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Sample records for receptor alpha-chain locus

  1. Association between genetic polymorphisms in the human interleukin-7 receptor alpha-chain and inhalation allergy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shamim, Z; Müller, K; Svejgaard, A

    2007-01-01

    Thymic stromal-derived lymphopoietin (TSLP) and interleukin-7 share a common receptor chain, IL-7Ralpha. IL-7 is involved in T-cell homeostasis, and TSLP induces production of pro-allergic cytokines. The gene encoding the IL-7Ralpha chain is polymorphic, and investigation of inhalation allergic p...

  2. Cleavage of functional IL-2 receptor alpha chain (CD25 from murine corneal and conjunctival epithelia by MMP-9

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farley William J

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background IL-2 has classically been considered a cytokine that regulates T cell proliferation and differentiation, signaling through its heterotrimeric receptor (IL-2R consisting of α (CD25, β (CD122, γ chains (CD132. Expression of IL-2R has also been detected in mucosal epithelial cells. Soluble IL-2Rα (CD25 has been reported as an inflammatory marker. We evaluated the expression of CD25 and CD122 in the ocular surface epithelium and investigated the mechanism of proteolytic cleavage of CD25 from these cells. Methods Desiccating stress (DS was used as an inducer of matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP-9. DS was created by subjecting C57BL/6 and MMP-9 knockout (BKO mice and their wild-type littermates (WT mice to a low humidity and drafty environment for 5 days (DS5. A separate group of C57BL/6 mice was subjected to DS5 and treatment with topical 0.025% doxycycline, a MMP inhibitor, administered QID. The expression of CD25 and CD122 was evaluated in cryosections by dual-label laser scanning confocal microscopy. Western blot was used to measure relative levels of CD25 in epithelial lysates. Gelatinase activity was evaluated by in situ zymography. Soluble CD25 in tear fluid was measured by an immunobead assay. Results CD25 and CD122 were abundantly expressed in cornea (all layers and conjunctiva epithelia (apical and subapical layers in nonstressed control mice. After desiccating stress, we found that immunoreactivity to CD25, but not CD122, decreased by the ocular surface epithelia and concentration of soluble CD25 in tears increased as MMP-9 staining increased. CD25 was preserved in C57BL/6 mice topically treated with an MMP-9 inhibitor and in MMP-9 knock-out mice. MMP-9 treatment of human cultured corneal epithelial cells decreased levels of CD25 protein in a concentration dependent fashion. Conclusion Our results indicate that functional IL-2R is produced by the ocular surface epithelia and that CD25 is proteolytic cleaved to its

  3. Preferential ADV-AJ association during recombination in the mouse T-cell receptor alpha/delta locus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aude-Garcia, C; Gallagher, M; Marche, P N; Jouvin-Marche, E

    2001-01-01

    The gene coding for a T-cell receptor (TCR) alpha chain is assembled from variable (ADV) and joining (AJ) genes located on Chromosome 14. Each of the 90 ADV genes can rearrange with any one of the 61 AJ genes. We have previously demonstrated that ADV and AJ gene segment use evolves with time, with a progressive opening of ADV and AJ regions of the locus. To define the rules governing the use of AJ genes by ADV genes belonging to one family, we carried out a detailed analysis of 268 combinations of ADV2 BALB/c transcripts. We found that the different ADV2 members use different sets of AJ genes depending on their location within the ADV locus: ADV2S7 (the most AJ proximal ADV2 member) rearranges mainly with the AJ genes located close to the TEA element, whereas 50% of the sequences for ADV2S8, which is distal to the AJ locus, use the most distal AJ genes. ADV2S5, an ADV2 member located in the middle of the ADV locus, is associated with a wider set of AJ genes, located in the center of the AJ locus. Taken together, our results indicate that, in addition to the progressive opening of the ADV and AJ loci, the chromosomal location of ADV and AJ genes is a factor affecting AJ use in BALB/c mice.

  4. Expression of the IL-6 receptor alpha-chain (CD126) in normal and abnormal plasma cells in monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance and smoldering myeloma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salem, Dalia Abdel-Raouf; Korde, Neha; Venzon, David J; Liewehr, David J; Maric, Irina; Calvo, Katherine R; Braylan, Raul; Tembhare, Prashant R; Yuan, Constance M; Landgren, Carl Ola; Stetler-Stevenson, Maryalice

    2018-01-01

    IL-6 activity in normal plasma cells (nPCs) and abnormal plasma cells (aPCs) is CD126 (subunit of IL-6 receptor) dependent. We quantified CD126 expression on nPCs and aPCs in monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS), smoldering myeloma (SMM), and multiple myeloma (MM). CD126 was detected on all nPCs and aPCs indicating that CD126 does not have diagnostic utility. CD126 expression was higher in aPCs than in nPCs in 85% SMM but only 41% MGUS and there was evidence that CD126 was higher in aPCs than nPCs in the SMM (p = .048) but not MGUS (p = .96) patients. There is also a greater association between nPC and aPC CD126 expression in low risk MGUS than observed in high risk MGUS and SMM, suggesting normal regulation of CD126 decreases with disease progression. Future studies need to elucidate the role of bone marrow milieu versus escape from normal CD126 regulation in malignant transformation of clonal plasma cells.

  5. Association of the human CD3-zeta chain with the alpha beta-T cell receptor/CD3 complex. Clues from a T cell variant with a mutated T cell receptor-alpha chain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Geisler, C; Schøller, J; Wahi, M A

    1990-01-01

    The TCR for Ag, on the majority of human T cells, is a disulfide-linked heterodimer composed of TCR-alpha and -beta chains noncovalently associated with the monomorphic CD3 complex composed of the CD3-gamma, -delta, -epsilon, and -zeta chains. The interactions involved in the assembly...... of the various components of this multimeric protein complex are not fully understood. In this report, a variant of the human leukemic T cell line Jurkat that synthesized all of the known components of the TCR/CD3 complex but fails to express the TCR/CD3 complex at the cell surface is further characterized....... This variant, J79, has a mutated TCR-alpha chain that does not affect the assembly of the pentameric form (TCR-alpha beta-CD3-gamma delta epsilon) of the TCR/CD3 complex but inhibits the assembly of the CD3-zeta homodimer with the rest of the complex (TCR-alpha beta-CD3-gamma delta epsilon----TCR-alpha beta-CD...

  6. Intestinal Coccidiosis in a Patient with Alpha-chain Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, Kristin; Bird, R. G.; Doe, W. F.

    1974-01-01

    During an ultrastructural study of small-intestinal mucosa from a patient suffering from alpha-chain disease organisms were identified within the epithelial cytoplasm which showed the fine structural features of the coccidian group. Though coccidiosis is well recognized as causing a diarrhoeal and often lethal illness in animals it has been neglected as a cause of disease in man. Thus this finding may be significant and warrants further investigation into its possible role in the pathogenesis of alpha-chain disease. ImagesFIG. 1FIG. 2FIG. 3FIG. 4 PMID:4131643

  7. Canine narcolepsy is associated with an elevated number of alpha 2-receptors in the locus coeruleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fruhstorfer, B; Mignot, E; Bowersox, S; Nishino, S; Dement, W C; Guilleminault, C

    1989-10-23

    alpha 2-Receptors in the canine brain were pharmacologically characterized using [3H]yohimbine binding. Competition studies revealed a single class of binding sites in frontal cortex but two distinct subtypes in nucleus caudatus. The role of central alpha 2-receptors in narcolepsy was investigated in 5 normal and 5 narcoleptic Doberman pinschers. Scatchard analysis of [3H]yohimbine binding in different brain areas revealed an increase in the number of alpha 2-binding sites limited to the locus coeruleus. This suggests that altered autoinhibition of norepinephrine release may be associated with the narcoleptic symptomatology.

  8. Inhibition of message for FcepsilonRI alpha chain blocks mast cell IL-4 production induced by co-culture with Mycoplasma pneumoniae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Danlin; Dai, Yuling; Duffy, Lynn B; Atkinson, T Prescott

    2008-04-01

    We have previously described the activation of RBL-2H3 mast cells for IL-4 production by Mycoplasma pneumoniae but the mechanism remains unclear. M. pneumoniae binds eukaryotic cells primarily through sialoglycoproteins on the target cell surface. This study was undertaken to determine whether the sialated FcepsilonRI alpha chain on RBL cells is important for M. pneumoniae-induced IL-4 production. We found that IgE-mediated IL-4 release by a series of RBL sublines correlated with the release induced by M. pneumoniae. Further, aggregation of FcgammaRII (CD32) in RBL cells using a monoclonal antibody inhibited both IgE-mediated and mycoplasma-induced IL-4 production, providing further evidence for an Fc receptor-mediated mechanism of activation. To examine the role of FcepsilonRI in mycoplasma-induced IL-4 release, we created stably transfected RBL sublines using a vector expressing a short hairpin sequence designed to inhibit message for the FcepsilonRI alpha chain. IgE-induced IL-4 production by the transfected sublines was reduced in similar proportion to the degree of message suppression. M. pneumoniae-induced IL-4 production in the four transfected sublines was completely blocked in contrast to results with the controls or parent RBL cells. We conclude that the heavily glycosylated FcepsilonRI alpha chain is required for activation of mast cells for IL-4 production by M. pneumoniae.

  9. Independent regulation of Rap1 and mitogen-activated protein kinase by the alpha chain of Go.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernasconi, Francesca; Malgaroli, Antonio; Vallar, Lucia

    Receptors coupled to G(i/o) proteins stimulate the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascade. The intracellular pathways linking the alpha chains of these G proteins to MAPK activation are not completely understood. One of the signaling molecules which has been suggested to act downstream of Galpha(i/o) is the small G protein Rap1. We investigated the role of Rap1 in MAPK stimulation by Galpha(o) in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. Our previous results have shown that in this cell system activated Galpha(o) strongly potentiates the MAPK response to the epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor. Rap1 regulation was examined in cells transfected with Rap1 and wild-type Galpha(o) or the activated mutant Galpha(o)-Q205L. Immunocytochemical analysis detected both Rap1 and the Galpha(o) subunit at the plasma membrane as well as on perinuclear cytoplasmic vesicles. Expression of wild-type Galpha(o) had no significant effect on the levels of activated Rap1. In contrast, Galpha(o)-Q205L virtually abolished the activation of Rap1 induced by EGF. Further experiments showed that MAPK stimulation by EGF was greatly inhibited by expression of activated Rap1, suggesting that Rap1 inhibition could mediate the effect of Galpha(o) on the MAPK cascade. However, Galpha(o)-Q205L efficiently inhibited the activation of Rap1 induced by fibroblast growth factor (FGF). We have previously found that the ability of FGF to activate MAPK is not modified by Galpha(o). In addition, expression of the GAP protein RAP1GAPII blocked Rap1 activation without affecting EGF- or FGF-dependent MAPK stimulation. These findings provide evidence for independent regulation of Rap1 and MAPK by the G(o )alpha chain.

  10. Renal Amyloidosis Associated With 5 Novel Variants in the Fibrinogen A Alpha Chain Protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowczenio, Dorota; Stensland, Maria; de Souza, Gustavo A; Strøm, Erik H; Gilbertson, Janet A; Taylor, Graham; Rendell, Nigel; Minogue, Shane; Efebera, Yvonne A; Lachmann, Helen J; Wechalekar, Ashutosh D; Hawkins, Philip N; Heimdal, Ketil R; Selvig, Kristian; Lægreid, Inger K; Demoulin, Nathalie; Aydin, Selda; Gillmore, Julian D; Wien, Tale N

    2017-05-01

    Fibrinogen A alpha chain amyloidosis is an autosomal dominant disease associated with mutations in the fibrinogen A alpha chain ( FGA ) gene, and it is the most common cause of hereditary renal amyloidosis in the UK. Patients typically present with kidney impairment and progress to end-stage renal disease over a median time of 4.6 years. Six patients presented with proteinuria, hypertension, and/or lower limb edema and underwent detailed clinical and laboratory investigations. A novel FGA gene mutation was identified in each case: 2 frameshift mutations F521Sfs*27 and G519Efs*30 and 4 single base substitutions G555F, E526K, E524K, R554H. In 5 subjects, extensive amyloid deposits were found solely within the glomeruli, which stained specifically with antibodies to fibrinogen A alpha chain, and in one of these cases, we found coexistent fibrinogen A alpha chain amyloidosis and anti-glomerular basement membrane antibody disease. One patient was diagnosed with light-chain amyloidosis after a bone marrow examination revealed a small clonal plasma cell population, and laser microdissection of the amyloid deposits followed by liquid chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry identified kappa light chain as the fibril protein. We report 6 novel mutations in the FGA gene: 5 were associated with renal fibrinogen A alpha chain amyloidosis and 1 was found to be incidental to light-chain amyloid deposits discovered in a patient with a plasma cell dyscrasia. Clinical awareness and suspicion of hereditary amyloidosis corroborated by genetic analysis and adequate typing using combined immunohistochemistry and laser microdissection and mass spectrometry is valuable to avoid misdiagnosis, especially when a family history of amyloidosis is absent.

  11. Dopamine D3 receptor gene locus: Association with schizophrenia, as well age of onset

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    Nimgsonkar, V.L.; Zhang, X.R.; Brar, J.S. [Univ. of Pittsburgh, PA (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Genetic factors are clearly involved in the etiology of schizophrenia, but their specific nature is unknown. If the genetic etiology is multifactorial or polygenic, the role of specific genes as susceptibility factors can be directly evaluated by examining allelic variation at these loci among cases in comparison with controls. Two studies have independently demonstrated an association of schizophrenia with homozygosity at the dopamine D3 receptor gene (D3RG) locus, using a biallelic polymorphism in the first exon of D3RG. These results are important because D3RG is a favored candidate gene. Three other studies have identified associations among sub-groups of patients, but the majority were negative. The present study involved patients with schizophrenia (DSM-III-R criteria) of Caucasian or African-American ethnicity (n=130). Two groups of controls, matched for ethnicity, were used: adults screened for schizophrenia (n=128) and unselected neonates (n=160). Multivariate analysis revealed an association between allele no. 1 homozygosity and schizophrenia in comparison with adult, but not neonatal controls. The association was most marked among Caucasian patients with a family history of schizophrenia (odds ratio 13.7, C.I. 1.8, 104.3). An association of the D3RG locus with age of onset (AOO) was also noted. The discrepancies in earlier studies may due to variations in control groups, differencies in mean AOO among different cohorts, or ethnic variations in susceptibility attributable to D3RG.

  12. Family and population-based studies of variation within the ghrelin receptor locus in relation to measures of obesity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gjesing, Anette P.; Larsen, Lesli Hingstrup; Torekov, Signe Sørensen

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The growth hormone secretagogue receptor (GHSR) is mediating hunger sensation when stimulated by its natural ligand ghrelin. In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that common and rare variation in the GHSR locus are related to increased prevalence of obesity and overweight am...

  13. Numerical modelling of the V-J combinations of the T cell receptor TRA/TRD locus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thuderoz, Florence; Simonet, Maria-Ana; Hansen, Olivier; Pasqual, Nicolas; Dariz, Aurélie; Baum, Thierry Pascal; Hierle, Vivien; Demongeot, Jacques; Marche, Patrice Noël; Jouvin-Marche, Evelyne

    2010-02-19

    T-Cell antigen Receptor (TR) repertoire is generated through rearrangements of V and J genes encoding alpha and beta chains. The quantification and frequency for every V-J combination during ontogeny and development of the immune system remain to be precisely established. We have addressed this issue by building a model able to account for Valpha-Jalpha gene rearrangements during thymus development of mice. So we developed a numerical model on the whole TRA/TRD locus, based on experimental data, to estimate how Valpha and Jalpha genes become accessible to rearrangements. The progressive opening of the locus to V-J gene recombinations is modeled through windows of accessibility of different sizes and with different speeds of progression. Furthermore, the possibility of successive secondary V-J rearrangements was included in the modelling. The model points out some unbalanced V-J associations resulting from a preferential access to gene rearrangements and from a non-uniform partition of the accessibility of the J genes, depending on their location in the locus. The model shows that 3 to 4 successive rearrangements are sufficient to explain the use of all the V and J genes of the locus. Finally, the model provides information on both the kinetics of rearrangements and frequencies of each V-J associations. The model accounts for the essential features of the observed rearrangements on the TRA/TRD locus and may provide a reference for the repertoire of the V-J combinatorial diversity.

  14. Numerical modelling of the V-J combinations of the T cell receptor TRA/TRD locus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florence Thuderoz

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available T-Cell antigen Receptor (TR repertoire is generated through rearrangements of V and J genes encoding alpha and beta chains. The quantification and frequency for every V-J combination during ontogeny and development of the immune system remain to be precisely established. We have addressed this issue by building a model able to account for Valpha-Jalpha gene rearrangements during thymus development of mice. So we developed a numerical model on the whole TRA/TRD locus, based on experimental data, to estimate how Valpha and Jalpha genes become accessible to rearrangements. The progressive opening of the locus to V-J gene recombinations is modeled through windows of accessibility of different sizes and with different speeds of progression. Furthermore, the possibility of successive secondary V-J rearrangements was included in the modelling. The model points out some unbalanced V-J associations resulting from a preferential access to gene rearrangements and from a non-uniform partition of the accessibility of the J genes, depending on their location in the locus. The model shows that 3 to 4 successive rearrangements are sufficient to explain the use of all the V and J genes of the locus. Finally, the model provides information on both the kinetics of rearrangements and frequencies of each V-J associations. The model accounts for the essential features of the observed rearrangements on the TRA/TRD locus and may provide a reference for the repertoire of the V-J combinatorial diversity.

  15. Lupus risk variants in the PXK locus alter B-cell receptor internalization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel E. Vaughn

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Genome wide association studies have identified variants in PXK that confer risk for humoral autoimmune diseases, including systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE or lupus, rheumatoid arthritis and more recently systemic sclerosis. While PXK is involved in trafficking of epidermal growth factor Receptor (EGFR in COS-7 cells, mechanisms linking PXK to lupus pathophysiology have remained undefined. In an effort to uncover the mechanism at this locus that increases lupus-risk, we undertook a fine-mapping analysis in a large multi-ancestral study of lupus patients and controls. We define a large (257kb common haplotype that confers lupus risk detected only in European ancestral populations and spans the promoter through the 3’ UTR of PXK. The strongest association was found at rs6445972 with P < 4.62 x 10-10, OR 0.81 (0.75 – 0.86. Using stepwise logistic regression analysis, we demonstrate that one signal drives the genetic association in the region. Bayesian analysis confirms our results, identifying a 95% credible set consisting of 172 variants spanning 200kb.Functionally, we found that PXK operates on the B-cell antigen receptor (BCR; we confirmed that PXK influenced the rate of BCR internalization. Furthermore, we demonstrate that individuals carrying the risk haplotype exhibited a decreased rate of BCR internalization, a process known to impact B cell survival and cell fate. Taken together, these data define a new candidate mechanism for the genetic association of variants around PXK with lupus risk and highlight the regulation of intracellular trafficking as a genetically regulated pathway mediating human autoimmunity.

  16. Glucocorticoid receptors in the locus coeruleus mediate sleep disorders caused by repeated corticosterone treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zi-Jun; Zhang, Xue-Qiong; Cui, Xiang-Yu; Cui, Su-Ying; Yu, Bin; Sheng, Zhao-Fu; Li, Sheng-Jie; Cao, Qing; Huang, Yuan-Li; Xu, Ya-Ping; Zhang, Yong-He

    2015-03-24

    Stress induced constant increase of cortisol level may lead to sleep disorder, but the mechanism remains unclear. Here we described a novel model to investigate stress mimicked sleep disorders induced by repetitive administration of corticosterone (CORT). After 7 days treatment of CORT, rats showed significant sleep disturbance, meanwhile, the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) level was notably lowered in locus coeruleus (LC). We further discovered the activation of noradrenergic neuron in LC, the suppression of GABAergic neuron in ventrolateral preoptic area (VLPO), the remarkable elevation of norepinephrine in LC, VLPO and hypothalamus, as well as increase of tyrosine hydroxylase in LC and decrease of glutamic acid decarboxylase in VLPO after CORT treatment. Microinjection of GR antagonist RU486 into LC reversed the CORT-induced sleep changes. These results suggest that GR in LC may play a key role in stress-related sleep disorders and support the hypothesis that repeated CORT treatment may decrease GR levels and induce the activation of noradrenergic neurons in LC, consequently inhibit GABAergic neurons in VLPO and result in sleep disorders. Our findings provide novel insights into the effect of stress-inducing agent CORT on sleep and GRs' role in sleep regulation.

  17. Sheep (Ovis aries) T cell receptor alpha (TRA) and delta (TRD) genes and genomic organization of the TRA/TRD locus

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Piccinni, Barbara; Massari, Serafina; Caputi Jambrenghi, Anna; Giannico, Francesco; Lefranc, Marie-Paule; Ciccarese, Salvatrice; Antonacci, Rachele

    2015-01-01

    ..."). While the T cell receptor alpha (TRA) and delta (TRD) genes and the genomic organization of the TRA/TRD locus has been determined in human and mouse, this information is still poorly known in artiodactyl species, such as sheep...

  18. A common variant at the TERT-CLPTM1L locus is associated with estrogen receptor-negative breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haiman, Christopher A; Chen, Gary K; Vachon, Celine M; Canzian, Federico; Dunning, Alison; Millikan, Robert C; Wang, Xianshu; Ademuyiwa, Foluso; Ahmed, Shahana; Ambrosone, Christine B; Baglietto, Laura; Balleine, Rosemary; Bandera, Elisa V; Beckmann, Matthias W; Berg, Christine D; Bernstein, Leslie; Blomqvist, Carl; Blot, William J; Brauch, Hiltrud; Buring, Julie E; Carey, Lisa A; Carpenter, Jane E; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Chanock, Stephen J; Chasman, Daniel I; Clarke, Christine L; Cox, Angela; Cross, Simon S; Deming, Sandra L; Diasio, Robert B; Dimopoulos, Athanasios M; Driver, W Ryan; Dünnebier, Thomas; Durcan, Lorraine; Eccles, Diana; Edlund, Christopher K; Ekici, Arif B; Fasching, Peter A; Feigelson, Heather S; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Fostira, Florentia; Försti, Asta; Fountzilas, George; Gerty, Susan M; Giles, Graham G; Godwin, Andrew K; Goodfellow, Paul; Graham, Nikki; Greco, Dario; Hamann, Ute; Hankinson, Susan E; Hartmann, Arndt; Hein, Rebecca; Heinz, Judith; Holbrook, Andrea; Hoover, Robert N; Hu, Jennifer J; Hunter, David J; Ingles, Sue A; Irwanto, Astrid; Ivanovich, Jennifer; John, Esther M; Johnson, Nicola; Jukkola-Vuorinen, Arja; Kaaks, Rudolf; Ko, Yon-Dschun; Kolonel, Laurence N; Konstantopoulou, Irene; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Kulkarni, Swati; Lambrechts, Diether; Lee, Adam M; Marchand, Loïc Le; Lesnick, Timothy; Liu, Jianjun; Lindstrom, Sara; Mannermaa, Arto; Margolin, Sara; Martin, Nicholas G; Miron, Penelope; Montgomery, Grant W; Nevanlinna, Heli; Nickels, Stephan; Nyante, Sarah; Olswold, Curtis; Palmer, Julie; Pathak, Harsh; Pectasides, Dimitrios; Perou, Charles M; Peto, Julian; Pharoah, Paul D P; Pooler, Loreall C; Press, Michael F; Pylkäs, Katri; Rebbeck, Timothy R; Rodriguez-Gil, Jorge L; Rosenberg, Lynn; Ross, Eric; Rüdiger, Thomas; Silva, Isabel dos Santos; Sawyer, Elinor; Schmidt, Marjanka K; Schulz-Wendtland, Rüdiger; Schumacher, Fredrick; Severi, Gianluca; Sheng, Xin; Signorello, Lisa B; Sinn, Hans-Peter; Stevens, Kristen N; Southey, Melissa C; Tapper, William J; Tomlinson, Ian; Hogervorst, Frans B L; Wauters, Els; Weaver, JoEllen; Wildiers, Hans; Winqvist, Robert; Van Den Berg, David; Wan, Peggy; Xia, Lucy Y; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Zheng, Wei; Ziegler, Regina G; Siddiq, Afshan; Slager, Susan L; Stram, Daniel O; Easton, Douglas; Kraft, Peter; Henderson, Brian E; Couch, Fergus J

    2011-10-30

    Estrogen receptor (ER)-negative breast cancer shows a higher incidence in women of African ancestry compared to women of European ancestry. In search of common risk alleles for ER-negative breast cancer, we combined genome-wide association study (GWAS) data from women of African ancestry (1,004 ER-negative cases and 2,745 controls) and European ancestry (1,718 ER-negative cases and 3,670 controls), with replication testing conducted in an additional 2,292 ER-negative cases and 16,901 controls of European ancestry. We identified a common risk variant for ER-negative breast cancer at the TERT-CLPTM1L locus on chromosome 5p15 (rs10069690: per-allele odds ratio (OR) = 1.18 per allele, P = 1.0 × 10(-10)). The variant was also significantly associated with triple-negative (ER-negative, progesterone receptor (PR)-negative and human epidermal growth factor-2 (HER2)-negative) breast cancer (OR = 1.25, P = 1.1 × 10(-9)), particularly in younger women (<50 years of age) (OR = 1.48, P = 1.9 × 10(-9)). Our results identify a genetic locus associated with estrogen receptor negative breast cancer subtypes in multiple populations.

  19. μ-Opioid receptor activation and noradrenaline transport inhibition by tapentadol in rat single locus coeruleus neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadeghi, Mahsa; Tzschentke, Thomas M; Christie, MacDonald J

    2015-01-01

    Tapentadol is a novel analgesic that combines moderate μ-opioid receptor agonism and noradrenaline reuptake inhibition in a single molecule. Both mechanisms of action are involved in producing analgesia; however, the potency and efficacy of tapentadol in individual neurons has not been characterized. Whole-cell patch-clamp recordings of G-protein-coupled inwardly rectifying K(+) (KIR 3.x) currents were made from rat locus coeruleus neurons in brain slices to investigate the potency and relative efficacy of tapentadol and compare its intrinsic activity with other clinically used opioids. Tapentadol showed agonist activity at μ receptors and was approximately six times less potent than morphine with respect to KIR 3.x current modulation. The intrinsic activity of tapentadol was lower than [Met]enkephalin, morphine and oxycodone, but higher than buprenorphine and pentazocine. Tapentadol inhibited the noradrenaline transporter (NAT) with potency similar to that at μ receptors. The interaction between these two mechanisms of action was additive in individual LC neurons. Tapentadol displays similar potency for both µ receptor activation and NAT inhibition in functioning neurons. The intrinsic activity of tapentadol at the μ receptor lies between that of buprenorphine and oxycodone, potentially explaining the favourable profile of side effects, related to μ receptors. This article is part of a themed section on Opioids: New Pathways to Functional Selectivity. To view the other articles in this section visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2015.172.issue-2. © 2013 The British Pharmacological Society.

  20. Pre-B Cell Receptor Signaling Induces Immunoglobulin κ Locus Accessibility by Functional Redistribution of Enhancer-Mediated Chromatin Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stadhouders, Ralph; de Bruijn, Marjolein J. W.; Rother, Magdalena B.; Yuvaraj, Saravanan; de Almeida, Claudia Ribeiro; Kolovos, Petros; Van Zelm, Menno C.; van Ijcken, Wilfred; Grosveld, Frank; Soler, Eric; Hendriks, Rudi W.

    2014-01-01

    During B cell development, the precursor B cell receptor (pre-BCR) checkpoint is thought to increase immunoglobulin κ light chain (Igκ) locus accessibility to the V(D)J recombinase. Accordingly, pre-B cells lacking the pre-BCR signaling molecules Btk or Slp65 showed reduced germline Vκ transcription. To investigate whether pre-BCR signaling modulates Vκ accessibility through enhancer-mediated Igκ locus topology, we performed chromosome conformation capture and sequencing analyses. These revealed that already in pro-B cells the κ enhancers robustly interact with the ∼3.2 Mb Vκ region and its flanking sequences. Analyses in wild-type, Btk, and Slp65 single- and double-deficient pre-B cells demonstrated that pre-BCR signaling reduces interactions of both enhancers with Igκ locus flanking sequences and increases interactions of the 3′κ enhancer with Vκ genes. Remarkably, pre-BCR signaling does not significantly affect interactions between the intronic enhancer and Vκ genes, which are already robust in pro-B cells. Both enhancers interact most frequently with highly used Vκ genes, which are often marked by transcription factor E2a. We conclude that the κ enhancers interact with the Vκ region already in pro-B cells and that pre-BCR signaling induces accessibility through a functional redistribution of long-range chromatin interactions within the Vκ region, whereby the two enhancers play distinct roles. PMID:24558349

  1. Fibrinogen A alpha-chain amyloidosis: report of the first case in Latin America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado, Juliana Reis; Silva, Marcos Vinícius da; Neves, Precil Diego Miranda de Menezes; Oliveira, Flavia Aparecida de; Corrêa, Rosana Rosa Miranda; Rodrigues, Willians Vinícius Dutra; Benson, Merril; Reis, Marlene Antônia Dos

    2013-03-01

    Hereditary fibrinogen A alpha-chain (AFib) amyloidosis affects different organs, especially the kidneys. No case of this disease has been reported in Latin America. A 52-year-old previously healthy Brazilian woman presented with a seven-month history of proteinuria in the absence of hematuria. The patient had normal blood pressure and reported no other symptoms. A renal biopsy was obtained and light microscopy revealed the presence of Congo red positive deposits (apple-green birefringence under polarized light) only in the glomerular compartment. These deposits were strongly immunoreactive to fibrinogen in all glomeruli. Electron microscopy showed the presence of organized deposits compatible with AFib. The diagnosis was confirmed by DNA analysis of the AFib gene, which demonstrated a Glu526Val mutation in one allele. This first description of hereditary AFib amyloidosis in Latin America highlights the need to include this type of amyloidosis in the differential diagnosis, especially in Brazil where the degree of miscegenation is high.

  2. Activation of µ-opioid receptors and block of KIR3 potassium channels and NMDA receptor conductance by l- and d-methadone in rat locus coeruleus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsui, Aya; Williams, John T

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Methadone activates opioid receptors to increase a potassium conductance mediated by G-protein-coupled, inwardly rectifying, potassium (KIR3) channels. Methadone also blocks KIR3 channels and N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA) receptors. However, the concentration dependence and stereospecificity of receptor activation and channel blockade by methadone on single neurons has not been characterized. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Intracellular and whole-cell recording were made from locus coeruleus neurons in brain slices and the activation of µ-opioid receptors and blockade of KIR3 and NMDA channels with l- and d-methadone was examined. KEY RESULTS The potency of l-methadone, measured by the amplitude of hyperpolarization was 16.5-fold higher than with d-methadone. A maximum hyperpolarization was caused by both enantiomers (∼30 mV); however, the maximum outward current measured with whole-cell voltage-clamp recording was smaller than the current induced by [Met]5enkephalin. The KIR3 conductance induced by activation of α2-adrenoceptors was decreased with high concentrations of l- and d-methadone (10–30 µM). In addition, methadone blocked the resting inward rectifying conductance (KIR). Both l- and d-methadone blocked the NMDA receptor-dependent current. The block of NMDA receptor-dependent current was voltage-dependent suggesting that methadone acted as a channel blocker. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS Methadone activated µ-opioid receptors at low concentrations in a stereospecific manner. KIR3 and NMDA receptor channel block was not stereospecific and required substantially higher concentrations. The separation in the concentration range suggests that the activation of µ-opioid receptors rather than the channel blocking properties mediate both the therapeutic and toxic actions of methadone. PMID:20659105

  3. Genetic abnormalities in sporadic parathyroid adenomas: Loss of heterozygosity for chromosome 3q markers flanking the calcium receptor locus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thompson, D.B.; Samowitz, W.S.; Davis, K. [Univ. of Utah School of Medicine, Salt Lake City, UT (United States)] [and others

    1995-10-01

    Inactivating mutations of the parathyroid cell calcium receptor (CaR) gene cause one form of familial benign/hypocalciuric hypercalcemia, and in homozygous form, cause neonatal severe primary hyperparathyroidism with parathyroid hyperplasia. Thus, we postulated that partial or total loss of CaR function might contribute to calcium insensitivity or even stimulate cell proliferation in sporadic parathyroid adenomas (PAds). To examine this possibility, we sought loss of heterozygosity (LOH) for markers flanking the CaR locus (3cen-3q21) in 35 PAds. We used 16 highly-polymorphic PCR-based markers in paired normal and tumor DNA, extracted from archived surgical specimens. Nineteen to twenty-four of the DNA pairs were informative with at least one marker. In two informative pairs, we found LOH for markers D3S1303, D3S1267, or D3S1269, which are tightly-linked with and flank the CaR locus. In one tumor, deletion mapping confined the lost area between D3S1271 and D3S1238 (41.7 centimorgans, cM). In the other tumor, LOH spanned most of chromosome 3, ranging at least from D3S1307 to D3S1311 (271.4 cM). LOH was confirmed by repetition of the experiments and quantified by phosphorimaging. Thus, we found LOH encompassing the CaR locus in approximately 10% of sporadic PAds. These data are consistent with the hypothesis that loss of CaR function may occur in PAds, with functional consequences for calcium sensitivity and cell proliferation. 20 refs., 2 figs.

  4. Separation and characterization of alpha-chain subunits from tilapia (Tilapia zillii) skin gelatin using ultrafiltration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shulin; Tang, Lanlan; Su, Wenjin; Weng, Wuyin; Osako, Kazufumi; Tanaka, Munehiko

    2015-12-01

    Alpha-chain subunits were separated from tilapia skin gelatin using ultrafiltration, and the physicochemical properties of obtained subunits were investigated. As a result, α1-subunit and α2-subunit could be successfully separated by 100 kDa MWCO regenerated cellulose membranes and 150 kDa MWCO polyethersulfone membranes, respectively. Glycine was the most dominant amino acid in both α1-subunit and α2-subunit. However, the tyrosine content was higher in α2-subunit than in α1-subunit, resulting in strong absorption near 280 nm observed in the UV absorption spectrum. Based on the DSC analysis, it was found that the glass transition temperatures of gelatin, α1-subunit and α2-subunit were 136.48 °C, 126.77 °C and 119.43 °C, respectively. Moreover, the reduced viscosity and denaturation temperature of α1-subunit were higher than those of α2-subunit, and the reduced viscosity reached the highest when α-subunits were mixed with α1/α2 ratio of approximately 2, suggesting that α1-subunit plays a more important role in the thermostability of gelatin than α2-subunit. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Refined localization of the Escherichia coli F4ab/F4ac receptor locus on pig chromosome 13

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Joller, D.; Jørgensen, Claus Bøttcher; Bertschinger, H.U.

    2009-01-01

    Diarrhoea in newborn and weaned pigs caused by enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) expressing F4 fimbriae leads to considerable losses in pig production. In this study, we refined the mapping of the receptor locus for ETEC F4ab/F4ac adhesion (F4bcR) by joint analysis of Nordic and Swiss data....

  6. Sex-specific effects of naturally occurring variants in the dopamine receptor D2 locus on insulin secretion and Type 2 diabetes susceptibility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guigas, B; de Leeuw van Weenen, J E; van Leeuwen, N

    2014-01-01

    AIMS: Modulation of dopamine receptor D2 (DRD2) activity affects insulin secretion in both rodents and isolated pancreatic β-cells. We hypothesized that single nucleotide polymorphisms in the DRD2/ANKK1 locus may affect susceptibility to Type 2 diabetes in humans. METHODS: Four potentially...

  7. Paradoxical effect of noradrenaline-mediated neurotransmission in the antinociceptive phenomenon that accompanies tonic-clonic seizures: role of locus coeruleus neurons and α(2)- and β-noradrenergic receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felippotti, Tatiana Tocchini; dos Reis Ferreira, Célio Marcos; de Freitas, Renato Leonardo; de Oliveira, Rithiele Cristina; de Oliveira, Ricardo; Paschoalin-Maurin, Tatiana; Coimbra, Norberto Cysne

    2011-10-01

    The postictal state is generally followed by antinociception. It is known that connections between the dorsal raphe nucleus, the periaqueductal gray matter, and the locus coeruleus, an important noradrenergic brainstem nucleus, are involved in the descending control of ascending nociceptive pathways. The aim of the present study was to determine whether noradrenergic mechanisms in the locus coeruleus are involved in postictal antinociception. Yohimbine (an α(2)-receptor antagonist) or propranolol (a β-receptor antagonist) was microinjected unilaterally into the locus coeruleus, followed by intraperitoneal administration of pentylenetetrazole (PTZ), a noncompetitive antagonist that blocks GABA-mediated Cl(-) influx. Although the administration of both yohimbine and propranolol to the locus coeruleus/subcoeruleus area resulted in a significant decrease in tonic or tonic-clonic seizure-induced antinociception, the effect of yohimbine restricted to the locus coeruleus was more distinct compared with that of propranolol, possibly because of the presynaptic localization of α(2)-noradrenergic receptors in locus coeruleus neurons. These effects were related to the modulation of noradrenergic activity in the locus coeruleus. Interestingly, microinjections of noradrenaline into the locus coeruleus also decrease the postictal antinociception. The present results suggest that the mechanism underlying postictal antinociception involves both α(2)- and β-noradrenergic receptors in the locus coeruleus, although the action of noradrenaline on these receptors causes a paradoxical effect, depending on the nature of the local neurotransmission. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Obese locus in WNIN/obese rat maps on chromosome 5 upstream of leptin receptor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajender Rao Kalashikam

    Full Text Available WNIN/Obese (WNIN/Ob rat a new mutant model of metabolic syndrome was identified in 1996 from an inbred Wistar rat strain, WNIN. So far several papers are published on this model highlighting its physical, biochemical and metabolic traits. WNIN/Ob is leptin resistant with unaltered leptin or its receptor coding sequences--the two well-known candidate genes for obesity. Genotyping analysis of F2 progeny (raised from WNIN/Ob × Fisher--344 in the present study localized the mutation to a recombinant region of 14.15cM on chromosome 5. This was further corroborated by QTL analysis for body weight, which narrowed this region to 4.43 cM with flanking markers D5Rat256 & D5Wox37. Interval mapping of body weight QTL shows that the LOD score peak maps upstream of leptin receptor and shows an additive effect suggesting this as a novel mutation and signifying the model as a valuable resource for studies on obesity and metabolic syndrome.

  9. Family and population-based studies of variation within the ghrelin receptor locus in relation to measures of obesity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anette P Gjesing

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The growth hormone secretagogue receptor (GHSR is mediating hunger sensation when stimulated by its natural ligand ghrelin. In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that common and rare variation in the GHSR locus are related to increased prevalence of obesity and overweight among Whites. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In a population-based study sample of 15,854 unrelated, middle-aged Danes, seven variants were genotyped to capture common variation in an 11 kbp region including GHSR. These were investigated for their individual and haplotypic association with obesity. None of these analyses revealed consistent association with measures of obesity. A -151C/T promoter mutation in the GHSR was found in two unrelated obese patients. One family presented with complete co-segregation, but the other with incomplete co-segregation. The mutation resulted in an increased transcriptional activity (p0.05 could be shown. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: In a population-based study sample of 15,854 Danes no association between GHSR genotypes and measures of obesity and overweight was found. Also, analyses of GHSR haplotypes lack consistent associations with obesity related traits. A rare functional GHSR promoter mutation variant was identified, yet there was no consistent relationship with obesity in neither family- nor population-based studies.

  10. Extensive variation in gene copy number at the killer immunoglobulin-like receptor locus in humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanne Vendelbosch

    Full Text Available Killer immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIRs are involved in the regulation of natural killer cell cytotoxicity. Within the human genome seventeen KIR genes are present, which all contain a large number of allelic variants. The high level of homology among KIR genes has hampered KIR genotyping in larger cohorts, and determination of gene copy number variation (CNV has been difficult. We have designed a multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA technique for genotyping and CNV determination in one single assay and validated the results by next-generation sequencing and with a KIR gene-specific short tandem repeat assay. In this way, we demonstrate in a cohort of 120 individuals a high level of CNV for all KIR genes except for the framework genes KIR3DL3 and KIR3DL2. Application of our MLPA assay in segregation analyses of families from the Centre d'Etude du Polymorphisme Humaine, previously KIR-genotyped by classical techniques, confirmed an earlier reported duplication and resulted in the identification of a novel duplication event in one of these families. In summary, our KIR MLPA assay allows rapid and accurate KIR genotyping and CNV detection, thus rendering improved transplantation programs and oncology treatment feasible, and enables more detailed studies on the role of KIRs in human (autoimmunity and infectious disease.

  11. Extensive variation in gene copy number at the killer immunoglobulin-like receptor locus in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vendelbosch, Sanne; de Boer, Martin; Gouw, Remko A T W; Ho, Cynthia K Y; Geissler, Judy; Swelsen, Wendy T N; Moorhouse, Michael J; Lardy, Neubury M; Roos, Dirk; van den Berg, Timo K; Kuijpers, Taco W

    2013-01-01

    Killer immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIRs) are involved in the regulation of natural killer cell cytotoxicity. Within the human genome seventeen KIR genes are present, which all contain a large number of allelic variants. The high level of homology among KIR genes has hampered KIR genotyping in larger cohorts, and determination of gene copy number variation (CNV) has been difficult. We have designed a multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) technique for genotyping and CNV determination in one single assay and validated the results by next-generation sequencing and with a KIR gene-specific short tandem repeat assay. In this way, we demonstrate in a cohort of 120 individuals a high level of CNV for all KIR genes except for the framework genes KIR3DL3 and KIR3DL2. Application of our MLPA assay in segregation analyses of families from the Centre d'Etude du Polymorphisme Humaine, previously KIR-genotyped by classical techniques, confirmed an earlier reported duplication and resulted in the identification of a novel duplication event in one of these families. In summary, our KIR MLPA assay allows rapid and accurate KIR genotyping and CNV detection, thus rendering improved transplantation programs and oncology treatment feasible, and enables more detailed studies on the role of KIRs in human (auto)immunity and infectious disease.

  12. Noradrenaline release in the locus coeruleus modulates memory formation and consolidation; roles for α- and β-adrenergic receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbs, M E; Hutchinson, D S; Summers, R J

    2010-11-10

    Noradrenaline, essential for the modulation of memory, is released in various parts of the brain from nerve terminals controlled by the locus coeruleus (LoC). Noradrenaline release consequent upon input from higher brain areas also occurs within the LoC itself. We examined the effect of noradrenaline on adrenergic receptors in the LoC on memory processing, using colored bead discrimination learning in the young domestic chick. We have shown previously that the release of noradrenaline in the hippocampus and cortex (mesopallium) is essential for acquisition and consolidation of short-term to intermediate and to long-term memory. Noradrenaline release within the LoC is triggered by the glutamatergic input from the forebrain. Inhibition by LoC injection of NMDA or AMPA receptor antagonists is rescued by injection of β2-and β3-adrenoceptor (AR) agonists in the hippocampus. We show that inhibition of α2A-ARs by BRL44408 in the LoC up to 30 min post-training consolidates weakly-reinforced learning. Conversely activation of α2A-ARs in the LoC at the times of consolidation between short-term and intermediate and long-term memory caused memory loss, which is likely to be due to a decreased release of noradrenaline within these two time windows. The α2A-AR antagonist will block presynaptic inhibitory receptors leading to an increase in extracellular noradrenaline. This interpretation is supported by the actions of noradrenaline uptake blockers that produce the same memory outcome. BRL44408 in the mesopallium also caused memory enhancement. β2-ARs are important in the first time window, whereas α1-, α2C-and β3-ARs are important in the second time window. The results reveal that for successful memory formation noradrenaline release is necessary within the LoC as well as in other brain regions, at the time of consolidation of memory from short-term to intermediate and from intermediate to long-term memory. Copyright © 2010 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights

  13. Allelic variation of melanocortin-1 receptor locus in Saudi indigenous sheep exhibiting different color coats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed H. Mahmoud

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective This study was designed to characterize the DNA polymorphisms of the melanocortin-1 receptor (MC1R gene in indigenous Saudi Arabian sheep breeds exhibiting different color coats, along with individuals of the Sawaknee breed, an exotic sheep imported from Sudan. Methods The complete coding region of MC1R gene including parts of 3′ and 5′ untranslated regions was amplified and sequenced from three the indigenous Saudi sheep; Najdi (generally black, n = 41, Naeimi (generally white with brown faces, n = 36 and Herri (generally white, n = 18, in addition to 13 Sawaknee sheep. Results Five single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs were detected in the MC1R gene: two led to nonsynonymous mutations (c.218 T>A, p.73 Met>Lys and c.361 G>A, p.121 Asp>Asn and three led to synonymous mutations (c.429 C>T, p.143 Tyr>Tyr; c.600 T>G, p.200 Leu>Leu, and c.735 C>T, p.245 Ile>Ile. Based on these five SNPs, eight haplotypes representing MC1R Ed and E+ alleles were identified among the studied sheep breeds. The most common haplotype (H3 of the dominant Ed allele was associated with either black or brown coat color in Najdi and Sawaknee sheep, respectively. Two other haplotypes (H6 and H7 of Ed allele, with only the nonsynonymous mutation A218T, were detected for the first time in Saudi indigenous sheep. Conclusion In addition to investigating the MC1R allelic variation in Saudi indigenous sheep populations, the present study supports the assumption that the two independent nonsynonymous Met73Lys and Asp121Asn mutations in MC1R gene are associated with black or red coat colors in sheep breeds.

  14. Mutations at the mouse ichthyosis locus are within the lamin B receptor gene: a single gene model for human Pelger-Huët anomaly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shultz, Leonard D; Lyons, Bonnie L; Burzenski, Lisa M; Gott, Bruce; Samuels, Rebecca; Schweitzer, Peter A; Dreger, Christine; Herrmann, Harald; Kalscheuer, Vera; Olins, Ada L; Olins, Donald E; Sperling, Karl; Hoffmann, Katrin

    2003-01-01

    The nature of the wild-type gene product at the mouse ichthyosis (ic) locus has been of great interest because mutations at this locus cause marked abnormalities in nuclear heterochromatin, similar to those observed in Pelger-Huët anomaly (PHA). We recently found that human PHA is caused by mutations in the gene (LBR) encoding lamin B receptor, an evolutionarily conserved inner nuclear membrane protein involved in nuclear assembly and chromatin binding. Mice homozygous for deleterious alleles at the ichthyosis (ic) locus present with a blood phenotype similar to PHA, and develop other phenotypic abnormalities, including alopecia, variable expression of syndactyly and hydrocephalus. The ic locus on mouse chromosome 1 shares conserved synteny with the chromosomal location of the human LBR locus on human chromosome 1. In this study, we identified one nonsense (815ins) and two frameshift mutations (1088insCC and 1884insGGAA) within the Lbr gene of mice homozygous for either of three independent mutations (ic, ic(J) and ic(4J), respectively) at the ichthyosis locus. These allelic mutations are predicted to result in truncated or severely impaired LBR protein. Our studies of mice homozygous for the ic(J) mutation revealed a complete loss of LBR protein as shown by immunofluorescence microscopy and immunoblotting. The findings provide the molecular basis for the heterochromatin clumping and other distinct phenotypes caused by ic mutations. These spontaneous Lbr mutations confirm the molecular basis of human PHA and provide a small animal model for determination of the precise function of LBR in normal and pathological states.

  15. 9q31.2-rs865686 as a susceptibility locus for estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Warren, Helen; Dudbridge, Frank; Fletcher, Olivia

    2012-01-01

    Our recent genome-wide association study identified a novel breast cancer susceptibility locus at 9q31.2 (rs865686).......Our recent genome-wide association study identified a novel breast cancer susceptibility locus at 9q31.2 (rs865686)....

  16. Alpha chain hemoglobins with electrophoretic mobility similar to that of hemoglobin S in a newborn screening program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Marcilene Rezende; Sendin, Shimene Mascarenhas; Araujo, Isabela Couto de Oliveira; Pimentel, Fernanda Silva; Viana, Marcos Borato

    2013-01-01

    To characterize alpha-chain variant hemoglobins with electric mobility similar to that of hemoglobin S in a newborn screening program. β(S) allele and alpha-thalassemia deletions were investigated in 14 children who had undefined hemoglobin at birth and an electrophoretic profile similar to that of hemoglobin S when they were six months old. Gene sequencing and restriction enzymes (DdeI, BsaJI, NlaIV, Bsu36I and TaqI) were used to identify hemoglobins. Clinical and hematological data were obtained from children who attended scheduled medical visits. THE FOLLOWING ALPHA CHAIN VARIANTS WERE FOUND: seven children with hemoglobin Hasharon [alpha2 47(CE5) Asp>His, HbA2:c.142G>C], all associated with alpha-thalassemia, five with hemoglobin Ottawa [alpha1 15(A13) Gly>Arg, HBA1:c.46G>C], one with hemoglobin St Luke's [alpha1 95(G2) Pro>Arg, HBA1:c.287C>G] and another one with hemoglobin Etobicoke [alpha212 84(F5) Ser>Arg, HBA212:c.255C>G]. Two associations with hemoglobin S were found: one with hemoglobin Ottawa and one with hemoglobin St Luke's. The mutation underlying hemoglobin Etobicoke was located in a hybrid α212 allele in one child. There was no evidence of clinically relevant hemoglobins detected in this study. Apparently these are the first cases of hemoglobin Ottawa, St Luke's, Etobicoke and the α212 gene described in Brazil. The hemoglobins detected in this study may lead to false diagnosis of sickle cell trait or sickle cell disease when only isoelectric focusing is used in neonatal screening. Additional tests are necessary for the correct identification of hemoglobin variants.

  17. Alpha chain hemoglobins with electrophoretic mobility similar to that of hemoglobin S in a newborn screening program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcilene Rezende Silva

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To characterize alpha-chain variant hemoglobins with electric mobility similar to that of hemoglobin S in a newborn screening program. METHODS: βS allele and alpha-thalassemia deletions were investigated in 14 children who had undefined hemoglobin at birth and an electrophoretic profile similar to that of hemoglobin S when they were six months old. Gene sequencing and restriction enzymes (DdeI, BsaJI, NlaIV, Bsu36I and TaqI were used to identify hemoglobins. Clinical and hematological data were obtained from children who attended scheduled medical visits. RESULTS: The following alpha chain variants were found: seven children with hemoglobin Hasharon [alpha2 47(CE5 Asp>His, HbA2:c.142G>C], all associated with alpha-thalassemia, five with hemoglobin Ottawa [alpha1 15(A13 Gly>Arg, HBA1:c.46G>C], one with hemoglobin St Luke's [alpha1 95(G2 Pro>Arg, HBA1:c.287C>G] and another one with hemoglobin Etobicoke [alpha212 84(F5 Ser>Arg, HBA212:c.255C>G]. Two associations with hemoglobin S were found: one with hemoglobin Ottawa and one with hemoglobin St Luke's. The mutation underlying hemoglobin Etobicoke was located in a hybrid α212 allele in one child. There was no evidence of clinically relevant hemoglobins detected in this study. CONCLUSION: Apparently these are the first cases of hemoglobin Ottawa, St Luke's, Etobicoke and the α212 gene described in Brazil. The hemoglobins detected in this study may lead to false diagnosis of sickle cell trait or sickle cell disease when only isoelectric focusing is used in neonatal screening. Additional tests are necessary for the correct identification of hemoglobin variants.

  18. HB KURDISTAN [ALPHA-47(CE5)ASP-]TYR], A NEW ALPHA-CHAIN VARIANT IN COMBINATION WITH BETA-THALASSEMIA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    GIORDANO, PC; HARTEVELD, CL; STRENG, H; Oosterwijk, Jan; HEISTER, JGAM; AMONS, R; BERNINI, LF

    1994-01-01

    We have characterized the structural abnormality of a new alpha chain mutant found in a Kurdish; family. The clinical and hematological investigation of eight individuals have shown that the a variant is associated with a beta degrees-thalassemia mutation (nonsense codon 39). The tryptic peptide map

  19. Sheep (Ovis aries) T cell receptor alpha (TRA) and delta (TRD) genes and genomic organization of the TRA/TRD locus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piccinni, Barbara; Massari, Serafina; Caputi Jambrenghi, Anna; Giannico, Francesco; Lefranc, Marie-Paule; Ciccarese, Salvatrice; Antonacci, Rachele

    2015-09-18

    In mammals, T cells develop along two discrete pathways characterized by expression of either the αβ or the γδ T cell receptors. Human and mouse display a low peripheral blood γδ T cell percentage ("γδ low species") while sheep, bovine and pig accounts for a high proportion of γδ T lymphocytes ("γδ high species"). While the T cell receptor alpha (TRA) and delta (TRD) genes and the genomic organization of the TRA/TRD locus has been determined in human and mouse, this information is still poorly known in artiodactyl species, such as sheep. The analysis of the current Ovis aries whole genome assembly, Oar_v3.1, revealed that, as in the other mammalian species, the sheep TRD locus is nested within the TRA locus. In the most 5' part the TRA/TRD locus contains TRAV genes which are intermingled with TRDV genes, then TRD genes which include seven TRDD, four TRDJ genes, one TRDC and a single TRDV gene with an inverted transcriptional orientation, and finally in the most 3' part, the TRA locus is completed by 61 TRAJ genes and one TRAC gene. Comparative sequence and analysis and annotation led to the identification of 66 TRAV genes assigned to 34 TRAV subgroups and 25 TRDV genes belonging to the TRDV1 subgroup, while one gene was found for each TRDV2, TRDV3 and TRDV4 subgroups. Multiple duplication events within several TRAV subgroups have generated the sheep TRAV germline repertoire, which is substantially larger than the human one. A significant proportion of these TRAV gene duplications seems to have occurred simultaneously with the amplification of the TRDV1 subgroup genes. This dynamic of expansion has also generated novel multigene subgroups, which are species-specific. Ovis aries TRA and TRD genes identified in this study were assigned IMGT definitive or temporary names and were approved by the IMGT/WHO-IUIS nomenclature committee. The completeness of the genome assembly in the 3' part of the locus has allowed us to interpret rearranged CDR3 of cDNA from

  20. A Case-Control Study of the Association between Polymorphisms in the Fibrinogen Alpha Chain Gene and Schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenwang Rao

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Our previous studies using the mass spectrum analysis provided evidence that fibrinopeptide A (FPA could be a potential biomarker for schizophrenia diagnosis. We sought further to demonstrate that variants in the fibrinogen alpha chain gene (FGA coded FPA might confer vulnerability to schizophrenia. 1,145 patients with schizophrenia and 1,016 healthy volunteers from the Han population in Northeast China were recruited. The association of three tag single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs (rs2070011 in the 5′UTR, rs2070016 in intron 4, and rs2070022 in the 3′UTR in FGA and schizophrenia was examined using a case-control study design. Genotypic distributions of these three SNPs were not found to be significantly different between cases and controls (rs2070011: χ2=1.28, P=0.528; rs2070016: χ2=4.11, P=0.128; rs2070022: χ2=1.23, P=0.541. There were also no significant differences in SNP allelic frequencies between cases and controls (all P>0.05. Additionally, the frequency of haplotypes consisting of alleles of these three SNPs was not significantly different between cases and healthy control subjects (global χ2=9.27, P=0.159. Our study did not show a significant association of FGA SNPs with schizophrenia. Future studies may need to test more FGA SNPs in a larger sample to identify those SNPs with a minor or moderate effect on schizophrenia.

  1. The Brassica napus receptor-like protein RLM2 is encoded by a second allele of the LepR3/Rlm2 blackleg resistance locus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larkan, Nicholas J; Ma, Lisong; Borhan, Mohammad Hossein

    2015-09-01

    Leucine-rich repeat receptor-like proteins (LRR-RLPs) are highly adaptable parts of the signalling apparatus for extracellular detection of plant pathogens. Resistance to blackleg disease of Brassica spp. caused by Leptosphaeria maculans is largely governed by host race-specific R-genes, including the LRR-RLP gene LepR3. The blackleg resistance gene Rlm2 was previously mapped to the same genetic interval as LepR3. In this study, the LepR3 locus of the Rlm2 Brassica napus line 'Glacier DH24287' was cloned, and B. napus transformants were analysed for recovery of the Rlm2 phenotype. Multiple B. napus, B. rapa and B. juncea lines were assessed for sequence variation at the locus. Rlm2 was found to be an allelic variant of the LepR3 LRR-RLP locus, conveying race-specific resistance to L. maculans isolates harbouring AvrLm2. Several defence-related LRR-RLPs have previously been shown to associate with the RLK SOBIR1 to facilitate defence signalling. Bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) and co-immunoprecipitation of RLM2-SOBIR1 studies revealed that RLM2 interacts with SOBIR1 of Arabidopsis thaliana when co-expressed in Nicotiana benthamiana. The interaction of RLM2 with AtSOBIR1 is suggestive of a conserved defence signalling pathway between B. napus and its close relative A. thaliana. © 2015 Society for Experimental Biology, Association of Applied Biologists and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Further evidence of a relationship between the retinoic acid receptor alpha locus and nonsyndromic cleft lip with or without cleft palate (CL [+-] P)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shaw, D.; Field, L. (Univ. of Calgary (Canada)); Ray, A. (Univ. of Toronto (Canada)); Marazita, M. (Medical College of Virginia, Richmond, VA (United States))

    1993-11-01

    Chenevix-Trench et al. (1992) reported a significant difference between nonsyndromic cleft lip with or without cleft palate (CL [+-] P) cases and unrelated controls in the frequency of alleles at the retinoic acid receptor alpha (RARA) PstI RFLP located at 17q21.1. They also observed borderline significant (P = .055) differences between allele frequencies in subjects with cleft lip and palate (CL + P) compared with those with cleft lip only (CL). Retinoic acid (RA) is a known teratogen capable of producing cleft palate in rodents (Abbott and Birnbaum 1990). Chenevix-Tench et al. (1992) hypothesized that variation in susceptibility to the effects of RA in humans may result from alterations at the RARA locus. We have investigated association and linkage between CL [+-] P and a microsatellite marker (D17S579) located at 17q21 (Hall et al. 1992), selected for its proximity to RARA, in 14 extended multiplex families from rural West Bengal, India.

  3. Identification of a functional NF-kappa B binding site in the murine T cell receptor beta 2 locus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamieson, C; Mauxion, F; Sen, R

    1989-11-01

    We have identified a sequence in the TCR beta 2 locus that is homologous to the kappa B site in the Ig kappa light chain enhancer. This element, TCR beta-B, is located in the vicinity of previously identified T cell-specific DNase1 hypersensitive sites. Transfection analysis shows that a 60-bp fragment encompassing this site is preferentially active in T cells stimulated with phorbol esters or the HTLV-1 tax gene product compared with a B cell line that constitutively expresses NF-kappa B. Our results provide the first evidence for transcriptional regulatory sequences residing within the J beta 2-C beta 2 intron and suggest the possible involvement of these sequences in modulation of TCR beta gene expression upon cellular activation.

  4. Further evidence of no linkage between schizophrenia and the dopamine D{sub 3} receptor gene locus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nanko, S.; Fukuda, R.; Hattori, M. [Teikyo Univ. School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan)] [and others

    1994-09-15

    The dopamine hypothesis of schizophrenia proposed that dopaminergic pathways are involved in the etiology of the disease. In particular, interest among psychiatrists has focused on the D{sub 2} receptor because of its affinity to antipsychotic drugs. Recently a new dopamine receptor gene has been cloned and named the dopamine D{sub 3} receptor. The D{sub 3} receptor is a potential site for antipsychotic drug action and may be involved in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. We have carried out a linkage study between the susceptibility gene for schizophrenia and polymorphism of the dopamine D{sub 3} receptor gene in two Japanese pedigrees. The LOD scores were negative for all genetic models and for all affective status at a recombination fraction {theta} = 0. Linkage of DRD{sub 3} has been excluded for the model 1 (dominant model) and the model 3 (recessive model). The LOD score was -3.43 at {theta} = 0 for model 1 (dominant model) and broad definition of affected status. These results were consistent with previous studies. 19 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  5. The μ1-opioid receptor and 5-HT2A- and 5HT2C-serotonergic receptors of the locus coeruleus are critical in elaborating hypoalgesia induced by tonic and tonic-clonic seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Freitas, Renato Leonardo; Medeiros, Priscila; da Silva, Juliana Almeida; de Oliveira, Rithiele Cristina; de Oliveira, Ricardo; Ullah, Farhad; Khan, Asmat Ullah; Coimbra, Norberto Cysne

    2016-11-12

    It has been proposed that the post-ictal state is associated with the expression of hypoalgesia. It is clear that the projections among the periaqueductal gray matter (PAG), dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN) and locus coeruleus (LC) play a role in pain management. These mesencephalic structures have direct reciprocal opioid and monoaminergic projections to the LC that can possibly modulate post-ictal hypoalgesia. The goal of this study was to examine if LC-opioid and serotonergic/noradrenergic mechanisms signal the post-ictal hypoalgesic responses to tonic-clonic seizures produced by intraperitoneal administration of pentylenetetrazole (PTZ at 64mg/kg), causing an ionophore γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-mediated Cl(-) influx antagonism. The rodents' nociceptive threshold was measured by the tail-flick test. Intra-LC cobalt chloride (1.0nM/0.2μL) microinjections produced intermittent local synaptic inhibition and were able to reduce post-ictal hypoalgesia. Central administration of naltrexone (a non-selective antagonist for opioid receptors), naloxonazine (a selective antagonist for μ1-opioid-receptors), methysergide (a non-selective antagonist for serotonergic receptors) or ketanserin (an antagonist for both α1-noradrenergic and 5-Hydroxytryptamine(HT)2A/2C receptors) at 5.0μg/0.2μL, R-96544 (a 5-HT2A receptor selective antagonist) at 10nM/0.2μL, or RS-102221 (a 5-HT2C receptor selective antagonist) at 0.15μg/0.2μL into the LC also decreased post-ictal hypoalgesia. The data presented here suggest that the post-ictal antinociception mechanism involves the μ1-opiod, 5-HT2A- and 5-HT2C-serotonergic, and α1-noradrenergic receptors in the LC. Copyright © 2016 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Methyl CpG Binding Protein 2 Gene Disruption Augments Tonic Currents of γ-Aminobutyric Acid Receptors in Locus Coeruleus Neurons: IMPACT ON NEURONAL EXCITABILITY AND BREATHING.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Weiwei; Cui, Ningren; Jin, Xin; Oginsky, Max F; Wu, Yang; Zhang, Shuang; Bondy, Brian; Johnson, Christopher M; Jiang, Chun

    2015-07-24

    People with Rett syndrome and mouse models show autonomic dysfunction involving the brain stem locus coeruleus (LC). Neurons in the LC of Mecp2-null mice are overly excited, likely resulting from a defect in neuronal intrinsic membrane properties and a deficiency in GABA synaptic inhibition. In addition to the synaptic GABA receptors, there is a group of GABAA receptors (GABAARs) that is located extrasynaptically and mediates tonic inhibition. Here we show evidence for augmentation of the extrasynaptic GABAARs in Mecp2-null mice. In brain slices, exposure of LC neurons to GABAAR agonists increased tonic currents that were blocked by GABAAR antagonists. With 10 μm GABA, the bicuculline-sensitive tonic currents were ∼4-fold larger in Mecp2-null LC neurons than in the WT. Single-cell PCR analysis showed that the δ subunit, the principal subunit of extrasynaptic GABAARs, was present in LC neurons. Expression levels of the δ subunit were ∼50% higher in Mecp2-null neurons than in the WT. Also increased in expression in Mecp2-null mice was another extrasynaptic GABAAR subunit, α6, by ∼4-fold. The δ subunit-selective agonists 4,5,6,7-tetrahydroisoxazolo[5,4-c]pyridin-3-ol hydrochloride and 4-chloro-N-[2-(2-thienyl)imidazo[1,2-a]pyridin-3-yl

  7. Confirmation of 5p12 As a Susceptibility Locus for Progesterone-Receptor-Positive, Lower Grade Breast Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Milne, Roger L.; Goode, Ellen L.; Garca-Closas, Montserrat; Couch, Fergus J.; Severi, Gianluca; Hein, Rebecca; Fredericksen, Zachary; Malats, Nuria; Pilar Zamora, M.; Arias Perez, Jose Ignacio; Benitez, Javier; Doerk, Thilo; Schuermann, Peter; Karstens, Johann H.; Hillemanns, Peter; Cox, Angela; Brock, Ian W.; Elliot, Graeme; Cross, Simon S.; Seal, Sheila; Turnbull, Clare; Renwick, Anthony; Rahman, Nazneen; Shen, Chen-Yang; Yu, Jyh-Cherng; Huang, Chiun-Sheng; Hou, Ming-Feng; Nordestgaard, Borge G.; Bojesen, Stig E.; Lanng, Charlotte; Alnaes, Grethe Grenaker; Kristensen, Vessela; Borrensen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Hopper, John L.; Dite, Gillian S.; Apicella, Carmel; Southey, Melissa C.; Lambrechts, Diether; Yesilyurt, Betul T.; Floris, Giuseppe; Leunen, Karin; Sangrajrang, Suleeporn; Gaborieau, Valerie; Brennan, Paul; McKay, James; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Radice, Paolo; Peterlongo, Paolo; Manoukian, Siranoush; Barile, Monica; Giles, Graham G.; Baglietto, Laura; John, Esther M.; Miron, Alexander; Chanock, Stephen J.; Lissowska, Jolanta; Sherman, Mark E.; Figueroa, Jonine D.; Bogdanova, Natalia V.; Antonenkova, Natalia N.; Zalutsky, Iosif V.; Rogov, Yuri I.; Fasching, Peter A.; Bayer, Christian M.; Ekici, Arif B.; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Brenner, Hermann; Mueller, Heiko; Arndt, Volker; Stegmaier, Christa; Andrulis, Irene L.; Knight, Julia A.; Glendon, Gord; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Mannermaa, Arto; Kataja, Vesa; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Hartikainen, Jaana M.; Meindl, Alfons; Heil, Joerg; Bartram, Claus R.; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Thomas, Gilles D.; Hoover, Robert N.; Fletcher, Olivia; Gibson, Lorna J.; Silva, Isabel dos Santos; Peto, Julian; Nickels, Stefan; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Ziogas, Argyrios; Sawyer, Elinor; Tomlinson, Ian; Kerin, Michael; Miller, Nicola; Schmidt, Marjanka K.; Broeks, Annegien; Van't Veer, Laura J.; Tollenaar, Rob A. E. M.; Pharoah, Paul D. P.; Dunning, Alison M.; Pooley, Karen A.; Marme, Frederik; Schneeweiss, Andreas; Sohn, Christof; Burwinkel, Barbara; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubinski, Jan; Jaworska, Katarzyna; Durda, Katarzyna; Kang, Daehee; Yoo, Keun-Young; Noh, Dong-Young; Ahn, Sei-Hyun; Hunter, David J.; Hankinson, Susan E.; Kraft, Peter; Lindstrom, Sara; Chen, Xiaoqing; Beesley, Jonathan; Hamann, Ute; Harth, Volker; Justenhoven, Christina; Winqvist, Robert; Pylkas, Katri; Jukkola-Vuorinen, Arja; Grip, Mervi; Hooning, Maartje; Hollestelle, Antoinette; Oldenburg, Rogier A.; Tilanus-Linthorst, Madeleine; Khusnutdinova, Elza; Bermisheva, Marina; Prokofieva, Darya; Farahtdinova, Albina; Olson, Janet E.; Wang, Xianshu; Humphreys, Manjeet K.; Wang, Qin; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Easton, Douglas F.

    2011-01-01

    Background: The single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) 5p12-rs10941679 has been found to be associated with risk of breast cancer, particularly estrogen receptor (ER)-positive disease. We aimed to further explore this association overall, and by tumor histopathology, in the Breast Cancer Association

  8. Confirmation of 5p12 as a susceptibility locus for progesterone-receptor- positive, lower grade breast cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.L. Milne (Roger); E.L. Goode (Ellen); M. García-Closas (Montserrat); F.J. Couch (Fergus); G. Severi (Gianluca); R. Hein (Rebecca); Z. Fredericksen (Zachary); N. Malats (Núria); M.P. Zamora (Pilar); J.I.A. Perez (Jose Ignacio Arias); J. Benítez (Javier); T. Dörk (Thilo); P. Schürmann (Peter); J.H. Karstens (Johann); P. Hillemanns (Peter); A. Cox (Angela); I.W. Brock (Ian); K.S. Elliot (Katherine); S.S. Cross (Simon); S. Seal (Sheila); C. Turnbull (Clare); A. Renwick (Anthony); N. Rahman (Nazneen); C-Y. Shen (Chen-Yang); J-C. Yu (Jyh-Cherng); C.-S. Huang (Chiun-Sheng); M.-F. Hou (Ming-Feng); B.G. Nordestgaard (Børge); S.E. Bojesen (Stig); C. Lanng (Charlotte); G.G. Alnæs (Grethe); V. Kristensen (Vessela); A.-L. Børrensen-Dale (Anne-Lise); J.L. Hopper (John); G.S. Dite (Gillian); C. Apicella (Carmel); M.C. Southey (Melissa); D. Lambrechts (Diether); B.T. Yesilyurt (Betül); O.A.M. Floris; K. Leunen; S. Sangrajrang (Suleeporn); V. Gaborieau (Valerie); P. Brennan (Paul); J.D. McKay (James); J. Chang-Claude (Jenny); S. Wang-Gohrke (Shan); P. Radice (Paolo); P. Peterlongo (Paolo); S. Manoukian (Siranoush); M. Barile (Monica); G.G. Giles (Graham); L. Baglietto (Laura); E.M. John (Esther); A. Miron (Alexander); S.J. Chanock (Stephen); J. Lissowska (Jolanta); M.E. Sherman (Mark); J.D. Figueroa (Jonine); N.V. Bogdanova (Natalia); N.N. Antonenkova (Natalia); I.V. Zalutsky (Iosif); Y.I. Rogov (Yuri); P.A. Fasching (Peter); T. Bayer (T.); A.B. Ekici (Arif); M.W. Beckmann (Matthias); H. Brenner (Hermann); H. Müller (Heike); V. Arndt (Volker); C. Stegmaier (Christa); I.L. Andrulis (Irene); J.A. Knight (Julia); G. Glendon (Gord); A.M. Mulligan (Anna Marie); A. Mannermaa (Arto); V. Kataja (Vesa); V-M. Kosma (Veli-Matti); J. Hartikainen (Jaana); A. Meindl (Alfons); J. Heil (Joerg); C.R. Bartram (Claus); R.K. Schmutzler (Rita); G. Thomas (Gilles); R.N. Hoover (Robert); O. Fletcher (Olivia); L.J. Gibson (Lorna); I. dos Santos Silva (Isabel); J. Peto (Julian); S. Nickels (Stefan); D. Flesch-Janys (Dieter); H. Anton-Culver (Hoda); A. Ziogas (Argyrios); E.J. Sawyer (Elinor); I.P. Tomlinson (Ian); M. Kerin (Michael); N. Miller (Nicola); M.K. Schmidt (Marjanka); A. Broeks (Annegien); L.J. van 't Veer (Laura); R.A.E.M. Tollenaar (Rob); P.D.P. Pharoah (Paul); A.M. Dunning (Alison); K.A. Pooley (Karen); F. Marme (Federick); A. Schneeweiss (Andreas); C. Sohn (Christof); B. Burwinkel (Barbara); A. Jakubowska (Anna); J. Lubinski (Jan); K. Jaworska (Katarzyna); K. Durda (Katarzyna); D. Kang (Daehee); K-Y. Yoo (Keun-Young); D-Y. Noh (Dong-Young); S.-H. Ahn (Sei-Hyun); D. Hunter (David); S.E. Hankinson (Susan); P. Kraft (Peter); S. Lindstrom (Stephen); X. Chen (Xiaoqing); J. Beesley (Jonathan); U. Hamann (Ute); V. Harth (Volker); C. Justenhoven (Christina); R. Winqvist (Robert); K. Pykäs (Katri); A. Jukkola-Vuorinen (Arja); M. Grip (Mervi); M.J. Hooning (Maartje); A. Hollestelle (Antoinette); R.A. Oldenburg (Rogier); M.M.A. Tilanus-Linthorst (Madeleine); E.K. Khusnutdinova (Elza); M. Bermisheva (Marina); D. Prokofieva (Darya); A. Farahtdinova (Albina); J.E. Olson (Janet); X. Wang (Xing); M.K. Humphreys (Manjeet); Q. Wang (Qing); G. Chenevix-Trench (Georgia); D.F. Easton (Douglas)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractBackground: The single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) 5p12-rs10941679 has been found to be associated with risk of breast cancer, particularly estrogen receptor (ER)-positive disease. We aimed to further explore this association overall, and by tumor histopathology, in the Breast Cancer

  9. Confirmation of 5p12 As a Susceptibility Locus for Progesterone-Receptor-Positive, Lower Grade Breast Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Milne, Roger L; Goode, Ellen L; García-Closas, Montserrat

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) 5p12-rs10941679 has been found to be associated with risk of breast cancer, particularly estrogen receptor (ER)-positive disease. We aimed to further explore this association overall, and by tumor histopathology, in the Breast Cancer Associatio...

  10. Identification of the tyrosine-protein phosphatase non-receptor type 2 as a rheumatoid arthritis susceptibility locus in europeans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna E Cobb

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Genome-wide association studies have facilitated the identification of over 30 susceptibility loci for rheumatoid arthritis (RA. However, evidence for a number of potential susceptibility genes have not so far reached genome-wide significance in studies of Caucasian RA. METHODS: A cohort of 4286 RA patients from across Europe and 5642 population matched controls were genotyped for 25 SNPs, then combined in a meta-analysis with previously published data. RESULTS: Significant evidence of association was detected for nine SNPs within the European samples. When meta-analysed with previously published data, 21 SNPs were associated with RA susceptibility. Although SNPs in the PTPN2 gene were previously reported to be associated with RA in both Japanese and European populations, we show genome-wide evidence for a different SNP within this gene associated with RA susceptibility in an independent European population (rs7234029, P = 4.4×10(-9. CONCLUSIONS: This study provides further genome-wide evidence for the association of the PTPN2 locus (encoding the T cell protein tyrosine phosphastase with Caucasian RA susceptibility. This finding adds to the growing evidence for PTPN2 being a pan-autoimmune susceptibility gene.

  11. Identification of the Tyrosine-Protein Phosphatase Non-Receptor Type 2 as a Rheumatoid Arthritis Susceptibility Locus in Europeans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobb, Joanna E.; Plant, Darren; Flynn, Edward; Tadjeddine, Meriem; Dieudé, Philippe; Cornélis, François; Ärlestig, Lisbeth; Dahlqvist, Solbritt Rantapää; Goulielmos, George; Boumpas, Dimitrios T.; Sidiropoulos, Prodromos; Krintel, Sophine B.; Ørnbjerg, Lykke M.; Hetland, Merete L.; Klareskog, Lars; Haeupl, Thomas; Filer, Andrew; Buckley, Christopher D.; Raza, Karim; Witte, Torsten; Schmidt, Reinhold E.; FitzGerald, Oliver; Veale, Douglas; Eyre, Stephen; Worthington, Jane

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Genome-wide association studies have facilitated the identification of over 30 susceptibility loci for rheumatoid arthritis (RA). However, evidence for a number of potential susceptibility genes have not so far reached genome-wide significance in studies of Caucasian RA. Methods A cohort of 4286 RA patients from across Europe and 5642 population matched controls were genotyped for 25 SNPs, then combined in a meta-analysis with previously published data. Results Significant evidence of association was detected for nine SNPs within the European samples. When meta-analysed with previously published data, 21 SNPs were associated with RA susceptibility. Although SNPs in the PTPN2 gene were previously reported to be associated with RA in both Japanese and European populations, we show genome-wide evidence for a different SNP within this gene associated with RA susceptibility in an independent European population (rs7234029, P = 4.4×10−9). Conclusions This study provides further genome-wide evidence for the association of the PTPN2 locus (encoding the T cell protein tyrosine phosphastase) with Caucasian RA susceptibility. This finding adds to the growing evidence for PTPN2 being a pan-autoimmune susceptibility gene. PMID:23840476

  12. Cloning and characterization of tdhA, a locus encoding a TonB-dependent heme receptor from Haemophilus ducreyi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, C E; Olsen, B; Elkins, C

    1998-09-01

    Haemophilus ducreyi is unable to synthesize heme and must acquire it from its only known host, humans. We cloned and sequenced a gene encoding an outer membrane receptor for heme. It was designated tdhA (for TonB-dependent heme receptor A) since it was related by sequence homology to the family of TonB-dependent receptors. TdhA was strikingly similar to open reading frame HI0113 from the genome of Haemophilus influenzae Rd and also shared homology with five other heme receptors, including HxuC, HemR, HmuR, ChuA, and ShuA, from gram-negative bacteria. An Escherichia coli hemA tonB mutant strongly expressing H. ducreyi tdhA grew on low levels of heme as a source of heme only when an intact H. ducreyi Ton system plasmid was present, formally demonstrating functional TonB dependence. tdhA was expressed poorly in vitro by H. ducreyi and only under conditions of heme limitation. A survey of H. ducreyi revealed that all tested strains but one synthesized small amounts of TdhA in vitro under heme-limiting conditions. Surprisingly, an isogenic mutant of tdhA as well as its parent, 35000, both required the same high levels of heme for growth (50 microgram/ml [77 microM] on agar medium). This result, together with previous findings, suggests that in vitro, the uptake of heme by H. ducreyi is mediated by a TonB- and TdhA-independent mechanism, possibly diffusion.

  13. The Locus Coeruleus–Norepinephrine System Mediates Empathy for Pain through Selective Up-Regulation of P2X3 Receptor in Dorsal Root Ganglia in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun-Fei Lü

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Empathy for pain (vicariously felt pain, an ability to feel, recognize, understand and share the painful emotions of others, has been gradually accepted to be a common identity in both humans and rodents, however, the underlying neural and molecular mechanisms are largely unknown. Recently, we have developed a rat model of empathy for pain in which pain can be transferred from a cagemate demonstrator (CD in pain to a naïve cagemate observer (CO after 30 min dyadic priming social interaction. The naïve CO rats display both mechanical pain hypersensitivity (hyperalgesia and enhanced spinal nociception. Chemical lesions of bilateral medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC abolish the empathic pain response completely, suggesting existence of a top-down facilitation system in production of empathy for pain. However, the social transfer of pain was not observed in non-cagemate observer (NCO after dyadic social interaction with a non-cagemate demonstrator (NCD in pain. Here we showed that dyadic social interaction with a painful CD resulted in elevation of circulating norepinephrine (NE and increased neuronal activity in the locus coeruleus (LC in the CO rats. Meanwhile, CO rats also had over-expression of P2X3, but not TRPV1, in the dorsal root ganglia (DRG. Chemical lesion of the LC-NE neurons by systemic DSP-4 and pharmacological inhibition of central synaptic release of NE by clonidine completely abolished increase in circulating NE and P2X3 receptor expression, as well as the sympathetically-maintained development of empathic mechanical hyperalgesia. However, in the NCO rats, neither the LC-NE neuronal activity nor the P2X3 receptor expression was altered after dyadic social interaction with a painful NCD although the circulating corticosterone and NE were elevated. Finally, in the periphery, both P2X3 receptor and α1 adrenergic receptor were found to be involved in the development of empathic mechanical hyperalgesia. Taken together with our previous

  14. Linkage disequilibria at the D[sub 2] dopamine receptor locus (DRD2) in alcoholics and controls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suarez, B.K.; Parsian, A.; Hampe, C.L.; Todd, R.D.; Reich, T.; Cloninger, C.R. (Washington Univ. School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States))

    1994-01-01

    Because of its central role in the neuromodulation of appetitive behaviors, the D[sub 2] dopamine receptor gene (DRD2) has received considerable scrutiny as a possible candidate that may affect susceptibility to addictive behaviors--especially alcoholism. Association studies that compare the frequencies of anonymous restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RFLPs) in alcoholics and controls have yielded equivocal results, suggesting that any role played by this receptor will account for only part of the variation. Since these RFLPs are not located in coding regions, the hypothesis has been advanced that the association seen in some studies results from linkage disequilibrium between these markers and one or more functional DRD2 alleles that affect susceptibility. To test this hypothesis, the authors have assayed four DRD2 RFLPs that span coding regions as well as a 3[prime] flanking RFLP in an expanded sample of 88 unrelated Caucasian alcoholics and 89 unrelated race-matched controls. No significant difference for any RFLP frequency between these samples was observed, although for one marker (phD2-244), the alcoholic sample showed a significant departure from the Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. The pattern of pairwise composite disequilibrium coefficients is broadly similar in the two samples, although when the five-marker haplotype frequencies are compared, a significant difference is revealed. This difference appears to be due to greater linkage disequilibrium of the control sample. These results do not support the involvement of the DRD2 region in the etiology of alcoholism. 64 refs., 2 figs., 6 tabs.

  15. Orexin type 1 receptor antagonism in rat locus coeruleus prevents the analgesic effect of intra-LC met-enkephalin microinjection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammad Ahmadi Soleimani, S; Azizi, Hossein; Mirnajafi-Zadeh, Javad; Semnanian, Saeed

    2015-09-01

    Long-term administration of opiates leads to development of tolerance to analgesic effects. This in turn compromise clinical use of these drugs for pain management. Although extensive studies have been conducted, the involved cellular mechanisms are still poorly understood. The nucleus locus coeruleus (LC), which is a dense homogenous cluster of noradrenergic neurons in brainstem, has been reported to be involved in mediating opiate effects including analgesia and tolerance. LC neurons express a high density of opioid receptors. On the other hand, orexinergic neurons send widespread projections to the LC region. Among the two types of orexin receptors (OX1R and OX2R), OX1R is highly expressed in LC neurons. It has been shown that orexin-A is involved in modulation of nociceptive behavior. Also, previous studies have demonstrated the involvement of OX1R in the development of morphine induced analgesia and tolerance. In the present study, the involvement of OX1R in development of met-enkephalin (ME) analgesic tolerance was investigated in LC nucleus. The tail flick test was used to evaluate the analgesic effect of intra-LC microinjection of ME in male Wistar rats (250-300g). Analgesic responses were reported as the percentage of maximum possible effect (% of MPE). Also, SB-334867 was used as a selective OX1R antagonist. Results indicate that intra-LC microinjection of ME (5μg/100nL) results in development of analgesic tolerance in 3days. Also, OX1R antagonism in LC nucleus significantly prevents the analgesic effect of intra-LC met-enkephalin microinjection. It appears that the analgesic effect of ME in LC neurons is mediated by orexinergic system. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Linkage disequilibrium between an allele at the dopamine D4 receptor locus and Tourette syndrome, by the transmission-disequilibrium test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grice, D.E.; Gelernter, J. [Veterans Administration Connecticut Healthcare System, West Haven, CT (United States); Leckman, J.F.; Pauls, D.L. [Yale Univ. School of Medicine, New Haven, CT (United States)] [and others

    1996-09-01

    Dopaminergic abnormalities are implicated in the pathogenesis of Tourette syndrome (TS) and chronic multiple tics. We used the transmission-disequilibrium test (TDT) method to test for linkage disequilibrium between a specific allele (the seven-repeat allele (DRD4*7R) of the exon 3 VNTR polymorphic site) at the D4 dopamine receptor locus (DRD4) and expression of chronic multiple tics and TS. This particular allele had been shown in functional studies to have different binding properties compared with the other common alleles in this DRD4 polymorphic system. We studied 64 family trios (consisting of an affected person and two parents, at least one heterozygous for DRD4*7R), including 12 nuclear family trios and 52 trios from four large TS kindreds. The DRD4*7R allele was transmitted significantly more frequently than expected ({chi}{sup 2}{sub TDT} ranging from 8.47 [P < .004] to 10.80 [P = .001], depending on breadth of disease definition and inclusion or exclusion of inferred genotypes). Confirmation of this finding will depend on either replication in other samples or the identification of a transmitted functional mutation within this sample. 56 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  17. Association study of nicotinic acetylcholine receptor genes identifies a novel lung cancer susceptibility locus near CHRNA1 in African-Americans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Kyle M; Amos, Christopher I; Wenzlaff, Angela S; Gorlov, Ivan P; Sison, Jennette D; Wu, Xifeng; Spitz, Margaret R; Hansen, Helen M; Lu, Emily Y; Wei, Chongjuan; Zhang, Huifeng; Chen, Wei; Lloyd, Stacy M; Frazier, Marsha L; Bracci, Paige M; Seldin, Michael F; Wrensch, Margaret R; Schwartz, Ann G; Wiencke, John K

    2012-11-01

    Studies in European and East Asian populations have identified lung cancer susceptibility loci in nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) genes on chromosome 15q25.1 which also appear to influence smoking behaviors. We sought to determine if genetic variation in nAChR genes influences lung cancer susceptibly in African-Americans, and evaluated the association of these cancer susceptibility loci with smoking behavior. A total of 1308 African-Americans with lung cancer and 1241 African-American controls from three centers were genotyped for 378 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) spanning the sixteen human nAChR genes. Associations between SNPs and the risk of lung cancer were estimated using logistic regression, adjusted for relevant covariates. Seven SNPs in three nAChR genes were significantly associated with lung cancer at a strict Bonferroni-corrected level, including a novel association on chromosome 2 near the promoter of CHRNA1 (rs3755486: OR = 1.40, 95% CI = 1.18-1.67, P = 1.0 x 10-4). Association analysis of an additional 305 imputed SNPs on 2q31.1 supported this association. Publicly available expression data demonstrated that the rs3755486 risk allele correlates with increased CHRNA1 gene expression. Additional SNP associations were observed on 15q25.1 in genes previously associated with lung cancer, including a missense variant in CHRNA5 (rs16969968: OR = 1.60, 95% CI = 1.27-2.01, P = 5.9 x 10-5). Risk alleles on 15q25.1 also correlated with an increased number of cigarettes smoked per day among the controls. These findings identify a novel lung cancer risk locus on 2q31.1 which correlates with CHRNA1 expression and replicate previous associations on 15q25.1 in African-Americans.

  18. Differential neuroprotective and anti-inflammatory effects of L-type voltage dependent calcium channel and ryanodine receptor antagonists in the substantia nigra and locus coeruleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopp, Sarah C; Royer, Sarah E; D'Angelo, Heather M; Kaercher, Roxanne M; Fisher, David A; Wenk, Gary L

    2015-03-01

    Neuroinflammation and degeneration of catecholaminergic brainstem nuclei occur early in neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease. Neuroinflammation increases levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines and reactive oxygen species which can alter neuronal calcium (Ca(+2)) homoeostasis via L-type voltage dependent calcium channels (L-VDCCs) and ryanodine receptors (RyRs). Alterations in Ca(+2) channel activity in the SN and LC can lead to disruption of normal pacemaking activity in these areas, contributing to behavioral deficits. Here, we utilized an in vivo model of chronic neuroinflammation: rats were infused intraventricularly with a continuous small dose (0.25 μg/h) of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or artificial cerebrospinal fluid (aCSF) for 28 days. Rats were treated with either the L-VDCC antagonist nimodipine or the RyR antagonist dantrolene. LPS-infused rats had significant motor deficits in the accelerating rotarod task as well as abnormal behavioral agitation in the forced swim task and open field. Corresponding with these behavioral deficits, LPS-infused rats also had significant increases in microglia activation and loss of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) immunoreactivity in the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNpc) and locus coeruleus (LC). Treatment with nimodipine or dantrolene normalized LPS-induced abnormalities in the rotarod and forced swim, restored the number of TH-immunoreactive cells in the LC, and significantly reduced microglia activation in the SNpc. Only nimodipine significantly reduced microglia activation in the LC, and neither drug increased TH immunoreactivity in the SNpc. These findings demonstrate that the Ca(+2) dysregulation in the LC and SN brainstem nuclei is differentially altered by chronic neuroinflammation. Overall, targeting Ca + 2 dysregulation may be an important target for ameliorating neurodegeneration in the SNpc and LC.

  19. [Somatic mutagenesis at T-cell receptor locus in inhabitants of radiation polluted regions as a result of the Chernobyl disaster].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamulaeva, I A; Smirnova, S G; Orlova, N V; Vereshchagina, O A; Chekin, S Iu; Smirnova, I A; Krikunova, L I; Parshin, V S; Ivanov, V K; Saenko, A S

    2006-01-01

    In the period of 2001-2004, frequency of cells bearing mutations at T-cell receptor (TCR) locus was assessed in 553 inhabitants of radiation polluted regions of the Russian Federation and 154 unexposed control persons. The inhabitants were divided into three groups according to age at the moment of the Chernobyl disaster and 137Cs pollution density: 1) in utero, 37-555 kBq/m2; 2) 0-14 years old, 20-555 kBq/m2; 3) 18 and more years old, highest 137Cs density (185 more than 555 kBq/m2). The most intense changes of the TCR-mutant cell frequency were observed in the group of persons exposed to ionizing radiation in utero. The mean frequency of the mutant cells was higher in the first group than in age-matched control group by about 1.5-fold: 4.0 x 10(-4) vs 2.7 x 10(-4) accordingly (p Chernobyl accident). The changes of the TCR-mutant cell frequency in persons exposed in pre- and postnatal periods differ not only quantitatively, but qualitatively. In the fist case all persons react to irradiation by increasing number of the TCR-mutant cells in some degree. In the second case - only a part of population. Proportion of reacting persons depends on age at the start of irradiation and, perhaps, on dose absorbed. The TCR-mutant frequency was significantly higher in persons with benign tumors of different localizations and nodules in thyroid gland than in persons without this pathology.

  20. An analysis paradigm for investigating multi-locus effects in complex disease: examination of three GABA receptor subunit genes on 15q11-q13 as risk factors for autistic disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashley-Koch, A E; Mei, H; Jaworski, J; Ma, D Q; Ritchie, M D; Menold, M M; Delong, G R; Abramson, R K; Wright, H H; Hussman, J P; Cuccaro, M L; Gilbert, J R; Martin, E R; Pericak-Vance, M A

    2006-05-01

    Gene-gene interactions are likely involved in many complex genetic disorders and new statistical approaches for detecting such interactions are needed. We propose a multi-analytic paradigm, relying on convergence of evidence across multiple analysis tools. Our paradigm tests for main and interactive effects, through allele, genotype and haplotype association. We applied our paradigm to genotype data from three GABAA receptor subunit genes (GABRB3, GABRA5, and GABRG3) on chromosome 15 in 470 Caucasian autism families. Previously implicated in autism, we hypothesized these genes interact to contribute to risk. We detected no evidence of main effects by allelic (PDT, FBAT) or genotypic (genotype-PDT) association at individual markers. However, three two-marker haplotypes in GABRG3 were significant (HBAT). We detected no significant multi-locus associations using genotype-PDT analysis or the EMDR data reduction program. However, consistent with the haplotype findings, the best single locus EMDR model selected a GABRG3 marker. Further, the best pairwise genotype-PDT result involved GABRB3 and GABRG3, and all multi-locus EMDR models also selected GABRB3 and GABRG3 markers. GABA receptor subunit genes do not significantly interact to contribute to autism risk in our overall data set. However, the consistency of results across analyses suggests that we have defined a useful framework for evaluating gene-gene interactions.

  1. 9q31.2-rs865686 as a Susceptibility Locus for Estrogen Receptor-Positive Breast Cancer: Evidence from the Breast Cancer Association Consortium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, Helen; Dudbridge, Frank; Fletcher, Olivia; Orr, Nick; Johnson, Nichola; Hopper, John L.; Apicella, Carmel; Southey, Melissa C.; Mahmoodi, Maryam; Schmidt, Marjanka K.; Broeks, Annegien; Cornelissen, Sten; Braaf, Linda M.; Muir, Kenneth R.; Lophatananon, Artitaya; Chaiwerawattana, Arkom; Wiangnon, Surapon; Fasching, Peter A.; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Ekici, Arif B.; Schulz-Wendtland, Ruediger; Sawyer, Elinor J.; Tomlinson, Ian; Kerin, Michael; Burwinkel, Barbara; Marme, Frederik; Schneeweiss, Andreas; Sohn, Christof; Guénel, Pascal; Truong, Thérèse; Laurent-Puig, Pierre; Mulot, Claire; Bojesen, Stig E; Nielsen, Sune F.; Flyger, Henrik; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Milne, Roger L.; Benítez, Javier; Arias-Pérez, José-Ignacio; Zamora, M. Pilar; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Ziogas, Argyrios; Bernstein, Leslie; Dur, Christina Clarke; Brenner, Hermann; Müller, Heiko; Arndt, Volker; Langheinz, Anne; Meindl, Alfons; Golatta, Michael; Bartram, Claus R.; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Brauch, Hiltrud; Justenhoven, Christina; Brüning, Thomas; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Eilber, Ursula; Dörk, Thilo; Schürmann, Peter; Bremer, Michael; Hillemanns, Peter; Nevanlinna, Heli; Muranen, Taru A.; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Blomqvist, Carl; Bogdanova, Natalia; Antonenkova, Natalia; Rogov, Yuriy; Bermisheva, Marina; Prokofyeva, Darya; Zinnatullina, Guzel; Khusnutdinova, Elza; Lindblom, Annika; Margolin, Sara; Mannermaa, Arto; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Hartikainen, Jaana M.; Kataja, Vesa; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Beesley, Jonathan; Chen, Xiaoqing; Lambrechts, Diether; Smeets, Ann; Paridaens, Robert; Weltens, Caroline; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Buck, Katharina; Behrens, Sabine; Peterlongo, Paolo; Bernard, Loris; Manoukian, Siranoush; Radice, Paolo; Couch, Fergus J.; Vachon, Celine; Wang, Xianshu; Olson, Janet; Giles, Graham; Baglietto, Laura; McLean, Cariona A.; Severi, Gianluca; John, Esther M.; Miron, Alexander; Winqvist, Robert; Pylkäs, Katri; Jukkola-Vuorinen, Arja; Grip, Mervi; Andrulis, Irene L.; Knight, Julia A.; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Weerasooriya, Nayana; Devilee, Peter; Tollenaar, Robert A.E.M.; Martens, John W.M.; Seynaeve, Caroline M.; Hooning, Maartje J.; Hollestelle, Antoinette; Jager, Agnes; Tilanus-Linthorst, Madeleine M.A.; Hall, Per; Czene, Kamila; Liu, Jianjun; Li, Jingmei; Cox, Angela; Cross, Simon S.; Brock, Ian W.; Reed, Malcolm W.R.; Pharoah, Paul; Blows, Fiona M.; Dunning, Alison M.; Ghoussaini, Maya; Ashworth, Alan; Swerdlow, Anthony; Jones, Michael; Schoemaker, Minouk; Easton, Douglas F.; Humphreys, Manjeet; Wang, Qin; Peto, Julian; dos-Santos-Silva, Isabel

    2013-01-01

    Background Our recent genome-wide association study identified a novel breast cancer susceptibility locus at 9q31.2 (rs865686). Methods To further investigate the rs865686–breast cancer association, we conducted a replication study within the Breast Cancer Association Consortium, which comprises 37 case–control studies (48,394 cases, 50,836 controls). Results This replication study provides additional strong evidence of an inverse association between rs865686 and breast cancer risk [study-adjusted per G-allele OR, 0.90; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.88; 0.91, P = 2.01 × 10–29] among women of European ancestry. There were ethnic differences in the estimated minor (G)-allele frequency among controls [0.09, 0.30, and 0.38 among, respectively, Asians, Eastern Europeans, and other Europeans; P for heterogeneity (Phet) = 1.3 × 10–143], but no evidence of ethnic differences in per allele OR (Phet = 0.43). rs865686 was associated with estrogen receptor–positive (ER+) disease (per G-allele OR, 0.89; 95% CI, 0.86–0.91; P = 3.13 × 10–22) but less strongly, if at all, with ER-negative (ER–) disease (OR, 0.98; 95% CI, 0.94–1.02; P = 0.26; Phet = 1.16 × 10–6), with no evidence of independent heterogeneity by progesterone receptor or HER2 status. The strength of the breast cancer association decreased with increasing age at diagnosis, with case-only analysis showing a trend in the number of copies of the G allele with increasing age at diagnosis (P for linear trend = 0.0095), but only among women with ER+ tumors. Conclusions This study is the first to show that rs865686 is a susceptibility marker for ER+ breast cancer. Impact The findings further support the view that genetic susceptibility varies according to tumor subtype. PMID:22859399

  2. The effects of intra-locus coeruleus injection of dopamine D2 receptor agents on Naloxone withdrawal signs in Morphine-dependent rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirzaii Dizgah I

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Opiate-induced addiction is a main social problem in Iran. As treatment of this problem is a health priority among the medical community, studies on this topic are very crucial. The exact mechanism of dependence on opiates and their withdrawal syndrome remain unclear. It seems that dopaminergic system and locus coeruleus (LC have an important role in the expression of somatic signs during opioids withdrawal. The LC has been shown to contain significant levels of dopamine (DA. In the present study, the effects of different D2 dopaminergic receptor agonist and antagonist administration in the LC on withdrawal sign expression in morphine dependence is investigated in rats. Methods: Adult male Wistar rats, weighing 220–280 g were divided into eight groups (n=8. Two cannulae were stereotaxically implanted bilaterally into the LC of each rat. After a one-week recovery, seven groups were rendered dependent on morphine by subcutaneous injection during a seven-day period. Non-dependent control animals received saline according to the same protocol. Animals received bilateral intra-LC injections of saline (1 μg/site and quinpirole (0.1, 0.3 and 0.5 μg/site, a D2 agonist 15 min and sulpiride (5, 15 and 30 μg/site, a D2 antagonist 30 min prior to naloxone injection about 24 hours after the last dose of morphine or saline according to their respective group. To calculate the total withdrawal score, as an index of withdrawal syndrome, 20 different withdrawal signs were assessed and the scores of the intensity of these withdrawal signs were added. Results: Total withdrawal scores were significantly decreased by quinpirole (0.1µg/site and sulpiride (15 and 30 µg/site. Conclusion: The D2 dopaminergic system in the LC may be involved in the morphine-induced dependency in rats. Further studies are needed to define the mechanism of this dependency in order to improve methods for the rehabilitation of addicts.

  3. 9q31.2-rs865686 as a susceptibility locus for estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer: Evidence from the Breast Cancer Association Consortium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H. Warren (Helen); F. Dudbridge (Frank); O. Fletcher (Olivia); N. Orr (Nick); N. Johnson (Nichola); J.L. Hopper (John); C. Apicella (Carmel); M.C. Southey (Melissa); M. Mahmoodi (Maryam); M.K. Schmidt (Marjanka); A. Broeks (Annegien); S. Cornelissen (Sten); L.M. Braaf (Linde); K.R. Muir (Kenneth); A. Lophatananon (Artitaya); A. Chaiwerawattana (Arkom); S. Wiangnon (Surapon); P.A. Fasching (Peter); M.W. Beckmann (Matthias); A.B. Ekici (Arif); R. Schulz-Wendtland (Rüdiger); E.J. Sawyer (Elinor); I.P. Tomlinson (Ian); M. Kerin (Michael); B. Burwinkel (Barbara); F. Marme (Federick); A. Schneeweiss (Andreas); C. Sohn (Christof); P. Guénel (Pascal); T. Truong (Thérèse); P. Laurent-Puig (Pierre); C. Mulot (Claire); S.E. Bojesen (Stig); S.F. Nielsen (Sune); H. Flyger (Henrik); B.G. Nordestgaard (Børge); R.L. Milne (Roger); J. Benítez (Javier); J.I. Arias Pérez (José Ignacio); M.P. Zamora (Pilar); H. Anton-Culver (Hoda); A. Ziogas (Argyrios); L. Bernstein (Leslie); C.C. Dur (Christina Clarke); H. Brenner (Hermann); H. Müller (Heike); V. Arndt (Volker); A. Langheinz (Anne); A. Meindl (Alfons); M. Golatta (Michael); C.R. Bartram (Claus); R.K. Schmutzler (Rita); H. Brauch (Hiltrud); C. Justenhoven (Christina); T. Brüning (Thomas); J. Chang-Claude (Jenny); S. Wang-Gohrke (Shan); U. Eilber (Ursula); T. Dörk (Thilo); P. Schürmann (Peter); M. Bremer (Michael); P. Hillemanns (Peter); H. Nevanlinna (Heli); T.A. Muranen (Taru); K. Aittomäki (Kristiina); C. Blomqvist (Carl); N.V. Bogdanova (Natalia); N.N. Antonenkova (Natalia); Y.I. Rogov (Yuri); M. Bermisheva (Marina); D. Prokofyeva (Darya); G. Zinnatullina (Guzel); E.K. Khusnutdinova (Elza); A. Lindblom (Annika); S. Margolin (Sara); A. Mannermaa (Arto); V-M. Kosma (Veli-Matti); J. Hartikainen (Jaana); V. Kataja (Vesa); G. Chenevix-Trench (Georgia); J. Beesley (Jonathan); X. Chen (Xiaoqing); D. Lambrechts (Diether); A. Smeets (Ann); R. Paridaens (Robert); C. Weltens (Caroline); D. Flesch-Janys (Dieter); K. Buck (Katharina); T.W. Behrens (Timothy); P. Peterlongo (Paolo); L. Bernard (Loris); S. Manoukian (Siranoush); P. Radice (Paolo); F.J. Couch (Fergus); C. Vachon (Celine); X. Wang (Xing); J.E. Olson (Janet); G.G. Giles (Graham); L. Baglietto (Laura); C.A. McLean (Cariona); G. Severi (Gianluca); E.M. John (Esther); A. Miron (Alexander); R. Winqvist (Robert); K. Pykäs (Katri); A. Jukkola-Vuorinen (Arja); M. Grip (Mervi); I.L. Andrulis (Irene); J.A. Knight (Julia); A.M. Mulligan (Anna Marie); N. Weerasooriya (Nayana); P. Devilee (Peter); R.A.E.M. Tollenaar (Rob); J.W.M. Martens (John); C.M. Seynaeve (Caroline); M.J. Hooning (Maartje); A. Hollestelle (Antoinette); A. Jager (Agnes); M.M.A. Tilanus-Linthorst (Madeleine); P. Hall (Per); K. Czene (Kamila); J. Liu (Jianjun); J. Li (Jingmei); A. Cox (Angela); S.S. Cross (Simon); I.W. Brock (Ian); M.W.R. Reed (Malcolm); P.D.P. Pharoah (Paul); F. Blows (Fiona); A.M. Dunning (Alison); M. Ghoussaini (Maya); A. Ashworth (Alan); A.J. Swerdlow (Anthony ); M. Jones (Marta); M. Schoemaker (Minouk); D.F. Easton (Douglas); M.K. Humphreys (Manjeet); Q. Wang (Qing); J. Peto (Julian); I. dos Santos Silva (Isabel)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Our recent genome-wide association study identified a novel breast cancer susceptibility locus at 9q31.2 (rs865686). Methods: To further investigate the rs865686-breast cancer association, we conducted a replication study within the Breast Cancer Association Consortium, which

  4. miR-451 deficiency is associated with altered endometrial fibrinogen alpha chain expression and reduced endometriotic implant establishment in an experimental mouse model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Warren B Nothnick

    Full Text Available Endometriosis is defined as the growth of endometrial glandular and stromal components in ectopic locations and affects as many as 10% of all women of reproductive age. Despite its high prevalence, the pathogenesis of endometriosis remains poorly understood. MicroRNAs, small non-coding RNAs that post-transcriptionally regulate gene expression, are mis-expressed in endometriosis but a functional role in the disease pathogenesis remains uncertain. To examine the role of microRNA-451 (miR-451 in the initial development of endometriosis, we utilized a novel mouse model in which eutopic endometrial fragments used to induce endometriosis were deficient for miR-451. After induction of the disease, we evaluated the impact of this deficiency on implant development and survival. Loss of miR-451 expression resulted in a lower number of ectopic lesions established in vivo. Analysis of differential protein profiles between miR-451 deficient and wild-type endometrial fragments revealed that fibrinogen alpha polypeptide isoform 2 precursor was approximately 2-fold higher in the miR-451 null donor endometrial tissue and this elevated expression of the protein was associated with altered expression of the parent fibrinogen alpha chain mRNA and protein. As this polypeptide contains RGD amino acid "cell adhesion" motifs which could impact early establishment of lesion development, we examined and confirmed using a cyclic RGD peptide antagonist, that endometrial cell adhesion and endometriosis establishment could be respectively inhibited both in vitro and in vivo. Collectively, these results suggest that the reduced miR-451 eutopic endometrial expression does not enhance initial establishment of these fragments when displaced into the peritoneal cavity, that loss of eutopic endometrial miR-451 expression is associated with altered expression of fibrinogen alpha chain mRNA and protein, and that RGD cyclic peptide antagonists inhibit establishment of endometriosis

  5. Common polymorphisms within the NR4A3 locus, encoding the orphan nuclear receptor Nor-1, are associated with enhanced β-cell function in non-diabetic subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuusisto Johanna

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Neuron-derived orphan receptor (Nor 1, nuclear receptor (Nur 77, and nuclear receptor-related protein (Nurr 1 constitute the NR4A family of orphan nuclear receptors which were recently found to modulate hepatic glucose production, insulin signalling in adipocytes, and oxidative metabolism in skeletal muscle. In this study, we assessed whether common genetic variation within the NR4A3 locus, encoding Nor-1, contributes to the development of prediabetic phenotypes, such as glucose intolerance, insulin resistance, or β-cell dysfunction. Methods We genotyped 1495 non-diabetic subjects from Southern Germany for the five tagging single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs rs7047636, rs1526267, rs2416879, rs12686676, and rs10819699 (minor allele frequencies ≥ 0.05 covering 100% of genetic variation within the NR4A3 locus (with D' = 1.0, r2 ≥ 0.9 and assessed their association with metabolic data derived from the fasting state, an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT, and a hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp (subgroup, N = 506. SNPs that revealed consistent associations with prediabetic phenotypes were subsequently genotyped in a second cohort (METSIM Study; Finland; N = 5265 for replication. Results All five SNPs were in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium (p ≥ 0.7, all. The minor alleles of three SNPs, i.e., rs1526267, rs12686676, and rs10819699, consistently tended to associate with higher insulin release as derived from plasma insulin at 30 min(OGTT, AUCC-peptide-to-AUCGluc ratio and the AUCIns30-to-AUCGluc30 ratio with rs12686676 reaching the level of significance (p ≤ 0.03, all; additive model. The association of the SNP rs12686676 with insulin secretion was replicated in the METSIM cohort (p ≤ 0.03, additive model. There was no consistent association with glucose tolerance or insulin resistance in both study cohorts. Conclusion We conclude that common genetic variation within the NR4A3 locus determines insulin secretion. Thus, NR4A3

  6. Surface expression of only gamma delta and/or alpha beta T cell receptor heterodimers by cells with four (alpha, beta, gamma, delta) functional receptor chains

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Saito, T.; Hochstenbach, F.; Marusic-Galesic, S.; Kruisbeek, A. M.; BRENNER, M.; GERMAIN, R. N.

    1988-01-01

    Surface expression of TCR dimers by cells synthesizing three or four distinct types of receptor chains was analyzed. Cells containing intact gamma, alpha, and beta chains had only gamma delta dimers on the cell surface. In human PEER cells, addition of a functional alpha chain led to the loss of

  7. Neonatal handling reduces angiotensin II receptor density in the medial preoptic area and paraventricular nucleus but not in arcuate nucleus and locus coeruleus of female rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Cármen Marilei; Donadio, Márcio Vinícius Fagundes; Franskoviaki, Inélia; Anselmo-Franci, Janete A; Franci, Celso Rodrigues; Lucion, Aldo Bolten; Sanvitto, Gilberto Luiz

    2006-01-05

    Neonatal handling alters the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis and the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonads axis (HPG) in adult animals, and angiotensin II (Ang II) modulates the functions in these axes. We tested whether neonatal handling could change the density of Ang II receptors in some central areas in female rats. Results showed decreased density of the Ang II receptors in the medial preoptic area (MPOA) and hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN) of the neonatal handled group.

  8. Transcription factor complex formation and chromatin fine structure alterations at the murine c-fms (CSF-1 receptor) locus during maturation of myeloid precursor cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tagoh, H; Himes, R; Clarke, D; Leenen, PJM; Riggs, AD; Hume, D; Bonifer, C

    2002-01-01

    Expression of the gene for the macrophage colony stimulating factor receptor (CSF-1R), c-fms, has been viewed as a hallmark of the commitment of multipotent precursor cells to macrophages. Lineage-restricted expression of the gene is controlled by conserved elements in the proximal promoter and

  9. Long-range regulatory polymorphisms affecting a GABA receptor constitute a quantitative trait locus (QTL for social behavior in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andres Bendesky

    Full Text Available Aggregation is a social behavior that varies between and within species, providing a model to study the genetic basis of behavioral diversity. In the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, aggregation is regulated by environmental context and by two neuromodulatory pathways, one dependent on the neuropeptide receptor NPR-1 and one dependent on the TGF-β family protein DAF-7. To gain further insight into the genetic regulation of aggregation, we characterize natural variation underlying behavioral differences between two wild-type C. elegans strains, N2 and CB4856. Using quantitative genetic techniques, including a survey of chromosome substitution strains and QTL analysis of recombinant inbred lines, we identify three new QTLs affecting aggregation in addition to the two known N2 mutations in npr-1 and glb-5. Fine-mapping with near-isogenic lines localized one QTL, accounting for 5%-8% of the behavioral variance between N2 and CB4856, 3' to the transcript of the GABA neurotransmitter receptor gene exp-1. Quantitative complementation tests demonstrated that this QTL affects exp-1, identifying exp-1 and GABA signaling as new regulators of aggregation. exp-1 interacts genetically with the daf-7 TGF-β pathway, which integrates food availability and population density, and exp-1 mutations affect the level of daf-7 expression. Our results add to growing evidence that genetic variation affecting neurotransmitter receptor genes is a source of natural behavioral variation.

  10. Association between the cortisol response to opioid blockade and the Asn40Asp polymorphism at the mu-opioid receptor locus (OPRM1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez-Avila, Carlos A; Wand, Gary; Luo, Xingguang; Gelernter, Joel; Kranzler, Henry R

    2003-04-01

    This study examined whether a reportedly functional polymorphism in the gene encoding the mu-opioid receptor protein (A118G, which causes an Asn40Asp substitution in the receptor's extracellular domain), modifies the cortisol response to the opioid antagonist naloxone. The polymorphism occurs commonly in European Americans and some other population groups, underscoring its potential phenotypic significance. Using a balanced, within-subject design involving two test sessions over a period of 3-7 days, we examined ACTH and cortisol responses to intravenous naloxone (125 microg/kg) or placebo in 30 healthy subjects (21 males, mean age = 24.4 years). Plasma ACTH and cortisol concentrations were measured over 120 min post infusion. DNA isolated from whole blood was PCR amplified and genotyped via restriction enzyme digestion, with genotypes assigned based on agarose gel size fractionation. Subjects with one or more Asp40 alleles (n = 6; 5 heterozygotes and 1 homozygote) had significantly higher cortisol concentrations at baseline and at 15, 60, and 90 min after naloxone infusion than subjects homozygous for the Asn40 allele (n = 24). Subjects with the Asp40 allele also had a greater peak cortisol response and a greater area under the cortisol time curve than those homozygous for the Asn40 allele. There were no effects of the Asn40Asp polymorphism on plasma ACTH concentration or on self-reported anxiety or distress. These findings are consistent with recent reports showing an enhanced cortisol response to naloxone and a reduced agonist effect of morphine-6-glucuronide among subjects with the Asp40 variant. Given evidence of its pharmacological significance, the clinical relevance of this polymorphism warrants further investigation. Copyright 2003 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  11. Locus control regions

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Li, Qiliang; Peterson, Kenneth R; Fang, Xiangdong; Stamatoyannopoulos, George

    2002-01-01

    Locus control regions (LCRs) are operationally defined by their ability to enhance the expression of linked genes to physiological levels in a tissue-specific and copy number-dependent manner at ectopic chromatin sites...

  12. Genome-wide association studies in women of African ancestry identified 3q26.21 as a novel susceptibility locus for oestrogen receptor negative breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huo, Dezheng; Feng, Ye; Haddad, Stephen; Zheng, Yonglan; Yao, Song; Han, Yoo-Jeong; Ogundiran, Temidayo O; Adebamowo, Clement; Ojengbede, Oladosu; Falusi, Adeyinka G; Zheng, Wei; Blot, William; Cai, Qiuyin; Signorello, Lisa; John, Esther M; Bernstein, Leslie; Hu, Jennifer J; Ziegler, Regina G; Nyante, Sarah; Bandera, Elisa V; Ingles, Sue A; Press, Michael F; Deming, Sandra L; Rodriguez-Gil, Jorge L; Nathanson, Katherine L; Domchek, Susan M; Rebbeck, Timothy R; Ruiz-Narváez, Edward A; Sucheston-Campbell, Lara E; Bensen, Jeannette T; Simon, Michael S; Hennis, Anselm; Nemesure, Barbara; Leske, M Cristina; Ambs, Stefan; Chen, Lin S; Qian, Frank; Gamazon, Eric R; Lunetta, Kathryn L; Cox, Nancy J; Chanock, Stephen J; Kolonel, Laurence N; Olshan, Andrew F; Ambrosone, Christine B; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I; Palmer, Julie R; Haiman, Christopher A

    2016-11-01

    Multiple breast cancer loci have been identified in previous genome-wide association studies, but they were mainly conducted in populations of European ancestry. Women of African ancestry are more likely to have young-onset and oestrogen receptor (ER) negative breast cancer for reasons that are unknown and understudied. To identify genetic risk factors for breast cancer in women of African descent, we conducted a meta-analysis of two genome-wide association studies of breast cancer; one study consists of 1,657 cases and 2,029 controls genotyped with Illumina’s HumanOmni2.5 BeadChip and the other study included 3,016 cases and 2,745 controls genotyped using Illumina Human1M-Duo BeadChip. The top 18,376 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) from the meta-analysis were replicated in the third study that consists of 1,984 African Americans cases and 2,939 controls. We found that SNP rs13074711, 26.5 Kb upstream of TNFSF10 at 3q26.21, was significantly associated with risk of oestrogen receptor (ER)-negative breast cancer (odds ratio [OR]=1.29, 95% CI: 1.18-1.40; P = 1.8 × 10 − 8). Functional annotations suggest that the TNFSF10 gene may be involved in breast cancer aetiology, but further functional experiments are needed. In addition, we confirmed SNP rs10069690 was the best indicator for ER-negative breast cancer at 5p15.33 (OR = 1.30; P = 2.4 × 10 − 10) and identified rs12998806 as the best indicator for ER-positive breast cancer at 2q35 (OR = 1.34; P = 2.2 × 10 − 8) for women of African ancestry. These findings demonstrated additional susceptibility alleles for breast cancer can be revealed in diverse populations and have important public health implications in building race/ethnicity-specific risk prediction model for breast cancer.

  13. A novel chromatin insulator regulates the chicken folate receptor gene from the influence of nearby constitutive heterochromatin and the β-globin locus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Buendía, Edgar; Escamilla-Del-Arenal, Martín; Pérez-Molina, Rosario; Tena, Juan J; Guerrero, Georgina; Suaste-Olmos, Fernando; Ayala-Ortega, Erandi; Gómez-Skarmeta, José Luis; Recillas-Targa, Félix

    2015-08-01

    The three-dimensional architecture of genomes provides new insights about genome organization and function, but many aspects remain unsolved at the local genomic scale. Here we investigate the regulation of two erythroid-specific loci, a folate receptor gene (FOLR1) and the β-globin gene cluster, which are separated by 16kb of constitutive heterochromatin. We found that in early erythroid differentiation the FOLR1 gene presents a permissive chromatin configuration that allows its expression. Once the transition to the next differentiation state occurs, the heterochromatin spreads into the FOLR1 domain, concomitant with the dissociation of CTCF from a novel binding site, thereby resulting in irreversible silencing of the FOLR1 gene. We demonstrate that the sequences surrounding the CTCF-binding site possess classical insulator properties in vitro and in vivo. In contrast, the chicken cHS4 β-globin insulator present on the other side of the heterochromatic segment is in a constitutive open chromatin configuration, with CTCF constantly bound from the early stages of erythroid differentiation. Therefore, this study demonstrates that the 16kb of constitutive heterochromatin contributes to silencing of the FOLR1 gene during erythroid differentiation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Investigation of a genome wide association signal for obesity: synthetic association and haplotype analyses at the melanocortin 4 receptor gene locus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Scherag

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Independent genome-wide association studies (GWAS showed an obesogenic effect of two single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP; rs12970134 and rs17782313 more than 150 kb downstream of the melanocortin 4 receptor gene (MC4R. It is unclear if the SNPs directly influence MC4R function or expression, or if the SNPs are on a haplotype that predisposes to obesity or includes functionally relevant genetic variation (synthetic association. As both exist, functionally relevant mutations and polymorphisms in the MC4R coding region and a robust association downstream of the gene, MC4R is an ideal model to explore synthetic association. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We analyzed a genomic region (364.9 kb encompassing the MC4R in GWAS data of 424 obesity trios (extremely obese child/adolescent and both parents. SNP rs12970134 showed the lowest p-value (p = 0.004; relative risk for the obesity effect allele: 1.37; conditional analyses on this SNP revealed that 7 of 78 analyzed SNPs provided independent signals (p≤0.05. These 8 SNPs were used to derive two-marker haplotypes. The three best (according to p-value haplotype combinations were chosen for confirmation in 363 independent obesity trios. The confirmed obesity effect haplotype includes SNPs 3' and 5' of the MC4R. Including MC4R coding variants in a joint model had almost no impact on the effect size estimators expected under synthetic association. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: A haplotype reaching from a region 5' of the MC4R to a region at least 150 kb from the 3' end of the gene showed a stronger association to obesity than single SNPs. Synthetic association analyses revealed that MC4R coding variants had almost no impact on the association signal. Carriers of the haplotype should be enriched for relevant mutations outside the MC4R coding region and could thus be used for re-sequencing approaches. Our data also underscore the problems underlying the identification of relevant mutations

  15. Amino acids of the Torpedo marmorata acetylcholine receptor. cap alpha. subunit labeled by a photoaffinity ligand for the acetylcholine binding site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dennis, M.; Giraudat, J.; Kotzyba-Hibert, F.; Goeldner, M.; Hirth, C.; Chang, J.Y.; Lazure, C.; Chretien, M.; Changeux, J.P.

    1988-04-05

    The acetylcholine-binding sites on the native, membrane-bound acetylcholine receptor from Torpedo marmorata were covalently labeled with the photoaffinity reagent (/sup 3/H)-p-(dimethylamino)-benzenediazonium fluoroborate (DDF) in the presence of phencyclidine by employing an energy-transfer photolysis procedure. The ..cap alpha..-chains isolated from receptor-rich membranes photolabeled in the absence or presence of carbamoylcholine were cleaved with CNBr and the radiolabeled fragments purified by high-performance liquid chromatography. Amino acid and/or sequence analysis demonstrated that the ..cap alpha..-chain residues Trp-149, Tyr-190, Cys-192, and Cys-193 and an unidentified residue(s) in the segment ..cap alpha.. 31-105 were all labeled by the photoaffinity reagent in an agonist-protectable manner. The labeled amino acids are located within three distinct regions of the large amino-terminal hydrophilic domain of the ..cap alpha..-subunit primary structure and plausibly lie in proximity to one another at the level of the acetylcholine-binding sites in the native receptor. These findings are in accord with models proposed for the transmembrane topology of the ..cap alpha..-chain that assign the amino-terminal segment ..cap alpha.. 1-210 to the synaptic cleft. Furthermore, the results suggest that the four identified (/sup 3/H)DDF-labeled resides, which are conserved in muscle and neuronal ..cap alpha..-chains but not in the other subunits, may be directly involved in agonist binding.

  16. Alcohol Locus of Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Patrick B.; Reszka, Diane

    Research has shown that differences in perceived control can influence drinking behavior and alcoholic rehabilitation. This study examined the viability of an alcohol-specific locus of control scale. Undergraduate students (41 male and 40 female) completed a demographic questionnaire assessing age, sex, ethnicity, and drinking frequency; Rotter's…

  17. EL LOCUS DE DISTRIBUCION COMO COROLARIO DEL LOCUS DE CONTROL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luisa Mayoral

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Este es un artículo científico acerca del Locus de Distribución, surgido de un estudio realizado con una población de docentes y alumnos universitarios. Respecto de los primeros, se ha indagado acerca de las atribuciones que se realizaban en torno a las recompensas y sanciones, que ellos distribuían a sus alumnos. Respecto de los segundos, se ha buscado determinar la valoración que estos realizaban de sus profesores, en términos de aquellas atribuciones. Para ello, se utilizaron dos paradigmas clásicamente empleados para verificar la existencia de una norma: el paradigma de la autopresentación (docentes, y el paradigma de los juicios (alumnos. La cuestión planteada fue determinar si en el caso de los comportamientos distributivos de refuerzos, las causas se atribuían a variables externas -en particular a los receptores de esos refuerzos- y si esas formas de atribución eran conocidas y valoradas o no, por los alumnos. De los resultados, surgió la confirmación de nuestra hipótesis de explicaciones externas en materia de comportamientos distributivos de sanciones en el ámbito de la docencia y la valoración positiva de estas atribuciones por los alumnos.

  18. Fine-Scale Mapping of the FGFR2 Breast Cancer Risk Locus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meyer, Kerstin B; O'Reilly, Martin; Michailidou, Kyriaki

    2013-01-01

    The 10q26 locus in the second intron of FGFR2 is the locus most strongly associated with estrogen-receptor-positive breast cancer in genome-wide association studies. We conducted fine-scale mapping in case-control studies genotyped with a custom chip (iCOGS), comprising 41 studies (n = 89,050) of...

  19. receptores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salete Regina Daronco Benetti

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Se trata de un estudio etnográfico, que tuvo lo objetivo de interpretar el sistema de conocimiento y del significado atribuidos a la sangre referente a la transfusión sanguínea por los donadores y receptores de un banco de sangre. Para la colecta de las informaciones se observaron los participantes y la entrevista etnográfica se realizó el análisis de dominio, taxonómicos y temáticos. Los dominios culturales fueron: la sangre es vida: fuente de vida y alimento valioso; creencias religiosas: fuentes simbólicas de apoyos; donación sanguínea: un gesto colaborador que exige cuidarse, gratifica y trae felicidad; donación sanguínea: fuente simbólica de inseguridad; estar enfermo es una condición para realizar transfusión sanguínea; transfusión sanguínea: esperanza de vida; Creencias populares: transfusión sanguínea como riesgo para la salud; donadores de sangre: personas benditas; donar y recibir sangre: como significado de felicidad. Temática: “líquido precioso que origina, sostiene, modifica la vida, provoca miedo e inseguridad”.

  20. C4BPAL1, a member of the human regulator of complement activation (RCA) gene cluster that resulted from the duplication of the gene coding for the [alpha]-chain of C4b-binding protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanchez-Corral, P.; Pardo-Manuel de Villena, F.; Rey-Campos, J.; Rodriguez de Cordoba, S. (Unidad de Immunologia, Madrid (Spain))

    1993-07-01

    The regulator of complement activation (RCA) gene cluster evolved by multiple gene duplications to produce a family of genes coding for proteins that collectively control the activation of the complement system. The authors report here the characterization of C4BPAL1, a member of the human RCA gene cluster that arose from the duplication of the C4BPA gene after the separation of rodent and primate lineages. C4BPAL1 maps 20 kb downstream of the C4BPA gene and is in the same 5[prime] to 3[prime] orientation found for all RCA genes characterized thus far. It includes nine exon-like regions homologous to exons 2-8, 11, and 12 of the C4BPA gene. Analysis of the C4BPAL1 sequence suggests that it is currently a pseudogene in humans. However, comparisons between C4BPAL1 and the human and murine C4BPA genes show sequence conservation, which strongly suggests that, for a long period of time, C4BPAL1 has been a functional gene coding for a protein with structural requirements similar to those of the [alpha]-chain of C4b-binding protein. 50 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  1. Secondary evolution of a self-incompatibility locus in the Brassicaceae genus Leavenworthia.

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    Sier-Ching Chantha

    Full Text Available Self-incompatibility (SI is the flowering plant reproductive system in which self pollen tube growth is inhibited, thereby preventing self-fertilization. SI has evolved independently in several different flowering plant lineages. In all Brassicaceae species in which the molecular basis of SI has been investigated in detail, the product of the S-locus receptor kinase (SRK gene functions as receptor in the initial step of the self pollen-rejection pathway, while that of the S-locus cysteine-rich (SCR gene functions as ligand. Here we examine the hypothesis that the S locus in the Brassicaceae genus Leavenworthia is paralogous with the S locus previously characterized in other members of the family. We also test the hypothesis that self-compatibility in this group is based on disruption of the pollen ligand-producing gene. Sequence analysis of the S-locus genes in Leavenworthia, phylogeny of S alleles, gene expression patterns, and comparative genomics analyses provide support for both hypotheses. Of special interest are two genes located in a non-S locus genomic region of Arabidopsis lyrata that exhibit domain structures, sequences, and phylogenetic histories similar to those of the S-locus genes in Leavenworthia, and that also share synteny with these genes. These A. lyrata genes resemble those comprising the A. lyrata S locus, but they do not function in self-recognition. Moreover, they appear to belong to a lineage that diverged from the ancestral Brassicaceae S-locus genes before allelic diversification at the S locus. We hypothesize that there has been neo-functionalization of these S-locus-like genes in the Leavenworthia lineage, resulting in evolution of a separate ligand-receptor system of SI. Our results also provide support for theoretical models that predict that the least constrained pathway to the evolution of self-compatibility is one involving loss of pollen gene function.

  2. Locus of control and competence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naditch, M P; DeMaio, T

    1975-12-01

    The relation of locus of control and competence in school achievement, social interactions, sports, and home related activities was examined. The sample consisted of 346 ninth-grade students, and competence was measured using self-report, antional battery test scores, grades, and sociometric ratings. Among males, locus of control was significantly related to competent performance only among those subjects who placed a high value on outcomes in each area. Among females, the pattern was exactly reversed. Locus of control and various forms of competence were related only in areas of low interest value. The implications of these findings were discussed.

  3. Mapping of panda plumage color locus on the microsatellite linkage map of the Japanese quail

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mizutani Makoto

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Panda (s is an autosomal recessive mutation, which displays overall white plumage color with spots of wild-type plumage in the Japanese quail (Coturnix japonica. In a previous study, the s locus was included in the same linkage group as serum albumin (Alb and vitamin-D binding protein (GC which are mapped on chicken (Gallus gallus chromosome 4 (GGA4. In this study, we mapped the s locus on the microsatellite linkage map of the Japanese quail by linkage analysis. Results Segregation data on the s locus were obtained from three-generation families (n = 106. Two microsatellite markers derived from the Japanese quail chromosome 4 (CJA04 and three microsatellite markers derived from GGA4 were genotyped in the three-generation families. We mapped the s locus between GUJ0026 and ABR0544 on CJA04. By comparative mapping with chicken, this locus was mapped between 10.0 Mb and 14.5 Mb region on GGA4. In this region, the endothelin receptor B subtype 2 gene (EDNRB2, an avian-specific paralog of the mammalian endothelin receptor B gene (EDNRB, is located. Because EDNRB is responsible for aganglionic megacolon and spot coat color in mouse, rat and equine, EDNRB2 is suggested to be a candidate gene for the s locus. Conclusion The s locus and the five microsatellite markers were mapped on CJA04 of the Japanese quail. EDNRB2 was suggested to be a candidate gene for the s locus.

  4. Pobreza y Locus de Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joaquina Palomar Lever

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available En este trabajo se busco conocer si existen diferencias en el locus de control según el nivel de pobreza en una población de 900 personas clasificadas en tres grupos: pobres extremos, pobres moderados y no pobres. Los sujetos estudiados compartieron la característica de ser personas económicamente independientes. Para este estudio se utilizaron como instrumentos de medición, un cuestionario sociodemográfico y una escala de locus de control. Los resultados muestran que los grupos de mayor ingreso familiar así como el grupo de no pobres y el de pobres moderados presentan en mayor medida un locus de control interno, mientras que el grupo de pobres extremos un mayor locus de control externo; por otro lado se observó que las personas de sexo masculino así como los de más edad (36 a 72 años presentan un locus de control más interno que aquellas personas de sexo femenino y de menor edad (19 a 35 años. Además, las personas con mayor nivel educativo (licenciatura y postgrado presentan una mayor tendencia hacia la internalidad en comparación con las personas de menor nivel educativo (sin escolaridad, primaria, secundaria y preparatoria. A su vez, se observó que la escolaridad de los padres influye en el locus de control. En términos generales, las variables que mejor predicen el locus de control fueron el ingreso familiar y la escolaridad de los sujetos

  5. Pobreza y Locus de Control

    OpenAIRE

    Joaquina Palomar Lever; Laura M. Valdés Trejo

    2004-01-01

    En este trabajo se busco conocer si existen diferencias en el locus de control según el nivel de pobreza en una población de 900 personas clasificadas en tres grupos: pobres extremos, pobres moderados y no pobres. Los sujetos estudiados compartieron la característica de ser personas económicamente independientes. Para este estudio se utilizaron como instrumentos de medición, un cuestionario sociodemográfico y una escala de locus de control. Los resultados muestran que los grupos d...

  6. A locus on 19p13 modifies risk of breast cancer in BRCA1 mutation carriers and is associated with hormone receptor-negative breast cancer in the general population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Antoniou, Antonis C; Wang, Xianshu; Fredericksen, Zachary S

    2010-01-01

    ) = 0.83, 95% CI 0.75-0.92, P(trend) = 0.0003) and an association with estrogen receptor-positive disease in the opposite direction (OR = 1.07, 95% CI 1.01-1.14, P(trend) = 0.016). The five SNPs were also associated with triple-negative breast cancer in a separate study of 2,301 triple-negative cases...

  7. Locus of control in graduation students

    OpenAIRE

    Haider Zaidi, Imran; MS (Clinical Psychology) Scholar G.C University, Faisalabad, Pakistan; Mohsin, M. Naeem; Director Distance Learning Education G.C University, Faisalabad, Pakistan

    2013-01-01

    The current research focused on exploring the direction of Locus of control as well as gender difference on locus of control among graduation students in Pakistan. A 29 item Locus of Control questionnaire (Rotter, 1966) was used to measure locus of control. Sample of (N=200) individuals (n=100) men and (n=100) women selected from different academic institutes of Faisalabad division Punjab Pakistan. Independent sample t-test was used for statistical analysis. This study has consistent results ...

  8. Speaking rate effects on locus equation slope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, Jeff; Weismer, Gary

    2013-01-01

    A locus equation describes a 1st order regression fit to a scatter of vowel steady-state frequency values predicting vowel onset frequency values. Locus equation coefficients are often interpreted as indices of coarticulation. Speaking rate variations with a constant consonant–vowel form are thought to induce changes in the degree of coarticulation. In the current work, the hypothesis that locus slope is a transparent index of coarticulation is examined through the analysis of acoustic samples of large-scale, nearly continuous variations in speaking rate. Following the methodological conventions for locus equation derivation, data pooled across ten vowels yield locus equation slopes that are mostly consistent with the hypothesis that locus equations vary systematically with coarticulation. Comparable analyses between different four-vowel pools reveal variations in the locus slope range and changes in locus slope sensitivity to rate change. Analyses across rate but within vowels are substantially less consistent with the locus hypothesis. Taken together, these findings suggest that the practice of vowel pooling exerts a non-negligible influence on locus outcomes. Results are discussed within the context of articulatory accounts of locus equations and the effects of speaking rate change. PMID:24535890

  9. T cell receptor V[alpha] gene segment with alternate splicing in the junctional region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marche, P.N.; Six, A.; Gahery, H.; Gris-Liebe, C.; Cazenave, P.A.; Jouvin-Marche, E. (Universite Pierre et Marie Curie, Paris (France))

    1993-11-15

    The locus encoding mouse TCR-[alpha] chain includes approximately 100 V[alpha] gene segments that can be organized in about 20 structural subfamilies. Southern blot analysis of a T cell line derived from the BALB/c strain, M5T, has indicated that both [alpha] loci were rearranged, as assessed by the deletion of the [delta] locus, and that the V[alpha] gene-segment involved in one of the rearrangements did not belong to any of the V[alpha] subfamilies already described. Transcripts of TCR-[alpha] chains from the M5T line were cloned after cDNA synthesis and anchored-polymerase chain reaction, revealing a V[alpha] gene segment of an as yet unidentified subfamily, V[alpha]5T. Molecular cloning of germ-line V[alpha]5T gene segments has shown that this subfamily contained two members, one of them being a pseudogene. The two members were located to each extremity of the [alpha] locus associated with a member of the V[alpha]13 and V[alpha]BWB subfamilies. Analysis of transcripts bearing the V[alpha]5T gene segment in the M5T line as well as in thymocytes has revealed that J[alpha] are frequently absent. This is due to an alternate donor splice site generated at the V[alpha]5T-J[alpha] junction that leads to a splicing from the end of V[alpha]5T to C[alpha] instead of the J[alpha] to C[alpha] conventional splicing. The impact of J[alpha] spliced-out transcripts on the allelic exclusion process is discussed. 41 refs., 5 figs.

  10. T cell receptor V alpha gene segment with alternate splicing in the junctional region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marche, P N; Six, A; Gahéry, H; Gris-Liebe, C; Cazenave, P A; Jouvin-Marche, E

    1993-11-15

    The locus encoding mouse TCR-alpha chain includes approximately 100 V alpha gene segments that can be organized in about 20 structural subfamilies. Southern blot analysis of a T cell line derived from the BALB/c strain, M5T, has indicated that both alpha loci were rearranged, as assessed by the deletion of the delta locus, and that the V alpha gene segment involved in one of the rearrangements did not belong to any of the V alpha subfamilies already described. Transcripts of TCR-alpha chains from the M5T line were cloned after cDNA synthesis and anchored-polymerase chain reaction, revealing a V alpha gene segment of an as yet unidentified subfamily, V alpha 5T. Molecular cloning of germ-line V alpha 5T gene segments has shown that this subfamily contained two members, one of them being a pseudogene. The two members were located to each extremity of the alpha locus associated with a member of the V alpha 13 and V alpha BWB subfamilies. Analysis of transcripts bearing the V alpha 5T gene segment in the M5T line as well as in thymocytes has revealed that J alpha are frequently absent. This is due to an alternate donor splice site generated at the V alpha 5T-J alpha junction that leads to a splicing from the end of V alpha 5T to C alpha instead of the J alpha to C alpha conventional splicing. The impact of J alpha spliced-out transcripts on the allelic exclusion process is discussed.

  11. A two-locus model of speciation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregorius, H R

    1992-02-07

    Speciation is considered as the evolution of partial or complete cross-incompatibility between the carriers of genes (at a locus called "object locus") that distinguish the prospective species populations. The mating relations at the object locus are modified by the alleles at a second mating modifier locus. Based on a widely applicable concept of fitness and mating preference, it is shown that heterozygote disadvantage in fitness at the object locus is necessary for speciation, which corroborates Wallace's hypothesis. It is pointed out that the difference between sympatric and parapatric speciation essentially lies in the mechanisms stabilizing the polymorphism required at the object locus as a prerequisite for speciation. In the presence of recombination between the object and mating modifier locus speciation may be prevented by forces maintaining gametic phase imbalance between these loci such as can result from unidirectional gene flow between parapatric populations.

  12. Contribution of glutamatergic systems in locus coeruleus to nucleus paragigantocellularis stimulation-evoked behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, N; Ho, I K; Rockhold, R W

    1999-08-01

    The role of extracellular glutamate, within the locus coeruleus, in mediation of the behavioral signs elicited by electrical stimulation of the nucleus paragigantocellularis (PGi) was investigated in conscious, opioid-naive rats. Each rat was prepared with a chronically implanted unilateral electrode within the PGi and a microdialysis guide cannula directed at the ipsilateral locus coeruleus. Opioid withdrawal-like behaviors (rearing, teeth-chattering, wet-dog shakes, etc.) and increases in extracellular glutamate concentrations within the locus coeruleus were evoked, in a frequency-dependent (0.5-50 Hz) manner, during PGi stimulation. Reverse dialysis perfusion of the locus coeruleus with the nonspecific glutamate receptor antagonist, kynurenic acid (0.1, 1 mM), reduced the intensity of stimulation-induced behaviors by roughly 50%, but had no effect on the corresponding increases in glutamate concentrations. Perfusion of the locus coeruleus with the glutamate transporter inhibitor, L-trans-pyrrolidine dicarboxylic acid, at 1, but not at 0.1, mM significantly increased glutamate levels in dialysates. Neither concentration of the transporter inhibitor altered the behavioral score. The results indicate that the opioid withdrawal-like behaviors elicited by electrical stimulation of the brainstem at the site of the PGi are positively correlated with locus coeruleus levels of glutamate, and suggest further that the behaviors are partially mediated by release of glutamate within the locus coeruleus or its immediate vicinity.

  13. 19p13.1 Is a triple-negative-specific breast cancer susceptibility locus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K. Stevens (Kristen); Z. Fredericksen (Zachary); C. Vachon (Celine); X. Wang (Xing); S. Margolin (Sara); A. Lindblom (Annika); H. Nevanlinna (Heli); D. Greco (Dario); K. Aittomäki (Kristiina); C. Blomqvist (Carl); J. Chang-Claude (Jenny); A. Vrieling (Alina); D. Flesch-Janys (Dieter); H.-P. Sinn (Hans-Peter); S. Wang-Gohrke (Shan); S. Nickels (Stefan); H. Brauch (Hiltrud); Y-D. Ko (Yon-Dschun); H.-P. Fischer; R.K. Schmutzler (Rita); A. Meindl (Alfons); C.R. Bartram (Claus); S. Schott (Sarah); C. Engel (Christoph); A.K. Godwin (Andrew); J. Weaver (JoEllen); S.S. Pathak; P. Sharma (Pankaj); H. Brenner (Hermann); H. Mul̈ler (Heiko); V. Arndt (Volker); C. Stegmaier (Christa); P. Miron (Penelope); D. Yannoukakos (Drakoulis); A. Stavropoulou (Alexandra); G. Fountzilas (George); H. Gogas (Helen); R. Swann (Ruth); M. Dwek (Miriam); A. Perkins (Annie); R.L. Milne (Roger); J. Benítez (Javier); M.P. Zamora (Pilar); J.I.A. Perez (Jose Ignacio Arias); S.E. Bojesen (Stig); S.F. Nielsen (Sune); B.G. Nordestgaard (Børge); H. Flyger (Henrik); P. Guénel (Pascal); T. Truong (Thérèse); F. Menegaux (Florence); E. Cordina-Duverger (Emilie); B. Burwinkel (Barbara); F. Marme (Federick); A. Schneeweiss (Andreas); C. Sohn (Christof); E.J. Sawyer (Elinor); I.P. Tomlinson (Ian); M. Kerin (Michael); J. Peto (Julian); N. Johnson (Nichola); O. Fletcher (Olivia); I. dos Santos Silva (Isabel); P.A. Fasching (Peter); M.W. Beckmann (Matthias); A. Hartmann; A.B. Ekici (Arif); A. Lophatananon (Artitaya); K.R. Muir (Kenneth); P. Puttawibul (Puttisak); S. Wiangnon (Surapon); M.K. Schmidt (Marjanka); A. Broeks (Annegien); L.M. Braaf (Linde); E.H. Rosenberg (Efraim); J.L. Hopper (John); C. Apicella (Carmel); D.J. Park (Daniel); M.C. Southey (Melissa); A.J. Swerdlow (Anthony ); A. Ashworth (Alan); O. Nicholas (Orr); M. Schoemaker (Minouk); H. Anton-Culver (Hoda); A. Ziogas (Argyrios); L. Bernstein (Leslie); C.C. Dur (Christina Clarke); C-Y. Shen (Chen-Yang); J-C. Yu (Jyh-Cherng); H.-M. Hsu (Huan-Ming); C.-N. Hsiung (Chia-Ni); U. Hamann (Ute); T. Dun̈nebier (Thomas); T. Rud̈iger (Thomas); H.U. Ulmer (Hans); P.D.P. Pharoah (Paul); A.M. Dunning (Alison); M.K. Humphreys (Manjeet); Q. Wang (Qing); A. Cox (Angela); S.S. Cross (Simon); M.W.R. Reed (Malcolm); P. Hall (Per); K. Czene (Kamila); C.B. Ambrosone (Christine); F. Ademuyiwa (Foluso); H. Hwang (Helena); D. Eccles (Diana); M. García-Closas (Montserrat); J.D. Figueroa (Jonine); M.E. Sherman (Mark); J. Lissowska (Jolanta); P. Devilee (Peter); C.M. Seynaeve (Caroline); R.A.E.M. Tollenaar (Rob); M.J. Hooning (Maartje); I.L. Andrulis (Irene); J.A. Knight (Julia); G. Glendon (Gord); A.M. Mulligan (Anna Marie); R. Winqvist (Robert); K. Pykäs (Katri); A. Jukkola-Vuorinen (Arja); M. Grip (Mervi); E.M. John (Esther); A. Miron (Alexander); G.G. Alnæs (Grethe); V. Kristensen (Vessela); A.-L. Brøresen-Dale (Anne-Lise); G.G. Giles (Graham); L. Baglietto (Laura); C.A. McLean (Catriona Ann); G. Severi (Gianluca); M. Kosel (Matthew); V.S. Pankratz (Shane); S. Slager (Susan); J.E. Olson (Janet); P. Radice (Paolo); P. Peterlongo (Paolo); S. Manoukian (Siranoush); M. Barile (Monica); D. Lambrechts (Diether); S. Hatse (Sigrid); A.-S. Dieudonné (Anne-Sophie); M.R. Christiaens (Marie Rose); G. Chenevix-Trench (Georgia); J. Beesley (Jonathan); X. Chen (Xiaoqing); A. Mannermaa (Arto); V-M. Kosma (Veli-Matti); J. Hartikainen (Jaana); Y. Soini (Ylermi); D.F. Easton (Douglas); F.J. Couch (Fergus)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractThe 19p13.1 breast cancer susceptibility locus is a modifier of breast cancer risk in BRCA1 mutation carriers and is also associated with the risk of ovarian cancer. Here, we investigated 19p13.1 variation and risk of breast cancer subtypes, defined by estrogen receptor (ER),

  14. EL LOCUS DE DISTRIBUCION COMO COROLARIO DEL LOCUS DE CONTROL (THE LOCUS OF DISTRIBUTION AS A COROLLARY TO THE LOCUS OF CONTROL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mayoral Luisa

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Resumen: Este es un artículo científico acerca del Locus de Distribución, surgido de un estudio realizado con una población de docentes y alumnos universitarios. Respecto de los primeros, se ha indagado acerca de las atribuciones que se realizaban en torno a las recompensas y sanciones, que ellos distribuían a sus alumnos.Respecto de los segundos, se ha buscado determinar la valoración que estos realizaban de sus profesores, en términos de aquellas atribuciones. Para ello, se utilizaron dos paradigmas clásicamente empleados para verificar la existencia de una norma: el paradigma de la autopresentación (docentes, y el paradigma de los j uicios (alumnos. La cuestión planteada fue determinar si en el caso de los comportamientos distributivos de refuerzos, las causas se atribuían a variables externas -en particular a los receptores de esos refuerzos- y si esas formas de atribución eran conocidas y valoradas o no, por los alumnos. De los resultados, surgió la confirmación de nuestra hipótesis de explicaciones externas en materia de comportamientos distributivos de sanciones en el ámbito de la docencia y la valoración positiva de estas atribuciones por los alumnos.Abstract:This one is a scientific article brings over of the Locus of Distribution, arisen from a study realized with a population of teachers and university pupils. Respect of the first ones, it has been investigated brings over of the attributions that were concerning around the reinforcements which they were distributing to pupils. Respect of the second ones, one has sought to determine the valuation that these realized of the teachers, in terms of those attributions. For it, two paradigms were in use classic used to check the existence of a norm: the paradigm of the auto-presentation (teachers, and the paradigm of the judgments (pupils The raised question was to determine if in case of the distributive behaviours of reinforcements, the reasons were assuming to external

  15. Locus of Control and Religious Orientation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talbott, Anne Marie; Heritage, Jeannette

    Rotter's Internal-External Locus of Control Scale has been the focus of much research since its introduction in 1966. To further that research, the relationships among locus of control, level of religious belief, attitudes toward women, attitudes toward feminism, attitudes toward homosexuality, gender, and traditional versus nontraditional…

  16. The mating type locus (MAT and sexual reproduction of Cryptococcus heveanensis: insights into the evolution of sex and sex-determining chromosomal regions in fungi.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Banu Metin

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Mating in basidiomycetous fungi is often controlled by two unlinked, multiallelic loci encoding homeodomain transcription factors or pheromones/pheromone receptors. In contrast to this tetrapolar organization, Cryptococcus neoformans/Cryptococcus gattii have a bipolar mating system, and a single biallelic locus governs sexual reproduction. The C. neoformans MAT locus is unusually large (>100 kb, contains >20 genes, and enhances virulence. Previous comparative genomic studies provided insights into how this unusual MAT locus might have evolved involving gene acquisitions into two unlinked loci and fusion into one contiguous locus, converting an ancestral tetrapolar system to a bipolar one. Here we tested this model by studying Cryptococcus heveanensis, a sister species to the pathogenic Cryptococcus species complex. An extant sexual cycle was discovered; co-incubating fertile isolates results in the teleomorph (Kwoniella heveanensis with dikaryotic hyphae, clamp connections, septate basidia, and basidiospores. To characterize the C. heveanensis MAT locus, a fosmid library was screened with C. neoformans/C. gattii MAT genes. Positive fosmids were sequenced and assembled to generate two large probably unlinked MAT gene clusters: one corresponding to the homeodomain locus and the other to the pheromone/receptor locus. Strikingly, two divergent homeodomain genes (SXI1, SXI2 are present, similar to the bE/bW Ustilago maydis paradigm, suggesting one or the other homeodomain gene was recently lost in C. neoformans/C. gattii. Sequencing MAT genes from other C. heveanensis isolates revealed a multiallelic homeodomain locus and at least a biallelic pheromone/receptor locus, similar to known tetrapolar species. Taken together, these studies reveal an extant C. heveanensis sexual cycle, define the structure of its MAT locus consistent with tetrapolar mating, and support the proposed evolutionary model for the bipolar Cryptococcus MAT locus revealing

  17. Electron microscopy of complexes of isolated acetylcholine receptor, biotinyl-toxin, and avidin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holtzman, E. (Columbia Univ., New York); Wise, D.; Wall, J.; Karlin, A.

    1982-01-01

    The principal curarimimetic toxin of Naja naja siamensis derivatized with biothinyl groups binds specifically both to acetylcholine receptor, isolated from Torpedo californica electric tissue, and to avidin. Isolated complexes of receptor monomer or dimer, biotinyl-toxin, and avidin were negatively stained and examined in the scanning transmission electron microscope. We measured the angle made by the radius to each avidin bound at the periphery of a monomeric unit in dimer to the axis connecting the centers of the monomers, starting at the crosslink between the monomers. We infer from the distribution of these angles that one toxin binding site is located in the range of 45/sup 0/ to 85/sup 0/ and another at about 100/sup 0/ further from the crosslink between the monomers. Because it is known that there are two toxin binding sites per monomer, associated with the two ..cap alpha.. chains, the bound avidins presumably point to portions of the ..cap alpha.. chains, indicating their positions relative to that portion of the delta chain located at the crosslink between monomers in dimer.

  18. Translocations affecting human immunoglobulin heavy chain locus

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    Sklyar I. V.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Translocations involving human immunoglobulin heavy chain (IGH locus are implicated in different leukaemias and lymphomas, including multiple myeloma, mantle cell lymphoma, Burkitt’s lymphoma and diffuse large B cell lymphoma. We have analysed published data and identified eleven breakpoint cluster regions (bcr related to these cancers within the IgH locus. These ~1 kbp bcrs are specific for one or several types of blood cancer. Our findings could help devise PCR-based assays to detect cancer-related translocations, to identify the mechanisms of translocations and to help in the research of potential translocation partners of the immunoglobulin locus at different stages of B-cell differentiation.

  19. Locus of control and decision to abort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, P N; Strano, D A; Willingham, W

    1984-04-01

    The relationship of locus of control to deciding on an abortion was investigated by administering Rotter's Locus of Control Scale to 118 women immediately prior to abortion and 2 weeks and 3 months following abortion. Subjects' scores were compared across the 3 time periods, and the abortion group's pretest scores were compared with those of a nonpregnant control, group. As hypothesized, the aborting group scored significantly more internal than the general population but no differences in locus of control were found across the 3 time period. The length of delay in deciding to abort an unwanted pregnancy following confirmation was also assessed. Women seeking 1st trimester abortions were divided into internal and external groups on the Rotter Scale and the lengths of delay were compared. The hypothesis that external scores would delay the decision longer than internal ones was confirmed. The results confirm characteristics of the locus of control construct and add information about personality characteristics of women undergoing abortion.

  20. A Revised Measure of Locus of Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clifford, Margaret M.

    1976-01-01

    A revised measure of locus of control for children and a summary of its descriptive statistics is presented. The nature of the instrument is discussed in light of Weiner's two-dimensional attribution table. (Author/MS)

  1. Maintaining (Locus of) Control? Assessing the Impact of Locus of Control on Education Decisions and Wages

    OpenAIRE

    Piatek, Rémi; Pinger, Pia

    2010-01-01

    This paper demonstrates that locus of control, i.e. whether individuals believe that reinforcement in life comes from their own actions instead of being determined by luck or destiny, is an important predictor of the decision to obtain higher education. Furthermore, the authors find that premarket locus of control, defined as locus of control measured at the time of schooling - before the individual enters the labor market - does not significantly affect later wages after controlling for educ...

  2. Culture, gender and locus of control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ottsen, Christina Lundsgaard; Johannessen, Kim Berg; Berntsen, Dorthe

    The current study is a cross-cultural comparison between the Middle East and Scandinavia. Two societies that offer a unique opportunity to examine gender differences in personal goals and how goals are affected by locus of control.......The current study is a cross-cultural comparison between the Middle East and Scandinavia. Two societies that offer a unique opportunity to examine gender differences in personal goals and how goals are affected by locus of control....

  3. Evidence for a critical role for the cytoplasmic region of the interleukin 2 (IL-2) receptor gamma chain in IL-2, IL-4, and IL-7 signalling.

    OpenAIRE

    Kawahara, A; Minami, Y; Taniguchi, T

    1994-01-01

    The high-affinity interleukin 2 receptor (IL-2R) consists of at least three distinct subunits: the IL-2R alpha chain (IL-2R alpha), beta chain (IL-2R beta), and gamma chain (IL-2R gamma). It has been shown that the cytoplasmic region of IL-2R beta, but not of IL-2R alpha, is essential for IL-2 signalling to the cell interior. In the present study, we examined the functional role of the IL-2R gamma cytoplasmic region in the IL-3-dependent mouse hematopoietic cell line BAF-B03, which expresses ...

  4. Kartenorientierte Isolierung des Rar1 Locus

    OpenAIRE

    Lahaye, Thomas

    1999-01-01

    The Mla12 allele of the barley-Mla locus confers resistance to powdery mildew isolates expressing the matching avirulence gene avrMla12. The Rar1 (Required for Mla12-specified resistance) locus has been found to be part of the Mla12-governed signal transduction pathway. Previous analysis has demonstrated that rar1-mutant alleles abolish not only Mla12 but also other R gene specificities. To elucidate the molecular mechanisms of R-gene mediated plant defence Rar1 was isolated by map-based clon...

  5. Locus of control in relation to flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Celeste M Taylor

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available The principal objective of the study was to examine the relationship between locus of control and optimal experience (flow in carrying out work and/or study activities. Two questionnaires measuring the aforementioned constructs were administered to a group of first and second-year Human Resource Management students (n=168 between the ages of 16 and 30. The results suggest that more frequent experience of flow is positively correlated with Autonomy and Internal Locus of Control. Limitations, lines of future research, implications and further contributions are discussed.

  6. Locus of control in children of divorce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalter, N; Alpern, D; Spence, R; Plunkett, J W

    1984-08-01

    Scores on the Nowicki-Strickland Locus of Control Scale for Children (N-SLOCSC) were compared for third and fifth grade boys and girls from intact versus maritally disrupted family backgrounds. Significant main effects for each independent variable revealed that fifth graders more than third, boys more than girls, and the marital disruption more than the intact group, exhibited higher internality in their locus of control scores. These findings strongly suggest that experiencing a parental divorce in childhood has a significant influence on generalized perceptions of personal control and effectance, perceptions which may ultimately mediate both short- and long-term outcomes in children's post-divorce adjustment.

  7. Phylogenetic Analysis of the SNORD116 Locus

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    Matthew A. Kocher

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The SNORD116 small nucleolar RNA locus (SNORD116@ is contained within the long noncoding RNA host gene SNHG14 on human chromosome 15q11-q13. The SNORD116 locus is a cluster of 28 or more small nucleolar (sno RNAs; C/D box (SNORDs. Individual RNAs within the cluster are tandem, highly similar sequences, referred to as SNORD116-1, SNORD116-2, etc., with the entire set referred to as SNORD116@. There are also related SNORD116 loci on other chromosomes, and these additional loci are conserved among primates. Inherited chromosomal 15q11-q13 deletions, encompassing the SNORD116@ locus, are causative for the paternally-inherited/maternally-imprinted genetic condition, Prader–Willi syndrome (PWS. Using in silico tools, along with molecular-based and sequenced-based confirmation, phylogenetic analysis of the SNORD116@ locus was performed. The consensus sequence for the SNORD116@ snoRNAs from various species was determined both for all the SNORD116 snoRNAs, as well as those grouped using sequence and location according to a human grouping convention. The implications of these findings are put in perspective for studying SNORD116 in patients with inherited Prader–Willi syndrome, as well as model organisms.

  8. Aspirations, Attributions, and Locus of Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuel, William; McNall, Sidne J.

    Self-evaluation is thought to play a major role in personality and motivation. Preliminary experience with success or failure, levels of aspiration, attributions for performance, and locus of control may all be interrelated factors in human motivation. After receiving success, failure, or no feedback on a concept formation task, subjects (N=90)…

  9. Locus of Equity and Brand Extension

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.M.J. van Osselaer (Stijn); J.W. Alba (Joseph)

    2003-01-01

    textabstractPrevailing wisdom assumes that brand equity increases when a brand touts its desirable attributes. We report conditions under which the use of attribute information to promote a product can shift the locus of equity from brand to attribute, thereby reducing the attractiveness of

  10. Locus Coeruleus and Dopamine-Dependent Memory Consolidation

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    Miwako Yamasaki

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Most everyday memories including many episodic-like memories that we may form automatically in the hippocampus (HPC are forgotten, while some of them are retained for a long time by a memory stabilization process, called initial memory consolidation. Specifically, the retention of everyday memory is enhanced, in humans and animals, when something novel happens shortly before or after the time of encoding. Converging evidence has indicated that dopamine (DA signaling via D1/D5 receptors in HPC is required for persistence of synaptic plasticity and memory, thereby playing an important role in the novelty-associated memory enhancement. In this review paper, we aim to provide an overview of the key findings related to D1/D5 receptor-dependent persistence of synaptic plasticity and memory in HPC, especially focusing on the emerging evidence for a role of the locus coeruleus (LC in DA-dependent memory consolidation. We then refer to candidate brain areas and circuits that might be responsible for detection and transmission of the environmental novelty signal and molecular and anatomical evidence for the LC-DA system. We also discuss molecular mechanisms that might mediate the environmental novelty-associated memory enhancement, including plasticity-related proteins that are involved in initial memory consolidation processes in HPC.

  11. Decrease of alpha-chains in beta-thalassemia

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    M. Papadaki

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available In the pathophysiology of beta-thalassemia, globin chain imbalance plays a central role in predicting red blood cell (RBC life span and disease severity. Strategies to improve globin chain imbalance are therefore a legitimate target in the management of this incurable genetic disorder. Classical gene addition with the available retroviral vectors can alter one of the two variables while combined reduction of achains could provide a more potent therapeutic effect. We developed foamy virus (FV vectors for the production of beta-globin and vectors targeting the a-globin transcript using the shRNA technology. Using FVderived vectors, we expressed human anti-a-globin short hairpin RNAs, off a potent PolIII promoter (H1; of the 4 different shRNAs tested, alpha-globin mRNA reduction varied from 6.3 to 54% of the control CD34+ cells. Similarly, vectors developed for the mouse alpha-globin, resulted in a significant reduction (range 15-28% of the control of aglobin in erythroid colonies of Lin- cells. To assay vector performance in vivo, we investigated the hematological parameters in thal3+/- mice transpalnted with FV-transduced Lin- cells, transduced with anti-alpha-globin shRNA. Despite low chimerism and low vector copy numbers (<0.5 per cell, we observed a 10% reduction in red cell distribution width, a marker for distorted erythropoiesis. We finally developed a combination FV vector expressing beta-globin off a HS40 enhancer and anti-alpha-globin shRNA and tested its performance in human CD34+ cells from a thalassemic patient. Globin chain imbalance was ameliorated from a beta/alpha ratio of 0.12 to the level of 0.5, clearly indicating a therapeutic benefit. Overall, shRNA control of alpha-globin excess is a feasible target but requires improvements since the RNAi effect is tough to predict and should ideally be combined with controllable elements.

  12. The Impact of Locus of Control on Language Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nodoushan, Mohammad Ali Salmani

    2012-01-01

    This study hypothesized that students' loci of control affected their language achievement. 198 (N = 198) EFL students took the Rotter's (1966) locus of control test and were classified as locus-internal (ni = 78), and locus-external (ne = 120). They then took their ordinary courses and at the end of the semester, they were given their exams.…

  13. Diversity at the Mla powdery mildew resistance locus from cultivated barley reveals sites of positive selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seeholzer, Sabine; Tsuchimatsu, Takashi; Jordan, Tina; Bieri, Stéphane; Pajonk, Simone; Yang, Wenxiang; Jahoor, Ahmed; Shimizu, Kentaro K; Keller, Beat; Schulze-Lefert, Paul

    2010-04-01

    The Mla locus in barley (Hordeum vulgare) conditions isolate-specific immunity to the powdery mildew fungus (Blumeria graminis f. sp. hordei) and encodes intracellular coiled-coil (CC) domain, nucleotide-binding (NB) site, and leucine-rich repeat (LRR)-containing receptor proteins. Over the last decades, genetic studies in breeding material have identified a large number of functional resistance genes at the Mla locus. To study the structural and functional diversity of this locus at the molecular level, we isolated 23 candidate MLA cDNAs from barley accessions that were previously shown by genetic studies to harbor different Mla resistance specificities. Resistance activity was detected for 13 candidate MLA cDNAs in a transient gene-expression assay. Sequence alignment of the deduced MLA proteins improved secondary structure predictions, revealing four additional, previously overlooked LRR. Analysis of nucleotide diversity of the candidate and validated MLA cDNAs revealed 34 sites of positive selection. Recombination or gene conversion events were frequent in the first half of the gene but positive selection was also found when this region was excluded. The positively selected sites are all, except two, located in the LRR domain and cluster in predicted solvent-exposed residues of the repeats 7 to 15 and adjacent turns on the concave side of the predicted solenoid protein structure. This domain-restricted pattern of positively selected sites, together with the length conservation of individual LRR, suggests direct binding of effectors to MLA receptors.

  14. Identification of a siderophore utilization locus in nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae

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    Seale Thomas W

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Haemophilus influenzae has an absolute aerobic growth requirement for either heme, or iron in the presence of protoporphyrin IX. Both iron and heme in the mammalian host are strictly limited in their availability to invading microorganisms. Many bacterial species overcome iron limitation in their environment by the synthesis and secretion of small iron binding molecules termed siderophores, which bind iron and deliver it into the bacterial cell via specific siderophore receptor proteins on the bacterial cell surface. There are currently no reports of siderophore production or utilization by H. influenzae. Results Comparative genomics revealed a putative four gene operon in the recently sequenced nontypeable H. influenzae strain R2846 that encodes predicted proteins exhibiting significant identity at the amino acid level to proteins involved in the utilization of the siderophore ferrichrome in other bacterial species. No siderophore biosynthesis genes were identified in the R2846 genome. Both comparative genomics and a PCR based analysis identified several additional H. influenzae strains possessing this operon. In growth curve assays strains containing the genes were able to utilize ferrichrome as an iron source. H. influenzae strains lacking the operon were unable to obtain iron from ferrichrome. An insertional mutation in one gene of the operon abrogated the ability of strains to utilize ferrichrome. In addition transcription of genes in the identified operon were repressible by high iron/heme levels in the growth media. Conclusions We have identified an iron/heme-repressible siderophore utilization locus present in several nontypeable H. influenzae strains. The same strains do not possess genes encoding proteins associated with siderophore synthesis. The siderophore utilization locus may enable the utilization of siderophores produced by other microorganisms in the polymicrobial environmental niche of the human nasopharynx

  15. The fester locus in Botryllus schlosseri experiences selection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nydam Marie L

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Allorecognition, the ability of an organism to distinguish self from non-self, occurs throughout the entire tree of life. Despite the prevalence and importance of allorecognition systems, the genetic basis of allorecognition has rarely been characterized outside the well-known MHC (Major Histocompatibility Complex in vertebrates and SI (Self-Incompatibility in plants. Where loci have been identified, their evolutionary history is an open question. We have previously identified the genes involved in self/non-self recognition in the colonial ascidian Botryllus schlosseri, and we can now begin to investigate their evolution. In B. schlosseri, colonies sharing 1 or more alleles of a gene called FuHC (Fusion Histocompatibility will fuse. Protein products of a locus called fester, located ~300 kb from FuHC, have been shown to play multiple roles in the histocompatibility reaction, as activating and/or inhibitory receptors. We test whether the proteins encoded by this locus are evolving neutrally or are experiencing balancing, directional, or purifying selection. Results Nearly all of the variation in the fester locus resides within populations. The 13 housekeeping genes (12 nuclear genes and mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase I have substantially more structure among populations within groups and among groups than fester. All polymorphism statistics (Tajima's D, Fu and Li's D* and F* are significantly negative for the East Coast A-type alleles, and Fu and Li's F* statistic is significantly negative for the West Coast A-type alleles. These results are likely due to selection rather than demography, given that 10 of the housekeeping loci have no populations with significant values for any of the polymorphism statistics. The majority of codons in the fester proteins have ω values 95% posterior probability of ω values > 1. Conclusion Fester proteins are evolving non-neutrally. The polymorphism statistics are consistent with either

  16. Effect of tapentadol on neurons in the locus coeruleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres-Sanchez, Sonia; Alba-Delgado, Cristina; Llorca-Torralba, Meritxell; Mico, Juan A; Berrocoso, Esther

    2013-09-01

    Tapentadol is a novel centrally acting drug that combines mu-opioid receptor (MOR) agonism and noradrenaline reuptake inhibition (NRI), producing analgesic effects in various painful conditions. We investigated the acute effects of tapentadol in the locus coeruleus (LC), a central nucleus regulated by the noradrenergic and opioid systems that is critical in pain modulation. In single-unit extracellular recordings of LC neurons from anaesthetized male Sprague-Dawley rats, tapentadol clearly inhibited the spontaneous electrophysiological activity of LC neurons in a dose-dependent manner (ED50 = 0.8 mg/kg). This inhibitory effect was reversed by RX821002 (an alpha2-adrenoceptor antagonist) and naloxone (a mu-opioid receptor antagonist) by 96.7% and 28.2%, respectively. Pretreatment with RX821002, N-ethoxycarbonyl-2-ethoxy-1-2-dihydroquinoline (EEDQ, an irreversible alpha2-adrenoceptor antagonist) or naloxone shifted the tapentadol dose-effect curve to the right (ED50 = 2.2 mg/kg, 2.0 mg/kg and 2.1 mg/kg, respectively). Furthermore, tapentadol inhibited the LC response to mechanical stimulation of the hindpaw in a dose-dependent manner. In summary, we demonstrate that acute administration of tapentadol inhibits LC neurons in vivo, mainly due to the activation of alpha2-adrenoceptors. These data suggest that both the noradrenergic and opioid systems participate in the inhibitory effect of tapentadol on LC neurons, albeit to different extents, which may account for its potent analgesic effect and mild opioidergic side-effects. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Locus of control and online learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suretha Esterhuysen

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available The integration of online learning in university courses is considered to be both inevitable and necessary. Thus there is an increasing need to raise awareness among educators and course designers about the critical issues impacting on online learning. The aim of this study, therefore, was to assess the differences between two groups of first-year Business Sciences learners (online and conventional learners in terms of biographic and demographic characteristics and locus of control. The study population consisted of 586 first-year learners of whom 185 completed the Locus of Control Inventory (LCI. The results show that the two groups of learners do not differ statistically significantly from each other with respect to locus of control. The findings and their implications are also discussed. Opsomming Die integrasie van aanlyn-leer in universiteitskursusse word beskou as sowel onafwendbaar as noodsaaklik. Daar is dus ’n toenemende behoefte om bewustheid onder opvoedkundiges en kursusontwerpers te kweek oor die kritiese aspekte wat ’n impak op aanlyn-leer het (Morgan, 1996. Daarom was die doel van hierdie ondersoek om die verskille tussen twee groepe eerstejaarleerders in Bestuurs- en Ekonomiese Wetenskap (aanlyn en konvensionele leerders te bepaal ten opsigte van biografiese en demografiese eienskappe en lokus van beheer. Die populasie het bestaan uit 586 eerstejaarleerders waarvan 185 die Lokus van Beheer Vraelys voltooi het. Die resultate toon dat die twee groepe leerders nie statisties beduidend van mekaar verskil het met betrekking tot lokus van beheer nie. Die bevindinge en implikasies word ook bespreek.

  18. Locus coeruleus and dopaminergic consolidation of everyday memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, Tomonori; Duszkiewicz, Adrian J.; Sonneborn, Alex; Spooner, Patrick A.; Yamasaki, Miwako; Watanabe, Masahiko; Smith, Caroline C.; Fernández, Guillén; Deisseroth, Karl; Greene, Robert W.; Morris, Richard G. M.

    2016-01-01

    Summary The retention of episodic-like memory is enhanced, in humans and animals, when something novel happens shortly before or after encoding. Using an everyday memory task in mice, we sought the neurons mediating this dopamine-dependent novelty effect, previously thought to originate exclusively from the tyrosine hydroxylase-expressing (TH+) neurons in the ventral tegmental area (VTA). We report that neuronal firing in the locus coeruleus (LC) is especially sensitive to environmental novelty, LC-TH+ neurons project more profusely than VTA-TH+ neurons to the hippocampus, optogenetic activation of LC-TH+ neurons mimics the novelty effect, and this novelty-associated memory enhancement is unaffected by VTA inactivation. Surprisingly, two effects of LC-TH+ photoactivation are sensitive to hippocampal D1/D5 receptor blockade and resistant to adrenoceptors blockade – memory enhancement and long lasting potentiation of synaptic transmission in CA1 ex vivo. Thus, LC-TH+ neurons can mediate post-encoding memory enhancement in a manner consistent with possible co-release of dopamine in hippocampus. PMID:27602521

  19. Cut Locus Construction using Deformable Simplicial Complexes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Misztal, Marek Krzysztof; Bærentzen, Jakob Andreas; Anton, François

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we present a method for appproximating cut loci for a given point p on Riemannian 2D manifolds, closely related to the notion of Voronoi diagrams. Our method finds the cut locus by advecting a front of points equally distant from p along the geodesics originating at p and finding th...... the domain to have disk topology. We test our method for tori of revolution and compare our results to the benchmark ones from [2]. The method, however, is generic and can be easily adapted to construct cut loci for other manifolds of genera other than 1....

  20. An empirical assessment of the construct "work locus of control"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allan Maram

    1998-06-01

    Full Text Available This study is concerned with the domain specificity of the locus of control construct within the workplace. The research investigated whether Specter's (1988 work locus of control scale, a work centred conceptualisation of Rotter's (1966 locus of control measure/ demonstrated evidence of criterion - related validity. This was done by assessing its relationship to leader-member exchange and organisational commitment. The results indicated that work locus of control correlated with both leader-member exchange and organisational commitment and that leadermember exchange acted as a mediator of the relationship between work locus of control and organisational commitment. This is consistent with results from a similar study undertaken by Kinicki & Vecchio (1994 who employed Rotter's (1966 general locus of control measure. The current research demonstrated stronger relationship than Kinicki & Vecchio's (1994 study, which suggests that Specter's (1988 domain specific scale may predict work behaviour more precisely than Rotter's (1966 more general measure.

  1. Epigenetic features that regulate IgH locus recombination and expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subrahmanyam, Ramesh; Sen, Ranjan

    2012-01-01

    Precisely regulated rearrangements that yield imprecise recombination junctions are hallmarks of antigen receptor gene assembly. At the immunoglobulin heavy chain (IgH) gene locus this is initiated by rearrangement of a D (H) gene segment to a J (H) gene segment to generate DJ(H) junctions, followed by rearrangement of a V (H) gene segment to the DJ(H) junction to generate fully recombined VDJ alleles. In this review we discuss the regulatory features of each step of IgH gene assembly and the role of epigenetic mechanisms in achieving regulatory precision.

  2. Locus of boundary crisis: expect infinitely many gaps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osinga, Hinke M

    2006-09-01

    Boundary crisis is a mechanism for destroying a chaotic attractor when one parameter is varied. In a two-parameter setting the locus of the boundary crisis is associated with curves of homoclinic or heteroclinic bifurcations of periodic saddle points. It is known that this locus has nondifferentiable points. We show here that the locus of boundary crisis is far more complicated than previously reported. It actually contains infinitely many gaps, corresponding to regions (of positive measure) where attractors exist.

  3. Complex rearrangements within the human J delta-C delta/J alpha-C alpha locus and aberrant recombination between J alpha segments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baer, R.; Boehm, T.; Yssel, H.; Spits, H.; Rabbitts, T. H.

    1988-01-01

    We have examined DNA rearrangements within a 120 kb cloned region of the human T cell receptor J delta-C delta/J alpha-C alpha locus. Three types of pattern emerge from an analysis of T cell lines and clones. Firstly, cells with two rearrangements within J delta-C delta; secondly, cells with one

  4. Impact of locus of control on health message effectiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Ying; Shen, Fuyuan

    2011-10-01

    This article examined how individuals' locus of control might moderate the effect of health message frames. An experiment was conducted whereby participants read either individual- or social-responsibility message frames after their locus of control was primed. Results indicated that messages presented in individual-responsibility frames were more persuasive when people were primed with internal locus of control, whereas social-responsibility framed appeals were more persuasive when people were primed with external locus of control. These results were found for individuals in both high and low cognitive load conditions. Theoretical and practical implications of the findings are discussed.

  5. Beyond the locus of spectrally pure colors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fairchild, Mark D.

    2008-01-01

    The spectrum locus of a CIE chromaticity diagram defines the boundary within which all physically realizable color stimuli must fall. While that is a physical and mathematical reality that cannot be violated, it is possible to create colors that appear as if they were produced by physically impossible stimuli. This can be accomplished through careful control of the viewing conditions and states of adaptation. This paper highlights the importance of considering color appearance issues in the design of displays and specification of color gamuts and illustrates how the perceived color gamut can be manipulated significantly through the relationship between white-point and primary luminance levels without changing the chromaticity gamut of a display system. Using a color appearance model, such as CIECAM02, display color gamuts can be specified in perceptual terms such as lightness, chroma, brightness, and colorfulness rather than in strictly physical terms of the stimuli that create these perceptions. Examination of these perceptual gamuts, and their relationships to the viewing conditions, allows demonstration of the possibility of producing display gamuts that appear to reach beyond the locus of pure spectral colors when compared with typical display setups.

  6. Genetic variation of the bronze locus (MC1R in turkeys from Southern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josmael Corso

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Domestic turkeys present several color phenotypes controlled by at least five genetic loci, but only one of these has been identified precisely: the bronze locus, which turned out to be the melanocortin-1 receptor (MC1R gene. MC1R variation is important for breeders interested in maintaining or developing different color varieties. In this study, we sequenced most of the MC1R gene from 16 White Holland (the main commercial turkey variety and 19 pigmented turkeys from southern Brazil with two purposes. The first was to describe the MC1R diversity in White Holland turkeys, which may serve as reservoirs of genetic diversity at this locus. The second was to test whether the traditional color classification used by Brazilian breeders is related to previously known MC1R alleles. White Holland turkeys had four different haplotypes corresponding to the bronze (b+ and black-winged bronze (b1 alleles. Pigmented turkeys also had four haplotypes corresponding to the b+ and b1 alleles, but different haplotypes represent the most common b+ allele in these two groups. The black (B allele was absent from our samples. Overall, our results suggest that white and pigmented individuals form two different populations, and that the traditional color classification used by Brazilian breeders cannot accurately predict the genotypes at the bronze locus.

  7. Genetic variation of the bronze locus (MC1R) in turkeys from Southern Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corso, Josmael; Hepp, Diego; Ledur, Mônica C; Peixoto, Jane O; Fagundes, Nelson J R; Freitas, Thales R O

    2017-01-01

    Domestic turkeys present several color phenotypes controlled by at least five genetic loci, but only one of these has been identified precisely: the bronze locus, which turned out to be the melanocortin-1 receptor (MC1R) gene. MC1R variation is important for breeders interested in maintaining or developing different color varieties. In this study, we sequenced most of the MC1R gene from 16 White Holland (the main commercial turkey variety) and 19 pigmented turkeys from southern Brazil with two purposes. The first was to describe the MC1R diversity in White Holland turkeys, which may serve as reservoirs of genetic diversity at this locus. The second was to test whether the traditional color classification used by Brazilian breeders is related to previously known MC1R alleles. White Holland turkeys had four different haplotypes corresponding to the bronze (b+) and black-winged bronze (b1) alleles. Pigmented turkeys also had four haplotypes corresponding to the b+ and b1 alleles, but different haplotypes represent the most common b+ allele in these two groups. The black (B) allele was absent from our samples. Overall, our results suggest that white and pigmented individuals form two different populations, and that the traditional color classification used by Brazilian breeders cannot accurately predict the genotypes at the bronze locus.

  8. Two-step activation of meiosis by the mat1 locus in Schizosaccharomyces pombe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willer, M; Hoffmann, Ulla-Lisbeth; Styrkársdóttir, U

    1995-01-01

    The mat1 locus is a key regulator of both conjugation and meiosis in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. Two alternative DNA segments of this locus, mat1-P and mat1-M, specify the haploid cell types (Plus and Minus). Each segment includes two genes: mat1-P includes mat1-Pc and mat1-Pm...... in which the mat1 locus plays two roles in controlling meiosis. In the first instance, the mat1-Pc and mat1-Mc functions are required to produce the mating pheromones and receptors that allow the generation of a pheromone signal. This signal is required to induce the expression of mat1-Pm and mat1-Mm....... This appears to be the major pheromone-dependent step in controlling meiosis since ectopic expression of these genes allows meiosis in the absence of mat1-Pc and mat1-Mc. The mat1-Pm and mat1-Mm products complete the initiation of meiosis by activating transcription of the mei3 gene....

  9. Interleukin 18 receptor 1 gene polymorphisms are associated with asthma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhu, Guohua; Whyte, Moira K B; Vestbo, Jørgen

    2008-01-01

    The interleukin 18 receptor (IL18R1) gene is a strong candidate gene for asthma. It has been implicated in the pathophysiology of asthma and maps to an asthma susceptibility locus on chromosome 2q12. The possibility of association between polymorphisms in IL18R1 and asthma was examined by genotyp......The interleukin 18 receptor (IL18R1) gene is a strong candidate gene for asthma. It has been implicated in the pathophysiology of asthma and maps to an asthma susceptibility locus on chromosome 2q12. The possibility of association between polymorphisms in IL18R1 and asthma was examined...

  10. Locus - ASTRA | LSDB Archive [Life Science Database Archive metadata

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available switchLanguage; BLAST Search Image Search Home About Archive Update History Data ...URL: ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/astra/LATEST/astra_locus.zip File size: 887 KB Simple search URL htt...icing type (ex. cassette) About This Database Database Description Download License Update History of This Database Site Policy | Contact Us Locus - ASTRA | LSDB Archive ...

  11. Locus of Control and Its Affect on Achievement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomlinson, Louise M.

    Locus of control is considered a primary factor in the difference between students' high and low achievement. This phenomenon is defined as a polar construct which refers to the degree to which individuals view their successes and failures as either contingent upon their own behaviors (internal locus of control) or independent of them (external…

  12. Metacognition: As a Predictor of One's Academic Locus of Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arslan, Serhat; Akin, Ahmet

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the effect of metacognition on one's academic locus of control. The study's sample group consists of 451 university students enrolled in various programs at Sakarya University, Turkey. In this study, the Metacognitive Awareness Inventory and the Academic Locus of Control Scale were used. The correlations and…

  13. Changing Locus of Control: Steelworkers Adjusting to Forced Unemployment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legerski, Elizabeth Miklya; Cornwall, Marie; O'Neil, Brock

    2006-01-01

    Using an abbreviated version of Levenson's (1981) locus of control scale, we examine change over time in the locus of control of displaced steelworkers. The first data collection occurred approximately six months after plant shutdown, the second occurred a year later. Utilizing a multidimensional measurement model, we test the major assumption…

  14. Locus of control and investment in risky assets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Salamanca, N.; de Grip, A.; Fouarge, D.; Montizaan, R.M.

    2013-01-01

    Using representative household panel data, we show that the investment behavior of households is related to the economic locus of control of household heads. A household's internal locus of control in economic issues is positively related to its decision to hold risky assets as well as its share of

  15. Pharmacists as Entrepreneurs or Employees: The Role of Locus of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To investigate whether locus of control distinguished between pharmacists who chose to become entrepreneurs and those who took up employee roles in pharmaceutical establishments. Methods: The enlarged version of Rotter's I-E scale designed to measure an individual's locus of control was used to survey a ...

  16. A new strategy for estimating two-locus recombination fractions ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Linkage analysis is now being widely used to map markers on each chromosome in the human genome, to map genetic diseases, and to identify genetic forms of common diseases. Two-locus linkage analysis and multi-locus analysis have been investigated comprehensively, and many computer programs have been ...

  17. Nucleotide variation at the methionine synthase locus in an ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nucleotide variation at the methionine synthase (MetE) locus within and among populations of an endangered forest tree Fokienia hodginsii in Vietnam was investigated in the present study. A total of 12 populations were sampled across Vietnam. The length of the sequenced locus varied from 1567 to 1559 bp. A total of 42 ...

  18. Health Beliefs and Locus of Control as Predictors of Cancer ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    OR= 0.35, p < 0.05), internal locus of control (OR = 1.43, p < 0.05) and health risks behaviour (OR= 0.42, p < 0.05) all significantly predicted cervical cancer screening behaviour of women. Keywords: Health beliefs, Health locus of control, cancer ...

  19. Pharmacists as Entrepreneurs or Employees: The Role of Locus of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Patrick Erah

    Methods: The enlarged version of Rotter's I-E scale designed to measure an individual's locus of ..... Research Instrument: The instrument used to .... qualified pharmacists who chose to become entrepreneurs and those who chose employee status in organisations. Those who showed more locus of control internality are ...

  20. Is this Red Spot the Blue Spot (locus ceruleum)?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choe, Won Sick; Lee, Yu Kyung; Lee, Min Kyung; Hwang, Kyung Hoon [Gachon University Gil Hospital, Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-06-15

    The authors report brain images of 18F-FDG-PET in a case of schizophrenia. The images showed strikingly increased bilateral uptake in the locus ceruleum. The locus ceruleum is called the blue spot and known to be a center of the norepinephrinergic system.

  1. The Role of Locus of Control in Leader Influence Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Avis L.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Investigated whether leader's (N=89) locus of control moderated the relationship between perceived leader influence behaviors and certain subordinate (N=245) outcome variables. The results showed that locus of control did significantly moderate the effect of supervisor influence on productivity and subordinate satisfaction with supervision. (JAC)

  2. The relationship between internal and external locus of control of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The method of this study was descriptive and correlational type. The statistic population in this study included parents of children, male and ... Research samples were assessed by using questionnaires Rutter locus of control and aggression. The results of the analysis showed that there is relationship between internal locus ...

  3. Personality and Locus of Control among School Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandya, Archana A.; Jogsan, Yogesh A.

    2013-01-01

    The main purpose of this investigation is to find out the sex differences in personality traits and locus of control among school children. A total 60 children (30 boys and 30 girls) were taken as a sample. The research tool for personality, children personality questionnaire was used, which was made by Cattell and Porter. Locus of control was…

  4. Turkish population data on the short tandem repeat locus TPOX

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vural, B; Poda, M; Atlioglu, E

    1998-01-01

    Allele and genotype frequencies were determined for the STR (short tandem repeat) locus TPOX in a random Turkish population sample of 200 individuals.......Allele and genotype frequencies were determined for the STR (short tandem repeat) locus TPOX in a random Turkish population sample of 200 individuals....

  5. Escala de Locus de controle ELCO/TELEBRÁS Scale of Locus of control - ELCO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Pasquali

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Com base na teoria de Rotter e Escala de Levenson foi elaborada uma escala de Locus de Controle Organizacional (ELCO, composta por 28 itens. A escala foi validada com uma amostra de 350 empregados do Sistema Telebrás. Verificou-se a presença dos 2 fatores previstos na teoria, a saber: internalidade e externalidade, aparecendo a escala de externalidade, com 18 itens, bem estruturada (alfa = 0.81 e a de internalidade, com 10 itens, deixando a desejar no que se refere à consistência interna (alfa = 0.66. Com os dados desta pesquisa foi feita também análise do Locus de Controle desses mesmos empregados. A constatação mais saliente foi a de que o nível de internalidade caiu com o aumento do nível escolar e o aumento da experiência profissional desses mesmos empregados. Estes resultados surpreendentes foram interpretados em termos da situação típica da empresa, que está passando por um período de transição, a saber: a passagem da condição de empresa estatal para empresa privada, o que seria motivo da perda de confiança dos empregados na própria competência, particularmente por parte daqueles com maior competência intelectual e maior experiência profissional. Fez-se igualmente reparos na qualidade psicométrica da escala e da própria teoria do Locus de controle, no sentido de que esta precisa ser melhor axiomatizada para possibilitar a elaboração de escalas mais precisas para a medida dos construtos que propõe.A scale with 28 items, the Organizational Locus of Control (ELCO, was built based on Rotter’s theory and Levenson’s scale. ELCO was validated on a sample of 350 employees of Telebrás, a governmental firm in Brazil. As foreseen from the theory, a principal-axis factoring showed the presence of the expected two factors, namely internal and external locus of control. The external locus of control factor, composed of 18 items, showed good internal consistency (alpha =.81 whereas the internal factor, with 10 items

  6. Locus of Control Orientation: Parents, Peers, and Place.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahlin, Eileen M; Lobo Antunes, Maria João

    2015-09-01

    An internal locus of control contributes to positive youth outcomes such as a general well-being and academic success, while also serving as a protective factor against exposure to community violence and reducing negative behaviors like violence. Despite these benefits, very little is known about antecedents of an internal locus of control orientation. Without an understanding of what factors contribute to the development of an internal locus of control, it is not clear how to best encourage its formation. This study uses data from the Project on Human Development in Chicago Neighborhoods to examine whether various mesosystem variables (family management strategies, peer interactions, neighborhood context, and individual-level characteristics) are associated with an internal locus of control orientation among 1,076 youth ages 9-19 living in 78 Chicago neighborhoods. Study participants were Hispanic (46 %), African American (34 %), and White (15 %), and 50 % were female. The findings suggest that, while most levels of the mesosystem influence locus of control orientation, family management strategies are more prominent determinants of an internal locus of control than peers, neighborhood context, or individual characteristics. Parental supervision over the time a youth spends at home and family socioeconomic status are consistent predictors of an internal locus of control, while harsh discipline is associated with an external locus of control. The discussion examines the import of various parenting techniques in shaping an internal locus of control and considers future avenues for research to further unpack how antecedents of locus of control can vary across youth.

  7. Health Locus of Control尺度開発の歴史(社会科学編)

    OpenAIRE

    吉田, 由美; Yumi, Yoshida; 千葉県立衛生短期大学(歯科保存学); Chiba College of Health Science

    1994-01-01

    This article describes the origins history of Health Locus of Control scales. First, Rotter's social learing theory, which is the theoretical background of the Health Locus of Control construct, is outlined. The scale and research trends of Locus of Control concept, and those of Health Locus of Control concept which are based on Locus of Control, are then reviewed. Finally, Health Locus of Control is discussed with regard to the implications for health education.

  8. Detecting purely epistatic multi-locus interactions by an omnibus permutation test on ensembles of two-locus analyses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Limwongse Chanin

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Purely epistatic multi-locus interactions cannot generally be detected via single-locus analysis in case-control studies of complex diseases. Recently, many two-locus and multi-locus analysis techniques have been shown to be promising for the epistasis detection. However, exhaustive multi-locus analysis requires prohibitively large computational efforts when problems involve large-scale or genome-wide data. Furthermore, there is no explicit proof that a combination of multiple two-locus analyses can lead to the correct identification of multi-locus interactions. Results The proposed 2LOmb algorithm performs an omnibus permutation test on ensembles of two-locus analyses. The algorithm consists of four main steps: two-locus analysis, a permutation test, global p-value determination and a progressive search for the best ensemble. 2LOmb is benchmarked against an exhaustive two-locus analysis technique, a set association approach, a correlation-based feature selection (CFS technique and a tuned ReliefF (TuRF technique. The simulation results indicate that 2LOmb produces a low false-positive error. Moreover, 2LOmb has the best performance in terms of an ability to identify all causative single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs and a low number of output SNPs in purely epistatic two-, three- and four-locus interaction problems. The interaction models constructed from the 2LOmb outputs via a multifactor dimensionality reduction (MDR method are also included for the confirmation of epistasis detection. 2LOmb is subsequently applied to a type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2D data set, which is obtained as a part of the UK genome-wide genetic epidemiology study by the Wellcome Trust Case Control Consortium (WTCCC. After primarily screening for SNPs that locate within or near 372 candidate genes and exhibit no marginal single-locus effects, the T2D data set is reduced to 7,065 SNPs from 370 genes. The 2LOmb search in the reduced T2D data reveals

  9. Reinforcement of genetic coherence in a two-locus model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregorius, H R; Steiner, W

    2001-01-01

    In order to maintain populations as units of reproduction and thus enable anagenetic evolution, genetic factors must exist which prevent continuing reproductive separation or enhance reproductive contact. This evolutionary principle is called genetic coherence and it marks the often ignored counterpart of cladistic evolution. Possibilities of the evolution of genetic coherence are studied with the help of a two-locus model with two alleles at each locus. The locus at which viability selection takes place is also the one that controls the fusion of gametes. The second locus acts on the first by modifying the control of the fusion probabilities. It thus acts as a mating modifier whereas the first locus plays the role of the object of selection and mating. Genetic coherence is enhanced by modifications which confer higher probabilities of fusion to heterotypic gametic combinations (resulting in heterozygous zygotes) at the object locus. It is shown that mutants at the mating modifier locus, which increase heterotypic fusions but do not lower the homotpyic fusions relative to the resident allele at the object locus, generally replace the resident allele. Since heterozygote advantage at the object locus is a necessary condition for this result to hold true, reinforcement of genetic coherence can be claimed for this case. If the homotypic fusions are lowered, complex situations may arise which may favor or disfavor the mutant depending on initial frequencies and recombination rates. To allow for a generalized analysis including alternative models of genetic coherence as well as the estimation of its degrees in real populations, an operational concept for the measurement of this degree is developed. The resulting index is applied to the interpretation of data from crossing experiments in Alnus species designed to detect incompatibility relations.

  10. Reinforcement of genetic coherence in a two-locus model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steiner Wilfried

    2001-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In order to maintain populations as units of reproduction and thus enable anagenetic evolution, genetic factors must exist which prevent continuing reproductive separation or enhance reproductive contact. This evolutionary principle is called genetic coherence and it marks the often ignored counterpart of cladistic evolution. Possibilities of the evolution of genetic coherence are studied with the help of a two-locus model with two alleles at each locus. The locus at which viability selection takes place is also the one that controls the fusion of gametes. The second locus acts on the first by modifying the control of the fusion probabilities. It thus acts as a mating modifier whereas the first locus plays the role of the object of selection and mating. Genetic coherence is enhanced by modifications which confer higher probabilities of fusion to heterotypic gametic combinations (resulting in heterozygous zygotes at the object locus. Results It is shown that mutants at the mating modifier locus, which increase heterotypic fusions but do not lower the homotpyic fusions relative to the resident allele at the object locus, generally replace the resident allele. Since heterozygote advantage at the object locus is a necessary condition for this result to hold true, reinforcement of genetic coherence can be claimed for this case. If the homotypic fusions are lowered, complex situations may arise which may favor or disfavor the mutant depending on initial frequencies and recombination rates. To allow for a generalized analysis including alternative models of genetic coherence as well as the estimation of its degrees in real populations, an operational concept for the measurement of this degree is developed. The resulting index is applied to the interpretation of data from crossing experiments in Alnus species designed to detect incompatibility relations.

  11. Generators of synchronous activity of the locus coeruleus during development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christie, M J

    1997-02-01

    The locus coeruleus is thought to play an important role in the development of the central nervous system through a coordinated release of noradrenaline. The influence of the locus coeruleus on its diverse targets is strongly synchronized by the existence of electrical and chemical coupling between neurones, afferent supply of the nucleus from restricted sources and diffuse innervation of target areas. Extensive coupling between neonatal locus coeruleus neurones produces rhythmic synchronized electrical activity and distributes afferent synaptic activity throughout the entire nucleus. The strength of electrical coupling declines with age but appears to persist to a limited extent in the adult.

  12. Relation of organizational citizenship behavior and locus of control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turnipseed, David L; Bacon, Calvin M

    2009-12-01

    The relation of organizational citizenship behavior and locus of control was assessed in a sample of 286 college students (52% men; M age = 24 yr.) who worked an average of 26 hr. per week. Measures were Spector's Work Locus of Control Scale and Podsakoff, et al.'s Organization Citizenship Behavior scale. Hierarchical multiple regressions indicated positive association of scores on work locus of control with scores on each of the four tested dimensions of organizational citizenship, as well as total organizational citizenship behavior.

  13. A gut-homing, oligoclonal CD4+ T cell population in severe-combined immunodeficient mice expressing a rearranged, transgenic class I-restricted alpha beta T cell receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reimann, J; Rudolphi, A; Spiess, S

    1995-01-01

    We studied the peripheral T cell compartment of H-2b severe combined immunodeficient (scid) mice that express a transgenic (tg) alpha beta T cell receptor (TcR) specific for the H-Y (male) epitope presented by the H-2 class I Db molecule. Large populations of CD3+ NK1.1-TCR beta T+ T cells were...... in these tg scid mice. CD4+ T cells were found in the peritoneal cavity, in the mesenteric lymph nodes and in the intraepithelial layer and lamina propria of the gut. All CD4+ T cells were CD44+ (i.e. showed evidence of antigen-driven differentiation) and expressed the tg V beta 8.2 TcR beta-chain (TcR beta T......+). Only few CD4+ T cells expressed the tg V alpha 3+ TcR alpha-chain (TcR alpha T). cDNA was prepared from CD4+ T cells from spleen or mesenteric lymph nodes of individual male and female tg scid mice; sequence analyses of polymerase chain reaction-amplified, endogenous TcR alpha-chain (TcR alpha E...

  14. Haplotypes at the Tas2r locus on distal chromosome 6 vary with quinine taste sensitivity in inbred mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Munger Steven D

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The detection of bitter-tasting compounds by the gustatory system is thought to alert animals to the presence of potentially toxic food. Some, if not all, bitter stimuli activate specific taste receptors, the T2Rs, which are expressed in subsets of taste receptor cells on the tongue and palate. However, there is evidence for both receptor-dependent and -independent transduction mechanisms for a number of bitter stimuli, including quinine hydrochloride (QHCl and denatonium benzoate (DB. Results We used brief-access behavioral taste testing of BXD/Ty recombinant inbred (RI mouse strains to map the major quantitative trait locus (QTL for taste sensitivity to QHCl. This QTL is restricted to a ~5 Mb interval on chromosome 6 that includes 24 genes encoding T2Rs (Tas2rs. Tas2rs at this locus display in total 307 coding region single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs between the two BXD/Ty RI parental strains, C57BL/6J (quinine-sensitive and DBA/2J (quinine insensitive; approximately 50% of these mutations are silent. Individual RI lines contain exclusively either C57BL/6J or DBA/2J Tas2r alleles at this locus, and RI lines containing C57BL/6J Tas2r alleles are more sensitive to QHCl than are lines containing DBA/2J alleles. Thus, the entire Tas2r cluster comprises a large haplotype that correlates with quinine taster status. Conclusion These studies, the first using a taste-salient assay to map the major QTL for quinine taste, indicate that a T2R-dependent transduction cascade is responsible for the majority of strain variance in quinine taste sensitivity. Furthermore, the large number of polymorphisms within coding exons of the Tas2r cluster, coupled with evidence that inbred strains exhibit largely similar bitter taste phenotypes, suggest that T2R receptors are quite tolerant to variation.

  15. Self-compatible B mutants in coprinus with altered pheromone-receptor specificities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olesnicky, N S; Brown, A J; Honda, Y; Dyos, S L; Dowell, S J; Casselton, L A

    2000-01-01

    A successful mating in the mushroom Coprinus cinereus brings together a compatible complement of pheromones and G-protein-coupled receptors encoded by multiallelic genes at the B mating-type locus. Rare B gene mutations lead to constitutive activation of B-regulated development without the need for mating. Here we characterize a mutation that arose in the B6 locus and show that it generates a mutant receptor with a single amino acid substitution (R96H) at the intracellular end of transmembrane domain III. Using a heterologous yeast assay and synthetic pheromones we show that the mutation does not make the receptor constitutively active but permits it to respond inappropriately to a normally incompatible pheromone encoded within the same B6 locus. Parallel experiments carried out in Coprinus showed that a F67W substitution in this same pheromone enabled it to activate the normally incompatible wild-type receptor. Together, our experiments show that a single amino acid replacement in either pheromone or receptor can deregulate the specificity of ligand-receptor recognition and confer a self-compatible B phenotype. In addition, we use the yeast assay to demonstrate that different receptors and pheromones found at a single B locus belong to discrete subfamilies within which receptor activation cannot normally occur. PMID:11063682

  16. Vitamin D receptor genotype is associated with osteoarthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Q. Huang (Qiuju); C.M. van Duijn (Cornelia); J.C. Birkenhäger (Jan); J.P.T.M. van Leeuwen (Hans); H.A.P. Pols (Huib); A.G. Uitterlinden (André); E. Odding (Else); H. Burger (Huibert); A. Hofman (Albert)

    1997-01-01

    textabstractOsteoporosis and osteoarthritis are age-related disorders of the skeleton with genetic components. Low bone density is a risk factor for osteoporotic fracture while osteoarthritis is associated with increased bone density. The 1,25-dihydroxy-vitamin D3 receptor (VDR) gene locus was

  17. Relationship among Dimensions of Family Communication Patterns and Locus of

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Hassan Anvari

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: This study was done to examine the relationship of self-efficacy with dimensions of family communication patterns and locus of control. Materials and Methods: The population of this study was all Isfahan University students in the 2010-2011 academic years. Two hundred seventy nine students from various faculties of the university selected by cluster sampling method. In this descriptive study were used from the revised scale of dimensions of family communication patterns, locus of control questionnaire and general self-efficacy scale. Results: Results showed that the dialogue orientation, locus of control and conformity orientation have a significant correlation with self-efficacy (p<0.01. In addition dialogue orientation, locus of control and conformity orientation predicted 13%, 7%, 2% of selfefficacy, respectively. Conclusion: Dialogue orientation in family is the most important predictor of students' self-efficacy.

  18. Multidimensional profiles of health locus of control in Hispanic Americans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Champagne, Brian R; Fox, Rina S; Mills, Sarah D; Sadler, Georgia Robins; Malcarne, Vanessa L

    2016-10-01

    Latent profile analysis identified health locus of control profiles among 436 Hispanic Americans who completed the Multidimensional Health Locus of Control scales. Results revealed four profiles: Internally Oriented-Weak, -Moderate, -Strong, and Externally Oriented. The profile groups were compared on sociocultural and demographic characteristics, health beliefs and behaviors, and physical and mental health outcomes. The Internally Oriented-Strong group had less cancer fatalism, religiosity, and equity health attributions, and more alcohol consumption than the other three groups; the Externally Oriented group had stronger equity health attributions and less alcohol consumption. Deriving multidimensional health locus of control profiles through latent profile analysis allows examination of the relationships of health locus of control subtypes to health variables. © The Author(s) 2015.

  19. A new strategy for estimating two-locus recombination fractions ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2011-08-19

    locus recombination fractions under some natural inequality restrictions. J. Genet. 90, 275–282]. Introduction. Linkage analysis is used in both human and other biologi- cal studies. Lathrop et al. (1984) discussed the strategies ...

  20. Locus of Control and Technology Adoption in Developing Country Agriculture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abay, Kibrom Araya; Blalock, Garrick; Berhane, Guush

    2017-01-01

    adoption decisions, including use of chemical fertilizers, improved seeds, and irrigation. We show that individuals with an internal locus of control have higher propensity of adopting agricultural technologies. We observe these empirical regularities in both datasets, and for both revealed measures......We investigate the implication of farmers’ locus of control on their technology adoption decisions. Our empirical analysis is based on two longitudinal surveys and hypothetical choice exercises conducted on Ethiopian farmers. We find that locus of control significantly predicts farmers’ technology...... of farmers’ technology adoption decisions as well as farmers’ hypothetical demand for agricultural technology. The results hold even in a more conservative fixed effects estimation approach, assuming locus of control as time-variant and dynamic behavioral trait. These findings provide behavioral...

  1. A canine chromosome 7 locus confers compulsive disorder susceptibility

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Dodman, N H; Karlsson, E K; Moon-Fanelli, A; Galdzicka, M; Perloski, M; Shuster, L; Lindblad-Toh, K; Ginns, E I

    2010-01-01

    ... pincher CCD with a chromosome 7 locus containing , an attractive candidate.Genome-wide association analyses were performed using DNA from 92 rigorously phenotyped Doberman pinscher FS BS cases and 6...

  2. Neurolinguistic programming training, trait anxiety, and locus of control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konefal, J; Duncan, R C; Reese, M A

    1992-06-01

    Training in the neurolinguistic programming techniques of shifting perceptual position, visual-kinesthetic dissociation, timelines, and change-history, all based on experiential cognitive processing of remembered events, leads to an increased awareness of behavioral contingencies and a more sensitive recognition of environmental cues which could serve to lower trait anxiety and increase the sense of internal control. This study reports on within-person and between-group changes in trait anxiety and locus of control as measured on the Spielberger State-Trait Anxiety Inventory and Wallston, Wallston, and DeVallis' Multiple Health Locus of Control immediately following a 21-day residential training in neurolinguistic programming. Significant with-in-person decreases in trait-anxiety scores and increases in internal locus of control scores were observed as predicted. Chance and powerful other locus of control scores were unchanged. Significant differences were noted on trait anxiety and locus of control scores between European and U.S. participants, although change scores were similar for the two groups. These findings are consistent with the hypothesis that this training may lower trait-anxiety scores and increase internal locus of control scores. A matched control group was not available, and follow-up was unfortunately not possible.

  3. [Health locus of control of patients in disease management programmes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnee, M; Grikscheit, F

    2013-06-01

    Health locus of control beliefs plays a major role in improving self-management skills of the chronically ill - a main goal in disease management programmes (DMP). This study aims at characterising participants in disease management regarding their health locus of control. Data are based on 4 cross-sectional postal surveys between spring and autumn of 2006 and 2007 within the Health Care Monitor of the Bertelsmann Foundation. Among the 6 285 respondents, 1 266 are chronically ill and not enrolled in a DMP and 327 are participating in a DMP. A high internal locus of control (HLC) occurs significantly less often in DMP patients than in normal chronically ill patients (and healthy people) controlling for age, gender and social class. With increasing age, a high internal locus of control is also significantly less likely. When comparing healthy people, the chronically ill and the DMP participants a social gradient of a high internal locus of control belief can be observed. The weaker internal and higher doctor-related external locus of control of DMP participants should be carefully observed by the physician when trying to strengthen the patients' self-management skills. Evaluators of DMP should take into account the different baselines of DMP patients and relevant control groups and incorporate these differences into the evaluation. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  4. Identification of two distinct genes at the vertebrate TRPC2 locus and their characterisation in a marsupial and a monotreme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaw Geoffrey

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The vomeronasal organ (VNO detects pheromones via two large families of vomeronasal receptors: vomeronasal receptor 1 (V1R and vomeronasal receptor 2 (V2R. Both VRs have a common receptor activation cascade involving transient receptor potential channel, subfamily C, member 2 (TRPC2. Results We characterised the TRPC2 locus in a marsupial, the tammar wallaby (Macropus eugenii, and identified two independently regulated genes not previously recognised as distinct. 3'-located exons comprise bona fide TRPC2 whilst 5'-located exons, previously identified as part of TRPC2, comprise a distinct gene, which we term XNDR (XRCC1 N-terminal domain-related. The two genes show contrasting expression patterns in the tammar: TRPC2 is specifically expressed in adult and developing VNO, whereas XNDR is widely expressed in many tissues suggesting a non-VNO-specific role. Strong expression of TRPC2 was detected only after about day 30 post-partum, suggesting that the VNO may not be functional during early pouch life of the tammar. Similarly restricted expression of TRPC2 and widespread expression of XNDR was also detected in the platypus. Bioinformatic analysis of the genomes of a wide range of species suggests that the identity of XNDR and TRPC2 as distinct genes is conserved among vertebrates. Finally, we analysed the promoter of mammalian TRPC2 and identified a conserved binding site for NHLH1, a transcription factor previously implicated in VNO receptor neuron development. Conclusions Two functionally distinct vertebrate genes-XNDR and TRPC2 - occupy a genomic locus that was previously defined as a single gene in the mouse. The former is widely expressed with a putative role in DNA repair, while the latter shows VNO-specific expression under the probable regulation of NHLH1.

  5. PENGARUH LOCUS OF CONTROL INTERNAL, LOCUS OF CONTROL EKSTERNAL, MANAJEMEN WAKTU, DAN KREATIVITAS MENGAJAR TERHADAP MOTIVASI BERPRESTASI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dita Alfitami

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The aims of this research were to know the influence of the internal locus of control, external locus of control, time management, and teaching creativity to achievement motivation (case study in introduction to Office Administration subject in class XI AP SMK N 1 Kendal lesson school year 2016/2017.The population in this study were all the tenth graders of the Office Administration study program at SMK Negeri 1 Kendal with the total number of 71 students. While the sample taken used was saturated samples because the population were less than 100 respondents. Data collection method used in this research, which use questionnaire. The data analysis using multiple linear regression analysis method, classic assumption test analysis, percentage descriptive analysis, and hypothesis test analysis with the help of SPSS 21 programs. The finding shows the results of multiple linear regression analysis obtained equation Y = -20,466 + 0,431 X1 + 0,301 X2 + 0,357 X3 + 0,364 X4+ e. Test of significance of regression equation with F test, obtained count = 43,846 with significance0.000 and less than 0,05. The amount of influence simultaneously or together from locus of control, external locus of control, time management, and teaching creativity to achievement motivation was71%. While influence in partial or individually for internal locus of control was 23,52%, external locus of control 12,67%, time management 22,84%, and teaching creativity 22,46%.

  6. A common variant at the TERT-CLPTM1L locus is associated with estrogen receptor–negative breast cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haiman, Christopher A; Chen, Gary K; Vachon, Celine M; Canzian, Federico; Dunning, Alison; Millikan, Robert C; Wang, Xianshu; Ademuyiwa, Foluso; Ahmed, Shahana; Ambrosone, Christine B; Baglietto, Laura; Balleine, Rosemary; Bandera, Elisa V; Beckmann, Matthias W; Berg, Christine D; Bernstein, Leslie; Blomqvist, Carl; Blot, William J; Brauch, Hiltrud; Buring, Julie E; Carey, Lisa A; Carpenter, Jane E; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Chanock, Stephen J; Chasman, Daniel I; Clarke, Christine L; Cox, Angela; Cross, Simon S; Deming, Sandra L; Diasio, Robert B; Dimopoulos, Athanasios M; Driver, W Ryan; Dünnebier, Thomas; Durcan, Lorraine; Eccles, Diana; Edlund, Christopher K; Ekici, Arif B; Fasching, Peter A; Feigelson, Heather S; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Fostira, Florentia; Försti, Asta; Fountzilas, George; Gerty, Susan M; Giles, Graham G; Godwin, Andrew K; Goodfellow, Paul; Graham, Nikki; Greco, Dario; Hamann, Ute; Hankinson, Susan E; Hartmann, Arndt; Hein, Rebecca; Heinz, Judith; Holbrook, Andrea; Hoover, Robert N; Hu, Jennifer J; Hunter, David J; Ingles, Sue A; Irwanto, Astrid; Ivanovich, Jennifer; John, Esther M; Johnson, Nicola; Jukkola-Vuorinen, Arja; Kaaks, Rudolf; Ko, Yon-Dschun; Kolonel, Laurence N; Konstantopoulou, Irene; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Kulkarni, Swati; Lambrechts, Diether; Lee, Adam M; Le Marchand, Loïc; Lesnick, Timothy; Liu, Jianjun; Lindstrom, Sara; Mannermaa, Arto; Margolin, Sara; Martin, Nicholas G; Miron, Penelope; Montgomery, Grant W; Nevanlinna, Heli; Nickels, Stephan; Nyante, Sarah; Olswold, Curtis; Palmer, Julie; Pathak, Harsh; Pectasides, Dimitrios; Perou, Charles M; Peto, Julian; Pharoah, Paul D P; Pooler, Loreall C; Press, Michael F; Pylkäs, Katri; Rebbeck, Timothy R; Rodriguez-Gil, Jorge L; Rosenberg, Lynn; Ross, Eric; Rüdiger, Thomas; Silva, Isabel dos Santos; Sawyer, Elinor; Schmidt, Marjanka K; Schulz-Wendtland, Rüdiger; Schumacher, Fredrick; Severi, Gianluca; Sheng, Xin; Signorello, Lisa B; Sinn, Hans-Peter; Stevens, Kristen N; Southey, Melissa C; Tapper, William J; Tomlinson, Ian; Hogervorst, Frans B L; Wauters, Els; Weaver, JoEllen; Wildiers, Hans; Winqvist, Robert; Van Den Berg, David; Wan, Peggy; Xia, Lucy Y; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Zheng, Wei; Ziegler, Regina G; Siddiq, Afshan; Slager, Susan L; Stram, Daniel O; Easton, Douglas; Kraft, Peter; Henderson, Brian E; Couch, Fergus J

    2012-01-01

    Estrogen receptor (ER)-negative breast cancer shows a higher incidence in women of African ancestry compared to women of European ancestry. In search of common risk alleles for ER-negative breast cancer, we combined genome-wide association study (GWAS) data from women of African ancestry (1,004 ER-negative cases and 2,745 controls) and European ancestry (1,718 ER-negative cases and 3,670 controls), with replication testing conducted in an additional 2,292 ER-negative cases and 16,901 controls of European ancestry. We identified a common risk variant for ER-negative breast cancer at the TERT-CLPTM1L locus on chromosome 5p15 (rs10069690: per-allele odds ratio (OR) = 1.18 per allele, P = 1.0 × 10−10). The variant was also significantly associated with triple-negative (ER-negative, progesterone receptor (PR)-negative and human epidermal growth factor-2 (HER2)-negative) breast cancer (OR = 1.25, P = 1.1 × 10−9), particularly in younger women (<50 years of age) (OR = 1.48, P = 1.9 × 10−9). Our results identify a genetic locus associated with estrogen receptor negative breast cancer subtypes in multiple populations. PMID:22037553

  7. A Distal Locus Element Mediates IFN-γ Priming of Lipopolysaccharide-Stimulated TNF Gene Expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nancy A. Chow

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Interferon γ (IFN-γ priming sensitizes monocytes and macrophages to lipopolysaccharide (LPS stimulation, resulting in augmented expression of a set of genes including TNF. Here, we demonstrate that IFN-γ priming of LPS-stimulated TNF transcription requires a distal TNF/LT locus element 8 kb upstream of the TNF transcription start site (hHS-8. IFN-γ stimulation leads to increased DNase I accessibility of hHS-8 and its recruitment of interferon regulatory factor 1 (IRF1, and subsequent LPS stimulation enhances H3K27 acetylation and induces enhancer RNA synthesis at hHS-8. Ablation of IRF1 or targeting the hHS-8 IRF1 binding site in vivo with Cas9 linked to the KRAB repressive domain abolishes IFN-γ priming, but does not affect LPS induction of the gene. Thus, IFN-γ poises a distal enhancer in the TNF/LT locus by chromatin remodeling and IRF1 recruitment, which then drives enhanced TNF gene expression in response to a secondary toll-like receptor (TLR stimulus.

  8. The Rvi15 (Vr2) apple scab resistance locus contains three TIR-NBS-LRR genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galli, Paolo; Patocchi, Andrea; Broggini, Giovanni Antonio Lodovico; Gessler, Cesare

    2010-05-01

    Scab caused by the pathogen Venturia inaequalis is considered the most important fungal disease of cultivated apple (Malus x domestica Borkh.). In all, 16 monogenic resistances against scab have been found in different Malus spp. and some of them are currently used in apple breeding for scab-resistant cultivars. However, the self incompatibility and the long generation time of Malus spp. together with the high standards of fruit quality demanded from the fresh market render the breeding of high-quality cultivars in apple a long and expensive task. Therefore, the cloning of disease resistance genes and the use of the cloned genes for the transformation of high-quality apple cultivars could be an approach to solve these drawbacks. We report the construction of a bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) contig spanning the Rvi15 (Vr2) apple scab resistance locus using two GMAL 2473 BAC libraries. A single BAC clone of the contig was sufficient to span the resistance locus. The BAC clone was completely sequenced, allowing identification of a sequence of 48.6 kb going from the two closest markers (ARGH17 and 77G20RP) bracketing Rvi15 (Vr2). Analysis of the 48.6-kb sequence revealed the presence of three putative genes characterized by a Toll and mammalian interleukin-1 receptor protein nucleotide-binding site leucine-rich repeat structure. All three genes were found to be transcribed.

  9. Comprehensive genetic assessment of the ESR1 locus identifies a risk region for endometrial cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    O’Mara, Tracy A; Glubb, Dylan M; Painter, Jodie N; Cheng, Timothy; Dennis, Joe; Attia, John; Holliday, Elizabeth G; McEvoy, Mark; Scott, Rodney J; Ashton, Katie; Proietto, Tony; Otton, Geoffrey; Shah, Mitul; Ahmed, Shahana; Healey, Catherine S; Gorman, Maggie; Martin, Lynn; Hodgson, Shirley; Fasching, Peter A; Hein, Alexander; Beckmann, Matthias W; Ekici, Arif B; Hall, Per; Czene, Kamila; Darabi, Hatef; Li, Jingmei; Dürst, Matthias; Runnebaum, Ingo; Hillemanns, Peter; Dörk, Thilo; Lambrechts, Diether; Depreeuw, Jeroen; Annibali, Daniela; Amant, Frederic; Zhao, Hui; Goode, Ellen L; Dowdy, Sean C; Fridley, Brooke L; Winham, Stacey J; Salvesen, Helga B; Njølstad, Tormund S; Trovik, Jone; Werner, Henrica MJ; Tham, Emma; Liu, Tao; Mints, Miriam; Bolla, Manjeet K; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Tyrer, Jonathan P; Wang, Qin; Hopper, John L; Peto, Julian; Swerdlow, Anthony J; Burwinkel, Barbara; Brenner, Hermann; Meindl, Alfons; Brauch, Hiltrud; Lindblom, Annika; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Couch, Fergus J; Giles, Graham G; Kristensen, Vessela N; Cox, Angela; Pharoah, Paul D P; Dunning, Alison M; Tomlinson, Ian; Easton, Douglas F; Thompson, Deborah J; Spurdle, Amanda B

    2015-01-01

    Excessive exposure to estrogen is a well-established risk factor for endometrial cancer (EC), particularly for cancers of endometrioid histology. The physiological function of estrogen is primarily mediated by estrogen receptor alpha, encoded by ESR1. Consequently, several studies have investigated whether variation at the ESR1 locus is associated with risk of EC, with conflicting results. We performed comprehensive fine-mapping analyses of 3,633 genotyped and imputed single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 6,607 EC cases and 37,925 controls. There was evidence of an EC risk signal located at a potential alternative promoter of the ESR1 gene (lead SNP rs79575945, P = 1.86 × 10−5), which was stronger for cancers of endometrioid subtype (P = 3.76 × 10−6). Bioinformatic analysis suggests that this risk signal is in a functionally important region targeting ESR1, and eQTL analysis found that rs79575945 was associated with expression of SYNE1, a neighbouring gene. In summary, we have identified a single EC risk signal located at ESR1, at study-wide significance. Given SNPs located at this locus have been associated with risk for breast cancer, also a hormonally driven cancer, this study adds weight to the rationale for performing informed candidate fine-scale genetic studies across cancer types. PMID:26330482

  10. The CTRB1/2 locus affects diabetes susceptibility and treatment via the incretin pathway

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    't Hart, Leen M; Fritsche, Andreas; Nijpels, Giel

    2013-01-01

    locus, also associated with an absolute 0.51±0.16% (5.6±1.7 mmol/mol) lower A1C response to DPP-4 inhibitor treatment in G allele carriers but there was no effect on GLP-1 RA treatment in type 2 diabetes patients (n=527). Furthermore, in pancreatic tissue we show that rs7202877 acts as expression......The incretin hormone glucagon-like-peptide 1 (GLP-1) promotes glucose homeostasis and enhances beta-cell function. GLP-1 receptor agonists (GLP-1 RA) and dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitors, which inhibit the physiological inactivation of endogenous GLP-1, are used for the treatment of type 2...... in the regulation of the incretin pathway, development of diabetes and response to DPP-4 inhibitor treatment....

  11. Inferring Demographic History Using Two-Locus Statistics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ragsdale, Aaron P; Gutenkunst, Ryan N

    2017-06-01

    Population demographic history may be learned from contemporary genetic variation data. Methods based on aggregating the statistics of many single loci into an allele frequency spectrum (AFS) have proven powerful, but such methods ignore potentially informative patterns of linkage disequilibrium (LD) between neighboring loci. To leverage such patterns, we developed a composite-likelihood framework for inferring demographic history from aggregated statistics of pairs of loci. Using this framework, we show that two-locus statistics are more sensitive to demographic history than single-locus statistics such as the AFS. In particular, two-locus statistics escape the notorious confounding of depth and duration of a bottleneck, and they provide a means to estimate effective population size based on the recombination rather than mutation rate. We applied our approach to a Zambian population of Drosophila melanogaster Notably, using both single- and two-locus statistics, we inferred a substantially lower ancestral effective population size than previous works and did not infer a bottleneck history. Together, our results demonstrate the broad potential for two-locus statistics to enable powerful population genetic inference. Copyright © 2017 by the Genetics Society of America.

  12. Impulsiveness, locus of control, motivation and problem gambling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Dave

    2004-01-01

    A questionnaire consisting of demographic items, questions about gambling behavior, the South Oaks Gambling Screen (SOGS), a depression inventory, the Eysenck Impulsiveness Questionnaire, Levenson's Internality, Powerful Others and Chance Scales of locus of control and the Gambling Motivation Scale, was completed by a non-random sample of 147 New Zealand university students who gambled for money, median age 24 years. Approximately 17 of the sample was classified as problem gamblers, the rest as non-problem gamblers. Multivariate analysis of variance showed that there were significant differences between problem and non-problem gamblers on gambling frequency, number of activities, parents' gambling, depression, impulsiveness and motivation, but not on locus of control. Amotivation (apathy) and motivation towards stimulation correlated with powerful others and chance locus of control, and motivation to impress others with powerful others locus of control. Hierarchical regression analysis showed that: (1) beyond gambling frequency, number of activities and parents' gambling, motivation explained a substantial proportion of variance in SOGS scores, with impulsiveness accounting for a lesser amount, and (2) predictors of problem gambling included impulsiveness, amotivation and the motivations for accomplishment and tension release. It was concluded that gambling motivation is a more useful construct than locus of control in explaining problem gambling. Suggestions were made for future research, and aspects of gambling motivation were discussed in terms of a treatment program with groups of problem gamblers.

  13. Mutation at the Human D1S80 Minisatellite Locus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuppareddi Balamurugan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Little is known about the general biology of minisatellites. The purpose of this study is to examine repeat mutations from the D1S80 minisatellite locus by sequence analysis to elucidate the mutational process at this locus. This is a highly polymorphic minisatellite locus, located in the subtelomeric region of chromosome 1. We have analyzed 90,000 human germline transmission events and found seven (7 mutations at this locus. The D1S80 alleles of the parentage trio, the child, mother, and the alleged father were sequenced and the origin of the mutation was determined. Using American Association of Blood Banks (AABB guidelines, we found a male mutation rate of 1.04×10-4 and a female mutation rate of 5.18×10-5 with an overall mutation rate of approximately 7.77×10-5. Also, in this study, we found that the identified mutations are in close proximity to the center of the repeat array rather than at the ends of the repeat array. Several studies have examined the mutational mechanisms of the minisatellites according to infinite allele model (IAM and the one-step stepwise mutation model (SMM. In this study, we found that this locus fits into the one-step mutation model (SMM mechanism in six out of seven instances similar to STR loci.

  14. A two-locus forensic match probability for subdivided populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayres, K L

    2000-01-01

    A two-locus match probability is presented that incorporates the effects of within-subpopulation inbreeding (consanguinity) in addition to population subdivision. The usual practice of calculating multi-locus match probabilities as the product of single-locus probabilities assumes independence between loci. There are a number of population genetics phenomena that can violate this assumption: in addition to consanguinity, which increases homozygosity at all loci simultaneously, gametic disequilibrium will introduce dependence into DNA profiles. However, in forensics the latter problem is usually addressed in part by the careful choice of unlinked loci. Hence, as is conventional, we assume gametic equilibrium here, and focus instead on between-locus dependence due to consanguinity. The resulting match probability formulae are an extension of existing methods in the literature, and are shown to be more conservative than these methods in the case of double homozygote matches. For two-locus profiles involving one or more heterozygous genotypes, results are similar to, or smaller than, the existing approaches.

  15. Transcriptional analysis of the Streptococcus pyogenes salivaricin locus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namprachan-Frantz, Phanramphoei; Rowe, Hannah M; Runft, Donna L; Neely, Melody N

    2014-02-01

    The sal lantibiotic locus plays an important role in the virulence of Streptococcus pyogenes. Our transcriptional analysis of the sal locus provides new information on the complex regulation of this operon. Transcription of the operon is regulated by a promoter upstream of the operon and by a second internal promoter upstream of the salKRZ genes. Here we identify the location of the internal promoter and provide information on how this promoter is autoregulated by proteins within the locus. We determined by primer extension that the salKR promoter is located within the salY gene and identified several regulatory regions important for expression. The higher activity of the promoter in a salKR deletion strain indicates a role in repression by the SalR response regulator. Further, this promoter had higher activity in a salA deletion strain, implicating corepression or a signaling role for the SalA peptide. Finally, we demonstrate that this promoter can be controlled by host factors. Analysis of transcriptional regulation of this locus provides a better understanding of the function of the sal locus in S. pyogenes pathogenesis.

  16. Biological significance of soluble IL-2 receptor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Calogero Caruso

    1993-01-01

    Full Text Available A NUMBER of receptors for growth factors and differentiation antigens have been found to be secreted or released by cells. Following mononuclear cell (MNC activation and interleukin-2 receptor (IL-2R expression, a soluble form of the Alpha;-chain of IL-2R (sIL-2R is released. The sIL-2R has been shown to be present in the culture supernatants of activated MNCs as well as in normal sera and, in higher amounts, in sera from subjects affected by several diseases including neoplastic, infectious and autoimmune ones, and in sera from transplanted patients suffering allograft rejection. The blood sIL-2R levels depend on the number of producing cells and the number of molecules per cell, so that sIL-2R blood values may represent an index of the number and the functional state of producing cells, both normal and neoplastic. Thus, monitoring of the immune system, mostly T-cells and haematological malignancies might be targets for the measurement of sIL-2R. Since many conditions may influence sIL-2R production, little diagnostic use may result from these measurements. However, since blood sIL-2R levels may correlate with disease progression and/or response to therapy, their measurement may be a useful index of activity and extent of disease. The precise biological role of the soluble form of the IL-2R is still a matter of debate. However, we know that increased sIL-2R levels may be observed in association with several immunological abnormalities and that sIL-2R is able to bind IL-2. It is conceivable then that in these conditions the excess sIL-2R released in vivo by activated lymphoid cells or by neoplastic cells may somehow regulate IL-2-dependent processes. On the other hand, it cannot exclude that sIL-2R is a by-product without biological significance. Finally, it is puzzling that in many conditions in which an increase of blood sIL-2R values has been observed, MNCs display a decreased in vitro capacity to produce sIL-2R. These seemingly contrasting

  17. AKT as Locus of Hydrogen Bond Network in Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radisavljevic, Ziv

    2018-01-01

    Generation and maintenance of a cancer complexity and robustness are impossible without hydrogen element. It is essential element for the cancer signaling through the AKT locus. Hyperactivated AKT locus by a positive feedback loops from the cancer hypoxic microenvironment generates a hydrogen bond network. Such network initiates protein-protein interaction at the AKT active site and at the same time stabilizes signal propagation. A hydrogen bond network conforms an entropy/enthalpy energetic process used for the interconversion of the AKT protein in metastasis formation and maintenance. Targeting the AKT locus by the redox balance change or hydrogen balance change or proton beam radiation disrupts a hydrogen bond network leading to the disappearance of a cancer complexity and robustness causing failure of the complex energy system in solid cancers and hematological malignancy. J. Cell. Biochem. 119: 130-133, 2018. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Lupus vulgaris occurring in a locus minoris resistentiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Richard; Beatch, Anita; Lee, Mao-Cheng; Cheung-Lee, Melody; Wasel, Norman

    2009-01-01

    The pathogenesis of lupus vulgaris, a form of cutaneous tuberculosis, is not always clear, especially in patients who do not have coexistent extracutaneous tuberculosis and in patients with single lesions. To report a case of lupus vulgaris in a locus minoris resistentiae (a site of reduced resistance) and to use a unique set of clinical circumstances and laboratory tests to reconstruct the pathogenesis of the lesion and the response to treatment. Lupus vulgaris can occur in a locus minoris resistentiae; local trauma and possibly other factors, such as increased temperature, topical corticosteroids, and the virulence of the infecting strain, may facilitate the growth of Mycobacterium tuberculosis present at a locus minoris resistentiae as a result of a silent bacillemia.

  19. Parenting style, locus of control, and oral hygiene in adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleksejūnienė, Jolanta; Brukienė, Vilma

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the study was to test if variations in oral hygiene levels in adolescents were associated with locus of control and parenting styles after controlling for demographic factors. The study sample comprised 237 adolescents aged 12-13 years. The structured questionnaire included demographic characteristics and items about parenting style and locus of control. The Individual Quantitative Plaque % Index (IQPI) and toothbrushing frequency were used as clinical outcome measures. In the bivariate analyses, socioeconomic status (P=0.012), number of children in the family (P=0.003), and frequency of toothbrushing (P=0.001) were related to dental plaque levels. Gender (Pparenting styles, locus of control, and oral hygiene levels was not confirmed.

  20. Locus-specific view of flax domestication history

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Yong-Bi; Diederichsen, Axel; Allaby, Robin G

    2012-01-01

    Crop domestication has been inferred genetically from neutral markers and increasingly from specific domestication-associated loci. However, some crops are utilized for multiple purposes that may or may not be reflected in a single domestication-associated locus. One such example is cultivated flax (Linum usitatissimum L.), the earliest oil and fiber crop, for which domestication history remains poorly understood. Oil composition of cultivated flax and pale flax (L. bienne Mill.) indicates that the sad2 locus is a candidate domestication locus associated with increased unsaturated fatty acid production in cultivated flax. A phylogenetic analysis of the sad2 locus in 43 pale and 70 cultivated flax accessions established a complex domestication history for flax that has not been observed previously. The analysis supports an early, independent domestication of a primitive flax lineage, in which the loss of seed dispersal through capsular indehiscence was not established, but increased oil content was likely occurred. A subsequent flax domestication process occurred that probably involved multiple domestications and includes lineages that contain oil, fiber, and winter varieties. In agreement with previous studies, oil rather than fiber varieties occupy basal phylogenetic positions. The data support multiple paths of flax domestication for oil-associated traits before selection of the other domestication-associated traits of seed dispersal loss and fiber production. The sad2 locus is less revealing about the origin of winter tolerance. In this case, a single domestication-associated locus is informative about the history of domesticated forms with the associated trait while partially informative on forms less associated with the trait. PMID:22408732

  1. Analysis of the ABCA4 genomic locus in Stargardt disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zernant, Jana; Xie, Yajing Angela; Ayuso, Carmen

    2014-01-01

    was designed to find the missing disease-causing ABCA4 variation by a combination of next-generation sequencing (NGS), array-Comparative Genome Hybridization (aCGH) screening, familial segregation and in silico analyses. The entire 140 kb ABCA4 genomic locus was sequenced in 114 STGD patients with one known...... excluded since they were not conserved in non-human primates, were frequent in African populations and, therefore, represented ancestral, and not disease-associated, variants. The sequence variability in the ABCA4 locus is extensive and the non-coding sequences do not harbor frequent mutations in STGD...

  2. Correlacional study among locus of control and human values

    OpenAIRE

    Saulo Santos Menezes Almeida

    2008-01-01

    O presente estudo teve como objetivo central analisar as relações entre locus de controle e valores. Participaram 355 universitários de Sergipe, a maioria do sexo feminino (62,8%) e solteiros (80%), com média de idade de 25,68 anos (amplitude de 17 a 56 anos). Os estudantes responderam à escala de locus de controle de Reyes e a escala de valores de Schwartz. Os resultados indicaram ser os instrumentos aptos a mensurar o proposto pelo objetivo, apresentando índices psicométricos satisfatórios....

  3. Hispanics' locus of control, acculturation, and wellness attitudes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentine, Sean R; Godkin, Jennie; Doughty, Graeme P

    2008-01-01

    There is reason to believe that various cultural attitudes and beliefs influence certain health behaviors, and additional research should identify the causes of such behaviors. This study explored the relationships among cultural identity, acculturation, locus of control, and health beliefs using a sample of 110 Hispanic individuals taking college classes in the southern or southwestern United States. Path analysis indicated that an external locus of control was positively related to health barrier perceptions and that acculturation was negatively related to health barrier perceptions. The findings suggest that Hispanics' perceived control over health outcomes and positive health beliefs could be enhanced with culturally perceptive counseling.

  4. Relationship between preference for red and locus of control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singg, S; Whiddon, T L

    2000-08-01

    The validity of the assumptions about the color red in the Lüscher color theory were examined by correlating preference for red to locus of control and sex. Undergraduates (100 men and 100 women) who scored or = 16 on the Rotter Internal-External Locus of Control Scale were administered the short form of the Lüscher Color Test. Consistent with the assumptions by Lüscher about the color red, the analysis of variance showed that Internal scorers preferred red significantly more than External scorers, but no sex difference was found.

  5. Fine-scale mapping of the FGFR2 breast cancer risk locus: putative functional variants differentially bind FOXA1 and E2F1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Kerstin B; O'Reilly, Martin; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Carlebur, Saskia; Edwards, Stacey L; French, Juliet D; Prathalingham, Radhika; Dennis, Joe; Bolla, Manjeet K; Wang, Qin; de Santiago, Ines; Hopper, John L; Tsimiklis, Helen; Apicella, Carmel; Southey, Melissa C; Schmidt, Marjanka K; Broeks, Annegien; Van 't Veer, Laura J; Hogervorst, Frans B; Muir, Kenneth; Lophatananon, Artitaya; Stewart-Brown, Sarah; Siriwanarangsan, Pornthep; Fasching, Peter A; Lux, Michael P; Ekici, Arif B; Beckmann, Matthias W; Peto, Julian; Dos Santos Silva, Isabel; Fletcher, Olivia; Johnson, Nichola; Sawyer, Elinor J; Tomlinson, Ian; Kerin, Michael J; Miller, Nicola; Marme, Federick; Schneeweiss, Andreas; Sohn, Christof; Burwinkel, Barbara; Guénel, Pascal; Truong, Thérèse; Laurent-Puig, Pierre; Menegaux, Florence; Bojesen, Stig E; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Nielsen, Sune F; Flyger, Henrik; Milne, Roger L; Zamora, M Pilar; Arias, Jose I; Benitez, Javier; Neuhausen, Susan; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Ziogas, Argyrios; Dur, Christina C; Brenner, Hermann; Müller, Heiko; Arndt, Volker; Stegmaier, Christa; Meindl, Alfons; Schmutzler, Rita K; Engel, Christoph; Ditsch, Nina; Brauch, Hiltrud; Brüning, Thomas; Ko, Yon-Dschun; Nevanlinna, Heli; Muranen, Taru A; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Blomqvist, Carl; Matsuo, Keitaro; Ito, Hidemi; Iwata, Hiroji; Yatabe, Yasushi; Dörk, Thilo; Helbig, Sonja; Bogdanova, Natalia V; Lindblom, Annika; Margolin, Sara; Mannermaa, Arto; Kataja, Vesa; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Hartikainen, Jaana M; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Wu, Anna H; Tseng, Chiu-Chen; Van Den Berg, David; Stram, Daniel O; Lambrechts, Diether; Thienpont, Bernard; Christiaens, Marie-Rose; Smeets, Ann; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Rudolph, Anja; Seibold, Petra; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Radice, Paolo; Peterlongo, Paolo; Bonanni, Bernardo; Bernard, Loris; Couch, Fergus J; Olson, Janet E; Wang, Xianshu; Purrington, Kristen; Giles, Graham G; Severi, Gianluca; Baglietto, Laura; McLean, Catriona; Haiman, Christopher A; Henderson, Brian E; Schumacher, Fredrick; Le Marchand, Loic; Simard, Jacques; Goldberg, Mark S; Labrèche, France; Dumont, Martine; Teo, Soo-Hwang; Yip, Cheng-Har; Phuah, Sze-Yee; Kristensen, Vessela; Grenaker Alnæs, Grethe; Børresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Zheng, Wei; Deming-Halverson, Sandra; Shrubsole, Martha; Long, Jirong; Winqvist, Robert; Pylkäs, Katri; Jukkola-Vuorinen, Arja; Kauppila, Saila; Andrulis, Irene L; Knight, Julia A; Glendon, Gord; Tchatchou, Sandrine; Devilee, Peter; Tollenaar, Robert A E M; Seynaeve, Caroline M; García-Closas, Montserrat; Figueroa, Jonine; Chanock, Stephen J; Lissowska, Jolanta; Czene, Kamila; Darabi, Hartef; Eriksson, Kimael; Hooning, Maartje J; Martens, John W M; van den Ouweland, Ans M W; van Deurzen, Carolien H M; Hall, Per; Li, Jingmei; Liu, Jianjun; Humphreys, Keith; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Lu, Wei; Gao, Yu-Tang; Cai, Hui; Cox, Angela; Reed, Malcolm W R; Blot, William; Signorello, Lisa B; Cai, Qiuyin; Pharoah, Paul D P; Ghoussaini, Maya; Harrington, Patricia; Tyrer, Jonathan; Kang, Daehee; Choi, Ji-Yeob; Park, Sue K; Noh, Dong-Young; Hartman, Mikael; Hui, Miao; Lim, Wei-Yen; Buhari, Shaik A; Hamann, Ute; Försti, Asta; Rüdiger, Thomas; Ulmer, Hans-Ulrich; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubinski, Jan; Jaworska, Katarzyna; Durda, Katarzyna; Sangrajrang, Suleeporn; Gaborieau, Valerie; Brennan, Paul; McKay, James; Vachon, Celine; Slager, Susan; Fostira, Florentia; Pilarski, Robert; Shen, Chen-Yang; Hsiung, Chia-Ni; Wu, Pei-Ei; Hou, Ming-Feng; Swerdlow, Anthony; Ashworth, Alan; Orr, Nick; Schoemaker, Minouk J; Ponder, Bruce A J; Dunning, Alison M; Easton, Douglas F

    2013-12-05

    The 10q26 locus in the second intron of FGFR2 is the locus most strongly associated with estrogen-receptor-positive breast cancer in genome-wide association studies. We conducted fine-scale mapping in case-control studies genotyped with a custom chip (iCOGS), comprising 41 studies (n = 89,050) of European ancestry, 9 Asian ancestry studies (n = 13,983), and 2 African ancestry studies (n = 2,028) from the Breast Cancer Association Consortium. We identified three statistically independent risk signals within the locus. Within risk signals 1 and 3, genetic analysis identified five and two variants, respectively, highly correlated with the most strongly associated SNPs. By using a combination of genetic fine mapping, data on DNase hypersensitivity, and electrophoretic mobility shift assays to study protein-DNA binding, we identified rs35054928, rs2981578, and rs45631563 as putative functional SNPs. Chromatin immunoprecipitation showed that FOXA1 preferentially bound to the risk-associated allele (C) of rs2981578 and was able to recruit ERα to this site in an allele-specific manner, whereas E2F1 preferentially bound the risk variant of rs35054928. The risk alleles were preferentially found in open chromatin and bound by Ser5 phosphorylated RNA polymerase II, suggesting that the risk alleles are associated with changes in transcription. Chromatin conformation capture demonstrated that the risk region was able to interact with the promoter of FGFR2, the likely target gene of this risk region. A role for FOXA1 in mediating breast cancer susceptibility at this locus is consistent with the finding that the FGFR2 risk locus primarily predisposes to estrogen-receptor-positive disease. Copyright © 2013 The American Society of Human Genetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Heterotic trait locus (HTL mapping identifies intra-locus interactions that underlie reproductive hybrid vigor in Sorghum bicolor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imri Ben-Israel

    Full Text Available Identifying intra-locus interactions underlying heterotic variation among whole-genome hybrids is a key to understanding mechanisms of heterosis and exploiting it for crop and livestock improvement. In this study, we present the development and first use of the heterotic trait locus (HTL mapping approach to associate specific intra-locus interactions with an overdominant heterotic mode of inheritance in a diallel population using Sorghum bicolor as the model. This method combines the advantages of ample genetic diversity and the possibility of studying non-additive inheritance. Furthermore, this design enables dissecting the latter to identify specific intra-locus interactions. We identified three HTLs (3.5% of loci tested with synergistic intra-locus effects on overdominant grain yield heterosis in 2 years of field trials. These loci account for 19.0% of the heterotic variation, including a significant interaction found between two of them. Moreover, analysis of one of these loci (hDPW4.1 in a consecutive F2 population confirmed a significant 21% increase in grain yield of heterozygous vs. homozygous plants in this locus. Notably, two of the three HTLs for grain yield are in synteny with previously reported overdominant quantitative trait loci for grain yield in maize. A mechanism for the reproductive heterosis found in this study is suggested, in which grain yield increase is achieved by releasing the compensatory tradeoffs between biomass and reproductive output, and between seed number and weight. These results highlight the power of analyzing a diverse set of inbreds and their hybrids for unraveling hitherto unknown allelic interactions mediating heterosis.

  7. Heterotic trait locus (HTL) mapping identifies intra-locus interactions that underlie reproductive hybrid vigor in Sorghum bicolor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Israel, Imri; Kilian, Benjamin; Nida, Habte; Fridman, Eyal

    2012-01-01

    Identifying intra-locus interactions underlying heterotic variation among whole-genome hybrids is a key to understanding mechanisms of heterosis and exploiting it for crop and livestock improvement. In this study, we present the development and first use of the heterotic trait locus (HTL) mapping approach to associate specific intra-locus interactions with an overdominant heterotic mode of inheritance in a diallel population using Sorghum bicolor as the model. This method combines the advantages of ample genetic diversity and the possibility of studying non-additive inheritance. Furthermore, this design enables dissecting the latter to identify specific intra-locus interactions. We identified three HTLs (3.5% of loci tested) with synergistic intra-locus effects on overdominant grain yield heterosis in 2 years of field trials. These loci account for 19.0% of the heterotic variation, including a significant interaction found between two of them. Moreover, analysis of one of these loci (hDPW4.1) in a consecutive F2 population confirmed a significant 21% increase in grain yield of heterozygous vs. homozygous plants in this locus. Notably, two of the three HTLs for grain yield are in synteny with previously reported overdominant quantitative trait loci for grain yield in maize. A mechanism for the reproductive heterosis found in this study is suggested, in which grain yield increase is achieved by releasing the compensatory tradeoffs between biomass and reproductive output, and between seed number and weight. These results highlight the power of analyzing a diverse set of inbreds and their hybrids for unraveling hitherto unknown allelic interactions mediating heterosis.

  8. Quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping for 100-kernel weight of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    hope&shola

    2010-12-06

    Dec 6, 2010 ... Abbreviations: KW, 100-kernel weight; CIM, composite interval mapping; CV, coefficient of variation; HNR, high nitrogen regime; LNR, low nitrogen regime; LOD, log10 of odds ratio;. MAS, marker-assisted selection; QTL, quantitative trait locus;. R2, percentage of phenotypic variance explained by QTL; RIL,.

  9. New distal marker closely linked to the fragile X locus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hulsebos, T. J.; Oostra, B. A.; Broersen, S.; Smits, A.; van Oost, B. A.; Westerveld, A.

    1991-01-01

    We have isolated II-10, a new X-chromosomal probe that identifies a highly informative two-allele TaqI restriction fragment length polymorphism at locus DXS466. Using somatic cell hybrids containing distinct portions of the long arm of the X chromosome, we could localize DXS466 between DXS296 and

  10. New distal marker closely linked to the fragile X locus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T. Hulsebos (Theo); B.A. Oostra (Ben); A. Broersen (Alexander); A. Smits; B.A. van Oost (B.); A. Westerveld (Andries)

    1991-01-01

    textabstractWe have isolated II-10, a new X-chromosomal probe that identifies a highly informative two-allele TaqI restriction fragment length polymorphism at locus DXS466. Using somatic cell hybrids containing distinct portions of the long arm of the X chromosome, we could localize DXS466 between

  11. Male-pattern baldness susceptibility locus at 20p11.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Richards, J.B.; Yuan, X.; Geller, F.; Waterworth, D.; Bataille, V.; Glass, D.; Song, K.; Waeber, G.; Vollenweider, P.; Aben, K.K.H.; Kiemeney, L.A.L.M.; Walters, B.; Soranzo, N.; Thorsteinsdottir, U.; Kong, A.; Rafnar, T.; Deloukas, P.; Sulem, P.; Stefansson, H.; Stefansson, K.; Spector, T.D.; Mooser, V.

    2008-01-01

    We conducted a genome-wide association study for androgenic alopecia in 1,125 men and identified a newly associated locus at chromosome 20p11.22, confirmed in three independent cohorts (n = 1,650; OR = 1.60, P = 1.1 x 10(-14) for rs1160312). The one man in seven who harbors risk alleles at both

  12. Emotional Intelligence, Locus of Control and Conflict Handling Skills ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study examined Emotional Intelligence, Locus of control and Conflict Handling Skills as Predictors of non-violent behaviours among University Students in South-Western Nigeria. The population was all the Nigerian University Students in the South-Western Nigerian out of which a sample of 1,000 participants were ...

  13. AUTOMATIC GENERATION OF ROOT LOCUS PLOTS FOR LINEAR ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Design and analysis of control systems often become difficult due to the complexity of the system model and the design techniques involved. This paper presents the development of a Tools Box in Microsoft Excel for control engineer that uses root locus as a time domain technique for system design and analysis. The Tool ...

  14. Exploring Learner Autonomy: Language Learning Locus of Control in Multilinguals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peek, Ron

    2016-01-01

    By using data from an online language learning beliefs survey (n?=?841), defining language learning experience in terms of participants' multilingualism, and using a domain-specific language learning locus of control (LLLOC) instrument, this article examines whether more experienced language learners can also be seen as more autonomous language…

  15. Relationships among Impulsiveness, Locus of Control, Sex, and Music Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miksza, Peter

    2006-01-01

    This study is an investigation of relationships among impulsiveness, locus of control, sex, observed practice behaviors, practice effectiveness, and self-reported practice habits in a sample of 40 college brass players. Practice effectiveness was defined by the amount of change in pretest and posttest performance achievement scores over one…

  16. Comparison of Locus of Control with Levels of Creativity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kneipp, Karen B.; Gadzella, Bernadette M.

    This study was undertaken to determine whether external locus of control orientation was significantly negatively correlated with levels of creativity. Subjects were 13 male and 13 female undergraduate students enrolled in psychology classes at a southwestern university. Mean age of the subjects was 28.6. Instruments used were Levenson's (1972) I…

  17. Dealing with Malfunction: Locus of Control in Web-Conferencing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klebl, Michael

    2014-01-01

    This paper considers how students deal with malfunctions that occur during the use of web conferencing systems in learning arrangements. In a survey among participants in online courses that make use of a web-conferencing system (N = 129), the relationship between a preference for internal or external locus of control and the perception of…

  18. Demographic Determinants of Locus of Control among Medical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Levenson Multidimensional Locus of Control Inventory and a Socio - demographic data collection sheet were used to collect data from 262 (183 males and 79 females) students selected through convenience sampling. Data were th analyzed using the 16th version of the SPPS. Percentages, means, t-test and ANOVA ...

  19. Social support, locus of control, and psychological well-being

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Zee, KI; Buunk, BP; Sanderman, R

    1997-01-01

    Social support seems to be positively related to psychological well-being. Studies have shown that individual differences exist in the ability to mobilize and use sources of support. The current study focused on locus of control as a personality factor that might be related to this ability, In 2

  20. Locus of control and investment in risky assets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Salamanca Acosta, Nicolas; de Grip, A.; Fouarge, Didier; Montizaan, Raymond

    2016-01-01

    We show that household heads with a strong internal economic locus of control are more likely to hold equity and hold a larger share of equity in their investment portfolio. This relation holds when we control for economic preferences and possible confounders such as financial literacy,

  1. Refinement of the locus for non-syndromic sensorineural deafness ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    2004-04-05

    Bergstrom et al. 1971). Several X-linked forms of isolated bilateral hearing impairment have been reported and their classification is based on the mode of onset and audiogram data (Gorlin 1995). Genetically, the locus DFN1 had been ...

  2. Response to selection in finite locus models with nonadditive effects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Esfandyari, Hadi; Henryon, Mark; Berg, Peer; Thomasen, Jørn Rind; Bijma, Piter; Sørensen, Anders Christian

    2017-01-01

    Under the finite-locus model in the absence of mutation, the additive genetic variation is expected to decrease when directional selection is acting on a population, according to quantitative-genetic theory. However, some theoretical studies of selection suggest that the level of additive

  3. A multi-locus phylogenetic evaluation of Diaporthe (Phomopsis)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Udayanga, D.; Liu, X.; Crous, P.W.; McKenzie, E.H.C.; Chukeatirote, E.; Hyde, K.D.

    2012-01-01

    The genus Diaporthe (Phomopsis) includes important plant pathogenic fungi with wide host ranges and geographic distributions. In the present study, phylogenetic species recognition in Diaporthe is re-evaluated using a multi-locus phylogeny based on a combined data matrix of rDNA ITS, and partial

  4. Concept -Mapping, Students' Locus of Control and Gender as ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study investigated the relative effectiveness of concept mapping and lecture methods on the academic achievement of Nigerian High School Studies in biology using gender and locus of control as intervening variables. This study made use of a 2 x 2 x 2 non-randomised control group, pretest - posttest ...

  5. Locus of control and learning strategies as predictors of academic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of the research was to determine the relationships which exist between academic success, learning strategies and locus of control. In order to achieve this aim a small-scale quantitative study, utilising two inventories, was done. The first measuring instrument is the Learning and Study Strategies Inventory, which is ...

  6. automatic generation of root locus plots for linear time invariant

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    other software package and the ease of using it on the readily available Microsoft Excel environment. Keywords: Asymptotes, Poles, Root Locus, Singularity Point, Zeros. 1. INTRODUCTION. The evolution of Control Engineering practice has propelled the performance of any design system to a reasonable satisfaction which ...

  7. Screening for genomic rearrangements at BRCA1 locus in Iranian ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Genetics; Volume 92; Issue 1. Screening for genomic rearrangements at BRCA1 locus in Iranian women with breast cancer using multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification. Vahid R. Yassaee Babak Emamalizadeh Mir Davood Omrani. Research Note Volume 92 Issue 1 April 2013 pp 131- ...

  8. Inferring relationships between pairs of individuals from locus heterozygosities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spinetti Isabella

    2002-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The traditional exact method for inferring relationships between individuals from genetic data is not easily applicable in all situations that may be encountered in several fields of applied genetics. This study describes an approach that gives affordable results and is easily applicable; it is based on the probabilities that two individuals share 0, 1 or both alleles at a locus identical by state. Results We show that these probabilities (zi depend on locus heterozygosity (H, and are scarcely affected by variation of the distribution of allele frequencies. This allows us to obtain empirical curves relating zi's to H for a series of common relationships, so that the likelihood ratio of a pair of relationships between any two individuals, given their genotypes at a locus, is a function of a single parameter, H. Application to large samples of mother-child and full-sib pairs shows that the statistical power of this method to infer the correct relationship is not much lower than the exact method. Analysis of a large database of STR data proves that locus heterozygosity does not vary significantly among Caucasian populations, apart from special cases, so that the likelihood ratio of the more common relationships between pairs of individuals may be obtained by looking at tabulated zi values. Conclusions A simple method is provided, which may be used by any scientist with the help of a calculator or a spreadsheet to compute the likelihood ratios of common alternative relationships between pairs of individuals.

  9. Relationship Among Achievement Motivation, Self-Esteem, Locus of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The thrust of the study was to examine the relationship among achievement motivation, self-esteem, locus of control and academic performance of university students in a Nigerian University. The purpose was to determine the extent university student\\'s academic performance was influenced by these criterion variables.

  10. Influence of Locus Control on Real and Perceived Relationships ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    They included the Nowicki-Strickland Internal – External Locus of Control Scale for children by Nowicki and Strickland (1973) and Emotional – Social Loneliness Inventory by Vincenzi and Grabosky, (1987). A cross sectional survey design was used while regression analysis and multivariate statistics were used in data ...

  11. Relationship between internet addiction and academic locus of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study identified the various internet activities engaged in by students in a Nigerian University and examined the relationship between internet addiction and their academic locus of control. The sample was made of 250 students selected from a University in Nigeria. An instrument tagged “Questionnaire on Students' ...

  12. Comparison of multi-locus enzyme and protein gel electrophoresis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Comparison of multi-locus enzyme and protein gel electrophoresis in the discrimination of five Fusarium species isolated from Egyptian cottons. ... resolution in organizing all isolates in their respective species-specific clusters. A low correlations was detected between geographical origin of isolates and genetic diversity.

  13. Sam Karlin and multi-locus population genetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldman, Marcus W

    2009-06-01

    Between 1967 and 1982, Sam Karlin made fundamental contributions to many areas of deterministic population genetic theory. This remembrance focuses on his work in multi-locus population genetics, primarily on the interaction between genotypic selection and the rate of recombination.

  14. The Influence of Locus of Control on Student Financial Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Britt, Sonya; Cumbie, Julie A.; Bell, Mary M.

    2013-01-01

    Data on psychological influences of financial behaviors has not been well addressed in student populations, which is concerning given the high levels of general and financial stress experienced by college students. The findings of this study indicate that college students with an external locus of control exhibit the worst financial behaviors.…

  15. 40 CFR 798.5195 - Mouse biochemical specific locus test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... pattern. Presumed mutants are bred to confirm the genetic nature of the change. (3) Animal selection—(i... SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT (CONTINUED) HEALTH EFFECTS TESTING GUIDELINES Genetic Toxicity § 798.5195 Mouse...) A biochemical specific locus mutation is a genetic change resulting from a DNA lesion causing...

  16. Gender, Age and Locus of Control as Correlates of Remedial ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study sought to explain remedial learners' attitude towards English language using three variables: gender, age and locus of control. Three properly validated instruments were used to collect data on the relevant variables from 385 remedial English learners randomly selected from 5 remedial education centers in ...

  17. Locus of Control and Smokeless Tobacco Use Among Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dignan, Mark; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Surveyed seventh-grade students from two school districts in rural North Carolina to determine the prevalence and correlates of smokeless tobacco use. Of those reporting use of smokeless tobacco, virtually all were male. Locus of control of "occasional" users was significantly more internal than those reporting "regular" use.…

  18. Exploring the relationship between work locus of control and job ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Therefore, to improve the performance of commercial banks in Nigeria, employer of labour should resharpen recruitment tools in a way that can identify candidates with internal work locus of control for appointment. Management of Commercial Banks in Nigeria should equally organise training programs that can boost ...

  19. Locus of the intensity effect in simple reaction time tasks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jaśkowski, Piotr; Kurczewska, Marta; Nowik, Agnieszka; van der Lubbe, Robert Henricus Johannes; Verleger, Rolf

    2007-01-01

    Evidence is still inconclusive regarding the locus of the stimulus intensity effect on information processing in reaction tasks. Miller, Ulrich, and Rinkenauer (1999) addressed this question by assessing the intensity effect on stimulus- and response-locked lateralized readiness potentials (LRPs) as

  20. Determination of the yield locus by means of temperature measurement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Banabic, D.; Huetink, Han

    2006-01-01

    The paper presents a theoretical background of the thermo-graphical method of determining the yield locus. The analytical expression of the temperature variation of the specimen deformed in the elastic state is determined starting from the first law of thermodynamics. The experimental method for

  1. (PLWHA): influence of social support, self-esteem, health locus

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Coping among people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA): influence of social support, self-esteem, health locus of control and gender. ... 73) = 5.59, p.05). It is then concluded that management of HIV/AIDS should ...

  2. Y-Chromosome short tandem repeat, typing technology, locus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Y-Chromosome short tandem repeat, typing technology, locus information and allele frequency in different population: A review. ... This review will highlight the importance of the Y- Chromosome as a tool for tracing human evolution and describes some details of Y-chromosomal short tandem repeat (STR) analysis. Among ...

  3. Influence of organisational climate and locus of control on job ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study examined the influence of perceived organisational climate and locus of control on job satisfaction and turnover intentions of commercial bank workers in Benin, Edo State, Nigeria. To determine this, a 2X2 ANOVA was used to analyse the data. Results from a field study of 200 employees of 25 commercial banks ...

  4. Influences of peer relations and locus of control on students ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effort to checkmate extravagance and maximize gain is the focus of all organizations more in this period of global financial crisis. There is need therefore to checkmate unnecessary financial spending. This study examines the influence of the variables, peer relations and locus of control, on such spending among University ...

  5. 240 INFLUENCES OF PEER RELATIONS AND LOCUS OF ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    therefore to checkmate unnecessary financial spending. This study examines the influence of the variables, peer relations and locus of control, on such spending among University students. Three hundred (144 males and 156 females) participants were used for the study. Their ages ranged between 20-30 years with mean ...

  6. Emotional intelligence and locus of control of adult patients with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: This article investigates emotional intelligence and locus of control in an adult breast cancer population receiving treatment. Gaining insight into these constructs will contribute to improving breast cancer patients' psychological well-being and to reducing physical vulnerability to disease before and during ...

  7. Health locus of control and internal resilience factors among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... the Multidimensional Health Locus of Control Scale (MHLC) (Wallston et al., 1978:165) and a modified version of the Resilience Scale (Wagnild & Young, 1993:160). Analysis of variance of the loci of control and resilience scores were conducted. Although 78% of the resilience scores were well within the moderate range, ...

  8. Locus of Control and Learning Disabilities: A Review and Discussion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudley-Marling, Curtis C.; And Others

    1982-01-01

    A literature review reveals that learning disabled children are more likely than normal achievers to attribute successes, but not failures, to external factors. The implications of locus of control for the field of learning disabilities are discussed in terms of its relation to academic achievement, learned helplessness, and remediation programs.…

  9. Communication Anxiety, Self-Image, and Locus of Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGary, Lois J.; Parks, Arlie Muller

    A study was conducted (1) to determine the effectiveness of a specially designed one-semester basic speech course on the self-image of college students experiencing extreme communication anxiety, and (2) to discover whether a difference existed between the self-image of students who had an external locus of control and those with an internal locus…

  10. DNA marker mining of ILSTS035 microsatellite locus on ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We describe tests for detecting and locating quantitative trait loci (QTL) for traits in Hanwoo cattle. From results of a permutation test to detect QTL for marbling, we selected the microsatellite locus ILSTS035 on chromosome 6 for further analysis. -means clustering analysis applied to five traits and nine DNA markers in ...

  11. The beneficial effects of meditation: contribution of the anterior cingulate and locus coeruleus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nancy Alker Craigmyle

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract During fMRI studies of meditation the cortical salience detecting and executive networks become active during awareness of mind wandering, shifting and sustained attention. The anterior cingulate (AC is activated during awareness of mind wandering.The AC modulates both the peripheral sympathetic nervous system (SNS and the central locus coeruleus (LC norepinephrine systems, which form the principal neuromodulatory system, regulating in multiple ways both neuronal and non-neuronal cells to maximize adaptation in changing environments. The LC is the primary source of central norepinephrine (C-NE and nearly the exclusive source of cortical norepinephrine. Normally activated by novel or salient stimuli, the AC initially inhibits the SNS reflexively, lowering peripheral norepinephrine (P-NE and activates the LC, increasing C-NE.Moderate levels of C-NE enhance working memory through alpha 2 adrenergic receptors, while higher levels of C-NE, acting on alpha 1 and beta receptors, enhance other executive network functions such as the stopping of ongoing behavior, attentional set shifting and sustained attention. The actions of the AC on both the central and peripheral noradrenergic systems are implicated in the beneficial effects of meditation. This paper will explore some of the known functions and interrelationships of the AC, SNS and LC with respect to their possible relevance to meditation.

  12. Evolutionary process of a tetranucleotide microsatellite locus in Acipenseriformes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Zhao Jun; Rivals, Eric; Zhao, Na; Lek, Sovan; Chang, Jianbo; Berrebi, Patrick

    2011-08-01

    The evolutionary dynamics of the tetra-nucleotide microsatellite locus Spl-106 were investigated at the repeat and flanking sequences in 137 individuals of 15 Acipenseriform species, giving 93 homologous sequences, which were detected in 11 out of 15 species. Twenty-three haplotypes of flanking sequences and three distinct types of repeats, type I, type II and type III, were found within these 93 sequences. The MS-Align hylogenetic method, newly applied to microsatellite sequences, permitted us to understand the repeat and flanking sequence evolution of Spl-106 locus. The flanking region of locus Spl-106 was highly conserved among the species of genera Acipenser, Huso and Scaphirhynchus, which diverged about 150 million years ago (Mya). The rate of flanking sequence divergence at the microsatellite locus Spl-106 in sturgeons is between 0.011% and 0.079% with an average at 0.028% per million years. Sequence alignment and phylogenetic trees produced by MS-Align showed that both the flanking and repeat regions can cluster the alleles of different species into Pacific and Atlantic lineages. Our results show a synchronous evolutionary pattern between the flanking and repeat regions. Moreover, the coexistence of different repeat types in the same species, even in the same individual, is probably due to two duplication events encompassing the locus Spl-106 that occurred during the divergence of Pacific lineage. The first occured before the diversification of Pacific species (121-96 Mya) and led to repeat types I and II. The second occurred more recently, just before the speciation of A. sinensis and A. dabryanus (69-10 Mya), and led to repeat type III. Sequences in the same species with different repeat types probably corresponds to paralogous loci. This study sheds a new light on the evolutionary mechanisms that shape the complex microsatellite loci involving different repeat types.

  13. Achievement motivation and locus of control of black university students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronel Erwee

    1986-04-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the study was to research the dimensionality of achievement motivation and locus of control in black university students. The Achievement Motivation Questionnaire (Pottas, Erwee, Boshoff & Lessing, 1980 and the Internal-External Locus of Control Scale (Rotter, 1966 were completed by 251 students. Three locus of control factors were extracted by means of principal factor analysis with varimax rotation, viz. Personal control, Political control, and Control over social relationships. The hypothesis that locus of control is a multi-dimensional construct was accepted. No significant sex differences occurred in the total scores obtained on the questionnaire. However, analyses of the subscales indicated that females seem to be more action-orientated, but believe that they can exert less control over political and world events than males. The hypothesis that locus of control and achievement motivation are two separate but interrelated constructs was supported. OpsommingDie doelwit van die studie was om die dimensionaliteit van swart studente se prestasiemotivering en lokus-van-kontrole na te vors. Die Prestasie-motiveringsvraelys (Pottas, Erwee, Boshoff en Lessing, 1980 en die Interne- Eksterne Lokus van Kontroleskaal (Rotter, 1966 is deur 251 studente voltooi. Drie lokus-van-kontrolefaktore, naamlik Persoonlike kontrole, Politieke kontrole en Kontrole oor interpersoonlike verhoudings, is deur middel van 'n hooffaktorontleding (met varimax-rotasie onttrek. Die hipotese dat lokus-van- kontrole 'n multidimensionele konstruk is, is aanvaar. Geen beduidende geslagsverskille in die totaaltellings op die meetinstrumente het voorgekom nie. Analises van die subskale het egter aangetoon dat die vroue hulself as meer aksie-georienteerd beskou het, maar oortuig was dat hulle nie veel beheer oor politieke en wereldgebeure het nie. Die hipotese dat prestasiemotivering en lokus-van-kontrole twee afsonderlike maar verwante konstrukte is, is aanvaar.

  14. A nematode demographics assay in transgenic roots reveals no significant impacts of the Rhg1 locus LRR-Kinase on soybean cyst nematode resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background Soybean cyst nematode (Heterodera glycines, SCN) is the most economically damaging pathogen of soybean (Glycine max) in the U.S. The Rhg1 locus is repeatedly observed as the quantitative trait locus with the greatest impact on SCN resistance. The Glyma18g02680.1 gene at the Rhg1 locus that encodes an apparent leucine-rich repeat transmembrane receptor-kinase (LRR-kinase) has been proposed to be the SCN resistance gene, but its function has not been confirmed. Generation of fertile transgenic soybean lines is difficult but methods have been published that test SCN resistance in transgenic roots generated with Agrobacterium rhizogenes. Results We report use of artificial microRNA (amiRNA) for gene silencing in soybean, refinements to transgenic root SCN resistance assays, and functional tests of the Rhg1 locus LRR-kinase gene. A nematode demographics assay monitored infecting nematode populations for their progress through developmental stages two weeks after inoculation, as a metric for SCN resistance. Significant differences were observed between resistant and susceptible control genotypes. Introduction of the Rhg1 locus LRR-kinase gene (genomic promoter/coding region/terminator; Peking/PI 437654-derived SCN-resistant source), into rhg1- SCN-susceptible plant lines carrying the resistant-source Rhg4+ locus, provided no significant increases in SCN resistance. Use of amiRNA to reduce expression of the LRR-kinase gene from the Rhg1 locus of Fayette (PI 88788 source of Rhg1) also did not detectably alter resistance to SCN. However, silencing of the LRR-kinase gene did have impacts on root development. Conclusion The nematode demographics assay can expedite testing of transgenic roots for SCN resistance. amiRNAs and the pSM103 vector that drives interchangeable amiRNA constructs through a soybean polyubiqutin promoter (Gmubi), with an intron-GFP marker for detection of transgenic roots, may have widespread use in legume biology. Studies in which expression

  15. Reframing Student Affairs Leadership: An Analysis of Organizational Frames of Reference and Locus of Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tull, Ashley; Freeman, Jerrid P.

    2011-01-01

    Examined in this study were the identified frames of reference and locus of control used by 478 student affairs administrators. Administrator responses were examined to identify frames of reference most commonly used and their preference order. Locus of control most commonly used and the relationship between frames of reference and locus of…

  16. Locus of Control in Offenders and Alleged Offenders with Learning Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, Wendy; Leggett, Janice; Garrett, Tanya

    2007-01-01

    Locus of control can be a useful measure of treatment outcome in offenders from the general population. However, there is little information regarding locus of control and offenders with learning disabilities. Existing measures of locus of control use complex language and abstract ideas that may not be accessible to individuals in this group. A…

  17. On the Relation of Locus of Control and L2 Reading and Writing Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghonsooly, Behzad; Shirvan, Majid Elahi

    2011-01-01

    Locus of control, a psychological construct, has been the focus of attention in recent decades. Psychologists have discussed the effect of locus of control on achieving life goals in social/psychological interactions. While learning a foreign language involves both social interactions and psychological processes, the role and relation of locus of…

  18. On the Locus Formed by the Maximum Heights of Projectile Motion with Air Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez-Saldana, H.

    2010-01-01

    We present an analysis on the locus formed by the set of maxima of the trajectories of a projectile launched in a medium with linear drag. Such a place, the locus of apexes, is written in terms of the Lambert "W" function in polar coordinates, confirming the special role played by this function in the problem. To characterize the locus, a study of…

  19. Research Paper Predicting HIV risk using a locus of control-based ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study performed correlational and linear regression analyses using statistical software SAS to establish the relationship between locus of control-based factors and HIV risk. Results: The results showed significant correlations between locus of control-based variables and HIV risk. The locus of control-based model ...

  20. DMPD: The Lps locus: genetic regulation of host responses to bacteriallipopolysaccharide. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 10669111 The Lps locus: genetic regulation of host responses to bacteriallipopolysa...ccharide. Qureshi ST, Gros P, Malo D. Inflamm Res. 1999 Dec;48(12):613-20. (.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show The Lps locus: genetic... regulation of host responses to bacteriallipopolysaccharide. PubmedID 10669111 Title The Lps locus: genetic

  1. An investigation on the mediating role of coping strategies on locus of control-- wellbeing relationship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiruchelvi, Arunachalam; Supriya, Mangatvadakkeveetil V

    2012-03-01

    The relationship among coping strategies, locus of control, and workplace wellbeing is examined. The model hypothesizes that coping strategies mediate the relationship between locus of control and work place well being. To test the model, data was collected from 154 software professionals using separate tools to assess coping strategies, locus of control and work place wellbeing. Model fit for the collected data was examined using structural equation modeling technique with the help of AMOS. Results support the view that coping strategies mediate the relationship between locus of control and work place wellbeing. While the path between locus of control and wellbeing is significant, the path between coping distraction and wellbeing is not significant.

  2. 11q13 is a Susceptibility Locus for Hormone Receptor Positive Breast Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lambrechts, Diether; Truong, Therese; Justenhoven, Christina

    2012-01-01

    A recent two-stage genome-wide association study (GWAS) identified five novel breast cancer susceptibility loci on chromosomes 9, 10 and 11. To provide more reliable estimates of the relative risk associated with these loci and investigate possible heterogeneity by subtype of breast cancer, we ge...

  3. Personal receptor repertoires: olfaction as a model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olender Tsviya

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Information on nucleotide diversity along completely sequenced human genomes has increased tremendously over the last few years. This makes it possible to reassess the diversity status of distinct receptor proteins in different human individuals. To this end, we focused on the complete inventory of human olfactory receptor coding regions as a model for personal receptor repertoires. Results By performing data-mining from public and private sources we scored genetic variations in 413 intact OR loci, for which one or more individuals had an intact open reading frame. Using 1000 Genomes Project haplotypes, we identified a total of 4069 full-length polypeptide variants encoded by these OR loci, average of ~10 per locus, constituting a lower limit for the effective human OR repertoire. Each individual is found to harbor as many as 600 OR allelic variants, ~50% higher than the locus count. Because OR neuronal expression is allelically excluded, this has direct effect on smell perception diversity of the species. We further identified 244 OR segregating pseudogenes (SPGs, loci showing both intact and pseudogene forms in the population, twenty-six of which are annotatively “resurrected” from a pseudogene status in the reference genome. Using a custom SNP microarray we validated 150 SPGs in a cohort of 468 individuals, with every individual genome averaging 36 disrupted sequence variations, 15 in homozygote form. Finally, we generated a multi-source compendium of 63 OR loci harboring deletion Copy Number Variations (CNVs. Our combined data suggest that 271 of the 413 intact OR loci (66% are affected by nonfunctional SNPs/indels and/or CNVs. Conclusions These results portray a case of unusually high genetic diversity, and suggest that individual humans have a highly personalized inventory of functional olfactory receptors, a conclusion that might apply to other receptor multigene families.

  4. Academic anxiety, locus of control, and achievement in medical school.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grover, P L; Smith, D U

    1981-09-01

    Programs designed to assist medical students in academic difficulty typically fail to consider the importance of such factors as academic anxiety and the individual's mechanisms for coping with stress. The authors have addressed this issue by examining relationships among prior achievement, academic anxiety, locus of control, and performance in the first year of medical school. Academic anxiety not only was found to be significantly related to first year performance, but also, when combined with a measure of prior achievement, resulted in a significant increase in prediction. Additional evidence is presented which suggests that the relationship between academic anxiety and achievement may be curvilinear. Locus of control was found to correlate significantly with academic anxiety and tended to shift in a direction of greater externality during the first year of medical school. Findings are discussed within the framework of existing psychological research, and implications are presented for medical admissions, curricula, and counseling.

  5. The validity of locus of control dimensions for Chicano populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garza, R T; Widlak, F W

    1977-12-01

    The multidimensional locus of control literature supported the tenability of five factorial dimensions: a) luck/fate, b) leadership/success, c) academics, d) politics, and e) respect. Contending that the contradictory locus of control findings involving Chicano populations may be due to methodological inadequacies, the purpose of the present study was to empirically determine the appropriateness of the five categories for comparing Chicano and Anglo populations. This was done by factor analyzing the responses of 203 Anglo and 244 Chicano undergraduates to Rotter's (1966) 1-E scale separately, and then comparing the corresponding factor pairs by using Cliff's (1966) congruence procedure. The luck/fate and leadership/success factors show substantial invariance across the two samples, whereas the cultural equivalence of the remaining three factors is somewhat questionable. The findings are discussed in relation to current knowledge of cross-cultural differences between Anglo and Chicano populations.

  6. The Molecular Revolution in Cutaneous Biology: EDC and Locus Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Inez Y; de Guzman Strong, Cristina

    2017-05-01

    The epidermal differentiation complex (EDC) locus consists of a cluster of genes important for the terminal differentiation of the epidermis. While early studies identified the functional importance of individual EDC genes, the recognition of the EDC genes as a cluster with its shared biology, homology, and physical linkage was pivotal to later studies that investigated the transcriptional regulation of the locus. Evolutionary conservation of the EDC and the transcriptional activation during epidermal differentiation suggested a cis-regulatory mechanism via conserved noncoding elements or enhancers. This line of pursuit led to the identification of CNE 923, an epidermal-specific enhancer that was found to mediate chromatin remodeling of the EDC in an AP-1 dependent manner. These genomic studies, as well as the advent of high-throughput sequencing and genome engineering techniques, have paved the way for future investigation into enhancer-mediated regulatory networks in cutaneous biology. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Locus Solus: The New York School Poets’ Missing Manifesto

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evelyn Austin

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Although the New York School of poetry is at its core a literary coterie, critics have been hesitant to consider the New York School an organized group. An exploration of Locus Solus, a literary journal edited by John Ashbery, Kenneth Koch, Frank O’Hara, Harry Mathews, and James Schuyler, however, reveals that the poets were most definitely concerned with presenting themselves as a joint force in American poetry. Through close reading and archival research, I untangle the poets’ instrumentalization of Locus Solus as an elaborate manifesto, exposing how the first three volumes were used to present the New York School poets and poetics, trace a poetic lineage, and put forward a succeeding generation.

  8. Analysis of the ABCA4 genomic locus in Stargardt disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zernant, Jana; Xie, Yajing Angela; Ayuso, Carmen; Riveiro-Alvarez, Rosa; Lopez-Martinez, Miguel-Angel; Simonelli, Francesca; Testa, Francesco; Gorin, Michael B; Strom, Samuel P; Bertelsen, Mette; Rosenberg, Thomas; Boone, Philip M; Yuan, Bo; Ayyagari, Radha; Nagy, Peter L; Tsang, Stephen H; Gouras, Peter; Collison, Frederick T; Lupski, James R; Fishman, Gerald A; Allikmets, Rando

    2014-12-20

    Autosomal recessive Stargardt disease (STGD1, MIM 248200) is caused by mutations in the ABCA4 gene. Complete sequencing of ABCA4 in STGD patients identifies compound heterozygous or homozygous disease-associated alleles in 65-70% of patients and only one mutation in 15-20% of patients. This study was designed to find the missing disease-causing ABCA4 variation by a combination of next-generation sequencing (NGS), array-Comparative Genome Hybridization (aCGH) screening, familial segregation and in silico analyses. The entire 140 kb ABCA4 genomic locus was sequenced in 114 STGD patients with one known ABCA4 exonic mutation revealing, on average, 200 intronic variants per sample. Filtering of these data resulted in 141 candidates for new mutations. Two variants were detected in four samples, two in three samples, and 20 variants in two samples, the remaining 117 new variants were detected only once. Multimodal analysis suggested 12 new likely pathogenic intronic ABCA4 variants, some of which were specific to (isolated) ethnic groups. No copy number variation (large deletions and insertions) was detected in any patient suggesting that it is a very rare event in the ABCA4 locus. Many variants were excluded since they were not conserved in non-human primates, were frequent in African populations and, therefore, represented ancestral, and not disease-associated, variants. The sequence variability in the ABCA4 locus is extensive and the non-coding sequences do not harbor frequent mutations in STGD patients of European-American descent. Defining disease-associated alleles in the ABCA4 locus requires exceptionally well characterized large cohorts and extensive analyses by a combination of various approaches. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. An Analysis of Leader Locus of Control and Influence Behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-05-01

    Social desirability response .j• bias: Three alternative models . Academy of Management Journal, 1983, 26. Graen, C., & Schiemann, W. Leader -member...among managers . Organizational Behavior and Human Performance, 1973, 1 184-200. Durand, D.E., & Nord, W.R. Perceived leader behavior as a function of...AD-A129 100 A N A NALYSIS OF LEAQER LOCUS OF CONTROL AND INFLUENCE BEHAVIORS U) NEBRASKA UNIV LINCOLN DEPT OF MANAGEMENT UNLSIID A L JOHNSON ET AL

  10. Locus-specific view of flax domestication history

    OpenAIRE

    Fu, Yong-Bi; Diederichsen, Axel; Allaby, Robin G.

    2012-01-01

    Crop domestication has been inferred genetically from neutral markers and increasingly from specific domestication-associated loci. However, some crops are utilized for multiple purposes that may or may not be reflected in a single domestication-associated locus. One such example is cultivated flax (Linum usitatissimum L.), the earliest oil and fiber crop, for which domestication history remains poorly understood. Oil composition of cultivated flax and pale flax (L. bienne Mill.) indicates th...

  11. Surfeit locus gene homologs are widely distributed in invertebrate genomes.

    OpenAIRE

    Armes, N.; Fried, M.

    1996-01-01

    The mouse Surfeit locus contains six sequence-unrelated genes (Surf-1 to -6) arranged in the tightest gene cluster so far described for mammals. The organization and juxtaposition of five of the Surfeit genes (Surf-1 to -5) are conserved between mammals and birds, and this may reflect a functional or regulatory requirement for the gene clustering. We have undertaken an evolutionary study to determine whether the Surfeit genes are conserved and clustered in invertebrate genomes. Drosophila mel...

  12. Characterization of a Multipeptide Lantibiotic Locus in Streptococcus pneumoniae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalie Maricic

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial communities are established through a combination of cooperative and antagonistic interactions between the inhabitants. Competitive interactions often involve the production of antimicrobial substances, including bacteriocins, which are small antimicrobial peptides that target other community members. Despite the nearly ubiquitous presence of bacteriocin-encoding loci, inhibitory activity has been attributed to only a small fraction of gene clusters. In this study, we characterized a novel locus (the pld locus in the pathogen Streptococcus pneumoniae that drives the production of a bacteriocin called pneumolancidin, which has broad antimicrobial activity. The locus encodes an unusual tandem array of four inhibitory peptides, three of which are absolutely required for antibacterial activity. The three peptide sequences are similar but appear to play distinct roles in regulation and inhibition. A modification enzyme typically found in loci encoding a class of highly modified bacteriocins called lantibiotics was required for inhibitory activity. The production of pneumolancidin is controlled by a two-component regulatory system that is activated by the accumulation of modified peptides. The locus is located on a mobile element that has been found in many pneumococcal lineages, although not all elements carry the pld genes. Intriguingly, a minimal region containing only the genes required for pneumolancidin immunity was found in several Streptococcus mitis strains. The pneumolancidin-producing strain can inhibit nearly all pneumococci tested to date and provided a competitive advantage in vivo. These peptides not only represent a unique strategy for bacterial competition but also are an important resource to guide the development of new antimicrobials.

  13. The Effects of Locus of Control and Task Difficulty on Procrastination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janssen, Tracy; Carton, John S

    1999-12-01

    The authors investigated the effects of locus of control expectancies and task difficulty on procrastination. Forty-two college students were administered an academic locus of control scale and a task that was similar to a typical college homework assignment. The students were randomly assigned to 1 of 2 task difficulty levels. Although none of the results involving task difficulty was significant, several results involving locus of control were significant. Specifically, analyses revealed that students with internal locus of control expectancies tended to begin working on the assignment sooner than students with external locus of control expectancies. In addition, students with internal locus of control completed and returned the assignment sooner than students with external locus of control. The results are discussed within the context of J. B. Rotter's (1966, 1975, 1982) social learning theory.

  14. Population genetics of the HRAS1 minisatellite locus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Devlin, B.; Risch, N. (Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States)); Krontiris, T. (Tufts Univ., Boston, MA (United States) New England Medical Center Hospital, Boston, MA (United States))

    1993-12-01

    Several years ago it was reported that rare HRAS1 VNTR alleles occurred more frequently in US Caucasian cancer patients than in unaffected controls. Such an association, in theory, could be caused by undetected population heterogeneity. Also, in a study clearly relevant to this issue, it was recently reported that significant deviations from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium exist at this locus in a sample of US Caucasians. These considerations motivate population genetic analysis of the HRAS1 locus. From published studies of the HRAS1 VNTR locus, which classified alleles into types, the authors found only small differences in the allele frequency distributions of samples from various European nations, although there were larger differences among ethnic groups (African American, Caucasian, and Oriental). In an analysis of variation of rare-allele frequencies among samples from four European nations, most of the variance was attributable to molecular methodology, and very little of the variance was accounted for by nationality. In addition, the authors showed that mixture of European subpopulations should result in only minor deviations from expected genotype proportions in a Caucasian database and demonstrated that there was no significant deviation from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium in the HRAS1 data. 35 refs., 4 tabs.

  15. Genomic characterization of the Atlantic cod sex-locus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Star, Bastiaan; Tørresen, Ole K; Nederbragt, Alexander J; Jakobsen, Kjetill S; Pampoulie, Christophe; Jentoft, Sissel

    2016-08-08

    A variety of sex determination mechanisms can be observed in evolutionary divergent teleosts. Sex determination is genetic in Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua), however the genomic location or size of its sex-locus is unknown. Here, we characterize the sex-locus of Atlantic cod using whole genome sequence (WGS) data of 227 wild-caught specimens. Analyzing more than 55 million polymorphic loci, we identify 166 loci that are associated with sex. These loci are located in six distinct regions on five different linkage groups (LG) in the genome. The largest of these regions, an approximately 55 Kb region on LG11, contains the majority of genotypes that segregate closely according to a XX-XY system. Genotypes in this region can be used genetically determine sex, whereas those in the other regions are inconsistently sex-linked. The identified region on LG11 and its surrounding genes have no clear sequence homology with genes or regulatory elements associated with sex-determination or differentiation in other species. The functionality of this sex-locus therefore remains unknown. The WGS strategy used here proved adequate for detecting the small regions associated with sex in this species. Our results highlight the evolutionary flexibility in genomic architecture underlying teleost sex-determination and allow practical applications to genetically sex Atlantic cod.

  16. Transvection at the vestigial locus of Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coulthard, Alistair B; Nolan, Nadia; Bell, John B; Hilliker, Arthur J

    2005-08-01

    Transvection is a phenomenon wherein gene expression is effected by the interaction of alleles in trans and often results in partial complementation between mutant alleles. Transvection is dependent upon somatic pairing between homologous chromosome regions and is a form of interallelic complementation that does not occur at the polypeptide level. In this study we demonstrated that transvection could occur at the vestigial (vg) locus by revealing that partial complementation between two vg mutant alleles could be disrupted by changing the genomic location of the alleles through chromosome rearrangement. If chromosome rearrangements affect transvection by disrupting somatic pairing, then combining chromosome rearrangements that restore somatic pairing should restore transvection. We were able to restore partial complementation in numerous rearrangement trans-heterozygotes, thus providing substantial evidence that the observed complementation at vg results from a transvection effect. Cytological analyses revealed this transvection effect to have a large proximal critical region, a feature common to other transvection effects. In the Drosophila interphase nucleus, paired chromosome arms are separated into distinct, nonoverlapping domains. We propose that if the relative position of each arm in the nucleus is determined by the centromere as a relic of chromosome positions after the last mitotic division, then a locus will be displaced to a different territory of the interphase nucleus relative to its nonrearranged homolog by any rearrangement that links that locus to a different centromere. This physical displacement in the nucleus hinders transvection by disrupting the somatic pairing of homologous chromosomes and gives rise to proximal critical regions.

  17. Relationship between nursing students' epistemological beliefs and locus of control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilmaz, Aylin; Kaya, Hülya

    2010-10-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between nursing students' epistemologic beliefs and locus of control, and the research was conducted at Istanbul University Florence Nightingale School of Nursing with 350 nursing students. Data were collected using the Turkish version of the Epistemological beliefs questionnaire and Rotter's Internal-External Locus of Control Scale. In the data analysis number, percentage, mean, correlation analysis, one-way analysis of variance and Tukey HSD test were used. The findings as whole indicated that nursing students' epistemological beliefs that "The Belief of Learning Depends on Effort (Effort)" showed a greater degree of development than their beliefs about the two other dimensions as named "The Belief of Learning Depends on Ability (Ability)" and "The Belief That There is Only One Unchanging Truth (Unchanging Truth)" in this study, while their belief that there is Unchanging Truth was not developed when compared to the other two. There was a positive correlation between nursing students locus of control and Effort and Ability dimensions, but a significant correlation was not found with Unchanging Truth dimension. This researcher suggests that research should be carried out to determine nursing students' epistemological beliefs and the factors influencing them in an environment to promote the development of these beliefs, and thus the research can be used to learn about the development of the epistemological beliefs. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Novel Crohn disease locus identified by genome-wide association maps to a gene desert on 5p13.1 and modulates expression of PTGER4.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cécile Libioulle

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available To identify novel susceptibility loci for Crohn disease (CD, we undertook a genome-wide association study with more than 300,000 SNPs characterized in 547 patients and 928 controls. We found three chromosome regions that provided evidence of disease association with p-values between 10(-6 and 10(-9. Two of these (IL23R on Chromosome 1 and CARD15 on Chromosome 16 correspond to genes previously reported to be associated with CD. In addition, a 250-kb region of Chromosome 5p13.1 was found to contain multiple markers with strongly suggestive evidence of disease association (including four markers with p < 10(-7. We replicated the results for 5p13.1 by studying 1,266 additional CD patients, 559 additional controls, and 428 trios. Significant evidence of association (p < 4 x 10(-4 was found in case/control comparisons with the replication data, while associated alleles were over-transmitted to affected offspring (p < 0.05, thus confirming that the 5p13.1 locus contributes to CD susceptibility. The CD-associated 250-kb region was saturated with 111 SNP markers. Haplotype analysis supports a complex locus architecture with multiple variants contributing to disease susceptibility. The novel 5p13.1 CD locus is contained within a 1.25-Mb gene desert. We present evidence that disease-associated alleles correlate with quantitative expression levels of the prostaglandin receptor EP4, PTGER4, the gene that resides closest to the associated region. Our results identify a major new susceptibility locus for CD, and suggest that genetic variants associated with disease risk at this locus could modulate cis-acting regulatory elements of PTGER4.

  19. Nerve growth factor receptor gene is at human chromosome region 17q12-17q22, distal to the chromosome 17 breakpoint in acute leukemias

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huebner, K.; Isobe, M.; Chao, M.; Bothwell, M.; Ross, A.H.; Finan, J.; Hoxie, J.A.; Sehgal, A.; Buck, C.R.; Lanahan, A.

    1986-03-01

    Genomic and cDNA clones for the human nerve growth factor receptor have been used in conjunction with somatic cell hybrid analysis and in situ hybridization to localize the nerve growth factor receptor locus to human chromosome region 17q12-q22. Additionally, part, if not all, of the nerve growth factor receptor locus is present on the translocated portion of 17q (17q21-qter) from a poorly differential acute leukemia in which the chromosome 17 breakpoint was indistinguishable cytogenetically from the 17 breakpoint observed in the t(15;17)(q22;q21) translocation associated with acute promyelocytic leukemia. Thus the nerve growth factor receptor locus may be closely distal to the acute promyelocytic leukemia-associated chromosome 17 breakpoint at 17q21.

  20. Evidence for genetic heterogeneity in tuberous sclerosis: One locus on chromosome 9 and at least one locus elsewhere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Northrup, H.; Rodriguez, E. Jr. (Univ. of Texas Medical School, Houston, TX (United States)); Herman, G.E.; Lewis, R.A. (Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX (United States)); Kwiatkowski, D.J. (Brigham and Womens' s Hospital, Boston, MA (United States)); Roach, E.S. (Univ. of Texas Southerwestern Medical School, Dallas, TX (United States)); Dobyns, W.B. (Riley Hospital, Indianapolis, IN (United States)); Daiger, S.P.; Blanton, S.H. (Univ. of Texas Health Science Center, Houston, TX (United States))

    1992-10-01

    Linkage of tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC), an autosomal dominant disorder, to markers on chromosome 9 was reported first in 1987. This assignment was confirmed by an international collaborative study that suggested more than one locus may be responsible for the phenotype. The authors studied 14 multigenerational TSC families (13 previously unreported) with markers for nine loci in the linked region of chromosome 9q32-q34. Results confirm the previous reports that the genetic locus in one-third to one-half of families maps to chromosome 9. Comparison of clinical findings in the chromosome 9-linked families with those in the chromosome 9-unlinked families reveals only a higher incidence of ungual fibromata in the chromosome 9-linked families. 38 refs., 6 figs., 4 tabs.

  1. Covalent modification of the interleukin-5 receptor by isothiazolones leads to inhibition of the binding of interleukin-5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devos, R; Guisez, Y; Plaetinck, G; Cornelis, S; Tavernier, J; van der Heyden, J; Foley, L H; Scheffler, J E

    1994-10-15

    Using a fusion protein of the human interleukin-5-receptor alpha chain (hIL5R alpha) and the human IgG C gamma 3 chain (hIL5R alpha-h gamma 3), we have developed a solid-phase assay for high-flux screening of a collection of synthetic compounds. We report on the identification of isothiazolone derivatives as potent inhibitors of binding of interleukin-5 (IL5) to the hIL5R alpha, as measured in a solid-phase assay (soluble hIL5R alpha or hIL5R alpha-h gamma 3) or on COS-1 cells expressing the hIL5R alpha on the cell membrane. The binding of hIL4 and human granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (hGM-CSF) to their respective receptors is not inhibited by the isothiazolones in similar assay systems. Scatchard analysis revealed that these compounds caused a decrease in affinity of the IL5R alpha for IL5. The inhibition of binding IL5 to its receptor by the isothiazolone derivatives is abrogated by free-sulfhydryl-containing compounds such as dithiothreitol, indicating that the isothiazolones react with the sulfhydryl group of free cysteine residues in the hIL5R alpha. Mutation of Cys66 led to a receptor which still binds hIL5, but which was insensitive to the inhibition by isothiazolones. Mutation of Cys249 and Cys296 to serine resulted in complete loss of IL-5-binding activity. The use of radio-labeled isothiazolone confirmed that Cys66, present in the first domain of the receptor, is the target for covalent modification leading to a decrease in affinity.

  2. Regulation of Arabidopsis root development by receptor-like kinase RGIR1 and abiotic stress

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yu, Nana

    2017-01-01

    In deze studie werd een Arabidopsis mutant geïndentificeerd met een kortere wortelfenotype die gemuteerd is in het At2g37050 locus. Het gen werd Root Growth Inhibition Receptor 1 (RGIR1) genoemd en codeert voor een leucine-rich repeat kinase behorende tot de LRR-I RLK subfamilie van Arabidopsis.

  3. Locus de Controle e escolha do método anticoncepcional Locus de Control y método anticonceptivo elegido Locus of Control and choice of contraceptive method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aline Salheb Alves

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Objetivou-se avaliar a relação entre o Locus de Controle e o tipo de método contraceptivo escolhido. Foi utilizada a Escala Multidimensional de Locus de Controle de Levenson e entrevistadas 191 mulheres. As usuárias de preservativo masculino apresentaram maior Internalidade do que as usuárias de injetável mensal. Quanto ao locus Externalidade Outros Poderosos, as usuárias de implante apresentavam menor externalidade do que as usuárias de preservativo masculino, laqueadura, injetável trimestral e DIU. Considerando-se o locus Externalidade Acaso, as usuárias de implante apresentaram menores escores do que as mulheres que optaram pela laqueadura, injetável trimestral e DIU. Observou-se ainda, menor Externalidade Acaso entre as usuárias de injetável mensal em relação às mulheres que fizeram opção pelo injetável trimestral.El objetivo es validar la relación entre el Locus de Control y el tipo de método anticonceptivo elegido. Fue usada la Escala Multidimensional de Locus de Control de Levenson. Fueron entrevistadas 191 mujeres. Las usuarias de condón masculino presentaron Internalidad más grande que las usuarias de inyectable mensual. Considerado el Locus Externalidad - Otro poderoso, las usuarias de implante presentaron menor externalidad de que las usuarias de condón masculino, laqueadura, inyectable trimestral y DIU. Considerado el Locus Externalidad - Quizá, las usuarias del implante presentaron menores resultados que las mujeres que eligieron por la laqueadura, inyectable trimestral y DIU. Se observo que las mujeres usuarias de inyectable mensual presentaron menor Externalidad - Quizá que las mujeres usuarias de inyectable trimestral.The purpose was to assess the relationship between locus of control and the contraceptive method chosen. It was used the Levenson's Multidimensional Locus of Control Scale and 191 women was interviewed. Users of male condoms presented greater Internality than the monthly contraceptive

  4. Examining the relationship between health locus of control and God Locus of Health Control: Is God an internal or external source?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, Joni M; Wilcox, Sara

    2017-11-01

    For many people, the influence of believing in a higher power can elicit powerful effects. This study examined the relationship between God control, health locus of control, and frequency of religious attendance within 838 college students through online surveys. Regression analysis showed that chance and external locus of control and frequency of religious attendance were significant and positive predictors of God Locus of Health Control. The association of powerful others external locus of control and God Locus of Health Control differed by race (stronger in non-Whites than Whites) and somewhat by gender (stronger in women than men). For some people, the role of a supreme being, or God, should be considered when designing programs for improving health behaviors.

  5. Multiple independent variants at the TERT locus are associated with telomere length and risks of breast and ovarian cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bojesen, Stig E; Pooley, Karen A; Johnatty, Sharon E; Beesley, Jonathan; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Tyrer, Jonathan P; Edwards, Stacey L; Pickett, Hilda A; Shen, Howard C; Smart, Chanel E; Hillman, Kristine M; Mai, Phuong L; Lawrenson, Kate; Stutz, Michael D; Lu, Yi; Karevan, Rod; Woods, Nicholas; Johnston, Rebecca L; French, Juliet D; Chen, Xiaoqing; Weischer, Maren; Nielsen, Sune F; Maranian, Melanie J; Ghoussaini, Maya; Ahmed, Shahana; Baynes, Caroline; Bolla, Manjeet K; Wang, Qin; Dennis, Joe; McGuffog, Lesley; Barrowdale, Daniel; Lee, Andrew; Healey, Sue; Lush, Michael; Tessier, Daniel C; Vincent, Daniel; Bacot, Françis; Vergote, Ignace; Lambrechts, Sandrina; Despierre, Evelyn; Risch, Harvey A; González-Neira, Anna; Rossing, Mary Anne; Pita, Guillermo; Doherty, Jennifer A; Álvarez, Nuria; Larson, Melissa C; Fridley, Brooke L; Schoof, Nils; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Cicek, Mine S; Peto, Julian; Kalli, Kimberly R; Broeks, Annegien; Armasu, Sebastian M; Schmidt, Marjanka K; Braaf, Linde M; Winterhoff, Boris; Nevanlinna, Heli; Konecny, Gottfried E; Lambrechts, Diether; Rogmann, Lisa; Guénel, Pascal; Teoman, Attila; Milne, Roger L; Garcia, Joaquin J; Cox, Angela; Shridhar, Vijayalakshmi; Burwinkel, Barbara; Marme, Frederik; Hein, Rebecca; Sawyer, Elinor J; Haiman, Christopher A; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Andrulis, Irene L; Moysich, Kirsten B; Hopper, John L; Odunsi, Kunle; Lindblom, Annika; Giles, Graham G; Brenner, Hermann; Simard, Jacques; Lurie, Galina; Fasching, Peter A; Carney, Michael E; Radice, Paolo; Wilkens, Lynne R; Swerdlow, Anthony; Goodman, Marc T; Brauch, Hiltrud; García-Closas, Montserrat; Hillemanns, Peter; Winqvist, Robert; Dürst, Matthias; Devilee, Peter; Runnebaum, Ingo; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubinski, Jan; Mannermaa, Arto; Butzow, Ralf; Bogdanova, Natalia V; Dörk, Thilo; Pelttari, Liisa M; Zheng, Wei; Leminen, Arto; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Bunker, Clareann H; Kristensen, Vessela; Ness, Roberta B; Muir, Kenneth; Edwards, Robert; Meindl, Alfons; Heitz, Florian; Matsuo, Keitaro; du Bois, Andreas; Wu, Anna H; Harter, Philipp; Teo, Soo-Hwang; Schwaab, Ira; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Blot, William; Hosono, Satoyo; Kang, Daehee; Nakanishi, Toru; Hartman, Mikael; Yatabe, Yasushi; Hamann, Ute; Karlan, Beth Y; Sangrajrang, Suleeporn; Kjaer, Susanne Krüger; Gaborieau, Valerie; Jensen, Allan; Eccles, Diana; Høgdall, Estrid; Shen, Chen-Yang; Brown, Judith; Woo, Yin Ling; Shah, Mitul; Azmi, Mat Adenan Noor; Luben, Robert; Omar, Siti Zawiah; Czene, Kamila; Vierkant, Robert A; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Flyger, Henrik; Vachon, Celine; Olson, Janet E; Wang, Xianshu; Levine, Douglas A; Rudolph, Anja; Weber, Rachel Palmieri; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Iversen, Edwin; Nickels, Stefan; Schildkraut, Joellen M; Silva, Isabel Dos Santos; Cramer, Daniel W; Gibson, Lorna; Terry, Kathryn L; Fletcher, Olivia; Vitonis, Allison F; van der Schoot, C Ellen; Poole, Elizabeth M; Hogervorst, Frans B L; Tworoger, Shelley S; Liu, Jianjun; Bandera, Elisa V; Li, Jingmei; Olson, Sara H; Humphreys, Keith; Orlow, Irene; Blomqvist, Carl; Rodriguez-Rodriguez, Lorna; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Salvesen, Helga B; Muranen, Taru A; Wik, Elisabeth; Brouwers, Barbara; Krakstad, Camilla; Wauters, Els; Halle, Mari K; Wildiers, Hans; Kiemeney, Lambertus A; Mulot, Claire; Aben, Katja K; Laurent-Puig, Pierre; van Altena, Anne M; Truong, Thérèse; Massuger, Leon F A G; Benitez, Javier; Pejovic, Tanja; Perez, Jose Ignacio Arias; Hoatlin, Maureen; Zamora, M Pilar; Cook, Linda S; Balasubramanian, Sabapathy P; Kelemen, Linda E; Schneeweiss, Andreas; Le, Nhu D; Sohn, Christof; Brooks-Wilson, Angela; Tomlinson, Ian; Kerin, Michael J; Miller, Nicola; Cybulski, Cezary; Henderson, Brian E; Menkiszak, Janusz; Schumacher, Fredrick; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Marchand, Loic Le; Yang, Hannah P; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Glendon, Gord; Engelholm, Svend Aage; Knight, Julia A; Høgdall, Claus K; Apicella, Carmel; Gore, Martin; Tsimiklis, Helen; Song, Honglin; Southey, Melissa C; Jager, Agnes; van den Ouweland, Ans M W; Brown, Robert; Martens, John W M; Flanagan, James M; Kriege, Mieke; Paul, James; Margolin, Sara; Siddiqui, Nadeem; Severi, Gianluca; Whittemore, Alice S; Baglietto, Laura; McGuire, Valerie; Stegmaier, Christa; Sieh, Weiva; Müller, Heiko; Arndt, Volker; Labrèche, France; Gao, Yu-Tang; Goldberg, Mark S; Yang, Gong; Dumont, Martine; McLaughlin, John R; Hartmann, Arndt; Ekici, Arif B; Beckmann, Matthias W; Phelan, Catherine M; Lux, Michael P; Permuth-Wey, Jenny; Peissel, Bernard; Sellers, Thomas A; Ficarazzi, Filomena; Barile, Monica; Ziogas, Argyrios; Ashworth, Alan; Gentry-Maharaj, Aleksandra; Jones, Michael; Ramus, Susan J; Orr, Nick; Menon, Usha; Pearce, Celeste L; Brüning, Thomas; Pike, Malcolm C; Ko, Yon-Dschun; Lissowska, Jolanta; Figueroa, Jonine; Kupryjanczyk, Jolanta; Chanock, Stephen J; Dansonka-Mieszkowska, Agnieszka; Jukkola-Vuorinen, Arja; Rzepecka, Iwona K; Pylkäs, Katri; Bidzinski, Mariusz; Kauppila, Saila; Hollestelle, Antoinette; Seynaeve, Caroline; Tollenaar, Rob A E M; Durda, Katarzyna; Jaworska, Katarzyna; Hartikainen, Jaana M; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Kataja, Vesa; Antonenkova, Natalia N; Long, Jirong; Shrubsole, Martha; Deming-Halverson, Sandra; Lophatananon, Artitaya; Siriwanarangsan, Pornthep; Stewart-Brown, Sarah; Ditsch, Nina; Lichtner, Peter; Schmutzler, Rita K; Ito, Hidemi; Iwata, Hiroji; Tajima, Kazuo; Tseng, Chiu-Chen; Stram, Daniel O; van den Berg, David; Yip, Cheng Har; Ikram, M Kamran; Teh, Yew-Ching; Cai, Hui; Lu, Wei; Signorello, Lisa B; Cai, Qiuyin; Noh, Dong-Young; Yoo, Keun-Young; Miao, Hui; Iau, Philip Tsau-Choong; Teo, Yik Ying; McKay, James; Shapiro, Charles; Ademuyiwa, Foluso; Fountzilas, George; Hsiung, Chia-Ni; Yu, Jyh-Cherng; Hou, Ming-Feng; Healey, Catherine S; Luccarini, Craig; Peock, Susan; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Peterlongo, Paolo; Rebbeck, Timothy R; Piedmonte, Marion; Singer, Christian F; Friedman, Eitan; Thomassen, Mads; Offit, Kenneth; Hansen, Thomas V O; Neuhausen, Susan L; Szabo, Csilla I; Blanco, Ignacio; Garber, Judy; Narod, Steven A; Weitzel, Jeffrey N; Montagna, Marco; Olah, Edith; Godwin, Andrew K; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Goldgar, David E; Caldes, Trinidad; Imyanitov, Evgeny N; Tihomirova, Laima; Arun, Banu K; Campbell, Ian; Mensenkamp, Arjen R; van Asperen, Christi J; van Roozendaal, Kees E P; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne; Collée, J Margriet; Oosterwijk, Jan C; Hooning, Maartje J; Rookus, Matti A; van der Luijt, Rob B; van Os, Theo A M; Evans, D Gareth; Frost, Debra; Fineberg, Elena; Barwell, Julian; Walker, Lisa; Kennedy, M John; Platte, Radka; Davidson, Rosemarie; Ellis, Steve D; Cole, Trevor; Paillerets, Brigitte Bressac-de; Buecher, Bruno; Damiola, Francesca; Faivre, Laurence; Frenay, Marc; Sinilnikova, Olga M; Caron, Olivier; Giraud, Sophie; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Bonadona, Valérie; Caux-Moncoutier, Virginie; Toloczko-Grabarek, Aleksandra; Gronwald, Jacek; Byrski, Tomasz; Spurdle, Amanda B; Bonanni, Bernardo; Zaffaroni, Daniela; Giannini, Giuseppe; Bernard, Loris; Dolcetti, Riccardo; Manoukian, Siranoush; Arnold, Norbert; Engel, Christoph; Deissler, Helmut; Rhiem, Kerstin; Niederacher, Dieter; Plendl, Hansjoerg; Sutter, Christian; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Borg, Åke; Melin, Beatrice; Rantala, Johanna; Soller, Maria; Nathanson, Katherine L; Domchek, Susan M; Rodriguez, Gustavo C; Salani, Ritu; Kaulich, Daphne Gschwantler; Tea, Muy-Kheng; Paluch, Shani Shimon; Laitman, Yael; Skytte, Anne-Bine; Kruse, Torben A; Jensen, Uffe Birk; Robson, Mark; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Ejlertsen, Bent; Foretova, Lenka; Savage, Sharon A; Lester, Jenny; Soucy, Penny; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B; Olswold, Curtis; Cunningham, Julie M; Slager, Susan; Pankratz, Vernon S; Dicks, Ed; Lakhani, Sunil R; Couch, Fergus J; Hall, Per; Monteiro, Alvaro N A; Gayther, Simon A; Pharoah, Paul D P; Reddel, Roger R; Goode, Ellen L; Greene, Mark H; Easton, Douglas F; Berchuck, Andrew; Antoniou, Antonis C; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Dunning, Alison M

    2013-01-01

    TERT-locus single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and leucocyte telomere measures are reportedly associated with risks of multiple cancers. Using the iCOGs chip, we analysed ~480 TERT-locus SNPs in breast (n=103,991), ovarian (n=39,774) and BRCA1 mutation carrier (11,705) cancer cases and controls. 53,724 participants have leucocyte telomere measures. Most associations cluster into three independent peaks. Peak 1 SNP rs2736108 minor allele associates with longer telomeres (P=5.8×10−7), reduced estrogen receptor negative (ER-negative) (P=1.0×10−8) and BRCA1 mutation carrier (P=1.1×10−5) breast cancer risks, and altered promoter-assay signal. Peak 2 SNP rs7705526 minor allele associates with longer telomeres (P=2.3×10−14), increased low malignant potential ovarian cancer risk (P=1.3×10−15) and increased promoter activity. Peak 3 SNPs rs10069690 and rs2242652 minor alleles increase ER-negative (P=1.2×10−12) and BRCA1 mutation carrier (P=1.6×10−14) breast and invasive ovarian (P=1.3×10−11) cancer risks, but not via altered telomere length. The cancer-risk alleles of rs2242652 and rs10069690 respectively increase silencing and generate a truncated TERT splice-variant. PMID:23535731

  6. CTCF and ncRNA regulate the 3-dimensional structure of antigen receptor loci to facilitate V(DJ recombination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nancy M Choi

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available At both the immunoglobulin (Ig heavy and kappa light chain loci, there are >100 functional variable (V genes spread over >2 Mb that must move into close proximity in 3D space to the (DJ genes to create a diverse repertoire of antibodies. Similar events take place at the T cell receptor (TCR loci to create a wide repertoire of TCRs. In this review, we will discuss the role of CTCF in forming rosette-like structures at the antigen receptor (AgR loci, and the varied roles it plays in alternately facilitating and repressing V(DJ rearrangements. In addition, non-coding RNAs (ncRNA, also known as germline transcription, can shape the 3D configuration of the Igh locus, and presumably that of the other AgR loci. At the Igh locus, this could occur by gathering the regions being transcribed in the VH locus into the same transcription factory where Iμ is being transcribed. Since the Iμ promoter, Eμ, is adjacent to the DJH rearrangement to which one V gene will ultimately rearrange, the process of germline transcription itself, prominent in the distal half of the VH locus, may play an important and direct role in locus compaction. Finally, we will discuss the impact of the transcriptional and epigenetic landscape of the Igh locus on VH gene rearrangement frequencies.

  7. Fine mapping a self-fertility locus in perennial ryegrass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Do Canto, Javier; Studer, Bruno; Frei, Ursula; Lübberstedt, Thomas

    2017-12-15

    A self-fertility locus was fine mapped to a 1.6 cM region on linkage group 5 in a perennial ryegrass population. This locus was the main determinant of pollen self-compatibility. In grasses, self-incompatibility (SI) is characterized by a two-loci gametophytic (S and Z) mechanism acting together in the recognition and inhibition of self-pollen. Mutations affecting the expression of SI have been reported in a few grass species. In perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne L.), a mutation independent from S and Z, and mapping on linkage group 5 (LG 5), was previously reported to produce self-fertile plants. Here, we describe fine mapping of the self-fertility (SF) gene in a perennial ryegrass population and determine whether there is any effect of other genomic regions on the pollen compatibility. The phenotypic segregation of SF showed a bimodal distribution with one mean at 49% pollen compatibility and the other at 91%. Marker-trait association analysis showed that only markers on LG 5 were significantly associated with the trait. A single gene model explained 82% of the observed variability and no effects of the other regions were detected. Using segregation and linkage analysis, the SF locus was located to a 1.6 cM region on LG 5. The flanking marker sequences were aligned to rice and Brachypodium distachyon reference genomes to estimate the physical distance. We provide markers tightly linked to SF that can be used for introgression of this trait into advanced breeding germplasm. Moreover, our results represent a further step towards the identification of the SF gene in LG 5.

  8. The construction of a normative scale of locus of control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johann M. Schepers

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available The primary objective of the study was to construct a normative scale of locus of control for use with students and adults. A corollary of the study was to establish the personality, interest and cognitive correlates of locus of control. Conceptually the instrument is based on attribution theory and on social learning theory. The first edition of the Locus of Control Inventory (LCI was applied to 356 first-year university students during 1994. A factor analysis of the 65 items of the inventory yielded three factors. The factors were interpreted as Autonomy, Internal Control and External Control. Three scales, corresponding to the three factors, were constructed, and yielded reliability coefficients of 0,80; 0,77 and 0,81 respectively. Following this the cognitive, interest and personality correlates of the LCI were determined. The implications of the findings are discussed. Opsomming Die hoofdoel van die studie was die konstruksie van ’n normatiewe skaal van lokus van beheer vir gebruik met studente en volwassenes. ’n Newe-doelwit van die studie was om die persoonlikheids-, belangstellings- en kognitiewe korrelate van lokus van beheer te bepaal. Konseptueel is die instrument op attribusieteorie en sosiale-leerteorie gebaseer. Die eerste-uitgawe van die Lokus van Beheervraelys (LvB is op 356 eerstejaaruniversiteitstudente toegepas gedurende 1994. ’n Faktorontleding van die 65 items van die vraelys is gedoen en het drie faktore opgelewer. Die faktore is as Outonomie, Interne Beheer en Eksterne Beheer geïnterpreteer. Voorts is drie skale wat ooreenstem met die drie faktore, gekonstrueer en het betroubaarhede van 0,80; 0,77 en 0,81, onderskeidelik, opgelewer. Vervolgens is die kognitiewe, belangstellings- en persoonlikheidskorrelate van die LvB bepaal. Die implikasies van die bevindinge word bespreek.

  9. Increased locus coeruleus tonic activity causes disengagement from a patch-foraging task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kane, Gary A; Vazey, Elena M; Wilson, Robert C; Shenhav, Amitai; Daw, Nathaniel D; Aston-Jones, Gary; Cohen, Jonathan D

    2017-12-01

    High levels of locus coeruleus (LC) tonic activity are associated with distraction and poor performance within a task. Adaptive gain theory (AGT; Aston-Jones & Cohen, 2005) suggests that this may reflect an adaptive function of the LC, encouraging search for more remunerative opportunities in times of low utility. Here, we examine whether stimulating LC tonic activity using designer receptors (DREADDs) promotes searching for better opportunities in a patch-foraging task as the value of a patch diminishes. The task required rats to decide repeatedly whether to exploit an immediate but depleting reward within a patch or to incur the cost of a time delay to travel to a new, fuller patch. Similar to behavior associated with high LC tonic activity in other tasks, we found that stimulating LC tonic activity impaired task performance, resulting in reduced task participation and increased response times and omission rates. However, this was accompanied by a more specific, predicted effect: a significant tendency to leave patches earlier, which was best explained by an increase in decision noise rather than a systematic bias to leave earlier (i.e., at higher values). This effect is consistent with the hypothesis that high LC tonic activity favors disengagement from current behavior, and the pursuit of alternatives, by augmenting processing noise. These results provide direct causal evidence for the relationship between LC tonic activity and flexible task switching proposed by AGT.

  10. Second locus for Hirschsprung disease/Waardenburg syndrome in a large Mennonite kindred

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dow, E.; Cross, S.; Williamson, R. [St. Mary`s Hospital Medical School, London (United Kingdom); Mulligan, L.M. [Univ. of Cambridge, MA (United States); Lyonnet, S. [Hopital des Enfants Malades, Paris (France); Wolgemuth, D.J. [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States); Mascari, M.; Ladda, R. [Milton S. Hershey Medical Center, PA (United States)

    1994-10-15

    We have studied a large Mennonite kindred in which 20 members were affected with Hirschburg disease (HSCR), 5 of whom had one or more manifestations of Waardenburg syndrome (WS) type II (WS2). Eleven additional relatives had signs of WS2 without HSCR. Since HSCR and WS2 each represent perturbations of neural crest migration/differentiation, this large pedigree with apparent cosegregation of HSCR and WS2 offered an opportunity to search for linkage between these loci, candidate genes, and random DNA markers, particularly in view of recent discoveries of genes for Waardenburg syndrome type I (WS1) and Hirschsprung disease (c-ret). We have examined the following possible linked markers in 69 relatives in this family: the c-ret gene (HSCR); the human PAX3 gene (HuP2) on chromosome 2q (WS1) and placental alkaline phosphatase (ALPP) on chromosome 2q (linked to WS1); argininosuccinate synthetase (ASS) on chromosome 9q, close to ABO blood groups which have shown weak linkage to WS; and the {beta}1 GABA receptor gene (GABARB1) on chromosome 4q13-11, close to c-kit, deletions of which cause piebaldism. Linkage between any of these loci and HSCR/WS in this kindred was excluded, demonstrating that there is at least one further locus for HSCR other than c-ret. 45 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  11. Decreased Interleukin-4 Release from the Neurons of the Locus Coeruleus in Response to Immobilization Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyun-ju Lee

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available It has been demonstrated that immobilization (IMO stress affects neuroimmune systems followed by alterations of physiology and behavior. Interleukin-4 (IL-4, an anti-inflammatory cytokine, is known to regulate inflammation caused by immune challenge but the effect of IMO on modulation of IL-4 expression in the brain has not been assessed yet. Here, it was demonstrated that IL-4 was produced by noradrenergic neurons in the locus coeruleus (LC of the brain and release of IL-4 was reduced in response to IMO. It was observed that IMO groups were more anxious than nontreated groups. Acute IMO (2 h/day, once stimulated secretion of plasma corticosterone and tyrosine hydroxylase (TH in the LC whereas these increments were diminished in exposure to chronic stress (2 h/day, 21 consecutive days. Glucocorticoid receptor (GR, TH, and IL-4-expressing cells were localized in identical neurons of the LC, indicating that hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal- (HPA- axis and sympathetic-adrenal-medullary- (SAM- axis might be involved in IL-4 secretion in the stress response. Accordingly, it was concluded that stress-induced decline of IL-4 concentration from LC neurons may be related to anxiety-like behavior and an inverse relationship exists between IL-4 secretion and HPA/SAM-axes activation.

  12. Locus of the apices of projectile trajectories under constant drag

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Saldaña, H.

    2017-11-01

    Using the hodograph method, we present an analytical solution for projectile coplanar motion under constant drag, parametrised by the velocity angle. We find the locus formed by the apices of the projectile trajectories, and discuss its implementation for the motion of a particle on an inclined plane in presence of Coulomb friction. The range and time of flight are obtained numerically, and we find that the optimal launching angle is smaller than in the drag-free case. This is a good example of a problem with constant dissipation of energy that includes curvature; it is appropriate for intermediate courses of mechanics.

  13. [Polymorphism of the DXS1062 locus in a Polish population].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cybulska, Lidia; Szczerkowska, Zofia

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a population study of a dinucleotide STR marker DXS1062. Blood samples were obtained from unrelated adult individuals (males and females) living in the northern part of Poland. In the analyzed population, 21 different phenotypes and 9 alleles of the DXS1062 locus were found. The alleles were sequenced and used for the construction of an allelic ladder. The nomenclature in accordance with ISFG guidelines was proposed. The most frequent alleles were 20 and 21. Statistical parameters (PR, PM, PD, PIC) showed that the examined system is useful in forensic medicine.

  14. Rapid Multi-Locus Sequence Typing Using Microfluidic Biochips

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-12

    Chlamydia (manuscript in preparation) and performed pilot studies on Staphylococcus aureus and Streptoccus pneumoniae (Data S4 and Text S2). Another potential...Found at: doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0010595.s009 (0.00 MB TXT) Text S2 mMLST sequencing of S. aureus and S. pneumoniae . Found at: doi:10.1371...provided S. aureus and S. pneumoniae strains. This publication made use of the Bacillus cereus Multi Locus Sequence Typing website (http://pubmlst.org

  15. Measurement of supernatural belief: sex differences and locus of control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randall, T M; Desrosiers, M

    1980-10-01

    Although we live in an age dominated by science and technology, there exists an increasingly popular anti-science sentiment. This study describes the development of a scale to assess the degree of personal acceptance of supernatural causality versus acceptance of scientific explanation. In addition to the psychometric data concerning validity and reliability of the scale, data are presented which showed the personality factor of supernaturalism to be independent of orthodox religious attitudes. Results indicated a significantly greater supernatural acceptance for women, and a positive relation of supernaturalism with external locus of control.

  16. Locus of control and its relationship with mental health and adjustment among adolescent females

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madhu Jain

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: There exists a plethora of researches which have identified the role of Locus of Control in maintaining sound mental health and adjustment. The present study examined the relationship of Locus of Control with Mental Health & overall Adjustment among adolescent females. Method: The participants consisted of 50 adolescent females. Mental Health Battery designed by Singh, Gupta (2000, Rotter′s Locus of Control Scale (1966 & Adjustment Inventory for College Students by Sinha & Singh (1995 were administered. Findings: The findings of the study revealed that adolescent females who possess internal locus of control showed better mental health & overall adjustment pattern which includes home, social, emotional, educational domains and health adjustment domain than those who possess external locus of control. Conclusion: The study highlights the pervasive influence of internal & external locus of control on mental health & adjustment among adolescent females.

  17. The relationship between the perception of own locus of control and aggression of adolescent boys

    OpenAIRE

    Lettie Breet; Chris Myburgh; Marie Poggenpoel

    2010-01-01

    Aggression is increasingly seen in most parts of South African society. Aggressive behaviour of boys in secondary school often results from frustrations caused by perceived high expectations of others regarding the role, locus of control, and personality of boys. Locus of control plays an important role in a person's perception concerning a situation and possible reactions to what is happening, or should be happening. A 56-item questionnaire, based on Rotter's "Locus of control" questionnaire...

  18. The Contribution of Locus of Control to Academic Procrastination in Islamic Education Management Students in Indonesia

    OpenAIRE

    Juliana Batubara

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed to describe the locus of control and academic procrastination, and investigate whether there is significance contributions of locus of control on student academic procrastination. This research was conducted by the Ex post-facto method was used in this study, where the data taken from two set of questionnaires. Proportional Stratified Random Sampling was used. There were 107 students involved this study. The results showed that the locus of control is in average level, meanwh...

  19. Prevalence of Porphyromonas gingivalis Four rag Locus Genotypes in Patients of Orthodontic Gingivitis and Periodontitis

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Yi; Zhang, Yujie; Wang, Lili; Guo, Yang; Xiao, Shuiqing

    2013-01-01

    Porphyromonas gingivalis is considered as a major etiological agent in periodontal diseases and implied to result in gingival inflammation under orthodontic appliance. rag locus is a pathogenicity island found in Porphyromonas gingivalis. Four rag locus variants are different in pathogenicity of Porphyromonas gingivalis. Moreover, there are different racial and geographic differences in distribution of rag locus genotypes. In this study, we assessed the prevalence of Porphyromonas gingivalis ...

  20. Evidence for chromosome 2p16.3 polycystic ovary syndrome susceptibility locus in affected women of European ancestry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutharasan, Priscilla; Galdones, Eugene; Peñalver Bernabé, Beatriz; Garcia, Obed A; Jafari, Nadereh; Shea, Lonnie D; Woodruff, Teresa K; Legro, Richard S; Dunaif, Andrea; Urbanek, Margrit

    2013-01-01

    A previous genome-wide association study in Chinese women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) identified a region on chromosome 2p16.3 encoding the LH/choriogonadotropin receptor (LHCGR) and FSH receptor (FSHR) genes as a reproducible PCOS susceptibility locus. The objective of the study was to determine the role of the LHCGR and/or FSHR gene in the etiology of PCOS in women of European ancestry. This was a genetic association study in a European ancestry cohort of women with PCOS. The study was conducted at an academic medical center. Participants in the study included 905 women with PCOS diagnosed by National Institutes of Health criteria and 956 control women. We genotyped 94 haplotype-tagging single-nucleotide polymorphisms and two coding single-nucleotide polymorphisms mapping to the coding region of LHCGR and FSHR plus 20 kb upstream and downstream of the genes and test for association in the case control cohort and for association with nine quantitative traits in the women with PCOS. We found strong evidence for an association of PCOS with rs7562215 (P = 0.0037) and rs10495960 (P = 0.0046). Although the marker with the strongest association in the Chinese PCOS genome-wide association study (rs13405728) was not informative in the European populations, we identified and genotyped three markers (rs35960650, rs2956355, and rs7562879) within 5 kb of rs13405728. Of these, rs7562879 was nominally associated with PCOS (P = 0.020). The strongest evidence for association mapping to FSHR was observed with rs1922476 (P = 0.0053). Furthermore, markers with the FSHR gene region were associated with FSH levels in women with PCOS. Fine mapping of the chromosome 2p16.3 Chinese PCOS susceptibility locus in a European ancestry cohort provides evidence for association with two independent loci and PCOS. The gene products LHCGR and FSHR therefore are likely to be important in the etiology of PCOS, regardless of ethnicity.

  1. Thorough investigation of a canine autoinflammatory disease (AID confirms one main risk locus and suggests a modifier locus for amyloidosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mia Olsson

    Full Text Available Autoinflammatory disease (AID manifests from the dysregulation of the innate immune system and is characterised by systemic and persistent inflammation. Clinical heterogeneity leads to patients presenting with one or a spectrum of phenotypic signs, leading to difficult diagnoses in the absence of a clear genetic cause. We used separate genome-wide SNP analyses to investigate five signs of AID (recurrent fever, arthritis, breed specific secondary dermatitis, otitis and systemic reactive amyloidosis in a canine comparative model, the pure bred Chinese Shar-Pei. Analysis of 255 DNA samples revealed a shared locus on chromosome 13 spanning two peaks of association. A three-marker haplotype based on the most significant SNP (p<2.6×10(-8 from each analysis showed that one haplotypic pair (H13-11 was present in the majority of AID individuals, implicating this as a shared risk factor for all phenotypes. We also noted that a genetic signature (F ST distinguishing the phenotypic extremes of the breed specific Chinese Shar-Pei thick and wrinkled skin, flanked the chromosome 13 AID locus; suggesting that breed development and differentiation has played a parallel role in the genetics of breed fitness. Intriguingly, a potential modifier locus for amyloidosis was revealed on chromosome 14, and an investigation of candidate genes from both this and the chromosome 13 regions revealed significant (p<0.05 renal differential expression in four genes previously implicated in kidney or immune health (AOAH, ELMO1, HAS2 and IL6. These results illustrate that phenotypic heterogeneity need not be a reflection of genetic heterogeneity, and that genetic modifiers of disease could be masked if syndromes were not first considered as individual clinical signs and then as a sum of their component parts.

  2. External locus of control contributes to racial disparities in memory and reasoning training gains in ACTIVE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahodne, Laura B; Meyer, Oanh L; Choi, Eunhee; Thomas, Michael L; Willis, Sherry L; Marsiske, Michael; Gross, Alden L; Rebok, George W; Parisi, Jeanine M

    2015-09-01

    Racial disparities in cognitive outcomes may be partly explained by differences in locus of control. African Americans report more external locus of control than non-Hispanic Whites, and external locus of control is associated with poorer health and cognition. The aims of this study were to compare cognitive training gains between African American and non-Hispanic White participants in the Advanced Cognitive Training for Independent and Vital Elderly (ACTIVE) study and determine whether racial differences in training gains are mediated by locus of control. The sample comprised 2,062 (26% African American) adults aged 65 and older who participated in memory, reasoning, or speed training. Latent growth curve models evaluated predictors of 10-year cognitive trajectories separately by training group. Multiple group modeling examined associations between training gains and locus of control across racial groups. Compared to non-Hispanic Whites, African Americans evidenced less improvement in memory and reasoning performance after training. These effects were partially mediated by locus of control, controlling for age, sex, education, health, depression, testing site, and initial cognitive ability. African Americans reported more external locus of control, which was associated with smaller training gains. External locus of control also had a stronger negative association with reasoning training gain for African Americans than for Whites. No racial difference in training gain was identified for speed training. Future intervention research with African Americans should test whether explicitly targeting external locus of control leads to greater cognitive improvement following cognitive training. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  3. Shiftwork Locus of Control, Situational and Behavioural Effects on Sleepiness and Fatigue in Shiftworkers

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    SMITH, Lawrence; TANIGAWA, Takeshi; TAKAHASHI, Masaya; MUTOU, Keiko; TACHIBANA, Naoko; KAGE, Yoshiko; ISO, Hiroyasu

    2005-01-01

    .... Power company shiftworkers completed a questionnaire that measured age/experience, number of dependents, shiftwork locus of control, morningness-eveningness, workload and sleep/health-related behaviours...

  4. Investigation of the 5q33.3 longevity locus and age-related phenotypes

    OpenAIRE

    Nygaard, Marianne; Thinggaard, Mikael; Christensen, Kaare; Christiansen, Lene

    2017-01-01

    A large meta-analysis recently found the 5q33.3 locus to be associated with survival to ≥ 90 years and lower all-cause mortality, thus suggesting it as a third human longevity locus alongside APOE and FOXO3A. The 5q33.3 locus has previously been associated with blood pressure regulation and cardiovascular diseases in middle-aged individuals. However, part of the influence on mortality appears to be independent of cardiovascular phenotypes, and the role of the 5q33.3 locus in longevity and sur...

  5. [Locus of control in girls with anorexia readiness syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaros, Katarzyna; Oszwa, Urszula

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the research was to indicate whether there are differences between locus of control (LOC) in girls with anorexia readiness syndrome (ARS) and without this syndrome. There was also a question about the relationship between LOC and the tendency to respond in incorrect attitudes towards food, eating and their bodies under stress. The sample consisted of girls aged 13-18 years randomly selected from five public Polish middle and high schools. Tools: 1) Eating Attitudes Questionnaire (EAQ) by B. Ziółkowska; 2) Locus of Control Questionnaire (LOCQ) by G. Krasowicz, A. Kurzyp-Wojnarska, to assess LOC of the subjects. The criterion group (N=23) was formed by girls who received high score in EAQ (signs of ARS) in the first stage of research (N=189). The control group (N = 23) were girls who received a low score in EAQ (no signs of ARS). Subjects with ARS were characterized by more external LOC than girls without any signs of this syndrome (t = -2.898; p < 0.01). The results did not confirm the hypothesis about the relationship between LOC and the tendency to respond by abnormal attitude to eating and own body in difficult situations in both groups. In pathogenesis of ARS where anorexic behaviors can become a way to a regain lost control, LOC may play a role as a mediating variable rather than a direct determinant of this syndrome.

  6. Genetic polymorphism at the CLOCK gene locus and major depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desan, P H; Oren, D A; Malison, R; Price, L H; Rosenbaum, J; Smoller, J; Charney, D S; Gelernter, J

    2000-06-12

    Genetic analysis in both mouse and Drosophila has indicated that the product of the CLOCK gene is an essential component of a circadian rhythm timing system. A single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP), T3111C, in the 3' flanking region of the human CLOCK gene has been identified. Homozygotes or heterozygotes for the 3111C allele have been reported to have higher mean scores on a measure of evening preference for activity (vs. morning preference) than subjects homozygous for the 3111T allele. Since major depression is hypothesized to be closely linked to circadian rhythms, we explored whether this polymorphism might be related to susceptibility to major depression. We also ascertained allele frequency in an African-American control population, to begin to evaluate population variation at this locus. CLOCK T3111C allele frequencies were determined in 280 European American (EA) subjects, 143 with a history of major depression and 137 screened controls, and in 58 African American (AA) screened control subjects, using a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) - restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) method. There was no significant difference between EA depressed and control subjects in allele frequency. There was a significant difference in allele frequency between EA and AA subjects, demonstrating a potential for population stratification. In none of these groups were significant deviations from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium found. The present data do not support an association between CLOCK gene alleles at the T3111C locus and major depression.

  7. The Locus analytical framework for indoor localization and tracking applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segou, Olga E.; Thomopoulos, Stelios C. A.

    2015-05-01

    Obtaining location information can be of paramount importance in the context of pervasive and context-aware computing applications. Many systems have been proposed to date, e.g. GPS that has been proven to offer satisfying results in outdoor areas. The increased effect of large and small scale fading in indoor environments, however, makes localization a challenge. This is particularly reflected in the multitude of different systems that have been proposed in the context of indoor localization (e.g. RADAR, Cricket etc). The performance of such systems is often validated on vastly different test beds and conditions, making performance comparisons difficult and often irrelevant. The Locus analytical framework incorporates algorithms from multiple disciplines such as channel modeling, non-uniform random number generation, computational geometry, localization, tracking and probabilistic modeling etc. in order to provide: (a) fast and accurate signal propagation simulation, (b) fast experimentation with localization and tracking algorithms and (c) an in-depth analysis methodology for estimating the performance limits of any Received Signal Strength localization system. Simulation results for the well-known Fingerprinting and Trilateration algorithms are herein presented and validated with experimental data collected in real conditions using IEEE 802.15.4 ZigBee modules. The analysis shows that the Locus framework accurately predicts the underlying distribution of the localization error and produces further estimates of the system's performance limitations (in a best-case/worst-case scenario basis).

  8. Self-regulated alternative splicing at the AHNAK locus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Morrée, Antoine; Droog, Marjolein; Grand Moursel, Laure; Bisschop, Ilona J M; Impagliazzo, Antonietta; Frants, Rune R; Klooster, Rinse; van der Maarel, Silvère M

    2012-01-01

    AHNAK is a 700-kDa protein involved in cytoarchitecture and calcium signaling. It is secondarily reduced in muscle of dysferlinopathy patients and accumulates in muscle of calpainopathy patients, both affected by a muscular dystrophy. AHNAK directly interacts with dysferlin. This interaction is lost on cleavage of AHNAK by the protease calpain 3, explaining the molecular observations in patients. Currently, little is known of AHNAK regulation. We describe the self-regulation of multiple mRNA transcripts emanating from the AHNAK locus in muscle cells. We show that the AHNAK gene consists of a 17-kb exon flanked by multiple small exons. This genetic structure is shared by AHNAK2 and Periaxin, which share a common ancestor. Two major AHNAK transcripts are differentially expressed during muscle differentiation that encode for a small (17-kDa) and a large (700-kDa) protein isoform. These proteins interact in the cytoplasm, but the small AHNAK is also present in the nucleus. During muscle differentiation the small AHNAK is strongly increased, thereby establishing a positive feedback loop to regulate mRNA splicing of its own locus. A small 17-kDa isoform of Periaxin similarly traffics between the cytoplasm and the nucleus to regulate mRNA splicing. Thus, AHNAK constitutes a novel mechanism in post-transcriptional control of gene expression.

  9. Allelism of Genes in the Ml-a locus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Giese, Nanna Henriette; Jensen, Hans Peter; Jørgensen, Jørgen Helms

    1980-01-01

    Seven barley lines or varieties, each with a different gene at the Ml-a locus for resistance to Erysiphe graminis were intercrossed. Progeny testing of the F2s using two different fungal isolates per cross provided evidence that there are two or more loci in the Ml-a region. Apparent recombinants...... were also screened for recombination between the Hor1 and Hor2 loci which are situated either side of the Ml-a locus. The cross between Ricardo and Iso42R (Rupee) yielded one possible recombinant, with Ml-a3 and Ml-a(Rul) in the coupling phase; other recombinants had wild-type genes in the coupling...... phase. Iso20R, derived from Hordeum spontaneum 'H204', carrying Ml-a6, had an additional gene, in close coupling with Ml-a6, tentatively named Ml-aSp2 or Reglv, causing an intermediate infection type with isolate EmA30. It is suggested that Ml-a(Ar) in Emir and Ml-a(Rul), shown to differ from other Ml-a...

  10. Variation in retinal degeneration phenotype inherited at the prcd locus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguirre, G D; Acland, G M

    1988-05-01

    Progressive rod-cone degeneration (prcd) is a recessively inherited visual cell disease. Neither the genetic abnormality nor the corresponding biochemical defect have yet been identified. Unique abnormalities of visual cell structure, function and renewal, however, characterize the disease phenotype and act as a marker for the prcd gene. The disease was first described in miniature poodle dogs (MP) but broadly similar retinal degenerations have been recognized, clinically, in other breeds. Crossbreeding experiments with prcd-affected MP and retinal degenerate English (ECS) and American (ACS) cocker spaniels now demonstrate that all the progeny are affected with a retinal degeneration indistinguishable from prcd in the MP. This indicates that the gene mutation in each breed is at the same (prcd) locus. In purebred prcd-affected ECS (prcd-ECS), however, the disease phenotype consistently differs from that in prcd-MP in its rate of progression and in the topographical distribution of disease within the retina. Ultrastructural variation in disease expression are also recognizable between the two phenotypes. These differences in disease phenotype may be ascribable to different genetic backgrounds in the two breeds, reflecting the effect of modifying genes, or may indicate separate, allelic, mutations at the same locus.

  11. LOCUS: immunizing medical students against the loss of professional values.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carufel-Wert, Donald A; Younkin, Sharon; Foertsch, Julie; Eisenberg, Todd; Haq, Cynthia L; Crouse, Byron J; Frey Iii, John J

    2007-05-01

    The Leadership Opportunities with Communities, the Underserved, and Special populations (LOCUS) program at the University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health is a longitudinal, extracurricular experience for medical students who wish to develop leadership skills and expand their involvement in community health activities during medical school. The program consists of a core curriculum delivered through retreats, workshops, and seminars; a mentor relationship with a physician who is engaged in community health services; and a community service project. On-line surveys and interviews with current and past participants as well as direct observations were used to evaluate the effects of the program on participants. Participants indicated that the program was worthwhile, relevant, and effective in building a community of like-minded peers and physician role models. Participants also reported that the program sustained their interest in and commitment to community service and allowed them to cultivate new skills during medical school. The curriculum and structure of the LOCUS program offers a successful method for helping medical students learn important leadership skills and maintain an altruistic commitment to service.

  12. Targeted transgenesis at the HPRT locus: an efficient strategy to achieve tightly controlled in vivo conditional expression with the tet system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palais, G; Nguyen Dinh Cat, A; Friedman, H; Panek-Huet, N; Millet, A; Tronche, F; Gellen, B; Mercadier, J-J; Peterson, A; Jaisser, F

    2009-04-10

    The tet-inducible system has been widely used to achieve conditional gene expression in genetically modified mice. To alleviate the frequent difficulties associated with recovery of relevant transgenic founders, we tested whether a controlled strategy of transgenesis would support reliable cell-specific, doxycycline (Dox)-controlled transgene expression in vivo. Taking advantage of the potent hypoxanthine-aminopterin-thymidine selection strategy and an embryonic stem (ES) cell line supporting efficient germ-line transmission, we used hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT) targeting to insert a single copy tet-inducible construct designed to allow both glucocorticoid receptor (GR) and beta-galactosidase (beta-Gal) expression. Conditional, Dox-dependent GR and beta-Gal expression was evidenced in targeted ES cells. Breeding ES-derived single copy transgenic mice with mice bearing appropriate tet transactivators resulted in beta-Gal expression both qualitatively and quantitatively similar to that observed in mice with random integration of the same construct. Interestingly, GR expression in mice was dependent on transgene orientation in the HPRT locus while embryonic stem cell expression was not. Thus, a conditional construct inserted in single copy and in predetermined orientation at the HPRT locus demonstrated a Dox-dependent gene expression phenotype in adult mice suggesting that controlled insertion of tet-inducible constructs at the HPRT locus can provide an efficient alternative strategy to reproducibly generate animal models with tetracycline-induced transgene expression.

  13. Are there gender differences in locus of control specific to alcohol dependence?

    Science.gov (United States)

    McPherson, Andrew; Martin, Colin R

    2017-01-01

    To investigate gender differences in locus of control in an alcohol-dependent population. Locus of control helps to explain behaviour in terms of internal (the individual is responsible) or external (outside forces, such as significant other people or chance, are responsible) elements. Past research on gender differences in locus of control in relation to alcohol dependence has shown mixed results. There is a need then to examine gender and locus of control in relation to alcohol dependence to ascertain the veracity of any locus of control differences as a function of gender. The Multidimensional Health Locus of Control form-C was administered to clients from alcohol dependence treatment centres in the West of Scotland. Independent t-tests were carried out to assess gender differences in alcohol dependence severity and internal/external aspects of locus of control. One hundred and eighty-eight (53% females) participants were recruited from a variety of alcohol dependence treatment centres. The majority of participants (72%) came from Alcoholics Anonymous groups. Women revealed a greater internal locus of control compared with men. Women also had a greater 'significant others' locus of control score than men. Men were more reliant on 'chance' and 'doctors' than women. All these trends were not, however, statistically significant. Gender differences in relation to locus of control and alcohol dependence from past studies are ambiguous. This study also found no clear statistically significant differences in locus of control orientation as a function of gender. This article helps nurses to contextualise health behaviours as a result of internal or external forces. It also helps nursing staff to better understand alcohol dependence treatment in relation to self-efficacy and control. Moreover, it highlights an important concept in health education theory. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Genome-wide association study identifies a single major locus contributing to survival into old age; the APOE locus revisited

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Deelen, Joris; Beekman, Marian; Uh, Hae-Won

    2011-01-01

    (LLS) and 1670 younger population controls. The strongest candidate SNPs from this GWAS have been analyzed in a meta-analysis of nonagenarian cases from the Rotterdam Study, Leiden 85-plus study and Danish 1905 cohort. Only one of the 62 prioritized SNPs from the GWAS analysis (P ... genome-wide significance with survival into old age in the meta-analysis of 4149 nonagenarian cases and 7582 younger controls (OR = 0.71 (95% CI 0.65-0.77), P = 3.39 x 10(-17) ). This SNP, rs2075650, is located in TOMM40 at chromosome 19q13.32 close to the apolipoprotein E (APOE) gene. Although...... of the nonagenarian cases from the LLS and their partners. In addition, we observed a novel association between this locus and serum levels of IGF-1 in females (P = 0.005). In conclusion, the major locus determining familial longevity up to high age as detected by GWAS was marked by rs2075650, which tags...

  15. Constitutive activity of the cannabinoid CB1 receptor regulates the function of co-expressed Mu opioid receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canals, Meritxell; Milligan, Graeme

    2008-04-25

    The human mu opioid receptor was expressed stably in Flp-In T-REx HEK293 cells. Occupancy by the agonist DAMGO (Tyr-d-Ala-Gly-N-methyl-Phe-Gly-ol) resulted in phosphorylation of the ERK1/2 MAP kinases, which was blocked by the opioid antagonist naloxone but not the cannabinoid CB1 receptor inverse agonist SR141716A. Expression of the human cannabinoid CB1 receptor in these cells from the inducible Flp-In T-REx locus did not alter expression levels of the mu opioid receptor. This allowed the cannabinoid CB1 agonist WIN55212-2 to stimulate ERK1/2 phosphorylation but resulted in a large reduction in the capacity of DAMGO to activate these kinases. Although lacking affinity for the mu opioid receptor, co-addition of SR141716A caused recovery of the effectiveness of DAMGO. In contrast co-addition of the CB1 receptor neutral antagonist O-2050 did not. Induction of the CB1 receptor also resulted in an increase of basal [(35)S]guanosine 5'-3-O-(thio)triphosphate (GTPgammaS) binding and thereby a greatly reduced capacity of DAMGO to further stimulate [(35)S]GTPgammaS binding. CB1 inverse agonists attenuated basal [(35)S]GTPgammaS binding and restored the capacity of DAMGO to stimulate. Flp-In T-REx HEK293 cells were generated, which express the human mu opioid receptor constitutively and harbor a modified D163N cannabinoid CB1 receptor that lacks constitutive activity. Induction of expression of the modified cannabinoid CB1 receptor did not limit DAMGO-mediated ERK1/2 MAP kinase phosphorylation and did not allow SR141716A to enhance the function of DAMGO. These data indicate that it is the constitutive activity inherent in the cannabinoid CB1 receptor that reduces the capacity of co-expressed mu opioid receptor to function.

  16. Functional Analysis of the Coronary Heart Disease Risk Locus on Chromosome 21q22

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beaney, Katherine E.; Smith, Andrew J. P.; Folkersen, Lasse Westergaard

    2017-01-01

    Background. The coronary heart disease (CHD) risk locus on 21q22 (lead SNP rs9982601) lies within a "gene desert." The aim of this study was to assess if this locus is associated with CHD risk factors and to identify the functional variant(s) and gene(s) involved. Methods. A phenome scan...

  17. PHIP - a novel candidate breast cancer susceptibility locus on 6q14.1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jiao, X. (Xiang); Aravidis, C. (Christos); Marikkannu, R. (Rajeshwari); Rantala, J. (Johanna); Picelli, S. (Simone); Adamovic, T. (Tatjana); Liu, T. (Tao); Maguire, P. (Paula); B. Kremeyer (Barbara); Luo, L. (Liping); von Holst, S. (Susanna); Kontham, V. (Vinaykumar); Thutkawkorapin, J. (Jessada); Margolin, S. (Sara); Du, Q. (Quan); Lundin, J. (Johanna); Michailidou, K. (Kyriaki); Bolla, M.K. (Manjeet K.); Wang, Q. (Qin); Dennis, J. (Joe); Lush, M. (Michael); C.B. Ambrosone (Christine); I.L. Andrulis (Irene); H. Anton-Culver (Hoda); Antonenkova, N.N. (Natalia N.); Arndt, V. (Volker); M.W. Beckmann (Matthias); C. Blomqvist (Carl); W.J. Blot (William); Boeckx, B. (Bram); S.E. Bojesen (Stig); B. Bonnani (Bernardo); J.S. Brand (Judith S.); H. Brauch (Hiltrud); H. Brenner (Hermann); A. Broeks (Annegien); T. Brüning (Thomas); B. Burwinkel (Barbara); Cai, Q. (Qiuyin); J. Chang-Claude (Jenny); NBCS Collaborators, (); Couch, F.J. (Fergus J.); A. Cox (Angela); S.S. Cross (Simon); S.L. Deming-Halverson (Sandra); P. Devilee (Peter); I. dos Santos Silva (Isabel); Dörk, T. (Thilo); M. Eriksson (Mats); P.A. Fasching (Peter); J.D. Figueroa (Jonine); D. Flesch-Janys (Dieter); H. Flyger (Henrik); M. Gabrielson (Marike); M. García-Closas (Montserrat); Giles, G.G. (Graham G.); A. González-Neira (Anna); P. Guénel (Pascal); Q. Guo (Qi); Gündert, M. (Melanie); C.A. Haiman (Christopher); Hallberg, E. (Emily); U. Hamann (Ute); P. harrington (Patricia); M.J. Hooning (Maartje); J.L. Hopper (John); Huang, G. (Guanmengqian); A. Jakubowska (Anna); M. Jones (Michael); M. Kerin (Michael); V-M. Kosma (Veli-Matti); Kristensen, V.N. (Vessela N.); Lambrechts, D. (Diether); L. Le Marchand (Loic); J. Lubinski (Jan); A. Mannermaa (Arto); J.W.M. Martens (John); A. Meindl (Alfons); R.L. Milne (Roger); A.-M. Mulligan (Anna-Marie); S.L. Neuhausen (Susan); H. Nevanlinna (Heli); J. Peto (Julian); K. Pykäs (Katri); P. Radice (Paolo); V. Rhenius (Valerie); E.J. Sawyer (Elinor); M.K. Schmidt (Marjanka); R.K. Schmutzler (Rita); C.M. Seynaeve (Caroline); Shah, M. (Mitul); J. Simard (Jacques); Southey, M.C. (Melissa C.); A.J. Swerdlow (Anthony ); T. Truong (Thérèse); Wendt, C. (Camilla); R. Winqvist (Robert); W. Zheng (Wei); kConFab/AOCS Investigators, (); J. Benítez (Javier); A.M. Dunning (Alison); P.D.P. Pharoah (Paul); D.F. Easton (Douglas); K. Czene (Kamila); P. Hall (Per); A. Lindblom (Annika)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractMost non-BRCA1/2 breast cancer families have no identified genetic cause. We used linkage and haplotype analyses in familial and sporadic breast cancer cases to identify a susceptibility locus on chromosome 6q. Two independent genome-wide linkage analysis studies suggested a 3 Mb locus

  18. PHIP - a novel candidate breast cancer susceptibility locus on 6q14.1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jiao, Xiang; Aravidis, Christos; Marikkannu, Rajeshwari

    2017-01-01

    Most non-BRCA1/2 breast cancer families have no identified genetic cause. We used linkage and haplotype analyses in familial and sporadic breast cancer cases to identify a susceptibility locus on chromosome 6q. Two independent genome-wide linkage analysis studies suggested a 3 Mb locus on chromos...

  19. Relationship Between Coping Strategies and Locus of Control With the Anxiety of Death in Old People

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hadi Hashemi Razini

    2017-09-01

    Conclusion Death anxiety is one of the key factors in the mental health of older adults. With regards to our findings, coping strategies and locus of control have an important role in death anxiety in older adults. Therefore, by designing psychological interventions based on coping strategies and changing locus of control from external to internal, death anxiety among the older adults can be improved.

  20. Self-Efficacy And Locus Of Control As Predictors Of Academic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study investigated self-efficacy and locus of control as predictor of academic achievement among Junior Secondary school students in Osun state Unity schools, using Self-Efficacy Scale (SES) and Locus of Control Scale (LOC) as measuring instruments. The Cronbach alpha coefficient for validity of the two instruments ...

  1. Locus of Control as It Relates to the Teaching Style of Elementary Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ture, Abidemi

    2013-01-01

    This research explored the relationship between elementary teachers' locus of control and teaching style. This research observed elementary teachers in their classrooms coupled with data gathered from information sheets, surveys, and interviews to determine if a relationship exists between the locus of control of the elementary teachers and…

  2. An Examination of Locus of Control, Epistemological Beliefs and Metacognitive Awareness in Preservice Early Childhood Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedel, Emine Ferda

    2012-01-01

    This study aims to explore the locus of control, epistemological beliefs and metacognitive awareness levels of preservice early childhood education teachers and to determine the interrelations among these variables. 206 teacher candidates have been asked to fill out Rotter's Internal-External Locus of Control Scale, Central Epistemological Beliefs…

  3. The Relationship between the Perception of Own Locus of Control and Aggression of Adolescent Boys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breet, Lettie; Myburgh, Chris; Poggenpoel, Marie

    2010-01-01

    Aggression is increasingly seen in most parts of South African society. Aggressive behaviour of boys in secondary school often results from frustrations caused by perceived high expectations of others regarding the role, locus of control, and personality of boys. Locus of control plays an important role in a person's perception concerning a…

  4. Predictors of Parental Locus of Control in Mothers of Pre- and Early Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freed, Rachel D.; Tompson, Martha C.

    2011-01-01

    Parental locus of control refers to parents' perceived power and efficacy in child-rearing situations. This study explored parental locus of control and its correlates in 160 mothers of children ages 8 to 14 cross-sectionally and 1 year later. Maternal depression, maternal expressed emotion, and child internalizing and externalizing behavior were…

  5. Goal Orientations, Locus of Control and Academic Achievement in Prospective Teachers: An Individual Differences Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulus, Mustafa

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the role of the prospective teachers' locus of control in goal orientations and of both orientations in academic achievement. The participants were 270 undergraduate students studying in different majors at the Faculty of Education in Pamukkale University. Goal Orientations and Locus of Control Scales were…

  6. Social Self-Efficacy, Academic Locus of Control, and Internet Addiction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iskender, Murat; Akin, Ahmet

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to examine the relationship of internet addiction, social self-efficacy, and academic locus of control. Participants were 311 university students who completed a questionnaire package that included the Online Cognition Scale, the Academic Locus of Control Scale, and the Perceived Social Self-efficacy Scale. The…

  7. Relationship of Personality and Locus of Control With Employment Outcomes among Participants with Spinal Cord Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, James S.; Broderick, Lynne

    2006-01-01

    We investigated relationships among personality, locus of control, and current post-injury employment status for 1,391 participants with spinal cord injury. Participants with higher internality locus-of-control scores and activity scores (personality) reported more favorable employment outcomes. Higher scores on chance and powerful others (locus…

  8. The genetic and regulatory architecture of ERBB3-type 1 diabetes susceptibility locus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaur, Simranjeet; Mirza, Aashiq H.; Brorsson, Caroline Anna

    2016-01-01

    -producing INS-1E cells and the genetic and regulatory architecture of the ERBB3 locus to provide insights to how rs2292239 may confer disease susceptibility. rs2292239 strongly correlated with residual β-cell function and metabolic control in children with T1D. ERBB3 locus associated lncRNA (NONHSAG011351...

  9. The interaction between the locus coeruleus and dorsal raphe nucleus studied with dual-probe microdialysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pudovkina, OL; Cremers, TIFH; Westerink, BHC

    2002-01-01

    The interaction between the locus coeruleus and dorsal raphe nucleus was investigated by means of dual-probe microdialysis in conscious rats. The release of noradrenaline and 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) after inhibition or stimulation of locus cocruleus and dorsal raphe activity was sampled in both

  10. A Study to Investigate the Relationship between Locus of Control and Academic Achievement of Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gujjar, Aijaz Ahmed; Aijaz, Rukhma

    2014-01-01

    Motivation is regarded as the alpha and omega of learning. It is the heart of teaching learning process. Motivation is defined as an internal state that arouses, directs, and maintains the behavior over time. Thus motivation is the pivotal component of learning and locus of control which is one of the important factors it stems from. Locus of…

  11. A Locus of Control-based HIV and AIDS Risk Reduction Training ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effi cacy of a locus of control-based training programme in reducing HIV and AIDS risk among university students. The locus of control-based variables that formed the training programme were social systems control, deferment of gratifi cation, personal values and expectancies, ...

  12. The relationship between the perception of own locus of control and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aggression is increasingly seen in most parts of South African society. Aggressive behaviour of boys in secondary school often results from frustrations caused by perceived high expectations of others regarding the role, locus of control, and personality of boys. Locus of control plays an important role in a person's ...

  13. Hubungan antara Locus Of Control dan Efektivitas Komunikasi antar Pribadi dengan Problem Focused Coping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eko Sujadi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Problem focused coping need to be possessed by every individual. The purposes of this research were to described locus of control, the effectiveness of interpersonal communication, problem focused coping,the correlation between locus of control with problem focused coping, andthe correlationbetween the effectiveness of interpersonal communication with problem focused coping.This research was descriptive & correlation research by using quantitative approach. Data were collected through a Likert scale questionaire and locus of controlby using inventory Rotters Internal-External Locus of Control (I-E Scale, which was the validity and reliability has been tested. The data were analyzed by percentage technique and product moment correlation. The finding of research are:  1locus of control were in the middle range between internal locus of control and external locus of control with an average as big as 11.46, 2 the general level of effectiveness of interpersonal communication is in high category, 3 the general level of problem focused coping is in high category, 4 there is correlation between locus of control withproblem focused coping, and 5 there is correlation betweeneffectiveness of interpersonal communicationwithproblem focused coping.

  14. The Role of Locus of Control and Feedback on Performance of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study examined Students' Locus of Control and Teacher Feedback using a 2x3 factorial to measure the performance of thirty-six (36) primary school students utilizing the two locus of control types and three levels of teacher feedback: no feedback, attributional feedback, and progressive feedback. No significant ...

  15. Self Esteem, Locus of Control and Multidimensional Perfectionism as the Predictors of Subjective Well Being

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karatas, Zeynep; Tagay, Ozlem

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine whether there is a relationship between self-esteem, locus of control and multidimensional perfectionism, and the extent to which the variables of self-esteem, locus of control and multidimensional perfectionism contribute to the prediction of subjective well-being. The study was carried out with 318 final…

  16. The Relationship of Locus of Control and Learned Helplessness in Special Education Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Mary V.; Barber, William H.

    1992-01-01

    The question of whether special education students exhibit more learned helpless behavior and a more external locus of control than regular students is examined. The effects of these psychological conditions on school success are considered, and programs for alleviating learned helplessness and establishing a more internal locus of control are…

  17. Diversity of a microsatellite locus in the CSN1S1 gene in goat ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the diversity of the microsatellite locus at the CSN1S1 gene in goats raised in southeastern Turkey. DNA was isolated from blood samples collected from goats raised in Kilis (n= 30), Sanliurfa (n= 30) and Siirt (n= 30) provinces of Turkey. The microsatellite locus was amplified ...

  18. computer-aided root aided root aided root aided root-locus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    AIDED ROOT-LOCUS NUMERICAL TECHNIQUE. LOCUS NUMERICAL TECHNIQUE. A. R. Zubair1,* , A. ... -loci obtained with this technique are found to confor loci obtained with this technique are found to confor loci are .... approaches which use complex analytic or semi- analytic representation that involve the use of.

  19. Association of 5' estrogen receptor alpha gene polymorphisms with bone mineral density, vertebral bone area and fracture risk

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.B.J. van Meurs (Joyce); A.G. Uitterlinden (André); H.A.P. Pols (Huib); A.E.A.M. Weel (Angelique); M. van de Klift (Marjolein); A.P. Bergink (Arjan); P.P. Arp (Pascal); Y. Fang (Yue); C.M. van Duijn (Cornelia); J.P.T.M. van Leeuwen (Hans); S.C.E. Schuit (Stephanie); A. Hofman (Albert)

    2003-01-01

    textabstractThis study investigates the influence of genetic variation of the estrogen receptor alpha (ESR1) gene locus on several bone parameters in 2042 individuals of The Rotterdam Study, a prospective population-based cohort study of elderly subjects. We analysed three polymorphic sites in the

  20. Young adult women: lifestyle and health locus of control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schank, M J; Lawrence, D M

    1993-08-01

    A study of 76 young adult women, 38 nursing students and 38 non-nursing students, examined their lifestyle practices and health locus of control (HLOC). Findings revealed a significant difference between reported lifestyle practices and the career choice of these young adult women. The lifestyle practice areas in which the most notable differences occurred included: use of seat belts, frequency of alcohol use, frequency of junk food intake, use of illegal drugs and hours of sleep per night. While differences in HLOC were evident between nursing and non-nursing students, no relationship was found between a young woman's HLOC and her lifestyle practices. The differences in HLOC showed that nurses were more frequently pure internal whereas most non-nurses were found to be double externals. The pure chance category had the fewest number of respondents. The difference in lifestyle practices between these young adult women can be explained in part by curriculum variations, as can the difference in HLOC patterns.

  1. Search for a schizophrenia susceptibility locus of human chromosome 22

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coon, H.; Hoff, M.; Holik, J. [Univ. of Utah Medical Center, Salt Lake City, UT (United States)] [and others

    1994-06-15

    We used 10 highly informative DNA polymorphic markers and genetic linkage analysis to examine whether a gene locus predisposing to schizophrenia is located on chromosome 22, in 105 families with schizophrenia and schizoaffective disorder. The LOD score method, including analysis for heterogeneity, provided no conclusive evidence of linkage under a dominant, recessive, or penetrance free model of inheritance. Affected sib-pair analysis was inconclusive. Affected Pedigree Member (APM) analysis gave only suggestive evidence for linkage. Multipoint APM analysis, using 4 adjacent loci including D22S281 and IL2RB, a region of interest from the APM analysis, gave non-significant results for the three different weighting functions. 18 refs., 1 fig., 7 tabs.

  2. Dynamic Quantitative Trait Locus Analysis of Plant Phenomic Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zitong; Sillanpää, Mikko J

    2015-12-01

    Advanced platforms have recently become available for automatic and systematic quantification of plant growth and development. These new techniques can efficiently produce multiple measurements of phenotypes over time, and introduce time as an extra dimension to quantitative trait locus (QTL) studies. Functional mapping utilizes a class of statistical models for identifying QTLs associated with the growth characteristics of interest. A major benefit of functional mapping is that it integrates information over multiple timepoints, and therefore could increase the statistical power for QTL detection. We review the current development of computationally efficient functional mapping methods which provide invaluable tools for analyzing large-scale timecourse data that are readily available in our post-genome era. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Natural history of the ERVWE1 endogenous retroviral locus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duret Laurent

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The human HERV-W multicopy family includes a unique proviral locus, termed ERVWE1, whose full-length envelope ORF was preserved through evolution by the action of a selective pressure. The encoded Env protein (Syncytin is involved in hominoid placental physiology. Results In order to infer the natural history of this domestication process, a comparative genomic analysis of the human 7q21.2 syntenic regions in eutherians was performed. In primates, this region was progressively colonized by LTR-elements, leading to two different evolutionary pathways in Cercopithecidae and Hominidae, a genetic drift versus a domestication, respectively. Conclusion The preservation in Hominoids of a genomic structure consisting in the juxtaposition of a retrotransposon-derived MaLR LTR and the ERVWE1 provirus suggests a functional link between both elements.

  4. Evolution of an Expanded Sex Determining Locus in Volvox

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferris, Patrick; Olson, Bradley J.S.C.; De Hoff, Peter L.; Douglass, Stephen; Diaz-Cano, David Casero; Prochnik, Simon; Geng, Sa; Rai, Rhitu; Grimwood, Jane; Schmutz, Jeremy; Nishii, Ichiro; Hamaji, Takashi; Nozaki, Hisayoshi; Pellegrini, Matteo; Umen, James G.

    2010-01-01

    Although dimorphic sexes have evolved repeatedly in multicellular eukaryotes, their origins are unknown. The mating locus (MT) of the sexually dimorphic multicellular green alga, Volvox carteri, specifies the production of eggs and sperm and has undergone a remarkable expansion and divergence relative to MT from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, a closely related unicellular species that has equal-sized gametes. Transcriptome analysis revealed a rewired gametic expression program for Volvox MT genes relative to Chlamydomonas, and identified multiple gender-specific and sex-regulated transcripts. The retinoblastoma tumor suppressor homolog MAT3 is a Volvox MT gene that displays sexually regulated alternative splicing and evidence of gender-specific selection, both indicative of cooption into the sexual cycle. Thus, sex-determining loci impact the evolution of both sex-related and non-sex-related genes. PMID:20395508

  5. Electroimmunodiffusion Studies of alpha Chain, Secretory Piece and Secretory IgA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-03-15

    V of proteins in biological flui ds collected in wt amounts~ ‘thus eliminating the need for stimulation of secretions and sample concentration...useful for determining levels of iminunoglobulins in unconcentrated saliva . The main immuno- glc ulin in saliva and other external secretions is...throughout this study (Behring Diagnostics , Somerville, N.J.). According to the manufacturer antiserum to free secretory piece was produced by immunization

  6. Ambroxol inhibits neutrophil respiratory burst activated by alpha chain integrin adhesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peroni, D G; Moser, S; Gallo, G; Pigozzi, R; Tenero, L; Zanoni, L; Boner, A L; Piacentini, G L

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate the possible anti-oxidant effect(s) of Ambroxol on neutrophils activated by ligand-binding of the drug with membrane-associated adhesion integrin CD11a and to estimate dose-response changes in oxygen free radical production. The amount of free radical production by anti-CD11a- and anti-CD4-coated neutrophils stimulated with N-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (FMLP) and challenged with increasing concentration of Ambroxol, was evaluated within a time frame of 90 minutes. A significant dose-dependent effect response of Ambroxol on O2‾ production by cells coated with anti-CD11a antibody was observed. This preliminary study opens a new perspective on the therapeutic role of Ambroxol as an antioxidant drug and for its potential use in controlling oxidative stress, particularly in leukocyte-dependent inflammation.

  7. The locus of semantic interference in picture naming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Macizo

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available El locus del efecto de interferencia semántica en la denominación de dibujos. En los experimentos que se presentan se utilizó el procedimiento de priming enmascarado para explorar el locus del efecto de interferencia semántica. Para ello se manipuló la naturaleza de la tarea (denominación y decisión de género, el tipo de relación entre el prime y el target (semántica y fonológica y el tiempo de presentación del prime. Los resultados indicaron que el efecto de interferencia semántica aparece en las tareas de denominación (Experimento 1 y de decisión de género (Experimento 2, con tiempos de presentación del prime de 100 ms. Este resultado replica el efecto encontrado por otros investigadores y lo extiende a la tarea de decisión de género. Por otro lado, el efecto de facilitación fonológica no apareció en la tarea de decisión de género (Experimento 3. Este patrón de resultados sugiere que el efecto de interferencia semántica es consecuencia de procesos que ocurren en el nivel de representación del lemma, y que la tarea de decisión de género no está influenciada por la activación fonológica.

  8. Response to Selection in Finite Locus Models with Nonadditive Effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esfandyari, Hadi; Henryon, Mark; Berg, Peer; Thomasen, Jørn Rind; Bijma, Piter; Sørensen, Anders Christian

    2017-05-01

    Under the finite-locus model in the absence of mutation, the additive genetic variation is expected to decrease when directional selection is acting on a population, according to quantitative-genetic theory. However, some theoretical studies of selection suggest that the level of additive variance can be sustained or even increased when nonadditive genetic effects are present. We tested the hypothesis that finite-locus models with both additive and nonadditive genetic effects maintain more additive genetic variance (VA) and realize larger medium- to long-term genetic gains than models with only additive effects when the trait under selection is subject to truncation selection. Four genetic models that included additive, dominance, and additive-by-additive epistatic effects were simulated. The simulated genome for individuals consisted of 25 chromosomes, each with a length of 1 M. One hundred bi-allelic QTL, 4 on each chromosome, were considered. In each generation, 100 sires and 100 dams were mated, producing 5 progeny per mating. The population was selected for a single trait (h2 = 0.1) for 100 discrete generations with selection on phenotype or BLUP-EBV. VA decreased with directional truncation selection even in presence of nonadditive genetic effects. Nonadditive effects influenced long-term response to selection and among genetic models additive gene action had highest response to selection. In addition, in all genetic models, BLUP-EBV resulted in a greater fixation of favorable and unfavorable alleles and higher response than phenotypic selection. In conclusion, for the schemes we simulated, the presence of nonadditive genetic effects had little effect in changes of additive variance and VA decreased by directional selection. © The American Genetic Association 2017. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Association between the ABO locus and hematological traits in Korean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Kyung-Won

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recently, genome-wide association studies identified a pleiotropic gene locus, ABO, as being significantly associated with hematological traits. To confirm the effects of ABO on hematological traits, we examined the link between the ABO locus and hematological traits in Korean population-based cohorts. Results Six tagging SNPs for ABO were analyzed with regard to their effects on hematological traits [white blood cell count (WBC, red blood cell count (RBC, platelet (Plat, mean corpuscular volume (MCV, and mean corpuscular haemoglobin concentration (MCHC]. Linear regression analyses were performed, controlling for recruitment center, sex, and age as covariates. Of the 6 tagging SNPs, 3 (rs2073823, rs8176720, and rs495828 and 3 (rs2073823, rs8176717, and rs687289 were significantly associated with RBC and MCV, respectively (Bonferroni correction p-value criteria r2s = 0.99. Of the remaining 3 SNPs (rs8176720, rs8176717 and rs687289, rs8176717 generated an independent signal with moderate p-value (= 0.045 when it was adjusted for by rs2073823 (the most significant SNP. We also identified a copy number variation (CNV that was tagged by the SNP rs8176717, the minor allele of which correlated with the deletion allele of CNV. Our haplotype analysis indicated that the haplotype that contained the CNV deletion was significantly associated with MCV (β ± se = 0.363 ± 0.118, p =2.09 × 10-3. Conclusions Our findings confirm that ABO is one of the genetic factors that are associated with hematological traits in the Korean population. This result is notable, because GWASs fail to evaluate the link between a CNV and phenotype traits.

  10. USING INQUIRY-BASED TEACHING (5E IN TEACHING VOCABULARY VIEWED FROM STUDENTS’ LOCUS OF CONTROL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahmatika Kayyis

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The objectives of the research are to find out: (1 whether inquiry-based teaching is more effective than grammar-translation method to teach vocabulary; (2 whether the students who have high locus of control have better vocabulary than those who have low locus of control; and (3 whether there is an interaction between teaching methods and locus of control in teaching vocabulary.The factorial design method 2x2 was employed in this research. The population of the research was the students of fourth semester of STKIP Muhammadiyah Pringsewu Lampung in the academic year of 2014/2015. Based on the test of the hypotheses, it can be concluded that inquiry-based teaching is not significant effective method to teach vocabulary. The conclusion is the measurement effectiveness of the method is not determined by the levels of the students’ locus of control Keywords: Vocabulary, Inquiry Based Teaching, Locus of Control

  11. The Contribution of Locus of Control to Academic Procrastination in Islamic Education Management Students in Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Batubara

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to describe the locus of control and academic procrastination, and investigate whether there is significance contributions of locus of control on student academic procrastination. This research was conducted by the Ex post-facto method was used in this study, where the data taken from two set of questionnaires. Proportional Stratified Random Sampling was used. There were 107 students involved this study. The results showed that the locus of control is in average level, meanwhile, and the students’ academic achievement was high. The study also showed that there is a significant contribution between the locus of control on students' academic procrastination. The article concludes that the importance that locus control for procrastination research, and with suggestions for educators who work with students who are adversely affected by procrastination.

  12. Detection and mapping of a lethal locus in a eucalyptus hybrid population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana Barbosa Rosado

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to verify the existence of a lethal locus in a eucalyptus hybrid population, and to quantify the segregation distortion in the linkage group 3 of the Eucalyptus genome. A E. grandis x E. urophylla hybrid population, which segregates for rust resistance, was genotyped with 19 microsatellite markers belonging to linkage group 3 of the Eucalyptus genome. To quantify the segregation distortion, maximum likelihood (ML models, specific to outbreeding populations, were used. These models consider the observed marker genotypes and the lethal locus viability as parameters. The ML solutions were obtained using the expectation‑maximization algorithm. A lethal locus in the linkage group 3 was verified and mapped, with high confidence, between the microssatellites EMBRA 189 e EMBRA 122. This lethal locus causes an intense gametic selection from the male side. Its map position is 25 cM from the locus which controls the rust resistance in this population.

  13. Organization of the cpe locus in CPE-positive clostridium perfringens type C and D isolates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jihong Li

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Clostridium perfringens enterotoxin (encoded by the cpe gene contributes to several important human, and possibly veterinary, enteric diseases. The current study investigated whether cpe locus organization in type C or D isolates resembles one of the three (one chromosomal and two plasmid-borne cpe loci commonly found amongst type A isolates. Multiplex PCR assays capable of detecting sequences in those type A cpe loci failed to amplify products from cpe-positive type C and D isolates, indicating these isolates possess different cpe locus arrangements. Therefore, restriction fragments containing the cpe gene were cloned and sequenced from two type C isolates and one type D isolate. The obtained cpe locus sequences were then used to construct an overlapping PCR assay to assess cpe locus diversity amongst other cpe-positive type C and D isolates. All seven surveyed cpe-positive type C isolates had a plasmid-borne cpe locus partially resembling the cpe locus of type A isolates carrying a chromosomal cpe gene. In contrast, all eight type D isolates shared the same plasmid-borne cpe locus, which differed substantially from the cpe locus present in other C. perfringens by containing two copies of an ORF with 67% identity to a transposase gene (COG4644 found in Tn1546, but not previously associated with the cpe gene. These results identify greater diversity amongst cpe locus organization than previously appreciated, providing new insights into cpe locus evolution. Finally, evidence for cpe gene mobilization was found for both type C and D isolates, which could explain their cpe plasmid diversity.

  14. Transcription and chromatin organization of a housekeeping gene cluster containing an integrated β-globin locus control region

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D. Noordermeer (Daan); M.R. Branco (Miguel); E. Splinter (Erik); P. Klous (Petra); W.F.J. van IJcken (Wilfred); S.M.A. Swagemakers (Sigrid); M. Koutsourakis (Manousos); P.J. van der Spek (Peter); A. Pombo (Ana); W.L. de Laat (Wouter)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractThe activity of locus control regions (LCR) has been correlated with chromatin decondensation, spreading of active chromatin marks, locus repositioning away from its chromosome territory (CT), increased association with transcription factories, and long-range interactions via chromatin

  15. The androgen receptor and estrogen receptor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oosterkamp, H.M.; Bernards, R.A.

    2002-01-01

    The androgen receptor (AR) and the estrogen receptors (ER) are members of the nuclear receptor (NR) family. These NRs are distinguished from the other transcription factors by their ability to control gene expression upon ligand binding (steroids, retinoids, thyroid hormone, vitamin D, fatty

  16. Estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor, and human epidermal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Current clinical practice employs the use of estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR), and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2), as biomarkers to appropriately select patients that would benefit from targeted therapy against these major molecular pathways of the disease. This study aims at ...

  17. Orexinergic system in the locus coeruleus modulates the CO2 ventilatory response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vicente, Mariane C; Dias, Mirela B; Fonseca, Elisa M; Bícego, Kênia C; Gargaglioni, Luciane H

    2016-05-01

    The orexins are hypothalamic neuropeptides involved in an array of functions such as regulation of sleep/wake states and chemoreception to CO2/pH. The locus coeruleus (LC) is a chemosensitive site and expresses an extensive population of orexin receptor 1 (OX1R). We tested the hypothesis that OX1Rs located in the LC participate in the ventilatory response to hypercapnia in a vigilance state and diurnal cycle-dependent manner. For this, we performed unilateral injections of SB-334867 (OX1R antagonist, 5 mM) into the LC of male Wistar rats and evaluated the ventilatory response to 7 % CO2 during wakefulness and sleep in the dark and light phases of the diurnal cycle. Hypercapnia induced an increase in ventilation (V E) in all groups compared to normocapnic values. However, during the dark phase, but not in the light phase, SB-334867 injection promoted an attenuation of the hypercapnic chemoreflex during wakefulness (V E: vehicle, 1502.6 ± 100 mL kg(-1) min(-1) vs SB-334867, 1200.3 ± 70.0 mL kg(-1) min(-1)) but not during sleep (V E: vehicle, 1383.0 ± 113.9 vs SB-334687, 1287.6 ± 92.1 mL kg(-1) min(-1)), due to changes in tidal volume (V T). We suggest that projections of orexin-containing neurons to the LC contribute, via OX1Rs, to the hypercapnic chemoreflex during wakefulness in the dark phase.

  18. Contrasting mode of evolution at a coat color locus in wild and domestic pigs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meiying Fang

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite having only begun approximately 10,000 years ago, the process of domestication has resulted in a degree of phenotypic variation within individual species normally associated with much deeper evolutionary time scales. Though many variable traits found in domestic animals are the result of relatively recent human-mediated selection, uncertainty remains as to whether the modern ubiquity of long-standing variable traits such as coat color results from selection or drift, and whether the underlying alleles were present in the wild ancestor or appeared after domestication began. Here, through an investigation of sequence diversity at the porcine melanocortin receptor 1 (MC1R locus, we provide evidence that wild and domestic pig (Sus scrofa haplotypes from China and Europe are the result of strikingly different selection pressures, and that coat color variation is the result of intentional selection for alleles that appeared after the advent of domestication. Asian and European wild boar (evolutionarily distinct subspecies differed only by synonymous substitutions, demonstrating that camouflage coat color is maintained by purifying selection. In domestic pigs, however, each of nine unique mutations altered the amino acid sequence thus generating coat color diversity. Most domestic MC1R alleles differed by more than one mutation from the wild-type, implying a long history of strong positive selection for coat color variants, during which time humans have cherry-picked rare mutations that would be quickly eliminated in wild contexts. This pattern demonstrates that coat color phenotypes result from direct human selection and not via a simple relaxation of natural selective pressures.

  19. Relationships of Locus of Control to Self Esteem, Academic Achievement, and Prediction of Performance among Nigerian Secondary School Pupils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maqsud, M.

    1983-01-01

    Among Nigerian secondary school boys, (1) socioeconomic background, locus of control, intelligence, and self-esteem positively affected academic achievement; (2) internal locus of control was positively correlated with intelligence, self-esteem, and academic achievement; and (3) internals (on locus of control) predicted their own academic…

  20. The 3D-structure of the Immunoglobulin Heavy Chain Locus: implications for long-range genomic interactions [supplemental data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Jhunjhunwala (Suchit); M.C. van Zelm (Menno); M.M. Peak (Mandy); S. Cutchin (Steve); R. Riblet (Roy); J.J.M. van Dongen (Jacques); F.G. Grosveld (Frank); T.A. Knoch (Tobias); C. Murre (Cornelis)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractThe immunoglobulin heavy-chain (Igh) locus is organized into distinct regions that contain multiple variable (VH), diversity (DH), joining (JH) and constant (CH) coding elements. How the Igh locus is structured in 3D space is unknown. To probe the topography of the Igh locus,

  1. Three subfamilies of pheromone and receptor genes generate multiple B mating specificities in the mushroom Coprinus cinereus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halsall, J R; Milner, M J; Casselton, L A

    2000-01-01

    The B mating type locus of the basidiomycete Coprinus cinereus encodes a large family of lipopeptide pheromones and their seven transmembrane domain receptors. Here we show that the B42 locus, like the previously described B6 locus, derives its unique specificity from nine multiallelic genes that are organized into three subgroups each comprising a receptor and two pheromone genes. We show that the three genes within each group are kept together as a functional unit by being embedded in an allele-specific DNA sequence. Using a combination of sequence analysis, Southern blotting, and DNA-mediated transformation with cloned genes, we demonstrate that different B loci may share alleles of one or two groups of genes. This is consistent with the prediction that the three subgroups of genes are functionally redundant and that it is the different combinations of their alleles that generate the multiple B mating specificities found in nature. The B42 locus was found to contain an additional gene, mfs1, that encodes a putative multidrug transporter belonging to the major facilitator family. In strains with other B mating specificities, this gene, whose functional significance was not established, lies in a region of shared homology flanking the B locus. PMID:10757757

  2. Weight loss maintenance in relation to locus of control: The MedWeight study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anastasiou, Costas A; Fappa, Evaggelia; Karfopoulou, Eleni; Gkza, Anastasia; Yannakoulia, Mary

    2015-08-01

    Locus of control, i.e. the degree of an individual's belief on the control of his/her life, has been related to many health outcomes, including weight loss in overweight/obese individuals. No information is available on the impact of locus of control in maintaining weight loss. We aimed to investigate the effect of locus of control in weight loss maintenance and explore potential associations with lifestyle factors. Study participants included 239 individuals (41% males) who had lost at least 10% of body weight in the past and either maintained the loss (maintainers: weight maintenance of at least 10% of initial weight) or regained it (regainers). Locus of control was defined by a relevant multi-dimensional scale; participants were categorised to internals and externals, based on "internal" and "others" sub-scales. A significant interaction was found between locus of control and weight loss maintenance status (p locus of control. Individualised treatment, according to locus of control, may increase weight loss maintenance rates in former overweight/obese individuals. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Impact of divorce on locus of control orientation in adult women: a longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doherty, W J

    1983-04-01

    Using longitudinal data for adult women from the National Longitudinal Surveys of Labor Market Experience, this study examined the relation between getting divorced and changes in the individual's locus of control orientation. The sample contained 1,814 white women ages 32-46 years who were in their first marriage in 1969. Marital status and locus of control (an 11-item abbreviated version of Rotter's Internal-External Locus of Control Scale) were measured in 1969, 1972, and 1977. Based on previous literature on locus of control and life events and on divorce, stress, and mental health, the author hypothesized that divorced people, in comparison with those who remained married, would show a short-term increase in externality from 1969-1972, followed by a return over the next 5 years to levels of locus of control comparable to that of the group who remained married. It was also hypothesized that locus of control scores would not predict the likelihood of becoming divorced over the 8-year period. All three hypotheses were confirmed. The findings were discussed in the context of two larger theoretical issues: the influence of important life events on locus of control and the causal direction in the well-documented association between divorce and mental health.

  4. Buffering Role of Locus of Control on Stress among the College/University Teachers of Bahawalpur

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aqeel Ahmad Khan (Corresponding author

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The present research is aimed to ascertain the role of locus of control in mediating or coping on various degree/levels of stress among the college/university teachers of Bahawalpur. For that purpose a sample of N=200 male/female college/university teacherswas selected by convenient sampling. Research tools, Locus of control by Julian Rotter (1966 and Stress questionnaire by International Stress Management Association UK, (2009 were administered for data collection. After the collection of data it was analyzedby SPSS. The results shows that the teachers identified with internal locus of control reveal low level of stress as contrast to the teachers with external locus of control. The study also confirms that high internal locus of control determines high coping andmediating ability of stress among the teachers. The study also pointed out that the teachers with external locus of control were more incline or prone to stress. Furthermore, Pearson and Spearman’s Correlation results at significant level of .000 show that bothvariables are highly correlated. Similarly, overall Mean of locus of control and Coefficient of variation reveals the high consistency role in relation with stress.

  5. Internal health locus of control predicts willingness to track health behaviors online and with smartphone applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Brooke L; Goldstein, Carly M; Gathright, Emily C; Hughes, Joel W; Latner, Janet D

    2017-12-01

    Given rising technology use across all demographic groups, digital interventions offer a potential strategy for increasing access to health information and care. Research is lacking on identifying individual differences that impact willingness to use digital interventions, which may affect patient engagement. Health locus of control, the amount of control an individual believes they have over their own health, may predict willingness to use mobile health (mHealth) applications ('apps') and online trackers. A cross-sectional study (n = 276) was conducted to assess college students' health locus of control beliefs and willingness to use health apps and online trackers. Internal and powerful other health locus of control beliefs predicted willingness to use health apps and online trackers while chance health locus of control beliefs did not. Individuals with internal and powerful other health locus of control beliefs are more willing than those with chance health locus of control beliefs to utilize a form of technology to monitor or change health behaviors. Health locus of control is an easy-to-assess patient characteristic providers can measure to identify which patients are more likely to utilize mHealth apps and online trackers.

  6. Prevalence of Porphyromonas gingivalis four rag locus genotypes in patients of orthodontic gingivitis and periodontitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yi; Zhang, Yujie; Wang, Lili; Guo, Yang; Xiao, Shuiqing

    2013-01-01

    Porphyromonas gingivalis is considered as a major etiological agent in periodontal diseases and implied to result in gingival inflammation under orthodontic appliance. rag locus is a pathogenicity island found in Porphyromonas gingivalis. Four rag locus variants are different in pathogenicity of Porphyromonas gingivalis. Moreover, there are different racial and geographic differences in distribution of rag locus genotypes. In this study, we assessed the prevalence of Porphyromonas gingivalis and rag locus genotypes in 102 gingival crevicular fluid samples from 57 cases of gingivitis patients with orthodontic appliances, 25 cases of periodontitis patients and 20 cases of periodontally healthy people through a 16S rRNA-based PCR and a multiplex PCR. The correlations between Porphyromona.gingivalis/rag locus and clinical indices were analyzed. The prevalence of Porphyromonas gingivalis and rag locus genes in periodontitis group was the highest among three groups and higher in orthodontic gingivitis than healthy people (pPorphyromonas gingivalis/rag locus and gingival index. rag-3 and rag-4 were the predominant genotypes in the patients of orthodontic gingivitis and mild-to-moderate periodontitis in Shandong. Porphyromonas.gingivalis carrying rag-1 has the strong virulence and could be associated with severe periodontitis.

  7. Organization and evolutionary trajectory of the mating type (MAT) locus in dermatophyte and dimorphic fungal pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wenjun; Metin, Banu; White, Theodore C; Heitman, Joseph

    2010-01-01

    Sexual reproduction in fungi is governed by a specialized genomic region, the mating type (MAT) locus, whose gene identity, organization, and complexity are diverse. We identified the MAT locus of five dermatophyte fungal pathogens (Microsporum gypseum, Microsporum canis, Trichophyton equinum, Trichophyton rubrum, and Trichophyton tonsurans) and a dimorphic fungus, Paracoccidioides brasiliensis, and performed phylogenetic analyses. The identified MAT locus idiomorphs of M. gypseum control cell type identity in mating assays, and recombinant progeny were produced. Virulence tests in Galleria mellonella larvae suggest the two mating types of M. gypseum may have equivalent virulence. Synteny analysis revealed common features of the MAT locus shared among these five dermatophytes: namely, a small size ( approximately 3 kb) and a novel gene arrangement. The SLA2, COX13, and APN2 genes, which flank the MAT locus in other Ascomycota are instead linked on one side of the dermatophyte MAT locus. In addition, the transcriptional orientations of the APN2 and COX13 genes are reversed compared to the dimorphic fungi Histoplasma capsulatum, Coccidioides immitis, and Coccidioides posadasii. A putative transposable element, pogo, was found to have inserted in the MAT1-2 idiomorph of one P. brasiliensis strain but not others. In conclusion, the evolution of the MAT locus of the dermatophytes and dimorphic fungi from the last common ancestor has been punctuated by both gene acquisition and expansion, and asymmetric gene loss. These studies further support a foundation to develop molecular and genetic tools for dermatophyte and dimorphic human fungal pathogens.

  8. Admixture mapping identifies a locus on 6q25 associated with breast cancer risk in US Latinas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fejerman, Laura; Chen, Gary K.; Eng, Celeste; Huntsman, Scott; Hu, Donglei; Williams, Amy; Pasaniuc, Bogdan; John, Esther M.; Via, Marc; Gignoux, Christopher; Ingles, Sue; Monroe, Kristine R.; Kolonel, Laurence N.; Torres-Mejía, Gabriela; Pérez-Stable, Eliseo J.; González Burchard, Esteban; Henderson, Brian E.; Haiman, Christopher A.; Ziv, Elad

    2012-01-01

    Among US Latinas and Mexican women, those with higher European ancestry have increased risk of breast cancer. We combined an admixture mapping and genome-wide association mapping approach to search for genomic regions that may explain this observation. Latina women with breast cancer (n= 1497) and Latina controls (n= 1272) were genotyped using Affymetrix and Illumina arrays. We inferred locus-specific genetic ancestry and compared the ancestry between cases and controls. We also performed single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) association analyses in regions of interest. Correction for multiple-hypothesis testing was conducted using permutations (Pcorrected). We identified one region where genetic ancestry was significantly associated with breast cancer risk: 6q25 [odds ratio (OR) per Indigenous American chromosome 0.75, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.65–0.85, P= 1.1 × 10−5, Pcorrected= 0.02]. A second region on 11p15 showed a trend towards association (OR per Indigenous American chromosome 0.77, 95% CI: 0.68–0.87, P= 4.3 × 10−5, Pcorrected= 0.08). In both regions, breast cancer risk decreased with higher Indigenous American ancestry in concordance with observations made on global ancestry. The peak of the 6q25 signal includes the estrogen receptor 1 (ESR1) gene and 5′ region, a locus previously implicated in breast cancer. Genome-wide association analysis found that a multi-SNP model explained the admixture signal in both regions. Our results confirm that the association between genetic ancestry and breast cancer risk in US Latinas is partly due to genetic differences between populations of European and Indigenous Americans origin. Fine-mapping within the 6q25 and possibly the 11p15 loci will lead to the discovery of the biologically functional variant/s behind this association. PMID:22228098

  9. Work stress and emotional exhaustion in nurses: the mediating role of internal locus of control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Partlak Günüşen, Neslihan; Ustün, Besti; Erdem, Sabri

    2014-01-01

    Burnout is a major problem for nursing. There is a strong relationship between work stress and emotional exhaustion. Although studies report a negative correlation between the internal locus of control and emotional exhaustion and work stress, the number of studies available on the subject is limited. This study intends to examine the extent to which the relationship between work stress and emotional exhaustion is mediated by nurses' internal locus of control. The study adopted a cross-sectional survey design. The data were analyzed using structural equation modeling techniques. The study sample consisted of 347 nurses who worked in a university hospital in Izmir, Turkey and who agreed to participate in the study. The Work-Related Strain Inventory was used to evaluate the nurses' work stress level, Maslach Burnout Inventory was used to evaluate their emotional exhaustion levels, and the Locus of Control Scale was used to evaluate the internal locus of control. The variables of the study were based on the Neuman Systems Model. Work stress was positively related to internal locus of control (β3 = .21, p exhaustion (β = -.03, p > 0.1). Internal locus of control was negatively related to emotional exhaustion (β = -.14, p exhaustion (mediated by internal locus of control β = .84, p exhaustion (mediated by internal locus of control, β = .84, p exhaustion and work stress was mediated, the impact of internal locus of control was limited. It is recommended that different variables be included in future studies so that they can mediate the relationship between work stress and emotional exhaustion.

  10. A third locus for autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxia Type I maps to chromosome 14q24. 3-qter: Evidence for the existence of a fourth locus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stevanin, G.; Guern, E.L.; Ravise, N.; Chneiweiss, H.; Duerr, A.; Cancel, G.; Vignal, A.; Boch, A.L.; Ruberg, M.; Penet, C.; Pothin, Y.; Lagroua, I.; Haguenau, M.; Rancurel, G.; Weissenbach, J.; Agid, Y.; Brice, A.

    1994-01-01

    The autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxias (ADCA) type I are a group of neurological disorders that are clinically and genetically heterogeneous. Two genes implicated in the disease, SCA1 (spinal cerebellar ataxia 1) and SCA2, are already localized. The authors have mapped a third locus to chromosome 14q24.3-qter, by linkage analysis in a non-SCA1/non-SCA2 family and have confirmed its existence in a second such family. The authors suggest designating this new locus [open quotes]SCA3.[close quotes] Combined analysis of the two families restricted the SCA3 locus to a 15-cM interval between markers D14S67 and D14S81. The gene for Machado-Joseph disease (MJD), a clinically different form of ADCA type I, has been recently assigned to chromosome 14q24.3-q32. Although the SCA3 locus is within the MJD region, linkage analyses cannot yet demonstrate whether they result from mutations of the same gene. Linkage to all three loci (SCA1, SCA2, and SCA3) was excluded in another family, which indicates the existence of a fourth ADCA type I locus. 36 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  11. Analysis of a plant complex resistance gene locus underlying immune-related hybrid incompatibility and its occurrence in nature.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rubén Alcázar

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Mechanisms underlying speciation in plants include detrimental (incompatible genetic interactions between parental alleles that incur a fitness cost in hybrids. We reported on recessive hybrid incompatibility between an Arabidopsis thaliana strain from Poland, Landsberg erecta (Ler, and many Central Asian A. thaliana strains. The incompatible interaction is determined by a polymorphic cluster of Toll/interleukin-1 receptor-nucleotide binding-leucine rich repeat (TNL RPP1 (Recognition of Peronospora parasitica1-like genes in Ler and alleles of the receptor-like kinase Strubbelig Receptor Family 3 (SRF3 in Central Asian strains Kas-2 or Kond, causing temperature-dependent autoimmunity and loss of growth and reproductive fitness. Here, we genetically dissected the RPP1-like Ler locus to determine contributions of individual RPP1-like Ler (R1-R8 genes to the incompatibility. In a neutral background, expression of most RPP1-like Ler genes, except R3, has no effect on growth or pathogen resistance. Incompatibility involves increased R3 expression and engineered R3 overexpression in a neutral background induces dwarfism and sterility. However, no individual RPP1-like Ler gene is sufficient for incompatibility between Ler and Kas-2 or Kond, suggesting that co-action of at least two RPP1-like members underlies this epistatic interaction. We find that the RPP1-like Ler haplotype is frequent and occurs with other Ler RPP1-like alleles in a local population in Gorzów Wielkopolski (Poland. Only Gorzów individuals carrying the RPP1-like Ler haplotype are incompatible with Kas-2 and Kond, whereas other RPP1-like alleles in the population are compatible. Therefore, the RPP1-like Ler haplotype has been maintained in genetically different individuals at a single site, allowing exploration of forces shaping the evolution of RPP1-like genes at local and regional population scales.

  12. Evidence for a third genetic locus for autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daoust, M.C.; Bichet, D.G. [Universite de Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Reynolds, D.M. [Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY (United States)] [and others

    1995-02-10

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is a genetically heterogeneous disease with loci on chromosomes 16p and 4q. It has a moderately high spontaneous mutation rate, although the relative frequency of such mutations at each gene locus is unknown. In studying genetic heterogeneity in the French-Canadian population, we identified a family in which a classical clinical presentation of ADPKD resulted from a mutation at a locus genetically distinct from either of the previously described loci for this disease. This suggests the existence of a third genetic locus for ADPKD. 21 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  13. Unequal segregation of SRK alleles at the S locus in Brassica cretica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edh, Kristina; Widén, Björn; Ceplitis, Alf

    2008-06-01

    In the Brassicaceae plant family, which includes the Arabidopsis and Brassica genera, self-incompatibility (SI) is controlled by genes at the S locus. Using experimental crosses, we studied the pattern of inheritance of S-locus alleles in the wild species Brassica cretica. Four full-sib families were established and unequal segregation of alleles at the SRK SI gene was found in one family. The segregation distortion acted in favour of a recessive (class II) allele and was best explained by some form of gametic-level selection. Our findings are discussed in the light of theoretical predictions of differential accumulation of deleterious mutations among S-locus alleles.

  14. Personal networks and locus of control in large urban centers of Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo De Grande

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This study analyzes the relationship between locus of control and interpersonal relations structures in Argentina. After a representative sample (n = 1500 of households in seven major urban centers (>200,000 inhabitants, it examines the relationship between the externality of locus of control and different aspects of personal networks of each respondent. The results show that people having more relations experiment lower levels of externality of locus of control. Likewise, lower levels of externality are informed when personal ties outside the neighborhood are available, as well as ties high educational level. In this regard, significant associations are verified between control and personal relations structures.

  15. Fine Structure and Instability of the Ml-a Locus in Barley

    OpenAIRE

    Wise, Roger P.; Ellingboe, Albert H.

    1985-01-01

    There are many naturally occurring variants at the Ml-a locus in barley that confer resistance to the powdery mildew fungus Erysiphe graminis f. sp. hordei. Since the Ml-a locus is bracketed by Hor-1 and Hor-2, genes that encode storage proteins in the endosperm, the Ml-a locus is amenable to fine structure analysis. Rare susceptible recombinants, as judged by exchange of flanking markers, were recovered in F3 families from the Ml-a10 x Ml-a1, Ml-a1 x Ml-a15 and Ml-a6 x Ml-a13 crosses. Some...

  16. A comparative study of entrepreneurs and managers: stress, burnout, locus of control, and social support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahim, M A

    1995-01-01

    This study investigated the relationships of job stress to job burnout, of locus of control and social support to stress and burnout, and the moderating effects of locus of control and social support on the stress-burnout relationship. These relationships were tested with questionnaire data collected from a random sample of entrepreneurs (N = 238) and managers (N = 288). Results showed that entrepreneurs reported that they had higher internal locus of control, received less social support, and had less job burnout than managers. Hierarchical regression analyses found support for eight of the ten main effects and one of the four moderating effects.

  17. Ghrelin axis genes, peptides and receptors: recent findings and future challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seim, Inge; Josh, Peter; Cunningham, Peter; Herington, Adrian; Chopin, Lisa

    2011-06-20

    The ghrelin axis consists of the gene products of the ghrelin gene (GHRL), and their receptors, including the classical ghrelin receptor GHSR. While it is well-known that the ghrelin gene encodes the 28 amino acid ghrelin peptide hormone, it is now also clear that the locus encodes a range of other bioactive molecules, including novel peptides and non-coding RNAs. For many of these molecules, the physiological functions and cognate receptor(s) remain to be determined. Emerging research techniques, including proteogenomics, are likely to reveal further ghrelin axis-derived molecules. Studies of the role of ghrelin axis genes, peptides and receptors, therefore, promises to be a fruitful area of basic and clinical research in years to come. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. The Examination of Pre-school Teacher Candidates’ Academic Locus of Control Levels According to Gender and Grade

    OpenAIRE

    Hakan Sarıçam; Ayşe Duran; Mehmet Çardak; Medera HALMATOV

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study is to examine the level of academic locus of control of the students who study pre-school education program. The sample of study is 329 students selected randomly in Faculty of Education from a mid-sized state University. In the study, Personal Information Form and Academic Locus of Control Scale prepared by researchers were used. Academic Locus of Control Scale includes two sub-dimensions; internal locus of control and external locus of control. Independent samples t t...

  19. Locus coeruleus, norepinephrine and Aβ peptides in Alzheimer's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer A. Ross

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Monoaminergic brainstem systems have widespread projections that participate in many central processes and, when dysregulated, contribute to a plethora of neuropsychiatric and neurodegenerative disorders. Synapses are the foundation of these neuronal circuits, and their local dysfunction results in global aberrations leading to pathophysiological disease states. This review focuses on the locus coeruleus (LC norepinephrine (NE brainstem system and its underappreciated role in Alzheimer's disease (AD. Amyloid beta (Aβ, a peptide that accumulates aberrantly in AD has recently been implicated as a modulator of neuronal excitability at the synapse. Evidence is presented showing that disruption of the LC-NE system at a synaptic and circuit level during early stages of AD, due to conditions such as chronic stress, can potentially lead to amyloid accumulation and contribute to the progression of this neurodegenerative disorder. Additional factors that impact neurodegeneration include neuroinflammation, and network de-synchronization. Consequently, targeting the LC-NE system may have significant therapeutic potential for AD, as it may facilitate modulation of Aβ production, curtail neuroinflammation, and prevent sleep and behavioral disturbances that often lead to negative patient outcomes.

  20. An Extracellular Polysaccharide Locus Required for Transmission of Bordetella bronchiseptica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewan, Kalyan K; Taylor-Mulneix, Dawn L; Hilburger, Lindsay J; Rivera, Israel; Preston, Andrew; Harvill, Eric T

    2017-10-17

    The lack of animal models to experimentally study how infectious agents transmit between hosts limits our understanding of what makes some pathogens so contagious. We recently developed a Bordetella bronchiseptica mouse model to study transmission and have used it to assess, for the first time, which of several well-studied "virulence factors" common to classical Bordetella species contribute to transmission. Among 13 mutants screened, a mutant lacking an extracellular polysaccharide (EPS) locus consistently failed to transmit. The loss of EPS had no obvious effect on in vitro characteristics of growth, adherence, cytotoxicity, or serum resistance, though it profoundly reduced the ability of the mutant to colonize the lower respiratory tract of mice. While wild-type B. bronchiseptica was shed from colonized mice and efficiently transmitted to cage-mates, the mutant colonized less efficiently, shed at lower numbers, and consequently did not transmit to naive animals. These results have important implications for potential roles of polysaccharides in the pathogenesis and transmission of Bordetella species as well as other respiratory pathogens. Cases of pertussis (whooping cough) caused by Bordetella pertussis are on the rise, and understanding factors that contribute to their spread is critical to its control.

  1. The locus of taboo context effects in picture naming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Samuel J; McMahon, Katie L; Burt, Jennifer S; de Zubicaray, Greig I

    2016-07-20

    Speakers respond more slowly when naming pictures presented with taboo (i.e., offensive/embarrassing) than with neutral distractor words in the picture-word interference paradigm. Over four experiments, we attempted to localize the processing stage at which this effect occurs during word production and determine whether it reflects the socially offensive/embarrassing nature of the stimuli. Experiment 1 demonstrated taboo interference at early stimulus onset asynchronies of -150 ms and 0 ms although not at 150 ms. In Experiment 2, taboo distractors sharing initial phonemes with target picture names eliminated the interference effect. Using additive factors logic, Experiment 3 demonstrated that taboo interference and phonological facilitation effects do not interact, indicating that the two effects originate at different processing levels within the speech production system. In Experiment 4, interference was observed for masked taboo distractors, including those sharing initial phonemes with the target picture names, indicating that the effect cannot be attributed to a processing level involving responses in an output buffer. In two of the four experiments, the magnitude of the interference effect correlated significantly with arousal ratings of the taboo words. However, no significant correlations were found for either offensiveness or valence ratings. These findings are consistent with a locus for the taboo interference effect prior to the processing stage responsible for word form encoding. We propose a pre-lexical account in which taboo distractors capture attention at the expense of target picture processing due to their high arousal levels.

  2. Molecular studies of deletions at the human steroid sulfatase locus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shapiro, L.J.; Yen, P.; Pomerantz, D.; Martin, E.; Rolewic, L.; Mohandas, T. (Univ. of California, Los Angeles (USA))

    1989-11-01

    The human steroid sulfatase gene (STS) is located on the distal X chromosome short arm close to the pseudoautosomal region but in a segment of DNA that is unique to the X chromosome. In contrast to most X chromosome-encoded genes, STS expression is not extinguished during the process of X chromosome inactivation. Deficiency of STS activity produced the syndrome of X chromosome-linked ichthyosis, which is one of the most common inborn errors of metabolism in man. Approximately 90% of STS{sup {minus}} individuals have large deletions at the STS locus. The authors and others have found that the end points of such deletions are heterogeneous in their location. One recently ascertained subject was observed to have a 40-kilobase deletion that is entirely intragenic, permitting the cloning and sequencing of the deletion junction. Studies of this patient and of other X chromosome sequences in other subjects permit some insight into the mechanism(s) responsible for generating frequent deletions on the short arm of the X chromosome.

  3. Polarized gene conversion at the bz locus of maize.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dooner, Hugo K; He, Limei

    2014-09-23

    Nucleotide diversity is greater in maize than in most organisms studied to date, so allelic pairs in a hybrid tend to be highly polymorphic. Most recombination events between such pairs of maize polymorphic alleles are crossovers. However, intragenic recombination events not associated with flanking marker exchange, corresponding to noncrossover gene conversions, predominate between alleles derived from the same progenitor. In these dimorphic heterozygotes, the two alleles differ only at the two mutant sites between which recombination is being measured. To investigate whether gene conversion at the bz locus is polarized, two large diallel crossing matrices involving mutant sites spread across the bz gene were performed and more than 2,500 intragenic recombinants were scored. In both diallels, around 90% of recombinants could be accounted for by gene conversion. Furthermore, conversion exhibited a striking polarity, with sites located within 150 bp of the start and stop codons converting more frequently than sites located in the middle of the gene. The implications of these findings are discussed with reference to recent data from genome-wide studies in other plants.

  4. Targeted transposition at the vestigial locus of Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heslip, T R; Hodgetts, R B

    1994-12-01

    Targeted transposition is the replacement of one P element with another. We are exploiting this unique property of P elements to study the complex regulatory domain of the Dopa decarboxylase (Ddc) gene in Drosophila melanogaster. P element constructs targeted to the same site in the genome will be subjected to the same position effect. This allows the subtle effects typical of most mutations in the Ddc regulatory region to be measured in the absence of the variable influences of position effects which are associated with the current method of germline transformation. We have investigated some of the parameters affecting targeted transposition of a Ddc transposon, P[Ddc], into a P element allele at the vestigial locus. These events were detected by an increased mutant vg phenotype. The location of the donor transposon in cis or in trans to the target had little effect on the frequency of targeting. Likewise, the mobility of different donor elements, as measured by their rate of transposition to a different chromosome, varied nearly 20-fold, while the rate of targeted transposition was very similar between them. All targeted alleles were precise replacements of the target P element by P[Ddc], but in several cases the donor was inserted in the opposite orientation. The targeted alleles could be described as the result of a replicative, conversion-like event.

  5. The functional organization of the vestigial locus in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, J A; Atkin, A L; Bell, J B

    1990-03-01

    Vestigial mutants are associated with imaginal disc cell death which results in the deletion of adult wing and haltere structures. The vestigial locus has previously been cloned, and mutational lesions associated with a number of vg alleles were mapped within a 19 kb DNA region defined as essential for vg function. Herein we report the identification and characterization of a developmentally regulated 3.8 kb vg transcript which is spliced from exons distributed throughout the essential interval defined above. All the characterized classical alleles have predictable effects on this transcription unit, and the severity of this effect is directly proportional to the severity of the wing phenotype. A repetitive domain within this transcription unit was identified and may serve as a tag to isolate other genes with functions related to vg. We also report an exceptional vg allele (vg83b27) that produces an extreme wing and haltere phenotype, but which defines a second vg complementation unit. This allele is associated with a 4 kb deletion entirely within a 4.5 kb vg intron as defined by the 3.8 kb transcription unit. Molecular and genetic evidence indicates that the vg83b27 mutation has a functional 3.8 kb transcription unit, thus accounting for its ability to complement classical alleles. The results indicate that sequences within a vg intron are essential for normal wing and haltere development.

  6. Modo-UG, a marsupial nonclassical MHC class I locus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gouin, Nicolas; Wright, April M; Miska, Katarzyna B; Parra, Zuly E; Samollow, Paul B; Baker, Michelle L; Miller, Robert D

    2006-06-01

    Modo-UG is a class I gene located in the MHC of the marsupial Monodelphis domestica, the gray, short-tailed opossum. Modo-UG is expressed as three alternatively spliced mRNA forms, all of which encode a transmembrane form with a short cytoplasmic tail that lacks phosphorylation sites typically found in classical class I molecules. The three alternative mRNAs would encode a full-length form, an isoform lacking the alpha2 domain, and one lacking both alpha2 and alpha3 domains. Genotyping both captive-bred and wild M. domestica from different geographic regions revealed no variation in the residues that make up Modo-UG's peptide-binding groove. Modo-UG's low polymorphism is contrasting to that of a nearby class I locus, Modo-UA1, which has a highly polymorphic peptide-binding region. Absence of functional polymorphism in Modo-UG is therefore not a general feature of opossum class I genes but the result of negative selection. Modo-UG is the first MHC linked marsupial class I to be described that appears to clearly have nonclassical features.

  7. The influence of message appeal, environmental hyperopia, and environmental locus of control on green policy communication

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lee, Yu-Kang

    2013-01-01

      In this paper, the author examined the message appeal in green policy communication by clarifying the moderating roles of environmental hyperopia and individual differences in environmental locus of control...

  8. [Polymorphism of TPH gene T3792A locus in Han ethnic group of north China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bing; Wang, Bao-Jie; Ding, Mei; Pang, Hao; Zhang, Zhen; Guan, Hong-Yu; Lu, Hong-Tao

    2008-12-01

    To investigate the polymorphism of the TPH gene T3792A locus in Han ethnic group of north China and its application value in forensic science. The polymorphism of T3792A locus of the TPH gene was analyzed by the ASPCR of blood samples from 173 unrelated individuals of north Chinese Han population. The distribution of the T3792A locus polymorphism of the TPH gene in Han ethnic group of north China followed the Hardy-Weinberg law, with the allele A and T gene frequency of 0.486 and 0.514, respectively. The TPH gene T3792A locus shows a very good genetic polymorphism, and may be applied to individual identification and paternity testing.

  9. Effects of Locus of Control and Type of Reinforcement on Programmed Instruction Performance of Adolescent Boys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregory, Mary K.

    1976-01-01

    Students with an internal locus of control functioned well under a variety of conditions while students needing extrinsic reinforcement functioned well only when feedback was provided by the experimenter. (MM)

  10. Impact of self-esteem, locus of control and gender on attitude ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    esteem scale developed by Adanijo and Oyefeso (1986), locus of control scale developed by Craig, Franklin and Andrew (1981) and attitude towards child adoption and adoptive parent questionnaire designed by the researchers. All measures used ...

  11. Inbreeding depression in a parasitoid wasp with single-locus complementary sex determination

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Vayssade, Chloé; de Fazio, Céline; Quaglietti, Bastien; Auguste, Alexandra; Ris, Nicolas; Fauvergue, Xavier

    2014-01-01

    .... Although recessive deleterious alleles that are expressed in males should be purged, an alternative form of inbreeding depression exists in species with single-locus complementary sex determination (sl-CSD...

  12. Inbreeding Depression in a Parasitoid Wasp with Single-Locus Complementary Sex Determination: e97733

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Chloé Vayssade; Céline de Fazio; Bastien Quaglietti; Alexandra Auguste; Nicolas Ris; Xavier Fauvergue

    2014-01-01

    .... Although recessive deleterious alleles that are expressed in males should be purged, an alternative form of inbreeding depression exists in species with single-locus complementary sex determination (sl-CSD...

  13. Health Locus of Control and Health Seeking Behaviour. The Ghanaian Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isaac Acheampong Sarfo

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available This study sought to examine the relationship between health locus of control orientation and health seeking behaviour, using the Ghanaian experience as a case in point. The study used the general population in the new Juaben Municipality as respondents based on their multiethnic backgrounds. Findings revealed that health locus of control did not mediate significantly between their illnesses and respective health seeking behaviour. There were various sociocultural factors like the collectivist cultural system that made a categorization of locus of control of any individual quite difficult. It was concluded that the cultural practices of respondents were the major determinant of individual’s behavior. In addition, the health system as practiced over a long period of time did not allow enough room for patients to make choices in terms of illness behaviour, a situation that affected their health locus of control behaviour.

  14. Genetic heterogeneity in benign familial neonatal convulsions: Identification of a new locus on chromosome 8q

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewis, T.B.; Leach, R.J.; O' Connell, P.; Ryan, S.G. (Univ. of Texas Health Science Center, San Antonio, TX (United States)); Ward, K. (Univ. of Utah Medical School, Salt Lake City, UT (United States))

    1993-09-01

    The syndrome of benign familial neonatal convulsions (BFNC) is a rare autosomal dominant disorder characterized by unprovoked seizures in the first weeks of life. One locus for BFNC has been mapped to chromosome 20 in several pedigrees, but the authors have excluded linkage to chromosome 20 in one large kindred. In order to identify this novel BFNC locus, dinucleotide repeat markers distributed throughout the genome were used to screen this family. Maximum pairwise LOD scores of 4.43 were obtained with markers D8S284 and D8S256 on chromosome 8q. Multipoint analysis placed the BFNC locus in the interval spanned by D8S198-D8S274. This study establishes the presence of a new BFNC locus and confirms genetic heterogeneity of this disorder. 26 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  15. Understanding the role of locus of control in consultative decision-making: a case study

    OpenAIRE

    Selart, Marcus

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: The study aims at clarifying whether locus of control may act as a bias in organisational decision-making or not. Design/methodology/approach: Altogether 44 managers working at Skanska (a Swedish multinational construction company) participated in the study. They were asked to complete a booklet including a locus of control test and a couple of decision tasks. The latter were based on case scenarios reflecting strategic issues relevant for consultative/ participative decision-making....

  16. Molecular Characterization Of The Vernalization Locus VRN1 In Perennial Ryegrass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Asp, Torben; Byrne, Stephen; Andersen, Jeppe R

    in perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne). Two allelic BAC clones of the VRN1 locus from the two genotypes Veyo and Falster with contrasting vernalization requirements were identified, sequenced, and characterized. The region surrounding the VRN1 locus in perennial ryegrass showed micro...... vernalization requirement. Our findings suggest that the 8.6kb region in the first intron of the VRN1 gene is an important regulatory region for vernalization response in perennial ryegrass....

  17. Relationship between Dental Anxiety and Health Locus of Control among Physiotherapy Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pooja Agarwal

    2013-01-01

    Materials & Method: A total of 152 students participated in the study. Dental anxiety was assessed using the 5 item Modified Dental Anxiety Scale (MDAS and Locus of Control was assessed using the 18 item Multidimensional Health Locus of Control (MHLC scale. Results: A Statistically significant positive correlation was found between the internal dimension of MHLC and dental anxiety. Conclusions: HLC was found to play an important role in predicting the dental anxiety among physiotherapy students.

  18. Health locus of control: Its relationship with medication adherence and medication wastage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Lorna Marie; Borg Theuma, Ruth; Cordina, Maria

    2017-12-09

    Non-adherence is a significant factor contributing to medication wastage. Whilst there is some evidence on the influence of patients' health locus of control in relation to adherence, there has been little inquiry into its relationship with mediation wastage. To determine the relationship between medication adherence and health locus of control as well as medication wastage and health locus of control in patients with chronic conditions. Outpatients having a diagnosis of asthma, cardiovascular conditions, or diabetes participated in a cross-sectional study employing a self-administered questionnaire. The questionnaire determined presence of unused medication (wastage), adherence using 'Tool for Adherence Behaviour Screening' (TABS), and health locus of control using 'Multidimensional Health Locus of Control' (MHLC) scale Form C. Logistic regression was performed to ascertain the effects of MHLC and demographics in relation to adherence and wastage. MHLC beliefs were divided into 8 types of health locus of control. One-Way ANOVA was used to assess differences between conditions and belief types. P-values ≤ .05 were considered significant. There were 330 patients recruited (58% male; age, mean±(SD): 61 ± 15 years; 110 asthma, 110 cardiovascular, 110 diabetes). In terms of health locus of control, females had higher 'doctors' beliefs (p = .054) and significantly lower 'other people' beliefs (p = adherence. Lower 'doctors' beliefs and higher 'other people' beliefs were significantly associated with wastage (p = adherence (p = medication, followed by 'pure internal' believers. 'Pure powerful others external' had the highest presence of unused medication. Healthcare professionals should take into account patients' health locus of control beliefs whilst conducting an intervention with patients; this can impact positively medication adherence and minimisation of medication wastage. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. The Interrelationship among Locus of Control, Sexual Satisfaction and Marital Satisfaction

    OpenAIRE

    Askari Asgharianji; Kamo Vardanyan; Shokouh Navabinejad

    2015-01-01

    The primary goal of the present study is to examine the interrelationships among locus of control, sexual satisfaction and marital satisfaction. In the current study, a sample which was composed of 200 married persons was investigated. Research tools include locus of control, sexual satisfaction and marital satisfaction. For data analysis, correlation and independent hierarchical multiple regression analyses were used to determine the relationships between the predictor variables and criterio...

  20. Buffering Role of Locus of Control on Stress among the College/University Teachers of Bahawalpur

    OpenAIRE

    Aqeel Ahmad Khan; Raheela Shahid; Muhammad Saleem

    2012-01-01

    The present research is aimed to ascertain the role of locus of control in mediating or coping on various degree/levels of stress among the college/university teachers of Bahawalpur. For that purpose a sample of N=200 male/female college/university teacherswas selected by convenient sampling. Research tools, Locus of control by Julian Rotter (1966) and Stress questionnaire by International Stress Management Association UK, (2009) were administered for data collection. After the collection of ...

  1. High-Density SNP Genotyping to Define β-Globin Locus Haplotypes

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Li; Muralidhar, Shalini; Singh, Manisha; Sylvan, Caprice; Kalra, Inderdeep S.; Quinn, Charles T.; Onyekwere, Onyinye C.; Pace, Betty S.

    2008-01-01

    Five major β-globin locus haplotypes have been established in individuals with sickle cell disease (SCD) from the Benin, Bantu, Senegal, Cameroon, and Arab-Indian populations. Historically, β-haplotypes were established using restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis across the β-locus, which consists of five functional β-like globin genes located on chromosome 11. Previous attempts to correlate these haplotypes as robust predictors of clinical phenotypes observed in SCD have n...

  2. Locus coeruleus damage and noradrenaline reductions in multiple sclerosis and experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polak, Paul E; Kalinin, Sergey; Feinstein, Douglas L

    2011-03-01

    The endogenous neurotransmitter noradrenaline exerts anti-inflammatory and neuroprotective effects in vitro and in vivo. Several studies report that noradrenaline levels are altered in the central nervous system of patients with multiple sclerosis and rodents with experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, which could contribute to pathology. Since the major source of noradrenaline are neurons in the locus coeruleus, we hypothesized that alterations in noradrenaline levels are a consequence of stress or damage to locus coeruleus neurons. In C57BL/6 mice immunized with myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein peptide 35-55 to develop chronic disease, cortical and spinal cord levels of noradrenaline were significantly reduced versus control mice. Immunohistochemical staining revealed increased astrocyte activation in the ventral portion of the locus coeruleus in immunized mice. The immunized mice showed neuronal damage in the locus coeruleus detected by a reduction of average cell size of tyrosine hydroxylase stained neurons. Analysis of the locus coeruleus of multiple sclerosis and control brains showed a significant increase in astrocyte activation, a reduction in noradrenaline levels, and neuronal stress indicated by hypertrophy of tyrosine hydroxylase stained cell bodies. However, the magnitude of these changes was not correlated with extent of demyelination or of cellular infiltrates. Together these findings demonstrate the presence of inflammation and neuronal stress in multiple sclerosis as well as in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. Since reduced noradrenaline levels could be permissive for increased inflammation and neuronal damage, these results suggest that methods to raise noradrenaline levels or increase locus coeruleus function may be of benefit in treating multiple sclerosis.

  3. Locus of control in maltreated children: the impact of attachment and cumulative trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Roazzi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Up until now research studies carried out on abused children have rarely taken in consideration the impact of maltreatment on the locus of control; furthermore results concerning the distribution of attachment internal models in this population are inconclusive. In addition, no study has ever taken in consideration the differential role of attachment and time of exposure to stress in the formation of attributive styles. This research work involved 60 maltreated children and 100 controls with the purpose of evaluating the associations between their attachment and age as for their locus of control. Internal Working Models were assessed by SAT and locus of control by the Nowicki-Strickland Scale. Results highlight mainly external locus of control and disorganized and avoidant IWMs in abused children. Furthermore, age was more predictive than attachment for locus of control. By contrast, in the control group at both age taken in consideration attachment was predictive of locus of control. Results are discussed in terms of problematic symptoms associated to maltreatment.

  4. Comparing health locus of control in patients with Spasmodic Dysphonia, Functional Dysphonia and Nonlaryngeal Dystonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haselden, Karen; Powell, Theresa; Drinnan, Mike; Carding, Paul

    2009-11-01

    Locus of Control (LoC) refers to an individuals' perception of whether they are in control of life events. Health Locus of Control refers to whether someone feels they have influence over their health. Health Locus of Control has not been studied in any depth in voice-disordered patients. The objective of this study was to examine Health Locus of Control in three patient groups: (1) Spasmodic Dysphonia, (2) Functional Dysphonia and (3) a nondysphonic group with Nonlaryngeal Dystonia. LoC was measured and compared in a total of 57 patients using the Multidimensional Health Locus of Control Scales (diagnostic specific) Form C. Internal, Chance, and Powerful others LoC were measured and comparisons were made using one-way analysis of variance. Contrary to expectations Internal LoC was found to be significantly higher in the Functional Dysphonia group when compared to the other two groups. There was no significant difference between the groups in Chance or Powerful others LoC. The two organic groups, Spasmodic Dysphonia and Nonlaryngeal Dystonia, were more alike in Internal Health Locus of Control than the Functional Dysphonia group. The diagnostic nature of the groups was reflected in their LoC scores rather than their voice loss. These results contribute to the debate about the etiology of Spasmodic Dysphonia and will be of interest to those involved in the psychology of voice and those managing voice-disordered patients.

  5. Social capital, political trust, and health locus of control: a population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindström, Martin

    2011-02-01

    To investigate the association between political trust in the Riksdag and lack of belief in the possibility to influence one's own health (external locus of control), taking horizontal trust into account. The 2008 public health survey in Skåne is a cross-sectional postal questionnaire study with a 55% participation rate. A random sample of 28,198 persons aged 18-80 years participated. Logistic regression models were used to investigate the associations between political trust in the Riksdag (an aspect of vertical trust) and lack of belief in the possibility to influence one's own health (external locus of control). The multiple regression analyses included age, country of birth, education, and horizontal trust in other people. A 33.7% of all men and 31.8% of all women lack internal locus of control. Low (external) health locus of control is more common in higher age groups, among people born outside Sweden, with lower education, low horizontal trust, low political trust, and no opinion concerning political trust. Respondents with not particularly strong political trust, no political trust at all and no opinion have significantly higher odds ratios of external locus of control throughout the multiple regression analyses. Low political trust in the Riksdag seems to be independently associated with external health locus of control.

  6. The relationship between the perception of own locus of control and aggression of adolescent boys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lettie Breet

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Aggression is increasingly seen in most parts of South African society. Aggressive behaviour of boys in secondary school often results from frustrations caused by perceived high expectations of others regarding the role, locus of control, and personality of boys. Locus of control plays an important role in a person's perception concerning a situation and possible reactions to what is happening, or should be happening. A 56-item questionnaire, based on Rotter's "Locus of control" questionnaire, and the DIAS Scale were used. The questionnaire was completed by 440 boys in Grades 9, 10, and 11. Various factor, item and differential statistical analyses were conducted. Three constructs were identified, i.e. physical, verbal, and indirect aggression. Results indicated that locus of control has a significant influence on verbal and indirect aggression. The differential analysis indicated that contextual variables (language of tuition, age, and grade play a significant, but not substantial, role in aggression. Furthermore, boys with an internal locus of control are significantly and substantially less aggressive than boys with an external locus of control, with respect to physical, verbal and indirect aggression.

  7. Locus heterogeneity disease genes encode proteins with high interconnectivity in the human protein interaction network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin eKeith

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Mutations in genes potentially lead to a number of genetic diseases with differing severity. These disease genes have been the focus of research in recent years showing that the disease gene population as a whole is not homogeneous, and can be categorised according to their interactions. Locus heterogeneity describes a single disorder caused by mutations in different genes each acting individually to cause the same disease. Using datasets of experimentally derived human disease genes and protein interactions, we created a protein interaction network to investigate the relationships between the products of genes associated with a disease displaying locus heterogeneity, and use network parameters to suggest properties that distinguish these disease genes from the overall disease gene population. Through the manual curation of known causative genes of 100 diseases displaying locus heterogeneity and 397 single-gene Mendelian disorders, we use network parameters to show that our locus heterogeneity network displays distinct properties from the global disease network and a Mendelian network. Using the global human proteome, through random simulation of the network we show that heterogeneous genes display significant interconnectivity. Further topological analysis of this network revealed clustering of locus heterogeneity genes that cause identical disorders, indicating that these disease genes are involved in similar biological processes. We then use this information to suggest novel genes that may also contribute to diseases with locus heterogeneity.

  8. Locus of control and peer relationships among Caucasian, Hispanic, Asian, and African American adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Hannah Soo; Chang, Kyle Edward; Chen, Chuansheng; Greenberger, Ellen

    2015-01-01

    Past research has shown that locus of control plays an important role in a wide range of behaviors, such as academic achievement and positive social behaviors. However, little is known about whether locus of control plays the same role in minority adolescents' peer relationships. The current study examined ethnic differences in the associations between locus of control and peer relationships in early adolescence using samples from the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study (ECLS-K: 5,612 Caucasian, 1,562 Hispanic, 507 Asian, and 908 African-American adolescents) and the National Education Longitudinal Study (NELS: 8,484 Caucasian, 1,604 Hispanic, and 860 Asian, and 1,228 African American adolescents). Gender was approximately evenly split in both samples. The results from the two datasets were highly consistent. Significant interactions between ethnicity and locus of control indicated that having a more internal locus of control was particularly important for Caucasian students' peer relationships (ECLS-K) and social status (NELS), but less so for Asian, Hispanic, and African American students. Our findings suggest that the role of locus of control in peer relationship is contingent upon culture.

  9. The unusual S locus of Leavenworthia is composed of two sets of paralogous loci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chantha, Sier-Ching; Herman, Adam C; Castric, Vincent; Vekemans, Xavier; Marande, William; Schoen, Daniel J

    2017-12-01

    The Leavenworthia self-incompatibility locus (S locus) consists of paralogs (Lal2, SCRL) of the canonical Brassicaceae S locus genes (SRK, SCR), and is situated in a genomic position that differs from the ancestral one in the Brassicaceae. Unexpectedly, in a small number of Leavenworthia alabamica plants examined, sequences closely resembling exon 1 of SRK have been found, but the function of these has remained unclear. BAC cloning and expression analyses were employed to characterize these SRK-like sequences. An SRK-positive Bacterial Artificial Chromosome clone was found to contain complete SRK and SCR sequences located close by one another in the derived genomic position of the Leavenworthia S locus, and in place of the more typical Lal2 and SCRL sequences. These sequences are expressed in stigmas and anthers, respectively, and crossing data show that the SRK/SCR haplotype is functional in self-incompatibility. Population surveys indicate that S loci possess such alleles. An ancestral translocation or recombination event involving SRK/SCR and Lal2/SCRL likely occurred, together with neofunctionalization of Lal2/SCRL, and both haplotype groups now function as Leavenworthia S locus alleles. These findings suggest that S locus alleles can have distinctly different evolutionary origins. © 2017 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2017 New Phytologist Trust.

  10. Searching for a major locus for male pattern baldness (MPB)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anker, R.; Eisen, A.Z.; Donis-Keller, H. [Washington Univ. School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States)

    1994-09-01

    Male pattern baldness (MPB) is a common trait in post-pubertal males. Approximately 50% of adult males present some degree of MPB by age 50. According to the classification provided by Hamilton in 1951 and modified by Norwood in 1975, the trait itself is a continuum that ranges from mild (Type I) to severe (Type VII) cases. In addition, there is extensive variability for the age of onset. The role of androgens in allowing the expression of this trait in males has been well established. This phenotype is uncommonly expressed in females. The high prevalence of the trait, the distribution of MPB as a continuous trait, and several non-allelic mutations identified in the mouse capable of affecting hair pattern, suggest that MPB is genetically heterogeneous. In order to reduce the probability of multiple non-allelic MPB genes within a pedigree, we selected 9 families in which MPB appears to segregate exclusively through the paternal lineage as compared to bilineal pedigrees. There are 32 males expressing this phenotype and females are treated as phenotype unknown. In general, affected individuals expressed the trait before 30 years of age with a severity of at least Type III or IV. We assumed an autosomal dominant model, with a gene frequency of 1/20 for the affected allele, and 90% penetrance. Simulation studies using the SLINK program with these pedigrees showed that these families would be sufficient to detect linkage under the assumption of a single major locus. If heterogeneity is present, the current resource does not have sufficient power to detect linkage at a statistically significant level, although candidate regions of the genome could be identified for further studies with additional pedigrees. Using 53 highly informative microsatellite markers, and a subset of 7 families, we have screened 30% of the genome. This search included several regions where candidate genes for MPB are located.

  11. Molecular characterization of the singed wings locus of Drosophila melanogaster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boykova Tatiana

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hormones frequently guide animal development via the induction of cascades of gene activities, whose products further amplify an initial hormonal stimulus. In Drosophila the transformation of the larva into the pupa and the subsequent metamorphosis to the adult stage is triggered by changes in the titer of the steroid hormone 20-hydroxyecdysone. singed wings (swi is the only gene known in Drosophila melanogaster for which mutations specifically interrupt the transmission of the regulatory signal from early to late ecdysone inducible genes. Results We have characterized singed wings locus, showing it to correspond to EG:171E4.2 (CG3095. swi encodes a predicted 68.5-kDa protein that contains N-terminal histidine-rich and threonine-rich domains, a cysteine-rich C-terminal region and two leucine-rich repeats. The SWI protein has a close homolog in D. melanogaster, defining a new family of SWI-like proteins, and is conserved in D. pseudoobscura. A lethal mutation, swit476, shows a severe disruption of the ecdysone pathway and is a C>Y substitution in one of the two conserved CysXCys motifs that are common to SWI and the Drosophila Toll-4 protein. Conclusions It is not entirely clear from the present molecular analysis how the SWI protein may function in the ecdysone induced cascade. Currently all predictions agree in that SWI is very unlikely to be a nuclear protein. Thus it probably exercises its control of "late" ecdysone genes indirectly. Apparently the genetic regulation of ecdysone signaling is much more complex then was previously anticipated.

  12. The locus of impairment in English developmental letter position dyslexia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kezilas, Yvette; Kohnen, Saskia; McKague, Meredith; Castles, Anne

    2014-01-01

    Many children with reading difficulties display phonological deficits and struggle to acquire non-lexical reading skills. However, not all children with reading difficulties have these problems, such as children with selective letter position dyslexia (LPD), who make excessive migration errors (such as reading slime as "smile"). Previous research has explored three possible loci for the deficit - the phonological output buffer, the orthographic input lexicon, and the orthographic-visual analysis stage of reading. While there is compelling evidence against a phonological output buffer and orthographic input lexicon deficit account of English LPD, the evidence in support of an orthographic-visual analysis deficit is currently limited. In this multiple single-case study with three English-speaking children with developmental LPD, we aimed to both replicate and extend previous findings regarding the locus of impairment in English LPD. First, we ruled out a phonological output buffer and an orthographic input lexicon deficit by administering tasks that directly assess phonological processing and lexical guessing. We then went on to directly assess whether or not children with LPD have an orthographic-visual analysis deficit by modifying two tasks that have previously been used to localize processing at this level: a same-different decision task and a non-word reading task. The results from these tasks indicate that LPD is most likely caused by a deficit specific to the coding of letter positions at the orthographic-visual analysis stage of reading. These findings provide further evidence for the heterogeneity of dyslexia and its underlying causes.

  13. The locus of impairment in English developmental letter position dyslexia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yvette eKezilas

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Many children with reading difficulties display phonological deficits and struggle to acquire nonlexical reading skills. However, not all children with reading difficulties have these problems, such as children with selective Letter Position Dyslexia (LPD, who make excessive migration errors (such as reading slime as ‘smile’. Previous research has explored three possible loci for the deficit – the phonological output buffer, the orthographic input lexicon, and the orthographic-visual analysis stage of reading. While there is compelling evidence against a phonological output buffer and orthographic input lexicon deficit account of English LPD, the evidence in support of an orthographic-visual analysis deficit is currently limited. In this multiple single-case study with three English speaking children with developmental LPD we aimed to both replicate and extend previous findings regarding the locus of impairment in English LPD. First, we ruled out a phonological output buffer and an orthographic input lexicon deficit by administering tasks that directly assess phonological processing and lexical guessing. We then went on to directly assess whether or not children with LPD have an orthographic-visual analysis deficit by modifying two tasks that have previously been used to localize processing at this level: a same-different decision task and a nonword reading task. The results from these tasks indicate that LPD is most likely caused by a deficit specific to the coding of letter positions at the orthographic-visual analysis stage of reading. These findings provide further evidence for the heterogeneity of dyslexia and its underlying causes.

  14. How the Land Became the Locus of Major Evolutionary Innovations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermeij, Geerat J

    2017-10-23

    Life originated in the sea and evolved its early metabolic pathways in water [1, 2]. Nevertheless, activities of organisms on land have influenced and enriched marine ecosystems with oxygen and nutrients for billions of years [3-7]. In contrast to the history of species diversity in the sea and on land [8-10] and the flows of resources within and between these two realms [11], little is known about the times and places of origin of major metabolic and ecological innovations during the Phanerozoic. Many innovations among multicellular organisms originated in the sea during or before the Cambrian, including predation and most of its variations, biomineralization, colonial or clonal growth, bioerosion, deposit feeding, bioturbation by animals, communication at a distance by vision and olfaction, photosymbiosis, chemosymbiosis, suspension feeding, osmotrophy, internal fertilization, jet propulsion, undulatory locomotion, and appendages for movement. Activity is less constrained in air than in the denser, more viscous medium of water [9, 12-14]. I therefore predict that high-performance metabolic and ecological innovations should predominantly originate on land after the Ordovician once organisms had conquered the challenges of life away from water and later appeared in the sea, either in marine-colonizing clades or by arising separately in clades that never left the sea. In support of this hypothesis, I show that 11 of 13 major post-Ordovician innovations appeared first or only on land. This terrestrial locus of innovation cannot be explained by the Cretaceous to recent expansion of diversity on land. It reveals one of several irreversible shifts in the history of life. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Handwriting with a preferred retinal locus for AMD with scotomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timberlake, George T; Bothwell, Rebecca J; Moyer, Kristen

    2013-05-01

    Individuals with macular scotomas from age-related macular degeneration frequently have difficulty writing legibly. The purpose of this study was to investigate the causes of this difficulty by documenting the location of the retinal image of the pen used for writing in relation to the scotoma and fixational preferred retinal locus (fPRL). Subjects with macular scotomas from age-related macular degeneration and visually normal age-matched controls wrote words while observing their hand, pen, and text in a scanning laser ophthalmoscope. Scanning laser ophthalmoscope video images were analyzed to find the retinal positions of the subject's scotoma, fixation area, and pen tip. Control subjects placed their fovea and scotoma subjects placed their fPRL on or very close to the pen tip for both cursive writing and printing. Scotoma subjects' written text sloped downward at a greater angle than controls'. Text angle was negatively correlated with fPRL eccentricity, visual acuity, and the amount the scotoma obscured the writing guides. When printing, control subjects placed their fovea precisely in the center of printing box guides, whereas scotoma subjects exhibited highly dispersed placement of the fPRL. The principal finding is that, because the retinal locations of the pen tip and the fPRL or fovea are coincident or very close, the fPRL and fovea are "monitoring" the pen tip and its location on the page. It is the PRL determined by asking subjects to fixate (i.e., the fPRL) that is used when handwriting, not a separate "handwriting" PRL. The poor handwriting performance of those with macular scotomas seems to be primarily caused by difficulty in placing letters in the appropriate location probably because of reduced visual acuity of the fPRL and scotoma obscuration of the area on which to write.

  16. Locus-specific ribosomal RNA gene silencing in nucleolar dominance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle S Lewis

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available The silencing of one parental set of rRNA genes in a genetic hybrid is an epigenetic phenomenon known as nucleolar dominance. We showed previously that silencing is restricted to the nucleolus organizer regions (NORs, the loci where rRNA genes are tandemly arrayed, and does not spread to or from neighboring protein-coding genes. One hypothesis is that nucleolar dominance is the net result of hundreds of silencing events acting one rRNA gene at a time. A prediction of this hypothesis is that rRNA gene silencing should occur independent of chromosomal location. An alternative hypothesis is that the regulatory unit in nucleolar dominance is the NOR, rather than each individual rRNA gene, in which case NOR localization may be essential for rRNA gene silencing. To test these alternative hypotheses, we examined the fates of rRNA transgenes integrated at ectopic locations. The transgenes were accurately transcribed in all independent transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana lines tested, indicating that NOR localization is not required for rRNA gene expression. Upon crossing the transgenic A. thaliana lines as ovule parents with A. lyrata to form F1 hybrids, a new system for the study of nucleolar dominance, the endogenous rRNA genes located within the A. thaliana NORs are silenced. However, rRNA transgenes escaped silencing in multiple independent hybrids. Collectively, our data suggest that rRNA gene activation can occur in a gene-autonomous fashion, independent of chromosomal location, whereas rRNA gene silencing in nucleolar dominance is locus-dependent.

  17. The 4q27 locus and prostate cancer risk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hopper John L

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chronic inflammation is considered to be implicated in the development of prostate cancer. In this study we are the first to investigate a potential association between variants in an autoimmune related region on chromosome 4q27 and prostate cancer risk. This region harbors two cytokine genes IL-2 and the recently described IL-21. Methods We genotyped six variants previously associated with autoimmune disease (namely rs13151961, rs13119723, rs17388568, rs3136534, rs6822844 and rs6840978 and one functional IL-2 promoter variant (rs2069762 for possible association with prostate cancer risk using the Australian Risk Factors for Prostate Cancer case-control Study. Results Overall, our results do not support an association between the seven variants at position 4q27 and prostate cancer risk. Per allele odds ratios (ORs were not significantly different from 1 (all P-values = 0.06. However, we found suggestive evidence for a significant association between the presence of the rs13119723 variant (located in a protein of unknown function and men with a family history of prostate cancer in first-degree relatives (P-value for interaction 0.02. The per allele OR associated with this variant was significantly higher than 1 (2.37; 95% C.I. = 1.01-5.57. Conclusions We suggest that genetic variation within the chromosome 4q27 locus might be associated with prostate cancer susceptibility in men with a family history of the disease. Furthermore, our study alludes to a potential role of unknown protein KIAA1109 in conferring this risk.

  18. Fine mapping of the NRG1 Hirschsprung's disease locus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clara Sze-Man Tang

    Full Text Available The primary pathology of Hirschsprung's disease (HSCR, colon aganglionosis is the absence of ganglia in variable lengths of the hindgut, resulting in functional obstruction. HSCR is attributed to a failure of migration of the enteric ganglion precursors along the developing gut. RET is a key regulator of the development of the enteric nervous system (ENS and the major HSCR-causing gene. Yet the reduced penetrance of RET DNA HSCR-associated variants together with the phenotypic variability suggest the involvement of additional genes in the disease. Through a genome-wide association study, we uncovered a ∼350 kb HSCR-associated region encompassing part of the neuregulin-1 gene (NRG1. To identify the causal NRG1 variants contributing to HSCR, we genotyped 243 SNPs variants on 343 ethnic Chinese HSCR patients and 359 controls. Genotype analysis coupled with imputation narrowed down the HSCR-associated region to 21 kb, with four of the most associated SNPs (rs10088313, rs10094655, rs4624987, and rs3884552 mapping to the NRG1 promoter. We investigated whether there was correlation between the genotype at the rs10088313 locus and the amount of NRG1 expressed in human gut tissues (40 patients and 21 controls and found differences in expression as a function of genotype. We also found significant differences in NRG1 expression levels between diseased and control individuals bearing the same rs10088313 risk genotype. This indicates that the effects of NRG1 common variants are likely to depend on other alleles or epigenetic factors present in the patients and would account for the variability in the genetic predisposition to HSCR.

  19. The Ikaros transcription factor regulates responsiveness to IL-12 and expression of IL-2 receptor alpha in mature, activated CD8 T cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric T Clambey

    Full Text Available The Ikaros family of transcription factors is critical for normal T cell development while limiting malignant transformation. Mature CD8 T cells express multiple Ikaros family members, yet little is known about their function in this context. To test the functions of this gene family, we used retroviral transduction to express a naturally occurring, dominant negative (DN isoform of Ikaros in activated CD8 T cells. Notably, expression of DN Ikaros profoundly enhanced the competitive advantage of activated CD8 T cells cultured in IL-12, such that by 6 days of culture, DN Ikaros-transduced cells were 100-fold more abundant than control cells. Expression of a DN isoform of Helios, a related Ikaros-family transcription factor, conferred a similar advantage to transduced cells in IL-12. While DN Ikaros-transduced cells had higher expression of the IL-2 receptor alpha chain, DN Ikaros-transduced cells achieved their competitive advantage through an IL-2 independent mechanism. Finally, the competitive advantage of DN Ikaros-transduced cells was manifested in vivo, following adoptive transfer of transduced cells. These data identify the Ikaros family of transcription factors as regulators of cytokine responsiveness in activated CD8 T cells, and suggest a role for this family in influencing effector and memory CD8 T cell differentiation.

  20. Possible linkage of a breast cancer-susceptibility locus to the ABO locus: sensitivity of LOD scores to a single new recombinant observation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skolnick, M H; Thompson, E A; Bishop, D T; Cannon, L A

    1984-01-01

    We present evidence of a pedigree in which a major gene for breast cancer-susceptibility appears to segregate in a dominant fashion. Linkage analysis suggests that the breast cancer-susceptibility locus in this family may be linked to the ABO locus, which is located on band q34 of chromosome 9. At an early stage in the analysis, a LOD score of 3.0 for zero recombination was obtained for linkage between ABO and the susceptibility locus, but a single recombinant reduced the LOD score to 1.72 at a recombination fraction of 0.06. A final observation of a nonrecombinant brings the LOD score for this pedigree to 1.99 at theta = 0.05. We attempt to put these results in perspective by discussing the sensitivity of the LOD score to the next observation. Examples of the volatility of LOD scores are given. These simple calculations show that tight linkage represents the worst case for the interpretation of a LOD score of 3.0. Finally, we discuss the linkage between the breast cancer-susceptibility locus and the ABO blood group and approaches to confirming or denying this result.

  1. Effectiveness of teaching cognitive-behavioral techniques on locus of control in hemodialysis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehrtak, Mohammad; Habibzadeh, Shahram; Farzaneh, Esmaeil; Rjaei-Khiavi, Abdollah

    2017-10-01

    Many of the cognitive behavioral models and therapeutic protocols developed so far for psychological disorders and chronic diseases have proved effective through clinical research. This study aimed to determine the effectiveness of teaching cognitive-behavioral techniques on locus of control in hemodialysis patients. This controlled clinical trial study was conducted in 2015 with 76 patients selected by census and treated with a hemodialysis machine in the dialysis department of Vali-Asr Hospital in the city of Meshkinshahr. A total of four patients were excluded because of their critical conditions while the rest, who were recruited, were randomly divided into two equal groups of 36 patients as the intervention and control groups. First, the locus of control was measured in both groups through a pretest, and cognitive-behavioral techniques were then taught to the intervention group during eight 45 to 90-minute sessions. The locus of control in patients of both groups was finally re-measured through a posttest. Data were collected using Rotter's Locus of Control Inventory. The Wilcoxon test and Mann-Whitney U test were respectively used in SPSS18 for data analysis. In the pretest and posttest stages respectively, 4.8% and 14.3% of samples in the control group as well as 14.3% and 33.3% of samples in the intervention group enjoyed internal locus of control. The difference between the pretest and posttest scores of internal locus of control in the intervention group was significant (p=0.004), which indicates the positive effect of cognitive-behavioral psychotherapeutic intervention on internalization of locus of control in this group. Given the external locus of control in most of the study patients and also the positive significant effect of cognitive-behavioral psychotherapy on internalization of locus of control in this group of patients, it appears necessary to have a psychology resident present in the hemodialysis department to teach the necessary cognitive

  2. Lipophorin Receptor: The Insect Lipoprotein Receptor

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 18; Issue 8. Lipophorin Receptor: The Insect Lipoprotein Receptor. G Ravikumar N B Vijayaprakash. General Article Volume 18 Issue 8 August 2013 pp 748-755. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  3. Curcumin blocks interleukin (IL)-2 signaling in T-lymphocytes by inhibiting IL-2 synthesis, CD25 expression, and IL-2 receptor signaling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forward, Nicholas A.; Conrad, David M. [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia (Canada); Power Coombs, Melanie R.; Doucette, Carolyn D. [Department of Pathology, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia (Canada); Furlong, Suzanne J. [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia (Canada); Lin, Tong-Jun [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia (Canada); Department of Pediatrics, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia (Canada); Hoskin, David W., E-mail: d.w.hoskin@dal.ca [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia (Canada); Department of Pathology, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia (Canada); Department of Surgery, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia (Canada)

    2011-04-22

    Highlights: {yields} Curcumin inhibits CD4{sup +} T-lymphocyte proliferation. {yields} Curcumin inhibits interleukin-2 (IL-2) synthesis and CD25 expression by CD4{sup +} T-lymphocytes. {yields} Curcumin interferes with IL-2 receptor signaling by inhibiting JAK3 and STAT5 phosphorylation. {yields} IL-2-dependent regulatory T-lymphocyte function and Foxp3 expression is downregulated by curcumin. -- Abstract: Curcumin (diferulomethane) is the principal curcuminoid in the spice tumeric and a potent inhibitor of activation-induced T-lymphocyte proliferation; however, the molecular basis of this immunosuppressive effect has not been well studied. Here we show that micromolar concentrations of curcumin inhibited DNA synthesis by mouse CD4{sup +} T-lymphocytes, as well as interleukin-2 (IL-2) and CD25 ({alpha} chain of the high affinity IL-2 receptor) expression in response to antibody-mediated cross-linking of CD3 and CD28. Curcumin acted downstream of protein kinase C activation and intracellular Ca{sup 2+} release to inhibit I{kappa}B phosphorylation, which is required for nuclear translocation of the transcription factor NF{kappa}B. In addition, IL-2-dependent DNA synthesis by mouse CTLL-2 cells, but not constitutive CD25 expression, was impaired in the presence of curcumin, which demonstrated an inhibitory effect on IL-2 receptor (IL-2R) signaling. IL-2-induced phosphorylation of STAT5A and JAK3, but not JAK1, was diminished in the presence of curcumin, indicating inhibition of critical proximal events in IL-2R signaling. In line with the inhibitory action of curcumin on IL-2R signaling, pretreatment of CD4{sup +}CD25{sup +} regulatory T-cells with curcumin downregulated suppressor function, as well as forkhead box p3 (Foxp3) expression. We conclude that curcumin inhibits IL-2 signaling by reducing available IL-2 and high affinity IL-2R, as well as interfering with IL-2R signaling.

  4. The AMPA receptor potentiator LY404187 increases cerebral glucose utilization and c-fos expression in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler, Jill H; Whalley, Katherine; Murray, Tracey; O'neill, Michael J; McCulloch, James

    2004-10-01

    AMPA receptor potentiators enhance AMPA receptor-mediated glutamatergic neurotransmission and may have therapeutic potential as cognitive enhancers or antidepressants. The anatomical basis for the action of AMPA receptor potentiators is unknown. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of the biarylpropylsulfonamide AMPA receptor potentiator, LY404187 (0.05 to 5 mg/kg subcutaneously), upon cerebral glucose utilization and c-fos expression using 14C-2-deoxglucose autoradiography and c-fos immunocytochemistry. LY404187 (0.5 mg/kg) produced significant elevations in glucose utilization in 28 of the 52 anatomical regions analyzed, which included rostral neocortical areas and the hippocampus, as well the dorsal raphe nucleus, lateral habenula, and locus coeruleus. No significant decreases in glucose utilization were observed in any region after LY404187 administration. The increases in glucose utilization with LY404187 (0.5 mg/kg) were blocked by pretreatment with the AMPA receptor antagonist LY293558 (25 mg/kg), indicating that LY404187 acts through AMPA receptor-mediated mechanisms. LY404187 (0.5 mg/kg) also produced increases in c-fos immunoreactivity in the cortex, locus coeruleus, and the dorsal raphe nucleus. These studies demonstrate neuronal activation in key brain areas that are associated with memory processes and thus provide an anatomical basis for the cognitive enhancing effects of AMPA receptor potentiators.

  5. The Rsv3 Locus Conferring Resistance to Soybean Mosaic Virus is Associated with a Cluster of Coiled-Coil Nucleotide-Binding Leucine-Rich Repeat Genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Su Jeoung Suh

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The (SMV resistance locus, , previously mapped between markers A519F/R and M3Satt in the soybean molecular linkage group B2 (chromosome 14, has been characterized by examination of the soybean genome sequence. The 154 kbp interval encompassing contains a family of closely related coiled-coil nucleotide-binding leucine-rich repeat (CC-NB-LRR genes. Tightly linked to this region are additional CC-NB-LRR genes and several leucine-rich repeat receptor-like kinase (LRR-RLK genes, thereby indicating that members of both multigene families constitute a heterogeneous cluster at the chromosomal region. To further confirm the sequence and genetic map concordance, we developed 16 markers from the genomic sequence including predicted CC-NB-LRR genes and their flanking sequences. Mapping of the resultant markers in three populations showed parallel alignment between the genetic and sequence maps in the -containing region. Phylogenetic analysis of five CC-NB-LRR genes including a pseudogene showed they were highly similar to each other and formed a subclade within a CC-NB-LRR gene clade with representatives from several plant families including legume species. These results demonstrate that the locus is associated with this cluster of CC-NB-LRR genes, thereby suggesting that the gene most likely encodes a member of this gene family. In addition, information from this study should facilitate marker-assisted selection and pyramiding of resistance genes.

  6. Acetylcholine receptor antibody

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003576.htm Acetylcholine receptor antibody To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Acetylcholine receptor antibody is a protein found in the blood ...

  7. Quantitative autoradiography of angiotensin II receptors in the SHR brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gehlert, D.R.; Speth, R.C.; Wamsley, J.K.

    1986-11-01

    Several lines of evidence indicate brain angiotensin II is associated with the elevation of blood pressure seen in the spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHR). These include an increased pressor response to intracerebroventricularly administered angiotensin II and a reduction of blood pressure in response to centrally administered angiotensin II receptor antagonists. Using quantitative receptor autoradiography, we have detected greater angiotensin II receptor binding in a number of discrete brain nuclei of the 6-week-old SHR when compared to age-matched Wistar-Kyoto controls. Tissue sections from various brain regions were labeled with (/sup 125/I)-angiotensin II according to a previously described method. Autoradiograms were generated by apposing the labeled tissue sections to LKB Ultrofilm along with brain paste standards which contained known amounts of (/sup 125/I). Quantitation of the binding, utilizing computer-assisted microdensitometry, indicated greater (/sup 125/I)-angiotensin II binding in several brain areas implicated in cardiovascular control including the subfornical organ, nucleus of the solitary tract, dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus, locus coeruleus, supraoptic nucleus and the organum vasculosum of the lamina terminalis. Scatchard analysis of the binding in the nucleus of the solitary tract indicated an increased receptor number (Bmax) was responsible for the change while binding in two forebrain structures, the subfornical organ and supraoptic nucleus, showed alterations in receptor number and affinity (Kd). Several other brain regions, unrelated to cardiovascular control, exhibited no change in (/sup 125/I)-angiotensin II binding.

  8. The Cell Wall Associated Kinases, WAKs, As Pectin Receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruce David Kohorn

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The Wall Associated Kinases, WAKs, are encoded by 5 highly similar genes clustered in a 30 kb locus in Arabidopsis. These receptor-like proteins contain a cytoplasmic serine threonine kinase, a transmembrane domain, and a less conserved region that is bound to the cell wall and contains a series of Epidermal Growth Factor (EGF repeats. Evidence is emerging that WAKs serve as pectin receptors, for both short oligogalacturonic acid fragments (OGs generated during pathogen exposure or wounding, and for longer pectins resident in native cell walls. This ability to bind and respond to several types of pectins correlates with a demonstrated role for WAKs in both the pathogen response and cell expansion during plant development.

  9. Clinical outcomes for Early Childhood Caries (ECC): the influence of health locus of control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chase, I; Berkowitz, R J; Proskin, H M; Weinstein, P; Billings, R

    2004-06-01

    To assess the relationship between clinical outcomes for children treated for ECC and health locus of control. The study cohort consisted of 79 children (42 males, 37 females) treated for ECC; age range was 2.3-7.3 years (mean 4.2 years) at the time of entry into the study. A questionnaire [developed by DeVellis et al., 1993] was administered to each child's parent(s) on the day of dental surgery. This questionnaire examined the expectation that healthcare outcomes in children are influenced by one of the following loci of control: Professional, Parent, Child, Media, Fate and Divine. The cohort was evaluated for new caries lesions at 6 months post dental surgery. Relapse was defined as the presence of new smooth surface caries lesions. For each locus, the scores for the Relapse versus Non-relapse groups (returning patients) and the scores for the returning versus non-returning patients were compared using t-tests. 57 children (72%) returned for follow-up and 21 of these 57 (37%) relapsed. No statistically significant difference for Relapse versus Non-relapse groups was indicated with respect to the scores for any locus parameter (p values ranged from 0.35 to 0.95). Returning parents (N=57) versus non- returning parents (N=22) exhibited statistically significant differences with respect to the Parent, Divine and Fate loci. Returning parents exhibited higher scores on the Parent locus (p=0.0392) and lower scores on the Fate (p=0.0024) and Divine (p=0.0031) loci. 1). The relapse rate (37%) was high and rapid for children treated for ECC; 2). no meaningful difference existed between the Relapse versus Non-relapse groups with respect to each health locus of control parameter; 3). parents who returned for follow-up care appeared to have an internal health locus of control while those who did not return had an external locus.

  10. Functional analysis of the TRIB1 associated locus linked to plasma triglycerides and coronary artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douvris, Adrianna; Soubeyrand, Sébastien; Naing, Thet; Martinuk, Amy; Nikpay, Majid; Williams, Andrew; Buick, Julie; Yauk, Carole; McPherson, Ruth

    2014-06-03

    The TRIB1 locus has been linked to hepatic triglyceride metabolism in mice and to plasma triglycerides and coronary artery disease in humans. The lipid-associated single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), identified by genome-wide association studies, are located ≈30 kb downstream from TRIB1, suggesting complex regulatory effects on genes or pathways relevant to hepatic triglyceride metabolism. The goal of this study was to investigate the functional relationship between common SNPs at the TRIB1 locus and plasma lipid traits. Characterization of the risk locus reveals that it encompasses a gene, TRIB1-associated locus (TRIBAL), composed of a well-conserved promoter region and an alternatively spliced transcript. Bioinformatic analysis and resequencing identified a single SNP, rs2001844, within the promoter region that associates with increased plasma triglycerides and reduced high-density lipoprotein cholesterol and coronary artery disease risk. Further, correction for triglycerides as a covariate indicated that the genome-wide association studies association is largely dependent on triglycerides. In addition, we show that rs2001844 is an expression trait locus (eQTL) for TRIB1 expression in blood and alters TRIBAL promoter activity in a reporter assay model. The TRIBAL transcript has features typical of long noncoding RNAs, including poor sequence conservation. Modulation of TRIBAL expression had limited impact on either TRIB1 or lipid regulatory genes mRNA levels in human hepatocyte models. In contrast, TRIB1 knockdown markedly increased TRIBAL expression in HepG2 cells and primary human hepatocytes. These studies demonstrate an interplay between a novel locus, TRIBAL, and TRIB1. TRIBAL is located in the genome-wide association studies identified risk locus, responds to altered expression of TRIB1, harbors a risk SNP that is an eQTL for TRIB1 expression, and associates with plasma triglyceride concentrations. © 2014 The Authors. Published on behalf of the

  11. Transgenic hybrid aspen trees with increased gibberellin (GA) concentrations suggest that GA acts in parallel with FLOWERING LOCUS T2 to control shoot elongation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eriksson, Maria E; Hoffman, Daniel; Kaduk, Mateusz; Mauriat, Mélanie; Moritz, Thomas

    2015-02-01

    Bioactive gibberellins (GAs) have been implicated in short day (SD)-induced growth cessation in Populus, because exogenous applications of bioactive GAs to hybrid aspens (Populus tremula × tremuloides) under SD conditions delay growth cessation. However, this effect diminishes with time, suggesting that plants may cease growth following exposure to SDs due to a reduction in sensitivity to GAs. In order to validate and further explore the role of GAs in growth cessation, we perturbed GA biosynthesis or signalling in hybrid aspen plants by overexpressing AtGA20ox1, AtGA2ox2 and PttGID1.3 (encoding GA biosynthesis enzymes and a GA receptor). We found trees with elevated concentrations of bioactive GA, due to overexpression of AtGA20ox1, continued to grow in SD conditions and were insensitive to the level of FLOWERING LOCUS T2 (FT2) expression. As transgenic plants overexpressing the PttGID1.3 GA receptor responded in a wild-type (WT) manner to SD conditions, this insensitivity did not result from limited receptor availability. As high concentrations of bioactive GA during SD conditions were sufficient to sustain shoot elongation growth in hybrid aspen trees, independent of FT2 expression levels, we conclude elongation growth in trees is regulated by both GA- and long day-responsive pathways, similar to the regulation of flowering in Arabidopsis thaliana. © 2014 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2014 New Phytologist Trust.

  12. Allele variations in the OCA2 gene (pink-eyed-dilution locus) are associated with genetic susceptibility to melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jannot, Anne-Sophie; Meziani, Roubila; Bertrand, Guylene; Gérard, Benedicte; Descamps, Vincent; Archimbaud, Alain; Picard, Catherine; Ollivaud, Laurence; Basset-Seguin, Nicole; Kerob, Delphine; Lanternier, Guy; Lebbe, Celeste; Saiag, P; Crickx, Beatrice; Clerget-Darpoux, Françoise; Grandchamp, Bernard; Soufir, Nadem; Melan-Cohort

    2005-08-01

    The occuloalbinism 2 (OCA2) gene, localized at 15q11, encodes a melanosomal transmembrane protein that is involved in the most common form of human occulo-cutaneous albinism, a human genetic disorder characterized by fair pigmentation and susceptibility to skin cancer. We wondered whether allele variations at this locus could influence susceptibility to malignant melanoma (MM). In all, 10 intragenic single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were genotyped in 113 patients with melanomas and in 105 Caucasian control subjects with no personal or family history of skin cancer. By comparing allelic distribution between cases and controls, we show that MM and OCA2 are associated (p value=0.030 after correction for multiple testing). Then, a recently developed strategy, the 'combination test' enabled us to show that a combination formed by two SNPs was most strongly associated to MM, suggesting a possible interaction between intragenic SNPs. In addition, the role of OCA2 on MM risk was also detected using a logistic model taking into account the presence of variants of the melanocortin 1 receptor gene (MC1R, a key pigmentation gene) and all pigmentation characteristics as melanoma risk factors. Our data demonstrate that a second pigmentation gene, in addition to MC1R, is involved in genetic susceptibility to melanoma.

  13. Social stress exacerbates the aversion to painful experiences in rats exposed to chronic pain: the role of the locus coeruleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bravo, Lidia; Alba-Delgado, Cristina; Torres-Sanchez, Sonia; Mico, Juan Antonio; Neto, Fani L; Berrocoso, Esther

    2013-10-01

    Stressful experiences seem to negatively influence pain perception through as yet unknown mechanisms. As the noradrenergic locus coeruleus (LC) nucleus coordinates many components of the stress response, as well as nociceptive transmission, we evaluated whether the sensory and affective dimension of chronic neuropathic pain worsens in situations of stress due to adaptive changes of LC neurons. Accordingly, male rats were socially isolated for 5 weeks, and in the last 2 weeks, neuropathic pain was induced by chronic constriction injury. In this situation of stress, chronic pain selectively heightened the animal's aversion to painful experiences (affective pain), as measured in the place escape/avoidance test, although no changes were observed in the sensory dimension of pain. In addition, electrophysiological recordings of LC neurons showed a low tonic but exacerbated nociceptive-evoked activity when the injured paw was stimulated. These changes were accompanied by an increase in tyrosine hydroxylase and gephyrin expression in the LC. Furthermore, intra-LC administration of bicuculline, a γ-aminobutyric acid-A receptor antagonist, attenuated the negative affective effects of pain. These data show that changes in the LC are greater than those expected from the simple summation of each independent factor (pain and stress), revealing mechanisms through which stressors may exacerbate pain perception without affecting the sensorial dimension. Copyright © 2013 International Association for the Study of Pain. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Androgen receptor abnormalities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.O. Brinkmann (Albert); G.G.J.M. Kuiper (George); C. Ris-Stalpers (Carolyn); H.C.J. van Rooij (Henri); G. Romalo (G.); G. Trifiro (Gianluca); E. Mulder (Eppo); L. Pinsky (L.); H.U. Schweikert (H.); J. Trapman (Jan)

    1991-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ The human androgen receptor is a member of the superfamily of steroid hormone receptors. Proper functioning of this protein is a prerequisite for normal male sexual differentiation and development. The cloning of the human androgen receptor cDNA and the elucidation of

  15. CD3 eta and CD3 zeta are alternatively spliced products of a common genetic locus and are transcriptionally and/or post-transcriptionally regulated during T-cell development.

    OpenAIRE

    Clayton, L K; D'Adamio, L; Howard, F D; Sieh, M; Hussey, R E; Koyasu, S; Reinherz, E L

    1991-01-01

    The CD3 eta subunit of the T-cell receptor is thought to subserve an important role in signal transduction and possibly T-cell development. Herein we characterize the organization of the mouse CD3 eta gene and show that it is part of one gene locus that also encodes CD3 zeta on chromosome 1. The NH2-terminal sequence of CD3 zeta and CD3 eta, which share the same leader peptide and are identical through amino acid 122 of each mature protein, is encoded by exons 1-7. However, exons 8 and 9 are ...

  16. [Links between depressive disorders and dependent personality disorders: The important effect of locus of control].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Versaevel, C; Martin, J-B; Lajugie, C

    2017-05-01

    Empirical researches have proved that there are powerful correlations between dependent personality and depression. Different hypotheses were described to conceptualize links between these two entities. The dysfunction of attributive style seems to be linked to dependency and to depression. Interpersonal dependency can be considered to be a mode of adaptation to the external direction of the locus of control. The self-esteem so subjected to the climate of social interactions can lead, by the discontinuity of its protective relations, to the depression. In a coordinated model, this study explores psychopathological aspects between depressive cognition, self-esteem and interpersonal dependency. This study tries to support the hypothesis that depression and dependency are consequences of an external locus of control, secondary in deterioration of the self-esteem and the main objective is to highlight correlations between external locus of control, interpersonal dependency, hopelessness and depressive affect. The regrouping of 42 patients in a protocol of psychotherapeutic practices allowed the realization of this retrospective study, multicentric within different hospitals or ambulant psychiatric structures of the agglomeration of Lille, during a period of 6 months. The administration of questionnaires (Beck Depression Inventory/Dependent Personality Questionnaire by Tyrer, translated by Loas/Hopelessness Scale by Beck/Powerful others and Chance Scale [IPC] of Levenson, translated by Loas) was included into clinical practice. The main results indicate that external locus of control "powerful others" is significantly correlated with pathological dependency (P<0.0001), depression (P<0.0001) and hopelessness (P=0.02). In addition, the pathological dependency seems to be correlated with external locus "chance" (P<0.05) and external locus "powerful others" (P<0.0001). We explored in this study the powerful links joining pathological dependency with depression. These

  17. Linkage disequilibrium at the APA insecticidal seed protein locus of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blair, Matthew W; Prieto, Sergio; Díaz, Lucy M; Buendía, Héctor F; Cardona, César

    2010-04-29

    An interesting seed protein family with a role in preventing insect herbivory is the multi-gene, APA family encoding the alpha-amylase inhibitor, phytohemagglutinin and arcelin proteins of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris). Variability for this gene family exists and has been exploited to breed for insect resistance. For example, the arcelin locus has been successfully transferred from wild to cultivated common bean genotypes to provide resistance against the bruchid species Zabrotes subfasciatus although the process has been hampered by a lack of genetic tools for and understanding about the locus. In this study, we analyzed linkage disequilibrium (LD) between microsatellite markers at the APA locus and bruchid resistance in a germplasm survey of 105 resistant and susceptible genotypes and compared this with LD in other parts of the genome. Microsatellite allele diversity was found to vary with each of the eight APA-linked markers analyzed, and two markers within the APA locus were found to be diagnostic for bruchid resistance or susceptibility and for the different arcelin alleles inherited from the wild accessions. Arc1 was found to provide higher levels of resistance than Arc5 and the markers in the APA locus were highly associated with resistance showing that introgression of this gene-family from wild beans provides resistance in cultivated beans. LD around the APA locus was found to be intermediate compared to other regions of the genome and the highest LD was found within the APA locus itself for example between the markers PV-atct001 and PV-ag004. We found the APA locus to be an important genetic determinant of bruchid resistance and also found that LD existed mostly within the APA locus but not beyond it. Moderate LD was also found for some other regions of the genome perhaps related to domestication genes. The LD pattern may reflect the introgression of arcelin from the wild into the cultivated background through breeding. LD and association studies for

  18. Linkage disequilibrium at the APA insecticidal seed protein locus of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Buendía Héctor F

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background An interesting seed protein family with a role in preventing insect herbivory is the multi-gene, APA family encoding the α-amylase inhibitor, phytohemagglutinin and arcelin proteins of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris. Variability for this gene family exists and has been exploited to breed for insect resistance. For example, the arcelin locus has been successfully transferred from wild to cultivated common bean genotypes to provide resistance against the bruchid species Zabrotes subfasciatus although the process has been hampered by a lack of genetic tools for and understanding about the locus. In this study, we analyzed linkage disequilibrium (LD between microsatellite markers at the APA locus and bruchid resistance in a germplasm survey of 105 resistant and susceptible genotypes and compared this with LD in other parts of the genome. Results Microsatellite allele diversity was found to vary with each of the eight APA-linked markers analyzed, and two markers within the APA locus were found to be diagnostic for bruchid resistance or susceptibility and for the different arcelin alleles inherited from the wild accessions. Arc1 was found to provide higher levels of resistance than Arc5 and the markers in the APA locus were highly associated with resistance showing that introgression of this gene-family from wild beans provides resistance in cultivated beans. LD around the APA locus was found to be intermediate compared to other regions of the genome and the highest LD was found within the APA locus itself for example between the markers PV-atct001 and PV-ag004. Conclusions We found the APA locus to be an important genetic determinant of bruchid resistance and also found that LD existed mostly within the APA locus but not beyond it. Moderate LD was also found for some other regions of the genome perhaps related to domestication genes. The LD pattern may reflect the introgression of arcelin from the wild into the cultivated

  19. The ESR1 (6q25 locus is associated with calcaneal ultrasound parameters and radial volumetric bone mineral density in European men.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kate L Holliday

    Full Text Available Genome-wide association studies (GWAS have identified 6q25, which incorporates the oestrogen receptor α gene (ESR1, as a quantitative trait locus for areal bone mineral density (BMD(a of the hip and lumbar spine. The aim of this study was to determine the influence of this locus on other bone health outcomes; calcaneal ultrasound (QUS parameters, radial peripheral quantitative computed tomography (pQCT parameters and markers of bone turnover in a population sample of European men.Eight single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP in the 6q25 locus were genotyped in men aged 40-79 years from 7 European countries, participating in the European Male Ageing Study (EMAS. The associations between SNPs and measured bone parameters were tested under an additive genetic model adjusting for centre using linear regression.2468 men, mean (SD aged 59.9 (11.1 years had QUS measurements performed and bone turnover marker levels measured. A subset of 628 men had DXA and pQCT measurements. Multiple independent SNPs showed significant associations with BMD using all three measurement techniques. Most notably, rs1999805 was associated with a 0.10 SD (95%CI 0.05, 0.16; p = 0.0001 lower estimated BMD at the calcaneus, a 0.14 SD (95%CI 0.05, 0.24; p = 0.004 lower total hip BMD(a, a 0.12 SD (95%CI 0.02, 0.23; p = 0.026 lower lumbar spine BMD(a and a 0.18 SD (95%CI 0.06, 0.29; p = 0.003 lower trabecular BMD at the distal radius for each copy of the minor allele. There was no association with serum levels of bone turnover markers and a single SNP which was associated with cortical density was also associated with cortical BMC and thickness.Our data replicate previous associations found between SNPs in the 6q25 locus and BMD(a at the hip and extend these data to include associations with calcaneal ultrasound parameters and radial volumetric BMD.

  20. Meiotic drive influences the outcome of sexually antagonistic selection at a linked locus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patten, M M

    2014-11-01

    Most meiotic drivers, such as the t-haplotype in Mus and the segregation distorter (SD) in Drosophila, act in a sex-specific manner, gaining a transmission advantage through one sex although suffering only the fitness costs associated with the driver in the other. Their inheritance is thus more likely through one of the two sexes, a property they share with sexually antagonistic alleles. Previous theory has shown that pairs of linked loci segregating for sexually antagonistic alleles are more likely to remain polymorphic and that linkage disequilibrium accrues between them. I probe this similarity between drive and sexual antagonism and examine the evolution of chromosomes experiencing these selection pressures simultaneously. Reminiscent of previous theory, I find that: the opportunity for polymorphism increases for a sexually antagonistic locus that is physically linked to a driving locus; the opportunity for polymorphism at a driving locus also increases when linked to a sexually antagonistic locus; and stable linkage disequilibrium accompanies any polymorphic equilibrium. Additionally, I find that drive at a linked locus favours the fixation of sexually antagonistic alleles that benefit the sex in which drive occurs. Further, I show that under certain conditions reduced recombination between these two loci is selectively favoured. These theoretical results provide clear, testable predictions about the nature of sexually antagonistic variation on driving chromosomes and have implications for the evolution of genomic architecture. © 2014 European Society For Evolutionary Biology. Journal of Evolutionary Biology © 2014 European Society For Evolutionary Biology.

  1. The relationship between locus of control and ethical behaviour among employees in the financial sector

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    E. Boshoff

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Unethical behaviour is a rapidly escalating trend in the current work situation, where – within organisations – there appears to be a decrease in ethical behaviour at a national as well as international level. Employees within the financial sector form a specific area of interest concerning ethical behaviour in South Africa. Various incidents of unethical conduct are reported within the financial sector, necessitating a specific focus on factors which may influence ethical behaviour. Current research supports a person-situation-interaction approach to ethical decision-making, where both individual and situational factors influence the decisions of individuals. Research indicate that individual factors such as locus of control may influence ethical behaviour. The way these variables are related among employees in the financial sector in South Africa, however, has not as yet been demonstrated. In order to determine the relationship between locus of control and ethical behaviour, Schepers’Locus of Control Questionnaire and the Work Beliefs Questionnaire were administered to 100 employees in the financial sector in Bloemfontein. Statistically significant relationships(p≤0,05 were found between internal locus of control and ethical behaviour, external locus of control and ethical behaviour, as well as autonomy and ethical behaviour. Recommendations were made in the light of the results regarding the development of strategies and interventions to minimise unethical behaviour within organisations.

  2. Composición del locus de control en dos ciudades latinoamericanas

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    Jesús Francisco Laborín Álvarez

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available El locus de control es un rasgo de personalidad vinculado con la atribución que hacen los individuos acerca de sus éxitos y fracasos. Los estudios en diferentes naciones y sociedades han demostrado que existen características generales y particulares respecto a la percepción de control y donde la cultura juega un papel importante. Se partió del objetivo de conocer la composición factorial del locus de control en dos poblaciones, Hermosillo, Sonora (México (n=600 y João Pessoa, Paraíba (Brasil (n=600; y establecer las diferencias en cuanto a dicho constructo en ambas poblaciones con respecto a las variables atributivas: edad, escolaridad, ocupación y ciudad. Los resultados revelan tres dimensiones comunes a las dos poblaciones: locus de control interno, locus de control afiliativo y locus de control externo. Los datos en general hacen ver que las muestras poblacionales de las ciudades hacen juicios de control en relación a los esfuerzos y el trabajo personal, en la afiliación a colectivos y grupos de interés como los fundamentos de explicación para éxitos y fracasos.

  3. Identification of a novel locus for a USH3 like syndrome combined with congenital cataract

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dad, S.; Østergaard, Elsebet; Thykjær, T.

    2010-01-01

    Usher syndrome (USH) is the most common genetic disease that causes both deafness and blindness. USH is divided into three types, USH1, USH2 and USH3, depending on the age of onset, the course of the disease, and on the degree of vestibular dysfunction. By homozygosity mapping of a consanguineous...... Danish family of Dutch descent, we have identified a novel locus for a rare USH3-like syndrome. The affected family members have a unique association of retinitis pigmentosa, progressive hearing impairment, vestibular dysfunction, and congenital cataract. The phenotype is similar, but not identical...... to that of USH3 patients, as congenital cataract has not been reported for USH3. By homozygosity mapping, we identified a 7.3 Mb locus on chromosome 15q22.2-23 with a maximum multipoint LOD score of 2.0. The locus partially overlaps with the USH1 locus, USH1H, a novel unnamed USH2 locus, and the non-syndromic...

  4. Comparing Locus of Control, Assertiveness and General Health among Young Drug Addicts in Iran

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    Shahriar Shahidi

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available "n "nObjective:The aim of this research was to compare the characteristics of assertiveness, locus of control and general health among young drug dependent patients in Iran. "n "nMethods: Three groups of Iranians: were choosed. The first group included drug dependent patients who had volunteered for treatment and had registered in the local Welfare Organization; the second group included dependent patients who were in the prison; and the third group held nondependent patients. All the participants were male and were matched for age and educational level . The following instruments were used in the present study: locus of control  uestionnaire , Assertiveness Scale and the General Health Questionnaire, GHQ. "n "nResults: The results of the present research showed that there were significant differences among the three groups in ssertiveness, locus of control and GHQ scores. It was found that participants in the non addictive group were more assertive and more internal in their locus of control and had higher GHQ scores than the other two groups. The participants in the prison group reported less assertiveness and lower GHQ scores than the non addictive group ; and their locus of control was more external. Conclusion: "n The results this study may be useful in terms of possible strategies for changing an attributive style in young adults in the framework of psychotherapy

  5. [Locus of control and self-concept in interpersonal conflict resolution approaches].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hisli Sahin, Nesrin; Basim, H Nejat; Cetin, Fatih

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between self-concept and locus of control in interpersonal conflict resolution approaches and to determine the predictors of conflict resolution approach choices. The study included 345 students aged between 18 and 28 years that were studying at universities in Ankara. Data were collected using the Interpersonal Conflict Resolution Approaches Scale to measure conflict resolution approaches, the Social Comparison Scale to measure self-concept, and the Internal-External Locus of Control Scale to measure locus of control. It was observed that confrontation approach to interpersonal conflict was predicted by self-concept (beta = 0.396, P resolution approaches. In addition to these findings, it was observed that females used self-disclosure (beta = -0.163, P resolution processes. Self-concept and locus of control were related to the behaviors adopted in the interpersonal conflict resolution process. Individuals with a positive self-concept and an internal locus of control adopted solutions to interpersonal conflict resolution that were more effective and constructive.

  6. Relationships between Locus of Control, Self-Efficacy, Efforts and Academic Achievement among Engineering Students

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    Alias Maizam

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to investigate the relationships between the affective learning needs namely, self-efficacy and locus of control, learning efforts and academic achievement among engineering students. For this purpose, a survey was conducted on first year engineering students from two technical universities in Malaysia. Self-efficacy and locus of control were assessed using existing instruments while learning efforts were assessed using a specifically designed instrument based on Carbonaro’s model of learning effort. Academic achievement data were based on cumulative grade point average (CGPA obtained from self-report by participants. The findings indicate that females engineering students tend to have higher self-efficacy compared to males while both groups have similar locus of control and invest in similar learning efforts. Only locus of control is found to be related to academic achievement while self-efficacy is found to be related to efforts. In conclusion, locus of control seems to be an important factor in predicting academic achievement among engineering students.

  7. [Validation of a sport injury locus of control scale].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paquet, Y

    2008-04-01

    In the area of health psychology, locus of control (LOC) [Psychol Monogr 80 (1966) 1-28] has consistently been considered as a dimension of personality which may entail many potential benefits for the individual. Originally, the LOC by Rotter [Psychol Monogr 80 (1966) 1-28] is a unidimensional concept. He defines: on one hand individuals with an internal LOC who establish a link between their behavior and the reinforcement obtained, and on the other hand, individuals with an external LOC who do not establish any link between their behavior and the reinforcement obtained. However, since Rotter, other authors like Levenson [Distinctions within the concept of internal-external control: development of a new scale. In: Proceedings of the 80th annual convention of the American psychological association. 1972. p. 261-2] have claimed a multidimensional concept with three factors: the internal (I), powerful other (P), and chance (C). The MHLCS was constructed with three factors, according to Levenson's model. Numerous scales have been designed in order to assess health-related LOC. The most widely used is the MHLCS [Health Educ Monogr 6 (1978) 160-170]. According to Lecocq [La réhabilitation après la blessure. In: Manuel de psychologie du sport : l'intervention auprès du sportif. Paris: Revue EPS; 2003. p. 377-402], such a multidimensional view would allow in-depth examinations of sport injuries. Indeed, from a theoretical perspective, sport participants with high LOC ratings are assumed to suffer less frequent injuries than those scoring low on this dimension. The purpose of the present paper is to present an adapted version of the MHLCS in French language. For Bruchon-Schweitzer [Bruchon-Schweitzer M, Dantzer R. Introduction à la psychologie de la santé. Paris: Presses universitaires de France; 1994], the three factors (I, P, and C) are independent or a little intercorrelated. Therefore, two models of sport injury LOC scale have been studied: the first with three

  8. Pure Land or Pure Mind?: Locus of Awakening and American Popular Religious Culture

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    Richard K. Payne

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This essay has two sections, each with its own distinct goal, forming an interrelated whole. The first introduces “locus of awakening,” and applies it to the relative success in America of Zen and Tibetan Buddhisms, compared to Pure Land Buddhism. The explanatory power of the concept is demonstrated by also considering Soka Gakkai. The difference between popular culture treatments of Zen and Tibetan Buddhisms, and Pure Land Buddhism was the problematic leading to identifying locus of awakening as an aspect of Buddhist thought. The second section locates it in the history of Buddhist thought, demonstrating that it is not a modern conceptualization of the path, not one created in response to Euro–American religio-therapeutic culture. Locus of awakening is, instead, part of the continuity of the Buddhist tradition, and does not fall on one side or the other of the sometimes overdrawn dichotomy between Asian and American Buddhisms.

  9. Dissection of a locus on mouse chromosome 5 reveals arthritis promoting and inhibitory genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindvall, Therese; Karlsson, Jenny; Holmdahl, Rikard

    2009-01-01

    ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: In a cross between the susceptible B10.RIII (H-2r) and resistant RIIIS/J (H-2r) mouse strains, a locus on mouse chromosome 5 (Eae39) was previously shown to control experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). Recently, quantitative trait loci (QTL), linked to disease...... with Eae39 congenic- and sub-interval congenic mice, carrying RIIIS/J genes on the B10.RIII genetic background, revealed three loci within Eae39 that control disease and anti-collagen antibody titers. Two of the loci promoted disease and the third locus was protecting from collagen induced arthritis...... development. By further breeding of mice with small congenic fragments, we identified a 3.2 Megabasepair (Mbp) interval that regulates disease. CONCLUSIONS: Disease promoting- and protecting genes within the Eae39 locus on mouse chromosome 5, control susceptibility to collagen induced arthritis. A disease...

  10. Emotional intelligence and OCB: The moderating role of work locus of control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turnipseed, David L

    2017-07-10

    This study sought to identify linkages between Mayer, Salovey, and Caruso's (2008) four dimensions of emotional intelligence (EI) and organizational citizenship behavior, and the moderating influence of locus of control. Using a sample of 290 employed students, the present study examines the effects of the dimensions of EI on OCB directed at individuals (OCB-I) and OCB directed at the organization (OCB-O). Emotionally intelligent individuals were hypothesized to engage in more organizational citizenship behavior (OCB) than individuals with lower EI. Work locus of control was hypothesized to moderate the emotional intelligence-OCB linkage, with high internals having a stronger emotional intelligence to OCB linkage. Results indicate that the EI dimensions of perceiving, understanding, and managing emotions had positive effects on OCB-I and OCB-O. Using emotions was not linked to OCB. Locus of control strengthened the EI to OCB-I link, but had no effect on the OCB-O linkage.

  11. The Limits of the Use of Locus of Control in Industrial Psychology: A Critical Evaluation

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    Emir Üzümçeker

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Locus of control is a personality variable that is employed by researchers from diverse disciplines. This article examines the limits of the construct’s usage in industrial and organizational psychology. Although locus of control is documented to predict a wide array of workplace behavior such as job satisfaction, job performance and turnover intention, some important conceptual, methodological and empirical flaws raise suspicions on the explanations proposed by researchers. Considering the shortage of experimental and longitudinal evidence, it is argued that the causal direction of the well-established correlations between locus of control and other organizational behavioral variables might be the opposite of the theory’s expectation. It is also claimed that some related constructs such as self-efficacy and belief in a just world might provide further explanations for observed correlations.

  12. Jurors' locus of control and defendants' attractiveness in death penalty sentencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckham, Crystal M; Spray, Beverly J; Pietz, Christina A

    2007-06-01

    The authors examined the relationship between jurors' locus of control and defendants' attractiveness in death penalty sentencing. Ninety-eight participants voluntarily served as mock jurors. The authors administered J. B. Rotter's (1966) Internal-External Locus of Control Scale to participants and then randomly assigned them to a group with either an attractive or an unattractive defendant (represented by photographs). Participants read a murder vignette and selected a punishment--either a lifetime jail sentence or the death penalty-for the defendant. Results indicated that neither jurors' locus of control nor defendants' attractiveness influenced sentencing. However, jurors' age and gender significantly influenced sentencing. Men, with the exception of the youngest men, were more likely than women to choose the death penalty. Additionally, young women were more likely than older women to select the death penalty. The authors discuss the implications of these results for the study of jury behavior and bias.

  13. An unusual occurrence of repeated single allele variation on Y-STR locus DYS458

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    Pankaj Shrivastava

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Six brothers were accused of gagging and raping a woman. A single male Y-STR profile was obtained from vaginal smear swab and clothes of the victim, which did not match with the DNA profile of the accused brothers. As a reference point, the blood sample of their father (aged 87 years was also analyzed with the same kit. The Y-STR haplotype of all six brothers was found to be the same as that of their father except at locus DYS458. At this locus, while the eldest, second and fourth siblings share allele 18 with their father, a loss of one repeat (allele 17 instead of 18 is observed in the third son while fifth and sixth siblings have allele 19 representing a gain of one repeat. Thus, two changes viz. a gain (twice and loss of one repeat at this locus in one generation is both interesting and unusual.

  14. Generalizability of diagnostic-prescriptive teaching strategies across student locus of control and multiple instructional units

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, Jean S.; Yeany, Russell H.

    The influence of locus of control and diagnostic testing with prescribed remediation on immediate and retained science achievement was the focus of the study. To test the generalizability of the results across instructional units and to check on the existence of a treatment warm-up period, the experiment was conducted across three biology units. The results supported the existence of the warm-up period with no significant effects of diagnosis and remediation during the first unit. On later units and on the retention measure, the experimental subjects achieved significantly more than the control. No locus of control X treatment interactions were found; although, in one unit, the internal locus of control subjects achieved significantly higher than externals.

  15. Analysis of Single Locus Trajectories for Extracting In Vivo Chromatin Tethering Interactions.

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    Assaf Amitai

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Is it possible to extract tethering forces applied on chromatin from the statistics of a single locus trajectories imaged in vivo? Chromatin fragments interact with many partners such as the nuclear membrane, other chromosomes or nuclear bodies, but the resulting forces cannot be directly measured in vivo. However, they impact chromatin dynamics and should be reflected in particular in the motion of a single locus. We present here a method based on polymer models and statistics of single trajectories to extract the force characteristics and in particular when they are generated by the gradient of a quadratic potential well. Using numerical simulations of a Rouse polymer and live cell imaging of the MAT-locus located on the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae chromosome III, we recover the amplitude and the distance between the observed and the interacting monomer. To conclude, the confined trajectories we observed in vivo reflect local interaction on chromatin.

  16. DNA polymorphism at locus-2 of growth hormone gene of Madura cattle

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    NITA ETIKAWATI

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The objectives of the research were to detect DNA polymorphism at locus 2 of bovine growth hormone gene of Madura cattle and to know its genetic diversity. DNA polymorphisms and their effect on phenotypic traits have been studied widely in dairy cattle but not for beef cattle, especially for Indonesian local cattle. Polymorphism was detected using PCR-RFLP using primer GH-5 and GH-6 for amplifying locus 2 of growth hormone gene. Genetic diversity was analyzed based on the formula of Nei (1973, 1975. DNA polymorphism was found on locus 2 of growth hormone gene using MspI restriction enzyme. This polymorphism may be caused the lost of restriction MspI site. The genetic diversity was 0.4422.

  17. Confirmation of locus heterogeneity in the pure form of familial spastic paraplegia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Speer, M.C.; Gaskell, P.C.; Robinson, L.C. [Duke Univ. Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States)] [and others

    1995-08-14

    Familial spastic paraplegia (FSP), characterized by progressive spasticity of the lower extremities, is in its {open_quotes}pure{close_quotes} form generally of autosomal dominant inheritance pattern. Hazen et al. reported tight linkage of a large FSP family to the highly polymorphic microsatellite marker D14S269 with z ({sub {theta}}) = 8.49 at {sub {theta}} = 0.00. They further demonstrated evidence for locus heterogeneity when they showed that 2 FSP families were unlinked to this region. We have subsequently studied 4 FSP families (3 American, one British) and excluded the disease locus in these families for approximately 30 cM on either side of D14S269, thereby confirming evidence for locus heterogeneity within the spastic paraplegia diagnostic classification. 28 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs.

  18. The Finnish lapphund retinal atrophy locus maps to the centromeric region of CFA9

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    Sargan David R

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dogs have the second largest number of genetic diseases, after humans. Among the diseases present in dogs, progressive retinal atrophy has been reported in more than a hundred breeds. In some of them, the mutation has been identified and genetic tests have allowed the identification of carriers, thus enabling a drastic reduction in the incidence of the disease. The Finnish lapphund is a dog breed presenting late-onset progressive retinal atrophy for which the disease locus remains unknown. Results In this study we mapped the progressive retinal atrophy locus in the Finnish lapphund using a DNA pooling approach, assuming that all affected dogs within the breed share the same identical-by descent-mutation as the cause of the disease (genetic homogeneity. Autosomal recessive inheritance was also assumed, after ruling out, from pedigree analysis, dominant and X-linked inheritance. DNA from 12 Finnish lapphund cases was mixed in one pool, and DNA from 12 first-degree relatives of these cases was mixed to serve as the control pool. The 2 pools were tested with 133 microsatellite markers, 3 of which showed a shift towards homozygosity in the cases. Individual genotyping with these 3 markers confirmed homozygosity for the GALK1 microsatellite only (chromosome 9. Further individual genotyping with additional samples (4 cases and 59 controls confirmed the association between this marker and the disease locus (p Conclusion The locus for progressive rod-cone degeneration is known to be close to the GALK1 locus, on the telomeric region of chromosome 9, where the retinal atrophy locus of the Finnish lapphund has been mapped. This suggests that the disease in this breed, as well as in the Swedish lapphund, may correspond to progressive rod-cone degeneration. This would increase the number of known dog breeds having this particular form of progressive retinal atrophy.

  19. Locus of Control and Career Interest of Sophomore Accountancy Students: Basis for Employment Path

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jovielyn Mañibo

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available This academic undertaking sought to determine the relationship between the locus of control and career interest of the respondents towards their future employment. The objectives of the study were to determine the respondents’ locus of control and career interest; to find if there is a significant relationship between the respondents’ locus of control and career interest and to develop an action plan that will gauge the students’ employment success as to their chosen field. In measuring and finding the relationship between the variables of the study, the researchers employed the quantitative method in the analysis of data using the questionnaires for locus of control (LOC and Career Cluster Interest Survey (CCIS as dominant tools. The participants chosen from this study were 74sophomore Accountancy students for Second Semester, School Year 2012 – 2013. Based from the results, most of the respondents (74 sophomore accountancy students have an external locus of control with career interest on education and training, human services, and finance. The computed rvalues indicates slight positive correlation, however, careers on government services, manufacturing , public administration, health science, human services showed significant correlation to internal (positive and external (negative locus of control. .Likewise, the Counseling and Testing Center of the university should conduct cognitive training targeting reasoning and speed of processing that can improve sense of personal control over one’s life and facilitate career orientation during the student- applicants’ admission as regards to their National Career Assessment Examination (NCAE results. With the findings of the study, a program design was created to gauge students employment path.

  20. Locus of control among spinal cord injury patients with different levels of posttraumatic stress disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Man Cheung; Preveza, Eleni; Papandreou, Konstantinos; Prevezas, Nikolaos

    2007-08-30

    Two hypotheses were investigated in the present study: 1) Patients with full posttraumatic stress symptoms following spinal cord injury (SCI) would experience more general health problems than those with partial posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), with no-PTSD and the control group; 2) Patients with full PTSD would endorse the external locus of control more than those with partial PTSD, no-PTSD and the control group. Sixty-two patients were recruited from a specialized rehabilitation clinic for spinal cord injury. The control group comprised 60 participants without SCI. Patients with SCI were assessed using the Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Checklist, the General Health Questionnaire-28 (GHQ-28) and the Multidimensional Health Locus of Control (MHLC). The control group was assessed using the GHQ-28 and the MHLC. The full PTSD group experienced more somatic problems, anxiety, social dysfunction and depression than the partial PTSD, the no-PTSD and the control groups. The results also showed that the full PTSD group endorsed significantly more external health locus of control than the control group. However, no significant differences were found between the three patient groups in health locus of control. The three PTSD sub-scales were positively correlated with general health problems. Further analyses showed that partial PTSD patients with paraplegia and partial PTSD patients whose SCI had a medically related cause were more likely to report less internal locus of control than other patients. Patients who suffered from full PTSD experienced more general health problems than those with fewer PTSD symptoms and those without SCI. External locus of control was a distinctive strategy that SCI-PTSD patients used in coping with the effects of SCI-PTSD.

  1. Characterization of histone H3K27 modifications in the {beta}-globin locus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Yea Woon [Department of Molecular Biology, College of Natural Sciences, Pusan National University, Pusan 609-735 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, AeRi, E-mail: kimaeri@pusan.ac.kr [Department of Molecular Biology, College of Natural Sciences, Pusan National University, Pusan 609-735 (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-02-11

    Research highlights: {yields} The {beta}-globin locus control region is hyperacetylated and monomethylated at histone H3K27. {yields} Highly transcribed globin genes are marked by H3K27ac, but H3K27me2 is remarkable at silent globin genes in erythroid K562 cells. {yields} Association of PRC2 subunits is comparable with H3K27me3 pattern. {yields} Modifications of histone H3K27 are established in an enhancer-dependent manner. -- Abstract: Histone H3K27 is acetylated or methylated in the environment of nuclear chromatin. Here, to characterize the modification pattern of H3K27 in locus control region (LCR) and to understand the correlation of various H3K27 modifications with transcriptional activity of genes, we analyzed the human {beta}-globin locus using the ChIP assay. The LCR of the human {beta}-globin locus was enriched by H3K27ac and H3K27me1 in erythroid K562 cells. The highly transcribed globin genes were hyperacetylated at H3K27, but the repressed globin genes were highly dimethylated at this lysine in these cells. However, in non-erythroid 293FT cells, the {beta}-globin locus was marked by a high level of H3K27me3. EZH2 and SUZ12, subunits of polycomb repressive complex 2, were comparably detected with the H3K27me3 pattern in K562 and 293FT cells. In addition, H3K27ac, H3K27me1 and H3K27me3 were established in an enhancer-dependent manner in a model minichromosomal locus containing an enhancer and its target gene. Taken together, these results show that H3K27 modifications have distinctive correlations with the chromatin state or transcription level of genes and are influenced by an enhancer.

  2. Health locus of control and self-efficacy predict back pain rehabilitation outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keedy, Nicole H; Keffala, Valerie J; Altmaier, Elizabeth M; Chen, Joseph J

    2014-01-01

    Chronic back pain treatments have generally been costly and/or ineffective despite advances in medical technology. Patient selection and factors intrinsic to patients, including beliefs and behaviors, have been increasingly looked upon as possible predictive factors for success following multidisciplinary intervention for chronic back pain. The current study investigated the value of using patients' perceived control over health changes (health locus of control) and their perceived ability to engage in pain management behaviors (pain-related self-efficacy) to predict physical and mental health outcomes. We retrospectively analyzed 61 patients who completed a two-week multidisciplinary chronic back pain rehabilitation program at our institution between 2007 and 2009. Patient demographics were identified and categorized. Pre- and post-intervention functional surveys, including the Multidimensional Health Locus of Control Form C, Chronic Pain Self-Efficacy Scale, Medical Outcomes Study Short Form-36 Version 2, Beck Depression Inventory-II, and Oswestry Disability Index Version 2, were used to evaluate benefit from back pain intervention and to examine patient factors that may predict physical and mental health outcomes. Participants included 28 males and 33 females, ages 28 to 72, completing chronic back pain rehabilitation. Locus of control, self-efficacy, and physical and mental health demonstrated treatment-related changes, with notable improvements in physical and mental health. Regression analyses examined the value of pre-treatment health locus of control and pain-related self-efficacy as predictors of physical and mental health one month following treatment. Higher internal and lower doctor health locus of control, and higher self-efficacy at baseline predicted higher lift scores one month after treatment (p self-efficacy also predicted better physical functioning (p self-efficacy and health locus of control may be valuable predictors of treatment benefit for

  3. Identification of the mating-type (MAT) locus that controls sexual reproduction of Blastomyces dermatitidis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wenjun; Sullivan, Thomas D; Walton, Eric; Averette, Anna Floyd; Sakthikumar, Sharadha; Cuomo, Christina A; Klein, Bruce S; Heitman, Joseph

    2013-01-01

    Blastomyces dermatitidis is a dimorphic fungal pathogen that primarily causes blastomycosis in the midwestern and northern United States and Canada. While the genes controlling sexual development have been known for a long time, the genes controlling sexual reproduction of B. dermatitidis (teleomorph, Ajellomyces dermatitidis) are unknown. We identified the mating-type (MAT) locus in the B. dermatitidis genome by comparative genomic approaches. The B. dermatitidis MAT locus resembles those of other dimorphic fungi, containing either an alpha-box (MAT1-1) or an HMG domain (MAT1-2) gene linked to the APN2, SLA2, and COX13 genes. However, in some strains of B. dermatitidis, the MAT locus harbors transposable elements (TEs) that make it unusually large compared to the MAT locus of other dimorphic fungi. Based on the MAT locus sequences of B. dermatitidis, we designed specific primers for PCR determination of the mating type. Two B. dermatitidis isolates of opposite mating types were cocultured on mating medium. Immature sexual structures were observed starting at 3 weeks of coculture, with coiled-hyphae-containing cleistothecia developing over the next 3 to 6 weeks. Genetic recombination was detected in potential progeny by mating-type determination, PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP), and random amplification of polymorphic DNA (RAPD) analyses, suggesting that a meiotic sexual cycle might have been completed. The F1 progeny were sexually fertile when tested with strains of the opposite mating type. Our studies provide a model for the evolution of the MAT locus in the dimorphic and closely related fungi and open the door to classic genetic analysis and studies on the possible roles of mating and mating type in infection and virulence.

  4. Identification of the tyrosine-protein phosphatase non-receptor type 2 as a rheumatoid arthritis susceptibility locus in europeans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cobb, Joanna E; Plant, Darren; Flynn, Edward

    2013-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies have facilitated the identification of over 30 susceptibility loci for rheumatoid arthritis (RA). However, evidence for a number of potential susceptibility genes have not so far reached genome-wide significance in studies of Caucasian RA....

  5. Confirmation of 5p12 As a Susceptibility Locus for Progesterone-Receptor-Positive, Lower Grade Breast Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Milne, Roger L; Goode, Ellen L; García-Closas, Montserrat

    2011-01-01

    Consortium. METHODS: Data were combined from 37 studies, including 40,972 invasive cases, 1,398 cases of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS), and 46,334 controls, all of white European ancestry, as well as 3,007 invasive cases and 2,337 controls of Asian ancestry. Associations overall and by tumor invasiveness...... and histopathology were assessed using logistic regression. RESULTS: For white Europeans, the per-allele OR associated with 5p12-rs10941679 was 1.11 (95% CI = 1.08-1.14, P = 7 × 10(-18)) for invasive breast cancer and 1.10 (95% CI = 1.01-1.21, P = 0.03) for DCIS. For Asian women, the estimated OR for invasive...

  6. Post-transcriptional regulation of lipoprotein receptors by the E3-ubiquitin ligase inducible degrader of the low-density lipoprotein receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorrentino, Vincenzo; Zelcer, Noam

    2012-06-01

    The hepatic low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) pathway is essential for clearing circulating LDL and is an important therapeutic target for treating cardiovascular disease. Abundance of the LDLR is subject to both transcriptional and nontranscriptional control. Here, we highlight a new post-transcriptional mechanism for controlling LDLR function via ubiquitination of the receptor by the E3-ubiquitin ligase inducible degrader of the LDLR (IDOL). IDOL is a recently identified transcriptional target of the liver X receptors. Acting as an E3-ubiquitin ligase IDOL promotes ubiquitination of the LDLR, thereby marking it for lysosomal degradation. The determinants required for degradation of the LDLR by IDOL have been largely identified. IDOL also targets two related lipoprotein receptors, the very low-density lipoprotein receptor and apolipoprotein E receptor 2. Despite several similarities, the IDOL, and PCSK9 pathways for controlling LDLR abundance seem independent of each other. Genome-wide association studies have recently identified IDOL as a locus influencing variability in circulating levels of LDL, thereby highlighting the possible role of IDOL in human lipoprotein metabolism. Transcriptional induction of IDOL by liver X receptor defines a new post-transcriptional pathway for controlling LDLR abundance and LDL uptake independent of sterol regulatory element binding proteins. Targeting IDOL activity may offer a novel therapeutic approach complementary to statins for treating cardiovascular disease.

  7. Class I Cytokine Receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steinocher, Helena

    The members of the class I cytokine receptor family are involved in a wide range of cellular processes and of high pharmaceutical importance, however, even though the transmembrane receptors have been studied for decades, it has not been fully elucidated yet, how these receptors induce their intr......The members of the class I cytokine receptor family are involved in a wide range of cellular processes and of high pharmaceutical importance, however, even though the transmembrane receptors have been studied for decades, it has not been fully elucidated yet, how these receptors induce...... their intracellular response. The overall goal of this thesis was to improve the understanding of class I cytokine receptor activation and regulation at an atomic level. Two members of the class I cytokine receptor family, the human growth hormone receptor (hGHR), and the human erythropoietin receptor (hEPOR) have...... the traptamers on the hEPOR TMD dimeric complex in detergent micelles. To gain a better understanding of hGHR regulation a point mutation in the hGHR intracellular domain (ICD), which has recently been linked to lung cancer, was characterized. The mutation was found to decrease binding of suppressor of cytokine...

  8. GABA receptor imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jong Doo [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-04-15

    GABA is primary an inhibitory neurotransmitter that is localized in inhibitory interneurons. GABA is released from presynaptic terminals and functions by binding to GABA receptors. There are two types of GABA receptors, GABA{sub A}-receptor that allows chloride to pass through a ligand gated ion channel and GABA{sub B}-receptor that uses G-proteins for signaling. The GABA{sub A}-receptor has a GABA binding site as well as a benzodiazepine binding sites, which modulate GABA{sub A}-receptor function. Benzodiazepine GABAA receptor imaging can be accomplished by radiolabeling derivates that activates benzodiazepine binding sites. There has been much research on flumazenil (FMZ) labeled with {sup 11}C-FMZ, a benzodiazepine derivate that is a selective, reversible antagonist to GABAA receptors. Recently, {sup 18}F-fluoroflumazenil (FFMZ) has been developed to overcome {sup 11}C's short half-life. {sup 18}F-FFMZ shows high selective affinity and good pharmacodynamics, and is a promising PET agent with better central benzodiazepine receptor imaging capabilities. In an epileptic focus, because the GABA/benzodiazepine receptor amount is decreased, using '1{sup 1}C-FMZ PET instead of {sup 18}F-FDG, PET, restrict the foci better and may also help find lesions better than high resolution MR. GABA{sub A} receptors are widely distributed in the cerebral cortex, and can be used as an viable neuronal marker. Therefore it can be used as a neuronal cell viability marker in cerebral ischemia. Also, GABA-receptors decrease in areas where neuronal plasticity develops, therefore, GABA imaging can be used to evaluate plasticity. Besides these usages, GABA receptors are related with psychological diseases, especially depression and schizophrenia as well as cerebral palsy, a motor-related disorder, so further in-depth studies are needed for these areas.

  9. Diferencias individuales y desarrollo de habilidades de liderazgo : el rol del locus de control

    OpenAIRE

    García Hernández, Jorge Alejandro; Guarin Galvis, Stephany

    2015-01-01

    El presente proyecto se ha elaborado con la finalidad de encontrar la relación existente entre el liderazgo y el locus de control, por medio de una revisión documental que permita dar una visión más amplia de estos dos fenómenos. De acuerdo con investigaciones realizadas, existen características individuales que afectan el desarrollo de liderazgo, lo cual a su vez tiene un impacto sobre el comportamiento de los individuos dentro de una sociedad. Uno de estos factores es el locus de contro...

  10. Genome-Wide Association Study in Dachshund: Identification of a Major Locus Affecting Intervertebral Disc Calcification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, Mette Sloth; Karlskov-Mortensen, Peter; Proschowsky, Helle Friis

    2011-01-01

    with intervertebral disc calcification in Dachshund through a genome-wide association (GWA) study. Based on thorough radiographic examinations, 48 cases with >= 6 disc calcifications or surgically treated for disc herniation and 46 controls with 0-1 disc calcifications were identified. GWA using the Illumina Canine......HD BeadChip identified a locus on chromosome 12 from 36.8 to 38.6 Mb with 36 markers reaching genome-wide significance (P-genome = 0.00001-0.026). This study suggests that a major locus on chromosome 12 harbors genetic variations affecting the development of intervertebral disc calcification in Dachshund....

  11. Composición del locus de control en dos ciudades latinoamericanas

    OpenAIRE

    Jesús Francisco Laborín Álvarez; José Ángel Vera Noriega; Francisco Fernando Durazo Salas; Erik Misael Parra Armenta

    2008-01-01

    El locus de control es un rasgo de personalidad vinculado con la atribución que hacen los individuos acerca de sus éxitos y fracasos. Los estudios en diferentes naciones y sociedades han demostrado que existen características generales y particulares respecto a la percepción de control y donde la cultura juega un papel importante. Se partió del objetivo de conocer la composición factorial del locus de control en dos poblaciones, Hermosillo, Sonora (México) (n=600) y João Pessoa, Paraíba (Bras...

  12. Analytic Root Locus and Lambert W Function in Control of a Process with Time Delay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cogan, Brian; de Paor, Annraoi M.

    2011-11-01

    Recently, the Lambert W function has arisen in the analysis of many systems including a restricted class of time-delay systems. An alternative approach to this analysis, based on the well-established root locus method, is shown here to contain the Lambert W function as a special case. As a purely illustrative example of the equivalence between the Lambert W function and analytic root locus a system comprising a Proportional controller with a time-delay process is analysed. Controller designs based on rightmost eigenvalue location and the dominant eigenvalue method are described.

  13. General self-esteem and locus of control of young sportsmen

    OpenAIRE

    Gašić-Pavišić Slobodanka; Joksimović Snežana; Janjetović Dragan

    2006-01-01

    This paper deals with the relationship between some elements of self-concept (general self-esteem and locus of control) and going in for sport in adolescence. The relationship between going in for sport and variables of self-concept (general self-esteem and external locus of control) was investigated in a sample of 300 adolescent boys and girls (150 sportsmen and 150 non-sportsmen). Modification of the Rosenberg’s General self-esteem scale and Bezinović-Savčić’s Scale of externality were used...

  14. Age-related hearing loss and the ahl locus in mice

    OpenAIRE

    Keithley, Elizabeth M.; Canto, Cecilia; Zheng, Qing Yin; Fischel-Ghodsian, Nathan; Johnson, Kenneth R.

    2004-01-01

    C57BL/6 (B6) mice experience hearing loss and cochlear degeneration beginning about mid-life, whereas CAST/Ei (CAST) mice retain normal hearing until old age. A locus contributing to the hearing loss of B6 mice, named age-related hearing loss (ahl), was mapped to Chromosome 10. A homozygous, congenic strain of mice (B6.CAST-+ahl), generated by crossing B6 (ahl/ahl) and CAST (+ahl/+ahl) mice has the same genomic material as the B6 mice except in the region of the ahl locus, which is derived fr...

  15. Interactions of vestigial and scabrous with the Notch locus of Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabinow, L; Birchler, J A

    1990-05-01

    Interactions are described between the Notch locus of Drosophila melanogaster, and two other loci, scabrous and vestigial, which respectively affect the eyes and wings. The Notch locus is responsible for mediating decisions of cell fate throughout development in many different tissues. Mutations and duplications of vestigial and scabrous alter the severity of phenotypes associated with Notch mutations and duplications in a manner that is essentially tissue- and allele-specific. These interactions indicate that the products of vestigial and scabrous act in conjunction with Notch to stimulate the differentiation of specific cell types.

  16. Schema and Locus of Control as Predictors of Obsessive Compulsive Disorder

    OpenAIRE

    Hamidreza Akbarikia; khachatur Gasparyan

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The study aimed to evaluate the correlation of maladjusted schema and locus of control with OCD, with the emphasis on cognitive approach to OCD. Method: In this study, 273 Iranian participants were selected; of whom,30% were male and 70% were female. Participants’age ranged from 19 to 34 and the mean age for the sample was 23.42(SD=2.46). Participants completed questionnaire batteries including measure of Levenson Locus of Control, Young Schema Scale and Y –bocsOCD Scale. One samp...

  17. Genetic analysis of the flaA locus of Bacillus subtilis.

    OpenAIRE

    Hauser, P.M.; Crabb, W D; Fiora, M G; Scoffone, F; Galizzi, A

    1991-01-01

    We isolated two clones of recombinant lambda bacteriophage with overlapping inserts of Bacillus subtilis chromosomal DNA corresponding to part of the flaA locus. The flaA4 and flaA15 mutations were localized on the physical map by marker rescue experiments. The flaA locus and the flaB (sigD) gene were mapped in transduction crosses, and the order glnA polC flaB flaA was determined. FlaB was linked to polC in transformation crosses.

  18. Ancestry-shift refinement mapping of the C6orf97-ESR1 breast cancer susceptibility locus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon N Stacey

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available We used an approach that we term ancestry-shift refinement mapping to investigate an association, originally discovered in a GWAS of a Chinese population, between rs2046210[T] and breast cancer susceptibility. The locus is on 6q25.1 in proximity to the C6orf97 and estrogen receptor alpha (ESR1 genes. We identified a panel of SNPs that are correlated with rs2046210 in Chinese, but not necessarily so in other ancestral populations, and genotyped them in breast cancer case:control samples of Asian, European, and African origin, a total of 10,176 cases and 13,286 controls. We found that rs2046210[T] does not confer substantial risk of breast cancer in Europeans and Africans (OR = 1.04, P = 0.099, and OR = 0.98, P = 0.77, respectively. Rather, in those ancestries, an association signal arises from a group of less common SNPs typified by rs9397435. The rs9397435[G] allele was found to confer risk of breast cancer in European (OR = 1.15, P = 1.2 x 10(-3, African (OR = 1.35, P = 0.014, and Asian (OR = 1.23, P = 2.9 x 10(-4 population samples. Combined over all ancestries, the OR was 1.19 (P = 3.9 x 10(-7, was without significant heterogeneity between ancestries (P(het = 0.36 and the SNP fully accounted for the association signal in each ancestry. Haplotypes bearing rs9397435[G] are well tagged by rs2046210[T] only in Asians. The rs9397435[G] allele showed associations with both estrogen receptor positive and estrogen receptor negative breast cancer. Using early-draft data from the 1,000 Genomes project, we found that the risk allele of a novel SNP (rs77275268, which is closely correlated with rs9397435, disrupts a partially methylated CpG sequence within a known CTCF binding site. These studies demonstrate that shifting the analysis among ancestral populations can provide valuable resolution in association mapping.

  19. Synaptic interactions between perifornical lateral hypothalamic area, locus coeruleus nucleus and the oral pontine reticular nucleus are implicated in the stage succession during sleep-wakefulness cycle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angel eNunez

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The perifornical area in the posterior lateral hypothalamus (PeFLH has been implicated in several physiological functions including the sleep-wakefulness regulation. The PeFLH area contains several cell types including those expressing orexins (Orx; also known as hypocretins, mainly located in the PeF nucleus. The aim of the present study was to elucidate the synaptic interactions between Orx neurons located in the PeFLH area and different brainstem neurons involved in the generation of wakefulness and sleep stages such as the locus coeruleus (LC nucleus (contributing to wakefulness and the oral pontine reticular nucleus (PnO nucleus (contributing to REM sleepAnatomical data demonstrated the existence of a neuronal network involving the PeFLH area, LC and the PnO nuclei that would control the sleep-wake cycle. Electrophysiological experiments indicated that PeFLH area had an excitatory effect on LC neurons. PeFLH stimulation increased the firing rate of LC neurons and induced an activation of the EEG. The excitatory effect evoked by PeFLH stimulation in LC neurons was blocked by the injection of the Orx-1 receptor antagonist SB-334867 into the LC. Similar electrical stimulation of the PeFLH area evoked an inhibition of PnO neurons by activation of GABAergic receptors because the effect was blocked by bicuculline application into the PnO. Our data also revealed that the LC and PnO nuclei exerted a feedback control on neuronal activity of PeFLH area. Electrical stimulation of LC facilitated firing activity of PeFLH neurons by activation of catecholaminergic receptors whereas PnO stimulation inhibited PeFLH neurons by activation of GABAergic receptors. In conclusion, Orx neurons of the PeFLH area seem to be an important organizer of the wakefulness and sleep stages in order to maintain a normal succession of stages during the sleep-wakefulness cycle.

  20. [Nuclear receptors PPARalpha].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soska, V

    2006-06-01

    Mechanism of the fibrates action is mediated by nuclear PPARalpha receptors (Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor). These receptors regulate a number of genes that are involved both in lipids and lipoproteins metabolism and other mediators (e.g. inflammatory mediatores). Due to PPARalpha activation by fibrates, triglycerides and small dense LDL concentration is decreased, HDL cholesterol is increased and both inflammation and prothrombotic status are reduced. These effects are very important in patients with metabolic syndrom.

  1. Multiple independent variants at the TERT locus are associated with telomere length and risks of breast and ovarian cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bojesen, Stig E.; Pooley, Karen A.; Johnatty, Sharon E.; Beesley, Jonathan; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Tyrer, Jonathan P.; Edwards, Stacey L.; Pickett, Hilda A.; Shen, Howard C.; Smart, Chanel E.; Hillman, Kristine M.; Mai, Phuong L.; Lawrenson, Kate; Stutz, Michael D.; Lu, Yi; Karevan, Rod; Woods, Nicholas; Johnstonw, Rebecca L.; French, Juliet D.; Chen, Xiaoqing; Weischer, Maren; Nielsen, Sune F.; Maranian, Melanie J.; Ghoussaini, Maya; Ahmed, Shahana; Baynes, Caroline; Bolla, Manjeet K.; Wang, Qin; Dennis, Joe; McGuffog, Lesley; Barrowdale, Daniel; Lee, Andrew; Healey, Sue; Lush, Michael; Tessier, Daniel C.; Vincent, Daniel; Bacot, Francis; Vergote, Ignace; Lambrechts, Sandrina; Despierre, Evelyn; Risch, Harvey A.; Gonzalez-Neira, Anna; Rossing, Mary Anne; Pita, Guillermo; Doherty, Jennifer A.; Alvarez, Nuria; Larson, Melissa C.; Fridley, Brooke L.; Schoof, Nils; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Cicek, Mine S.; Peto, Julian; Kalli, Kimberly R.; Broeks, Annegien; Armasu, Sebastian M.; Schmidt, Marjanka K.; Braaf, Linde M.; Winterhoff, Boris; Nevanlinna, Heli; Konecny, Gottfried E.; Lambrechts, Diether; Rogmann, Lisa; Guenel, Pascal; Teoman, Attila; Milne, Roger L.; Garcia, Joaquin J.; Cox, Angela; Shridhar, Vijayalakshmi; Burwinkel, Barbara; Marme, Frederik; Hein, Rebecca; Sawyer, Elinor J.; Haiman, Christopher A.; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Andrulis, Irene L.; Moysich, Kirsten B.; Hopper, John L.; Odunsi, Kunle; Lindblom, Annika; Giles, Graham G.; Brenner, Hermann; Simard, Jacques; Lurie, Galina; Fasching, Peter A.; Carney, Michael E.; Radice, Paolo; Wilkens, Lynne R.; Swerdlow, Anthony; Goodman, Marc T.; Brauch, Hiltrud; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Hillemanns, Peter; Winqvist, Robert; Durst, Matthias; Devilee, Peter; Runnebaum, Ingo; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubinski, Jan; Mannermaa, Arto; Butzow, Ralf; Bogdanova, Natalia V.; Doerk, Thilo; Pelttari, Liisa M.; Zheng, Wei; Leminen, Arto; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Bunker, Clareann H.; Kristensen, Vessela; Ness, Roberta B.; Muir, Kenneth; Edwards, Robert; Meindl, Alfons; Heitz, Florian; Matsuo, Keitaro; du Bois, Andreas; Wu, Anna H.; Harter, Philipp; Teo, Soo-Hwang; Schwaab, Ira; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Blot, William; Hosono, Satoyo; Kang, Daehee; Nakanishi, Toru; Hartman, Mikael; Yatabe, Yasushi; Hamann, Ute; Karlan, Beth Y.; Sangrajrang, Suleeporn; Kjaer, Susanne Kruger; Gaborieau, Valerie; Jensen, Allan; Eccles, Diana; Hogdall, Estrid; Shen, Chen-Yang; Brown, Judith; Woo, Yin Ling; Shah, Mitul; Azmi, Mat Adenan Noor; Luben, Robert; Omar, Siti Zawiah; Czene, Kamila; Vierkant, Robert A.; Nordestgaard, Borge G.; Flyger, Henrik; Vachon, Celine; Olson, Janet E.; Wang, Xianshu; Levine, Douglas A.; Rudolph, Anja; Weber, Rachel Palmieri; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Iversen, Edwin; Nickels, Stefan; Schildkraut, Joellen M.; Silva, Isabel Dos Santos; Cramer, Daniel W.; Gibson, Lorna; Terry, Kathryn L.; Fletcher, Olivia; Vitonis, Allison F.; van der Schoot, C. Ellen; Poole, Elizabeth M.; Hogervorst, Frans B. L.; Tworoger, Shelley S.; Liu, Jianjun; Bandera, Elisa V.; Li, Jingmei; Olson, Sara H.; Humphreys, Keith; Row, Irene; Blomqvist, Carl; Rodriguez-Rodriguez, Lorna; Aittomaki, Kristiina; Salvesen, Helga B.; Muranen, Taru A.; Wik, Elisabeth; Brouwers, Barbara; Krakstad, Camilla; Wauters, Els; Halle, Mari K.; Wildiers, Hans; Kiemeney, Lambertus A.; Mulot, Claire; Aben, Katja K.; Laurent-Puig, Pierre; Altena, Anne Mvan; Therese Truong, [No Value; Massuger, Leon F. A. G.; Benitez, Javier; Pejovic, Tanja; Arias Perez, Jose Ignacio; Hoatlin, Maureen; Zamora, M. Pilar; Cook, Linda S.; Balasubramanian, Sabapathy P.; Kelemen, Linda E.; Schneeweiss, Andreas; Le, Nhu D.; Sohn, Christof; Brooks-Wilson, Angela; Tomlinson, Ian; Kerin, Michael J.; Miller, Nicola; Cybulski, Cezary; Henderson, Brian E.; Menkiszak, Janusz; Schumacher, Fredrick; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Marchand, Loic Le; Yang, Hannah P.; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Glendon, Gord; Engelholm, Svend Aage; Knight, Julia A.; Hogdall, Claus K.; Apicella, Carmel; Gore, Martin; Tsimiklis, Helen; Song, Honglin; Southey, Melissa C.; Jager, Agnes; den Ouweland, Ans M. Wvan; Brown, Robert; Martens, John W. M.; Flanagan, James M.; Kriege, Mieke; Paul, James; Margolin, Sara; Siddiqui, Nadeem; Severi, Gianluca; Whittemore, Alice S.; Baglietto, Laura; McGuire, Valerie; Stegmaier, Christa; Sieh, Weiva; Mueller, Heiko; Arndt, Volker; Labreche, France; Gao, Yu-Tang; Goldberg, Mark S.; Yang, Gong; Dumont, Martine; McLaughlin, John R.; Hartmann, Arndt; Ekici, Arif B.; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Phelan, Catherine M.; Lux, Michael P.; Permuth-Wey, Jenny; Peissel, Bernard; Sellers, Thomas A.; Ficarazzi, Filomena; Barile, Monica; Ziogas, Argyrios; Ashworth, Alan; Gentry-Maharaj, Aleksandra; Jones, Michael; Ramus, Susan J.; Orr, Nick; Menon, Usha; Pearce, Celeste L.; Bruening, Thomas; Pike, Malcolm C.; Ko, Yon-Dschun; Lissowska, Jolanta; Figueroa, Jonine; Kupryjanczyk, Jolanta; Chanock, Stephen J.; Dansonka-Mieszkowska, Agnieszka; Jukkola-Vuorinen, Arja; Rzepecka, Iwona K.; Pylkas, Katri; Bidzinski, Mariusz; Kauppila, Saila; Hollestelle, Antoinette; Seynaeve, Caroline; Tollenaar, Rob A. E. M.; Durda, Katarzyna; Jaworska, Katarzyna; Hartikainen, Jaana M.; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Kataja, Vesa; Antonenkova, Natalia N.; Long, Jirong; Shrubsole, Martha; Deming-Halverson, Sandra; Lophatananon, Artitaya; Siriwanarangsan, Pornthep; Stewart-Brown, Sarah; Ditsch, Nina; Lichtner, Peter; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Ito, Hidemi; Iwata, Hiroji; Tajima, Kazuo; Tseng, Chiu-Chen; Stram, Daniel O.; van den Berg, David; Yip, Cheng Har; Ikrarn, M. Kamran; Teh, Yew-Ching; Cai, Hui; Lu, Wei; Signorello, Lisa B.; Cai, Qiuyin; Noh, Dong-Young; Yoo, Keun-Young; Miao, Hui; Iau, Philip Tsau-Choong; Teo, Yik Ying; McKay, James; Shapiro, Charles; Ademuyiwa, Foluso; Fountzilas, George; Hsiung, Chia-Ni; Yu, Jyh-Cherng; Hou, Ming-Feng; Healey, Catherine S.; Luccarini, Craig; Peock, Susan; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Peterlongo, Paolo; Rebbeck, Timothy R.; Piedmonte, Marion; Singer, Christian F.; Friedman, Eitan; Thomassen, Mads; Offit, Kenneth; Hansen, Thomas V. O.; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Szabo, Csilla I.; Blanco, Ignacio; Garber, Judy; Narod, Steven A.; Weitzel, Jeffrey N.; Montagna, Marco; Olah, Edith; Godwin, Andrew K.; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Goldgar, David E.; Caldes, Trinidad; Imyanitov, Evgeny N.; Tihomirova, Laima; Arun, Banu K.; Campbell, Ian; Mensenkamp, Arjen R.; van Asperen, Christi J.; van Roozendaa, Kees E. P.; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne; Collee, J. Margriet; Oosterwijk, Jan C.; Hooning, Maartje J.; Rookus, Matti A.; van der Luijt, Rob B.; Os, Theo A. Mvan; Evans, D. Gareth; Frost, Debra; Fineberg, Elena; Barwell, Julian; Walker, Lisa; Kennedy, M. John; Platte, Radka; Davidson, Rosemarie; Ellis, Steve D.; Cole, Trevor; Bressac-de Paillerets, Brigitte; Buecher, Bruno; Damiola, Francesca; Faivre, Laurence; Frenay, Marc; Sinilnikova, Olga M.; Caron, Olivier; Giraud, Sophie; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Bonadona, Valerie; Caux-Moncoutier, Virginie; Toloczko-Grabarek, Aleksandra; Gronwald, Jacek; Byrski, Tomasz; Spurdle, Amanda B.; Bonanni, Bernardo; Zaffaroni, Daniela; Giannini, Giuseppe; Bernard, Loris; Dolcetti, Riccardo; Manoukian, Siranoush; Arnold, Norbert; Engel, Christoph; Deissler, Helmut; Rhiem, Kerstin; Niederacher, Dieter; Pendl, Hansjoerg; Sutter, Christian; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Borg, Ake; Mein, Beatrice; Rantala, Johanna; Soller, Maria; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Domchek, Susan M.; Rodriguez, Gustavo C.; Salani, Ritu; Kaulich, Daphne Gschwantler; Tea, Muy-Kheng; Paluch, Shani Shimon; Laitman, Yael; Skytte, Anne-Bine; Kruse, Torben A.; Jensen, Uffe Birk; Robson, Mark; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Ejlertsen, Bent; Foretova, Lenka; Savage, Sharon A.; Lesterm, Jenny; Soucy, Penny; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B.; Olswold, Curtis; Cunningham, Julie M.; Slager, Susan; Pankratz, Vernon S.; Dicks, Ed; Lakhani, Sunil R.; Couch, Fergus J.; Hall, Per; Monteiro, Alvaro N. A.; Gayther, Simon A.; Pharoah, Paul D. P.; Reddel, Roger R.; Goode, Ellen L.; Greene, Mark H.; Easton, Douglas F.; Berchuck, Andrew; Antoniou, Antonis C.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Dunning, Alison M.

    TERT-locus SNPs and leukocyte telomere measures are reportedly associated with risks of multiple cancers. Using the Illumina custom genotyping array iCOG, we analyzed similar to 480 SNPs at the TERT locus in breast (n = 103,991), ovarian (n = 39,774) and BRCA1 mutation carrier (n = 11,705) cancer

  2. Multiple independent variants at the TERT locus are associated with telomere length and risks of breast and ovarian cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bojesen, S.E.; Pooley, K.A.; Johnatty, S.E.; Beesley, J.; Michailidou, K.; Tyrer, J.P.; Edwards, S.L.; Pickett, H.A.; Shen, H.C.; Smart, C.E.; Hillman, K.M.; Mai, P.L.; Lawrenson, K.; Stutz, M.D.; Lu, Y.; Karevan, R.; Woods, N.; Johnston, R.L.; French, J.D.; Chen, X.; Weischer, M.; Nielsen, S.F.; Maranian, M.J.; Ghoussaini, M.; Ahmed, S.; Baynes, C.; Bolla, M.K.; Wang, Q.; Dennis, J.; McGuffog, L.; Barrowdale, D.; Lee, A.; Healey, S.; Lush, M.; Tessier, D.C.; Vincent, D.; Bacot, F.; Vergote, I.; Lambrechts, S.; Despierre, E.; Risch, H.A.; Gonzalez-Neira, A.; Rossing, M.A.; Pita, G.; Doherty, J.A.; Alvarez, N.; Larson, M.C.; Fridley, B.L.; Schoof, N.; Chang-Claude, J.; Cicek, M.S.; Peto, J.; Kalli, K.R.; Broeks, A.; Armasu, S.M.; Schmidt, M.K.; Braaf, L.M.; Winterhoff, B.; Nevanlinna, H.; Konecny, G.E.; Lambrechts, D.; Rogmann, L.; Guenel, P.; Teoman, A.; Milne, R.L.; Garcia, J.J.; Cox, A.; Shridhar, V.; Burwinkel, B.; Marme, F.; Hein, R.; Sawyer, E.J.; Haiman, C.A.; Wang-Gohrke, S.; Andrulis, I.L.; Moysich, K.B.; Hopper, J.L.; Odunsi, K.; Lindblom, A.; Giles, G.G.; Brenner, H.; Simard, J.; Lurie, G.; Fasching, P.A.; Carney, M.E.; Radice, P.; Wilkens, L.R.; Swerdlow, A.; Goodman, M.T.; Kiemeney, L.A.L.M.; Aben, K.K.H.; Altena, A.M. van; Massuger, L.F.A.G.; Mensenkamp, A.R.

    2013-01-01

    TERT-locus SNPs and leukocyte telomere measures are reportedly associated with risks of multiple cancers. Using the Illumina custom genotyping array iCOGs, we analyzed approximately 480 SNPs at the TERT locus in breast (n = 103,991), ovarian (n = 39,774) and BRCA1 mutation carrier (n = 11,705)

  3. Locus of Control, Interest in Schooling and Science Achievement of Some Deaf and Typical Secondary School Students in Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olatoye, R. Ademola; Aanu, E. Mosunmola

    2010-01-01

    This study compared locus of control, interest in school and science achievement of typical and deaf secondary school students. The study also investigated influence of students' locus of control and interest in school on general science achievement. Seventy two (72) deaf and 235 typical children were purposively selected from eight secondary…

  4. Job Stress and Locus of Control in Teachers: Comparisons between Samples from the United States and Zimbabwe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crothers, Laura M.; Kanyongo, Gibbs Y.; Kolbert, Jered B.; Lipinski, John; Kachmar, Steven P.; Koch, Gary D.

    2010-01-01

    This study examines the relationship between educators' locus of control and job stress using samples from the US and Zimbabwe. Multiple regression analyses are used to identify significant relationships in the US sample between teachers' external locus of control and the severity of the job stress that they experience, coupled with the perceived…

  5. An Investigation of Preservice Teachers' Perceptions of Locus of Control, Self-Regulation, and Motivation in Online Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Sung-Ho

    2012-01-01

    This study examined how students' perceptions of locus of control, self-regulation, and motivation were related in an online learning environment. The participants were 73 preservice teachers enrolled in two online technology courses. Near the end of their online course, the participants completed "Brown's Locus of Control…

  6. Interactions between Superintendent Leader Behavior and Locus of Control on Job Satisfaction as Perceived by Vocational Teachers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohan, Alan R.

    A study investigated the interactions between leadership style and the personality variable locus of control on vocational teacher job satisfaction. It used a 2x2x2 factorial design to explore three independent variables: (1) the consideration dimension of leader behavior; (2) the initiating structure dimension of leader behavior; and (3) locus of…

  7. Integration of least angle regression with empirical Bayes for multi-locus genome-wide association studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Multi-locus genome-wide association studies has become the state-of-the-art procedure to identify quantitative trait loci (QTL) associated with traits simultaneously. However, implementation of multi-locus model is still difficult. In this study, we integrated least angle regression with empirical B...

  8. Positive correlations between the health locus of control and self-management behaviors in hemodialysis patients in Xiamen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia-Li Fan

    2016-03-01

    Conclusion: The results of this study provided evidence that there is a strong relationship between the health locus of control and self-management behaviors in hemodialysis patients. This study provides important information for medical professionals as they design strategies to educate hemodialysis patients on their health locus of control and self-management behaviors.

  9. Investigating Prospective Teachers' Perceived Problem-Solving Abilities in Relation to Gender, Major, Place Lived, and Locus of Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çakir, Mustafa

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate prospective teachers' perceived personal problem-solving competencies in relation to gender, major, place lived, and internal-external locus of control. The Personal Problem-Solving Inventory and Rotter's Internal-External Locus of Control Scale were used to collect data from freshman teacher candidates…

  10. Multiple independent variants at the TERT locus are associated with telomere length and risks of breast and ovarian cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bojesen, Stig Egil; Pooley, Karen A; Johnatty, Sharon E

    2013-01-01

    TERT-locus SNPs and leukocyte telomere measures are reportedly associated with risks of multiple cancers. Using the Illumina custom genotyping array iCOGs, we analyzed ∼480 SNPs at the TERT locus in breast (n = 103,991), ovarian (n = 39,774) and BRCA1 mutation carrier (n = 11,705) cancer cases an...

  11. Academic Locus of Control, Tendencies Towards Academic Dishonesty and Test Anxiety Levels as the Predictors of Academic Self-Efficacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yesilyurt, Etem

    2014-01-01

    Many studies have focused on finding the level of effect that academic locus of control, tendencies towards academic dishonesty, and test anxiety levels have had on academic self-efficacy, and providing a separate explanation ratio for each. The relationship among the effects of the academic locus of control, tendencies towards academic…

  12. Evidence that breast cancer risk at the 2q35 locus is mediated through IGFBP5 regulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ghoussaini, Maya; Edwards, Stacey L; Michailidou, Kyriaki

    2014-01-01

    GWAS have identified a breast cancer susceptibility locus on 2q35. Here we report the fine mapping of this locus using data from 101,943 subjects from 50 case-control studies. We genotype 276 SNPs using the 'iCOGS' genotyping array and impute genotypes for a further 1,284 using 1000 Genomes Proje...

  13. Locus of Control, Self-Efficacy, and Motivation in Different Schools: Is Moderation the Key to Success?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Angelika; Hattie, John; Hamilton, Richard J.

    2005-01-01

    This study used a novel multidimensional locus of control instrument (I-SEE) to investigate the relationship between locus of control, motivation, and academic achievement in three different types of school. The strengths of the I-SEE are that it incorporates the construct of self-efficacy and that it is embedded in a model of personality and…

  14. PHIP - a novel candidate breast cancer susceptibility locus on 6q14.1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jiao, Xiang; Aravidis, Christos; Marikkannu, Rajeshwari

    2017-01-01

    Most non-BRCA1/2 breast cancer families have no identified genetic cause. We used linkage and haplotype analyses in familial and sporadic breast cancer cases to identify a susceptibility locus on chromosome 6q. Two independent genome-wide linkage analysis studies suggested a 3 Mb locus on chromos...

  15. Feline T-Cell Receptor V- and J-Region Sequences Retrieved from the Trace Archive and from Transcriptome Analysis of Cats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Thomas Andreas Weiss

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The variable domains of antigen receptors are very diverse and assembled in a modular system from a number of V-, D-, and J-region genes. Here we describe additional variants of V- and J-region genes of the feline T-cell receptor (TRG as well as the corresponding RSSs retrieved from Trace Archive of feline genomic sequences. Additionally, an unusually recombined TRGV-domain containing a partial inverted repeat of the included J-region and a short interspersed element of the CAN-SINE family located within the feline T-cell receptor locus are also described.

  16. Influence of heavy episodic drinking on the relation between men's locus of control and aggression toward intimate partners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, Kathryn E; Parrott, Dominic J

    2010-03-01

    This study examined the interactive effects of locus of control and heavy episodic drinking on men's physical assault and sexual coercion against intimate partners. Participants were 151 heterosexual drinking men who completed self-report measures of locus of control, alcohol consumption during the past 12 months, and intimate-partner aggression during the past 12 months. An internal locus of control was associated with a lower frequency of physical assault and sexual coercion toward intimate partners among men who reported lower quantities of alcohol consumption. However, data suggested that the protective qualities of an internal locus of control for both forms of partner aggression diminished among men who reported higher quantities of alcohol consumption. These results support alcohol myopia theory and extend this theory by suggesting how alcohol consumption may affect the relation between locus of control and different forms of intimate-partner aggression toward women.

  17. Identification of quantitative trait locus (QTLs) for γ-aminobutyric acid ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Identification of quantitative trait locus (QTLs) for γ-aminobutyric acid content in grain of barley. ... These results are beneficial for understanding the genetic basis of GABA and developing the markers linked with GABA for marker-assisted selection breeding in barley. Key words: γ-Aminobutyric acid (GABA), quantitative trait ...

  18. How visualization layout relates to locus of control and other personality factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziemkiewicz, Caroline; Ottley, Alvitta; Crouser, R Jordan; Yauilla, Ashley Rye; Su, Sara L; Ribarsky, William; Chang, Remco

    2013-07-01

    Existing research suggests that individual personality differences are correlated with a user's speed and accuracy in solving problems with different types of complex visualization systems. We extend this research by isolating factors in personality traits as well as in the visualizations that could have contributed to the observed correlation. We focus on a personality trait known as "locus of control” (LOC), which represents a person's tendency to see themselves as controlled by or in control of external events. To isolate variables of the visualization design, we control extraneous factors such as color, interaction, and labeling. We conduct a user study with four visualizations that gradually shift from a list metaphor to a containment metaphor and compare the participants' speed, accuracy, and preference with their locus of control and other personality factors. Our findings demonstrate that there is indeed a correlation between the two: participants with an internal locus of control perform more poorly with visualizations that employ a containment metaphor, while those with an external locus of control perform well with such visualizations. These results provide evidence for the externalization theory of visualization. Finally, we propose applications of these findings to adaptive visual analytics and visualization evaluation.

  19. An improved procedure of mapping a quantitative trait locus via the ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Mapping a locus controlling a quantitative genetic trait (e.g. blood pressure) to a specific genomic region is of considerable contemporary interest. Data on the ... data of a sample of unrelated individuals and a Bayes's rule is used to classify each parent into a QTL genotypic class. In the second stage, we have proposed an ...

  20. A Nearly Non-Functional Mutant Allele of the Storage Protein Locus Hor2 in Barley

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Doll, Hans

    1980-01-01

    The low content of the storage protein fraction hordein-2 in the high-lysine mutant Risø 56 is due to a mutation at or near the locus Hor2 coding for hordein-2 polypeptides. The mutant gene is recessive in its qualitative effect on the electrophoretic banding pattern of hordein-2, but co-dominant...

  1. Quantitative trait locus analysis of nitrogen use efficiency in barley (Hordeum vulgare L.)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kindu, G.A.; Tang, J.; Yin, X.; Struik, P.C.

    2014-01-01

    Quantitative trait locus (QTL) analysis of nitrogen use efficiency (NUE) of barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) was conducted on data generated from two pot experiments carried out in 2005 (using four nitrogen rates) and 2008 (with three rates) with AFLP markers and 94 recombinant inbred lines (RILs) of the

  2. The Answer Is the Question: The Effect of Verb Causality on Locus of Explanation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semin, Gun R.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Investigated how verb causality in question formulation affects the locus of causal origin for answers. Hypothesized questions formulated with action verbs cue the logical subject of the question sentence as the causal origin for answers. Reverse tendency was expected for state verbs. Verb type in question formulation was found to affect…

  3. Detection of a quantitative trait locus associated with resistance to Ascaris suum infection in pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skallerup, Per; Nejsum, Peter; Jørgensen, Claus B; Göring, Harald H H; Karlskov-Mortensen, Peter; Archibald, Alan L; Fredholm, Merete; Thamsborg, Stig M

    2012-04-01

    Helminths almost invariably have an over-dispersed distribution in the host population. Human and animal studies have provided evidence suggesting that a large part of this variation is due to host genetic factors. Recently, the heritability for roundworm (Ascaris suum) infection levels in pigs was estimated to be 0.45. We used single nucleotide polymorphism markers to perform a whole-genome scan on 195 pigs experimentally infected with A. suum. A putative quantitative trait locus for worm burden on chromosome 4 covering 2.5 Mbp was identified by measured genotype analysis, although none of the SNPs reached genome-wide significance. To validate the putative quantitative trait locus, we genotyped two of the SNPs within the region in unrelated, informative animals exposed to experimental or natural infections and from which we had worm counts and/or faecal egg counts; the validation studies showed that one of the SNPs (TXNIP) was associated with total worm burden (P < 0.001) and adult worm burden(P < 0.0001), whereas the other SNP (ARNT) was associated with adult worm burden (P < 0.025) in these populations. We were thus able to confirm the existence of the quantitative trait locus on chromosome 4.This is to our knowledge the first report of a quantitative trait locus associated with helminth burden in pigs.

  4. The role of the locus coeruleus-noradrenaline system in temporal attention and uncertainty processing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brown, Stephen B.R.E.

    2015-01-01

    This dissertation explores the involvement of the locus-coeruleus-noradrenaline (LC-NE) system in both temporal attention and uncertainty processing. To this end, a number of cognitive tasks are used (Stroop, passive viewing, attentional blink, accessory stimulus, auditory oddball) and a number of

  5. Fine-mapping of the 1p11.2 breast cancer susceptibility locus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Horne, H.N. (Hisani N.); Chung, C.C. (Charles C.); Zhang, H. (Han); Yu, K. (Kai); Prokunina-Olsson, L. (Ludmila); K. Michailidou (Kyriaki); M.K. Bolla (Manjeet K.); Q. Wang (Qing); J. Dennis (Joe); J.L. Hopper (John); M.C. Southey (Melissa); M.K. Schmidt (Marjanka); A. Broeks (Annegien); K.R. Muir (K.); A. Lophatananon (Artitaya); P.A. Fasching (Peter); M.W. Beckmann (Matthias); O. Fletcher (Olivia); Johnson, N. (Nichola); E.J. Sawyer (Elinor); I.P. Tomlinson (Ian); Burwinkel, B. (Barbara); Marme, F. (Frederik); P. Guénel (Pascal); T. Truong (Thérèse); S.E. Bojesen (Stig); H. Flyger (Henrik); J. Benítez (Javier); A. González-Neira (Anna); H. Anton-Culver (Hoda); S.L. Neuhausen (Susan); Brenner, H. (Hermann); V. Arndt (Volker); A. Meindl (Alfons); R.K. Schmutzler (Rita); H. Brauch (Hiltrud); U. Hamann (Ute); H. Nevanlinna (Heli); S. Khan (Sofia); K. Matsuo (Keitaro); H. Iwata (Hiroji); T. Dörk (Thilo); N.V. Bogdanova (Natalia); A. Lindblom (Annika); S. Margolin (Sara); A. Mannermaa (Arto); V-M. Kosma (Veli-Matti); G. Chenevix-Trench (Georgia); A.H. Wu (Anna); Ven Den Berg, D. (David); A. Smeets (Ann); H. Zhao (Hui); J. Chang-Claude (Jenny); A. Rudolph (Anja); P. Radice (Paolo); M. Barile (Monica); F.J. Couch (Fergus); Vachon, C. (Celine); Giles, G.G. (Graham G.); R.L. Milne (Roger); C.A. Haiman (Christopher A.); L. Le Marchand (Loic); M.S. Goldberg (Mark); S.-H. Teo; N.A.M. Taib (Nur Aishah Mohd); V. Kristensen (Vessela); Borresen-Dale, A.-L. (Anne-Lise); W. Zheng (Wei); M. Shrubsole (Martha); R. Winqvist (Robert); A. Jukkola-Vuorinen (Arja); I.L. Andrulis (Irene); J.A. Knight (Julia); P. Devilee (Peter); C.M. Seynaeve (Caroline); M. García-Closas (Montserrat); K. Czene (Kamila); H. Darabi (Hatef); A. Hollestelle (Antoinette); J.W.M. Martens (John); J. Li (Jingmei); W. Lu (Wei); X.-O. Shu (Xiao-Ou); A. Cox (Angela); S.S. Cross (Simon); W.J. Blot (William); Q. Cai (Qiuyin); M. Shah (Mitul); C. Luccarini (Craig); Baynes, C. (Caroline); P. harrington (Patricia); D. Kang (Daehee); J.-Y. Choi (Ji-Yeob); J.M. Hartman (Joost); Chia, K.S. (Kee Seng); M. Kabisch (Maria); D. Torres (Diana); A. Jakubowska (Anna); J. Lubinski (Jan); S. Sangrajrang (Suleeporn); P. Brennan (Paul); S. Slager (Susan); D. Yannoukakos (Drakoulis); C.-Y. Shen (Chen-Yang); M.-F. Hou (Ming-Feng); A.J. Swerdlow (Anthony ); N. Orr (Nick); J. Simard (Jacques); P. Hall (Per); P.D.P. Pharoah (Paul); D.F. Easton (Douglas F.); Chanock, S.J. (Stephen J.); A.M. Dunning (Alison); J.D. Figueroa (Jonine)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractThe Cancer Genetic Markers of Susceptibility genome-wide association study (GWAS) originally identified a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs11249433 at 1p11.2 associated with breast cancer risk. To fine-map this locus, we genotyped 92 SNPs in a 900kb region (120,505,799-121,481,132)

  6. Influence of TYK2 in systemic sclerosis susceptibility : a new locus in the IL-12 pathway

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    López-Isac, Elena; Campillo-Davo, Diana; Bossini-Castillo, Lara; Guerra, Sandra G; Assassi, Shervin; Simeón, Carmen Pilar; Carreira, Patricia; Ortego-Centeno, Norberto; García de la Peña, Paloma; Beretta, Lorenzo; Santaniello, Alessandro; Bellocchi, Chiara; Lunardi, Claudio; Moroncini, Gianluca; Gabrielli, Armando; Riemekasten, Gabriela; Witte, Torsten; Hunzelmann, Nicolas; Kreuter, Alexander; Distler, Jörg Hw; Voskuyl, Alexandre E; de Vries-Bouwstra, Jeska; Herrick, Ariane; Worthington, Jane; Denton, Christopher P; Fonseca, Carmen; Radstake, Timothy Rdj; Mayes, Maureen D; Martín, Javier

    OBJECTIVES: TYK2 is a common genetic risk factor for several autoimmune diseases. This gene encodes a protein kinase involved in interleukin 12 (IL-12) pathway, which is a well-known player in the pathogenesis of systemic sclerosis (SSc). Therefore, we aimed to assess the possible role of this locus

  7. Illness perception in pediatric somatization and asthma: complaints and health locus of control beliefs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bundschuh Silke

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Health- and illness-related cognitions of pediatric patients with asthma or somatization and of their caregivers are considered relevant for patient education and for cognitive-behavioral interventions. This study investigates the relationship between diagnosis and illness perception by child and parent in two different chronic conditions such as somatization disorder and asthma. Methods 25 patients with somatoform disorders and 25 patients with asthma bronchiale completed the Giessen Complaint List and the Multidimensional Health Locus of Control Scale. Primary caregivers independently answered parallel proxy-report instruments. Analyses of variance were performed to determine the impact of diagnosis and perspective. Correlations were calculated to determine the concordance between patient and caregiver reports. Results No statistically significant differences in illness locus of control beliefs were found between asthma and somatoform disorder children or parents. Parents reported more internal and fatalistic locus of control beliefs compared with their children. Correlations between patient and caregiver reports of symptoms and health locus of control beliefs were low to moderate. Conclusion Clinicians should take into account a sense of insufficient symptom control in both diagnostic groups and different viewpoints of patients and their parents.

  8. Generalizability of Diagnostic-Prescriptive Teaching Strategies across Student Locus of Control and Multiple Instructional Units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, Jean S.; Yeany, Russell H.

    Reported is a study that explores the effect on student achievement of diagnostic-prescriptive instructional strategies on preservice elementary education majors (N=43) enrolled in an introductory biology course. Factors of pre-treatment achievement and locus of control were analyzed as well. Units on Mendelian genetics, modern genetics, and…

  9. Effects of Students\\' Characteristics and Locus of Control on Their Satisfaction with Online Distance Education Experience

    OpenAIRE

    Cui, Guoqiang

    2013-01-01

    Online learners bring varied learning experiences depending on their different personal characteristics and traits. This descriptive and correlational study explored students\\' online satisfaction in relation to their locus of control orientation and their personal characteristics including gender, age, ethnicity, and online learning experiences. Responses were collected from students in an online course at Virginia Tech. Descriptive statistics, Pearson correlations and Multiple Linear Regres...

  10. The Relationship between STD Locus of Control and STD Acquisition among Adolescent Girls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenthal, Susan L.; Griffith, Jennifer O.; Succop, Paul A.; Biro, Frank M.; Lewis, Lisa M.; DeVellis, Robert F.; Stanberry, Lawrence R.

    2002-01-01

    Adolescent girls from an urban-based clinic participated in a longitudinal study about psychosexual development and risk of STD acquisition. The girls were asked about their perceptions of loci of control (parents, internal control) as it relates to STD acquisition. Responses to locus of control correlated over time but variations were not found…

  11. Applied Genomics in Cattle – Identification of the SLICK locus in tropically adapted cattle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Over the past 3 years, ARS scientists have been working to identify the underlying genetic variants responsible for a heat tolerance phenotype in cattle associated with the SLICK locus typically found in Senepol cattle. This presentation reviews the general field of applied genomics in cattle, and ...

  12. The murine Th2 locus undergoes epigenetic modification in the thymus during fetal and postnatal ontogeny.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Momoko Yoshimoto

    Full Text Available Epigenetic modifications play a central role in the differentiation and function of immune cells in adult animals. Developmentally regulated epigenetic patterns also appear to contribute to the ontogeny of the immune system. We show here that the epigenetic profile of the T-helper (Th 2 locus undergoes changes in T lineage cells beginning in mid-gestation and extending throughout the first week of life. In particular, regulatory regions of the Th2 locus are largely methylated at CpG residues among fetal liver common lymphoid progenitor cells. The locus subsequently becomes highly hypomethylated among the downstream progeny of these cells within the fetal thymus. This hypomethylated state is preserved until birth when the locus becomes rapidly re-methylated, achieving adult-like status by 3-6 days post birth. Notably, the capacity for rapid, high level Th2 cytokine production is lost in parallel with this re-methylation. In vitro organ culture and in vivo transplantation experiments indicate that signals from the adult environment are required to achieve the postnatal methylated state. Together, these findings indicate that the Th2 bias of neonates may be conferred, in part, by an epigenetic profile inherited from fetal life. However, the fetal program is rapidly terminated post birth by the development of signals leading to the acquisition of adult-like epigenetic patterns.

  13. Interrelationships of Study Habits and Attitudes, Locus of Control, Motivation Achievement Tendencies and Academic Achievement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadzella, Bernadette M.; And Others

    The study investigated (a) relationships between measures on study habits and attitudes, locus of control, achieving tendency, and semester grade-point averages (SGPA), (b) differences between the sexes on the above mentioned variables, and (c) best predictor of SGPA. The subjects were 39 males and 81 females. There were a number of significant…

  14. Predicting the Likelihood of Going to Graduate School: The Importance of Locus of Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordstrom, Cynthia R.; Segrist, Dan J.

    2009-01-01

    Although many undergraduates apply to graduate school, only a fraction will be admitted. A question arises as to what factors relate to the likelihood of pursuing graduate studies. The current research examined this question by surveying students in a Careers in Psychology course. We hypothesized that GPA, a more internal locus of control…

  15. Raising Issues of Student Locus of Control: Beginning a Longitudinal Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Carol A.; Mihans, Richard J., II

    2009-01-01

    Locus of control is considered the belief in one's ability to influence life events. Someone who accepts both positive and negative outcomes and consequences as the result of their own behaviour is considered "internal" whereas someone who considers others to have influence over both positive (luck) and negative (others' fault) results…

  16. Longitudinal Factor Structure of General Self-Concept and Locus of Control among High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ze; Su, Ihui

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the longitudinal factor structure of general self-concept and locus of control among high school students over a 4-year period, with data from the National Educational Longitudinal Study of 1988. Measurement invariance was tested over time and across gender and ethnic groups; second-order piecewise latent growth models were…

  17. Students' Commitment, Engagement and Locus of Control as Predictor of Academic Achievement at Higher Education Level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarwar, Muhammad; Ashrafi, Ghulam Muhammad

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze Students' Commitment, Engagement and Locus of Control as predictors of Academic Achievement at Higher Education Level. We used analytical model and conclusive research approach to conduct study and survey method for data collection. We selected 369 students using multistage sampling technique from three…

  18. Learning to Learn Online: Using Locus of Control to Help Students Become Successful Online Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowes, Susan; Lin, Peiyi

    2015-01-01

    In this study, approximately 600 online high school students were asked to take Rotter's locus of control questionnaire and then reflect on the results, with the goal of helping them think about their ability to regulate their learning in this new environment. In addition, it was hoped that the results could provide a diagnostic for teachers who…

  19. The Relationship between Critical Thinking Disposition and Locus of Control in Pre-Service Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oguz, Aytunga; Sariçam, Hakan

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the current research study was to examine the link between critical thinking dispositions and locus of control in pre-service teachers. The participants of this study were selected via easily accessible sampling technique. The participants consist of 347 pre-service teachers (203 female, 144 male) in Kütahya, Turkey. The Rotter…

  20. Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Following Stillbirth: Trauma Characteristics, Locus of Control, Posttraumatic Cognitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Man Cheung; Reed, Jacqueline

    2017-06-01

    This study examined the incidence of PTSD and psychiatric co-morbidity among women who experienced stillbirth and investigated the relationship between locus of control, trauma characteristics of stillbirth, posttraumatic cognitions, PTSD and co-morbid psychiatric symptoms following stillbirth. Fifty women recorded information on stillbirth experiences, and completed the Posttraumatic Stress Diagnostic Scale, General Health Questionnaire-28, Edinburgh Post-natal Depression Scale, Rotter's Locus of Control Scale and the Posttraumatic Cognitions Inventory. 60, 28 and 12 % met the diagnostic criteria for probable full-PTSD, partial and no-PTSD respectively. Sixty-two percent and 54 % scored at or above the cutoff of the General Health Questionnaire-28 and postnatal depression respectively. Women who experienced stillbirth reported significantly more psychiatric co-morbid and post-natal depressive symptoms than the comparison group. Both groups were similar in locus of control. Women who experienced stillbirth reported negative cognitions about the self the most. After adjusting for postnatal depression, trauma characteristics were significantly correlated with Posttraumatic cognitions which, in turn, were significantly correlated with PTSD and psychiatric co-morbidity. Locus of control was not significantly correlated with psychological outcomes. Mediational analyses showed that negative cognitions about self mediated the relationship between trauma characteristics and psychiatric co-morbidity only. Women reported a high incidence of probable PTSD and co-morbid psychiatric symptoms following stillbirth. Stillbirth trauma characteristics influenced how they negatively perceived themselves. This then specifically influenced general psychological problems rather than PTSD symptoms.