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  1. Melanocortin 1 receptor-signaling deficiency results in an articular cartilage phenotype and accelerates pathogenesis of surgically induced murine osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenz, Julia; Seebach, Elisabeth; Hackmayer, Gerit; Greth, Carina; Bauer, Richard J; Kleinschmidt, Kerstin; Bettenworth, Dominik; Böhm, Markus; Grifka, Joachim; Grässel, Susanne

    2014-01-01

    Proopiomelanocortin-derived peptides exert pleiotropic effects via binding to melanocortin receptors (MCR). MCR-subtypes have been detected in cartilage and bone and mediate an increasing number of effects in diathrodial joints. This study aims to determine the role of MC1-receptors (MC1) in joint physiology and pathogenesis of osteoarthritis (OA) using MC1-signaling deficient mice (Mc1re/e). OA was surgically induced in Mc1re/e and wild-type (WT) mice by transection of the medial meniscotibial ligament. Histomorphometry of Safranin O stained articular cartilage was performed with non-operated controls (11 weeks and 6 months) and 4/8 weeks past surgery. µCT-analysis for assessing epiphyseal bone architecture was performed as a longitudinal study at 4/8 weeks after OA-induction. Collagen II, ICAM-1 and MC1 expression was analysed by immunohistochemistry. Mc1re/e mice display less Safranin O and collagen II stained articular cartilage area compared to WT prior to OA-induction without signs of spontaneous cartilage surface erosion. This MC1-signaling deficiency related cartilage phenotype persisted in 6 month animals. At 4/8 weeks after OA-induction cartilage erosions were increased in Mc1re/e knees paralleled by weaker collagen II staining. Prior to OA-induction, Mc1re/e mice do not differ from WT with respect to bone parameters. During OA, Mc1re/e mice developed more osteophytes and had higher epiphyseal bone density and mass. Trabecular thickness was increased while concomitantly trabecular separation was decreased in Mc1re/e mice. Numbers of ICAM-positive chondrocytes were equal in non-operated 11 weeks Mc1re/e and WT whereas number of positive chondrocytes decreased during OA-progression. Unchallenged Mc1re/e mice display smaller articular cartilage covered area without OA-related surface erosions indicating that MC1-signaling is critical for proper cartilage matrix integrity and formation. When challenged with OA, Mc1re/e mice develop a more severe OA

  2. Hyperglucagonemia during insulin deficiency accelerates protein catabolism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nair, K.S.; Halliday, D.; Matthews, D.E.; Welle, S.L.

    1987-01-01

    Hyperglucagonemia coexists with insulin deficiency or insulin resistance in many conditions where urinary nitrogen excretion is increased, but the precise role of glucagon in these conditions is controversial. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of hyperglucagonemia on protein metabolism in insulin-deficient subjects. The authors used the stable isotope of an essential amino acid (L-[1- 13 C]leucine) as a tracer of in vivo protein metabolism. A combined deficiency of insulin and glucagon was induced by intravenous infusion of somatostatin. Hyperglucagonemia and hypoinsulinemia were induced by infusions of somatostatin and glucagon. When somatostatin alone was infused leucine flux increased, indicating a 6-17% increase in proteolysis. When somatostatin and glucagon were infused, leucine flux increased, indicating a 12-32% increase in proteolysis. The increase in leucine flux during the infusion of somatostatin and glucagon was higher than the increase during infusion of somatostatin alone. Somatostatin alone did not change leucine oxidation, whereas the somatostatin plus glucagon increased leucine oxidation 100%. They conclude that hyperglucagonemia accelerated proteolysis and leucine oxidation in insulin-deficient humans

  3. Type 1 diabetes promotes disruption of advanced atherosclerotic lesions in LDL receptor-deficient mice

    OpenAIRE

    Johansson, Fredrik; Kramer, Farah; Barnhart, Shelley; Kanter, Jenny E.; Vaisar, Tomas; Merrill, Rachel D.; Geng, Linda; Oka, Kazuhiro; Chan, Lawrence; Chait, Alan; Heinecke, Jay W.; Bornfeldt, Karin E.

    2008-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease, largely because of disruption of atherosclerotic lesions, accounts for the majority of deaths in people with type 1 diabetes. Recent mouse models have provided insights into the accelerated atherosclerotic lesion initiation in diabetes, but it is unknown whether diabetes directly worsens more clinically relevant advanced lesions. We therefore used an LDL receptor-deficient mouse model, in which type 1 diabetes can be induced at will, to investigate the effects of diabe...

  4. CRF1 receptor-deficiency increases cocaine reward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contarino, Angelo; Kitchener, Pierre; Vallée, Monique; Papaleo, Francesco; Piazza, Pier-Vincenzo

    2017-05-01

    Stimulant drugs produce reward but also activate stress-responsive systems. The corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) and the related hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis stress-responsive systems are activated by stimulant drugs. However, their role in stimulant drug-induced reward remains poorly understood. Herein, we report that CRF 1 receptor-deficient (CRF 1 -/-), but not wild-type, mice show conditioned place preference (CPP) responses to a relatively low cocaine dose (5 mg/kg, i.p.). Conversely, wild-type, but not CRF 1 -/-, mice display CPP responses to a relatively high cocaine dose (20 mg/kg, i.p.), indicating that CRF 1 receptor-deficiency alters the rewarding effects of cocaine. Acute pharmacological antagonism of the CRF 1 receptor by antalarmin also eliminates cocaine reward. Nevertheless, CRF 1 -/- mice display higher stereotypy responses to cocaine than wild-type mice. Despite the very low plasma corticosterone concentration, CRF 1 -/- mice show higher nuclear glucocorticoid receptor (GR) levels in the brain region of the hippocampus than wild-type mice. Full rescue of wild-type-like corticosterone and GR circadian rhythm and level in CRF 1 -/- mice by exogenous corticosterone does not affect CRF 1 receptor-dependent cocaine reward but induces stereotypy responses to cocaine. These results indicate a critical role for the CRF 1 receptor in cocaine reward, independently of the closely related HPA axis activity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Growth hormone receptor deficiency (Laron syndrome) in black ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Non-Caucasians with growth honnone receptor (GHR) deficiency/Lamn syndrome among the .... 4,3 cm (-2,4 SOS for bone age 8,5 years at age 12); the girl's height at age 7 years was 77,5 cm (-8,0 SOS, height ... of serum incubated with '25I-labelled human growth hormone and expressed as relative specific binding ...

  6. Melanocortin 1 Receptor Deficiency Promotes Atherosclerosis in Apolipoprotein E-/- Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinne, Petteri; Kadiri, James J; Velasco-Delgado, Mauricio; Nuutinen, Salla; Viitala, Miro; Hollmén, Maija; Rami, Martina; Savontaus, Eriika; Steffens, Sabine

    2018-02-01

    The MC1-R (melanocortin 1 receptor) is expressed by monocytes and macrophages where it mediates anti-inflammatory actions. MC1-R also protects against macrophage foam cell formation primarily by promoting cholesterol efflux through the ABCA1 (ATP-binding cassette transporter subfamily A member 1) and ABCG1 (ATP-binding cassette transporter subfamily G member 1). In this study, we aimed to investigate whether global deficiency in MC1-R signaling affects the development of atherosclerosis. Apoe -/- (apolipoprotein E deficient) mice were crossed with recessive yellow (Mc1r e/e ) mice carrying dysfunctional MC1-R and fed a high-fat diet to induce atherosclerosis. Apoe -/- Mc1r e/e mice developed significantly larger atherosclerotic lesions in the aortic sinus and in the whole aorta compared with Apoe -/- controls. In terms of plaque composition, MC1-R deficiency was associated with less collagen and smooth muscle cells and increased necrotic core, indicative of more vulnerable lesions. These changes were accompanied by reduced Abca1 and Abcg1 expression in the aorta. Furthermore, Apoe -/- Mc1r e/e mice showed a defect in bile acid metabolism that aggravated high-fat diet-induced hypercholesterolemia and hepatic lipid accumulation. Flow cytometric analysis of leukocyte profile revealed that dysfunctional MC1-R enhanced arterial accumulation of classical Ly6C high monocytes and macrophages, effects that were evident in mice fed a normal chow diet but not under high-fat diet conditions. In support of enhanced arterial recruitment of Ly6C high monocytes, these cells had increased expression of L-selectin and P-selectin glycoprotein ligand 1. The present study highlights the importance of MC1-R in the development of atherosclerosis. Deficiency in MC1-R signaling exacerbates atherosclerosis by disturbing cholesterol handling and by increasing arterial monocyte accumulation. © 2017 The Authors.

  7. Hematopoietic sphingosine 1-phosphate lyase deficiency decreases atherosclerotic lesion development in LDL-receptor deficient mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martine Bot

    Full Text Available AIMS: Altered sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P homeostasis and signaling is implicated in various inflammatory diseases including atherosclerosis. As S1P levels are tightly controlled by S1P lyase, we investigated the impact of hematopoietic S1P lyase (Sgpl1(-/- deficiency on leukocyte subsets relevant to atherosclerosis. METHODS AND RESULTS: LDL receptor deficient mice that were transplanted with Sgpl1(-/- bone marrow showed disrupted S1P gradients translating into lymphopenia and abrogated lymphocyte mitogenic and cytokine response as compared to controls. Remarkably however, Sgpl1(-/- chimeras displayed mild monocytosis, due to impeded stromal retention and myelopoiesis, and plasma cytokine and macrophage expression patterns, that were largely compatible with classical macrophage activation. Collectively these two phenotypic features of Sgpl1 deficiency culminated in diminished atherogenic response. CONCLUSIONS: Here we not only firmly establish the critical role of hematopoietic S1P lyase in controlling S1P levels and T cell trafficking in blood and lymphoid tissue, but also identify leukocyte Sgpl1 as critical factor in monocyte macrophage differentiation and function. Its, partly counterbalancing, pro- and anti-inflammatory activity spectrum imply that intervention in S1P lyase function in inflammatory disorders such as atherosclerosis should be considered with caution.

  8. Methamphetamine Increases Locomotion and Dopamine Transporter Activity in Dopamine D5 Receptor-Deficient Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Hayashizaki, Seiji; Hirai, Shinobu; Ito, Yumi; Honda, Yoshiko; Arime, Yosefu; Sora, Ichiro; Okado, Haruo; Kodama, Tohru; Takada, Masahiko

    2013-01-01

    Dopamine regulates the psychomotor stimulant activities of amphetamine-like substances in the brain. The effects of dopamine are mediated through five known dopamine receptor subtypes in mammals. The functional relevance of D5 dopamine receptors in the central nervous system is not well understood. To determine the functional relevance of D5 dopamine receptors, we created D5 dopamine receptor-deficient mice and then used these mice to assess the roles of D5 dopamine receptors in the behaviora...

  9. Idh2 deficiency accelerates renal dysfunction in aged mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Su Jeong; Cha, Hanvit; Lee, Seoyoon; Kim, Hyunjin; Ku, Hyeong Jun; Kim, Sung Hwan; Park, Jung Hyun; Lee, Jin Hyup; Park, Kwon Moo; Park, Jeen-Woo

    2017-11-04

    The free radical or oxidative stress theory of aging postulates that senescence is due to an accumulation of cellular oxidative damage, caused largely by reactive oxygen species (ROS) that are produced as by-products of normal metabolic processes in mitochondria. The oxidative stress may arise as a result of either increased ROS production or decreased ability to detoxify ROS. The availability of the mitochondrial NADPH pool is critical for the maintenance of the mitochondrial antioxidant system. The major enzyme responsible for generating mitochondrial NADPH is mitochondrial NADP + -dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH2). Depletion of IDH2 in mice (idh2 -/- ) shortens life span and accelerates the degeneration of multiple age-sensitive traits, such as hair grayness, skin pathology, and eye pathology. Among the various internal organs tested in this study, IDH2 depletion-induced acceleration of senescence was uniquely observed in the kidney. Renal function and structure were greatly deteriorated in 24-month-old idh2 -/- mice compared with wild-type. In addition, disruption of redox status, which promotes oxidative damage and apoptosis, was more pronounced in idh2 -/- mice. These data support a significant role for increased oxidative stress as a result of compromised mitochondrial antioxidant defenses in modulating life span in mice, and thus support the oxidative stress theory of aging. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Facial morphometry of Ecuadorian patients with growth hormone receptor deficiency/Laron syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaefer, G B; Rosenbloom, A L; Guevara-Aguirre, J; Campbell, E A; Ullrich, F; Patil, K; Frias, J L

    1994-01-01

    Facial morphometry using computerised image analysis was performed on patients with growth hormone receptor deficiency (Laron syndrome) from an inbred population of southern Ecuador. Morphometrics were compared for 49 patients, 70 unaffected relatives, and 14 unrelated persons. Patients with growth hormone receptor deficiency showed significant decreases in measures of vertical facial growth as compared to unaffected relatives and unrelated persons with short stature from other causes. This report validates and quantifies the clinical impression of foreshortened facies in growth hormone receptor deficiency. Images PMID:7815422

  11. Deficiency of leptin receptor in myeloid cells disrupts hypothalamic metabolic circuits and causes body weight increase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuanqing Gao

    2018-01-01

    Conclusions: Myeloid cell leptin receptor deficient mice partially replicate the db/db phenotype. Leptin signaling in hypothalamic microglia is important for microglial function and a correct formation of the hypothalamic neuronal circuit regulating metabolism.

  12. Increased vascular sympathetic modulation in mice with Mas receptor deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabello Casali, Karina; Ravizzoni Dartora, Daniela; Moura, Marina; Bertagnolli, Mariane; Bader, Michael; Haibara, Andrea; Alenina, Natalia; Irigoyen, Maria Claudia; Santos, Robson A

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2)/angiotensin (Ang)-(1–7)/Mas axis could modulate the heart rate (HR) and blood pressure variabilities (BPV) which are important predictors of cardiovascular risk and provide information about the autonomic modulation of the cardiovascular system. Therefore we investigated the effect of Mas deficiency on autonomic modulation in wild type and Mas-knockout (KO) mice. Methods: Blood pressure was recorded at high sample rate (4000 Hz). Stationary sequences of 200–250 beats were randomly chosen. Frequency domain analysis of HR and BPV was performed with an autoregressive algorithm on the pulse interval sequences and on respective systolic sequences. Results: The KO group presented an increase of systolic arterial pressure (SAP; 127.26±11.20 vs 135.07±6.98 mmHg), BPV (3.54±1.54 vs 5.87±2.12 mmHg2), and low-frequency component of systolic BPV (0.12±0.11 vs 0.47±0.34 mmHg2). Conclusions: The deletion of Mas receptor is associated with an increase of SAP and with an increased BPV, indicating alterations in autonomic control. Increase of sympathetic vascular modulation in absence of Mas evidences the important role of Ang-(1–7)/Mas on cardiovascular regulation. Moreover, the absence of significant changes in HR and HRV can indicate an adaptation of autonomic cardiac balance. Our results suggest that the Ang-(1–7)/Mas axis seems more important in autonomic modulation of arterial pressure than HR. PMID:27080540

  13. Soluble Transferrin Receptor - A Marker For Iron Deficiency; A Review

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Parameters for measuring iron deficiency have been established for decades and have served clinicians in the management of this nutritional disorder. The bone marrow still remains the gold standard in the final diagnosis of iron deficiency. However, researchers have been able to identify the dominating role of the ...

  14. Decreased autophosphorylation of EGF receptor in insulin-deficient diabetic rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okamoto, M.; Kahn, C.R.; Maron, R.; White, M.F.

    1988-01-01

    The authors have previously reported that despite an increase in receptor concentration, there is a decrease in autophosphorylation and tyrosine kinase activity of the insulin receptor in insulin-deficient diabetic rats. To determine if other tyrosine kinases might be altered, they have studied the epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor kinase in wheat germ agglutinin-purified, Triton X-100-solubilized liver membranes from streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic rats and the insulin-deficient BB rat. They find that autophosphorylation of EGF receptor is decreased in proportion to the severity of the diabetic state in STZ rats with a maximal decrease of 67%. A similar decrease in autophosphorylation was observed in diabetic BB rats that was partially normalized by insulin treatment. Separation of tryptic phosphopeptides by reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography revealed a decrease in labeling at all sites of autophosphorylation. A parallel decrease in EGF receptor phosphorylation was also found by immunoblotting with an antiphosphotyrosine antibody. EGF receptor concentration, determined by Scatchard analysis of 125 I-labeled EGF binding, was decreased by 39% in the STZ rat and 27% in the diabetic BB rat. Thus autophosphorylation of EGF receptor, like that of the insulin receptor, is decreased in insulin-deficient rat liver. In the case of EGF receptor, this is due in part to a decrease in receptor number and in part to a decrease in the specific activity of the kinase

  15. Toll-like receptor 2 or toll-like receptor 4 deficiency does not modify lupus in MRLlpr mice.

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    Simon J Freeley

    Full Text Available Systemic lupus erythematosus is an autoimmune disease with a high morbidity and nephritis is a common manifestation. Previous studies in murine lupus models have suggest a role for Toll-like receptor 2 and 4. We examined the role of these molecules in MRL lpr mice which is one of the most established and robust murine models. We compared disease parameters in Toll-like receptor 2 or Toll-like receptor 4 deficient mice with their littermate controls. We found no difference in the severity of glomerulonephritis as assessed by histology, serum creatinine and albuminuria when Toll-like receptor 2 or Toll-like receptor 4 deficient MRLlpr mice were compared with Toll-like receptor sufficient controls. We also found similar levels of anti-dsDNA and anti-ssDNA antibodies. These results show that Toll-like receptor 2 and Toll-like receptor 4 do not play a significant role in MRLlpr mice, and therefore they may not be important in human lupus.

  16. [The Relationship Study between Expressions of P2X5 Receptor and Deficiency-cold Syndrome/Deficiency-heat Syndrome at Various Ambient Temperatures].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Li-ping; Yu, Hong-jie; Huang, Rui; Li, Xin-min; Zhan, Xiang-hong; Hou, Jun-lin

    2015-05-01

    To detect the expression of the peripheral blood P2X5 receptor at various ambient temperatures, and to explore its relationship with deficiency-cold syndrome and deficiency-heat syndrome. Subjects were selected by questionnaire and expert diagnosis, and assigned to the normal control group, the deficiency-cold syndrome group, and the deficiency-heat syndrome group, 20 in each group. 5 mL venous blood was collected at room temperature (25 °C) and cold temperature (-4-5 °C) respectively. Then the expression of P2X5 receptor was relatively quantified by real-time fluorescence quantitative PCR, and compared at room temperature and cold temperature respectively. The expression of P2X5 receptor in deficiency-cold syndrome and deficiency-heat syndrome groups was lower than that in the normal control group at room temperature (P cold temperature in the deficiency-cold syndrome group than in the normal control group (P receptor showed no difference in all groups at two different temperatures (P > 0.05). The expression of P2X5 receptor was different in different syndrome groups at various ambient temperatures. Ambient temperatures had insignificant effect on the expression of P2X5 receptor of the population with the same syndrome.

  17. Hematopoietic Sphingosine 1-Phosphate Lyase Deficiency Decreases Atherosclerotic Lesion Development in LDL-Receptor Deficient Mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bot, Martine; Van Veldhoven, Paul P.; de Jager, Saskia C. A.; Johnson, Jason; Nijstad, Niels; Van Santbrink, Peter J.; Westra, Marijke M.; Van Der Hoeven, Gerd; Gijbels, Marion J.; Mueller-Tidow, Carsten; Varga, Georg; Tietge, Uwe J. F.; Kuiper, Johan; Van Berkel, Theo J. C.; Nofer, Jerzy-Roch; Bot, Ilze; Biessen, Erik A. L.

    2013-01-01

    Aims: Altered sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) homeostasis and signaling is implicated in various inflammatory diseases including atherosclerosis. As S1P levels are tightly controlled by S1P lyase, we investigated the impact of hematopoietic S1P lyase (Sgpl1(-/-)) deficiency on leukocyte subsets

  18. Hematopoietic Sphingosine 1-Phosphate Lyase Deficiency Decreases Atherosclerotic Lesion Development in LDL-Receptor Deficient Mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bot, M.; Veldhoven, van P.P.; Jager, de S.C.; Johnson, J.; Nijstad, N.; van, Santbrink P.J.; Westra, M.M.; Hoeven, van der G.; Gijbels, M.J.; Muller-Tidow, C.; Varga, G.; Tietge, U.J.; Kuiper, J.; Berkel, van T.J.; Nofer, J.R.; Bot, I.; Biessen, E.A.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Aims Altered sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) homeostasis and signaling is implicated in various inflammatory diseases including atherosclerosis. As S1P levels are tightly controlled by S1P lyase, we investigated the impact of hematopoietic S1P lyase (Sgpl1−/−) deficiency on leukocyte

  19. Hematopoietic sphingosine 1-phosphate lyase deficiency decreases atherosclerotic lesion development in LDL-receptor deficient mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bot, Martine; van Veldhoven, Paul P.; de Jager, Saskia C. A.; Johnson, Jason; Nijstad, Niels; van Santbrink, Peter J.; Westra, Marijke M.; van der Hoeven, Gerd; Gijbels, Marion J.; Müller-Tidow, Carsten; Varga, Georg; Tietge, Uwe J. F.; Kuiper, Johan; van Berkel, Theo J. C.; Nofer, Jerzy-Roch; Bot, Ilze; Biessen, Erik A. L.

    2013-01-01

    Altered sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) homeostasis and signaling is implicated in various inflammatory diseases including atherosclerosis. As S1P levels are tightly controlled by S1P lyase, we investigated the impact of hematopoietic S1P lyase (Sgpl1(-/-)) deficiency on leukocyte subsets relevant to

  20. Epithelial-microbial crosstalk in polymeric Ig receptor deficient mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reikvam, D.H.; Derrien, M.M.N.; Islam, R.; Erofeev, A.; Grcic, V.; Sandvik, A.; Gaustad, P.; Meza-Zepeda, L.A.; Jahnsen, F.L.; Smidt, H.; Johansen, F.E.

    2012-01-01

    Innate and adaptive mucosal defense mechanisms ensure a homeostatic relationship with the large and complex mutualistic gut microbiota. Dimeric IgA and pentameric IgM are transported across the intestinal epithelium via the epithelial polymeric Ig receptor (pIgR) and provide a significant portion of

  1. Physiological roles revealed by ghrelin and ghrelin receptor deficient mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghrelin is a hormone made in the stomach and known primarily for its growth hormone releasing and orexigenic properties. Nevertheless, ghrelin through its receptor, the GHS-R1a, has been shown to exert many roles including regulation of glucose homeostasis, memory & learning, food addiction and neur...

  2. Soluble transferrin receptor: a differentiating marker between iron deficiency anaemia and anaemia of chronic disorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saboor, M.; Moinuddin, A.; Naureen, A.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Iron deficiency anaemia and anaemia of chronic disorders are the two major causes of microcytic and hypochromic anaemia. Many times the diagnosis of these conditions becomes difficult through conventional laboratory tests. Determination of soluble transferrin receptors is a helpful laboratory test for the differential diagnosis of these conditions. The study was conducted to evaluate the role of soluble transferrin receptors in the differential diagnosis between iron deficiency anaemia and anaemia of chronic disorders. Methods: A total of 80 blood samples were evaluated, i.e., 20 samples from normal adult male, 20 samples from normal adult female, 20 samples from iron deficiency anaemia group and 20 samples from patients with anaemia of chronic disorders. Soluble transferrin receptors were determined by ELISA technique using Quantikine IVD kit (R and D Systems). Results: There was significant difference in the levels of sTfR in iron deficiency anaemia and anaemia of chronic disorders. Statistically non-significant difference was observed between the levels of sTfR in patients with anaemia of chronic disorders as compared to normal control group. Conclusion: The sTfR determination can be used as a reliable differentiating marker in the diagnosis of iron deficiency anaemia and anaemia of chronic disorders. (author)

  3. Deficiency of the GPR39 receptor is associated with obesity and altered adipocyte metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Pia Steen; Jin, Chunyu; Madsen, Andreas Nygaard

    2011-01-01

    , conceivably due to decreased energy expenditure and adipocyte lipolytic activity.-Petersen, P. S., Jin, C., Madsen, A. N., Rasmussen, M., Kuhre, R., L. Egerod, K. L., Nielsen, L. B., Schwartz. T. W., Holst, B. Deficiency of the GPR39 receptor is associated with obesity and altered adipocyte metabolism....

  4. An unusual case of iron deficiency anemia is associated with extremely low level of transferrin receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Shuangying; Li, Huihui; Sun, Xiaoyan; Li, Juan; Li, Kuanyu

    2015-01-01

    A case study of a female patient, diagnosed with iron deficiency anemia, was unresponsive to oral iron treatment and only partially responsive to parenteral iron therapy, a clinical profile resembling the iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia (IRIDA) disorder. However, the patient failed to exhibit microcytic phenotype, one of the IRIDA hallmarks. Biochemical assays revealed that serum iron, hepcidin, interluekin 6, and transferrin saturation were within the normal range of references or were comparable to her non-anemic offspring. Iron contents in serum and red blood cells and hemoglobin levels were measured, which confirmed the partial improvement of anemia after parenteral iron therapy. Strikingly, serum transferrin receptor in patient was almost undetectable, reflecting the very low activity of bone-marrow erythropoiesis. Our data demonstrate that this is not a case of systemic iron deficiency, but rather cellular iron deficit due to the low level of transferrin receptor, particularly in erythroid tissue.

  5. Fcγ receptor deficiency attenuates diabetic nephropathy

    OpenAIRE

    López-Parra, Virginia; Mallavia, Beñat; López-Franco, Óscar; Ortiz-Muñoz, Guadalupe; Oguiza, Ainhoa; Recio, Carlota; Blanco, Julia A Parra; Nimmerjahn, F.; Egido de los Rios, J.; Gómez-Guerrero, Carmen

    2012-01-01

    Among patients with diabetes, increased production of immunoglobulins against proteins modified by diabetes is associated with proteinuria and cardiovascular risk, suggesting that immune mechanisms may contribute to the development of diabetes complications, such as nephropathy. We investigated the contribution of IgG Fcg receptors to diabetic renal injury in hyperglycemic, hypercholesterolemic mice. Weused streptozotocin to induce diabetes in apolipoprotein E–deficientmice and in...

  6. Vitamin D receptor deficiency impairs inner ear development in zebrafish

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwon, Hye-Joo

    2016-01-01

    The biological actions of vitamin D are largely mediated through binding to the vitamin D receptor (VDR), a member of the nuclear hormone receptor family, which regulates gene expression in a wide variety of tissues and cells. Mutations in VDR gene have been implicated in ear disorders (hearing loss and balance disorder) but the mechanisms are not well established. In this study, to investigate the role of VDR in inner ear development, morpholino-mediated gene knockdown approaches were used in zebrafish model system. Two paralogs for VDR, vdra and vdrb, have been identified in zebrafish. Knockdown of vdra had no effect on ear development, whereas knockdown of vdrb displayed morphological ear defects including smaller otic vesicles with malformed semicircular canals and abnormal otoliths. Loss-of-vdrb resulted in down-regulation of pre-otic markers, pax8 and pax2a, indicating impairment of otic induction. Furthermore, zebrafish embryos lacking vdrb produced fewer sensory hair cells in the ears and showed disruption of balance and motor coordination. These data reveal that VDR signaling plays an important role in ear development. - Highlights: • VDR signaling is involved in ear development. • Knockdown of vdrb causes inner ear malformations during embryogenesis. • Knockdown of vdrb affects otic placode induction. • Knockdown of vdrb reduces the number of sensory hair cells in the inner ear. • Knockdown of vdrb disrupts balance and motor coordination.

  7. Vitamin C Deficiency Reduces Muscarinic Receptor Coronary Artery Vasoconstriction and Plasma Tetrahydrobiopterin Concentration in Guinea Pigs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gry Freja Skovsted

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Vitamin C (vitC deficiency is associated with increased cardiovascular disease risk, but its specific interplay with arteriolar function is unclear. This study investigates the effect of vitC deficiency in guinea pigs on plasma biopterin status and the vasomotor responses in coronary arteries exposed to vasoconstrictor/-dilator agents. Dunkin Hartley female guinea pigs (n = 32 were randomized to high (1500 mg/kg diet or low (0 to 50 mg/kg diet vitC for 10–12 weeks. At euthanasia, coronary artery segments were dissected and mounted in a wire-myograph. Vasomotor responses to potassium, carbachol, sodium nitroprusside (SNP, U46619, sarafotoxin 6c (S6c and endothelin-1 (ET-1 were recorded. Plasma vitC and tetrahydrobiopterin were measured by HPLC. Plasma vitC status reflected the diets with deficient animals displaying reduced tetrahydrobiopterin. Vasoconstrictor responses to carbachol were significantly decreased in vitC deficient coronary arteries independent of their general vasoconstrictor/vasodilator capacity (p < 0.001. Moreover, in vitC deficient animals, carbachol-induced vasodilator responses correlated with coronary artery diameter (p < 0.001. Inhibition of cyclooxygenases with indomethacin increased carbachol-induced vasoconstriction, suggesting an augmented carbachol-induced release of vasodilator prostanoids. Atropine abolished carbachol-induced vasomotion, supporting a specific muscarinic receptor effect. Arterial responses to SNP, potassium, S6c, U46619 and ET-1 were unaffected by vitC status. The study shows that vitC deficiency decreases tetrahydrobiopterin concentrations and muscarinic receptor mediated contraction in coronary arteries. This attenuated vasoconstrictor response may be linked to altered production of vasoactive arachidonic acid metabolites and reduced muscarinic receptor expression/signaling.

  8. Deficiency in DNA damage response of enterocytes accelerates intestinal stem cell aging in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Joung-Sun; Jeon, Ho-Jun; Pyo, Jung-Hoon; Kim, Young-Shin; Yoo, Mi-Ae

    2018-03-07

    Stem cell dysfunction is closely linked to tissue and organismal aging and age-related diseases, and heavily influenced by the niche cells' environment. The DNA damage response (DDR) is a key pathway for tissue degeneration and organismal aging; however, the precise protective role of DDR in stem cell/niche aging is unclear. The Drosophila midgut is an excellent model to study the biology of stem cell/niche aging because of its easy genetic manipulation and its short lifespan. Here, we showed that deficiency of DDR in Drosophila enterocytes (ECs) accelerates intestinal stem cell (ISC) aging. We generated flies with knockdown of Mre11 , Rad50 , Nbs1 , ATM , ATR , Chk1 , and Chk2 , which decrease the DDR system in ECs. EC-specific DDR depletion induced EC death, accelerated the aging of ISCs, as evidenced by ISC hyperproliferation, DNA damage accumulation, and increased centrosome amplification, and affected the adult fly's survival. Our data indicated a distinct effect of DDR depletion in stem or niche cells on tissue-resident stem cell proliferation. Our findings provide evidence of the essential role of DDR in protecting EC against ISC aging, thus providing a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms of stem cell/niche aging.

  9. Genomic and epigenetic evidence for oxytocin receptor deficiency in autism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Worley Gordon

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Autism comprises a spectrum of behavioral and cognitive disturbances of childhood development and is known to be highly heritable. Although numerous approaches have been used to identify genes implicated in the development of autism, less than 10% of autism cases have been attributed to single gene disorders. Methods We describe the use of high-resolution genome-wide tilepath microarrays and comparative genomic hybridization to identify copy number variants within 119 probands from multiplex autism families. We next carried out DNA methylation analysis by bisulfite sequencing in a proband and his family, expanding this analysis to methylation analysis of peripheral blood and temporal cortex DNA of autism cases and matched controls from independent datasets. We also assessed oxytocin receptor (OXTR gene expression within the temporal cortex tissue by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR. Results Our analysis revealed a genomic deletion containing the oxytocin receptor gene, OXTR (MIM accession no.: 167055, previously implicated in autism, was present in an autism proband and his mother who exhibits symptoms of obsessive-compulsive disorder. The proband's affected sibling did not harbor this deletion but instead may exhibit epigenetic misregulation of this gene through aberrant gene silencing by DNA methylation. Further DNA methylation analysis of the CpG island known to regulate OXTR expression identified several CpG dinucleotides that show independent statistically significant increases in the DNA methylation status in the peripheral blood cells and temporal cortex in independent datasets of individuals with autism as compared to control samples. Associated with the increase in methylation of these CpG dinucleotides is our finding that OXTR mRNA showed decreased expression in the temporal cortex tissue of autism cases matched for age and sex compared to controls. Conclusion Together, these data provide

  10. Urethral dysfunction in female mice with estrogen receptor β deficiency.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yung-Hsiang Chen

    Full Text Available Estrogen has various regulatory functions in the growth, development, and differentiation of the female urogenital system. This study investigated the roles of ERβ in stress urinary incontinence (SUI. Wild-type (ERβ(+/+ and knockout (ERβ(-/- female mice were generated (aged 6-8 weeks, n = 6 and urethral function and protein expression were measured. Leak point pressures (LPP and maximum urethral closure pressure (MUCP were assessed in mice under urethane anesthesia. After the measurements, the urethras were removed for proteomic analysis using label-free quantitative proteomics by nano-liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS analysis. The interaction between these proteins was further analysed using MetaCore. Lastly, Western blot was used to confirm the candidate proteins. Compared with the ERβ(+/+ group, the LPP and MUCP values of the ERβ(-/- group were significantly decreased. Additionally, we identified 85 differentially expressed proteins in the urethra of ERβ(-/- female mice; 57 proteins were up-regulated and 28 were down-regulated. The majority of the ERβ knockout-modified proteins were involved in cell-matrix adhesion, metabolism, immune response, signal transduction, nuclear receptor translational regelation, and muscle contraction and development. Western blot confirmed the up-regulation of myosin and collagen in urethra. By contrast, elastin was down-regulated in the ERβ(-/- mice. This study is the first study to estimate protein expression changes in urethras from ERβ(-/- female mice. These changes could be related to the molecular mechanism of ERβ in SUI.

  11. CD1d deficiency inhibits the development of abdominal aortic aneurysms in LDL receptor deficient mice.

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    Gijs H M van Puijvelde

    Full Text Available An abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA is a dilatation of the abdominal aorta leading to serious complications and mostly to death. AAA development is associated with an accumulation of inflammatory cells in the aorta including NKT cells. An important factor in promoting the recruitment of these inflammatory cells into tissues and thereby contributing to the development of AAA is angiotensin II (Ang II. We demonstrate that a deficiency in CD1d dependent NKT cells under hyperlipidemic conditions (LDLr-/-CD1d-/- mice results in a strong decline in the severity of angiotensin II induced aneurysm formation when compared with LDLr-/- mice. In addition, we show that Ang II amplifies the activation of NKT cells both in vivo and in vitro. We also provide evidence that type I NKT cells contribute to AAA development by inducing the expression of matrix degrading enzymes in vSMCs and macrophages, and by cytokine dependently decreasing vSMC viability. Altogether, these data prove that CD1d-dependent NKT cells contribute to AAA development in the Ang II-mediated aneurysm model by enhancing aortic degradation, establishing that therapeutic applications which target NKT cells can be a successful way to prevent AAA development.

  12. Vitamin C deficiency reduces muscarinic receptor coronary artery vasoconstriction and plasma tetrahydrobiopterin concentration in guinea pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skovsted, Gry Freja; Tveden-Nyborg, Pernille; Lindblad, Maiken Marie

    2017-01-01

    Vitamin C (vitC) deficiency is associated with increased cardiovascular disease risk, but its specific interplay with arteriolar function is unclear. This study investigates the effect of vitC deficiency in guinea pigs on plasma biopterin status and the vasomotor responses in coronary arteries...... exposed to vasoconstrictor/-dilator agents. Dunkin Hartley female guinea pigs (n = 32) were randomized to high (1500 mg/kg diet) or low (0 to 50 mg/kg diet) vitC for 10-12 weeks. At euthanasia, coronary artery segments were dissected and mounted in a wire-myograph. Vasomotor responses to potassium......-1 were unaffected by vitC status. The study shows that vitC deficiency decreases tetrahydrobiopterin concentrations and muscarinic receptor mediated contraction in coronary arteries. This attenuated vasoconstrictor response may be linked to altered production of vasoactive arachidonic acid...

  13. Early childhood BMI trajectories in monogenic obesity due to leptin, leptin receptor, and melanocortin 4 receptor deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohlsdorf, Katja; Nunziata, Adriana; Funcke, Jan-Bernd; Brandt, Stephanie; von Schnurbein, Julia; Vollbach, Heike; Lennerz, Belinda; Fritsch, Maria; Greber-Platzer, Susanne; Fröhlich-Reiterer, Elke; Luedeke, Manuel; Borck, Guntram; Debatin, Klaus-Michael; Fischer-Posovszky, Pamela; Wabitsch, Martin

    2018-02-27

    To evaluate whether early childhood body mass index (BMI) is an appropriate indicator for monogenic obesity. A cohort of n = 21 children living in Germany or Austria with monogenic obesity due to congenital leptin deficiency (group LEP, n = 6), leptin receptor deficiency (group LEPR, n = 6) and primarily heterozygous MC4 receptor deficiency (group MC4R, n = 9) was analyzed. A control group (CTRL) was defined that consisted of n = 22 obese adolescents with no mutation in the above mentioned genes. Early childhood (0-5 years) BMI trajectories were compared between the groups at selected time points. The LEP and LEPR group showed a tremendous increase in BMI during the first 2 years of life with all patients displaying a BMI >27 kg/m 2 (27.2-38.4 kg/m 2 ) and %BMI P95 (percentage of the 95th percentile BMI for age and sex) >140% (144.8-198.6%) at the age of 2 years and a BMI > 33 kg/m 2 (33.3-45.9 kg/m 2 ) and %BMI P95  > 184% (184.1-212.6%) at the age of 5 years. The MC4R and CTRL groups had a later onset of obesity with significantly lower BMI values at both time points (p BMI trajectories in this pediatric cohort with monogenic obesity we suggest that BMI values >27.0 kg/m 2 or %BMI P95  > 140% at the age of 2 years and BMI values >33.0 kg/m 2 or %BMI P95  > 184% at the age of 5 years may be useful cut points to identify children who should undergo genetic screening for monogenic obesity due to functionally relevant mutations in the leptin gene or leptin receptor gene.

  14. [Learning and Memory Capacity and NMDA Receptor Expression in Shen Deficiency Constitution Rats].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yu-ru; Sun, Yao-guang; Zhang, Qi; Wang, Xiao-di; Wang, Xing; Sun, Li-jun

    2016-05-01

    To explore material bases and neurobiological mechanisms of "Shen storing will" by observing learning and memory capacities and N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA) receptor expressions in Shen deficiency constitution (SDC) rats. Totally 40 SD rats were randomly divided into the model group, the Zuogui Pill (ZP) group, the Yougui Pill (YP) group, the blank control group (consisting of normal pregnant rats), 10 in each group. SDC young rat model (inherent deficiency and postnatal malnutrition) was prepared by the classic way of "cat scaring rat". Medication started when they were scared by cat. Rats in the ZP group and the YP group were administered by gastrogavage with ZP suspension 0.1875 g/mL and YP suspension 0.0938 g/mL respectively. Equal volume of normal saline was administered to rats in the blank control group and the model group by gastrogavage. All medication was given once per day, 5 days in a week for 2 consecutive months. Learning and memory capacities were detected by Morris water maze test. Expressions of NMDA receptor subunits NR2A and NR2B in hippocamus were detected by immunohistochemical method. Compared with the blank control group, the latency period, total distance in Morris water maze test were longer in the model group (P learning and memory capacities and lowered NMDA receptor expressions. ZP and YP could up-regulate learning and memory capacities and NMDA receptor expressions, thereby improving deterioration of brain functions in SDC rats.

  15. Muscarinic supersensitivity and impaired receptor desensitization in G protein-coupled receptor kinase 5-deficient mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gainetdinov, R R; Bohn, L M; Walker, J K; Laporte, S A; Macrae, A D; Caron, M G; Lefkowitz, R J; Premont, R T

    1999-12-01

    G protein-coupled receptor kinase 5 (GRK5) is a member of a family of enzymes that phosphorylate activated G protein-coupled receptors (GPCR). To address the physiological importance of GRK5-mediated regulation of GPCRs, mice bearing targeted deletion of the GRK5 gene (GRK5-KO) were generated. GRK5-KO mice exhibited mild spontaneous hypothermia as well as pronounced behavioral supersensitivity upon challenge with the nonselective muscarinic agonist oxotremorine. Classical cholinergic responses such as hypothermia, hypoactivity, tremor, and salivation were enhanced in GRK5-KO animals. The antinociceptive effect of oxotremorine was also potentiated and prolonged. Muscarinic receptors in brains from GRK5-KO mice resisted oxotremorine-induced desensitization, as assessed by oxotremorine-stimulated [5S]GTPgammaS binding. These data demonstrate that elimination of GRK5 results in cholinergic supersensitivity and impaired muscarinic receptor desensitization and suggest that a deficit of GPCR desensitization may be an underlying cause of behavioral supersensitivity.

  16. Priming of microglia in a DNA-repair deficient model of accelerated aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raj, Divya D A; Jaarsma, Dick; Holtman, Inge R; Olah, Marta; Ferreira, Filipa M; Schaafsma, Wandert; Brouwer, Nieske; Meijer, Michel M; de Waard, Monique C; van der Pluijm, Ingrid; Brandt, Renata; Kreft, Karim L; Laman, Jon D; de Haan, Gerald; Biber, Knut P H; Hoeijmakers, Jan H J; Eggen, Bart J L; Boddeke, Hendrikus W G M

    2014-09-01

    Aging is associated with reduced function, degenerative changes, and increased neuroinflammation of the central nervous system (CNS). Increasing evidence suggests that changes in microglia cells contribute to the age-related deterioration of the CNS. The most prominent age-related change of microglia is enhanced sensitivity to inflammatory stimuli, referred to as priming. It is unclear if priming is due to intrinsic microglia ageing or induced by the ageing neural environment. We have studied this in Ercc1 mutant mice, a DNA repair-deficient mouse model that displays features of accelerated aging in multiple tissues including the CNS. In Ercc1 mutant mice, microglia showed hallmark features of priming such as an exaggerated response to peripheral lipopolysaccharide exposure in terms of cytokine expression and phagocytosis. Specific targeting of the Ercc1 deletion to forebrain neurons resulted in a progressive priming response in microglia exemplified by phenotypic alterations. Summarizing, these data show that neuronal genotoxic stress is sufficient to switch microglia from a resting to a primed state. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Decay-accelerating factor 1 deficiency exacerbates Trypanosoma cruzi-induced murine chronic myositis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solana, María E; Ferrer, María F; Novoa, María Mercedes; Song, Wen-Chao; Gómez, Ricardo M

    2012-10-01

    Murine infection with Trypanosoma cruzi (Tc) has been used to study the role of T-cells in the pathogenesis of human inflammatory idiopathic myositis. Absence of decay-accelerating factor 1 (Daf1) has been shown to enhance murine T-cell responses and autoimmunity. To determine whether Daf1 deficiency can exacerbate Tc-induced myositis, C57BL/6 DAF(+/+) and DAF(-/-) mice were inoculated with 5 × 10(4) trypomastigotes, and their morbidity, parasitemia, parasite burden, histopathology, and T-cell expansion were studied in the acute and chronic stages. DAF(-/-) mice had lower parasitemia and parasite burden but higher morbidity, muscle histopathology, and increased number of CD44(+) (activated/memory phenotype) splenic CD4(+) and CD8(+) T-cells. An enhanced CD8(+) T-cell immune-specific response may explain the lower parasitemia and parasite burden levels and the increase in histopathological lesions. We propose that Tc-inoculated DAF(-/-) mice are a useful model to study T-cell mediated immunity in skeletal muscle tissues. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Deficiency of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors p21Cip1 and p27Kip1 accelerates atherogenesis in apolipoprotein E-deficient mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akyuerek, Levent M.; Boehm, Manfred; Olive, Michelle; Zhou, Alex-Xianghua; San, Hong; Nabel, Elizabeth G.

    2010-01-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors, p21 Cip1 and p27 Kip1 , are upregulated during vascular cell proliferation and negatively regulate growth of vascular cells. We hypothesized that absence of either p21 Cip1 or p27 Kip1 in apolipoprotein E (apoE)-deficiency may increase atherosclerotic plaque formation. Compared to apoE -/- aortae, both apoE -/- /p21 -/- and apoE -/- /p27 -/- aortae exhibited significantly more atherosclerotic plaque following a high-cholesterol regimen. This increase was particularly observed in the abdominal aortic regions. Deficiency of p27 Kip1 accelerated plaque formation significantly more than p21 -/- in apoE -/- mice. This increased plaque formation was in parallel with increased intima/media area ratios. Deficiency of p21 Cip1 and p27 Kip1 accelerates atherogenesis in apoE -/- mice. These findings have significant implications for our understanding of the molecular basis of atherosclerosis associated with excessive proliferation of vascular cells.

  19. The role of CCK2 receptors in energy homeostasis: insights from the CCK2 receptor-deficient mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiland, Tracey J; Voudouris, Nicholas J; Kent, Stephen

    2004-09-15

    The present study explored the contribution of type 2 cholecystokinin (CCK) receptors in energy regulation. A total of 78 CCK2 receptor-deficient mice and 80 wild-type controls were acclimated to a 12:12 light-dark cycle at 30 +/- 1 degrees C. Using a computer-monitored biotelemetry system, circadian patterns of body temperature, food intake, and activity were monitored for 4 days. Body weight and water consumption were manually recorded during this period. Results indicate that CCK2 receptor invalidation produces elevated body temperature during both the photophase and scotophase (by 0.38 and 0.12 degrees C, respectively), increased body weight (29.3 +/- 0.2 vs. 26.8 +/- 0.2 g) and water consumption (4.1 +/- 0.1 vs. 3.2 +/- 0.1 ml), and decreased scotophase locomotor activity (WT: 7.0 +/- 0.2 vs. KO: 6.1 +/- 0.2 counts/min). These findings suggest an important role for CCK2 receptors in processes underlying energy regulation during basal and possibly pathological states.

  20. Interleukin-33 Receptor (ST2 Deficiency Improves the Outcome of Staphylococcus aureus-Induced Septic Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larissa Staurengo-Ferrari

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available The ST2 receptor is a member of the Toll/IL-1R superfamily and interleukin-33 (IL-33 is its agonist. Recently, it has been demonstrated that IL-33/ST2 axis plays key roles in inflammation and immune mediated diseases. Here, we investigated the effect of ST2 deficiency in Staphylococcus aureus-induced septic arthritis physiopathology. Synovial fluid samples from septic arthritis and osteoarthritis individuals were assessed regarding IL-33 and soluble (s ST2 levels. The IL-33 levels in samples from synovial fluid were significantly increased, whereas no sST2 levels were detected in patients with septic arthritis when compared with osteoarthritis individuals. The intra-articular injection of 1 × 107 colony-forming unity/10 μl of S. aureus American Type Culture Collection 6538 in wild-type (WT mice induced IL-33 and sST2 production with a profile resembling the observation in the synovial fluid of septic arthritis patients. Data using WT, and ST2 deficient (−/− and interferon-γ (IFN-γ−/− mice showed that ST2 deficiency shifts the immune balance toward a type 1 immune response that contributes to eliminating the infection due to enhanced microbicide effect via NO production by neutrophils and macrophages. In fact, the treatment of ST2−/− bone marrow-derived macrophage cells with anti-IFN-γ abrogates the beneficial phenotype in the absence of ST2, which confirms that ST2 deficiency leads to IFN-γ expression and boosts the bacterial killing activity of macrophages against S. aureus. In agreement, WT cells achieved similar immune response to ST2 deficiency by IFN-γ treatment. The present results unveil a previously unrecognized beneficial effect of ST2 deficiency in S. aureus-induced septic arthritis.

  1. Cell-surface acceleration of urokinase-catalyzed receptor cleavage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høyer-Hansen, G; Ploug, M; Behrendt, N

    1997-01-01

    by a prior incubation of the cells with uPA inactivated by diisopropyl fluorophosphate, demonstrating a requirement for specific receptor binding of the active uPA to obtain the high-efficiency cleavage of cell-bound uPAR. Furthermore, amino-terminal sequence analysis revealed that uPAR(2+3), purified from U...

  2. Resistance to diet-induced adiposity in cannabinoid receptor-1 deficient mice is not due to impaired adipocyte function

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oosterveer, Maaike H.; Koolman, Anniek H.; de Boer, Pieter T.; Bos, Trijnie; Bleeker, Aycha; Bloks, Vincent W.; Kuipers, Folkert; Sauer, Pieter J. J.; van Dijk, Gertjan

    2011-01-01

    Background: Overactivity and/or dysregulation of the endocannabinoid system (ECS) contribute to development of obesity. In vitro studies indicate a regulatory role for the cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1) in adipocyte function and CB1-receptor deficient (CB1-/-) mice are resistant to high fat

  3. Phencyclidine-induced social withdrawal results from deficient stimulation of cannabinoid CB₁ receptors: implications for schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seillier, Alexandre; Martinez, Alex A; Giuffrida, Andrea

    2013-08-01

    The neuronal mechanisms underlying social withdrawal, one of the core negative symptoms of schizophrenia, are not well understood. Recent studies suggest an involvement of the endocannabinoid system in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia and, in particular, of negative symptoms. We used biochemical, pharmacological, and behavioral approaches to investigate the role played by the endocannabinoid system in social withdrawal induced by sub-chronic administration of phencyclidine (PCP). Pharmacological enhancement of endocannabinoid levels via systemic administration of URB597, an inhibitor of endocannabinoid degradation, reversed social withdrawal in PCP-treated rats via stimulation of CB1 receptors, but reduced social interaction in control animals through activation of a cannabinoid/vanilloid-sensitive receptor. In addition, the potent CB agonist CP55,940 reversed PCP-induced social withdrawal in a CB₁-dependent manner, whereas pharmacological blockade of CB₁ receptors by either AM251 or SR141716 reduced the time spent in social interaction in control animals. PCP-induced social withdrawal was accompanied by a decrease of anandamide (AEA) levels in the amygdala and prefrontal cortex, and these deficits were reversed by URB597. As CB₁ receptors are predominantly expressed on GABAergic interneurons containing the anxiogenic peptide cholecystokinin (CCK), we also examined whether the PCP-induced social withdrawal resulted from deficient CB₁-mediated modulation of CCK transmission. The selective CCK2 antagonist LY225910 blocked both PCP- and AM251-induced social withdrawal, but not URB597 effect in control rats. Taken together, these findings indicate that AEA-mediated activation of CB₁ receptors is crucial for social interaction, and that PCP-induced social withdrawal results from deficient endocannabinoid transmission.

  4. Abalation of Ghrelin receptor in leptin-deficient mice has paradoxical effects on glucose homeostasis compared to Ghrelin-abalated Leptin-deficient mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghrelin is produced predominantly in stomach and is known to be the endogenous ligand of the growth hormone secretagogue receptor (GHSR). Ghrelin is a GH stimulator and an orexigenic hormone. In contrast, leptin is an anorexic hormone, and leptin-deficient ob/ob mice are obese and diabetic. To study...

  5. Erythroblast transferrin receptors and transferrin kinetics in iron deficiency and various anemias

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muta, K.; Nishimura, J.; Ideguchi, H.; Umemura, T.; Ibayashi, H.

    1987-01-01

    To clarify the role of transferrin receptors in cases of altered iron metabolism in clinical pathological conditions, we studied: number of binding sites; affinity; and recycling kinetics of transferrin receptors on human erythroblasts. Since transferrin receptors are mainly present on erythroblasts, the number of surface transferrin receptors was determined by assay of binding of 125 I-transferrin and the percentage of erythroblasts in bone marrow mononuclear cells. The number of binding sites on erythroblasts from patients with an iron deficiency anemia was significantly greater than in normal subjects. Among those with an aplastic anemia, hemolytic anemia, myelodysplastic syndrome, and polycythemia vera compared to normal subjects, there were no considerable differences in the numbers of binding sites. The dissociation constants (Kd) were measured using Scatchard analysis. The apparent Kd was unchanged (about 10 nmol/L) in patients and normal subjects. The kinetics of endocytosis and exocytosis of 125 I-transferrin, examined by acid treatment, revealed no variations in recycling kinetics among the patients and normal subjects. These data suggest that iron uptake is regulated by modulation of the number of surface transferrin receptors, thereby reflecting the iron demand of the erythroblast

  6. Development of occlusive neointimal lesions in distal pulmonary arteries of endothelin B receptor-deficient rats: a new model of severe pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivy, D Dunbar; McMurtry, Ivan F; Colvin, Kelley; Imamura, Masatoshi; Oka, Masahiko; Lee, Dong-Seok; Gebb, Sarah; Jones, Peter Lloyd

    2005-06-07

    Human pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is characterized by proliferation of vascular smooth muscle and, in its more severe form, by the development of occlusive neointimal lesions. However, few animal models of pulmonary neointimal proliferation exist, thereby limiting a complete understanding of the pathobiology of PAH. Recent studies of the endothelin (ET) system demonstrate that deficiency of the ET(B) receptor predisposes adult rats to acute and chronic hypoxic PAH, yet these animals fail to develop neointimal lesions. Herein, we determined and thereafter showed that exposure of ET(B) receptor-deficient rats to the endothelial toxin monocrotaline (MCT) leads to the development of neointimal lesions that share hallmarks of human PAH. The pulmonary hemodynamic and morphometric effects of 60 mg/kg MCT in control (MCT(+/+)) and ET(B) receptor-deficient (MCT(sl/sl)) rats at 6 weeks of age were assessed. MCT(sl/sl) rats developed more severe PAH, characterized by elevated pulmonary artery pressure, diminished cardiac output, and right ventricular hypertrophy. In MCT(sl/sl) rats, morphometric evaluation revealed the presence of neointimal lesions within small distal pulmonary arteries, increased medial wall thickness, and decreased arterial-to-alveolar ratio. In keeping with this, barium angiography revealed diminished distal pulmonary vasculature of MCT(sl/sl) rat lungs. Cells within neointimal lesions expressed smooth muscle and endothelial cell markers. Moreover, cells within neointimal lesions exhibited increased levels of proliferation and were located in a tissue microenvironment enriched with vascular endothelial growth factor, tenascin-C, and activated matrix metalloproteinase-9, factors already implicated in human PAH. Finally, assessment of steady state mRNA showed that whereas expression of ET(B) receptors was decreased in MCT(sl/sl) rat lungs, ET(A) receptor expression increased. Deficiency of the ET(B) receptor markedly accelerates the progression of

  7. OSCAR is a collagen receptor that costimulates osteoclastogenesis in DAP12-deficient humans and mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barrow, Alexander David; Raynal, Nicolas; Levin Andersen, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    by preosteoclasts in vitro, but OSCAR lacks a cognate ligand and its role in vivo has been unclear. Using samples from mice and patients deficient in various ITAM signaling pathways, we show here that OSCAR costimulates one of the major FcRγ-associated pathways required for osteoclastogenesis in vivo. Furthermore...... to signaling that increased numbers of osteoclasts in culture. Thus, our results suggest that ITAM-containing receptors can respond to exposed ligands in collagen, leading to the functional differentiation of leukocytes, which provides what we believe to be a new concept for ITAM regulation of cytokine...

  8. Toll-like receptor-2 deficiency enhances non-alcoholic steatohepatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brady Kristen

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previously we reported that mice deficient in toll-like receptor 4 (TLR-4 signalling were protected from diet-induced non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH. Another member of the toll-like receptor family, TLR-2, has been shown to play a role in lipid trafficking via uptake of diacylated lipoproteins. However, a role for TLR-2 in NASH has not been elucidated. The objectives of the current study were to examine the influence of dietary fat quality and TLR-2 on NASH pathogenesis. Methods Steatohepatitis was induced in male Db, C57BL/6 and TLR-2-/- mice by feeding an L-amino acid-defined diet that was deficient in methionine and choline (MCDD. Mice fed the base diet supplemented with methionine and choline (control diet; CD were used as controls. To determine the role of fat quality, MCDD was enriched with polyunsaturated corn oil (PUFA or coconut oil that is comprised mostly of saturated fat (SAFA; the total amount of each fat was 112.9 g/kg of diet. After 8 weeks of feeding CD or MCDD, hepatic steatosis, inflammation and necrosis were evaluated in histological sections. Total RNA was extracted from frozen liver samples and mRNA expression of TNFα, collagen α1, IL-10, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPAR-γ, TLR-4, and CD14, was analyzed via real-time PCR. Protein levels of TLR-2 were analyzed by western blot. Results Panlobular macrovessicular steatosis and diffuse leukocyte infiltration were noted in PUFA-fed Db mice. Histological scores demonstrated significantly less steatosis, inflammation and necrosis in SAFA-fed mice of all mouse strains. However, compared to wild type mice, hepatocellular damage was notably more severe in TLR-2-/- mice. Consistent with histological findings, mRNA expression of TNFα was elevated by approximately 3-fold in TLR-2-/- mice; PPAR-γ expression was blunted in this strain compared to wild type. Expression of the matrix protein collagen αI was also significantly higher in TLR-2

  9. Gender-specific effects of endogenous testosterone: female alpha-estrogen receptor-deficient C57Bl/6J mice develop glomerulosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliot, S J; Berho, M; Korach, K; Doublier, S; Lupia, E; Striker, G E; Karl, M

    2007-08-01

    Young female mice on a C57Bl/6J (B6) background are considered glomerulosclerosis (GS)-resistant but aging B6 mice develop mild GS. Estrogen deficiency accelerates while estrogen replacement retards GS in young sclerosis-prone oligosyndactyly mutant mice on an ROP background. To explore the effects of sex hormones on glomerular structure and function in the context of gender and genetic background, we studied mice in which the estrogen-receptor (ER) genes alpha- or -beta were deleted (alpha- or betaER knockout (KO)) and crossed into the B6 background. We also studied ovariectomized (Ovx) B6 mice given testosterone. Male and female betaERKO and male alphaERKO mice had no glomerular dysfunction at 9 months of age; however, alphaERKO female mice displayed albuminuria and GS. Ovx prevented glomerular dysfunction in alphaERKO female mice by eliminating endogenous testosterone production while exogenous testosterone induced GS in Ovx B6 mice. Androgen receptor (AR) expression and function was found in microdissected glomeruli and cultured mesangial cells. Testosterone compared to placebo increased both AR expression and TGF-beta1 mRNA levels in glomeruli isolated from female B6 mice. Estrogen deficiency had no deleterious effects on the glomeruli in B6 mice. Our study shows that genetic traits strongly influence the GS-promoting effects of estrogen deficiency while testosterone induces GS in a gender-specific manner.

  10. Insulin receptor degradation is accelerated in cultured lymphocytes from patients with genetic syndromes of extreme insulin resistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McElduff, A.; Hedo, J.A.; Taylor, S.I.; Roth, J.; Gorden, P.

    1984-01-01

    The insulin receptor degradation rate was examined in B lymphocytes that were obtained from peripheral blood of normal subjects and patients with several syndromes of extreme insulin resistance. The insulin receptors were surface labeled using Na 125 I/lactoperoxidase and the cells were returned to incubate in growth media. After varying periods of incubation, aliquots of cells were solubilized and the cell content of labeled receptor subunits were measured by immunoprecipitation with anti-receptor antibodies and NaDodSO4/polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. In cell lines from four patients in whom the number of insulin receptors was reduced by greater than 90%, the rate of receptor loss was greater than normal (t1/2 equals 3.8 +/- 0.9 h vs. 6.5 +/- 1.2 h; mean +/- SD, P less than 0.01). However, a similar acceleration in receptor degradation was seen in cells from five patients with extreme insulin resistance but low-normal insulin receptor concentration (t1/2 equals 4.4 +/- 0.9 h). Thus, all the patients with genetic syndromes of insulin resistance had accelerated receptor degradation, regardless of their receptor concentration. By contrast, insulin receptors on cultured lymphocytes that were obtained from patients with extreme insulin resistance secondary to autoantibodies to the insulin receptor had normal receptor degradation (t1/2 equals 6.1 +/- 1.9 h). We conclude that (a) accelerated insulin receptor degradation is an additional feature of cells from patients with genetic forms of insulin resistance; (b) that accelerated insulin receptor degradation may explain the low-normal receptor concentrations that were seen in some patients with extreme insulin resistance; and (c) that accelerated degradation does not explain the decreased receptor concentration in patients with very low insulin receptor binding and, therefore, by inference, a defect in receptor synthesis must be present in this subgroup

  11. Endochondral Ossification Is Accelerated in Cholinesterase-Deficient Mice and in Avian Mesenchymal Micromass Cultures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janine Spieker

    Full Text Available Most components of the cholinergic system are detected in skeletogenic cell types in vitro, yet the function of this system in skeletogenesis remains unclear. Here, we analyzed endochondral ossification in mutant murine fetuses, in which genes of the rate-limiting cholinergic enzymes acetyl- (AChE, or butyrylcholinesterase (BChE, or both were deleted (called here A-B+, A+B-, A-B-, respectively. In all mutant embryos bone growth and cartilage remodeling into mineralizing bone were accelerated, as revealed by Alcian blue (A-blu and Alizarin red (A-red staining. In A+B- and A-B- onset of mineralization was observed before E13.5, about 2 days earlier than in wild type and A-B+ mice. In all mutants between E18.5 to birth A-blu staining disappeared from epiphyses prematurely. Instead, A-blu+ cells were dislocated into diaphyses, most pronounced so in A-B- mutants, indicating additive effects of both missing ChEs in A-B- mutant mice. The remodeling effects were supported by in situ hybridization (ISH experiments performed on cryosections from A-B- mice, in which Ihh, Runx2, MMP-13, ALP, Col-II and Col-X were considerably decreased, or had disappeared between E18.5 and P0. With a second approach, we applied an improved in vitro micromass model from chicken limb buds that allowed histological distinction between areas of cartilage, apoptosis and mineralization. When treated with the AChE inhibitor BW284c51, or with nicotine, there was decrease in cartilage and accelerated mineralization, suggesting that these effects were mediated through nicotinic receptors (α7-nAChR. We conclude that due to absence of either one or both cholinesterases in KO mice, or inhibition of AChE in chicken micromass cultures, there is increase in cholinergic signalling, which leads to increased chondroblast production and premature mineralization, at the expense of incomplete chondrogenic differentiation. This emphasizes the importance of cholinergic signalling in cartilage and

  12. The daidzein- and estradiol- induced anorectic action in CCK or leptin receptor deficiency rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujitani, Mina; Mizushige, Takafumi; Bhattarai, Keshab; Iwahara, Asami; Aida, Ryojiro; Kishida, Taro

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the effect of daidzein feeding and estradiol treatment on food intake in cholecystokinin-1 receptor (CCK1R) deficiency, leptin receptor (ObRb) deficiency rats and their wild-type rats. These rats underwent an ovariectomy or a sham operation. For the 5 week experiment, each rat was divided in three groups: control, daidzein (150 mg/kg diet), and estradiol (4.2 μg/rat/day) groups. In both CCK1R+ and CCK1R- rats, daidzein feeding and estradiol treatment significantly decreased food intake. Daidzein feeding significantly reduced food intake in ovariectomized ObRb- rats, although not in ObRb+ rats. Estradiol treatment significantly lowered food intake in ovariectomized ObRb+ and ObRb- rats. In the ovariectomized rats, estradiol treatment significantly increases uterine weight, while daidzein feeding did not change it, suggesting that daidzein might have no or weak estrogenic effect in our experiment. These results suggest that CCK1R and ObRb signalings were not essential for the daidzein- and estradiol-induced anorectic action.

  13. Intermittent hypoxia and hypercapnia induce pulmonary artery atherosclerosis and ventricular dysfunction in low density lipoprotein receptor deficient mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas, Robert M; Bowden, Karen; Pattison, Jennifer; Peterson, Alexander B; Juliano, Joseph; Dalton, Nancy D; Gu, Yusu; Alvarez, Erika; Imamura, Toshihiro; Peterson, Kirk L; Witztum, Joseph L; Haddad, Gabriel G; Li, Andrew C

    2013-12-01

    Patients with obstructive sleep apnea, who experience episodic hypoxia and hypercapnia during sleep, often demonstrate increased inflammation, oxidative stress, and dyslipidemia. We hypothesized that sleep apnea patients would be predisposed to the development of atherosclerosis. To dissect the mechanisms involved, we developed an animal model in mice whereby we expose mice to intermittent hypoxia/hypercapnia (IHH) in normobaric environments. Two- to three-month-old low-density lipoprotein receptor deficient (Ldlr(-/-)) mice were fed a high-fat diet for 8 or 16 wk while being exposed to IHH for either 10 h/day or 24 h/day. Plasma lipid levels, pulmonary artery and aortic atherosclerotic lesions, and cardiac function were then assayed. Surprisingly, atherosclerosis in the aorta of IHH mice was similar compared with controls. However, in IHH mice, atherosclerosis was markedly increased in the trunk and proximal branches of the pulmonary artery of exposed mice; even though plasma cholesterol and triglycerides were lower than in controls. Hemodynamic analysis revealed that right ventricular maximum pressure and isovolumic relaxation constant were significantly increased in IHH exposed mice and left ventricular % fractional shortening was reduced. In conclusion, 1) Intermittent hypoxia/hypercapnia remarkably accelerated atherosclerotic lesions in the pulmonary artery of Ldlr(-/-) mice and 2) increased lesion formation in the pulmonary artery was associated with right and left ventricular dysfunction. These findings raise the possibility that patients with obstructive sleep apnea may be susceptible to atherosclerotic disease in the pulmonary vasculature, an observation that has not been previously recognized.

  14. Leptin Receptor Deficiency is Associated With Upregulation of Cannabinoid 1 Receptors in Limbic Brain Regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    THANOS, PANAYOTIS K.; RAMALHETE, ROBERTO C.; MICHAELIDES, MICHAEL; PIYIS, YIANNI K.; WANG, GENE-JACK; VOLKOW, NORA D.

    2009-01-01

    Leptin receptor dysfunction results in overeating and obesity. Leptin regulates hypothalamic signaling that underlies the motivation to hyperphagia, but the interaction between leptin and cannabinoid signaling is poorly understood. We evaluated the role of cannabinoid 1 receptors (CB1R) in overeating and the effects of food deprivation on CB1R in the brain. One-month-old Zucker rats were divided into unrestricted and restricted (fed 70% of unrestricted rats) diet groups and maintained until adulthood (4 months). Levels of relative binding sites of CB1R (CB1R binding levels) were assessed using [3H] SR141716A in vitro autoradiography. These levels were higher (except cerebellum and hypothalamus) at 4 months than at 1 month of age. One month CB1R binding levels for most brain regions did not differ between Ob and Lean (Le) rats (except in frontal and cingulate cortices in Le and in the hypothalamus in Ob). Four month Ob rats had higher CB1R binding levels than Le in most brain regions and food restriction was associated with higher CB1R levels in all brain regions in Ob, but not in Le rats. CB1R binding levels increased between adolescence and young adulthood which we believe was influenced by leptin and food availability. The high levels of CB1R in Ob rats suggest that leptin's inhibition of food-intake is in part mediated by downregulation of CB1R and that leptin interferes with CB1R upregulation under food-deprivation conditions. These results are consistent with prior findings showing increased levels of endogenous cannabinoids in the Ob rats corroborating the regulation of cannabinoid signaling by leptin. PMID:18563836

  15. A novel method to generate T-cell receptor-deficient chimeric antigen receptor T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamiya, Takahiro; Wong, Desmond; Png, Yi Tian; Campana, Dario

    2018-03-13

    Practical methods are needed to increase the applicability and efficacy of chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T-cell therapies. Using donor-derived CAR-T cells is attractive, but expression of endogenous T-cell receptors (TCRs) carries the risk for graft-versus-host-disease (GVHD). To remove surface TCRαβ, we combined an antibody-derived single-chain variable fragment specific for CD3ε with 21 different amino acid sequences predicted to retain it intracellularly. After transduction in T cells, several of these protein expression blockers (PEBLs) colocalized intracellularly with CD3ε, blocking surface CD3 and TCRαβ expression. In 25 experiments, median TCRαβ expression in T lymphocytes was reduced from 95.7% to 25.0%; CD3/TCRαβ cell depletion yielded virtually pure TCRαβ-negative T cells. Anti-CD3ε PEBLs abrogated TCRαβ-mediated signaling, without affecting immunophenotype or proliferation. In anti-CD3ε PEBL-T cells, expression of an anti-CD19-41BB-CD3ζ CAR induced cytokine secretion, long-term proliferation, and CD19 + leukemia cell killing, at rates meeting or exceeding those of CAR-T cells with normal CD3/TCRαβ expression. In immunodeficient mice, anti-CD3ε PEBL-T cells had markedly reduced GVHD potential; when transduced with anti-CD19 CAR, these T cells killed engrafted leukemic cells. PEBL blockade of surface CD3/TCRαβ expression is an effective tool to prepare allogeneic CAR-T cells. Combined PEBL and CAR expression can be achieved in a single-step procedure, is easily adaptable to current cell manufacturing protocols, and can be used to target other T-cell molecules to further enhance CAR-T-cell therapies. © 2018 by The American Society of Hematology.

  16. The role of serum transferrin receptor in the diagnosis of iron deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remacha, A F; Sarda, M P; Parellada, M; Ubeda, J; Manteiga, R

    1998-11-01

    Iron deficiency anemia (IDA) is often associated with inflammatory disorders. The most conventional parameters of iron metabolism are therefore affected, making the evaluation of iron status difficult. Serum transferrin receptor (sTfR) levels are raised in iron deficiency but are not influenced by inflammatory changes. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of sTfR in differentiating IDA with inflammatory features. A diagnostic study of sTfR measured by immunoassay was carried out in IDA and anemia of chronic disorders (ACD). The cut-off points of sTfR and the ratio of sTfR/serum ferritin, which were obtained after comparing IDA and ACD, were applied to a group of 64 patients with mixed iron patterns (MIX) (16 with ACD and 48 with IDA). The best cut-off point of sTfR between IDA and ACD was 4.7 mg/L. Applying this cut-off to the MIX group, an efficiency of 87% was obtained (sensitivity 92% and specificity 81%). This level of sTfR correctly classified 53 out of 64 cases of the MIX group (83%). Using the ratio of sTfRx 100/serum ferritin, the best cut-off point was 8 (efficiency 100%), which correctly classified 62 out of 64 cases of the MIX group (97%). This study demonstrates that sTfR in conjunction with other iron parameters is very useful in iron deficiency evaluation, especially in hospital practice. Iron treatment should be considered in patients with mixed patterns of iron status, in which the diagnosis of IDA versus ACD is difficult, when the levels of sTfR exceed the cut-off point.

  17. Novel Toll-like receptor-4 deficiency attenuates trastuzumab (Herceptin induced cardiac injury in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yousif Nasser

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cardiac inflammation and generation of oxidative stress are known to contribute to trastuzumab (herceptin induced cardiac toxicity. Toll-like receptors (TLRs are a part of the innate immune system and are involved in cardiac stress reactions. Since TLR4 might play a relevant role in cardiac inflammatory signaling, we investigated whether or not TLR4 is involved in trastuzumab induced cardiotoxicity. Methods Seven days after a single injection of herceptin (2 mg/kg; i.p., left ventricular pressure volume loops were measured in HeN compotent (TLR4+/+ and HeJ mutant (TLR4-/- treated with trastuzumab and control mice. Immunofluorescent staining for monocyte infiltration and analyses of plasma by (ELISAs for different chemokines including: MCP-1and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α, Western immunoblotting assay for ICAM-1, and used troponin I for cardiac injury marker. Results Trastuzumab injection resulted in an impairment of left ventricular function in TLR-4 competent (HeN, in contrast TLR4-/- trastuzumab mice showed improved left ventricular function EF%, CO; p -/-; p -/-, marked reduction of myocardial troponin-I levels in TLR4-deficient mice. Data are presented as means ± SE; n = 8 in each group p Conclusions Treatment with trastuzumab induces an inflammatory response that contributes to myocardial tissue TLR4 mediates chemokine expression (TNF-α, MCP-1and ICAM-1, so in experimental animals TLR4 deficiency improves left ventricular function and attenuates pathophysiological key mechanisms in trastuzumab induced cardiomyopathy.

  18. β1-Adrenergic receptor deficiency in ghrelin-expressing cells causes hypoglycemia in susceptible individuals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mani, Bharath K.; Osborne-Lawrence, Sherri; Vijayaraghavan, Prasanna; Hepler, Chelsea; Zigman, Jeffrey M.

    2016-01-01

    Ghrelin is an orexigenic gastric peptide hormone secreted when caloric intake is limited. Ghrelin also regulates blood glucose, as emphasized by the hypoglycemia that is induced by caloric restriction in mouse models of deficient ghrelin signaling. Here, we hypothesized that activation of β1-adrenergic receptors (β1ARs) localized to ghrelin cells is required for caloric restriction–associated ghrelin release and the ensuing protective glucoregulatory response. In mice lacking the β1AR specifically in ghrelin-expressing cells, ghrelin secretion was markedly blunted, resulting in profound hypoglycemia and prevalent mortality upon severe caloric restriction. Replacement of ghrelin blocked the effects of caloric restriction in β1AR-deficient mice. We also determined that treating calorically restricted juvenile WT mice with beta blockers led to reduced plasma ghrelin and hypoglycemia, the latter of which is similar to the life-threatening, fasting-induced hypoglycemia observed in infants treated with beta blockers. These findings highlight the critical functions of ghrelin in preventing hypoglycemia and promoting survival during severe caloric restriction and the requirement for ghrelin cell–expressed β1ARs in these processes. Moreover, these results indicate a potential role for ghrelin in mediating beta blocker–associated hypoglycemia in susceptible individuals, such as young children. PMID:27548523

  19. Chronic vitamin C deficiency does not accelerate oxidative stress in ageing brains of guinea pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tveden-Nyborg, Pernille; Andersen, Stine Hasselholt; Miyashita, Namiyo

    2012-01-01

      Increased oxidative stress in the brain has consistently been implied in ageing and in several degenerative brain disorders. Acting as a pivotal antioxidant in the brain, vitamin C is preferentially retained during deficiency and may play an essential role in neuroprotection during ageing. Thus......, a lack of vitamin C could be associated with an increase in redox imbalance in the ageing brain. The present study compared oxidative stress of ageing to that of a long-term non-scorbutic vitamin C deficiency in guinea pigs. Adults (3-9 months old) were compared to old (36-42 months old) animals during...... a six-month dietary intervention by assessing vitamin C transport and redox homeostasis in the brain. In contrast to our hypothesis, chronic vitamin C deficiency did not affect the measured markers of oxidative stress in the brains of adult and aged animals. However, aged animals generally showed...

  20. NADPH oxidase 1 deficiency alters caveolin phosphorylation and angiotensin II-receptor localization in vascular smooth muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basset, Olivier; Deffert, Christine; Foti, Michelangelo; Bedard, Karen; Jaquet, Vincent; Ogier-Denis, Eric; Krause, Karl-Heinz

    2009-10-01

    The superoxide-generating NADPH oxidase NOX1 is thought to be involved in signaling by the angiotensin II-receptor AT1R. However, underlying signaling steps are poorly understood. In this study, we investigated the effect of AngII on aortic smooth muscle from wild-type and NOX1-deficient mice. NOX1-deficient cells showed decreased basal ROS generation and did not produce ROS in response to AngII. Unexpectedly, AngII-dependent Ca(2+) signaling was markedly decreased in NOX1-deficient cells. Immunostaining demonstrated that AT1R was localized on the plasma membrane in wild-type, but intracellularly in NOX1-deficient cells. Immunohistochemistry and immunoblotting showed a decreased expression of AT1R in the aorta of NOX1-deficient mice. To investigate the basis of the abnormal AT1R targeting, we studied caveolin expression and phosphorylation. The amounts of total caveolin and of caveolae were not different in NOX1-deficient mice, but a marked decrease occurred in the phosphorylated form of caveolin. Exogenous H(2)O(2) or transfection of a NOX1 plasmid restored AngII responses in NOX1-deficient cells. Based on these findings, we propose that NOX1-derived reactive oxygen species regulate cell-surface expression of AT1R through mechanisms including caveolin phosphorylation. The lack cell-surface AT1R expression in smooth muscle could be involved in the decreased blood pressure in NOX1-deficient mice.

  1. A bovine papillomavirus-1 based vector restores the function of the low-density lipoprotein receptor in the receptor-deficient CHO-ldlA7 cell line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ustav Mart

    2002-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The rationale of using bovine papillomavirus-1 (BPV-1 derived vectors in gene therapy protocols lies in their episomal maintenance at intermediate to high copy number, and stable, high-level expression of the gene products. We constructed the BPV-1 based vector harbouring the human low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR gene cDNA and tested its ability to restore the function of the LDLR in the receptor-deficient cell line CHO-ldlA7. Results The introduced vector p3.7LDL produced functionally active LDL receptors in the receptor-deficient cell line CHO-ldlA7 during the 32-week period of observation as determined by the internalisation assay with the labelled LDL particles. Conclusion Bovine papillomavirus type-1 (BPV-1-derived vectors could be suitable for gene therapy due to their episomal maintenance at intermediate to high copy number and stable, high-level expression of the gene products. The constructed BPV-1 based vector p3.7LDL produced functionally active LDL receptors in the LDLR-deficient cell line CHO-ldlA7 during the 32-week period of observation. In vivo experiments should reveal, whether 1–5% transfection efficiency obtained in the current work is sufficient to bring about detectable and clinically significant lowering of the amount of circulating LDL cholesterol particles.

  2. Growth hormone receptor deficiency in Ecuador: clinical and biochemical phenotype in two populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guevara-Aguirre, J; Rosenbloom, A L; Fielder, P J; Diamond, F B; Rosenfeld, R G

    1993-02-01

    We have identified 56 patients with GH receptor deficiency (Laron syndrome) from two provinces in southern Ecuador, one group of 26 (Loja province) with a 4:1 female predominance and 30 patients from neighboring El Oro province with a normal sex ratio. There were no significant differences between the Loja and El Oro populations in stature (-5.3 to -11.5 standard deviation score), other auxologic measures, or in biochemical measures. GH binding protein, the circulating extracellular domain of the GH receptor, was measured by ligand immunofunction assay and found to be comparably low in children and adults. Levels of insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-I and -II and the GH-dependent IGF binding protein-3 (measured by RIA) were significantly greater, and GH and IGF binding protein-2 levels significantly lower in adults than children. Levels of IGF-I (adults) and IGF binding protein-3 (children and adults) correlated inversely with statural deviation from normal (P < 0.01). School performance was at an exceptionally high level, 41 out of 47 who had attended school being in the top 3 in classes of 15-50 persons.

  3. Outcomes of breast cancer patients with triple negative receptor status treated with accelerated partial breast irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkinson, J Ben; Reid, Robert E; Shaitelman, Simona F; Chen, Peter Y; Mitchell, Christine K; Wallace, Michelle F; Marvin, Kimberly S; Grills, Inga S; Margolis, Jeffrey M; Vicini, Frank A

    2011-11-01

    Triple negative receptor status (TNRS) of patients undergoing breast-conserving therapy treated with whole-breast irradiation has been associated with increased distant metastasis and decreased disease-free and overall survival. This paper reports the outcomes of TNRS patients treated with accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI). We studied 455 patients who received APBI at our institution, using interstitial, intracavitary, and three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy. TNRS was assigned if a patient tested negative for all three (ER [estrogen receptor], PR [progesterone receptor], and HER2/neu) receptors. Of 202 patients with all receptor results available, 20 patients were designated TNRS, and 182 patients had at least one receptor positive (RP). We analyzed ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence (IBTR), regional nodal failure (RNF), distant metastasis (DM), and overall survival (OS). Mean follow-up was 4.1 years for the TNRS group and 5.1 years for the RP cohort (p = 0.11). TNRS patients had a higher histologic grade (59% TNRS vs. 13% RP; p 0.52). OS for the RP cohort was 93% at 5 years (p > 0.28). In our patient population, TNRS conferred a clinical outcome similar to that of patients with RP disease treated with APBI. Further investigation with larger patient populations and longer follow-up periods is warranted to confirm that APBI is a safe and effective treatment for patients with localized TNRS breast cancer. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Outcomes of Breast Cancer Patients With Triple Negative Receptor Status Treated With Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilkinson, J. Ben; Reid, Robert E.; Shaitelman, Simona F.; Chen, Peter Y.; Mitchell, Christine K.; Wallace, Michelle F.; Marvin, Kimberly S.; Grills, Inga S.; Margolis, Jeffrey M.; Vicini, Frank A.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Triple negative receptor status (TNRS) of patients undergoing breast-conserving therapy treated with whole-breast irradiation has been associated with increased distant metastasis and decreased disease-free and overall survival. This paper reports the outcomes of TNRS patients treated with accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI). Methods and Materials: We studied 455 patients who received APBI at our institution, using interstitial, intracavitary, and three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy. TNRS was assigned if a patient tested negative for all three (ER [estrogen receptor], PR [progesterone receptor], and HER2/neu) receptors. Of 202 patients with all receptor results available, 20 patients were designated TNRS, and 182 patients had at least one receptor positive (RP). We analyzed ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence (IBTR), regional nodal failure (RNF), distant metastasis (DM), and overall survival (OS). Results: Mean follow-up was 4.1 years for the TNRS group and 5.1 years for the RP cohort (p = 0.11). TNRS patients had a higher histologic grade (59% TNRS vs. 13% RP; p 0.52). OS for the RP cohort was 93% at 5 years (p > 0.28). Conclusions: In our patient population, TNRS conferred a clinical outcome similar to that of patients with RP disease treated with APBI. Further investigation with larger patient populations and longer follow-up periods is warranted to confirm that APBI is a safe and effective treatment for patients with localized TNRS breast cancer.

  5. Intermittent hypoxia and hypercapnia induce pulmonary artery atherosclerosis and ventricular dysfunction in low density lipoprotein receptor deficient mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowden, Karen; Pattison, Jennifer; Peterson, Alexander B.; Juliano, Joseph; Dalton, Nancy D.; Gu, Yusu; Alvarez, Erika; Imamura, Toshihiro; Peterson, Kirk L.; Witztum, Joseph L.; Haddad, Gabriel G.; Li, Andrew C.

    2013-01-01

    Patients with obstructive sleep apnea, who experience episodic hypoxia and hypercapnia during sleep, often demonstrate increased inflammation, oxidative stress, and dyslipidemia. We hypothesized that sleep apnea patients would be predisposed to the development of atherosclerosis. To dissect the mechanisms involved, we developed an animal model in mice whereby we expose mice to intermittent hypoxia/hypercapnia (IHH) in normobaric environments. Two- to three-month-old low-density lipoprotein receptor deficient (Ldlr−/−) mice were fed a high-fat diet for 8 or 16 wk while being exposed to IHH for either 10 h/day or 24 h/day. Plasma lipid levels, pulmonary artery and aortic atherosclerotic lesions, and cardiac function were then assayed. Surprisingly, atherosclerosis in the aorta of IHH mice was similar compared with controls. However, in IHH mice, atherosclerosis was markedly increased in the trunk and proximal branches of the pulmonary artery of exposed mice; even though plasma cholesterol and triglycerides were lower than in controls. Hemodynamic analysis revealed that right ventricular maximum pressure and isovolumic relaxation constant were significantly increased in IHH exposed mice and left ventricular % fractional shortening was reduced. In conclusion, 1) Intermittent hypoxia/hypercapnia remarkably accelerated atherosclerotic lesions in the pulmonary artery of Ldlr−/− mice and 2) increased lesion formation in the pulmonary artery was associated with right and left ventricular dysfunction. These findings raise the possibility that patients with obstructive sleep apnea may be susceptible to atherosclerotic disease in the pulmonary vasculature, an observation that has not been previously recognized. PMID:23990245

  6. Eicosapentaenoic acid ameliorates non-alcoholic steatohepatitis in a novel mouse model using melanocortin 4 receptor-deficient mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konuma, Kuniha; Itoh, Michiko; Suganami, Takayoshi; Kanai, Sayaka; Nakagawa, Nobutaka; Sakai, Takeru; Kawano, Hiroyuki; Hara, Mitsuko; Kojima, Soichi; Izumi, Yuichi; Ogawa, Yoshihiro

    2015-01-01

    Many attempts have been made to find novel therapeutic strategies for non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), while their clinical efficacy is unclear. We have recently reported a novel rodent model of NASH using melanocortin 4 receptor-deficient (MC4R-KO) mice, which exhibit the sequence of events that comprise hepatic steatosis, liver fibrosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma with obesity-related phenotypes. In the liver of MC4R-KO mice, there is a unique histological feature termed hepatic crown-like structures (hCLS), where macrophages interact with dead hepatocytes and fibrogenic cells, thereby accelerating inflammation and fibrosis. In this study, we employed MC4R-KO mice to examine the effect of highly purified eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), a clinically available n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid, on the development of NASH. EPA treatment markedly prevented the development of hepatocyte injury, hCLS formation and liver fibrosis along with lipid accumulation. EPA treatment was also effective even after MC4R-KO mice developed NASH. Intriguingly, improvement of liver fibrosis was accompanied by the reduction of hCLS formation and plasma kallikrein-mediated transforming growth factor-β activation. Moreover, EPA treatment increased the otherwise reduced serum concentrations of adiponectin, an adipocytokine with anti-inflammatory and anti-fibrotic properties. Collectively, EPA treatment effectively prevents the development and progression of NASH in MC4R-KO mice along with amelioration of hepatic steatosis. This study unravels a novel anti-fibrotic mechanism of EPA, thereby suggesting a clinical implication for the treatment of NASH.

  7. Eicosapentaenoic acid ameliorates non-alcoholic steatohepatitis in a novel mouse model using melanocortin 4 receptor-deficient mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuniha Konuma

    Full Text Available Many attempts have been made to find novel therapeutic strategies for non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH, while their clinical efficacy is unclear. We have recently reported a novel rodent model of NASH using melanocortin 4 receptor-deficient (MC4R-KO mice, which exhibit the sequence of events that comprise hepatic steatosis, liver fibrosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma with obesity-related phenotypes. In the liver of MC4R-KO mice, there is a unique histological feature termed hepatic crown-like structures (hCLS, where macrophages interact with dead hepatocytes and fibrogenic cells, thereby accelerating inflammation and fibrosis. In this study, we employed MC4R-KO mice to examine the effect of highly purified eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA, a clinically available n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid, on the development of NASH. EPA treatment markedly prevented the development of hepatocyte injury, hCLS formation and liver fibrosis along with lipid accumulation. EPA treatment was also effective even after MC4R-KO mice developed NASH. Intriguingly, improvement of liver fibrosis was accompanied by the reduction of hCLS formation and plasma kallikrein-mediated transforming growth factor-β activation. Moreover, EPA treatment increased the otherwise reduced serum concentrations of adiponectin, an adipocytokine with anti-inflammatory and anti-fibrotic properties. Collectively, EPA treatment effectively prevents the development and progression of NASH in MC4R-KO mice along with amelioration of hepatic steatosis. This study unravels a novel anti-fibrotic mechanism of EPA, thereby suggesting a clinical implication for the treatment of NASH.

  8. Adipocyte Glucocorticoid Receptor Deficiency Attenuates Aging- and HFD-Induced Obesity and Impairs the Feeding-Fasting Transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Kristina M; Hartmann, Kerstin; Kaltenecker, Doris; Vettorazzi, Sabine; Bauer, Mandy; Mauser, Lea; Amann, Sabine; Jall, Sigrid; Fischer, Katrin; Esterbauer, Harald; Müller, Timo D; Tschöp, Matthias H; Magnes, Christoph; Haybaeck, Johannes; Scherer, Thomas; Bordag, Natalie; Tuckermann, Jan P; Moriggl, Richard

    2017-02-01

    Glucocorticoids (GCs) are important regulators of systemic energy metabolism, and aberrant GC action is linked to metabolic dysfunctions. Yet, the extent to which normal and pathophysiological energy metabolism depend on the GC receptor (GR) in adipocytes remains unclear. Here, we demonstrate that adipocyte GR deficiency in mice significantly impacts systemic metabolism in different energetic states. Plasma metabolomics and biochemical analyses revealed a marked global effect of GR deficiency on systemic metabolite abundance and, thus, substrate partitioning in fed and fasted states. This correlated with a decreased lipolytic capacity of GR-deficient adipocytes under postabsorptive and fasting conditions, resulting from impaired signal transduction from β-adrenergic receptors to adenylate cyclase. Upon prolonged fasting, the impaired lipolytic response resulted in abnormal substrate utilization and lean mass wasting. Conversely, GR deficiency attenuated aging-/diet-associated obesity, adipocyte hypertrophy, and liver steatosis. Systemic glucose tolerance was improved in obese GR-deficient mice, which was associated with increased insulin signaling in muscle and adipose tissue. We conclude that the GR in adipocytes exerts central but diverging roles in the regulation of metabolic homeostasis depending on the energetic state. The adipocyte GR is indispensable for the feeding-fasting transition but also promotes adiposity and associated metabolic disorders in fat-fed and aged mice. © 2017 by the American Diabetes Association.

  9. Toll-like receptor 2 deficiency leads to delayed exacerbation of ischemic injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bohacek Ivan

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Using a live imaging approach, we have previously shown that microglia activation after stroke is characterized by marked and long-term induction of the Toll-like receptor (TLR 2 biophotonic signals. However, the role of TLR2 (and potentially other TLRs beyond the acute innate immune response and as early neuroprotection against ischemic injury is not well understood. Methods TLR2−/− mice were subjected to transient middle cerebral artery occlusion followed by different reperfusion times. Analyses assessing microglial activation profile/innate immune response were performed using in situ hybridization, immunohistochemistry analysis, flow cytometry and inflammatory cytokine array. The effects of the TLR2 deficiency on the evolution of ischemic brain injury were analyzed using a cresyl violet staining of brain sections with appropriate lesion size estimation. Results Here we report that TLR2 deficiency markedly affects post-stroke immune response resulting in delayed exacerbation of the ischemic injury. The temporal analysis of the microglia/macrophage activation profiles in TLR2−/− mice and age-matched controls revealed reduced microglia/macrophage activation after stroke, reduced capacity of resident microglia to proliferate as well as decreased levels of monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1 and consequently lower levels of CD45high/CD11b+ expressing cells as shown by flow cytometry analysis. Importantly, although acute ischemic lesions (24 to 72 h were smaller in TLR2−/− mice, the observed alterations in innate immune response were more pronounced at later time points (at day 7 after initial stroke, which finally resulted in delayed exacerbation of ischemic lesion leading to larger chronic infarctions as compared with wild-type mice. Moreover, our results revealed that TLR2 deficiency is associated with significant decrease in the levels of neurotrophic/anti-apoptotic factor Insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1

  10. Bio-Spectroscopic Imaging Provides Evidence of Hippocampal Zn Deficiency and Decreased Lipid Unsaturation in an Accelerated Ageing Mouse Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fimognari, Nicholas; Hollings, Ashley; Lam, Virginie; Tidy, Rebecca J; Kewish, Cameron M; Albrecht, Matthew A; Takechi, Ryu; Mamo, John C L; Hackett, Mark J

    2018-06-14

    Western society is facing a health epidemic due to the increasing incidence of dementia in ageing populations, and there are still few effective diagnostic methods, minimal treatment options, and no cure. Ageing is the greatest risk factor for memory loss that occurs during the natural ageing process, as well as being the greatest risk factor for neurodegenerative disease such as Alzheimer's disease. Therefore, greater understanding of the biochemical pathways that drive a healthy ageing brain towards dementia (pathological ageing or Alzheimer's disease), is required to accelerate the development of improved diagnostics and therapies. Unfortunately, many animal models of dementia model chronic amyloid precursor protein over-expression, which although highly relevant to mechanisms of amyloidosis and familial Alzheimer's disease, does not model well dementia during the natural ageing process. A promising animal model reported to model mechanisms of accelerated natural ageing and memory impairments, is the senescence accelerated murine prone strain 8 (SAMP8), which has been adopted by many research group to study the biochemical transitions that occur during brain ageing. A limitation to traditional methods of biochemical characterisation is that many important biochemical and elemental markers (lipid saturation, lactate, transition metals) cannot be imaged at meso- or micro-spatial resolution. Therefore, in this investigation we report the first multi-modal biospectroscopic characterisation of the SAMP8 model, and have identified important biochemical and elemental alterations, and co-localisations, between 4 month old SAMP8 mice and the relevant control (SAMR1) mice. Specifically, we demonstrate direct evidence of altered metabolism and disturbed lipid homeostasis within corpus callosum white matter, in addition to localised hippocampal metal deficiencies, in the accelerated ageing phenotype. Such findings have important implication for future research aimed at

  11. Xeroderma Pigmentosum Group C Deficiency Alters Cigarette Smoke DNA Damage Cell Fate and Accelerates Emphysema Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sears, Catherine R; Zhou, Huaxin; Justice, Matthew J; Fisher, Amanda J; Saliba, Jacob; Lamb, Isaac; Wicker, Jessica; Schweitzer, Kelly S; Petrache, Irina

    2018-03-01

    Cigarette smoke (CS) exposure is a major risk factor for the development of emphysema, a common disease characterized by loss of cells comprising the lung parenchyma. The mechanisms of cell injury leading to emphysema are not completely understood but are thought to involve persistent cytotoxic or mutagenic DNA damage induced by CS. Using complementary cell culture and mouse models of CS exposure, we investigated the role of the DNA repair protein, xeroderma pigmentosum group C (XPC), on CS-induced DNA damage repair and emphysema. Expression of XPC was decreased in mouse lungs after chronic CS exposure and XPC knockdown in cultured human lung epithelial cells decreased their survival after CS exposure due to activation of the intrinsic apoptosis pathway. Similarly, cell autophagy and apoptosis were increased in XPC-deficient mouse lungs and were further increased by CS exposure. XPC deficiency was associated with structural and functional changes characteristic of emphysema, which were worsened by age, similar to levels observed with chronic CS exposure. Taken together, these findings suggest that repair of DNA damage by XPC plays an important and previously unrecognized role in the maintenance of alveolar structures. These findings support that loss of XPC, possibly due to chronic CS exposure, promotes emphysema development and further supports a link between DNA damage, impaired DNA repair, and development of emphysema.

  12. The antidepressant tianeptine reverts synaptic AMPA receptor defects caused by deficiency of CDKL5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tramarin, Marco; Rusconi, Laura; Pizzamiglio, Lara; Barbiero, Isabella; Peroni, Diana; Scaramuzza, Linda; Guilliams, Tim; Cavalla, David; Antonucci, Flavia; Kilstrup-Nielsen, Charlotte

    2018-06-15

    Mutations in the X-linked cyclin-dependent kinase-like 5 (CDKL5) gene cause a complex neurological disorder, characterized by infantile seizures, impairment of cognitive and motor skills and autistic features. Loss of Cdkl5 in mice affects dendritic spine maturation and dynamics but the underlying molecular mechanisms are still far from fully understood. Here we show that Cdkl5 deficiency in primary hippocampal neurons leads to deranged expression of the alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-iso-xazole propionic acid receptors (AMPA-R). In particular, a dramatic reduction of expression of the GluA2 subunit occurs concomitantly with its hyper-phosphorylation on Serine 880 and increased ubiquitination. Consequently, Cdkl5 silencing skews the composition of membrane-inserted AMPA-Rs towards the GluA2-lacking calcium-permeable form. Such derangement is likely to contribute, at least in part, to the altered synaptic functions and cognitive impairment linked to loss of Cdkl5. Importantly, we find that tianeptine, a cognitive enhancer and antidepressant drug, known to recruit and stabilise AMPA-Rs at the synaptic sites, can normalise the expression of membrane inserted AMPA-Rs as well as the number of PSD-95 clusters, suggesting its therapeutic potential for patients with mutations in CDKL5.

  13. Citrullus lanatus `Sentinel' (Watermelon) Extract Reduces Atherosclerosis in LDL Receptor Deficient Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poduri, Aruna; Rateri, Debra L.; Saha, Shubin K.; Saha, Sibu; Daugherty, Alan

    2012-01-01

    Watermelon (Citrullus lanatus or C. lanatus) has many potentially bioactive compounds including citrulline, which may influence atherosclerosis. In this study, we determined the effects of C. lanatus, provided as an extract of the cultivar `sentinel', on hypercholesterolemia-induced atherosclerosis in mice. Male LDL receptor deficient mice at 8 weeks old were given either C. lanatus `sentinel' extract (2% vol/vol; n=10) or a mixture of matching carbohydrates (2% vol/vol; n=8) as the control in drinking water, while fed a saturated fat-enriched diet for 12 weeks ad libitum. Mice consuming C. lanatus `sentinel' extract had significantly increased plasma citrulline concentrations. Systolic blood pressure was comparable between the two groups. Consumption of C. lanatus `sentinel' extract led to lower body weight and fat mass without influencing lean mass. There were no differences in food and water intake, and urine output between the two groups. C. lanatus `sentinel' extract administration decreased plasma cholesterol concentrations that were attributed to reductions of intermediate/low density lipoprotein cholesterol. Plasma concentrations of MCP-1 and IFN-γ were decreased and IL-10 increased in mice consuming C. lanatus `sentinel' extract. Intake of C. lanatus `sentinel' extract resulted in reductions of atherosclerosis in both aortic arch and thoracic regions. In conclusion, consumption of C. lanatus `sentinel' extract led to reduced body weight gain, decreased plasma cholesterol concentrations, improved homeostasis of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines, and attenuated development of atherosclerosis without affecting systolic blood pressure in hypercholesterolemic mice. PMID:22902326

  14. DNA mismatch repair deficiency accelerates lung neoplasm development in K-rasLA1/+ mice: a brief report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Downey, Charlene M; Jirik, Frank R

    2015-01-01

    Inherited as well as acquired deficiencies in specific DNA mismatch repair (MMR) components are associated with the development of a wide range of benign and malignant neoplasms. Loss of key members such as MSH2 and MLH1 severely cripples the ability of the cell to recognize and correct such lesions as base:base mismatches and replicative DNA polymerase errors such as slippages at repetitive sequences. Genomic instability resulting from MMR deficiency not only predisposes cells to malignant transformation but may also promote tumor progression. To test the latter, we interbred Msh2 −/− mice with the K-ras LA1/+ transgenic line that spontaneously develops a range of premalignant and malignant lung lesions. Compared to K-ras LA1/+ mice, K-ras LA1/+ ; Msh2 −/− mice developed lung adenomas and adenocarcinomas at an increased frequency and also demonstrated evidence of accelerated adenocarcinoma growth. Since MMR defects have been identified in some human lung cancers, the mutant mice may not only be of preclinical utility but they will also be useful in identifying gene alterations able to act in concert with Kras mutants to promote tumor progression

  15. 4PS/insulin receptor substrate (IRS)-2 is the alternative substrate of the insulin receptor in IRS-1-deficient mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patti, M E; Sun, X J; Bruening, J C; Araki, E; Lipes, M A; White, M F; Kahn, C R

    1995-10-20

    Insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS-1) is the major cytoplasmic substrate of the insulin and insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-1 receptors. Transgenic mice lacking IRS-1 are resistant to insulin and IGF-1, but exhibit significant residual insulin action which corresponds to the presence of an alternative high molecular weight substrate in liver and muscle. Recently, Sun et al. (Sun, X.-J., Wang, L.-M., Zhang, Y., Yenush, L. P., Myers, M. G., Jr., Glasheen, E., Lane, W.S., Pierce, J. H., and White, M. F. (1995) Nature 377, 173-177) purified and cloned 4PS, the major substrate of the IL-4 receptor-associated tyrosine kinase in myeloid cells, which has significant structural similarity to IRS-1. To determine if 4PS is the alternative substrate of the insulin receptor in IRS-1-deficient mice, we performed immunoprecipitation, immunoblotting, and phosphatidylinositol (PI) 3-kinase assays using specific antibodies to 4PS. Following insulin stimulation, 4PS is rapidly phosphorylated in liver and muscle, binds to the p85 subunit of PI 3-kinase, and activates the enzyme. Insulin stimulation also results in the association of 4PS with Grb 2 in both liver and muscle. In IRS-1-deficient mice, both the phosphorylation of 4PS and associated PI 3-kinase activity are enhanced, without an increase in protein expression. Immunodepletion of 4PS from liver and muscle homogenates removes most of the phosphotyrosine-associated PI 3-kinase activity in IRS-1-deficient mice. Thus, 4PS is the primary alternative substrate, i.e. IRS-2, which plays a major role in physiologic insulin signal transduction via both PI 3-kinase activation and Grb 2/Sos association. In IRS-1-deficient mice, 4PS/IRS-2 provides signal transduction to these two major pathways of insulin signaling.

  16. Megalin is a receptor for apolipoprotein M, and kidney-specific megalin-deficiency confers urinary excretion of apolipoprotein M

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Faber, Kirsten; Hvidberg, Vibeke; Moestrup, Søren K

    2006-01-01

    . In addition, apoM is expressed at high levels in the kidney tubule cells. In this study, we show that the multiligand receptor megalin, which is expressed in kidney proximal tubule cells, is a receptor for apoM and mediates its uptake in the kidney. To examine apoM binding to megalin, a recombinant apo....... To examine the importance of apoM binding by megalin in vivo, we analyzed mice with a tissue-specific deficiency of megalin in the kidney. Megalin deficiency was associated with pronounced urinary excretion of apoM, whereas apoM was not detected in normal mouse, human, or rat urine. Gel filtration analysis...... showed that the urinary apoM-containing particles were small and devoid of apoA-I. The results suggest that apoM binds to megalin and that megalin-mediated endocytosis in kidney proximal tubules prevents apoM excretion in the urine....

  17. Deficiency of ABCA1 and ABCG1 in Macrophages Increases Inflammation and Accelerates Atherosclerosis in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westerterp, Marit; Murphy, Andrew J.; Wang, Mi; Pagler, Tamara A.; Vengrenyuk, Yuliya; Kappus, Mojdeh S.; Gorman, Darren J.; Nagareddy, Prabhakara R.; Zhu, Xuewei; Abramowicz, Sandra; Parks, John S.; Welch, Carrie; Fisher, Edward A.; Wang, Nan; Yvan-Charvet, Laurent; Tall, Alan R.

    2013-01-01

    Rationale Plasma HDL levels are inversely correlated with atherosclerosis. Although it is widely assumed that this is due to the ability of HDL to promote cholesterol efflux from macrophage foam cells, direct experimental support for this hypothesis is lacking. Objective To assess the role of macrophage cholesterol efflux pathways in atherogenesis. Methods and Results We developed MAC-ABCDKO mice with efficient deletion of the ATP Binding Cassette Transporters A1 and G1 (ABCA1 and ABCG1) in macrophages but not in hematopoietic stem or progenitor populations. MAC-ABCDKO bone marrow (BM) was transplanted into Ldlr-/- recipients. On the chow diet, these mice had similar plasma cholesterol and blood monocyte levels but increased atherosclerosis compared to controls. On the Western type diet (WTD), MAC-ABCDKO BM transplanted Ldlr-/- mice had disproportionate atherosclerosis, considering they also had lower VLDL/LDL cholesterol levels than controls. ABCA1/G1 deficient macrophages in lesions showed increased inflammatory gene expression. Unexpectedly, WTD-fed MAC-ABCDKO BM transplanted Ldlr-/- mice displayed monocytosis and neutrophilia in the absence of HSPC proliferation. Mechanistic studies revealed increased expression of M-CSF and G-CSF in splenic macrophage foam cells, driving BM monocyte and neutrophil production. Conclusion These studies 1) show that macrophage deficiency of ABCA1/G1 is pro-atherogenic likely by promoting plaque inflammation and 2) uncover a novel positive feedback loop in which cholesterol-laden splenic macrophages signal BM progenitors to produce monocytes, with suppression by macrophage cholesterol efflux pathways. PMID:23572498

  18. Abnormalities in osteoclastogenesis and decreased tumorigenesis in mice deficient for ovarian cancer G protein-coupled receptor 1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Li

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Ovarian cancer G protein-coupled receptor 1 (OGR1 has been shown to be a proton sensing receptor in vitro. We have shown that OGR1 functions as a tumor metastasis suppressor gene when it is over-expressed in human prostate cancer cells in vivo. To examine the physiological functions of OGR1, we generated conditional OGR1 deficient mice by homologous recombination. OGR1 deficient mice were viable and upon gross-inspection appeared normal. Consistent with in vitro studies showing that OGR1 is involved in osteoclastogenesis, reduced osteoclasts were detected in OGR1 deficient mice. A pH-dependent osteoclasts survival effect was also observed. However, overall abnormality in the bones of these animals was not observed. In addition, melanoma cell tumorigenesis was significantly inhibited in OGR1 deficient mice. OGR1 deficient mice in the mixed background produced significantly less peritoneal macrophages when stimulated with thioglycolate. These macrophages also showed altered extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK activation and nitric oxide (NO production in response to lipopolysaccharide. OGR1-dependent pH responses assessed by cAMP production and cell survival in macrophages or brown fat cells were not observed, presumably due to the presence of other proton sensing receptors in these cells. Our results indicate that OGR1's role in osteoclastogenesis is not strong enough to affect overall bone development and its role in tumorigenesis warrants further investigation. The mice generated can be potentially used for several disease models, including cancers or osteoclast-related diseases.

  19. Deficiency of the NR4A Orphan Nuclear Receptor NOR1 attenuates Neointima Formation Following Vascular Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomiyama, Takashi; Zhao, Yue; Gizard, Florence; Findeisen, Hannes M.; Heywood, Elizabeth B.; Jones, Karrie L.; Conneely, Orla M.; Bruemmer, Dennis

    2009-01-01

    Background The neuron-derived orphan receptor-1 (NOR1) belongs to the evolutionary highly conserved and most ancient NR4A subfamily of the nuclear hormone receptor superfamily. Members of this subfamily function as early response genes regulating key cellular processes including proliferation, differentiation, and survival. Although NOR1 has previously been demonstrated to be required for smooth muscle cell (SMC) proliferation in vitro, the role of this nuclear receptor for the proliferative response underlying neointima formation and target genes trans-activated by NOR1 remain to be defined. Methods and Results Using a model of guide wire-induced arterial injury, we demonstrate decreased neointima formation in NOR1-/- mice compared to wildtype mice. In vitro, NOR1-deficient SMC exhibit decreased proliferation due to a G1→S phase arrest of the cell cycle and increased apoptosis in response to serum deprivation. NOR1-deficiency alters phosphorylation of the retinoblastoma protein by preventing mitogen-induced cyclin D1 and D2 expression. Conversely, overexpression of NOR1 induces cyclin D1 expression and the transcriptional activity of the cyclin D1 promoter in transient reporter assays. Gel shift and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays identified a putative response element for NR4A receptors in the cyclin D1 promoter, to which NOR1 is recruited in response to mitogenic stimulation. Finally, we provide evidence that these observations are applicable in vivo by demonstrating decreased cyclin D1 expression during neointima formation in NOR1-deficient mice. Conclusions These experiments characterize cyclin D1 as a NOR1-regulated target gene in SMC and demonstrate that NOR1 deficiency decreases neointima formation in response to vascular injury. PMID:19153266

  20. Bile acids override steatosis in farnesoid X receptor deficient mice in a model of non-alcoholic steatohepatitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Weibin; Liu, Xijun; Peng, Xiaomin; Xue, Ruyi; Ji, Lingling; Shen, Xizhong; Chen, She; Gu, Jianxin; Zhang, Si

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • FXR deficiency enhanced MCD diet-induced hepatic fibrosis. • FXR deficiency attenuated MCD diet-induced hepatic steatosis. • FXR deficiency repressed genes involved in fatty acid uptake and triglyceride accumulation. - Abstract: Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is one of the most common liver diseases, and the pathogenesis is still not well known. The farnesoid X receptor (FXR) is a member of the nuclear hormone receptor superfamily and plays an essential role in maintaining bile acid and lipid homeostasis. In this study, we study the role of FXR in the pathogenesis of NFALD. We found that FXR deficient (FXR −/− ) mice fed methionine- and choline-deficient (MCD) diet had higher serum ALT and AST activities and lower hepatic triglyceride levels than wild-type (WT) mice fed MCD diet. Expression of genes involved in inflammation (VCAM-1) and fibrosis (α-SMA) was increased in FXR −/− mice fed MCD diet (FXR −/− /MCD) compared to WT mice fed MCD diet (WT/MCD). Although MCD diet significantly induced hepatic fibrosis in terms of liver histology, FXR −/− /MCD mice showed less degree of hepatic steatosis than WT/MCD mice. Moreover, FXR deficiency synergistically potentiated the elevation effects of MCD diet on serum and hepatic bile acids levels. The super-physiological concentrations of hepatic bile acids in FXR −/− /MCD mice inhibited the expression of genes involved in fatty acid uptake and triglyceride accumulation, which may be an explanation for less steatosis in FXR −/− /MCD mice in contrast to WT/MCD mice. These results suggest that hepatic bile acids accumulation could override simple steatosis in hepatic injury during the progression of NAFLD and further emphasize the role of FXR in maintaining hepatic bile acid homeostasis in liver disorders and in hepatic protection

  1. Bile acids override steatosis in farnesoid X receptor deficient mice in a model of non-alcoholic steatohepatitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Weibin; Liu, Xijun; Peng, Xiaomin [Gene Research Center, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Shanghai Medical College, Fudan University, Shanghai 200032 (China); Xue, Ruyi [Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Zhongshan Hospital, Shanghai Institute of Liver Disease, Fudan University, Shanghai 200032 (China); Ji, Lingling [Gene Research Center, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Shanghai Medical College, Fudan University, Shanghai 200032 (China); Shen, Xizhong [Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Zhongshan Hospital, Shanghai Institute of Liver Disease, Fudan University, Shanghai 200032 (China); Chen, She, E-mail: shechen@fudan.edu.cn [Gene Research Center, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Shanghai Medical College, Fudan University, Shanghai 200032 (China); Gu, Jianxin [Gene Research Center, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Shanghai Medical College, Fudan University, Shanghai 200032 (China); Zhang, Si, E-mail: zhangsi@fudan.edu.cn [Gene Research Center, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Shanghai Medical College, Fudan University, Shanghai 200032 (China)

    2014-05-23

    Highlights: • FXR deficiency enhanced MCD diet-induced hepatic fibrosis. • FXR deficiency attenuated MCD diet-induced hepatic steatosis. • FXR deficiency repressed genes involved in fatty acid uptake and triglyceride accumulation. - Abstract: Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is one of the most common liver diseases, and the pathogenesis is still not well known. The farnesoid X receptor (FXR) is a member of the nuclear hormone receptor superfamily and plays an essential role in maintaining bile acid and lipid homeostasis. In this study, we study the role of FXR in the pathogenesis of NFALD. We found that FXR deficient (FXR{sup −/−}) mice fed methionine- and choline-deficient (MCD) diet had higher serum ALT and AST activities and lower hepatic triglyceride levels than wild-type (WT) mice fed MCD diet. Expression of genes involved in inflammation (VCAM-1) and fibrosis (α-SMA) was increased in FXR{sup −/−} mice fed MCD diet (FXR{sup −/−}/MCD) compared to WT mice fed MCD diet (WT/MCD). Although MCD diet significantly induced hepatic fibrosis in terms of liver histology, FXR{sup −/−}/MCD mice showed less degree of hepatic steatosis than WT/MCD mice. Moreover, FXR deficiency synergistically potentiated the elevation effects of MCD diet on serum and hepatic bile acids levels. The super-physiological concentrations of hepatic bile acids in FXR{sup −/−}/MCD mice inhibited the expression of genes involved in fatty acid uptake and triglyceride accumulation, which may be an explanation for less steatosis in FXR{sup −/−}/MCD mice in contrast to WT/MCD mice. These results suggest that hepatic bile acids accumulation could override simple steatosis in hepatic injury during the progression of NAFLD and further emphasize the role of FXR in maintaining hepatic bile acid homeostasis in liver disorders and in hepatic protection.

  2. Impaired LDL receptor-related protein 1 translocation correlates with improved dyslipidemia and atherosclerosis in apoE-deficient mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip L S M Gordts

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Determination of the in vivo significance of LDL receptor-related protein 1 (LRP1 dysfunction on lipid metabolism and atherosclerosis development in absence of its main ligand apoE. METHODS AND RESULTS: LRP1 knock-in mice carrying an inactivating mutation in the NPxYxxL motif were crossed with apoE-deficient mice. In the absence of apoE, relative to LRP1 wild-type animals, LRP1 mutated mice showed an increased clearance of postprandial lipids despite a compromised LRP1 endocytosis rate and inefficient insulin-mediated translocation of the receptor to the plasma membrane, likely due to inefficient slow recycling of the mutated receptor. Postprandial lipoprotein improvement was explained by increased hepatic clearance of triglyceride-rich remnant lipoproteins and accompanied by a compensatory 1.6-fold upregulation of LDLR expression in hepatocytes. One year-old apoE-deficient mice having the dysfunctional LRP1 revealed a 3-fold decrease in spontaneous atherosclerosis development and a 2-fold reduction in LDL-cholesterol levels. CONCLUSION: These findings demonstrate that the NPxYxxL motif in LRP1 is important for insulin-mediated translocation and slow perinuclear endosomal recycling. These LRP1 impairments correlated with reduced atherogenesis and cholesterol levels in apoE-deficient mice, likely via compensatory LDLR upregulation.

  3. Fractalkine receptor (CX3CR1 deficiency sensitizes mice to the behavioral changes induced by lipopolysaccharide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelley Keith W

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Interactions between fractalkine (CX3CL1 and fractalkine receptor (CX3CR1 regulate microglial activation in the CNS. Recent findings indicate that age-associated impairments in CX3CL1 and CX3CR1 are directly associated with exaggerated microglial activation and an impaired recovery from sickness behavior after peripheral injection of lipopolysaccharide (LPS. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to determine the extent to which an acute LPS injection causes amplified and prolonged microglial activation and behavioral deficits in CX3CR1-deficient mice (CX3CR1-/-. Methods CX3CR1-/- mice or control heterozygote mice (CX3CR1+/- were injected with LPS (0.5 mg/kg i.p. or saline and behavior (i.e., sickness and depression-like behavior, microglial activation, and markers of tryptophan metabolism were determined. All data were analyzed using Statistical Analysis Systems General Linear Model procedures and were subjected to one-, two-, or three-way ANOVA to determine significant main effects and interactions. Results LPS injection caused a prolonged duration of social withdrawal in CX3CR1-/- mice compared to control mice. This extended social withdrawal was associated with enhanced mRNA expression of IL-1β, indolamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO and kynurenine monooxygenase (KMO in microglia 4 h after LPS. Moreover, elevated expression of IL-1β and CD14 was still detected in microglia of CX3CR1-/- mice 24 h after LPS. There was also increased turnover of tryptophan, serotonin, and dopamine in the brain 24 h after LPS, but these increases were independent of CX3CR1 expression. When submitted to the tail suspension test 48 and 72 h after LPS, an increased duration of immobility was evident only in CX3CR1-/- mice. This depression-like behavior in CX3CR1-/- mice was associated with a persistent activated microglial phenotype in the hippocampus and prefrontal cortex. Conclusions Taken together, these data indicate that a deficiency of CX3CR1

  4. Fractalkine receptor (CX3CR1) deficiency sensitizes mice to the behavioral changes induced by lipopolysaccharide

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background Interactions between fractalkine (CX3CL1) and fractalkine receptor (CX3CR1) regulate microglial activation in the CNS. Recent findings indicate that age-associated impairments in CX3CL1 and CX3CR1 are directly associated with exaggerated microglial activation and an impaired recovery from sickness behavior after peripheral injection of lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Therefore, the purpose of this study was to determine the extent to which an acute LPS injection causes amplified and prolonged microglial activation and behavioral deficits in CX3CR1-deficient mice (CX3CR1-/-). Methods CX3CR1-/- mice or control heterozygote mice (CX3CR1+/-) were injected with LPS (0.5 mg/kg i.p.) or saline and behavior (i.e., sickness and depression-like behavior), microglial activation, and markers of tryptophan metabolism were determined. All data were analyzed using Statistical Analysis Systems General Linear Model procedures and were subjected to one-, two-, or three-way ANOVA to determine significant main effects and interactions. Results LPS injection caused a prolonged duration of social withdrawal in CX3CR1-/- mice compared to control mice. This extended social withdrawal was associated with enhanced mRNA expression of IL-1β, indolamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) and kynurenine monooxygenase (KMO) in microglia 4 h after LPS. Moreover, elevated expression of IL-1β and CD14 was still detected in microglia of CX3CR1-/- mice 24 h after LPS. There was also increased turnover of tryptophan, serotonin, and dopamine in the brain 24 h after LPS, but these increases were independent of CX3CR1 expression. When submitted to the tail suspension test 48 and 72 h after LPS, an increased duration of immobility was evident only in CX3CR1-/- mice. This depression-like behavior in CX3CR1-/- mice was associated with a persistent activated microglial phenotype in the hippocampus and prefrontal cortex. Conclusions Taken together, these data indicate that a deficiency of CX3CR1 is permissive to

  5. Susceptibility to endotoxin induced uveitis is not reduced in mice deficient in BLT1, the high affinity leukotriene B4 receptor

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, J R; Subbarao, K; Franc, D T; Haribabu, B; Rosenbaum, J T

    2004-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the role of arachidonic acid derived chemotactic factor, LTB4, in the development of endotoxin induced uveitis (EIU), using mice deficient in the BLT1 gene which encodes the high affinity LTB4 receptor.

  6. MiR-34a deficiency accelerates medulloblastoma formation in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thor, Theresa; Künkele, Annette; Pajtler, Kristian W; Wefers, Annika K; Stephan, Harald; Mestdagh, Pieter; Heukamp, Lukas; Hartmann, Wolfgang; Vandesompele, Jo; Sadowski, Natalie; Becker, Lore; Garrett, Lillian; Hölter, Sabine M; Horsch, Marion; Calzada-Wack, Julia; Klein-Rodewald, Tanja; Racz, Ildiko; Zimmer, Andreas; Beckers, Johannes; Neff, Frauke; Klopstock, Thomas; De Antonellis, Pasqualino; Zollo, Massimo; Wurst, Wolfgang; Fuchs, Helmut; Gailus-Durner, Valérie; Schüller, Ulrich; de Angelis, Martin Hrabě; Eggert, Angelika; Schramm, Alexander; Schulte, Johannes H

    2015-05-15

    Previous studies have evaluated the role of miRNAs in cancer initiation and progression. MiR-34a was found to be downregulated in several tumors, including medulloblastomas. Here we employed targeted transgenesis to analyze the function of miR-34a in vivo. We generated mice with a constitutive deletion of the miR-34a gene. These mice were devoid of mir-34a expression in all analyzed tissues, but were viable and fertile. A comprehensive standardized phenotypic analysis including more than 300 single parameters revealed no apparent phenotype. Analysis of miR-34a expression in human medulloblastomas and medulloblastoma cell lines revealed significantly lower levels than in normal human cerebellum. Re-expression of miR-34a in human medulloblastoma cells reduced cell viability and proliferation, induced apoptosis and downregulated the miR-34a target genes, MYCN and SIRT1. Activation of the Shh pathway by targeting SmoA1 transgene overexpression causes medulloblastoma in mice, which is dependent on the presence and upregulation of Mycn. Analysis of miR-34a in medulloblastomas derived from ND2:SmoA1(tg) mice revealed significant suppression of miR-34a compared to normal cerebellum. Tumor incidence was significantly increased and tumor formation was significantly accelerated in mice transgenic for SmoA1 and lacking miR-34a. Interestingly, Mycn and Sirt1 were strongly expressed in medulloblastomas derived from these mice. We here demonstrate that miR-34a is dispensable for normal development, but that its loss accelerates medulloblastomagenesis. Strategies aiming to re-express miR-34a in tumors could, therefore, represent an efficient therapeutic option. © 2014 UICC.

  7. C5a receptor deficiency alters energy utilization and fat storage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Roy

    Full Text Available To investigate the impact of whole body C5a receptor (C5aR deficiency on energy metabolism and fat storage.Male wildtype (WT and C5aR knockout (C5aRKO mice were fed a low fat (CHOW or a high fat high sucrose diet-induced obesity (DIO diet for 14 weeks. Body weight and food intake were measured weekly. Indirect calorimetry, dietary fatload clearance, insulin and glucose tolerance tests were also evaluated. Liver, muscle and adipose tissue mRNA gene expression were measured by RT-PCR.At week one and 12, C5aRKO mice on DIO had increased oxygen consumption. After 12 weeks, although food intake was comparable, C5aRKO mice had lower body weight (-7% CHOW, -12% DIO as well as smaller gonadal (-38% CHOW, -36% DIO and inguinal (-29% CHOW, -30% DIO fat pads than their WT counterparts. Conversely, in WT mice, C5aR was upregulated in DIO vs CHOW diets in gonadal adipose tissue, muscle and liver, while C5L2 mRNA expression was lower in C5aRKO on both diet. Furthermore, blood analysis showed lower plasma triglyceride and non-esterified fatty acid levels in both C5aRKO groups, with faster postprandial triglyceride clearance after a fatload. Additionally, C5aRKO mice showed lower CD36 expression in gonadal and muscle on both diets, while DGAT1 expression was higher in gonadal (CHOW and liver (CHOW and DIO and PPARγ was increased in muscle and liver.These observations point towards a role (either direct or indirect for C5aR in energy expenditure and fat storage, suggesting a dual role for C5aR in metabolism as well as in immunity.

  8. Citrullus lanatus 'sentinel' (watermelon) extract reduces atherosclerosis in LDL receptor-deficient mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poduri, Aruna; Rateri, Debra L; Saha, Shubin K; Saha, Sibu; Daugherty, Alan

    2013-05-01

    Watermelon (Citrullus lanatus or C. lanatus) has many potentially bioactive compounds including citrulline, which may influence atherosclerosis. In this study, we determined the effects of C. lanatus, provided as an extract of the cultivar 'sentinel,' on hypercholesterolemia-induced atherosclerosis in mice. Male low-density lipoprotein receptor-deficient mice at 8 weeks old were given either C. lanatus 'sentinel' extract (2% vol/vol; n=10) or a mixture of matching carbohydrates (2% vol/vol; n=8) as the control in drinking water while being fed a saturated fat-enriched diet for 12 weeks ad libitum. Mice consuming C. lanatus 'sentinel' extract had significantly increased plasma citrulline concentrations. Systolic blood pressure was comparable between the two groups. Consumption of C. lanatus 'sentinel' extract led to lower body weight and fat mass without influencing lean mass. There were no differences in food and water intake and in urine output between the two groups. C. lanatus 'sentinel' extract administration decreased plasma cholesterol concentrations that were attributed to reductions of intermediate-/low-density lipoprotein cholesterol. Plasma concentrations of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 and interferon-gamma were decreased and those of interleukin-10 were increased in mice consuming C. lanatus 'sentinel' extract. Intake of C. lanatus 'sentinel' extract resulted in reductions of atherosclerosis in both aortic arch and thoracic regions. In conclusion, consumption of C. lanatus 'sentinel' extract led to reduced body weight gain, decreased plasma cholesterol concentrations, improved homeostasis of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines, and attenuated development of atherosclerosis without affecting systolic blood pressure in hypercholesterolemic mice. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Dopamine receptor D5 deficiency results in a selective reduction of hippocampal NMDA receptor subunit NR2B expression and impaired memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moraga-Amaro, Rodrigo; González, Hugo; Ugalde, Valentina; Donoso-Ramos, Juan Pablo; Quintana-Donoso, Daisy; Lara, Marcelo; Morales, Bernardo; Rojas, Patricio; Pacheco, Rodrigo; Stehberg, Jimmy

    2016-04-01

    Pharmacological evidence associates type I dopamine receptors, including subtypes D1 and D5, with learning and memory. Analyses using genetic approaches have determined the relative contribution of dopamine receptor D1 (D1R) in cognitive tasks. However, the lack of drugs that can discriminate between D1R and D5R has made the pharmacological distinction between the two receptors difficult. Here, we aimed to determine the role of D5R in learning and memory. In this study we tested D5R knockout mice and wild-type littermates in a battery of behavioral tests, including memory, attention, locomotion, anxiety and motivational evaluations. Our results show that genetic deficiency of D5R significantly impairs performance in the Morris water maze paradigm, object location and object recognition memory, indicating a relevant role for D5R in spatial memory and recognition memory. Moreover, the lack of D5R resulted in decreased exploration and locomotion. In contrast, D5R deficiency had no impact on working memory, anxiety and depressive-like behavior, measured using the spontaneous alternation, open-field, tail suspension test, and forced swimming test. Electrophysiological analyses performed on hippocampal slices showed impairment in long-term-potentiation in mice lacking D5R. Further analyses at the molecular level showed that genetic deficiency of D5R results in a strong and selective reduction in the expression of the NMDA receptor subunit NR2B in the hippocampus. These findings demonstrate the relevant contribution of D5R in memory and suggest a functional interaction of D5R with hippocampal glutamatergic pathways. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Accelerators

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2001-01-01

    The talk summarizes the principles of particle acceleration and addresses problems related to storage rings like LEP and LHC. Special emphasis will be given to orbit stability, long term stability of the particle motion, collective effects and synchrotron radiation.

  11. Leptin Increases Striatal Dopamine D2 Receptor Binding in Leptin-Deficient Obese (ob/ob) Mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pfaffly, J.; Michaelides, M.; Wang, G-J.; Pessin, J.E.; Volkow, N.D.; Thanos, P.K.

    2010-06-01

    Peripheral and central leptin administration have been shown to mediate central dopamine (DA) signaling. Leptin-receptor deficient rodents show decreased DA D2 receptor (D2R) binding in striatum and unique DA profiles compared to controls. Leptin-deficient mice show increased DA activity in reward-related brain regions. The objective of this study was to examine whether basal D2R-binding differences contribute to the phenotypic behaviors of leptin-deficient ob/ob mice, and whether D2R binding is altered in response to peripheral leptin treatment in these mice. Leptin decreased body weight, food intake, and plasma insulin concentration in ob/ob mice but not in wild-type mice. Basal striatal D2R binding (measured with autoradiography [{sup 3}H] spiperone) did not differ between ob/ob and wild-type mice but the response to leptin did. In wild-type mice, leptin decreased striatal D2R binding, whereas, in ob/ob mice, leptin increased D2R binding. Our findings provide further evidence that leptin modulates D2R expression in striatum and that these effects are genotype/phenotype dependent.

  12. Phencyclidine-Induced Social Withdrawal Results from Deficient Stimulation of Cannabinoid CB1 Receptors: Implications for Schizophrenia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seillier, Alexandre; Martinez, Alex A; Giuffrida, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    The neuronal mechanisms underlying social withdrawal, one of the core negative symptoms of schizophrenia, are not well understood. Recent studies suggest an involvement of the endocannabinoid system in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia and, in particular, of negative symptoms. We used biochemical, pharmacological, and behavioral approaches to investigate the role played by the endocannabinoid system in social withdrawal induced by sub-chronic administration of phencyclidine (PCP). Pharmacological enhancement of endocannabinoid levels via systemic administration of URB597, an inhibitor of endocannabinoid degradation, reversed social withdrawal in PCP-treated rats via stimulation of CB1 receptors, but reduced social interaction in control animals through activation of a cannabinoid/vanilloid-sensitive receptor. In addition, the potent CB agonist CP55,940 reversed PCP-induced social withdrawal in a CB1-dependent manner, whereas pharmacological blockade of CB1 receptors by either AM251 or SR141716 reduced the time spent in social interaction in control animals. PCP-induced social withdrawal was accompanied by a decrease of anandamide (AEA) levels in the amygdala and prefrontal cortex, and these deficits were reversed by URB597. As CB1 receptors are predominantly expressed on GABAergic interneurons containing the anxiogenic peptide cholecystokinin (CCK), we also examined whether the PCP-induced social withdrawal resulted from deficient CB1-mediated modulation of CCK transmission. The selective CCK2 antagonist LY225910 blocked both PCP- and AM251-induced social withdrawal, but not URB597 effect in control rats. Taken together, these findings indicate that AEA-mediated activation of CB1 receptors is crucial for social interaction, and that PCP-induced social withdrawal results from deficient endocannabinoid transmission. PMID:23563893

  13. Validity of leptin receptor-deficiency (db/db) type 2 diabetes mellitus mice as a model of secondary osteoporosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Le; You, Yong-Ke; Zhu, Tracy Y.; Zheng, Li-Zhen; Huang, Xiao-Ru; Chen, Hai-Yong; Yao, Dong; Lan, Hui-Yao; Qin, Ling

    2016-06-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the validation of the leptin receptor-deficient mice model for secondary osteoporosis associated with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) at bone micro-architectural level. Thirty three 36-week old male mice were divided into four groups: normal control (db/m) (n = 7), leptin receptor-deficient T2DM (db/db) (n = 8), human C-reactive protein (CRP) transgenic normal control (crp/db/m) (n = 7), and human CRP transgenic T2DM (crp/db/db) (n = 11). Lumber vertebrae (L5) and bilateral lower limbs were scanned by micro-CT to analyze trabecular and cortical bone quality. Right femora were used for three-point bending to analyze the mechanical properties. Trabecular bone quality at L5 was better in db/db or crp/db/db group in terms of bone mineral density (BMD), bone volume fraction, connectivity density, trabecular number and separation (all p  0.05). Maximum loading and energy yield in mechanical test were similar among groups while the elastic modulus in db/db and crp/db/db significantly lower than db/m. The leptin-receptor mice is not a proper model for secondary osteoporosis associated with T2DM.

  14. Impaired endothelial barrier function in apolipoprotein M-deficient mice is dependent on sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor 1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Pernille M; Liu, Catherine H; Swendeman, Steven L

    2016-01-01

    Apolipoprotein M (ApoM) transports sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) in plasma, and ApoM-deficient mice (Apom(-/-)) have ∼50% reduced plasma S1P levels. There are 5 known S1P receptors, and S1P induces adherens junction formation between endothelial cells through the S1P1 receptor, which in turn...... suppresses vascular leak. Increased vascular permeability is a hallmark of inflammation. The purpose of this study was to explore the relationships between vascular leakage in ApoM deficiency and S1P1 function in normal physiology and in inflammation. Vascular permeability in the lungs was assessed...... by accumulation of dextran molecules (70 kDa) and was increased ∼40% in Apom(-/-) mice compared to WT (C57Bl6/j) mice. Reconstitution of plasma ApoM/S1P or treatment with an S1P1 receptor agonist (SEW2871) rapidly reversed the vascular leakage to a level similar to that in WT mice, suggesting that it is caused...

  15. Chronic stress accelerates ligature-induced periodontitis by suppressing glucocorticoid receptor-α signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Huaixiu; Xu, Minguang; Wang, Feng; Liu, Shisen; Gu, Jing; Lin, Songshan; Zhao, Lisheng

    2016-03-25

    Periodontitis is a common chronic inflammatory disease. Recent studies have shown that chronic stress (CS) might modulate periodontal disease, but there are few models of CS-induced periodontitis, and the underlying mechanisms are unclear. The present study established a rat model of periodontitis associated with CS induced by nylon thread ligatures. The severity of periodontitis was evaluated in this model by radiographic and pathological examination. The inflammatory reaction indicated by the elevated serum levels of interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6 and IL-8 was assessed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Toll-like receptor-4 (TLR4) and glucocorticoid receptor-α (GR-α) expressions were detected by reverse transcriptase-PCR and western blotting. Open-field tests and serum corticosterone were used to evaluate CS. The results showed that CS induced behavioral changes and increased corticosterone levels of the animals with periodontitis. CS stimulation markedly increased alveolar bone loss, periodontal pocket depth and the number of plaques. It also enhanced the inflammatory reaction. These results suggest that CS accelerated the ligature-induced pathological changes associated with periodontitis. Further analysis of the mechanisms involved showed that GR-α expression was significantly downregulated in periodontal tissues of the animals undergoing CS. Blocking GR-α signaling in lipopolysaccharide and corticosteroid-treated human periodontal ligament fibroblast cells in vitro significantly upregulated the expression of p-Akt (protein kinase B) and TLR4, promoted nuclear factor-κB activity and increased levels of IL-1β, IL-6 and IL-8. This research suggests that CS might accelerate the pathological progression of periodontitis by a GR-α signaling-mediated inflammatory response and that this may be a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of periodontal disease, particularly in patients with CS.

  16. GPR84 deficiency reduces microgliosis, but accelerates dendritic degeneration and cognitive decline in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Audoy-Rémus, Julie; Bozoyan, Lusine; Dumas, Aline; Filali, Mohammed; Lecours, Cynthia; Lacroix, Steve; Rivest, Serge; Tremblay, Marie-Eve; Vallières, Luc

    2015-05-01

    Microglia surrounds the amyloid plaques that form in the brains of patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD), but their role is controversial. Under inflammatory conditions, these cells can express GPR84, an orphan receptor whose pathophysiological role is unknown. Here, we report that GPR84 is upregulated in microglia of APP/PS1 transgenic mice, a model of AD. Without GPR84, these mice display both accelerated cognitive decline and a reduced number of microglia, especially in areas surrounding plaques. The lack of GPR84 affects neither plaque formation nor hippocampal neurogenesis, but promotes dendritic degeneration. Furthermore, GPR84 does not influence the clinical progression of other diseases in which its expression has been reported, i.e., experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) and endotoxic shock. We conclude that GPR84 plays a beneficial role in amyloid pathology by acting as a sensor for a yet unknown ligand that promotes microglia recruitment, a response affecting dendritic degeneration and required to prevent further cognitive decline. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Farnesoid X Receptor Deficiency Improves Glucose Homeostasis in Mouse Models of Obesity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prawitt, Janne; Abdelkarim, Mouaadh; Stroeve, Johanna H. M.; Popescu, Iuliana; Duez, Helene; Velagapudi, Vidya R.; Dumont, Julie; Bouchaert, Emmanuel; van Dijk, Theo H.; Lucas, Anthony; Dorchies, Emilie; Daoudi, Mehdi; Lestavel, Sophie; Gonzalez, Frank J.; Oresic, Matej; Cariou, Bertrand; Kuipers, Folkert; Caron, Sandrine; Staels, Bart

    OBJECTIVE-Bile acids (BA) participate in the maintenance of metabolic homeostasis acting through different signaling pathways. The nuclear BA receptor farnesoid X receptor (FXR) regulates pathways in BA, lipid, glucose, and energy metabolism, which become dysregulated in obesity. However, the role

  18. Whole-Body Vibration Mimics the Metabolic Effects of Exercise in Male Leptin Receptor-Deficient Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGee-Lawrence, Meghan E; Wenger, Karl H; Misra, Sudipta; Davis, Catherine L; Pollock, Norman K; Elsalanty, Mohammed; Ding, Kehong; Isales, Carlos M; Hamrick, Mark W; Wosiski-Kuhn, Marlena; Arounleut, Phonepasong; Mattson, Mark P; Cutler, Roy G; Yu, Jack C; Stranahan, Alexis M

    2017-05-01

    Whole-body vibration (WBV) has gained attention as a potential exercise mimetic, but direct comparisons with the metabolic effects of exercise are scarce. To determine whether WBV recapitulates the metabolic and osteogenic effects of physical activity, we exposed male wild-type (WT) and leptin receptor-deficient (db/db) mice to daily treadmill exercise (TE) or WBV for 3 months. Body weights were analyzed and compared with WT and db/db mice that remained sedentary. Glucose and insulin tolerance testing revealed comparable attenuation of hyperglycemia and insulin resistance in db/db mice following TE or WBV. Both interventions reduced body weight in db/db mice and normalized muscle fiber diameter. TE or WBV also attenuated adipocyte hypertrophy in visceral adipose tissue and reduced hepatic lipid content in db/db mice. Although the effects of leptin receptor deficiency on cortical bone structure were not eliminated by either intervention, exercise and WBV increased circulating levels of osteocalcin in db/db mice. In the context of increased serum osteocalcin, the modest effects of TE and WBV on bone geometry, mineralization, and biomechanics may reflect subtle increases in osteoblast activity in multiple areas of the skeleton. Taken together, these observations indicate that WBV recapitulates the effects of exercise on metabolism in type 2 diabetes.

  19. PX-RICS-deficient mice mimic autism spectrum disorder in Jacobsen syndrome through impaired GABAA receptor trafficking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Tsutomu; Arima-Yoshida, Fumiko; Sakaue, Fumika; Nasu-Nishimura, Yukiko; Takeda, Yasuko; Matsuura, Ken; Akshoomoff, Natacha; Mattson, Sarah N; Grossfeld, Paul D; Manabe, Toshiya; Akiyama, Tetsu

    2016-03-16

    Jacobsen syndrome (JBS) is a rare congenital disorder caused by a terminal deletion of the long arm of chromosome 11. A subset of patients exhibit social behavioural problems that meet the diagnostic criteria for autism spectrum disorder (ASD); however, the underlying molecular pathogenesis remains poorly understood. PX-RICS is located in the chromosomal region commonly deleted in JBS patients with autistic-like behaviour. Here we report that PX-RICS-deficient mice exhibit ASD-like social behaviours and ASD-related comorbidities. PX-RICS-deficient neurons show reduced surface γ-aminobutyric acid type A receptor (GABAAR) levels and impaired GABAAR-mediated synaptic transmission. PX-RICS, GABARAP and 14-3-3ζ/θ form an adaptor complex that interconnects GABAAR and dynein/dynactin, thereby facilitating GABAAR surface expression. ASD-like behavioural abnormalities in PX-RICS-deficient mice are ameliorated by enhancing inhibitory synaptic transmission with a GABAAR agonist. Our findings demonstrate a critical role of PX-RICS in cognition and suggest a causal link between PX-RICS deletion and ASD-like behaviour in JBS patients.

  20. Hypersensitivity to thromboxane receptor mediated cerebral vasomotion and CBF oscillations during acute NO-deficiency in rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Béla Horváth

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Low frequency (4-12 cpm spontaneous fluctuations of the cerebrovascular tone (vasomotion and oscillations of the cerebral blood flow (CBF have been reported in diseases associated with endothelial dysfunction. Since endothelium-derived nitric oxide (NO suppresses constitutively the release and vascular effects of thromboxane A(2 (TXA(2, NO-deficiency is often associated with activation of thromboxane receptors (TP. In the present study we hypothesized that in the absence of NO, overactivation of the TP-receptor mediated cerebrovascular signaling pathway contributes to the development of vasomotion and CBF oscillations. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Effects of pharmacological modulation of TP-receptor activation and its downstream signaling pathway have been investigated on CBF oscillations (measured by laser-Doppler flowmetry in anesthetized rats and vasomotion (measured by isometric tension recording in isolated rat middle cerebral arteries, MCAs both under physiological conditions and after acute inhibition of NO synthesis. Administration of the TP-receptor agonist U-46619 (1 µg/kg i.v. to control animals failed to induce any changes of the systemic or cerebral circulatory parameters. Inhibition of the NO synthesis by nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME, 100 mg/kg i.v. resulted in increased mean arterial blood pressure and a decreased CBF accompanied by appearance of CBF-oscillations with a dominant frequency of 148±2 mHz. U-46619 significantly augmented the CBF-oscillations induced by L-NAME while inhibition of endogenous TXA(2 synthesis by ozagrel (10 mg/kg i.v. attenuated it. In isolated MCAs U-46619 in a concentration of 100 nM, which induced weak and stable contraction under physiological conditions, evoked sustained vasomotion in the absence of NO, which effect could be completely reversed by inhibition of Rho-kinase by 10 µM Y-27632. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: These results suggest that hypersensitivity of the TP-receptor

  1. Apolipoprotein E deficiency increases remnant lipoproteins and accelerates progressive atherosclerosis, but not xanthoma formation, in gene modified minipigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shim, Jeong; Poulsen, Christian Bo; Hagensen, Mette K.

    2017-01-01

    Summary: Deficiency of apolipoprotein E (APOE) causes familial dysbetalipoproteinemia in humans resulting in a higher risk of atherosclerotic disease. In mice, APOE deficiency results in a severe atherosclerosis phenotype, but it is unknown to what extent this is unique to mice. In this study, AP...

  2. P2X7 receptor-deficient mice are susceptible to bone cancer pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Rikke Rie; Nielsen, Christian K.; Nasser, Arafat

    2011-01-01

    The purinergic P2X7 receptor is implicated in both neuropathic and inflammatory pain, and has been suggested as a possible target in pain treatment. However, the specific role of the P2X7 receptor in bone cancer pain is unknown. We demonstrated that BALB/cJ P2X7 receptor knockout (P2X7R KO) mice...... were susceptible to bone cancer pain and moreover had an earlier onset of pain-related behaviours compared with cancer-bearing, wild-type mice. Furthermore, acute treatment with the selective P2X7 receptor antagonist, A-438079, failed to alleviate pain-related behaviours in models of bone cancer pain...... with and without astrocyte activation (BALB/cJ or C3H mice inoculated with 4T1 mammary cancer cells or NCTC 2472 osteosarcoma cells, respectively), suggesting that astrocytic P2X7 receptors play a negligible role in bone cancer pain. The results support the hypothesis that bone cancer pain is a separate pain state...

  3. G protein-coupled receptor 39 deficiency is associated with pancreatic islet dysfunction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holst, Birgitte; Egerod, Kristoffer L; Jin, Chunyu

    2009-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptor (GPR)-39 is a seven-transmembrane receptor expressed mainly in endocrine and metabolic tissues that acts as a Zn(++) sensor signaling mainly through the G(q) and G(12/13) pathways. The expression of GPR39 is regulated by hepatocyte nuclear factor (HNF)-1alpha and HNF-4...... tolerance both during oral and iv glucose tolerance tests, and Gpr39(-/-) mice had decreased plasma insulin response to oral glucose. Islet architecture was normal in the Gpr39 null mice, but expression of Pdx-1 and Hnf-1alpha was reduced. Isolated, perifused islets from Gpr39 null mice secreted less...

  4. Reciprocal feedback regulation of PI3K and androgen receptor signaling in PTEN-deficient prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carver, Brett S; Chapinski, Caren; Wongvipat, John; Hieronymus, Haley; Chen, Yu; Chandarlapaty, Sarat; Arora, Vivek K; Le, Carl; Koutcher, Jason; Scher, Howard; Scardino, Peter T; Rosen, Neal; Sawyers, Charles L

    2011-05-17

    Prostate cancer is characterized by its dependence on androgen receptor (AR) and frequent activation of PI3K signaling. We find that AR transcriptional output is decreased in human and murine tumors with PTEN deletion and that PI3K pathway inhibition activates AR signaling by relieving feedback inhibition of HER kinases. Similarly, AR inhibition activates AKT signaling by reducing levels of the AKT phosphatase PHLPP. Thus, these two oncogenic pathways cross-regulate each other by reciprocal feedback. Inhibition of one activates the other, thereby maintaining tumor cell survival. However, combined pharmacologic inhibition of PI3K and AR signaling caused near-complete prostate cancer regressions in a Pten-deficient murine prostate cancer model and in human prostate cancer xenografts, indicating that both pathways coordinately support survival. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Temporal phasing of locomotor activity, heart rate rhythmicity, and core body temperature is disrupted in VIP receptor 2-deficient mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hannibal, Jens; Hsiung, Hansen M; Fahrenkrug, Jan

    2011-01-01

    Neurons of the brain's biological clock located in the hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) generate circadian rhythms of physiology (core body temperature, hormone secretion, locomotor activity, sleep/wake, and heart rate) with distinct temporal phasing when entrained by the light/dark (LD......) cycle. The neuropeptide vasoactive intestinal polypetide (VIP) and its receptor (VPAC2) are highly expressed in the SCN. Recent studies indicate that VIPergic signaling plays an essential role in the maintenance of ongoing circadian rhythmicity by synchronizing SCN cells and by maintaining rhythmicity...... within individual neurons. To further increase the understanding of the role of VPAC2 signaling in circadian regulation, we implanted telemetric devices and simultaneously measured core body temperature, spontaneous activity, and heart rate in a strain of VPAC2-deficient mice and compared...

  6. Effect of vertical sleeve gastrectomy in melanocortin receptor 4-deficient rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mul, J.D.; Begg, D.P.; Alsters, S.I.; van Haaften, G.; Duran, K.J.; D'Alessio, D.A.; le Roux, C.W.; Woods, S.C.; Sandoval, D.A.; Blakemore, A.I.; Cuppen, E.; van Haelst, M.M.; Seeley, R.J.

    2012-01-01

    Bariatric surgery is currently the most effective treatment for obesity. Vertical sleeve gastrectomy (VSG), a commonly applied bariatric procedure, involves surgically incising most of the volume of the stomach. In humans, partial loss of melanocortin receptor-4 (MC4R) activity is the most common

  7. Melanocortin receptor 4 deficiency affects body weight regulation, grooming behavior, and substrate preference in the rat

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mul, J.D.; van Boxtel, R.; Bergen, D.J.; Brans, M.A.; Brakkee, J.H.; Toonen, P.W.; Garner, K.M.; Adan, R.A.; Cuppen, E.

    2012-01-01

    Obesity is caused by an imbalance between energy intake and expenditure and has become a major health-care problem in western society. The central melanocortin system plays a crucial role in the regulation of feeding and energy expenditure, and functional loss of melanocortin receptor 4 (MC4R) is

  8. Sepse por Salmonella associada à deficiência do receptor da Interleucina-12 (IL-12Rb1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carvalho Beatriz Tavares Costa

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: descrever caso clínico de uma criança que desenvolveu septicemia por Salmonella enteritidis, sendo diagnosticada imunodeficiência primária. DESCRIÇÃO: paciente masculino, de um ano e 9 meses, com febre e lesões de pele há 50 dias, internado com lesão perilabial ulcerada com secreção purulenta, lesão ulcerada friável em língua, lesões ulcerocrostosas em membros, pneumonia bilateral com derrame pleural e choque séptico, sendo diagnosticado Salmonella enteritidis como agente etiológico. A identificação desta bactéria direcionou a investigação para a síndrome MIM. O diagnóstico de deficiência do receptor da interleucina-12 (IL-12Rbeta1 foi confirmado através da dosagem de IL-12 e do interferon (IFN-gama produzido pelas células do paciente em meio de cultura. O resultado demonstrou ausência de produção de IL-12 e do IFN-gama mesmo após estímulo adequado. COMENTÁRIOS: a identificação da Salmonella enteritidis como agente etiológico de septicemia sugere uma disfunção do sistema imunológico. Foi realizada avaliação laboratorial das imunidades humoral, celular e inata. Após avaliação laboratorial direcionada para síndrome MIM, foi confirmada a deficiência do receptor da Interleucina-12 (IL-12Rbeta1. O uso do IFN-gama é recomendado nos casos graves, assim como o tratamento de suporte e o aconselhamento genético.

  9. Novel mechanism by which probucol lowers low density lipoprotein levels demonstrated in the LDL receptor-deficient rabbit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naruszewicz, M.; Carew, T.E.; Pittman, R.C.; Witztum, J.L.; Steinberg, D.

    1984-01-01

    Treatment of low density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor-deficient rabbits (WHHL rabbits) with probucol (1% w/w in a chow diet) lowered their LDL-cholesterol levels by 36%, consonant with the reported effectiveness of the drug in patients deficient in the LDL receptor. Initial studies of LDL fractional catabolic rate (FCR) using 125 I-labeled LDL prepared from the serum of untreated WHHL rabbits showed no difference between probucol-treated WHHL rabbits and untreated WHHL rabbits. When, however, 125 I-labeled LDL was prepared from donor WHHL rabbits under treatment with probucol and injected back into them, the FCR was found to be increased by about 50% above that measured simultaneously using 131 I-labeled LDL prepared from untreated WHHL donors. The labeled LDL from probucol-treated donors was also metabolized more rapidly than that from untreated donors when injected into untreated WHHL rabbits or into untreated wild-type New Zealand White rabbits. Finally, it was shown that rabbit skin fibroblasts in culture degraded labeled LDL prepared from probucol-treated WHHL rabbits more rapidly than that prepared from untreated WHHL donors. This was true both for normal rabbit fibroblasts and also for WHHL skin fibroblasts, although the absolute degradation rates in the latter were, of course, much lower for both forms of LDL. The data indicate that a major mechanism by which probucol lowers LDL levels relates not to changes in the cellular mechanisms for LDL uptake or to changes in LDL production but rather to intrinsic changes in the structure and metabolism of the plasma LDL of the probucol-treated animal

  10. Resistance to diet-induced adiposity in cannabinoid receptor-1 deficient mice is not due to impaired adipocyte function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oosterveer Maaike H

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Overactivity and/or dysregulation of the endocannabinoid system (ECS contribute to development of obesity. In vitro studies indicate a regulatory role for the cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1 in adipocyte function and CB1-receptor deficient (CB1-/- mice are resistant to high fat diet-induced obesity. Whether this phenotype of CB1-/- mice is related to altered fat metabolism in adipose tissue is unknown. Methods We evaluated adipose tissue differentiation/proliferation markers and quantified lipogenic and lipolytic activities in fat tissues of CB1-/- and CB1+/+ mice fed a high-fat (HF or a high-fat/fish oil (HF/FO diet as compared to animals receiving a low-fat chow diet. Comparison between HF diet and HF/FO diet allowed to investigate the influence of dietary fat quality on adipose tissue biology in relation to CB1 functioning. Results The adiposity-resistant phenotype of the CB1-/- mice was characterized by reduced fat mass and adipocyte size in HF and HF/FO-fed CB1-/- mice in parallel to a significant increase in energy expenditure as compared to CB1+/+ mice. The expression levels of adipocyte differentiation and proliferation markers were however maintained in these animals. Consistent with unaltered lipogenic gene expression, the fatty acid synthesis rates in adipose tissues from CB1-/- and CB1+/+ mice were unchanged. Whole-body and adipose-specific lipoprotein lipase (LPL activities were also not altered in CB1-/- mice. Conclusions These findings indicate that protection against diet-induced adiposity in CB1-deficient mice is not related to changes in adipocyte function per se, but rather results from increased energy dissipation by oxidative and non-oxidative pathways.

  11. Pineal germinoma in a child with interferon-γ receptor 1 deficiency. case report and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taramasso, L; Boisson-Dupuis, S; Garrè, M L; Bondi, E; Cama, A; Nozza, P; Morana, G; Casanova, J L; Marazzi, M G

    2014-11-01

    Interferon-γ receptor 1 (IFN-γR1) deficiency is one of the primary immunodeficiencies conferring Mendelian Susceptibility to Mycobacterial Disease (MSMD). Some cases of neoplasms have been recently reported in patients with MSMD, underlying the already known link between immunodeficiency and carcinogenesis. We report the first case of intracranial tumour, i.e. pineal germinoma, in a 11-year-old patient with complete IFN-γR1 deficiency. The first clinical presentation of the genetic immunodeficiency dates back to when the child was aged 2 y and 10 mo, when he presented a multi-focal osteomyelitis caused by Mycobacterium scrofulaceum. The diagnosis of IFN-γR1 deficiency (523delT/523delT in IFNGR1 gene) was subsequently made. The child responded to antibiotic therapy and remained in stable clinical condition until the age of 11 years, when he started complaining of frontal, chronic headache. MRI revealed a solid pineal region mass lesion measuring 20 × 29 × 36 mm. Histological findings revealed a diagnosis of pineal germinoma. The patient received chemotherapy followed by local whole ventricular irradiation with boost on pineal site, experiencing complete remission, and to date he is tumor-free at four years follow-up. Four other cases of tumors have been reported in patients affected by MSMD in our knowledge: a case of Kaposi sarcoma, a case of B-cell lymphoma, a case of cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma and a case of oesophageal squamous cell carcinoma. In conclusion, in patients with MSMD, not only the surveillance of infectious diseases, but also that of tumors is important.

  12. Absence of serum growth hormone binding protein in patients with growth hormone receptor deficiency (Laron dwarfism)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daughaday, W.H.; Trivedi, B.

    1987-07-01

    It has recently been recognized that human serum contains a protein that specifically binds human growth hormone (hGH). This protein has the same restricted specificity for hGH as the membrane-bound GH receptor. To determine whether the GH-binding protein is a derivative of, or otherwise related to, the GH receptor, the authors have examined the serum of three patients with Laron-type dwarfism, a condition in which GH refractoriness has been attributed to a defect in the GH receptor. The binding of /sup 125/I-labeled hGH incubated with serum has been measured after gel filtration of the serum through an Ultrogel AcA 44 minicolumn. Results are expressed as percent of specifically bound /sup 125/I-hGH and as specific binding relative to that of a reference serum after correction is made for endogenous GH. The mean +/- SEM of specific binding of sera from eight normal adults (26-46 years of age) was 21.6 +/- 0.45%, and the relative specific binding was 101.1 +/- 8.6%. Sera from 11 normal children had lower specific binding of 12.5 +/- 1.95% and relative specific binding of 56.6 +/- 9.1%. Sera from three children with Laron-type dwarfism lacked any demonstrable GH binding, whereas sera from 10 other children with other types of nonpituitary short stature had normal relative specific binding. They suggest that the serum GH-binding protein is a soluble derivative of the GH receptor. Measurement of the serum GH-binding protein may permit recognition of other abnormalities of the GH receptor.

  13. Absence of serum growth hormone binding protein in patients with growth hormone receptor deficiency (Laron dwarfism)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daughaday, W.H.; Trivedi, B.

    1987-01-01

    It has recently been recognized that human serum contains a protein that specifically binds human growth hormone (hGH). This protein has the same restricted specificity for hGH as the membrane-bound GH receptor. To determine whether the GH-binding protein is a derivative of, or otherwise related to, the GH receptor, the authors have examined the serum of three patients with Laron-type dwarfism, a condition in which GH refractoriness has been attributed to a defect in the GH receptor. The binding of 125 I-labeled hGH incubated with serum has been measured after gel filtration of the serum through an Ultrogel AcA 44 minicolumn. Results are expressed as percent of specifically bound 125 I-hGH and as specific binding relative to that of a reference serum after correction is made for endogenous GH. The mean +/- SEM of specific binding of sera from eight normal adults (26-46 years of age) was 21.6 +/- 0.45%, and the relative specific binding was 101.1 +/- 8.6%. Sera from 11 normal children had lower specific binding of 12.5 +/- 1.95% and relative specific binding of 56.6 +/- 9.1%. Sera from three children with Laron-type dwarfism lacked any demonstrable GH binding, whereas sera from 10 other children with other types of nonpituitary short stature had normal relative specific binding. They suggest that the serum GH-binding protein is a soluble derivative of the GH receptor. Measurement of the serum GH-binding protein may permit recognition of other abnormalities of the GH receptor

  14. Effects of High Fat Feeding and Diabetes on Regression of Atherosclerosis Induced by Low-Density Lipoprotein Receptor Gene Therapy in LDL Receptor-Deficient Mice.

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    Florian Willecke

    Full Text Available We tested whether a high fat diet (HFD containing the inflammatory dietary fatty acid palmitate or insulin deficient diabetes altered the remodeling of atherosclerotic plaques in LDL receptor knockout (Ldlr-/- mice. Cholesterol reduction was achieved by using a helper-dependent adenovirus (HDAd carrying the gene for the low-density lipoprotein receptor (Ldlr; HDAd-LDLR. After injection of the HDAd-LDLR, mice consuming either HFD, which led to insulin resistance but not hyperglycemia, or low fat diet (LFD, showed regression compared to baseline. However there was no difference between the two groups in terms of atherosclerotic lesion size, or CD68+ cell and lipid content. Because of the lack of effects of these two diets, we then tested whether viral-mediated cholesterol reduction would lead to defective regression in mice with greater hyperglycemia. In both normoglycemic and streptozotocin (STZ-treated hyperglycemic mice, HDAd-LDLR significantly reduced plasma cholesterol levels, decreased atherosclerotic lesion size, reduced macrophage area and lipid content, and increased collagen content of plaque in the aortic sinus. However, reductions in anti-inflammatory and ER stress-related genes were less pronounced in STZ-diabetic mice compared to non-diabetic mice. In conclusion, HDAd-mediated Ldlr gene therapy is an effective and simple method to induce atherosclerosis regression in Ldlr-/- mice in different metabolic states.

  15. Clinical features of Candidiasis in patients with inherited interleukin 12 receptor β1 deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouederni, Monia; Sanal, Ozden; Ikinciogullari, Aydan; Tezcan, Ilhan; Dogu, Figen; Sologuren, Ithaisa; Pedraza-Sánchez, Sigifredo; Keser, Melike; Tanir, Gonul; Nieuwhof, Chris; Colino, Elena; Kumararatne, Dinakantha; Levy, Jacov; Kutukculer, Necil; Aytekin, Caner; Herrera-Ramos, Estefanía; Bhatti, Micah; Karaca, Neslihan; Barbouche, Ridha; Broides, Arnon; Goudouris, Ekaterini; Franco, José Luis; Parvaneh, Nima; Reisli, Ismail; Strickler, Alexis; Shcherbina, Anna; Somer, Ayper; Segal, Anthony; Angel-Moreno, Alfonso; Lezana-Fernandez, José Luis; Bejaoui, Mohamed; Bobadilla-Del Valle, Miriam; Kachboura, Salem; Sentongo, Timothy; Ben-Mustapha, Imen; Bustamante, Jacinta; Picard, Capucine; Puel, Anne; Boisson-Dupuis, Stéphanie; Abel, Laurent; Casanova, Jean-Laurent; Rodríguez-Gallego, Carlos

    2014-01-01

    Interleukin 12Rβ1 (IL-12Rβ1)-deficient patients are prone to clinical disease caused by mycobacteria, Salmonella, and other intramacrophagic pathogens, probably because of impaired interleukin 12-dependent interferon γ production. About 25% of patients also display mucocutaneous candidiasis, probably owing to impaired interleukin 23-dependent interleukin 17 immunity. The clinical features and outcome of candidiasis in these patients have not been described before, to our knowledge. We report here the clinical signs of candidiasis in 35 patients with IL-12Rβ1 deficiency. Most (n = 71) of the 76 episodes of candidiasis were mucocutaneous. Isolated oropharyngeal candidiasis (OPC) was the most common presentation (59 episodes, 34 patients) and was recurrent or persistent in 26 patients. Esophageal candidiasis (n = 7) was associated with proven OPC in 2 episodes, and cutaneous candidiasis (n = 2) with OPC in 1 patient, whereas isolated vulvovaginal candidiasis (VVC; n = 3) was not. Five episodes of proven invasive candidiasis were documented in 4 patients; 1 of these episodes was community acquired in the absence of any other comorbid condition. The first episode of candidiasis occurred earlier in life (median age±standard deviation, 1.5 ± 7.87 years) than infections with environmental mycobacteria (4.29 ± 11.9 years), Mycobacterium tuberculosis (4 ± 3.12 years), or Salmonella species (4.58 ± 4.17 years) or other rare infections (3 ± 11.67 years). Candidiasis was the first documented infection in 19 of the 35 patients, despite the vaccination of 10 of these 19 patients with live bacille Calmette-Guérin. Patients who are deficient in IL-12Rβ1 may have candidiasis, usually mucocutaneous, which is frequently recurrent or persistent. Candidiasis may be the first clinical manifestation in these patients.

  16. Clinical Features of Candidiasis in Patients With Inherited Interleukin 12 Receptor β1 Deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouederni, Monia; Sanal, Ozden; Ikincioğullari, Aydan; Tezcan, Ilhan; Dogu, Figen; Sologuren, Ithaisa; Pedraza-Sánchez, Sigifredo; Keser, Melike; Tanir, Gonul; Nieuwhof, Chris; Colino, Elena; Kumararatne, Dinakantha; Levy, Jacov; Kutukculer, Necil; Aytekin, Caner; Herrera-Ramos, Estefanía; Bhatti, Micah; Karaca, Neslihan; Barbouche, Ridha; Broides, Arnon; Goudouris, Ekaterini; Franco, José Luis; Parvaneh, Nima; Reisli, Ismail; Strickler, Alexis; Shcherbina, Anna; Somer, Ayper; Segal, Anthony; Angel-Moreno, Alfonso; Lezana-Fernandez, José Luis; Bejaoui, Mohamed; Bobadilla-Del Valle, Miriam; Kachboura, Salem; Sentongo, Timothy; Ben-Mustapha, Imen; Bustamante, Jacinta; Picard, Capucine; Puel, Anne; Boisson-Dupuis, Stéphanie; Abel, Laurent; Casanova, Jean-Laurent; Rodríguez-Gallego, Carlos

    2014-01-01

    Background. Interleukin 12Rβ1 (IL-12Rβ1)–deficient patients are prone to clinical disease caused by mycobacteria, Salmonella, and other intramacrophagic pathogens, probably because of impaired interleukin 12–dependent interferon γ production. About 25% of patients also display mucocutaneous candidiasis, probably owing to impaired interleukin 23–dependent interleukin 17 immunity. The clinical features and outcome of candidiasis in these patients have not been described before, to our knowledge. We report here the clinical signs of candidiasis in 35 patients with IL-12Rβ1 deficiency. Results. Most (n = 71) of the 76 episodes of candidiasis were mucocutaneous. Isolated oropharyngeal candidiasis (OPC) was the most common presentation (59 episodes, 34 patients) and was recurrent or persistent in 26 patients. Esophageal candidiasis (n = 7) was associated with proven OPC in 2 episodes, and cutaneous candidiasis (n = 2) with OPC in 1 patient, whereas isolated vulvovaginal candidiasis (VVC; n = 3) was not. Five episodes of proven invasive candidiasis were documented in 4 patients; 1 of these episodes was community acquired in the absence of any other comorbid condition. The first episode of candidiasis occurred earlier in life (median age±standard deviation, 1.5 ± 7.87 years) than infections with environmental mycobacteria (4.29 ± 11.9 years), Mycobacterium tuberculosis (4 ± 3.12 years), or Salmonella species (4.58 ± 4.17 years) or other rare infections (3 ± 11.67 years). Candidiasis was the first documented infection in 19 of the 35 patients, despite the vaccination of 10 of these 19 patients with live bacille Calmette-Guérin. Conclusions. Patients who are deficient in IL-12Rβ1 may have candidiasis, usually mucocutaneous, which is frequently recurrent or persistent. Candidiasis may be the first clinical manifestation in these patients. PMID:24186907

  17. Acceleration of the glycolytic flux by steroid receptor coactivator-2 is essential for endometrial decidualization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramakrishna Kommagani

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Early embryo miscarriage is linked to inadequate endometrial decidualization, a cellular transformation process that enables deep blastocyst invasion into the maternal compartment. Although much of the cellular events that underpin endometrial stromal cell (ESC decidualization are well recognized, the individual gene(s and molecular pathways that drive the initiation and progression of this process remain elusive. Using a genetic mouse model and a primary human ESC culture model, we demonstrate that steroid receptor coactivator-2 (SRC-2 is indispensable for rapid steroid hormone-dependent proliferation of ESCs, a critical cell-division step which precedes ESC terminal differentiation into decidual cells. We reveal that SRC-2 is required for increasing the glycolytic flux in human ESCs, which enables rapid proliferation to occur during the early stages of the decidualization program. Specifically, SRC-2 increases the glycolytic flux through induction of 6-phosphofructo-2-kinase/fructose-2, 6-bisphosphatase 3 (PFKFB3, a major rate-limiting glycolytic enzyme. Similarly, acute treatment of mice with a small molecule inhibitor of PFKFB3 significantly suppressed the ability of these animals to exhibit an endometrial decidual response. Together, these data strongly support a conserved mechanism of action by which SRC-2 accelerates the glycolytic flux through PFKFB3 induction to provide the necessary bioenergy and biomass to meet the demands of a high proliferation rate observed in ESCs prior to their differentiation into decidual cells. Because deregulation of endometrial SRC-2 expression has been associated with common gynecological disorders of reproductive-age women, this signaling pathway, involving SRC-2 and PFKFB3, promises to offer new clinical approaches in the diagnosis and/or treatment of a non-receptive uterus in patients presenting idiopathic infertility, recurrent early pregnancy loss, or increased time to pregnancy.

  18. Plant sterol or stanol esters retard lesion formation in LDL receptor-deficient mice independent of changes in serum plant sterols

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Plat, Jogchum; Beugels, Ilona; Gijbels, Marion J. J.; de Winther, Menno P. J.; Mensink, Ronald P.

    2006-01-01

    Statins do not always decrease coronary heart disease mortality, which was speculated based on increased serum plant sterols observed during statin treatment. To evaluate plant sterol atherogenicity, we fed low density lipoprotein-receptor deficient (LDLr(+/-)) mice for 35 weeks with Western diets

  19. In LDL receptor-deficient mice, catabolism of remnant lipoproteins requires a high level of apoE but is inhibited by excess apoE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijk, K.W. van; Vlijmen, B.J.M. van; Hof, H.B. van 't; Zee, A. van der; Santamarina-Fojo, S.; Berkel, T.J.C. van; Havekes, L.M.; Hofker, M.H.

    1999-01-01

    To investigate the quantitative requirement for apolipoprotein (apo) E in the clearance of lipoproteins via the non-low density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor mediated pathway, human APOE was overexpressed at various levels in the livers of mice deficient for both the endogenous Apoe and Ldlr genes

  20. Interleukin-1 receptor type I gene-deficient mice are less susceptible to Staphylococcus epidermidis biomaterial-associated infection than are wild-type mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boelens, J. J.; van der Poll, T.; Zaat, S. A.; Murk, J. L.; Weening, J. J.; Dankert, J.

    2000-01-01

    Elevated concentrations of interleukin-1 (IL-1) were found in tissue surrounding biomaterials infected with Staphylococcus epidermidis. To determine the role of IL-1 in biomaterial-associated infection (BAI), IL-1 receptor type I-deficient (IL-1R(-/-)) and wild-type mice received subcutaneous

  1. Chronic stress accelerates the development of endometriosis in mouse through adrenergic receptor β2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Qiqi; Liu, Xishi; Qi, Qiuming; Guo, Sun-Wei

    2016-11-01

    (a non-specific ADRB agonist), respectively. In all three experiments, the bodyweight and hotplate latency were evaluated before sacrifice 14 days after the induction. In all experimentations, the lesion weight was evaluated and the harvested ectopic endometrial tissue samples were subjected to immunohistochemistry analysis of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), CD31-positive microvessels, proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), phosphorylated CREB, ADRB1, ADRB2, ADRB3, adrenergic receptor α1 (ADRA1) and ADRA2. Exposure to chronic stress accelerated the development of endometriosis and exacerbated the endometriosis-associated generalized hyperalgesia. This promotional effect is likely to be mediated through the systemic activation of the sympatho-adreno-medullary (SAM) axis, which results in subsequent release of catecholamines. The surging catecholamines may activate ADRB2 and CREB, yielding increased angiogenesis and cellular proliferation in ectopic endometrium in mice with induced endometriosis. In addition, β adrenergic receptor blockade completely abolished the promotional effect of chronic stress, likely through suppression of ADRB2 and CREB activation, thus suppressing angiogenesis and proliferation. Moreover, a non-specific adrenergic β agonist and a specific adrenergic β2 agonist, but not non-specific adrenergic α agonist, acted similarly to chronic stress, accelerating the development of endometriosis and exacerbating the generalized hyperalgesia in mice with pre-existing endometriosis. NA. This study is limited by the use of immunohistochemistry analyses only and the lack of molecular data. The present study provides the experimental evidence that chronic stress can promote the development of endometriosis through the activation of ADRB2. Given ADRB2 is also expressed in human endometriosis and appears to be functional, and in light of recent awareness that adrenergic signaling plays critical roles in tumorigenesis, it is likely that

  2. The little women of Loja--growth hormone-receptor deficiency in an inbred population of southern Ecuador.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenbloom, A L; Guevara Aguirre, J; Rosenfeld, R G; Fielder, P J

    1990-11-15

    Laron-type dwarfism, which is characterized by the clinical appearance of isolated growth hormone deficiency with elevated serum levels of growth hormone and decreased serum levels of insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I), has been described in approximately 50 patients. This condition is caused by a deficiency of the cellular receptor for growth hormone, and it is transmitted as an autosomal recessive trait, as indicated by an equal sex distribution and a high rate of consanguinity in affected families. We studied 20 patients (19 females and 1 male, 2 to 49 years of age), from an inbred Spanish population in southern Ecuador, who had the clinical features of Laron-type dwarfism. Seventeen patients were members of two large pedigrees. Among the 13 affected sibships, there were 19 affected and 24 unaffected female siblings and 1 affected and 21 unaffected male siblings. The patients' heights ranged from 10.0 to 6.7 SD below the normal mean height for age in the United States. In addition to the previously described features, 15 patients had limited elbow extensibility, all had blue scleras, affected adults had relatively short extremities, and all four affected women over 30 years of age had hip degeneration. Basal serum concentrations of growth hormone were elevated in all affected children (30 to 160 micrograms per liter) and normal to moderately elevated in the adults. The serum level of growth hormone-binding protein ranged from 1 to 30 percent of normal; IGF-I concentrations were low--less than or equal to 7 micrograms per liter in the children and less than or equal to 66 micrograms per liter in the adults (normal for Ecuadorean women, 98 to 238). Serum levels of IGF-II and growth hormone-dependent IGF-binding protein-3 were also low. We describe an inbred population with a high incidence of growth hormone-receptor deficiency resulting in a clinical picture resembling Laron-type dwarfism but differing principally in showing a marked predominance of affected

  3. FGF-2 deficiency does not influence FGF ligand and receptor expression during development of the nigrostriatal system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratzka, Andreas; Baron, Olga; Grothe, Claudia

    2011-01-01

    Secreted proteins of the fibroblast growth factor (FGF) family play important roles during development of various organ systems. A detailed knowledge of their temporal and spatial expression profiles, especially of closely related FGF family members, are essential to further identification of specific functions in distinct tissues. In the central nervous system dopaminergic neurons of the substantia nigra and their axonal projections into the striatum progressively degenerate in Parkinson's disease. In contrast, FGF-2 deficient mice display increased numbers of dopaminergic neurons. In this study, we determined the expression profiles of all 22 FGF-ligands and 10 FGF-receptor isoforms, in order to clarify, if FGF-2 deficiency leads to compensatory up-regulation of other FGFs in the nigrostriatal system. Three tissues, ventral mesencephalon (VM), striatum (STR) and as reference tissue spinal cord (SC) of wild-type and FGF-2 deficient mice at four developmental stages E14.5, P0, P28, and adult were comparatively analyzed by quantitative RT-PCR. As no differences between the genotypes were observed, a compensatory up-regulation can be excluded. Moreover, this analysis revealed that the majority of FGF-ligands (18/22) and FGF-receptors (9/10) are expressed during normal development of the nigrostriatal system and identified dynamic changes for some family members. By comparing relative expression level changes to SC reference tissue, general alterations in all 3 tissues, such as increased expression of FGF-1, -2, -22, FgfR-2c, -3c and decreased expression of FGF-13 during postnatal development were identified. Further, specific changes affecting only one tissue, such as increased FGF-16 (STR) or decreased FGF-17 (VM) expression, or two tissues, such as decreased expression of FGF-8 (VM, STR) and FGF-15 (SC, VM) were found. Moreover, 3 developmentally down-regulated FGFs (FGF-8b, FGF-15, FGF-17a) were functionally characterized by plasmid-based over-expression in

  4. Peroxisomal proliferator activated receptordeficiency in a Canadian kindred with familial partial lipodystrophy type 3 (FPLD3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cao Henian

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Familial partial lipodystrophy (Dunnigan type 3 (FPLD3, Mendelian Inheritance in Man [MIM] 604367 results from heterozygous mutations in PPARG encoding peroxisomal proliferator-activated receptor-γ. Both dominant-negative and haploinsufficiency mechanisms have been suggested for this condition. Methods We present a Canadian FPLD3 kindred with an affected mother who had loss of fat on arms and legs, but no increase in facial, neck, suprascapular or abdominal fat. She had profound insulin resistance, diabetes, severe hypertriglyceridemia and relapsing pancreatitis, while her pre-pubescent daughter had normal fat distribution but elevated plasma triglycerides and C-peptide and depressed high-density lipoprotein cholesterol. Results The mother and daughter were each heterozygous for PPARG nonsense mutation Y355X, whose protein product in vitro was transcriptionally inactive with no dominant-negative activity against the wild-type receptor. In addition the mutant protein appeared to be markedly unstable. Conclusion Taken together with previous studies of human PPARG mutations, these findings suggest that PPAR-γ deficiency due either to haploinsufficiency or to substantial activity loss due to dominant negative interference of the normal allele product's function can each contribute to the FPLD3 phenotype.

  5. Deficiency of Lipoprotein Lipase in Neurons Decreases AMPA Receptor Phosphorylation and Leads to Neurobehavioral Abnormalities in Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tian Yu

    Full Text Available Alterations in lipid metabolism have been found in several neurodegenerative disorders, including Alzheimer's disease. Lipoprotein lipase (LPL hydrolyzes triacylglycerides in lipoproteins and regulates lipid metabolism in multiple organs and tissues, including the central nervous system (CNS. Though many brain regions express LPL, the functions of this lipase in the CNS remain largely unknown. We developed mice with neuron-specific LPL deficiency that became obese on chow by 16 wks in homozygous mutant mice (NEXLPL-/- and 10 mo in heterozygous mice (NEXLPL+/-. In the present study, we show that 21 mo NEXLPL+/- mice display substantial cognitive function decline including poorer learning and memory, and increased anxiety with no difference in general motor activities and exploratory behavior. These neurobehavioral abnormalities are associated with a reduction in the 2-amino-3-(3-hydroxy-5-methyl-isoxazol-4-yl propanoic acid (AMPA receptor subunit GluA1 and its phosphorylation, without any alterations in amyloid β accumulation. Importantly, a marked deficit in omega-3 and omega-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA in the hippocampus precedes the development of the neurobehavioral phenotype of NEXLPL+/- mice. And, a diet supplemented with n-3 PUFA can improve the learning and memory of NEXLPL+/- mice at both 10 mo and 21 mo of age. We interpret these findings to indicate that LPL regulates the availability of PUFA in the CNS and, this in turn, impacts the strength of synaptic plasticity in the brain of aging mice through the modification of AMPA receptor and its phosphorylation.

  6. Characterization of Ebola virus entry by using pseudotyped viruses: identification of receptor-deficient cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wool-Lewis, R J; Bates, P

    1998-04-01

    Studies analyzing Ebola virus replication have been severely hampered by the extreme pathogenicity of this virus. To permit analysis of the host range and function of the Ebola virus glycoprotein (Ebo-GP), we have developed a system for pseudotyping these glycoproteins into murine leukemia virus (MLV). This pseudotyped virus, MLV(Ebola), can be readily concentrated to titers which exceed 5 x 10(6) infectious units/ml and is effectively neutralized by antibodies specific for Ebo-GP. Analysis of MLV(Ebola) infection revealed that the host range conferred by Ebo-GP is very broad, extending to cells of a variety of species. Notably, all lymphoid cell lines tested were completely resistant to infection; we speculate that this is due to the absence of a cellular receptor for Ebo-GP on B and T cells. The generation of high-titer MLV(Ebola) pseudotypes will be useful for the analysis of immune responses to Ebola virus infection, development of neutralizing antibodies, analysis of glycoprotein function, and isolation of the cellular receptor(s) for the Ebola virus.

  7. Did hypocretin receptor 2 autoantibodies cause narcolepsy with hypocretin deficiency in Pandemrix-vaccinated children? Comment on “Antibodies to influenza nucleoprotein cross-react with human hypocretin receptor 2”

    OpenAIRE

    Vassalli Anne

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Did hypocretin receptor 2 auto antibodies cause narcolepsy with hypocretin deficiency in Pandemrix vaccinated children as suggested by Ahmed et al.? Using newly developed mouse models to report and inactivate hypocretin receptor expression Vassalli et al. now show that hypocretin neurons (whose loss causes narcolepsy) do not express hypocretin autoreceptors raising questions to the interpretation of Ahmed et al.’s findings. Mouse Genome Informatics: www.informatics.jax.org/reference/...

  8. Pharmacological profile of DA-6886, a novel 5-HT4 receptor agonist to accelerate colonic motor activity in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Min Jung; Cho, Kang Hun; Park, Hyun Min; Sung, Hyun Jung; Choi, Sunghak; Im, Weonbin

    2014-07-15

    DA-6886, the gastrointestinal prokinetic benzamide derivative is a novel 5-HT4 receptor agonist being developed for the treatment of constipation-predominant irritable bowel syndrome (IBS-C). The purpose of this study was to characterize in vitro and in vivo pharmacological profile of DA-6886. We used various receptor binding assay, cAMP accumulation assay, organ bath experiment and colonic transit assay in normal and chemically constipated mice. DA-6886 exhibited high affinity and selectivity to human 5-HT4 receptor splice variants, with mean pKi of 7.1, 7.5, 7.9 for the human 5-HT4a, 5-HT4b and 5-HT4d, respectively. By contrast, DA-6886 did not show significant affinity for several receptors including dopamine D2 receptor, other 5-HT receptors except for 5-HT2B receptor (pKi value of 6.2). The affinity for 5-HT4 receptor was translated into functional agonist activity in Cos-7 cells expressing 5-HT4 receptor splice variants. Furthermore, DA-6886 induced relaxation of the rat oesophagus preparation (pEC50 value of 7.4) in a 5-HT4 receptor antagonist-sensitive manner. The evaluation of DA-6886 in CHO cells expressing hERG channels revealed that it inhibited hERG channel current with an pIC50 value of 4.3, indicating that the compound was 1000-fold more selective for the 5-HT4 receptor over hERG channels. In the normal ICR mice, oral administration of DA-6886 (0.4 and 2mg/kg) resulted in marked stimulation of colonic transit. Furthermore, in the loperamide-induced constipation mouse model, 2mg/kg of DA-6886 significantly improved the delay of colonic transit, similar to 10mg/kg of tegaserod. Taken together, DA-6886 is a highly potent and selective 5-HT4 receptor agonist to accelerate colonic transit in mice, which might be therapeutic agent having a favorable safety profile in the treatment of gastrointestinal motor disorders such as IBS-C and chronic constipation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Protection against high-fat diet-induced obesity in Helz2-deficient male mice due to enhanced expression of hepatic leptin receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshino, Satoshi; Satoh, Tetsurou; Yamada, Masanobu; Hashimoto, Koshi; Tomaru, Takuya; Katano-Toki, Akiko; Kakizaki, Satoru; Okada, Shuichi; Shimizu, Hiroyuki; Ozawa, Atsushi; Tuchiya, Takafumi; Ikota, Hayato; Nakazato, Yoichi; Mori, Munemasa; Matozaki, Takashi; Sasaki, Tsutomu; Kitamura, Tadahiro; Mori, Masatomo

    2014-09-01

    Obesity arises from impaired energy balance, which is centrally coordinated by leptin through activation of the long form of leptin receptor (Leprb). Obesity causes central leptin resistance. However, whether enhanced peripheral leptin sensitivity could overcome central leptin resistance remains obscure. A peripheral metabolic organ targeted by leptin is the liver, with low Leprb expression. We here show that mice fed a high-fat diet (HFD) and obese patients with hepatosteatosis exhibit increased expression of hepatic helicase with zinc finger 2, a transcriptional coactivator (Helz2), which functions as a transcriptional coregulator of several nuclear receptors, including peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ in vitro. To explore the physiological importance of Helz2, we generated Helz2-deficient mice and analyzed their metabolic phenotypes. Helz2-deficient mice showing hyperleptinemia associated with central leptin resistance were protected against HFD-induced obesity and had significantly up-regulated hepatic Leprb expression. Helz2 deficiency and adenovirus-mediated liver-specific exogenous Leprb overexpression in wild-type mice significantly stimulated hepatic AMP-activated protein kinase on HFD, whereas Helz2-deficient db/db mice lacking functional Leprb did not. Fatty acid-β oxidation was increased in Helz2-deficeint hepatocytes, and Helz2-deficient mice revealed increased oxygen consumption and decreased respiratory quotient in calorimetry analyses. The enhanced hepatic AMP-activated protein kinase energy-sensing pathway in Helz2-deficient mice ameliorated hyperlipidemia, hepatosteatosis, and insulin resistance by reducing lipogenic gene expression and stimulating lipid-burning gene expression in the liver. These findings together demonstrate that Helz2 deficiency ameliorates HFD-induced metabolic abnormalities by stimulating endogenous hepatic Leprb expression, despite central leptin resistance. Hepatic HELZ2 might be a novel target molecule for

  10. Toll-Like Receptor 4 Deficiency Causes Reduced Exploratory Behavior in Mice Under Approach-Avoidance Conflict.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chunlu; Yan, Yixiu; Cheng, Jingjing; Xiao, Gang; Gu, Jueqing; Zhang, Luqi; Yuan, Siyu; Wang, Junlu; Shen, Yi; Zhou, Yu-Dong

    2016-04-01

    Abnormal approach-avoidance behavior has been linked to deficits in the mesolimbic dopamine (DA) system of the brain. Recently, increasing evidence has indicated that toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4), an important pattern-recognition receptor in the innate immune system, can be directly activated by substances of abuse, resulting in an increase of the extracellular DA level in the nucleus accumbens. We thus hypothesized that TLR4-dependent signaling might regulate approach-avoidance behavior. To test this hypothesis, we compared the novelty-seeking and social interaction behaviors of TLR4-deficient (TLR4(-/-)) and wild-type (WT) mice in an approach-avoidance conflict situation in which the positive motivation to explore a novel object or interact with an unfamiliar mouse was counteracted by the negative motivation to hide in exposed, large spaces. We found that TLR4(-/-) mice exhibited reduced novelty-seeking and social interaction in the large open spaces. In less stressful test apparatuses similar in size to the mouse cage, however, TLR4(-/-) mice performed normally in both novelty-seeking and social interaction tests. The reduced exploratory behaviors under approach-avoidance conflict were not due to a high anxiety level or an enhanced fear response in the TLR4(-/-) mice, as these mice showed normal anxiety and fear responses in the open field and passive avoidance tests, respectively. Importantly, the novelty-seeking behavior in the large open field induced a higher level of c-Fos activation in the nucleus accumbens shell (NAcSh) in TLR4(-/-) mice than in WT mice. Partially inactivating the NAcSh via infusion of GABA receptor agonists restored the novelty-seeking behavior of TLR4(-/-) mice. These data suggested that TLR4 is crucial for positive motivational behavior under approach-avoidance conflict. TLR4-dependent activation of neurons in the NAcSh may contribute to this phenomenon.

  11. Ca2+-mobilizing agonists increase mitochondrial ATP production to accelerate cytosolic Ca2+ removal: aberrations in human complex I deficiency.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visch, H.J.; Koopman, W.J.H.; Zeegers, D.; Emst-de Vries, S.E. van; Kuppeveld, F.J.M. van; Heuvel, L.W. van den; Smeitink, J.A.M.; Willems, P.H.G.M.

    2006-01-01

    Previously, we reported that both the bradykinin (Bk)-induced increase in mitochondrial ATP concentration ([ATP]M) and the rate of cytosolic Ca2+ removal are significantly decreased in skin fibroblasts from a patient with an isolated complex I deficiency. Here we demonstrate that the mitochondrial

  12. High-salt diet combined with elevated angiotensin II accelerates atherosclerosis in apolipoprotein E-deficient mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansson, Maria E; Bernberg, Evelina; Andersson, Irene J

    2009-01-01

    to atherosclerosis. METHODS: Apolipoprotein E-deficient (ApoE-/-) mice received standard or high-salt diet (8%) alone or in combination with fixed angiotensin II (Ang II) infusion (0.5 microg/kg per min). BP was measured using telemetry, and plaque burden was assessed in the thoracic aorta and innominate artery. We...

  13. Acceleration of bone development and regeneration through the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway in mice heterozygously deficient for GSK-3β

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arioka, Masaki; Takahashi-Yanaga, Fumi; Sasaki, Masanori; Yoshihara, Tatsuya; Morimoto, Sachio; Takashima, Akihiko; Mori, Yoshihide; Sasaguri, Toshiyuki

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: •The Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway was activated in GSK-3β +/− mice. •The cortical and trabecular bone volumes were increased in GSK-3β +/− mice. •Regeneration of a partial bone defect was accelerated in GSK-3β +/− mice. -- Abstract: Glycogen synthase kinase (GSK)-3β plays an important role in osteoblastogenesis by regulating the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway. Therefore, we investigated whether GSK-3β deficiency affects bone development and regeneration using mice heterozygously deficient for GSK-3β (GSK-3β +/− ). The amounts of β-catenin, c-Myc, cyclin D1, and runt-related transcription factor-2 (Runx2) in the bone marrow cells of GSK-3β +/− mice were significantly increased compared with those of wild-type mice, indicating that Wnt/β-catenin signals were enhanced in GSK-3β +/− mice. Microcomputed tomography of the distal femoral metaphyses demonstrated that the volumes of both the cortical and trabecular bones were increased in GSK-3β +/− mice compared with those in wild-type mice. Subsequently, to investigate the effect of GSK-3β deficiency on bone regeneration, we established a partial bone defect in the femur and observed new bone at 14 days after surgery. The volume and mineral density of the new bone were significantly higher in GSK-3β +/− mice than those in wild-type mice. These results suggest that bone formation and regeneration in vivo are accelerated by inhibition of GSK-3β, probably through activation of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway

  14. Acceleration of bone development and regeneration through the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway in mice heterozygously deficient for GSK-3β

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arioka, Masaki [Department of Clinical Pharmacology, Faculty of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan); Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Faculty of Dental Science, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan); Takahashi-Yanaga, Fumi, E-mail: yanaga@clipharm.med.kyushu-u.ac.jp [Department of Clinical Pharmacology, Faculty of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan); Global Medical Science Education Unit, Faculty of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan); Sasaki, Masanori [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Faculty of Dental Science, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan); Yoshihara, Tatsuya; Morimoto, Sachio [Department of Clinical Pharmacology, Faculty of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan); Takashima, Akihiko [Department of Aging Neurobiology, National Center for Geriatrics and Gerontology, Oobu (Japan); Mori, Yoshihide [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Faculty of Dental Science, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan); Sasaguri, Toshiyuki [Department of Clinical Pharmacology, Faculty of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan)

    2013-11-01

    Highlights: •The Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway was activated in GSK-3β{sup +/−} mice. •The cortical and trabecular bone volumes were increased in GSK-3β{sup +/−} mice. •Regeneration of a partial bone defect was accelerated in GSK-3β{sup +/−} mice. -- Abstract: Glycogen synthase kinase (GSK)-3β plays an important role in osteoblastogenesis by regulating the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway. Therefore, we investigated whether GSK-3β deficiency affects bone development and regeneration using mice heterozygously deficient for GSK-3β (GSK-3β{sup +/−}). The amounts of β-catenin, c-Myc, cyclin D1, and runt-related transcription factor-2 (Runx2) in the bone marrow cells of GSK-3β{sup +/−} mice were significantly increased compared with those of wild-type mice, indicating that Wnt/β-catenin signals were enhanced in GSK-3β{sup +/−} mice. Microcomputed tomography of the distal femoral metaphyses demonstrated that the volumes of both the cortical and trabecular bones were increased in GSK-3β{sup +/−} mice compared with those in wild-type mice. Subsequently, to investigate the effect of GSK-3β deficiency on bone regeneration, we established a partial bone defect in the femur and observed new bone at 14 days after surgery. The volume and mineral density of the new bone were significantly higher in GSK-3β{sup +/−} mice than those in wild-type mice. These results suggest that bone formation and regeneration in vivo are accelerated by inhibition of GSK-3β, probably through activation of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway.

  15. Altered Circadian Food Anticipatory Activity Rhythms in PACAP Receptor 1 (PAC1 Deficient Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jens Hannibal

    Full Text Available Light signals from intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells (ipRGCs entrain the circadian clock and regulate negative masking. Two neurotransmitters, glutamate and Pituitary Adenylate Cyclase Activating Polypeptide (PACAP, found in the ipRGCs transmit light signals to the brain via glutamate receptors and the specific PACAP type 1 (PAC1 receptor. Light entrainment occurs during the twilight zones and has little effect on clock phase during daytime. When nocturnal animals have access to food only for a few hours during the resting phase at daytime, they adapt behavior to the restricted feeding (RF paradigm and show food anticipatory activity (FAA. A recent study in mice and rats demonstrating that light regulates FAA prompted us to investigate the role of PACAP/PAC1 signaling in the light mediated regulation of FAA. PAC1 receptor knock out (PAC1-/- and wild type (PAC1+/+ mice placed in running wheels were examined in a full photoperiod (FPP of 12:12 h light/dark (LD and a skeleton photoperiod (SPP 1:11:1:11 h L:DD:L:DD at 300 and 10 lux light intensity. Both PAC1-/- mice and PAC1+/+ littermates entrained to FPP and SPP at both light intensities. However, when placed in RF with access to food for 4-5 h during the subjective day, a significant change in behavior was observed in PAC1-/- mice compared to PAC1+/+ mice. While PAC1-/- mice showed similar FAA as PAC1+/+ animals in FPP at 300 lux, PAC1-/- mice demonstrated an advanced onset of FAA with a nearly 3-fold increase in amplitude compared to PAC1+/+ mice when placed in SPP at 300 lux. The same pattern of FAA was observed at 10 lux during both FPP and SPP. The present study indicates a role of PACAP/PAC1 signaling during light regulated FAA. Most likely, PACAP found in ipRGCs mediating non-image forming light information to the brain is involved.

  16. Antihypertensive effect of etamicastat in dopamine D2 receptor-deficient mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armando, Ines; Asico, Laureano D; Wang, Xiaoyan; Jones, John E; Serrão, Maria Paula; Cuevas, Santiago; Grandy, David K; Soares-da-Silva, Patricio; Jose, Pedro A

    2018-04-13

    Abnormalities of the D 2 R gene (DRD2) play a role in the pathogenesis of human essential hypertension; variants of the DRD2 have been reported to be associated with hypertension. Disruption of Drd2 (D 2 -/- ) in mice increases blood pressure. The hypertension of D 2 -/- mice has been related, in part, to increased sympathetic activity, renal oxidative stress, and renal endothelin B receptor (ETBR) expression. We tested in D 2 -/- mice the effect of etamicastat, a reversible peripheral inhibitor of dopamine-β-hydroxylase that reduces the biosynthesis of norepinephrine from dopamine and decreases sympathetic nerve activity. Blood pressure was measured in anesthetized D 2 -/- mice treated with etamicastat by gavage, (10 mg/kg), conscious D 2 -/- mice, and D 2 +/+ littermates, and mice with the D 2 R selectively silenced in the kidney, treated with etamicastat in the drinking water (10 mg/kg per day). Tissue and urinary catecholamines and renal expression of selected G protein-coupled receptors, enzymes related to the production of reactive oxygen species, and sodium transporters were also measured. Etamicastat decreased blood pressure both in anesthetized and conscious D 2 -/- mice and mice with renal-selective silencing of D 2 R to levels similar or close to those measured in D 2 +/+ littermates. Etamicastat decreased cardiac and renal norepinephrine and increased cardiac and urinary dopamine levels in D 2 -/- mice. It also normalized the increased renal protein expressions of ETBR, NADPH oxidase isoenzymes, and urinary 8-isoprostane, as well as renal NHE3 and NCC, and increased the renal expression of D 1 R but not D 5 R in D 2 -/- mice. In conclusion, etamicastat is effective in normalizing the increased blood pressure and some of the abnormal renal biochemical alterations of D 2 -/- mice.

  17. Functional hypothalamic amenorrhea due to increased CRH tone in melanocortin receptor 2-deficient mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuwaki, Takashi; Nishihara, Masugi; Sato, Tsuyoshi; Yoda, Tetsuya; Iwakura, Yoichiro; Chida, Dai

    2010-11-01

    Exposure to chronic stressors results in dysregulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis and a disruption in reproduction. CRH, the principal regulator of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis induces the secretion of ACTH from the pituitary, which stimulates adrenal steroidogenesis via the specific cell-surface melanocortin 2 receptor (MC2R). Previously, we demonstrated that MC2R(-/-) mice had undetectable levels of corticosterone despite high ACTH levels. Here, we evaluated the reproductive functions of female MC2R(-/-) mice and analyzed the mechanism of the disrupted cyclicity of these mice. The expression of CRH in the paraventricular nucleus was significantly increased in MC2R(-/-) mice under nonstressed conditions. Although MC2R(-/-) females were fertile, they showed a prolonged estrous cycle. After hormonal stimulation, MC2R(-/-) females produced nearly-normal numbers of eggs, but slightly less than MC2R(+/-) females, and showed near-normal ovarian histology. During diestrus, the number of GnRH-positive cells in the medial preoptic area was significantly reduced in MC2R(-/-) females. CRH type 1 receptor antagonist restored estrous cyclicity in MC2R(-/-) females. Kisspeptin-positive areas in the arcuate nucleus were comparable, whereas kisspeptin-positive areas in the anteroventral periventricular nucleus in MC2R(-/-) females were significantly reduced compared with MC2R(+/-) females, suggesting that arcuate nucleus kisspeptin is not involved, but anteroventral periventricular nucleus kisspeptin may be involved, in the maintenance of estrous cyclicity. Our findings show that high levels of hypothalamic CRH disturb estrous cyclicity in the female animals and that the MC2R(-/-) female is a unique animal model of functional hypothalamic amenorrhea.

  18. D4 receptor deficiency in mice has limited effects on impulsivity and novelty seeking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helms, C M; Gubner, N R; Wilhelm, C J; Mitchell, S H; Grandy, D K

    2008-09-01

    Alleles of the human dopamine D(4) receptor (D(4)R) gene (DRD4.7) have repeatedly been found to correlate with novelty seeking, substance abuse, pathological gambling, and attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). If these various psychopathologies are a result of attenuated D(4)R-mediated signaling, mice lacking D(4)Rs (D(4)KO) should be more impulsive than wild-type (WT) mice and exhibit more novelty seeking. However, in our study, D(4)KO and WT mice showed similar levels of impulsivity as measured by delay discounting performance and response inhibition on a Go/No-go test, suggesting that D(4)R-mediated signaling may not affect impulsivity. D(4)KO mice were more active than WT mice in the first 5 min of a novel open field test, suggesting greater novelty seeking. For both genotypes, more impulsive mice habituated less in the novel open field. These data suggest that the absence of D(4)Rs is not sufficient to cause psychopathologies associated with heightened impulsivity and novelty seeking.

  19. Reduced cerebral ischemia-reperfusion injury in Toll-like receptor 4 deficient mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao Canxiang; Yang Qingwu; Lv Fenglin; Cui Jie; Fu Huabin; Wang Jingzhou

    2007-01-01

    Inflammatory reaction plays an important role in cerebral ischemia-reperfusion injury, however, its mechanism is still unclear. Our study aims to explore the function of Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) in the process of cerebral ischemia-reperfusion. We made middle cerebral artery ischemia-reperfusion model in mice with line embolism method. Compared with C3H/OuJ mice, scores of cerebral water content, cerebral infarct size and neurologic impairment in C3H/Hej mice were obviously lower after 6 h ischemia and 24 h reperfusion. Light microscopic and electron microscopic results showed that cerebral ischemia-reperfusion injury in C3H/Hej mice was less serious than that in C3H/OuJ mice. TNF-α and IL-6 contents in C3H/HeJ mice were obviously lower than that in C3H/OuJ mice with ELISA. The results showed that TLR4 participates in the process of cerebral ischemia-reperfusion injury probably through decrease of inflammatory cytokines. TLR4 may become a new target for prevention of cerebral ischemia-reperfusion injury. Our study suggests that TLR4 is one of the mechanisms of cerebral ischemia-reperfusion injury besides its important role in innate immunity

  20. Endogenous activation of adenosine A(1) receptors accelerates ischemic suppression of spontaneous electrocortical activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ilie, Andrei; Ciocan, Dragos; Zagrean, Ana-Maria

    2006-01-01

    Cerebral ischemia induces a rapid suppression of spontaneous brain rhythms prior to major alterations in ionic homeostasis. It was found in vitro during ischemia that the rapidly formed adenosine, resulting from the intracellular breakdown of ATP, may inhibit synaptic transmission via the A(1......) receptor subtype. The link between endogenous A(1) receptor activation during ischemia and the suppression of spontaneous electrocortical activity has not yet been established in the intact brain. The aim of this study was to investigate in vivo the effects of A(1) receptor antagonism by 8-cyclopentyl-1...

  1. Effect of dietary fat on hepatic liver X receptor expression in P-glycoprotein deficient mice: implications for cholesterol metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Stephen D

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Pgp (P-glycoprotein, MDR1, ABCB1 is an energy-dependent drug efflux pump that is a member of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC family of proteins. Preliminary studies have reported that nonspecific inhibitors of Pgp affect synthesis and esterification of cholesterol, putatively by blocking trafficking of cholesterol from the plasma membrane to the endoplasmic reticulum, and that relative increases in Pgp within a given cell type are associated with increased accumulation of cholesterol. Several key efflux proteins involved in the cholesterol metabolic pathway are transcriptionally regulated by the nuclear hormone liver X receptor (LXR. Therefore, to examine the interplay between P-glycoprotein and the cholesterol metabolic pathway, we utilized a high fat, normal cholesterol diet to upregulate LXRα without affecting dietary cholesterol. Our research has demonstrated that mice lacking in P-glycoprotein do not exhibit alterations in hepatic total cholesterol storage, circulating plasma total cholesterol levels, or total cholesterol concentration in the bile when compared to control animals on either a normal (25% calories from dietary fat or high fat (45% calories from dietary fat diet. However, p-glycoprotein deficient mice (Mdr1a-/-/1b-/- exhibit increased hepatic LXRα protein expression and an elevation in fecal cholesterol concentration when compared to controls.

  2. Presence of 25(OH)D deficiency and its effect on vitamin D receptor mRNA expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goswami, R; Mondal, A M; Tomar, N; Ray, D; Chattopadhyay, P; Gupta, N; Sreenivas, V

    2009-03-01

    Vitamin D and its metabolites act through vitamin D receptor (VDR). We hypothesized that subjects with low serum 25(OH)D levels but normal PTH might have increased VDR expression. VDRmRNA expression was assessed by real time PCR in duodenal mucosa and PBMC (peripheral blood mononuclear cells) in 45 subjects with normal duodenoscopy and in PBMC alone in 48 healthy volunteers with hypovitaminosis D. 25(OH)D, PTH and VDRmRNA expression in PBMC was reassessed after 8 weeks of oral cholecalciferol (60 000 IU per week) in a subset (n=23) of healthy volunteers. The VDRmRNA expressions in the duodenum and PBMC were significantly correlated (r=0.42), but the expression was 13 times higher in the former than the latter. The mean VDRmRNA expression was similar in 25(OH)D-deficient subjects with or without PTH elevation, both in the duodenum and PBMC. The PBMC VDRmRNA expression showed no significant change after cholecalciferol supplementation. A weak correlation coefficient between duodenal mucosa and PBMC VDRmRNA suggests that caution needs to be exercised while using the latter as a surrogate for other sites.

  3. Simvastatin reduces neointimal thickening in low-density lipoprotein receptor-deficient mice after experimental angioplasty without changing plasma lipids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhiping; Fukutomi, Tatsuya; Zago, Alexandre C; Ehlers, Raila; Detmers, Patricia A; Wright, Samuel D; Rogers, Campbell; Simon, Daniel I

    2002-07-02

    Statins exert antiinflammatory and antiproliferative actions independent of cholesterol lowering. To determine whether these actions might affect neointimal formation, we investigated the effect of simvastatin on the response to experimental angioplasty in LDL receptor-deficient (LDLR-/-) mice, a model of hypercholesterolemia in which changes in plasma lipids are not observed in response to simvastatin. Carotid artery dilation (2.5 atm) and complete endothelial denudation were performed in male C57BL/6J LDLR-/- mice treated with low-dose (2 mg/kg) or high-dose (20 mg/kg) simvastatin or vehicle subcutaneously 72 hours before and then daily after injury. After 7 and 28 days, intimal and medial sizes were measured and the intima to media area ratio (I:M) was calculated. Total plasma cholesterol and triglyceride levels were similar in simvastatin- and vehicle-treated mice. Intimal thickening and I:M were reduced significantly by low- and high-dose simvastatin compared with vehicle alone. Simvastatin treatment was associated with reduced cellular proliferation (BrdU), leukocyte accumulation (CD45), and platelet-derived growth factor-induced phosphorylation of the survival factor Akt and increased apoptosis after injury. Simvastatin modulates vascular repair after injury in the absence of lipid-lowering effects. Although the mechanisms are not yet established, additional research may lead to new understanding of the actions of statins and novel therapeutic interventions for preventing restenosis.

  4. TWEAK Receptor Deficiency Has Opposite Effects on Female and Male Mice Subjected to Neonatal Hypoxia–Ischemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anton Kichev

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Tumor necrosis factor (TNF-like weak inducer of apoptosis (TWEAK is a multifunctional cytokine member of the TNF family. TWEAK binds to its only known receptor, Fn14, enabling it to activate downstream signaling processes in response to tissue injury. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of TWEAK signaling in neonatal hypoxia–ischemia (HI. We found that after neonatal HI, both TWEAK and Fn14 expression were increased to a greater extent in male compared with female mice. To assess the role of TWEAK signaling after HI, the size of the injury was measured in neonatal mice genetically deficient in Fn14 and compared with their wild-type and heterozygote littermates. A significant sex difference in the Fn14 knockout (KO animals was observed. Fn14 gene KO was beneficial in females; conversely, reducing Fn14 expression exacerbated the brain injury in male mice. Our findings indicate that the TWEAK/Fn14 pathway is critical for development of hypoxic–ischemic brain injury in immature animals. However, as the responses are different in males and females, clinical implementation depends on development of sex-specific therapies.

  5. Impact of PACAP and PAC1 receptor deficiency on the neurochemical and behavioral effects of acute and chronic restraint stress in male C57BL/6 mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mustafa, Tomris; Jiang, Sunny Zhihong; Eiden, Adrian M; Weihe, Eberhard; Thistlethwaite, Ian; Eiden, Lee E

    2015-01-01

    Acute restraint stress (ARS) for 3 h causes corticosterone (CORT) elevation in venous blood, which is accompanied by Fos up-regulation in the paraventricular nucleus (PVN) of male C57BL/6 mice. CORT elevation by ARS is attenuated in PACAP-deficient mice, but unaffected in PAC1-deficient mice. Correspondingly, Fos up-regulation by ARS is greatly attenuated in PACAP-deficient mice, but much less so in PAC1-deficient animals. We noted that both PACAP- and PAC1-deficiency greatly attenuate CORT elevation after ARS when CORT measurements are performed on trunk blood following euthanasia by abrupt cervical separation: this latter observation is of critical importance in assessing the role of PACAP neurotransmission in ARS, based on previous reports in which serum CORT was sampled from trunk blood. Seven days of chronic restraint stress (CRS) induces non-habituating CORT elevation, and weight loss consequent to hypophagia, in wild-type male C57BL/6 mice. Both CORT elevation and weight loss following 7-day CRS are severely blunted in PACAP-deficient mice, but only slightly in PAC1-deficient mice. However, longer periods of daily restraint (14-21 days) resulted in sustained weight loss and elevated CORT in wild-type mice, and these effects of long-term chronic stress were attenuated or abolished in both PACAP- and PAC1-deficient mice. We conclude that while a PACAP receptor in addition to PAC1 may mediate some of the PACAP-dependent central effects of ARS and short-term (7 days) CRS.

  6. Induction of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis in C57BL/6 mice deficient in either the chemokine macrophage inflammatory protein-1alpha or its CCR5 receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tran, E H; Kuziel, W A; Owens, T

    2000-01-01

    -type mice in Th1 cytokine gene expression, the kinetics and severity of disease, and infiltration of the central nervous system by lymphocytes, macrophages and granulocytes. RNase protection assays showed comparable accumulation of mRNA for the chemokines interferon-inducible protein-10, RANTES, macrophage...... and its CCR5 receptor in the induction of EAE by immunizing C57BL / 6 mice deficient in either MIP-1alpha or CCR5 with myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG). We found that MIP-1alpha-deficient mice were fully susceptible to MOG-induced EAE. These knockout animals were indistinguishable from wild...... chemoattractant protein-1, MIP-1beta, MIP-2, lymphotactin and T cell activation gene-3 during the course of the disease. CCR5-deficient mice were also susceptible to disease induction by MOG. The dispensability of MIP-1alpha and CCR5 for MOG-induced EAE in C57BL / 6 mice supports the idea that differential...

  7. Maturation profile of inferior olivary neurons expressing ionotropic glutamate receptors in rats: role in coding linear accelerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chuan; Han, Lei; Ma, Chun-Wai; Lai, Suk-King; Lai, Chun-Hong; Shum, Daisy Kwok Yan; Chan, Ying-Shing

    2013-07-01

    Using sinusoidal oscillations of linear acceleration along both the horizontal and vertical planes to stimulate otolith organs in the inner ear, we charted the postnatal time at which responsive neurons in the rat inferior olive (IO) first showed Fos expression, an indicator of neuronal recruitment into the otolith circuit. Neurons in subnucleus dorsomedial cell column (DMCC) were activated by vertical stimulation as early as P9 and by horizontal (interaural) stimulation as early as P11. By P13, neurons in the β subnucleus of IO (IOβ) became responsive to horizontal stimulation along the interaural and antero-posterior directions. By P21, neurons in the rostral IOβ became also responsive to vertical stimulation, but those in the caudal IOβ remained responsive only to horizontal stimulation. Nearly all functionally activated neurons in DMCC and IOβ were immunopositive for the NR1 subunit of the NMDA receptor and the GluR2/3 subunit of the AMPA receptor. In situ hybridization studies further indicated abundant mRNA signals of the glutamate receptor subunits by the end of the second postnatal week. This is reinforced by whole-cell patch-clamp data in which glutamate receptor-mediated miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents of rostral IOβ neurons showed postnatal increase in amplitude, reaching the adult level by P14. Further, these neurons exhibited subthreshold oscillations in membrane potential as from P14. Taken together, our results support that ionotropic glutamate receptors in the IO enable postnatal coding of gravity-related information and that the rostral IOβ is the only IO subnucleus that encodes spatial orientations in 3-D.

  8. Diosgenin promotes oligodendrocyte progenitor cell differentiation through estrogen receptor-mediated ERK1/2 activation to accelerate remyelination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Lin; Guo, Dazhi; Hu, Chun; Shen, Weiran; Shan, Lei; Li, Cui; Liu, Xiuyun; Yang, Wenjing; Zhang, Weidong; He, Cheng

    2012-07-01

    Differentiation of oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs) into mature oligodendrocytes is a prerequisite for remyelination after demyelination, and impairment of this process is suggested to be a major reason for remyelination failure. Diosgenin, a plant-derived steroid, has been implicated for therapeutic use in many diseases, but little is known about its effect on the central nervous system. In this study, using a purified rat OPC culture model, we show that diosgenin significantly and specifically promotes OPC differentiation without affecting the viability, proliferation, or migration of OPC. Interestingly, the effect of diosgenin can be blocked by estrogen receptor (ER) antagonist ICI 182780 but not by glucocorticoid and progesterone receptor antagonist RU38486, nor by mineralocorticoid receptor antagonist spirolactone. Moreover, it is revealed that both ER-alpha and ER-beta are expressed in OPC, and diosgenin can activate the extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) in OPC via ER. The pro-differentiation effect of diosgenin can also be obstructed by the ERK inhibitor PD98059. Furthermore, in the cuprizone-induced demyelination model, it is demonstrated that diosgenin administration significantly accelerates/enhances remyelination as detected by Luxol fast blue stain, MBP immunohistochemistry and real time RT-PCR. Diosgenin also increases the number of mature oligodendrocytes in the corpus callosum while it does not affect the number of OPCs. Taking together, our results suggest that diosgenin promotes the differentiation of OPC into mature oligodendrocyte through an ER-mediated ERK1/2 activation pathway to accelerate remyelination, which implicates a novel therapeutic usage of this steroidal natural product in demyelinating diseases such as multiple sclerosis (MS). Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Impaired clearance of influenza A virus in obese, leptin receptor deficient mice is independent of leptin signaling in the lung epithelium and macrophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathryn A Radigan

    Full Text Available During the recent H1N1 outbreak, obese patients had worsened lung injury and increased mortality. We used a murine model of influenza A pneumonia to test the hypothesis that leptin receptor deficiency might explain the enhanced mortality in obese patients.We infected wild-type, obese mice globally deficient in the leptin receptor (db/db and non-obese mice with tissue specific deletion of the leptin receptor in the lung epithelium (SPC-Cre/LepR fl/fl or macrophages and alveolar type II cells (LysM-Cre/Lepr fl/fl with influenza A virus (A/WSN/33 [H1N1] (500 and 1500 pfu/mouse and measured mortality, viral clearance and several markers of lung injury severity.The clearance of influenza A virus from the lungs of mice was impaired in obese mice globally deficient in the leptin receptor (db/db compared to normal weight wild-type mice. In contrast, non-obese, SP-C-Cre+/+/LepR fl/fl and LysM-Cre+/+/LepR fl/fl had improved viral clearance after influenza A infection. In obese mice, mortality was increased compared with wild-type mice, while the SP-C-Cre+/+/LepR fl/fl and LysM-Cre+/+/LepR fl/fl mice exhibited improved survival.Global loss of the leptin receptor results in reduced viral clearance and worse outcomes following influenza A infection. These findings are not the result of the loss of leptin signaling in lung epithelial cells or macrophages. Our results suggest that factors associated with obesity or with leptin signaling in non-myeloid populations such as natural killer and T cells may be associated with worsened outcomes following influenza A infection.

  10. Reducing inflammation and rescuing FTD-related behavioral deficits in progranulin-deficient mice with α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor agonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minami, S Sakura; Shen, Vivian; Le, David; Krabbe, Grietje; Asgarov, Rustam; Perez-Celajes, Liberty; Lee, Chih-Hung; Li, Jinhe; Donnelly-Roberts, Diana; Gan, Li

    2015-10-15

    Mutations in the progranulin gene cause frontotemporal dementia (FTD), a debilitating neurodegenerative disease that involves atrophy of the frontal and temporal lobes and affects personality, behavior, and language. Progranulin-deficient mouse models of FTD exhibit deficits in compulsive and social behaviors reminiscent of patients with FTD, and develop excessive microgliosis and increased release of inflammatory cytokines. Activation of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) by nicotine or specific α7 nAChR agonists reduces neuroinflammation. Here, we investigated whether activation of nAChRs by nicotine or α7 agonists improved the excessive inflammatory and behavioral phenotypes of a progranulin-deficient FTD mouse model. We found that treatment with selective α7 agonists, PHA-568487 or ABT-107, strongly suppressed the activation of NF-κB in progranulin-deficient cells. Treatment with ABT-107 also reduced microgliosis, decreased TNFα levels, and reduced compulsive behavior in progranulin-deficient mice. Collectively, these data suggest that targeting activation of the α7 nAChR pathway may be beneficial in decreasing neuroinflammation and reversing some of the behavioral deficits observed in progranulin-deficient FTD. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  11. High-salt diet combined with elevated angiotensin II accelerates atherosclerosis in apolipoprotein E-deficient mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansson, Maria E; Bernberg, Evelina; Andersson, Irene J

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: High-salt diet likely elevates blood pressure (BP), thus increasing the risk of cardiovascular events. We hypothesized that a high-salt diet plays a critical role in subjects whose renin-angiotensin systems cannot adjust to variable salt intake, rendering them more susceptible...... to atherosclerosis. METHODS: Apolipoprotein E-deficient (ApoE-/-) mice received standard or high-salt diet (8%) alone or in combination with fixed angiotensin II (Ang II) infusion (0.5 microg/kg per min). BP was measured using telemetry, and plaque burden was assessed in the thoracic aorta and innominate artery. We...... used urinary isoprostane as a marker for oxidative stress. RESULTS: Although high-salt diet per se did not affect plaque extension, high salt combined with Ang II increased plaque area significantly in both the aorta and the innominate artery as compared with Ang II or salt alone (P

  12. G protein-coupled receptor kinase-2-deficient mice are protected from dextran sodium sulfate-induced acute colitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steury, Michael D; Kang, Ho Jun; Lee, Taehyung; Lucas, Peter C; McCabe, Laura R; Parameswaran, Narayanan

    2018-06-01

    G protein-coupled receptor kinase 2 (GRK2) is a serine/threonine kinase and plays a key role in different disease processes. Previously, we showed that GRK2 knockdown enhances wound healing in colonic epithelial cells. Therefore, we hypothesized that ablation of GRK2 would protect mice from dextran sodium sulfate (DSS)-induced acute colitis. To test this, we administered DSS to wild-type (GRK2 +/+ ) and GRK2 heterozygous (GRK +/- ) mice in their drinking water for 7 days. As predicted, GRK2 +/- mice were protected from colitis as demonstrated by decreased weight loss (20% loss in GRK2 +/+ vs. 11% loss in GRK2 +/- ). lower disease activity index (GRK2 +/+ 9.1 vs GRK2 +/- 4.1), and increased colon lengths (GRK2 +/+ 4.7 cm vs GRK2 +/- 5.3 cm). To examine the mechanisms by which GRK2 +/- mice are protected from colitis, we investigated expression of inflammatory genes in the colon as well as immune cell profiles in colonic lamina propria, mesenteric lymph node, and in bone marrow. Our results did not reveal differences in immune cell profiles between the two genotypes. However, expression of inflammatory genes was significantly decreased in DSS-treated GRK2 +/- mice compared with GRK2 +/+ . To understand the mechanisms, we generated myeloid-specific GRK2 knockout mice and subjected them to DSS-induced colitis. Similar to whole body GRK2 heterozygous knockout mice, myeloid-specific knockout of GRK2 was sufficient for the protection from DSS-induced colitis. Together our results indicate that deficiency of GRK2 protects mice from DSS-induced colitis and further suggests that the mechanism of this effect is likely via GRK2 regulation of inflammatory genes in the myeloid cells.

  13. Divergent impact of Toll-like receptor 2 deficiency on repair mechanisms in healthy muscle versus Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mojumdar, Kamalika; Giordano, Christian; Lemaire, Christian; Liang, Feng; Divangahi, Maziar; Qureshi, Salman T; Petrof, Basil J

    2016-05-01

    Injury to skeletal muscle, whether acute or chronic, triggers macrophage-mediated innate immunity in a manner which can be either beneficial or harmful for subsequent repair. Endogenous ligands for Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) are released by damaged tissues and might play an important role in activating the innate immune system following muscle injury. To test this hypothesis, we compared macrophage behaviour and muscle repair mechanisms in mice lacking TLR2 under conditions of either acute (cardiotoxin-induced) or chronic (mdx mouse genetic model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy; DMD) muscle damage. In previously healthy muscle subjected to acute damage, TLR2 deficiency reduced macrophage numbers in the muscle post-injury but did not alter the expression pattern of the prototypical macrophage polarization markers iNOS and CD206. In addition, there was abnormal persistence of necrotic fibres and impaired regeneration in TLR2-/- muscles after acute injury. In contrast, TLR2 ablation in chronically diseased muscles of mdx mice not only resulted in significantly reduced macrophage numbers but additionally modified their phenotype by shifting from inflammatory (iNOS(pos) CD206(neg) ) to more anti-inflammatory (iNOS(neg) CD206(pos) ) characteristics. This decrease in macrophage-mediated inflammation was associated with ameliorated muscle histopathology and improved force-generating capacity of the dystrophic muscle. Our results suggest that the role of TLR2 in macrophage function and skeletal muscle repair depends greatly upon the muscle injury context, and raise the possibility that inhibition of TLR2 could serve as a useful therapeutic measure in DMD. Copyright © 2016 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. Deficiency in Poly(ADP-ribose Polymerase-1 (PARP-1 Accelerates Aging and Spontaneous Carcinogenesis in Mice

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    Tatiana S. Piskunova

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Genetic and biochemical studies have shown that PARP-1 and poly(ADP-ribosylation play an important role in DNA repair, genomic stability, cell death, inflammation, telomere maintenance, and suppressing tumorigenesis, suggesting that the homeostasis of poly(ADP-ribosylation and PARP-1 may also play an important role in aging. Here we show that PARP-1−/− mice exhibit a reduction of life span and a significant increase of population aging rate. Analysis of noninvasive parameters, including body weight gain, body temperature, estrous function, behavior, and a number of biochemical indices suggests the acceleration of biological aging in PARP-1−/− mice. The incidence of spontaneous tumors in both PARP-1−/− and PARP-1+/+ groups is similar; however, malignant tumors including uterine tumors, lung adenocarcinomas and hepatocellular carcinomas, develop at a significantly higher frequency in PARP-1−/− mice than PARP-1+/+ mice (72% and 49%, resp.; < .05. In addition, spontaneous tumors appear earlier in PARP-1−/− mice compared to the wild type group. Histopathological studies revealed a wide spectrum of tumors in uterus, ovaries, liver, lungs, mammary gland, soft tissues, and lymphoid organs in both groups of the mice. These results demonstrate that inactivation of DNA repair gene PARP-1 in mice leads to acceleration of aging, shortened life span, and increased spontaneous carcinogenesis.

  15. Role of light and the circadian clock in the rhythmic oscillation of intraocular pressure: Studies in VPAC2 receptor and PACAP deficient mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahrenkrug, Jan; Georg, Birgitte; Hannibal, Jens; Jørgensen, Henrik Løvendahl

    2018-04-01

    The intraocular pressure of mice displays a daily rhythmicity being highest during the dark period. The present study was performed to elucidate the role of the circadian clock and light in the diurnal and the circadian variations in intraocular pressure in mice, by using animals with disrupted clock function (VPAC2 receptor knockout mice) or impaired light information to the clock (PACAP knockout mice). In wildtype mice, intraocular pressure measured under light/dark conditions showed a statistically significant 24 h sinusoidal rhythm with nadir during the light phase and peak during the dark phase. After transfer of the wildtype mice into constant darkness, the intraocular pressure increased, but the rhythmic changes in intraocular pressure continued with a pattern identical to that obtained during the light/dark cycle. The intraocular pressure in VPAC2 receptor deficient mice during light/dark conditions also showed a sinusoidal pattern with significant changes as a function of a 24 h cycle. However, transfer of the VPAC2 receptor knockout mice into constant darkness completely abolished the rhythmic changes in intraocular pressure. The intraocular pressure in PACAP deficient mice oscillated significantly during both 24 h light and darkness and during constant darkness. During LD conditions, the amplitude of PACAP deficient was significantly lower compared to wildtype mice, resulting in higher daytime and lower nighttime values. In conclusion, by studying the VPAC2 receptor knockout mouse which lacks circadian control and the PACAP knockout mouse which displays impaired light signaling, we provided evidence that the daily intraocular pressure rhythms are primarily generated by the circadian master clock and to a lesser extent by environmental light and darkness. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Calcium Overload Accelerates Phosphate-Induced Vascular Calcification Via Pit-1, but not the Calcium-Sensing Receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masumoto, Asuka; Sonou, Tomohiro; Ohya, Masaki; Yashiro, Mitsuru; Nakashima, Yuri; Okuda, Kouji; Iwashita, Yuko; Mima, Toru; Negi, Shigeo; Shigematsu, Takashi

    2017-07-01

    Vascular calcification (VC) is a risk factor of cardiovascular and all-cause mortality in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). CKD-mineral and bone metabolism disorder is an important problem in patients with renal failure. Abnormal levels of serum phosphate and calcium affect CKD-mineral and bone metabolism disorder and contribute to bone disease, VC, and cardiovascular disease. Hypercalcemia is a contributing factor in progression of VC in patients with CKD. However, the mechanisms of how calcium promotes intracellular calcification are still unclear. This study aimed to examine the mechanisms underlying calcium-induced calcification in a rat aortic tissue culture model. Aortic segments from 7-week-old male Sprague-Dawley rats were cultured in serum-supplemented medium for 10 days. We added high calcium (HiCa; calcium 3.0 mM) to high phosphate (HPi; phosphate 3.8 mM) medium to accelerate phosphate and calcium-induced VC. We used phosphonoformic acid and the calcimimetic R-568 to determine whether the mechanism of calcification involves Pit-1 or the calcium-sensing receptor. Medial VC was significantly augmented by HPi+HiCa medium compared with HPi alone (300%, p<0.05), and was associated with upregulation of Pit-1 protein. Pit-1 protein concentrations in HPi+HiCa medium were greater than those in HPi medium. Phosphonoformic acid completely negated the augmentation of medial VC induced by HPi+HiCa. R-568 had no additive direct effect on medial VC. These results indicated that exposure to HPi+HiCa accelerates medial VC, and this is mediated through Pit-1, not the calcium-sensing receptor.

  17. Functional ET(A)-ET(B) Receptor Cross-talk in Basilar Artery In Situ From ET(B) Receptor Deficient Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, SeongHun; Gariepy, Cheryl E; Yanagisawa, Masashi; Zuccarello, Mario; Rapoport, Robert M

    2016-03-01

    The role of endothelin (ET)(A)-ET(B) receptor cross-talk in limiting the ET(A) receptor antagonist inhibition of ET-1 constriction is revealed by the partial or complete dependency of the ET(A) receptor antagonist inhibition on functional removal of the ET(B) receptor. Although functional removal of the ET(B) receptor is generally accomplished with ET(B) receptor antagonist, a novel approach using rats containing a naturally occurring deletion mutation in the ET(B) receptor [rescued "spotting lethal" (sl) rats; ET(B)(sl/sl)] demonstrated increased ET(A) receptor antagonist inhibition of ET-1 constriction in vena cava. We investigated whether this deletion mutation was also sufficient to remove the ET(B) receptor dependency of the ET(A) receptor antagonist inhibition of ET-1 constriction in the basilar artery. Consistent with previous reports, ET-1 plasma levels were elevated in ET(B)(sl/sl) as compared with ET(B)(+/+) rats. ET(B) receptor antagonist failed to relax the ET-1 constricted basilar artery from ET(B)(+/+) and ET(B)(sl/sl) rats. Relaxation to combined ET(A) and ET(B) receptor antagonist was greater than relaxation to ET(A) receptor antagonist in the basilar artery from ET(B)(+/+) and, unexpectedly, ET(B)(sl/sl) rats. These findings confirm the presence of ET(A)-ET(B) receptor cross-talk in the basilar artery. We speculate that mutant ET(B) receptor expression produced by alternative splicing may be sufficient to allow cross-talk.

  18. Mucolipin co-deficiency causes accelerated endolysosomal vacuolation of enterocytes and failure-to-thrive from birth to weaning.

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    Natalie N Remis

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available During the suckling period, intestinal enterocytes are richly endowed with endosomes and lysosomes, which they presumably utilize for the uptake and intracellular digestion of milk proteins. By weaning, mature intestinal enterocytes replace those rich in lysosomes. We found that mouse enterocytes before weaning express high levels of two endolysosomal cation channels, mucolipins 3 and 1 -products of Trpml3 and Trpml1 genes; moreover neonatal enterocytes of mice lacking both mucolipins (Trpml3-/-;Trpml1-/- vacuolated pathologically within hours of birth and remained so until weaning. Ultrastructurally and chemically these fast-forming vacuoles resembled those that systemically appear in epithelial cells of mucolipidosis type IV (MLIV patients, which bear mutations in Trpml1. Hence, lack of both mucolipins 1 and 3 causes an accelerated MLIV-type of vacuolation in enterocytes. The vacuoles were aberrant hybrid organelles with both endosomal and lysosomal components, and were not generated by alterations in endocytosis or exocytosis, but likely by an imbalance between fusion of lysosomes and endosomes and their subsequent scission. However, upon extensive vacuolation enterocytes displayed reduced endocytosis from the intestinal lumen, a defect expected to compromise nutrient uptake. Mice lacking both mucolipins suffered a growth delay that began after birth and continued through the suckling period but recovered after weaning, coinciding with the developmental period of enterocyte vacuolation. Our results demonstrate genetic redundancy between lysosomal mucolipins 3 and 1 in neonatal enterocytes. Furthermore, our Trpml3-/-;Trpml1-/- mice represent a polygenic animal model of the poorly-understood, and often intractable, neonatal failure-to-thrive with intestinal pathology. Our results implicate lysosomes in neonatal intestinal pathologies, a major cause of infant mortality worldwide, and suggest transient intestinal dysfunction might affect newborns

  19. G-protein-coupled receptor 137 accelerates proliferation of urinary bladder cancer cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Yiheng; Bi, Wenhuan; Zhang, Fei; Wu, Wenbo; Xia, Shujie; Liu, Haitao

    2015-01-01

    Urinary bladder cancer is a worldwide concern because of its level of incidence and recurrence. To search an effective therapeutic strategy for urinary bladder cancer, it is important to identify proteins involved in tumorigenesis that could serve as potential targets for diagnosis and treatment. G-protein-coupled receptors (GPRs) constitute a large protein family of receptors that sense molecules outside the cell and activate signal transduction pathways and cellular responses inside the cell. GPR137 is a newly discovered human gene encoding orphan GPRs. In this study, we aimed to investigate the physiological role of GPR137 in urinary bladder cancer. The effect of GPR137 on cell growth was examined via an RNA interference (RNAi) lentivirus system in two human urinary bladder cancer cell lines BT5637 and T24. Lentivirus-mediated RNAi could specifically suppressed GPR137 expression in vitro, resulting in alleviated cell viability and impaired colony formation, as well as blocks G0/G1 and S phases of the cell cycle. These results suggested GPR137 as an essential player in urinary bladder cancer cell growth, and it may serve as a potential target for gene therapy in the treatment of urinary bladder cancer. © 2014 International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  20. Chemokine-like receptor 1 deficiency does not affect the development of insulin resistance and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease in mice.

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    Nanda Gruben

    Full Text Available The adipokine chemerin and its receptor, chemokine-like receptor 1 (Cmklr1, are associated with insulin resistance and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD, which covers a broad spectrum of liver diseases, ranging from simple steatosis to nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH. It is possible that chemerin and/or Cmklr1 exert their effects on these disorders through inflammation, but so far the data have been controversial. To gain further insight into this matter, we studied the effect of whole-body Cmklr1 deficiency on insulin resistance and NAFLD. In view of the primary role of macrophages in hepatic inflammation, we also transplanted bone marrow from Cmklr1 knock-out (Cmklr1-/- mice and wild type (WT mice into low-density lipoprotein receptor knock-out (Ldlr-/- mice, a mouse model for NASH. All mice were fed a high fat, high cholesterol diet containing 21% fat from milk butter and 0.2% cholesterol for 12 weeks. Insulin resistance was assessed by an oral glucose tolerance test, an insulin tolerance test, and by measurement of plasma glucose and insulin levels. Liver pathology was determined by measuring hepatic inflammation, fibrosis, lipid accumulation and the NAFLD activity score (NAS. Whole-body Cmklr1 deficiency did not affect body weight gain or food intake. In addition, we observed no differences between WT and Cmklr1-/- mice for hepatic inflammatory and fibrotic gene expression, immune cell infiltration, lipid accumulation or NAS. In line with this, we detected no differences in insulin resistance. In concordance with whole-body Cmklr1 deficiency, the absence of Cmklr1 in bone marrow-derived cells in Ldlr-/- mice did not affect their insulin resistance or liver pathology. Our results indicate that Cmklr1 is not involved in the pathogenesis of insulin resistance or NAFLD. Thus, we recommend that the associations reported between Cmklr1 and insulin resistance or NAFLD should be interpreted with caution.

  1. Mucolipin Co-deficiency Causes Accelerated Endolysosomal Vacuolation of Enterocytes and Failure-to-Thrive from Birth to Weaning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castiglioni, Andrew J.; Flores, Emma N.; Cantú, Jorge A.; García-Añoveros, Jaime

    2014-01-01

    During the suckling period, intestinal enterocytes are richly endowed with endosomes and lysosomes, which they presumably utilize for the uptake and intracellular digestion of milk proteins. By weaning, mature intestinal enterocytes replace those rich in lysosomes. We found that mouse enterocytes before weaning express high levels of two endolysosomal cation channels, mucolipins 3 and 1 -products of Trpml3 and Trpml1 genes; moreover neonatal enterocytes of mice lacking both mucolipins (Trpml3−/−;Trpml1−/−) vacuolated pathologically within hours of birth and remained so until weaning. Ultrastructurally and chemically these fast-forming vacuoles resembled those that systemically appear in epithelial cells of mucolipidosis type IV (MLIV) patients, which bear mutations in Trpml1. Hence, lack of both mucolipins 1 and 3 causes an accelerated MLIV-type of vacuolation in enterocytes. The vacuoles were aberrant hybrid organelles with both endosomal and lysosomal components, and were not generated by alterations in endocytosis or exocytosis, but likely by an imbalance between fusion of lysosomes and endosomes and their subsequent scission. However, upon extensive vacuolation enterocytes displayed reduced endocytosis from the intestinal lumen, a defect expected to compromise nutrient uptake. Mice lacking both mucolipins suffered a growth delay that began after birth and continued through the suckling period but recovered after weaning, coinciding with the developmental period of enterocyte vacuolation. Our results demonstrate genetic redundancy between lysosomal mucolipins 3 and 1 in neonatal enterocytes. Furthermore, our Trpml3−/−;Trpml1−/− mice represent a polygenic animal model of the poorly-understood, and often intractable, neonatal failure-to-thrive with intestinal pathology. Our results implicate lysosomes in neonatal intestinal pathologies, a major cause of infant mortality worldwide, and suggest transient intestinal dysfunction might affect newborns

  2. Activation of calcium-sensing receptor accelerates apoptosis in hyperplastic parathyroid cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mizobuchi, Masahide; Ogata, Hiroaki; Hatamura, Ikuji; Saji, Fumie; Koiwa, Fumihiko; Kinugasa, Eriko; Koshikawa, Shozo; Akizawa, Tadao

    2007-01-01

    Calcimimetic compounds inhibit not only parathyroid hormone (PTH) synthesis and secretion, but also parathyroid cell proliferation. The aim of this investigation is to examine the effect of the calcimimetic compound NPS R-568 (R-568) on parathyroid cell death in uremic rats. Hyperplastic parathyroid glands were obtained from uremic rats (subtotal nephrectomy and high-phosphorus diet), and incubated in the media only or the media which contained high concentration of R-568 (10 -4 M), or 10% cyclodextrin, for 6 h. R-568 treatment significantly suppressed medium PTH concentration compared with that of the other two groups. R-568 treatment not only increased the number of terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end-labeling assay-positive cells, but also induced the morphologic changes of cell death determined by light or electron microscopy. These results suggest that CaR activation by R-568 accelerates parathyroid cell death, probably through an apoptotic mechanism in uremic rats in vitro

  3. Accelerated turnover of taste bud cells in mice deficient for the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p27Kip1

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    Perna Marla K

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mammalian taste buds contain several specialized cell types that coordinately respond to tastants and communicate with sensory nerves. While it has long been appreciated that these cells undergo continual turnover, little is known concerning how adequate numbers of cells are generated and maintained. The cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p27Kip1 has been shown to influence cell number in several developing tissues, by coordinating cell cycle exit during cell differentiation. Here, we investigated its involvement in the control of taste cell replacement by examining adult mice with targeted ablation of the p27Kip1 gene. Results Histological and morphometric analyses of fungiform and circumvallate taste buds reveal no structural differences between wild-type and p27Kip1-null mice. However, when examined in functional assays, mutants show substantial proliferative changes. In BrdU incorporation experiments, more S-phase-labeled precursors appear within circumvallate taste buds at 1 day post-injection, the earliest time point examined. After 1 week, twice as many labeled intragemmal cells are present, but numbers return to wild-type levels by 2 weeks. Mutant taste buds also contain more TUNEL-labeled cells and 50% more apoptotic bodies than wild-type controls. In normal mice, p27 Kip1 is evident in a subset of receptor and presynaptic taste cells beginning about 3 days post-injection, correlating with the onset of taste cell maturation. Loss of gene function, however, does not alter the proportions of distinct immunohistochemically-identified cell types. Conclusions p27Kip1 participates in taste cell replacement by regulating the number of precursor cells available for entry into taste buds. This is consistent with a role for the protein in timing cell cycle withdrawal in progenitor cells. The equivalence of mutant and wild-type taste buds with regard to cell number, cell types and general structure contrasts with the hyperplasia

  4. A neurokinin 3 receptor-selective agonist accelerates pulsatile luteinizing hormone secretion in lactating cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Sho; Wakabayashi, Yoshihiro; Yamamura, Takashi; Ohkura, Satoshi; Matsuyama, Shuichi

    2017-07-01

    Pulsatile gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) secretion, which is indispensable for follicular development, is suppressed in lactating dairy and beef cattle. Neurokinin B (NKB) neurons in the arcuate nucleus of the hypothalamus are considered to play an essential role in generating the pulsatile mode of GnRH/luteinizing hormone (LH) secretion. The present study aimed to clarify the role of NKB-neurokinin 3 receptor (NK3R) signaling in the pulsatile pattern of GnRH/gonadotropin secretion in postpartum lactating cattle. We examined the effects of the administration of an NK3R-selective agonist, senktide, on gonadotropin secretion in lactating cattle. The lactating cattle, at approximately 7 days postpartum, were intravenously infused with senktide (30 or 300 nmol/min) or vehicle for 24 h. The administration of 30 or 300 nmol/min senktide significantly increased LH pulse frequency compared to in the control group during 0-4 or 20-24 h after infusion, respectively. Moreover, LH and follicle-stimulating hormone levels were gradually increased by 300 nmol/min administration of senktide during the 0-4-h sampling period. Ultrasonography of the ovaries was performed to identify the first postpartum ovulation in senktide-administered lactating cattle. The interval from calving to first postpartum ovulation was significantly shorter in the 300 nmol/min senktide-administered group than in the control group. Taken together, these findings suggest that senktide infusion elicits an increase in LH pulse frequency that may stimulate follicular development and, in turn, induce the first postpartum ovulation in lactating cattle. © The Authors 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Society for the Study of Reproduction. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. Generation of Novel Traj18-Deficient Mice Lacking Vα14 Natural Killer T Cells with an Undisturbed T Cell Receptor α-Chain Repertoire.

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    Nyambayar Dashtsoodol

    Full Text Available Invariant Vα14 natural killer T (NKT cells, characterized by the expression of a single invariant T cell receptor (TCR α chain encoded by rearranged Trav11 (Vα14-Traj18 (Jα18 gene segments in mice, and TRAV10 (Vα24-TRAJ18 (Jα18 in humans, mediate adjuvant effects to activate various effector cell types in both innate and adaptive immune systems that facilitates the potent antitumor effects. It was recently reported that the Jα18-deficient mouse described by our group in 1997 harbors perturbed TCRα repertoire, which raised concerns regarding the validity of some of the experimental conclusions that have been made using this mouse line. To resolve this concern, we generated a novel Traj18-deficient mouse line by specifically targeting the Traj18 gene segment using Cre-Lox approach. Here we showed the newly generated Traj18-deficient mouse has, apart from the absence of Traj18, an undisturbed TCRα chain repertoire by using next generation sequencing and by detecting normal generation of Vα19Jα33 expressing mucosal associated invariant T cells, whose development was abrogated in the originally described Jα18-KO mice. We also demonstrated here the definitive requirement for NKT cells in the protection against tumors and their potent adjuvant effects on antigen-specific CD8 T cells.

  6. Decreased phosphorylation of δ and ε subunits of the acetylcholine receptor coincides with delayed postsynaptic maturation in PKC θ deficient mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanuza, Maria A; Besalduch, Núria; González, Carmen; Santafé, Manel M; Garcia, Neus; Tomàs, Marta; Nelson, Phillip G; Tomàs, Josep

    2010-09-01

    Protein kinase C (PKC) activity is involved in the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) redistribution at the neuromuscular junction in vivo during postnatal maturation. Here we studied, in PKC theta (PKCtheta) deficient mice (KO), how the theta isoform of PKC is involved in the nAChR cluster maturation that is accompanied by the developmental activity-dependent neuromuscular synapse elimination process. We found that axonal elimination and dispersion of nAChR from the postsynaptic plaques and its redistribution to form the mature postsynaptic apparatus were delayed but not totally suppressed in PKCtheta deficient mice. Moreover, the delay in the maturation of the morphology of the nAChR clusters during the early postnatal synapse elimination period in the PKCtheta deficient mice coincides with a reduction in the PKCtheta-mediated phosphorylation on the delta subunit of the nAChR. In addition, we show evidence for PKCtheta regulation of PKA in normally phosphorylating the epsilon subunit of nAChR. We have also found that the theta isoform of PKC is located on the postsynaptic component of the neuromuscular junction but is also expressed by motoneurons in the spinal cord and in the motor nerve terminals. The results allow us to hypothesize that a spatially specific and opposing action of PKCtheta and PKA may result in activity-dependent alterations to synaptic connectivity at both the nerve inputs and the postsynaptic nAChR clusters. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Accelerated habit formation following amphetamine exposure is reversed by D1, but enhanced by D2, receptor antagonists

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    Andrew John Dudley Nelson

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Repeated exposure to the psychostimulant amphetamine has been shown to disrupt goal-directed instrumental actions and promote the early and abnormal development of goal-insensitive habitual responding (Nelson and Killcross, 2006. To investigate the neuropharmacological specificity of this effect as well as restore goal-directed responding in animals with pre-training amphetamine exposure, animals were treated with the non-selective dopamine antagonist α-flupenthixol, the selective D1 antagonist SCH 23390 or the selective D2 antagonist eticlopride, prior to instrumental training (3 sessions. Subsequently, the reinforcer was paired with LiCL-induced gastric-malaise and animals were given a test of goal-sensitivity both in extinction and reacquisition. The effect of these dopaminergic antagonists on the sensitivity of lever press performance to outcome devaluation was assessed in animals with pre-training exposure to amphetamine (Experiments 1a-1c or in non-sensitized animals (Experiment 2. Both α-flupenthixol and SCH23390 reversed accelerated habit formation following amphetamine sensitization. However, eticlopride appeared to enhance this effect and render instrumental performance compulsive as these animals were unable to inhibit responding both in extinction and reacquisition, even though a consumption test confirmed they had acquired an aversion to the reinforcer. These findings demonstrate that amphetamine induced-disruption of goal-directed behaviour is mediated by activity at distinct dopamine receptor subtypes and may represent a putative model of the neurochemical processes involved in the loss of voluntary control over behaviour.

  8. Activation of Adiponectin Receptor Regulates Proprotein Convertase Subtilisin/Kexin Type 9 Expression and Inhibits Lesions in ApoE-Deficient Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Lei; Yang, Xiaoxiao; Li, Qi; Zeng, Peng; Liu, Ying; Liu, Lipei; Chen, Yuanli; Yu, Miao; Ma, Chuanrui; Li, Xiaoju; Li, Yan; Zhang, Rongxin; Zhu, Yan; Miao, Qing Robert; Han, Jihong; Duan, Yajun

    2017-07-01

    The reduced adiponectin levels are associated with atherosclerosis. Adiponectin exerts its functions by activating adiponectin receptor (AdipoR). Proprotein convertase subtilisin kexin type 9 (PCSK9) degrades LDLR protein (low-density lipoprotein receptor) to increase serum LDL-cholesterol levels. PCSK9 expression can be regulated by PPARγ (peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ) or SREBP2 (sterol regulatory element-binding protein 2). The effects of AdipoR agonists on PCSK9 and LDLR expression, serum lipid profiles, and atherosclerosis remain unknown. At cellular levels, AdipoR agonists (ADP355 and AdipoRon) induced PCSK9 transcription/expression that solely depended on activation of PPAR-responsive element in the PCSK9 promoter. AdipoR agonists induced PPARγ expression; thus, the AdipoR agonist-activated PCSK9 expression/production was impaired in PPARγ deficient hepatocytes. Meanwhile, AdipoR agonists transcriptionally activated LDLR expression by activating SRE in the LDLR promoter. Moreover, AMP-activated protein kinase α (AMPKα) was involved in AdipoR agonist-activated PCSK9 expression. In wild-type mice, ADP355 increased PCSK9 and LDLR expression and serum PCSK9 levels, which was associated with activation of PPARγ, AMPKα and SREBP2 and reduction of LDL-cholesterol levels. In contrast, ADP355 reduced PCSK9 expression/secretion in apoE-deficient (apoE -/- ) mice, but it still activated hepatic LDLR, PPARγ, AMPKα, and SREBP2. More importantly, ADP355 inhibited lesions in en face aortas and sinus lesions in aortic root in apoE -/- mice with amelioration of lipid profiles. Our study demonstrates that AdipoR activation by agonists regulated PCSK9 expression differently in wild-type and apoE -/- mice. However, ADP355 activated hepatic LDLR expression and ameliorated lipid metabolism in both types of mice and inhibited atherosclerosis in apoE -/- mice. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  9. Deficiency in adipocyte chemokine receptor CXCR4 exacerbates obesity and compromises thermoregulatory responses of brown adipose tissue in a mouse model of diet-induced obesity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Longbiao; Heuser-Baker, Janet; Herlea-Pana, Oana; Zhang, Nan; Szweda, Luke I.; Griffin, Timothy M.; Barlic-Dicen, Jana

    2014-01-01

    The chemokine receptor CXCR4 is expressed on adipocytes and macrophages in adipose tissue, but its role in this tissue remains unknown. We evaluated whether deficiency in either adipocyte or myeloid leukocyte CXCR4 affects body weight (BW) and adiposity in a mouse model of high-fat-diet (HFD)-induced obesity. We found that ablation of adipocyte, but not myeloid leukocyte, CXCR4 exacerbated obesity. The HFD-fed adipocyte-specific CXCR4-knockout (AdCXCR4ko) mice, compared to wild-type C57BL/6 control mice, had increased BW (average: 52.0 g vs. 35.5 g), adiposity (average: 49.3 vs. 21.0% of total BW), and inflammatory leukocyte content in white adipose tissue (WAT), despite comparable food intake. As previously reported, HFD feeding increased uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1) expression (fold increase: 3.5) in brown adipose tissue (BAT) of the C57BL/6 control mice. However, no HFD-induced increase in UCP1 expression was observed in the AdCXCR4ko mice, which were cold sensitive. Thus, our study suggests that adipocyte CXCR4 limits development of obesity by preventing excessive inflammatory cell recruitment into WAT and by supporting thermogenic activity of BAT. Since CXCR4 is conserved between mouse and human, the newfound role of CXCR4 in mouse adipose tissue may parallel the role of this chemokine receptor in human adipose tissue.—Yao, L., Heuser-Baker, J., Herlea-Pana, O., Zhang, N., Szweda, L. I., Griffin, T. M., Barlic-Dicen, J. Deficiency in adipocyte chemokine receptor CXCR4 exacerbates obesity and compromises thermoregulatory responses of brown adipose tissue in a mouse model of diet-induced obesity. PMID:25016030

  10. Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) deficient mice are protected from adipose tissue inflammation in aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Amiya K; O'Brien, Martin; Mau, Theresa; Yung, Raymond

    2017-09-07

    Adipose tissue (AT) inflammation is a central mechanism for metabolic dysfunction in both diet-induced obesity and age-associated obesity. Studies in diet-induced obesity have characterized the role of Fetuin A (Fet A) in Free Fatty Acids (FFA)-mediated TLR4 activation and adipose tissue inflammation. However, the role of Fet A & TLR4 in aging-related adipose tissue inflammation is unknown. In the current study, analysis of epidymymal fat pads of C57/Bl6 male mice, we found that, in contrast to data from diet-induced obesity models, adipose tissue from aged mice have normal Fet A and TLR4 expression. Interestingly, aged TLR4-deficient mice have diminished adipose tissue inflammation compared to normal controls. We further demonstrated that reduced AT inflammation in old TLR4-deficient mice is linked to impaired ER stress, augmented autophagy activity, and diminished senescence phenomenon. Importantly, old TLR4-deficient mice have improved glucose tolerance compared to age-matched wild type mice, suggesting that the observed reduced AT inflammation in aged TLR4-deficient mice has important physiological consequences. Taken together, our present study establishes novel aspect of aging-associated AT inflammation that is distinct from diet-induced AT inflammation. Our results also provide strong evidence that TLR4 plays a significant role in promoting aging adipose tissue inflammation.

  11. Firing properties of dopamine neurons in freely moving dopamine-deficient mice: Effects of dopamine receptor activation and anesthesia

    OpenAIRE

    Robinson, Siobhan; Smith, David M.; Mizumori, Sheri J. Y.; Palmiter, Richard D.

    2004-01-01

    To examine the regulation of midbrain dopamine neurons, recordings were obtained from single neurons of freely moving, genetically engineered dopamine-deficient (DD) mice. DD mice were tested without dopamine signaling (basal state) and with endogenous dopamine signaling (after L-dopa administration). In the basal state, when dopamine concentration in DD mice is

  12. Effects of growth hormone and insulin-like growth factor 1 deficiency on ageing and longevity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laron, Zvi

    2002-01-01

    Present knowledge on the effects of growth hormone (GH)/insulin-like growth hormone (IGF)1 deficiency on ageing and lifespan are reviewed. Evidence is presented that isolated GH deficiency (IGHD), multiple pituitary hormone deficiencies (MPHD) including GH, as well as primary IGE1 deficiency (GH resistance, Laron syndrome) present signs of early ageing such as thin and wrinkled skin, obesity, hyperglycemia and osteoporosis. These changes do not seem to affect the lifespan, as patients reach old age. Animal models of genetic MPHD (Ames and Snell mice) and GH receptor knockout mice (primary IGF1 deficiency) also have a statistically significant higher longevity compared to normal controls. On the contrary, mice transgenic for GH and acromegalic patients secreting large amounts of GH have premature death. In conclusion longstanding GH/IGF1 deficiency affects several parameters of the ageing process without impairing lifespan, and as shown in animal models prolongs longevity. In contrast high GH/IGF1 levels accelerate death.

  13. Storage Pool Deficiencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Deficiency Factor V Deficiency Combined FV & FVIII Deficiencies Factor VII Deficiency Factor X Deficiency Factor XI Deficiency Factor ... Deficiency Factor V Deficiency Combined FV & FVIII Deficiencies Factor VII Deficiency Factor X Deficiency Factor XI Deficiency Factor ...

  14. Mechanical Vibration Mitigates the Decrease of Bone Quantity and Bone Quality of Leptin Receptor-Deficient Db/Db Mice by Promoting Bone Formation and Inhibiting Bone Resorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jing, Da; Luo, Erping; Cai, Jing; Tong, Shichao; Zhai, Mingming; Shen, Guanghao; Wang, Xin; Luo, Zhuojing

    2016-09-01

    Leptin, a major hormonal product of adipocytes, is involved in regulating appetite and energy metabolism. Substantial studies have revealed the anabolic actions of leptin on skeletons and bone cells both in vivo and in vitro. Growing evidence has substantiated that leptin receptor-deficient db/db mice exhibit decreased bone mass and impaired bone microstructure despite several conflicting results previously reported. We herein systematically investigated bone microarchitecture, mechanical strength, bone turnover and its potential molecular mechanisms in db/db mice. More importantly, we also explored an effective approach for increasing bone mass in leptin receptor-deficient animals in an easy and noninvasive manner. Our results show that deterioration of trabecular and cortical bone microarchitecture and decreases of skeletal mechanical strength-including maximum load, yield load, stiffness, energy, tissue-level modulus and hardness-in db/db mice were significantly ameliorated by 12-week, whole-body vibration (WBV) with 0.5 g, 45 Hz via micro-computed tomography (μCT), three-point bending, and nanoindentation examinations. Serum biochemical analysis shows that WBV significantly decreased serum tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase 5b (TRACP5b) and CTx-1 levels and also mitigated the reduction of serum osteocalcin (OCN) in db/db mice. Bone histomorphometric analysis confirmed that decreased bone formation-lower mineral apposition rate, bone formation rate, and osteoblast numbers in cancellous bone-in db/db mice were suppressed by WBV. Real-time PCR assays show that WBV mitigated the reductions of tibial alkaline phosphatase (ALP), OCN, Runt-related transcription factor 2 (RUNX2), type I collagen (COL1), BMP2, Wnt3a, Lrp6, and β-catenin mRNA expression, and prevented the increases of tibial sclerostin (SOST), RANK, RANKL, RANL/osteoprotegerin (OPG) gene levels in db/db mice. Our results show that WBV promoted bone quantity and quality in db/db mice with obvious

  15. Topical administration of interleukin-1 receptor antagonist as a therapy for aqueous-deficient dry eye in autoimmune disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijmasi, Trinka; Chen, Feeling Y T; Chen, Ying Ting; Gallup, Marianne; McNamara, Nancy

    2013-01-01

    Dry eye is commonly associated with autoimmune diseases such as Sjögren's syndrome (SS), in which exocrinopathy of the lacrimal gland leads to aqueous tear deficiency and keratoconjunctivitis sicca (KCS). KCS is among the most common and debilitating clinical manifestations of SS that is often recalcitrant to therapy. We established mice deficient in the autoimmune regulator (Aire) gene as a model for autoimmune-mediated aqueous-deficient dry eye. In Aire-deficient mice, CD4+ T cells represent the main effector cells and local signaling via the interleukin-1 (IL-1/IL-1R1) pathway provides an essential link between autoreactive CD4+ T cells and ocular surface disease. In the current study, we evaluated the efficacy of topical administration of IL-1R1 antagonist (IL-1RA) anakinra in alleviating ocular surface damage resulting from aqueous-deficient dry eye in the setting of autoimmune disease. We compared the effect of commercially available IL-1R1 antagonist, anakinra (50 μg/mL concentration) to that of carboxymethylcellulose (CMC) vehicle control as a treatment for dry eye. Age-matched, Aire-deficient mice were treated three times daily with anakinra or CMC vehicle for 14 days using side-by-side (n = 4 mice/group) and paired-eye (n = 5) comparisons. We assessed (1) ocular surface damage with lissamine green staining; (2) tear secretion with wetting of phenol-red threads; (3) goblet cell (GC) mucin glycosylation with lectin histochemistry; (4) immune cell infiltration using anti-F4/80, CD11c, and CD4 T cell antibodies; and (5) gene expression of cornified envelope protein, Small Proline-Rich Protein-1B (SPRR1B) with real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Aire-deficient mice treated with anakinra experienced significant improvements in ocular surface integrity and tear secretion. After 7 days of treatment, lissamine green staining decreased in eyes treated with anakinra compared to an equivalent increase in staining following treatment with CMC vehicle

  16. Lipoprotein receptors in copper-deficient rats: in vitro binding of high-density lipoprotein subfractions to liver membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hassel, C.A.

    1986-01-01

    Three studies were conducted to determine whether the elevated plasma and HDL cholesterol levels observed in copper-deficient rats could be explained by the interaction of 125 I-HDL subfractions with liver membrane preparations in vitro. Rats from all studies were randomly divided into two dietary treatments, copper-deficient and adequate (0.7 mg and 8.0 mg Cukg diet, respectively). Total binding data and computer derived estimates (K/sub d/ and B/sub max/) were used to compare differences between treatments. Binding data from all experiments conformed to a one-site model. In all cases, binding was saturable and EDTA and pronase insensitive. Treatment differences were observed in Study I ( 125 I-apo E-free HDL binding to crude liver membranes). Significantly lower total binding and B/sub max/ were observed when lipoproteins and membranes from copper-deficient animals were used in the assay. Competition experiments from Studies II and III demonstrate that the different HDL subfractions competed effectively with one another for binding sites, indicating that apo E is not a determinant in binding of rat 125 I-HDL subfractions to purified liver plasma membranes

  17. Melatonin Attenuates Memory Impairment Induced by Klotho Gene Deficiency Via Interactive Signaling Between MT2 Receptor, ERK, and Nrf2-Related Antioxidant Potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Eun-Joo; Chung, Yoon Hee; Le, Hoang-Lan Thi; Jeong, Ji Hoon; Dang, Duy-Khanh; Nam, Yunsung; Wie, Myung Bok; Nah, Seung-Yeol; Nabeshima, Yo-Ichi; Nabeshima, Toshitaka; Kim, Hyoung-Chun

    2015-01-01

    Background: We demonstrated that oxidative stress plays a crucial role in cognitive impairment in klotho mutant mice, a genetic model of aging. Since down-regulation of melatonin due to aging is well documented, we used this genetic model to determine whether the antioxidant property of melatonin affects memory impairment. Methods: First, we examined the effects of melatonin on hippocampal oxidative parameters and the glutathione/oxidized glutathione (GSH/GSSG) ratio and memory dysfunction of klotho mutant mice. Second, we investigated whether a specific melatonin receptor is involved in the melatonin-mediated pharmacological response by application with melatonin receptor antagonists. Third, we examined phospho-extracellular-signal-regulated kinase (ERK) expression, nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) nuclear translocation, Nrf2 DNA binding activity, and glutamate-cysteine ligase (GCL) mRNA expression. Finally, we examined effects of the ERK inhibitor SL327 in response to antioxidant efficacy and memory enhancement mediated by melatonin. Results: Treatment with melatonin resulted in significant attenuations of oxidative damage, a decrease in the GSH/GSSG ratio, and a significant amelioration of memory impairment in this aging model. These effects of melatonin were significantly counteracted by the selective MT2 receptor antagonist 4-P-PDOT. Importantly, 4-P-PDOT or SL327 also counteracted melatonin-mediated attenuation in response to the decreases in phospho-ERK expression, Nrf2 nuclear translocation, Nrf2 DNA-binding activity, and GCL mRNA expression in the hippocampi of klotho mutant mice. SL327 also counteracted the up-regulation of the GSH/GSSG ratio and the memory enhancement mediated by melatonin in klotho mutant mice. Conclusions: Melatonin attenuates oxidative stress and the associated memory impairment induced by klotho deficiency via signaling interaction between the MT2 receptor and ERK- and Nrf2-related antioxidant potential. PMID

  18. Gene expression of a truncated and the full-length growth hormone (GH) receptor in subcutaneous fat and skeletal muscle in GH-deficient adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fisker, Sidse; Kristensen, K; Rosenfalck, A M

    2001-01-01

    the relationship of circulating GHBP and body composition to GHR and GHRtr gene expression. Eleven adult GH-deficient patients were studied before and after 4 months of GH substitution therapy. Abdominal fat obtained by liposuction and femoral muscle biopsies were taken at baseline and after 4 months. Gene...... expression of GHR and GHRtr in adipose tissue and skeletal muscle was determined and expressed relative to the expression of beta-actin. Gene expression of GHR in abdominal sc adipose tissue was not altered, whereas the expression of GHRtr increased significantly. In skeletal muscle inverse changes were seen...... in the expression of messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) levels for the two GH receptor forms: expression of GHR increased significantly, whereas mRNA levels for GHRtr decreased. As expected, body composition changed with reduction of body fat mass after 4 months of GH treatment. Levels of circulating GHBP decreased...

  19. Utrophin abundance is reduced at neuromuscular junctions of patients with both inherited and acquired acetylcholine receptor deficiencies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slater, CR; Young, C; Wood, SJ; Bewick, GS; Anderson, LVB; Baxter, P; Fawcett, PRW; Roberts, M; Jacobson, L; Kuks, J; Vincent, A; NewsomDavis, J

    Congenital myasthenic syndromes are a heterogenous group of conditions in which muscle weakness resulting from impaired neuromuscular transmission is often present from infancy. One form of congenital myasthenic syndrome is due to a reduction of the number of acetylcholine receptors (AChRs) at the

  20. Leukocytic Toll-Like Receptor 2 Deficiency Preserves Cardiac Function And Reduces Fibrosis In Sustained Pressure Overload

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, Jiong-Wei; Fontes, Magda S. C.; Wang, Xiaoyuan; Chong, Suet Yen; Kessler, Elise L.; Zhang, Ya-Nan; de Haan, Judith J.; Arslan, Fatih; de Jager, Saskia C. A.; Timmers, Leo; van Veen, Toon A. B.; Lam, Carolyn S. P.; de Kleijn, Dominique P. V.

    2017-01-01

    An involement of Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) has been established in cardiac dysfunction after acute myocardial infarction; however, its role in chronic pressure overload is unclear. We sought to evaluate the role of TLR2 in cardiac hypertrophy, fibrosis and dysfunction in sustained pressure

  1. The selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs) raloxifene and tamoxifen improve ANP levels and decrease nuclear translocation of NF-kB in estrogen-deficient rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamas, Aline Z; Nascimento, Andrews M; Medeiros, Ana Raquel S; Caliman, Izabela F; Dalpiaz, Polyana L M; Firmes, Luciana B; Sousa, Glauciene J; Oliveira, Phablo Wendell C; Andrade, Tadeu U; Reis, Adelina M; Gouvea, Sônia A; Bissoli, Nazaré S

    2017-08-01

    The selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs) raloxifene and tamoxifen are used for the treatment of osteoporosis and cancer, respectively, in women. The impairment of both the Atrial Natriuretic Peptide (ANP) cell signaling system and the translocation of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-kB) to the cell nucleus are associated with detrimental cardiovascular effects and inflammation. The effects of SERMs on these parameters in the cardiac tissue of estrogen-deficient rats has not been reported. We investigated the effects of raloxifene and tamoxifen on ANP signaling, p65 NF-kB nuclear translocation, cardiac histology and contractility. Female rats were divided into five groups: control (SHAM), ovariectomized (OVX), OVX-treated 17-β-estradiol (E), OVX-treated raloxifene (RLX) and OVX-treated tamoxifen (TAM). The treatments started 21days after ovariectomy and continued for 14days. Ovariectomy reduced ANP mRNA in the left atrium (LA), decreased the content of ANP protein in the LA and in plasma, and increased the level of p65 NF-kB nuclear translocation in the left ventricle. Both 17-β-estradiol and SERMs were able to reverse these alterations, which were induced by the estrogen deficient state. The hemodynamic and cardiac structural parameters analyzed in the present work were not modified by the interventions. Our study demonstrates, for the first time, the additional benefits of raloxifene and tamoxifen in an estrogen-deficient state. These include the normalization of plasmatic and cardiac ANP levels and cardiac p65 NF-kB translocation. Therefore, these treatments promote cardiovascular protection and may contribute to the prevention of cardiac dysfunction observed long-term in postmenopausal women. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z o.o.

  2. Temporal phasing of locomotor activity, heart rate rhythmicity, and core body temperature is disrupted in VIP receptor 2-deficient mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hannibal, Jens; Hsiung, Hansen M; Fahrenkrug, Jan

    2011-01-01

    these observations with observations made from mice examined by wheel-running activity. The study demonstrates that VPAC2 signaling is necessary for a functional circadian clock driving locomotor activity, core body temperature, and heart rate rhythmicity, since VPAC2-deficient mice lose the rhythms in all three...... to that of wild-type mice. The use of telemetric devices to measure circadian locomotor activity, temperature, and heart rate, together with the classical determination of circadian rhythms of wheel-running activity, raises questions about how representative wheel-running activity may be of other behavioral...

  3. Ablation of ghrelin receptor in leptin-deficient ob/ob mice has paradoxical effects on glucose homeostasis when compared with ablation of ghrelin in ob/ob mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    The orexigenic hormone ghrelin is important in diabetes because it has an inhibitory effect on insulin secretion. Ghrelin ablation in leptin-deficient ob/ob (Ghrelin(-/-):ob/ob) mice increases insulin secretion and improves hyperglycemia. The physiologically relevant ghrelin receptor is the growth ...

  4. Altered Rhythm of Adrenal Clock Genes, StAR and Serum Corticosterone in VIP Receptor 2-Deficient Mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fahrenkrug, Jan; Georg, Birgitte; Hannibal, Jens

    2012-01-01

    oscillator based on a group of clock genes and their protein products. Mice lacking the VPAC2 receptor display disrupted circadian rhythm of physiology and behaviour, and therefore, we using real-time RT-PCR quantified (1) the mRNAs for the clock genes Per1 and Bmal1 in the adrenal gland and SCN, (2......RNA expression and serum corticosterone concentration. Double immunohistochemistry showed that the PER1 protein and StAR were co-localised in the same steroidogenic cells. Circulating corticosterone plays a role in the circadian timing system and the misaligned corticosterone rhythm in the VPAC2 receptor......The circadian time-keeping system consists of clocks in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) and in peripheral organs including an adrenal clock linked to the rhythmic corticosteroid production by regulating steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR). Clock cells contain an autonomous molecular...

  5. The Use of an IL-1 Receptor Antagonist Peptide to Control Inflammation in the Treatment of Corneal Limbal Epithelial Stem Cell Deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Fok

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Corneal limbal stem cell deficiency (LSCD may be treated using ex vivo limbal epithelial stem cells (LESCs derived from cadaveric donor tissue. However, continuing challenges exist around tissue availability, inflammation, and transplant rejection. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS or recombinant human IL-1β stimulated primary human keratocyte and LESC models were used to investigate the anti-inflammatory properties of a short chain, IL-1 receptor antagonist peptide for use in LESC sheet growth to control inflammation. The peptide was characterized using mass spectroscopy and high performance liquid chromatography. Peptide cytotoxicity, patterns of cell cytokine expression in response to LPS or IL-1β stimulation, and peptide suppression of this response were investigated by MTS/LDH assays, ELISA, and q-PCR. Cell differences in LPS stimulated toll-like receptor 4 expression were investigated using immunocytochemistry. A significant reduction in rIL-1β stimulated inflammatory cytokine production occurred following LESC and keratocyte incubation with anti-inflammatory peptide and in LPS stimulated IL-6 and IL-8 production following keratocyte incubation with peptide (1 mg/mL P<0.05. LESCs produced no cytokine response to LPS stimulation and showed no TLR4 expression. The peptide supported LESC growth when adhered to a silicone hydrogel contact lens indicating potential use in improved LESC grafting through suppression of inflammation.

  6. Serotonin hyperinnervation and upregulated 5-HT2A receptor expression and motor-stimulating function in nigrostriatal dopamine-deficient Pitx3 mutant mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Li; Qiu, Guozhen; Ding, Shengyuan; Zhou, Fu-Ming

    2013-01-23

    The striatum receives serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) innervation and expresses 5-HT2A receptors (5-HT2ARs) and other 5-HT receptors, raising the possibility that the striatal 5-HT system may undergo adaptive changes after chronic severe dopamine (DA) loss and contribute to the function and dysfunction of the striatum. Here we show that in transcription factor Pitx3 gene mutant mice with a selective, severe DA loss in the dorsal striatum mimicking the DA denervation in late Parkinson's disease (PD), both the 5-HT innervation and the 5-HT2AR mRNA expression were increased in the dorsal striatum. Functionally, while having no detectable motor effect in wild type mice, the 5-HT2R agonist 2,5-dimethoxy-4-iodoamphetamine increased both the baseline and l-dopa-induced normal ambulatory and dyskinetic movements in Pitx3 mutant mice, whereas the selective 5-HT2AR blocker volinanserin had the opposite effects. These results demonstrate that Pitx3 mutant mice are a convenient and valid mouse model to study the compensatory 5-HT upregulation following the loss of the nigrostriatal DA projection and that the upregulated 5-HT2AR function in the DA deficient dorsal striatum may enhance both normal and dyskinetic movements. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Interleukin-21 receptor deficiency increases the initial toll-like receptor 2 response but protects against joint pathology by reducing Th1 and Th17 cells during streptococcal cell wall arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marijnissen, Renoud J; Roeleveld, Debbie M; Young, Deborah; Nickerson-Nutter, Cheryl; Abdollahi-Roodsaz, Shahla; Garcia de Aquino, Sabrina; van de Loo, Fons A J; van Spriel, Annemiek B; Boots, Annemieke M H; van den Berg, Wim B; Koenders, Marije I

    2014-04-01

    The cytokine interleukin-21 (IL-21) can have both proinflammatory and immunosuppressive effects. The purpose of this study was to investigate the potential dual role of IL-21 in experimental arthritis in relation to Th17 cells. Antigen-induced arthritis (AIA) and chronic streptococcal cell wall (SCW) arthritis were induced in IL-21 receptor-deficient (IL-21R(-/-) ) and wild-type mice. Knee joints, synovial tissue, and serum were analyzed for arthritis pathology and inflammatory markers. During AIA and chronic SCW arthritis, IL-21R deficiency protected against severe inflammation and joint destruction. This was accompanied by suppressed serum IgG1 levels and antigen-specific T cell responses. Levels of IL-17 were reduced during AIA, and synovial lymphocytes isolated during SCW arthritis for flow cytometry demonstrated that mainly IL-17+ interferon-γ (IFNγ)-positive T cells were reduced in IL-21R(-/-) mice. However, during the acute phases of SCW arthritis, significantly higher joint swelling scores were observed, consistent with enhanced tumor necrosis factor and IL-6 expression. Interestingly, IL-21R(-/-) mice were significantly less capable of up-regulating suppressor of cytokine signaling 1 (SOCS-1) and SOCS-3 messenger RNA. IL-21 stimulation also affected the Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR-2)/caspase recruitment domain 15 response to SCW fragments in vitro, indicating that impaired SOCS regulation in the absence of IL-21 signaling might contribute to the increased local activation during SCW arthritis. In contrast to the proinflammatory role of IL-21 in adaptive immunity, which drives IL-17+IFN+ cells and joint pathology during chronic experimental arthritis, IL-21 also has an important immunosuppressive role, presumably by inhibiting TLR signaling via SOCS-1 and SOCS-3. If this dual role of IL-21 in various immune processes is present in human disease, it could make IL-21 a difficult therapeutic target in rheumatoid arthritis. Copyright © 2014 by the American

  8. Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation From Unrelated Donors in 2 Cases of Interleukin-10 Receptor Deficiency: Is Surgery Not a Requirement?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocacik Uygun, Dilara F; Uygun, Vedat; Daloğlu, Hayriye; Öztürkmen, Seda; Karasu, Gülsün; Reisli, İsmail; Sayar, Ersin; Yüksekkaya, Hasan A; Glocker, Erik-Oliver; Boztuğ, Kaan; Yeşilipek, Akif

    2018-04-20

    Mutations in interleukin-10 and its receptors cause infantile inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), a hyperinflammatory disorder characterized by severe, treatment-refractory colitis, multiple abscesses, and enterocutaneous fistulas. Patients with infantile IBD often require several surgical interventions, including complete colectomy, and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is currently the only known medical therapy. Traditionally, operative management has been preferred before stem cell transplantation because of the latter's increased susceptibility to procedural complications; however, surgical intervention could be delayed, and possibly reconsidered, because our 2 patients with infantile IBD demonstrated a rapid response to treatment via engraftment.

  9. 5-HT2A receptor deficiency alters the metabolic and transcriptional, but not the behavioral, consequences of chronic unpredictable stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minal Jaggar

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Chronic stress enhances risk for psychiatric disorders, and in animal models is known to evoke depression-like behavior accompanied by perturbed neurohormonal, metabolic, neuroarchitectural and transcriptional changes. Serotonergic neurotransmission, including serotonin2A (5-HT2A receptors, have been implicated in mediating specific aspects of stress-induced responses. Here we investigated the influence of chronic unpredictable stress (CUS on depression-like behavior, serum metabolic measures, and gene expression in stress-associated neurocircuitry of the prefrontal cortex (PFC and hippocampus in 5-HT2A receptor knockout (5-HT2A−/− and wild-type mice of both sexes. While 5-HT2A−/− male and female mice exhibited a baseline reduced anxiety-like state, this did not alter the onset or severity of behavioral despair during and at the cessation of CUS, indicating that these mice can develop stress-evoked depressive behavior. Analysis of metabolic parameters in serum revealed a CUS-evoked dyslipidemia, which was abrogated in 5-HT2A−/− female mice with a hyperlipidemic baseline phenotype. 5-HT2A−/− male mice in contrast did not exhibit such a baseline shift in their serum lipid profile. Specific stress-responsive genes (Crh, Crhr1, Nr3c1, and Nr3c2, trophic factors (Bdnf, Igf1 and immediate early genes (IEGs (Arc, Fos, Fosb, Egr1-4 in the PFC and hippocampus were altered in 5-HT2A−/− mice both under baseline and CUS conditions. Our results support a role for the 5-HT2A receptor in specific metabolic and transcriptional, but not behavioral, consequences of CUS, and highlight that the contribution of the 5-HT2A receptor to stress-evoked changes is sexually dimorphic. Keywords: 5-HT2A−/− mice, Prefrontal cortex, Hippocampus, Gene expression, Sexual dimorphism, Despair

  10. G protein-coupled receptor kinase-3-deficient mice exhibit WHIM syndrome features and attenuated inflammatory responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarrant, Teresa K.; Billard, Matthew J.; Timoshchenko, Roman G.; McGinnis, Marcus W.; Serafin, D. Stephen; Foreman, Oded; Esserman, Denise A.; Chao, Nelson J.; Lento, William E.; Lee, David M.; Patel, Dhavalkumar; Siderovski, David P.

    2013-01-01

    Chemokine receptor interactions coordinate leukocyte migration in inflammation. Chemokine receptors are GPCRs that when activated, are phosphorylated by GRKs to turn off G protein-mediated signaling yet recruit additional signaling machinery. Recently, GRK3 was identified as a negative regulator of CXCL12/CXCR4 signaling that is defective in human WHIM syndrome. Here, we report that GRK3−/− mice exhibit numerous features of human WHIM, such as impaired CXCL12-mediated desensitization, enhanced CXCR4 signaling to ERK activation, altered granulocyte migration, and a mild myelokathexis. Moreover, GRK3−/− protects mice from two acute models of inflammatory arthritis (K/BxN serum transfer and CAIA). In these granulocyte-dependent disease models, protection of GRK3−/− mice is mediated by retention of cells in the marrow, fewer circulating granulocytes in the peripheral blood, and reduced granulocytes in the joints during active inflammation. In contrast to WHIM, GRK3−/− mice have minimal hypogammaglobulinemia and a peripheral leukocytosis with increased lymphocytes and absent neutropenia. Thus, we conclude that the loss of GRK3-mediated regulation of CXCL12/CXCR4 signaling contributes to some, but not all, of the complete WHIM phenotype and that GRK3 inhibition may be beneficial in the treatment of inflammatory arthritis. PMID:23935208

  11. Differential Expression of Claudin Family Proteins in Mouse Ovarian Serous Papillary Epithelial Adenoma in Aging FSH Receptor-Deficient Mutants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jayaprakash Aravindakshan

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Ovarian cancer is a deadly disease with long latency. To understand the consequences of loss of folliclestimulating hormone receptor (FSH-R signaling and to explore why the atrophic and anovulatory ovaries of follitropin receptor knockout (FORKO mice develop different types of ovarian tumors, including serous papillary epithelial adenoma later in life, we used mRNA expression profiling to gain a comprehensive view of misregulated genes. Using real-time quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, protein analysis, and cellular localization, we show, for the first time, in vivo evidence that, in the absence of FSH-R signaling, claudin-3, claudin-4, and claudin-11 are selectively upregulated, whereas claudin-1 decreases in ovarian surface epithelium and tumors in comparison to wild type. In vitro experiments using a mouse ovarian surface epithelial cell line derived from wild-type females reveal direct hormonal influence on claudin proteins. Although recent studies suggest that cell junction proteins are differentially expressed in ovarian tumors in women, the etiology of such changes remains unclear. Our results suggest an altered hormonal environment resulting from FSH-R loss as a cause of early changes in tight junction proteins that predispose the ovary to late-onset tumors that occur with aging. More importantly, this study identifies claudin-11 overexpression in mouse ovarian serous cystadenoma.

  12. Angiotensin II type 1a receptor-deficient mice develop angiotensin II-induced oxidative stress and DNA damage without blood pressure increase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimnol, Anna; Amann, Kerstin; Mandel, Philipp; Hartmann, Christina; Schupp, Nicole

    2017-12-01

    Hypertensive patients have an increased risk of developing kidney cancer. We have shown in vivo that besides elevating blood pressure, angiotensin II causes DNA damage dose dependently. Here, the role of blood pressure in the formation of DNA damage is studied. Mice lacking one of the two murine angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1R) subtypes, AT1aR, were equipped with osmotic minipumps, delivering angiotensin II during 28 days. Parameters of oxidative stress and DNA damage of kidneys and hearts of AT1aR-knockout mice were compared with wild-type (C57BL/6) mice receiving angiotensin II, and additionally, with wild-type mice treated with candesartan, an antagonist of both AT1R subtypes. In wild-type mice, angiotensin II induced hypertension, reduced kidney function, and led to a significant formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Furthermore, genomic damage was markedly increased in this group. All these responses to angiotensin II could be attenuated by concurrent administration of candesartan. In AT1aR-deficient mice treated with angiotensin II, systolic pressure was not increased, and renal function was not affected. However, angiotensin II still led to an increase of ROS in kidneys and hearts of these animals. Additionally, genomic damage in the form of double-strand breaks was significantly induced in kidneys of AT1aR-deficient mice. Our results show that angiotensin II induced ROS production and DNA damage even without the presence of AT1aR and independently of blood pressure changes. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  13. Transcriptome profiling of equine vitamin E deficient neuroaxonal dystrophy identifies upregulation of liver X receptor target genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finno, Carrie J.; Bordbari, Matthew H.; Valberg, Stephanie J.; Lee, David; Herron, Josi; Hines, Kelly; Monsour, Tamer; Scott, Erica; Bannasch, Danika L.; Mickelson, James; Xu, Libin

    2016-01-01

    Specific spontaneous heritable neurodegenerative diseases have been associated with lower serum and cerebrospinal fluid α-tocopherol (α-TOH) concentrations. Equine neuroaxonal dystrophy (eNAD) has similar histologic lesions to human ataxia with vitamin E deficiency caused by mutations in the α-TOH transfer protein gene (TTPA). Mutations in TTPA are not present with eNAD and the molecular basis remains unknown. Given the neuropathologic phenotypic similarity of the conditions, we assessed the molecular basis of eNAD by global transcriptome sequencing of the cervical spinal cord. Differential gene expression analysis identified 157 significantly (FDRmedulla oblongata of eNAD horses. Evidence of LXR activation supports a role for modulation of oxysterol-dependent LXR transcription factor activity by tocopherols. We hypothesize that the protective role of α-TOH in eNAD may reside in its ability to prevent oxysterol accumulation and subsequent activation of the LXR in order to decrease lipid peroxidation associated neurodegeneration. PMID:27751910

  14. Function of Receptor 1 in uptaking transferrin and its relation to iron deficiency and iron gestational preeclampsia

    OpenAIRE

    Gómez-Gutiérrez, Alejandra María; Parra-Sosa, Beatriz Elena; César Bueno-Sánchez, Julio

    2013-01-01

    La anemia ferropénica gestacional afecta al 48 % de las mujeres y se asocia con efectos deletéreos para la madre y el feto. Para la captación del hierro de la gestante es necesaria la expresión en el sincitiotrofoblasto de la glicoproteína receptor 1 de transferrina (TfR1). En ensayos celulares, en modelos animales y en humanos la deprivación de hierro se ha asociado a un aumento en la transcripción y expresión del TfR1, que se ha explicado como un mecanismo compensatorio para la captación de...

  15. Tandem mass spectrometry, but not T-cell receptor excision circle analysis, identifies newborns with late-onset adenosine deaminase deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    la Marca, Giancarlo; Canessa, Clementina; Giocaliere, Elisa; Romano, Francesca; Duse, Marzia; Malvagia, Sabrina; Lippi, Francesca; Funghini, Silvia; Bianchi, Leila; Della Bona, Maria Luisa; Valleriani, Claudia; Ombrone, Daniela; Moriondo, Maria; Villanelli, Fabio; Speckmann, Carsten; Adams, Stuart; Gaspar, Bobby H; Hershfield, Michael; Santisteban, Ines; Fairbanks, Lynette; Ragusa, Giovanni; Resti, Massimo; de Martino, Maurizio; Guerrini, Renzo; Azzari, Chiara

    2013-06-01

    Adenosine deaminase (ADA)-severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) is caused by genetic variants that disrupt the function of ADA. In its early-onset form, it is rapidly fatal to infants. Delayed or late-onset ADA-SCID is characterized by insidious progressive immunodeficiency that leads to permanent organ damage or death. Quantification of T-cell receptor excision circles (TRECs) or tandem mass spectrometry (tandem-MS) analysis of dried blood spots (DBSs) collected at birth can identify newborns with early-onset ADA-SCID and are used in screening programs. However, it is not clear whether these analyses can identify newborns who will have delayed or late-onset ADA-SCID before symptoms appear. We performed a retrospective study to evaluate whether tandem-MS and quantitative TREC analyses of DBSs could identify newborns who had delayed-onset ADA-SCID later in life. We tested stored DBSs collected at birth from 3 patients with delayed-onset ADA-SCID using tandem-MS (PCT EP2010/070517) to evaluate levels of adenosine and 2'-deoxyadenosine and real-time PCR to quantify TREC levels. We also analyzed DBSs from 3 newborns with early-onset ADA-SCID and 2 healthy newborn carriers of ADA deficiency. The DBSs taken at birth from the 3 patients with delayed-onset ADA-SCID had adenosine levels of 10, 25, and 19 μmol/L (normal value, <1.5 μmol/L) and 2'-deoxyadenosine levels of 0.7, 2.7, and 2.4 μmol/L (normal value, <0.07 μmol/L); the mean levels of adenosine and 2'-deoxyadenosine were respectively 12.0- and 27.6-fold higher than normal values. DBSs taken at birth from all 3 patients with delayed-onset ADA deficiency had normal TREC levels, but TRECs were undetectable in blood samples taken from the same patients at the time of diagnosis. Tandem-MS but not TREC quantification identifies newborns with delayed- or late-onset ADA deficiency. Copyright © 2013 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. The effect of leptin receptor deficiency and fasting on cannabinoid receptor 1 mRNA expression in the rat hypothalamus, brainstem and nodose ganglion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jelsing, Jacob; Larsen, Philip Just; Vrang, Niels

    2009-10-02

    Despite ample evidence for the involvement of the endocannabinoid system in the control of appetite, food intake and energy balance, relatively little is known about the regulation of cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB(1)R) expression in respect to leptin signalling and fasting. In the present study, we examined CB(1)R mRNA levels in lean (Fa/?) and obese (fa/fa) male Zucker rats under basal and food-restricted conditions. Using stereological sampling principles coupled with semi-quantitative radioactive in situ hybridization we provide semi-quantitative estimates of CB(1)R mRNA expression in key appetite regulatory hypothalamic and brainstem areas, as well as in the nodose ganglia. Whereas no effect of fasting were determined on CB(1)R mRNA levels in the paraventricular (PVN) and ventromedial hypothalamic (VMH) nucleus, in the brainstem dorsal vagal complex or nodose ganglion of lean Zucker rats, CB(1)R mRNA levels were consistently elevated in obese Zucker rats pointing to a direct influence of disrupted leptin signalling on CB(1)R mRNA regulation.

  17. The Dwarfs of Sindh: severe growth hormone (GH) deficiency caused by a mutation in the GH-releasing hormone receptor gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumann, G; Maheshwari, H

    1997-11-01

    We report the discovery of a cluster of severe familial dwarfism in two villages in the Province of Sindh in Pakistan. Dwarfism is proportionate and occurs in members of a kindred with a high degree of consanguinity. Only the last generation is affected, with the oldest dwarf being 28 years old. The mode of inheritance is autosomal recessive. Phenotype analysis and endocrine testing revealed isolated growth hormone deficiency (GHD) as the reason for growth failure. Linkage analysis for the loci of several candidate genes yielded a high lod score for the growth hormone-releasing hormone receptor (GHRH-R) locus on chromosome 7. Amplification and sequencing of the GHRH-R gene in affected subjects demonstrated an amber nonsense mutation (GAG-->TAG; Glu50-->Stop) in exon 3. The mutation, in its homozygous form, segregated 100% with the dwarf phenotype. It predicts a truncation of the GHRH-R in its extracellular domain, which is likely to result in a severely disabled or non-existent receptor protein. Subjects who are heterozygous for the mutation show mild biochemical abnormalities in the growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH)--growth hormone--insulin-like growth factor axis, but have only minimal or no growth retardation. The occurrence of an offspring of two dwarfed parents indicates that the GHRH-R is not necessary for fertility in either sex. We conclude that Sindh dwarfism is caused by an inactivating mutation in the GHRH-R gene, resulting in the inability to transmit a GHRH signal and consequent severe isolated GHD.

  18. Differential regulation by agonist and phorbol ester of cloned m1 and m2 muscarinic acetylcholine receptors in mouse Y1 adrenal cells and in Y1 cells deficient in cAMP-dependent protein kinase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scherer, N.M.; Nathanson, N.M.

    1990-01-01

    Cloned muscarinic acetylcholine m1 and m2 receptors were expressed in stably transfected mouse Y1 adrenal cells and in a variant Y1 line, Kin-8, which is deficient in cAMP-dependent protein kinase activity (PKA - ). m1 and m2 receptors were rapidly internalized following exposure of transfected PKA + or PKA - cells to the muscarinic agonist carbachol. Thus, agonist-dependent internalization of m1 and m2 did not require PKA activity. A differential effect of PKA on regulation by agonist of the m2 receptor, but not the m1 receptor, was unmasked in PKA - cells. These data indicate that the basal activity of PKA may modulate the agonist-dependent internalization of the m2 receptor, but not the m1 receptor. The internalization of the m1 and m2 receptors in both PKA + and PKA - cells was accompanied by desensitization of functional responses. Exposure of PKA + cells to 10 -7 M phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA), an activator of protein kinase C, resulted in a 30 ± 9% decrease in the number of m1 receptors on the cell surface. The m2 receptor was not internalized following treatment of either PKA + or PKA - cells with PMA. Thus, the m1 and m2 receptors show differential sensitivity to internalization by PMA. Agonist-dependent internalization of the m1 receptor appeared to be independent of activation of PKC because (1) agonist-dependent internalization of m1 was not attenuated in PKA - cells, (2) the rate and extent of internalization of m1 in cells exposed to PMA were less than those in cells exposed to agonist, and (3) treatment of cells with concanavalin A selectivity blocked internalization of m1 in cells exposed to PMA, but not to agonist. The effects of agonist and PMA on receptor internalization were not additive. Exposure of PKA + or PKA - cells to PMA reduced the magnitude of pilocarpine-stimulated PI hydrolysis by about 25%

  19. AGE and their receptor RAGE in systemic autoimmune diseases : An inflammation propagating factor contributing to accelerated atherosclerosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nienhuis, Hans L. A.; Westra, Johanna; Smit, Andries J.; Limburg, Pieter C.; Kallenberg, Cees G. M.; Bijl, Marc

    2009-01-01

    Systemic autoimmune diseases are associated with inflammation, and oxidative stress favouring the formation of advanced glycation endproducts (AGE), able to modulate cellular functions by activation of receptor for advanced glycation endproducts (RAGE). As RAGE expression is increased in an

  20. Differential expression of glutamate transporters EAAT1 and EAAT2 in mice deficient for PACAP-type I receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zink, M; Schmitt, A; Henn, F A; Gass, P

    2004-12-01

    Pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) modulates glutamatergic neurotransmission and induces the expression of glutamate transporters EAAT1 and EAAT2 in newborn mouse astroglial cell cultures. Since nanomolar concentrations of PACAP exert this effect, signal transduction via the high affinity PACAP-type I-receptor PAC1 was assumed. To test this hypothesis and to assess the importance of PAC1-signalling in vivo, we analyzed glutamate transporter expression in mice with a PAC1 knockout. EAAT1 and EAAT2 expression was investigated in the hippocampus and the cerebral cortex of PAC1 mutant mice and wildtype littermates by semiquantitative in-situ-hybridization. PAC1-knockout mice show a subtle but significant reduction of EAAT1 expression in the dentate gyrus. In contrast, reduced expression levels of EAAT1 in the cerebral cortex did not reach statistical significance and EAAT2 expression was unchanged in CA3 and cerebral cortex of PAC1 mutant mice. Our data confirm the previously reported in-vitro-regulation of EAAT1 in the adult nervous system in vivo. EAAT2 expression, however, is unchanged in PAC1 knockout mice, most likely due to counterbalancing factors.

  1. Nuclear accumulation of epidermal growth factor receptor and acceleration of G1/S stage by Epstein-Barr-encoded oncoprotein latent membrane protein 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tao Yongguang; Song Xing; Deng Xiyun; Xie Daxin; Lee, Leo M.; Liu Yiping; Li Wei; Li Lili; Deng Lin; Wu Qiao; Gong Jianping; Cao Ya

    2005-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-encoded latent membrane protein 1 (LMP1) is considered to be the major oncogenic protein of EBV-encoded proteins and has always been the core of the oncogenic mechanism of EBV. Advanced studies on nuclear translocation of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) family have greatly improved our knowledge of the biological function of cell surface receptors. In this study, we used the Tet-on LMP1 HNE2 cell line as a cell model, which is a dual-stable LMP1-integrated nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) cell line and the expression of LMP1 which could be regulated by the Tet system. We found that LMP1 could regulate the nuclear accumulation of EGFR in a dose-dependent manner quantitatively and qualitatively. We also demonstrated that the nuclear localization sequence of EGFR played some roles in the location of the protein within the nucleus under LMP1 regulation and EGFR in the nucleus could bind to the promoters of cyclinD1 and cyclinE, respectively. We further demonstrated that EGFR is involved in the acceleration of the G1/S phase transition by LMP1 through binding to cyclinD1 and cyclinE directly. These findings provided a novel view that the acceleration of LMP1 on the G1/S transition via the nuclear accumulation of EGFR was critical in the process of nasopharyngeal carcinoma

  2. Can soluble transferrin receptor be used in diagnosing iron deficiency anemia and assessing iron response in infants with moderate acute malnutrition?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Büyükkaragöz, Bahar; Akgun, Necat A; Bulus, Ayse D; Durmus Aydogdu, Sultan; Bal, Cengiz

    2017-04-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of soluble transferrin receptor (sTfR) in diagnosing iron deficiency anemia (IDA) and evaluating iron response in infants with moderate acute malnutrition (MAM). Infants with hemoglobin (Hb) levels lower than threshold values for anemia for their ages and hypochromic/ microcytic anemia on peripheral smear were recruited. MAM was defined as weight/height z score iron parameters and sTfR were compared among 41 infants with MAM and anemia (MA group), 32 infants with anemia without MAM (group A), and healthy controls (n= 30). Following anemia and malnutrition treatment, tests were repeated. Besides hematological indices compatible with IDA, serum iron (Fe) and transferrin saturation (TS) were significantly lower, while transferrin was significantly higher in MA and A groups compared to controls (p 0.05) and significantly higher than controls (p iron treatment, sTfR decreased in both MA and A groups (p iron treatment, we believe that this parameter was not influenced by MAM or inflammation; and it alone can be used to detect IDA and monitor treatment response in infants with MAM.

  3. An investigation into ‘two hit’ effects of BDNF deficiency and young-adult cannabinoid receptor stimulation on prepulse inhibition regulation and memory in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maren eKlug

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Reduced brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF signalling has been shown in the frontal cortex and hippocampus in schizophrenia. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether a BDNF deficit would modulate effects of chronic cannabis intake, a well-described risk factor for schizophrenia development. BDNF heterozygous mice (HET and wild-type controls were chronically treated during weeks 6, 7 and 8 of life with the cannabinoid CB1 receptor agonist, CP55,940 (CP. After a 2-week delay, there were no CP-induced deficits in any of the groups in short-term spatial memory in a Y-maze task or novel object recognition memory. Baseline prepulse inhibition (PPI was lower but average startle was increased in BDNF HET compared to wild-type controls. Acute CP administration before the PPI session caused a marked increase in PPI in male HET mice pre-treated with CP but not in any of the other male groups. In females, there were small increases of PPI in all groups upon acute CP administration. Acute CP administration furthermore reduced startle and this effect was greater in HET mice irrespective of chronic CP pre-treatment. Analysis of the levels of [3H]CP55,940 binding by autoradiography revealed a significant increase in the nucleus accumbens of male BDNF HET mice previously treated with CP but not in any of the other groups or in the caudate nucleus.These results show that BDNF deficiency and chronic young-adult cannabinoid receptor stimulation do not interact in this model on learning and memory later in life. In contrast, male ‘two hit’ mice, but not females, were hypersensitive to the effect of acute CP on sensorimotor gating. These effects may be related to a selective increase of [3H]CP55,940 binding in the nucleus accumbens, reflecting up-regulation of CB1 receptor density in this region. These data could be of relevance to our understanding of differential ‘two hit’ neurodevelopmental mechanisms in schizophrenia.

  4. 5-HT2C Receptor Desensitization Moderates Anxiety in 5-HTT Deficient Mice: From Behavioral to Cellular Evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Cédric BP; Martin, Vincent S.; Trigo, José M.; Chevarin, Caroline; Maldonado, Rafael; Fink, Latham H.; Cunningham, Kathryn A.; Hamon, Michel; Lanfumey, Laurence

    2015-01-01

    Background: Desensitization and blockade of 5-HT2C receptors (5-HT2CR) have long been thought to be central in the therapeutic action of antidepressant drugs. However, besides behavioral pharmacology studies, there is little in vivo data documenting antidepressant-induced 5-HT2CR desensitization in specific brain areas. Methods: Mice lacking the 5-HT reuptake carrier (5-HTT-/-) were used to model the consequences of chronic 5-HT reuptake inhibition with antidepressant drugs. The effect of this mutation on 5-HT2CR was evaluated at the behavioral (social interaction, novelty-suppressed feeding, and 5-HT2CR–induced hypolocomotion tests), the neurochemical, and the cellular (RT-qPCR, mRNA editing, and c-fos–induced expression) levels. Results: Although 5-HTT-/- mice had an anxiogenic profile in the novelty-suppressed feeding test, they displayed less 5-HT2CR–mediated anxiety in response to the agonist m-chlorophenylpiperazine in the social interaction test. In addition, 5-HT2CR–mediated inhibition of a stress-induced increase in 5-HT turnover, measured in various brain areas, was markedly reduced in 5-HTT-/- mutants. These indices of tolerance to 5-HT2CR stimulation were associated neither with altered levels of 5-HT2CR protein and mRNA nor with changes in pre-mRNA editing in the frontal cortex. However, basal c-fos mRNA production in cells expressing 5-HT2CR was higher in 5-HTT-/- mutants, suggesting an altered basal activity of these cells following sustained 5-HT reuptake carrier inactivation. Furthermore, the increased c-fos mRNA expression in 5-HT2CR–like immune-positive cortical cells observed in wild-type mice treated acutely with the 5-HT2CR agonist RO-60,0175 was absent in 5-HTT-/- mutants. Conclusions: Such blunted responsiveness of the 5-HT2CR system, observed at the cell signaling level, probably contributes to the moderation of the anxiety phenotype in 5-HTT-/- mice. PMID:25522398

  5. GABA(A receptor-mediated acceleration of aging-associated memory decline in APP/PS1 mice and its pharmacological treatment by picrotoxin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuji Yoshiike

    Full Text Available Advanced age and mutations in the genes encoding amyloid precursor protein (APP and presenilin (PS1 are two serious risk factors for Alzheimer's disease (AD. Finding common pathogenic changes originating from these risks may lead to a new therapeutic strategy. We observed a decline in memory performance and reduction in hippocampal long-term potentiation (LTP in both mature adult (9-15 months transgenic APP/PS1 mice and old (19-25 months non-transgenic (nonTg mice. By contrast, in the presence of bicuculline, a GABA(A receptor antagonist, LTP in adult APP/PS1 mice and old nonTg mice was larger than that in adult nonTg mice. The increased LTP levels in bicuculline-treated slices suggested that GABA(A receptor-mediated inhibition in adult APP/PS1 and old nonTg mice was upregulated. Assuming that enhanced inhibition of LTP mediates memory decline in APP/PS1 mice, we rescued memory deficits in adult APP/PS1 mice by treating them with another GABA(A receptor antagonist, picrotoxin (PTX, at a non-epileptic dose for 10 days. Among the saline vehicle-treated groups, substantially higher levels of synaptic proteins such as GABA(A receptor alpha1 subunit, PSD95, and NR2B were observed in APP/PS1 mice than in nonTg control mice. This difference was insignificant among PTX-treated groups, suggesting that memory decline in APP/PS1 mice may result from changes in synaptic protein levels through homeostatic mechanisms. Several independent studies reported previously in aged rodents both an increased level of GABA(A receptor alpha1 subunit and improvement of cognitive functions by long term GABA(A receptor antagonist treatment. Therefore, reduced LTP linked to enhanced GABA(A receptor-mediated inhibition may be triggered by aging and may be accelerated by familial AD-linked gene products like Abeta and mutant PS1, leading to cognitive decline that is pharmacologically treatable at least at this stage of disease progression in mice.

  6. Iodine Deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Fax/Phone Home » Iodine Deficiency Leer en Español Iodine Deficiency Iodine is an element that is needed ... world’s population remains at risk for iodine deficiency. Iodine Deficiency FAQs WHAT IS THE THYROID GLAND? The ...

  7. Central GLP-1 receptor signalling accelerates plasma clearance of triacylglycerol and glucose by activating brown adipose tissue in mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kooijman, Sander; Wang, Yanan; Parlevliet, Edwin T.; Boon, Mariëtte R.; Edelschaap, David; Snaterse, Gido; Pijl, Hanno; Romijn, Johannes A.; Rensen, Patrick C. N.

    2015-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) receptor (GLP-1R) agonism, used in the treatment of type 2 diabetes, has recently been shown to increase thermogenesis via the brain. As brown adipose tissue (BAT) produces heat by burning triacylglycerol (TG) and takes up glucose for de novo lipogenesis, the aim of

  8. Iron-responsive olfactory uptake of manganese improves motor function deficits associated with iron deficiency.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonghan Kim

    Full Text Available Iron-responsive manganese uptake is increased in iron-deficient rats, suggesting that toxicity related to manganese exposure could be modified by iron status. To explore possible interactions, the distribution of intranasally-instilled manganese in control and iron-deficient rat brain was characterized by quantitative image analysis using T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. Manganese accumulation in the brain of iron-deficient rats was doubled after intranasal administration of MnCl(2 for 1- or 3-week. Enhanced manganese level was observed in specific brain regions of iron-deficient rats, including the striatum, hippocampus, and prefrontal cortex. Iron-deficient rats spent reduced time on a standard accelerating rotarod bar before falling and with lower peak speed compared to controls; unexpectedly, these measures of motor function significantly improved in iron-deficient rats intranasally-instilled with MnCl(2. Although tissue dopamine concentrations were similar in the striatum, dopamine transporter (DAT and dopamine receptor D(1 (D1R levels were reduced and dopamine receptor D(2 (D2R levels were increased in manganese-instilled rats, suggesting that manganese-induced changes in post-synaptic dopaminergic signaling contribute to the compensatory effect. Enhanced olfactory manganese uptake during iron deficiency appears to be a programmed "rescue response" with beneficial influence on motor impairment due to low iron status.

  9. Chimeric Feline Coronaviruses That Encode Type II Spike Protein on Type I Genetic Background Display Accelerated Viral Growth and Altered Receptor Usage▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tekes, Gergely; Hofmann-Lehmann, Regina; Bank-Wolf, Barbara; Maier, Reinhard; Thiel, Heinz-Jürgen; Thiel, Volker

    2010-01-01

    Persistent infection of domestic cats with feline coronaviruses (FCoVs) can lead to a highly lethal, immunopathological disease termed feline infectious peritonitis (FIP). Interestingly, there are two serotypes, type I and type II FCoVs, that can cause both persistent infection and FIP, even though their main determinant of host cell tropism, the spike (S) protein, is of different phylogeny and displays limited sequence identity. In cell culture, however, there are apparent differences. Type II FCoVs can be propagated to high titers by employing feline aminopeptidase N (fAPN) as a cellular receptor, whereas the propagation of type I FCoVs is usually difficult, and the involvement of fAPN as a receptor is controversial. In this study we have analyzed the phenotypes of recombinant FCoVs that are based on the genetic background of type I FCoV strain Black but encode the type II FCoV strain 79-1146 S protein. Our data demonstrate that recombinant FCoVs expressing a type II FCoV S protein acquire the ability to efficiently use fAPN for host cell entry and corroborate the notion that type I FCoVs use another main host cell receptor. We also observed that recombinant FCoVs display a large-plaque phenotype and, unexpectedly, accelerated growth kinetics indistinguishable from that of type II FCoV strain 79-1146. Thus, the main phenotypic differences for type I and type II FCoVs in cell culture, namely, the growth kinetics and the efficient usage of fAPN as a cellular receptor, can be attributed solely to the FCoV S protein. PMID:19906918

  10. Expression of an IRF-3 fusion protein and mouse estrogen receptor, inhibits hepatitis C viral replication in RIG-I-deficient Huh 7.5 cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Chen

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Interferon Regulatory Factor-3 (IRF-3 plays a central role in the induction of interferon (IFN production and succeeding interferon-stimulated genes (ISG expression en route for restraining hepatitis C virus (HCV infection. Here, we established a stable Huh7.5-IRF3ER cell line expressing a fusion protein of IRF-3 and mouse estrogen receptor (ER to examine IFN production and anti-HCV effects of IRF-3 in retinoic acid inducible-gene-I (RIG-I deficient Huh 7.5 cells. Homodimerization of the IRF-3ER fusion protein was detected by Western blotting after treatment with the estrogen receptor agonist 4-hydrotamoxifen (4-HT in Huh7.5-IRF3ER cells. Expression of IFN-α, IFN-β, and their inhibitory effects on HCV replication were demonstrated by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR. Peak expression of IFN-α and IFN-β was achieved 24-hours post 4-HT treatment, coinciding with the appearance of phosphorylated signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT proteins. Additionally, HCV viral replication declined in time-dependent fashion. In previous studies, a novel IFN-mediated pathway regulating expression of 1-8U and heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein M (hnRNP M inhibited HCV internal ribosomal entry site (IRES-dependent translation. When expression of ISGs such as 1-8U and hnRNP M were measured in 4-HT-treated Huh7.5-IRF3ER cells, both genes were positively regulated by activation of the IRF-3ER fusion protein. In conclusion, the anti-HCV effects of IRF-3ER homodimerization inhibited HCV RNA replication as well as HCV IRES-dependent translation in Huh7.5-IRF3ER cells. The results of this study indicate that IRF-3ER homodimerization is a key step to restore IFN expression in Huh7.5-IRF3ER cells and in achieving its anti-HCV effects.

  11. A novel mutation of the adrenocorticotropin receptor (ACTH-R) gene in a family with the syndrome of isolated glucocorticoid deficiency, but no ACTH-R abnormalities in two families with the triple A syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsigos, C.; Arai, K.; Latronico, A.C. [National Inst. of Child Health and Human Development, Bethesda, MD (United States)]|[Temple Univ. School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA (United States)]|[Children`s Hospital of New Jersey, Newark, NJ (United States)] [and others

    1995-07-01

    Isolated glucocorticoid deficiency (IGD) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by primary adrenocortical insufficiency, usually without mineralocorticoid deficiency. Occasionally, the disorder is associated with alacrima and achalasia of the esophagus (triple A syndrome), suggesting potential heterogeneity in its etiology. Mutations in the ACTH receptor gene have been reported in several families with IGD. We have amplified and directly sequenced the entire intronless ACTH receptor gene in 1 other family with IGD and 2 famlies with triple A syndrome. The proband with IGD was a homozygote for an A {r_arrow}G substitution, changing tyrosine 254 to cysteine in the third extracellular loop of the receptor protein, probably interfering with ligand binding. Both of her parents were heterozygotes for this mutation, which was not detected in 100 normal alleles. No mutations were identified in the entire coding area of the ACTH receptor in the 2 families with triple A syndrome, supporting the idea of a developmental or postreceptor defect in this syndrome. 19 refs., 1 fig.

  12. Deficiency of Interleukin-1 Receptor Antagonist (DIRA): Report of the First Indian Patient and a Novel Deletion Affecting IL1RN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendonca, Leonardo O; Malle, Louise; Donovan, Frank X; Chandrasekharappa, Settara C; Montealegre Sanchez, Gina A; Garg, Megha; Tedgard, Ulf; Castells, Mariana; Saini, Shiv S; Dutta, Sourabh; Goldbach-Mansky, Raphaela; Suri, Deepti; Jesus, Adriana A

    2017-07-01

    Deficiency of interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (DIRA) is a rare life-threatening autoinflammatory disease caused by autosomal recessive mutations in IL1RN. DIRA presents clinically with early onset generalized pustulosis, multifocal osteomyelitis, and elevation of acute phase reactants. We evaluated and treated an antibiotic-unresponsive patient with presumed DIRA with recombinant IL-1Ra (anakinra). The patient developed anaphylaxis to anakinra and was subsequently desensitized. Genetic analysis of IL1RN was undertaken and treatment with anakinra was initiated. A 5-month-old Indian girl born to healthy non-consanguineous parents presented at the third week of life with irritability, sterile multifocal osteomyelitis including ribs and clavicles, a mild pustular rash, and elevated acute phase reactants. SNP array of the patient's genomic DNA revealed a previously unrecognized homozygous deletion of approximately 22.5 Kb. PCR and Sanger sequencing of the borders of the deleted area allowed identification of the breakpoints of the deletion, thus confirming a homozygous 22,216 bp deletion that spans the first four exons of IL1RN. Due to a clinical suspicion of DIRA, anakinra was initiated which resulted in an anaphylactic reaction that triggered desensitization with subsequent marked and sustained clinical and laboratory improvement. We report a novel DIRA-causing homozygous deletion affecting IL1RN in an Indian patient. The mutation likely is a founder mutation; the design of breakpoint-specific primers will enable genetic screening in Indian patients suspected of DIRA. The patient developed anaphylaxis to anakinra, was desensitized, and is in clinical remission on continued treatment.

  13. Antiatherosclerotic Effects of 1-Methylnicotinamide in Apolipoprotein E/Low-Density Lipoprotein Receptor-Deficient Mice: A Comparison with Nicotinic Acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mateuszuk, Lukasz; Jasztal, Agnieszka; Maslak, Edyta; Gasior-Glogowska, Marlena; Baranska, Malgorzata; Sitek, Barbara; Kostogrys, Renata; Zakrzewska, Agnieszka; Kij, Agnieszka; Walczak, Maria; Chlopicki, Stefan

    2016-02-01

    1-Methylnicotinamide (MNA), the major endogenous metabolite of nicotinic acid (NicA), may partially contribute to the vasoprotective properties of NicA. Here we compared the antiatherosclerotic effects of MNA and NicA in apolipoprotein E (ApoE)/low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR)-deficient mice. ApoE/LDLR(-/-) mice were treated with MNA or NicA (100 mg/kg). Plaque size, macrophages, and cholesterol content in the brachiocephalic artery, endothelial function in the aorta, systemic inflammation, platelet activation, as well as the concentration of MNA and its metabolites in plasma and urine were measured. MNA and NicA reduced atherosclerotic plaque area, plaque inflammation, and cholesterol content in the brachiocephalic artery. The antiatherosclerotic actions of MNA and NicA were associated with improved endothelial function, as evidenced by a higher concentration of 6-keto-prostaglandin F1 α and nitrite/nitrate in the aortic ring effluent, inhibition of platelets (blunted thromboxane B2 generation), and inhibition of systemic inflammation (lower plasma concentration of serum amyloid P, haptoglobin). NicA treatment resulted in an approximately 2-fold higher concentration of MNA and its metabolites in urine and a 4-fold higher nicotinamide/MNA ratio in plasma, compared with MNA treatment. In summary; MNA displays pronounced antiatherosclerotic action in ApoE/LDLR(-/-) mice, an effect associated with an improvement in prostacyclin- and nitric oxide-dependent endothelial function, inhibition of platelet activation, inhibition of inflammatory burden in plaques, and diminished systemic inflammation. Despite substantially higher MNA availability after NicA treatment, compared with an equivalent dose of MNA, the antiatherosclerotic effect of NicA was not stronger. We suggest that detrimental effects of NicA or its metabolites other than MNA may limit beneficial effects of NicA-derived MNA. Copyright © 2016 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental

  14. CER-001, a HDL-mimetic, stimulates the reverse lipid transport and atherosclerosis regression in high cholesterol diet-fed LDL-receptor deficient mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tardy, Claudine; Goffinet, Marine; Boubekeur, Nadia; Ackermann, Rose; Sy, Gavin; Bluteau, Alice; Cholez, Guy; Keyserling, Constance; Lalwani, Narendra; Paolini, John F; Dasseux, Jean-Louis; Barbaras, Ronald; Baron, Rudi

    2014-01-01

    CER-001 is a novel engineered HDL-mimetic comprised of recombinant human apoA-I and phospholipids that was designed to mimic the beneficial properties of nascent pre-β HDL. In this study, we have evaluated the capacity of CER-001 to perform reverse lipid transport in single dose studies as well as to regress atherosclerosis in LDLr(-/-) mice after short-term multiple-dose infusions. CER-001 induced cholesterol efflux from macrophages and exhibited anti-inflammatory response similar to natural HDL. Studies with HUVEC demonstrated CER-001 at a concentration of 500 μg/mL completely suppressed the secretion of cytokines IL-6, IL-8, GM-CSF and MCP-1. Following infusion of CER-001 (10mg/kg) in C57Bl/6J mice, we observed a transient increase in the mobilization of unesterified cholesterol in HDL particles containing recombinant human apoA-I. Finally we show that cholesterol elimination was stimulated in CER-001 treated animals as demonstrated by the increased cholesterol concentration in liver and feces. In a familial hypercholesterolemia mouse model (LDL-receptor deficient mice), the infusion of CER-001 caused 17% and 32% reductions in plaque size, 17% and 23% reductions in lipid content after 5 and 10 doses given every 2 days, respectively. Also, there was an 80% reduction in macrophage content in the plaque following 5 doses, and decreased VCAM-1 expression by 16% and 22% in the plaque following 5 and 10 intravenous doses of CER-001, respectively. These data demonstrate that CER-001 rapidly enhances reverse lipid transport in the mouse, reducing vascular inflammation and promoting regression of diet-induced atherosclerosis in LDLr(-/-) mice upon a short-term multiple dose treatment. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Bilirubin Increases Insulin Sensitivity in Leptin-Receptor Deficient and Diet-Induced Obese Mice Through Suppression of ER Stress and Chronic Inflammation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Huansheng; Huang, Hu; Yun, Xinxu; Kim, Do-sung; Yue, Yinan; Wu, Hongju; Sutter, Alton; Chavin, Kenneth D.; Otterbein, Leo E.; Adams, David B.; Kim, Young-Bum

    2014-01-01

    Obesity-induced endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress causes chronic inflammation in adipose tissue and steatosis in the liver, and eventually leads to insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes (T2D). The goal of this study was to understand the mechanisms by which administration of bilirubin, a powerful antioxidant, reduces hyperglycemia and ameliorates obesity in leptin-receptor-deficient (db/db) and diet-induced obese (DIO) mouse models. db/db or DIO mice were injected with bilirubin or vehicle ip. Blood glucose and body weight were measured. Activation of insulin-signaling pathways, expression of inflammatory cytokines, and ER stress markers were measured in skeletal muscle, adipose tissue, and liver of mice. Bilirubin administration significantly reduced hyperglycemia and increased insulin sensitivity in db/db mice. Bilirubin treatment increased protein kinase B (PKB/Akt) phosphorylation in skeletal muscle and suppressed expression of ER stress markers, including the 78-kDa glucose-regulated protein (GRP78), CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein (C/EBP) homologous protein, X box binding protein (XBP-1), and activating transcription factor 4 in db/db mice. In DIO mice, bilirubin treatment significantly reduced body weight and increased insulin sensitivity. Moreover, bilirubin suppressed macrophage infiltration and proinflammatory cytokine expression, including TNF-α, IL-1β, and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, in adipose tissue. In liver and adipose tissue of DIO mice, bilirubin ameliorated hepatic steatosis and reduced expression of GRP78 and C/EBP homologous protein. These results demonstrate that bilirubin administration improves hyperglycemia and obesity by increasing insulin sensitivity in both genetically engineered and DIO mice models. Bilirubin or bilirubin-increasing drugs might be useful as an insulin sensitizer for the treatment of obesity-induced insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes based on its profound anti-ER stress and antiinflammatory properties. PMID

  16. Bilirubin Prevents Atherosclerotic Lesion Formation in Low-Density Lipoprotein Receptor-Deficient Mice by Inhibiting Endothelial VCAM-1 and ICAM-1 Signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, Megan E; Idelman, Gila; Konaniah, Eddy S; Zucker, Stephen D

    2017-04-01

    Numerous epidemiological studies support an inverse association between serum bilirubin levels and the incidence of cardiovascular disease; however, the mechanism(s) by which bilirubin may protect against atherosclerosis is undefined. The goals of the present investigations were to assess the ability of bilirubin to prevent atherosclerotic plaque formation in low-density lipoprotein receptor-deficient ( Ldlr -/- ) mice and elucidate the molecular processes underlying this effect. Bilirubin, at physiological concentrations (≤20 μmol/L), dose-dependently inhibits THP-1 monocyte migration across tumor necrosis factor α-activated human umbilical vein endothelial cell monolayers without altering leukocyte binding or cytokine production. A potent antioxidant, bilirubin effectively blocks the generation of cellular reactive oxygen species induced by the cross-linking of endothelial vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 (VCAM-1) or intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1). These findings were validated by treating cells with blocking antibodies or with specific inhibitors of VCAM-1 and ICAM-1 signaling. When administered to Ldlr -/- mice on a Western diet, bilirubin (30 mg/kg intraperitoneally) prevents atherosclerotic plaque formation, but does not alter circulating cholesterol or chemokine levels. Aortic roots from bilirubin-treated animals exhibit reduced lipid and collagen deposition, decreased infiltration of monocytes and lymphocytes, fewer smooth muscle cells, and diminished levels of chlorotyrosine and nitrotyrosine, without changes in VCAM-1 or ICAM-1 expression. Bilirubin suppresses atherosclerotic plaque formation in Ldlr -/- mice by disrupting endothelial VCAM-1- and ICAM-1-mediated leukocyte migration through the scavenging of reactive oxygen species signaling intermediaries. These findings suggest a potential mechanism for the apparent cardioprotective effects of bilirubin. © 2017 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc

  17. Left ventricular dysfunction with reduced functional cardiac reserve in diabetic and non-diabetic LDL-receptor deficient apolipoprotein B100-only mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bosch Fatima

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lack of suitable mouse models has hindered the studying of diabetic macrovascular complications. We examined the effects of type 2 diabetes on coronary artery disease and cardiac function in hypercholesterolemic low-density lipoprotein receptor-deficient apolipoprotein B100-only mice (LDLR-/-ApoB100/100. Methods and results 18-month-old LDLR-/-ApoB100/100 (n = 12, diabetic LDLR-/-ApoB100/100 mice overexpressing insulin-like growth factor-II (IGF-II in pancreatic beta cells (IGF-II/LDLR-/-ApoB100/100, n = 14 and age-matched C57Bl/6 mice (n = 15 were studied after three months of high-fat Western diet. Compared to LDLR-/-ApoB100/100 mice, diabetic IGF-II/LDLR-/-ApoB100/100 mice demonstrated more calcified atherosclerotic lesions in aorta. However, compensatory vascular enlargement was similar in both diabetic and non-diabetic mice with equal atherosclerosis (cross-sectional lesion area ~60% and consequently the lumen area was preserved. In coronary arteries, both hypercholesterolemic models showed significant stenosis (~80% despite positive remodeling. Echocardiography revealed severe left ventricular systolic dysfunction and anteroapical akinesia in both LDLR-/-ApoB100/100 and IGF-II/LDLR-/-ApoB100/100 mice. Myocardial scarring was not detected, cardiac reserve after dobutamine challenge was preserved and ultrasructural changes revealed ischemic yet viable myocardium, which together with coronary artery stenosis and slightly impaired myocardial perfusion suggest myocardial hibernation resulting from chronic hypoperfusion. Conclusions LDLR-/-ApoB100/100 mice develop significant coronary atherosclerosis, severe left ventricular dysfunction with preserved but diminished cardiac reserve and signs of chronic myocardial hibernation. However, the cardiac outcome is not worsened by type 2 diabetes, despite more advanced aortic atherosclerosis in diabetic animals.

  18. Intrahippocampal LSD accelerates learning and desensitizes the 5-HT(2A) receptor in the rabbit, Romano et al.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romano, Anthony G; Quinn, Jennifer L; Li, Luchuan; Dave, Kuldip D; Schindler, Emmanuelle A; Aloyo, Vincent J; Harvey, John A

    2010-10-01

    Parenteral injections of d-lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD), a serotonin 5-HT(2A) receptor agonist, enhance eyeblink conditioning. Another hallucinogen, (±)-1(2, 5-dimethoxy-4-iodophenyl)-2-aminopropane hydrochloride (DOI), was shown to elicit a 5-HT(2A)-mediated behavior (head bobs) after injection into the hippocampus, a structure known to mediate trace eyeblink conditioning. This study aims to determine if parenteral injections of the hallucinogens LSD, d,l-2,5-dimethoxy-4-methylamphetamine, and 5-methoxy-dimethyltryptamine elicit the 5-HT(2A)-mediated behavior of head bobs and whether intrahippocampal injections of LSD would produce head bobs and enhance trace eyeblink conditioning. LSD was infused into the dorsal hippocampus just prior to each of eight conditioning sessions. One day after the last infusion of LSD, DOI was infused into the hippocampus to determine whether there had been a desensitization of the 5-HT(2A) receptor as measured by a decrease in DOI-elicited head bobs. Acute parenteral or intrahippocampal LSD elicited a 5-HT(2A) but not a 5-HT(2C)-mediated behavior, and chronic administration enhanced conditioned responding relative to vehicle controls. Rabbits that had been chronically infused with 3 or 10 nmol per side of LSD during Pavlovian conditioning and then infused with DOI demonstrated a smaller increase in head bobs relative to controls. LSD produced its enhancement of Pavlovian conditioning through an effect on 5-HT(2A) receptors located in the dorsal hippocampus. The slight, short-lived enhancement of learning produced by LSD appears to be due to the development of desensitization of the 5-HT(2A) receptor within the hippocampus as a result of repeated administration of its agonist (LSD).

  19. A high-protein diet during hospitalization is associated with an accelerated decrease in soluble urokinase plasminogen activator receptor levels in acutely ill elderly medical patients with SIRS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tavenier, Juliette; Haupt, Thomas Huneck; Andersen, Aino L

    2017-01-01

    inflammation in healthy elderly. We hypothesized that nutritional support and resistance training would accelerate the resolution of inflammation in hospitalized elderly patients with SIRS. Acutely admitted patients aged >65 years with SIRS were randomized to an intervention consisting of a high-protein diet...... (1.7 g/kg per day) during hospitalization, and daily protein supplement (18.8 g) and 3 weekly resistance training sessions for 12 weeks after discharge (Intervention, n=14), or to standard-care (Control, n=15). Plasma levels of the inflammatory biomarkers soluble urokinase plasminogen activator...... receptor (suPAR), interleukin-6, C-reactive protein (CRP), and albumin were measured at admission, discharge, and 4 and 13 weeks after discharge. The Intervention group had an earlier decrease in suPAR levels than the Control group: -15.4% vs. +14.5%, P=.007 during hospitalization, and -2.4% vs. -28.6%, P...

  20. Up-regulated Ectonucleotidases in Fas-Associated Death Domain Protein- and Receptor-Interacting Protein Kinase 1-Deficient Jurkat Leukemia Cells Counteract Extracellular ATP/AMP Accumulation via Pannexin-1 Channels during Chemotherapeutic Drug-Induced Apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd-Tressler, Andrea M; Lane, Graham S; Dubyak, George R

    2017-07-01

    Pannexin-1 (Panx1) channels mediate the efflux of ATP and AMP from cancer cells in response to induction of extrinsic apoptosis by death receptors or intrinsic apoptosis by chemotherapeutic agents. We previously described the accumulation of extracellular ATP /AMP during chemotherapy-induced apoptosis in Jurkat human leukemia cells. In this study, we compared how different signaling pathways determine extracellular nucleotide pools in control Jurkat cells versus Jurkat lines that lack the Fas-associated death domain (FADD) or receptor-interacting protein kinase 1 (RIP1) cell death regulatory proteins. Tumor necrosis factor- α induced extrinsic apoptosis in control Jurkat cells and necroptosis in FADD-deficient cells; treatment of both lines with chemotherapeutic drugs elicited similar intrinsic apoptosis. Robust extracellular ATP/AMP accumulation was observed in the FADD-deficient cells during necroptosis, but not during apoptotic activation of Panx1 channels. Accumulation of extracellular ATP/AMP was similarly absent in RIP1-deficient Jurkat cells during apoptotic responses to chemotherapeutic agents. Apoptotic activation triggered equivalent proteolytic gating of Panx1 channels in all three Jurkat cell lines. The differences in extracellular ATP/AMP accumulation correlated with cell-line-specific expression of ectonucleotidases that metabolized the released ATP/AMP. CD73 mRNA, and α β -methylene-ADP-inhibitable ecto-AMPase activity were elevated in the FADD-deficient cells. In contrast, the RIP1-deficient cells were defined by increased expression of tartrate-sensitive prostatic acid phosphatase as a broadly acting ectonucleotidase. Thus, extracellular nucleotide accumulation during regulated tumor cell death involves interplay between ATP/AMP efflux pathways and different cell-autonomous ectonucleotidases. Differential expression of particular ectonucleotidases in tumor cell variants will determine whether chemotherapy-induced activation of Panx1 channels

  1. Inhibition of Group I Metabotropic Glutamate Receptors Reverses Autistic-Like Phenotypes Caused by Deficiency of the Translation Repressor eIF4E Binding Protein 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar-Valles, Argel; Matta-Camacho, Edna; Khoutorsky, Arkady; Gkogkas, Christos; Nader, Karim; Lacaille, Jean-Claude; Sonenberg, Nahum

    2015-08-05

    Exacerbated mRNA translation during brain development has been linked to autism spectrum disorders (ASDs). Deletion of the eukaryotic initiation factor 4E (eIF4E)-binding protein 2 gene (Eif4ebp2), encoding the suppressor of mRNA translation initiation 4E-BP2, leads to an imbalance in excitatory-to-inhibitory neurotransmission and ASD-like behaviors. Inhibition of group I metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) mGluR1 and mGluR5 reverses the autistic phenotypes in several ASD mouse models. Importantly, these receptors control synaptic physiology via activation of mRNA translation. We investigated the potential reversal of autistic-like phenotypes in Eif4ebp2(-/-) mice by using antagonists of mGluR1 (JNJ16259685) or mGluR5 (fenobam). Augmented hippocampal mGluR-induced long-term depression (LTD; or chemically induced mGluR-LTD) in Eif4ebp2(-/-) mice was rescued by mGluR1 or mGluR5 antagonists. While rescue by mGluR5 inhibition occurs through the blockade of a protein synthesis-dependent component of LTD, normalization by mGluR1 antagonists requires the activation of protein synthesis. Synaptically induced LTD was deficient in Eif4ebp2(-/-) mice, and this deficit was not rescued by group I mGluR antagonists. Furthermore, a single dose of mGluR1 (0.3 mg/kg) or mGluR5 (3 mg/kg) antagonists in vivo reversed the deficits in social interaction and repetitive behaviors (marble burying) in Eif4ebp2(-/-) mice. Our results demonstrate that Eif4ebp2(-/-) mice serve as a relevant model to test potential therapies for ASD symptoms. In addition, we provide substantive evidence that the inhibition of mGluR1/mGluR5 is an effective treatment for physiological and behavioral alterations caused by exacerbated mRNA translation initiation. Exacerbated mRNA translation during brain development is associated with several autism spectrum disorders (ASDs). We recently demonstrated that the deletion of a negative regulator of mRNA translation initiation, the eukaryotic initiation factor 4E

  2. receptores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salete Regina Daronco Benetti

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Se trata de un estudio etnográfico, que tuvo lo objetivo de interpretar el sistema de conocimiento y del significado atribuidos a la sangre referente a la transfusión sanguínea por los donadores y receptores de un banco de sangre. Para la colecta de las informaciones se observaron los participantes y la entrevista etnográfica se realizó el análisis de dominio, taxonómicos y temáticos. Los dominios culturales fueron: la sangre es vida: fuente de vida y alimento valioso; creencias religiosas: fuentes simbólicas de apoyos; donación sanguínea: un gesto colaborador que exige cuidarse, gratifica y trae felicidad; donación sanguínea: fuente simbólica de inseguridad; estar enfermo es una condición para realizar transfusión sanguínea; transfusión sanguínea: esperanza de vida; Creencias populares: transfusión sanguínea como riesgo para la salud; donadores de sangre: personas benditas; donar y recibir sangre: como significado de felicidad. Temática: “líquido precioso que origina, sostiene, modifica la vida, provoca miedo e inseguridad”.

  3. Deficiency of ATP-binding cassette transporters A1 and G1 in macrophages increases inflammation and accelerates atherosclerosis in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westerterp, Marit; Murphy, Andrew J; Wang, Mi; Pagler, Tamara A; Vengrenyuk, Yuliya; Kappus, Mojdeh S; Gorman, Darren J; Nagareddy, Prabhakara R; Zhu, Xuewei; Abramowicz, Sandra; Parks, John S; Welch, Carrie; Fisher, Edward A; Wang, Nan; Yvan-Charvet, Laurent; Tall, Alan R

    2013-05-24

    Plasma high-density lipoprotein levels are inversely correlated with atherosclerosis. Although it is widely assumed that this is attributable to the ability of high-density lipoprotein to promote cholesterol efflux from macrophage foam cells, direct experimental support for this hypothesis is lacking. To assess the role of macrophage cholesterol efflux pathways in atherogenesis. We developed mice with efficient deletion of the ATP-binding cassette transporters A1 and G1 (ABCA1 and ABCG1) in macrophages (MAC-ABC(DKO) mice) but not in hematopoietic stem or progenitor populations. MAC-ABC(DKO) bone marrow (BM) was transplanted into Ldlr(-/-) recipients. On the chow diet, these mice had similar plasma cholesterol and blood monocyte levels but increased atherosclerosis compared with controls. On the Western-type diet, MAC-ABC(DKO) BM-transplanted Ldlr(-/-) mice had disproportionate atherosclerosis, considering they also had lower very low-density lipoprotein/low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels than controls. ABCA1/G1-deficient macrophages in lesions showed increased inflammatory gene expression. Unexpectedly, Western-type diet-fed MAC-ABC(DKO) BM-transplanted Ldlr(-/-) mice displayed monocytosis and neutrophilia in the absence of hematopoietic stem and multipotential progenitor cells proliferation. Mechanistic studies revealed increased expressions of machrophage colony stimulating factor and granulocyte colony stimulating factor in splenic macrophage foam cells, driving BM monocyte and neutrophil production. These studies show that macrophage deficiency of ABCA1/G1 is proatherogenic likely by promoting plaque inflammation and uncover a novel positive feedback loop in which cholesterol-laden splenic macrophages signal BM progenitors to produce monocytes, with suppression by macrophage cholesterol efflux pathways.

  4. Health Deficiencies

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — A list of all health deficiencies currently listed on Nursing Home Compare, including the nursing home that received the deficiency, the associated inspection date,...

  5. Activated type I TGFbeta receptor (Alk5) kinase confers enhancedsurvival to mammary epithelial cells and accelerates mammary tumorprogression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muraoka-Cook, Rebecca S.; Shin, Incheol; Yi, Jae Youn; Easterly,Evangeline; Barcellos-Hoff, Mary Helen; Yingling, Jonathan M.; Zent, Roy; Arteaga, Carlos L.

    2005-01-02

    The transforming growth factor-betas (TGF{beta}s) are members of a large superfamily of pleiotropic cytokines that also includes the activins and the bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs). Members of the TGF{beta} family regulate complex physiological processes such cell proliferation, differentiation, adhesion, cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions, motility, and cell death, among others (Massague, 1998). Dysregulation of TGF{beta} signaling contributes to several pathological processes including cancer, fibrosis, and auto-immune disorders (Massague et al., 2000). The TGF{beta}s elicit their biological effects by binding to type II and type I transmembrane receptor serine-threonine kinases (T{beta}RII and T{beta}RI) which, in turn, phosphorylated Smad 2 and Smad 3. Phosphorylated Smad 2/3 associate with Smad 4 and, as a heteromeric complex, translocate to the nucleus where they regulate gene transcription. The inhibitory Smad7 down regulates TGF{beta} signaling by binding to activated T{beta}RI and interfering with its ability to phosphorylate Smad 2/3 (Derynck and Zhang, 2003; Shi and Massague, 2003). Signaling is also regulated by Smad proteolysis. TGF{beta} receptor-mediated activation results in multi-ubiquitination of Smad 2 in the nucleus and subsequent degradation of Smad 2 by the proteasome (Lo and Massague, 1999). Activation of TGF{beta} receptors also induces mobilization of a Smad 7-Smurf complex from the nucleus to the cytoplasm; this complex recognizes the activated receptors and mediates their ubiquitination and internalization via caveolin-rich vesicles, leading to termination of TGF{beta} signaling (Di Guglielmo et al., 2003). Other signal transducers/pathways have been implicated in TGF{beta} actions. These include the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (Erk), c-Jun N-terminal kinase (Jnk), p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), protein phosphatase PP2A, phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase (PI3K), and the family of Rho GTPases [reviewed in

  6. Inhibition of the prostaglandin EP2 receptor is neuroprotective and accelerates functional recovery in a rat model of organophosphorus induced status epilepticus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas, Asheebo; Ganesh, Thota; Lelutiu, Nadia; Gueorguieva, Paoula; Dingledine, Raymond

    2015-01-01

    Exposure to high levels of organophosphorus compounds (OP) can induce status epilepticus (SE) in humans and rodents via acute cholinergic toxicity, leading to neurodegeneration and brain inflammation. Currently there is no treatment to combat the neuropathologies associated with OP exposure. We recently demonstrated that inhibition of the EP2 receptor for PGE2 reduces neuronal injury in mice following pilocarpine-induced SE. Here, we investigated the therapeutic effects of an EP2 inhibitor (TG6-10-1) in a rat model of SE using diisopropyl fluorophosphate (DFP). We tested the hypothesis that EP2 receptor inhibition initiated well after the onset of DFP-induced SE reduces the associated neuropathologies. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were injected with pyridostigmine bromide (0.1 mg/kg, sc) and atropine methylbromide (20 mg/kg, sc) followed by DFP (9.5 mg/kg, ip) to induce SE. DFP administration resulted in prolonged upregulation of COX-2. The rats were administered TG6-10-1 or vehicle (ip) at various time points relative to DFP exposure. Treatment with TG6-10-1 or vehicle did not alter the observed behavioral seizures, however six doses of TG6-10-1 starting 80-150 min after the onset of DFP-induced SE significantly reduced neurodegeneration in the hippocampus, blunted the inflammatory cytokine burst, reduced microglial activation and decreased weight loss in the days after status epilepticus. By contrast, astrogliosis was unaffected by EP2 inhibition 4 d after DFP. Transient treatments with the EP2 antagonist 1 h before DFP, or beginning 4 h after DFP, were ineffective. Delayed mortality, which was low (10%) after DFP, was unaffected by TG6-10-1. Thus, selective inhibition of the EP2 receptor within a time window that coincides with the induction of cyclooxygenase-2 by DFP is neuroprotective and accelerates functional recovery of rats. PMID:25656476

  7. Combined IL-12 receptor and IgA deficiency in an adult man intestinally infested by an unknown, non-cultivable mycobacterium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schejbel, L; Rasmussen, E M; Kemp, Helle Bruunsgaard

    2011-01-01

    deficiencies could promote illness. Even though the IgA deficiency in itself does not predispose to mycobacterial disease, the lack of secreted IgA may have disturbed the intestinal homoeostasis and increased the susceptibility to the low-virulent mycobacterium that the patient was not able to clear because...

  8. Detection of early stage atherosclerotic plaques using PET and CT fusion imaging targeting P-selectin in low density lipoprotein receptor-deficient mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakamura, Ikuko, E-mail: nakamuri@riken.jp [RIKEN Center for Molecular Imaging Science, Kobe (Japan); Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, Saga University, Saga (Japan); Hasegawa, Koki [RIKEN Center for Molecular Imaging Science, Kobe (Japan); Department of Pathology and Experimental Medicine, Kumamoto University, Kumamoto (Japan); Wada, Yasuhiro [RIKEN Center for Molecular Imaging Science, Kobe (Japan); Hirase, Tetsuaki; Node, Koichi [Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, Saga University, Saga (Japan); Watanabe, Yasuyoshi, E-mail: yywata@riken.jp [RIKEN Center for Molecular Imaging Science, Kobe (Japan)

    2013-03-29

    Highlights: ► P-selectin regulates leukocyte recruitment as an early stage event of atherogenesis. ► We developed an antibody-based molecular imaging probe targeting P-selectin for PET. ► This is the first report on successful PET imaging for delineation of P-selectin. ► P-selectin is a candidate target for atherosclerotic plaque imaging by clinical PET. -- Abstract: Background: Sensitive detection and qualitative analysis of atherosclerotic plaques are in high demand in cardiovascular clinical settings. The leukocyte–endothelial interaction mediated by an adhesion molecule P-selectin participates in arterial wall inflammation and atherosclerosis. Methods and results: A {sup 64}Cu-1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid conjugated anti-P-selectin monoclonal antibody ({sup 64}Cu-DOTA-anti-P-selectin mAb) probe was prepared by conjugating an anti-P-selectin monoclonal antibody with DOTA followed by {sup 64}Cu labeling. Thirty-six hours prior to PET and CT fusion imaging, 3 MBq of {sup 64}Cu-DOTA-anti-P-selectin mAb was intravenously injected into low density lipoprotein receptor-deficient Ldlr-/- mice. After a 180 min PET scan, autoradiography and biodistribution of {sup 64}Cu-DOTA-anti-P-selectin monoclonal antibody was examined using excised aortas. In Ldlr-/- mice fed with a high cholesterol diet for promotion of atherosclerotic plaque development, PET and CT fusion imaging revealed selective and prominent accumulation of the probe in the aortic root. Autoradiography of aortas that demonstrated probe uptake into atherosclerotic plaques was confirmed by Oil red O staining for lipid droplets. In Ldlr-/- mice fed with a chow diet to develop mild atherosclerotic plaques, probe accumulation was barely detectable in the aortic root on PET and CT fusion imaging. Probe biodistribution in aortas was 6.6-fold higher in Ldlr-/- mice fed with a high cholesterol diet than in those fed with a normal chow diet. {sup 64}Cu-DOTA-anti-P-selectin m

  9. Opposing effects of CXCR3 and CCR5 deficiency on CD8+ T cell-mediated inflammation in the central nervous system of virus-infected mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Lemos, Carina; Christensen, Jeanette Erbo; Nansen, Anneline

    2005-01-01

    and therefore protect mice against the otherwise fatal CD8+ T cell-mediated immune attack. Contrary to expectations, the accumulation of mononuclear cells in cerebrospinal fluid was only slightly delayed compared with mice with normal expression of both receptors. Even more surprising, CXCR3/CCR5 double-deficient......T cells play a key role in the control of viral infection in the CNS but may also contribute to immune-mediated cell damage. To study the redundancy of the chemokine receptors CXCR3 and CCR5 in regulating virus-induced CD8+ T cell-mediated inflammation in the brain, CXCR3/CCR5 double-deficient mice...... mice were more susceptible to intracerebral infection than CXCR3-deficient mice. Analysis of effector T cell generation revealed an accelerated antiviral CD8+ T cell response in CXCR3/CCR5 double-deficient mice. Furthermore, while the accumulation of CD8+ T cells in the neural parenchyma...

  10. Recovery of NMDA receptor currents from MK-801 blockade is accelerated by Mg2+ and memantine under conditions of agonist exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKay, Sean; Bengtson, C. Peter; Bading, Hilmar; Wyllie, David J.A.; Hardingham, Giles E.

    2013-01-01

    MK-801 is a use-dependent NMDA receptor open channel blocker with a very slow off-rate. These properties can be exploited to ‘pre-block’ a population of NMDARs, such as synaptic ones, enabling the selective activation of a different population, such as extrasynaptic NMDARs. However, the usefulness of this approach is dependent on the stability of MK-801 blockade after washout. We have revisited this issue, and confirm that recovery of NMDAR currents from MK-801 blockade is enhanced by channel opening by NMDA, and find that it is further increased when Mg2+ is also present. In the presence of Mg2+, 50% recovery from MK-801 blockade is achieved after 10′ of 100 μM NMDA, or 30′ of 15 μM NMDA exposure. In Mg2+-free medium, NMDA-induced MK-801 dissociation was found to be much slower. Memantine, another PCP-site antagonist, could substitute for Mg2+ in accelerating the unblock of MK-801 in the presence of NMDA. This suggests a model whereby, upon dissociation from its binding site in the pore, MK-801 is able to re-bind in a process antagonized by Mg2+ or another PCP-site antagonist. Finally we show that even when all NMDARs are pre-blocked by MK-801, incubation of neurons with 100 μM NMDA in the presence of Mg2+ for 2.5 h triggers sufficient unblocking to kill >80% of neurons. We conclude that while synaptic MK-801 ‘pre-block’ protocols are useful for pharmacologically assessing synaptic vs. extrasynaptic contributions to NMDAR currents, or studying short-term effects, it is problematic to use this technique to attempt to study the effects of long-term selective extrasynaptic NMDAR activation. This article is part of the Special Issue entitled ‘Glutamate Receptor-Dependent Synaptic Plasticity’. PMID:23402996

  11. IGF-1 deficiency impairs neurovascular coupling in mice: implications for cerebromicrovascular aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toth, Peter; Tarantini, Stefano; Ashpole, Nicole M; Tucsek, Zsuzsanna; Milne, Ginger L; Valcarcel-Ares, Noa M; Menyhart, Akos; Farkas, Eszter; Sonntag, William E; Csiszar, Anna; Ungvari, Zoltan

    2015-12-01

    Aging is associated with marked deficiency in circulating IGF-1, which has been shown to contribute to age-related cognitive decline. Impairment of moment-to-moment adjustment of cerebral blood flow (CBF) via neurovascular coupling is thought to play a critical role in the genesis of age-related cognitive impairment. To establish the link between IGF-1 deficiency and cerebromicrovascular impairment, neurovascular coupling mechanisms were studied in a novel mouse model of IGF-1 deficiency (Igf1(f/f) -TBG-Cre-AAV8) and accelerated vascular aging. We found that IGF-1-deficient mice exhibit neurovascular uncoupling and show a deficit in hippocampal-dependent spatial memory test, mimicking the aging phenotype. IGF-1 deficiency significantly impaired cerebromicrovascular endothelial function decreasing NO mediation of neurovascular coupling. IGF-1 deficiency also impaired glutamate-mediated CBF responses, likely due to dysregulation of astrocytic expression of metabotropic glutamate receptors and impairing mediation of CBF responses by eicosanoid gliotransmitters. Collectively, we demonstrate that IGF-1 deficiency promotes cerebromicrovascular dysfunction and neurovascular uncoupling mimicking the aging phenotype, which are likely to contribute to cognitive impairment. © 2015 The Authors. Aging Cell published by the Anatomical Society and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Impaired virus control and severe CD8+ T-cell-mediated immunopathology in chimeric mice deficient in gamma interferon receptor expression on both parenchymal and hematopoietic cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henrichsen, Pernille; Bartholdy, Christina; Christensen, Jan Pravsgaard

    2005-01-01

    be capable of responding to IFN-gamma, but expression of the relevant receptor on non-T cells could be experimentally controlled. Only when the IFN-gamma receptor is absent on both radioresistant parenchymal and bone marrow-derived cells will chimeric mice challenged with a highly invasive, noncytolytic...

  13. Iodine Deficiency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zimmermann, M.B.

    2009-01-01

    Iodine deficiency has multiple adverse effects in humans, termed iodine deficiency disorders, due to inadequate thyroid hormone production. Globally, it is estimated that 2 billion individuals have an insufficient iodine intake, and South Asia and sub-Saharan Africa are particularly affected.

  14. Using Soluble Transferrin Receptor and Taking Inflammation into Account When Defining Serum Ferritin Cutoffs Improved the Diagnosis of Iron Deficiency in a Group of Canadian Preschool Inuit Children from Nunavik

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huguette Turgeon O’Brien

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The prevalence of iron depletion, iron deficient erythropoiesis (IDE, and iron deficiency anemia (IDA was assessed in preschool Inuit children using soluble transferrin receptor (sTfR and traditional indicators of iron status while disregarding or taking inflammation into account when defining SF cutoffs. Iron depletion was defined as follows: (1 SF 5 mg/L, respectively. IDE corresponded to iron depletion combined with total iron binding capacity > 72 μmol/L and/or transferrin saturation < 16%. Iron depletion and IDE affected almost half of the children when accounting for inflammation, compared to one-third when the SF cutoff was defined regardless of CRP level (P<0.0001. The prevalence of IDE adjusted for inflammation (45.1% was very similar to the prevalence observed when sTfR was used as a sole marker of IDE (47.4%. The prevalence of anemia was 15%. The prevalence of IDA (IDE + hemoglobin < 110 g/L was higher when accounting for than when disregarding inflammation (8.0% versus 6.2%, P=0.083. Using sTfR and different SF cutoffs for children with versus without inflammation improved the diagnosis of iron depletion and IDE. Our results confirm that Inuit children are at particularly high risk for iron deficiency.

  15. Effect of iron deficiency on the expression of insulin-like growth factor-II and its receptor in neuronal and glial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales González, E; Contreras, I; Estrada, J A

    2014-09-01

    Many studies have demonstrated that iron deficiency modifies the normal function of the central nervous system and alters cognitive abilities. When cellular damage occurs in the central nervous system, neuroprotective mechanisms, such as the production of neurotrophic factors, are essential in order for nervous tissue to function correctly. Insulin-like growth factor II (IGF- II) is a neurotrophic factor that was recently shown to be involved in the normal functioning of cognitive processes in animal models. However, the impact of iron deficiency on the expression and function of this molecule has not yet been clarified. Mixed primary cell cultures from the central nervous system were collected to simulate iron deficiency using deferoxamine. The expression of IGF-I, IGF-II, IGF-IR, and IGF-IIR was determined with the western blot test. We observed increased expression of IGF-II, along with a corresponding decrease in the expression of IGF-IIR, in iron-deficient mixed primary cell cultures. We did not observe alterations in the expression of these proteins in isolated microglia or neuronal cultures under the same conditions. We did not detect differences in the expression of IGF-I and IGF-IR in iron-deficient cultures. In vitro iron deficiency increases the expression of IGF-II in mixed glial cell cultures, which may have a beneficial effect on brain tissue homeostasis in a situation in which iron availability is decreased. Copyright © 2013 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  16. Steroid receptor coactivator 1 deficiency increases MMTV-neu mediated tumor latency and differentiation specific gene expression, decreases metastasis, and inhibits response to PPAR ligands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Ji Seung; Crowe, David L

    2010-01-01

    The peroxisome proliferator activated receptor (PPAR) subgroup of the nuclear hormone receptor superfamily is activated by a variety of natural and synthetic ligands. PPARs can heterodimerize with retinoid X receptors, which have homology to other members of the nuclear receptor superfamily. Ligand binding to PPAR/RXRs results in recruitment of transcriptional coactivator proteins such as steroid receptor coactivator 1 (SRC-1) and CREB binding protein (CBP). Both SRC-1 and CBP are histone acetyltransferases, which by modifying nucleosomal histones, produce more open chromatin structure and increase transcriptional activity. Nuclear hormone receptors can recruit limiting amounts of coactivators from other transcription factor binding sites such as AP-1, thereby inhibiting the activity of AP-1 target genes. PPAR and RXR ligands have been used in experimental breast cancer therapy. The role of coactivator expression in mammary tumorigenesis and response to drug therapy has been the subject of recent studies. We examined the effects of loss of SRC-1 on MMTV-neu mediated mammary tumorigenesis. SRC-1 null mutation in mammary tumor prone mice increased the tumor latency period, reduced tumor proliferation index and metastasis, inhibited response to PPAR and RXR ligands, and induced genes involved in mammary gland differentiation. We also examined human breast cancer cell lines overexpressing SRC-1 or CBP. Coactivator overexpression increased cellular proliferation with resistance to PPAR and RXR ligands and remodeled chromatin of the proximal epidermal growth factor receptor promoter. These results indicate that histone acetyltransferases play key roles in mammary tumorigenesis and response to anti-proliferative therapies

  17. Protein tyrosine phosphatase receptor type R deficient mice exhibit increased exploration in a new environment and impaired novel object recognition memory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Erkens, M.; Bakker, B.; Duijn, L.M. van; Hendriks, W.J.A.J.; Zee, C.E.E.M. van der

    2014-01-01

    Mouse gene Ptprr encodes multiple protein tyrosine phosphatase receptor type R (PTPRR) isoforms that negatively regulate mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathways. In the mouse brain, PTPRR proteins are expressed in cerebellum, olfactory bulb, hippocampus, amygdala and perirhinal

  18. Accelerated in vivo proliferation of memory phenotype CD4+ T-cells in human HIV-1 infection irrespective of viral chemokine co-receptor tropism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Zhang

    Full Text Available CD4(+ T-cell loss is the hallmark of HIV-1 infection. CD4 counts fall more rapidly in advanced disease when CCR5-tropic viral strains tend to be replaced by X4-tropic viruses. We hypothesized: (i that the early dominance of CCR5-tropic viruses results from faster turnover rates of CCR5(+ cells, and (ii that X4-tropic strains exert greater pathogenicity by preferentially increasing turnover rates within the CXCR4(+ compartment. To test these hypotheses we measured in vivo turnover rates of CD4(+ T-cell subpopulations sorted by chemokine receptor expression, using in vivo deuterium-glucose labeling. Deuterium enrichment was modeled to derive in vivo proliferation (p and disappearance (d* rates which were related to viral tropism data. 13 healthy controls and 13 treatment-naive HIV-1-infected subjects (CD4 143-569 cells/ul participated. CCR5-expression defined a CD4(+ subpopulation of predominantly CD45R0(+ memory cells with accelerated in vivo proliferation (p = 2.50 vs 1.60%/d, CCR5(+ vs CCR5(-; healthy controls; P<0.01. Conversely, CXCR4 expression defined CD4(+ T-cells (predominantly CD45RA(+ naive cells with low turnover rates. The dominant effect of HIV infection was accelerated turnover of CCR5(+CD45R0(+CD4(+ memory T-cells (p = 5.16 vs 2.50%/d, HIV vs controls; P<0.05, naïve cells being relatively unaffected. Similar patterns were observed whether the dominant circulating HIV-1 strain was R5-tropic (n = 9 or X4-tropic (n = 4. Although numbers were small, X4-tropic viruses did not appear to specifically drive turnover of CXCR4-expressing cells (p = 0.54 vs 0.72 vs 0.44%/d in control, R5-tropic, and X4-tropic groups respectively. Our data are most consistent with models in which CD4(+ T-cell loss is primarily driven by non-specific immune activation.

  19. Platelet-derived growth factor receptor-β, carrying the activating mutation D849N, accelerates the establishment of B16 melanoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Shioto; Heldin, Carl-Henrik; Heuchel, Rainer Lothar

    2007-01-01

    Platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-BB and PDGF receptor (PDGFR)-β are mainly expressed in the developing vasculature, where PDGF-BB is produced by endothelial cells and PDGFR-β is expressed by mural cells, including pericytes. PDGF-BB is produced by most types of solid tumors, and PDGF receptor signaling participates in various processes, including autocrine stimulation of tumor cell growth, recruitment of tumor stroma fibroblasts, and stimulation of tumor angiogenesis. Furthermore, PDGF-BB-producing tumors are characterized by increased pericyte abundance and accelerated tumor growth. Thus, there is a growing interest in the development of tumor treatment strategies by blocking PDGF/PDGFR function. We have recently generated a mouse model carrying an activated PDGFR-β by replacing the highly conserved aspartic acid residue (D) 849 in the activating loop with asparagine (N). This allowed us to investigate, in an orthotopic tumor model, the role of increased stromal PDGFR-β signaling in tumor-stroma interactions. B16 melanoma cells lacking PDGFR-β expression and either mock-transfected or engineered to express PDGF-BB, were injected alone or in combination with matrigel into mice carrying the activated PDGFR-β (D849N) and into wild type mice. The tumor growth rate was followed and the vessel status of tumors, i.e. total vessel area/tumor, average vessel surface and pericyte density of vessels, was analyzed after resection. Tumors grown in mice carrying an activated PDGFR-β were established earlier than those in wild-type mice. In this early phase, the total vessel area and the average vessel surface were higher in tumors grown in mice carrying the activated PDGFR-β (D849N) compared to wild-type mice, whereas we did not find a significant difference in the number of tumor vessels and the pericyte abundance around tumor vessels between wild type and mutant mice. At later phases of tumor progression, no significant difference in tumor growth rate was

  20. Muscarinic Receptor Signaling in Colon Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosenvinge, Erik C. von, E-mail: evonrose@medicine.umaryland.edu; Raufman, Jean-Pierre [University of Maryland School of Medicine, Division of Gastroenterology & Hepatology, 22 S. Greene Street, N3W62, Baltimore, MD 21201 (United States); Department of Veterans Affairs, VA Maryland Health Care System, 10 North Greene Street, Baltimore, MD 21201 (United States)

    2011-03-02

    According to the adenoma-carcinoma sequence, colon cancer results from accumulating somatic gene mutations; environmental growth factors accelerate and augment this process. For example, diets rich in meat and fat increase fecal bile acids and colon cancer risk. In rodent cancer models, increased fecal bile acids promote colon dysplasia. Conversely, in rodents and in persons with inflammatory bowel disease, low-dose ursodeoxycholic acid treatment alters fecal bile acid composition and attenuates colon neoplasia. In the course of elucidating the mechanism underlying these actions, we discovered that bile acids interact functionally with intestinal muscarinic receptors. The present communication reviews muscarinic receptor expression in normal and neoplastic colon epithelium, the role of autocrine signaling following synthesis and release of acetylcholine from colon cancer cells, post-muscarinic receptor signaling including the role of transactivation of epidermal growth factor receptors and activation of the ERK and PI3K/AKT signaling pathways, the structural biology and metabolism of bile acids and evidence for functional interaction of bile acids with muscarinic receptors on human colon cancer cells. In murine colon cancer models, deficiency of subtype 3 muscarinic receptors attenuates intestinal neoplasia; a proof-of-concept supporting muscarinic receptor signaling as a therapeutic target for colon cancer.

  1. Muscarinic Receptor Signaling in Colon Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenvinge, Erik C. von; Raufman, Jean-Pierre

    2011-01-01

    According to the adenoma-carcinoma sequence, colon cancer results from accumulating somatic gene mutations; environmental growth factors accelerate and augment this process. For example, diets rich in meat and fat increase fecal bile acids and colon cancer risk. In rodent cancer models, increased fecal bile acids promote colon dysplasia. Conversely, in rodents and in persons with inflammatory bowel disease, low-dose ursodeoxycholic acid treatment alters fecal bile acid composition and attenuates colon neoplasia. In the course of elucidating the mechanism underlying these actions, we discovered that bile acids interact functionally with intestinal muscarinic receptors. The present communication reviews muscarinic receptor expression in normal and neoplastic colon epithelium, the role of autocrine signaling following synthesis and release of acetylcholine from colon cancer cells, post-muscarinic receptor signaling including the role of transactivation of epidermal growth factor receptors and activation of the ERK and PI3K/AKT signaling pathways, the structural biology and metabolism of bile acids and evidence for functional interaction of bile acids with muscarinic receptors on human colon cancer cells. In murine colon cancer models, deficiency of subtype 3 muscarinic receptors attenuates intestinal neoplasia; a proof-of-concept supporting muscarinic receptor signaling as a therapeutic target for colon cancer

  2. Muscarinic Receptor Signaling in Colon Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Pierre Raufman

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available According to the adenoma-carcinoma sequence, colon cancer results from accumulating somatic gene mutations; environmental growth factors accelerate and augment this process. For example, diets rich in meat and fat increase fecal bile acids and colon cancer risk. In rodent cancer models, increased fecal bile acids promote colon dysplasia. Conversely, in rodents and in persons with inflammatory bowel disease, low-dose ursodeoxycholic acid treatment alters fecal bile acid composition and attenuates colon neoplasia. In the course of elucidating the mechanism underlying these actions, we discovered that bile acids interact functionally with intestinal muscarinic receptors. The present communication reviews muscarinic receptor expression in normal and neoplastic colon epithelium, the role of autocrine signaling following synthesis and release of acetylcholine from colon cancer cells, post-muscarinic receptor signaling including the role of transactivation of epidermal growth factor receptors and activation of the ERK and PI3K/AKT signaling pathways, the structural biology and metabolism of bile acids and evidence for functional interaction of bile acids with muscarinic receptors on human colon cancer cells. In murine colon cancer models, deficiency of subtype 3 muscarinic receptors attenuates intestinal neoplasia; a proof-of-concept supporting muscarinic receptor signaling as a therapeutic target for colon cancer.

  3. Vitamin D deficiency in girls from South Brazil: a cross-sectional study on prevalence and association with vitamin D receptor gene variants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santos Betânia R

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Vitamin D deficiency has been associated with a multitude of disorders including diabetes, defective insulin secretion as well as rickets and poor bone health. Vitamin D is also a concern during childhood and adolescence and has been reported in girls from South Brazil. We determined the prevalence of vitamin D deficiency in girls from South Brazil and investigated whether the genotypic distribution of the BsmI, ApaI and TaqI polymorphisms of the VDR gene and their haplotypes were associated with vitamin D levels. Methods Cross-sectional study including 234 apparently healthy girls aged 7 to 18 years. Height and weight were measured for calculation of body mass index (BMI percentiles for age. Plasma levels of 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OHD] were assessed. Participants were genotyped for ApaI (rs7975232, TaqI (rs731236, and BsmI (rs1544410 SNPs. Results The median and interquartile range (25-75% of BMI percentile was 62.0 (33.3 – 84.9. The frequency of overweight/obesity was 24.9%. Circulating levels of 25(OHD (≥ 30 ng/mL were adequate in 9.4%; insufficient in 54.3% (20–29 ng/mL; and deficient in 36.3% (vs. GA + AA, two-tailed Student’s t-test p vs. GT + TT, two-tailed Student’s t-test p = 0.031 and TaqI (TT vs. TC + CC, two-tailed Student’s t-test p = 0.005 SNPs and the GGT haplotype (two-tailed Student’s t-test p = 0.036 were significantly associated with lower 25(OHD levels. Conclusions 25-hydroxyvitamin D deficiency and insufficiency were highly prevalent in this sample. The BsmI, ApaI and TaqI wild variants of the VDR gene, as well as the GGT haplotype, were associated with lower vitamin D levels, suggesting that VDR gene polymorphisms could be linked to higher susceptibility to vitamin D deficiency in a sub-population of children and adolescents.

  4. Deficient p75 low-affinity neurotrophin receptor expression does alter the composition of cellular infiltrate in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis in C57BL/6 mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kust, B; Mantingh-Otter, [No Value; Boddeke, E; Copray, S

    We have shown earlier that induction of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE)-a model for the human disease multiple sclerosis-in C5713L/6 wild-type mice resulted in the expression of the p75 low-affinity neurotrophin receptor (p75(NTR)) in endothelial cells in the CNS. In comparison to

  5. Leptin deficiency unmasks the deleterious effects of impaired peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ function (P465L PPARγ) in mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gray, S.L.; Dalla Nora, E.; Grosse, J.; Manieri, M.; Stoeger, T.; Medina-Gomez, G.; Burling, K.; Wattler, S.; Russ, A.; Yeo, G.S.H.; Chatterjee, V.K.; O'Rahilly, S.; Voshol, P.J.; Cinti, S.; Vidal-Puig, A.

    2006-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)γ is a key transcription factor facilitating fat deposition in adipose tissue through its proadipogenic and lipogenic actions. Human patients with dominant-negative mutations in PPARγ display lipodystrophy and extreme insulin resistance. For this

  6. Effect of human scavenger receptor class A overexpression in bone marrow-derived cells on cholesterol levels and atherosclerosis in ApoE-deficient mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Eck, M.; de Winther, M. P.; Herijgers, N.; Havekes, L. M.; Hofker, M. H.; Groot, P. H.; van Berkel, T. J.

    2000-01-01

    In the arterial wall, scavenger receptor class A (SRA) is implicated in pathological lipid deposition. In contrast, in the liver, SRA is suggested to remove modified lipoproteins from the circulation, thereby protecting the body from their pathological action. The role of SRA on bone marrow-derived

  7. Effect of human scavenger receptor class A overexpression in bone marrow-derived cells on cholesterol levels and atherosclerosis in apoE-deficient mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eck, M. van; Winther, M.P.J. de; Herijgers, N.; Havekes, L.M.; Hofker, M.H.; Groot, P.H.E.; Berkel, T.J.C. van

    2000-01-01

    In the arterial wall, scavenger receptor class A (SRA) is implicated in pathological lipid deposition. In contrast, in the liver, SRA is suggested to remove modified lipoproteins from the circulation, thereby protecting the body from their pathological action. The role of SRA on bone marrow-derived

  8. A juvenile form of postsynaptic hippocampal long-term potentiation in mice deficient for the AMPA receptor subunit GluR-A

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jensen, V.; Kaiser, K.M.M.; Borchardt, T.; Adelmann, G.; Rozov, A.; Burnashev, N.; Brix, C.; Frotscher, M.; Anderson, P.; Hvalby, O.; Sakmann, B.; Seeburg, P.H.; Sprengel, R.

    2003-01-01

    In adult mice, long-term potentiation (LTP) of synaptic transmission at CA3-to-CA1 synapses induced by tetanic stimulation requires L-α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionate (AMPA) receptors containing GluR-A subunits. Here, we report a GluR-A-independent form of LTP, which is comparable in

  9. Very late-onset group B Streptococcus meningitis, sepsis, and systemic shigellosis due to interleukin-1 receptor-associated kinase-4 deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, Jens C; Ghandil, Pegah; Chrabieh, Maya; Casanova, Jean-Laurent; Picard, Capucine; Puel, Anne; Creech, C Buddy

    2009-11-01

    We describe a child with very late-onset group B Streptococcus sepsis and meningitis, systemic shigellosis, and chronic osteomyelitis. Peripheral blood cells obtained from the patient and her brother did not respond to stimulation with either interleukin-1beta or lipopolysaccharide. Sequencing of the interleukin-1 receptor-associated kinase-4 gene revealed 2 novel mutations.

  10. What Are Rare Clotting Factor Deficiencies?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Deficiency Factor V Deficiency Combined FV & FVIII Deficiencies Factor VII Deficiency Factor X Deficiency Factor XI Deficiency Factor ... Deficiency Factor V Deficiency Combined FV & FVIII Deficiencies Factor VII Deficiency Factor X Deficiency Factor XI Deficiency Factor ...

  11. Can Accelerators Accelerate Learning?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, A. C. F.; Fonseca, P.; Coelho, L. F. S.

    2009-01-01

    The 'Young Talented' education program developed by the Brazilian State Funding Agency (FAPERJ)[1] makes it possible for high-schools students from public high schools to perform activities in scientific laboratories. In the Atomic and Molecular Physics Laboratory at Federal University of Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), the students are confronted with modern research tools like the 1.7 MV ion accelerator. Being a user-friendly machine, the accelerator is easily manageable by the students, who can perform simple hands-on activities, stimulating interest in physics, and getting the students close to modern laboratory techniques.

  12. Can Accelerators Accelerate Learning?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, A. C. F.; Fonseca, P.; Coelho, L. F. S.

    2009-03-01

    The 'Young Talented' education program developed by the Brazilian State Funding Agency (FAPERJ) [1] makes it possible for high-schools students from public high schools to perform activities in scientific laboratories. In the Atomic and Molecular Physics Laboratory at Federal University of Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), the students are confronted with modern research tools like the 1.7 MV ion accelerator. Being a user-friendly machine, the accelerator is easily manageable by the students, who can perform simple hands-on activities, stimulating interest in physics, and getting the students close to modern laboratory techniques.

  13. D-serine deficiency attenuates the behavioral and cellular effects induced by the hallucinogenic 5-HT(2A) receptor agonist DOI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Santini, Martin A; Balu, Darrick T; Puhl, Matthew D

    2014-01-01

    Both the serotonin and glutamate systems have been implicated in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia, as well as in the mechanism of action of antipsychotic drugs. Psychedelic drugs act through the serotonin 2A receptor (5-HT2AR), and elicit a head-twitch response (HTR) in mice, which directly...... correlates to 5-HT2AR activation and is absent in 5-HT2AR knockout mice. The precise mechanism of this response remains unclear, but both an intrinsic cortico-cortical pathway and a thalamo-cortical pathway involving glutamate release have been proposed. Here, we used a genetic model of NMDAR hypofunction......RNA. These altered functional responses in SRKO mice were not associated with changes in cortical or hippocampal 5-HT levels or in 5-HT2AR and metabotropic glutamate-2 receptor (mGluR2) mRNA and protein expression. Together, these findings suggest that D-serine-dependent NMDAR activity is involved in mediating...

  14. Growth hormone receptor deficiency in mice results in reduced systolic blood pressure and plasma renin, increased aortic eNOS expression, and altered cardiovascular structure and function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egecioglu, E; Andersson, I J; Bollano, E

    2007-01-01

    To study the role of the growth hormone receptor (GHR) in the development of cardiovascular structure and function, female GHR gene-disrupted or knockout (KO) and wild-type (WT) mice at age 18 wk were used. GHR KO mice had lower plasma renin levels (12 +/- 2 vs. 20 +/- 4 mGU/ml, P < 0.05) and inc....... These data suggest an important role for an intact GH/IGF-I axis in the maintenance of a normal cardiovascular system....

  15. Plasma accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bingham, R.; Angelis, U. de; Johnston, T.W.

    1991-01-01

    Recently attention has focused on charged particle acceleration in a plasma by a fast, large amplitude, longitudinal electron plasma wave. The plasma beat wave and plasma wakefield accelerators are two efficient ways of producing ultra-high accelerating gradients. Starting with the plasma beat wave accelerator (PBWA) and laser wakefield accelerator (LWFA) schemes and the plasma wakefield accelerator (PWFA) steady progress has been made in theory, simulations and experiments. Computations are presented for the study of LWFA. (author)

  16. Linear Accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vretenar, M

    2014-01-01

    The main features of radio-frequency linear accelerators are introduced, reviewing the different types of accelerating structures and presenting the main characteristics aspects of linac beam dynamics

  17. T−B+NK+ severe combined immunodeficiency caused by complete deficiency of the CD3ζ subunit of the T-cell antigen receptor complex

    OpenAIRE

    Roberts, Joseph L.; Lauritsen, Jens Peter H.; Cooney, Myriah; Parrott, Roberta E.; Sajaroff, Elisa O.; Win, Chan M.; Keller, Michael D.; Carpenter, Jeffery H.; Carabana, Juan; Krangel, Michael S.; Sarzotti, Marcella; Zhong, Xiao-Ping; Wiest, David L.; Buckley, Rebecca H.

    2007-01-01

    CD3ζ is a subunit of the T-cell antigen receptor (TCR) complex required for its assembly and surface expression that also plays an important role in TCR-mediated signal transduction. We report here a patient with T−B+NK+ severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) who was homozygous for a single C insertion following nucleotide 411 in exon 7 of the CD3ζ gene. The few T cells present contained no detectable CD3ζ protein, expressed low levels of cell surface CD3ε, and were nonfunctional. CD4+CD8−CD...

  18. Growth hormone receptor-deficient pigs resemble the pathophysiology of human Laron syndrome and reveal altered activation of signaling cascades in the liver

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arne Hinrichs

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Laron syndrome (LS is a rare, autosomal recessive disorder in humans caused by loss-of-function mutations of the growth hormone receptor (GHR gene. To establish a large animal model for LS, pigs with GHR knockout (KO mutations were generated and characterized. Methods: CRISPR/Cas9 technology was applied to mutate exon 3 of the GHR gene in porcine zygotes. Two heterozygous founder sows with a 1-bp or 7-bp insertion in GHR exon 3 were obtained, and their heterozygous F1 offspring were intercrossed to produce GHR-KO, heterozygous GHR mutant, and wild-type pigs. Since the latter two groups were not significantly different in any parameter investigated, they were pooled as the GHR expressing control group. The characterization program included body and organ growth, body composition, endocrine and clinical-chemical parameters, as well as signaling studies in liver tissue. Results: GHR-KO pigs lacked GHR and had markedly reduced serum insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF1 levels and reduced IGF-binding protein 3 (IGFBP3 activity but increased IGFBP2 levels. Serum GH concentrations were significantly elevated compared with control pigs. GHR-KO pigs had a normal birth weight. Growth retardation became significant at the age of five weeks. At the age of six months, the body weight of GHR-KO pigs was reduced by 60% compared with controls. Most organ weights of GHR-KO pigs were reduced proportionally to body weight. However, the weights of liver, kidneys, and heart were disproportionately reduced, while the relative brain weight was almost doubled. GHR-KO pigs had a markedly increased percentage of total body fat relative to body weight and displayed transient juvenile hypoglycemia along with decreased serum triglyceride and cholesterol levels. Analysis of insulin receptor related signaling in the liver of adult fasted pigs revealed increased phosphorylation of IRS1 and PI3K. In agreement with the loss of GHR, phosphorylation of STAT5 was

  19. Evidence for a partial deficiency of the LDL (apo B,E) receptor within a family of rhesus monkeys with a spontaneous hypercholesterolemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scanu, A.M.; Khalil, A.; Tidore, M.; Kaiser, M.; Pfaffinger, D.; Carey, D.; Dawson, G.

    1987-01-01

    Spontaneous hypercholesterolemia is rare among non-human primates. Through screening of a rhesus monkey colony they have identified a family in which 3 out of its 6 members have a persistent hypercholesterolemia on a cholesterol-free Purina Chow diet and are high responders to a dietary fat challenge. On a basal diet the 3 affected animals also exhibited high plasma levels of LDL and apoB. To shed light on the mechanism of the hypercholesterolemia they have grown in culture fibroblasts from skin biopsies obtained from all members of the rhesus monkey family and 12 control. Binding studies at 4 0 C and ligand blotting experiments using 125 I-LDL of either normolipidemic rhesus monkeys or human subjects have shown that the fibroblasts from the 3 monkeys with a spontaneous hypercholesterolemia have a significant reduction of the number of LDL receptor and to the same extent as fibroblasts derived from subjects with heterozygous FH studied at the same time. The data suggest that the spontaneous elevation of plasma cholesterol observed in the 3 family members is related, at least in part, to a defective uptake of LDL by the LDL receptor pathway

  20. Growth hormone receptor-deficient pigs resemble the pathophysiology of human Laron syndrome and reveal altered activation of signaling cascades in the liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinrichs, Arne; Kessler, Barbara; Kurome, Mayuko; Blutke, Andreas; Kemter, Elisabeth; Bernau, Maren; Scholz, Armin M; Rathkolb, Birgit; Renner, Simone; Bultmann, Sebastian; Leonhardt, Heinrich; de Angelis, Martin Hrabĕ; Nagashima, Hiroshi; Hoeflich, Andreas; Blum, Werner F; Bidlingmaier, Martin; Wanke, Rüdiger; Dahlhoff, Maik; Wolf, Eckhard

    2018-05-01

    Laron syndrome (LS) is a rare, autosomal recessive disorder in humans caused by loss-of-function mutations of the growth hormone receptor (GHR) gene. To establish a large animal model for LS, pigs with GHR knockout (KO) mutations were generated and characterized. CRISPR/Cas9 technology was applied to mutate exon 3 of the GHR gene in porcine zygotes. Two heterozygous founder sows with a 1-bp or 7-bp insertion in GHR exon 3 were obtained, and their heterozygous F1 offspring were intercrossed to produce GHR-KO, heterozygous GHR mutant, and wild-type pigs. Since the latter two groups were not significantly different in any parameter investigated, they were pooled as the GHR expressing control group. The characterization program included body and organ growth, body composition, endocrine and clinical-chemical parameters, as well as signaling studies in liver tissue. GHR-KO pigs lacked GHR and had markedly reduced serum insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF1) levels and reduced IGF-binding protein 3 (IGFBP3) activity but increased IGFBP2 levels. Serum GH concentrations were significantly elevated compared with control pigs. GHR-KO pigs had a normal birth weight. Growth retardation became significant at the age of five weeks. At the age of six months, the body weight of GHR-KO pigs was reduced by 60% compared with controls. Most organ weights of GHR-KO pigs were reduced proportionally to body weight. However, the weights of liver, kidneys, and heart were disproportionately reduced, while the relative brain weight was almost doubled. GHR-KO pigs had a markedly increased percentage of total body fat relative to body weight and displayed transient juvenile hypoglycemia along with decreased serum triglyceride and cholesterol levels. Analysis of insulin receptor related signaling in the liver of adult fasted pigs revealed increased phosphorylation of IRS1 and PI3K. In agreement with the loss of GHR, phosphorylation of STAT5 was significantly reduced. In contrast, phosphorylation

  1. Accelerator Service

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Champelovier, Y.; Ferrari, M.; Gardon, A.; Hadinger, G.; Martin, J.; Plantier, A.

    1998-01-01

    Since the cessation of the operation of hydrogen cluster accelerator in July 1996, four electrostatic accelerators were in operation and used by the peri-nuclear teams working in multidisciplinary collaborations. These are the 4 MV Van de Graaff accelerator, 2,5 MV Van de Graaff accelerator, 400 kV ion implanter as well as the 120 kV isotope separator

  2. Improved differential diagnosis of anemia of chronic disease and iron deficiency anemia: a prospective multicenter evaluation of soluble transferrin receptor and the sTfR/log ferritin index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skikne, Barry S; Punnonen, Kari; Caldron, Paul H; Bennett, Michael T; Rehu, Mari; Gasior, Gail H; Chamberlin, Janna S; Sullivan, Linda A; Bray, Kurtis R; Southwick, Paula C

    2011-11-01

    Anemia of chronic disease (ACD) and iron deficiency anemia (IDA) are the most prevalent forms of anemia and often occur concurrently. Standard tests of iron status used in differential diagnosis are affected by inflammation, hindering clinical interpretation. In contrast, soluble transferrin receptor (sTfR) indicates iron deficiency and is unaffected by inflammation. Objectives of this prospective multicenter clinical trial were to evaluate and compare the diagnostic accuracy of sTfR and the sTfR/log ferritin index (sTfR Index) for differential diagnosis using the automated Access(®) sTfR assay (Beckman Coulter) and sTfR Index. We consecutively enrolled 145 anemic patients with common disorders associated with IDA and ACD. Subjects with IDA or ACD + IDA had significantly higher sTfR and sTfR Index values than subjects with ACD (P < 0.0001). ROC curves produced the following cutoffs for sTfR: 21 nmol/L (or 1.55 mg/L), and the sTfR Index: 14 (using nmol/L) (or 1.03 using mg/L). The sTfR Index was superior to sTfR (AUC 0.87 vs. 0.74, P < 0.0001). Use of all three parameters in combination more than doubled the detection of IDA, from 41% (ferritin alone) to 92% (ferritin, sTfR, sTfR Index). Use of sTfR and the sTfR Index improves detection of IDA, particularly in situations where routine markers provide equivocal results. Findings demonstrate a significant advantage in the simultaneous determination of ferritin, sTfR and sTfR Index. Obtaining a ferritin level alone may delay diagnosis of combined IDA and ACD. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  3. Restoration of pharyngeal dilator muscle force in dystrophin-deficient (mdx) mice following co-treatment with neutralizing interleukin-6 receptor antibodies and urocortin 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, David P; Rowland, Jane; Canavan, Leonie; Murphy, Kevin H; Brannock, Molly; O'Malley, Dervla; O'Halloran, Ken D; Edge, Deirdre

    2017-09-01

    What is the central question of this study? We previously reported impaired upper airway dilator muscle function in the mdx mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). Our aim was to assess the effect of blocking interleukin-6 receptor signalling and stimulating corticotrophin-releasing factor receptor 2 signalling on mdx sternohyoid muscle structure and function. What is the main finding and its importance? The interventional treatment had a positive inotropic effect on sternohyoid muscle force, restoring mechanical work and power to wild-type values, reduced myofibre central nucleation and preserved the myosin heavy chain type IIb fibre complement of mdx sternohyoid muscle. These data might have implications for development of pharmacotherapies for DMD with relevance to respiratory muscle performance. The mdx mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy shows evidence of impaired pharyngeal dilator muscle function. We hypothesized that inflammatory and stress-related factors are implicated in airway dilator muscle dysfunction. Six-week-old mdx (n = 26) and wild-type (WT; n = 26) mice received either saline (0.9% w/v) or a co-administration of neutralizing interleukin-6 receptor antibodies (0.2 mg kg -1 ) and corticotrophin-releasing factor receptor 2 agonist (urocortin 2; 30 μg kg -1 ) over 2 weeks. Sternohyoid muscle isometric and isotonic contractile function was examined ex vivo. Muscle fibre centronucleation and muscle cellular infiltration, collagen content, fibre-type distribution and fibre cross-sectional area were determined by histology and immunofluorescence. Muscle chemokine content was examined by use of a multiplex assay. Sternohyoid peak specific force at 100 Hz was significantly reduced in mdx compared with WT. Drug treatment completely restored force in mdx sternohyoid to WT levels. The percentage of centrally nucleated muscle fibres was significantly increased in mdx, and this was partly ameliorated after drug treatment. The areal

  4. Hypothalamic Dysfunction of the Thrombospondin Receptor α2δ-1 Underlies the Overeating and Obesity Triggered by Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor Deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordeira, Joshua W.; Felsted, Jennifer A.; Teillon, Sarah; Daftary, Shabrine; Panessiti, Micaella; Wirth, Jena; Sena-Esteves, Miguel

    2014-01-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and its receptor, TrkB, are critical components of the neural circuitry controlling appetite and body weight. Diminished BDNF signaling in mice results in severe hyperphagia and obesity. In humans, BDNF haploinsufficiency and the functional Bdnf Val66Met polymorphism have been linked to elevated food intake and body weight. The mechanisms underlying this dysfunction are poorly defined. We demonstrate a chief role of α2δ-1, a calcium channel subunit and thrombospondin receptor, in triggering overeating in mice with central BDNF depletion. We show reduced α2δ-1 cell-surface expression in the BDNF mutant ventromedial hypothalamus (VMH), an energy balance-regulating center. This deficit contributes to the hyperphagia exhibited by BDNF mutant mice because selective inhibition of α2δ-1 by gabapentin infusion into wild-type VMH significantly increases feeding and body weight gain. Importantly, viral-mediated α2δ-1 rescue in BDNF mutant VMH significantly mitigates their hyperphagia, obesity, and liver steatosis and normalizes deficits in glucose homeostasis. Whole-cell recordings in BDNF mutant VMH neurons revealed normal calcium currents but reduced frequency of EPSCs. These results suggest calcium channel-independent effects of α2δ-1 on feeding and implicate α2δ-1–thrombospondin interactions known to facilitate excitatory synapse assembly. Our findings identify a central mechanism mediating the inhibitory effects of BDNF on feeding. They also demonstrate a novel and critical role for α2δ-1 in appetite control and suggest a mechanism underlying weight gain in humans treated with gabapentinoid drugs. PMID:24403154

  5. Divergent responses to thermogenic stimuli in BAT and subcutaneous adipose tissue from interleukin 18 and interleukin 18 receptor 1-deficient mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pazos, Patricia; Lima, Luis; Tovar, Sulay; González-Touceda, David; Diéguez, Carlos; García, María C

    2015-12-10

    Brown and beige adipocytes recruitment in brown (BAT) or white adipose tissue, mainly in the inguinal fat pad (iWAT), meet the need for temperature adaptation in cold-exposure conditions and protect against obesity in face of hypercaloric diets. Using interleukin18 (Il18) and Il18 receptor 1- knockout (Il18r1-KO) mice, this study aimed to investigate the role of IL18 signaling in BAT and iWAT activation and thermogenesis under both stimuli. Il18-KO, extremely dietary obesity-prone as previously described, failed to develop diet-induced thermogenesis as assessed by BAT and iWAT Ucp1 mRNA levels. Overweight when fed standard chow but not HFD, HFD-fed Il18r1-KO mice exhibited increased iWAT Ucp1 gene expression. Energy expenditure was reduced in pre-obese Il18r1-KO mice and restored upon HFD-challenge. Cold exposure lead to similar results; Il18r1-KO mice were protected against acute body temperature drop, displaying a more brown-like structure, alternative macrophage activation and thermogenic gene expression in iWAT than WT controls. Opposite effects were observed in Il18-KO mice. Thus, Il18 and Il18r1 genetic ablation disparate effects on energy homeostasis are likely mediated by divergent BAT responses to thermogenic stimuli as well as iWAT browning. These results suggest that a more complex receptor-signaling system mediates the IL18 adipose-tissue specific effects in energy expenditure.

  6. Wake-promoting effects of ONO-4127Na, a prostaglandin DP1 receptor antagonist, in hypocretin/orexin deficient narcoleptic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagawa, Yohei; Sato, Masatoshi; Sakai, Noriaki; Chikahisa, Sachiko; Chiba, Shintaro; Maruyama, Takashi; Yamamoto, Junki; Nishino, Seiji

    2016-11-01

    Prostaglandin (PG)D2 is an endogenous sleep substance, and a series of animal studies reported that PGD2 or PGD2 receptor (DP1) agonists promote sleep, while DP1 antagonists promote wakefulness. This suggests the possibility of use of PG DP1 antagonists as wake-promoting compounds. We therefore evaluated the wake-promoting effects of ONO-4127Na, a DP1 antagonist, in a mouse model of narcolepsy (i.e., orexin/ataxin-3 transgenic mice) and compared those to effects of modafinil. ONO-4127Na perfused in the basal forebrain (BF) area potently promoted wakefulness in both wild type and narcoleptic mice, and the wake-promoting effects of ONO-4127Na at 2.93 × 10(-4) M roughly corresponded to those of modafinil at 100 mg/kg (p.o.). The wake promoting effects of ONO-4127Na was observed both during light and dark periods, and much larger effects were seen during the light period when mice slept most of the time. ONO-4127Na, when perfused in the hypothalamic area, had no effects on sleep. We further demonstrated that wake-promoting effects of ONO-4127Na were abolished in DP1 KO mice, confirming that the wake-promoting effect of ONO-4127Na is mediated by blockade of the PG DP1 receptors located in the BF area. ONO-4127Na reduced DREM, an EEG/EMG assessment of behavioral cataplexy in narcoleptic mice, suggesting that ONO-4127Na is likely to have anticataplectic effects. DP1 antagonists may be a new class of compounds for the treatment of narcolepsy-cataplexy, and further studies are warranted. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Research Home / < Back To Health Topics / Iron-Deficiency Anemia Iron-Deficiency Anemia Also known as Leer en español Iron-deficiency ... iron-deficiency anemia. Blood tests to screen for iron-deficiency anemia To screen for iron-deficiency anemia, your doctor ...

  8. Iron deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schou, Morten; Bosselmann, Helle; Gaborit, Freja

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Both iron deficiency (ID) and cardiovascular biomarkers are associated with a poor outcome in heart failure (HF). The relationship between different cardiovascular biomarkers and ID is unknown, and the true prevalence of ID in an outpatient HF clinic is probably overlooked. OBJECTIVES.......043). CONCLUSION: ID is frequent in an outpatient HF clinic. ID is not associated with cardiovascular biomarkers after adjustment for traditional confounders. Inflammation, but not neurohormonal activation is associated with ID in systolic HF. Further studies are needed to understand iron metabolism in elderly HF...

  9. Mangifera indica L. extract (Vimang®) reduces plasma and liver cholesterol and leucocyte oxidative stress in hypercholesterolemic LDL receptor deficient mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorighello, Gabriel G; Inada, Natália M; Paim, Bruno A; Pardo-Andreu, Gilberto L; Vercesi, Anibal E; Oliveira, Helena C F

    2018-06-01

    Cardiovascular diseases are major causes of death worldwide. Beyond the classical cholesterol risk factor, other conditions such as oxidative stress are well documented to promote atherosclerosis. The Mangifera indica L. extract (Vimang®) was reported to present antioxidant and hypocholesterolemic properties. Thus, here we evaluate the effects of Vimang treatment on risk factors of the atherosclerosis prone model of familial hypercholesterolemia, the LDL receptor knockout mice. Mice were treated with Vimang during 2 weeks and were fed a cholesterol-enriched diet during the second week. The Vimang treated mice presented significantly reduced levels of plasma (15%) and liver (20%) cholesterol, increased plasma total antioxidant capacity (10%) and decreased reactive oxygen species (ROS) production by spleen mononuclear cells (50%), P Vimang treated mice. Therefore, in this study we demonstrated that Vimang has protective effects on systemic and tissue-specific risk factors, but it is not sufficient to promote a reduction in the initial steps of atherosclerosis development. In addition, we disclosed a new antioxidant target of Vimang, the spleen mononuclear cells that might be relevant for more advanced stages of atherosclerosis. © 2018 International Federation for Cell Biology.

  10. A large increase of sour taste receptor cells in Skn-1-deficient mice does not alter the number of their sour taste signal-transmitting gustatory neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeda, Naohiro; Narukawa, Masataka; Ishimaru, Yoshiro; Yamamoto, Kurumi; Misaka, Takumi; Abe, Keiko

    2017-05-01

    The connections between taste receptor cells (TRCs) and innervating gustatory neurons are formed in a mutually dependent manner during development. To investigate whether a change in the ratio of cell types that compose taste buds influences the number of innervating gustatory neurons, we analyzed the proportion of gustatory neurons that transmit sour taste signals in adult Skn-1a -/- mice in which the number of sour TRCs is greatly increased. We generated polycystic kidney disease 1 like 3-wheat germ agglutinin (pkd1l3-WGA)/Skn-1a +/+ and pkd1l3-WGA/Skn-1a -/- mice by crossing Skn-1a -/- mice and pkd1l3-WGA transgenic mice, in which neural pathways of sour taste signals can be visualized. The number of WGA-positive cells in the circumvallate papillae is 3-fold higher in taste buds of pkd1l3-WGA/Skn-1a -/- mice relative to pkd1l3-WGA/Skn-1a +/+ mice. Intriguingly, the ratio of WGA-positive neurons to P2X 2 -expressing gustatory neurons in nodose/petrosal ganglia was similar between pkd1l3-WGA/Skn-1a +/+ and pkd1l3-WGA/Skn-1a -/- mice. In conclusion, an alteration in the ratio of cell types that compose taste buds does not influence the number of gustatory neurons that transmit sour taste signals. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  11. Averrhoa carambola free phenolic extract ameliorates nonalcoholic hepatic steatosis by modulating mircoRNA-34a, mircoRNA-33 and AMPK pathways in leptin receptor-deficient db/db mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Daorui; You, Lijun; Zhou, Lin; Li, Tong; Zheng, Bisheng; Liu, Rui Hai

    2017-12-13

    The objective of the present study is to investigate the hepatic steatosis relieving effect of Averrhoa carambola free phenolic extract (ACF) on leptin receptor-deficient (db/db) mice and elucidate the modulation hepatic lipogenesis mechanisms. The serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST) assays, accompanying hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) staining, were applied to identify the alleviation of liver histopathological changes. Serum and hepatic lipid assays, combined with oil red O staining, were used to investigate the amelioration of lipid accumulation. Further assessments by quantitative real-time PCR and western blot assays were used to elucidate the suppression of the fatty acid and triglyceride (TG) synthesis mechanisms underlying ACF protection. These results indicated that ACF treatment significantly reduced the liver TG of db/db mice (p < 0.05). The mechanisms are partly through phosphorylation of AMPK α and down-regulation of SREBP-1c expression, and further down-regulation of FAS and SCD1 (p < 0.05). In addition, the expression levels of mircoRNA-34a and mircoRNA-33, which modulate this signaling pathway, were significantly down-regulated by ACF treatment (p < 0.05). Collectively, these results revealed that ACF exhibited a potent hepatic steatosis relieving effect partly by inhibiting the signal transduction of hepatic lipogenesis.

  12. Angiotensin II accelerates functional recovery in the rat sciatic nerve in vivo: role of the AT2 receptor and the transcription factor NF-kappaB.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinecke, Kirstin; Lucius, Ralph; Reinecke, Alexander; Rickert, Uta; Herdegen, Thomas; Unger, Thomas

    2003-11-01

    The AT2 receptor regulates several functions of nerve cells, e.g., ionic fluxes, cell differentiation, and axonal regeneration, but also modulates programmed cell death. We tested the hypothesis that angiotensin II (ANG II) via its AT2 receptor not only promotes regeneration but also functional recovery after sciatic nerve crush in adult rats. ANG II (10(-7), 10(-9), 10(-11) M) applied locally via osmotic minipumps promoted functional recovery with maximal effects after the lowest concentration. The toe spread distance as a parameter for re-innervation after 20 days was significantly (Pelectrical stimulation (return of sensorimotor function) was reduced to 14.6 days vs. 17.9 days in the control group (PSchwann cells. Histological criteria, morphometric analyses, and electron microscopy confirmed the functional data. These results are the first to present direct evidence for an involvement of the AT2 receptor and NF-kappaB in peripheral nerve regeneration.

  13. A small animal peripheral challenge model of yellow fever using interferon-receptor deficient mice and the 17D-204 vaccine strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thibodeaux, Brett A; Garbino, Nina C; Liss, Nathan M; Piper, Joseph; Blair, Carol D; Roehrig, John T

    2012-05-02

    Yellow fever virus (YFV), a member of the genus Flavivirus, is a mosquito-borne pathogen that requires wild-type (wt), virulent strains to be handled at biosafety level (BSL) 3, with HEPA-filtration of room air exhaust (BSL3+). YFV is found in tropical regions of Africa and South America and causes severe hepatic disease and death in humans. Despite the availability of effective vaccines (17D-204 or 17DD), YFV is still responsible for an estimated 200,000 cases of illness and 30,000 deaths annually. Besides vaccination, there are no other prophylactic or therapeutic strategies approved for use in human YF. Current small animal models of YF require either intra-cranial inoculation of YF vaccine to establish infection, or use of wt strains (e.g., Asibi) in order to achieve pathology. We have developed and characterized a BSL2, adult mouse peripheral challenge model for YFV infection in mice lacking receptors for interferons α, β, and γ (strain AG129). Intraperitoneal challenge of AG129 mice with 17D-204 is a uniformly lethal in a dose-dependent manner, and 17D-204-infected AG129 mice exhibit high viral titers in both brain and liver suggesting this infection is both neurotropic and viscerotropic. Furthermore the use of a mouse model permitted the construction of a 59-biomarker multi-analyte profile (MAP) using samples of brain, liver, and serum taken at multiple time points over the course of infection. This MAP serves as a baseline for evaluating novel therapeutics and their effect on disease progression. Changes (4-fold or greater) in serum and tissue levels of pro- and anti-inflammatory mediators as well as other factors associated with tissue damage were noted in AG129 mice infected with 17D-204 as compared to mock-infected control animals. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  14. Sex differences between CRF1 receptor deficient mice following naloxone-precipitated morphine withdrawal in a conditioned place aversion paradigm: implication of HPA axis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan-Antonio García-Carmona

    Full Text Available Extinction period of positive affective memory of drug taking and negative affective memory of drug withdrawal, as well as the different response of men and women might be important for the clinical treatment of drug addiction. We investigate the role of corticotropin releasing factor receptor type one (CRF1R and the different response of male and female mice in the expression and extinction of the aversive memory.We used genetically engineered male and female mice lacking functional CRF1R. The animals were rendered dependent on morphine by intraperitoneally injection of increasing doses of morphine (10-60 mg/kg. Negative state associated with naloxone (1 mg/kg s.c.-precipitated morphine withdrawal was examined by using conditioned place aversion (CPA paradigm. No sex differences for CPA expression were found in wild-type (n = 29 or CRF1R knockout (KO mice (n = 29. However, CRF1R KO mice presented less aversion score than wild-type mice, suggesting that CRF1R KO mice were less responsive than wild-type to continuous associations between drug administration and environmental stimuli. In addition, CPA extinction was delayed in wild-type and CRF1R KO male mice compared with females of both genotypes. The genetic disruption of the CRF1R pathway decreased the period of extinction in males and females suggesting that CRF/CRF1R is implicated in the duration of aversive memory. Our results also showed that the increase in adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH levels observed in wild-type (n = 11 mice after CPA expression, were attenuated in CRF1R KO mice (n = 10. In addition, ACTH returned to the baseline levels in males and females once CPA extinction was finished.These results suggest that, at least, CPA expression is partially due to an increase in plasma ACTH levels, through activation of CRF1R, which can return when CPA extinction is finished.

  15. Convergence of hepcidin deficiency, systemic iron overloading, heme accumulation, and REV-ERBα/β activation in aryl hydrocarbon receptor-elicited hepatotoxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fader, Kelly A.; Nault, Rance [Department of Biochemistry & Molecular Biology, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Institute for Integrative Toxicology, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Kirby, Mathew P.; Markous, Gena [Department of Biochemistry & Molecular Biology, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Matthews, Jason [Department of Nutrition, Institute of Basic Medical Sciences, University of Oslo, Oslo 0316 (Norway); Zacharewski, Timothy R., E-mail: tzachare@msu.edu [Department of Biochemistry & Molecular Biology, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Institute for Integrative Toxicology, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States)

    2017-04-15

    Persistent aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) agonists elicit dose-dependent hepatic lipid accumulation, oxidative stress, inflammation, and fibrosis in mice. Iron (Fe) promotes AhR-mediated oxidative stress by catalyzing reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. To further characterize the role of Fe in AhR-mediated hepatotoxicity, male C57BL/6 mice were orally gavaged with sesame oil vehicle or 0.01–30 μg/kg 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) every 4 days for 28 days. Duodenal epithelial and hepatic RNA-Seq data were integrated with hepatic AhR ChIP-Seq, capillary electrophoresis protein measurements, and clinical chemistry analyses. TCDD dose-dependently repressed hepatic expression of hepcidin (Hamp and Hamp2), the master regulator of systemic Fe homeostasis, resulting in a 2.6-fold increase in serum Fe with accumulating Fe spilling into urine. Total hepatic Fe levels were negligibly increased while transferrin saturation remained unchanged. Furthermore, TCDD elicited dose-dependent gene expression changes in heme biosynthesis including the induction of aminolevulinic acid synthase 1 (Alas1) and repression of uroporphyrinogen decarboxylase (Urod), leading to a 50% increase in hepatic hemin and a 13.2-fold increase in total urinary porphyrins. Consistent with this heme accumulation, differential gene expression suggests that heme activated BACH1 and REV-ERBα/β, causing induction of heme oxygenase 1 (Hmox1) and repression of fatty acid biosynthesis, respectively. Collectively, these results suggest that Hamp repression, Fe accumulation, and increased heme levels converge to promote oxidative stress and the progression of TCDD-elicited hepatotoxicity. - Highlights: • TCDD represses hepatic hepcidin expression, leading to systemic iron overloading. • Dysregulation of heme biosynthesis is consistent with heme and porphyrin accumulation. • Heme-activated REV-ERBα/β repress circadian-regulated hepatic lipid metabolism. • Disruption of iron

  16. Deficiency of the Purinergic Receptor 2X7 Attenuates Nonalcoholic Steatohepatitis Induced by High-Fat Diet: Possible Role of the NLRP3 Inflammasome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Blasetti Fantauzzi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Molecular mechanisms driving transition from simple steatosis to nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH, a critical step in the progression of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD to cirrhosis, are poorly defined. This study aimed at investigating the role of the purinergic receptor 2X7 (PR2X7, through the NLRP3 inflammasome, in the development of NASH. To this end, mice knockout for the Pr2x7 gene (Pr2x7−/− and coeval wild-type (WT mice were fed a high-fat diet (HFD or normal-fat diet for 16 weeks. NAFLD grade and stage were lower in Pr2x7−/− than WT mice, and only 1/7 Pr2x7−/− animals showed evidence of NASH, as compared with 4/7 WT mice. Molecular markers of inflammation, oxidative stress, and fibrosis were markedly increased in WT-HFD mice, whereas no or significantly reduced increments were detected in Pr2x7−/− animals, which showed also decreased modulation of genes of lipid metabolism. Deletion of Pr2x7 gene was associated with blunted or abolished activation of NLRP3 inflammasome and expression of its components, which were induced in liver sinusoidal endothelial cells challenged with appropriate stimuli. These data show that Pr2x7 gene deletion protects mice from HFD-induced NASH, possibly through blunted activation of NLRP3 inflammasome, suggesting that PR2X7 and NLRP3 may represent novel therapeutic targets.

  17. Future accelerators (?)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John Womersley

    2003-08-21

    I describe the future accelerator facilities that are currently foreseen for electroweak scale physics, neutrino physics, and nuclear structure. I will explore the physics justification for these machines, and suggest how the case for future accelerators can be made.

  18. Uptake by J774 macrophages of very-low-density lipoproteins isolated from apoE-deficient mice is mediated by a distinct receptor and stimulated by lipoprotein lipase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hendriks, W.L.; Sman van der - Beer, F. de; Vlijmen, B.J.M. van; Vark, L.C. van; Hofker, M.H.; Havekes, L.M.

    1997-01-01

    Apolipoprotein (apo) E-deficient mice display marked accumulation in the plasma of VLDL deficient in both apoE and apoBl00 but containing apoB48, apoA-1, apoCs, and apoA-IV. Since apoE-deficient mice develop severe atherosclerotic lesions with lipid-laden macrophages, we reasoned that the uptake of

  19. Treatment with the anti-IL-6 receptor antibody attenuates muscular dystrophy via promoting skeletal muscle regeneration in dystrophin-/utrophin-deficient mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wada, Eiji; Tanihata, Jun; Iwamura, Akira; Takeda, Shin'ichi; Hayashi, Yukiko K; Matsuda, Ryoichi

    2017-10-27

    Chronic increases in the levels of the inflammatory cytokine interleukin-6 (IL-6) in serum and skeletal muscle are thought to contribute to the progression of muscular dystrophy. Dystrophin/utrophin double-knockout (dKO) mice develop a more severe and progressive muscular dystrophy than the mdx mice, the most common murine model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). In particular, dKO mice have smaller body sizes and muscle diameters, and develop progressive kyphosis and fibrosis in skeletal and cardiac muscles. As mdx mice and DMD patients, we found that IL-6 levels in the skeletal muscle were significantly increased in dKO mice. Thus, in this study, we aimed to analyze the effects of IL-6 receptor (IL-6R) blockade on the muscle pathology of dKO mice. Male dKO mice were administered an initial injection (200 mg/kg intraperitoneally (i.p.)) of either the anti-IL-6R antibody MR16-1 or an isotype-matched control rat IgG at the age of 14 days, and were then given weekly injections (25 mg/kg i.p.) until 90 days of age. Treatment of dKO mice with the MR16-1 antibody successfully inhibited the IL-6 pathway in the skeletal muscle and resulted in a significant reduction in the expression levels of phosphorylated signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 in the skeletal muscle. Pathologically, a significant increase in the area of embryonic myosin heavy chain-positive myofibers and muscle diameter, and reduced fibrosis in the quadriceps muscle were observed. These results demonstrated the therapeutic effects of IL-6R blockade on promoting muscle regeneration. Consistently, serum creatine kinase levels were decreased. Despite these improvements observed in the limb muscles, degeneration of the diaphragm and cardiac muscles was not ameliorated by the treatment of mice with the MR16-1 antibody. As no adverse effects of treatment with the MR16-1 antibody were observed, our results indicate that the anti-IL-6R antibody is a potential therapy for muscular dystrophy

  20. Heart rate acceleration with GLP-1 receptor agonists in type 2 diabetes patients : an acute and 12-week randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smits, Mark M; Tonneijck, Lennart; Muskiet, Marcel H A; Hoekstra, T.; Kramer, Mark H H; Diamant, Michaela; van Raalte, Daniël H

    OBJECTIVE: To examine mechanisms underlying resting heart rate (RHR) increments of GLP-1 receptor agonists in type 2 diabetes patients. DESIGN: Acute and 12-week randomised, placebo-controlled, double-blind, single-centre, parallel-group trial. METHODS: In total, 57 type 2 diabetes patients

  1. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... To Health Topics / Iron-Deficiency Anemia Iron-Deficiency Anemia Also known as Leer en español Iron-deficiency ... anemia. Blood tests to screen for iron-deficiency anemia To screen for iron-deficiency anemia, your doctor ...

  2. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... To Health Topics / Iron-Deficiency Anemia Iron-Deficiency Anemia Also known as Leer en español Iron-deficiency ... anemia. Blood tests to screen for iron-deficiency anemia To screen for iron-deficiency anemia, your doctor ...

  3. Omega-3 fatty acid deficient male rats exhibit abnormal behavioral activation in the forced swim test following chronic fluoxetine treatment: association with altered 5-HT1A and alpha2A adrenergic receptor expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Able, Jessica A; Liu, Yanhong; Jandacek, Ronald; Rider, Therese; Tso, Patrick; McNamara, Robert K

    2014-03-01

    Omega-3 fatty acid deficiency during development leads to enduing alterations in central monoamine neurotransmission in rat brain. Here we investigated the effects of omega-3 fatty acid deficiency on behavioral and neurochemical responses to chronic fluoxetine (FLX) treatment. Male rats were fed diets with (CON, n = 34) or without (DEF, n = 30) the omega-3 fatty acid precursor alpha-linolenic acid (ALA) during peri-adolescent development (P21-P90). A subset of CON (n = 14) and DEF (n = 12) rats were administered FLX (10 mg/kg/d) through their drinking water for 30 d beginning on P60. The forced swimming test (FST) was initiated on P90, and regional brain mRNA markers of serotonin and noradrenaline neurotransmission were determined. Dietary ALA depletion led to significant reductions in frontal cortex docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, 22:6n-3) composition in DEF (-26%, p = 0.0001) and DEF + FLX (-32%, p = 0.0001) rats. Plasma FLX and norfluoxetine concentrations did not different between FLX-treated DEF and CON rats. During the 15-min FST pretest, DEF + FLX rats exhibited significantly greater climbing behavior compared with CON + FLX rats. During the 5-min test trial, FLX treatment reduced immobility and increased swimming in CON and DEF rats, and only DEF + FLX rats exhibited significant elevations in climbing behavior. DEF + FLX rats exhibited greater midbrain, and lower frontal cortex, 5-HT1A mRNA expression compared with all groups including CON + FLX rats. DEF + FLX rats also exhibited greater midbrain alpha2A adrenergic receptor mRNA expression which was positively correlated with climbing behavior in the FST. These preclinical data demonstrate that low omega-3 fatty acid status leads to abnormal behavioral and neurochemical responses to chronic FLX treatment in male rats. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... you are diagnosed with iron-deficiency anemia. Risk Factors You may have an increased risk for iron- ... iron-deficiency anemia if you have certain risk factors , including pregnancy. To prevent iron-deficiency anemia, your ...

  5. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... to moderate iron-deficiency anemia, or red blood cell transfusion for severe iron-deficiency anemia. You may ... body needs iron to make healthy red blood cells. Iron-deficiency anemia usually develops over time because ...

  6. Vitamin Deficiency Anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... are unique to specific vitamin deficiencies. Folate-deficiency anemia risk factors include: Undergoing hemodialysis for kidney failure. ... the metabolism of folate. Vitamin B-12 deficiency anemia risk factors include: Lack of intrinsic factor. Most ...

  7. Expression of serum insulin-like growth factors, insulin-like growth factor-binding proteins, and the growth hormone-binding protein in heterozygote relatives of Ecuadorian growth hormone receptor deficient patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fielder, P J; Guevara-Aguirre, J; Rosenbloom, A L; Carlsson, L; Hintz, R L; Rosenfeld, R G

    1992-04-01

    Recently, an isolated population of apparent GH-receptor deficient (GHRD) patients has been identified in the Loja province of southern Ecuador. These individuals presented many of the physical and biochemical phenotypes characteristic of Laron-Syndrome and are believed to have a defect in the GH-receptor gene. In this study, we have compared the biochemical phenotypes between the affected individuals and their parents, considered to be obligate heterozygotes for the disorder. Serum GH, insulin-like growth factor I and II (IGF-I and IGF-II) levels were measured by RIA Insulin-like growth factor binding proteins. (IGFBPs) were measured by Western ligand blotting (WLB) of serum samples, following separation by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, and relative quantitation of serum IGFBPs was performed with a scanning laser densitometer. Serum GH-binding protein (GHBP) levels were measured with a ligand-mediated immunofunctional assay using a monoclonal antibody raised against the GHBP. These values were then compared to values obtained from normal, sex-matched adult Ecuadorian controls, to determine if the above parameters were abnormal in the heterozygotes. The serum IGF-I levels of the GHRD patients were less than 13% of control values for adults and 2% for children. However, the IGF-I levels of both the mothers and fathers were not significantly different from that of the control population. The serum IGF-II levels of the GHRD patients were approximately 20% of control values for adults and 12% for the children. The IGF-II levels of the mothers were reduced, but were not significantly different from that of the control population. However, IGF-II levels of the fathers were significantly lower than those of controls (64% of control male levels). WLB analysis of serum IGFBP levels of the affected subjects demonstrated increased IGFBP-2 and decreased IGFBP-3, suggesting an inverse relationship between these IGFBPs. The GHRD patients who had the

  8. Lack of association between autonomously functioning thyroid nodules and germline polymorphisms of the thyrotropin receptor and Gαs genes in a mild to moderate iodine-deficient Caucasian population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vicchio, Teresa Manuela; Giovinazzo, Salvatore; Certo, Rosaria; Cucinotta, Mariapaola; Micali, Carmelo; Baldari, Sergio; Benvenga, Salvatore; Trimarchi, Francesco; Campennì, Alfredo; Ruggeri, Rosaria Maddalena

    2014-07-01

    Mutations of the thyrotropin receptor (TSHR) and/or Gαs gene have been found in a number of, but not all, autonomously functioning thyroid nodules (AFTNs). Recently, in a 15-year-old girl with a hyperfunctioning papillary thyroid carcinoma, we found two somatic and germline single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs): a SNP of the TSHR gene (exon 7, codon 187) and a SNP of Gαs gene (exon 8, codon 185). The same silent SNP of the TSHR gene had been reported in patients with AFTN or familial non-autoimmune hyperthyroidism. No further data about the prevalence of the two SNPs in AFTNs as well as in the general population are available in the literature. To clarify the possible role of these SNPs in predisposing to AFTN. Germline DNA was extracted from blood leukocytes of 115 patients with AFTNs (43 males and 72 females, aged 31-85 years, mean ± SD = 64 ± 13) and 100 sex-matched healthy individuals from the same geographic area, which is marginally iodine deficient. The genotype distribution of the two SNPs was investigated by restriction fragment length polymorphism-polymerase chain reaction. The prevalence of the two SNPs in our study population was low and not different to that found in healthy individuals: 8 % of patients vs. 9 % of controls were heterozygous for the TSHR SNP and 4 % patients vs. 6 % controls were heterozygous for the Gαs SNP. One patient harbored both SNPs. These results suggest that these two SNPs do not confer susceptibility for the development of AFTN.

  9. Electrostatic accelerators

    OpenAIRE

    Hinterberger, F

    2006-01-01

    The principle of electrostatic accelerators is presented. We consider Cockcroft– Walton, Van de Graaff and Tandem Van de Graaff accelerators. We resume high voltage generators such as cascade generators, Van de Graaff band generators, Pelletron generators, Laddertron generators and Dynamitron generators. The speci c features of accelerating tubes, ion optics and methods of voltage stabilization are described. We discuss the characteristic beam properties and the variety of possible beams. We ...

  10. Electrostatic accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Hinterberger, F

    2006-01-01

    The principle of electrostatic accelerators is presented. We consider Cockcroft– Walton, Van de Graaff and Tandem Van de Graaff accelerators. We resume high voltage generators such as cascade generators, Van de Graaff band generators, Pelletron generators, Laddertron generators and Dynamitron generators. The speci c features of accelerating tubes, ion optics and methods of voltage stabilization are described. We discuss the characteristic beam properties and the variety of possible beams. We sketch possible applications and the progress in the development of electrostatic accelerators.

  11. Accelerator development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1975-01-01

    Because the use of accelerated heavy ions would provide many opportunities for new and important studies in nuclear physics and nuclear chemistry, as well as other disciplines, both the Chemistry and Physics Divisions are supporting the development of a heavy-ion accelerator. The design of greatest current interest includes a tandem accelerator with a terminal voltage of approximately 25 MV injecting into a linear accelerator with rf superconducting resonators. This combined accelerator facility would be capable of accelerating ions of masses ranging over the entire periodic table to an energy corresponding to approximately 10 MeV/nucleon. This approach, as compared to other concepts, has the advantages of lower construction costs, lower operating power, 100 percent duty factor, and high beam quality (good energy resolution, good timing resolution, small beam size, and small beam divergence). The included sections describe the concept of the proposed heavy-ion accelerator, and the development program aiming at: (1) investigation of the individual questions concerning the superconducting accelerating resonators; (2) construction and testing of prototype accelerator systems; and (3) search for economical solutions to engineering problems. (U.S.)

  12. Polymorphisms in the P2X7 receptor gene are associated with low lumbar spine bone mineral density and accelerated bone loss in post-menopausal women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gartland, Alison; Skarratt, Kristen K; Hocking, Lynne J

    2012-01-01

    The P2X7 receptor gene (P2RX7) is highly polymorphic with five previously described loss-of-function (LOF) single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP; c.151+1G>T, c.946G>A, c.1096C>G, c.1513A>C and c.1729T>A) and one gain-of-function SNP (c.489C>T). The purpose of this study was to determine whether th...... publication, 11 January 2012; doi:10.1038/ejhg.2011.245....

  13. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Iron-Deficiency Anemia Iron-Deficiency Anemia Also known as Leer en español Iron-deficiency anemia is a ... address the cause of your iron deficiency, such as any underlying bleeding. If undiagnosed or untreated, iron- ...

  14. RECIRCULATING ACCELERATION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    BERG, J.S.; GARREN, A.A.; JOHNSTONE, C.

    2000-01-01

    This paper compares various types of recirculating accelerators, outlining the advantages and disadvantages of various approaches. The accelerators are characterized according to the types of arcs they use: whether there is a single arc for the entire recirculator or there are multiple arcs, and whether the arc(s) are isochronous or non-isochronous

  15. LIBO accelerates

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    The prototype module of LIBO, a linear accelerator project designed for cancer therapy, has passed its first proton-beam acceleration test. In parallel a new version - LIBO-30 - is being developed, which promises to open up even more interesting avenues.

  16. Accelerating Inspire

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2266999

    2017-01-01

    CERN has been involved in the dissemination of scientific results since its early days and has continuously updated the distribution channels. Currently, Inspire hosts catalogues of articles, authors, institutions, conferences, jobs, experiments, journals and more. Successful orientation among this amount of data requires comprehensive linking between the content. Inspire has lacked a system for linking experiments and articles together based on which accelerator they were conducted at. The purpose of this project has been to create such a system. Records for 156 accelerators were created and all 2913 experiments on Inspire were given corresponding MARC tags. Records of 18404 accelerator physics related bibliographic entries were also tagged with corresponding accelerator tags. Finally, as a part of the endeavour to broaden CERN's presence on Wikipedia, existing Wikipedia articles of accelerators were updated with short descriptions and links to Inspire. In total, 86 Wikipedia articles were updated. This repo...

  17. Genetics Home Reference: leptin receptor deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... caused by reduced production of hormones that direct sexual development. Affected individuals experience delayed puberty or do not ... regulating the body's response to hormones that control sexual development, and that this response is affected by LEPR ...

  18. Deletion of vitamin D receptor leads to premature emphysema/COPD by increased matrix metalloproteinases and lymphoid aggregates formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sundar, Isaac K.; Hwang, Jae-Woong [Department of Environmental Medicine, Lung Biology and Disease Program, University of Rochester Medical Center, Box 850, 601 Elmwood Avenue, Rochester, NY 14642 (United States); Wu, Shaoping [Department of Medicine, Gastroenterology and Hepatology Division, University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, NY (United States); Sun, Jun [Department of Medicine, Gastroenterology and Hepatology Division, University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, NY (United States); The Department of Microbiology and Immunology, University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, NY (United States); The James Wilmot Cancer Center, University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, NY (United States); Rahman, Irfan, E-mail: irfan_rahman@urmc.rochester.edu [Department of Environmental Medicine, Lung Biology and Disease Program, University of Rochester Medical Center, Box 850, 601 Elmwood Avenue, Rochester, NY 14642 (United States)

    2011-03-04

    Research highlights: {yields} Vitamin D deficiency is linked to accelerated decline in lung function. {yields} Levels of vitamin D receptor (VDR) are decreased in lungs of patients with COPD. {yields} VDR knock-out mouse showed increased lung inflammation and emphysema. {yields} This was associated with decline in lung function and increased MMPs. {yields} VDR knock-out mouse model is useful for studying the mechanisms of lung diseases. -- Abstract: Deficiency of vitamin D is associated with accelerated decline in lung function. Vitamin D is a ligand for nuclear hormone vitamin D receptor (VDR), and upon binding it modulates various cellular functions. The level of VDR is reduced in lungs of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) which led us to hypothesize that deficiency of VDR leads to significant alterations in lung phenotype that are characteristics of COPD/emphysema associated with increased inflammatory response. We found that VDR knock-out (VDR{sup -/-}) mice had increased influx of inflammatory cells, phospho-acetylation of nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-{kappa}B) associated with increased proinflammatory mediators, and up-regulation of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) MMP-2, MMP-9, and MMP-12 in the lung. This was associated with emphysema and decline in lung function associated with lymphoid aggregates formation compared to WT mice. These findings suggest that deficiency of VDR in mouse lung can lead to an early onset of emphysema/COPD because of chronic inflammation, immune dysregulation, and lung destruction.

  19. Deletion of vitamin D receptor leads to premature emphysema/COPD by increased matrix metalloproteinases and lymphoid aggregates formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sundar, Isaac K.; Hwang, Jae-Woong; Wu, Shaoping; Sun, Jun; Rahman, Irfan

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → Vitamin D deficiency is linked to accelerated decline in lung function. → Levels of vitamin D receptor (VDR) are decreased in lungs of patients with COPD. → VDR knock-out mouse showed increased lung inflammation and emphysema. → This was associated with decline in lung function and increased MMPs. → VDR knock-out mouse model is useful for studying the mechanisms of lung diseases. -- Abstract: Deficiency of vitamin D is associated with accelerated decline in lung function. Vitamin D is a ligand for nuclear hormone vitamin D receptor (VDR), and upon binding it modulates various cellular functions. The level of VDR is reduced in lungs of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) which led us to hypothesize that deficiency of VDR leads to significant alterations in lung phenotype that are characteristics of COPD/emphysema associated with increased inflammatory response. We found that VDR knock-out (VDR -/- ) mice had increased influx of inflammatory cells, phospho-acetylation of nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-κB) associated with increased proinflammatory mediators, and up-regulation of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) MMP-2, MMP-9, and MMP-12 in the lung. This was associated with emphysema and decline in lung function associated with lymphoid aggregates formation compared to WT mice. These findings suggest that deficiency of VDR in mouse lung can lead to an early onset of emphysema/COPD because of chronic inflammation, immune dysregulation, and lung destruction.

  20. FXR-deficiency confers increased susceptibility to torpor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cariou, Bertrand; Bouchaert, Emmanuel; Abdelkarim, Mouaadh; Dumont, Julie; Caron, Sandrine; Fruchart, Jean-Charles; Burcelin, Remy; Kuipers, Folkert; Staels, Bart

    2007-01-01

    The role of the nuclear receptor FXR in adaptive thermogenesis was investigated using FXR-deficient mice. Despite elevated serum bile acid concentrations and increased mRNA expression profiles of thermogenic genes in brown adipose tissue, FXR-deficiency did not alter energy expenditure under basal

  1. FMIT accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Armstrong, D.D.

    1983-01-01

    A 35-MeV 100-mA cw linear accelerator is being designed by Los Alamos for use in the Fusion Materials Irradiation Test (FMIT) Facility. Essential to this program is the design, construction, and evaluation of performance of the accelerator's injector, low-energy beam transport, and radio-frequency quadrupole sections before they are shipped to the facility site. The installation and testing of some of these sections have begun as well as the testing of the rf, noninterceptive beam diagnostics, computer control, dc power, and vacuum systems. An overview of the accelerator systems and the performance to date is given

  2. Electron accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abramyan.

    1981-01-01

    The USSR produces an electron accelerator family of a simple design powered straight from the mains. The specifications are given of accelerators ELITA-400, ELITA-3, ELT-2, TEUS-3 and RIUS-5 with maximum electron energies of 0.3 to 5 MeV, a mean power of 10 to 70 kW operating in both the pulsed and the continuous (TEUS-3) modes. Pulsed accelerators ELITA-400 and ELITA-3 and RIUS-5 in which TESLA resonance transformers are used are characterized by their compact size. (Ha)

  3. Dopamine D1 receptor activation maintains motor coordination in injured rats but does not accelerate the recovery of the motor coordination deficit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avila-Luna, Alberto; Gálvez-Rosas, Arturo; Alfaro-Rodríguez, Alfonso; Reyes-Legorreta, Celia; Garza-Montaño, Paloma; González-Piña, Rigoberto; Bueno-Nava, Antonio

    2018-01-15

    The sensorimotor cortex and the striatum are interconnected by the corticostriatal pathway, suggesting that cortical injury alters the striatal function that is associated with skilled movements and motor learning, which are functions that may be modulated by dopamine (DA). In this study, we explored motor coordination and balance in order to investigate whether the activation of D 1 receptors (D 1 Rs) modulates functional recovery after cortical injury. The results of the beam-walking test showed motor deficit in the injured group at 24, 48 and 96h post-injury, and the recovery time was observed at 192h after cortical injury. In the sham and injured rats, systemic administration of the D 1 R antagonist SCH-23390 (1mg/kg) alone at 24, 48, 96 and 192h significantly (Pmotor deficit, while administration of the D 1 R agonist SKF-38393 alone (2, 3 and 4mg/kg) at 24, 48, 96 and 192h post-injury did not produce a significant difference; however, the co-administration of SKF-38393 and SCH-23390 prevented the antagonist-induced increase in the motor deficit. The cortical+striatal injury showed significantly increased the motor deficit at 24, 48, 96 and 192h post-injury (Pmotor recovery, but the activation of D 1 Rs maintained motor coordination, confirming that an intact striatum may be necessary for achieving recovery. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Horizontal Accelerator

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Horizontal Accelerator (HA) Facility is a versatile research tool available for use on projects requiring simulation of the crash environment. The HA Facility is...

  5. Acceleration theorems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palmer, R.

    1994-06-01

    Electromagnetic fields can be separated into near and far components. Near fields are extensions of static fields. They do not radiate, and they fall off more rapidly from a source than far fields. Near fields can accelerate particles, but the ratio of acceleration to source fields at a distance R, is always less than R/λ or 1, whichever is smaller. Far fields can be represented as sums of plane parallel, transversely polarized waves that travel at the velocity of light. A single such wave in a vacuum cannot give continuous acceleration, and it is shown that no sums of such waves can give net first order acceleration. This theorem is proven in three different ways; each method showing a different aspect of the situation

  6. LINEAR ACCELERATOR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christofilos, N.C.; Polk, I.J.

    1959-02-17

    Improvements in linear particle accelerators are described. A drift tube system for a linear ion accelerator reduces gap capacity between adjacent drift tube ends. This is accomplished by reducing the ratio of the diameter of the drift tube to the diameter of the resonant cavity. Concentration of magnetic field intensity at the longitudinal midpoint of the external sunface of each drift tube is reduced by increasing the external drift tube diameter at the longitudinal center region.

  7. Addition of hydrochlorothiazide to angiotensin receptor blocker therapy can achieve a lower sodium balance with no acceleration of intrarenal renin angiotensin system in patients with chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuwa, Daisuke; Fukuda, Michio; Ogiyama, Yoshiaki; Sato, Ryo; Mizuno, Masashi; Miura, Toshiyuki; Abe-Dohmae, Sumiko; Michikawa, Makoto; Kobori, Hiroyuki; Ohte, Nobuyuki

    2016-01-01

    Angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs) produce a lower sodium (Na) balance, and the natriuretic effect is enhanced under Na deprivation, despite falls in blood pressure (BP) and glomerular filtration rate (GFR). The effect of additional hydrochlorothiazide (HCTZ; 12.5 mg/day) to ARB treatment (valsartan; 80 mg/day) on glomerulotubular Na balance was evaluated in 23 patients with chronic kidney disease. Add-on HCTZ decreased GFR, tubular Na load, and tubular Na reabsorption (t(Na)), although 24-hour urinary Na excretion (U(Na)V) remained constant. Daily urinary angiotensinogen excretion (U(AGT)V, 152±10→82±17 μg/g Cre) reduced (p=0.02). Changes in tubular Na load (r(2)=0.26) and t(Na) (r(2)=0.25) correlated with baseline 24-hour U(AGT)V. Changes in filtered Na load correlated with changes in nighttime systolic BP (r(2)=0.17), but not with changes in daytime systolic BP. The change in the t(Na) to filtered Na load ratio was influenced by the change in daytime U(Na)V (β=-0.67, F=16.8), rather than the change in nighttime U(Na)V. Lower Na balance was produced by add-on HCTZ to ARB treatment without an increase of intra-renal renin-angiotensin system activity, leading to restoration of nocturnal hypertension. A further study is needed to demonstrate that the reduction of U(AGT)V by additional diuretics to ARBs prevents the progression of nephropathy or cardiovascular events. © The Author(s) 2016.

  8. The Role of (BETA)-Catenin in Androgen Receptor Signaling

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bhowmick, Neil A

    2006-01-01

    .... Our preliminary data seem indicate stromally derived paracrine Wnt family members activate theepithelial frizzled receptor to enable prostate epithelial survival in an androgen deficient environment...

  9. Suppression of WIF-1 through promoter hypermethylation causes accelerated proliferation of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) overexpressing MCF10AT1 breast cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Dalei; Wong, Patrick; Li, Wen; Vogel, Christoph F.; Matsumura, Fumio

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → 5-Aza-2'-deoxycytidine (AZ) causes proliferation suppression and ERα recovery. → AZ down-regulates Wnt/β-catenin pathway mainly by increasing WIF-1 expression. → Both ERα and AhR have some effects on DNA methylation in breast cancer cells. → Artificial overexpression of ERα in ER negative cells increases WIF-1 expression. → WIF-1 promoter hypermethylation is one of the major causes for accelerated proliferation. -- Abstract: The cause for increased cell proliferation in AHR overexpressing breast cancer cells still remains unknown. Here we studied the molecular basis of aggressive cell proliferation of an AHR overexpressing and ERα functionally down-regulated MCF10AT1 cell line, designated as P20E, in comparison to a matched sub-line, P20C with normal AHR expression and ERα function. We found that a 4-day treatment of P20E cells with 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine (AZ) caused a significant suppression of cell proliferation. Such an effect of AZ was accompanied with the significant recovery of ERα function. Among diagnostic markers of AZ-induced cellular changes we found conspicuous up-regulation of mRNA expression of Wnt inhibitory factor-1 (WIF-1), particularly in P20E. The possibility of AZ-induced demethylation on the promoter of WIF-1 gene was confirmed through methylation specific PCR assay. Such AZ-induced changes in P20E cells were also accompanied with the decrease in the binding of nuclear proteins to the 32 P labeled TRE (TCF response element) and the reduced accumulation of β-catenin protein in the cell nucleus, indicating the importance of Wnt/β-catenin pathway in maintaining the increased cell proliferation in P20E line over P20C line. The importance of WIF-1 in this regard has been validated by transfecting cells with siRNA against WIF-1, which caused an increase in cell proliferation. Moreover, artificial overexpression of ERα in both P20E as well as MDA-MB-231 cells increased the mRNA expression of WIF-1. Together these

  10. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... fatigue or tiredness, shortness of breath, or chest pain. If your doctor diagnoses you with iron-deficiency ... Common symptoms of iron-deficiency anemia include: Chest pain Coldness in the hands and feet Difficulty concentrating ...

  11. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... heart failure . Increased risk of infections Motor or cognitive development delays in children Pregnancy complications, such as ... for iron-deficiency anemia. Learn about exciting research areas that NHLBI is exploring about iron-deficiency anemia. ...

  12. Factor VII deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000548.htm Factor VII deficiency To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Factor VII (seven) deficiency is a disorder caused by a ...

  13. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... deficiency anemia can cause serious complications, including heart failure and development delays in children. Explore this Health ... lead to iron-deficiency anemia include: End-stage kidney failure, where there is blood loss during dialysis. ...

  14. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... for iron-deficiency anemia. Lifestyle habits Certain lifestyle habits may increase your risk for iron-deficiency anemia, including: Vegetarian or vegan eating patterns. Not eating enough iron-rich foods, such ...

  15. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... deficiency anemia can cause serious complications, including heart failure and development delays in children. Explore this Health ... to iron-deficiency anemia include: End-stage kidney failure, where there is blood loss during dialysis. People ...

  16. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... view the colon directly. What if my doctor thinks something else is causing my iron-deficiency anemia? ... deficiency anemia early in life affects later behavior, thinking, and mood during adolescence. Treating anemia in premature ...

  17. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... mg and women need 18 mg. After age 51, both men and women need 8 mg. Pregnant ... for iron-deficiency anemia. Learn about exciting research areas that NHLBI is exploring about iron-deficiency anemia. ...

  18. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... iron-deficiency anemia. These conditions include: Intestinal and digestive conditions, such as celiac disease; inflammatory bowel diseases, ... iron-deficiency anemia , such as bleeding in the digestive or urinary tract or heavy menstrual bleeding, your ...

  19. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... conditions that can cause iron-deficiency anemia. Blood tests to screen for iron-deficiency anemia To screen ... the size of your liver and spleen. Blood tests Based on results from blood tests to screen ...

  20. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... from developing iron-deficiency anemia. Foods that are good sources of iron include dried beans, dried fruits, eggs, lean red meat, ... signs of iron-deficiency anemia include: Brittle nails ...

  1. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... your doctor may recommend you eat heart-healthy foods or control other conditions that can cause iron-deficiency anemia. Blood tests to screen for iron-deficiency anemia To screen ...

  2. Fire Safety Deficiencies

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — A list of all fire safety deficiencies currently listed on Nursing Home Compare, including the nursing home that received the deficiency, the associated inspection...

  3. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... learning how having iron-deficiency anemia early in life affects later behavior, thinking, and mood during adolescence. ... iron-deficiency anemia in blood donors affects the quality of donated red blood cells, such as how ...

  4. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... iron-deficiency anemia in blood donors affects the quality of donated red blood cells, such as how ... Cells From Iron-deficient Donors: Recovery and Storage Quality. Learn more about participating in a clinical trial . ...

  5. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... leaving cells where it is stored or from being absorbed in the duodenum, the first part of ... treatments for iron-deficiency anemia. Living With After being diagnosed with iron-deficiency anemia, it is important ...

  6. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... if you are diagnosed with iron-deficiency anemia. Risk Factors You may have an increased risk for iron-deficiency anemia because of your age, ... or sex. Age You may be at increased risk for iron deficiency at certain ages: Infants between ...

  7. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Home / < Back To Health Topics / Iron-Deficiency Anemia Iron-Deficiency Anemia Also known as Leer en español ... bleeding Consuming less than recommended daily amounts of iron Iron-deficiency anemia can be caused by getting ...

  8. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Topics News & Resources Intramural Research Home / < Back To Health Topics / Iron-Deficiency Anemia Iron-Deficiency Anemia Also known as Leer ... and symptoms as well as complications from iron-deficiency anemia. Research for Your Health The NHLBI is part of the U.S. Department ...

  9. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... anemia, your doctor may order the following blood tests to diagnose iron-deficiency anemia: Complete blood count (CBC) to ... than normal when viewed under a microscope. Different tests help your doctor diagnose iron-deficiency anemia. In iron-deficiency anemia, blood ...

  10. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... for iron-deficiency anemia if you have certain risk factors , including pregnancy. To prevent iron-deficiency anemia, your doctor may recommend you eat heart-healthy foods or control other conditions that can cause iron-deficiency anemia. ...

  11. Accelerator microanalysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tuniz, C.

    1997-01-01

    Particle accelerators have been developed more than sixty years ago to investigate nuclear and atomic phenomena. A major shift toward applications of accelerators in the study of materials structure and composition in inter-disciplinary projects has been witnessed in the last two decades. The Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO) has developed advanced research programs based on the use of particle and photon beams. Atmospheric pollution problems are investigated at the 3 MV Van de Graff accelerator using ion beam analysis techniques to detect toxic elements in aerosol particles. High temperature superconductor and semiconductor materials are characterised using the recoil of iodine and other heavy ions produced at ANTARES, the 10-MV Tandem accelerator. A heavy-ion microprobe is presently being developed at ANTARES to map elemental concentrations of specific elements with micro-size resolution. An Accelerator mass Spectrometry (AMS) system has been developed at ANSTO for the ultra-sensitive detection of Carbon-14, Iodine-129 and other long-lived radioisotopes. This AMS spectrometer is a key instrument for climate change studies and international safeguards. ANSTO is also managing the Australian Synchrotron Research program based on facilities developed at the Photon Factory (Japan) and at the Advanced Photon Source (USA). Advanced projects in biology, materials chemistry, structural condensed matter and other disciplines are being promoted by a consortium involving Australian universities and research institutions. This paper will review recent advances in the use of particle accelerators, with a particular emphasis on applications developed at ANSTO and related to problems of international concern, such as global environmental change, public health and nuclear proliferation

  12. Carnitine Deficiency and Pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anouk de Bruyn

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We present two cases of carnitine deficiency in pregnancy. In our first case, systematic screening revealed L-carnitine deficiency in the first born of an asymptomatic mother. In the course of her second pregnancy, maternal carnitine levels showed a deficiency as well. In a second case, a mother known with carnitine deficiency under supplementation was followed throughout her pregnancy. Both pregnancies had an uneventful outcome. Because carnitine deficiency can have serious complications, supplementation with carnitine is advised. This supplementation should be continued throughout pregnancy according to plasma concentrations.

  13. Accelerator operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1980-01-01

    This section is concerned with the operation of both the tandem-linac system and the Dynamitron, two accelerators that are used for entirely different research. Developmental activities associated with the tandem and the Dynamitron are also treated here, but developmental activities associated with the superconducting linac are covered separately because this work is a program of technology development in its own right

  14. CNSTN Accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Habbassi, Afifa; Trabelsi, Adel

    2010-01-01

    This project give a big idea about the measurement of the linear accelerator in the CNSTN. During this work we control dose distribution for different product. For this characterisation we have to make an installation qualification ,operational qualification,performance qualification and of course for every step we have to control temperature and the dose ,even the distribution of the last one.

  15. Accelerators course

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva HR-RFA; Métral, E

    2006-01-01

    1a) Introduction and motivation 1b) History and accelerator types 2) Transverse beam dynamics 3a) Longitudinal beam dynamics 3b) Figure of merit of a synchrotron/collider 3c) Beam control 4) Main limiting factors 5) Technical challenges

  16. Accelerator operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1979-01-01

    Operations of the SuperHILAC, the Bevatron/Bevalac, and the 184-inch Synchrocyclotron during the period from October 1977 to September 1978 are discussed. These include ion source development, accelerator facilities, the Heavy Ion Spectrometer System, and Bevelac biomedical operations

  17. Accelerator update

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1995-01-01

    When the Accelerator Conference, combined International High Energy and US Particle versions, held in Dallas in May, was initially scheduled, progress nearby for the US Superconducting Supercollider was high on the preliminary agenda. With the SSC voted down by Congress in October 1993, this was no longer the case. However the content of the meeting, in terms of both its deep implications for ambitious new projects and the breadth of its scope, showed that the worldwide particle accelerator field is far from being moribund. A traditional feature of such accelerator conferences is the multiplicity of parallel sessions. No one person can attend all sessions, so that delegates can follow completely different paths and emerge with totally different impressions. Despite this overload, and despite the SSC cancellation, the general picture is one of encouraging progress over a wide range of major new projects throughout the world. At the same time, spinoff from, and applications of, accelerators and accelerator technology are becoming increasingly important. Centrestage is now CERN's LHC proton-proton collider, where a test string of superconducting magnets is operating over long periods at the nominal LHC field of 8.36 tesla or more. The assignment of the underground areas in the existing 27- kilometre LEP tunnel is now quasidefinitive (see page 3). For CERN's existing big machine, the LEP electron-positron collider, ongoing work concentrates on boosting performance using improved optics and bunch trains. But the main objective is the LEP2 scheme using superconducting accelerating cavities to boost the beam energy (see page 6). After some initial teething problems, production and operation of these cavities appears to have been mastered, at least under test conditions. A highlight at CERN last year was the first run with lead ions (December 1994, page 15). Handling these heavy particles with systems originally designed for protons calls for ingenuity. The SPS

  18. Accelerator update

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    1995-09-15

    When the Accelerator Conference, combined International High Energy and US Particle versions, held in Dallas in May, was initially scheduled, progress nearby for the US Superconducting Supercollider was high on the preliminary agenda. With the SSC voted down by Congress in October 1993, this was no longer the case. However the content of the meeting, in terms of both its deep implications for ambitious new projects and the breadth of its scope, showed that the worldwide particle accelerator field is far from being moribund. A traditional feature of such accelerator conferences is the multiplicity of parallel sessions. No one person can attend all sessions, so that delegates can follow completely different paths and emerge with totally different impressions. Despite this overload, and despite the SSC cancellation, the general picture is one of encouraging progress over a wide range of major new projects throughout the world. At the same time, spinoff from, and applications of, accelerators and accelerator technology are becoming increasingly important. Centrestage is now CERN's LHC proton-proton collider, where a test string of superconducting magnets is operating over long periods at the nominal LHC field of 8.36 tesla or more. The assignment of the underground areas in the existing 27- kilometre LEP tunnel is now quasidefinitive (see page 3). For CERN's existing big machine, the LEP electron-positron collider, ongoing work concentrates on boosting performance using improved optics and bunch trains. But the main objective is the LEP2 scheme using superconducting accelerating cavities to boost the beam energy (see page 6). After some initial teething problems, production and operation of these cavities appears to have been mastered, at least under test conditions. A highlight at CERN last year was the first run with lead ions (December 1994, page 15). Handling these heavy particles with systems originally designed for protons calls for ingenuity. The SPS has managed

  19. Developmental vitamin D deficiency alters MK-801-induced behaviours in adult offspring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kesby, James P; O'Loan, Jonathan C; Alexander, Suzanne; Deng, Chao; Huang, Xu-Feng; McGrath, John J; Eyles, Darryl W; Burne, Thomas H J

    2012-04-01

    Developmental vitamin D (DVD) deficiency is a candidate risk factor for developing schizophrenia in humans. In rodents DVD deficiency induces subtle changes in the way the brain develops. This early developmental insult leads to select behavioural changes in the adult, such as an enhanced response to amphetamine-induced locomotion in female DVD-deficient rats but not in male DVD-deficient rats and an enhanced locomotor response to the N-methyl-D: -aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist, MK-801, in male DVD-deficient rats. However, the response to MK-801-induced locomotion in female DVD-deficient rats is unknown. Therefore, the aim of the current study was to further examine this behavioural finding in male and female rats and assess NMDA receptor density. DVD-deficient Sprague Dawley rats were assessed for locomotion, ataxia, acoustic startle response (ASR) and prepulse inhibition (PPI) of the ASR to multiple doses of MK-801. The NMDA receptor density in relevant brain regions was assessed in a drug-naive cohort. DVD deficiency increased locomotion in response to MK-801 in both sexes. DVD-deficient rats also showed an enhanced ASR compared with control rats, but PPI was normal. Moreover, DVD deficiency decreased NMDA receptor density in the caudate putamen of both sexes. These results suggest that a transient prenatal vitamin D deficiency has a long-lasting effect on NMDA-mediated signalling in the rodent brain and may be a plausible candidate risk factor for schizophrenia and other neuropsychiatric disorders.

  20. Omega-3 Fatty Acid Deficient Male Rats Exhibit Abnormal Behavioral Activation in the Forced Swim Test Following Chronic Fluoxetine Treatment: Association with Altered 5-HT1A and Alpha2A Adrenergic Receptor Expression

    OpenAIRE

    Able, Jessica A.; Liu, Yanhong; Jandacek, Ronald; Rider, Therese; Tso, Patrick; McNamara, Robert K.

    2013-01-01

    Omega-3 fatty acid deficiency during development leads to enduing alterations in central monoamine neurotransmission in rat brain. Here we investigated the effects of omega-3 fatty acid deficiency on behavioral and neurochemical responses to chronic fluoxetine (FLX) treatment. Male rats were fed diets with (CON, n=34) or without (DEF, n=30) the omega-3 fatty acid precursor alpha-linolenic acid (ALA) during peri-adolescent development (P21-P90). A subset of CON (n=14) and DEF (n=12) rats were ...

  1. Accelerating Value Creation with Accelerators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jonsson, Eythor Ivar

    2015-01-01

    and developing the best business ideas and support the due diligence process. Even universities are noticing that the learning experience of the action learning approach is an effective way to develop capabilities and change cultures. Accelerators related to what has historically been associated...

  2. Muscle hypertrophy induced by myostatin inhibition accelerates degeneration in dysferlinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yun-Sil; Lehar, Adam; Sebald, Suzanne; Liu, Min; Swaggart, Kayleigh A; Talbot, C Conover; Pytel, Peter; Barton, Elisabeth R; McNally, Elizabeth M; Lee, Se-Jin

    2015-10-15

    Myostatin is a secreted signaling molecule that normally acts to limit muscle growth. As a result, there is extensive effort directed at developing drugs capable of targeting myostatin to treat patients with muscle loss. One potential concern with this therapeutic approach in patients with muscle degenerative diseases like muscular dystrophy is that inducing hypertrophy may increase stress on dystrophic fibers, thereby accelerating disease progression. To investigate this possibility, we examined the effect of blocking the myostatin pathway in dysferlin-deficient (Dysf(-/-)) mice, in which membrane repair is compromised, either by transgenic expression of follistatin in skeletal muscle or by systemic administration of the soluble form of the activin type IIB receptor (ACVR2B/Fc). Here, we show that myostatin inhibition by follistatin transgene expression in Dysf(-/-) mice results in early improvement in histopathology but ultimately exacerbates muscle degeneration; this effect was not observed in dystrophin-deficient (mdx) mice, suggesting that accelerated degeneration induced by follistatin transgene expression is specific to mice lacking dysferlin. Dysf(-/-) mice injected with ACVR2B/Fc showed significant increases in muscle mass and amelioration of fibrotic changes normally seen in 8-month-old Dysf(-/-) mice. Despite these potentially beneficial effects, ACVR2B/Fc treatment caused increases in serum CK levels in some Dysf(-/-) mice, indicating possible muscle damage induced by hypertrophy. These findings suggest that depending on the disease context, inducing muscle hypertrophy by myostatin blockade may have detrimental effects, which need to be weighed against the potential gains in muscle growth and decreased fibrosis. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press.

  3. Folate Deficiency Could Restrain Decidual Angiogenesis in Pregnant Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanli Li

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The mechanism of birth defects induced by folate deficiency was focused on mainly in fetal development. Little is known about the effect of folate deficiency on the maternal uterus, especially on decidual angiogenesis after implantation which establishes vessel networks to support embryo development. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of folate deficiency on decidual angiogenesis. Serum folate levels were measured by electrochemiluminescence. The status of decidual angiogenesis was examined by cluster designation 34 (CD34 immunohistochemistry and the expression of angiogenic factors, including vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGFA, placental growth factor (PLGF, and VEGF receptor 2 (VEGFR2 were also tested. Serum levels of homocysteine (Hcy, follicle stimulating hormone (FSH, luteinizing hormone (LH, prolactin (PRL, progesterone (P4, and estradiol (E2 were detected by Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The folate-deficient mice had a lower folate level and a higher Hcy level. Folate deficiency restrained decidual angiogenesis with significant abnormalities in vascular density and the enlargement and elongation of the vascular sinus. It also showed a reduction in the expressions of VEGFA, VEGFR2, and PLGF. In addition, the serum levels of P4, E2, LH, and PRL were reduced in folate-deficient mice, and the expression of progesterone receptor (PR and estrogen receptor α (ERα were abnormal. These results indicated that folate deficiency could impaire decidual angiogenesis and it may be related to the vasculotoxic properties of Hcy and the imbalance of the reproductive hormone.

  4. Role of transcription factor Sp1 and RNA binding protein HuR in the downregulation of Dr+ Escherichia coli receptor protein decay accelerating factor (DAF or CD55) by nitric oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banadakoppa, Manu; Liebenthal, Daniel; Nowak, David E; Urvil, Petri; Yallampalli, Uma; Wilson, Gerald M; Kishor, Aparna; Yallampalli, Chandra

    2013-02-01

    We previously reported that nitric oxide (NO) reduces the rate of bacteremia and maternal mortality in pregnant rats with uterine infection by Escherichia coli expressing the Dr Fimbria (Dr(+) ). The epithelial invasion of Dr(+) E. coli is dependent on the expression level of its cellular receptor decay accelerating factor (DAF). NO reduces the rate of bacteremia by downregulating the expression of DAF. In this study, we elucidated the role of transcription factor Sp1 and RNA binding protein HuR in the downregulation of human DAF by NO. We generated a series of deletion mutant constructs of DAF gene 5'-untranslated region and mapped the NO-response region upstream to the core promoter region of the DAF gene. One of the several Sp1 binding sites in the DAF 5'-untranslated region was located within the NO-response region. The binding of Sp1 to this site was inhibited by NO. Furthermore, NO also promoted the degradation of DAF mRNA. The 3'-untranslated region of DAF harbors an AU-rich element and this element destabilized the mRNA transcript. NO promoted the rapid degradation of DAF mRNA by inhibiting the binding of mRNA stabilizing protein HuR to this AU-rich region. The inhibition of binding of HuR to the AU-rich region was due to the S-nitrosylation of one or more cysteine residues by NO. Thus, these data reveal the molecular mediators of transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation of DAF by NO with implications in pathophysiology related to DAF. © 2012 The Authors Journal compilation © 2012 FEBS.

  5. Laser acceleration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tajima, T.; Nakajima, K.; Mourou, G.

    2017-02-01

    The fundamental idea of Laser Wakefield Acceleration (LWFA) is reviewed. An ultrafast intense laser pulse drives coherent wakefield with a relativistic amplitude robustly supported by the plasma. While the large amplitude of wakefields involves collective resonant oscillations of the eigenmode of the entire plasma electrons, the wake phase velocity ˜ c and ultrafastness of the laser pulse introduce the wake stability and rigidity. A large number of worldwide experiments show a rapid progress of this concept realization toward both the high-energy accelerator prospect and broad applications. The strong interest in this has been spurring and stimulating novel laser technologies, including the Chirped Pulse Amplification, the Thin Film Compression, the Coherent Amplification Network, and the Relativistic Mirror Compression. These in turn have created a conglomerate of novel science and technology with LWFA to form a new genre of high field science with many parameters of merit in this field increasing exponentially lately. This science has triggered a number of worldwide research centers and initiatives. Associated physics of ion acceleration, X-ray generation, and astrophysical processes of ultrahigh energy cosmic rays are reviewed. Applications such as X-ray free electron laser, cancer therapy, and radioisotope production etc. are considered. A new avenue of LWFA using nanomaterials is also emerging.

  6. Laser acceleration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tajima, T.; Nakajima, K.; Mourou, G.

    2017-01-01

    The fundamental idea of LaserWakefield Acceleration (LWFA) is reviewed. An ultrafast intense laser pulse drives coherent wakefield with a relativistic amplitude robustly supported by the plasma. While the large amplitude of wake fields involves collective resonant oscillations of the eigenmode of the entire plasma electrons, the wake phase velocity ∼ c and ultra fastness of the laser pulse introduce the wake stability and rigidity. A large number of worldwide experiments show a rapid progress of this concept realization toward both the high-energy accelerator prospect and broad applications. The strong interest in this has been spurring and stimulating novel laser technologies, including the Chirped Pulse Amplification, the Thin Film Compression, the Coherent Amplification Network, and the Relativistic Mirror Compression. These in turn have created a conglomerate of novel science and technology with LWFA to form a new genre of high field science with many parameters of merit in this field increasing exponentially lately. This science has triggered a number of worldwide research centers and initiatives. Associated physics of ion acceleration, X-ray generation, and astrophysical processes of ultrahigh energy cosmic rays are reviewed. Applications such as X-ray free electron laser, cancer therapy, and radioisotope production etc. are considered. A new avenue of LWFA using nano materials is also emerging.

  7. Accelerating networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, David M D; Onnela, Jukka-Pekka; Johnson, Neil F

    2007-01-01

    Evolving out-of-equilibrium networks have been under intense scrutiny recently. In many real-world settings the number of links added per new node is not constant but depends on the time at which the node is introduced in the system. This simple idea gives rise to the concept of accelerating networks, for which we review an existing definition and-after finding it somewhat constrictive-offer a new definition. The new definition provided here views network acceleration as a time dependent property of a given system as opposed to being a property of the specific algorithm applied to grow the network. The definition also covers both unweighted and weighted networks. As time-stamped network data becomes increasingly available, the proposed measures may be easily applied to such empirical datasets. As a simple case study we apply the concepts to study the evolution of three different instances of Wikipedia, namely, those in English, German, and Japanese, and find that the networks undergo different acceleration regimes in their evolution

  8. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... increased need for iron during growth spurts. Older adults, especially those over age ... athletes. Athletes, especially young females, are at risk for iron deficiency. Endurance ...

  9. Iodine deficiency disorders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ali, S M [Pakistan Council for Science and Technology, Islamabad (Pakistan)

    1994-12-31

    Iodine deficiency (IDD) is one of the common problem in the diet. Iodine deficiency as prevalence of goiter in population occurs in the mountainous areas. There is consensus that 800 million people are at risk of IDD from living in iodine deficient area and 190 million from goiter. Very high prevalence of IDD in different parts of the world are striking. It has generally observed that in iodine-deficient areas about 50% are affected with goiter, 1-5% from cretinsim and 20% from impaired mental and/or mortor function. (A.B.).

  10. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) and Small Business Technology Transfer (STTR) programs. Our ... more information about Donor Iron Deficiency Study - Red Blood Cells ...

  11. Advanced concepts for acceleration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keefe, D.

    1986-07-01

    Selected examples of advanced accelerator concepts are reviewed. Such plasma accelerators as plasma beat wave accelerator, plasma wake field accelerator, and plasma grating accelerator are discussed particularly as examples of concepts for accelerating relativistic electrons or positrons. Also covered are the pulsed electron-beam, pulsed laser accelerator, inverse Cherenkov accelerator, inverse free-electron laser, switched radial-line accelerators, and two-beam accelerator. Advanced concepts for ion acceleration discussed include the electron ring accelerator, excitation of waves on intense electron beams, and two-wave combinations

  12. New insights into iron deficiency and iron deficiency anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camaschella, Clara

    2017-07-01

    Recent advances in iron metabolism have stimulated new interest in iron deficiency (ID) and its anemia (IDA), common conditions worldwide. Absolute ID/IDA, i.e. the decrease of total body iron, is easily diagnosed based on decreased levels of serum ferritin and transferrin saturation. Relative lack of iron in specific organs/tissues, and IDA in the context of inflammatory disorders, are diagnosed based on arbitrary cut offs of ferritin and transferrin saturation and/or marker combination (as the soluble transferrin receptor/ferritin index) in an appropriate clinical context. Most ID patients are candidate to traditional treatment with oral iron salts, while high hepcidin levels block their absorption in inflammatory disorders. New iron preparations and new treatment modalities are available: high-dose intravenous iron compounds are becoming popular and indications to their use are increasing, although long-term side effects remain to be evaluated. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Accelerators and the Accelerator Community

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malamud, Ernest; Sessler, Andrew

    2008-06-01

    In this paper, standing back--looking from afar--and adopting a historical perspective, the field of accelerator science is examined. How it grew, what are the forces that made it what it is, where it is now, and what it is likely to be in the future are the subjects explored. Clearly, a great deal of personal opinion is invoked in this process.

  14. Accelerators and the Accelerator Community

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malamud, Ernest; Sessler, Andrew

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, standing back--looking from afar--and adopting a historical perspective, the field of accelerator science is examined. How it grew, what are the forces that made it what it is, where it is now, and what it is likely to be in the future are the subjects explored. Clearly, a great deal of personal opinion is invoked in this process

  15. Ring accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gisler, G.; Faehl, R.

    1983-01-01

    We present two-dimensional simulations in (r-z) and r-theta) cylinderical geometries of imploding-liner-driven accelerators of rings of charged particles. We address issues of azimuthal and longitudinal stability of the rings. We discuss self-trapping designs in which beam injection and extraction is aided by means of external cusp fields. Our simulations are done with the 2-1/2-D particle-in-cell plasma simulation code CLINER, which combines collisionless, electromagnetic PIC capabilities with a quasi-MHD finite element package

  16. accelerating cavity

    CERN Multimedia

    On the inside of the cavity there is a layer of niobium. Operating at 4.2 degrees above absolute zero, the niobium is superconducting and carries an accelerating field of 6 million volts per metre with negligible losses. Each cavity has a surface of 6 m2. The niobium layer is only 1.2 microns thick, ten times thinner than a hair. Such a large area had never been coated to such a high accuracy. A speck of dust could ruin the performance of the whole cavity so the work had to be done in an extremely clean environment.

  17. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... exploring about iron-deficiency anemia. Read more New treatments for disorders that lead to iron-deficiency anemia. We are ... and other pathways. This could help develop new therapies for conditions that ... behavior, thinking, and mood during adolescence. Treating anemia in ...

  18. Muscle phosphorylase kinase deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Preisler, N; Orngreen, M C; Echaniz-Laguna, A

    2012-01-01

    To examine metabolism during exercise in 2 patients with muscle phosphorylase kinase (PHK) deficiency and to further define the phenotype of this rare glycogen storage disease (GSD).......To examine metabolism during exercise in 2 patients with muscle phosphorylase kinase (PHK) deficiency and to further define the phenotype of this rare glycogen storage disease (GSD)....

  19. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... loss and lead to iron-deficiency anemia. Common causes of blood loss that lead to iron-deficiency anemia include: Bleeding in your GI tract, from an ulcer, colon cancer, or regular use of medicines such as aspirin ...

  20. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... iron-deficiency anemia. Search the NIH Research Portfolio Online Reporting Tools (RePORT) to learn about research that ... iron-deficiency anemia in blood donors affects the quality of donated red blood cells, such as how ...

  1. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... blocks the intestine from taking up iron. Other medical conditions Other medical conditions that may lead to iron-deficiency anemia ... daily amount of iron. If you have other medical conditions that cause iron-deficiency anemia , such as ...

  2. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... anemia if you have certain risk factors , including pregnancy. To prevent iron-deficiency anemia, your doctor may recommend you eat heart-healthy foods or control other conditions that can cause iron-deficiency anemia. Blood tests to screen for ...

  3. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Are you curious about how inflammation from chronic diseases can cause iron-deficiency anemia? Read more When there is ... DBDR) is a leader in research on the causes, prevention, and treatment of blood diseases, including iron-deficiency anemia. Search the NIH Research ...

  4. Nutritional iron deficiency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zimmermann, M.B.; Hurrell, R.F.

    2007-01-01

    Iron deficiency is one of the leading risk factors for disability and death worldwide, affecting an estimated 2 billion people. Nutritional iron deficiency arises when physiological requirements cannot be met by iron absorption from diet. Dietary iron bioavailability is low in populations consuming

  5. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Topics section only, or the News and Resources section. NHLBI Entire Site NHLBI Entire Site Health ... español Iron-deficiency anemia is a common type of anemia that occurs if you do not have enough iron in your body. People with mild or moderate iron-deficiency anemia ...

  6. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... for iron-deficiency anemia. Lifestyle habits Certain lifestyle habits may increase your risk for iron-deficiency anemia, including: Vegetarian or vegan eating patterns. Not eating enough iron-rich foods, such as meat and fish, may result in ...

  7. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... blood cells. Iron-deficiency anemia usually develops over time because your body’s intake of iron is too ... clamping of your newborn’s umbilical cord at the time of delivery. This may help prevent iron-deficiency ...

  8. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... other conditions that can cause iron-deficiency anemia. Blood tests to screen for iron-deficiency anemia To screen ... check the size of your liver and spleen. Blood tests Based on results from blood tests to screen ...

  9. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... also are hoping to determine which iron supplements work best to treat iron-deficiency anemia in children who do not consume the daily recommended amount of iron. Read less Participate in NHLBI Clinical Trials We lead or sponsor many studies related to iron-deficiency anemia. See if you ...

  10. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... en español Iron-deficiency anemia is a common type of anemia that occurs if you do not ... iron-deficiency anemia and help rule out other types of anemia. Treatment will explain treatment-related complications ...

  11. Iron deficiency in childhood

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Uijterschout, L.

    2015-01-01

    Iron deficiency (ID) is the most common micronutrient deficiency in the world. Iron is involved in oxygen transport, energy metabolism, immune response, and plays an important role in brain development. In infancy, ID is associated with adverse effects on cognitive, motor, and behavioral development

  12. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... anemia. Return to Signs, Symptoms, and Complications to review signs and symptoms as well as complications from iron-deficiency ... NIH]) Heavy Menstrual Bleeding (Centers for Disease Control and ... Dietary Supplement Fact Sheet (NIH) Iron-Deficiency Anemia (National Library ...

  13. Iron deficiency anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anemia - iron deficiency ... iron from old red blood cells. Iron deficiency anemia develops when your body's iron stores run low. ... You may have no symptoms if the anemia is mild. Most of the time, ... slowly. Symptoms may include: Feeling weak or tired more often ...

  14. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... be at risk for iron-deficiency anemia. Lifestyle habits Certain lifestyle habits may increase your risk for iron-deficiency anemia, ... you are experiencing side effects such as a bad metallic taste, vomiting, diarrhea, constipation, or upset stomach. ...

  15. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... how we are using current research and advancing research to prevent iron-deficiency anemia. Participate in NHLBI Clinical Trials will explain our ongoing clinical studies that are investigating prevention strategies for iron-deficiency anemia. Signs, Symptoms, and Complications ...

  16. Cosmic ray acceleration mechanisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cesarsky, C.J.

    1982-09-01

    We present a brief summary of some of the most popular theories of cosmic ray acceleration: Fermi acceleration, its application to acceleration by shocks in a scattering medium, and impulsive acceleration by relativistic shocks

  17. Insulin receptors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kahn, C.R.; Harrison, L.C.

    1988-01-01

    This book contains the proceedings on insulin receptors. Part A: Methods for the study of structure and function. Topics covered include: Method for purification and labeling of insulin receptors, the insulin receptor kinase, and insulin receptors on special tissues

  18. The chicken c-erbA alpha-product induces expression of thyroid hormone-responsive genes in 3,5,3'-triiodothyronine receptor-deficient rat hepatoma cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Muñoz, A; Höppner, W; Sap, J

    1990-01-01

    To determine the capacity of the chicken c-erbA (cTR-alpha) gene product in regulating expression of known thyroid hormone-responsive genes, both the cTR-alpha and the viral v-erbA genes were expressed in FAO cells, a rat hepatoma cell line defective for functional thyroid hormone receptors. Upon...

  19. Vitamin B12 deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Green, Ralph; Allen, Lindsay H; Bjørke-Monsen, Anne-Lise

    2017-01-01

    , subclinical deficiency affects between 2.5% and 26% of the general population depending on the definition used, although the clinical relevance is unclear. B12 deficiency can affect individuals at all ages, but most particularly elderly individuals. Infants, children, adolescents and women of reproductive age...... remain debated. Management depends on B12 supplementation, either via high-dose oral routes or via parenteral administration. This Primer describes the current knowledge surrounding B12 deficiency, and highlights improvements in diagnostic methods as well as shifting concepts about the prevalence, causes...

  20. Excitatory amino acid receptors and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meldrum, B S

    1992-08-01

    Recent advances in the molecular biology of excitatory amino acid receptors are reviewed. Evidence that drugs blocking the excitatory action of glutamate at the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) and non-NMDA receptors may be of clinical use in epilepsy, Parkinson's disease, cerebral ischaemia and trauma, acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) encephalopathy and neuropathic pain is summarized.

  1. Gender affects skin wound healing in plasminogen deficient mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birgitte Rønø

    Full Text Available The fibrinolytic activity of plasmin plays a fundamental role in resolution of blood clots and clearance of extravascular deposited fibrin in damaged tissues. These vital functions of plasmin are exploited by malignant cells to accelerate tumor growth and facilitate metastases. Mice lacking functional plasmin thus display decreased tumor growth in a variety of cancer models. Interestingly, this role of plasmin has, in regard to skin cancer, been shown to be restricted to male mice. It remains to be clarified whether gender also affects other phenotypic characteristics of plasmin deficiency or if this gender effect is restricted to skin cancer. To investigate this, we tested the effect of gender on plasmin dependent immune cell migration, accumulation of hepatic fibrin depositions, skin composition, and skin wound healing. Gender did not affect immune cell migration or hepatic fibrin accumulation in neither wildtype nor plasmin deficient mice, and the existing differences in skin composition between males and females were unaffected by plasmin deficiency. In contrast, gender had a marked effect on the ability of plasmin deficient mice to heal skin wounds, which was seen as an accelerated wound closure in female versus male plasmin deficient mice. Further studies showed that this gender effect could not be reversed by ovariectomy, suggesting that female sex-hormones did not mediate the accelerated skin wound healing in plasmin deficient female mice. Histological examination of healed wounds revealed larger amounts of fibrotic scars in the provisional matrix of plasmin deficient male mice compared to female mice. These fibrotic scars correlated to an obstruction of cell infiltration of the granulation tissue, which is a prerequisite for wound healing. In conclusion, the presented data show that the gender dependent effect of plasmin deficiency is tissue specific and may be secondary to already established differences between genders, such as skin

  2. Bicarbonate-sensitive calcification and lifespan of klotho-deficient mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leibrock, Christina B; Voelkl, Jakob; Kohlhofer, Ursula; Quintanilla-Martinez, Leticia; Kuro-O, Makoto; Lang, Florian

    2016-01-01

    Klotho, a protein counteracting aging, is a powerful inhibitor of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 [1,25(OH)2D3] formation and regulator of mineral metabolism. In klotho hypomorphic (kl/kl) mice, excessive 1,25(OH)2D3 formation leads to hypercalcemia, hyperphosphatemia and vascular calcification, severe growth deficits, accelerated aging and early death. Kl/kl mice further suffer from extracellular volume depletion and hypotension, leading to the stimulation of antidiuretic hormone and aldosterone release. A vitamin D-deficient diet, restriction of dietary phosphate, inhibition of mineralocorticoid receptors with spironolactone, and dietary NaCl all extend the lifespan of kl/kl mice. Kl/kl mice suffer from acidosis. The present study explored whether replacement of tap drinking water by 150 mM NaHCO3 affects the growth, tissue calcification, and lifespan of kl/kl mice. As a result, NaHCO3 administration to kl/kl mice did not reverse the growth deficit but substantially decreased tissue calcification and significantly increased the average lifespan from 78 to 127 days. NaHCO3 did not significantly affect plasma concentrations of 1,25(OH)2D3 and Ca(2+) but significantly decreased plasma phosphate concentration and plasma aldosterone concentration. The present study reveals a novel effect of bicarbonate, i.e., a favorable influence on vascular calcification and early death of klotho-deficient mice. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  3. Prostaglandin Receptor Signaling in Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshiyuki Matsuoka

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Prostanoids, consisting of the prostaglandins (PGs and the thromboxanes (TXs, are a group of lipid mediators formed in response to various stimuli. They include PGD2, PGE2, PGF2α, PGI2, and TXA2. They are released outside of the cells immediately after synthesis, and exert their actions by binding to a G-protein coupled rhodopsin-type receptor on the surface of target cells. There are eight types of the prostanoid receptors conserved in mammals from mouse to human. They are the PGD receptor (DP, four subtypes of the PGE receptor (EP1, EP2, EP3, and EP4, the PGF receptor (FP, PGI receptor (IP, and TXA receptor (TP. Recently, mice deficient in each of these prostanoid receptors were generated and subjected to various experimental models of disease. These studies have revealed the roles of PG receptor signaling in various pathological conditions, and suggest that selective manipulation of the prostanoid receptors may be beneficial in treatment of the pathological conditions. Here we review these recent findings of roles of prostanoid receptor signaling and their therapeutic implications.

  4. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... body to absorb iron from the gastrointestinal tract (GI tract). Blood loss When you lose blood, you ... to iron-deficiency anemia include: Bleeding in your GI tract, from an ulcer, colon cancer, or regular ...

  5. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... for gastrointestinal bleeding To see if gastrointestinal bleeding is causing your iron-deficiency anemia, your doctor may order the following procedures to guide treatment . Fecal ...

  6. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... complications, including heart failure and development delays in children. Explore this Health ... red blood cells. Iron-deficiency anemia usually develops over time because your body’s intake of iron ...

  7. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... Supplement Fact Sheet (NIH) Iron-Deficiency Anemia (National Library of Medicine, MedlinePlus) ... Privacy Policy Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) Accessibility Copyright and Usage No FEAR ...

  8. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... our clinical trials . Are you a frequent blood donor living in New York City? This study is looking at how iron-deficiency anemia in blood donors affects the quality of donated red blood cells, ...

  9. Vitamin D Deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to other diseases. In children, it can cause rickets. Rickets is a rare disease that causes the bones ... and children are at higher risk of getting rickets. In adults, severe vitamin D deficiency leads to ...

  10. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... Health and Human Development, we are investigating how best to treat premature newborns with low hemoglobin levels. ... are hoping to determine which iron supplements work best to treat iron-deficiency anemia in children who ...

  11. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... and Strategic Vision Leadership Scientific Divisions Operations and Administration Advisory Committees Budget and Legislative Information Jobs and ... may recommend you eat heart-healthy foods or control other conditions that can cause iron-deficiency anemia. ...

  12. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... iron-deficiency anemia may cause the following complications: Depression Heart problems. If you do not have enough ... these usually go away within a day or two. Red blood cell transfusions. These may be used ...

  13. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... more. Read less Reminders Return to Causes to review how blood loss, not consuming the recommended amount ... iron-deficiency anemia. Return to Risk Factors to review family history, lifestyle, unhealthy environments, or other factors ...

  14. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... same for boys and girls. From birth to 6 months, babies need 0.27 mg of iron. ... for iron deficiency at certain ages: Infants between 6 and 12 months, especially if they are fed ...

  15. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... detect signs of iron-deficiency anemia and help rule out other types of anemia. Treatment will explain ... your blood. More testing may be needed to rule out other types of anemia. Tests for gastrointestinal ...

  16. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... red blood cells, called hemolysis . Hemolysis, in this case, is caused by strong muscle contractions and the ... to prevent iron-deficiency anemia. Participate in NHLBI Clinical Trials will explain our ongoing clinical studies that ...

  17. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... to improve health through research and scientific discovery. Improving health with current research Learn about the following ... deficiency anemia early in life affects later behavior, thinking, and mood during adolescence. Treating anemia in premature ...

  18. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... A-Z Clinical Trials Publications and Resources Health Education and Awareness ... If your doctor diagnoses you with iron-deficiency anemia, your treatment will depend on the cause and severity of the condition. Your ...

  19. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... your blood may be normal even if the total amount of iron in your body is low. ... iron-deficiency anemia in blood donors affects the quality of donated red blood cells, such as how ...

  20. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... interferes with the body’s ability to make hemoglobin. Family history and genetics Von Willebrand disease is an ... deficiency anemia. Return to Risk Factors to review family history, lifestyle, unhealthy environments, or other factors that ...

  1. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... diagnoses you with iron-deficiency anemia, your treatment will depend on the cause and severity of the ... of iron. The recommended daily amounts of iron will depend on your age, sex, and whether you ...

  2. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... from developing iron-deficiency anemia. Foods that are good sources of iron include dried beans, dried fruits, ... iron is needed, such as childhood and pregnancy. Good sources of iron are meat, poultry, fish, and ...

  3. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... A-Z Clinical Trials Publications and Resources Health Education and Awareness The Science Science Home Blood Disorders ... infancy has lasting effects. We are interested in learning how having iron-deficiency anemia early in life ...

  4. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... heart failure . Increased risk of infections Motor or cognitive development delays in children Pregnancy complications, such as ... iron-deficiency anemia may require intravenous (IV) iron therapy or a blood transfusion . Iron supplements Your doctor ...

  5. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... absorb iron and lead to iron-deficiency anemia. These conditions include: Intestinal and digestive conditions, such as ... tract. Inflammation from congestive heart failure or obesity . These chronic conditions can lead to inflammation that may ...

  6. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... Blood Disorders and Blood Safety Sleep Science and Sleep Disorders Lung Diseases Heart and Vascular Diseases Precision Medicine ... prevention and treatment of heart, lung, blood, and sleep disorders, including iron-deficiency anemia. Learn about the current ...

  7. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... iron-deficiency anemia early in life affects later behavior, thinking, and mood during adolescence. Treating anemia in ... Visit Children and Clinical Studies to hear experts, parents, and children talk about their experiences with clinical ...

  8. Factor V deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000550.htm Factor V deficiency To use the sharing features on ... M. is also a founding member of Hi-Ethics and subscribes to the principles of the Health ...

  9. Factor II deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000549.htm Factor II deficiency To use the sharing features on ... M. is also a founding member of Hi-Ethics and subscribes to the principles of the Health ...

  10. Factor X deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000553.htm Factor X deficiency To use the sharing features on ... M. is also a founding member of Hi-Ethics and subscribes to the principles of the Health ...

  11. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... is caused by strong muscle contractions and the impact of feet repeatedly striking the ground, such as ... funding on iron-deficiency anemia. We stimulate high-impact research. Our Trans-Omics for Precision Medicine (TOPMed) ...

  12. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... may be diagnosed with iron-deficiency anemia if you have low iron or ferritin levels in your blood. More testing may be needed to rule out other types of anemia. Tests for gastrointestinal ...

  13. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... for your body to absorb iron from the gastrointestinal tract (GI tract). Blood loss When you lose blood, ... iron deficiency. Endurance athletes lose iron through their gastrointestinal tracts. They also lose iron through the breakdown of ...

  14. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... vegetables. Foods rich in vitamin C, such as oranges, strawberries, and tomatoes, may help increase your absorption ... deficiency anemia, your doctor may recommend erythropoiesis stimulating agents (esa) . These medicines stimulate the bone marrow to ...

  15. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... were born prematurely may be at an even higher risk, as most of a newborn’s iron stores ... men of the same age. Women are at higher risk for iron-deficiency anemia under some circumstances, ...

  16. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... Iron-Deficiency Anemia (National Library of Medicine, MedlinePlus) Building 31 31 Center Drive Bethesda, MD 20892 Learn ... and Usage No FEAR Act Grants and Funding Building 31 31 Center Drive Bethesda, MD 20892 Learn ...

  17. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... may recommend erythropoiesis stimulating agents (esa) . These medicines stimulate the bone marrow to make more red blood ... NHLBI is funding on iron-deficiency anemia. We stimulate high-impact research. Our Trans-Omics for Precision ...

  18. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... tests, especially in infants and small children Heavy menstrual periods Injury or surgery Urinary tract bleeding Consuming ... iron-deficiency anemia from trauma, surgery, or heavy menstrual periods. Individuals with a gene for hemophilia, including ...

  19. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... and naproxen Certain rare genetic conditions such as hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia, which causes bleeding in the bowels ... iron-deficiency anemia may cause the following complications: Depression Heart problems. If you do not have enough ...

  20. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... lead in their blood from their environment or water. Lead interferes with the body’s ability to make ... iron-deficiency anemia in blood donors affects the quality of donated red blood cells, such as how ...

  1. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... also often take other medicines—such as proton pump inhibitors, anticoagulants, or blood thinners—that may cause iron-deficiency anemia. Proton pump inhibitors interfere with iron absorption, and blood thinners ...

  2. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Cells From Iron-deficient Donors: Recovery and Storage Quality. Learn more about participating in a clinical trial . View all trials from ClinicalTrials.gov . Visit Children and Clinical Studies to hear experts, parents, and ...

  3. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... Look for Treatment will discuss medicines and eating pattern changes that your doctors may recommend if you ... iron-deficiency anemia, including: Vegetarian or vegan eating patterns. Not eating enough iron-rich foods, such as ...

  4. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... girls. From birth to 6 months, babies need 0.27 mg of iron. This number goes up ... screen blood donors for low iron stores. Reliable point-of-care testing may help identify iron deficiency ...

  5. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... striking the ground, such as with marathon runners. Sex Girls and women between the ages of 14 ... developing iron-deficiency anemia. Foods that are good sources of iron include dried beans, dried fruits, eggs, ...

  6. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... increase your risk for iron-deficiency anemia, including: Vegetarian or vegan eating patterns. Not eating enough iron- ... factors , such as if you are following a vegetarian eating pattern, your doctor may recommend changes to ...

  7. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... deficiency anemia. Proton pump inhibitors interfere with iron absorption, and blood thinners increase the likelihood of bleeding ... oranges, strawberries, and tomatoes, may help increase your absorption of iron. If you are pregnant, talk to ...

  8. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... screen for iron-deficiency anemia, your doctor may order a blood test called a complete blood count ( ... your risk factors , do a physical exam, or order blood tests or other diagnostic tests. Physical exam ...

  9. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... duodenum, the first part of the small intestine just beyond the stomach. Even if you have enough ... clamping of your newborn’s umbilical cord at the time of delivery. This may help prevent iron-deficiency ...

  10. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... less than 12 g/dl for women is diagnostic of anemia. In iron-deficiency anemia, red blood ... both full-term and preterm infants. Look for Diagnosis will explain tests and procedures that your doctor ...

  11. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... less than 12 g/dl for women is diagnostic of anemia. In iron-deficiency anemia, red blood ... physical exam, or order blood tests or other diagnostic tests. Physical exam Your doctor may ask about ...

  12. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... risk for iron-deficiency anemia, including: Vegetarian or vegan eating patterns. Not eating enough iron-rich foods, ... iron-fortified foods that have iron added. Vegetarian diets can provide enough iron if you choose nonmeat ...

  13. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... bleeding. If undiagnosed or untreated, iron-deficiency anemia can cause serious complications, including heart failure and development ... iron is too low. Low intake of iron can happen because of blood loss, consuming less than ...

  14. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... improved health for people with iron-deficiency anemia. Recipient Epidemiology Donor Studies program findings help to protect blood donors . NHLBI’s Recipient Epidemiology Donor Studies (REDS) program , which began in ...

  15. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... a frequent blood donor living in New York City? This study is looking at how iron-deficiency ... frequently. This study is located in New York City, and is recruiting by invitation only. View more ...

  16. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... to 11 mg for children ages 7 to 12 months, and down to 7 mg for children ... deficiency at certain ages: Infants between 6 and 12 months, especially if they are fed only breast ...

  17. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... in our clinical trials . Are you a frequent blood donor living in New York City? This study is looking at how iron-deficiency anemia in blood donors affects the quality of donated red blood cells, ...

  18. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... iron-deficiency anemia may cause the following complications: Depression Heart problems. If you do not have enough ... prevent complications such as abnormal heart rhythms and depression. Learn the warning signs of serious complications and ...

  19. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... prevent complications such as abnormal heart rhythms and depression. Learn the warning signs of serious complications and ... donors for low iron stores. Reliable point-of-care testing may help identify iron deficiency before potentially ...

  20. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... be at risk for iron-deficiency anemia. Lifestyle habits Certain lifestyle habits may increase your risk for ... Surgery, upper endoscopy or colonoscopy, to stop bleeding. Healthy lifestyle changes To help you meet your daily ...

  1. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... breastfeeding women older than 18 need 9 mg. Problems absorbing iron Even if you consume the recommended ... interested in learning how having iron-deficiency anemia early in life affects later behavior, thinking, and mood ...

  2. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... starch. Restless legs syndrome Shortness of breath Weakness Complications Undiagnosed or untreated iron-deficiency anemia may cause ... as complete blood count and iron studies. Prevent complications over your lifetime To prevent complications from iron- ...

  3. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... you do not have enough iron in your body. People with mild or moderate iron-deficiency anemia ... and where to find more information. Causes Your body needs iron to make healthy red blood cells. ...

  4. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... iron-deficiency anemia. Learn about the current and future NHLBI efforts to improve health through research and ... blood donors. Cardiovascular Health Study identifies predictors of future health problems in older adults. The NHLBI-sponsored ...

  5. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... as most of a newborn’s iron stores are developed during the third trimester of pregnancy. Children between ... This makes it harder to stop bleeding and can increase the risk of iron-deficiency anemia from ...

  6. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... an MCV of less than 80 femtoliters (fL). Prevention strategies If you have certain risk factors , such ... explain our ongoing clinical studies that are investigating prevention strategies for iron-deficiency anemia. Signs, Symptoms, and ...

  7. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... Safety Sleep Science and Sleep Disorders Lung Diseases Heart and Vascular Diseases Precision Medicine Activities Obesity, Nutrition, ... iron-deficiency anemia can cause serious complications, including heart failure and development delays in children. Explore this ...

  8. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... symptoms. More severe iron-deficiency anemia may cause fatigue or tiredness, shortness of breath, or chest pain. ... in the hands and feet Difficulty concentrating Dizziness Fatigue, or feeling tired, is the most common symptom. ...

  9. Manganese deficiency in plants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Sidsel Birkelund; Jensen, Poul Erik; Husted, Søren

    2016-01-01

    Manganese (Mn) is an essential plant micronutrient with an indispensable function as a catalyst in the oxygen-evolving complex (OEC) of photosystem II (PSII). Even so, Mn deficiency frequently occurs without visual leaf symptoms, thereby masking the distribution and dimension of the problem...... restricting crop productivity in many places of the world. Hence, timely alleviation of latent Mn deficiency is a challenge in promoting plant growth and quality. We describe here the key mechanisms of Mn deficiency in plants by focusing on the impact of Mn on PSII stability and functionality. We also address...... the mechanisms underlying the differential tolerance towards Mn deficiency observed among plant genotypes, which enable Mn-efficient plants to grow on marginal land with poor Mn availability....

  10. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... to learn more about iron-deficiency anemia, our role in research and clinical trials to improve health, ... of Blood Diseases and Resources (DBDR) is a leader in research on the causes, prevention, and treatment ...

  11. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... Treatment will explain treatment-related complications or side effects. Diagnosis Iron-deficiency anemia may be detected during ... to your doctor if you are experiencing side effects such as a bad metallic taste, vomiting, diarrhea, ...

  12. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... an increased risk for iron-deficiency anemia because of your age, unhealthy environments, family ... 12 months, especially if they are fed only breast milk or are fed formula that is not fortified ...

  13. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... blood tests, especially in infants and small children Heavy menstrual periods Injury or surgery Urinary tract bleeding ... of iron-deficiency anemia from trauma, surgery, or heavy menstrual periods. Individuals with a gene for hemophilia, ...

  14. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... developing iron-deficiency anemia. Foods that are good sources of iron include dried beans, dried fruits, eggs, ... is needed, such as childhood and pregnancy. Good sources of iron are meat, poultry, fish, and iron- ...

  15. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... Individuals with a gene for hemophilia, including symptomatic female carriers who have heavy menstrual periods, may be ... anemia. Endurance activities and athletes. Athletes, especially young females, are at risk for iron deficiency. Endurance athletes ...

  16. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... and Strategic Vision Leadership Scientific Divisions Operations and Administration Advisory Committees Budget and Legislative Information Jobs and ... blood cells. Iron-deficiency anemia usually develops over time because your body’s intake of iron is too ...

  17. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... MCV of less than 80 femtoliters (fL). Prevention strategies If you have certain risk factors , such as ... our ongoing clinical studies that are investigating prevention strategies for iron-deficiency anemia. Signs, Symptoms, and Complications ...

  18. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... may recommend you eat heart-healthy foods or control other conditions that can cause iron-deficiency anemia. ... heavy menstrual bleeding, your doctor will want to control these other conditions to prevent you from developing ...

  19. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... lead to iron-deficiency anemia include: End-stage kidney failure, where there is blood loss during dialysis. People who have chronic kidney disease also often take other medicines—such as ...

  20. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... may be at risk for iron-deficiency anemia. Lifestyle habits Certain lifestyle habits may increase your risk ... upper endoscopy or colonoscopy, to stop bleeding. Healthy lifestyle changes To help you meet your daily recommended ...

  1. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... endoscopy or colonoscopy, to stop bleeding. Healthy lifestyle changes To help you meet your daily recommended iron ... iron-deficiency anemia early in life affects later behavior, thinking, and mood during adolescence. Treating anemia in ...

  2. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... Chest pain Coldness in the hands and feet Difficulty concentrating Dizziness Fatigue, or feeling tired, is the ... Our support of SBIR/STTR programs is helping advance research in iron-deficiency anemia, in part by ...

  3. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... infancy has lasting effects. We are interested in learning how having iron-deficiency anemia early in life ... Customer Service/Center for Health Information Email Alerts Jobs and Careers Site Index About NHLBI National Institute ...

  4. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... family history and genetics , lifestyle habits, or sex. Age You may be at increased risk for iron ... Signs, Symptoms, and Complications Iron-deficiency anemia can range from mild to severe. People with mild or ...

  5. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... iron to prepare for blood loss during delivery. Screening and Prevention Your doctor may screen you for ... and symptoms of iron-deficiency anemia. Return to Screening and Prevention to review tests to screen for ...

  6. Autoradiographic analysis of mu1, mu2, and delta opioid binding in the central nervous system of C57BL/6BY and CXBK (opioid receptor-deficient) mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moskowitz, A.S.

    1985-01-01

    In this study the authors used semi-quantitative in vitro autoradiography to compare the levels of binding to central mu 1 , mu 2 , and delta opioid sites in two strains of mice, C57BL/6BY and CXBK. The CXBK strain is known to be deficient in whole brain opioid binding sites and to be less sensitive than the C57 strain to the analgesic and locomotor stimulatory effects of opiates and opioids. Delta sites were visualized using [ 3 H][D-Ala 2 -D-Leu 5 ]-enkephalin (DADL) plus a low concentration of morphine, total mu sites (mu 1 and mu 2 ) were visualized using [ 3 H]dihydromorphine (DHM), and mu 2 sites were visualized using [ 3 H]DHM plus a low concentration of DADL. Binding to mu 1 sites was determined by subtracting mu 2 binding from total mu binding. The authors found that the two strains did not consistently differ in the levels of delta sites. The CXBK strain, however, either had less or the same amount of mu binding as the C57 strain in all areas studied. The CXBK strain was especially deficient in mu 1 binding, particularly in areas involved in pain processing. (Auth.)

  7. Expression profiling analysis: Uncoupling protein 2 deficiency improves hepatic glucose, lipid profiles and insulin sensitivity in high-fat diet-fed mice by modulating expression of genes in peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Mei-Cen; Yu, Ping; Sun, Qi; Li, Yu-Xiu

    2016-03-01

    Uncoupling protein 2 (UCP2), which was an important mitochondrial inner membrane protein associated with glucose and lipid metabolism, widely expresses in all kinds of tissues including hepatocytes. The present study aimed to explore the impact of UCP2 deficiency on glucose and lipid metabolism, insulin sensitivity and its effect on the liver-associated signaling pathway by expression profiling analysis. Four-week-old male UCP2-/- mice and UCP2+/+ mice were randomly assigned to four groups: UCP2-/- on a high-fat diet, UCP2-/- on a normal chow diet, UCP2+/+ on a high-fat diet and UCP2+/+ on a normal chow diet. The differentially expressed genes in the four groups on the 16th week were identified by Affymetrix gene array. The results of intraperitoneal glucose tolerance test and insulin tolerance showed that blood glucose and β-cell function were improved in the UCP2-/- group on high-fat diet. Enhanced insulin sensitivity was observed in the UCP2-/- group. The differentially expressed genes were mapped to 23 pathways (P high-fat diet. The upregulation of genes in the PPAR signaling pathway could explain our finding that UCP2 deficiency ameliorated insulin sensitivity. The manipulation of UCP2 protein expression could represent a new strategy for the prevention and treatment of diabetes.

  8. Receptor-mediated endocytosis of polypeptide hormones is a regulated process: inhibition of [125I]iodoinsulin internalization in hypoinsulinemic diabetes of rat and man

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carpentier, J.L.; Robert, A.; Grunberger, G.; van Obberghen, E.; Freychet, P.; Orci, L.; Gorden, P.

    1986-01-01

    Much data suggest that receptor-mediated endocytosis is regulated in states of hormone excess. Thus, in hyperinsulinemic states there is an accelerated loss of cell surface insulin receptors. In the present experiments we addressed this question in hypoinsulinemic states, in which insulin binding to cell surface receptors is generally increased. In hepatocytes obtained from hypoinsulinemic streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats, [ 125 I]iodoglucagon internalization was increased, while at the same time [ 125 I]iodoinsulin internalization was decreased. The defect in [ 125 I]iodoinsulin internalization was corrected by insulin treatment of the animal. In peripheral blood monocytes from patients with type I insulinopenic diabetes, internalization of [ 125 I]iodoinsulin was impaired; this defect was not present in insulin-treated patients. These data in the hypoinsulinemic rat and human diabetes suggest that receptor-mediated endocytosis is regulated in states of insulin deficiency as well as insulin excess. Delayed or reduced internalization of the insulin-receptor complex could amplify the muted signal caused by deficient hormone secretion

  9. [Iron deficiency and pica].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz, J A; Marcos, J; Risueño, C E; de Cos, C; López, R; Capote, F J; Martín, M V; Gil, J L

    1998-02-01

    To study the relationship between pica and iron-lack anaemia in a series of iron-deficiency patients in order to establish the pathogenesis of such relationship. Four-hundred and thirty-three patients were analysed. Pica was studied by introducing certain diet queries into the clinical history. All patients received oral iron and were periodically controlled with the usual clinico-haematological procedures. Pica was present in 23 patients (5.3%). Eight nourishing (namely, coffee grains, almonds, chocolate, ice, lettuce, carrots, sunflower seeds and bread) and 2 non-nourishing (clay and paper) substances were involved. A second episode of pica appeared in 9 cases upon relapsing of iron deficiency. Both anaemia and pica were cured by etiologic and substitutive therapy in all instances. No clear correlation was found with either socio-economic status or pathogenetic causes of iron deficiency and pica, and no haematological differences were seen between patients with pica and those without this alteration. (1) The pathogenesis of pica is unclear, although it appears unrelated to the degree of iron deficiency. (2) According to the findings in this series, pica seems a consequence of iron deficiency rather than its cause. (3) Adequate therapy can cure both conditions, although pica may reappear upon relapse of iron deficiency.

  10. Minimal Effects of Age and Exposure to a Noisy Environment on Hearing in Alpha9 Nicotinic Receptor Knockout Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda M. Lauer

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Studies have suggested a role of weakened medial olivocochlear (OC efferent feedback in accelerated hearing loss and increased susceptibility to noise. The present study investigated the progression of hearing loss with age and exposure to a noisy environment in medial OC-deficient mice. Alpha9 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor knockout (α9KO and wild types were screened for hearing loss using auditory brainstem responses. α9KO mice housed in a quiet environment did not show increased hearing loss compared to wild types in young adulthood and middle age. Challenging the medial OC system by housing in a noisy environment did not increase hearing loss in α9KO mice compared to wild types. ABR wave 1 amplitudes also did not show differences between α9KO mice and wild types. These data suggest that deficient medial OC feedback does not result in early onset of hearing loss.

  11. Serum transferrin receptor in polycythemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manteiga, R; Remacha, A F; Sardà, M P; Ubeda, J

    1998-10-01

    We measured serum transferrin receptor (sTfR) levels in 22 patients with polycythemia vera and in 26 cases of secondary polycythemia. In our study, raised sTfR levels in both polycythemia groups were related to iron deficiency.

  12. Sector ring accelerator ''RESATRON''

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwabe, E.

    1980-01-01

    Project of sector ring accelerator RESATRON is described. The curiosity of this accelerator is the second cycle of acceleration of the beam after stripping it on the foil. In such an accelerator heavy ions with a different ratio Z to A can be accelerated. (S.B.)

  13. Multiperiodic accelerator structures for linear particle accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tran, D.T.

    1975-01-01

    High efficiency linear accelerator structures, comprised of a succession of cylindrical resonant cavities for acceleration, are described. Coupling annular cavities are located at the periphery, each being coupled to two adjacent cylindrical cavities. (auth)

  14. Accelerators of atomic particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarancev, V.

    1975-01-01

    A brief survey is presented of accelerators and methods of accelerating elementary particles. The principle of collective accelerating of elementary particles is clarified and the problems are discussed of its realization. (B.S.)

  15. Iron, Anemia, and Iron Deficiency Anemia among Young Children in the United States

    OpenAIRE

    Gupta, Priya M.; Perrine, Cria G.; Mei, Zuguo; Scanlon, Kelley S.

    2016-01-01

    Iron deficiency and anemia are associated with impaired neurocognitive development and immune function in young children. Total body iron, calculated from serum ferritin and soluble transferrin receptor concentrations, and hemoglobin allow for monitoring of the iron and anemia status of children in the United States. The purpose of this analysis is to describe the prevalence of iron deficiency (ID), anemia, and iron deficiency anemia (IDA) among children 1–5 years using data from the 2007–201...

  16. BMI-1 Mediates Estrogen-Deficiency-Induced Bone Loss by Inhibiting Reactive Oxygen Species Accumulation and T Cell Activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jinbo; Wang, Qian; Yang, Renlei; Zhang, Jiaqi; Li, Xing; Zhou, Xichao; Miao, Dengshun

    2017-05-01

    Previous studies have shown that estrogen regulates bone homeostasis through regulatory effects on oxidative stress. However, it is unclear how estrogen deficiency triggers reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation. Recent studies provide evidence that the B lymphoma Mo-MLV insertion region 1 (BMI-1) plays a critical role in protection against oxidative stress and that this gene is directly regulated by estrogen via estrogen receptor (ER) at the transcriptional level. In this study, ovariectomized mice were given drinking water with/without antioxidant N-acetyl-cysteine (NAC, 1 mg/mL) supplementation, and compared with each other and with sham mice. Results showed that ovariectomy resulted in bone loss with increased osteoclast surface, increased ROS levels, T cell activation, and increased TNF and RANKL levels in serum and in CD4 T cells; NAC supplementation largely prevented these alterations. BMI-1 expression levels were dramatically downregulated in CD4 T cells from ovariectomized mice. We supplemented drinking water to BMI-1-deficient mice with/without NAC and compared them with each other and with wild-type (WT) mice. We found that BMI-1 deficiency mimicked alterations observed in ovariectomy whereas NAC supplementation reversed all alterations induced by BMI-1 deficiency. Because T cells are critical in mediating ovariectomy-induced bone loss, we further assessed whether BMI-1 overexpression in lymphocytes can protect against estrogen deficiency-induced osteoclastogenesis and bone loss by inhibiting oxidative stress, T cell activation, and RANKL production. When WT and Eμ-BMI-1 transgenic mice with BMI-1 specifically overexpressed in lymphocytes were ovariectomized and compared with each other and with WT sham mice, we found that BMI-1 overexpression in lymphocytes clearly reversed all alterations induced by ovariectomy. Results from this study indicate that estrogen deficiency downregulates BMI-1 and subsequently increases ROS, T cell activation, and

  17. Dopamine Receptors and Parkinson's Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shin Hisahara

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Parkinson's disease (PD is a progressive extrapyramidal motor disorder. Pathologically, this disease is characterized by the selective dopaminergic (DAergic neuronal degeneration in the substantia nigra. Correcting the DA deficiency in PD with levodopa (L-dopa significantly attenuates the motor symptoms; however, its effectiveness often declines, and L-dopa-related adverse effects emerge after long-term treatment. Nowadays, DA receptor agonists are useful medication even regarded as first choice to delay the starting of L-dopa therapy. In advanced stage of PD, they are also used as adjunct therapy together with L-dopa. DA receptor agonists act by stimulation of presynaptic and postsynaptic DA receptors. Despite the usefulness, they could be causative drugs for valvulopathy and nonmotor complication such as DA dysregulation syndrome (DDS. In this paper, physiological characteristics of DA receptor familyare discussed. We also discuss the validity, benefits, and specific adverse effects of pharmaceutical DA receptor agonist.

  18. Antepartum Ornithine Transcarbamylase Deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hitoshi Nakajima

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Ornithine transcarbamylase deficiency (OTCD is the most common type urea cycle enzyme deficiencies. This syndrome results from a deficiency of the mitochondrial enzyme ornithine transcarbamylase, which catalyzes the conversion of ornithine and carbamoyl phosphate to citrullin. Our case was a 28-year-old female diagnosed with OTCD following neurocognitive deficit during her first pregnancy. Although hyperammonemia was suspected as the cause of the patient's mental changes, there was no evidence of chronic liver disease. Plasma amino acid and urine organic acid analysis revealed OTCD. After combined modality treatment with arginine, sodium benzoate and hemodialysis, the patient's plasma ammonia level stabilized and her mental status returned to normal. At last she recovered without any damage left.

  19. Vitamin Excess and Deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diab, Liliane; Krebs, Nancy F

    2018-04-01

    The published literature supports the high prevalence of supplement use in children and adolescents in the United States. Pediatricians today are faced with questions from parents and patients about the benefits, safety, efficacy, and correct dose of vitamins and minerals. In this article, we review 7 vitamins with the most clinical relevance as judged by abundance in food, risks and symptoms of deficiency, and potential for toxicity. Specifically, we focus on possible clinical scenarios that can be indicative of nutritional deficiency. We synthesize and summarize guidelines from nutrition experts, various medical societies, the World Health Organization, and the American Academy of Pediatrics. © American Academy of Pediatrics, 2018. All rights reserved.

  20. Development of Occlusive Neointimal Lesions in Distal Pulmonary Arteries of Endothelin B Receptor–Deficient Rats: A New Model of Severe Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivy, D. Dunbar; McMurtry, Ivan F.; Colvin, Kelley; Imamura, Masatoshi; Oka, Masahiko; Lee, Dong-Seok; Gebb, Sarah; Jones, Peter Lloyd

    2007-01-01

    Background Human pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is characterized by proliferation of vascular smooth muscle and, in its more severe form, by the development of occlusive neointimal lesions. However, few animal models of pulmonary neointimal proliferation exist, thereby limiting a complete understanding of the pathobiology of PAH. Recent studies of the endothelin (ET) system demonstrate that deficiency of the ETB receptor predisposes adult rats to acute and chronic hypoxic PAH, yet these animals fail to develop neointimal lesions. Herein, we determined and thereafter showed that exposure of ETB receptor–deficient rats to the endothelial toxin monocrotaline (MCT) leads to the development of neointimal lesions that share hallmarks of human PAH. Methods and Results The pulmonary hemodynamic and morphometric effects of 60 mg/kg MCT in control (MCT+/+) and ETB receptor–deficient (MCTsl/sl) rats at 6 weeks of age were assessed. MCTsl/sl rats developed more severe PAH, characterized by elevated pulmonary artery pressure, diminished cardiac output, and right ventricular hypertrophy. In MCTsl/sl rats, morphometric evaluation revealed the presence of neointimal lesions within small distal pulmonary arteries, increased medial wall thickness, and decreased arterial-to-alveolar ratio. In keeping with this, barium angiography revealed diminished distal pulmonary vasculature of MCTsl/sl rat lungs. Cells within neointimal lesions expressed smooth muscle and endothelial cell markers. Moreover, cells within neointimal lesions exhibited increased levels of proliferation and were located in a tissue microenvironment enriched with vascular endothelial growth factor, tenascin-C, and activated matrix metalloproteinase-9, factors already implicated in human PAH. Finally, assessment of steady state mRNA showed that whereas expression of ETB receptors was decreased in MCTsl/sl rat lungs, ETA receptor expression increased. Conclusions Deficiency of the ETB receptor markedly

  1. What Is Combined Deficiency of Vitamin K-Dependent Clotting Factors?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Deficiency Factor V Deficiency Combined FV & FVIII Deficiencies Factor VII Deficiency Factor X Deficiency Factor XI Deficiency Factor ... Deficiency Factor V Deficiency Combined FV & FVIII Deficiencies Factor VII Deficiency Factor X Deficiency Factor XI Deficiency Factor ...

  2. Iron deficiency alters megakaryopoiesis and platelet phenotype independent of thrombopoietin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evstatiev, Rayko; Bukaty, Adam; Jimenez, Kristine; Kulnigg-Dabsch, Stefanie; Surman, Lidia; Schmid, Werner; Eferl, Robert; Lippert, Kathrin; Scheiber-Mojdehkar, Barbara; Kvasnicka, Hans Michael; Khare, Vineeta; Gasche, Christoph

    2014-05-01

    Iron deficiency is a common cause of reactive thrombocytosis, however, the exact pathways have not been revealed. Here we aimed to study the mechanisms behind iron deficiency-induced thrombocytosis. Within few weeks, iron-depleted diet caused iron deficiency in young Sprague-Dawley rats, as reflected by a drop in hemoglobin, mean corpuscular volume, hepatic iron content and hepcidin mRNA in the liver. Thrombocytosis established in parallel. Moreover, platelets produced in iron deficient animals displayed a higher mean platelet volume and increased aggregation. Bone marrow studies revealed subtle alterations that are suggestive of expansion of megakaryocyte progenitors, an increase in megakaryocyte ploidy and accelerated megakaryocyte differentiation. Iron deficiency did not alter the production of hematopoietic growth factors such as thrombopoietin, interleukin 6 or interleukin 11. Megakaryocytic cell lines grown in iron-depleted conditions exhibited reduced proliferation but increased ploidy and cell size. Our data suggest that iron deficiency increases megakaryopoietic differentiation and alters platelet phenotype without changes in megakaryocyte growth factors, specifically TPO. Iron deficiency-induced thrombocytosis may have evolved to maintain or increase the coagulation capacity in conditions with chronic bleeding. Copyright © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Somatostatin receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Lars Neisig; Stidsen, Carsten Enggaard; Hartmann, Bolette

    2003-01-01

    functional units, receptors co-operate. The total receptor apparatus of individual cell types is composed of different-ligand receptors (e.g. SRIF and non-SRIF receptors) and co-expressed receptor subtypes (e.g. sst(2) and sst(5) receptors) in characteristic proportions. In other words, levels of individual......-peptides, receptor agonists and antagonists. Relatively long half lives, as compared to those of the endogenous ligands, have been paramount from the outset. Motivated by theoretical puzzles or the shortcomings of present-day diagnostics and therapy, investigators have also aimed to produce subtype...

  4. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... grams per deciliter (g/dl) for men and less than 12 g/dl for women is diagnostic of anemia. In iron-deficiency anemia, ... blood levels of iron will be low, or less than 10 micromoles per liter (mmol/L) for both men and women. Normal levels are 10 to 30 mmol/L. ...

  5. Alpha1-antitrypsin deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stolk, Jan; Seersholm, Niels; Kalsheker, Noor

    2006-01-01

    The Alpha One International Registry (AIR), a multinational research program focused on alpha1-antitrypsin (AAT) deficiency, was formed in response to a World Health Organization recommendation. Each of the nearly 20 participating countries maintains a national registry of patients with AAT defic...

  6. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... is blood loss during dialysis. People who have chronic kidney disease also often take other medicines—such as proton ... reduces iron absorption. Other treatments If you have chronic kidney disease and iron-deficiency anemia, your doctor may recommend ...

  7. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... A-Z Clinical Trials Publications and Resources Health Education and Awareness The Science Science Home Blood Disorders ... Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) and Small Business Technology Transfer (STTR) ... We are interested in learning how having iron-deficiency anemia early in life ...

  8. Arginase-1 deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sin, Yuan Yan; Baron, Garrett; Schulze, Andreas; Funk, Colin D

    2015-12-01

    Arginase-1 (ARG1) deficiency is a rare autosomal recessive disorder that affects the liver-based urea cycle, leading to impaired ureagenesis. This genetic disorder is caused by 40+ mutations found fairly uniformly spread throughout the ARG1 gene, resulting in partial or complete loss of enzyme function, which catalyzes the hydrolysis of arginine to ornithine and urea. ARG1-deficient patients exhibit hyperargininemia with spastic paraparesis, progressive neurological and intellectual impairment, persistent growth retardation, and infrequent episodes of hyperammonemia, a clinical pattern that differs strikingly from other urea cycle disorders. This review briefly highlights the current understanding of the etiology and pathophysiology of ARG1 deficiency derived from clinical case reports and therapeutic strategies stretching over several decades and reports on several exciting new developments regarding the pathophysiology of the disorder using ARG1 global and inducible knockout mouse models. Gene transfer studies in these mice are revealing potential therapeutic options that can be exploited in the future. However, caution is advised in extrapolating results since the lethal disease phenotype in mice is much more severe than in humans indicating that the mouse models may not precisely recapitulate human disease etiology. Finally, some of the functions and implications of ARG1 in non-urea cycle activities are considered. Lingering questions and future areas to be addressed relating to the clinical manifestations of ARG1 deficiency in liver and brain are also presented. Hopefully, this review will spark invigorated research efforts that lead to treatments with better clinical outcomes.

  9. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Science Science Home Blood Disorders and Blood Safety Sleep Science and Sleep Disorders Lung Diseases Heart and Vascular Diseases Precision ... prevention and treatment of heart, lung, blood, and sleep disorders, including iron-deficiency anemia. Learn about the ...

  10. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... infection. A history of gastrointestinal surgery, such as weight-loss surgery—especially gastric bypass—or gastrectomy. Certain rare ... prevention and treatment of heart, lung, blood, and sleep disorders, including iron-deficiency anemia. Learn about the ...

  11. Vitamin B12 deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitamin B12 (B12; also known as cobalamin) is a B vitamin that has an important role in cellular metabolism, especially in DNA synthesis, methylation and mitochondrial metabolism. Clinical B12 deficiency with classic haematological and neurological manifestations is relatively uncommon. However, sub...

  12. Leukocyte adhesion deficiencies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Vijver, Edith; van den Berg, Timo K.; Kuijpers, Taco W.

    2013-01-01

    During inflammation, leukocytes play a key role in maintaining tissue homeostasis through elimination of pathogens and removal of damaged tissue. Leukocytes migrate to the site of inflammation by crawling over and through the blood vessel wall, into the tissue. Leukocyte adhesion deficiencies (ie,

  13. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... iron supplements work best to treat iron-deficiency anemia in children who do not consume the daily recommended amount ... and Clinical Studies to hear experts, parents, and children talk about their experiences with clinical ... Anemia Arrhythmia Blood Donation Blood Tests Blood ...

  14. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Working at the NHLBI Contact and FAQs Accessible Search Form Search the NHLBI, use the drop down list to ... treatment of blood diseases, including iron-deficiency anemia. Search the NIH Research Portfolio Online Reporting Tools (RePORT) ...

  15. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... or even heart failure . Increased risk of infections Motor or cognitive development delays in children Pregnancy complications, ... Upper endoscopy to look for bleeding in the esophagus, stomach, and the first part of the ... blood, and sleep disorders, including iron-deficiency anemia. Learn about the current ...

  16. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... how having iron-deficiency anemia early in life affects later behavior, thinking, and mood during adolescence. Treating anemia in premature or very small newborns . In collaboration with the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, we are investigating how ...

  17. Iron deficiency in children

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    cell and excess iron is stored as ferritin to protect the cell from oxidative ... iron deficiency has negative effects during pregnancy and in the postpartum period, which affects maternal health ... use of undiluted cow's milk and a predominant cow's milk intake in .... on bone marrow smear or biopsy for the definitive diagnosis of.

  18. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Certain conditions or medicines can decrease your body’s ability to absorb iron and lead to iron-deficiency ... environment or water. Lead interferes with the body’s ability to make hemoglobin. Family history and genetics Von ...

  19. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... supplements. Iron supplements can change how certain medicines work. Your doctor may suggest check-ups to make sure your ... To prevent complications from iron-deficiency anemia, your doctor may ... during certain stages of life when more iron is needed, such as childhood ...

  20. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... an MCV of less than 80 femtoliters (fL). Prevention strategies If you have certain risk factors , such as if you are following a ... unhealthy environments, or other factors that increase your risk of developing iron-deficiency ... to Screening and Prevention to review tests to screen for and strategies ...