods to characterize and optimize image quality and dose in a spectrum of clinical

  11. Holographic non-Gaussianity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McFadden, Paul; Skenderis, Kostas

    2011-01-01

    We investigate the non-Gaussianity of primordial cosmological perturbations within our recently proposed holographic description of inflationary universes. We derive a holographic formula that determines the bispectrum of cosmological curvature perturbations in terms of correlation functions of a holographically dual three-dimensional non-gravitational quantum field theory (QFT). This allows us to compute the primordial bispectrum for a universe which started in a non-geometric holographic phase, using perturbative QFT calculations. Strikingly, for a class of models specified by a three-dimensional super-renormalisable QFT, the primordial bispectrum is of exactly the factorisable equilateral form with f NL equil. = 5/36, irrespective of the details of the dual QFT. A by-product of this investigation is a holographic formula for the three-point function of the trace of the stress-energy tensor along general holographic RG flows, which should have applications outside the remit of this work

  12. Image reconstruction for a Positron Emission Tomograph optimized for breast cancer imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Virador, Patrick R.G.

    2000-01-01

    The author performs image reconstruction for a novel Positron Emission Tomography camera that is optimized for breast cancer imaging. This work addresses for the first time, the problem of fully-3D, tomographic reconstruction using a septa-less, stationary, (i.e. no rotation or linear motion), and rectangular camera whose Field of View (FOV) encompasses the entire volume enclosed by detector modules capable of measuring Depth of Interaction (DOI) information. The camera is rectangular in shape in order to accommodate breasts of varying sizes while allowing for soft compression of the breast during the scan. This non-standard geometry of the camera exacerbates two problems: (a) radial elongation due to crystal penetration and (b) reconstructing images from irregularly sampled data. Packing considerations also give rise to regions in projection space that are not sampled which lead to missing information. The author presents new Fourier Methods based image reconstruction algorithms that incorporate DOI information and accommodate the irregular sampling of the camera in a consistent manner by defining lines of responses (LORs) between the measured interaction points instead of rebinning the events into predefined crystal face LORs which is the only other method to handle DOI information proposed thus far. The new procedures maximize the use of the increased sampling provided by the DOI while minimizing interpolation in the data. The new algorithms use fixed-width evenly spaced radial bins in order to take advantage of the speed of the Fast Fourier Transform (FFT), which necessitates the use of irregular angular sampling in order to minimize the number of unnormalizable Zero-Efficiency Bins (ZEBs). In order to address the persisting ZEBs and the issue of missing information originating from packing considerations, the algorithms (a) perform nearest neighbor smoothing in 2D in the radial bins (b) employ a semi-iterative procedure in order to estimate the unsampled data

  13. Image reconstruction for a Positron Emission Tomograph optimized for breast cancer imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Virador, Patrick R.G. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2000-04-01

    The author performs image reconstruction for a novel Positron Emission Tomography camera that is optimized for breast cancer imaging. This work addresses for the first time, the problem of fully-3D, tomographic reconstruction using a septa-less, stationary, (i.e. no rotation or linear motion), and rectangular camera whose Field of View (FOV) encompasses the entire volume enclosed by detector modules capable of measuring Depth of Interaction (DOI) information. The camera is rectangular in shape in order to accommodate breasts of varying sizes while allowing for soft compression of the breast during the scan. This non-standard geometry of the camera exacerbates two problems: (a) radial elongation due to crystal penetration and (b) reconstructing images from irregularly sampled data. Packing considerations also give rise to regions in projection space that are not sampled which lead to missing information. The author presents new Fourier Methods based image reconstruction algorithms that incorporate DOI information and accommodate the irregular sampling of the camera in a consistent manner by defining lines of responses (LORs) between the measured interaction points instead of rebinning the events into predefined crystal face LORs which is the only other method to handle DOI information proposed thus far. The new procedures maximize the use of the increased sampling provided by the DOI while minimizing interpolation in the data. The new algorithms use fixed-width evenly spaced radial bins in order to take advantage of the speed of the Fast Fourier Transform (FFT), which necessitates the use of irregular angular sampling in order to minimize the number of unnormalizable Zero-Efficiency Bins (ZEBs). In order to address the persisting ZEBs and the issue of missing information originating from packing considerations, the algorithms (a) perform nearest neighbor smoothing in 2D in the radial bins (b) employ a semi-iterative procedure in order to estimate the unsampled data

  14. Separated reconstruction of images from ultrasonic holograms with tridimensional object by digital processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Son, J.H.

    1979-01-01

    Because of much attractiveness, digital reconstruction of image from ultrasonic hologram by computer has been widely studied in recent years. But the method of digital reconstruction of image is displayed in the plain only, so study is done mainly of the hologram obtained from bidimensional objects. Many applications of the ultrasonic holography such as the non-distructive testing and the ultrasonic diagnosis are mostly of the tridimensional object. In the ordinary digital reconstruction of the image from the hologram obtained from tridimensional object, a question of hidden-image problem arises, and the separated reconstruction of the image for the considered part of the object is required. In this paper, multi-diffraction by tridimensional object is assumed to have linearity, ie. superposition property by each diffraction of bidimensional objects. And a new algorithm is proposed here, namely reconstructed image for considered one of bidimensional objects in tridimensional object obtained by means of operation from the two holograms tilted in unequal angles. Such tilted holograms are obtained from the tilted linear array receivers by scanning method. That images can be reconstructed by the operation from two holograms means that the new algorithm is verified. And another new method of the transformation of hologram, that is, transformation of a hologram to arbitrarily tilted hologram, has been proved valid. The reconstructed images obtained with the method of transformation and the method of operation, are the images reconstructed from one hologram by the tridimensional object and more distinctly separated that any images mentioned above. (author)

  15. Current profile reconstruction using electron temperature imaging diagnostics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tritz, K.; Stutman, D.; Delgado-Aparicio, L.F.; Finkenthal, M.; Pacella, D.; Kaita, R.; Stratton, B.; Sabbagh, S.

    2004-01-01

    Flux surface shape information can be used to constrain the current profile for reconstruction of the plasma equilibrium. One method of inferring flux surface shape relies on plasma x-ray emission; however, deviations from the flux surfaces due to impurity and density asymmetries complicate the interpretation. Electron isotherm surfaces should correspond well to the plasma flux surfaces, and equilibrium constraint modeling using this isotherm information constrains the current profile. The KFIT code is used to assess the profile uncertainty and to optimize the number, location and SNR required for the Te detectors. As Te imaging detectors we consider tangentially viewing, vertically spaced, linear gas electron multiplier arrays operated in pulse height analysis (PHA) mode and multifoil soft x-ray arrays. Isoflux coordinate sets provided by T e measurements offer a strong constraint on the equilibrium reconstruction in both a stacked horizontal array configuration and a crossed horizontal and vertical beam system, with q 0 determined to within ±4%. The required SNR can be provided with either PHA or multicolor diagnostic techniques, though the multicolor system requires ∼x4 better statistics for comparable final errors

  16. Image reconstruction in k-space from MR data encoded with ambiguous gradient fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, Gerrit; Gallichan, Daniel; Weber, Hans; Witschey, Walter R T; Honal, Matthias; Hennig, Jürgen; Zaitsev, Maxim

    2015-02-01

    In this work, the limits of image reconstruction in k-space are explored when non-bijective gradient fields are used for spatial encoding. The image space analogy between parallel imaging and imaging with non-bijective encoding fields is partially broken in k-space. As a consequence, it is hypothesized and proven that ambiguities can only be resolved partially in k-space, and not completely as is the case in image space. Image-space and k-space based reconstruction algorithms for multi-channel radiofrequency data acquisitions are programmed and tested using numerical simulations as well as in vivo measurement data. The hypothesis is verified based on an analysis of reconstructed images. It is found that non-bijective gradient fields have the effect that densely sampled autocalibration data, used for k-space reconstruction, provide less information than a separate scan of the receiver coil sensitivity maps, used for image space reconstruction. Consequently, in k-space only the undersampling artifact can be unfolded, whereas in image space, it is also possible to resolve aliasing that is caused by the non-bijectivity of the gradient fields. For standard imaging, reconstruction in image space and in k-space is nearly equivalent, whereas there is a fundamental difference with practical consequences for the selection of image reconstruction algorithms when non-bijective encoding fields are involved. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Focal dynamics of multiple filaments: Microscopic imaging and reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiran, P. Prem; Bagchi, Suman; Kumar, G. Ravindra; Krishnan, Siva Rama; Arnold, C. L.; Couairon, A.

    2010-01-01

    We observe the complete dynamics of the propagation of very intense, femtosecond laser pulses in air under tight focusing conditions via direct imaging of the entire interaction zone. The whole life history of the focused pulses is then reconstructed by means of numerical simulations. We show that beam breakup leads to a dual-rate increase in filament numbers with laser power. Linearly and circularly polarized pulses give rise to beam breakup and fusion governed by external focusing conditions. For tight focusing conditions, intensity saturation due to plasma generation and nonlinear losses does not limit the intensity growth, thereby giving access to a new propagation regime featured by an efficient laser energy deposition in fully ionized air and intense 10 15 W/cm 2 pulses at the focus.

  18. Magnetic resonance imaging evaluation of cruciate ligaments after arthroscopic reconstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amit Kharat

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Due to increase in road traffic and sports injuries, tears of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL and the posterior cruciate ligament (PCL of the knee are common. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI is emerging as an important tool of diagnosis and evaluation of these injuries. Methods: We carried out a prospective study on role of MRI on ten patients who had undergone ACL or PCL repair over a period of six months. In this report we present three illustrative cases to capture the spectrum of findings in our series to underline the role of MRI in management of such injuries and discuss the modalities of the procedure. Results: In our series, as demonstrated by the cases, MRI had an important role in diagnosis and evaluation of injuries to the cruciate ligaments. Conclusion: MRI can play an important role, particularly in tertiary centres, in diagnosis and evaluation of reconstructed ACL and PCL ligaments of the knee joint.

  19. Algorithms of CT value correction for reconstructing a radiotherapy simulation image through axial CT images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogino, Takashi; Egawa, Sunao

    1991-01-01

    New algorithms of CT value correction for reconstructing a radiotherapy simulation image through axial CT images were developed. One, designated plane weighting method, is to correct CT value in proportion to the position of the beam element passing through the voxel. The other, designated solid weighting method, is to correct CT value in proportion to the length of the beam element passing through the voxel and the volume of voxel. Phantom experiments showed fair spatial resolution in the transverse direction. In the longitudinal direction, however, spatial resolution of under slice thickness could not be obtained. Contrast resolution was equivalent for both methods. In patient studies, the reconstructed radiotherapy simulation image was almost similar in visual perception of the density resolution to a simulation film taken by X-ray simulator. (author)

  20. Consistent reconstruction of 4D fetal heart ultrasound images to cope with fetal motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanner, Christine; Flach, Barbara; Eggenberger, Céline; Mattausch, Oliver; Bajka, Michael; Goksel, Orcun

    2017-08-01

    4D ultrasound imaging of the fetal heart relies on reconstructions from B-mode images. In the presence of fetal motion, current approaches suffer from artifacts, which are unrecoverable for single sweeps. We propose to use many sweeps and exploit the resulting redundancy to automatically recover from motion by reconstructing a 4D image which is consistent in phase, space, and time. An interactive visualization framework to view animated ultrasound slices from 4D reconstructions on arbitrary planes was developed using a magnetically tracked mock probe. We first quantified the performance of 10 4D reconstruction formulations on simulated data. Reconstructions of 14 in vivo sequences by a baseline, the current state-of-the-art, and the proposed approach were then visually ranked with respect to temporal quality on orthogonal views. Rankings from 5 observers showed that the proposed 4D reconstruction approach significantly improves temporal image quality in comparison with the baseline. The 4D reconstructions of the baseline and the proposed methods were then inspected interactively for accessibility to clinically important views and rated for their clinical usefulness by an ultrasound specialist in obstetrics and gynecology. The reconstructions by the proposed method were rated as 'very useful' in 71% and were statistically significantly more useful than the baseline reconstructions. Multi-sweep fetal heart ultrasound acquisitions in combination with consistent 4D image reconstruction improves quality as well as clinical usefulness of the resulting 4D images in the presence of fetal motion.

  1. Cone-beam and fan-beam image reconstruction algorithms based on spherical and circular harmonics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeng, Gengsheng L; Gullberg, Grant T

    2004-01-01

    A cone-beam image reconstruction algorithm using spherical harmonic expansions is proposed. The reconstruction algorithm is in the form of a summation of inner products of two discrete arrays of spherical harmonic expansion coefficients at each cone-beam point of acquisition. This form is different from the common filtered backprojection algorithm and the direct Fourier reconstruction algorithm. There is no re-sampling of the data, and spherical harmonic expansions are used instead of Fourier expansions. As a special case, a new fan-beam image reconstruction algorithm is also derived in terms of a circular harmonic expansion. Computer simulation results for both cone-beam and fan-beam algorithms are presented for circular planar orbit acquisitions. The algorithms give accurate reconstructions; however, the implementation of the cone-beam reconstruction algorithm is computationally intensive. A relatively efficient algorithm is proposed for reconstructing the central slice of the image when a circular scanning orbit is used

  2. Reusable holographic velocimetry system based on polarization multiplexing in Bacteriorhodopsin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koek, W.D.; Chan, V.S.S.; Ooms, T.A.; Bhattacharya, N.; Westerweel, J.; Braat, J.J.M.

    2005-01-01

    We present a novel holographic particle image velocimetry (HPIV) system using a reversible holographic material as the recording medium. In HPIV the three-dimensional flow field throughout a volume is detected by adding small tracer particles to a normally transparent medium. By recording the

  3. Image quality of iterative reconstruction in cranial CT imaging: comparison of model-based iterative reconstruction (MBIR) and adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASiR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Notohamiprodjo, S.; Deak, Z.; Meurer, F.; Maertz, F.; Mueck, F.G.; Geyer, L.L.; Wirth, S. [Ludwig-Maximilians University Hospital of Munich, Institute for Clinical Radiology, Munich (Germany)

    2015-01-15

    The purpose of this study was to compare cranial CT (CCT) image quality (IQ) of the MBIR algorithm with standard iterative reconstruction (ASiR). In this institutional review board (IRB)-approved study, raw data sets of 100 unenhanced CCT examinations (120 kV, 50-260 mAs, 20 mm collimation, 0.984 pitch) were reconstructed with both ASiR and MBIR. Signal-to-noise (SNR) and contrast-to-noise (CNR) were calculated from attenuation values measured in caudate nucleus, frontal white matter, anterior ventricle horn, fourth ventricle, and pons. Two radiologists, who were blinded to the reconstruction algorithms, evaluated anonymized multiplanar reformations of 2.5 mm with respect to depiction of different parenchymal structures and impact of artefacts on IQ with a five-point scale (0: unacceptable, 1: less than average, 2: average, 3: above average, 4: excellent). MBIR decreased artefacts more effectively than ASiR (p < 0.01). The median depiction score for MBIR was 3, whereas the median value for ASiR was 2 (p < 0.01). SNR and CNR were significantly higher in MBIR than ASiR (p < 0.01). MBIR showed significant improvement of IQ parameters compared to ASiR. As CCT is an examination that is frequently required, the use of MBIR may allow for substantial reduction of radiation exposure caused by medical diagnostics. (orig.)

  4. Image quality of iterative reconstruction in cranial CT imaging: comparison of model-based iterative reconstruction (MBIR) and adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASiR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Notohamiprodjo, S.; Deak, Z.; Meurer, F.; Maertz, F.; Mueck, F.G.; Geyer, L.L.; Wirth, S.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare cranial CT (CCT) image quality (IQ) of the MBIR algorithm with standard iterative reconstruction (ASiR). In this institutional review board (IRB)-approved study, raw data sets of 100 unenhanced CCT examinations (120 kV, 50-260 mAs, 20 mm collimation, 0.984 pitch) were reconstructed with both ASiR and MBIR. Signal-to-noise (SNR) and contrast-to-noise (CNR) were calculated from attenuation values measured in caudate nucleus, frontal white matter, anterior ventricle horn, fourth ventricle, and pons. Two radiologists, who were blinded to the reconstruction algorithms, evaluated anonymized multiplanar reformations of 2.5 mm with respect to depiction of different parenchymal structures and impact of artefacts on IQ with a five-point scale (0: unacceptable, 1: less than average, 2: average, 3: above average, 4: excellent). MBIR decreased artefacts more effectively than ASiR (p < 0.01). The median depiction score for MBIR was 3, whereas the median value for ASiR was 2 (p < 0.01). SNR and CNR were significantly higher in MBIR than ASiR (p < 0.01). MBIR showed significant improvement of IQ parameters compared to ASiR. As CCT is an examination that is frequently required, the use of MBIR may allow for substantial reduction of radiation exposure caused by medical diagnostics. (orig.)

  5. Reconstructed coronal views of CT and isotopic images of the pancreas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kasuga, Toshio; Kobayashi, Toshio; Nakanishi, Fumiko

    1980-01-01

    To compare functional images of the pancreas by scintigraphy with morphological views of the pancreas by CT, CT coronal views of the pancreas were reconstructed. As CT coronal views were reconstructed from the routine scanning, there was a problem in longitudinal spatial resolution. However, almost satisfactory total images of the pancreas were obtained by improving images adequately. In 27 patients whose diseases had been confirmed, it was easy to compare pancreatic scintigrams with pancreatic CT images by using reconstructed CT coronal views, and information which had not been obtained by original CT images could be obtained by using reconstructed CT coronal views. Especially, defects on pancreatic images and the shape of pancreas which had not been visualized clearly by scintigraphy alone could be visualized by using reconstructed CT coronal views of the pancreas. (Tsunoda, M.)

  6. Calibrated Phase-Shifting Digital Holographic Microscope Using a Sampling Moiré Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng Xia

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available A calibrated phase-shifting digital holographic microscope system capable of improving the quality of reconstructed images is proposed. Phase-shifting errors are introduced in phase-shifted holograms for numerous reasons, such as the non-linearity of piezoelectric transducers (PZTs, wavelength fluctuations in lasers, and environmental disturbances, leading to poor-quality reconstructions. In our system, in addition to the camera used to record object information, an extra camera is used to record interferograms, which are used to analyze phase-shifting errors using a sampling Moiré technique. The quality of the reconstructed object images can be improved by the phase-shifting error compensation algorithm. Both the numerical simulation and experiment demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed system.

  7. Molecular Imaging : Computer Reconstruction and Practice - Proceedings of the NATO Advanced Study Institute on Molecular Imaging from Physical Principles to Computer Reconstruction and Practice

    CERN Document Server

    Lemoigne, Yves

    2008-01-01

    This volume collects the lectures presented at the ninth ESI School held at Archamps (FR) in November 2006 and is dedicated to nuclear physics applications in molecular imaging. The lectures focus on the multiple facets of image reconstruction processing and management and illustrate the role of digital imaging in clinical practice. Medical computing and image reconstruction are introduced by analysing the underlying physics principles and their implementation, relevant quality aspects, clinical performance and recent advancements in the field. Several stages of the imaging process are specifically addressed, e.g. optimisation of data acquisition and storage, distributed computing, physiology and detector modelling, computer algorithms for image reconstruction and measurement in tomography applications, for both clinical and biomedical research applications. All topics are presented with didactical language and style, making this book an appropriate reference for students and professionals seeking a comprehen...

  8. Cardiovascular CT angiography in neonates and children : Image quality and potential for radiation dose reduction with iterative image reconstruction techniques

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tricarico, Francesco; Hlavacek, Anthony M.; Schoepf, U. Joseph; Ebersberger, Ullrich; Nance, John W.; Vliegenthart, Rozemarijn; Cho, Young Jun; Spears, J. Reid; Secchi, Francesco; Savino, Giancarlo; Marano, Riccardo; Schoenberg, Stefan O.; Bonomo, Lorenzo; Apfaltrer, Paul

    To evaluate image quality (IQ) of low-radiation-dose paediatric cardiovascular CT angiography (CTA), comparing iterative reconstruction in image space (IRIS) and sinogram-affirmed iterative reconstruction (SAFIRE) with filtered back-projection (FBP) and estimate the potential for further dose

  9. Use of holographic environment in business and educational application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rajput, A.Q.K.; Shaikh, M.Z.; Khanzada, T.J.S.

    2003-01-01

    Holographic environment is based on high-equipped Multimedia information systems. These are based on the evolving powers of computers to handle huge volume of information. Holographic environment is a simulated environment that allows the user to touch and interact with projections, which are derived from the distant real environment. A new communications technology is being developed that will facilitate to interact inside a simulated environment, even if you are thousands of miles apart. This is done with enhancing the electro-holography, which is the computer based generation of diffraction fringes from 3D input data and the display of the reconstructed object in real-time. This research paper presents the design and development of holographic environment for reduction of distances in business and educational applications. The Holographic Environment development with the use of multimedia information systems is discussed. In Particular the characteristics of holographic data and the current research results in the area of real time holographic display systems are spanned. The Technical components of holographic system are also encountered. Finally, issues of improvement in efficiency of Holographic Environments by compression of data are presented along with its utilization for educational and business applications. (author)

  10. Postoperative evaluation after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: Measurements and abnormalities on radiographic and CT imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Min Cheol; Choi, Yun Sun; KIm, Hyoung Seop; Choi, Nam Hong [Nowon Eulji Medical Center, Eulji University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-11-15

    Reconstruction of a ruptured anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is a well-established procedure for repair of ACL injury. Despite improvement of surgical and rehabilitation techniques over the past decades, up to 25% of patients still fail to regain satisfactory function after an ACL reconstruction. With development of CT imaging techniques for reducing metal artifacts, multi-planar reconstruction, and three-dimensional reconstruction, early post-operative imaging is increasingly being used to provide immediate feedback to surgeons regarding tunnel positioning, fixation, and device placement. Early post-operative radiography and CT imaging are easy to perform and serve as the baseline examinations for future reference.

  11. Reconstructions with identical filling (RIF) of the heart: a physiological approach to image reconstruction in coronary CT angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reinartz, S.D.; Diefenbach, B.S.; Kuhl, C.K.; Mahnken, A.H.; Allmendinger, T.

    2012-01-01

    To compare image quality in coronary artery computed tomography angiography (cCTA) using reconstructions with automated phase detection and Reconstructions computed with Identical Filling of the heart (RIF). Seventy-four patients underwent ECG-gated dual source CT (DSCT) between November 2009 and July 2010 for suspected coronary heart disease (n = 35), planning of transcatheter aortic valve replacement (n = 34) or evaluation of ventricular function (n = 5). Image data sets by the RIF formula and automated phase detection were computed and evaluated with the AHA 15-segment model and a 5-grade Likert scale (1: poor, 5: excellent quality). Subgroups regarding rhythm (sinus rhythm = SR; arrhythmia = ARR) and potential premedication were evaluated by a per-segment, per-vessel and per-patient analysis. RIF significantly improved image quality in 10 of 15 coronary segments (P < 0.05). More diagnostic segments were provided by RIF regarding the entire cohort (n = 693 vs. 590, P < 0.001) and all of the subgroups (e.g. ARR: n = 143 vs. 72, P < 0.001). In arrhythmic patients (n = 19), more diagnostic vessels (e.g. LAD: n = 10 vs. 3; P < 0.014) and complete data sets (n = 7 vs. 1; P < 0.001) were produced. RIF reconstruction is superior to automatic diastolic non-edited reconstructions, especially in arrhythmic patients. RIF theory provides a physiological approach for determining the optimal image reconstruction point in ECG-gated CT angiography. (orig.)

  12. PET image reconstruction with rotationally symmetric polygonal pixel grid based highly compressible system matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Yunhan; Xia Yan; Liu Yaqiang; Wang Shi; Ma Tianyu; Chen Jing; Hong Baoyu

    2013-01-01

    To achieve a maximum compression of system matrix in positron emission tomography (PET) image reconstruction, we proposed a polygonal image pixel division strategy in accordance with rotationally symmetric PET geometry. Geometrical definition and indexing rule for polygonal pixels were established. Image conversion from polygonal pixel structure to conventional rectangular pixel structure was implemented using a conversion matrix. A set of test images were analytically defined in polygonal pixel structure, converted to conventional rectangular pixel based images, and correctly displayed which verified the correctness of the image definition, conversion description and conversion of polygonal pixel structure. A compressed system matrix for PET image recon was generated by tap model and tested by forward-projecting three different distributions of radioactive sources to the sinogram domain and comparing them with theoretical predictions. On a practical small animal PET scanner, a compress ratio of 12.6:1 of the system matrix size was achieved with the polygonal pixel structure, comparing with the conventional rectangular pixel based tap-mode one. OS-EM iterative image reconstruction algorithms with the polygonal and conventional Cartesian pixel grid were developed. A hot rod phantom was detected and reconstructed based on these two grids with reasonable time cost. Image resolution of reconstructed images was both 1.35 mm. We conclude that it is feasible to reconstruct and display images in a polygonal image pixel structure based on a compressed system matrix in PET image reconstruction. (authors)

  13. Does thorax EIT image analysis depend on the image reconstruction method?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Zhanqi; Frerichs, Inéz; Pulletz, Sven; Müller-Lisse, Ullrich; Möller, Knut

    2013-04-01

    Different methods were proposed to analyze the resulting images of electrical impedance tomography (EIT) measurements during ventilation. The aim of our study was to examine if the analysis methods based on back-projection deliver the same results when applied on images based on other reconstruction algorithms. Seven mechanically ventilated patients with ARDS were examined by EIT. The thorax contours were determined from the routine CT images. EIT raw data was reconstructed offline with (1) filtered back-projection with circular forward model (BPC); (2) GREIT reconstruction method with circular forward model (GREITC) and (3) GREIT with individual thorax geometry (GREITT). Three parameters were calculated on the resulting images: linearity, global ventilation distribution and regional ventilation distribution. The results of linearity test are 5.03±2.45, 4.66±2.25 and 5.32±2.30 for BPC, GREITC and GREITT, respectively (median ±interquartile range). The differences among the three methods are not significant (p = 0.93, Kruskal-Wallis test). The proportions of ventilation in the right lung are 0.58±0.17, 0.59±0.20 and 0.59±0.25 for BPC, GREITC and GREITT, respectively (p = 0.98). The differences of the GI index based on different reconstruction methods (0.53±0.16, 0.51±0.25 and 0.54±0.16 for BPC, GREITC and GREITT, respectively) are also not significant (p = 0.93). We conclude that the parameters developed for images generated with GREITT are comparable with filtered back-projection and GREITC.

  14. A Method for Interactive 3D Reconstruction of Piecewise Planar Objects from Single Images

    OpenAIRE

    Sturm , Peter; Maybank , Steve

    1999-01-01

    International audience; We present an approach for 3D reconstruction of objects from a single image. Obviously, constraints on the 3D structure are needed to perform this task. Our approach is based on user-provided coplanarity, perpendicularity and parallelism constraints. These are used to calibrate the image and perform 3D reconstruction. The method is described in detail and results are provided.

  15. Influence of light refraction on the image reconstruction in transmission optical tomography of scattering media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tereshchenko, Sergei A; Potapov, D A; Podgaetskii, Vitalii M; Smirnov, A V

    2002-01-01

    A distorting influence of light refraction at the boundaries of scattering media on the results of tomographic reconstruction of images of radially symmetric objects is investigated. The methods for the correction of such refraction-caused distortions are described. The results of the image reconstruction for two model cylindrical objects are presented.

  16. Influence of iterative image reconstruction on CT-based calcium score measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Osch, Jochen A. C.; Mouden, Mohamed; van Dalen, Jorn A.; Timmer, Jorik R.; Reiffers, Stoffer; Knollema, Siert; Greuter, Marcel J. W.; Ottervanger, Jan Paul; Jager, Piet L.

    Iterative reconstruction techniques for coronary CT angiography have been introduced as an alternative for traditional filter back projection (FBP) to reduce image noise, allowing improved image quality and a potential for dose reduction. However, the impact of iterative reconstruction on the

  17. Improvement of image quality and dose management in CT fluoroscopy by iterative 3D image reconstruction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grosser, Oliver S.; Kupitz, Dennis; Powerski, Maciej; Mohnike, Konrad; Ricke, Jens [University Hospital Magdeburg, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Magdeburg (Germany); Wybranski, Christian [University Hospital Magdeburg, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Magdeburg (Germany); University Hospital Cologne, Institute for Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Cologne (Germany); Pech, Maciej [University Hospital Magdeburg, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Magdeburg (Germany); Medical University of Gdansk, Second Department of Radiology, Gdansk (Poland); Amthauer, Holger [University Hospital Magdeburg, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Magdeburg (Germany); Charite, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Berlin (Germany)

    2017-09-15

    The objective of this study was to assess the influence of an iterative CT reconstruction algorithm (IA), newly available for CT-fluoroscopy (CTF), on image noise, readers' confidence and effective dose compared to filtered back projection (FBP). Data from 165 patients (FBP/IA = 82/74) with CTF in the thorax, abdomen and pelvis were included. Noise was analysed in a large-diameter vessel. The impact of reconstruction and variables (e.g. X-ray tube current I) influencing noise and effective dose were analysed by ANOVA and a pairwise t-test with Bonferroni-Holm correction. Noise and readers' confidence were evaluated by three readers. Noise was significantly influenced by reconstruction, I, body region and circumference (all p ≤ 0.0002). IA reduced the noise significantly compared to FBP (p = 0.02). The effect varied for body regions and circumferences (p ≤ 0.001). The effective dose was influenced by the reconstruction, body region, interventional procedure and I (all p ≤ 0.02). The inter-rater reliability for noise and readers' confidence was good (W ≥ 0.75, p < 0.0001). Noise and readers' confidence were significantly better in AIDR-3D compared to FBP (p ≤ 0.03). Generally, IA yielded a significant reduction of the median effective dose. The CTF reconstruction by IA showed a significant reduction in noise and effective dose while readers' confidence increased. (orig.)

  18. Experimental validation of incomplete data CT image reconstruction techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eberhard, J.W.; Hsiao, M.L.; Tam, K.C.

    1989-01-01

    X-ray CT inspection of large metal parts is often limited by x-ray penetration problems along many of the ray paths required for a complete CT data set. In addition, because of the complex geometry of many industrial parts, manipulation difficulties often prevent scanning over some range of angles. CT images reconstructed from these incomplete data sets contain a variety of artifacts which limit their usefulness in part quality determination. Over the past several years, the authors' company has developed 2 new methods of incorporating a priori information about the parts under inspection to significantly improve incomplete data CT image quality. This work reviews the methods which were developed and presents experimental results which confirm the effectiveness of the techniques. The new methods for dealing with incomplete CT data sets rely on a priori information from part blueprints (in electronic form), outer boundary information from touch sensors, estimates of part outer boundaries from available x-ray data, and linear x-ray attenuation coefficients of the part. The two methods make use of this information in different fashions. The relative performance of the two methods in detecting various flaw types is compared. Methods for accurately registering a priori information with x-ray data are also described. These results are critical to a new industrial x-ray inspection cell built for inspection of large aircraft engine parts

  19. Comparison of different reconstruction algorithms for three-dimensional ultrasound imaging in a neurosurgical setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, D; Lippert, C; Vollmer, F; Bozinov, O; Benes, L; Schulte, D M; Sure, U

    2012-09-01

    Freehand three-dimensional ultrasound imaging (3D-US) is increasingly used in image-guided surgery. During image acquisition, a set of B-scans is acquired that is distributed in a non-parallel manner over the area of interest. Reconstructing these images into a regular array allows 3D visualization. However, the reconstruction process may introduce artefacts and may therefore reduce image quality. The aim of the study is to compare different algorithms with respect to image quality and diagnostic value for image guidance in neurosurgery. 3D-US data sets were acquired during surgery of various intracerebral lesions using an integrated ultrasound-navigation device. They were stored for post-hoc evaluation. Five different reconstruction algorithms, a standard multiplanar reconstruction with interpolation (MPR), a pixel nearest neighbour method (PNN), a voxel nearest neighbour method (VNN) and two voxel based distance-weighted algorithms (VNN2 and DW) were tested with respect to image quality and artefact formation. The capability of the algorithm to fill gaps within the sample volume was investigated and a clinical evaluation with respect to the diagnostic value of the reconstructed images was performed. MPR was significantly worse than the other algorithms in filling gaps. In an image subtraction test, VNN2 and DW reliably reconstructed images even if large amounts of data were missing. However, the quality of the reconstruction improved, if data acquisition was performed in a structured manner. When evaluating the diagnostic value of reconstructed axial, sagittal and coronal views, VNN2 and DW were judged to be significantly better than MPR and VNN. VNN2 and DW could be identified as robust algorithms that generate reconstructed US images with a high diagnostic value. These algorithms improve the utility and reliability of 3D-US imaging during intraoperative navigation. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. Super resolution reconstruction of infrared images based on classified dictionary learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Fei; Han, Pingli; Wang, Yi; Li, Xuan; Bai, Lu; Shao, Xiaopeng

    2018-05-01

    Infrared images always suffer from low-resolution problems resulting from limitations of imaging devices. An economical approach to combat this problem involves reconstructing high-resolution images by reasonable methods without updating devices. Inspired by compressed sensing theory, this study presents and demonstrates a Classified Dictionary Learning method to reconstruct high-resolution infrared images. It classifies features of the samples into several reasonable clusters and trained a dictionary pair for each cluster. The optimal pair of dictionaries is chosen for each image reconstruction and therefore, more satisfactory results is achieved without the increase in computational complexity and time cost. Experiments and results demonstrated that it is a viable method for infrared images reconstruction since it improves image resolution and recovers detailed information of targets.

  1. A resolution-enhancing image reconstruction method for few-view differential phase-contrast tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Huifeng; Anastasio, Mark A.

    2017-03-01

    It is well-known that properly designed image reconstruction methods can facilitate reductions in imaging doses and data-acquisition times in tomographic imaging. The ability to do so is particularly important for emerging modalities such as differential X-ray phase-contrast tomography (D-XPCT), which are currently limited by these factors. An important application of D-XPCT is high-resolution imaging of biomedical samples. However, reconstructing high-resolution images from few-view tomographic measurements remains a challenging task. In this work, a two-step sub-space reconstruction strategy is proposed and investigated for use in few-view D-XPCT image reconstruction. It is demonstrated that the resulting iterative algorithm can mitigate the high-frequency information loss caused by data incompleteness and produce images that have better preserved high spatial frequency content than those produced by use of a conventional penalized least squares (PLS) estimator.

  2. Aliasless fresnel transform image reconstruction in phase scrambling fourier transform technique by data interpolation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, Yoshifumi; Liu, Na; Ito, Satoshi

    2006-01-01

    The signal in the Fresnel transform technique corresponds to a blurred one of the spin density image. Because the amplitudes of adjacent sampled signals have a high interrelation, the signal amplitude at a point between sampled points can be estimated with a high degree of accuracy even if the sampling is so coarse as to generate aliasing in the reconstructed images. In this report, we describe a new aliasless image reconstruction technique in the phase scrambling Fourier transform (PSFT) imaging technique in which the PSFT signals are converted to Fresnel transform signals by multiplying them by a quadratic phase term and are then interpolated using polynomial expressions to generate fully encoded signals. Numerical simulation using MR images showed that almost completely aliasless images are reconstructed by this technique. Experiments using ultra-low-field PSFT MRI were conducted, and aliasless images were reconstructed from coarsely sampled PSFT signals. (author)

  3. Image-guided stereotactic surgery using ultrasonography and reconstructive three-dimensional CT-imaging system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawamura, Hirotsune; Iseki, Hiroshi; Umezawa, Yoshihiro

    1991-01-01

    A new simulation and navigation system utilizing three-dimensional CT images has been developed for image-guided stereotactic surgery. Preoperative CT images are not always useful in predicting the intraoperative location of lesions, for cerebral lesions are easily displaced or distorted by gravity, brain retraction, and/or CSF aspiration during operative procedure. This new system, however, has the advantage that the intraoperative locations of intracranial lesions or the anatomical structures of the brain can be precisely confirmed during stereotactic surgery. Serial CT images were obtained from a patient whose head had been fixed to the ISEKI CT-guided stereotactic frame. The data of serial CT images were saved on a floppy disc and then transferred to the work station (IRIS) using the off line. In order to find the best approach angle for ultrasound-guided stereotactic surgery, three-dimenstional CT images were reconstructed using the work station. The site of the craniotomy or the angle of the trajectory of the ultrasound probe was measured preoperatively based on the three-dimensional CT images. Then, in the operating room, the patient's head was fixed to the ISEKI frame with the subframe at the same position as before according to the measurement of the CT images. In a case of cystic glioma, the predicable ultrasonograms from three-dimensional reconstructive CT images were ascertained to correspond well to the actual ultrasound images during ultrasound-guided stereotactic surgery. Therefore, the new simulation and navigation system can be judged to be a powerful operative supporting modality for correcting the locations of cerebral lesions; it allows one to perform stereotactic surgery more accurately and less invasively. (author)

  4. Holographic Moire Contouring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sciammarella, C. A.; Sainov, Ventseslav; Simova, Eli

    1990-04-01

    Theoretical analysis and experimental results on holographic moire contouring (HMC) of difussely reflecting objects are presented. The sensitivity and application constraints of the method are discussed. A high signal-to-noise ratio and contrast of the fringes is achieved through the use of high quality silver halide holographic plates HP-650. A good agreement between theoretical and experimental results is observed.

  5. Choice of reconstructed tissue properties affects interpretation of lung EIT images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grychtol, Bartłomiej; Adler, Andy

    2014-06-01

    Electrical impedance tomography (EIT) estimates an image of change in electrical properties within a body from stimulations and measurements at surface electrodes. There is significant interest in EIT as a tool to monitor and guide ventilation therapy in mechanically ventilated patients. In lung EIT, the EIT inverse problem is commonly linearized and only changes in electrical properties are reconstructed. Early algorithms reconstructed changes in resistivity, while most recent work using the finite element method reconstructs conductivity. Recently, we demonstrated that EIT images of ventilation can be misleading if the electrical contrasts within the thorax are not taken into account during the image reconstruction process. In this paper, we explore the effect of the choice of the reconstructed electrical properties (resistivity or conductivity) on the resulting EIT images. We show in simulation and experimental data that EIT images reconstructed with the same algorithm but with different parametrizations lead to large and clinically significant differences in the resulting images, which persist even after attempts to eliminate the impact of the parameter choice by recovering volume changes from the EIT images. Since there is no consensus among the most popular reconstruction algorithms and devices regarding the parametrization, this finding has implications for potential clinical use of EIT. We propose a program of research to develop reconstruction techniques that account for both the relationship between air volume and electrical properties of the lung and artefacts introduced by the linearization.

  6. Choice of reconstructed tissue properties affects interpretation of lung EIT images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grychtol, Bartłomiej; Adler, Andy

    2014-01-01

    Electrical impedance tomography (EIT) estimates an image of change in electrical properties within a body from stimulations and measurements at surface electrodes. There is significant interest in EIT as a tool to monitor and guide ventilation therapy in mechanically ventilated patients. In lung EIT, the EIT inverse problem is commonly linearized and only changes in electrical properties are reconstructed. Early algorithms reconstructed changes in resistivity, while most recent work using the finite element method reconstructs conductivity. Recently, we demonstrated that EIT images of ventilation can be misleading if the electrical contrasts within the thorax are not taken into account during the image reconstruction process. In this paper, we explore the effect of the choice of the reconstructed electrical properties (resistivity or conductivity) on the resulting EIT images. We show in simulation and experimental data that EIT images reconstructed with the same algorithm but with different parametrizations lead to large and clinically significant differences in the resulting images, which persist even after attempts to eliminate the impact of the parameter choice by recovering volume changes from the EIT images. Since there is no consensus among the most popular reconstruction algorithms and devices regarding the parametrization, this finding has implications for potential clinical use of EIT. We propose a program of research to develop reconstruction techniques that account for both the relationship between air volume and electrical properties of the lung and artefacts introduced by the linearization. (paper)

  7. Multi-view Multi-sparsity Kernel Reconstruction for Multi-class Image Classification

    KAUST Repository

    Zhu, Xiaofeng

    2015-05-28

    This paper addresses the problem of multi-class image classification by proposing a novel multi-view multi-sparsity kernel reconstruction (MMKR for short) model. Given images (including test images and training images) representing with multiple visual features, the MMKR first maps them into a high-dimensional space, e.g., a reproducing kernel Hilbert space (RKHS), where test images are then linearly reconstructed by some representative training images, rather than all of them. Furthermore a classification rule is proposed to classify test images. Experimental results on real datasets show the effectiveness of the proposed MMKR while comparing to state-of-the-art algorithms.

  8. Electro-optical system for the high speed reconstruction of computed tomography images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tresp, V.

    1989-01-01

    An electro-optical system for the high-speed reconstruction of computed tomography (CT) images has been built and studied. The system is capable of reconstructing high-contrast and high-resolution images at video rate (30 images per second), which is more than two orders of magnitude faster than the reconstruction rate achieved by special purpose digital computers used in commercial CT systems. The filtered back-projection algorithm which was implemented in the reconstruction system requires the filtering of all projections with a prescribed filter function. A space-integrating acousto-optical convolver, a surface acoustic wave filter and a digital finite-impulse response filter were used for this purpose and their performances were compared. The second part of the reconstruction, the back projection of the filtered projections, is computationally very expensive. An optical back projector has been built which maps the filtered projections onto the two-dimensional image space using an anamorphic lens system and a prism image rotator. The reconstructed image is viewed by a video camera, routed through a real-time image-enhancement system, and displayed on a TV monitor. The system reconstructs parallel-beam projection data, and in a modified version, is also capable of reconstructing fan-beam projection data. This extension is important since the latter are the kind of projection data actually acquired in high-speed X-ray CT scanners. The reconstruction system was tested by reconstructing precomputed projection data of phantom images. These were stored in a special purpose projection memory and transmitted to the reconstruction system as an electronic signal. In this way, a projection measurement system that acquires projections sequentially was simulated

  9. SU-E-I-73: Clinical Evaluation of CT Image Reconstructed Using Interior Tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, J; Ge, G; Winkler, M; Cong, W; Wang, G

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Radiation dose reduction has been a long standing challenge in CT imaging of obese patients. Recent advances in interior tomography (reconstruction of an interior region of interest (ROI) from line integrals associated with only paths through the ROI) promise to achieve significant radiation dose reduction without compromising image quality. This study is to investigate the application of this technique in CT imaging through evaluating imaging quality reconstructed from patient data. Methods: Projection data were directly obtained from patients who had CT examinations in a Dual Source CT scanner (DSCT). Two detectors in a DSCT acquired projection data simultaneously. One detector provided projection data for full field of view (FOV, 50 cm) while another detectors provided truncated projection data for a FOV of 26 cm. Full FOV CT images were reconstructed using both filtered back projection and iterative algorithm; while interior tomography algorithm was implemented to reconstruct ROI images. For comparison reason, FBP was also used to reconstruct ROI images. Reconstructed CT images were evaluated by radiologists and compared with images from CT scanner. Results: The results show that the reconstructed ROI image was in excellent agreement with the truth inside the ROI, obtained from images from CT scanner, and the detailed features in the ROI were quantitatively accurate. Radiologists evaluation shows that CT images reconstructed with interior tomography met diagnosis requirements. Radiation dose may be reduced up to 50% using interior tomography, depending on patient size. Conclusion: This study shows that interior tomography can be readily employed in CT imaging for radiation dose reduction. It may be especially useful in imaging obese patients, whose subcutaneous tissue is less clinically relevant but may significantly increase radiation dose

  10. A single-sided homogeneous Green's function representation for holographic imaging, inverse scattering, time-reversal acoustics and interferometric Green's function retrieval

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wapenaar, Kees; Thorbecke, Jan; van der Neut, Joost

    2016-04-01

    Green's theorem plays a fundamental role in a diverse range of wavefield imaging applications, such as holographic imaging, inverse scattering, time-reversal acoustics and interferometric Green's function retrieval. In many of those applications, the homogeneous Green's function (i.e. the Green's function of the wave equation without a singularity on the right-hand side) is represented by a closed boundary integral. In practical applications, sources and/or receivers are usually present only on an open surface, which implies that a significant part of the closed boundary integral is by necessity ignored. Here we derive a homogeneous Green's function representation for the common situation that sources and/or receivers are present on an open surface only. We modify the integrand in such a way that it vanishes on the part of the boundary where no sources and receivers are present. As a consequence, the remaining integral along the open surface is an accurate single-sided representation of the homogeneous Green's function. This single-sided representation accounts for all orders of multiple scattering. The new representation significantly improves the aforementioned wavefield imaging applications, particularly in situations where the first-order scattering approximation breaks down.

  11. Polychromatic holographic plasma diagnostics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhiglinskij, A.G.; Morozov, A.O.

    1992-01-01

    Review of holographic interferometry properties is performed and advantages of this method by plasma diagnostics are indicated. Main results obtained by the method of holographic interferometry in studies of various-type plasmas are considered. Special attention is paid to multiwave plasma diagnostics, the necessity of which is related as a rule to multicomponent composition of plasma. The eight laser and gas-discharge sources and holographic schemes, which make it possible to realize plasma polychromatic and holographic interferometry, are considered. The advantages of the method are demonstrated by examples of polychromatic holographic diagnostics of arc discharge and discharge in a hollow cathode. Review of theoretical works determining the applicability area of resonance polychromatic interferometry is carried out

  12. Model-Based Photoacoustic Image Reconstruction using Compressed Sensing and Smoothed L0 Norm

    OpenAIRE

    Mozaffarzadeh, Moein; Mahloojifar, Ali; Nasiriavanaki, Mohammadreza; Orooji, Mahdi

    2018-01-01

    Photoacoustic imaging (PAI) is a novel medical imaging modality that uses the advantages of the spatial resolution of ultrasound imaging and the high contrast of pure optical imaging. Analytical algorithms are usually employed to reconstruct the photoacoustic (PA) images as a result of their simple implementation. However, they provide a low accurate image. Model-based (MB) algorithms are used to improve the image quality and accuracy while a large number of transducers and data acquisition a...

  13. Magni: A Python Package for Compressive Sampling and Reconstruction of Atomic Force Microscopy Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Schou Oxvig

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Magni is an open source Python package that embraces compressed sensing and Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM imaging techniques. It provides AFM-specific functionality for undersampling and reconstructing images from AFM equipment and thereby accelerating the acquisition of AFM images. Magni also provides researchers in compressed sensing with a selection of algorithms for reconstructing undersampled general images, and offers a consistent and rigorous way to efficiently evaluate the researchers own developed reconstruction algorithms in terms of phase transitions. The package also serves as a convenient platform for researchers in compressed sensing aiming at obtaining a high degree of reproducibility of their research.

  14. An iterative reconstruction method of complex images using expectation maximization for radial parallel MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Joonsung; Kim, Dongchan; Oh, Changhyun; Han, Yeji; Park, HyunWook

    2013-01-01

    In MRI (magnetic resonance imaging), signal sampling along a radial k-space trajectory is preferred in certain applications due to its distinct advantages such as robustness to motion, and the radial sampling can be beneficial for reconstruction algorithms such as parallel MRI (pMRI) due to the incoherency. For radial MRI, the image is usually reconstructed from projection data using analytic methods such as filtered back-projection or Fourier reconstruction after gridding. However, the quality of the reconstructed image from these analytic methods can be degraded when the number of acquired projection views is insufficient. In this paper, we propose a novel reconstruction method based on the expectation maximization (EM) method, where the EM algorithm is remodeled for MRI so that complex images can be reconstructed. Then, to optimize the proposed method for radial pMRI, a reconstruction method that uses coil sensitivity information of multichannel RF coils is formulated. Experiment results from synthetic and in vivo data show that the proposed method introduces better reconstructed images than the analytic methods, even from highly subsampled data, and provides monotonic convergence properties compared to the conjugate gradient based reconstruction method. (paper)

  15. A BPF-FBP tandem algorithm for image reconstruction in reverse helical cone-beam CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Seungryong; Xia, Dan; Pellizzari, Charles A.; Pan Xiaochuan

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Reverse helical cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) is a scanning configuration for potential applications in image-guided radiation therapy in which an accurate anatomic image of the patient is needed for image-guidance procedures. The authors previously developed an algorithm for image reconstruction from nontruncated data of an object that is completely within the reverse helix. The purpose of this work is to develop an image reconstruction approach for reverse helical CBCT of a long object that extends out of the reverse helix and therefore constitutes data truncation. Methods: The proposed approach comprises of two reconstruction steps. In the first step, a chord-based backprojection-filtration (BPF) algorithm reconstructs a volumetric image of an object from the original cone-beam data. Because there exists a chordless region in the middle of the reverse helix, the image obtained in the first step contains an unreconstructed central-gap region. In the second step, the gap region is reconstructed by use of a Pack-Noo-formula-based filteredbackprojection (FBP) algorithm from the modified cone-beam data obtained by subtracting from the original cone-beam data the reprojection of the image reconstructed in the first step. Results: The authors have performed numerical studies to validate the proposed approach in image reconstruction from reverse helical cone-beam data. The results confirm that the proposed approach can reconstruct accurate images of a long object without suffering from data-truncation artifacts or cone-angle artifacts. Conclusions: They developed and validated a BPF-FBP tandem algorithm to reconstruct images of a long object from reverse helical cone-beam data. The chord-based BPF algorithm was utilized for converting the long-object problem into a short-object problem. The proposed approach is applicable to other scanning configurations such as reduced circular sinusoidal trajectories.

  16. Real-time SPARSE-SENSE cardiac cine MR imaging: optimization of image reconstruction and sequence validation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goebel, Juliane; Nensa, Felix; Bomas, Bettina; Schemuth, Haemi P; Maderwald, Stefan; Gratz, Marcel; Quick, Harald H; Schlosser, Thomas; Nassenstein, Kai

    2016-12-01

    Improved real-time cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) sequences have currently been introduced, but so far only limited practical experience exists. This study aimed at image reconstruction optimization and clinical validation of a new highly accelerated real-time cine SPARSE-SENSE sequence. Left ventricular (LV) short-axis stacks of a real-time free-breathing SPARSE-SENSE sequence with high spatiotemporal resolution and of a standard segmented cine SSFP sequence were acquired at 1.5 T in 11 volunteers and 15 patients. To determine the optimal iterations, all volunteers' SPARSE-SENSE images were reconstructed using 10-200 iterations, and contrast ratios, image entropies, and reconstruction times were assessed. Subsequently, the patients' SPARSE-SENSE images were reconstructed with the clinically optimal iterations. LV volumetric values were evaluated and compared between both sequences. Sufficient image quality and acceptable reconstruction times were achieved when using 80 iterations. Bland-Altman plots and Passing-Bablok regression showed good agreement for all volumetric parameters. 80 iterations are recommended for iterative SPARSE-SENSE image reconstruction in clinical routine. Real-time cine SPARSE-SENSE yielded comparable volumetric results as the current standard SSFP sequence. Due to its intrinsic low image acquisition times, real-time cine SPARSE-SENSE imaging with iterative image reconstruction seems to be an attractive alternative for LV function analysis. • A highly accelerated real-time CMR sequence using SPARSE-SENSE was evaluated. • SPARSE-SENSE allows free breathing in real-time cardiac cine imaging. • For clinically optimal SPARSE-SENSE image reconstruction, 80 iterations are recommended. • Real-time SPARSE-SENSE imaging yielded comparable volumetric results as the reference SSFP sequence. • The fast SPARSE-SENSE sequence is an attractive alternative to standard SSFP sequences.

  17. Recent improvements in Hurricane Imaging Radiometer’s brightness temperature image reconstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sayak K. Biswas

    Full Text Available NASA MSFCs airborne Hurricane Imaging Radiometer (HIRAD uses interferometric aperture synthesis to produce high resolution wide swath images of scene brightness temperature (Tb distribution at four discrete C-band microwave frequencies (4.0, 5.0, 6.0 and 6.6 GHz. Images of ocean surface wind speed under heavy precipitation such as in tropical cyclones, is inferred from these measurements. The baseline HIRAD Tb reconstruction algorithm had produced prominent along-track streaks in the Tb images. Particularly the 4.0 GHz channel had been so dominated by the streaks as to be unusable.The loss of a frequency channel had compromised the final wind speed retrievals. During 2016, the HIRAD team made substantial progress in developing a quality controlled signal processing technique for the HIRAD data collected in 2015’s Tropical Cyclone Intensity (TCI experiment and reduced the effect of streaks in all channels including 4.0 GHz. 2000 MSC: 41A05, 41A10, 65D05, 65D17, Keywords: Microwave radiometry, Aperture synthesis, Image reconstruction, Hurricane winds

  18. PIRPLE: a penalized-likelihood framework for incorporation of prior images in CT reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stayman, J Webster; Dang, Hao; Ding, Yifu; Siewerdsen, Jeffrey H

    2013-01-01

    Over the course of diagnosis and treatment, it is common for a number of imaging studies to be acquired. Such imaging sequences can provide substantial patient-specific prior knowledge about the anatomy that can be incorporated into a prior-image-based tomographic reconstruction for improved image quality and better dose utilization. We present a general methodology using a model-based reconstruction approach including formulations of the measurement noise that also integrates prior images. This penalized-likelihood technique adopts a sparsity enforcing penalty that incorporates prior information yet allows for change between the current reconstruction and the prior image. Moreover, since prior images are generally not registered with the current image volume, we present a modified model-based approach that seeks a joint registration of the prior image in addition to the reconstruction of projection data. We demonstrate that the combined prior-image- and model-based technique outperforms methods that ignore the prior data or lack a noise model. Moreover, we demonstrate the importance of registration for prior-image-based reconstruction methods and show that the prior-image-registered penalized-likelihood estimation (PIRPLE) approach can maintain a high level of image quality in the presence of noisy and undersampled projection data. (paper)

  19. Linearized image reconstruction method for ultrasound modulated electrical impedance tomography based on power density distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Xizi; Xu, Yanbin; Dong, Feng

    2017-01-01

    Electrical resistance tomography (ERT) is a promising measurement technique with important industrial and clinical applications. However, with limited effective measurements, it suffers from poor spatial resolution due to the ill-posedness of the inverse problem. Recently, there has been an increasing research interest in hybrid imaging techniques, utilizing couplings of physical modalities, because these techniques obtain much more effective measurement information and promise high resolution. Ultrasound modulated electrical impedance tomography (UMEIT) is one of the newly developed hybrid imaging techniques, which combines electric and acoustic modalities. A linearized image reconstruction method based on power density is proposed for UMEIT. The interior data, power density distribution, is adopted to reconstruct the conductivity distribution with the proposed image reconstruction method. At the same time, relating the power density change to the change in conductivity, the Jacobian matrix is employed to make the nonlinear problem into a linear one. The analytic formulation of this Jacobian matrix is derived and its effectiveness is also verified. In addition, different excitation patterns are tested and analyzed, and opposite excitation provides the best performance with the proposed method. Also, multiple power density distributions are combined to implement image reconstruction. Finally, image reconstruction is implemented with the linear back-projection (LBP) algorithm. Compared with ERT, with the proposed image reconstruction method, UMEIT can produce reconstructed images with higher quality and better quantitative evaluation results. (paper)

  20. In-line digital holographic sensor for monitoring and characterizing marine particulates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Owen, Robert B.; Zozulya, Alex A.

    2000-01-01

    We report an in-line digital holographic sensor (DHS) for monitoring and characterizing marine particulates. This system images individual particles over a deep depth of field (>25 cm) with a resolution of 5 μm. The DHS projects a collimated beam through the water column and onto a lensless CCD array. Some light is diffracted by particulates and forms an object beam; the undeflected remainder constitutes the reference beam. The two beams combine at the CCD array and create an in-line hologram, which is then numerically reconstructed. The DHS eliminates many problems traditionally associated with holography. The CCD recording material considerably lowers the exposure time and eliminates most vibration problems. The laser power needs are low; the DHS uses a small 10-mW diode laser. Rapid numerical reconstruction eliminates photographic processing and optical reconstruction. We successfully operated the DHS underwater on a remotely operated vehicle; our test results include tracing a single particle from one hologram to the next, thus deriving a velocity vector for marine mass transport. We outline our digital holographic reconstruction procedure, and present our graphical user interface and user software tools. The DHS is particularly useful for providing in situ ground-truth measurements for environmental remote sensing. (c) 2000 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers

  1. A Superresolution Image Reconstruction Algorithm Based on Landweber in Electrical Capacitance Tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Deyun

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available According to the image reconstruction accuracy influenced by the “soft field” nature and ill-conditioned problems in electrical capacitance tomography, a superresolution image reconstruction algorithm based on Landweber is proposed in the paper, which is based on the working principle of the electrical capacitance tomography system. The method uses the algorithm which is derived by regularization of solutions derived and derives closed solution by fast Fourier transform of the convolution kernel. So, it ensures the certainty of the solution and improves the stability and quality of image reconstruction results. Simulation results show that the imaging precision and real-time imaging of the algorithm are better than Landweber algorithm, and this algorithm proposes a new method for the electrical capacitance tomography image reconstruction algorithm.

  2. Robust framework for PET image reconstruction incorporating system and measurement uncertainties.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huafeng Liu

    Full Text Available In Positron Emission Tomography (PET, an optimal estimate of the radioactivity concentration is obtained from the measured emission data under certain criteria. So far, all the well-known statistical reconstruction algorithms require exactly known system probability matrix a priori, and the quality of such system model largely determines the quality of the reconstructed images. In this paper, we propose an algorithm for PET image reconstruction for the real world case where the PET system model is subject to uncertainties. The method counts PET reconstruction as a regularization problem and the image estimation is achieved by means of an uncertainty weighted least squares framework. The performance of our work is evaluated with the Shepp-Logan simulated and real phantom data, which demonstrates significant improvements in image quality over the least squares reconstruction efforts.

  3. Imaging features of anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction graft insufficiency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shang Yao; Zhang Yue; Tian Chunyan; Zheng Zhuozhao

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the imaging features of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) graft insufficiency. Methods: X-Ray and MR imaging examinations in 24 consecutive patients who had ACL reconstructive graft insufficiency were retrospectively evaluated for tunnel position, osteoarthrosis and its related complications. Follow-up arthroscopy showed 16 graft tears and 8 graft laxities. Fisher exact test was used to compare tunnel malpositions, the proportion of graft tear on MRI and osteoarthrosis between graft tear group and graft laxity group. Results: Two malpositions of tibial tunnel and 3 malpositions of femoral tunnel were seen in graft tear group. Three-malpositions of tibial tunnel and 4 malpositions of femoral tunnel were seen in graft laxity group. The proportion of tibial or femoral malposition showed no significant difference between the two groups (P=0.289, P=0.167). In graft tear group, 15 complete graft tears were diagnosed correctly, 1 partial tear was misdiagnosed as normal on MRI. In graft laxity group, 4 grafts were diagnosed as normal and 4 were considered as graft tear on MRI. A significant difference was seen between the two groups (P=0.028) in the proportion of graft tear diagnosed on MRI. Fourteen osteoarthrosis were seen in graft tear group and 5 in graft laxity group. No significant difference was seen between the two groups (P= 0.289) in the proportion of osteoarthrosis. Conclusion: The proportions of tunnel malposition and osteoarthrosis showed no significant difference between the graft tear group and graft Laxity group. Most graft tears can be diagnosed accurately on MRI, but some cases of graft laxity may be misdiagnosed for graft tear. (authors)

  4. Positron transaxial emission tomograph with computerized image reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jatteau, Michel.

    1981-01-01

    This invention concerns a positron transaxial emission tomography apparatus with computerized image reconstruction, like those used in nuclear medicine for studying the metabolism of organs, in physiological examinations and as a diagnosis aid. The operation is based on the principle of the detection of photons emitted when the positrons are annihilated by impact with an electron. The appliance is mainly composed of: (a) - a set of gamma ray detectors distributed on a polygonal arrangement around the body area to be examined, (b) - circuits for amplifying the signals delivered by the gamma ray detectors, (c) - computers essentially comprising energy integration and discrimination circuits and provided at the output of the detectors for calculating and delivering, as from the amplified signals, information on the position and energy relative to each occurrence constituted by the detections of photons, (d) - time coincidence circuits for selecting by emission of detector validation signals, only those occurrences, among the ensemble of those detected, which effectively result from the annihilation of positrons inside the area examined, (e) - a data processing system [fr

  5. Silver halide sensitized gelatin process effects in holographic lenses recorded on Slavich PFG-01 plates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collados, Maria Victoria; Arias, Isabel; García, Ana; Atencia, Jesús; Quintanilla, Manuel

    2003-02-01

    In this work we study the feasibility of using silver halide sensitized gelatin based on PFG-01 (Slavich) emulsions to construct uniaxial compound lenses. This processing is able to introduce variations in the thickness and refractive index of the emulsion. We prove that these changes are not sufficient to provide the observed variations in Bragg conditions in the reconstruction and that a shear-type effect must exist to explain the performance of processed emulsions. We study the characteristics of a compound lens, obtaining acceptable image quality, good resolution, and the typical field limitation of volume holographic elements.

  6. An efficient algorithm for reconstruction of spect images in the presence of spatially varying attenuation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeeberg, B.R.; Bacharach, S.; Carson, R.; Green, M.V.; Larson, S.M.; Soucaille, J.F.

    1985-01-01

    An algorithm is presented which permits the reconstruction of SPECT images in the presence of spatially varying attenuation. The algorithm considers the spatially variant attenuation as a perturbation of the constant attenuation case and computes a reconstructed image and a correction image to estimate the effects of this perturbation. The corrected image will be computed from these two images and is of comparable quality both visually and quantitatively to those simulated for zero or constant attenuation taken as standard reference images. In addition, the algorithm is time efficient, in that the time required is approximately 2.5 times that for a standard convolution-back projection algorithm

  7. Progress in high-resolution x-ray holographic microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacobsen, C.; Kirz, J.; Howells, M.; McQuaid, K.; Rothman, S.; Feder, R.; Sayre, D.

    1987-07-01

    Among the various types of x-ray microscopes that have been demonstrated, the holographic microscope has had the largest gap between promise and performance. The difficulties of fabricating x-ray optical elements have led some to view holography as the most attractive method for obtaining the ultimate in high resolution x-ray micrographs; however, we know of no investigations prior to 1987 that clearly demonstrated submicron resolution in reconstructed images. Previous efforts suffered from problems such as limited resolution and dynamic range in the recording media, low coherent x-ray flux, and aberrations and diffraction limits in visible light reconstruction. We have addressed the recording limitations through the use of an undulator x-ray source and high-resolution photoresist recording media. For improved results in the readout and reconstruction steps, we have employed metal shadowing and transmission electron microscopy, along with numerical reconstruction techniques. We believe that this approach will allow holography to emerge as a practical method of high-resolution x-ray microscopy. 30 refs., 4 figs

  8. Progress in high-resolution x-ray holographic microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacobsen, C.; Kirz, J.; Howells, M.; McQuaid, K.; Rothman, S.; Feder, R.; Sayre, D.

    1987-07-01

    Among the various types of x-ray microscopes that have been demonstrated, the holographic microscope has had the largest gap between promise and performance. The difficulties of fabricating x-ray optical elements have led some to view holography as the most attractive method for obtaining the ultimate in high resolution x-ray micrographs; however, we know of no investigations prior to 1987 that clearly demonstrated submicron resolution in reconstructed images. Previous efforts suffered from problems such as limited resolution and dynamic range in the recording media, low coherent x-ray flux, and aberrations and diffraction limits in visible light reconstruction. We have addressed the recording limitations through the use of an undulator x-ray source and high-resolution photoresist recording media. For improved results in the readout and reconstruction steps, we have employed metal shadowing and transmission electron microscopy, along with numerical reconstruction techniques. We believe that this approach will allow holography to emerge as a practical method of high-resolution x-ray microscopy. 30 refs., 4 figs.

  9. Digital stereo-holographic microscopy for studying three-dimensional particle dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byeon, Hyeokjun; Go, Taesik; Lee, Sang Joon

    2018-06-01

    A digital stereo-holographic microscopy (DsHM) with two viewing angles is proposed to measure 3D information of microscale particles. This approach includes two volumetric recordings and numerical reconstruction, and it involves the combination of separately reconstructed holograms. The 3D positional information of a particle was determined by searching the center of the overlapped reconstructed volume. After confirming the proposed technique using static spherical particles, the 3D information of moving particles suspended in a Hagen-Poiseiulle flow was successfully obtained. Moreover, the 3D information of nonspherical particles, including ellipsoidal particles and red blood cells, were measured using the proposed technique. In addition to 3D positional information, the orientation and shape of the test samples were obtained from the plane images by slicing the overlapped volume perpendicular to the directions of the image recordings. This DsHM technique will be useful in analyzing the 3D dynamic behavior of various nonspherical particles, which cannot be measured by conventional digital holographic microscopy.

  10. Sparsity-promoting orthogonal dictionary updating for image reconstruction from highly undersampled magnetic resonance data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Jinhong; Guo, Li; Feng, Qianjin; Chen, Wufan; Feng, Yanqiu

    2015-01-01

    Image reconstruction from undersampled k-space data accelerates magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) by exploiting image sparseness in certain transform domains. Employing image patch representation over a learned dictionary has the advantage of being adaptive to local image structures and thus can better sparsify images than using fixed transforms (e.g. wavelets and total variations). Dictionary learning methods have recently been introduced to MRI reconstruction, and these methods demonstrate significantly reduced reconstruction errors compared to sparse MRI reconstruction using fixed transforms. However, the synthesis sparse coding problem in dictionary learning is NP-hard and computationally expensive. In this paper, we present a novel sparsity-promoting orthogonal dictionary updating method for efficient image reconstruction from highly undersampled MRI data. The orthogonality imposed on the learned dictionary enables the minimization problem in the reconstruction to be solved by an efficient optimization algorithm which alternately updates representation coefficients, orthogonal dictionary, and missing k-space data. Moreover, both sparsity level and sparse representation contribution using updated dictionaries gradually increase during iterations to recover more details, assuming the progressively improved quality of the dictionary. Simulation and real data experimental results both demonstrate that the proposed method is approximately 10 to 100 times faster than the K-SVD-based dictionary learning MRI method and simultaneously improves reconstruction accuracy. (paper)

  11. Sparsity-promoting orthogonal dictionary updating for image reconstruction from highly undersampled magnetic resonance data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jinhong; Guo, Li; Feng, Qianjin; Chen, Wufan; Feng, Yanqiu

    2015-07-21

    Image reconstruction from undersampled k-space data accelerates magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) by exploiting image sparseness in certain transform domains. Employing image patch representation over a learned dictionary has the advantage of being adaptive to local image structures and thus can better sparsify images than using fixed transforms (e.g. wavelets and total variations). Dictionary learning methods have recently been introduced to MRI reconstruction, and these methods demonstrate significantly reduced reconstruction errors compared to sparse MRI reconstruction using fixed transforms. However, the synthesis sparse coding problem in dictionary learning is NP-hard and computationally expensive. In this paper, we present a novel sparsity-promoting orthogonal dictionary updating method for efficient image reconstruction from highly undersampled MRI data. The orthogonality imposed on the learned dictionary enables the minimization problem in the reconstruction to be solved by an efficient optimization algorithm which alternately updates representation coefficients, orthogonal dictionary, and missing k-space data. Moreover, both sparsity level and sparse representation contribution using updated dictionaries gradually increase during iterations to recover more details, assuming the progressively improved quality of the dictionary. Simulation and real data experimental results both demonstrate that the proposed method is approximately 10 to 100 times faster than the K-SVD-based dictionary learning MRI method and simultaneously improves reconstruction accuracy.

  12. A comparative study of three-dimensional reconstructive images of temporomandibular joint using computed tomogram

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, Suk Young; Koh, Kwang Joon

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to clarify the spatial relationship of temporomandibular joint and to an aid in the diagnosis of temporomandibular disorder. For this study, three-dimensional images of normal temporomandibular joint were reconstructed by computer image analysis system and three-dimensional reconstructive program integrated in computed tomography. The obtained results were as follows : 1. Two-dimensional computed tomograms had the better resolution than three dimensional computed tomograms in the evaluation of bone structure and the disk of TMJ. 2. Direct sagittal computed tomograms and coronal computed tomograms had the better resolution in the evaluation of the disk of TMJ. 3. The positional relationship of the disk could be visualized, but the configuration of the disk could not be clearly visualized on three-dimensional reconstructive CT images. 4. Three-dimensional reconstructive CT images had the smoother margin than three-dimensional images reconstructed by computer image analysis system, but the images of the latter had the better perspective. 5. Three-dimensional reconstructive images had the better spatial relationship of the TMJ articulation, and the joint space were more clearly visualized on dissection images.

  13. Multiple-image hiding using super resolution reconstruction in high-frequency domains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiao-Wei; Zhao, Wu-Xiang; Wang, Jun; Wang, Qiong-Hua

    2017-12-01

    In this paper, a robust multiple-image hiding method using the computer-generated integral imaging and the modified super-resolution reconstruction algorithm is proposed. In our work, the host image is first transformed into frequency domains by cellular automata (CA), to assure the quality of the stego-image, the secret images are embedded into the CA high-frequency domains. The proposed method has the following advantages: (1) robustness to geometric attacks because of the memory-distributed property of elemental images, (2) increasing quality of the reconstructed secret images as the scheme utilizes the modified super-resolution reconstruction algorithm. The simulation results show that the proposed multiple-image hiding method outperforms other similar hiding methods and is robust to some geometric attacks, e.g., Gaussian noise and JPEG compression attacks.

  14. Synthetic biology's tall order: Reconstruction of 3D, super resolution images of single molecules in real-time

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Henriques, R

    2010-08-31

    Full Text Available -to-use reconstruction software coupled with image acquisition. Here, we present QuickPALM, an Image plugin, enabling real-time reconstruction of 3D super-resolution images during acquisition and drift correction. We illustrate its application by reconstructing Cy5...

  15. GPU-accelerated Kernel Regression Reconstruction for Freehand 3D Ultrasound Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Tiexiang; Li, Ling; Zhu, Qingsong; Qin, Wenjian; Gu, Jia; Yang, Feng; Xie, Yaoqin

    2017-07-01

    Volume reconstruction method plays an important role in improving reconstructed volumetric image quality for freehand three-dimensional (3D) ultrasound imaging. By utilizing the capability of programmable graphics processing unit (GPU), we can achieve a real-time incremental volume reconstruction at a speed of 25-50 frames per second (fps). After incremental reconstruction and visualization, hole-filling is performed on GPU to fill remaining empty voxels. However, traditional pixel nearest neighbor-based hole-filling fails to reconstruct volume with high image quality. On the contrary, the kernel regression provides an accurate volume reconstruction method for 3D ultrasound imaging but with the cost of heavy computational complexity. In this paper, a GPU-based fast kernel regression method is proposed for high-quality volume after the incremental reconstruction of freehand ultrasound. The experimental results show that improved image quality for speckle reduction and details preservation can be obtained with the parameter setting of kernel window size of [Formula: see text] and kernel bandwidth of 1.0. The computational performance of the proposed GPU-based method can be over 200 times faster than that on central processing unit (CPU), and the volume with size of 50 million voxels in our experiment can be reconstructed within 10 seconds.

  16. Application of EM holographic methods to borehole vertical electric source data to map a fuel oil spill

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartel, L.C.

    1993-01-01

    The multifrequency, multisource holographic method used in the analysis of seismic data is to extended electromagnetic (EM) data within the audio frequency range. The method is applied to the secondary magnetic fields produced by a borehole, vertical electric source (VES). The holographic method is a numerical reconstruction procedure based on the double focusing principle for both the source array and the receiver array. The approach used here is to Fourier transform the constructed image from frequency space to time space and set time equal to zero. The image is formed when the in-phase part (real part) is a maximum or the out-of-phase (imaginary part) is a minimum; i.e., the EM wave is phase coherent at its origination. In the application here the secondary magnetic fields are treated as scattered fields. In the numerical reconstruction, the seismic analog of the wave vector is used; i.e., the imaginary part of the actual wave vector is ignored. The multifrequency, multisource holographic method is applied to calculated model data and to actual field data acquired to map a diesel fuel oil spill

  17. Applications of EM holographic methods to borehole vertical electric source data to map a fuel oil spill

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartel, L.C.

    1993-01-01

    The multifrequency, multisource holographic method used in the analysis of seismic data is to extended electromagnetic (EM) data within the audio frequency range. The method is applied to the secondary magnetic fields produced by a borehole, vertical electric source (VES). The holographic method is a numerical reconstruction procedure based on the double focusing principle for both the source array and the receiver array. The approach used here is to Fourier transform the constructed image from frequency space to time space and set time equal to zero. The image is formed when the in-phase part (real part) is a maximum or the out-of-phase (imaginary part) is a minimum; i.e., the EM wave is phase coherent at its origination. In the application here the secondary magnetic fields are treated as scattered fields. In the numerical reconstruction, the seismic analog of the wave vector is used; i.e., the imaginary part of the actual wave vector is ignore. The multifrequency, multisource holographic method is applied to calculated model data and to actual field data acquired to map a diesel fuel oil spill

  18. Accuracy concerns in digital speckle photography combined with Fresnel digital holographic interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yuchen; Zemmamouche, Redouane; Vandenrijt, Jean-François; Georges, Marc P.

    2018-05-01

    A combination of digital holographic interferometry (DHI) and digital speckle photography (DSP) allows in-plane and out-of-plane displacement measurement between two states of an object. The former can be determined by correlating the two speckle patterns whereas the latter is given by the phase difference obtained from DHI. We show that the amplitude of numerically reconstructed object wavefront obtained from Fresnel in-line digital holography (DH), in combination with phase shifting techniques, can be used as speckle patterns in DSP. The accuracy of in-plane measurement is improved after correcting the phase errors induced by reference wave during reconstruction process. Furthermore, unlike conventional imaging system, Fresnel DH offers the possibility to resize the pixel size of speckle patterns situated on the reconstruction plane under the same optical configuration simply by zero-padding the hologram. The flexibility of speckle size adjustment in Fresnel DH ensures the accuracy of estimation result using DSP.

  19. Practical algorithms for simulation and reconstruction of digital in-line holograms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latychevskaia, Tatiana; Fink, Hans-Werner

    2015-03-20

    Here we present practical methods for simulation and reconstruction of in-line digital holograms recorded with plane and spherical waves. The algorithms described here are applicable to holographic imaging of an object exhibiting absorption as well as phase-shifting properties. Optimal parameters, related to distances, sampling rate, and other factors for successful simulation and reconstruction of holograms are evaluated and criteria for the achievable resolution are worked out. Moreover, we show that the numerical procedures for the reconstruction of holograms recorded with plane and spherical waves are identical under certain conditions. Experimental examples of holograms and their reconstructions are also discussed.

  20. The value of spiral CT thin imaging reconstruction in the diagnosis of obstructive jaundice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Zhi; Liu Zhang; Yang Chaoxiang; Lin Chengye; Zhang Li; Li Yuxiang; Ma Yunyan; Xiao Haisong; Lu Zhifeng; Wang Bo; Zhou Yunhong

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To approach the value of spiral CT thin imaging reconstruction in the diagnosis of obstructive jaundice in order to improve the correctness of the diagnosis. Methods: Analysis the cases' clinical manifestation and the CT images, who were diagnosed as obstructive jaundice by operation. All of cases had high-resolution computed tomograyhy scan. The thickness and the interval is 5mm, reconstructed the thickness and the interval to 1 mm and 1.5 mm, then send the images to the workstation and MRR were processed. Analysis the date with the pathology. Results: Spiral CT thin imaging reconstruction have 98% and 93% in the accuracy of location and characterization in the obstruction. Conclusion: The spiral CT thin imaging reconstruction is a good method to improve the accuracy of location and characterization in the obstructive jaundice. (authors)

  1. Linear image reconstruction for a diffuse optical mammography system in a noncompressed geometry using scattering fluid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nielsen, Tim; Brendel, Bernhard; Ziegler, Ronny; Beek, Michiel van; Uhlemann, Falk; Bontus, Claas; Koehler, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    Diffuse optical tomography (DOT) is a potential new imaging modality to detect or monitor breast lesions. Recently, Philips developed a new DOT system capable of transmission and fluorescence imaging, where the investigated breast is hanging freely into the measurement cup containing scattering fluid. We present a fast and robust image reconstruction algorithm that is used for the transmission measurements. The algorithm is based on the Rytov approximation. We show that this algorithm can be used over a wide range of tissue optical properties if the reconstruction is adapted to each patient. We use estimates of the breast shape and average tissue optical properties to initialize the reconstruction, which improves the image quality significantly. We demonstrate the capability of the measurement system and reconstruction to image breast lesions by clinical examples

  2. Color quality improvement of reconstructed images in color digital holography using speckle method and spectral estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funamizu, Hideki; Onodera, Yusei; Aizu, Yoshihisa

    2018-05-01

    In this study, we report color quality improvement of reconstructed images in color digital holography using the speckle method and the spectral estimation. In this technique, an object is illuminated by a speckle field and then an object wave is produced, while a plane wave is used as a reference wave. For three wavelengths, the interference patterns of two coherent waves are recorded as digital holograms on an image sensor. Speckle fields are changed by moving a ground glass plate in an in-plane direction, and a number of holograms are acquired to average the reconstructed images. After the averaging process of images reconstructed from multiple holograms, we use the Wiener estimation method for obtaining spectral transmittance curves in reconstructed images. The color reproducibility in this method is demonstrated and evaluated using a Macbeth color chart film and staining cells of onion.

  3. Research on copying system of dynamic multiplex holographic stereograms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Huaiping; Yang, Hong; Zheng, Tong

    2003-05-01

    The most important advantage of holographic stereograms over conventional hologram is that they can produce 3D images at any desired scale with movement, holographers in many countries involved in the studies towards it. We began our works in the early 80's and accomplished two research projects automatic system for making synthetic holograms and multiplex synthetic rainbow holograms, Based on these works, a large scale holographic stereogram of an animated goldfish was made by us for practical advertisement. In order to meet the needs of the market, a copying system for making multiplex holographic stereograms, and a special kind of silver halide holographic film developed by us recently. The characteristic of the copying system and the property of the special silver-halide emulsion are introduced in this paper.

  4. Holographic characterization of colloidal particles in turbid media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheong, Fook Chiong; Kasimbeg, Priya; Ruffner, David B.; Hlaing, Ei Hnin; Blusewicz, Jaroslaw M.; Philips, Laura A.; Grier, David G.

    2017-10-01

    Holographic particle characterization uses in-line holographic microscopy and the Lorenz-Mie theory of light scattering to measure the diameter and the refractive index of individual colloidal particles in their native dispersions. This wealth of information has proved invaluable in fields as diverse as soft-matter physics, biopharmaceuticals, wastewater management, and food science but so far has been available only for dispersions in transparent media. Here, we demonstrate that holographic characterization can yield precise and accurate results even when the particles of interest are dispersed in turbid media. By elucidating how multiple light scattering contributes to image formation in holographic microscopy, we establish the range conditions under which holographic characterization can reliably probe turbid samples. We validate the technique with measurements on model colloidal spheres dispersed in commercial nanoparticle slurries.

  5. Three-dimensional reconstruction and visualization system for medical images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Preston, D.F.; Batnitzky, S.; Kyo Rak Lee; Cook, P.N.; Cook, L.T.; Dwyer, S.J.

    1982-01-01

    A three-dimensional reconstruction and visualization system could be of significant advantage in medical application such as neurosurgery and radiation treatment planning. The reconstructed anatomic structures from CT head scans could be used in a head stereotactic system to help plan the surgical procedure and the radiation treatment for a brain lesion. Also, the use of three-dimensional reconstruction algorithm provides for quantitative measures such as volume and surface area estimation of the anatomic features. This aspect of the three-dimensional reconstruction system may be used to monitor the progress or staging of a disease and the effects of patient treatment. Two cases are presented to illustrate the three-dimensional surface reconstruction and visualization system

  6. Image alignment for tomography reconstruction from synchrotron X-ray microscopic images.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang-Chieh Cheng

    Full Text Available A synchrotron X-ray microscope is a powerful imaging apparatus for taking high-resolution and high-contrast X-ray images of nanoscale objects. A sufficient number of X-ray projection images from different angles is required for constructing 3D volume images of an object. Because a synchrotron light source is immobile, a rotational object holder is required for tomography. At a resolution of 10 nm per pixel, the vibration of the holder caused by rotating the object cannot be disregarded if tomographic images are to be reconstructed accurately. This paper presents a computer method to compensate for the vibration of the rotational holder by aligning neighboring X-ray images. This alignment process involves two steps. The first step is to match the "projected feature points" in the sequence of images. The matched projected feature points in the x-θ plane should form a set of sine-shaped loci. The second step is to fit the loci to a set of sine waves to compute the parameters required for alignment. The experimental results show that the proposed method outperforms two previously proposed methods, Xradia and SPIDER. The developed software system can be downloaded from the URL, http://www.cs.nctu.edu.tw/~chengchc/SCTA or http://goo.gl/s4AMx.

  7. Image alignment for tomography reconstruction from synchrotron X-ray microscopic images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Chang-Chieh; Chien, Chia-Chi; Chen, Hsiang-Hsin; Hwu, Yeukuang; Ching, Yu-Tai

    2014-01-01

    A synchrotron X-ray microscope is a powerful imaging apparatus for taking high-resolution and high-contrast X-ray images of nanoscale objects. A sufficient number of X-ray projection images from different angles is required for constructing 3D volume images of an object. Because a synchrotron light source is immobile, a rotational object holder is required for tomography. At a resolution of 10 nm per pixel, the vibration of the holder caused by rotating the object cannot be disregarded if tomographic images are to be reconstructed accurately. This paper presents a computer method to compensate for the vibration of the rotational holder by aligning neighboring X-ray images. This alignment process involves two steps. The first step is to match the "projected feature points" in the sequence of images. The matched projected feature points in the x-θ plane should form a set of sine-shaped loci. The second step is to fit the loci to a set of sine waves to compute the parameters required for alignment. The experimental results show that the proposed method outperforms two previously proposed methods, Xradia and SPIDER. The developed software system can be downloaded from the URL, http://www.cs.nctu.edu.tw/~chengchc/SCTA or http://goo.gl/s4AMx.

  8. Self-training-based spectral image reconstruction for art paintings with multispectral imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Peng; Xu, Haisong; Diao, Changyu; Ye, Zhengnan

    2017-10-20

    A self-training-based spectral reflectance recovery method was developed to accurately reconstruct the spectral images of art paintings with multispectral imaging. By partitioning the multispectral images with the k-means clustering algorithm, the training samples are directly extracted from the art painting itself to restrain the deterioration of spectral estimation caused by the material inconsistency between the training samples and the art painting. Coordinate paper is used to locate the extracted training samples. The spectral reflectances of the extracted training samples are acquired indirectly with a spectroradiometer, and the circle Hough transform is adopted to detect the circle measuring area of the spectroradiometer. Through simulation and a practical experiment, the implementation of the proposed method is explained in detail, and it is verified to have better reflectance recovery performance than that using the commercial target and is comparable to the approach using a painted color target.

  9. A tensor-based dictionary learning approach to tomographic image reconstruction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Soltani, Sara; Kilmer, Misha E.; Hansen, Per Christian

    2016-01-01

    We consider tomographic reconstruction using priors in the form of a dictionary learned from training images. The reconstruction has two stages: first we construct a tensor dictionary prior from our training data, and then we pose the reconstruction problem in terms of recovering the expansion...... coefficients in that dictionary. Our approach differs from past approaches in that (a) we use a third-order tensor representation for our images and (b) we recast the reconstruction problem using the tensor formulation. The dictionary learning problem is presented as a non-negative tensor factorization problem...... with sparsity constraints. The reconstruction problem is formulated in a convex optimization framework by looking for a solution with a sparse representation in the tensor dictionary. Numerical results show that our tensor formulation leads to very sparse representations of both the training images...

  10. Incorporation of local dependent reliability information into the Prior Image Constrained Compressed Sensing (PICCS) reconstruction algorithm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaegler, Sven; Sauer, Otto; Stsepankou, Dzmitry; Hesser, Juergen

    2015-01-01

    The reduction of dose in cone beam computer tomography (CBCT) arises from the decrease of the tube current for each projection as well as from the reduction of the number of projections. In order to maintain good image quality, sophisticated image reconstruction techniques are required. The Prior Image Constrained Compressed Sensing (PICCS) incorporates prior images into the reconstruction algorithm and outperforms the widespread used Feldkamp-Davis-Kress-algorithm (FDK) when the number of projections is reduced. However, prior images that contain major variations are not appropriately considered so far in PICCS. We therefore propose the partial-PICCS (pPICCS) algorithm. This framework is a problem-specific extension of PICCS and enables the incorporation of the reliability of the prior images additionally. We assumed that the prior images are composed of areas with large and small deviations. Accordingly, a weighting matrix considered the assigned areas in the objective function. We applied our algorithm to the problem of image reconstruction from few views by simulations with a computer phantom as well as on clinical CBCT projections from a head-and-neck case. All prior images contained large local variations. The reconstructed images were compared to the reconstruction results by the FDK-algorithm, by Compressed Sensing (CS) and by PICCS. To show the gain of image quality we compared image details with the reference image and used quantitative metrics (root-mean-square error (RMSE), contrast-to-noise-ratio (CNR)). The pPICCS reconstruction framework yield images with substantially improved quality even when the number of projections was very small. The images contained less streaking, blurring and inaccurately reconstructed structures compared to the images reconstructed by FDK, CS and conventional PICCS. The increased image quality is also reflected in large RMSE differences. We proposed a modification of the original PICCS algorithm. The pPICCS algorithm

  11. Evaluation of image reconstruction methods for 123I-MIBG-SPECT. A rank-order study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soederberg, Marcus; Mattsson, Soeren; Oddstig, Jenny; Uusijaervi-Lizana, Helena; Leide-Svegborn, Sigrid; Valind, Sven; Thorsson, Ola; Garpered, Sabine; Prautzsch, Tilmann; Tischenko, Oleg

    2012-01-01

    Background: There is an opportunity to improve the image quality and lesion detectability in single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) by choosing an appropriate reconstruction method and optimal parameters for the reconstruction. Purpose: To optimize the use of the Flash 3D reconstruction algorithm in terms of equivalent iteration (EI) number (number of subsets times the number of iterations) and to compare with two recently developed reconstruction algorithms ReSPECT and orthogonal polynomial expansion on disc (OPED) for application on 123 I-metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG)-SPECT. Material and Methods: Eleven adult patients underwent SPECT 4 h and 14 patients 24 h after injection of approximately 200 MBq 123 I-MIBG using a Siemens Symbia T6 SPECT/CT. Images were reconstructed from raw data using the Flash 3D algorithm at eight different EI numbers. The images were ranked by three experienced nuclear medicine physicians according to their overall impression of the image quality. The obtained optimal images were then compared in one further visual comparison with images reconstructed using the ReSPECT and OPED algorithms. Results: The optimal EI number for Flash 3D was determined to be 32 for acquisition 4 h and 24 h after injection. The average rank order (best first) for the different reconstructions for acquisition after 4 h was: Flash 3D 32 > ReSPECT > Flash 3D 64 > OPED, and after 24 h: Flash 3D 16 > ReSPECT > Flash 3D 32 > OPED. A fair level of inter-observer agreement concerning optimal EI number and reconstruction algorithm was obtained, which may be explained by the different individual preferences of what is appropriate image quality. Conclusion: Using Siemens Symbia T6 SPECT/CT and specified acquisition parameters, Flash 3D 32 (4 h) and Flash 3D 16 (24 h), followed by ReSPECT, were assessed to be the preferable reconstruction algorithms in visual assessment of 123 I-MIBG images

  12. MRI reconstruction of multi-image acquisitions using a rank regularizer with data reordering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adluru, Ganesh, E-mail: gadluru@gmail.com; Anderson, Jeffrey [UCAIR, Department of Radiology, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah 84108 (United States); Gur, Yaniv [IBM Almaden Research Center, San Jose, California 95120 (United States); Chen, Liyong; Feinberg, David [Advanced MRI Technologies, Sebastpool, California, 95472 (United States); DiBella, Edward V. R. [UCAIR, Department of Radiology, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah 84108 and Department of Bioengineering, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah 84112 (United States)

    2015-08-15

    Purpose: To improve rank constrained reconstructions for undersampled multi-image MRI acquisitions. Methods: Motivated by the recent developments in low-rank matrix completion theory and its applicability to rapid dynamic MRI, a new reordering-based rank constrained reconstruction of undersampled multi-image data that uses prior image information is proposed. Instead of directly minimizing the nuclear norm of a matrix of estimated images, the nuclear norm of reordered matrix values is minimized. The reordering is based on the prior image estimates. The method is tested on brain diffusion imaging data and dynamic contrast enhanced myocardial perfusion data. Results: Good quality images from data undersampled by a factor of three for diffusion imaging and by a factor of 3.5 for dynamic cardiac perfusion imaging with respiratory motion were obtained. Reordering gave visually improved image quality over standard nuclear norm minimization reconstructions. Root mean squared errors with respect to ground truth images were improved by ∼18% and ∼16% with reordering for diffusion and perfusion applications, respectively. Conclusions: The reordered low-rank constraint is a way to inject prior image information that offers improvements over a standard low-rank constraint for undersampled multi-image MRI reconstructions.

  13. MRI reconstruction of multi-image acquisitions using a rank regularizer with data reordering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adluru, Ganesh; Anderson, Jeffrey; Gur, Yaniv; Chen, Liyong; Feinberg, David; DiBella, Edward V. R.

    2015-01-01