WorldWideScience

Sample records for reactor licensing experience

  1. Licensing experience of the HTR-10 test reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, Y.; Xu, Y.

    1996-01-01

    A 10MW high temperature gas-cooled test reactor (HTR-10) is now being projected by the Institute of Nuclear Energy Technology within China's National High Technology Programme. The Construction Permit of HTR-10 was issued by the Chinese nuclear licensing authority around the end of 1994 after a period of about one year of safety review of the reactor design. HTR-10 is the first high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) to be constructed in China. The purpose of this test reactor project is to test and demonstrate the technology and safety features of the advanced modular high temperature reactor design. The reactor uses spherical fuel elements with coated fuel particles. The reactor unit and the steam generator unit are arranged in a ''side-by-side'' way. Maximum fuel temperature under the accident condition of a complete loss of coolant is limited to values much lower than the safety limit set for the fuel element. Since the philosophy of the technical and safety design of HTR-10 comes from the high temperature modular reactor design, the reactor is also called the Test Module. HTR-10 represents among others also a licensing challenge. On the one side, it is the first helium reactor in China, and there are less licensing experiences both for the regulator and for the designer. On the other side, the reactor design incorporates many advanced design features in the direction of passive or inherent safety, and it is presently a world-wide issue how to treat properly the passive or inherent safety design features in the licensing safety review. In this presentation, the licensing criteria of HTR-10 are discussed. The organization and activities of the safety review for the construction permit licensing are described. Some of the main safety issues in the licensing procedure are addressed. Among these are, for example, fuel element behaviour, source term, safety classification of systems and components, containment design. The licensing experiences of HTR-10 are of

  2. Reactor licensing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harvie, J.D.

    2002-01-01

    This presentation discusses reactor licensing and includes the legislative basis for licensing, other relevant legislation , the purpose of the Nuclear Safety and Control Act, important regulations, regulatory document, policies, and standards. It also discusses the role of the CNSC, its mandate and safety philosophy

  3. New Reactor Siting, Licensing and Construction Experience. Proceedings of the 2. CNRA International Workshop on 'New Reactor Siting, Licensing and Construction Experience'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    This report documents the proceedings from the 2. Workshop on New Reactor Siting, Licensing and Construction Experience. A total of 45 specialists from 16 countries and international organisations attended. The meeting was sponsored by the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency Committee on Nuclear Regulatory Activities and hosted by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (U.S.NRC). The objectives of the workshop were to provide a forum to exchange information on lessons learned from siting, licensing and constructing new nuclear power plants around the world. Key focus areas included siting practices and regulatory positions that have been enhanced as a result of the Fukushima accident; lessons learned from licensing and design review approaches and challenges, construction experience and recommendations for regulatory oversight; and regulatory cooperation on generic and design specific issues through the MDEP specific working groups. The workshop was structured in 4 technical sessions, each followed by ample time for panel discussions. The first technical session was devoted to regulatory cooperation on generic and design specific issues, MDEP working groups (EPR, AP1000), vendor inspection co-operation, digital I and C, and codes and standards. The second technical session was intended to discuss and share regulatory positions on siting practices and enhancements as a result of lessons learned from Fukushima accident. The third technical session addressed the construction experience and regulatory oversight of new reactor construction activities. And the fourth technical session included presentations on the lessons learned from regulatory licensing reviews of new reactor designs

  4. Licensed operating reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-04-01

    The Operating Units Status Report --- Licensed Operating Reactors provides data on the operation of nuclear units as timely and accurately as possible. This information is collected by the Office of Information Resources Management from the Headquarters staff on NRC's Office of Enforcement (OE), from NRC's Regional Offices, and from utilities. The three sections of the report are: monthly highlights and statistics for commercial operating units, and errata from previously reported data; a compilation of detailed information on each unit, provided by NRC's Regional Offices, OE Headquarters and the utilities; and an appendix for miscellaneous information such as spent fuel storage capability, reactor-years of experience and non- power reactors in the US

  5. Licensed operating reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-08-01

    THE OPERATING UNITS STATUS REPORT - LICENSED OPERATING REACTORS provides data on the operation of nuclear units as timely and accurately as possible. This information is collected by the Office of Information Resources Management from the Headquarters staff of NRC's Office of Enforcement (OE), from NRC's Regional Offices, and from utilities. The three sections of the report are: monthly highlights and statistics for commercial operating units, and errata from previously reported data; a compilation of detailed information on each unit, provided by NRC's Regional Offices, OE Headquarters and the utilities; and an appendix for miscellaneous information such as spent fuel storage capability, reactor-years of experience and non-power reactors in the US

  6. Licensed operating reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's monthly LICENSED OPERATING REACTORS Status Summary Report provides data on the operation of nuclear units as timely and accurately as possible. This information is collected by the Office of Information Resources Management, from the Headquarters Staff of NRC's Office of Inspection and Enforcement, from NRC's Regional Offices, and from utilities. This report is divided into three sections: the first contains monthly highlights and statistics for commercial operating units, and errata from previously reported data; the second is a compilation of detailed information on each unit, provided by NRC Regional Offices, IE Headquarters and the Utilities; and the third section is an appendix for miscellaneous information such as spent fuel storage capability, reactor years of experience and non-power reactors in the United States

  7. Licensed operating reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartfield, R.A.

    1990-03-01

    The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's monthly Licensed Operating Reactors Status Summary Report provides data on the operation of nuclear units as timely and accurately as possible. This information is collected by the Office of Information Resources Management, from the Headquarters Staff of NRC's Office of Inspection and Enforcement, from NRC's Regional Offices, and from utilities. This report is divided into three sections: the first contains monthly highlights and statistics for commercial operating units, and errata from previously reported data; the second is a compilation of detailed information on each unit, provided by NRC Regional Offices, IE Headquarters and the Utilities; and the third section is an appendix for miscellaneous information such as spent fuel storage capability, reactor years of experience and non-power reactors in the United States

  8. Licensed operating reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-08-01

    The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's monthly LICENSED OPERATING REACTORS Status Summary Report provides data on the operation of nuclear units as timely and accurately as possible. This information is collected by the Office of Information Resources Management, from the Headquarters Staff of NRC's Office of Inspection and Enforcement, from NRC's Regional Offices, and from utilities. This report is divided into three sections: the first contains monthly highlights and statistics for commercial operating units, and errata from previously reported data; the second is a compilation of detailed information on each unit, provided by NRC Regional Offices, IE Headquarters and the utilities; and the third section is an appendix for miscellaneous information such as spent fuel storage capability, reactor years of experience and non-power reactors in the United States

  9. Advanced Reactor Licensing: Experience with Digital I&C Technology in Evolutionary Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wood, RT

    2004-09-27

    This report presents the findings from a study of experience with digital instrumentation and controls (I&C) technology in evolutionary nuclear power plants. In particular, this study evaluated regulatory approaches employed by the international nuclear power community for licensing advanced l&C systems and identified lessons learned. The report (1) gives an overview of the modern l&C technologies employed at numerous evolutionary nuclear power plants, (2) identifies performance experience derived from those applications, (3) discusses regulatory processes employed and issues that have arisen, (4) captures lessons learned from performance and regulatory experience, (5) suggests anticipated issues that may arise from international near-term deployment of reactor concepts, and (6) offers conclusions and recommendations for potential activities to support advanced reactor licensing in the United States.

  10. Advanced Reactor Licensing: Experience with Digital I and C Technology in Evolutionary Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wood, RT

    2004-01-01

    This report presents the findings from a study of experience with digital instrumentation and controls (I and C) technology in evolutionary nuclear power plants. In particular, this study evaluated regulatory approaches employed by the international nuclear power community for licensing advanced l and C systems and identified lessons learned. The report (1) gives an overview of the modern l and C technologies employed at numerous evolutionary nuclear power plants, (2) identifies performance experience derived from those applications, (3) discusses regulatory processes employed and issues that have arisen, (4) captures lessons learned from performance and regulatory experience, (5) suggests anticipated issues that may arise from international near-term deployment of reactor concepts, and (6) offers conclusions and recommendations for potential activities to support advanced reactor licensing in the United States

  11. Nuclear reactor operator licensing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bursey, R.J.

    1978-01-01

    The Atomic Energy Act of 1954, which was amended in 1974 by the Energy Reorganization Act, established the requirement that individuals who had the responsibility of operating the reactors in nuclear power plants must be licensed. Section 107 of the act states ''the Commission shall (1) prescribe uniform conditions for licensing individuals; (2) determine the qualifications of such individuals; and (3) issue licenses to such individuals in such form as the Commission may prescribe.'' The article discusses the types of licenses, the selection and training of individuals, and the administration of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission licensing examinations

  12. Licensed operating reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's monthly LICENSED OPERATING REACTORS Status Summary Report provides data on the operation of nuclear units as timely and accurately as possible. This information is collected by the Office of Information Resources Management, from the Headquarters Staff of NRC's Office of Inspection and Enforcement, from NRC's Regional Offices, and from utilities. Since all of the data concerning operation of the units is provided by the utility operators less than two weeks after the end of the month, necessary corrections to published information are shown on the ERRATA page. This report is divided into three sections: the first contains monthly highlights and statistics for commercial operating units, and errata from previously reported data; the second is a compilation of detailed information on each unit, provided by NRC Regional Offices, IE Headquarters and the Utilities; and the third section is an appendix for miscellaneous information such as spent fuel storage capability, reactor years of experience and non-power reactors in the United States

  13. Licensed operating reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-06-01

    The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's monthly LICENSED OPERATING REACTORS Status Summary Report provides data on the operation of nuclear units as timely and accurately as possible. This information is collected by the Office of Information Resources Management, from the Headquarters Staff of NRC's Office of Inspection and Enforcement, from NRC's Regional Offices, and from utilities. Since all of the data concerning operation of the units are provided by the utility operators less than two weeks after the end of the month, necessary corrections to published information are shown on the ERRATA page. This report is divided into three sections: the first contains monthly highlights and statistics for commercial operating units, and errata from previously reported data; the second is a compilation of detailed information on each unit, provided by NRC Regional Offices, IE Headquarters and the Utilities; and the third section is an appendix for miscellaneous information such as spent fuel storage capability, reactor years of experience and non-power reactors in the United States

  14. Proceedings of the CNRA Workshop on New Reactor Siting, Licensing and Construction Experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    This report documents the proceedings from the 'Workshop on New Reactor Siting, Licensing and Construction Experience', held in Prague, Czech Republic on 15-17 September 2010. A total of 59 specialists from 16 countries and international organisations attended. The Meeting was sponsored by the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency Committee on Nuclear Regulatory Activities and hosted by the State Office for Nuclear Safety (SUJB) in Czech Republic. The objectives of the workshop were to review and discuss recent and past construction experience lessons learned including perspectives from regulatory authorities, as well as vendors, and licensee. The workshop addressed issues associated with project management resources including: a) overall human resources, expertise, experience and organisation available to the licensee, b) capability of each potential vendor (in-house knowledge and skills versus planned subcontracting and subcontractor management). The workshop also discussed the lessons learned in the regulation of site selection, evaluation and site preparation as well as the review of regulatory practices for the licensing of new reactors, including the regulatory body infrastructure, staffing and expertise needed. The workshop provided an excellent opportunity to communicate recent experience on these topics to a wider audience, including participants from OECD member countries as well as New Entrants from non-OECD member countries. The workshop allowed the WGRNR group to introduce and discuss the current programme of work and products under development in order to gain insights from workshop participants on each of the programme of work areas, and get feedback on additional focus areas. The workshop was structured in 4 technical sessions, each followed by ample time for panel discussions. The first technical session was devoted to presentations of the licensing process for new reactors followed by different member countries. The second technical session was

  15. Operating reactors licensing actions summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-08-01

    The Operating Reactors Licensing Actions Summary is designed to provide the management of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) with an overview of licensing actions dealing with operating power and nonpower reactors

  16. Operating reactors licensing actions summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-04-01

    The operating reactors licensing actions summary is designed to provide the management of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) with an overview of licensing actions dealing with operating power and nonpower reactors. These reports utilize data collected from the Division of Licensing in the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation and are prepared by the Office of Management and Program Analysis

  17. Licensing of nuclear reactor operators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-09-01

    Recommendations are presented for the licensing of nuclear reactor operators in units licensed according to the legislation in effect. They apply to all physical persons designated by the Operating Organization of the nuclear reactor or reactors to execute any of the following functional activities: a) to manipulate the controls of a definite reactor b) to direct the authorized activities of the reactor operators licesed according to the present recommendations. (F.E.) [pt

  18. Licensed operating reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-11-01

    The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's monthly Licensed Operating Reactors Status Summary Report provides data on the operation of nuclear units as timely and accurately as possible. This information is collected by the Office of Information Resources Management, from the Headquarters Staff of NRC's Office of Inspection and Enforcement, from NRC's Regional Offices, and from utilities. Since all of the data concerning operation of the units is provided by the utility operators less than two weeks after the end of the month, necessary corrections to published information are shown on the errata page

  19. Operating reactors licensing actions summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-01-01

    The operating reactors licensing actions summary is designed to provide the management of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) with an overview of licensing actions dealing with operating power and nonpower reactors. These reports utilize data collected from the Division of Licensing in the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation and are prepared by the Office of Management and Program Analysis. This summary report is published primarily for internal NRC use in managing the operating reactors licensing actions program. Its content will change based on NRC management informational requirements

  20. Operating reactors licensing actions summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-05-01

    The operating reactors licensing actions summary is designed to provide the management of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) with an overview of licensing actions dealing with operating power and nonpower reactors. These reports utilize data collected from the Division of Licensing in the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation and are prepared by the Office of Management and Program Analysis. This summary report is published primarily for internal NRC use in managing the operating reactors licensing actions program. Its content will change based on NRC management informational requirements

  1. Operating reactors licensing actions summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-03-01

    The operating reactors licensing actions summary is designed to provide the management of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) with an overview of licensing actions dealing with operating power and nonpower reactors. These reports utilize data collected from the Division of Licensing in the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation and are prepared by the Office of Management and Program Analysis. This summary report is published primarily for internal NRC use in managing the operating reactors licensing actions program. Its content will change based on NRC management informational requirements

  2. Operating reactors licensing actions summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-07-01

    The operating reactors licensing actions summary is designed to provide the management of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) with an overview of licensing actions dealing with operating power and nonpower reactors. These reports utilize data collected from the Division of Licensing in the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation and are prepared by the Office of Management and Program Analysis. This summary report is published primarily for internal NRC use in managing the operating reactors licensing actions program. Its content will change based on NRC management informational requirements

  3. Operating reactors licensing actions summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-11-01

    The operating reactors licensing actions summary is designed to provide the management of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) with an overview of licensing actions dealing with operating power and nonpower reactors. These reports utilize data collected from the Division of Licensing in the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation and are prepared by the Office of Management and Program Analysis. This summary report is published primarily for internal NRC use in managing the operating reactors licensing actions program. Its content will change based on NRC management informational requirements

  4. Operating reactors licensing actions summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-10-01

    The operating reactors licensing actions summary is designed to provide the management of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) with an overview of licensing actions dealing with operating power and nonpower reactors. These reports utilize data collected from the Division of Licensing in the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation and are prepared by the Office of Management and Program Analysis. This summary report is published primarily for internal NRC use in managing the operating reactors licensing actions program. Its content will change based on NRC management informational requirements

  5. Operating reactors licensing actions summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-08-01

    The operating reactors licensing actions summary is designed to provide the management of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) with an overview of licensing actions dealing with operating power and nonpower reactors. These reports utilize data collected from the Division of Licensing in the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation and are prepared by the Office of Management and Program Analysis. This summary report is published primarily for internal NRC use in managing the operating reactors licensing actions program. Its content will change based on NRC management informational requirements

  6. Operating reactors licensing actions summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-09-01

    The operating reactors licensing actions summary is designed to provide the management of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) with an overview of licensing actions dealing with operating power and nonpower reactors. These reports utilize data collected from the Division of Licensing in the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation and are prepared by the Office of Management and Program Analysis. This summary report is published primarily for internal NRC use in managing the operating reactors licensing actions program. Its content will change based on NRC management informational requirements

  7. Licensed operating reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-08-01

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission's annual summary of licensed nuclear power reactor data is based primarily on the report of operating data submitted by licensees for each unit for the month of December because that report contains data for the month of December, the year to date (in this case calendar 1990) and cumulative data, usually from the date of commercial operation. The data is not independently verified, but various computer checks are made. The report is divided into two sections. The first contains summary highlights and the second contains data on each individual unit in commercial operation. Section 1 capacity and availability factors are simple arithmetic averages. Section 2 items in the cumulative column are generally as reported by the licensee and notes as to the use of weighted averages and starting dates other than commercial operation are provided

  8. Licensed operating reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartfield, R.A.

    1994-03-01

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commissions annual summary of licensed nuclear power reactor data is based primarily on the report of operating data submitted by licensees for each unit for the month of December, the year to date (in this case calendar year 1993) and cumulative data, usually for the date of commercial operation. The data is not independently verified, but various computer checks are made. The report is divided into two sections. The first contains summary highlights and the second contains data on each individual unit in commercial operation. Section 1 capacity and availability factors are simple arithmetic averages. Section 2 items in the cumulative column are generally as reported by the licensee and notes as to the use of weighted averages and starting dates other than commercial operation are provided

  9. Licensing activities for advanced reactors in NNC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chevalier, A.B.H.; Mustoe, J.; Walters, J.; Ingham, E.L.

    2001-01-01

    NNC has been involved in safety and licensing activities for advanced reactors for many years. Most recently NNC has been involved with national regulators or their representatives for the HTR (High Temperature Reactor) reactor and the possible siting of ITER (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor) within Europe. Commonalties between the two activities can be seen, even though one is a fission process and the other based on a completely new technology. Both have the potential to generate power at a very low overall exposure to the public and station staff, but both also need to demonstrate to the regulator the safety of a design which differs from the standard LWR practice. In both concepts passive design features provide a major part of the safety argument, but the detailed assessment and justification of these features in licensing terms still needs to be made. A number of critical safety issues can be identified, which generally apply to any advanced system. These are: Safety categorization, codes and standards; confinement or containment; ALARA; safety code modelling and data; Occupational Exposure; occupational exposures; decommissioning and waste; no evacuation, or no emergency plans. The UK is notable for a flexible licensing regime, which allows a safety case to be built up from first principles, where this is applicable. In addition, experience of licensing gas cooled, water cooled and liquid metal plant, as well as extensive experience outside the UK provides NNC with a unique insight into the different licensing methodologies which can be applied in the licensing process. This paper discusses some possible approaches which could be applied in order to satisfy regulatory demands when addressing the critical issues listed above. (author)

  10. International Harmonization of Reactor Licensing Regulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuhnt, Dietmar.

    1977-01-01

    The purpose of a harmonization policy for reactor licensing regulations on the basis of already considerable experience is to attain greater rationalisation in this field, in the interest of economic policy and healthy competition, and most important, radiation protection and safety of installations. This paper considers the legal instruments for such harmonization and the conditions for their implementation, in particular within the Communities framework. (NEA) [fr

  11. New trends in the evaluation and implementation of the safety-related operating experience associated with NRC-licensed reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michelson, C.; Heltemes, C.J.

    1981-01-01

    This article is an overview of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission program for the evaluation and dissemination of the safety-related operating experience associated with all NRC-licensed reactors. It discusses the historical background and past problems that led to the recent formation of NRC's Office for Analysis and Evaluation of Operational Data (AEOD) and details its activities, organization, staffing, and proposed analysis and evaluation methodology. The programs of industry organizations and nuclear plant licensees and the integration of foreign operating experience are included in the overview. The problems and limitations of the Licensee Event Report (LER) program and the Nuclear Plant Reliability Data system program are discussed. The AEOD analysis and evaluation methodology program includes some new improvements in the assessment of safety-related operating experience. Of particular note is the sequence coding and search procedure being developed by AEOD under a contract with the Nuclear Safety Information Center at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. This computer-based retrieval system will have markedly improved search strategy capability for such items as commoncause failures or complex system interactions involving various failure sequences and other relationships associated with an event. The system retrieves failure data and information on the principal LER occurrence and on related component and system responses. The computer-generated Power Reactor Watch List enables AEOD to monitor all critical or unusual situations warranting close attention because of potential public health and safety. This listing is supported by a preestablished computer search strategy of the historical data base permitting identification of all past events and statistical information that are applicable to the situation being watched

  12. Licensing of away-from-reactor (AFR) installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gray, P.L.

    1980-01-01

    Storage of spent fuel at Away-From-Reactor (AFR) installations will allow reactors to continue to operate until reprocessing or other fuel disposal means are available. AFR installations must be licensed by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). Although wide experience in licensing reactors exists, the licensing of an AFR installation is a relatively new activity. Only one has been licensed to date. This paper delineates the requirements for licensing an AFR installation and projects a licensing schedule. Because the NRC is developing specific AFR requirements, this schedule is based primarily on draft NRC documents. The major documents needed for an AFR license application are similar to those for a reactor. They include: a Safety Analysis Report (SAR), and Environmental Report (ER), safeguards and security plans, decommissioning plans, proposed technical specifications, and others. However, the licensing effort has one major difference in that for AFR installations it will be a one-step effort, with follow-up, rather than the two-step process used for reactors. The projected licensing schedule shows that the elapsed time between filing an application and issuance of a license will be about 32 months, assuming intervention. The legal procedural steps will determine the time schedule and will override considerations of technical complexity. A license could be issued in about 14 months in the absence of intervention

  13. Advanced CANDU reactor pre-licensing progress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Popov, N.K.; West, J.; Snell, V.G.; Ion, R.; Archinoff, G.; Xu, C.

    2005-01-01

    The Advanced CANDU Reactor (ACR) is an evolutionary advancement of the current CANDU 6 reactor, aimed at producing electrical power for a capital cost and at a unit-energy cost significantly less than that of the current reactor designs. The Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission (CNSC) staff are currently reviewing the ACR design to determine whether, in their opinion, there are any fundamental barriers that would prevent the licensing of the design in Canada. This CNSC licensability review will not constitute a licence, but is expected to reduce regulatory risk. The CNSC pre-licensing review started in September 2003, and was focused on identifying topics and issues for ACR-700 that will require a more detailed review. CNSC staff reviewed about 120 reports, and issued to AECL 65 packages of questions and comments. Currently CNSC staff is reviewing AECL responses to all packages of comments. AECL has recently refocused the design efforts to the ACR-1000, which is a larger version of the ACR design. During the remainder of the pre-licensing review, the CNSC review will be focused on the ACR-1000. AECL Technologies Inc. (AECLT), a wholly-owned US subsidiary of AECL, is engaged in a pre-application process for the ACR-700 with the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC) to identify and resolve major issues prior to entering a formal process to obtain standard design certification. To date, the USNRC has produced a Pre-Application Safety Assessment Report (PASAR), which contains their reviews of key focus topics. During the remainder of the pre-application phase, AECLT will address the issues identified in the PASAR. Pursuant to the bilateral agreement between AECL and the Chinese nuclear regulator, the National Nuclear Safety Administration (NNSA) and its Nuclear Safety Center (NSC), NNSA/NSC are reviewing the ACR in seven focus areas. The review started in September 2004, and will take three years. The main objective of the review is to determine how the ACR complies

  14. A BWR licensing experience in the USA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Powers, J.; Ogura, C.; Arai, K.; Thomas, S.; Mookhoek, B.

    2015-09-01

    The US-Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (A BWR), certified by the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (US NRC), is a third generation, evolutionary boiling water reactor design which is the reference for the South Texas Project Units 3 and 4 (STP3-4) Combined License Application (Cola). Nuclear Innovation North America (Nina) is the License Applicant for this new build project, and Toshiba is the selected primary technology contractor. The STP3-4 project has finished the US NRC technical review of the Cola through the final meeting of the Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS), and the Final Safety Evaluation Report (FSER) is scheduled to be issued by the US NRC in the middle of 2015. The next steps are to support the Mandatory Hearing process, and voting by the NRC commissioners on the motion to grant the Combined License, which is scheduled beginning of 2016 according to US NRC schedule as of March 30, 2015. This paper summarizes the history and progress of the US-A BWR licensing, including the experiences of the Licensee, Nina, and Toshiba as the Epc team worked through the Code of Federal Regulations Title 10 (10-Cfr) Part 52 process, and provides some perspectives on how the related licensing material would also be of value within a 10-Cfr Part 50, two-step process to minimize schedule and financial risks which could arise from ongoing technical developments and regulatory reviews. (Author)

  15. A BWR licensing experience in the USA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Powers, J.; Ogura, C. [Toshiba America Nuclear Energy, Charlotte, North Carolina (United States); Arai, K. [Toshiba Corporation, Yokohama, Kanagawa (Japan); Thomas, S.; Mookhoek, B., E-mail: jim.powers@toshiba.com [Nuclear Innovation North America, Lake Jackson, Texas (United States)

    2015-09-15

    The US-Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (A BWR), certified by the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (US NRC), is a third generation, evolutionary boiling water reactor design which is the reference for the South Texas Project Units 3 and 4 (STP3-4) Combined License Application (Cola). Nuclear Innovation North America (Nina) is the License Applicant for this new build project, and Toshiba is the selected primary technology contractor. The STP3-4 project has finished the US NRC technical review of the Cola through the final meeting of the Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS), and the Final Safety Evaluation Report (FSER) is scheduled to be issued by the US NRC in the middle of 2015. The next steps are to support the Mandatory Hearing process, and voting by the NRC commissioners on the motion to grant the Combined License, which is scheduled beginning of 2016 according to US NRC schedule as of March 30, 2015. This paper summarizes the history and progress of the US-A BWR licensing, including the experiences of the Licensee, Nina, and Toshiba as the Epc team worked through the Code of Federal Regulations Title 10 (10-Cfr) Part 52 process, and provides some perspectives on how the related licensing material would also be of value within a 10-Cfr Part 50, two-step process to minimize schedule and financial risks which could arise from ongoing technical developments and regulatory reviews. (Author)

  16. Nuclear safety requirements for operation licensing of Egyptian research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, E.E.M.; Rahman, F.A.

    2000-01-01

    From the view of responsibility for health and nuclear safety, this work creates a framework for the application of nuclear regulatory rules to ensure safe operation for the sake of obtaining or maintaining operation licensing for nuclear research reactors. It has been performed according to the recommendations of the IAEA for research reactor safety regulations which clearly states that the scope of the application should include all research reactors being designed, constructed, commissioned, operated, modified or decommissioned. From that concept, the present work establishes a model structure and a computer logic program for a regulatory licensing system (RLS code). It applies both the regulatory inspection and enforcement regulatory rules on the different licensing process stages. The present established RLS code is then applied to the Egyptian Research Reactors, namely; the first ET-RR-1, which was constructed and still operating since 1961, and the second MPR research reactor (ET-RR-2) which is now in the preliminary operation stage. The results showed that for the ET-RR-1 reactor, all operational activities, including maintenance, in-service inspection, renewal, modification and experiments should meet the appropriate regulatory compliance action program. Also, the results showed that for the new MPR research reactor (ET-RR-2), all commissioning and operational stages should also meet the regulatory inspection and enforcement action program of the operational licensing safety requirements. (author)

  17. Licensed reactor nuclear safety criteria applicable to DOE reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-11-01

    This document is a compilation and source list of nuclear safety criteria that the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) applies to licensed reactors; it can be used by DOE and DOE contractors to identify NRC criteria to be evaluated for application to the DOE reactors under their cognizance. The criteria listed are those that are applied to the areas of nuclear safety addressed in the safety analysis report of a licensed reactor. They are derived from federal regulations, USNRC regulatory guides, Standard Review Plan (SRP) branch technical positions and appendices, and industry codes and standards

  18. Management of spent fuel from power and research reactors using CASTOR and CONSTOR casks and licensing experience worldwide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becher, D.

    2003-01-01

    An overview of the spent fuel storage in CASTOR and CONSTOR casks during the last 30 years is made. Design characteristics of the both types of casks are presented. CASTOR casks fulfill both the requirements for type B packages according to the IAEA requirements covering different accident situations in storage sites. Analyses of nuclear and thermal behavior and strength are carried out for CONSTOR concept. Special experimental program for verification of mechanical and thermomechanical properties is implemented. Licensing experience of the casks in German storage facilities is presented. Special modifications of CASTOR casks for WWER-440 and RBMK fuel assemblies have been designed for implementation in Eastern Europe. Contracts for GNB spent fuel casks delivery are concluded with Czech Republic, Slovakia, Hungary and Lithuania

  19. Non-Power Reactor Operator Licensing Examiner Standards. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-06-01

    The Non-Power Reactor Operator Licensing Examiner Standards provide policy and guidance to NRC examiners and establish the procedures and practices for examining and licensing of applicants for NRC operator licenses pursuant to Part 55 of Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations (10 CFR 55). They are intended to assist NRC examiners and facility licensees to understand the examination process better and to provide for equitable and consistent administration of examinations to all applicants by NRC examiners. These standards are not a substitute for the operator licensing regulations and are subject to revision or other internal operator examination licensing policy changes. As appropriate, these standards will be revised periodically to accommodate comments and reflect new information or experience

  20. Non-Power Reactor Operator Licensing Examiner Standards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-06-01

    The Non-Power Reactor Operator Licensing Examiner Standards provide policy and guidance to NRC examiners and establish the procedures and practices for examining and licensing of applicants for NRC operator licenses pursuant to Part 55 of Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations (10 CFR Part 55). They are intended to assist NRC examiners and facility licensees to understand the examination process better and to provide for equitable and consistent administration of examinations to all applicants by NRC examiners. These standards are not a substitute for the operator licensing regulations and are subject to revision or other internal operator examination licensing policy changes. As appropriate, this standard will be revised periodically to accommodate comments and reflect new information or experience

  1. Non-Power Reactor Operator Licensing Examiner Standards. Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-06-01

    The Non-Power Reactor Operator Licensing Examiner Standards provide policy and guidance to NRC examiners and establish the procedures and practices for examining and licensing of applicants for NRC operator licenses pursuant to Part 55 of Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations (10 CFR 55). They are intended to assist NRC examiners and facility licensees to understand the examination process better and to provide for equitable and consistent administration of examinations to all applicants by NRC examiners. These standards are not a substitute for the operator licensing regulations and are subject to revision or other internal operator examination licensing policy changes. As appropriate, these standards will be revised periodically to accommodate comments and reflect new information or experience.

  2. Operating reactors licensing actions summary. Vol.4, No. 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-06-01

    The operating reactors licensing actions summary is designed to provide the management of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) with an overview of licensing actions dealing with operating power and nonpower reactors

  3. Operating reactors licensing actions summary. Vol. 3, No. 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-04-01

    The operating reactors licensing actions summary is designed to provide the management of the Nuclear Regularory Commission (NRC) with an overview of licensing actions dealing with operating power and nonpower reactors. These reports utilize data collected from the Division of Licensing in the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation and are prepared by the Office of Management and Program Analysis. This summary report is published primarily for internal NRC use in managing the operating reactors licensing actions program

  4. Operating reactors licensing actions summary. Volume 5, No. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-04-01

    The Operating Reactors Licensing Actions Summary is designed to provide the management of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) with an overview of licensing actions dealing with operating power and nonpower reactors. These reports utilize data collected from the Division of Licensing in the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation and are prepared by the Office of Resource Management. This summary report is published primarily for internal NRC use in managing the Operating Reactors Licensing Actions Program

  5. Licensing of MAPLE reactors in Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, A.G.; Labrie, J.P.; Langman, V.J.

    1999-01-01

    Full text: The Operating Licence for a MAPLE reactor (i.e., a 10 MW(th), pool-type reactor), has been approved by the Atomic Energy Control Board (AECB) on August 16th, 1999. This Operating Licence has been obtained within three years of the initiation of the MDS Nordion Medical Isotopes Reactor (MMIR) project, which entails the design, construction and commissioning of two 10 MW MAPLE reactors at AECL's Chalk River Laboratories. The scope and nature of the information required by the AECB, the licensing process and highlights of the events which led to successfully obtaining the Operating Licence for the MAPLE reactor are discussed. These discussions address all phases of the licensing process (i.e., the environmental assessment in support of siting, the Preliminary Safety Analysis Report, PSAR, in support of design, procurement and construction, the Final Safety Analysis Report, FSAR, in support of commissioning and operations, and the development of suitable quality assurance subprograms for each phase). An overview of some of the unique technical aspects associated with the MAPLE reactors, and how they have been addressed during the licensing process are also provided (e.g., applying CSA N285.0, General Requirements for Pressure-Retaining Systems and Components in CANDU Nuclear Power Plants, to a small, low pressure, low temperature research reactor, confirmation of the performance of the driver fuel via laboratory and/or in-reactor testing, validation of the computer codes used to perform the safety analyses, critical parameter uncertainty assessment, full scale hydraulic testing of the performance of the design, fuel handling, human factors validation, operator training and certification). (author)

  6. Licensed reactor nuclear safety criteria applicable to DOE reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-04-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) Order DOE 5480.6, Safety of Department of Energy-Owned Nuclear Reactors, establishes reactor safety requirements to assure that reactors are sited, designed, constructed, modified, operated, maintained, and decommissioned in a manner that adequately protects health and safety and is in accordance with uniform standards, guides, and codes which are consistent with those applied to comparable licensed reactors. This document identifies nuclear safety criteria applied to NRC [Nuclear Regulatory Commission] licensed reactors. The titles of the chapters and sections of USNRC Regulatory Guide 1.70, Standard Format and Content of Safety Analysis Reports for Nuclear Power Plants, Rev. 3, are used as the format for compiling the NRC criteria applied to the various areas of nuclear safety addressed in a safety analysis report for a nuclear reactor. In each section the criteria are compiled in four groups: (1) Code of Federal Regulations, (2) US NRC Regulatory Guides, SRP Branch Technical Positions and Appendices, (3) Codes and Standards, and (4) Supplemental Information. The degree of application of these criteria to a DOE-owned reactor, consistent with their application to comparable licensed reactors, must be determined by the DOE and DOE contractor

  7. Operating reactors licensing actions summary. Volume 5, No. 7

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-09-01

    The Operating Reactors Licensing Actions Summary is designed to provide the management of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) with an overview of licensing actions dealing with operating power and nonpower reactors. These reports utilize data collected from the Division of Licensing in the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation and are prepared by the Office of Resource Management

  8. Cooperation in reactor design evaluation and licensing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaufer, B.; Wasylyk, A.

    2014-01-01

    In January 2007 the World Nuclear Association (WNA) established the Cooperation in Reactor Design Evaluation and Licensing (CORDEL) Working Group with the aim of stimulating a dialogue between the nuclear industry (including reactor vendors, operators and utilities) and nuclear regulators (national and international organisations) on the benefits and means of achieving a worldwide convergence of reactor safety standards for reactor designs. From the time of its inception to the present, CORDEL has evolved from a group of experts discussing how to achieve international standardisation in nuclear safety design to an established and recognised working group dedicated to analysing and forging common understandings in key areas as input to major decisions on nuclear energy policy. This paper will review the general directions and activities CORDEL plans to undertake during the next five-year period, including its general strategy, activities, priorities and interactions with its customers in order to meet its objectives. (author)

  9. Cooperation in reactor design evaluation and licensing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaufer, B.; Wasylyk, A. [World Nuclear Association, London (United Kingdom)

    2014-07-01

    In January 2007 the World Nuclear Association (WNA) established the Cooperation in Reactor Design Evaluation and Licensing (CORDEL) Working Group with the aim of stimulating a dialogue between the nuclear industry (including reactor vendors, operators and utilities) and nuclear regulators (national and international organisations) on the benefits and means of achieving a worldwide convergence of reactor safety standards for reactor designs. From the time of its inception to the present, CORDEL has evolved from a group of experts discussing how to achieve international standardisation in nuclear safety design to an established and recognised working group dedicated to analysing and forging common understandings in key areas as input to major decisions on nuclear energy policy. This paper will review the general directions and activities CORDEL plans to undertake during the next five-year period, including its general strategy, activities, priorities and interactions with its customers in order to meet its objectives. (author)

  10. Safety and licensing for small and medium power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trauger, D.B.

    1987-01-01

    Proposed new concepts for small and medium power reactors differ substantially from traditional Light Water Reactors (LWRs). Although designers have a large base of experience in safety and licensing, much of it is not relevant to new concepts. It can be a disadvantage if regulators apply LWR rules directly. A fresh start is appropriate. The extensive interactions between industry, regulators, and the public complicates but may enhance safety. It is basic to recognize the features that distinguish nuclear energy safety from that for other industries. These features include: nuclear reactivity, fission product radiation, and radioactive decay heat. Small and medium power reactors offer potential advantages over LWRs, particularly for reactivity and decay heat

  11. Operating reactors licensing actions summary. Volume 5, Number 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-03-01

    This document is designed to provide the management of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) with an overview of licensing actions dealing with operating power and nonpower reactors. These reports utilize data collected from the Division of Licensing in the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation and are prepared by the Office of Resource Management. This summary report is published primarily for internal NRC use in managing the operating reactors licensing actions program

  12. Operating reactors licensing actions summary. Volume 5, No. 6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-08-01

    The operating reactors licensing actions summary is designed to provide the management of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) with an overview of licensing actions dealing with operating power and nonpower reactors. These reports utilize data collected from the Division of Licensing in the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation and are prepared by the Office of Resource Management. This summary report is published for internal NRC use in managing the Operating Reactors Licensing Actions Program. Its content will change based on NRC management informational requirements

  13. Operating reactors licensing actions summary. Vol. 3, No. 6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-07-01

    The operating reactors licensing actions summary is designed to provide the management of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) with an overview of licensing actions dealing with operating power and nonpower reactors. These reports utilize data collected from the Division of Licensing in the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation and are prepared by the Office of Management and Program Analysis. This summary report is published primarily for internal NRC use in managing the operating reactors licensing actions program. Its content will change based on NRC management informational requirements

  14. Establishing a safety and licensing basis for generation IV advanced reactors. License by test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kadak, Andrew C.

    2001-01-01

    The license by test approach to licensing is a novel method of licensing reactors. It provides an opportunity to deal with innovative non-water reactors in a direct way on a time scale that could permit early certification based on tests of a demonstration reactor. The uncertainties in the design and significant contributors to risk would be identified in the PRA during the design. Deterministic analysis computer codes could be tested on a real reactor. Scaling effects and associated uncertainties would be minimized. License by test is an approach that has sufficient merit to be developed and tested

  15. Licensing of ANSTO's Replacement Research Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Summerfield, M.W.; Garea, V.

    2003-01-01

    This paper presents a general description of the licensing of the 20 MW Pool-type Replacement Research Reactor (RRR) currently being built by the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO) at their Lucas Heights site. The following aspects will be addressed: 1) The influence of ARPANSA's (the Australian regulator) Regulatory Assessment Principles and Design Criteria on the design of the RRR. 2) The Site Licence Application, including the EIS and the supporting siting documentation. 3) The Construction Licence Application, including the PSAR and associated documentation. 4) The review process, including the IAEA Peer Review and the Public Submissions as well as ARPANSA's own review. 5) The interface between ANSTO, INVAP and ARPANSA in relation to the ongoing compliance with ARPANS Regulation 51 and 54. 6) The future Operating Licence Application, including the draft FSAR and associated documentation. These aspects are all addressed from the point of view of the licensee ANSTO and the RRR Project. Particular emphasis will be given to the way in which the licensing process is integrated into the overall project program and how the licensing and regulatory regime within Australia influenced the design of the RRR. In particular, the safety design features that have been incorporated as a result of the specific requirements of ANSTO and the Australian regulator will be briefly described. The paper will close with a description of how the RRR meets, and in many aspects exceeds the requirements of ANSTO and the Australian regulator. (author)

  16. Operating reactors licensing actions summary. Volume 5, No. 9

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-11-01

    This document is designed to provide the management of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) with an overview of licensing actions dealing with operating power and nonpower reactors. These reports utilize data collected from the Division of Licensing in the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation and are prepared by the Office of Resource Management

  17. Operating reactors licensing actions summary. Volume 5, No. 8

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-10-01

    This summary is designed to provide the management of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) with an overview of licensing actions dealing with operating power and nonpower reactors. These reports utilize data collected from the Division of Licensing in the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation and are prepared by the Office of Resource Management

  18. Operating reactors licensing actions summary. Volume 4, No. 9

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-11-01

    This document is designed to provide the management of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) with an overview of licensing actions dealing with operating power and nonpower reactors. These reports utilize data collected from the division of licensing in the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation and are prepared by the Office of Resource Management

  19. Operating reactors licensing actions summary. Vol. 4, No. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-04-01

    This summary is designed to provide the management of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) with an overview of licensing actions dealing with operating power and nonpower reactors. These reports utilize data collected from the Division of Licensing in the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation and are prepared by the Office of Resource Management

  20. Safety and licensing for small and medium power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trauger, D.B.

    1988-01-01

    Proposed new concepts for small and medium power reactors differ substantially from traditional Light Water Reactors (LWRs). Although designers have a large base of experience in safety and licensing, much of it is not relevant to new concepts. It can be a disadvantage if regulators apply LWR rules directly. A fresh start is appropriate. The extensive interactions between industry, regulators, and the public complicate but may enhance safety. It is basic to recognize the features that distinguish nuclear energy safety from that for other industries. These features include: Nuclear reactivity, fission product radiation, and radioactive decay heat. Small and medium power reactors offer potential advantages over LWRs, particularly for reactivity and decay heat. (orig.)

  1. Lessons learned from the licensing process for the Clinch River Breeder Reactor Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dickson, P.W.; Clare, G.H.

    1991-01-01

    This paper presents the experience of licensing a specific liquid-metal fast breeder reactor (LMFBR), the Clinch River Breader Reactor Plant (CRBRP). It was a success story in that the licensing process was accomplished in a very short time span. The actions of the applicant and the actions of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) in response are presented and discussed to provide guidance to future efforts to license unconventional reactors. The history is told from the perspective of the authors. As such, some of the reasons given for success or lack of success are subjective interpretations. Nevertheless, the authors' positions provided them an excellent viewpoint to make these judgements. During the second phase of the licensing process, they were the CRBRP Technical Director and the Licensing Manager, respectively, for the Westinghouse Electric Corporation, the prime contractor for the reactor plant

  2. Establishment of regulatory framework for the development reactor licensing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jo, Jong C.; Yune, Young G.; Kim, Woong S.; Ahn, Sang K.; Kim, In G.; Kim, Hho J.

    2003-01-01

    With a trend that various types of advanced reactor designs are currently under development worldwide, the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute has been developing an advanced reactor called ' System-integrated Modular Advanced Reactor (SMART)', which is a small sized integral type pressurized water reactor with a rated thermal power of 330 MW. To demonstrate the safety and the performance of the SMART reactor design, the SMART Research and Development Center has embarked to build a scaled-down pilot plant of SMART, called 'SMART-P' with a rated thermal power of 65 MW. In preparation for the forthcoming applications for both construction permit and operating license of SMART-P in the near future, the Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety is developing a new regulatory framework for licensing review of such a development reactor, which covers establishment of licensing process, identification and resolution of technical and safety issues, development of regulatory evaluation or verification-purpose computer codes and analytical methods, and establishment of design-specific, general design and operating criteria, regulations, and associated regulatory guides. This paper presents the current activities for establishing a regulatory framework for the licensing of a research and development reactor. Discussions are made on the SMART-P development program, the current Korean regulatory framework for reactor licensing, the SMART-P licensing-related issues, and the approach and strategy for developing an effective regulatory framework for the SMART-P licensing

  3. Undergraduate reactor control experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edwards, R.M.; Power, M.A.; Bryan, M.

    1992-01-01

    A sequence of reactor and related experiments has been a central element of a senior-level laboratory course at Pennsylvania State University (Penn State) for more than 20 yr. A new experiment has been developed where the students program and operate a computer controller that manipulates the speed of a secondary control rod to regulate TRIGA reactor power. Elementary feedback control theory is introduced to explain the experiment, which emphasizes the nonlinear aspect of reactor control where power level changes are equivalent to a change in control loop gain. Digital control of nuclear reactors has become more visible at Penn State with the replacement of the original analog-based TRIGA reactor control console with a modern computer-based digital control console. Several TRIGA reactor dynamics experiments, which comprise half of the three-credit laboratory course, lead to the control experiment finale: (a) digital simulation, (b) control rod calibration, (c) reactor pulsing, (d) reactivity oscillator, and (e) reactor noise

  4. Licensing of the first reload of Angra-1 reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alvarenga, M.A.B.

    1985-01-01

    The historical aspects related to the licensing of the first reload of Angra-1 reactor are presented. The dates, the institutions, the experts, as well as the documents generated during that process are presented. (M.I.)

  5. Licensing process for future applications of advanced-design nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, C.L.

    1990-01-01

    The existing 10CFR50 two-step licensing process in the Code of Federal Regulations can continue to be a viable licensing vehicle for future applications, at least for the near future. The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Commissioners and staff, the public, and the utilities (along with supporting architect/engineers and nuclear steam supply system vendors) have a vast body of experience and knowledge of the existing part 50 licensing process. All these participants are familiar with their respective roles in this process, and history shows this process to be a workable licensing vehicle. Nevertheless, the use of 10CFR52 should be encouraged for future applications. This proposed new rule is intended to achieve the early resolution of licensing issues, to reduce the complexity and uncertainty of the licensing process, and enhance the safety and reliability of nuclear power plants. Part 52's overall purpose is to improve reactor safety and streamline the licensing process by encouraging the use of standard reactor designs and by allowing the early resolution of site environmental and reactor safety issues. The public should be afforded an earlier entry into the licensing process as a result of design certification rulemaking process and combined construction permit/operating license hearings

  6. The strategy of experimental power reactor licensing in Indonesia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moch Djoko Birmano

    2015-01-01

    Currently, BATAN has being planned to develop Experimental Power Reactor (EPR), that is the research nuclear reactor that can generate power (electricity or heat). The EPR is planned will be built in the National Center for Research of Science and Technology (Puspiptek) area at Serpong, South Tangerang, Banten Province, with the choice of reactor types is HTGR with the power size of 10 MWth. As stated in the Act No. 10 year 1997 on Nuclear Power, that every construction and operation of nuclear reactors and other nuclear installations and decommissioning of nuclear reactors required to have a permit. Furthermore, the its implementation arrangements is regulated in Government Regulation (GR) No. 2 year 2014 on Licensing of Nuclear Installations and Nuclear Material Utilization, which contains the requirements and procedures for the licensing process since site, construction, commissioning, operation, and decommissioning, it means licensing is implemented during the activity of construction, operation and decommissioning of NPPs.While, for the more detailed licensing arrangements available in the guidelines of BAPETEN Chairman Regulation (BCR). This study was conducted to understand the legal and institutional aspects, types and stages, and the licensing process of RDE, and identify licensing strategy so that timely as planned. Methodologies used include the literature study, consultation with experts in BAPETEN, discussions in the national seminar including FGD. (author)

  7. Set of rules SOR 2 licensing of nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-05-01

    This is the set of rules promulgated by the Israel Atomic Energy Commission pursuant to the Supervision of Supplies and Services Law 5718-1957, Order regarding Supervision of Nuclear Reactors (1974) Chapter 3: Permits, to provide for the Licensing of Nuclear Reactors. (B.G.)

  8. Risk-assessment techniques and the reactor licensing process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levine, S.

    1979-01-01

    A brief description of the Reactor Safety Study (WASH-1400), concentrating on the engineering aspects of the contribution to reactor accident risks is followed by some comments on how we have applied the insights and techniques developed in this study to prepare a program to improve the safety of nuclear power plants. Some new work we are just beginning on the application of risk-assessment techniques to stablize the reactor licensing process is also discussed

  9. The development of reactor operator license examination question bank

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, In Hwan; Woo, S. M.; Kam, S. C.; Nam, K. J.; Lim, H. P.

    2001-12-01

    The number of NPP keeps increasing therefore there is more need of reactor operators. This trend requires the more efficiency in managing the license examination. Question bank system will help us to develop good quality examination materials and keep them in it. The ultimate purpose of the bank system is for selecting qualified reactor operators who are primarily responsible for the safety of reactor operation in NPP

  10. Challenges in licensing a sodium-cooled advanced recycling reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levin, Alan E.

    2008-01-01

    As part of the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP), the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has focused on the use of sodium-cooled fast reactors (SFRs) for the destruction of minor actinides derived from used reactor fuel. This approach engenders an array of challenges with respect to the licensing of the reactor: the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has never completed the review of an application for an operating license for a sodium-cooled reactor. Moreover, the current U.S. regulatory structure has been developed to deal almost exclusively with light-water reactor (LWR) designs. Consequently, the NRC must either (1) develop a new regulatory process for SFRs, or (2) reinterpret the existing regulations to apply them, as appropriate, to SFR designs. During the 1980s and 1990s, the NRC conducted preliminary safety assessments of the Sodium Advanced Fast Reactor (SAFR) and the Power Reactor Innovative Small Module (PRISM) designs, and in that context, began to consider how to apply LWR-based regulations to SFR designs. This paper builds on that work to consider the challenges, from the reactor designer's point of view, associated with licensing an SFR today, considering (1) the evolution of SFR designs, (2) the particular requirements of reactor designs to meet GNEP objectives, and (3) the evolution of NRC regulations since the conclusion of the SAFR and PRISM reviews. (author)

  11. Systems engineering and the licensing of Small Modular Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kulesa, T., E-mail: tkulesa@us.ibm.com [IBM, Philidelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Soderholm, K., E-mail: Kristiina.Soderholm@fortum.com [Fortum Power (Finland); Fechtelkotter, P., E-mail: pfech@us.ibm.com [IBM, Boston, Massacheusets (United States)

    2014-07-01

    Both global warming and the need for dependable sources of energy continue to make nuclear power generation an appealing option. But a history of cost overruns, project delays, and environmental disaster has pushed the industry to innovate and design a more flexible, scalable, and safe source of nuclear energy - the small modular reactor. Innovation in generation technology creates disruption in already complex licensing and regulatory processes. This paper discusses how the application of systems engineering and requirements management can help combat confusion, rework, and efficiency problems across the engineering and compliance life cycle. The paper is based on the PhD Dissertation 'Licensing Model Development for Small Modular Reactors (SMRs) - Focusing on Finnish Regulatory Framework', approved in 2013. The result of the study gives recommendations and tools to develop and optimize the licensing process for SMRs. The most important SMR-specific feature, in terms of licensing, is the modularity of the design. Here the modularity indicates multi-module SMR designs, which creates new challenges in the licensing process. Another feature impacting licensing feasibility is the plan to build many standardized power plants in series and use factory-fabricated modules to optimize the construction costs. SMR licensing challenges are under discussion in many international forums, such as World Nuclear Association Cooperation in Reactor Design Evaluation and Licensing Small Modular Reactor group (WNA CORDEL SMR) group and IAEA INPRO regulators' forum. This paper also presents an application of the new licensing process using Systems Engineering, Requirements Management, and Project Management practices and tools. (author)

  12. Systems engineering and the licensing of Small Modular Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulesa, T.; Soderholm, K.; Fechtelkotter, P.

    2014-01-01

    Both global warming and the need for dependable sources of energy continue to make nuclear power generation an appealing option. But a history of cost overruns, project delays, and environmental disaster has pushed the industry to innovate and design a more flexible, scalable, and safe source of nuclear energy - the small modular reactor. Innovation in generation technology creates disruption in already complex licensing and regulatory processes. This paper discusses how the application of systems engineering and requirements management can help combat confusion, rework, and efficiency problems across the engineering and compliance life cycle. The paper is based on the PhD Dissertation 'Licensing Model Development for Small Modular Reactors (SMRs) - Focusing on Finnish Regulatory Framework', approved in 2013. The result of the study gives recommendations and tools to develop and optimize the licensing process for SMRs. The most important SMR-specific feature, in terms of licensing, is the modularity of the design. Here the modularity indicates multi-module SMR designs, which creates new challenges in the licensing process. Another feature impacting licensing feasibility is the plan to build many standardized power plants in series and use factory-fabricated modules to optimize the construction costs. SMR licensing challenges are under discussion in many international forums, such as World Nuclear Association Cooperation in Reactor Design Evaluation and Licensing Small Modular Reactor group (WNA CORDEL SMR) group and IAEA INPRO regulators' forum. This paper also presents an application of the new licensing process using Systems Engineering, Requirements Management, and Project Management practices and tools. (author)

  13. Licensing of advanced reactors: Status report and perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, T.

    1988-01-01

    In July, 1986, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission issued a Policy State on the Regulation of Advanced Nuclear Power Plants. As part of this policy, advanced reactor designers were encouraged to interact with NRC [Nuclear Regulatory Commission] early in the design process to obtain feedback regarding licensing requirements for advanced reactors. Accordingly, the staff has been interacting with the Department of Energy (DOE) and its contractors on the review of three advanced reactor conceptual designs: one modular high temperature gas-cooled reactor (MHTGR) and two liquid metal reactors (LMRs). This paper provides a status of the NRC review effort, describes the key policy and technical issues resulting from our review and provides the current status and approach to the development of licensing guidance on each

  14. Role of fission gas release in reactor licensing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-11-01

    The release of fission gases from oxide pellets to the fuel rod internal voidage (gap) is reviewed with regard to the required safety analysis in reactor licensing. Significant analyzed effects are described, prominent gas release models are reviewed, and various methods used in the licensing process are summarized. The report thus serves as a guide to a large body of literature including company reports and government documents. A discussion of the state of the art of gas release analysis is presented

  15. The Dragon reactor experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1976-01-01

    The concept on which the Dragon Reactor Experiment was based was evolved at the Atomic Energy Research Establishment at Harwell in 1956, and in February of that year a High Temperature Gas- cooled Reactor Project Group was set up to study the feasibility of a helium-cooled reactor with a graphite or beryllium moderator, and with the emphasis on the thorium fuel cycle [af

  16. AGING MANAGMENT OF REACTOR COOLANT SYSTEM MECHANICAL COMPONENTS FOR LICENSE RENEWAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    SUBUDHI, M.; MORANTE, R.; LEE, A.D.

    2002-01-01

    The reactor coolant system (RCS) mechanical components that require an aging management review for license renewal include the primary loop piping and associated connections to other support systems, reactor vessel, reactor vessel internals, pressurizer. steam generators, reactor coolant pumps, and all other inter-connected piping, pipe fittings, valves, and bolting. All major RCS components are located inside the reactor building. Based on the evaluation findings of recently submitted license renewal applications for pressurized water reactors, this paper presents the plant programs and/or activities proposed by the applicants to manage the effects of aging. These programs and/or activities provide reasonable assurance that the intended function(s) of these mechanical components will be maintained for the period of extended operation. The license renewal application includes identification of RCS subcomponents that are within the scope of license renewal and are vulnerable to age-related degradation when exposed to environmental and operational conditions. determination of the effects of aging on their intended safety functions. and implementation of the aging management programs and/or activities including both current and new programs. Industry-wide operating experience, including generic communication by the NRC, is part of the aging management review for the RCS components. In addition, this paper discusses time-limited aging analyses associated with neutron embrittlement of the reactor vessel beltline region and thermal fatigue

  17. Licensing issues for inherently safe fast reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kastenberg, W.E.; Lee, S.; Okrent, D.

    1986-01-01

    There has been considerable interest recently in a new generation of liquid metal reactor (LMR) concepts in the US. Some significant changes in regulatory philosophy will be required if the anticipated cost advantages of inherently safe designs are to be achieved. The defense in depth philosophy will need to be significantly re-evaluated in the context of inherently safe reactors. It is the purpose of this paper to begin such a re-evaluation of this regulatory philosophy

  18. Reactor licensing process: a status report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Long, J.A.

    1977-01-01

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), in its review of applications for licenses to construct and operate nuclear power plants, is required to consider those measures necessary to ensure the protection of the health and safety of the public and the environment. The article discusses the NRC staff procedures and policies for conducting the detailed safety, environmental, and antitrust reviews that provide the basis for these assurances. Included is a discussion of the improvements to the licensing process currently being proposed or implemented to enhance its stability and predictability for the benefit of all involved with the regulation of nuclear power. The views and opinions expressed in the article are those of the author alone and do not represent positions of the NRC

  19. Licensing procedures and safety criteria for research reactors in France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berry, J.L.; Lerouge, B.

    1980-11-01

    This paper summarizes the recent evolution of the French research reactor capacity, describes the licensing process, the main safety criteria which are taken into consideration, and associated safety research. Some of the existing facilities underwent important modifications to comply with more severe safety criteria, increase the experimental capabilities or qualify new low-enrichment fuels for research reactors. At the end, a few considerations are given to the consequences of the Osiris core conversion

  20. Decentralization of operating reactor licensing reviews: NRR Pilot Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hannon, J.N.

    1984-07-01

    This report, which has incorporated comments received from the Commission and ACRS, describes the program for decentralization of selected operating reactor licensing technical review activities. The 2-year pilot program will be reviewed to verify that safety is enhanced as anticipated by the incorporation of prescribed management techniques and application of resources. If the program fails to operate as designed, it will be terminated

  1. Experience acquired by Furnas for licensing nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, A.J.C. da; Xavier, E.E.

    1986-01-01

    The system for licensing of Almirante Alvaro Alberto Nuclear Power Plant-Unit 1 is presented. The process phases for reactor construction and operation are described: preliminary site approval; bases for safety review; partial construction permits; final construction permits; emission of final report of safety analysis; initial operation license and permanent operation license. (M.C.K.) [pt

  2. Nuclear power reactor licensing and regulation in the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shapar, H.K.

    1979-01-01

    The report is devoted to four subjects: an explanation of the origins, statutory basis and development of the present regulatory system in the United States; a description of the various actions which must be taken by a license applicant and by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission before a nuclear power plant can be constructed and placed on-line, an account of the current regulatory practices followed by the US NRC in licensing nuclear power reactors; an identification of some of the 'lessons learned' from the Three Mile Island accident and some proposed regulatory and legislative solutions. (NEA) [fr

  3. Sodium Fast Reactor Safety and Licensing Research Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Denman, Matthew; Lachance, Jeff; Sofu, Tanju; Wigeland, Roald; Flanagan, George; Bari, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Conclusions: The Sodium Fast Reactor Safety and Licensing Research Plan reports conclude a multi-year expert elicitation process. All information included in the studies are publicly available and the reports are UUR. These reports are intended to guide SFR researchers in the safety and licensing arena to important and outstanding issues Two (and a half) projects have been funded based on the recommendations in this report: • Modernization of SAS4A; • Incorporation of Contain/LMR with MELCOR; • (Data recovery at INL and PNNL)

  4. 78 FR 5840 - Notice of License Termination for University of Illinois Advanced TRIGA Reactor, License No. R-115

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-28

    ... University of Illinois Advanced TRIGA Reactor, License No. R-115 The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is noticing the termination of Facility Operating License No. R-115, for the University of Illinois... Operating License No. R-115 is terminated. The above referenced documents may be examined, and/or copied for...

  5. Health physics aspects of advanced reactor licensing reviews

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hinson, C.S.

    1995-01-01

    The last Construction Permit to be issued by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) for a U.S. light water reactor (LWR) was granted in the late 1970s. In 1989 the NRC issued 10 CFR Part 52 which is intended to serve as a framework for the licensing of future reactor designs. The NRC is currently reviewing four different future on open-quotes next-generationclose quotes reactor designs. Two of these designs are classified as evolutionary designs (modified versions of current generation LWRs) and two are advanced designs (reactors incorporating simplified designs and passive means for accident mitigation). These open-quotes next-generationclose quotes reactor designs incorporate many innovative design features which are intended to maintain personnel doses ALARA and ensure that the annual average collective dose at these reactors does not exceed 100 person-rems (1 person-sievert) per year. This paper discusses some of the ALARA design features which are incorporated in the four open-quotes next-generationclose quotes reactor designs incorporate many innovative design features which are intended to maintain personnel doses ALARA and ensure that the annual average collective dose at these reactors does not exceed 100 person-rems (1 person-sievert) per year. This paper discusses some of the ALARA design features which are incorporated in the four open-quotes next-generationclose quotes reactor designs currently being reviewed by the NRC

  6. Health physics aspects of advanced reactor licensing reviews

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hinson, C.S. [Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States)

    1995-03-01

    The last Construction Permit to be issued by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) for a U.S. light water reactor (LWR) was granted in the late 1970s. In 1989 the NRC issued 10 CFR Part 52 which is intended to serve as a framework for the licensing of future reactor designs. The NRC is currently reviewing four different future on {open_quotes}next-generation{close_quotes} reactor designs. Two of these designs are classified as evolutionary designs (modified versions of current generation LWRs) and two are advanced designs (reactors incorporating simplified designs and passive means for accident mitigation). These {open_quotes}next-generation{close_quotes} reactor designs incorporate many innovative design features which are intended to maintain personnel doses ALARA and ensure that the annual average collective dose at these reactors does not exceed 100 person-rems (1 person-sievert) per year. This paper discusses some of the ALARA design features which are incorporated in the four {open_quotes}next-generation{close_quotes} reactor designs incorporate many innovative design features which are intended to maintain personnel doses ALARA and ensure that the annual average collective dose at these reactors does not exceed 100 person-rems (1 person-sievert) per year. This paper discusses some of the ALARA design features which are incorporated in the four {open_quotes}next-generation{close_quotes} reactor designs currently being reviewed by the NRC.

  7. Licensing of ANSTO'S OPAL reactor during construction and commissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Summerfield, M.W.; Ordonez, J.P.

    2006-01-01

    Full text: This paper presents a general description of the ongoing licensing activities associated with the construction and commissioning of the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation's (ANSTO) Open Pool Australian Light-water (OPAL) Reactor at their Lucas Heights site. It addresses the following aspects: The Construction Licence - what it is and what impact it had on the construction of the OPAL Reactor, specifically the various Construction Licence Conditions; The interface between ANSTO, INVAP and ARPANSA during the construction of the OPAL Reactor, particularly in relation to ARPANS Regulation 54; Specific licensing issues that have arisen during the construction and commissioning process and how they have been resolved; The Operating Licence Application - what it is and how it interfaces with the construction and commissioning of the OPAL Reactor. These aspects are all addressed from the point of view of the licensee ANSTO and the RRR Project. Particular emphasis will be given to the way in which the licensing process is integrated into the overall project program and the lessons learnt that may be of benefit to other licensees and regulators. Note that this paper is an update of a presentation given at IGORR10 and follows on from a paper previously presented at PNBC12 in October 2002

  8. HTR-PM Safety requirement and Licensing experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Fu; Zhang Zuoyi; Dong Yujie; Wu Zongxin; Sun Yuliang

    2014-01-01

    HTR-PM is a 200MWe modular pebble bed high temperature reactor demonstration plant which is being built in Shidao Bay, Weihai, Shandong, China. The main design parameters of HTR-PM were fixed in 2006, the basic design was completed in 2008. The review of Preliminary Safety Analysis Report (PSAR) of HTR-PM was started in April 2008, completed in September 2009. In general, HTR- PM design complies with the current safety requirement for nuclear power plant in China, no special standards are developed for modular HTR. Anyway, Chinese Nuclear Safety Authority, together with the designers, developed some dedicated design criteria for key systems and components and published the guideline for the review of safety analysis report of HTR-PM, based on the experiences from licensing of HTR-10 and new development of nuclear safety. The probabilistic safety goal for HTR-PM was also defined by the safety authority. The review of HTR-PM PSAR lasted for one and a half years, with 3 dialogues meetings and 8 topics meetings, with more than 2000 worksheets and answer sheets. The heavily discussed topics during the PSAR review process included: the requirement for the sub-atmospheric ventilation system, the utilization of PSA in design process, the scope of beyond design basis accidents, the requirement for the qualification of TRISO coating particle fuel, and etc. Because of the characteristics of first of a kind for the demonstration plant, the safety authority emphasized the requirement for the experiment and validation, the PSAR was licensed with certain licensing conditions. The whole licensing process was under control, and was re-evaluated again after Fukushima accident to be shown that the design of HTR-PM complies with current safety requirement. This is a good example for how to license a new reactor. (author)

  9. Sodium fast reactor safety and licensing research plan. Volume II.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ludewig, H. (Brokhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY); Powers, D. A.; Hewson, John C.; LaChance, Jeffrey L.; Wright, A. (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL); Phillips, J.; Zeyen, R. (Institute for Energy Petten, Saint-Paul-lez-Durance, France); Clement, B. (IRSN/DPAM.SEMIC Bt 702, Saint-Paul-lez-Durance, France); Garner, Frank (Radiation Effects Consulting, Richland, WA); Walters, Leon (Advanced Reactor Concepts, Los Alamos, NM); Wright, Steve; Ott, Larry J. (Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN); Suo-Anttila, Ahti Jorma; Denning, Richard (Ohio State University, Columbus, OH); Ohshima, Hiroyuki (Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Ibaraki, Japan); Ohno, S. (Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Ibaraki, Japan); Miyhara, S. (Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Ibaraki, Japan); Yacout, Abdellatif (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL); Farmer, M. (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL); Wade, D. (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL); Grandy, C. (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL); Schmidt, R.; Cahalen, J. (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL); Olivier, Tara Jean; Budnitz, R. (Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA); Tobita, Yoshiharu (Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Ibaraki, Japan); Serre, Frederic (Centre d' %C3%94etudes nucl%C3%94eaires de Cadarache, Cea, France); Natesan, Ken (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL); Carbajo, Juan J. (Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN); Jeong, Hae-Yong (Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon, Korea); Wigeland, Roald (Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID); Corradini, Michael (University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI); Thomas, Justin (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL); Wei, Tom (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL); Sofu, Tanju (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL); Flanagan, George F. (Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN); Bari, R. (Brokhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY); Porter D. (Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID); Lambert, J. (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL); Hayes, S. (Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID); Sackett, J. (Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID); Denman, Matthew R.

    2012-05-01

    Expert panels comprised of subject matter experts identified at the U.S. National Laboratories (SNL, ANL, INL, ORNL, LBL, and BNL), universities (University of Wisconsin and Ohio State University), international agencies (IRSN, CEA, JAEA, KAERI, and JRC-IE) and private consultation companies (Radiation Effects Consulting) were assembled to perform a gap analysis for sodium fast reactor licensing. Expert-opinion elicitation was performed to qualitatively assess the current state of sodium fast reactor technologies. Five independent gap analyses were performed resulting in the following topical reports: (1) Accident Initiators and Sequences (i.e., Initiators/Sequences Technology Gap Analysis), (2) Sodium Technology Phenomena (i.e., Advanced Burner Reactor Sodium Technology Gap Analysis), (3) Fuels and Materials (i.e., Sodium Fast Reactor Fuels and Materials: Research Needs), (4) Source Term Characterization (i.e., Advanced Sodium Fast Reactor Accident Source Terms: Research Needs), and (5) Computer Codes and Models (i.e., Sodium Fast Reactor Gaps Analysis of Computer Codes and Models for Accident Analysis and Reactor Safety). Volume II of the Sodium Research Plan consolidates the five gap analysis reports produced by each expert panel, wherein the importance of the identified phenomena and necessities of further experimental research and code development were addressed. The findings from these five reports comprised the basis for the analysis in Sodium Fast Reactor Research Plan Volume I.

  10. Sodium fast reactor safety and licensing research plan - Volume II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ludewig, H.; Powers, D.A.; Hewson, John C.; LaChance, Jeffrey L.; Wright, A.; Phillips, J.; Zeyen, R.; Clement, B.; Garner, Frank; Walters, Leon; Wright, Steve; Ott, Larry J.; Suo-Anttila, Ahti Jorma; Denning, Richard; Ohshima, Hiroyuki; Ohno, S.; Miyhara, S.; Yacout, Abdellatif; Farmer, M.; Wade, D.; Grandy, C.; Schmidt, R.; Cahalen, J.; Olivier, Tara Jean; Budnitz, R.; Tobita, Yoshiharu; Serre, Frederic; Natesan, Ken; Carbajo, Juan J.; Jeong, Hae-Yong; Wigeland, Roald; Corradini, Michael; Thomas, Justin; Wei, Tom; Sofu, Tanju; Flanagan, George F.; Bari, R.; Porter D.

    2012-01-01

    Expert panels comprised of subject matter experts identified at the U.S. National Laboratories (SNL, ANL, INL, ORNL, LBL, and BNL), universities (University of Wisconsin and Ohio State University), international agencies (IRSN, CEA, JAEA, KAERI, and JRC-IE) and private consultation companies (Radiation Effects Consulting) were assembled to perform a gap analysis for sodium fast reactor licensing. Expert-opinion elicitation was performed to qualitatively assess the current state of sodium fast reactor technologies. Five independent gap analyses were performed resulting in the following topical reports: (1) Accident Initiators and Sequences (i.e., Initiators/Sequences Technology Gap Analysis), (2) Sodium Technology Phenomena (i.e., Advanced Burner Reactor Sodium Technology Gap Analysis), (3) Fuels and Materials (i.e., Sodium Fast Reactor Fuels and Materials: Research Needs), (4) Source Term Characterization (i.e., Advanced Sodium Fast Reactor Accident Source Terms: Research Needs), and (5) Computer Codes and Models (i.e., Sodium Fast Reactor Gaps Analysis of Computer Codes and Models for Accident Analysis and Reactor Safety). Volume II of the Sodium Research Plan consolidates the five gap analysis reports produced by each expert panel, wherein the importance of the identified phenomena and necessities of further experimental research and code development were addressed. The findings from these five reports comprised the basis for the analysis in Sodium Fast Reactor Research Plan Volume I.

  11. Licensing procedures and safety criteria for research reactors in France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berry, J.L.; Lerouge, B.

    1983-01-01

    From the very beginning of the CEA up to now, a great deal of work has been devoted to the development and utilization of research reactors in France for the needs of fundamental and applied research, production of radioisotopes, and training. In recent years, new reactors were commissioned while others were decommissioned. Moreover some of the existing facilities underwent important modifications to comply with more severe safety criteria, increase the experimental capabilities or qualify new low-enrichment fuels for research reactors (Osiris and Isis). This paper summarizes the recent evolution of the French research reactor capacity, describes the licensing process, the main safety criteria which are taken into consideration, and associated safety research. At the end, a few considerations are given to the consequences of the Osiris core conversion. Safety of research reactors has been studied in detail and many improvements have been brought due to: implementation of a specific experimental program, and adaptation of safety principles and rules elaborated for power reactors. Research reactors in operation in France have been built within a 22 year period. Meanwhile, safety rules have been improved. Old reactors do not comply with all the new rules but modifications are continuously made: after analysis of incidents, when replacement of equipment has to be carried out, when an important modification (fuel conversion for example) is decided upon

  12. Licensing procedures and safety criteria for research reactors in France

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berry, J L; Lerouge, B [Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires de Saclay (France)

    1983-08-01

    From the very beginning of the CEA up to now, a great deal of work has been devoted to the development and utilization of research reactors in France for the needs of fundamental and applied research, production of radioisotopes, and training. In recent years, new reactors were commissioned while others were decommissioned. Moreover some of the existing facilities underwent important modifications to comply with more severe safety criteria, increase the experimental capabilities or qualify new low-enrichment fuels for research reactors (Osiris and Isis). This paper summarizes the recent evolution of the French research reactor capacity, describes the licensing process, the main safety criteria which are taken into consideration, and associated safety research. At the end, a few considerations are given to the consequences of the Osiris core conversion. Safety of research reactors has been studied in detail and many improvements have been brought due to: implementation of a specific experimental program, and adaptation of safety principles and rules elaborated for power reactors. Research reactors in operation in France have been built within a 22 year period. Meanwhile, safety rules have been improved. Old reactors do not comply with all the new rules but modifications are continuously made: after analysis of incidents, when replacement of equipment has to be carried out, when an important modification (fuel conversion for example) is decided upon.

  13. Licensed operating reactors: status summary report, data as of May 31, 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-06-01

    The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's monthly LICENSED OPERATING REACTORS Status Summary Report provides data on the operation of nuclear units as timely and accurately as possible. This report is divided into three sections: the first contains monthly highlights and statistics for commercial operating units, and errata from previously reported data; the second is a compilation of detailed information on each unit, provided by NRC Regional Offices, IE Headquarters and the Utilities; and the third section is an appendix for miscellaneous information such as spent fuel storage capability, reactor years of experience and non-power reactors in the United States

  14. Licensed operating reactors: Status summary report, data as of 02-28-89

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-03-01

    The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's monthly Licensed Operating Reactor Status Summary Report provides data on the operation of nuclear units as timely and accurately as possible. This report is divided into three sections: the first contains monthly highlights and statistics for commercial operating units, and errata from previously reported data; the second is a compilation of detailed information on each unit, provided by NRC Regional Offices, IE Headquarters and the Utilities; and the third section is an appendix for miscellaneous information such as spent fuel storage capability, reactor years of experience and non-power reactors in the United States

  15. Licensed operating reactors status summary report data as of January 31, 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwartz, I.

    1989-03-01

    The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's monthly LICENSED OPERATING REACTORS Status Summary Report provides data on the operation of nuclear units as timely and accurately as possible. This report is divided into three sections: the first contains monthly highlights and statistics for commercial operating units, and errata from previously reported data; the second is a compilation of detailed information on each unit, provided by NRC Regional Offices, IE Headquarters and the Utilities; and the third section is an appendix for miscellaneous information, such as spent fuel storage capability, reactor years of experience, and non-power reactors in the United States

  16. Licensed operating reactors. Status summary report, data as of 8-31-82

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-09-01

    The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's monthly LICENSED OPERATING REACTORS Status Summary Report provides data on the operation of nuclear units as timely and accurately as possible. This report is divided into three sections: the first contains monthly highlights and statistics for commercial operating units, and errata from previously reported data; the second is a compilation of detailed information on each unit, provided by NRC Regional Offices, IE Headquarters and the Utilities; and the third section is an appendix for miscellaneous information such as spent fuel storage capability, reactor years of experience and non-power reactors in the United States

  17. Licensed operating reactors: Status summary report data as of 9-30-86

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-03-01

    The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's monthly Licensed Operating Reactors Status Summary Report provides data on the operation of nuclear units as timely and accurately as possible. This report is divided into three sections: the first contains monthly highlights and statistics for commercial operating units, and errata from previously reported data; the second is a compilation of detailed information on each unit, provided by NRC Regional Offices. IE Headquarters and the Utilities; and the third section is an appendix for miscellaneous information such as spent fuel storage capability, reactor years of experience and non-power reactors in the United States

  18. Licensed operating reactors status summary report, data as of December 31, 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-02-01

    The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's monthly LICENSED OPERATING REACTORS Status Summary Report provides data on the operation of nuclear units as timely and accurately as possible. This report is divided into three sections: the first contains monthly highlights and statistics for commercial operating units, and errata from previously reported data; the second is a compilation of detailed information on each unit, provided by NRC Regional Offices, IE Headquarters and the Utilities; and the third section is an appendix for miscellaneous information such as spent fuel storage capability, reactor years of experience and non-power reactors in the United States

  19. Licensed operating reactors status summary report data as of April 30, 1983. Vol. 7, No. 5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-05-01

    The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's monthly Licensed Operating Reactors Status Summary Report provides data on the operation of nuclear units as timely and accurately as possible. This report is divided into three sections: the first contains monthly highlights and statistics for commercial operating units, and errata from previously reported data; the second is a compilation of detailed information on each unit, provided by NRC Regional Offices, IE Headquarters and the Utilities; and the third section is an appendix for miscellaneous information such as spent fuel storage capability, reactor years of experience and non-power reactors in the United States

  20. Licensed operating reactors. Status summary report data as of October 31, 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-11-01

    The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's monthly LICENSED OPERATING REACTORS Status Summary Report provides data on the operation of nuclear units as timely and accurately as possible. This report is divided into three sections: the first contains monthly highlights and statistics for commercial operating units, and errata from previously reported data; the second is a compilation of detailed information on each unit, provided by NRC Regional Offices, IE Headquarters and the Utilities; and the third section is an appendix for miscellaneous information such as spent fuel storage capability, reactor years of experience and non-power reactors in the United States

  1. Licensed operating reactors: status summary report, data as of May 31, 1983. Volume 7, No. 6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-06-01

    The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's monthly Licensed Operating Reactors Status Summary Report provides data on the operation of nuclear units as timely and accurately as possible. This report is divided into three sections: the first contains monthly highlights and statistics for commercial operating units, and errata from previously reported data; the second is a compilation of detailed information on each unit, provided by NRC Regional Offices, IE Headquarters and the Utilities; and the third section is an appendix for miscellaneous information such as spent fuel storage capability, reactor years of experience and non-power reactors in the United States

  2. Licensed operating reactors: Status summary report, data as of 11-30-88

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's monthly LICENSED OPERATING REACTORS Status Summary Report provides data on the operation of nuclear units as timely and accurately as possible. This report is divided into three sections: the first contains monthly highlights and statistics for commercial operating units, and errata from previously reported data; the second is a compilation of detailed information on each unit, provided by NRC Regional Offices, IE Headquarters and the Utilities; and the third section is an appendix for miscellaneous information, such as spent fuel storage capability, reactor years of experience, and non-power reactors in the United States

  3. Licensed operating reactors: Status summary report, data as of 11-30-86

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-06-01

    The operating units status report - licensed operating reactors provides data on the operation of nuclear units as timely and accurately as possible. This information is collected by the Office of Administration and Resources Management from the Headquarters staff of NRC's Office of Enforcement (OE), from NRC's Regional Offices, OE Headquarters and the utilities; and an appendix for miscellaneous information such as spent fuel storage capability, reactor-years of experience and non-power reactors in the US. It is hoped the report is helpful to all agencies and individuals interested in maintaining an awareness of the US energy situation as a whole

  4. Licensed operating reactors: Status summary report, Data as of 08-31-86

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-03-01

    The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's monthly LICENSED OPERATING REACTORS Status Summary Report provides data on the operation of nuclear units as timely and accurately as possible. This report is divided into three sections: the first contains monthly highlights and statistics for commercial operating units, and errata from previously reported data; the second is a compilation of detailed information on each unit, provided by NRC Regional Offices, IE Headquarters and the Utilities; and the third section is an appendix for miscellaneous information such as spent fuel storage capability, reactor years of experience and non-power reactors in the United States

  5. Licensing of the OPAL reactor during construction and commissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Summerfield, M.

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents a description of the licensing activities associated with the construction and commissioning of the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation's (ANSTO) OPAL reactor. It addresses the Construction Licence, the interface between ANSTO, INVAP (the contractor with responsibility for design and construction of the facility) and the Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety Agency (ARPANSA, the Australian nuclear regulator) during the construction of OPAL, specific licensing issues that have arisen during the construction and commissioning process, and the Operating Licence Application. Particular emphasis will be given to the way in which the licensing process is integrated into the overall project program and the lessons learnt that may be of benefit to other licensees and regulators

  6. Small modular reactors: current status, economic aspects and licensing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zimbron E, E.; Puente E, F.

    2014-10-01

    Interest for nuclear energy had resurgence since the beginning of the new century. This was a consequence of the new world conditions and needs: increasing energy demands (mainly from developing countries), awareness of the importance of energetic security and the necessity of limiting carbon emissions. In this nuclear boom, Small Modular Reactors (SMRs) develop and start to consolidate as a viable option for the present energy market. Their modular characteristics, lower initial capital cost, passive safety features and their niche applications, situate them as a technology with various advantages. The following study will present and analysis that will help to comprehend the SMRs present status. Information will show planned reactors, reactors in construction and in operation, advantages and challenges of their implementation, relevant economic aspects and important licensing factors that need to be highlighted. The analysis showed that the SMR technology is still in an initial stage that could reach and important development point in the next ten years. In this period, many of the reactors that are in design stage or that are through their licensing process might be constructed and could be getting ready for a commercial status. On the other hand, it has been observed that there are two main economic factors that need to be considered for any SMRs implementation project. First, the costs (initial, operation, maintenance, fuel and decommissioning) and second their possible niche market applications. Additionally, it has been noted that the licensing process is one of the greatest challenges for SMR general development. Licensing is mainly related to topic such as Emergency Planning Zone, first-of-a-kind engineering, passive safety features, proliferation resistance, multiple module designs and staffing. Previous information will serve as a base for carrying out a feasibility assessment analysis for SMR in Mexico. This part will be the last section of the project

  7. Small modular reactors: current status, economic aspects and licensing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zimbron E, E. [Instituto Tecnologico de Estudios Superiores de Monterrey, Campus Santa Fe, Av. Carlos Lazo No. 100, Santa Fe, 01389 Mexico D. F. (Mexico); Puente E, F., E-mail: erick.zimbron@gmail.com [ININ, Direccion de Investigacion Cientifica, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2014-10-15

    Interest for nuclear energy had resurgence since the beginning of the new century. This was a consequence of the new world conditions and needs: increasing energy demands (mainly from developing countries), awareness of the importance of energetic security and the necessity of limiting carbon emissions. In this nuclear boom, Small Modular Reactors (SMRs) develop and start to consolidate as a viable option for the present energy market. Their modular characteristics, lower initial capital cost, passive safety features and their niche applications, situate them as a technology with various advantages. The following study will present and analysis that will help to comprehend the SMRs present status. Information will show planned reactors, reactors in construction and in operation, advantages and challenges of their implementation, relevant economic aspects and important licensing factors that need to be highlighted. The analysis showed that the SMR technology is still in an initial stage that could reach and important development point in the next ten years. In this period, many of the reactors that are in design stage or that are through their licensing process might be constructed and could be getting ready for a commercial status. On the other hand, it has been observed that there are two main economic factors that need to be considered for any SMRs implementation project. First, the costs (initial, operation, maintenance, fuel and decommissioning) and second their possible niche market applications. Additionally, it has been noted that the licensing process is one of the greatest challenges for SMR general development. Licensing is mainly related to topic such as Emergency Planning Zone, first-of-a-kind engineering, passive safety features, proliferation resistance, multiple module designs and staffing. Previous information will serve as a base for carrying out a feasibility assessment analysis for SMR in Mexico. This part will be the last section of the project

  8. 77 FR 26321 - Reed College, Reed Research Nuclear Reactor, Renewed Facility Operating License No. R-112

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-03

    ... Nuclear Reactor, Renewed Facility Operating License No. R-112 AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission... Commission (NRC or the Commission) has issued renewed Facility Operating License No. R- 112, held by Reed... License No. R-112 will expire 20 years from its date of issuance. The renewed facility operating license...

  9. Reactors Project Delivery: The Value of Experiance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stosic, V. Zoran

    2014-01-01

    State of Affairs: Energy Potential and Density versus Environmental Load of different Energy Sources, Development of Fuel into Energy/Electricity Generation, Production Costs of Electricity, Contributions of Nuclear Energy to Security of Energy Supply, Recent Nuclear Development, Public Support growing again. Projects Status: Reactors under Construction, Different Projects Industrial Schemes, Projects Overview. The Value of Experience: Licensing, Standardization on Early Engineering Activities, Supply Chain and Manufacturing of Heavy Components, Installation, Procurement. (author)

  10. License renewal of the HFR research reactor - A regulatory view

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van der Plas, Y.

    2006-01-01

    Full text: Regulatory policy in The Netherlands is having safety evaluations of a nuclear installation each ten year. Recently a periodic safety evaluation has been finished on the 45 MW High Flux Reactor (HFR) in Petten divided over the following main topics: Risk Scoping Study; HEU-LEU fuel conversion; Evaluation against a pre-defined Reference Licensing Basis; Ageing study. The Risk Scoping Study is a limited probabilistic safety assessment showing scenarios towards serious core degradation and their probabilities. Individual risks for members of the public induced by the incidents analyzed in the first phase are compared with the mortality limits and probabilistic doses limits of the national BKSE decree. For non- proliferation reasons the fuel is converted from high to low enriched uranium. Before starting the project a reference licensing basis (RLB) was defined. A list of postulated initiating events (PIEs), re-establishing a design basis has been approved. An ageing management system shall provide information on the actual status and the residual life time of the plant. The evaluation results into a list of deficiencies, recommendations and suggestions from which modifications are to be proposed. Examples are: more redundancy and separation within the reactor protection system; renewal of the emergency and decay heat cooling; addition of a secundary reactor shut down system; more redundancy in the electric power supply; addition of injection valves introducing efficient use of passive cooling inventor) under LOCA conditions; damping of the impact from loads accidentally falling into the pool. A new nuclear license was issued begin 2004, covering all modifications which are to be implemented ultimate end 2007

  11. Assessment of specialized educational programs for licensed nuclear reactor operators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melber, B.D.; Saari, L.M.; White, A.S.; Geisendorfer, C.L.; Huenefeld, J.C.

    1986-02-01

    This report assesses the job-relatedness of specialized educational programs for licensed nuclear reactor operators. The approach used involved systematically comparing the curriculum of specialized educational programs for college credit, to academic knowledge identified as necessary for carrying out the jobs of licenses reactor operators. A sample of eight programs, including A.S. degree, B.S. degree, and coursework programs were studied. Subject matter experts in the field of nuclear operations curriculum and training determined the extent to which individual program curricula covered the identified job-related academic knowledge. The major conclusions of the report are: There is a great deal of variation among individual programs, ranging from coverage of 15% to 65% of the job-related academic knowledge. Four schools cover at least half, and four schools cover less than one-third of this knowledge content; There is no systematic difference in the job-relatedness of the different types of specialized educational programs, A.S. degree, B.S. degree, and coursework; and Traditional B.S. degree programs in nuclear engineering cover as much job-related knowledge (about one-half of this knowledge content) as most of the specialized educational programs

  12. Safety-evaluation report related to renewal of the operating license for the Texas A and M University Research Reactor. Docket No. 50-128, License R-83

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-03-01

    This Safety Evaluation Report for the application filed by the Texas A and M University (Texas A and M) for a renewal of operating license number R-83 to continue to operate a research reactor has been prepared by the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The facility is owned and operated by the Texas Engineering and Experiment Station of the Texas A and M University and is located on the campus in College Station, Brazos County, Texas. The staff concludes that the TRIGA reactor facility can continue to be operated by Texas A and M University without endangering the health and safety of the public

  13. Aspects of the licensing procedures for enrichment reduction in research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krull, W.

    1983-01-01

    The enrichment reduction for research reactors requires a licensing procedure. For this purpose the qualification of the new fuel has to be demonstrated and changes in reactor safety have to be investigated like reactivity values, form-factors, Pu- and fission product inventory, safety margins and accidents. Calculations should be partly experimentally verified. The possible extent of the licensing procedure is discussed. (orig.) [de

  14. Sodium fast reactor safety and licensing research plan. Volume I.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sofu, Tanju (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL); LaChance, Jeffrey L.; Bari, R. (Brokhaven National Laboratory Upton, NY); Wigeland, Roald (Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID); Denman, Matthew R.; Flanagan, George F. (Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN)

    2012-05-01

    This report proposes potential research priorities for the Department of Energy (DOE) with the intent of improving the licensability of the Sodium Fast Reactor (SFR). In support of this project, five panels were tasked with identifying potential safety-related gaps in available information, data, and models needed to support the licensing of a SFR. The areas examined were sodium technology, accident sequences and initiators, source term characterization, codes and methods, and fuels and materials. It is the intent of this report to utilize a structured and transparent process that incorporates feedback from all interested stakeholders to suggest future funding priorities for the SFR research and development. While numerous gaps were identified, two cross-cutting gaps related to knowledge preservation were agreed upon by all panels and should be addressed in the near future. The first gap is a need to re-evaluate the current procedures for removing the Applied Technology designation from old documents. The second cross-cutting gap is the need for a robust Knowledge Management and Preservation system in all SFR research areas. Closure of these and the other identified gaps will require both a reprioritization of funding within DOE as well as a re-evaluation of existing bureaucratic procedures within the DOE associated with Applied Technology and Knowledge Management.

  15. Sodium Fast Reactor Safety and Licensing Research Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Denman, M.; Lachance, J.; Sofu, T.; Bari, R.; Flanagon, G.; Wigeland, R.

    2015-01-01

    This paper summarizes potential research priorities for the US Department of Energy (DOE) with the intent of improving the licensability of the sodium cooled fast reactor (SFR). In support of this project, five panels were tasked with identifying potential safety related gaps in the available information, data and models needed to support the licensing of an SFR. The areas examined were sodium technology; accident sequences and initiators; source term characterization, codes and methods; and fuels and materials. It is the intent of this paper to utilize a structured and transparent process that incorporates feedback from all interested stakeholders to suggest future funding priorities for SFR research and development. While numerous gaps were identified, two cross-cutting gaps related to knowledge preservation were agreed upon by all panels and should be addressed in the near future. The first gap is a need to re-evaluate the current procedures for removing the applied technology access control designation from old documents. The second cross-cutting gap is the need for a robust knowledge management and preservation system in all SFR research areas. Closure of these and the other identified gaps will require both a reprioritization of funding within DOE as well as a re-evaluation of existing bureaucratic procedures within the DOE associated with applied technology and knowledge management. (author)

  16. Sodium fast reactor safety and licensing research plan - Volume I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sofu, Tanju; LaChance, Jeffrey L.; Bari, R.; Wigeland, Roald; Denman, Matthew R.; Flanagan, George F.

    2012-01-01

    This report proposes potential research priorities for the Department of Energy (DOE) with the intent of improving the licensability of the Sodium Fast Reactor (SFR). In support of this project, five panels were tasked with identifying potential safety-related gaps in available information, data, and models needed to support the licensing of a SFR. The areas examined were sodium technology, accident sequences and initiators, source term characterization, codes and methods, and fuels and materials. It is the intent of this report to utilize a structured and transparent process that incorporates feedback from all interested stakeholders to suggest future funding priorities for the SFR research and development. While numerous gaps were identified, two cross-cutting gaps related to knowledge preservation were agreed upon by all panels and should be addressed in the near future. The first gap is a need to re-evaluate the current procedures for removing the Applied Technology designation from old documents. The second cross-cutting gap is the need for a robust Knowledge Management and Preservation system in all SFR research areas. Closure of these and the other identified gaps will require both a reprioritization of funding within DOE as well as a re-evaluation of existing bureaucratic procedures within the DOE associated with Applied Technology and Knowledge Management.

  17. The HOR core conversion program development and licensing experiences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vries, J.W. de; Gibcus, H.P.M.; Leege, P.F.A. de

    1997-01-01

    This paper deals with the experiences in the development of a fuel conversion program for a 2 MW university type research reactor, the HOR. It gives an overview of the technical and administrative aspects concerning the fuel conversion program development since the eighties, including the safety review and licensing process. The overall final safety report was submitted in 1995, together with the environmental impact report, and a licence application was submitted accordingly. The licence permitting the conversion was issued in 1996, coming into force at the beginning of this year, although an appeal case is still pending. At the moment the necessary preparations for starting the actual conversion of the HOR are made. The general program characteristics are addressed. (author)

  18. Licensed operating reactors: Status summary report data as of June 30, 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-07-01

    The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's monthly Licensed Operating Reactors Status Summary Report provides data on the operation of nuclear units as timely and accurately as possible. This information is collected by the office of Information Resources Management, from the Headquarters Staff of NRC's Office of Inspection and Enforcement, from NRC's Regional Offices, and from utilities. This report is divided into three sections: the first contains monthly highlights and statistics for commercial operating units, and errata from previously reported data; the second is a compilation of detailed information on each unit, provided by NRC Regional Offices, IE Headquarters and the Utilities; and the third section is an appendix for miscellaneous information such as spent fuel storage capability, reactor years of experience and non-power reactors in the United States

  19. Licensed operating reactors: Status summary report: Data as of February 29, 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-04-01

    The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's monthly Licensed Operating Reactors Status Summary Report provides data on the operation of nuclear units as timely and accurately as possible. This information is collected by the Office of Information Resources Management, from the Headquarters Staff of NRC's Office of Inspection and Enforcement, from NRC's Regional Offices, and from utilities. This report is divided into three sections: the first contains monthly highlights and statistics for commercial operating units; the second is a compilation of detailed information on each unit, provided by NRC Regional Offices, IE Headquarters and the Utilities; and the third section is an appendix for miscellaneous information such as spent fuel storage capability, reactor years of experience and non-power reactors in the United States

  20. Licensed operating reactors: status summary report, data as of 6-30-81

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-07-01

    The Operating Units Status Report - Licensed Operating Reactors provides data on the operation of nuclear units as timely and accurately as possible. This information is collected by the Office of Management and Program Analysis from the Headquarters staff of NRC's Office of Inspection and Enforcement, from NRC's Regional Offices, and from utilities. The three sections of the report are: monthly highlights and statistics for commercial operating units, and errata from previously reported data; a compilation of detailed information on each unit, provided by NRC's Regional Offices, IE Headquarters and the utilities; and an appendix for miscellaneous information such as spent fuel storage capability, reactor-years of experience and non-power reactors in the U.S. It is hoped the report is helpful to all agencies and individuals interested in maintaining an awareness of the U.S. energy situation as a whole

  1. Licensed operating reactors: Status summary report, data as of September 30, 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-12-01

    THE OPERATING UNITS STATUS REPORT -- LICENSED OPERATING REACTORS provides data on the operation of nuclear units as timely and accurately as possible. This information is collected by the Office of Information Resources Management from the Headquarters staff of NRC's Office of Enforcement (OE), from NRC's Regional Offices, and from utilities. The three sections of the report are: monthly highlights and statistics for commercial operating units, and errata from previously reported data; a compilation of detailed information on each unit, provided by NRC's Regional Offices, OE Headquarters and the utilities; and an appendix for miscellaneous information such as spent fuel storage capability, reactor-years of experience and non-power reactors in the US. It is hoped the report is helpful to all agencies and individuals interested in maintaining an awareness of the US energy situation as a whole

  2. Licensed operating reactors: Status summary report, data as of 07-31-86

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-12-01

    The Operating Units Status Report - Licensed Operating Reactors provides data on the operation of nuclear units as timely and accurately as possible. This information is collected by the Office of Resource Management from the Headquarters staff of NRC's Office of Inspection and Enforcement, from NRC's Regional Offices, and from utilities. The three sections of the report are: monthly highlights and statistics for commercial operating units, and errata from previously reported data; a compilation of detailed information on each unit, provided by NRC's Regional Offices, IE Headquarters and the utilities; and an appendix for miscellaneous information such as spent fuel storage capability, reactor-years of experience and non-power reactors in the US. It is hoped the report is helpful to all agencies and individuals interested in maintaining an awareness of the US energy situation as a whole

  3. Licensed operating reactors. Status summary report, data as of April 30, 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-05-01

    The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's monthly LICENSED OPERATING REACTORS Status Summary Report provides data on the operation of nuclear units as timely and accurately as possible. This information is collected by the Office of Management and Program Analysis, from the Headquarters Staff of NRC's Office of Inspection and Enforcement, from NRC's Regional Offices, and from utilities. This report is divided into three sections: the first contains monthly highlights and statistics for commercial operating units, and errata from previously reported data; the second is a compilation of detailed information on each unit, provided by NRC Regional Offices, IE Headquarters and the Utilities; and the third section is an appendix for miscellaneous information such as spent fuel storage capability, reactor years of experience and non-power reactors in the United States

  4. Licensed operating reactors: Status summary report, Data as of July 31, 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-10-01

    The Operating Units Status Report - Licensed Operating Reactors provides data on the operation of nuclear units as timely and accurately as possible. This information is collected by the Office of Administration and Resources Management from the Headquarters staff of NRC's Office of Enforcement (OE), from NRC's Regional Offices, and from utilities. The three sections of the report are: monthly highlights and statistics for commercial operating units, and errata from previously reported data; a compilation of detailed information on each unit, provided by NRC's Regional Offices, OE Headquarters and the utilities; and an appendix for miscellaneous information such as spent fuel storage capability, reactor-years of experience and non-power reactors in the US. It is hoped the report is helpful to all agencies and individuals interested in maintaining an awareness of the US energy situation as a whole

  5. Licensed operating reactors: Status summary report, data as of August 31, 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-12-01

    The Operating Units Status Report - Licensed Operating Reactors provides data on the operation of nuclear units as timely and accurately as possible. This information is collected by the Office of Administration and Resources Management from the Headquarters staff of NRC's Office of Enforcement (OE), from NRC's Regional Offices, and from utilities. The three sections of the report are: monthly highlights and statistics for commercial operating units, and errata from previously reported data; a compilation of detailed information on each unit, provided by NRC's Regional Offices, OE Headquarters and the utilities; and an appendix for miscellaneous information such as spent fuel storage capability, reactor-years of experience and non-power reactors in the US. It is hoped the report is helpful to all agencies and individuals interested in maintaining an awareness of the US energy situation as a whole

  6. Licensed operating reactors: Status summary report, Data as of October 31, 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwartz, I.

    1987-12-01

    The operating units status report - licensed operating reactors provides data on the operation of nuclear units as timely and accurately as possible. This information is collected by the Office of Administration and Resources Management from the Headquarters staff of NRC's Office of Enforcement (OE), from NRC's Regional Offices, and from utilities. The three sections of the report are: monthly highlights and statistics for commercial operating units, and errata from previously reported data; a compilation of detailed information on each unit, provided by NRC's Regional Offices, OE Headquarters and the utilities; and an appendix for miscellaneous information such as spent fuel storage capability, reactor-years of experience and non-power reactors in the US. It is hoped the report is helpful to all agencies and individuals interested in maintaining an awareness of the US energy situation as a whole

  7. Licensed operating reactors. Status summary report as of February 29, 1984. Volume 8, No. 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-04-01

    The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's monthly Licensed Operating Reactors Status Summary Report provides data on the operation of nuclear units as timely and accurately as possible. This information is collected by the Office of Resource Management, from the Headquarters Staff of NRC's Office of Inspection and Enforcement (IE), from NRC's Regional Offices, and from utilities. This report is divided into three sections: the first contains monthly highlights and statistics for commercial operating units, and errata from previously reported data; the second is a compilation of detailed information on each unit, provided by NRC Regional Offices, IE Headquarters and the utilities; and the third section is an appendix for miscellaneous information such as spent fuel storage capability, reactor years of experience and non-power reactors in the United States

  8. Licensed operating reactors: Status summary report, Data as of May 31, 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-10-01

    The OPERATING UNITS STATUS REPORT - LICENSED OPERATING REACTORS provides data on the operation of nuclear units as timely and accurately as possible. This information is collected by the Office of Administration and Resources Management from the Headquarters staff of NRC's Office of Enforcement (OE), from NRC's Regional Offices, and from utilities. The three sections of the report are: monthly highlights and statistics for commercial operating units, and errata from previously reported data; a compilation of detailed information on each unit, provided by NRC's Regional Offices, OE Headquarters and the utilities; and an appendix for miscellaneous information such as spent fuel storage capability, reactor-years of experience and non-power reactors in the US. It is hoped the report is helpful to all agencies and individuals interested in maintaining an awareness of the US energy situation as a whole

  9. Licensed operating reactors: Status summary report, Data as of June 30, 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-07-01

    The Operating Units Status Report - Licensed Operating Reactors provides data on the operation of nuclear units as timely and accurately as possible. This information is collected by the Office of Administration and Resources Management from the Headquarters staff of NRC's Office of Enforcement (OE), from NRC's Regional Offices, and from utilities. The three sections of the report are: monthly highlights and statistics for commercial operating units, and errata from previously reported data; a compilation of detailed information on each unit, provided by NRC's Regional Offices, OE Headquarters and the utilities; and an appendix for miscellaneous information such as spent fuel storage capability, reactor-years of experience and non-power reactors in the US. It is hoped the report is helpful to all agencies and individuals interested in maintaining an awareness of the US energy situation as a whole

  10. Licensed operating reactors: Status summary report, data as of 12-31-89

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-02-01

    The Operating Units Status Report - Licensed Operating Reactors provides data on the operation of nuclear units as timely and accurately as possible. This information is collected by the Office of Information Resources Management from the Headquarters staff of NRC's Office of Enforcement (OE), from NRC's Regional Offices, and from utilities. The three sections of the report are: monthly highlights and statistics for commercial operating units, and errata from previously reported data; a compilation of detailed information on each unit, provided by NRC's Regional Offices, OE Headquarters and the utilities; and an appendix for miscellaneous information such as spent fuel storage capability, reactor-years of experience and non-power reactors in the US. It is hoped the report is helpful to all agencies and individuals interested in maintaining an awareness of the US energy situation as a whole

  11. Licensed operating reactors: Status summary report, data as of 9-30-87

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-10-01

    The OPERATING UNITS STATUS REPORT - LICENSED OPERATING REACTORS provides data on the operation of nuclear units as timely and accurately as possible. This information is collected by the Office of Administration and Resources Management from the Headquarters staff of NRC's Office of Enforcement (OE), from NRC's Regional Offices, and from utilities. The three sections of the report are: monthly highlights and statistics for commercial operating units, and errata from previously reported data; a compilation of detailed information on each unit, provided by NRC's Regional Offices, OE Headquarters and the utilities; and an appendix for miscellaneous information such as spent fuel storage capability, reactor-years of experience and non-power reactors in the US. It is hoped the report is helpful to all agencies and individuals interested in maintaining an awareness of the US energy situation as a whole

  12. Licensed operating reactors: Status summary report, Data as of 2-28-87

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-10-01

    The Operating Units Status Report- Licensed Operating Reactors provides data on the operation of nuclear units as timely and accurately as possible. This information is collected by the Office of Administration and Resources Management from the Headquarters staff of NRC's Office of Enforcement (OE), from NRC's Regional Offices, and from utilities. The three sections of the report are: monthly highlights and statistics for commercial operating units, and errata from previously reported data; a compilation of detailed information on each unit, provided by NRC's Regional Offices, OE Headquarters and the utilities; and an appendix for miscellaneous information such as spent fuel storage capability, reactor-years of experience and non-power reactors in the US. It is hoped the report is helpful to all agencies and individuals interested in maintaining an awareness of the US energy situation as a whole

  13. Licensing of ''grandfather's'' facilities: Ukrainian experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mikolaitchouk, H.; Bogdan, L.; Steinberg, N.

    1995-01-01

    In the former USSR, unlike most countries, radioactive waste management activities including waste disposal needed no license. But after the USSR breakdown the Ukrainian Parliament -- Verkhovna Rada -- invoked the revised Law on Business activities. According to Article 4 of the Law, in order to treat or to dispose radioactive waste every enterprise has to get a special permission or license. In compliance with the Law, the Cabinet of Ministers by its Ordinance of January 13, 1993, authorized the Ukrainian State Committee for Nuclear and Radiation Safety (UkrSCNRS) to issue special permissions or licenses for waste treatment and disposal. And that requirement was valid not only for future activities but also for existing facilities in operation. Taking into account the undergoing legislative process, SCNRS began to develop its licensing process without waiting for the special nuclear laws to be passed. On the basis of the legislation already in effect, first of all the Law on Enterprises (full responsibility of enterprises for their activities) and Law on Business activities (requirement to have a license for special types of activities), the newly formed national regulatory body had to identify all the enterprises that needed to be licensed, to establish relevant procedures, to develop related regulatory documents, to implement these procedures and documents at operating enterprises, and for each case to make a decision concerning feasibility of issuing a license, period of validity and license conditions

  14. Impact of the Three Mile Island accident on reactor safety and licensing in Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harvie, J.D.

    1980-06-01

    This paper discusses the implications of the accident at Three Mile Island on reactor safety and licensing in Canada. Reactor safety principles which can be learned from, or are reaffirmed by, the accident are reviewed. It is concluded that reactor safety demands a firm commitment to safety by all those involved in the nuclear industry. (auth)

  15. Reactors licensing: proposal of an integrated quality and environment regulatory structure for nuclear research reactors in Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serra, Reynaldo Cavalcanti

    2014-01-01

    A new integrated regulatory structure based on quality and integrated issues has been proposed to be implemented on the licensing process of nuclear research reactors in Brazil. The study starts with a literature review about the licensing process in several countries, all of them members of the International Atomic Energy Agency. After this phase it is performed a comparative study with the Brazilian licensing process to identify good practices (positive aspects), the gaps on it and to propose an approach of an integrated quality and environmental management system, in order to contribute with a new licensing process scheme in Brazil. The literature review considered the following research nuclear reactors: Jules-Horowitz and OSIRIS (France), Hanaro (Korea), Maples 1 and 2 (Canada), OPAL (Australia), Pallas (Holand), ETRR-2 (Egypt) and IEA-R1 (Brazil). The current nuclear research reactors licensing process in Brazil is conducted by two regulatory bodies: the Brazilian National Nuclear Energy Commission (CNEN) and the Brazilian Institute of Environment and Renewable Natural Resources (IBAMA). CNEN is responsible by nuclear issues, while IBAMA by environmental one. To support the study it was applied a questionnaire and interviews based on the current regulatory structure to four nuclear research reactors in Brazil. Nowadays, the nuclear research reactor’s licensing process, in Brazil, has six phases and the environmental licensing process has three phases. A correlation study among these phases leads to a proposal of a new quality and environmental integrated licensing structure with four harmonized phases, hence reducing potential delays in this process. (author)

  16. Licensing schedule for away-from-reactor (AFR) spent fuel storage facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gray, P.L.

    1981-08-01

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission has authority to issue licenses for Away-From-Reactor (AFR) installations for the storage of spent nuclear fuel. This report presents a detailed estimate of the time required to prosecute a licensing action. The projected licensing schedule shows that the elapsed time between filing an application and issuance of a license will be about 32 months, assuming intervention. The legal procedural steps will determine the time schedule and will override considerations of technical complexity. A license could be issued in about 14 months in the absence of intervention

  17. Practice and trends in nuclear fuel licensing in France (pressurized water reactor fuels)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roudier, S.; Badel, D.; Beraha, R.; Champ, M.; Tricot, N.; Tran Dai, P.

    1994-01-01

    The activities of governmental French authorities responsible for safety of nuclear installations are outlined. The main bodies involved in nuclear safety are: the CSSIN (High Council for Nuclear Safety and Information), CINB (Inter-ministerial Commission for Basic Nuclear Installations) and DSIN (Nuclear Installations Safety Directorate). A brief review of the main fuel licensing issues supported by DSIN is given, which includes: 1) formal regularity procedure ensuring the safety of nuclear installations and especially the pressurized water reactors; 2) guidelines for nuclear design and manufacturing requirements related to safety and 3) safety goals and associated limits. The fuel safety documents for reloading as well as the research and development programmes in the field of technical safety are also described. The ongoing experiments in CABRI reactor, aimed at determining the high burnup fuel behaviour under reactivity initiated accidents until 65 GW d/Mt U, are one of these programs

  18. Practice and trends in nuclear fuel licensing in France (pressurized water reactor fuels)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roudier, S [Direction de la Surete des Installations Nucleaires, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France); Badel, D; Beraha, R [Direction Regionale de l` Industrie, de la Recherche et de l` Environnement Rhone-Alpes, Lyon (France); Champ, M; Tricot, N; Tran Dai, P [CEA Centre d` Etudes de Fontenay-aux-Roses, 92 (France). Inst. de Protection et de Surete Nucleaire

    1994-12-31

    The activities of governmental French authorities responsible for safety of nuclear installations are outlined. The main bodies involved in nuclear safety are: the CSSIN (High Council for Nuclear Safety and Information), CINB (Inter-ministerial Commission for Basic Nuclear Installations) and DSIN (Nuclear Installations Safety Directorate). A brief review of the main fuel licensing issues supported by DSIN is given, which includes: (1) formal regularity procedure ensuring the safety of nuclear installations and especially the pressurized water reactors; (2) guidelines for nuclear design and manufacturing requirements related to safety and (3) safety goals and associated limits. The fuel safety documents for reloading as well as the research and development programmes in the field of technical safety are also described. The ongoing experiments in CABRI reactor, aimed at determining the high burnup fuel behaviour under reactivity initiated accidents until 65 GW d/Mt U, are one of these programs.

  19. Improved best estimate plus uncertainty methodology, including advanced validation concepts, to license evolving nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Unal, C.; Williams, B.; Hemez, F.; Atamturktur, S.H.; McClure, P.

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → The best estimate plus uncertainty methodology (BEPU) is one option in the licensing of nuclear reactors. → The challenges for extending the BEPU method for fuel qualification for an advanced reactor fuel are primarily driven by schedule, the need for data, and the sufficiency of the data. → In this paper we develop an extended BEPU methodology that can potentially be used to address these new challenges in the design and licensing of advanced nuclear reactors. → The main components of the proposed methodology are verification, validation, calibration, and uncertainty quantification. → The methodology includes a formalism to quantify an adequate level of validation (predictive maturity) with respect to existing data, so that required new testing can be minimized, saving cost by demonstrating that further testing will not enhance the quality of the predictive tools. - Abstract: Many evolving nuclear energy technologies use advanced predictive multiscale, multiphysics modeling and simulation (M and S) capabilities to reduce the cost and schedule of design and licensing. Historically, the role of experiments has been as a primary tool for the design and understanding of nuclear system behavior, while M and S played the subordinate role of supporting experiments. In the new era of multiscale, multiphysics computational-based technology development, this role has been reversed. The experiments will still be needed, but they will be performed at different scales to calibrate and validate the models leading to predictive simulations for design and licensing. Minimizing the required number of validation experiments produces cost and time savings. The use of multiscale, multiphysics models introduces challenges in validating these predictive tools - traditional methodologies will have to be modified to address these challenges. This paper gives the basic aspects of a methodology that can potentially be used to address these new challenges in

  20. Gas reactor and associated nuclear experience in the UK relevant to high temperature reactor engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beech, D.J.; May, R.

    2000-01-01

    In the UK, the NNC played a leading role in the design and build of all of the UK's commercial magnox reactors and advanced gas-cooled reactors (AGRs). It was also involved in the DRAGON project and was responsible for producing designs for large scale HTRs and other gas reactor designs employing helium and carbon dioxide coolants. This paper addresses the gas reactor experience and its relevance to the current HTR designs under development which use helium as the coolant, through the consideration of a representative sample of the issues addressed in the UK by the NNC in support of the AGR and other reactor programmes. Modern HTR designs provide unique engineering challenges. The success of the AGR design, reflected in the extended lifetimes agreed upon by the licensing authorities at many stations, indicates that these challenges can be successfully overcome. The UK experience is unique and provides substantial support to future gas reactor and high temperature engineering studies. (authors)

  1. TRIGA reactor operating experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, T.V.

    1970-01-01

    The Oregon State TRIGA Reactor (OSTR) has been in operation 3 years. Last August it was upgraded from 250 kW to 1000 kW. This was accomplished with little difficulty. During the 3 years of operation no major problems have been experienced. Most of the problems have been minor in nature and easily corrected. They came from lazy susan (dry bearing), Westronics Recorder (dead spots in the range), The Reg Rod Magnet Lead-in Circuit (a new type lead-in wire that does not require the lead-in cord to coil during rod withdrawal hss been delivered, much better than the original) and other small corrections

  2. Physical experiments. Reactor theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korn, H.; Werle, H.; Bluhm, H.; Fieg, G.; Kappler, F.; Kuhn, D.; Lalovic, M.; Woll, D.; Kuefner, K.; Woznicki, Z.; Buckel, G.; Stehle, B.; Borgwaldt, H.

    1975-01-01

    The γ-spectrum in SNEAK 9C-1 and 9C-2 was measured by means of Si(Li) solid state detectors for verification of methods of shielding calculation. The blanket spectra turned out to be slightly harder than the spectra in the fissile zone; the plutonium spectra are slightly harder than the respective uranium spectra. This result is expected to be explained by studies to be carried out on the basis of a γ-transport program. For reactor theoretical calculations two 2-dimensional diffusion programs were compared with each other, and a 3-dimensional diffusion program was compared with a flux synthesis program. An improved source iteration scheme was drafted for the Karlsruhe Monte Carlo code. (orig.) [de

  3. Licensing process characteristics of Small Modular Reactors and spent nuclear fuel repository

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Söderholm, Kristiina, E-mail: kristiina.soderholm@fortum.com [Fortum Power (Finland); Tuunanen, Jari, E-mail: jari.tuunanen@fortum.com [Fortum Power (Finland); Amaba, Ben, E-mail: baamaba@us.ibm.com [IBM Complex Systems (United States); Bergqvist, Sofia, E-mail: sofia.bergqvist@se.ibm.com [IBM Rational Software (Sweden); Lusardi, Paul, E-mail: plusardi@nuscalepower.com [NuScale Power (United States)

    2014-09-15

    Highlights: • We examine the licensing process challenges of modular nuclear facilities. • We compare the features of Small Modular Reactors and spent nuclear fuel repository. • We present the need of nuclear licensing simplification. • Part of the licensing is proposed to be internationally applicable. • Systems engineering and requirements engineering benefits are presented. - Abstract: This paper aims to increase the understanding of the licensing processes characteristics of Small Modular Reactors (SMR) compared with licensing of spent nuclear fuel repository. The basis of the SMR licensing process development lies in licensing processes used in Finland, France, the UK, Canada and the USA. These countries have been selected for this study because of their various licensing processes and recent actions in the new NPP construction. Certain aspects of the aviation industry licensing process have also been studied and selected practices have been investigated as possibly suitable for use in nuclear licensing. Suitable features for SMR licensing are emphasized and suggested. The licensing features of the spent nuclear fuel deep repository along with similar features of SMR licensing are discussed. Since there are similar types of challenges of lengthy licensing time frames, as well as modular features to be taken into account in licensing, these two different nuclear industry fields can be compared. The main SMR features to take into account in licensing are: • Standardization of the design. • Modularity. • Mass production. • Serial construction. Modularity can be divided into two different categories: the first category is simply a single power plant unit constructed of independently engineered modules (e.g. construction process for Westinghouse AP-1000 NPP) and the second one a power plant composed of many reactor modules, which are manufactured in factories and installed as needed (e.g. NuScale Power SMR design). The deep underground repository

  4. Licensing topical report: interpretation of general design criteria for high-temperature gas-cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orvis, D.D.; Raabe, P.H.

    1980-01-01

    This Licensing Topical Report presents a set of General Design Criteria (GDC) which is proposed for applicability to licensing of graphite-moderated, high-temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGRs). Modifications as necessary to reflect HTGR characteristics and design practices have been made to the GDC derived for applicability to light-water-cooled reactors and presented in Appendix A of Part 50, Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations, including the Introduction, Definitions, and Criteria. It is concluded that the proposed set of GDC affords a better basis for design and licensing of HTGRs

  5. Generic aging management programs for license renewal of BWR reactor coolant systems components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shah, V.N.; Liu, Y.Y.

    2002-01-01

    The paper reviews the existing generic aging management programs (AMPs) for the reactor coolant system (RCS) components in boiling water reactors (BWRs), including the reactor pressure vessel and internals, the reactor recirculation system, and the connected piping. These programs have been evaluated in the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) report, Generic Aging Lessons Learned (GALL), NUREG-1801, for their use in the license renewal process to manage several aging effects, including loss of material, crack initiation and growth, loss of fracture toughness, loss of preload, wall thinning, and cumulative fatigue damage. The program evaluation includes a review of ten attributes (scope of program, preventive actions, parameters monitored/inspected, detection of aging effects, monitoring and trending, acceptance criteria, corrective actions, confirmative process, administrative control, and operating experience) for their effectiveness in managing a specific aging effect in a given component(s). The generic programs are based on the ASME Section XI inservice inspection requirements; industry guidelines for inspection and evaluation of aging effects in BWR reactor vessel, internals, and recirculation piping; monitoring and control of BWR water chemistry; and operating experience as reported in the USNRC generic communications and industry reports. The review concludes that all generic AMPs are acceptable for managing aging effects in BWR RCS components during an extended period of operation and do not need further evaluation. However, the plant-specific programs for managing aging in certain RCS components during an extended period of operation do require further evaluation. For some plant-specific AMPs, the GALL report recommends an aging management activity to verify their effectiveness. An example of such an activity is a one-time inspection of Class 1 small-bore piping to ensure that service-induced weld cracking is not occurring in the piping. Several of

  6. Generic Aging Management Programs for License Renewal of BWR Reactor Coolant System Components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shah, V.N.; Liu, Y.Y.

    2002-01-01

    The paper reviews the existing generic aging management programs (AMPs) for the reactor coolant system (RCS) components in boiling water reactors (BWRs), including the reactor pressure vessel and internals, the reactor recirculation system, and the connected piping. These programs have been evaluated in the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) report, Generic Aging Lessons Learned (GALL), NUREG-1801, for their use in the license renewal process to manage several aging effects, including loss of material, crack initiation and growth, loss of fracture toughness, loss of preload, wall thinning, and cumulative fatigue damage. The program evaluation includes a review of ten attributes (scope of program, preventive actions, parameters monitored/inspected, detection of aging effects, monitoring and trending, acceptance criteria, corrective actions, confirmative process, administrative control, and operating experience) for their effectiveness in managing a specific aging effect in a given component(s). The generic programs are based on the ASME Section XI inservice inspection requirements; industry guidelines for inspection and evaluation of aging effects in BWR reactor vessel, internals, and recirculation piping; monitoring and control of BWR water chemistry; and operating experience as reported in the USNRC generic communications and industry reports. The review concludes that all generic AMPs are acceptable for managing aging effects in BWR RCS components during an extended period of operation and do not need further evaluation. However, the plant-specific programs for managing aging in certain RCS components during an extended period of operation do require further evaluation. For some plant-specific AMPs, the GALL report recommends an aging management activity to verify their effectiveness. An example of such an activity is a one-time inspection of Class 1 small-bore piping to ensure that service-induced weld cracking is not occurring in the piping. Several of

  7. Two Approaches to Reactor Decommissioning: 10 CFR Part 50 License Termination and License Amendment, Lessons Learned from the Regulatory Perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watson, B.A.; Buckley, J.T.; Craig, C.M.

    2006-01-01

    Trojan Nuclear Plant (Trojan) and Maine Yankee Nuclear Plant (Maine Yankee) were the first two power reactors to complete decommissioning under the U. S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission's (NRC's) License Termination Rule (LTR), 10 CFR Part 20, Subpart E. The respective owners' decisions to decommission the sites resulted in different approaches to both the physical aspects of the decommissioning, and the approach for obtaining approval for completing the decommissioning in accordance with regulations. Being in different States, the two single-unit pressurized water reactor sites had different State requirements and levels of public interest that impacted the decommissioning approaches. This resulted in significant differences in decommissioning planning, conduct of decommissioning operations, volumes of low- level radioactive waste disposed, and the final status survey (FSS) program. While both licensees have Independent Spent Fuel Storage Installations (ISFSIs), Trojan obtained a separate license for the ISFSI in accordance with the requirements of 10 CFR Part 72 and terminated their 10 CFR Part 50 license. Maine Yankee elected to obtain a general license under 10 CFR Part 50 for the ISFSI and reduce the physical site footprint to the ISFSI through a series of license amendments. While the NRC regulations are flexible and allow different approaches to ISFSI licensing there are separate licensing requirements that must be addressed. In 10 CFR 50.82, the NRC mandates public participation in the decommissioning process. For Maine Yankee, public input resulted in the licensee entering into an agreement with a concerned citizen group and resulted in State legislation that significantly lowered the dose limit below the NRC radiological criteria of 25 mrem (0.25 mSv) per year (yr) in 10 CFR 20.1402 for unrestricted use. The lowering of the radiological criteria resulted in a significant dose modeling effort using site-specific Derived Concentrations Guideline Levels (DCGLs

  8. 78 FR 73898 - Operator Licensing Examination Standards for Power Reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-09

    [email protected] . Both of the Office of New Reactors; or Timothy Kolb, Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation, U...: timothy.kolb@nrc.gov . SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: I. Accessing Information and Submitting Comments A...

  9. Licensing of the TRIGA Mark III reactor at the Mexican Nuclear Centre

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramirez, R.M.; Arrendondo, R.R.

    1990-01-01

    The TRIGA Mark III reactor at the Mexican Nuclear Centre went critical in 1968 and remained so until 1979 when the National Commission for Nuclear Safety and Safeguards (CNSNS), the Mexican regulatory authority, was set up. The reactor was therefore operating without a formal operating license, and the CNSNS accordingly requested the ININ to license the reactor under the existing conditions and to ensure that any modification of the original design complied with Standards ANSI/ANS-15 and with the code of practice set out in IAEA Safety Series No. 35. The most relevant points in granting the operating licence were: (a) the preparation of the Safety Report; (b) the formulation and application of the Quality Assurance Programme; (c) the reconditioning of the following reactor systems: the cooling systems; the ventilation and exhaust system; the monitoring system and control panel; (d) the training of the reactor operating staff at junior and senior levels; and (e) the formulation of procedures and instructions. Once the provisional operating license was obtained for the reactor it was considered necessary to modify the reactor core, which has been composed of 20% enriched standards fuel, to a mixed core based on a mixture of standard fuel and FLIP-type fuel with 70% 235 U enrichment. The CNSNS therefore requested that the mixed core be licensed and a technical report was accordingly annexed to the Safety Report, its contents including the following subjects: (a) neutron analysis of the proposed configuration; (b) reactor shutdown margins; (c) accident analysis; and (d) technical specifications. The licensing process was completed this year and we are now hoping to obtain the final operating license

  10. Gas Reactor International Cooperative Program. Interim report. Safety and licensing evaluaion of German Pebble Bed Reactor concepts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-09-01

    The Pebble Bed Gas Cooled Reactor, as developed in the Federal Republic of Germany, was reviewed from a United States Safety and Licensing perspective. The primary concepts considered were the steam cycle electric generating pebble bed (HTR-K) and the process heat pebble bed (PNP), although generic consideration of the direct cycle gas turbine pebble bed (HHT) was included. The study examines potential U.S. licensing issues and offers some suggestions as to required development areas

  11. CANDU reactor experience: fuel performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Truant, P.T.; Hastings, I.J.

    1985-07-01

    Ontario Hydro has more than 126 reactor-years experience in operating CANDU reactors. Fuel performance has been excellent with 47 000 channel fuelling operations successfully completed and 99.9 percent of the more than 380 000 bundles irradiated operating as designed. Fuel performance limits and fuel defects have had a negligible effect on station safety, reliability, the environment and cost. The actual incapability charged to fuel is less than 0.1 percent over the stations' lifetimes, and more recently has been zero

  12. Licensed operating reactors: Status summary report, data as of October 31, 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-12-01

    The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's monthly Licensed Operating Reactors Status Summary Report provides data on the operation of nuclear units as timely and accurately as possible. This information is collected by the Office of Information Resources Management, from the Headquarters Staff of NRC's Office of Inspection and Enforcement, from NRC's Regional Offices, and from utilities. Since all of the data concerning operation of the units is provided by the utility operators less than two weeks after the end of the month, necessary corrections to published information are shown on the Errata page. This report is divided into three sections: the first contains monthly highlights and statistics for commercial operating units, and errata from previously reported data; the second is a compilation of detailed information on each unit, provided by NRC Regional Offices, IE Headquarters and the Utilities; and the third section is an appendix for miscellaneous information such as spent fuel storage capability, reactor years of experience and non-power reactors in the United States

  13. Licensed operating reactors: Status summary report, data as of 07-31-88

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-09-01

    The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's monthly LICENSED OPERATING REACTORS Status Summary Report provides data on the operation of nuclear units as timely and accurately as possible. This information is collected by the Office of Information Resources Management, from the Headquarters Staff of NRC's Office of Inspection and Enforcement, from NRC's Regional Offices, and from utilities. Since all of the data concerning operation of the units is provided by the utility operators less than two weeks after the end of the month, necessary corrections to published information are shown on the ERRATA page. This report is divided into three sections: the first contains monthly highlights and statistics for commercial operating units, and errata from previously reported data; the second is a compilation of detailed information on each unit, provided by NRC Regional Offices, IE Headquarters and the Utilities; and the third section is an appendix for miscellaneous information such as spent fuel storage capability, reactor years of experience and non-power reactors in the United States

  14. Licensed operating reactors: Status summary report, data as of August 31, 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-10-01

    The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's monthly LICENSED OPERATING REACTORS Status Summary Report provides data on the operation of nuclear units as timely and accurately as possible. This information is collected by the Office of Information Resources Management, from the Headquarters Staff of NRC's Office of Inspection and Enforcement, from NRC's Regional Offices, and from utilities. Since all of the data concerning operation of the units is provided by the utility operators less than two weeks after the end of the month, necessary corrections to published information are shown on the ERRATA page. This report is divided into three sections: the first contains monthly highlights and statistics for commercial operating units, and errata from previously reported data; the second is a compilation of detailed information on each unit, provided by NRC Regional Offices, IE Headquarters and the Utilities; and the third section is an appendix for miscellaneous information such as spent fuel storage capability, reactor years of experience and non-power reactors in the United States

  15. Licensed operating reactors: Status summary report, data as of May 31, 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwartz, I.

    1988-07-01

    The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's monthly LICENSED OPERATING REACTORS Status Summary Report provides data on the operation of nuclear units as timely and accurately as possible. This information is collected by the Office of Information Resource Management from the Headquarters Staff of NRC's Office of Inspection and Enforcement, from NRC's Regional Offices, and from utilities. Since all of the data concerning operation of the units is provided by the utility operators less than two weeks after the end of the month, necessary corrections to published information are shown on the ERRATA page. This report is divided into three sections: the first contains monthly highlights and statistics for commercial operation units, and errata from previously reported data; the second is a compilation of detailed information on each unit, provided by the NRC Regional Offices, IE Headquarters and the Utilities; and the third section is an appendix for miscellaneous information such as spent fuel storage capability, reactor years of experience and non-power reactors in the United States

  16. Licensed operating reactors. Status summary report, data as of 3-31-82

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-04-01

    The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's monthly Licensed Operating Reactors Status Summary Report provides data on the operation of nuclear units as timely and accurately as possible. This information is collected by the Office of Management and Program Analysis, from the Headquarters Staff of NRC's Office of Inspection and Enforcement, from NRC's Regional Offices, and from utilities. Since all of the data concerning operation of the units is provided by the utility operators less than two weeks after the end of the month, necessary corrections to published information are shown on the Errata page. This report is divided into three sections: the first contains monthly highlights and statistics for commercial operating units, and errata from previously reported data; the second is a compilation of detailed information on each unit, provided by NRC Regional Offices, IE Headquarters and the Utilities; and the third section is an appendix for miscellaneous information such as spent fuel storage capability, reactor years of experience and non-power reactors in the United States

  17. Licensed operating reactors status summary report, data as of April 30, 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-06-01

    The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's monthly LICENSED OPERATING REACTORS Status Summary Report provides data on the operation of nuclear units as timely and accurately as possible. This information is collected by the Office of Information Resources Management, from the Headquarters Staff of NRC's Office of Inspection and Enforcement, from NRC's Regional Offices, and from utilities. Since all of the data concerning operation of the units is provided by the utility operators less than two weeks after the end of the month, necessary corrections to published information are shown on the the ERRATA page. This report is divided into three sections: the first contains monthly highlights and statistics for commercial operating units, and errata from previously reported data; the second is a compilation of detailed information on each unit, provided by NRC Regional Offices, IE Headquarters and the Utilities; and the third section is an appendix for miscellaneous information such as spent fuel storage capability, reactor years of experience and non-power reactors in the United States

  18. Licensed operating reactors status summary report, data as of December 31, 1985. Volume 10, No. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's monthly Licensed Operating Reactors Status Summary Report provides data on the operation of nuclear units as timely and accurately as possible. This information is collected by the Office of Resource Management, from the Headquarters Staff of NRC's Office of Inspection and Enforcement, from NRC's Regional Offices, and from utilities. Since all of the data concerning operation of the units is provided by the utility operators less than two weeks after the end of the month, necessary corrections to published information are shown on the Errata page. This report is divided into three sections: the first contains monthly highlights and statistics for commercial operating units, and errata from previously reported data; the second is a compilation of detailed information on each unit, provided by NRC Regional Offices, IE Headquarters and the Utilities; and the third section is an appendix for miscellaneous information such as spent fuel storage capability, reactor years of experience and non-power reactors in the United States

  19. Operator licensing examination standards for power reactors. Interim revision 8

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    These examination standards are intended to assist NRC examiners and facility licensees to better understand the processes associated with initial and requalification examinations. The standards also ensure the equitable and consistent administration of examinations for all applicants. These standards are for guidance purposes and are not a substitute for the operator licensing regulations (i.e., 10 CFR Part 55), and they are subject to revision or other changes in internal operator licensing policy. This interim revision permits facility licensees to prepare their initial operator licensing examinations on a voluntary basis pending an amendment to 10 CFR Part 55 that will require facility participation. The NRC intends to solicit comments on this revision during the rulemaking process and to issue a final Revision 8 in conjunction with the final rule

  20. Legislative and regulatory aspects of nuclear power reactor licensing in the U.S.A

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malsch, M.G.

    1976-01-01

    An explanation of the origins, statutory basis and development of the present regulatory system in the US. A description of the various actions which must be taken by a license applicant and by the USNRC before a nuclear power plant can be constructed and placed on-line. Account of the current regulatory practices followed by the USNRC in licensing nuclear power reactors. (orig./HP) [de

  1. Decommissioning and decontamination of licensed reactor facilities and demonstration nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lear, G.; Erickson, P.B.

    1975-01-01

    Decommissioning of licensed reactors and demonstration nuclear power plants has been accomplished by mothballing (protective storage), entombment, and dismantling or a combination of these three. The alternative selected by a licensee seems to be primarily based on cost. A licensee must, however, show that the decommissioning process provides adequate protection of the health and safety of the public and no adverse impact on the environment. To date the NRC has approved each of the alternatives in the decommissioning of different facilities. The decommissioning of small research reactors has been accomplished primarily by dismantling. Licensed nuclear power plants, however, have been decommissioned primarily by being placed in a mothballed state in which they continue to retain a reactor license and the associated licensee responsibilities

  2. Specificity in the licensing process of reduced enrichment in the Bulgarian research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vitkova, Marietta; Gorinov, Ivan

    2005-01-01

    The presented paper considers some specific questions of the licensing process regarding the reconstruction of the Bulgarian IRT-2000 research reactor, which includes conversion to the low enriched fuel. This specificity has risen as a result of two facts. The design of the reactor reconstruction was made on the basis of the existing fresh 36% highly enriched fuel. But after finishing of the design process, this fresh highly enriched fuel was shipped back to Russia in the framework of the RERTR program. These facts have involved some changes in both - in the licensing and the design processes. Re-analysis of the neutronic and thermal-hydraulic calculations is required to be made on the base of the technical specifications of the new LEU fuel. To facilitate the licensing process the NRA has adopted regulatory acceptance criteria for approval of the reactor core design with LEU fuel. (author)

  3. Application of probabilistic risk assessment in nuclear and environmental licensing processes of nuclear reactors in Brazil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mata, Jonatas F.C. da; Vasconcelos, Vanderley de; Mesquita, Amir Z., E-mail: jonatasfmata@yahoo.com.br, E-mail: vasconv@cdtn.br, E-mail: amir@cdtn.br [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    The nuclear accident at Fukushima Daiichi, occurred in Japan in 2011, brought reflections, worldwide, on the management of nuclear and environmental licensing processes of existing nuclear reactors. One of the key lessons learned in this matter, is that the studies of Probabilistic Safety Assessment and Severe Accidents are becoming essential, even in the early stage of a nuclear development project. In Brazil, Brazilian Nuclear Energy Commission, CNEN, conducts the nuclear licensing. The organism responsible for the environmental licensing is Brazilian Institute of Environment and Renewable Natural Resources, IBAMA. In the scope of the licensing processes of these two institutions, the safety analysis is essentially deterministic, complemented by probabilistic studies. The Probabilistic Safety Assessment (PSA) is the study performed to evaluate the behavior of the nuclear reactor in a sequence of events that may lead to the melting of its core. It includes both probability and consequence estimation of these events, which are called Severe Accidents, allowing to obtain the risk assessment of the plant. Thus, the possible shortcomings in the design of systems are identified, providing basis for safety assessment and improving safety. During the environmental licensing, a Quantitative Risk Analysis (QRA), including probabilistic evaluations, is required in order to support the development of the Risk Analysis Study, the Risk Management Program and the Emergency Plan. This article aims to provide an overview of probabilistic risk assessment methodologies and their applications in nuclear and environmental licensing processes of nuclear reactors in Brazil. (author)

  4. PWR reactor pressure vessel internals license renewal industry report; revision 1. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwirian, R.; Robison, G.

    1994-07-01

    The U.S. nuclear power industry, through coordination by the Nuclear Management and Resources Council (NUMARC), and sponsorship by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), has evaluated age-related degradation effects for a number of major plant systems, structures and components, in the license renewal technical Industry Reports (IRs). License renewal applicants may choose to reference these IRs in support of their plant-specific license renewal applications, as an equivalent to the integrated plant assessment provisions of the license renewal rule (10 CFR Part 54). Pressurized water reactor (PWR) reactor pressure vessel (RPV) internals designed by all three U.S. PWR nuclear steam supply system vendors have been evaluated relative to the effects of age-related degradation mechanisms; the capability of current design limits; inservice examination, testing, repair, refurbishment, and other programs to manage these effects; and the assurance that these internals can continue to perform their intended safety functions in the license renewal term. This industry report (IR), one of a series of ten, provides a generic technical basis for evaluation of PWR reactor pressure vessel internals for license renewal

  5. Application of probabilistic risk assessment in nuclear and environmental licensing processes of nuclear reactors in Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mata, Jonatas F.C. da; Vasconcelos, Vanderley de; Mesquita, Amir Z.

    2015-01-01

    The nuclear accident at Fukushima Daiichi, occurred in Japan in 2011, brought reflections, worldwide, on the management of nuclear and environmental licensing processes of existing nuclear reactors. One of the key lessons learned in this matter, is that the studies of Probabilistic Safety Assessment and Severe Accidents are becoming essential, even in the early stage of a nuclear development project. In Brazil, Brazilian Nuclear Energy Commission, CNEN, conducts the nuclear licensing. The organism responsible for the environmental licensing is Brazilian Institute of Environment and Renewable Natural Resources, IBAMA. In the scope of the licensing processes of these two institutions, the safety analysis is essentially deterministic, complemented by probabilistic studies. The Probabilistic Safety Assessment (PSA) is the study performed to evaluate the behavior of the nuclear reactor in a sequence of events that may lead to the melting of its core. It includes both probability and consequence estimation of these events, which are called Severe Accidents, allowing to obtain the risk assessment of the plant. Thus, the possible shortcomings in the design of systems are identified, providing basis for safety assessment and improving safety. During the environmental licensing, a Quantitative Risk Analysis (QRA), including probabilistic evaluations, is required in order to support the development of the Risk Analysis Study, the Risk Management Program and the Emergency Plan. This article aims to provide an overview of probabilistic risk assessment methodologies and their applications in nuclear and environmental licensing processes of nuclear reactors in Brazil. (author)

  6. Guidelines for preparing and reviewing applications for the licensing of non-power reactors: Standard review plan and acceptance criteria. NUREG - 1537, Part 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-02-01

    NUREG - 1537, Part 2 gives guidance on the conduct of licensing action reviews to NRC staff who review non-power reactor licensing applications. These licensing actions include construction permits and initial operating licenses, license renewals, amendments, conversions from highly enriched uranium to low-enriched uranium, decommissioning, and license termination

  7. Guidelines for preparing and reviewing applications for the licensing of non-power reactors: Standard review plan and acceptance criteria. NUREG - 1537, Part 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-02-01

    NUREG - 1537, Part 2 gives guidance on the conduct of licensing action reviews to NRC staff who review non-power reactor licensing applications. These licensing actions include construction permits and initial operating licenses, license renewals, amendments, conversions from highly enriched uranium to low-enriched uranium, decommissioning, and license termination.

  8. A comparative analysis of the domestic and foreign licensing processes for power and non-power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joe, J. C.; Youn, Y. K.; Kim, W. S.; Kim, H. J.

    2003-01-01

    The System-integrated Modular Advanced Reactor (SMART), a small to medium sized integral type Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) has been developed in Korea. Now, SMART-P, a 1/5 scaled-down of the SMART, is being developed for the purpose of demonstrating the safety and performance of SMART design. The SMART-P is a first-of-a-kind reactor which is utilized for the research and development of a power reactor. Since the licensing process of such a reactor is not clearly specified in the current Atomic Energy Act, a comparative survey and analysis of domestic and foreign licensing processes for power and non-power reactors has been carried out to develop the rationale and technical basis for establishing the licensing process of such a reactor. The domestic and foreign licensing processes of power and non-power reactors have been surveyed and compared, including those of the U.S.A., Japan, France, U.K., Canada, and IAEA. The general trends in nuclear reactor classification, licensing procedures, regulatory technical requirements, and other licensing requirements and regulations have been investigated. The results of this study will be used as the rationale and technical basis for establishing the licensing process of reactors at development stage such as SMART-P

  9. Licensing Support Experience of the BN-600 Operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khrennikov, N.; Sintsov, A.

    2013-01-01

    License procedure - Main principle: • All works, including fatigue tests of new types of fuel, are carried out at the unit 3 Beloyarsk nuclear power plants with the BN-600 reactor with the justification of the regulatory body. • Justification procedure is standard for all power units and independent from the reactor types. • The regulatory body and independent experts or technical support organizations, which can be involved in this work by the regulatory body, review SAR, operational manuals and other operator documents. • Safety requirements (i.e. Federal rules and codes). The project and design documents shall meet safety requirements. • The technical and organizational measures for safety guarantee shall meet well-known results of the research investigations or shall be experimental validate

  10. 77 FR 68155 - The Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Institute TRIGA Reactor: Facility Operating License No. R-84

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-15

    ... Research Institute TRIGA Reactor: Facility Operating License No. R-84 AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission... considering an application for the renewal of Facility Operating License No. R-84 (Application), which... the renewal of Facility Operating License No. R-84, which currently authorizes the licensee to operate...

  11. 77 FR 42771 - License Renewal for the Dow Chemical TRIGA Research Reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-20

    ... Chemical Company in Midland, MI and is a part of the Analytical Sciences Laboratory. The reactor is housed... releases of liquid radioactive waste by any of the disposal methods. Solid low-level radioactive waste... addition, denial of the application for license renewal would cause the loss of the benefits of teaching...

  12. 10 CFR 110.26 - General license for the export of nuclear reactor components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false General license for the export of nuclear reactor components. 110.26 Section 110.26 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) EXPORT AND IMPORT OF... Denmark Finland France Germany Greece Indonesia Ireland Italy Japan Latvia Lithuania Luxembourg...

  13. PARR-2: reactor description and experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wyne, M.F.; Meghji, J.H.

    1990-12-01

    PARR-2 is a miniature neutron source reactor (MNSR) research reactor has been designed at the rate of 27 kW. Reactor assembly comprises of peaking characteristics with a self limiting flux. In this report reactor description with its assembly and instrumentation control system has been explained. The reactor engineering and physics experiments which can be performed on this reactor are explained in this report. PARR-2 is fueled with HEU fuel pins which are about 90% enriched in U-235. Specific requirements for the safety of the reactor, its building and the personnel, normal instrumentation as required in an industrial environment is sufficient. (A.B.)

  14. Licensing assessment of the Candu Pressurized Heavy Water Reactor. Preliminary safety information document. Volume II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-06-01

    ERDA has requested United Engineers and Constructors (UE and C) to evaluate the design of the Canadian natural uranium fueled, heavy water moderated (CANDU) nuclear reactor power plant to assess its conformance with the licensing criteria and guidelines of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC) for light water reactors. This assessment was used to identify cost significant items of nonconformance and to provide a basis for developing a detailed cost estimate for a 1140 MWe, 3-loop Pressurized Heavy Water Reactor (PHWR) located at the Middletown, USA Site

  15. Gas reactor international cooperative program interim report: United States/Federal Republic of Germany nuclear licensing comparison

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-09-01

    In order to compare US and FRG Nuclear Licensing, a summary description of United States Nuclear Licensing is provided as a basis. This is followed by detailed information on the participants in the Nuclear Licensing process in the Federal Republic of Germany (FRG). FRG licensing procedures are described and the rules and regulations imposed are summarized. The status of gas reactor licensing in both the U.S. and the FRG is outlined and overall conclusions are drawn as to the major licensing differences. An appendix describes the most important technical differences between US and FRG criteria

  16. Licensed operating reactors. Status summary report data as of March 31, 1986. Volume 10, No. 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-05-01

    The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's monthly LICENSED OPERATING REACTORS Status Summary Report provides data on the operation of nuclear units as timely and accurately as possible. This information is collected by the Office of Resource Management, from the Headquarters Staff of NRC's Office of Inspection and Enforcement, from NRC's Regional Offices, and from utilities. Since all of the data concerning operation of the units is provided by the utility operators less than two weeks after the end of the month, necessary corrections to published information are shown on the ERRATA page. This report is divided into three sections: the first contains monthly highlights and statistics for commercial operating units, and errata from previously reported data; the second is a compilation of detailed information on each unit, provided by NRC Regional Offices, IE Headquarters and the Utilities; and the third section is an appendix for miscellaneous information such as spent fuel storage capability, reactor years of experience and non-power reactors in the United States. The percentage computations, Items 20 through 24 in Section 2, the vendor capacity factors on page 1-7, and actual vs potential energy production on page 1-2 are computed using actual data for the period of consideration. The percentages listed in power generation on page 1-2 are computed as a arithmetic average. The factors for the life-span of each unit (the ''Cumulative'' column) are reported by the utility and are not entirely recomputed by NRC. Utility power production data is checked for consistency with previously submitted statistics. It is hoped this status report proves informative and helpful to all agencies and individuals interested in analyzing trends in the nuclear industry which might have safety implications, or in maintaining an awareness of the US energy situation as a whole

  17. Licensed operating reactors. Status summary report, data as of October 31, 1985. Volume 9, No. 11

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-12-01

    The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's monthly Licensed Operating Reactors Status Summary Report provides data on the operation of nuclear units as timely and accurately as possible. This information is collected by the Office of Resource Management, from the Headquarters Staff of NRC's Office of Inspection and Enforcement, from NRC's Regional Offices, and from utilities. Since all of the data concerning operation of the units is provided by the utility operators less than two weeks after the end of the month, necessary corrections to published information are shown on the errata page. This report is divided into three sections: the first contains monthly highlights and statistics for commercial operating units, and errata from previously reported data; the second is a compilation of detailed information on each unit, provided by NRC Regional Offices, IE Headquarters and the Utilities; and the third section is an appendix for miscellaneous information such as spent fuel storage capability, reactor years of experience and non-power reactors in the United States. The percentage computations, Items 20 through 24 in Section 2, the vendor capacity factors on page 1-7, and actual vs potential energy production on page 1-2 are computed using actual data for the period of consideration. The percentages listed in power generation on page 1-2 are computed as an arithmetic average. The factors for the life-span of each unit (the ''Cumulative'' column) are reported by the utility and are not entirely re-computed by NRC. Utility power production data is checked for consistency with previously submitted statistics

  18. Daya bay reactor neutrino experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao Jun

    2010-01-01

    Daya Bay Reactor Neutrino Experiment is a large international collaboration experiment under construction. The experiment aims to precisely determine the neutrino mixing angle θ 13 by detecting the neutrinos produced by the Daya Bay Nuclear Power Plant. θ 13 is one of two unknown fundamental parameters in neutrino mixing. Its magnitude is a roadmap of the future neutrino physics, and very likely related to the puzzle of missing antimatter in our universe. The precise measurement has very important physics significance. The detectors of Daya Bay is under construction now. The full operation is expected in 2011. Three years' data taking will reach the designed the precision, to determine sin 2 2θ 13 to better than 0.01. Daya Bay neutrino detector is an underground large nuclear detector of low background, low energy, and high precision. In this paper, the layout of the experiment, the design and fabrication progress of the detectors, and some highlighted nuclear detecting techniques developed in the detector R and D are introduced. (author)

  19. Lessons from early experience in reactor development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, W.

    1976-09-01

    This paper deals with several issues in U.S. reactor development and demonstration experience. The focus is on the period between 1946 and 1963 during which the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) guided early reactor research and development (R and D) and conducted the Power Reactor Demonstration Program

  20. Guidelines for preparing and reviewing applications for the licensing of non-power reactors: Format and Content. NUREG-1537, Part 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-02-01

    NUREG - 1537, Part 1 gives guidance to non-power reactor licensees and applicants on the format and content of applications to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission for licensing actions. These licensing actions include construction permits and initial operating licenses, license renewals, amendments, conversions from highly enriched uranium to low-enriched uranium, decommissioning, and license termination.

  1. Guidelines for preparing and reviewing applications for the licensing of non-power reactors: Format and Content. NUREG-1537, Part 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-02-01

    NUREG - 1537, Part 1 gives guidance to non-power reactor licensees and applicants on the format and content of applications to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission for licensing actions. These licensing actions include construction permits and initial operating licenses, license renewals, amendments, conversions from highly enriched uranium to low-enriched uranium, decommissioning, and license termination

  2. Safety and licensing analysis of 471 MWt PRISM reactor module

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Tuyle, G.J.; Slovik, G.C.

    1991-01-01

    Independent analyses of unscrammed events postulated for the 471 MW t PRISM reactor module, as performed by Brookhaven National Laboratory for the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, are discussed. Peak fuel, cladding, and sodium temperatures for several postulated events were compared against reference temperatures. In general, BNL could essentially duplicate GE's analytical results, by making GE's assumptions. For the postulated unscrammed loss of flow (ULOF) events, the newly added Gas Expansion Modules (GEMs), have improved the passive shutdown response. With respect to the unscrammed loss of heat sink (ULOHS) event, there was little impact expected from the latest revisions, and little was found. For the unscrammed transient over-power (UTOP) events, uncertainties with respect to the behavior of ternary metal fuel leave unresolved the issue of how large a UTOP initiator (between 20 and 40 cents) may be acceptable. (author)

  3. Conversion to low-enriched fuel in research reactor aspects of licensing the Federal Republic of Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacquemin, J.

    1985-01-01

    Conversion to low-enriched fuel and usage of new developed highly densified fuel in research-reactors will be an essential alteration in operating the reactor. According to the German Energy Act this has to be licensed. here might be some risk to the licensee of an older research-reactor by suspending his operating license because he cannot meet current requirements to be fulfilled or because of a court decision.Disposal of irradiated fuel elements of the new fuel type is a further significant problem which has to be solved before issuing a new license. (author)

  4. The regulation and licensing of research reactors and associated facilities in the United Kingdom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weightman, M.W.; Willby, C.R.

    1990-01-01

    In the United Kingdom, the Nuclear Installations Inspectorate (NII) licenses nuclear facilities, including research reactors, on behalf of the Health and Safety Executive (HSE). The legislation, the regulatory organizations and the methods of operation that have been developed over the last 30 years result in a largely non-prescriptive form of control that is well suited to research reactors. The most important part of the regulatory system is the license and the attachment of conditions which it permits. These conditions require the licensee to prepare arrangements to control the safety of the facility. In doing so the licensee is encouraged to develop a 'safety culture' within its organization. This is particularly important for research reactors which may have limited staff resources and where the ability, and at times the need, to have access to the core is much greater than for nuclear power plants. Present day issues such as the ageing of nuclear facilities, public access to the rationale behind regulatory decisions, and the emergence of more stringent safety requirements, which include a need for quantified safety criteria, have been addressed by the NII. This paper explores the relevance of such issues to the regulation of research reactors. In particular, it discusses some of the factors associated with research reactors that should be considered in developing criteria for the tolerability of risk from these nuclear facilities. From a consideration of these factors, it is the authors' view that the range of tolerable risk to the public from the operation of new research reactors may be expected to be more stringent than similar criteria for new nuclear power plants, whereas the criteria for tolerable risk for research reactor workers are expected to be about the same as those for power reactor workers

  5. Rules for the licensing of new experiments in BR2: application to the test irradiation of new MTR-fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joppen, F.

    2000-01-01

    New types of MTR fuel elements are being developed and require a qualification before routine operation could be authorized. During the test irradiation the new fuel elements .are considered as experimental devices and their irradiation is allowed according to the procedures for experiments. Authorization is based on the advice .of a consultative committee on experiments. This procedure is valid as long as the irradiation is covered by the actual reactor license. An additional license or an amendment is only required if due to the experiment the risk for the workers or the environment is increased in a significant way. A few experimental fuel plates loaded in the primary loop of the reactor will not increase this risk. The source term for potential radioactive releases remains more or less the same. The probability for an accident can be limited by restricting the heat flux and surface temperature. (author)

  6. Licensing activities for the partial decommissioning of IRT-2000 research reactor in Sofia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Apostolov, T.; Ilieva, Kr.; Papukchiev, A.; Kalchev, B.

    2001-01-01

    The project for refurbishment of IRT-2000 research reactor in Sofia into low-power reactor (200 kW) is based on the retention of some IRT-2000 buildings, facilities and equipment. The activities, which determine the partial decommissioning should be realized in accordance with preliminary developed licensing documents as General Plan, Safety Analysis Report and Environment Impact assessment Report. The goal of these documents is to provide and guarantee safe and effective activities with radioactive materials, to define strictly the dismantling procedures, and in the same time to minimize their influence on the environment. The Technical Tasks for General Plan, Safety Analysis Report and Environment Impact Assessment Report have been prepared and will be presented as preliminary licensing documents to the National Regulatory Body for approval before their application. A Quality Management system is being developed nowadays at INRNE. After its certification some requirements of the regulatory body will be completed. This certified QA system is a major part of the licensing procedure for the reconstruction of IRT-2000 research reactor. (author)

  7. Recent U.S. reactor operating experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stello, V. Jr.

    1977-01-01

    A qualitative assessment of U.S. and foreign reactor operating experience is provided. Recent operating occurrences having potentially significant safety impacts on power operation are described. An evaluation of the seriousness of each of these issues and the plans for resolution is discussed. A quantitative report on U.S. reactor operational experience is included. The details of the NRC program for evaluating and applying operating reactor experience in the regulatory process is discussed. A review is made of the adequacy of operating reactor safety and environmental margins based on actual operating experience. The Regulatory response philosophy to operating reactor experiences is detailed. This discussion indicates the NRC emphasis on the importance of a balanced action plan to provide for the protection of public safety in the national interest

  8. 77 FR 7613 - Dow Chemical Company; Dow Chemical TRIGA Research Reactor; Facility Operating License No. R-108

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-13

    ... NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION [Docket No. 50-264; NRC-2012-0026] Dow Chemical Company; Dow Chemical TRIGA Research Reactor; Facility Operating License No. R-108 AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission... Facility Operating License No. R-108 (``Application''), which currently authorizes the Dow Chemical Company...

  9. Operation and Licensing of Mixed Cores in Water Cooled Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-11-01

    Nuclear fuel is a highly complex material that is subject to continuous development and is produced by a range of manufacturers. During operation of a nuclear power plant, the nuclear fuel is subject to extreme conditions of temperature, corroding environment and irradiation, and many different designs of fuel have been manufactured with differing fuel materials, cladding materials and assembly structure to ensure these conditions. The core of an operating power plant can contain hundreds of fuel assemblies, and where there is more than a single design of a fuel assembly in the core, whether through a change of fuel vendor, introduction of an improved design or for some other reason, the core is described as a mixed core. The task of ensuring that the different assembly types do not interact in a harmful manner, causing, for example, differing flow resistance resulting in under cooling, is an important part of ensuring nuclear safety. This report has compiled the latest information on the operational experience of mixed cores and the tools and techniques that are used to analyse the core operation and demonstrate that there are no safety related problems with its operation. This publication is a result of a technical meeting in 2011 and a series of consultants meetings

  10. The combined use of test reactor experiments and power reactor tests for the development of PCI-resistant fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Junkrans, S.; Vesterlund, G.; Vaernild, O.

    1980-01-01

    The theme of this paper is that for development of PCI-resistant fuel acceptable from the commercial and licensing aspects, extensive and time-consuming work is needed both in a test reactor and in power reactors. The test reactor is necessary for ramp testing to power levels not allowed in power reactors and with the aim of generating fuel failures. It is also used for other special irradiation experiments. The access to power reactors is necessary to generate information on performance in a real LWR core and to incubate at a reasonable cost the large amount of rods required for test reactor ramping. Selected results from the ASEA-ATOM work are used to support these conclusions. (author)

  11. International Experience with Fast Reactor Operation & Testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sackett, John I.; Grandy, C.

    2013-01-01

    Conclusion: • Worldwide experience with fast reactors has demonstrated the robustness of the technology and it stands ready for worldwide deployment. • The lessons learned are many and there is danger that what has been learned will be forgotten given that there is little activity in fast reactor development at the present time. • For this reason it is essential that knowledge of fast reactor technology be preserved, an activity supported in the U.S. as well as other countries

  12. Reactor coolant pump service life evaluation for current life cycle optimization and license renewal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doroshuk, B.W.; Berto, D.S.; Robles, M.

    1990-01-01

    This paper reports that as part of the plant life cycle management and license renewal program, Baltimore Gas and Electric Company (BG and E) has completed a service life evaluation of their reactor coolant pumps, funded jointly by EPRI and performed by ABB Combustion Engineering Nuclear Power. Two of the goals of the BG and E plant life cycle management and license renewal program, and of this current evaluation, are to identify actions which would optimize current plant operation, and ensure that license renewal remains a viable option. The reactor coolant pumps (RCPs) at BG and E's Calvert Cliffs Units 1 and 2 are Byron Jackson pumps with a diffuser and a single suction. This pump design is also used in many other nuclear plants. The RCP service life evaluation assessed the effect of all plausible age-related degradation mechanisms (ARDMs) on the RCP components. Cyclic fatigue and thermal embrittlement were two ARDMs identified as having a high potential to limit the service life of the pump case. The pump case is a primary pressure boundary component. Hence, ensuring its continued structural integrity is important

  13. Licensing assessment of the CANDU pressurized heavy water reactor. Volume I. Preliminary safety information document

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-06-01

    The PHWR design contains certain features that will require significant modifications to comply with USNRC siting and safety requirements. The most significant of these features are the reactor vessel; control systems; quality assurance program requirements; seismic design of structures, systems and components; and providing an inservice inspection program capability. None of these areas appear insolvable with current state-of-the-art engineering or with upgrading of the quality assurance program for components constructed outside of the USA. In order to be licensed in the U. S., the entire reactor assembly would have to be redesigned to comply with ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code, Section III, Division 1 and Division 2. A summary matrix at the end of this volume identifies compliance of the systems and structures of the PHWR plant with the USNRC General Design Criteria. The matrix further identifies the estimated incremental cost to a 600 MWe PHWR that would be required to license the plant in the U. S. Further, the matrix identifies whether or not the incremental licensing cost is size dependent and the relative percentage of the base direct cost of a Canadian sited plant

  14. Summary of IEA-R1 research a reactor licensing related to its power increase from 2 to 10 MW

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-04-01

    This work is a summary of IEA-R1 research reactor licensing related to its power increase from 2 to 10 MW. It reports also safety requirements, fuel elements, and reactor control modifications inherent to power increase. (A.C.A.S.)

  15. Licensed operating reactors. Status summary report, data as of August 31, 1983. Volume 8, No. 9

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-10-01

    This report is divided into three sections: the first contains monthly highlights and statistics for commercial operating units, and errata from previously reported data; the second is a compilation of detailed information on each unit; and the third section is an appendix for miscellaneous information such as spent fuel storage capability, reactor years of experience and non-power reactors in the United States

  16. Experiments with the SUR 100 training reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milicic, B.

    1984-06-01

    This paper contains a compilation of various experiments using the SUR - 100 reactor for training purposes, which have been widly proved in practical work at the School for Nuclear Technology of the Karlsruhe Research Center. (orig.) [de

  17. Operational and reliability experience with reactor instrumentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dixon, F.; Gow, R.S.

    1978-01-01

    In the last 15 years the CEGB has experienced progressive plant development, integration and changes in operating regime through nine nuclear (gas-cooled reactor) power stations with corresponding instrumentation advances leading towards more refined centralized control. Operation and reliability experience with reactor instrumentation is reported in this paper with reference to the progressive changes related to the early magnox, late magnox and AGR periods. Data on instrumentation reliability in terms of reactor forced outages are presented and show that the instrumentation contributions to loss of generating plant availability are small. Reactor safety circuits, neutron flux and temperature measurements, gas analysis and vibration monitoring are discussed. In reviewing the reactor instrumentation the emphasis is on reporting recent experience, particularly on AGR equipment, but overall performance and changes to magnox equipment are included so that some appreciation can be obtained of instrumentation requirements with respect to plant lifetimes. (author)

  18. Experience in using a research reactor for the training of power reactor operators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blotcky, A.J.; Arsenaut, L.J.

    1972-01-01

    A research reactor facility such as the one at the Omaha Veterans Administration Hospital would have much to offer in the way of training reactor operators. Although most of the candidates for the course had either received previous training in the Westinghouse Reactor Operator Training Program, had operated nuclear submarine reactors or had operated power reactors, they were not offered the opportunity to perform the extensive manipulations of a reactor that a small research facility will allow. In addition the AEC recommends 10 research reactor startups per student as a prerequisite for a cold operator?s license and these can easily be obtained during the training period

  19. Licensed operating reactors: Status summary report, data as of December 31, 1995. Volume 20

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-06-01

    The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's monthly summary of licensed nuclear power reactor data is based primarily on the operating data report submitted by licensees for each unit. This report is divided into two sections: the first contains summary highlights and the second contains data on each individual unit in commercial operation. Section 1 availability factors, capacity factors, and forced outage rates are simple arithmetic averages. Section 2 items in the cumulative column are generally as reported by the licensees and notes to the use of weighted averages and starting dates other than commercial operation are provided

  20. Safety-licensing assessment of NASAP reactor concepts and fuel cycle facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lipinski, W.C.; Prohammer, F.G.; van Erp, J.B.; Seefeldt, W.B.

    1978-06-01

    Assessments are presented of the safety/licensability of reactor concepts based on information supplied by the Nonproliferation Alternative Systems Assessment Program (NASAP) characterization contractors in their updated responses to the data package for NASAP Rolling Report II. The assessment of the LMFBR includes information from a characterization contractor on alternate fuel cycles but does not include information provided by a characterization contractor on plant-related safety issues. The information provided by the characterization contractors was supplemented by assessments provided by the U. S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission

  1. Federal supervisory authorities' power to issue directives in nuclear licensing procedures (Kalkar reactor)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1990-01-01

    The Federal Constitutional Court (BVerfG) is concerned in its judgement with the legal instrument of Federal supervisory authorities' power to issue directives in nuclear licensing procedures (Kalkar reactor). Dealt with are questions concerning material and excercising competences, the Federal Government's right to issue directives and possible violation of Laender rights, as well as the legal position between Land and Federal Government, the necessity to issue clear directives, questions concerning the competence to issue directives and the Federal Government's duty to consider the overall interests (Federal Government and Laender interests), questions concerning constitutional state principles and the limits in the relations between Federal Government - Laender concerning legal competence. (RST) [de

  2. Operating experience and maintenance at the TRIGA Mark II LENA reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cingoli, F.; Altieri, S.; Lana, F.; Rosti, G.; Alloni, L.; Meloni, S.

    1988-01-01

    The last two years at the Trigs Mark II LENA plant were characterized by the running of the n-n-bar oscillation NADIR experiment. Consequently reactor operation was positively affected and the running hours rose again above 1000 hours per year. The LENA team was also deeply involved in the procedures for the renewal of the reactor operation license. The new requirements set by the Nuclear Energy Licensing Authority (ENEA for Italy) most of which concerning radiation protection and environmental impact, have been already fulfilled. In some cases the installation of new apparatus is underway

  3. Reactor operator screening test experiences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Brien, W.J.; Penkala, J.L.; Witzig, W.F.

    1976-01-01

    When it became apparent to Duquesne Light Company of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, that the throughput of their candidate selection-Phase I training-reactor operator certification sequence was something short of acceptable, the utility decided to ask consultants to make recommendations with respect to candidate selection procedures. The recommendation implemented was to create a Nuclear Training Test that would predict the success of a candidate in completing Phase I training and subsequently qualify for reactor operator certification. The mechanics involved in developing and calibrating the Nuclear Training Test are described. An arbitration decision that resulted when a number of International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers union employees filed a grievance alleging that the selection examination was unfair, invalid, not job related, inappropriate, and discriminatorily evaluated is also discussed. The arbitration decision favored the use of the Nuclear Training Test

  4. Operating Experience with Power Reactors. Proceedings of the Conference on Operating Experience with Power Reactors. Vol. I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1963-10-15

    At the beginning of 1963 nuclear power plants produced some 3 500 000kW of electrical power to different distribution grids around the world. Much significant operating experience has been gained with these power reactors, but this experience is often not collected in such a way as to make it easily available. The International Atomic Energy Agency convened a Conference on Operating Experience with Power Reactors in Vienna from 4-8 June 1963 which was attended by 240 participants representing 27 of the Agency's Member States and six international organizations. At the Conference, 42 papers giving detailed experience with more than 20 nuclear power stations were discussed. Although similar meetings on a national or regional scale have been held earlier in various countries, this is the first arranged by the Agency on a world-wide basis. Some of the detailed material may have been given earlier but for the most part it represents new and recently acquired experience, and for the first time it has been possible to compile in one place such extensive material on the operating experience with power reactors. The Conference discussed the experience gained both generally in the context of national and international nuclear power development programmes, and more specifically in the detailed operating experience with different power reactor stations. In addition, various plant components, fuel cycles, staffing of nuclear plants and licensing of such staff were treated. It is hoped that these Proceedings will be of interest not only to nuclear plant designers and operators who daily encounter problems similar to those discussed by the Conference, but also to those guiding the planning and implementation of power development programmes.

  5. Operating Experience with Power Reactors. Proceedings of the Conference on Operating Experience with Power Reactors. Vol. II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1963-10-15

    At the beginning of 1963 nuclear power plants produced some 3 500 000 kW of electrical power to different distribution grids around the world. Much significant operating experience has been gained with these power reactors, but this experience is often not collected in such a way as to make it easily available. The International Atomic Energy Agency convened a Conference on Operating Experience with Power Reactors in Vienna from 4 -8 June 1963 which was attended by 240 participants representing 27 of the Agency's Member States and six international organizations. At the Conference, 42 papers giving detailed experience with more than 20 nuclear power stations were discussed. Although similar meetings on a national or regional scale have been held earlier in various countries, this is the first arranged by the Agency on a world-wide basis. Some of the detailed material may have been given earlier but for the most part it represents new and recently acquired experience, and for the first time it has been possible to compile in one place such extensive material on the operating experience with power reactors. The Conference discussed the experience gained both generally in the context of national and international nuclear power development programmes, and more specifically in the detailed operating experience with different power reactor stations. In addition, various plant components, fuel cycles, staffing of nuclear plants and licensing of such staff were treated. It is hoped that these Proceedings will be of interest not only to nuclear , plant designers and operators who daily encounter problems similar to those discussed by the Conference, but also to those guiding the planning and implementation of power development programmes.

  6. Experience in utilizing research reactors in Yugoslavia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pop-Jordanov, J.; Raisic, N. [Boris Kidric Institute of Nuclear Sciences VINCA, Belgrade (Yugoslavia); Copic, M.; Gabrovsek, Z. [Jozef Stefan Institute Ljubljana (Yugoslavia)

    1972-07-01

    The nuclear institutes in Yugoslavia possess three research reactors. Since 1958, two heavy-water reactors have been in operation at the 'Boris Kidric' Institute, a zero-power reactor RB and a 6. 5-MW reactor RA. At the Jozef Stefan Institute, a 250-kW TRIGA Mark II reactor has been operating since 1966. All reactors are equipped with the necessary experimental facilities. The main activities based on these reactors are: (1) fundamental research in solid-state and nuclear physics; (2) R and D activities related to nuclear power program; and (3) radioisotope production. In fundamental physics, inelastic neutron scattering and diffraction phenomena are studied by means of the neutron beam tubes and applied to investigations of the structures of solids and liquids. Valuable results are also obtained in n - γ reaction studies. Experiments connected with the fuel -element development program, owing to the characteristics of the existing reactors, are limited to determination of the fuel element parameters, to studies on the purity of uranium, and to a small number of capsule irradiations. All three reactors are also used for the verification of different methods applied in the analysis of power reactors, particularly concerning neutron flux distributions, the optimization of reactor core configurations and the shielding effects. An appreciable irradiation space in the reactors is reserved for isotope production. Fruitful international co-operation has been established in all these activities, on the basis of either bilateral or multilateral arrangements. The paper gives a critical analysis of the utilization of research reactors in a developing country such as Yugoslavia. The investments in and the operational costs of research reactors are compared with the benefits obtained in different areas of reactor application. The impact on the general scientific, technological and educational level in the country is also considered. In particular, an attempt is made ro

  7. Experience in utilizing research reactors in Yugoslavia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pop-Jordanov, J.; Raisic, N.; Copic, M.; Gabrovsek, Z.

    1972-01-01

    The nuclear institutes in Yugoslavia possess three research reactors. Since 1958, two heavy-water reactors have been in operation at the 'Boris Kidric' Institute, a zero-power reactor RB and a 6. 5-MW reactor RA. At the Jozef Stefan Institute, a 250-kW TRIGA Mark II reactor has been operating since 1966. All reactors are equipped with the necessary experimental facilities. The main activities based on these reactors are: (1) fundamental research in solid-state and nuclear physics; (2) R and D activities related to nuclear power program; and (3) radioisotope production. In fundamental physics, inelastic neutron scattering and diffraction phenomena are studied by means of the neutron beam tubes and applied to investigations of the structures of solids and liquids. Valuable results are also obtained in n - γ reaction studies. Experiments connected with the fuel -element development program, owing to the characteristics of the existing reactors, are limited to determination of the fuel element parameters, to studies on the purity of uranium, and to a small number of capsule irradiations. All three reactors are also used for the verification of different methods applied in the analysis of power reactors, particularly concerning neutron flux distributions, the optimization of reactor core configurations and the shielding effects. An appreciable irradiation space in the reactors is reserved for isotope production. Fruitful international co-operation has been established in all these activities, on the basis of either bilateral or multilateral arrangements. The paper gives a critical analysis of the utilization of research reactors in a developing country such as Yugoslavia. The investments in and the operational costs of research reactors are compared with the benefits obtained in different areas of reactor application. The impact on the general scientific, technological and educational level in the country is also considered. In particular, an attempt is made ro

  8. Results of the Nucifer reactor neutrino experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buck, Christian; Lindner, Manfred [MPIK Heidelberg (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    Nuclear reactors are a strong and pure source of electron antineutrinos. With neutrino experiments close to compact reactor cores new insights into neutrino properties and reactor physics can be obtained. The Nucifer experiment is one of the pioneers in this class of very short baseline projects. Its detector to reactor distance is only about 7 m. The data obtained in the last years allowed to estimate the plutonium concentration in the reactor core by the neutrino flux measurement. This is of interest for safeguard applications and non proliferation efforts. The antineutrinos in Nucifer are detected via the inverse beta decay on free protons. Those Hydrogen nuclei are provided by 850 liters of organic liquid scintillator. For higher detection efficiency and background reduction the liquid is loaded with Gadolinium. Despite all shielding efforts and veto systems the background induced by the reactor activity and cosmogenic particles is still the main challenge in the experiment. The principle of the Nucifer detector is similar to the needs of upcoming experiments searching for sterile neutrinos. Therefore, the Nucifer results are also valuable input for the understanding and optimization of those next generation projects. The observation of sterile neutrinos would imply new physics beyond the standard model.

  9. NRC as referee (reactor licensing following the Three Mile Island accident)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eisenhut, D.G.

    1984-01-01

    In this article, the NRC's licensing director reports on the progress made by US utilities in complying with the key regulations stemming from the Three Mile Island accident. Over 130 items must be improved at more than 65 reactors. The actions taken by France in response to its own analysis of the accident are discussed. New NRC requirements with regard to operational safety, design, and emergency-response capability are outlined. Nearly all the training, or software, items in Nureg-0737 (''Clarification of TMI Action Plan Requirements'') and more than half of the mechanical, or hardware, items have been completed at plants with operating reactors. The Committee to Review Generic Requirements was created to develop means for controlling the number and nature of NRC requirements placed on licensees. Probabilistic risk-assessment techniques were not widely used by the NRC until after the Three Mile Island accident. The NRC has directed licensees and applicants for operating licenses to conduct control-room design reviews to identify and correct human-engineering discrepancies. Includes 2 tables

  10. Operating experience with the DRAGON High Temperature Reactor experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simon, R.A.; Capp, P.D.

    2002-01-01

    The Dragon Reactor Experiment in Winfrith/UK was a materials test facility for a number of HTR projects pursued in the sixties and seventies of the last century. It was built and managed as an OECD/NEA international joint undertaking. The reactor operated successfully between 1964 and 1975 to satisfy the growing demand for irradiation testing of fuels and fuel elements as well as for technological tests of components and materials. The paper describes the reactor's main experimental features and presents results of 11 years of reactor operation relevant for future HTRs. (author)

  11. Detecting Dark Photons with Reactor Neutrino Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, H. K.

    2017-08-01

    We propose to search for light U (1 ) dark photons, A', produced via kinetically mixing with ordinary photons via the Compton-like process, γ e-→A'e-, in a nuclear reactor and detected by their interactions with the material in the active volumes of reactor neutrino experiments. We derive 95% confidence-level upper limits on ɛ , the A'-γ mixing parameter, ɛ , for dark-photon masses below 1 MeV of ɛ reactors as potential sources of intense fluxes of low-mass dark photons.

  12. Experience in operation of heavy water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rotaru, Ion; Bilegan, Iosif; Ghitescu, Petre

    1999-01-01

    The paper presents the main topics of the CANDU owners group (COG) meeting held in Mangalia, Romania on 7-10 September 1998. These meetings are part of the IAEA program for exchange of information related mainly to CANDU reactor operation safety. The first meeting for PHWR reactors took place in Vienna in 1989, followed by those in Argentina (1991), India (1994) and Korea (1996). The topics discussed at the meeting in Romania were: operation experience and recent major events, performances of CANDU reactors and safe operation, nuclear safety and operation procedures of PHWR, programs and strategies of lifetime management of installations and components of NPPs, developments and updates

  13. Operational experience of the Marcoule reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conte, F.

    1963-01-01

    The results obtaining from three years operation of the reactors G-2, G-3 have made it possible to accumulate a considerable amount of operational experience of these reactors. The main original points: - the pre-stressed concrete casing - the possibility of loading while under power - automatic temperature control have been perfectly justified by the results of operation. The author confirms the importance of these original solutions and draws conclusions concerning the study of future nuclear power stations. (author) [fr

  14. Present and future oscillation experiments at reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mikaehlyan, L.A.

    2001-01-01

    A report is presented on recent progress and developments (since the NANP'99 Conference) in the current and future long baseline (∼100 - 800 km) oscillation experiments at reactors. These experiments, under certain assumptions, can fully reconstruct the internal mass structure of the electron neutrino and provide a laboratory test of solar and atmospheric neutrino problems

  15. Licensing considerations in converting NRC-licensed non-power reactors from high-enriched to low-enriched uranium fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carter, R.E.

    1985-01-01

    During the mid-1970s, there was increasing concern with the possibility that highly enriched uranium (HEU), widely used in non-power reactors around the world, might be diverted from its intended peaceful uses. In 1982 the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) issued a policy statement that was intended to conform with the perceived international thinking, and that addressed the two relevant areas in which NRC has statutory responsibility, namely, export of special nuclear materials for non-USA non-power reactors, and the licensing of USA-based non-power reactors not owned by the Federal government. To further address the second area, NRC issued a proposed rule for public comment that would require all NRC-licensed non-power reactors using HEU to convert to low enriched uranium (LEU) fuel, unless they could demonstrate a unique purpose. Currently the NRC staff is revising the proposed rule. An underlying principle guiding the staff is that as long as a change in enrichment does not lead to safety-related reactor modifications, and does not involve an unreviewed safety question, the licensee could convert the core without prior NRC approval. At the time of writing this paper, a regulatory method of achieving this principle has not been finalized. (author)

  16. Licensing considerations in converting NRC-licensed non-power reactors from high-enriched to low-enriched uranium fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carter, R E

    1985-07-01

    During the mid-1970s, there was increasing concern with the possibility that highly enriched uranium (HEU), widely used in non-power reactors around the world, might be diverted from its intended peaceful uses. In 1982 the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) issued a policy statement that was intended to conform with the perceived international thinking, and that addressed the two relevant areas in which NRC has statutory responsibility, namely, export of special nuclear materials for non-USA non-power reactors, and the licensing of USA-based non-power reactors not owned by the Federal government. To further address the second area, NRC issued a proposed rule for public comment that would require all NRC-licensed non-power reactors using HEU to convert to low enriched uranium (LEU) fuel, unless they could demonstrate a unique purpose. Currently the NRC staff is revising the proposed rule. An underlying principle guiding the staff is that as long as a change in enrichment does not lead to safety-related reactor modifications, and does not involve an unreviewed safety question, the licensee could convert the core without prior NRC approval. At the time of writing this paper, a regulatory method of achieving this principle has not been finalized. (author)

  17. Licensed operating reactors. Status summary report, data as of April 30, 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-05-01

    This report is divided into three sections: the first contains monthly highlights and statistics for commercial operating units, and errata from previously reported data; the second is a compilation of detailed information on each unit, provided by NRC Regional Offices, IE Headquarters and the Utilities; and the third section is an appendix for miscellaneous information such as spent storage capability, reactor years of experience and non-power reactors in the United States

  18. Licensed operating reactors. Status summary report, data as of February 28, 1986. Volume 10, No. 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-04-01

    This report is divided into three sections: the first contains monthly highlights and statistics for commercial operating units, and errata from previously reported data; the second is a compilation of detailed information on each unit, provided by NRC Regional Offices, IE Headquarters and the Utilities; and the third section is an appendix for miscellaneous information such as spent fuel storage capability, reactor years of experience and non-power reactors in the United States

  19. Licensed operating reactors status summary report, data as of August 31, 1985. Volume 9, No. 9

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-10-01

    This report is divided into three sections: the first contains monthly highlights and statistics for commercial operating units, and errata from previously reported data; the second is a compilation of detailed information on each unit, provided by NRC Regional Offices, IE Headquarters and the Utilities; and the third section is an appendix for miscellaneous information such as spent fuel storage capability, reactor years of experience and non-power reactors in the United States

  20. Licensed operating reactors. Status summary report, data as of May 31, 1986. Volume 10, Number 6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-08-01

    This report is divided into three sections: the first contains monthly highlights and statistics for commercial operating units, and errata from previously reported data; the second is a compilation of detailed information on each unit, provided by NRC Regional Offices, IE Headquarters and the Utilities; and the third section is an appendix for miscellaneous information such as spent fuel storage capability, reactor years of experience and non-power reactors in the United States

  1. Licensed operating reactors. Status summary report: data as of July 31, 1985. Volume 9, No. 8

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-09-01

    This report is divided into three sections: the first contains monthly highlights and statistics for commercial operating units, and errata from previously reported data; the second is a compilation of detailed information on each unit, provided by NRC Regional Offices, IE Head-quarters and the Utilities; and the third section is an appendix for miscellaneous information such as spent fuel storage capabilitiy, reactor years of experience and non-power reactors in the United States

  2. Licensed operating reactors: Status summary report data as of 06-30-86

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-11-01

    This report is divided into three sections: the first contains monthly highlights and statistics for commercial operating units, and errata from previously reported data; the second is a compilation of detailed information on each unit, provided by NRC Regional Offices, IE Headquarters and Utilities; and the third section is an appendix for miscellaneous information such as spent fuel storage capability, reactor years of experience and non-power reactors in the United States

  3. Licensed operating reactors. Status summary report data as of January 31, 1986. Volume 10, No. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-03-01

    This report is divided into three sections: the first contains monthly highlights and statistics for commercial operating units, and errata from previously reported data; the second is a compilation of detailed information on each unit, provided by NRC Regional Offices, IE Headquarters and the Utilities; and the third section is an appendix for miscellaneous information such as spent fuel storage capability, reactor years of experience and non-power reactors in the United States

  4. Shutdown requirements in licensing of research reactors and consequences for operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roegler, H.-J.; Stein, J.

    1983-01-01

    Most countries start their nuclear life with the setup of a research reactor. Most countries have at this time no licensing authority established which can act on existing laws, rules and regulations. Thus, most countries have during this starting phase to rely on the regulations fixed by international institutions such as the IAEA (or by national institutions as the former NRC in US, which happens to take place more often from reasons below). This implies a specific responsibility for international regulations since they have to be very clear and unique. Moreover they have to be applicable to all plants they are set forth for and they have to give no unavoidable restrictions on the use of the plant. Additionally some recheck of the rules based on national rules in forth will be of help. The enrichment reduction for research reactors gave frequent cause to look at the existing IAEA-publications for research reactors. They are laid down in the safety series no. 35 edited 1971. I will only discuss here specific parts of these considerations or requirements. Since the authors' personal impressions are that the published considerations are neither that clear nor that less restrictive as necessary the subsequent discussion is carried out. One of the confusing points of the existing IAEA-regulations is the lengthy discussion of reactivity considerations for critical assemblies first, no similar separate discussion for research reactors and a second discussion titled 'control-rod considerations' under the main title 'considerations applying to critical assemblies and research reactor'. This discussion will be restricted to the latter since the critical assemblies with their timely Constance of maximum excess reactivity do not present any problem for all shut-down conditions

  5. The Reactor Analysis Support Package (RASP): Volume 10, Guidelines for developing a reload licensing capability:Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diamond, D.J.

    1988-08-01

    The EPRI Reactor Analysis Support Package (RASP) consists of computer codes and documentation for calculating core performance and plant transients. This report was written to help a utility to use these tools properly for reload design and safety evaluations. The emphasis is on the steps that the utility can take to develop a methodology that is approved by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission for reload licensing submittals. The report treats both the planning and the implementation of this type of calculational capability. With regard to planning, there is discussion defining objectives, resource requirements, organization and scheduling. In order to help the engineering staff implement the plan there is discussion of the development of a methodology for event analysis, qualification of the methods, and the writing of design control procedures and topical reports. The experience of utilities, and especially of GPU Nuclear Corporation (GPUN), in developing a reload licensing capability is cited throughout the report and extracts from GPUN design control procedures are included in the appendices. 16 refs., 23 figs., 9 tabs

  6. Experiences with interpretation and application of the German Atomic Energy Act for the German research reactors in Geesthacht FRG-1 and FRG-2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krull, W.

    1980-01-01

    The German research reactors FRG-1 and FRG-2 have passed different types of licensing procedures in the past years. It is reported about the experiences we have got in the interpretation and application of section 7 of the German Atomic Energy Act. Following these experiences an estimation is done for the licensing procedure for the reduction of the uranium enrichment. (orig.) [de

  7. THTR steam generator licensing experience as seen by the manufacturer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fricker, H.W.

    1981-01-01

    This paper describes the licensing procedures of the manufacture of the 300 MWe THTR steam generator. The following problems are discussed: operating data, design, materials used, manufacture and installation of the generator, and also quality control

  8. Leak before break experience in CANDU reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Price, E.G.; Moan, G.D.; Coleman, C.E.

    1988-04-01

    The paper describes how the requirements for Leak-Before-Break are met in CANDU reactors. The requirements are based on operational and laboratory experience. After the onset of leakage in a fuel channel from a delayed hydride crack, time is available to the operator to take action before the crack grows to an unstable length. The time available is calculated using different models which use crack growth data from small specimen tests. When the results from crack growth behaviour experiments, carried out on components removed from reactor are used in the model, the time available for operator response is about 100 hours

  9. Regulations concerning licensing of nuclear reactor facilities and other nuclear installations, Decree No 7/9141, 6 January 1975

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-01-01

    This Decree lays down the licensing system for nuclear installations in Turkey and also sets up a Nuclear Safety Committee whose duty is to ensure that the requirements of this Decree are met. The Committee is made up of members of the Atomic Energy Commission specialized in reactors, nuclear safety, health physics, reactor physics as well as two experts respectively appointed by the Ministry of Health and Social Welfare and the Ministry of Energy and National Resources. (NEA) [fr

  10. CANDU reactors. Experience and innovation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hart, R.S.; Brooks, G.L.

    1989-02-01

    The title of this paper highlights two key considerations which must be properly balanced through good management in the evolution of any engineering product. Excessive reliance on experience will lead to product stagnation; excessive reliance on innovation will often lead to an unsatisfactory product, at least in the first generation of this product. To illustrate this balancing process, the paper reviews CANDU evolution and experience and the balance between proveness and innovation achieved through management of the evolution process from early prototypes to today's large-scale commercial units. A forecast of continuing evolutionary directions is included

  11. Candu reactors - experience and innovation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hart, R.S.; Brooks, G.L.

    1989-01-01

    The title of this paper highlights two key considerations which must be properly balanced through good management in the evolution of any engineering product. Excessive reliance on experience will lead to product stagnation; excessive reliance on innovation will often lead to an unsatisfactory product, at least in the first generation of this product. To illustrate this balancing process, the paper reviews CANDU evolution and experience and the balance between proveness and innovation achieved through management of the evolution process from early prototypes to today's large-scale commercial units. A forecast of continuing evolutionary directions is included

  12. Radiological characterisation experience with Magnox reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Westall, Bill A.; Towton, Barbara

    2012-01-01

    At the end of generation, power reactors will be decommissioned. Whether decommissioning is prompt or deferred, knowledge of the radioactive inventory of plant and structures is needed to develop and underpin the decommissioning strategy. As decommissioning progresses the level of detail required for the radioactive inventory increases as more specific and detailed questions need answering. Failure to adequately characterise will result in increased costs and project overruns due to missing optimal solutions, over pessimistic assumptions or unforeseen problems and regulatory issues. Radiological characterisation for decommissioning of Magnox power stations in the UK has been in progress for over a quarter of a century. Firstly measurements and calculations were carried out to develop a strategy. These have been followed by measurements to determine radioactive inventories of waste streams and packages or to allow decontamination of structures and most recently for partial de-licensing of sites. Some examples of the work carried out for the Magnox stations will be given, ranging from the neutron activation calculations to estimate the radioactive inventory within a bio-shield and measurements to validate them. Various plant and structures where the radioactive inventory is due to contamination have been characterised by measurements and examples for boilers and cooling ponds will be discussed. Various routine and ad-hoc measurements and shielding assessments have been performed on waste forms to help satisfy conditions for acceptance for disposal or exemption, which will be reviewed. Finally the measurements for de-licensing and the successful application of Data Quality Objectives will be addressed. (authors)

  13. Licensed operating reactors. Status summary report data as of 12-31-94: Volume 19

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-04-01

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission's annual summary of licensed nuclear power reactor data is based primarily on the report of operating data submitted by licensees for each unit for the month of December because that report contains data for the month of December, the year to date (in this case calendar year 1994) and cumulative data, usually from the date of commercial operation. The data is not independently verified, but various computer checks are made. The report is divided into two sections. The first contains summary highlights and the second contains data on each individual unit in commercial operation. Section 1 capacity and availability factors are simple arithmetic averages. Section 2 items in the cumulative column are generally as reported by the licensee and notes as to the use of weighted averages and starting dates other than commercial operation are provided

  14. Licensed operating reactors: Status summary report data as of December 31, 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartfield, R.A.

    1993-03-01

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission's annual summary of licensed nuclear power reactor data is based primarily on the report of operating data submitted by licensees for each unit for the month of December because that report contains data for the month of December, the year to date (in this case calendar year 1992) and cumulative data, usually from the date of commercial operation. ne data is not independently verified, but various computer checks are made. The report is divided into two sections. The first contains summary highlights and the second contains data on each individual unit in commercial operation Section 1 capacity and availability factors are simple arithmetic averages. Section 2 items in the cumulative column are generally as reported by the licensee and notes as to the use of weighted averages and starting dates other than commercial operation are provided

  15. Licensed operating reactors. Status summary report data as of 12-31-94: Volume 19

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-04-01

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission`s annual summary of licensed nuclear power reactor data is based primarily on the report of operating data submitted by licensees for each unit for the month of December because that report contains data for the month of December, the year to date (in this case calendar year 1994) and cumulative data, usually from the date of commercial operation. The data is not independently verified, but various computer checks are made. The report is divided into two sections. The first contains summary highlights and the second contains data on each individual unit in commercial operation. Section 1 capacity and availability factors are simple arithmetic averages. Section 2 items in the cumulative column are generally as reported by the licensee and notes as to the use of weighted averages and starting dates other than commercial operation are provided.

  16. Licensed operating reactors. Status summary report data as of December 31, 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hartfield, R.A.

    1994-03-01

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commissions annual summary of licensed nuclear power reactor data is based primarily on the report of operating data submitted by licensees for each unit for the month of December, the year to date (in this case calendar year 1993) and cumulative data, usually for the date of commercial operation. The data is not independently verified, but various computer checks are made. The report is divided into two sections. The first contains summary highlights and the second contains data on each individual unit in commercial operation. Section 1 capacity and availability factors are simple arithmetic averages. Section 2 items in the cumulative column are generally as reported by the licensee and notes as to the use of weighted averages and starting dates other than commercial operation are provided.

  17. Research and development associated with licensing of MHTGR [Modular High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, H.

    1990-01-01

    The Modular High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (MHTGR) currently under development by the US Department of Energy (US-DOE) for commercial applications has top-level goals of producing safe, economical power for the US utility industry. The utility industry has been represented in formulating design and licensing requirements through both a ''Utility User Requirements Document'' and by participating in the DOE system engineering process known as the ''Integrated Approach.'' The result of this collaboration has been to set stringent goals for both the safety and operational reliability of the MHTGR. To achieve these goals, the designer must have access to a more comprehensive data base of properties in several fields of technology than is currently available. A technology development program has been planned to provide this data to the designer in time to support both his design activities and the submittal of formal licensing application documents. The US-DOE has chosen the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to take the lead in planning and executing these technology programs. When completed these will augment the designer's current data base and provide the necessary depth to meet the stringent goals which have been set for the MHTGR. It is worth noting that the goals of safety and operational reliability are complementary, and the data required from the technology development program will be similar. Therefore, the program to support the licensing of the MHTGR is not separate from that required for design, but is a subset of that which meets all the requirements that result from implementing the US-DOE's integrated approach. 38 figs

  18. US graphite reactor D ampersand D experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garrett, S.M.K.; Williams, N.C.

    1997-02-01

    This report describes the results of the U.S. Graphite Reactor Experience Task for the Decommissioning Strategy Plan for the Leningrad Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) Unit 1 Study. The work described in this report was performed by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for the Department of Energy (DOE)

  19. State system experience with safeguarding power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roehnsch, W.

    1982-01-01

    This session describes the development and operation of the State System of Accountancy and Control in the German Democratic Republic, and summarizes operating experience with safeguards at power reactor facilities. Overall organization and responsibilities, containment and surveillance measures, materials accounting, and inspection procedures will be outlined. Cooperation between the IAEA, State system, facility, and supplier authorities will also be addressed

  20. Electronic licensing filing system development and implementation experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walderhaug, J.

    1993-01-01

    The Electronic Licensing Filing System (ELFS) is a microcomputer-based integrated document search and retrieval system for the Nuclear Regulatory Affairs Division of Southern California Edison (SCE). ELFS allows the user access to the current licensing basis of a subject by providing an easily searchable electronic information data base consisting of regulatory correspondence, design-bases documentation, licensing documents [updated final safety and analysis report (UFSAR) and technical specifications], and regulatory guidance or directives [10CFR, generic letters, bulletins, notices, circulars, regulatory guides, policy statements, and selected US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) regulations]. It is used in the preparation of correspondence and submittals to the NRC, 50.59 safety evaluations, design-bases reconstitution, and commitment tracking and management

  1. Physics experiments with the operating reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cullington, G R; King, D C

    1973-09-27

    Experimental techniques have been developed and used on Dragon to give consistent information on excess reactivity and shut down margin. The reactivity measurements have been correlated with the theoretical calculations and have led to improvements in the calculations. The methods used and the results obtained are accepted by the Safety Committee as sufficient evidence for compliance with the fuel loading safety rules. Although the reactor was not designed as an experimental facility, flux and dose measurements experiments have been successfully carried out. Mass flow and negative reactivity transient measurements have been carried out. These are valuable for demonstration of the flexibility of the reactor system and for giving confidence in theoretical calculations.

  2. Physics experiment on the Dragon reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hunt, C.

    1974-10-15

    The paper describes a set of DRAGON experiments planned to measure burn-up effects in DRAGON irradiated fuel. Irradiated fuel elements from DRAGON are to be subjected to reactivity measurements in the HECTOR experimental reactor to infer the residual U235 content followed by isotopic analyses at CEA laboratories in 1975. Fast neutron damage to DRAGON graphite is compared to fast neutron dose measurements using Ni58 (n,p) Co58 activation wires in both DRAGON and the DIDO MTR. Gamma scanning of irradiated fuel elements are used to compare axial power profiles to those derived from two-dimensional and three-dimensional calculations of the DRAGON reactor.

  3. Safety Evaluation Report related to the renewal of the operating license for the research reactor at Pennsylvania State University

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    This Safety Evaluation Report for the application filed by the Pennsylvania State University for a renewal of Operating License R-2 to continue to operate the Pennsylvania State University Breazeale Reactor (PSBR) has been prepared by the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The facility is located on the campus in University Park, Pennsylvania. On the basis of its technical review, the staff concludes that the reactor facility can continue to be operated by the university without endangering the health and safety of the public or the environment

  4. Licensed operating reactors. Status summary report: data as of September 30, 1985. Volume 9, No. 10

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-11-01

    This report provides data on the operation of nuclear units as timely and accurately as possible. This information is collected by the Office of Resource Management from the Headquarters staff of NRC's Office of Inspection and Enforcement, from NRC's Regional Offices, and from utilities. The three sections of the report are: monthly highlights and statistics for commercial operating units, and errata from previously reported data; a compilation of detailed information on each unit, provided by NRC's Regional Offices, IE Headquarters and the utilities; and an appendix for miscellaneous information such as spent fuel storage capability, reactor-years of experience and non-power reactors in the US

  5. Licensed operating reactors. Status summary report data as of May 31, 1985. Vol. 9, No. 6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-07-01

    This report provides data on the operation of nuclear units as timely and accurately as possible. This information is collected by the Office of Resource Management from the Headquarters staff of NRC's Office of Inspection and Enforcement, from NRC's Regional Offices, and from utilities. The three sections of the report are: monthly highlights and statistics for commercial operating units, and errata from previously reported data; a compilation of detailed information on each unit, provided by NRC's Regional Offices, IE Headquarters and the utilities; and an appendix for miscellaneous information such as spent fuel storage capability, reactor-years of experience and non-power reactors in the US

  6. Licensed operating reactors: Status summary report, Data as of 12-31-86

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-09-01

    This report provides data on the operation of nuclear units as timely and accurately as possible. This information is collected by the Office of Administration and Resources Management from the Headquarters staff of NRC's Office of Enforcement (OE), from NRC's Regional Offices, and from utilities. The three sections of the report are monthly highlights and statistics for commercial operating units and errata from previously reported data; a compilation of detailed information on each unit, provided by NRC's Regional Offices, OE Headquarters and the utilities; and an appendix for miscellaneous information such as spent fuel storage capability, reactor-years of experience and non-power reactors in the US

  7. TVA experience in BWR reload design and licensing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robertson, J.D.

    1986-01-01

    TVA has developed and implemented the capability to perform BWR reload core design and licensing analyses. The advantages accruing from this capability include the tangible cost-savings from performing reload analyses in-house. Also, ''intangible'' benefits such as increased operating flexibility and the ability to accommodate multivendor fuel designs have been demonstrated. The major disadvantage with performing in-house analyses is the cost associated with development and maintenance of the analytical methods and staff expertise

  8. The SM and MIR reactors operation experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuprienko, V.A.; Klinov, A.V.; Svyatkin, M.N.; Shamardin, V.K.

    1995-01-01

    The SM and MIR operation experience show that continuous work on the problem of ageing, in all its aspects, allows for prolongation of the research plant life cycle by several folds as compared to the initial project. The redesigned SM-3 reactor will operate for another 20 years. The similar result is expected from the MIR planned reconstruction which scope will be the topic of future presentations. (orig.)

  9. Proposed Activities to Address Regulatory Gaps and Challenges for Licensing Advanced Reactors Using Seismic Isolation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coleman, Justin Leigh [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Kammerer, Annie M. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Whittaker, Andrew S. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-12-01

    Over the last decade, particularly since implementation of the certified design regulatory approaches outlined in 10 CFR 52, “Licenses, Certifications, and Approvals for Nuclear Power Plants,” interest has been increasing in the use of seismic isolation (SI) technology to support seismic safety in nuclear facilities. In 2009, the United States (U.S.) Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) initiated research activities to develop new guidance targeted at isolated facilities because SI is being considered for nuclear power plants in the U.S. One product of that research, which was developed around a risk-informed regulatory approach, is a draft NRC NUREG series (NUREG/CR) report that investigates and discusses considerations for use of SI in otherwise traditionally founded large light water reactors (LWRs). A coordinated effort led to new provisions for SI of LWRs in the American Society of Civil Engineers standard ASCE/SEI 4-16, “Seismic Analysis of Safety Related Nuclear Structures.” The risk-informed design philosophy that underpinned development of the technical basis for these documents led to a set of proposed performance objectives and acceptance criteria intended to serve as the foundation for future NRC guidance on the use of SI and related technology. Although the guidance provided in the draft SI NUREG/CR report and ASCE/SEI 4 16 provides a sound basis for further development of nuclear power plant designs incorporating SI, these initial documents were focused on surface-founded or near-surface-founded LWRs and were, necessarily, limited in scope. For example, there is limited information in both the draft NUREG/CR report and ASCE/SEI 4-16 related to nonlinear analysis of soil-structure systems for deeply-embedded reactors, the isolation of components, and the use of vertical isolation systems. Also not included in the draft SI NUREG/CR report are special considerations for licensing of isolated facilities using the certified design approach in 10 CFR

  10. Proposed Activities to Address Regulatory Gaps and Challenges for Licensing Advanced Reactors Using Seismic Isolation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coleman, Justin Leigh; Kammerer, Annie M.; Whittaker, Andrew S.

    2016-01-01

    Over the last decade, particularly since implementation of the certified design regulatory approaches outlined in 10 CFR 52, 'Licenses, Certifications, and Approvals for Nuclear Power Plants,' interest has been increasing in the use of seismic isolation (SI) technology to support seismic safety in nuclear facilities. In 2009, the United States (U.S.) Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) initiated research activities to develop new guidance targeted at isolated facilities because SI is being considered for nuclear power plants in the U.S. One product of that research, which was developed around a risk-informed regulatory approach, is a draft NRC NUREG series (NUREG/CR) report that investigates and discusses considerations for use of SI in otherwise traditionally founded large light water reactors (LWRs). A coordinated effort led to new provisions for SI of LWRs in the American Society of Civil Engineers standard ASCE/SEI 4-16, 'Seismic Analysis of Safety Related Nuclear Structures.' The risk-informed design philosophy that underpinned development of the technical basis for these documents led to a set of proposed performance objectives and acceptance criteria intended to serve as the foundation for future NRC guidance on the use of SI and related technology. Although the guidance provided in the draft SI NUREG/CR report and ASCE/SEI 4 16 provides a sound basis for further development of nuclear power plant designs incorporating SI, these initial documents were focused on surface-founded or near-surface-founded LWRs and were, necessarily, limited in scope. For example, there is limited information in both the draft NUREG/CR report and ASCE/SEI 4-16 related to nonlinear analysis of soil-structure systems for deeply-embedded reactors, the isolation of components, and the use of vertical isolation systems. Also not included in the draft SI NUREG/CR report are special considerations for licensing of isolated facilities using the certified design

  11. Improved best estimate plus uncertainty methodology including advanced validation concepts to license evolving nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Unal, Cetin; Williams, Brian; McClure, Patrick; Nelson, Ralph A.

    2010-01-01

    Many evolving nuclear energy programs plan to use advanced predictive multi-scale multi-physics simulation and modeling capabilities to reduce cost and time from design through licensing. Historically, the role of experiments was primary tool for design and understanding of nuclear system behavior while modeling and simulation played the subordinate role of supporting experiments. In the new era of multi-scale multi-physics computational based technology development, the experiments will still be needed but they will be performed at different scales to calibrate and validate models leading predictive simulations. Cost saving goals of programs will require us to minimize the required number of validation experiments. Utilization of more multi-scale multi-physics models introduces complexities in the validation of predictive tools. Traditional methodologies will have to be modified to address these arising issues. This paper lays out the basic aspects of a methodology that can be potentially used to address these new challenges in design and licensing of evolving nuclear technology programs. The main components of the proposed methodology are verification, validation, calibration, and uncertainty quantification. An enhanced calibration concept is introduced and is accomplished through data assimilation. The goal is to enable best-estimate prediction of system behaviors in both normal and safety related environments. To achieve this goal requires the additional steps of estimating the domain of validation and quantification of uncertainties that allow for extension of results to areas of the validation domain that are not directly tested with experiments, which might include extension of the modeling and simulation (M and S) capabilities for application to full-scale systems. The new methodology suggests a formalism to quantify an adequate level of validation (predictive maturity) with respect to required selective data so that required testing can be minimized for

  12. Improved best estimate plus uncertainty methodology including advanced validation concepts to license evolving nuclear reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Unal, Cetin [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Williams, Brian [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mc Clure, Patrick [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Nelson, Ralph A [IDAHO NATIONAL LAB

    2010-01-01

    Many evolving nuclear energy programs plan to use advanced predictive multi-scale multi-physics simulation and modeling capabilities to reduce cost and time from design through licensing. Historically, the role of experiments was primary tool for design and understanding of nuclear system behavior while modeling and simulation played the subordinate role of supporting experiments. In the new era of multi-scale multi-physics computational based technology development, the experiments will still be needed but they will be performed at different scales to calibrate and validate models leading predictive simulations. Cost saving goals of programs will require us to minimize the required number of validation experiments. Utilization of more multi-scale multi-physics models introduces complexities in the validation of predictive tools. Traditional methodologies will have to be modified to address these arising issues. This paper lays out the basic aspects of a methodology that can be potentially used to address these new challenges in design and licensing of evolving nuclear technology programs. The main components of the proposed methodology are verification, validation, calibration, and uncertainty quantification. An enhanced calibration concept is introduced and is accomplished through data assimilation. The goal is to enable best-estimate prediction of system behaviors in both normal and safety related environments. To achieve this goal requires the additional steps of estimating the domain of validation and quantification of uncertainties that allow for extension of results to areas of the validation domain that are not directly tested with experiments, which might include extension of the modeling and simulation (M&S) capabilities for application to full-scale systems. The new methodology suggests a formalism to quantify an adequate level of validation (predictive maturity) with respect to required selective data so that required testing can be minimized for cost

  13. The SLOWPOKE licensing model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snell, V. G.; Takats, F.; Szivos, K.

    1989-08-15

    The SLOWPOKE Energy System (SES-10) is a 10 MW heating reactor that has been developed in Canada. It will be capable of running without a licensed operator in continuous attendance, and will be sited in urban areas. It has forgiving safety characteristics, including transient time-scales of the order of hours. A process called `up-front` licensing has been evolved in Canada to identify, and resolve, regulatory concerns early in the process. Because of the potential market in Hungary for nuclear district heating, a licensing plan has been developed that incorporates Canadian licensing experience, identifies specific Hungarian requirements, and reduces the risk of licensing delays by seeking agreement of all parties at an early stage in the program.

  14. Future of nuclear licensing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Denton, H.R.

    1984-01-01

    The following topics are outlined: Comparison of US and best foreign experience in nuclear power plant construction and operation; Status of licensing and construction; Observed attributes; Reduced construction time; Fewer reactor trips; Higher capacity factor; Diesel generator reliability; Steam generator tube leakage; and US regulatory initiatives: NRC efforts and industry efforts

  15. Siemens Nuclear Power Corporation methods development for BWR/PWR reactor licensing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pruitt, D.W.

    1992-01-01

    This presentation addresses the Siemens Nuclear Power Corporation (SNP) perspective on the primary forces driving methods development in the nuclear industry. These forces are fuel design, computational environment and industry requirement evolution. The first segment of the discussion presents the SNP experience base. SNP develops, manufactures and licenses both BWR and PWR reload fuel. A review of this experience base highlights the accelerating rate at which new fuel designs are being introduced into the nuclear industry. The application of advanced BWR lattice geometries provides an example of fuel design trends. The second aspect of the presentation is the rapid evolution of the computing environment. The final subject in the presentation is the impact of industry requirements on code or methods development

  16. License renewal and power upgrade of the Cornell University TRIGA reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aderhold, Howard C.

    1984-01-01

    The Cornell Mark II TRIGA reactor has been a principal facility for instruction and research in nuclear science and engineering at Cornell, and it has been extensively used by other departments at Cornell and by nearby universities and industries. Initially the fuel was low hydride, 8.5w/o 19%-enriched, aluminum clad; in 1974 it was changed to high-hydride, stainless-steel-clad. The maximum power has been 100 kW, with pulses to $2, and operation has been on a one-shift demand basis. Annual energy generation of 50 MWH has been typical. Standard features include a 4-inch tangential port and our 6-inch radial ports, a thermal column with hohlraum and vertical access, a central thimble, a 'rabbit', and a set of dry irradiation tubes, replacing the 'Lazy Susan'. The license was renewed and amended in November 1983; the new limits are 500 kW and $3 pulses. Physical changes to the facility included addition of a water-to-water heat exchanger and of a diffuser at the water outlet ∼ 60 cm above the core. The flow rate is 300 liters per minute in the primary (reactor) side of the heat exchanger. The temperature of the chilled water entering the secondary of the exchanger is ∼ 12?C; its flow rate is adjusted by a servo-controlled by-pass valve to maintain the desired range of pool water temperature. Steps taken to go to higher power included rearrangement of fuel elements to increase excess reactivity, recalibration of control rods, and power vs ion chamber current calibrations at successively higher power by comparing the rate of rise of pool temperature with a known rate using electrical heating elements. Steady-state operation has been done up to 480 kW (nominal) but pulsing at the newly allowed higher levels has not been tested as yet

  17. Public information and licensing procedures for nuclear installations. European experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mayoux, J.C.; Chevillard, F.; Mutschler, U.; Stubbe, C.

    1981-10-01

    This paper reviews the licensing procedures for nuclear installations in various European countries and examines the form, content and methods selected for information and consultation of the public. The author stresses the importance of this stage in the procedure, both for the nuclear operator and the public authorities, given the population's concern about the environment. He concludes that, irrespective of its complexity, the nuclear field cannot remain the concern of a few initiates competent to take decisions and that, consequently, this implies creation of new information systems to meet the public's desire to participate more directly in the process. (NEA) [fr

  18. Experience with valves for PHWR reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Narayan, K.; Mhetre, S.G.

    1977-01-01

    Material specifications and inspection and testing requirements of the valves meant for use in nuclear reactors are mentioned. In the heavy water systems (both primary and moderator) of a PHWR type reactor, the valves used are gate valves, globe valves, diaphragm valves, butterfly valves, check valves and relief valves. Their locations and functions they perform in the Rajasthan Atomic Power Station Unit-1 are described. Experience with them is given. The major problems encountered with them have been : (1) leakage from the stem seals and body bonnet joint, (2) leakage due to failure of diaphragm and/or washout of the packing and (3) malfunctioning. Measures taken to solve these are discussed. Finally a mention has been made of improved versions of valves, namely, metal diaphragm valve and inverted relief valve. (M.G.B.)

  19. Reactor physics experiment plan using TCA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimada, Shoichiro [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2000-06-01

    The Reduced-Moderation Water Reactor (RMWR) is one of the next generation water-cooled reactors, which aims at effective utilization of uranium resource, high burn-up, long operation cycle, and plutonium multi-recycle. For verification of the feasibility, negative void reactivity coefficient and conversion ratio more than 1.0 must be confirmed. This report is to plan critical experiments using TCA in JAERI. Critical Experiments performed so far in Europe and Japan are reviewed, and no useful data are available for RMWR development. Critical experiments using TCA (Tank Type Critical Assembly) in JAERI are planned. MOX fuel rods should be prepared for the experiments and some modifications of equipment are needed for use of MOX fuel rods. This report describes the preliminary plan of physics experiments. The number of MOX-fuel rods used in the experiments is obtained by calculations and modification of the equipment for the experiments are shown. New MOX fuel and UO{sub 2} fuel rods are necessary for the RMWR critical experiments. Number of MOX fuel rods is 1000 for Plutonium fissile enrichment of 5 wt%, 1000 for 10 wt%, 1500 for 15 wt% and 500 for 20 wt%, respectively. Depleted UO{sub 2} fuel rods for blanket/buffer region are 4000. Driver fuel rods of 4.9 wt% UO{sub 2} are 3000. Modification of TCA facility is requested to treat the large amount of MOX fuels from safety point of view. Additional shielding device at the top of the tank for loading the MOX fuels and additional safety plates to ensure safety are requested. The core is divided into two regions by inserting an inner tank to avoid criticality in MOX region only. The test region is composed by MOX fuel rods in the inner tank. Criticality is established by UO{sub 2} driver fuel rods outside of the inner tank. (Tsuchihashi, K.)

  20. Impact of 2D/3D-project on LOCA-licensing analysis and reactor safety of PWRs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winkler, F.; Krebs, W.D.

    1989-01-01

    In the past LOCA-licensing analysis has included large conservatisms to compensate for the lack of detailed two phase flow and full scale experimental data. The 2D/3D-project was established to improve the data base in order to minimize the conservatisms required. The significant results and findings of the full scale Upper Plenum Test Facility (UPTF) and from the electrically heated Slab Core Test Facility (SCTF) were particularly useful for understanding the multidimensional phenomena in the primary system and in the core of a PWR. UPTF results were used to verify the TRAC-PF1 analysis of a PWR with combined ECC-Injection during the reflood phase of a large break-LOCA. Comparison of these results with results from classic licensing calculations quantifies the large safety margin in earlier licensing procedures and in reactor systems. (orig.)

  1. The intelligent customer: considerations around build-own-operate business and licensing models for small modular reactors in Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, K.

    2014-01-01

    An organization planning a proposal for a build-own-operate business model needs to address expanded licensee responsibilities under this model, associated regulatory impacts and how this affects their role as an 'intelligent customer'. This is particularly important for cases where builder-owner-operators plan to manufacture factory-fuelled designs and ship them to a site for installation and operation. The primary responsibility for safe conduct of licensed activities rests with the licensee. A build-own-operate model expands the scope of licensed activities to include design, manufacturing, transport, construction, and operation. The licensee must be able to demonstrate they are qualified to conduct all licensed activities including sufficient competent resources within the licensee's organization to oversee('Intelligent Customer') any work it commissions externally and the subsequent flow down through of the supply chain. This paper examines aspects that organizations need to assess the suitability of approaches that it may take to maintain in-house expertise for the control and oversight of licensed activities at all times. It considers the approach to identification of: core capabilities the licensee would need to understand its safety case under a build-own-operate model to manage licensed activities in accordance with requirements under the Nuclear Safety and Control Acta licensee's 'intelligent customer' capabilities in particular around understanding, specifying, overseeing and accepting work undertaken on its behalf by contractors. While this paper is focused on small modular reactors, being an intelligent customer applies to large commercial or research reactors equally; the size of reactor is immaterial.

  2. The intelligent customer: considerations around build-own-operate business and licensing models for small modular reactors in Canada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, K., E-mail: kenneth.jones@cnsc-ccsn.gc.ca [Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada)

    2014-07-01

    An organization planning a proposal for a build-own-operate business model needs to address expanded licensee responsibilities under this model, associated regulatory impacts and how this affects their role as an 'intelligent customer'. This is particularly important for cases where builder-owner-operators plan to manufacture factory-fuelled designs and ship them to a site for installation and operation. The primary responsibility for safe conduct of licensed activities rests with the licensee. A build-own-operate model expands the scope of licensed activities to include design, manufacturing, transport, construction, and operation. The licensee must be able to demonstrate they are qualified to conduct all licensed activities including sufficient competent resources within the licensee's organization to oversee('Intelligent Customer') any work it commissions externally and the subsequent flow down through of the supply chain. This paper examines aspects that organizations need to assess the suitability of approaches that it may take to maintain in-house expertise for the control and oversight of licensed activities at all times. It considers the approach to identification of: core capabilities the licensee would need to understand its safety case under a build-own-operate model to manage licensed activities in accordance with requirements under the Nuclear Safety and Control Acta licensee's 'intelligent customer' capabilities in particular around understanding, specifying, overseeing and accepting work undertaken on its behalf by contractors. While this paper is focused on small modular reactors, being an intelligent customer applies to large commercial or research reactors equally; the size of reactor is immaterial.

  3. Review of the Brazilian experience in the licensing of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lederman, L.; Laborne, J.J.

    1983-01-01

    Survey of the licensing of the Brazilian Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs) is presented. The organization and technical expertise of the Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear, the Brazilian Regulatory Body, is reviewed with regard to in-house experience, foreign consultants, agreements with regulatory bodies of other countries and research contracts with Brazilian univerisities. The application of the two-stage licensing process and the stage of development of Brazilian nuclear standards is described. Finally, the paper speculates about the future role of probabilistic risk assessment in the Brazilian licensing process

  4. Licensed operating reactors. Status summary report, data as of September 30, 1984. Volume 8, No. 10

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-11-01

    This report is divided into three sections: the first contains monthly highlights and statistics for commercial operating units, and errata from previously reported data; the second is a compilation of detailed information on each unit, provided by NRC Regional Offices, IE Headquarters and the Utilities; and the third section is an appendix for miscellaneous information such as spent fuel storage capability, reactor years of experience and non-power reactors in the United States. The percentage computations, Items 20 through 24 in Section 2, the vendor capacity factors, and actual vs. potential energy production are computed using actual data for the period of consideration. The percentages listed in power generation are computed as an arithmetic average. The factors for the life-span of each unit (the Cumulative column) are reported by the utility. Utility power production data is checked for consistency with previously submitted statistics

  5. Experience with mechanical segmentation of reactor internals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlson, R.; Hedin, G.

    2003-01-01

    Operating experience from BWE:s world-wide has shown that many plants experience initial cracking of the reactor internals after approximately 20 to 25 years of service life. This ''mid-life crisis'', considering a plant design life of 40 years, is now being addressed by many utilities. Successful resolution of these issues should give many more years of trouble-free operation. Replacement of reactor internals could be, in many cases, the most favourable option to achieve this. The proactive strategy of many utilities to replace internals in a planned way is a market-driven effort to minimize the overall costs for power generation, including time spent for handling contingencies and unplanned outages. Based on technical analyses, knowledge about component market prices and in-house costs, a cost-effective, optimized strategy for inspection, mitigation and replacements can be implemented. Also decommissioning of nuclear plants has become a reality for many utilities as numerous plants worldwide are closed due to age and/or other reasons. These facts address a need for safe, fast and cost-effective methods for segmentation of internals. Westinghouse has over the last years developed methods for segmentation of internals and has also carried out successful segmentation projects. Our experience from the segmentation business for Nordic BWR:s is that the most important parameters to consider when choosing a method and equipment for a segmentation project are: - Safety, - Cost-effectiveness, - Cleanliness, - Reliability. (orig.)

  6. Plant experience of experimental fast reactor 'Joyo'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-01-01

    The experimental fast reactor ''JOYO'' installed in Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corp. (PNC) of Japan completed its operation using the first core (called MK-I core) in December, 1981, and the works to transfer to MK-2 core have been performed since January, 1982. In this report, the experiences obtained through the construction, test and operation of ''JOYO'' over 12 years from the start of erection in 1970 to the termination of operation in 1981 are described. The contents of the report are divided into design, construction, the outline of facilities, testing, operating and maintenance experiences, and the topics on MK-I operation. As for the construction, the design changes performed before the start of manufacture or construction and the improvement and trouble restoring works implemented at the start of overall functional tests are reported. As for testing, overall functional tests, criticality test, low power test and power increasing test are described in detail. The number of test items of overall functional testing reached 266. The rated output operation of the reactor at 75 MW was performed six times in 1980 and 1981 until the termination of operation. No fuel failure was detected in MK-I operation, and the stable operation performance of the FBR was proved through MK-I operation. The topics on the MK-I operation includes natural circulation test, the measurement of total leakage rate for the containment vessel, and wear-marks which are the trace of wear due to the contact of fuel pins with the wires wound around the adjacent fuel pins, found in the post irradiation examination of fuel. (Wakatsuki, Y.)

  7. Reactor safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butz, H.P.; Heuser, F.W.; May, H.

    1985-01-01

    The paper comprises an introduction into nuclear physics bases, the safety concept generally speaking, safety devices of pwr type reactors, accident analysis, external influences, probabilistic safety assessment and risk studies. It further describes operational experience, licensing procedures under the Atomic Energy Law, research in reactor safety and the nuclear fuel cycle. (DG) [de

  8. The double chooz reactor neutrino experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Botella, I Gil [CIEMAT, Basic Research Department, Avenida Complutense, 22, 28040 Madrid (Spain)], E-mail: ines.gil@ciemat.es

    2008-05-15

    The Double Chooz reactor neutrino experiment will be the next detector to search for a non vanishing {theta}{sub 13} mixing angle with unprecedented sensitivity, which might open the way to unveiling CP violation in the leptonic sector. The measurement of this angle will be based in a precise comparison of the antineutrino spectrum at two identical detectors located at different distances from the Chooz nuclear reactor cores in France. Double Chooz is particularly attractive because of its capability to measure sin{sup 2} (2{theta}{sub 13}) to 3{sigma} if sin{sup 2}(2{theta}{sub 13}) > 0.05 or to exclude sin{sup 2}(2{theta}{sub 13}) down to 0.03 at 90% C.L. for {delta}m{sup 2} = 2.5 x 10{sup -3} eV{sup 2} in three years of data taking with both detectors. The construction of the far detector starts in 2008 and the first neutrino results are expected in 2009. The current status of the experiment, its physics potential and design and expected performance of the detector are reviewed.

  9. Conceptual framework for using 'Best Estimate plus Uncertainty' as a basis for licensing activities for fuels developed for an advanced reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McClure, P.; Unal, C.; Boyack, B.

    2010-01-01

    Closing the fuel cycle is one of the major technical challenges to expanding the use of nuclear energy to meet the world's need for benign, environmentally safe electrical power. 'Closing the fuel cycle ' means getting the maximum amount of energy possible out of uranium fuel while minimizing the amount of high-level waste that must be stored. The U.S. Dept. of Energy's Fuel Cycle Research and Development (FCRD) program is investigating the recycling of transuranic isotopes contained in spent nuclear fuel. Recycling minimizes the amount of high-level waste that would require storage in repositories. Developing new fuels and the advanced reactors that burn them is a long process typically spanning two decades from concept to final licensing. A unique challenge to meeting the FCRD objectives in this area is the fact that the experimental database is incomplete. Thus, using a traditional, heavily empirical approach to develop and qualify fuels for an advanced reactor plant will be very challenging. To address this concern, FCRD has launched an advanced modeling and simulation (M and S) approach to revolutionize fuel development and advanced reactor design. This new approach depends on transferring recent advances in the computational sciences and computer technologies into the development of these program elements. The licensing process that historically has been used by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) for fuels qualification is based on using a large body of experimental work to qualify and license a new fuel. If an M and S approach with more directed experimentation is to be considered as an alternative approach for licensing, a framework needs to be developed early in the process. Using M and S with limited experiments as a basis for demonstrating that a design can meet NRC requirements is not new and has precedence in the NRC. The method is generically referred to as a 'Best Estimate plus Uncertainty' (BE+U) approach because the goal of the

  10. Advanced Reactor Fuels Irradiation Experiment Design Objectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chichester, Heather Jean MacLean; Hayes, Steven Lowe; Dempsey, Douglas; Harp, Jason Michael

    2016-01-01

    This report summarizes the objectives of the current irradiation testing activities being undertaken by the Advanced Fuels Campaign relative to supporting the development and demonstration of innovative design features for metallic fuels in order to realize reliable performance to ultra-high burnups. The AFC-3 and AFC-4 test series are nearing completion; the experiments in this test series that have been completed or are in progress are reviewed and the objectives and test matrices for the final experiments in these two series are defined. The objectives, testing strategy, and test parameters associated with a future AFC test series, AFC-5, are documented. Finally, the future intersections and/or synergies of the AFC irradiation testing program with those of the TREAT transient testing program, emerging needs of proposed Versatile Test Reactor concepts, and the Joint Fuel Cycle Study program’s Integrated Recycle Test are discussed.

  11. Advanced Reactor Fuels Irradiation Experiment Design Objectives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chichester, Heather Jean MacLean [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Hayes, Steven Lowe [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Dempsey, Douglas [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Harp, Jason Michael [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-09-01

    This report summarizes the objectives of the current irradiation testing activities being undertaken by the Advanced Fuels Campaign relative to supporting the development and demonstration of innovative design features for metallic fuels in order to realize reliable performance to ultra-high burnups. The AFC-3 and AFC-4 test series are nearing completion; the experiments in this test series that have been completed or are in progress are reviewed and the objectives and test matrices for the final experiments in these two series are defined. The objectives, testing strategy, and test parameters associated with a future AFC test series, AFC-5, are documented. Finally, the future intersections and/or synergies of the AFC irradiation testing program with those of the TREAT transient testing program, emerging needs of proposed Versatile Test Reactor concepts, and the Joint Fuel Cycle Study program’s Integrated Recycle Test are discussed.

  12. Finnish experiences on licensing and using of programmable digital systems in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haapanen, P.; Maskuniitty, M.; Heimburger, H.; Hall, L.E.; Manninen, T.

    1993-01-01

    Finnish utility companies, Imatran Voima Oy (IVO) and Teollisuuden Voima (TVO), and the licensing authority, the Finnish Centre for Radiation and Nuclear Safety (STUK), are preparing for a new nuclear power plant in Finland. Plant vendors are proposing programmable digital automation systems for both the safety-related and the operational I and C (instrumentation and control) systems in this new unit. Also in existing plant units the replacement of certain old analog systems with state-of-the-art digital ones will become necessary in the years to come. Licensing of programmable systems for safety critical applications requires a new approach due to the special properties and failure modes of these systems. The major difficulties seem to be in the assessment and quantification of software reliability. The Technical Research Centre of Finland has in co-operation with the authority and the utilities conducted a project (AJA) to develop domestically applicable licensing requirements, guidelines and practices. International standards, guidelines and licensing practices have been analyzed in order to specify national licensing requirements. The paper describes and discusses the findings and experiences of the AJA project so far. The experience in introducing advanced programmable digital control and computer systems in the operating nuclear power plants will be covered briefly. Although these systems are not safety-related but systems of more general interest regarding nuclear safety, some routines regarding the licensing of safety- related systems have been followed. In these backfitting and replacement projects some experience have been gained in how to license safety-related programmable systems. (Author) 31 refs., 2 figs

  13. Some scoping experiments for a space reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alexander, C.A.; Ogden, J.S.

    1983-01-01

    Some scoping experiments were performed to evaluate fuel performance in a lithium heat pipe reactor operating at a nominal 1500K heat pipe temperature. Fuel-coolant and fuel-coolant-clad relationships showed that once a failed heat pipe occurs temperatures can rise high enough so that large concentrations of uranium can be transported by the vapor phase. Upon condensation this uranium would be capable of penetrating heat pipes adjacent to the failed pipe. The potential for propagation of failure exists with UO 2 and a lithium heat pipe. Changing the composition of the metal of the heat pipe would have only a second order effect on the kinetics of the failure mechanism. Uranium carbide and nitride were considered as potential fuels which are nonreactive in a lithium environment. At high temperatures the nitride would be favored because of its better compatibility with potential cladding materials. Compositions of UN with small additions of YN appear to offer very attractive properties for a compact high temperature high power density reactor

  14. Storage experience in Hungary with fuel from research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gado, J.; Hargitai, T.

    1996-01-01

    In Hungary several critical assemblies, a training reactor and a research reactor have been in operation. The fuel used in the research and training reactors are of Soviet origin. Though spent fuel storage experience is fairly good, medium and long term storage solutions are needed. (author)

  15. Channel type reactors with supercritical water coolant. Russian experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuznetsov, Y.N.; Gabaraev, B.A.

    2003-01-01

    Transition to coolant of supercritical parameters allows for principle engineering-andeconomic characteristics of light-water nuclear power reactors to be substantially enhanced. Russian experience in development of channel-type reactors with supercritical water coolant has demonstrated advantages and practical feasibility of such reactors. (author)

  16. Lessons from feedback of safety operating experience for reactor physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suchomel, J.; Rapavy, S.

    1999-01-01

    Analyses of events in WWER operations as a part of safety experience feedback provide a valuable source of lessons for reactor physics. Examples of events from Bohunice operation will be shown such as events with inadequate approach to criticality, positive reactivity insertions, expulsion of a control rod from shut-down reactor, problems with reactor protection system and control rods. (Authors)

  17. Data acquisition. GRAAL experiment. Hybrid reactor experiment. AMS experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barancourt, D.; Barbier, G.; Bosson, G.; Bouvier, J.; Gallin-Martel, L.; Meillon, B.; Stassi, P.; Tournier, M.

    1997-01-01

    The main activity of the data acquisition team has consisted in hardware and software developments for the GRAAL experiment with the trigger board, for the 'Reacteurs Hybrides' group with an acquisition board ADCVME8V and for the AMS experiment with the monitoring of the aerogel detector. (authors)

  18. License renewal process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fable, D.; Prah, M.; Vrankic, K.; Lebegner, J.

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to provide information about license renewal process, as defined by Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). The Atomic Energy Act and NRC regulations limit commercial power reactor licenses to an initial 40 years but also permit such licenses to be renewed. This original 40-year term for reactor licenses was based on economic and antitrust considerations not on limitations of nuclear technology. Due to this selected time period; however, some structures and components may have been engineered on the basis of an expected 40-year service life. The NRC has established a timely license renewal process and clear requirements codified in 10 CFR Part 51 and 10 CFR Part 54, that are needed to assure safe plant operation for extended plant life. The timely renewal of licenses for an additional 20 years, where appropriate to renew them, may be important to ensuring an adequate energy supply during the first half of the 21st Century. License renewal rests on the determination that currently operating plants continue to maintain adequate levels of safety, and over the plant's life, this level has been enhanced through maintenance of the licensing bases, with appropriate adjustments to address new information from industry operating experience. Additionally, NRC activities have provided ongoing assurance that the licensing bases will continue to provide an acceptable level of safety. This paper provides additional discussion of license renewal costs, as one of key elements in evaluation of license renewal justifiability. Including structure of costs, approximately value and two different approaches, conservative and typical. Current status and position of Nuclear Power Plant Krsko, related to license renewal process, will be briefly presented in this paper. NPP Krsko is designed based on NRC Regulations, so requirements from 10 CFR 51, and 10 CFR 54, are applicable to NPP Krsko, as well. Finally, this paper will give an overview of current status of

  19. Licensed operating reactors: Status summary report data as of 04-30-88

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-05-01

    This report is divided into three sections: the first contains monthly highlights and statistics for commercial operating units, and errata from previously reported data; the second is a compilation of detailed information on each unit, provided by NRC Regional Offices, IE Headquarters and the Utilities; and the third section is an appendix for miscellaneous information such as spent fuel storage capability, reactor years of experience and non-power reactors in the United States. The percentage computations, Items 20 through 24 in Section 2, the vendor capacity factors on page 1-7, and actual vs. potential energy production on page 1-2 are computed using actual data for the period of consideration. The percentages listed in power generation on Page 1-2 are computed as an arithmetic average. The factors for the life-span of each unit (the ''Cumulative'' column) are reported by the utility and are not entirely re-computed by NRC. Utility power production data is checked for consistency with previously submitted statistics. It is hoped this status report proves informative and helpful to all agencies and individuals interested in analyzing trends in the nuclear industry which might have safety implications, or in maintaining an awareness of the US energy situation as a whole

  20. Simulator experiments: effects of experience of senior reactor operators and of presence of a shift technical advisor on performance in a boiling water reactor control room

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beare, A.N.; Dorris, R.E.; Gray, L.H.

    1984-12-01

    This report describes the first experiment in a Nuclear Regulatory Commission-sponsored program of training simulator experiments and field data collection to evaluate the effects of selected performance shaping factors on the performance of nuclear power plant control room operators. The factors investigated were the experience level of the Senior Reactor Operator (SRO) and the presence of a Shift Technical Advisor (STA). Data were collected from 16 two-man crews of licensed operators (one SRO and one RO). The crews were split into high and low SRO-experience groups on the basis of the years of experience of the SROs as SROs. One half (4 of the 8 crews in each group) of the high- and low-SRO experience groups were assisted by an STA or an SRO acting as an STA. The crews responded to four simulated plant casualties which ranged in severity from an uncomplicated turbine trip to an anticipated transient without scram (ATWS). No significant differences in overall performance were found between groups led by high (25 to 114 months licensed as an SRO) and low (1 to 17 months as an SRO) experience SROs. However, crews led by low experience SROs tended to have shorter task performance times than crews led by high experience SROs. Although a tendency for the STA-assisted groups to score higher on four of the five measures was observed, the presence of the STA had no statistically significant effect on overall team performance. The correlation between individual performance, as measured by four of the task performance measures, and experience, measured by months as a licensed operator, was not statistically significant, nor was the correlation between task performance and recency of simulator training. 18 references, 5 figures, 13 tables

  1. Reactors licensing: proposal of an integrated quality and environment regulatory structure for nuclear research reactors in Brazil; Licenciamento de reatores: proposta de uma estrutura regulatoria integrada com abordagem em qualidade e meio ambiente para reatores de pesquisa no Brasil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serra, Reynaldo Cavalcanti

    2014-07-01

    A new integrated regulatory structure based on quality and integrated issues has been proposed to be implemented on the licensing process of nuclear research reactors in Brazil. The study starts with a literature review about the licensing process in several countries, all of them members of the International Atomic Energy Agency. After this phase it is performed a comparative study with the Brazilian licensing process to identify good practices (positive aspects), the gaps on it and to propose an approach of an integrated quality and environmental management system, in order to contribute with a new licensing process scheme in Brazil. The literature review considered the following research nuclear reactors: Jules-Horowitz and OSIRIS (France), Hanaro (Korea), Maples 1 and 2 (Canada), OPAL (Australia), Pallas (Holand), ETRR-2 (Egypt) and IEA-R1 (Brazil). The current nuclear research reactors licensing process in Brazil is conducted by two regulatory bodies: the Brazilian National Nuclear Energy Commission (CNEN) and the Brazilian Institute of Environment and Renewable Natural Resources (IBAMA). CNEN is responsible by nuclear issues, while IBAMA by environmental one. To support the study it was applied a questionnaire and interviews based on the current regulatory structure to four nuclear research reactors in Brazil. Nowadays, the nuclear research reactor’s licensing process, in Brazil, has six phases and the environmental licensing process has three phases. A correlation study among these phases leads to a proposal of a new quality and environmental integrated licensing structure with four harmonized phases, hence reducing potential delays in this process. (author)

  2. Operational experience with Dragon reactor experiment of relevance to commercial reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Capp, P.D.; Simon, R.A.

    1976-01-01

    An important part of the experience gained during the first ten years of successful power operation of the Dragon Reactor is relevant to the design and operation of future High Temperature Reactors (HTRs). The aspects presented in this paper have been chosen as being particularly applicable to larger HTR systems. Core performance under a variety of conditions is surveyed with particular emphasis on a technique developed for the identification and location of unpurged releasing fuel and the presence of activation and fission products in the core area. The lessons learned during the reflector block replacement are presented. Operating experience with the primary circuit identifies the lack of mixing of gas streams within the hot plenum and the problems of gas streaming in ducts. Helium leakage from the circuit is often greater than the optimum 0.1%/d. Virtually all the leakage problems are associated with the small bore instrument pipework essential for the many experiments associated with the Dragon Reactor Experiment (DRE). Primary circuit maintenance work confirms the generally clean state of the DRE circuit but identifies 137 Cs and 110 Agsup(m) as possible hazards if fuel emitting these isotopes is irradiated. (author)

  3. License renewal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Newberry, S.

    1993-01-01

    This article gives an overview of the process of license renewal for nuclear power plants. It explains what is meant by license renewal, the significance of license renewal, and goes over key elements involved in the process of license renewal. Those key elements are NRC requirements embodied in 10 CFR Part 54 (Reactor Safety) and 10 CFR Part 51 (Environmental Issues). In addition Industry Reports must be developed and reviewed. License renewal is essentially the process of applying for a 20 year extension to the original 40 year operating license granted for the plant. This is a very long term process, which involves a lot of preparation, and compliance with regulatory rules and guidelines. In general it is a process which is expected to begin when plants reach an operating lifetime of 20 years. It has provisions for allowing the public to become involved in the review process

  4. Operating experiences since rise-to-power test in high temperature engineering test reactor (HTTR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tochio, Daisuke; Watanabe, Shuji; Motegi, Toshihiro; Kawano, Shuichi; Kameyama, Yasuhiko; Sekita, Kenji; Kawasaki, Kozo

    2007-03-01

    The rise-to-power test of the High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR) was actually started in April 2000. The rated thermal power of 30MW and the rated reactor outlet coolant temperature of 850degC were achieved in the middle of Dec. 2001. After that, the reactor thermal power of 30MW and the reactor outlet coolant temperature of 950degC were achieved in the final rise-to-power test in April 2004. After receiving the operation licensing at 850degC, the safety demonstration tests have conducted to demonstrate inherent safety features of the HTGRs as well as to obtain the core and plant transient data for validation of safety analysis codes and for establishment of safety design and evaluation technologies. This paper summarizes the HTTR operating experiences for six years from start of the rise-to-power test that are categorized into (1) Operating experiences related to advanced gas-cooled reactor design, (2) Operating experiences for improvement of the performance, (3) Operating experiences due to fail of system and components. (author)

  5. The pre-licensing of a multi-purpose hybrid research reactor for high-tech applications 'MYRRHA'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hakimi, N.; Dams, C.; Wertelaers, A.; Nys, V.; Schrauben, M.; Dresselaers, R.

    2013-01-01

    The Belgian Nuclear Research Centre in Mol has been working for several years on the design of a multi-purpose flexible irradiation facility in order to replace the ageing BR2, a multipurpose materials testing reactor (MTR), in operation since 1962. MYRRHA, a flexible fast spectrum research reactor is conceived as an accelerator driven system (ADS), able to operate in sub-critical and critical modes. It contains a proton accelerator of 600 MeV, a spallation target and a multiplying medium with MOX fuel, cooled by liquid lead-bismuth (Pb-Bi). Since February 2011, the Belgian Nuclear Research Centre has engaged in a 'pre-licensing' process with the regulatory authority for an estimated period up to mid 2014. The paper presents on the one hand the objectives of the pre-licensing phase as well as its implementation process and on the other hand, 2 implementing instruments which have been developed by the regulatory authority providing guidance to the designer of MYRRHA in order to meet the pre-licensing phase objectives. The first instrument is a strategic note for the design and operation of MYRRHA where as the second instrument is a guidance document for the format and content of a design options and provisions file (DOPF). Both instruments have been developed taking into account that MYRRHA is an irradiation facility using a Generation IV nuclear power system's type technology (liquid metal cooled fast neutron reactor). The strategic note overview aims to cover the safety approach as well as the security requirements and safeguards obligation applicable to MYRRHA. In particular, in the strategic note, a specific attention has been paid in order to ensure that a safety, security and safeguards integrated approach will drive the development of the MYRRHA design. The safety approach focuses on the safety goals and the minimum safety objectives set by the regulatory authority for this innovative design. The DOPF overview presents its objectives and structure resuming

  6. Safety Evaluation Report related to the renewal of the operating license for the Westinghouse research reactor at Zion, Illinois (Docket No. 50-87)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-09-01

    This Safety Evaluation Report, for the application filed by the Westinghouse Electric Company, for renewal of operating license number R-119 to continue to operate the research reactor, has been prepared by the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The facility is operated by Westinghouse and is located in Zion, Illinois. The staff concludes that the reactor facility can continue to be operated by Westinghouse without endangering the health and safety of the public

  7. Safety Evaluation Report related to the renewal of the operating license for the General Electric-Nuclear Test Reactor (GE-NTR) (Docket No. 50-73)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-09-01

    This Safety Evaluation Report for the application filed by the General Electric Company (GE) for a renewal license number R-33 to continue to operate its research reactor has been prepared by the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The facility is owned and operated by GE and is located in Pleasanton, California. The staff concludes that the reactor can continue to be operated by GE without endangering the health and safety of the public

  8. Institutional Power: Identity, Politics, and Lived Experiences in the Dance License via Portfolio Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maloney, Betsy

    2015-01-01

    In this research study, I examined how institutional power affected the experiences of two dance educators attempting to gain their K-12 dance teaching license in Minnesota. My research analyzed the ways in which candidates applying for the portfolio review process constructed, amended, or abandoned their identities as teachers/artists/individuals…

  9. Age vs. experience : evaluation of a video feedback intervention for newly licensed teen drivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-06

    This project examines the effects of age, experience, and video-based feedback on the rate and type of safety-relevant events captured on video event : recorders in the vehicles of three groups of newly licensed young drivers: : 1. 14.5- to 15.5-year...

  10. Reactor licensing in the United States and Federal Republic of Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salvatore, J.E.L.

    1980-02-01

    The licensing procedure for nuclear power plants in the United States and in the Federal Republic of Germany is analysed. The security policy, the inspections and the supervision during their construction and operation are discussed. (A.L.) [pt

  11. ITER licensing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gordon, C.W.

    2005-01-01

    ITER was fortunate to have four countries interested in ITER siting to the point where licensing discussions were initiated. This experience uncovered the challenges of licensing a first of a kind, fusion machine under different licensing regimes and helped prepare the way for the site specific licensing process. These initial steps in licensing ITER have allowed for refining the safety case and provide confidence that the design and safety approach will be licensable. With site-specific licensing underway, the necessary regulatory submissions have been defined and are well on the way to being completed. Of course, there is still work to be done and details to be sorted out. However, the informal international discussions to bring both the proponent and regulatory authority up to a common level of understanding have laid the foundation for a licensing process that should proceed smoothly. This paper provides observations from the perspective of the International Team. (author)

  12. Experience with reactor assembly of FBTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srinivasan, G.; Ravishankar, K.; Babu, A.; Varadarajan, S.; Arumugam, P.; Sekhar, P.

    2006-01-01

    Reactor Assembly, also called Block Pile, is the heart of FBTR and houses the core, top and lateral shields, control rod drive mechanisms (CRDM), sodium inlet pipe and outlet pipes etc. Two major problems which arose during commissioning were reactor vessel tilt due to convection in cover gas space and failure of inflatable seals. The reactor vessel tilt was solved by Helium injection. Reactor was operated without pressurising the inflatable seals till 2005, when the seals were replaced. Other major problems in the course of twenty years of reactor operation were failure of three CRDM lower parts, Core Cover plate which houses the core thermocouples getting stuck in the fuel handling position, water leaks from the Biological Shield Cooling (BSC) coils around the reactor, failure of core wires in the trailing cables during fuel handling etc. This paper addresses the major problems faced and modifications carried out. (author)

  13. New safety experiments in decommissioned superheated steam reactor at Karlstein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koerting, K.

    1986-01-01

    This article gives a concise summary of the Status Report of the Superheated Steam Reactor Safety Program (PHDR) Project, held at KfK on Dec. 5, 1985. The results discussed dealt with fire experiments, shock tests simulating airplane crashes, temperature shocks in the reactor pressure vessel, studies of crack detection in pressure vessels and blasting experiments associated with nuclear plant decommissioning

  14. Experience and prospects for developing research reactors of different types

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuatbekov, R.P.; Tretyakov, I.T.; Romanov, N.V.; Lukasevich, I.B.

    2015-01-01

    NIKIET has a 60-year experience in the development of research reactors. Altogether, there have been more than 25 NIKIET-designed plants of different types built in Russia and 20 more in other countries, including pool-type water-cooled and water moderated research reactors, tank-type and pressure-tube research reactors, pressurized high-flux, heavy-water, pulsed and other research reactors. Most of the research reactors were designed as multipurpose plants for operation at research centers in a broad range of applications. Besides, unique research reactors were developed for specific application fields. Apart from the experience in the development of research reactor designs and the participation in the reactor construction, a unique amount of knowledge has been gained on the operation of research reactors. This makes it possible to use highly reliable technical solutions in the designs of new research reactors to ensure increased safety, greater economic efficiency and maintainability of the reactor systems. A multipurpose pool-type research reactor of a new generation is planned to be built at the Center for Nuclear Energy Science & Technology (CNEST) in the Socialist Republic of Vietnam to be used to support a spectrum of research activities, training of skilled personnel for Vietnam nuclear industry and efficient production of isotopes. It is exactly the applications a research reactor is designed for that defines the reactor type, design and capacity, and the selection of fuel and components subject to all requirements of industry regulations. The design of the new research reactor has a great potential in terms of upgrading and installation of extra experimental devices. (author)

  15. Proposed Reactor Operating Experience Feedback System Development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahn, Seung Hoon; Kim, Min Chul; Huh, Chang Wook; Lee, Durk Hun; Bae, Koo Hyun

    2006-01-01

    Most events occurring in nuclear power plants are not individually significant, and prevented from progressing to accident conditions by a series of barriers against core damage and radioactive releases. Significant events, if occur, are almost always a breach of these multiple barriers. As illustrated in the 'Swiss cheese' model, the individual layers of defense or 'cheese slices' have weakness or 'holes.' These weaknesses are inconstant, i.e., the holes are open or close at random. When by chance all the holes are aligned, a hazard causes the significant event of concern. Elements of low significant events, inattention to detail, time or economic pressure, uncorrected poor practices/habits, marginal maintenance and equipment care, etc., make holes in the layers of defense; some elements may make more holes in different layers, incurring more chances to be aligned. An effective reduction of the holes, therefore, is gained through better knowledge or awareness of increasing trends of the event elements, followed by appropriate actions. According to the Swiss cheese metaphor, attention to the Operating Experience (OE) feedback system, as opposed to the individual and to randomness, is drawn from a viewpoint of reactor safety

  16. Siting Practices and Site Licensing Process for New Reactors in Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vos, Marcel de

    2011-01-01

    'Siting' in Canada is composed of Site Evaluation and Site Selection. As outlined in CNSC Regulatory Document RD-346 Site Evaluation for New Nuclear Power Plants (based on IAEA NS-R-3), prior to the triggering of the Environmental Assessment (EA) and licensing processes, the proponent is expected to use a robust process to characterize proposed sites over the full life cycle of the facility, and then develop a fully documented defense of the site selection case. This case forms the backbone for submissions in support of the EA and the application for a License to Prepare Site which will be reviewed by the CNSC and other applicable federal authorities. The Environmental Assessment process and License to Prepare Site in Canada do not require a proponent to select a specific design; however, CNSC does not accept a 'black box' approach to siting. CNSC balances the level of design information required with the extent of safety assurance desired for any designs being contemplated for the proposed site. Nevertheless, the design information submitted must be sufficient to justify the site as suitable for all future licensing stages. The depth of plant design information contributes significantly to the credibility of the applicant's case for both the EA and application for License to Prepare Site. The review process utilizes an assessment plan with defined review stages and timelines. The outcome of these reviews is a series of recommendations to a federal government appointed Joint Review Panel (which also serves as a panel of the 'Commission') which, following public hearings, renders a decision regarding the EA, and subsequently, the application for a License to Prepare Site. (author)

  17. Discussion of the use of the Dragon reactor as a facility for integral reactor physics experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gutmann, H

    1972-06-05

    The purpose and use of the Dragon Reactor Experiment (DRE) has changed considerably during the years of its operation. The original purpose was to show that the principle of a High Temperature Reactor is sound and demonstrate its operation. After this achievement, the purpose of the Dragon reactor changed to the use as a fuel testing facility. During recent years, a new use of the DRE has been added to its use as a fuel testing facility, namely Fuel Element Design Testing. The current report covers reactor physics experiments aspects.

  18. The experiences of research reactor accident to safety improvement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiranto, S.

    1999-01-01

    The safety of reactor operation is the main factor in order that the nuclear technology development program can be held according the expected target. Several experience with research reactor incidents must be learned and understood by the nuclear program personnel, especially for operators and supervisors of RSG-GA. Siwabessy. From the incident experience of research reactor in the world, which mentioned in the book 'Experience with research reactor incidents' by IAEA, 1995, was concluded that the main cause of research reactor accidents is understandless about the safety culture by the nuclear installation personnel. With learn, understand and compare between this experiences and the condition of RSG GA Siwabessy is expended the operators and supervisors more attention about the safety culture, so that RSG GA Siwabessy can be operated successfull, safely according the expected target

  19. Evaluation of experience and trends in international co-operation in nuclear safety and licensing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stadie, K.B.; Strohl, P.

    1977-01-01

    The paper traces the development of co-operation in nuclear safety technology between the OECD Member countries which began as early as 1965 and is now organised under the auspices of the Committee on the Safety of Nuclear Installations of the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency. The principal objective is to exchange and evaluate information on relevant R and D and hence broaden the technical basis for decision-making by licensing authorities in the different countries. The membership of the Committee on the Safety of Nuclear Installations combines expertise in nuclear safety R and D and in licensing questions so that licensing procedures in the different countries may be exposed continuously to the influence of overall technological progress. The Committee actively seeks to narrow the differences between administrative procedures and traditional legal practices in Member countries as these affect the licensing of nuclear installations, primarily by assessing and comparing the methods employed. The paper shows how the Committee's working arrangements provide for maximum flexibility: the various co-ordinated programmes are selected after in-depth evaluation of potential areas of priority and are implemented through ad hoc Working Groups, specialist meetings or task forces, or in the form of special studies involving all interested countries. The results, conclusions and recommendations emerging from each programme are reviewed by the Committee before dissemination. Hitherto the greater part of the Committee's activities has been concerned with the safety of light water reactors and related subjects, but more attention is now being given to other topics such as LMFBR safety technology and the safety of fuel cycle facilities, particularly those at the end of the process, the so-called ''back-end'' plants. The paper discusses certain problems and constraints encountered in implementing the programme, some of which stem from Member countries' different degrees of penetration

  20. The reactor antineutrino anomaly and low energy threshold neutrino experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cañas, B. C.; Garcés, E. A.; Miranda, O. G.; Parada, A.

    2018-01-01

    Short distance reactor antineutrino experiments measure an antineutrino spectrum a few percent lower than expected from theoretical predictions. In this work we study the potential of low energy threshold reactor experiments in the context of a light sterile neutrino signal. We discuss the perspectives of the recently detected coherent elastic neutrino-nucleus scattering in future reactor antineutrino experiments. We find that the expectations to improve the current constraints on the mixing with sterile neutrinos are promising. We also analyze the measurements of antineutrino scattering off electrons from short distance reactor experiments. In this case, the statistics is not competitive with inverse beta decay experiments, although future experiments might play a role when compare it with the Gallium anomaly.

  1. Fast breeder reactors: can we learn from experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keck, O.

    1981-01-01

    An economic analysis of FBRs, in particular the long-term benefits to be expected, with reference to the experience of the West German fast breeder reactor programme suggests ways of bringing more realism into governmental decisions on the development of new reactor types. It is suggested that if reactor manufacturers and utilities financed commercial-size demonstration plants from their own funds, then the government would get more realistic advice. (U.K.)

  2. Selection, training, qualification and licensing of Three Mile Island reactor operating personnel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eytchison, R.M.

    1980-01-01

    The various programs which were intended to staff Three Mile Island with competent, trained operators and supervisors are reviewed. The analysis includes a review of the regulations concerning operator training and licensing, and describes how the requirements were implemented by the NRC, Metropolitan Edison Company, and Babcock and Wilcox Company. Finally the programs conducted by these three organisations are evaluated. (U.K.)

  3. 78 FR 15747 - Charlissa C. Smith (Denial of Senior Reactor Operator License)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-12

    ... NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION [Docket No. 55-23694-SP; ASLBP No. 13-925-01-SP-BD01] Charlissa C... Reconstitution Pursuant to 10 CFR 2.313(c) and 2.321(b), the Atomic Safety and Licensing Board (Board) in the above-captioned Charlissa C. Smith case is hereby reconstituted because Administrative Judge Alan S...

  4. Brookhaven Reactor Experiment Control Facility, a distributed function computer network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dimmler, D.G.; Greenlaw, N.; Kelley, M.A.; Potter, D.W.; Rankowitz, S.; Stubblefield, F.W.

    1975-11-01

    A computer network for real-time data acquisition, monitoring and control of a series of experiments at the Brookhaven High Flux Beam Reactor has been developed and has been set into routine operation. This reactor experiment control facility presently services nine neutron spectrometers and one x-ray diffractometer. Several additional experiment connections are in progress. The architecture of the facility is based on a distributed function network concept. A statement of implementation and results is presented

  5. Safety Evaluation Report related to the renewal of the operating license for the training and research reactor at the University of Michigan (Docket No. 50-2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-07-01

    This Safety Evaluation Report for the application filed by the University of Michigan (UM) for renewal of the Ford Nuclear Reactor (FNR) operating license number R-28 to continue to operate its research reactor has been prepared by the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The facility is located on the North Campus of the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor, Michigan. The staff concludes that the reactor can continue to be operated by the University of Michigan without endangering the health and safety of the public

  6. Gas Reactor International Cooperative Program. Interim report. Construction and operating experience of selected European Gas-Cooled Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-09-01

    The construction and operating experience of selected European Gas-Cooled Reactors is summarized along with technical descriptions of the plants. Included in the report are the AVR Experimental Pebble Bed Reactor, the Dragon Reactor, AGR Reactors, and the Thorium High Temperature Reactor (THTR). The study demonstrates that the European experience has been favorable and forms a good foundation for the development of Advanced High Temperature Reactors

  7. Experience in Reviewing Small Modular Reactor Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmad Nabil Abdul Rahim; Alfred, S.L.; Phongsakorn, P.

    2015-01-01

    Malaysia is in the stage of conducting Preliminary Technical Feasibility Study for the Deployment of Small Modular Reactor (SMR). There are different types of SMR, some already under construction in Argentina (CAREM) and China (HTR-PM) - (light water reactor and high temperature reactor technologies), others with near-term deployment such as SMART in South Korea, ACP100 in China, mPower and NuScale in the US, and others with longer term deployment prospects (liquid-metal cooled reactor technologies). The study was mainly to get an overview of the technology available in the market. The SMR ranking in the study was done through listing out the most deployable technology in the market according to their types. As a new comer country, the proven technology with an excellent operation history will usually be the main consideration points. (author)

  8. Status of development and licensing support for advanced liquid metal reactors in the United States

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pedersen, D R [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL (United States); Gyorey, G [General Electric, San Jose, CA (United States)

    1991-07-01

    The cornerstones of the United States Advanced Liquid Metal Cooled Reactor (ALMR) program sponsored by the Department of Energy are: the ALMR plant design program at General Electric based on the PRISM (Power Reactor Innovative Small Module) concept, and the Integral Fast Reactor program (IFR) at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). The goal of the U.S. program is to produce a standard, commercial ALMR, including the associated fuel cycle. The paper addresses the status of the IFR program, the ALMR program and the interaction of the ALMR program with the regulatory environment. (author)

  9. Status of development and licensing support for advanced liquid metal reactors in the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pedersen, D.R.; Gyorey, G.

    1991-01-01

    The cornerstones of the United States Advanced Liquid Metal Cooled Reactor (ALMR) program sponsored by the Department of Energy are: the ALMR plant design program at General Electric based on the PRISM (Power Reactor Innovative Small Module) concept, and the Integral Fast Reactor program (IFR) at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). The goal of the US program is to produce a standard, commercial ALMR, including the associated fuel cycle. The paper addresses the status of the IFR program, the ALMR program and the interaction of the ALMR program with the regulatory environment

  10. Status of development and licensing support for advanced liquid metal reactors in the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pedersen, D.R.; Gyorey, G.

    1991-01-01

    The cornerstones of the United States Advanced Liquid Metal Cooled Reactor (ALMR) program sponsored by the Department of Energy are: the ALMR plant design program at General Electric based on the PRISM (Power Reactor Innovative Small Module) concept, and the Integral Fast Reactor program (IFR) at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). The goal of the U.S. program is to produce a standard, commercial ALMR, including the associated fuel cycle. The paper addresses the status of the IFR program, the ALMR program and the interaction of the ALMR program with the regulatory environment. (author)

  11. Review of irradiation experiments for water reactor safety research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tobioka, Toshiaki

    1977-02-01

    A review is made of irradiation experiments for water reactor safety research under way in both commercial power plants and test reactors. Such experiments are grouped in two; first, LWR fuel performance under normal and abnormal operating conditions, and second, irradiation effects on fracture toughness in LWR vessels. In the former are fuel densification, swelling, and the influence of power ramp and cycling on fuel rod, and also fuel rod behavior under accident conditions in in-reactor experiment. In the latter are the effects of neutron exposure level on the ferritic steel of pressure vessels, etc.. (auth.)

  12. Reactor G1: high power experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laage, F. de; Teste du Baillet, A.; Veyssiere, A.; Wanner, G.

    1957-01-01

    The experiments carried out in the starting-up programme of the reactor G1 comprised a series of tests at high power, which allowed the following points to be studied: 1- Effect of poisoning by Xenon (absolute value, evolution). 2- Temperature coefficients of the uranium and graphite for a temperature distribution corresponding to heating by fission. 3- Effect of the pressure (due to the coiling system) on the reactivity. 4- Calibration of the security rods as a function of their position in the pile (1). 5- Temperature distribution of the graphite, the sheathing, the uranium and the air leaving the canals, in a pile running normally at high power. 6- Neutron flux distribution in a pile running normally at high power. 7- Determination of the power by nuclear and thermodynamic methods. These experiments have been carried out under two very different pile conditions. From the 1. to the 15. of August 1956, a series of power increases, followed by periods of stabilisation, were induced in a pile containing uranium only, in 457 canals, amounting to about 34 tons of fuel. A knowledge of the efficiency of the control rods in such a pile has made it possible to measure with good accuracy the principal effects at high temperatures, that is, to deal with points 1, 2, 3, 5. Flux charts giving information on the variations of the material Laplacian and extrapolation lengths in the reflector have been drawn up. Finally the thermodynamic power has been measured under good conditions, in spite of some installation difficulties. On September 16, the pile had its final charge of 100 tons. All the canals were loaded, 1,234 with uranium and 53 (i.e. exactly 4 per cent of the total number) with thorium uniformly distributed in a square lattice of 100 cm side. Since technical difficulties prevented the calibration of the control rods, the measurements were limited to the determination of the thermodynamic power and the temperature distributions (points 5 and 7). This report will

  13. Safety evaluation report related to the renewal of the operating license for the research reactor at North Carolina State University

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-04-01

    This safety evaluation report (SER) summarizes the findings of a safety review conducted by the staff of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation (NRR). The staff conducted this review in response to a timely application filed by North Carolina State University (the licensee or NCSU) for a 20-year renewal of Facility Operating License R-120 to continue to operate the NCSU PULSTAR research reactor. The facility is located in the Burlington Engineering Laboratory complex on the NCSU campus in Raleigh, North Carolina. In its safety review, the staff considered information submitted by the licensee (including past operating history recorded in the licensee`s annual reports to the NRC), as well as inspection reports prepared by NRC Region H personnel and first-hand observations. On the basis of this review, the staff concludes that NCSU can continue to operate the PULSTAR research reactor, in accordance with its application, without endangering the health and safety of the public. 16 refs., 31 figs., 7 tabs.

  14. Safety evaluation report related to the renewal of the operating license for the research reactor at North Carolina State University

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-04-01

    This safety evaluation report (SER) summarizes the findings of a safety review conducted by the staff of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation (NRR). The staff conducted this review in response to a timely application filed by North Carolina State University (the licensee or NCSU) for a 20-year renewal of Facility Operating License R-120 to continue to operate the NCSU PULSTAR research reactor. The facility is located in the Burlington Engineering Laboratory complex on the NCSU campus in Raleigh, North Carolina. In its safety review, the staff considered information submitted by the licensee (including past operating history recorded in the licensee's annual reports to the NRC), as well as inspection reports prepared by NRC Region H personnel and first-hand observations. On the basis of this review, the staff concludes that NCSU can continue to operate the PULSTAR research reactor, in accordance with its application, without endangering the health and safety of the public. 16 refs., 31 figs., 7 tabs

  15. Study on reactor power transient characteristics (reactor training experiments). Control rod reactivity calibration by positive period method and other experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ozaki, Yoshihiko; Sunagawa, Takeyoshi

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, it is reported about some experiments that have been carried out in the reactor training that targets sophomore of the department of applied nuclear engineering, FUT. Reactor of Kinki University Atomic Energy Research Institute (UTR-KINKI) was used for reactor training. When each critical state was achieved at different reactor output respectively in reactor operating, it was confirmed that the control rod position at that time does not change. Further, control rod reactivity calibration experiments using positive Period method were carried out for shim safety rod and regulating rod, respectively. The results were obtained as reasonable values in comparison with the nominal value of the UTR-KINKI. The measurement of reactor power change after reactor scram was performed, and the presence of the delayed neutron precursor was confirmed by calculating the half-life. The spatial dose rate measurement experiment of neutrons and γ-rays in the reactor room in a reactor power 1W operating conditions were also performed. (author)

  16. The licensing processes influence on nuclear market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Locatelli, Giorgio; Mancini, Mauro; Sainati, Tristano; Sallinen, Liisa

    2011-01-01

    The paper deals with the licensing nuclear power plants; it focuses primarily on the licensing process implications into the international nuclear market. Nowadays there are twenty-six countries that are planning to build new nuclear facilities, and thirty-seven where nuclear reactors are proposed; on the other hand, there are mainly ten international reactor vendors. At international level, there are few vendors that have sufficient resources, capabilities and experience to carry out the design and delivering of a nuclear power plant in the international market; On the other hand, the licensing processes are strictly dependent on national law frameworks, and on the nuclear policies. The paper proposes a comparison of six licensing processes (the ones established in Finland, France, Italy, South Korea, USA and UK), and analyzes its main features and implications; the IAEA licensing process is taken as reference point. The objective of the paper is to propose a systemic approach for considering the licensing procedures. The framework proposed enables facilitating the licensing management and inferring the main features of licensing contexts. The paper concludes with a forecast of the nuclear licensing context, especially with respect to the fourth generation of nuclear reactors. (author)

  17. French experience in research reactor fuel transportation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raisonnier, Daniele

    1996-01-01

    Since 1963 Transnucleaire has safely performed a large number of national and international transports of radioactive material. Transnucleaire has also designed and supplied suitable packaging for all types of nuclear fuel cycle radioactive material from front-end and back-end products and for power or for research reactors. Transportation of spent fuel from power reactors are made on a regular and industrial basis, but this is not yet the case for the transport of spent fuel coming from research reactors. Each shipment is a permanent challenge and requires a reactive organization dealing with all the transportation issues. This presentation will explain the choices made by Transnucleaire and its associates to provide and optimize the corresponding services while remaining in full compliance with the applicable regulations and customer requirements. (author)

  18. PAHR experiments in the MELUSINE reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rousseau, D.; Dereymez, P.; Guyon, H.; Junod, E.; Ploujoux, M.; Tournebize, F.; Backs, H.

    1983-01-01

    After a hypothetical accident in a fast neutron reactor core, the nuclear fuel and construction materials melt partially. In several out-of-pile devices, the melting materials and the sodium coolant come to interact thermodynamically. In short, a few seconds after the accident a bed of debris immersed in sodium is formed on a plane of steel. The PAHR program has as principal objective to study the thermodynamic behaviour of this bed in the MELUSINE reactor, taking into account the most crucial parameters that rule the phenomena. More particularly, the aim is to draw attention to the bed behaviour beyond the fusion point of the steel up to the partial fusion of the fuel. The authors describe the CELIA capsule and its instrumentation; the operation conditions of the reactor and the coupling factor; the out-of-pile materials and their operation conditions. (Auth.)

  19. Safety Evaluation Report, related to the renewal of the operating license for the critical experiment facility of the Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (Docket No. 50-225)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-10-01

    This Safety Evaluation Report for the application filed by the Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI) for a renewal of operating license CX-22 to continue to operate a critical experiment facility has been prepared by the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The facility is owned and operated by Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute and is located at a site in the city of Schenectady, New York. The staff concludes that this critical facility can continue to be operated by RPI without endangering the health and safety of the public

  20. Managing the high level waste nuclear regulatory commission licensing process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baskin, K.P.

    1992-01-01

    This paper reports that the process for obtaining Nuclear Regulatory Commission permits for the high level waste storage facility is basically the same process commercial nuclear power plants followed to obtain construction permits and operating licenses for their facilities. Therefore, the experience from licensing commercial reactors can be applied to the high level waste facility. Proper management of the licensing process will be the key to the successful project. The management of the licensing process was categorized into four areas as follows: responsibility, organization, communication and documentation. Drawing on experience from nuclear power plant licensing and basic management principles, the management requirement for successfully accomplishing the project goals are discussed

  1. System Requirements Document for the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aigner, R.D.

    2000-04-01

    The purpose of the conversion process is to convert the {sup 233}U fluoride compounds that are being extracted from the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment (MSRE) equipment to a stable oxide for long-term storage at Bldg. 3019.

  2. From USA operation experience of industrial uranium-graphite reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burdakov, N.S.

    1996-01-01

    The review on materials, presented by a group of the USA specialists at the seminar in Moscow on October 9-11, 1995 is considered. The above specialists shared their experience in operation of the Hanford industrial reactors, aimed at plutonium production for atomic bombs. The purpose of the above visit consisted in providing assistance to the Russian specialists by evaluation and modernization of operational conditions safety improvement of the RBMK type reactors. Special attention is paid to the behaviour of the graphite lining and channel tubes with an account of possible channel power interaction with the reactor structural units. The information on the experience of the Hanford reactor operation may be useful for specialists, operating the RBMK type reactors

  3. A safety assessment of the use of graphite in nuclear reactors licensed by the US NRC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schweitzer, D.G.; Gurinsky, D.H.; Kaplan, E.; Sastre, C.

    1987-09-01

    This report reviews existing literature and knowledge on graphite burning and on stored energy accumulation and releases in order to assess what role, if any, a stored energy release can have in initiating or contributing to hypothetical graphite burning scenarios in research reactors. It also addresses the question of graphite ignition and self-sustained combustion in the event of a loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA). The conditions necessary to initiate and maintain graphite burning are summarized and discussed. From analyses of existing information it is concluded that only stored energy accumulations and releases below the burning temperature (650 0 C) are pertinent. After reviewing the existing knowledge on stored energy it is possible to show that stored energy releases do not occur spontaneously, and that the maximum stored energy that can be released from any reactor containing graphite is a very small fraction of the energy produced during the first few minutes of a burning incident. The conclusions from these analyses are that the potential to initiate or maintain a graphite burning incident is essentially independent of the stored energy in the graphite, and depends on other factors that are unique for these reactors, research reactors, and for Fort St. Vrain. In order to have self-sustained rapid graphite oxidation in any of these reactors, certain necessary conditions of geometry, temperature, oxygen supply, reaction product removal, and a favorable heat balance must be maintained. There is no new evidence associated with either the Windscale Accident or the Chernobyl Accident that indicates a credible potential for a graphite burning accident in any of the reactors considered in this review

  4. DOE's foreign research reactor transportation services contract: Perspective and experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patterson, John

    1997-01-01

    DOE committed to low- and moderate-income countries participating in the foreign research reactor spent fuel returns program that the United States government would provide for the transportation of the spent fuel. In fulfillment of that commitment, DOE entered into transportation services contracts with qualified, private-sector firms. NAC will discuss its experience as a transportation services provider, including range of services available to the foreign reactors, advantages to DOE and to the foreign research reactors, access to contract services by high income countries and potential advantages, and experience with initial tasks performed under the contract. (author)

  5. Tritium experience in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skinner, C.H.; Blanchard, W.; Hosea, J.; Mueller, D.; Nagy, A.; Hogan, J.

    1998-01-01

    Tritium management is a key enabling element in fusion technology. Tritium fuel was used in 3.5 years of successful deuterium-tritium (D-T) operations in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory. The D-T campaign enabled TFTR to explore the transport, alpha physics, and MHD stability of a reactor core. It also provided experience with tritium retention and removal that highlighted the importance of these issues in future D-T machines. In this paper, the authors summarize the tritium retention and removal experience in TFTR and its implications for future reactors

  6. Experience from and research activities at the Otaniemi TRIGA reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bars, Bruno

    1976-01-01

    Experience from the Finnish TRIGA Reactor is reported, small changes and improvements in the control console of the Fir-1 reactor have been made. A minicomputer based data collecting system is planned and installed. It will be used for collecting data from operation and radiation monitors including the new isotope laboratory, and also simultaneously smaller experiments such as control rod calibration. A minicomputer is used for on-line reactor noise studies. The automatic uranium analyzer has a maximum sensitivity of 0.03 μg U 235 and 1.2 Th 232 . The system is now used at a sampling rate of about one sample per minute. (author)

  7. Ageing management experience at NUR Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melllal, Sabrina; Rezig, Mohamed; Zamoun, Rachid; Ameur, Azeddin [Nuclear Research Center of Draria, Algiers (Algeria)

    2013-07-01

    NUR is a 1 MW, open pool reactor moderated and cooled by light water. It was commissioned in 1989. NUR is used for education and training in Nuclear Engineering and related topics for COMENA and National Scientific Community. It is also used to perform R and D works and services at national and regional levels. In this presentation, we describe the methodology and the main development activities related to the ageing management at NUR reactor. These activities include inspection actions and development actions to introduce modifications, to solve obsolescence issues in view to implement the required preventive and curative maintenance programs and to improve the performances of the installation. These actions involved mainly the Operation Assistance System of the Reactor (OAS), the secondary cooling loop, the cooling tower. A new OAS using a new technology and having more possibilities than the older one was introduced in the control system of the reactor. The OAS hardware structure, software structure and the main functions performed are presented. The second loop is entirely refurbished. Two new cooling towers are installed and connected to the main heat exchanger with new piping and valves. The architecture of this new installation is described and the performance assessed. Other actions which involve auxiliary systems like emergency electrical system, air pneumatic system and automatic fire extinguishing are presented.

  8. Safety evaluation report related to the renewal of the operating license for the Worcester Polytechnic Institute open-pool training reactor, Docket No. 50-134

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-12-01

    This Safety Evaluation Report for the application filed by the Worcester Polytechnic Institute (WPI) for a renewal of Operating License R-61 to continue to operate the WPI 10-kW open-pool training reactor has been prepared by the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The facility is owned and operated by the Worcester Polytechnic Institute and is located on the WPI campus in Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts. The staff concludes that the reactor facility can continue to be operated by WPI without endangering the health and safety of the public

  9. Safety-evaluation report related to the license renewal and power increase for the National Bureau of Standards Reactor (Docket No. 50-184)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-09-01

    This Safety Evaluation Report for the application filed by the National Bureau of Standards (NBS) for an increase in power from 10 MWt to 20 MWt and for a renewal of the Operating License TR-5 to continue to operate the test reactor has been prepared by the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The facility is located in Gaithersburg, Maryland, on the site of the National Bureau of Standards, which is a bureau of the Department of Commerce. The staff concludes that the NBS reactor can operate at the 20 MWt power level without endangering the health and safety of the public

  10. Safety Evaluation Report related to the renewal of the operating license for the TRIGA training and research reactor at the University of Utah (Docket No. 50-407)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-03-01

    This Safety Evaluation Report for the application filed by the University of Utah (UU) for a renewal of operating license R-126 to continue to operate a training and research reactor facility has been prepared by the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The facility is owned and operated by the University of Utah and is located on its campus in Salt Lake City, Salt Lake County, Utah. The staff concludes that this training reactor facility can continue to be operated by UU without endangering the health and safety of the public

  11. Safety evaluation report related to the renewal of the operating license for the training and research reactor at the University of Maryland (Docket No. 50-166)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-03-01

    This Safety Evaluation Report for the application filed by the University of Maryland (UMD) for a renewal of operating license R-70 to continue to operate a training and research reactor facility has been prepared by the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The facility is owned and operated by the University of Maryland and is located at a site in College Park, Prince Georges County, Maryland. The staff concludes that this training reactor facility can continue to be operated by UMD without endangering the health and safety of the public

  12. Safety evaluation report related to the renewal of the operating license for the University of New Mexico Research Reactor (Docket No. 50-252)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-03-01

    This Safety Evaluation Report for the application filed by the University of New Mexico (UNM) for renewal of Operating License No. R-102 to continue to operate its research reactor has been prepared by the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The facility is located on the campus of the University of New Mexico in Albuquerque, New Mexico. The staff concludes that the reactor can continue to be operated by the University of New Mexico without endangering the health and safety of the public. 7 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs

  13. Safety Evaluation Report related to renewal of the operating license for the CAVALIER Training Reactor at the University of Virginia (Docket No. 50-396)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-05-01

    This Safety Evaluation Report for the application filed by the University of Virginia for a renewal of Operating License R-123 to continue to operate the CAVALIER (Cooperatively Assembled Virginia Low Intensity Educational Reactor) has been prepared by the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The facility is owned and operated by the University of Virginia and is located on the campus in Charlottesville, Virginia. Based on its technical review, the staff concludes that the reactor facility can continue to be operated by the university without endangering the health and safety of the public or the environment

  14. Safety Evaluation Report related to the renewal of the operating license for the research reactor at Manhattan College (Docket No. 50-199)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-02-01

    This Safety Evaluation Report for the application filed by Manhattan College (MC) for a renewal of Operating License R-94 to continue to operate the MC 0.1-W open-pool training reactor has been prepared by the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The facility is owned and operated by MC and is located two blocks away from the MC main campus in the Riverdale area of New York City, New York. The staff concludes that the reactor facility can continue to be operated by MC without endangering the health and safety of the public

  15. Safety Evaluation Report related to the renewal of the operating license for the research reactor at Purdue University: Docket No. 50-182

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-04-01

    This Safety Evaluation Report for the application filed by Purdue University for a renewal of Operating License R-87 to continue to operate a research reactor has been prepared by the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The facility is owned by Purdue University and is located on the campus in West Lafayette, Indiana. On the basis of its technical review, the staff concludes that the reactor facility can continue to be operated by the university without endangering the health and safety of the public or the enviroment

  16. Safety Evaluation Report related to the renewal of the operating license for the research reactor at Michigan State University (Docket No. 50-294)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-08-01

    This Safety Evaluation Report for the application filed by the Michigan State University (MSU) for a renewal of operating license number R-114 to continue to operate the TRIGA Mark I research reactor has been prepared by the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The facility is owned and operated by the Michigan State University and is located on the campus of Michigan State University in East Lansing, Ingham County, Michigan. The staff concludes that the TRIGA reactor facility can continue to be operated by MSU without endangering the health and safety of the public

  17. Safety evaluation report related to the renewal of the operating license for the Washington State University TRIGA reactor. Docket No. 50-27

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-05-01

    This Safety Evaluation Report for the application filed by the Washington State University (WSU) for a renewal of operating license number R-76 to continue to operate a research reactor has been prepared by the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The facility is owned and operated by the Washington State University and is located on the WSU campus in Pullman, Whitman County, Washington. The staff concludes that the TRIGA reactor facility can continue to be operated by WSU without endangering the health and safety of the public

  18. Safety evaluation report related to the license renewal and power increase for the National Bureau of Standards reactor (Docket No. 50-184)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernard, H.

    1984-03-01

    Supplement 1 to the Safety Evaluation Report (SER) related to the renewal of the operating license and for a power increase (10 MWt to 20 MWt) for the research reactor at the National Bureau of Standards (NBS) facility has been prepared by the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. This supplement reports on the review of the licensee's emergency plan, which had not been reviewed at the time the Safety Evaluation Report (NUREG-1007) was published, and the review of the NBS application by the Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards, which was completed subsequent to the publication of the SER

  19. Safety evaluation report related to the renewal of the operating license for the research reactor at the University of Florida. Docket No. 50-83

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-05-01

    This Safety Evaluation Report for the application filed by the University of Florida (UF) for a renewal of Operating License R-56 to continue to operate its Argonaut-type research reactor has been prepared by the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The facility is owned and operated by the University of Florida and is located on the UF campus in Gainesville, Alachua County, Florida. The staff concludes that the reactor facility can continue to be operated by UF without endangering the health and safety of the public

  20. Safety Evaluation Report related to the renewal of the operating license for the training and research reactor at the University of Lowell (Docket No. 50-223)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-11-01

    This Safety Evaluation Report for the application filed by the University of Lowell (UL) for renewal of operating license number R-125 to continue to operate its research reactor has been prepared by the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The facility is located on the North Campus of the University of Lowell in Lowell, Massachusetts. The staff concludes that the reactor can continue to be operated by the University of Lowell without endangering the health and safety of the public

  1. Safety-evaluation report related to the renewal of the operating license for the Cornell University TRIGA Research Reactor. Docket No. 50-157

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-08-01

    This Safety Evaluation Report for the application filed by the Cornell University for a renewal of Operating License R-80 to continue to operate a research reactor has been prepared by the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The facility is owned and operated by Cornell University and is located on the Cornell campus in Ithaca, New York. The staff concludes that the TRIGA reactor facility can continue to be operated by Cornell without endangering the health and safety of the public

  2. Safety Evaluation Report related to the construction permit and operating license for the research reactor at the University of Texas (Docket No. 50-602)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-05-01

    This Safety Evaluation Report for the application filed by the University of Texas for a construction permit and operating license to construct and operate a TRIGA research reactor has been prepared by the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The facility is owned and operated by the University of Texas and is located at the university's Balcones Research Center, about 7 miles (11.6 km) north of the main campus in Austin, Texas. The staff concludes that the TRIGA reactor facility can be constructed and operated by the University of Texas without endangering the health and safety of the public

  3. Safety Evaluation Report related to the renewal of the operating license for the TRIGA training and research reactor at the University of Arizona (Docket No. 50-113)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-05-01

    This Safety Evaluation Report for the application filed by the University of Arizona for the renewal of Operating License R-52 to continue operating its research reactor at an increased operating power level has been prepared by the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The facility is located on the University of Arizona campus in Tucson, Arizona. The staff concludes that the reactor can continue to be operated by the University of Arizona without endangering the health and safety of the public. 20 refs., 8 figs., 5 tabs

  4. Safety Evaluation Report related to the renewal of the operating license for the research reactor at the Universiy of Missouri-Rolla (Docket No. 5-123)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-12-01

    This Safety Evaluation Report for the application filed by the University of Missouri-Rolla for a renewal of Operating License R-79 to continue to operate a research reactor has been prepared by the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The facility is owned by the University of Missouri and is located on the campus in Rolla, Missouri. On the basis of its technical review, the staff concludes that the reactor facility can continue to be operated by the university without endangering the health and safety of the public or the environment

  5. Safety Evaluation Report related to the renewal of the operating license for the research reactor at the University of Kansas (Docket No. 50-148)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-05-01

    This Safety Evaluation Report for the application filed by the University of Kansas (KU) for a renewal of Operating License R-78 to continue to operate the KU 250-kW open-pool training reactor has been prepared by the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The facility is owned and operated by the University of Kansas and is located on the KU campus in Lawrence, Douglas County, Kansas. The staff concludes that the reactor facility can continue to be operated by KU without endangering the health and safety of the public. 17 references, 11 figures, 4 tables

  6. Training and qualification of licensed reactor operators at General Public Utilities Nuclear Corporation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Long, R.L.; Coe, R.P.

    1992-01-01

    Following the Three Mile Island-2 (TMI-2) accident in 1979, the utility responsible for managing the facility has looked closely at the training and qualification of its reactor operators. Performance-based operator training programmes are now in place, as required by the United States National Academy for Nuclear Training. Operators also participate directly in the development of a professional code of behaviour. (UK)

  7. Aging management of reactor internals and license renewal of US PWR plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, H. T. [Electric Power Research Institute, EPRI, 3420 Hillview Avenue, Palo Alto, California 94304 (United States)

    2006-09-15

    Age-related degradation mechanisms of key components are subject to aging management review by utilities considering plant license renewal. The management of aging effects in PWR internals must be demonstrated as specified in the US NRC Standard Review. The US NRC staff has also issued a Generic Aging Lessons Learned (GALL) report that documents the staff's basis for determining when existing generic programs are adequate to manage aging without change and when existing generic programs should be augmented for license renewal. The EPRI Materials Reliability Program (MRP) has been conducting studies to develop technical bases and guidelines to support aging management of PWR internals, with a particular attention to utility License Renewal commitments. The strategic approach taken by the MRP includes: developing an overall aging management framework, defining degradation mechanism screening values, categorizing and ranking internals components based on screening, performing functionality analyses and safety evaluation, and developing inspection and evaluation guidelines associated with each category of components. Screening criteria are developed for the following potential internals degradation mechanisms: - Stress Corrosion Cracking [Excluding Irradiation Effects]; - Irradiation-Assisted Stress Corrosion Cracking; - Thermal Aging Embrittlement; - Irradiation Embrittlement; - Void Swelling; - Stress Relaxation and Creep [Irradiation-enhanced]; - Wear; - Fatigue. The ranking and categorization calls to bin internals components into four categories: - Category A: component items for which aging degradation significance is minimal and aging effects are below the screening criteria; - Category C: 'lead' component items for which aging degradation significance is high or moderate and aging effects are above screening levels; - Category B: component items above screening levels but are not 'lead' component items and aging degradation significance

  8. Pre-licensed driving experience and car crash involvement during the learner and restricted, licence stages of graduated driver licensing: Findings from the New Zealand drivers study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Begg, Dorothy J; Langley, John D; Brookland, Rebecca L; Ameratunga, Shanthi; Gulliver, Pauline

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether pre-licence driving experiences, that is driving before beginning the licensing process, increased or decreased crash risk as a car driver, during the learner or the restricted licence stages of the graduated driver licensing system (GDLS). Study participants were 15-24 year old members of the New Zealand Drivers Study (NZDS) - a prospective cohort study of newly licensed car drivers. The interview stages of the NZDS are linked to, the three licensing stages of the GDLS: learner, restricted and full. Baseline demographic (age, ethnicity, residential location, deprivation), personality (impulsivity, sensation seeking, aggression) and, behavioural data, (including pre-licensed driving behaviour), were obtained at the learner licence interview. Data on distance driven and crashes that occurred at the learner licence and restricted licence stages, were reported at the restricted and full licence interviews, respectively. Crash data were also obtained from police traffic crash report files and this was combined with the self-reported crash data. The analysis of the learner licence stage crashes, when only supervised driving is allowed, was based on the participants who had passed the restricted licence test and undertaken the NZDS, restricted licence interview (n=2358). The analysis of the restricted licence stage crashes, when unsupervised driving is first allowed, was based on those who had passed the full licence test and completed the full licence interview (n=1428). After controlling for a range of demographic, personality, behavioural variables and distance driven, Poisson regression showed that the only pre-licence driving behaviour that showed a consistent relationship with subsequent crashes was on-road car driving which was associated with an increased risk of being the driver in a car crash during the learner licence period. This research showed that pre-licensed driving did not reduce crash risk among learner or

  9. NPP License Renewal and Aging Management: Revised Guidance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hull, A.B.; Hiser, A.L.; Lindo-Talin, S.E.

    2012-01-01

    Based on the Atomic Energy Act, the NRC issues licenses for commercial power reactors to operate for up to 40 years and allows these licenses to be renewed for up to another 20 years. NRC has approved license renewal (LR) for well over 50% of U.S. located reactors originally licensed to operate for 40 years. Of these 104 reactors (69 PWRs, 35 BWRs), the NRC has issued renewed licenses for 71 units and is currently reviewing applications for another 15 units. As of May 1, 2012, ten plants at nine sites had entered their 41st year of operation and thus are in their first period of extended operation (PEO). Five more plants will enter the PEO by the end of 2012. One foundation of the license renewal process has been license renewal guidance documents (LRGDs). The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) revised key guidance documents used for nuclear power LR in 2010 and 2011. These include NUREG-1800, 'Standard Review Plan for Review of License Renewal Applications,' revision 2 (SRP-LR), and NUREG-1801, 'Generic Aging Lessons Learned (GALL) Report,' revision 2 (GALL Report). The guidance documents were updated to reflect lessons learned and operating experience gained since the guidance documents were last issued in 2005. The reactor LRGDs referenced in this poster can all be accessed at http://www.nrc.gov/reactors/operating/licensing/renewal/guidance.html (author)

  10. Operating experience feedback from safety significant events at research reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shokr, A.M. [Atomic Energy Authority, Abouzabal (Egypt). Egypt Second Research Reactor; Rao, D. [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai (India)

    2015-05-15

    Operating experience feedback is an effective mechanism to provide lessons learned from the events and the associated corrective actions to prevent recurrence of events, resulting in improving safety in the nuclear installations. This paper analyzes the events of safety significance that have been occurred at research reactors and discusses the root causes and lessons learned from these events. Insights from literature on events at research reactors and feedback from events at nuclear power plants that are relevant to research reactors are also presented along with discussions. The results of the analysis showed the importance of communication of safety information and exchange of operating experience are vital to prevent reoccurrences of events. The analysis showed also the need for continued attention to human factors and training of operating personnel, and the need for establishing systematic ageing management programmes of reactor facilities, and programmes for safety management of handling of nuclear fuel, core components, and experimental devices.

  11. Experiences in stability testing of boiling water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    March-Leuba, J.; Otaduy, P.J.

    1986-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to summarize experiences with boiling water reactor (BWR) stability testing using noise analysis techniques. These techniques have been studied over an extended period of time, but it has been only recently that they have been well established and generally accepted. This paper contains first a review of the problem of BWR neutronic stability, focusing on its physical causes and its effects on reactor operation. The paper also describes the main techniques used to quantify, from noise measurements, the reactor's stability in terms of a decay ratio. Finally, the main results and experiences obtained from the stability tests performed at the Dresden and the Browns Ferry reactors using noise analysis techniques are summarized

  12. Operating experience feedback from safety significant events at research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shokr, A.M.

    2015-01-01

    Operating experience feedback is an effective mechanism to provide lessons learned from the events and the associated corrective actions to prevent recurrence of events, resulting in improving safety in the nuclear installations. This paper analyzes the events of safety significance that have been occurred at research reactors and discusses the root causes and lessons learned from these events. Insights from literature on events at research reactors and feedback from events at nuclear power plants that are relevant to research reactors are also presented along with discussions. The results of the analysis showed the importance of communication of safety information and exchange of operating experience are vital to prevent reoccurrences of events. The analysis showed also the need for continued attention to human factors and training of operating personnel, and the need for establishing systematic ageing management programmes of reactor facilities, and programmes for safety management of handling of nuclear fuel, core components, and experimental devices.

  13. Backflushable filter experience at the N Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ball, B.; Best, W.T.; Keith, R.C.

    1987-01-01

    The N Reactor is an 4000 MWt, light-water cooled, graphite-moderated reactor located on the Hanford Site in Washington State. A radwaste pilot plant to process plant effluent was constructed in order to maximize future efficiency when a full size radioactive processing facility is built. The pilot plant's purpose is to vary operational parameters such as filtration and ion exchange on a smaller scale to gather as much data as possible. The input to the pilot plant is radioactive drain lines from the N Reactor. The effluent passes through a backflushable filter and a series of ion exchange columns all scaled down from the future proposed facility. A backflushable filter was selected for this application because of the specific characteristics of the plant effluent and the potential reduced operating costs. The filter performance has been excellent in terms of filtration of the effluent. Typical total suspended solids in the plant effluent range from 1 to 6.1 ppm; the filter reduces this value to less than 0.1 ppm. In addition to outstanding filtration efficiency, the use of a precoat material on the filter has resulted in impressive decontamination factors. The filter has been successful in removing up to 50% of the influent activity. An improved performance of several nuclides over other filtration systems has also been achieved. By varying the composition and amount of precoat material on the filter, substantial reductions in waste volumes (and associated operating and disposal costs) have been demonstrated while maintaining a high degree of removal of both activity and total suspended solids

  14. Operating experiences at the Finnish TRIGA reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salmenhaara, Seppo

    1988-01-01

    The Finnish TRIGA reactor has been in operation since March 1962. There are still 57 original Al-clad fuel elements in the core. So far we have had only two fuel cladding failures in 1981 and 1988. The first one was an Al-clad element and the second one a SS-clad. The low rate of fuel cladding failures has made it possible to use continuously also the Al-clad fuel elements. Although some conventional irradiations of certain type have been repeated successfully tens of times, new and unexpected incidents can still take place. As an example an event of a leaking irradiation capsule is described

  15. The primary circuit of the dragon high temperature reactor experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simon, R.

    2005-01-01

    The 20 MWth Dragon Reactor Experiment was the first HTGR (High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor) with coated particle fuel. Its purpose was to test fuel and materials for the High Temperature Reactor programmes pursued in Europe 40 years ago. This paper describes the design and construction of the primary (helium) circuit. It summarizes the main design objectives, lists the performance data and explains the flow paths of the heat removal and helium purification systems. The principal circuit accidents postulated are discussed and the choice of the main construction materials is given. (author)

  16. Experience in Cuba in the licensing during import, commissioning and operation of an Irradiator LLCo ISOGAMMA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forteza, Yamil Lopez; Reyes, Yolanda Perez; Garcia, Jose R. Quevedo; Molina, Igor I. Sarabia; Gonzalez, Leonel Omarovich; Zubiaur, Omar Cruz

    2013-01-01

    This work presented the experiences during the process of licensing an irradiator ISOGAMMA LLCo model according to the recommendations of the International Atomic Energy (IAEA). Aspects of the safety assessment are detailed, as well as control and verification requirements for radiation safety and security at different stages of the process (import, transportation, installation irradiator loading 60Co sources, commissioning and operation) of irradiator recently installed in Cuba. The results of the evaluation carried a source of reference and consultation necessary for the work of the regulator to consider for similar processes that lie ahead in other facilities irradiation

  17. Power cycling experiments in INR-TRIGA-SSR Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dumitru, M.

    2008-01-01

    The in-reactor experimental program started this summer with some power cycling experiments to provide date on fuel behaviour under abnormal reactor operating conditions. The paper describes the irradiation device, its operational features and an original 'under-flux' movement system. Also, there are presented main data of irradiation device (pressure, flow, temperature, construction), in-pile section, location, sample, instrumentation, experimental sequences and operating data of Interest for the experimenters. (author)

  18. Decommissioning the Los Alamos Molten Plutonium Reactor Experiment (LAMPRE I)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harper, J.R.; Garde, R.

    1981-11-01

    The Los Alamos Molten Plutonium Reactor Experiment (LAMPRE I) was decommissioned at the Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico, in 1980. The LAMPRE I was a sodium-cooled reactor built to develop plutonium fuels for fast breeder applications. It was retired in the mid-1960s. This report describes the decommissioning procedures, the health physics programs, the waste management, and the costs for the operation

  19. Performance improvement of the Annular Core Pulse Reactor for reactor safety experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reuscher, J.A.; Pickard, P.S.

    1976-01-01

    The Annular Core Pulse Reactor (ACPR) is a TRIGA type reactor which has been in operation at Sandia Laboratories since 1967. The reactor is utilized in a wide variety of experimental programs which include radiation effects, neutron radiography, activation analysis, and fast reactor safety. During the past several years, the ACPR has become an important experimental facility for the United States Fast Reactor Safety Research Program and questions of interest to the safety of the LMFBR are being addressed. In order to enhance the capabilities of the ACPR for reactor safety experiments, a project to improve the performance of the reactor was initiated. It is anticipated that the pulse fluence can be increased by a factor of 2.0 to 2.5 utilizing a two-region core concept with high heat capacity fuel elements around the central irradiation cavity. In addition, the steady-state power of the reactor will be increased by about a factor of two. The new features of the improvements are described

  20. Safety-evaluation report related to the renewal of the operating license for the research reactor at the Iowa State University (Docket No. 50-116)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-09-01

    This Safety Evaluation Report for the application filed by the Iowa State University (ISU) for a renewal of the Class 104 Operating License R-59 to continue to operate its Argonaut-type research reactor has been prepared by the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The facility is owned and operated by the Iowa State University, and is located on the ISU campus in Ames, Story County, Iowa. The staff concludes that the reactor facility can continue to be operated by ISU without endangering the health and safety of the public. The principal matters reviewed are: design, testing, and performance of the reactor components and systems; the expected consequences of credible accidents; the licensee's management organization; the method used for the control of radiological effluents; the licensee's technical specifications; financial data and information; the physical protection program; procedures for training reactor operators; and emergency plans. 11 references, 15 figures, 13 tables

  1. Final Environmental Statement related to license renewal and power increase for the National Bureau of Standards Reactor: Docket No. 50-184

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-08-01

    This Final Environmental Statement contains an assessment of the environmental impact associated with renewal of Operating License No. TR-5 for the National Bureau of Standards (NBS) reactor for a period of 20 years at a power level of 20 MW. This reactor is located on the 576-acre NBS site near Gaithersburg in Montgomery County, Maryland, about 20 mi northwest of the center of Washington, DC. The reactor is a high-flux heavy-water-moderated, cooled and reflected test reactor, which first went critical on December 7, 1967. Though the reactor was originally designed for 20-MW operation, it has been operating for 14 years at a maximum authorized power level to 10 MW. Program demand is now great enough to warrant operation at a power level of 20 MW. No additional major changes to the physical plant are required to operate at 20 MW

  2. Operator licensing examiner standards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    The Operator Licensing Examiner Standards provide policy and guidance to NRC examiners and establish the procedures and practices for examining licensees and applicants for reactor operator and senior reactor operator licenses at power reactor facilities pursuant to Part 55 of Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations (10 CFR 55). The Examiner Standards are intended to assist NRC examiners and facility licensees to better understand the initial and requalification examination processes and to ensure the equitable and consistent administration of examinations to all applicants. These standards are not a substitute for the operator licensing regulations and are subject to revision or other internal operator licensing policy changes

  3. Licensing of spent fuel dry storage and consolidated rod storage: A Review of Issues and Experiences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bailey, W.J.

    1990-02-01

    The results of this study, performed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) and sponsored by the US Department of Energy (DOE), respond to the nuclear industry's recommendation that a report be prepared that collects and describes the licensing issues (and their resolutions) that confront a new applicant requesting approval from the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) for dry storage of spent fuel or for large-scale storage of consolidated spent fuel rods in pools. The issues are identified in comments, questions, and requests from the NRC during its review of applicants' submittals. Included in the report are discussions of (1) the 18 topical reports on cask and module designs for dry storage fuel that have been submitted to the NRC, (2) the three license applications for dry storage of spent fuel at independent spent fuel storage installations (ISFSIs) that have been submitted to the NRC, and (3) the three applications (one of which was later withdrawn) for large-scale storage of consolidated fuel rods in existing spent fuel storage pools at reactors that were submitted tot he NRC. For each of the applications submitted, examples of some of the issues (and suggestions for their resolutions) are described. The issues and their resolutions are also covered in detail in an example in each of the three subject areas: (1) the application for the CASTOR V/21 dry spent fuel storage cask, (2) the application for the ISFSI for dry storage of spent fuel at Surry, and (3) the application for full-scale wet storage of consolidated spent fuel at Millstone-2. The conclusions in the report include examples of major issues that applicants have encountered. Recommendations for future applicants to follow are listed. 401 refs., 26 tabs.

  4. Guide for licensing evaluations using CRAC2: A computer program for calculating reactor accident consequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White, J.E.; Roussin, R.W.; Gilpin, H.

    1988-12-01

    A version of the CRAC2 computer code applicable for use in analyses of consequences and risks of reactor accidents in case work for environmental statements has been implemented for use on the Nuclear Regulatory Commission Data General MV/8000 computer system. Input preparation is facilitated through the use of an interactive computer program which operates on an IBM personal computer. The resulting CRAC2 input deck is transmitted to the MV/8000 by using an error-free file transfer mechanism. To facilitate the use of CRAC2 at NRC, relevant background material on input requirements and model descriptions has been extracted from four reports - ''Calculations of Reactor Accident Consequences,'' Version 2, NUREG/CR-2326 (SAND81-1994) and ''CRAC2 Model Descriptions,'' NUREG/CR-2552 (SAND82-0342), ''CRAC Calculations for Accident Sections of Environmental Statements, '' NUREG/CR-2901 (SAND82-1693), and ''Sensitivity and Uncertainty Studies of the CRAC2 Computer Code,'' NUREG/CR-4038 (ORNL-6114). When this background information is combined with instructions on the input processor, this report provides a self-contained guide for preparing CRAC2 input data with a specific orientation toward applications on the MV/8000. 8 refs., 11 figs., 10 tabs

  5. Clinch River Breeder Reactor Plant. License application, statement of general information

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-01-01

    Application is made for a reactor facility consisting of a liquid metal cooled reactor and steam generator system, a steam turbine driven electric generating system, electrical switchyard, and related auxiliaries and supporting structures. The primary system is located in an inert atmosphere in shielded vaults within a containment structure. Sodium coolant is used to remove heat from the core and radial blanket. Heat from the primary sodium is transferred in heat exchangers to non radioactive sodium which is used to convert feed-water into steam which is superheated to drive a tandem-compound generator. A single shaft multi-stage turbine generator produces 380 MW(e) with steam conditions of 1450 psig at 900 0 F. Fuel is sintered ceramic pellets of mixed uranium-plutonium oxides encapsulated in stainless steel. There are 198 fuel assemblies with each assembly consisting of 217 fuel rods placed in a hexagonal channel. Plutonium enrichment ranges from 1817 to 32.0 percent by weight. Axial blanket sections contain depleted UO 2 with 99.8 percent 238 U and 0.2 percent 235 U by weight. The proposed location of the plant is within the corporate limits of the city of Oak Ridge in Roane County, Tennessee. (U.S.)

  6. Thermal hydraulic reactor safety analyses and experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holmstroem, H.; Eerikaeinen, L.; Kervinen, T.; Kilpi, K.; Mattila, L.; Miettinen, J.; Yrjoelae, V.

    1989-04-01

    The report introduces the results of the thermal hydraulic reactor safety research performed in the Nuclear Engineering Laboratory of the Technical Research Centre of Finland (VTT) during the years 1972-1987. Also practical applications i.e. analyses for the safety authorities and power companies are presented. The emphasis is on description of the state-of-the-art know how. The report describes VTT's most important computer codes, both those of foreign origin and those developed at VTT, and their assessment work, VTT's own experimental research, as well as international experimental projects and other forms of cooperation VTT has participated in. Appendix 8 contains a comprehensive list of the most important publications and technical reports produced. They present the content and results of the research in detail.(orig.)

  7. Background studies for the MINER Coherent Neutrino Scattering reactor experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agnolet, G.; Baker, W.; Barker, D.; Beck, R.; Carroll, T.J.; Cesar, J.; Cushman, P.; Dent, J.B.; De Rijck, S.; Dutta, B.; Flanagan, W.; Fritts, M.; Gao, Y.; Harris, H.R.; Hays, C.C.; Iyer, V.

    2017-01-01

    The proposed Mitchell Institute Neutrino Experiment at Reactor (MINER) experiment at the Nuclear Science Center at Texas A&M University will search for coherent elastic neutrino-nucleus scattering within close proximity (about 2 m) of a 1 MW TRIGA nuclear reactor core using low threshold, cryogenic germanium and silicon detectors. Given the Standard Model cross section of the scattering process and the proposed experimental proximity to the reactor, as many as 5–20 events/kg/day are expected. We discuss the status of preliminary measurements to characterize the main backgrounds for the proposed experiment. Both in situ measurements at the experimental site and simulations using the MCNP and GEANT4 codes are described. A strategy for monitoring backgrounds during data taking is briefly discussed.

  8. Background studies for the MINER Coherent Neutrino Scattering reactor experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agnolet, G.; Baker, W. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, and the Mitchell Institute for Fundamental Physics and Astronomy, Texas A& M University, College Station, TX 77843 (United States); Barker, D. [School of Physics & Astronomy, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States); Beck, R. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, and the Mitchell Institute for Fundamental Physics and Astronomy, Texas A& M University, College Station, TX 77843 (United States); Carroll, T.J.; Cesar, J. [Department of Physics, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Cushman, P. [School of Physics & Astronomy, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States); Dent, J.B. [Department of Physics, University of Louisiana at Lafayette, Lafayette, LA 70504 (United States); De Rijck, S. [Department of Physics, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Dutta, B. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, and the Mitchell Institute for Fundamental Physics and Astronomy, Texas A& M University, College Station, TX 77843 (United States); Flanagan, W. [Department of Physics, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Fritts, M. [School of Physics & Astronomy, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States); Gao, Y. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, and the Mitchell Institute for Fundamental Physics and Astronomy, Texas A& M University, College Station, TX 77843 (United States); Department of Physics & Astronomy, Wayne State University, Detroit 48201 (United States); Harris, H.R.; Hays, C.C. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, and the Mitchell Institute for Fundamental Physics and Astronomy, Texas A& M University, College Station, TX 77843 (United States); Iyer, V. [School of Physical Sciences, National Institute of Science Education and Research, Jatni - 752050 (India); and others

    2017-05-01

    The proposed Mitchell Institute Neutrino Experiment at Reactor (MINER) experiment at the Nuclear Science Center at Texas A&M University will search for coherent elastic neutrino-nucleus scattering within close proximity (about 2 m) of a 1 MW TRIGA nuclear reactor core using low threshold, cryogenic germanium and silicon detectors. Given the Standard Model cross section of the scattering process and the proposed experimental proximity to the reactor, as many as 5–20 events/kg/day are expected. We discuss the status of preliminary measurements to characterize the main backgrounds for the proposed experiment. Both in situ measurements at the experimental site and simulations using the MCNP and GEANT4 codes are described. A strategy for monitoring backgrounds during data taking is briefly discussed.

  9. Liquid metal cooled reactors: Experience in design and operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-12-01

    on key fast reactor technology aspects in an integrative sense useful to engineers, scientists, managers, university students and professors. This publication has been prepared to contribute toward the IAEA activity to preserve the knowledge gained in the liquid metal cooled fast reactor (LMFR) technology development. This technology development and experience include aspects addressing not only experimental and demonstration reactors, but also all activities from reactor construction to decommissioning. This publication provides a survey of worldwide experience gained over the past five decades in LMFR development, design, operation and decommissioning, which has been accumulated through the IAEA programmes carried out within the framework of the TWG-FR and the Agency's INIS and NKMS

  10. Safety and licensing of MHTGR [Modular High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silady, F.A.; Millunzi, A.C.; Kelley, A.P. Jr.; Cunliffe, J.

    1987-07-01

    The Modular High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor (MHTGR) design meets stringent top-level regulatory and user safety requirements that require that the normal and off-normal operation of the plant not disturb the public's day-to-day activities. Quantitative, top-level regulatory criteria have been specified from US NRC and EPA sources to guide the design. The user/utility group has further specified that these criteria be met at the plant boundary. The focus of the safety approach has then been centered on retaining the radionuclide inventory within the fuel by removing core heat, controlling chemical attack, and by controlling heat generation. The MHTGR is shown to passively meet the stringent requirements with margin. No operator action is required and the plant is insensitive to operator error

  11. Determination of an optimum reactor coolant system average temperature within the licensed operating window

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thaulez, F.; Basic, I.; Vrbanic, I.

    2003-01-01

    The Krsko modernization power uprate analyses have been performed in such a way as to cover plant operation in a range of average reactor coolant temperatures (Tavg) of 301.7 deg C to 307.4 deg C, with steam generator tube plugging levels of up to 5%. The upper bound is temporarily restricted to 305.7 deg C, as long as Zirc-4 fuel is present in the core. (It is, however,acceptable to operate at 307.4 deg C with a few Zirc-4 assemblies, if meeting certain conditionsand subjected to a corrosion and rod internal pressure evaluation in the frame of the cyclespecificnuclear core design.) The Tavg optimization method takes into account two effects, that are opposed to each other: the impact of steam pressure on the electrical power output versus the impact of Tavg on the cost of reactor fuel. The positive economical impact of a Tavg increase through the increase in MWe output is around 6 to 8 times higher than the corresponding negative impact on the fuel cost. From this perspective, it is desirable to have Tavg as high as possible. This statement is not affected by a change in the relationship between steam pressure and Tavg level. However, there are also other considerations intervening in the definition of the optimum. This paper discusses the procedure for selection of optimal Tavg for the forthcoming cycle in relation to the impacts of change in Tavg level and/or variations of the steam pressure versus Tavg relationship. (author)

  12. Reactor G1: high power experiments; Experiences a forte puissance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laage, F de; Teste du Baillet, A; Veyssiere, A; Wanner, G [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires; Retel, H [Societe Rateau, D.E.A. (France)

    1957-07-01

    The experiments carried out in the starting-up programme of the reactor G1 comprised a series of tests at high power, which allowed the following points to be studied: 1- Effect of poisoning by Xenon (absolute value, evolution). 2- Temperature coefficients of the uranium and graphite for a temperature distribution corresponding to heating by fission. 3- Effect of the pressure (due to the coiling system) on the reactivity. 4- Calibration of the security rods as a function of their position in the pile (1). 5- Temperature distribution of the graphite, the sheathing, the uranium and the air leaving the canals, in a pile running normally at high power. 6- Neutron flux distribution in a pile running normally at high power. 7- Determination of the power by nuclear and thermodynamic methods. These experiments have been carried out under two very different pile conditions. From the 1. to the 15. of August 1956, a series of power increases, followed by periods of stabilisation, were induced in a pile containing uranium only, in 457 canals, amounting to about 34 tons of fuel. A knowledge of the efficiency of the control rods in such a pile has made it possible to measure with good accuracy the principal effects at high temperatures, that is, to deal with points 1, 2, 3, 5. Flux charts giving information on the variations of the material Laplacian and extrapolation lengths in the reflector have been drawn up. Finally the thermodynamic power has been measured under good conditions, in spite of some installation difficulties. On September 16, the pile had its final charge of 100 tons. All the canals were loaded, 1,234 with uranium and 53 (i.e. exactly 4 per cent of the total number) with thorium uniformly distributed in a square lattice of 100 cm side. Since technical difficulties prevented the calibration of the control rods, the measurements were limited to the determination of the thermodynamic power and the temperature distributions (points 5 and 7). This report will

  13. Dry cooling tower operating experience in the LOFT reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hunter, J.A.

    1980-01-01

    A dry cooling tower has been uniquely utilized to dissipate heat generated in a small experimental pressurized water nuclear reactor. Operational experience revealed that dry cooling towers can be intermittently operated with minimal wind susceptibility and water hammer occurrences by cooling potential steam sources after a reactor scram, by isolating idle tubes from the external atmosphere, and by operating at relatively high pressures. Operating experience has also revealed that tube freezing can be minimized by incorporating the proper heating and heat loss prevention features

  14. Non-standard interaction effects at reactor neutrino experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohlsson, Tommy; Zhang, He

    2009-01-01

    We study non-standard interactions (NSIs) at reactor neutrino experiments, and in particular, the mimicking effects on θ 13 . We present generic formulas for oscillation probabilities including NSIs from sources and detectors. Instructive mappings between the fundamental leptonic mixing parameters and the effective leptonic mixing parameters are established. In addition, NSI corrections to the mixing angles θ 13 and θ 12 are discussed in detailed. Finally, we show that, even for a vanishing θ 13 , an oscillation phenomenon may still be observed in future short baseline reactor neutrino experiments, such as Double Chooz and Daya Bay, due to the existences of NSIs

  15. Calculation of low-energy reactor neutrino spectra reactor for reactor neutrino experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riyana, Eka Sapta; Suda, Shoya; Ishibashi, Kenji; Matsuura, Hideaki [Dept. of Applied Quantum Physics and Nuclear Engineering, Kyushu University, Kyushu (Japan); Katakura, Junichi [Dept. of Nuclear System Safety Engineering, Nagaoka University of Technology, Nagaoka (Japan)

    2016-06-15

    Nuclear reactors produce a great number of antielectron neutrinos mainly from beta-decay chains of fission products. Such neutrinos have energies mostly in MeV range. We are interested in neutrinos in a region of keV, since they may take part in special weak interactions. We calculate reactor antineutrino spectra especially in the low energy region. In this work we present neutrino spectrum from a typical pressurized water reactor (PWR) reactor core. To calculate neutrino spectra, we need information about all generated nuclides that emit neutrinos. They are mainly fission fragments, reaction products and trans-uranium nuclides that undergo negative beta decay. Information in relation to trans-uranium nuclide compositions and its evolution in time (burn-up process) were provided by a reactor code MVP-BURN. We used typical PWR parameter input for MVP-BURN code and assumed the reactor to be operated continuously for 1 year (12 months) in a steady thermal power (3.4 GWth). The PWR has three fuel compositions of 2.0, 3.5 and 4.1 wt% {sup 235}U contents. For preliminary calculation we adopted a standard burn-up chain model provided by MVP-BURN. The chain model treated 21 heavy nuclides and 50 fission products. The MVB-BURN code utilized JENDL 3.3 as nuclear data library. We confirm that the antielectron neutrino flux in the low energy region increases with burn-up of nuclear fuel. The antielectron-neutrino spectrum in low energy region is influenced by beta emitter nuclides with low Q value in beta decay (e.g. {sup 241}Pu) which is influenced by burp-up level: Low energy antielectron-neutrino spectra or emission rates increase when beta emitters with low Q value in beta decay accumulate. Our result shows the flux of low energy reactor neutrinos increases with burn-up of nuclear fuel.

  16. Investigating the spectral anomaly with different reactor antineutrino experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Buck

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The spectral shape of reactor antineutrinos measured in recent experiments shows anomalies in comparison to neutrino reference spectra. New precision measurements of the reactor neutrino spectra as well as more complete input in nuclear data bases are needed to resolve the observed discrepancies between models and experimental results. This article proposes the combination of experiments at reactors which are highly enriched in U235 with commercial reactors with typically lower enrichment to gain new insights into the origin of the anomalous neutrino spectrum. The presented method clarifies, if the spectral anomaly is either solely or not at all related to the predicted U235 spectrum. Considering the current improvements of the energy scale uncertainty of present-day experiments, a significance of three sigma and above can be reached. As an example, we discuss the option of a direct comparison of the measured shape in the currently running Double Chooz near detector and the upcoming Stereo experiment. A quantitative feasibility study emphasizes that a precise understanding of the energy scale systematics is a crucial prerequisite in recent and next generation experiments investigating the spectral anomaly.

  17. Tokamak fusion test reactor FELIX plate experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hua, T.O.; Nygren, R.E.; Turner, L.R.

    1986-01-01

    For a conducting material exposed to both a time-varying and a static magnetic field, such as a limiter blade in a tokamak, the induced eddy currents and the deflection arising from those eddy currents can be strongly coupled. The coupling effects reduce the currents and deflections markedly, sometimes an order of magnitude, from the values predicted if coupling is neglected. A series of experiments to study current-deflection coupling were performed using the Fusion Electromagnetic Inductance Experiment (FELIX) facility at Argonne National Laboratory. Magnetic damping and magnetic stiffness resulting from the coupling are discussed, and analytical expressions for induced eddy current and rigid body rotation in the FELIX plate experiment are compared with the experimental results. Predictions for the degree of coupling based on various parameters are made using the analytical model

  18. Advanced test reactor testing experience-past, present and future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marshall, Frances M.

    2006-01-01

    The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR), at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), is one of the world's premier test reactors for providing the capability for studying the effects of intense neutron and gamma radiation on reactor materials and fuels. The physical configuration of the ATR, a 4-leaf clover shape, allows the reactor to be operated at different power levels in the corner 'lobes' to allow for different testing conditions for multiple simultaneous experiments. The combination of high flux (maximum thermal neutron fluxes of 1E15 neutrons per square centimeter per second and maximum fast [E>1.0 MeV] neutron fluxes of 5E14 neutrons per square centimeter per second) and large test volumes (up to 122 cm long and 12.7 cm diameter) provide unique testing opportunities. The current experiments in the ATR are for a variety of test sponsors - US government, foreign governments, private researchers, and commercial companies needing neutron irradiation services. There are three basic types of test configurations in the ATR. The simplest configuration is the sealed static capsule, which places the capsule in direct contact with the primary coolant. The next level of experiment complexity is an instrumented lead experiment, which allows for active control of experiment conditions during the irradiation. The most complex experiment is the pressurized water loop, in which the test sample can be subjected to the exact environment of a pressurized water reactor. For future research, some ATR modifications and enhancements are currently planned. This paper provides more details on some of the ATR capabilities, key design features, experiments, and future plans

  19. ORNL fusion reactor shielding integral experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santoro, R.T.; Alsmiller, R.G. Jr.; Barnes, J.M.; Chapman, G.T.

    1980-01-01

    Integral experiments that measure the neutron and gamma-ray energy spectra resulting from the attenuation of approx. 14 MeV T(D,n) 4 He reaction neutrons in laminated slabs of stainless steel type 304, borated polyethylene, and a tungsten alloy (Hevimet) and from neutrons streaming through a 30-cm-diameter iron duct (L/D = 3) imbedded in a concrete shield have been performed. The facility, the NE-213 liquid scintillator detector system, and the experimental techniques used to obtain the measured data are described. The two-dimensional discrete ordinates radiation transport codes, calculational models, and nuclear data used in the analysis of the experiments are reviewed

  20. Liquid jet experiments: relevance to inertial confinement fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffman, M.A.

    1981-01-01

    In order to try to find a reactor design which offered protection against neutron damage, studies were undertaken at LLNL (the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory) of self-healing, renewable liquid-wall reactor concepts. In conjuction with these studies, were done a seris of small-scale aer jet experiments were done over the past several years at UCD (University of California, Davis Campus) to simulate the behavior of liquid lithium (or lithium-lead) jets in these liquid-wall fusion reactor concepts. Extropolating the results of these small-scale experiments to the large-scale lithium jets, tentatively concluded that the lithium jet can be re-established after the microexplosion, and with careful design the jets should not breakup due to instabilities during the relatively quiscent period between MICROEXPLOSIONS

  1. An Overview of the International Reactor Physics Experiment Evaluation Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Briggs, J. Blair; Gulliford, Jim

    2014-01-01

    Interest in high-quality integral benchmark data is increasing as efforts to quantify and reduce calculational uncertainties associated with advanced modeling and simulation accelerate to meet the demands of next generation reactor and advanced fuel cycle concepts. Two Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) activities, the International Criticality Safety Benchmark Evaluation Project (ICSBEP), initiated in 1992, and the International Reactor Physics Experiment Evaluation Project (IRPhEP), initiated in 2003, have been identifying existing integral experiment data, evaluating those data, and providing integral benchmark specifications for methods and data validation for nearly two decades. Data provided by those two projects will be of use to the international reactor physics, criticality safety, and nuclear data communities for future decades. An overview of the IRPhEP and a brief update of the ICSBEP are provided in this paper.

  2. Safety evaluation report related to the construction permit and operating license for the research reactor at the University of Texas (Docket No. 50-602)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    The Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has prepared Supplement 1 to NUREG-1135, ''Safety Evaluation Report Related to the Construction Permit and Operating License for the Research Reactor at the University of Texas'' (SER) May 1985. The reactor facility is owned by The University of Texas at Austin (UT, the applicant) and is located at the University's Balcones Research Center in Austin, Texas. This supplement to the SER (SSER) describes the changes to the reactor facility design from the description in the SER. The SER and SSER together reflect the facility as built. The SSER also documents the reviews that the NRC has completed regarding the applicant's emergency plan, security plan, and technical specifications that were identified as open in the SER

  3. Reactor dynamics experiment of nuclear ship Mutsu using pseudo random signal (II). The second experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayashi, Koji; Shimazaki, Junya; Nabeshima, Kunihiko; Ochiai, Masaaki; Shinohara, Yoshikuni; Inoue, Kimihiko.

    1995-01-01

    In order to investigate dynamics of the reactor plant of the nuclear ship Mutsu, the second reactor noise experiment using pseudo random binary sequences (PRBS) was performed on August 30, 1991 in the third experimental navigation. The experiments using both reactivity and load disturbances were performed at 50% of reactor power and under a quiet sea condition. Each PRBS was applied by manual operation of the control rod or the main steam valve. Various signals of the plant responses and of the acceleration of ship motion were measured. Furthermore, natural reactor noise signals were measured after each PRBS experiment in order to evaluate the effects of the PRBS disturbances. This paper summarizes the planning of the experiment, the instruction for the experiment and logs, the data recording conditions, recorded signal wave forms and the results of power spectral analysis. (author)

  4. Reactor dynamics experiment of nuclear ship Mutsu using pseudo random signal (III). The third experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayashi, Koji; Shimazaki, Junya; Nabeshima, Kunihiko; Ochiai, Masaaki; Shinohara, Yoshikuni; Inoue, Kimihiko.

    1995-03-01

    In order to investigate dynamics of the reactor plant of the nuclear ship Mutsu, the third reactor noise experiment using pseudo random binary sequences (PRBS) was performed on September 16, 1991 in the third experimental navigation. The experiments using both reactivity and load disturbances were performed at 70% of reactor power and under a normal sea condition. Each PRBS was applied by manual operation of the control rod or the main steam valve. Various signals of the plant responses and of the acceleration of ship motion were measured. Furthermore, natural reactor noise signals were measured after each PRBS experiment in order to evaluate the effects of the PRBS disturbances. This paper summarizes the planning of the experiment, the instruction for the experiment and logs, the data recording conditions, recorded signal wave forms and the results of power spectral analysis. (author)

  5. Safety evaluation report related to the renewal of the operating license for the Zero-Power Reactor at Cornell University, Docket No. 50-97

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-09-01

    This Safety Evaluation Report for the application filed by Cornell University (CU) for a renewal of Operating License R-80 to continue to operate a zero-power reactor (ZPR) has been prepared by the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The facility is owned and operated by Cornell University and is located on the Cornell campus in Ithaca, New York. The staff concludes that the ZPR facility can continue to be operated by CU without endangering the health and safety of the public

  6. Complementarity of integral and differential experiments for reactor physics purposes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tellier, Henry.

    1981-04-01

    In this paper, the following topics are studied: uranium 238 effective integral; thermal range uranium 238 capture cross section; Americium 242 m capture cross section. The mentioned examples show that differential and integral experiments are both useful to the reactor physicists

  7. French gas cooled reactor experience with moisture ingress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bastien, D.; Brie, M.

    1995-01-01

    During the history of operation of six gas cooled reactors in France, some experience has been gained with accidental water ingress into the primary system. This occurred as a result of leaks in steam generators. This paper describes the cause of the leaks, and the resulting consequences. (author). 2 refs, 8 figs

  8. Experiences Gained from Independent Assessment in Licensing of Advanced I and C Systems in Nuclear Power Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindner, Arndt B.; Wach, Dieter H.

    2003-01-01

    Operational benefits and enlarged functionality of modern technology, but also the physical and the technological aging of conventional instrumentation and control (I and C) systems, are motivations for modernization of I and C systems in nuclear power plants (NPPs). In case of safety-relevant I and C systems, the licensing authorities require the demonstration of sufficient safety of the systems.In several countries ongoing research and development projects are directed to provide a scientific basis and engineering solutions for cost-effective assessment of software-based I and C systems important to safety in NPPs. International initiatives have been started to develop a harmonized safety assessment methodology. The Institute for Safety Technology (ISTec) has been engaged in national and international programs as well as in establishing a two-phase qualification approach, which comprises a generic plant-independent qualification of hardware and software components and a plant-specific system qualification phase.In both generic qualification and plant-specific system qualification, ISTec has been involved as an independent third-party assessor for the relevant state authority. This paper reports experiences from the ISTec involvement in the assessment projects, e.g., in the assessment of the I and C important to safety in the new German High-Flux Research Reactor (FRM-2) in Munich and in the assessments of I and C modernization in NPPs of foreign countries (Bohunice, Slovak Republic; Paks, Hungary; and others). Conclusions are drawn from the experiences with respect to the practicability of the two-phase qualification concept and from the major findings in the plant-specific I and C assessments

  9. Safety Assurance for Irradiating Experiments in the Advanced Test Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    T. A. Tomberlin; S. B. Grover

    2004-11-01

    The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR), located at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), was specifically designed to provide a high neutron flux test environment for conducting a variety of experiments. This paper addresses the safety assurance process for two general types of experiments conducted in the ATR facility and how the safety analyses for experiments are related to the ATR safety basis. One type of experiment is more routine and generally represents greater risks; therefore, this type of experiment is addressed in more detail in the ATR safety basis. This allows the individual safety analysis for this type of experiment to be more standardized. The second type of experiment is defined in more general terms in the ATR safety basis and is permitted under more general controls. Therefore, the individual safety analysis for the second type of experiment tends to be more unique and is tailored to each experiment.

  10. Safety Assurance for Irradiating Experiments in the Advanced Test Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    T. A. Tomberlin; S. B. Grover

    2004-01-01

    The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR), located at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), was specifically designed to provide a high neutron flux test environment for conducting a variety of experiments. This paper addresses the safety assurance process for two general types of experiments conducted in the ATR facility and how the safety analyses for experiments are related to the ATR safety basis. One type of experiment is more routine and generally represents greater risks; therefore, this type of experiment is addressed in more detail in the ATR safety basis. This allows the individual safety analysis for this type of experiment to be more standardized. The second type of experiment is defined in more general terms in the ATR safety basis and is permitted under more general controls. Therefore, the individual safety analysis for the second type of experiment tends to be more unique and is tailored to each experiment

  11. Review of experiments for research reactors - approved 1974

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1977-01-01

    This standard establishes guidelines for the review and approval of experiments performed at research reactor facilities. This standard identifies the major areas that shall be reviewed for each experiment to ensure that it (a) falls within the limits delineated in the technical specifications, (b) does not present an unreviewed safety question as defined in 10 CFR Section 50.59 π2-, (c) does not constitute a threat to the health and safety of any individual or group of individuals, and (d) does not constitute a hazard to the reactor facility or other equipment. In addition, this standard recommends a system for classifying experiments to establish levels of review and approval commensurate with the level of risk inherent in the experiment

  12. Licensing of HTGRs in the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fisher, C.R.; Orvis, D.D.

    1981-01-01

    The licensing history of the high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) in the United States is given historical perspective. The experience began with the licensing of the Peach Bottom Atomic Power Station and extends to the continuing experience at the Fort St. Vrain Nuclear Generating Station. Additional experience was obtained from the licensing reviews in the mid-1970s of the large HTGR plants that were to be built by Philadelphia Electric Company and Delmarva Power and Light. Also, information was provided by the licensing review of the General Atomic standard plant by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) at about the same time. These experiences are summarized in terms of the principal design criteria that were required by the regulatory authority for each project. These criteria include specification of the design basis accidents that were postulated for the plant safety analysis. Several technical issues raised by the NRC during their review of the large HTGR are presented. (author)

  13. Licensing of HTGRs in the United States

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fisher, C. R.; Orvis, D. D. [General Atomic Co., San Diego, CA (USA)

    1981-01-15

    The licensing history of the high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) in the United States is given historical perspective. The experience began with the licensing of the Peach Bottom Atomic Power Station and extends to the continuing experience at the Fort St. Vrain Nuclear Generating Station. Additional experience was obtained from the licensing reviews in the mid-1970s of the large HTGR plants that were to be built by Philadelphia Electric Company and Delmarva Power and Light. Also, information was provided by the licensing review of the General Atomic standard plant by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) at about the same time. These experiences are summarized in terms of the principal design criteria that were required by the regulatory authority for each project. These criteria include specification of the design basis accidents that were postulated for the plant safety analysis. Several technical issues raised by the NRC during their review of the large HTGR are presented.

  14. Packaging and shipment of U.S. breeder reactor experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berger, J.D.

    1980-01-01

    Irradiation testing of fuels and materials in the Fast Test Reactor (FTR) required development of a shipping cask (designated T-3) and associated hardware for loading and shipping of these experiments to postirradiation examination facilities. The T-3 shipping-cask program included design, fabrication, and testing of internal cask packages to protect the experiments during loading, shipping, and unloading. The cask was designed for loading in both the vertical and horizontal attitudes

  15. Storage of water reactor spent fuel in water pools. Survey of world experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-01-01

    Following discharge from a nuclear reactor, spent fuel has to be stored in water pools at the reactor site to allow for radioactive decay and cooling. After this initial storage period, the future treatment of spent fuel depends on the fuel cycle concept chosen. Spent fuel can either be treated by chemical processing or conditioning for final disposal at the relevant fuel cycle facilities, or be held in interim storage - at the reactor site or at a central storage facility. Recent forecasts predict that, by the year 2000, more than 150,000 tonnes of heavy metal from spent LWR fuel will have been accumulated. Because of postponed commitments regarding spent fuel treatment, a significant amount of spent fuel will still be held in storage at that time. Although very positive experience with wet storage has been gained over the past 40 years, making wet storage a proven technology, it appears desirable to summarize all available data for the benefit of designers, storage pool operators, licensing agenices and the general public. Such data will be essential for assessing the viability of extended water pool storage of spent nuclear fuel. In 1979, the International Atomic Energy Agency and the Nuclear Energy Agency of the OECD jointly issued a questionnaire dealing with all aspects of water pool storage. This report summarizes the information received from storage pool operators

  16. Combined potential of future long-baseline and reactor experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huber, P.; Lindner, M.; Rolinec, M.; Schwetz, T.; Winter, W.

    2005-01-01

    We investigate the determination of neutrino oscillation parameters by experiments within the next ten years. The potential of conventional beam experiments (MINOS, ICARUS, OPERA), superbeam experiments (T2K, NOνA), and reactor experiments (D-CHOOZ) to improve the precision on the 'atmospheric' parameters Δm 31 2 , θ 23 , as well as the sensitivity to θ 13 are discussed. Further, we comment on the possibility to determine the leptonic CP-phase and the neutrino mass hierarchy if θ 13 turns out to be large

  17. Basic experiments of reactor physics using the critical assembly TCA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Obara, Toru; Igashira, Masayuki; Sekimoto, Hiroshi; Nakajima, Ken; Suzaki, Takenori.

    1994-02-01

    This report is based on lectures given to graduate students of Tokyo Institute of Technology. It covers educational experiments conducted with the Tank-Type Critical Assembly (TCA) at Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute in July, 1993. During this period, the following basic experiments on reactor physics were performed: (1) Critical approach experiment, (2) Measurement of neutron flux distribution, (3) Measurement of power distribution, (4) Measurement of fuel rod worth distribution, (5) Measurement of safety sheet worth by the rod drop method. The principle of experiments, experimental procedure, and analysis of results are described in this report. (author)

  18. Fission product behavior in the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Compere, E.L.; Kirslis, S.S.; Bohlmann, E.G.; Blankenship, F.F.; Grimes, W.R.

    1975-10-01

    Essentially all the fission product data for numerous and varied samples taken during operation of the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment or as part of the examination of specimens removed after particular phases of operation are reported, together with the appropriate inventory or other basis of comparison, and relevant reactor parameters and conditions. Fission product behavior fell into distinct chemical groups. Evidence for fission product behavior during operation over a period of 26 months with 235 U fuel (more than 9000 effective full-power hours) was consistent with behavior during operation using 233 U fuel over a period of about 15 months (more than 5100 effective full-power hours)

  19. Experiments in power distribution control on the IRT-2000 reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Filipchuk, E.V.; Potapenko, P.T.; Trofimov, A.P.; Kosilov, A.N.; Neboyan, V.T.; Timokhin, E.S.

    1975-01-01

    The results from the experimental investigations of a system for regulating the neutron field on a research reactor IRT-2000 are shown. The right of such experiments on a reactor with a little active zone is substantiated. A successful attempt was made in this work to apply primary elements of straight charging in the neutron field regulating system. A system with independent instrumentally local regulators, a system with hard cross connections and a structure with a ''floating'' installation are studied. Serial common industrial regulators BRT-2 were used

  20. Decommissioning experience of the Japan power demonstration reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoshi, T.; Yanagihara, S.; Tachibana, M.; Momma, T.

    1992-01-01

    Actual dismantling of the Japan Power Demonstration Reactor (JPDR) has been progressing since 1986 aiming to make stage 3 condition as the final goal. Such highly activated components as the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) and the inner portion of biological shield concrete close to the RPV have removed using the remotely operated cutting machines. Useful data on the dismantling techniques and their safety as well as the manpower expenditure and radiation exposure of workers have been obtained. Experiences gained through the dismantling works are described in this paper. (author)

  1. Training experience at Experimental Breeder Reactor II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Driscoll, J.W.; McCormick, R.P.; McCreery, H.I.

    1978-01-01

    The EBR-II Training Group develops, maintains,and oversees training programs and activities associated with the EBR-II Project. The group originally spent all its time on EBR-II plant-operations training, but has gradually spread its work into other areas. These other areas of training now include mechanical maintenance, fuel manufacturing facility, instrumentation and control, fissile fuel handling, and emergency activities. This report describes each of the programs and gives a statistical breakdown of the time spent by the Training Group for each program. The major training programs for the EBR-II Project are presented by multimedia methods at a pace controlled by the student. The Training Group has much experience in the use of audio-visual techniques and equipment, including video-tapes, 35 mm slides, Super 8 and 16 mm film, models, and filmstrips. The effectiveness of these techniques is evaluated in this report

  2. Regulatory aspects and experience with Russian research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morozov, S.I.

    2003-01-01

    Regulatory activity of Gosatomnadzor of Russia in the field of research reactors (RR) safety implies implementing three major aspects: 1) establishing the nuclear and radiation safety standards; 2) licensing; and 3) inspection and enforcement. Relatively recently a full set of safety standards and regulations for RR has been established thus allowing Gosatomnadzor of Russia to effectively implement its designated functions in the field of RR safety. A minimum set of these documents is shown as follows: Level I: Fundamentals: Law 'On the use of nuclear energy'; Law 'On Public radiation protection' Level II: Safety Standard: 'General Provisions for Safety of Research Facilities' Level III: Safety Rules: Nuclear Safety; - Radiation Safety; Waste Management; Safe Decommissioning of RR; Safety Analysis Report; QAP Level IV: Safety Regulations: Licensing (incl. Peer Review and Safety Assessment) - Inspection Gosatomnadzor of Russia has created and regularly updates the database on nuclear research reactors based on the actual status of all facilities. According to the database many facilities have been shutdown during recent years whether temporary or permanently waiting for the final decision on their decommissioning. For example, in 2003 Gosatomnadzor of Russia has 85 nuclear research reactors under its supervision (compared to 113 in 1998). This fact can be explained by three main reasons: 1) experimental program finished and no other programmes in place; 2) lack of resources (financial and human); 3) safety problems (physical obsolescence and ageing of equipment). One of the main difficulties in regulating RR safety is a variety of operating organizations - 21, with different financial and human resource capabilities. Ministries responsible for supporting their operation are of a little help. It becomes obvious that a unified governmental program for RR utilization is urgently needed to decide what number of RR and for what needed purposes is required to support the

  3. International Reactor Physics Experiment Evaluation (IRPhE) Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    The International Reactor Physics Experiment Evaluation (IRPhE) Project aims to provide the nuclear community with qualified benchmark data sets by collecting reactor physics experimental data from nuclear facilities, worldwide. More specifically the objectives of the expert group are as follows: - maintaining an inventory of the experiments that have been carried out and documented; - archiving the primary documents and data released in computer-readable form; - promoting the use of the format and methods developed and seek to have them adopted as a standard. For those experiments where interest and priority is expressed by member countries or working parties and executive groups within the NEA provide guidance or co-ordination in: - compiling experiments into a standard international agreed format; - verifying the data, to the extent possible, by reviewing original and subsequently revised documentation, and by consulting with the experimenters or individuals who are familiar with the experimenters or the experimental facility; - analysing and interpreting the experiments with current state-of-the-art methods; - publishing electronically the benchmark evaluations. The expert group will: - identify gaps in data and provide guidance on priorities for future experiments; - involve the young generation (Masters and PhD students and young researchers) to find an effective way of transferring know-how in experimental techniques and analysis methods; - provide a tool for improved exploitation of completed experiments for Generation IV reactors; - coordinate closely its work with other NSC experimental work groups in particular the International Criticality Safety Benchmark Evaluation Project (ICSBEP), the Shielding Integral Benchmark Experiment Data Base (SINBAD) and others, e.g. knowledge preservation in fast reactors of the IAEA, the ANS Joint Benchmark Activities; - keep a close link with the working parties on scientific issues of reactor systems (WPRS), the expert

  4. Latest Results from the Daya Bay Reactor Neutrino Experiment

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2014-01-01

    Among all the fundamental particles that have been experimentally observed, neutrinos remain one of the least understood. The Daya Bay Reactor Neutrino Experiment in China consists of eight identical detectors placed underground at different baselines from three groups of nuclear reactors, a configuration that is ideally suited for studying the properties of these elusive particles. This talk will present three sets of results that have just recently been released by the Daya Bay Collaboration: (i) a precision measurement of the oscillation parameters that drive the disappearance of electron antineutrinos at short baselines, (ii) a search for sterile neutrino mixing, and (iii) a high-statistics determination of the absolute flux and spectrum of reactor-produced electron antineutrinos. All of these results extend the limits of our knowledge in their respective areas and thus shed new light on neutrinos and the physics that surround them.

  5. Experiment operations plan for the MT-4 experiment in the NRU reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Russcher, G.E.; Wilson, C.L.; Parchen, L.J.; Marshall, R.K.; Hesson, G.M.; Webb, B.J.; Freshley, M.D.

    1983-06-01

    A series of thermal-hydraulic and cladding materials deformation experiments were conducted using light-water reactor fuel bundles as part of the Pacific Northwest Laboratory Loss-of-Coolant Accident (LOCA) Simulation Program. This report is the formal operations plan for MT-4 - the fourth materials deformation experiment conducted in the National Research Universal (NRU) reactor, Chalk River, Ontario, Canada. A major objective of MT-4 was to simulate a pressurized water reactor LOCA that could induce fuel rod cladding deformation and rupture due to a short-term adiabatic transient and a peak fuel cladding temperature of 1200K (1700 0 F)

  6. Licensing of safety critical software for nuclear reactors. Common position of seven European nuclear regulators and authorised technical support organisations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    licensing software-based systems. This document should neither be considered as a standard, nor as a new set of European regulations, nor as a common subset of national regulations, nor as a replacement for national policies. It is the account, as complete as possible, of a common technical agreement among regulatory and safety experts. National regulations may have additional requirements or different requirements, but hopefully in the end no essential divergence with the common positions. It is precisely from this common agreement that regulators can draw support and benefit when assessing safety cases, licensee's submissions, and issuing regulations. The document is also useful to licensees, designers, suppliers for issuing bids and developing new applications. Evidence to support the safety demonstration of a computer based digital system is produced throughout the system life cycle, and evolves in nature and substance with the project. The task force has adopted the view that three basic independent types of evidence can and must be produced: evidence related to the quality of the development process; evidence related to the adequacy of the product; and evidence of the competence and qualifications of the staff involved in all of the system life cycle phases. In addition, convincing operating experience may be needed to support the safety demonstration of pre-existing software. As a consequence, the task force reached early agreement on an important fundamental recommendation that applies at the inception of any project, namely: A safety plan shall be agreed upon at the beginning of the project between the licensor and the licensee. This plan shall identify how the safety demonstration will be achieved. More precisely, the plan shall identify the types of evidence that will be used, and how and when this evidence shall be produced. This report neither specifies nor imposes the contents of a specific safety plan. All the subsequent recommendations are founded on the

  7. Neutron irradiation experiments for fusion reactor materials through JUPITER program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abe, K.; Namba, C.; Wiffen, F.W.; Jones, R.H.

    1998-01-01

    A Japan-USA program of irradiation experiments for fusion research, ''JUPITER'', has been established as a 6 year program from 1995 to 2000. The goal is to study ''the dynamic behavior of fusion reactor materials and their response to variable and complex irradiation environment''. This is phase-three of the collaborative program, which follows RTNS-II program (phase-1: 1982-1986) and FFTF/MOTA program (phase-2: 1987-1994). This program is to provide a scientific basis for application of materials performance data, generated by fission reactor experiments, to anticipated fusion environments. Following the systematic study on cumulative irradiation effects, done through FFTF/MOTA program. JUPITER is emphasizing the importance of dynamic irradiation effects on materials performance in fusion systems. The irradiation experiments in this program include low activation structural materials, functional ceramics and other innovative materials. The experimental data are analyzed by theoretical modeling and computer simulation to integrate the above effects. (orig.)

  8. Chasing {theta}{sub 13} with new reactor neutrino experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lasserre, Th. [DSM/DAPNIA/SPP, CEA/Saclay, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    2005-12-15

    It is now widely accepted that a new middle baseline disappearance reactor neutrino experiment with multiple detectors could provide a clean measurement of the {theta}{sub 13} mixing angle, free from any parameter degeneracies and correlations induced by matter effect and the unknown leptonic Dirac CP phase. The current best constraint on the third mixing angle comes from the Chooz reactor neutrino experiment sin{sup 2}(2{theta}{sub 13})<0.2 (90 % C.L., {delta}m{sub atm}{sup 2}=2.010{sup -3} eV{sup 2}). Several projects of experiment, with different timescales, have been proposed over the last two years all around the world. Their sensitivities range from sin{sup 2}(2{theta}{sub 13})<0.01 to 0.03, having thus an excellent discovery potential of the {nu}{sub e} fraction of {nu}{sub 3}.

  9. Summary report on safety and licensing strategy support for the ABR prototype

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cahalan, J. E.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2007-01-01

    Argonne National Laboratory is providing support to the US Department of Energy in the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) in certification of an advanced, sodium-cooled fast reactor. The reactor is to be constructed as a prototype for future commercial power reactors that will produce electricity while consuming actinides recovered from light water reactor spent fuel. This prototype reactor has been called the Advanced Burner Reactor, or ABR, and is now often referred to as the advanced recycle reactor. As part of its activities, Argonne is providing technical services to assist definition of a safety and licensing strategy for the ABR prototype, and to further implementation of the strategy. In FY06, an organizational meeting was held for DOE and its laboratory contractors to discuss licensing alternatives and review previous licensing experience for the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) and the Clinch River Breeder Reactor Plant (CRBRP). Near the end of FY06, a report summarizing the discussions and conclusions was written. One of the top-level conclusions recorded in the report was a recommendation to follow a licensing strategy that included the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) as the regulatory review and licensing authority. In FY07, activities ar Argonne to support safety and licensing progress have continued. These activities have focused on further evaluation of licensing alternatives; assessment of design, analysis, and documentation implications of licensing paths; and initial technical interactions with the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. This report summarizes FY07 activities

  10. Field experience in use of radiation instruments in Cirus reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramesh, N.; Sharma, R.C.; Agarwal, S.K.; Sawant, D.K.; Yadav, R.K.B.; Prasad, S.K.

    2005-01-01

    Cirus, located at Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, is a 40 MW (Th) research reactor fuelled by natural uranium, moderated by heavy water and cooled by de-mineralized light water. Graphite is used as reflector in this reactor. The reactor, commissioned in the year 1960, was in operation with availability factor of about 70% till early nineties. There after signs of ageing started surfacing up. After ageing studies, refurbishment plan was finalized and executed during the period from 1997-2002. after successful refurbishment, the reactor is in operation at full power. A wide range of radiation instruments have been used at Cirus for online monitoring of the radiological status of various process systems and environmental releases. Also, variety of survey meters, counting systems and monitors have been used by the health physics unit of the reactor for radiation hazard control. Many of these instruments, which were originally of Canadian design, have undergone changes due to obsolescence or as part of upgradation. This paper describes the experience with the radiation instruments of Cirus, bringing out their effectiveness in meeting the design intent, difficulties faced in their field use, and modifications carried out based on the performance feed back. Also, this paper highlights the areas where further efforts are needed to develop nuclear instrumentation to further strengthen monitoring and surveillance. (author)

  11. Nuclear data and integral experiments in reactor physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farinelli, U.

    1980-01-01

    The material given here broadly covers the content of the 10 lectures delivered at the Winter Course on Reactor Theory and Power Reactors, ICTP, Trieste (13 February - 10 March 1978). However, the parts that could easily be found in the current literature have been omitted and replaced with the appropriate references. The needs for reactor physics calculations, particularly as applicable to commercial reactors, are reviewed in the introduction. The relative merits and shortcomings of fundamental and semi-empirical methods are discussed. The relative importance of different nuclear data, the ways in which they can be measured or calculated, and the sources of information on measured and evaluated data are briefly reviewed. The various approaches to the condensation of nuclear data to multigroup cross sections are described. After some consideration to the sensitivity calculations and the evaluation of errors, some of the most important type of integral experiments in reactor physics are introduced, with a view to showing the main difficulties in the interpretation and utilization of their results and the most recent trends in experimentation. The conclusions try to assign some priorities in the implementation of experimental and calculational capabilities, especially for a developing country. (author)

  12. Concept study for interim storage of research reactor fuel elements in transport and storage casks. Transport and storage licensing procedure for the CASTOR MTR 2 cask. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weiss, M.

    2001-01-01

    As a result of the project, a concept was to be developed for managing spent fuel elements from research reactors on the basis of the interim storage technology existing in Germany, in order to make the transition to direct disposal possible in the long term. This final report describes the studies for the spent fuel management concept as well as the development of a transport and storage cask for spent fuel elements from research reactors. The concept analyses were based on data of the fuel to be disposed of, as well as the handling conditions for casks at the German research reactors. Due to the quite different conditions for handling of casks at the individual reactors, it was necessary to examine different cask concepts as well as special solutions for loading the casks outside of the spent fuel pools. As a result of these analyses, a concept was elaborated on the basis of a newly developed transport and storage cask as well as a mobile fuel transfer system for the reactor stations, at which a direct loading of the cask is not possible, as the optimal variant. The cask necessary for this concept with the designation CASTOR trademark MTR 2 follows in ist design the tried and tested principles of the CASTOR trademark casks for transport and interim storage of spent LWR fuel. With the CASTOR trademark MTR 2, it is possible to transport and to place into long term interim storage various fuel element types, which have been and are currently used in German research reactors. The technical development of the cask has been completed, the documents for the transport license as type B(U)F package design and for obtaining the storage license at the interim storage facility of Ahaus have been prepared, submitted to the licensing authorities and to a large degree already evaluated positively. The transport license of the CASTOR trademark MTR 2 has been issued for the shipment of VKTA-contents and FRM II compact fuel elements. (orig.)

  13. UK experience of safety requirements for thermal reactor stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matthews, R.R.; Dale, G.C.; Tweedy, J.N.

    1977-01-01

    The paper summarises the development of safety requirements since the first of the Generating Boards' Magnox reactors commenced operation in 1962 and includes A.G.R. safety together with the preparation of S.G.H.W.R. design safety criteria. It outlines the basic principles originally adopted and shows how safety assessment is a continuing process throughout the life of a reactor. Some description is given of the continuous effort over the years to obtain increased safety margins for existing and new reactors, taking into account the construction and operating experience, experimental information, and more sophisticated computer-aided design techniques which have become available. The main safeguards against risks arising from the Generating Boards' reactors are the achievement of high standards of design, construction and operation, in conjunction with comprehensive fault analyses to ensure that adequate protective equipment is provided. The most important analyses refer to faults which can lead to excessive fuel element temperatures arising from an increase in power or a reduction in cooling capacity. They include the possibility of unintended control rod withdrawal at power or at start-up, coolant flow failure, pressure circuit failure, loss of boiler feed water, and failure of electric power. The paper reviews the protective equipment, and the policy for reactor safety assessments which include application of maximum credible accident philosophy and later the limited use of reliability and probability methods. Some of the Generating Boards' reactors are now more than half way through their planned working lives and during this time safety protective equipment has occasionally been brought into operation, often for spurious reasons. The general performance, of safety equipment is reviewed particularly for incidents such as main turbo-alternator trip, circulator failure, fuel element failures and other similar events, and some problems which have given rise to

  14. The radon monitoring system in Daya Bay Reactor Neutrino Experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chu, M.C.; Kwan, K.K.; Kwok, M.W.; Kwok, T.; Leung, J.K.C.; Leung, K.Y.; Lin, Y.C.; Luk, K.B.; Pun, C.S.J.

    2016-01-01

    We developed a highly sensitive, reliable and portable automatic system (H 3 ) to monitor the radon concentration of the underground experimental halls of the Daya Bay Reactor Neutrino Experiment. H 3 is able to measure radon concentration with a statistical error less than 10% in a 1-h measurement of dehumidified air (R.H. 5% at 25 °C) with radon concentration as low as 50 Bq/m 3 . This is achieved by using a large radon progeny collection chamber, semiconductor α-particle detector with high energy resolution, improved electronics and software. The integrated radon monitoring system is highly customizable to operate in different run modes at scheduled times and can be controlled remotely to sample radon in ambient air or in water from the water pools where the antineutrino detectors are being housed. The radon monitoring system has been running in the three experimental halls of the Daya Bay Reactor Neutrino Experiment since November 2013.

  15. Fast breeder reactors: Experience and trends. V. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    The IAEA Symposium on ''Fast Breeder Reactors: Experience and Future Trends'' was held, at the invitation of the Government of France, in Lyons, France, on 22-26 July 1985. It was hosted by the French Commissariat a l'energie atomique and Electricite de France. The purpose of the Symposium was to review the experience gained so far in the field of LMFBRs, taking into account the constructional, operational, technological, economic and fuel cycle aspects, and to consider the developmental trends as well as the international co-operation in fast breeder reactor design and utilization. The Symposium was attended by almost 400 participants (340 participants, 35 observers and 20 journalists) from 25 countries and five international organizations. More than 80 papers were presented and discussed during six regular sessions and four poster sessions. A separate abstract was prepared for each of these papers

  16. NPP License Renewal and Aging Management: Revised Guidance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hull, A.B.; Hiser, A.L.; Lindo-Talin, S.E.

    2012-01-01

    Based on the Atomic Energy Act, the NRC issues licenses for commercial power reactors to operate for up to 40 years and allows these licenses to be renewed for up to another 20 years. NRC has approved license renewal for well over 50% of U.S. located reactors originally licensed to operate for 40 years. Of these 104 reactors (69 PWRs, 35 BWRs), the NRC has issued renewed licenses for 71 units and is currently reviewing applications for another 15 units. As of May 1, 2012, ten plants at nine sites had entered their 41st year of operation and thus are in their first period of extended operation (PEO). Five more plants will enter the PEO by the end of 2012. One foundation of the license renewal process has been license renewal guidance documents (LRGDs). The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) revised key guidance documents used for nuclear power license renewal in 2010 and 2011. These include NUREG-1800, 'Standard Review Plan for Review of License Renewal Applications,' revision 2 (SRP-LR), and NUREG-1801, 'Generic Aging Lessons Learned (GALL) Report,' revision 2 (GALL Report). The guidance documents were updated to reflect lessons learned and operating experience gained since the guidance documents were last issued in 2005. (author)

  17. Slow control systems of the Reactor Experiment for Neutrino Oscillation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, J.H.; Jang, H.I.; Choi, W.Q.; Choi, Y.; Jang, J.S.; Jeon, E.J.; Joo, K.K.; Kim, B.R.; Kim, H.S.; Kim, J.Y.; Kim, S.B.; Kim, S.Y.; Kim, W.; Kim, Y.D.; Ko, Y.J.; Lee, J.K.; Lim, I.T.; Pac, M.Y.; Park, I.G.; Park, J.S.

    2016-01-01

    The RENO experiment has been in operation since August 2011 to measure reactor antineutrino disappearance using identical near and far detectors. For accurate measurements of neutrino mixing parameters and efficient data taking, it is crucial to monitor and control the detector in real time. Environmental conditions also need to be monitored for stable operation of detectors as well as for safety reasons. In this paper, we report the design, hardware, operation, and performance of the slow control system.

  18. Trends and experiences in reactor coolant pump motors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1980-01-01

    A review of the requirements and features of these motors is given as background along with a discussion of trends and experiences. Included are a discussion of thrust bearings and a review of safety related requirements and design features. Primary coolant pump motors are vertical induction motors for pumps that circulate huge quantities of water through the reactor core to carry the heat generated there to steam generator heat exchangers. 4 refs

  19. Presentation summary, safety design aspects and U.S. licensing challenges of the pebble bed modular reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sproat, Ward; Slabber, Johan

    2001-01-01

    This presentation consists of three sections: An overview of the status of the PBMR project in South Africa, a review of the design features and philosophy being utilized to design the PBMR, and a summary of the key licensing issues that Exelon has identified in assessing the licensability of the PBMR for application in this country

  20. Overview of Experiments for Physics of Fast Reactors from the International Handbooks of Evaluated Criticality Safety Benchmark Experiments and Evaluated Reactor Physics Benchmark Experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bess, J. D.; Briggs, J. B.; Gulliford, J.; Ivanova, T.; Rozhikhin, E. V.; Semenov, M. Yu.; Tsibulya, A. M.; Koscheev, V. N.

    2017-07-01

    Overview of Experiments to Study the Physics of Fast Reactors Represented in the International Directories of Critical and Reactor Experiments John D. Bess Idaho National Laboratory Jim Gulliford, Tatiana Ivanova Nuclear Energy Agency of the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development E.V.Rozhikhin, M.Yu.Sem?nov, A.M.Tsibulya Institute of Physics and Power Engineering The study the physics of fast reactors traditionally used the experiments presented in the manual labor of the Working Group on Evaluation of sections CSEWG (ENDF-202) issued by the Brookhaven National Laboratory in 1974. This handbook presents simplified homogeneous model experiments with relevant experimental data, as amended. The Nuclear Energy Agency of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development coordinates the activities of two international projects on the collection, evaluation and documentation of experimental data - the International Project on the assessment of critical experiments (1994) and the International Project on the assessment of reactor experiments (since 2005). The result of the activities of these projects are replenished every year, an international directory of critical (ICSBEP Handbook) and reactor (IRPhEP Handbook) experiments. The handbooks present detailed models of experiments with minimal amendments. Such models are of particular interest in terms of the settlements modern programs. The directories contain a large number of experiments which are suitable for the study of physics of fast reactors. Many of these experiments were performed at specialized critical stands, such as BFS (Russia), ZPR and ZPPR (USA), the ZEBRA (UK) and the experimental reactor JOYO (Japan), FFTF (USA). Other experiments, such as compact metal assembly, is also of interest in terms of the physics of fast reactors, they have been carried out on the universal critical stands in Russian institutes (VNIITF and VNIIEF) and the US (LANL, LLNL, and others.). Also worth mentioning

  1. Unwanted Sexual Attention in Licensed Venues: Considering LGBTIQ Young Adults’ Experiences and Perceptions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bianca Fileborn

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Sexual violence within the lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender/transsexual, intersex and queer (LGBTIQ communities remains largely under-researched and under-theorised. Yet, emerging research suggests that sexual violence is a significant issue within the LGBTIQ communities. Additionally, the occurrence of sexual violence and unwanted sexual attention within specific social and cultural contexts is, for the most part, insufficiently examined. This article draws on research exploring young LGBTIQ adults’ perceptions and experiences of unwanted sexual attention in licensed venues. Firstly, I consider the theoretical and conceptual underpinnings of ‘unwanted sexual attention’ as a category of analysis. I then move on to consider participants’ use of licensed venues, the particular significance of pubs and clubs to LGBTIQ young people, and their perceptions and experiences of unwanted sexual attention. Finally, I discuss the implications of these findings for theoretical and conceptual understandings of unwanted sexual attention and sexual violence. En general, se ha investigado y teorizado muy poco sobre la violencia sexual dentro de las comunidades de lesbianas, gays, bisexuales, transgénero / transexuales, intersex y queer (LGBTIQ. Sin embargo, investigaciones recientes sugieren que la violencia sexual es un problema importante en estas comunidades. Además, la incidencia de la violencia sexual y atención sexual no deseada dentro de contextos sociales y culturales específicos no está, en su mayor parte, suficientemente examinada. Este artículo se basa en la investigación de la percepción y experiencias de atención sexual no deseada en locales con licencia para vender alcohol. En primer lugar, se tienen en cuenta los fundamentos teóricos y conceptuales de “atención sexual no deseada” como una categoría de análisis. A continuación, se considera el uso de locales con licencia por parte de los participantes, el significado

  2. In-pile experiments and test facilities proposed for fast reactor safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grolmes, M.A.; Avery, R.; Goldman, A.J.; Fauske, H.K.; Marchaterre, J.F.; Rose, D.; Wright, A.E.

    1976-01-01

    The role of in-pile experiments in support of the resolution of fast breeder reactor safety and licensing issues has been re-examined, with emphasis on key safety issues. Experiment needs have been related to the specific characteristics of these safety issues and to realistic requirements for additional test facility capabilities which can be achieved and utilized within the next ten years. It is found that those safety issues related to the energetics of core disruptive accidents have the largest impact on new facility requirements. However, utilization of existing facilities with modifications can provide for a continuing increase in experiment capability and experiment results on a timely bases. Emphasis has been placed upon maximum utilization of existing facilities and minimum requirements for new facilities. This evaluation has concluded that a new Safety Test Facility, STF, along with major modifications to the EBR II facility, improvement in TREAT capabilities, the existing Sodium Loop Safety Facility and corresponding Support Facilities provide the essential elements of the Safety Research Experiment Facilities (SAREF) required for resolution of key issues

  3. Licensing of the proposed PBMR-SA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clapisson, G.A.; Henderson, N.R.; Hill, T.F.; Keenan, N.H.; Metcalf, P.E.; Mysenkov, A.

    1997-01-01

    This paper describes the preliminary criteria, which are intended to be used by the South African regulatory authority (CNS), for licensing of the ESKOM proposed - South African high temperature gas-cooled Pebble Bed Modular Reactor (PBMR-SA). The CNS intends to apply the existing CNS licensing approach together with some international design criteria used for advanced reactors as well as international experience gained from the safety evaluation of the MHTGR, THTR, etc. A major requirement to this type of reactor is that it should comply with the current CNS risk criteria and provide, as a minimum, the same degree of protection to the operator, public and environment that is required for the current generation of nuclear reactors. (author)

  4. Licensed operating reactors. Status summary report, data as of 6-30-84. Volume 8, No. 7

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-08-01

    This monthly report provides data on the operation of nuclear units as timely and accurately as possible. This report is divided into three sections: the first contains monthly highlights and statistics for commercial operating units, and errata from previously reported data; the second is a compilation of detailed information on each unit, provided by NRC Regional Offices, IE Headquarters and the Utilities; and the third section is an appendix for miscellaneous information such as spent fuel storage capability, reactor years of experience and non-power reactors in the United States. The percentage computations, the vendor capacity factors, and actual vs potential energy production are computed using actual data for the period of consideration. The percentages listed in power generation are computed as an arithmetic average. The factors for the life-span of each unit (the Cumulative column) are reported by the utility and are not entirely re-computed by NRC. Utility power production data are checked for consistency with previously submitted statistics

  5. Light water reactor mixed-oxide fuel irradiation experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hodge, S.A.; Cowell, B.S.; Chang, G.S.; Ryskamp, J.M.

    1998-01-01

    The United States Department of Energy Office of Fissile Materials Disposition is sponsoring and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is leading an irradiation experiment to test mixed uranium-plutonium oxide (MOX) fuel made from weapons-grade (WG) plutonium. In this multiyear program, sealed capsules containing MOX fuel pellets fabricated at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) are being irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). The planned experiments will investigate the utilization of dry-processed plutonium, the effects of WG plutonium isotopics on MOX performance, and any material interactions of gallium with Zircaloy cladding

  6. Review of the first partial licence for the Muelheim-Kaerlich reactor on the basis of the licensing requirements under nuclear law

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hahn, L.; Wimmer, J.

    1990-11-01

    The expert opinion is restricted in the main to the licensing requirements in connection with the latest state-of-the-art precautionary measures against damage, i.e. subsection 3 of paragraph 7 section 2 Atomic Energy Act. Subject of the evaluations regarding the required new scope of licensing were the cancelled first partial licence, subsequent partial licences, the TUEV (Technical Control Board) expert opinion, the safety report with its continuations as well as the judgments of the Higher Administrative Court in Koblenz and the Federal Administrative Court. For determining the state-of-the-art, the expert opinion refers to the valid body of regulations, the latest concepts for PWRs in particular in the Federal Republic of Germany, and more recent results in reactor safety research. (orig./DG) [de

  7. Complementary role of critical integral experiment and power reactor start-up experiments for LMFBR neutronics data and method validation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salvatores, M.

    1986-09-01

    Both critical experiments and power reactor results play at present a complementary role in reducing the uncertainties in Key design parameters for LMFBR, which can be relevant for the economic performances of this type of reactors

  8. Status of the Daya Bay Reactor Neutrino Oscillation Experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, Cheng-Ju Stephen

    2010-01-01

    The last unknown neutrino mixing angle θ 13 is one of the fundamental parameters of nature; it is also a crucial parameter for determining the sensitivity of future long-baseline experiments aimed to study CP violation in the neutrino sector. Daya Bay is a reactor neutrino oscillation experiment designed to achieve a sensitivity on the value of sin 2 (2*θ 13 ) to better than 0.01 at 90% CL. The experiment consists of multiple identical detectors placed underground at different baselines to minimize systematic errors and suppress cosmogenic backgrounds. With the baseline design, the expected anti-neutrino signal at the far site is about 360 events per day and at each of the near sites is about 1500 events per day. An overview and current status of the experiment will be presented.

  9. Reactor Neutrino Detection for Non Proliferation with the NUCIFER Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bouvet, L. [CEA, Centre de Saclay, IRFU, Gif-sur-Yvette, (France); Bouvier, S.; Bui, V. M. [Laboratoire Subatech, Ecole des Mines, Nantes Cedex 3 (France); others, and

    2012-06-15

    Neutrinos are the most abundant matter particles in the Universe. Thoroughly investigated in basic science, the neutrino field is now delivering first applications to the monitoring of nuclear reactors. The neutrinos are emitted in the decay chain of the fission products; therefore measuring their flux provides real-time information, directly related to the fission process occurring in the reactor core. Because of the very weak interaction of neutrinos with matter a neutrino detector can stand outside the core containment vessel and provide a non-intrusive and inherently tamper resistant measurement. After a brief review of the existing data and worldwide projects, we present the NUCIFER experiment. The active part of the detector is a tank filled up with one ton of Gadolinium-doped liquid scintillator. Sixteen photomultiplier tubes, isolated from the liquid by an acrylic buffer, read out the light produced by the interaction of a neutrino with the protons of the liquid. The tank is surrounded by plastic scintillator plates to veto the cosmic rays. Then polyethylene and lead shielding suppress the background coming from external neutrons and gamma rays respectively. The NUCIFER detector has been designed for an optimal compromise between the detection performances and the specifications of operation in a safeguards regime. Its global footprint is 2.8 m x 2.8 m and it can monitor remotely the nuclear power plant thermal power and Plutonium content with very little maintenance on years scale. The experiment is currently installed near the OSIRIS research reactor (70 MWth) at CEA, in Saclay, France. First data are expected by May 2012. This work is done in contact with the IAEA/SGTN division that is currently investigating the potentiality of neutrinos as a novel safeguards tool. A dedicated working group has been created in 2010 to coordinate the simulation effort of various reactor types as well as the development of dedicated detectors and define and eventually

  10. Vibration behavior of PWR reactor internals Model experiments and analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Assedo, R.; Dubourg, M.; Livolant, M.; Epstein, A.

    1975-01-01

    In the late 1971, the CEA and FRAMATOME decided to undertake a comprehensive joint program of studying the vibration behavior of PWR internals of the 900 MWe, 50 cycle, 3 loop reactor series being built by FRAMATOME in France. The PWR reactor internals are submitted to several sources of excitation during normal operation. Two main sources of excitation may effect the internals behavior: the large flow turbulences which could generate various instabilities such as: vortex shedding: the pump pressure fluctuations which could generate acoustic noise in the circuit at frequencies corresponding to shaft speed frequencies or blade passing frequencies, and their respective harmonics. The flow induced vibrations are of complex nature and the approach selected, for this comprehensive program, is semi-empirical and based on both theoretical analysis and experiments on a reduced scale model and full scale internals. The experimental support of this program consists of: the SAFRAN test loop which consists of an hydroelastic similitude of a 1/8 scale model of a PWR; harmonic vibration tests in air performed on full scale reactor internals in the manufacturing shop; the GENNEVILLIERS facilities which is a full flow test facility of primary pump; the measurements carried out during start up on the Tihange reactor. This program will be completed in April 1975. The results of this program, the originality of which consists of studying separately the effects of random excitations and acoustic noises, on the internals behavior, and by establishing a comparison between experiments and analysis, will bring a major contribution for explaining the complex vibration phenomena occurring in a PWR

  11. “The balancing act”— Licensed practical nurse experiences of falls and fall prevention: a qualitative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Häggqvist Beatrice

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Falls are common in old age and may have serious consequences. There are many strategies to predict and prevent falls from occurring in long-term care and hospitals. The aim of this study was to describe licensed practical nurse experiences of predicting and preventing further falls when working with patients who had experienced a fall-related fracture. Licensed practical nurses are the main caretakers that work most closely with the patients. Methods A qualitative study of focus groups interviews and field observations was done. 15 licensed practical nurses from a rehabilitation ward and an acute ward in a hospital in northern Sweden were interviewed. Content was analyzed using qualitative content analysis. Results The result of the licensed practical nurse thoughts and experiences about risk of falling and fall prevention work is represented in one theme, “the balancing act”. The theme includes three categories: “the right to decide”, “the constant watch”, and “the ongoing negotiation” as well as nine subcategories. The analysis showed similarities and differences between rehabilitation and acute wards. At both wards it was a core strategy in the licensed practical nurse work to always be ready and to pay attention to patients’ appearance and behavior. At the rehabilitation ward, it was an explicit working task to judge the patients’ risk of falling and to be active to prevent falls. At the acute ward, the words “risk of falling” were not used and fall prevention were not discussed; instead the licensed practical nurses used for example “dizzy and pale”. The results also indicated differences in components that facilitate workplace learning and knowledge transfer. Conclusions Differences between the wards are most probably rooted in organizational differences. When it is expected by the leadership, licensed practical nurses can express patient risk of falling, share their observations with others

  12. The RERTR demonstration experiments program at the Ford Nuclear Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wehe, D K; King, J S [Department of Nuclear Engineering, University of Michigan (United States)

    1983-08-01

    The purpose of this paper is to highlight a major part of the experimental work which is being carried out at the Ford Nuclear Reactor (FNR) in conjunction with the RERTR program. A demonstration experiments program has been developed to: 1) characterize the FNR in sufficient detail to discern and quantify neutronic differences between the high and low enriched cores; 2) provide the theoretical group with measurements to benchmark their calculations. As with any experimental program associated with a reactor, stringent constraints limit the experiments which can be performed. Some experiments are performed routinely on the FNR (such as control rod calibrations), and much data is already available. Unfortunately, the accuracy we demand precludes using much of this earlier data. And in many cases, the requirement of precise (and copious) data has led to either developing new techniques (as in the case of rhodium mapping and neutron diffraction) or to further refinements on existing methods (as in the case of spectral unfolding). Nevertheless, we have tried to stay within the realm of recognized, well-established experimental methods in order to assuage any doubts about measured differences between HEU and LEU core parameters. This paper describes the principal results of the experiments performed so far.

  13. Operation and maintenance experiences at the C.R.E. Casaccia TRIGA reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Festinesi, A.

    1988-01-01

    The memoir explains TRIGA RC-1 plant activities from last European TRIGA Users' Conference till today. In particular, measures following reactor exercise license renewing (March 1987) are described. Finally, difficulties and measures about shielding tank's water funguses and spores contamination, are explained. (author)

  14. IRIS pre-application licensing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carelli, Mario D.; Kling, Charles L.; Ritterbusch, Stanley E.

    2003-01-01

    This paper presents the approach to pre-application licensing by the International Reactor Innovative and Secure (IRIS), and advanced, integral reactor design with a thermal power of 1000 MW. The rationale for the pre-application licensing is discussed. Since IRIS technology is based on proven LWR experience, the project will rely on AP600/AP1000 precedent and will focus during the pre-application on long lead and novel items. A discussion of the evolution of the project to significantly reduce licensing issues is provided, followed by a summary of the IRIS safety-by-design which provides a formidable first step in the Defense in Depth approach. The effects of the safety-by-design, as well as of passive systems, on the IRIS safety will be investigated in a proposed testing program that will be reviewed by NRC during the pre-application. Documentation to be provided to NRC is discussed. Early design analyses indicate that the benefits of the IRIS safety-by-design approach are so significant that the basic premise of current emergency planning regulations (i.e., likelihood of core damage) will be reduced to the extent that special emergency response planning beyond the exclusion area boundary may not be needed. How this very significant outcome can be effected through a highly risk-informed licensing is discussed. (author)

  15. Further experience in simulation of rod drop experiments in the Loviisa and Mochovce reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siltanen, P.; Kaloinen, E.; Tanskanen, A.; Mattila, R.

    2001-01-01

    Simulations of reactor scram experiments using the 3-dimensional kinetics code HEXTRAN have been updated for the initial cores of Loviisa-1 and 2 Mochovce-1 and have been extended to burned cores of Loviisa-1. In these simulations, the entire experiment is simulated dynamically, including the behaviour of the core, the signal of the ionization chamber, and the inverse point kinetics of the reactivity meter. The predicted output of the reactivity meter is compared with the output observed during the experiment (Authors)

  16. IRPhEP-handbook, International Handbook of Evaluated Reactor Physics Benchmark Experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sartori, Enrico; Blair Briggs, J.

    2008-01-01

    1 - Description: The purpose of the International Reactor Physics Experiment Evaluation Project (IRPhEP) is to provide an extensively peer-reviewed set of reactor physics-related integral data that can be used by reactor designers and safety analysts to validate the analytical tools used to design next-generation reactors and establish the safety basis for operation of these reactors. This work of the IRPhEP is formally documented in the 'International Handbook of Evaluated Reactor Physics Benchmark Experiments,' a single source of verified and extensively peer-reviewed reactor physics benchmark measurements data. The IRPhE Handbook is available on DVD. You may request a DVD by completing the DVD Request Form available at: http://irphep.inl.gov/handbook/hbrequest.shtml The evaluation process entails the following steps: 1. Identify a comprehensive set of reactor physics experimental measurements data, 2. Evaluate the data and quantify overall uncertainties through various types of sensitivity analysis to the extent possible, verify the data by reviewing original and subsequently revised documentation, and by talking with the experimenters or individuals who are familiar with the experimental facility, 3. Compile the data into a standardized format, 4. Perform calculations of each experiment with standard reactor physics codes where it would add information, 5. Formally document the work into a single source of verified and peer reviewed reactor physics benchmark measurements data. The International Handbook of Evaluated Reactor Physics Benchmark Experiments contains reactor physics benchmark specifications that have been derived from experiments that were performed at various nuclear experimental facilities around the world. The benchmark specifications are intended for use by reactor physics personal to validate calculational techniques. The 2008 Edition of the International Handbook of Evaluated Reactor Physics Experiments contains data from 25 different

  17. Operation experience of the Indonesian multipurpose research reactor RSG-GAS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hastowo, Hudi; Tarigan, Alim [Multipurpose Reactor Center, National Nuclear Energy Agency of the Republic of Indonesia (PRSG-BATAN), Kawasan PUSPIPTEK Serpong, Tangerang (Indonesia)

    1999-08-01

    RSG-GAS is a multipurpose research reactor with nominal power of 30 MW, operated by BATAN since 1987. The reactor is an open pool type, cooled and moderated with light water, using the LEU-MTR fuel element in the form of U{sub 3}O{sub 8}-Al dispersion. Up to know, the reactor have been operated around 30,000 hours to serve the user. The reactor have been utilized to produce radioisotope, neutron beam experiments, irradiation of fuel element and its structural material, and reactor physics experiments. This report will explain in further detail concerning operational experience of this reactor, i.e. reactor operation data, reactor utilization, research program, technical problems and it solutions, plant modification and improvement, and development plan to enhance better reactor operation performance and its utilization. (author)

  18. Operation experience of the Indonesian multipurpose research reactor RSG-GAS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hastowo, Hudi; Tarigan, Alim

    1999-01-01

    RSG-GAS is a multipurpose research reactor with nominal power of 30 MW, operated by BATAN since 1987. The reactor is an open pool type, cooled and moderated with light water, using the LEU-MTR fuel element in the form of U 3 O 8 -Al dispersion. Up to know, the reactor have been operated around 30,000 hours to serve the user. The reactor have been utilized to produce radioisotope, neutron beam experiments, irradiation of fuel element and its structural material, and reactor physics experiments. This report will explain in further detail concerning operational experience of this reactor, i.e. reactor operation data, reactor utilization, research program, technical problems and it solutions, plant modification and improvement, and development plan to enhance better reactor operation performance and its utilization. (author)

  19. Educational reactor-physics experiments with the critical assemble TCA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsutsui, Hiroaki; Okubo, Masaaki; Igashira, Masayuki [Tokyo Inst. of Tech. (Japan); Horiki, Oichiro; Suzaki, Takenori

    1997-10-01

    The Tank-Type Critical Assembly (TCA) of Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute is research equipment for light water reactor physics. In the present report, the lectures given to the graduate students of Tokyo Institute of Technology who participated in the educational experiment course held on 26-30 August at TCA are rearranged to provide useful information for those who will implement educational basic experiments with TCA in the future. This report describes the principles, procedures, and data analyses for (1) Critical approach and Exponential experiment, (2) Measurement of neutron flux distribution, (3) Measurement of power distribution, (4) Measurement of fuel rod worth distribution, and (5) Measurement of safety plate worth by the rod drop method. (author)

  20. Educational reactor-physics experiments with the critical assembly TCA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsutsui, Hiroaki; Okubo, Masaaki; Igashira, Masayuki; Horiki, Oichiro; Suzaki, Takenori.

    1997-10-01

    The Tank-Type Critical Assembly (TCA) of Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute is research equipment for light water reactor physics. In the present report, the lectures given to the graduate students of Tokyo Institute of Technology who participated in the educational experiment course held on 26-30 August at TCA are rearranged to provide useful information for those who will implement educational basic experiments with TCA in the future. This report describes the principles, procedures, and data analyses for 1) Critical approach and Exponential experiment, 2) Measurement of neutron flux distribution, 3) Measurement of power distribution, 4) Measurement of fuel rod worth distribution, and 5) Measurement of safety plate worth by the rod drop method. (author)

  1. Design experiences for medical irradiation field at the musashi reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aizawa, Otohiko

    1994-01-01

    The design of the medical irradiation field at the Musashi reactor was carried out from 1974 to 1975, about 20 years ago. Various numerical analyses have been carried out recently, and it is astonishing to find out that the performance close to the optimum as a 100 kW reactor has been obtained. The reason for this is that the design was carried out by dividing into the stationary part and the moving part, and as for the moving part, the structure was determined by repeating trial and error and experiments. In this paper, the comparison of the analysis carried out later with the experimental data and the change of the absorbed dose at the time of medical irradiation accompanying the change of neutron energy spectra are reported. As the characteristics of the medical irradiation field at the Musashi reactor, the neutron energy spectra and the absorbed dose and mean medical irradiation time are shown. As the problems in boron neutron capture therapy, the neutron fluence required for the therapy, the way of thinking on background dose, and the problem of determining the irradiation time are discussed. The features of epithermal neutron beam are explained. (K.I.)

  2. UCN-VCN facility and experiments in Kyoto University Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawabata, Yuji; Okumura, Kiyoshi; Utsuro, Masahiko

    1993-01-01

    An ultracold and very cold neutron facility was installed in Kyoto University Reactor (KUR). The facility consists of a very cold neutron (VCN) guide tube, a VCN bender, a supermirror neutron turbine and experimental equipments with ultracold neutrons (UCN). The properties of each equipments are presented. UCN is generated by a supermirror neutron turbine combined with the cold neutron source operated with liquid deuterium, and the UCN output spectrum was measured by the time-of-flight method. A gravity analyzer for high resolution spectroscopy and a neutron bottle for decay experiments are now developing as the UCN research in KUR. (author)

  3. MHTGR: New production reactor summary of experience base

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-03-01

    Worldwide interest in the Modular High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (MHTGR) stems from the capability of the system to retain the advanced fuel and thermal performance while providing unparalleled levels of safety. The small power level of the MHTGR and its passive systems give it a margin of safety not attained by other concepts being developed for power generation. This report covers the experience base for the key nuclear system, components, and processes related to the MHTGR-NPR. 9 refs., 39 figs., 9 tabs

  4. Experience in arranging shipments of spent fuel assemblies of commercial and research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komarov, S.; Barinkov, O.; Eshcherkin, A.; Lozhnikov, V.; Smirnov, A.

    2008-01-01

    At present the key activities of Sosny Company are to inspect physical conditions, handle and arrange shipment of SFA including failed SFA. In 2003 after obtaining the license of Gosatomnadzor (Rostechnadzor now) entitled to handle nuclear materials in the process of their shipment, Sosny Company started preparing certification and arranging SFA shipment on its own. About 40 shipments of SFA were performed with participation of Sosny Company. Experience in handling failed SFA - an example of development of a new technology could be the transport and technological scheme of RBMK-1000 SFA shipment from Leningradskaya NPP that was designed by Sosny Company. TUK-11 cask was selected for this shipment. The example of change of transport and technological scheme is modification of the technology for handling and shipment of WWER-440 SFA from Kola NPP. Experience in arranging transportation - based on the results of development of logistics schemes for shipping SFA of reactor facilities Sosny Company justified and implemented composition of mixed trains containing rail cars of many types that enabled to perform shipment more efficiently in time and cost. Experience in arranging handling and shipment of research reactor SFA - over the past years the activity of Sosny Company was aimed at implementing international Russian Research Reactor Fuel Return (RRRFR) program. Since equipment of the majority of research centers doesn't allow for the large casks to be accepted and loaded, special casks of less mass and dimensions are used to ship SFA from research reactors. In RRRFR program it is assumed to use different casks for RR SFA such as Russian TUK- 19, TUK-128 and foreign SKODA VPVR/M and NAC-LWT. At present Sosny Company is involved in coordination of the efforts of the affected organizations in creating the type 'C' package for RR SFA in the RF. Conclusion: Under conditions of constant increase of the requirements to shipment safety and complication of regulations of all

  5. Status Report on Scoping Reactor Physics and Sensitivity/Uncertainty Analysis of LR-0 Reactor Molten Salt Experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, Nicholas R.; Mueller, Donald E.; Patton, Bruce W.; Powers, Jeffrey J.

    2016-01-01

    Experiments are being planned at Research Centre Rež (RC Rež) to use the FLiBe (2 "7LiF-BeF_2) salt from the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment (MSRE) to perform reactor physics measurements in the LR-0 low power nuclear reactor. These experiments are intended to inform on neutron spectral effects and nuclear data uncertainties for advanced reactor systems utilizing FLiBe salt in a thermal neutron energy spectrum. Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is performing sensitivity/uncertainty (S/U) analysis of these planned experiments as part of the ongoing collaboration between the United States and the Czech Republic on civilian nuclear energy research and development. The objective of these analyses is to produce the sensitivity of neutron multiplication to cross section data on an energy-dependent basis for specific nuclides. This report provides a status update on the S/U analyses of critical experiments at the LR-0 Reactor relevant to fluoride salt-cooled high temperature reactor (FHR) and liquid-fueled molten salt reactor (MSR) concepts. The S/U analyses will be used to inform design of FLiBe-based experiments using the salt from MSRE.

  6. Status Report on Scoping Reactor Physics and Sensitivity/Uncertainty Analysis of LR-0 Reactor Molten Salt Experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, Nicholas R. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Reactor and Nuclear Systems Division; Mueller, Donald E. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Reactor and Nuclear Systems Division; Patton, Bruce W. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Reactor and Nuclear Systems Division; Powers, Jeffrey J. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Reactor and Nuclear Systems Division

    2016-08-31

    Experiments are being planned at Research Centre Rež (RC Rež) to use the FLiBe (2 7LiF-BeF2) salt from the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment (MSRE) to perform reactor physics measurements in the LR-0 low power nuclear reactor. These experiments are intended to inform on neutron spectral effects and nuclear data uncertainties for advanced reactor systems utilizing FLiBe salt in a thermal neutron energy spectrum. Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is performing sensitivity/uncertainty (S/U) analysis of these planned experiments as part of the ongoing collaboration between the United States and the Czech Republic on civilian nuclear energy research and development. The objective of these analyses is to produce the sensitivity of neutron multiplication to cross section data on an energy-dependent basis for specific nuclides. This report provides a status update on the S/U analyses of critical experiments at the LR-0 Reactor relevant to fluoride salt-cooled high temperature reactor (FHR) and liquid-fueled molten salt reactor (MSR) concepts. The S/U analyses will be used to inform design of FLiBe-based experiments using the salt from MSRE.

  7. Maximizing the use of research reactors in training power reactor operating staff with special reference to US experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cox, J.A.

    1976-01-01

    Research reactors have been used in training nuclear power plant personnel for many years. Using the experience in the United States of America a programme is proposed that will maximize the training conducted at a research reactor and lessen the time that the staff must spend training elsewhere. The programme is adaptable to future training of replacement staff and for staff retraining. (author)

  8. Commissioning and Operational Experience in Power Reactor Fuel Reprocessing Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pradhan, S., E-mail: spradhan@barctara.gov.in [Tarapur Based Reprocessing Plant, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Tarapur (India)

    2014-10-15

    After completing design, construction, commissioning, operation and maintenance experience of the reprocessing plants at Tarapur, Mumbai and Kalpakkam a new reprocessing plant is commissioned and put into operation at BARC, Tarapur since 2011. Subsequent to construction clearance, commissioning of the plant is taken in many steps with simultaneous review by design and safety committees. In spite of vast experience, all the staff was retrained in various aspects of process and utility operations and in operation of innovative changes incorporated in the design. Operating personnel are licensed through an elaborate procedure consisting of various check lists followed by personnel interview. Commissioning systems were divided in sub-systems. Sub-systems were commissioned independently and later integrated testing was carried out. For commissioning, extreme operating conditions were identified in consultation with designers and detailed commissioning procedures were made accordingly. Commissioning was done in different conditions to ensure safety, smooth operation and maintainability. Few modifications were carried out based on commissioning experience. Technical specifications for operation of the plant are made in consultation with designers and reviewed by safety committees. Operation of the plant was carried out after successful commissioning trials with Deep Depleted Uranium (DDU). Emergency operating procedures for each design basis accident were made. Performance of various systems, subsystems are quite satisfactory and the plant has given very good capacity factor. (author)

  9. Operation experience at the Neuherberg Research Reactor (FRN) with several modifications of reactor components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Demmeler, M; Rau, G [Gesellschaft fuer Strahlen- und Umweltforschung mbH, Neuherberg (Germany)

    1974-07-01

    Since the first full power operation in September 1972 up till now (Dec. 1973) the TRIGA Mark III reactor FRN has run more than 500 MWh in steady state operation and has been pulsed for 265 times. During startup experiments, neutron- and gamma-flux mapping has been performed with special technical devices in the core and in several irradiation positions, mainly in the thermal column and in the exposure room. Furthermore reactivity values of each fuel element have been measured at full power of 1 MW, thus enabling a more accurate burnup calculation. Troubles with the rotary specimen rack occurred at power rates above 280 kW; here, the lazy susan stuck, caused by thermal stress. Thus it will be replaced by a hydraulic-operated type, which has been developed at the TRIGA reactor Heidelberg. In order to increase irradiation capacity, a new core configuration has been set up a few months ago, replacing several fuel-reflector-elements by irradiation tubes within the grid-plate positions E-22, G-2, G-17 and G-36. Four additional fuel elements had to be inserted to compensate for the resulting reactivity losses. The original plan of regaining sufficient excess-reactivity by inserting a fuel element in grid-plate position A-l failed because of local boiling in the center of the core by 1 MW-operation. Experiments at the reactor started with the begin of routine-operation in September 1973. Up till now, a total of 450 neutron- and gamma- irradiations have been performed, mainly for neutron-activations. (author)

  10. International feedback experience on the cutting of reactor internal components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boucau, J.

    2014-01-01

    Westinghouse capitalizes more than 30 years of experience in the cutting of internal components of reactor and their packaging in view of their storage. Westinghouse has developed and validated different methods for cutting: plasma torch cutting, high pressure abrasive water jet cutting, electric discharge cutting and mechanical cutting. A long feedback experience has enabled Westinghouse to list the pros and cons of each cutting technology. The plasma torch cutting is fast but rises dosimetry concerns linked to the control of the cuttings and the clarity of water. Abrasive water jet cutting requires the installation of costly safety devices and of an equipment for filtering water but this technology allows accurate cuttings in hard-to-reach zones. Mechanical cutting is the most favourable technology in terms of wastes generation and of the clarity of water but the cutting speed is low. (A.C.)

  11. ACR: Licensing and design readiness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alizadeh, A.

    2009-01-01

    Full text The Canadian nuclear technology has a long history dating back to the 1940s. In this regard, Canada is in a unique situation, shared only by a very few countries, where original nuclear power technology has been invented and further developed. Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission (CNSC), then called AECB, was established in 1946. CNSC focuses on nuclear security, nuclear safety, establishing health and safety regulations, and has also played an instrumental role in the formation of the IAEA. CNSC has provided assistance to the establishment of regulatory authorities in AECL's client countries such as Korea, Argentina, China and Romania. AECL has developed the Gen III+ ACR 1000 as evolutionary advancement of the current CANDU 6 reactor. ACR-1000 has evolved from AECL's in depth experience with CANDU systems, components, and materials, as well as the feedback received from owners and operators of CANDU plants. The ACR-1000 design retains the proven strengths and features of CANDU reactors, while incorporating innovations and state-of-the-art technology. It also features major improvements in economics, inherent safety characteristics, and performance. ACR-1000 has completed its Basic Engineering, has advanced in the licensing process in Canada, and is ready for deployment in Canadian and world markets. EC6 is an evolution of CANDU 6 and is a Gen III natural uranium fuelled reactor. Its medium size and potential for fuel localization and advanced fuel cycles is an optimal strategic solution in many markets.AECL's reactor products are shown to be compliant with a variety of licensing and regulatory requirements. These include the new CNSC DRD-337, IAEA NS-R1, and EUR. This allows the countries interested in CANDU reactor products to be confident of its licensing in their own regulatory regimes.

  12. Management of historical waste from research reactors: the Dutch experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Heek, Aliki; Metz, Bert; Janssen, Bas; Groothuis, Ron

    2013-01-01

    Most radioactive waste emerges as well-defined waste streams from operating power reactors. The management of this is an on-going practice, based on comprehensive (IAEA) guidelines. A special waste category however consists of the historical waste from research reactors, mostly originating from various experiments in the early years of the nuclear era. Removal of the waste from the research site, often required by law, raises challenges: the waste packages must fulfill the acceptance criteria from the receiving storage site as well as the criteria for nuclear transports. Often the aged waste containers do not fulfill today's requirements anymore, and their contents are not well documented. Therefore removal of historical waste requires advanced characterization, sorting, sustainable repackaging and sometimes conditioning of the waste. This paper describes the Dutch experience of a historical waste removal campaign from the Petten High Flux research reactor. The reactor is still in operation, but Dutch legislation asks for central storage of all radioactive waste at the COVRA site in Vlissingen since the availability of the high- and intermediate-level waste storage facility HABOG in 2004. In order to comply with COVRA's acceptance criteria, the complex and mixed inventory of intermediate and low level waste must be characterized and conditioned, identifying the relevant nuclides and their activities. Sorting and segregation of the waste in a Hot Cell offers the possibility to reduce the environmental footprint of the historical waste, by repackaging it into different classes of intermediate and low level waste. In this way, most of the waste volume can be separated into lower level categories not needing to be stored in the HABOG, but in the less demanding LOG facility for low-level waste instead. The characterization and sorting is done on the basis of a combination of gamma scanning with high energy resolution of the closed waste canister and low

  13. IRPhE - International Reactor Physics Experiments database

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sartori, E.

    2004-01-01

    The OECD/NEA Nuclear Science Committee (NSC) has identified the need to establish international databases containing all the important experiments that are available for sharing among the specialists and has set up or sponsored specific activities to achieve this. The aim is to preserve them in an agreed standard format in computer accessible form, to use them for international activities involving validation of current and new calculational schemes including computer codes and nuclear data libraries, for assessing uncertainties, confidence bounds and safety margins, and to record measurement methods and techniques. It is a significant saving results from disseminating a standard benchmark set to be used worldwide. A framework for professionals that use the standard benchmark set to validate and verify modeling codes and data for radiation transport, criticality safety and reactor physics applications guarantees a comparative set of analyses. It represents also a good basis for pinpointing important gaps and where efforts should be concentrated and ensures knowledge and competence preservation, management and transfer in nuclear science and engineering. A large number of experimentalists, physicists, evaluators, modelers have devoted large amounts of their efforts and competencies to produce the data on which the methods we are using today are based. These data are far from having been exploited fully for the different nuclear and radiation technologies. This wealth of information needs to be preserved in a form more easily exploitable by modern information technology and for use in connection with novel and refined computational models with limitations of the past removed. These data will form the basis for the studies of more advanced nuclear technology, will be instrumental in identifying areas where there is a lack of knowledge and thus provide support to justifying new experiments that would reduce design uncertainties and consequently costs. Improvement of

  14. COUNTERCURRENT FLOW LIMITATION EXPERIMENTS AND MODELING FOR IMPROVED REACTOR SAFETY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vierow, Karen

    2008-01-01

    This project is investigating countercurrent flow and 'flooding' phenomena in light water reactor systems to improve reactor safety of current and future reactors. To better understand the occurrence of flooding in the surge line geometry of a PWR, two experimental programs were performed. In the first, a test facility with an acrylic test section provided visual data on flooding for air-water systems in large diameter tubes. This test section also allowed for development of techniques to form an annular liquid film along the inner surface of the 'surge line' and other techniques which would be difficult to verify in an opaque test section. Based on experiences in the air-water testing and the improved understanding of flooding phenomena, two series of tests were conducted in a large-diameter, stainless steel test section. Air-water test results and steam-water test results were directly compared to note the effect of condensation. Results indicate that, as for smaller diameter tubes, the flooding phenomena is predominantly driven by the hydrodynamics. Tests with the test sections inclined were attempted but the annular film was easily disrupted. A theoretical model for steam venting from inclined tubes is proposed herein and validated against air-water data. Empirical correlations were proposed for air-water and steam-water data. Methods for developing analytical models of the air-water and steam-water systems are discussed, as is the applicability of the current data to the surge line conditions. This report documents the project results from July 1, 2005 through June 30, 2008

  15. Experiment for search for sterile neutrino at SM-3 reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serebrov, A. P.; Ivochkin, V. G.; Samoylov, R. M.; Fomin, A. K.; Zinoviev, V. G.; Neustroev, P. V.; Golovtsov, V. L.; Gruzinsky, N. V.; Solovey, V. A.; Cherniy, A. V.; Zherebtsov, O. M.; Martemyanov, V. P.; Zinoev, V. G.; Tarasenkov, V. G.; Aleshin, V. I.; Petelin, A. L.; Pavlov, S. V.; Izhutov, A. L.; Sazontov, S. A.; Ryazanov, D. K.; Gromov, M. O.; Afanasiev, V. V.; Matrosov, L. N.; Matrosova, M. Yu.

    2016-11-01

    In connection with the question of possible existence of sterile neutrino the laboratory on the basis of SM-3 reactor was created to search for oscillations of reactor antineutrino. A prototype of a neutrino detector with scintillator volume of 400 l can be moved at the distance of 6-11 m from the reactor core. The measurements of background conditions have been made. It is shown that the main experimental problem is associated with cosmic radiation background. Test measurements of dependence of a reactor antineutrino flux on the distance from a reactor core have been made. The prospects of search for oscillations of reactor antineutrino at short distances are discussed.

  16. Irradiation Experiments on Plutonium Fuels for Fast Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frost, B. R.T.; Wait, E. [Atomic Energy Research Establishment Harwell, Berks. (United Kingdom)

    1967-09-15

    An assessment carried out some years ago indicated that cermet fuels might provide the high burn-up and integrity required for fast reactors. An irradiation programme was started at Harwell on (U, Pu)O{sub 2} -SS cermet plates and rods, mainly In thermal neutron fluxes, to gain experience of dimensional stability at temperatures typical of modern sodium-cooled fast reactor designs (600-650 Degree-Sign C). A subsequent assessment showed that cermets carried a large penalty as far as breeding was concerned and (U, Pu)C was chosen by Harwell for long-term study as an alternative, economic, fast reactor fuel. However, the results from the cermet experiments were of sufficient promise to proceed with parallel irradiation programmes on cermets and carbide. The studies of cermets showed that dimensional instability (swelling and cladding rupture) were caused by the pressures exerted on the steel matrix by the fuel particles, and that the initial density of the fuel particles was important in determining the burn-up at which failure occurred. Further, it was shown that cermets provided a useful vehicle for studying the changes occurring in oxide fuel particles with increasing burn-up. The disappearance of initial porosity and its replacement by fission gas bubbles and segregated solid fission products was studied in some detaiL No significant differences were observed between UO{sub 2} and(U,Pu)O{sub 2} particles. The initial studies of (U, Pu)C were concerned with the effect of varying composition and structure on swelling and fission gas release. A tantalum-lined nickel alloy cladding material was used to contain both pellet and powder specimens In an irradiation experiment in the core of the Dounreay fast reactor. This showed that the presence of a metal phase in the fuel led to a high swelling rate, that fission gas release was low up to {approx} 3% bum-up, and that a low density powder accommodated the swelling without excessive straining of the can. A subsequent

  17. The Program Planned for the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haubenreich, Paul N.

    1967-01-01

    This document outlines the program planned for the MSRE in fiscal years 1968 and 1969. It includes a bar diagram of the program, a critical-path type diagram of the operations, and a brief description of each task. In addition to the work at the reactor site, the outline also covers activities elsewhere at ORNL and by the AEC that directly affect the reactor schedule. The amount of detail and the accuracy with which we can estimate times varies considerably among the different items on the schedule. Some items, such as annual checkouts and core sample replacement, have been done before and our time estimates do not include any contingency, In the case of such tasks as planning, reviewing, and preparing for experiments or operations, we have set target dates that appear reasonable and we fully expect to meet these. Processing the salt is a different matter. If there are no unforeseen difficulties we should finish easily in the time shown, but the operation is in part a shakedown, so delays would not be too surprising, The time for modifying the system and adding fluoroborate is, of course, uncertain because the requirements are not yet known. As the requirements develop in more detail the estimate will be updated, but we do not foresee any major dislocation in the schedule, The scheduled time for preparation of enriching salt is becoming tight because of delays in facility construction. Should there be further delays in this key item, the entire schedule would have to be reconsidered.

  18. Oscillation experiments techniques in CEA Minerve experimental reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antony, M.; Di-Salvo, J.; Pepino, A.; Bosq, J. C.; Bernard, D.; Leconte, P.; Hudelot, J. P.; Lyoussi, A. [CEA CADARACHE, DEN/DER/SPEx, 13108 Saint Paul-lez-Durance (France)

    2009-07-01

    This paper deals with experiments in the Minerve pool Zero Power Reactor. Minerve is mainly devoted to neutronics studies, in view to improve the calculation routes by reducing the uncertainties of the experimental databases for nuclides arising in plutonium and wastes management. Minerve experimental measurement programs are performed by using the oscillation technique. This experimental technique consists in a periodic insertion and extraction of samples containing the nuclide of interest in a well characterized neutron spectrum. The reactivity variation of the sample is compensated by a calibrated rotary automatic pilot using cadmium sectors. The normal accuracy for measurements of small-worth samples in Minerve by using such a technique is about 3% for absolute reactivity worth, including the uncertainties on the material balance and on the calibration step. Reactivity effects of less than 1.5 cent can be measured. The OSMOSE and the OCEAN programs have been carried out since 2005 and will last until 2011. These programs aim at improving, in different neutron spectra, the absorption cross sections of respectively a majority of the separated heavy nuclides from {sup 232}Th to {sup 245}Cm appearing during the reactor and the fuel cycle physics, and of current and future types of absorbers as Gd, Hf, Er, Dy and Eu. (authors)

  19. Westinghouse experience in using mechanical cutting for reactor vessel internals segmentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boucau, Joseph; Fallstroem, Stefan; Segerud, Per; Kreitman, Paul J.

    2010-01-01

    plants dismantled to date in the US have repackaged the less activated waste back into the reactor vessel and shipped the entire assembly to the disposal site. Decisions like these can be driven by many factors such as disposal costs, transportation logistics, licensing fees, etc., but will have a significant impact on the segmentation and packaging plan so must be considered early in the planning phase. All segmentation tools are remotely controlled since the mechanical segmentation projects that Westinghouse has executed, so far, have been performed under water due to the high radiation levels. ALARA and personal safety is the number one priority during the site work. The complexity of the work requires well designed and reliable tools. Westinghouse has optimized the technologies from its experiences accumulated over the years. Its main focus has always been to improve tool handling and cutting speed, water cleanliness, fail-safe and safety aspects. Different band saws, disc saws, tube cutters and shearing tools have been developed to cut the reactor internals. All of those equipments are hydraulically driven which is very suitable for submerged applications. The purpose of this paper will be to provide an overview of the Westinghouse mechanical segmentation process, based on actual experience from the work that has been completed to date. (authors)

  20. Technical report: technical development on the silicide plate-type fuel experiment at nuclear safety research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yanagisawa, Kazuaki; Soyama, Kazuhiko; Ichikawa, Hiroki

    1991-08-01

    According to a reduction of fuel enrichment from 45 w/o 235 U to 20 w/o, an aluminide plate-type fuel used currently in the domestic research and material testing reactors will be replaced by a silicide plate-type one. One of the major concern arisen from this alternation is to understand the fuel behavior under simulated reactivity initiated accident (RIA) conditions, this is strongly necessary from the safety and licensing point of view. The in-core RIA experiments are, therefore, carried out at Nuclear Safety Research Reactor (NSRR) in Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI). The silicide plate-type fuel consisted of the ternary alloy of U-Al-Si as a meat with uranium density up to 4.8 g/cm 3 having thickness by 0.51 mm and the binary alloy of Al-3%Mg as a cladding by thickness of 0.38 mm. Comparison of the physical properties of this metallic plate fuel with the UO 2 -zircaloy fuel rod used conventionally in commercial light water reactors shows that the heat conductivity of the former is of the order of about 13 times greater than the latter, however the melting temperature is only one-half (1570degC). Prior to in-core RIA experiments, there were some difficulties lay in our technical path. This report summarized the technical achievements obtained through our four years work. (J.P.N.)

  1. Capacitor requirements for controlled thermonuclear experiments and reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boicourt, G.P.; Hoffman, P.S.

    1975-01-01

    Future controlled thermonuclear experiments as well as controlled thermonuclear reactors will require substantial numbers of capacitors. The demands on these units are likely to be quite severe and quite different from the normal demands placed on either present energy storage capacitors or present power factor correction capacitors. It is unlikely that these two types will suffice for all necessary Controlled Thermonuclear Research (CTR) applications. The types of capacitors required for the various CTR operating conditions are enumerated. Factors that influence the life, cost and operating abilities of these types of capacitors are discussed. The problems of capacitors in a radiation environment are considered. Areas are defined where future research is needed. Some directions that this research should take are suggested. (U.S.)

  2. Reactor Dynamics Experiments with a Sub-Critical Assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miley, G.H.; Yang, Y.; Wu, L.; Momota, H.

    2004-01-01

    A resurgence in use of nuclear power is now underway worldwide. However due to the shutdown of many university research reactors , student laboratories must rely more heavily on use of sub-critical assemblies. Here a driven sub-critical is described that uses a cylindrical Inertial Electrostatic Confinement (IEC) device to provide a fusion neutron source. The small IEC neutron source would be inserted in a fuel element position, with its power input controlled externally at a control panel. This feature opens the way to use of the critical assembly for a number of transient experiments such as sub-critical pulsing and neutron wave propagation. That in turn adds important new insights and excitement for the student teaching laboratory

  3. Experiments on Critical Heat Flux for CAREM -25 Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazufri, C.M

    2000-01-01

    The prediction of critical heat flux (CHF) in rod bundles of light water reactors is basically performed with the aid of empirical correlations derived from experimental data.Many CHF correlations have been proposed and are widely used in the analysis of the thermal margin during normal operation, transient, and accident conditions.Correlations found in the open literature are not sufficiently verified for the thermal hydraulic conditions that appear in the CAREM core under normal operation: high pressure, low flow, and low qualities.To compensate this deficiency, an experimental investigation on CHF in such thermal-hydraulic conditions was carried out.The experiments have been performed in the Institute of Physics and Power Engineering of Russian Federation.A short description of facilities, details of the experimental program and some preliminary results obtained are presented in this work

  4. Capacitor requirements for controlled thermonuclear experiments and reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boicourt, G.P.; Hoffman, P.S.

    1975-01-01

    Future controlled thermonuclear experiments as well as controlled thermonuclear reactors will require substantial numbers of capacitors. The demands on these units are likely to be quite severe and quite different from the normal demands placed on either present energy storage capacitors or present power factor correction capacitors. It is unlikely that these two types will suffice for all necessary Controlled Thermonuclear Research (CTR) applications. The types of capacitors required for the various CTR operating conditions are enumerated. Factors that influence the life, cost and operating abilities of these types of capacitors are discussed. The problems of capacitors in a radiation environment are considered. Areas are defined where future research is needed. Some directions that this research should take are suggested

  5. Reactor Emergency Action Level Monitor: Knowledge acquisition experiences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Touchton, R.A.

    1987-01-01

    This paper presents the Knowledge Acquisition experiences in developing the Reactor Emergency Action Level Monitor (REALM) Expert System Prototype. REALM is an expert system which interprets plant sensor data and provides advice on the proper emergency classification. The REALM project is being funded by the Electric Power Research Institute, Consolidated Edison is serving as the host utility, and the effort is being conducted by Technology Applications, Inc. REALM is being designed to provide expert assistance in the identification of a nuclear power plant emergency situation and the determination of its severity, ultimately operating in a real-time, on-line processing environment. The paper discusses briefly the direct knowledge acquisition techniques used by the project team (who are themselves power industry engineers), to extract relevant knowledge from plant specifications and procedures

  6. Development of a reactor thermalhydraulic experiment databank(SORTED1)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bang, Young Seck; Kim, Eun Kyoung; Kim, Hho Jung; Lee, Sang Yong

    1994-01-01

    The recent trend in thermalhydraulic safety analysis of nuclear power plant shows the best-estimate and probabilistic approaches, therefore, the verification of the best-estimate code based on the applicable experiment data has been required. The present study focused on developing a simple databank, SORTED1, to be effectively used for code verification. The development of SORTED1 includes a data collection from the various sources including ENCOUNTER, which is the reactor safety data bank of U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, a reorganization of collected resources suitable for requirements of SORTED1 database management system (DBMS), and a development of a simple DBMS. The SORTED1 is designed in Unix environment with graphic user interface to improve a user convenience and has a capability to provide the test related information. The currently registered data in SORTED1 cover 759 thermalhydraulic tests including LOFT, Semiscale, etc

  7. Experience from developed and licensing an underground repository for low and intermediate level radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ebel, K.; Richter, D.

    1988-01-01

    In the German Democratic Republic an abandoned salt mine was selected and reconstructed to serve as a central repository for low and intermediate level wastes from nuclear power plants and radioisotope production and application from all over the country. The decision to establish such a repository was based on safety and technical-economic studies performed in the 1960s. The repository is owned by the main waste producer, the nuclear plant utility. It was designed, constructed and commissioned during 1972-1978. The licensing steps included a site licence (1972), a construction licence (1974), a comissioning licence and a continuous operation licence (1979). The paper reviews the overall choice of the disposal option, the responsibilities in radioactive waste management, the licensing and surveillance activities, the methods for transport and disposal, and the waste acceptance criteria established for the repository. (author)

  8. Licensing decisions and safety research related to LMFBR accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Denise, R.P.; Speis, T.P.; Kelber, C.N.; Curtis, R.T.

    1977-01-01

    The licensing approach which ensures adequate protection of the public health and safety against serious accidents is described. This paper describes the role of core melt and core disruptive accidents in the design, safety research, and licensing processes, using the Clinch River Breeder Reactor (CRBR) as a focal point. Major design attention is placed on the prevention of these accidents so that the probability of core melt accidents is reduced to a sufficiently low level that they are not treated as design basis accidents. Additional requirements are placed upon the design to further reduce residual risk. This licensing process is supported by a confirmatory research program designed to provide an independent basis for licensing judgements. It has as a goal the resolution of generic safety issues prior to the establishment of a commercial LMFBR industry. The program includes accident analysis, experiments in materials interactions, aerosol transport and system integrity and planning for new safety test facilities. The problems are approached in a multi-disciplinary functional manner that identifies key safety issues and centralizes efforts to resolve them. The near term objectives of the program support the licensing of the Clinch River Breeder Reactor (CRBR) and the proposed Prototype Large Breeder Reactor (PLBR). The long term objectives of the program support the licensing of commercial LMFBRs during the late 1980's and beyond. This safety research is designed to provide an independent basis for the licensing judgements which must be made by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission

  9. Licensing the next generation of reactors in the USA: Recent experience, key issues and challenges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cyr, K.D.; Crockett, S.F.; Burns, S.G.

    2006-01-01

    Over the past 20 years, the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has spent much effort on revising its procedures for reviewing nuclear power plant designs. Earlier procedures, instituted by the NRC's predecessor, the Atomic Energy Commission, permitted the resolution of important safety and environmental issues to be delayed until construction was underway. Moreover, the principal means of public participation in the resolution was through the medium of the courtroom trial. However, under new procedures, which have been upheld in the federal courts, nearly all safety and environmental issues are resolved before construction begins, and the public participates in the resolution of these issues without having to engage in a full-blown trial. The agency believes that safety and public participation are better served by the new procedures, and that the agency is thus well-positioned to review new designs. Nonetheless, the agency continues to seek improvements in its processes. This paper was presented in an earlier form by Mr. Burns at Nuclear Inter Jura 2005. (author)

  10. The double chooz experiment: simulation of reactor antineutrino spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, T.

    2010-01-01

    The Double Chooz experiment aims to study the oscillations of electron antineutrinos produced by the Chooz nuclear power station, located in France, in the Ardennes region. It will lead to an unprecedented accuracy on the value of the mixing angle θ 13 . Improving the current knowledge on this parameter, given by the Chooz experiment, requires a reduction of both statistical and systematic errors, that is to say not only observing a large data sample, but also controlling the experimental uncertainties involved in the production and detection of electron antineutrinos. The use of two identical detectors will cancel most of the experimental systematic uncertainties limiting the sensitivity to the value of the mixing angle. We present in this thesis, simulations of reactor antineutrino spectra that were carried out in order to control the sources of systematic uncertainty related to the production of these particles by the plant. We also discuss our work on controlling the normalization error of the experiment through the precise determination of the number of target protons by a weighing measurement and through the study of the fiducial volume of the detectors which requires an accurate modeling of neutron physics. After three years of data taking with two detectors, Double Chooz will be able to disentangle an oscillation signal for sin 2 2θ 13 ≥ 0.05 (at 3σ) or, if no oscillations are observed, to put a limit of sin 2 2θ 13 ≤ 0.03 at 90% C.L. (author) [fr

  11. Experience in the recruitment, organization and training of operations and maintenance personnel for the Malaysian research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jamal Khair Ibrahim.

    1983-01-01

    The TRIGA Reactor located at the Tun Ismail Atomic Research Centre (PUSPATI) Complex is owned and operated by the Nuclear Energy Unit of the Prime Minster's Department. The operations and maintenance personnel are part and parcel of the national civil service organization. As such, the requirement and remuneration of these personnel are handled by a central federal government personnel management agency in common with personnel from other federal government agencies. In addition, the reactor is the first and only one in Malaysia, a developing country, which is the process of committing herself towards a nuclear power programme. These factors coupled with the absence of an independent reactor operator licensing agency posed unique problems in the recruitment, organization, training and licensing of operations personnel for the facility. The paper discusses these factors and their bearing on the recruitment, training, licensing and career development prospects of the PUSPATI TRIGA Reactor operators. (author)

  12. Operational experience of the Marcoule reactors; Experience d'exploitation des reacteurs de Marcoule

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conte, F [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Centre de Production de Plutonium, Marcoule (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1963-07-01

    The results obtaining from three years operation of the reactors G-2, G-3 have made it possible to accumulate a considerable amount of operational experience of these reactors. The main original points: - the pre-stressed concrete casing - the possibility of loading while under power - automatic temperature control have been perfectly justified by the results of operation. The author confirms the importance of these original solutions and draws conclusions concerning the study of future nuclear power stations. (author) [French] Les resultats atteints apres trois ans de fonctionnement des reacteurs G-2/G-3 permettent une accumulation considerable de l'experience d'exploitation de ces reacteurs. Les principales originalites: - caisson en beton precontraint - chargement en marche - surveillance automatique des temperatures sont largement justifiees par l'exploitation actuelle. L'auteur confirme l'interet de ces solutions d'avant-garde et en tire des conclusions pour les etudes de futures centrales nucleaires. (auteur)

  13. Licensing issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roberts, J.P.; Desell, L.J.; Birch, M.L.; Berkowitz, L.; Bader, J.F.

    1992-01-01

    To provide guidance for the Department of Energy's (DOE) Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has issued a draft regulatory guide on the Format and Content for the License Application for the High-Level Waste Repository (FCRG). To facilitate the development of the FCRG, NRC suggested that DOE use the draft guide as the basis for preparing an annotated outline for a license application. DOE is doing so using an iterative process called the Annotated Outline Initiative. DOE;s use of the Initiative will assist in achieving the desired incorporation of actual experience in the FCRG, contribute to the development of shared interpretation and understanding of NRC regulations, and provide other important programmatic benefits described in this paper

  14. Experiences in controlling the upgrading of TRIGA 2000 Bandung reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huda, K.; Wibowo, Y.W.; Suprawhardana, M.S.

    2001-01-01

    TRIGA 2000 Bandung Reactor was established in 1961 for research, education and isotope production purposes. The reactor reached its first criticality in October 1964 and operated at nominal power of 250 kW until 1971. In 1971 the reactor was upgraded to the power level of 1000 kW. In order to raise the capacity of isotope production, the reactor has been upgraded again to the power level of 2000 kW. During the modification of the reactor, the Center for Research and Development of Nuclear Techniques (CRDNT) was management of the reactor as it faced many problems, either technical or non-technical ones. This caused the upgrading activities to take a long time. At this time, the reactor upgrading has almost finished, and the nuclear commissioning is going on. Several aspects and problems associated with the upgrading process have been reviewed and the results are discussed in the present paper. (author)

  15. Reactors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shah, Vivek; Vaz Salles, Marcos António

    2018-01-01

    The requirements for OLTP database systems are becoming ever more demanding. Domains such as finance and computer games increasingly mandate that developers be able to encode complex application logic and control transaction latencies in in-memory databases. At the same time, infrastructure...... engineers in these domains need to experiment with and deploy OLTP database architectures that ensure application scalability and maximize resource utilization in modern machines. In this paper, we propose a relational actor programming model for in-memory databases as a novel, holistic approach towards......-level function calls. In contrast to classic transactional models, however, reactors allow developers to take advantage of intra-transaction parallelism and state encapsulation in their applications to reduce latency and improve locality. Moreover, reactors enable a new degree of flexibility in database...

  16. International Reactor Physics Experiment Evaluation (IRPhE) Project. IRPhE Handbook - 2015 edition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bess, John D.; Gullifor, Jim

    2015-03-01

    The purpose of the International Reactor Physics Experiment Evaluation (IRPhE) Project is to provide an extensively peer-reviewed set of reactor physics-related integral data that can be used by reactor designers and safety analysts to validate the analytical tools used to design next-generation reactors and establish the safety basis for operation of these reactors. This work of the IRPhE Project is formally documented in the 'International Handbook of Evaluated Reactor Physics Benchmark Experiments', a single source of verified and extensively peer-reviewed reactor physics benchmark measurements data. The evaluation process entails the following steps: Identify a comprehensive set of reactor physics experimental measurements data, Evaluate the data and quantify overall uncertainties through various types of sensitivity analysis to the extent possible, verify the data by reviewing original and subsequently revised documentation, and by talking with the experimenters or individuals who are familiar with the experimental facility, Compile the data into a standardized format, Perform calculations of each experiment with standard reactor physics codes where it would add information, Formally document the work into a single source of verified and peer reviewed reactor physics benchmark measurements data. The International Handbook of Evaluated Reactor Physics Benchmark Experiments contains reactor physics benchmark specifications that have been derived from experiments that were performed at nuclear facilities around the world. The benchmark specifications are intended for use by reactor designers, safety analysts and nuclear data evaluators to validate calculation techniques and data. Example calculations are presented; these do not constitute a validation or endorsement of the codes or cross-section data. The 2015 edition of the International Handbook of Evaluated Reactor Physics Benchmark Experiments contains data from 143 experimental series that were

  17. The licensing process of the design modifications of Cernavoda 2 NPP resulting from the operating experience of CANDU plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goicea, L.

    2005-01-01

    The CANDU 6 plant now under construction in Cernavoda include over two hundred significant improvements made in order to comply with current codes and standards and licensing requirements relative to the operating CANDU 6 in Romania. These evolutionary improvements are incorporated in CANDU 6 design taking advance of CANDU operating experience, of the designer company research and development and technical advances worldwide in order to further enhance safety, reliability and economics. This paper gives a general idea of the evaluation of the modifications of the Cernavoda 2 nuclear power plant against the design of Cernavoda 1 and states the safety principles and requirements which are the basis for this evaluation. (author)

  18. Criticality calculations in reactor accelerator coupling experiment (Race)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reda, M.A.; Spaulding, R.; Hunt, A.; Harmon, J.F.; Beller, D.E.

    2005-01-01

    A Reactor Accelerator Coupling Experiment (RACE) is to be performed at the Idaho State University Idaho Accelerator Center (IAC). The electron accelerator is used to generate neutrons by inducing Bremsstrahlung photon-neutron reactions in a Tungsten- Copper target. This accelerator/target system produces a source of ∼1012 n/s, which can initiate fission reactions in the subcritical system. This coupling experiment between a 40-MeV electron accelerator and a subcritical system will allow us to predict and measure coupling efficiency, reactivity, and multiplication. In this paper, the results of the criticality and multiplication calculations, which were carried out using the Monte Carlo radiation transport code MCNPX, for different coupling design options are presented. The fuel plate arrangements and the surrounding tank dimensions have been optimized. Criticality using graphite instead of water for reflector/moderator outside of the core region has been studied. The RACE configuration at the IAC will have a criticality (k-effective) of about 0,92 and a multiplication of about 10. (authors)

  19. Liquid nitrogen - water interaction experiments for fusion reactor accident scenarios

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duckworth, R.; Murphy, J.; Pfotenhauer, J.; Corradini, M.

    2001-01-01

    With the implementation of superconducting magnets in fusion reactors, the possibility exists for the interaction between water and cryogenic systems. The interaction between liquid nitrogen and water was investigated experimentally and numerically. The rate of pressurization and peak pressure were found to be driven thermodynamically by the expansion of the water and the boil-off of the liquid nitrogen and did not have a vapor explosion nature. Since the peak pressure was small in comparison to previous work with stratified geometries, the role of the geometry of the interacting fluids has been shown to be significant. Comparisons of the peak pressure and the rate of pressurization with respect to the ratio of the liquid nitrogen mass to water mass reveal no functional dependence as was observed in the liquid helium-water experiments. A simple thermodynamic model provides a fairly good description of the pressure rise data. From the data, the model will allow one to extract the interaction area of the water. As with previous liquid helium-water interaction experiments, more extensive investigation of the mass ratio and interaction geometry is needed to define boundaries between explosive and non-explosive conditions. (authors)

  20. Operator licensing examiner standards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-06-01

    The Operator Licensing Examiner Standards provide policy and guidance to NRC examiners and establish the procedures and practices for examining licensees and applicants for reactor operator and senior reactor operator licenses at power reactor facilities pursuant to Part 55 of Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations (10 CFR 55). The Examiner Standards are intended to assist NRC examiners and facility licensees to better understand the initial and requalification examination processes and to ensure the equitable and consistent administration of examinations to all applicants. These standards are not a substitute for the operator licensing regulations and are subject to revision or other internal operator licensing policy changes. Revision 7 was published in January 1993 and became effective in August 1993. Supplement 1 is being issued primarily to implement administrative changes to the requalification examination program resulting from the amendment to 10 CFR 55 that eliminated the requirement for every licensed operator to pass an NRC-conducted requalification examination as a condition for license renewal. The supplement does not substantially alter either the initial or requalification examination processes and will become effective 30 days after its publication is noticed in the Federal Register. The corporate notification letters issued after the effective date will provide facility licensees with at least 90 days notice that the examinations will be administered in accordance with the revised procedures

  1. French experience in design, operation and revamping of nuclear research reactors, in support of advanced reactors development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barre, B.; Bergeonneau, P.; Merchie, F.; Minguet, J.L.; Rousselle, P.

    1996-01-01

    The French nuclear program is strongly based on the R and D work performed in the CEA nuclear research centers and particularly on the various experimental programs carried out in its research reactors in the frame of cooperative actions between the Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique (CEA), Framatome and Electricite de France (EDF). Several types of research reactors have been built by Technicatome and CEA to carry out successfully this considerable R and D work on fuels and materials, among them the socalled Materials Testing Reactors (MTR) SILOE (35 MW) and OSIRIS (70 MW) which are indeed very well suited for technological irradiations. Their simple and flexible design and the large irradiation space available around the core, the SILOE and OSIRIS reactors can be shared by several types of applications such as fuel and material testings for nuclear power plants, radioisotopes production, silicon doping and fundamental research. It is worthwhile recalling that Technicatome and CEA have also built research reactors fully dedicated to safety experimental studies, such as the CABRI, SCARABEE and PHEBUS reactors at Cadarache, and others dedicated to fundamental research such as ORPHEE (14 MW) and the Reacteur a Haut Flux -High Flux Reactor- (RHF 57 MW). This paper will present some of the most significant conceptual and design features of all these reactors as well as the main improvements brought to most of them in the last years. Based on this wide experience, CEA and Technicatome have specially designed for export a new multipurpose research reactor named SIRIUS, with two versions depending on the utilization spectrum and the power range (5 MW to 30 MW). At last, CEA has recently launched the preliminary project study of a new MTR, the Jules Horowitz Reactor, to meet the future needs of fuels and materials irradiations in the next 4 or 5 decades, in support of the French long term nuclear power program. (J.P.N.)

  2. ORNL's NRC-sponsored HTGR safety and licensing analysis activities for Fort St. Vrain and advanced reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ball, S.J.; Cleveland, J.C.; Harrington, R.M.

    1985-01-01

    The ORNL safety analysis program for the HTGR was established in 1974 to provide technical assistance to the USNRC on licensing questions for both Fort St. Vrain and advanced plant concepts. The emphasis has been on development of major component and system dynamic simulation codes, and use of these codes to analyze specific licensing-related scenarios. The program has also emphasized code verification, using Fort St. Vrain data where applicable, and comparing results with industry-generated codes. By the use of model and parameter adjustment routines, safety-significant uncertainties have been identified. A major part of the analysis work has been done for the Fort St. Vrain HTGR, and has included analyses of FSAR accident scenario re-evaluations, the core block oscillation problem, core support thermal stress questions, technical specification upgrade review, and TMI action plan applicability studies. The large, 2240-MW(t) cogeneration lead plant design was analyzed in a multi-laboratory cooperative effort to estimate fission product source terms from postulated severe accidents

  3. Safety Research Experiment Facility Project. Conceptual design report. Volume VII. Reactor cooling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-12-01

    The Reactor Cooling System (RCS) will provide the required cooling during test operations of the Safety Research Experiment Facility (SAREF) reactor. The RCS transfers the reactor energy generated in the core to a closed-loop water storage system located completely inside the reactor containment building. After the reactor core has cooled to a safe level, the stored heat is rejected through intermediate heat exchangers to a common forced-draft evaporative cooling tower. The RCS is comprised of three independent cooling loops of which any two can remove sufficient heat from the core to prevent structural damage to the system components

  4. FELIX experiments and computational needs for eddy current analysis of fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turner, L.R.

    1984-01-01

    In a fusion reactor, changing magnetic fields are closely coupled to the electrically-conducting metal structure. This coupling is particularly pronounced in a tokamak reactor in which magnetic fields are used to confine, stabilize, drive, and heat the plasma. Electromagnetic effects in future fusion reactors will have far-reaching implications in the configuration, operation, and maintenance of the reactors. This paper describes the impact of eddy-current effects on future reactors, the requirements of computer codes for analyzing those effects, and the FELIX experiments which will provide needed data for code validation

  5. Determination of the neutron flux for the Yankee Rowe experiment in the Ford Nuclear Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cacciapouti, R.J.; Petrusha, L.

    1994-01-01

    Yankee Atomic Electric Company undertook a Test Irradiation Program at the Ford Nuclear Reactor of the University of Michigan. The program was implemented to characterize the irradiation response of representative Yankee Rowe reactor vessel beltline plate materials. The program was also intended to remove uncertainties in the existing reactor vessel fluence and damage predictions on the Yankee Rowe reactor vessel steel. Since this is the first in-core experiment of this type for the Ford Nuclear Reactor, the measurement of the reaction rate and the estimate of the fluence are presented

  6. Heavy reflector experiments in the IPEN/MB-01 reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, Adimir dos; Silva, Graciete Simoes de Andrade e; Mura, Luis Felipe; Fuga, Rinaldo; Jerez, Rogerio; Mendonca, Arlindo Gilson

    2012-01-01

    Full text: The heavy reflector experiments performed in the IPEN/MB-01 research reactor facility comprise a set of critical configurations employing the standard 28x26-fuel-rod configuration. The heavy reflector either Stainless Steel, Carbon Steel or Nickel plates was placed at one of the faces of the IPEN/MB-01 reactor. Criticality is achieved by inserting the control banks BC1 and BC2 to the critical position. 32 plates around 0.3 mm thick were used in the experiment. The chosen distance between last fuel rod row and the first laminate for both type of laminates was 5.5 mm. Considering initially the SS case, the experimental data reveal that the reactivity decreases up to the sixth plate and after that it increases, becomes nearly zero (which was equivalent to initial zero excess reactivity with zero plates) for the 21 plates case and reaches a value of 154.91 pcm when the whole set of 32 plates are inserted in the reflector. This is a very striking result because it demonstrates that when all 32 plates are inserted in the reflector there is a net gain of reactivity. The reactivity behavior demonstrates all the physics events already mentioned in this work. When the number of plates are small (around 6), the neutron absorption in the plates is more important than the neutron reflection and the reactivity decreases. This condition holds up to a point where the neutron reflection becomes more important than the neutron absorption in the plates and the reactivity increases. The experimental data for the Carbon Steel and Nickel case shows the main features of the SS case, but for the Carbon Steel case the reactivity gain is small, thus demonstrating that Carbon Steel or essentially iron has not the reflector capability as the SS laminates do. The measured data of Nickel plates show a higher reactivity gain, thus demonstrating that Nickel is a good reflector. The theoretical analysis employing MCNP5 and ENDF/B-VII.0 show that the SS calculated results are in a good

  7. Study on the Neutrino Oscillation with a Next Generation Medium-Baseline Reactor Experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joo, Kyung Kwang; Shin, Chang Dong

    2014-01-01

    For over fifty years, reactor experiments have played an important role in neutrino physics, in both discoveries and precision measurements. One of the methods to verify the existence of neutrino is the observation of neutrino oscillation phenomena. Electron antineutrinos emitted from a reactor provide the measurement of the small mixing angle θ 13 , providing rich programs of neutrino properties, detector development, nuclear monitoring, and application. Using reactor neutrinos, future reactor neutrino experiments, more precise measurements of θ 12 ,Δm 12 2 , and mass hierarchy will be explored. The precise measurement of θ 13 would be crucial for measuring the CP violation parameters at accelerators. Therefore, reactor neutrino physics will assist in the complete understanding of the fundamental nature and implications of neutrino masses and mixing. In this paper, we investigated several characteristics of RENO-50, which is a future medium-baseline reactor neutrino oscillation experiment, by using the GloBES simulation package

  8. Safety evaluation report related to the renewal of the operating license for the Research Reactor at the State University of New York at Buffalo, Docket No. 50-57

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-05-01

    This Safety Evaluation Report for the application filed by the State University of New York at Buffalo for a renewal of Operating License R-77 to continue to operate a research reactor has been prepared by the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The facility is owned by the State University of New York and is located on the campus in Buffalo, New York. Based on its technical review, the staff concludes that the reactor facility can continue to be operated by the University without endangering the health and safety of the public or endangering the environment

  9. Preliminary Study of 20 MWth Experiment Power Reactor based on Pebble Bed Reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irwanto, Dwi; Permana, Sidik; Pramuditya, Syeilendra

    2017-07-01

    In this study, preliminary design calculations for experimental small power reactor (20 MWt) based on Pebble Bed Reactor (PBR) are performed. PBR technology chosen due to its advantages in neutronic and safety aspects. Several important parameters, such as fissile enrichment, number of fuel passes, burnup and effective multiplication factor are taken into account in the calculation to find neutronic characteristics of the present reactor design.

  10. A plan of reactor physics experiments for reduced-moderation water reactors with MOX fuel in TCA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimada, Shoichiro; Akie, Hiroshi; Suzaki, Takenori; Okubo, Tutomu; Usui, Shuji; Shirakawa, Toshihisa; Iwamura, Takamiti; Kugo, Teruhiko; Ishikawa, Nobuyuki

    2000-06-01

    The Reduced-Moderation Water Reactor (RMWR) is one of the next generation water-cooled reactors which aim at effective utilization of uranium resource, high burn-up, long operation cycle, and plutonium multi-recycle. For verification of the feasibility, negative void reactivity coefficient and conversion ratio more than 1.0 must be confirmed. Critical Experiments performed so far in Eualope and Japan were reviewed, and no useful data are available for RMWR development. Critical experiments using TCA (Tank Type Critical Assembly) in JAERI are planned. MOX fuel rods should be prepared for the experiments and some modifications of the equipment are needed for use of MOX fuel rods. This report describes the preliminary plan of physics experiments. The number of MOX fuel rods used in the experiments are obtained by calculations and the modification of the equipment for the experiments are shown. (author)

  11. Federal Administrative Court refused to declare the first partial license of the Muelheim-Kaerlich reactor null and void

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1980-01-01

    In its decision of July 17, 1980, the Federal Administrative Court dismissed the appeal lodged by an appelant against the dimissal by the Supreme Administrative Court concerning the nullity of the first partial licence for the Muelheim-Kaerlich reactor as being unfounded. In doing so, the issue of nullity has been marked off from the issue of foreclosure of demurers. The amount in ligitation was fixed at 20000 DM for the proceedings of appeal. (HSCH) [de

  12. A review of experiments and results from the transient reactor test (TREAT) facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deitrich, L. W.

    1998-01-01

    The TREAT Facility was designed and built in the late 1950s at Argonne National Laboratory to provide a transient reactor for safety experiments on samples of reactor fuels. It first operated in 1959. Throughout its history, experiments conducted in TREAT have been important in establishing the behavior of a wide variety of reactor fuel elements under conditions predicted to occur in reactor accidents ranging from mild off normal transients to hypothetical core disruptive accidents. For much of its history, TREAT was used primarily to test liquid-metal reactor fuel elements, initially for the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II (EBR-II), then for the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF), the Clinch River Breeder Reactor Plant (CRBRP), the British Prototype Fast Reactor (PFR), and finally, for the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR). Both oxide and metal elements were tested in dry capsules and in flowing sodium loops. The data obtained were instrumental in establishing the behavior of the fuel under off-normal and accident conditions, a necessary part of the safety analysis of the various reactors. In addition, TREAT was used to test light-water reactor (LWR) elements in a steam environment to obtain fission-product release data under meltdown conditions. Studies are now under way on applications of TREAT to testing of the behavior of high-burnup LWR elements under reactivity-initiated accident (RIA) conditions using a high-pressure water loop

  13. Experience with the licensing of the interim spent fuel storage facility modification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bezak, S.; Beres, J.

    1999-01-01

    After political and economical changes in the end of eighties, the utility operating the nuclear power plants in the Slovak Republic (SE, a.s.) decided to change the original scheme of the back-end of the nuclear fuel cycle; instead of reprocessing in the USSR/Russian Federation spent fuel will be stored in an interim spent fuel storage facility until the time of the final decision. As the best solution, a modification of the existing interim spent fuel storage facility has been proposed. Due to lack of legal documents for this area, the Regulatory Authority of the Slovak Republic (UJD SR) performed licensing procedures of the modification on the basis of recommendations by the IAEA, the US NRC and the relevant parts of the US CFR Title 10. (author)

  14. Sodium coolant of fast reactors: Experience and problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kozlov, F.A.; Volchkov, L.G.; Drobyshev, A.V.; Nikulin, M.P.; Kochetkov, L.A.; Alexeev, V.V.

    1997-01-01

    In present report the following subjects are considered: state of the coolant and sodium systems under normal operating condition as well as under decommissioning, disclosing of sodium circuits and liquidation of its consequences, cleaning from sodium and decontamination under repairing works of equipment and circuits. Cleaning of coolant and sodium systems under normal operating conditions and under accident contamination. Cleaning of the equipment under repairing works and during decommissioning from sodium and products of its interaction with water and air. Treatment of sodium waste, taking into account a possibility of sodium fires. It is shown that the state of coolant, cover gas, surfaces of constructive materials which are in contact with them, cleaning systems, formed during installation operation require development of specific technologies. Developed technologies ensured safety operation of sodium cooled installations as in normal operating conditions so in abnormal situations. R and D activities in this field and experience gained provided a solid base for coping with problems arising during decommissioning. Prospective research problems are emphasized where the future efforts should be concentrated in order to improve characteristics of sodium cooled reactors and to make their decommissioning optimal and safe. (author)

  15. Technical report on operating experience with boiling water reactor offgas systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lo, R.; Barrett, L.; Grimes, B.; Eisenhut, D.

    1978-03-01

    Over 100 reactor years of Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) operating experience have been accumulated since the first commercial operation of BWRs. A number of incidents have occurred involving the ''offgas'' of these Boiling Water Reactors. This report describes the generation and processing of ''offgas'' in Boiling Water Reactors, the safety considerations regarding systems processing the ''offgas'', operating experience involving ignitions or explosions of ''offgas'' and possible measures to reduce the likelihood of future ignitions or explosions and to mitigate the consequences of such incidents should they occur

  16. Licensing of safety critical software for nuclear reactors. Common position of seven European nuclear regulators and authorised technical support organisations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2010-07-01

    It is widely accepted that the assessment of software cannot be limited to verification and testing of the end product, i.e. the computer code. Other factors such as the quality of the processes and methods for specifying, designing and coding have an important impact on the implementation. Existing standards provide limited guidance on the regulatory and safety assessment of these factors. An undesirable consequence of this situation is that the licensing approaches taken by nuclear safety authorities and by technical support organisations are determined independently with only limited informal technical co-ordination and information exchange. It is notable that several software implementations of nuclear safety systems have been marred by costly delays caused by difficulties in co-ordinating the development and qualification process. It was thus felt necessary to compare the respective licensing approaches, to identify where a consensus already exists, and to see how greater consistency and more mutual acceptance could be introduced into current practices. This report is the result of the work of a group of regulator and safety authorities' experts. The 2007 version was completed at the invitation of the Western European Nuclear Regulators' Association (WENRA). The major result of the work is the identification of consensus and common technical positions on a set of important licensing issues raised by the design and operation of computer based systems used in nuclear power plants for the implementation of safety functions. The purpose is to introduce greater consistency and more mutual acceptance into current practices. To achieve these common positions, detailed consideration was paid to the licensing approaches followed in the different countries represented by the experts of the task force. The report is intended to be useful: - to coordinate regulators' and safety experts' technical viewpoints in the design of regulators' national

  17. Licensing of safety critical software for nuclear reactors. Common position of seven European nuclear regulators and authorised technical support organisations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    It is widely accepted that the assessment of software cannot be limited to verification and testing of the end product, i.e. the computer code. Other factors such as the quality of the processes and methods for specifying, designing and coding have an important impact on the implementation. Existing standards provide limited guidance on the regulatory and safety assessment of these factors. An undesirable consequence of this situation is that the licensing approaches taken by nuclear safety authorities and by technical support organisations are determined independently with only limited informal technical co-ordination and information exchange. It is notable that several software implementations of nuclear safety systems have been marred by costly delays caused by difficulties in co-ordinating the development and qualification process. It was thus felt necessary to compare the respective licensing approaches, to identify where a consensus already exists, and to see how greater consistency and more mutual acceptance could be introduced into current practices. This report is the result of the work of a group of regulator and safety authorities' experts. The 2007 version was completed at the invitation of the Western European Nuclear Regulators' Association (WENRA). The major result of the work is the identification of consensus and common technical positions on a set of important licensing issues raised by the design and operation of computer based systems used in nuclear power plants for the implementation of safety functions. The purpose is to introduce greater consistency and more mutual acceptance into current practices. To achieve these common positions, detailed consideration was paid to the licensing approaches followed in the different countries represented by the experts of the task force. The report is intended to be useful: - to coordinate regulators' and safety experts' technical viewpoints in the design of regulators' national policies and in revisions

  18. Fast reactor operating experience gained in Russia: Analysis of anomalies and abnormal operation cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ashurko, Y.M.; Baklushin, R.P.; Zagorulko, Y.I.; Ivanenko, V.N.; Matveyev, V.P.; Vasilyev, B.A.

    2000-01-01

    Review of various anomalous events and abnormal operation experience gained in the process of Russian fast reactors operation is given in the paper. The main information refers to the BN-600 demonstration reactor operation. Statistical data on sodium leaks and steam generator failures are presented, and sources of these events and countermeasures taken to avoid their appearance on the operating reactors as well as related changes made in the BN-800 reactor design are considered. In the paper, some features of impurities behaviour are considered in various modes of the BN-600 reactor operation. Information is given on the impurities ingress into the circuits, on abnormal situation emerged in the process of the BN-600 reactor operation and its probable cause. Information is presented on the event related to the increased torque of the BN-600 reactor central rotating column and repair works performed. (author)

  19. Development, operational experience and implications for future design of fast reactors in Western Europe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brandstetter, A.; Broomfield, A.M.; Saitcevsky, B.

    1990-01-01

    Over the past 30 years, the partners now collaborating in Europe on fast-reactor development have taken the technology from a theoretical possibility to an engineering reality. In that time there has been a progression from experimental zero-energy facilities followed by small power-producing engineering test reactors, to prototype reactors and a large commercial-size reactor. The paper describes the highlights of the reactor programmes in the partner countries and by example illustrates the experience gained from reactor operation and some of the principal activities in the supporting development programme. These include such topics as fuel performance, fast-neutron physics, liquid-metal thermal hydraulics, sodium chemistry, instrumentation and safety aspects. The paper concludes by summarizing some of the main objectives of the current development programme, which is directed to the support of the European Fast Reactor design being prepared by the European design and construction companies. (author)

  20. Scaling analysis in bepu licensing of LWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D' auria, Francesco; Lanfredini, Marco; Muellner, Nikolaus [University of Pisa, Pisa (Italy)

    2012-08-15

    'Scaling' plays an important role for safety analyses in the licensing of water cooled nuclear power reactors. Accident analyses, a sub set of safety analyses, is mostly based on nuclear reactor system thermal hydraulics, and therefore based on an adequate experimental data base, and in recent licensing applications, on best estimate computer code calculations. In the field of nuclear reactor technology, only a small set of the needed experiments can be executed at a nuclear power plant; the major part of experiments, either because of economics or because of safety concerns, has to be executed at reduced scale facilities. How to address the scaling issue has been the subject of numerous investigations in the past few decades (a lot of work has been performed in the 80thies and 90thies of the last century), and is still the focus of many scientific studies. The present paper proposes a 'roadmap' to scaling. Key elements are the 'scaling-pyramid', related 'scaling bridges' and a logical path across scaling achievements (which constitute the 'scaling puzzle'). The objective is addressing the scaling issue when demonstrating the applicability of the system codes, the 'key-to-scaling', in the licensing process of a nuclear power plant. The proposed 'road map to scaling' aims at solving the 'scaling puzzle', by introducing a unified approach to the problem.