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Sample records for recombinant clostridium botulinum

  1. Production and evaluation of a recombinant chimeric vaccine against clostridium botulinum neurotoxin types C and D.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana A F Gil

    Full Text Available Bovine botulism is a fatal disease that is caused by botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs produced by Clostridium botulinum serotypes C and D and that causes great economic losses, with nearly 100% lethality during outbreaks. It has also been considered a potential source of human food-borne illness in many countries. Vaccination has been reported to be the most effective way to control bovine botulism. However, the commercially available toxoid-based vaccines are difficult and hazardous to produce. Neutralizing antibodies targeted against the C-terminal fragment of the BoNT heavy chain (HC are known to confer efficient protection against lethal doses of BoNTs. In this study, a novel recombinant chimera, consisting of Escherichia coli heat-labile enterotoxin B subunit (LTB, a strong adjuvant of the humoral immune response, fused to the HC of BoNT serotypes C and D, was produced in E. coli. Mice vaccinated with the chimera containing LTB and an equivalent molar ratio of the chimera without LTB plus aluminum hydroxide (Al(OH3 developed 2 IU/mL of antitoxins for both serotypes. Guinea pigs immunized with the recombinant chimera with LTB plus Al(OH3 developed a protective immune response against both BoNT/C (5 IU/mL and BoNT/D (10 IU/mL, as determined by a mouse neutralization bioassay with pooled sera. The results achieved with guinea pig sera fulfilled the requirements of commercial vaccines for prevention of botulism, as determined by the Brazilian Ministry of Agriculture, Livestock and Food, Supply. The presence of LTB was essential for the development of a strong humoral immune response, as it acted in synergism with Al(OH3. Thus, the vaccine described in this study is a strong candidate for the control of botulism in cattle.

  2. Flagellar glycosylation in Clostridium botulinum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twine, Susan M; Paul, Catherine J; Vinogradov, Evgeny; McNally, David J; Brisson, Jean-Robert; Mullen, James A; McMullin, David R; Jarrell, Harold C; Austin, John W; Kelly, John F; Logan, Susan M

    2008-09-01

    Flagellins from Clostridium botulinum were shown to be post-translationally modified with novel glycan moieties by top-down MS analysis of purified flagellin protein from strains of various toxin serotypes. Detailed analyses of flagellin from two strains of C. botulinum demonstrated that the protein is modified by a novel glycan moiety of mass 417 Da in O-linkage. Bioinformatic analysis of available C. botulinum genomes identified a flagellar glycosylation island containing homologs of genes recently identified in Campylobacter coli that have been shown to be responsible for the biosynthesis of legionaminic acid derivatives. Structural characterization of the carbohydrate moiety was completed utilizing both MS and NMR spectroscopy, and it was shown to be a novel legionaminic acid derivative, 7-acetamido-5-(N-methyl-glutam-4-yl)-amino-3,5,7,9-tetradeoxy-D-glycero-alpha-D-galacto-nonulosonic acid, (alphaLeg5GluNMe7Ac). Electron transfer dissociation MS with and without collision-activated dissociation was utilized to map seven sites of O-linked glycosylation, eliminating the need for chemical derivatization of tryptic peptides prior to analysis. Marker ions for novel glycans, as well as a unique C-terminal flagellin peptide marker ion, were identified in a top-down analysis of the intact protein. These ions have the potential for use in for rapid detection and discrimination of C. botulinum cells, indicating botulinum neurotoxin contamination. This is the first report of glycosylation of Gram-positive flagellar proteins by the 'sialic acid-like' nonulosonate sugar, legionaminic acid.

  3. Protective vaccination with a recombinant fragment of Clostridium botulinum neurotoxin serotype A expressed from a synthetic gene in Escherichia coli.

    OpenAIRE

    Clayton, M A; Clayton, J M; Brown, D R; Middlebrook, J L

    1995-01-01

    A completely synthetic gene encoding fragment C, a approximately 50-kDa fragment, of botulinum neurotoxin serotype A was constructed from oligonucleotides. The gene was expressed in Escherichia coli, and full-sized product was produced as judged by Western blot (immunoblot) analysis. Crude extracts of E. coli expressing the gene were used to vaccinate mice and evaluate their survival against challenge with active toxin. Mice given three subcutaneous vaccinations were protected against an intr...

  4. Clostridium botulinum in irradiated fish

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hobbs, G.

    1977-01-01

    The properties of the Cl. botulinum resp. its toxin are described with a view to a combined heat and radiation treatment for fish conservation. The method is tested in several laboratories on 10 different fish products. It is found that the spore former Cl. botulinum is a critical factor in this type of preservation which can hardly be overcome although this method has organoleptic advantages over heat pasteurization of fish. At a storage temperatue over 5 0 C, there is a strong increase in toxin; the same applies to fish with a high fat content. Under poor hygienic conditions, the risk is markedly increased. The author recommends strict control measures in the production and distribution of fish, i.e. cooling and salt treatment. (AJ) [de

  5. Molecular diversity of Clostridium botulinum and phenotypically similar strains.

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    Grenda, T; Kukier, E; Sieradzki, Z; Goldsztejn, M; Kwiatek, K

    2016-12-01

    This study was undertaken to examine phenotypic and genetic features of strains preliminary classified as Clostridium botulinum species. The phenotypic characteristics were assessed with different culture media and biochemical tests. The genetic characterization included detection of botulinum toxin genes by PCR and macrorestriction analysis with SmaI, XhoI and SacII by PFGE (Pulsed-field Gel Electrophoresis). Despite similar biochemical properties of all analysed strains, only 47% of them contained genes determining toxicity specific to C. botulinum species. The most valuable differentiation of C. botulinum and C. botulinum-like strains was obtained after SmaI digestion. The highest affinity was observed among C. botulinum type B profiles which was even up to 100%. It was found 100% of affinity between C. botulinum and C. botulinum-like strains, however, the similarity among C. botulinum and C. botulinum-like was generally lower than 80%.

  6. Investigation of Clostridium botulinum group III's mobilome content

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    Woudstra, Cédric; Maréchal, Le Caroline; Souillard, Rozenn; Anniballi, Fabrizio; Auricchio, Bruna; Bano, Luca; Bayon-Auboyer, Marie Hélène; Koene, Miriam; Mermoud, Isabelle; Brito, Roseane B.; Lobato, Francisco C.F.; Silva, Rodrigo O.S.; Dorner, Martin B.; Fach, Patrick

    2018-01-01

    Clostridium botulinum group III is mainly responsible for botulism in animals. It could lead to high animal mortality rates and, therefore, represents a major environmental and economic concern. Strains of this group harbor the botulinum toxin locus on an unstable bacteriophage. Since the release of

  7. Investigation of Clostridium botulinum group III's mobilome content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woudstra, Cédric; Le Maréchal, Caroline; Souillard, Rozenn; Anniballi, Fabrizio; Auricchio, Bruna; Bano, Luca; Bayon-Auboyer, Marie-Hélène; Koene, Miriam; Mermoud, Isabelle; Brito, Roseane B; Lobato, Francisco C F; Silva, Rodrigo O S; Dorner, Martin B; Fach, Patrick

    2018-02-01

    Clostridium botulinum group III is mainly responsible for botulism in animals. It could lead to high animal mortality rates and, therefore, represents a major environmental and economic concern. Strains of this group harbor the botulinum toxin locus on an unstable bacteriophage. Since the release of the first complete C. botulinum group III genome sequence (strain BKT015925), strains have been found to contain others mobile elements encoding for toxin components. In this study, seven assays targeting toxin genes present on the genetic mobile elements of C. botulinum group III were developed with the objective to better characterize C. botulinum group III strains. The investigation of 110 C. botulinum group III strains and 519 naturally contaminated samples collected during botulism outbreaks in Europe showed alpha-toxin and C2-I/C2-II markers to be systematically associated with type C/D bont-positive samples, which may indicate an important role of these elements in the pathogenicity mechanisms. On the contrary, bont type D/C strains and the related positive samples appeared to contain almost none of the markers tested. Interestingly, 31 bont-negative samples collected on farms after a botulism outbreak revealed to be positive for some of the genetic mobile elements tested. This suggests loss of the bont phage, either in farm environment after the outbreak or during laboratory handling. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. CRYSTAL STRUCTURE OF CLOSTRIDIUM BOTULINUM NEUROTOXIN SEROTYPE B

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    SWAMINATHAN, S.; ESWARAMOORTHY, S.

    2001-01-01

    The toxigenic strains of Clostridium botulinum produce seven serologically distinct types of neurotoxins labeled A - G (EC 3.4.24.69), while Clostridium tetani produces tetanus neurotoxin (EC 3.4.24.68). Botulinum and tetanus neurotoxins (BoNTs and TeNT) are produced as single inactive chains of molecular mass of approximately 150 kDa. Most of these neurotoxins are released after being cleaved into two chains, a heavy chain (HI) of 100 kDa and a light chain (L) of 50 kDa held together by an interchain disulfide bond, by tissue proteinases. BoNT/E is released as a single chain but cleaved by host proteinases[1]. Clostvidium botulinum neurotoxins are extremely poisonous proteins with their LD(sub 50) for humans in the range of 0.1 - 1 ng kg(sup -1)[2]. Botulinum neurotoxins are responsible for neuroparalytic syndromes of botulism characterized by serious neurological disorders and flaccid paralysis. BoNTs block the release of acetylcholine at the neuromuscular junction causing flaccid paralysis while TeNT blocks the release of neurotransmitters like glycine and(gamma)-aminobutyric acid (GABA) in the inhibitory interneurons of the spinal cord resulting in spastic paralysis. In spite of different clinical symptoms, their aetiological agents intoxicate neuronal cells in the same way and these toxins have similar structural organization[3

  9. CRYSTAL STRUCTURE OF CLOSTRIDIUM BOTULINUM NEUROTOXIN SEROTYPE B.

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    SWAMINATHAN,S.; ESWARAMOORTHY,S.

    2001-11-19

    The toxigenic strains of Clostridium botulinum produce seven serologically distinct types of neurotoxins labeled A - G (EC 3.4.24.69), while Clostridium tetani produces tetanus neurotoxin (EC 3.4.24.68). Botulinum and tetanus neurotoxins (BoNTs and TeNT) are produced as single inactive chains of molecular mass of approximately 150 kDa. Most of these neurotoxins are released after being cleaved into two chains, a heavy chain (HI) of 100 kDa and a light chain (L) of 50 kDa held together by an interchain disulfide bond, by tissue proteinases. BoNT/E is released as a single chain but cleaved by host proteinases [1]. Clostvidium botulinum neurotoxins are extremely poisonous proteins with their LD{sub 50} for humans in the range of 0.1 - 1 ng kg{sup -1} [2]. Botulinum neurotoxins are responsible for neuroparalytic syndromes of botulism characterized by serious neurological disorders and flaccid paralysis. BoNTs block the release of acetylcholine at the neuromuscular junction causing flaccid paralysis while TeNT blocks the release of neurotransmitters like glycine and {gamma}-aminobutyric acid (GABA) in the inhibitory interneurons of the spinal cord resulting in spastic paralysis. In spite of different clinical symptoms, their aetiological agents intoxicate neuronal cells in the same way and these toxins have similar structural organization [3].

  10. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of the HA3 component of Clostridium botulinum type C progenitor toxin

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    Nakamura, Toshio; Tonozuka, Takashi; Kotani, Mao; Obata, Kanae [Department of Applied Biological Science, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, 3-5-8 Saiwai-cho, Fuchu-shi, Tokyo 183-8509 (Japan); Oguma, Keiji [Okayama University Graduate School of Medicine, Dentistry and Pharmaceutical Sciences, 2-5-1 Shikata-cho, Okayama 700-8558 (Japan); Nishikawa, Atsushi, E-mail: nishikaw@cc.tuat.ac.jp [Department of Applied Biological Science, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, 3-5-8 Saiwai-cho, Fuchu-shi, Tokyo 183-8509 (Japan); CREST, Japan Science and Technology Agency (Japan)

    2007-12-01

    HA3, a 70 kDa haemagglutinating protein, is a precursor form of HA3a and HA3b, the subcomponents of Clostridium botulinum type C 16S progenitor toxin. In this report, recombinant HA3 protein was overexpressed in Escherichia coli, purified and crystallized. HA3, a 70 kDa haemagglutinating protein, is a precursor form of HA3a and HA3b, the subcomponents of Clostridium botulinum type C 16S progenitor toxin. In this report, recombinant HA3 protein was overexpressed in Escherichia coli, purified and crystallized. Diffraction data were collected to 2.6 Å resolution and the crystal belonged to the hexagonal space group P6{sub 3}. Matthews coefficient and self-rotation function calculations indicate that there is probably one molecule of HA3 in the asymmetric unit. A search for heavy-atom derivatives has been undertaken.

  11. Independent evolution of neurotoxin and flagellar genetic loci in proteolytic Clostridium botulinum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Andrew T; Paul, Catherine J; Mason, David R; Twine, Susan M; Alston, Mark J; Logan, Susan M; Austin, John W; Peck, Michael W

    2009-03-19

    Proteolytic Clostridium botulinum is the causative agent of botulism, a severe neuroparalytic illness. Given the severity of botulism, surprisingly little is known of the population structure, biology, phylogeny or evolution of C. botulinum. The recent determination of the genome sequence of C. botulinum has allowed comparative genomic indexing using a DNA microarray. Whole genome microarray analysis revealed that 63% of the coding sequences (CDSs) present in reference strain ATCC 3502 were common to all 61 widely-representative strains of proteolytic C. botulinum and the closely related C. sporogenes tested. This indicates a relatively stable genome. There was, however, evidence for recombination and genetic exchange, in particular within the neurotoxin gene and cluster (including transfer of neurotoxin genes to C. sporogenes), and the flagellar glycosylation island (FGI). These two loci appear to have evolved independently from each other, and from the remainder of the genetic complement. A number of strains were atypical; for example, while 10 out of 14 strains that formed type A1 toxin gave almost identical profiles in whole genome, neurotoxin cluster and FGI analyses, the other four strains showed divergent properties. Furthermore, a new neurotoxin sub-type (A5) has been discovered in strains from heroin-associated wound botulism cases. For the first time, differences in glycosylation profiles of the flagella could be linked to differences in the gene content of the FGI. Proteolytic C. botulinum has a stable genome backbone containing specific regions of genetic heterogeneity. These include the neurotoxin gene cluster and the FGI, each having evolved independently of each other and the remainder of the genetic complement. Analysis of these genetic components provides a high degree of discrimination of strains of proteolytic C. botulinum, and is suitable for clinical and forensic investigations of botulism outbreaks.

  12. Independent evolution of neurotoxin and flagellar genetic loci in proteolytic Clostridium botulinum

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    Twine Susan M

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Proteolytic Clostridium botulinum is the causative agent of botulism, a severe neuroparalytic illness. Given the severity of botulism, surprisingly little is known of the population structure, biology, phylogeny or evolution of C. botulinum. The recent determination of the genome sequence of C. botulinum has allowed comparative genomic indexing using a DNA microarray. Results Whole genome microarray analysis revealed that 63% of the coding sequences (CDSs present in reference strain ATCC 3502 were common to all 61 widely-representative strains of proteolytic C. botulinum and the closely related C. sporogenes tested. This indicates a relatively stable genome. There was, however, evidence for recombination and genetic exchange, in particular within the neurotoxin gene and cluster (including transfer of neurotoxin genes to C. sporogenes, and the flagellar glycosylation island (FGI. These two loci appear to have evolved independently from each other, and from the remainder of the genetic complement. A number of strains were atypical; for example, while 10 out of 14 strains that formed type A1 toxin gave almost identical profiles in whole genome, neurotoxin cluster and FGI analyses, the other four strains showed divergent properties. Furthermore, a new neurotoxin sub-type (A5 has been discovered in strains from heroin-associated wound botulism cases. For the first time, differences in glycosylation profiles of the flagella could be linked to differences in the gene content of the FGI. Conclusion Proteolytic C. botulinum has a stable genome backbone containing specific regions of genetic heterogeneity. These include the neurotoxin gene cluster and the FGI, each having evolved independently of each other and the remainder of the genetic complement. Analysis of these genetic components provides a high degree of discrimination of strains of proteolytic C. botulinum, and is suitable for clinical and forensic investigations of botulism

  13. Cellular Entry of Clostridium perfringens Iota-Toxin and Clostridium botulinum C2 Toxin

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    Masaya Takehara

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Clostridium perfringens iota-toxin and Clostridium botulinum C2 toxin are composed of two non-linked proteins, one being the enzymatic component and the other being the binding/translocation component. These latter components recognize specific receptors and oligomerize in plasma membrane lipid-rafts, mediating the uptake of the enzymatic component into the cytosol. Enzymatic components induce actin cytoskeleton disorganization through the ADP-ribosylation of actin and are responsible for cell rounding and death. This review focuses upon the recent advances in cellular internalization of clostridial binary toxins.

  14. Cellular Entry of Clostridium perfringens Iota-Toxin and Clostridium botulinum C2 Toxin.

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    Takehara, Masaya; Takagishi, Teruhisa; Seike, Soshi; Oda, Masataka; Sakaguchi, Yoshihiko; Hisatsune, Junzo; Ochi, Sadayuki; Kobayashi, Keiko; Nagahama, Masahiro

    2017-08-11

    Clostridium perfringens iota-toxin and Clostridium botulinum C2 toxin are composed of two non-linked proteins, one being the enzymatic component and the other being the binding/translocation component. These latter components recognize specific receptors and oligomerize in plasma membrane lipid-rafts, mediating the uptake of the enzymatic component into the cytosol. Enzymatic components induce actin cytoskeleton disorganization through the ADP-ribosylation of actin and are responsible for cell rounding and death. This review focuses upon the recent advances in cellular internalization of clostridial binary toxins.

  15. Neurotoxin synthesis is positively regulated by the sporulation transcription factor Spo0A in Clostridium botulinum type E.

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    Mascher, Gerald; Mertaoja, Anna; Korkeala, Hannu; Lindström, Miia

    2017-10-01

    Clostridium botulinum produces the most potent natural toxin, the botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT), probably to create anaerobiosis and nutrients by killing the host, and forms endospores that facilitate survival in harsh conditions and transmission. Peak BoNT production coincides with initiation of sporulation in C. botulinum cultures, which suggests common regulation. Here, we show that Spo0A, the master regulator of sporulation, positively regulates BoNT production. Insertional inactivation of spo0A in C. botulinum type E strain Beluga resulted in significantly reduced BoNT production and in abolished or highly reduced sporulation in relation to wild-type controls. Complementation with spo0A restored BoNT production and sporulation. Recombinant DNA-binding domain of Spo0A directly bound to a putative Spo0A-binding box (CTTCGAA) within the BoNT/E operon promoter, demonstrating direct regulation. Spo0A is the first neurotoxin regulator reported in C. botulinum type E. Unlike other C. botulinum strains that are terrestrial and employ the alternative sigma factor BotR in directing BoNT expression, C. botulinum type E strains are adapted to aquatic ecosystems, possess distinct epidemiology and lack BotR. Our results provide fundamental new knowledge on the genetic control of BoNT production and demonstrate common regulation of BoNT production and sporulation, providing a key intervention point for control. © 2017 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Molecular diversity of neurotoxins from Clostridium botulinum type D strains.

    OpenAIRE

    Moriishi, K; Syuto, B; Kubo, S; Oguma, K

    1989-01-01

    The molecular properties of Clostridium botulinum type D South African (D-SA) were compared with those of neurotoxins from type D strain 1873 (D-1873) and type C strains Stockholm and 6813. D-SA toxin, purified 610-fold from the culture supernatant in an overall yield of 30%, consisted of an intact peptide chain with a molecular weight of 140,000. Limited proteolysis of the toxin by trypsin formed a dichain structure consisting of a light chain (Mr, 50,000) and a heavy chain (Mr, 90,000) link...

  17. The Structure of the Neurotoxin- Associated Protein HA33/A from Clostridium botulinum Suggests a Reoccurring Beta-Trefoil Fold in the Progenitor Toxin Complex

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Arndt, Joseph W; Gu, Jenny; Jaroszewski, Lukasz; Schwarzenbacher, Robert; Hanson, Michael A; Lebeda, Frank L; Stevens, Raymond C

    2004-01-01

    The hemagglutinating protein HA33 from Clostridium botulinum is associated with the large botulinum neurotoxin secreted complexes and is critical in toxin protection, internalization, and possibly activation...

  18. Quantification of Nonproteolytic Clostridium botulinum Spore Loads in Food Materials.

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    Barker, Gary C; Malakar, Pradeep K; Plowman, June; Peck, Michael W

    2016-01-04

    We have produced data and developed analysis to build representations for the concentration of spores of nonproteolytic Clostridium botulinum in materials that are used during the manufacture of minimally processed chilled foods in the United Kingdom. Food materials are categorized into homogenous groups which include meat, fish, shellfish, cereals, fresh plant material, dairy liquid, dairy nonliquid, mushroom and fungi, and dried herbs and spices. Models are constructed in a Bayesian framework and represent a combination of information from a literature survey of spore loads from positive-control experiments that establish a detection limit and from dedicated microbiological tests for real food materials. The detection of nonproteolytic C. botulinum employed an optimized protocol that combines selective enrichment culture with multiplex PCR, and the majority of tests on food materials were negative. Posterior beliefs about spore loads center on a concentration range of 1 to 10 spores kg(-1). Posterior beliefs for larger spore loads were most significant for dried herbs and spices and were most sensitive to the detailed results from control experiments. Probability distributions for spore loads are represented in a convenient form that can be used for numerical analysis and risk assessments. Copyright © 2016 Barker et al.

  19. Occurrence of human pathogenic Clostridium botulinum among healthy dairy animals: an emerging public health hazard.

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    Abdel-Moein, Khaled A; Hamza, Dalia A

    2016-01-01

    The current study was conducted to investigate the occurrence of human pathogenic Clostridium botulinum in the feces of dairy animals. Fecal samples were collected from 203 apparently healthy dairy animals (50 cattle, 50 buffaloes, 52 sheep, 51 goats). Samples were cultured to recover C. botulinum while human pathogenic C. botulinum strains were identified after screening of all C. botulinum isolates for the presence of genes that encode toxins type A, B, E, F. The overall prevalence of C. botulinum was 18.7% whereas human pathogenic C. botulinum strains (only type A) were isolated from six animals at the rates of 2, 2, 5.8, and 2% for cattle, buffaloes, sheep, and goats, respectively. High fecal carriage rates of C. botulinum among apparently healthy dairy animals especially type A alarm both veterinary and public health communities for a potential role which may be played by dairy animals in the epidemiology of such pathogen.

  20. Plasmidome interchange between Clostridium botulinum, Clostridium novyi and Clostridium haemolyticum converts strains of independent lineages into distinctly different pathogens.

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    Skarin, Hanna; Segerman, Bo

    2014-01-01

    Clostridium botulinum (group III), Clostridium novyi and Clostridium haemolyticum are well-known pathogens causing animal botulism, gas gangrene/black disease, and bacillary hemoglobinuria, respectively. A close genetic relationship exists between the species, which has resulted in the collective term C. novyi sensu lato. The pathogenic traits in these species, e.g., the botulinum neurotoxin and the novyi alpha toxin, are mainly linked to a large plasmidome consisting of plasmids and circular prophages. The plasmidome of C. novyi sensu lato has so far been poorly characterized. In this study we explored the genomic relationship of a wide range of strains of C. novyi sensu lato with a special focus on the dynamics of the plasmidome. Twenty-four genomes were sequenced from strains selected to represent as much as possible the genetic diversity in C. novyi sensu lato. Sixty-one plasmids were identified in these genomes and 28 of them were completed. The genomic comparisons revealed four separate lineages, which did not strictly correlate with the species designations. The plasmids were categorized into 13 different plasmid groups on the basis of their similarity and conservation of plasmid replication or partitioning genes. The plasmid groups, lineages and species were to a large extent entwined because plasmids and toxin genes had moved across the lineage boundaries. This dynamic process appears to be primarily driven by phages. We here present a comprehensive characterization of the complex species group C. novyi sensu lato, explaining the intermixed genetic properties. This study also provides examples how the reorganization of the botulinum toxin and the novyi alpha toxin genes within the plasmidome has affected the pathogenesis of the strains.

  1. Plasmidome interchange between Clostridium botulinum, Clostridium novyi and Clostridium haemolyticum converts strains of independent lineages into distinctly different pathogens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanna Skarin

    Full Text Available Clostridium botulinum (group III, Clostridium novyi and Clostridium haemolyticum are well-known pathogens causing animal botulism, gas gangrene/black disease, and bacillary hemoglobinuria, respectively. A close genetic relationship exists between the species, which has resulted in the collective term C. novyi sensu lato. The pathogenic traits in these species, e.g., the botulinum neurotoxin and the novyi alpha toxin, are mainly linked to a large plasmidome consisting of plasmids and circular prophages. The plasmidome of C. novyi sensu lato has so far been poorly characterized. In this study we explored the genomic relationship of a wide range of strains of C. novyi sensu lato with a special focus on the dynamics of the plasmidome. Twenty-four genomes were sequenced from strains selected to represent as much as possible the genetic diversity in C. novyi sensu lato. Sixty-one plasmids were identified in these genomes and 28 of them were completed. The genomic comparisons revealed four separate lineages, which did not strictly correlate with the species designations. The plasmids were categorized into 13 different plasmid groups on the basis of their similarity and conservation of plasmid replication or partitioning genes. The plasmid groups, lineages and species were to a large extent entwined because plasmids and toxin genes had moved across the lineage boundaries. This dynamic process appears to be primarily driven by phages. We here present a comprehensive characterization of the complex species group C. novyi sensu lato, explaining the intermixed genetic properties. This study also provides examples how the reorganization of the botulinum toxin and the novyi alpha toxin genes within the plasmidome has affected the pathogenesis of the strains.

  2. EGA Protects Mammalian Cells from Clostridium difficile CDT, Clostridium perfringens Iota Toxin and Clostridium botulinum C2 Toxin.

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    Schnell, Leonie; Mittler, Ann-Katrin; Sadi, Mirko; Popoff, Michel R; Schwan, Carsten; Aktories, Klaus; Mattarei, Andrea; Azarnia Tehran, Domenico; Montecucco, Cesare; Barth, Holger

    2016-04-01

    The pathogenic bacteria Clostridium difficile, Clostridium perfringens and Clostridium botulinum produce the binary actin ADP-ribosylating toxins CDT, iota and C2, respectively. These toxins are composed of a transport component (B) and a separate enzyme component (A). When both components assemble on the surface of mammalian target cells, the B components mediate the entry of the A components via endosomes into the cytosol. Here, the A components ADP-ribosylate G-actin, resulting in depolymerization of F-actin, cell-rounding and eventually death. In the present study, we demonstrate that 4-bromobenzaldehyde N-(2,6-dimethylphenyl)semicarbazone (EGA), a compound that protects cells from multiple toxins and viruses, also protects different mammalian epithelial cells from all three binary actin ADP-ribosylating toxins. In contrast, EGA did not inhibit the intoxication of cells with Clostridium difficile toxins A and B, indicating a possible different entry route for this toxin. EGA does not affect either the binding of the C2 toxin to the cells surface or the enzyme activity of the A components of CDT, iota and C2, suggesting that this compound interferes with cellular uptake of the toxins. Moreover, for C2 toxin, we demonstrated that EGA inhibits the pH-dependent transport of the A component across cell membranes. EGA is not cytotoxic, and therefore, we propose it as a lead compound for the development of novel pharmacological inhibitors against clostridial binary actin ADP-ribosylating toxins.

  3. EGA Protects Mammalian Cells from Clostridium difficile CDT, Clostridium perfringens Iota Toxin and Clostridium botulinum C2 Toxin

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    Schnell, Leonie; Mittler, Ann-Katrin; Sadi, Mirko; Popoff, Michel R.; Schwan, Carsten; Aktories, Klaus; Mattarei, Andrea; Tehran, Domenico Azarnia; Montecucco, Cesare; Barth, Holger

    2016-01-01

    The pathogenic bacteria Clostridium difficile, Clostridium perfringens and Clostridium botulinum produce the binary actin ADP-ribosylating toxins CDT, iota and C2, respectively. These toxins are composed of a transport component (B) and a separate enzyme component (A). When both components assemble on the surface of mammalian target cells, the B components mediate the entry of the A components via endosomes into the cytosol. Here, the A components ADP-ribosylate G-actin, resulting in depolymerization of F-actin, cell-rounding and eventually death. In the present study, we demonstrate that 4-bromobenzaldehyde N-(2,6-dimethylphenyl)semicarbazone (EGA), a compound that protects cells from multiple toxins and viruses, also protects different mammalian epithelial cells from all three binary actin ADP-ribosylating toxins. In contrast, EGA did not inhibit the intoxication of cells with Clostridium difficile toxins A and B, indicating a possible different entry route for this toxin. EGA does not affect either the binding of the C2 toxin to the cells surface or the enzyme activity of the A components of CDT, iota and C2, suggesting that this compound interferes with cellular uptake of the toxins. Moreover, for C2 toxin, we demonstrated that EGA inhibits the pH-dependent transport of the A component across cell membranes. EGA is not cytotoxic, and therefore, we propose it as a lead compound for the development of novel pharmacological inhibitors against clostridial binary actin ADP-ribosylating toxins. PMID:27043629

  4. Clostridium botulinum group I strain genotyping by 15-locus multilocus variable-number tandem-repeat analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fillo, S.; Giordani, F.; Anniballi, F.; Gorgé, O.; Ramisse, V.; Vergnaud, G.; Riehm, J.M.; Scholz, H.C.; Splettstoesser, W.D.; Kieboom, J.; Olsen, J.-S.; Fenicia, L.; Lista, F.

    2011-01-01

    Clostridium botulinum is a taxonomic designation that encompasses a broad variety of spore-forming, Gram-positive bacteria producing the botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT). C. botulinum is the etiologic agent of botulism, a rare but severe neuroparalytic disease. Fine-resolution genetic characterization of

  5. A survey of traditional Iranian food products for contamination with toxigenic Clostridium botulinum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H.R. Tavakoli

    Full Text Available Summary: This study aimed to determine the rate of Clostridium botulinum contamination in some traditional Iranian food products (cheese, kashk and salted fish and evaluate the efficacy of the mouse bioassay method in detection of C. botulinum toxins in these foods. A total of 131 samples (57 cheese, 11 kashk and 63 salted fish were collected and examined to determine the rate of contamination by C. botulinum. Standard monovalent anti-toxins were used to determine the types of toxin. C. botulinum bacteria were detected in 4.58% of the examined samples (1.52% of cheese and 3.06% of salted fish samples. While no contamination was detected in the kashk samples, C. botulinum types A and E were found to be dominant in cheese and salted fish samples, respectively. These results indicate—some traditional Iranian foods may be contaminated with different types of C. botulinum, and the consumption of these products, either raw or cooked, may contribute to food-borne intoxications. Keywords: Clostridium botulinum, Botulinum toxin, Traditional foods

  6. Phospholipase C produced by Clostridium botulinum types C and D: comparison of gene, enzymatic, and biological activities with those of Clostridium perfringens alpha-toxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatmawati, Ni Nengah Dwi; Sakaguchi, Yoshihiko; Suzuki, Tomonori; Oda, Masataka; Shimizu, Kenta; Yamamoto, Yumiko; Sakurai, Jun; Matsushita, Osamu; Oguma, Keiji

    2013-01-01

    Clostridium botulinum type C and D strains recently have been found to produce PLC on egg yolk agar plates. To characterize the gene, enzymatic and biological activities of C. botulinum PLCs (Cb-PLCs), the cb-plc genes from 8 strains were sequenced, and 1 representative gene was cloned and expressed as a recombinant protein. The enzymatic and hemolytic activities of the recombinant Cb-PLC were measured and compared with those of the Clostridium perfringens alpha-toxin. Each of the eight cb-plc genes encoded a 399 amino acid residue protein preceded by a 27 residue signal peptide. The protein consists of 2 domains, the N- and C-domains, and the overall amino acid sequence identity between Cb-PLC and alpha-toxin was greater than 50%, suggesting that Cb-PLC is homologous to the alpha-toxin. The key residues in the N-domain were conserved, whereas those in the C-domain which are important in membrane interaction were different than in the alpha-toxin. As expected, Cb-PLC could hydrolyze egg yolk phospholipid, p-nitrophenylphosphorylcholine, and sphingomyelin, and also exhibited hemolytic activity;however, its activities were about 4- to over 200-fold lower than those of alpha-toxin. Although Cb-PLC showed weak enzymatic and biological activities, it is speculated that Cb-PLC might play a role in the pathogenicity of botulism or for bacterial survival.

  7. Molecular Evolutionary Constraints that Determine the Avirulence State of Clostridium botulinum C2 Toxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prisilla, A; Prathiviraj, R; Chellapandi, P

    2017-04-01

    Clostridium botulinum (group-III) is an anaerobic bacterium producing C2 toxin along with botulinum neurotoxins. C2 toxin is belonged to binary toxin A family in bacterial ADP-ribosylation superfamily. A structural and functional diversity of binary toxin A family was inferred from different evolutionary constraints to determine the avirulence state of C2 toxin. Evolutionary genetic analyses revealed evidence of C2 toxin cluster evolution through horizontal gene transfer from the phage or plasmid origins, site-specific insertion by gene divergence, and homologous recombination event. It has also described that residue in conserved NAD-binding core, family-specific domain structure, and functional motifs found to predetermine its virulence state. Any mutational changes in these residues destabilized its structure-function relationship. Avirulent mutants of C2 toxin were screened and selected from a crucial site required for catalytic function of C2I and pore-forming function of C2II. We found coevolved amino acid pairs contributing an essential role in stabilization of its local structural environment. Avirulent toxins selected in this study were evaluated by detecting evolutionary constraints in stability of protein backbone structure, folding and conformational dynamic space, and antigenic peptides. We found 4 avirulent mutants of C2I and 5 mutants of C2II showing more stability in their local structural environment and backbone structure with rapid fold rate, and low conformational flexibility at mutated sites. Since, evolutionary constraints-free mutants with lack of catalytic and pore-forming function suggested as potential immunogenic candidates for treating C. botulinum infected poultry and veterinary animals. Single amino acid substitution in C2 toxin thus provides a major importance to understand its structure-function link, not only of a molecule but also of the pathogenesis.

  8. Investigation of inactivation of Clostridium botulinum toxin by nuclear radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaltenhaeuser, A.; Werner, K.H.

    1989-01-01

    The effect of nuclear radiation on the toxicity and the molecular structure of the toxin produced by the microorganism Clostridium botulinum type A was investigated. The radiation induced changes in the structure of the toxin molecule. This effect is influenced by the composition or the medium above the toxin solution as well as by the temperature during the irradiation. The results of the investigation indicate that with increasing irradiation dose a new molecule was formed with immunological properties similar to the properties of the original molecule however with a greater molecular weight. After exposure to a radiation dose of 3,4 Mrad at normal temperature in air, complete detoxification of the substance was found. Immunizing experiments with the toxoid with two guinea-pigs indicated a pronounced increase of the antibody titer in the serum after 4 weeks. Vaccination experiments with the toxoid on animals show, that the protection against the effect of the toxin corresponds to the demands of the European Pharmacopoeia. The efficiency of the toxoid shows a similar efficiency as toxoids produced by chemical methods. The production of a toxoid-viccine with the relatively simple method of nuclear radiation appears possible. (orig./MG) With 12 refs., 3 tabs., 11 figs [de

  9. Transcriptomic Analysis of (Group I) Clostridium botulinum ATCC 3502 Cold Shock Response

    OpenAIRE

    Dahlsten, Elias; Isokallio, Marita; Somervuo, Panu; Lindström, Miia; Korkeala, Hannu

    2014-01-01

    Profound understanding of the mechanisms foodborne pathogenic bacteria utilize in adaptation to the environmental stress they encounter during food processing and storage is of paramount importance in design of control measures. Chill temperature is a central control measure applied in minimally processed foods; however, data on the mechanisms the foodborne pathogen Clostridium botulinum activates upon cold stress are scarce. Transcriptomic analysis on the C. botulinum ATCC 3502 strain upon t...

  10. Evaluation of DNA Extraction Methods Suitable for PCR-based Detection and Genotyping of Clostridium botulinum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Auricchio, Bruna; Anniballi, Fabrizio; Fiore, Alfonsina

    2013-01-01

    in terms of cost, time, labor, and supplies. Eleven botulinum toxin–producing clostridia strains and 25 samples (10 food, 13 clinical, and 2 environmental samples) naturally contaminated with botulinum toxin–producing clostridia were used to compare 4 DNA extraction procedures: Chelex® 100 matrix, Phenol......Sufficient quality and quantity of extracted DNA is critical to detecting and performing genotyping of Clostridium botulinum by means of PCR-based methods. An ideal extraction method has to optimize DNA yield, minimize DNA degradation, allow multiple samples to be extracted, and be efficient...

  11. Diversity of the Germination Apparatus in Clostridium botulinum Groups I, II, III and IV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason Brunt

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Clostridium botulinum is a highly dangerous pathogen that forms very resistant endospores that are ubiquitous in the environment, and which, under favourable conditions germinate to produce vegetative cells that multiply and form the exceptionally potent botulinum neurotoxin. To improve the control of botulinum neurotoxin-forming clostridia, it is important to understand the mechanisms involved in spore germination. Here we present models for spore germination in C. botulinum based on comparative genomics analyses, with C. botulinum Groups I and III sharing similar pathways, which differ from those proposed for C. botulinum Groups II and IV. All spores germinate in response to amino acids interacting with a germinant receptor, with four types of germinant receptor identified (encoded by various combinations of gerA, gerB and gerC genes (gerX. There are three gene clusters with an ABC-like configuration; ABC gerX1, ABABCB gerX2 and ACxBBB gerX4, and a single CA-B gerX3 gene cluster. Subtypes have been identified for most germinant receptors types, and the individual GerX subunits of each cluster show similar grouping in phylogenetic trees. C. botulinum Group I contained the largest variety of gerX subtypes, with three gerX1, three gerX2 and one gerX3 subtypes, while C. botulinum Group III contained two gerX1 types and one gerX4. C. botulinum Groups II and IV contained a single germinant receptor, gerX3 and gerX1, respectively. It is likely that all four C. botulinum Groups include a SpoVA channel involved in DPA release. The cortex lytic enzymes present in C. botulinum Groups I and III appear to be CwlJ and SleB, while in C. botulinum Groups II and IV, SleC appears to be important.

  12. Clostridium botulinum Spores Found in Honey from Small Apiaries in Poland

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    Wojtacka Joanna

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available A total of 102 honey samples collected from small apiaries (≤ 20 hives in Poland were analysed for the presence of Clostridium botulinum spores. The samples were prepared using the dilution centrifugation method and cultured in parallel in cooked meat medium (CMM and tripticase peptone glucose yeast (TPGY enrichment broths. Identification of toxin types A, B, and E of Clostridium botulinum strains was performed with the use of the multiplex PCR method. Positive samples were also subjected to quantitative analysis with the use of Clostridium botulinum Isolation Agar Base (CBAB. The prevalence analysis showed 22 (21.6% samples contaminated with C. botulinum spores. The major serotype detected was botulin neurotoxin type A – 16 (72.7% whereas type B was found in 3 (13.6% honey samples and type E also only in 3 (13.6% honey samples. Dual-toxin-producing strains were noted. The average quantity of spores in PCR - C. botulinum positive samples was 190 in 1 gram of honey.

  13. Neurotoxin gene profiling of Clostridium botulinum types C and D gathered from different countries within Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Woudstra, C.; Skarin, A.; Anniballi, F.; Fenicia, F.; Bano, L.; Drigo, I.; Koene, M.G.J.; Bäyon-Auboyer, M.H.; Buffereau, J.P.; Medici, D.; Fach, P.

    2012-01-01

    Clostridium botulinum types C and D, as well as their mosaic variants C-D and D-C, are associated with avian and mammalian botulism. This study reports on the development of low-density macroarrays based on the GeneDisc cycler platform (Pall-GeneDisc Technologies) applied to the simultaneous

  14. Clostridium botulinum type E occurs and grows in the alga Cladophora glomerata

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byappanahalli, M.N.; Whitman, R.L.

    2009-01-01

    In recent years, massive avian die-offs from Clostridium botulinum type E infection have occurred in the Sleeping Bear Dunes National Lakeshore (SLBE) area of Lake Michigan. These outbreaks have been coincidental with massive blooms of the green algae Cladophora, mostly Cladophora glomerata. We tested the hypothesis that Clostridium botulinum type E can grow under suitable conditions in these algal mats. In a lab mesocosm study, Cladophora from four outbreak-impacted beaches from SLBE were compared with four unimpacted beaches in the Milwaukee–Racine area for bontE gene of Clostridium botulinum. Frequency of the bontE gene was higher after incubation (25 °C for up to 6 weeks) of Cladophora from impacted vs. the unimpacted area. Since no type E gene was detected initially in Cladophora from any of the eight locations, we infer that the increased occurrence of type E gene arose from spore germination or vegetative Clostridium growth within the existing algal mats of SLBE. Moreover, we found that the congener Clostridium perfringens readily grows in mesocosms containing Cladophora.

  15. Sugar-binding sites of the HA1 subcomponent of Clostridium botulinum type C progenitor toxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Toshio; Tonozuka, Takashi; Ide, Azusa; Yuzawa, Takayuki; Oguma, Keiji; Nishikawa, Atsushi

    2008-02-22

    Clostridium botulinum type C 16S progenitor toxin contains a hemagglutinin (HA) subcomponent, designated HA1, which appears to play an important role in the effective internalization of the toxin in gastrointestinal epithelial cells and in creating a broad specificity for the oligosaccharide structure that corresponds to various targets. In this study, using the recombinant protein fused to glutathione S-transferase, we investigated the binding specificity of the HA1 subcomponent to sugars and estimated the binding sites of HA1 based on X-ray crystallography and soaking experiments using various sugars. N-Acetylneuraminic acid, N-acetylgalactosamine, and galactose effectively inhibited the binding that occurs between glutathione S-transferase-HA1 and mucins, whereas N-acetylglucosamine and glucose did not inhibit it. The crystal structures of HA1 complex with N-acetylneuraminic acid, N-acetylgalactosamine, and galactose were also determined. There are two sugar-binding sites, sites I and II. Site I corresponds to the electron densities noted for all sugars and is located at the C-terminal beta-trefoil domain, while site II corresponds to the electron densities noted only for galactose. An aromatic amino acid residue, Trp176, at site I has a stacking interaction with the hexose ring of the sugars. On the other hand, there is no aromatic residue at site II; thus, the interaction with galactose seems to be poor. The double mutant W176A at site I and D271F at site II has no avidity for N-acetylneuraminic acid but has avidity for galactose. In this report, the binding specificity of botulinum C16S toxin HA1 to various sugars is demonstrated based on its structural features.

  16. Molecular properties of each subcomponent in Clostridium botulinum type B haemagglutinin complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arimitsu, Hideyuki; Sakaguchi, Yoshihiko; Lee, Jae-Chul; Ochi, Sadayuki; Tsukamoto, Kentaro; Yamamoto, Yumiko; Ma, Shaobo; Tsuji, Takao; Oguma, Keiji

    2008-08-01

    The role of each subcomponent of Clostridium botulinum serotype B haemagglutinin (HA), which is one component of 16S toxin, and consists of four subcomponents (HA1, 2, 3a, and 3b), was investigated. In order to identify the subcomponent contributing to the stability of a neurotoxin in the gastro-intestinal tract, each recombinant HA (rHA) subcomponent was incubated with gastro-intestinal proteases. Although rHA1 and rHA3 were stable to these proteases except for specific cleavage, rHA2 was not. Anti-free whole HA serum reacted with neither rHA2 nor HA2 in 16S toxin on both Western blot and ELISA, while anti-rHA2 serum reacted with both rHA2 and HA2 in 16S toxin on Western blots, although it did not react with 16S toxin in ELISA. Binding or haemagglutination activity against erythrocytes was found in rHA1 and rHA3, but not in rHA2. In addition, only HA1 bound to the intestinal section. These results indicate that the HA (and 16S toxin) complex is assembled in the way that HA1 and HA3 (HA3a plus HA3b) encase HA2, followed by modification with trypsin-like bacterial protease, leading to the conclusion that HA1 and HA3 act as protective factors for the neurotoxin and as attachment factors to host cells.

  17. In situ detection of the Clostridium botulinum type C1 toxin gene in wetland sediments with a nested PCR assay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, Judy L.; Rocke, Tonie E.; Aiken, Judd M.

    1999-01-01

    A nested PCR was developed for detection of the Clostridium botulinum type C1 toxin gene in sediments collected from wetlands where avian botulism outbreaks had or had not occurred. The C1 toxin gene was detected in 16 of 18 sites, demonstrating both the ubiquitous distribution of C. botulinum type C in wetland sediments and the sensitivity of the detection assay.

  18. Isolation and functional characterization of the novel Clostridium botulinum neurotoxin A8 subtype.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Skadi Kull

    Full Text Available Botulism is a severe neurological disease caused by the complex family of botulinum neurotoxins (BoNT. Based on the different serotypes known today, a classification of serotype variants termed subtypes has been proposed according to sequence diversity and immunological properties. However, the relevance of BoNT subtypes is currently not well understood. Here we describe the isolation of a novel Clostridium botulinum strain from a food-borne botulism outbreak near Chemnitz, Germany. Comparison of its botulinum neurotoxin gene sequence with published sequences identified it to be a novel subtype within the BoNT/A serotype designated BoNT/A8. The neurotoxin gene is located within an ha-orfX+ cluster and showed highest homology to BoNT/A1, A2, A5, and A6. Unexpectedly, we found an arginine insertion located in the HC domain of the heavy chain, which is unique compared to all other BoNT/A subtypes known so far. Functional characterization revealed that the binding characteristics to its main neuronal protein receptor SV2C seemed unaffected, whereas binding to membrane-incorporated gangliosides was reduced in comparison to BoNT/A1. Moreover, we found significantly lower enzymatic activity of the natural, full-length neurotoxin and the recombinant light chain of BoNT/A8 compared to BoNT/A1 in different endopeptidase assays. Both reduced ganglioside binding and enzymatic activity may contribute to the considerably lower biological activity of BoNT/A8 as measured in a mouse phrenic nerve hemidiaphragm assay. Despite its reduced activity the novel BoNT/A8 subtype caused severe botulism in a 63-year-old male. To our knowledge, this is the first description and a comprehensive characterization of a novel BoNT/A subtype which combines genetic information on the neurotoxin gene cluster with an in-depth functional analysis using different technical approaches. Our results show that subtyping of BoNT is highly relevant and that understanding of the detailed

  19. Isolation and functional characterization of the novel Clostridium botulinum neurotoxin A8 subtype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kull, Skadi; Schulz, K Melanie; Weisemann, Jasmin; Kirchner, Sebastian; Schreiber, Tanja; Bollenbach, Alexander; Dabrowski, P Wojtek; Nitsche, Andreas; Kalb, Suzanne R; Dorner, Martin B; Barr, John R; Rummel, Andreas; Dorner, Brigitte G

    2015-01-01

    Botulism is a severe neurological disease caused by the complex family of botulinum neurotoxins (BoNT). Based on the different serotypes known today, a classification of serotype variants termed subtypes has been proposed according to sequence diversity and immunological properties. However, the relevance of BoNT subtypes is currently not well understood. Here we describe the isolation of a novel Clostridium botulinum strain from a food-borne botulism outbreak near Chemnitz, Germany. Comparison of its botulinum neurotoxin gene sequence with published sequences identified it to be a novel subtype within the BoNT/A serotype designated BoNT/A8. The neurotoxin gene is located within an ha-orfX+ cluster and showed highest homology to BoNT/A1, A2, A5, and A6. Unexpectedly, we found an arginine insertion located in the HC domain of the heavy chain, which is unique compared to all other BoNT/A subtypes known so far. Functional characterization revealed that the binding characteristics to its main neuronal protein receptor SV2C seemed unaffected, whereas binding to membrane-incorporated gangliosides was reduced in comparison to BoNT/A1. Moreover, we found significantly lower enzymatic activity of the natural, full-length neurotoxin and the recombinant light chain of BoNT/A8 compared to BoNT/A1 in different endopeptidase assays. Both reduced ganglioside binding and enzymatic activity may contribute to the considerably lower biological activity of BoNT/A8 as measured in a mouse phrenic nerve hemidiaphragm assay. Despite its reduced activity the novel BoNT/A8 subtype caused severe botulism in a 63-year-old male. To our knowledge, this is the first description and a comprehensive characterization of a novel BoNT/A subtype which combines genetic information on the neurotoxin gene cluster with an in-depth functional analysis using different technical approaches. Our results show that subtyping of BoNT is highly relevant and that understanding of the detailed toxin function might

  20. Fatal Clostridium botulinum toxicosis in eleven Holstein cattle fed round bale barley haylage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelch, W J; Kerr, L A; Pringle, J K; Rohrbach, B W; Whitlock, R H

    2000-09-01

    Twenty-two lactating Holstein cattle in Tennessee had clinical signs of intoxication with preformed Clostridium botulinum toxin. These signs included weakness, paralysis of the tongue and chest muscles, abdominal breathing, and, in 11 of the 22 cows, death. Differential diagnoses included hypocalcemia, hypomagnesemia, carbohydrate overload, and several toxicoses including mycotoxin, lead, nitrate, organophosphate, atropine or atropine-like alkaloid, and botulism. A diagnosis of botulism by the ingestion of preformed C. botulinum type B toxin was made by eliminating these other diseases, by finding C. botulinum type B spores in 3 bales of round bale barley haylage fed to these cattle, and by isolating preformed type B toxin from 1 of the 3 bales. Confirmation of the toxin type was made by demonstrating mouse lethality by intraperitoneal injection of specimen extracts with neutralization by C. botulinum type B antitoxin. The haylage, harvested green and encased in black plastic bags to facilitate fermentation, was presumably contaminated by the botulinum toxin when fermentation failed to produce enough acid to lower the pH to 4.5, the pH below which C. botulinum growth is inhibited. Farmers and ranchers who use round hay balers to produce haylage should be alert to this potential problem.

  1. Multiplex real-time PCR SYBR Green for detection and typing of group III Clostridium botulinum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anniballi, Fabrizio; Auricchio, Bruna; Delibato, Elisabetta; Antonacci, Monia; De Medici, Dario; Fenicia, Lucia

    2012-01-27

    Clostridium botulinum type C and type D belonging to the group III organisms, are mainly responsible for animal botulism outbreaks. Clinical signs alone are often insufficient to make a diagnosis of botulism and a laboratory confirmation is required. Laboratory confirmation can be performed by demonstrating the presence of botulinum neurotoxins in serum, gastrointestinal contents, liver, wound of sick or dead animals, or by demonstrating the presence of C. botulinum in gastrointestinal contents, liver, and wound. Demonstration of spores in gastrointestinal contents or tissue of animals with clinical signs indicative of botulism reinforces the clinical diagnosis. With the aim of detecting and typing C. botulinum group III organisms, a multiplex real-time PCR SYBR Green was developed and in-house validated. Selectivity, limit of detection, relative accuracy, relative specificity, relative sensitivity, and repeatability of the method were investigated. The multiplex real-time PCR SYBR green used showed a 100% selectivity, 100% relative accuracy, 100% relative specificity, 100% relative sensitivity and a limit of detection of 277 and 580 DNA copies for C. botulinum type C and C. botulinum type D, respectively. The method reported here represents a suitable tool for laboratory diagnosis of type C and D botulism and for testing a large number of samples collected during the animal botulism surveillance and prevention activities. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Conditions associated with Clostridium sporogenes growth as a surrogate for Clostridium botulinum in nonthermally processed canned butter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, R H; Dunn, M L; Ogden, L V; Jefferies, L K; Eggett, D L; Steele, F M

    2013-05-01

    The objective of this study was to better understand the effect of butter composition and emulsion structure on growth and survival of Clostridium sporogenes, used as a surrogate for C. botulinum in canned butter. The lack of a thermal process step in commercially available canned butter raises questions of potential safety, because it is hermetically sealed and generally exhibits anaerobic growth conditions, which are optimal for Clostridium botulinum growth. Without thermal processing, low-acid canned foods must have inhibitory factors present to prevent C. botulinum growth. Some potential intrinsic inhibitory factors, or hurdles, within butter include: reduced water activity, acidity in cultured products, elevated salt content, and the micro-droplet nature of the aqueous phase in the butter emulsion. It was hypothesized that a normal, intact butter emulsion would have sufficient hurdles to prevent C. botulinum growth, whereas a broken butter emulsion would result in a coalesced aqueous phase that would allow for C. botulinum growth. Batch-churned butter was inoculated with C. sporogenes; butter samples with varying salt contents (0, 0.8, 1.6, and 2.4% wt/wt NaCl) were prepared and stored in coated steel cans for varying times (1 or 2 wk) and temperatures (22 or 41°C) to determine temperature and emulsion structure effects on C. sporogenes growth. Samples stored at 41°C showed a significant increase in C. sporogenes growth compared with those stored at 22°C. Furthermore, NaCl addition was found to have a significant effect on C. sporogenes growth, with 0.8% NaCl promoting more growth than 0%, but with decreases in growth observed at 1.6 and 2.4%. Uninoculated control plates were also found to have bacterial growth; this growth was attributed to other anaerobic bacteria present within the cream. It was concluded that removal of the hurdle created by the micro-droplet size of the emulsion aqueous phase could result in C. botulinum growth even at elevated salt

  3. Mechanisms of food processing and storage-related stress tolerance in Clostridium botulinum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahlsten, Elias; Lindström, Miia; Korkeala, Hannu

    2015-05-01

    Vegetative cultures of Clostridium botulinum produce the extremely potent botulinum neurotoxin, and may jeopardize the safety of foods unless sufficient measures to prevent growth are applied. Minimal food processing relies on combinations of mild treatments, primarily to avoid deterioration of the sensory qualities of the food. Tolerance of C. botulinum to minimal food processing is well characterized. However, data on effects of successive treatments on robustness towards further processing is lacking. Developments in genetic manipulation tools and the availability of annotated genomes have allowed identification of genetic mechanisms involved in stress tolerance of C. botulinum. Most studies focused on low temperature, and the importance of various regulatory mechanisms in cold tolerance of C. botulinum has been demonstrated. Furthermore, novel roles in cold tolerance were shown for metabolic pathways under the control of these regulators. A role for secondary oxidative stress in tolerance to extreme temperatures has been proposed. Additionally, genetic mechanisms related to tolerance to heat, low pH, and high salinity have been characterized. Data on genetic stress-related mechanisms of psychrotrophic Group II C. botulinum strains are scarce; these mechanisms are of interest for food safety research and should thus be investigated. This minireview encompasses the importance of C. botulinum as a food safety hazard and its central physiological characteristics related to food-processing and storage-related stress. Special attention is given to recent findings considering genetic mechanisms C. botulinum utilizes in detecting and countering these adverse conditions. Copyright © 2014 Institut Pasteur. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  4. Construction of a nontoxigenic Clostridium botulinum strain for food challenge studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradshaw, Marite; Marshall, Kristin M; Heap, John T; Tepp, William H; Minton, Nigel P; Johnson, Eric A

    2010-01-01

    Clostridium botulinum produces the most poisonous natural toxin known and is a perennial concern to the food industry and to regulatory agencies due to the potential threat of food-borne botulism. To ensure the botulinal safety of foods, rigorous food challenge testing to validate food-processing conditions and food formulations has been routinely performed. Detection of the botulinum neurotoxin is performed by using a mouse bioassay and/or in vitro assays. There has been considerable interest by the food industry and regulatory agencies in minimizing or even replacing the use of animals in these challenge studies. In addition, due to stringent select-agent regulations, the testing of various foods using toxigenic C. botulinum strains requires facilities and personnel that are certified for work with this organism. For this purpose we propose to generate sets of nontoxigenic C. botulinum strains from proteolytic and nonproteolytic groups that differ from the wild-type strains only by their inability to produce botulinum neurotoxin. In this initial study we describe the generation of a nontoxigenic mutant of C. botulinum strain 62A using the ClosTron mutagenesis system by inserting a group II intron into the botulinum neurotoxin type A gene (bont/A). The mutant clones were nontoxigenic as determined by Western blots and mouse bioassays but showed physiological characteristics, including growth properties and sporulation, that were similar to those of the parent strain in laboratory media. Additional studies will be required to evaluate comparable characteristics in various food matrices. The availability of suitable nontoxigenic C. botulinum strains for food challenge studies will be beneficial for enhancing the botulinal safety of foods as well as increasing the biosafety of workers and may eliminate the use of laboratory animals.

  5. Enhancing nitrite inhibition of Clostridium botulinum with isoascorbate in perishable canned cured meat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tompkin, R B; Christiansen, L N; Shaparis, A B

    1978-01-01

    Addition of sodium isoascorbate to the formulation for perishable canned comminuted cured meat markedly enhanced the efficacy of nitrite against Clostridium botulinum. This effect was reproducible through a series of three tests. In one test it was found that the initial addition of 50 microgram of sodium nitrite per g plus isoascorbate was as effective as 156 microgram of sodium nitrite per g alone. PMID:341810

  6. DEVELOPMENT OF ENZYME-LINKAGE IMMUNOSORBENT ASSAY AGAINST TYPE B OF CLOSTRIDIUM BOTULINUM: A PRELIMINARY STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. N. Depamede

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Clostridium botulinum neurotoxin (BoNTs is one of the causes of economic loss in the livestock industry. This economic loss would be as a direct result when animals poisoned by BoNTs or indirectly when the livestock products are contaminated by BoNTs, which end up with the products are banned by authority. Therefore a routine surveillance of BoNTs in the farm and in livestock product processing industry is urgently needed. One of the most relatively quick and accurate methods to perform a routine detection of the presence of BoNTs is enzyme-linkage immunosorbant assay (ELISA. In this article we describe the results of the development of ELISA, using polyclonal antibodies against BoNTs-B produced locally. Antibodies were generated from six Balb/c mice with standard immunological methods. Mice were immunized three times for a period of 8 weeks with a commercial type B Clostridium botulinum toxoid at a dose of 100 ng per mouse per injection. The resulting antibody was purified by a combination of ammonium sulfate precipitation 50% (w/v technique and a protein A column method. The results of this preliminary study indicated that the developed ELISA method capable of detecting type B Clostridium botulinum toxin up to 1.0 ng/ml.

  7. An Investigation of Immunogenicity of Chitosan-Based Botulinum Neurotoxin E Binding Domain Recombinant Candidate Vaccine via Mucosal Route

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Javad Bagheripour

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Botulism syndrome is caused by serotypes A-G of neurotoxins of Clostridium genus. Neurotoxin binding domain is an appropriate vaccine candidate due to its immunogenic activity. In this study, the immunogenicity of chitosan-based botulinum neurotoxin E binding domain recombinant candidate vaccine was investigated via mucosal route of administration. Methods: In this experimental study, chitosan nanoparticles containing rBoNT/E protein were synthesized by ionic gelation method and were administered orally and intranasally to mice. After each administration, IgG antibody titer was measured by ELISA method. Finally, all groups were challenged with active botulinum neurotoxin type E. Data were analyzed using Duncan and repeated ANOVA tests. The significance level was considered as p0.05, even intranasal route reduced the immunogenicity.

  8. Investigating CRISPR-Cas systems in Clostridium botulinum via bioinformatics tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negahdaripour, Manica; Nezafat, Navid; Hajighahramani, Nasim; Rahmatabadi, Seyyed Soheil; Ghasemi, Younes

    2017-10-01

    The Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) systems are a type of innate immunity found in some prokaryotes, which protect them against alien genetic elements by targeting foreign nucleic acids. Some other functions are also attributed to these systems. Clostridium botulinum bacteria produce botulinum neurotoxins (BoNT), one of the deadliest known toxins for humans and some animals. Food poisoning due to these bacteria is still a challenge in food industries. On the other hand, BoNT has been widely investigated for therapeutic applications including different muscle disorders. Bont genes may be located on bacterial chromosomes, plasmids, or even prophages. Generally, the genomes of Cl. botulinum show a high level of plasticity. In order to investigate the presence and characteristics of CRISPRs in these anaerobe bacteria, an in silico study on 113 CRISPR arrays identified in 38 Cl. botulinum strains was performed. A high occurrence of CRISPR arrays (80%) were found, with a remarkable frequency on plasmids. Several (CRISPR-associated) Cas proteins from different types were recognized in the studied strains, which were mostly Cas6. The CRISPR-Cas systems were identified as type I or III, but no type II. The spacers showed more homology with bacterial plasmids than phages. Active CRISPR-Cas systems can prevent the transfer of foreign genes, which may also include bont genes. This study provides the first insight into the probable roles of CRISPR-Cas systems in Cl. botulinum strains such as toxigenicity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Clostridium botulinum neurotoxin type B is heat-stable in milk and not inactivated by pasteurization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasooly, Reuven; Do, Paula M

    2010-12-08

    Foodborne botulism is caused by the ingestion of foods containing botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs). To study the heat stability of Clostridium botulinum neurotoxins, we needed to measure and compare the activity of botulinum neurotoxins, serotypes A and B, under various pasteurization conditions. Currently, the only accepted assay to detect active C. botulinum neurotoxin is an in vivo mouse bioassay, which raises ethical concerns with regard to the use of experimental animals. In this study, noninvasive methods were used to simultaneously detect and distinguish between active BoNT serotypes A and B in one reaction and sample. We developed an enzymatic activity assay employing internally quenched fluorogenic peptides corresponding to SNAP-25, for BoNT-A, and VAMP2, for BoNT-B, as an alternative method to the mouse bioassay. Because each peptide is labeled with different fluorophores, we were able to distinguish between these two toxins. We used this method to analyze the heat stability of BoNT-A and BoNT-B. This study reports that conventional milk pasteurization (63 °C, 30 min) inactivated BoNT serotype A; however, serotype B is heat-stable in milk and not inactivated by pasteurization. Using this activity assay, we also showed that the commonly used food processes such as acidity and pasteurization, which are known to inhibit C. botulinum growth and toxin production, are more effective in inactivating BoNT serotype A than serotype B when conventional pasteurization (63 °C, 30 min) is used.

  10. Genetic homogeneity of Clostridium botulinum type A1 strains with unique toxin gene clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raphael, Brian H; Luquez, Carolina; McCroskey, Loretta M; Joseph, Lavin A; Jacobson, Mark J; Johnson, Eric A; Maslanka, Susan E; Andreadis, Joanne D

    2008-07-01

    A group of five clonally related Clostridium botulinum type A strains isolated from different sources over a period of nearly 40 years harbored several conserved genetic properties. These strains contained a variant bont/A1 with five nucleotide polymorphisms compared to the gene in C. botulinum strain ATCC 3502. The strains also had a common toxin gene cluster composition (ha-/orfX+) similar to that associated with bont/A in type A strains containing an unexpressed bont/B [termed A(B) strains]. However, bont/B was not identified in the strains examined. Comparative genomic hybridization demonstrated identical genomic content among the strains relative to C. botulinum strain ATCC 3502. In addition, microarray data demonstrated the absence of several genes flanking the toxin gene cluster among the ha-/orfX+ A1 strains, suggesting the presence of genomic rearrangements with respect to this region compared to the C. botulinum ATCC 3502 strain. All five strains were shown to have identical flaA variable region nucleotide sequences. The pulsed-field gel electrophoresis patterns of the strains were indistinguishable when digested with SmaI, and a shift in the size of at least one band was observed in a single strain when digested with XhoI. These results demonstrate surprising genomic homogeneity among a cluster of unique C. botulinum type A strains of diverse origin.

  11. Crystal structure of the HA3 subcomponent of Clostridium botulinum type C progenitor toxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Toshio; Kotani, Mao; Tonozuka, Takashi; Ide, Azusa; Oguma, Keiji; Nishikawa, Atsushi

    2009-01-30

    The Clostridium botulinum type C 16S progenitor toxin contains a neurotoxin and several nontoxic components, designated nontoxic nonhemagglutinin (HA), HA1 (HA-33), HA2 (HA-17), HA3a (HA-22-23), and HA3b (HA-53). The HA3b subcomponent seems to play an important role cooperatively with HA1 in the internalization of the toxin by gastrointestinal epithelial cells via binding of these subcomponents to specific oligosaccharides. In this study, we investigated the sugar-binding specificity of the HA3b subcomponent using recombinant protein fused to glutathione S-transferase and determined the three-dimensional structure of the HA3a-HA3b complex based on X-ray crystallography. The crystal structure was determined at a resolution of 2.6 A. HA3b contains three domains, domains I to III, and the structure of domain I resembles HA3a. In crystal packing, three HA3a-HA3b molecules are assembled to form a three-leaved propeller-like structure. The three HA3b domain I and three HA3a alternate, forming a trimer of dimers. In a database search, no proteins with high structural homology to any of the domains (Z score >10) were found. Especially, HA3a and HA3b domain I, mainly composed of beta-sheets, reveal a unique fold. In binding assays, HA3b bound sialic acid with high affinity, but did not bind galactose, N-acetylgalactosamine, or N-acetylglucosamine. The electron density of liganded N-acetylneuraminic acid was determined by crystal soaking. In the sugar-complex structure, the N-acetylneuraminic acid-binding site was located in the cleft formed between domains II and III of HA3b. This report provides the first determination of the three-dimensional structure of the HA3a-HA3b complex and its sialic acid binding site. Our results will provide useful information for elucidating the mechanism of assembly of the C16S toxin and for understanding the interactions with oligosaccharides on epithelial cells and internalization of the botulinum toxin complex.

  12. Flagellin Diversity in Clostridium botulinum Groups I and II: a New Strategy for Strain Identification▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Catherine J.; Twine, Susan M.; Tam, Kevin J.; Mullen, James A.; Kelly, John F.; Austin, John W.; Logan, Susan M.

    2007-01-01

    Strains of Clostridium botulinum are traditionally identified by botulinum neurotoxin type; however, identification of an additional target for typing would improve differentiation. Isolation of flagellar filaments and analysis by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) showed that C. botulinum produced multiple flagellin proteins. Nano-liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (nLC-MS/MS) analysis of in-gel tryptic digests identified peptides in all flagellin bands that matched two homologous tandem flagellin genes identified in the C. botulinum Hall A genome. Designated flaA1 and flaA2, these open reading frames encode the major structural flagellins of C. botulinum. Colony PCR and sequencing of flaA1/A2 variable regions classified 80 environmental and clinical strains into group I or group II and clustered isolates into 12 flagellar types. Flagellar type was distinct from neurotoxin type, and epidemiologically related isolates clustered together. Sequencing a larger PCR product, obtained during amplification of flaA1/A2 from type E strain Bennett identified a second flagellin gene, flaB. LC-MS analysis confirmed that flaB encoded a large type E-specific flagellin protein, and the predicted molecular mass for FlaB matched that observed by SDS-PAGE. In contrast, the molecular mass of FlaA was 2 to 12 kDa larger than the mass predicted by the flaA1/A2 sequence of a given strain, suggesting that FlaA is posttranslationally modified. While identification of FlaB, and the observation by SDS-PAGE of different masses of the FlaA proteins, showed the flagellin proteins of C. botulinum to be diverse, the presence of the flaA1/A2 gene in all strains examined facilitates single locus sequence typing of C. botulinum using the flagellin variable region. PMID:17351097

  13. Flagellin diversity in Clostridium botulinum groups I and II: a new strategy for strain identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Catherine J; Twine, Susan M; Tam, Kevin J; Mullen, James A; Kelly, John F; Austin, John W; Logan, Susan M

    2007-05-01

    Strains of Clostridium botulinum are traditionally identified by botulinum neurotoxin type; however, identification of an additional target for typing would improve differentiation. Isolation of flagellar filaments and analysis by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) showed that C. botulinum produced multiple flagellin proteins. Nano-liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (nLC-MS/MS) analysis of in-gel tryptic digests identified peptides in all flagellin bands that matched two homologous tandem flagellin genes identified in the C. botulinum Hall A genome. Designated flaA1 and flaA2, these open reading frames encode the major structural flagellins of C. botulinum. Colony PCR and sequencing of flaA1/A2 variable regions classified 80 environmental and clinical strains into group I or group II and clustered isolates into 12 flagellar types. Flagellar type was distinct from neurotoxin type, and epidemiologically related isolates clustered together. Sequencing a larger PCR product, obtained during amplification of flaA1/A2 from type E strain Bennett identified a second flagellin gene, flaB. LC-MS analysis confirmed that flaB encoded a large type E-specific flagellin protein, and the predicted molecular mass for FlaB matched that observed by SDS-PAGE. In contrast, the molecular mass of FlaA was 2 to 12 kDa larger than the mass predicted by the flaA1/A2 sequence of a given strain, suggesting that FlaA is posttranslationally modified. While identification of FlaB, and the observation by SDS-PAGE of different masses of the FlaA proteins, showed the flagellin proteins of C. botulinum to be diverse, the presence of the flaA1/A2 gene in all strains examined facilitates single locus sequence typing of C. botulinum using the flagellin variable region.

  14. Detection of Clostridium botulinum in liquid manure and biogas plant wastes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuhaus, Jürgen; Schrödl, Wieland; Shehata, Awad A; Krüger, Monika

    2015-09-01

    Biogas plants have been considered as a source for possible amplification and distribution of pathogenic bacteria capable of causing severe infections in humans and animals. Manure and biogas wastes could be sources for spore-forming bacteria such as Clostridium botulinum. In the present study, 24 liquid manure and 84 biogas waste samples from dairies where the majority of the cows suffered from chronic botulism were investigated for the presence of botulinum neurotoxins (BoNT) and C. botulinum spores. The prevalence of BoNT/A, B, C, D, and E in biogas wastes was 16.6, 8.3, 10.7, 7.1, and 10.8 %, respectively, while in manure, the prevalence was 0.0, 0.0, 0.0, 8.3, and 4.1 %, respectively. After enrichment of samples in reinforced cultural medium, they were tested for C. botulinum BoNT/A, B, C, D, and E using ELISA (indirect C. botulinum detection). The prevalence of C. botulinum type A, B, C, D, and E samples in biogas wastes was 20.2, 15.5, 19, 10.7, and 34.8 %, respectively, while the prevalence in liquid manure was 0.0, 0.0, 0.0, 8.3, and 12.5 %, respectively. In conclusion, the occurrence of BoNT and C. botulinum spores in biogas waste of diseased animals indicates an increased and underestimated hygienic risk. Application of digestates from biogas fermentations as fertilizers could lead to an accumulation of long lifespan spores in the environment and could be a possible health hazard.

  15. Attempts to identify Clostridium botulinum toxin in milk from three experimentally intoxicated Holstein cows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moeller, R.B.; Puschner, B.; Walker, R.L.; Rocke, T.E.; Smith, S.R.; Cullor, J.S.; Ardans, A.A.

    2009-01-01

    Three adult lactating Holstein cows were injected in the subcutaneous abdominal vein with 175 ng/kg of body weight of Clostridium botulinum type C toxin (451 cow median toxic doses) to determine if this botulinum toxin crosses the blood–milk barrier. Whole blood (in sodium heparin) and clotted blood serum samples were taken at 0 min, 10 min, and 3, 6, 9, and 12 h postinoculation. Milk samples were taken at 0 min and at 3, 6, 9 and 12 h postinoculation. All samples were tested for the presence of the toxin using the mouse bioassay and immunostick ELISA test. The immunostick ELISA identified the toxin in whole blood and the mouse bioassay identified the toxin in serum at all times examined in all 3 animals. Toxin was not identified by either detection method in milk samples collected from the 3 animals. From these results, it appears that Clostridium botulinum type C toxin does not cross from the blood to the milk in detectable concentrations.

  16. Retargeting the Clostridium botulinum C2 toxin to the neuronal cytosol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlik, Benjamin J; Hruska, Elizabeth J; Van Cott, Kevin E; Blum, Paul H

    2016-03-30

    Many biological toxins are known to attack specific cell types, delivering their enzymatic payloads to the cytosol. This process can be manipulated by molecular engineering of chimeric toxins. Using toxins with naturally unlinked components as a starting point is advantageous because it allows for the development of payloads separately from the binding/translocation components. Here the Clostridium botulinum C2 binding/translocation domain was retargeted to neural cell populations by deleting its non-specific binding domain and replacing it with a C. botulinum neurotoxin binding domain. This fusion protein was used to deliver fluorescently labeled payloads to Neuro-2a cells. Intracellular delivery was quantified by flow cytometry and found to be dependent on artificial enrichment of cells with the polysialoganglioside receptor GT1b. Visualization by confocal microscopy showed a dissociation of payloads from the early endosome indicating translocation of the chimeric toxin. The natural Clostridium botulinum C2 toxin was then delivered to human glioblastoma A172 and synchronized HeLa cells. In the presence of the fusion protein, native cytosolic enzymatic activity of the enzyme was observed and found to be GT1b-dependent. This retargeted toxin may enable delivery of therapeutics to peripheral neurons and be of use in addressing experimental questions about neural physiology.

  17. High pressure thermal inactivation of Clostridium botulinum type E endospores – kinetic modeling and mechanistic insights

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Andreas Lenz

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Cold-tolerant, neurotoxigenic, endospore forming Clostridium (C. botulinum type E belongs to the non-proteolytic physiological C. botulinum group II, is primarily associated with aquatic environments, and presents a safety risk for seafood. High pressure thermal (HPT processing exploiting the synergistic effect of pressure and temperature can be used to inactivate bacterial endospores.We investigated the inactivation of C. botulinum type E spores by (near isothermal HPT treatments at 300 – 1200 MPa at 30 – 75 °C for 1 s – 10 min. The occurrence of heat and lysozyme susceptible spore fractions after such treatments was determined. The experimental data were modeled to obtain kinetic parameters and represented graphically by isoeffect lines. In contrast to findings for spores of other species and within the range of treatment parameters applied, zones of spore stabilization (lower inactivation than heat treatments alone, large heat susceptible (HPT-induced germinated or lysozyme-dependently germinable (damaged coat layer spore fractions were not detected. Inactivation followed 1st order kinetics. DPA release kinetics allowed for insights into possible inactivation mechanisms suggesting a (poorly effective physiologic-like (similar to nutrient-induced germination at ≤ 450 MPa/≤ 45 °C and non-physiological germination at >500 MPa/>60 – 70 °C.Results of this study support the existence of some commonalities in the HPT inactivation mechanism of C. botulinum type E spores and Bacillus spores although both organisms have significantly different HPT resistance properties. The information presented here contributes to closing the gap in knowledge regarding the HPT inactivation of spore formers relevant to food safety and may help industrial implementation of HPT processing. The markedly lower HPT resistance of C. botulinum type E spores than spores from other C. botulinum types, could allow for the implementation of milder processes without

  18. Toxin formation by Clostridium botulinum type B in radurized fish

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suhadi, F.; Thayib, S.S.

    1981-01-01

    The relation between maximum storage life and earliest toxin formation by proteolytic and nonproteolytic strains of C. botulinum type B in irradiated and unirradiated raw fish was determinated. The fish species used were Rastrelliger sp., Euthynnus sp. and Scomberomorus sp. Uninoculated fish samples held under the same treatment conditions were evaluated for the estimation of storage life by untrained panelist. The results showed that a storage temperature at or lower than 5.6 0 C is recommended in order to avoid botulism hazard caused by nonproteolytic type B. When the samples were inoculated with spores of proteolytic strains, no toxic samples were found during the storage life in all treatments with storage temperatures at or lower than 10.2 0 C. Toxin formation by proteolytic strains of C. botulinum type B in boiled (''Pindang'') chub mackerel (Rastrelliger sp.) under storage at ambient temperatures (27-31 0 C) was also determinated. The results showed that in the samples which were inoculated before the process of ''Pindang'', the earliest toxin formations were detected after the samples were spoiled regardless of the irradiation dose, strain and inoculum level; while in control unsalted samples, toxin was detected before or after the samples were spoiled, depending on the strain and inoculum level. Salt content in ordinary ''Pindang'' fish plays a major role both in extension of the storage life and the delay in toxin formation. When the samples were inoculated after the process of ''Pindang'', toxin was detected before or after the samples were spoiled, depending on the strain, salt content, irradiation dose and inoculum level. Irradiation does not prevent the toxin formation in ''Pindang'' fish if the samples are heavily contaminated with proteolytic strains of C. botulinum type B after cooking. (author)

  19. Transcriptomic analysis of (group I Clostridium botulinum ATCC 3502 cold shock response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elias Dahlsten

    Full Text Available Profound understanding of the mechanisms foodborne pathogenic bacteria utilize in adaptation to the environmental stress they encounter during food processing and storage is of paramount importance in design of control measures. Chill temperature is a central control measure applied in minimally processed foods; however, data on the mechanisms the foodborne pathogen Clostridium botulinum activates upon cold stress are scarce. Transcriptomic analysis on the C. botulinum ATCC 3502 strain upon temperature downshift from 37°C to 15°C was performed to identify the cold-responsive gene set of this organism. Significant up- or down-regulation of 16 and 11 genes, respectively, was observed 1 h after the cold shock. At 5 h after the temperature downshift, 199 and 210 genes were up- or down-regulated, respectively. Thus, the relatively small gene set affected initially indicated a targeted acute response to cold shock, whereas extensive metabolic remodeling appeared to take place after prolonged exposure to cold. Genes related to fatty acid biosynthesis, oxidative stress response, and iron uptake and storage were induced, in addition to mechanisms previously characterized as cold-tolerance related in bacteria. Furthermore, several uncharacterized DNA-binding transcriptional regulator-encoding genes were induced, suggesting involvement of novel regulatory mechanisms in the cold shock response of C. botulinum. The role of such regulators, CBO0477 and CBO0558A, in cold tolerance of C. botulinum ATCC 3502 was demonstrated by deteriorated growth of related mutants at 17°C.

  20. Nitrite, nitrite alternatives, and the control of Clostridium botulinum in cured meats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierson, M D; Smoot, L A

    1982-01-01

    Historically, nitrite has been a component of meat-curing additives for several centuries. In recent years the safety of nitrite as an additive in cured meats has been questioned mainly because of the possible formation of carcinogenic nitrosamines. Nitrite has many important functions in meat curing including its role in color development, flavor, antioxidant properties, and antimicrobial activity. The inhibition of Clostridium botulinum growth and toxin production is an especially important antimicrobial property of nitrite. This review discusses the effects of processing, curing ingredients (especially nitrite), and storage of cured meats in relation to the control of C. botulinum. If nitrite is eliminated from cured meats or the level of usage decreased, then alternatives for the antibotulinal function of nitrite need to be considered. Several potential alternatives including sorbates, parabens, and biological acidulants are discussed.

  1. Regulation of Botulinum Neurotoxin Synthesis and Toxin Complex Formation by Arginine and Glucose in Clostridium botulinum ATCC 3502.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fredrick, Chase M; Lin, Guangyun; Johnson, Eric A

    2017-07-01

    Botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT), produced by neurotoxigenic clostridia, is the most potent biological toxin known and the causative agent of the paralytic disease botulism. The nutritional, environmental, and genetic regulation of BoNT synthesis, activation, stability, and toxin complex (TC) formation is not well studied. Previous studies indicated that growth and BoNT formation were affected by arginine and glucose in Clostridium botulinum types A and B. In the present study, C. botulinum ATCC 3502 was grown in toxin production medium (TPM) with different levels of arginine and glucose and of three products of arginine metabolism, citrulline, proline, and ornithine. Cultures were analyzed for growth (optical density at 600 nm [OD 600 ]), spore formation, and BoNT and TC formation by Western blotting and immunoprecipitation and for BoNT activity by mouse bioassay. A high level of arginine (20 g/liter) repressed BoNT production approximately 1,000-fold, enhanced growth, slowed lysis, and reduced endospore production by greater than 1,000-fold. Similar effects on toxin production were seen with equivalent levels of citrulline but not ornithine or proline. In TPM lacking glucose, levels of formation of BoNT/A1 and TC were significantly decreased, and extracellular BoNT and TC proteins were partially inactivated after the first day of culture. An understanding of the regulation of C. botulinum growth and BoNT and TC formation should be valuable in defining requirements for BoNT formation in foods and clinical samples, improving the quality of BoNT for pharmaceutical preparations, and elucidating the biological functions of BoNTs for the bacterium. IMPORTANCE Botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT) is a major food safety and bioterrorism concern and is also an important pharmaceutical, and yet the regulation of its synthesis, activation, and stability in culture media, foods, and clinical samples is not well understood. This paper provides insights into the effects of critical

  2. Association of toxin-producing Clostridium botulinum with the macroalga Cladophora in the Great Lakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chun, Chan Lan; Ochsner, Urs; Byappanahalli, Muruleedhara N; Whitman, Richard L; Tepp, William H; Lin, Guangyun; Johnson, Eric A; Peller, Julie; Sadowsky, Michael J

    2013-03-19

    Avian botulism, a paralytic disease of birds, often occurs on a yearly cycle and is increasingly becoming more common in the Great Lakes. Outbreaks are caused by bird ingestion of neurotoxins produced by Clostridium botulinum, a spore-forming, gram-positive, anaerobe. The nuisance, macrophytic, green alga Cladophora (Chlorophyta; mostly Cladophora glomerata L.) is a potential habitat for the growth of C. botulinum. A high incidence of botulism in shoreline birds at Sleeping Bear Dunes National Lakeshore (SLBE) in Lake Michigan coincides with increasingly massive accumulations of Cladophora in nearshore waters. In this study, free-floating algal mats were collected from SLBE and other shorelines of the Great Lakes between June and October 2011. The abundance of C. botulinum in algal mats was quantified and the type of botulism neurotoxin (bont) genes associated with this organism were determined by using most-probable-number PCR (MPN-PCR) and five distinct bont gene-specific primers (A, B, C, E, and F). The MPN-PCR results showed that 16 of 22 (73%) algal mats from the SLBE and 23 of 31(74%) algal mats from other shorelines of the Great Lakes contained the bont type E (bont/E) gene. C. botulinum was present up to 15000 MPN per gram dried algae based on gene copies of bont/E. In addition, genes for bont/A and bont/B, which are commonly associated with human diseases, were detected in a few algal samples. Moreover, C. botulinum was present as vegetative cells rather than as dormant spores in Cladophora mats. Mouse toxin assays done using supernatants from enrichment of Cladophora containing high densities of C. botulinum (>1000 MPN/g dried algae) showed that Cladophora-borne C. botulinum were toxin-producing species (BoNT/E). Our results indicate that Cladophora provides a habitat for C. botulinum, warranting additional studies to better understand the relationship between this bacterium and the alga, and how this interaction potentially contributes to botulism

  3. Prospects for the Elimination of Clostridium Botulinum from Fish and Fishery Products by Irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hobbs, G. [Torry Research Station, Ministry of Technology, Aberdeen, Scotland (United Kingdom)

    1968-07-15

    The paper first discusses the occurrence of Clostridium botulinum in fish and fishery products and their resistance to irradiation, and then considers the different possible irradiation treatments such as radappertization, radurization and combined processes. For Great Britain it is suggested that sea- frozen fish should be thawed, filleted, packaged and irradiated at 0.3 Mrads. This irradiation treatment would give a sufficient extension of the market life. To eliminate the botulism hazard a temperature of less than 5 Degree-Sign C for storage and distribution is recommended. (author)

  4. Involvement of Clostridium botulinum ATCC 3502 sigma factor K in early-stage sporulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirk, David G; Dahlsten, Elias; Zhang, Zhen; Korkeala, Hannu; Lindström, Miia

    2012-07-01

    A key survival mechanism of Clostridium botulinum, the notorious neurotoxic food pathogen, is the ability to form heat-resistant spores. While the genetic mechanisms of sporulation are well understood in the model organism Bacillus subtilis, nothing is known about these mechanisms in C. botulinum. Using the ClosTron gene-knockout tool, sigK, encoding late-stage (stage IV) sporulation sigma factor K in B. subtilis, was disrupted in C. botulinum ATCC 3502 to produce two different mutants with distinct insertion sites and orientations. Both mutants were unable to form spores, and their elongated cell morphology suggested that the sporulation pathway was blocked at an early stage. In contrast, sigK-complemented mutants sporulated successfully. Quantitative real-time PCR analysis of sigK in the parent strain revealed expression at the late log growth phase in the parent strain. Analysis of spo0A, encoding the sporulation master switch, in the sigK mutant and the parent showed significantly reduced relative levels of spo0A expression in the sigK mutant compared to the parent strain. Similarly, sigF showed significantly lower relative transcription levels in the sigK mutant than the parent strain, suggesting that the sporulation pathway was blocked in the sigK mutant at an early stage. We conclude that σ(K) is essential for early-stage sporulation in C. botulinum ATCC 3502, rather than being involved in late-stage sporulation, as reported for the sporulation model organism B. subtilis. Understanding the sporulation mechanism of C. botulinum provides keys to control the public health risks that the spores of this dangerous pathogen cause through foods.

  5. Study on potential Clostridium botulinum growth and toxin production in Parma ham

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Merialdi

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to investigate Clostridium botulinum growth and toxin production in the industrially manufactured Italian Parma ham. The study focuses on the Parma ham production phase identified as maximum risk to C. botulinum proliferation, i.e. the transition from cold phase (salting and resting to a phase carried out at temperature between 15 and 23°C (drying. A preliminary in vitro test was carried out in order to verify the capability of 6 C. botulinum strains (1 type A, 4 type B, and 1 type E strains to grow in conditions of temperature, pH and NaCl concentration comparable to those of the beginning stage of ham drying. Five C. botulinum strains grew at 20°C and pH 6, four strains produced toxin when inoculated at a concentration equal to 103 cfu/mL at NaCl concentration of 4%, while when the inoculum concentration was 10 cfu/mL, NaCl concentration of 3% resulted the toxin-genesis limiting factor. An experimental contamination with a mixture of the 5 C. botulinum strains selected by the preliminary in vitro test was performed on 9 thighs inoculated at the end of the resting phase. The study was designed to evaluate the potential growth and toxin production in extremely favourable conditions for the bacterium. Type B proteolytic C. botulinum toxin was produced after 14 days of incubation at 20°C in 2 thighs characterised by high weight, low number of days of resting and anomalous physiochemical characteristics [one for very low NaCl concentration (1.59%, the other for elevated pH (6.27 and both for high water activity values (>0.970]. The results of this research confirm that the cold resting step is a critical phase in the production process of Parma ham for the investigated hazard. Based on the present study, the long resting phase adopted in the manufacturing of Parma ham is proven effective to prevent the growth of C. botulinum, an event which could not otherwise be excluded if the hams were processed under less

  6. Modification of an acetone-sodium dodecyl sulfate disruption method for cellular protein extraction from neuropathogenic Clostridium botulinum

    Science.gov (United States)

    An acetone-sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) disruption method was used for the extraction of cellular proteins from neurotoxigenic Clostridium botulinum. The amount of protein extracted per gram of dry weight and the protein profile as revealed by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) was comparabl...

  7. Binding properties of Clostridium botulinum type C progenitor toxin to mucins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Toshio; Takada, Noriko; Tonozuka, Takashi; Sakano, Yoshiyuki; Oguma, Keiji; Nishikawa, Atsushi

    2007-04-01

    It has been reported that Clostridium botulinum type C 16S progenitor toxin (C16S toxin) first binds to the sialic acid on the cell surface of mucin before invading cells [A. Nishikawa, N. Uotsu, H. Arimitsu, J.C. Lee, Y. Miura, Y. Fujinaga, H. Nakada, T. Watanabe, T. Ohyama, Y. Sakano, K. Oguma, The receptor and transporter for internalization of Clostridium botulinum type C progenitor toxin into HT-29 cells, Biochem. Biophys. Res. Commun. 319 (2004) 327-333]. In this study we investigated the binding properties of the C16S toxin to glycoproteins. Although the toxin bound to membrane blotted mucin derived from the bovine submaxillary gland (BSM), which contains a lot of sialyl oligosaccharides, it did not bind to neuraminidase-treated BSM. The binding of the toxin to BSM was inhibited by N-acetylneuraminic acid, N-glycolylneuraminic acid, and sialyl oligosaccharides strongly, but was not inhibited by neutral oligosaccharides. Both sialyl alpha2-3 lactose and sialyl alpha2-6 lactose prevented binding similarly. On the other hand, the toxin also bound well to porcine gastric mucin. In this case, neutral oligosaccharides might play an important role as ligand, since galactose and lactose inhibited binding. These results suggest that the toxin is capable of recognizing a wide variety of oligosaccharide structures.

  8. New Insights into the genetic diversity of Clostridium botulinum Group III through extensive genome exploration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cédric eWoudstra

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Animal botulism is caused by group III Clostridium botulinum strains producing type C and D toxins, or their chimeric forms C/D and D/C. Animal botulism is considered an emerging disease in Europe, notably in poultry production. Before our study, 14 genomes from different countries were available in the public database, but none were from France. In order to investigate the genetic relationship of French strains with different geographical areas and find new potential typing targets, 17 strains of C. botulinum group III were sequenced (16 from France and one from New Caledonia. Fourteen were type C/D strains isolated from chickens, ducks, guinea fowl and turkeys and three were type D/C strains isolated from cattle. The New Caledonian strain was a type D/C strain. Whole genome sequence analysis showed the French strains to be closely related to European strains from C. botulinum group III lineages Ia and Ib. The investigation of CRISPR sequences as genetic targets for differentiating strains in group III proved to be irrelevant for type C/D due to a deficient CRISPR/Cas mechanism, but not for type D/C. Conversely, the extrachromosomal elements of type C/D strains could be used to generate a genetic ID card. The highest level of discrimination was achieved with SNP core phylogeny, which allowed differentiation up to strain level and provide the most relevant information for genetic epidemiology studies and discrimination.

  9. Effect of sodium nitrite on toxin production by Clostridium botulinum in bacon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christiansen, L N; Tompkin, R B; Shaparis, A B; Kueper, T V; Johnston, R W; Kautter, D A; Kolari, O J

    1974-04-01

    Pork bellies were formulated to 0, 30, 60, 120, 170, or 340 mug of nitrite per g of meat and inoculated with Clostridium botulinum via pickle or after processing and slicing. Processed bacon was stored at 7 or 27 C and assayed for nitrite, nitrate, and botulinal toxin at different intervals. Nitrite levels declined during processing and storage. The rate of decrease was more rapid at 27 than at 7 C. Although not added to the system, nitrate was detected in samples during processing and storage at 7 and 27 C. The amount of nitrate found was related to formulated nitrite levels. No toxin was found in samples incubated at 7 C throughout the 84-day test period. At 27 C, via pickle, inoculated samples with low inoculum (210 C. botulinum per g before processing and 52 per g after processing) became toxic if formulated with 120 mug of nitrite per g of meat or less. Toxin was not detected in bacon formulated with 170 or 340 mug of nitrite per g of meat under these same conditions. Toxin was detected at all formulated nitrite levels in bacon inoculated via the pickle with 19,000 C. botulinum per g (4,300 per g after processing) and in samples inoculated after slicing. However, increased levels of formulated nitrite decreased the probability of botulinal toxin formation in bacon inoculated by both methods.

  10. The purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of dihydrodipicolinate synthase from Clostridium botulinum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dobson, Renwick C. J.; Atkinson, Sarah C.; Gorman, Michael A.; Newman, Janet M.; Parker, Michael W.; Perugini, Matthew A.

    2008-01-01

    Dihydrodipicolinate synthase (DHDPS), an enzyme in the lysine-biosynthetic pathway, is a promising target for antibiotic development against pathogenic bacteria. Here, the expression, purification, crystallization and preliminary diffraction analysis of DHDPS from C. botulinum are reported. In recent years, dihydrodipicolinate synthase (DHDPS; EC 4.2.1.52) has received considerable attention from both mechanistic and structural viewpoints. This enzyme, which is part of the diaminopimelate pathway leading to lysine, couples (S)-aspartate-β-semialdehyde with pyruvate via a Schiff base to a conserved active-site lysine. In this paper, the expression, purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of DHDPS from Clostridium botulinum, an important bacterial pathogen, are presented. The enzyme was crystallized in a number of forms, predominantly using PEG precipitants, with the best crystal diffracting to beyond 1.9 Å resolution and displaying P4 2 2 1 2 symmetry. The unit-cell parameters were a = b = 92.9, c = 60.4 Å. The crystal volume per protein weight (V M ) was 2.07 Å 3 Da −1 , with an estimated solvent content of 41%. The structure of the enzyme will help guide the design of novel therapeutics against the C. botulinum pathogen

  11. Rapid Detection of Clostridium botulinum Toxins A, B, E, and F in Clinical Samples, Selected Food Matrices, and Buffer Using Paramagnetic Bead-Based Electrochemiluminescence Detection

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rivera, Victor R; Gamez, Frank J; Keener, William K; White, Jill A; Poli, Mark A

    2006-01-01

    Sensitive and specific electrochemiluminescence (ECL) assays were used to detect Clostridium botulinum neurotoxins serotypes A, B, E, and F in undiluted human serum, undiluted human urine, assay buffer, and selected food matrices...

  12. Prevalence of toxin-producing Clostridium botulinum associated with the macroalga Cladophora in three Great Lakes: growth and management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chun, Chan Lan; Kahn, Chase I.; Borchert, Andrew J.; Byappanahalli, Muruleedhara N.; Whitman, Richard L.; Peller, Julie R.; Pier, Christina; Lin, Guangyun; Johnson, Eric A.; Sadowsky, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    The reemergence of avian botulism caused by Clostridium botulinum type E has been observed across the Great Lakes in recent years. Evidence suggests an association between the nuisance algae, Cladophoraspp., and C. botulinum in nearshore areas of the Great Lakes. However, the nature of the association between Cladophora and C. botulinum is not fully understood due, in part, to the complex food web interactions in this disease etiology. In this study, we extensively evaluated their association by quantitatively examining population size and serotypes of C. botulinum in algal mats collected from wide geographic areas in lakes Michigan, Ontario, and Erie in 2011–2012 and comparing them with frequencies in other matrices such as sand and water. A high prevalence (96%) of C. botulinum type E was observed inCladophora mats collected from shorelines of the Great Lakes in 2012. Among the algae samples containing detectable C. botulinum, the population size of C. Botulinum type E was 100–104 MPN/g dried algae, which was much greater (up to 103 fold) than that found in sand or the water column, indicating thatCladophora mats are sources of this pathogen. Mouse toxinantitoxin bioassays confirmed that the putativeC. botulinum belonged to the type E serotype. Steam treatment was effective in reducing or eliminating C. botulinum type E viable cells in Cladophora mats, thereby breaking the potential transmission route of toxin up to the food chain. Consequently, our data suggest that steam treatment incorporated with a beach cleaning machine may be an effective treatment of Cladophora-borne C. botulinum and may reduce bird mortality and human health risks.

  13. Draft Genome Sequence of a Clostridium botulinum Isolate from Water Used for Cooling at a Plant Producing Low-Acid Canned Foods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basavanna, Uma; Gonzalez-Escalona, Narjol; Timme, Ruth; Datta, Shomik; Schoen, Brianna; Brown, Eric W; Zink, Donald; Sharma, Shashi K

    2013-01-01

    Clostridium botulinum is a pathogen of concern for low-acid canned foods. Here we report draft genomes of a neurotoxin-producing C. botulinum strain isolated from water samples used for cooling low-acid canned foods at a canning facility. The genome sequence confirmed that this strain belonged to C. botulinum serotype B1, albeit with major differences, including thousands of unique single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) compared to other genomes of the same serotype.

  14. Draft Genome Sequence of a Clostridium botulinum Isolate from Water Used for Cooling at a Plant Producing Low-Acid Canned Foods

    OpenAIRE

    Basavanna, Uma; Gonzalez-Escalona, Narjol; Timme, Ruth; Datta, Shomik; Schoen, Brianna; Brown, Eric W.; Zink, Donald; Sharma, Shashi K.

    2013-01-01

    Clostridium botulinum is a pathogen of concern for low-acid canned foods. Here we report draft genomes of a neurotoxin-producing C.?botulinum strain isolated from water samples used for cooling low-acid canned foods at a canning facility. The genome sequence confirmed that this strain belonged to C.?botulinum serotype B1, albeit with major differences, including thousands of unique single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) compared to other genomes of the same serotype.

  15. Investigation of inactivation of Clostridium botulinum toxin by nuclear radiation. Final report. Untersuchung zur Desaktivierung des Clostridium botulinum Toxins durch Kernstrahlung. Endbericht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaltenhaeuser, A.; Werner, K.H.

    1989-01-01

    The effect of nuclear radiation on the toxicity and the molecular structure of the toxin produced by the microorganism Clostridium botulinum type A was investigated. The radiation induced changes in the structure of the toxin molecule. This effect is influenced by the composition or the medium above the toxin solution as well as by the temperature during the irradiation. The results of the investigation indicate that with increasing irradiation dose a new molecule was formed with immunological properties similar to the properties of the original molecule however with a greater molecular weight. After exposure to a radiation dose of 3,4 Mrad at normal temperature in air, complete detoxification of the substance was found. Immunizing experiments with the toxoid with two guinea-pigs indicated a pronounced increase of the antibody titer in the serum after 4 weeks. Vaccination experiments with the toxoid on animals show, that the protection against the effect of the toxin corresponds to the demands of the European Pharmacopoeia. The efficiency of the toxoid shows a similar efficiency as toxoids produced by chemical methods. The production of a toxoid-viccine with the relatively simple method of nuclear radiation appears possible. (orig./MG) With 12 refs., 3 tabs., 11 figs.

  16. Studies on the irradiation of toxins of Clostridium botulinum and Staphylococcus aureus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rose, S.A.; Bailey, N.E.; Stringer, M.F.; Modi, N.K.; Tranter, H.S.; Hambleton, P.

    1989-01-01

    The effects of irradiation of Clostridium botulinum neutotoxin type A (BNTA) and staphylococcal enterotoxin A (SEA) in gelatin phosphate buffer and cooked mince beef slurries were investigated. Estimation of toxins by immunoassays showed that in buffer, toxins were destroyed by irradiation at 8.0 kGy; in mince slurries however, 45% of BTNA and 27-34% of SEA remained after this level of irradiation. At 23.7 kGy, over twice the dose of irradiation proposed for legal acceptance in the UK, 15% of BNTA and 16-26% of SEA still remained. Increasing concentrations of mince conferred increased protection against the effect of irradiation on both toxins. The biological activity of BNTA was more sensitive to irradiation than the immunological activity. Staphylococcal enterotoxin was more resistant to irradiation than BNTA. Irradiation should therefore only be used in conjunction with good manufacturing practices to prevent microbial proliferation and toxin production prior to irradiation. (author)

  17. Studies on the irradiation of toxins of Clostridium botulinum and Staphylococcus aureus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rose, S A; Bailey, N E; Stringer, M F [Campden Food and Drink Research Association, Chipping Campden (UK); Modi, N K; Tranter, H S [Porton International plc., London (UK); Hambleton, P [Centre for Applied Microbiological Research, Porton Down (UK)

    1988-10-01

    The effects of irradiation of Clostridium botulinum neurotoxin type A (BNTA) and staphylococcal enterotoxin A (SEA) in gelatin phosphate buffer and cooked mince beef slurries were investigated. Estimation of toxins by immunoassays showed that in buffer, toxins were destroyed by irradiation at 8.0 kGy; in mince slurries however, 45% of BTNA and 27-34% of SEA remained after this level of irradiation. At 23.7 kGy, over twice the dose of irradiation proposed for legal acceptance in the UK, 15% of BNTA and 16-26% of SEA still remained. Increasing concentrations of mince conferred increased protection against the effect of irradiation on both toxins. The biological activity of BNTA was more sensitive to irradiation than the immunological activity. Staphylococcal enterotoxin was more resistant to irradiation than BNTA. Irradiation should therefore only be used in conjunction with good manufacturing practices to prevent microbial proliferation and toxin production prior to irradiation. (author).

  18. Studies on the irradiation of toxins of Clostridium botulinum and Staphylococcus aureus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rose, S.A.; Bailey, N.E.; Stringer, M.F.; Modi, N.K.; Tranter, H.S.; Hambleton, P.

    1988-01-01

    The effects of irradiation of Clostridium botulinum neurotoxin type A (BNTA) and staphylococcal enterotoxin A (SEA) in gelatin phosphate buffer and cooked mince beef slurries were investigated. Estimation of toxins by immunoassays showed that in buffer, toxins were destroyed by irradiation at 8.0 kGy; in mince slurries however, 45% of BTNA and 27-34% of SEA remained after this level of irradiation. At 23.7 kGy, over twice the dose of irradiation proposed for legal acceptance in the UK, 15% of BNTA and 16-26% of SEA still remained. Increasing concentrations of mince conferred increased protection against the effect of irradiation on both toxins. The biological activity of BNTA was more sensitive to irradiation than the immunological activity. Staphylococcal enterotoxin was more resistant to irradiation than BNTA. Irradiation should therefore only be used in conjunction with good manufacturing practices to prevent microbial proliferation and toxin production prior to irradiation. (author)

  19. Studies on the irradiation of toxins of Clostridium botulinum and Staphylococcus aureus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rose, S.A.; Bailey, N.E.; Stringer, M.F. (Campden Food and Drink Research Association, Chipping Campden (UK)); Modi, N.K.; Tranter, H.S. (Centre for Applied Micobiological Research, Porton Down, (UK)); Hambleton, P. (Porton International plc, London (UK))

    1989-09-01

    The effects of irradiation of Clostridium botulinum neutotoxin type A (BNTA) and staphylococcal enterotoxin A (SEA) in gelatin phosphate buffer and cooked mince beef slurries were investigated. Estimation of toxins by immunoassays showed that in buffer, toxins were destroyed by irradiation at 8.0 kGy; in mince slurries however, 45% of BTNA and 27-34% of SEA remained after this level of irradiation. At 23.7 kGy, over twice the dose of irradiation proposed for legal acceptance in the UK, 15% of BNTA and 16-26% of SEA still remained. Increasing concentrations of mince conferred increased protection against the effect of irradiation on both toxins. The biological activity of BNTA was more sensitive to irradiation than the immunological activity. Staphylococcal enterotoxin was more resistant to irradiation than BNTA. Irradiation should therefore only be used in conjunction with good manufacturing practices to prevent microbial proliferation and toxin production prior to irradiation. (author).

  20. Inhibition of toxinogenesis of type a Clostridium botulinum in beef using combined treatments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lasta, J.A.; Rodriguez, H.R.; Pensel, N.A.; Margaria, C.A.; Gallinger, M.M.; Artuso, C.A.; Masana, M.O.; Suarez-Rebollo, M.P.

    1998-01-01

    A shelf stable beef product was developed on the basis of combined treatments involving a reduction in water activity and using specific anti-microbial agents, thermal processing, vacuum packaging and irradiation. Beef foreshanks were cured, thermally processed and irradiated at 7.5 and 15 kGy. Sensory analysis and microbiological, chemical and lipid stability studies were carried out on the non-inoculated samples. In addition, challenge studies involving samples inoculated with 10 3 or 10 5 spores of Clostridium botulinum/g were performed. The samples challenged with 10 3 spores of C. botulinum and irradiated with 15 kGy did not show toxin production during a storage time of 8 months at 28 deg. C. The non-challenged samples showed low 2-thiobarbituric acid numbers and a significant decrease in residual nitrite during storage. Sensory studies carried out by a trained panel indicated that these samples developed some mild off-flavours, which diminished as the storage time increased, and showed good overall acceptance. Studies to introduce a further safety factor, by adding sodium propionate, are currently in progress. (author)

  1. Crystal structure of Clostridium botulinum whole hemagglutinin reveals a huge triskelion-shaped molecular complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amatsu, Sho; Sugawara, Yo; Matsumura, Takuhiro; Kitadokoro, Kengo; Fujinaga, Yukako

    2013-12-06

    Clostridium botulinum HA is a component of the large botulinum neurotoxin complex and is critical for its oral toxicity. HA plays multiple roles in toxin penetration in the gastrointestinal tract, including protection from the digestive environment, binding to the intestinal mucosal surface, and disruption of the epithelial barrier. At least two properties of HA contribute to these roles: the sugar-binding activity and the barrier-disrupting activity that depends on E-cadherin binding of HA. HA consists of three different proteins, HA1, HA2, and HA3, whose structures have been partially solved and are made up mainly of β-strands. Here, we demonstrate structural and functional reconstitution of whole HA and present the complete structure of HA of serotype B determined by x-ray crystallography at 3.5 Å resolution. This structure reveals whole HA to be a huge triskelion-shaped molecule. Our results suggest that whole HA is functionally and structurally separable into two parts: HA1, involved in recognition of cell-surface carbohydrates, and HA2-HA3, involved in paracellular barrier disruption by E-cadherin binding.

  2. Clostridium botulinum strains producing BoNT/F4 or BoNT/F5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raphael, Brian H; Bradshaw, Marite; Kalb, Suzanne R; Joseph, Lavin A; Lúquez, Carolina; Barr, John R; Johnson, Eric A; Maslanka, Susan E

    2014-05-01

    Botulinum neurotoxin type F (BoNT/F) may be produced by Clostridium botulinum alone or in combination with another toxin type such as BoNT/A or BoNT/B. Type F neurotoxin gene sequences have been further classified into seven toxin subtypes. Recently, the genome sequence of one strain of C. botulinum (Af84) was shown to contain three neurotoxin genes (bont/F4, bont/F5, and bont/A2). In this study, eight strains containing bont/F4 and seven strains containing bont/F5 were examined. Culture supernatants produced by these strains were incubated with BoNT/F-specific peptide substrates. Cleavage products of these peptides were subjected to mass spectral analysis, allowing detection of the BoNT/F subtypes present in the culture supernatants. PCR analysis demonstrated that a plasmid-specific marker (PL-6) was observed only among strains containing bont/F5. Among these strains, Southern hybridization revealed the presence of an approximately 242-kb plasmid harboring bont/F5. Genome sequencing of four of these strains revealed that the genomic backgrounds of strains harboring either bont/F4 or bont/F5 are diverse. None of the strains analyzed in this study were shown to produce BoNT/F4 and BoNT/F5 simultaneously, suggesting that strain Af84 is unusual. Finally, these data support a role for the mobility of a bont/F5-carrying plasmid among strains of diverse genomic backgrounds.

  3. Preliminary X-ray crystallographic study of the receptor-binding domain of the D/C mosaic neurotoxin from Clostridium botulinum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuemket, Nipawan; Tanaka, Yoshikazu; Tsukamoto, Kentaro; Tsuji, Takao; Nakamura, Keiji; Kozaki, Shunji; Yao, Min; Tanaka, Isao

    2010-01-01

    To determine the binding mechanism of BoNT/OFD05 and its ganglioside receptors on neuronal cells, recombinant BoNT/OFD05 receptor-binding domain has been expressed, purified and crystallized. Botulinum toxin (BoNT) from Clostridium botulinum OFD05, isolated from bovine botulism, is a D/C mosaic-type BoNT. BoNTs possess binding, translocation and catalytic domains. The BoNT/OFD05 binding domain exhibits significant sequence identity to BoNT/C, which requires a single ganglioside as a binding receptor on neuronal cells, while BoNT/A and BoNT/B require two receptors for specific binding. To determine the binding mechanism of BoNT/OFD05 and its ganglioside receptors on neuronal cells, recombinant BoNT/OFD05 receptor-binding domain has been expressed, purified and crystallized. Native and SeMet-derivative crystals showed X-ray diffraction to 2.8 and 3.1 Å resolution, respectively. The crystals belonged to space group P2 1 2 1 2 1

  4. Effect of Cultured Celery Juice, Temperature, and Product Composition on the Inhibition of Proteolytic Clostridium botulinum Toxin Production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golden, Max C; Wanless, Brandon J; David, Jairus R D; Kottapalli, Bala; Lineback, D Scott; Talley, Ryan J; Glass, Kathleen A

    2017-08-01

    Clostridium botulinum may be of concern in prepared refrigerated meals, for which strict cold chain management cannot be guaranteed. This study evaluated the effect of temperature, product composition, and cultured celery juice powder (CCJP) as a source of nitrite on the inhibition of botulinum toxin formation in two experimental (meat- and vegetable-based) prepared meals. Data obtained from the challenge study were compared with a published mathematical model to determine whether the model is fail-safe with regard to the tested meals. Treatments were inoculated with proteolytic C. botulinum, vacuum packaged, cooked at 90°C for 10 min, and assayed for botulinum toxin at appropriate intervals in samples stored at 10, 15, or 20°C for up to 8 weeks. None of the treatments stored at 10°C for 8 weeks supported toxin production by proteolytic C. botulinum. The addition of CCJP delayed toxin production by 1 and 3 weeks in cauliflower potatoes and in Dijon pork, respectively, stored at 15°C. Toxin production was delayed by 1 week at 20°C when CCJP was added to the cauliflower potatoes. This study found that the predictive model was fail-safe but was overly conservative for the experimental meals described. Finally, this study confirms that product composition, the addition of nitrite via CCJP, storage time, and temperature play important roles in the inhibition of toxin formation by proteolytic C. botulinum.

  5. Growth of and toxin production by nonproteolytic Clostridium botulinum in cooked puréed vegetables at refrigeration temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlin, F; Peck, M W

    1996-01-01

    Seven strains of nonproteolytic Clostridium botulinum (types B, E, and F) were each inoculated into a range of anaerobic cooked puréed vegetables. After incubation at 10 degrees C for 15 to 60 days, all seven strains formed toxin in mushrooms, five did so in broccoli, four did so in cauliflower, three did so in asparagus, and one did so in kale. Growth kinetics of nonproteolytic C. botulinum type B in cooked mushrooms, cauliflower, and potatoes were determined at 16, 10, 8, and 5 degrees C. Growth and toxin production occurred in cooked cauliflower and mushrooms at all temperatures and in potatoes at 16 and 8 degrees C. The C. botulinum neurotoxin was detected within 3 to 5 days at 16 degrees C, 11 to 13 days at 10 degrees C, 10 to 34 days at 8 degrees C, and 17 to 20 days at 5 degrees C. PMID:8702303

  6. Detection of Clostridium botulinum type C cells in the gastrointestinal tracts of Mozambique tilapia (Oreochromis mossambicus) by polymerase chain reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nol, P.; Williamson, J.L.; Rocke, T.E.; Yuill, Thomas M.

    2004-01-01

    We established a method of directly detecting Clostridium botulinum type C cells, while minimizing spore detection, in the intestinal contents of Mozambique tilapia (Oreochromis mossambicus). This technique involved extraction of predominantly cellular DNA from tilapia intestinal tracts and used a polymerase chain reaction assay to detect presence of type C1 toxin gene. We consistently detected C. botulinum type C cells in tilapia gastrointestinal contents at a level of 7.5×104 cells per 0.25 g material or 1.9×103 cells. This technique is useful for determining prevalence of the potentially active organisms within a given population of fish and may be adapted to other types of C. botulinum and vertebrate populations as well.

  7. Detection and confirmation of Clostridium botulinum in water used for cooling at a plant producing low-acid canned foods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sachdeva, Amita; Defibaugh-Chávez, Stephanie L H; Day, James B; Zink, Donald; Sharma, Shashi K

    2010-11-01

    Our laboratory tested water samples used for cooling low-acid canned foods at a canning facility under investigation by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. We used an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay with digoxigenin-labeled antibodies (DIG-ELISA) and real-time PCR as screening methods and confirmed the presence of neurotoxin-producing Clostridium botulinum in the samples by mouse bioassay.

  8. Detection and Confirmation of Clostridium botulinum in Water Used for Cooling at a Plant Producing Low-Acid Canned Foods▿

    OpenAIRE

    Sachdeva, Amita; Defibaugh-Chávez, Stephanie L. H.; Day, James B.; Zink, Donald; Sharma, Shashi K.

    2010-01-01

    Our laboratory tested water samples used for cooling low-acid canned foods at a canning facility under investigation by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. We used an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay with digoxigenin-labeled antibodies (DIG-ELISA) and real-time PCR as screening methods and confirmed the presence of neurotoxin-producing Clostridium botulinum in the samples by mouse bioassay.

  9. Occurrence and distribution of Vibrio spp., Listonella spp., and Clostridium botulinum in the Seto Inland Sea of Japan.

    OpenAIRE

    Venkateswaran, K; Nakano, H; Okabe, T; Takayama, K; Matsuda, O; Hashimoto, H

    1989-01-01

    The distribution of Vibrio species in samples of surface water, bottom water (water 2 m above the sediment), and sediment from the Seto Inland Sea was studied. A simple technique using a membrane filter and short preenrichment in alkaline peptone water was developed to resuscitate the injured cells, followed by plating them onto TCBS agar. In addition, a survey was conducted to determine the incidence of Clostridium botulinum in sediment samples. Large populations of heterotrophs were found i...

  10. Effects of gamma radiation on Clostridium botulinum type E under various parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, Y.H.

    1986-01-01

    Spores of Clostridium botulinum type E strain Eklund (Eklund) was irradiated with gamma radiation and its recovery was tested on the tryptone-peptone-glucose-yeast extract-agar (TPGYA) containing various levels of NaCl and Na-thioglycollate. The presence of 0.5% or more NaCl in the media decreased the viable counts, while Na-thioglycollate of up to 0.15% did not affect the recovery of both irradiated and non-irradiated spores. Eklund spores were also irradiated under air (21% O 2 ), N 2 O and N 2 , with or without the additive of one of the following agents (additive/concentration): disodium ethylenediaminetetraacetate (EDTA), 0.01 M; t-butanol, 0.1 M; NaCl, 0.01 M; catalyze, 10 mg/ml and DL-cysteine, 0.1 mM. Radiation process was most effective in destroying the spores when carried out under air (21% O 2 ), followed by N 2 O and N 2 . Among the additives tested, EDTA was the most efficient protector followed by t-butanol when irradiation process was carried under N 2 O and N 2 gas environment. Catalase and DL-cysteine sensitized the spores when irradiated under N 2 O and N 2 , while NaCl only sensitized under N 2 . Spores kept frozen at -75 0 C for 30 days but thawed prior to irradiation were more sensitive to radiation damage than freshly prepared spores. Radiation resistance of the spores increased when 15% glycerol was added to the phosphate bugger (0.06 M, pH 7.0) and used as suspending media. When the concentration of the spore increased from 10 6 /ml to 10 11 /ml, the radiosensitivities also increased. Seven strains of C. botulinum type E were screened for plasmids by agarose gel electrophoresis

  11. A history of study on safety of irradiated foods (2). Clostridium botulinum in irradiated seafood from the reports by the United States Atomic Energy Commission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyahara, Makoto

    2004-01-01

    This review is a part of ''history of study on the wholesomeness of irradiated foods''. Clostridium botulinum in irradiated seafood have been of great concern at the beginning of development of irradiated food. This review describes the studies on Clostridium botulinum by US. Atomic Energy Commission in 1960's with their data and what they recognized it as a risk factor of irradiated foods. In 1999 FAO/IAEA/WHO reported that Clostridium botulinum type A and B spors are apparently the most resistant and thus of great concern in the radiation sterilization of food, whereas the less radiation-resistant type E spores are important in low dose irradiation of foods, particularly fishery products. This review also describes current break-through application by NASA and Canadian irradiator. (author)

  12. In vitro reconstitution of the Clostridium botulinum type D progenitor toxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouguchi, Hirokazu; Watanabe, Toshihiro; Sagane, Yoshimasa; Sunagawa, Hiroyuki; Ohyama, Tohru

    2002-01-25

    Clostridium botulinum type D strain 4947 produces two different sizes of progenitor toxins (M and L) as intact forms without proteolytic processing. The M toxin is composed of neurotoxin (NT) and nontoxic-nonhemagglutinin (NTNHA), whereas the L toxin is composed of the M toxin and hemagglutinin (HA) subcomponents (HA-70, HA-17, and HA-33). The HA-70 subcomponent and the HA-33/17 complex were isolated from the L toxin to near homogeneity by chromatography in the presence of denaturing agents. We were able to demonstrate, for the first time, in vitro reconstitution of the L toxin formed by mixing purified M toxin, HA-70, and HA-33/17. The properties of reconstituted and native L toxins are indistinguishable with respect to their gel filtration profiles, native-PAGE profiles, hemagglutination activity, binding activity to erythrocytes, and oral toxicity to mice. M toxin, which contained nicked NTNHA prepared by treatment with trypsin, could no longer be reconstituted to the L toxin with HA subcomponents, whereas the L toxin treated with proteases was not degraded into M toxin and HA subcomponents. We conclude that the M toxin forms first by assembly of NT with NTNHA and is subsequently converted to the L toxin by assembly with HA-70 and HA-33/17.

  13. Amino acid residues involved in membrane insertion and pore formation of Clostridium botulinum C2 toxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Alexander E; Neumeyer, Tobias; Sun, Jianjun; Collier, R John; Benz, Roland; Aktories, Klaus

    2008-08-12

    The actin-ADP-ribosylating Clostridium botulinum C2 toxin consists of the enzymatic component C2I and the binding component C2II. C2II forms heptameric channels involved in translocation of the enzymatic component into the target cell. On the basis of the heptameric toxin channel, we studied functional consequences of mutagenesis of amino acid residues probably lining the lumen of the toxin channel. Substitution of glutamate-399 of C2II with alanine blocked channel formation and cytotoxicity of the holotoxin. Although cytotoxicity and rounding up of cells by C2I were completely blocked by exchange of phenylalanine-428 with alanine, the mutation increased potassium conductance caused by C2II in artificial membranes by about 2-3-fold over that of wild-type toxin. In contrast to its effects on single-channel potassium conductance in artificial membranes, the F428A mutation delayed the kinetics of pore formation in lipid vesicles and inhibited the activity of C2II in promoting (86)Rb (+) release from preloaded intact cells after pH shift of the medium. Moreover, F428A C2II exhibited delayed and diminished formation of C2II aggregates at low pH, indicating major changes of the biophysical properties of the toxin. The data indicate that phenylalanine-428 of C2II plays a major role in conformational changes occurring during pore formation of the binding component of C2II.

  14. Feedtrough dirt as a source of Clostridium botulinum type C intoxication in a group of farm horses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heath, Sebastian E.; Bell, Roxy J.; Chirino-Trejo, Manuel; Schuh, JoAnne C.L.; Harland, Richard J.

    1990-01-01

    Four horses from the same farm developed clinical signs of botulism during the winter months; three of these horses died. One horse survived an initial attack and recovered over a three-week period, but died during a second attack. The horse that survived took six weeks to recover. Clinical and postmortem examination ruled out other causes of disease. Confirmation of the diagnosis was made by isolation of Clostridium botulinum type C toxin from the dirt in the bottom of an oak feedtrough used by all horses, and from the colonic contents of one of the horses that died. To our knowledge, this is the second case of C. botulinum type C intoxication reported in horses in North America. In both cases, soil and sand near aquatic environments were identified as the source of toxin. PMID:17423488

  15. Effect of headspace CO2 concentration on toxin production by Clostridium botulinum in MAP, irradiated fresh pork

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lambert, A.D.; Smith, J.P.; Dodds, K.L.

    1991-01-01

    The effects of five initial levels of CO2 (15, 30, 45, 60, and 75%) and three irradiation doses (0, 0.5, and 1.0 kGy) on toxin production by Clostridium botulinum in inoculated fresh pork were studied using factorial design experiments. Headspace CO2 levels increased in all samples during storage at 15 degrees C. In most treatments, spoilage preceded toxigenesis. Toxin production occurred faster in samples initially packaged with 15 to 30% of CO2 while higher levels of CO2 (45-75%) delayed toxin production. Low-dose irradiation delayed toxin production at all levels of CO2 in the package headspace. Contrary to expectations, including a CO2 absorbent in the package enhanced toxin production by C. botulinum. This was attributed to production of H2 by the CO2 absorbent, possibly resulting in a decrease in the oxido-reduction potential of the meat

  16. Prevalence of neurotoxic Clostridium botulinum type C in the gastrointestinal tracts of tilapia (Oreochromis mossambicus) in the Salton Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nol, P; Rocke, T E; Gross, K; Yuill, T M

    2004-07-01

    Tilapia (Oreochromis mossambicus) have been implicated as the source of type C toxin in avian botulism outbreaks in pelicans (Pelecanus erythrorhynchos, Pelecanus occidentalis californicus) at the Salton Sea in southern California (USA). We collected sick, dead, and healthy fish from various sites throughout the Sea during the summers of 1999 through 2001 and tested them for the presence of Clostridium botulinum type C cells by polymerase chain reaction targeting the C(1) neurotoxin gene. Four of 96 (4%), 57 of 664 (9%), and five of 355 (1%) tilapia tested were positive for C. botulinum type C toxin gene in 1999, 2000, and 2001, respectively. The total number of positive fish was significantly greater in 2000 than in 2001 (P<0.0001). No difference in numbers of positives was detected between sick and dead fish compared with live fish. In 2000, no significant relationships were revealed among the variables studied, such as location and date of collection.

  17. Three enzymatically active neurotoxins of Clostridium botulinum strain Af84: BoNT/A2, /F4, and /F5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalb, Suzanne R; Baudys, Jakub; Smith, Theresa J; Smith, Leonard A; Barr, John R

    2014-04-01

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) are produced by various species of clostridia and are potent neurotoxins which cause the disease botulism, by cleaving proteins needed for successful nerve transmission. There are currently seven confirmed serotypes of BoNTs, labeled A-G, and toxin-producing clostridia typically only produce one serotype of BoNT. There are a few strains (bivalent strains) which are known to produce more than one serotype of BoNT, producing either both BoNT/A and /B, BoNT/A and /F, or BoNT/B and /F, designated as Ab, Ba, Af, or Bf. Recently, it was reported that Clostridium botulinum strain Af84 has three neurotoxin gene clusters: bont/A2, bont/F4, and bont/F5. This was the first report of a clostridial organism containing more than two neurotoxin gene clusters. Using a mass spectrometry based proteomics approach, we report here that all three neurotoxins, BoNT/A2, /F4, and /F5, are produced by C. botulinum Af84. Label free MS(E) quantification of the three toxins indicated that toxin composition is 88% BoNT/A2, 1% BoNT/F4, and 11% BoNT/F5. The enzymatic activity of all three neurotoxins was assessed by examining the enzymatic activity of the neurotoxins upon peptide substrates, which mimic the toxins' natural targets, and monitoring cleavage of the substrates by mass spectrometry. We determined that all three neurotoxins are enzymatically active. This is the first report of three enzymatically active neurotoxins produced in a single strain of Clostridium botulinum.

  18. Produção e caracterização de quimeras recombinantes C e D de Clostridium botulinum

    OpenAIRE

    Gil, Luciana Aquini Fernandes

    2012-01-01

    O botulismo bovino é uma intoxicação letal causada pela ingestão da neurotoxina produzida pelo Clostridium botulinum principalmente dos tipos C e D que atua inibindo a liberação de acetilcolina na junção neuromuscular levando à morte por paralisia flácida, com grande importância econômica e sanitária, sendo uma das principais causas de morte em bovinos adultos no Brasil. O controle imunológico do botulismo bovino depende da presença de anticorpos neutralizantes contra as neurotoxinas botul...

  19. Morphological and genetic characterization of group I Clostridium botulinum type B strain 111 and the transcriptional regulator spoIIID gene knockout mutant in sporulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosomi, Koji; Kuwana, Ritsuko; Takamatsu, Hiromu; Kohda, Tomoko; Kozaki, Shunji; Mukamoto, Masafumi

    2015-06-01

    Clostridium botulinum is a heat-resistant spore-forming bacterium that causes the serious paralytic illness botulism. Heat-resistant spores may cause food sanitation hazards and sporulation plays a central role in the survival of C. botulinum. We observed morphological changes and investigated the role of the transcriptional regulator SpoIIID in the sporulation of C. botulinum type B strain 111 in order to elucidate the molecular mechanism in C. botulinum. C. botulinum type B formed heat-resistant spores through successive morphological changes corresponding to those of Bacillus subtilis, a spore-forming model organism. An analysis of the spoIIID gene knockout mutant revealed that the transcriptional regulator SpoIIID contributed to heat-resistant spore formation by C. botulinum type B and activated the transcription of the sigK gene later during sporulation. Transcription of the spoIIID gene, which differed from that in B. subtilis and Clostridium difficile, was observed in the sigE gene knockout mutant of C. botulinum type B. An analysis of the sigF gene knockout mutant showed that the sporulation-specific sigma factor SigF was essential for transcription of the spoIIID gene in C. botulinum type B. These results suggest that the regulation of sporulation in C. botulinum is not similar to that in B. subtilis and other clostridia. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of dihydrodipicolinate synthase from Clostridium botulinum in the presence of its substrate pyruvate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atkinson, Sarah C.; Dobson, Renwick C. J.; Newman, Janet M.; Gorman, Michael A.; Dogovski, Con; Parker, Michael W.; Perugini, Matthew A.

    2009-01-01

    Dihydrodipicolinate synthase (DHDPS) catalyzes an important step in lysine biosynthesis. Here, the crystallization and preliminary diffraction analysis to 1.2 Å resolution of DHDPS from C. botulinum in the presence of its substrate pyruvate is reported. In this paper, the crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis to near-atomic resolution of DHDPS from Clostridium botulinum crystallized in the presence of its substrate pyruvate are presented. The enzyme crystallized in a number of forms using a variety of PEG precipitants, with the best crystal diffracting to 1.2 Å resolution and belonging to space group C2, in contrast to the unbound form, which had trigonal symmetry. The unit-cell parameters were a = 143.4, b = 54.8, c = 94.3 Å, β = 126.3°. The crystal volume per protein weight (V M ) was 2.3 Å 3 Da −1 (based on the presence of two monomers in the asymmetric unit), with an estimated solvent content of 46%. The high-resolution structure of the pyruvate-bound form of C. botulinum DHDPS will provide insight into the function and stability of this essential bacterial enzyme

  1. Clostridium botulinum serotype D neurotoxin and toxin complex bind to bovine aortic endothelial cells via sialic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoneyama, Tohru; Miyata, Keita; Chikai, Tomoyuki; Mikami, Akifumi; Suzuki, Tomonori; Hasegawa, Kimiko; Ikeda, Toshihiko; Watanabe, Toshihiro; Ohyama, Tohru; Niwa, Koichi

    2008-12-01

    Botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT) is produced as a large toxin complex (L-TC) associated with nontoxic nonhemagglutinin (NTNHA) and three hemagglutinin subcomponents (HA-70, -33 and -17). The binding properties of BoNT to neurons and L-TC to intestinal epithelial cells are well documented, while those to other tissues are largely unknown. Here, to obtain novel insights into the pathogenesis of foodborne botulism, we examine whether botulinum toxins bind to vascular endothelial cells. BoNT and 750 kDa L-TC (a complex of BoNT, NTNHA and HAs) of Clostridium botulinum serotype D were incubated with bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAECs), and binding to the cells was assessed using sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and Western blot. Both BoNT and L-TC bound to BAECs, with L-TC showing stronger binding. Binding of BoNT and L-TC to BAECs was significantly inhibited by N-acetyl neuraminic acid in the cell culture medium or by treatment of the cells with neuraminidase. However, galactose, lactose or N-acetyl galactosamine did not significantly inhibit toxin binding to the cells. This is the first report demonstrating that BoNT and L-TC bind to BAECs via sialic acid, and this mechanism may be important in the trafficking pathway of BoNT in foodborne botulism.

  2. Theoretical and Applied Aspects of Radiation D-Values for Spores of Clostridium Botulinum; Aspects Theoriques et Pratiques des Valeurs D de Rayonnement Appliquees aux Spores de Clostridium Botulinum; Teoreticheskie i prikladnye aspekty koehffitsienta izlucheniya odlya spor Clostridium Botulinum; Aspectos Teoricos y Practicos de los Valores D para Esporas del Clostridium Botulinum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grecz, N. [Biophysics Laboratory, Illinois Institute Of Technology, Chicago, IL (United States)

    1966-11-15

    peroxilo y perhidroxilo). Las variaciones de los valores D{sub 10} de una determinada cepa motivadas por diversas condiciones ambientales pueden relacionarse con los efectos indirectos, en tanto que las variaciones en los valores Dio entre una cepa y otra en condiciones normalizadas se relacionan con la cantidad y la estructura del ADN nucleoide de las esporas. A este respecto, todas las cepas del C. botulinum estudiadas hasta la fecha pueden ser clasificadas provisionalmente en tres grupos. El grupo 1 comprende las cepas (A, B y E); con valores D de 0,13 Mrad aproximadamente o menores. Estas esporas proporcionan curvas de activacion de impacto unico, y probablemente tienen un solo cromosoma, con una probabilidad muy baja de autorregeneracion. El grupo 2 comprende las cepas 12885A, 62A, 77A y 9B, cuyo valor D{sub 10} es del orden de 0,23 Mrad. Los datos de que se dispone sobre los blancos sugieren que esas esporas poseen un solo cromosoma de 900 {mu}m con un factor de autorregeneracion de 13. El grupo 3 comprende las cepas sumamente resistentes 33A, 36A, 40B, 41B y 53B, siendo el correspondiente valor D{sub 10} =0,33 Mrad. Los datos de que se dispone sobre los blancos sugieren que estas esporas poseen dos cromosomas de 900 {mu} cada una, con un factor de autorregeneracion (N) comprendido entre 80 y 90, es decir, N = 13{sup 2}/2. (author) [Russian] Ustanovleno, chto spory iClostridium botulinum. imejut ravnuju ili bol'shuju stojkost' k vozdejstviju ionizirujushhih izluchenij, chem spory drugih netoksichnyh organizmov, portjashhih produkty. Po jetoj prichine standarty mikrobiologicheskoj obrabotki v celjah konservacii produktov s pomoshh'ju izluchenij neizmenno svjazyvalis' so stojkost'ju spor S. botulinum k vozdejstviju izluchenij. Kojefficient radiostojkosti predstavljaet soboj znachenie D{sub 10} , opredeljaemoe kak doza, neobhodimaja dlja odnogo cikla 90% inaktivacii odnoj populjacii, i 12-D bylo proizvol'no opredeleno, kak bezopasnaja doza obluchenija dlja sohranenija

  3. Camelid-derived heavy-chain nanobody against Clostridium botulinum neurotoxin E in Pichia pastoris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baghban, Roghayyeh; Gargari, Seyed Latif Mousavi; Rajabibazl, Masoumeh; Nazarian, Shahram; Bakherad, Hamid

    2016-01-01

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) result in severe and often fatal disease, botulism. Common remedial measures such as equine antitoxin and human botulism immunoglobulin in turn are problematic and time-consuming. Therefore, diagnosis and therapy of BoNTs are vital. The variable domain of heavy-chain antibodies (VHH) has unique features, such as the ability to identify and bind specifically to target epitopes and ease of production in bacteria and yeast. The Pichia pastoris is suitable for expression of recombinant antibody fragments. Disulfide bond formation and correct folds of protein with a high yield are some of the advantages of this eukaryotic host. In this study, we have expressed and purified the camelid VHH against BoNT/E in P. pastoris. The final yield of P. pastoris-expressed antibody was estimated to be 16 mg/l, which is higher than that expressed by Escherichia coli. The nanobody expressed in P. pastoris neutralized 4LD50 of the BoNT/E upon i.p. injection in 25% of mice. The nanobody expressed in E. coli extended the mice's survival to 1.5-fold compared to the control. This experiment indicated that the quality of expressed protein in the yeast is superior to that of the bacterial expression. Favorable protein folding by P. pastoris seems to play a role in its better toxin-binding property. © 2014 International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  4. Structure-function discrepancy in Clostridium botulinum C3 toxin for its rational prioritization as a subunit vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prathiviraj, R; Prisilla, A; Chellapandi, P

    2016-06-01

    Clostridium botulinum is anaerobic pathogenic bacterium causing food-born botulism in human and animals by producing botulinum neurotoxins A-H, C2, and C3 cytotoxins. Physiological group III strains (type C and D) of this bacterium are capable of producing C2 and C3 toxins in cattle and avian. Herein, we have revealed the structure-function disparity of C3 toxins from two different C. botulinum type C phage (CboC) and type D phage (CboD) to design avirulent toxins rationally. Structure-function discrepancy of the both toxins was computationally evaluated from their homology models based on the conservation in sequence-structure-function relationships upon covariation and point mutations. It has shown that 8 avirulent mutants were generated from CboC of 34 mutants while 27 avirulent mutants resulted from CboD mutants. No major changes were found in tertiary structure of these toxins; however, some structural variations appeared in the coiled and loop regions. Correlated mutation on the first residue would disorder or revolutionize the hydrogen bonding pattern of the coevolved pairs. It suggested that the residues coupling in the local structural environments were compensated with coevolved pairs so as to preserve a pseudocatalytic function in the avirulent mutants. Avirulent mutants of C3 toxins have shown a stable structure with a common blue print of folding process and also attained a near-native backrub ensemble. Thus, we concluded that selecting the site-directed mutagenesis sites are very important criteria for designing avirulent toxins, in development of rational subunit vaccines, to cattle and avian, but the vaccine specificity can be determined by the C3 toxins of C. botulinum harboring phages.

  5. Structure and action of the binary C2 toxin from Clostridium botulinum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schleberger, Christian; Hochmann, Henrike; Barth, Holger; Aktories, Klaus; Schulz, Georg E

    2006-12-08

    C2 toxin from Clostridium botulinum is composed of the enzyme component C2-I, which ADP-ribosylates actin, and the binding and translocation component C2-II, responsible for the interaction with eukaryotic cell receptors and the following endocytosis. Three C2-I crystal structures at resolutions of up to 1.75 A are presented together with a crystal structure of C2-II at an appreciably lower resolution and a model of the prepore formed by fragment C2-IIa. The C2-I structure was determined at pH 3.0 and at pH 6.1. The structural differences are small, indicating that C2-I does not unfold, even at a pH value as low as 3.0. The ADP-ribosyl transferase activity of C2-I was determined for alpha and beta/gamma-actin and related to that of Iota toxin and of mutant S361R of C2-I that introduced the arginine observed in Iota toxin. The substantial activity differences between alpha and beta/gamma-actin cannot be explained by the protein structures currently available. The structure of the transport component C2-II at pH 4.3 was established by molecular replacement using a model of the protective antigen of anthrax toxin at pH 6.0. The C-terminal receptor-binding domain of C2-II could not be located but was present in the crystals. It may be mobile. The relative orientation and positions of the four other domains of C2-II do not differ much from those of the protective antigen, indicating that no large conformational changes occur between pH 4.3 and pH 6.0. A model of the C2-IIa prepore structure was constructed based on the corresponding assembly of the protective antigen. It revealed a surprisingly large number of asparagine residues lining the pore. The interaction between C2-I and C2-IIa and the translocation of C2-I into the target cell are discussed.

  6. Alternative Sigma Factors SigF, SigE, and SigG Are Essential for Sporulation in Clostridium botulinum ATCC 3502

    OpenAIRE

    Kirk, David G.; Zhang, Zhen; Korkeala, Hannu; Lindström, Miia

    2014-01-01

    Clostridium botulinum produces heat-resistant endospores that may germinate and outgrow into neurotoxic cultures in foods. Sporulation is regulated by the transcription factor Spo0A and the alternative sigma factors SigF, SigE, SigG, and SigK in most spore formers studied to date. We constructed mutants of sigF, sigE, and sigG in C. botulinum ATCC 3502 and used quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR and electron microscopy to assess their expression of the sporulation pathway on transcription...

  7. Structural Studies on Intact Clostridium Botulinum Neurotoxins Complexed with Inhibitors Leading to Drug Design

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Swaminathan, Subramanyam

    2005-01-01

    .... While one is common to botulinum toxins, the other is unique for tetanus. The second unique site also binds a tri-peptide which suggests that this peptide could be used as an inhibitor for tetanus, at least...

  8. Identification of RNA species in the RNA-toxin complex and structure of the complex in Clostridium botulinum type E.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitamura, Masaru

    2002-02-15

    Clostridium botulinum type E toxin was isolated in the form of a complex with RNA(s) from bacterial cells. Characterization of the complexed RNA remains to be elucidated. The RNA is identified here as ribosomal RNA (rRNA) having 23S and 16S components. The RNA-toxin complexes were found to be made up of three types with different molecular sizes. The three types of RNA-toxin complex are toxin bound to both the 23S and 16S rRNA, toxin bound to the 16S rRNA and a small amount of 23S rRNA, and toxin bound only to the 16S rRNA. ©2002 Elsevier Science (USA).

  9. Prevalence of neurotoxic Clostridium botulinum type C in the gastrointestinal tracts of tilapis (Oreochromis mossambicus) in the Salton Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nol, P.J.; Rocke, T.E.; Gross, K.; Yuill, Thomas M.

    2004-01-01

    Tilapia (Oreochromis mossambicus) have been implicated as the source of type C toxin in avian botulism outbreaks in pelicans (Pelecanus erythrorhynchos, Pelecanus occidentalis californicus) at the Salton Sea in southern California (USA). We collected sick, dead, and healthy fish from various sites throughout the Sea during the summers of 1999 through 2001 and tested them for the presence of Clostridium botulinum type C cells by polymerase chain reaction targeting the C1 neurotoxin gene. Four of 96 (4%), 57 of 664 (9%), and five of 355 (1%) tilapia tested were positive for C. botulinum type C toxin gene in 1999, 2000, and 2001, respectively. The total number of positive fish was significantly greater in 2000 than in 2001 (P<0.0001). No difference in numbers of positives was detected between sick and dead fish compared with live fish. In 2000, no significant relationships were revealed among the variables studied, such as location and date of collection.

  10. Science, practice, and human errors in controlling Clostridium botulinum in heat-preserved food in hermetic containers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pflug, Irving J

    2010-05-01

    The incidence of botulism in canned food in the last century is reviewed along with the background science; a few conclusions are reached based on analysis of published data. There are two primary aspects to botulism control: the design of an adequate process and the delivery of the adequate process to containers of food. The probability that the designed process will not be adequate to control Clostridium botulinum is very small, probably less than 1.0 x 10(-6), based on containers of food, whereas the failure of the operator of the processing equipment to deliver the specified process to containers of food may be of the order of 1 in 40, to 1 in 100, based on processing units (retort loads). In the commercial food canning industry, failure to deliver the process will probably be of the order of 1.0 x 10(-4) to 1.0 x 10(-6) when U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) regulations are followed. Botulism incidents have occurred in food canning plants that have not followed the FDA regulations. It is possible but very rare to have botulism result from postprocessing contamination. It may thus be concluded that botulism incidents in canned food are primarily the result of human failure in the delivery of the designed or specified process to containers of food that, in turn, result in the survival, outgrowth, and toxin production of C. botulinum spores. Therefore, efforts in C. botulinum control should be concentrated on reducing human errors in the delivery of the specified process to containers of food.

  11. Structure, Function and Evolution of Clostridium botulinum C2 and C3 Toxins: Insight to Poultry and Veterinary Vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chellapandi, Paulchamy; Prisilla, Arokiyasamy

    2017-01-01

    Clostridium botulinum group III strains are able to produce cytotoxins, C2 toxin and C3 exotoxin, along with botulinum neurotoxin types C and D. C2 toxin and C3 exotoxin produced by this organism are the most important members of bacterial ADP-ribosyltransferase superfamily. Both toxins have distinct pathophysiological functions in the avian and mammalian hosts. The members of this superfamily transfer an ADP-ribose moiety of NAD+ to specific eukaryotic target proteins. The present review describes the structure, function and evolution aspects of these toxins with a special emphasis to the development of veterinary vaccines. C2 toxin is a binary toxin that consists of a catalytic subunit (C2I) and a translocation subunit (C2II). C2I component is structurally and functionally similar to the VIP2 and iota A toxin whereas C2II component shows a significant homology with the protective antigen from anthrax toxin and iota B. Unlike C2 toxin, C3 toxin is devoid of translocation/binding subunit. Extensive studies on their sequence-structure-function link spawn additional efforts to understand the catalytic mechanisms and target recognition. Structural and functional relationships with them are often determined by using evolutionary constraints as valuable biological measures. Enzyme-deficient mutants derived from these toxins have been used as drug/protein delivery systems in eukaryotic cells. Thus, current knowledge on their molecular diversity is a well-known perspective to design immunotoxin or subunit vaccine for C. botulinum infection. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  12. Heat shock and prolonged heat stress attenuate neurotoxin and sporulation gene expression in group I Clostridium botulinum strain ATCC 3502.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selby, Katja; Mascher, Gerald; Somervuo, Panu; Lindström, Miia; Korkeala, Hannu

    2017-01-01

    Foodborne pathogenic bacteria are exposed to a number of environmental stresses during food processing, storage, and preparation, and in the human body. In order to improve the safety of food, the understanding of molecular stress response mechanisms foodborne pathogens employ is essential. Many response mechanisms that are activated during heat shock may cross-protect bacteria against other environmental stresses. To better understand the molecular mechanisms Clostridium botulinum, the causative agent of botulism, utilizes during acute heat stress and during adaptation to stressfully high temperature, the C. botulinum Group I strain ATCC 3502 was grown in continuous culture at 39°C and exposed to heat shock at 45°C, followed by prolonged heat stress at 45°C to allow adaptation of the culture to the high temperature. Growth in continuous culture was performed to exclude secondary growth phase effects or other environmental impacts on bacterial gene transcription. Changes in global gene expression profiles were studied using DNA microarray hybridization. During acute heat stress, Class I and III heat shock genes as well as members of the SOS regulon were activated. The neurotoxin gene botA and genes encoding the neurotoxin-associated proteins were suppressed throughout the study. Prolonged heat stress led to suppression of the sporulation machinery whereas genes related to chemotaxis and motility were activated. Induced expression of a large proportion of prophage genes was detected, suggesting an important role of acquired genes in the stress resistance of C. botulinum. Finally, changes in the expression of a large number of genes related to carbohydrate and amino acid metabolism indicated remodeling of the cellular metabolism.

  13. The orphan germinant receptor protein GerXAO (but not GerX3b) is essential for L-alanine induced germination in Clostridium botulinum Group II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunt, Jason; Carter, Andrew T; Pye, Hannah V; Peck, Michael W

    2018-05-04

    Clostridium botulinum is an anaerobic spore forming bacterium that produces the potent botulinum neurotoxin that causes a severe and fatal neuro-paralytic disease of humans and animals (botulism). C. botulinum Group II is a psychrotrophic saccharolytic bacterium that forms spores of moderate heat resistance and is a particular hazard in minimally heated chilled foods. Spore germination is a fundamental process that allows the spore to transition to a vegetative cell and typically involves a germinant receptor (GR) that responds to environmental signals. Analysis of C. botulinum Group II genomes shows they contain a single GR cluster (gerX3b), and an additional single gerA subunit (gerXAO). Spores of C. botulinum Group II strain Eklund 17B germinated in response to the addition of L-alanine, but did not germinate following the addition of exogenous Ca 2+ -DPA. Insertional inactivation experiments in this strain unexpectedly revealed that the orphan GR GerXAO is essential for L-alanine stimulated germination. GerX3bA and GerX3bC affected the germination rate but were unable to induce germination in the absence of GerXAO. No role could be identified for GerX3bB. This is the first study to identify the functional germination receptor of C. botulinum Group II.

  14. Development and application of a new method for specific and sensitive enumeration of spores of nonproteolytic Clostridium botulinum types B, E, and F in foods and food materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peck, Michael W; Plowman, June; Aldus, Clare F; Wyatt, Gary M; Izurieta, Walter Penaloza; Stringer, Sandra C; Barker, Gary C

    2010-10-01

    The highly potent botulinum neurotoxins are responsible for botulism, a severe neuroparalytic disease. Strains of nonproteolytic Clostridium botulinum form neurotoxins of types B, E, and F and are the main hazard associated with minimally heated refrigerated foods. Recent developments in quantitative microbiological risk assessment (QMRA) and food safety objectives (FSO) have made food safety more quantitative and include, as inputs, probability distributions for the contamination of food materials and foods. A new method that combines a selective enrichment culture with multiplex PCR has been developed and validated to enumerate specifically the spores of nonproteolytic C. botulinum. Key features of this new method include the following: (i) it is specific for nonproteolytic C. botulinum (and does not detect proteolytic C. botulinum), (ii) the detection limit has been determined for each food tested (using carefully structured control samples), and (iii) a low detection limit has been achieved by the use of selective enrichment and large test samples. The method has been used to enumerate spores of nonproteolytic C. botulinum in 637 samples of 19 food materials included in pasta-based minimally heated refrigerated foods and in 7 complete foods. A total of 32 samples (5 egg pastas and 27 scallops) contained spores of nonproteolytic C. botulinum type B or F. The majority of samples contained <100 spores/kg, but one sample of scallops contained 444 spores/kg. Nonproteolytic C. botulinum type E was not detected. Importantly, for QMRA and FSO, the construction of probability distributions will enable the frequency of packs containing particular levels of contamination to be determined.

  15. Contamination of honey produced in the Republic of Kazakhstan with Clostridium botulinum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafina Raikhan

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the first results of a study on the contamination of honey produced in the Republic of Kazakhstan with C. botulinum spores known to pose a potential infection threat to infants. During microbiological analysis, culturing methods with TPGY, Willis-Hobbs agar, FAA agar connected with PCR, sequencing, and a mouse bioassay were used. The C. botulinum contamination rate of honey was relatively low as determined, at 0.91%. Nonetheless, the potential danger of the bacteria to childrens’ health should not be neglected

  16. Egg yolk antibodies for detection and neutralization of Clostridium botulinum type A neurotoxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trott, D L; Yang, M; Gonzalez, J; Larson, A E; Tepp, W H; Johnson, E A; Cook, M E

    2009-05-01

    The objective of this research project was to determine the usefulness of an egg antibody platform for producing materials for the detection and neutralization of botulinum type A neurotoxin. Yield estimates for detection and neutralizing antibodies produced using methods described were calculated. Antibody specific to botulinum toxoid A (aToxoid) and toxin A (aBoNT/A) was produced by immunizing hens with botulinum toxoid A (toxoid) followed by increasing amounts of botulinum neurotoxin A (BoNT/A) in Freund incomplete adjuvant. Egg yolks were extracted with polyethylene glycol (PEG) for antibody detection and neutralization experiments. A model aToxoid/toxoid immunoassay using only egg yolk antibody was developed and had a detection limit of 1 pg/ml of toxoid. In an indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay of BoNT/A-specific antibody, the aBoNT/A contained more BoNT/A-specific antibody than did the aToxoid, and aBoNT/A was as effective as commercial rabbit antibody. The aToxoid provided no protection against BoNT/A in a standard mouse neutralization assay; however, 1 mg of PEG-extracted aBoNT/A neutralized 4,000 lethal doses of BoNT/A injected intraperitoneally. Based on these results, we calculated that in 1 month one hen could produce more than 100 liters of antibody detection reagents or enough antibody to neutralize approximately 11.6 million mouse lethal doses of botulinum toxin. Utilization of an egg antibody platform is potentially rapid (28 to 70 days) and scalable to kilogram quantities using current egg production facilities with as few as 1,000 hens.

  17. Inhibition of toxigenesis of group II (nonproteolytic) Clostridium botulinum type B in meat products by using a reduced level of nitrite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keto-Timonen, Riikka; Lindström, Miia; Puolanne, Eero; Niemistö, Markku; Korkeala, Hannu

    2012-07-01

    The effect of three different concentrations of sodium nitrite (0, 75, and 120 mg/kg) on growth and toxigenesis of group II (nonproteolytic) Clostridium botulinum type B was studied in Finnish wiener-type sausage, bologna-type sausage, and cooked ham. A low level of inoculum (2.0 log CFU/g) was used for wiener-type sausage and bologna-type sausage, and both low (2.0 log CFU/g) and high (4.0 log CFU/g) levels were used for cooked ham. The products were formulated and processed under simulated commercial conditions and stored at 8°C for 5 weeks. C. botulinum counts were determined in five replicate samples of each nitrite concentration at 1, 3, and 5 weeks after thermal processing. All samples were positive for C. botulinum type B. The highest C. botulinum counts were detected in nitrite-free products. Toxigenesis was observed in nitrite-free products during storage, but products containing either 75 or 120 mg/kg nitrite remained nontoxic during the 5-week study period, suggesting that spores surviving the heat treatment were unable to germinate and develop into a toxic culture in the presence of nitrite. The results suggest that the safety of processed meat products with respect to group II C. botulinum type B can be maintained even with a reduced concentration (75 mg/kg) of sodium nitrite.

  18. Bacterial spores as possible contaminants of biomedical materials and devices. [Bacillus anthracis, clostridium botulinum, C. perfringens, C. tetani

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grecz, N; Kang, T

    1973-01-01

    Destruction of spores on biomedical devices in drugs, and biologicals is essential for prevention of infection of patients with pathogenic sporeformers. Of particular concern are Clostridium tetani, C. perfringens, C. botulinum, Bacillus anthracis and other sporeforming pathogens. Spores are ubiquitous in nature and contamination of biomedical devices varies depending on manufacturing process, handling, raw materials and other variables. In the last 20 years the number of cases per year of specific notifiable diseases in the United States was as follows: tetanus, 120 to 500 cases, botulism, 7 to 47 cases, and anthrax, 2 to 10 cases. Gas gangrene is caused by a mixed flora consisting predominantly of sporeformers. C botulinum, which usually acts as saprophytic agent of food poisoning, may also initiate pathogenic processes; there are nine cases on record in the United States of botulism wound infections almost half of which ended in death. The spores of these organisms are distinguished by high radiation resistance and their erradication often requires severe radiation treatments. Representative bacterial spores in various suspending media show D/sub 10/ values (dose necessary to destroy 90 percent of a given population) ranging from approximately 0.1 to 0.4 Mrad. Some viruses show D/sub 10/ values up to greater than 1 Mrad. The D/sub 10/-values of spores vary depending on physical, chemical and biological factors. This variability is important in evaluation and selection of biological indicator organisms. Radiation sterilization of biomedical devices and biomedical materials must provide safety from infectious microorganisms including radiation resistant spores and viruses.

  19. The Rho Termination Factor of Clostridium botulinum contains a Prion-Like Domain with a highly Amyloidogenic Core

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irantzu ePallares

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Prion-like proteins can switch between a soluble intrinsically disordered conformation and a highly ordered amyloid assembly. This conformational promiscuity is encoded in specific sequence regions, known as prion domains (PrDs. Prions are best known as the causative factors of neurological diseases in mammals. However, bioinformatics analyses reveal that proteins bearing PrDs are present in all kingdoms of life, including bacteria, thus supporting the idea that they serve conserved beneficial cellular functions. Despite the proportion of predicted prion-like proteins in bacterial proteomes is generally low, pathogenic species seem to have a higher prionic load, suggesting that these malleable proteins may favor pathogenic traits. In the present work, we performed a stringent computational analysis of the Clostridium botulinum pathogen proteome in the search for prion-like proteins. A total of 54 candidates were predicted for this anaerobic bacterium, including the transcription termination Rho factor. This RNA-binding protein has been shown to play a crucial role in bacterial adaptation to changing environments. We show here that the predicted disordered PrD domain of this RNA-binding protein contains an inner, highly polar, asparagine-rich short sequence able to spontaneously self-assemble into amyloid-like structures, bearing thus the potential to induce a Rho factor conformational switch that might rewire gene expression in response to environmental conditions.

  20. Comparison of toxin production by clostridium botulinum type E in irradiated and unirradiated vacuum-packed trout (Salmo gairdneri)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hussain, M.; Ehlermann, D.; Diehl, J.F.

    1977-01-01

    Trouts obtained from a nearby Fish farm were slaughtered, gutted, cut into 100g samples and inoculated with 10 1 , 10 3 and 10 5 spores per g of Clostridium botulinum type E. The vacuum-packed samples were stored under melting ice (0 0 C) and at temperatures of 5 0 and 10 0 C for periods of up to 8 weeks. At weekly intervals, occurrence of spoilage and toxin production were determined. Only at 10 0 C storage, the irradiated samples showed toxin production before spoilage was observed. When the fishes were stored at 5 0 C, no toxicity occured before spoilage was observed even in samples treated with doses as high as 200 krad. Samples stored under melting ice, irradiated or unirradiated, never showed toxin production. It is concluded that the radurization of fish at doses of about 100 or 200 krad and at storage temperatures of melting ice or up to 5 0 C is safe with regard to a possible botulism risk. (orig.) [de

  1. Comparison of toxin production by clostridium botulinum type E in irradiated vacuum-packed trout (Salmo gairdneri)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hussain, A.M.; Ehlermann, D.; Diehl, J.F.

    1977-01-01

    Trouts obtained from a nearby Fish farm were slaughtered, gutted, cut into 100 g samples and inoculated with 10 1 , 10 3 and 10 5 spores per g of Clostridium botulinum type E. The vacuum-packed samples were stored under melting ice (0 0 C) and at temperatures of 5 0 and 10 0 C for periods of up to 8 weeks. At weekly intervals, occurrence of spoilage and toxin production were determined. Only at 10 0 C storage, the irradiated samples showed toxin production before spoilage was observed. When the fishes were stored at 5 0 C, no toxicity occurred before spoilage was observed even in samples treated with doses as high as 200 krad. Samples stored under melting ice, irradiated or unirradiated, never showed toxin production. It is concluded that the radurization of fish at doses of about 100 or 200 krad and at storage temperatures of melting ice or up to 5 0 C is safe with regard to a possible botulism risk. (orig.) [de

  2. Comparison of toxin production by clostridium botulinum type E in irradiated and unirradiated vacuum-packed trout (Salmo gairdneri)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hussain, A.M.; Ehlermann, D.; Diehl, J.F.

    1977-01-01

    Trouts obtained from a nearby fish farm were slaughtered, gutted, cut into 100 g samples and inoculated with 10 1 , 10 3 and 10 5 spores per g of Clostridium botulinum type E. The vacuum-packed samples were stored under melting ice (0 0 C) and at temperatures of 5 0 and 10 0 C for periods of up to 8 weeks. At weekly intervals, occurrence of spoilage and toxin production were determined. Only at 10 0 C storage, the irradiated samples showed toxin production before spoilage was observed. When the fishes were stored at 5 0 C, no toxicity occurred before spoilage was observed even in samples treated with doses as high as 200 krad. Samples stored under melting ice, irradiated or unirradiated, never showed toxin production. It is concluded that the radurization of fish at doses of about 100 or 200 krad and at storage temperatures of melting ice or up to 5 0 C is safe with regard to a possible botulism risk. (orig.) [de

  3. Factors affecting growth and toxin production by Clostridium botulinum type E on irradiated (0.3 Mrad) chicken skins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Firstenberg-Eden, R.; Rowley, D.B.; Shattuck, G.E.

    1982-01-01

    A model system (chicken skins with chicken exudate) was used to determine if Clostridium botulinum type E (Beluga) spores, stressed by low dose irradiation, would develop and produce toxin at abuse temperatures of 10 and 30 0 C in the absence of characteristic spoilage. Unstressed spores germinated, multiplied, and produced toxin on vacuum-packed chicken skins, stored at either 30 or 10 0 C. Cell numbers increased faster and toxin was evident sooner at 30 0 C than at 10 0 C. At 30 0 C, growth occurred and toxin was produced more slowly when samples were incubated aerobically than anaerobically. When samples were incubated aerobically at 10 0 C, no toxin was detected within a test period of 14 days. An irradiation dose of 0.3 Mrad at 5 0 C reduced a spore population on vacuum-sealed chicken skins by about 90%. The surviving population produced toxin at 30 0 C under either aerobic or anaerobic conditions, at 10 0 C no toxin was detected even on skins incubated anaerobically. Under the worst conditions (30 0 C, vacuum packed) toxin was not detected prior to characteristic spoilage caused by the natural flora surviving 0.3 Mrad

  4. Botulinum toxin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nigam P

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Botulinum toxin, one of the most poisonous biological substances known, is a neurotoxin produced by the bacterium Clostridium botulinum. C. botulinum elaborates eight antigenically distinguishable exotoxins (A, B, C 1 , C 2 , D, E, F and G. All serotypes interfere with neural transmission by blocking the release of acetylcholine, the principal neurotransmitter at the neuromuscular junction, causing muscle paralysis. The weakness induced by injection with botulinum toxin A usually lasts about three months. Botulinum toxins now play a very significant role in the management of a wide variety of medical conditions, especially strabismus and focal dystonias, hemifacial spasm, and various spastic movement disorders, headaches, hypersalivation, hyperhidrosis, and some chronic conditions that respond only partially to medical treatment. The list of possible new indications is rapidly expanding. The cosmetological applications include correction of lines, creases and wrinkling all over the face, chin, neck, and chest to dermatological applications such as hyperhidrosis. Injections with botulinum toxin are generally well tolerated and side effects are few. A precise knowledge and understanding of the functional anatomy of the mimetic muscles is absolutely necessary to correctly use botulinum toxins in clinical practice.

  5. In Vivo Toxicity and Immunological Characterization of Detoxified Recombinant Botulinum Neurotoxin Type A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravichandran, Easwaran; Janardhanan, Pavithra; Patel, Kruti; Riding, Stephen; Cai, Shuowei; Singh, Bal Ram

    2016-03-01

    A double-mutant E224A/E262A full-length botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT) Type A with structural similarity to native BoNT/A but lacking the endopeptidase activity provides an ideal surrogate for testing pharmacokinetics and immunochemical characteristics of BoNT. We determined lethality (LD50) of deactivated recombinant botulinum neurotoxin (drBoNT/A) to be 24.0 μg by intraperitoneal route (i.p). The polypeptide drBoNT/A labeled with near infra-red dye 800 (NIR 800) was used to examine its distribution to different organs using whole body imaging when administered to mice via intravenous (i.v) or i.p route. Also, drBoNT/A was used to evaluate its immunogenicity in Balb/C mice model. drBoNT/A was found to be highly immunogenic when tested under various in vivo conditions in Balb/C mice model. For the first time we have demonstrated that a full length 150 kDa drBoNT/A, by administering via inhalation route in mice model, has evoked both circulating immunoglobulin levels of IgG and secretory IgA at the mucosal surface. The immunoglobulin levels were sufficient enough to protect against the challenge dose of native BoNT toxin in mice model. Tissue distribution of drBoNT/A seems to be similar to that of native toxin. Based on the characteristics described in this report this nontoxic holotoxin protein will assist us to explore the window of opportunity available for therapeutic treatment in case of unnatural poisoning, and also it can be an effective vaccine candidate.

  6. Effect of Equilibrated pH and Indigenous Spoilage Microorganisms on the Inhibition of Proteolytic Clostridium botulinum Toxin Production in Experimental Meals under Temperature Abuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golden, Max C; Wanless, Brandon J; David, Jairus R D; Lineback, D Scott; Talley, Ryan J; Kottapalli, Bala; Glass, Kathleen A

    2017-08-01

    Clostridium botulinum is a foreseeable biological hazard in prepared refrigerated meals that needs to be addressed in food safety plans. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of product composition and storage temperature on the inhibition of botulinum toxin formation in nine experimental meals (meat, vegetable, or carbohydrate based). Treatments were inoculated with proteolytic C. botulinum, vacuum packaged, cooked at 90°C for 10 min, and assayed for botulinum toxin in samples stored at 25°C for up to 96 h for phase 1, or at 25°C for 12 h and then transferred to 12.5°C for up to 12 and 6 weeks in phases 1 and 2, respectively. For phase 1, none of the treatments (equilibrated pH 5.8) supported toxin production when stored at 25°C for 48 h, but toxin production was observed in all treatments at 72 h. For the remaining experiments with storage at 12.5°C, toxin production was dependent on equilibrated pH, storage time, and growth of indigenous spoilage microorganisms. In phase 1, no gross spoilage and no botulinum toxin was detected for any treatment (pH ≤5.8) stored at 12.5°C for 12 weeks. In phase 2, gross spoilage varied by commodity, with the brussels sprouts meal with pH 6.5 showing the most rapid spoilage within 2 weeks and botulinum toxin detected at 5 and 6 weeks for the control and cultured celery juice treatments, respectively. In contrast, spoilage microbes decreased the pH of a pH 5.9 beef treatment by 1.0 unit, potentially inhibiting C. botulinum through 6 weeks at 12.5°C. None of the other treatments with pH 5.8 or below supported toxin production or spoilage. This study provides validation for preventive controls in refrigerated meals. These include equilibrated product pH and storage temperature and time to inhibit toxin formation by proteolytic C. botulinum, but the impact of indigenous microflora on safety and interpretation of challenge studies is also highlighted.

  7. Crystal structure of a catalytically active, non-toxic endopeptidase derivative of Clostridium botulinum toxin A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masuyer, Geoffrey; Thiyagarajan, Nethaji; James, Peter L; Marks, Philip M H; Chaddock, John A; Acharya, K Ravi

    2009-03-27

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) modulate cholinergic nerve terminals to result in neurotransmitter blockade. BoNTs consists of catalytic (LC), translocation (Hn) and cell-binding domains (Hc). The binding function of the Hc domain is essential for BoNTs to bind the neuronal cell membrane, therefore, removal of the Hc domain results in a product that retains the endopeptidase activity of the LC but is non-toxic. Thus, a molecule consisting of LC and Hn domains of BoNTs, termed LHn, is a suitable molecule for engineering novel therapeutics. The structure of LHA at 2.6 A reported here provides an understanding of the structural implications and challenges of engineering therapeutic molecules that combine functional properties of LHn of BoNTs with specific ligand partners to target different cell types.

  8. Non-linear pressure/temperature-dependence of high pressure thermal inactivation of proteolytic Clostridium botulinum type B in foods.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maximilian B Maier

    Full Text Available The effect of high pressure thermal (HPT processing on the inactivation of spores of proteolytic type B Clostridium botulinum TMW 2.357 in four differently composed low-acid foods (green peas with ham, steamed sole, vegetable soup, braised veal was studied in an industrially feasible pressure range and temperatures between 100 and 120°C. Inactivation curves exhibited rapid inactivation during compression and decompression followed by strong tailing effects. The highest inactivation (approx. 6-log cycle reduction was obtained in braised veal at 600 MPa and 110°C after 300 s pressure-holding time. In general, inactivation curves exhibited similar negative exponential shapes, but maximum achievable inactivation levels were lower in foods with higher fat contents. At high treatment temperatures, spore inactivation was more effective at lower pressure levels (300 vs. 600 MPa, which indicates a non-linear pressure/temperature-dependence of the HPT spore inactivation efficiency. A comparison of spore inactivation levels achievable using HPT treatments versus a conventional heat sterilization treatment (121.1°C, 3 min illustrates the potential of combining high pressures and temperatures to replace conventional retorting with the possibility to reduce the process temperature or shorten the processing time. Finally, experiments using varying spore inoculation levels suggested the presence of a resistant fraction comprising approximately 0.01% of a spore population as reason for the pronounced tailing effects in survivor curves. The loss of the high resistance properties upon cultivation indicates that those differences develop during sporulation and are not linked to permanent modifications at the genetic level.

  9. [Intoxication of botulinum toxin].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chudzicka, Aleksandra

    2015-09-01

    Botulinum toxin is an egzotoxin produced by Gram positive bacteria Clostridium botulinum. It is among the most potent toxins known. The 3 main clinical presentations of botulism are as follows: foodborne botulism, infant botulism and wound botulism. The main symptom of intoxication is flat muscles paralysis. The treatment is supportive care and administration of antitoxin. In prevention the correct preparing of canned food is most important. Botulinum toxin is accepted as a biological weapon. © 2015 MEDPRESS.

  10. Growth of non-toxigenic Clostridium botulinum mutant LNT01 in cooked beef: One-step kinetic analysis and comparison with C. sporogenes and C. perfringens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Lihan

    2018-05-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the growth kinetics of Clostridium botulinum LNT01, a non-toxigenic mutant of C. botulinum 62A, in cooked ground beef. The spores of C. botulinum LNT01 were inoculated to ground beef and incubated anaerobically under different temperature conditions to observe growth and develop growth curves. A one-step kinetic analysis method was used to analyze the growth curves simultaneously to minimize the global residual error. The data analysis was performed using the USDA IPMP-Global Fit, with the Huang model as the primary model and the cardinal parameters model as the secondary model. The results of data analysis showed that the minimum, optimum, and maximum growth temperatures of this mutant are 11.5, 36.4, and 44.3 °C, and the estimated optimum specific growth rate is 0.633 ln CFU/g per h, or 0.275 log CFU/g per h. The maximum cell density is 7.84 log CFU/g. The models and kinetic parameters were validated using additional isothermal and dynamic growth curves. The resulting residual errors of validation followed a Laplace distribution, with about 60% of the residual errors within ±0.5 log CFU/g of experimental observations, suggesting that the models could predict the growth of C. botulinum LNT01 in ground beef with reasonable accuracy. Comparing with C. perfringens, C. botulinum LNT01 grows at much slower rates and with much longer lag times. Its growth kinetics is also very similar to C. sporogenes in ground beef. The results of computer simulation using kinetic models showed that, while prolific growth of C. perfringens may occur in ground beef during cooling, no growth of C. botulinum LNT01 or C. sporogenes would occur under the same cooling conditions. The models developed in this study may be used for prediction of the growth and risk assessments of proteolytic C. botulinum in cooked meats. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  11. Validation of a real-time PCR based method for detection of Clostridium botulinum types C, D and their mosaic variants C-D and D-C in a multicenter collaborative trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Woudstra, C.; Skarin, H.; Anniballi, F.

    2013-01-01

    Two real-time PCR arrays based on the GeneDisc® cycler platform (Pall-GeneDisc Technologies) were evaluated in a multicenter collaborative trial for their capacity to specifically detect and discriminate Clostridium botulinum types C, D and their mosaic variants C-D and D-C that are associated wi...

  12. Effects of irradiation on growth and toxigenicity of Clostridium botulinum types A and B inoculated onto chicken skins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dezfulian, M.; Bartlett, J.G.

    1987-01-01

    This study was conducted to examine the effects of 0.3-Mrad irradiation on growth and toxigenicity of Clostridum botulinum types A and B on chicken skins. Irradiation followed by aerobic or anaerobic incubation at 30 0 C extended the shelf life of skin samples and delayed growth and toxin production by C. botulinum. During 2 weeks of incubation at 10 0 C, the irradiated and nonirradiated C. botulinum spores failed to grow or produce toxin

  13. Toxin production by Clostridium Botulinum type B (proteolitic) in radurized raw fish

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suhadi, F.

    1978-01-01

    The earliest toxin production by three proteolytic strains of Cl. botulinum type B was determined in irradiated and unirradiated raw fish (Rastrelliger sp., Euthynnus sp., and Scomberomorus sp.) under the storage temperatures of 20, 10, and 5degC. The estimation of maximum storage life was evaluated by an untrained panel on uninoculated fish samples and in parellel the total bacterial counts were also determined. Percentage data of the toxic samples were analyzed according to a fully randomized design involving factorial treatments. In unirradiated samples with inoculum levels of 10 2 -10 6 spores per gram and stored at 20degC, the earliest toxin production was detected after the samples were spoiled. While in irradiated samples toxin were detected before the end of the storage life or after the samples were spoiled, depending on the levels of inoculum. In general, both in unirradiated and irradiated samples inoculated with 10 2 -10 6 spores per gram and stored at 10degC, the earlieast toxin production was detected after the samples were spoiled. While the samples were stored at 5degC, no toxic samples were found up to 30 days of storage when the experiment were terminated. The percentage of toxic samples was shown highly effected by type B strains, fish species, inoculum levels and storage time, when the storage temperature is 20degC. But no significant difference was found after treatment with irradiation doses. In general the interaction effects between those treatments on the percentage of toxic samples showed no significant difference. (author)

  14. Differential effects of sporulation temperature on the high pressure resistance of Clostridium botulinum type E spores and the interconnection with sporulation medium cation contents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenz, Christian A; Vogel, Rudi F

    2015-04-01

    High pressure thermal (HPT) processing can be used to improve traditional preservation methods and increase food safety and durability, whereas quality related characteristics can be largely maintained. Clostridium (C.) botulinum type E is a non-proteolytic, psychrotrophic, toxin-producing spore former, commonly associated with aquatic environments in temperate regions of the northern hemisphere. Sporulation in nature is likely to occur under varying conditions including temperature and nutrient availability, which might affect resistance properties of resulting spores. In our study, we determined the effect of sporulation temperature (13-38 °C) on the resistance of three Clostridium botulinum type E strains to differently intense HPT treatments (200 MPa at 40 and 80 °C, and 800 MPa at 40 and 80 °C). Furthermore, the effect of cations on sporulation temperature-mediated alterations in HHP resistance was investigated. Results indicate that low and high sporulation temperatures can increase and decrease sporal HPT resistance, respectively, in a treatment-dependent (pressure level, treatment temperature) manner, whereas the trends observed are largely unaffected by pressure dwells (1 s-10 min). Furthermore, results show that the cation content of the sporulation medium (Ca(2+), Mg(2+), Mn(2+)) marginally influences and partially counteracts effects on the HPT resistance of spores grown at low and elevated temperatures, respectively. This suggests that sporulation temperature and medium cations provoke changes in some common spore resistance structures. Sporulation conditions can markedly affect spore resistance properties and, thus, should be considered for the experimental setup of worst case studies aiming to evaluate the effectiveness of food processes in terms of the inactivation of C. botulinum type E spores. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Linden flower (Tilia spp. as potential vehicle of Clostridium botulinum spores in the transmission of infant botulism El té de tilo como vehículo potencial de esporas de Clostridium botulinum en la transmisión del botulismo infantil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. I. Bianco

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Infant botulism is an intestinal toxemia caused principally by Clostridium botulinum. Since the infection occurs in the intestinal tract, numerous food products have been investigated for the presence of C. botulinum and its neurotoxins. In many countries, people use linden flower (Tilia spp tea as a household remedy and give it to infants as a sedative. Therefore, to help provide a clear picture of this disease transmission, we investigated the presence of botulinum spores in linden flowers. In this study, we analyzed 100 samples of unwrapped linden flowers and 100 samples of linden flowers in tea bags to determine the prevalence and spore-load of C. botulinum. Results were analyzed by the Fisher test. We detected a prevalence of 3% of botulinum spores in the unwrapped linden flowers analyzed and a spore load of 30 spores per 100 grams. None of the industrialized linden flowers analyzed were contaminated with botulinum spores. C. botulinum type A was identified in two samples and type B in one sample. Linden flowers must be considered a potential vehicle of C. botulinum, and the ingestion of linden flower tea can represent a risk factor for infant botulism.El botulismo del lactante es una toxiinfección causada, principalmente, por Clostridium botulinum. Debido a que esta infección ocurre en el tracto intestinal, la presencia de esta bacteria y sus neurotoxinas ha sido investigada en numerosos alimentos. En muchos países se utiliza el té de tilo (Tilia spp. como sedante natural, el que se administra incluso a los lactantes. A fin de contribuir al esclarecimiento de la transmisión de esta enfermedad, se investigó la prevalencia y la carga de esporas botulínicas en esta hierba. Se analizaron 100 muestras de tilo comercializado a granel y 100 muestras de tilo industralizado en “saquitos”. Los resultados de prevalencia fueron analizados por el test de Fisher y la carga de esporas por la técnica del número más probable. Se halló una

  16. Complete subunit structure of the Clostridium botulinum type D toxin complex via intermediate assembly with nontoxic components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutoh, Shingo; Kouguchi, Hirokazu; Sagane, Yoshimasa; Suzuki, Tomonori; Hasegawa, Kimiko; Watanabe, Toshihiro; Ohyama, Tohru

    2003-09-23

    Clostridium botulinum serotype D strains usually produce two types of stable toxin complex (TC), namely, the 300 kDa M (M-TC) and the 660 kDa L (L-TC) toxin complexes. We previously proposed assembly pathways for both TCs [Kouguchi, H., et al. (2002) J. Biol. Chem. 277, 2650-2656]: M-TC is composed by association of neurotoxin (NT) and nontoxic nonhemagglutinin (NTNHA); conjugation of M-TC with three auxiliary types of hemagglutinin subcomponents (HA-33, HA-17, and HA-70) leads to the formation of L-TC. In this study, we found three TC species, 410, 540, and 610 kDa TC species, in the culture supernatant of type D strain 4947. The 540 and 610 kDa TC species displayed banding patterns on SDS-PAGE similar to that of L-TC but with less staining intensity of the HA-33 and HA-17 bands than those of L-TC, indicating that these are intermediate species in the pathway to L-TC assembly. In contrast, the 410 kDa TC species consisted of M-TC and two molecules of HA-70. All of the TC species, except L-TC, demonstrated no hemagglutination activity. When the intermediate TC species were mixed with an isolated HA-33/17 complex, every TC species converted to 650 kDa L-TC with full hemagglutination activity and had the same molecular composition of L-TC. On the basis of titration analysis with the HA-33/17 complex, the stoichiometry of the HA-33/17 complex molecules in the L-TC, 610 kDa, and 540 kDa TC species was estimated as 4, 3, and 2, respectively. In conclusion, the complete subunit composition of mature L-TC is deduced to be a dodecamer assembled by a single NT, a single NTNHA, two HA-70, four HA-33, and four HA-17 molecules.

  17. Isolation of recombinant antibodies directed against surface proteins of Clostridium difficile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirvan, Ali Nazari; Aitken, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Clostridium difficile has emerged as an increasingly important nosocomial pathogen and the prime causative agent of antibiotic-associated diarrhoea and pseudomembranous colitis in humans. In addition to toxins A and B, immunological studies using antisera from patients infected with C. difficile have shown that a number of other bacterial factors contribute to the pathogenesis, including surface proteins, which are responsible for adhesion, motility and other interactions with the human host. In this study, various clostridial targets, including FliC, FliD and cell wall protein 66, were expressed and purified. Phage antibody display yielded a large panel of specific recombinant antibodies, which were expressed, purified and characterised. Reactions of the recombinant antibodies with their targets were detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay; and Western blotting suggested that linear rather than conformational epitopes were recognised. Binding of the recombinant antibodies to surface-layer proteins and their components showed strain specificity, with good recognition of proteins from C. difficile 630. However, no reaction was observed for strain R20291-a representative of the 027 ribotype. Binding of the recombinant antibodies to C. difficile M120 extracts indicated that a component of a surface-layer protein of this strain might possess immunoglobulin-binding activities. The recombinant antibodies against FliC and FliD proteins were able to inhibit bacterial motility. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda.

  18. Expression of recombinant Clostridium difficile toxin A and B in Bacillus megaterium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nie Weijia

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Major Clostridium difficile virulence factors are the exotoxins TcdA and TcdB. Due to the large size and poor stability of the proteins, the active recombinant TcdA and TcdB have been difficult to produce. Results The toxin genes tcdA and tcdB were amplified by PCR using chromosomal DNA from a toxigenic strain as a template, and cloned into a shuttle vector pHis1522. The sequences of both tcdA and tcdB genes in the vector have been verified by DNA sequencing. The constructs were transformed into B. megaterium protoplasts and the protein expression was controlled under a xylose promoter. The recombinant toxins (rTcdA and rTcdB were purified from bacterial crude extracts. Approximately 5 – 10 mg of highly purified recombinant toxins were obtained from one liter of bacterial culture. The resulting rTcdA and rTcdB had similar molecular masses to the native toxins, and their biological activities were found to be similar to their native counterparts after an extensive examination. Conclusion We have generated the full length and active recombinant TcdA and TcdB in Bacillus megaterium.

  19. Construction of heterologous gene expression cassettes for the development of recombinant Clostridium beijerinckii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Young Hoon; Eom, Gyeong Tae; Kang, Kyoung Hee; Joo, Jeong Chan; Jang, Young-Ah; Choi, Jae Woo; Song, Bong Keun; Lee, Seung Hwan; Park, Si Jae

    2016-04-01

    Gene-expression cassettes for the construction of recombinant Clostridium beijerinckii were developed as potential tools for metabolic engineering of C. beijerinckii. Gene expression cassettes containing ColE1 origin and pAMB origin along with the erythromycin resistance gene were constructed, in which promoters from Escherichia coli, Lactococcus lactis, Ralstonia eutropha, C. acetobutylicum, and C. beijerinckii are examined as potential promoters in C. beijerinckii. Zymogram analysis of the cell extracts and comparison of lipase activities of the recombinant C. beijerinckii strains expressing Pseudomonas fluorescens tliA gene suggested that the tliA gene was functionally expressed by all the examined promoters with different expression level. Also, recombinant C. beijerinckii expressing C. beijerinckii secondary alcohol dehydrogenase by the constructed expression cassettes successfully produced 2-propanol from glucose. The best promoter for TliA expression was the R. eutropha phaP promoter while that for 2-propanol production was the putative C. beijerinckii pta promoter. Gene expression cassettes developed in this study may be useful tools for the construction of recombinant C. beijerinckii strains as host strains for the valuable chemicals and fuels from renewable resources.

  20. Ultrastructure of a hexagonal array in exosporium of a highly sporogenic mutant of Clostridium botulinum type A revealed by electron microscopy using optical diffraction and filtration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masuda, K; Kawata, T; Takumi, K; Kinouchi, T

    1980-01-01

    The ultrastructure of a hexagonal array in the exosporium from spores of a highly sporogenic mutant of Clostridium botulinum type A strain 190L was studied by electron microscopy of negatively stained exosporium fragments using optical diffraction and filtration. The exosporium was composed of three or more lamellae showing and equilateral, hexagonal periodicity. Images of the single exosporium layer from which the noise had been filtered optically revealed that the hexagonally arranged, morphological unit of the exosporium was composed of three globular subunits about 2.1 nm in diameter which were arranged at the vertices of an equilateral triangle with sides of about 2.4 nm. The morphological units were arranged with a spacing of about 4.5 nm. the adjacent globular subunits appeared to be interconnected by delicate linkers.

  1. Effect of initial O2 and CO2 and low-dose irradiation on toxin production by Clostridium botulinum in MAP fresh pork

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lambert, A.D.; Smith, J.P.; Dodds, K.L.

    1991-01-01

    The effects of irradiation, initial O2, initial CO2 and the presence of an O2 and CO2 absorbent on toxin production by Clostridium botulinum in inoculated pork stored at 15 degrees C were studied using a factorial experiment. Toxin production occurred faster in samples initially packaged with 20% O2, compared to samples packaged with 100% N2. The presence of CO2 in the package headspace was not a significant factor affecting time until toxin detection. Irradiation was significant in delaying the time until toxin detection in samples initially packaged with 20% O2 but not in other treatments. Sensory rejection, based primarily on discoloration, occurred within 7 to 14 d, irrespective of treatment. All samples were spoiled before they became toxic

  2. Clostridium botulinum C2 toxin--new insights into the cellular up-take of the actin-ADP-ribosylating toxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aktories, Klaus; Barth, Holger

    2004-04-01

    Clostridium botulinum C2 toxin is a member of the family of binary actin-ADP-ribosylating toxins. It consists of the enzyme component C2I, and the separated binding/translocation component C2II. Proteolytically activated C2II forms heptamers and binds to a carbohydrate cell surface receptor. After attachment of C2I, the toxin complex is endocytosed to reach early endosomes. At low pH of endosomes, C2II-heptamers insert into the membrane, form pores and deliver C2I into the cytosol. Here, C2I ADP-ribosylates actin at Arg177 to block actin polymerization and to induce depolymerization of actin filaments. The mini-review describes main properties of C2 toxin and discusses new findings on the involvement of chaperones in the up-take process of the toxin.

  3. Structural constraints-based evaluation of immunogenic avirulent toxins from Clostridium botulinum C2 and C3 toxins as subunit vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prisilla, A; Prathiviraj, R; Sasikala, R; Chellapandi, P

    2016-10-01

    Clostridium botulinum (group-III) is an anaerobic bacterium producing C2 and C3 toxins in addition to botulinum neurotoxins in avian and mammalian cells. C2 and C3 toxins are members of bacterial ADP-ribosyltransferase superfamily, which modify the eukaryotic cell surface proteins by ADP-ribosylation reaction. Herein, the mutant proteins with lack of catalytic and pore forming function derived from C2 (C2I and C2II) and C3 toxins were computationally evaluated to understand their structure-function integrity. We have chosen many structural constraints including local structural environment, folding process, backbone conformation, conformational dynamic sub-space, NAD-binding specificity and antigenic determinants for screening of suitable avirulent toxins. A total of 20 avirulent mutants were identified out of 23 mutants, which were experimentally produced by site-directed mutagenesis. No changes in secondary structural elements in particular to α-helices and β-sheets and also in fold rate of all-β classes. Structural stability was maintained by reordered hydrophobic and hydrogen bonding patterns. Molecular dynamic studies suggested that coupled mutations may restrain the binding affinity to NAD(+) or protein substrate upon structural destabilization. Avirulent toxins of this study have stable energetic backbone conformation with a common blue print of folding process. Molecular docking studies revealed that avirulent mutants formed more favorable hydrogen bonding with the side-chain of amino acids near to conserved NAD-binding core, despite of restraining NAD-binding specificity. Thus, structural constraints in the avirulent toxins would determine their immunogenic nature for the prioritization of protein-based subunit vaccine/immunogens to avian and veterinary animals infected with C. botulinum. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Development and Application of a New Method for Specific and Sensitive Enumeration of Spores of Nonproteolytic Clostridium botulinum Types B, E, and F in Foods and Food Materials ▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peck, Michael W.; Plowman, June; Aldus, Clare F.; Wyatt, Gary M.; Penaloza Izurieta, Walter; Stringer, Sandra C.; Barker, Gary C.

    2010-01-01

    The highly potent botulinum neurotoxins are responsible for botulism, a severe neuroparalytic disease. Strains of nonproteolytic Clostridium botulinum form neurotoxins of types B, E, and F and are the main hazard associated with minimally heated refrigerated foods. Recent developments in quantitative microbiological risk assessment (QMRA) and food safety objectives (FSO) have made food safety more quantitative and include, as inputs, probability distributions for the contamination of food materials and foods. A new method that combines a selective enrichment culture with multiplex PCR has been developed and validated to enumerate specifically the spores of nonproteolytic C. botulinum. Key features of this new method include the following: (i) it is specific for nonproteolytic C. botulinum (and does not detect proteolytic C. botulinum), (ii) the detection limit has been determined for each food tested (using carefully structured control samples), and (iii) a low detection limit has been achieved by the use of selective enrichment and large test samples. The method has been used to enumerate spores of nonproteolytic C. botulinum in 637 samples of 19 food materials included in pasta-based minimally heated refrigerated foods and in 7 complete foods. A total of 32 samples (5 egg pastas and 27 scallops) contained spores of nonproteolytic C. botulinum type B or F. The majority of samples contained <100 spores/kg, but one sample of scallops contained 444 spores/kg. Nonproteolytic C. botulinum type E was not detected. Importantly, for QMRA and FSO, the construction of probability distributions will enable the frequency of packs containing particular levels of contamination to be determined. PMID:20709854

  5. Neuronal targeting, internalization, and biological activity of a recombinant atoxic derivative of botulinum neurotoxin A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNT) have the unique capacity to cross epithelial barriers, target neuromuscular junctions, and translocate active metalloprotease component to the cytosol of motor neurons. We have taken advantage of the molecular carriers responsible for this trafficking to create a family ...

  6. Development of a recombinant toxin fragment vaccine for Clostridium difficile infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karczewski, Jerzy; Zorman, Julie; Wang, Su; Miezeiewski, Matthew; Xie, Jinfu; Soring, Keri; Petrescu, Ioan; Rogers, Irene; Thiriot, David S; Cook, James C; Chamberlin, Mihaela; Xoconostle, Rachel F; Nahas, Debbie D; Joyce, Joseph G; Bodmer, Jean-Luc; Heinrichs, Jon H; Secore, Susan

    2014-05-19

    Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is the major cause of antibiotic-associated diarrhea and pseudomembranous colitis, a disease associated with significant morbidity and mortality. The disease is mostly of nosocomial origin, with elderly patients undergoing anti-microbial therapy being particularly at risk. C. difficile produces two large toxins: Toxin A (TcdA) and Toxin B (TcdB). The two toxins act synergistically to damage and impair the colonic epithelium, and are primarily responsible for the pathogenesis associated with CDI. The feasibility of toxin-based vaccination against C. difficile is being vigorously investigated. A vaccine based on formaldehyde-inactivated Toxin A and Toxin B (toxoids) was reported to be safe and immunogenic in healthy volunteers and is now undergoing evaluation in clinical efficacy trials. In order to eliminate cytotoxic effects, a chemical inactivation step must be included in the manufacturing process of this toxin-based vaccine. In addition, the large-scale production of highly toxic antigens could be a challenging and costly process. Vaccines based on non-toxic fragments of genetically engineered versions of the toxins alleviate most of these limitations. We have evaluated a vaccine assembled from two recombinant fragments of TcdB and explored their potential as components of a novel experimental vaccine against CDI. Golden Syrian hamsters vaccinated with recombinant fragments of TcdB combined with full length TcdA (Toxoid A) developed high titer IgG responses and potent neutralizing antibody titers. We also show here that the recombinant vaccine protected animals against lethal challenge with C. difficile spores, with efficacy equivalent to the toxoid vaccine. The development of a two-segment recombinant vaccine could provide several advantages over toxoid TcdA/TcdB such as improvements in manufacturability. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Recombinant Alpha, Beta, and Epsilon Toxins of Clostridium perfringens: Production Strategies and Applications as Veterinary Vaccines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos Roberto A. Ferreira

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Clostridium perfringens is a spore-forming, commensal, ubiquitous bacterium that is present in the gastrointestinal tract of healthy humans and animals. This bacterium produces up to 18 toxins. The species is classified into five toxinotypes (A–E according to the toxins that the bacterium produces: alpha, beta, epsilon, or iota. Each of these toxinotypes is associated with myriad different, frequently fatal, illnesses that affect a range of farm animals and humans. Alpha, beta, and epsilon toxins are the main causes of disease. Vaccinations that generate neutralizing antibodies are the most common prophylactic measures that are currently in use. These vaccines consist of toxoids that are obtained from C. perfringens cultures. Recombinant vaccines offer several advantages over conventional toxoids, especially in terms of the production process. As such, they are steadily gaining ground as a promising vaccination solution. This review discusses the main strategies that are currently used to produce recombinant vaccines containing alpha, beta, and epsilon toxins of C. perfringens, as well as the potential application of these molecules as vaccines for mammalian livestock animals.

  8. Bioconversion of Agricultural Waste to Ethanol by SSF Using Recombinant Cellulase from Clostridium thermocellum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruchi Mutreja

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of different pretreatment methods, temperature, and enzyme concentration on ethanol production from 8 lignocellulosic agrowaste by simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF using recombinant cellulase and Saccharomyces cerevisiae were studied. Recombinant cellulase was isolated from E. coli BL21 cells transformed with CtLic26A-Cel5-CBM11 full-length gene from Clostridium thermocellum and produced in both batch and fed-batch processes. The maximum cell OD and specific activity in batch mode were 1.6 and 1.91 U/mg, respectively, whereas in the fed-batch mode, maximum cell OD and specific activity were 3.8 and 3.5 U/mg, respectively, displaying a 2-fold increase. Eight substrates, Syzygium cumini (jamun, Azadirachta indica (neem, Saracens indica (asoka, bambusa dendrocalmus (bamboo, Populas nigra (poplar, Achnatherum hymenoides (wild grass, Eucalyptus marginata (eucalyptus, and Mangifera indica (mango, were subjected to SSF. Of three pretreatments, acid, alkali, and steam explosion, acid pretreatment Syzygium cumini (Jamun at 30°C gave maximum ethanol yield of 1.42 g/L.

  9. Bioconversion of Agricultural Waste to Ethanol by SSF Using Recombinant Cellulase from Clostridium thermocellum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutreja, Ruchi; Das, Debasish; Goyal, Dinesh; Goyal, Arun

    2011-01-01

    The effect of different pretreatment methods, temperature, and enzyme concentration on ethanol production from 8 lignocellulosic agrowaste by simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) using recombinant cellulase and Saccharomyces cerevisiae were studied. Recombinant cellulase was isolated from E. coli BL21 cells transformed with CtLic26A-Cel5-CBM11 full-length gene from Clostridium thermocellum and produced in both batch and fed-batch processes. The maximum cell OD and specific activity in batch mode were 1.6 and 1.91 U/mg, respectively, whereas in the fed-batch mode, maximum cell OD and specific activity were 3.8 and 3.5 U/mg, respectively, displaying a 2-fold increase. Eight substrates, Syzygium cumini (jamun), Azadirachta indica (neem), Saracens indica (asoka), bambusa dendrocalmus (bamboo), Populas nigra (poplar), Achnatherum hymenoides (wild grass), Eucalyptus marginata (eucalyptus), and Mangifera indica (mango), were subjected to SSF. Of three pretreatments, acid, alkali, and steam explosion, acid pretreatment Syzygium cumini (Jamun) at 30°C gave maximum ethanol yield of 1.42 g/L.

  10. Vaccination with Clostridium perfringens recombinant proteins in combination with Montanide™ ISA 71 VG adjuvant increases protection against experimental necrotic enteritis in commercial broiler chickens

    Science.gov (United States)

    This study was performed to compare four Clostridium perfringens recombinant proteins as vaccine candidates using the Montanide™ ISA 71 VG adjuvant in an experimental model of necrotic enteritis. Broiler chickens were immunized with clostridial recombinant proteins with ISA 71 VG, and intestinal le...

  11. A large outbreak of bovine botulism possibly linked to a massive contamination of grass silage by type D/C Clostridium botulinum spores on a farm with dairy and poultry operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Relun, A; Dorso, L; Douart, A; Chartier, C; Guatteo, R; Mazuet, C; Popoff, M R; Assié, S

    2017-12-01

    Type D bovine botulism outbreaks associated with poultry litter are increasingly reported in European countries, but the circumstances of exposure to Clostridium botulinum toxins remain unclear. In spring 2015, a large type D/C bovine botulism outbreak affected a farm with dairy and poultry operations. Epidemiological and laboratory investigations strongly suggest that the outbreak was caused by feeding cattle with insufficiently acidified grass silage that was contaminated by type D/C C. botulinum spores. The source of the spores remains unclear, but could have been a stack of poultry litter stored in the grass silage pasture before harvesting. The presence of putrefied poultry carcasses mixed in with the litter is relatively unlikely considering the careful daily removal of poultry carcasses. These findings reinforce the importance of proper ensiling of feed materials and highlight the need for safe disposal of poultry litter, even in the case of good management of poultry deadstock, in order to prevent bovine botulism.

  12. Generation and Characterization of Six Recombinant Botulinum Neurotoxins as Reference Material to Serve in an International Proficiency Test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasmin Weisemann

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The detection and identification of botulinum neurotoxins (BoNT is complex due to the existence of seven serotypes, derived mosaic toxins and more than 40 subtypes. Expert laboratories currently use different technical approaches to detect, identify and quantify BoNT, but due to the lack of (certified reference materials, analytical results can hardly be compared. In this study, the six BoNT/A1–F1 prototypes were successfully produced by recombinant techniques, facilitating handling, as well as improving purity, yield, reproducibility and biosafety. All six BoNTs were quantitatively nicked into active di-chain toxins linked by a disulfide bridge. The materials were thoroughly characterized with respect to purity, identity, protein concentration, catalytic and biological activities. For BoNT/A1, B1 and E1, serotypes pathogenic to humans, the catalytic activity and the precise protein concentration were determined by Endopep-mass spectrometry and validated amino acid analysis, respectively. In addition, BoNT/A1, B1, E1 and F1 were successfully detected by immunological assays, unambiguously identified by mass spectrometric-based methods, and their specific activities were assigned by the mouse LD50 bioassay. The potencies of all six BoNT/A1–F1 were quantified by the ex vivo mouse phrenic nerve hemidiaphragm assay, allowing a direct comparison. In conclusion, highly pure recombinant BoNT reference materials were produced, thoroughly characterized and employed as spiking material in a worldwide BoNT proficiency test organized by the EQuATox consortium.

  13. Femtogram-level detection of Clostridium botulinum neurotoxin type A by sandwich immunoassay using nanoporous substrate and ultra-bright fluorescent suprananoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bok, Sangho; Korampally, Venumadhav; Darr, Charles M; Folk, William R; Polo-Parada, Luis; Gangopadhyay, Keshab; Gangopadhyay, Shubhra

    2013-03-15

    We report a simple, robust fluorescence biosensor for the ultra-sensitive detection of Clostridium botulinum Neurotoxin Type A (BoNT/A) in complex, real-world media. High intrinsic signal amplification was achieved through the combined use of ultra-bright, photostable dye-doped nanoparticle (DOSNP) tags and high surface area nanoporous organosilicate (NPO) thin films. DOSNP with 22 nm diameter were synthesized with more than 200 times equivalent free dye fluorescence and conjugated to antibodies with average degree of substitution of 90 dyes per antibody, representing an order of magnitude increase compared with conventional dye-labeled antibodies. The NPO films were engineered to form constructive interference at the surface where fluorophores were located. In addition, DOSNP-labeled antibodies with NPO films increased surface roughness causing diffuse scattering resulting in 24% more scattering intensity than dye-labeled antibody with NPO films. These substrates were used for immobilization of capture antibodies against BoNT/A, which was further quantified by DOSNP-labeled signal antibodies. The combination of optical effects enhanced the fluorescence and, therefore, the signal-to-noise ratio significantly. BoNT/A was detected in PBS buffer down to 21.3 fg mL(-1) in 4 h. The assay was then extended to several complex media and the four-hour detection limit was found to be 145.8 fg mL(-1) in orange juice and 164.2 fg mL(-1) in tap water, respectively, demonstrating at least two orders of magnitude improvement comparing to the reported detection limit of other enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA). This assay, therefore, demonstrates a novel method for rapid, ultra-low level detection of not only BoNT/A, but other analytes as well. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Inactivation of bacterial spores by combination processes: ultraviolet plus gamma radiation. [Streptococcus faecium, micrococcus radiodurans, clostridium botulinum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grecz, N; Durban, E

    1973-01-01

    Bacterial spores, viruses and some vegetative bacteria such as Streptococcus faecium and Micrococcus radiodurans are distinguished by high radiation resistance. In order to lay a theoretical basis for biomedical sterilization applications, we have investigated the combined action of uv and gamma rays. Spores of two strains of C. botulinum were selected, a highly radiation resistant strain, 33A having a D/sub 10/-value of 0.32 Mrad, and a relatively radiation sensitive strain, 51B having a D/sub 10/-value of 0.12 Mrad. Strain 33A exhibits an extensive initial ''shoulder'' in its uv as well as gamma ray survival curves; strain 51B shows only a slight shoulder. The shoulder in the gamma ray survival curve of spores of strain 33A could be reduced or completely eliminated by preirradiation with uv. Simultaneously the D/sub 10/-value for gamma inactivation of spores of 33A was reduced substantially. For example, the gamma resistance was reduced almost to half of its original D/sub 10/-value by uv-preirradiation for only one minute under an 8 watt GE germicidal lamp. The effect of uv-preirradiation on the radiation sensitive strain 51B was less pronounced. In fact, there was about seven fold higher positive interaction (synergism) between uv and gamma radiation in 33A spores than in 51B spores. The experiments suggest that interference with DNA repair enzymes in the radiation resistant strain are responsible for lethal synergism between uv and gamma radiation. A hypothesis is developed attempting to explain the combined effect of these two radiations in terms of a special summation of known DNA lesions in the cell. These observations emphasize the potential practical advantages of combining uv and gamma rays for effective sterilization of certain biomedical devices, drugs and biologicals.

  15. Crystal structure and novel recognition motif of rho ADP-ribosylating C3 exoenzyme from Clostridium botulinum: structural insights for recognition specificity and catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, S; Arvai, A S; Clancy, S B; Tainer, J A

    2001-01-05

    Clostridium botulinum C3 exoenzyme inactivates the small GTP-binding protein family Rho by ADP-ribosylating asparagine 41, which depolymerizes the actin cytoskeleton. C3 thus represents a major family of the bacterial toxins that transfer the ADP-ribose moiety of NAD to specific amino acids in acceptor proteins to modify key biological activities in eukaryotic cells, including protein synthesis, differentiation, transformation, and intracellular signaling. The 1.7 A resolution C3 exoenzyme structure establishes the conserved features of the core NAD-binding beta-sandwich fold with other ADP-ribosylating toxins despite little sequence conservation. Importantly, the central core of the C3 exoenzyme structure is distinguished by the absence of an active site loop observed in many other ADP-ribosylating toxins. Unlike the ADP-ribosylating toxins that possess the active site loop near the central core, the C3 exoenzyme replaces the active site loop with an alpha-helix, alpha3. Moreover, structural and sequence similarities with the catalytic domain of vegetative insecticidal protein 2 (VIP2), an actin ADP-ribosyltransferase, unexpectedly implicates two adjacent, protruding turns, which join beta5 and beta6 of the toxin core fold, as a novel recognition specificity motif for this newly defined toxin family. Turn 1 evidently positions the solvent-exposed, aromatic side-chain of Phe209 to interact with the hydrophobic region of Rho adjacent to its GTP-binding site. Turn 2 evidently both places the Gln212 side-chain for hydrogen bonding to recognize Rho Asn41 for nucleophilic attack on the anomeric carbon of NAD ribose and holds the key Glu214 catalytic side-chain in the adjacent catalytic pocket. This proposed bipartite ADP-ribosylating toxin turn-turn (ARTT) motif places the VIP2 and C3 toxin classes into a single ARTT family characterized by analogous target protein recognition via turn 1 aromatic and turn 2 hydrogen-bonding side-chain moieties. Turn 2 centrally anchors

  16. Botulinum toxin: bioweapon & magic drug.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhaked, Ram Kumar; Singh, Manglesh Kumar; Singh, Padma; Gupta, Pallavi

    2010-11-01

    Botulinum neurotoxins, causative agents of botulism in humans, are produced by Clostridium botulinum, an anaerobic spore-former Gram positive bacillus. Botulinum neurotoxin poses a major bioweapon threat because of its extreme potency and lethality; its ease of production, transport, and misuse; and the need for prolonged intensive care among affected persons. A single gram of crystalline toxin, evenly dispersed and inhaled, can kill more than one million people. The basis of the phenomenal potency of botulinum toxin is enzymatic; the toxin is a zinc proteinase that cleaves neuronal vesicle associated proteins responsible for acetylcholine release into the neuromuscular junction. As a military or terrorist weapon, botulinum toxin could be disseminated via aerosol or by contamination of water or food supplies, causing widespread casualties. A fascinating aspect of botulinum toxin research in recent years has been development of the most potent toxin into a molecule of significant therapeutic utility . It is the first biological toxin which is licensed for treatment of human diseases. In the late 1980s, Canada approved use of the toxin to treat strabismus, in 2001 in the removal of facial wrinkles and in 2002, the FDA in the United States followed suit. The present review focuses on both warfare potential and medical uses of botulinum neurotoxin.

  17. Development of a quail embryo model for the detection of botulinum toxin type A activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clostridium botulinum is a ubiquitous microorganism which under certain anaerobic conditions can produce botulinum toxins. Due to concerns in regards to both food-borne illness and the potential use of botulinum toxin as a biological weapon, the capability to assess the amount of toxin in a food or...

  18. Botulinum Toxin for Rhinitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozcan, Cengiz; Ismi, Onur

    2016-08-01

    Rhinitis is a common clinical entity. Besides nasal obstruction, itching, and sneezing, one of the most important symptoms of rhinitis is nasal hypersecretion produced by nasal glands and exudate from the nasal vascular bed. Allergic rhinitis is an IgE-mediated inflammatory reaction of nasal mucosa after exposure to environmental allergens. Idiopathic rhinitis describes rhinitis symptoms that occur after non-allergic, noninfectious irritants. Specific allergen avoidance, topical nasal decongestants, nasal corticosteroids, immunotherapy, and sinonasal surgery are the main treatment options. Because the current treatment modalities are not enough for reducing rhinorrhea in some patients, novel treatment options are required to solve this problem. Botulinum toxin is an exotoxin generated by Clostridium botulinum. It disturbs the signal transmission at the neuromuscular and neuroglandular junction by inhibiting the acetylcholine release from the presynaptic nerve terminal. It has been widely used in neuromuscular, hypersecretory, and autonomic nerve system disorders. There have been a lot of published articles concerning the effect of this toxin on rhinitis symptoms. Based on the results of these reports, intranasal botulinum toxin A administration appears to be a safe and effective treatment method for decreasing rhinitis symptoms in rhinitis patients with a long-lasting effect. Botulinum toxin type A will be a good treatment option for the chronic rhinitis patients who are resistant to other treatment methods.

  19. Immunization with Recombinant TcdB-Encapsulated Nanocomplex Induces Protection against Clostridium difficile Challenge in a Mouse Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Wen Liu

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Clostridium difficile is considered to be one of the major cause of infectious diarrhea in healthcare systems worldwide. Symptoms of C. difficile infection are caused largely by the production of two cytotoxins: toxin A (TcdA and toxin B (TcdB. Vaccine development is considered desirable as it would decrease the mounting medical costs and mortality associated with C. difficile infections. Biodegradable nanoparticles composed of poly-γ-glutamic acid (γ-PGA and chitosan have proven to be a safe and effective antigen delivery system for many viral vaccines. However, few studies have used this efficient antigen carrier for bacterial vaccine development. In this study, we eliminated the toxin activity domain of toxin B by constructing a recombinant protein rTcdB consists of residues 1852-2363 of TcdB receptor binding domain. The rTcdB was encapsulated in nanoparticles composed of γ-PGA and chitosan. Three rounds of intraperitoneal vaccination led to high anti-TcdB antibody responses and afforded mice full protection mice from lethal dose of C. difficile spore challenge. Protection was associated with high levels of toxin-neutralizing antibodies, and the rTcdB-encapsulated NPs elicited a longer-lasting antibody titers than antigen with the conventional adjuvant, aluminum hydroxide. Significant reductions in the level of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines were observed in vaccinated mouse. These results suggested that polymeric nanocomplex-based vaccine design can be useful in developing vaccine against C. difficile infections.

  20. Botulinum toxin: The Midas touch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shilpa, P S; Kaul, Rachna; Sultana, Nishat; Bhat, Suraksha

    2014-01-01

    Botulinum Toxin (BT) is a natural molecule produced during growth and autolysis of bacterium called Clostridium botulinum. Use of BT for cosmetic purposes has gained popularity over past two decades, and recently, other therapeutic uses of BT has been extensively studied. BT is considered as a minimally invasive agent that can be used in the treatment of various orofacial disorders and improving the quality of life in such patients. The objective of this article is to review the nature, mechanism of action of BT, and its application in various head and neck diseases.

  1. Treatment of anismus in intractable constipation with botulinum A toxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallan, R I; Williams, N S; Melling, J; Waldron, D J; Womack, N R; Morrison, J F

    1988-09-24

    In seven patients with anismus the striated sphincter muscle complex was selectively weakened by local injection of Clostridium botulinum type A toxin. Symptom scores improved significantly and correlated with a significant reduction in the maximum voluntary and canal squeeze pressure and a significant increase in the anorectal angle on straining. Botulinum A toxin seems to be promising treatment for some patients with anismus.

  2. Botulinum toxin in medicine and cosmetology – two hundred years’ history and new perspectives

    OpenAIRE

    Małgorzata Zbrojkiewicz; Agata Lebiedowska; Barbara Błońska-Fajfrowska Barbara Błońska-Fajfrowska

    2018-01-01

    It has been nearly 200 years since the discovery of the botulinum toxin and the strain responsible for its synthesis Clostridium botulinum. Over this period, the knowledge about botulism and the use of botulinum toxin in medicine has been significantly expanded. Currently, eight serotypes of botulinum toxin (A-H) are known and they differ from each other by molecular weight, antigenic structure, immunogenicity, receptors, localization of coding genes and by the duration of the therapeutic ...

  3. MOLECULAR-BIOLOGY OF CLOSTRIDIAL TOXINS - EXPRESSION OF MESSENGER-RNAS ENCODING TETANUS AND BOTULINUM NEUROTOXINS IN APLYSIA NEURONS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    MOCHIDA, S; POULAIN, B; EISEL, U; BINZ, T; KURAZONO, H; NIEMANN, H; TAUC, L

    1990-01-01

    mRNAs encoding the light chain of tetanus and botulinum neurotoxins were transcribed, in vitro, from the cloned and specifically truncated genes of Clostridium tetani and Clostridium botulinum, respectively, and injected into presynaptic identified cholinergic neurons of the buccal ganglia of

  4. Genetic Diversity Among Botulinum Neurotoxin Producing Clostridial Strains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hill, K K; Smith, T J; Helma, C H; Ticknor, L O; Foley, B T; Svennson, R T; Brown, J L; Johnson, E A; Smith, L A; Okinaka, R T; Jackson, P J; Marks, J D

    2006-07-06

    Clostridium botulinum is a taxonomic designation for many diverse anaerobic spore forming rod-shaped bacteria which have the common property of producing botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs). The BoNTs are exoneurotoxins that can cause severe paralysis and even death in humans and various other animal species. A collection of 174 C. botulinum strains were examined by amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) analysis and by sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene and BoNT genes to examine genetic diversity within this species. This collection contained representatives of each of the seven different serotypes of botulinum neurotoxins (BoNT A-G). Analysis of the16S rRNA sequences confirmed earlier reports of at least four distinct genomic backgrounds (Groups I-IV) each of which has independently acquired one or more BoNT serotypes through horizontal gene transfer. AFLP analysis provided higher resolution, and can be used to further subdivide the four groups into sub-groups. Sequencing of the BoNT genes from serotypes A, B and E in multiple strains confirmed significant sequence variation within each serotype. Four distinct lineages within each of the BoNT A and B serotypes, and five distinct lineages of serotype E strains were identified. The nucleotide sequences of the seven serotypes of BoNT were compared and show varying degrees of interrelatedness and recombination as has been previously noted for the NTNH gene which is linked to BoNT. These analyses contribute to the understanding of the evolution and phylogeny within this species and assist in the development of improved diagnostics and therapeutics for treatment of botulism.

  5. Protein Domain Analysis of C. botulinum Type A Neurotoxin and Its Relationship with Other Botulinum Serotypes

    OpenAIRE

    Sharma, Shashi K.; Basavanna, Uma; Shukla, Hem D.

    2009-01-01

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) are highly potent poisons produced by seven serotypes of Clostridium botulinum. The mechanism of neurotoxin action is a multistep process which leads to the cleavage of one of three different SNARE proteins essential for synaptic vesicle fusion and transmission of the nerve signals to muscles: synaptobrevin, syntaxin, or SNAP-25. In order to understand the precise mechanism of neurotoxin in a host, the domain structure of the neurotoxin was analyzed among differe...

  6. Botulinum toxin in pain treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colhado, Orlando Carlos Gomes; Boeing, Marcelo; Ortega, Luciano Bornia

    2009-01-01

    Botulinum toxin (BTX) is one of the most potent bacterial toxins known and its effectiveness in the treatment of some pain syndromes is well known. However, the efficacy of some of its indications is still in the process of being confirmed. The objective of this study was to review the history, pharmacological properties, and clinical applications of BTX in the treatment of pain of different origins. Botulinum toxin is produced by fermentation of Clostridium botulinum, a Gram-positive, anaerobic bacterium. Commercially, BTX comes in two presentations, types A and B. Botulinum toxin, a neurotoxin with high affinity for cholinergic synapses, blocks the release of acetylcholine by nerve endings without interfering with neuronal conduction of electrical signals or synthesis and storage of acetylcholine. It has been proven that BTX can selectively weaken painful muscles, interrupting the spasm-pain cycle. Several studies have demonstrated the efficacy and safety of BTX-A in the treatment of tension headaches, migraines, chronic lumbar pain, and myofascial pain. Botulinum toxin type A is well tolerated in the treatment of chronic pain disorders in which pharmacotherapy regimens can cause side effects. The reduction in the consumption of analgesics and length of action of 3 to 4 months per dose represent other advantages of its use. However, further studies are necessary to establish the efficacy of BTX-A in chronic pain disorders and its exact mechanism of action, as well as its potential in multifactorial treatments.

  7. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of a novel haemagglutinin component of the toxin complex of serotype C Clostridium botulinum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Shintaro; Akiyama, Tomonori; Sagane, Yoshimasa; Miyashita, Shin-Ichiro; Watanabe, Toshihiro; Yajima, Shunsuke; Niwa, Koichi

    2014-03-01

    The botulinum toxin complex, the causative agent of botulism, passes through the intestinal wall via sugar-chain-dependent cell binding of a haemagglutinin of 33 kDa molecular weight (HA-33). The amino-acid sequence of the C-terminal half of HA-33 of the serotype C strain Yoichi (C-Yoichi) shares only 46% identity with those of the major serotype C strains. Additionally, C-Yoichi HA-33 exhibits a unique sugar-binding specificity. In the present work, C-Yoichi HA-33 was expressed in Escherichia coli and crystallized. Diffraction data were collected at a resolution of 2.2 Å. The crystals belonged to space group R3. The complete detailed protein structure will yield insight into how the unique HA-33 protein recognizes sugar moieties.

  8. Clostridium botulinum C2 toxin. Identification of the binding site for chloroquine and related compounds and influence of the binding site on properties of the C2II channel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumeyer, Tobias; Schiffler, Bettina; Maier, Elke; Lang, Alexander E; Aktories, Klaus; Benz, Roland

    2008-02-15

    Clostridium botulinum C2 toxin belongs to the family of binary AB type toxins that are structurally organized into distinct enzyme (A, C2I) and binding (B, C2II) components. The proteolytically activated 60-kDa C2II binding component is essential for C2I transport into target cells. It oligomerizes into heptamers and forms channels in lipid bilayer membranes. The C2II channel is cation-selective and can be blocked by chloroquine and related compounds. Residues 303-330 of C2II contain a conserved pattern of alternating hydrophobic and hydrophilic residues, which has been implicated in the formation of two amphipathic beta-strands involved in membrane insertion and channel formation. In the present study, C2II mutants created by substitution of different negatively charged amino acids by alanine-scanning mutagenesis were analyzed in artificial lipid bilayer membranes. The results suggested that most of the C2II mutants formed SDS-resistant oligomers (heptamers) similar to wild type. The mutated negatively charged amino acids did not influence channel properties with the exception of Glu(399) and Asp(426), which are probably localized in the vestibule near the channel entrance. These mutants show a dramatic decrease in their affinity for binding of chloroquine and its analogues. Similarly, F428A, which represents the Phi-clamp in anthrax protective antigen, was mutated in C2II in several other amino acids. The C2II mutants F428A, F428D, F428Y, and F428W not only showed altered chloroquine binding but also had drastically changed single channel properties. The results suggest that amino acids Glu(399), Asp(426), and Phe(428) have a major impact on the function of C2II as a binding protein for C2I delivery into target cells.

  9. Channel formation by the binding component of Clostridium botulinum C2 toxin: glutamate 307 of C2II affects channel properties in vitro and pH-dependent C2I translocation in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blöcker, Dagmar; Bachmeyer, Christoph; Benz, Roland; Aktories, Klaus; Barth, Holger

    2003-05-13

    The binding component (C2II) of the binary Clostridium botulinum C2 toxin mediates transport of the actin ADP-ribosylating enzyme component (C2I) into the cytosol of target cells. C2II (80 kDa) is activated by trypsin cleavage, and proteolytically activated C2II (60 kDa) oligomerizes to heptamers in solution. Activated C2II forms channels in lipid bilayer membranes which are highly cation selective and voltage-gated. A role for this channel in C2I translocation across the cell membrane into the cytosol is discussed. Amino acid residues 303-331 of C2II contain a conserved pattern of alternating hydrophobic and hydrophilic residues, which likely facilitates membrane insertion and channel formation by creating two antiparallel beta-strands. Some of the residues are in strategic positions within the putative C2II channel, in particular, glutamate 307 (E307) localized in its center and glycine 316 (G316) localized on the trans side of the membrane. Here, single-lysine substitutions of these amino acids and the double mutant E307K/G316K of C2II were analyzed in vivo and in artificial lipid bilayer experiments. The pH dependence of C2I transport across cellular membranes was altered, and a pH of properties of C2II were substantially changed by the mutations, as evidenced by reduced cation selectivity. Interestingly, the voltage dependence of wild-type C2II was completely lost for the E307K mutant, which means that E307 is responsible for voltage gating. Chloroquine blocked the E307K mutant channel and intoxication of Vero cells by mutant C2II and C2I, indicating that chloroquine binding does not involve E307. Overall, the voltage gating and cation selectivity of the C2II channel do not play an important role in translocation of C2I into the cytosol.

  10. Prevalence of Clostridium botulinum and thermophilic heat-resistant spores in raw carrots and green beans used in French canning industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sevenier, V; Delannoy, S; André, S; Fach, P; Remize, F

    2012-04-16

    Two categories of vegetables (carrots and green beans) that are widely used in the manufacture of canned food were surveyed for their spore contamination. Samples were recovered from 10 manufactures spread over all producing areas in France. Two samples over 316 raw vegetables collected were found positive for botulinum neurotoxin producing Clostridia spores as tested by PCR-based GeneDisc assay. Both positive samplestested positive for the type B neurotoxin gene (bont/B). In parallel, heat-resistant spores of thermophilic bacteria that are likely to be associated with canned food spoilage after prolonged incubation at 55 °C were surveyed after specific enrichment. Prevalence varied between 1.6% for Moorella thermoacetica/thermoautotrophica in green bean samples and 8.6% for either Geobacillus stearothermophilus or Thermoanaerobacterium spp. in carrot samples. Vegetable preparation, e.g. washing and edge cutting, considerably reduced spore contamination levels. These data constitute the first wide examination of vegetables specifically cultivated for industrialpurposes for their contamination by spores of thermophilic bacterial species. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Botulinum Toxin: Pharmacology and Therapeutic Roles in Pain States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, Shilpadevi; Willett, Olga; Thompkins, Terin; Hermann, Robert; Ramanathan, Sathish; Cornett, Elyse M; Fox, Charles J; Kaye, Alan David

    2016-03-01

    Botulinum toxin, also known as Botox, is produced by Clostridium botulinum, a gram-positive anaerobic bacterium, and botulinum toxin injections are among the most commonly practiced cosmetic procedures in the USA. Although botulinum toxin is typically associated with cosmetic procedures, it can be used to treat a variety of other conditions, including pain. Botulinum toxin blocks the release of acetylcholine from nerve endings to paralyze muscles and to decrease the pain response. Botulinum toxin has a long duration of action, lasting up to 5 months after initial treatment which makes it an excellent treatment for chronic pain patients. This manuscript will outline in detail why botulinum toxin is used as a successful treatment for pain in multiple conditions as well as outline the risks associated with using botulinum toxin in certain individuals. As of today, the only FDA-approved chronic condition that botulinum toxin can be used to treat is migraines and this is related to its ability to decrease muscle tension and increase muscle relaxation. Contraindications to botulinum toxin treatments are limited to a hypersensitivity to the toxin or an infection at the site of injection, and there are no known drug interactions with botulinum toxin. Botulinum toxin is an advantageous and effective alternative pain treatment and a therapy to consider for those that do not respond to opioid treatment. In summary, botulinum toxin is a relatively safe and effective treatment for individuals with certain pain conditions, including migraines. More research is warranted to elucidate chronic and long-term implications of botulinum toxin treatment as well as effects in pregnant, elderly, and adolescent patients.

  12. Therapeutic Approaches of Botulinum Toxin in Gynecology

    OpenAIRE

    Marius Alexandru Moga; Oana Gabriela Dimienescu; Andreea Bălan; Ioan Scârneciu; Barna Barabaș; Liana Pleș

    2018-01-01

    Botulinum toxins (BoNTs) are produced by several anaerobic species of the genus Clostridium and, although they were originally considered lethal toxins, today they find their usefulness in the treatment of a wide range of pathologies in various medical specialties. Botulinum neurotoxin has been identified in seven different isoforms (BoNT-A, BoNT-B, BoNT-C, BoNT-D, BoNT-E, BoNT-F, and BoNT-G). Neurotoxigenic Clostridia can produce more than 40 different BoNT subtypes and, recently, a new BoNT...

  13. A monoclonal antibody based capture ELISA for botulinum neurotoxin serotype B: toxin detection in food

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botulism is a serious foodborne neuroparalyic disease caused by botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT) produced by the anaerobic bacterium Clostridium botulinum. Seven toxin serotypes (A-H) have been described. The majority of human cases of botulism are caused by serotypes A and B followed by E and F. We repo...

  14. Recombinant Lactobacillus casei expressing Clostridium perfringens toxoids α, β2, ε and β1 gives protection against Clostridium perfringens in rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Li; Guo, Zhihou; Liu, Jiali; Wang, Zi; Wang, Ruichong; Li, Yijing; Wang, Li; Xu, Yigang; Tang, Lijie; Qiao, Xinyuan

    2017-07-13

    The present study used Lactobacillus casei ATCC 393 as antigen delivery system to express C. perfringens toxoids α-β2-ε-β1 to construct the recombination Lactobacillus casei pPG-2-α-β2-ε-β1/L. casei 393. After being induced by 1% xylose, the specificity and integrity of recombinant strain were determined by Western-blotting. Rabbits as native animal model were immunized orally with pPG-2-α-β2-ε-β1/L. casei 393 and the titers of specific IgG and sIgA were determined by ELISA. The result showed that oral administration with the recombinants could elicit both local mucosal and systemic immune responses. The proliferation of spleen lymphocytes in rabbits immunized with pPG-2-α-β2-ε-β1/L. casei 393 was observed. Levels of IL-4 and IFN-γ produced were significantly higher in lymphocytes isolated from the vaccine group than those from the control groups. Flow cytometry assay showed that both the percentages of CD4+T cells and CD8+T cells from the vaccine group were significantly increased than the control groups. All these results showed that immunizing with recombinants can elicit both humoral immunity and cellular immunity. Besides, in order to determine the effectiveness of oral immunization with pPG-2-α-β2-ε-β1/L. casei 393, rabbits of vaccine group and control groups were challenged with 1×LD 100 unit of culture filtrate of C. perfringens type C and type D toxins respectively. After challenge, 100% of the immunized rabbits survived, while the rabbits of the control group were killed within 48h. Observation on histopathology showed that histopathological changes were obviously found in heart, liver, spleen, lung, kidney, intestine and brain of rabbits from the control groups, while no apparent histopathological change was observed in the vaccine group. All the results show that pPG-2-α-β2-ε-β1/L. casei 393 can eliciteffective immunoprotection against C. perfringens. All of these suggest that the use of pPG-2-α-β2-ε-β1/L. casei 393 can be

  15. Protein Receptor(s) of Botulinum Neurotoxin

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    therapeutic agent, which is a more effective drug in this form than the pure BoNT (12). Again, the molecular basis of the superior therapeutic efficacy of...neurotoxin B, Nat Struct Biol 7, 693-699 36. Hanson, M. A. and Stevens, R. C. (2000) Cocrystal structure of synaptobrevin-II bound to botulinum...designing novel drugs , Biochimie 82 (2000) 943-53. 21. L.A. Smith, Development of recombinant vaccines for botulinum neurotoxin, Toxicon 36 (1998) 539

  16. Treatment of proctalgia fugax with botulinum A toxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsinelos, P; Kalomenopoulou, M; Christodoulou, K; Katsiba, D; Tsolkas, P; Pilpilidis, I; Papagiannis, A; Kapitsinis, I; Vasiliadis, I; Souparis, T

    2001-11-01

    Two recent studies described a temporal association between a high-amplitude and high-frequency myoelectrical activity of the anal sphincter and the occurrence of proctalgia, which suggest that paroxysmal hyperkinesis of the anus may cause proctalgia fugax. We describe a single case of proctalgia fugax responding to anal sphincter injection of Clostridium botulinum type A toxin. The presumed aetiology of proctalgia fugax is discussed and the possible mechanism of action of botulinum toxin (BTX) in this condition is outlined. Botulinum A toxin seems to be a promising treatment for patients with proctalgia fugax, and further trials appear to be worthwhile for this condition, which has been described as incurable.

  17. The European AntibotABE Framework Program and Its Update: Development of Innovative Botulinum Antibodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine Rasetti-Escargueil

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The goal of the AntiBotABE Program was the development of recombinant antibodies that neutralize botulinum neurotoxins (BoNT A, B and E. These serotypes are lethal and responsible for most human botulinum cases. To improve therapeutic efficacy, the heavy and light chains (HC and LC of the three BoNT serotypes were targeted to achieve a synergistic effect (oligoclonal antibodies. For antibody isolation, macaques were immunized with the recombinant and non-toxic BoNT/A, B or E, HC or LC, followed by the generation of immune phage-display libraries. Antibodies were selected from these libraries against the holotoxin and further analyzed in in vitro and ex vivo assays. For each library, the best ex vivo neutralizing antibody fragments were germline-humanized and expressed as immunoglobulin G (IgGs. The IgGs were tested in vivo, in a standardized model of protection, and challenged with toxins obtained from collections of Clostridium strains. Protective antibody combinations against BoNT/A and BoNT/B were evidenced and for BoNT/E, the anti-LC antibody alone was found highly protective. The combination of these five antibodies as an oligoclonal antibody cocktail can be clinically and regulatorily developed while their high “humanness” predicts a high tolerance in humans.

  18. Recombiner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kikuchi, Nobuo.

    1983-01-01

    Purpose: To shorten the pre-heating time for a recombiner and obtain a uniform temperature distribution for the charged catalyst layer in a BWR type reactor. Constitution: A pre-heating heater is disposed to the outer periphery of a vessel for a recombiner packed with catalysts for recombining hydrogen and oxygen in gases flowing through a radioactive gaseous wastes processing system. Heat pipes for transmitting the heat applied to said container to the catalyst are disposed vertically and horizontally within the container. Different length of the heat pipes are combined. In this way, pre-heating time for the recombiner before the operation start and before the system switching can be shortened and the uniform pre-heating for the inside of the recombiner is also made possible. Further, heater control in the pre-heating can be carried out effectively and with ease. (Moriyama, K.)

  19. Recombiner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osumi, Morimichi.

    1979-01-01

    Purpose: To provide a recombiner which is capable of converting hydrogen gas into water by use of high-frequency heating at comparatively low temperatures and is safe and cheap in cost. Constitution: Hydrogen gas is introduced from an outer pipeline to the main structure of a recombiner, and when it passes through the vicinity of the central part of the recombiner, it is reacted with copper oxide (CuO 2 ) heated to a temperature more than 300 0 C by a high-frequency heater, and converted gently into water by reduction operation (2H 2 + CuO 2 → Cu + 2H 2 O). The thus prepared water is exhausted through the outer pipeline to a suppression pool. A part of hydrogen gas which has not been converted completely into water by the reaction and is remaining as hydrogen is recovered through exhaust nozzles and again introduced into the main structure of the recombiner. (Yoshino, Y.)

  20. Production and characterisation of a neutralising chimeric antibody against botulinum neurotoxin A.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie Prigent

    Full Text Available Botulinum neurotoxins, produced by Clostridium botulinum bacteria, are the causative agent of botulism. This disease only affects a few hundred people each year, thus ranking it among the orphan diseases. However, botulinum toxin type A (BoNT/A is the most potent toxin known to man. Due to their potency and ease of production, these toxins were classified by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC as Category A biothreat agents. For several biothreat agents, like BoNT/A, passive immunotherapy remains the only possible effective treatment allowing in vivo neutralization, despite possible major side effects. Recently, several mouse monoclonal antibodies directed against a recombinant fragment of BoNT/A were produced in our laboratory and most efficiently neutralised the neurotoxin. In the present work, the most powerful one, TA12, was selected for chimerisation. The variable regions of this antibody were thus cloned and fused with the constant counterparts of human IgG1 (kappa light and gamma 1 heavy chains. Chimeric antibody production was evaluated in mammalian myeloma cells (SP2/0-Ag14 and insect cells (Sf9. After purifying the recombinant antibody by affinity chromatography, the biochemical properties of chimeric and mouse antibody were compared. Both have the same very low affinity constant (close to 10 pM and the chimeric antibody exhibited a similar capacity to its parent counterpart in neutralising the toxin in vivo. Its strong affinity and high neutralising potency make this chimeric antibody interesting for immunotherapy treatment in humans in cases of poisoning, particularly as there is a probable limitation of the immunological side effects observed with classical polyclonal antisera from heterologous species.

  1. Cloning, recombinant production, crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction studies of a family 84 glycoside hydrolase from Clostridium perfringens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ficko-Blean, Elizabeth; Boraston, Alisdair B.

    2005-01-01

    Crystallization of a family 84 glycoside hydrolase, a putative virulence factor, secreted by C. perfringens is reported. Clostridium perfringens is a ubiquitous environmental organism that is capable of causing a variety of diseases in mammals, including gas gangrene and necrotic enteritis in humans. The activity of a secreted hyaluronidase, attributed to the NagH protein, contributes to the pathogenicity of this organism. The family 84 catalytic module of one of the three homologues of NagH found in C. perfringens (ATCC 13124) has been cloned. The 69 kDa catalytic module of NagJ, here called GH84C, was overproduced in Escherichia coli and purified by immobilized metal-affinity chromatography (IMAC). Crystals belonging to space group I222 or I2 1 2 1 2 1 with unit-cell parameters a = 130.39, b = 150.05, c = 155.43 Å were obtained that diffracted to 2.1 Å. Selenomethionyl crystals have also been produced, leading to the possibility of solving the phase problem by MAD using synchrotron radiation

  2. Generation and characterization of recombinant bivalent fusion protein r-Cpib for immunotherapy against Clostridium perfringens beta and iota toxemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Shreya; Majumder, Saugata; Kingston, Joseph J; Batra, Harsh V

    2016-02-01

    Clostridium perfringens beta (CPB) and iota (CPI) toxaemias result in some of the most lethal forms of haemorrhagic and necrotic enteritis and sudden death syndrome affecting especially neonates. While CPB enterotoxemia is one of the most common forms of clostridial enterotoxemia, CPI enterotoxemia though putatively considered to be rare is an emerging cause of concern. The similarities in clinical manifestation, gross and histopathology findings of both types of toxaemias coupled to the infrequency of CPI toxaemia might lead to symptomatic misidentification with Type C resulting in therapeutic failure due to habitual administration of CPB anti-toxin which is ineffective against CPI. Therefore in the present study, to generate a composite anti-toxin capable of neutralizing both toxaemias, a novel bivalent chimera r-Cpib was constructed by splicing the non-toxic C terminal binding regions of CPB and CPI, via a flexible glycine linker (G4S) by overlap-extension PCR. The fusion protein was characterized for its therapeutic abilities toward CPI and CPB toxin neutralizations. The r-Cpib was found to be non-toxic and could competitively inhibit binding of CPB to host cell receptors thereby reducing its cytotoxicity. Immunization of mice with r-Cpib generated specific antibodies capable of neutralizing the above toxaemias both in vitro and in vivo. Caco-2 cells exposed to a mixture of anti-r-Cpib sera and native CPI or CPB, displayed significantly superior protection against the respective toxins while passive challenge of mice with a similar mixture resulted in 83 and 91% protection against CPI and CPB respectively. Alternatively, mice exposed to a mixture of sham sera and native toxins died within 2-3 days. This work thus demonstrates r-Cpib as a novel bivalent fusion protein capable of efficient immunotherapy against C. perfringens CPI and CPB toxaemia. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Update on botulinum neurotoxin use in aesthetic dermatology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Omer; Keller, Emily C; Arndt, Kenneth A

    2014-12-01

    Botulinum toxins are among the most widely studied and versatile drugs in the medicinal market. Since their extraction from Clostridium botulinum, they have been harnessed and incorporated into different formulations with varied properties and actions. These products have been used to treat countless disorders such as musculoskeletal disorders, headaches, and eye disorders, among many others. In the realm of aesthetic cutaneous medicine, the evolution and creativity in the use of botulinum toxins has been swift and ever changing. Knowledge of the science and innovation behind this toxin enables the user to provide the patient with a variety of treatment options founded in evidence-based medicine. This review will highlight the properties and actions of the newer, more recent neurotoxin preparations, as well as some of the latest and novel therapeutic applications of botulinum toxins.

  4. Mathematical modeling and growth kinetics of Clostridium sporogenes in cooked beef

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clostridium sporogenes PA 3679 is a common surrogate for proteolytic Clostridium botulinum for thermal process development and validation. However, little information is available concerning the growth kinetics of C. sporogenes in food. Therefore, the objective of this study was to investigate the...

  5. A Monoclonal Antibody Based Capture ELISA for Botulinum Neurotoxin Serotype B: Toxin Detection in Food

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larry H. Stanker

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Botulism is a serious foodborne neuroparalytic disease, caused by botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT, produced by the anaerobic bacterium Clostridium botulinum. Seven toxin serotypes (A–H have been described. The majority of human cases of botulism are caused by serotypes A and B followed by E and F. We report here a group of serotype B specific monoclonal antibodies (mAbs capable of binding toxin under physiological conditions. Thus, they serve as capture antibodies for a sandwich (capture ELISA. The antibodies were generated using recombinant peptide fragments corresponding to the receptor-binding domain of the toxin heavy chain as immunogen. Their binding properties suggest that they bind a complex epitope with dissociation constants (KD’s for individual antibodies ranging from 10 to 48 × 10−11 M. Assay performance for all possible combinations of capture-detector antibody pairs was evaluated and the antibody pair resulting in the lowest level of detection (L.O.D., ~20 pg/mL was determined. Toxin was detected in spiked dairy samples with good recoveries at concentrations as low as 0.5 pg/mL and in ground beef samples at levels as low as 2 ng/g. Thus, the sandwich ELISA described here uses mAb for both the capture and detector antibodies (binding different epitopes on the toxin molecule and readily detects toxin in those food samples tested.

  6. A monoclonal antibody based capture ELISA for botulinum neurotoxin serotype B: toxin detection in food.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanker, Larry H; Scotcher, Miles C; Cheng, Luisa; Ching, Kathryn; McGarvey, Jeffery; Hodge, David; Hnasko, Robert

    2013-11-18

    Botulism is a serious foodborne neuroparalytic disease, caused by botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT), produced by the anaerobic bacterium Clostridium botulinum. Seven toxin serotypes (A-H) have been described. The majority of human cases of botulism are caused by serotypes A and B followed by E and F. We report here a group of serotype B specific monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) capable of binding toxin under physiological conditions. Thus, they serve as capture antibodies for a sandwich (capture) ELISA. The antibodies were generated using recombinant peptide fragments corresponding to the receptor-binding domain of the toxin heavy chain as immunogen. Their binding properties suggest that they bind a complex epitope with dissociation constants (KD's) for individual antibodies ranging from 10 to 48 × 10-11 M. Assay performance for all possible combinations of capture-detector antibody pairs was evaluated and the antibody pair resulting in the lowest level of detection (L.O.D.), ~20 pg/mL was determined. Toxin was detected in spiked dairy samples with good recoveries at concentrations as low as 0.5 pg/mL and in ground beef samples at levels as low as 2 ng/g. Thus, the sandwich ELISA described here uses mAb for both the capture and detector antibodies (binding different epitopes on the toxin molecule) and readily detects toxin in those food samples tested.

  7. Recombiner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saalfrank, H.

    1985-01-01

    Air containing hydrogen can be oxidized by heating in a container called a recombiner, in order to avoid the collection of hydrogen. The container is long and a large number of straight heating bars are arranged in parallel in it and they are flanged to a lid. The heating bars are surrounded by tubes, in order to obtain good heat transfer by a narrow annular gap. (orig.) [de

  8. Botulinum toxin injection - larynx

    Science.gov (United States)

    Injection laryngoplasty; Botox - larynx: spasmodic dysphonia-BTX; Essential voice tremor (EVT)-btx; Glottic insufficiency; Percutaneous electromyography - guided botulinum toxin treatment; Percutaneous indirect laryngoscopy - guided botulinum toxin treatment; ...

  9. Efficacy of a potential trivalent vaccine based on Hc fragments of botulinum toxins A, B, and E produced in a cell-free expression system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zichel, R; Mimran, A; Keren, A; Barnea, A; Steinberger-Levy, I; Marcus, D; Turgeman, A; Reuveny, S

    2010-05-01

    Botulinum toxins produced by the anaerobic bacterium Clostridium botulinum are the most potent biological toxins in nature. Traditionally, people at risk are immunized with a formaldehyde-inactivated toxin complex. Second generation vaccines are based on the recombinant carboxy-terminal heavy-chain (Hc) fragment of the neurotoxin. However, the materialization of this approach is challenging, mainly due to the high AT content of clostridial genes. Herein, we present an alternative strategy in which the native genes encoding Hc proteins of botulinum toxins A, B, and E were used to express the recombinant Hc fragments in a cell-free expression system. We used the unique property of this open system to introduce different combinations of chaperone systems, protein disulfide isomerase (PDI), and reducing/oxidizing environments directly to the expression reaction. Optimized expression conditions led to increased production of soluble Hc protein, which was successfully scaled up using a continuous exchange (CE) cell-free system. Hc proteins were produced at a concentration of more than 1 mg/ml and purified by one-step Ni(+) affinity chromatography. Mice immunized with three injections containing 5 microg of any of the in vitro-expressed, alum-absorbed, Hc vaccines generated a serum enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) titer of 10(5) against the native toxin complex, which enabled protection against a high-dose toxin challenge (10(3) to 10(6) mouse 50% lethal dose [MsLD(50)]). Finally, immunization with a trivalent HcA, HcB, and HcE vaccine protected mice against the corresponding trivalent 10(5) MsLD(50) toxin challenge. Our results together with the latest developments in scalability of the in vitro protein expression systems offer alternative routes for the preparation of botulinum vaccine.

  10. Comparative pathogenomics of Clostridium tetani.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan E Cohen

    Full Text Available Clostridium tetani and Clostridium botulinum produce two of the most potent neurotoxins known, tetanus neurotoxin and botulinum neurotoxin, respectively. Extensive biochemical and genetic investigation has been devoted to identifying and characterizing various C. botulinum strains. Less effort has been focused on studying C. tetani likely because recently sequenced strains of C. tetani show much less genetic diversity than C. botulinum strains and because widespread vaccination efforts have reduced the public health threat from tetanus. Our aim was to acquire genomic data on the U.S. vaccine strain of C. tetani to better understand its genetic relationship to previously published genomic data from European vaccine strains. We performed high throughput genomic sequence analysis on two wild-type and two vaccine C. tetani strains. Comparative genomic analysis was performed using these and previously published genomic data for seven other C. tetani strains. Our analysis focused on single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP and four distinct constituents of the mobile genome (mobilome: a hypervariable flagellar glycosylation island region, five conserved bacteriophage insertion regions, variations in three CRISPR (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats-Cas (CRISPR-associated systems, and a single plasmid. Intact type IA and IB CRISPR/Cas systems were within 10 of 11 strains. A type IIIA CRISPR/Cas system was present in two strains. Phage infection histories derived from CRISPR-Cas sequences indicate C. tetani encounters phages common among commensal gut bacteria and soil-borne organisms consistent with C. tetani distribution in nature. All vaccine strains form a clade distinct from currently sequenced wild type strains when considering variations in these mobile elements. SNP, flagellar glycosylation island, prophage content and CRISPR/Cas phylogenic histories provide tentative evidence suggesting vaccine and wild type strains share a

  11. Comparative pathogenomics of Clostridium tetani.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Jonathan E; Wang, Rong; Shen, Rong-Fong; Wu, Wells W; Keller, James E

    2017-01-01

    Clostridium tetani and Clostridium botulinum produce two of the most potent neurotoxins known, tetanus neurotoxin and botulinum neurotoxin, respectively. Extensive biochemical and genetic investigation has been devoted to identifying and characterizing various C. botulinum strains. Less effort has been focused on studying C. tetani likely because recently sequenced strains of C. tetani show much less genetic diversity than C. botulinum strains and because widespread vaccination efforts have reduced the public health threat from tetanus. Our aim was to acquire genomic data on the U.S. vaccine strain of C. tetani to better understand its genetic relationship to previously published genomic data from European vaccine strains. We performed high throughput genomic sequence analysis on two wild-type and two vaccine C. tetani strains. Comparative genomic analysis was performed using these and previously published genomic data for seven other C. tetani strains. Our analysis focused on single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) and four distinct constituents of the mobile genome (mobilome): a hypervariable flagellar glycosylation island region, five conserved bacteriophage insertion regions, variations in three CRISPR (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats)-Cas (CRISPR-associated) systems, and a single plasmid. Intact type IA and IB CRISPR/Cas systems were within 10 of 11 strains. A type IIIA CRISPR/Cas system was present in two strains. Phage infection histories derived from CRISPR-Cas sequences indicate C. tetani encounters phages common among commensal gut bacteria and soil-borne organisms consistent with C. tetani distribution in nature. All vaccine strains form a clade distinct from currently sequenced wild type strains when considering variations in these mobile elements. SNP, flagellar glycosylation island, prophage content and CRISPR/Cas phylogenic histories provide tentative evidence suggesting vaccine and wild type strains share a common ancestor.

  12. Improved soluble expression and characterization of the Hc domain of Clostridium botulinum neurotoxin serotype A in Escherichia coli by using a PCR-synthesized gene and a Trx co-expression strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Rongchang; Shi, Jing; Cai, Kun; Tu, Wei; Hou, Xiaojun; Liu, Hao; Xiao, Le; Wang, Qin; Tang, Yunming; Wang, Hui

    2010-05-01

    Botulinum neurotoxin serotype A (BoNT/A) is an extremely potent bacterial protein toxin. The Hc fragment of BoNT/A (AHc) was shown to be non-toxic, antigenic, and capable of eliciting a protective immunity in animals challenged with homologous BoNT. In this study, we synthesized AHc gene by using T4 DNA ligase and PCR. The AHc was expressed at a high level in Escherichia coli successfully. Because of using the Trx co-expression strain, the expressed AHc is in a soluble and active form. The yield of the purified AHc was about 70mg/L, and its purity was up to 90% through one-step affinity chromatography. The AHc was positively identified by the antibodies raised against BoNT/A using immunological-dot-blot and Western blot assays. AHc was shown to bind with gangliosides and elicit immunity against BoNT/A, indicating that the expressed and purified AHc protein retains a functionally active conformation. Furthermore, the purified AHc has a strong immunogenicity and can be used as a potential subunit candidate vaccine for botulinum toxin serotype A. Copyright (c) 2009 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Therapeutic Approaches of Botulinum Toxin in Gynecology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moga, Marius Alexandru; Dimienescu, Oana Gabriela; Bălan, Andreea; Scârneciu, Ioan; Barabaș, Barna; Pleș, Liana

    2018-04-21

    Botulinum toxins (BoNTs) are produced by several anaerobic species of the genus Clostridium and, although they were originally considered lethal toxins, today they find their usefulness in the treatment of a wide range of pathologies in various medical specialties. Botulinum neurotoxin has been identified in seven different isoforms (BoNT-A, BoNT-B, BoNT-C, BoNT-D, BoNT-E, BoNT-F, and BoNT-G). Neurotoxigenic Clostridia can produce more than 40 different BoNT subtypes and, recently, a new BoNT serotype (BoNT-X) has been reported in some studies. BoNT-X has not been shown to actually be an active neurotoxin despite its catalytically active LC, so it should be described as a putative eighth serotype. The mechanism of action of the serotypes is similar: they inhibit the release of acetylcholine from the nerve endings but their therapeutically potency varies. Botulinum toxin type A (BoNT-A) is the most studied serotype for therapeutic purposes. Regarding the gynecological pathology, a series of studies based on the efficiency of its use in the treatment of refractory myofascial pelvic pain, vaginism, dyspareunia, vulvodynia and overactive bladder or urinary incontinence have been reported. The current study is a review of the literature regarding the efficiency of BoNT-A in the gynecological pathology and on the long and short-term effects of its administration.

  14. Therapeutic Approaches of Botulinum Toxin in Gynecology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marius Alexandru Moga

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Botulinum toxins (BoNTs are produced by several anaerobic species of the genus Clostridium and, although they were originally considered lethal toxins, today they find their usefulness in the treatment of a wide range of pathologies in various medical specialties. Botulinum neurotoxin has been identified in seven different isoforms (BoNT-A, BoNT-B, BoNT-C, BoNT-D, BoNT-E, BoNT-F, and BoNT-G. Neurotoxigenic Clostridia can produce more than 40 different BoNT subtypes and, recently, a new BoNT serotype (BoNT-X has been reported in some studies. BoNT-X has not been shown to actually be an active neurotoxin despite its catalytically active LC, so it should be described as a putative eighth serotype. The mechanism of action of the serotypes is similar: they inhibit the release of acetylcholine from the nerve endings but their therapeutically potency varies. Botulinum toxin type A (BoNT-A is the most studied serotype for therapeutic purposes. Regarding the gynecological pathology, a series of studies based on the efficiency of its use in the treatment of refractory myofascial pelvic pain, vaginism, dyspareunia, vulvodynia and overactive bladder or urinary incontinence have been reported. The current study is a review of the literature regarding the efficiency of BoNT-A in the gynecological pathology and on the long and short-term effects of its administration.

  15. Botulinum Neurotoxin Injections

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... botulinum neurotoxin as much art as it is science. It is in your best interest to locate the most well-trained and experienced doctor you can find. Before making an appointment to receive botulinum neuro toxin injections, ask the office personnel which doctor ...

  16. Characterization of Hemagglutinin Negative Botulinum Progenitor Toxins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzanne R. Kalb

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Botulism is a disease involving intoxication with botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs, toxic proteins produced by Clostridium botulinum and other clostridia. The 150 kDa neurotoxin is produced in conjunction with other proteins to form the botulinum progenitor toxin complex (PTC, alternating in size from 300 kDa to 500 kDa. These progenitor complexes can be classified into hemagglutinin positive or hemagglutinin negative, depending on the ability of some of the neurotoxin-associated proteins (NAPs to cause hemagglutination. The hemagglutinin positive progenitor toxin complex consists of BoNT, nontoxic non-hemagglutinin (NTNH, and three hemagglutinin proteins; HA-70, HA-33, and HA-17. Hemagglutinin negative progenitor toxin complexes contain BoNT and NTNH as the minimally functional PTC (M-PTC, but not the three hemagglutinin proteins. Interestingly, the genome of hemagglutinin negative progenitor toxin complexes comprises open reading frames (orfs which encode for three proteins, but the existence of these proteins has not yet been extensively demonstrated. In this work, we demonstrate that these three proteins exist and form part of the PTC for hemagglutinin negative complexes. Several hemagglutinin negative strains producing BoNT/A, /E, and /F were found to contain the three open reading frame proteins. Additionally, several BoNT/A-containing bivalent strains were examined, and NAPs from both genes, including the open reading frame proteins, were associated with BoNT/A. The open reading frame encoded proteins are more easily removed from the botulinum complex than the hemagglutinin proteins, but are present in several BoNT/A and /F toxin preparations. These are not easily removed from the BoNT/E complex, however, and are present even in commercially-available purified BoNT/E complex.

  17. Clostridium difficile

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, Guido J.; Nieuwdorp, Max

    2017-01-01

    Clostridium difficileinfection (CDI), inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), and metabolic diseases such as obesity, type 2 diabetes (T2D), and nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). Fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) is currently tested as a therapeutic option in various diseases and can also help to

  18. Topical botulinum toxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Ashley; Nasir, Adnan

    2010-03-01

    Nanotechnology is a rapidly growing discipline that capitalizes on the unique properties of matter engineered on the nanoscale. Vehicles incorporating nanotechnology have led to great strides in drug delivery, allowing for increased active ingredient stability, bioavailability, and site-specific targeting. Botulinum toxin has historically been used for the correction of neurological and neuromuscular disorders, such as torticollis, blepharospasm, and strabismus. Recent dermatological indications have been for the management of axillary hyperhydrosis and facial rhytides. Traditional methods of botulinum toxin delivery have been needle-based. These have been associated with increased pain and cost. Newer methods of botulinum toxin formulation have yielded topical preparations that are bioactive in small pilot clinical studies. While there are some risks associated with topical delivery, the refinement and standardization of delivery systems and techniques for the topical administration of botulinum toxin using nanotechnology is anticipated in the near future.

  19. Beneficial and harmful roles of bacteria from the Clostridium genus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samul, Dorota; Worsztynowicz, Paulina; Leja, Katarzyna; Grajek, Włodzimierz

    2013-01-01

    Bacteria of the Clostridium genus are often described only as a biological threat and a foe of mankind. However, many of them have positive properties and thanks to them they may be used in many industry branches (e.g., in solvents and alcohol production, in medicine, and also in esthetic cosmetology). During the last 10 years interest in application of C. botulinum and C. tetani in medicine significantly increased. Currently, the structure and biochemical properties of neurotoxins produced by these bacterial species, as well as possibilities of application of such toxins as botulinum as a therapeutic factor in humans, are being intensely researched. The main aim of this article is to demonstrate that bacteria from Clostridium spp. are not only pathogens and the enemy of humanity but they also have many important beneficial properties which make them usable among many chemical, medical, and cosmetic applications.

  20. The first non Clostridial botulinum-like toxin cleaves VAMP within the juxtamembrane domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zornetta, Irene; Azarnia Tehran, Domenico; Arrigoni, Giorgio; Anniballi, Fabrizio; Bano, Luca; Leka, Oneda; Zanotti, Giuseppe; Binz, Thomas; Montecucco, Cesare

    2016-07-22

    The genome of Weissella oryzae SG25T was recently sequenced and a botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT) like gene was identified by bioinformatics methods. The typical three-domains organization of BoNTs with a N-terminal metalloprotease domain, a translocation and a cell binding domains could be identified. The BoNT family of neurotoxins is rapidly growing, but this was the first indication of the possible expression of a BoNT toxin outside the Clostridium genus. We performed molecular modeling and dynamics simulations showing that the 50 kDa N-terminal domain folds very similarly to the metalloprotease domain of BoNT/B, whilst the binding part is different. However, neither the recombinant metalloprotease nor the binding domains showed cross-reactivity with the standard antisera that define the seven serotypes of BoNTs. We found that the purified Weissella metalloprotease cleaves VAMP at a single site untouched by the other VAMP-specific BoNTs. This site is a unique Trp-Trp peptide bond located within the juxtamembrane segment of VAMP which is essential for neurotransmitter release. Therefore, the present study identifies the first non-Clostridial BoNT-like metalloprotease that cleaves VAMP at a novel and relevant site and we propose to label it BoNT/Wo.

  1. Novel Botulinum Neurotoxins: Exploring Underneath the Iceberg Tip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tehran, Domenico Azarnia; Pirazzini, Marco

    2018-05-10

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs), the etiological agents of botulism, are the deadliest toxins known to humans. Yet, thanks to their biological and toxicological features, BoNTs have become sophisticated tools to study neuronal physiology and valuable therapeutics for an increasing number of human disorders. BoNTs are produced by multiple bacteria of the genus Clostridium and, on the basis of their different immunological properties, were classified as seven distinct types of toxin. BoNT classification remained stagnant for the last 50 years until, via bioinformatics and high-throughput sequencing techniques, dozens of BoNT variants, novel serotypes as well as BoNT-like toxins within non-clostridial species have been discovered. Here, we discuss how the now “booming field” of botulinum neurotoxin may shed light on their evolutionary origin and open exciting avenues for future therapeutic applications.

  2. Novel Botulinum Neurotoxins: Exploring Underneath the Iceberg Tip

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Domenico Azarnia Tehran

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs, the etiological agents of botulism, are the deadliest toxins known to humans. Yet, thanks to their biological and toxicological features, BoNTs have become sophisticated tools to study neuronal physiology and valuable therapeutics for an increasing number of human disorders. BoNTs are produced by multiple bacteria of the genus Clostridium and, on the basis of their different immunological properties, were classified as seven distinct types of toxin. BoNT classification remained stagnant for the last 50 years until, via bioinformatics and high-throughput sequencing techniques, dozens of BoNT variants, novel serotypes as well as BoNT-like toxins within non-clostridial species have been discovered. Here, we discuss how the now “booming field” of botulinum neurotoxin may shed light on their evolutionary origin and open exciting avenues for future therapeutic applications.

  3. Botulinum neurotoxin vaccines: Past history and recent developments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusnak, Janice M; Smith, Leonard A

    2009-12-01

    Botulinum toxin may cause a neuroparalytic illness that may result in respiratory failure and require prolonged mechanical ventilation. As medical resources needed for supportive care of botulism in a bioterrorist event may quickly overwhelm the local healthcare systems, biodefense research efforts have been directed towards the development of a vaccine to prevent botulism. While human botulism has been caused only by toxin serotypes A, B, and E (rarely serotype F), all seven known immunologically distinct toxin serotypes (A - G) may potentially cause intoxication in humans from a bioterrorist event. A pentavalent (ABCDE) botulinum toxoid (PBT) has been administered as an investigation new drug (IND) to at-risk individuals for nearly 50 years. Due to declining immunogenicity of the PBT, research efforts have been directed at development of both improved (less local reactogenicity) botulinum toxoids and recombinant vaccines as potential vaccine candidates to replace the PBT.

  4. Differentiating Botulinum Neurotoxin-Producing Clostridia with a Simple, Multiplex PCR Assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, Charles H D; Vazquez, Adam J; Hill, Karen; Smith, Theresa J; Nottingham, Roxanne; Stone, Nathan E; Sobek, Colin J; Cocking, Jill H; Fernández, Rafael A; Caballero, Patricia A; Leiser, Owen P; Keim, Paul; Sahl, Jason W

    2017-09-15

    Diverse members of the genus Clostridium produce botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs), which cause a flaccid paralysis known as botulism. While multiple species of clostridia produce BoNTs, the majority of human botulism cases have been attributed to Clostridium botulinum groups I and II. Recent comparative genomic studies have demonstrated the genomic diversity within these BoNT-producing species. This report introduces a multiplex PCR assay for differentiating members of C. botulinum group I, C. sporogenes , and two major subgroups within C. botulinum group II. Coding region sequences unique to each of the four species/subgroups were identified by in silico analyses of thousands of genome assemblies, and PCR primers were designed to amplify each marker. The resulting multiplex PCR assay correctly assigned 41 tested isolates to the appropriate species or subgroup. A separate PCR assay to determine the presence of the ntnh gene (a gene associated with the botulinum neurotoxin gene cluster) was developed and validated. The ntnh gene PCR assay provides information about the presence or absence of the botulinum neurotoxin gene cluster and the type of gene cluster present ( ha positive [ ha + ] or orfX + ). The increased availability of whole-genome sequence data and comparative genomic tools enabled the design of these assays, which provide valuable information for characterizing BoNT-producing clostridia. The PCR assays are rapid, inexpensive tests that can be applied to a variety of sample types to assign isolates to species/subgroups and to detect clostridia with botulinum neurotoxin gene ( bont ) clusters. IMPORTANCE Diverse clostridia produce the botulinum neurotoxin, one of the most potent known neurotoxins. In this study, a multiplex PCR assay was developed to differentiate clostridia that are most commonly isolated in connection with human botulism cases: C. botulinum group I, C. sporogenes , and two major subgroups within C. botulinum group II. Since Bo

  5. Headache and botulinum toxin

    OpenAIRE

    Porta, M.; Camerlingo, M.

    2005-01-01

    The authors discuss clinical and international experience about botulinum toxins (BTX types A and B) in headache treatment. Data from literature suggest good results for the treatment of tensiontype headache, migraine and chronic tension–type headache. In the present paper mechanisms of action and injection sites will also be discussed.

  6. Diffusion of Botulinum Toxins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew A. Brodsky

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: It is generally agreed that diffusion of botulinum toxin occurs, but the extent of the spread and its clinical importance are disputed. Many factors have been suggested to play a role but which have the most clinical relevance is a subject of much discussion.Methods: This review discusses the variables affecting diffusion, including protein composition and molecular size as well as injection factors (e.g., volume, dose, injection method. It also discusses data on diffusion from comparative studies in animal models and human clinical trials that illustrate differences between the available botulinum toxin products (onabotulinumtoxinA, abobotulinumtoxinA, incobotulinumtoxinA, and rimabotulinumtoxinB.Results: Neither molecular weight nor the presence of complexing proteins appears to affect diffusion; however, injection volume, concentration, and dose all play roles and are modifiable. Both animal and human studies show that botulinum toxin products are not interchangeable, and that some products are associated with greater diffusion and higher rates of diffusion-related adverse events than others.Discussion: Each of the botulinum toxins is a unique pharmacologic entity. A working knowledge of the different serotypes is essential to avoid unwanted diffusion-related adverse events. In addition, clinicians should be aware that the factors influencing diffusion may range from properties intrinsic to the drug to accurate muscle selection as well as dilution, volume, and dose injected.

  7. Topical Botulinum Toxin

    OpenAIRE

    Collins, Ashley; Nasir, Adnan

    2010-01-01

    Nanotechnology is a rapidly growing discipline that capitalizes on the unique properties of matter engineered on the nanoscale. Vehicles incorporating nanotechnology have led to great strides in drug delivery, allowing for increased active ingredient stability, bioavailability, and site-specific targeting. Botulinum toxin has historically been used for the correction of neurological and neuromuscular disorders, such as torticollis, blepharospasm, and strabismus. Recent dermatological indicati...

  8. Antipruritic effects of botulinum neurotoxins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gazerani, Parisa

    2018-01-01

    This review explores current evidence to demonstrate that botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) exert antipruritic effects. Both experimental and clinical conditions in which botulinum neurotoxins have been applied for pruritus relief will be presented and significant findings will be highlighted. Potent....... Potential mechanisms underlying antipruritic effects will also be discussed and ongoing challenges and unmet needs will be addressed.......This review explores current evidence to demonstrate that botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) exert antipruritic effects. Both experimental and clinical conditions in which botulinum neurotoxins have been applied for pruritus relief will be presented and significant findings will be highlighted...

  9. Botulinum toxin: yesterday, today, tomorrow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. R. Artemenko

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Botulinum toxin (BoNT is a bacterial neurotoxin presented with seven serotypes that inhibit neurotransmitter release from nerve endings. The serotypes of BoNT are antigenically dissimilar, act via different, but interconnected mechanisms, and are not interchangeable. The activity of BoNT is associated with impaired neuroexocytosis occurring in several steps: from the binding of BoNT to its specific receptor on the axon terminal membrane to the proteolytic enzymatic cleavage of SNARE substrate. The effect of BoNT is considered to be restricted to the peripheral nervous system, but when given in particularly high doses, it has been recently shown to affect individual brain structures. In addition, by modulating peripheral afferentation, BoNT may influence the excitability of central neuronal structures at both spinal and cortical levels. Only BoNT serotypes A and B are used in clinical practice and aesthetic medicine. The type A has gained the widest acceptance as a therapeutic agent for more than 100 abnormalities manifesting themselves as muscular hyperactivity, hyperfunction of endocrine gland, and chronic pain. The effect of BoNT preparations shows itself 2-5 days after injection, lasts 3 months or more, and gradually decreases with as a result of pharmacokinetic and intracellular reparative processes. Biotechnology advances and potentialities allow purposefully modification of the protein molecular structure of BoNT, which expands the use and efficiency of performed therapy with neurotoxins. Recombinant technologies provide a combination of major therapeutic properties of each used BoNT serotype and expand indications for recombinant chimeric toxins.

  10. Botulinum Toxin (Botox) for Facial Wrinkles

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Stories Español Eye Health / Eye Health A-Z Botulinum Toxin (Botox) for Facial Wrinkles Sections Botulinum Toxin (Botox) ... Facial Wrinkles How Does Botulinum Toxin (Botox) Work? Botulinum Toxin (Botox) for Facial Wrinkles Leer en Español: La ...

  11. USE OF BOTULINUM TOXIN TYPE A IN THE TREATMENT OF SPASTICITY IN CHILDREN WITH CEREBRAL PALSY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ljiljana Lazić

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Cerebral palsy has an incidence of about 1-2 per 1000 live births, and in spite of the progress of neonatal medicine, it seems that the incidence will not subside in the near future. The most important characteristic of cerebral palsy is movement abnormality: spasticity, chorea, athetosis, ataxia, dystonia, as well as their different combinations. About 70% of children who suffer from cerebral palsy also suffer from some form of spasticity. Spasticity is a type of muscle hypertonicity characterized by rapid increase in resistance to passive stretching of muscles. The interest for botulinum toxin application in the treatment of spasticity has dramatically increased in the last 10 years. Botulinum toxin is the most powerful neurotoxin that is found in nature. It is produced by anaerobic bacteria – clostridium botulinum. It is produced in eight serotypes of which type A is the most commonly used. Botulinum toxin blocks neuromuscular transmission and causes irreversible weakness of the treated muscle. It has been used since 1993 in the treatment of cerebral palsy in children. The toxin effect is permanent and it results in irreversible denervation. Functional recovery is possible after 2-4 months, due to sprouting of nerve endings and the formation of new synaptic contacts. Treatment with botulinum toxin is safe. Adverse effects are rare, temporary and completely reversible. Application of botulinum toxin prevents or reduces contractures and deformities, and thus delays or avoids surgical treatment. Yet, physical therapy, which prolongs and improves the effects of botulinum toxin, remains an essential and most important form of therapy in the treatment of children with cerebral palsy.

  12. Botulinum toxin in trigeminal neuralgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo-Álvarez, Federico; Hernando de la Bárcena, Ignacio; Marzo-Sola, María Eugenia

    2017-01-06

    Trigeminal neuralgia is one of the most disabling facial pain syndromes, with a significant impact on patients' quality of life. Pharmacotherapy is the first choice for treatment but cases of drug resistance often require new strategies, among which various interventional treatments have been used. In recent years a new therapeutic strategy consisting of botulinum toxin has emerged, with promising results. We reviewed clinical cases and case series, open-label studies and randomized clinical trials examining the use of botulinum toxin for drug-refractory trigeminal neuralgia published in the literature. The administration of botulinum toxin has proven to be a safe and effective therapeutic strategy in patients with drug-refractory idiopathic trigeminal neuralgia, but many questions remain unanswered as to the precise role of botulinum toxin in the treatment of this disease. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  13. A recombinant fusion toxin based on enzymatic inactive C3bot1 selectively targets macrophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lydia Dmochewitz

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The C3bot1 protein (~23 kDa from Clostridium botulinum ADP-ribosylates and thereby inactivates Rho. C3bot1 is selectively taken up into the cytosol of monocytes/macrophages but not of other cell types such as epithelial cells or fibroblasts. Most likely, the internalization occurs by a specific endocytotic pathway via acidified endosomes. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here, we tested whether enzymatic inactive C3bot1E174Q serves as a macrophage-selective transport system for delivery of enzymatic active proteins into the cytosol of such cells. Having confirmed that C3bot1E174Q does not induce macrophage activation, we used the actin ADP-ribosylating C2I (∼50 kDa from Clostridium botulinum as a reporter enzyme for C3bot1E174Q-mediated delivery into macrophages. The recombinant C3bot1E174Q-C2I fusion toxin was cloned and expressed as GST-protein in Escherichia coli. Purified C3bot1E174Q-C2I was recognized by antibodies against C2I and C3bot and showed C2I-specific enzyme activity in vitro. When applied to cultured cells C3bot1E174Q-C2I ADP-ribosylated actin in the cytosol of macrophages including J774A.1 and RAW264.7 cell lines as well as primary cultured human macrophages but not of epithelial cells. Together with confocal fluorescence microscopy experiments, the biochemical data indicate the selective uptake of a recombinant C3-fusion toxin into the cytosol of macrophages. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: In summary, we demonstrated that C3bot1E174Q can be used as a delivery system for fast, selective and specific transport of enzymes into the cytosol of living macrophages. Therefore, C3-based fusion toxins can represent valuable molecular tools in experimental macrophage pharmacology and cell biology as well as attractive candidates to develop new therapeutic approaches against macrophage-associated diseases.

  14. The Clostridium sporulation programs: diversity and preservation of endospore differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Hinai, Mohab A; Jones, Shawn W; Papoutsakis, Eleftherios T

    2015-03-01

    Bacillus and Clostridium organisms initiate the sporulation process when unfavorable conditions are detected. The sporulation process is a carefully orchestrated cascade of events at both the transcriptional and posttranslational levels involving a multitude of sigma factors, transcription factors, proteases, and phosphatases. Like Bacillus genomes, sequenced Clostridium genomes contain genes for all major sporulation-specific transcription and sigma factors (spo0A, sigH, sigF, sigE, sigG, and sigK) that orchestrate the sporulation program. However, recent studies have shown that there are substantial differences in the sporulation programs between the two genera as well as among different Clostridium species. First, in the absence of a Bacillus-like phosphorelay system, activation of Spo0A in Clostridium organisms is carried out by a number of orphan histidine kinases. Second, downstream of Spo0A, the transcriptional and posttranslational regulation of the canonical set of four sporulation-specific sigma factors (σ(F), σ(E), σ(G), and σ(K)) display different patterns, not only compared to Bacillus but also among Clostridium organisms. Finally, recent studies demonstrated that σ(K), the last sigma factor to be activated according to the Bacillus subtilis model, is involved in the very early stages of sporulation in Clostridium acetobutylicum, C. perfringens, and C. botulinum as well as in the very late stages of spore maturation in C. acetobutylicum. Despite profound differences in initiation, propagation, and orchestration of expression of spore morphogenetic components, these findings demonstrate not only the robustness of the endospore sporulation program but also the plasticity of the program to generate different complex phenotypes, some apparently regulated at the epigenetic level. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  15. In-Vivo Neutralization of Botulinum Neurotoxin Serotype E Using Rabbit Polyclonal Antibody Developed against BoNT/E Light Chain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rani, Sarita; Ponmariappan, S; Sharma, Arti; Kamboj, D V; Jain, A K

    2017-01-01

    Clostridium botulinum is an obligate anaerobic, Gram positive bacterium that secretes extremely toxic substances known as botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) that cause serious paralytic illness called botulism. Based upon the serological properties, these neurotoxin have been classified into seven serotypes designated from A to G. Due to extreme toxicity of BoNTs, these neurotoxins have been designated as category A biowarfare agents. There is no commercial neutralizing antibody available for the treatment of botulism. Hence there is an urgent need to develop therapeutic intervention for prevention and cure of botulism within short period. BoNT antiserum injection is still the effective treatment. In the present study, the recombinant light chain of BoNT/E was successfully purified in soluble form. The purified rBoNT/E LC was used for the generation of polyclonal antibody in rabbit. In order to find out the neutralizing capacity of generated antisera, rabbit antiserum was incubated with 20 LD50 of botulinum neurotoxin type E for 1 hour at 37°C and then injected intraperitoneally (IP) into mice. Further in another set of experiments antiserum was administered in different ways that included administration of - antiserum and BoNT/E toxin simultaneously without preincubation, one after another at the same and different time points for its therapeutic ability. To find out cross neutralization capacity, rBoNT/E LC antiserum was pre-incubated with 5 LD50 of BoNT/A, BoNT/B, BoNT/F and then injected (IP) into mice. In all the cases mice were observed continuously for 96 hours. The results clearly indicate that developed polyclonal rabbit antiserum showed serotype specific neutralization of BoNT/E toxin only but not of BoNT/A, BoNT/B and BoNT/F. The developed antibodies will be used for preventive and therapeutic intervention of type 'E' botulism. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  16. On the translocation of botulinum and tetanus neurotoxins across the membrane of acidic intracellular compartments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirazzini, Marco; Azarnia Tehran, Domenico; Leka, Oneda; Zanetti, Giulia; Rossetto, Ornella; Montecucco, Cesare

    2016-03-01

    Tetanus and botulinum neurotoxins are produced by anaerobic bacteria of the genus Clostridium and are the most poisonous toxins known, with 50% mouse lethal dose comprised within the range of 0.1-few nanograms per Kg, depending on the individual toxin. Botulinum neurotoxins are similarly toxic to humans and can therefore be considered for potential use in bioterrorism. At the same time, their neurospecificity and reversibility of action make them excellent therapeutics for a growing and heterogeneous number of human diseases that are characterized by a hyperactivity of peripheral nerve terminals. The complete crystallographic structure is available for some botulinum toxins, and reveals that they consist of four domains functionally related to the four steps of their mechanism of neuron intoxication: 1) binding to specific receptors of the presynaptic membrane; 2) internalization via endocytic vesicles; 3) translocation across the membrane of endocytic vesicles into the neuronal cytosol; 4) catalytic activity of the enzymatic moiety directed towards the SNARE proteins. Despite the many advances in understanding the structure-mechanism relationship of tetanus and botulinum neurotoxins, the molecular events involved in the translocation step have been only partially elucidated. Here we will review recent advances that have provided relevant insights on the process and discuss possible models that can be experimentally tested. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Pore-Forming Toxins edited by Mauro Dalla Serra and Franco Gambale. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  17. Assembly and function of the botulinum neurotoxin progenitor complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Shenyan; Jin, Rongsheng

    2013-01-01

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) are among the most poisonous substances known to man, but paradoxically, BoNT-containing medicines and cosmetics have been used with great success in the clinic. Accidental BoNT poisoning mainly occurs through oral ingestion of food contaminated with Clostridium botulinum. BoNTs are naturally produced in the form of progenitor toxin complexes (PTCs), which are high molecular weight (up to ~900 kDa) multiprotein complexes composed of BoNT and several non-toxic neurotoxin-associated proteins (NAPs). NAPs protect the inherently fragile BoNTs against the hostile environment of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract and help BoNTs pass through the intestinal epithelial barrier before they are released into the general circulation. These events are essential for ingested BoNTs to gain access to motoneurons, where they inhibit neurotransmitter release and cause muscle paralysis. In this review, we discuss the structural basis for assembly of NAPs and BoNT into the PTC that protects BoNT and facilitate its delivery into the bloodstream.

  18. [Botulism: structure and function of botulinum toxin and its clinical application].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oguma, Keiji; Yamamoto, Yumiko; Suzuki, Tomonori; Fatmawati, Ni Nengah Dwi; Fujita, Kumiko

    2012-08-01

    Clostridium botulinum produces seven immunological distinct poisonous neurotoxins, A to G, with molecular masses of approximately 150kDa. In acidic foods and culture fluid, the neurotoxins associate with non-toxic components, and form large complexes designated progenitor toxins. The progenitor toxins are found in three forms named LL, L, and M. These neurotoxins and progenitor toxins were purified, and whole nucleotide sequences of their structure genes were determined. In this manuscript, the structure and function of these toxins, and the application of these toxins to clinical usage have been described.

  19. Clostridium Difficile Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clostridium difficile (C. difficile) is a bacterium that causes diarrhea and more serious intestinal conditions such as colitis. Symptoms include Watery ... Loss of appetite Nausea Abdominal pain or tenderness C. difficile is more common in people who need ...

  20. Clostridium XIV Meeting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lynd, Lee

    2016-08-28

    The 14th biannual Clostridium meeting was held at Dartmouth College from August 28 through 31, 2016. As noted in the meeting program (http://clostridiumxiv.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/09/Clostridium_XIV_program.pdf). the meeting featured 119 registered attendees, 33 oral presentations, 5 of which were given by younger presenters, 40 posters, and 2 keynote presentations, with strong participation by female and international scientists.

  1. Botulinum toxin for vaginismus treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Juliana Rocha; Souza, Renan Pedra

    2012-01-01

    Vaginismus is characterized by recurrent or persistent involuntary contraction of the perineal muscles surrounding the outer third of the vagina when penile, finger, tampon, or speculum penetration is attempted. Recent results have suggested the use of botulinum toxin for the treatment of vaginismus. Here, we assessed previously published data to evaluate the therapeutic effectiveness of botulinum toxin for vaginismus. We have carried out a systematic review followed by a meta-analysis. Our results indicate that botulinum toxin is an effective therapeutic option for patients with vaginismus (pooled odds ratio of 8.723 with 95% confidence interval limits of 1.942 and 39.162, p = 0.005). This may hold particularly true in treatment-refractory patients because most of the studies included in this meta-analysis have enrolled these subjects in their primary analysis. Botulinum toxin appears to bea reasonable intervention for vaginismus. However, this conclusion should be read carefully because of the deficiency of placebo-controlled randomized clinical trials and the quality issues presented in the existing ones.

  2. CRISPR/Cas9-Mediated Genomic Deletion of the Beta-1, 4 N-acetylgalactosaminyltransferase 1 Gene in Murine P19 Embryonal Carcinoma Cells Results in Low Sensitivity to Botulinum Neurotoxin Type C.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kentaro Tsukamoto

    Full Text Available Botulinum neurotoxins produced by Clostridium botulinum cause flaccid paralysis by inhibiting neurotransmitter release at peripheral nerve terminals. Previously, we found that neurons derived from the murine P19 embryonal carcinoma cell line exhibited high sensitivity to botulinum neurotoxin type C. In order to prove the utility of P19 cells for the study of the intracellular mechanism of botulinum neurotoxins, ganglioside-knockout neurons were generated by deletion of the gene encoding beta-1,4 N-acetylgalactosaminyltransferase 1 in P19 cells using the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats combined with Cas9 (CRISPR/Cas9 system. By using this system, knockout cells could be generated more easily than with previous methods. The sensitivity of the generated beta-1,4 N-acetylgalactosaminyltransferase 1-depleted P19 neurons to botulinum neurotoxin type C was decreased considerably, and the exogenous addition of the gangliosides GD1a, GD1b, and GT1b restored the susceptibility of P19 cells to botulinum neurotoxin type C. In particular, addition of a mixture of these three ganglioside more effectively recovered the sensitivity of knockout cells compared to independent addition of GD1a, GD1b, or GT1b. Consequently, the genome-edited P19 cells generated by the CRISPR/Cas9 system were useful for identifying and defining the intracellular molecules involved in the toxic action of botulinum neurotoxins.

  3. Taxonogenomic description of four new Clostridium species isolated from human gut: ‘Clostridium amazonitimonense’, ‘Clostridium merdae’, ‘Clostridium massilidielmoense’ and ‘Clostridium nigeriense’

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.T. Alou

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Culturomics investigates microbial diversity of the human microbiome by combining diversified culture conditions, matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry and 16S rRNA gene identification. The present study allowed identification of four putative new Clostridium sensu stricto species: ‘Clostridium amazonitimonense’ strain LF2T, ‘Clostridium massilidielmoense’ strain MT26T, ‘Clostridium nigeriense’ strain Marseille-P2414T and ‘Clostridium merdae’ strain Marseille-P2953T, which we describe using the concept of taxonogenomics. We describe the main characteristics of each bacterium and present their complete genome sequence and annotation. Keywords: ‘Clostridium amazonitimonense’, ‘Clostridium massilidielmoense’, ‘Clostridium merdae’, ‘Clostridium nigeriense’, culturomics, emerging bacteria, human microbiota, taxonogenomics

  4. Botulinum Neurotoxins: Biology, Pharmacology, and Toxicology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirazzini, Marco; Rossetto, Ornella; Eleopra, Roberto; Montecucco, Cesare

    2017-04-01

    The study of botulinum neurotoxins (BoNT) is rapidly progressing in many aspects. Novel BoNTs are being discovered owing to next generation sequencing, but their biologic and pharmacological properties remain largely unknown. The molecular structure of the large protein complexes that the toxin forms with accessory proteins, which are included in some BoNT type A1 and B1 pharmacological preparations, have been determined. By far the largest effort has been dedicated to the testing and validation of BoNTs as therapeutic agents in an ever increasing number of applications, including pain therapy. BoNT type A1 has been also exploited in a variety of cosmetic treatments, alone or in combination with other agents, and this specific market has reached the size of the one dedicated to the treatment of medical syndromes. The pharmacological properties and mode of action of BoNTs have shed light on general principles of neuronal transport and protein-protein interactions and are stimulating basic science studies. Moreover, the wide array of BoNTs discovered and to be discovered and the production of recombinant BoNTs endowed with specific properties suggest novel uses in therapeutics with increasing disease/symptom specifity. These recent developments are reviewed here to provide an updated picture of the biologic mechanism of action of BoNTs, of their increasing use in pharmacology and in cosmetics, and of their toxicology. Copyright © 2017 by The Author(s).

  5. Prevalence of C. botulinum and C. perfringens spores in food products available on Polish market

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grenda Tomasz

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of Clostridium botulinum and Clostridium perfringens in food samples purchased from Polish producers. Material and Methods: The analyses were performed on 260 food samples collected in Lublin and Subcarpathian regions: 56 of smoked meat, 21 of pork meat, 20 of dairy products, 26 of vegetable and fruit preserves, 40 of ready-to-eat meals, 27 of fish preserves, and 70 of honey collected directly from apiaries. Results: C. botulinum strains were isolated from 2.3% (6/260 of samples and the isolates were classified as toxin types A (4/260 and B (2/260. C. perfringens strains were isolated from 14% (37/260 of samples. All the isolates were classified as toxin type A, 28 of them were able also to produce α toxin and 9 - β2 toxin. Conclusion: On the basis of the obtained results it could be suggested that risk assessment, especially regarding the entire honey harvesting process, should be provided in order to ensure the microbiological safety of the products to be consumed by infants and people with a weakened immune system.

  6. Clostridium difficile toxin CDT induces formation of microtubule-based protrusions and increases adherence of bacteria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carsten Schwan

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Clostridium difficile causes antibiotic-associated diarrhea and pseudomembranous colitis by production of the Rho GTPase-glucosylating toxins A and B. Recently emerging hypervirulent Clostridium difficile strains additionally produce the binary ADP-ribosyltransferase toxin CDT (Clostridium difficile transferase, which ADP-ribosylates actin and inhibits actin polymerization. Thus far, the role of CDT as a virulence factor is not understood. Here we report by using time-lapse- and immunofluorescence microscopy that CDT and other binary actin-ADP-ribosylating toxins, including Clostridium botulinum C2 toxin and Clostridium perfringens iota toxin, induce redistribution of microtubules and formation of long (up to >150 microm microtubule-based protrusions at the surface of intestinal epithelial cells. The toxins increase the length of decoration of microtubule plus-ends by EB1/3, CLIP-170 and CLIP-115 proteins and cause redistribution of the capture proteins CLASP2 and ACF7 from microtubules at the cell cortex into the cell interior. The CDT-induced microtubule protrusions form a dense meshwork at the cell surface, which wrap and embed bacterial cells, thereby largely increasing the adherence of Clostridia. The study describes a novel type of microtubule structure caused by less efficient microtubule capture and offers a new perspective for the pathogenetic role of CDT and other binary actin-ADP-ribosylating toxins in host-pathogen interactions.

  7. Clostridium difficile Recombinant Toxin A Repeating Units as a Carrier Protein for Conjugate Vaccines: Studies of Pneumococcal Type 14, Escherichia coli K1, and Shigella flexneri Type 2a Polysaccharides in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavliakova, Danka; Moncrief, J. Scott; Lyerly, David M.; Schiffman, Gerald; Bryla, Dolores A.; Robbins, John B.; Schneerson, Rachel

    2000-01-01

    Unlike the native protein, a nontoxic peptide (repeating unit of the native toxin designated rARU) from Clostridium difficile toxin A (CDTA) afforded an antigen that could be bound covalently to the surface polysaccharides of pneumococcus type 14, Shigella flexneri type 2a, and Escherichia coli K1. The yields of these polysaccharide-protein conjugates were significantly increased by prior treatment of rARU with succinic anhydride. Conjugates, prepared with rARU or succinylated (rARUsucc), were administered to mice by a clinically relevant dosage and immunization scheme. All conjugates elicited high levels of serum immunoglobulin G both to the polysaccharides and to CDTA. Conjugate-induced anti-CDTA had neutralizing activity in vitro and protected mice challenged with CDTA, similar to the rARU alone. Conjugates prepared with succinylated rARU, therefore, have potential for serving both as effective carrier proteins for polysaccharides and for preventing enteric disease caused by C. difficile. PMID:10722615

  8. Clostridium difficile Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... TeensRead MoreBMI Calculator Acute BronchitisHigh Blood PressureBursitis of the HipHigh CholesterolExercise-induced UrticariaMicroscopic HematuriaKidney CystsDe Quervain’s Tenosynovitis Home Diseases and Conditions Clostridium difficile (C. diff.) ...

  9. Botulinum toxin in bruxism treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piotr Piech

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Bruxism is defined as abnormal, fixed, unconscious chewing organ function, deviating qualitatively and quantitatively from normal function. Another definition speaks of motor dysfunction in the mouth, characterized by grinding and clenching of the teeth, occurring during sleep. The etiology of this disorder has not been explained until now, but it is believed to be related to localized, mental, nervous and neurotransmitter disorders. Purpose: The aim of the study is to review literature and knowledge about the use of botulinum toxin in the treatment of bruxism. Methods of treatment: The patient reports to the physician usually after a distressing, difficult to locate pain. The basis for proper treatment is to detect parafunctions and to make the patient aware of their existence. Diagnostic symptoms include dentinal lesions, recesses, enamel cracks and abfractive cavities, as well as changes in the mucosal area of the cheeks. Treatment begins with the use of an occlusive therapy to relax muscles, reduce parafunction and relieve pain. In the form of severe pain, NSAIDs are introduced and, if necessary, anxiolytics, sedatives and antidepressants. In the absence of response to the treatment used, botulinum toxin type A injections are used. The dose of the agent depends on the initial muscle tone and the effect of decrease in its activity is maintained for 4 to 6 months. Conclusions: The use of botulinum toxin makes it possible to selectively exclude overactive muscles, which is a great advantage over other techniques. An additional benefit of this therapy is achieved good cosmetic effect, reversible effect and minimal amount of side effects.

  10. Role of Botulinum Toxin in Depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsaik, Ajay K; Mascarenhas, Sonia S; Hashmi, Aqeel; Prokop, Larry J; John, Vineeth; Okusaga, Olaoluwa; Singh, Balwinder

    2016-03-01

    The goal of this review was to consolidate the evidence concerning the efficacy of botulinum toxin type A (onabotulinumtoxinA) in depression. We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cochrane, and Scopus through May 5, 2014, for studies evaluating the efficacy of botulinum toxin A in depression. Only randomized controlled trials were included in the meta-analysis. A pooled mean difference in primary depression score, and pooled odds ratio for response and remission rate with 95% confidence interval (CI) were estimated using the random-effects model. Heterogeneity was assessed using Cochran Q test and χ statistic. Of the 639 articles that were initially retrieved, 5 studies enrolling 194 subjects (age 49±9.6 y) were included in the systematic review, and 3 randomized controlled trials enrolling 134 subjects were included in the meta-analysis. The meta-analysis showed a significant decrease in mean primary depression scores among patients who received botulinum toxin A compared with placebo (-9.80; 95% CI, -12.90 to -6.69) with modest heterogeneity between the studies (Cochran Q test, χ=70). Response and remission rates were 8.3 and 4.6 times higher, respectively, among patients receiving botulinum toxin A compared with placebo, with no heterogeneity between the studies. The 2 studies excluded from the meta-analysis also found a significant decrease in primary depression scores in patients after receiving botulinum toxin A. A few subjects had minor side effects, which were similar between the groups receiving botulinum toxin and those receiving placebo. This study suggests that botulinum toxin A can produce significant improvement in depressive symptoms and is a safe adjunctive treatment for patients receiving pharmacotherapy for depression. Future trials are needed to evaluate the antidepressant effect per se of botulinum toxin A and to further elucidate the underlying antidepressant mechanism of botulinum toxin A.

  11. Botulinum toxin for the treatment of strabismus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowe, Fiona J; Noonan, Carmel P

    2017-03-02

    The use of botulinum toxin as an investigative and treatment modality for strabismus is well reported in the medical literature. However, it is unclear how effective it is in comparison to other treatment options for strabismus. The primary objective was to examine the efficacy of botulinum toxin therapy in the treatment of strabismus compared with alternative conservative or surgical treatment options. This review sought to ascertain those types of strabismus that particularly benefit from the use of botulinum toxin as a treatment option (such as small angle strabismus or strabismus with binocular potential, i.e. the potential to use both eyes together as a pair). The secondary objectives were to investigate the dose effect and complication rates associated with botulinum toxin. We searched CENTRAL (which contains the Cochrane Eyes and Vision Trials Register) (2016, Issue 6), Ovid MEDLINE, Ovid MEDLINE In-Process and Other Non-Indexed Citations, Ovid MEDLINE Daily, Ovid OLDMEDLINE (January 1946 to July 2016), Embase (January 1980 to July 2016), Latin American and Caribbean Literature on Health Sciences (LILACS) (January 1982 to July 2016), the ISRCTN registry (www.isrctn.com/editAdvancedSearch), ClinicalTrials.gov (www.clinicaltrials.gov), and the World Health Organization (WHO) International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP) (www.who.int/ictrp/search/en). We did not use any date or language restrictions in the electronic searches for trials. We last searched the electronic databases on 11 July 2016. We handsearched the British and Irish Orthoptic Journal, Australian Orthoptic Journal, proceedings of the European Strabismological Association (ESA), International Strabismological Association (ISA) and International Orthoptic Association (IOA) (www.liv.ac.uk/orthoptics/research/search.htm) and American Academy of Paediatric Ophthalmology and Strabismus meetings (AAPOS). We contacted researchers who are active in this field for information about further

  12. Botulinum toxin for the treatment of bruxism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tinastepe, Neslihan; Küçük, Burcu Bal; Oral, Koray

    2015-10-01

    Botulinum toxin, the most potent biological toxin, has been shown to be effective for a variety of disorders in several medical conditions, when used both therapeutically and cosmetically. In recent years, there has been a rising trend in the use of this pharmacological agent to control bruxing activity, despite its reported adverse effects. The aim of this review was to provide a brief overview to clarify the underlying essential ideas for the use of botulinum toxin in bruxism based on available scientific papers. An electronic literature search was performed to identify publications related to botulinum toxin and its use for bruxism in PubMed. Hand searching of relevant articles was also made to identify additional studies. Of the eleven identified studies, only two were randomized controlled trials, compared with the effectiveness of botulinum toxins on the reduction in the frequency of bruxism events and myofascial pain after injection. The authors of these studies concluded that botulinum toxin could be used as an effective treatment for reducing nocturnal bruxism and myofascial pain in patients with bruxism. Evidence-based research was limited on this topic. More randomized controlled studies are needed to confirm that botulinum toxin is safe and reliable for routine clinical use in bruxism.

  13. Botulinum neurotoxin formulations: overcoming the confusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samizadeh S

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Souphiyeh Samizadeh,1 Koenraad De Boulle2 1Great British Academy of Aesthetic Medicine, London, UK; 2Aalst Dermatology Clinic, Aalst, Belgium Abstract: Botulinum toxin A is produced by anaerobic spore-forming bacteria and is used for various therapeutic and cosmetic purposes. Botulinum toxin A injections are the most popular nonsurgical procedure worldwide. Despite an increased demand for botulinum toxin A injections, the clinical pharmacology and differences in formulation of commonly available products are poorly understood. The various products available in the market are unique and vary in terms of units, chemical properties, biological activities, and weight, and are therefore not interchangeable. For safe clinical practice and to achieve optimal results, the practitioners need to understand the clinical issues of potency, conversion ratio, and safety issues (toxin spread and immunogenicity. In this paper, the basic clinical pharmacology of botulinum toxin A and differences between onabotulinum toxin A, abobotulinum toxin A, and incobotulinum toxin A are discussed. Keywords: botulinum toxin, botulinum neurotoxin, moiety, protein complexes

  14. Botulinum toxin in parkinsonism: The when, how, and which for botulinum toxin injections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardoso, Francisco

    2018-06-01

    The aim of this article is to provide a review of the use of injections of botulinum toxin in the management of selected symptoms and signs of Parkinson's disease and other forms of parkinsonism. Sialorrhea is defined as inability to control oral secretions, resulting in excessive saliva in the oropharynx. There is a high level of evidence for the treatment of sialorrhea in parkinsonism with injections of different forms of botulinum toxin type A as well as botulinum toxin type B. Tremor can be improved by the use of botulinum toxin injections but improved tremor control often leads to concomitant motor weakness, limiting its use. Levodopa induced dyskinesias are difficult to treat with botulinum toxin injections because of their variable frequency and direction. Apraxia of eyelid opening, a sign more commonly seen in progressive supranuclear palsy and other tauopathies, often improves after botulinum toxin injections. Recent data suggest that regardless of the underlying mechanism, pain in parkinsonism can be alleviated by botulinum toxin injections. Finally, freezing of gait, camptocormia and Pisa syndrome in parkinsonism almost invariably fail to respond to botulinum toxin injections. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Recombinant Programming

    OpenAIRE

    Pawlak , Renaud; Cuesta , Carlos; Younessi , Houman

    2004-01-01

    This research report presents a promising new approach to computation called Recombinant Programming. The novelty of our approach is that it separates the program into two layers of computation: the recombination and the interpretation layer. The recombination layer takes sequences as inputs and allows the programmer to recombine these sequences through the definition of cohesive code units called extensions. The output of such recombination is a mesh that can be used by the interpretation la...

  16. Neuronal Functions Associated with Endo- and Exocytotic Events-cum-Molecular Trafficking May Be Cell Maturation-Dependent: Lessons Learned from Studies on Botulism

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Clostridium botulinum type A progenitor toxins . Infect Immun 64:1589–1594 Li L, Singh BR (1999) Structure -function relationship of clostridial...experimental design and demonstration of the validity of the targeted neurologic therapeutic delivery approach based on recombinant botulinum toxin ...Endocytosis Exocytosis Molecular trafficking Cell maturation Botulism Targeted therapeutic Background Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) are produced by

  17. Toxina botulínica y su empleo en la patología oral y maxilofacial Botulinum toxin and its use in oral and maxillofacial pathology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Martínez-Pérez

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Resumen: Las toxinas botulínicas son exotoxinas de la bacteria formadora de esporas Clostridim botulinum y los agentes causantes del botulismo. Cuando se inyecta en el músculo produce una parálisis flácida. El efecto clínico está directamente relacionado con la dosis y debe ajustarse para cada caso concreto. La Toxina botulínica ha demostrado en los más de veinte años en que se está utilizando que es un fármaco seguro. Las indicaciones de la toxina botulínica en la actualidad incluyen todas aquellas patologías que resultan de la hiperfunción muscular y la disfunción autonómica.Abstract: Botilinum toxins are exotoxins of the bacteria that form the Clostridium botulinum spores and the causative agents of botulism. When injected into the muscle flaccid paralysis is produced. The clinical effect is directly related with the dose and is should be adjusted for each particular case. over the last twenty years that it has been in use, the botulinum toxin has shown itself to be a reliable drug. Current indications for the use of botulinum toxin include all those pathologies which are the results of muscle hyperfunction and autonomic dysfunction.

  18. Botulinum neurotoxin B recognizes its protein receptor with high affinity and specificity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Rongsheng; Rummel, Andreas; Binz, Thomas; Brunger, Axel T

    2006-12-21

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) are produced by Clostridium botulinum and cause the neuroparalytic syndrome of botulism. With a lethal dose of 1 ng kg(-1), they pose a biological hazard to humans and a serious potential bioweapon threat. BoNTs bind with high specificity at neuromuscular junctions and they impair exocytosis of synaptic vesicles containing acetylcholine through specific proteolysis of SNAREs (soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive fusion protein attachment protein receptors), which constitute part of the synaptic vesicle fusion machinery. The molecular details of the toxin-cell recognition have been elusive. Here we report the structure of a BoNT in complex with its protein receptor: the receptor-binding domain of botulinum neurotoxin serotype B (BoNT/B) bound to the luminal domain of synaptotagmin II, determined at 2.15 A resolution. On binding, a helix is induced in the luminal domain which binds to a saddle-shaped crevice on a distal tip of BoNT/B. This crevice is adjacent to the non-overlapping ganglioside-binding site of BoNT/B. Synaptotagmin II interacts with BoNT/B with nanomolar affinity, at both neutral and acidic endosomal pH. Biochemical and neuronal ex vivo studies of structure-based mutations indicate high specificity and affinity of the interaction, and high selectivity of BoNT/B among synaptotagmin I and II isoforms. Synergistic binding of both synaptotagmin and ganglioside imposes geometric restrictions on the initiation of BoNT/B translocation after endocytosis. Our results provide the basis for the rational development of preventive vaccines or inhibitors against these neurotoxins.

  19. Diagnosis of Clostridium difficile

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, M B F; Olsen, K E P; Nielsen, X C

    2015-01-01

    The diagnosis of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) requires the detection of toxigenic C. difficile or its toxins and a clinical assessment. We evaluated the performance of four nucleic acid amplification tests (NAATs) detecting toxigenic C. difficile directly from faeces compared to routine...... ribotyping and toxinotyping (TT) were performed on culture-positive samples. In parallel, the samples were analysed by four NAATs; two targeting tcdA or tcdB (illumigene® C. difficile and PCRFast® C. difficile A/B) and two multi-target real-time (RT) PCR assays also targeting cdt and tcdC alleles...... characteristic of epidemic and potentially more virulent PCR ribotypes 027, 066 and 078 (GeneXpert® C. difficile/Epi and an 'in-house RT PCR' two-step algorithm). The multi-target assays were significantly more sensitive compared to routine toxigenic culture (p 

  20. Update on botulinum toxin and dermal fillers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berbos, Zachary J; Lipham, William J

    2010-09-01

    The art and science of facial rejuvenation is an ever-evolving field of medicine, as evidenced by the continual development of new surgical and nonsurgical treatment modalities. Over the past 10 years, the use of botulinum toxin and dermal fillers for aesthetic purposes has risen sharply. Herein, we discuss properties of several commonly used injectable products and provide basic instruction for their use toward the goal of achieving facial rejuvenation. The demand for nonsurgical injection-based facial rejuvenation products has risen enormously in recent years. Used independently or concurrently, botulinum toxin and dermal filler agents offer an affordable, minimally invasive approach to facial rejuvenation. Botulinum toxin and dermal fillers can be used to diminish facial rhytides, restore facial volume, and sculpt facial contours, thereby achieving an aesthetically pleasing, youthful facial appearance.

  1. RNA aptasensor for rapid detection of natively folded type A botulinum neurotoxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janardhanan, Pavithra; Mello, Charlene M; Singh, Bal Ram; Lou, Jianlong; Marks, James D; Cai, Shuowei

    2013-12-15

    A surface plasmon resonance based RNA aptasensor for rapid detection of natively folded type A botulinum neurotoxin is reported. Using detoxified recombinant type A botulinum neurotoxin as the surrogate, the aptasensor detects active toxin within 90 min. The detection limit of the aptasensor in phosphate buffered saline, carrot juice, and fat free milk is 5.8 ng/ml, 20.3 ng/ml and 23.4 ng/ml, respectively, while that in 5-fold diluted human serum is 22.5 ng/ml. Recovery of toxin from disparate sample matrices are within 91-116%. Most significant is the ability of this aptasensor to effectively differentiate the natively folded toxin from denatured, inactive toxin, which is important for homeland security surveillance and threat assessment. The aptasensor is stable for more than 30 days and over 400 injections/regeneration cycles. Such an aptasensor holds great promise for rapid detection of active botulinum neurotoxin for field surveillance due to its robustness, stability and reusability. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Botulinum toxin type B micromechanosensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, W; Montana, Vedrana; Chapman, Edwin R; Mohideen, U; Parpura, Vladimir

    2003-11-11

    Botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT) types A, B, E, and F are toxic to humans; early and rapid detection is essential for adequate medical treatment. Presently available tests for detection of BoNTs, although sensitive, require hours to days. We report a BoNT-B sensor whose properties allow detection of BoNT-B within minutes. The technique relies on the detection of an agarose bead detachment from the tip of a micromachined cantilever resulting from BoNT-B action on its substratum, the synaptic protein synaptobrevin 2, attached to the beads. The mechanical resonance frequency of the cantilever is monitored for the detection. To suspend the bead off the cantilever we use synaptobrevin's molecular interaction with another synaptic protein, syntaxin 1A, that was deposited onto the cantilever tip. Additionally, this bead detachment technique is general and can be used in any displacement reaction, such as in receptor-ligand pairs, where the introduction of one chemical leads to the displacement of another. The technique is of broad interest and will find uses outside toxicology.

  3. Special Concerns for Seniors: Clostridium difficile

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Drugs" Home | Contact Us Special Concerns for Seniors Clostridium difficile - an introduction Clostridium difficile (“C. diff”) ... see APUA’s contribution to CDC’s Vital Signs campaign . Seniors are especially at risk People over the age ...

  4. Clostridium subterminale septicemia in an immunocompetent patient

    OpenAIRE

    Daganou Maria; Kyriakoudi Ann; Moraitou Helen; Pontikis Konstantinos; Avgeropoulou Stavrina; Tripolitsioti Paraskevi; Koutsoukou Antonia

    2016-01-01

    Clostridium subterminale is a Clostridium species that has been rarely isolated in the blood of immunocompromised patients. We report a case of C. subterminale septicemia in an immunocompetent patient who presented with acute mediastinitis following spontaneous esophageal rupture.

  5. Clostridium subterminale septicemia in an immunocompetent patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daganou, Maria; Kyriakoudi, Ann; Moraitou, Helen; Pontikis, Konstantinos; Avgeropoulou, Stavrina; Tripolitsioti, Paraskevi; Koutsoukou, Antonia

    2016-01-01

    Clostridium subterminale is a Clostridium species that has been rarely isolated in the blood of immunocompromised patients. We report a case of C. subterminale septicemia in an immunocompetent patient who presented with acute mediastinitis following spontaneous esophageal rupture.

  6. Proposal to restrict the genus Clostridium Prazmowski to Clostridium butyricum and related species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawson, Paul A; Rainey, Fred A

    2016-02-01

    The genus Clostridium as presently constituted is phylogenetically and phenotypically incoherent. Data from polyphasic taxonomic studies indicate that the genus comprises a collection of very heterogeneous species. Numerous phylogenetic studies, principally based on sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene, indicate that the genus Clostridium should be restricted to Clostridium cluster I as Clostridium sensu stricto . Despite these findings, authors continue to add novel species to the genus Clostridium that do not fall within the radiation of cluster I and the type species Clostridium butyricum , thus perpetuating the confusion associated with the taxonomy of this group. Here, we formally propose that members of the genus Clostridium Prazmowski be restricted to the type species C. butyricum and cluster I species. Eubacterium moniliforme , Eubacterium tarantellae , Sarcina maxima and Sarcina ventriculi should be transferred to the genus Clostridium as Clostridium moniliforme comb. nov., Clostridium tarantellae comb. nov., Clostridium maximum comb. nov. and Clostridium ventriculi comb. nov. A novel genus, Hathewaya gen. nov., is proposed for the species Clostridium histolyticum , Clostridium limosum and Clostridium proteolyticum as Hathewaya histolytica gen. nov. comb. nov., Hathewaya limosa comb. nov. and Hathewaya proteolytica comb. nov. The type species of the genus Hathewaya is Hathewaya histolytica.

  7. Botulinum Toxin in Neurogenic Detrusor Overactivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Arturo Levi D'Ancona

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Purpose To evaluate the effects of botulinum toxin on urodynamic parameters and quality of life in patients with neurogenic detrusor overactivity. Methods Thirty four adult patients with spinal cord injury and detrusor overactivity were selected. The patients received 300 units of botulinum toxin type A. The endpoints evaluated with the episodes of urinary incontinence and measured the maximum cystometric capacity, maximum amplitude of detrusor pressure and bladder compliance at the beginning and end of the study (24 weeks and evaluated the quality of life by applying the Qualiveen questionnaire. Results A significant decrease in the episodes of urinary incontinence was observed. All urodynamic parameters presented a significant improvement. The same was observed in the quality of life index and the specific impact of urinary problems scores from the Qualiveen questionnaire. Six patients did not complete the study, two due to incomplete follow-up, and four violated protocol and were excluded from the analyses. No systemic adverse events of botulinum toxin type A were reported. Conclusions A botulinum toxin type A showed a significantly improved response in urodynamics parameters and specific and general quality of life.

  8. Treatment diary for botulinum toxin spasticity treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Biering-Sørensen, Bo; Iversen, Helle K; Frederiksen, Inge M S

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study is to develop a treatment diary for patients receiving spasticity treatment including botulinum toxin injection and physiotherapy and/or occupational therapy. The diary focuses on problems triggered by skeletal muscle overactivity; agreed goals for treatment and the patient...

  9. Genetic Recombination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitehouse, H. L. K.

    1973-01-01

    Discusses the mechanisms of genetic recombination with particular emphasis on the study of the fungus Sordaria brevicollis. The study of recombination is facilitated by the use of mutants of this fungus in which the color of the ascospores is affected. (JR)

  10. The effects of nitrite on the survival of Clostridium sporogenes and the autoxidation properties of the Kavurma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yetim, Hasan; Kayacier, Ahmed; Kesmen, Zulal; Sagdic, Osman

    2006-02-01

    Kavurma is a traditional cooked (fried) meat product manufactured to preserve meat. Some bacterial genera, e.g., clostridia are important in kavurma. The objective of this study was to determine the influence of nitrite and the traditional cooking process on the survival and proliferation of Clostridium botulinum and the autoxidation properties of the kavurma. For this purpose, Clostridium sporogenes having similar characteristics to C. botulinum was used, and the samples were inoculated with 10(6) CFU/g C. sporogenes cells before the traditional cooking. The final products were packaged and stored under refrigeration for 6 months, and then the oxidation parameters (TBA, peroxide and free fatty acid values) and C. sporogenes counts of samples were determined. It was observed that C. sporogenes could survive during the traditional cooking process and storage. However, counts decreased during storage; for example, nitrite containing samples initially had 3.21logCFU/g C. sporogenes and 2.73logCFU/g at the end of storage. While nitrite had a slight antimicrobial effect on clostridia, it significantly reduced the TBA, peroxide and FFA values of the samples. In conclusion, it is suggested that addition of 100ppm of nitrite might be useful in kavurma processing because of its role in limiting oxidation as well as its antimicrobial effect.

  11. Clostridium difficile Infection in Outpatients

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2011-11-07

    Dr. Jon Mark Hirshon, Associate Professor of Emergency Medicine at the University of Maryland School of Medicine, discusses Clostridium difficile infection in outpatients.  Created: 11/7/2011 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 11/21/2011.

  12. Optimizing sporulation of Clostridium perfringens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jong, de A.E.I.; Beumer, R.R.; Rombouts, F.M.

    2002-01-01

    Many sporulation media have been developed for Clostridium perfringens, but none stimulates sporulation for all strains. The aim of our experiments was to develop a sporulation method using Duncan and Strong (DS) medium, which supports sporulation of a wide variety of strains. Different inoculation

  13. Clostridium difficile in Retail Meats

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    Clostridium difficile is a common cause of diarrhea in healthcare settings but little is known about what causes cases in the community. In this podcast, CDC's Dr. L. Clifford McDonald discusses two papers in the May 2009 edition of Emerging Infectious Diseases that explore whether the organism could be found in meat samples purchased in grocery stores in Arizona and Canada.

  14. Using llama derived single domain antibodies to target botulinum neurotoxins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swain, Marla D.; Anderson, George P.; Bernstein, Rachael D.; Liu, Jinny L.; Goldman, Ellen R.

    2010-04-01

    Llama serum contains both conventional IgG as well as unique forms of antibody that contain only heavy chains where antigen binding is mediated through a single variable domain. These variable domains can be expressed recombinantly and are referred to as single domain antibodies (sdAb). SdAb are among the smallest known naturally derived antigen binding fragments, possess good solubility, thermal stability, and can refold after heat and chemical denaturation. Llamas were immunized with either BoNT A or B toxoid and phage display libraries prepared. Single domain antibodies (sdAb) that were able to detect botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT) serotypes A and B were selected from their respective libraries. Here, the binders obtained by panning the BoNT B library on either BoNT B toxoid or BoNT B complex toxoid coated plates or BoNT B toxin coupled microspheres are described. Using these panning methods, we selected for binders that showed specificity for BoNT B. Phage displayed binders were screened, moved to a protein expression vector and soluble sdAb was produced. Using a Luminex flow cytometer binders were evaluated in direct binding assays. We have exploited the unique properties of sdAb and used them as biological recognition elements in immuno-based sensors that can detect BoNT B.

  15. Therapeutic applications of botulinum neurotoxins in head and neck disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Alshadwi

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: Botulinum neurotoxin therapy provides viable alternatives to traditional treatment modalities for some conditions affecting the head and neck region that have neurological components. This therapy can overcome some of the morbidities associated with conventional therapy. More research is needed to determine the ideal doses of botulinum neurotoxin to treat different diseases affecting the head and neck regions.

  16. The resurgence of botulinum toxin injection for strabismus in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahan, Marielle; Engel, J Mark

    2017-09-01

    The present review discusses recent advances in the use of botulinum toxin for the management of strabismus in children. Botulinum toxin injection produces similar results compared to surgery for certain subtypes of strabismus, especially acute onset esotropia. It may be more effective in many subtypes of esotropia where surgery has been less reliable, including partially accommodative esotropia, esotropia associated with cerebral palsy, and thyroid eye disease. Small retrospective studies have demonstrated the efficacy of botulinum toxin in the treatment of many types of pediatric strabismus, providing some guidance for clinicians to determine which patients would benefit most from this intervention. Although administration of botulinum toxin is generally accepted as a reasonable option in select cases, many strabismus surgeons have not fully embraced the treatment, in part because of perceived disadvantages compared to surgery and difficulty in identifying subsets with the highest potential for therapeutic success. A recent study compared the administration of botulinum toxin in children with acute-onset esotropia to surgical correction and found botulinum toxin had a statistically equal success rate, but with the advantage of significantly less time under general anesthesia. In addition, botulinum toxin has been recently tried in patients with partially accommodative esotropia, esotropia associated with cerebral palsy, cyclic esotropia, and in patients with thyroid eye disease. The present review will discuss current clinical recommendations based on recent studies on the use of botulinum toxin in children with strabismus.

  17. The potential role of Clostridium botulinum toxin in the treatment of equine laminitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hardeman, L C

    2016-01-01

    Laminitis is a severe and painful disease in the horse that may lead to loosening of the attachment of the distal phalanx to the horny hoof capsule. Although a large variety of treatment options has come and gone since the first descriptions of laminitis, there is certainly a thus far unmet need for

  18. Botulinum Toxin Type A as a Therapeutic Agent against Headache and Related Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siro Luvisetto

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Botulinum neurotoxin A (BoNT/A is a toxin produced by the naturally-occurring Clostridium botulinum that causes botulism. The potential of BoNT/A as a useful medical intervention was discovered by scientists developing a vaccine to protect against botulism. They found that, when injected into a muscle, BoNT/A causes a flaccid paralysis. Following this discovery, BoNT/A has been used for many years in the treatment of conditions of pathological muscle hyperactivity, like dystonias and spasticities. In parallel, the toxin has become a “glamour” drug due to its power to ward off facial wrinkles, particularly frontal, due to the activity of the mimic muscles. After the discovery that the drug also appeared to have a preventive effect on headache, scientists spent many efforts to study the potentially-therapeutic action of BoNT/A against pain. BoNT/A is effective at reducing pain in a number of disease states, including cervical dystonia, neuropathic pain, lower back pain, spasticity, myofascial pain and bladder pain. In 2010, regulatory approval for the treatment of chronic migraine with BoNT/A was given, notwithstanding the fact that the mechanism of action is still not completely elucidated. In the present review, we summarize experimental evidence that may help to clarify the mechanisms of action of BoNT/A in relation to the alleviation of headache pain, with particular emphasis on preclinical studies, both in animals and humans. Moreover, we summarize the latest clinical trials that show evidence on headache conditions that may obtain benefits from therapy with BoNT/A.

  19. Initial North American experience with botulinum toxin type A for treatment of anismus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joo, J S; Agachan, F; Wolff, B; Nogueras, J J; Wexner, S D

    1996-10-01

    Botulinum toxin type A (BTX-A), produced by Clostridium botulinum, is a potent neurotoxin. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of BTX-A for treatment of anismus. All patients treated with BTX-A for anismus were evaluated. Eligibility criteria included a history of chronic assisted evacuation (laxatives, enemas, or suppositories), demonstration of anismus by cinedefecogram and electromyography, and failure of a minimum of three sessions of supervised biofeedback therapy (BF). Contingent on body mass, 6 to 15 units of BTX-A was injected bilaterally under electromyography guidance into the external sphincter or the puborectalis muscle. Treatment was repeated as necessary for a maximum of three sessions during a three-month period. Success was considered as discontinuation of evacuatory assistance and was evaluated between one and three months and again at up to one year. Between July 1994 and May 1995, four patients ranging from 29 to 82 years in age (2 females, 2 males) had anismus that failed to respond to between 3 and 15 biofeedback sessions. All patients improved between one and three months after BTX-A injection, and two had sustained improvement for a range of three months to one year. There was no morbidity or mortality associated with BTX-A injection. BTX-A is extremely successful for temporary treatment of anismus that is refractory to BF management. However, because the mechanism of action is short, longer term results are only 50 percent successful. Hopefully, modifications in the strain of BTX-A and dose administered will allow longer periods of success or a repeat trial of BF. Nonetheless, this preliminary report is very encouraging in offering a method of managing this recalcitrant condition.

  20. Botulinum toxin type A products are not interchangeable: a review of the evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brin MF

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Mitchell F Brin,1,2 Charmaine James,3 John Maltman1 1Allergan, Inc., Irvine, CA, USA; 2Department of Neurology, University of California, Irvine, CA, USA; 3Allergan, Marlow, UKAbstract: Botulinum toxin type A (BoNTA products are injectable biologic medications derived from Clostridium botulinum bacteria. Several different BoNTA products are marketed in various countries, and they are not interchangeable. Differences between products include manufacturing processes, formulations, and the assay methods used to determine units of biological activity. These differences result in a specific set of interactions between each BoNTA product and the tissue injected. Consequently, the products show differences in their in vivo profiles, including preclinical dose response curves and clinical dosing, efficacy, duration, and safety/adverse events. Most, but not all, published studies document these differences, suggesting that individual BoNTA products act differently depending on experimental and clinical conditions, and these differences may not always be predictable. Differentiation through regulatory approvals provides a measure of confidence in safety and efficacy at the specified doses for each approved indication. Moreover, the products differ in the amount of study to which they have been subjected, as evidenced by the number of publications in the peer-reviewed literature and the quantity and quality of clinical studies. Given that BoNTAs are potent biological products that meet important clinical needs, it is critical to recognize that their dosing and product performance are not interchangeable and each product should be used according to manufacturer guidelines.Keywords: onabotulinumtoxinA, abobotulinumtoxinA, incobotulinumtoxinA, glabellar lines, non-interchangeability

  1. Botulinum Toxin Type A as a Therapeutic Agent against Headache and Related Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luvisetto, Siro; Gazerani, Parisa; Cianchetti, Carlo; Pavone, Flaminia

    2015-01-01

    Botulinum neurotoxin A (BoNT/A) is a toxin produced by the naturally-occurring Clostridium botulinum that causes botulism. The potential of BoNT/A as a useful medical intervention was discovered by scientists developing a vaccine to protect against botulism. They found that, when injected into a muscle, BoNT/A causes a flaccid paralysis. Following this discovery, BoNT/A has been used for many years in the treatment of conditions of pathological muscle hyperactivity, like dystonias and spasticities. In parallel, the toxin has become a “glamour” drug due to its power to ward off facial wrinkles, particularly frontal, due to the activity of the mimic muscles. After the discovery that the drug also appeared to have a preventive effect on headache, scientists spent many efforts to study the potentially-therapeutic action of BoNT/A against pain. BoNT/A is effective at reducing pain in a number of disease states, including cervical dystonia, neuropathic pain, lower back pain, spasticity, myofascial pain and bladder pain. In 2010, regulatory approval for the treatment of chronic migraine with BoNT/A was given, notwithstanding the fact that the mechanism of action is still not completely elucidated. In the present review, we summarize experimental evidence that may help to clarify the mechanisms of action of BoNT/A in relation to the alleviation of headache pain, with particular emphasis on preclinical studies, both in animals and humans. Moreover, we summarize the latest clinical trials that show evidence on headache conditions that may obtain benefits from therapy with BoNT/A. PMID:26404377

  2. Comparison of the catalytic properties of the botulinum neurotoxin subtypes A1 and A5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dongxia; Krilich, Joan; Pellett, Sabine; Baudys, Jakub; Tepp, William H; Barr, John R; Johnson, Eric A; Kalb, Suzanne R

    2013-12-01

    Clostridium botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) cause the life-threatening disease botulism through the inhibition of neurotransmitter release by cleaving essential SNARE proteins. There are seven serologically distinctive types of BoNTs and many subtypes within a serotype have been identified. BoNT/A5 is a recently discovered subtype of type A botulinum neurotoxin which possesses a very high degree of sequence similarity and identity to the well-studied A1 subtype. In the present study, we examined the endopeptidase activity of these two BoNT/A subtypes and our results revealed significant differences in substrate binding and cleavage efficiency between subtype A5 and A1. Distinctive hydrolysis efficiency was observed between the two toxins during cleavage of the native substrate SNAP-25 versus a shortened peptide mimic. N-terminal truncation studies demonstrated that a key region of the SNAP-25, including the amino acid residues at 151 through 154 located in the remote binding region of the substrate, contributed to the differential catalytic properties between A1 and A5. Elevated binding affinity of the peptide substrate resulted from including these important residues and enhanced BoNT/A5's hydrolysis efficiency. In addition, mutations of these amino acid residues affect the proteolytic performance of the two toxins in different ways. This study provides a better understanding of the biological activity of these toxins, their performance characteristics in the Endopep-MS assay to detect BoNT in clinical samples and foods, and is useful for the development of peptide substrates. © 2013. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Peg Precipitation Coupled with Chromatography is a New and Sufficient Method for the Purification of Botulinum Neurotoxin Type B

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yao; Kang, Lin; Gao, Shan; Gao, Xing; Xin, Wenwen; Wang, Jinglin

    2012-01-01

    Clostridium botulinum neurotoxins are used to treat a variety of neuro-muscular disorders, as well as in cosmetology. The increased demand requires efficient methods for the production and purification of these toxins. In this study, a new purification process was developed for purifying type B neurotoxin. The kinetics of C.botulinum strain growth and neurotoxin production were determined for maximum yield of toxin. The neurotoxin was purified by polyethylene glycol (PEG) precipitation and chromatography. Based on design of full factorial experiment, 20% (w/v) PEG-6000, 4°C, pH 5.0 and 0.3 M NaCl were optimal conditions to obtain a high recovery rate of 87% for the type B neurotoxin complex, as indicated by a purification factor of 61.5 fold. Furthermore, residual bacterial cells, impurity proteins and some nucleic acids were removed by PEG precipitation. The following purification of neurotoxin was accomplished by two chromatography techniques using Sephacryl™ S-100 and phenyl HP columns. The neurotoxin was recovered with an overall yield of 21.5% and the purification factor increased to 216.7 fold. In addition, a mouse bioassay determined the purified neurotoxin complex possessed a specific toxicity (LD50) of 4.095 ng/kg. PMID:22761863

  4. An evidence-based review of botulinum toxin (Botox) applications in non-cosmetic head and neck conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persaud, Ricardo; Garas, George; Silva, Sanjeev; Stamatoglou, Constantine; Chatrath, Paul; Patel, Kalpesh

    2013-01-01

    Botulinum toxin (Botox) is an exotoxin produced from Clostridium botulinum. It works by blocking the release of acetylcholine from the cholinergic nerve end plates leading to inactivity of the muscles or glands innervated. Botox is best known for its beneficial role in facial aesthetics but recent literature has highlighted its usage in multiple non-cosmetic medical and surgical conditions. This article reviews the current evidence pertaining to Botox use in the head and neck. A literature review was conducted using The Cochrane Controlled Trials Register, Medline and EMBASE databases limited to English Language articles published from 1980 to 2012. The findings suggest that there is level 1 evidence supporting the efficacy of Botox in the treatment of spasmodic dysphonia, essential voice tremor, headache, cervical dystonia, masticatory myalgia, sialorrhoea, temporomandibular joint disorders, bruxism, blepharospasm, hemifacial spasm and rhinitis. For chronic neck pain there is level 1 evidence to show that Botox is ineffective. Level 2 evidence exists for vocal tics, trigeminal neuralgia, dysphagia and post-laryngectomy oesophageal speech. For stuttering, ‘first bite syndrome’, facial nerve paresis, Frey's syndrome, oromandibular dystonia and palatal/stapedial myoclonus the evidence is level 4. Thus, the literature highlights a therapeutic role for Botox in a wide range of non-cosmetic conditions pertaining to the head and neck (mainly level 1 evidence). With ongoing research, the spectrum of clinical applications and number of people receiving Botox will no doubt increase. Botox appears to justify its title as ‘the poison that heals’. PMID:23476731

  5. The therapeutic usage of botulinum toxin (Botox in non-cosmetic head and neck conditions – An evidence based review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamran Habib Awan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Botulinum toxin (Botox is an exotoxin produced from Clostridium botulinum. It blocks the release of acetylcholine from the cholinergic nerve end plates resulting in inactivity of the muscles or glands innervated. The efficacy of Botox in facial aesthetics is well established; however, recent literature has highlighted its utilization in multiple non-cosmetic medical and surgical conditions. The present article reviews the current evidence pertaining to Botox use in the non-cosmetic head and neck conditions. A literature search was conducted using MEDLINE, EMBASE, ISI Web of Science and the Cochrane databases limited to English Language articles published from January 1980 to December 2014. The findings showed that there is level 1 evidence supporting the efficacy of Botox in the treatment of laryngeal dystonia, headache, cervical dystonia, masticatory myalgia, sialorrhoea, temporomandibular joint disorders, bruxism, blepharospasm, hemifacial spasm and rhinitis. For chronic neck pain there is level 1 evidence to show that Botox is ineffective. Level 2 evidence exists for vocal tics and trigeminal. For stuttering, facial nerve paresis, Frey’s syndrome and oromandibular dystonia the evidence is level 4. Thus, there is compelling evidence in the published literature to demonstrate the beneficial role of Botox in a wide range of non-cosmetic conditions pertaining to the head and neck (mainly level 1 evidence. With more and more research, the range of clinical applications and number of individuals getting Botox will doubtlessly increase. Botox appears to justify its title as ‘the poison that heals’.

  6. The Botulinum Toxin as a Therapeutic Agent: Molecular Structure and Mechanism of Action in Motor and Sensory Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Raj; Dhaliwal, Harkiran Preet; Kukreja, Roshan Vijay; Singh, Bal Ram

    2016-02-01

    Botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT) produced by Clostridium botulinum is the most potent molecule known to mankind. Higher potency of BoNT is attributed to several factors, including structural and functional uniqueness, target specificity, and longevity. Although BoNT is an extremely toxic molecule, it is now increasingly used for the treatment of disorders related to muscle hyperactivity and glandular hyperactivity. Weakening of muscles due to peripheral action of BoNT produces a therapeutic effect. Depending on the target tissue, BoNT can block the cholinergic neuromuscular or cholinergic autonomic innervation of exocrine glands and smooth muscles. In recent observations of the analgesic properties of BoNT, the toxin modifies the sensory feedback loop to the central nervous system. Differential effects of BoNT in excitatory and inhibitory neurons provide a unique therapeutic tool. In this review the authors briefly summarize the structure and mechanism of actions of BoNT on motor and sensory neurons to explain its therapeutic effects and future potential. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  7. Botulinum toxin in the treatment of vocal fold nodules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Jacqui E; Belafsky, Peter C

    2009-12-01

    Promising new techniques in the management of vocal fold nodules have been developed in the past 2 years. Simultaneously, the therapeutic use of botulinum toxin has rapidly expanded. This review explores the use of botulinum toxin in treatment of vocal nodules and summarizes current therapeutic concepts. New microsurgical instruments and techniques, refinements in laser technology, radiosurgical excision and steroid intralesional injections are all promising new techniques in the management of vocal nodules. Botulinum toxin-induced 'voice rest' is a new technique we have employed in patients with recalcitrant nodules. Successful resolution of nodules is possible with this technique, without the risk of vocal fold scarring inherent in dissection/excision techniques. Botulinum toxin usage is exponentially increasing, and large-scale, long-term studies demonstrate its safety profile. Targeted vocal fold temporary paralysis induced by botulinum toxin injection is a new, well tolerated and efficacious treatment in patients with persistent vocal fold nodules.

  8. Botulinum Toxin and Muscle Atrophy: A Wanted or Unwanted Effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durand, Paul D; Couto, Rafael A; Isakov, Raymond; Yoo, Donald B; Azizzadeh, Babak; Guyuron, Bahman; Zins, James E

    2016-04-01

    While the facial rejuvenating effect of botulinum toxin type A is well known and widespread, its use in body and facial contouring is less common. We first describe its use for deliberate muscle volume reduction, and then document instances of unanticipated and undesirable muscle atrophy. Finally, we investigate the potential long-term adverse effects of botulinum toxin-induced muscle atrophy. Although the use of botulinum toxin type A in the cosmetic patient has been extensively studied, there are several questions yet to be addressed. Does prolonged botulinum toxin treatment increase its duration of action? What is the mechanism of muscle atrophy and what is the cause of its reversibility once treatment has stopped? We proceed to examine how prolonged chemodenervation with botulinum toxin can increase its duration of effect and potentially contribute to muscle atrophy. Instances of inadvertent botulinum toxin-induced atrophy are also described. These include the "hourglass deformity" secondary to botulinum toxin type A treatment for migraine headaches, and a patient with atrophy of multiple facial muscles from injections for hemifacial spasm. Numerous reports demonstrate that muscle atrophy after botulinum toxin type A treatment occurs and is both reversible and temporary, with current literature supporting the notion that repeated chemodenervation with botulinum toxin likely responsible for both therapeutic and incidental temporary muscle atrophy. Furthermore, duration of response may be increased with subsequent treatments, thus minimizing frequency of reinjection. Practitioners should be aware of the temporary and reversible effect of botulinum toxin-induced muscle atrophy and be prepared to reassure patients on this matter. © 2016 The American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery, Inc. Reprints and permission: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Purification and characterization of a novel subtype a3 botulinum neurotoxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tepp, William H; Lin, Guangyun; Johnson, Eric A

    2012-05-01

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) produced by Clostridium botulinum are of considerable importance due to their being the cause of human and animal botulism, their potential as bioterrorism agents, and their utility as important pharmaceuticals. Type A is prominent due to its high toxicity and long duration of action. Five subtypes of type A BoNT are currently recognized; BoNT/A1, -/A2, and -/A5 have been purified, and their properties have been studied. BoNT/A3 is intriguing because it is not effectively neutralized by polyclonal anti-BoNT/A1 antibodies, and thus, it may potentially replace BoNT/A1 for patients who have become refractive to treatment with BoNT/A1 due to antibody formation or other modes of resistance. Purification of BoNT/A3 has been challenging because of its low levels of production in culture and the need for innovative purification procedures. In this study, modified Mueller-Miller medium was used in place of traditional toxin production medium (TPM) to culture C. botulinum A3 (CDC strain) and boost toxin production. BoNT/A3 titers were at least 10-fold higher than those produced in TPM. A purification method was developed to obtain greater than 95% pure BoNT/A3. The specific toxicity of BoNT/A3 as determined by mouse bioassay was 5.8 × 10(7) 50% lethal doses (LD(50))/mg. Neutralization of BoNT/A3 toxicity by a polyclonal anti-BoNT/A1 antibody was approximately 10-fold less than the neutralization of BoNT/A1 toxicity. In addition, differences in symptoms were observed between mice that were injected with BoNT/A3 and those that were injected with BoNT/A1. These results indicate that BoNT/A3 has novel biochemical and pharmacological properties compared to those of other subtype A toxins.

  10. The Binary Toxin CDT of Clostridium difficile as a Tool for Intracellular Delivery of Bacterial Glucosyltransferase Domains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lara-Antonia Beer

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Binary toxins are produced by several pathogenic bacteria. Examples are the C2 toxin from Clostridium botulinum, the iota toxin from Clostridium perfringens, and the CDT from Clostridium difficile. All these binary toxins have ADP-ribosyltransferases (ADPRT as their enzymatically active component that modify monomeric actin in their target cells. The binary C2 toxin was intensively described as a tool for intracellular delivery of allogenic ADPRTs. Here, we firstly describe the binary toxin CDT from C. difficile as an effective tool for heterologous intracellular delivery. Even 60 kDa glucosyltransferase domains of large clostridial glucosyltransferases can be delivered into cells. The glucosyltransferase domains of five tested large clostridial glucosyltransferases were successfully introduced into cells as chimeric fusions to the CDTa adapter domain (CDTaN. Cell uptake was demonstrated by the analysis of cell morphology, cytoskeleton staining, and intracellular substrate glucosylation. The fusion toxins were functional only when the adapter domain of CDTa was N-terminally located, according to its native orientation. Thus, like other binary toxins, the CDTaN/b system can be used for standardized delivery systems not only for bacterial ADPRTs but also for a variety of bacterial glucosyltransferase domains.

  11. Spectrum Recombination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenslade, Thomas B., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    Describes several methods of executing lecture demonstrations involving the recombination of the spectrum. Groups the techniques into two general classes: bringing selected portions of the spectrum together using lenses or mirrors and blurring the colors by rapid movement or foreshortening. (JM)

  12. Botulinum toxin for treatment of restrictive strabismus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merino, Pilar S; Vera, Rebeca E; Mariñas, Laura G; Gómez de Liaño, Pilar S; Escribano, Jose V

    To study the types of acquired restrictive strabismus treated in a tertiary hospital and the outcome of treatment with botulinum toxin. We performed a 10-year retrospective study of patients with restrictive strabismus aged ≥18 years who were treated with botulinum toxin. Treatment was considered successful if the final vertical deviation was ≤5 PD, horizontal deviation ≤10 PD, with no head turn or diplopia. We included 27 cases (mean age, 61.9 years). Horizontal strabismus was diagnosed in 11.1%, vertical in 51.9%, and mixed in 37%. Strabismus was secondary to cataract surgery in 6 cases, high myopia in 6, orbital fractures in 5, retinal surgery in 5, Graves ophthalmopathy in 4, and repair of conjunctival injury in 1 case. Diplopia was diagnosed in all patients, head turn in 33.3%. The initial deviation was 14 PD (range, 2-40), the mean number of injections per patient was 1.6 (range, 1-3), and the mean dose was 9.5 IU (range, 2.5-22.5). At the end of follow-up, diplopia was recorded in 59.3%, head turn in 18.5%, surgical treatment in 51.9%, and need for prism glasses in 14.8%. Outcome was successful in 37% of patients (4 high myopia, 3 orbital fractures, 2 post-surgical retinal detachment, and 1 post-cataract surgery). Mean follow-up was 3±1.8 years. Vertical deviation was observed in half of the sample. The most frequent deviation was secondary to cataract surgery and high myopia. Treatment with botulinum toxin was successful in one-third of the patients at the end of follow-up. Copyright © 2016 Spanish General Council of Optometry. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  13. Ultrasound-guided botulinum toxin injections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. E. Khatkova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the key conditions for achieving the desirable result during botulinum toxin therapy for muscular dystonia, spasticity, and other diseases accompanied by spasm, pain, and autonomic dysfunction (dystonias, spasticity, etc. is the proper administration of the agent into the muscles directly involved in the pathological process. The exact entry of botulinum toxin into the target muscles is essential for successful and safe treatment because its injection into a normal muscle may cause side effects. The most common errors are the incorrect depth and incorrect direction of a needle on insertion. Therefore, the exact injection of the agent particularly into the shallow and deep muscles is a difficult task even for an experienced specialist and requires the use of controlling methods.The European Consensus on Botulinum Toxin Therapy points out that various injection techniques are needed for the better identification of necessary muscles. However, there are currently no reports on the clear advantage of any technique. In our country, injections using palpation and anatomical landmarks have been widely used in routine practice so far; electromyographic monitoring and electrostimulation have been less frequently applied. In recent years, the new method ultrasound-guided injection has continued to grow more popular. This effective, accessible, and easy-to-use method makes it possible to manage a real-time injection process and to ensure the exact entry of the agent into the muscle. This paper is dedicated to a comparative analysis of different injection methods and to a description of the ultrasound-guided technique and its advantages over others. 

  14. Clostridium subterminale septicemia in an immunocompetent patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daganou Maria

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Clostridium subterminale is a Clostridium species that has been rarely isolated in the blood of immunocompromised patients. We report a case of C. subterminale septicemia in an immunocompetent patient who presented with acute mediastinitis following spontaneous esophageal rupture.

  15. Botulinum toxin for treatment of glandular hypersecretory disorders.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Laing, T A

    2012-02-03

    SUMMARY: The use of botulinum toxin to treat disorders of the salivary glands is increasing in popularity in recent years. Recent reports of the use of botulinum toxin in glandular hypersecretion suggest overall favourable results with minimal side-effects. However, few randomised clinical trials means that data are limited with respect to candidate suitability, treatment dosages, frequency and duration of treatment. We report a selection of such cases from our own department managed with botulinum toxin and review the current data on use of the toxin to treat salivary gland disorders such as Frey\\'s syndrome, excessive salivation (sialorrhoea), focal and general hyperhidrosis, excessive lacrimation and chronic rhinitis.

  16. Cosmetic Effect of Botulinum Toxin In Focal Hyperhydrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jain S

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Hyperhydrosis of axillae, palm and sole is not a very uncommon problem. It leads to great embarrassment and considerable emotional stress to the individuals. Botulinum toxins prevent the release of acetylcholine at nerve terminals, therefore, reduces sweat secretion. Six patients of axillary and 4 patients of palmer and planter hyperhydrosis were treated with botulinum toxin. All patients experienced relatively satisfactory reduction of hyperhydrosis for period ranging between 4-7 months. No adverse effects were observed. Botulinum toxin therefore can be considered as an effective treatment in focal hyperhydrosis.

  17. Viability of Clostridium sporogenes spores after CaO hygienization of meat waste

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justyna Bauza-Kaszewska

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The occurrence of the pathogenic species [i]C. perfringens[/i] and [i]C. botulinum spores[/i] in animal by-products poses a potential epidemiological hazard. Strong entero- and neurotoxins produced by these bacteria adversely affect human health. To inactivate pathogens present in animal by-products, waste must be subjected to various methods of sanitization. The aim of the presented study was to estimate the effect of different doses of CaO on the viability of spores [i] Clostridium sporogenes[/i] in meat wastes category 3. During the research, two doses of burnt lime were added to the poultry mince meat and meat mixed with swine blood contaminated with [i]Clostridium sporogenes[/i] spore suspension. Half of the samples collected for microbiological analyses were buffered to achieve the pH level ~7, the other were examined without pH neutralization. To estimate the spore number, 10-fold dilution series in peptone water was prepared and heat-treated at 80 °C for 10 min. After cooling-down, one milliliter of each dilution was pour-plated onto DRCM medium solidified with agar. Statistical analysis were performed using the Statistica software. Application of 70% CaO caused complete inactivation of [i]Clostridium spores[/i] in meat wastes after 48 hours. The highest temperature achieved during the experiment was 67 °C. Rapid alkalization of the biomass resulted in increasing pH to values exceeding 12. The effect of liming was not dependent on the meat wastes composition nor CaO dose. The experiment proved the efficiency of liming as a method of animal by-products sanitization. Application of the obtained results may help reduce the epidemiological risk and ensure safety to people handling meat wastes at each stage of their processing and utilization.

  18. Botulinum toxin therapy for limb dystonias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshimura, D M; Aminoff, M J; Olney, R K

    1992-03-01

    We investigated the effectiveness of botulinum toxin in 17 patients with limb dystonias (10 with occupational cramps, three with idiopathic dystonia unrelated to activity, and two each with post-stroke and parkinsonian dystonia) in a placebo-controlled, blinded study. We identified affected muscles clinically and by recording the EMG from implanted wire electrodes at rest and during performance of tasks that precipitated abnormal postures. There were three injections given with graded doses of toxin (average doses, 5 to 10, 10 to 20, and 20 to 40 units per muscle) and one with placebo, in random order. Subjective improvement occurred after 53% of injections of botulinum toxin, and this was substantial in 24%. Only one patient (7%) improved after placebo injection. Subjective improvement occurred in 82% of patients with at least one dose of toxin, lasting for 1 to 4 months. Response rates were similar between clinical groups. Objective evaluation failed to demonstrate significant improvement following treatment with toxin compared with placebo. The major side effect was transient focal weakness after 53% of injections of toxin.

  19. Botulinum Toxin in Management of Limb Tremor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elina Zakin

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Essential tremor is characterized by persistent, usually bilateral and symmetric, postural or kinetic activation of agonist and antagonist muscles involving either the distal or proximal upper extremity. Quality of life is often affected and one’s ability to perform daily tasks becomes impaired. Oral therapies, including propranolol and primidone, can be effective in the management of essential tremor, although adverse effects can limit their use and about 50% of individuals lack response to oral pharmacotherapy. Locally administered botulinum toxin injection has become increasingly useful in the management of essential tremor. Targeting of select muscles with botulinum toxin is an area of active research, and muscle selection has important implications for toxin dosing and functional outcomes. The use of anatomical landmarks with palpation, EMG guidance, electrical stimulation, and ultrasound has been studied as a technique for muscle localization in toxin injection. Earlier studies implemented a standard protocol for the injection of (predominantly wrist flexors and extensors using palpation and EMG guidance. Targeting of muscles by selection of specific activators of tremor (tailored to each patient using kinematic analysis might allow for improvement in efficacy, including functional outcomes. It is this individualized muscle selection and toxin dosing (requiring injection within various sites of a single muscle that has allowed for success in the management of tremors.

  20. [Botulinum toxin and rejuvenation of the eye].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volpei, Ch; Miniconi, M-J; Brunner, C I; Besins, T; Braccini, F

    2013-01-01

    Treatments with botulinum toxin in the forehead and periorbital areas may induce disappointing or even paradoxical results. Our study, focused on this area aimed at refining injection techniques by analyzing muscular balances and comparing the effect according to injection doses and topography. This experimental study has been carried out in the form of 2 session workshops, with volunteers duly informed of the study contents and giving their informed consent. It was conducted by physicians and surgeons members of SAMCEP* (Société Avancée de Médecine et Chirurgie Esthétique et Plastique). The botulinum toxin was onabotulinumtoxin A. Results were evaluated 15 days after treatment, in regard to global eyebrow position, eyebrow head and tail position; muscle interactions; lines above the eyebrow. Eleven case reports and their results are shown and discussed. Our study underlines two important insights: muscle balances and "border areas", between orbicularis oculi and corrugator, key features for eyebrow head, and between frontalis and orbicularis oculifor eyebrow tail.

  1. Clostridium difficile in Retail Meats

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2009-04-16

    Clostridium difficile is a common cause of diarrhea in healthcare settings but little is known about what causes cases in the community. In this podcast, CDC's Dr. L. Clifford McDonald discusses two papers in the May 2009 edition of Emerging Infectious Diseases that explore whether the organism could be found in meat samples purchased in grocery stores in Arizona and Canada.  Created: 4/16/2009 by Emerging Infectious Diseases.   Date Released: 4/16/2009.

  2. Treatment of Gastrointestinal Sphincters Spasms with Botulinum Toxin A

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Brisinda

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Botulinum toxin A inhibits neuromuscular transmission. It has become a drug with many indications. The range of clinical applications has grown to encompass several neurological and non-neurological conditions. One of the most recent achievements in the field is the observation that botulinum toxin A provides benefit in diseases of the gastrointestinal tract. Although toxin blocks cholinergic nerve endings in the autonomic nervous system, it has also been shown that it does not block non-adrenergic non-cholinergic responses mediated by nitric oxide. This has promoted further interest in using botulinum toxin A as a treatment for overactive smooth muscles and sphincters. The introduction of this therapy has made the treatment of several clinical conditions easier, in the outpatient setting, at a lower cost and without permanent complications. This review presents current data on the use of botulinum toxin A in the treatment of pathological conditions of the gastrointestinal tract.

  3. Botulinum toxin for treatment of the focal dystonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Yusaku

    2017-07-29

    Dystonia is defined as a movement disorder characterized by sustained or intermittent muscles contraction causing abnormal, often repetitive, movements, postures, or both. Dystonic movements are typically patterned and twisting, and may be tremulous. The precis diagnosis of dystonia is difficult for physicians because neurological brain imaging does not provide enough practical information. The diagnosis is depend on clinical experience of physicians. Botulinum toxin treatment is the accepted standard of care for patients with focal dystonia. Botulinum toxin treatment results in significant improvement of decreasing the symptom of dystonia. The success of treatment is dependent on muscle selection for treating involved muscles. Usually performance of botulinum toxin treatment is injected according to clinical experience of surface anatomy or clinical location method. However, the benefit of guidance of botulinum toxin treatment is improve outcome in dystonia. Injection techniques with ultra sound echogram or EMG guidance to identify dystonic muscles can be more benefit for patients.

  4. Three-Dimensional Structure Determination of Botulinum Toxin

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Stevens, Ray

    1997-01-01

    ...) Based on the structure of the neurotoxin, understand the toxins mechanism of action. We have accomplished the first goal of determining the three-dimensional structure of the 150 kD botulinum neurotoxin serotype...

  5. Three-Dimensional Structure Determination of Botulinum Toxin

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Stevens, Ray

    1998-01-01

    ...) Based on the structure of the neurotoxin, understand the toxins mechanism of action. We have accomplished the first goal of determining the three-dimensional structure of the 150 kD botulinum neurotoxin serotype...

  6. Historical Perspectives and Guidelines for Botulinum Neurotoxin Subtype Nomenclature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael W. Peck

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Botulinum neurotoxins are diverse proteins. They are currently represented by at least seven serotypes and more than 40 subtypes. New clostridial strains that produce novel neurotoxin variants are being identified with increasing frequency, which presents challenges when organizing the nomenclature surrounding these neurotoxins. Worldwide, researchers are faced with the possibility that toxins having identical sequences may be given different designations or novel toxins having unique sequences may be given the same designations on publication. In order to minimize these problems, an ad hoc committee consisting of over 20 researchers in the field of botulinum neurotoxin research was convened to discuss the clarification of the issues involved in botulinum neurotoxin nomenclature. This publication presents a historical overview of the issues and provides guidelines for botulinum neurotoxin subtype nomenclature in the future.

  7. Botulinum toxin A for the Treatment of Overactive Bladder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Po-Fan; Chiu, Hung-Chieh; Chen, Kuan-Chieh; Chang, Chao-Hsiang; Chou, Eric Chieh-Lung

    2016-02-29

    The standard treatment for overactive bladder starts with patient education and behavior therapies, followed by antimuscarinic agents. For patients with urgency urinary incontinence refractory to antimuscarinic therapy, currently both American Urological Association (AUA) and European Association of Urology (EAU) guidelines suggested that intravesical injection of botulinum toxin A should be offered. The mechanism of botulinum toxin A includes inhibition of vesicular release of neurotransmitters and the axonal expression of capsaicin and purinergic receptors in the suburothelium, as well as attenuation of central sensitization. Multiple randomized, placebo-controlled trials demonstrated that botulinum toxin A to be an effective treatment for patients with refractory idiopathic or neurogenic detrusor overactivity. The urinary incontinence episodes, maximum cystometric capacity, and maximum detrusor pressure were improved greater by botulinum toxin A compared to placebo. The adverse effects of botulinum toxin A, such as urinary retention and urinary tract infection, were primarily localized to the lower urinary tract. Therefore, botulinum toxin A offers an effective treatment option for patients with refractory overactive bladder.

  8. Botulinum toxin treatment for facial palsy: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Lilli; Lui, Michael; Nduka, Charles

    2017-06-01

    Facial palsy may be complicated by ipsilateral synkinesis or contralateral hyperkinesis. Botulinum toxin is increasingly used in the management of facial palsy; however, the optimum dose, treatment interval, adjunct therapy and performance as compared with alternative treatments have not been well established. This study aimed to systematically review the evidence for the use of botulinum toxin in facial palsy. The Cochrane central register of controlled trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE(R) (1946 to September 2015) and Embase Classic + Embase (1947 to September 2015) were searched for randomised studies using botulinum toxin in facial palsy. Forty-seven studies were identified, and three included. Their physical and patient-reported outcomes are described, and observations and cautions are discussed. Facial asymmetry has a strong correlation to subjective domains such as impairment in social interaction and perception of self-image and appearance. Botulinum toxin injections represent a minimally invasive technique that is helpful in restoring facial symmetry at rest and during movement in chronic, and potentially acute, facial palsy. Botulinum toxin in combination with physical therapy may be particularly helpful. Currently, there is a paucity of data; areas for further research are suggested. A strong body of evidence may allow botulinum toxin treatment to be nationally standardised and recommended in the management of facial palsy. Copyright © 2017 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Botulinum toxin injection in laryngeal dyspnea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woisard, Virginie; Liu, Xuelai; Bes, Marie Christine Arné; Simonetta-Moreau, Marion

    2017-02-01

    Data, regarding the use of botulinum toxin (BT-A) in laryngeal dyspnea, are scarce, coming from some cases reports in the literature, including Vocal fold paralysis, laryngeal dystonia, vocal cord dysfunction also called paradoxical motion of the vocal fold (PMVF), and post-neuroleptic laryngeal dyskinesia. There is no consensus regarding the muscles and the doses to inject. The aim of this study is to present a retrospective review of patients treated in our ENT Department by BT-A injection in this indication. This study is a retrospective study describing patients who underwent an injection of botulinum toxin for laryngeal dyspnea in the ENT Department from 2005 to 2015 years. The inclusion criteria were a dyspnea associated with a laryngeal dysfunction, confirmed by flexible fiberoptic nasopharyngolaryngoscopy. Information concerning the causes of the dyspnea, the botulinum toxin BT-A injections procedure, post-injection follow-up, and respiratory outcome were collected for all patients included. In the group of 13 patients included, the main cause identified as principal factor linked with the short breath was: a bilateral VF paralysis (Patel et al., Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg 130:686-689, 7), laryngeal dystonia (Balkissoon and Kenn, Semin Respir Crit Care Med 33:595-605, 2), Anxiety syndrome associated with unilateral vocal fold paralysis or asthma (Marcinow et al., Laryngoscope 124:1425-1430, 3), and an isolated asthma (Zwirner et al., Eur Arch Otorhinolaryngol 254:242-245, 1). Nine out of the thirteen patients were improved by the injections. A BT-A-induced stable benefit for four patients led them to stop the injections in the follow-up. Good outcome was observed in five other patients (main cause: bilateral VP paralysis), allowing a progressive lengthening of the delay between BT-A injections. Four patients did not report a positive risk/benefit ratio after BT-A injections; two of them (with bilateral VF paralysis), because of respiratory side effects and

  10. Yesterday and Today: The Impact of Research Conducted at Camp Detrick on Botulinum Toxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebeda, Frank J; Adler, Michael; Dembek, Zygmunt F

    2018-05-01

    finding was the identification of critical nutritional components for improved growth of Clostridium botulinum and the increased production of BoTx serotype A. The purification processes that were developed at Camp Detrick allowed for the production of crystalline material to be scaled up for the manufacture of toxoid vaccine. Based on the research by Camp Detrick scientists, a toxoid supply of over 1 million units was available to vaccinate ~300,000 troops before the large-scale operations of D-Day. BoTx research during the period 1943 to 1956 resulted in refinements in the techniques for isolating and purifying the crystalline BoTx type A. These results led to the development and manufacture of a toxoid vaccine that was available in a sufficient quantity to protect ~300,000 warfighters in a large-scale military operation. One of the most important long-term consequences derived from the knowledge gained by the efforts at Camp Detrick was the development in the 1980s of safe and effective therapeutic uses for BoTx type A, the most lethal biological substance known.

  11. Botulinum toxin drugs: brief history and outlook.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dressler, D

    2016-03-01

    The global botulinum toxin (BT) market is currently undergoing rapid changes: this may be the time to review the history and the future of BT drug development. Since the early 1990s Botox(®) and Dysport(®) dominated the international BT market. Later, Myobloc(®)/NeuroBloc(®), a liquid BT type B drug, came out, but failed. Xeomin(®) is the latest major BT drug. It features removal of complexing proteins and improved neurotoxin purity. Several new BT drugs are coming out of Korea, China and Russia. Scientific challenges for BT drug development include modification of BT's duration of action, its transdermal transport and the design of BT hybrid drugs for specific target tissues. The increased competition will change the global BT market fundamentally and a re-organisation according to large indication groups, such as therapeutic and cosmetic applications, might occur.

  12. Ultrasound Guidance for Botulinum Neurotoxin Chemodenervation Procedures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katharine E. Alter

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Injections of botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs are prescribed by clinicians for a variety of disorders that cause over-activity of muscles; glands; pain and other structures. Accurately targeting the structure for injection is one of the principle goals when performing BoNTs procedures. Traditionally; injections have been guided by anatomic landmarks; palpation; range of motion; electromyography or electrical stimulation. Ultrasound (US based imaging based guidance overcomes some of the limitations of traditional techniques. US and/or US combined with traditional guidance techniques is utilized and or recommended by many expert clinicians; authors and in practice guidelines by professional academies. This article reviews the advantages and disadvantages of available guidance techniques including US as well as technical aspects of US guidance and a focused literature review related to US guidance for chemodenervation procedures including BoNTs injection.

  13. Botulinum toxin type a for chronic migraine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashkenazi, Avi

    2010-03-01

    Chronic migraine (CM) is the leading cause of chronic daily headache, a common and debilitating headache syndrome. The management of CM patients is challenging, with only limited benefit from available oral preventive medications. Botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT) has been used extensively to treat disorders associated with increased muscle tone. More recent scientific data support an analgesic effect of the toxin. The pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic profiles of BoNT make it an appealing candidate for migraine prevention. Results from older clinical trials on the efficacy of the toxin in CM were inconclusive. However, recent trials using more stringent inclusion criteria have shown positive results, supporting the use of the toxin in some patients with this disorder. This review summarizes the scientific data on the analgesic properties of BoNT, as well as the clinical data on the efficacy of the toxin in treating CM.

  14. [Applications of botulinum toxin in Neurology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Ruiz, Pedro J

    2013-07-07

    At present, botulinum toxin (BT) is one of the most fundamental available drugs in Neurology, only comparable with levodopa. BT is currently used in those entities characterized by excessive muscle contraction, including dystonia and spasticity. In addition, BT has been used to control pain associated with increased muscle contraction in dystonia and spasticity, but also is useful to control chronic pain not associated with muscle contraction, such as chronic daily headache. Finally, BT is useful in sialorrhoea and bruxism. The mechanism of action is complex, mainly acting on terminal neuromuscular junction, but also exhibiting analgesic properties, probably through inhibition of pain neurotransmitters release. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  15. Nieuwe mogelijkheden bij Clostridium difficile-infecties

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Nood, Els; Keller, Josbert J.; Kuijper, Ed J.; Speelman, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Currently available broad spectrum antibiotics are not sufficiently effective against recurrent Clostridium difficile infections (CDI). Donor faecal microbiota transplantation is a very effective treatment for second and recurrent infection but is time-consuming and requires careful screening of

  16. Botulinum toxin for motor and phonic tics in Tourette's syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Sanjay; Srivanitchapoom, Prachaya; Kirubakaran, Richard; Berman, Brian D

    2018-01-05

    Gilles de la Tourette syndrome, or Tourette's syndrome, is defined as the presence of both motor and vocal (phonic) tics for more than 12 months, that manifest before the age of 18 years, in the absence of secondary causes. Treatment of motor and phonic tics is difficult and challenging. To determine the safety and effectiveness of botulinum toxin in treating motor and phonic tics in people with Tourette's syndrome, and to analyse the effect of botulinum toxin on premonitory urge and sensory tics. We searched the Cochrane Movement Disorders Group Trials Register, CENTRAL, MEDLINE, and two trials registers to 25 October 2017. We reviewed reference lists of relevant articles for additional trials. We considered all randomised, controlled, double-blind studies comparing botulinum toxin to placebo or other medications for the treatment of motor and phonic tics in Tourette's syndrome for this review. We sought both parallel group and cross-over studies of children or adults, at any dose, and for any duration. We followed standard Cochrane methods to select studies, assess risk of bias, extract and analyse data. All authors independently abstracted data onto standardized forms; disagreements were resolved by mutual discussion. Only one randomised placebo-controlled, double-blind cross-over study met our selection criteria. In this study, 20 participants with motor tics were enrolled over a three-year recruitment period; 18 (14 of whom had a diagnosis of Tourette's syndrome) completed the study; in total, 21 focal motor tics were treated. Although we considered most bias domains to be at low risk of bias, the study recruited a small number of participants with relatively mild tics and provided limited data for our key outcomes. The effects of botulinum toxin injections on tic frequency, measured by videotape or rated subjectively, and on premonitory urge, are uncertain (very low-quality evidence). The quality of evidence for adverse events following botulinum toxin was

  17. Botulinum Toxin Therapy: Is Syringe Type Related to Cost-Effectiveness?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foglietti, Mark Anthony; Wright, Lauren; Foglietti-Fostyk, Alanna

    2018-03-01

    Clostridium botulinum toxin is effective through cleaving presynaptic proteins at the neuromuscular junction, which prevents the release of acetylcholine and inhibits muscle contraction. Several serotypes of botulinum toxin (BT) exist; however, only 2 types have been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for commercial and medical use, A and B. Both types of BT must be administered intramuscularly with a syringe, but the type of syringe is the injector's preference. Which syringe type is most efficient in minimizing product waste and most cost-effective for the patient and provider? We performed a single-center, open-label, analytical study using BT therapy and 2 types of syringes for analytics of cost-effectiveness. OnabotulinumtoxinA was the neuromodulator used in this report. Vials (100 U) of BT A were each reconstituted with 2.5 mL of 0.9% sodium chloride, for a final concentration of 4 U/0.1 mL. High-dead-space syringes are compared with low-dead-space syringes: 1-mL tuberculin (TB) luer slip syringe with detachable 25-gauge needle and 1-mL ultrafine insulin syringe with an attached 31-gauge needle, respectively. After each syringe was evacuated, the TB syringe was noted to contain 0.05 mL of the remaining product in the hub. Providers are discarding approximately 2 U of BT per TB syringe product injection. If the physician uses 30 syringes per day, 3 days a week, for 1 year, it equals to a lost revenue of approximately $155,500 per year. To individualize the cost-effective analysis, average quantity of syringes used per patient and overall patient volume must be considered, with corresponding adjustment of cost and units discarded. The American Society of Plastic Surgeons reported that the use of neuromodulators has increased by approximately 797% from 2000 to 2016. During that period, the price of neuromodulators has also increased by approximately 85%. Considering these statistics, the type of syringe used for BT neuromodular injection is a

  18. Treatment of Palatal Myoclonus with Botulinum Toxin Injection

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    Mursalin M. Anis

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Palatal myoclonus is a rare cause of pulsatile tinnitus in patients presenting to the otolaryngology office. Rhythmic involuntary contractions of the palatal muscles produce the pulsatile tinnitus in these patients. Treatment of this benign but distressing condition with anxiolytics, anticonvulsants, and surgery has been largely unsuccessful. A few investigators have obtained promising results with botulinum toxin injection into the palatal muscles. We present a patient with palatal myoclonus who failed conservative treatment with anxiolytics. Unilateral injection of botulinum toxin into her tensor veli palatini muscle under electromyographic guidance resolved pulsatile tinnitus in her ipsilateral ear and unmasked pulsatile tinnitus in the contralateral ear. A novel method of following transient postinjection symptoms using a diary is presented in this study. Botulinum toxin dose must be titrated to achieve optimal results in each individual patient, analogous to titrations done for spasmodic dysphonia. Knowledge of the temporal onset of postinjection side effects and symptomatic relief may aid physicians in dose titration and surveillance. We present suggestions on titrating the botulinum toxin dose to optimal levels. A review of the literature on the use of botulinum toxin for palatal myoclonus and some common complications are discussed.

  19. Bupivacaine and botulinum toxin to treat comitant strabismus

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    Luisa Moreira Hopker

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To evaluate the change in ocular motility and muscle thickness measured with ultrasonography after intramuscular injection of bupivacaine and botulinum toxin A. METHODS: Eight patients (five female were enrolled to measure ocular motility prior and 1, 7, 30 and 180 days after one injection of 2 ml of 1.5% bupivacaine and 2.5 U of botulinum toxin A in agonist and antagonist muscles, respectively, of eight amblyopic eyes. Muscle thickness was measured prior and on days 1, 7 and 30 after injection using 10-MHz ultrasonography (eyelid technique. RESULTS: Mean change in alignment was 10 prism diopters after 180 days (n=6. An average increase of 1.01 mm in muscle thickness was observed after 30 days of bupivacaine injection and 0.28 mm increase was observed after botulinum toxin A injection, as measured by ultrasonography. Lateral rectus muscles injected with bupivacaine had a mean increase of 1.5 mm in muscle thickness. CONCLUSION: In this study, a change in ocular motility was observed after 180 days of intramuscular injection of bupivacaine and botulinum toxin in horizontal extraocular muscles. Overall, there was an increase of muscle thickness in both botulinum toxinum A and bupivacaine injected muscles after 30 days of injection when measured by ultrasonography. This change was more pronounced on lateral rectus muscles after bupivacaine injection.

  20. Postpartum Clostridium sordellii infection associated with fatal toxic shock syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rørbye, C; Petersen, Ina Sleimann; Nilas, Lisbeth

    2000-01-01

    Clostridium bacteria are anaerobic Gram positive spore-form-ing bacilli, known to cause distinct clinical syndromes such as botulism, tetanus, pseudomembranous colitis and myonecrosis. The natural habitats of Clostridium species are soil, water and the gastrointestinal tract of animals and humans....... In 5-10% of all women, Clostridium species are also found to be normal inhabitants in the microbial flora of the female genital tract. In case of a non-sexually transmitted genital tract infection, Clostridium species are isolated in 4-20%, and clostridium welchii seems to be the most common isolate....... Clostridium sordellii is rarely encountered in clinical specimens (1% of Clostridium species), but it has been described as a human pathogen with fatal potential. Two toxins, a lethal and a hemorrhagic (that antigenically and pathophysiologically appear similar to Clostridium difficile toxins B and A...

  1. Toxinas de Clostridium perfringens Toxins of Clostridium perfringens

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    W. E. Morris

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Clostridium perfringens es un bacilo grampositivo anaerobio con capacidad de formar esporas. Es uno de los patógenos bacterianos con mayor distribución en el medio ambiente, ya que puede ser aislado de muestras de suelo y de agua y además forma parte de la microbiota intestinal de animales y humanos. Sin embargo, en ciertas ocasiones puede actuar como patógeno oportunista y causar enfermedades como la gangrena gaseosa, la enterotoxemia del ovino y del caprino y la disentería del cordero, entre otras. En humanos, está asociado a enfermedades como la intoxicación por alimentos, la enterocolitis necrotizante en niños y la enteritis necrótica o pigbel de las tribus de Papúa-Nueva Guinea. El renovado interés que existe actualmente en el estudio de C. perfringens como patógeno veterinario y humano, junto con el avance de la biología molecular, han hecho posible que la ciencia tenga hoy un conocimiento más profundo sobre la biología y la patogenia de esta bacteria. En esta revisión bibliográfica se discuten y actualizan los principales aspectos de la patogenia intestinal de C. perfringens teniendo en cuenta las toxinas con mayor importancia médica descritas hasta el presente.Clostridium perfringens is an anaerobic gram-positive spore-forming bacillus. It is one of the pathogens with larger distribution in the environment; it can be isolated from soil and water samples, which also belongs to the intestinal flora of animals and humans. However, on some occasions it can act as an opportunistic pathogen, causing diseases such as gas gangrene, enterotoxemia in sheep and goats and lamb dysentery, among others. In human beings, it is associated to diseases such as food poisoning, necrotic enterocolitis of the infant and necrotic enteritis or pigbel in Papua-New Guinea tribes. The renewed interest existing nowadays in the study of C. perfringens as a veterinarian and human pathogen, together with the advance of molecular biology, had enabled

  2. Treatment of displaced mandibular condylar fracture with botulinum toxin A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akbay, Ercan; Cevik, Cengiz; Damlar, Ibrahim; Altan, Ahmet

    2014-04-01

    The aim of this case report is to discuss the effect on condylar reduction of botulinum toxin A treatment used in a child with displaced fracture at condylar neck of mandible. A 3-years old boy was admitted to our clinic for incomplete fracture of mandibular symphysis and displaced condylar fracture at the left side. An asymmetrical occlusal splint with intermaxillary fixation was used instead of open reduction and internal fixation because of incomplete fracture of symphysis and possible complications of condyle surgery. However, it was observed that condylar angulation persisted despite this procedure. Thus, botulinum toxin A was administered to masseter, temporalis and pterygoideus medialis muscles. At the end of first month, it was seen that mandibular condyle was almost completely recovered and that fusion was achieved. In conclusion, Botulinum A toxin injection aiming the suppression of masticatory muscle strength facilitates the reduction in the conservative management of displaced condyle in pediatric patients. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Effectiveness of botulinum toxin A in treatment of refractory erythromelalgia

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    Kuan-Hsiang Lin

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Erythromelalgia is characterized by intense burning pain, erythema, and heat in affected areas after precipitating factors such as warm temperature or stress. It is refractory to treatment in some situations. We describe a woman with adenosquamous cell carcinoma of the lung and medically refractory erythromelalgia. The symptoms of erythromelalgia presented as refractory to any medical treatment. Due to the unresponsive nature of her condition, botulinum toxin type A (onabotulinumtoxin A was injected over both of her cheeks, periodically for six cycles. Her symptoms responded dramatically to subcutaneous and intradermal injection of botulinum toxin type A. Repetitive injection demonstrated consistent and reproducible responses, and the efficacy was maintained for approximately 1 month. No adverse effects or complications were noted. Botulinum toxin type A might be safe and effective as an alternative treatment for refractory erythromelalgia, but further large-scale studies are required.

  4. Botulinum toxin type A versus botulinum toxin type B for cervical dystonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duarte, Gonçalo S; Castelão, Mafalda; Rodrigues, Filipe B; Marques, Raquel E; Ferreira, Joaquim; Sampaio, Cristina; Moore, Austen P; Costa, João

    2016-10-26

    This is an update of a Cochrane review first published in 2003. Cervical dystonia is the most common form of focal dystonia and is a disabling disorder characterised by painful involuntary head posturing. There are two available formulations of botulinum toxin, with botulinum toxin type A (BtA) usually considered the first line therapy for this condition. Botulinum toxin type B (BtB) is an alternative option, with no compelling theoretical reason why it might not be as- or even more effective - than BtA. To compare the efficacy, safety and tolerability of botulinum toxin type A (BtA) versus botulinum toxin type B (BtB) in people with cervical dystonia. To identify studies for this review we searched the Cochrane Movement Disorders Group Trials Register, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, Embase, reference lists of articles and conference proceedings. All elements of the search, with no language restrictions, were last run in October 2016. Double-blind, parallel, randomised, placebo-controlled trials (RCTs) comparing BtA versus BtB in adults with cervical dystonia. Two independent authors assessed records, selected included studies, extracted data using a paper pro forma, and evaluated the risk of bias. We resolved disagreements by consensus or by consulting a third author. We performed meta-analyses using the random-effects model, for the comparison BtA versus BtB to estimate pooled effects and corresponding 95% confidence intervals (95% CI). No prespecified subgroup analyses were carried out. The primary efficacy outcome was improvement on any validated symptomatic rating scale, and the primary safety outcome was the proportion of participants with adverse events. We included three RCTs, all new to this update, of very low to low methodological quality, with a total of 270 participants.Two studies exclusively enrolled participants with a known positive response to BtA treatment. This raises concerns of population enrichment

  5. Polyclonal Antibody Therapies for Clostridium difficile Infection

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    Michael R. Simon

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Clostridium difficile infection has emerged as a growing worldwide health problem. The colitis of Clostridium difficile infection results from the synergistic action of C. difficile secreted toxins A and B upon the colon mucosa. A human monoclonal IgG anti-toxin has demonstrated the ability in combination therapy to reduce mortality in C. difficile challenged hamsters. This antibody is currently in a clinical trial for the treatment of human Clostridium difficile infection. More than one group of investigators has considered using polyclonal bovine colostral antibodies to toxins A and B as an oral passive immunization. A significant proportion of the healthy human population possesses polyclonal antibodies to the Clostridium difficile toxins. We have demonstrated that polyclonal IgA derived from the pooled plasma of healthy donors possesses specificity to toxins A and B and can neutralize these toxins in a cell-based assay. This suggests that secretory IgA prepared from such pooled plasma IgA may be able to be used as an oral treatment for Clostridium difficile infection.

  6. Recent advances in botulinum neurotoxin inhibitor development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiris, Erkan; Burnett, James C; Kane, Christopher D; Bavari, Sina

    2014-01-01

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) are endopeptidases that target motor neurons and block acetylcholine neurotransmitter release. This action results in the muscle paralysis that defines the disease botulism. To date, there are no FDA-approved therapeutics to treat BoNT-mediated paralysis after intoxication of the motor neuron. Importantly, the rationale for pursuing treatments to counter these toxins is driven by their potential misuse. Current drug discovery efforts have mainly focused on small molecules, peptides, and peptidomimetics that can directly and competitively inhibit BoNT light chain proteolytic activity. Although this is a rational approach, direct inhibition of the Zn(2+) metalloprotease activity has been elusive as demonstrated by the dearth of candidates undergoing clinical evaluation. Therefore, broadening the scope of viable targets beyond that of active site protease inhibitors represents an additional strategy that could move the field closer to the clinic. Here we review the rationale, and discuss the outcomes of earlier approaches and highlight potential new targets for BoNT inhibition. These include BoNT uptake and processing inhibitors, enzymatic inhibitors, and modulators of neuronal processes associated with toxin clearance, neurotransmitter potentiation, and other pathways geared towards neuronal recovery and repair.

  7. Botulinum neurotoxin: a marvel of protein design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montal, Mauricio

    2010-01-01

    Botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT), the causative agent of botulism, is acknowledged to be the most poisonous protein known. BoNT proteases disable synaptic vesicle exocytosis by cleaving their cytosolic SNARE (soluble NSF attachment protein receptor) substrates. BoNT is a modular nanomachine: an N-terminal Zn(2+)-metalloprotease, which cleaves the SNAREs; a central helical protein-conducting channel, which chaperones the protease across endosomes; and a C-terminal receptor-binding module, consisting of two subdomains that determine target specificity by binding to a ganglioside and a protein receptor on the cell surface and triggering endocytosis. For BoNT, functional complexity emerges from its modular design and the tight interplay between its component modules--a partnership with consequences that surpass the simple sum of the individual component's action. BoNTs exploit this design at each step of the intoxication process, thereby achieving an exquisite toxicity. This review summarizes current knowledge on the structure of individual modules and presents mechanistic insights into how this protein machine evolved to this level of sophistication. Understanding the design principles underpinning the function of such a dynamic modular protein remains a challenging task.

  8. Why do females use botulinum toxin injections?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carter Singh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Botulinum toxin (BT use for enhancing the facial features has become a commonly accepted form of aesthetic intervention. This study conducted a self-report survey of female BT users in order to explore the motivating factors in its use (cost-benefit analysis. Settings and Design: This is a cross-sectional exploratory pilot study. Materials and Methods: Self-report questionnaires were administered to 41 consecutive clients attending an independent medical practice for BT injections for cosmetic purposes. All the participants were females and represented a range of age groups from the 20s to above 60s. Items in the nonstandardized questionnaire elicited questions relating to the reasons for and against BT use. Statistical Analysis Used: Descriptive analysis was used rather than inferential statistics, and involved ranking the responses according to the most likely reasons for using BT and disadvantages of its use. Results: In general, the primary motivating factor for BT use was to improve self-esteem, and the greatest disadvantage involved financial costs associated with the procedure. Conclusions: The main findings of this study suggest that females who use BT for aesthetic purposes are motivated by personal psychological gains (intrapersonal attributes rather than social gains (interpersonal factors. In other words, they do not believe that having BT will equate to being treated any better by other people but would rather provide them with confidence and satisfaction regarding their self-image.

  9. Diffusion, spread, and migration of botulinum toxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez-Castaneda, Juan; Jankovic, Joseph; Comella, Cynthia; Dashtipour, Khashayar; Fernandez, Hubert H; Mari, Zoltan

    2013-11-01

    Botulinum toxin (BoNT) is an acetylcholine release inhibitor and a neuromuscular blocking agent used for the treatment of a variety of neurologic and medical conditions. The efficacy and safety of BoNT depends on accurate selection and identification of intended targets but also may be determined by other factors, including physical spread of the molecule from the injection site, passive diffusion, and migration to distal sites via axonal or hematogenous transport. The passive kinetic dispersion of the toxin away from the injection site in a gradient-dependent manner may also play a role in toxin spread. In addition to unique properties of the various BoNT products, volume and dilution may also influence local and systemic distribution of BoNT. Most of the local and remote complications of BoNT injections are thought to be due to unwanted spread or diffusion of the toxin's biologic activity into adjacent and distal muscles. Despite widespread therapeutic and cosmetic use of BoNT over more than three decades, there is a remarkable paucity of published data on the mechanisms of distribution and its effects on clinical outcomes. The primary aim of this article is to critically review the available experimental and clinical literature and place it in the practical context. © 2013 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society.

  10. Computer-Assisted Communication Device for Botulinum-Intoxicated Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    development of small molecule therapeutics for botulinum neurotoxin and on the development of nerve agent pretreatments and therapies . He has published...Souayah, N., Karim, H., Kamin, S.S., McArdle, J. and Marcus, S. (2006) ‘Severe botulism after focal injection of botulinum toxin’, Neurology , Vol...67, pp.1855–1856. Tacket, C.O., Shandera, W.X., Mann, J.M., Hargrett, N.T. and Blake, P.A. (1984) ‘ Equine antitoxin use and other factors that

  11. BOTULINUM TOXIN FOR THE TREATMENT OF CHRONIC HEADACHE

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    L. B. Zavaliy

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT. The article deals with the use of botulinum toxin in the treatment of chronic headache. We present four clinical cases of patients who sought treatment in the “Pain Clinic” of N.V. Sklifosovsky Research Institute for Emergency Medicine with a chronic severe cephalgic syndrome of different genesis (migraine, tension headache, dystonia, which had not responded to outpatient treatment for a long time. The paper shows the change of pain in patients with various forms of headache after treatment with botulinum toxin type A, indicating the effectiveness of the method in these patients. 

  12. Treatment of Chronic Migraine with Focus on Botulinum Neurotoxins

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    Sara M. Schaefer

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Migraine is the most common neurological disorder, and contributes to disability and large healthcare costs in the United States and the world. The treatment of migraine until recently has focused on medications, both abortive and prophylactic, but treatment of chronic migraine has been revolutionized with the introduction of botulinum toxin injection therapy. In this review, we explore the current understanding of migraine pathophysiology, and the evolution of the use of botulinum toxin therapy including proposed pathophysiological mechanisms through animal data. We also discuss the similarities and differences between three injection techniques.

  13. Update on Clostridium difficile infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Monnier, A; Zahar, J-R; Barbut, F

    2014-08-01

    Clostridium difficile infections (CDI) occur primarily in hospitalized patients with risk factors such as concomitant or recent use of antibiotics. CDI related additional costs are important for the global population and health-care facilities. CDI epidemiology has changed since 2003: they became more frequent boosted by large outbreaks, more severe, more resistant to antibiotic treatment, and spread to new groups of population without any risk factor. This is partly due to the emergence and worldwide dissemination of new and more virulent C. difficile strains such as the epidemic clone 027/NAP1/BI. The host immune response plays a central role in the pathogenesis of CDI and could also be involved in the occurrence of recurrent or severe forms. New guidelines including new molecular tests (NAAT) have recently clarified and simplified the diagnostic strategies for the microbiological diagnosis of CDI. The CDI incidence was proven to be related to the level of clinical suspicion and the frequency of microbiological screening for C. difficile. The current recommendations for the treatment of CDI mention oral metronidazole as the first line treatment for mild to moderate diarrhea. Oral vancomycin use should be restricted to severe cases. In the absence of consensus, the treatment of multiple recurrences remains a major concern. New and more targeted antibiotics and innovative therapeutic strategies (fecal transplantation, monoclonal antibodies, and vaccination) have emerged as new therapies for CDI. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. Epidemiology of Clostridium difficile Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    DePestel, Daryl D.; Aronoff, David M.

    2014-01-01

    There has been dramatic change in the epidemiology of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) since the turn of the 21st Century noted by a marked increase in incidence and severity, occurring at a disproportionately higher frequency in older patients. Historically considered a nosocomial infection associated with antibiotic exposure, CDI has now also emerged in the community in populations previously considered low risk. Emerging risk factors and disease recurrence represent continued challenges in the management of CDI. The increased incidence and severity associated with CDI has coincided with the emergence and rapid spread of a previously rare strain, ribotype 027. Recent data from the U.S. and Europe suggest the incidence of CDI may have reached a crescendo in recent years and is perhaps beginning to plateau. The acute-care direct costs of CDI were estimated to be $4.8 billion in 2008. However, nearly all the published studies have focused on CDI diagnosed and treated in acute-care hospital setting and fail to measure the burden outside the hospital, including recently discharged patients, outpatients, and those in long-term care facilities. Enhanced surveillance methods are needed to monitor the incidence, identify populations at risk, and characterize the molecular epidemiology of strains causing CDI. PMID:24064435

  15. Utilizing Ayurvedic literature for the identification of novel phytochemical inhibitors of botulinum neurotoxin A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yalamanchili, Chinni; Manda, Vamshi K; Chittiboyina, Amar G; Guernieri, Rebecca L; Harrell, William A; Webb, Robert P; Smith, Leonard A; Khan, Ikhlas A

    2017-02-02

    Ayurveda, an ancient holistic system of health care practiced on the Indian subcontinent, utilizes a number of multi-plant formulations and is considered by many as a potential source for novel treatments, as well as the identification of new drugs. Our aim is to identify novel phytochemicals for the inhibition of bacterial exotoxin, botulinum neurotoxin A (BoNT/A) based on Ayurvedic literature. BoNT/A is released by Clostridium species, which when ingested, inhibits the release of acetylcholine by concentrating at the neuromuscular junction and causes flaccid paralysis, resulting in a condition termed as botulism, and may also lead to death due to respiratory arrest. Fifteen plants were selected from the book 'Diagnosis and treatment of diseases in Ayurveda' by Vaidya Bhagwan Dash and Lalitesh Kashyap, based on their frequency of use in the formulations used for the treatment of six diseases with neuromuscular symptoms similar to botulism. Phytochemicals from these plants were screened using in silico, and in vitro methods. Structures of 570 reported phytochemicals from 14 plants were docked inside six reported BoNT/A light chain crystal structures using ensemble docking module in Maestro (Schrödinger, LLE). From the docking scores and structural diversity, nine compounds including acoric acid 1, three flavonoids, three coumarins derivatives, one kava lactone were selected and screened using an in vitro HPLC-based protease assay. The bioassay results showed that several compounds possess BoNT/A LC inhibition of 50-60% when compared to positive controls NSC 84094 and CB7967495 (80-95%). Further testing of the active compounds identified from Ayurvedic literature and structure-activity studies of acoric acid 1 using more sensitive bioassays is under way. The identification of acoric acid 1, a novel scaffold against BoNT/A, exemplifies the utility of Ayurvedic literature for the discovery of novel drug leads. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights

  16. Mechano- and metabosensitive alterations after injection of botulinum toxin into gastrocnemius muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caron, Guillaume; Rouzi, Talifujiang; Grelot, Laurent; Magalon, Guy; Marqueste, Tanguy; Decherchi, Patrick

    2014-07-01

    This study was designed to investigate effects of motor denervation by Clostridium botulinum toxin serotype A (BoNT/A) on the afferent activity of fibers originating from the gastrocnemius muscle of rats. Animals were randomized in two groups, 1) untreated animals acting as control and 2) treated animals in which the toxin was injected in the left muscle. Locomotor activity was evaluated once per day during 12 days with a test based on footprint measurements of walking rats (sciatic functional index). At the end of the functional assessment period, electrophysiological tests were used to measure muscle properties, metabosensitive afferent fiber responses to chemical (KCl and lactic acid) injections, electrically induced fatigue (EIF), and mechanosensitive responses to tendon vibrations. Additionally, ventilatory response was recorded during repetitive muscle contractions. Then, rats were sacrificed, and the BoNT/A-injected muscles were weighed. Twelve days postinjection we observed a complete motor denervation associated with a significant muscle atrophy and loss of force to direct muscle stimulation. In the BoNT/A group, the metabosensitive responses to KCl injections were unaltered. However, we observed alterations in responses to EIF and to 1 mM of lactic acid (which induces the greatest activation). The ventilatory adjustments during repetitive muscle activation were abolished, and the mechanosensitive fiber responses to tendon vibrations were reduced. These results indicate that BoNT/A alters the sensorimotor loop and may induce insufficient motor and physiological adjustments in patients in whom a motor denervation with BoNT/A was performed. Copyright © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Cloning and expression in Escherichia coli of cellulases genes from Clostridium IBUN 22A

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucy Carolina Vargas Pabón

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Genomic library of the native strain Clostridium IBUN 22A was constructed, using plasmid pBluescriptlI® KS+/ - as cloning vector and its expression in Escherichia coli was evaluated. Eight recombination clones with enzymatic activity were detected by enzymatic screening and using the red-Congo test with three substrates: cellobiose, carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC and cellulose powder (native. Restriction analysis of three recombination plasmids, representative of each enzymatic activity showed the inserted size (1600, 13000 and 11000bp approximately for pBS68, pBS25 and pBS57 respectively. More studies of protein expression and enzymatic characterization will allow theses enzymes and other typical parameters to be defined. In the same way the fragment sequence cloned will lead to a more detailed analysis and definition of the biotechnological potential of this strain regarding solvent production using cellulosic substrates for fermentation.

  18. EPIDEMIOLOGIC INVESTIGATION OF CLOSTRIDIUM DIFFICILE AND CLOSTRIDIUM PERFRINGENS IN HEALTHY HORSES

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schoster, Angelika; Arroyo, Luis; Staempfli, Henry

    Clostridium difficile and Clostridium perfringens are important causes of equine colitis but can also be found in healthy individuals. Epidemiologic information is restricted to cross-sectional studies of fecal shedding with little information on prevalence in gastrointestinal compartments other ...... supports results of previous studies that indicate this organism is rare in healthy horses.......Clostridium difficile and Clostridium perfringens are important causes of equine colitis but can also be found in healthy individuals. Epidemiologic information is restricted to cross-sectional studies of fecal shedding with little information on prevalence in gastrointestinal compartments other...... than feces and variability in shedding over time. The objectives were to investigate the presence of C. difficile and C. perfringens in healthy horses over time and assess prevalence in different gastrointestinal compartments. Feces were collected monthly from 25 horses for one year. Ingesta were...

  19. Electromyography in cervical dystonia: changes after botulinum and trihexyphenidyl

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brans, J. W.; Aramideh, M.; Koelman, J. H.; Lindeboom, R.; Speelman, J. D.; Ongerboer de Visser, B. W.

    1998-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The value of physical examination in detecting involved neck muscles in cervical dystonia (CD) is uncertain and little is known about changes in electromyographic (EMG) features after botulinum toxin type A (BTA) treatment. METHODS: In a double-blind, randomized study we recorded the EMG

  20. Centrifugal microfluidic platform for ultrasensitive detection of Botulinum Toxin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botulinum neurotoxin – a global public health threat and category A bioterrorism agent - is the most toxic substance known and one of the most challenging toxins to detect due to its lethality at extremely low concentrations. Hence the live-mouse bioassay because of its superior sensitivity, remains...

  1. Comparison of oral toxicological properties of botulinum neurotoxin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) are among the most potent biological toxins for humans. Of the seven known serotypes (A-G) of BoNT, serotypes A, B and E cause most of the foodborne intoxications in humans. BoNTs in nature are associated with non-toxic accessory proteins known as neurotoxin-associated ...

  2. Longitudinal Phonatory Characteristics after Botulinum Toxin Type A Injection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Kimberly V.; And Others

    1996-01-01

    A study investigated the long-term effects of a Botulinum Toxin Type A injection on the glottal competency of a man with adductor spasmodic dysphonia. Results suggest that change in degree of glottal adduction over time can be observed even when vocal instability is present within each recording session. (CR)

  3. Experience with botulinum toxin in the treatment of cerebral palsy

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Institute of Child Health, Red Cross War Memorial Children's. Hospital and University of .... A majority of the children in this study showed definite short- term benefit following botulinum toxin injection and this form of therapy constitutes ... repeated when necessary as long as the spasticity remains dynamic. Patients with ...

  4. Calf muscle volume estimates: Implications for Botulinum toxin treatment?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bandholm, Thomas; Sonne-Holm, Stig; Thomsen, Carsten

    2007-01-01

    An optimal botulinum toxin dose may be related to the volume of the targeted muscle. We investigated the suitability of using ultrasound and anthropometry to estimate gastrocnemius and soleus muscle volume. Gastrocnemius and soleus muscle thickness was measured in 11 cadaveric human legs, using...

  5. Intramural injection with botulinum toxin significantly elongates the pig esophagus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Heidi Fhær; Jensen, Thorbjørn Søren Rønn; Rasmussen, Lars

    2013-01-01

    Surgical treatment of long-gap esophageal atresia (LGEA) is challenging. Methods which facilitate stretching of the esophageal pouches may allow primary anastomosis. Botulinum toxin type A (BTX-A) blocks acetylcholine release in neuromuscular junctions, thereby causing muscle relaxation. We...

  6. Botulinum toxin A, brain and pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matak, Ivica; Lacković, Zdravko

    2014-01-01

    Botulinum neurotoxin type A (BoNT/A) is one of the most potent toxins known and a potential biological threat. At the same time, it is among the most widely used therapeutic proteins used yearly by millions of people, especially for cosmetic purposes. Currently, its clinical use in certain types of pain is increasing, and its long-term duration of effects represents a special clinical value. Efficacy of BoNT/A in different types of pain has been found in numerous clinical trials and case reports, as well as in animal pain models. However, sites and mechanisms of BoNT/A actions involved in nociception are a matter of controversy. In analogy with well known neuroparalytic effects in peripheral cholinergic synapses, presently dominant opinion is that BoNT/A exerts pain reduction by inhibiting peripheral neurotransmitter/inflammatory mediator release from sensory nerves. On the other hand, growing number of behavioral and immunohistochemical studies demonstrated the requirement of axonal transport for BoNT/A's antinociceptive action. In addition, toxin's enzymatic activity in central sensory regions was clearly identified after its peripheral application. Apart from general pharmacology, this review summarizes the clinical and experimental evidence for BoNT/A antinociceptive activity and compares the data in favor of peripheral vs. central site and mechanism of action. Based on literature review and published results from our laboratory we propose that the hypothesis of peripheral site of BoNT/A action is not sufficient to explain the experimental data collected up to now. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Description of Clostridium phoceensis sp. nov., a new species within the genus Clostridium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Hosny

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Clostridium phoceensis sp. nov., strain GD3T (= CSUR P1929 = DSM 100334 is the type strain of C. phoceensis sp. nov., a new species within the genus Clostridium. This strain was isolated from the gut microbiota of a 28-year-old healthy French man. C. phoceensis is a Gram-negative, spore-forming, nonmotile, strictly anaerobic bacterium. We describe its complete genome sequence and annotation, together with its phenotypic characteristics.

  8. Clostridium difficile infection in Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putsathit, Papanin; Kiratisin, Pattarachai; Ngamwongsatit, Puriya; Riley, Thomas V

    2015-01-01

    Clostridium difficile is the aetiological agent in ca. 20% of cases of antimicrobial-associated diarrhoea in hospitalised adults. Diseases caused by this organism range from mild diarrhoea to occasional fatal pseudomembranous colitis. The epidemiology of C. difficile infection (CDI) has changed notably in the past decade, following epidemics in the early 2000s of PCR ribotype (RT) 027 infection in North America and Europe, where there was an increase in disease severity and mortality. Another major event has been the emergence of RT 078, initially as the predominant ribotype in production animals in the USA and Europe, and then in humans in Europe. Although there have been numerous investigations of the epidemiology of CDI in North America and Europe, limited studies have been undertaken elsewhere, particularly in Asia. Antimicrobial exposure remains the major risk factor for CDI. Given the high prevalence of indiscriminate and inappropriate use of antimicrobials in Asia, it is conceivable that CDI is relatively common among humans and animals. This review describes the level of knowledge in Thailand regarding C. difficile detection methods, prevalence and antimicrobial susceptibility profile, as well as the clinical features of, treatment options for and outcomes of the disease. In addition, antimicrobial usage in livestock in Thailand will be reviewed. A literature search yielded 18 studies mentioning C. difficile in Thailand, a greater number than from any other Asian country. It is possible that the situation in Thailand in relation to CDI may mirror the situation in other developing Asians countries. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. and the International Society of Chemotherapy. All rights reserved.

  9. Effect of Botulinum Toxin and Surgery among Spasmodic Dysphonia Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Esch, Babette F; Wegner, Inge; Stegeman, Inge; Grolman, Wilko

    2017-02-01

    Objective The effect of botulinum toxin among patients with adductor spasmodic dysphonia (AdSD) is temporary. To optimize long-term treatment outcome, other therapy options should be evaluated. Alternative treatment options for AdSD comprise several surgical treatments, such as thyroarytenoid myotomy, thyroplasty, selective laryngeal adductor denervation-reinnervation, laryngeal nerve crush, and recurrent laryngeal nerve resection. Here, we present the first systematic review comparing the effect of botulinum toxin with surgical treatment among patients diagnosed with AdSD. Data Sources MEDLINE (PubMed), EMBASE, and the Cochrane Library. Methods Articles were reviewed by 2 independent authors, and data were compiled in tables for analysis of the objective outcome (voice expert evaluation after voice recording), the subjective outcome (patient self-assessment scores), and voice-related quality of life (Voice Health Index scores). Results No clinical trials comparing both treatment modalities were identified. Single-armed studies evaluated either the effect of botulinum toxin or surgical treatment. Thirteen studies reported outcomes after botulinum toxin treatment (n = 419), and 9 studies reported outcomes after surgical treatment (n = 585 patients). A positive effect of bilateral botulinum toxin injections was found for the objective voice outcome, subjective voice outcome, and quality of life. The duration of the beneficial effect ranged from 15 to 18 weeks. Surgical treatment had an overall positive effect on objective voice improvement, subjective voice improvement, and quality of live. Conclusion No preference for one treatment could be demonstrated. Prospective clinical trials comparing treatment modalities are recommended to delineate the optimal outcomes by direct comparison.

  10. Behavior of Clostridium perfringens at low temperatures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jong, de A.E.I.; Rombouts, F.M.; Beumer, R.R.

    2004-01-01

    Refrigerated storage is an important step in the preparation of foods and inadequate storage is one of the main causes of food poisoning outbreaks of Clostridium perfringens. Therefore, growth and germination characteristics of C. perfringens in a temperature range of 3-42 degreesC were determined

  11. Clostridium difficile and pediatric inflammatory bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martinelli, Massimo; Strisciuglio, Caterina; Veres, Gabor

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Clostridium difficile infection is associated with pediatric inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) in several ways. We sought to investigate C. difficile infection in pediatric patients with IBD in comparison with a group of children with celiac disease and to evaluate IBD disease course o...

  12. Clostridium cadaveris bacteraemia: two cases and review.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schade, R.P.; Rijn, M. Van; Timmers, H.J.L.M.; Dofferhoff, A.S.M.; Klaassen, C.H.W.; Meis, J.F.G.M.

    2006-01-01

    Clostridium cadaveris is a strict anaerobic Gram-positive rod that is the most prominent bacterium during the decay of dead bodies. We present 2 rare cases of bacteraemia with C. cadaveris. The source of both infectious episodes was most probably of gastrointestinal origin.

  13. Clostridium difficile infection : epidemiology, complications and recurrences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bauer, Martijn Philippe

    2014-01-01

    Clostridium difficile is a spore-forming bacterium, the toxin-producing strains of which cause colitis. Risk factors are antibiotics, advanced age and severe comorbidity. C. difficile infection (CDI) has been regarded as mostly a hospital-acquired infection. Preventing relapses is considered the

  14. The changing epidemiology of Clostridium difficile infections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Freeman, J.; Bauer, M. P.; Baines, S. D.; Corver, J.; Fawley, W. N.; Goorhuis, B.; Kuijper, E. J.; Wilcox, M. H.

    2010-01-01

    The epidemiology of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) has changed dramatically during this millennium. Infection rates have increased markedly in most countries with detailed surveillance data. There have been clear changes in the clinical presentation, response to treatment, and outcome of CDI.

  15. Clostridium difficile infection in returning travellers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Michal Stevens, A.; Esposito, Douglas H.; Stoney, Rhett J.; Hamer, Davidson H.; Flores-Figueroa, Jose; Bottieau, Emmanuel; Connor, Bradley A.; Gkrania-Klotsas, Effrossyni; Goorhuis, Abraham; Hynes, Noreen A.; Libman, Michael; Lopez-Velez, Rogelio; McCarthy, Anne E.; von Sonnenburg, Frank; Schwartz, Eli; van Genderen, Perry J. J.; Scott Benson, L.; Leung, Daniel T.

    2017-01-01

    There is increasing recognition of the contribution of community-acquired cases to the global burden of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI). The epidemiology of CDI among international travellers is poorly understood, and factors associated with international travel, such as antibiotic use and

  16. Botulinum toxin in medicine and cosmetology – two hundred years’ history and new perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Małgorzata Zbrojkiewicz

    2018-04-01

    of coding genes and by the duration of the therapeutic effect. American physician Allan B. Scott was the first to demonstrate the use of botulinum toxin for medical purposes. Nowadays, botulinum toxin type A is widely used in medicine. Botulinum toxin injections are not only one of the most popular non-surgical aesthetic-cosmetic procedures, but are also widely used in neurology, ophthalmology and dermatology. The therapeutic potential of botulinum toxin has not been exhausted yet. Currently, many clinical trials are underway to extend the therapeutic indications of botulinum toxin and to improve its safety. Due to the huge development in medicine, botulinum toxin is today not only associated with aesthetic procedures and improvement in appearance, but also with raising the quality of life for people suffering from diseases with excessive muscle contraction and with other neuromuscular disorders.

  17. A Medical Research and Evaluation Facility (MREF) and Studies Supporting the Medical Chemical Defense Program. Evaluation of the Passive Protection Against Five Serotypes of Botulinum Toxin Provided by Botulinum Human Immune Globulin in an Animal Model

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Olson, Carl

    1998-01-01

    Pentavalent (ABCDE) botulinum toxoid vaccine is intended for use as a prophylactic measure to protect combat troops against the lethal effects of botulinum toxins A-E, a group of toxins considered to be a serious biological warfare threat...

  18. Use of intradermal botulinum toxin to reduce sebum production and facial pore size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Anil R

    2008-09-01

    Review the safety profile and subjective efficacy of intradermal botulinum toxin type A in facial pore size and sebum production. Retrospective analysis of 20 patients. Twenty consecutive patients with a single application of intradermal botulinum toxin type A were examined: Patients (17/20) noted an improvement in sebum production and a decrease in pores size at 1 month after injection. No complications were observed, and 17/20 patients were satisfied with the procedure. Preliminary data suggests that intradermal botulinum toxin may play a role in decreasing sebum production. Further quantitive study may be necessary to determine effects of intradermal botulinum toxin on pore size.

  19. Therapeutic Recombinant Monoclonal Antibodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakhtiar, Ray

    2012-01-01

    During the last two decades, the rapid growth of biotechnology-derived techniques has led to a myriad of therapeutic recombinant monoclonal antibodies with significant clinical benefits. Recombinant monoclonal antibodies can be obtained from a number of natural sources such as animal cell cultures using recombinant DNA engineering. In contrast to…

  20. Botulinum toxin injection causes hyper-reflexia and increased muscle stiffness of the triceps surae muscle in the rat

    OpenAIRE

    Pingel, Jessica; Wienecke, Jacob; Lorentzen, Jakob; Nielsen, Jens Bo

    2016-01-01

    This study demonstrates, for the first time, adaptive plastic changes in the stretch reflex circuitry following denervation induced by botulinum toxin injection. The study also demonstrates alterations of the elastic properties of the muscles following botulinum injection.

  1. Photoionization and Recombination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nahar, Sultana N.

    2000-01-01

    Theoretically self-consistent calculations for photoionization and (e + ion) recombination are described. The same eigenfunction expansion for the ion is employed in coupled channel calculations for both processes, thus ensuring consistency between cross sections and rates. The theoretical treatment of (e + ion) recombination subsumes both the non-resonant recombination ("radiative recombination"), and the resonant recombination ("di-electronic recombination") processes in a unified scheme. In addition to the total, unified recombination rates, level-specific recombination rates and photoionization cross sections are obtained for a large number of atomic levels. Both relativistic Breit-Pauli, and non-relativistic LS coupling, calculations are carried out in the close coupling approximation using the R-matrix method. Although the calculations are computationally intensive, they yield nearly all photoionization and recombination parameters needed for astrophysical photoionization models with higher precision than hitherto possible, estimated at about 10-20% from comparison with experimentally available data (including experimentally derived DR rates). Results are electronically available for over 40 atoms and ions. Photoionization and recombination of He-, and Li-like C and Fe are described for X-ray modeling. The unified method yields total and complete (e+ion) recombination rate coefficients, that can not otherwise be obtained theoretically or experimentally.

  2. Treatment of chronic tension-type headache with botulinum toxin: a double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Padberg, M.; de Bruijn, S. F. T. M.; de Haan, R. J.; Tavy, D. L. J.

    2004-01-01

    Botulinum toxin is increasingly advocated as effective treatment in chronic tension-type headache. We conducted a randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trial to prove efficacy of botulinum toxin in chronic tension-type headache. Patients were randomly assigned to receive botulinum toxin (maximum

  3. [Spasm of the near reflex. Treatment with botulinum toxin].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merino, P; Rojas, P; Gómez de Liaño, P; Franco Iglesias, G

    2015-05-01

    A 38-year old female with diplopia and esotropia, with limitation of ocular abduction in both eyes, with full abduction after doll's head rotation also being observed. She was diagnosed with spasm of the near reflex. Treatment with injections of botulinum toxin in both medial rectus has temporally resolved the convergence spasm. Near reflex spasm is characterized as miosis, pseudomyopia, and convergent strabismus that lead to diplopia, blurred vision, headache, and variable, progressive, and intermittent esotropia. As the spasm worsens there will be limited ocular versions and ductions simulating a sixth nerve palsy. Botulinum toxin may be effective in some cases. Copyright © 2013 Sociedad Española de Oftalmología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  4. Botulinum toxin for conditions of the female pelvis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Khawand, Dominique; Wehbe, Salim; Whitmore, Kristene

    2013-07-01

    Botulinum toxin has recently been approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for the treatment of urinary incontinence associated with neurogenic detrusor overactivity. However, it has also been used off-label for a multitude of other conditions in the female pelvis, including urological, gynecological, and colorectal. This article reviews the most recent data regarding its efficacy and safety, and administration techniques for those conditions. A literature review of the most relevant reports published between 1985 and 2012. Urinary incontinence related to neurogenic detrusor overactivity is currently the only approved indication in the female pelvis. Other supported off-label uses include: idiopathic detrusor overactivity, interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome, detrusor sphincter dyssynergia, high-tone pelvic floor dysfunction, anal fissure, anismus, and functional anal pain. Botulinum toxin may effectively and safely be used in many conditions of the female pelvis. More high quality research is needed to better clarify its role in the therapeutic algorithm for those indications.

  5. Botulinum Toxin for the Treatment of Tremor and Tics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lotia, Mitesh; Jankovic, Joseph

    2016-02-01

    The therapeutic applications of botulinum toxin (BoNT) have grown manifold since its initial approval in 1989 by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of strabismus, blepharospasm, and other facial spasms. Although it is the most potent biologic toxin known to man, long-term studies have established its safety in the treatment of a variety of neurologic and nonneurologic disorders. Despite a paucity of randomized controlled trials, BoNT has been found to be beneficial in treating a variety of tremors and tics when used by clinicians skilled in the administration of the drug for these hyperkinetic movement disorders. Botulinum toxin injections can provide meaningful improvement in patients with localized tremors and tics; in some cases, they may be an alternative to other treatments with more undesirable adverse effects. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  6. Occlusion therapy of unilateral amblyopia with botulinum toxin induced ptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halkiadakis, Ioannis; Iliaki, Olga; Kalyvianaki, Maria I; Tsilimbaris, Miltiadis K

    2007-01-01

    In order to evaluate the role of botulinum toxin induced ptosis as an occlusion method to treat unilateral deep strabismic amblyopia in two uncooperative children, we injected 0.2 ml of diluted botulinum toxin in the levator palpaebrae; low sedation was necessary in one of the two children. In both cases a marked ptosis was achieved, which lasted about four weeks and then gradually resolved completely. The visual acuity of the ablyopic eye increased in both children, making patching easy thereafter. One child developed amblyopia in the injected eye, which was handled successfully using part-time occlusion. No other side effects were noted. Whether this new method could be a simple, safe and effective alternative method of occlusion for the treatment of deep amblyopia in uncooperative children needs to be proven with a larger series of children.

  7. Outcomes of Buccinator Treatment With Botulinum Toxin in Facial Synkinesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Priyesh N; Owen, Scott R; Norton, Cathey P; Emerson, Brandon T; Bronaugh, Andrea B; Ries, William R; Stephan, Scott J

    2018-05-01

    The buccinator, despite being a prominent midface muscle, has been previously overlooked as a target in the treatment of facial synkinesis with botulinum toxin. To evaluate outcomes of patients treated with botulinum toxin to the buccinator muscle in the setting of facial synkinesis. Prospective cohort study of patients who underwent treatment for facial synkinesis with botulinum toxin over multiple treatment cycles during a 1-year period was carried out in a tertiary referral center. Botulinum toxin treatment of facial musculature, including treatment cycles with and without buccinator injections. Subjective outcomes were evaluated using the Synkinesis Assessment Questionnaire (SAQ) prior to injection of botulinum toxin and 2 weeks after treatment. Outcomes of SAQ preinjection and postinjection scores were compared in patients who had at least 1 treatment cycle with and without buccinator injections. Subanalysis was performed on SAQ questions specific to buccinator function (facial tightness and lip movement). Of 84 patients who received botulinum toxin injections for facial synkinesis, 33 received injections into the buccinator muscle. Of the 33, 23 met inclusion criteria (19 [82.6%] women; mean [SD] age, 46 [10] years). These patients presented for 82 treatment visits, of which 44 (53.6%) involved buccinator injections and 38 (46.4%) were without buccinator injections. The most common etiology of facial paralysis included vestibular schwannoma (10 [43.5%] participants) and Bell Palsy (9 [39.1%] participants). All patients had improved posttreatment SAQ scores compared with prebotulinum scores regardless of buccinator treatment. Compared with treatment cycles in which the buccinator was not addressed, buccinator injections resulted in lower total postinjection SAQ scores (45.9; 95% CI, 38.8-46.8; vs 42.8; 95% CI, 41.3-50.4; P = .43) and greater differences in prebotox and postbotox injection outcomes (18; 95% CI, 16.2-21.8; vs 19; 95% CI, 14.2-21.8; P

  8. [Contribution of botulinum toxin to maxillo-facial surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batifol, D; de Boutray, M; Goudot, P; Lorenzo, S

    2013-04-01

    Botulinum toxin has a wide range of use in maxillo-facial surgery due to its action on muscles, on the glandular system, and against pain. It already has been given several market authorizations as indicated for: blepharospasm, spasmodic stiff neck, and glabellar lines. Furthermore, several studies are ongoing to prove its effectiveness and usefulness for many other pathologies: treatment of pain following cervical spine surgery; action on salivary glands after trauma, hypertrophy, or hyper-salivation; analgesic action (acknowledged but still being experimented) on neuralgia, articular pain, and keloids scars due to its anti-inflammatory properties. Botulinum toxin injections in the cervico-facial area are more and more used and should be to be correctly assessed. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  9. DESTRUCTION OF FRANCISELLA TULARENSIS AND YERSINIA PESTIS PERSISTENCE OF BACILLUS ANTHRACIS SPORES AND CLOSTRIDIUM BOTULINUM IN MUNICIPAL SOLID LANDFILL LEACHATES

    Science.gov (United States)

    The United States Environmental Protection Agency Office of Research and Development National Homeland Security Research Center (NHSRC) in collaboration with the Department of Defense Edgewood Chemical Biological Center (ECBC) are evaluating the permanence of biological and chemi...

  10. Botulinum toxin type A as treatment of partially accommodative esotropia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores-Reyes, E M; Castillo-López, M G; Toledo-Silva, R; Vargas-Ortega, J; Murillo-Correa, C E; Aguilar-Ruiz, A

    2016-03-01

    To determine the effectiveness of a botulinum toxin type A injection in both medial rectus muscles in patients with partially accommodative esotropia. Residual deviation and stability of strabismus were evaluated at 18 months follow up. A prospective, analytical, quasi-experimental study was conducted on a cohort of 21 patients who underwent total cycloplegic refraction and with a residual deviation of at least 14 DP. A botulinum toxin type A dose of 5 IU was injected into each medial rectus muscle for a residual deviation greater than 18 DP, with a dose of 2.5 IU being used for a deviation between 14 and 18 DP. Multivariate logistic regression analyses were performed to relate residual deviation to variables recorded as potential predictors. A total of 21 patients were included, 33.3% (n=7) males and 66.6% (n=14) females. Mean visual acuity was -.28±.25 logMAR for right eye (range 0 to -1) and -.42±.31 logMAR for left eye (range 0 to -1.3). Mean angle of residual deviation before application of botulinum toxin was 40.95±8.6DP without spectacles correction, and 22.3±7.99 DP with full cycloplegic refraction. Adverse effects were ptosis in 14.2% (n=3), diplopia 23.8% (n=5), and vertical deviation in 33% (n=7). One patient had a poor outcome, therefore required surgical treatment. At one year follow up, 85.71% of patients showed good results with esotropia of 12 DP or less, dropping to 71.43% at 18 months of follow up. Botulinum toxin type A is an effective long-term treatment with a good response in 71.43% of patients. No predictors of good response were demonstrated. Copyright © 2015 Sociedad Española de Oftalmología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  11. Temporomandibular Myofacial Pain Treated with Botulinum Toxin Injection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niv Mor

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available This article reviews the diagnoses and treatment of temporomandibular disorders (TMD and outlines of the role of botulinum toxin (BoNT in the treatment of myofacial TMD. This manuscript includes a brief history of the use of BoNT in the treatment of pain, the mechanism of action of BoNT, and the techniques for injections, adverse effects and contraindications when using BoNT to treat mayofacial pain caused by TMD.

  12. Botulinum toxin and neuromodulation for overactive bladder treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramazan Yavuz Akman

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The overactive bladder (OAB is a symptom complex characterized by urgency with /without urge incontinence, and often associated with frequency and nocturia. First-line therapy for OAB includes behavioral therapies and anticholinergic drugs. Although a large number of patients respond to conservative or pharmacological therapy or a combination of the two, some patients are refractory and require additional options for intervention. Botulinum toxin therapy and neuromodulation are frequently used treatment options in refractory OAB patients.

  13. Correction of Malocclusion by Botulinum Neurotoxin Injection into Masticatory Muscles

    OpenAIRE

    Seok, Hyun; Kim, Seong-Gon

    2018-01-01

    Botulinum toxin (BTX) is a neurotoxin, and its injection in masticatory muscles induces muscle weakness and paralysis. This paralytic effect of BTX induces growth retardation of the maxillofacial bones, changes in dental eruption and occlusion state, and facial asymmetry. Using masticatory muscle paralysis and its effect via BTX, BTX can be used for the correction of malocclusion after orthognathic surgery and mandible fracture. The paralysis of specific masticatory muscles by BTX injection r...

  14. Botulinum toxin: An emerging therapy in female bladder outlet obstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aditya A Pradhan

    2009-01-01

    Discussion: There is a gradual improvement in symptoms over time and the maximal effect occurred at 10-14 days. The duration of improvement was approximately 16.8 weeks. All patients were satisfied by the degree of improvement felt. Conclusions: Botulinum toxin proved successful in improving the voiding characteristics. It possibly acts at the zone of hypertonicity at the bladder neck or midurethra. The only disadvantage is the high cost of the drug.

  15. Identification of novel linear megaplasmids carrying a ß-lactamase gene in neurotoxigenic Clostridium butyricum type E strains.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanna Franciosa

    Full Text Available Since the first isolation of type E botulinum toxin-producing Clostridium butyricum from two infant botulism cases in Italy in 1984, this peculiar microorganism has been implicated in different forms of botulism worldwide. By applying particular pulsed-field gel electrophoresis run conditions, we were able to show for the first time that ten neurotoxigenic C. butyricum type E strains originated from Italy and China have linear megaplasmids in their genomes. At least four different megaplasmid sizes were identified among the ten neurotoxigenic C. butyricum type E strains. Each isolate displayed a single sized megaplasmid that was shown to possess a linear structure by ATP-dependent exonuclease digestion. Some of the neurotoxigenic C. butyricum type E strains possessed additional smaller circular plasmids. In order to investigate the genetic content of the newly identified megaplasmids, selected gene probes were designed and used in Southern hybridization experiments. Our results revealed that the type E botulinum neurotoxin gene was chromosome-located in all neurotoxigenic C. butyricum type E strains. Similar results were obtained with the 16S rRNA, the tetracycline tet(P and the lincomycin resistance protein lmrB gene probes. A specific mobA gene probe only hybridized to the smaller plasmids of the Italian C. butyricum type E strains. Of note, a ß-lactamase gene probe hybridized to the megaplasmids of eight neurotoxigenic C. butyricum type E strains, of which seven from clinical sources and the remaining one from a food implicated in foodborne botulism, whereas this ß-lactam antibiotic resistance gene was absent form the megaplasmids of the two soil strains examined. The widespread occurrence among C. butyricum type E strains associated to human disease of linear megaplasmids harboring an antibiotic resistance gene strongly suggests that the megaplasmids could have played an important role in the emergence of C. butyricum type E as a human

  16. TREATMENT OF CLOSTRIDIUM DIFFICILE- ASSOCIATED DISEASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Snezana Antic-Mladenovic

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Clostridium difficile is a Gram-positive, spore-forming, anaerobic bacillus that is widely distributed in the environment, but is found as a part of a normal large bowel flora in approximately 3% of normal adults. C. difficile produces two protein exotoxins: toxin A and toxin B. Both toxins are responsible for causing the sings and symptoms of disease.C. difficile is now thought to be responsible for a spectrum of diseases, ranging from asymptomatic colonization to diarrhea of varying severity, life-threatening colitis, often as a consequence of long-term antibiotic exposure. This spectrum has become known as C. difficile-associated disease (CDAD.Treatment of Clostridium difficile-associated disease demand administration of effi-cient antibiotics (vancomycin, metronidazole, anion exchange resins and probiotics (Lactobacillus spp., Saccharomyces boulardii.

  17. In ovo vaccines based on recombinant NetB toxin and Montanide IMS adjuvants induced protective immunity against Necrotic Enteritis in chickens

    Science.gov (United States)

    The current study was conducted to investigate the effects of in ovo injection of recombinant clostridium NetB toxin plus Eimeria profilin proteins in combination with Montanide adjuvants in modulating immune system in chickens infected for experimental necrotic enteritis (NE) disease. Broiler eggs ...

  18. Botulinum toxin in preparation of oral cavity for microsurgical reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corradino, Bartolo; Di Lorenzo, Sara; Mossuto, Carmela; Costa, Renato Patrizio; Moschella, Francesco

    2010-01-01

    Infiltration of botulinum toxin in the major salivary glands allows a temporary reduction of salivation that begins 8 days afterwards and returns to normal within 2 months. The inhibition of salivary secretion, carried out before the oral cavity reconstructive surgery, could allow a reduction of the incidence of oro-cutaneous fistulas and local complications. Saliva stagnation is a risk factor for patients who have to undergo reconstructive microsurgery of the oral cavity, because of fistula formation and local complications in the oral cavity. The authors suggest infiltration of botulinum toxin in the major salivary glands to reduce salivation temporarily during the healing stage. During the preoperative stage, 20 patients with oral cavity carcinoma who were candidates for microsurgical reconstruction underwent sialoscintigraphy and a quantitative measurement of the salivary secretion. Injection of botulinum toxin was carried out in the salivary glands 4 days before surgery. The saliva quantitative measurement was repeated 3 and 8 days after infiltration, sialoscintigraphy after 15 days. In all cases, the saliva quantitative measurement revealed a reduction of 50% and 70% of the salivary secretion after 72 h and 8 days, respectively. A lower rate of local complications was observed.

  19. [Bruxism, temporo-mandibular dysfunction and botulinum toxin].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chikhani, L; Dichamp, J

    2003-07-01

    Tooth grinding and tooth clenching are unvoluntary mainly nocturnal habits that result in an hypertrophy of masseter and temporalis muscles with an unbalance between opening and closing muscles of the jaw and lead to an alteration of mandibular condyles movements and to hyper pressure in the temporo-mandibular joints (TMJ) which can generate severe pain. Intra muscular injections of botulinum toxin permit to restablish the balance between closing and opening muscles, to relieve pain, to treat masseteric hypertrophy with improvement of face outline and to recover a normal cinetic of temporo-mandibular joints. Moreover, botulinum toxin injections permit to quit habits of tooth grinding and clenching and one single session of injections is curative for 2/3 of the patients. There are no side effects apart from slight diffusion to superficial muscles of the face resulting in a "fixed" smile for about 6 to 8 weeks. So injections of botulinum toxin in masseter and temporalis muscles are an efficient treatment of bruxism and TMJ dysfunction, cheap with no lasting side effect.

  20. Botulinum toxin in the treatment of refractory vaginismus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghazizadeh, Shirin; Nikzad, Masoomeh

    2004-11-01

    To investigate the efficacy of botulinum toxin injection to treat women with moderate and severe vaginismus. Twenty-four women referred to our clinic from February 2002 to February 2004 (mean age 25 years; range 19-34 years) with third- to fourth-degree vaginismus were recruited for this study. These women had previous unsuccessful treatments. Botulinum toxin (150-400 mIU) was injected into the puborectalis muscles in 3 sites on each side of the vagina. Twenty-three patients (95.8%) had vaginal examinations 1 week postoperatively that showed little or no vaginismus, 18 (75%) achieved satisfactory intercourse after the first injection, 4 (16.7%) had mild pain, 1 was cured after a second injection, 1 patient refused vaginal examination and did not attempt to have coitus, and another had no coitus as a result of her husband's secondary impotence. The women were followed up for a mean of 12.3 months (range 2-24 months), and there were no cases of recurrence. In refractory cases of vaginismus when conventional therapies have failed, local injection of botulinum toxin can be considered. III.

  1. Pneumothorax complicating botulinum toxin injection in the body of a dilated oesophagus in achalasia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weusten, Bas L. A. M.; Samsom, Melvin; Smout, André J. P. M.

    2003-01-01

    Botulinum toxin is used for an increasing number of indications in the field of gastroenterology. We report a case in which injection of botulinum toxin in the dilated tubular oesophagus in a patient with achalasia was complicated by a pneumothorax necessitating suction drainage

  2. Muscle selection for treatment of cervical dystonia with botulinum toxin : A systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijmeijer, S. W. R.; Koelman, J. H. T. M.; Kamphuis, D. J.; Tijssen, M. A. J.

    Rationale: Cervical dystonia, also called spasmodic torticollis, is the most common form of (primary) dystonia. Intramuscular injections with botulinum toxin are the first line of treatment for cervical dystonia. To optimise the treatment response to botulinum toxin correct muscles should be

  3. Muscle selection for treatment of cervical dystonia with botulinum toxin - A systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijmeijer, S. W. R.; Koelman, J. H. T. M.; Kamphuis, D. J.; Tijssen, M. A. J.

    2012-01-01

    Rationale: Cervical dystonia, also called spasmodic torticollis, is the most common form of (primary) dystonia. Intramuscular injections with botulinum toxin are the first line of treatment for cervical dystonia. To optimise the treatment response to botulinum toxin correct muscles should be

  4. Effect of a clown's presence at botulinum toxin injections in children: a randomized, prospective study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Lars Kjaersgaard; Kibæk, Maria; Martinussen, Torben

    2011-01-01

    The effect of the presence of a hospital clown during pediatric procedures has rarely been evaluated. In a pediatric ward, botulinum toxin injection is a painful procedure and a stressful experience for the child. We undertook a study of the effect of the presence of a hospital clown on children...... treated with botulinum toxin in an outpatient setting....

  5. New techniques for growing anaerobic bacteria: experiments with Clostridium butyricum and Clostridium acetobutylicum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adler, H.I.; Crow, W.D.; Hadden, C.T.; Hall, J.; Machanoff, R.

    1983-01-01

    Stable membrane fragments derived from Escherichia coli produce and maintain strict anaerobic conditions when added to liquid or solid bacteriological media. Techniques for growing Clostridium butyricum and Clostridium acetobutylicum in membrane-containing media are described. Liquid cultures initiated by very small inocula can be grown in direct contact with air. In solid media, colonies develop rapidly from individual cells even without incubation in anaerobic jars or similar devices. Observations on growth rates, spontaneous mutations, radiation, and oxygen sensitivity of anaerobic bacteria have been made using these new techniques

  6. Structural and mutational analyses of the receptor binding domain of botulinum D/C mosaic neurotoxin: Insight into the ganglioside binding mechanism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nuemket, Nipawan [Graduate School of Life Sciences, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-0810 (Japan); Tanaka, Yoshikazu [Creative Research Institution ' Sousei,' Hokkaido University, Sapporo 001-0021 (Japan); Faculty of Advanced Life Science, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-0810 (Japan); Tsukamoto, Kentaro; Tsuji, Takao [Department of Microbiology, Fujita Health University School of Medicine, Toyoake, Aichi 470-1192 (Japan); Nakamura, Keiji; Kozaki, Shunji [Department of Veterinary Science, Graduate School of Life and Environmental Sciences, Osaka Prefecture University, Osaka 598-8531 (Japan); Yao, Min [Graduate School of Life Sciences, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-0810 (Japan); Faculty of Advanced Life Science, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-0810 (Japan); Tanaka, Isao, E-mail: tanaka@castor.sci.hokudai.ac.jp [Graduate School of Life Sciences, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-0810 (Japan); Faculty of Advanced Life Science, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-0810 (Japan)

    2011-07-29

    Highlights: {yields} We determined the crystal structure of the receptor binding domain of BoNT in complex with 3'-sialyllactose. {yields} An electron density derived from the 3'-sialyllactose was confirmed at the cleft in the C-terminal subdomain. {yields} Alanine site-directed mutagenesis showed that GBS and GBL are important for ganglioside binding. {yields} A cell binding mechanism, which involves cooperative contribution of two sites, was proposed. -- Abstract: Clostridium botulinum type D strain OFD05, which produces the D/C mosaic neurotoxin, was isolated from cattle killed by the recent botulism outbreak in Japan. The D/C mosaic neurotoxin is the most toxic of the botulinum neurotoxins (BoNT) characterized to date. Here, we determined the crystal structure of the receptor binding domain of BoNT from strain OFD05 in complex with 3'-sialyllactose at a resolution of 3.0 A. In the structure, an electron density derived from the 3'-sialyllactose was confirmed at the cleft in the C-terminal subdomain. Alanine site-directed mutagenesis showed the significant contribution of the residues surrounding the cleft to ganglioside recognition. In addition, a loop adjoining the cleft also plays an important role in ganglioside recognition. In contrast, little effect was observed when the residues located around the surface previously identified as the protein receptor binding site in other BoNTs were substituted. The results of cell binding analysis of the mutants were significantly correlated with the ganglioside binding properties. Based on these observations, a cell binding mechanism of BoNT from strain OFD05 is proposed, which involves cooperative contribution of two ganglioside binding sites.

  7. Long-Term Effects of Botulinum Toxin Complex Type A Injection on Mechano- and Metabo-Sensitive Afferent Fibers Originating from Gastrocnemius Muscle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillaume Caron

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to investigate long term effects of motor denervation by botulinum toxin complex type A (BoNT/A from Clostridium Botulinum, on the afferent fibers originating from the gastrocnemius muscle of rats. Animals were divided in 2 experimental groups: 1 untreated animals acting as control and 2 treated animals in which the toxin was injected in the left muscle, the latter being itself divided into 3 subgroups according to their locomotor recovery with the help of a test based on footprint measurements of walking rats: i no recovery (B0, ii 50% recovery (B50 and iii full recovery (B100. Then, muscle properties, metabosensitive afferent fiber responses to potassium chloride (KCl and lactic acid injections and Electrically-Induced Fatigue (EIF, and mechanosensitive responses to tendon vibrations were measured. At the end of the experiment, rats were killed and the toxin injected muscles were weighted. After toxin injection, we observed a complete paralysis associated to a loss of force to muscle stimulation and a significant muscle atrophy, and a return to baseline when the animals recover. The response to fatigue was only decreased in the B0 group. The responses to KCl injections were only altered in the B100 groups while responses to lactic acid were altered in the 3 injected groups. Finally, our results indicated that neurotoxin altered the biphasic pattern of response of the mechanosensitive fiber to tendon vibrations in the B0 and B50 groups. These results indicated that neurotoxin injection induces muscle afferent activity alterations that persist and even worsen when the muscle has recovered his motor activity.

  8. Long-Term Effects of Botulinum Toxin Complex Type A Injection on Mechano- and Metabo-Sensitive Afferent Fibers Originating from Gastrocnemius Muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caron, Guillaume; Marqueste, Tanguy; Decherchi, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate long term effects of motor denervation by botulinum toxin complex type A (BoNT/A) from Clostridium Botulinum, on the afferent fibers originating from the gastrocnemius muscle of rats. Animals were divided in 2 experimental groups: 1) untreated animals acting as control and 2) treated animals in which the toxin was injected in the left muscle, the latter being itself divided into 3 subgroups according to their locomotor recovery with the help of a test based on footprint measurements of walking rats: i) no recovery (B0), ii) 50% recovery (B50) and iii) full recovery (B100). Then, muscle properties, metabosensitive afferent fiber responses to potassium chloride (KCl) and lactic acid injections and Electrically-Induced Fatigue (EIF), and mechanosensitive responses to tendon vibrations were measured. At the end of the experiment, rats were killed and the toxin injected muscles were weighted. After toxin injection, we observed a complete paralysis associated to a loss of force to muscle stimulation and a significant muscle atrophy, and a return to baseline when the animals recover. The response to fatigue was only decreased in the B0 group. The responses to KCl injections were only altered in the B100 groups while responses to lactic acid were altered in the 3 injected groups. Finally, our results indicated that neurotoxin altered the biphasic pattern of response of the mechanosensitive fiber to tendon vibrations in the B0 and B50 groups. These results indicated that neurotoxin injection induces muscle afferent activity alterations that persist and even worsen when the muscle has recovered his motor activity.

  9. Effects of different replicons in conjugative plasmids on transformation efficiency, plasmid stability, gene expression and n-butanol biosynthesis in Clostridium tyrobutyricum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Mingrui; Du, Yinming; Jiang, Wenyan; Chang, Wei-Lun; Yang, Shang-Tian [Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States). William G. Lowrie Dept. of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering; Tang, I-Ching [Bioprocessing Innovative Company, Dublin, OH (United States)

    2012-01-15

    Clostridium tyrobutyricum ATCC 25755 can produce butyric acid, acetic acid, and hydrogen as the main products from various carbon sources. In this study, C. tyrobutyricum was used as a host to produce n-butanol by expressing adhE2 gene under the control of a native thiolase promoter using four different conjugative plasmids (pMTL82151, 83151, 84151, and 85151) each with a different replicon (pBP1 from C. botulinum NCTC2916, pCB102 from C. butyricum, pCD6 from Clostridium difficile, and pIM13 from Bacillus subtilis). The effects of different replicons on transformation efficiency, plasmid stability, adhE2 expression and aldehyde/alcohol dehydrogenase activities, and butanol production by different mutants of C. tyrobutyricum were investigated. Among the four plasmids and replicons studied, pMTL82151 with pBP1 gave the highest transformation efficiency, plasmid stability, gene expression, and butanol biosynthesis. Butanol production from various substrates, including glucose, xylose, mannose, and mannitol were then investigated with the best mutant strain harboring adhE2 in pMTL82151. A high butanol titer of 20.5 g/L with 0.33 g/g yield and 0.32 g/L h productivity was obtained with mannitol as the substrate in batch fermentation with pH controlled at {proportional_to}6.0. (orig.)

  10. Office-based endoscopic botulinum toxin injection in laryngeal movement disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaderbay, A; Righini, C A; Castellanos, P F; Atallah, I

    2018-06-01

    Botulinum toxin injection is widely used for the treatment of laryngeal movement disorders. Electromyography-guided percutaneous injection is the technique most commonly used to perform intralaryngeal botulinum toxin injection. We describe an endoscopic approach for intralaryngeal botulinum toxin injection under local anaesthesia without using electromyography. A flexible video-endoscope with an operating channel is used. After local anaesthesia of the larynx by instillation of lidocaine, a flexible needle is inserted into the operating channel in order to inject the desired dose of botulinum toxin into the vocal and/or vestibular folds. Endoscopic botulinum toxin injection under local anaesthesia is a reliable technique for the treatment of laryngeal movement disorders. It can be performed by any laryngologist without the need for electromyography. It is easy to perform for the operator and comfortable for the patient. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. Recombination of cluster ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnsen, Rainer

    1993-01-01

    Some of our recent work on molecular band emissions from recombination of molecular dimer ions (N4(+) and CO(+) CO) is discussed. Much of the experimental work was done by Y. S. Cao; the results on N4(+) recombination have been published. A brief progress report is given on our ongoing measurements of neutral products of recombination using the flowing-afterglow Langmuir-probe technique in conjunction with laser-induced fluorescence.

  12. Management of Clostridium difficile diarrhoea in District General ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... four cases of Clostridium difficile in our hospital over duration of three months. We looked into the demographic features of the patient population and compliance with the Trust guidelines for the management of the diarrhoea. Keywords:Diarrhoea, Clostridium difficile, Management. Internet Journal of Medical Update Vol.

  13. Clostridium difficile: A healthcare-associated infection of unknown ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Clostridium difficile: A healthcare-associated infection of unknown significance in adults in sub-Saharan Africa. ... Abstract. Background: Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) causes a high burden of disease in high-resource healthcare systems, with significant morbidity, mortality, and financial implications. CDI is a ...

  14. [Cloning of Clostridium perfringens alpha-toxin gene and extracellular expression in Escherichia coli].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Masaharu; Kikuchi, Maho; Komoriya, Tomoe; Watanabe, Kunitomo; Kouno, Hideki

    2007-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens (C. perfringens) is a Gram-positive bacterial pathogen that widely propagets in the soil and the gastrointestinal tract of human and animals. This bacteria causes food poisoning, gas gangrene and other various range of infectious diseases. But there is no standard diagnosis method of C. perfringens. In order to develop a new type of immunoassay for clinical purpose, we studied expression and extracellular secretion of recombinant alpha-toxin having enzyme activity in E. coli expression system. Cloning was carried out after PCR amplification from C. perfringens GAI 94074 which was clinical isolate. Three kinds of fragment were cloned using pET100/D-TOPO vector. These fragments coded for ribosome binding site, signal peptide, and alpha-toxin gene respectively. Recombinant pET100 plasmid transformed into TOP 10 cells and the obtained plasmids were transformed into BL21 (DE3) cells. Then, the transformants were induced expression with IPTG. In conclusion, we successfully cloned, expressed and exteracellular secreted C. perfringens alpha-toxin containing signal peptide. Biologically, the obtained recombinant protein was positive for phospholipase C activity.

  15. A rapid qualitative assay for detection of Clostridium perfringens in canned food products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dave, Gayatri Ashwinkumar

    2017-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens (MTCC 1349) is a Gram-positive, anaerobic, endospore forming, and rod-shaped bacterium. This bacterium produces a variety of toxins under strict anaerobic environment. C. perfringens can grow at temperatures ranging between 20°C and 50°C. It is the major causetive agent for gas gangrene, cellulitis, septicemia, necrotic enteritis and food poisoning, which are common toxin induced conditions noted in human and animals. C. perfringens can produce produce four major types of toxins that are used for the classification of strains, classified under type A-E. Across the globe many countries, including the United States, are affected by C. perfringens food poisonings where it is ranked as one of the most common causes of food borne infections. To date, no direct one step assay for the detection of C. perfringens has been developed and only few methods are known for accurate detection of C. perfringens. Long detection and incubation time is the major consideration of these reporter assays. The prensent study proposes a rapid and reliable colorimetric assay for the detection of C. perfringens. In principale, this assay detects the para nitrophenyl (yellow colour end product) liberated due to the hydrolysis of paranitrophenyl phosphetidyl choline (PNPC) through phospholipase C (lecithinase). Constitutive secretion of phospholipase C is a charactristic feature of C. perfringens. This assay detects the presence of the extracellular lecithinse through the PNPC impragnated impregnated probe. The probe is impregnated with peranitrophenyl phosphotidyl choline ester, which is colourless substrate used by lecithinase. The designed assay is specific towards PNPC and detectes very small quantites of lecithinase under conditions used. The reaction is substrate specific, no cross reaction was observed upon incubation with other substrates. In addition, this assay gave negative results with other clostridium strains, no cross reactions were observed with other

  16. Evaluation of a focused virtual library of heterobifunctional ligands for Clostridium difficile toxins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanhueza, Carlos A; Cartmell, Jonathan; El-Hawiet, Amr; Szpacenko, Adam; Kitova, Elena N; Daneshfar, Rambod; Klassen, John S; Lang, Dean E; Eugenio, Luiz; Ng, Kenneth K-S; Kitov, Pavel I; Bundle, David R

    2015-01-07

    A focused library of virtual heterobifunctional ligands was generated in silico and a set of ligands with recombined fragments was synthesized and evaluated for binding to Clostridium difficile toxins. The position of the trisaccharide fragment was used as a reference for filtering docked poses during virtual screening to match the trisaccharide ligand in a crystal structure. The peptoid, a diversity fragment probing the protein surface area adjacent to a known binding site, was generated by a multi-component Ugi reaction. Our approach combines modular fragment-based design with in silico screening of synthetically feasible compounds and lays the groundwork for future efforts in development of composite bifunctional ligands for large clostridial toxins.

  17. The History of Collagenase Clostridium Histolyticum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Kevin K; Bennett, Nelson

    2015-10-01

    After its U.S. FDA approval in 2013, Collagenase Clostridium histolyticum (CCh) has seen increasing use as a nonoperative treatment for Peyronie's disease (PD). We review the history of CCh and trials that led to its adoption. To provide a historical and contemporary context for the evolution of Collagenase Clostridium histolyticum as a treatment modality for Peyronie's disease. A comprehensive search of peer-reviewed literature was performed pertaining to CCh and its biochemical and clinical significance. The main outcome studied was the efficacy and safety profile of CCh in PD. CCh use in other diseases processes and its associated outcomes are also described. CCh injection yields objective improvement in penile curvature across multiple trials in PD patients. Recently, level 1 strength of evidence has emerged supporting its widespread use. As such, CCh stands as the only FDA-approved injectable therapy for PD. Adverse events were namely limited to local reactions. Serious systemic complications and need for intervention were rare. CCh is a safe and effective treatment for PD patients with deformities and plaque configuration amenable to injectable therapy. Multiple trials have demonstrated improvements in objective and subjective metrics such as penile curvature and bother scores. However, multiyear follow-up is needed to assess durability and its sustained clinical significance. Currently, refinement in dosing and technique has established a niche for CCh in PD patients who are affected by their symptoms but are not yet committed to surgical intervention. Yang KK and Bennett N. The history of collagenase clostridium histolyticum. Copyright © 2015 International Society for Sexual Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Clostridium Difficile Infection in the Nephrology Ward

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylwia Dudzicz

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Clostridium difficile is currently the most frequently identified pathogen causing antibiotic-associated diarrhea and the main cause of nosocomial diarrhea. In recent years, increases incidence of infection, severe infection, recurrent infection and mortality from Clostridium difficile infection (CDI have been observed. This may be a consequence of excessive antibiotic use and spread of the hypervirulent epidemic BI/NAP1/027 strain of Clostridium difficile. The main risk factors for CDI are: antibiotic therapy, previous hospitalizations and number of comorbid conditions. Prevention of CDI mainly is focused in two directions: reducing the exposure of patients to the disease pathogen by intensifying hygiene measures, and reducing the impact of risk factors. A meta-analyses of clinical studies (observational, cohort and case control showed significantly higher risk of CDI and CDI recurrence in patients with chronic kidney disease and increased mortality risk in chronic kidney disease patients with CDI comparing those without CDI. Increased risk of CDI in patients with chronic kidney disease can be caused by: frequent antibiotic therapy associated with numerous infections resulting in intestinal microflora dysfunction, frequent hospitalizations, older age of the patients and an impaired immune system. Among preventative measures against CDI, the use of probiotics were also studied. In patients hospitalized in nephrology ward highly significant reduction of the CDI incidence was observed after the introduction of Lactobacillus plantarum 299v as CDI prophylaxis. Therefore, the use of Lactobacillus plantarum 299v seems to be a promising method of CDI prevention in chronic kidney disease patients hospitalized in nephrology ward.

  19. Probiotics and prevention of Clostridium difficile infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, E J C; Johnson, S J; Maziade, P-J; Evans, C T; Sniffen, J C; Millette, M; McFarland, L V

    2017-06-01

    The role of probiotics as adjunctive measures in the prevention of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) has been controversial. However, a growing body of evidence has suggested that they have a role in primary prevention of CDI. Elements of this controversy are reviewed and the proposed mechanisms of action, the value and cost effectiveness of probiotics are addressed with a focus on three agents, Saccharomyces boulardii, Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG and the combination of Lactobacillus acidophilus CL1285, Lactobacillus casei LBC80R, Lactobacillus rhamnosus CLR2 (Bio-K+). Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Annotation of the Clostridium Acetobutylicum Genome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daly, M. J.

    2004-06-09

    The genome sequence of the solvent producing bacterium Clostridium acetobutylicum ATCC824, has been determined by the shotgun approach. The genome consists of a 3.94 Mb chromosome and a 192 kb megaplasmid that contains the majority of genes responsible for solvent production. Comparison of C. acetobutylicum to Bacillus subtilis reveals significant local conservation of gene order, which has not been seen in comparisons of other genomes with similar, or, in some cases, closer, phylogenetic proximity. This conservation allows the prediction of many previously undetected operons in both bacteria.

  1. Clostridium difficile in Humans and Food Animals

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2008-06-30

    Clostridium difficile is an antibiotic-resistant bacterium that causes diarrhea and sometimes serious intestinal illnesses. In recent years, C. difficile infections have been increasing in number and severity, including among some people outside healthcare settings. In this podcast, CDC's Dr. Michael Jhung discusses his recent study that looked at a new, increasingly prevalent strain of C. difficile in people and compared it to a strain historically found in animals to see whether the two might be linked. The study is published in the July 2008 issue of Emerging Infectious Diseases.  Created: 6/30/2008 by Emerging Infectious Diseases.   Date Released: 7/3/2008.

  2. Clostridium difficile in Humans and Food Animals

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    Clostridium difficile is an antibiotic-resistant bacterium that causes diarrhea and sometimes serious intestinal illnesses. In recent years, C. difficile infections have been increasing in number and severity, including among some people outside healthcare settings. In this podcast, CDC's Dr. Michael Jhung discusses his recent study that looked at a new, increasingly prevalent strain of C. difficile in people and compared it to a strain historically found in animals to see whether the two might be linked. The study is published in the July 2008 issue of Emerging Infectious Diseases.

  3. High-level expression, purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic studies of the receptor-binding domain of botulinum neurotoxin serotype D

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Yanfeng; Gao, Xiaoli; Qin, Ling; Buchko, Garry W.; Robinson, Howard; Varnum, Susan M.

    2010-01-01

    The receptor-binding domain of botulinum neurotoxin serotype D was expressed in E. coli using a codon-optimized cDNA. The highly purified protein crystallized in space group P2 1 2 1 2 1 , with unit-cell parameters a = 60.8, b = 89.7, c = 93.9 Å, and the crystals diffracted to 1.65 Å resolution. Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) are highly toxic proteins for humans and animals that are responsible for the deadly neuroparalytic disease botulism. Here, details of the expression and purification of the receptor-binding domain (HCR) of BoNT/D in Escherichia coli are presented. Using a codon-optimized cDNA, BoNT/D-HCR was expressed at a high level (150–200 mg per litre of culture) in the soluble fraction. Following a three-step purification protocol, very pure (>98%) BoNT/D-HCR was obtained. The recombinant BoNT/D-HCR was crystallized and the crystals diffracted to 1.65 Å resolution. The crystals belonged to space group P2 1 2 1 2 1 , with unit-cell parameters a = 60.8, b = 89.7, c = 93.9 Å. Preliminary crystallographic data analysis revealed the presence of one molecule in the asymmetric unit

  4. Historical Perspectives and Guidelines for Botulinum Neurotoxin Subtype Nomenclature

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-26

    Each neurotoxin subtype within a serotype cleaves its target substrate at the same single conserved peptide bond, except for BoNT/F5 (Table 2) [55...common for strains of C. botulinum Group III to form a chimeric or hybrid protein that combines elements of BoNT/C and BoNT/D neurotoxin, rather than a...Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. UNCLASSIFIED 15 reported as BoNT/CD or BoNT/DC chimeric toxins [22]. Two exotoxins

  5. Botulinum toxin for the management of bladder dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schurch, Brigitte

    2006-01-01

    This review highlights a recent innovation in the medical treatment of detrusor overactivity (DO). Anticholinergics are usually the gold standard to treat bladder overactivity. Adverse effects and lack of efficacy are the two main causes for considering alternative treatments. Until recently, invasive surgery (mainly bladder augmentation) was the only available treatment option for patients with intractable DO. This article considers botulinum toxin type A (BTX-A) injection as an alternative treatment to surgery in patients with DO who do not respond to anticholinergic therapy. To identify papers for inclusion in this review, we searched PubMed with the keywords 'botulinum toxin', 'overactive bladder', 'urinary incontinence' and 'neurogenic bladder' for the years 2000-5. Review articles were not included. Abstracts were cited only if they contained important new information. Experimental animal studies and articles or book chapters related to the use of botulinum toxin for other indications (such as achalasia and cervical dystonia) were analysed with regard to the mechanisms of action of botulinum toxin. From this review, it appears that BTX-A injection into the detrusor muscle is a very effective method for treating urinary incontinence secondary to neurogenic detrusor overactivity (NDO), as well as urinary incontinence due to idiopathic overactive bladder (IDO). In both conditions, the duration of effect seems to be at least 6 months. Overall success rates seem to be similar in both patient populations. For NDO, only one evidence-based medicine level 1 study is available, whereas for IDO, only evidence-based medicine level 3 or 4 studies have been published. Particularly in this latter indication, injection technique and outcome parameters vary from study to study and need to be standardised. Without randomised controlled studies aimed at comparing different techniques and dosages, it remains difficult to decide what technique is optimal for treating patients

  6. Botulinum toxin (BoNT) and back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porta, Mauro; Maggioni, G

    2004-02-01

    Myofascial pain syndrome is defined as subacute or chronic pain with sensory, motor and autonomic symptoms referred from active trigger points with associated painful dysfunctions. Authors present the usefulness of botulinum toxin A or B (BoNT/A or BoNT/B) injected into target muscles since the toxin is capable of controlling not only the muscular spasm but mostly the pain by alternative mechanisms of action, which are discussed. Posology of BoNT, technical aspects and results are presented. BoNT represents an interesting and useful tool for an adequate management of patients with myofascial pain.

  7. Botulinum as a Toxin for Treating Post-herpetic Neuralgia

    OpenAIRE

    DING, Xu-Dong; ZHONG, Jing; LIU, Yan-Ping; CHEN, Hua-Xian

    2017-01-01

    Background: We aimed to study the curative effects of botulinum A toxin (BTX-A) on the treatment of post-herpetic neuralgia (PNH). Methods: We enrolled 58 PNH patients and treated them with hypodermic injection of BTX-A in Xiangyang No.1 People?s Hospital, Hubei University of Medicine, Hubei, China. We measured and compared the Visual Analog Score (VAS), Neuropathy Pain Scale (NPS), Quality of Life Scale (SF-36) score, PNH seizure severity degree, seizure duration, frequency of attack and the...

  8. In Silico Analysis for the Study of Botulinum Toxin Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Tomonori; Miyazaki, Satoru

    2010-01-01

    Protein-protein interactions play many important roles in biological function. Knowledge of protein-protein complex structure is required for understanding the function. The determination of protein-protein complex structure by experimental studies remains difficult, therefore computational prediction of protein structures by structure modeling and docking studies is valuable method. In addition, MD simulation is also one of the most popular methods for protein structure modeling and characteristics. Here, we attempt to predict protein-protein complex structure and property using some of bioinformatic methods, and we focus botulinum toxin complex as target structure.

  9. Advances in Assays and Analytical Approaches for Botulinum Toxin Detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grate, Jay W.; Ozanich, Richard M.; Warner, Marvin G.; Bruckner-Lea, Cindy J.; Marks, James D.

    2010-08-04

    Methods to detect botulinum toxin, the most poisonous substance known, are reviewed. Current assays are being developed with two main objectives in mind: 1) to obtain sufficiently low detection limits to replace the mouse bioassay with an in vitro assay, and 2) to develop rapid assays for screening purposes that are as sensitive as possible while requiring an hour or less to process the sample an obtain the result. This review emphasizes the diverse analytical approaches and devices that have been developed over the last decade, while also briefly reviewing representative older immunoassays to provide background and context.

  10. Use of botulinum A toxin for proctalgia fugax-a case report of successful treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grigoriou, Marios; Ioannidis, Aristeidis; Kofina, Konstantinia; Efthimiadis, Christoforos

    2017-11-01

    Proctalgia fugax is considered as intermittent anal pain of unknown etiology; a variety of treatments have been used, without, however, permanent results. Injection of botulinum A toxin is recently suggested as an alternative option. We present the case of a woman presenting proctalgia fugax that was untreatable through other current forms of treatment. After two administrations of botulinum A toxin, 80 units and 100 units each, the patient remained asymptomatic on 8-month follow-up control. Botulinum A toxin injection can reduce internal anal sphincter pressure, leading to relief of symptoms, and seems a promising option with minimal morbidity in cases on proctalgia fugax that does not respond to other current treatments.

  11. Mortality and Clostridium difficile infection in an Australian setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Brett G; Gardner, Anne; Hiller, Janet E

    2013-10-01

    To quantify the risk of death associated with Clostridium difficile infection, in an Australian tertiary hospital. Two reviews examining Clostridium difficile infection and mortality indicate that Clostridium difficile infection is associated with increased mortality in hospitalized patients. Studies investigating the mortality of Clostridium difficile infection in settings outside of Europe and North America are required, so that the epidemiology of Clostridium difficile infection in these regions can be understood and appropriate prevention strategies made. An observational non-concurrent cohort study design was used. Data from all persons who had (exposed) and a matched sample of persons who did not have Clostridium difficile infection, for the calendar years 2007-2010, were analysed. The risk of dying within 30, 60, 90 and 180 days was compared using the two groups. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis and conditional logistic regression models were applied to the data to examine time to death and mortality risk adjusted for comorbidities using the Charlson Comorbidity Index. One hundred and fifty-eight cases of infection were identified. A statistically significant difference in all-cause mortality was identified between exposed and non-exposed groups at 60 and 180 days. In a conditional regression model, mortality in the exposed group was significantly higher at 180 days. In this Australian study, Clostridium difficile infection was associated with increased mortality. In doing so, it highlights the need for nurses to immediately instigate contact precautions for persons suspected of having Clostridium difficile infection and to facilitate a timely faecal collection for testing. Our findings support ongoing surveillance of Clostridium difficile infection and associated prevention and control activities. © 2013 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  12. The pangenome of the genus Clostridium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udaondo, Zulema; Duque, Estrella; Ramos, Juan-Luis

    2017-07-01

    The pangenome for the genus Clostridium sensu stricto, which was obtained using highly curated and annotated genomes from 16 species is presented; some of these cause disease, while others are used for the production of added-value chemicals. Multilocus sequencing analysis revealed that species of this genus group into at least two clades that include non-pathogenic and pathogenic strains, suggesting that pathogenicity is dispersed across the phylogenetic tree. The core genome of the genus includes 546 protein families, which mainly comprise those involved in protein translation and DNA repair. The GS-GOGAT may represent the central pathway for generating organic nitrogen from inorganic nitrogen sources. Glycerol and glucose metabolism genes are well represented in the core genome together with a set of energy conservation systems. A metabolic network comprising proteins/enzymes, RNAs and metabolites, whose topological structure is a non-random and scale-free network with hierarchically structured modules was built. These modules shed light on the interactions between RNAs, proteins and metabolites, revealing biological features of transcription and translation, cell wall biosynthesis, C1 metabolism and N metabolism. Network analysis identified four nodes that function as hubs and bottlenecks, namely, coenzyme A, HPr kinases, S-adenosylmethionine and the ribonuclease P-protein, suggesting pivotal roles for them in Clostridium. © 2017 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Secretion of clostridium cellulase by E. coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Ida Kuo

    1998-01-01

    A gene, encoding an endocellulase from a newly isolated mesophilic Clostridium strain IY-2 which can digest bamboo fibers, cellulose, rice straw, and sawdust, was isolated by shotgun cloning in an E. coli expression plasmid pLC2833. E. coli positive clones were selected based on their ability to hydrolyze milled bamboo fibers and cellulose present in agar plates. One clone contained a 2.8 kb DNA fragment that was responsible for cellulase activity. Western blot analyses indicated that the positive clone produced a secreted cellulase with a mass of about 58,000 daltons that was identical in size to the subunit of one of the three major Clostridium cellulases. The products of cellulose digestion by this cloned cellulase were cellotetraose and soluble higher polymers. The cloned DNA contained signal sequences capable of directing the secretion of heterologous proteins from an E. coli host. The invention describes a bioprocess for the treatment of cellulosic plant materials to produce cellular growth substrates and fermentation end products suitable for production of liquid fuels, solvents, and acids.

  14. Key Research Issues in Clostridium difficile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Zhanel

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Clostridium difficile is an emerging pathogen that causes C difficile-associated diarrhea, an important nosocomial infection. Control of this infection remains a challenge, and much needs to be determined about the antimicrobial resistance of the organism, antibiotic stewardship, contamination of the patient environment, and various host factors that determine susceptibility or resistance to infection. A national symposium focusing on C difficile infections, the Clostridium difficile Symposium on Emerging Issues and Research, was hosted on November 23, 2004, by the Department of Medical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases at the University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba, in partnership with the Canadian Institutes of Health Research. This symposium, which aimed to summarize key research issues regarding C difficile infections in Canada, had the following objectives: to provide a forum for learning and discussion about C difficile and its impact on the health of Canadians; to identify the key research issues that should be addressed; and to explore potential research funding opportunities and collaboration. The present report summarizes key research issues identified for C difficile infections in Canada by addressing four major themes: diagnosis and surveillance, infection prevention and control, antibiotic stewardship, and clinical management.

  15. Pneumatic dilation and botulinum toxin: when and why?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozzi, Rosamaria; Di Martino, Vincenzo; Inzirillo, Antonio; D'Avenia, Eugenio; Inzirillo, Maurizio; Cattaneo, Fabio; Cattaneo, Domenico

    2013-01-01

    Pneumatic dilation and botulinum toxin:when and why? The endoscopic treatment options of achalasia include botulinum toxin (BT) injection and pneumatic dilation (PD) of the lower esophageal sphincter (LES). BT can reduce the LES pressure by blocking the release of acetylcoline from presynaptic cholinergic nerve terminals in the myenteric plexus. Although the procedure is safe and good initial response is reported, there is a wide variability in the duration of the response and the effect tends to decrease over time. BT is usually recommended for elderly patients or patients with comorbid illnesses, who are poor candidates for more invasive procedures. PD aims at tearing the muscle fibers of the LES and is considered the most effective nonsurgical treatment for achalasia. Technical details of the procedure vary in different institutions and in many clinical settings the choice between PD or minimally invasive surgical myotomy depends upon local expertise in the procedures. Further endoscopic treatment options such as submucosal esophageal myotomy or self-expanding metallic stents are being studied.

  16. Use of Botulinum toxin in 55 children with cerebral palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammadi M

    2000-10-01

    Full Text Available Botulinum toxin A (BTA inhibits presynaptic release of acetylcholine at the neuromuscular junction and has reportedly been successful in the treatment of spastic disorders.To evaluate the effect of botulinum toxin on cerebral palsied children with spastic or mixed type of the disease, especially those patiens having spasticity as a cardinal symptom without joint contracture, we designed the following study. Ninety-one cases (55 of referred patients to pediatic Neurology outpatient clinics of children’s Medical Center were given BTA injections in affected muscles of the lower limb. They were reevaluating 3 to 5 weeks and 3 months later for type of walking and range of affected joints’ movement. The study showed a clinically significant gait improvement in 71.2% of patients (P<0.0005 and also an overall increased range of motion in affected limbs after BTA injection (P<0.04. Side effects occurred only in two cases as transient generalized weakness, gent recurvatum and ptosis. Drug effectiveness was time-limited, lasting abot 3 months in all patients ( a golden time for rehabilitation therapists to improve the patients’ condition. Overall, BTA has improved both the type of walking as well as the range of joints motion in our patients. So its’ administration is suggested in cerebral palsied children if the spasticity is a major and disabling sign

  17. The medicinal chemistry of botulinum, ricin and anthrax toxins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicks, Rickey P; Hartell, Mark G; Nichols, Daniel A; Bhattacharjee, Apurba K; van Hamont, John E; Skillman, Donald R

    2005-01-01

    The potential use of weapons of mass destruction (nuclear, biological or chemical) by terrorist organizations represents a major threat to world peace and safety. Only a limited number of vaccines are available to protect the general population from the medical consequences of these weapons. In addition there are major health concerns associated with a pre-exposure mass vaccination of the general population. To reduce or eliminate the impact of these terrible threats, new drugs must be developed to safely treat individuals exposed to these agents. A review of all therapeutic agents under development for the treatment of the illnesses and injuries that result from exposure to nuclear, biological or chemical warfare agents is beyond the scope of any single article. The intent here is to provide a focused review for medicinal and organic chemists of three widely discussed and easily deployed biological warfare agents, botulinum neurotoxin and ricin toxins and the bacteria Bacillus anthracis. Anthrax will be addressed because of its similarity in both structure and mechanism of catalytic activity with botulinum toxin. The common feature of these three agents is that they exhibit their biological activity via toxin enzymatic hydrolysis of a specific bond in their respective substrate molecules. A brief introduction to the history of each of the biological warfare agents is presented followed by a discussion on the mechanisms of action of each at the molecular level, and a review of current potential inhibitors under investigation.

  18. Report of Allergic Reaction After Application of Botulinum Toxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Careta, Mariana Figueiroa; Delgado, Livia; Patriota, Régia

    2015-07-01

    Botulinum toxin is a widely used treatment with satisfactory results, and it is relatively safe in the doses used for cosmetic procedures. The authors report a case of allergic reaction to Chinese botulinum toxin serotype A (CBTX-A). Although this is a rare adverse event, it is nonetheless clinically relevant to healthcare professionals. A 44-year-old woman presented to the authors' hospital complaining of dynamic wrinkles. CBTX-A was used to treat her. Minutes after application, she developed urticarial plaques proximal to the injection site. The patient had an allergic reaction, as documented by a positive skin test, which was controlled by the administration of antihistamines and systemic corticosteroids. This report is intended to guide healthcare professionals faced with this type of adverse event regarding how to proceed without hindering the delivery and effectiveness of the treatment. When performed by a qualified health professional, this treatment brings excellent results in the vast majority of cases. 5 Risk. © 2015 The American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery, Inc. Reprints and permission: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. Effects of botulinum toxin on strength-duration properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yerdelen, Deniz; Koc, Filiz; Sarica, Yakup

    2007-10-01

    Axonal excitability studies have been used in several diseases to investigate the underlying pathophysiology. The threshold tracking technique was developed to measure noninvasively several indices of axonal excitability, such as strength-duration properties. This study investigated the possible effects of botulinum toxin on strength-duration time constant (SDTC) in patients with the symptoms and signs of botulism. The clinical and electrophysiological findings of 13 patients who were admitted to the authors' clinic with botulism signs and symptoms were evaluated in a 5-day period after exposure to the toxin prospectively. After routine diagnostic electroneuromyographic examinations and electromyogram with repetitive nerve stimulation at 20-50 Hz, SDTC was studied. The results were compared with 13 age- and sex-matched healthy volunteers. The SDTCs were 381 +/- 60 micros and 471 +/- 84 micros in patients and controls, respectively. There was a statistical difference between the two groups (p = .003, Mann Whitney U test). These findings suggest a possible effect of botulinum toxin, known to be effective at neuromuscular junction, on Na(+)/K(+) pump activity, and Na(+) or K(+) conductance.

  20. Activated recombinant adenovirus proteinases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Carl W.; Mangel, Walter F.

    1999-08-10

    This application describes methods and expression constructs for producing activatable recombinant adenovirus proteinases. Purified activatable recombinant adenovirus proteinases and methods of purification are described. Activated adenovirus proteinases and methods for obtaining activated adenovirus proteinases are further included. Isolated peptide cofactors of adenovirus proteinase activity, methods of purifying and identifying said peptide cofactors are also described. Antibodies immunoreactive with adenovirus proteinases, immunospecific antibodies, and methods for preparing them are also described. Other related methods and materials are also described.

  1. Hadron correlations from recombination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fries, Rainer J [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States)

    2005-01-01

    Quark recombination is a successful model to describe the hadronization of a deconfined quark gluon plasma. Jet-like dihadron correlations measured at RHIC provide a challenge for this picture. We discuss how correlations between hadrons can arise from correlations between partons before hadronization. An enhancement of correlations through the recombination process, similar to the enhancement of elliptic flow is found. Hot spots from completely or partially quenched jets are a likely source of such parton correlations.

  2. [Botulinum toxin type A in headache treatment : Established and experimental indications].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaul, C; Holle-Lee, D; Straube, A

    2016-08-01

    In recent years botulinum toxin type A has been used increasingly more in the treatment of specific headache disorders. Especially regarding chronic migraine with and without combined medication overuse, convincing randomized studies have proven the efficacy of this treatment option and have led to approval for this indication. Regarding other headache entities, such as episodic migraine, tension-type headache, trigeminal autonomic cephalalgia (TAC), neuralgic, neuropathic and myofascial pain, currently available scientific data on the efficacy of botulinum toxin type A are scarce and often ambiguous. The exact underlying mechanisms of the influence of botulinum toxin type A on the pathophysiology of headache are not completely clear but an influence on the release of calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) seems to play a crucial role. This article summarizes the most important studies as well as experiences of treatment with botulinum toxin type A regarding different headache entities.

  3. Combinatorial Strategies and High Throughput Screening in Drug Discovery Targeted to Channel of Botulinum

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Montel, Mauricio

    2004-01-01

    This program examines innovative approaches and powerful new technologies to identify selective and potent agents directed to prevent or relieve the neuroparalytic toxic actions of botulinum toxin A (BoNTA)1...

  4. New industrial butanol-producing organism, Clostridium amylovorum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cataldi, M S

    1964-01-01

    A new Clostridium was isolated from starch-containing substances; it ferments corn and potato starch and sugar molasses, giving important yields of butanol and acetone; it is gram-positive, strictly anaerobic and sporulates in plectron form.

  5. Clostridium difficile infection in the community: a zoonotic disease?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hensgens, M.P.; Keessen, E.C.; Squire, M.M.; Riley, T.V.; Koene, M.G.J.; de Boer, E.; Lipman, L.J.A.; Kuijper, E.J.

    2012-01-01

    Clostridium difficile infections (CDIs) are traditionally seen in elderly and hospitalized patients who have used antibiotic therapy. In the community, CDIs requiring a visit to a general practitioner are increasingly occurring among young and relatively healthy individuals without known

  6. Clostridium difficile infections in the community: a zoonotic disease?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hensgens, M.P.M.; Keessen, A.M.; Squire, M.M.; Riley, T.V.; Koene, M.G.J.; Boer, de E.; Lipman, L.J.; Kuijper, E.J.

    2012-01-01

    Clostridium difficile infections (CDIs) are traditionally seen in elderly and hospitalized patients who have used antibiotic therapy. In the community, CDIs requiring a visit to a general practitioner are increasingly occurring among young and relatively healthy individuals without known

  7. Comparison of media for enumeration of Clostridium perfringens from foods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jong, A.E.I. de; Eijhusen, G.P.; Brouwer-Post, E.J.F.; Grand, M.; Johansson, T.; Kärkkäinen, T.; Marugg, J.; Veld, P.H. in 't; Warmerdam, F.H.M.; Wörner, G.; Zicavo, A.; Rombouts, F.M.; Beumer, R.R.

    2003-01-01

    Many media have been developed to enumerate Clostridium perfringens from foods. In this study, six media [iron sulfite (IS) agar, tryptose sulfite cycloserine (TSC) agar, Shahidi Ferguson perfringens (SFP) agar, sulfite cycloserine azide (SCA), differential clostridial agar (DCA), and oleandomycin

  8. effluent by bacillus cereus and clostridium butyricum using

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    Double-chambered MFCs was used for the study and operated ..... The third one is wire electron transfer, which uses ... phase indicates that the Bacillus cereus and Clostridium butyricum ..... Improving Start Up Performance With Carbon Mesh.

  9. Clostridium difficile Infection Worsens the Prognosis of Ulcerative Colitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María E Negrón

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The impact of Clostridium difficile infections among ulcerative colitis (UC patients is well characterized. However, there is little knowledge regarding the association between C difficile infections and postoperative complications among UC patients.

  10. Botulinum toxin for treatment of Frey's syndrome: report of two cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teive Hélio A.G.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Frey's syndrome is a phenomenon of hemifacial flushing and sweating after gustatory stimulus, usually secondary to surgical trauma over the parotid gland, although other injury mechanisms may be seen. It is accepted as a result of aberrant regeneration of facial autonomic nerve fibers. Treatment evolved from ineffective medical and surgical approaches to botulinum toxin. We evaluate the effectiveness and safety of botulinum toxin in the treatment of this complication in two patients.

  11. Bruxism secondary to brain injury treated with Botulinum toxin-A: a case report

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Maaytah, Mohammed; Jerjes, Waseem; Upile, Tahwinder; Swinson, Brian; Hopper, Colin; Ayliffe, Peter

    2006-01-01

    We report a successful treatment of bruxism in a patient with anoxic brain injury using botulinum toxin-A (BTX-A). On examination the mouth opening was 0 mm, no feeding was possible through the mouth. Botulinum toxin was injected into the masseter and temporalis; great improvement in trismus and bruxism was noted after 3 weeks. One further treatment improved the mouth opening on the following week and the patient was discharged from our care to be reviewed when required. PMID:17123443

  12. Use of botulinum A toxin for proctalgia fugax—a case report of successful treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Grigoriou, Marios; Ioannidis, Aristeidis; Kofina, Konstantinia; Efthimiadis, Christoforos

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Proctalgia fugax is considered as intermittent anal pain of unknown etiology; a variety of treatments have been used, without, however, permanent results. Injection of botulinum A toxin is recently suggested as an alternative option. We present the case of a woman presenting proctalgia fugax that was untreatable through other current forms of treatment. After two administrations of botulinum A toxin, 80 units and 100 units each, the patient remained asymptomatic on 8-month follow-up ...

  13. AbobotulinumtoxinA Efficacy and Safety in Children With Equinus Foot Previously Treated With Botulinum Toxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dabrowski, Edward; Bonikowski, Marcin; Gormley, Mark; Volteau, Magali; Picaut, Philippe; Delgado, Mauricio R

    2018-05-01

    The effects of botulinum toxin are transient, and repeat injections are required in children with lower-limb spasticity. However, the efficacy of botulinum toxin in patients who have received previous injections has remained largely unexplored. We present subgroup analyses of a phase III study conducted in ambulatory children (aged two to 17) with spastic equinus foot. Patients were randomized to single doses of abobotulinumtoxinA 10 U/kg/leg, 15 U/kg/leg, or placebo injected into the gastrocnemius-soleus complex (one or both legs). The first analysis was prespecified to review the effect of abobotulinumtoxinA in children previously treated with botulinum toxin versus those children new to the treatment; a second post hoc analysis evaluated the effect of abobotulinumtoxinA in children who changed botulinum toxin formulation. Of the 241 randomized patients, 113 had previously received botulinum toxin, including 86 who had been treated with another formulation. In both analyses, muscle tone (Modified Ashworth Scale) and the Physicians Global Assessment, at week 4, improved with abobotulinumtoxinA treatment versus placebo, regardless of baseline botulinum toxin status. Placebo responses in patients new to treatment were consistently higher than in the previously treated group. These results demonstrate similar abobotulinumtoxinA efficacy and safety profiles in children with spasticity who are new to botulinum toxin treatment and those children who were previously treated. The efficacy and safety of abobotulinumtoxinA treatment in these previously treated patients were comparable with the overall trial population, indicating that doses of 10 and 15 U/kg/leg are suitable starting doses for children with spasticity regardless of the previous botulinum toxin preparation used. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Clostridium difficile infection in Europe: a hospital-based survey

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bauer, Martijn P; Notermans, Daan W; van Benthem, Birgit H B

    2011-01-01

    Little is known about the extent of Clostridium difficile infection in Europe. Our aim was to obtain a more complete overview of C difficile infection in Europe and build capacity for diagnosis and surveillance.......Little is known about the extent of Clostridium difficile infection in Europe. Our aim was to obtain a more complete overview of C difficile infection in Europe and build capacity for diagnosis and surveillance....

  15. Reactive arthritis induced by recurrent Clostridium difficile colitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allison Marr

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Clostridium difficile colitis is a common infection that can be difficult to resolve and may result in recurrent infections. Reactive arthritis is a rare presentation of this disease and its treatment is not well differentiated in the literature. We describe a case of reactive arthritis occurring in a patient with a history of recurrent Clostridium difficile colitis while currently receiving a taper of oral vancomycin. His arthritis symptoms resolved with corticosteroids and continued treatment with anticlostridial antibiotics.

  16. Updates on the sporulation process in Clostridium species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talukdar, Prabhat K; Olguín-Araneda, Valeria; Alnoman, Maryam; Paredes-Sabja, Daniel; Sarker, Mahfuzur R

    2015-05-01

    Sporulation is an important strategy for certain bacterial species within the phylum Firmicutes to survive longer periods of time in adverse conditions. All spore-forming bacteria have two phases in their life; the vegetative form, where they can maintain all metabolic activities and replicate to increase numbers, and the spore form, where no metabolic activities exist. Although many essential components of sporulation are conserved among the spore-forming bacteria, there are differences in the regulation and the pathways among different genera, even at the species level. While we have gained much information from the most studied spore-forming bacterial genus, Bacillus, we still lack an in-depth understanding of spore formation in the genus Clostridium. Clostridium and Bacillus share the master regulator of sporulation, Spo0A, and its downstream pathways, but there are differences in the activation of the Spo0A pathway. While Bacillus species use a multi-component phosphorylation pathway for phosphorylation of Spo0A, termed phosphorelay, such a phosphorelay system is absent in Clostridium. On the other hand, a number of genes regulated by the different sporulation-specific transcription factors are conserved between different Clostridium and Bacillus species. In this review, we discuss the recent findings on Clostridium sporulation and compare the sporulation mechanism in Clostridium and Bacillus. Copyright © 2014 Institut Pasteur. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  17. Efficacy of botulinum toxins on bruxism: an evidence-based review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Hu; Liao, Zhengyu; Wang, Yan; Liao, Lina; Lai, Wenli

    2012-02-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the efficacy of botulinum toxins on bruxism. Electronic databases (PubMed, Embase and Science Citation Index), websites (Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials and ClinicalTrials.gov) and the literature database of SIGLE (System for Information on Grey Literature in Europe) were searched from January 1990 to April 2011 for randomised controlled trials or nonrandomised studies assessing the efficacy of botulinum toxins on bruxism. There was no language restriction. Through a predefined search strategy, we retrieved 28 studies from PubMed, 94 from Embase, 60 from the Science Citation Index, two ongoing clinical trials and two from the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials. Of these, only four studies met our inclusion criteria and were finally included. Of the four included studies, two were randomised controlled trials and two were controlled before-and-after studies. These studies showed that botulinum toxin injections can reduce the frequency of bruxism events, decrease bruxism-induced pain levels and satisfy patients' self-assessment with regard to the effectiveness of botulinum toxins on bruxism. In comparison with oral splint, botulinum toxins are equally effective on bruxism. Furthermore, botulinum toxin injections at a dosage of bruxism and are safe to use. Therefore, they can be used clinically for otherwise healthy patients with bruxism. © 2012 FDI World Dental Federation.

  18. Botulinum toxin therapy in Frey's syndrome: a retrospective study of 440 treatments in 100 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen, S; Jerowski, M; Ludwig, L; Fischer-Krall, E; Beutner, D; Grosheva, M

    2017-04-01

    Frey's syndrome is characterised as sweating, redness and warmth of the parotideal area and is often treated with botulinum toxin A. The objective of this retrospective study was to prove whether the toxin dosage and time-to-treatment intervals change after repeated botulinum toxin injections. The charts of patients, who were treated for Frey's syndrome during the last 16 years, were assessed. Three brands of botulinum toxin A were available for therapy. The Minor test was used to confirm the sweating before each treatment and to determine the toxin dosage. Constant amount of botulinum toxin was injected per cm 2 of the affected area. Patients consulted our department for the next treatment as soon as they felt disturbed by recurring sweating and when the sweating was objectively evident in the Minor test. Time intervals between treatments and injected toxin dosages were assessed. In total, 100 patients received 440 treatments in 16 years. Repeated injections, median 4.0, were carried out in 70.5% of patients. Median time interval to the first injection was 2.8 years. Median time interval between treatments was 12.0 months and showed to be steady (anova, P = .49, F = 1.01). Duration of effect of botulinum toxin on Frey's syndrome was long-lasting and stable with no significantly different time intervals between treatments. The extent of the sweating area did not vary significantly after repeated treatments and required a constant dose of botulinum toxin A. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. [Seniority of neurobladder and effectiveness of a first intradetrusor injection of botulinum toxin].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacout, M; Guinet-Lacoste, A; Popoff, M; Verollet, D; Lebreton, F; Amarenco, G

    2015-09-01

    Intradetrusor injection of botulinum toxin is one of the second-line therapy of neurologenic detrusor overactivity. In 26% to 66% of the cases, intradetrusor injection of botulinum toxin is inefficient in order to reduce overactive bladder symptoms and/or overactive detrusor. The objective of this study is to determine whether it exists a link between the efficacy of the first IDBT and the length of neurological detrusor overactivity symptoms. Retrospective study on 79 patients which have a first intradetrusor injection of botulinum toxin between January 2001 and December 2013. Inclusion criteria were patients older than 18 and having neurological detrusor overactivity. There is no significant difference of intradetrusor injection of botulinum toxin efficacy according to duration of urinary symptoms in the general neurologigal population (multiple sclerosis, spinal cord injury, spinal cord compression, ischemic pathology, infectious pathology) with the mean age being 46 years. On the contrary, the length of evolution of neurological detrusor overactivity symptoms before the intradetrusor botox injection therapy and the efficiency of the first intradetrusor injection of botulinum toxin seem to be correlated with negative results in patients with multiple sclerosis. The duration of urinary symptoms is a predictive factor of primary failure of intradetrusor injection of botulinum toxin in multiple sclerosis patients, in univariate analysis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  20. Toxina botulínica no tratamento da dor Toxina botulínica en el tratamiento del dolor Botulinum toxin in pain treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orlando Carlos Gomes Colhado

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available JUSTIFICATIVA E OBJETIVOS: A toxina botulínica (TxB, uma das mais potentes toxinas bacterianas conhecidas, tem reconhecidamente ação terapêutica eficaz no tratamento de algumas síndromes dolorosas. Entretanto, algumas de suas indicações ainda estão em fase de comprovação com relação a sua eficácia. O objetivo deste estudo foi revisar o histórico, propriedades farmacológicas e aplicações clinicas da TxB, quando empregada no tratamento de dores de diferentes origens. CONTEÚDO: A TxB é o produto da fermentação do Clostridium Botulinum, uma bactéria anaeróbia Gram-positiva. Comercialmente, as TxB existem nas formas A e B, agentes biológicos obtidos laboratorialmente. A TxB, uma neurotoxina que possui alta afinidade pelas sinapses colinérgicas, ocasiona bloqueio na liberação de acetilcolina pelo terminal nervoso, sem alterar a condução neural de sinais elétricos ou síntese e armazenamento de acetilcolina. Comprovadamente, a TxB pode enfraquecer seletivamente a musculatura dolorosa, interrompendo o ciclo espasmo-dor. Com relação à dor, varias publicações têm demonstrado a eficácia e segurança da TxB-A no tratamento da cefaleia tipo tensão, migrânea, dor lombar crônica e dor miofascial. CONCLUSÕES: A TxB-A é segura e bem tolerada em desordens dolorosas crônicas, onde regimes de farmacoterapia podem sabidamente provocar efeitos colaterais. Outra vantagem é a redução do uso de analgésicos e o tempo de ação de 3 a 4 meses por dose. Entretanto pesquisas futuras serão necessárias para se estabelecer a eficácia da TxB-A em desordens dolorosas crônicas e seu exato mecanismo no alivio da dor, bem como seu potencial em tratamentos multifatoriais.JUSTIFICATIVA Y OBJETIVOS: La toxina botulínica (TxB, una de las más potentes toxinas bacterianas de que se tiene conocimiento, posee una reconocida acción terapéutica eficaz en el tratamiento de algunos síndromes dolorosos. Sin embargo, algunas de sus

  1. Biosynthesis of dipicolinic acid in Clostridium roseum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prakasan, K. (Paraiba Univ., Joao Pessoa (Brazil)); Sharma, D. (Gobind Ballabh Pant Univ. of Agriculture and Technology, Nainital (India))

    1981-02-01

    Dipicolinic acid (DPA) synthesis was studied in Clostridium roseum by permitting the organism to complete vegetative growth in trypticase medium and trasfering the cells to a non-growth-promoting-medium, supplemented with the appropriate /sup 14/C-labelled precursors to complete sporulation and assaying the incorporation of label into DPA. Glu, asp, ala, ser and acetate were found to be efficient precursors of DPA and each one influenced the incorporation of other into DPA. The data suggest that a C/sub 5/ precursor is being trasformed into a C/sub 4/ intermediate, and a C/sub 2/ precursor into a C/sub 4/ intermediate, before their entry into DPA carbon structure. A C/sub 4/ plus C/sub 3/ condensation is favoured over C/sub 5/ plus C/sub 2/ or other condensation in the DPA biosynthesis.

  2. Biosynthesis of dipicolinic acid in Clostridium roseum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prakasan, K.; Sharma, D.

    1981-01-01

    Dipicolinic acid (DPA) synthesis was studied in Clostridium roseum by permitting the organism to complete vegetative growth in trypticase medium and trasfering the cells to a non-growth-promoting-medium, supplemented with the appropriate 14 C-labelled precursors to complete sporulation and assaying the incorporation of label into DPA. Glu, asp, ala, ser and acetate were found to be efficient precursors of DPA and each one influenced the incorporation of other into DPA. The data suggest that a C 5 precursor is being trasformed into a C 4 intermediate, and a C 2 precursor into a C 4 intermediate, before their entry into DPA carbon structure. A C 4 plus C 3 condensation is favoured over C 5 plus C 2 or other condensation in the DPA biosynthesis. (Author) [pt

  3. Recombinant Lipoproteins as Novel Vaccines with Intrinsic Adjuvant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, Pele; Huang, Jui-Hsin; Leng, Chih-Hsiang; Liu, Shih-Jen; Chen, Hsin-Wei

    2015-01-01

    A core platform technology for high production of recombinant lipoproteins with built-in immunostimulator for novel subunit vaccine development has been established. This platform technology has the following advantages: (1) easily convert antigen into lipidated recombinant protein using a fusion sequence containing lipobox and express high level (50-150mg/L) in Escherichia coli; (2) a robust high-yield up- and downstream bioprocess for lipoprotein production is successfully developed to devoid endotoxin contamination; (3) the lipid moiety of recombinant lipoproteins, which is identical to that of bacterial lipoproteins is recognized as danger signals by the immune system (Toll-like receptor 2 agonist), so both innate and adaptive immune responses can be induced by lipoproteins; and (4) successfully demonstrate the feasibility and safety of this core platform technology in meningococcal group B subunit vaccine, dengue subunit vaccine, novel subunit vaccine against Clostridium difficile-associated diseases, and HPV-based immunotherapeutic vaccines in animal model studies. © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Regulation of Meiotic Recombination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gregory p. Copenhaver

    2011-11-09

    Meiotic recombination results in the heritable rearrangement of DNA, primarily through reciprocal exchange between homologous chromosome or gene conversion. In plants these events are critical for ensuring proper chromosome segregation, facilitating DNA repair and providing a basis for genetic diversity. Understanding this fundamental biological mechanism will directly facilitate trait mapping, conventional plant breeding, and development of genetic engineering techniques that will help support the responsible production and conversion of renewable resources for fuels, chemicals, and the conservation of energy (1-3). Substantial progress has been made in understanding the basal recombination machinery, much of which is conserved in organisms as diverse as yeast, plants and mammals (4, 5). Significantly less is known about the factors that regulate how often and where that basal machinery acts on higher eukaryotic chromosomes. One important mechanism for regulating the frequency and distribution of meiotic recombination is crossover interference - or the ability of one recombination event to influence nearby events. The MUS81 gene is thought to play an important role in regulating the influence of interference on crossing over. The immediate goals of this project are to use reverse genetics to identify mutants in two putative MUS81 homologs in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana, characterize those mutants and initiate a novel forward genetic screen for additional regulators of meiotic recombination. The long-term goal of the project is to understand how meiotic recombination is regulated in higher eukaryotes with an emphasis on the molecular basis of crossover interference. The ability to monitor recombination in all four meiotic products (tetrad analysis) has been a powerful tool in the arsenal of yeast geneticists. Previously, the qrt mutant of Arabidopsis, which causes the four pollen products of male meiosis to remain attached, was developed as a facile system

  5. Recombinational repair: workshop summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howard-Flanders, P.

    1983-01-01

    Recombinational repair may or may not be synonymous with postreplication repair. Considerable progress has been made in the study of the relevant enzymes, particularly those from bacteria. In this workshop we focus on the recombination enzyme RecA protein. What structural changes take place in the protein and in DNA during repair. How does homologous pairing take place. How is ATP hydrolysis coupled to the stand exchange reaction and the formation of heteroduplx DNA. Turning to another enzyme needed for certain kinds of bacterial recombination, we will ask whether the purified recB protein and recC protein complement each other and are sufficient for exonuclease V activity. In higher cells, we would like to know whether sister exchanges, which occur in bacteria after uv irradiation, are also seen in animal cells

  6. Botulinum Neurotoxin Detection Methods for Public Health Response and Surveillance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagarajan Thirunavukkarasu

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Botulism outbreak due to consumption of food contaminated with botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs is a public health emergency. The threat of bioterrorism through deliberate distribution in food sources and/or aerosolization of BoNTs raises global public health and security concerns due to the potential for high mortality and morbidity. Rapid and reliable detection methods are necessary to support clinical diagnosis and surveillance for identifying the source of contamination, performing epidemiological analysis of the outbreak, preventing and responding to botulism outbreaks. This review considers the applicability of various BoNT detection methods and examines their fitness-for-purpose in safeguarding the public health and security goals.

  7. Analgesic Effects of Botulinum Toxin in Children with CP

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandahl Michelsen, Josephine; Normann, Gitte; Wong, Christian

    2018-01-01

    Experiencing pain is the greatest contributor to a reduced quality of life in children with cerebral palsy (CP). The presence of pain is quite common (~60%) and increases with age. This leads to missed school days, less participation, and reduced ambulation. Despite these alarming consequences...... of disorders and could potentially have an analgesic effect in children with CP as well. Even though most of the studies presented here show promising results, many also have limitations in their methodology as it is unlikely to capture all dimensions of pain in this heterogeneous group using only one...... assessment tool. In this review, we present a new way of examining the analgesic effect of botulinum toxin in children with CP using a variety of pain scores....

  8. Structural Analysis of Botulinum Neurotoxin Type G Receptor Binding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmitt, John; Karalewitz, Andrew; Benefield, Desire A.; Mushrush, Darren J.; Pruitt, Rory N.; Spiller, Benjamin W.; Barbieri, Joseph T.; Lacy, D. Borden (Vanderbilt); (MCW)

    2010-10-19

    Botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT) binds peripheral neurons at the neuromuscular junction through a dual-receptor mechanism that includes interactions with ganglioside and protein receptors. The receptor identities vary depending on BoNT serotype (A-G). BoNT/B and BoNT/G bind the luminal domains of synaptotagmin I and II, homologous synaptic vesicle proteins. We observe conditions under which BoNT/B binds both Syt isoforms, but BoNT/G binds only SytI. Both serotypes bind ganglioside G{sub T1b}. The BoNT/G receptor-binding domain crystal structure provides a context for examining these binding interactions and a platform for understanding the physiological relevance of different Syt receptor isoforms in vivo.

  9. Focal myositis of lower extremity responsive to botulinum A toxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitrovic, Josko; Prka, Zeljko; Zic, Rado; Marusic, Srecko; Morovic-Vergles, Jadranka

    2014-01-01

    Focal myositis is a rare, mostly benign disease (pseudotumor) of skeletal muscle, histopathologically characterized by interstitial myositis and tumorous enlargement of a single muscle. The etiology of focal myositis remains unknown; however, localized myopathy has been postulated to be caused by denervation lesions. This case report describes a patient that presented with clinical, laboratory, electromyoneurography, and magnetic resonance imaging features of focal myositis complicated with intervertebral disk protrusion in the lumbosacral spine affected with radicular distress. In most cases, focal myositic lesions show spontaneous regression, relapses are rare, and long-term prognosis is good. There is a wide spectrum of therapeutic options, from no therapy at all through nonsteroidal antirheumatics and glucocorticoids to radiotherapy, surgical excision, and immunosuppressants. In the patient presented, treatment with glucocorticoids, methotrexate, and surgical excision failed to produce satisfactory results. Clinical improvement, pain relief, and reduction in lower leg volume were only achieved by local infiltration of botulinum A toxin.

  10. [Botulinum toxin: An important complement for facial rejuvenation surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Louarn, C

    2017-10-01

    The improved understanding of the functional anatomy of the face and of the action of the botulinum toxin A leads us to determine a new injection procedure which consequently decreases the risk of eyebrow and eyelid ptosis and increases the toxin's injection possibilities and efficiencies. With less units of toxin, the technique herein described proposes to be more efficient on more muscles: variable toxin injections concentration adapted to each injected muscle are used. Thanks to a new procedure in the upper face, toxin A injection can be quite close to an endoscopic surgical action. In addition, interesting results are achievable to rejuvenate the lateral canthus with injection on the upper lateral tarsus, to rejuvenate the nose with injection at the alar base, the jawline and the neck region. Lastly, a smoothing effect on the skin (meso botox) is obtained by the anticholinergic action of the toxin A on the dermal receptors. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  11. Botulinum toxin treatment for limb spasticity in childhood cerebral palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vito ePavone

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available CP is the most common cause of chronic disability in childhood occurring in 2 to 2.5/1000 births. It is a severe disorder and a significant number of patients present cognitive delay and difficulty in walking. The use of botulinum toxin (BTX has become a popular treatment for CP especially for spastic and dystonic muscles while avoiding deformity and pain. Moreover, the combination of physiotherapy, casting, orthotics and injection of BTX may delay or decrease the need for surgical intervention while reserving single-event, multi-level surgery for fixed musculotendinous contractures and bony deformities in older children. This report highlights the utility of BTX in the treatment of cerebral palsy in children. We include techniques for administration, side effects and possible resistance as well as specific use in the upper and lower limbs muscles

  12. Botulinum Toxin in Secondarily Nonresponsive Patients with Spasmodic Dysphonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mor, Niv; Tang, Christopher; Blitzer, Andrew

    2016-09-01

    Chemodenervation with botulinum toxin (BoNT) has been effective and well tolerated for all types of dystonia for >30 years. We reviewed outcomes of our patients treated with BoNT serotype A (BoNT-A) for spasmodic dysphonia (SD) who became secondarily nonresponsive. We found that 8 of 1400 patients became nonresponsive to BoNT-A (0.57%), which is lower than the secondary nonresponse rate in other dystonias. After a cessation period, 4 of our patients resumed BoNT-A injections, and recurrence of immunoresistance was not seen in any of them. When compared with patients with other dystonias, patients with SD receive extremely low doses of BoNT. Small antigen challenge may explain the lower rate of immunoresistance and long-lasting efficacy after BoNT-A is restarted among secondary nonresponsive patients with SD. © American Academy of Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery Foundation 2016.

  13. Peptide inhibitors of botulinum neurotoxin by mRNA display

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yiadom, Kwabena P.A.B.; Muhie, Seid; Yang, David C.H.

    2005-01-01

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) are extremely toxic. The metalloproteases associated with the toxins cleave proteins essential for neurotransmitter secretion. Inhibitors of the metalloprotease are currently sought to control the toxicity of BoNTs. Toward that goal, we produced a synthetic cDNA for the expression and purification of the metalloprotease of BoNT/A in Escherichia coli as a biotin-ubiquitin fusion protein, and constructed a combinatorial peptide library to screen for BoNT/A light chain inhibitors using mRNA display. A protease assay was developed using immobilized intact SNAP-25 as the substrate. The new peptide inhibitors showed a 10-fold increase in affinity to BoNT/A light chain than the parent peptide. Interestingly, the sequences of the new peptide inhibitors showed abundant hydrophobic residues but few hydrophilic residues. The results suggest that mRNA display may provide a general approach in developing peptide inhibitors of BoNTs

  14. Antigenic sites on the HN domain of botulinum neurotoxin A stimulate protective antibody responses against active toxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayyar, B Vijayalakshmi; Tajhya, Rajeev B; Beeton, Christine; Atassi, M Zouhair

    2015-10-28

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) are the most toxic substances known. BoNT intoxicates cells in a highly programmed fashion initiated by binding to the cell surface, internalization and enzymatic cleavage of substrate, thus, inhibiting synaptic exocytosis. Over the past two decades, immunological significance of BoNT/A C-terminal heavy chain (HC) and light chain (LC) domains were investigated extensively leading to important findings. In the current work, we explored the significance of BoNT/A heavy chain N-terminal (HN) region as a vaccine candidate. Mice were immunized with recombinant HN519-845 generating antibodies (Abs) that were found to be protective against lethal dose of BoNT/A. Immuno-dominant regions of HN519-845 were identified and individually investigated for antibody response along with synthetic peptides within those regions, using in vivo protection assays against BoNT/A. Results were confirmed by patch-clamp analysis where anti-HN antibodies were studied for the ability to block toxin-induced channel formation. This data strongly indicated that HN519-593 is an important region in generating protective antibodies and should be valuable in a vaccine design. These results are the first to describe and dissect the protective activity of the BoNT/A HN domain.

  15. Reconstituting botulinum toxin drugs: shaking, stirring or what?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dressler, Dirk; Bigalke, Hans

    2016-05-01

    Most botulinum toxin (BT) drugs are stored as powders which need to be reconstituted with normal saline before clinical use. As botulinum neurotoxin (BNT), the therapeutically active ingredient, is a large double-stranded protein the process of reconstitution should be performed with special attention to mechanical stress applied. We wanted to test the mechanical stability of BNT during the reconstitution process. For this, 100 MU onabotulinumtoxinA (Botox(®), Irvine, CA, USA) was reconstituted with 2.0 ml of NaCl/H2O. Gentle reconstitution (GR) was performed with a 5 ml syringe, a 0.90 × 70 mm injection needle, one cycle of injection-aspiration-injection and two gentle shakes of the vial. Aggressive reconstitution (AR) was performed with a 5 ml syringe, a 0.40 × 40 mm injection needle, ten injection-aspiration-injection cycles and 30 s of continuous shaking of the vial. AR increased the time to paralysis in the mouse hemidiaphragm assay (HDA) from 72.0 ± 4.6 to 106.0 ± 16.0 min (*p = 0.002, two-tailed t test after Kolmogorov-Smirnova test with Lilliefors correction for normal distribution). Construction of a calibration curve revealed that the increase in the time to paralysis was correlated with a loss of potency of from 100 to 58 MU (-42 %). BT users should use large diameter injection needles for reconstitution, apply two or three injection-aspiration-injection cycles and, maybe, shake the vials a few times to rinse the entire glass wall. Aggressive reconstitution with small diameter needles, prolonged injection-aspiration-injection and violent shaking should be avoided.

  16. Multidose Botulinum Toxin A for Intralaryngeal Injection: A Cost Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Mark R; Young, VyVy N; Smith, Libby J; Rosen, Clark A

    2018-01-04

    Botulinum toxin A (BtxA) injection is the mainstay treatment for laryngeal dystonias. BtxA product labeling states that reconstituted toxin should be used within 4 hours on a single patient despite several studies that have demonstrated multidose BtxA to be safe and effective. Many insurance carriers mandate the use of an outside pharmacy which necessitates a single-use approach. This study compares the cost savings of multidose BtxA for laryngeal dystonia compared to single-use. This is a retrospective review and projected cost savings analysis. Records and billing information were reviewed for patients receiving BtxA for intralaryngeal injection at a single laryngology division in 2015. Inclusion criteria included CPT 64617 or J0585; exclusion criteria included CPT 64616. The price of BtxA 100 unit vial for calculation was $670. A total of 142 patients were seen for intralaryngeal BtxA injection resulting in 337 visits over 1 year. The average BtxA dose per visit was 2.86 units with an average of 3.06 procedure visits per year. The calculated cost of BtxA treatment using a single vial approach was found to be $2,050 per patient per year. If billed instead for $7/unit with 5 units wastage charge per visit, the yearly per patient charge is $168. Single vial-use of BtxA injection thus represents a 1,118% price increase versus multidose use. When estimated for yearly prevalence of spasmodic dysphonia, multidose BtxA use would save almost $100 million annually. Multidose botulinum toxin A application utilizing per unit billing is significantly less expensive than per single-use vial billing and would save the health-care system significant amount of money without any sacrifice in safety or effectiveness. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  17. Parton recombination model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwa, R.C.

    1978-08-01

    Low P/sub T/ meson production in hadronic collisions is described in the framework of the parton model. The recombination of quark and antiquark is suggested as the dominant mechanism in the large x region. Phenomenological evidences for the mechanism are given. The application to meson initiated reactions yields the quark distribution in mesons. 21 references

  18. Phylogeny of the ammonia-producing ruminal bacteria Peptostreptococcus anaerobius, Clostridium sticklandii, and Clostridium aminophilum sp. nov

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paster, B. J.; Russell, J. B.; Yang, C. M.; Chow, J. M.; Woese, C. R.; Tanner, R.

    1993-01-01

    In previous studies, gram-positive bacteria which grew rapidly with peptides or an amino acid as the sole energy source were isolated from bovine rumina. Three isolates, strains C, FT (T = type strain), and SR, were considered to be ecologically important since they produced up to 20-fold more ammonia than other ammonia-producing ruminal bacteria. On the basis of phenotypic criteria, the taxonomic position of these new isolates was uncertain. In this study, the 16S rRNA sequences of these isolates and related bacteria were determined to establish the phylogenetic positions of the organisms. The sequences of strains C, FT, and SR and reference strains of Peptostreptococcus anaerobius, Clostridium sticklandii, Clostridium coccoides, Clostridium aminovalericum, Acetomaculum ruminis, Clostridium leptum, Clostridium lituseburense, Clostridium acidiurici, and Clostridium barkeri were determined by using a modified Sanger dideoxy chain termination method. Strain C, a large coccus purported to belong to the genus Peptostreptococcus, was closely related to P. anaerobius, with a level of sequence similarity of 99.6%. Strain SR, a heat-resistant, short, rod-shaped organism, was closely related to C. sticklandii, with a level of sequence similarity of 99.9%. However, strain FT, a heat-resistant, pleomorphic, rod-shaped organism, was only distantly related to some clostridial species and P. anaerobius. On the basis of the sequence data, it was clear that strain FT warranted designation as a separate species. The closest known relative of strain FT was C. coccoides (level of similarity, only 90.6%). Additional strains that are phenotypically similar to strain FT were isolated in this study.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS).

  19. Characterisation of botulinum toxins type A and B, by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionisation and electrospray mass spectrometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baar, B.L.M. van; Hulst, A.G.; Jong, A.L. de; Wils, E.R.J.

    2002-01-01

    A method earlier developed for the mass spectrometric (MS) identification of tetanus toxin (TTx) was applied to botulinum toxins type A and B (BTxA and BTxB). Botulinum toxins are extremely neurotoxic bacterial toxins, likely to be used as biological warfare agent. Biologically active BTxA and BTxB

  20. Muscle disuse caused by botulinum toxin injection leads to increased central gain of the stretch reflex in the rat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pingel, Jessica; Hultborn, Hans; Naslund-Koch, Lui

    2017-01-01

    Botulinum toxin (Btx) is used in children with cerebral palsy and other neurological patients to diminish spasticity and reduce the risk of development of contractures. Here, we investigated changes in the central gain of the stretch reflex circuitry in response to botulinum toxin injection...

  1. Effect of Botulinum Toxin Type A on TGF-β/Smad Pathway Signaling: Implications for Silicone-Induced Capsule Formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sena; Ahn, Moonsang; Piao, Yibo; Ha, Yooseok; Choi, Dae-Kyoung; Yi, Min-Hee; Shin, Nara; Kim, Dong Woon; Oh, Sang-Ha

    2016-11-01

    One of the most serious complications of breast surgery using implants is capsular contracture. Several preventive treatments have been introduced; however, the mechanism of capsule formation has not been resolved completely. The authors previously identified negative effects of botulinum toxin type A on capsule formation, expression of transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1, and differentiation of fibroblasts into myofibroblasts. Thus, the authors investigated how to prevent capsule formation by using botulinum toxin type A, particularly by means of TGF-β1 signaling, in human fibroblasts. In vitro, cultured human fibroblasts were treated with TGF-β1 and/or botulinum toxin type A. Expression of collagen, matrix metalloproteinase, and Smad was examined by Western blotting. The activation of matrix metalloproteinase was observed by gelatin zymography. In vivo, the effect of botulinum toxin type A on the phosphorylation of Smad2 in silicone-induced capsule formation was evaluated by immunocytochemistry. In vitro, the phosphorylation of Smad2 was inhibited by botulinum toxin type A treatment. The expression levels of collagen types 1 and 3 were inhibited by botulinum toxin type A treatment, whereas those of matrix metalloproteinase-2 and matrix metalloproteinase-9 were enhanced. Gelatin zymography experiments confirmed enhanced matrix metalloproteinase-2 activity in collagen degradation. In vivo, botulinum toxin type A treatment reduced capsule thickness and Smad2 phosphorylation in silicone-induced capsules. This study suggests that botulinum toxin type A plays an important role in the inhibition of capsule formation through the TGF-β/Smad signaling pathway. Therapeutic, V.

  2. Botulinum toxin A for treatment of neurogenic detrusor overactivity and incontinence in patients with spinal cord lesions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagi, Per; Biering-Sørensen, Fin

    2004-01-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of intravesical botulinum toxin A (BTA) in the treatment of severe neurogenic detrusor overactivity (NDO) with incontinence in patients with spinal cord lesions (SCLs).......To evaluate the efficacy of intravesical botulinum toxin A (BTA) in the treatment of severe neurogenic detrusor overactivity (NDO) with incontinence in patients with spinal cord lesions (SCLs)....

  3. Clostridium perfringens isolate typing by multiplex PCR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MR Ahsani

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Clostridium perfringens is an important pathogen that provokes numerous different diseases. This bacterium is classified into five different types, each of which capable of causing a different disease. There are various methods for the bacterial identification, many are labor-intensive, time-consuming, expensive and also present low sensitivity and specificity. The aim of this research was to identify the different types of C. perfringens using PCR molecular method. In this study, 130 sheep-dung samples were randomly collected from areas around the city of Kerman, southeastern Iran. After processing and culturing of samples, the produced colonies were morphologically studied, gram stain test was also carried out and the genera of these bacteria were identified through biochemical tests. DNA extracted from isolated bacteria for genotyping was tested by multiplex PCR with specific primers. Based on length of synthesized fragments by PCR, toxin types and bacterial strains were detected. C. perfringens isolated types were divided as follows: 17.39% type A, 21.74% type B, 34.78% type C and 26.09% type D. It should be emphasized that, up to the present moment, C. perfringens type A has not been reported in Iran.

  4. The economic burden of Clostridium difficile

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGlone, S. M.; Bailey, R. R.; Zimmer, S. M.; Popovich, M. J.; Tian, Y.; Ufberg, P.; Muder, R. R.; Lee, B. Y.

    2013-01-01

    Although Clostridium difficile (C. difficile) is the leading cause of infectious diarrhoea in hospitalized patients, the economic burden of this major nosocomial pathogen for hospitals, third-party payers and society remains unclear. We developed an economic computer simulation model to determine the costs attributable to healthcare-acquired C. difficile infection (CDI) from the hospital, third-party payer and societal perspectives. Sensitivity analyses explored the effects of varying the cost of hospitalization, C. difficile-attributable length of stay, and the probability of initial and secondary recurrences. The median cost of a case ranged from $9179 to $11 456 from the hospital perspective, $8932 to $11 679 from the third-party payor perspective, and $13 310 to $16 464 from the societal perspective. Most of the costs incurred were accrued during a patient’s primary CDI episode. Hospitals with an incidence of 4.1 CDI cases per 100 000 discharges would incur costs ≥$3.2 million (hospital perspective); an incidence of 10.5 would lead to costs ≥$30.6 million. Our model suggests that the annual US economic burden of CDI would be ≥$496 million (hospital perspective), ≥$547 million (third-party payer perspective) and ≥$796 million (societal perspective). Our results show that C. difficile infection is indeed costly, not only to third-party payers and the hospital, but to society as well. These results are consistent with current literature citing C. difficile as a costly disease. PMID:21668576

  5. CLOSTRIDIUM PERFRINGENS IN MEAT AND MEAT PRODUCTS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    HALL, H E; ANGELOTTI, R

    1965-05-01

    A total of 262 specimens of meat and meat dishes were examined for the presence of Clostridium perfringens. Of this total, 161 were raw, unprocessed beef, veal, lamb, pork, or chicken; 101 were processed meats and meat dishes. C. perfringens was isolated from 113 (43.1%) of these specimens. The highest percentage of contamination (82%) was found in veal cuts, and the lowest (4.7%) in sliced sandwich meats and spreads. Only 2 of the 113 isolates were shown to produce heat-resistant spores, which indicates a very low incidence (0.8%) of contamination. These findings indicate that outbreaks of C. perfringens food-borne disease in the Cincinnati area are caused principally by the contamination of the food with vegetative cells or spores of the organism after cooking. Studies of the effects of various holding temperatures on the growth of C. perfringens indicated that, in the range of 5 to 15 C, no multiplication would occur, but that viable cells would still be present at the end of a 5-day holding period. Extremely rapid growth occurred at temperatures around 45 C, and complete inhibition of growth was accomplished between 49 and 52 C.

  6. Clostridium difficile is an autotrophic bacterial pathogen.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Köpke

    Full Text Available During the last decade, Clostridium difficile infection showed a dramatic increase in incidence and virulence in the Northern hemisphere. This incessantly challenging disease is the leading cause of antibiotic-associated and nosocomial infectious diarrhea and became life-threatening especially among elderly people. It is generally assumed that all human bacterial pathogens are heterotrophic organisms, being either saccharolytic or proteolytic. So far, this has not been questioned as colonization of the human gut gives access to an environment, rich in organic nutrients. Here, we present data that C. difficile (both clinical and rumen isolates is also able to grow on CO2+H2 as sole carbon and energy source, thus representing the first identified autotrophic bacterial pathogen. Comparison of several different strains revealed high conservation of genes for autotrophic growth and showed that the ability to use gas mixtures for growth decreases or is lost upon prolonged culturing under heterotrophic conditions. The metabolic flexibility of C. difficile (heterotrophic growth on various substrates as well as autotrophy could allow the organism in the gut to avoid competition by niche differentiation and contribute to its survival when stressed or in unfavorable conditions that cause death to other bacteria. This may be an important trait for the pathogenicity of C. difficile.

  7. Phosphorylation of proteins in Clostridium thermohydrosulfuricum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Londesborough, J.

    1986-01-01

    Cell extracts of the thermophile Clostridium thermohydrosulfuricum catalyzed the phosphorylation by (γ- 32 P)ATP of several endogenous proteins with M/sub r/s between 13,000 and 100,000. Serine and tyrosine were the main acceptors. Distinct substrate proteins were found in the soluble (e.g., proteins p66, p63, and p53 of M/sub r/s 66,000, 63,000, and 53,000, respectively) and particulate (p76 and p30) fractions, both of which contained protein kinase and phosphatase activity. The soluble fraction suppressed the phosphorylation of particulate proteins and contained a protein kinase inhibitor. Phosphorylation of p53 was promoted by 10μM fructose 1,6-bisphosphate or glucose 1,6-bisphosphate and suppressed by hexose monophosphates, whereas p30 and p13 were suppressed by 5 μM brain (but not spinach) calmodulin. Polyamines, including the odd polyamines characteristic of thermophiles, modulated the labeling of most of the phosphoproteins. Apart from p66, all the proteins labeled in vitro were also rapidly labeled in intact cells by 32 P/sub i/. Several proteins strongly labeled in vivo were labeled slowly or not at all in vitro

  8. Crystal structure of Clostridium difficile toxin A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chumbler, Nicole M.; Rutherford, Stacey A.; Zhang, Zhifen; Farrow, Melissa A.; Lisher, John P.; Farquhar, Erik; Giedroc, David P.; Spiller, Benjamin W.; Melnyk, Roman A.; Lacy, D. Borden

    2016-01-11

    Clostridium difficile infection is the leading cause of hospital-acquired diarrhoea and pseudomembranous colitis. Disease is mediated by the actions of two toxins, TcdA and TcdB, which cause the diarrhoea, as well as inflammation and necrosis within the colon. The toxins are large (308 and 270 kDa, respectively), homologous (47% amino acid identity) glucosyltransferases that target small GTPases within the host. The multidomain toxins enter cells by receptor-mediated endocytosis and, upon exposure to the low pH of the endosome, insert into and deliver two enzymatic domains across the membrane. Eukaryotic inositol-hexakisphosphate (InsP6) binds an autoprocessing domain to activate a proteolysis event that releases the N-terminal glucosyltransferase domain into the cytosol. Here, we report the crystal structure of a 1,832-amino-acid fragment of TcdA (TcdA1832), which reveals a requirement for zinc in the mechanism of toxin autoprocessing and an extended delivery domain that serves as a scaffold for the hydrophobic α-helices involved in pH-dependent pore formation. A surface loop of the delivery domain whose sequence is strictly conserved among all large clostridial toxins is shown to be functionally important, and is highlighted for future efforts in the development of vaccines and novel therapeutics.

  9. Clostridium difficile – From Colonization to Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schäffler, Holger; Breitrück, Anne

    2018-01-01

    Clostridium difficile is the most frequent cause of nosocomial antibiotic-associated diarrhea. The incidence of C. difficile infection (CDI) has been rising worldwide with subsequent increases in morbidity, mortality, and health care costs. Asymptomatic colonization with C. difficile is common and a high prevalence has been found in specific cohorts, e.g., hospitalized patients, adults in nursing homes and in infants. However, the risk of infection with C. difficile differs significantly between these cohorts. While CDI is a clear indication for therapy, colonization with C. difficile is not believed to be a direct precursor for CDI and therefore does not require treatment. Antibiotic therapy causes alterations of the intestinal microbial composition, enabling C. difficile colonization and consecutive toxin production leading to disruption of the colonic epithelial cells. Clinical symptoms of CDI range from mild diarrhea to potentially life-threatening conditions like pseudomembranous colitis or toxic megacolon. While antibiotics are still the treatment of choice for CDI, new therapies have emerged in recent years such as antibodies against C. difficile toxin B and fecal microbial transfer (FMT). This specific therapy for CDI underscores the role of the indigenous bacterial composition in the prevention of the disease in healthy individuals and its role in the pathogenesis after alteration by antibiotic treatment. In addition to the pathogenesis of CDI, this review focuses on the colonization of C. difficile in the human gut and factors promoting CDI. PMID:29692762

  10. Emerging monoclonal antibodies against Clostridium difficile infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Péchiné, Séverine; Janoir, Claire; Collignon, Anne

    2017-04-01

    Clostridium difficile infections are characterized by a high recurrence rate despite antibiotic treatments and there is an urgent need to develop new treatments such as fecal transplantation and immonotherapy. Besides active immunotherapy with vaccines, passive immunotherapy has shown promise, especially with monoclonal antibodies. Areas covered: Herein, the authors review the different assays performed with monoclonal antibodies against C. difficile toxins and surface proteins to treat or prevent primary or recurrent episodes of C. difficile infection in animal models and in clinical trials as well. Notably, the authors lay emphasis on the phase III clinical trial (MODIFY II), which allowed bezlotoxumab to be approved by the Food and Drug Administration and the European Medicines Agency. They also review new strategies for producing single domain antibodies and nanobodies against C. difficile and new approaches to deliver them in the digestive tract. Expert opinion: Only two human Mabs against TcdA and TcdB have been tested alone or in combination in clinical trials. However, many animal model studies have provided rationale for the use of Mabs and nanobodies in C. difficile infection and pave the way for further clinical investigation.

  11. [Epidemiology of Clostridium difficile infection in Spain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asensio, Angel; Monge, Diana

    2012-06-01

    There has been increasing interest in Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) due its association with healthcare and its impact on morbidity and mortality in the elderly. During the last few years there has been a growing increase in the number of published studies on the incidence, changes on the clinical presentation and on the epidemiology, with the description of new risk factors. The frequency of CDI in Spain is not sufficiently characterised. The available data indicates that incidence is within the range of that of surrounding countries but increasing. Furthermore, the high and growing use of broad spectrum antibiotics, both in our hospitals and in the community setting, are factors that favour the increase of the disease. The hyper-virulent ribotype 027 has not spread in our hospitals. We need to know with enhanced validity and accuracy the incidence of CDI, both community and healthcare-associated, the information on outbreaks, the incidence on certain population groups, the characterisation of circulating ribotypes and the impact of the disease in terms of mortality and health costs. We need to implement programs for the improvement of antibiotic therapy in the hospital, as well as in the community. Furthermore, the knowledge and the performance of standard precautions need to be improved, particularly hand hygiene, and the specific measures to limit the transmission of C. difficile among the healthcare institutions. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  12. Antibiotic prescribing policy and Clostridium difficile diarrhoea.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Connor, K A

    2012-02-03

    BACKGROUND: Broad-spectrum antibiotics, particularly intravenous cephalosporins, are associated with Clostridium difficile diarrhoea. Diarrhoea due to C. difficile is a growing problem in hospitals, especially among elderly patients. AIM: To establish whether changing an antibiotic policy with the aim of reducing the use of injectable cephalosporins leads to a reduction in the incidence of C. difficile diarrhoea in elderly patients. DESIGN: Retrospective analysis. METHODS: A group of patients who were subject to the new antibiotic policy from the period following July 2000, were compared with patients who were admitted prior to July 2000 and were not subject to the new policy. Infections, antibiotic prescriptions and mortality rates were determined from case notes, and C. difficle diarrhoea rates from microbiological data. RESULTS: Intravenous cephalosporin use fell from 210 to 28 defined daily doses (p < 0.001) following the change in antibiotic policy, with a corresponding increase in piperacillin-tazobactam (p < 0.001) and moxifloxacin (p < 0.001) use. The new policy led to a significant reduction in C. difficile diarrhoea cases. The relative risk of developing C. difficile infection with the old policy compared to the new policy was 3.24 (95%CI 1.07-9.84, p = 0.03). DISCUSSION: The antibiotic policy was successfully introduced into an elderly care service. It reduced both intravenous cephalosporin use and C. difficile diarrhoea.

  13. Sepsis due to clostridium septicum: case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foga, M.M.; McGinn, G.J.; Kroeker, M.A.; Guzman, R.

    2000-01-01

    Clostridium septicum is an unusual anaerobic, gram-positive, gas-producing bacillus, which has been identified as a cause of fulminant rapidly fatal infection in humans. Infection with C. septicum usually occurs in patients with cancer, patients receiving immunosuppressive chemotherapy, or patients with a nonmalignant hematological disorder such as hemolytic uremic syndrome. C. septicum infection most commonly involves the abdomen, and a recent review article has identified 164 cases in the medical literature describing the abdominal findings in this disease. Intracranial manifestation of C. septicum infection are less common and include meningitis, cerebritis, abscess formation and pneumocephalus. There have been only 12 documented cases in the English literature describing central nervous system lesions associated with C. septicum. We present a case report of a 56-year-old man in whom septicemia due to C. septicum developed as a complication of Crohn's disease. To our knowledge, there has never been a previous report of C. septicum sepsis related to underlying Crohn's disease. Our case is also remarkable in that an intracerebral gas collection developed at the site of a mycotic infarct related to C. septicum bacteremia, Intracranial, intraparenchymal gas formation related to anaerobic infection is extremely rare; to our knowledge, this radiological finding related to C. septicum sepsis has been described in only 1 previous case report in the medical literature. We also describe the intra-abdominal manifestations of C. septicum sepsis that occurred in this patient as well as the associated radiographic and pathologic findings. (author)

  14. Perfringolysin O: The Underrated Clostridium perfringens Toxin?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verherstraeten, Stefanie; Goossens, Evy; Valgaeren, Bonnie; Pardon, Bart; Timbermont, Leen; Haesebrouck, Freddy; Ducatelle, Richard; Deprez, Piet; Wade, Kristin R; Tweten, Rodney; Van Immerseel, Filip

    2015-05-14

    The anaerobic bacterium Clostridium perfringens expresses multiple toxins that promote disease development in both humans and animals. One such toxin is perfringolysin O (PFO, classically referred to as θ toxin), a pore-forming cholesterol-dependent cytolysin (CDC). PFO is secreted as a water-soluble monomer that recognizes and binds membranes via cholesterol. Membrane-bound monomers undergo structural changes that culminate in the formation of an oligomerized prepore complex on the membrane surface. The prepore then undergoes conversion into the bilayer-spanning pore measuring approximately 250-300 Å in diameter. PFO is expressed in nearly all identified C. perfringens strains and harbors interesting traits that suggest a potential undefined role for PFO in disease development. Research has demonstrated a role for PFO in gas gangrene progression and bovine necrohemorrhagic enteritis, but there is limited data available to determine if PFO also functions in additional disease presentations caused by C. perfringens. This review summarizes the known structural and functional characteristics of PFO, while highlighting recent insights into the potential contributions of PFO to disease pathogenesis.

  15. Perfringolysin O: The Underrated Clostridium perfringens Toxin?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefanie Verherstraeten

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The anaerobic bacterium Clostridium perfringens expresses multiple toxins that promote disease development in both humans and animals. One such toxin is perfringolysin O (PFO, classically referred to as θ toxin, a pore-forming cholesterol-dependent cytolysin (CDC. PFO is secreted as a water-soluble monomer that recognizes and binds membranes via cholesterol. Membrane-bound monomers undergo structural changes that culminate in the formation of an oligomerized prepore complex on the membrane surface. The prepore then undergoes conversion into the bilayer-spanning pore measuring approximately 250–300 Å in diameter. PFO is expressed in nearly all identified C. perfringens strains and harbors interesting traits that suggest a potential undefined role for PFO in disease development. Research has demonstrated a role for PFO in gas gangrene progression and bovine necrohemorrhagic enteritis, but there is limited data available to determine if PFO also functions in additional disease presentations caused by C. perfringens. This review summarizes the known structural and functional characteristics of PFO, while highlighting recent insights into the potential contributions of PFO to disease pathogenesis.

  16. Review of botulinum toxin type A for the prophylactic treatment of chronic daily headache

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Evers

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Stefan EversDepartment of Neurology, University of Münster, Münster, GermanyAbstract: Botulinum toxin A is increasingly used in the treatment of idiopathic and symptomatic headache disorders. However, only few controlled trials are available and many trials can hardly be compared to each other because of different endpoints and different trial designs. In particular chronic daily headache, which is defined as an idiopathic headache occurring on more than 15 days per month for at least 3 months and a daily duration of at least 4 hours, is considered as a headache disorder with possible efficacy of botulinum toxin A. For the prophylactic treatment of chronic tension-type headache and chronic migraine, no sufficient positive evidence for a successful treatment can be obtained from randomized, double-blind, and placebo-controlled trials to date. For the treatment of chronic daily headache including medication overuse headache, there is some positive evidence for efficacy in a subgroup of patients. To date, the majority of double-blind and placebo-controlled studies do not suggest that botulinum toxin A is efficacious in the treatment of chronic idiopathic headache disorders. However, it is possible that some subgroups of patients with chronic daily headache will benefit from a long-term treatment with botulinum toxin A.Keywords: botulinum toxin A, chronic daily headache, chronic tension-type headache, chronic migraine

  17. A pilot study to evaluate effectiveness of botulinum toxin in treatment of androgenetic alopecia in males

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sehdev Singh

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Androgenetic alopecia is a common form of alopecia with multifactorial etiology. Finasteride and minoxidil are approved by the FDA for the treatment of androgenetic alopecia. Balding scalp is believed to have relative microvascular insufficiency. Blood vessels in the scalp travel through the intramuscular plane. Intramuscular injection of botulinum toxin relaxes muscles and thereby increases blood flow in balding scalp. We conducted a pilot study to evaluate the efficacy of botulinum toxin in androgenetic alopecia management. Material and Methods: The study was conducted in a tertiary care center. A total of 10 male patients with androgenetic alopecia meeting inclusion criteria of the study were included. In the scalp, 30 sites were injected with 5 U of botulinum toxin in each site. Preprocedure photograph taken and evaluation was done, which was repeated after 24 weeks. Efficacy was assessed by photography and self-assessment scoring was done by patients. Results: Of 10 patients, 8 had good to excellent response on photographic assessment. At the end of 24 weeks, 1 patient showed poor and 1 showed fair response to treatment. As per self-assessment, 7of 10 patients showed good to excellent response. Two patients had fair response and 1 patient showed poor response to treatment. Conclusion: Botulinum toxin was found to be safe and effective therapy for the management of androgenetic alopecia in this pilot study. Studies with larger sample size and randomized controlled trials are required to establish the role of botulinum toxin in the management of androgenetic alopecia.

  18. Vocal aging and adductor spasmodic dysphonia: Response to botulinum toxin injection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael P Cannito

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Michael P Cannito, Joel C Kahane, Lesya ChornaSchool of Audiology and Speech-Language Pathology, The University of Memphis, Memphis, TN, USAAbstract: Aging of the larynx is characterized by involutional changes which alter its biomechanical and neural properties and create a biological environment that is different from younger counterparts. Illustrative anatomical examples are presented. This natural, non-disease process appears to set conditions which may influence the effectiveness of botulinum toxin injection and our expectations for its success. Adductor spasmodic dysphonia, a type of laryngeal dystonia, is typically treated using botulinum toxin injections of the vocal folds in order to suppress adductory muscle spasms which are disruptive to production of speech and voice. A few studies have suggested diminished response to treatment in older patients with adductor spasmodic dysphonia. This retrospective study provides a reanalysis of existing pre-to-post treatment data as function of age. Perceptual judgments of speech produced by 42 patients with ADSD were made by two panels of professional listeners with expertise in voice or fluency of speech. Results demonstrate a markedly reduced positive response to botulinum toxin treatment in the older patients. Perceptual findings are further elucidated by means of acoustic spectrography. Literature on vocal aging is reviewed to provide a specific set of biological mechanisms that best account for the observed interaction of botulinum toxin treatment with advancing age.Keywords: vocal aging, adductor spasmodic dysphonia, botulinum toxin, voice quality, speech fluency

  19. The innovative therapeutic application of botulinum toxin type A in urology patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chrysoula Belai

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In the history of medical science the use of botulinum toxin was impressive. In the early 18th century it was defined as the neurotoxin implicated in the deadly disease botulism. Today, despite the toxic action finds application in the treatment of various diseases in a wide range of Medicine. Its use in urology was revolutionary in the treatment of neurogenic bladder, refractory idiopathic detrusor overactivity and other painful syndromes. The purpose of this review was to describe the treatment option of intravesical injection of botulinum toxin, in diseases of the urinary tract. The review showed that after many test applications under the experimental studies, the botulinum toxin type A has already established itself as the new treatment of choice after failure of conservative drug dealing in patients with neuro-urological symptoms of lower urinary tract. Cases of application of botulinum toxin in Urology are related to overactive bladder, neurogenic or idiopathic etiology, as bladder pain syndrome and chronic pelvic pain syndrome. According to the guidelines of the European Union directives Urology, the intravesical botulinum toxin injections are the most effective, minimally invasive treatment which results in reducing neurogenic hyperactivity of detrusor. In conclusion, this is a safe, easy and effective method that can be applied by health professionals, helping improve patients’ quality of life with neuro-urological diseases.

  20. Botulinum toxin as a therapeutic agent to prevent relapse in deep bite patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mücke, Thomas; Löffel, Anja; Kanatas, Anastasios; Karnezi, Sandy; Rana, Majeed; Fichter, Andreas; Haarmann, Stephan; Wolff, Klaus-Dietrich; Loeffelbein, Denys John

    2016-05-01

    The etiology of deep bite is multifactorial. One of the causes is increased muscular activity. This makes the treatment of deep bite malocclusions difficult and often results in relapse in many cases. In this work we compared patients with surgical orthognathic treatment only and surgical orthognathic treatment with additional injections of botulinum toxin after mandibular advancement for class II division 2 malocclusion. This is a prospective study. Adult patients were assessed pretreatment (T1), posttreatment (T2), and long-term after 1 year (T3). In total, 32 patients (mean age, 30.7 years; 23 women and 9 men) reached the study end point (T3); 24 patients were treated without botulinum toxin and 8 patients received preoperative injections of botulinum toxin. Significant differences between both groups were observed, with a more stable result for the experimental group treated with botulinum toxin. In a selective group of adult patients with a class II division II incisor relationship and with a class II skeletal base, botulinum toxin injections can effectively prevent relapse. This may present an alternative to a conventional myotomy. Copyright © 2016 European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Unilateral transient mydriasis and ptosis after botulinum toxin injection for a cosmetic procedure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akkaya S

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Sezen Akkaya,1 Hatice Kübra Kökcen,1 Tuğba Atakan2 1Fatih Sultan Mehmet Education and Training Hospital, Ophthalmology Clinics, Bostanci, Istanbul, 2Aksaray Hospital, Ophthalmology Clinics, Konya, Turkey Abstract: We report a case of unilateral transient mydriasis and ptosis after botulinum toxin injection applied by a medical doctor for a cosmetic procedure. A 36-year-old nurse was referred to our eye clinic with unilateral mydriasis and ptosis in the right eye 3 days after botulinum toxin injection for a cosmetic procedure. Botulinum toxin was applied to her eye by a doctor at her hospital who was not an ophthalmologist. She was treated with topical apraclonidine 0.5% ophthalmic solution. Her ptosis decreased to 2 mm with apraclonidine and her visual axis improved. Mydriasis was present for 3 weeks and then disappeared. Mild ptosis continued for 3 months, then resolved completely. Patients seeking treatment with botulinum toxin A for cosmetic purposes should be warned about the possibility of ptosis and mydriasis after injection. If these side effects are seen, the patient must be referred to an ophthalmologist for appropriate management. Keywords: botulinum toxin, mydriasis, ptosis

  2. Usefulness of intra-articular botulinum toxin injections. A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khenioui, Hichem; Houvenagel, Eric; Catanzariti, Jean François; Guyot, Marc Alexandre; Agnani, Olivier; Donze, Cécile

    2016-03-01

    Botulinum toxin is a proven and widely used treatment for numerous conditions characterized by excessive muscular contractions. Recent studies have assessed the analgesic effect of botulinum toxin in joint pain and started to unravel its mechanisms. We searched the international literature via the Medline database using the term "intraarticular botulinum toxin injection" combined with any of the following terms: "knee", "ankle", "shoulder", "osteoarthritis", "adhesive capsulitis of the shoulder". Of 16 selected articles about intraarticular botulinum toxin injections, 7 were randomized controlled trials done in patients with osteoarthritis, adhesive capsulitis of the shoulder, or chronic pain after joint replacement surgery. Proof of anti-nociceptive effects was obtained in some of these indications and the safety and tolerance profile was satisfactory. The studies are heterogeneous. The comparator was usually a glucocorticoid or a placebo; a single study used hyaluronic acid. Pain intensity was the primary outcome measure. The number of randomized trials and sample sizes are too small to provide a satisfactory level of scientific evidence or statistical power. Unanswered issues include the effective dosage and the optimal dilution and injection modalities of botulinum toxin. Copyright © 2015 Société française de rhumatologie. Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. Efficacy of Botulinum Toxin Injections in the Treatment of Various Types of Facial Region Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arzu Çoban

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Local injection of botulinum toxin is a highly effective treatment option for a wide range of movement disorders and there are reliable sources of information on its indications, effects and safety in clinical practice. In this study, we report our experience with botulinum toxin in the treatment of facial region disorders. METHODS: Patients who had been followed in the Botulinum Toxin Outpatient Clinic of the Neurology Department were retrospectively evaluated. Two preparations of botulinum toxin type A (BT-A were used. The efficacy of BT-A injections was rated according to the improvement in symptoms as follows: marked - 75-100% improvement, good - 50-74%, moderate - 25-49%, and insufficient - less than 25% symptom relief. RESULTS: One hundred eighty-two patients (73 male, 109 female with various facial region disorders were included. The efficacy rates for patients who had very good and good improvement were high in the treatment of blepharospasm, hemifacial spasm, facial synkinesis, and Meige syndrome and moderate for oromandibular dystonia and hypersalivation. Ptosis was the most common side effect. CONCLUSION: According to our results, botulinum toxin was very effective treatment for blepharospasm, Meige syndrome, hemifacial spasm and facial synkinesis, whereas it demonstrated good efficacy in oromandibular dystonia and hypersalivation

  4. Comparative study of biological activity of four botulinum toxin type A preparations in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Myung Eun; Song, Dae Heon; Park, Joo Hyun

    2013-01-01

    Units of available botulinum toxin preparations are not interchangeable, and the dose-conversion ratios between such preparations remain controversial. To compare the efficacy and safety of four botulinum toxin type A preparations. Murine gastrocnemius compound muscle action potentials (CMAPs) were recorded before and after injecting the four botulinum toxin preparations (onabotulinumtoxinA, abobotulinumtoxinA, new botulinum toxin, and incobotulinumtoxinA). In all preparations, CMAP amplitudes decreased until 4 days after receiving the injection and then gradually recovered. On postinjection day 84, the amplitudes returned to baseline in all groups except the high-dose groups. CMAP amplitude in the contralateral limb also decreased up to postinjection days 4 to 7 and then gradually returned to baseline by postinjection day 28. The dose-conversion ratio between onabotulinumtoxinA and abobotulinumtoxinA was determined to be 1:2.6; previous reports of 1:3 were considered too high. A dose-conversion ratio between onabotulinumtoxinA and new botulinum toxin of 1:1 was deemed appropriate. OnabotulinumtoxinA and incobotulinumtoxinA demonstrated a dose-conversion ratio of 1:1.07. The efficacy of incobotulinumtoxinA was slightly lower than that of onabotulinumtoxinA. These dose-conversion ratios are applicable solely from an efficacy standpoint and not for safety. This study was conducted in mice, so it may not translate perfectly to human applications. © 2012 by the American Society for Dermatologic Surgery, Inc. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Promoters and proteins from Clostridium thermocellum and uses thereof

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, J. H. David; Newcomb, Michael

    2012-11-13

    The present invention relates to an inducible and a high expression nucleic acid promoter isolated from Clostridium thermocellum. These promoters are useful for directing expression of a protein or polypeptide encoded by a nucleic acid molecule operably associated with the nucleic acid promoters. The present invention also relates to nucleic acid constructs including the C. thermocellum promoters, and expression vectors and hosts containing such nucleic acid constructs. The present invention also relates to protein isolated from Clostridium thermocellum, including a repressor protein. The present invention also provides methods of using the isolated promoters and proteins from Clostridium thermocellum, including methods for directing inducible in vitro and in vivo expression of a protein or polypeptide in a host, and methods of producing ethanol from a cellulosic biomass.

  6. Site directed recombination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurka, Jerzy W.

    1997-01-01

    Enhanced homologous recombination is obtained by employing a consensus sequence which has been found to be associated with integration of repeat sequences, such as Alu and ID. The consensus sequence or sequence having a single transition mutation determines one site of a double break which allows for high efficiency of integration at the site. By introducing single or double stranded DNA having the consensus sequence flanking region joined to a sequence of interest, one can reproducibly direct integration of the sequence of interest at one or a limited number of sites. In this way, specific sites can be identified and homologous recombination achieved at the site by employing a second flanking sequence associated with a sequence proximal to the 3'-nick.

  7. Nonradiative recombination in semiconductors

    CERN Document Server

    Abakumov, VN; Yassievich, IN

    1991-01-01

    In recent years, great progress has been made in the understandingof recombination processes controlling the number of excessfree carriers in semiconductors under nonequilibrium conditions. As a result, it is now possible to give a comprehensivetheoretical description of these processes. The authors haveselected a number of experimental results which elucidate theunderlying physical problems and enable a test of theoreticalmodels. The following topics are dealt with: phenomenological theory ofrecombination, theoretical models of shallow and deep localizedstates, cascade model of carrier captu

  8. Llama Single Domain Antibodies Specific for the 7 Botulinum Neurotoxin Serotypes as Heptaplex Immunoreagents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collazo, M. Thelma; Garza, John A.; Hayhurst, Andrew

    2010-01-01

    Background There are currently 7 known serotypes of botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT) classified upon non-cross reactivity of neutralizing immunoglobulins. Non-neutralizing immunoglobulins, however, can exhibit cross-reactivities between 2 or more serotypes, particularly mosaic forms, which can hamper the development of highly specific immunoassays, especially if based on polyclonal antisera. Here we employ facile recombinant antibody technology to subtractively select ligands to each of the 7 BoNT serotypes, resulting in populations with very high specificity for their intended serotype. Methods and Findings A single llama was immunized with a cocktail of 7 BoNT toxoids to generate a phage display library of single domain antibodies (sdAb, VHH or nanobodies) which were selected on live toxins. Resulting sdAb were capable of detecting both toxin and toxin complex with the best combinations able to detect 100s-10s of pg per 50 µL sample in a liquid bead array. The most sensitive sdAb were combined in a heptaplex assay to identify each of the BoNT serotypes in buffer and milk and to a lesser extent in carrot juice, orange juice and cola. Several anti-A(1) sdAb recognized A2 complex, showing that subtype cross-reactivity within a serotype was evident. Many of our sdAb could act as both captor and tracer for several toxin and toxin complexes suggesting sdAb can be used as architectural probes to indicate BoNT oligomerisation. Six of 14 anti-A clones exhibited inhibition of SNAP-25 cleavage in the neuro-2A assay indicating some sdAb had toxin neutralizing capabilities. Many sdAb were also shown to be refoldable after exposure to high temperatures in contrast to polyclonal antisera, as monitored by circular dichroism. Conclusions Our panel of molecularly flexible antibodies should not only serve as a good starting point for ruggedizing assays and inhibitors, but enable the intricate architectures of BoNT toxins and complexes to be probed more extensively. PMID:20098614

  9. Botulinum neurotoxins A and E undergo retrograde axonal transport in primary motor neurons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Restani

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The striking differences between the clinical symptoms of tetanus and botulism have been ascribed to the different fate of the parental neurotoxins once internalised in motor neurons. Tetanus toxin (TeNT is known to undergo transcytosis into inhibitory interneurons and block the release of inhibitory neurotransmitters in the spinal cord, causing a spastic paralysis. In contrast, botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs block acetylcholine release at the neuromuscular junction, therefore inducing a flaccid paralysis. Whilst overt experimental evidence supports the sorting of TeNT to the axonal retrograde transport pathway, recent findings challenge the established view that BoNT trafficking is restricted to the neuromuscular junction by highlighting central effects caused by these neurotoxins. These results suggest a more complex scenario whereby BoNTs also engage long-range trafficking mechanisms. However, the intracellular pathways underlying this process remain unclear. We sought to fill this gap by using primary motor neurons either in mass culture or differentiated in microfluidic devices to directly monitor the endocytosis and axonal transport of full length BoNT/A and BoNT/E and their recombinant binding fragments. We show that BoNT/A and BoNT/E are internalised by spinal cord motor neurons and undergo fast axonal retrograde transport. BoNT/A and BoNT/E are internalised in non-acidic axonal carriers that partially overlap with those containing TeNT, following a process that is largely independent of stimulated synaptic vesicle endo-exocytosis. Following intramuscular injection in vivo, BoNT/A and TeNT displayed central effects with a similar time course. Central actions paralleled the peripheral spastic paralysis for TeNT, but lagged behind the onset of flaccid paralysis for BoNT/A. These results suggest that the fast axonal retrograde transport compartment is composed of multifunctional trafficking organelles orchestrating the simultaneous transfer

  10. Recombination epoch revisited

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krolik, J.H.

    1989-01-01

    Previous studies of cosmological recombination have shown that this process produces as a by-product a highly superthermal population of Ly-alpha photons which retard completion of recombination. Cosmological redshifting was thought to determine the frequency distribution of the photons, while two-photon decay of hydrogen's 2s state was thought to control their numbers. It is shown here that frequency diffusion due to photon scattering dominate the cosmological redshift in the frequency range near line center which fixes the ratio of ground state to excited state population, while incoherent scattering into the far-red damping wing effectively destroys Ly-alpha photons as a rate which is competitive with two-photon decay. The former effect tends to hold back recombination, while the latter tends to accelerate it; the net results depends on cosmological parameters, particularly the combination Omega(b) h/sq rt (2q0), where Omega(b) is the fraction of the critical density provided by baryons. 18 references

  11. Dielectronic recombination theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LaGattuta, K.J.

    1991-01-01

    A theory now in wide use for the calculation of dielectronic recombination cross sections (σ DR ) and rate coefficients (α DR ) was one introduced originally by Feshbach for nuclear physics applications, and then later adapted for atomic scattering problems by Hahn. In the following, we briefly review this theory in a very general form, which allows one to account for the effects of overlapping and interacting resonances, as well as continuum-continuum coupling. An extension of our notation will then also allow for the inclusion of the effects of direct radiative recombination, along with a treatment of the interference between radiative and dielectronic recombination. Other approaches to the calculation of σ DR have been described by Fano and by Seaton. We will not consider those theories here. Calculations of α DR have progressed considerably over the last 25 years, since the early work of Burgess. Advances in the reliability of theoretical predictions have also been promoted recently b a variety of direct laboratory measurements of σ DR . While the measurements of σ DR for δn ≠ 0 excitations have tended to agree very well with calculations, the case of δn = 0 has been much problematic. However, by invoking a mechanism originally proposed by Jacobs, which takes into account the effect of stray electric fields on high Rydberg states (HRS) participating in the DR process, new calculations have improved the agreement between theory and experiment for these cases. Nevertheless, certain discrepancies still remain

  12. Botulinum toxin for treating muscular temporomandibular disorders: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Machado

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: This study, through a systematic literature review, aims to analyze the effectiveness of Botulinum Toxin as a treatment for masticatory myofascial pain and muscles temporomandibular disorders (TMD. METHODS: Survey in research bases: MEDLINE, Cochrane, EMBASE, Pubmed, Lilacs and BBO, between the years of 1966 and April 2011, with focus in randomized or quasi-randomized controlled clinical trials, blind or double-blind. RESULTS: After applying the inclusion criteria, 4 articles comprised the final sample: 3 were double-blind randomized controlled clinical trials and 1 was single-blind randomized controlled clinical trial. CONCLUSIONS: According to the literature, there is lack of evidence about the real effectiveness of botulinum toxin in the treatment of masticatory myofascial pain and muscular TMD. Thus, further randomized controlled clinical trials, with representative samples and longer follow-up time, to assess the real effectiveness of the technique are needed.OBJETIVO: este trabalho, por meio de uma revisão sistemática da literatura, teve como objetivo analisar a efetividade da toxina botulínica como tratamento para dor miofascial mastigatória e disfunções temporomandibulares (DTM musculares. MÉTODOS: pesquisa nas bases de dados Medline, Cochrane, Embase, Pubmed, Lilacs e BBO, no período entre 1966 e abril de 2011, com enfoque em estudos clínicos controlados randomizados ou quase-randomizados, cegos ou duplo-cegos. RESULTADOS: após a aplicação dos critérios de inclusão, chegou-se a 4 artigos, sendo que 3 eram estudos clínicos controlados randomizados duplo-cego e 1 era estudo clínico controlado randomizado simples-cego. CONCLUSÕES: pela análise da literatura, verificou-se um número reduzido de evidências significativas sobre a real efetividade da toxina botulínica no tratamento da dor miofascial e de DTM musculares. Assim, são necessários novos estudos clínicos controlados randomizados, com amostras

  13. Botulinum toxin injections for low-back pain and sciatica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waseem, Zeeshan; Boulias, Chris; Gordon, Allan; Ismail, Farooq; Sheean, Geoffrey; Furlan, Andrea D

    2011-01-19

    Adequate relief from low-back pain (LBP) is not always possible. Emerging evidence suggests a role for botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT) injections in treating pain disorders. Proponents of BoNT suggest its properties can decrease muscle spasms, ischemia and inflammatory markers, thereby reducing pain. To determine the effects of botulinum toxin injections in adults with LBP. We searched CENTRAL (The Cochrane Library 2009, issue 3) and MEDLINE, EMBASE, and CINAHL to August 2009; screened references from included studies; consulted with content experts and Allergan. We included published and unpublished randomised controlled trials without language restrictions We included randomised trials that evaluated BoNT serotypes versus other treatments in patients with non-specific LBP of any duration. Two review authors selected the studies, assessed the risk of bias using the Cochrane Back Review Group criteria, and extracted the data using standardized forms. We performed a qualitative analysis due to lack of data. We excluded evidence from nineteen studies due to non-randomisation, incomplete or unpublished data. We included three randomised trials (N =123 patients). Only one study included patients with chronic non-specific LBP; the other two examined unique subpopulations. Only one of the three trials had a low risk of bias and demonstrated that BoNT injections reduced pain at three and eight weeks and improved function at eight weeks better than saline injections. The second trial showed that BoNT injections were better than injections of corticosteroid plus lidocaine or placebo in patients with sciatica attributed to piriformis syndrome. The third trial concluded that BoNT injections were better than traditional acupuncture in patients with third lumbar transverse process syndrome. Both studies with high risk of bias had several key limitations. Heterogeneity of the studies prevented meta-analysis. There is low quality evidence that BoNT injections improved pain, function

  14. The Rise and Fall of Metronidazole for Clostridium difficile Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chahine, Elias B

    2018-06-01

    Clostridium difficile is posing urgent health threats. Older studies have shown that metronidazole and vancomycin are equally effective in the treatment of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI). Given its inexpensive cost and low propensity to select antimicrobial resistant organisms, metronidazole became rapidly the drug of choice despite its pharmacokinetic limitations in the treatment of CDI. However, newer studies demonstrated that metronidazole is inferior to vancomycin, prompting clinicians to change their long-standing position on using metronidazole for mild to moderate infections and on reserving vancomycin for severe infections. Moving forward, metronidazole will fall out of favor in the treatment of CDI.

  15. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray characterization of the catalytic domain of collagenase G from Clostridium histolyticum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eckhard, Ulrich; Nüss, Dorota; Ducka, Paulina; Schönauer, Esther; Brandstetter, Hans

    2008-01-01

    The catalytic domain of collagenase G from C. histolyticum was expressed in E. coli BL21 (DE3) and purified using affinity and size-exclusion column-chromatographic methods. Crystals were obtained at 290 K by the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion method and diffraction data have been collected to 2.75 Å resolution. The catalytic domain of collagenase G from Clostridium histolyticum has been cloned, recombinantly expressed in Escherichia coli and purified using affinity and size-exclusion column-chromatographic methods. Crystals of the catalytic domain were obtained from 0.12 M sodium citrate and 23%(v/v) PEG 3350 at 293 K. The crystals diffracted to 2.75 Å resolution using synchrotron radiation. The crystals belong to an orthorhombic space group, with unit-cell parameters a = 57, b = 109, c = 181 Å. This unit cell is consistent with the presence of one molecule per asymmetric unit and a solvent content of approximately 53%

  16. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray characterization of the catalytic domain of collagenase G from Clostridium histolyticum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eckhard, Ulrich, E-mail: ulrich.eckhard@sbg.ac.at; Nüss, Dorota; Ducka, Paulina; Schönauer, Esther; Brandstetter, Hans [Structural Biology Group, Department of Molecular Biology, University of Salzburg, 5020 Salzburg (Austria)

    2008-05-01

    The catalytic domain of collagenase G from C. histolyticum was expressed in E. coli BL21 (DE3) and purified using affinity and size-exclusion column-chromatographic methods. Crystals were obtained at 290 K by the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion method and diffraction data have been collected to 2.75 Å resolution. The catalytic domain of collagenase G from Clostridium histolyticum has been cloned, recombinantly expressed in Escherichia coli and purified using affinity and size-exclusion column-chromatographic methods. Crystals of the catalytic domain were obtained from 0.12 M sodium citrate and 23%(v/v) PEG 3350 at 293 K. The crystals diffracted to 2.75 Å resolution using synchrotron radiation. The crystals belong to an orthorhombic space group, with unit-cell parameters a = 57, b = 109, c = 181 Å. This unit cell is consistent with the presence of one molecule per asymmetric unit and a solvent content of approximately 53%.

  17. Use of botulinum A toxin for proctalgia fugax—a case report of successful treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grigoriou, Marios; Ioannidis, Aristeidis; Efthimiadis, Christoforos

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Proctalgia fugax is considered as intermittent anal pain of unknown etiology; a variety of treatments have been used, without, however, permanent results. Injection of botulinum A toxin is recently suggested as an alternative option. We present the case of a woman presenting proctalgia fugax that was untreatable through other current forms of treatment. After two administrations of botulinum A toxin, 80 units and 100 units each, the patient remained asymptomatic on 8-month follow-up control. Botulinum A toxin injection can reduce internal anal sphincter pressure, leading to relief of symptoms, and seems a promising option with minimal morbidity in cases on proctalgia fugax that does not respond to other current treatments. PMID:29218214

  18. Effects of X-irradiation on axonal sprouting induced by botulinum toxin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomez, S; Duchen, L W [National Hospital, London (UK); Hornsey, S [Hammersmith Hospital, London (UK). M.R.C. Cyclotron Unit

    1982-01-01

    The effect of X-irradiation on axonal sprouting of motor nerves induced by botulinum toxin was examined. Muscles of one leg in the mouse were X-irradiated (15Gy) prior to the injection of a locally paralysing dose of botulinum toxin. It was found that axonal sprouting occurred as expected, but the sprouts remained unmyelinated and many degenerated. Fewer new end-plates were formed, muscles remained more severely atrophied and supersensitive to acetylcholine and recovery of neuromuscular transmission was greatly delayed when compared with the effects of botulinum toxin alone. X-irradiation did not prevent sprouting but, probably by impairing Schwann cell proliferation, altered axon-Schwann cell relationships and prevented the maturation of newly-formed axons and the differentiation of new end-plates.

  19. Botulinum toxin in the management of sialorrhoea in acquired brain injury

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Carroll, A

    2016-06-01

    Sialorrhoea as a consequence of severe acquired brain injury can significantly negatively impact on quality of life. Medications used in its management have many side effects which can cause problems in the severely disabled. Botulinum toxin is an effective treatment of sialorrhoea in a number of neurological conditions but may also have a role to play in the management of sialorrhoea following severe ABI. We report on 4 cases of sialorrhoea following acquired brain injury causing a variety of problems, whose parotid glands were injected with Botulinum toxin type A (Dysport) 50mu each, under ultrasound guidance. All cases had a clinically and statistically significant reduction in drooling as measured by the teacher drooling scale (p=0.005) and carers Visual Analogue Scale (p=0.012). There were no side effects reported. Botulinum toxin is an effective treatment for sialorrhoea associated with acquired brain injury.

  20. Botulinum toxin type A in children and adolescents with severe cerebral palsy: a retrospective chart review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesterman, Ronit; Gorter, Jan Willem; Harvey, Adrienne; Lockhart, Julia; McEwen-Hill, Jenny; Margallo, Karen; Goldie, Nancy

    2014-02-01

    This retrospective cohort study reviewed set goals and their outcomes of children and adolescents with severe cerebral palsy who received botulinum toxin A in 2008 and 2009. Sixty children (36 male, mean age 9 years) were included. They received on average 4 (range 1-7) treatments, with the dosage varying between 20 and 400 units per treatment (3-21 U/kg/body weight). Mild transient side effects were reported in 12 of 242 treatments with botulinum toxin A. Treatment goals were related to lower limb function (82%), range of motion (68%), positioning (33%), upper limb function (33%), and facilitating ease of care in dressing (30%), toileting, and diapering (22%). The treatment goals were reached in 60% to 85% by report of the parent and child dyad. Our findings suggest that botulinum toxin A should be considered as a treatment option in patients with cerebral palsy within Gross Motor Function Classification System levels IV and V.

  1. Characterization of Clostridium Baratii Type F Strains Responsible for an Outbreak of Botulism Linked to Beef Meat Consumption in France.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazuet, Christelle; Legeay, Christine; Sautereau, Jean; Bouchier, Christiane; Criscuolo, Alexis; Bouvet, Philippe; Trehard, Hélène; Jourdan Da Silva, Nathalie; Popoff, Michel

    2017-02-01

    A second botulism outbreak due to Clostridium baratii occurred in France in August 2015 and included three patients who had their meal in a restaurant the same day. We report the characterization of C. baratii isolates including whole genome sequencing (WGS). Four C. baratii isolates collected in August 2015 from the outbreak 2 were analysed for toxin production and typing as well as for genetic characterization. WGS was done using using the NEBNext Ultra DNA Library Prep kit for Illumina (New England Biolabs) and sequenced on MiSeq machine (Illumina) in paired-end reads of 250 bases. The phylogenetic tree was generated based on the UPGMA method with genetic distances computed by using the Kimura two-parameter model. Evolutionary analyses were conducted in Bionumerics (V.6.6 Applied Maths). Three C. baratii isolates for patient's stools and one isolate from meat produced botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT) type F and retained a bont/F7 gene in OrfX cluster. All isolates were identical according to the WGS. However, phylogeny of the core genome showed that the four C. baratii strains were distantly related to that of the previous C. baratii outbreak in France in 2014 and from the other C. baratii strains reported in databanks. The fact that the strains isolated from the patients and meat samples were genetically identical supports that the meat used for the Bolognese sauce was responsible for this second botulism outbreak in France. These isolates were unrelated to that from the first C. baratii outbreak in France in 2014 indicating a distinct source of contamination. WGS provided robust determination of genetic relatedness and information regarding BoNT typing and toxin gene locus genomic localization.

  2. Increased levels of SV2A botulinum neurotoxin receptor in clinical sensory disorders and functional effects of botulinum toxins A and E in cultured human sensory neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yiangou Y

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Yiangos Yiangou1 Uma Anand1,2, William R. Otto2, Marco Sinisi3, Michael Fox3, Rolfe Birch3 Keith A. Foster4, Gaurav Mukerji1,5, Ayesha Akbar1,6, Sanjiv K. Agarwal5, Praveen Anand11Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Imperial College London, Hammersmith Hospital, London; 2Histopathology Laboratory, Cancer Research UK, London Research Institute, London; 3Peripheral Nerve Injury Unit, Royal National Orthopaedic Hospital, Stanmore; 4Syntaxin Ltd, Oxford; 5Department of Urology; 6Department of Gastroenterology, Imperial College London, Hammersmith Hospital, London, United Kingdom Background: There is increasing evidence that botulinum neurotoxin A may affect sensory nociceptor fibers, but the expression of its receptors in clinical pain states, and its effects in human sensory neurons, are largely unknown.Methods: We studied synaptic vesicle protein subtype SV2A, a receptor for botulinum neurotoxin A, by immunostaining in a range of clinical tissues, including human dorsal root ganglion sensory neurons, peripheral nerves, the urinary bladder, and the colon. We also determined the effects of botulinum neurotoxins A and E on localization of the capsaicin receptor, TRPV1, and functional sensitivity to capsaicin stimuli in cultured human dorsal root ganglion neurons.Results: Image analysis showed that SV2A immunoreactive nerve fibers were increased in injured nerves proximal to the injury (P = 0.002, and in painful neuromas (P = 0.0027; the ratio of percentage area SV2A to neurofilaments (a structural marker was increased proximal to injury (P = 0.0022 and in neuromas (P = 0.0001, indicating increased SV2A levels in injured nerve fibers. In the urinary bladder, SV2A nerve fibers were found in detrusor muscle and associated with blood vessels, with a significant increase in idiopathic detrusor overactivity (P = 0.002 and painful bladder syndrome (P = 0.0087. Colon biopsies showed numerous SV2A-positive nerve fibers, which were increased in quiescent

  3. The Efficacy of Botulinum Toxin A Intramuscular Injections in After-Stroke Spasticity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melek Karaçam

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Spasticity is a common dysfunction in stroke patients. It hinders the performance of everyday living activities and lowers the quality of life. In this study, it was aimed to investigate the effects of botulinum toxin A therapy on various aspects, such as muscle tone, pain, daily living activities and disability. METHODS: Fifteen patients with stroke presenting with focal spasticity in the botulinum toxin outpatient unit were evaluated. Results before and after treatment were evaluated by applying different scales. Modified Ashworth Scale was applied for the severity of spasticity. The Medical Council Research Scale was used to test muscle power, and the disability scoring scale, Visual Analogue Pain Scale and Barthel index were the other measures tested. RESULTS: It was found that therapy with botulinum toxin A was effective in spasticity. The increased muscle tone and the disability scores decreased prominently after the treatment (p< 0.05. Lower values in pain scores (p< 0.05 also contributed to better functional outcome (p< 0.01. Along with the significantly good outcome according to the scales, the higher scores in quality of life, feeling of well-being, good performance during the physiotherapy sessions, and less medications needed for spasticity were also indications in commencing the therapy of botulinum toxin A in spasticity. CONCLUSION: Spasticity is a complicated condition causing serious disability. Botulinum toxin A is a preferred therapy when there is an increased motor activity. The effects of the agent are reversible and reliable. The duration of the treatment is long-lasting. Since botulinum toxin A is easily applied and the outcome in focal spasticity is favorable, it is recommended as the first-line choice in the treatment of focal spasticity

  4. Pleiotropic roles of Clostridium difficile sin locus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ou, Junjun; Dupuy, Bruno

    2018-01-01

    Clostridium difficile is the primary cause of nosocomial diarrhea and pseudomembranous colitis. It produces dormant spores, which serve as an infectious vehicle responsible for transmission of the disease and persistence of the organism in the environment. In Bacillus subtilis, the sin locus coding SinR (113 aa) and SinI (57 aa) is responsible for sporulation inhibition. In B. subtilis, SinR mainly acts as a repressor of its target genes to control sporulation, biofilm formation, and autolysis. SinI is an inhibitor of SinR, so their interaction determines whether SinR can inhibit its target gene expression. The C. difficile genome carries two sinR homologs in the operon that we named sinR and sinR’, coding for SinR (112 aa) and SinR’ (105 aa), respectively. In this study, we constructed and characterized sin locus mutants in two different C. difficile strains R20291 and JIR8094, to decipher the locus’s role in C. difficile physiology. Transcriptome analysis of the sinRR’ mutants revealed their pleiotropic roles in controlling several pathways including sporulation, toxin production, and motility in C. difficile. Through various genetic and biochemical experiments, we have shown that SinR can regulate transcription of key regulators in these pathways, which includes sigD, spo0A, and codY. We have found that SinR’ acts as an antagonist to SinR by blocking its repressor activity. Using a hamster model, we have also demonstrated that the sin locus is needed for successful C. difficile infection. This study reveals the sin locus as a central link that connects the gene regulatory networks of sporulation, toxin production, and motility; three key pathways that are important for C. difficile pathogenesis. PMID:29529083

  5. CRISPR Diversity and Microevolution in Clostridium difficile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Joakim M; Shoup, Madelyn; Robinson, Cathy; Britton, Robert; Olsen, Katharina E P; Barrangou, Rodolphe

    2016-09-19

    Virulent strains of Clostridium difficile have become a global health problem associated with morbidity and mortality. Traditional typing methods do not provide ideal resolution to track outbreak strains, ascertain genetic diversity between isolates, or monitor the phylogeny of this species on a global basis. Here, we investigate the occurrence and diversity of clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) and CRISPR-associated genes (cas) in C. difficile to assess the potential of CRISPR-based phylogeny and high-resolution genotyping. A single Type-IB CRISPR-Cas system was identified in 217 analyzed genomes with cas gene clusters present at conserved chromosomal locations, suggesting vertical evolution of the system, assessing a total of 1,865 CRISPR arrays. The CRISPR arrays, markedly enriched (8.5 arrays/genome) compared with other species, occur both at conserved and variable locations across strains, and thus provide a basis for typing based on locus occurrence and spacer polymorphism. Clustering of strains by array composition correlated with sequence type (ST) analysis. Spacer content and polymorphism within conserved CRISPR arrays revealed phylogenetic relationship across clades and within ST. Spacer polymorphisms of conserved arrays were instrumental for differentiating closely related strains, e.g., ST1/RT027/B1 strains and pathogenicity locus encoding ST3/RT001 strains. CRISPR spacers showed sequence similarity to phage sequences, which is consistent with the native role of CRISPR-Cas as adaptive immune systems in bacteria. Overall, CRISPR-Cas sequences constitute a valuable basis for genotyping of C. difficile isolates, provide insights into the micro-evolutionary events that occur between closely related strains, and reflect the evolutionary trajectory of these genomes. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  6. CRISPR Diversity and Microevolution in Clostridium difficile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Joakim M.; Shoup, Madelyn; Robinson, Cathy; Britton, Robert; Olsen, Katharina E.P.; Barrangou, Rodolphe

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Virulent strains of Clostridium difficile have become a global health problem associated with morbidity and mortality. Traditional typing methods do not provide ideal resolution to track outbreak strains, ascertain genetic diversity between isolates, or monitor the phylogeny of this species on a global basis. Here, we investigate the occurrence and diversity of clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) and CRISPR-associated genes (cas) in C. difficile to assess the potential of CRISPR-based phylogeny and high-resolution genotyping. A single Type-IB CRISPR-Cas system was identified in 217 analyzed genomes with cas gene clusters present at conserved chromosomal locations, suggesting vertical evolution of the system, assessing a total of 1,865 CRISPR arrays. The CRISPR arrays, markedly enriched (8.5 arrays/genome) compared with other species, occur both at conserved and variable locations across strains, and thus provide a basis for typing based on locus occurrence and spacer polymorphism. Clustering of strains by array composition correlated with sequence type (ST) analysis. Spacer content and polymorphism within conserved CRISPR arrays revealed phylogenetic relationship across clades and within ST. Spacer polymorphisms of conserved arrays were instrumental for differentiating closely related strains, e.g., ST1/RT027/B1 strains and pathogenicity locus encoding ST3/RT001 strains. CRISPR spacers showed sequence similarity to phage sequences, which is consistent with the native role of CRISPR-Cas as adaptive immune systems in bacteria. Overall, CRISPR-Cas sequences constitute a valuable basis for genotyping of C. difficile isolates, provide insights into the micro-evolutionary events that occur between closely related strains, and reflect the evolutionary trajectory of these genomes. PMID:27576538

  7. Effect of a probiotic on prevention of diarrhea and Clostridium difficile and Clostridium perfringens shedding in foals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schoster, Angelika; Staempfli, H R; Abrahams, M

    2015-01-01

    of incidence and duration of diarrhea and fecal shedding of Clostridium perfringens and Clostridium difficile between treatment and age groups. RESULTS: The overall incidence of diarrhea was 41 of 72 (59%) and did not differ (P = 0.37) between treatment groups. Foals treated with probiotics were more likely...... of C. perfringens shedding was 55% with no difference between treatment groups (P = 0.23). The prevalence of C. difficile shedding was 11%. CONCLUSION AND CLINICAL IMPORTANCE: There was no benefit of administering a 3-week course of probiotics, but potential adverse effects were noted. Whether...

  8. Botulinum toxin in the management of facial paralysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabin, Jonathan A; Massry, Guy G; Azizzadeh, Babak

    2015-08-01

    Complete flaccid facial paralysis, as well as the synkinetic and hyperkinetic sequelae of partial recovery, has significant impact on quality of life. Patients suffer from functional deficiencies, cosmetic deformity, discomfort and social consequences leading to emotional distress. Despite an extensive and sophisticated array of available interventions for facial reanimation, most patients have persistent issues that require consistent follow-up. In long-term management, botulinum toxin (BT) injection remains a critical tool in the treatment of the facial paralysis patient, particularly in the case of synkinesis, hyperkinesis and imbalance. We review the recent scientific literature and highlight key principles and developments in the use of BT in the management of facial paralysis, including less common applications for acute facial paralysis, hyperlacrimation and pseudoptosis. We reviewed the literature for the latest advances in the use of BT in facial paralysis, including applications and technique, as well as measurement tools and adjunct exercises. We also share our experience in treating our own patient population. BT continues to be a well tolerated and effective tool in the long-term management of facial paralysis, specifically in treating synkinesis, imbalance and hyperkinesis, as well as hyperlacrimation and pseudoptosis. Consistent measurement tools and adjunct neuromuscular retraining are crucial in the successful deployment of BT. Controversy exists as to whether BT should be used to manage facial paralysis during the acute phase, and whether BT application to the nonparalyzed face can improve long-term recovery in the paralyzed side.

  9. Botulinum toxin a can positively impact first impression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dayan, Steven H; Lieberman, Elliot D; Thakkar, Nirav N; Larimer, Karen A; Anstead, Amy

    2008-06-01

    BACKGROUND First impression is influenced by facial appearance and improved by cosmetic surgery. OBJECTIVE We wanted to determine if treatment with botulinum toxin A (BTxnA) would improve first impression. MATERIALS AND METHODS Women received BTxnA in the forehead. Photos were taken prior to, and 1 week after, final BTxnA injection in smiling and relaxed poses. Photos were divided into books with each subject represented only once. Evaluators completed a survey rating first impression on various measures of success for each photo. RESULTS No differences were seen for social skills, financial, or relationship success scales. A significant decrease in first impression scores between treatment photos was seen for academic performance and occupational success. However, analysis of between-subject effects found that "smile/relax" accounted for the decreased score in both scales. Significant increases in first impression scores were seen for dating success, attractiveness, and athletic success scales where smile/relax and BTxnA contributed significantly to the improved scores. CONCLUSIONS BTxnA improved first impression scores for dating success, attractiveness, and athletic success scales. Academic performance and occupational success scores were not affected by BTxnA when the smile/relax variable was included. The smile/relax variable was a more important predictor for academic performance and occupational success scores.

  10. Botulinum toxin alleviates dysphagia of patients with inclusion body myositis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrey, Aleksi; Airas, Laura; Jokela, Manu; Pulkkinen, Jaakko

    2017-09-15

    Oropharyngeal dysphagia is a disabling and undertreated symptom that often occurs in patients with sporadic inclusion body myositis (s-IBM). In this study, we examined the effect of botulinum neurotoxin A (BoNT-A) injections to the cricopharyngeus muscle (CPM) of patients with s-IBM and dysphagia. A single-center retrospective study involving 40 biopsy-proven s-IBM-patients treated in the District of Southwest Finland from 2000 to 2013. The incidence of dysphagia, rate of aspirations, rate of aspiration pneumonias and treatment results of dysphagia were analyzed. Patients treated for dysphagia were evaluated before and after surgery by video-fluoroscopy and/or using a questionnaire. Twenty-five of the 40 s-IBM patients (62.5%) experienced dysphagia. BoNT-A was injected a median of 2 times (range 1-7) in 12 patients with dysphagia. Before the injections 7 patients reported aspiration, none afterwards. The corresponding figures for aspiration pneumonia were 3 and 0. All of these patients had normal swallowing function 12months (median, range 2-60) after the last injection. BoNT-A injections to the CPM alleviate the dysphagia of s-IBM patients reversibly and appear to reduce the rate of aspiration effectively. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Botulinum toxin's axonal transport from periphery to the spinal cord.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matak, Ivica; Riederer, Peter; Lacković, Zdravko

    2012-07-01

    Axonal transport of enzymatically active botulinum toxin A (BTX-A) from periphery to the CNS has been described in facial and trigeminal nerve, leading to cleavage of synaptosomal-associated protein 25 (SNAP-25) in central nuclei. Aim of present study was to examine the existence of axonal transport of peripherally applied BTX-A to spinal cord via sciatic nerve. We employed BTX-A-cleaved SNAP-25 immunohistochemistry of lumbar spinal cord after intramuscular and subcutaneous hind limb injections, and intraneural BTX-A sciatic nerve injections. Truncated SNAP-25 in ipsilateral spinal cord ventral horns and dorsal horns appeared after single peripheral BTX-A administrations, even at low intramuscular dose applied (5 U/kg). Cleaved SNAP-25 appearance in the spinal cord after BTX-A injection into the sciatic nerve was prevented by proximal intrasciatic injection of colchicine (5 mM, 2 μl). Cleaved SNAP-25 in ventral horn, using choline-acetyltransferase (ChAT) double labeling, was localized within cholinergic neurons. These results extend the recent findings on BTX-A retrograde axonal transport in facial and trigeminal nerve. Appearance of truncated SNAP-25 in spinal cord following low-dose peripheral BTX-A suggest that the axonal transport of BTX-A occurs commonly following peripheral application. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Integrated bioassays in microfluidic devices: botulinum toxin assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangru, Shakuntala; Bentz, Bryan L; Davis, Timothy J; Desai, Nitin; Stabile, Paul J; Schmidt, James J; Millard, Charles B; Bavari, Sina; Kodukula, Krishna

    2005-12-01

    A microfluidic assay was developed for screening botulinum neurotoxin serotype A (BoNT-A) by using a fluorescent resonance energy transfer (FRET) assay. Molded silicone microdevices with integral valves, pumps, and reagent reservoirs were designed and fabricated. Electrical and pneumatic control hardware were constructed, and software was written to automate the assay protocol and data acquisition. Detection was accomplished by fluorescence microscopy. The system was validated with a peptide inhibitor, running 2 parallel assays, as a feasibility demonstration. The small footprint of each bioreactor cell (0.5 cm2) and scalable fluidic architecture enabled many parallel assays on a single chip. The chip is programmable to run a dilution series in each lane, generating concentration-response data for multiple inhibitors. The assay results showed good agreement with the corresponding experiments done at a macroscale level. Although the system has been developed for BoNT-A screening, a wide variety of assays can be performed on the microfluidic chip with little or no modification.

  13. Challenges in searching for therapeutics against Botulinum Neurotoxins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirazzini, Marco; Rossetto, Ornella

    2017-05-01

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) are the most potent toxins known. BoNTs are responsible for botulism, a deadly neuroparalytic syndrome caused by the inactivation of neurotransmitter release at peripheral nerve terminals. Thanks to their specificity and potency, BoNTs are both considered potential bio-weapons and therapeutics of choice for a variety of medical syndromes. Several variants of BoNTs have been identified with individual biological properties and little antigenic relation. This expands greatly the potential of BoNTs as therapeutics but poses a major safety problem, increasing the need for finding appropriate antidotes. Areas covered: The authors describe the multi-step molecular mechanism through which BoNTs enter nerve terminals and discuss the many levels at which the toxins can be inhibited. They review the outcomes of the different strategies adopted to limit neurotoxicity and counter intoxication. Potential new targets arising from the last discoveries of the mechanism of action and the approaches to promote neuromuscular junction recovery are also discussed. Expert opinion: Current drug discovery efforts have mainly focused on BoNT type A and addressed primarily light chain proteolytic activity. Development of pan-BoNT inhibitors acting independently of BoNT immunological properties and targeting a common step of the intoxication process should be encouraged.

  14. Contralateral botulinum toxin injection to improve facial asymmetry after acute facial paralysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jin

    2013-02-01

    The application of botulinum toxin to the healthy side of the face in patients with long-standing facial paralysis has been shown to be a minimally invasive technique that improves facial symmetry at rest and during facial motion, but our experience using botulinum toxin therapy for facial sequelae prompted the idea that botulinum toxin might be useful in acute cases of facial paralysis, leading to improve facial asymmetry. In cases in which medical or surgical treatment options are limited because of existing medical problems or advanced age, most patients with acute facial palsy are advised to await spontaneous recovery or are informed that no effective intervention exists. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of botulinum toxin treatment for facial asymmetry in 18 patients after acute facial palsy who could not be optimally treated by medical or surgical management because of severe medical or other problems. From 2009 to 2011, nine patients with Bell's palsy, 5 with herpes zoster oticus and 4 with traumatic facial palsy (10 men and 8 women; age range, 22-82 yr; mean, 50.8 yr) participated in this study. Botulinum toxin A (Botox; Allergan Incorporated, Irvine, CA, USA) was injected using a tuberculin syringe with a 27-gauge needle. The amount injected per site varied from 2.5 to 3 U, and the total dose used per patient was 32 to 68 U (mean, 47.5 +/- 8.4 U). After administration of a single dose of botulinum toxin A on the nonparalyzed side of 18 patients with acute facial paralysis, marked relief of facial asymmetry was observed in 8 patients within 1 month of injection. Decreased facial asymmetry and strengthened facial function on the paralyzed side led to an increased HB and SB grade within 6 months after injection. Use of botulinum toxin after acute facial palsy cases is of great value. Such therapy decreases the relative hyperkinesis contralateral to the paralysis, leading to greater symmetric function. Especially in patients with medical

  15. The role of botulinum toxin in vasospastic disorders of the hand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumeister, Michael W

    2015-02-01

    Raynaud phenomenon may be a primary disorder or associated with a variety of other autoimmune processes. Raynaud phenomenon produces digital vasospasm, which can lead to ischemia and ulceration. The treatment of Raynaud phenomenon has been difficult because multiple medical treatments have not provided uniform resolution of symptoms. Many patients have turned to surgery and sympathectomies for the treatment of unrelenting vasospasm. Botulinum toxin has been shown to be an effective alternative to surgery, with a single treatment being capable of resolving pain and healing ulcer. This article reviews the use of botulinum toxin for the treatment of Raynaud phenomenon. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Successful use of botulinum toxin type a in the treatment of refractory postoperative dyspareunia.

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    Park, Amy J; Paraiso, Marie Fidela R

    2009-08-01

    Refractory dyspareunia presents a challenging therapeutic dilemma. A woman with defecatory dysfunction and dyspareunia presented with stage 2 prolapse. She underwent laparoscopic and vaginal pelvic floor reconstruction with excision of endometriosis. The patient experienced increased dyspareunia and de novo vaginismus postoperatively that were refractory to trigger point injections, physical therapy, and medical and surgical management. She underwent botulinum toxin type A injections into her levator ani muscles, which allowed her to have sexual intercourse again after 2 years of apareunia with no recurrence of pain for 12 months. Injecting botulinum toxin into the levator ani muscles shows promise for postoperative patients who develop vaginismus and do not respond to conservative therapy.

  17. Sphincter of Oddi botulinum toxin injection to prevent pancreatic fistula after distal pancreatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hackert, Thilo; Klaiber, Ulla; Hinz, Ulf; Kehayova, Tzveta; Probst, Pascal; Knebel, Phillip; Diener, Markus K; Schneider, Lutz; Strobel, Oliver; Michalski, Christoph W; Ulrich, Alexis; Sauer, Peter; Büchler, Markus W

    2017-05-01

    Postoperative pancreatic fistula represents the most important complication after distal pancreatectomy. The aim of this study was to evaluate the use of a preoperative endoscopic injection of botulinum toxin into the sphincter of Oddi to prevent postoperative pancreatic fistula (German Clinical Trials Register number: DRKS00007885). This was an investigator-initiated, prospective clinical phase I/II trial with an exploratory study design. We included patients who underwent preoperative endoscopic sphincter botulinum toxin injection (100 units of Botox). End points were the feasibility, safety, and postoperative outcomes, including postoperative pancreatic fistula within 30 days after distal pancreatectomy. Botulinum toxin patients were compared with a control collective of patients undergoing distal pancreatectomy without botulinum toxin injection by case-control matching in a 1:1 ratio. Between February 2015 and February 2016, 29 patients were included. All patients underwent successful sphincter of Oddi botulinum toxin injection within a median of 6 (range 0-10) days before operation. One patient had an asymptomatic, self-limiting (48 hours) increase in serum amylase and lipase after injection. Distal pancreatectomy was performed in 24/29 patients; 5 patients were not resectable. Of the patients receiving botulinum toxin, 7 (29%) had increased amylase levels in drainage fluid on postoperative day 3 (the International Study Group of Pancreatic Surgery definition of postoperative pancreatic fistula grade A) without symptoms or need for reintervention. Importantly, no clinically relevant fistulas (International Study Group of Pancreatic Surgery grades B/C) were observed in botulinum toxin patients compared to 33% postoperative pancreatic fistula grade B/C in case-control patients (P botulinum toxin injection is a novel and safe approach to decrease the incidence of clinically relevant postoperative pancreatic fistula after distal pancreatectomy. The results of

  18. Endocardial botulinum toxin injection into ganglionated plexi in order to reduce atrial fibrillation inducibility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    А. Г. Стрельников

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Prior animal studies suggest that botulinum toxin injection into the epicardial fat pads can suppress atrial fibrillation (AF inducibility. The purpose of the present study was to assess the efficacy and safety of endocardial botulinum toxin injection into epicardial fat pads and intramyocardial left atrial ganglionated plexi (GP for preventing AF.Methods. Twenty-four dogs were separated into 3 groups: endocardial approach for botulinum toxin (Xeomin, Germany injection into epicardial fat pads and intramyocardial GPs; endocardial approach for placebo injection (0.9% normal saline; control 1; n = 8 and epicardial approach for botulinum toxin injection (control 2; n = 8.Results. A mean of 6.9±1.7 intramyocardial injections (10 U/0.2 mL at each and 3 injections (50 U/1 mL at each were administered into each site exhibiting a positive vagal response and into each epicardial fat pad in all groups (p>0.05 between groups.The injections of botulinum toxin demonstrated dramatic prolongation of ERP in all PV-atrial junctions. This effect correlated with less pronounced ERP shortening in response to vagal nerve stimulation. Suppression of AF inducibility was observed at 7 days after endocardial botulinum toxin injections. The level of AF inducibility was: at 7 days – 57% (p<0.001 vs placebo; p<0.001 vs baseline; at 14 days – 61% (p<0.001 vs placebo; p<0.001 vs baseline; at 1 month – 38% (p<0.001 vs placebo; p<0.001 vs baseline; at 3 months – 23% (p = 0.003; p = 0.06 vs baseline. There were no differences between botulinum groups (p>0.05 for all. The effect of AF suppression disappeared at 3 months. No procedure-related complications occurred.Conclusion. Botulinum toxin injection into intramyocardial GPs and epicardial fat pads by an endocardial approach is feasible and safe. It provides complete removal of cardiac vagal responses and reliably reduces vulnerability to atrial fibrillation.

  19. Towards new uses of botulinum toxin as a novel therapeutic tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickett, Andy; Perrow, Karen

    2011-01-01

    The uses of botulinum toxin in the fields of neurology, ophthalmology, urology, rehabilitation medicine and aesthetic applications have been revolutionary for the treatment of patients. This non-invasive therapeutic has continually been developed since first discovered in the 1970s as a new approach to what were previously surgical treatments. As these applications develop, so also the molecules are developing into tools with new therapeutic properties in specific clinical areas. This review examines how the botulinum toxin molecule is being adapted to new therapeutic uses and also how new areas of use for the existing molecules are being identified. Prospects for future developments are also considered.

  20. Towards New Uses of Botulinum Toxin as a Novel Therapeutic Tool

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen Perrow

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The uses of botulinum toxin in the fields of neurology, ophthalmology, urology, rehabilitation medicine and aesthetic applications have been revolutionary for the treatment of patients. This non-invasive therapeutic has continually been developed since first discovered in the 1970s as a new approach to what were previously surgical treatments. As these applications develop, so also the molecules are developing into tools with new therapeutic properties in specific clinical areas. This review examines how the botulinum toxin molecule is being adapted to new therapeutic uses and also how new areas of use for the existing molecules are being identified. Prospects for future developments are also considered.