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Sample records for reciprocally innervated circuit

  1. Tremorgenesis: a new conceptual scheme using reciprocally innervated circuit of neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manto Mario

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Neural circuits controlling fast movements are inherently unsteady as a result of their reciprocal innervation. This instability is enhanced by increased membrane excitability. Recent studies indicate that the loss of external inhibition is an important factor in the pathogenesis of several tremor disorders such as essential tremor, cerebellar kinetic tremor or parkinsonian tremor. Shaikh and colleagues propose a new conceptual scheme to analyze tremor disorders. Oscillations are simulated by changing the intrinsic membrane properties of burst neurons. The authors use a model neuron of Hodgkin-Huxley type with added hyperpolarization activated cation current (Ih, low threshold calcium current (It, and GABA/glycine mediated chloride currents. Post-inhibitory rebound is taken into account. The model includes a reciprocally innervated circuit of neurons projecting to pairs of agonist and antagonist muscles. A set of four burst neurons has been simulated: inhibitory agonist, inhibitory antagonist, excitatory agonist, and excitatory antagonist. The model fits well with the known anatomical organization of neural circuits for limb movements in premotor/motor areas, and, interestingly, this model does not require any structural modification in the anatomical organization or connectivity of the constituent neurons. The authors simulate essential tremor when Ih is increased. Membrane excitability is augmented by up-regulating Ih and It. A high level of congruence with the recordings made in patients exhibiting essential tremor is reached. These simulations support the hypothesis that increased membrane excitability in potentially unsteady circuits generate oscillations mimicking tremor disorders encountered in daily practice. This new approach opens new perspectives for both the understanding and the treatment of neurological tremor. It provides the rationale for decreasing membrane excitability by acting on a normal ion channel in a context of

  2. Tremorgenesis: a new conceptual scheme using reciprocally innervated circuit of neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manto, Mario

    2008-11-26

    Neural circuits controlling fast movements are inherently unsteady as a result of their reciprocal innervation. This instability is enhanced by increased membrane excitability. Recent studies indicate that the loss of external inhibition is an important factor in the pathogenesis of several tremor disorders such as essential tremor, cerebellar kinetic tremor or parkinsonian tremor. Shaikh and colleagues propose a new conceptual scheme to analyze tremor disorders. Oscillations are simulated by changing the intrinsic membrane properties of burst neurons. The authors use a model neuron of Hodgkin-Huxley type with added hyperpolarization activated cation current (Ih), low threshold calcium current (It), and GABA/glycine mediated chloride currents. Post-inhibitory rebound is taken into account. The model includes a reciprocally innervated circuit of neurons projecting to pairs of agonist and antagonist muscles. A set of four burst neurons has been simulated: inhibitory agonist, inhibitory antagonist, excitatory agonist, and excitatory antagonist. The model fits well with the known anatomical organization of neural circuits for limb movements in premotor/motor areas, and, interestingly, this model does not require any structural modification in the anatomical organization or connectivity of the constituent neurons. The authors simulate essential tremor when Ih is increased. Membrane excitability is augmented by up-regulating Ih and It. A high level of congruence with the recordings made in patients exhibiting essential tremor is reached. These simulations support the hypothesis that increased membrane excitability in potentially unsteady circuits generate oscillations mimicking tremor disorders encountered in daily practice. This new approach opens new perspectives for both the understanding and the treatment of neurological tremor. It provides the rationale for decreasing membrane excitability by acting on a normal ion channel in a context of impaired external

  3. The reciprocal relation of mutual inductance in a coupled circuit system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dake

    2012-09-01

    The reciprocal relation of mutual inductance in a coupled circuit system is demonstrated theoretically. An alternating-current (AC) analysis is employed to investigate energy conservation in the system, with the only assumption being the steady-state operation of the circuit. This method can be adopted for teaching electromagnetism at the introductory level, provided the students have an adequate background in calculus.

  4. APC/C and SCFcyclin F Constitute a Reciprocal Feedback Circuit Controlling S-Phase Entry

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    Rajarshi Choudhury

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The anaphase promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C is an ubiquitin ligase and core component of the cell-cycle oscillator. During G1 phase, APC/C binds to its substrate receptor Cdh1 and APC/CCdh1 plays an important role in restricting S-phase entry and maintaining genome integrity. We describe a reciprocal feedback circuit between APC/C and a second ubiquitin ligase, the SCF (Skp1-Cul1-F box. We show that cyclin F, a cell-cycle-regulated substrate receptor (F-box protein for the SCF, is targeted for degradation by APC/C. Furthermore, we establish that Cdh1 is itself a substrate of SCFcyclin F. Cyclin F loss impairs Cdh1 degradation and delays S-phase entry, and this delay is reversed by simultaneous removal of Cdh1. These data indicate that the coordinated, temporal ordering of cyclin F and Cdh1 degradation, organized in a double-negative feedback loop, represents a fundamental aspect of cell-cycle control. This mutual antagonism could be a feature of other oscillating systems.

  5. APC/C and SCF(cyclin F) Constitute a Reciprocal Feedback Circuit Controlling S-Phase Entry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhury, Rajarshi; Bonacci, Thomas; Arceci, Anthony; Lahiri, Debojyoti; Mills, Christine A; Kernan, Jennifer L; Branigan, Timothy B; DeCaprio, James A; Burke, Daniel J; Emanuele, Michael J

    2016-09-20

    The anaphase promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C) is an ubiquitin ligase and core component of the cell-cycle oscillator. During G1 phase, APC/C binds to its substrate receptor Cdh1 and APC/C(Cdh1) plays an important role in restricting S-phase entry and maintaining genome integrity. We describe a reciprocal feedback circuit between APC/C and a second ubiquitin ligase, the SCF (Skp1-Cul1-F box). We show that cyclin F, a cell-cycle-regulated substrate receptor (F-box protein) for the SCF, is targeted for degradation by APC/C. Furthermore, we establish that Cdh1 is itself a substrate of SCF(cyclin F). Cyclin F loss impairs Cdh1 degradation and delays S-phase entry, and this delay is reversed by simultaneous removal of Cdh1. These data indicate that the coordinated, temporal ordering of cyclin F and Cdh1 degradation, organized in a double-negative feedback loop, represents a fundamental aspect of cell-cycle control. This mutual antagonism could be a feature of other oscillating systems.

  6. Passive technologies for future large-scale photonic integrated circuits on silicon: polarization handling, light non-reciprocity and loss reduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daoxin Dai

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Silicon-based large-scale photonic integrated circuits are becoming important, due to the need for higher complexity and lower cost for optical transmitters, receivers and optical buffers. In this paper, passive technologies for large-scale photonic integrated circuits are described, including polarization handling, light non-reciprocity and loss reduction. The design rule for polarization beam splitters based on asymmetrical directional couplers is summarized and several novel designs for ultra-short polarization beam splitters are reviewed. A novel concept for realizing a polarization splitter–rotator is presented with a very simple fabrication process. Realization of silicon-based light non-reciprocity devices (e.g., optical isolator, which is very important for transmitters to avoid sensitivity to reflections, is also demonstrated with the help of magneto-optical material by the bonding technology. Low-loss waveguides are another important technology for large-scale photonic integrated circuits. Ultra-low loss optical waveguides are achieved by designing a Si3N4 core with a very high aspect ratio. The loss is reduced further to <0.1 dB m−1 with an improved fabrication process incorporating a high-quality thermal oxide upper cladding by means of wafer bonding. With the developed ultra-low loss Si3N4 optical waveguides, some devices are also demonstrated, including ultra-high-Q ring resonators, low-loss arrayed-waveguide grating (demultiplexers, and high-extinction-ratio polarizers.

  7. Autonomic cardiac innervation

    OpenAIRE

    Hasan, Wohaib

    2013-01-01

    Autonomic cardiac neurons have a common origin in the neural crest but undergo distinct developmental differentiation as they mature toward their adult phenotype. Progenitor cells respond to repulsive cues during migration, followed by differentiation cues from paracrine sources that promote neurochemistry and differentiation. When autonomic axons start to innervate cardiac tissue, neurotrophic factors from vascular tissue are essential for maintenance of neurons before they reach their targe...

  8. The Reciprocalizer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Parigi, Dario; Kirkegaard, Poul Henning

    2013-01-01

    The geometry of reciprocal structures is extremely difficult to predict and control, and it cannot be described with the available CAD software or by hierarchical, associative parametric modellers. The geometry of a network of reciprocally connected elements is a characteristic that emerges, bottom......-up, from the complex interaction between all the elements shape, topology and position, and requires numerical solution of the geometric compatibility. This paper presents a design tool, the “Reciprocalizer”, that is able to solve the geometry of reciprocal structures. The tool has been tested...

  9. Electromagnetic Reciprocity.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aldridge, David F.

    2014-11-01

    A reciprocity theorem is an explicit mathematical relationship between two different wavefields that can exist within the same space - time configuration. Reciprocity theorems provi de the theoretical underpinning for mod ern full waveform inversion solutions, and also suggest practical strategies for speed ing up large - scale numerical modeling of geophysical datasets . In the present work, several previously - developed electromagnetic r eciprocity theorems are generalized to accommodate a broader range of medi um, source , and receiver types. Reciprocity relations enabling the interchange of various types of point sources and point receivers within a three - dimensional electromagnetic model are derived. Two numerical modeling algorithms in current use are successfully tested for adherence to reciprocity. Finally, the reciprocity theorem forms the point of departure for a lengthy derivation of electromagnetic Frechet derivatives. These mathe matical objects quantify the sensitivity of geophysical electromagnetic data to variatio ns in medium parameters, and thus constitute indispensable tools for solution of the full waveform inverse problem. ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS Sandia National Labor atories is a multi - program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the US Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE - AC04 - 94AL85000. Signif icant portions of the work reported herein were conducted under a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) between Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) and CARBO Ceramics Incorporated. The author acknowledges Mr. Chad Cannan and Mr. Terry Pa lisch of CARBO Ceramics, and Ms. Amy Halloran, manager of SNL's Geophysics and Atmospheric Sciences Department, for their interest in and encouragement of this work. Special thanks are due to Dr . Lewis C. Bartel ( recently retired from Sandia National Labo ratories

  10. Innervation of ''painful'' lumbar discs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coppes, MH; Marani, E; Thomeer, RTWM; Groen, GJ

    1997-01-01

    Study Design. The authors investigated the innervation of discographically confirmed degenerated and ''painful'' human intervertebral discs. Objective. To determine the type and distribution patterns of nerve fibers present in degenerated human intervertebral discs. Summary of Background Data. The i

  11. Reciprocal MicroRNA Expression in Mesocortical Circuit and Its Interplay with Serotonin Transporter Define Resilient Rats in the Chronic Mild Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zurawek, Dariusz; Kusmider, Maciej; Faron-Gorecka, Agata; Gruca, Piotr; Pabian, Paulina; Solich, Joanna; Kolasa, Magdalena; Papp, Mariusz; Dziedzicka-Wasylewska, Marta

    2016-09-22

    Prolonged stress perturbs physiological balance of a subject and thus can lead to depression. Nevertheless, some individuals are more resilient to stress than the others. Defining molecular factors underlying resilience to stress may contribute to the development of a new antidepressant strategy based on the restoration of resilient phenotype in depressed subjects. We used chronic mild stress (CMS) paradigm-well-characterized animal model of depression which caused in rats behavioral deficits (anhedonia) manifested by decreased consumption of sucrose solution. CMS also generated a proportion of resilient rats which did not alter sucrose consumption despite being stressed. Recently, regulation of a gene expression associated with microRNA (miRNA) is considered as an important factor modulating biochemical response to stress. Based on our previous work and literature survey, we investigated changes in the expression level of seven miRNAs (i.e., miR-18a-5p, miR-34a-5p, miR-135a-5p, miR-195-5p, miR-320-3p, miR-674-3p, miR-872-5p) in mesocortical circuit-crucially involved in stress response in order to find differences between susceptible and resilient phenotype. Bioinformatic analysis showed that all miRNAs of interest potentially target serotonin transporter (SERT). Chronic stress caused global increase in the expression of the abovementioned miRNAs in ventral tegmental area (VTA) of stressed rats followed by parallel decrease in miRNA expression in prefrontal cortex (PCx). This effect was more profound in resilient than anhedonic animals. Moreover, we observed decreased level of SERT in VTA of resilient rats. Our findings show that mesocortical circuit is involved in the response to stress and this phenomenon is more efficient in resilient animals.

  12. Beyond Reciprocity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Afsah, Ebrahim

    2010-01-01

    , reflecting rather the enormous diversity of the human condition. This makes it difficult to speak of the phenomenon of war as one common observable fact, majestically constant throughout time and space. This historical, cultural, and operational diversity considerably complicates the analysis of war and its...... the effectiveness of reciprocal moderation on which the law of war has traditionally relied as its chief enforcement mechanism. This study seeks to understand why norms take a particular form rather than laying out the applicable rules and applying them to different categories of people under different...... and logically questionable because any privileged regime presupposes a standard regime. The privileges to which lawful combatants are entitled when they become prisoners of war are important, but they must not detract from the far more elementary protections to which anybody else is entitled to...

  13. Dense and overlapping innervation of pyramidal neurons by neocortical chandelier cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inan, Melis; Blázquez-Llorca, Lidia; Merchán-Perez, Angel; Anderson, Stewart A.; DeFelipe, Javier; Yuste, Rafael

    2013-01-01

    Chandelier (or axo-axonic) cells are a distinct group of GABAergic interneurons that innervate the axon initial segments of pyramidal cells and thus could have an important role controlling the activity of cortical circuits. To understand their connectivity we labeled upper layers chandelier cells (ChCs) from mouse neocortex with a genetic strategy and studied how their axons contact local populations of pyramidal neurons, using immunohistochemical detection of axon initial segments. We studied ChCs located in the border of layers 1 and 2 from primary somatosensory cortex and find that practically all ChC axon terminals contact axon initial segments with an average of 3–5 boutons per cartridge. By measuring the number of putative synapses in initial segments we estimate that each pyramidal neuron is innervated, on average, by at least 4 ChCs. Additionally, each individual ChC contacts 35–50% of pyramidal neurons within its axonal arbor, with pockets of high innervation density. Finally, we find that ChC axons seems to have a conserved innervation pattern at different postnatal ages (P18–90), with only relatively small lateral expansions of their arbor and increases in the total number of their cartridges during the developmental period analyzed. We conclude that ChCs innervate neighboring pyramidal neurons in a dense and overlapping manner, an innervation pattern which could enable ChCs exert a widespread influence on their local circuits. PMID:23365230

  14. Auditory hair cell innervational patterns in lizards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, M R; Beck, J

    1988-05-22

    The pattern of afferent and efferent innervation of two to four unidirectional (UHC) and two to nine bidirectional (BHC) hair cells of five different types of lizard auditory papillae was determined by reconstruction of serial TEM sections. The species studies were Crotaphytus wislizeni (iguanid), Podarcis (Lacerta) sicula and P. muralis (lacertids), Ameiva ameiva (teiid), Coleonyx variegatus (gekkonid), and Mabuya multifasciata (scincid). The main object was to determine in which species and in which hair cell types the nerve fibers were innervating only one (exclusive innervation), or two or more hair cells (nonexclusive innervation); how many nerve fibers were supplying each hair cell; how many synapses were made by the innervating fibers; and the total number of synapses on each hair cell. In the species studies, efferent innervation was limited to the UHC, and except for the iguanid, C. wislizeni, it was nonexclusive, each fiber supplying two or more hair cells. Afferent innervation varied both with the species and the hair cell types. In Crotaphytus, both the UHC and the BHC were exclusively innervated. In Podarcis and Ameiva, the UHC were innervated exclusively by some fibers but nonexclusively by others (mixed pattern). In Coleonyx, the UHC were exclusively innervated but the BHC were nonexclusively innervated. In Mabuya, both the UHC and BHC were nonexclusively innervated. The number of afferent nerve fibers and the number of afferent synapses were always larger in the UHC than in the BHC. In Ameiva, Podarcis, and Mabuya, groups of bidirectionally oriented hair cells occur in regions of cytologically distinct UHC, and in Ameiva, unidirectionally oriented hair cells occur in cytologically distinct BHC regions.

  15. Connections of the superior paraolivary nucleus of the rat: II. Reciprocal connections with the tectal longitudinal column

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    Antonio eViñuela

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The superior paraolivary nucleus (SPON, a prominent GABAergic center of the mammalian auditory brainstem, projects to the ipsilateral inferior colliculus (IC and sends axons through the commissure of the IC (CoIC. Herein we demonstrate that the SPON is reciprocally connected with the recently discovered tectal longitudinal column (TLC. The TLC is a long and narrow structure that spans nearly the entire midbrain tectum longitudinally, immediately above the periaqueductal gray matter (PAG and very close to the midline.Unilateral injections of biotinylated dextran into the SPON of the rat label abundant terminal fibers in the TLC of both sides, with an ipsilateral predominance. The SPON provides a dense innervation of the entire rostrocaudal extent of the ipsilateral TLC, and a relatively sparser innervation of the caudal and rostral portions of the contralateral TLC. SPON fibers reach the TLC by two routes: as collaterals of axons of the CoIC, and as axons that circumvent the ipsilateral IC before traveling in the deep layers of the superior colliculus.The density of these projections identifies SPON as a significant source of input to the TLC. Other targets of the SPON discovered in this study include the deep layers of the superior colliculus and the PAG. The same experiments reveal numerous labeled cell bodies in the TLC, interspersed among the labeled SPON fibers. This observation suggests that the SPON is a significant target of TLC projections.The discovery of novel reciprocal connections between the SPON and the TLC opens unexpected avenues for investigation of sound processing in mammalian brainstem circuits.

  16. Regression of polyneural innervation in the human psoas muscle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gramsbergen, A; IjkemaPaassen, J; Nikkels, PGJ; HaddersAlgra, M

    1997-01-01

    During the early stages of mammalian ontogeny muscle fibres are innervated by more than one axon. This polyneural innervation is replaced by mononeural innervation in the course of development. The regression of polyneural innervation in the psoas muscle in the human is the topic of the present stud

  17. 利用互易性电路设计降低超声流量测量的零点误差和温度漂移%Reciprocal circuit design to reduce zero error and thermal drift in ultrasonic flow metering

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨波; 曹丽; 罗予频

    2012-01-01

    In ultrasonic flow metering system, the "zero-flow error" caused by the non-identical of signal waveforms received in both directions and the "thermal drift" caused by transducers' thermal characteristics which seriously deteriorate the accuracy and stability of the transit-time difference(TTD) measurement can be improved by promoting the reciprocity of the measurement system. In this paper, the approaches to achieve reciprocal measurement system are discussed based on the analyses of the equivalent circuit model of the ultrasonic flow meters. Measurement circuits specially designed for improving the system reciprocity by matching the equivalent impedances of transmitting and receiving circuits are proposed. In these designs, the load impedances of the transducers can be varied flexibly to meet varieties of requirements, and the designs are easy to implement in measurement instruments. Experiments performed on practical metering pipe show that, both the zero error and the thermal drift in the metering can be reduced by using proposed circuit design, the accuracy and stability of the flow rate measurement can be promoted.%超声流量测量系统中,严重影响时间差检测的准确度和稳定性的“零点误差”和“温度漂移”问题可以通过对测量系统互易性的改善加以改进.本文通过对测量系统等效电路模型的分析阐述了系统互易的成立条件,并提出了一种通过对激励和接收电路等效阻抗进行对称性设计提高测量系统互易性的测量电路.这一电路设计易于在仪表中实现,其中换能器的负载阻抗能够根据需要灵活设定.在实际测量管道上进行的实验证明,使用这样的电路设计进行流量测量,能够大幅降低零点误差并抑制温度漂移,使得流量测量结果更加准确稳定.

  18. Is it time for cardiac innervation imaging?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knuuti, J. [Turku Univ., Turku (Finland) Turku PET Center; Sipola, P. [Kuopio Univ., Kuopio (Finland)

    2005-03-01

    The autonomic nervous system plays an important role in the regulation of cardiac function and the regional distribution of cardiac nerve terminals can be visualized using scintigraphic techniques. The most commonly used tracer is iodine-123-metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) but C-11-hydroxyephedrine has also been used with PET. When imaging with MIBG, the ratio of heart-to-mediastinal counts is used as an index of tracer uptake, and regional distribution is also assessed from tomographic images. The rate of clearance of the tracer can also be measured and indicates the function of the adrenergic system. Innervation imaging has been applied in patients with susceptibility to arrythmias, coronary artery disease, hypertrophic and dilated cardiomyopathy and anthracycline induced cardiotoxicity. Abnormal adrenergic innervation or function appear to exist in many pathophysiological conditions indicating that sympathetic neurons are very susceptible to damage. Abnormal findings in innervation imaging also appear to have significant prognostic value especially in patients with cardiomyopathy. Recently, it has also been shown that innervation imaging can monitor drug-induced changes in cardiac adrenergic activity. Although innervation imaging holds great promise for clinical use, the method has not received wider clinical acceptance. Larger randomized studies are required to confirm the value of innervation imaging in various specific indications.

  19. The Value of Reciprocity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molm, Linda D.; Schaefer, David R.; Collett, Jessica L.

    2007-01-01

    The value of reciprocity in social exchange potentially comprises both instrumental value (the value of the actual benefits received from exchange) and communicative or symbolic value (the expressive and uncertainty reduction value conveyed by features of the act of reciprocity itself). While all forms of exchange provide instrumental value, we…

  20. The Structure of Reciprocity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molm, Linda D.

    2010-01-01

    Reciprocity is one of the defining features of social exchange and social life, yet exchange theorists have tended to take it for granted. Drawing on work from a decade-long theoretical research program, I argue that reciprocity is structured and variable across different forms of exchange, that these variations in the structure of reciprocity…

  1. The Reciprocity Controversy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerald Carter

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Reciprocity (or ―reciprocal altruism‖ was once considered an important and widespread evolutionary explanation for cooperation, yet many reviews now conclude that it is rare or absent outside of humans. Here, I show that nonhuman reciprocity seems rare mainly because its meaning has changed over time. The original broad concept of reciprocity is well supported by evidence, but subsequent divergent uses of the term have relied on various translations of the strategy ‗tit-for-tat‘ in the repeated Prisoner‘s Dilemma game. This model has resulted in four problematic approaches to defining and testing reciprocity. Authors that deny evidence of nonhuman reciprocity tend to (1 assume that it requires sophisticated cognition, (2 focus exclusively on short-term contingency with a single partner, (3 require paradoxical evidence for a temporary lifetime fitness cost, and (4 assume that responses to investments are fixed. While these restrictions basically define reciprocity out of existence, evidence shows that fungi, plants, fish, birds, rats, and primates enforce mutual benefit by contingently altering their cooperative investments based on the cooperative returns, just as predicted by the original reciprocity theory.

  2. Breaking reciprocity in nanophotonics: optomechanical interactions (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alù, Andrea

    2016-09-01

    Lorentz reciprocity refers to a fundamental symmetry relation that governs several physical systems. In this talk, we will discuss our recent theoretical, design, experimental, and commercialization efforts in the area of non-reciprocal photonics, using temporal modulation of metamaterial elements to realize isolation for guided waves in nanophotonic systems and radio-frequency circuits, and for propagating waves in free-space, as well as to break the symmetry between emission and absorption in optical and radio-frequency open systems.

  3. Attribution and reciprocity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sebald, Alexander Christopher

    2010-01-01

    , in turn, influence behavior. Dufwenberg and Kirchsteiger [Dufwenberg, M., Kirchsteiger, G., 2004. A theory of sequential reciprocity. Games Econ. Behav. 47 (2), 268-298] formalize this empirical finding in their ‘theory of sequential reciprocity'. This paper extends their analysis by moves of chance. More...... precisely, an extended framework is presented which allows for the analysis of strategic interactions of reciprocal agents in situations in which material outcomes also depend on chance. Moves of chance influence the attribution of responsibilities, people's perceptions about the (un)kindness of others and......, hence, their reciprocal behavior. Furthermore, with the help of two applications it is demonstrated how this framework can be used to explain experimental findings showing that people react very differently in outcomewise-identical situations depending on the moves of chance involved....

  4. Preganglionic innervation of the pancreas islet cells in the rat

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    LUITEN, PGM; TERHORST, GJ; KOOPMANS, SJ; RIETBERG, M; STEFFENS, AB

    1984-01-01

    The position and number of preganglionic somata innervating the insulin-secreting β-cells of the endocrine pancreas were investigated in Wistar rats. This question was approached by comparing the innervation of the pancreas of normal rats with the innervation of the pancreas in alloxan-induced diabe

  5. Reciprocal inhibition in man.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crone, C

    1993-11-01

    Reciprocal inhibition is the automatic antagonist alpha motor neurone inhibition which is evoked by contraction of the agonist muscle. This so-called natural reciprocal inhibition is a ubiquitous and pronounced phenomenon in man and must be suspected of playing a major role in the control of voluntary movements. The spinal pathways underlying this inhibitory phenomenon were studied. The disynaptic reciprocal Ia inhibitory pathway between the tibial anterior muscle and the soleus alpha motor neurones was identified and described in man. It was shown that the inhibition can be evoked in most healthy subjects at rest, but the degree of inhibition varies considerably from one subject to another. It was concluded that it corresponds to the disynaptic reciprocal Ia inhibitory pathway which has been extensively described in animal experiments. The disynaptic reciprocal inhibition was shown to increase during the dynamic phase of a dorsiflexion movement of the foot, but not during the tonic phase. However, when the peripheral afferent feedback from the contracting muscle was blocked by ischaemia, an increase of the inhibition was revealed also during the tonic phase of the dorsiflexion. The concealment of this increase during unrestrained peripheral feedback from the muscle was thought to be due to the post-activation depression mechanism; a mechanism which was described further and which probably involves reduced transmitter release at Ia afferent terminals as a result of previous activation of these afferent fibers. Hence the hypothesis was supported that alpha motor neurones and the corresponding inhibitory interneurones, which project reciprocal inhibition to the antagonist motor neurones, are activated in parallel during voluntary contraction of agonist muscles. An additional reciprocal inhibitory mechanism, the long latency reciprocal inhibition, was described between the tibial anterior muscle and the soleus alpha motor neurones. It was shown to be evoked by group I

  6. The Nature of Disclosure Reciprocity: Three Forms of Reciprocation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, John H.; Archer, Richard L.

    Several theoretical approaches have been offered to explain the phenomenon of reciprocity: trust-liking, social exchange, and modeling. The emphasis of previous research on self-disclosure reciprocity (descriptive reciprocation), the intimacy of the facts an individual reveals about him- or herself, stems largely from the fact that these…

  7. Origins of serotonin innervation of forebrain structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellar, K. J.; Brown, P. A.; Madrid, J.; Bernstein, M.; Vernikos-Danellis, J.; Mehler, W. R.

    1977-01-01

    The tryptophan hydroxylase activity and high-affinity uptake of (3H) serotonin ((3H)5-HT) were measured in five discrete brain regions of rats following lesions of the dorsal or median raphe nuclei. Dorsal raphe lesions reduced enzyme and uptake activity in the striatum only. Median raphe lesions reduced activities in the hippocampus, septal area, frontal cortex, and, to a lesser extent, in the hypothalamus. These data are consistent with the suggestion that the dorsal and median raphe nuclei are the origins of two separate ascending serotonergic systems - one innervating striatal structures and the other mesolimbic structures, predominantly. In addition, the data suggest that measurements of high-affinity uptake of (3H)5-HT may be a more reliable index of innervation than either 5-HT content or tryptophan hydroxylase activity.

  8. Development of Postural Muscles and Their Innervation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. IJkema-Paassen

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Control of posture is a prerequisite for efficient motor performance. Posture depends on muscles capable of enduring contractions, whereas movements often require quick, forceful muscle actions. To serve these different goals, muscles contain fibers that meet these different tasks. Muscles with strong postural functions mainly consist of slow muscle fibers with a great resistance against fatigue. Flexor muscles in the leg and arm muscles are mainly composed of fast muscle fibers producing relatively large forces that are rapidly fatigable. Development of the neuromuscular system continues after birth. We discuss in the human baby and in animal experiments changes in muscle fiber properties, regression from polyneural into mononeural innervation, and developmental changes in the motoneurons of postural muscles during that period. The regression of poly-neural innervation in postural muscles and the development of dendrite bundles of their motoneurons seem to be linked to the transition from the immature into the adult-like patterns of moving and postural control.

  9. Series of Reciprocal Triangular Numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruckman, Paul; Dence, Joseph B.; Dence, Thomas P.; Young, Justin

    2013-01-01

    Reciprocal triangular numbers have appeared in series since the very first infinite series were summed. Here we attack a number of subseries of the reciprocal triangular numbers by methodically expressing them as integrals.

  10. Time-dependent miR-16 serum fluctuations together with reciprocal changes in the expression level of miR-16 in mesocortical circuit contribute to stress resilient phenotype in chronic mild stress - An animal model of depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zurawek, Dariusz; Kusmider, Maciej; Faron-Gorecka, Agata; Gruca, Piotr; Pabian, Paulina; Kolasa, Magdalena; Solich, Joanna; Szafran-Pilch, Kinga; Papp, Mariusz; Dziedzicka-Wasylewska, Marta

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are involved in stress-related pathologies. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying stress resilience are elusive. Using chronic mild stress (CMS), an animal model of depression, we identified animals exhibiting a resilient phenotype. We investigated serum levels of corticosterone, melatonin and 376 mature miRNAs to find peripheral biomarkers associated with the resilient phenotype. miR-16, selected during screening step, was assayed in different brain regions in order to find potential relationship between brain and peripheral alterations in response to stress. Two CMS experiments that lasted for 2 and 7 consecutive weeks were performed. During both CMS procedures, sucrose consumption levels were significantly decreased in anhedonic-like animals (presilient rats did not change despite the rats being stressed. Serum corticosterone measurements indicated that anhedonic-like animals had blunted hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis activity, whereas resilient animals exhibited dynamic responses to stress. miRNA profiling revealed that resilient animals had elevated serum levels of miR-16 after 7 weeks of CMS (adjusted p-valueresilient animals exhibited reciprocal changes in miR-16 expression level in mesocortical pathway after 2 weeks of CMS (pResilient animals can actively cope with stress on a biochemical level and miR-16 may contribute to a "stress-resistant" behavioral phenotype by pleiotropic modulation of the expression of genes involved in the function of the nervous system. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. and ECNP. All rights reserved.

  11. Vagal innervation of the rat duodenum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, X; Renehan, W E; Fogel, R

    2000-02-14

    Electrophysiologic and anterograde tract tracing studies have demonstrated that the vagus nerve innervates the duodenum. These studies, however, have provided little information regarding the finer anatomic topography within the vagal complex. In this study, the retrograde neuronal tracers WGA-HRP or DiI, applied to the duodenum, were used to characterize the vagal afferent and efferent innervation of this portion of the gastrointestinal tract. This approach labeled a substantial number of motor neurons in both the medial and lateral columns of the dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus (DMNV). Vagal motor neurons innervating the duodenum were seen across the medial-lateral extent of the DMNV and between 600 microm rostral to obex and 1600 microm caudal to obex. The three branches of the vagus nerve contained efferent fibers to the duodenum. The gastric branch of the vagus nerve was the pathway that connected the majority of DMNV neurons with the duodenum. These neurons were located in the medial and middle thirds of the DMNV. The celiac branch to the duodenum was composed of axons from the majority of lateral column neurons but also contained axons from neurons in the medial column. The hepatic branch of the vagus nerve contained only a small number of cell axons. Some neurons were located medially whereas others were in the lateral third of the duodenum. Although central terminations of vagal primary afferents from the duodenum were not found in previous tract tracing studies, we observed a large number of terminals in the subpostremal/commissural region of the nucleus of the solitary tract. Similar to the motor fibers, most afferent fibers from the duodenum were located in the gastric branch of the vagus nerve, although the hepatic and celiac branches also contained afferent neurons. These results demonstrate that the vagal innervation of the duodenum is unique, being an amalgam of what would be expected following labeling of more proximal and distal portions of the

  12. Reciprocity, World Prices and Welfare

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raimondos-Møller, Pascalis; Woodland, Alan D.

    We examine in detail the circumstances under which reciprocity, as defined in Bagwell and Staiger (1999), leads to fixed world prices. We show that a change of tariffs satisfying reciprocity does not necessarily imply constant world prices in a world of many goods and countries. While...... it is possible to find tariff reforms that are consistent with both reciprocity and constant world prices, these reforms do not follow from the reciprocity condition, but rather from the requirement of unchanged world prices. We propose an alternative reciprocity rule that is guaranteed to raise the welfare...

  13. The Role of Neuromediators and Innervation in Cutaneous Wound Healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashrafi, Mohammed; Baguneid, Mohamed; Bayat, Ardeshir

    2016-06-15

    The skin is densely innervated with an intricate network of cutaneous nerves, neuromediators and specific receptors which influence a variety of physiological and disease processes. There is emerging evidence that cutaneous innervation may play an important role in mediating wound healing. This review aims to comprehensively examine the evidence that signifies the role of innervation during the overlapping stages of cutaneous wound healing. Numerous neuropeptides that are secreted by the sensory and autonomic nerve fibres play an essential part during the distinct phases of wound healing. Delayed wound healing in diabetes and fetal cutaneous regeneration following wounding further highlights the pivotal role skin innervation and its associated neuromediators play in wound healing. Understanding the mechanisms via which cutaneous innervation modulates wound healing in both the adult and fetus will provide opportunities to develop therapeutic devices which could manipulate skin innervation to aid wound healing.

  14. Algebraic circuits

    CERN Document Server

    Lloris Ruiz, Antonio; Parrilla Roure, Luis; García Ríos, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    This book presents a complete and accurate study of algebraic circuits, digital circuits whose performance can be associated with any algebraic structure. The authors distinguish between basic algebraic circuits, such as Linear Feedback Shift Registers (LFSRs) and cellular automata, and algebraic circuits, such as finite fields or Galois fields. The book includes a comprehensive review of representation systems, of arithmetic circuits implementing basic and more complex operations, and of the residue number systems (RNS). It presents a study of basic algebraic circuits such as LFSRs and cellular automata as well as a study of circuits related to Galois fields, including two real cryptographic applications of Galois fields.

  15. Spatially reciprocal inhibition of inhibition within a stimulus selection network in the avian midbrain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goddard, C Alex; Mysore, Shreesh P; Bryant, Astra S; Huguenard, John R; Knudsen, Eric I

    2014-01-01

    Reciprocal inhibition between inhibitory projection neurons has been proposed as the most efficient circuit motif to achieve the flexible selection of one stimulus among competing alternatives. However, whether such a motif exists in networks that mediate selection is unclear. Here, we study the connectivity within the nucleus isthmi pars magnocellularis (Imc), a GABAergic nucleus that mediates competitive selection in the midbrain stimulus selection network. Using laser photostimulation of caged glutamate, we find that feedback inhibitory connectivity is global within the Imc. Unlike typical lateral inhibition in other circuits, intra-Imc inhibition remains functionally powerful over long distances. Anatomically, we observed long-range axonal projections and retrograde somatic labeling from focal injections of bi-directional tracers in the Imc, consistent with spatial reciprocity of intra-Imc inhibition. Together, the data indicate that spatially reciprocal inhibition of inhibition occurs throughout the Imc. Thus, the midbrain selection circuit possesses the most efficient circuit motif possible for fast, reliable, and flexible selection.

  16. Cartography of human diaphragmatic innervation: preliminary data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verin, Eric; Marie, Jean-Paul; Similowski, Thomas

    2011-04-30

    In humans, anatomy indicates that the phrenic nerve mainly arises from the C4 cervical root, with variable C3 and C5 contributions. How this translates into functional innervation is unknown. The diaphragm response to electrical stimulation of C3, C4 and C5 was described in three patients undergoing surgical laryngeal reinnervation with an upper phrenic root (surface chest electrodes at anterior, lateral and posterior sites; oesophageal and gastric pressures (Pes and Pga) to derive transdiaphragmatic pressure (Pdi)). Anatomically, the phrenic nerve predominantly originated from C4. Phrenic stimulation elicited motor responses at the three sites in the three patients, as did C4 stimulation. It produced Pdi values of 9, 11, and 14cmH(2)O in the three patients, respectively, vs. 9, 9, and 7cmH(2)O for C4. C3 stimulation produced modest Pdi responses, whereas C5 stimulation could produce Pdi responses close to those observed with C4 stimulation. These singular observations confirm the dominance of C4 in diaphragm innervation but suggest than C5 can be of importance. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. INNERVATED RECTUS-ABDOMINIS MYOFASCIAL FLAP FOR DYNAMIC CARDIOMYOPLASTY

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    WIJNBERG, DS; EBELS, T; ROBINSON, PH

    1994-01-01

    This study examined the rectus abdominis myofascial flap as an innervated nap for dynamic cardiomyoplastic purposes. It is common to use the latissimus dorsi to wrap or patch around or in the heart, but there is a need for more innervated skeletal muscle for a variety of reasons. The rectus abdomini

  18. Innervation of the renal proximal convoluted tubule of the rat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barajas, L.; Powers, K. (Harbor-UCLA Medical Center, Torrance (USA))

    1989-12-01

    Experimental data suggest the proximal tubule as a major site of neurogenic influence on tubular function. The functional and anatomical axial heterogeneity of the proximal tubule prompted this study of the distribution of innervation sites along the early, mid, and late proximal convoluted tubule (PCT) of the rat. Serial section autoradiograms, with tritiated norepinephrine serving as a marker for monoaminergic nerves, were used in this study. Freehand clay models and graphic reconstructions of proximal tubules permitted a rough estimation of the location of the innervation sites along the PCT. In the subcapsular nephrons, the early PCT (first third) was devoid of innervation sites with most of the innervation occurring in the mid (middle third) and in the late (last third) PCT. Innervation sites were found in the early PCT in nephrons located deeper in the cortex. In juxtamedullary nephrons, innervation sites could be observed on the PCT as it left the glomerulus. This gradient of PCT innervation can be explained by the different tubulovascular relationships of nephrons at different levels of the cortex. The absence of innervation sites in the early PCT of subcapsular nephrons suggests that any influence of the renal nerves on the early PCT might be due to an effect of neurotransmitter released from renal nerves reaching the early PCT via the interstitium and/or capillaries.

  19. Dual innervation of neonatal Merkel cells in mouse touch domes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingwen Niu

    Full Text Available Merkel cell-neurite complexes are specialized mechanosensory end organs that mediate discriminative touch sensation. It is well established that type I slowly adapting (SAI mechanoreceptors, which express neural filament heavy chain (NFH, innervate Merkel cells. It was previously shown that neurotrophic factor NT3 and its receptor TrkC play crucial roles in controlling touch dome Merkel cell innervation of NFH+ fibers. In addition, nerve fibers expressing another neurotrophic tyrosine receptor kinase (NTRK, Ret, innervate touch dome Merkel cells as well. However, the relationship between afferents responsive to NT3/TrkC signaling and those expressing Ret is unclear. It is also controversial if these Ret+ fibers belong to the early or late Ret+ DRG neurons, which are defined based on the co-expression and developmental dependence of TrkA. To address these questions, we genetically traced Ret+ and TrkC+ fibers and analyzed their developmental dependence on TrkA. We found that Merkel cells in neonatal mouse touch domes receive innervation of two types of fibers: one group is Ret+, while the other subset expresses TrkC and NFH. In addition, Ret+ fibers depend on TrkA for their survival and normal innervation whereas NFH+ Merkel cell innervating fibers are almost unaltered in TrkA mutant mice, supporting that Ret+ and NFH+/TrkC+ afferents are two distinct groups. Ret signaling, on the other hand, plays a minor role for the innervation of neonatal touch domes. In contrast, Merkel cells in the glabrous skin are mainly contacted by NFH+/TrkC+ afferents. Taken together, our results suggest that neonatal Merkel cells around hair follicles receive dual innervation while Merkel cells in the glabrous skin are mainly innervated by only SAI mechanoreceptors. In addition, our results suggest that neonatal Ret+ Merkel cell innervating fibers most likely belong to the late but not early Ret+ DRG neurons.

  20. Fine structure of the pinealopetal innervation of the mammalian pineal gland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, M.

    1992-01-01

    Anatomi, ultrastructure, neuropeptides, central innervation, mammals, sympathitic, heman fetus, parasymathetic......Anatomi, ultrastructure, neuropeptides, central innervation, mammals, sympathitic, heman fetus, parasymathetic...

  1. Innervation of the sheep pineal gland by nonsympathetic nerve fibers containing NADPH-diaphorase activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    López-Figueroa, Manuel O.; Ravault, Jean-Paul; Cozzi, Bruno;

    1997-01-01

    Neuroanatomy, NADPH-diaphorase, nitric oxide, innervation, superior cervical ganglionectomy, neuropeptide Y.......Neuroanatomy, NADPH-diaphorase, nitric oxide, innervation, superior cervical ganglionectomy, neuropeptide Y....

  2. Direct reciprocity in structured populations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.M. van Veelen; J. García; D.G. Rand; M.A. Nowak

    2012-01-01

    Reciprocity and repeated games have been at the center of attention when studying the evolution of human cooperation. Direct reciprocity is considered to be a powerful mechanism for the evolution of cooperation, and it is generally assumed that it can lead to high levels of cooperation. Here we expl

  3. Structural Behaviour of Reciprocal Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Parigi, Dario; Kirkegaard, Poul Henning

    2013-01-01

    The present paper focuses on the comparison of several two-dimensional and three-dimensional reciprocal configurations. The goal of such comparison is to analyse the structural behaviour when changing the geometric parameters used to describe the geometry of reciprocal structures....

  4. Afferent innervation of the utricular macula in pigeons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Si, Xiaohong; Zakir, Mridha Md; Dickman, J. David

    2003-01-01

    Biotinylated dextran amine (BDA) was used to retrogradely label afferents innervating the utricular macula in adult pigeons. The pigeon utriclar macula consists of a large rectangular-shaped neuroepithelium with a dorsally curved anterior edge and an extended medioposterior tail. The macula could be demarcated into several regions based on cytoarchitectural differences. The striola occupied 30% of the macula and contained a large density of type I hair cells with fewer type II hair cells. Medial and lateral extrastriola zones were located outside the striola and contained only type II hair cells. A six- to eight-cell-wide band of type II hair cells existed near the center of the striola. The reversal line marked by the morphological polarization of hair cells coursed throughout the epithelium, near the peripheral margin, and through the center of the type II band. Calyx afferents innervated type I hair cells with calyceal terminals that contained between 2 and 15 receptor cells. Calyx afferents were located only in the striola region, exclusive of the type II band, had small total fiber innervation areas and low innervation densities. Dimorph afferents innervated both type I and type II hair cells with calyceal and bouton terminals and were primarily located in the striola region. Dimorph afferents had smaller calyceal terminals with few type I hair cells, extended fiber branches with bouton terminals and larger innervation areas. Bouton afferents innervated only type II hair cells in the extrastriola and type II band regions. Bouton afferents innervating the type II band had smaller terminal fields with fewer bouton terminals and smaller innervation areas than fibers located in the extrastriolar zones. Bouton afferents had the most bouton terminals on the longest fibers, the largest innervation areas with the highest innervation densities of all afferents. Among all afferents, smaller terminal innervation fields were observed in the striola and large fields were

  5. Combinatorial Reciprocity Theorems

    CERN Document Server

    Beck, Matthias

    2012-01-01

    A common theme of enumerative combinatorics is formed by counting functions that are polynomials evaluated at positive integers. In this expository paper, we focus on four families of such counting functions connected to hyperplane arrangements, lattice points in polyhedra, proper colorings of graphs, and $P$-partitions. We will see that in each instance we get interesting information out of a counting function when we evaluate it at a \\emph{negative} integer (and so, a priori the counting function does not make sense at this number). Our goals are to convey some of the charm these "alternative" evaluations of counting functions exhibit, and to weave a unifying thread through various combinatorial reciprocity theorems by looking at them through the lens of geometry, which will include some scenic detours through other combinatorial concepts.

  6. Anodal transcranial direct current stimulation of the motor cortex induces opposite modulation of reciprocal inhibition in wrist extensor and flexor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lackmy-Vallée, Alexandra; Klomjai, Wanalee; Bussel, Bernard; Katz, Rose; Roche, Nicolas

    2014-09-15

    Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) is used as a noninvasive tool to modulate brain excitability in humans. Recently, several studies have demonstrated that tDCS applied over the motor cortex also modulates spinal neural network excitability and therefore can be used to explore the corticospinal control acting on spinal neurons. Previously, we showed that reciprocal inhibition directed to wrist flexor motoneurons is enhanced during contralateral anodal tDCS, but it is likely that the corticospinal control acting on spinal networks controlling wrist flexors and extensors is not similar. The primary aim of the study was to explore the effects of anodal tDCS on reciprocal inhibition directed to wrist extensor motoneurons. To further examine the supraspinal control acting on the reciprocal inhibition between wrist flexors and extensors, we also explored the effects of the tDCS applied to the ipsilateral hand motor area. In healthy volunteers, we tested the effects induced by sham and anodal tDCS on reciprocal inhibition pathways innervating wrist muscles. Reciprocal inhibition directed from flexor to extensor muscles and the reverse situation, i.e., reciprocal inhibition, directed from extensors to flexors were studied in parallel with the H reflex technique. Our main finding was that contralateral anodal tDCS induces opposing effects on reciprocal inhibition: it decreases reciprocal inhibition directed from flexors to extensors, but it increases reciprocal inhibition directed from extensors to flexors. The functional result of these opposite effects on reciprocal inhibition seems to favor wrist extension excitability, suggesting an asymmetric descending control onto the interneurons that mediate reciprocal inhibition.

  7. Nerve growth factor facilitates perivascular innervation in neovasculatures of mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitsuhiro Goda

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available It is well known that blood vessels including arterioles have a perivascular innervation. It is also widely accepted that perivascular nerves maintain vascular tone and regulate blood flow. Although there are currently prevailing opinions, unified views on the innervation of microcirculation in any organs have not been established. The present study was designed to investigate whether there are perivascular nerves innervated in microvessels and neovessels. Furthermore, we examined whether nerve growth factor (NGF can exert a promotional effect on perivascular nerve innervation in neovessels of Matrigel plugs. A Matrigel was subcutaneously implanted in mouse. The presence of perivascular nerves in Matrigel on Day 7–21 after the implantation was immunohistochemically studied. NGF or saline was subcutaneously administered by an osmotic mini-pump for a period of 3–14 days. The immunostaining of neovasculatures in Matrigel showed the presence of perivascular nerves on Day 21 after Matrigel injection. Perivascular nerve innervation of neovessels within Matrigel implanted in NGF-treated mice was observed in Day 17 after Matrigel implantation. However, NGF treatment did not increase numbers of neovessels in Matrigel. These results suggest that perivascular nerves innervate neovessels as neovasculatures mature and that NGF accelerates the innervation of perivascular nerves in neovessels.

  8. Innervation of the thick ascending limb of Henle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barajas, L.; Powers, K.V.

    1988-08-01

    The overlap of accumulations of autoradiographic grains (AAGs) on profiles of the thick ascending limb of Henle (TALH) was measured in autoradiograms of sections from rat kidneys with monoaminergic nerves labeled by means of tritiated norepinephrine. The amount of AAG overlap was used as an indirect means of quantifying innervation along the TALHs of superficial, mid-cortical, and juxtamedullary nephrons. The density of innervation along the TALH showed nephron heterogeneity; the juxtamedullary nephrons with a high pre- and postjuxtaglomerular apparatus (JGA) TALH density of innervation and the upper and midcortical nephrons with high TALH innervation densities at the level of the JGA. The pre-JGA TALH of the juxtamedullary nephrons had a significantly higher (P less than 0.001) density of innervation than the midcortical or superficial nephrons. The TALHs of juxtamedullary nephrons were found to have substantially more innervation than the TALHs of the other nephrons. For all three populations of nephrons, the pre-JGA TALH had the greatest amount of innervation. Neural regulation of TALH function would occur mainly along the pre-JGA and level of the JGA TALH. This regulation would increase TALH NaCl reabsorption (decrease luminal NaCl concentration) and therefore influence 1) the urinary concentrating mechanism, and 2) renin secretion via the macula densa mechanism. The innervation of the TALH was predominantly associated with the vasculature of the TALH's own nephron. However, innervation associated with medullary ray capillary beds from deeper nephrons was observed on pre-JGA TALHs from superficial and midcortical nephrons.

  9. Intrinsic innervation of the uterus in guinea pig and rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mustafa, F; Fatani, J A; el-Eishi, H; el-Badawi, M G

    1987-01-01

    The pattern of distribution of cholinergic and adrenergic nerves in the uterus of albino rats and guinea pigs was examined histochemically. In the albino rat, the uterus was found well-innervated by both adrenergic and cholinergic nerves with a clear regional variation. Dense innervation was demonstrated at the tubal and cervical ends of the uterus and in the cervix. Cholinergic nerves supplying the glands were more numerous than the adrenergic nerves which were relatively few. In the guinea-pigs, the uterus was richly innervated by adrenergic nerves with a clear regional variation. No cholinesterase-positive nerves or nerve cells were demonstrated.

  10. Direct reciprocity in spatial populations enhances R-reciprocity as well as ST-reciprocity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kohei Miyaji

    Full Text Available As is well-known, spatial reciprocity plays an important role in facilitating the emergence of cooperative traits, and the effect of direct reciprocity is also obvious for explaining the cooperation dynamics. However, how the combination of these two scenarios influences cooperation is still unclear. In the present work, we study the evolution of cooperation in 2 × 2 games via considering both spatial structured populations and direct reciprocity driven by the strategy with 1-memory length. Our results show that cooperation can be significantly facilitated on the whole parameter plane. For prisoner's dilemma game, cooperation dominates the system even at strong dilemma, where maximal social payoff is still realized. In this sense, R-reciprocity forms and it is robust to the extremely strong dilemma. Interestingly, when turning to chicken game, we find that ST-reciprocity is also guaranteed, through which social average payoff and cooperation is greatly enhanced. This reciprocity mechanism is supported by mean-field analysis and different interaction topologies. Thus, our study indicates that direct reciprocity in structured populations can be regarded as a more powerful factor for the sustainability of cooperation.

  11. Social evolution: reciprocity there is.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taborsky, Michael

    2013-06-01

    The theory of cooperation predicts that altruism can be established by reciprocity, yet empirical evidence from nature is contentious. Increasingly though, experimental results from social vertebrates challenge the nearly exclusive explanatory power of relatedness for the evolution of cooperation.

  12. Simpler valve for reciprocating engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akkerman, J. W.

    1978-01-01

    Simpler design eliminating camshafts, cams, and mechanical springs should improve reliability of hydrazine powered reciprocating engines. Valve is expected to improve efficiency, and reduce weight of engines in range up to 50 horsepower.

  13. Innervation of ectopic endometrium in a rat model of endometriosis

    OpenAIRE

    Berkley, Karen J; Dmitrieva, Natalia; Curtis, Kathleen S.; Papka, Raymond E

    2004-01-01

    Endometriosis (ENDO) is a disorder in which vascularized growths of endometrial tissue occur outside the uterus. Its symptoms include reduced fertility and severe pelvic pain. Mechanisms that maintain the ectopic growths and evoke symptoms are poorly understood. One factor not yet considered is that the ectopic growths develop their own innervation. Here, we tested the hypothesis that the growths develop both an autonomic and a sensory innervation. We used a rat model of surgically induced EN...

  14. Functional analysis of the larval feeding circuit in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatt, Parag K; Neckameyer, Wendi S

    2013-11-19

    The serotonergic feeding circuit in Drosophila melanogaster larvae can be used to investigate neuronal substrates of critical importance during the development of the circuit. Using the functional output of the circuit, feeding, changes in the neuronal architecture of the stomatogastric system can be visualized. Feeding behavior can be recorded by observing the rate of retraction of the mouth hooks, which receive innervation from the brain. Locomotor behavior is used as a physiological control for feeding, since larvae use their mouth hooks to traverse across an agar substrate. Changes in feeding behavior can be correlated with the axonal architecture of the neurites innervating the gut. Using immunohistochemistry it is possible to visualize and quantitate these changes. Improper handling of the larvae during behavior paradigms can alter data as they are very sensitive to manipulations. Proper imaging of the neurite architecture innervating the gut is critical for precise quantitation of number and size of varicosities as well as the extent of branch nodes. Analysis of most circuits allow only for visualization of neurite architecture or behavioral effects; however, this model allows one to correlate the functional output of the circuit with the impairments in neuronal architecture.

  15. The evolution of reciprocal sharing

    OpenAIRE

    Moore, Jim

    1984-01-01

    Genetical models of the evolution of reciprocal altruism (as distinct from cooperation, mutualism, or nepotism) have difficulty explaining the initial establishment of an altruist gene in a selfish deme. Though potential mechanisms have been suggested, there is an alternative: much "altruistic" behavior may in fact be purely selfish in origin and consequently reciprocity need not be invoked to provide a selective benefit to the actor. _Sharing_ and _helping_ are fundamentally different behavi...

  16. Resonance circuits for adiabatic circuits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Schlachta

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the possible techniques to reduces the power consumption in digital CMOS circuits is to slow down the charge transport. This slowdown can be achieved by introducing an inductor in the charging path. Additionally, the inductor can act as an energy storage element, conserving the energy that is normally dissipated during discharging. Together with the parasitic capacitances from the circuit a LCresonant circuit is formed.

  17. Sensory innervation of rat contracture shoulder model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochiai, Nobuyasu; Ohtori, Seiji; Kenmoku, Tomonori; Yamazaki, Hironori; Ochiai, Satoko; Saisu, Takashi; Matsuki, Keisuke; Takahashi, Kazuhisa

    2013-02-01

    To date, few studies have investigated the cause of pain experienced by patients with frozen shoulder. The purposes of this study were to establish a rat contracture model and clarify the innervation pattern of the glenohumeral (GH) joint and subacromial bursa (SAB) using immunohistochemistry in the dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons. The rat contracture models were made by tying the animal's humerus and scapula with No. 2-0 FiberWire (Arthrex, Naples, FL, USA). Contracture was confirmed on x-ray images taken 8 weeks after the operation. Subsequently, two kinds of neurotracers, Fluoro-Gold (FG) (Fluorochrome, Denver, CO, USA) and 1,1'-dioctadecyl-3,3,3',3'-tetramethyl-indocarbocyanine perchlorate (DiI) (Molecular Probes, Eugene, OR, USA), were used to detect the GH joints and SAB separately. FG tracers were injected into GH joints, and DiI tracers were injected into the SAB. At 7 days after injection, DRGs were harvested between C1 and T1. Immunohistochemistry by use of calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) was performed. CGRP is thought to be one of the causes of pain sensation in joint disease. We evaluated the percentages of FG-labeled CGRP-immunoreactive (CGRP-ir) neurons in the total number of FG-labeled neurons and of DiI-labeled CGRP-ir neurons in the total number of DiI-labeled neurons. Abduction and total arc of the rotation were statistically significantly decreased in the contracture group. Furthermore, the percentage of CGRP-ir DRG neurons was significantly higher in the contracture group in both the GH joint and SAB. These results show that pain sensation in rat shoulder contracture may be induced by the up-regulation of CGRP expression in DRG neurons. Copyright © 2013 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Brown-adipose-tissue macrophages control tissue innervation and homeostatic energy expenditure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Yochai; Boura-Halfon, Sigalit; Cortese, Nina; Haimon, Zhana; Sar Shalom, Hadas; Kuperman, Yael; Kalchenko, Vyacheslav; Brandis, Alexander; David, Eyal; Segal-Hayoun, Yifat; Chappell-Maor, Louise; Yaron, Avraham; Jung, Steffen

    2017-06-01

    Tissue macrophages provide immunological defense and contribute to the establishment and maintenance of tissue homeostasis. Here we used constitutive and inducible mutagenesis to delete the nuclear transcription regulator Mecp2 in macrophages. Mice that lacked the gene encoding Mecp2, which is associated with Rett syndrome, in macrophages did not show signs of neurodevelopmental disorder but displayed spontaneous obesity, which was linked to impaired function of brown adipose tissue (BAT). Specifically, mutagenesis of a BAT-resident Cx3Cr1(+) macrophage subpopulation compromised homeostatic thermogenesis but not acute, cold-induced thermogenesis. Mechanistically, malfunction of BAT in pre-obese mice with mutant macrophages was associated with diminished sympathetic innervation and local titers of norepinephrine, which resulted in lower expression of thermogenic factors by adipocytes. Mutant macrophages overexpressed the signaling receptor and ligand PlexinA4, which might contribute to the phenotype by repulsion of sympathetic axons expressing the transmembrane semaphorin Sema6A. Collectively, we report a previously unappreciated homeostatic role for macrophages in the control of tissue innervation. Disruption of this circuit in BAT resulted in metabolic imbalance.

  19. Neural innervation of white adipose tissue and the control of lipolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartness, Timothy J; Liu, Yang; Shrestha, Yogendra B; Ryu, Vitaly

    2014-10-01

    White adipose tissue (WAT) is innervated by the sympathetic nervous system (SNS) and its activation is necessary for lipolysis. WAT parasympathetic innervation is not supported. Fully-executed SNS-norepinephrine (NE)-mediated WAT lipolysis is dependent on β-adrenoceptor stimulation ultimately hinging on hormone sensitive lipase and perilipin A phosphorylation. WAT sympathetic drive is appropriately measured electrophysiologically and neurochemically (NE turnover) in non-human animals and this drive is fat pad-specific preventing generalizations among WAT depots and non-WAT organs. Leptin-triggered SNS-mediated lipolysis is weakly supported, whereas insulin or adenosine inhibition of SNS/NE-mediated lipolysis is strongly supported. In addition to lipolysis control, increases or decreases in WAT SNS drive/NE inhibit and stimulate white adipocyte proliferation, respectively. WAT sensory nerves are of spinal-origin and sensitive to local leptin and increases in sympathetic drive, the latter implicating lipolysis. Transsynaptic viral tract tracers revealed WAT central sympathetic and sensory circuits including SNS-sensory feedback loops that may control lipolysis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Immunomodulation stimulates the innervation of engineered tooth organ.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tunay Kökten

    Full Text Available The sensory innervation of the dental mesenchyme is essential for tooth function and protection. Sensory innervation of the dental pulp is mediated by axons originating from the trigeminal ganglia and is strictly regulated in time. Teeth can develop from cultured re-associations between dissociated dental epithelial and mesenchymal cells from Embryonic Day 14 mouse molars, after implantation under the skin of adult ICR mice. In these conditions however, the innervation of the dental mesenchyme did not occur spontaneously. In order to go further with this question, complementary experimental approaches were designed. Cultured cell re-associations were implanted together with trigeminal ganglia for one or two weeks. Although axonal growth was regularly observed extending from the trigeminal ganglia to all around the forming teeth, the presence of axons in the dental mesenchyme was detected in less than 2.5% of samples after two weeks, demonstrating a specific impairment of their entering the dental mesenchyme. In clinical context, immunosuppressive therapy using cyclosporin A was found to accelerate the innervation of transplanted tissues. Indeed, when cultured cell re-associations and trigeminal ganglia were co-implanted in cyclosporin A-treated ICR mice, nerve fibers were detected in the dental pulp, even reaching odontoblasts after one week. However, cyclosporin A shows multiple effects, including direct ones on nerve growth. To test whether there may be a direct functional relationship between immunomodulation and innervation, cell re-associations and trigeminal ganglia were co-implanted in immunocompromised Nude mice. In these conditions as well, the innervation of the dental mesenchyme was observed already after one week of implantation, but axons reached the odontoblast layer after two weeks only. This study demonstrated that immunodepression per se does stimulate the innervation of the dental mesenchyme.

  1. Innervation changes induced by inflammation of the rat thoracolumbar fascia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoheisel, U; Rosner, J; Mense, S

    2015-08-06

    Recently, the fascia innervation has become an important issue, particularly the existence of nociceptive fibers. Fascia can be a source of pain in several disorders such as fasciitis and non-specific low back pain. However, nothing is known about possible changes of the fascia innervation under pathological circumstances. This question is important, because theoretically pain from the fascia cannot only be due to increased nociceptor discharges, but also to a denser innervation of the fascia by nociceptive endings. In this histological study, an inflammation was induced in the thoracolumbar fascia (TLF) of rats and the innervation by various fiber types compared between the inflamed and intact TLF. Although the TLF is generally considered to have proprioceptive functions, no corpuscular proprioceptors (Pacini and Ruffini corpuscles) were found. To obtain quantitative data, the length of fibers and free nerve endings were determined in the three layers of the rat TLF: inner layer (IL, adjacent to the multifidus muscle), middle layer (ML) and outer layer (OL). The main results were that the overall innervation density showed little change; however, there were significant changes in some of the layers. The innervation density was significantly decreased in the OL, but this change was partly compensated for by an increase in the IL. The density of substance P (SP)-positive - presumably nociceptive - fibers was significantly increased. In contrast, the postganglionic sympathetic fibers were significantly decreased. In conclusion, the inflamed TLF showed an increase of presumably nociceptive fibers, which may explain the pain from a pathologically altered fascia. The meaning of the decreased innervation by sympathetic fibers is obscure at present. The lack of proprioceptive corpuscular receptors within the TLF does not preclude its role as a proprioceptive structure, because some of the free nerve endings may function as proprioceptors. Copyright © 2015 IBRO. Published

  2. Direct reciprocity in structured populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Veelen, Matthijs; García, Julián; Rand, David G; Nowak, Martin A

    2012-06-19

    Reciprocity and repeated games have been at the center of attention when studying the evolution of human cooperation. Direct reciprocity is considered to be a powerful mechanism for the evolution of cooperation, and it is generally assumed that it can lead to high levels of cooperation. Here we explore an open-ended, infinite strategy space, where every strategy that can be encoded by a finite state automaton is a possible mutant. Surprisingly, we find that direct reciprocity alone does not lead to high levels of cooperation. Instead we observe perpetual oscillations between cooperation and defection, with defection being substantially more frequent than cooperation. The reason for this is that "indirect invasions" remove equilibrium strategies: every strategy has neutral mutants, which in turn can be invaded by other strategies. However, reciprocity is not the only way to promote cooperation. Another mechanism for the evolution of cooperation, which has received as much attention, is assortment because of population structure. Here we develop a theory that allows us to study the synergistic interaction between direct reciprocity and assortment. This framework is particularly well suited for understanding human interactions, which are typically repeated and occur in relatively fluid but not unstructured populations. We show that if repeated games are combined with only a small amount of assortment, then natural selection favors the behavior typically observed among humans: high levels of cooperation implemented using conditional strategies.

  3. Public privacy: Reciprocity and Silence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenny Kennedy

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available In his 1958 poem 'Dedication to my Wife' TS Eliot proclaims "these are private words addressed to you in public". Simultaneously written for his wife, Valerie Fletcher, and to the implied you of a discourse network, Eliot's poem helps to illustrate the narrative voices and silences that are constitutive of an intimate public sphere. This paper situates reciprocity as a condition of possibility for public privacy. It shows how reciprocity is enabled by systems of code operating through material and symbolic registers. Code promises to control communication, to produce neutral, systemic forms of meaning. Yet such automation is challenged by uneven and fragmented patterns of reciprocity. Moreover, examining the media of public privacy reveals historical trajectories important for understanding contemporary socio­technical platforms of reciprocity. To explore the implicit requirement of reciprocity in publicly private practices, three sites of communication are investigated framed by a media archaeology perspective: postal networks, the mail­art project PostSecret and the anonymous zine 'You'.

  4. Assortment and the evolution of generalized reciprocity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rankin, Daniel J; Taborsky, Michael

    2009-07-01

    Reciprocity is often invoked to explain cooperation. Reciprocity is cognitively demanding, and both direct and indirect reciprocity require that individuals store information about the propensity of their partners to cooperate. By contrast, generalized reciprocity, wherein individuals help on the condition that they received help previously, only relies on whether an individual received help in a previous encounter. Such anonymous information makes generalized reciprocity hard to evolve in a well-mixed population, as the strategy will lose out to pure defectors. Here we analyze a model for the evolution of generalized reciprocity, incorporating assortment of encounters, to investigate the conditions under which it will evolve. We show that, in a well-mixed population, generalized reciprocity cannot evolve. However, incorporating assortment of encounters can favor the evolution of generalized reciprocity in which indiscriminate cooperation and defection are both unstable. We show that generalized reciprocity can evolve under both the prisoner's dilemma and the snowdrift game.

  5. GATING CIRCUITS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merrill, L.C.

    1958-10-14

    Control circuits for vacuum tubes are described, and a binary counter having an improved trigger circuit is reported. The salient feature of the binary counter is the application of the input signal to the cathode of each of two vacuum tubes through separate capacitors and the connection of each cathode to ground through separate diodes. The control of the binary counter is achieved in this manner without special pulse shaping of the input signal. A further advantage of the circuit is the simplicity and minimum nuruber of components required, making its use particularly desirable in computer machines.

  6. Muscles innervated by a single motor neuron exhibit divergent synaptic properties on multiple time scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blitz, Dawn M; Pritchard, Amy E; Latimer, John K; Wakefield, Andrew T

    2017-01-19

    Adaptive changes in the output of neural circuits underlying rhythmic behaviors are relayed to muscles via motor neuron activity. Pre- and postsynaptic properties of neuromuscular junctions can impact the transformation from motor neuron activity to muscle response. Further, synaptic plasticity occurring on the time scale of inter-spike intervals can differ between multiple muscles innervated by the same motor neuron. In rhythmic behaviors, motor neuron bursts can elicit additional synaptic plasticity. However, it is unknown if plasticity regulated by the longer time scale of inter-burst intervals also differs between synapses from the same neuron, and whether any such distinctions occur across a physiological activity range. To address these issues, we measured electrical responses in muscles innervated by a chewing circuit neuron, the lateral gastric (LG) motor neuron, in a well-characterized small motor system, the stomatogastric nervous system (STNS) of the Jonah crab, Cancer borealis In vitro and in vivo, sensory, hormonal and modulatory inputs elicit LG bursting consisting of inter-spike intervals of 50-250 ms and inter-burst intervals of 2-24 s. Muscles expressed similar facilitation measured with paired stimuli except at the shortest inter-spike interval. However distinct decay time constants resulted in differences in temporal summation. In response to bursting activity, augmentation occurred to different extents and saturated at different inter-burst intervals in the three muscles. Further, augmentation interacted with facilitation, resulting in distinct intra-burst facilitation between muscles. Thus, responses of multiple target muscles diverge across a physiological activity range due to distinct synaptic properties sensitive to multiple time scales.

  7. Innervation of ectopic endometrium in a rat model of endometriosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berkley, Karen J; Dmitrieva, Natalia; Curtis, Kathleen S; Papka, Raymond E

    2004-07-27

    Endometriosis (ENDO) is a disorder in which vascularized growths of endometrial tissue occur outside the uterus. Its symptoms include reduced fertility and severe pelvic pain. Mechanisms that maintain the ectopic growths and evoke symptoms are poorly understood. One factor not yet considered is that the ectopic growths develop their own innervation. Here, we tested the hypothesis that the growths develop both an autonomic and a sensory innervation. We used a rat model of surgically induced ENDO whose growths mimic those in women. Furthermore, similar to women with ENDO, such rats exhibit reduced fertility and increased pelvic nociception. The ENDO was induced by autotransplanting, on mesenteric cascade arteries, small pieces of uterus that formed vascularized cysts. The cysts and healthy uterus were harvested from proestrous rats and immunostained using the pan-neuronal marker PGP9.5 and specific markers for calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) (sensory C and A delta fibers), substance P (SP) (sensory C and A delta fibers) and vesicular monoamine transporter (sympathetic fibers). Cysts (like the uterus) were robustly innervated, with many PGP9.5-stained neurites accompanying blood vessels and extending into nearby luminal epithelial layers. CGRP-, SP-, and vesicular monoamine transporter-immunostained neurites also were observed, with CGRP and SP neurites extending the furthest into the cyst lining. These results demonstrate that ectopic endometrial growths develop an autonomic and sensory innervation. This innervation could contribute not only to symptoms associated with ENDO but also to maintenance of the ectopic growths.

  8. Born Reciprocity and Cosmic Accelerations

    CERN Document Server

    Bolognesi, S

    2015-01-01

    The trans-Planckian theory is a model that realizes concretely the Born reciprocity idea, which is the postulate of absolute equivalence between coordinate $x$ and momenta $p$. This model is intrinsically global, and thus it is naturally implemented in a cosmological setting. Cosmology and Born reciprocity are made for each other. Inflation provides the essential mechanism to suppress the terms coming from the dual part of the action. The trans-Planckian theory, on the other hand, provides an explanation for the accelerated periods of the universe scale factor, both the inflationary period and the present period dominated by dark energy. All of this is possible just considering a simple model that contains gravity, one gauge field plus one matter field (to be identified with dark matter) together with the reciprocity principle.

  9. Non-Reciprocal Optical Antennas

    CERN Document Server

    Castro-Lopez, Marta; van Hulst, Niek F

    2014-01-01

    Plasmonics aims to interface photonics and electronics. Finding optical, near-field analogues of much used electro-technical components is crucial to the success of such a platform. Here we present the plasmonic analogue of a non-reciprocal antenna. For non-reciprocality in a plasmonic context, the optical excitation and emission resonances of the antenna need to be an orthogonal set. We show that nonlinear excitation of metal nanoantennas creates a sufficient shift between excitation and emission wavelengths that they can be interpreted as decoupled, allowing for independent tuning of excitation and emission properties along different spatial dimensions. This leads, for given excitation wavelength and polarization, to independent optimization of emission intensity, frequency spectrum, polarization and angular spectrum. Non-reciprocal optical antennas of both gold and aluminum are characterized and shown to be useful as e.g. nonlinear signal transducers or nanoscale sources of widely tunable light.

  10. Function and innervation of the involuntary m. retroauricularis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heuser, M

    1976-10-01

    Beside the automatic, obligatory and tonic coinnervation of the involuntary m. retroauricularis in conjugate lateral gaze (oculoauricular phenomenon, nystagmus) several other physiological ways of accidental coinnervation are described. In talking, chewing, swallowing and during involuntary inspiration irregular bursts of innervation may be registered. In sleep regular rhythmic inspiratory innervation is demonstrated as well as myoclonic jerks. With reservation, an allusion is made to rem-sleep. In "nervous subjects" irregular involuntary innervation of the m. retroauricularis might serve as a measurement instrument for the involuntary somatomotor nervous system, i.e. the degree of neurotic tensity. An early myasthenic reaction is gained from the M. retroauricularis in patients with ocular forms of the disease. A common motor nucleus of abducens and facial nerve is discussed. Complementary studies are announced on the various forms of facial paralysis, strabismus and nystagmus. A further diagnostic use is presumed.

  11. The Lesser Palatine Nerve Innervates the Levator Veli Palatini Muscle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuura, Yoshitaka; Kawai, Katsuya; Yamada, Shigehito; Suzuki, Shigehiko

    2016-01-01

    Summary: When the lesser palatine nerve (LPN) is supposed to be a branch of the trigeminal nerve and innervate sensation of the soft palate, whether the LPN contains motor fibers is unclear. In this study, we monitored the electromyogram of the levator veli palatini (LVP) muscle on stimulating the LPN during palatoplasty in 3 patients. The electromyogram of the muscles showed the myogenic potential induced by electrostimulation of the LPN. Taken together with the finding from our previous anatomical study that the motor fibers come from the facial nerve, this result supports the double innervation theory of the LVP, which posits that both the pharyngeal plexus and the facial nerve innervate it. Identifying and preserving the LPN during palatoplasty might improve postoperative speech results. PMID:27757354

  12. Extrinsic and local glutamatergic inputs of the rat hippocampal CA1 area differentially innervate pyramidal cells and interneurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takács, Virág T; Klausberger, Thomas; Somogyi, Peter; Freund, Tamás F; Gulyás, Attila I

    2012-06-01

    The two main glutamatergic pathways to the CA1 area, the Schaffer collateral/commissural input and the entorhinal fibers, as well as the local axons of CA1 pyramidal cells innervate both pyramidal cells and interneurons. To determine whether these inputs differ in their weights of activating GABAergic circuits, we have studied the relative proportion of pyramidal cells and interneurons among their postsynaptic targets in serial electron microscopic sections. Local axons of CA1 pyramidal cells, intracellularly labeled in vitro or in vivo, innervated a relatively high proportion of interneuronal postsynaptic targets (65.9 and 53.8%, in vitro and in vivo, respectively) in stratum (str.) oriens and alveus. In contrast, axons of in vitro labeled CA3 pyramidal cells in str. oriens and str. radiatum of the CA1 area made synaptic junctions predominantly with pyramidal cell spines (92.9%). The postsynaptic targets of anterogradely labeled medial entorhinal cortical boutons in CA1 str. lacunosum-moleculare were primarily pyramidal neuron dendritic spines and shafts (90.8%). The alvear group of the entorhinal afferents, traversing str. oriens, str. pyramidale, and str. radiatum showed a higher preference for innervating GABAergic cells (21.3%), particularly in str. oriens/alveus. These data demonstrate that different glutamatergic pathways innervate CA1 GABAergic cells to different extents. The results suggest that the numerically smaller CA1 local axonal inputs together with the alvear part of the entorhinal input preferentially act on GABAergic interneurons in contrast to the CA3, or the entorhinal input in str. lacunosum-moleculare. The results highlight differences in the postsynaptic target selection of the feed-forward versus recurrent glutamatergic inputs to the CA1 and CA3 areas.

  13. Remodelling sympathetic innervation in rat pancreatic islets ontogeny

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiriart Marcia

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pancreatic islets are not fully developed at birth and it is not clear how they are vascularised and innervated. Nerve Growth Factor (NGF is required to guide sympathetic neurons that innervate peripheral organs and also in cardiovascular system and ovary angiogenesis. Pancreatic beta cells of a transgenic mouse that over-expressed NGF in attracts sympathetic hyper-innervation towards them. Moreover, we have previously demonstrated that adult beta cells synthesize and secrete NGF; however, we do not know how is NGF secreted during development, nor if it might be trophic for sympathetic innervation and survival in the pancreas. We analyzed sympathetic innervation and vasculature development in rat pancreatic islets at different developmental stages; foetal (F19, early postnatal (P1, weaning period (P20 and adults. We temporarily correlated these events to NGF secretion by islet cells. Results Sympathetic fibres reached pancreatic islets in the early postnatal period, apparently following blood vessels. The maximal number of sympathetic fibres (TH immunopositive in the periphery of the islets was observed at P20, and then fibres entered the islets and reached the core where beta cells are mainly located. The number of fibres decreased from that stage to adulthood. At all stages studied, islet cells secreted NGF and also expressed the high affinity receptor TrkA. Foetal and neonatal isolated islet cells secreted more NGF than adults. TrkA receptors were expressed at all stages in pancreatic sympathetic fibres and blood vessels. These last structures were NGF–immunoreactive only at early stages (foetal and P0. Conclusion The results suggest that NGF signalling play an important role in the guidance of blood vessels and sympathetic fibres toward the islets during foetal and neonatal stages and could also preserve innervation at later stages of life.

  14. A Theory of Sequential Reciprocity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dufwenberg, M.; Kirchsteiger, G.

    1998-01-01

    Many experimental studies indicate that people are motivated by reciprocity. Rabin (1993) develops techniques for incorporating such concerns into game theory and economics. His model, however, does not fare well when applied to situations with an interesting dynamic structure (like many experimenta

  15. The Principle of Structural Reciprocity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pugnale, Alberto; Parigi, Dario; Kirkegaard, Poul Henning

    2011-01-01

    This paper deals with the principle of structural reciprocity, considering its origins in both Occidental and Orient culture and aiming to highlight the definition, main peculiarities and interesting aspects of such concept referring to its application to the world of construction. Issues spanning...

  16. Reciprocity theory of homogeneous reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agbormbai, Adolf A.

    1990-03-01

    The reciprocity formalism is applied to the homogeneous gaseous reactions in which the structure of the participating molecules changes upon collision with one another, resulting in a change in the composition of the gas. The approach is applied to various classes of dissociation, recombination, rearrangement, ionizing, and photochemical reactions. It is shown that for the principle of reciprocity to be satisfied it is necessary that all chemical reactions exist in complementary pairs which consist of the forward and backward reactions. The backward reaction may be described by either the reverse or inverse process. The forward and backward processes must satisfy the same reciprocity equation. Because the number of dynamical variables is usually unbalanced on both sides of a chemical equation, it is necessary that this balance be established by including as many of the dynamical variables as needed before the reciprocity equation can be formulated. Statistical transformation models of the reactions are formulated. The models are classified under the titles free exchange, restricted exchange and simplified restricted exchange. The special equations for the forward and backward processes are obtained. The models are consistent with the H theorem and Le Chatelier's principle. The models are also formulated in the context of the direct simulation Monte Carlo method.

  17. GENERALIZED RECIPROCAL THEOREMS AND THEIR APPLICATIONS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    付宝连

    2002-01-01

    Generalized reciprocal theorems of non-coupled and coupled systems , which are valid for two deformed bodies with different constitutive relations are established by generalizing the idea of Betti ' s reciprocal theorem. When the constitutive relations of the two deformed bodies are all alike and linear elastic, the generalized reciprocal theorem of non-coupled systems just becomes Betti' s . Meanwhile, the generalized reciprocal theorems are applied to simulate calculations in elasticity.

  18. Parallel basal ganglia circuits for decision making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hikosaka, Okihide; Ghazizadeh, Ali; Griggs, Whitney; Amita, Hidetoshi

    2017-02-02

    The basal ganglia control body movements, mainly, based on their values. Critical for this mechanism is dopamine neurons, which sends unpredicted value signals, mainly, to the striatum. This mechanism enables animals to change their behaviors flexibly, eventually choosing a valuable behavior. However, this may not be the best behavior, because the flexible choice is focused on recent, and, therefore, limited, experiences (i.e., short-term memories). Our old and recent studies suggest that the basal ganglia contain separate circuits that process value signals in a completely different manner. They are insensitive to recent changes in value, yet gradually accumulate the value of each behavior (i.e., movement or object choice). These stable circuits eventually encode values of many behaviors and then retain the value signals for a long time (i.e., long-term memories). They are innervated by a separate group of dopamine neurons that retain value signals, even when no reward is predicted. Importantly, the stable circuits can control motor behaviors (e.g., hand or eye) quickly and precisely, which allows animals to automatically acquire valuable outcomes based on historical life experiences. These behaviors would be called 'skills', which are crucial for survival. The stable circuits are localized in the posterior part of the basal ganglia, separately from the flexible circuits located in the anterior part. To summarize, the flexible and stable circuits in the basal ganglia, working together but independently, enable animals (and humans) to reach valuable goals in various contexts.

  19. An Inquiry into Relationship Suicides and Reciprocity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Mark S.; Callanan, Valerie J.; Lester, David; Haines, Janet

    2009-01-01

    Few theories on suicide have been grounded in the norm of reciprocity. There is literature on suicide, however, describing motivations such as retaliation and retreat which can be interpreted as modes of adaptation to the norm of reciprocity. We propose a reciprocity-based theory to explain suicides associated with relationship problems. Employing…

  20. Reciprocity of Interpersonal Attraction: A Confirmed Hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Voie, Lawrence; Kenny, David A.

    An increase in reciprocity of interpersonal attraction during the early acquaintance period followed by continuing social reciprocity are propositions that are central principles of several social psychological viewpoints. However, there is little empirical evidence of increasing reciprocity of interpersonal attraction over time. Two potential…

  1. Capuchin Monkeys Judge Third-Party Reciprocity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, James R.; Takimoto, Ayaka; Kuroshima, Hika; Fujita, Kazuo

    2013-01-01

    Increasing interest is being shown in how children develop an understanding of reciprocity in social exchanges and fairness in resource distribution, including social exchanges between third parties. Although there are descriptions of reciprocity on a one-to-one basis in other species, whether nonhumans detect reciprocity and violations of…

  2. 47 CFR 51.221 - Reciprocal compensation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Reciprocal compensation. 51.221 Section 51.221... Obligations of All Local Exchange Carriers § 51.221 Reciprocal compensation. The rules governing reciprocal compensation are set forth in subpart H of this part....

  3. Adaptive plasticity of vaginal innervation in term pregnant rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Zhaohui; Smith, Peter G

    2011-12-01

    Changes in reproductive status place varied functional demands on the vagina. These include receptivity to male intromission and sperm transport in estrus, barrier functions during early pregnancy, and providing a conduit for fetal passage at parturition. Peripheral innervation regulates vaginal function, which in turn may be influenced by circulating reproductive hormones. We assessed vaginal innervation in diestrus and estrus (before and after the estrous cycle surge in estrogen), and in the early (low estrogen) and late (high estrogen) stages in pregnancy. In vaginal sections from cycling rats, axons immunoreactive for the pan-neuronal marker protein gene product 9.5 (PGP 9.5) showed a small reduction at estrus relative to diestrus, but this difference did not persist after correcting for changes in target size. No changes were detected in axons immunoreactive for tyrosine hydroxylase (sympathetic), vesicular acetylcholine transporter (parasympathetic), or calcitonin gene-related peptide and transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV-1; sensory nociceptors). In rats at 10 days of pregnancy, innervation was similar to that observed in cycling rats. However, at 21 days of pregnancy, axons immunoreactive for PGP 9.5 and each of the subpopulation-selective markers were significantly reduced both when expressed as percentage of sectional area or after correcting for changes in target size. Because peripheral nerves regulate vaginal smooth muscle tone, blood flow, and pain sensitivity, reductions in innervation may represent important adaptive mechanisms facilitating parturition.

  4. Polyneural innervation in the psoas muscle of the developing rat

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ijkema-Paassen, J; Gramsbergen, A

    1998-01-01

    Polyneural innervation was studied in the psoas muscle in developing rats from P4 till P25 and at adult age, with the combined silver-acetylcholinesterase technique. Nerve endings were counted, and endplates were measured. These data were compared with such data in the human. The end of polyneural i

  5. Sensory innervation of the thoracolumbar fascia in rats and humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tesarz, J; Hoheisel, U; Wiedenhöfer, B; Mense, S

    2011-10-27

    The available data on the innervation of the thoracolumbar fascia (TLF) are inconsistent and partly contradictory. Therefore, the role of the fascia as a potential source of pain in the low back is difficult to assess. In the present study, a quantitative evaluation of calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) and substance P (SP)-containing free nerve endings was performed in the rat TLF. A preliminary non-quantitative evaluation was also performed in specimens of the human TLF. The data show that the TLF is a densely innervated tissue with marked differences in the distribution of the nerve endings over the fascial layers. In the rat, we distinguished three layers: (1) Outer layer (transversely oriented collagen fibers adjacent to the subcutaneous tissue), (2) middle layer (massive collagen fiber bundles oriented obliquely to the animal's long axis), and (3) inner layer (loose connective tissue covering the paraspinal muscles). The subcutaneous tissue and the outer layer showed a particularly dense innervation with sensory fibers. SP-positive free nerve endings-which are assumed to be nociceptive-were exclusively found in these layers. Because of its dense sensory innervation, including presumably nociceptive fibers, the TLF may play an important role in low back pain.

  6. Autonomic innervation of the heart. Role of molecular imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slart, Riemer H.J.A; Elsinga, Philip H. [Univ. Medical Center Groningen (Netherlands). Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging; Tio, Rene A. [Univ. Medical Center Groningen (Netherlands). Thorax Center Cardiology; Schwaiger, Markus (ed.) [Technische Univ. Muenchen Klinikum Rechts der Isar (Germany). Nuklearmedizinische Klinik

    2015-03-01

    Reviews in detail the value of SPECT-CT and PET-CT in the imaging of cardiac innervation. Details the role of imaging in a range of conditions and diseases. Includes important background on pathophysiology, tracers, radiopharmaceutical production, and kinetic modeling software. This book explains in detail the potential value of the hybrid modalities, SPECT-CT and PET-CT, in the imaging of cardiac innervation in a wide range of conditions and diseases, including ischemic heart disease, diabetes mellitus, heart failure, amyloidosis, heart transplantation, and ventricular arrhythmias. Imaging of the brain-heart axis in neurodegenerative disease and stress and of cardiotoxicity is also discussed. The roles of the various available tracers are fully considered, and individual chapters address radiopharmaceutical development under GMP, imaging physics, and kinetic modeling software. Highly relevant background information is included on the autonomic nervous system of the heart and its pathophysiology, and in addition future perspectives are discussed. Awareness of the importance of autonomic innervation of the heart for the optimal management of cardiac patients is growing, and there is an evident need for objective measurement techniques or imaging modalities. In this context, Autonomic Innervation of the Heart will be of wide interest to clinicians, researchers, and industry.

  7. Functional Reconstruction of Sarcoma Defects Utilising Innervated Free Flaps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damien Grinsell

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Soft-tissue reconstruction following preoperative radiotherapy and wide resection of soft tissue sarcoma remains a challenge. Pedicled and free tissue transfers are an essential part of limb sparing surgery. We report 22 cases of sarcoma treated with radiotherapy and wide excision followed by one-stage innervated free or pedicled musculocutaneous flap transfers. The resection involved the upper limb in 3 cases, the lower limb in 17, and the abdominal wall in 2. The flaps used for the reconstruction were mainly latissimus dorsi and gracilis. The range of motion was restored fully in 14 patients. The muscle strength of the compartment reconstructed was of grades 4 and 5 in all patients except one. The overall function was excellent in all the cases with functional scores of 71.2% in the upper limb and 84% in the lower limb. The only 2 major complications were flap necrosis, both revised with another flap, one of which was innervated with restoration of function. Innervated flaps are valuable alternatives for reconstruction after sarcoma resection in the extremity and in the abdominal wall. The excellent functional results are encouraging, and we believe that innervated muscle reconstruction should be encouraged in the treatment of sarcoma after radiotherapy and wide resection.

  8. Innervation of the hard palate of the rat

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liem, Swie Bing

    1989-01-01

    This study is undertaken to gain more insight into the pattern of innervation of the hard palate of the rat and into the morphology of the sensory structures found there. Since the main research project of the Department of Neurobiology and Oral Physiology is dedicated to the formulation of a model

  9. [The epiglottis, a glosso-laryngeal structure: an anatomic study of its innervation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Touré, G; Vacher, C

    2005-09-01

    The epiglottis is known as a laryngeal structure. The authors studied the innervation of epiglottis using the Sihler method on six human epiglottises. Innervation of the epiglottis depended on the rami from the vagus, glossopharyngeal and hypoglossal nerves. By its innervation, epiglottis seems to be a glosso-laryngeal structure, as is confirmed by embryology, histology and clinical applications.

  10. Using reciprocity in Boundary Element Calculations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juhl, Peter Møller; Cutanda Henriquez, Vicente

    2010-01-01

    The concept of reciprocity is widely used in both theoretical and experimental work. In Boundary Element calculations reciprocity is sometimes employed in the solution of computationally expensive scattering problems, which sometimes can be more efficiently dealt with when formulated...... as the reciprocal radiation problem. The present paper concerns the situation of having a point source (which is reciprocal to a point receiver) at or near a discretized boundary element surface. The accuracy of the original and the reciprocal problem is compared in a test case for which an analytical solution...

  11. Tacit Collusion under Fairness and Reciprocity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doruk İriş

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper departs from the standard profit-maximizing model of firm behavior by assuming that firms are motivated in part by personal animosity–or respect–towards their competitors. A reciprocal firm responds to unkind behavior of rivals with unkind actions (negative reciprocity, while at the same time, it responds to kind behavior of rivals with kind actions (positive reciprocity. We find that collusion is easier to sustain when firms have a concern for reciprocity towards competing firms provided that they consider collusive prices to be kind and punishment prices to be unkind. Thus, reciprocity concerns among firms can have adverse welfare consequences for consumers.

  12. Controllable circuit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2010-01-01

    A switch-mode power circuit comprises a controllable element and a control unit. The controllable element is configured to control a current in response to a control signal supplied to the controllable element. The control unit is connected to the controllable element and provides the control...

  13. Reciprocal uniparental disomy in yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Sabrina L; Petes, Thomas D

    2012-06-19

    In the diploid cells of most organisms, including humans, each chromosome is usually distinguishable from its partner homolog by multiple single-nucleotide polymorphisms. One common type of genetic alteration observed in tumor cells is uniparental disomy (UPD), in which a pair of homologous chromosomes are derived from a single parent, resulting in loss of heterozygosity for all single-nucleotide polymorphisms while maintaining diploidy. Somatic UPD events are usually explained as reflecting two consecutive nondisjunction events. Here we report a previously undescribed mode of chromosome segregation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae in which one cell division produces daughter cells with reciprocal UPD for the same pair of chromosomes without an aneuploid intermediate. One pair of sister chromatids is segregated into one daughter cell and the other pair is segregated into the other daughter cell, mimicking a meiotic chromosome segregation pattern. We term this process "reciprocal uniparental disomy."

  14. Indirect reciprocity with trinary reputations

    CERN Document Server

    Tanabe, Shoma; Masuda, Naoki

    2012-01-01

    Indirect reciprocity is a reputation-based mechanism for cooperation in social dilemma situations when individuals do not repeatedly meet. The conditions under which cooperation based on indirect reciprocity occurs has been examined in great details. Previous theoretical analysis assumed for mathematical tractability that an individual possesses a binary reputation value, i.e., good or bad, which depends on their past actions and other factors. However, in real situations, reputations of individuals may be multiple valued. Another puzzling discrepancy between the theory and experiments is the status of the so-called image scoring, in which cooperation and defection are judged to be good and bad, respectively, independent of other factors. Such an assessment rule is found in behavioral experiments, whereas it is known to be unstable in theory. In the present study, we fill both gaps by theoretical analysis of a trinary reputation model. By an exhaustive search, we identify all the cooperative and stable equili...

  15. Variations of lumbrical muscle innervation patterns in the hand, focusing on the dual innervation of the third lumbrical muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hur, Mi-Sun

    2017-02-01

    This study was conducted to clarify the innervation patterns of the lumbrical muscles by identifying the origin of the nerve fascicles innervating these muscles. The lumbricals in the hand were investigated in 50 specimens of embalmed Korean adult cadavers. Dual innervation of the third lumbrical was most frequently observed in 64.0%. The third lumbrical was innervated by a branch arising from the median nerve (MN) distal to site at which the superficial branch of the ulnar nerve (sUN) joins the MN in 34%. When separating and tracing the nerve fascicles from the MN distal to the communicating branch from the sUN to MN, the fascicles contained parts of the MN and sUN in 18% and part of the MN in 16%. These results will be helpful for accurate diagnoses, surgical procedures, and electrophysiological examinations in lesions of the MN and ulnar nerve in the hand. Muscle Nerve, 2016 Muscle Nerve 55: 160-165, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Excitatory orexinergic innervation of rat nucleus incertus--Implications for ascending arousal, motivation and feeding control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blasiak, Anna; Siwiec, Marcin; Grabowiecka, Agnieszka; Blasiak, Tomasz; Czerw, Anna; Blasiak, Ewa; Kania, Alan; Rajfur, Zenon; Lewandowski, Marian H; Gundlach, Andrew L

    2015-12-01

    Orexin/hypocretin peptides play a central role in the integrated control of feeding/reward and behavioural activation, principally via interactions with other neural systems. A brainstem area involved in behavioural activation is the nucleus incertus (NI), located in the posterior ventromedial central grey. Several studies have implicated NI in control of arousal/stress and reward/feeding responses. Orexin receptor mRNA expression identifies NI as a putative target of orexin modulation. Therefore, in this study we performed neural tract-tracing and immunofluorescence staining to characterise the orexinergic innervation of NI. Our results indicate a convergent innervation of the NI area by different orexin neuron populations, with an abundance of orexin-A-containing axons making putative synaptic contacts with relaxin-3-positive NI neurons. The influence of orexin-A on NI neuron activity was investigated using patch-clamp recordings. Orexin-A depolarised the majority (64%) of recorded neurons and this effect was maintained in the presence of tetrodotoxin and glutamate and GABA receptor antagonists, indicating a likely postsynaptic action. Voltage-clamp experiments revealed that in 'type I' NI neurons comprising relaxin-3-positive cells, orexin-A acted via L-type calcium channels, whereas in 'type II' relaxin-3-negative neurons, activation of a sodium/calcium exchanger was involved. A majority of the orexin-A sensitive neurons tested for the presence of orexin receptor mRNA, were OX2 mRNA-positive. Immunohistochemical staining for putative orexin receptors on NI neurons, confirmed stronger expression of OX2 than OX1 receptors. Our data demonstrate a strong influence of orexin-A on NI neurons, consistent with an important role for this hypothalamic/tegmental circuit in the regulation of arousal/vigilance and motivated behaviours.

  17. Optogenetic Demonstration of Functional Innervation of Mouse Colon by Neurons Derived From Transplanted Neural Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stamp, Lincon A; Gwynne, Rachel M; Foong, Jaime P P; Lomax, Alan E; Hao, Marlene M; Kaplan, David I; Reid, Christopher A; Petrou, Steven; Allen, Andrew M; Bornstein, Joel C; Young, Heather M

    2017-05-01

    Cell therapy offers the potential to treat gastrointestinal motility disorders caused by diseased or absent enteric neurons. We examined whether neurons generated from transplanted enteric neural cells provide a functional innervation of bowel smooth muscle in mice. Enteric neural cells expressing the light-sensitive ion channel, channelrhodopsin, were isolated from the fetal or postnatal mouse bowel and transplanted into the distal colon of 3- to 4-week-old wild-type recipient mice. Intracellular electrophysiological recordings of responses to light stimulation of the transplanted cells were made from colonic smooth muscle cells in recipient mice. Electrical stimulation of endogenous enteric neurons was used as a control. The axons of graft-derived neurons formed a plexus in the circular muscle layer. Selective stimulation of graft-derived cells by light resulted in excitatory and inhibitory junction potentials, the electrical events underlying contraction and relaxation, respectively, in colonic muscle cells. Graft-derived excitatory and inhibitory motor neurons released the same neurotransmitters as endogenous motor neurons-acetylcholine and a combination of adenosine triphosphate and nitric oxide, respectively. Graft-derived neurons also included interneurons that provided synaptic inputs to motor neurons, but the pharmacologic properties of interneurons varied with the age of the donors from which enteric neural cells were obtained. Enteric neural cells transplanted into the bowel give rise to multiple functional types of neurons that integrate and provide a functional innervation of the smooth muscle of the bowel wall. Circuits composed of both motor neurons and interneurons were established, but the age at which cells are isolated influences the neurotransmitter phenotype of interneurons that are generated. Copyright © 2017 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Imperfect information facilitates the evolution of reciprocity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurokawa, Shun

    2016-06-01

    The existence of cooperation demands explanation since cooperation is costly to the actor. Reciprocity has long been regarded as a potential explanatory mechanism for the existence of cooperation. Reciprocity is a mechanism wherein a cooperator responds to an opponent's behavior by switching his/her own behavior. Hence, a possible problematic case relevant to the theory of reciprocity evolution arises when the mechanism is such that the information regarding an opponent's behavior is imperfect. Although it has been confirmed also by previous theoretical studies that imperfect information interferes with the evolution of reciprocity, this argument is based on the assumption that there are no mistakes in behavior. And, a previous study presumed that it might be expected that when such mistakes occur, reciprocity can more readily evolve in the case of imperfect information than in the case of perfect information. The reason why the previous study considers so is that in the former case, reciprocators can miss defections incurred by other reciprocators' mistakes due to imperfect information, allowing cooperation to persist when such reciprocators meet. However, contrary to this expectation, the previous study has shown that even when mistakes occur, imperfect information interferes with the evolution of reciprocity. Nevertheless, the previous study assumed that payoffs are linear (i.e., that the effect of behavior is additive and there are no synergetic effects). In this study, we revisited the same problem but removed the assumption that payoffs are linear. We used evolutionarily stable strategy analysis to compare the condition for reciprocity to evolve when mistakes occur and information is imperfect with the condition for reciprocity to evolve when mistakes occur and information is perfect. Our study revealed that when payoffs are not linear, imperfect information can facilitate the evolution of reciprocity when mistakes occur; while when payoffs are linear

  19. [Adrenergic innervation and norepinephrine content in postnatal rat uterus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itoh, M

    1983-03-01

    Using fluorescent histochemical method and high performance liquid chromatography with electrochemical detector, we investigated adrenergic innervation and norepinephrine content in the rat uterus in the process of the growth. The adrenergic nerve terminals in the rat uterus developed with age and reached to adult level at 7 weeks of age after birth, although the short adrenergic ganglionic cells and small intense fluorescent cells were present even at birth. Norepinephrine content per organ also increased with age and reached to adult level at 10 weeks of age after birth, while NE content per gram wet tissue weight had a peak in 3-day-old rat uterus. These morphological and biochemical data revealed that the sympathetic nervous system in rat uterus matures in 7 to 10 weeks after birth, while the short adrenergic nervous system is accomplished in earlier stage. The maturation of adrenergic innervation in the uterus was considerably later than in the other organs of rat and developed with the sexual maturation.

  20. Characterisation of the primary afferent spinal innervation of mouse uterus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geraldine eHerweijer

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The primary afferent innervation of the uterus is incompletely understood. The aim of this study was to identify the location and characteristics of primary afferent neurons that innervate the uterine horn of mice and correlate the different morphological types of putative primary afferent nerve endings, immunoreactive to the sensory marker, calcitonin gene related peptide (CGRP. Using retrograde tracing, injection of 5-10µL of 1,1'-didodecyl-3,3,3,3'-tetramethylindocarbocyanine perchlorate (DiI into discrete single sites in each uterine horn revealed a biomodal distribution of sensory neurons in dorsal root ganglia (DRG with peak labelling occurring between T13-L3 and a second smaller peak between L6-S1. The mean cross sectional area of labelled cells was 463 µm2 +/- SEM. A significantly greater proportion of labelled neurons consisted of small cell bodies (<300 µm2 in the sacral spinal cord (S2 compared with peak labelling at the lumbar (L2 region. In both sections and whole mount preparations, immunohistochemical staining for CGRP revealed substantial innervation of the uterus by CGRP-positive nerve fibres located primarily at the border between the circular and longitudinal muscle layers (N=4. The nerve endings were classified into three distinct types: single, branching or complex, that often aligned preferentially in either the circular or longitudinal axis of the smooth muscles. Complex endings were often associated with mesenteric vessels. We have identified that the cell bodies of primary afferent neurons innervating the mouse uterus lie primarily in DRG at L2 and S1 spinal levels. Also, the greatest density of CGRP immunoreactivity lies within the myometrium, with at least three different morphological types of nerve endings identified. These findings will facilitate further investigations into the mechanisms underlying sensory transduction in mouse uterus.

  1. The innervated free toe web flap for clitoris reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dabernig, Jörg; Shelley, Odhran P; Schaff, Jürgen

    2007-01-01

    Clitoris reconstruction is often used in transgender reassignment. Most techniques now reconstruct the clitoris using glans pedicled on the dorsal phallic neurovascular bundle. Other techniques of clitoris reconstruction re-shape retained elements of the proximal segment of the corpora cavernosa, as well as techniques mobilising local flaps. We are presenting a new technique for clitoris reconstruction using an innervated free web space flap. The operative technique and outcome are illustrated and discussed in this case report.

  2. Analog and VLSI circuits

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Wai-Kai

    2009-01-01

    Featuring hundreds of illustrations and references, this book provides the information on analog and VLSI circuits. It focuses on analog integrated circuits, presenting the knowledge on monolithic device models, analog circuit cells, high performance analog circuits, RF communication circuits, and PLL circuits.

  3. Ovarian innervation develops before initiation of folliculogenesis in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malamed, S; Gibney, J A; Ojeda, S R

    1992-10-01

    Sympathetic neurotransmitters have been shown to be present in the ovary of the rat during early postnatal development and to affect steroidogenesis before the ovary becomes responsive to gonadotropins, and before the first primordial follicles are formed. This study was undertaken to determine if development of the ovarian innervation is an event that antedates the initiation of folliculogenesis in the rat, Rattus norvegicus. Serial sections of postnatal ovaries revealed a negligible frequency of follicles 24 h after birth (about 1 primordial follicle per ovary). Twelve hours later there were about 500 follicles per ovary, a number that more than doubled to about 1300 during the subsequent 12 h, indicating that an explosive period of follicular differentiation occurs between the end of postnatal days 1 and 2. Electron microscopy demonstrated that before birth the ovaries are already innervated by fibers containing clear and dense-core vesicles. Immunohistochemistry performed on either fetal (day 19) or newborn (less than 15h after birth) ovaries showed the presence of catecholaminergic nerves, identified by their content of immunoreactive tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), the rate-limiting enzyme in catecholamine biosynthesis. While some of these fibers innervate blood vessels, others are associated with primordial ovarian cells, thereby suggesting their participation in non-vascular functions. Since prefollicular ovaries are insensitive to gonadotropins, the results suggest that the developing ovary becomes subjected to direct neurogenic influences before it acquires responsiveness to gonadotropins.

  4. [Density of the neurovegetative innervation of the uterus of rats].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canon, E; Timmermans, L G

    1986-01-01

    Using the Karnovsky and Roots modified by E1 Badawi and Schenk's technic for the cholinergic innervation and with the method of Lindvall and Björklund modified by de la Torre and Surgeon for the adrenergic ones, we demonstrate the innervation of each tissular layer, in cervix, corpus and cornua of the uterus of the she-rat in pro-oestrus state. A statistic evaluation is established for the different areas. The density of cholinergic innervation is richer than the adrenergic one. The number of cholinergic fibers is maximum in the cervix. It decreases in corpus and cornua especially in the mucosal and sub-mucosal layers. The density of the muscular nervous network is predominant in the corpus versus the cervix. The number of adrenergic nerves is maximum in corpus it diminishes in the cervix and the cornua. In each region, the muscular adrenergic network domines over the other tissular layers. We confirm statistically morphometric non parametric observations of these other authors.

  5. Onsager Reciprocity in Premelting Solids

    KAUST Repository

    Peppin, S. S. L.

    2009-02-01

    The diffusive motion of foreign particles dispersed in a premelting solid is analyzed within the framework of irreversible thermodynamics. We determine the mass diffusion coefficient, thermal diffusion coefficient and Soret coefficient of the particles in the dilute limit, and find good agreement with experimental data. In contrast to liquid suspensions, the unique nature of premelting solids allows us to derive an expression for the Dufour coefficient and independently verify the Onsager reciprocal relation coupling diffusion to the flow of heat. © 2009 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC.

  6. Towards a unified theory of reciprocity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosas, Alejandro

    2012-02-01

    In a unified theory of human reciprocity, the strong and weak forms are similar because neither is biologically altruistic and both require normative motivation to support cooperation. However, strong reciprocity is necessary to support cooperation in public goods games. It involves inflicting costs on defectors; and though the costs for punishers are recouped, recouping costs requires complex institutions that would not have emerged if weak reciprocity had been enough.

  7. Qualitative and quantitative stability analysis of penta-rhythmic circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwabedal, Justus T. C.; Knapper, Drake E.; Shilnikov, Andrey L.

    2016-12-01

    Inhibitory circuits of relaxation oscillators are often-used models for dynamics of biological networks. We present a qualitative and quantitative stability analysis of such a circuit constituted by three generic oscillators (of a Fitzhugh-Nagumo type) as its nodes coupled reciprocally. Depending on inhibitory strengths, and parameters of individual oscillators, the circuit exhibits polyrhythmicity of up to five simultaneously stable rhythms. With methods of bifurcation analysis and phase reduction, we investigate qualitative changes in stability of these circuit rhythms for a wide range of parameters. Furthermore, we quantify robustness of the rhythms maintained under random perturbations by monitoring phase diffusion in the circuit. Our findings allow us to describe how circuit dynamics relate to dynamics of individual nodes. We also find that quantitative and qualitative stability properties of polyrhythmicity do not always align.

  8. Circuit Connectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-01-01

    The U-shaped wire devices in the upper photo are Digi-Klipsm; aids to compact packaging of electrical and electronic devices. They serve as connectors linking the circuitry of one circuit board with another in multi-board systems. Digi-Klips were originally developed for Goddard Space Flight Center to meet a need for lightweight, reliable connectors to replace hand-wired connections formerly used in spacecraft. They are made of beryllium copper wire, noted for its excellent conductivity and its spring-like properties, which assure solid electrical contact over a long period of time.

  9. Reciprocally-Rotating Velocity Obstacles

    KAUST Repository

    Giese, Andrew

    2014-05-01

    © 2014 IEEE. Modern multi-agent systems frequently use highlevel planners to extract basic paths for agents, and then rely on local collision avoidance to ensure that the agents reach their destinations without colliding with one another or dynamic obstacles. One state-of-the-art local collision avoidance technique is Optimal Reciprocal Collision Avoidance (ORCA). Despite being fast and efficient for circular-shaped agents, ORCA may deadlock when polygonal shapes are used. To address this shortcoming, we introduce Reciprocally-Rotating Velocity Obstacles (RRVO). RRVO generalizes ORCA by introducing a notion of rotation for polygonally-shaped agents. This generalization permits more realistic motion than ORCA and does not suffer from as much deadlock. In this paper, we present the theory of RRVO and show empirically that it does not suffer from the deadlock issue ORCA has, permits agents to reach goals faster, and has a comparable collision rate at the cost of performance overhead quadratic in the (typically small) user-defined parameter δ.

  10. Indirect reciprocity with trinary reputations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanabe, Shoma; Suzuki, Hideyuki; Masuda, Naoki

    2013-01-21

    Indirect reciprocity is a reputation-based mechanism for cooperation in social dilemma situations when individuals do not repeatedly meet. The conditions under which cooperation based on indirect reciprocity occurs have been examined in great details. Most previous theoretical analysis assumed for mathematical tractability that an individual possesses a binary reputation value, i.e., good or bad, which depends on their past actions and other factors. However, in real situations, reputations of individuals may be multiple valued. Another puzzling discrepancy between the theory and experiments is the status of the so-called image scoring, in which cooperation and defection are judged to be good and bad, respectively, independent of other factors. Such an assessment rule is found in behavioral experiments, whereas it is known to be unstable in theory. In the present study, we fill both gaps by analyzing a trinary reputation model. By an exhaustive search, we identify all the cooperative and stable equilibria composed of a homogeneous population or a heterogeneous population containing two types of players. Some results derived for the trinary reputation model are direct extensions of those for the binary model. However, we find that the trinary model allows cooperation under image scoring under some mild conditions. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Selective innervation of fast and slow muscle regions during early chick neuromuscular development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafuse, V F; Milner, L D; Landmesser, L T

    1996-11-01

    The electrical properties of adult motoneurons are well matched to the contractile properties of the fast or slow muscle fibers that they innervate. How this precise matching occurs developmentally is not known. To investigate whether motoneurons exhibit selectivity in innervating discrete muscle regions, containing either fast or slow muscle fibers during early neuromuscular development, we caused embryonic chick hindlimb muscles to become innervated by segmentally inappropriate motoneurons. We used the in vitro spinal cord-hindlimb preparation to identify electrophysiologically the pools of foreign motoneurons innervating the posterior iliotibialis (pITIB), an all-fast muscle, and the iliofibularis (IFIB), a partitioned muscle containing discrete fast and slow regions. The results showed that the pITIB and the fast region of the IFIB were exclusively innervated by motoneurons that normally supply fast muscles. In contrast, the slow region of the IFIB was always innervated by motoneuron pools that normally supply slow muscles. Some experimental IFIB muscles lacked a fast region and were innervated solely by "slow" motoneurons. In addition, the intramuscular nerve branching patterns were always appropriate to the fast-slow nature of the muscle (region) innervated. The selective innervation was found early in the motoneuron death period, and we found no evidence that motoneurons grew into appropriate muscle regions, but failed to form functional contacts. Together, these results support the hypothesis that different classes of motoneurons exhibit molecular differences that allow them to project selectively to, and innervate, muscle fibers of the appropriate type during early neuromuscular development.

  12. LOGIC CIRCUIT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strong, G.H.; Faught, M.L.

    1963-12-24

    A device for safety rod counting in a nuclear reactor is described. A Wheatstone bridge circuit is adapted to prevent de-energizing the hopper coils of a ball backup system if safety rods, sufficient in total control effect, properly enter the reactor core to effect shut down. A plurality of resistances form one arm of the bridge, each resistance being associated with a particular safety rod and weighted in value according to the control effect of the particular safety rod. Switching means are used to switch each of the resistances in and out of the bridge circuit responsive to the presence of a particular safety rod in its effective position in the reactor core and responsive to the attainment of a predetermined velocity by a particular safety rod enroute to its effective position. The bridge is unbalanced in one direction during normal reactor operation prior to the generation of a scram signal and the switching means and resistances are adapted to unbalance the bridge in the opposite direction if the safety rods produce a predetermined amount of control effect in response to the scram signal. The bridge unbalance reversal is then utilized to prevent the actuation of the ball backup system, or, conversely, a failure of the safety rods to produce the predetermined effect produces no unbalance reversal and the ball backup system is actuated. (AEC)

  13. Collective of mechatronics circuit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1987-02-15

    This book is composed of three parts, which deals with mechatronics system about sensor, circuit and motor. The contents of the first part are photo sensor of collector for output, locating detection circuit with photo interrupts, photo sensor circuit with CdS cell and lamp, interface circuit with logic and LED and temperature sensor circuit. The second part deals with oscillation circuit with crystal, C-R oscillation circuit, F-V converter, timer circuit, stability power circuit, DC amp and DC-DC converter. The last part is comprised of bridge server circuit, deformation bridge server, controlling circuit of DC motor, controlling circuit with IC for PLL and driver circuit of stepping motor and driver circuit of Brushless.

  14. Loneliness, exchange orientation, and reciprocity in friendships

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buunk, Abraham (Bram); Prins, K.S.

    1998-01-01

    Guided by equity theory this study among 185 Dutch students explored the effects of exchange orientation and reciprocity in the relationship with the best friend upon loneliness. Reciprocity was in general more common in this relationship than feeling advantaged or deprived. The association between

  15. Free-Form Kinetic Reciprocal System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Parigi, Dario; Sassone, Mario

    2011-01-01

    Kinetic Reciprocal System (KRS) are innovative moveable structures based on the principle of reciprocity [1] with internal pin-slot constraints [2]. The analysis of KRS kinematic and static determinacy is developed through the construction of kinematic matrices, accordingly with [3...

  16. Education, Gift and Reciprocity: A Preliminary Discussion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabourin, Eric

    2013-01-01

    This paper analyzes the importance and role of the reciprocity relationship in education. It presents a review on the mobilization of the principle of reciprocity--in the anthropological but also sociological and economic senses--in educational processes, especially in adult education. The study is divided into three parts. The first part analyzes…

  17. An Introduction to the Onsager Reciprocal Relations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monroe, Charles W.; Newman, John

    2007-01-01

    The Onsager reciprocal relations are essential to multicomponent transport theory. A discussion of the principles that should be used to derive flux laws for coupled diffusion is presented here. Fluctuation theory is employed to determine the reciprocal relation for transport coefficients that characterize coupled mass and heat transfer in binary…

  18. Implementing Reciprocal Teaching: Was It Effective?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Hilawani, Yasser A.; And Others

    This study was conducted to explore the relationship between teaching methods and students' grades at the college level. Subjects, 58 undergraduate students enrolled in 2 introductory education courses, were organized into groups and exposed to one of two teaching methods: the lecture format and reciprocal teaching. Reciprocal teaching engages…

  19. Loneliness, exchange orientation, and reciprocity in friendships

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buunk, Abraham (Bram); Prins, K.S.

    1998-01-01

    Guided by equity theory this study among 185 Dutch students explored the effects of exchange orientation and reciprocity in the relationship with the best friend upon loneliness. Reciprocity was in general more common in this relationship than feeling advantaged or deprived. The association between

  20. Reciprocity Outperforms Conformity to Promote Cooperation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romano, Angelo; Balliet, Daniel

    2017-08-01

    Evolutionary psychologists have proposed two processes that could give rise to the pervasiveness of human cooperation observed among individuals who are not genetically related: reciprocity and conformity. We tested whether reciprocity outperformed conformity in promoting cooperation, especially when these psychological processes would promote a different cooperative or noncooperative response. To do so, across three studies, we observed participants' cooperation with a partner after learning (a) that their partner had behaved cooperatively (or not) on several previous trials and (b) that their group members had behaved cooperatively (or not) on several previous trials with that same partner. Although we found that people both reciprocate and conform, reciprocity has a stronger influence on cooperation. Moreover, we found that conformity can be partly explained by a concern about one's reputation-a finding that supports a reciprocity framework.

  1. Quantum coherence: Reciprocity and distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Asutosh

    2017-03-01

    Quantum coherence is the outcome of the superposition principle. Recently, it has been theorized as a quantum resource, and is the premise of quantum correlations in multipartite systems. It is therefore interesting to study the coherence content and its distribution in a multipartite quantum system. In this work, we show analytically as well as numerically the reciprocity between coherence and mixedness of a quantum state. We find that this trade-off is a general feature in the sense that it is true for large spectra of measures of coherence and of mixedness. We also study the distribution of coherence in multipartite systems by looking at monogamy-type relation-which we refer to as additivity relation-between coherences of different parts of the system. We show that for the Dicke states, while the normalized measures of coherence violate the additivity relation, the unnormalized ones satisfy the same.

  2. The relationship between reciprocity and burnout in Dutch medical residents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prins, Jelle T.; Gazendam-Donofrio, Stacey M.; Dillingh, Gea S.; van de Wiel, Harry B. M.; van der Heijden, Frank M. M. A.; Hoekstra-Weebers, Josette E. H. M.

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE This study examined reciprocity in medical residents' relationships with supervisors, fellow residents, nurses and patients, and associations between reciprocity and burnout. Furthermore, we considered if a discrepancy between the perceived and preferred levels of reciprocity influenced th

  3. Egr3 dependent sympathetic target tissue innervation in the absence of neuron death.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Li

    Full Text Available Nerve Growth Factor (NGF is a target tissue derived neurotrophin required for normal sympathetic neuron survival and target tissue innervation. NGF signaling regulates gene expression in sympathetic neurons, which in turn mediates critical aspects of neuron survival, axon extension and terminal axon branching during sympathetic nervous system (SNS development. Egr3 is a transcription factor regulated by NGF signaling in sympathetic neurons that is essential for normal SNS development. Germline Egr3-deficient mice have physiologic dysautonomia characterized by apoptotic sympathetic neuron death and abnormal innervation to many target tissues. The extent to which sympathetic innervation abnormalities in the absence of Egr3 is caused by altered innervation or by neuron death during development is unknown. Using Bax-deficient mice to abrogate apoptotic sympathetic neuron death in vivo, we show that Egr3 has an essential role in target tissue innervation in the absence of neuron death. Sympathetic target tissue innervation is abnormal in many target tissues in the absence of neuron death, and like NGF, Egr3 also appears to effect target tissue innervation heterogeneously. In some tissues, such as heart, spleen, bowel, kidney, pineal gland and the eye, Egr3 is essential for normal innervation, whereas in other tissues such as lung, stomach, pancreas and liver, Egr3 appears to have little role in innervation. Moreover, in salivary glands and heart, two tissues where Egr3 has an essential role in sympathetic innervation, NGF and NT-3 are expressed normally in the absence of Egr3 indicating that abnormal target tissue innervation is not due to deregulation of these neurotrophins in target tissues. Taken together, these results clearly demonstrate a role for Egr3 in mediating sympathetic target tissue innervation that is independent of neuron survival or neurotrophin deregulation.

  4. Commutation circuit for an HVDC circuit breaker

    Science.gov (United States)

    Premerlani, William J.

    1981-01-01

    A commutation circuit for a high voltage DC circuit breaker incorporates a resistor capacitor combination and a charging circuit connected to the main breaker, such that a commutating capacitor is discharged in opposition to the load current to force the current in an arc after breaker opening to zero to facilitate arc interruption. In a particular embodiment, a normally open commutating circuit is connected across the contacts of a main DC circuit breaker to absorb the inductive system energy trapped by breaker opening and to limit recovery voltages to a level tolerable by the commutating circuit components.

  5. The spatiotemporal development of innervation in spinal ligaments of chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, H; Moreau, M; Greidanus, N; Bilo, J; Russell, G; Raso, J; Bagnall, K

    1996-08-01

    The development of the innervation of both central and lateral (intertransverse) spinal ligaments was investigated in chickens between the time of hatching and 13 wk of age. A total of 36 White Leghorn chickens in 4 groups of 9 at ages 0, 2, 7, and 13 wk were used. The spinal ligaments were dissected, serially sectioned and labelled with a monoclonal antibody against neurofilament protein and observed using either conventional fluorescence or confocal microscopy. Only a few nerve elements were found in the ligaments at hatching and these consisted simply of single nerve fibres and small nerve bundles. The number of nerve elements increased rapidly up to 7 wk of age when large nerve bundles and Ruffini corpuscles were also found. The number of nerve elements decreased between 7 and 13 wk birds when the ligaments had begun to ossify and the amount of collagenous ligamentous tissue was significantly reduced. The fluctuation in numbers of neural elements was due to changes in numbers of single nerve fibres and small nerve bundles rather than large nerve bundles and Ruffini corpuscles which remained constant. In contrast to this significant increase in numbers of nerve elements, the innervation density of the ligaments decreased because of the overwhelming increase of the ligament volume due to growth. There were no differences between ligaments on the left and right sides of the body, but there was an unequal distribution of the neural elements within the ligaments; most were found in the cranial third of the intertransverse ligaments. These results show that significant changes in innervation of spinal ligaments occur during development and reflect the possibility that damage to the ligaments during this time could produce significant and permanent damage, especially in relation to the maintenance of an erect spine.

  6. Magnetic-free non-reciprocity and isolation based on parametrically modulated coupled-resonator loops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estep, Nicholas A.; Sounas, Dimitrios L.; Soric, Jason; Alù, Andrea

    2014-12-01

    Non-reciprocal components, which are essential to many modern communication systems, are almost exclusively based on magneto-optical materials, severely limiting their applicability. A practical and inexpensive route to magnetic-free non-reciprocity could revolutionize radio-frequency and nanophotonic communication networks. Angular-momentum biasing was recently proposed as a means of realizing isolation for sound waves travelling in a rotating medium, and envisaged as a path towards compact, linear integrated non-reciprocal electromagnetic components. Inspired by this concept, here we demonstrate a subwavelength, linear radio-frequency non-reciprocal circulator free from magnetic materials and bias. The scheme is based on the parametric modulation of three identical, strongly and symmetrically coupled resonators. Their resonant frequencies are modulated by external signals with the same amplitude and a relative phase difference of 120°, imparting an effective electronic angular momentum to the system. We observe giant non-reciprocity, with up to six orders of magnitude difference in transmission for opposite directions. Furthermore, the device topology is tunable in real time, and can be directly embedded in a conventional integrated circuit.

  7. Localization of motoneurons innervating individual abdominal muscles of the cat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Alan D.

    1987-01-01

    The paper presents the results of a systematic investigation of the innervation of the cat's individual abdominal muscles. The segmental distribution of the different motor pools was determined by using electrical microstimulation of the ventral horn to produce visible localized muscle twitches and by retrograde transport of horseradish peroxidase injected into individual muscles. The segmental distribution of each motor pool was as follows: rectus abdominis, T4-L3; external oblique, T6-L3; transverse abdominis, T9-L3; and internal oblique, T13-L3.

  8. [The sources of the adrenergic innervation of the rat uterus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proĭmina, F I; Rakitskaia, V V

    1990-09-01

    Complete disappearance of adrenergic fibers in the rat uterus is only possible after complete removal of ovaries along with ovarian plexus, transection of the uterus-vaginal connexion and removal of a portion of sympathetic nervous trunk. "Long" adrenergic neurons situated in spinal sympathetic ganglia, seem not to be the only source of sympathetic innervation of the myometrium's vessels. A part of nervous fibers of vascular plexuses and all muscle nerves are represented by "short" neurons starting from the ganglionic structures of the uterus-vaginal connexion.

  9. Double innervations to the superior belly of omohyoid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rao TR

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Awareness in the variations of infrahyoid muscles is useful guide for both in studies of human anatomy and in clinical practice today. The use of muscular flaps as a reconstructive tool requires a thorough anatomical knowledge of its blood supply and innervations. These muscles vary considerably in the extent of their development. The omohyoid is the most frequently absent muscle of this group. We present a rare case of double nerve supply to the superior belly of omohyoid, which was found during our routine anatomical dissection on the right side of the neck of a 55-year-old male cadaver.

  10. Analog circuit design designing dynamic circuit response

    CERN Document Server

    Feucht, Dennis

    2010-01-01

    This second volume, Designing Dynamic Circuit Response builds upon the first volume Designing Amplifier Circuits by extending coverage to include reactances and their time- and frequency-related behavioral consequences.

  11. Broadband non-reciprocal transmission of sound with invariant frequency

    CERN Document Server

    Gu, Zhong-ming; Liang, Bin; Zou, Xin-ye; Cheng, Jian-chun

    2015-01-01

    The emergence of "acoustic diode" (AD) capable of rectifying acoustic wave like electrical diodes do to electricity has been believed to be able to offer unconventional manipulation on sound, e.g., to isolate the wrong-way reflection, and therefore have great potential in various important scenarios such as medical ultrasound applications. However, the existing ADs have always been suffering from the problem that the transmitted wave must have either doubled frequency or deviated direction, lacking the most crucial features for achieving such expectations in practice. Here we design and experimentally demonstrate a broadband yet compact non-reciprocal device with hitherto inaccessible functionality of maintaining the original frequency and high forward transmission while virtually blocking the backscattered wave, which is close to what a perfect AD is expected to provide and is promising to play the essential role in realistic acoustic systems like electric diodes do in electrical circuits. Such an extreme ab...

  12. Reciprocity and Ethical Tuberculosis Treatment and Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Diego S; Dawson, Angus; Upshur, Ross E G

    2016-03-01

    This paper explores the notion of reciprocity in the context of active pulmonary and laryngeal tuberculosis (TB) treatment and related control policies and practices. We seek to do three things: First, we sketch the background to contemporary global TB care and suggest that poverty is a key feature when considering the treatment of TB patients. We use two examples from TB care to explore the role of reciprocity: isolation and the use of novel TB drugs. Second, we explore alternative means of justifying the use of reciprocity through appeal to different moral and political theoretical traditions (i.e., virtue ethics, deontology, and consequentialism). We suggest that each theory can be used to provide reasons to take reciprocity seriously as an independent moral concept, despite any other differences. Third, we explore general meanings and uses of the concept of reciprocity, with the primary intention of demonstrating that it cannot be simply reduced to other more frequently invoked moral concepts such as beneficence or justice. We argue that reciprocity can function as a mid-level principle in public health, and generally, captures a core social obligation arising once an individual or group is burdened as a result of acting for the benefit of others (even if they derive a benefit themselves). We conclude that while more needs to be explored in relation to the theoretical justification and application of reciprocity, sufficient arguments can be made for it to be taken more seriously as a key principle within public health ethics and bioethics more generally.

  13. Hox genes: choreographers in neural development, architects of circuit organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philippidou, Polyxeni; Dasen, Jeremy S

    2013-10-02

    The neural circuits governing vital behaviors, such as respiration and locomotion, are comprised of discrete neuronal populations residing within the brainstem and spinal cord. Work over the past decade has provided a fairly comprehensive understanding of the developmental pathways that determine the identity of major neuronal classes within the neural tube. However, the steps through which neurons acquire the subtype diversities necessary for their incorporation into a particular circuit are still poorly defined. Studies on the specification of motor neurons indicate that the large family of Hox transcription factors has a key role in generating the subtypes required for selective muscle innervation. There is also emerging evidence that Hox genes function in multiple neuronal classes to shape synaptic specificity during development, suggesting a broader role in circuit assembly. This Review highlights the functions and mechanisms of Hox gene networks and their multifaceted roles during neuronal specification and connectivity.

  14. Two distinct neural mechanisms underlying indirect reciprocity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Takamitsu; Takezawa, Masanori; Nakawake, Yo; Kunimatsu, Akira; Yamasue, Hidenori; Nakamura, Mitsuhiro; Miyashita, Yasushi; Masuda, Naoki

    2014-03-18

    Cooperation is a hallmark of human society. Humans often cooperate with strangers even if they will not meet each other again. This so-called indirect reciprocity enables large-scale cooperation among nonkin and can occur based on a reputation mechanism or as a succession of pay-it-forward behavior. Here, we provide the functional and anatomical neural evidence for two distinct mechanisms governing the two types of indirect reciprocity. Cooperation occurring as reputation-based reciprocity specifically recruited the precuneus, a region associated with self-centered cognition. During such cooperative behavior, the precuneus was functionally connected with the caudate, a region linking rewards to behavior. Furthermore, the precuneus of a cooperative subject had a strong resting-state functional connectivity (rsFC) with the caudate and a large gray matter volume. In contrast, pay-it-forward reciprocity recruited the anterior insula (AI), a brain region associated with affective empathy. The AI was functionally connected with the caudate during cooperation occurring as pay-it-forward reciprocity, and its gray matter volume and rsFC with the caudate predicted the tendency of such cooperation. The revealed difference is consistent with the existing results of evolutionary game theory: although reputation-based indirect reciprocity robustly evolves as a self-interested behavior in theory, pay-it-forward indirect reciprocity does not on its own. The present study provides neural mechanisms underlying indirect reciprocity and suggests that pay-it-forward reciprocity may not occur as myopic profit maximization but elicit emotional rewards.

  15. ADVANCED RECIPROCATING COMPRESSION TECHNOLOGY (ARCT)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Danny M. Deffenbaugh; Klaus Brun; Ralph E. Harris; J. Pete Harrell; Robert J. Mckee; J. Jeffrey Moore; Steven J. Svedeman; Anthony J. Smalley; Eugene L. Broerman; Robert A Hart; Marybeth G. Nored; Ryan S. Gernentz; Shane P. Siebenaler

    2005-12-01

    The U.S. natural gas pipeline industry is facing the twin challenges of increased flexibility and capacity expansion. To meet these challenges, the industry requires improved choices in gas compression to address new construction and enhancement of the currently installed infrastructure. The current fleet of installed reciprocating compression is primarily slow-speed integral machines. Most new reciprocating compression is and will be large, high-speed separable units. The major challenges with the fleet of slow-speed integral machines are: limited flexibility and a large range in performance. In an attempt to increase flexibility, many operators are choosing to single-act cylinders, which are causing reduced reliability and integrity. While the best performing units in the fleet exhibit thermal efficiencies between 90% and 92%, the low performers are running down to 50% with the mean at about 80%. The major cause for this large disparity is due to installation losses in the pulsation control system. In the better performers, the losses are about evenly split between installation losses and valve losses. The major challenges for high-speed machines are: cylinder nozzle pulsations, mechanical vibrations due to cylinder stretch, short valve life, and low thermal performance. To shift nozzle pulsation to higher orders, nozzles are shortened, and to dampen the amplitudes, orifices are added. The shortened nozzles result in mechanical coupling with the cylinder, thereby, causing increased vibration due to the cylinder stretch mode. Valve life is even shorter than for slow speeds and can be on the order of a few months. The thermal efficiency is 10% to 15% lower than slow-speed equipment with the best performance in the 75% to 80% range. The goal of this advanced reciprocating compression program is to develop the technology for both high speed and low speed compression that will expand unit flexibility, increase thermal efficiency, and increase reliability and integrity

  16. Analog circuit design designing waveform processing circuits

    CERN Document Server

    Feucht, Dennis

    2010-01-01

    The fourth volume in the set Designing Waveform-Processing Circuits builds on the previous 3 volumes and presents a variety of analog non-amplifier circuits, including voltage references, current sources, filters, hysteresis switches and oscilloscope trigger and sweep circuitry, function generation, absolute-value circuits, and peak detectors.

  17. Microfluidics co-culture systems for studying tooth innervation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierfrancesco ePagella

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Innervation plays a key role in the development and homeostasis of organs and tissues of the orofacial complex. Among these structures, teeth are peculiar organs as they are not innervated until later stages of development. Furthermore, the implication of neurons in tooth initiation, morphogenesis and differentiation is still controversial. Co-cultures constitute a valuable method to investigate and manipulate the interactions of nerve fibres with their target organs in a controlled and isolated environment. Conventional co-cultures between neurons and their target tissues have already been performed, but these cultures do not offer optimal conditions that are closely mimicking the in vivo situation. Indeed, specific cell populations require different culture media in order to preserve their physiological properties. In this study we evaluate the usefulness of a microfluidics system for co-culturing mouse trigeminal ganglia and developing teeth. This device allows the application of specific media for the appropriate development of both neuronal and dental tissues. The results show that mouse trigeminal ganglia and teeth survive for long culture periods in this microfluidics system, and that teeth maintain the attractive or repulsive effect on trigeminal neurites that has been observed in vivo. Neurites are repealed when co-cultured with embryonic tooth germs, while postnatal teeth exert an attractive effect to trigeminal ganglia-derived neurons.In conclusion, microfluidics system devices provide a valuable tool for studying the behaviour of neurons during the development of orofacial tissues and organs, faithfully imitating the in vivo situation.

  18. Structural studies of innervation on nonpregnant rat uterus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garfield, R E

    1986-07-01

    Whole-mount preparations of the uterus and mesentery from nonpregnant rats were examined after staining with glyoxylic acid or acetylcholinesterase to demonstrate the innervation. Some uterine tissues were also evaluated by electron microscopy. Glyoxylic acid fluorescent nerves were present in the mesentery, mesometrium, and uterine wall exclusively around blood vessels. Acetylcholinesterase positive nerve fibers from Frankenhäuser's plexus (cervical ganglia) were associated with blood vessels and muscle in the uterine wall but not in the mesentery. Electron microscopy revealed nerve varicosities with granular vesicles associated with blood vessels and varicosities with agranular vesicles located near blood vessels and muscle cells. Treatment of animals for 3 days with 5- and 6-hydroxydopamine, respectively, increased granular size and damaged the varicosities with granular vesicles but did not change nerves with agranular vesicles or induce the presence of gap junctions. The results of this study suggest that blood vessels in the uterus are highly innervated by both adrenergic and other types of nerves that probably control blood flow. Nonadrenergic but not adrenergic nerves may also directly control myometrial contractility.

  19. [Microscopic innervation and vascularization of the tongue. General study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuentes, A; Sanchiz, O

    1992-01-01

    Our study deals with 23 prenatal human tongues, and a comparative study was carried out on one neonatal tongue and a few human and animal postnatal tongues. Sagittal and coronal sections were stained with various techniques. After the 7th week, the development of the nerves and their relationships with the neighboring structures can be observed. There are very few capillaries making up the superficial vascular network under the epithelium. The vessels whose walls are beginning to develop include the future red blood cells with their basophilic nuclei. During the whole process of evolution, there is a tight correlation between the collagen fibers and the neighboring structures. The innervation and vascularization--the latter with changes in the vascular walls--progressively increase. A short time before birth, the nerve fibers include their characteristic components, except for the Schmidt-Lantermann fissures. A considerable innervation advances towards the papillae, and anterior and posterior nerve networks enter the papillae, whose connective tissue includes groups of corpuscles on serial sections.

  20. Ontogeny of innervation of rat and ovine fetal adrenals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engeland, W C; Wotus, C; Rose, J C

    1998-01-01

    The formation of adrenocortical zonation occurs in rats during late gestation. Since adult cortical function is modulated by neural mediators, it is possible that the development of differentiated function is dependent on cortical innervation. The goal of this study was to compare the pattern and timing of rodent and ovine adrenal innervation during late organogenesis by staining with antibodies directed against the neuropeptides vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP), calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) and neuropeptide tyrosine (NPY) and the catecholamine biosynthetic enzyme, tyrosine hydroxylase (TOH). Rat adrenals were collected from fetal days 17-21 (term=21 days) and ovine adrenals from fetal days 101-136 (term=145 days). Adrenals were fixed, cryosectioned at 100 microns and immunostained using Cy3-conjugated secondary antibodies. In both species, staining of VIP, CGRP, NPY and TOH fibers was observed in the capsule and subcapsular layers of the cortex during gestation. In late gestation, VIP- and NPY-positive ganglions cells were observed near the medulla extending processes toward the outer cortex; in ovine adrenals, fibers from ganglion cells appeared to surround nests of outer cortical (presumably, zona glomerulosa) cells. These data show that phenotypically distinct neural elements appear at different stages of adrenocortical development. The presence of neural elements in contact with adrenal cortical cells supports the possibility for neural control of adrenocortical development.

  1. Inequality Aversion and Reciprocity in Moonlighting Games

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dirk Engelmann

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available We study behavior in a moonlighting game with unequal initial endowments. In this game, predictions for second-mover behavior based on inequality aversion are in contrast to reciprocity. We find that inequality aversion explains only few observations. The comparison to a treatment with equal endowments supports the conclusion that behavior is better captured by intuitive notions of reciprocity than by inequality aversion. Extending the model by allowing for alternative reference points promises better performance, but leads to other problems. We conclude that the fact that inequality aversion often works as a good short-hand for reciprocity is driven by biased design choices.

  2. Reciprocity Effects in the Trust Game

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Smith

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available I use data from a previous experiment for classifying subjects based on their behavior in the trust game. Prior literature defines a “reciprocity effect” as the tendency for Second Movers to return proportions increasing in the amounts that they receive. In the data that I use, 31% of Second Movers show reciprocity effects, 31% are neutral, and 25% consistently free-ride, indicating that the aggregate reciprocity effect for the sample as a whole is attributable to a minority of the subjects.

  3. Spite and Reciprocity in Auctions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshikazu Ikeda

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents a complete information model of bidding in second price sealed-bid and ascending-bid (English auctions, in which potential buyers know the unit valuation of other bidders and may spitefully prefer that their rivals earn a lower surplus. Bidders with spiteful preferences should overbid in equilibrium when they know their rival has a higher value than their own, and bidders with a higher value underbid to reciprocate the spiteful overbidding of the lower value bidders. The model also predicts different bidding behavior in second price as compared to ascending-bid auctions. The paper also presents experimental evidence broadly consistent with the model. In the complete information environment, lower value bidders overbid more than higher value bidders, and they overbid more frequently in the second price auction than in the ascending price auction. Overall, the lower value bidder submits bids that exceed value about half the time. These patterns are not found in the incomplete information environment, consistent with the model.

  4. Reciprocity is not give and take: asymmetric reciprocity to positive and negative acts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keysar, Boaz; Converse, Benjamin A; Wang, Jiunwen; Epley, Nicholas

    2008-12-01

    Unlike economic exchange, social exchange has no well-defined "value." It is based on the norm of reciprocity, in which giving and taking are to be repaid in equivalent measure. Although giving and taking are colloquially assumed to be equivalent actions, we demonstrate that they produce different patterns of reciprocity. In five experiments utilizing a dictator game, people reciprocated in like measure to apparently prosocial acts of giving, but reciprocated more selfishly to apparently antisocial acts of taking, even when the objective outcomes of the acts of giving and taking were identical. Additional results demonstrate that acts of giving in social exchanges are perceived as more generous than objectively identical acts of taking, that taking tends to escalate, and that the asymmetry in reciprocity is not due to gaining versus losing resources. Reciprocity appears to operate on an exchange rate that assigns value to the meaning of events, in a fashion that encourages prosocial exchanges.

  5. Reduced innervation and delayed re-innervation after epithelial wounding in type 2 diabetic Goto-Kakizaki rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Feng; Gao, Nan; Yin, Jia; Yu, Fu-Shin X

    2012-12-01

    Patients with diabetes are at an increased risk for developing corneal complications including delayed wound healing and potential vision loss. To understand the cause of diabetic keratopathy, we investigated innervation and its correlation with delayed corneal epithelial wound healing in type 2 diabetic Goto-Kakizaki (GK) rats. GK rats are smaller than the age-matched control Wistar rats from which the GK rats were derived. The blood sugar levels of GK rats are significantly higher than those of Wistar rats. GK rats had increased rose bengal staining and cornea fragility. Fewer nerve fibers were detected compared with Wistar rats. Although nerve fiber densities detected by whole-mount immunohistochemistry were similar near the limbal region, in the central cornea the subbasal nerve plexuses were thinner, less abundant, and showed less branching in GK rats. Corneal epithelial wound closure was delayed and re-innervation was slow and incomplete in GK rats. These abnormalities were more apparent in older GK rats (12 months). Our data suggest that diabetic neuropathy occurs in the cornea of type 2 diabetic GK rats, and defects in the sensory nerve and/or tear film may contribute to diabetic keratopathy and delayed epithelial wound healing in diabetic corneas.

  6. [Adrenergic innervation of the uterus of the rat in various phases of the estrous cycle].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakitskaia, V V; Proimina, F I; Chudinov, Iu V

    1986-07-01

    Adrenergic innervation of the rat uterus is connected chiefly with vessel innervation. The highest density of fibers and the highest intensity of specific fluorescence is shown in the stage of dioestrus, the least those--in oestrus. These indices correlated with the estradiol and progesterone level in the plasma.

  7. Cerebrovascular innervation: adaptation to changes in metabolic demand and flow fluctuations in rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Denderen, Jacqueline Catharine Maria van

    2003-01-01

    The heterogeneous nature of the basal cerebral arteries is well illustrated by the differences in the extent of innervation as found in different species as well as the variation in the degree of innervation during ageing and disease. To explain these differences, we postulated a coupling between va

  8. Marked innervation but also signs of nerve degeneration in between the Achilles and plantaris tendons and presence of innervation within the plantaris tendon in midportion Achilles tendinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spang, C; Harandi, V M; Alfredson, H; Forsgren, S

    2015-06-01

    The plantaris tendon is increasingly recognised as an important factor in midportion Achilles tendinopathy. Its innervation pattern is completely unknown. Plantaris tendons (n=56) and associated peritendinous tissue from 46 patients with midportion Achilles tendinopathy and where the plantaris tendon was closely related to the Achilles tendon were evaluated. Morphological evaluations and stainings for nerve markers [general (PGP9.5), sensory (CGRP), sympathetic (TH)], glutamate NMDA receptor and Schwann cells (S-100β) were made. A marked innervation, as evidenced by evaluation for PGP9.5 reactions, occurred in the peritendinous tissue located between the plantaris and Achilles tendons. It contained sensory and to some extent sympathetic and NMDAR1-positive axons. There was also an innervation in the zones of connective tissue within the plantaris tendons. Interestingly, some of the nerve fascicles showed a partial lack of axonal reactions. New information on the innervation patterns for the plantaris tendon in situations with midportion Achilles tendinopathy has here been obtained. The peritendinous tissue was found to be markedly innervated and there was also innervation within the plantaris tendon. Furthermore, axonal degeneration is likely to occur. Both features should be further taken into account when considering the relationship between the nervous system and tendinopathy.

  9. Agenda Setting and Reciprocal Vote Trading

    OpenAIRE

    Urs Fischbacher; Simeon Schudy

    2010-01-01

    We study the implications of reciprocity on agenda setting in a sequential policy decision. We designed a laboratory experiment in which a committee decides sequentially on three independent bills. Selfish committee members would turn down all bills but reCiprocity allows for implicit vote trading. This mechanism gives power to agenda setters. We find that agenda setters use their power when setting the agenda but are rather generous in the voting decision. Legislators benefiting from the cho...

  10. On the coexistence of reciprocity and materialism

    OpenAIRE

    Akiko Maruyama

    2007-01-01

    This paper studies the problem of the long-run preferences distribution in a large population using an evolutionary approach. Special attention is given to the investigation of the property of the mixed population equilibria, in which materialists and reciprocators coexist. Some of the players with reciprocal preference care about not only their own material payoffs but also about those of others, while the remaining ones are materialists who maximize their own material payoffs.

  11. Anatomical study of the variations in innervation of the orbicularis oculi by the facial nerve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouattara, D; Vacher, C; de Vasconcellos, J-J Accioli; Kassanyou, S; Gnanazan, G; N'Guessan, B

    2004-02-01

    While the divisions of the facial nerve in the face are well known, the innervation of the orbicularis oculi by the different distal branches of the facial nerve is poorly described. To determine which branches of the facial nerve play a role in this innervation, the facial nerve was dissected in 30 fresh cadavers. The innervation of this muscle was in the form of two plexuses, a superior one, most often (93%) formed by the union of the temporal and superior zygomatic branches, and an inferior one, usually formed (63%) by the union of the inferior zygomatic and superior buccal branches. This new mode of innervation explains how, without damage to both plexuses, innervation of orbicularis oculi by the facial nerve remains functional. It also explains the often unsatisfactory results of treatment of primary blepharospasm, and the unusual character of palsies of this muscle in cervicofacial lifts.

  12. 30 CFR 57.13010 - Reciprocating-type air compressors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Reciprocating-type air compressors. 57.13010... Air and Boilers § 57.13010 Reciprocating-type air compressors. (a) Reciprocating-type air compressors... than 25 percent. (b) However, this standard does not apply to reciprocating-type air compressors...

  13. 30 CFR 56.13010 - Reciprocating-type air compressors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Reciprocating-type air compressors. 56.13010... and Boilers § 56.13010 Reciprocating-type air compressors. (a) Reciprocating-type air compressors... than 25 percent. (b) However, this standard does not apply to reciprocating-type air compressors...

  14. Assessment of myocardial adrenergic innervation in patients with sick sinus syndrome: effect of asynchronous ventricular activation from ventricular apical stimulation

    OpenAIRE

    Marketou, M E; Simantirakis, E N; Prassopoulos, V K; Chrysostomakis, S I; Velidaki, A A; Karkavitsas, N S; Vardas, P.E.

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To investigate ventricular sympathetic innervation in patients with sick sinus syndrome and to detect regional deterioration of adrenergic innervation caused by asynchronous ventricular activation from right ventricular pacing.

  15. Static non-reciprocity in mechanical metamaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coulais, Corentin; Sounas, Dimitrios; Alù, Andrea

    2017-02-01

    Reciprocity is a general, fundamental principle governing various physical systems, which ensures that the transfer function—the transmission of a physical quantity, say light intensity—between any two points in space is identical, regardless of geometrical or material asymmetries. Breaking this transmission symmetry offers enhanced control over signal transport, isolation and source protection. So far, devices that break reciprocity (and therefore show non-reciprocity) have been mostly considered in dynamic systems involving electromagnetic, acoustic and mechanical wave propagation associated with fields varying in space and time. Here we show that it is possible to break reciprocity in static systems, realizing mechanical metamaterials that exhibit vastly different output displacements under excitation from different sides, as well as one-way displacement amplification. This is achieved by combining large nonlinearities with suitable geometrical asymmetries and/or topological features. In addition to extending non-reciprocity and isolation to statics, our work sheds light on energy propagation in nonlinear materials with asymmetric crystalline structures and topological properties. We anticipate that breaking reciprocity will open avenues for energy absorption, conversion and harvesting, soft robotics, prosthetics and optomechanics.

  16. Structural optimization of free-form reciprocal structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Parigi, Dario

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents an optimization algorithm for the design of structurally efficient free-form reciprocal structures. Because of the geometric complexity of reciprocal structures, only a few structural studies have been carried out so far, and we have a limited knowledge of the relation between...... geometry and structural behaviour in reciprocal structures. This study takes advantage of the preceding work carried by the author on the Reciprocalizer, a software tool for the generation of reciprocal geometries. The Reciprocalizer has been included into a structural optimization algorithm...... for the generation of structurally efficient free-form reciprocal structures....

  17. Solid-state circuits

    CERN Document Server

    Pridham, G J

    2013-01-01

    Solid-State Circuits provides an introduction to the theory and practice underlying solid-state circuits, laying particular emphasis on field effect transistors and integrated circuits. Topics range from construction and characteristics of semiconductor devices to rectification and power supplies, low-frequency amplifiers, sine- and square-wave oscillators, and high-frequency effects and circuits. Black-box equivalent circuits of bipolar transistors, physical equivalent circuits of bipolar transistors, and equivalent circuits of field effect transistors are also covered. This volume is divided

  18. Simple Autonomous Chaotic Circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piper, Jessica; Sprott, J.

    2010-03-01

    Over the last several decades, numerous electronic circuits exhibiting chaos have been proposed. Non-autonomous circuits with as few as two components have been developed. However, the operation of such circuits relies on the non-ideal behavior of the devices used, and therefore the circuit equations can be quite complex. In this paper, we present two simple autonomous chaotic circuits using only opamps and linear passive components. The circuits each use one opamp as a comparator, to provide a signum nonlinearity. The chaotic behavior is robust, and independent of nonlinearities in the passive components. Moreover, the circuit equations are among the algebraically simplest chaotic systems yet constructed.

  19. Circuit analysis for dummies

    CERN Document Server

    Santiago, John

    2013-01-01

    Circuits overloaded from electric circuit analysis? Many universities require that students pursuing a degree in electrical or computer engineering take an Electric Circuit Analysis course to determine who will ""make the cut"" and continue in the degree program. Circuit Analysis For Dummies will help these students to better understand electric circuit analysis by presenting the information in an effective and straightforward manner. Circuit Analysis For Dummies gives you clear-cut information about the topics covered in an electric circuit analysis courses to help

  20. Current limiter circuit system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Witcher, Joseph Brandon; Bredemann, Michael V.

    2017-09-05

    An apparatus comprising a steady state sensing circuit, a switching circuit, and a detection circuit. The steady state sensing circuit is connected to a first, a second and a third node. The first node is connected to a first device, the second node is connected to a second device, and the steady state sensing circuit causes a scaled current to flow at the third node. The scaled current is proportional to a voltage difference between the first and second node. The switching circuit limits an amount of current that flows between the first and second device. The detection circuit is connected to the third node and the switching circuit. The detection circuit monitors the scaled current at the third node and controls the switching circuit to limit the amount of the current that flows between the first and second device when the scaled current is greater than a desired level.

  1. Peptidergic innervation of human esophageal and cardiac carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shuang-Hong Lü; Yan Zhou; Hai-Ping Que; Shao-Jun Liu

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the distribution of neuropeptideimmunoreactive nerve fibers in esophageal and cardiac carcinoma as well as their relationship with tumor cells so as to explore if there is nerve innervation in esophageal and cardiac carcinoma.METHODS: Esophageal and cardiac carcinoma specimens were collected from surgical operation. One part of them were fixed immediately with 4 % paraformaldehyde and then cut with a cryostat into 40-pm-thick sections to perform immunohistochemical analysis. Antibodies of ten kinds of neuropeptide including calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), galanin (GAL), substance P (SP), etc. were used for immunostaining of nerve fibers. The other part of the tumor specimens were cut into little blocks (1 mm3) and cocultured with chick embryo dorsal root ganglia (DRG) to investigate if the tumor blocks could induce the neurons of DRG to extend processes, so as to probe into the possiblereasons for the nerve fibers growing into tumors. RESULTS: Substantial amounts of neuropeptide including GAL-, NPY-, SP-immunoreactive nerve bundles and scattered nerve fibers were distributed in esophageal and cardiac carcinomas. The scattered nerve fibers waved their way among tumor cells and contacted with tumor cells closely. Some of them even encircled tumor cells. There were many varicosities aligned on the nerve fibers like beads. They were also closely related to tumor cells. In the co-culture group, about 63 %and 67 % of DRG co-cultured with esophageal and cardiac tumor blocks respectively extended enormous processes,especially on the side adjacent to the tumor, whereas in the control group (without tumor blocks), no processes grew out.CONCLUSION: Esophageal and cardiac carcinomas may be innervated by peptidergic nerve fibers, and they can induce neurons of DRG to extend processes in vitro.

  2. Solenoid-Simulation Circuit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, R. A.

    1986-01-01

    Electrical properties of solenoids imitated for tests of control circuits. Simulation circuit imitates voltage and current responses of two engine-controlling solenoids. Used in tests of programs of digital engine-control circuits, also provides electronic interface with circuits imitating electrical properties of pressure sensors and linear variable-differential transformers. Produces voltages, currents, delays, and discrete turnon and turnoff signals representing operation of solenoid in engine-control relay. Many such circuits used simulating overall engine circuitry.

  3. Beyond Optimality to Understanding Neuronal Circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marder, Eve

    2010-03-01

    I will summarize recent theoretical and experimental work that shows that similar circuit outputs can be produced with highly variable circuit parameters. This work argues that the nervous system of each healthy individual has found a set of different solutions that give ``good enough'' circuit performance. I will use examples from theoretical and experimental studies using the crustacean stomatogastric nervous system to argue that synaptic and intrinsic currents can vary far more than the output of the circuit in which they are found. These data have significant implications for the mechanisms that maintain stable function over the animal's lifetime, and for the kinds of changes that allow the nervous system to recover function after injury. In this kind of complex system, merely collecting mean data from many individuals can lead to significant errors, and it becomes important to measure as many individual network parameters in each individual as possible. This work raises the question of the extent to which neuromodulation can be constant with underlying circuit parameter variation. To address this question, we construct two cell reciprocally inhibitory circuits using the dynamic clamp from biological GM neurons of the crab stomatogastric ganglion. We then describe the output of the circuits while sweeping through a range of synaptic and intrinsic conductances, first in control saline and then in the presence of serotonin. We find that serotonin extends the ranges of parameters that produce alternating bursting. Moreover, although serotonin's effects are highly robust and significant on the entire population, individual networks respond anomalously. These data demonstrate that while neuromodulation may have robust actions on a population, not all individuals may respond as do the majority. These findings have important implications for evolution.

  4. Segregated cholinergic transmission modulates dopamine neurons integrated in distinct functional circuits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dautan, Daniel; Souza, Albert S; Huerta-Ocampo, Icnelia; Valencia, Miguel; Assous, Maxime; Witten, Ilana B; Deisseroth, Karl; Tepper, James M; Bolam, J Paul; Gerdjikov, Todor V; Mena-Segovia, Juan

    2016-08-01

    Dopamine neurons in the ventral tegmental area (VTA) receive cholinergic innervation from brainstem structures that are associated with either movement or reward. Whereas cholinergic neurons of the pedunculopontine nucleus (PPN) carry an associative/motor signal, those of the laterodorsal tegmental nucleus (LDT) convey limbic information. We used optogenetics and in vivo juxtacellular recording and labeling to examine the influence of brainstem cholinergic innervation of distinct neuronal subpopulations in the VTA. We found that LDT cholinergic axons selectively enhanced the bursting activity of mesolimbic dopamine neurons that were excited by aversive stimulation. In contrast, PPN cholinergic axons activated and changed the discharge properties of VTA neurons that were integrated in distinct functional circuits and were inhibited by aversive stimulation. Although both structures conveyed a reinforcing signal, they had opposite roles in locomotion. Our results demonstrate that two modes of cholinergic transmission operate in the VTA and segregate the neurons involved in different reward circuits.

  5. RECIPROCITY CALIBRATION OF A SONAR TRANSDUCER FROM ELECTRICAL IMPEDANCE MEASUREMENTS IN WATER AND IN AIR : THE DELTA-Z RECIPROCITY CALIBRATION METHOD

    OpenAIRE

    S. Baker(Department of Physics and Astronomy, University College London, London, United Kingdom); Bedard, R.; Patton, M.; Wilson, O.

    1990-01-01

    A method is described by which the free-field, open-circuit voltage sensitivity of a reversible underwater acoustic transducer may be obtained from measurements of its input electrical impedance in water and in air. This method, which we have termed the Delta-Z reciprocity calibration method, is being developed for the in-service calibration of sonar transducers installed in domes which can be flooded and purged. The application of the Delta-Z method to the calibration of a single tonpilz-typ...

  6. Hidden circuits and argumentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leinonen, Risto; Kesonen, Mikko H. P.; Hirvonen, Pekka E.

    2016-11-01

    Despite the relevance of DC circuits in everyday life and schools, they have been shown to cause numerous learning difficulties at various school levels. In the course of this article, we present a flexible method for teaching DC circuits at lower secondary level. The method is labelled as hidden circuits, and the essential idea underlying hidden circuits is in hiding the actual wiring of DC circuits, but to make their behaviour evident for pupils. Pupils are expected to find out the wiring of the circuit which should enhance their learning of DC circuits. We present two possible ways to utilise hidden circuits in a classroom. First, they can be used to test and enhance pupils’ conceptual understanding when pupils are expected to find out which one of the offered circuit diagram options corresponds to the actual circuit shown. This method aims to get pupils to evaluate the circuits holistically rather than locally, and as a part of that aim this method highlights any learning difficulties of pupils. Second, hidden circuits can be used to enhance pupils’ argumentation skills with the aid of argumentation sheet that illustrates the main elements of an argument. Based on the findings from our co-operating teachers and our own experiences, hidden circuits offer a flexible and motivating way to supplement teaching of DC circuits.

  7. Motor activity affects adult skeletal muscle re-innervation acting via tyrosine kinase receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sartini, Stefano; Bartolini, Fanny; Ambrogini, Patrizia; Betti, Michele; Ciuffoli, Stefano; Lattanzi, Davide; Di Palma, Michael; Cuppini, Riccardo

    2013-05-01

    Recently, muscle expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) mRNA and protein under activity control has been reported. BDNF is a neurotrophin known to be involved in axon sprouting in the CNS. Hence, we set out to study the effect of chronic treadmill mid-intensity running on adult rat muscle re-innervation, and to explore the involvement of BDNF and tropomyosin-related kinase (Trk) receptors. After nerve crush, muscle re-innervation was evaluated using intracellular recordings, tension recordings, immunostaining and Western blot analyses. An enhanced muscle multiple innervation was found in running rats that was fully reversed to control values blocking Trk receptors or interrupting the running activity. An increase in muscle multiple innervation was also found in sedentary rats treated with a selective TrkB receptor agonist. The expression of TrkB receptors by intramuscular axons was demonstrated, and increased muscle expression of BDNF was found in running animals. The increase in muscle multiple innervation was consistent with the faster muscle re-innervation that we found in running animals. We conclude that, when regenerating axons contact muscle cells, muscle activity progressively increases modulating BDNF and possibly other growth factors, which in turn, acting via Trk receptors, induce axon sprouting to re-innervate skeletal muscle.

  8. Hypothalamic Vasopressinergic Projections Innervate Central Amygdala GABAergic Neurons: Implications for Anxiety and Stress Coping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández, Vito S.; Hernández, Oscar R.; Perez de la Mora, Miguel; Gómora, María J.; Fuxe, Kjell; Eiden, Lee E.; Zhang, Limei

    2016-01-01

    The arginine-vasopressin (AVP)-containing hypothalamic magnocellular neurosecretory neurons (VPMNNs) are known for their role in hydro-electrolytic balance control via their projections to the neurohypophysis. Recently, projections from these same neurons to hippocampus, habenula and other brain regions in which vasopressin infusion modulates contingent social and emotionally-affected behaviors, have been reported. Here, we present evidence that VPMNN collaterals also project to the amygdaloid complex, and establish synaptic connections with neurons in central amygdala (CeA). The density of AVP innervation in amygdala was substantially increased in adult rats that had experienced neonatal maternal separation (MS), consistent with our previous observations that MS enhances VPMNN number in the paraventricular (PVN) and supraoptic (SON) nuclei of the hypothalamus. In the CeA, V1a AVP receptor mRNA was only observed in GABAergic neurons, demonstrated by complete co-localization of V1a transcripts in neurons expressing Gad1 and Gad2 transcripts in CeA using the RNAscope method. V1b and V2 receptor mRNAs were not detected, using the same method. Water-deprivation (WD) for 24 h, which increased the metabolic activity of VPMNNs, also increased anxiety-like behavior measured using the elevated plus maze (EPM) test, and this effect was mimicked by bilateral microinfusion of AVP into the CeA. Anxious behavior induced by either WD or AVP infusion was reversed by CeA infusion of V1a antagonist. VPMNNs are thus a newly discovered source of CeA inhibitory circuit modulation, through which both early-life and adult stress coping signals are conveyed from the hypothalamus to the amygdala. PMID:27932956

  9. Hypothalamic vasopressinergic projections innervate central amygdala GABAergic neurons: implications for anxiety and stress coping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vito Salvador Hernandez

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The arginine-vasopressin (AVP-containing hypothalamic magnocellular neurosecretory neurons (VPMNNs are known for their role in hydro-electrolytic balance control via their projections to neurohypophysis. Recently, projections from these same neurons to hippocampus, habenula, and other brain regions, in which vasopressin infusion modulates contingent social and emotionally-affected behaviors, have been reported. Here, we present evidence that VPMNN collaterals also project to the amygdaloid complex, and establish synaptic connections with neurons in central amygdala (CeA. The density of AVP innervation in amygdala was substantially increased in adult rats that had experienced neonatal maternal separation (MS, consistent with our previous observations that MS enhances VPMNN number in the paraventricular (PVN and supraoptic (SON nuclei of the hypothalamus. In the CeA, V1a AVP receptor mRNA was only observed in GABAergic neurons, demonstrated by complete co-localization of V1a transcripts in neurons expressing Gad1 and Gad2 transcripts in CeA using the RNAscope method. V1b and V2 receptors mRNA were not detected, using the same method. Water-deprivation for 24 hrs, which increased the metabolic activity of VPMNNs, also increased anxiety-like behavior measured using the elevated plus maze test, and this effect was mimicked by bilateral microinfusion of VP into the CeA. Anxious behavior induced by either water deprivation or VP infusion was reversed by CeA infusion of V1a antagonist. VPMNNs are thus a newly discovered source of central amygdala inhibitory circuit modulation, through which both early-life and adult stress coping signals are conveyed from the hypothalamus to the amygdala.

  10. Comment to "Nonreciprocal Light Propagation in a Silicon Photonic Circuit"

    CERN Document Server

    Baets, Roel; Melloni, Andrea; Popović, Miloš; Vanwolleghem, Mathias

    2011-01-01

    In the article "Nonreciprocal Light Propagation in a Silicon Photonic Circuit" (Science 333, 729-733 (2011) a nonreciprocal waveguide system based on a combination of silicon, dielectrics and metals is reported. In this Comment it is explained that the interpretation with respect to nonreciprocity in this paper is incorrect and conflicts with the fundamental Lorentz reciprocity theorem. It is further pointed out that a previous publication already introduced the device concept.

  11. Inner ear hair cells deteriorate in mice engineered to have no or diminished innervation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer eKersigo

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The innervation of the inner ear critically depends on the two neurotrophins Ntf3 and Bdnf. In contrast to this molecularly well established dependency, evidence regarding the need of innervation for long-term maintenance of inner ear hair cells is inconclusive due to experimental variability. Mutant mice that lack both neurotrophins could shed light on the long-term consequences of innervation loss on hair cells without introducing experimental variability, but do not survive after birth. Mutant mice with conditional deletion of both neurotrophins lose almost all innervation by postnatal day 10 and show an initially normal development of hair cells by this stage. No innervation remains after three weeks and complete loss of all innervation results in near complete loss of outer and many inner hair cells of the organ of Corti within 4 months. Mutants that retain one allele of either neurotrophin have only partial loss of innervation of the organ of Corti and show a longer viability of cochlear hair cells with more profound loss of inner hair cells. Ultimately, however, hair cells disappear with a base to apex progression, proportional to the residual density of innervation and similar to carboplatin ototoxicity. Similar to reports of hair cell loss after aminoglycoside treatment, blobbing of stereocilia of apparently dying hair cells protrude into the cochlear duct. Denervation of vestibular sensory epithelia for several months also resulted in variable results, ranging from unusual hair cells resembling the aberrations found in the organ of Corti, to near normal hair cells in the canal cristae. Fusion and/or resorption of stereocilia and loss of hair cells follows a pattern reminiscent of Myo6 and Cdc42 null mice. Our data support a role of innervation for long-term maintenance but with a remarkable local variation that needs to be taken into account when attempting regeneration of the organ of Corti.

  12. Selective regulation of nerve growth factor expression in developing cutaneous tissue by early sensory innervation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vizard Tom N

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the developing vertebrate peripheral nervous system, the survival of sympathetic neurons and the majority of sensory neurons depends on a supply of nerve growth factor (NGF from tissues they innervate. Although neurotrophic theory presupposes, and the available evidence suggests, that the level of NGF expression is completely independent of innervation, the possibility that innervation may regulate the timing or level of NGF expression has not been rigorously investigated in a sufficiently well-characterized developing system. Results To address this important question, we studied the influence of innervation on the regulation of NGF mRNA expression in the embryonic mouse maxillary process in vitro and in vivo. The maxillary process receives its innervation from predominantly NGF-dependent sensory neurons of the trigeminal ganglion and is the most densely innervated cutaneous territory with the highest levels of NGF in the embryo. When early, uninnervated maxillary processes were cultured alone, the level of NGF mRNA rose more slowly than in maxillary processes cultured with attached trigeminal ganglia. In contrast to the positive influence of early innervation on NGF mRNA expression, the levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF mRNA and neurotrophin-3 (NT3 mRNA rose to the same extent in early maxillary processes grown with and without trigeminal ganglia. The level of NGF mRNA, but not BDNF mRNA or NT3 mRNA, was also significantly lower in the maxillary processes of erbB3-/- mice, which have substantially fewer trigeminal neurons than wild-type mice. Conclusions This selective effect of initial innervation on target field NGF mRNA expression provokes a re-evaluation of a key assertion of neurotrophic theory that the level of NGF expression is independent of innervation.

  13. Intuitive analog circuit design

    CERN Document Server

    Thompson, Marc

    2013-01-01

    Intuitive Analog Circuit Design outlines ways of thinking about analog circuits and systems that let you develop a feel for what a good, working analog circuit design should be. This book reflects author Marc Thompson's 30 years of experience designing analog and power electronics circuits and teaching graduate-level analog circuit design, and is the ideal reference for anyone who needs a straightforward introduction to the subject. In this book, Dr. Thompson describes intuitive and ""back-of-the-envelope"" techniques for designing and analyzing analog circuits, including transistor amplifi

  14. The circuit designer's companion

    CERN Document Server

    Williams, Tim

    2013-01-01

    The Circuit Designer's Companion covers the theoretical aspects and practices in analogue and digital circuit design. Electronic circuit design involves designing a circuit that will fulfill its specified function and designing the same circuit so that every production model of it will fulfill its specified function, and no other undesired and unspecified function.This book is composed of nine chapters and starts with a review of the concept of grounding, wiring, and printed circuits. The subsequent chapters deal with the passive and active components of circuitry design. These topics are foll

  15. Ontogeny of the serotonergic projection to rat neocortex: transient expression of a dense innervation to primary sensory areas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D' Amato, R.J.; Blue, M.E.; Largent, B.L.; Lynch, D.R.; Ledbetter, D.J.; Molliver, M.E.; Snyder, S.H.

    1987-06-01

    The development of serotonergic innervation to rat cerebral cortex was characterized by immunohistochemical localization of serotonin combined with autoradiographic imaging of serotonin-uptake sites. In neonatal rat, a transient, dense, serotonergic innervation appears in all primary sensory areas of cortex. In somatosensory cortex, dense patches of serotonergic innervation are aligned with specialized cellular aggregates called barrels. The dense patches are not apparent after 3 weeks of age, and the serotonergic innervation becomes more uniform in adult neocortex. This precocious neonatal serotonergic innervation may play a transient physiologic role in sensory areas of cortex or may exert a trophic influence on the development of cortical circuitry and thalamocortical connections.

  16. The lophophore innervation pattern of the inarticulate brachiopod Lingula anatina (Brachiopoda) supports monophyly of Lophophorata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temereva, E N; Malakhov, V V

    2015-01-01

    Lophophore innervation in the brachiopod Lingula anatina has been investigated using immunocytochemistry and laser confocal microscopy. Three prominent nerves, namely, the main brachial nerve, the accessory brachial nerve, and the lower brachial nerve, have been found to extend along each brachium of the lophophore. Tentacle innervation is also described in detail. Comparative analysis revealed homologous nerves in lophophores of brachiopods, phoronids, and bryozoans. Similarities in tentacle innervation in these phyla of invertebrates have been detected. The results obtained confirm lophophore homology in different groups of lophophorates and provide evidence for monophyly of Lophophorata.

  17. Disappearance and recovery of catecholamine innervation in brain regions of adult goldfish following 6-hydroxydopamine treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contestabile, A; Friz, T; Caravaggio, M V

    1979-10-01

    The effect of 6-OHDA treatment on catecholamine innervation was studied in the cerebellum, optic tectum and lobus vagi of the goldfish. Catecholamine terminals completely disappeared in less than two weeks after intraventricular injection of 10 microgram 6-OHDA. In periods comprised between 40 days and 4 months after drug injection, catecholamine terminals reappeared to a different degree. The cerebellum showed the highest recovery and, as far as the valvula cerebelli was concerned, also over-innervation. The remarkable power to restore catecholamine innervation led to a distribution of reappearing terminals similar to that of normal animals in the different layers of the three structures examined.

  18. Reciprocating Feed System Development Status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trewek, Mary (Technical Monitor); Blackmon, James B.; Eddleman, David E.

    2005-01-01

    The reciprocating feed system (RFS) is an alternative means of providing high pressure propellant flow at low cost and system mass, with high fail-operational reliability. The RFS functions by storing the liquid propellants in large, low-pressure tanks and then expelling each propellant through two or three small, high-pressure tanks. Each RFS tank is sequentially filled, pressurized, expelled, vented, and refilled so as to provide a constant, or variable, mass flow rate to the engine. This type of system is much lighter than a conventional pressure fed system in part due to the greatly reduced amount of inert tank weight. The delivered payload for an RFS is superior to that of conventional pressure fed systems for conditions of high total impulse and it is competitive with turbopump systems, up to approximately 2000 psi. An advanced version of the RFS uses autogenous pressurization and thrust augmentation to achieve higher performance. In this version, the pressurization gases are combusted in a small engine, thus making the pressurization system, in effect, part of the propulsion system. The RFS appears to be much less expensive than a turbopump system, due to reduced research and development cost and hardware cost, since it is basically composed of small high- pressure tanks, a pressurization system, and control valves. A major benefit is the high reliability fail-operational mode; in the event of a failure in one of the three tank-systems, it can operate on the two remaining tanks. Other benefits include variable pressure and flow rates, ease of engine restart in micro-gravity, and enhanced propellant acquisition and control under adverse acceleration conditions. We present a system mass analysis tool that accepts user inputs for various design and mission parameters and calculates such output values payload and vehicle weights for the conventional pressure fed system, the RFS, the Autogenous Pressurization Thrust Augmentation (APTA) RFS, and turbopump systems

  19. Theory of reciprocating contact for viscoelastic solids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putignano, Carmine; Carbone, Giuseppe; Dini, Daniele

    2016-04-01

    A theory of reciprocating contacts for linear viscoelastic materials is presented. Results are discussed for the case of a rigid sphere sinusoidally driven in sliding contact with a viscoelastic half-space. Depending on the size of the contact, the frequency and amplitude of the reciprocating motion, and on the relaxation time of the viscoelastic body, we establish that the contact behavior may range from the steady-state viscoelastic solution, in which traction forces always oppose the direction of the sliding rigid punch, to a more elaborate trend, which is due to the strong interaction between different regions of the path covered during the reciprocating motion. Practical implications span a number of applications, ranging from seismic engineering to biotechnology.

  20. Modelling fluid flow in a reciprocating compressor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tuhovcak Jan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Efficiency of reciprocating compressor is strongly dependent on the valves characteristics, which affects the flow through the suction and discharge line. Understanding the phenomenon inside the compressor is necessary step in development process. Commercial CFD tools offer wide capabilities to simulate the flow inside the reciprocating compressor, however they are too complicated in terms of computational time and mesh creation. Several parameters describing compressor could be therefore examined without the CFD analysis, such is valve characteristic, flow through the cycle and heat transfer. The aim of this paper is to show a numerical tool for reciprocating compressor based on the energy balance through the cycle, which provides valve characteristics, flow through the cycle and heat losses from the cylinder. Spring-damping-mass model was used for the valve description. Boundary conditions were extracted from the performance test of 4-cylinder semihermetic compressor and numerical tool validation was performed with indicated p-V diagram comparison.

  1. Modelling fluid flow in a reciprocating compressor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuhovcak, Jan; Hejčík, Jiří; Jícha, Miroslav

    2015-05-01

    Efficiency of reciprocating compressor is strongly dependent on the valves characteristics, which affects the flow through the suction and discharge line. Understanding the phenomenon inside the compressor is necessary step in development process. Commercial CFD tools offer wide capabilities to simulate the flow inside the reciprocating compressor, however they are too complicated in terms of computational time and mesh creation. Several parameters describing compressor could be therefore examined without the CFD analysis, such is valve characteristic, flow through the cycle and heat transfer. The aim of this paper is to show a numerical tool for reciprocating compressor based on the energy balance through the cycle, which provides valve characteristics, flow through the cycle and heat losses from the cylinder. Spring-damping-mass model was used for the valve description. Boundary conditions were extracted from the performance test of 4-cylinder semihermetic compressor and numerical tool validation was performed with indicated p-V diagram comparison.

  2. Non-reciprocal nonlinear optic induced transparency and frequency conversion on a chip

    CERN Document Server

    Guo, Xiang; Jung, Hojoong; Tang, Hong X

    2015-01-01

    Developments in photonic chips have spurred photon based classical and quantum information processing, attributing to the high stability and scalability of integrated photonic devices [1, 2]. Optical nonlinearity [3] is indispensable in these complex photonic circuits, because it allows for classical and quantum light sources, all-optical switch, modulation, and non-reciprocity in ambient environments. It is commonly known that nonlinear interactions are often greatly enhanced in the microcavities [4]. However, the manifestations of coherent photon-photon interaction in a cavity, analogous to the electromagnetically induced transparency [5], have never been reported on an integrated platform. Here, we present an experimental demonstration of the coherent photon-photon interaction induced by second order optical nonlinearity (\\chi^{(2)} ) on an aluminum nitride photonic chip. The non-reciprocal nonlinear optic induced transparency is demonstrated as a result of the coherent interference between photons with di...

  3. Sensory and sympathetic innervation of cervical facet joint in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Hai-yu; CHEN An-min; GUO Feng-jing; LIAO Guang-jun; XIAO Wei-dong

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To explore the patterns of innervation of cervical facet joints and determine the pathways from facet joints to dorsal root ganglions (DRGs) in order to clarify the causes of diffuse neck pain, headache, and shoulder pain.Methods: Forty-two male Sprague-Dawley rats,weighing 250-300 g, were randomly divided into three groups: Group A ( n = 18), Group B ( n = 18), and Group C (n = 6 ). Under anesthesia with intraperitoneal pentobarbital sodium (45 mg/kg body weight), a midline dorsal longitudinal incision was made over the cervical spine to expose the left cervical facet joint capsule of all the rats under a microscope. The rats in Group A underwent sympathectomy, but the rats in Group B and Group C did not undergo sympathectomy. Then 0.6 μl 5 % bisbenzimide (Bb) were injected into the C1-2, C3-4 and C5-6 facet joints of 6 rats respectively in Group A and Group B. The holes were immediately sealed with mineral wax to prevent leakage of Bb and the fascia and skin were closed. But in Group C, 0.9% normal saline was injected into the corresponding joint capsules. Then under deep reanesthesia with intraperitoneal pentobarbital sodium (45 mg/kg body weight), C1-C8 left DRGs in all rats and the sympathetic ganglions in Group B were obtained and the number of the labeled neurons was determined.Results: Neurons labeled with Bb were present in C1-C8 DRGs in both Group A and Group B, and sympathetic ganglions in Group B. In the C1-2 and C3-4 subgroups,labeled neurons were present from C1 to C8 DRGs, while in C5-6 subgroups they were from C, to C8. The number of Bb ( + ) neurons after sympathectomy was not significantly different in the injected level from that without sympathectomy. But in the other levels, the number of Bb ( + ) neurons after sympathectomy was significantly less than that without sympathectomy.Conclusions: The innervation of the cervical facet joints is derived from both sensory and sympathetic nervous system, and DRGs are associated with

  4. Electrical Circuits and Water Analogies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Frederick A.; Wilson, Jerry D.

    1974-01-01

    Briefly describes water analogies for electrical circuits and presents plans for the construction of apparatus to demonstrate these analogies. Demonstrations include series circuits, parallel circuits, and capacitors. (GS)

  5. Feasibility analysis of reciprocating magnetic heat pumps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, A. V.; Hartley, J. G.; Shelton, Sam V.; Smith, M. M.

    1989-01-01

    A reciprocating gadolinium core in a regeneration fluid column in the warm bore of a superconducting solenoidal magnet is considered for magnetic refrigeration in 3.517 MW (1000 ton) applications. A procedure is presented to minimize the amount of superconducting cable needed in the magnet design. Estimated system capital costs for an ideal magnetic refrigerator of this type become comparable to conventional chillers as the frequency of reciprocation approaches 10 Hertz. A 1-D finite difference analysis of a regenerator cycling at 0.027 Hertz is presented which exhibits some of the features seen in the experiments of G. V. Brown.

  6. The practical operational-amplifier gyrator circuit for inductorless filter synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutherland, W. C.

    1976-01-01

    A literature is reported for gyrator circuits utilizing operational amplifiers as the active device. A gyrator is a two port nonreciprocal device with the property that the input impedance is proportional to the reciprocal of the load impedance. Following an experimental study, the gyrator circuit with optimum properties was selected for additional testing. A theoretical analysis was performed and compared to the experimental results for excellent agreement.

  7. Circuits on Cylinders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kristoffer Arnsfelt; Miltersen, Peter Bro; Vinay, V

    2006-01-01

    We consider the computational power of constant width polynomial size cylindrical circuits and nondeterministic branching programs. We show that every function computed by a Pi2 o MOD o AC0 circuit can also be computed by a constant width polynomial size cylindrical nondeterministic branching...... program (or cylindrical circuit) and that every function computed by a constant width polynomial size cylindrical circuit belongs to ACC0....

  8. Electric circuits essentials

    CERN Document Server

    REA, Editors of

    2012-01-01

    REA's Essentials provide quick and easy access to critical information in a variety of different fields, ranging from the most basic to the most advanced. As its name implies, these concise, comprehensive study guides summarize the essentials of the field covered. Essentials are helpful when preparing for exams, doing homework and will remain a lasting reference source for students, teachers, and professionals. Electric Circuits I includes units, notation, resistive circuits, experimental laws, transient circuits, network theorems, techniques of circuit analysis, sinusoidal analysis, polyph

  9. Piezoelectric drive circuit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treu, Jr., Charles A.

    1999-08-31

    A piezoelectric motor drive circuit is provided which utilizes the piezoelectric elements as oscillators and a Meacham half-bridge approach to develop feedback from the motor ground circuit to produce a signal to drive amplifiers to power the motor. The circuit automatically compensates for shifts in harmonic frequency of the piezoelectric elements due to pressure and temperature changes.

  10. Signal sampling circuit

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Louwsma, S.M.; Vertregt, Maarten

    2010-01-01

    A sampling circuit for sampling a signal is disclosed. The sampling circuit comprises a plurality of sampling channels adapted to sample the signal in time-multiplexed fashion, each sampling channel comprising a respective track-and-hold circuit connected to a respective analogue to digital converte

  11. Signal sampling circuit

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Louwsma, S.M.; Vertregt, Maarten

    2011-01-01

    A sampling circuit for sampling a signal is disclosed. The sampling circuit comprises a plurality of sampling channels adapted to sample the signal in time-multiplexed fashion, each sampling channel comprising a respective track-and-hold circuit connected to a respective analogue to digital converte

  12. Load testing circuit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2009-01-01

    A load testing circuit a circuit tests the load impedance of a load connected to an amplifier. The load impedance includes a first terminal and a second terminal, the load testing circuit comprising a signal generator providing a test signal of a defined bandwidth to the first terminal of the load...

  13. Short-circuit logic

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergstra, J.A.; Ponse, A.

    2010-01-01

    Short-circuit evaluation denotes the semantics of propositional connectives in which the second argument is only evaluated if the first argument does not suffice to determine the value of the expression. In programming, short-circuit evaluation is widely used. A short-circuit logic is a variant of p

  14. Signal sampling circuit

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Louwsma, Simon Minze; Vertregt, Maarten

    2011-01-01

    A sampling circuit for sampling a signal is disclosed. The sampling circuit comprises a plurality of sampling channels adapted to sample the signal in time-multiplexed fashion, each sampling channel comprising a respective track-and-hold circuit connected to a respective analogue to digital converte

  15. Signal sampling circuit

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Louwsma, Simon Minze; Vertregt, Maarten

    2010-01-01

    A sampling circuit for sampling a signal is disclosed. The sampling circuit comprises a plurality of sampling channels adapted to sample the signal in time-multiplexed fashion, each sampling channel comprising a respective track-and-hold circuit connected to a respective analogue to digital converte

  16. The effect of the transplanted pineal gland on the sympathetic innervation of the rat sublingual gland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chanthaphavong, R S; Murphy, S M; Anderson, C R

    2004-08-01

    We investigated the effect of the pineal on sympathetic neurons that normally innervate the sublingual gland of the rat. When the pineal gland was transplanted into the sublingual gland, it remained as a distinct mass that was innervated by sympathetic axons. Injection of the retrograde tracer, Fast Blue, into the sublingual gland labelled sympathetic neurons in the ipsilateral superior cervical ganglion (SCG). Thirty per cent of all neurons labelled retrogradely by Fast Blue injection into transplanted pineal glands were immunoreactive for both neuropeptide Y (NPY) and calbindin. This combination is characteristic of sympathetic neurons innervating the pineal gland in its normal location, but not the sympathetic vasoconstrictor neurons normally innervating the sublingual gland. This, and our previous study in which the pineal gland was shown to similarly influence the phenotype of salivary secretomotor neurons, suggests that a range of different functional classes of sympathetic neuron are able to change their phenotype in response to signals released by the pineal gland.

  17. Development of the vagal innervation of the gut: steering the wandering nerve

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ratcliffe, E. M; Farrar, N. R; Fox, E. A

    2011-01-01

    .... During fetal development, axons from the cell bodies of the nodose ganglia and the dorsal motor nucleus grow into the gut to find their enteric targets, providing the vagal sensory and motor innervations respectively...

  18. Physiological correlates of vagal nerve innervation in lower vertebrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preston, E; Courtice, G P

    1995-05-01

    In lower vertebrates, cardiac vagal innervation shows less anatomic complexity and specialization than in mammals. To assess the physiological development of vagal specialization in the vertebrates, we investigated cardiac chronotropic effects of electrical stimulation of left and right vagus nerves separately and the interactions between both nerves in anesthetized animals from three vertebrate groups, toad (Bufo marinus), shark (Heterodontus portusjacksoni), and lizard (Physignathus lesueurii). Atropine-sensitive slowing was effected equally by left or right vagi in all species, and chronotropic effects of simultaneous stimulation were the same as the sum of left and right responses. In sharks and lizards, no slowing after atropine was detected (10 Hz stimulation). In toads, after atropine, cardiac slowing was elicited equally by left or right vagal stimulation > 2 Hz. Simultaneous stimulation of both vagi after atropine caused significantly greater slowing than the sum of left and right responses. The results suggest even distribution of left and right vagal nerve endings to pacemaker cells, and limited competition for cardiac receptor sites in lower vertebrates.

  19. Evaluation of autonomic innervation of the clitoris and bulb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilmaz, Ugur; Kromm, Brenda G; Yang, Claire C

    2004-11-01

    Female sexual dysfunction is a common disorder but there are few objective measures of female genital function. We present a novel technique to record electrical activity of the female genital erectile tissue. We placed concentric needle electrodes in the right clitoral crus and the bulb of 22 healthy women. Following spontaneous activity recording we stimulated the median nerve to activate the sympathetic nervous system. We simultaneously measured evoked activity in the clitoris and bulb, and hand sympathetic skin responses (SSRs). Spontaneous electrical activity of the clitoris and bulb was present in 13 subjects. A total of 21 subjects had evoked activity in the bulb, while 18 had evoked activity in the clitoris. All subjects had hand SSRs. Evoked genital response latencies were similar to hand SSR latency (p > 0.05). Evoked electrical activity was recordable in the clitoris and bulb but it was more easily performed in the bulb. Evoked electrical activity is more consistently obtained than spontaneous activity. These tests represent possible objective measures of female genital autonomic innervation, which may have relevance to female sexual function.

  20. Hippocampal CA3 pyramidal cells selectively innervate aspiny interneurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittner, Lucia; Henze, Darrell A; Záborszky, László; Buzsáki, György

    2006-09-01

    The specific connectivity among principal cells and interneurons determines the flow of activity in neuronal networks. To elucidate the connections between hippocampal principal cells and various classes of interneurons, CA3 pyramidal cells were intracellularly labelled with biocytin in anaesthetized rats and the three-dimensional distribution of their axon collaterals was reconstructed. The sections were double-stained for substance P receptor (SPR)- or metabotropic glutamate receptor 1alpha (mGluR-1alpha)-immunoreactivity to investigate interneuron targets of the CA3 pyramidal cells. SPR-containing interneurons represent a large portion of the GABAergic population, including spiny and aspiny classes. Axon terminals of CA3 pyramidal cells contacted SPR-positive interneuron dendrites in the hilus and in all hippocampal strata in both CA3 and CA1 regions (7.16% of all boutons). The majority of axons formed single contacts (87.5%), but multiple contacts (up to six) on single target neurons were also found. CA3 pyramidal cell axon collaterals innervated several types of morphologically different aspiny SPR-positive interneurons. In contrast, spiny SPR-interneurons or mGluR-1alpha-positive interneurons in the hilus, CA3 and CA1 regions were rarely contacted by the filled pyramidal cells. These findings indicate a strong target selection of CA3 pyramidal cells favouring the activation of aspiny classes of interneurons.

  1. Low Latency Digit-Recurrence Reciprocal and Square-Root Reciprocal Algorithm and Architecture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Antelo, Elisardo; Lang, Tomas; Montuschi, Paolo

    2005-01-01

    The reciprocal and square-root reciprocal operations are important in several applications. For these operations, we present algorithms that combine a digit-by-digit module and one iteration of a quadratic-convergence approximation. The latter is implemented by a digit-recurrence, which uses......-up of about 2 and, because of the approximation part, the area factor is also about 2. We also show a combined implementation for both operations that has essentially the same complexity as that for square-root reciprocal alone....

  2. [The adrenergic innervation of the normal rat uterus and during pregnancy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakitskaia, V V; Chudinov, Iu V; Shaliapina, V G

    1990-09-01

    Histochemical analysis revealed that, normally, the main amount of adrenergic fibers in the rat uterus is connected with vascular innervation. The amount of neural elements projecting to the muscle cells in insignificant. In pregnancy, the amount of fibers with the specific fluorescence decreases and they completely disappear from the myometrium in parturient rats. Biochemical analysis corroborated the finding that the noradrenaline level is considerably decreased at the time in sympathetic neurons innervating the uterus thus leading to a physiological "desympathization" of the organ.

  3. Innervation of the elbow joint: Is total denervation possible? A cadaveric anatomic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Kesel, Renata; Van Glabbeek, Francis; Mugenzi, Dominique; De Vos, Joris; Vermeulen, Katrien; Van Renterghem, Debbie; Bortier, Hilde; Schuind, Frédéric

    2012-09-01

    The aim of this anatomical study was to find out if total denervation of the elbow joint is technically feasible. The endbranches of the brachial plexus of eight fresh-frozen upper arm cadavers were dissected with optical loupe magnification. All major nerves of the upper limb (except the axillary and the medial brachial cutaneous nerve) give some terminal articular endbranches to the elbow. The articular endbranches arise from muscular endbranches, cutaneous endbranches, or arise straight from the main nerves of the brachial plexus. A topographic diagram was made of the different nerves innervating the elbow joint. The ulno-posterior part of the elbow is innervated by the ulnar nerve and some branches of medial antebrachial cutaneous nerve. The radial-posterior part of the elbow is innervated exclusively by the radial nerve. The ulno-anterior part of the elbow is innervated by the median nerve and the musculocutaneous nerve. The radio-anterior part of the elbow is innervated by the radial nerve and the musculocutaneous nerve. These elbow innervation findings are relevant to both anatomical and clinical field as they provide evidence that the total denervation of the elbow joint is impossible. Nevertheless, partial denervation, like denervation of the lateral epicondyle or the ulnar part of elbow, is technically possible.

  4. Reversible Logic Circuit Synthesis

    CERN Document Server

    Shende, V V; Markov, I L; Prasad, A K; Hayes, John P.; Markov, Igor L.; Prasad, Aditya K.; Shende, Vivek V.

    2002-01-01

    Reversible, or information-lossless, circuits have applications in digital signal processing, communication, computer graphics and cryptography. They are also a fundamental requirement for quantum computation. We investigate the synthesis of reversible circuits that employ a minimum number of gates and contain no redundant input-output line-pairs (temporary storage channels). We propose new constructions for reversible circuits composed of NOT, Controlled-NOT, and TOFFOLI gates (the CNT gate library) based on permutation theory. A new algorithm is given to synthesize optimal reversible circuits using an arbitrary gate library. We also describe much faster heuristic algorithms. We also pursue applications of the proposed techniques to the synthesis of quantum circuits.

  5. Cooperation under indirect reciprocity and imitative trust.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serguei Saavedra

    Full Text Available Indirect reciprocity, a key concept in behavioral experiments and evolutionary game theory, provides a mechanism that allows reciprocal altruism to emerge in a population of self-regarding individuals even when repeated interactions between pairs of actors are unlikely. Recent empirical evidence show that humans typically follow complex assessment strategies involving both reciprocity and social imitation when making cooperative decisions. However, currently, we have no systematic understanding of how imitation, a mechanism that may also generate negative effects via a process of cumulative advantage, affects cooperation when repeated interactions are unlikely or information about a recipient's reputation is unavailable. Here we extend existing evolutionary models, which use an image score for reputation to track how individuals cooperate by contributing resources, by introducing a new imitative-trust score, which tracks whether actors have been the recipients of cooperation in the past. We show that imitative trust can co-exist with indirect reciprocity mechanisms up to a threshold and then cooperation reverses -revealing the elusive nature of cooperation. Moreover, we find that when information about a recipient's reputation is limited, trusting the action of third parties towards her (i.e. imitating does favor a higher collective cooperation compared to random-trusting and share-alike mechanisms. We believe these results shed new light on the factors favoring social imitation as an adaptive mechanism in populations of cooperating social actors.

  6. Cooperation under indirect reciprocity and imitative trust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saavedra, Serguei; Smith, David; Reed-Tsochas, Felix

    2010-10-27

    Indirect reciprocity, a key concept in behavioral experiments and evolutionary game theory, provides a mechanism that allows reciprocal altruism to emerge in a population of self-regarding individuals even when repeated interactions between pairs of actors are unlikely. Recent empirical evidence show that humans typically follow complex assessment strategies involving both reciprocity and social imitation when making cooperative decisions. However, currently, we have no systematic understanding of how imitation, a mechanism that may also generate negative effects via a process of cumulative advantage, affects cooperation when repeated interactions are unlikely or information about a recipient's reputation is unavailable. Here we extend existing evolutionary models, which use an image score for reputation to track how individuals cooperate by contributing resources, by introducing a new imitative-trust score, which tracks whether actors have been the recipients of cooperation in the past. We show that imitative trust can co-exist with indirect reciprocity mechanisms up to a threshold and then cooperation reverses -revealing the elusive nature of cooperation. Moreover, we find that when information about a recipient's reputation is limited, trusting the action of third parties towards her (i.e. imitating) does favor a higher collective cooperation compared to random-trusting and share-alike mechanisms. We believe these results shed new light on the factors favoring social imitation as an adaptive mechanism in populations of cooperating social actors.

  7. The Effects of Feedback as Interpersonal Reciprocities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levenstein, Joseph; And Others

    1977-01-01

    Tests the hypothesis that a response to a given feedback statement will be its reciprocal. In Phase 1, a pool of feedback statements was written and scaled along dimensions of power (dominance-submission) and affect (affection-hostility). In Phase 2, these statements were used as the basis for giving feedback and replying to it. (Author)

  8. Reciprocity, Materialism and Welfare: An Evolutionary Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Anders

    2001-01-01

    We analyze preference evolution in a simple bargaining situation. Preferences for reciprocity, who sustain a conflict-free outcome, may be viable if players have enough information about the opponent's preferences. However, depending on the initial starting point preference evolution can in general...

  9. Robustness of Long Span Reciprocal Timber Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balfroid, Nathalie; Kirkegaard, Poul Henning; Sassone, Mario SASSONE

    2011-01-01

    engineer may take necessary steps to design robust structures that are insensitive to accidental circumstances. The present paper makes a discussion of such robustness issues related to the future development of reciprocal timber structures. The paper concludes that these kind of structures can have...

  10. Students' Confusions with Reciprocal and Inverse Functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kontorovich, Igor'

    2017-01-01

    These classroom notes are focused on undergraduate students' understanding of the polysemous symbol of superscript (-1), which can be interpreted as a reciprocal or an inverse function. Examination of 240 scripts in a mid-term test identified that some first-year students struggle with choosing the contextually correct interpretation and there are…

  11. Human-animal amity and reciprocity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wissenburg, M.L.J.

    2014-01-01

    Animals are now widely accepted as subjects of justice: not equal but deserving equal consideration; not free but deserving liberties (that is, selfconstraining human duties). But liberty and equality are not all there is to a flourishing society – how about amity and reciprocity? Isn’t a minimal de

  12. Reciprocal altruism under conditions of partner selection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vos, H.; Smaniotto, R.C.; Elsas, D.A.

    2001-01-01

    This paper is a contribution to solving the problem of whether reciprocal altruism can emerge and maintain itself in a population of selfish individuals. We use an evolutionary game theoretic simulation model (the Social Evolution Model) to investigate the relative fitness of two versions of a recip

  13. 37 CFR 11.24 - Reciprocal discipline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Reciprocal discipline. 11.24... discipline. (a) Notification of OED Director. Within thirty days of being publicly censured, publicly... USPTO Director. The OED Director shall, in addition, without Committee on Discipline authorization,...

  14. 78 FR 53792 - Draft Guidance for Reciprocity

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-30

    ...The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is revising its licensing guidance for reciprocity. The NRC is requesting public comment on draft NUREG-1556, Volume 19, Revision 1, ``Consolidated Guidance about Materials Licenses: Guidance for Agreement State Licensees about NRC Form 241 `Report of Proposed Activities in Non- Agreement States, Areas of Exclusive Federal Jurisdiction, of Offshore......

  15. Non-Reciprocal on Wafer Microwave Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-05-27

    Journal of Applied Physics , (02 2012): 7542. doi: Bijoy K. Kuanr, T. J. Fal, Z...Celinski, R. E. Camley. Iron based microstrip phase shifter; optimization of phase shift, Journal of Applied Physics , (02 2012): 7508. doi: T. J...Fal, R. E. Camley. Non-reciprocal devices using attenuated total reflection and thin filmmagnetic layered structures, Journal of Applied Physics ,

  16. Students' Confusions with Reciprocal and Inverse Functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kontorovich, Igor'

    2017-01-01

    These classroom notes are focused on undergraduate students' understanding of the polysemous symbol of superscript (-1), which can be interpreted as a reciprocal or an inverse function. Examination of 240 scripts in a mid-term test identified that some first-year students struggle with choosing the contextually correct interpretation and there are…

  17. The Infinite Sum of Reciprocal of the Fibonacci Numbers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guo Jie ZHANG

    2011-01-01

    In this paper,we consider infinite sums of the reciprocals of the Fibonacci numbers.Then applying the floor function to the reciprocals of this sums,we obtain a new identity involving the Fibonacci numbers.

  18. Exact Threshold Circuits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kristoffer Arnsfelt; Podolskii, Vladimir V.

    2010-01-01

    We initiate a systematic study of constant depth Boolean circuits built using exact threshold gates. We consider both unweighted and weighted exact threshold gates and introduce corresponding circuit classes. We next show that this gives a hierarchy of classes that seamlessly interleave with the ......We initiate a systematic study of constant depth Boolean circuits built using exact threshold gates. We consider both unweighted and weighted exact threshold gates and introduce corresponding circuit classes. We next show that this gives a hierarchy of classes that seamlessly interleave...... with the well-studied corresponding hierarchies defined using ordinary threshold gates. A major open problem in Boolean circuit complexity is to provide an explicit super-polynomial lower bound for depth two threshold circuits. We identify the class of depth two exact threshold circuits as a natural subclass...

  19. Feedback in analog circuits

    CERN Document Server

    Ochoa, Agustin

    2016-01-01

    This book describes a consistent and direct methodology to the analysis and design of analog circuits with particular application to circuits containing feedback. The analysis and design of circuits containing feedback is generally presented by either following a series of examples where each circuit is simplified through the use of insight or experience (someone else’s), or a complete nodal-matrix analysis generating lots of algebra. Neither of these approaches leads to gaining insight into the design process easily. The author develops a systematic approach to circuit analysis, the Driving Point Impedance and Signal Flow Graphs (DPI/SFG) method that does not require a-priori insight to the circuit being considered and results in factored analysis supporting the design function. This approach enables designers to account fully for loading and the bi-directional nature of elements both in the feedback path and in the amplifier itself, properties many times assumed negligible and ignored. Feedback circuits a...

  20. Bending Resistance and Cyclic Fatigue Life of Reciproc, Unicone, and WaveOne Reciprocating Instruments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Emmanuel João Nogueira Leal; Villarino, Laise Silva; Vieira, Victor Talarico Leal; Accorsi-Mendonça, Thais; Antunes, Henrique Dos Santos; De-Deus, Gustavo; Lopes, Hélio Pereira

    2016-12-01

    This study evaluated the bending resistance and cyclic fatigue life of a new single-file reciprocating instrument (Unicone; Medin, Nové Město na Moravě, Czech Republic). Reciproc (VDW, Munich, Germany) and WaveOne (Dentsply Maillefer) instruments were used as references for comparison. Flexibility was determined by 45° bending tests using a universal testing machine. The cyclic fatigue test was performed using a custom-made device. For this test, an artificial canal with a 60° angle and a 5-mm radius of curvature was used. Scanning electron microscopic analysis was performed to determine the mode of fracture and possible deformations at the helical shaft. Statistical analysis for the bending resistance test was performed using parametric methods (ie, 1-way analysis of variance). Post hoc pair-wise comparisons were performed using the Tukey test for multiple comparisons (P bending resistance than the other tested systems (P  .05). When mean life was compared among the brands, Reciproc lasted longer than WaveOne with a probability of 99.9%, longer than Unicone in the "RECIPROC ALL" mode with a probability of 99.9%, and longer than Unicone in the "WAVEONE ALL" mode with a probability of 99.9% (all statistically significant). Moreover, WaveOne lasted longer than Unicone in the "RECIPROC ALL" mode with a probability of 98.5% and longer than Unicone in the "WAVEONE ALL" mode with a probability of 99.8% (all statistically significant). Finally, Unicone in the "RECIPROC ALL" mode lasted longer than Unicone in the "WAVEONE ALL" mode with a probability of 95.3% (statistically significant). The new reciprocating instrument Unicone showed lower cyclic fatigue resistance compared with Reciproc R25 and WaveOne Primary files. Copyright © 2016 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Hybrid Optimization in the Design of Reciprocal Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Parigi, Dario; Kirkegaard, Poul Henning; Sassone, Mario

    2012-01-01

    The paper presents a method to generate the geometry of reciprocal structures by means of a hybrid optimization procedure. The geometry of reciprocal structures where elements are sitting on the top or in the bottom of each other is extremely difficult to predict because of the non...... is then applied to a recent example of free-form reciprocal structure....

  2. A 1.5 GFLOPS Reciprocal Unit for Computer Graphics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nannarelli, Alberto; Rasmussen, Morten Sleth; Stuart, Matthias Bo

    2006-01-01

    The reciprocal operation 1/d is a frequent operation performed in graphics processors (GPUs). In this work, we present the design of a radix-16 reciprocal unit based on the algorithm combining the traditional digit-by-digit algorithm and the approximation of the reciprocal by one Newton...

  3. 32 CFR 634.16 - Reciprocal state-military action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Reciprocal state-military action. 634.16 Section... Reciprocal state-military action. (a) Commanders will recognize the interests of the states in matters of POV... formal military reciprocity, the procedures below will be adopted: (1) Commanders will recognize...

  4. Familial Reciprocity and Subjective Well-Being in Ghana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Ming-Chang; Dzorgbo, Dan-Bright S.

    2012-01-01

    The authors investigated variations in reciprocity and the impact of reciprocity on well-being in a West African society. They hypothesized that household size and income diversity encourage reciprocity, which in turn enhances subjective well-being. In empirical testing of these hypotheses the authors used the data of the Core Welfare Indicators…

  5. Development of neuropeptide Y-mediated heart innervation in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masliukov, Petr M; Moiseev, Konstantin; Emanuilov, Andrey I; Anikina, Tatyana A; Zverev, Alexey A; Nozdrachev, Alexandr D

    2016-02-01

    Neuropeptide Y (NPY) plays a trophic role in the nervous and vascular systems and in cardiac hypertrophy. However, there is no report concerning the expression of NPY and its receptors in the heart during postnatal development. In the current study, immunohistochemistry and Western blot analysis was used to label NPY, and Y1R, Y2R, and Y5R receptors in the heart tissue and intramural cardiac ganglia from rats of different ages (newborn, 10 days old, 20 days old, 30 days old, 60 days old, 1 year old, and 2 years old).The obtained data suggest age-dependent changes of NPY-mediated heart innervation. The density of NPY-immunoreactive (IR) fibers was the least in newborn animals and increased in the first 20 days of life. In the atria of newborn and 10-day-old rats, NPY-IR fibers were more abundant compared with the ventricles. The vast majority of NPY-IR fibers also contained tyrosine hydroxylase, a key enzyme in catecholamine synthesis.The expression of Y1R increased between 10 and 20 days of life. Faint Y2R immunoreactivity was observed in the atria and ventricles of 20-day-old and older rats. In contrast, the highest level of the expression of Y5R was found in newborn pups comparing with more adult rats. All intramural ganglionic neurons were also Y1R-IR and Y5R-IR and Y2R-negative in all studied animals.Thus, the increasing of density of NPY-containing nerve fibers accompanies changes in relation of different subtypes of NPY receptors in the heart during development.

  6. Sensory innervation of the hairy skin (light- and electronmicroscopic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halata, Z

    1993-07-01

    The sense of touch develops early in phylogeny and is one of the most important senses for the survival of the animal. Touch organs of hairy skin in mammals include the so-called "Haarscheiben" (also Pinkus corpuscles) and all types of hair follicles with their nerve endings. The touch organs of the skin consist of a mechanical transducing component and the sensory component. The epithelium and its derivatives like hair follicles and sebaceous glands are the mechanical transducing component transmitting the mechanical forces like pressure or touch to the second component--the sensory nerve endings. In mammalian hairy skin all sinus and guard hairs and many vellus hairs are touch organs. The sinus hair is a typical example of a touch organ. All mammals except humans are equipped with these highly differentiated touch organs. The hair follicle is almost completely embedded in a blood sinus and equipped with more than 2,000 sensory nerve endings. All sinus and guard hairs are equipped with free nerve endings (nociceptors), Merkel nerve endings (slowly adapting [SA I] mechanoreceptor units-pressure detectors), palisades of lanceolate nerve endings (velocity detectors), and pilo-Ruffini corpuscles (tension receptors). In most of the sinus hairs lamellated corpuscles of Pacini type could be found (rapidly adapting receptors-acceleration detectors). Most vellus hairs are equipped with free and lanceolate nerve endings. Some of the vellus hairs of the upper portion of the body (head, upper extremity) are innervated by Merkel nerve endings. The presence of pilo-Ruffini nerve endings in vellus hairs is very unusual.

  7. Succinate dehydrogenase activity and soma size of motoneurons innervating different portions of the rat tibialis anterior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishihara, A.; Roy, R. R.; Edgerton, V. R.

    1995-01-01

    The spatial distribution, soma size and oxidative enzyme activity of gamma and alpha motoneurons innervating muscle fibres in the deep (away from the surface of the muscle) and superficial (close to the surface of the muscle) portions of the tibialis anterior in normal rats were determined. The deep portion had a higher percentage of high oxidative fibres than the superficial portion of the muscle. Motoneurons were labelled by retrograde neuronal transport of fluorescent tracers: Fast Blue and Nuclear Yellow were injected into the deep portion and Nuclear Yellow into the superficial portion of the muscle. Therefore, motoneurons innervating the deep portion were identified by both a blue fluorescent cytoplasm and a golden-yellow fluorescent nucleus, while motoneurons innervating the superficial portion were identified by only a golden-yellow fluorescent nucleus. After staining for succinate dehydrogenase activity on the same section used for the identification of the motoneurons, soma size and succinate dehydrogenase activity of the motoneurons were measured. The gamma and alpha motoneurons innervating both the deep and superficial portions were located primarily at L4 and were intermingled within the same region of the dorsolateral portion of the ventral horn in the spinal cord. Mean soma size was similar for either gamma or alpha motoneurons in the two portions of the muscle. The alpha motoneurons innervating the superficial portion had a lower mean succinate dehydrogenase activity than those innervating the deep portion of the muscle. An inverse relationship between soma size and succinate dehydrogenase activity of alpha, but not gamma, motoneurons innervating both the deep and superficial portions was observed. Based on three-dimensional reconstructions within the spinal cord, there were no apparent differences in the spatial distribution of the motoneurons, either gamma or alpha, associated with the deep and superficial compartments of the muscle. The data

  8. Innervation by a GABAergic neuron depresses spontaneous release in glutamatergic neurons and unveils the clamping phenotype of synaptotagmin-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wierda, Keimpe D B; Sørensen, Jakob B

    2014-02-01

    The role of spontaneously occurring release events in glutamatergic and GABAergic neurons and their regulation is intensely debated. To study the interdependence of glutamatergic and GABAergic spontaneous release, we compared reciprocally connected "mixed" glutamatergic/GABAergic neuronal pairs from mice cultured on astrocyte islands with "homotypic" glutamatergic or GABAergic pairs and autaptic neurons. We measured mEPSC and mIPSC frequencies simultaneously from both neurons. Neuronal pairs formed both interneuronal synaptic and autaptic connections indiscriminately. We find that whereas mEPSC and mIPSC frequencies did not deviate between autaptic and synaptic connections, the frequency of mEPSCs in mixed pairs was strongly depressed compared with either autaptic neurons or glutamatergic pairs. Simultaneous imaging of synapses, or comparison to evoked release amplitudes, showed that this decrease was not caused by fewer active synapses. The mEPSC frequency was negatively correlated with the mIPSC frequency, indicating interdependence. Moreover, the reduction in mEPSC frequency was abolished when established pairs were exposed to bicuculline for 3 d, but not by long-term incubation with tetrodotoxin, indicating that spontaneous GABA release downregulates mEPSC frequency. Further investigations showed that knockout of synaptotagmin-1 did not affect mEPSC frequencies in either glutamatergic autaptic neurons or in glutamatergic pairs. However, in mixed glutamatergic/GABAergic pairs, mEPSC frequencies were increased by a factor of four in the synaptotagmin-1-null neurons, which is in line with data obtained from mixed cultures. The effect persisted after incubation with BAPTA-AM. We conclude that spontaneous GABA release exerts control over mEPSC release, and GABAergic innervation of glutamatergic neurons unveils the unclamping phenotype of the synaptotagmin-1-null neurons.

  9. Magnitude and phase reciprocity calibration of ultrasonic piezoelectric disk in air

    CERN Document Server

    Andersen, Kenneth K; Kocbach, Jan

    2016-01-01

    A modified conventional three-transducer reciprocity calibration method is used to measure the magnitude and phase responses of the transmitting voltage response and the free-field open-circuit receiving voltage sensitivity of ultrasonic piezoelectric transducers radiating in air at 1 atm. The transducers used in this work are 20 x 2 mm circular piezoelectric ceramic disks with their first and second radial modes at approximately 100 and 250 kHz, respectively. The transducer characterization is supported and aided by finite element simulations of the measurement system and the measured frequency responses. Preliminary results indicate that the magnitude and phase responses of the transmitting voltage response and the free-field open-circuit receiving voltage sensitivity can be measured with fair accuracy in a limited frequency band around the first radial mode of the piezoelectric ceramic disk. Further work is needed to demonstrate and quantify the accuracy actually obtained using the three-transducer recipro...

  10. Reciprocity, social ties, and competition in markets for experience goods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huck, Steffen; Tyran, Jean-Robert

    2007-01-01

    Reciprocal customers may disproportionately improve the performance of markets for experience goods. Reciprocal customers reward (punish) firms for providing good (bad) quality by upholding (terminating) the customer relation. This may induce firms to provide good quality which, in turn, may induce...... a positive externality for non-reciprocal customers who would, in the absence of reciprocal types, face market breakdown. This efficiency-enhancing effect of reciprocity is boosted when there are social ties between consumers and competition between firms. The existence of social ties or competition alone...

  11. Regenerative feedback resonant circuit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, A. Mark; Kelly, James F.; McCloy, John S.; McMakin, Douglas L.

    2014-09-02

    A regenerative feedback resonant circuit for measuring a transient response in a loop is disclosed. The circuit includes an amplifier for generating a signal in the loop. The circuit further includes a resonator having a resonant cavity and a material located within the cavity. The signal sent into the resonator produces a resonant frequency. A variation of the resonant frequency due to perturbations in electromagnetic properties of the material is measured.

  12. Analog circuit design

    CERN Document Server

    Dobkin, Bob

    2012-01-01

    Analog circuit and system design today is more essential than ever before. With the growth of digital systems, wireless communications, complex industrial and automotive systems, designers are being challenged to develop sophisticated analog solutions. This comprehensive source book of circuit design solutions aids engineers with elegant and practical design techniques that focus on common analog challenges. The book's in-depth application examples provide insight into circuit design and application solutions that you can apply in today's demanding designs. <

  13. Parallelizing quantum circuit synthesis

    OpenAIRE

    Di Matteo, Olivia; Mosca, Michele

    2016-01-01

    Quantum circuit synthesis is the process in which an arbitrary unitary operation is decomposed into a sequence of gates from a universal set, typically one which a quantum computer can implement both efficiently and fault-tolerantly. As physical implementations of quantum computers improve, the need is growing for tools which can effectively synthesize components of the circuits and algorithms they will run. Existing algorithms for exact, multi-qubit circuit synthesis scale exponentially in t...

  14. Analog circuits cookbook

    CERN Document Server

    Hickman, Ian

    2013-01-01

    Analog Circuits Cookbook presents articles about advanced circuit techniques, components and concepts, useful IC for analog signal processing in the audio range, direct digital synthesis, and ingenious video op-amp. The book also includes articles about amplitude measurements on RF signals, linear optical imager, power supplies and devices, and RF circuits and techniques. Professionals and students of electrical engineering will find the book informative and useful.

  15. Ontogeny of the serotonergic projection to rat neocortex: transient expression of a dense innervation to primary sensory areas.

    OpenAIRE

    D'Amato, R J; Blue, M E; Largent, B L; Lynch, D R; Ledbetter, D J; Molliver, M E; Snyder, S H

    1987-01-01

    The development of serotonergic innervation to rat cerebral cortex was characterized by immunohistochemical localization of serotonin combined with autoradiographic imaging of serotonin-uptake sites. In neonatal rat, a transient, dense, serotonergic innervation appears in all primary sensory areas of cortex. In somatosensory cortex, dense patches of serotonergic innervation are aligned with specialized cellular aggregates called barrels. The dense patches are not apparent after 3 weeks of age...

  16. Collective motion in non-reciprocal swarms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bo LIU; Tianguang CHU; Long WANG

    2009-01-01

    This paper studies a non-reciprocal swarm model that consists of a group of mobile autonomous agents with an attraction-repulsion function governing the interaction of the agents. The function is chosen to have infinitely large values of repulsion for vanishing distance between two agents so as to avoid occurrence of collision. It is shown analytically that under the detailed balance condition in coupling weights, all the agents will aggregate and eventually form a cohesive cluster of finite size around the weighted center of the swarm in a finite time. Moreover, the swarm system is completely stable, namely, the motion of all agents converge to the set of equilibrium points. For the general case of non-reciprocal swarms without the detailed balance condition, numerical simulations show that more complex self-organized oscillations can emerge in the swarms. The effect of noise on collective dynamics of the swarm is also examined with a white Gaussian noise model.

  17. Nihility in non-reciprocal bianisotropic media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ra’di Younes

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Here we consider electromagnetic response of non-reciprocal bianisotropic materials in some extreme regimes. The magneto-electric coupling is modeled by symmetric and antisymmetric uniaxial dyadics, which correspond to the so called artificial Tellegen media and moving media, respectively. Extreme electromagnetic properties of uniaxial non-reciprocal bianisotropic materials in the limiting case of nihility, when both permittivity and permeability of the media tend to zero, and only the magneto-electric parameters define the material response, are studied. Among other interesting effects, we show that the moving nihility materials provide the extreme asymmetry in the phase shift of transmitted waves propagating along the opposite directions. Furthermore, we reveal a possibility to create an angular filter with extreme sensitivity to the incidence angle, also using moving nihility slabs.

  18. Reciprocal Suffering: Caregiver Concerns During Hospice Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittenberg-Lyles, Elaine; Demiris, George; Oliver, Debra Parker; Burt, Stephanie

    2010-01-01

    Context For many hospice caregivers, the constancy and difficulty of caregiving impact their physical quality of life and cause depression, psychological distress, guilt, loneliness, and restrictions on social activities. Objectives Deviating from traditional unidimensional research on hospice caregivers, this study explored the transactional nature of reciprocal suffering by examining caregiver concerns through four dimensions: physical, psychological, social, and spiritual. Methods Researchers analyzed audiotapes of intervention discussions between hospice caregivers and research social workers. Results Results indicated that of the 125 pain talk utterances, the majority referenced psychological concern (49%), followed by physical (28%), social (22%), and spiritual (2%). Reflections on concerns revealed a global perspective of caregiving, which highlighted the patient’s needs juxtaposed to the caregiver’s recognized limitations. Conclusion By examining the reciprocal nature of suffering for caregivers, this study reinforced the need for assessing caregivers in hospice care, with specific emphasis on the importance of providing caregiver education on pain management. PMID:21146356

  19. Interdependent network reciprocity in evolutionary games

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Zhen; Perc, Matjaz

    2013-01-01

    Besides the structure of interactions within networks, also the interactions between networks are of the outmost importance. We therefore study the outcome of the public goods game on two interdependent networks that are connected by means of a utility function, which determines how payoffs on both networks jointly influence the success of players in each individual network. We show that an unbiased coupling allows the spontaneous emergence of interdependent network reciprocity, which is capable to maintain healthy levels of public cooperation even in extremely adverse conditions. The mechanism, however, requires simultaneous formation of correlated cooperator clusters on both networks. If this does not emerge or if the coordination process is disturbed, network reciprocity fails, resulting in the total collapse of cooperation. Network interdependence can thus be exploited effectively to promote cooperation past the limits imposed by isolated networks, but only if the coordination between the interdependent n...

  20. Reciprocity-induced bias in digital reputation

    CERN Document Server

    Livan, Giacomo; Aste, Tomaso

    2016-01-01

    The peer-to-peer (P2P) economy relies on establishing trust in distributed networked systems, where the reliability of a user is assessed through digital peer-review processes that aggregate ratings into reputation scores. Here we present evidence of a network effect which biases the digital reputations of the users of P2P networks, showing that P2P networks display exceedingly high levels of reciprocity. In fact, these are so large that they are close to the highest levels structurally compatible with the networks' reputation landscape. This shows that the crowdsourcing process underpinning digital reputation is significantly distorted by the attempt of users to mutually boost reputation, or to retaliate, through the exchange of ratings. We show that the least active users are predominantly responsible for such reciprocity-induced bias, and that this fact can be exploited to suppress the bias itself.

  1. Condition monitoring of reciprocating seal based on FBG sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xiuxu; Zhang, Shuanshuan; Wen, Pengfei; Zhen, Wenhan; Ke, Wei

    2016-07-01

    The failure of hydraulic reciprocating seals will seriously affect the normal operation of hydraulic reciprocating machinery, so the potential fault condition monitoring of reciprocating seals is very important. However, it is extremely difficult because of the limitation of reciprocating motion and the structure constraints of seal groove. In this study, an approach using fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensors is presented. Experimental results show that the contact strain changes of a reciprocating seal can be detected by FBG sensors in the operation process of the hydraulic cylinders. The failure condition of the reciprocating seal can be identified by wavelet packet energy entropy, and the center frequency of power spectrum analysis. It can provide an effective solution for the fault prevention and health management of reciprocating hydraulic rod seals.

  2. Electronic devices and circuits

    CERN Document Server

    Pridham, Gordon John

    1968-01-01

    Electronic Devices and Circuits, Volume 1 deals with the design and applications of electronic devices and circuits such as passive components, diodes, triodes and transistors, rectification and power supplies, amplifying circuits, electronic instruments, and oscillators. These topics are supported with introductory network theory and physics. This volume is comprised of nine chapters and begins by explaining the operation of resistive, inductive, and capacitive elements in direct and alternating current circuits. The theory for some of the expressions quoted in later chapters is presented. Th

  3. CMOS circuits manual

    CERN Document Server

    Marston, R M

    1995-01-01

    CMOS Circuits Manual is a user's guide for CMOS. The book emphasizes the practical aspects of CMOS and provides circuits, tables, and graphs to further relate the fundamentals with the applications. The text first discusses the basic principles and characteristics of the CMOS devices. The succeeding chapters detail the types of CMOS IC, including simple inverter, gate and logic ICs and circuits, and complex counters and decoders. The last chapter presents a miscellaneous collection of two dozen useful CMOS circuits. The book will be useful to researchers and professionals who employ CMOS circu

  4. Circuits and filters handbook

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Wai-Kai

    2003-01-01

    A bestseller in its first edition, The Circuits and Filters Handbook has been thoroughly updated to provide the most current, most comprehensive information available in both the classical and emerging fields of circuits and filters, both analog and digital. This edition contains 29 new chapters, with significant additions in the areas of computer-aided design, circuit simulation, VLSI circuits, design automation, and active and digital filters. It will undoubtedly take its place as the engineer's first choice in looking for solutions to problems encountered in the design, analysis, and behavi

  5. Timergenerator circuits manual

    CERN Document Server

    Marston, R M

    2013-01-01

    Timer/Generator Circuits Manual is an 11-chapter text that deals mainly with waveform generator techniques and circuits. Each chapter starts with an explanation of the basic principles of its subject followed by a wide range of practical circuit designs. This work presents a total of over 300 practical circuits, diagrams, and tables.Chapter 1 outlines the basic principles and the different types of generator. Chapters 2 to 9 deal with a specific type of waveform generator, including sine, square, triangular, sawtooth, and special waveform generators pulse. These chapters also include pulse gen

  6. Security electronics circuits manual

    CERN Document Server

    MARSTON, R M

    1998-01-01

    Security Electronics Circuits Manual is an invaluable guide for engineers and technicians in the security industry. It will also prove to be a useful guide for students and experimenters, as well as providing experienced amateurs and DIY enthusiasts with numerous ideas to protect their homes, businesses and properties.As with all Ray Marston's Circuits Manuals, the style is easy-to-read and non-mathematical, with the emphasis firmly on practical applications, circuits and design ideas. The ICs and other devices used in the practical circuits are modestly priced and readily available ty

  7. MOS integrated circuit design

    CERN Document Server

    Wolfendale, E

    2013-01-01

    MOS Integral Circuit Design aims to help in the design of integrated circuits, especially large-scale ones, using MOS Technology through teaching of techniques, practical applications, and examples. The book covers topics such as design equation and process parameters; MOS static and dynamic circuits; logic design techniques, system partitioning, and layout techniques. Also featured are computer aids such as logic simulation and mask layout, as well as examples on simple MOS design. The text is recommended for electrical engineers who would like to know how to use MOS for integral circuit desi

  8. Printed circuit board industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaDou, Joseph

    2006-05-01

    The printed circuit board is the platform upon which microelectronic components such as semiconductor chips and capacitors are mounted. It provides the electrical interconnections between components and is found in virtually all electronics products. Once considered low technology, the printed circuit board is evolving into a high-technology product. Printed circuit board manufacturing is highly complicated, requiring large equipment investments and over 50 process steps. Many of the high-speed, miniaturized printed circuit boards are now manufactured in cleanrooms with the same health and safety problems posed by other microelectronics manufacturing. Asia produces three-fourths of the world's printed circuit boards. In Asian countries, glycol ethers are the major solvents used in the printed circuit board industry. Large quantities of hazardous chemicals such as formaldehyde, dimethylformamide, and lead are used by the printed circuit board industry. For decades, chemically intensive and often sloppy manufacturing processes exposed tens of thousands of workers to a large number of chemicals that are now known to be reproductive toxicants and carcinogens. The printed circuit board industry has exposed workers to high doses of toxic metals, solvents, acids, and photolithographic chemicals. Only recently has there been any serious effort to diminish the quantity of lead distributed worldwide by the printed circuit board industry. Billions of electronics products have been discarded in every region of the world. This paper summarizes recent regulatory and enforcement efforts.

  9. The enteric nervous system and gastrointestinal innervation: integrated local and central control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furness, John B; Callaghan, Brid P; Rivera, Leni R; Cho, Hyun-Jung

    2014-01-01

    The digestive system is innervated through its connections with the central nervous system (CNS) and by the enteric nervous system (ENS) within the wall of the gastrointestinal tract. The ENS works in concert with CNS reflex and command centers and with neural pathways that pass through sympathetic ganglia to control digestive function. There is bidirectional information flow between the ENS and CNS and between the ENS and sympathetic prevertebral ganglia.The ENS in human contains 200-600 million neurons, distributed in many thousands of small ganglia, the great majority of which are found in two plexuses, the myenteric and submucosal plexuses. The myenteric plexus forms a continuous network that extends from the upper esophagus to the internal anal sphincter. Submucosal ganglia and connecting fiber bundles form plexuses in the small and large intestines, but not in the stomach and esophagus. The connections between the ENS and CNS are carried by the vagus and pelvic nerves and sympathetic pathways. Neurons also project from the ENS to prevertebral ganglia, the gallbladder, pancreas and trachea.The relative roles of the ENS and CNS differ considerably along the digestive tract. Movements of the striated muscle esophagus are determined by neural pattern generators in the CNS. Likewise the CNS has a major role in monitoring the state of the stomach and, in turn, controlling its contractile activity and acid secretion, through vago-vagal reflexes. In contrast, the ENS in the small intestine and colon contains full reflex circuits, including sensory neurons, interneurons and several classes of motor neuron, through which muscle activity, transmucosal fluid fluxes, local blood flow and other functions are controlled. The CNS has control of defecation, via the defecation centers in the lumbosacral spinal cord. The importance of the ENS is emphasized by the life-threatening effects of some ENS neuropathies. By contrast, removal of vagal or sympathetic connections with the

  10. A Flight Sensory-Motor to Olfactory Processing Circuit in the Moth Manduca sexta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, Samual P; Chapman, Phillip D; Lizbinski, Kristyn M; Daly, Kevin C; Dacks, Andrew M

    2016-01-01

    Neural circuits projecting information from motor to sensory pathways are common across sensory domains. These circuits typically modify sensory function as a result of motor pattern activation; this is particularly so in cases where the resultant behavior affects the sensory experience or its processing. However, such circuits have not been observed projecting to an olfactory pathway in any species despite well characterized active sampling behaviors that produce reafferent mechanical stimuli, such as sniffing in mammals and wing beating in the moth Manduca sexta. In this study we characterize a circuit that connects a flight sensory-motor center to an olfactory center in Manduca. This circuit consists of a single pair of histamine immunoreactive (HA-ir) neurons that project from the mesothoracic ganglion to innervate a subset of ventral antennal lobe (AL) glomeruli. Furthermore, within the AL we show that the M. sexta histamine B receptor (MsHisClB) is exclusively expressed by a subset of GABAergic and peptidergic LNs, which broadly project to all olfactory glomeruli. Finally, the HA-ir cell pair is present in fifth stage instar larvae; however, the absence of MsHisClB-ir in the larval antennal center indicates that the circuit is incomplete prior to metamorphosis and importantly prior to the expression of flight behavior. Although the functional consequences of this circuit remain unknown, these results provide the first detailed description of a circuit that interconnects an olfactory system with motor centers driving flight behaviors including odor-guided flight.

  11. Facial Affect Reciprocity in Dyadic Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-01

    Factor Inventory (NEOFFI; Costa & McCrae , 1989, 1992), a 60-item version of form S of the NEO-PI-R that provides a measure of the five factor model...emotion and reciprocal affective relationships in families of disturbed adolescents. Family Process, 28(3), 337–348. Costa , P. T., & McCrae , R. R...1989). The Neo-PI/Neo-FFI manual supplement. Odessa, FL: Psychological Assessment Resources. Costa , P. T., & McCrae , R. R. (1992). Revised Neo

  12. Nonexistence in Reciprocal and Logarithmic Regression

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Josef Bukac

    2003-01-01

    Fitting logarithmic b ln(clx), a+bln(c+x) or reciprocal b/(c+x), a+b/(c+x) regression models to data by the least squares method asks for the determination of the closure of the set of each type of these functions defined on a finite domain. It follows that a minimal solution may not exist. But it does exist when the closure is considered.

  13. Mills' ratio: Reciprocal concavity and functional inequalities

    CERN Document Server

    Baricz, Árpád

    2010-01-01

    This note contains suficient conditions for the probability density function of an arbitrary continuous univariate distribution such that the corresponding Mills ratio to be reciprocally convex (concave). To illustrate the applications of the main results, the Mills ratio of some common continuous univariate distributions, like gamma, log-normal and Student's t distributions, are discussed in details. The application to monopoly theory is also summarized.

  14. Reciprocity Theorems for Ab Initio Force Calculations

    CERN Document Server

    Wei, C; Mele, E J; Rappe, A M; Lewis, Steven P.; Rappe, Andrew M.

    1996-01-01

    We present a method for calculating ab initio interatomic forces which scales quadratically with the size of the system and provides a physically transparent representation of the force in terms of the spatial variation of the electronic charge density. The method is based on a reciprocity theorem for evaluating an effective potential acting on a charged ion in the core of each atom. We illustrate the method with calculations for diatomic molecules.

  15. Topographical projections of segmental nerves to the frog glutaeus muscle during loss of polyneuronal innervation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, M; Lavidis, N

    1986-06-01

    The development of synaptic connexions to the frog (Limnodynastes tasmaniansis) glutaeus muscle from segmental nerves 8 and 9 was determined using glycogen depletion, contraction and electrophysiological methods between stages 54 and 60 (Nieuwkoop & Faber, 1975). There was no change in the number of muscle cells in the glutaeus from stage 55 onwards; the maturation of muscle cells was most advanced at the point of nerve entry on the ventral surface of the glutaeus and least advanced at the dorsal surface. Electrophysiological determination of the segmental innervation of the dorsal surface of the muscle in low calcium (0.5 mM) indicated that the muscle was almost uniquely innervated by nerve 8 at stage 54. Weak nerve 9 terminals were detected at stage 54 only if the calcium concentration was raised to 6.0 mM. Innervation by nerve 9 was first detected in low calcium at stage 55. There was then a progressive decrease in the innervation of the glutaeus muscle by nerve 8 in regions apposed to the iliofibularis muscle, until stage 59 when this part of the glutaeus was almost completely innervated by nerve 9. Glycogen depletion of muscle fibres following tetanic stimulation of either segmental nerve confirmed that the region of the glutaeus muscle apposed by the iliofibularis becomes progressively innervated by nerve 9 during development. Contraction studies of the segmental innervation of the glutaeus muscle in normal calcium (2 mM) indicated that the muscle was predominantly innervated by nerve 8 at stage 54. There was then a progressive increase in the number of nerve 9 motor units up to stage 56. The size of individual motor units declined for both nerves 8 and 9 until stage 59, when the average motor unit size was about 9% of the muscle. It is suggested that the decline in the innervation by nerve 8 of the side of the glutaeus muscle apposing the iliofibularis muscle is due to this region of the muscle selectively favouring synapse formation by nerve 9 over nerve 8.

  16. The catecholaminergic innervation of the claustrum of the pig.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirone, Andrea; Miragliotta, Vincenzo; Ciregia, Federica; Giannessi, Elisabetta; Cozzi, Bruno

    2017-10-01

    Over the past decades, the number of studies employing the pig brain as a model for neurochemical studies has dramatically increased. The key translational features of the pig brain are the similarities with the cortical and subcortical structures of the human brain. In addition, the caudalmost part of the pig claustrum (CL) is characterized by a wide enlargement called posterior puddle, an ideal structure for physiological recordings. Several hypotheses have been proposed for CL function, the key factor being its reciprocal connectivity with most areas of the cerebral cortex and selected subcortical structures. However, afferents from the brainstem could also be involved. The brainstem is the main source of catecholaminergic axons that play an important neuromodulatory action in different brain functions. To study a possible role of the CL in catecholaminergic pathways, we analyzed the presence and the distribution of afferents immunostained with antibodies against tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) and dopamine betahydroxylase (DBH) in the pig CL. Here we show that the CL contains significant TH immunoreactive axons contacting perikarya, whereas projections staining for DBH are very scarce. Our findings hint at the possibility that brainstem catecholaminergic afferents project to the CL, suggesting (i) a possible role of this nucleus in functions controlled by brainstem structures; and, consequently, (ii) its potential involvement in the pathophysiology of neurodegenerative pathologies, including Parkinson's disease (PD). © 2017 Anatomical Society.

  17. Grooming reciprocity in male Tibetan macaques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Dong-Po; Li, Jin-Hua; Garber, Paul A; Matheson, Megan D; Sun, Bing-Hua; Zhu, Yong

    2013-10-01

    In several primate species, adult males are reported to compete for access to reproductive partners as well as forming affiliative and cohesive social bonds based on the exchange of goods or services. We hypothesized that among a broad set of fitness-maximizing strategies, grooming can be used by individual adult males to enhance social relationships through reciprocity and/or through the interchange of grooming for a different but equivalent good or service. We used focal animal sampling and continuously recorded dyadic grooming and agonistic interactions to test a series of predictions regarding male social interactions in a free-ranging group of Tibetan macaques (Macaca thibetana) at Huangshan, China. During the non-mating season or between males of similar rank throughout the year, grooming effort given was matched by grooming effort received. However, lower ranking males groomed higher ranking males at a greater rate and/or for a longer duration during both the mating and non-mating periods. We found that higher ranking males directed less aggression towards males with whom they formed a frequent grooming partnership, indicating that grooming received was interchanged for increased social tolerance. These data suggest that individual male Tibetan macaques employ alternative social strategies associated with grooming reciprocity or interchange depending on dominance rank and rates of aggression, and highlight the importance of both biological markets and grooming reciprocity as behavioral mechanisms used by resident adult males to form and maintain affiliative social bonds.

  18. Independence of connexin expression and vasomotor conduction from sympathetic innervation in hamster feed arteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Looft-Wilson, Robin C; Haug, Sara J; Neufer, P Darrell; Segal, Steven S

    2004-01-01

    Vasomotor responses can travel along the wall of resistance microvessels by two distinct mechanisms: cell-to-cell conduction through gap junctions or the release of neurotransmitter along perivascular nerves. It is unknown whether vascular innervation influences the expression of connexin molecules which comprise gap junctions, or the conduction of vasomotor responses. In feed arteries of the hamster retractor muscle (RFA), the authors tested whether sympathetic denervation would alter the expression of connexin isoforms and the conduction of vasomotor responses. Using intact vessels with sympathetic innervation and those 7-8 days following denervation surgery, mRNA expression was quantified using real-time PCR, cellular localization of Cx protein was characterized using immunohistochemistry, and vasomotor responses to dilator and constrictor stimuli were evaluated in isolated pressurized RFA. Connexin protein localization and mRNA expression were similar between innervated and denervated vessels. mRNA levels were Cx43 = Cx37 > Cx45 > Cx40. Vasodilation to acetylcholine conducted >/=2000 microm along innervated and denervated vessels, as did the biphasic conduction of vasoconstriction and vasodilation in response to KCl. Vasoconstriction to phenylephrine conducted <500 microm and was attenuated (p <.05) in denervated vessels. The profile of connexin expression and the conduction of vasomotor responses are largely independent of sympathetic innervation in feed arteries of the hamster retractor muscle (RFA).

  19. Imaging three-dimensional innervation zone distribution in muscles from M-wave recordings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chuan; Peng, Yun; Liu, Yang; Li, Sheng; Zhou, Ping; Zev Rymer, William; Zhang, Yingchun

    2017-06-01

    Objective. To localize neuromuscular junctions in skeletal muscles in vivo which is of great importance in understanding, diagnosing and managing of neuromuscular disorders. Approach. A three-dimensional global innervation zone imaging technique was developed to characterize the global distribution of innervation zones, as an indication of the location and features of neuromuscular junctions, using electrically evoked high-density surface electromyogram recordings. Main results. The performance of the technique was evaluated in the biceps brachii of six intact human subjects. The geometric centers of the distributions of the reconstructed innervation zones were determined with a mean distance of 9.4  ±  1.4 cm from the reference plane, situated at the medial epicondyle of the humerus. A mean depth was calculated as 1.5  ±  0.3 cm from the geometric centers to the closed points over the skin. The results are consistent with those reported in previous histology studies. It was also found that the volumes and distributions of the reconstructed innervation zones changed as the stimulation intensities increased until the supramaximal muscle response was achieved. Significance. Results have demonstrated the high performance of the proposed imaging technique in noninvasively imaging global distributions of the innervation zones in the three-dimensional muscle space in vivo, and the feasibility of its clinical applications, such as guiding botulinum toxin injections in spasticity management, or in early diagnosis of neurodegenerative progression of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

  20. Cortical serotonin and norepinephrine denervation in parkinsonism: preferential loss of the beaded serotonin innervation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayyar, Tultul; Bubser, Michael; Ferguson, Marcus C; Neely, M Diana; Shawn Goodwin, J; Montine, Thomas J; Deutch, Ariel Y; Ansah, Twum A

    2009-07-01

    Parkinson's Disease (PD) is marked by prominent motor symptoms that reflect striatal dopamine insufficiency. However, non-motor symptoms, including depression, are common in PD. It has been suggested that these changes reflect pathological involvement of non-dopaminergic systems. We examined regional changes in serotonin (5-HT) and norepinephrine (NE) systems in mice treated with two different 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) treatment paradigms, at survival times of 3 or 16 weeks after the last MPTP injection. MPTP caused a decrease in striatal dopamine concentration, the magnitude of which depended on the treatment regimen and survival interval after MPTP treatment. There was significant involvement of other subcortical areas receiving a dopamine innervation, but no consistent changes in 5-HT or NE levels in subcortical sites. In contrast, we observed an enduring decrease in 5-HT and NE concentrations in both the somatosensory cortex and medial prefrontal cortex (PFC). Immunohistochemical studies also revealed a decrease in the density of PFC NE and 5-HT axons. The decrease in the cortical serotonergic innervation preferentially involved the thick beaded but not smooth fine 5-HT axons. Similar changes in the 5-HT innervation of post-mortem samples of the PFC from idiopathic PD cases were seen. Our findings point to a major loss of the 5-HT and NE innervations of the cortex in MPTP-induced parkinsonism, and suggest that loss of the beaded cortical 5-HT innervation is associated with a predisposition to the development of depression in PD.

  1. Analysis and measurement of the sympathetic and sensory innervation of white and brown adipose tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughan, Cheryl H; Zarebidaki, Eleen; Ehlen, J Christopher; Bartness, Timothy J

    2014-01-01

    Here, we provide a detailed account of how to denervate white and brown adipose tissue (WAT and BAT) and how to measure sympathetic nervous system (SNS) activity to these and other tissues neurochemically. The brain controls many of the functions of WAT and BAT via the SNS innervation of the tissues, especially lipolysis and thermogenesis, respectively. There is no clearly demonstrated parasympathetic innervation of WAT or the major interscapular BAT (IBAT) depot. WAT and BAT communicate with the brain neurally via sensory nerves. We detail the surgical denervation (eliminating both innervations) of several WAT pads and IBAT. We also detail more selective chemical denervation of the SNS innervation via intra-WAT/IBAT 6-hydroxy-dopamine (a catecholaminergic neurotoxin) injections and selective chemical sensory denervation via intra-WAT/IBAT capsaicin (a sensory nerve neurotoxin) injections. Verifications of the denervations are provided (HPLC-EC detection for SNS, ELIA for calcitonin gene-related peptide (proven sensory nerve marker)). Finally, assessment of the SNS drive to WAT/BAT or other tissues is described using the alpha-methyl-para-tyrosine method combined with HPLC-EC, a direct neurochemical measure of SNS activity. These methods have proven useful for us and for other investigators interested in innervation of adipose tissues. The chemical denervation approach has been extended to nonadipose tissues as well.

  2. Robust Topological Terahertz Circuits using Semiconductors

    CERN Document Server

    Bahari, Babak; Kanté, Boubacar

    2016-01-01

    Topological Insulator-based devices can transport electrons/photons at the surfaces of materials without any back reflections, even in the presence of obstacles. Topological properties have recently been studied using non-reciprocal materials such as gyromagnetics or using bianisotropy. However, these effects usually saturate at optical frequencies and limit our ability to scale down devices. In order to implement topological devices that we introduce in this paper for the terahertz range, we show that semiconductors can be utilized via their cyclotron resonance in combination with small magnetic fields. We propose novel terahertz operating devices such as the topological tunable power splitter and the topological circulator. This work opens new perspectives in the design of terahertz integrated devices and circuits with high functionality.

  3. REM Sleep and Endothermy: Potential Sites and Mechanism of a Reciprocal Interference

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matteo Cerri

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Numerous data show a reciprocal interaction between REM sleep and thermoregulation. During REM sleep, the function of thermoregulation appears to be impaired; from the other hand, the tonic activation of thermogenesis, such as during cold exposure, suppresses REM sleep occurrence. Recently, both the central neural network controlling REM sleep and the central neural network controlling thermoregulation have been progressively unraveled. Thermoregulation was shown to be controlled by a central “core” circuit, responsible for the maintenance of body temperature, modulated by a set of accessory areas. REM sleep was suggested to be controlled by a group of hypothalamic neurons overlooking at the REM sleep generating circuits within the brainstem. The two networks overlap in a few areas, and in this review, we will suggest that in such overlap may reside the explanation of the reciprocal interaction between REM sleep and thermoregulation. Considering the peculiar modulation of thermoregulation by REM sleep the result of their coincidental evolution, REM sleep may therefore be seen as a period of transient heterothermy.

  4. Identification of a spinal circuit for light touch and fine motor control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourane, Steeve; Grossmann, Katja S.; Britz, Olivier; Dalet, Antoine; Del Barrio, Marta Garcia; Stam, Floor J.; Garcia-Campmany, Lidia; Koch, Stephanie; Goulding, Martyn

    2015-01-01

    Sensory circuits in the dorsal spinal cord integrate and transmit multiple cutaneous sensory modalities including the sense of light touch. Here we identify a population of excitatory interneurons (INs) in the dorsal horn that are important for transmitting innocuous light touch sensation. These neurons express the ROR alpha (RORα) nuclear orphan receptor and are selectively innervated by cutaneous low threshold mechanoreceptors (LTMs). Targeted removal of RORα INs in the dorsal spinal cord leads a marked reduction in behavioral responsiveness to light touch without affecting responses to noxious and itch stimuli. RORα IN-deficient mice also display a selective deficit in corrective foot movements. This phenotype, together with our demonstration that the RORα INs are innervated by corticospinal and vestibulospinal projection neurons, argues that the RORα INs direct corrective reflex movements by integrating touch information with descending motor commands from the cortex and cerebellum. PMID:25635458

  5. Synchronizing Hyperchaotic Circuits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tamasevicius, Arunas; Cenys, Antanas; Namajunas, Audrius

    1997-01-01

    Regarding possible applications to secure communications the technique of synchronizing hyperchaotic circuits with a single dynamical variable is discussed. Several specific examples including the fourth-order circuits with two positive Lyapunov exponents as well as the oscillator with a delay line...... characterized by multiple positive Lyapunov exponents are reviewd....

  6. Genetic circuit design automation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Alec A K; Der, Bryan S; Shin, Jonghyeon; Vaidyanathan, Prashant; Paralanov, Vanya; Strychalski, Elizabeth A; Ross, David; Densmore, Douglas; Voigt, Christopher A

    2016-04-01

    Computation can be performed in living cells by DNA-encoded circuits that process sensory information and control biological functions. Their construction is time-intensive, requiring manual part assembly and balancing of regulator expression. We describe a design environment, Cello, in which a user writes Verilog code that is automatically transformed into a DNA sequence. Algorithms build a circuit diagram, assign and connect gates, and simulate performance. Reliable circuit design requires the insulation of gates from genetic context, so that they function identically when used in different circuits. We used Cello to design 60 circuits forEscherichia coli(880,000 base pairs of DNA), for which each DNA sequence was built as predicted by the software with no additional tuning. Of these, 45 circuits performed correctly in every output state (up to 10 regulators and 55 parts), and across all circuits 92% of the output states functioned as predicted. Design automation simplifies the incorporation of genetic circuits into biotechnology projects that require decision-making, control, sensing, or spatial organization.

  7. A Virtual Circuits Lab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vick, Matthew E.

    2010-01-01

    The University of Colorado's Physics Education Technology (PhET) website offers free, high-quality simulations of many physics experiments that can be used in the classroom. The Circuit Construction Kit, for example, allows students to safely and constructively play with circuit components while learning the mathematics behind many circuit…

  8. Nanofibers implant functionalized by neural growth factor as a strategy to innervate a bioengineered tooth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eap, Sandy; Bécavin, Thibault; Keller, Laetitia; Kökten, Tunay; Fioretti, Florence; Weickert, Jean-Luc; Deveaux, Etienne; Benkirane-Jessel, Nadia; Kuchler-Bopp, Sabine

    2014-03-01

    Current strategies for jaw reconstruction require multiple procedures, to repair the bone defect, to offer sufficient support, and to place the tooth implant. The entire procedure can be painful and time-consuming, and the desired functional repair can be achieved only when both steps are successful. The ability to engineer combined tooth and bone constructs, which would grow in a coordinated fashion with the surrounding tissues, could potentially improve the clinical outcomes and also reduce patient suffering. A unique nanofibrous and active implant for bone-tooth unit regeneration and also the innervation of this bioengineered tooth are demonstrated. A nanofibrous polycaprolactone membrane is functionalized with neural growth factor, along with dental germ, and tooth innervation follows. Such innervation allows complete functionality and tissue homeostasis of the tooth, such as dentinal sensitivity, odontoblast function, masticatory forces, and blood flow.

  9. Reciprocity on the hardwood: passing patterns among professional basketball players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willer, Robb; Sharkey, Amanda; Frey, Seth

    2012-01-01

    Past theory and research view reciprocal resource sharing as a fundamental building block of human societies. Most studies of reciprocity dynamics have focused on trading among individuals in laboratory settings. But if motivations to engage in these patterns of resource sharing are powerful, then we should observe forms of reciprocity even in highly structured group environments in which reciprocity does not clearly serve individual or group interests. To this end, we investigated whether patterns of reciprocity might emerge among teammates in professional basketball games. Using data from logs of National Basketball Association (NBA) games of the 2008-9 season, we estimated a series of conditional logistic regression models to test the impact of different factors on the probability that a given player would assist another player in scoring a basket. Our analysis found evidence for a direct reciprocity effect in which players who had "received" assists in the past tended to subsequently reciprocate their benefactors. Further, this tendency was time-dependent, with the probability of repayment highest soon after receiving an assist and declining as game time passed. We found no evidence for generalized reciprocity - a tendency to "pay forward" assists - and only very limited evidence for indirect reciprocity - a tendency to reward players who had sent others many assists. These findings highlight the power of reciprocity to shape human behavior, even in a setting characterized by extensive planning, division of labor, quick decision-making, and a focus on inter-group competition.

  10. Reciprocity on the hardwood: passing patterns among professional basketball players.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robb Willer

    Full Text Available Past theory and research view reciprocal resource sharing as a fundamental building block of human societies. Most studies of reciprocity dynamics have focused on trading among individuals in laboratory settings. But if motivations to engage in these patterns of resource sharing are powerful, then we should observe forms of reciprocity even in highly structured group environments in which reciprocity does not clearly serve individual or group interests. To this end, we investigated whether patterns of reciprocity might emerge among teammates in professional basketball games. Using data from logs of National Basketball Association (NBA games of the 2008-9 season, we estimated a series of conditional logistic regression models to test the impact of different factors on the probability that a given player would assist another player in scoring a basket. Our analysis found evidence for a direct reciprocity effect in which players who had "received" assists in the past tended to subsequently reciprocate their benefactors. Further, this tendency was time-dependent, with the probability of repayment highest soon after receiving an assist and declining as game time passed. We found no evidence for generalized reciprocity - a tendency to "pay forward" assists - and only very limited evidence for indirect reciprocity - a tendency to reward players who had sent others many assists. These findings highlight the power of reciprocity to shape human behavior, even in a setting characterized by extensive planning, division of labor, quick decision-making, and a focus on inter-group competition.

  11. Integrating Neural Circuits Controlling Female Sexual Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Micevych, Paul E.; Meisel, Robert L.

    2017-01-01

    The hypothalamus is most often associated with innate behaviors such as is hunger, thirst and sex. While the expression of these behaviors important for survival of the individual or the species is nested within the hypothalamus, the desire (i.e., motivation) for them is centered within the mesolimbic reward circuitry. In this review, we will use female sexual behavior as a model to examine the interaction of these circuits. We will examine the evidence for a hypothalamic circuit that regulates consummatory aspects of reproductive behavior, i.e., lordosis behavior, a measure of sexual receptivity that involves estradiol membrane-initiated signaling in the arcuate nucleus (ARH), activating β-endorphin projections to the medial preoptic nucleus (MPN), which in turn modulate ventromedial hypothalamic nucleus (VMH) activity—the common output from the hypothalamus. Estradiol modulates not only a series of neuropeptides, transmitters and receptors but induces dendritic spines that are for estrogenic induction of lordosis behavior. Simultaneously, in the nucleus accumbens of the mesolimbic system, the mating experience produces long term changes in dopamine signaling and structure. Sexual experience sensitizes the response of nucleus accumbens neurons to dopamine signaling through the induction of a long lasting early immediate gene. While estrogen alone increases spines in the ARH, sexual experience increases dendritic spine density in the nucleus accumbens. These two circuits appear to converge onto the medial preoptic area where there is a reciprocal influence of motivational circuits on consummatory behavior and vice versa. While it has not been formally demonstrated in the human, such circuitry is generally highly conserved and thus, understanding the anatomy, neurochemistry and physiology can provide useful insight into the motivation for sexual behavior and other innate behaviors in humans. PMID:28642689

  12. Localization of Biogenic Amines in the Foregut of Aplysia californica: Catecholaminergic and Serotonergic Innervation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Rubio, Clarissa; Serrano, Geidy E.; Miller, Mark W.

    2009-01-01

    This study examined the catecholaminergic and serotonergic innervation of the foregut of Aplysia californica, a model system in which the control of feeding behaviors can be investigated at the cellular level. Similar numbers (15-25) of serotonin-like-immunoreactive (5HTli) and tyrosine hydroxylase-like-immunoreactive (THli) fibers were present in each (bilateral) esophageal nerve (En), the major source of pregastric neural innervation in this system. The majority of En 5HTli and THli fibers originated from the anterior branch (En2), which innervates the pharynx and the anterior esophagus. Fewer fibers were present in the posterior branch (En1), which innervates the majority of the esophagus and the crop. Backfills of the two En branches toward the central nervous system (CNS) labeled a single, centrifugally projecting serotonergic fiber, originating from the metacerebral cell (MCC). The MCC fiber projected only to En2. No central THli neurons were found to project to the En. Surveys of the pharynx and esophagus revealed major differences between their patterns of catecholaminergic (CA) and serotonergic innervation. Whereas THli fibers and cell bodies were distributed throughout the foregut, 5HTli fibers were present in restricted plexi, and no 5HTli somata were detected. Double-labeling experiments in the periphery revealed THli neurons projecting toward the buccal ganglion via En2. Other afferents received dense perisomatic serotonergic innervation. Finally, qualitative and quantitative differences were observed between the buccal motor programs (BMPs) produced by stimulation of the two En branches. These observations increase our understanding of aminergic contributions to the pregastric regulation of Aplysia feeding behaviors. PMID:19330814

  13. Quantified distribution of the noradrenaline innervation in the hippocampus of adult rat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oleskevich, S.; Descarries, L.; Lacaille, J.C. (Universite de Montreal, Quebec (Canada))

    1989-11-01

    A recently developed radioautographic technique, based on the uptake labeling of monoamine terminals in vitro, was used to quantify the noradrenaline (NA) innervation in adult rat hippocampus. After incubation of brain slices with 1 microM 3H-NA, the NA varicosities were visualized as small aggregates of silver grains, in light microscope radioautographs prepared at 3 equidistant horizontal levels across the ventral 2/3 of the hippocampus. Using a computer-assisted image analyzer, counts were obtained from the subiculum (SUB), 3 sectors of Ammon's horn (CA1, CA3-a, CA3-b) and 3 sectors of the dentate gyrus (DG-medial blade, crest, and lateral blade), every lamina being sampled in each region. After a double correction for duration of radioautographic exposure and section thickness, and following measurement of varicosity diameter in electron microscope radioautographs, it was possible to express these results in number of terminals per volumetric unit of tissue. It was thus found that the overall density of hippocampal NA innervation averages 2.1 million varicosities/mm3 of tissue, a value almost twice as high as that in cerebral cortex. This innervation is 20% denser ventrally than dorsally and is heterogeneous both in terms of regional and laminar distribution. SUB and DG are more strongly innervated than Ammon's horn, wherein CA1 has the lowest overall density. In SUB and CA1, there is a clear predilection of NA varicosities for the stratum moleculare. In CA3, there is a narrow band of even stronger innervation in the stratum radiatum, near the apical border of the stratum pyramidale, contrasting with a 3 times lower density in this cell layer and the stratum oriens. In DG, the NA innervation is again the weakest in the cell body layer and exhibits an almost 3-fold greater density in the polymorph layer, the highest of all hippocampus.

  14. Acute and chronic estrogen supplementation decreases uterine sympathetic innervation in ovariectomized adult virgin rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoubina, E V; Mize, A L; Alper, R H; Smith, P G

    2001-10-01

    Uterine innervation undergoes substantial reorganization associated with changes in reproductive status. Nerves innervating the uterus are decreased in pregnancy and puberty, and even the normal rodent estrous cycle is characterized by fluctuations in numbers of myometrial nerve fibers. During the follicular (proestrus/estrous) phase of the estrous cycle, intact nerves are rapidly depleted and then return over the next 2-3 days in the luteal (metestrus/diestrus) phase. We hypothesize that uterine nerve depletion is initiated by increased circulating estrogen in the follicular phase. However, studies have not shown whether estrogen can reduce uterine innervation and, if so, whether the time course is compatible with the rapid changes observed in the estrous cycle. These questions were addressed in the present study. Mature ovariectomized virgin rats received 17-beta-estradiol as a single injection (10 microg/kg s.c.) or chronically from timed-release pellets (0.1 microg/pellet for 3 weeks sustained release). Total (protein gene-product 9.5-immunoreactive) and sympathetic (dopamine beta-hydroxylase-immunoreactive) uterine innervation was assessed quantitatively. Both total and sympathetic innervation was abundant in uterine longitudinal smooth muscle of ovariectomized rats. However, following acute or chronic estrogen administration, total and sympathetic fiber numbers were markedly decreased. This was not due to altered uterine size, as reductions persisted after correcting for size differences. Our results indicate that sympathetic nerves are lost from uterine smooth muscle after estradiol treatment in a manner similar to that seen in the intact animal during estrus and pregnancy. This suggests that the rise in estradiol prior to estrus is sufficient to deplete uterine sympathetic innervation.

  15. The adductor part of the adductor magnus is innervated by both obturator and sciatic nerves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takizawa, Megumi; Suzuki, Daisuke; Ito, Hajime; Fujimiya, Mineko; Uchiyama, Eiichi

    2014-07-01

    The hip adductor group, innervated predominantly by the obturator nerve, occupies a large volume of the lower limb. However, case reports of patients with obturator nerve palsy or denervation have described no more than minimal gait disturbance. Those facts are surprising, given the architectural characteristics of the hip adductors. Our aim was to investigate which regions of the adductor magnus are innervated by the obturator nerve and by which sciatic nerve and to consider the clinical implications. Twenty-one lower limbs were examined from 21 formalin-fixed cadavers, 18 males and 3 females. The adductor magnus was dissected and was divided into four parts (AM1-AM4) based on the locations of the perforating arteries and the adductor hiatus. AM1 was supplied solely by the obturator nerve. AM2, AM3, and AM4 received innervation from both the posterior branch of the obturator nerve and the tibial nerve portion of the sciatic nerve in 2 (9.5%), 20 (95.2%), and 6 (28.6%) of the cadavers, respectively. The double innervation in more than 90% of the AM3s is especially noteworthy. Generally, AM1-AM3 corresponds to the adductor part, traditionally characterized as innervated by the obturator nerve, and AM4 corresponds to the hamstrings part, innervated by the sciatic nerve. Here, we showed that the sciatic nerve supplies not only the hamstrings part but also the adductor part. These two nerves spread more widely than has generally been believed, which could have practical implications for the assessment and treatment of motor disability.

  16. Localization of sympathetic postganglionic neurons innervating mesenteric artery and vein in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, N K; Liu, J C; Chen, H I

    2000-04-12

    Physiological and histochemical studies have demonstrated the control and innervation of sympathetic nerves to the artery and vein vessels of splanchnic circulation. In our laboratory, we first used the technique of retrograde transport of horseradish peroxidase to identify the origin of sympathetic neurons innervating the mesenteric vein. In this study, double fluorescence staining technique was used for a simultaneous localization of the sympathetic postganglionic neurons supplying the mesenteric artery and vein in rats. First-order branches of mesenteric artery (A) and vein (V) in the vicinity of ileo-cecal junction were isolated for application of fluorescent dyes (Fast Blue, FB and Diamidino Yellow, DY). The application of FB and DY on A and V was alternated in the next animal to minimize the difference in dye uptake. The animal was allowed to recover for 6-7 days assuring a complete uptake of FB and DY into the cytoplasm and nucleus, respectively. The number of FB, DY and double staining neurons in the prevertebral and paravertebral ganglia were counted under a fluorescent microscope after animal fixation and serial frozen section (30 microm) of the sympathetic ganglia. Our study revealed the following findings: (1) Distribution of the fluorescence-staining neurons in the sympathetic ganglia was as follows: right celiac ganglion (39%), superior mesenteric ganglion (30%), left celiac ganglion (26%), inferior mesenteric ganglion (1%) and paravertebral ganglia (4%). (2) Double staining neurons that dually innervate A and V amounted to 54% of total staining neurons. There were 41% neurons singly innervating A and 5% innervating V. (3) The ratio of neurons supplying the A and V ranged from 1.41 to 1.75 (average 1.61). (4) There was no distinct topographical distribution with respect to the neuron location innervating A and V. The distribution of neurons appeared in a scattering pattern.

  17. Innervation pattern of the suprascapular nerve within supraspinatus: a three-dimensional computer modeling study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermenegildo, J A; Roberts, S L; Kim, S Y

    2014-05-01

    The relationship between the innervation pattern of the suprascapular nerve (SSN) and the muscle architecture of supraspinatus has not been thoroughly investigated. The supraspinatus is composed of two architecturally distinct regions: anterior and posterior. Each of these regions is further subdivided into three parts: superficial, middle and deep. The purpose of this study was to investigate the course of the SSN throughout the volume of supraspinatus and to relate the intramuscular branches to the distinct regions and parts of the supraspinatus. The SSN was dissected in thirty formalin embalmed cadaveric specimens and digitized throughout the muscle volume in six of those specimens. The digitized data were modeled using Autodesk(®) Maya(®) 2011. The three-dimensional (3D) models were used to relate the intramuscular innervation pattern to the muscle and tendon architecture defined by Kim et al. (2007, Clin Anat 20:648-655). The SSN bifurcated into two main trunks: medial and lateral. All parts of the anterior region were predominantly innervated by the medial trunk and its proximal and medial branches, whereas all parts of the posterior region predominantly by the lateral trunk and its posterolateral and/or posteromedial branches. The posterior region also received innervation from the proximal branch of the medial trunk in half of the specimens. These findings provide evidence that the anterior and posterior regions are distinct with respect to their innervation. The 3D map of the innervation pattern will aid in planning future clinical studies investigating muscle activation patterns and provide insight into possible injury of the nerve with supraspinatus pathology and surgical techniques.

  18. Approximate circuits for increased reliability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamlet, Jason R.; Mayo, Jackson R.

    2015-08-18

    Embodiments of the invention describe a Boolean circuit having a voter circuit and a plurality of approximate circuits each based, at least in part, on a reference circuit. The approximate circuits are each to generate one or more output signals based on values of received input signals. The voter circuit is to receive the one or more output signals generated by each of the approximate circuits, and is to output one or more signals corresponding to a majority value of the received signals. At least some of the approximate circuits are to generate an output value different than the reference circuit for one or more input signal values; however, for each possible input signal value, the majority values of the one or more output signals generated by the approximate circuits and received by the voter circuit correspond to output signal result values of the reference circuit.

  19. Approximate circuits for increased reliability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamlet, Jason R.; Mayo, Jackson R.

    2015-12-22

    Embodiments of the invention describe a Boolean circuit having a voter circuit and a plurality of approximate circuits each based, at least in part, on a reference circuit. The approximate circuits are each to generate one or more output signals based on values of received input signals. The voter circuit is to receive the one or more output signals generated by each of the approximate circuits, and is to output one or more signals corresponding to a majority value of the received signals. At least some of the approximate circuits are to generate an output value different than the reference circuit for one or more input signal values; however, for each possible input signal value, the majority values of the one or more output signals generated by the approximate circuits and received by the voter circuit correspond to output signal result values of the reference circuit.

  20. Mortality salience increases personal relevance of the norm of reciprocity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schindler, Simon; Reinhard, Marc-André; Stahlberg, Dagmar

    2012-10-01

    Research on terror management theory found evidence that people under mortality salience strive to live up to salient cultural norms and values, like egalitarianism, pacifism, or helpfulness. A basic, strongly internalized norm in most human societies is the norm of reciprocity: people should support those who supported them (i.e., positive reciprocity), and people should injure those who injured them (i.e., negative reciprocity), respectively. In an experiment (N = 98; 47 women, 51 men), mortality salience overall significantly increased personal relevance of the norm of reciprocity (M = 4.45, SD = 0.65) compared to a control condition (M = 4.19, SD = 0.59). Specifically, under mortality salience there was higher motivation to punish those who treated them unfavourably (negative norm of reciprocity). Unexpectedly, relevance of the norm of positive reciprocity remained unaffected by mortality salience. Implications and limitations are discussed.

  1. Associations between xerostomia, histopathological alterations, and autonomic innervation of labial salivary glands in men in late midlife

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Christiane Elisabeth; Larsen, Jytte Overgaard; Reibel, Jesper

    2014-01-01

    glands and with quantitative measures of the glandular autonomic innervation. Another aim was to study the relation between the autonomic innervation and loss of secretory acinar cells in these glands. METHODS: Labial salivary gland biopsies were taken from the lower lip from 190 men, born in 1953...

  2. Magnetic Force Transmission of a Reciprocating Motion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qing-chang Tan; Fu-sheng Zheng; Jian-gang Li

    2008-01-01

    Magnetic force transmission of a reciprocating motion is studied by theoretical analysis and experiment. A mathematical model for calculating the magnetic force is derived using the theory of equivalent magnetic charges. An experimental rig is constructed to test the transmission and the model is verified by experiment. Effect of the transmission parameters on the magnetic force is analyzed theoretically from the model, and characteristic of the transmission is studied experimentally. Since the transmission is without direct contact between two elements, it is suitable for application in an organism.

  3. Neural correlate of human reciprocity in social interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakaiya, Shiro; Shiraito, Yuki; Kato, Junko; Ide, Hiroko; Okada, Kensuke; Takano, Kouji; Kansaku, Kenji

    2013-01-01

    Reciprocity plays a key role maintaining cooperation in society. However, little is known about the neural process that underpins human reciprocity during social interactions. Our neuroimaging study manipulated partner identity (computer, human) and strategy (random, tit-for-tat) in repeated prisoner's dilemma games and investigated the neural correlate of reciprocal interaction with humans. Reciprocal cooperation with humans but exploitation of computers by defection was associated with activation in the left amygdala. Amygdala activation was also positively and negatively correlated with a preference change for human partners following tit-for-tat and random strategies, respectively. The correlated activation represented the intensity of positive feeling toward reciprocal and negative feeling toward non-reciprocal partners, and so reflected reciprocity in social interaction. Reciprocity in social interaction, however, might plausibly be misinterpreted and so we also examined the neural coding of insight into the reciprocity of partners. Those with and without insight revealed differential brain activation across the reward-related circuitry (i.e., the right middle dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and dorsal caudate) and theory of mind (ToM) regions [i.e., ventromedial prefrontal cortex (VMPFC) and precuneus]. Among differential activations, activation in the precuneus, which accompanied deactivation of the VMPFC, was specific to those without insight into human partners who were engaged in a tit-for-tat strategy. This asymmetric (de)activation might involve specific contributions of ToM regions to the human search for reciprocity. Consequently, the intensity of emotion attached to human reciprocity was represented in the amygdala, whereas insight into the reciprocity of others was reflected in activation across the reward-related and ToM regions. This suggests the critical role of mentalizing, which was not equated with reward expectation during social interactions.

  4. Static and kinematic formulation of planar reciprocal assemblies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Parigi, Dario; Sassone, Mario; Kirkegaard, Poul Henning

    2014-01-01

    Planar reciprocal frames are two dimensional structures formed by elements joined together according to the principle of structural reciprocity. In this paper a rigorous formulation of the static and kinematic problem is proposed and developed extending the theory of pin-jointed assemblies....... This formulation is used to evaluate the static and kinematic determinacy of reciprocal assemblies from the properties of their equilibrium and kinematic matrices...

  5. Neural correlate of human reciprocity in social interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiro eSakaiya

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Reciprocity plays a key role maintaining cooperation in society. However, little is known about the neural process that underpins human reciprocity during social interactions. Our neuroimaging study manipulated partner identity (computer, human and strategy (random, tit-for-tat in repeated prisoner’s dilemma games and investigated the neural correlate of reciprocal interaction with humans. Reciprocal cooperation with humans but exploitation of computers by defection was associated with activation in the left amygdala. Amygdala activation was also positively and negatively correlated with a preference change for human partners following tit-for-tat and random strategies, respectively. The correlated activation represented the intensity of positive feeling toward reciprocal and negative feeling toward non-reciprocal partners, and so reflected reciprocity in social interaction. Reciprocity in social interaction, however, might plausibly be misinterpreted and so we also examined the neural coding of insight into the reciprocity of partners. Those with and without insight revealed differential brain activation across the reward-related circuitry (i.e., the right middle dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and dorsal caudate and theory of mind (ToM regions (i.e., ventromedial prefrontal cortex [VMPFC] and precuneus. Among differential activations, activation in the precuneus, which accompanied deactivation of the VMPFC, was specific to those without insight into human partners who were engaged in a tit-for-tat strategy. This asymmetric (deactivation might involve specific contributions of ToM regions to the human search for reciprocity. Consequently, the intensity of emotion attached to human reciprocity was represented in the amygdala, whereas insight into the reciprocity of others was reflected in activation across the reward-related and ToM regions. This suggests the critical role of mentalizing, which was not equated with reward expectation during

  6. Plasmonic Nanoguides and Circuits

    CERN Document Server

    Bozhevolnyi, Sergey

    2008-01-01

    Modern communication systems dealing with huge amounts of data at ever increasing speed try to utilize the best aspects of electronic and optical circuits. Electronic circuits are tiny but their operation speed is limited, whereas optical circuits are extremely fast but their sizes are limited by diffraction. Waveguide components utilizing surface plasmon (SP) modes were found to combine the huge optical bandwidth and compactness of electronics, and plasmonics thereby began to be considered as the next chip-scale technology. In this book, the authors concentrate on the SP waveguide configurati

  7. Optoelectronics circuits manual

    CERN Document Server

    Marston, R M

    2013-01-01

    Optoelectronics Circuits Manual covers the basic principles and characteristics of the best known types of optoelectronic devices, as well as the practical applications of many of these optoelectronic devices. The book describes LED display circuits and LED dot- and bar-graph circuits and discusses the applications of seven-segment displays, light-sensitive devices, optocouplers, and a variety of brightness control techniques. The text also tackles infrared light-beam alarms and multichannel remote control systems. The book provides practical user information and circuitry and illustrations.

  8. Circuit analysis with Multisim

    CERN Document Server

    Baez-Lopez, David

    2011-01-01

    This book is concerned with circuit simulation using National Instruments Multisim. It focuses on the use and comprehension of the working techniques for electrical and electronic circuit simulation. The first chapters are devoted to basic circuit analysis.It starts by describing in detail how to perform a DC analysis using only resistors and independent and controlled sources. Then, it introduces capacitors and inductors to make a transient analysis. In the case of transient analysis, it is possible to have an initial condition either in the capacitor voltage or in the inductor current, or bo

  9. Modern TTL circuits manual

    CERN Document Server

    Marston, R M

    2013-01-01

    Modern TTL Circuits Manual provides an introduction to the basic principles of Transistor-Transistor Logic (TTL). This book outlines the major features of the 74 series of integrated circuits (ICs) and introduces the various sub-groups of the TTL family.Organized into seven chapters, this book begins with an overview of the basics of digital ICs. This text then examines the symbology and mathematics of digital logic. Other chapters consider a variety of topics, including waveform generator circuitry, clocked flip-flop and counter circuits, special counter/dividers, registers, data latches, com

  10. Pragmatic circuits frequency domain

    CERN Document Server

    Eccles, William

    2006-01-01

    Pragmatic Circuits: Frequency Domain goes through the Laplace transform to get from the time domain to topics that include the s-plane, Bode diagrams, and the sinusoidal steady state. This second of three volumes ends with a-c power, which, although it is just a special case of the sinusoidal steady state, is an important topic with unique techniques and terminology. Pragmatic Circuits: Frequency Domain is focused on the frequency domain. In other words, time will no longer be the independent variable in our analysis. The two other volumes in the Pragmatic Circuits series include titles on DC

  11. Gallium Arsenide Domino Circuit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Long; Long, Stephen I.

    1990-01-01

    Advantages include reduced power and high speed. Experimental gallium arsenide field-effect-transistor (FET) domino circuit replicated in large numbers for use in dynamic-logic systems. Name of circuit denotes mode of operation, which logic signals propagate from each stage to next when successive stages operated at slightly staggered clock cycles, in manner reminiscent of dominoes falling in a row. Building block of domino circuit includes input, inverter, and level-shifting substages. Combinational logic executed in input substage. During low half of clock cycle, result of logic operation transmitted to following stage.

  12. Troubleshooting analog circuits

    CERN Document Server

    Pease, Robert A

    1991-01-01

    Troubleshooting Analog Circuits is a guidebook for solving product or process related problems in analog circuits. The book also provides advice in selecting equipment, preventing problems, and general tips. The coverage of the book includes the philosophy of troubleshooting; the modes of failure of various components; and preventive measures. The text also deals with the active components of analog circuits, including diodes and rectifiers, optically coupled devices, solar cells, and batteries. The book will be of great use to both students and practitioners of electronics engineering. Other

  13. Monolithic microwave integrated circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pucel, R. A.

    Monolithic microwave integrated circuits (MMICs), a new microwave technology which is expected to exert a profound influence on microwave circuit designs for future military systems as well as for the commercial and consumer markets, is discussed. The book contains an historical discussion followed by a comprehensive review presenting the current status in the field. The general topics of the volume are: design considerations, materials and processing considerations, monolithic circuit applications, and CAD, measurement, and packaging techniques. All phases of MMIC technology are covered, from design to testing.

  14. Institutionalize Reciprocity to Overcome the Public Goods Provision Problem.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroki Ozono

    Full Text Available Cooperation is fundamental to human societies, and one of the important paths for its emergence and maintenance is reciprocity. In prisoner's dilemma (PD experiments, reciprocal strategies are often effective at attaining and maintaining high cooperation. In many public goods (PG games or n-person PD experiments, however, reciprocal strategies are not successful at engendering cooperation. In the present paper, we attribute this difficulty to a coordination problem against free riding among reciprocators: Because it is difficult for the reciprocators to coordinate their behaviors against free riders, this may lead to inequality among players, which will demotivate them from cooperating in future rounds. We propose a new mechanism, institutionalized reciprocity (IR, which refers to embedding the reciprocal strategy as an institution (i.e., institutionalizing the reciprocal strategy. We experimentally demonstrate that IR can prevent groups of reciprocators from falling into coordination failure and achieve high cooperation in PG games. In conclusion, we argue that a natural extension of the present study will be to investigate the possibility of IR to serve as a collective punishment system.

  15. Electromagnetic Reciprocal Cloak with Only Axial Material Parameter Spatially Variant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Jing Yang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Reciprocal cloak is an intriguing metamaterial device, in which a hidden antenna or a sensor can receive electromagnetic irradiation from the outside but its presence will not be detected. Based on transformation optics, a cylindrical electromagnetic reciprocal cloak with only axial parameter varying with radius is designed and validated by full wave simulation. When two dispersive reciprocal cloaks are put together, they do not interfere with each other. Our work demonstrates the electromagnetic compatibility (EMC ability of the reciprocal cloak which is very important in multi antenna and sensor design.

  16. Institutionalize Reciprocity to Overcome the Public Goods Provision Problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozono, Hiroki; Kamijo, Yoshio; Shimizu, Kazumi

    2016-01-01

    Cooperation is fundamental to human societies, and one of the important paths for its emergence and maintenance is reciprocity. In prisoner's dilemma (PD) experiments, reciprocal strategies are often effective at attaining and maintaining high cooperation. In many public goods (PG) games or n-person PD experiments, however, reciprocal strategies are not successful at engendering cooperation. In the present paper, we attribute this difficulty to a coordination problem against free riding among reciprocators: Because it is difficult for the reciprocators to coordinate their behaviors against free riders, this may lead to inequality among players, which will demotivate them from cooperating in future rounds. We propose a new mechanism, institutionalized reciprocity (IR), which refers to embedding the reciprocal strategy as an institution (i.e., institutionalizing the reciprocal strategy). We experimentally demonstrate that IR can prevent groups of reciprocators from falling into coordination failure and achieve high cooperation in PG games. In conclusion, we argue that a natural extension of the present study will be to investigate the possibility of IR to serve as a collective punishment system.

  17. Sleep Health: Reciprocal Regulation of Sleep and Innate Immunity

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Irwin, Michael R; Opp, Mark R

    2017-01-01

    ...://www.neuropsychopharmacologyreviews.org Web End =www.neuropsychopharmacologyreviews.org 129 Sleep Health: Reciprocal Regulation of Sleep and Innate Immunity [notdef][notdef][notdef][notdef][notdef...

  18. Relationships between cardiac innervation/perfusion imbalance and ventricular arrhythmias: impact on invasive electrophysiological parameters and ablation procedures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gimelli, Alessia [Fondazione Toscana Gabriele Monasterio, Pisa (Italy); Menichetti, Francesca; Soldati, Ezio; Liga, Riccardo; Vannozzi, Andrea; Bongiorni, Maria Grazia [University Hospital of Pisa, Cardio-Thoracic and Vascular Department, Pisa (Italy); Marzullo, Paolo [Fondazione Toscana Gabriele Monasterio, Pisa (Italy); CNR, Institute of Clinical Physiology, Pisa (Italy)

    2016-12-15

    To assess the relationship between regional myocardial perfusion and sympathetic innervation parameters at myocardial scintigraphy and intra-cavitary electrophysiological data in patients with ventricular arrhythmias (VA) submitted to invasive electrophysiological study and ablation procedure. Sixteen subjects underwent invasive electrophysiological study with electroanatomical mapping (EAM) followed by trans-catheter ablations of VA. Before ablation all patients were studied with a combined evaluation of regional myocardial perfusion and sympathetic innervation by means of tomographic {sup 99m}Tc-tetrofosmin and {sup 123}I- metaiodobenzylguanidine cadmium-zinc-telluride (CZT) scintigraphies, respectively. Off-line spatial co-registration of CZT perfusion and innervation data with the three-dimensional EAM reconstruction was performed in every patient. CZT revealed the presence of myocardial scar in 55 (20 %) segments. Of the viable myocardial segments, 131 (60 %) presented a preserved adrenergic innervation, while 86 (40 %) showed a significantly depressed innervation (i.e. innervation/perfusion mismatch). On EAM, the invasively measured intra-cavitary voltage was significantly lower in scarred segments than in viable ones (1.7 ± 1.5 mV vs. 4.0 ± 2.2 mV, P < 0.001). Interestingly, among the viable segments, those showing an innervation/perfusion mismatch presented a significantly lower intra-cavitary voltage than those with preserved innervation (1.9 ± 2.5 mV vs. 4.7 ± 2.3 mV, P < 0.001). Intra-cardiac ablation was performed in 63 (23 %) segments. On multivariate analysis, after correction for scar burden, the segments showing an innervation/perfusion mismatch remained the most frequent ablation targets (OR 5.6, 95 % CI 1.5-20.8; P = 0.009). In patients with VA, intra-cavitary electrical abnormalities frequently originate at the level of viable myocardial segments with depressed sympathetic innervation that frequently represents the ultimate ablation target

  19. Printed circuit for ATLAS

    CERN Multimedia

    Laurent Guiraud

    1999-01-01

    A printed circuit board made by scientists in the ATLAS collaboration for the transition radiaton tracker (TRT). This will read data produced when a high energy particle crosses the boundary between two materials with different electrical properties.

  20. Latching overcurrent circuit breaker

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, M. L.

    1970-01-01

    Circuit breaker consists of a preset current amplitude sensor, and a lamp-photo-resistor combination in a feedback arrangement which energizes a power switching relay. The ac input power is removed from the load at predetermined current amplitudes.

  1. High temperature circuit breaker

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, R. N.; Travis, E. F.

    1970-01-01

    Alternating current circuit breaker is suitable for reliable long-term service at 1000 deg F in the vacuum conditions of outer space. Construction materials are resistant to nuclear radiation and vacuum welding. Service test conditions and results are given.

  2. Advanced Natural Gas Reciprocating Engines(s)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zurlo, James [Dresser, Inc., Addison, TX (United States)

    2012-04-05

    The ARES program was initiated in 2001 to improve the overall brake thermal efficiency of stationary, natural gas, reciprocating engines. The ARES program is a joint award that is shared by Dresser, Inc., Caterpillar and Cummins. The ARES program was divided into three phases; ARES I (achieve 44% BTE), ARES II (achieve 47% BTE) and ARES III (achieve 50% BTE). Dresser, Inc. completed ARES I in March 2005 which resulted in the commercialization of the APG1000 product line. ARES II activities were completed in September 2010 and the technology developed is currently being integrated into products. ARES III activities began in October 2010. The ARES program goal is to improve the efficiency of natural gas reciprocating engines. The ARES project is structured in three phases with higher efficiency goals in each phase. The ARES objectives are as follows: 1. Achieve 44% (ARES I), 47% (ARES II), and 50% brake thermal efficiency (BTE) as a final ARES III objective 2. Achieve 0.1 g/bhp-hr NOx emissions (with after-treatment) 3. Reduce the cost of the produced electricity by 10% 4. Improve or maintain reliability, durability and maintenance costs

  3. Overriding Faulty Circuit Breakers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robbins, Richard L.; Pierson, Thomas E.

    1987-01-01

    Retainer keeps power on in emergency. Simple mechanical device attaches to failed aircraft-type push/pull circuit breaker to restore electrical power temporarily until breaker replaced. Device holds push/pull button in closed position; unnecessary for crewmember to hold button in position by continual finger pressure. Sleeve and plug hold button in, overriding mechanical failure in circuit breaker. Windows in sleeve show button position.

  4. Thematic review series: adipocyte biology. Sympathetic and sensory innervation of white adipose tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartness, Timothy J; Song, C K

    2007-08-01

    During our study of the reversal of seasonal obesity in Siberian hamsters, we found an interaction between receptors for the pineal hormone melatonin and the sympathetic nervous system (SNS) outflow from brain to white adipose tissue (WAT). This ultimately led us and others to conclude that the SNS innervation of WAT is the primary initiator of lipid mobilization in these as well as other animals, including humans. There is strong neurochemical (norepinephrine turnover), neuroanatomical (viral tract tracing), and functional (sympathetic denervation-induced blockade of lipolysis) evidence for the role of the SNS in lipid mobilization. Recent findings suggest the presence of WAT sensory innervation based on strong neuroanatomical (viral tract tracing, immunohistochemical markers of sensory nerves) and suggestive functional (capsaicin sensory denervation-induced WAT growth) evidence, the latter implying a role in conveying adiposity information to the brain. By contrast, parasympathetic nervous system innervation of WAT is characterized by largely negative neuroanatomical evidence (viral tract tracing, immunohistochemical and biochemical markers of parasympathetic nerves). Functional evidence (intraneural stimulation and in situ microdialysis) for the role of the SNS innervation in lipid mobilization in human WAT is convincing, with some controversy regarding the level of sympathetic nerve activity in human obesity.

  5. [Inter-organ neural communications in the innervation of bronchi and pulmonary circulation vessels].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andriesh, V N

    1987-04-01

    By means of V.P. Vorobiov's preparation in complex of the thoracic cavity organs of persons at various age and sex in fetuses, sources of innervation of bronchi and vessels of the pulmonary circulation have been stated. They make the composition of the cardiac nerves getting off the superior, middle cervical, cervico-thoracic (stellate) and from 3 to 5 thoracic nodes of the sympathetic trunk, superior and inferior cardiac branches of the nervus vagus. Connection between the nerves of the bronchi and vessels of the pulmonary circulation with the cardiac and esophageal nerves and formation of interorganic nervous plexuses are demonstrated. Not always the diaphragmal nerve participates in the innervation of the bronchi and pulmonary vessels. In total preparations and flat sections, elective revealing of the nervous elements with Shiff reagent in M. G. Shubich and A. B. Khodos modification and Gomori thiocholine method, makes it possible to follow connections of the pulmonary veins nerves with the left atrium, intrapulmonary connection of the perivascular and peribronchial plexuses, as well as participation of nervous elements of the pulmonary trunk in innervation of the right ventricle walls. There are multiple vegetative communications participating in innervation of the bronchi and vessels of the pulmonary circulation. The relations of the pulmonary nerves with the nerves of other thoracic organs are very complex; this explains the nature of the repercussive reactions of the lungs after surgical interventions performed in the other organs of the thoracic cavity.

  6. Bilateral familial vertical Duane Syndrome with synergistic convergence, aberrant trigeminal innervation, and facial hypoplasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malvika Gupta

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A 5-year-old girl presented with bilateral familial vertical  Duane retraction syndrome with alternating esotropia, elevation deficit, Marcus gunn phenomenon, and facial hypoplasia. Abnormal adducting downshoots on attempting abduction suggestive of a synergistic convergence were noted. Hypothesis suggests aberrant innervations or peripheral anatomic connections between inferior and medial recti.

  7. Organization Of Lumbosacral Motoneuronal Cell Groups Innervating Hindlimb, Pelvic Floor And Axial Muscles In The Cat.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holstege, G.; VanderHorst, V.G.J.M.

    1997-01-01

    In a study on descending pathways from the nucleus retroambiguus (NRA) to hindlimb motoneurons (see accompanying paper), it appeared impossible, using data from the literature, to precisely determine which muscles were innervated by the motoneurons receiving the NRA fibers. This lack of data made it

  8. Organization of lumbosacral motoneuronal cell groups innervating hindlimb, pelvic floor, and axial muscles in the cat

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vanderhorst, VGJM; Holstege, G

    1997-01-01

    In a study on descending pathways from the nucleus retroambiguus (NRA) to hindlimb motoneurons (see accompanying paper), it appeared impossible, using data from the literature, to precisely determine which muscles were innervated by the motoneurons receiving the NRA fibers. This lack of data made it

  9. Variations in innervation of muscles in anterior compartment of arm - a cadaveric study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Parminder; Kumar, Rajesh; Jain, Anjali

    2014-05-01

    Study was undertaken to observe the variation in the innervation of muscles in the front of arm. The results were compiled. Embryological basis and clinical applications of encountered variations were tried to explain with the help of available literature. Thirty upper limbs from fifteen cadavers were dissected to observe the contents of front of arm. Musculocutaneous nerve, median nerve and innervation of the muscles of front of arm were observed. Variations were observed in 13% of cases. Commonly seen variation was the absence of musculocutaneous nerve and innervation of muscles of front of arm by branches of median nerve. This variation was seen bilaterally in 3.3% of cases and unilaterally in 6.6% cases. Bilateral presence of this variation in one out of fifteen cadavers is rare finding. Variation is more common on right side as compared to the left side. Bilateral absence of musculocutaneous nerve and innervation of muscles of front of arm from the branches of median nerve is a rare variation. Knowledge of such anatomical variations is of interest to the anatomist and clinician alike. Variations assume significance during surgical exploration of the axilla and can even fail nerve block of infraclavicular part of brachial plexus. Surgeons who perform procedures involving neoplasm or repairing trauma need to be aware of these variations.

  10. Variations in Innervation of Muscles in Anterior Compartment of Arm – A Cadaveric Study

    OpenAIRE

    Kaur, Parminder; kumar, Rajesh; Jain, Anjali

    2014-01-01

    Aims and Objective: Study was undertaken to observe the variation in the innervation of muscles in the front of arm. The results were compiled. Embryological basis and clinical applications of encountered variations were tried to explain with the help of available literature.

  11. The role of Sema3–Npn-1 signaling during diaphragm innervation and muscle development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huettl, Rosa-Eva; Hanuschick, Philipp; Amend, Anna-Lena; Alberton, Paolo; Aszodi, Attila; Huber, Andrea B.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Correct innervation of the main respiratory muscle in mammals, namely the thoracic diaphragm, is a crucial pre-requisite for the functionality of this muscle and the viability of the entire organism. Systemic impairment of Sema3A–Npn-1 (Npn-1 is also known as NRP1) signaling causes excessive branching of phrenic nerves in the diaphragm and into the central tendon region, where the majority of misguided axons innervate ectopic musculature. To elucidate whether these ectopic muscles are a result of misguidance of myoblast precursors due to the loss of Sema3A–Npn-1 signaling, we conditionally ablated Npn-1 in somatic motor neurons, which led to a similar phenotype of phrenic nerve defasciculation and, intriguingly, also formation of innervated ectopic muscles. We therefore hypothesize that ectopic myocyte fusion is caused by additional factors released by misprojecting growth cones. Slit2 and its Robo receptors are expressed by phrenic motor axons and migrating myoblasts, respectively, during innervation of the diaphragm. In vitro analyses revealed a chemoattractant effect of Slit2 on primary diaphragm myoblasts. Thus, we postulate that factors released by motor neuron growth cones have an influence on the migration properties of myoblasts during establishment of the diaphragm. PMID:27466379

  12. Peptidergic and non-peptidergic innervation and vasomotor responses of human lenticulostriate and posterior cerebral arteries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jansen-Olesen, Inger; Gulbenkian, Sergio; Engel, Ulla;

    2004-01-01

    -hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) and the relaxant responses induced by acetylcholine (ACh), VIP and pituitary adenylate cyclase activating peptide-27 (PACAP) as well as CGRP and SP were compared in vitro. In conclusion, there was no major difference in innervation pattern or vasomotor sensitivity (pEC50 and pIC50 values...

  13. Innervation Patterns of Sea Otter (Enhydra lutris Mystacial Follicle-Sinus Complexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Douglas Marshall

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Sea otters (Enhydra lutris are the most recent group of mammals to return to the sea, and may exemplify divergent somatosensory tactile systems among mammals. Therefore, we quantified the mystacial vibrissal array of sea otters and histologically processed follicle-sinus complexes (F-SCs to test the hypotheses that the number of myelinated axons per F-SC is greater than that found for terrestrial mammalian vibrissae and that their organization and microstructure converge with those of pinniped vibrissae. A mean of 120.5 vibrissae were arranged rostrally on a broad, blunt muzzle in 7-8 rows and 9-13 columns. The F-SCs of sea otters are tripartite in their organization and similar in microstructure to pinnipeds rather than terrestrial species. Each F-SC was innervated by a mean 1339±408.3 axons. Innervation to the entire mystacial vibrissal array was estimated at 161,313 axons. Our data support the hypothesis that the disproportionate expansion of the coronal gyrus in somatosensory cortex of sea otters is related to the high innervation investment of the mystacial vibrissal array, and that quantifying innervation investment is a good proxy for tactile sensitivity. We predict that the tactile performance of sea otter mystacial vibrissae is comparable to that of harbor seals, sea lions and walruses¬.

  14. H19/let-7/LIN28 reciprocal negative regulatory circuit promotes breast cancer stem cell maintenance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Fei; Li, Ting-Ting; Wang, Kai-Li; Xiao, Guo-Qing; Wang, Ju-Hong; Zhao, Hai-Dong; Kang, Zhi-Jie; Fan, Wen-Jun; Zhu, Li-Li; Li, Mei; Cui, Bai; Zheng, Fei-Meng; Wang, Hong-Jiang; Lam, Eric W-F; Wang, Bo; Xu, Jie; Liu, Quentin

    2017-01-19

    Long noncoding RNA-H19 (H19), an imprinted oncofetal gene, has a central role in carcinogenesis. Hitherto, the mechanism by which H19 regulates cancer stem cells, remains elusive. Here we show that breast cancer stem cells (BCSCs) express high levels of H19, and ectopic overexpression of H19 significantly promotes breast cancer cell clonogenicity, migration and mammosphere-forming ability. Conversely, silencing of H19 represses these BCSC properties. In concordance, knockdown of H19 markedly inhibits tumor growth and suppresses tumorigenesis in nude mice. Mechanistically, we found that H19 functions as a competing endogenous RNA to sponge miRNA let-7, leading to an increase in expression of a let-7 target, the core pluripotency factor LIN28, which is enriched in BCSC populations and breast patient samples. Intriguingly, this gain of LIN28 expression can also feedback to reverse the H19 loss-mediated suppression of BCSC properties. Our data also reveal that LIN28 blocks mature let-7 production and, thereby, de-represses H19 expression in breast cancer cells. Appropriately, H19 and LIN28 expression exhibits strong correlations in primary breast carcinomas. Collectively, these findings reveal that lncRNA H19, miRNA let-7 and transcriptional factor LIN28 form a double-negative feedback loop, which has a critical role in the maintenance of BCSCs. Consequently, disrupting this pathway provides a novel therapeutic strategy for breast cancer.

  15. Investigation of Microwave Monolithic Integrated Circuit (MMIC) non-reciprocal millimeterwave components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talisa, S. H.; Krishnaswamy, S. V.; Adam, J. D.; Yoo, K. C.; Doyle, N. J.

    1991-09-01

    Two ferrite film deposition techniques were investigated in this program for possible use in the monolithic integration of Gallium Arsenide electronic and magnetic millimeter-wave devices; (1) spin-spray plating (SSP) of nickel zinc ferrite films, and (2) sputtering of barium hexaferrites with C-axis oriented normally to the film plane. The SSP technique potential for this application was demonstrated. Film structural characteristics were studied, as well as their adhesions to other substrates and the conditions for growth of thicker films. Multilayers totalling 25 microns in thickness were grown on semiconducting substrates. The SSP process occurs at about 100 C and was experimentally demonstrated not to damage Gallium arsenide MMIC devices. The magnetic characteristics of these films were comparable to ceramic materials. A scheme for the monolithic integration of magnetic and Gallium arsenide electronic devices was proposed and its feasibility experimentally demonstrated. The films showed higher dielectric loss than was desirable, possibly owing to high water content. A better drying technique is required. Barium ferrite films with C-axis texture were reproducibly grown on sapphire. Magnetic measurements yielded acceptable saturation magnetization and anisotrophy field. Ferromagnetic resonance was not observed, possibly due to broad linewidths.

  16. Heterogeneous photonic integrated circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Alexander W.; Fish, Gregory; Hall, Eric

    2012-01-01

    Photonic Integrated Circuits (PICs) have been dichotomized into circuits with high passive content (silica and silicon PLCs) and high active content (InP tunable lasers and transceivers) due to the trade-off in material characteristics used within these two classes. This has led to restrictions in the adoption of PICs to systems in which only one of the two classes of circuits are required to be made on a singular chip. Much work has been done to create convergence in these two classes by either engineering the materials to achieve the functionality of both device types on a single platform, or in epitaxial growth techniques to transfer one material to the next, but have yet to demonstrate performance equal to that of components fabricated in their native substrates. Advances in waferbonding techniques have led to a new class of heterogeneously integrated photonic circuits that allow for the concurrent use of active and passive materials within a photonic circuit, realizing components on a transferred substrate that have equivalent performance as their native substrate. In this talk, we review and compare advances made in heterogeneous integration along with demonstrations of components and circuits enabled by this technology.

  17. Cell type-specific thalamic innervation in a column of rat vibrissal cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Hanno S; Wimmer, Verena C; Hemberger, Mike; Bruno, Randy M; de Kock, Christiaan P J; Frick, Andreas; Sakmann, Bert; Helmstaedter, Moritz

    2010-10-01

    This is the concluding article in a series of 3 studies that investigate the anatomical determinants of thalamocortical (TC) input to excitatory neurons in a cortical column of rat primary somatosensory cortex (S1). We used viral synaptophysin-enhanced green fluorescent protein expression in thalamic neurons and reconstructions of biocytin-labeled cortical neurons in TC slices to quantify the number and distribution of boutons from the ventral posterior medial (VPM) and posteromedial (POm) nuclei potentially innervating dendritic arbors of excitatory neurons located in layers (L)2-6 of a cortical column in rat somatosensory cortex. We found that 1) all types of excitatory neurons potentially receive substantial TC input (90-580 boutons per neuron); 2) pyramidal neurons in L3-L6 receive dual TC input from both VPM and POm that is potentially of equal magnitude for thick-tufted L5 pyramidal neurons (ca. 300 boutons each from VPM and POm); 3) L3, L4, and L5 pyramidal neurons have multiple (2-4) subcellular TC innervation domains that match the dendritic compartments of pyramidal cells; and 4) a subtype of thick-tufted L5 pyramidal neurons has an additional VPM innervation domain in L4. The multiple subcellular TC innervation domains of L5 pyramidal neurons may partly explain their specific action potential patterns observed in vivo. We conclude that the substantial potential TC innervation of all excitatory neuron types in a cortical column constitutes an anatomical basis for the initial near-simultaneous representation of a sensory stimulus in different neuron types.

  18. Double muscle innervation using end-to-side neurorrhaphy in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisangela Jeronymo Stipp-Brambilla

    Full Text Available CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVE: One of the techniques used for treating facial paralysis is double muscle innervation using end-to-end neurorrhaphy with sectioning of healthy nerves. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether double muscle innervation by means of end-to-side neurorrhaphy could occur, with maintenance of muscle innervation. DESIGN AND SETTING: Experimental study developed at the Experimental Research Center, Faculdade de Medicina de Botucatu, Unesp. METHODS: One hundred rats were allocated to five groups as follows: G1, control group; G2, the peroneal nerve was sectioned; G3, the tibial nerve was transected and the proximal stump was end-to-side sutured to the intact peroneal nerve; G4, 120 days after the G3 surgery, the peroneal nerve was sectioned proximally to the neurorrhaphy; G5, 120 days after the G3 surgery, the peroneal and tibial nerves were sectioned proximally to the neurorrhaphy. RESULTS: One hundred and fifty days after the surgery, G3 did not show any change in tibial muscle weight or muscle fiber diameter, but the axonal fiber diameter in the peroneal nerve distal to the neurorrhaphy had decreased. Although G4 showed atrophy of the cranial tibial muscle 30 days after sectioning the peroneal nerve, the electrophysiological test results and axonal diameter measurement confirmed that muscle reinnervation had occurred. CONCLUSION: These findings suggest that double muscle innervation did not occur through end-to-side neurorrhaphy; the tibial nerve was not able to maintain muscle innervation after the peroneal nerve had been sectioned, although muscle reinnervation was found to have occurred, 30 days after the peroneal nerve had been sectioned.

  19. Neurotrophic Modulation of Myelinated Cutaneous Innervation and Mechanical Sensory Loss in Diabetic Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christianson, Julie A.; Ryals, Janelle M.; Johnson, Megan S.; Dobrowsky, Rick T.; Wright, Douglas E.

    2007-01-01

    Human diabetic patients often lose touch and vibratory sensations, but to date, most studies on diabetes-induced sensory nerve degeneration have focused on epidermal C-fibers. Here, we explored the effects of diabetes on cutaneous myelinated fibers in relation to the behavioral responses to tactile stimuli from diabetic mice. Weekly behavioral testing began prior to STZ administration and continued until 8 weeks, at which time myelinated fiber innervation was examined in the footpad by immunohistochemistry using antiserum to NF-H and MBP. Diabetic mice developed reduced behavioral responses to non-noxious (monofilaments) and noxious (pin prick) stimuli. In addition, diabetic mice displayed a 50% reduction in NF-H-positive myelinated innervation of the dermal footpad compared to non-diabetic mice. To test whether two neurotrophins NGF and/or NT-3 known to support myelinated cutaneous fibers could influence myelinated innervation, diabetic mice were treated intrathecally for two weeks with NGF, NT-3, NGF and NT-3. Neurotrophin-treated mice were then compared to diabetic mice treated with insulin for two weeks. NGF and insulin treatment both increased paw withdrawal to mechanical stimulation in diabetic mice, whereas NT-3 or a combination of NGF and NT-3 failed to alter paw withdrawal responses. Surprisingly, all treatments significantly increased myelinated innervation compared to control-treated diabetic mice, demonstrating that myelinated cutaneous fibers damaged by hyperglycemia respond to intrathecal administration of neurotrophins. Moreover, NT-3 treatment increased epidermal Merkel cell numbers associated with nerve fibers, consistent with increased numbers of NT-3-responsive slowly adapting A-fibers. These studies suggest that myelinated fiber loss may contribute as significantly as unmyelinated epidermal loss in diabetic neuropathy, and the contradiction between neurotrophin-induced increases in dermal innervation and behavior emphasize the need for multiple

  20. Morphology of parasympathetic neurons innervating rat lingual salivary glands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Miwon; Chiego, Daniel J; Bradley, Robert M

    2004-03-31

    Saliva is essential for taste function and not only does saliva influence taste reception, but also taste perception initiates salivation. As a first step in investigating circuits involved in gustatory-salivary reflexes, we have studied the morphology of the rat inferior salivatory nucleus (ISN), which contains parasympathetic secretomotor neurons that control the parotid and lingual (von Ebner) salivary glands. By applying the fluorescent label Fluorogold to the cut end of the glossopharyngeal nerve, the neurons supplying only the lingual salivary glands were labeled. Confocal microscopy and three-dimensional reconstruction were used to analyze the labeled neurons in the horizontal plane to determine their morphological characteristics. Additional neurons were studied in the coronal plane to determine the influence of the plane of section on neuron morphology. Reconstructions indicated that inferior salivatory neurons extend in a rostral-caudal distribution just adjacent to the medial border of the nucleus of the solitary tract (NST). There is considerable morphological variability among neurons, with neurons having up to 6 primary dendrites and 17 dendritic segments that extend a maximum of 834 microm from the soma. However, although ISN neurons vary in the size and complexity of their dendritic trees, distributions of all measures of neuron morphology are unimodal, indicating that distinct groups of neurons are not revealed based on these measures. There is, however, variability in the orientation pattern of the dendritic trees that is not represented in either the population or mean measures. Individual neurons can be categorized with either mediolateral, rostro-caudal or no apparent preferred orientation. Comparisons of neurons in rostral, intermediate or caudal third of the ISN revealed regional differences in neuron morphology; neurons in the caudal third have significantly longer dendrites than those in the intermediate or rostral third. Thus, while ISN

  1. Circuit simulation: some humbling thoughts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wendt, Manfred; /Fermilab

    2006-01-01

    A short, very personal note on circuit simulation is presented. It does neither include theoretical background on circuit simulation, nor offers an overview of available software, but just gives some general remarks for a discussion on circuit simulator needs in context to the design and development of accelerator beam instrumentation circuits and systems.

  2. Low latency asynchronous interface circuits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sadowski, Greg

    2017-06-20

    In one form, a logic circuit includes an asynchronous logic circuit, a synchronous logic circuit, and an interface circuit coupled between the asynchronous logic circuit and the synchronous logic circuit. The asynchronous logic circuit has a plurality of asynchronous outputs for providing a corresponding plurality of asynchronous signals. The synchronous logic circuit has a plurality of synchronous inputs corresponding to the plurality of asynchronous outputs, a stretch input for receiving a stretch signal, and a clock output for providing a clock signal. The synchronous logic circuit provides the clock signal as a periodic signal but prolongs a predetermined state of the clock signal while the stretch signal is active. The asynchronous interface detects whether metastability could occur when latching any of the plurality of the asynchronous outputs of the asynchronous logic circuit using said clock signal, and activates the stretch signal while the metastability could occur.

  3. The evolution of generalized reciprocity on social interaction networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Doorn, Gerrit Sander; Taborsky, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Generalized reciprocity (help anyone, if helped by someone) is a minimal strategy capable of supporting cooperation between unrelated individuals. Its simplicity makes it an attractive model to explain the evolution of reciprocal altruism in animals that lack the information or cognitive skills need

  4. Group differences in reciprocity, multiplexity and exchange : measures and application

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Agneessens, Filip; Skvoretz, John

    2012-01-01

    Local forces structure social networks. One major and widely researched local force is reciprocity, often assumed to work homogeneously across actors-i.e., all actors are equally subject to the same level of force towards reciprocity. Other local forces, like multiplexity and exchange, are also ofte

  5. Sex Differences in the Reciprocal Behaviour of Children with Autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Backer van Ommeren, Tineke; Koot, Hans M.; Scheeren, Anke M.; Begeer, Sander

    2017-01-01

    Differences in the social limitations of girls compared to boys on the autism spectrum are still poorly understood. Impaired social-emotional reciprocity is a core diagnostic criterion for an autism spectrum disorder. This study compares sex differences in reciprocal behaviour in children with autism spectrum disorder (32 girls, 114 boys) and in…

  6. Similarity and Reciprocity in the Friendships of Elementary School Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, M. L.; Drewry, Debra L.

    1985-01-01

    Investigated the effect of similarity and reciprocity on dyadic friendship choices in third- and sixth-grade students. Reciprocal (mutual) friendships were more similar in proximity, popularity, and self-concept than those in nonreciprocal (nonmutual) dyads. Results are discussed in relation to the interpersonal attraction theories. (Author/DST)

  7. Regular linear systems and their reciprocals : applications to Riccati equations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Curtain, RF

    2003-01-01

    For a regular linear system with zero in the resolvent set of the generator we introduce its reciprocal system, which has bounded generators. We show that there are close relationships between key system theoretic properties of such regular linear systems and their reciprocals. To illustrate the use

  8. Reciprocal link for a coupled Camassa-Holm type equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Nianhua; Zhang, Jinshun; Wu, Lihua

    2016-04-01

    A coupled Camassa-Holm type equation is linked to the first negative flow in a modified Drinfeld-Sokolov III hierarchy by a transformation of reciprocal type. Meanwhile the Lax pair and bi-Hamiltonian structure behaviors of this coupled Camassa-Holm type equation under the reciprocal transformation are analyzed.

  9. Reciprocal Mentorship: An Effective Support for Online Instructors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabriel, Martha A.; Kaufield, Kandra J.

    2008-01-01

    This article presents a reciprocal model of mentoring as an alternative approach to more traditional mentoring models. A mentor, experienced with online course delivery and pedagogy, worked with six online instructors over two academic terms within a reciprocal mentorship model. This model was designed to build a collaborative learning…

  10. Resisting moral wiggle room: How robust is reciprocal behavior?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Weele, J.; Kulisa, J.; Kosfeld, M.; Friebel, G.

    2014-01-01

    We provide the second mover in a trust game and a moonlighting game with an excuse for not reciprocating. While this type of manipulation has been shown to strongly reduce giving in the dictator game, we find that the availability of the excuse has no effect on the incidence of reciprocal behavior

  11. Static And Kinematic Formulation Of Planar Reciprocal Assemblies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Parigi, Dario; Kirkegaard, Poul Henning

    2013-01-01

    Planar reciprocal frames are two dimensional structures formed by elements joined together according to the principle of structural reciprocity. In this paper a rigorous formulation of the static and kinematic problem is proposed and developed by extending the work on pin-jointed assemblies by Pe...

  12. Reciprocal Ontological Models Show Indeterminism Comparable to Quantum Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandyopadhyay, Somshubhro; Banik, Manik; Bhattacharya, Some Sankar; Ghosh, Sibasish; Kar, Guruprasad; Mukherjee, Amit; Roy, Arup

    2016-12-01

    We show that within the class of ontological models due to Harrigan and Spekkens, those satisfying preparation-measurement reciprocity must allow indeterminism comparable to that in quantum theory. Our result implies that one can design quantum random number generator, for which it is impossible, even in principle, to construct a reciprocal deterministic model.

  13. Reciprocal Ontological Models Show Indeterminism Comparable to Quantum Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandyopadhyay, Somshubhro; Banik, Manik; Bhattacharya, Some Sankar; Ghosh, Sibasish; Kar, Guruprasad; Mukherjee, Amit; Roy, Arup

    2017-02-01

    We show that within the class of ontological models due to Harrigan and Spekkens, those satisfying preparation-measurement reciprocity must allow indeterminism comparable to that in quantum theory. Our result implies that one can design quantum random number generator, for which it is impossible, even in principle, to construct a reciprocal deterministic model.

  14. Reciprocal Relationships between Math Self-Concept and Math Anxiety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Wondimu; Minnaert, Alexander; Kuyper, Hans; van der Werf, Greetje

    2012-01-01

    The present study examined the reciprocal relationships between self-concept and anxiety in mathematics. A sample of 495 grade 7 students (51% girls) completed self-report measures assessing self-concept and anxiety three times in a school year. Structural equation modeling was used to test a cross-lagged panel model of reciprocal effects between…

  15. Transient nature of cooperation by pay-it-forward reciprocity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horita, Yutaka; Takezawa, Masanori; Kinjo, Takuji; Nakawake, Yo; Masuda, Naoki

    2016-01-20

    Humans often forward kindness received from others to strangers, a phenomenon called the upstream or pay-it-forward indirect reciprocity. Some field observations and laboratory experiments found evidence of pay-it-forward reciprocity in which chains of cooperative acts persist in social dilemma situations. Theoretically, however, cooperation based on pay-it-forward reciprocity is not sustainable. We carried out laboratory experiments of a pay-it-forward indirect reciprocity game (i.e., chained gift-giving game) on a large scale in terms of group size and time. We found that cooperation consistent with pay-it-forward reciprocity occurred only in a first few decisions per participant and that cooperation originated from inherent pro-sociality of individuals. In contrast, the same groups of participants showed persisting chains of cooperation in a different indirect reciprocity game in which participants earned reputation by cooperating. Our experimental results suggest that pay-it-forward reciprocity is transient and disappears when a person makes decisions repeatedly, whereas the reputation-based reciprocity is stable in the same situation.

  16. A Survey of Reciprocal Borrowers at Nichols Library, Naperville, Illinois.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strack, Nancy C.

    This paper presents results of a survey that examined the spending activities of patrons from other libraries while in Naperville (Illinois) using their reciprocal borrowing privileges at Nichols Library, the local public library. Results of a questionnaire from 100 of the 7,540 registered reciprocal borrowers provide information on: home…

  17. Reciprocal Borrowing Patterns in the North Suburban Library System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Able Consultants, DeKalb, IL.

    During a 5-day period in 1990, a total of 1,401 reciprocal borrowers in the North Suburban Library System (NSLS) received questionnaires asking about their choice of library and other aspects of borrowing behavior to provide data on the reciprocal borrowing characteristics and patterns within the system. This survey was designed to identify the…

  18. An Analysis of Direct Reciprocal Borrowing among Quebec University Libraries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duy, Joanna C.; Lariviere, Vincent

    2013-01-01

    An analysis of Quebec academic libraries' direct reciprocal borrowing statistics from 2005 to 2010 reveals that the physical distance separating universities plays an important role in determining the amount of direct reciprocal borrowing activity conducted between institutions. Significant statistical correlations were also seen between the…

  19. A semiconductor laser excitation circuit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaadzunari, O.; Masaty, K.

    1984-03-27

    A semiconductor laser excitation circuit is patented that is designed for operation in a pulsed mode with a high pulse repetition frequency. This circuit includes, in addition to a semiconductor laser, a high speed photodetector, a reference voltage source, a comparator, and a pulse oscillator and modulator. If the circuit is built using standard silicon integrated circuits, its speed amounts to several hundred megahertz, if it is constructed using gallium arsenide integrated circuits, its speed is several gigahertz.

  20. Design and Fabrication of a Free-Form Reciprocal Roof

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Parigi, Dario

    2015-01-01

    The paper presents the framework and the design and construction process of a freeform reciprocal pavilion realized during a one-week long workshop with the students of the 1st semester of the Master of Science in Architecture and Design, fall 2014, at Aalborg University. The workshop didactic...... of relations between design parameters and a wide array of measurable performances. Due to the reciprocal structures geometric complexity, the shape generation process is handled using the Reciprocalizer, a software tool developed by the author that embeds in a computational environment the constructional...... logic of reciprocal structures. It enables to engage in real time in iterative processes that allows unfolding the geometric complexity and turn it into a source of inspiration for expanding the design space and triggering the development of unique, adapted and integrated design solutions. Reciprocal...

  1. Efficient Design And Fabrication Of Free-Form Reciprocal Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Parigi, Dario; Kirkegaard, Poul Henning

    2013-01-01

    Structures based on the principle of reciprocity have been autonomously studied and used since the antiquity on the basis of different needs and purposes. The application of the principle of reciprocity requires the presence of at least two elements, at the same time both supporting and being...... supported by the other with no hierarchy, meeting along their span and never in their vertices. A computational method has been developed to predict and control the geometry of large networks of reciprocally connected, round un-notched elements. The method enables the possibility of using reciprocal...... structures to closely fit any free-form geometry through the determination of the geometric parameters that describe the contact position of each element with the others in the assembly. This method has been applied for the design and realization of a free-form reciprocal structure composed of 506 round, un...

  2. Control of coherent backscattering by breaking optical reciprocity

    CERN Document Server

    Bromberg, Y; Popoff, S M; Cao, H

    2015-01-01

    Reciprocity is a universal principle that has a profound impact on many areas of physics. A fundamental phenomenon in condensed-matter physics, optical physics and acoustics, arising from reciprocity, is the constructive interference of quantum or classical waves which propagate along time-reversed paths in disordered media, leading to, for example, weak localization and metal-insulator transition. Previous studies have shown that such coherent effects are suppressed when reciprocity is broken. Here we show that by breaking reciprocity in a controlled manner, we can tune, rather than simply suppress, these phenomena. In particular, we manipulate coherent backscattering of light, also known as weak localization. By utilizing a non-reciprocal magneto-optical effect, we control the interference between time-reversed paths inside a multimode fiber with strong mode mixing, and realize a continuous transition from the well-known peak to a dip in the backscattered intensity. Our results may open new possibilities fo...

  3. Permanent junctional reciprocating tachycardia in a dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santilli, Roberto A; Santos, Luis F N; Perego, Manuela

    2013-09-01

    A 5-year-old male English Bulldog was presented with a 1-year history of paroxysmal supraventricular tachycardia (SVT) partially responsive to amiodarone. At admission the surface ECG showed sustained runs of a narrow QRS complex tachycardia, with a ventricular cycle length (R-R interval) of 260 ms, alternating with periods of sinus rhythm. Endocardial mapping identified the electrogenic mechanism of the SVT as a circus movement tachycardia with retrograde and decremental conduction along a concealed postero-septal atrioventricular pathway (AP) and anterograde conduction along the atrioventricular node. These characteristics were indicative of a permanent junctional reciprocating tachycardia (PJRT). Radiofrequency catheter ablation of the AP successfully terminated the PJRT, with no recurrence of tachycardia on Holter monitoring at 12 months follow-up.

  4. Sleep and exercise: a reciprocal issue?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chennaoui, Mounir; Arnal, Pierrick J; Sauvet, Fabien; Léger, Damien

    2015-04-01

    Sleep and exercise influence each other through complex, bilateral interactions that involve multiple physiological and psychological pathways. Physical activity is usually considered as beneficial in aiding sleep although this link may be subject to multiple moderating factors such as sex, age, fitness level, sleep quality and the characteristics of the exercise (intensity, duration, time of day, environment). It is therefore vital to improve knowledge in fundamental physiology in order to understand the benefits of exercise on the quantity and quality of sleep in healthy subjects and patients. Conversely, sleep disturbances could also impair a person's cognitive performance or their capacity for exercise and increase the risk of exercise-induced injuries either during extreme and/or prolonged exercise or during team sports. This review aims to describe the reciprocal fundamental physiological effects linking sleep and exercise in order to improve the pertinent use of exercise in sleep medicine and prevent sleep disorders in sportsmen.

  5. Thermal Powered Reciprocating-Force Motor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatum, III, Paul F. (Inventor); McDow Elliott, Amelia (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A thermal-powered reciprocating-force motor includes a shutter switchable between a first position that passes solar energy and a second position that blocks solar energy. A shape memory alloy (SMA) actuator is coupled to the shutter to control switching thereof between the shutter's first and second position. The actuator is positioned with respect to the shutter such that (1) solar energy impinges on the SMA when the shutter is in its first position so that the SMA experiences contraction in length until the shutter is switched to its second position, and (2) solar energy is impeded from impingement on the SMA when the shutter is in its second position so that the SMA experiences extension in length. Elastic members coupled to the actuator apply a force to the SMA that aids in its extension in length until the shutter is switched to its first position.

  6. Testosterone inhibits trust but promotes reciprocity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boksem, Maarten A S; Mehta, Pranjal H; Van den Bergh, Bram; van Son, Veerle; Trautmann, Stefan T; Roelofs, Karin; Smidts, Ale; Sanfey, Alan G

    2013-11-01

    The steroid hormone testosterone has been associated with behavior intended to obtain or maintain high social status. Although such behavior is typically characterized as aggressive and competitive, it is clear that high social status is achieved and maintained not only through antisocial behavior but also through prosocial behavior. In the present experiment, we investigated the impact of testosterone administration on trust and reciprocity using a double-blind randomized control design. We found that a single dose of 0.5 mg of testosterone decreased trust but increased generosity when repaying trust. These findings suggest that testosterone may mediate different types of status-seeking behavior. It may increase competitive, potentially aggressive, and antisocial behavior when social challenges and threats (i.e., abuse of trust and betrayal) need to be considered; however, it may promote prosocial behavior in the absence of these threats, when high status and good reputation may be best served by prosocial behavior.

  7. Non-Reciprocal Brillouiin Scattering Induced Transparency

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, JunHwan; Han, Kewen; Wang, Hailin; Bahl, Gaurav

    2014-01-01

    Electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) [1, 2] provides a powerful mechanism for controlling light propagation in a dielectric medium, and for producing both slow and fast light. EIT traditionally arises from destructive interference induced by a nonradiative coherence in an atomic system. Stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) of light from propagating hypersonic acoustic waves [3] has also been used successfully for the generation of slow and fast light [4-7]. However, EIT-type processes based on SBS were considered infeasible because of the short coherence lifetime of hypersonic phonons. Here, we demonstrate a new Brillouin scattering induced transparency (BSIT) phenomenon generated by acousto-optic interaction of light with long-lived propagating phonons [8, 9]. This transparency is intrinsically non-reciprocal due to the stringent phase-matching requirements. We demonstrate BSIT in a silica microresonator having a specific, naturally occurring, forward-SBS phase-matched modal configuration [8, 9]. ...

  8. 76 FR 8661 - Airworthiness Directives; Lycoming Engines, Fuel Injected Reciprocating Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-15

    ...-14-07, Amendment 39-15602 (73 FR 39574), for certain fuel injected reciprocating engines manufactured... Directives; Lycoming Engines, Fuel Injected Reciprocating Engines AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration... airworthiness directive (AD) that applies to certain fuel injected reciprocating engines manufactured...

  9. 77 FR 60341 - National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Reciprocating Internal Combustion...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-03

    ... Reciprocating Internal Combustion Engines; New Source Performance Standards for Stationary Internal Combustion... Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Stationary Reciprocating Internal Combustion Engines to..., ``National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Reciprocating Internal Combustion Engines; New...

  10. 26 CFR 1.826-1 - Election by reciprocal underwriters and interinsurers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Perpetual Policies Or Premium Deposits) § 1.826-1 Election by reciprocal underwriters and interinsurers. (a... reciprocal and the deductions allocable thereto under the same method of accounting used by the reciprocal...

  11. The Mind Grows Circuits

    CERN Document Server

    Panigrahy, Rina

    2012-01-01

    There is a vast supply of prior art that study models for mental processes. Some studies in psychology and philosophy approach it from an inner perspective in terms of experiences and percepts. Others such as neurobiology or connectionist-machines approach it externally by viewing the mind as complex circuit of neurons where each neuron is a primitive binary circuit. In this paper, we also model the mind as a place where a circuit grows, starting as a collection of primitive components at birth and then builds up incrementally in a bottom up fashion. A new node is formed by a simple composition of prior nodes when we undergo a repeated experience that can be described by that composition. Unlike neural networks, however, these circuits take "concepts" or "percepts" as inputs and outputs. Thus the growing circuits can be likened to a growing collection of lambda expressions that are built on top of one another in an attempt to compress the sensory input as a heuristic to bound its Kolmogorov Complexity.

  12. Afferent Innervation, Muscle Spindles, and Contractures Following Neonatal Brachial Plexus Injury in a Mouse Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolaou, Sia; Hu, Liangjun; Cornwall, Roger

    2015-10-01

    We used an established mouse model of elbow flexion contracture after neonatal brachial plexus injury (NBPI) to test the hypothesis that preservation of afferent innervation protects against contractures and is associated with preservation of muscle spindles and ErbB signaling. A model of preganglionic C5 through C7 NBPI was first tested in mice with fluorescent axons using confocal imaging to confirm preserved afferent innervation of spindles despite motor end plate denervation. Preganglionic and postganglionic injuries were then created in wild-type mice. Four weeks later, we assessed total and afferent denervation of the elbow flexors by musculocutaneous nerve immunohistochemistry. Biceps muscle volume and cross-sectional area were measured by micro computed tomography. An observer who was blinded to the study protocol measured elbow flexion contractures. Biceps spindle and muscle fiber morphology and ErbB signaling pathway activity were assessed histologically and immunohistochemically. Preganglionic and postganglionic injuries caused similar total denervation and biceps muscle atrophy. However, after preganglionic injuries, afferent innervation was partially preserved and elbow flexion contractures were significantly less severe. Spindles degenerated after postganglionic injury but were preserved after preganglionic injury. ErbB signaling was inactivated in denervated spindles after postganglionic injury but ErbB signaling activity was preserved in spindles after preganglionic injury with retained afferent innervation. Preganglionic and postganglionic injuries were associated with upregulation of ErbB signaling in extrafusal muscle fibers. Contractures after NBPI are associated with muscle spindle degeneration and loss of spindle ErbB signaling activity. Preservation of afferent innervation maintained spindle development and ErbB signaling activity, and protected against contractures. Pharmacologic modulation of ErbB signaling, which is being investigated as a

  13. Chaotic memristive circuit: equivalent circuit realization and dynamical analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bao Bo-Cheng; Xu Jian-Ping; Zhou Guo-Hua; Ma Zheng-Hua; Zou Ling

    2011-01-01

    In this paper,a practical equivalent circuit of an active flux-controlled memristor characterized by smooth piecewise-quadratic nonlinearity is designed and an experimental chaotic memristive circuit is implemented.The chaotic memristive circuit has an equilibrium set and its stability is dependent on the initial state of the memristor.The initial state-dependent and the circuit parameter-dependent dynamics of the chaotic memristive circuit are investigated via phase portraits,bifurcation diagrams and Lyapunov exponents.Both experimental and simulation results validate the proposed equivalent circuit realization of the active flux-controlled memristor.

  14. Primer printed circuit boards

    CERN Document Server

    Argyle, Andrew

    2009-01-01

    Step-by-step instructions for making your own PCBs at home. Making your own printed circuit board (PCB) might seem a daunting task, but once you master the steps, it's easy to attain professional-looking results. Printed circuit boards, which connect chips and other components, are what make almost all modern electronic devices possible. PCBs are made from sheets of fiberglass clad with copper, usually in multiplelayers. Cut a computer motherboard in two, for instance, and you'll often see five or more differently patterned layers. Making boards at home is relatively easy

  15. Current Conveyor Equivalent Circuits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tejmal S. Rathore

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available An equivalence between a class of (current conveyor CC II+ and CC II- circuits is established. CC IIequivalent circuit uses one extra element. However, under certain condition, the extra element can be eliminated. As an illustration of the application of this equivalence, minimal first and second order all-pass filters are derived. Incertain cases, it is possible to compensate the effect of the input resistor of CC at port X. At the end, an open problem of realizing an Nth order (N > 2 minimal all-pass filter is stated.

  16. Circuit design for reliability

    CERN Document Server

    Cao, Yu; Wirth, Gilson

    2015-01-01

    This book presents physical understanding, modeling and simulation, on-chip characterization, layout solutions, and design techniques that are effective to enhance the reliability of various circuit units.  The authors provide readers with techniques for state of the art and future technologies, ranging from technology modeling, fault detection and analysis, circuit hardening, and reliability management. Provides comprehensive review on various reliability mechanisms at sub-45nm nodes; Describes practical modeling and characterization techniques for reliability; Includes thorough presentation of robust design techniques for major VLSI design units; Promotes physical understanding with first-principle simulations.

  17. Inrush Current Control Circuit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Steven W. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    An inrush current control circuit having an input terminal connected to a DC power supply and an output terminal connected to a load capacitor limits the inrush current that charges up the load capacitor during power up of a system. When the DC power supply applies a DC voltage to the input terminal, the inrush current control circuit produces a voltage ramp at the load capacitor instead of an abrupt DC voltage. The voltage ramp results in a constant low level current to charge up the load capacitor, greatly reducing the current drain on the DC power supply.

  18. Electronic circuits fundamentals & applications

    CERN Document Server

    Tooley, Mike

    2015-01-01

    Electronics explained in one volume, using both theoretical and practical applications.New chapter on Raspberry PiCompanion website contains free electronic tools to aid learning for students and a question bank for lecturersPractical investigations and questions within each chapter help reinforce learning Mike Tooley provides all the information required to get to grips with the fundamentals of electronics, detailing the underpinning knowledge necessary to appreciate the operation of a wide range of electronic circuits, including amplifiers, logic circuits, power supplies and oscillators. The

  19. 75 FR 80761 - National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Reciprocating Internal Combustion...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-23

    ... Reciprocating Internal Combustion Engines AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Notice of... air pollutants for reciprocating internal combustion engines and requesting public comment on one...

  20. Aspects Regarding the Unidirectional Two-Port Circuits Implemented by Means of Electronic Gyrators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    TONT, G.

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The paper investigates the behavior of unidirectional two-port equivalent circuit composed of an electronic gyrator with Antoniou operational amplifier and a reciprocal two-port built by a transversal resistance (RT. From the analysis of two-port equations standpoint, by correct choice of circuit conductance, the two-port can operate as an ideal or a lossy gyrator. Due to the interest in practical aspects of energy transfer from one terminal to other, an analysis of the two-port parameters for the unidirectional circuit diagram is performed. The validity of the tested circuit results obtained analytically and through numerical simulation PSpice has been verified experimentally, in two cases, with equal and different transfer conductance.

  1. III-V/silicon photonic integrated circuits for communication and sensing applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roelkens, Gunther; Keyvaninia, Shahram; Stankovic, Stevan; De Koninck, Yannick; Tassaert, Martijn; Mechet, Pauline; Spuesens, Thijs; Hattasan, N.; Gassenq, A.; Muneeb, M.; Ryckeboer, E.; Ghosh, Samir; Van Thourhout, D.; Baets, R.

    2013-03-01

    In this paper we review our work in the field of heterogeneous integration of III-V semiconductors and non-reciprocal optical materials on a silicon waveguide circuit. We elaborate on the heterogeneous integration technology based on adhesive DVS-BCB die-to-wafer bonding and discuss several device demonstrations. The presented devices are envisioned to be used in photonic integrated circuits for communication applications (telecommunications and optical interconnects) as well as in spectroscopic sensing systems operating in the short-wave infrared wavelength range.

  2. Advanced Natural Gas Reciprocating Engine(s)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwok, Doris; Boucher, Cheryl

    2009-09-30

    Energy independence and fuel savings are hallmarks of the nation’s energy strategy. The advancement of natural gas reciprocating engine power generation technology is critical to the nation’s future. A new engine platform that meets the efficiency, emissions, fuel flexibility, cost and reliability/maintainability targets will enable American manufacturers to have highly competitive products that provide substantial environmental and economic benefits in the US and in international markets. Along with Cummins and Waukesha, Caterpillar participated in a multiyear cooperative agreement with the Department of Energy to create a 50% efficiency natural gas powered reciprocating engine system with a 95% reduction in NOx emissions by the year 2013. This platform developed under this agreement will be a significant contributor to the US energy strategy and will enable gas engine technology to remain a highly competitive choice, meeting customer cost of electricity targets, and regulatory environmental standard. Engine development under the Advanced Reciprocating Engine System (ARES) program was divided into phases, with the ultimate goal being approached in a series of incremental steps. This incremental approach would promote the commercialization of ARES technologies as soon as they emerged from development and would provide a technical and commercial foundation of later-developing technologies. Demonstrations of the Phase I and Phase II technology were completed in 2004 and 2008, respectively. Program tasks in Phase III included component and system development and testing from 2009-2012. Two advanced ignition technology evaluations were investigated under the ARES program: laser ignition and distributed ignition (DIGN). In collaboration with Colorado State University (CSU), a laser ignition system was developed to provide ignition at lean burn and high boost conditions. Much work has been performed in Caterpillar’s DIGN program under the ARES program. This work

  3. A magnetically driven reciprocating probe for tokamak scrape-off layer measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunn, J P; Pascal, J-Y

    2011-12-01

    A new in situ reciprocating probe system has been developed to provide scrape-off layer measurements in the Tore Supra tokamak. The probe motion is provided by the rotation of an energized coil in the tokamak magnetic field. Simple analytic approximations to the exact numerical model were used to identify the important parameters that govern the dynamics of the system, and optimize the coil geometry, the electrical circuit, and the stiffness of the retaining spring. The linear speed of the probe is directly proportional to the current induced by the coil's rotation; its integral gives the coil position, providing a means to implement real-time feedback control of the probe motion. Two probes were recently mounted on a movable outboard antenna protection limiter in Tore Supra and provided automatic measurements during the 2011 experimental campaign.

  4. A thermal network model for induction motors of hermetic reciprocating compressors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutra, T.; Deschamps, C. J.

    2015-08-01

    This paper describes a simulation model for small reciprocating compressors with emphasis on the electrical motor modelling. Heat transfer is solved through algebraic equations derived from lumped thermal energy balances applied to the compressor components. Thermal conductances between the motor components are characterized via a thermal network model. The single-phase induction motor is modelled via an equivalent circuit, allowing predictions for the motor performance and distributed losses. The predicted temperature distribution is used to evaluate the stator and rotor windings resistances. The thermal and electric models are solved in a coupled manner with a model for the compression cycle. Predictions of temperature distribution, motor efficiency, as well as isentropic and volumetric efficiencies, are compared with experimental data at different operating conditions. The model is then applied to analyse the motor temperature as a function of input voltage and stator wire diameter.

  5. Changes in the Spinal Neural Circuits are Dependent on the Movement Speed of the Visuomotor Task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubota, Shinji; Hirano, Masato; Koizume, Yoshiki; Tanabe, Shigeo; Funase, Kozo

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that spinal neural circuits are modulated by motor skill training. However, the effects of task movement speed on changes in spinal neural circuits have not been clarified. The aim of this research was to investigate whether spinal neural circuits were affected by task movement speed. Thirty-eight healthy subjects participated in this study. In experiment 1, the effects of task movement speed on the spinal neural circuits were examined. Eighteen subjects performed a visuomotor task involving ankle muscle slow (nine subjects) or fast (nine subjects) movement speed. Another nine subjects performed a non-visuomotor task (controls) in fast movement speed. The motor task training lasted for 20 min. The amounts of D1 inhibition and reciprocal Ia inhibition were measured using H-relfex condition-test paradigm and recorded before, and at 5, 15, and 30 min after the training session. In experiment 2, using transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), the effects of corticospinal descending inputs on the presynaptic inhibitory pathway were examined before and after performing either a visuomotor (eight subjects) or a control task (eight subjects). All measurements were taken under resting conditions. The amount of D1 inhibition increased after the visuomotor task irrespective of movement speed (P circuits, and that task movement speed is one of the critical factors for inducing plastic changes in reciprocal Ia inhibition.

  6. Clustering in large networks does not promote upstream reciprocity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masuda, Naoki

    2011-01-01

    Upstream reciprocity (also called generalized reciprocity) is a putative mechanism for cooperation in social dilemma situations with which players help others when they are helped by somebody else. It is a type of indirect reciprocity. Although upstream reciprocity is often observed in experiments, most theories suggest that it is operative only when players form short cycles such as triangles, implying a small population size, or when it is combined with other mechanisms that promote cooperation on their own. An expectation is that real social networks, which are known to be full of triangles and other short cycles, may accommodate upstream reciprocity. In this study, I extend the upstream reciprocity game proposed for a directed cycle by Boyd and Richerson to the case of general networks. The model is not evolutionary and concerns the conditions under which the unanimity of cooperative players is a Nash equilibrium. I show that an abundance of triangles or other short cycles in a network does little to promote upstream reciprocity. Cooperation is less likely for a larger population size even if triangles are abundant in the network. In addition, in contrast to the results for evolutionary social dilemma games on networks, scale-free networks lead to less cooperation than networks with a homogeneous degree distribution.

  7. The evolution of reciprocity: social types or social incentives?

    Science.gov (United States)

    André, Jean-Baptiste

    2010-02-01

    The vast majority of human beings regularly engage in reciprocal cooperation with nonrelated conspecifics, and yet the current evolutionary understanding of these behaviors is insufficient. Intuitively, reciprocity should evolve if past behavior conveys information about future behavior. But it is not straightforward to understand why this should be an outcome of evolution. Most evolutionary models assume that individuals' past behavior informs others about their stable social type (defector, cooperator, reciprocator, etc.), which makes it sensible to reciprocate. In this article, after describing the central source of difficulty in the evolutionary understanding of reciprocity, I put forward an alternative explanation based on a work by O. Leimar. It consists of taking into account the fact that the payoffs to individuals in social interactions can change through time. This offers a solution because individuals' past behavior then signals their payoffs, which also makes it sensible to reciprocate. Even though the overwhelming majority of evolutionary models implicitly endorse the social types mechanism, I argue that the social incentives mechanism may underlie reciprocity in humans.

  8. Clustering in large networks does not promote upstream reciprocity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naoki Masuda

    Full Text Available Upstream reciprocity (also called generalized reciprocity is a putative mechanism for cooperation in social dilemma situations with which players help others when they are helped by somebody else. It is a type of indirect reciprocity. Although upstream reciprocity is often observed in experiments, most theories suggest that it is operative only when players form short cycles such as triangles, implying a small population size, or when it is combined with other mechanisms that promote cooperation on their own. An expectation is that real social networks, which are known to be full of triangles and other short cycles, may accommodate upstream reciprocity. In this study, I extend the upstream reciprocity game proposed for a directed cycle by Boyd and Richerson to the case of general networks. The model is not evolutionary and concerns the conditions under which the unanimity of cooperative players is a Nash equilibrium. I show that an abundance of triangles or other short cycles in a network does little to promote upstream reciprocity. Cooperation is less likely for a larger population size even if triangles are abundant in the network. In addition, in contrast to the results for evolutionary social dilemma games on networks, scale-free networks lead to less cooperation than networks with a homogeneous degree distribution.

  9. The evolution of generalized reciprocity on social interaction networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Doorn, Gerrit Sander; Taborsky, Michael

    2012-03-01

    Generalized reciprocity (help anyone, if helped by someone) is a minimal strategy capable of supporting cooperation between unrelated individuals. Its simplicity makes it an attractive model to explain the evolution of reciprocal altruism in animals that lack the information or cognitive skills needed for other types of reciprocity. Yet, generalized reciprocity is anonymous and thus defenseless against exploitation by defectors. Recognizing that animals hardly ever interact randomly, we investigate whether social network structure can mitigate this vulnerability. Our results show that heterogeneous interaction patterns strongly support the evolution of generalized reciprocity. The future probability of being rewarded for an altruistic act is inversely proportional to the average connectivity of the social network when cooperators are rare. Accordingly, sparse networks are conducive to the invasion of reciprocal altruism. Moreover, the evolutionary stability of cooperation is enhanced by a modular network structure. Communities of reciprocal altruists are protected against exploitation, because modularity increases the mean access time, that is, the average number of steps that it takes for a random walk on the network to reach a defector. Sparseness and community structure are characteristic properties of vertebrate social interaction patterns, as illustrated by network data from natural populations ranging from fish to primates.

  10. Near optimal graphene terahertz non-reciprocal isolator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamagnone, Michele; Moldovan, Clara; Poumirol, Jean-Marie; Kuzmenko, Alexey B.; Ionescu, Adrian M.; Mosig, Juan R.; Perruisseau-Carrier, Julien

    2016-04-01

    Isolators, or optical diodes, are devices enabling unidirectional light propagation by using non-reciprocal optical materials, namely materials able to break Lorentz reciprocity. The realization of isolators at terahertz frequencies is a very important open challenge made difficult by the intrinsically lossy propagation of terahertz radiation in current non-reciprocal materials. Here we report the design, fabrication and measurement of a terahertz non-reciprocal isolator for circularly polarized waves based on magnetostatically biased monolayer graphene, operating in reflection. The device exploits the non-reciprocal optical conductivity of graphene and, in spite of its simple design, it exhibits almost 20 dB of isolation and only 7.5 dB of insertion loss at 2.9 THz. Operation with linearly polarized light can be achieved using quarter-wave plates as polarization converters. These results demonstrate the superiority of graphene with respect to currently used terahertz non-reciprocal materials and pave the way to a novel class of optimal non-reciprocal devices.

  11. ESD analog circuits and design

    CERN Document Server

    Voldman, Steven H

    2014-01-01

    A comprehensive and in-depth review of analog circuit layout, schematic architecture, device, power network and ESD design This book will provide a balanced overview of analog circuit design layout, analog circuit schematic development, architecture of chips, and ESD design.  It will start at an introductory level and will bring the reader right up to the state-of-the-art. Two critical design aspects for analog and power integrated circuits are combined. The first design aspect covers analog circuit design techniques to achieve the desired circuit performance. The second and main aspect pres

  12. Is fast fiber innervation responsible for increased acetylcholinesterase activity in reinnervating soleus muscles?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misulis, K. E.; Dettbarn, W. D.

    1985-01-01

    An investigation was conducted as to whether the predominantly slow SOL, which is low in AChE activity, is initially reinnervated by axons that originally innervated fast muscle fibers with high AChE activity, such as those of the EDL. Local denervation of the SOL in the guinea pig was performed because this muscle is composed solely of slow (type I) fibers; thereby virtually eliminating the possibility of homologous muscle fast fiber innervation. The overshoot in this preparation was qualitatively similar to that seen with distal denervation in the guinea pig and local and distal denervation in the rat. Thus, initial fast fiber innvervation is not responsible for the patterns of change in AChE activity seen with reinnervation in the SOL. It is concluded that the neural control of AChe is different in these two muscles and may reflect specific differences in the characteristics of AChE regulation in fast and slow muscle.

  13. Organization of the motoneurons innervating the pelvic muscles of the male rat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schrøder, H D

    1980-01-01

    The cytoarchitecture of the motoneuron pool of the male rat was studied at the lumbo-sacral transition area, particularly in L6. In the latter segment a dorso-medial (DM), ventral (V), dorso-lateral (DL), and retrodorso-lateral group (RDL) could be defined. The DL group was associated with a prom......The cytoarchitecture of the motoneuron pool of the male rat was studied at the lumbo-sacral transition area, particularly in L6. In the latter segment a dorso-medial (DM), ventral (V), dorso-lateral (DL), and retrodorso-lateral group (RDL) could be defined. The DL group was associated......, and sphincter ani were each innervated by two populations of neurons that were situated in separate areas which had different histochemical properties, and which thus probably have different compositions of their afferent inputs. The duality in the motoneuron pool that innervates the pelvic mucscle might...

  14. [Efferent innervation of pulmonary blood vessels and bronchi in rat (an immunohistochemical study)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chumasov, E I; Voronchikhin, P A; Korzhevskiĭ, D É

    2012-01-01

    In this investigation the peculiarities of innervation of bronchi and blood vessels of the lung were studied in 20 rats using immunohistochemical demonstration of synaptophysin and alpha-actin. The results obtained have showen that the densest innervation is typical for bronchial walls, particularly, for the muscular lamina. Synaptophysin-immunoreactive terminals (SFIT) were detected in the bronchi in close association with both circular bundles of smooth muscle cells and microganglia. Dense network of SFIT was found in the pulmonary vein--in its middle tunic formed by cardiomyocytes. In contrast to the bronchi and pulmonary vein, large branches of the pulmonary artery contained no SFIT. We briefly discuss the problem of the origin of the nerve fibers described and their functions and suggest that SFIT are formed by efferent fibers (axons) of neurons arising from either the intrapulmonary parasympathetic ganglia.

  15. The same dorsal root ganglion neurons innervate uterus and colon in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaban, Victor; Christensen, Amy; Wakamatsu, Micah; McDonald, Michelle; Rapkin, Andrea; McDonald, John; Micevych, Paul

    2007-02-12

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether primary sensory neurons that innervate the uterus receive convergent input from the colon. To test this, in the rat, cell bodies of colonic and uterine dorsal root ganglia were retrogradely labeled with fluorescent tracer dyes microinjected into the colon/rectum and bilaterally into the uterine horns. Ganglia were harvested, cryoprotected and cut into 20 microm slices to identify positively stained cells for fluorescent microscopy. Up to 5% of neurons were colon-specific or uterus-specific, and 10-15% of labeled ganglion neurons innervate both viscera in the L1, L2, L6 and S1-S3 levels. These results suggest a novel form of visceral sensory integration in the dorsal root ganglion that may underlie comorbidity of many functional pain syndromes.

  16. Dissociation of Thermal Nociception and Epidermal Innervation in Streptozotocin-Diabetic Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beiswenger, Kristina K; Calcutt, Nigel A; Mizisin, Andrew P

    2008-01-01

    The quantification of epidermal innervation, which consists primarily of heat-sensitive C-fibers, is emerging as a tool for diagnosing and staging diabetic neuropathy. However, the relationship between changes in heat sensitivity and changes in epidermal innervation has not yet been adequately explored. Therefore, we assessed epidermal nerve fiber density and thermal withdrawal latency in the hind paw of Swiss Webster mice after two and four weeks of streptozotocin-induced diabetes. Thermal hypoalgesia developed after only two weeks of diabetes, but a measurable reduction in PGP9.5-immunoreactive epidermal nerve fiber density did not appear until four weeks. These data suggest that impaired epidermal nociceptor function contributes to early diabetes-induced thermal hypoalgesia prior to the loss of peripheral terminals. PMID:18619518

  17. Anomalous Innervation of the Median Nerve in the Arm in the Absence of the Musculocutaneous Nerve

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khursheed Raza

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The brachial plexus innervates the upper extremities. While variations in the formation of the brachial plexus and its terminal branches are quite common, it is uncommon for the median nerve to innervate the muscles of the arm. During the dissection of an elderly male cadaver at the Department of Anatomy, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi, India, in 2016, the coracobrachialis muscle was found to be supplied by a direct branch from the lateral root of the median nerve and the musculocutaneous nerve was absent. The branches of the median nerve supplied the biceps brachii and brachialis muscles and the last branch continued as the lateral cutaneous nerve of the forearm. These variations may present atypically in cases of arm flexor paralysis or sensory loss on the lateral forearm. Knowledge of these variations is important in surgeries and during the administration of regional anaesthesia near the shoulder joint and upper arm.

  18. Bioluminescent bioreporter integrated circuit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simpson, Michael L. (Knoxville, TN); Sayler, Gary S. (Blaine, TN); Paulus, Michael J. (Knoxville, TN)

    2000-01-01

    Disclosed are monolithic bioelectronic devices comprising a bioreporter and an OASIC. These bioluminescent bioreporter integrated circuit are useful in detecting substances such as pollutants, explosives, and heavy-metals residing in inhospitable areas such as groundwater, industrial process vessels, and battlefields. Also disclosed are methods and apparatus for environmental pollutant detection, oil exploration, drug discovery, industrial process control, and hazardous chemical monitoring.

  19. Superconducting Quantum Circuits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Majer, J.B.

    2002-01-01

    This thesis describes a number of experiments with superconducting cir- cuits containing small Josephson junctions. The circuits are made out of aluminum islands which are interconnected with a very thin insulating alu- minum oxide layer. The connections form a Josephson junction. The current trough

  20. Quantum secure circuit evaluation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Huanhuan; LI Bin; ZHUANG Zhenquan

    2004-01-01

    In order to solve the problem of classical secure circuit evaluation, this paper proposes a quantum approach. In this approach, the method of inserting redundant entangled particles and quantum signature has been employed to strengthen the security of the system. Theoretical analysis shows that our solution is secure against classical and quantum attacks.

  1. Advanced Natural Gas Reciprocating Engine(s)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwok, Doris; Boucher, Cheryl

    2009-09-30

    Energy independence and fuel savings are hallmarks of the nation’s energy strategy. The advancement of natural gas reciprocating engine power generation technology is critical to the nation’s future. A new engine platform that meets the efficiency, emissions, fuel flexibility, cost and reliability/maintainability targets will enable American manufacturers to have highly competitive products that provide substantial environmental and economic benefits in the US and in international markets. Along with Cummins and Waukesha, Caterpillar participated in a multiyear cooperative agreement with the Department of Energy to create a 50% efficiency natural gas powered reciprocating engine system with a 95% reduction in NOx emissions by the year 2013. This platform developed under this agreement will be a significant contributor to the US energy strategy and will enable gas engine technology to remain a highly competitive choice, meeting customer cost of electricity targets, and regulatory environmental standard. Engine development under the Advanced Reciprocating Engine System (ARES) program was divided into phases, with the ultimate goal being approached in a series of incremental steps. This incremental approach would promote the commercialization of ARES technologies as soon as they emerged from development and would provide a technical and commercial foundation of later-developing technologies. Demonstrations of the Phase I and Phase II technology were completed in 2004 and 2008, respectively. Program tasks in Phase III included component and system development and testing from 2009-2012. Two advanced ignition technology evaluations were investigated under the ARES program: laser ignition and distributed ignition (DIGN). In collaboration with Colorado State University (CSU), a laser ignition system was developed to provide ignition at lean burn and high boost conditions. Much work has been performed in Caterpillar’s DIGN program under the ARES program. This work

  2. Lumped modeling with circuit elements for nonreciprocal magnetoelectric tunable band-pass filter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiao-Hong; Zhou, Hao-Miao; Zhang, Qiu-shi; Hu, Wen-Wen

    2016-11-01

    This paper presents a lumped equivalent circuit model of the nonreciprocal magnetoelectric tunable microwave band-pass filter. The reciprocal coupled-line circuit is based on the converse magnetoelectric effect of magnetoelectric composites, includes the electrical tunable equivalent factor of the piezoelectric layer, and is established by the introduced lumped elements, such as radiation capacitance, radiation inductance, and coupling inductance, according to the transmission characteristics of the electromagnetic wave and magnetostatic wave in an inverted-L-shaped microstrip line and ferrite slab. The nonreciprocal transmission property of the filter is described by the introduced T-shaped circuit containing controlled sources. Finally, the lumped equivalent circuit of a nonreciprocal magnetoelectric tunable microwave band-pass filter is given and the lumped parameters are also expressed. When the deviation angles of the ferrite slab are respectively 0° and 45°, the corresponding magnetoelectric devices are respectively a reciprocal device and a nonreciprocal device. The curves of S parameter obtained by the lumped equivalent circuit model and electromagnetic simulation are in good agreement with the experimental results. When the deviation angle is between 0° and 45°, the maximum value of the S parameter predicted by the lumped equivalent circuit model is in good agreement with the experimental result. The comparison results of the paper show that the lumped equivalent circuit model is valid. Further, the effect of some key material parameters on the performance of devices is predicted by the lumped equivalent circuit model. The research can provide the theoretical basis for the design and application of nonreciprocal magnetoelectric tunable devices. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11172285, 11472259, and 11302217) and the Natural Science Foundation of Zhejiang Province, China (Grant No. LR13A020002).

  3. Contribution of renal innervation to hypertension in rat autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gattone, Vincent H; Siqueira, Tibério M; Powell, Charles R; Trambaugh, Chad M; Lingeman, James E; Shalhav, Arieh L

    2008-08-01

    The kidney has both afferent (sensory) and efferent (sympathetic) nerves that can influence renal function. Renal innervation has been shown to play a role in the pathogenesis of many forms of hypertension. Hypertension and flank pain are common clinical manifestations of autosomal dominant (AD) polycystic kidney disease (PKD). We hypothesize that renal innervation contributes to the hypertension and progression of cystic change in rodent PKD. In the present study, the contribution of renal innervation to hypertension and progression of renal histopathology and dysfunction was assessed in male Han:SPRD-Cy/+ rats with ADPKD. At 4 weeks of age, male offspring from crosses of heterozygotes (Cy/+) were randomized into either 1) bilateral surgical renal denervation, 2) surgical sham denervation control, or 3) nonoperated control groups. A midline laparotomy was performed to allow the renal denervation (i.e., physical stripping of the nerves and painting the artery with phenol/alcohol). Blood pressure (tail cuff method), renal function (BUN) and histology were assessed at 8 weeks of age. Bilateral renal denervation reduced the cystic kidney size, cyst volume density, systolic blood pressure, and improved renal function (BUN) as compared with nonoperated controls. Operated control cystic rats had kidney weights, cyst volume densities, systolic blood pressures, and plasma BUN levels that were intermediate between those in the denervated animals and the nonoperated controls. The denervated group had a reduced systolic blood pressure compared with the operated control animals, indicating that the renal innervations was a major contributor to the hypertension in this model of ADPKD. Renal denervation was efficacious in reducing some pathology, including hypertension, renal enlargement, and cystic pathology. However, sham operation also affected the cystic disease but to a lesser extent. We hypothesize that the amelioration of hypertension in Cy/+ rats was due to the effects

  4. Sensory innervation of the external and internal genitalia of the female rat

    OpenAIRE

    Peters, Lawrence C.; Kristal, Mark B.; Komisaruk, Barry R.

    1987-01-01

    Using a whole-nerve recording method, the genitalia of the female rat were found to receive afferent innervation as follows. Pelvic nerve: vagina, cervix, and perineal skin; hypogastric nerve: cervix and proximal three fifths of the uterus; pudendal nerve: skin of perineum, inner thigh, and clitoral sheath. It is probable that the pudendal and pelvic nerves are activated during copulation, and that all 3 nerves are activated during parturition.

  5. Intracerebroventricular Administration of Neuropeptide Y Induces Hepatic Insulin Resistance via Sympathetic Innervation

    OpenAIRE

    Anita M van den Hoek; Van Heijningen, Caroline; Schröder-van der Elst, Janny P.; Ouwens, D. Margriet; Havekes, Louis M.; Johannes A Romijn; Kalsbeek, Andries; Pijl, Hanno

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—We recently showed that intracerebroventricular infusion of neuropeptide Y (NPY) hampers inhibition of endogenous glucose production (EGP) by insulin in mice. The downstream mechanisms responsible for these effects of NPY remain to be elucidated. Therefore, the aim of this study was to establish whether intracerebroventricular NPY administration modulates the suppressive action of insulin on EGP via hepatic sympathetic or parasympathetic innervation. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS—The ...

  6. Age-related changes in the innervation of the prostate gland

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    The adult prostate gland grows and develops under hormonal control while its physiological functions are controlled by the autonomic nervous system. The prostate gland receives sympathetic input via the hypogastric nerve and parasympathetic input via the pelvic nerve. In addition, the hypogastric and pelvic nerves also provide sensory inputs to the gland. This review provides a summary of the innervation of the adult prostate gland and describes the changes which occur with age and disease. G...

  7. Semaphorin 3A controls timing and patterning of the dental pulp innervation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moe, Kyaw; Sijaona, Angelina; Shrestha, Anjana; Kettunen, Paivi; Taniguchi, Masahiko; Luukko, Keijo

    2012-12-01

    Timing and patterning of dental pulp innervation are strictly spatio-temporally regulated but it is still not known how they are controlled at molecular level. We analyzed postnatal innervation of the dental pulp in the mandibular first molar of mice deficient for Semaphorin 3A (Sema3A) axon repellant molecule. Immunohistochemical localization of nerve fibers on serial sections covering the whole tooth germs using anti-peripherin antibody revealed that nerve fibers were prematurely present within the preodontoblast layer next to the inner enamel epithelium already at PN0 in Sema3A(-/-) mice. In contrast, in the wild-type (Sema3A(+/+)) mice nerve fibers were seen in the pulp only after enamel formation at PN3. The nerves in Sema3A(-/-) pulp were notably defasciculated and thinner compared to that of Sema3A(+/+) mice. A premature formation of an abnormal, enlarged nerve plexus with a high number of arborizations was apparent in the pulp-dentin border target area in Sema3A(-/-) already at PN2 whereas in the wild-type mice the first sign of plexus formation was seen at PN7. The expression of mRNAs for Ngf, Gdnf and Ncam neuroregulatory molecules in mandibular molar as well as receptors for neurotrophic factors and class 3 semaphorins including Sema3A (TrkA, p75, TrkB, TrkC, Ret, Npn1, Npn2, PlxA4) in trigeminal ganglia were not altered in the Sema3A(-/-) mice. Collectively, this data show that Sema3A serves an essential role in molar tooth pulp innervation controlling the timing of nerve fiber penetration into the pulp, their patterning and the formation of nerve plexus at pulp-dentin border area, and provide further support for the hypothesis that tooth innervation is regulated by the coordinated activity of locally expressed neuroregulatory molecules exerting positive and negative influences on growing dental nerve fibers.

  8. Development of cardiac parasympathetic neurons, glial cells, and regional cholinergic innervation of the mouse heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fregoso, S P; Hoover, D B

    2012-09-27

    Very little is known about the development of cardiac parasympathetic ganglia and cholinergic innervation of the mouse heart. Accordingly, we evaluated the growth of cholinergic neurons and nerve fibers in mouse hearts from embryonic day 18.5 (E18.5) through postnatal day 21(P21). Cholinergic perikarya and varicose nerve fibers were identified in paraffin sections immunostained for the vesicular acetylcholine transporter (VAChT). Satellite cells and Schwann cells in adjacent sections were identified by immunostaining for S100β calcium binding protein (S100) and brain-fatty acid binding protein (B-FABP). We found that cardiac ganglia had formed in close association to the atria and cholinergic innervation of the atrioventricular junction had already begun by E18.5. However, most cholinergic innervation of the heart, including the sinoatrial node, developed postnatally (P0.5-P21) along with a doubling of the cross-sectional area of cholinergic perikarya. Satellite cells were present throughout neonatal cardiac ganglia and expressed primarily B-FABP. As they became more mature at P21, satellite cells stained strongly for both B-FABP and S100. Satellite cells appeared to surround most cardiac parasympathetic neurons, even in neonatal hearts. Mature Schwann cells, identified by morphology and strong staining for S100, were already present at E18.5 in atrial regions that receive cholinergic innervation at later developmental times. The abundance and distribution of S100-positive Schwann cells increased postnatally along with nerve density. While S100 staining of cardiac Schwann cells was maintained in P21 and older mice, Schwann cells did not show B-FABP staining at these times. Parallel development of satellite cells and cholinergic perikarya in the cardiac ganglia and the increase in abundance of Schwann cells and varicose cholinergic nerve fibers in the atria suggest that neuronal-glial interactions could be important for development of the parasympathetic nervous

  9. Vagal cardiac efferent innervation in F344 rats: Effects of chronic intermittent hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Zixi Jack

    2017-03-01

    Chronic intermittent hypoxia (CIH), which is a physiological consequence of obstructive sleep apnea, reduces baroreflex control of heart rate (HR). Previously, we showed that the heart rate (HR) response to electrical stimulation of the vagal efferent nerve was significantly increased following CIH in F344 rats. Since vagal cardiac efferent from the nucleus ambiguus (NA) project to cardiac ganglia and regulate HR, we hypothesized that vagal cardiac efferent innervation of cardiac ganglia is reorganized. Young adult F344 rats were exposed either to room air (RA) or to intermittent hypoxia for 35-50days. Fluorescent tracer DiI was injected into the NA to label vagal efferent innervation of cardiac ganglia which had been counterstained by Fluoro-Gold (FG) injections (i.p). Confocal microscopy was used to examine vagal cardiac efferent axons and terminals in cardiac ganglia. NA axons entered cardiac ganglia and innervated principal neurons (PNs) with robust basket endings in both RA control and CIH animals. In addition, the percentage of PNs which were innervated by DiI-labeled fibers in ganglia was similar. In CIH rats, abnormally large swollen cardiac axon segments and disorganized terminals as well as leaky endings were observed. In general, vagal efferent terminal varicosities around PNs appeared larger and the number of varicosities was significantly increased. Interestingly, some cardiac axons had sprouting-like terminal structures in the cardiac ganglia as well as in cardiac muscle, which had not been found in RA control. Finally, CIH increased the size of PNs and reduced the ratio of nucleus to PN somata. Thus, CIH significantly remodeled the structure of vagal cardiac axons and terminals in cardiac ganglia as well as cardiac PNs.

  10. Reciprocal relativity of noninertial frames: quantum mechanics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Low, Stephen G [4301 Avenue D, Austin, Texas, 78751 (United States)

    2007-04-06

    Noninertial transformations on time-position-momentum-energy space {l_brace}t, q, p, e{r_brace} with invariant Born-Green metric ds{sup 2} = -dt{sup 2} + 1/c{sup 2} dq{sup 2} + 1/b{sup 2} (dp{sup 2} = 1/c{sup 2} de{sup 2}) and the symplectic metric -de and dt + dp and dq are studied. This U 1,3) group of transformations contains the Lorentz group as the inertial special case and, in the limit of small forces and velocities, reduces to the expected Hamilton transformations leaving invariant the symplectic metric and the nonrelativistic line element ds{sup 2} -dt{sup 2}. The U(1,3) transformations bound relative velocities by c and relative forces by b. Spacetime is no longer an invariant subspace but is relative to noninertial observer frames. In the limit of b {yields} {infinity}, spacetime is invariant. Born was lead to the metric by a concept of reciprocity between position and momentum degrees of freedom and for this reason we call this reciprocal relativity. For large b, such effects will almost certainly only manifest in a quantum regime. Wigner showed that special relativistic quantum mechanics follows from the projective representations of the inhomogeneous Lorentz group. Projective representations of a Lie group are equivalent to the unitary representations of its central extension. The same method of projective representations for the inhomogeneous U(1,3) group is used to define the quantum theory in the noninertial case. The central extension of the inhomogeneous U(1,3) group is the cover of the quaplectic group Q(1,3) U(1,3) x{sub s} H(4), H(4) is the Weyl-Heisenberg group. The H(4) group, and the associated Heisenberg commutation relations central to quantum mechanics, results directly from requiring projective representations. A set of second-order wave equations result from the representations of the Casimir operators.

  11. Characterizations of some bivariate models using reciprocal coordinate subtangents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sreenarayanapurath Madhavan Sunoj

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In the present paper, we consider the bivariate version of reciprocal coordinate subtangent (RCST and study its usefulness in characterizing some important bivariate models.  In particular, characterization results are proved for a general bivariate model whose conditional distributions are proportional hazard rate models (see Navarro and Sarabia, 2011, Sarmanov family and Ali-Mikhail-Haq family of bivariate distributions.  We also study the relationship between local dependence function and reciprocal subtangent and a characterization result is proved for a bivariate model proposed by Jones (1998.  Further, the concept of reciprocal coordinate subtangent is extended to conditionally specified models.

  12. Effects of the re-innervation of organotypic skin explants on the epidermis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebonvallet, Nicolas; Boulais, Nicholas; Le Gall, Christelle; Pereira, Ulysse; Gauché, Dominique; Gobin, Eric; Pers, Jacques-Olivier; Jeanmaire, Christine; Danoux, Louis; Pauly, Gilles; Misery, Laurent

    2012-02-01

    The nervous system takes part in skin homeostasis and interacts with skin cells. In in vitro organotypic skin models, these interactions are lost owing to the absence of nerve endings. We have developed an in vitro organotypic skin model based on a re-innervated human skin explant using primary sensory neurons from the dorsal root ganglia of rats. After 10 days of co-culture between skin explant and neurons, a dense network of nerve fibres was observed. The epidermis and dermis presented nerve fibres associated with cellular body from sensory neurons introduced in the co-culture. Epidermal thickness, cell density and quality of re-innervated skin explant were all higher when skin explants were re-innervated by sensory neurons at 10 days of culture. Proliferation of epidermal cell was not modified, but the apoptosis was significantly diminished. Hence, this innovative model of co-cultured skin explants and neurons allows better epidermal integrity and could be useful for studies concerning interactions between the skin and its peripheral nervous system.

  13. Sensory innervation of the nonspecialized connective tissues in the low back of the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corey, Sarah M; Vizzard, Margaret A; Badger, Gary J; Langevin, Helene M

    2011-01-01

    Chronic musculoskeletal pain, including low back pain, is a worldwide debilitating condition; however, the mechanisms that underlie its development remain poorly understood. Pathological neuroplastic changes in the sensory innervation of connective tissue may contribute to the development of nonspecific chronic low back pain. Progress in understanding such potentially important abnormalities is hampered by limited knowledge of connective tissue's normal sensory innervation. The goal of this study was to evaluate and quantify the sensory nerve fibers terminating within the nonspecialized connective tissues in the low back of the rat. With 3-dimensional reconstructions of thick (30-80 μm) tissue sections we have for the first time conclusively identified sensory nerve fiber terminations within the collagen matrix of connective tissue in the low back. Using dye labeling techniques with Fast Blue, presumptive dorsal root ganglia cells that innervate the low back were identified. Of the Fast Blue-labeled cells, 60-88% also expressed calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) immunoreactivity. Based on the immunolabeling with CGRP and the approximate size of these nerve fibers (≤2 μm) we hypothesize that they are Aδ or C fibers and thus may play a role in the development of chronic pain.

  14. Effect of postnatal lead exposure on the development of sympathetic innervation of the heart. [Rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abreu, M.E.

    1983-01-01

    To determine possible mechanisms for this Pb-induced cardiotoxicity, several neutrochemical parameters indicative of cardiac sympathetic innervation were measured in developing rats. Presynaptic indices of nerve terminal development which were studied included steady-state levels of norepinephrine, neuronal uptake and vesicular storage of /sup 3/H-norepinephrine. Analysis of postsynaptic development was accomplished by quantitating the density of ..beta..-adrenergic receptors and by measuring the activity of adenylate cyclase. Rat pups were exposed to Pb from birth to weaning (21 days) via the milk of dams whose drinking water contained 0.2% Pb acetate. This method and level of Pb treatment had no effect on body or heart weight development, however, it did result in a seven-fold increase in the blood Pb content (70-75 ..mu..g/dl) of the treated pups during the period of exposure. Pb exposure accelerated the development of sympathetic innervation of the heart as detected by significant increases in the vesicular uptake of /sup 3/H-norepinephrine and the steady-state concentration of norepinephrine measured at postnatal day 4. On the other hand, ontogeny of the neutronal uptake of /sup 3/H-norepinephrine in the heart and in the forebrain was not affected by Pb treatment. The apparent premature development of sympathetic innervation induced by Pb treatment was not reflected in significant alterations in either the density or the affinity of ..beta..-adrenergic receptor sites determined by the binding kinetics of /sup 3/H-dihydroalprenolol.

  15. [Efferent innervation of the arteries of human leptomeninx in arterial hypertension].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chertok, V M; Kotsiuba, A E; Babich, E V

    2009-01-01

    Structure of the efferent nerve plexuses (adrenergic, acetylcholinestherase- and cholinacetyltranspherase-positive, NO-dependent), was studied in the arteries of human leptomeninx with different diameters. Material was obtained from the corpses of the healthy people and of the patients with initial stages of arterial hypertension (AH). It was shown that the concentrations of cholinergic and adrenergic nerve fibers and varicosities in axon terminal part, innervating the arteries with the diameters ranging from 450 till 100 microm, were not significantly different. In these arteries, NO-ergic plexuses were also detected. In patients with AH, regardless the arterial diameters, the significant increase (up to 15-20%) of adrenergic nerve fiber and varicosity concentrations was found. The changes in cholinergic nerve fiber concentration were found to depend on the vessel diameter: the significant decrease of these parameter was observed only in arteries with the diameter of 100-200 microm. No significant changes in nerve plexus concentration was noticed in the arteries with greater or smaller diameter. In NO-ergic neural conductors, the enzyme activity decreased only in the large arteries, and remained almost unchanged in the small vascular branches. The changes in the vasomotor innervation described in AH, are interpreted as a vasomotor innervation dysfunction of the leptomeninx arteries that may result in the hemodynamic disturbances.

  16. Innervation of the Human Cavum Conchae and Auditory Canal: Anatomical Basis for Transcutaneous Auricular Nerve Stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bermejo, P.; López, M.; Larraya, I.; Chamorro, J.; Cobo, J. L.; Ordóñez, S.

    2017-01-01

    The innocuous transcutaneous stimulation of nerves supplying the outer ear has been demonstrated to be as effective as the invasive direct stimulation of the vagus nerve for the treatment of some neurological and nonneurological disturbances. Thus, the precise knowledge of external ear innervation is of maximal interest for the design of transcutaneous auricular nerve stimulation devices. We analyzed eleven outer ears, and the innervation was assessed by Masson's trichrome staining, immunohistochemistry, or immunofluorescence (neurofilaments, S100 protein, and myelin-basic protein). In both the cavum conchae and the auditory canal, nerve profiles were identified between the cartilage and the skin and out of the cartilage. The density of nerves and of myelinated nerve fibers was higher out of the cartilage and in the auditory canal with respect to the cavum conchae. Moreover, the nerves were more numerous in the superior and posterior-inferior than in the anterior-inferior segments of the auditory canal. The present study established a precise nerve map of the human cavum conchae and the cartilaginous segment of the auditory canal demonstrating regional differences in the pattern of innervation of the human outer ear. These results may provide additional neuroanatomical basis for the accurate design of auricular transcutaneous nerve stimulation devices.

  17. Re-innervation of fast and slow twitch muscle following nerve crush at birth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McArdle, J J; Sansone, F M

    1977-10-01

    1. The frequency of miniature end-plate potentials (m.e.p.p.s) was significantly greater in the fast twitch extensor digitorum longus muscle (extensor) than in the slow twitch soleus, even though end-plate surface area was greater for fibres in the latter muscle. 2. Crush of the sciatic nerve at birth did not prevent the appearance of this difference in m.e.p.p. frequency. However, the frequency of the potentials in the re-innervated muscles was less than normal, even though the regenerated neuromuscular junction was qualitatively normal in morphology. 3. Though the re-innevated muscles were differentiated with respect to twitch time course, the extensor muscle was more responsive than normal to the contracture-inducing action of caffeine. 4. The Z line of the re-innervated extensor muscle was similar to that of the normal soleus in thickness. 5. Resting potential, passive electrical properties and action potential generating mechanism of the sarcolemma were normal. 6. Since the re-innervated muscles lacked muscle spindles, a role of sensory feed-back in the function of the neuromuscular junction as well as the neutrotrophic regulation of muscle is discussed.

  18. Relative number and distribution of murine hypothalamic proopiomelanocortin neurons innervating distinct target sites.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Connie M King

    Full Text Available Proopiomelanocortin (POMC neurons send projections widely throughout the brain consistent with their role in regulating numerous homeostatic processes and mediating analgesia and reward. Recent data suggest that POMC neurons located in the rostral and caudal extents of the arcuate nucleus of the hypothalamus may mediate selective actions, however it is not clear if POMC neurons in these regions of the arcuate nucleus innervate specific target sites. In the present study, fluorescent microspheres and cholera toxin B were used to retrogradely label POMC neurons in POMC-DsRed transgenic mice. The number and location of POMC cells projecting to the supraoptic nucleus, periaqueductal gray, ventral tegmental area, paraventricular nucleus, lateral hypothalamic nucleus, amygdala and the dosal vagal complex was determined. Tracer injected unilaterally labeled POMC neurons in both sides of the arcuate nucleus. While the total number of retrogradely labeled cells in the arcuate nucleus varied by injection site, less than 10% of POMC neurons were labeled with tracer injected into any target area. Limited target sites appear to be preferentially innervated by POMC neurons that reside in the rostral or caudal extremes of the arcuate nucleus, whereas the majority of target sites are innervated by diffusely distributed POMC neurons. The modest number of cells projecting to each target site indicates that relatively few POMC neurons may mediate potent and specific physiologic responses and therefore disturbed signaling in a very few POMC neurons may have significant consequences.

  19. Selective innervation of foreign muscles following damage or removal of normal muscle targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boss, V; Wigston, D J

    1992-08-22

    The restoration of a normal pattern of neural connectivity following nerve injury depends upon the selective reinnervation of appropriate postsynaptic targets. Previous studies suggest that, in the neuromuscular system, recognition between regenerating motoneurons and target muscles depends upon the positions of origin of the motoneurons and muscles. In axolotls, portions of the motor pools of adjacent muscles overlap. We found that, following removal of a pair of adjacent hindlimb muscles, anterior and posterior iliotibialis, many regenerating iliotibialis motor axons invaded foreign muscles. A more anterior foreign muscle, puboischiofemoralis internus, received greater innervation from anterior iliotibialis motoneurons, whereas a more posterior muscle, iliofibularis, received greater innervation from posterior iliotibialis motoneurons. Furthermore, anterior iliotibialis motoneurons that reinnervated puboischiofemoralis internus occupied the rostral portion of anterior iliotibialis motor pool, which overlaps that of puboischiofemoralis internus. Anterior iliotibialis motoneurons that reinnervated iliofibularis occupied the caudal portion of the anterior iliotibialis motor pool, which overlaps that of iliofibularis. When both anterior and posterior iliotibialis were damaged so that their myofibers were permanently destroyed, the rostrocaudal origins of the motoneurons that reinnervated them were virtually the same, suggesting that the motoneurons had difficulty distinguishing between the myofiberless iliotibialis muscles. However, some iliotibialis motoneurons invaded puboischiofemoralis internus instead of their myofiberless targets. Puboischiofemoralis internus received more innervation from the anterior iliotibialis motoneurons than the positionally less appropriate posterior iliotibialis motoneurons. These data are consistent with the hypothesis that selective reinnervation of muscle depends upon a system of recognition cues based on position.

  20. IGF-1 potentiates sensory innervation signalling by modulating the mitochondrial fission/fusion balance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Yuan; Li, Jianmin; Liu, Zhen; Liu, Huaxiang; Li, Hao; Li, Zhenzhong

    2017-01-01

    Restoring the contractile function of long-term denervated skeletal muscle (SKM) cells is difficult due to the long period of denervation, which causes a loss of contractility. Although sensory innervation is considered a promising protective approach, its effect is still restricted. In this study, we introduced insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) as an efficient protective agent and observed that IGF-1 potentiated the effects of sensory protection by preventing denervated muscle atrophy and improving the condition of denervated muscle cells in vivo and in vitro. IGF-1-induced Akt phosphorylation suppressed the mitochondrial outer-membrane protein Mul1 expression, which is a key step on preserving contractile property of sensory innervated SKM cells. Mul1 overexpression interfered with the balance between mitochondrial fusion and fission and was a key node for blocking the effects of IGF-1 that preserved the contractility of sensory-innervated SKM cells. Activation of AMP-activated protein kinase α (AMPKα), a mitochondrial downstream target, could block the effects of IGF-1. These data provide novel evidence that might be applied when searching for new approaches to improve the functional condition of long-term denervated SKM cells by increasing sensory protection using the IGF-1 signalling system to modulate the balance between mitochondrial fusion and fission. PMID:28276453

  1. Relative number and distribution of murine hypothalamic proopiomelanocortin neurons innervating distinct target sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Connie M; Hentges, Shane T

    2011-01-01

    Proopiomelanocortin (POMC) neurons send projections widely throughout the brain consistent with their role in regulating numerous homeostatic processes and mediating analgesia and reward. Recent data suggest that POMC neurons located in the rostral and caudal extents of the arcuate nucleus of the hypothalamus may mediate selective actions, however it is not clear if POMC neurons in these regions of the arcuate nucleus innervate specific target sites. In the present study, fluorescent microspheres and cholera toxin B were used to retrogradely label POMC neurons in POMC-DsRed transgenic mice. The number and location of POMC cells projecting to the supraoptic nucleus, periaqueductal gray, ventral tegmental area, paraventricular nucleus, lateral hypothalamic nucleus, amygdala and the dosal vagal complex was determined. Tracer injected unilaterally labeled POMC neurons in both sides of the arcuate nucleus. While the total number of retrogradely labeled cells in the arcuate nucleus varied by injection site, less than 10% of POMC neurons were labeled with tracer injected into any target area. Limited target sites appear to be preferentially innervated by POMC neurons that reside in the rostral or caudal extremes of the arcuate nucleus, whereas the majority of target sites are innervated by diffusely distributed POMC neurons. The modest number of cells projecting to each target site indicates that relatively few POMC neurons may mediate potent and specific physiologic responses and therefore disturbed signaling in a very few POMC neurons may have significant consequences.

  2. Imaging of the autonomic nervous system: focus on cardiac sympathetic innervation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, David S

    2003-12-01

    Symptoms or signs of abnormal autonomic nervous system function occur commonly in several neurological disorders. Clinical evaluations have depended on physiological, pharmacological, and neurochemical approaches. Recently, imaging of sympathetic noradrenergic innervation has been introduced and applied especially in the heart. Most studies have used the radiolabeled sympathomimetic amine, (123)I-metaiodobenzylguanidine. Decreased uptake or increased "washout" of (123)I-metaiodobenzylguanidine-derived radioactivity is associated with worse prognosis or more severe disease in hypertension, congestive heart failure, arrhythmias, and diabetes mellitus. This pattern may reflect a high rate of postganglionic sympathetic nerve traffic to the heart. Many recent studies have agreed on the remarkable finding that all patients with Parkinson's disease and orthostatic hypotension have a loss of cardiac sympathetic innervation, whereas all patients with multiple system atrophy, often difficult to distinguish clinically from Parkinson's disease, have intact cardiac sympathetic innervation. Because Parkinson's disease entails a postganglionic sympathetic noradrenergic lesion, the disease appears to be not only a movement disorder, with dopamine loss in the nigrostriatal system of the brain, but also a dysautonomia, with noradrenaline loss in the sympathetic nervous system of the heart. As new ligands are developed, one may predict further discoveries of involvement of components of the autonomic nervous system in neurological diseases.

  3. Midbrain dopamine neurons associated with reward processing innervate the neurogenic subventricular zone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lennington, Jessica B; Pope, Sara; Goodheart, Anna E; Drozdowicz, Linda; Daniels, Stephen B; Salamone, John D; Conover, Joanne C

    2011-09-14

    Coordinated regulation of the adult neurogenic subventricular zone (SVZ) is accomplished by a myriad of intrinsic and extrinsic factors. The neurotransmitter dopamine is one regulatory molecule implicated in SVZ function. Nigrostriatal and ventral tegmental area (VTA) midbrain dopamine neurons innervate regions adjacent to the SVZ, and dopamine synapses are found on SVZ cells. Cell division within the SVZ is decreased in humans with Parkinson's disease and in animal models of Parkinson's disease following exposure to toxins that selectively remove nigrostriatal neurons, suggesting that dopamine is critical for SVZ function and nigrostriatal neurons are the main suppliers of SVZ dopamine. However, when we examined the aphakia mouse, which is deficient in nigrostriatal neurons, we found no detrimental effect to SVZ proliferation or organization. Instead, dopamine innervation of the SVZ tracked to neurons at the ventrolateral boundary of the VTA. This same dopaminergic neuron population also innervated the SVZ of control mice. Characterization of these neurons revealed expression of proteins indicative of VTA neurons. Furthermore, exposure to the neurotoxin MPTP depleted neurons in the ventrolateral VTA and resulted in decreased SVZ proliferation. Together, these results reveal that dopamine signaling in the SVZ originates from a population of midbrain neurons more typically associated with motivational and reward processing.

  4. Ontogeny of neuro-insular complexes and islets innervation in the human pancreas.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra E. Proshchina

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The ontogeny of the neuro-insular complexes (NIC and the islets innervation in human pancreas has not been studied in detail. Our aim was to describe the developmental dynamics and distribution of the nervous system structures in the endocrine part of human pancreas. We used doublestaining with antibodies specific to pan-neural markers (neuron-specific enolase (NSE and S100 protein and to hormones of pancreatic endocrine cells. NSE and S100-positive nerves and ganglia were identified in the human fetal pancreas from gestation week (gw 10 onwards. Later the density of S100 and NSE-positive fibers increased. In adults this network was sparse. The islets innervation started to form from gw 14. NSE-containing endocrine cells were identified from gw 12 onwards. Additionally, S100-positive cells were detected both in the periphery and within some of the islets starting at gw 14. The analysis of islets innervation has shown that the fetal pancreas contained neuro-insular complexes and the number of these complexes was reduced in adults. The highest density of neuro-insular complexes is detected during middle and late fetal periods, when the mosaic islets, typical for adults, form. The close integration between the developing pancreatic islets and the nervous system structures may play an important role not only in the hormone secretion, but also in the islets morphogenesis.

  5. Dopaminergic Innervation of the Mouse Inner Ear: Evidence for a Separate Cytochemical Group of Cochlear Efferent Fibers

    OpenAIRE

    2006-01-01

    Immunostaining mouse cochleas for tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) and dopamine β-hydroxylase suggests that there is a rich adrenergic innervation throughout the auditory nerve trunk and a small dopaminergic innervation of the sensory cell areas. Surgical cuts in the brainstem confirm these dopaminergic fibers as part of the olivocochlear efferent bundle. Within the sensory epithelium, TH-positive terminals are seen only in the inner hair cell area, where they intermingle with other olivocochlear te...

  6. Sprouted innervation into uterine transplants contributes to the development of hyperalgesia in a rat model of endometriosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAllister, Stacy L; Dmitrieva, Natalia; Berkley, Karen J

    2012-01-01

    Endometriosis is an enigmatic painful disorder whose pain symptoms remain difficult to alleviate in large part because the disorder is defined by extrauteral endometrial growths whose contribution to pain is poorly understood. A rat model (ENDO) involves autotransplanting on abdominal arteries uterine segments that grow into vascularized cysts that become innervated with sensory and sympathetic fibers. ENDO rats exhibit vaginal hyperalgesia. We used behavioral, physiological, and immunohistochemical methods to test the hypothesis that cyst innervation contributes to the development of this hyperalgesia after transplant. Rudimentary sensory and sympathetic innervation appeared in the cysts at two weeks, sprouted further and more densely into the cyst wall by four weeks, and matured by six weeks post-transplant. Sensory fibers became abnormally functionally active between two and three weeks post-transplant, remaining active thereafter. Vaginal hyperalgesia became significant between four and five weeks post-transplant, and stabilized after six to eight weeks. Removing cysts before they acquired functional innervation prevented vaginal hyperalgesia from developing, whereas sham cyst removal did not. Thus, abnormally-active innervation of ectopic growths occurs before hyperalgesia develops, supporting the hypothesis. These findings suggest that painful endometriosis can be classified as a mixed inflammatory/neuropathic pain condition, which opens new avenues for pain relief. The findings also have implications beyond endometriosis by suggesting that functionality of any transplanted tissue can be influenced by the innervation it acquires.

  7. Sprouted innervation into uterine transplants contributes to the development of hyperalgesia in a rat model of endometriosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stacy L McAllister

    Full Text Available Endometriosis is an enigmatic painful disorder whose pain symptoms remain difficult to alleviate in large part because the disorder is defined by extrauteral endometrial growths whose contribution to pain is poorly understood. A rat model (ENDO involves autotransplanting on abdominal arteries uterine segments that grow into vascularized cysts that become innervated with sensory and sympathetic fibers. ENDO rats exhibit vaginal hyperalgesia. We used behavioral, physiological, and immunohistochemical methods to test the hypothesis that cyst innervation contributes to the development of this hyperalgesia after transplant. Rudimentary sensory and sympathetic innervation appeared in the cysts at two weeks, sprouted further and more densely into the cyst wall by four weeks, and matured by six weeks post-transplant. Sensory fibers became abnormally functionally active between two and three weeks post-transplant, remaining active thereafter. Vaginal hyperalgesia became significant between four and five weeks post-transplant, and stabilized after six to eight weeks. Removing cysts before they acquired functional innervation prevented vaginal hyperalgesia from developing, whereas sham cyst removal did not. Thus, abnormally-active innervation of ectopic growths occurs before hyperalgesia develops, supporting the hypothesis. These findings suggest that painful endometriosis can be classified as a mixed inflammatory/neuropathic pain condition, which opens new avenues for pain relief. The findings also have implications beyond endometriosis by suggesting that functionality of any transplanted tissue can be influenced by the innervation it acquires.

  8. Mild Hyperbaric Oxygen Improves Decreased Oxidative Capacity of Spinal Motoneurons Innervating the Soleus Muscle of Rats with Type 2 Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takemura, Ai; Ishihara, Akihiko

    2016-09-01

    Rats with type 2 diabetes exhibit decreased oxidative capacity, such as reduced oxidative enzyme activity, low-intensity staining for oxidative enzymes in fibers, and no high-oxidative type IIA fibers, in the skeletal muscle, especially in the soleus muscle. In contrast, there are no data available concerning the oxidative capacity of spinal motoneurons innervating skeletal muscle of rats with type 2 diabetes. This study examined the oxidative capacity of motoneurons innervating the soleus muscle of non-obese rats with type 2 diabetes. In addition, this study examined the effects of mild hyperbaric oxygen at 1.25 atmospheres absolute with 36 % oxygen for 10 weeks on the oxidative capacity of motoneurons innervating the soleus muscle because mild hyperbaric oxygen improves the decreased oxidative capacity of the soleus muscle in non-obese rats with type 2 diabetes. Spinal motoneurons innervating the soleus muscle were identified using nuclear yellow, a retrograde fluorescent neuronal tracer. Thereafter, the cell body sizes and succinate dehydrogenase activity of identified motoneurons were analyzed. Decreased succinate dehydrogenase activity of small-sized alpha motoneurons innervating the soleus muscle was observed in rats with type 2 diabetes. The decreased succinate dehydrogenase activity of these motoneurons was improved by mild hyperbaric oxygen. Therefore, we concluded that rats with type 2 diabetes have decreased oxidative capacity in motoneurons innervating the soleus muscle and this decreased oxidative capacity is improved by mild hyperbaric oxygen.

  9. Somatotopic organization of lumbar muscle-innervating neurons in the ventral horn of the rat spinal cord.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Yuzuru; Ohtori, Seiji; Takahashi, Kazuhisa

    2010-04-01

    The ventral horn of the rat spinal cord was investigated with respect to the somatotopic organization of the motor neurons that innervate the lumbar muscles. Neurotracer 1,1'-dioctadecyl-3,3,3',3'-tetramethylindocarbocyanine perchlorate (DiI) was applied to specific sites in lumbar muscles. Spinal cord segments at L1 through L4 levels were cut into 40-mum serial transverse sections. Labeled neurons were located in the ventromedial nucleus (VM) and lateromedial nucleus (LM) nuclei of Rexed's lamina IX. Motor neurons innervating the m. interspinales lumborum and m. multifidus were without exception present in the VM, whereas all motor neurons innervating the m. rectus abdominis were present in the LM. Forty percent of motor neurons innervating the m. quadratus lumborum were present in the VM and the other 60% were in the LM. Although most of the motor neurons innervating the m. psoas major were present in the LM, a few labeled neurons existed in the VM. These results suggest that the border zone demarcating the areas of innervation of the dorsal and ventral rami of spinal nerves crosses the m. quadratus lumborum.

  10. Resistor Combinations for Parallel Circuits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McTernan, James P.

    1978-01-01

    To help simplify both teaching and learning of parallel circuits, a high school electricity/electronics teacher presents and illustrates the use of tables of values for parallel resistive circuits in which total resistances are whole numbers. (MF)

  11. Stochastic evolutionary dynamics of direct reciprocity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imhof, Lorens A; Nowak, Martin A

    2010-02-01

    Evolutionary game theory is the study of frequency-dependent selection. The success of an individual depends on the frequencies of strategies that are used in the population. We propose a new model for studying evolutionary dynamics in games with a continuous strategy space. The population size is finite. All members of the population use the same strategy. A mutant strategy is chosen from some distribution over the strategy space. The fixation probability of the mutant strategy in the resident population is calculated. The new mutant takes over the population with this probability. In this case, the mutant becomes the new resident. Otherwise, the existing resident remains. Then, another mutant is generated. These dynamics lead to a stationary distribution over the entire strategy space. Our new approach generalizes classical adaptive dynamics in three ways: (i) the population size is finite; (ii) mutants can be drawn non-locally and (iii) the dynamics are stochastic. We explore reactive strategies in the repeated Prisoner's Dilemma. We perform 'knock-out experiments' to study how various strategies affect the evolution of cooperation. We find that 'tit-for-tat' is a weak catalyst for the emergence of cooperation, while 'always cooperate' is a strong catalyst for the emergence of defection. Our analysis leads to a new understanding of the optimal level of forgiveness that is needed for the evolution of cooperation under direct reciprocity.

  12. Improving reading comprehension through Reciprocal Teaching Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Endang Komariah

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available This study is aimed at discovering the benefits of the Reciprocal Teaching Method (RTM in the reading classroom, finding out the achievements of students after four comprehension training sessions of using RTM, and exploring the perceptions of students on the use of RTM. This method uses four comprehension strategies: predicting, questioning, clarifying, and summarizing, to help learners monitor their development of reading comprehension by themselves. Students work in groups of four or five and the members are divided into five roles which are the leader, predictor, clarifier, questioner, and summarizer. The subjects were 24 students from the twelfth grade at a high school in Banda Aceh. Observations, tests, documents and interviews were collected to get the data. The results showed that the students were more active and productive in the reading classroom after RTM sessions and their reading proficiency improved. They learnt how to apply several of the strategies from RTM while reading. The results also showed that they preferred this method for teaching-learning reading compared to the conventional one. Therefore, teachers are suggested to consider using this method for teaching reading that instils the students on how to apply the four comprehension strategies used in reading.

  13. Electronic circuits and systems: A compilation. [including integrated circuits, logic circuits, varactor diode circuits, low pass filters, and optical equipment circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-01-01

    Technological information is presented electronic circuits and systems which have potential utility outside the aerospace community. Topics discussed include circuit components such as filters, converters, and integrators, circuits designed for use with specific equipment or systems, and circuits designed primarily for use with optical equipment or displays.

  14. The LMT circuit and SPICE

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindberg, Erik; Murali, K.; Tamacevicius, Arunas

    2006-01-01

    The state equations of the LMT circuit are modeled as a dedicated analogue computer circuit and solved by means of PSpice. The nonlinear part of the system is studied. Problems with the PSpice program are presented.......The state equations of the LMT circuit are modeled as a dedicated analogue computer circuit and solved by means of PSpice. The nonlinear part of the system is studied. Problems with the PSpice program are presented....

  15. Behavioral synthesis of asynchronous circuits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Sune Fallgaard

    2005-01-01

    This thesis presents a method for behavioral synthesis of asynchronous circuits, which aims at providing a synthesis flow which uses and tranfers methods from synchronous circuits to asynchronous circuits. We move the synchronous behavioral synthesis abstraction into the asynchronous handshake...... is idle. This reduces unnecessary switching activity in the individual functional units and therefore the energy consumption of the entire circuit. A collection of behavioral synthesis algorithms have been developed allowing the designer to perform time and power constrained design space exploration...

  16. Diode, transistor & fet circuits manual

    CERN Document Server

    Marston, R M

    2013-01-01

    Diode, Transistor and FET Circuits Manual is a handbook of circuits based on discrete semiconductor components such as diodes, transistors, and FETS. The book also includes diagrams and practical circuits. The book describes basic and special diode characteristics, heat wave-rectifier circuits, transformers, filter capacitors, and rectifier ratings. The text also presents practical applications of associated devices, for example, zeners, varicaps, photodiodes, or LEDs, as well as it describes bipolar transistor characteristics. The transistor can be used in three basic amplifier configuration

  17. Statistical circuit design for yield improvement in CMOS circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamath, H. J.; Purviance, J. E.; Whitaker, S. R.

    1990-01-01

    This paper addresses the statistical design of CMOS integrated circuits for improved parametric yield. The work uses the Monte Carlo technique of circuit simulation to obtain an unbiased estimation of the yield. A simple graphical analysis tool, the yield factor histogram, is presented. The yield factor histograms are generated by a new computer program called SPICENTER. Using the yield factor histograms, the most sensitive circuit parameters are noted, and their nominal values are changed to improve the yield. Two basic CMOS example circuits, one analog and one digital, are chosen and their designs are 'centered' to illustrate the use of the yield factor histograms for statistical circuit design.

  18. Indirect reciprocity and the evolution of "moral signals"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smead, Rory

    2010-01-01

    Signals regarding the behavior of others are an essential element of human moral systems and there are important evolutionary connections between language and large-scale cooperation. In particular, social communication may be required for the reputation tracking needed to stabilize indirect reciprocity. Additionally, scholars have suggested that the benefits of indirect reciprocity may have been important for the evolution of language and that social signals may have coevolved with large-scale cooperation. This paper investigates the possibility of such a coevolution. Using the tools of evolutionary game theory, we present a model that incorporates primitive "moral signaling" into a simple setting of indirect reciprocity. This model reveals some potential difficulties for the evolution of "moral signals." We find that it is possible for "moral signals" to evolve alongside indirect reciprocity, but without some external pressure aiding the evolution of a signaling system, such a coevolution is unlikely.

  19. Reciprocity revisited: Give and take in Dutch and immigrant families

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Komter; J.M.D. Schans

    2008-01-01

    Classical theory suggests that "generalized reciprocity," giving without clear expectations of returns, is characteristic for exchange within the family. Modern theory assumes differences between Western, "individualistic" cultures, and non-Western, more "collectivistic" cultures, presumably leading

  20. Feasibility of Applying Controllable Lubrication Techniques to Reciprocating Machines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pulido, Edgar Estupinan

    modified hydrostatic lubrication. In this case, the hydrostatic lubrication is modified by injecting oil at controllable pressures, through orifices circumferentially located around the bearing surface. In order to study the performance of journal bearings of reciprocating machines, operating under...... conventional lubrication conditions, a mathematical model of a reciprocating mechanism connected to a rigid / flexible rotor via thin fluid films was developed. The mathematical model involves the use of multibody dynamics theory for the modelling of the reciprocating mechanism (rigid bodies), finite elements...... of the reciprocating engine, obtained with the help of multibody dynamics (rigid components) and finite elements method (flexible components), and the global system of equations is numerically solved. The analysis of the results was carried out with focus on the behaviour of the journal orbits, maximum fluid film...

  1. Reciprocal Rights and Responsibilities in Parent-Child Relations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumrind, Diana

    1978-01-01

    This article examines critically the case for protecting children's rights as against the case for protecting children's welfare. The principle of reciprocity in parent-child relations is rejected. (Author/AM)

  2. Reciprocal Rights and Responsibilities in Parent-Child Relations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumrind, Diana

    1978-01-01

    This article examines critically the case for protecting children's rights as against the case for protecting children's welfare. The principle of reciprocity in parent-child relations is rejected. (Author/AM)

  3. Reciprocity revisited: Give and take in Dutch and immigrant families

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Komter, A.; Schans, J.M.D.

    2008-01-01

    Classical theory suggests that "generalized reciprocity," giving without clear expectations of returns, is characteristic for exchange within the family. Modern theory assumes differences between Western, "individualistic" cultures, and non-Western, more "collectivistic" cultures, presumably leading

  4. Experienced teacher learning within the context of reciprocal peer coaching

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zwart, R.C.; Wubbels, T.; Bergen, Th.C.M.; Bolhuis, S.

    2007-01-01

    A considerable amount of literature on peer coaching suggests that the professional development of teachers can be improved through experimentation, observation, reflection, the exchange of professional ideas, and shared problem-solving. Reciprocal peer coaching provides teachers with an opportunity

  5. Reciprocal relations for transmission coefficients - Theory and application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Jianmin; Achenbach, Jan D.; Roberts, Ronald A.

    1989-01-01

    The authors present a rigorous proof of certain intuitively plausible reciprocal relations for time harmonic plane-wave transmission and reflection at the interface between a fluid and an anisotropic elastic solid. Precise forms of the reciprocity relations for the transmission coefficients and for the transmitted energy fluxes are derived, based on the reciprocity theorem of elastodynamics. It is shown that the reciprocity relations can be used in conjunction with measured values of peak amplitudes for transmission through a slab of the solid (water-solid-water) to obtain the water-solid coefficients. Experiments were performed for a slab of a unidirectional fiber-reinforced composite. Good agreement of the experimentally measured transmission coefficients with theoretical values was obtained.

  6. Reciprocal link for a coupled Camassa–Holm type equation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Nianhua, E-mail: linianh@hqu.edu.cn; Zhang, Jinshun; Wu, Lihua

    2016-04-08

    Highlights: • We construct a reciprocal transformation for a coupled Camassa–Holm type equation proposed by Geng and Xue. • The transformed coupled Camassa–Holm type system is a reduction of the first negative flow in a modified Drinfeld–Sokolov III hierarchy. • The Lax pair and bi-Hamiltonian structure behaviors of the coupled Camassa–Holm type equation under the reciprocal transformation are analyzed. - Abstract: A coupled Camassa–Holm type equation is linked to the first negative flow in a modified Drinfeld–Sokolov III hierarchy by a transformation of reciprocal type. Meanwhile the Lax pair and bi-Hamiltonian structure behaviors of this coupled Camassa–Holm type equation under the reciprocal transformation are analyzed.

  7. EFRC guidelines for vibrations in reciprocating compressor systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eijk, A.

    2008-01-01

    One of the disadvantages of a reciprocating compressor is that it generates pulsations and vibrations, which, without limitation and proper attention during design, manufacturing, installation and operation, can lead to fatigue failures, inefficiency, capacity limitations and unsafe situations. To j

  8. 47 CFR 97.107 - Reciprocal operating authority.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... the United States has a multilateral or bilateral agreement: (1) The terms of the agreement between... service is regulated by the FCC, provided there is in effect a multilateral or bilateral reciprocal...

  9. Chaotic hypothesis: Onsager reciprocity and fluctuation-dissipation theorem

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gallavotti, G. [Rutgers Univ., New Brunswick, NJ (United States)

    1996-09-01

    It is shown that the chaoticity hypothesis recently introduced in statistical mechanics, which is analogous to Ruelle`s principle for turbulence, implies the Onsager reciprocity and the fluctuation-dissipation theorem in various reversible models for coexisting transport phenomena.

  10. Chaotic hypothesis Onsager reciprocity and fluctuation-dissipation theorem

    CERN Document Server

    Gallavotti, G

    1996-01-01

    It is shown that the "chaoticity hypothesis", analogous to Ruelle's principle for turbulence and recently introduced in statistical mechanics, implies the Onsager reciprocity and the fluctuation dissipation theorem in various models for coexisting transport phenomena.

  11. Circuit Bodging: Atari Punk Console

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Allen, B.

    2009-01-01

    Circuit bodging is back! Maxwell is proud to present small, simple, but ultimately lovable little circuits to build for your own, personal pleasure. In this edition we are featuring: The Atari Punk Console. The Atari Punk Console (or APC) is a 555 timer IC based noise maker circuit. The original was

  12. Circuit Bodging: Atari Punk Console

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Allen, B.

    2009-01-01

    Circuit bodging is back! Maxwell is proud to present small, simple, but ultimately lovable little circuits to build for your own, personal pleasure. In this edition we are featuring: The Atari Punk Console. The Atari Punk Console (or APC) is a 555 timer IC based noise maker circuit. The original was

  13. Selective Manipulation of Neural Circuits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hong Geun; Carmel, Jason B

    2016-04-01

    Unraveling the complex network of neural circuits that form the nervous system demands tools that can manipulate specific circuits. The recent evolution of genetic tools to target neural circuits allows an unprecedented precision in elucidating their function. Here we describe two general approaches for achieving circuit specificity. The first uses the genetic identity of a cell, such as a transcription factor unique to a circuit, to drive expression of a molecule that can manipulate cell function. The second uses the spatial connectivity of a circuit to achieve specificity: one genetic element is introduced at the origin of a circuit and the other at its termination. When the two genetic elements combine within a neuron, they can alter its function. These two general approaches can be combined to allow manipulation of neurons with a specific genetic identity by introducing a regulatory gene into the origin or termination of the circuit. We consider the advantages and disadvantages of both these general approaches with regard to specificity and efficacy of the manipulations. We also review the genetic techniques that allow gain- and loss-of-function within specific neural circuits. These approaches introduce light-sensitive channels (optogenetic) or drug sensitive channels (chemogenetic) into neurons that form specific circuits. We compare these tools with others developed for circuit-specific manipulation and describe the advantages of each. Finally, we discuss how these tools might be applied for identification of the neural circuits that mediate behavior and for repair of neural connections.

  14. Photovoltaic reciprocity and quasi-Fermi level splitting in nanostructure-based solar cells (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aeberhard, Urs

    2017-04-01

    The photovoltaic reciprocity theory relates the electroluminescence spectrum of a solar cell under applied bias to the external photovoltaic quantum efficiency of the device as measured at short circuit conditions [1]. So far, the theory has been verified for a wide range of devices and material systems and forms the basis of a growing number of luminesecence imaging techniques used in the characterization of photovoltaic materials, cells and modules [2-5]. However, there are also some examples where the theory fails, such as in the case of amorphous silicon. In our contribution, we critically assess the assumptions made in the derivation of the theory and compare its predictions with rigorous formal relations as well as numerical computations in the framework of a comprehensive quantum-kinetic theory of photovoltaics [6] as applied to ultra-thin absorber architectures [7]. One of the main applications of the photovoltaic reciprocity relation is the determination of quasi-Fermi level splittings (QFLS) in solar cells from the measurement of luminescence. In nanostructure-based photovoltaic architectures, the determination of QFLS is challenging, but instrumental to assess the performance potential of the concepts. Here, we use our quasi-Fermi level-free theory to investigate existence and size of QFLS in quantum well and quantum dot solar cells. [1] Uwe Rau. Reciprocity relation between photovoltaic quantum efficiency and electrolumines- cent emission of solar cells. Phys. Rev. B, 76(8):085303, 2007. [2] Thomas Kirchartz and Uwe Rau. Electroluminescence analysis of high efficiency cu(in,ga)se2 solar cells. J. Appl. Phys., 102(10), 2007. [3] Thomas Kirchartz, Uwe Rau, Martin Hermle, Andreas W. Bett, Anke Helbig, and Jrgen H. Werner. Internal voltages in GaInP-GaInAs-Ge multijunction solar cells determined by electro- luminescence measurements. Appl. Phys. Lett., 92(12), 2008. [4] Thomas Kirchartz, Anke Helbig, Wilfried Reetz, Michael Reuter, Jürgen H. Werner, and

  15. The Diagnosis of Reciprocating Machinery by Bayesian Networks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    A Bayesian Network is a reasoning tool based on probability theory and has many advantages that other reasoning tools do not have. This paper discusses the basic theory of Bayesian networks and studies the problems in constructing Bayesian networks. The paper also constructs a Bayesian diagnosis network of a reciprocating compressor. The example helps us to draw a conclusion that Bayesian diagnosis networks can diagnose reciprocating machinery effectively.

  16. A New Robust Image Matching Method Based on Distance Reciprocal

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵春江; 施文康; 邓勇

    2004-01-01

    Object matching between two-dimensional images is an important problem in computer vision. The purpose of object matching is to decide the similarity between two objects. A new robust image matching method based on distance reciprocal was presented. The distance reciprocal is based on human visual perception. This method is simple and effective. Moreover, it is robust against noise. The experiments show that this method outperforms the Hausdorff distance, when the images with noise interfered need to be recognized.

  17. The general chain transform and self-reciprocal functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cyril Nasim

    1985-01-01

    Full Text Available A theory of a generalized form of the chain transforms of order n is developed, and various properties of these are established including the Parseval relation. Most known cases of the standard theory are derived as special cases. Also a theory of self-reciprocal functions is given, based on these general chain transforms; and relations among various classes of self-reciprocal functions are established.

  18. Reciprocal cooperation in avian mobbing: playing nice pays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheatcroft, David J; Price, Trevor D

    2008-08-01

    Unrelated passerine birds often join together while mobbing, a widespread antipredator behavior during which birds harass a predator. Although previous analyses concluded that mobbing could not have evolved via reciprocity, Krams and colleagues' field experiments show that birds preferentially join mobs with neighbors that have aided them previously, suggesting that these birds utilize reciprocity-based strategies involving individual recognition and recollection of previous interactions with others. This implies a level of sophistication in bird communities greater than had previously been realized.

  19. Mechanical characteristics of counterfeit Reciproc instruments: a call for attention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, C S; Vieira, V T L; Antunes, H S; De-Deus, G; Elias, C N; Moreira, E J L; Silva, E J N L

    2017-05-04

    To report the main differences seen by direct visual inspection between original and counterfeit Reciproc instruments, together with an evaluation of instrument bending resistance, cyclic fatigue, surface finish, Vickers microhardness and chemical composition. The visual aspects of original Reciproc R25 (VDW, Munich, Germany) and counterfeit Reciproc R25 instruments (claimed to be original, supposedly with dimensions similar to those of Reciproc R25 files, bought at www.mercadolivre.com.br) were evaluated under direct observation, stereomicroscopy and scanning electron microscope. The flexibility of original and counterfeit Reciproc R25 was determined via 45° bending tests according to the ISO 3630-1 specification. Instruments were also subjected to cyclic fatigue resistance, measuring the time to fracture in an artificial stainless steel canal with a 60° angle and 5-mm radius of curvature. The fracture surfaces of all fragments were examined under a scanning electron microscope. Roughness of the instruments was quantified using a profilometer, and the microhardness test was carried out using a Vickers hardness tester. Energy-dispersive X-ray microanalysis (EDX) was also carried out. Results were analysed statistically using the Student's t-test at a significance level of P differences were observed such as ISO colour coding, measurement marks, stopper and morphologic characteristics. Original Reciproc instruments had significantly longer cyclic fatigue life and significantly lower bending resistance than counterfeit Reciproc instruments (P differences in the chemical composition of the instruments (P different raw material. Original Reciproc files outperformed counterfeit instruments in all tests. It is thus important that identification strategies for these counterfeit instruments be developed, thereby preventing their inadvertent use. © 2017 International Endodontic Journal. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Competition or collaboration? The reciprocity effect in loan syndication

    OpenAIRE

    Jian Cai

    2009-01-01

    It is well recognized that loan syndication generates a moral hazard problem by diluting the lead arranger's incentive to monitor the borrower. This paper proposes and tests a novel view that reciprocal arrangements among lead arrangers serve as an effective mechanism to mitigate this agency problem. Lender arrangements in about seven out of ten syndicated loans are reciprocal in the sense that lead arrangers also participate in loans that are led by their participant lenders. I develop a mod...

  1. LC-Circuit Calorimetry

    CERN Document Server

    Bossen, Olaf

    2011-01-01

    We present a new type of calorimeter in which we couple an unknown heat capacity with the aid of Peltier elements to an electrical circuit. The use of an electrical inductance and an amplifier in the circuit allows us to achieve autonomous oscillations, and the measurement of the corresponding resonance frequency makes it possible to accurately measure the heat capacity with an intrinsic statistical error that decreases as ~t^{-3/2} with measuring time t, as opposed to a corresponding error ~t^{-1/2} in the conventional alternating current (a.c.) method to measure heat capacities. We have built a demonstration experiment to show the feasibility of the new technique, and we have tested it on a gadolinium sample at its transition to the ferromagnetic state.

  2. Neuromorphic silicon neuron circuits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giacomo eIndiveri

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Hardware implementations of spiking neurons can be extremely useful for a large variety of applications, ranging from high-speed modeling of large-scale neural systems to real-time behaving systems, to bidirectional brain-machine interfaces. The specific circuit solutions used to implement silicon neurons depend on the application requirements. In this paper we describe the most common building blocks and techniques used to implement these circuits, and present an overview of a wide range of neuromorphic silicon neurons, which implement different computational models, ranging from biophysically realistic and conductance based Hodgkin-Huxley models to bi-dimensional generalized adaptive Integrate and Fire models. We compare the different design methodologies used for each silicon neuron design described, and demonstrate their features with experimental results, measured from a wide range of fabricated VLSI chips.

  3. Cartography of serotonergic circuits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sparta, Dennis R; Stuber, Garret D

    2014-08-06

    Serotonin is an essential neuromodulator, but the precise circuit connectivity that regulates serotonergic neurons has not been well defined. Using rabies virus tracing strategies Weissbourd et al. (2014) and Pollak Dorocic et al. (2014) in this issue of Neuron and Ogawa et al. (2014) in Cell Reports provide a comprehensive map of the inputs to serotonergic neurons, highlighting the complexity and diversity of potential upstream cellular regulators. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Strong reciprocity, human cooperation, and the enforcement of social norms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fehr, Ernst; Fischbacher, Urs; Gächter, Simon

    2002-03-01

    This paper provides strong evidence challenging the self-interest assumption that dominates the behavioral sciences and much evolutionary thinking. The evidence indicates that many people have a tendency to voluntarily cooperate, if treated fairly, and to punish noncooperators. We call this behavioral propensity "strong reciprocity" and show empirically that it can lead to almost universal cooperation in circumstances in which purely self-interested behavior would cause a complete breakdown of cooperation. In addition, we show that people are willing to punish those who behaved unfairly towards a third person or who defected in a Prisoner's Dilemma game with a third person. This suggests that strong reciprocity is a powerful device for the enforcement of social norms involving, for example, food sharing or collective action. Strong reciprocity cannot be rationalized as an adaptive trait by the leading evolutionary theories of human cooperation (in other words, kin selection, reciprocal altruism, indirect reciprocity, and costly signaling theory). However, multilevel selection theories of cultural evolution are consistent with strong reciprocity.

  5. Inkjet deposited circuit components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bidoki, S. M.; Nouri, J.; Heidari, A. A.

    2010-05-01

    All-printed electronics as a means of achieving ultra-low-cost electronic circuits has attracted great interest in recent years. Inkjet printing is one of the most promising techniques by which the circuit components can be ultimately drawn (i.e. printed) onto the substrate in one step. Here, the inkjet printing technique was used to chemically deposit silver nanoparticles (10-200 nm) simply by ejection of silver nitrate and reducing solutions onto different substrates such as paper, PET plastic film and textile fabrics. The silver patterns were tested for their functionality to work as circuit components like conductor, resistor, capacitor and inductor. Different levels of conductivity were achieved simply by changing the printing sequence, inks ratio and concentration. The highest level of conductivity achieved by an office thermal inkjet printer (300 dpi) was 5.54 × 105 S m-1 on paper. Inkjet deposited capacitors could exhibit a capacitance of more than 1.5 nF (parallel plate 45 × 45 mm2) and induction coils displayed an inductance of around 400 µH (planar coil 10 cm in diameter). Comparison of electronic performance of inkjet deposited components to the performance of conventionally etched items makes the technique highly promising for fabricating different printed electronic devices.

  6. Digital integrated circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polasek, P.; Halamik, J.

    1984-05-01

    The term semicustom designed integrated circuits denotes integrated circuits of an all purpose character in which the production of chips is completed by using one to three custom design stencil type exposure masks. This involves in most cases interconnecting masks that are used to devise the circuit function desired by the customer. Silicon plates with an all purpose gate matrix are produced up to the interconnection level and can be kept at this phase in storage, after which a customer's specific demands can be met very expediently. All purpose logic fields containing 200 logic gates on a chip and an all purpose chip to be expanded to 1,000 logic gates are discussed. The technology facilitates the devising of fast gates with a delay of approximately 5 ns and power dissipation of 1 mW. In assembly it will be possible to make use of the entire assortment of the currently used casings with 16, 18, 20, 24, 28 and 40 outlets. In addition to the development of the mentioned technology, a general methodology for design of the mentioned gate fields is currently under way.

  7. Changes to the shuttle circuits

    CERN Multimedia

    GS Department

    2011-01-01

    To fit with passengers expectation, there will be some changes to the shuttle circuits as from Monday 10 October. See details on http://cern.ch/ShuttleService (on line on 7 October). Circuit No. 5 is cancelled as circuit No. 1 also stops at Bldg. 33. In order to guarantee shorter travel times, circuit No. 1 will circulate on Meyrin site only and circuit No. 2, with departures from Bldg. 33 and 500, on Prévessin site only. Site Services Section

  8. Power system with an integrated lubrication circuit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoff, Brian D.; Akasam, Sivaprasad; Algrain, Marcelo C.; Johnson, Kris W.; Lane, William H.

    2009-11-10

    A power system includes an engine having a first lubrication circuit and at least one auxiliary power unit having a second lubrication circuit. The first lubrication circuit is in fluid communication with the second lubrication circuit.

  9. Analytical Assessment of the Reciprocating Feed System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eddleman, David E.; Blackmon, James B.; Morton, Christopher D.

    2006-01-01

    A preliminary analysis tool has been created in Microsoft Excel to determine deliverable payload mass, total system mass, and performance of spacecraft systems using various types of propellant feed systems. These mass estimates are conducted by inserting into the user interface the basic mission parameters (e.g., thrust, burn time, specific impulse, mixture ratio, etc.), system architecture (e.g., propulsion system type and characteristics, propellants, pressurization system type, etc.), and design properties (e.g., material properties, safety factors, etc.). Different propellant feed and pressurization systems are available for comparison in the program. This gives the user the ability to compare conventional pressure fed, reciprocating feed system (RFS), autogenous pressurization thrust augmentation (APTA RFS), and turbopump systems with the deliverable payload, inert mass, and total system mass being the primary comparison metrics. Analyses of several types of missions and spacecraft were conducted and it was found that the RFS offers a performance improvement, especially in terms of delivered payload, over conventional pressure fed systems. Furthermore, it is competitive with a turbopump system at low to moderate chamber pressures, up to approximately 1,500 psi. Various example cases estimating the system mass and deliverable payload of several types of spacecraft are presented that illustrate the potential system performance advantages of the RFS. In addition, a reliability assessment of the RFS was conducted, comparing it to simplified conventional pressure fed and turbopump systems, based on MIL-STD 756B; these results showed that the RFS offers higher reliability, and thus substantially longer periods between system refurbishment, than turbopump systems, and is competitive with conventional pressure fed systems. This is primarily the result of the intrinsic RFS fail-operational capability with three run tanks, since the system can operate with just two run

  10. Memristor based startup circuit for self biased circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Mangal; Singh, Amit Kumar; Rathi, Amit; Singhal, Sonal

    2016-04-01

    This paper presents the design of a Memristor based startup circuit for self biased circuits. Memristor has many advantages over conventional CMOS devices such as low leakage current at nanometer scale, easy to manufacture. In this work the switching characteristics of memristor is utilized. First the theoretical equations describing the switching behavior of memristor are investigated. To prove the switching capability of Memristor, a startup circuit based on memristor is proposed which uses series combination of Memristor and capacitor. Proposed circuit is compared with the previously reported MOSFET based startup circuits. Comparison of different circuits was done to validate the results. Simulation results show that memristor based circuit can attain on (I = 12.94 µA) to off state (I = 1 .2 µA) in 25 ns while the MOSFET based startup circuits take on (I = 14.19 µA) to off state (I = 1.4 µA) in more than 90 ns. The benefit comes in terms of area because the number of components used in the circuit are lesser than the conventional startup circuits.

  11. Increased serotonergic innervation of lumbosacral motoneurons of rolling mouse Nagoya in correlation with abnormal hindlimb extension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koyanagi, Y; Sawada, K; Sakata-Haga, H; Jeong, Y-G; Fukui, Y

    2006-12-01

    Rolling Mouse Nagoya (RMN) carries a mutation in a gene encoding for alpha(1A) subunit of P/Q-type Ca(2+) channel (Ca(v)2.1). In addition to ataxia, this mutant mouse exhibits abnormal hindlimb extension, which is characterized by a sustained excessive tone of hindlimb extensor muscles. This study aimed to clarify whether serotonergic (5-HTergic) innervation of the spinal motoneurons was altered in RMN in relation to the abnormal hindlimb extension. The density of 5-HT immunoreactive fibres in the ventral horn of lumbar and sacral regions of spinal cord was significantly greater in RMN than in controls. Retrograde wheat germ agglutinin-conjugated horseradish peroxidase (WGA-HRP) labelling combined with 5-HT immunostaining revealed that the number of 5-HT immunoreactive terminals adjoining femoris quadriceps motoneurons was about 2.5-fold greater in RMN than in controls. Furthermore, 5-HT immunostaining in the lumbar cord ventral horn was examined in three other Ca(v)2.1 mutant mice (tottering, leaner and pogo) as to whether or not they showed the abnormal hindlimb extension. Among these mutants, the increased density of 5-HT immunoreactive fibres was observed in correlation with the presence of the abnormal hindlimb extension. The results suggest an increased 5-HTergic innervation of the lumbosacral motoneurons in correlation with the abnormal hindlimb extension in RMN and other Ca(v)2.1 mutant mice. As 5-HT is known to induce the sustained membrane depolarizations without continuous excitatory synaptic inputs (plateau potentials) in spinal motoneurons, the increased 5-HTergic innervation may cause the sustained excitation of hindlimb extensor motoneurons, resulting in the abnormal hindlimb extension.

  12. Estradiol-dependent catecholaminergic innervation of auditory areas in a seasonally breeding songbird.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matragrano, Lisa L; Sanford, Sara E; Salvante, Katrina G; Sockman, Keith W; Maney, Donna L

    2011-08-01

    A growing body of evidence suggests that gonadal steroids such as estradiol (E2) alter neural responses not only in brain regions associated with reproductive behavior but also in sensory areas. Because catecholamine systems are involved in sensory processing and selective attention, and because they are sensitive to E2 in many species, they may mediate the neural effects of E2 in sensory areas. Here, we tested the effects of E2 on catecholaminergic innervation, synthesis and activity in the auditory system of white-throated sparrows, a seasonally breeding songbird in which E2 promotes selective auditory responses to song. Non-breeding females with regressed ovaries were held on a winter-like photoperiod and implanted with silastic capsules containing either no hormone or E2. In one hemisphere of the brain, we used immunohistochemistry to quantify fibers immunoreactive for tyrosine hydroxylase or dopamine beta-hydroxylase in the auditory forebrain, thalamus and midbrain. E2 treatment increased catecholaminergic innervation in the same areas of the auditory system in which E2 promotes selectivity for song. In the contralateral hemisphere we quantified dopamine, norepinephrine and their metabolites in tissue punches using HPLC. Norepinephrine increased in the auditory forebrain, but not the midbrain, after E2 treatment. We found that evidence of interhemispheric differences, both in immunoreactivity and catecholamine content that did not depend on E2 treatment. Overall, our results show that increases in plasma E2 typical of the breeding season enhanced catecholaminergic innervation and synthesis in some parts of the auditory system, raising the possibility that catecholamines play a role in E2-dependent auditory plasticity in songbirds.

  13. Growth Hormone (GH) and Rehabilitation Promoted Distal Innervation in a Child Affected by Caudal Regression Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devesa, Jesús; Alonso, Alba; López, Natalia; García, José; Puell, Carlos I.; Pablos, Tamara; Devesa, Pablo

    2017-01-01

    Caudal regression syndrome (CRS) is a malformation occurring during the fetal period and mainly characterized by an incomplete development of the spinal cord (SC), which is often accompanied by other developmental anomalies. We studied a 9-month old child with CRS who presented interruption of the SC at the L2–L3 level, sacral agenesis, a lack of innervation of the inferior limbs (flaccid paraplegia), and neurogenic bladder and bowel. Given the known positive effects of growth hormone (GH) on neural stem cells (NSCs), we treated him with GH and rehabilitation, trying to induce recovery from the aforementioned sequelae. The Gross Motor Function Test (GMFM)-88 test score was 12.31%. After a blood analysis, GH treatment (0.3 mg/day, 5 days/week, during 3 months and then 15 days without GH) and rehabilitation commenced. This protocol was followed for 5 years, the last GH dose being 1 mg/day. Blood analysis and physical exams were performed every 3 months initially and then every 6 months. Six months after commencing the treatment the GMFM-88 score increased to 39.48%. Responses to sensitive stimuli appeared in most of the territories explored; 18 months later sensitive innervation was complete and the patient moved all muscles over the knees and controlled his sphincters. Three years later he began to walk with crutches, there was plantar flexion, and the GMFM-88 score was 78.48%. In summary, GH plus rehabilitation may be useful for innervating distal areas below the level of the incomplete spinal cord in CRS. It is likely that GH acted on the ependymal SC NSCs, as the hormone does in the neurogenic niches of the brain, and rehabilitation helped to achieve practically full functionality. PMID:28124993

  14. Effects of ovariectomy and dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) on vaginal wall thickness and innervation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelletier, Georges; Ouellet, Johanne; Martel, Céline; Labrie, Fernand

    2012-10-01

    One mechanism by which low sexual steroid activity observed after menopause could cause sexual dysfunction is by deficient vaginal innervation. Recently, it has been shown that intravaginal administration of dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) could produce beneficial effects on sexual dysfunction in postmenopausal women. The goal of this study was to determine if DHEA could modify innervation in the rat vagina. The area occupied by the nerve fibers immunoreactive for protein gene product 9.5 (PGP 9.5), a panneuronal marker or tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), a sympathetic nerve fiber marker, in the lamina propria and muscular layers, respectively, as well as the total area of each of these 2 layers were measured by stereological analysis. The innervation of the rat vagina was examined 9 months after ovariectomy (OVX) compared to intact animals and treatment of OVX animals with DHEA (80 mg/kg). Four sections from each vagina (5 animals/groups) were immunostained. In OVX animals, the lamina propria area was decreased to 44%, an effect which was reversed by DHEA to 69% of the intact value. OVX also caused a 59% decrease in the area of PGP 9.5 fibers, an effect which was prevented by DHEA, thus showing a 68% stimulatory effect of DHEA on the density of PGP 9.5 fibers in the lamina propria compared to OVX animals. Following OVX, the muscular layer area was decreased by 61%. DHEA treatment induced 118% and 71% increases in TH fiber area compared to OVX and intact animals, respectively. The density of TH fibers was 182% increased over intact controls by DHEA treatment of OVX animals. The relatively potent stimulatory effect of DHEA on intravaginal nerve fiber density provides a possible explanation for the beneficial effects of intravaginal DHEA on sexual dysfunction observed in postmenopausal women. © 2012 International Society for Sexual Medicine.

  15. Distribution and ultrastructural features of the serotonin innervation in rat and squirrel monkey subthalamic nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parent, Martin; Wallman, Marie-Josée; Descarries, Laurent

    2010-04-01

    The main purpose of this light and electron microscopic immunocytochemical study was to characterize and compare the serotonin (5-HT) innervation of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) in rats and squirrel monkeys (Saimiri sciureus) following labeling with an antibody against the 5-HT transporter (SERT). Unbiased counts of SERT+ axon varicosities revealed an average density of 5-HT innervation higher in monkeys (1.52 x 10(6) varicosities/mm3) than rats (1.17 x 10(6)), particularly in the anterior half of the nucleus (1.70 x 10(6)). As measured by electron microscopy, SERT+ axon varicosity profiles in the STN of both species were smaller than unlabeled profiles. The number of SERT+ profiles displaying a synaptic junction indicated that, in both rat and monkey STN, approximately half of 5-HT axon varicosities were asynaptic. In monkeys, all synaptic junctions made by SERT+ varicosities were asymmetrical, as opposed to only 77% in rats. Despite the higher density of 5-HT innervation in the anterior half of monkey STN, the ultrastructural features of its SERT+ varicosities, including synaptic incidence, did not significantly differ from those in its posterior half. These findings suggest that, throughout the rat and monkey STN, 5-HT afferents may exert their influence via both synaptic delivery and diffusion of 5-HT, and that an ambient level of 5-HT maintained in STN by these two modes of transmission might also modulate neuronal activity and influence motor behavior. A better understanding of the factors governing the complex interplay between these signaling processes would greatly improve our knowledge of the physiopathology of the STN.

  16. Maintenance of bladder innervation in diabetes: a stereological study of streptozotocin-treated female rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langdale, C L; Thor, K B; Marson, L; Burgard, E C

    2014-10-01

    Neuropathy and cystopathy are two common conditions in patients with chronic diabetes. Despite obvious bladder sensory and motor nerve dysfunction in diabetes, no studies have selectively explored whether sensory or motor innervation is affected in the bladder. In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that loss of bladder sensory and motor fibers is responsible for bladder sensory and motor dysfunction. Parasympathetic and sensory innervation of the bladder dome and neck were examined using immunohistochemistry (IHC) and stereology in adult female rats 12weeks after induction of diabetes by streptozotocin. Naïve and age matched rats were evaluated as controls. Diabetic rats had mean blood glucose level of >400mg/dl, and bladder weights and thicknesses that were more than doubled compared to naïve rats. In naïve rats, parasympathetic vesicular acetylcholine transporter (VAT) and sensory calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) immunopositive nerve fibers were located in bladder smooth muscle and were more densely distributed in the neck compared to the dome. Within the urothelial region, CGRP nerve fibers were densely distributed while VAT nerve fibers were sparsely distributed in the bladder neck and both were virtually absent in the bladder dome. Streptozotocin induced diabetes did not change the total nerve fiber length of either VAT or CGRP stained fibers in either the neck or dome. These studies indicate that hyperglycemia, induced by streptozotocin treatment, does not result in a loss of parasympathetic VAT or CGRP sensory nerve fibers, per se, but the doubling of bladder weight and mass does indicate a decrease in innervation density.

  17. Removal of half the sympathetic innervation does not reduce vasoconstrictor responses in rat tail artery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripovic, Diana; McLachlan, Elspeth M; Brock, James A

    2013-06-01

    Following reinnervation of denervated rat tail arteries, nerve-evoked contractions are at least as large as those evoked in normally innervated arteries despite a much lower nerve terminal density. Here nerve-evoked contractions have been investigated after transection of half the sympathetic innervation of normal tail arteries. After 1 week, the noradrenergic plexus 50-70 mm along the tail was about half as dense as control. Excitatory junction potentials recorded in smooth muscle cells of arterial segments isolated in vitro were half their normal amplitude. Surprisingly, nerve-evoked contractions of isometrically mounted segments were not reduced in amplitude, as was also the case after only 3 days. After 1 week, enhancement of nerve-evoked contractions by blocking either neuronal re-uptake of noradrenaline with desmethylimipramine or prejunctional α2-adrenoceptors with idazoxan was similar to control, suggesting that these mechanisms are matched to the number of innervating axons. The relative contribution of postjunctional α2-adrenoceptors to contractions evoked by long trains of stimuli was enhanced but that of α1-adrenoceptors was unchanged. Transiently, sensitivity to the α1-adrenoceptor agonist phenylephrine was slightly increased. After 7 weeks, amplitudes of nerve-evoked contractions remained similar to control, and sensitivity to phenylephrine had recovered but that to the α2-adrenoceptor agonist clonidine was slightly raised. The normal amplitude of nerve-evoked contractions after partial denervation is only partly explained by the greater contribution of α2-adrenoceptors. While the post-receptor mechanisms activated by nerve-released transmitter may be modified to amplify the contractions after partial denervation, our findings suggest that these mechanisms are normally saturated, at least in this artery.

  18. Differential cardiac responses to unilateral sympathetic nerve stimulation in the isolated innervated rabbit heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winter, James; Tanko, Abdul Samed; Brack, Kieran E; Coote, John H; Ng, G André

    2012-01-26

    The heart receives both a left and right sympathetic innervation. Currently there is no description of an in vitro whole heart preparation for comparing the influence of each sympathetic supply on cardiac function. The aim was to establish the viability of using an in vitro model to investigate the effects of left and right sympathetic chain stimulation (LSS/RSS). For this purpose the upper sympathetic chain on each side was isolated and bipolar stimulating electrodes were attached between T2-T3 and electrically insulated from surrounding tissue in a Langendorff innervated rabbit heart preparation (n=8). Heart rate (HR) was investigated during sinus rhythm, whilst dromotropic, inotropic and ventricular electrophysiological effects were measured during constant pacing (250 bpm). All responses exhibited linear increases with increases in stimulation frequency (2-10 Hz). The change in HR was larger during RSS than LSS (P<0.01), increasing by 78±9 bpm and 49±8 bpm respectively (10 Hz, baseline; 145±7 bpm). Left ventricular pressure was increased from a baseline of 50±4 mmHg, by 22±5 mmHg (LSS, 10 Hz) and 4±1 mmHg (RSS, 10 Hz) respectively (P<0.001). LSS, but not RSS, caused a shortening of basal and apical monophasic action potential duration (MAPD90). We demonstrate that RSS exerts a greater effect at the sinoatrial node and LSS at the left ventricle. The study confirms previous experiments on dogs and cats, provides quantitative data on the comparative influence of right and left sympathetic nerves and demonstrates the feasibility of isolating and stimulating the ipsilateral cardiac sympathetic supply in an in vitro innervated rabbit heart preparation.

  19. Growth Hormone (GH) and Rehabilitation Promoted Distal Innervation in a Child Affected by Caudal Regression Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devesa, Jesús; Alonso, Alba; López, Natalia; García, José; Puell, Carlos I; Pablos, Tamara; Devesa, Pablo

    2017-01-23

    Caudal regression syndrome (CRS) is a malformation occurring during the fetal period and mainly characterized by an incomplete development of the spinal cord (SC), which is often accompanied by other developmental anomalies. We studied a 9-month old child with CRS who presented interruption of the SC at the L2-L3 level, sacral agenesis, a lack of innervation of the inferior limbs (flaccid paraplegia), and neurogenic bladder and bowel. Given the known positive effects of growth hormone (GH) on neural stem cells (NSCs), we treated him with GH and rehabilitation, trying to induce recovery from the aforementioned sequelae. The Gross Motor Function Test (GMFM)-88 test score was 12.31%. After a blood analysis, GH treatment (0.3 mg/day, 5 days/week, during 3 months and then 15 days without GH) and rehabilitation commenced. This protocol was followed for 5 years, the last GH dose being 1 mg/day. Blood analysis and physical exams were performed every 3 months initially and then every 6 months. Six months after commencing the treatment the GMFM-88 score increased to 39.48%. Responses to sensitive stimuli appeared in most of the territories explored; 18 months later sensitive innervation was complete and the patient moved all muscles over the knees and controlled his sphincters. Three years later he began to walk with crutches, there was plantar flexion, and the GMFM-88 score was 78.48%. In summary, GH plus rehabilitation may be useful for innervating distal areas below the level of the incomplete spinal cord in CRS. It is likely that GH acted on the ependymal SC NSCs, as the hormone does in the neurogenic niches of the brain, and rehabilitation helped to achieve practically full functionality.

  20. Growth Hormone (GH and Rehabilitation Promoted Distal Innervation in a Child Affected by Caudal Regression Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesús Devesa

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Caudal regression syndrome (CRS is a malformation occurring during the fetal period and mainly characterized by an incomplete development of the spinal cord (SC, which is often accompanied by other developmental anomalies. We studied a 9-month old child with CRS who presented interruption of the SC at the L2–L3 level, sacral agenesis, a lack of innervation of the inferior limbs (flaccid paraplegia, and neurogenic bladder and bowel. Given the known positive effects of growth hormone (GH on neural stem cells (NSCs, we treated him with GH and rehabilitation, trying to induce recovery from the aforementioned sequelae. The Gross Motor Function Test (GMFM-88 test score was 12.31%. After a blood analysis, GH treatment (0.3 mg/day, 5 days/week, during 3 months and then 15 days without GH and rehabilitation commenced. This protocol was followed for 5 years, the last GH dose being 1 mg/day. Blood analysis and physical exams were performed every 3 months initially and then every 6 months. Six months after commencing the treatment the GMFM-88 score increased to 39.48%. Responses to sensitive stimuli appeared in most of the territories explored; 18 months later sensitive innervation was complete and the patient moved all muscles over the knees and controlled his sphincters. Three years later he began to walk with crutches, there was plantar flexion, and the GMFM-88 score was 78.48%. In summary, GH plus rehabilitation may be useful for innervating distal areas below the level of the incomplete spinal cord in CRS. It is likely that GH acted on the ependymal SC NSCs, as the hormone does in the neurogenic niches of the brain, and rehabilitation helped to achieve practically full functionality.

  1. Electric circuits problem solver

    CERN Document Server

    REA, Editors of

    2012-01-01

    Each Problem Solver is an insightful and essential study and solution guide chock-full of clear, concise problem-solving gems. All your questions can be found in one convenient source from one of the most trusted names in reference solution guides. More useful, more practical, and more informative, these study aids are the best review books and textbook companions available. Nothing remotely as comprehensive or as helpful exists in their subject anywhere. Perfect for undergraduate and graduate studies.Here in this highly useful reference is the finest overview of electric circuits currently av

  2. Linear integrated circuits

    CERN Document Server

    Carr, Joseph

    1996-01-01

    The linear IC market is large and growing, as is the demand for well trained technicians and engineers who understand how these devices work and how to apply them. Linear Integrated Circuits provides in-depth coverage of the devices and their operation, but not at the expense of practical applications in which linear devices figure prominently. This book is written for a wide readership from FE and first degree students, to hobbyists and professionals.Chapter 1 offers a general introduction that will provide students with the foundations of linear IC technology. From chapter 2 onwa

  3. Optoelectronics circuits manual

    CERN Document Server

    Marston, R M

    1999-01-01

    This manual is a useful single-volume guide specifically aimed at the practical design engineer, technician, and experimenter, as well as the electronics student and amateur. It deals with the subject in an easy to read, down to earth, and non-mathematical yet comprehensive manner, explaining the basic principles and characteristics of the best known devices, and presenting the reader with many practical applications and over 200 circuits. Most of the ICs and other devices used are inexpensive and readily available types, with universally recognised type numbers.The second edition

  4. Nano integrated circuit process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Yung Sup

    2004-02-15

    This book contains nine chapters, which are introduction of manufacture of semiconductor chip, oxidation such as Dry-oxidation, wet oxidation, oxidation model and oxide film, diffusion like diffusion process, diffusion equation, diffusion coefficient and diffusion system, ion implantation, including ion distribution, channeling, multiimplantation and masking and its system, sputtering such as CVD and PVD, lithography, wet etch and dry etch, interconnection and flattening like metal-silicon connection, silicide, multiple layer metal process and flattening, an integrated circuit process, including MOSFET and CMOS.

  5. Photonic Integrated Circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krainak, Michael; Merritt, Scott

    2016-01-01

    Integrated photonics generally is the integration of multiple lithographically defined photonic and electronic components and devices (e.g. lasers, detectors, waveguides passive structures, modulators, electronic control and optical interconnects) on a single platform with nanometer-scale feature sizes. The development of photonic integrated circuits permits size, weight, power and cost reductions for spacecraft microprocessors, optical communication, processor buses, advanced data processing, and integrated optic science instrument optical systems, subsystems and components. This is particularly critical for small spacecraft platforms. We will give an overview of some NASA applications for integrated photonics.

  6. Electronic logic circuits

    CERN Document Server

    Gibson, J

    2013-01-01

    Most branches of organizing utilize digital electronic systems. This book introduces the design of such systems using basic logic elements as the components. The material is presented in a straightforward manner suitable for students of electronic engineering and computer science. The book is also of use to engineers in related disciplines who require a clear introduction to logic circuits. This third edition has been revised to encompass the most recent advances in technology as well as the latest trends in components and notation. It includes a wide coverage of application specific integrate

  7. Electronics circuits and systems

    CERN Document Server

    Bishop, Owen

    2011-01-01

    The material in Electronics - Circuits and Systems is a truly up-to-date textbook, with coverage carefully matched to the electronics units of the 2007 BTEC National Engineering and the latest AS and A Level specifications in Electronics from AQA, OCR and WJEC. The material has been organized with a logical learning progression, making it ideal for a wide range of pre-degree courses in electronics. The approach is student-centred and includes: numerous examples and activities; web research topics; Self Test features, highlighted key facts, formulae and definitions. Ea

  8. Electronics circuits and systems

    CERN Document Server

    Bishop, Owen

    2007-01-01

    The material in Electronics - Circuits and Systems is a truly up-to-date textbook, with coverage carefully matched to the electronics units of the 2007 BTEC National Engineering and the latest AS and A Level specifications in Electronics from AQA, OCR and WJEC. The material has been organized with a logical learning progression, making it ideal for a wide range of pre-degree courses in electronics. The approach is student-centred and includes: numerous examples and activities; web research topics; Self Test features, highlighted key facts, formulae and definitions. Each chapter ends with a set

  9. Sequential circuit design for radiation hardened multiple voltage integrated circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Lawrence T.; McIver, III, John K.

    2009-11-24

    The present invention includes a radiation hardened sequential circuit, such as a bistable circuit, flip-flop or other suitable design that presents substantial immunity to ionizing radiation while simultaneously maintaining a low operating voltage. In one embodiment, the circuit includes a plurality of logic elements that operate on relatively low voltage, and a master and slave latches each having storage elements that operate on a relatively high voltage.

  10. Fine structural study of the innervation of muscle spindles in the internal oblique muscle of the abdominal wall in the adult mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desaki, Junzo; Ezaki, Taichi; Nishida, Naoya

    2010-01-01

    We examined by electron microscopy the innervation of muscle spindles in the internal oblique muscle of the mouse abdominal wall. In the equatorial region, in addition to the sensory innervation on individual intrafusal muscle fibers, sensory cross terminals were often observed between nuclear chain fibers. In the area from the juxtaequatorial region to the polar region, nuclear bag fibers were supplied by trail and plate-type motor endings, while nuclear chain fibers were innervated by sensory endings, being probably secondary sensory endings. From these findings, it is clear that the innervation patterns differ between two types of intrafusal muscle fibers.

  11. Central projections of the sensory innervation of the rat middle meningeal artery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Y.; Broman, J.; Edvinsson, L.

    2008-01-01

    the central projections of sensory nerves that innervate cranial vessels, of which the middle meningeal artery (MMA) is the largest artery supplying the dura mater. In this study, cholera toxin subunit b (CTb) or wheat germ agglutinin-horseradish peroxidase conjugate (WGA-HRP) was applied on the adventitia...... in laminae III-V. These results indicate that sensory information from the MMA is transmitted through both trigeminal and cervical spinal nerve branches to a region in the central nervous system extending rostrally from the C3 dorsal horn to the interpolar part of the spinal trigeminal nucleus. Our data...

  12. Changes of the vasculature and innervation in the anterior segment of the RCS rat eye.

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, Christian Albrecht

    2011-12-01

    Investigating the anterior eye segment vasculature and innervation of dystrophic RCS rats, two major unique findings were observed: in the iris, young adult animals with retinal dystrophy showed an increase in substance P nerve fibres and a dilation of arterioles and capillaries. This finding continued during ageing. In the pars plana region, the surface covered by venules decreased continuously with age. In older animals, this decrease was parallelled by a local decrease of sympathetic TH-positive nerve fibres supplying these venules. For both conditions, no comparable data exists so far in the literature. They might point to a unique situation in the anterior eye segment of the dystrophic RCS rat.

  13. Distinct requirements for TrkB and TrkC signaling in target innervation by sensory neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Postigo, Antonio; Calella, Anna Maria; Fritzsch, Bernd; Knipper, Marlies; Katz, David; Eilers, Andreas; Schimmang, Thomas; Lewin, Gary R.; Klein, Rudiger; Minichiello, Liliana

    2002-01-01

    Signaling by brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) via the TrkB receptor, or by neurotrophin-3 (NT3) through the TrkC receptor support distinct populations of sensory neurons. The intracellular signaling pathways activated by Trk (tyrosine kinase) receptors, which in vivo promote neuronal survival and target innervation, are not well understood. Using mice with TrkB or TrkC receptors lacking the docking site for Shc adaptors (trkB(shc/shc) and trkC(shc/shc) mice), we show that TrkB and TrkC promote survival of sensory neurons mainly through Shc site-independent pathways, suggesting that these receptors use similar pathways to prevent apoptosis. In contrast, the regulation of target innervation appears different: in trkB(shc/shc) mice neurons lose target innervation, whereas in trkC(shc/shc) mice the surviving TrkC-dependent neurons maintain target innervation and function. Biochemical analysis indicates that phosphorylation at the Shc site positively regulates autophosphorylation of TrkB, but not of TrkC. Our findings show that although TrkB and TrkC signals mediating survival are largely similar, TrkB and TrkC signals required for maintenance of target innervation in vivo are regulated by distinct mechanisms.

  14. A comparison of the innervation characteristics of the lateral spinal ligaments between normal subjects and patients with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, H; Greidanus, N; Moreau, M; Mahood, J; Raso, V J; Russell, G; Bagnall, K

    1997-01-01

    Evidence is rapidly accumulating to suggest that general proprioceptive dysfunction might be a major contributing factor in the development of adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS). The innervation of appropriate ligaments which has been shown to be involved in proprioceptive feedback mechanisms, has also been suggested to play a part in this sensory dysfunction. Accordingly, this study compared the innervation characteristics of lateral spinal ligaments from patients with AIS to similar measurements from control subjects. Using an antibody to neurofilament protein, Ruffini corpuscles, small and large nerve bundles, and free nerve endings were identified and their numbers and distribution patterns compared. In the control group, the innervation was found to be symmetrical between left and right sides but was more concentrated in the ventral portion of each ligament. No apparent morphological defect of the innervation was found in the lateral spinal ligaments of the scoliosis patients but the innervation densities of Ruffini corpuscles, single nerve fibres and total neural elements were significantly lower (p<0.01) than those found in normal subjects. These results suggest a possible mechanism for the production of AIS and warrant further study.

  15. Sensory innervation of the dorsal longitudinal ligament and the meninges in the lumbar spine of the dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waber-Wenger, Barbara; Forterre, Franck; Kuehni-Boghenbor, Kathrin; Danuser, Renzo; Stein, Jens Volker; Stoffel, Michael Hubert

    2014-10-01

    Although intervertebral disc herniation is a well-known disease in dogs, pain management for this condition has remained a challenge. The goal of the present study is to address the lack of information regarding the innervation of anatomical structures within the canine vertebral canal. Immunolabeling was performed with antibodies against protein gene product 9.5, Tuj-1 (neuron-specific class III β-tubulin), calcitonin gene-related peptide, and neuropeptide Y in combination with the lectin from Lycopersicon esculentum as a marker for blood vessels. Staining was indicative of both sensory and sympathetic fibers. Innervation density was the highest in lateral areas, intermediate in dorsal areas, and the lowest in ventral areas. In the dorsal longitudinal ligament (DLL), the highest innervation density was observed in the lateral regions. Innervation was lower at mid-vertebral levels than at intervertebral levels. The presence of sensory and sympathetic fibers in the canine dura and DLL suggests that pain may originate from both these structures. Due to these regional differences in sensory innervation patterns, trauma to intervertebral DLL and lateral dura is expected to be particularly painful. The results ought to provide a better basis for the assessment of medicinal and surgical procedures.

  16. Comments on scaling effect of reciprocity in BRDF study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Hongrui; WANG Jindi

    2004-01-01

    Reciprocity principle is a common theory in electromagnetics and optics. It is also one of the general principles of the radiation transformation theory. However, in many remote sensing studies, this principle cannot be always supported by experimental data, especially when the scaling effect of the remote sensing image pixel is considered. The debate over the issue of whether the reciprocity principle can be used as a fundamental standard in evaluating the effectiveness of remote sensing observations has lasted for years. Using geometrical optics model, Li and Wan proved the existence of the scaling effect in applying the reciprocity principle to a remote sensing image pixel in 1998. In 2002, Snyder challenged Li's proof, and attempted to prove that reciprocity principle is universally valid without any scale limitation. In this paper, we will argue with Snyder's theory and point out that Snyder's theory had neglected an important condition used in Li's proof and, as a result, drawn the wrong conclusion. Here we will restate Li's condition in his demonstration and offer a further proof to verify that reciprocity principle cannot be applied unconditionally to the study of bi-directional reflectance distribution function (BRDF) of land surfaces in field or satellite remote sensing observation scale.

  17. 49 CFR 236.13 - Spring switch; selection of signal control circuits through circuit controller.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... circuits through circuit controller. 236.13 Section 236.13 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to...; selection of signal control circuits through circuit controller. The control circuits of signals governing... circuit controller, or through the contacts of relay repeating the position of such circuit...

  18. Quasi-Linear Circuit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, William; Bird, Ross; Eldred, Dennis; Zook, Jon; Knowles, Gareth

    2013-01-01

    This work involved developing spacequalifiable switch mode DC/DC power supplies that improve performance with fewer components, and result in elimination of digital components and reduction in magnetics. This design is for missions where systems may be operating under extreme conditions, especially at elevated temperature levels from 200 to 300 degC. Prior art for radiation-tolerant DC/DC converters has been accomplished utilizing classical magnetic-based switch mode converter topologies; however, this requires specific shielding and component de-rating to meet the high-reliability specifications. It requires complex measurement and feedback components, and will not enable automatic re-optimization for larger changes in voltage supply or electrical loading condition. The innovation is a switch mode DC/DC power supply that eliminates the need for processors and most magnetics. It can provide a well-regulated voltage supply with a gain of 1:100 step-up to 8:1 step down, tolerating an up to 30% fluctuation of the voltage supply parameters. The circuit incorporates a ceramic core transformer in a manner that enables it to provide a well-regulated voltage output without use of any processor components or magnetic transformers. The circuit adjusts its internal parameters to re-optimize its performance for changes in supply voltage, environmental conditions, or electrical loading at the output

  19. Automated Design of Quantum Circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Colin P.; Gray, Alexander G.

    2000-01-01

    In order to design a quantum circuit that performs a desired quantum computation, it is necessary to find a decomposition of the unitary matrix that represents that computation in terms of a sequence of quantum gate operations. To date, such designs have either been found by hand or by exhaustive enumeration of all possible circuit topologies. In this paper we propose an automated approach to quantum circuit design using search heuristics based on principles abstracted from evolutionary genetics, i.e. using a genetic programming algorithm adapted specially for this problem. We demonstrate the method on the task of discovering quantum circuit designs for quantum teleportation. We show that to find a given known circuit design (one which was hand-crafted by a human), the method considers roughly an order of magnitude fewer designs than naive enumeration. In addition, the method finds novel circuit designs superior to those previously known.

  20. Large-scale circuit simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Y. P.

    1982-12-01

    The simulation of VLSI (Very Large Scale Integration) circuits falls beyond the capabilities of conventional circuit simulators like SPICE. On the other hand, conventional logic simulators can only give the results of logic levels 1 and 0 with the attendent loss of detail in the waveforms. The aim of developing large-scale circuit simulation is to bridge the gap between conventional circuit simulation and logic simulation. This research is to investigate new approaches for fast and relatively accurate time-domain simulation of MOS (Metal Oxide Semiconductors), LSI (Large Scale Integration) and VLSI circuits. New techniques and new algorithms are studied in the following areas: (1) analysis sequencing (2) nonlinear iteration (3) modified Gauss-Seidel method (4) latency criteria and timestep control scheme. The developed methods have been implemented into a simulation program PREMOS which could be used as a design verification tool for MOS circuits.

  1. Integrated circuit cooled turbine blade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Ching-Pang; Jiang, Nan; Um, Jae Y.; Holloman, Harry; Koester, Steven

    2017-08-29

    A turbine rotor blade includes at least two integrated cooling circuits that are formed within the blade that include a leading edge circuit having a first cavity and a second cavity and a trailing edge circuit that includes at least a third cavity located aft of the second cavity. The trailing edge circuit flows aft with at least two substantially 180-degree turns at the tip end and the root end of the blade providing at least a penultimate cavity and a last cavity. The last cavity is located along a trailing edge of the blade. A tip axial cooling channel connects to the first cavity of the leading edge circuit and the penultimate cavity of the trailing edge circuit. At least one crossover hole connects the penultimate cavity to the last cavity substantially near the tip end of the blade.

  2. CMOS Nonlinear Signal Processing Circuits

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    The chapter describes various nonlinear signal processing CMOS circuits, including a high reliable WTA/LTA, simple MED cell, and low-voltage arbitrary order extractor. We focus the discussion on CMOS analog circuit design with reliable, programmable capability, and low voltage operation. It is a practical problem when the multiple identical cells are required to match and realized within a single chip using a conventional process. Thus, the design of high-reliable circuit is indeed needed. Th...

  3. Analog electronic neural network circuits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Graf, H.P.; Jackel, L.D. (AT and T Bell Labs., Holmdel, NJ (USA))

    1989-07-01

    The large interconnectivity and moderate precision required in neural network models present new opportunities for analog computing. This paper discusses analog circuits for a variety of problems such as pattern matching, optimization, and learning. Most of the circuits build so far are relatively small, exploratory designs. The most mature circuits are those for template matching. Chips performing this function are now being applied to pattern recognition problems.

  4. Investigation on the Reciprocity Principle with In-Situ Pumping Test in Confined Aquifer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yong-Lin; Lin, Hong-Ru; Huang, Shao-Yang; Yeh, Tian-Chyi J.; Wen, Jet-Chau

    2016-04-01

    In this study, the pumping test of reciprocity between wells is developed for 11 wells located on campus of NYUST. The reciprocity analysis is conducted with the heterogeneous hydraulic properties distributions of the site. The mathematical theory of reciprocity implies that choose one as stimulation point and the other as observed response point in two known points at the same random field. Repeat the above action, the response behavior should have the reciprocity between the two points. However, the lack of literature with the field experiment to prove that reciprocity principle. Therefore, this study is expected to investigate the reciprocity of drawdown with the pumping test which will have heterogeneous hydraulic properties distributions obtained by inverse process. In general, there are two ways to investigate the reciprocity of pumping tests of two wells. One way is to evaluate the drawdown reciprocity of two sequential wells. From the evaluation the reciprocity of the drawdown behavior during the sequential pumping wells, the reciprocity of the drawdown behavior is investigated. The other one is to estimate cross-correlation between the drawdown behavior of the sequential pumping wells and heterogeneous hydraulic properties distributions. The reciprocity of between the drawdown and the heterogeneous hydraulic properties distributions is therefore can be investigated. This study proved the reciprocity of drawdown with the sequential pumping test and heterogeneous hydraulic properties distributions obtained by inverse method. Meanwhile, we proved the reciprocity is existed during the pumping test in the confined aquifer. Keywords: Reciprocity, Cross-correlation, Confined aquifer, Stimulation, Response

  5. Transistor switching and sequential circuits

    CERN Document Server

    Sparkes, John J

    1969-01-01

    Transistor Switching and Sequential Circuits presents the basic ideas involved in the construction of computers, instrumentation, pulse communication systems, and automation. This book discusses the design procedure for sequential circuits. Organized into two parts encompassing eight chapters, this book begins with an overview of the ways on how to generate the types of waveforms needed in digital circuits, principally ramps, square waves, and delays. This text then considers the behavior of some simple circuits, including the inverter, the emitter follower, and the long-tailed pair. Other cha

  6. Unstable oscillators based hyperchaotic circuit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Murali, K.; Tamasevicius, A.; G. Mykolaitis, A.;

    1999-01-01

    A simple 4th order hyperchaotic circuit with unstable oscillators is described. The circuit contains two negative impedance converters, two inductors, two capacitors, a linear resistor and a diode. The Lyapunov exponents are presented to confirm hyperchaotic nature of the oscillations in the circ......A simple 4th order hyperchaotic circuit with unstable oscillators is described. The circuit contains two negative impedance converters, two inductors, two capacitors, a linear resistor and a diode. The Lyapunov exponents are presented to confirm hyperchaotic nature of the oscillations...

  7. EVOLUTION OF NEUROENDOCRINE CELL POPULATION AND PEPTIDERGIC INNERVATION, ASSESSED BY DISCRIMINANT ANALYSIS, DURING POSTNATAL DEVELOPMENT OF THE RAT PROSTATE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosario Rodríguez

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Serotonin immunoreactive neuroendocrine cells and peptidergic nerves (NPY and VIP could have a role in prostate growth and function. In the present study, rats grouped by stages of postnatal development (prepubertal, pubertal, young and aged adults were employed in order to ascertain whether age causes changes in the number of serotoninergic neuroendocrine cells and the length of NPY and VIP fibres. Discriminant analysis was performed in order to ascertain the classificatory power of stereologic variables (absolute and relative measurements of cell number and fibre length on age groups. The following conclusions were drawn: a discriminant analysis confirms the androgen-dependence of both neuroendocrine cells and NPYVIP innervation during the postnatal development of the rat prostate; b periglandular innervation has more relevance than interglandular innervation in classifying the rats in age groups; and c peptidergic nerves from ventral, ampullar and periductal regions were more age-dependent than nerves from the dorso-lateral region.

  8. [Innervation disturbances of the quadriceps muscle in chondropathia patellae. A critical appraisal of the current concept of chondropathia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weh, L; Eickhoff, W

    1983-01-01

    In a group of patients with typical histories of chondropathy, but in whom no other criteria of selection were applied, evidence of neurogenic damage in the quadriceps muscle was found. Innervational damage was also found regularly in the corresponding segments of the paravertebral musculature. Only in three cases, in which horn cell damage was suspected, were there no changes in the paravertebral musculature. There were abnormal structural or functional findings in the lumbar spine in all the patients. A disequilibrium between the median and lateral vastus groups, attributable to innervation, was postulated and subsequently confirmed by electromyography. The nature of chondropathia patellae as an insertion tendopathy is discussed, taking the lack of concomitance of chondropathy and chondromalacia into consideration as well as the findings in the group of patients examined. Phenomena associated with chondropathy which have hitherto incongruous may be explained on the basis of an asymmetrical innervation disturbance.

  9. Oral sensation and function: a comparison of patients with innervated radial forearm free flap reconstruction to healthy matched controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loewen, Irene J; Boliek, Carol A; Harris, Jeffrey; Seikaly, Hadi; Rieger, Jana M

    2010-01-01

    Limited evidence exists for the use of innervated radial forearm free flap (RFFF) reconstruction of hemiglossectomy defects. This study reports on sensation, mastication, and speech outcomes for patients with innervated RFFF reconstruction of the anterior two-thirds of the tongue. Sensation, mastication, and speech intelligibility were assessed in 8 patients and age- and sex-matched controls. Sensation of intact tongue tissue after reconstruction of the hemitongue did not differ from controls. Although some sensory ability was restored to patients' reconstructed tongue, differences existed between the patient group and controls. However, whole mouth sensations resulted in similar sensory ability as controls. Whereas patients demonstrated adequate masticatory and speech ability, differences existed between patients and controls. Although some sensory ability is preserved in patients who have had tongue reconstruction with an innervated RFFF, functional outcomes such as masticatory ability and speech intelligibility may be affected in some patients.

  10. Radionuclide imaging of cardiac sympathetic innervation in heart failure: unlocking untapped potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Shuchita; Amanullah, Aman

    2015-03-01

    Heart failure (HF) is associated with sympathetic overactivity, which contributes to disease progression and arrhythmia development. Cardiac sympathetic innervation imaging can be performed using radiotracers that are taken up in the presynaptic nerve terminal of sympathetic nerves. The commonly used radiotracers are (123)I-metaiodobenzylguanidine ((123)I-mIBG) for planar and single-photon emission computed tomography imaging, and (11)C-hydroxyephedrine for positron emission tomography imaging. Sympathetic innervation imaging has been used in assessing prognosis, response to treatment, risk of ventricular arrhythmias and sudden death and prediction of response to cardiac resynchronization therapy in patients with HF. Other potential applications of these techniques are in patients with chemotherapy-induced cardiomyopathy, predicting myocardial recovery in patients with left ventricular assist devices, and assessing reinnervation following cardiac transplantation. There is a lack of standardization with respect to technique of (123)I-mIBG imaging that needs to be overcome for the imaging modality to gain popularity in clinical practice.

  11. Antennular projections to the midbrain of the spiny lobster. II. Sensory innervation of the olfactory lobe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, M; Ache, B W

    1992-04-15

    The projection pattern of antennular sensory afferents in the olfactory lobe (OL) of the spiny lobster, Panulirus argus, was examined by backfilling axons in the antennular nerve (AN) with biocytin. Thin, presumptive olfactory afferents from the lateral division of the AN form a tract in the brain that diverges into a dense plexus that completely envelops the glomerular cortex of the OL. Most of the thin (diameter less than or equal to 0.3-1 microns) afferents project to single glomeruli. About 10% of the thin afferents, however, branch in the plexus and project to multiple glomeruli. A smaller number of medium-sized to thick (diameter 2-10 microns), presumably mechanosensory, afferents also innervate the OL and co-project to multiple glomeruli with the thin afferents. Afferents arborize profusely within the columnar glomeruli into very fine processes that penetrate to the base of the columns, but selectively terminate in either the cap/subcap region or in the innermost part of the base of the columns, often with conspicuous terminal boutons, forming two distinct regions of presumptive synaptic output. These results suggest that 1) The majority of the OL innervation is provided by olfactory sensilla (aesthetascs), but that other types of sensilla provide additional, likely mechanosensory, input to the OL. 2) The projection of olfactory afferents is not strictly uniglomerular. 3) The columnar organization of crustacean olfactory glomeruli is functionally significant and may provide an evolutionary correlate of the recently proposed subdivision of the vertebrate olfactory bulb into "functional columns."

  12. Innervation of the sinu-atrial node and neighbouring regions in two human embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orts Llorca, F; Domenech Mateu, J M; Puerta Fonolla, J

    1979-03-01

    In human embryos of 20 to 23 mm (36 to 40 days) it is possible to identify on the right side a nerve that we may call the sinusal, which originates by several roots from the nervus vagus dexter (Figs. 1A, B, D), descending through the right ventrolateral face of the primary trachea and right bronchus (Fig. 2, arrows). Beaded in appearance, it gives a fine anastomotic branch which, passing in front of the arteria pulmonalis dextra, passes to the left side (Figs. 2B, C, D; AN). At this level it gives the large branch for the nodus sinoatrialis which, penetrating through the wall of the superior vena cava, provides a rich innervation for the nodus sinoatrialis which is already in an advanced stage of differentiation (Fig. 3, 2; Cy, D, AN). Afterwards it gives fine branches which, following the atrial fold, are distributed throughout the posterior face of the atrium dextrum (Fig. 3). It increases in diameter and, passing through the angle formed by the right pulmonary veins with the atrium dextrum, reaches the intrapericardial portion of the inferior vena cava in the vicinity of its outlet from the atrium (Fig. 3, arrows). The whole innervation is parasympathetic at the stages studied.

  13. Abnormal innervation patterns in the anorectum of ETU-induced fetal rats with anorectal malformations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Weilin; Jia, Huimin; Zhang, Hailan; Chen, Qingjiang; Zhang, Tao; Bai, Yuzuo; Yuan, Zhengwei

    2011-05-16

    To investigate whether anorectal malformations (ARMs) were associated with a global neuromuscular maldevelopment of the lower gastrointestinal (GI) tract and anorectum, the distribution of neuronal markers protein gene product (PGP9.5), nitric oxide synthases (NOs), neuromuscular junction markers (synaptophysin, SYP), interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC) marker (c-kit) within the terminal rectum were analyzed by immunohistochemistry and Western blot in rat embryos with ethylenethiourea (ETU) induced ARMs. From Gestational day16 (Gd16) to Gd21, neural crest-derived cells (NCC) migrated from the proximal gut into the terminal colon, colonising it along its entire length, gradually proliferated and differentiated to innervate the distal gut. From Gd19 to Gd21, significant gross-morphological differences of the anorectum of normal (n=90) and ARMs (n=90) embryos were found. Different myenteric plexus (MPs) development of the anorectum suggested that ARMs were associated with a global abnormal innervation patterns in the anorectum in gestational course and might have some postoperative effect.

  14. Time course of myosin heavy chain transitions in neonatal rats: importance of innervation and thyroid state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, G. R.; McCue, S. A.; Zeng, M.; Baldwin, K. M.

    1999-01-01

    During the postnatal period, rat limb muscles adapt to weight bearing via the replacement of embryonic (Emb) and neonatal (Neo) myosin heavy chains (MHCs) by the adult isoforms. Our aim was to characterize this transition in terms of the six MHC isoforms expressed in skeletal muscle and to determine the importance of innervation and thyroid hormone status on the attainment of the adult MHC phenotype. Neonatal rats were made hypothyroid via propylthiouracil (PTU) injection. In normal and PTU subgroups, leg muscles were unilaterally denervated at 15 days of age. The MHC profiles of plantaris (PLN) and soleus (Sol) muscles were determined at 7, 14, 23, and 30 days postpartum. At day 7, the Sol MHC profile was 55% type I, 30% Emb, and 10% Neo; in the PLN, the pattern was 60% Neo and 25% Emb. By day 30 the Sol and PLN had essentially attained an adult MHC profile in the controls. PTU augmented slow MHC expression in the Sol, whereas in the PLN it markedly repressed IIb MHC by retaining neonatal MHC expression. Denervation blunted the upregulation of IIb in the PLN and of Type I in the Sol and shifted the pattern to greater expression of IIa and IIx MHCs in both muscles. In contrast to previous observations, these findings collectively suggest that both an intact thyroid and innervation state are obligatory for the attainment of the adult MHC phenotype, particularly in fast-twitch muscles.

  15. Macrophages associated with the intrinsic and extrinsic autonomic innervation of the rat gastrointestinal tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Robert J; Powley, Terry L

    2012-07-02

    Interactions between macrophages and the autonomic innervation of gastrointestinal (GI) tract smooth muscle have received little experimental attention. To better understand this relationship, immunohistochemistry was performed on GI whole mounts from rats at three ages. The phenotypes, morphologies, and distributions of gut macrophages are consistent with the cells performing extensive housekeeping functions in the smooth muscle layers. Specifically, a dense population of macrophages was located throughout the muscle wall where they were distributed among the muscle fibers and along the vasculature. Macrophages were also associated with ganglia and connectives of the myenteric plexus and with the sympathetic innervation. Additionally, these cells were in tight registration with the dendrites and axons of the myenteric neurons as well as the varicosities along the length of the sympathetic axons, suggestive of a contribution by the macrophages to the homeostasis of both synapses and contacts between the various elements of the enteric circuitry. Similarly, macrophages were involved in the presumed elimination of neuropathies as indicated by their association with dystrophic neurons and neurites which are located throughout the myenteric plexus and smooth muscle wall of aged rats. Importantly, the patterns of macrophage-neuron interactions in the gut paralleled the much more extensively characterized interactions of macrophages (i.e., microglia) and neurons in the CNS. The present observations in the PNS as well as extrapolations from homologous microglia in the CNS suggest that GI macrophages play significant roles in maintaining the nervous system of the gut in the face of wear and tear, disease, and aging.

  16. Developmental guidance of embryonic corneal innervation: roles of Semaphorin3A and Slit2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubilus, James K; Linsenmayer, Thomas F

    2010-08-01

    The cornea is one of the most densely innervated structures of the body. In the developing chicken embryo, nerves from the ophthalmic trigeminal ganglion (OTG) innervate the cornea in a series of spatially and temporally regulated events. However, little is known concerning the signals that regulate these events. Here we have examined the involvement of the axon guidance molecules Semaphorin3A and Slit2, and their respective receptors, Neuropilin-1 and Robo2. Expression analyses of early corneas suggest an involvement of both Semaphorin3A and Slit2 in preventing nerves from entering the corneal stroma until the proper time (i.e., they serve as negative regulators), and analyses of their receptors support this conclusion. At later stages of development the expression of Semaphorin3A is again consistent with its serving as a negative regulator-this time for nerves entering the corneal epithelium. However, expression analyses of Robo2 at this stage raised the possibility that Slit2 had switched from a negative regulator to a positive regulator. In support of such a switch, functional analyses-by addition of recombinant Slit2 protein or immunoneutralization with a Slit2 antibody-showed that at an early stage Slit2 negatively regulates the outgrowth of nerves from the OTG, whereas at the later stage it positively regulated the growth of nerves by increasing nerve branching within the corneal epithelium.

  17. A clinical case and anatomical study of the innervation supply of the vastus medialis muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozer, H; Tekdemir, I; Elhan, A; Turanli, S; Engebretsen, L

    2004-03-01

    The innervation supply to the vastus medialis (VM) muscle, a component of quadriceps femoris (QF), is provided by a branch of the femoral nerve (FN) running along the muscle. The course of the nerve from lumbar roots to the muscle has been described by many researchers. It is known to ride along the femoral vein, artery and saphenous nerve and enter the adductor canal (Hunter's canal), and then to divide into branches that supply vastus medialis and the knee joint. Femoral mononeuropathy is uncommon, and is usually due to compression in the spinal level. Hematoma in the psoas and iliacus muscles, drug abuse, lithotomy position and limb lengthening are the other associated reasons for a mononeuropathy of the femoral nerve. Isolated vastus lateralis (VL) atrophies have been reported by a few authors, suggesting that compression of the nerve and direct violation of the nerve with injections might be the reason for mononeuropathy. Isolated VM atrophy has not been previously reported. The purpose of the study was to identify the anatomical structures around the FN branch which innervates the VM muscle.

  18. Structure, innervation and response properties of integumentary sensory organs in crocodilians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leitch, Duncan B; Catania, Kenneth C

    2012-12-01

    Integumentary sensory organs (ISOs) are densely distributed on the jaws of crocodilians and on body scales of members of the families Crocodilidae and Gavialidae. We examined the distribution, anatomy, innervation and response properties of ISOs on the face and body of crocodilians and documented related behaviors for an alligatorid (Alligator mississippiensis) and a crocodylid (Crocodylus niloticus). Each of the ISOs (roughly 4000 in A. mississippiensis and 9000 in C. niloticus) was innervated by networks of afferents supplying multiple different mechanoreceptors. Electrophysiological recordings from the trigeminal ganglion and peripheral nerves were made to isolate single-unit receptive fields and to test possible osmoreceptive and electroreceptive functions. Multiple small (100 mm(2)) and higher thresholds (13.725 mN). Rapidly adapting, slowly adapting type I and slowly adapting type II responses were identified based on neuronal responses. Several rapidly adapting units responded maximally to vibrations at 20-35 Hz, consistent with reports of the ISOs' role in detecting prey-generated water surface ripples. Despite crocodilians' armored bodies, the ISOs imparted a mechanical sensitivity exceeding that of primate fingertips. We conclude that crocodilian ISOs have diverse functions, including detection of water movements, indicating when to bite based on direct contact of pursued prey, and fine tactile discrimination of items held in the jaws.

  19. Localization of the autonomic, somatic and sensory neurons innervating the cranial tibial muscle of the pig.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botti, Maddalena; Gazza, Ferdinando; Ragionieri, Luisa; Minelli, Luisa Bo; Panu, Rino

    2011-01-01

    The location of sympathetic, somatic and sensory neurons projecting to the cranial tibial muscle of the pig hindlimb was studied with the neuronal non-transynaptic tracer Fast Blue. Additionally, the number and the size of these neurons were determinated. The Fast blue, randomly applied to the cranial tibial muscle belly of 3 pigs, labelled sympathetic neurons in the ipsilateral L5-S3 and contralateral S1 sympathetic trunk ganglia and in the prevertebral caudal mesenteric ganglia of both sides. The somatic motoneurons were identified in the ipsilateral ventral horn of the S1 segment of spinal cord, while the sensory neurons were located in the ipsilateral L7-S1 spinal ganglia. The diameter of the multipolar sympathetic neurons oscillated between 26 and 46 microm in the sympathetic trunk ganglia and between 18 and 42 microm in the caudal mesenteric ganglia. The size of the multipolar spinal motoneurons oscillated between 33 and 102 microm. The size of the pseudounipolar sensory neurons oscillated between 23 and 67 microm. In all ganglia, the labelled neurons were localized at random and did not show a somatotopic distribution. Our results document a conspicuous autonomic innervation projecting to the "classic" skeletal cranial tibial muscle. Probably this innervation is destined to the muscle vessels.

  20. Reciprocal Feedback: Closing the Loop on Postactivity Surveys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Richard A

    2015-01-01

    Those who conduct feedback surveys, which follow almost every CME presentation and medical-school lecture, would do well to offer participants' reciprocal feedback. That is, the course director should provide each survey respondent, on request, a brief summary of the comments received from this survey and the extent to which the recommendations will lead to objective improvements in the future. Surveyors who provide respondents with reciprocal feedback can expect heightened credibility, more reliable feedback in the future, and an added incentive to effect significant change for the better. Feedback has not circled all the way back until we have provided a succinct summary of results to those who have offered us their comments and suggestions. Let us close the loop; let reciprocal feedback become the last word in CME surveys.