WorldWideScience

Sample records for reactor energy system

  1. Advanced energy system with nuclear reactors as an energy source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, Y.; Ishizuka, T.; Nikitin, K.

    2007-01-01

    About two-thirds of the energy generated in a light water reactors (LWRs) core is currently dissipated to the ocean as lukewarm water through steam condensers; more than half the energy in helium (He) gas turbine high temperature gas cooled reactors (HTGRs) is dissipated through pre-coolers and inter coolers. The new waste heat recovery system efficiently recovers the waste heat from reactors using boiling heat transfer of 20 degree C liquid carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) instead of conventional sea water as a cooling medium. The CO 2 gasified in the cooling process is used directly as a working fluid of mechanical heat pumps for hot water supply. In LWRs, the net energy utilization fraction to total heat generation in the core exceeds 85% through the waste heat recovery. This cogeneration system is about 2.5 times more effective than current systems in reducing global warming gas emissions and long half- life radioactive material accumulation. It also increases uranium resource utilization relative to current LWRs. In the HTGR cogeneration system, the waste heat is also useful for cold water supply by introducing an adsorption refrigeration system since the gas temperature is still as high as about 190 degree Celsius. When the heat recovery system is incorporated into the HTGR, the electricity to heat-supply ratio of the HTGR cogeneration system accommodates the demand ratio in cities well; it would be suited to dispersed energy sources. The heat supply cost is expected to be lower than those of conventional fossil-fired boilers beyond operation of about four years. The waste heat recovered is able to be utilized not only for local heat supply but also for methane and methanol production from waste products of cities and farms through high-temperature fermentation, e.g., garbage, waste wood and used paper that are produced in cities, along with excreta produced through farming. The methane and methanol can be used to generate hydrogen for fuel cells. The new waste heat

  2. Applications of plasma core reactors to terrestrial energy systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lantham, T.S.; Biancardi, F.R.; Rodgers, R.J.

    1974-01-01

    Plasma core reactors offer several new options for future energy needs in addition to space power and propulsion applications. Power extraction from plasma core reactors with gaseous nuclear fuel allows operation at temperatures higher than conventional reactors. Highly efficient thermodynamic cycles and applications employing direct coupling of radiant energy are possible. Conceptual configurations of plasma core reactors for terrestrail applications are described. Closed-cycle gas turbines, MHD systems, photo- and thermo-chemical hydrogen production processes, and laser systems using plasma core reactors as prime energy sources are considered. Cycle efficiencies in the range of 50 to 65 percent are calculated for closed-cycle gas turbine and MHD electrical generators. Reactor advantages include continuous fuel reprocessing which limits inventory of radioactive by-products and thorium-U-233 breeder configurations with about 5-year doubling times

  3. The generation IV nuclear reactor systems - Energy of future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohai, Dumitru; Jianu, Adrian

    2006-01-01

    Ten nations joined within the Generation IV International Forum (GIF), agreeing on a framework for international cooperation in research. Their goal is to develop future-generation nuclear energy systems that can be licensed, constructed, and operated in an economically competitive way while addressing the issues of safety, proliferation, and other public perception concerns. The objective is for the Gen IV systems to be available for deployment by 2030. Using more than 100 nuclear experts from its 10 member nations, the GIF has developed a Gen IV Technology Roadmap to guide the research and development of the world's most advanced, efficient and safe nuclear power systems. The Gen IV Technology Roadmap calls for extensive research and development of six different potential future reactor systems. These include water-cooled, gas-cooled, liquid metal-cooled and nonclassical systems. One or more of these reactor systems will provide the best combination of safety, reliability, efficiency and proliferation resistance at a competitive cost. The main goals for the Gen IV Nuclear Energy Systems are: - Provide sustainable energy generation that meets clean air objectives and promotes long-term availability of systems and effective fuel use for worldwide energy production; - Minimize and manage their nuclear waste and noticeably reduce the long-term stewardship burden in the future, improving the protection of public health and the environment; - Increase the assurance that these reactors are very unattractive and the least desirable route for diversion or theft of weapons-usable materials, and provide increased protection against acts of terrorism; - Have a clear life-cycle cost advantage over other energy sources; - Have a level of financial risk comparable to other energy projects; - Excel in safety and reliability; - Have a low likelihood and degree of reactor core damage. (authors)

  4. Advanced Reactor Systems and Future Energy Market Needs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magwood, W.; Keppler, J.H.; Paillere, Henri; ); Gogan, K.; Ben Naceur, K.; Baritaud, M.; ); Shropshire, D.; ); Wilmshurst, N.; Janssens, A.; Janes, J.; Urdal, H.; Finan, A.; Cubbage, A.; Stoltz, M.; Toni, J. de; Wasylyk, A.; Ivens, R.; Paramonov, D.; Franceschini, F.; Mundy, Th.; Kuran, S.; Edwards, L.; Kamide, H.; Hwang, I.; Hittner, D.; ); Levesque, C.; LeBlanc, D.; Redmond, E.; Rayment, F.; Faudon, V.; Finan, A.; Gauche, F.

    2017-04-01

    It is clear that future nuclear systems will operate in an environment that will be very different from the electricity systems that accompanied the fast deployment of nuclear power plants in the 1970's and 1980's. As countries fulfil their commitment to de-carbonise their energy systems, low-carbon sources of electricity and in particular variable renewables, will take large shares of the overall generation capacities. This is challenging since in most cases, the timescale for nuclear technology development is far greater than the speed at which markets and policy/regulation frameworks can change. Nuclear energy, which in OECD countries is still the largest source of low-carbon electricity, has a major role to play as a low-carbon dispatchable technology. In its 2 degree scenarios, the International Energy Agency (IEA) projects that nuclear capacity globally could reach over 900 GW by 2050, with a share of electricity generation rising from less than 11% today to about 16%. Nuclear energy could also play a role in the decarbonization of the heat sector, by targeting non-electric applications. The workshop discussed how energy systems are evolving towards low-carbon systems, what the future of energy market needs are, the changing regulatory framework from both the point of view of safety requirements and environmental constraints, and how reactor developers are taking these into account in their designs. In terms of technology, the scope covered all advanced reactor systems under development today, including evolutionary light water reactors (LWRs), small modular reactors (SMRs) - whether LWR technology-based or not, and Generation IV (Gen IV) systems. This document brings together the available presentations (slides) of the workshop

  5. Zero energy reactor 'RB'

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Popovic, D; Takac, S; Markovic, H; Raisic, N; Zdravkovic, Z; Radanovic, Lj [Boris Kidric Institute of Nuclear Sciences, Vinca, Beograd (Yugoslavia)

    1959-03-15

    In 1958 the zero energy reactor RB was built with the purpose of enabling critical experiments with various reactor systems to be carried out. The first core assembly built in this reactor consists of heavy water as moderator and natural uranium metal as fuel. In order to be able to obtain very accurate results when measuring the main characteristics of the assembly the reactor was built as a completely bare system. (author)

  6. Creation of reactor's reliable system of emergency energy supply

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batyrbekov, G.A.; Brovkin, A.Yu.; Petukhov, V.K.; Chekushin, A.I.; Chernyaev, V.P.; Yagotinets, N.A.

    1998-01-01

    System of reliable power supply of the WWR-K reactor complex is described, which completely provides safety operation of reactor equipment in the case of total voltage loss from external power transmission lines as well as under destruction of accumulation batteries by earthquake more than 6 balls. Switching on in operation of diesel-generators and system of constant current supply from accumulator batteries is occurred automatically under cessation of voltage supply from centralized power system. Reliable reactor dampening in case it work on capacity has been ensured. Reactor cooling under its emergency shutdown during both the partial or the total loss of coolant in first counter has been carried out. Under full coolant loss the system of emergency reactor cooling has been switched on in operation

  7. Thermophotovoltaic Energy Conversion in Space Nuclear Reactor Power Systems

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Presby, Andrew L

    2004-01-01

    .... This has potential benefits for space nuclear reactor power systems currently in development. The primary obstacle to space operation of thermophotovoltaic devices appears to be the low heat rejection temperatures which necessitate large radiator areas...

  8. Reactor system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyano, Hiroshi; Narabayashi, Naoshi.

    1990-01-01

    The represent invention concerns a reactor system with improved water injection means to a pressure vessel of a BWR type reactor. A steam pump is connected to a heat removing system pipeline, a high pressure water injection system pipeline and a low pressure water injection system pipeline for injecting water into the pressure vessel. A pump actuation pipeline is disposed being branched from a main steam pump or a steam relieaf pipeline system, through which steams are supplied to actuate the steam pump and supply cooling water into the pressure vessel thereby cooling the reactor core. The steam pump converts the heat energy into the kinetic energy and elevates the pressure of water to a level higher than the pressure of the steams supplied by way of a pressure-elevating diffuser. Cooling water can be supplied to the pressure vessel by the pressure elevation. This can surely inject cooling water into the pressure vessel upon loss of coolant accident or in a case if reactor scram is necessary, without using an additional power source. (I.N.)

  9. The measure system of thermion energy switch over in reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Xing

    1999-01-01

    The system is the application of VI in the field of reactor, to use LabWINDOW/CVI and currency PC collection card, the system can measure and analyse the speciality of V-I and temperature. It is perfectly and high rate performance system, it can be expand to 128 channels for get dissimilitude signal. It can be used in M and C of all kinds field

  10. Reactor Subsystem Simulation for Nuclear Hybrid Energy Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shannon Bragg-Sitton; J. Michael Doster; Alan Rominger

    2012-09-01

    Preliminary system models have been developed by Idaho National Laboratory researchers and are currently being enhanced to assess integrated system performance given multiple sources (e.g., nuclear + wind) and multiple applications (i.e., electricity + process heat). Initial efforts to integrate a Fortran-based simulation of a small modular reactor (SMR) with the balance of plant model have been completed in FY12. This initial effort takes advantage of an existing SMR model developed at North Carolina State University to provide initial integrated system simulation for a relatively low cost. The SMR subsystem simulation details are discussed in this report.

  11. A coupled nuclear reactor thermal energy storage system for enhanced load following operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alameri, Saeed A.; King, Jeffrey C.

    2013-01-01

    Nuclear power plants operate most economically at a constant power level, providing base load electric power. In an energy grid containing a high fraction of renewable power sources, nuclear reactors may be subject to significantly variable power demands. These variable power demands can negatively impact the effective capacity factor of the reactor and result in severe economic penalties. Coupling a nuclear reactor to a large thermal energy storage block will allow the reactor to better respond to variable power demands. In the system described in this paper, a Prismatic core Advanced High Temperature Reactor supplies constant power to a lithium chloride molten salt thermal energy storage block that provides thermal power as needed to a closed Brayton cycle energy conversion system. During normal operation, the thermal energy storage block stores thermal energy during the night for use in the times of peak demand during the day. In this case, the nuclear reactor stays at a constant thermal power level. After a loss of forced circulation, the reactor reaches a shut down state in less than half an hour and the average fuel, graphite and coolant temperatures remain well within the design limits over the duration of the transient, demonstrating the inherent safety of the coupled system. (author)

  12. Reactor System Design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chi, S. K.; Kim, G. K.; Yeo, J. W.

    2006-08-01

    SMART NPP(Nuclear Power Plant) has been developed for duel purpose, electricity generation and energy supply for seawater desalination. The objective of this project IS to design the reactor system of SMART pilot plant(SMART-P) which will be built and operated for the integrated technology verification of SMART. SMART-P is an integral reactor in which primary components of reactor coolant system are enclosed in single pressure vessel without connecting pipes. The major components installed within a vessel includes a core, twelve steam generator cassettes, a low-temperature self pressurizer, twelve control rod drives, and two main coolant pumps. SMART-P reactor system design was categorized to the reactor coe design, fluid system design, reactor mechanical design, major component design and MMIS design. Reactor safety -analysis and performance analysis were performed for developed SMART=P reactor system. Also, the preparation of safety analysis report, and the technical support for licensing acquisition are performed

  13. Passive safe small reactor for distributed energy supply system sited in water filled pit at seaside

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishida, Toshihisa; Imayoshi, Shou

    2003-01-01

    Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute has developed a Passive Safe Small Reactor for Distributed Energy Supply System (PSRD) concept. The PSRD is an integrated-type PWR with reactor thermal power of 100 to 300 MW aimed at supplying electricity, district heating, etc. In design of the PSRD, high priority is laid on enhancement of safety as well as improvement of economy. Safety is enhanced by the following means: i) Extreme reduction of pipes penetrating the reactor vessel, by limiting to only those of the steam, the feed water and the safety valves, ii) Adoption of the water filled containment and the passive safety systems with fluid driven by natural circulation force, and iii) Adoption of the in-vessel type control rod drive mechanism, accompanying a passive reactor shut-down device. For improvement of economy, simplification of the reactor system and long operation of the core over five years without refueling with low enriched UO 2 fuel rods are achieved. To avoid releasing the radioactive materials to the circumstance even if a hypothetical accident, the containment is submerged in a pit filled with seawater at a seaside. Refueling or maintenance of the reactor can be conducted using an exclusive barge instead of the reactor building. (author)

  14. Future view of total energy system and reactor engineering and reactor physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ozawa, T.

    1974-01-01

    This paper outlines the present status of fission reactors and fusion reactors. The conversion ratio of light water reactors is 0.5, and the efficiency is 32% because of relatively low temperature. Both pressurized water reactors and boiling water reactors are technically well developed, their performances are well known, and the fuel cycle is well developed, so that both reactors have monopolized power reactor market. But the reprocessing of spent fuel and the treatment of their hazards are inevitable, and the construction and enlargement of reprocessing facilities are indispensable. In LMFBR's tight sealing is easy because they are non-pressurized, and the efficiency is 41%. But liquid sodium is strongly activated and recirculated, so that chemical obstruction due to the breakage of recirculating pumps, pipings, and heat exchangers may occur, and the hazard of plutonium is large. Regarding controlled thermo-nuclear fusion reactors, because Lawson criterion must be satisfied, two methods of plasma confinement are now experimented. One is the plasma confinement by strong magnetic field of 50 KG to 100 KG, and the other is the confinement by the implosion method with high-power laser beam. The latter has much more uncertainties than the former, but recently both methods have made much progress. (Tai, I)

  15. Modification of the Japanese first nuclear ship reactor for a regional energy supply system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, K.; Shimazu, Y.; Narabayashi, T.; Tsuji, M.

    2008-01-01

    Nuclear Ship Mutsu was developed as the first experimental nuclear ship of Japan. It has several advantages as a prototype for regional energy supply system. Considering the attractive advantages of the Mutsu reactor, we investigated the feasibility of development of a small regional energy system by adopting the Mutsu reactor as a starting model. The system could supply with not only electricity but also heat. Heat could be used for hot-water supply, a heating system of a house, melting snow and so on, especially for those in northern part of Japan. The system should satisfy the requirements for GEN IV systems and the current regulations. From this point of view, the modification of the reactor was initiated by taking into improvements and technology of the state of arts to fulfill the requirements such as (1) Longer core life without refueling, (2) Reactivity adjustment for load change without control rods or soluble boron, (3) Simpler operations for load changes and (4) Ultimate safety with sufficient passive capability. Currently it is assumed to use basic standard 17x17 fuel assembly design for WH type PWRs. Nuclear design calculations are carried out by 'SRAC 2002 ', which has been developed in Japan Atomic Energy Agency. Several problems have not been solved yet, but we confirmed the proposed core has about 10 years life time. So the proposed core has a possibility to be used for a small regional energy system. (authors)

  16. Development of a thermal–hydraulic system code, TAPINS, for 10 MW regional energy reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Yeon-Gun; Kim, Jong-Won; Park, Goon-Cherl

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► A thermal–hydraulic system code named TAPINS is developed for simulations of an integral reactor. ► The TAPINS is based on the one-dimensional momentum integral model. ► A dynamic model for the steam–gas pressurizer with non-condensable gas present is proposed. ► A series of pressurizer insurge test and natural circulation test are simulated by the TAPINS. ► It is proved that the TAPINS can provide reliable prediction of an integral reactor system on natural circulation. - Abstract: Small modular reactors (SMRs) with integral system layout have been drawing a great deal of attention as alternative options to branch out the utilization of nuclear energy as well as to offer the inherent safety features. Serving to confirm the design basis and analyze the transient behavior of an integral reactor such as REX-10, a thermal–hydraulic system code named TAPINS (Thermal–hydraulic Analysis Program for INtegral reactor System) is developed in this study. The TAPINS supports the simple pre-processing to build up the frameworks of node diagram for the typical integral reactor configuration. The TAPINS basically consists of mathematical models for the reactor coolant system, the core, the once-through helical-coil steam generator, and the built-in steam–gas pressurizer. The hydrodynamic model of the TAPINS is formulated using the one-dimensional momentum integral model, which is based on the analytical integration of the momentum equation around the closed loop in the system. As a key contribution of the study, a dynamic model for the steam–gas pressurizer with non-condensable gas present is newly proposed and incorporated into the code. The TAPINS is validated by comparing against the experimental data from the pressurizer insurge tests conducted at MIT (Massachusetts Institute of Technology) and natural circulation tests in the RTF (REX-10 Test Facility) at RERI (Regional Energy Reactor Institute). From the comparison results, it is

  17. Concept of passive safe small reactor for distributed energy supply system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishida, Toshihisa; Nakajima, Nobuya; Sawada, Ken-ichi; Yoritsune, Tsutomu; Shimada, Shoichiro; Nakano, Yoshihiro; Yonomoto, Taisuke; Takahashi, Hiroki

    2003-01-01

    This paper presents a concept of a Passive Safe Small Reactor for Distributed energy supply system (PSRD). The PSRD is an integrated-type PWR with reactor thermal power of 100 to 300 MW aimed at supplying electricity, district heating, etc. In design of the PSRD, high priority is laid on enhancement of safety as well as improvement of economy. Safety is enhanced by the following means: i) Extreme reduction of pipes penetrating the reactor vessel, by limiting to only those of the steam, the feed water and the safety valves, ii) Adoption of the water filled containment and the passive safety systems with fluid driven by natural circulation force, and iii) Adoption of the in-vessel type control rod drive mechanism, accompanying a passive reactor shut-down. To comply with a severe operation condition of PSRD, material of the ball bearing with graphite retainer has been selected by test. For improvement of economy, simplification of the reactor system and long operation of the core are achieved. Optimization of core design concerning the burnable poison ensures the burn-up of 28 GWd/t for low enriched UO 2 fuel rods. (author)

  18. Design and Analysis of the Power Control System of the Fast Zero Energy Reactor FR-0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schuh, N J.H.

    1966-12-15

    This report describes the power control by means of the fine-control rod and the design of the control system of the fast zero energy reactor FR-0 located in Studsvik, Sweden. System requirements and some operational conditions were used as design criteria. Manual and automatic control is possible. Variable electronic end-stops for the control rod have been designed, because of the special construction of the reactor and control rod. Noise in the control system caused by the reactor, detector and electronics caused disturbances of the control system at the lower power levels. The noise power-spectrum was measured. Statistical design methods, using the measured noise power spectrum, were used to design filters, which will reduce the influence of the noise at the lower power levels. Root Loci sketches and Bode diagrams were used for stability analyses. The system was simulated on an analogue computer, taking into account even nonlinearities of the control system and noise. Typical cases of reactor operation were simulated and stability analysis performed.

  19. Design and Analysis of the Power Control System of the Fast Zero Energy Reactor FR-0

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schuh, N.J.H.

    1966-12-01

    This report describes the power control by means of the fine-control rod and the design of the control system of the fast zero energy reactor FR-0 located in Studsvik, Sweden. System requirements and some operational conditions were used as design criteria. Manual and automatic control is possible. Variable electronic end-stops for the control rod have been designed, because of the special construction of the reactor and control rod. Noise in the control system caused by the reactor, detector and electronics caused disturbances of the control system at the lower power levels. The noise power-spectrum was measured. Statistical design methods, using the measured noise power spectrum, were used to design filters, which will reduce the influence of the noise at the lower power levels. Root Loci sketches and Bode diagrams were used for stability analyses. The system was simulated on an analogue computer, taking into account even nonlinearities of the control system and noise. Typical cases of reactor operation were simulated and stability analysis performed

  20. A design study of superconducting energy storage system for a tokamak fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ueda, Kazuo

    1979-01-01

    A design study of a superconducting inductive energy storage system (SC-IES) has been carried out in commission with JAERI. The SC-IES is to be applied to the power supply system for a tokamak experimental fusion reactor. The study was initiated with the definition of the requirement for the SC-IES and selection of the coil shape. The design of the coil and the cryostat has been followed. The design parameters are: stored energy 10 GJ, B max 8 T, conductor Nb-Ti, overall size 18 m (diameter) x 10 m (height). Technical problems and usefullness of SC-IES are discussed also. (author)

  1. The story of fission reactors: from Chicago Pile to advanced energy systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kannan, Umasankari

    2017-01-01

    Nuclear reactors have been designed which cater to different applications from small research reactors of a few watts to power reactors of several Giga Watts. Based on the neutron energy, there are thermal, intermediate and fast reactors operating are being designed. On the fuel utilization front, there are designs ranging from reactors using natural uranium fuel to enriched uranium to more efficient thorium based reactors. Reactors have also been designed which are neutron eaters, minor actinide burners and breeders. There have been variety of coolant and moderating materials used for different applications from water, gas cooled, liquid sodium cooled to molten salt cooled reactors. Several new reactor designs have been developed using innovative concepts in high temperature reactors, nuclear power packs and compact reactors for special purposes. The design challenges are many from modest designs to complicated hybrid reactors. The GEN-IV forum of IAEA has selected a few of these reactor designs for commercial power production in the coming years based on several quantified indicators. The evolutionary and revolutionary design approaches have been made over the years catering to different need of energy generation. A glimpse of some of the reactors being currently developed and the design modifications done in existing reactors have been given in this paper

  2. Increased sharing of renewable energies in the electricity production system: what impact on the reactor fleet?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cany, C.; Devezeaux de Lavergne, J.G.; Mansilla, C.; Mathonniere, G.

    2017-01-01

    This article presents the flexibility of an individual reactor and of the complete fleet of reactors as a means to cope with the variability of renewable energies like solar or wind energies. Flexibility means the ability for load following and this ability is limited by both safety rules and limits on the release of radionuclides in the environment. The flexibility of the fleet depends on individual reactor flexibility but also on organisational and economic constraints. The participation of a reactor to load following depends on: its availability (not in maintenance or testing phase), its position in the cycle, the positioning of its scheduled shutdowns and the minimization of the volume of effluents. The study presents the future need of flexibility for the reactor fleet as the shares of wind and solar energies increase in the French energy mix. (A.C.)

  3. Thermodynamic exergy analysis for small modular reactor in nuclear hybrid energy system - 15110

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boldon, L.; Liu, L.; Sabharwall, P.; Rabiti, C.; Bragg-Sitton, S.M.

    2015-01-01

    To assess the inherent value of energy in a thermal system, it is necessary to understand both the quantity and quality of energy available or the exergy. We study the case where nuclear energy through a small modular reactor (SMR) is supplementing the available wind energy through storage to meet the needs of the electrical grid. Nuclear power is also being used for the production of hydrogen via high temperature steam electrolysis. For a SMR exergy analysis, both the physical and economic environments must be considered. The physical environment incorporates the energy, raw materials, and reference environment, where the reference environment refers to natural resources available without limit and without cost. This paper aims to explore the use of exergy analysis methods to estimate and optimize SMR resources and costs for individual subsystems, based on thermodynamic principles-resource utilization and efficiency. The paper will present background information on exergy theory; identify the core subsystems in an SMR plant coupled with storage systems in support of renewable energy and hydrogen production; perform a thermodynamic exergy analysis; determine the cost allocation among these subsystems; and calculate unit 'exergetic' costs, unit 'exergo-economic' costs, and first and second law efficiencies. Exergetic and 'exergo-economic' costs ultimately determine how individual subsystems contribute to overall profitability and how efficiencies and consumption may be optimized to improve profitability, making SMRs more competitive with other generation technologies

  4. Systems dynamics (SD) strategy for Small Modular Reactor (SMR) marketing - Conquest at the MIT Energy Laboratory (Pres. MIT Energy Initiative)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woo, T. H. [Yonsei University, Wonju (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    This reactor has the specification as the power is 330 MWt pressurized water reactor (PWR) with integral steam generators and advanced safety features. In the plant design, it is planned for electricity generation of 100 MWe and thermal applications of seawater desalination where the life span is a 60-year operation design and three-year refueling cycle. Regarding of the licensing, the standard design was approved from the Korean regulator in mid-2012 and the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) has a plan to build a demonstration plant to operate from 2017. According to the previous study of the marketing strategy of the Canadian small reactor, Safe LOW-POwer Kritical Experiment (SLOWPOKE) reactor had been investigated in 1988. Therefore, it is interesting to compare SMART and SLOWPOKE. In this work, it is to find out the strategy of the successful marketing of SMART and suggest continuous marketing prospects. There are specifications and parameters of SMART in Tables 1 and 2. The public acceptance (PA) had been studies as safety-public interpretation, SLOWPOKE safety-experience and process, and economics in the previous paper of the SLOWPOKE, which was about the marketing strategy for the commercial nuclear reactor. The highly cognitive networking based dynamical modeling was discussed where the system is treated by a complex and non-linear way. The linear networking of the interested issue was changed by the SD algorithm where the feedback and multiple connections are added to the original networking theory. The non-linear method has shown the complexity of the marketing strategy, especially for the NPP which is the very expensive and safety focused facility.

  5. Systems dynamics (SD) strategy for Small Modular Reactor (SMR) marketing - Conquest at the MIT Energy Laboratory (Pres. MIT Energy Initiative)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woo, T. H.

    2016-01-01

    This reactor has the specification as the power is 330 MWt pressurized water reactor (PWR) with integral steam generators and advanced safety features. In the plant design, it is planned for electricity generation of 100 MWe and thermal applications of seawater desalination where the life span is a 60-year operation design and three-year refueling cycle. Regarding of the licensing, the standard design was approved from the Korean regulator in mid-2012 and the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) has a plan to build a demonstration plant to operate from 2017. According to the previous study of the marketing strategy of the Canadian small reactor, Safe LOW-POwer Kritical Experiment (SLOWPOKE) reactor had been investigated in 1988. Therefore, it is interesting to compare SMART and SLOWPOKE. In this work, it is to find out the strategy of the successful marketing of SMART and suggest continuous marketing prospects. There are specifications and parameters of SMART in Tables 1 and 2. The public acceptance (PA) had been studies as safety-public interpretation, SLOWPOKE safety-experience and process, and economics in the previous paper of the SLOWPOKE, which was about the marketing strategy for the commercial nuclear reactor. The highly cognitive networking based dynamical modeling was discussed where the system is treated by a complex and non-linear way. The linear networking of the interested issue was changed by the SD algorithm where the feedback and multiple connections are added to the original networking theory. The non-linear method has shown the complexity of the marketing strategy, especially for the NPP which is the very expensive and safety focused facility

  6. Modeling Chilled-Water Storage System Components for Coupling to a Small Modular Reactor in a Nuclear Hybrid Energy System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misenheimer, Corey Thomas

    The intermittency of wind and solar power puts strain on electric grids, often forcing carbonbased and nuclear sources of energy to operate in a load-follow mode. Operating nuclear reactors in a load-follow fashion is undesirable due to the associated thermal and mechanical stresses placed on the fuel and other reactor components. Various Thermal Energy Storage (TES) elements and ancillary energy applications can be coupled to nuclear (or renewable) power sources to help absorb grid instabilities caused by daily electric demand changes and renewable intermittency, thereby forming the basis of a candidate Nuclear Hybrid Energy System (NHES). During the warmer months of the year in many parts of the country, facility air-conditioning loads are significant contributors to the increase in the daily peak electric demand. Previous research demonstrated that a stratified chilled-water storage tank can displace peak cooling loads to off-peak hours. Based on these findings, the objective of this work is to evaluate the prospect of using a stratified chilled-water storage tank as a potential TES reservoir for a nuclear reactor in a NHES. This is accomplished by developing time-dependent models of chilled-water system components, including absorption chillers, cooling towers, a storage tank, and facility cooling loads appropriate for a large office space or college campus, as a callable FORTRAN subroutine. The resulting TES model is coupled to a high-fidelity mPower-sized Small Modular Reactor (SMR) Simulator, with the goal of utilizing excess reactor capacity to operate several sizable chillers in order to keep reactor power constant. Chilled-water production via single effect, lithium bromide (LiBr) absorption chillers is primarily examined in this study, although the use of electric chillers is briefly explored. Absorption chillers use hot water or low-pressure steam to drive an absorption-refrigeration cycle. The mathematical framework for a high-fidelity dynamic

  7. Janus probe, a detection system for high energy reactor gamma-ray spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gold, R.; Kaiser, B.J.

    1980-03-01

    In reactor environments, gamma-ray spectra are continuous and the absolute magnitude as well as the general shape of the gamma continuum are of paramount importance. Consequently, conventional methods of gamma-ray detection are not suitable for in-core gamma-ray spectrometry. To meet these specific needs, a method of continuous gamma-ray spectrometry, namely Compton Recoil Gamma-Ray Spectrometry, was developed for in-situ observations of reactor environments. A new gamma-ray detection system has been developed which extends the applicability of Compton Recoil Gamma-Ray Spectrometry up to roughly 7 MeV. This detection system is comprised of two separate Si(Li) detectors placed face-to-face. Hence this new detection system is called the Janus probe. Also shown is the block diagram of pulse processing instrumentation for the Janus probe. This new gamma probe not only extends the upper energy limit of in-core gamma-ray spectrometry, but in addition possesses other fundamental advantages

  8. Molten salt reactor technology for long-range and wide-scale nuclear energy system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ignatiev, V.; Alexseev, P.; Menshikov, L.; Prusakov, V.; Subbotine, S.

    1997-01-01

    A possibility of creation of multi-component nuclear power system in which alongside with thermal and fast reactors, molten salt burner reactors, for incineration of weapon grade plutonium, some minor actinides and transmutation of some fission products will be presented. The purposes of this work are to review the present status of the molten salt reactor technology and innovative non-aqueous chemical processing methods, to indicate the importance of the uncertainties remaining, to identify the additional work needed, and to evaluate the probability of success in obtaining improved safety characteristics for new concept of molten salt - burner reactor with external neutron source. 8 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs

  9. HYPER (hybrid power extraction reactor): a system for clean nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, W.S.; Shin, U.; Han, S.-J.; Song, T.Y.; Choi, B.H.; Park, C.K.

    2000-01-01

    The Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) has been performing accelerator driven system related research and development (RID) called HYPER (hybrid power extraction reactor) for the transmutation of nuclear waste and energy production through the transmutation process. HYPER program is within the frame work of the national mid and long-term nuclear research plan. KAERI is aiming to develop the elemental technologies for the subcritical transmutation system by the year of 2001 and build a small bench scale test facility (∝5 MW) by the year of 2006. Some major features of HYPER have been developed and employed. On-power fueling concepts are employed to keep system power constant with a minimum variation of accelerator power. A hollow cylinder-type metal fuel is designed for the on-line refueling concept. Lead-bismuth (Pb-Bi) is adopted as a coolant and spallation target material. 1 GeV 16 mA proton beam is designed to be provided for HYPER. HYPER is to transmute about 380 kg of TRU a year and produce 1000 MW of power. The support ratio of HYPER for LWR units producing the same power is believed to be 5∝6. (orig.)

  10. Thermodynamic exergy analysis for small modular reactor in nuclear hybrid energy system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boldon Lauren

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Small modular reactors (SMRs provide a unique opportunity for future nuclear development with reduced financial risks, allowing the United States to meet growing energy demands through safe, reliable, clean air electricity generation while reducing greenhouse gas emissions and the reliance on unstable fossil fuel prices. A nuclear power plant is comprised of several complex subsystems which utilize materials from other subsystems and their surroundings. The economic utility of resources, or thermoeconomics, is extremely difficult to analyze, particularly when trying to optimize resources and costs among individual subsystems and determine prices for products. Economics and thermodynamics cannot provide this information individually. Thermoeconomics, however, provides a method of coupling the quality of energy available based on exergy and the value of this available energy – “exergetic costs”. For an SMR exergy analysis, both the physical and economic environments must be considered. The physical environment incorporates the energy, raw materials, and reference environment, where the reference environment refers to natural resources available without limit and without cost, such as air input to a boiler. The economic environment includes market influences and prices in addition to installation, operation, and maintenance costs required for production to occur. The exergetic cost or the required exergy for production may be determined by analyzing the physical environment alone. However, to optimize the system economics, this environment must be coupled with the economic environment. A balance exists between enhancing systems to improve efficiency and optimizing costs. Prior research into SMR thermodynamics has not detailed methods on improving exergetic costs for an SMR coupled with storage technologies and renewable energy such as wind or solar in a hybrid energy system. This process requires balancing technological efficiencies and

  11. The study on the role of very high temperature reactor and nuclear process heat utilization in future energy systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yasukawa, Sigeru; Mankin, Shuichi; Tadokoro, Yoshihiro; Sato, Osamu; Yamaguchi, Kazuo; Ueno, Seiichi

    1986-11-01

    This report describes the analytical results being made in the study on the role of Very High Temperature Reactor and nuclear process heat utilization in future energy system, which is aimed at zero emission. In the former part of the report, the modeling of the reference energy system, main characteristics of energy technologies, and scenario indicators as well as system behavioral objectives for optimization are explained. In the latter part, analytical results such as the time-period variation of overall energy utilization efficiency, energy supply/demand structure in long-terms, energy contribution and economic competition of new energy technologies, environmental effluents released through verious energy activities, impacts to and from national economy, and some sensitivity analyses, are reviewed. (author)

  12. Passive residual energy utilization system in thermal cycles on water-cooled power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Placco, Guilherme M.; Guimaraes, Lamartine N.F.; Santos, Rubens S. dos

    2013-01-01

    This work presents a concept of a residual energy utilization in nuclear plants thermal cycles. After taking notice of the causes of the Fukushima nuclear plant accident, an idea arose to adapt a passive thermal circuit as part of the ECCS (Emergency Core Cooling System). One of the research topics of IEAv (Institute for Advanced Studies), as part of the heat conversion of a space nuclear power system is a passive multi fluid turbine. One of the main characteristics of this device is its passive capability of staying inert and be brought to power at moments notice. During the first experiments and testing of this passive device, it became clear that any small amount of gas flow would generate power. Given that in the first stages of the Fukushima accident and even during the whole event there was plenty availability of steam flow that would be the proper condition to make the proposed system to work. This system starts in case of failure of the ECCS, including loss of site power, loss of diesel generators and loss of the battery power. This system does not requires electricity to run and will work with bleed steam. It will generate enough power to supply the plant safety system avoiding overheating of the reactor core produced by the decay heat. This passive system uses a modified Tesla type turbine. With the tests conducted until now, it is possible to ensure that the operation of this new turbine in a thermal cycle is very satisfactory and it performs as expected. (author)

  13. Energy production and reactor efficiency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1975-01-01

    Doubts have been raised in relation to the economic and energetic efficiency of nuclear reactors. Some economists are questioning whether, when all the capital and material inputs to fission technology are considered, nuclear reactors yield sufficiently large amounts of energy to show a nett gain of energy. (author)

  14. R and D programme on generation IV nuclear energy systems: the high temperatures gas-cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carre, F.; Fiorini, G.L.; Billot, P.; Anzieu, P.; Brossard, P.

    2005-01-01

    The Generation IV Technology Roadmap selected, among others, a sequenced development of advanced high temperature gas cooled reactors as one of the main focus for R and D on future nuclear energy systems. The selection of this research objective originates both from the significance of high temperature and fast neutrons for nuclear energy to meet the needs for a sustainable development for the medium-long term (2020/2030 and beyond), and from the significant common R and D pathway that supports both medium term industrial projects and more advanced versions of gas cooled reactors. The first step of the 'Gas Technology Path' aims to support the development of a modular HTR to meet specific international market needs around 2020. The second step is a Very High Temperature Reactor - VHTR (>950 C) - to efficiently produce hydrogen through thermo-chemical or electro-chemical water splitting or to generate electricity with an efficiency above 50%, among other applications of high temperature nuclear heat. The third step of the Path is a Gas Fast Reactor - GFR - that features a fast-spectrum helium-cooled reactor and closed fuel cycle, with a direct or indirect thermodynamic cycle for electricity production and full recycle of actinides. Hydrogen production is also considered for the GFR. The paper succinctly presents the R and D program currently under definition and partially launched within the Generation IV International Forum on this consistent set of advanced gas cooled nuclear systems. (orig.)

  15. Supporting the national energy needs for the early 21st century with the advanced liquid metal reactor system (ALMRS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hutchins, B.A.; Quinn, J.E.; Thompson, M.L.

    1991-01-01

    This paper presents a cost effective approach to providing a major contribution to the electricity needs of the United States in the early 21st century through an integrated Advanced Liquid Metal Reactor System (ALMRS). This system has several synergistic components which are under development by the United States Department of Energy (DOE): the modular, passively safe ALMR reactor design; metal fuel recycle (aka IFR); and the processing of LWR spent fuel to use as startup fuel for the ALMR. Each of these components contributes to an overall system behavior that will be able to provide an important portion of the United States' electrical energy needs beginning about the year 2010, while at the same time translating some fuel wastes of the LWR spent fuel to an asset. This paper describes each of these components and their synergism. Economic projections and busbar costs for this system are also presented

  16. Gas Turbine Energy Conversion Systems for Nuclear Power Plants Applicable to LiFTR Liquid Fluoride Thorium Reactor Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juhasz, Albert J.

    2014-01-01

    This panel plans to cover thermal energy and electric power production issues facing our nation and the world over the next decades, with relevant technologies ranging from near term to mid-and far term.Although the main focus will be on ground based plants to provide baseload electric power, energy conversion systems (ECS) for space are also included, with solar- or nuclear energy sources for output power levels ranging tens of Watts to kilo-Watts for unmanned spacecraft, and eventual mega-Watts for lunar outposts and planetary surface colonies. Implications of these technologies on future terrestrial energy systems, combined with advanced fracking, are touched upon.Thorium based reactors, and nuclear fusion along with suitable gas turbine energy conversion systems (ECS) will also be considered by the panelists. The characteristics of the above mentioned ECS will be described, both in terms of their overall energy utilization effectiveness and also with regard to climactic effects due to exhaust emissions.

  17. Process modeling of a reversible solid oxide cell (r-SOC) energy storage system utilizing commercially available SOC reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mottaghizadeh, Pegah; Santhanam, Srikanth; Heddrich, Marc P.; Friedrich, K. Andreas; Rinaldi, Fabio

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • An electric energy storage system was developed based on a commercially available SOC reactor. • Heat generated in SOFC mode of r-SOC is utilized in SOEC operation of r-SOC using latent heat storage. • A round trip efficiency of 54.3% was reached for the reference system at atmospheric pressure. • An improved process system design achieved a round-trip efficiency of 60.4% at 25 bar. - Abstract: The increase of intermittent renewable energy contribution in power grids has urged us to seek means for temporal decoupling of electricity production and consumption. A reversible solid oxide cell (r-SOC) enables storage of surplus electricity through electrochemical reactions when it is in electrolysis mode. The reserved energy in form of chemical compounds is then converted to electricity when the cell operates as a fuel cell. A process system model was implemented using Aspen Plus® V8.8 based on a commercially available r-SOC reactor experimentally characterized at DLR. In this study a complete self-sustaining system configuration is designed by optimal thermal integration and balance of plant. Under reference conditions a round trip efficiency of 54.3% was achieved. Generated heat in fuel cell mode is exploited by latent heat storage tanks to enable endothermic operation of reactor in its electrolysis mode. In total, out of 100 units of thermal energy stored in heat storage tanks during fuel cell mode, 90% was utilized to offset heat demand of system in its electrolysis mode. Parametric analysis revealed the significance of heat storage tanks in thermal management even when reactor entered its exothermic mode of electrolysis. An improved process system design demonstrates a system round-trip efficiency of 60.4% at 25 bar.

  18. Nuclear reactor shutdown system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mangus, J.D.; Cooper, M.H.

    1982-01-01

    An improved nuclear reactor shutdown system is described comprising a temperature sensitive device connected to control the electric power supply to a magnetic latch holding a body of a neutron absorbing material. The temperature sensitive device is exposed to the reactor coolant so that when the reactor coolant temperature rises above a specific level, the temperature sensitive device will cause deenergization of the magnetic latch to allow the body of neutron absorbing material to enter the reactor core. (author)

  19. TRIGA reactor main systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boeck, H.; Villa, M.

    2007-01-01

    This module describes the main systems of low power (<2 MW) and higher power (≥2 MW) TRIGA reactors. The most significant difference between the two is that forced reactor cooling and an emergency core cooling system are generally required for the higher power TRIGA reactors. However, those TRIGA reactors that are designed to be operated above 3 MW also use a TRIGA fuel that is specifically designed for those higher power outputs (3 to 14 MW). Typical values are given for the respective systems although each TRIGA facility will have unique characteristics that may only be determined by the experienced facility operators. Due to the inherent wide scope of these research reactor facilities construction and missions, this training module covers those systems found at most operating TRIGA reactor facilities but may also discuss non-standard equipment that was found to be operationally useful although not necessarily required. (author)

  20. Energy from nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hospe, J.

    1977-01-01

    This VDI-Nachrichten series has the target to provide a technical-objective basis for the discussion of the pros and cons of nuclear power. The first part deals with LWR-type reactors which so far have prevailed in nuclear power generation. (orig.) [de

  1. Nuclear reactor safety systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ball, R.M.; Roberts, R.C.

    1980-01-01

    A safety system for shutting down a nuclear reactor under overload conditions is described. The system includes a series of parallel-connected computer memory type look-up tables each of which receives data on a particular reactor parameter and in each of which a precalculated functional value for that parameter is stored indicative of the percentage of maximum reactor load that the parameter contributes. The various functional values corresponding to the actual measured parameters are added together to provide a control signal used to shut down the reactor under overload conditions. (U.K.)

  2. Nuclear reactor engineering: Reactor systems engineering. Fourth edition, Volume Two

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glasstone, S.; Sesonske, A.

    1994-01-01

    This new edition of this classic reference combines broad yet in-depth coverage of nuclear engineering principles with practical descriptions of their application in the design and operation of nuclear power plants. Extensively updated, the fourth edition includes new materials on reactor safety and risk analysis, regulation, fuel management, waste management and operational aspects of nuclear power. This volume contains the following: the systems concept, design decisions, and information tools; energy transport; reactor fuel management and energy cost considerations; environmental effects of nuclear power and waste management; nuclear reactor safety and regulation; power reactor systems; plant operations; and advanced plants and the future

  3. Total energy supply-system for manned spaceship using nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Narabayashi, Tadashi; Honma, Yuji; Yoshida, Yutaka; Shimazu, Yoichiro

    2007-01-01

    In order to explore the deep space, such as Mars, Jupiter, Saturn, etc in the future, a spacecraft that will be driven by nuclear power should be developed. At present, satellites or space probes have been using mainly electric source of chemical battery, fuel battery, solar battery, and RI battery. However, considering highly developed and extensive space exploration in the future, it is obvious that larger electric power is required over the long term space travel more than several years. Additionally, the solar battery used in space will be fundamentally impossible to use in planetary exploration father away form Mars because sunlight is attenuated. Therefore, larger electric power source must be installed in the space craft. In this study, we consider about co-generation system for heat and electricity using nuclear power. We think that the nuclear power is appropriate for using in deep space because of a long time operation without refueling and possibility in downsizing due to higher power density. We selected the fast reactor system of about 18 MWth compared with other type of reactors, such as PWR and high temperature gas reactor (Honma, 2006). With regard to a power generation system, we examined about efficiency of Stirling engine compared with a gas-turbine engine. Theoretical efficiency of Stirling engine is much higher than that of gas-turbine engine. Therefore, we selected Stirling engine and we have started the model test of a Stirling engine. Total power generation at International Space Station (ISS) that has been built since 1998 is about 110kWe. We estimated that about 5 times as much electricity as that of ISS is enough to explore or developed the space. In that case, 2.5MWe will be generated by the system, number of crews will be about 10 and 2MW will be used to electric propulsion. (author)

  4. Pressurized water reactor systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyer, P.J.

    1975-01-01

    Design and mode of operation of the main PWR components are described: reactor core, pressure vessel and internals, cooling systems with pumps and steam generators, ancillary systems, and waste processing. (TK) [de

  5. Innovative energy production in fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iiyoshi, A.; Momota, H.; Motojima, O.; Okamoto, M.; Sudo, S.; Tomita, Y.; Yamaguchi, S.; Ohnishi, M.; Onozuka, M.; Uenosono, C.

    1993-10-01

    Concepts of innovative energy production in neutron-lean fusion reactors without having the conventional turbine-type generator are proposed for improving the plant efficiency. These concepts are (a) traveling wave direct energy conversion of 14.7 MeV protons, (b) cusp type direct energy conversion of charged particles, (c) efficient use of radiation with semiconductor and supplying clean fuel in a form of hydrogen gas, and (d) direct energy conversion from deposited heat to electric power with semiconductor utilizing Nernst effect. The candidates of reactors such as a toroidal system and an open system are also studied for application of the new concepts. The study shows the above concepts for a commercial reactor are promising. (author)

  6. Innovative energy production in fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iiyoshi, A.; Momota, H.; Motojima, O.

    1994-01-01

    Concepts of innovative energy production in neutron-lean fusion reactors without having the conventional turbine-type generator are proposed for improving the plant efficiency. These concepts are (a) traveling wave direct energy conversion of 14.7 MeV protons, (b) cusp type direct energy conversion of charged particles, (c) efficient use of radiation with semiconductor and supplying clean fuel in a form of hydrogen gas, and (d) direct energy conversion from deposited heat to electric power with semiconductor utilizing Nernst effect. The candidates of reactors such as a toroidal system and an open system are also studied for application of the new concepts. The study shows the above concepts for a commercial reactor are promising. (author)

  7. Innovative energy production in fusion reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iiyoshi, A.; Momota, H.; Motojima, O.; Okamoto, M.; Sudo, S.; Tomita, Y.; Yamaguchi, S.; Ohnishi, M.; Onozuka, M.; Uenosono, C.

    1993-10-01

    Concepts of innovative energy production in neutron-lean fusion reactors without having the conventional turbine-type generator are proposed for improving the plant efficiency. These concepts are: (1) traveling wave direct energy conversion of 14.7 MeV protons; (2) cusp type direct energy conversion of charged particles; (3) efficient use of radiation with semiconductor and supplying clean fuel in a form of hydrogen gas; and (4) direct energy conversion from deposited heat to electric power with semiconductor utilizing Nernst effect. The candidates of reactors such as a toroidal system and an open system are also studied for application of the new concepts. The study shows the above concepts for a commercial reactor are promising.

  8. Innovative energy production in fusion reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iiyoshi, A.; Momota, H.; Motojima, O.; Okamoto, M.; Sudo, S.; Tomita, Y.; Yamaguchi, S.; Ohnishi, M.; Onozuka, M.; Uenosono, C.

    1993-10-01

    Concepts of innovative energy production in neutron-lean fusion reactors without having the conventional turbine-type generator are proposed for improving the plant efficiency. These concepts are (a) traveling wave direct energy conversion of 14.7 MeV protons, (b) cusp type direct energy conversion of charged particles, (c) efficient use of radiation with semiconductor and supplying clean fuel in a form of hydrogen gas, and (d) direct energy conversion from deposited heat to electric power with semiconductor utilizing Nernst effect. The candidates of reactors such as a toroidal system and an open system are also studied for application of the new concepts. The study shows the above concepts for a commercial reactor are promising. (author).

  9. Reactor Safety Assessment System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sebo, D.E.; Bray, M.A.; King, M.A.

    1987-01-01

    The Reactor Safety Assessment System (RSAS) is an expert system under development for the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC). RSAS is designed for use at the USNRC Operations Center in the event of a serious incident at a licensed nuclear power plant. RSAS is a situation assessment expert system which uses plant parametric data to generate conclusions for use by the NRC Reactor Safety Team. RSAS uses multiple rule bases and plant specific setpoint files to be applicable to all licensed nuclear power plants in the United States. RSAS currently covers several generic reactor categories and multiple plants within each category

  10. Reactor safety assessment system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sebo, D.E.; Bray, M.A.; King, M.A.

    1987-01-01

    The Reactor Safety Assessment System (RSAS) is an expert system under development for the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC). RSA is designed for use at the USNRC Operations Center in the event of a serious incident at a licensed nuclear power plant. RSAS is a situation assessment expert system which uses plant parametric data to generate conclusions for use by the NRC Reactor Safety Team. RSAS uses multiple rule bases and plant specific setpoint files to be applicable to all licensed nuclear power plants in the United States. RSAS currently covers several generic reactor categories and multiple plants within each category

  11. Advanced reactors and future energy market needs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paillere, Henri; )

    2017-01-01

    Based on the results of a very well-attended international workshop on 'Advanced Reactor Systems and Future Energy Market Needs' that took place in April 2017, the NEA has embarked on a two-year study with the objective of analysing evolving energy market needs and requirements, as well as examining how well reactor technologies under development today will fit into tomorrow's low-carbon world. The NEA Expert Group on Advanced Reactor Systems and Future Energy Market Needs (ARFEM) held its first meeting on 5-6 July 2017 with experts from Canada, France, Italy, Japan, Korea, Poland, Romania, Russia and the United Kingdom. The outcome of the study will provide much needed insight into how well nuclear can fulfil its role as a key low-carbon technology, and help identify challenges related to new operational, regulatory or market requirements

  12. FFTF reactor assembly system technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mangelsdorf, T.A.

    1975-01-01

    An overview is presented of the FFTF reactor and plant together with descriptions of core components, core internals, core system, primary and secondary control rod system, reactor instrumentation, reactor vessel and closure head, and supporting test programs

  13. Nuclear reactor safety system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ball, R.M.; Roberts, R.C.

    1983-01-01

    The invention provides a safety system for a nuclear reactor which uses a parallel combination of computer type look-up tables each of which receives data on a particular parameter (from transducers located in the reactor system) and each of which produces the functional counterpart of that particular parameter. The various functional counterparts are then added together to form a control signal for shutting down the reactor. The functional counterparts are developed by analysis of experimental thermal and hydraulic data, which are used to form expressions that define safe conditions

  14. New measurement system for on line in core high-energy neutron flux monitoring in materials testing reactor conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geslot, B.; Vermeeren, L.; Filliatre, P.; Lopez, A. Legrand; Barbot, L.; Jammes, C.; Bréaud, S.; Oriol, L.; Villard, J.-F.

    2011-03-01

    Flux monitoring is of great interest for experimental studies in material testing reactors. Nowadays, only the thermal neutron flux can be monitored on line, e.g., using fission chambers or self-powered neutron detectors. In the framework of the Joint Instrumentation Laboratory between SCK-CEN and CEA, we have developed a fast neutron detector system (FNDS) capable of measuring on line the local high-energy neutron flux in fission reactor core and reflector locations. FNDS is based on fission chambers measurements in Campbelling mode. The system consists of two detectors, one detector being mainly sensitive to fast neutrons and the other one to thermal neutrons. On line data processing uses the CEA depletion code DARWIN in order to disentangle fast and thermal neutrons components, taking into account the isotopic evolution of the fissile deposit. The first results of FNDS experimental test in the BR2 reactor are presented in this paper. Several fission chambers have been irradiated up to a fluence of about 7 × 1020 n/cm2. A good agreement (less than 10% discrepancy) was observed between FNDS fast flux estimation and reference flux measurement.

  15. New measurement system for on line in core high-energy neutron flux monitoring in materials testing reactor conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geslot, B.; Filliatre, P.; Barbot, L.; Jammes, C.; Breaud, S.; Oriol, L.; Villard, J.-F. [CEA, DEN, Cadarache, SPEx/LDCI, F-13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Vermeeren, L. [SCK-CEN, Boeretang 200, B-2400 Mol (Belgium); Lopez, A. Legrand [CEA, DEN, Saclay, SIREN/LECSI, F-91400 Saclay (France)

    2011-03-15

    Flux monitoring is of great interest for experimental studies in material testing reactors. Nowadays, only the thermal neutron flux can be monitored on line, e.g., using fission chambers or self-powered neutron detectors. In the framework of the Joint Instrumentation Laboratory between SCK-CEN and CEA, we have developed a fast neutron detector system (FNDS) capable of measuring on line the local high-energy neutron flux in fission reactor core and reflector locations. FNDS is based on fission chambers measurements in Campbelling mode. The system consists of two detectors, one detector being mainly sensitive to fast neutrons and the other one to thermal neutrons. On line data processing uses the CEA depletion code DARWIN in order to disentangle fast and thermal neutrons components, taking into account the isotopic evolution of the fissile deposit. The first results of FNDS experimental test in the BR2 reactor are presented in this paper. Several fission chambers have been irradiated up to a fluence of about 7 x 10{sup 20} n/cm{sup 2}. A good agreement (less than 10% discrepancy) was observed between FNDS fast flux estimation and reference flux measurement.

  16. New measurement system for on line in core high-energy neutron flux monitoring in materials testing reactor conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geslot, B.; Filliatre, P.; Barbot, L.; Jammes, C.; Breaud, S.; Oriol, L.; Villard, J.-F.; Vermeeren, L.; Lopez, A. Legrand

    2011-01-01

    Flux monitoring is of great interest for experimental studies in material testing reactors. Nowadays, only the thermal neutron flux can be monitored on line, e.g., using fission chambers or self-powered neutron detectors. In the framework of the Joint Instrumentation Laboratory between SCK-CEN and CEA, we have developed a fast neutron detector system (FNDS) capable of measuring on line the local high-energy neutron flux in fission reactor core and reflector locations. FNDS is based on fission chambers measurements in Campbelling mode. The system consists of two detectors, one detector being mainly sensitive to fast neutrons and the other one to thermal neutrons. On line data processing uses the CEA depletion code DARWIN in order to disentangle fast and thermal neutrons components, taking into account the isotopic evolution of the fissile deposit. The first results of FNDS experimental test in the BR2 reactor are presented in this paper. Several fission chambers have been irradiated up to a fluence of about 7 x 10 20 n/cm 2 . A good agreement (less than 10% discrepancy) was observed between FNDS fast flux estimation and reference flux measurement.

  17. A contribution for the problematic of measurements of fast-neutron-energy spectrum in thermal reactor-systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dederichs, H.

    1978-06-01

    The aims of this work are to check the experimental conditions for using of a 6 Li-semiconductor-spectrometer at thermal reactor-systems and to measure the neutron-energy-spectra at the critical experiment KAHTER comparing with the theory. Using the spectrometer at thermal-neutraon-experiments questions will be attended as resolution, statistic and selection of usable nuclear data. The nuclear data will be gauged by qualified measurements, the statistic will be estimated by simulated calculations and the resolution will be improved by using the Fredholm-equation in the calculations. The calculated spectra show a good agreement with the measured spectra. Only in the energy region of maximum distribution of fission-neutrons there are little difference. The measurements show the using of the spectrometer is recommended at systems with preponderant thermal neutron-spectra, although the resolution and statistic are optimized for the spectrometer by measurements at experiments with fast neutron-spectra. (orig.) 891 RW [de

  18. Nuclear reactor monitoring system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drummond, C.N.; Bybee, R.T.; Mason, F.L.; Worsham, H.J.

    1976-01-01

    The invention pertains to an improved monitoring system for the neutron flux in a nuclear reactor. It is proposed to combine neutron flux detectors, a thermoelement, and a background radiation detector in one measuring unit. The spatial arrangement of these elements is fixed with great exactness; they are enclosed by an elastic cover and are brought into position in the reactor with the aid of a bent tube. The arrangement has a low failure rate and is easy to maintain. (HP) [de

  19. Research Reactors for the Development of Materials and Fuels for Innovative Nuclear Energy Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2017-01-01

    This publication presents an overview of research reactor capabilities and capacities in the development of fuels and materials for innovative nuclear reactors, such as GenIV reactors. The compendium provides comprehensive information on the potential for materials and fuel testing research of 30 research reactors, both operational and in development. This information includes their power levels, mode of operation, current status, availability and historical overview of their utilization. A summary of these capabilities and capacities is presented in the overview tables of section 6. Papers providing a technical description of the research reactors, including their specific features for utilization are collected as profiles on a CD-ROM and represent an integral part of this publication. The publication is intended to foster wider access to information on existing research reactors with capacity for advanced material testing research and thus ensure their increased utilization in this particular domain. It is expected that it can also serve as a supporting tool for the establishment of regional and international networking through research reactor coalitions and IAEA designated international centres based on research reactors.

  20. Studies on energy gain of muon catalyzed hybrid D-D Reactor and it comparison to D-T system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eskandari, M.R.; Hoseine-Motlagh, S.N.; Faghihi, F.

    1998-01-01

    Regarding the advantages of hybrid fusion reactors, in most recent studies, the energy gain of muon catalyzed D-T hybrid reactors are studied. Knowing advantages of D-D fuel such as availability, not being radio-active, no tritium inventory requirement and transport problems, the muon catalyzed hybrid D-D reactor (μCHDDR) gain is calculated here for a given net reaction by solving its dynamical equations for various deuterium densities. It is shown theμCHDDR has advantages even for previously suggested similar D-T reactor

  1. Reactor feedwater system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kagaya, Hiroyuki; Tominaga, Kenji.

    1993-01-01

    In a simplified water type reactor using a gravitationally dropping emergency core cooling system (ECCS), the present invention effectively prevents remaining high temperature water in feedwater pipelines from flowing into the reactor upon occurrence of abnormal events. That is, (1) upon LOCA, if a feedwater pipeline injection valve is closed, boiling under reduced pressure of the remaining high temperature water occurs in the feedwater pipelines, generated steams prevent the remaining high temperature water from flowing into the reactor. Accordingly, the reactor is depressurized rapidly. (2) The feedwater pipeline injection valve is closed and a bypassing valve is opened. Steams generated by boiling under reduced pressure of the remaining high temperature water in the feedwater pipelines are released to a condensator or a suppression pool passing through bypass pipelines. As a result, the remaining high temperature water is prevented from flowing into the reactor. Accordingly, the reactor is rapidly depressurized and cooled. It is possible to accelerate the depressurization of the reactor by the method described above. Further, load on the depressurization valve disposed to a main steam pipe can be reduced. (I.S.)

  2. Reactor control system. PWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    At present, 23 units of PWR type reactors have been operated in Japan since the start of Mihama Unit 1 operation in 1970 and various improvements have been made to upgrade operability of power stations as well as reliability and safety of power plants. As the share of nuclear power increases, further improvements of operating performance such as load following capability will be requested for power stations with more reliable and safer operation. This article outlined the reactor control system of PWR type reactors and described the control performance of power plants realized with those systems. The PWR control system is characterized that the turbine power is automatic or manually controlled with request of the electric power system and then the nuclear power is followingly controlled with the change of core reactivity. The system mainly consists of reactor automatic control system (control rod control system), pressurizer pressure control system, pressurizer water level control system, steam generator water level control system and turbine bypass control system. (T. Tanaka)

  3. Reactor protection system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fairbrother, D.B.; Lesniak, L.M.; Orgera, E.G.

    1977-10-01

    The report describes the reactor protection system (RPS-II) designed for use on Babcock and Wilcox 145-, later 177-, and 205-fuel assembly pressurized water reactors. In this system, relays in the trip logic have been replaced by solid state devices. A calculating module for the low DNBR, pump status, and offset trip functions has replaced the overpower trip (based on flow and imbalance), the power/RC pump trip, and the variable low-pressure trip. Included is a description of the changes from the present Oconee-type reactor protection system (RPS-I), a functional and hardware description of the calculating module, a description of the software programmed in the calculating module, and a discussion of the qualification program conducted to ensure that the degree of protection provided by RPS-II is not less than that provided by previously licensed systems supplied by B and W

  4. The nuclear reactor systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bacher, P.

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes the various nuclear reactor systems, starting with the Generation II, then the present development of the Generation III and the stakes and challenges of the future Generation IV. Some have found appropriate to oppose reactor systems or generations one to another, especially by minimizing the enhancements of generation III compared to generation II or by expecting the earth from generation IV (meaning that generation III is already obsolete). In the first part of the document (chapter 2), some keys are given to the reader to develop its proper opinion. Chapter 3 describes more precisely the various reactor systems and generations. Chapter 4 discusses the large industrial manoeuvres around the generation III, and the last chapter gives some economical references, taking into account, for the various means of power generation, the impediments linked to climate protection

  5. Energy infrastructure: hydrogen energy system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veziroglu, T N

    1979-02-01

    In a hydrogen system, hydrogen is not a primary source of energy, but an intermediary, an energy carrier between the primary energy sources and the user. The new unconventional energy sources, such as nuclear breeder reactors, fusion reactors, direct solar radiation, wind energy, ocean thermal energy, and geothermal energy have their shortcomings. These shortcomings of the new sources point out to the need for an intermediary energy system to form the link between the primary energy sources and the user. In such a system, the intermediary energy form must be transportable and storable; economical to produce; and if possible renewable and pollution-free. The above prerequisites are best met by hydrogen. Hydrogen is plentiful in the form of water. It is the cheapest synthetic fuel to manufacture per unit of energy stored in it. It is the least polluting of all of the fuels, and is the lightest and recyclable. In the proposed system, hydrogen would be produced in large plants located away from the consumption centers at the sites where primary new energy sources and water are available. Hydrogen would then be transported to energy consumption centers where it would be used in every application where fossil fuels are being used today. Once such a system is established, it will never be necessary to change to any other energy system.

  6. An energy amplifier fluidized bed nuclear reactor concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sefidvash, F.; Seifritz, W.

    2001-01-01

    The concept of a fluidized bed nuclear reactor driven by an energy amplifier system is described. The reactor has promising characteristics of inherent safety and passive cooling. The reactor can easily operate with any desired spectrum in order to be a plutonium burner or have it operate with thorium fuel cycle. (orig.) [de

  7. Nuclear reactor refueling system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wade, E.E.

    1978-01-01

    A system for transferring fuel assemblies between a nuclear reactor core and a fuel storage area while the fuel assembies remain completely submerged in a continuous body of coolant is described. The system comprises an in-vessel fuel transfer machine located inside the reactor vessel and an ex-vessel fuel transfer machine located in a fuel storage tank. The in-vessel fuel transfer machine comprises two independently rotatable frames with a pivotable fuel transfer apparatus disposed on the lower rotatable frame. The ex-vessel fuel transfer machine comprises one frame with a pivotable fuel transfer apparatus disposed thereon. The pivotable apparatuses are capable of being aligned with each other to transfer a fuel assembly between the reactor vessel and fuel storage tank while the fuel assembly remains completely submerged in a continuous body of coolant. 9 claims, 7 figures

  8. Moltex Energy's stable salt reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Sullivan, R.; Laurie, J.

    2016-01-01

    A stable salt reactor is a molten salt reactor in which the molten fuel salt is contained in fuel rods. This concept was invented in 1951 and re-discovered and improved recently by Moltex Energy Company. The main advantage of using molten salt fuel is that the 2 problematic fission products cesium and iodine do not exist in gaseous form but rather in a form of a salt that present no danger in case of accident. Another advantage is the strongly negative temperature coefficient for reactivity which means the reactor self-regulates. The feasibility studies have been performed on a molten salt fuel composed of sodium chloride and plutonium/uranium/lanthanide/actinide trichloride. The coolant fluid is a mix of sodium and zirconium fluoride salts that will need low flow rates. The addition of 1 mol% of metal zirconium to the coolant fluid reduces the risk of corrosion with standard steels and the addition of 2% of hafnium reduces the neutron dose. The temperature of the coolant is expected to reach 650 Celsius degrees at the exit of the core. This reactor is designed to be modular and it will be able to burn actinides. (A.C.)

  9. Comparison of fuel cycles characteristics for nuclear energy systems based on WWER-TOI and BN-1200 reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kagramanyan, V.S.; Kalashnikov, A.G.; Kapranova, Eh.N.; Puzakov, A.Yu.

    2014-01-01

    Authors determine the characteristics of the fuel cycle (FC) based on stationary nuclear power system based on WWER-TOI and BN-1200 reactors with fuel of different composition. Characteristics of reactor systems with partial or complete spent nuclear fuel reprocessing and recycling of plutonium are compared to those of the reference system consisting only of WWER-TOI with uranium oxide fuel, operating in an open FC [ru

  10. Nuclear reactor trip system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cook, B.M.

    1982-01-01

    Each parameter of the processes of a nuclear reactor and components operatively associated with it is monitored by a set of four like sensors. A trip system normally operates on a ''two out four'' configuration; i.e., to trip the reactor it is necessary that at least two sensors of a set sense an off-normal parameter. This assumes that all sensors are in normal operating condition. However, when a sensor is in test or is subject to maintenance or is defective or disabled, the ''two out of four''configuration would be reduced to a ''one out of three'' configuration because the affected sensor is taken out of service. This would expose the system to the possibility that a single sensor failure, which may be spurious, will cause a trip of the reactor. To prevent this, it is necessary that the affected sensor be bypassed. If only one sensor is bypassed, the system operates on a ''two out of three'' configuration. With two sensors bypassed, the sensing of an off-normal parameter by a third sensor trips the reactor. The by-pass circuit also disables the circuit coupling the by-passed sensor to the trip circuit. (author)

  11. Modification of Japanese first nuclear ship reactor for a regional energy supply system using gadolinia as a burnable poison

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Kotaro; Shimazu, Yoichiro; Narabayashi, Tadashi; Tsuji, Masashi

    2009-01-01

    In our laboratory, a small regional energy supply system which uses a small nuclear reactor has been studied for a long time. This system could supply not only heat but also electricity. Heat could be used for hot-water supply, a heating system of a house, melting snow and so on. In this point, this system seems to be useful for the places like northern part of Japan where it snows in winter. This reactor is based on Nuclear Ship Mutsu which was developed as the first nuclear ship of Japan about 40 years ago. It has several advantages for a small reactor. For example, its moderator temperature coefficient is always to be deeply negative because boric acid solution is not used in moderator and coolant. This can lead to a self-controlled operation without control rod maneuvering for load change. But some modifications have been performed in order to satisfy requirements such as (1) longer core life without refueling and reshuffling, (2) reactivity adjustment for load change without control rods or soluble boron, (3) simpler operations for load changes and (4) ultimate safety with sufficient passive capability. In our previous study, we confirmed the core based on Mutsu core had longer core life (about 10 years) using high uranium enrichment fuel (more than 5wt%) and current 17x17 fuel assemblies. We also confirmed excess reactivity during the cycle could be suppressed using combination of erbium oxide (Er 2 O 3 ) and gadolinium oxide (Gd 2 O 3 ) as burnable poisons. Er 2 O 3 has advantages such that criticality safety can be kept even if uranium enrichment is more than 5wt% and burnup characteristics of the core can be gradual. But at this time there are 2 problems to apply for the core using Er 2 O 3 in Japan. First problem is that more than 5wt% enrichment fuel is not yet accepted in Japan. Second problem is that there are no experiences of using Er 2 O 3 in commercial reactors in Japan. Considering these problems, we have to modify the design of the core, using

  12. The energy gap and the fast reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hill, J.

    1977-01-01

    The background to the development of fast reactors is summarized. In Britain, the results of the many experiments performed, the operation of the Dounreay Fast Reactor for the past 18 years and the first year's operation of the larger Prototype Fast Reactor have all been very encouraging, in that they demonstrated that the performance corresponded well with predictions, breeding is possible, and the system is exceptionally stable in operation. The next step in fast reactor engineering is to build a full-scale fast reactor power station. There would seem to be little reason to expect more trouble than could reasonably be expected in constructing any large project of this general nature. However, from an engineering point of view continuity of experience is required. If a decision to build a commercial fast reactor were taken today there would be a 14-year gap between strating this and the start of the Prototype Fast Reactor. This is already much too long. From an environmental standpoint we have to demonstrate that we can manufacture and reprocess fast reacctor fuel for a substantial programme in a way that does not lead to pollution of the environment, and that plutonium-containing fuel can be transported in the quantities required in safety and in a way that does not attract terrorists or require a private army to ensure its security. Finally, we have to find a way to allow many countries to obtain the energy they need from fast reactors, without leading to the proliferation of nuclear weapons or weapons capability. (author)

  13. Reactor system safety assurance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mattson, R.J.

    1984-01-01

    The philosophy of reactor safety is that design should follow established and conservative engineering practices, there should be safety margins in all modes of plant operation, special systems should be provided for accidents, and safety systems should have redundant components. This philosophy provides ''defense in depth.'' Additionally, the safety of nuclear power plants relies on ''safety systems'' to assure acceptable response to design basis events. Operating experience has shown the need to study plant response to more frequent upset conditions and to account for the influence of operators and non-safety systems on overall performance. Defense in depth is being supplemented by risk and reliability assessment

  14. Multi-objective technico-economic optimization of energy conversion systems: hydrogen and electricity cogeneration from Generation IV nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomez, A.

    2008-01-01

    With the increase in environmental considerations, such as the control of greenhouse emissions, and with the decrease in the fossil energy resources, hydrogen is currently considered as a promising energy vector. One of the main technological challenges of a future hydrogen economy is its large scale production without fossil fuel emissions. Under this context, nuclear energy is particularly adapted for hydrogen massive production by thermochemical cycles or high temperature electrolysis. One of the selected nuclear systems is the Very High Temperature Reactor (950 C/1200 C), cooled with helium, and dedicated to hydrogen production or to hydrogen electricity cogeneration. The main objective of this investigation, within the framework of a collaboration between CEA, French Atomic Agency (Cadarache) and LGC (Toulouse), consists in defining a technico-economic optimization methodology of electricity-hydrogen cogeneration systems, in order to identify and propose promising development strategies. Among the massive production processes of hydrogen, the thermochemical cycle Iodine-Sulphur has been considered. Taking into account the diversity of the used energies (i.e., heat and electricity) on the one hand and of the produced energies (hydrogen and electricity) on the other hand of the studied cogeneration system, an exergetic approach has been developed due to its ability to consider various energy forms on the same thermodynamical basis. The CYCLOP software tool (CEA) is used for the thermodynamic modelling of these systems. The economic criterion, calculated using the SEMER software tool (CEA), is based on the minimization of the total production site cost over its lifespan i.e., investment, operating costs and nuclear fuel cost. Capital investment involves the development of cost functions adapted to specific technologies and their specific operating conditions. The resulting optimization problems consist in maximizing the energy production, while minimizing the

  15. Advanced burnup calculation code system in a subcritical state with continuous-energy Monte Carlo code for fusion-fission hybrid reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsunaka, Masayuki; Ohta, Masayuki; Miyamaru, Hiroyuki; Murata, Isao

    2009-01-01

    The fusion-fission (FF) hybrid reactor is a promising energy source that is thought to act as a bridge between the existing fission reactor and the genuine fusion reactor in the future. The burnup calculation system that aims at precise burnup calculations of a subcritical system was developed for the detailed design of the FF hybrid reactor, and the system consists of MCNP, ORIGEN, and postprocess codes. In the present study, the calculation system was substantially modified to improve the calculation accuracy and at the same time the calculation speed as well. The reaction rate estimation can be carried out accurately with the present system that uses track-length (TL) data in the continuous-energy treatment. As for the speed-up of the reaction rate calculation, a new TL data bunching scheme was developed so that only necessary TL data are used as long as the accuracy of the point-wise nuclear data is conserved. With the present system, an example analysis result for our proposed FF hybrid reactor is described, showing that the computation time could really be saved with the same accuracy as before. (author)

  16. Oxidation of carbon based material for innovative energy systems (HTR, fusion reactor): status and further needs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moormann, R.; Hinssen, H.K.; Latge, Ch.; Dumesnil, J.; Veltkamp, A.C.; Grabon, V.; Beech, D.; Buckthorpe, D.; Dominguez, T.; Krussenberg, A.K.; Wu, C.H.

    2000-01-01

    Following an overview on kinetics of carbon/gas reactions, status and further needs in selected safety relevant fields of graphite oxidation in high temperature reactors (HTRs) and fusion reactors are outlined. Kinetics was detected due to the presence of such elements as severe air ingress, lack of experimental data on Boudouard reaction and a similar lack of data in the field of advanced oxidation. The development of coatings which protect against oxidation should focus on stability under neutron irradiation and on the general feasibility of coatings on HTR pebble fuel graphite. Oxidation under normal operation of direct cycle HTR requires examinations of gas atmospheres and of catalytic effects. Advanced carbon materials like CFCs and mixed materials should be developed and tested with respect to their oxidation resistance in a common HTR/fusion task. In an interim HTR, fuel storage radiolytic oxidation under normal operation and thermal oxidation in accidents have to be considered. Plans for future work in these fields are described. (authors)

  17. BWR reactor management system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makino, Kakuji; Kawamura, Atsuo; Yoshioka, Ritsuo; Neda, Toshikatsu.

    1979-01-01

    It is necessary to grasp the delicate state of operation in reactor cores in view of the control of burn-up and power output at the time of the operation management of BWRs. Enormous labor has been required for the collection, processing and evaluation of the data. It is desirable to obtain the safer, more efficient and faster method of operation control by predicting the states in cores including the change of xenon and reflecting them to operation plans as well as by tracing with high accuracy the past burn-up history for a long period. At present, the on-line evaluation of the states in cores is carried out with the process computers attached to respective units, but the amount of data required for core operation management of high degree far exceeds their capacity. From such viewpoints, the research and development on the reactor management system were carried out. The data processing concerning core operation management is performed with newly installed computers utilizing the data from existing process computers, and the operation of reactor cores, the qualitative improvement of management works, labor saving, and fast, efficient operation control are feasible with it. This system was installed in an actual plant in October, 1977. The composition of the system, the prediction of the change in local output distribution accompanying control rod operation, the prediction of the change in the states in cores due to the flow rate of coolant, and the function of collecting plant data are explained. (Kako, I.)

  18. Nuclear reactor sealing system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McEdwards, J.A.

    1983-01-01

    A liquid metal-cooled nuclear reactor sealing system is disclosed. The nuclear reactor includes a vessel sealed at its upper end by a closure head. The closure head comprises at least two components, one of which is rotatable; and the two components define an annulus therebetween. The sealing system includes at least a first and second inflatable seal disposed in series in an upper portion of the annulus. The system further includes a dip seal extending into a body of insulation located adjacent a bottom portion of the closure head. The dip seal comprises a trough formed by a lower portion of one of the components, and a seal blade pendently supported from the other component and extending downwardly into the trough. A body of liquid metal is contained in the trough which submerges a portion of the seal blade. The seal blade is provided with at least one aperture located above the body of liquid metal for providing fluid communication between the annulus intermediate the dip seal and the inflatable seals, and a body of cover gas located inside the vessel. There also is provided means for introducing a purge gas into the annulus intermediate the inflatable seals and the seal blade. The purge gas is introduced in an amount sufficient to substantially reduce diffusion of radioactive cover gas or sodium vapor up to the inflatable seals. The purge gas mixes with the cover gas in the reactor vessel where it can be withdrawn from the vessel for treatment and recycle to the vessel

  19. Strategy and perspective on future energy systems, technological range potentials for gas cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bouchard, J.; Bernard, P.; Pochon, E.

    2002-01-01

    Over the past century, energy consumption worldwide has increased more than ten-fold and, by the year 2050, is likely to be twice what it is today. This increase of energy demand seems inescapable, in view of the growth of the world population and the right to energy access and development for all countries around the world. The pursuit of energy production in the current conditions, essentially based on fossil fuels, would result in the depletion of all the known oil and gas sources in the world with the risks of scarcity of supply. The economies of many countries, particularly countries who do not have natural fossil resources, could suffer under hardships and uncertainties relating to the oil and gas prices. Another consequence would be a doubling of the annual emissions of greenhouse gases by the year 2050 with its consequences over climate change. Energy savings and renewable energy sources shall contribute to avoid such risks, however it will not be enough, by far, to meet the energy consumption of 9 billion inhabitants across the planet. Nuclear energy has unique advantages as to sustainable development, and could offer a safe and economic solution, with long-term resources and no greenhouse effect

  20. Thermionic nuclear reactor systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kennel, E.B.

    1986-01-01

    Thermionic nuclear reactors can be expected to be candidate space power supplies for power demands ranging from about ten kilowatts to several megawatts. The conventional ''ignited mode'' thermionic fuel element (TFE) is the basis for most reactor designs to date. Laboratory converters have been built and tested with efficiencies in the range of 7-12% for over 10,000 hours. Even longer lifetimes are projected. More advanced capabilities are potentially achievable in other modes of operation, such as the self-pulsed or unignited diode. Coupled with modest improvements in fuel and emitter material performance, the efficiency of an advanced thermionic conversion system can be extended to the 15-20% range. Advanced thermionic power systems are expected to be compatible with other advanced features such as: (1) Intrinsic subcritically under accident conditions, ensuring 100% safety upon launch abort; (2) Intrinsic low radiation levels during reactor shutdown, allowing manned servicing and/or rendezvous; (3) DC to DC power conditioning using lightweight power MOSFETS; and (4) AC output using pulsed converters

  1. Analysis of Russian transition scenarios to innovative nuclear energy system based on thermal and fast reactors with closed nuclear fuel cycle using INPRO methodology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kagramanyan, V.S.; Poplavskaya, E.V.; Korobeynikov, V.V.; Kalashnikov, A.G.; Moseev, A.L.; Korobitsyn, V.E.; Andreeva-Andrievskaya, L.N.

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents the results of the analysis of modeling of Russian nuclear energy (NE) scenarios on the basis of thermal and fast reactors with closed nuclear fuel cycle (NFC). Modeling has been carried out with use of CYCLE code (SSC RF IPPE's tool) designed for analysis of Nuclear Energy System (NES) with closed NFC taking into account plutonium and minor actinides (MA) isotopic composition change during multi-recycling of fuel in fast reactors. When considering fast reactor introduction scenarios, one of important questions is to define optimal time for their introduction and related NFC's facilities. Analysis of the results obtained has been fulfilled using the key INPRO indicators for sustainable energy development. It was shown that a delay in fast reactor introduction led to serious ecological, social and finally economic risks for providing energy security and sustainable development of Russia in long-term prospects and loss of knowledge and experience in mastering innovative technologies of fast reactors and related nuclear fuel cycle. (author)

  2. IMPACT OF ENERGY GROUP STRUCTURE ON NUCLEAR DATA TARGET ACCURACY REQUIREMENTS FOR ADVANCED REACTOR SYSTEMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    G. Palmiotti; M. Salvatores; H. Hiruta

    2011-06-01

    A target accuracy assessment study using both a fine and a broad energy structure has shown that less stringent nuclear data accuracy requirements are needed for the latter energy structure. However, even though a reduction is observed, still the requirements will be very difficult to be met unless integral experiments are also used to reduce nuclear data uncertainties. Target accuracy assessment is the inverse problem of the uncertainty evaluation. To establish priorities and target accuracies on data uncertainty reduction, a formal approach can be adopted by defining target accuracy on design parameters and finding out required accuracy on data in order to meet them. In fact, the unknown uncertainty data requirements can be obtained by solving a minimization problem where the sensitivity coefficients in conjunction with the constraints on the integral parameters provide the needed quantities for finding the solutions.

  3. Reactor safety systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kafka, P.

    1975-01-01

    The spectrum of possible accidents may become characterized by the 'maximum credible accident', which will/will not happen. Similary, the performance of safety systems in a multitude of situations is sometimes simplified to 'the emergency system will/will not work' or even 'reactors are/ are not safe'. In assessing safety, one must avoid this fallacy of reducing a complicated situation to the simple black-and-white picture of yes/no. Similarly, there is a natural tendency continually to improve the safety of a system to assure that it is 'safe enough'. Any system can be made safer and there is usually some additional cost. It is important to balance the increased safety against the increased costs. (orig.) [de

  4. Reactor cooling system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, Etsuji.

    1979-01-01

    Purpose: To eliminate cleaning steps in the pipelines upon reactor shut-down by connecting a filtrating and desalting device to the cooling system to thereby always clean up the water in the pipelines. Constitution: A filtrating and desalting device is connected to the pipelines in the cooling system by way of drain valves and a check valve. Desalted water is taken out from the exit of the filtrating and desalting device and injected to one end of the cooling system pipelines by way of the drain valve and the check valve and then returned by way of another drain valve to the desalting device. Water in the pipelines is thus always desalted and the cleaning step in the pipelines is no more required in the shut-down. (Kawakami, Y.)

  5. Reactor system on barge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayashi, Kingo; Yamada, Nobuyuki

    1987-01-01

    Floating electrical power plants or power plant barges add new dimensions to utility planners and agencies in the world. Intrinsically safe and economical reactors (ISER) employ steel reactor pressure vessels, which significantly reduce the weight as compared with PIUS, and provide siting versatility including barge-mounted plants. In this paper, the outline of power plant barges and barge-mounted ISERs is described. Besides their mobility, power plant barges have the salient advantages such as short delivery time and better quality control due to the outfitting in shipyards. These power plant barges may be temporarily moored or permanently grounded in shallow water at the centers of industrial complexes or the suitable areas adjacent to them, and satisfy the increasing needs for electric power. A cost-effective and technically perfect barge positioning system should be designed to meet the specific requirement for the location and its condition. Offshore siting away from coast may be applicable only to large plants of 1,000 MWe or more, and inshore siting and coastal or river siting are considered for an ISER-200 barge-mounted plant. The system of a barge-mounted ISER plant is discussed in the case of a floating type and the type on a seismic base isolator. (Kako, I.)

  6. Nuclear reactor safety system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Takashi.

    1979-01-01

    Purpose: To allow sufficient removal of radioactive substance released in the reactor containment shell upon loss of coolants accidents thus to sufficiently decrease the exposure dose to human body. Constitution: A clean-up system is provided downstream of a heat exchanger and it is branched into a pipeway to be connected to a spray nozzle and further connected by way of a valve to a reactor container. After the end of sudden transient changes upon loss of coolants accidents, the pool water stored in the pressure suppression chamber is purified in the clean-up system and then sprayed in the dry-well by way of a spray nozzle. The sprayed water dissolves to remove water soluble radioactive substances floating in the dry-well and then returns to the pressure suppression chamber. Since radioactive substances in the dry-well can thus removed rapidly and effectively and the pool water can be reused, public hazard can also be decreased. (Horiuchi, T.)

  7. Energy deposition in STARFIRE reactor components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gohar, Y.; Brooks, J.N.

    1985-04-01

    The energy deposition in the STARFIRE commercial tokamak reactor was calculated based on detailed models for the different reactor components. The heat deposition and the 14 MeV neutron flux poloidal distributions in the first wall were obtained. The poloidal surface heat load distribution in the first wall was calculated from the plasma radiation. The Monte Carlo method was used for the calculation to allow an accurate modeling for the reactor geometry

  8. Gaseous fuel reactors for power systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helmick, H.H.; Schwenk, F.C.

    1978-01-01

    The Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory is participating in a NASA-sponsored program to demonstrate the feasibility of a gaseous uranium fueled reactor. The work is aimed at acquiring experimental and theoretical information for the design of a prototype plasma core reactor which will test heat removal by optical radiation. The basic goal of this work is for space applications, however, other NASA-sponsored work suggests several attractive applications to help meet earth-bound energy needs. Such potential benefits are small critical mass, on-site fuel processing, high fuel burnup, low fission fragment inventory in reactor core, high temperature for process heat, optical radiation for photochemistry and space power transmission, and high temperature for advanced propulsion systems. Low power reactor experiments using uranium hexafluoride gas as fuel demonstrated performance in accordance with reactor physics predictions. The final phase of experimental activity now in progress is the fabrication and testing of a buffer gas vortex confinement system

  9. Reactor feedwater system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hikabe, Katsumi.

    1978-01-01

    Purpose: In order to prevent thermal stresses of a core of PWR type reactor, described has been a method for feeding heated recirculating water to the core in the case of the reactor start-up or shut-down. Constitution: A recirculating water is degassed, cleaned up and heated in the steam condensers, and then feeds the water to the reactor, characterized in that heaters are provided in the bypasses of the turbine, so that heated water is constantly supplied to the reactor. (Nakamura, S.)

  10. Gaseous fuel reactors for power systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendall, J. S.; Rodgers, R. J.

    1977-01-01

    Gaseous-fuel nuclear reactors have significant advantages as energy sources for closed-cycle power systems. The advantages arise from the removal of temperature limits associated with conventional reactor fuel elements, the wide variety of methods of extracting energy from fissioning gases, and inherent low fissile and fission product in-core inventory due to continuous fuel reprocessing. Example power cycles and their general performance characteristics are discussed. Efficiencies of gaseous fuel reactor systems are shown to be high with resulting minimal environmental effects. A technical overview of the NASA-funded research program in gaseous fuel reactors is described and results of recent tests of uranium hexafluoride (UF6)-fueled critical assemblies are presented.

  11. Monitor for reactor feedwater systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takizawa, Yoji; Tomizawa, Teruaki

    1983-01-01

    Purpose: To improve the reliability of operator's procedures upon occurrence of the feedwater system abnormality in a BWR type reactor by presenting the operation with effective information to avoid such abnormality. Constitution: A feedwater temperature at the reactor inlet of a reactor feedwater system measured by a temperature detector and a predetermined value for the feedwater temperature at the reactor inlet determined depending on the reactor conditions are inputted to a start-up system. The start-up system outputs a start-up signal when the difference between the inputted values exceeds a predetermined value. Then, the start-up signal is inputted to a display device where information required for the operator is displayed in the device. Thus, the information required for the operator is rapidly provided upon abnormality of the feedwater system to thereby improve the reliability of the operator's procedures. (Moriyama, K.)

  12. Breeder reactor fuel fabrication system development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bennett, D.W.; Fritz, R.L.; McLemore, D.R.; Yatabe, J.M.

    1981-01-01

    Significant progress has been made in the design and development of remotely operated breeder reactor fuel fabrication and support systems (e.g., analytical chemistry). These activities are focused by the Secure Automated Fabrication (SAF) Program sponsored by the Department of Energy to provide: a reliable supply of fuel pins to support US liquid metal cooled breeder reactors and at the same time demonstrate the fabrication of mixed uranium/plutonium fuel by remotely operated and automated methods

  13. Specific energy released in power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaritskaya, T.S.; Kiselev, G.V.; Rudik, A.P.; Tsenter, Eh.M.

    1986-01-01

    Technique of determination are described and analysis of specific energy for different methods of critically maintance of RBMK and WWER-440 reactors are conducted. Characteristics of the optimal mode of critically maintanance are determined

  14. The study on the role of very high temperature reactor and nuclear process heat utilization in future energy systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yasukawa, Shigeru; Mankin, Shuichi; Sato, Osamu; Tadokoro, Yoshihiro; Nakano, Yasuyuki; Nagano, Takao; Yamaguchi, Kazuo; Ueno, Seiichi.

    1987-11-01

    The objectives of the systems analysis study on ''The Role of High Temperature Nuclear Heat in Future Energy Systems'' under the cooperative research program between Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology are to analyze the effect and the impact of introduction of high temperature nuclear heat in Japanese long-term energy systems aiming at zero environmental emissions from view points of energy supply/demand, economy progress, and environmental protection, and to show the potentials of involved technologies and to extract the associated problems necessary for research and developments. This report describes the results being obtained in these three years from 1985. The present status of our energy system are explained at first, then, our findings concerning on analytical approach, method for analysis, view points to the future, scenario state space, reference energy systems, evolving technologies in it, and results analyzed are described. (author)

  15. Status of the design and safety project for the sodium-cooled fast reactor as a generation IV nuclear energy system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niwa, Hajime; Fiorini, Gian-Luigi; Sim, Yoon-Sub; Lennox, Tom; Cahalan, James E.

    2005-01-01

    The Design and Safety Project Management Board (DSPMB) was established under the Sodium Cooled Fast Reactor (SFR) System Steering Committee (SSC) in the Generation IV international Forum. The DSPMB will promote collaborative R and D activities on reactor core design, and safety assessment for candidate systems, and also integrate these results together with those from other PMBs such as advanced fuel and component to a whole fast reactor system in order to develop high performance systems that will satisfy the goals of Generation IV nuclear energy systems. The DSPMB has formulated the present R and D schedules for this purpose. Two SFR concepts were proposed: a loop-type system with primarily a MOX fuel core and a pool-type system with a metal fuel core. Study of innovative systems and their evaluation will also be included. The safety project will cover both the safety assessment of the design and the preparation of the methods/tools to be used for the assessment. After a rather short viability phase, the project will move to the performance phase for development of performance data and design optimization of conceptual designs. This paper describes the schedules, work packages and tasks for the collaborative studies of the member countries. (author)

  16. Novel reactors and energy synergetics status 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ekholm, R.

    1982-01-01

    The recession, increasing energy costs, recent studies like NASAP and INFCE, recent innovations and new developments have resulted in a new situation in the energy field. Even near term nuclear power R and D planning requires thus concurrent studies of spallation (accelerator) and fusion/fission hybrid breeding. A first overview of these and other novel reactors is presented. It is now realized more than before that the energy production must be based on optimal synergetics based on symbiotic systems that include a larger variety of energy sources, even if we restrict us, as in this report, to nuclear power. A central factor is the considerations associated with the constraints of fuel supplies, of enriched fissile fuels, of U and Th and of fusile fuels (T). This report emphasizes the inherent characteristics of various energy producing machines and symbiotic systems in this respect including the status, national programmes, environmental impacts and their expected break-even U-prices as reported in the literature. (Author)

  17. Reactor safety protection system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishi, Hiroshi; Yokoyama, Tsuguo.

    1989-01-01

    A plurality of neutron detectors are disposed around a reactor core and detection signals from optional two neutron detectors are inputted into a ratio calculation device. If the ratio between both of the neutron flux level signals exceeds a predetermined value, a reactor trip signal is generated from an alarm setting device. Further, detection signals from all of the neutron detection devices are inputted into an average calculation device and the reactor trip signal is generated also in a case where the average value exceeds a predetermined set value. That is, when the reactor core power is increased locally, the detection signal from the neutron detector nearer to the point of power increase is greater than the increase rate for the entire reactor core power, while the detection signal from the neutron detector remote from the point of power increase is smaller. Thus, the local power increase ratio in the FBR reactor core can be detected efficiently by calculating the ratio for the neutron flux level signals from two neutron detectors, thereby enabling to exactly recognize the local power increase rate in the reactor core. (N.H.)

  18. Reactor power control system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomisawa, Teruaki.

    1981-01-01

    Purpose: To restore reactor-power condition in a minimum time after a termination of turbine bypass by reducing the throttling of the reactor power at the time of load-failure as low as possible. Constitution: The transient change of the internal pressure of condenser is continuously monitored. When a turbine is bypassed, a speed-control-command signal for a coolant recirculating pump is generated according as the internal pressure of the condenser. When the signal relating to the internal pressure of the condenser indicates insufficient power, a reactor-control-rod-drive signal is generated. (J.P.N.)

  19. Energy systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haefele, W.

    1974-01-01

    Up to the present the production, transmission and distribution of energy has been considered mostly as a fragmented problem; at best only subsystems have been considered. Today the scale of energy utilization is increasing rapidly, and correspondingly, the reliance of societies on energy. Such strong quantitative increases influence the qualitative nature of energy utilization in most of its aspects. Resources, reserves, reliability and environment are among the key words that may characterize the change in the nature of the energy utilization problem. Energy can no longer be considered an isolated technical and economical problem, rather it is embedded in the ecosphere and the society-technology complex. Restraints and boundary conditions have to be taken into account with the same degree of attention as in traditional technical problems, for example a steam turbine. This results in a strong degree of interweaving. Further, the purpose of providing energy becomes more visible, that is, to make survival possible in a civilized and highly populated world on a finite globe. Because of such interweaving and finiteness it is felt that energy should be considered as a system and therefore the term 'energy systems' is used. The production of energy is only one component of such a system; the handling of energy and the embedding of energy into the global and social complex in terms of ecology, economy, risks and resources are of similar importance. he systems approach to the energy problem needs more explanation. This paper is meant to give an outline of the underlying problems and it is hoped that by so doing the wide range of sometimes confusing voices about energy can be better understood. Such confusion starts already with the term 'energy crisis'. Is there an energy crisis or not? Much future work is required to tackle the problems of energy systems. This paper can only marginally help in that respect. But it is hoped that it will help understand the scope of the

  20. Energy systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haefele, W [Nuclear Research Centre, Applied Systems Analysis and Reactor Physics, Karlsruhe (Germany); International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis, Laxenburg (Austria)

    1974-07-01

    Up to the present the production, transmission and distribution of energy has been considered mostly as a fragmented problem; at best only subsystems have been considered. Today the scale of energy utilization is increasing rapidly, and correspondingly, the reliance of societies on energy. Such strong quantitative increases influence the qualitative nature of energy utilization in most of its aspects. Resources, reserves, reliability and environment are among the key words that may characterize the change in the nature of the energy utilization problem. Energy can no longer be considered an isolated technical and economical problem, rather it is embedded in the ecosphere and the society-technology complex. Restraints and boundary conditions have to be taken into account with the same degree of attention as in traditional technical problems, for example a steam turbine. This results in a strong degree of interweaving. Further, the purpose of providing energy becomes more visible, that is, to make survival possible in a civilized and highly populated world on a finite globe. Because of such interweaving and finiteness it is felt that energy should be considered as a system and therefore the term 'energy systems' is used. The production of energy is only one component of such a system; the handling of energy and the embedding of energy into the global and social complex in terms of ecology, economy, risks and resources are of similar importance. he systems approach to the energy problem needs more explanation. This paper is meant to give an outline of the underlying problems and it is hoped that by so doing the wide range of sometimes confusing voices about energy can be better understood. Such confusion starts already with the term 'energy crisis'. Is there an energy crisis or not? Much future work is required to tackle the problems of energy systems. This paper can only marginally help in that respect. But it is hoped that it will help understand the scope of the

  1. Zero energy reactor RB technical characteristics and experimental possibilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jovanovic, S; Takac, S; Raisic, N; Lolic, B; Markovic, H [Boris Kidric Institute of Nuclear Sciences Vinca, Beograd (Yugoslavia)

    1963-04-15

    The zero energy reactor RB was constructed in 1958 in accordance with the nuclear reactor development programme of the Boris Kidric Institute of Nuclear Sciences. The reactor was in operation until the middle of 1959 when the heavy water, serving as the moderator, was transported to the high flux reactor RA, built at the same time at the Boris Kidric Institute. Owing to the fact that the purchase of new quantities of heavy water was planned for 1961 it was decided to reconstruct the RB reactor in order to improve the safety of the system and to obtain better flexibility in performing the experiments. New control, safety and radiation monitoring systems were constructed. Some changes were also made on the reactor tank, water circulation system and the water level monitoring equipment. The reconstruction was completed in 1961. and the heavy water was delivered early in 1962. The reconstructed reactor was critical for the first time in summer 1962, and from that time was in continuous operation. This report presents an outline of the design and construction characteristics of the reactor. The main intention is to inform potential users of the reactor about experimental possibilities, advantages and disadvantages of such a critical facility.

  2. Zero energy reactor RB technical characteristics and experimental possibilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jovanovic, S.; Takac, S.; Raisic, N.; Lolic, B.; Markovic, H.

    1963-04-01

    The zero energy reactor RB was constructed in 1958 in accordance with the nuclear reactor development programme of the Boris Kidric Institute of Nuclear Sciences. The reactor was in operation until the middle of 1959 when the heavy water, serving as the moderator, was transported to the high flux reactor RA, built at the same time at the Boris Kidric Institute. Owing to the fact that the purchase of new quantities of heavy water was planned for 1961 it was decided to reconstruct the RB reactor in order to improve the safety of the system and to obtain better flexibility in performing the experiments. New control, safety and radiation monitoring systems were constructed. Some changes were also made on the reactor tank, water circulation system and the water level monitoring equipment. The reconstruction was completed in 1961. and the heavy water was delivered early in 1962. The reconstructed reactor was critical for the first time in summer 1962, and from that time was in continuous operation. This report presents an outline of the design and construction characteristics of the reactor. The main intention is to inform potential users of the reactor about experimental possibilities, advantages and disadvantages of such a critical facility

  3. Terrestrial Energy bets on molten salt reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2015-01-01

    Terrestrial Energy is a Canadian enterprise, founded in 2013, for marketing the integral molten salt reactor (IMSR). A first prototype (called MSRE and with an energy output of 8 MW) was designed and operated between 1965 and 1969 by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. IMSR is a small, modular reactor with a thermal energy output of 400 MW. According to Terrestrial Energy the technology of conventional power reactors is too complicated and too expensive. On the contrary IMSR's technology appears to be simple, easy to operate and affordable. With a staff of 30 people Terrestrial Energy appears to be a start-up in the nuclear sector. A process of pre-licensing will be launched in 2016 with the Canadian nuclear safety authority. (A.C.)

  4. INPRO Assessment of the Planned Nuclear Energy System of Belarus. A report of the International Project on Innovative Nuclear Reactors and Fuel Cycles (INPRO)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-09-01

    The International Project on Innovative Nuclear Reactors and Fuel Cycles (INPRO) was started in 2001 on the basis of IAEA General Conference resolution GC(44)/RES/21. INPRO activities have since been continuously endorsed by IAEA General Conference resolutions and by the General Assembly of the United Nations. The objectives of INPRO are to help ensure that nuclear energy is available to contribute, in a sustainable manner, to the goal of meeting the energy needs of the 21st century, and to bring together technology holders and users so that they can jointly consider the international and national actions required for ensuring sustainability of nuclear energy through innovations in technology and/or institutional arrangements. To fulfill these objectives, INPRO has developed a set of basic principles, user requirements and criteria, and an assessment method which, taken together, comprise the INPRO methodology for the evaluation of the long term sustainability of innovative nuclear energy systems. The INPRO methodology is documented in IAEA-TECDOC-1575 Rev.1, comprising an overview volume and eight additional volumes covering economics, institutional measures (infrastructure), waste management, proliferation resistance, physical protection, environment (impact of stressors and availability of resources), safety of reactors, and safety of nuclear fuel cycle facilities. This publication is the final report of an assessment of the planned nuclear energy system of Belarus using the INPRO methodology. The assessment was performed in 2009-2011 by Belarusian experts in a strategic partnership with the Russian Federation and with support from the IAEA's INPRO Group

  5. INPRO Assessment of the Planned Nuclear Energy System of Belarus. A report of the International Project on Innovative Nuclear Reactors and Fuel Cycles (INPRO)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2013-09-15

    The International Project on Innovative Nuclear Reactors and Fuel Cycles (INPRO) was started in 2001 on the basis of IAEA General Conference resolution GC(44)/RES/21. INPRO activities have since been continuously endorsed by IAEA General Conference resolutions and by the General Assembly of the United Nations. The objectives of INPRO are to help ensure that nuclear energy is available to contribute, in a sustainable manner, to the goal of meeting the energy needs of the 21st century, and to bring together technology holders and users so that they can jointly consider the international and national actions required for ensuring sustainability of nuclear energy through innovations in technology and/or institutional arrangements. To fulfill these objectives, INPRO has developed a set of basic principles, user requirements and criteria, and an assessment method which, taken together, comprise the INPRO methodology for the evaluation of the long term sustainability of innovative nuclear energy systems. The INPRO methodology is documented in IAEA-TECDOC-1575 Rev.1, comprising an overview volume and eight additional volumes covering economics, institutional measures (infrastructure), waste management, proliferation resistance, physical protection, environment (impact of stressors and availability of resources), safety of reactors, and safety of nuclear fuel cycle facilities. This publication is the final report of an assessment of the planned nuclear energy system of Belarus using the INPRO methodology. The assessment was performed in 2009-2011 by Belarusian experts in a strategic partnership with the Russian Federation and with support from the IAEA's INPRO Group.

  6. BWR type reactor system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morooka, Shin-ichi.

    1980-01-01

    Purpose: To reduce the internal structure in a reactor by rapidly and efficiently transferring heat generated in a reactor core out of the reactor and eliminating the danger of radiation exposure. Constitution: Steam generated in a pressure vessel is introduced into heat pipe group by inserting the heat pipe group into the steam dome of the pressure vessel. The introduced steam is condensed in the heat pipes to transfer the heat of the steam to the heat pipe group. The transferred heat is transmitted to a heat exchanger provided out of a containment vessel to generate steam to operate a turbine. Thus, it is not necessary to introduce the steam including radioactive substance externally and can remove only the heat so as to carry out the desired purpose. (Kamimura, M.)

  7. Advanced robotic remote handling system for reactor dismantlement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shinohara, Yoshikuni; Usui, Hozumi; Fujii, Yoshio

    1991-01-01

    An advanced robotic remote handling system equipped with a multi-functional amphibious manipulator has been developed and used to dismantle a portion of radioactive reactor internals of an experimental boiling water reactor in the program of reactor decommissioning technology development carried out by the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute. (author)

  8. Molt salts reactors capacity for wastes incineration and energy production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    David, S.; Nuttin, A.

    2005-01-01

    The molten salt reactors present many advantages in the framework of the IV generation systems development for the energy production and/or the wastes incineration. After a recall of the main studies realized on the molten salt reactors, this document presents the new concepts and the identified research axis: the MSRE project and experience, the incinerators concepts, the thorium cycle. (A.L.B.)

  9. Modular reactor head shielding system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacobson, E. B.

    1985-01-01

    An improved modular reactor head shielding system is provided that includes a frame which is removably assembled on a reactor head such that no structural or mechanical alteration of the head is required. The shielding system also includes hanging assemblies to mount flexible shielding pads on trolleys which can be moved along the frame. The assemblies allow individual pivoting movement of the pads. The pivoting movement along with the movement allowed by the trolleys provides ease of access to any point on the reactor head. The assemblies also facilitate safe and efficient mounting of the pads directly to and from storage containers such that workers have additional shielding throughout virtually the entire installation and removal process. The flexible shielding pads are designed to interleave with one another when assembled around the reactor head for substantially improved containment of radiation leakage

  10. Choice of thermal reactor systems: a report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1977-09-01

    This is a report by the UK National Nuclear Corporation published by the UK Secretary of State for Energy (Mr. Benn) on 29th July 1977. It is concerned with the advantages and disadvantages of three thermal reactor systems -the AGR (advanced gas cooled reactor), the PWR (pressurised water reactor), and the SGHWR (steam generating heavy water reactor). The object was to help in the future choice of a thermal system for the UK to cover the next 25 years. The matter of export potential is also considered. A programme of four stations of 1100 to 1300 MW each over six years starting from 1979 was assumed. It is emphasised that a decision must be taken now both about reactor systems and actual orders. Headings are as follows: Extract from conclusions reached; Summary of main features of assessment; General conclusions regarding the following - safety, security of the investment, operational characteristics, development and launching requirements, effect on industry, and capital and generation costs. It is stated that in order to make an overall judgement on reactor choice the technical, commercial and social issues involved must be weighed in conjunction with cost differentials.

  11. Energy storage for tokamak reactor cycles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buchanan, C.H.

    1979-01-01

    The inherent characteristic of a tokamak reactor requiring periodic plasma quench and reignition introduces the problem of energy storage to permit continuous electrical output to the power grid. The cycle under consideration in this paper is a 1000 second burn followed by a 100 second reignition phase. The physical size of a typical toroidal plasma reaction chamber for a tokamak reactor has been described earlier. The thermal energy storage requirements described in this reference will serve as a basis for much of the ensuing discussion

  12. The energy-saving anaerobic baffled reactor membrane bioreactor (EABR-MBR) system for recycling wastewater from a high-rise building.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratanatamskul, Chavalit; Charoenphol, Chakraphan

    2015-01-01

    A novel energy-saving anaerobic baffled reactor-membrane bioreactor (EABR-MBR) system has been developed as a compact biological treatment system for reuse of water from a high-rise building. The anaerobic baffled reactor (ABR) compartment had five baffles and served as the anaerobic degradation zone, followed by the aerobic MBR compartment. The total operating hydraulic retention time (HRT) of the EABR-MBR system was 3 hours (2 hours for ABR compartment and very short HRT of 1 hour for aerobic MBR compartment). The wastewater came from the Charoen Wisawakam building. The results showed that treated effluent quality was quite good and highly promising for water reuse purposes. The average flux of the membrane was kept at 30 l/(m2h). The EABR-MBR system could remove chemical oxygen demand, total nitrogen and total phosphorus from building wastewater by more than 90%. Moreover, it was found that phosphorus concentration was rising in the ABR compartment due to the phosphorus release phenomenon, and then the concentration decreased rapidly in the aerobic MBR compartment due to the phosphorus uptake phenomenon. This implies that phosphorus-accumulating organisms inside the EABR-MBR system are responsible for biological phosphorus removal. The research suggests that the EABR-MBR system can be a promising system for water reuse and reclamation for high-rise building application in the near future.

  13. Safety system for reactor container

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimizu, Miwako; Seki, Osamu; Mano, Takio.

    1995-01-01

    A slanted structure is formed below a reactor core where there is a possibility that molten reactor core materials are dropped, and above a water level of a pool which is formed by coolants flown from a reactor recycling system and accumulated on the inner bottom of the reactor container, to prevent molten fuels from dropping at once in the form of a large amount of lump. The molten materials are provisionally received on the structure, gradually formed into small pieces and then dropped. Further, the molten materials are dropped and received provisionally on a group of coolant-flowing pipelines below the structure, to lower the temperature of the molten materials, and then the reactor core molten materials are gradually formed into small pieces and dropped into the pool water. Since they are not dropped directly into the pool water but dropped gradually into the pool water as small droplets, occurrence of steam explosion can be reduced. The occurrence of steam explosion due to dropped molten reactor core material and pool water is suppressed, and the molten materials are kept in the pool water, thereby enabling to maintain the integrity of the reactor container more effectively. (N.H.)

  14. The fast reactor and energy supply

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-01-01

    The progress made with fast reactor development in many countries is summarised showing that the aim is to provide to the nation concerned an ability to instal fast reactor power stations at the end of this century or early in the next one. Accepting the importance of fast reactors as a potential independent source of energy, problems concerning economics, industrial capability, technical factors, public acceptibility and in particular plutonium management, are discussed. It is concluded that although fast reactors have reached a comparatively advanced stage of development, a number of factors make it likely that their introduction for electricity generation will be a gradual process. Nevertheless it is necessary to complete demonstration and development phases in good time. (U.K.)

  15. Radiolytic production of chemical fuels in fusion reactor systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fish, J D

    1977-06-01

    Miley's energy flow diagram for fusion reactor systems is extended to include radiolytic production of chemical fuel. Systematic study of the economics and the overall efficiencies of fusion reactor systems leads to a criterion for evaluating the potential of radiolytic production of chemical fuel as a means of enhancing the performance of a fusion reactor system. The ecumenicity of the schema is demonstrated by application to (1) tokamaks, (2) mirror machines, (3) theta-pinch reactors, (4) laser-heated solenoids, and (5) inertially confined, laser-pellet devices. Pure fusion reactors as well as fusion-fission hybrids are considered.

  16. Radiolytic production of chemical fuels in fusion reactor systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fish, J.D.

    1977-06-01

    Miley's energy flow diagram for fusion reactor systems is extended to include radiolytic production of chemical fuel. Systematic study of the economics and the overall efficiencies of fusion reactor systems leads to a criterion for evaluating the potential of radiolytic production of chemical fuel as a means of enhancing the performance of a fusion reactor system. The ecumenicity of the schema is demonstrated by application to (1) tokamaks, (2) mirror machines, (3) theta-pinch reactors, (4) laser-heated solenoids, and (5) inertially confined, laser-pellet devices. Pure fusion reactors as well as fusion-fission hybrids are considered

  17. Reactor protection system. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fairbrother, D.B.; Vincent, D.R.; Lesniak, L.M.

    1975-04-01

    The reactor protection system-II (RPS-II) designed for use on Babcock and Wilcox 145- and 205-fuel assembly pressurized water reactors is described. In this system, relays in the trip logic have been replaced by solid state devices. A calculating module for the low DNBR, pump status, and offset trip functions has replaced the overpower trip (based on flow and imbalance), the power/RC pump trip, and the variable low pressure trip. Included is a description of the changes from the present Oconee-type reactor protection system (RPS-I), a functional and hardware description of the calculating module, and a discussion of the qualification program conducted to ensure that the degree of protection provided by RPS-II is not less than that provided by previously licensed systems supplied by B and W. (U.S.)

  18. The unique safety challenges of space reactor systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lanes, S.J.; Marshall, A.C.

    1991-01-01

    Compact reactor systems can provide high levels of power for extended periods in space environments. Their relatively low mass and their ability to operate independently of their proximity to the sun make reactor power systems high desirable for many civilian and military space missions. The US Department of Energy is developing reactor system technologies to provide electrical power for space applications. In addition, reactors are now being considered to provide thermal power to a hydrogen propellant for nuclear thermal rocketry. Space reactor safety issues differ from commercial reactor issues, in some areas, because of very different operating requirements and environments. Accidents similar to those postulated for commercial reactors must be considered for space reactors during their operational phase. Safety strategies will need to be established that account for the consequences of the loss of essential power

  19. Potential of incineration of long-life fission products from fission energy system by D-T and D-D fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sekimoto, H.; Takashima, H.

    2001-01-01

    The incineration of LLFPs, all of which can not be incinerated with only the fast reactor without isotope separation is studied by employing the DT and DD fusion reactors. The requirement of production of tritium for the DT reactor is severe and the thickness of the blanket should be decreased considerably to incinerate the considerable amount of LLFPs. On the other hand the DD fusion reactor is free from the neutron economy constraint and can incinerate all LLFPs. The pure DD reactor can also show the excellent performance to reduce the first wall loading less than 1 MW/m 2 even for total LLFP incineration. By raising the wall loading to the design limit, the D-D reactor can incinerate the LLFPs from several fast reactors. When the fusion reactor is utilized as an energy producer, plasma confinement is very difficult problem, especially for the D-D reactor compared to the D-T reactor. However, when it is utilized as an incinerator of LLFP, this problem becomes considerably easier. Therefore, the incineration of LLFP is considered as an attractive subject for the D-D reactor. (author)

  20. Potential of incineration of long-life fission products from fission energy system by D-T and D-D fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sekimoto, Hiroshi; Takashima, Hiroaki

    1999-01-01

    The incineration of LLFPs, all of which can not be incinerated with only the fast reactor without isotope separation is studied by employing the DT and DD fusion reactors. The requirement of production of tritium for the DT reactor is severe and the thickness of the blanket should be decreased considerably to incinerate the considerable amount of LLFPs. On the other hand the DD fusion reactor is free from the neutron economy constraint and can incinerate all LLFPs. The pure DD reactor can also show the excellent performance to reduce the first wall loading less than 1 MW/m 2 even for total LLFP incineration. By raising the wall loading to the design limit, the D-D reactor can incinerate the LLFPs from several fast reactors. When the fusion reactor is utilized as an energy producer, plasma confinement is very difficult problem, especially for the D-D reactor compared to the D-T reactor. However, when it is utilized as an incinerator of LLFP, this problem becomes considerably easier. Therefore, the incineration of LLFP is considered as an attractive subject for the D-D reactor. (author)

  1. Reactors Save Energy, Costs for Hydrogen Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    While examining fuel-reforming technology for fuel cells onboard aircraft, Glenn Research Center partnered with Garrettsville, Ohio-based Catacel Corporation through the Glenn Alliance Technology Exchange program and a Space Act Agreement. Catacel developed a stackable structural reactor that is now employed for commercial hydrogen production and results in energy savings of about 20 percent.

  2. Sodium fast reactors energy conversion systems. Na-CO2 interaction. Comparison with Na-water interaction of conventional water Rankine cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Latge, Christian; Simon, Nicole

    2006-01-01

    The Sodium Fast Reactor is a very promising candidate for the development of Fast Neutron Reactors. It is well known owing to its wide development since the 1950's, throughout all countries involved in the development of nuclear power plants. The development of Sodium-cooled fast neutron reactors is possible due to its very attractive sodium, nuclear, physical and even some of its chemical properties. Nevertheless, the operational feedback has shown that the concept has several drawbacks: difficulties for In-Service Inspection and Repair operations due to the sodium opacity and possible detrimental effects of its reactivity with air and water when the heat conversion is performed with a conventional Rankine cycle. Moreover, the various design projects have shown some difficulties in enhancing its competitiveness with regards to existing NPPs without any new innovative options, i.e. the possibility of suppressing the intermediate circuits and/or the development of an optimized energy conversion system. The Supercritical CO 2 Brayton Cycle option for the energy conversion has been widely suggested because of its high thermodynamic efficiency (over 40%), its potential compactness of the Balance Of Plant equipment due to the small-sized turbo machinery system, and for its applicability to both Direct or Indirect Cycle (Na, PbBi, He) assuming the hypothesis that the Supercritical CO 2 -Na interaction has less serious potential consequences than sodium-water consequences in the conventional Rankine cycle. Within the framework of the SMFR (Small Modular Fast Reactor) project, developed jointly by Argonne National Laboratory (ANL-USA), the 'Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique' (CEA) and Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA, formerly Japan Nuclear Cycle development), this option has been selected and investigated. This paper deals with the study of the interaction between Na and CO 2 , based on a literature review: the result of this study will allow the definition of R and D

  3. Introduction to the use of the INPRO methodology in a nuclear energy system assessment. A report of the International Project on Innovative Nuclear Reactors and Fuel Cycles (INPRO)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    The International Project on Innovative Nuclear Reactors and Fuel Cycles (INPRO) was initiated in 2001 on the basis of an IAEA General Conference resolution in 2000 (GC(44)/RES/21). INPRO activities have since that time been continuously endorsed by resolutions of the IAEA General Conference and by the General Assembly of the United Nations. The objectives of INPRO are to: Help ensure that nuclear energy is available to contribute, in a sustainable manner, to the goal of meeting energy needs in the 21st century; Bring together technology holders and users so that they can jointly consider the international and national actions required to ensure the sustainability of nuclear energy through innovations in technology and/or institutional arrangements. To fulfil these objectives, INPRO developed a set of basic principles, user requirements and criteria, along with an assessment method, which are the basis of the INPRO methodology for evaluation of the sustainability of innovative nuclear energy systems. To provide additional guidance in using the INPRO methodology, the nine volume INPRO Manual was developed; it consists of an overview volume and eight volumes covering the areas of economics, institutional measures (infrastructure), waste management, proliferation resistance, physical protection, environment (including the impact of stressors and the availability of resources), reactor safety, and the safety of nuclear fuel cycle facilities. To assist Member States in applying the INPRO methodology, the nuclear energy system assessment (NESA) support package is being developed. This includes a database (containing input data for assessment), provision of training courses in the INPRO methodology and examples of comprehensive assessments. This publication provides guidance on how a variety of potential users, including nuclear technology developers, experienced users and prospective first time nuclear technology users (newcomers) can apply the INPRO methodology for

  4. Reactor fueling system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hattori, Noriaki; Hirano, Haruyoshi.

    1983-01-01

    Purpose: To optimally position a fuel catcher by mounting a television camera to a fuel catching portion and judging video images by the use of a computer or the like. Constitution: A television camera is mounted to the lower end of a fuel catching mechanism for handling nuclear fuels and a fuel assembly disposed within a reactor core or a fuel storage pool is observed directly from above to judge the position for the fuel assembly by means of video signals. Then, the relative deviation between the actual position of the fuel catcher and that set in a memory device is determined and the positional correction is carried out automatically so as to reduce the determined deviation to zero. This enables to catch the fuel assembly without failure and improves the efficiency for the fuel exchange operation. (Moriyama, K.)

  5. Power reactor information system (PRIS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-06-01

    Since the very beginning of commercial operation of nuclear power plants, the nuclear power industry worldwide has accumulated more than 5000 reactor years of experience. The IAEA has been collecting Operating Experience data for Nuclear Power Plants since 1970 which were computerized in 1980. The Agency has undertaken to make Power Reactor Information System (PRIS) available on-line to its Member States. The aim of this publication is to provide the users of PRIS from their terminals with description of data base and communication systems and to show the methods of accessing the data

  6. Solvent refined coal reactor quench system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorogood, Robert M.

    1983-01-01

    There is described an improved SRC reactor quench system using a condensed product which is recycled to the reactor and provides cooling by evaporation. In the process, the second and subsequent reactors of a series of reactors are cooled by the addition of a light oil fraction which provides cooling by evaporation in the reactor. The vaporized quench liquid is recondensed from the reactor outlet vapor stream.

  7. Calculation of low-energy reactor neutrino spectra reactor for reactor neutrino experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riyana, Eka Sapta; Suda, Shoya; Ishibashi, Kenji; Matsuura, Hideaki [Dept. of Applied Quantum Physics and Nuclear Engineering, Kyushu University, Kyushu (Japan); Katakura, Junichi [Dept. of Nuclear System Safety Engineering, Nagaoka University of Technology, Nagaoka (Japan)

    2016-06-15

    Nuclear reactors produce a great number of antielectron neutrinos mainly from beta-decay chains of fission products. Such neutrinos have energies mostly in MeV range. We are interested in neutrinos in a region of keV, since they may take part in special weak interactions. We calculate reactor antineutrino spectra especially in the low energy region. In this work we present neutrino spectrum from a typical pressurized water reactor (PWR) reactor core. To calculate neutrino spectra, we need information about all generated nuclides that emit neutrinos. They are mainly fission fragments, reaction products and trans-uranium nuclides that undergo negative beta decay. Information in relation to trans-uranium nuclide compositions and its evolution in time (burn-up process) were provided by a reactor code MVP-BURN. We used typical PWR parameter input for MVP-BURN code and assumed the reactor to be operated continuously for 1 year (12 months) in a steady thermal power (3.4 GWth). The PWR has three fuel compositions of 2.0, 3.5 and 4.1 wt% {sup 235}U contents. For preliminary calculation we adopted a standard burn-up chain model provided by MVP-BURN. The chain model treated 21 heavy nuclides and 50 fission products. The MVB-BURN code utilized JENDL 3.3 as nuclear data library. We confirm that the antielectron neutrino flux in the low energy region increases with burn-up of nuclear fuel. The antielectron-neutrino spectrum in low energy region is influenced by beta emitter nuclides with low Q value in beta decay (e.g. {sup 241}Pu) which is influenced by burp-up level: Low energy antielectron-neutrino spectra or emission rates increase when beta emitters with low Q value in beta decay accumulate. Our result shows the flux of low energy reactor neutrinos increases with burn-up of nuclear fuel.

  8. Assessment of Nuclear Energy Systems Based on a Closed Nuclear Fuel Cycle with Fast Reactors. A report of the International Project on Innovative Nuclear Reactors and Fuel Cycles (INPRO)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    A Joint Study was started in 2005 and completed in 2007 within the International Project on Innovative Nuclear Reactors and Fuel Cycles (INPRO). Canada, China, France, India, Japan, the Republic of Korea, the Russian Federation, and Ukraine participated in this study. The objectives were to assess a nuclear energy system based on a closed fuel cycle (CNFC) with fast reactors (FR) regarding its sustainability, determine milestones for the nuclear energy system deployment, and establish frameworks for, and areas of, collaborative R and D work. The assessment was carried out in accordance with the requirements of INPRO methodology and guiding documents of the Joint Study developed and approved by the participating parties (Canada and Ukraine participated in the discussions during the Joint Study, but did not contribute to the assessments themselves). The Joint Study was implemented in steps. In its first step, nominated experts, during the course of extensive discussions, analyzed the country/region/world context data; discussed national and global scenarios of introduction of the CNFC-FR systems; identified technologies suitable for the INS; and arrived at a broad definition of a common CNFC-FR system. In the second step, the participants of the study examined characteristics of CNFC-FR systems for compliance with criteria of sustainability developed in the INPRO methodology in the area of economics, safety, environment, waste management, proliferation resistance, and infrastructure. The results of the study were submitted to and endorsed by the INPRO Steering Committee in meetings held in Vienna 2005 - 2007. The authors of the Joint Study report highly appreciate the valuable comments provided by delegates of the INPRO Steering Committee meetings as well as the advice and assistance of the other experts. Due to the length of the Joint Study report, a summary of the results was produced, which is the content of this publication. The full text of the Joint Study

  9. Power Reactor Information System (PRIS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spiegelberg, R.

    1992-01-01

    The IAEA has been collecting Operating Experience data for Nuclear Power Plants of the IAEA Member States since 1970. In order to facilitate an analysis of nuclear power plant performance as well as to produce relevant publications, all previously collected data supplied from the questionnaires were computerized in 1980 and the Power Reactor Information System was implemented. PRIS currently contains production records for the years up to and including 1990 and about 98% of the reactors-years operating experience in the world is contained in PRIS. (orig.)

  10. Reactor structure and superconducting magnet system of ITER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tada, Eisuke; Yoshida, Kiyoshi; Shibanuma, Kiyoshi; Okuno, Kiyoshi; Tsuji, Hiroshi; Shimamoto, Susumu

    1993-01-01

    Fusion Experimental Reactors are one of the major steps toward realization of the fusion energy and the key objective are to demonstrate the scientific and technological feasibility prior to the Demo Fusion Reactor. ITER (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor) is one of experimental reactors and the conceptual design has been completed by the united efforts of USA, USSR, EC and Japan. In parallel with the conceptual design, key technology development in various areas has being conducted. This paper describes the overall design concepts and the latest technological achievements of the ITER reactor structure and superconducting magnet system. (author)

  11. Lessons Learned from Nuclear Energy System Assessments (NESA) Using the INPRO Methodology. A Report of the International Project on Innovative Nuclear Reactors and Fuel Cycles (INPRO)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-11-01

    The International Project on Innovative Nuclear Reactors and Fuel Cycles (INPRO) was initiated in 2001 on the basis of a resolution of the IAEA General Conference in 2000 (GC(44)/RES/21). INPRO activities have since been continuously endorsed by resolutions of IAEA General Conferences and by the General Assembly of the United Nations. The objectives of INPRO are to: Help ensure that nuclear energy is available to contribute, in a sustainable manner, to meeting the energy needs of the 21st century; Bring together technology holders and users so that they can consider jointly the international and national actions required for achieving desired innovations in nuclear reactors and fuel cycles. INPRO is proceeding in steps. In its first step, referred to as Phase 1, 2001 to 2006, INPRO developed a set of basic principles, user requirements and criteria together with an assessment method, which taken together, comprise the INPRO methodology for the evaluation of innovative nuclear energy systems. To provide additional guidance in using the INPRO methodology an INPRO Manual was developed; it is comprised of an overview volume and eight additional volumes covering the areas of economics, infrastructure, waste management, proliferation resistance, physical protection, environment, safety of reactors, and safety of the nuclear fuel cycle facilities. Based on a decision of the 9 INPRO steering committee in July 2006, INPRO has entered into Phase 2. This phase has three main directions of activity: methodology improvement, infrastructure/institutional aspects and collaborative projects. As of March 2009, INPRO had 28 members: Argentina, Armenia, Belarus, Belgium, Brazil, Bulgaria, Canada, Chile, China, Czech Republic, France, Germany, India, Indonesia, Japan, Republic of Korea, Morocco, Netherlands, Pakistan, the Russian Federation, Slovakia, South Africa, Spain, Switzerland, Turkey, Ukraine, United States of America and the European Commission. This IAEA-TECDOC is part of

  12. Tokamak reactor systems studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    A summary of work completed on the ARIES project during this report period is given. The main areas of effort were: neutronics, shield optimization and design, safety, systems, startup and shutdown, and ripple loss

  13. Reactor limit control system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rubbel, F.E.

    1982-01-01

    The very extensive use of limitations in the operational field between protection system and closed-loop controls is an important feature of German understanding of operational safety. The design of limitations is based on very large activities in the computational field but mostly on the high level of the plant-wide own commissioning experience of a turnkey contractor. Limitations combine intelligence features of closed-loop controls with the high availability of protection systems. (orig.)

  14. Innovative Energy Planning and Nuclear Option Using CANDLE Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sekimoto, H; Nagata, A; Mingyu, Y [Tokyo Institute of Technology, Tokyo (Japan)

    2008-07-01

    A new reactor burn-up strategy CANDLE (Constant Axial shape of Neutron flux, nuclide densities and power shape During Life of Energy producing reactor) was proposed, where shapes of neutron flux, nuclide densities and power density distributions remain constant but move upward (or downward) along its core axis. This burn-up strategy can derive many merits. The change of excess reactivity along burn-up is theoretically zero for ideal equilibrium condition, and shim rods will not be required for this reactor. The reactor becomes free from accidents induced by unexpected control rods withdrawal. The core characteristics, such as power feedback coefficients and power peaking factor, are not changed during life of operation. Therefore, the operation of the reactor becomes much easier than the conventional reactors. The infinite-medium neutron multiplication factor of replacing fuel is less than unity. Therefore, the transportation and storage of replacing fuels becomes easy and safe, since they are free from criticality accidents. Small long life fast reactor with CANDLE burn-up concept has investigated with depleted uranium as a replacing fuel. Both core diameter and height are chosen to be 2.0 m, and the thermal power is 200 MW. Lead-bismuth is used as a coolant, and nitride (enriched N-15) fuel are employed. The velocity of burning region along burn-up is less than 1.0 cm/year that enables a long life design easily. The core averaged discharged fuel burn-up is about 40 percent. It is about ten times of light water reactor burn-up. The spent fuel volume becomes one-tenth of light water reactor spent fuel. If a light water reactor with a certain power output has been operated for 40 years, the CANDLE reactor can be operated for 2000 years with the same power output and with only depleted uranium left after fuel production for the light water reactor. The system does not need any reprocessing or enrichment. Therefore, the reactor operation becomes very safe, the waste

  15. Innovative Energy Planning and Nuclear Option Using CANDLE Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sekimoto, H.; Nagata, A.; Mingyu, Y.

    2008-01-01

    A new reactor burn-up strategy CANDLE (Constant Axial shape of Neutron flux, nuclide densities and power shape During Life of Energy producing reactor) was proposed, where shapes of neutron flux, nuclide densities and power density distributions remain constant but move upward (or downward) along its core axis. This burn-up strategy can derive many merits. The change of excess reactivity along burn-up is theoretically zero for ideal equilibrium condition, and shim rods will not be required for this reactor. The reactor becomes free from accidents induced by unexpected control rods withdrawal. The core characteristics, such as power feedback coefficients and power peaking factor, are not changed during life of operation. Therefore, the operation of the reactor becomes much easier than the conventional reactors. The infinite-medium neutron multiplication factor of replacing fuel is less than unity. Therefore, the transportation and storage of replacing fuels becomes easy and safe, since they are free from criticality accidents. Small long life fast reactor with CANDLE burn-up concept has investigated with depleted uranium as a replacing fuel. Both core diameter and height are chosen to be 2.0 m, and the thermal power is 200 MW. Lead-bismuth is used as a coolant, and nitride (enriched N-15) fuel are employed. The velocity of burning region along burn-up is less than 1.0 cm/year that enables a long life design easily. The core averaged discharged fuel burn-up is about 40 percent. It is about ten times of light water reactor burn-up. The spent fuel volume becomes one-tenth of light water reactor spent fuel. If a light water reactor with a certain power output has been operated for 40 years, the CANDLE reactor can be operated for 2000 years with the same power output and with only depleted uranium left after fuel production for the light water reactor. The system does not need any reprocessing or enrichment. Therefore, the reactor operation becomes very safe, the waste

  16. BWR reactor water cleanup system flexible wedge gate isolation valve qualification and high energy flow interruption test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeWall, K.G.; Steele, R. Jr.

    1989-10-01

    This report presents the results of research performed to develop technical insights for the NRC effort regarding Generic Issue 87, ''Failure of HPCI Steam Line Without Isolation.'' Volume III of this report contains the data and findings from the original research performed to assess the qualification of the valves and reported in EGG-SSRE-7387, ''Qualification of Valve Assemblies in High Energy BWR Systems Penetrating Containment.'' We present the original work here to complete the documentation trail. The recommendations contained in Volume III of this report resulted in the test program described in Volume I and II. The research began with a survey to characterize the population of normally open containment isolation valves in those process lines that connect to the primary system and penetrate containment. The qualification methodology used by the various manufacturers identified in the survey is reviewed and deficiencies in that methodology are identified. Recommendations for expanding the qualification of valve assemblies for high energy pipe break conditions are presented. 11 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs

  17. Core cooling system for reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kondo, Ryoichi; Amada, Tatsuo.

    1976-01-01

    Purpose: To improve the function of residual heat dissipation from the reactor core in case of emergency by providing a secondary cooling system flow channel, through which fluid having been subjected to heat exchange with the fluid flowing in a primary cooling system flow channel flows, with a core residual heat removal system in parallel with a main cooling system provided with a steam generator. Constitution: Heat generated in the core during normal reactor operation is transferred from a primary cooling system flow channel to a secondary cooling system flow channel through a main heat exchanger and then transferred through a steam generator to a water-steam system flow channel. In the event if removal of heat from the core by the main cooling system becomes impossible due to such cause as breakage of the duct line of the primary cooling system flow channel or a trouble in a primary cooling system pump, a flow control valve is opened, and steam generator inlet and outlet valves are closed, thus increasing the flow rate in the core residual heat removal system. Thereafter, a blower is started to cause dissipation of the core residual heat from the flow channel of a system for heat dissipation to atmosphere. (Seki, T.)

  18. Reactor protection and shut-down system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klar

    1980-01-01

    The reactor protection system being a part of the reactor safety system. The requirements on the reactor protection system are: high safety with regard to signal processing, high availability, self-reporting of faults etc. The functional sections of the reactor protection system are the analog section, the logic section and the generating of output signals. Description of the operation characteristics and of the extension of function. (orig.)

  19. Nuclear reactor power supply system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cook, B.M.

    1982-01-01

    The redundant signals from the sensor assemblies measuring the process parameters of a nuclear reactor power supply are transmitted each in its turn to a protection system which operates to actuate the protection apparatus for signals indicating off-process conditions. Each sensor assembly includes a number of like sensors measuring the same parameters. The sets of process signals derived from the sensor assemblies are each in its turn transmitted from the protection system to the control system which impresses control signals on the reactor or its components to counteract the tendency for conditions to drift off-normal status requiring operation of the protection system. A parameter signal selector prevents a parameter signal which differs from the other parameter signals of the set by more than twice the allowable variation from passing to the control system. Test signals are periodically impressed by a test unit on a selected pair of a selection unit and control channels. This arrangement eliminates the possibility that a single component failure which may be spurious will cause an inadvertent trip of the reactor during test. (author)

  20. JAERI thermal reactor standard code system for reactor design and analysis SRAC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuchihashi, Keichiro

    1985-01-01

    SRAC, JAERI thermal reactor standard code system for reactor design and analysis, developed in Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, is for all types of thermal neutron nuclear design and analysis. The code system has undergone extensive verifications to confirm its functions, and has been used in core modification of the research reactor, detailed design of the multi-purpose high temperature gas reactor and analysis of the experiment with a critical assembly. In nuclear calculation with the code system, multi-group lattice calculation is first made with the libraries. Then, with the resultant homogeneous equivalent group constants, reactor core calculation is made. Described are the following: purpose and development of the code system, functions of the SRAC system, bench mark tests and usage state and future development. (Mori, K.)

  1. Space reactor electric systems: system integration studies, Phase 1 report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, R.V.; Bost, D.; Determan, W.R.; Harty, R.B.; Katz, B.; Keshishian, V.; Lillie, A.F.; Thomson, W.B.

    1983-01-01

    This report presents the results of preliminary space reactor electric system integration studies performed by Rockwell International's Energy Systems Group (ESG). The preliminary studies investigated a broad range of reactor electric system concepts for powers of 25 and 100 KWe. The purpose of the studies was to provide timely system information of suitable accuracy to support ongoing mission planning activities. The preliminary system studies were performed by assembling the five different subsystems that are used in a system: the reactor, the shielding, the primary heat transport, the power conversion-processing, and the heat rejection subsystems. The subsystem data in this report were largely based on Rockwell's recently prepared Subsystem Technology Assessment Report. Nine generic types of reactor subsystems were used in these system studies. Several levels of technology were used for each type of reactor subsystem. Seven generic types of power conversion-processing subsystems were used, and several levels of technology were again used for each type. In addition, various types and levels of technology were used for the shielding, primary heat transport, and heat rejection subsystems. A total of 60 systems were studied

  2. Reactor protection systems for the Replacement Research Reactor, ANSTO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morris, C.R.

    2003-01-01

    The 20-MW Replacement Research Reactor Project which is currently under construction at ANSTO will have a combination of a state of the art triplicated computer based reactor protection system, and a fully independent, and diverse, triplicated analogue reactor protection system, that has been in use in the nuclear industry, for many decades. The First Reactor Protection System (FRPS) consists of a Triconex triplicated modular redundant system that has recently been approved by the USNRC for use in the USA?s power reactor program. The Second Reactor Protection System is a hardwired analogue system supplied by Foxboro, the Spec 200 system, which is also Class1E qualified. The FRPS is used to drop the control rods when its safety parameter setpoints have been reached. The SRPS is used to drain the reflector tank and since this operation would result in a reactor poison out due to the time it would take to refill the tank the FRPS trip setpoints are more limiting. The FRPS and SRPS have limited hardwired indications on the control panels in the main control room (MCR) and emergency control centre (ECC), however all FRPS and SRPS parameters are capable of being displayed on the reactor control and monitoring system (RCMS) video display units. The RCMS is a Foxboro Series I/A control system which is used for plant control and monitoring and as a protection system for the cold neutron source. This paper will provide technical information on both systems, their trip logics, their interconnections with each other, and their integration into the reactor control and monitoring system and control panels. (author)

  3. Microchannel Reactor System for Catalytic Hydrogenation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adeniyi Lawal; Woo Lee; Ron Besser; Donald Kientzler; Luke Achenie

    2010-12-22

    We successfully demonstrated a novel process intensification concept enabled by the development of microchannel reactors, for energy efficient catalytic hydrogenation reactions at moderate temperature, and pressure, and low solvent levels. We designed, fabricated, evaluated, and optimized a laboratory-scale microchannel reactor system for hydrogenation of onitroanisole and a proprietary BMS molecule. In the second phase of the program, as a prelude to full-scale commercialization, we designed and developed a fully-automated skid-mounted multichannel microreactor pilot plant system for multiphase reactions. The system is capable of processing 1 – 10 kg/h of liquid substrate, and an industrially relevant immiscible liquid-liquid was successfully demonstrated on the system. Our microreactor-based pilot plant is one-of-akind. We anticipate that this process intensification concept, if successfully demonstrated, will provide a paradigm-changing basis for replacing existing energy inefficient, cost ineffective, environmentally detrimental slurry semi-batch reactor-based manufacturing practiced in the pharmaceutical and fine chemicals industries.

  4. Assessment of Nuclear Energy Systems based on a Closed Nuclear Fuel Cycle with Fast Reactors. A Report of the International Project on Innovative Nuclear Reactors and Fuel Cycles (INPRO)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-09-01

    A Joint Study was started in 2005 and completed in 2007 within the International Project on Innovative Nuclear Reactors and Fuel Cycles (INPRO). Canada, China, France, India, Japan, the Republic of Korea, the Russian Federation, and Ukraine participated in this study. The objectives were to assess a nuclear energy system based on a closed fuel cycle (CNFC) with fast reactors (FR) regarding its sustainability, determine milestones for the nuclear energy system deployment, and establish frameworks for, and areas of, collaborative R and D work. The assessment was carried out in accordance with requirements of INPRO methodology and guiding documents of the Joint Study developed and approved by the participating parties (Canada and Ukraine participated in the discussions during the Joint Study but did not contribute to the assessments themselves). The Joint Study was implemented in steps. In its first step, nominated experts in course of extensive discussions analyzed the country/region/world context data, discussed national and global scenarios of introduction of the INS CNFC-FR, identified technologies suitable for the INS, and arrived at a broad definition of a common INS CNFC-FR. In the second step, the participants of the study examined characteristics of INS CNFC-FR for compliance with criteria of sustainability developed in the INPRO methodology in the domain of economics, safety, environment, waste management, proliferation resistance, physical protection and infrastructure. The results of the study were submitted to and endorsed by the INPRO Steering Committee meetings held in Vienna 2005-2007. The authors of the report highly appreciate the valuable comments provided by delegates of INPRO Steering Committee meetings as well as the advice and assistance of the other experts. Due to the length of the Joint Study report a summary of the results was produced, which was published as a hard copy. The full text of the Joint Study report is available on the CD

  5. Perspective of nuclear energy and advanced reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez Jimenez, J.; Cobian, J.

    2007-01-01

    Future nuclear energy growth will be the result of the contributions of every single plant being constructed or projected at present as it is connected to the grid. As per IAEA, there exists presently 34 nuclear power plants under construction 81 with the necessary permits and funding and 223 proposed, which are plants seriously pursuing permits and financing. This means that in a few decades the number of nuclear power plants in operation will have doubled. This growth rate is characterised by the incorporation of new countries to the nuclear club and the gradually increasing importance of Asian countries. During this expansive phase, generation III and III+designs are or will be used. These designs incorporate the experience from operating plants, and introduce innovations on rationalization design efficiency and safety, with emphasis on passive safety features. In a posterior phase, generation IV designs, presently under development, will be employed. Generation IV consists of several types of reactors (fast reactors, very high temperature reactors, etc), which will improve further sustain ability, economy, safety and reliability concepts. The described situation seems to lead to a renaissance of the nuclear energy to levels hardly thinkable several years ago. (Author)

  6. Reactor and process design in sustainable energy technology

    CERN Document Server

    Shi, Fan

    2014-01-01

    Reactor Process Design in Sustainable Energy Technology compiles and explains current developments in reactor and process design in sustainable energy technologies, including optimization and scale-up methodologies and numerical methods. Sustainable energy technologies that require more efficient means of converting and utilizing energy can help provide for burgeoning global energy demand while reducing anthropogenic carbon dioxide emissions associated with energy production. The book, contributed by an international team of academic and industry experts in the field, brings numerous reactor design cases to readers based on their valuable experience from lab R&D scale to industry levels. It is the first to emphasize reactor engineering in sustainable energy technology discussing design. It provides comprehensive tools and information to help engineers and energy professionals learn, design, and specify chemical reactors and processes confidently. Emphasis on reactor engineering in sustainable energy techn...

  7. Dosimetry system of the RB reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lolic, B.; Vukadin, D.

    1962-01-01

    Although RB reactor is operated at very low power levels, safety and dosimetry systems have high importance. This paper shows detailed dosimetry system with fundamental typical components. Estimated radiation doses dependent on reactor power are given at some characteristic points in the rooms nearby reactor

  8. Nuclear reactor vessel decontamination systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McGuire, P. J.

    1985-01-01

    There is disclosed in the present application, a decontamination system for reactor vessels. The system is operatable without entry by personnel into the contaminated vessel before the decontamination operation is carried out and comprises an assembly which is introduced into the vertical cylindrical vessel of the typical boiling water reactor through the open top. The assembly includes a circular track which is centered by guideways permanently installed in the reactor vessel and the track guides opposed pairs of nozzles through which water under very high pressure is directed at the wall for progressively cutting and sweeping a tenacious radioactive coating as the nozzles are driven around the track in close proximity to the vessel wall. The whole assembly is hoisted to a level above the top of the vessel by a crane, outboard slides on the assembly brought into engagement with the permanent guideways and the assembly progressively lowered in the vessel as the decontamination operation progresses. The assembly also includes a low pressure nozzle which forms a spray umbrella above the high pressure nozzles to contain radioactive particles dislodged during the decontamination

  9. Reactor technology: power conversion systems and reactor operation and maintenance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Powell, J.R.

    1977-01-01

    The use of advanced fuels permits the use of coolants (organic, high pressure helium) that result in power conversion systems with good thermal efficiency and relatively low cost. Water coolant would significantly reduce thermal efficiency, while lithium and salt coolants, which have been proposed for DT reactors, will have comparable power conversion efficiencies, but will probably be significantly more expensive. Helium cooled blankets with direct gas turbine power conversion cycles can also be used with DT reactors, but activation problems will be more severe, and the portion of blanket power in the metallic structure will probably not be available for the direct cycle, because of temperature limitations. A very important potential advantage of advanced fuel reactors over DT fusion reactors is the possibility of easier blanket maintenance and reduced down time for replacement. If unexpected leaks occur, in most cases the leaking circuit can be shut off and a redundant cooling curcuit will take over the thermal load. With the D-He 3 reactor, it appears practical to do this while the reactor is operating, as long as the leak is small enough not to shut down the reactor. Redundancy for Cat-D reactors has not been explored in detail, but appears feasible in principle. The idea of mobile units operating in the reactor chamber for service and maintenance of radioactive elements is explored

  10. Nuclear power reactors and hydrogen storage systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ibrahim Aly Mahmoud El Osery.

    1980-01-01

    Among conclusions and results come by, a nuclear-electric-hydrogen integrated power system was suggested as a way to prevent the energy crisis. It was shown that the hydrogen power system using nuclear power as a leading energy resource would hold an advantage in the current international situation as well as for the long-term future. Results reported provide designers of integrated nuclear-electric-hydrogen systems with computation models and routines which will allow them to explore the optimal solution in coupling power reactors to hydrogen producing systems, taking into account the specific characters of hydrogen storage systems. The models were meant for average computers of a type easily available in developing countries. (author)

  11. Emergency system for nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-01-01

    The invention concerns a circuit called 'of emergency help' intended to remove, in a safe and quick manner, the residual thermal power on the safety vessel of a fast neutron reactor cooled by a liquid metal flow, in the event of a failure occurring inside the main reactor vessel or on it. This system includes a network of spray nozzle tubes, distributed around and near the external surface of the safety vessel, to project on to the surface of the vessel a mist of a liquid having high latent vaporisation heat. The steam produced on contact with the safety vessel is collected in the space provided between the safety vessel and the external protection vessel by at least one collector pipe for dischaging this steam outside the vessel. Under a preferred design mode of the invention the liquid is water the use of which turns out to be particularly advantageous in practice owing to its favourable physical properties and its low cost [fr

  12. The Optimization of power reactor control system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Danupoyo, S.D.

    1997-01-01

    A power reactor is an important part in nuclear powered electrical plant systems. Success in controlling the power reactor will establish safety of the whole power plant systems. Until now, the power reactor has been controlled by a classical control system that was designed based on output feedback method. To meet the safety requirements that are now more restricted, the recently used power reactor control system should be modified. this paper describes a power reactor control system that is designed based on a state feedback method optimized with LQG (Linear-quadrature-gaussian) method and equipped with a state estimator. A pressurized-water type reactor has been used as the model. by using a point kinetics method with one group delayed neutrons. the result of simulation testing shows that the optimized control system can control the power reactor more effective and efficient than the classical control system

  13. Pneumatic transport systems for TRIGA reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bolton, John A.

    1970-01-01

    Main parameters and advantages of pneumatically operated systems, primarily those operated by gas pressure are discussed. The special irradiation ends for the TRIGA reactor are described. To give some idea of the complexity of some modern systems, the author presents the large system currently operating at the National Bureau of Standards in Washington. In this system, 13 stations are located throughout the radiochemistry laboratories and three irradiation ends are located in the reactor, which is a 14-megawatt unit. The system incorporates practically every fail-safe device possible, including ball valves located on all capsule lines entering the reactor area, designed to close automatically in the event of a reactor scram, and at that time capsules within the reactor would be diverted by means of switches located on the inside of the reactor wall. The whole system is under final control of a permission control panel located in the reactor control room. Many other safety accessories of the system are described

  14. Advanced Reactor Technology/Energy Conversion Project FY17 Accomplishments.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rochau, Gary E. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2018-02-01

    The purpose of the ART Energy Conversion (EC) Project is to provide solutions to convert the heat from an advanced reactor to useful products that support commercial application of the reactor designs.

  15. Hydrogen production system based on high temperature gas cooled reactor energy using the sulfur-iodine (SI) thermochemical water splitting cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia, L.; Gonzalez, D.

    2011-01-01

    Hydrogen production from water using nuclear energy offers one of the most attractive zero-emission energy strategies and the only one that is practical on a substantial scale. Recently, strong interest is seen in hydrogen production using heat of a high-temperature gas-cooled reactor. The high-temperature characteristics of the modular helium reactor (MHR) make it a strong candidate for producing hydrogen using thermochemical or high-temperature electrolysis (HTE) processes. Eventually it could be also employ a high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR), which is particularly attractive because it has unique capability, among potential future generation nuclear power options, to produce high-temperature heat ideally suited for nuclear-heated hydrogen production. Using heat from nuclear reactors to drive a sulfur-iodine (SI) thermochemical hydrogen production process has been interest of many laboratories in the world. One of the promising approaches to produce large quantity of hydrogen in an efficient way using the nuclear energy is the sulfur-iodine (SI) thermochemical water splitting cycle. Among the thermochemical cycles, the sulfur iodine process remains a very promising solution in matter of efficiency and cost. This work provides a pre-conceptual design description of a SI-Based H2-Nuclear Reactor plant. Software based on chemical process simulation (CPS) was used to simulate the thermochemical water splitting cycle Sulfur-Iodine for hydrogen production. (Author)

  16. Nuclear energy center site survey reactor plant considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-05-01

    The Energy Reorganization Act of 1974 required the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) to make a nuclear energy center site survey (NECSS). Background information for the NECSS report was developed in a series of tasks which include: socioeconomic inpacts; environmental impact (reactor facilities); emergency response capability (reactor facilities); aging of nuclear energy centers; and dry cooled nuclear energy centers

  17. Digital control system of advanced reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peng Huaqing; Zhang Rui; Liu Lixin

    2001-01-01

    This article produced the Digital Control System For Advanced Reactor made by NPIC. This system uses Siemens SIMATIC PCS 7 process control system and includes five control system: reactor power control system, pressurizer level control system, pressurizer pressure control system, steam generator water level control system and dump control system. This system uses three automatic station to realize the function of five control system. Because the safety requisition of reactor is very strict, the system is redundant. The system configuration uses CFC and SCL. the human-machine interface is configured by Wincc. Finally the system passed the test of simulation by using RETRAN 02 to simulate the control object. The research solved the key technology of digital control system of reactor and will be very helpful for the nationalization of digital reactor control system

  18. Propose Reactor Control and Monitoring System for RTP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohd Sabri Minhat; Izhar Abu Hussin; Mohd Idris Taib; Mohd Khairulezwan Abdul Manan; Nurfarhana Ayuni Joha

    2011-01-01

    Reactor control and monitoring system is a one of the important features used in reactor. The control and monitoring must come together to provide safety, excellent performance and reliable in nuclear reactor technology application. Objectives of this technical paper are to design and propose reactor control system and reactor monitoring system in Research Reactor (RTP) for Reactor Upgrading Project. (author)

  19. Recirculation system for nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braun, H. E.; Dollard, W. J.; Tower, S. N.

    1980-01-01

    A recirculation system for use in pressurized water nuclear reactors to increase the output temperature of the reactor coolant, thereby achieving a significant improvement in plant efficiency without exceeding current core design limits. A portion of the hot outlet coolant is recirculated to the inlets of the peripheral fuel assemblies which operate at relatively low power levels. The outlet temperature from these peripheral fuel assemblies is increased to a temperature above that of the average core outlet. The recirculation system uses external pumps and introduces the hot recirculation coolant to the free space between the core barrel and the core baffle, where it flows downward and inward to the inlets of the peripheral fuel assemblies. In the unlikely event of a loss of coolant accident, the recirculation system flow path through the free space and to the inlets of the fuel assemblies is utilized for the injection of emergency coolant to the lower vessel and core. During emergency coolant injection, the emergency coolant is prevented from bypassing the core through the recirculation system by check valves inserted into the recirculation system piping

  20. Computerized reactor pressure vessel materials information system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strosnider, J.; Monserrate, C.; Kenworthy, L.D.; Tether, C.D.

    1980-10-01

    A computerized information system for storage and retrieval of reactor pressure vessel materials data was established, as part of Task Action Plan A-11, Reactor Vessel Materials Toughness. Data stored in the system are necessary for evaluating the resistance of reactor pressure vessels to flaw-induced fracture. This report includes (1) a description of the information system; (2) guidance on accessing the system; and (3) a user's manual for the system

  1. Reactor-core isolation cooling system with dedicated generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nazareno, E.V.; Dillmann, C.W.

    1992-01-01

    This patent describes a nuclear reactor complex. It comprises a dual-phase nuclear reactor; a main turbine for converting phase-conversion energy stored by vapor into mechanical energy for driving a generator; a main generator for converting the mechanical energy into electricity; a fluid reservoir external to the reactor; a reactor core isolation cooling system with several components at least some of which require electrical power. It also comprises an auxiliary pump for pumping fluid from the reservoir into the reactor pressure vessel; an auxiliary turbine for driving the pump; control means for regulating the rotation rate of the auxiliary turbine; cooling means for cooling the control means; and an auxiliary generator coupled to the auxiliary turbine for providing at least a portion of the electrical power required by the components during a blackout condition

  2. Breeding description for fast reactors and symbiotic reactor systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanan, N.A.

    1979-01-01

    A mathematical model was developed to provide a breeding description for fast reactors and symbiotic reactor systems by means of figures of merit type quantities. The model was used to investigate the effect of several parameters and different fuel usage strategies on the figures of merit which provide the breeding description. The integrated fuel cycle model for a single-reactor is reviewed. The excess discharge is automatically used to fuel identical reactors. The resulting model describes the accumulation of fuel in a system of identical reactors. Finite burnup and out-of-pile delays and losses are treated in the model. The model is then extended from fast breeder park to symbiotic reactor systems. The asymptotic behavior of the fuel accumulation is analyzed. The asymptotic growth rate appears as the largest eigenvalue in the solution of the characteristic equations of the time dependent differential balance equations for the system. The eigenvector corresponding to the growth rate is the core equilibrium composition. The analogy of the long-term fuel cycle equations, in the framework of this model, and the neutron balance equations is explored. An eigenvalue problem adjoint to the one generated by the characteristic equations of the system is defined. The eigenvector corresponding to the largest eigenvalue, i.e. to the growth rate, represents the ''isotopic breeding worths.'' Analogously to the neutron adjoint flux it is shown that the isotopic breeding worths represent the importance of an isotope for breeding, i.e. for the growth rate of a system

  3. Development of a core follow calculational system for research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muller, E.Z.; Ball, G.; Joubert, W.R.; Schutte, H.C.; Stoker, C.C.; Reitsma, F.

    1994-01-01

    Over the last few years a comprehensive Pressurized Water Reactor and Materials Testing Reactor core analysis code system based on modern reactor physics methods has been under development by the Atomic Energy Corporation of South Africa. This system, known as OSCAR-3, will incorporate a customized graphical user interface and data management system to ensure user-friendliness and good quality control. The system has now reached the stage of development where it can be used for practical MTR core analyses. This paper describes the current capabilities of the components of the OSCAR-3 package, their integration within the package, and outlines future developments. 10 refs., 1 tab., 1 fig

  4. The nuclear instrumentation system of the French 1400 MWe reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bourgerette, A.; Mauduit, J.P.

    1993-01-01

    The nuclear instrumentation systems in power reactors in France have made considerable advances thanks to technological progress. The appearance of an integrated digital protection system (SPIN) and the extension of digital techniques have considerably improved performance and operating flexibility. Working on the basis of technology developed jointly with the Nuclear Electronics and Instrumentation Department at the French Atomic Energy Commission (CEA), Framatome and Merlin Gerin have designed the new nuclear instrumentation system for 1400 MW reactors. (authors). 4 figs

  5. Functional systems of a pressurized water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heinzel, V.

    1982-01-01

    The main topics, discussed in the present paper, are: - Principle design of the reactor coolant system - reactor pressure vessel with internals - containment design - residual heat removal and emergency cooling systems - nuclear component cooling systems - emergency feed water systems - plant electric power supply system. (orig./RW)

  6. Investigation of the possibility of using residual heat reactor energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aminov, R. Z.; Yurin, V. E.; Bessonov, V. N.

    2017-11-01

    The largest contribution to the probable frequency of core damage is blackout events. The main component of the heat capacity at each reactor within a few minutes following a blackout is the heat resulting from the braking of beta-particles and the transfer of gamma-ray energy by the fission fragments and their decay products, which is known as the residual heat. The power of the residual heat changes gradually over a long period of time and for a VVER-1000 reactor is about 15-20 MW of thermal power over 72 hours. Current cooldown systems increase the cost of the basic nuclear power plants (NPP) funds without changing the amount of electricity generated. Such systems remain on standby, accelerating the aging of the equipment and accordingly reducing its reliability. The probability of system failure increases with the duration of idle time. Furthermore, the reactor residual heat energy is not used. A proposed system for cooling nuclear power plants involves the use of residual thermal power to supply the station’s own needs in emergency situations accompanied by a complete blackout. The thermal power of residual heat can be converted to electrical energy through an additional low power steam turbine. In normal mode, the additional steam turbine generates electricity, which makes it possible to ensure spare NPP and a return on the investment in the reservation system. In this work, experimental data obtained from a Balakovo NPP was analyzed to determine the admissibility of cooldown of the reactors through the 2nd circuit over a long time period, while maintaining high-level parameters for the steam generated by the steam generators.

  7. Data acquisition system for nuclear reactor environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tiwari, Akash; Tiwari, Railesha; Tiwari, S.S.; Panday, Lokesh; Suri, Nitin; Chouksey, Abhsek; Singh, Sarvesh Kumar; Dwivedi, Tarun; Agrawal, Ashish; Pandey, Pranav Kumar; Sharma, Brijnandan; Bhatia, Chirag

    2004-01-01

    We have designed an online real time data acquisition system for nuclear reactor environment monitoring. Data acquisition system has eight channels of analog signals and one channel of pulsed input signal from detectors like GM Tube, or any other similar input. Connectivity between the data acquisition system and environmental parameters monitoring computer is made through a wireless data communication link of 151 MHz/100 mW RF power and 10 km maximum communication range for remote data telemetry. Sensors used are gamma ionizing radiation sensor made from CsI:Tl scintillator, atmospheric pressure sensor with +/-0.1 mbar precision, temperature sensor with +/-l milli degree Celsius precision, relative humidity with +/-0.1RH precision, pulse counts with +/-1 count in 0-10000 Hz count rate measurement precision and +/-1 count is accumulated count measurement precision. The entire data acquisition system and wireless telemetry system is 9 V battery powered and the device is to be fitted on a wireless controlled mobile robot for scanning the nuclear reactor zone from remote. Wireless video camera has been planned for integration into the existing system on a later date for moving the robotics environmental data acquisition system beyond human vision reach. System development cost is Rs.25 Lacs and has been developed for Department of Atomic Energy, Government of India and Indian Defense use. (author)

  8. Nuclear reactor coolant and cover gas system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    George, J.A.; Redding, A.H.; Tower, S.N.

    1976-01-01

    A core cooling system is disclosed for a nuclear reactor of the type utilizing a liquid coolant with a cover gas above free surfaces of the coolant. The disclosed system provides for a large inventory of reactor coolant and a balanced low pressure cover gas arrangement. A flow restricting device disposed within a reactor vessel achieves a pressure of the cover gas in the reactor vessel lower than the pressure of the reactor coolant in the vessel. The low gas pressure is maintained over all free surfaces of the coolant in the cooling system including a coolant reservoir tank. Reactor coolant stored in the reservoir tank allows for the large reactor coolant inventory provided by the invention

  9. Development of multi-functional telerobotic systems for reactor dismantlement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujii, Yoshio; Usui, Hozumi; Shinohara, Yoshikuni

    1992-01-01

    This report summarizes technological features of advanced telerobotic systems for reactor dismantling application developed at the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute. Taking into consideration the special environmental conditions in reactor dismantling, major effort was made to develop multifunctional telerobotic system of high reliability which can be used to perform various complex tasks in an unstructured environment and operated in an easy and flexible manner. The system development was carried out through constructing three systems in seccession; a light-duty and a heavy-duty system as a prototype system for engineering test in cold environment, and a demonstration system for practical on-site application to dismantling highly radioactive reactor internals of an experimental boiling water reactor JPDR (Japan Power Demonstration Reactor). Each system was equipped with one or two amphibious manipulators which can be operated in either a push-button manual, a bilateral master-slave, a teach-and-playback or a programmed control mode. Different scheme was adopted in each system at designing the manipulator, transporter and man-machine interface so as to compare their advantages and disadvantages. According to the JPDR decommissioning program, the demonstration system was successfully operated to dismantle a portion of the radioactive reactor internals of the JPDR, which used underwater plasma arc cutting method and proved the usefulness of the multi-functional telerobotic system for reducing the occupational hazards and enhancing the work efficiency in the course of dismantling highly radioactive reactor components. (author)

  10. Direct energy conversion of radiation energy in fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamaguchi, S.; Iiyoshi, A.; Motojima, O.; Okamoto, M.; Sudo, S.; Ohnishi, M.; Onozuka, M.; Uenosono, C.

    1993-11-01

    Direct energy conversion from plasma heat flux has been studied. Since major parts of fusion energy in the advanced fusion reactor are radiation and charged particle energies, the flexible design of the blanket is possible. We discuss the potentiality of the thermoelectric element that generates electricity by temperature gradient in conductors. A strong magnetic field is used to confine the fusion plasma, therefore, it is appropriate to consider the effect of the magnetic field. We propose a new element which is called Nernst element. The new element needs the magnetic field and the temperature gradient. We compare the efficiency of these two elements in a semiconductor model. Finally, a direct energy conversion are mentioned. (author)

  11. Direct energy conversion of radiation energy in fusion reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, S.; Iiyoshi, A.; Motojima, O.; Okamoto, M.; Sudo, S.; Ohnishi, M.; Onozuka, M.; Uenosono, C.

    1993-11-01

    Direct energy conversion from plasma heat flux has been studied. Since major parts of fusion energy in the advanced fusion reactor are radiation and charged particle energies, the flexible design of the blanket is possible. We discuss the potentiality of the thermoelectric element that generates electricity by temperature gradient in conductors. A strong magnetic field is used to confine the fusion plasma, therefore, it is appropriate to consider the effect of the magnetic field. We propose a new element which is called Nernst element. The new element needs the magnetic field and the temperature gradient. We compare the efficiency of these two elements in a semiconductor model. Finally, a direct energy conversion are mentioned.

  12. Direct energy conversion of radiation energy in fusion reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamaguchi, S.; Iiyoshi, A.; Motojima, O.; Okamoto, M.; Sudo, S.; Ohnishi, M.; Onozuka, M.; Uenosono, C.

    1993-11-01

    Direct energy conversion from plasma heat flux has been studied. Since major parts of fusion energy in the advanced fusion reactor are radiation and charged particle energies, the flexible design of the blanket is possible. We discuss the potentiality of the thermoelectric element that generates electricity by temperature gradient in conductors. A strong magnetic field is used to confine the fusion plasma, therefore, it is appropriate to consider the effect of the magnetic field. We propose a new element which is called Nernst element. The new element needs the magnetic field and the temperature gradient. We compare the efficiency of these two elements in a semiconductor model. Finally, a direct energy conversion are mentioned. (author).

  13. Direct energy conversion of radiation energy in fusion reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamaguchi, S.; Iiyoshi, A.; Motojima, O.; Okamoto, M.; Sudo, S. [National Inst. for Fusion Science, Nagoya (Japan); Ohnishi, M.; Onozuka, M.; Uenosono, C.

    1994-12-31

    Direct energy conversion from plasma heat flux has been studied. Since major parts of fusion energy in the advanced fusion reactor are radiation and charged particle energies, the flexible design of the blanket is possible. We discuss the potentiality of the thermoelectric element that generate electricity by temperature gradient in conductors. A Strong magnetic field is used to confine the fusion plasma, therefore, it is appropriate to consider the effect of the magnetic field. We propose a new element which is called Nernst element. The new element needs the magnetic field and the temperature gradient. We compare the efficiency of these two elements in a semiconductor model. Finally, a direct energy converter are mentioned. (author).

  14. Direct energy conversion of radiation energy in fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamaguchi, S.; Iiyoshi, A.; Motojima, O.; Okamoto, M.; Sudo, S.; Ohnishi, M.; Onozuka, M.; Uenosono, C.

    1994-01-01

    Direct energy conversion from plasma heat flux has been studied. Since major parts of fusion energy in the advanced fusion reactor are radiation and charged particle energies, the flexible design of the blanket is possible. We discuss the potentiality of the thermoelectric element that generate electricity by temperature gradient in conductors. A Strong magnetic field is used to confine the fusion plasma, therefore, it is appropriate to consider the effect of the magnetic field. We propose a new element which is called Nernst element. The new element needs the magnetic field and the temperature gradient. We compare the efficiency of these two elements in a semiconductor model. Finally, a direct energy converter are mentioned. (author)

  15. Natural circulating passive cooling system for nuclear reactor containment structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gou, Perng-Fei; Wade, Gentry E.

    1990-01-01

    A passive cooling system for the contaminant structure of a nuclear reactor plant providing protection against overpressure within the containment attributable to inadvertent leakage or rupture of the system components. The cooling system utilizes natural convection for transferring heat imbalances and enables the discharge of irradiation free thermal energy to the atmosphere for heat disposal from the system.

  16. Passive cooling system for nuclear reactor containment structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gou, Perng-Fei; Wade, Gentry E.

    1989-01-01

    A passive cooling system for the contaminant structure of a nuclear reactor plant providing protection against overpressure within the containment attributable to inadvertent leakage or rupture of the system components. The cooling system utilizes natural convection for transferring heat imbalances and enables the discharge of irradiation free thermal energy to the atmosphere for heat disposal from the system.

  17. Experimental power reactor dc generator energy storage study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heck, F.M.; Smeltzer, G.S.; Myers, E.H.; Kilgore, L.

    1978-01-01

    This study covers the use of dc generators for meeting the Experimental Power Reactor Ohmic Heating Energy Storage Requirements. The dc generators satisfy these requirements which are the same as defined in WFPS-TME-038 which covered the use of ac generators and homopolar generators. The costs of the latter two systems have been revised to eliminate first-of-a-kind factors. The cost figures for dc generators indicate a need to develop larger machines in order to take advantage of the economy-of-scale that the large ac machines have. Each of the systems has its own favorable salient features on which to base a system selection

  18. Future nuclear systems, Astrid, an option for the fourth generation: preparing the future of nuclear energy, sustainably optimising resources, defining technological options, sodium-cooled fast reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ter Minassian, Vahe

    2016-01-01

    Energy independence and security of supplies, improved safety standards, sustainably optimised material management, minimal waste production - all without greenhouse gas emissions. These are the Generation IV International Forum specifications for nuclear energy of the future. The CEA is responsible for designing Astrid, an integrated technology demonstrator for the 4. generation of sodium-cooled fast reactors, in accordance with the French Sustainable Nuclear Materials and Waste Management Act of June 28, 2006, and funded as part of the Investments for the Future programme enacted by the French parliament in 2010. Energy management - a vital need and a factor of economic growth - is a major challenge for the world of tomorrow. The nuclear industry has significant advantages in this regard, although it faces safety, resource sustainability, and waste management issues that must be met through continuing technological innovation. Fast reactors are also of interest to the nuclear industry because their recycling capability would solve a number of problems related to the stockpiles of uranium and plutonium. After the resumption of R and D work with EDF and AREVA in 2006, the Astrid design studies began in 2010. The CEA, as owner and contracting authority for this programme, is now in a position to define the broad outlines of the demonstrator 4. generation reactor that could be commissioned during the next decade. A sodium-cooled fast reactor (SFR) operates in the same way as a conventional nuclear reactor: fission reactions in the atoms of fuel in the core generate heat, which is conveyed to a turbine generator to produce electricity. In the context of 4. generation technology, SFRs represent an innovative solution for optimising the use of raw materials as well as for enhancing safety. Here are a few ideas advanced by the CEA. (authors)

  19. Tandem Mirror Reactor Systems Code (Version I)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reid, R.L.; Finn, P.A.; Gohar, M.Y.

    1985-09-01

    A computer code was developed to model a Tandem Mirror Reactor. Ths is the first Tandem Mirror Reactor model to couple, in detail, the highly linked physics, magnetics, and neutronic analysis into a single code. This report describes the code architecture, provides a summary description of the modules comprising the code, and includes an example execution of the Tandem Mirror Reactor Systems Code. Results from this code for two sensitivity studies are also included. These studies are: (1) to determine the impact of center cell plasma radius, length, and ion temperature on reactor cost and performance at constant fusion power; and (2) to determine the impact of reactor power level on cost

  20. Safety analysis of reactor's cooling system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    Results of the analysis of reactor's RBMK-1500 coolant system during normal operation mode, hydrodynamic testing and in the case of earthquake are presented. Analysis was performed using RELAP5 code. Calculations showed the most vulnerable place in the reactor's coolant system. It was found that in the case of earthquake the horizontal support system of drum separator could be damaged

  1. Molecular ecology of anaerobic reactor systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hofman-Bang, H. Jacob Peider; Zheng, D.; Westermann, Peter

    2003-01-01

    Anaerobic reactor systems are essential for the treatment of solid and liquid wastes and constitute a core facility in many waste treatment plants. Although much is known about the basic metabolism in different types of anaerobic reactors, little is known about the microbes responsible for these ......Anaerobic reactor systems are essential for the treatment of solid and liquid wastes and constitute a core facility in many waste treatment plants. Although much is known about the basic metabolism in different types of anaerobic reactors, little is known about the microbes responsible...... to the abundance of each microbe in anaerobic reactor systems by rRNA probing. This chapter focuses on various molecular techniques employed and problems encountered when elucidating the microbial ecology of anaerobic reactor systems. Methods such as quantitative dot blot/fluorescence in-situ probing using various...

  2. Production of energy in a high temperature reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1979-01-01

    The cooling gas having left the reactor core is fed to a generator for direct production of current from the kinetic energy. Afterwards the gas is fed to a heat exchanger for cooling, then compressed and refed to the reactor core. The method further comprises that one part of the energy of the fission material is directly converted to electric energy in the reactor core, whereas the other part of the energy of the fission material is impressed upon the cooling gas. According to the invention the cooling gas when entering the reactor is first fed to that part of the reactor core which serves as a thermoionic or thermoelectric transducer. Afterwards the cooling gas is fed to the remaining part of the reactor gas. (P.K.)

  3. NE-213-scintillator-based neutron detection system for diagnostic measurements of energy spectra for neutrons having energies greater than or equal to 0.8 MeV created during plasma operations at the Princeton Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dickens, J.K.; Hill, N.W.; Hou, F.S.; McConnell, J.W.; Spencer, R.R.; Tsang, F.Y.

    1985-08-01

    A system for making diagnostic measurements of the energy spectra of greater than or equal to 0.8-MeV neutrons produced during plasma operations of the Princeton Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) has been fabricated and tested and is presently in operation in the TFTR Test Cell Basement. The system consists of two separate detectors, each made up of cells containing liquid NE-213 scintillator attached permanently to RCA-8850 photomultiplier tubes. Pulses obtained from each photomultiplier system are amplified and electronically analyzed to identify and separate those pulses due to neutron-induced events in the detector from those due to photon-induced events in the detector. Signals from each detector are routed to two separate Analog-to-Digital Converters, and the resulting digitized information, representing: (1) the raw neutron-spectrum data; and (2) the raw photon-spectrum data, are transmited to the CICADA data-acquisition computer system of the TFTR. Software programs have been installed on the CICADA system to analyze the raw data to provide moderate-resolution recreations of the energy spectrum of the neutron and photon fluences incident on the detector during the operation of the TFTR. A complete description of, as well as the operation of, the hardware and software is given in this report

  4. RSAS: a Reactor Safety Assessment System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sebo, D.E.; Dixon, B.W.; Bray, M.A.

    1985-01-01

    The Reactor Safety Assessment System (RSAS) is an expert system under development for the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). RSAS is being developed for use at the NRC's Operations Center in the event of a serious incident at a licensed nuclear power plant. The system generates situation assessments for the NRC Reactor Safety Team based on a limited number of plant parameters, known operator actions, and plant status data. The RSAS rule base currently covers one reactor type. The extension of the rule base to other reactor types is also discussed

  5. Fission energy: The integral fast reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Yoon I.

    1989-01-01

    The Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) is an innovative reactor concept being developed at Argonne National Laboratory as a such next- generation reactor concept. The IFR concept has a number of specific technical advantages that collectively address the potential difficulties facing the expansion of nuclear power deployment. In particular, the IFR concept can meet all three fundamental requirements needed in a next-generation reactor as discussed below. This document discusses these requirements

  6. Fission energy: The integral fast reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Yoon I.

    1989-01-01

    The Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) is an innovative reactor concept being developed at Argonne National Laboratory as a such next- generation reactor concept. The IFR concept has a number of specific technical advantages that collectively address the potential difficulties facing the expansion of nuclear power deployment. In particular, the IFR concept can meet all three fundamental requirements needed in a next-generation reactor as discussed below. This document discusses these requirements.

  7. FISS: a computer program for reactor systems studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamm, H.; Sherman, G.R.; Wright, J.H.; Nieman, R.E.

    1979-08-01

    ΣFISSΣ is a computer code for use in investigating alternative fuel cycle strategies for Canadian and world nuclear programs. The code performs a system simulation accounting for dynamic effects of growing nuclear systems. Facilities in the model include storage for irradiated fuel, mines, plants for enrichment, fuel fabrication, fuel reprocessing and heavy water, and reactors. FISS is particularly useful for comparing various reactor strategies and studying sensitivities of resource consumption, capital investment and energy costs with changes in fuel cycle parameters, reactor parameters and financial variables. (author)

  8. Nuclear Energy Enabling Technologies (NEET) Reactor Materials: News for the Reactor Materials Crosscut, May 2016

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maloy, Stuart Andrew [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Materials Science in Radiation and Dynamics Extremes

    2016-09-26

    In this newsletter for Nuclear Energy Enabling Technologies (NEET) Reactor Materials, pages 1-3 cover highlights from the DOE-NE (Nuclear Energy) programs, pages 4-6 cover determining the stress-strain response of ion-irradiated metallic materials via spherical nanoindentation, and pages 7-8 cover theoretical approaches to understanding long-term materials behavior in light water reactors.

  9. SP-100 space reactor power system readiness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Josloff, A.T.; Matteo, D.N.; Bailey, H.S.

    1992-01-01

    This paper discusses the SP-100 Space Reactor Power System which is being developed by GE, under contract to the U.S. Department of Energy, to provide electrical power in the range of 10's to 100's of kW. The system represents an enabling technology for a wide variety of earth orbital and interplanetary science missions, nuclear electric propulsion (NEP) stages, and lunar/Mars surface power for the Space Exploration Initiative (SEI). The technology and design is now at a state of readiness to support the definition of early flight demonstration missions. Of particular importance is that SP-100 meets the demanding U.S. safety performance, reliability and life requirements. The system is scalable and flexible and can be configured to provide 10's to 100's of kWe without repeating development work and can meet DoD goals for an early, low-power demonstration flight in the 1996-1997 time frame

  10. Hybrid reactors: Nuclear breeding or energy production?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piera, Mireia; Lafuente, Antonio; Abanades, Alberto; Martinez-Val, J.M.

    2010-01-01

    After reviewing the long-standing tradition on hybrid research, an assessment model is presented in order to characterize the hybrid performance under different objectives. In hybrids, neutron multiplication in the subcritical blanket plays a major role, not only for energy production and nuclear breeding, but also for tritium breeding, which is fundamental requirement in fusion-fission hybrids. All three objectives are better achieved with high values of the neutron multiplication factor (k-eff) with the obvious and fundamental limitation that it cannot reach criticality under any event, particularly, in the case of a loss of coolant accident. This limitation will be very important in the selection of the coolant. Some general considerations will be proposed, as guidelines for assessing the hybrid potential in a given scenario. Those guidelines point out that hybrids can be of great interest for the future of nuclear energy in a framework of Sustainable Development, because they can contribute to the efficient exploitation of nuclear fuels, with very high safety features. Additionally, a proposal is presented on a blanket specially suited for fusion-fission hybrids, although this reactor concept is still under review, and new work is needed for identifying the most suitable blanket composition, which can vary depending on the main objective of the hybrid.

  11. New reactor technology: safety improvements in nuclear power systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corradini, M L

    2007-11-01

    Almost 450 nuclear power plants are currently operating throughout the world and supplying about 17% of the world's electricity. These plants perform safely, reliably, and have no free-release of byproducts to the environment. Given the current rate of growth in electricity demand and the ever growing concerns for the environment, nuclear power can only satisfy the need for electricity and other energy-intensive products if it can demonstrate (1) enhanced safety and system reliability, (2) minimal environmental impact via sustainable system designs, and (3) competitive economics. The U.S. Department of Energy with the international community has begun research on the next generation of nuclear energy systems that can be made available to the market by 2030 or earlier, and that can offer significant advances toward these challenging goals; in particular, six candidate reactor system designs have been identified. These future nuclear power systems will require advances in materials, reactor physics, as well as thermal-hydraulics to realize their full potential. However, all of these designs must demonstrate enhanced safety above and beyond current light water reactor systems if the next generation of nuclear power plants is to grow in number far beyond the current population. This paper reviews the advanced Generation-IV reactor systems and the key safety phenomena that must be considered to guarantee that enhanced safety can be assured in future nuclear reactor systems.

  12. Nuclear reactor auxiliary heat removal system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, R.E.; Pierce, B.L.

    1977-01-01

    An auxiliary heat removal system to remove residual heat from gas-cooled nuclear reactors is described. The reactor coolant is expanded through a turbine, cooled in a heat exchanger and compressed by a compressor before reentering the reactor coolant. The turbine powers both the compressor and the pump which pumps a second fluid through the heat exchanger to cool the reactor coolant. A pneumatic starter is utilized to start the turbine, thereby making the auxiliary heat removal system independent of external power sources

  13. Wind energy systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, H. J.

    1978-01-01

    A discussion on wind energy systems involved with the DOE wind energy program is presented. Some of the problems associated with wind energy systems are discussed. The cost, efficiency, and structural design of wind energy systems are analyzed.

  14. Expert system for fast reactor diagnostic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parcy, J.P.

    1982-09-01

    A general description of expert systems is given. The operation of a fast reactor is reviewed. The expert system to the diagnosis of breakdowns limited to the reactor core. The structure of the system is described: specification of the diagnostics; structure of the data bank and evaluation of the rules; specification of the prediagnostics and evaluation; explanation of the diagnostics; time evolution of the system; comparison with other expert systems. Applications to some cases of faults are finally presented [fr

  15. Design of virtual SCADA simulation system for pressurized water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wijaksono, Umar; Abdullah, Ade Gafar; Hakim, Dadang Lukman

    2016-01-01

    The Virtual SCADA system is a software-based Human-Machine Interface that can visualize the process of a plant. This paper described the results of the virtual SCADA system design that aims to recognize the principle of the Nuclear Power Plant type Pressurized Water Reactor. This simulation uses technical data of the Nuclear Power Plant Unit Olkiluoto 3 in Finland. This device was developed using Wonderware Intouch, which is equipped with manual books for each component, animation links, alarm systems, real time and historical trending, and security system. The results showed that in general this device can demonstrate clearly the principles of energy flow and energy conversion processes in Pressurized Water Reactors. This virtual SCADA simulation system can be used as instructional media to recognize the principle of Pressurized Water Reactor

  16. Design of virtual SCADA simulation system for pressurized water reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wijaksono, Umar, E-mail: umar.wijaksono@student.upi.edu; Abdullah, Ade Gafar; Hakim, Dadang Lukman [Electrical Power System Research Group, Department of Electrical Engineering Education, Jl. Dr. Setiabudi No. 207 Bandung, Indonesia 40154 (Indonesia)

    2016-02-08

    The Virtual SCADA system is a software-based Human-Machine Interface that can visualize the process of a plant. This paper described the results of the virtual SCADA system design that aims to recognize the principle of the Nuclear Power Plant type Pressurized Water Reactor. This simulation uses technical data of the Nuclear Power Plant Unit Olkiluoto 3 in Finland. This device was developed using Wonderware Intouch, which is equipped with manual books for each component, animation links, alarm systems, real time and historical trending, and security system. The results showed that in general this device can demonstrate clearly the principles of energy flow and energy conversion processes in Pressurized Water Reactors. This virtual SCADA simulation system can be used as instructional media to recognize the principle of Pressurized Water Reactor.

  17. Reactor inventory monitoring system for Angra-1 reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    S Neto, Joaquim A.; Silva, Marcos C.; Pinheiro, Ronaldo F.M.; Soares, Milton; Martinez, Aquilino; Comerlato, Cesar A.; Oliveira, Eugenio A.

    1996-01-01

    This work describes the project of Reactor Inventory Monitoring System, which will be installed in Angra I Nuclear Power Plant. The inventory information is important to the operators take corrective actions in case of an incident that may cause a failure in the core cooling. (author)

  18. Innovative inspection system for reactor pressure vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mertens, K.; Trautmann, H.

    1999-01-01

    The versatile, compact and modern underwater systems described, the DELPHIN manipulators and MIDAS submarines, are innovative systems enabling RPV inspections at considerably reduced efforts and time, thus reducing the total time required for ISI of reactors. (orig./CB) [de

  19. Fusion reactors as a future energy source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seifritz, W.

    A detailed update of fusion research concepts is given. Discussions are given for the following areas: (1) the magnetic confinement principle, (2) UWMAK I: conceptual design for a fusion reactor, (3) the inertial confinement principle, (4) the laser fusion power plant, (5) electron-induced fusion, (6) the long-term development potential of fusion reactors, (7) the symbiosis between fusion and fission reactors, (8) fuel supply for fusion reactors, (9) safety and environmental impact, and (10) accidents, and (11) waste removal and storage

  20. Proceedings of workshop on reactor shutdown system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-03-01

    India has gained considerable experience in design, development, construction and operation of research and power reactors during the last four decades. Reactor shutdown system (RSS) is the most important engineered safety system of any reactor. A lot of technological developments have taken place to improve the reactor shutdown systems, particularly with advancement in reliability analysis and instrumentation and control. If the reactor is not shutdown, the fuel may melt, releasing radioactivity and possibly reactivity addition as in the case of Fast Breeder Reactor (FBR). Apart from radiological safety consequences, large investment has to be written off. The function of the RSS is to stop fission chain reaction and prevent breach of fuel. The design of RSS is multidisciplinary. It requires reactor physics analysis, design of absorber rods, drive mechanisms, safety logic to order shutdown and instrumentation to detect unsafe conditions. High reliability is essential and this requires two independent shutdown systems. This book contains the proceedings of the workshop on reactor shutdown system and papers relevant to INIS are indexed separately

  1. Study on secondary shutdown systems in Tehran research reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jalali, H.R.; Fadaei, A.H., E-mail: Fadaei_amir@aut.ac.ir; Gharib, M.

    2015-09-15

    Highlights: • A study was undertaken to summarize the techniques for secondary shutdown systems (SSS). • Neutronic calculation performed for proposed systems as SSS. • Dumping the heavy water stored in the reflector vessel is capable to shut down reactor. • Neutronic and transient calculation was done for validating the selected SSS. • All calculation shown that this system has advantages in safety and neutron economy. - Abstract: One important safety aspect of any research reactor is the ability to shut down the reactor. Usually, research reactors, currently in operation, have a single shutdown system based on the simultaneous insertion of the all control rods into the reactor core through gravity. Nevertheless, the International Atomic Energy Agency currently recommends use of two shutdown systems which are fully independent from each other to guarantee secure shutdown when one of them fails. This work presents an investigative study into secondary shutdown systems, which will be an important safety component in the research reactor and will provide another alternative way to shut down the reactor emergently. As part of this project, a study was undertaken to summarize the techniques that are currently used at world-wide research reactors for recognizing available techniques to consider in research reactors. Removal of the reflector, removal of the fuels, change in critical shape of reactor core and insertion of neutron absorber between the core and reflector are selected as possible techniques in mentioned function. In the next step, a comparison is performed for these methods from neutronic aspects. Then, chosen method is studied from the transient behavior point of view. Tehran research reactor which is a 5 MW open-pool reactor selected as a case study and all calculations are carried out for it. It has 5 control rods which serve the purpose of both reactivity control and shutdown of reactor under abnormal condition. Results indicated that heavy

  2. Nuclear reactor safety program in US department of energy and future perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Y.T.

    1988-01-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) establishes policy, issues orders, and assures compliance with requirements. The contractors who design, construct, modify, operate, maintain and decommission DOE reactors, set forth the assessment of the safety of cognizant reactors and implement DOE orders. Teams of experts in the Department, through scheduled and unscheduled review programs, reassess the safety of reactors in every phases of their lives. As new technology develops, the safety programs are reevaluated and policies are modified to accommodate these new technologies. The diagnostic capabilities of the computer using multiple alarms to enhance detection of defects and control of a reactor have been greatly utilized in reactor operating systems. The Application of artificial intelligence technologies for diagnostic and even for the decision making process in the event of reactor accidents would be one of the future trends in reactor safety programs

  3. Nuclear reactor safety program in U.S. Department of Energy and future perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Y.T.

    1987-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) establishes policy, issues orders, and assures compliance with requirements. The contractors who design, construct, modify, operate, maintain and decommission DOE reactors, set forth the assessment of the safety of cognizant reactors and impliment DOE orders. Teams of experts in the Depatment, through scheduled and unscheduled review programs, reassess the safety of reactors in every phases of their lives. As new technology develops, the safety programs are reevaluated and policies are modified to accommodate these new technologies. The diagnostic capabilities of the computer using multiple alarms to enhance detection of defects and control of a reactor have been greatly utilized in reactor operating systems. The application of artificial intelligence (AI) technologies for diagnostic and even for the decision making process in the event of reactor accidents would be one of the future trends in reactor safety programs. (author)

  4. CURE: Clean use of reactor energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-05-01

    This paper presents the results of a joint Westinghouse Hanford Company (Westinghouse Hanford)-Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) study that considered the feasibility of treating radioactive waste before disposal to reduce the inventory of long-lived radionuclides, making the waste more suitable for geologic disposal. The treatment considered here is one in which waste would be chemically separated so that long-lived radionuclides can be treated using specific processes appropriate for the nuclide. The technical feasibility of enhancing repository performance by this type of treatment is considered in this report. A joint Westinghouse Hanford-PNL study group developed a concept called the Clean Use of Reactor Energy (CURE), and evaluated the potential of current technology to reduce the long-lived radionuclide content in waste from the nuclear power industry. The CURE process consists of three components: chemical separation of elements that have significant quantities of long-lived radioisotopes in the waste, exposure in a neutron flux to transmute the radioisotopes to stable nuclides, and packaging of radionuclides that cannot be transmuted easily for storage or geologic disposal. 76 refs., 32 figs., 24 tabs

  5. Colliding beam fusion reactor space propulsion system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wessel, Frank J.; Binderbauer, Michl W.; Rostoker, Norman; Rahman, Hafiz Ur; O'Toole, Joseph

    2000-01-01

    We describe a space propulsion system based on the Colliding Beam Fusion Reactor (CBFR). The CBFR is a high-beta, field-reversed, magnetic configuration with ion energies in the range of hundreds of keV. Repetitively-pulsed ion beams sustain the plasma distribution and provide current drive. The confinement physics is based on the Vlasov-Maxwell equation, including a Fokker Planck collision operator and all sources and sinks for energy and particle flow. The mean azimuthal velocities and temperatures of the fuel ion species are equal and the plasma current is unneutralized by the electrons. The resulting distribution functions are thermal in a moving frame of reference. The ion gyro-orbit radius is comparable to the dimensions of the confinement system, hence classical transport of the particles and energy is expected and the device is scaleable. We have analyzed the design over a range of 10 6 -10 9 Watts of output power (0.15-150 Newtons thrust) with a specific impulse of, I sp ∼10 6 sec. A 50 MW propulsion system might involve the following parameters: 4-meters diameterx10-meters length, magnetic field ∼7 Tesla, ion beam current ∼10 A, and fuels of either D-He 3 ,P-B 11 ,P-Li 6 ,D-Li 6 , etc

  6. TREAT Reactor Control and Protection System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lipinski, W.C.; Brookshier, W.K.; Burrows, D.R.; Lenkszus, F.R.; McDowell, W.P.

    1985-01-01

    The main control algorithm of the Transient Reactor Test Facility (TREAT) Automatic Reactor Control System (ARCS) resides in Read Only Memory (ROM) and only experiment specific parameters are input via keyboard entry. Prior to executing an experiment, the software and hardware of the control computer is tested by a closed loop real-time simulation. Two computers with parallel processing are used for the reactor simulation and another computer is used for simulation of the control rod system. A monitor computer, used as a redundant diverse reactor protection channel, uses more conservative setpoints and reduces challenges to the Reactor Trip System (RTS). The RTS consists of triplicated hardwired channels with one out of three logic. The RTS is automatically tested by a digital Dedicated Microprocessor Tester (DMT) prior to the execution of an experiment. 6 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab

  7. Reactor core design aiding system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanazawa, Nobuhiro; Hamaguchi, Yukio; Nakao, Takashi; Kondo, Yasuhide

    1995-01-01

    A two-dimensional radial power distribution and an axial one-dimensional power distribution are determined based on a distribution of a three-dimensional infinite multiplication factor, to obtain estimated power distribution estimation values. The estimation values are synthesized to obtain estimated three-dimensional power distribution values. In addition, the distribution of a two-dimensional radial multiplication factor and the distribution of an one-dimensional axial multiplication factor are determined based on the three-dimensional power distribution, to obtain estimated values for the multiplication factor distribution. The estimated values are synthesized to form estimated values for the three-dimensional multiplication factor distribution. Further, estimated fuel loading pattern value is determined based on the three-dimensional power distribution or the two-dimensional radial power distribution. Since the processes for determining the estimated values comprise only additive and multiplying operations, processing time can be remarkably saved compared with calculation based on a detailed physical models. Since the estimation is performed on every fuel assemblies, a nervous circuit network not depending on the reactor core system can be constituted. (N.H.)

  8. Additional reactor protection system of RBMK-1500

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    Analysis of anticipated transients without scram of RBMK-1500 reactor showed that additional reactor protection system is required. Data of accident analysis in the case of loose of external electric power and loose of vacuum in condensers of turbines are provided

  9. Monolithic reactor : Higher yield, less energy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kreutzer, M.T.; Moulijn, J.A.; Kapteijn, F.; Mols, B.

    2004-01-01

    The production of margarine, the desulphurisation of crude oil, and the manufacture of synthetic diesel fuel, these are only three of the many industrial processes in which a three-phase reactor is used. Traditionally, this type of reactor is rather ill-defined. Success with a lab scale set-up is no

  10. Fast reactors: the future of nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carvalho, H.G. de.

    1988-08-01

    The main problems to be solved for FBR type reactors become viable economically, presenting the research programs of Europe, United States of America, Japan and Brazil are described. The cooperations between interested countries for improving FBR type reactors, and the financial and human resources necessaries for the development of programs, are evaluated. The fuel cycle is also analysed. (M.C.K.) [pt

  11. Electrical system regulations of the IEA-R1 reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mello, Jose Roberto de; Madi Filho, Tufic

    2013-01-01

    The IEA-R1 reactor of the Nuclear and Energy Research Institute (IPEN-CNEN/SP), is a research reactor open pool type, designed and built by the U.S. firm Babcock and Wilcox, having, as coolant and moderator, deionized light water and beryllium and graphite, as reflectors. Until about 1988, the reactor safety systems received power from only one source of energy. As an example, it may be cited the control desk that was powered only by the vital electrical system 220V, which, in case the electricity fails, is powered by the generator group: no-break 220V. In the years 1989 and 1990, a reform of the electrical system upgrading to increase the reactor power and, also, to meet the technical standards of the ABNT (Associacao Brasileira de Normas Tecnicas) was carried out. This work has the objective of showing the relationship between the electric power system and the IEA-R1 reactor security. Also, it demonstrates that, should some electrical power interruption occur, during the reactor operation, this occurrence would not start an accident event. (author)

  12. New technology for reactor protection system of CAREM reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dezzutti, J.C.; Verrastro, C.; Estryk, D.

    2009-01-01

    The use of FPGA in safety functions in a nuclear power plant, increase the reliability of software based systems, without loose any of the function required by the supervision and control systems. In this work the architecture of a Reactor Protection System is described, it use four independent measurement channels in 2 oo 4 configuration, each channel is based on diverse approach in 1 oo 2 configuration, the reliability of this system is near the same than the hardwired logic, with full performance like software based system. (author)

  13. MAPLE-X10 reactor digital control system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deverno, M.T.; Hinds, H.W.

    1991-10-01

    The MAPLE-X10 reactor, currently under construction at the Chalk River Laboratories of Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, is a 10 MW t , pool-type, light-water reactor. It will be used for radioisotope production and silicon neutron transmutation doping. The reactor is controlled by a Digital Control System (DCS) and protected against abnormal process events by two independent safety systems. The DCS is an integrated control system used to regulate the reactor power and process systems. The safety philosophy for the control system is to minimize unsafe events arising from system failures and operational errors. this is achieved through redundancy, fail-safe design, automatic fault detection, and the selection of highly reliable components. The DCS provides both computer-controlled reactor regulation from the shutdown state to full power and automated reactor shutdown if safe limits are exceeded or critical sensors malfunction. The use of commercially available hardware with enhanced quality assurance makes the system cost effective while providing a high degree of reliability

  14. Next generation of energy production systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rouault, J.; Garnier, J.C.; Carre, F.

    2003-01-01

    This document gathers the slides that have been presented at the Gedepeon conference. Gedepeon is a research group involving scientists from Cea (French atomic energy commission), CNRS (national center of scientific research), EDF (electricity of France) and Framatome that is devoted to the study of new energy sources and particularly to the study of the future generations of nuclear systems. The contributions have been classed into 9 topics: 1) gas cooled reactors, 2) molten salt reactors (MSBR), 3) the recycling of plutonium and americium, 4) reprocessing of molten salt reactor fuels, 5) behavior of graphite under radiation, 6) metallic materials for molten salt reactors, 7) refractory fuels of gas cooled reactors, 8) the nuclear cycle for the next generations of nuclear systems, and 9) organization of research programs on the new energy sources

  15. Distributed expert systems for nuclear reactor control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otaduy, P.J.

    1992-01-01

    A network of distributed expert systems is the heart of a prototype supervisory control architecture developed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) for an advanced multimodular reactor. Eight expert systems encode knowledge on signal acquisition, diagnostics, safeguards, and control strategies in a hybrid rule-based, multiprocessing and object-oriented distributed computing environment. An interactive simulation of a power block consisting of three reactors and one turbine provides a realistic, testbed for performance analysis of the integrated control system in real-time. Implementation details and representative reactor transients are discussed

  16. Next-generation reactors in the national energy strategy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McGoff, D.J.

    1991-01-01

    In February 1991, the Bush Administration released the National Energy Strategy designed to provide an adequate and balanced energy supply. The strategy provides for major increases in energy efficiency and conservation. Even with these savings, however, there will be a need for substantial increases in base-load electrical generating capacity to sustain economic growth. The strategy identifies the actions required to allow nuclear power to cleanly and safely meet a substantial portion of this needed additional base-load capacity after the turn of the century. On June 27, 1991, the US Department of Energy (DOE) transmitted to Congress the Strategic Plan for Civilian Reactor Development, which reflects the initiative identified in the National Energy Strategy. The strategic plan identifies the advanced light water reactor (ALWR) as the basis for expanded use of nuclear power. The second advanced reactor concept that is being pursued is the modular high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (MHTGR)

  17. Evaluation of Potential Locations for Siting Small Modular Reactors near Federal Energy Clusters to Support Federal Clean Energy Goals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belles, Randy J. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Omitaomu, Olufemi A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2014-09-01

    Geographic information systems (GIS) technology was applied to analyze federal energy demand across the contiguous US. Several federal energy clusters were previously identified, including Hampton Roads, Virginia, which was subsequently studied in detail. This study provides an analysis of three additional diverse federal energy clusters. The analysis shows that there are potential sites in various federal energy clusters that could be evaluated further for placement of an integral pressurized-water reactor (iPWR) to support meeting federal clean energy goals.

  18. Seismic attenuation system for a nuclear reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liszkai, Tamas; Cadell, Seth

    2018-01-30

    A system for attenuating seismic forces includes a reactor pressure vessel containing nuclear fuel and a containment vessel that houses the reactor pressure vessel. Both the reactor pressure vessel and the containment vessel include a bottom head. Additionally, the system includes a base support to contact a support surface on which the containment vessel is positioned in a substantially vertical orientation. An attenuation device is located between the bottom head of the reactor pressure vessel and the bottom head of the containment vessel. Seismic forces that travel from the base support to the reactor pressure vessel via the containment vessel are attenuated by the attenuation device in a direction that is substantially lateral to the vertical orientation of the containment vessel.

  19. Inertial Fusion Energy Reactor Design Studies: Prometheus-L, Prometheus-H

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waganer, L.M.; Driemeyer, D.E.; Lee, V.D.

    1992-03-01

    This report contains a review of design studies for inertial confinement reactor. This third of three three volumes discusses the following topics: Driver system definition; vacuum system; fuel processing systems (FPS); cavity design and analysis; heat transport and thermal energy conversion; balance of plant systems; remote maintenance systems; safety and environment; economics; and comparison of IFE designs

  20. Innovative nuclear energy systems roadmap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-12-01

    Developing nuclear energy that is sustainable, safe, has little waste by-product, and cannot be proliferated is an extremely vital and pressing issue. To resolve the four issues through free thinking and overall vision, research activities of 'innovative nuclear energy systems' and 'innovative separation and transmutation' started as a unique 21st Century COE Program for nuclear energy called the Innovative Nuclear Energy Systems for Sustainable Development of the World, COE-INES. 'Innovative nuclear energy systems' include research on CANDLE burn-up reactors, lead-cooled fast reactors and using nuclear energy in heat energy. 'Innovative separation and transmutation' include research on using chemical microchips to efficiently separate TRU waste to MA, burning or destroying waste products, or transmuting plutonium and other nuclear materials. Research on 'nuclear technology and society' and 'education' was also added in order for nuclear energy to be accepted into society. COE-INES was a five-year program ending in 2007. But some activities should be continued and this roadmap detailed them as a rough guide focusing inventions and discoveries. This technology roadmap was created for social acceptance and should be flexible to respond to changing times and conditions. (T. Tanaka)

  1. Environmental, financial and energy feasibility of the electrolysis of the water steam of a generation IV reactor cooling system during the moments of low consumption ef eletrical energy: challenges and perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stefanelli, Eduardo J.; Vargas, Miltom; Garcia, Pedro L.; Seo, Emilia S.M.; Oliveira, Wagner de S.

    2009-01-01

    Our civilization is in an inflection moment. Our current decisions will lead us to drastic changes in the planet climate or to cleaner and more sustainable energy generation models. In a certain moment in the evolution of our society, we have privileged the productivity instead of the reasonable use of the planet's resources. This option has been leading us to a situation in which these resources are seriously jeopardized. New models of energy generation and use should be discussed and adopted in order to reverse this process. The electric-power consumption is not constant through time and it must be generated at the moment it is going to be used. There are moments of great idleness in the electric-power generation system, counterbalanced by high demand moments. This characteristic has induced us to the construction of a model of great generation capacity that remains without use most of the time, producing huge financial and environmental impacts. In this article, we discuss the environmental, financial and energy viability of using the idle capacity of the electric-power system to, through water steam electrolysis, produce hydrogen, which would be reconverted into electric power in peak moments by a fuel cell. In this study, we aim at investigating the viability of associating a SOFC (Solid Oxide Fuel Cell), acting as an electrolysis bow, to a generation IV reactor, in order to produce hydrogen from superheated water steam in the cooling of the reactor, which will be converted into electric power via SOFC (Solid Oxide Fuel Cell) in peak moments. The method used in this investigation was to study the electric charge variation consumed in a day, randomly selected in relation to the hour of the day, to launch a curve into a diagram 'Demand x hour of the day', to establish the peak moments, the minimum moments, and the average consumption, and, based on these data and geometrically, predict the viability of using the energetic potential of the moments in which the

  2. Environmental, financial and energy feasibility of the electrolysis of the water steam of a generation IV reactor cooling system during the moments of low consumption ef eletrical energy: challenges and perspectives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stefanelli, Eduardo J.; Vargas, Miltom; Garcia, Pedro L.; Seo, Emilia S.M.; Oliveira, Wagner de S. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)], e-mail: ipen@stefanelli.eng.br

    2009-07-01

    Our civilization is in an inflection moment. Our current decisions will lead us to drastic changes in the planet climate or to cleaner and more sustainable energy generation models. In a certain moment in the evolution of our society, we have privileged the productivity instead of the reasonable use of the planet's resources. This option has been leading us to a situation in which these resources are seriously jeopardized. New models of energy generation and use should be discussed and adopted in order to reverse this process. The electric-power consumption is not constant through time and it must be generated at the moment it is going to be used. There are moments of great idleness in the electric-power generation system, counterbalanced by high demand moments. This characteristic has induced us to the construction of a model of great generation capacity that remains without use most of the time, producing huge financial and environmental impacts. In this article, we discuss the environmental, financial and energy viability of using the idle capacity of the electric-power system to, through water steam electrolysis, produce hydrogen, which would be reconverted into electric power in peak moments by a fuel cell. In this study, we aim at investigating the viability of associating a SOFC (Solid Oxide Fuel Cell), acting as an electrolysis bow, to a generation IV reactor, in order to produce hydrogen from superheated water steam in the cooling of the reactor, which will be converted into electric power via SOFC (Solid Oxide Fuel Cell) in peak moments. The method used in this investigation was to study the electric charge variation consumed in a day, randomly selected in relation to the hour of the day, to launch a curve into a diagram 'Demand x hour of the day', to establish the peak moments, the minimum moments, and the average consumption, and, based on these data and geometrically, predict the viability of using the energetic potential of the moments

  3. Survey of thorium utilization in power reactor systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwartz, M.H.; Schleifer, P.; Dahlberg, R.C.

    1976-01-01

    It is clear that thorium-fueled thermal power reactor systems based on current technology can play a vital role in serving present and long-term energy needs. Advanced thorium converters and thermal breeders can provide an expanded resource base from which the world's growing energy demands can be met. Utilization of a symbiotic system of fast breeders and thorium-fueled thermal reactors can be particularly effective in providing low cost power while conserving uranium resources. Breeder reactors are characterized by high capital costs and very low fuel costs since they produce more fuel than they consume. This excess fuel can be used to fuel thermal converter reactors whose capital costs are low. This symbiosis is optimized when 233 U is bred in the fast breeders and then used to fuel high-conversion-ratio thermal converter reactors operating on the thorium-uranium fuel cycle. The thorium-cycle HTGR, after undergoing more than fifteen years of development in both the United States and Europe, provides for the optimum utilization of our limited uranium resources. Other thermal reactor systems, previously operating on the uranium cycle, also show potential in their capability to utilize the thorium cycle effectively

  4. Nonlinear dynamic analysis of nuclear reactor primary coolant systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saffell, B.F. Jr.; Macek, R.W.; Thompson, T.R.; Lippert, R.F.

    1979-01-01

    The ADINA computer code is utilized to perform mechanical response analysis of pressurized reactor primary coolant systems subjected to postulated loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) loadings. Specifically, three plant analyses are performed utilizing the geometric and material nonlinear analysis capabilities of ADINA. Each reactor system finite element model represents the reactor vessel and internals, piping, major components, and component supports in a single coupled model. Material and geometric nonlinear capabilities of the beam and truss elements are employed in the formulation of each finite element model. Loadings applied to each plant for LOCA dynamic analysis include steady-state pressure, dead weight, strain energy release, transient piping hydraulic forces, and reactor vessel cavity pressurization. Representative results are presented with some suggestions for consideration in future ADINA code development

  5. Preliminary design concepts for the advanced neutron source reactor systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peretz, F.J.

    1988-01-01

    This paper describes the initial design work to develop the reactor systems hardware concepts for the advanced neutron source (ANS) reactor. This project has not yet entered the conceptual design phase; thus, design efforts are quite preliminary. This paper presents the collective work of members of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., Engineering Division, and other participating organizations. The primary purpose of this effort is to show that the ANS reactor concept is realistic from a hardware standpoint and to show that project objectives can be met. It also serves to generate physical models for use in neutronic and thermal-hydraulic core design efforts and defines the constraints and objectives for the design. Finally, this effort will develop the criteria for use in the conceptual design of the reactor

  6. Reactor Design for Bioelectrochemical Systems

    KAUST Repository

    Mohanakrishna, G.

    2017-12-01

    Bioelectrochemical systems (BES) are novel hybrid systems which are designed to generate renewable energy from the low cost substrate in a sustainable way. Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) are the well studied application of BES systems that generate electricity from the wide variety of organic components and wastewaters. MFC mechanism deals with the microbial oxidation of organic molecules for the production of electrons and protons. The MFC design helps to build the electrochemical gradient on anode and cathode which leads for the bioelectricity generation. As whole reactions of MFCs happen at mild environmental and operating conditions and using waste organics as the substrate, it is defined as the sustainable and alternative option for global energy needs and attracted worldwide researchers into this research area. Apart from MFC, BES has other applications such as microbial electrolysis cells (MECs) for biohydrogen production, microbial desalinations cells (MDCs) for water desalination, and microbial electrosynthesis cells (MEC) for value added products formation. All these applications are designed to perform efficiently under mild operational conditions. Specific strains of bacteria or specifically enriched microbial consortia are acting as the biocatalyst for the oxidation and reduction of BES. Detailed function of the biocatalyst has been discussed in the other chapters of this book.

  7. Reactor Design for Bioelectrochemical Systems

    KAUST Repository

    Mohanakrishna, G.; Kalathil, Shafeer; Pant, Deepak

    2017-01-01

    Bioelectrochemical systems (BES) are novel hybrid systems which are designed to generate renewable energy from the low cost substrate in a sustainable way. Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) are the well studied application of BES systems that generate electricity from the wide variety of organic components and wastewaters. MFC mechanism deals with the microbial oxidation of organic molecules for the production of electrons and protons. The MFC design helps to build the electrochemical gradient on anode and cathode which leads for the bioelectricity generation. As whole reactions of MFCs happen at mild environmental and operating conditions and using waste organics as the substrate, it is defined as the sustainable and alternative option for global energy needs and attracted worldwide researchers into this research area. Apart from MFC, BES has other applications such as microbial electrolysis cells (MECs) for biohydrogen production, microbial desalinations cells (MDCs) for water desalination, and microbial electrosynthesis cells (MEC) for value added products formation. All these applications are designed to perform efficiently under mild operational conditions. Specific strains of bacteria or specifically enriched microbial consortia are acting as the biocatalyst for the oxidation and reduction of BES. Detailed function of the biocatalyst has been discussed in the other chapters of this book.

  8. Design study of superconducting inductive energy storages for tokamak fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-08-01

    Design of the superconducting inductive energy storages (SC-IES) has been studied. One SC-IES is for the power supply system in a experimental tokamak fusion reactor, and the other in a future practical reactor. Study started with definition of the requirements of SC-IES, followed by optimization of the coil shape and determination of major parameters. Then, the coil and the vessel were designed, including the following: for SC-IES of the experimental reactor, stored energy 10 GJ, B max 8 T, conductor NbTi and size 18 m diameter x 10 m height; for SC-IES of the practical reactor, stored energy 56 GJ, B max 10.5 T, conductor Nb 3 Sn and size 26 m diameter x 15 m height. Design of the coil protection system and an outline of the auxiliary systems (for refrigeration and evacuation) are also given, and further, problems and usefullness of SC-IES. (auth.)

  9. Stack Monitoring System At PUSPATI TRIGA Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zamrul Faizad Omar; Mohd Sabri Minhat; Zareen Khan Abdul Jalil Khan; Ridzuan Abdul Mutalib; Khairulezwan Abdul Manan; Nurfarhana Ayuni Joha; Izhar Abu Hussin

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes the current Stack Monitoring System at PUSPATI TRIGA Reactor (RTP) building. A stack monitoring system is a continuous air monitor placed at the reactor top for monitoring the presence of radioactive gaseous in the effluent air from the RTP building. The system consists of four detectors that provide the reading for background, particulate, Iodine and Noble gas. There is a plan to replace the current system due to frequent fault of the system, thus thorough understanding of the current system is required. Overview of the whole system will be explained in this paper. Some current results would be displayed and moving forward brief plan would be mentioned. (author)

  10. Policy-induced market introduction of Generation IV reactor systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heek, Aliki Irina van; Roelofs, Ferry

    2011-01-01

    Almost 10 years ago the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) started the Generation IV Initiative (GenIV) with 9 other national governments with a positive ground attitude towards nuclear energy. Some of these Generation IV systems, like the fast reactors, are nearing the demonstration stage. The question on how their market introduction will be implemented becomes increasingly urgent. One main topic for future reactor technologies is the treatment of radioactive waste products. Technological solutions to this issue are being developed. One possible process is the transformation of long-living radioactive nuclides into short living ones; a process known as transmutation, which can be done in a nuclear reactor only. Various Generation IV reactor concepts are suitable for this process, and of these systems most experience has been gained with the sodium-cooled fast reactor (SFR). However, both these first generation SFR plants and their Generation IV successors are designed as electricity generating plants, and therefore supposed to be commercially viable in the electricity markets. Various studies indicate that the generation costs of a combined LWR-(S)FR nuclear generating park (LWR: light water reactor) will be higher than that of an LWR-only park. To investigate the effects of the deployment of the different reactors and fuel cycles on the waste produced, resources used and costs incurred as a function of time, a dynamic fuel cycle assessment is performed. This study will focus on the waste impact of the introduction of a fraction of fast reactors in the European nuclear reactor park with a cost increase as described in the previous paragraph. The nuclear fuel cycle scenario code DANESS is used for this, as well as the nuclear park model of the EU-27 used for the previous study. (orig.)

  11. Environmental and economic assessments of magnetic and inertial fusion energy reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamazaki, K.; Oishi, T.; Mori, K.

    2011-10-01

    Global warming due to rapid greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions is one of the present-day crucial problems, and fusion reactors are expected to be abundant electric power generation systems to reduce human GHG emission amounts. To search for an environmental-friendly and economical fusion reactor system, comparative system studies have been done for several magnetic fusion energy reactors, and have been extended to include inertial fusion energy reactors. We clarify new scaling formulae for the cost of electricity and GHG emission rate with respect to key design parameters, which might be helpful in making a strategy for fusion research development. Comparisons with other conventional electric power generation systems are carried out taking into account the introduction of GHG taxes and the application of the carbon dioxide capture and storage system to fossil power generators.

  12. 10 CFR 50.46a - Acceptance criteria for reactor coolant system venting systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Acceptance criteria for reactor coolant system venting systems. 50.46a Section 50.46a Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION DOMESTIC LICENSING OF PRODUCTION AND... function of these systems. High point vents are not required for the tubes in U-tube steam generators...

  13. Sampling system for a boiling reactor NPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zabelin, A.I.; Yakovleva, E.D.; Solov'ev, Yu.A.

    1976-01-01

    Investigations and pilot running of the nuclear power plant with a VK-50 boiling reactor reveal the necessity of normalizing the design system of water sampling and of mandatory replacement of the needle-type throttle device by a helical one. A method for designing a helical throttle device has been worked out. The quantitative characteristics of depositions of corrosion products along the line of reactor water sampling are presented. Recommendations are given on the organizaton of the sampling system of a nuclear power plant with BWR type reactors

  14. ANALYTICAL SYNTHESIS OF CHEMICAL REACTOR CONTROL SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Labutin

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The problem of the analytical synthesis of the synergetic control system of chemical reactor for the realization of a complex series-parallel exothermal reaction has been solved. The synthesis of control principles is performed using the analytical design method of aggregated regulators. Synthesized nonlinear control system solves the problem of stabilization of the concentration of target component at the exit of reactor and also enables one to automatically transfer to new production using the equipment.

  15. Scanning tunneling microscope assembly, reactor, and system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Feng; Salmeron, Miquel; Somorjai, Gabor A

    2014-11-18

    An embodiment of a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) reactor includes a pressure vessel, an STM assembly, and three spring coupling objects. The pressure vessel includes a sealable port, an interior, and an exterior. An embodiment of an STM system includes a vacuum chamber, an STM reactor, and three springs. The three springs couple the STM reactor to the vacuum chamber and are operable to suspend the scanning tunneling microscope reactor within the interior of the vacuum chamber during operation of the STM reactor. An embodiment of an STM assembly includes a coarse displacement arrangement, a piezoelectric fine displacement scanning tube coupled to the coarse displacement arrangement, and a receiver. The piezoelectric fine displacement scanning tube is coupled to the coarse displacement arrangement. The receiver is coupled to the piezoelectric scanning tube and is operable to receive a tip holder, and the tip holder is operable to receive a tip.

  16. Reactor protection systems of 500 MWe PHWRs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mallik, G; Kelkar, M G; Apte, Ravindra [C and I Group, Nuclear Power Corporation, Mumbai (India)

    1997-03-01

    The 500 MWe PHWR has two totally independent, diverse, fast acting shutdown system called Shutdown System 1 (SDS 1) and Shutdown System 2 (SDS 2). The trip generation circuitry of SDS 1 and SDS 2 are known as Reactor Protection System 1 (RPS 1) and Reactor Protection System 2 (RPS 2) respectively. Some of the features specific to 500 MWe reactors are Core Over Power Protection System (COPPS) based upon in core Self Powered Neutron Detector (SPND) signals, use of local two out of three coincidence logic and adoption of overlap testing for RPS 2, use of Fine Impulse Testing (FIT) in RPS 2, testing of the final control elements namely electro-magnetic clutch of individual Shutoff Rods (SRs) of SDS 1 and all the fast acting valves of SDS 2, etc. The two shutdown systems have totally separate sets of sensors and associated signal processing circuitry as well as physical arrangements. A separate computerised test and monitoring unit is used for each of the two shutdown systems. Use of Programmable Digital Comparator (PDC) unit exclusively for reactor protection systems, has been adopted. The capability of PDC unit is enhanced and communication links are provided for its integration in over all system. The paper describes the design features of reactor protection systems. (author). 3 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

  17. Flexible Conversion Ratio Fast Reactor Systems Evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neil Todreas; Pavel Hejzlar

    2008-06-30

    Conceptual designs of lead-cooled and liquid salt-cooled fast flexible conversion ratio reactors were developed. Both concepts have cores reated at 2400 MWt placed in a large-pool-type vessel with dual-free level, which also contains four intermediate heat exchanges coupling a primary coolant to a compact and efficient supercritical CO2 Brayton cycle power conversion system. Decay heat is removed passively using an enhanced Reactor Vessel Auxiliary Cooling System and a Passive Secondary Auxiliary Cooling System. The most important findings were that (1) it is feasible to design the lead-cooled and salt-cooled reactor with the flexible conversion ratio (CR) in the range of CR=0 and CR=1 n a manner that achieves inherent reactor shutdown in unprotected accidents, (2) the salt-cooled reactor requires Lithium thermal Expansion Modules to overcme the inherent salt coolant's large positive coolant temperature reactivity coefficient, (3) the preferable salt for fast spectrum high power density cores is NaCl-Kcl-MgCl2 as opposed to fluoride salts due to its better themal-hydraulic and neutronic characteristics, and (4) both reactor, but attain power density 3 times smaller than that of the sodium-cooled reactor.

  18. Flexible Conversion Ratio Fast Reactor Systems Evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neil Todreas; Pavel Hejzlar

    2008-01-01

    Conceptual designs of lead-cooled and liquid salt-cooled fast flexible conversion ratio reactors were developed. Both concepts have cores treated at 2400 MWt placed in a large-pool-type vessel with dual-free level, which also contains four intermediate heat exchanges coupling a primary coolant to a compact and efficient supercritical CO2 Brayton cycle power conversion system. Decay heat is removed passively using an enhanced Reactor Vessel Auxiliary Cooling System and a Passive Secondary Auxiliary Cooling System. The most important findings were that (1) it is feasible to design the lead-cooled and salt-cooled reactor with the flexible conversion ratio (CR) in the range of CR=0 and CR=1 n a manner that achieves inherent reactor shutdown in unprotected accidents, (2) the salt-cooled reactor requires Lithium thermal Expansion Modules to overcome the inherent salt coolant's large positive coolant temperature reactivity coefficient, (3) the preferable salt for fast spectrum high power density cores is NaCl-Kcl-MgCl2 as opposed to fluoride salts due to its better thermal-hydraulic and neutronic characteristics, and (4) both reactor, but attain power density 3 times smaller than that of the sodium-cooled reactor

  19. Development of an automatic reactor inspection system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jae Hee; Eom, Heung Seop; Lee, Jae Cheol; Choi, Yoo Raek; Moon, Soon Seung

    2002-02-01

    Using recent technologies on a mobile robot computer science, we developed an automatic inspection system for weld lines of the reactor vessel. The ultrasonic inspection of the reactor pressure vessel is currently performed by commercialized robot manipulators. Since, however, the conventional fixed type robot manipulator is very huge, heavy and expensive, it needs long inspection time and is hard to handle and maintain. In order to resolve these problems, we developed a new automatic inspection system using a small mobile robot crawling on the vertical wall of the reactor vessel. According to our conceptual design, we developed the reactor inspection system including an underwater inspection robot, a laser position control subsystem, an ultrasonic data acquisition/analysis subsystem and a main control subsystem. We successfully carried out underwater experiments on the reactor vessel mockup, and real reactor ready for Ulchine nuclear power plant unit 6 at Dusan Heavy Industry in Korea. After this project, we have a plan to commercialize our inspection system. Using this system, we can expect much reduction of the inspection time, performance enhancement, automatic management of inspection history, etc. In the economic point of view, we can also expect import substitution more than 4 million dollars. The established essential technologies for intelligent control and automation are expected to be synthetically applied to the automation of similar systems in nuclear power plants

  20. REACTOR CONTROL ROD OPERATING SYSTEM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, G.

    1961-12-12

    A nuclear reactor control rod mechanism is designed which mechanically moves the control rods into and out of the core under normal conditions but rapidly forces the control rods into the core by catapultic action in the event of an emergency. (AEC)

  1. Reactor core operation management system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sato, Tomomi.

    1992-05-28

    Among operations of periodical inspection for a nuclear power plant, sequence, time and safety rule, as well as necessary equipments and the number thereof required for each of the operation are determined previously for given operation plannings, relevant to the reactor core operations. Operation items relative to each of coordinates of the reactor core are retrieved and arranged based on specified conditions, to use the operation equipments effectively. Further, a combination of operations, relative to the reactor core coordinates with no physical interference and shortest in accordance with safety rules is judged, and the order and the step of the operation relevant to the entire reactor core operations are planned. After the start of the operation, the necessity for changing the operation sequence is judged depending on the judgement as to whether it is conducted according to the safety rule and the deviation between the plan and the result, based on the information for the progress of each of the operations. Alternatively, the operation sequence and the step to be changed are planned again in accordance with the requirement for the change of the operation planning. Then, the shortest operation time can be planned depending on the simultaneous operation impossible condition and the condition for the operation time zone determined by labor conditions. (N.H.).

  2. Reactor core operation management system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Tomomi.

    1992-01-01

    Among operations of periodical inspection for a nuclear power plant, sequence, time and safety rule, as well as necessary equipments and the number thereof required for each of the operation are determined previously for given operation plannings, relevant to the reactor core operations. Operation items relative to each of coordinates of the reactor core are retrieved and arranged based on specified conditions, to use the operation equipments effectively. Further, a combination of operations, relative to the reactor core coordinates with no physical interference and shortest in accordance with safety rules is judged, and the order and the step of the operation relevant to the entire reactor core operations are planned. After the start of the operation, the necessity for changing the operation sequence is judged depending on the judgement as to whether it is conducted according to the safety rule and the deviation between the plan and the result, based on the information for the progress of each of the operations. Alternatively, the operation sequence and the step to be changed are planned again in accordance with the requirement for the change of the operation planning. Then, the shortest operation time can be planned depending on the simultaneous operation impossible condition and the condition for the operation time zone determined by labor conditions. (N.H.)

  3. Cooling system upon reactor isolation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Kohei; Oda, Shingo; Miura, Satoshi

    1992-01-01

    A water level indicator for detecting the upper limit value for a range of using a suppression pool and a thermometer for detecting the temperature of water at the cooling water inlet of an auxiliary device are disposed. When a detection signal is intaken and the water level in the suppression pool reach the upper limit value for the range of use, a secondary flow rate control value is opened and a primary flow rate control valve is closed. When the temperature of the water at the cooling water inlet of the auxiliary device reaches the upper limit value, the primary and the secondary flow rate control valves are opened. During a stand-by state, the first flow rate control valve is set open and the secondary flow rate control valve is set closed respectively. After reactor isolation, if a reactor water low level signal is received, an RCIC pump is actuated and cooling water is sent automatically under pressure from a condensate storage tank to the reactor and the auxiliary device requiring coolants by way of the primary flow rate control valve. Rated flow rate is ensured in the reactor and cooling water of an appropriate temperature can be supplied to the auxiliary device. (N.H.)

  4. The effect of heavy water reactors and liquid fuel reactors on the long-term development of nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brand, P.; Wiechers, W.K.

    1974-01-01

    The effects of the rates at which various combinations of power reactor types are installed on the long-range (to the year 2040) uranium and plutonium inventory requirements are examined. Consideration is given to light water reactors, fast breeder reactors, high temperature gas-cooled reactors, heavy water reactors, and thermal breeder reactors, in various combinations, and assuming alternatively a 3% and a 5% growth in energy demand

  5. Cooling system for auxiliary reactor component

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujihira, Tomoko.

    1991-01-01

    A cooling system for auxiliary reactor components comprises three systems, that is, two systems of reactor component cooling water systems (RCCW systems) and a high pressure component cooling water system (HPCCW system). Connecting pipelines having partition valves are intervened each in a cooling water supply pipeline to an emmergency component of each of the RCCW systems, a cooling water return pipeline from the emmergency component of each of the RCCW systems, a cooling water supply pipeline to each of the emmergency components of one of the RCCW system and the HPCCW system and a cooling water return pipeline from each of the emmergency components of one of the RCCW system and the HPCCW system. With such constitution, cooling water can be supplied also to the emmergency components in the stand-by system upon periodical inspection or ISI, thereby enabling to improve the backup performance of the emmergency cooling system. (I.N.)

  6. Measurements of gamma-ray energy deposition in a heterogeneous reactor experimental configuration and their analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calamand, D.; Wouters, R. de; Knipe, A.D.; Menil, R.

    1984-10-01

    An important contribution to the power output of a fast reactor is provided by the energy deposition from gamma-rays, and is particularly significant in the inner fertile zones of heterogeneous breeder reactor designs. To establish the validity of calculational methods and data for such systems an extensive series of measurements was performed in the zero power reactor Masurca, as part of the RACINE programme. The experimental study involved four European laboratories and the measurement techniques covered a range of thermoluminescent dosemeters and an ionization chamber. The present paper describes and compares the gamma-ray energy deposition measurements and analysis

  7. Energy Information Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Home > Building Energy Information Systems and Performance Monitoring (EIS-PM) Building Energy evaluate and improve performance monitoring tools for energy savings in commercial buildings. Within the and visualization capabilities to energy and facility managers. As an increasing number of

  8. Gen-III/III+ reactors. Solving the future energy supply shortfall. The SWR-1000 option

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stosic, Z.V.

    2006-01-01

    Deficiency of non-renewable energy sources, growing demand for electricity and primary energy, increase in population, raised concentration of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere and global warming are the facts which make nuclear energy currently the most realistic option to replace fossil fuels and satisfy global demand. The nuclear power industry has been developing and improving reactor technology for almost five decades and is now ready for the next generation of reactors which should solve the future energy supply shortfall. The advanced Gen-III/III+ (Generation III and/or III+) reactor designs incorporate passive or inherent safety features which require no active controls or operational intervention to manage accidents in the event of system malfunction. The passive safety equipment functions according to basic laws of physics such as gravity and natural convection and is automatically initiated. By combining these passive systems with proven active safety systems, the advanced reactors can be considered to be amongst the safest equipment ever made. Since the beginning of the 90's AREVA NP has been intensively engaged in the design of two advanced Gen-III+ reactors: (i) PWR (Pressurized Water Reactor) EPR (Evolutionary Power Reactor) and (ii) BWR (Boiling Water Reactor) SWR-1000. The SWR-1000 reactor design marks a new era in the successful tradition of BWR technology. It meets the highest safety standards, including control of a core melt accident. This is achieved by supplementing active safety systems with passive safety equipment of diverse design for accident detection and control and by simplifying systems needed for normal plant operation. A short construction period, flexible fuel cycle lengths and a high fuel discharge burn-up contribute towards meeting economic goals. The SWR-1000 completely fulfils international nuclear regulatory requirements. (author)

  9. Recycling systems for BWR type reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takagi, Akio; Yamamoto, Fumiaki; Fukumoto, Ryuji.

    1986-01-01

    Purpose: To stabilize the coolant flowing characteristics and reactor core reactivity. Constitution: The recycling system in a BWR type reactor comprises a recycling pump disposed to the outside of a reactor pressure vessel, a ring header connected to the recycling pump through main pipe ways, and a plurality of pipes branched from and connected with the ring header and connected to a plurality of jet pumps within the pressure vessel. Then, by making the diameter for the pipeways of each of the branched pipes different from each other, the effective cross-sectional area is varied to thereby average the coolant flow rate supplied to each of the jet pumps. (Seki, T.)

  10. Integral Fast Reactor: A future source of nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Southon, R.

    1993-01-01

    Argonne National Laboratory is developing a reactor concept that would be an important part of the worlds energy future. This report discusses the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) concept which provides significant improvements over current generation reactors in reactor safety, plant complexity, nuclear proliferation, and waste generation. Two major facilities, a reactor and a fuel cycle facility, make up the IFR concept. The reactor uses fast neutrons and metal fuel in a sodium coolant at atmospheric pressure that relies on laws of physics to keep it safe. The fuel cycle facility is a hot cell using remote handling techniques for fabricating reactor fuel. The fuel feed stock includes spent fuel from the reactor, and potentially, spent light water reactor fuel and plutonium from weapons. This paper discusses the unique features of the IFR concept and the differences the quality assurance program has from current commercial practices. The IFR concept provides an opportunity to design a quality assurance program that makes use of the best contemporary ideas on management and quality

  11. Nuclear reactor machine refuelling system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cashen, W.S.; Erwin, D.

    1977-01-01

    Part of an on-line fuelling machine for a CANDU pressure-tube reactor is described. The present invention provides a refuelling machine wherein the fuelling components, including the fuel carrier and the closure adapter, are positively positioned and retained within the machine magazine or positively secured to the machine charge tube head, and cannot be accidentally disengaged as in former practice. The positive positioning devices include an arcuate keeper plate. Simplified hooked fingers are used. (NDH)

  12. Reactor vessel stud closure system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spiegelman, S.R.; Salton, R.B.; Beer, R.W.; Malandra, L.J.; Cognevich, M.L.

    1982-01-01

    A quick-acting stud tensioner apparatus for enabling the loosening or tightening of a stud nut on a reactor vessel stud. The apparatus is adapted to engage the vessel stud by closing a gripper around an upper end of the vessel stud when the apparatus is seated on the stud. Upon lifting the apparatus, the gripper releases the vessel stud so that the apparatus can be removed

  13. Nuclear reactor system for ABWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyano, Hiroshi; Kitagawa, Koji

    1997-01-01

    Various tests and measurements were performed during the pre-operational test run of Unit No. 6 of The Tokyo Electric Power Co., Inc.'s Kashiwazaki-Kariwa Nuclear Power Station, the first advanced boiling water reactor (ABWR) unit in the world, and the design and performance adequacy of the ABWR were confirmed. The realization of the ABWR in Japan took about 20 years. It was decided that technologies for the reactor internal pump (RIP) and the fine-motion control rod drive (FMCRD), which had been applied in Europe, would be incorporated in the ABWR aiming at simplification of its structure and operation. These main components were evaluated, modified and verified in consideration of the unique Japanese environment, such as seismic conditions, through a joint study program with Japanese utilities as well as an improvement and standardization program in cooperation with the government. In addition to incorporating RIP and FMCRD technologies, the ABWR also has improved features in terms of the design of the reactor pressure vessel and internals, as well as automated servicing equipment for the RIP, FMCRD, and primary containment vessel. (author)

  14. Renewal of reactor cooling system of JMTR. Reactor building site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onoue, Ryuji; Kawamata, Takanori; Otsuka, Kaoru; Sekine, Katsunori; Koike, Sumio; Gorai, Shigeru; Nishiyama, Yutaka; Fukasaku, Akitomi

    2012-03-01

    The Japan Materials Testing Reactor (JMTR) is a light water moderated and cooled tank-type reactor, and its thermal power is 50 MW. The JMTR is categorized as high flux testing reactors in the world. The JMTR has been utilized for irradiation experiments of nuclear fuels and materials, as well as for radioisotope productions since the first criticality in March 1968 until August 2006. JAEA is decided to refurbish the JMTR as an important fundamental infrastructure to promote the nuclear research and development. And The JMTR refurbishment work is carried out for 4 years from 2007. Before refurbishment work, from August 2006 to March 2007, all concerned renewal facilities were selected from evaluation on their damage and wear in terms of aging. Facilities which replacement parts are no longer manufactured or not likely to be manufactured continuously in near future, are selected as renewal ones. Replace priority was decided with special attention to safety concerns. A monitoring of aging condition by the regular maintenance activity is an important factor in selection of continuous using after the restart. In this report, renewal of the cooling system within refurbishment facilities in the JMTR is summarized. (author)

  15. Light water reactor safeguards system evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varnado, G.B.; Ericson, D.M. Jr.; Bennett, H.A.; Hulme, B.L.; Daniel, S.L.

    1978-01-01

    A methodology for assessing the effectiveness of safeguards systems was developed in this study and was applied to a typical light water reactor plant. The relative importance of detection systems, barriers, response forces and other safeguards system components was examined in extensive parameter variation studies. (author)

  16. Modeling and performance of the MHTGR [Modular High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor] reactor cavity cooling system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conklin, J.C.

    1990-04-01

    The Reactor Cavity Cooling System (RCCS) of the Modular High- Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (MHTGR) proposed by the U.S. Department of Energy is designed to remove the nuclear afterheat passively in the event that neither the heat transport system nor the shutdown cooling circulator subsystem is available. A computer dynamic simulation for the physical and mathematical modeling of and RCCS is described here. Two conclusions can be made form computations performed under the assumption of a uniform reactor vessel temperature. First, the heat transferred across the annulus from the reactor vessel and then to ambient conditions is very dependent on the surface emissivities of the reactor vessel and RCCS panels. These emissivities should be periodically checked to ensure the safety function of the RCCS. Second, the heat transfer from the reactor vessel is reduced by a maximum of 10% by the presence of steam at 1 atm in the reactor cavity annulus for an assumed constant in the transmission of radiant energy across the annulus can be expected to result in an increase in the reactor vessel temperature for the MHTGR. Further investigation of participating radiation media, including small particles, in the reactor cavity annulus is warranted. 26 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab

  17. Accelerator-driven transmutation reactor analysis code system (ATRAS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sasa, Toshinobu; Tsujimoto, Kazufumi; Takizuka, Takakazu; Takano, Hideki [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1999-03-01

    JAERI is proceeding a design study of the hybrid type minor actinide transmutation system which mainly consist of an intense proton accelerator and a fast subcritical core. Neutronics and burnup characteristics of the accelerator-driven system is important from a view point of the maintenance of subcriticality and energy balance during the system operation. To determine those characteristics accurately, it is necessary to involve reactions at high-energy region, which are not treated on ordinary reactor analysis codes. The authors developed a code system named ATRAS to analyze the neutronics and burnup characteristics of accelerator-driven subcritical reactor systems. ATRAS has a function of burnup analysis taking account of the effect of spallation neutron source. ATRAS consists of a spallation analysis code, a neutron transport codes and a burnup analysis code. Utility programs for fuel exchange, pre-processing and post-processing are also incorporated. (author)

  18. Contained fission explosion breeder reactor system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Juhl, N.H.; Marwick, E.F.

    1983-01-01

    A reactor system for producing useful thermal energy and valuable isotopes, such as plutonium-239, uranium-233, and/or tritium, in which a pair of sub-critical masses of fissile and fertile actinide slugs are propelled into an ellipsoidal pressure vessel. The propelled slugs intercept near the center of the chamber where the concurring slugs become a more than prompt configuration thereby producing a fission explosion. Re-useable accelerating mechanisms are provided external of the vessel for propelling the slugs at predetermined time intervals into the vessel. A working fluid of lean molten metal slurry is injected into the chamber prior to each explosion for the attenuation of the explosion's effects, for the protection of the chamber's walls, and for the absorbtion of thermal energy and debris from the explosion. The working fluid is injected into the chamber in a pattern so as not to interfere with the flight paths of the slugs and to maximize the concentration of working fluid near the chamber's center. The heated working fluid is drained from the vessel and is used to perform useful work. Most of the debris from the explosion is collected as precipitate and is used for the manufacture of new slugs

  19. Croatian Energy System Defossilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Potocnik, V.

    2013-01-01

    Defossilization of an energy system, as primary cause of the actual climate change, means exchange of predominantly imported fossil fuels with climate more convenient energy carriers, facilitating thus the way out of crisis.Overview of the world and Croatian energy system situation is presented as well as the overview of climate change. The most important Croatian energy system defossilization measures-energy efficiency increase, renewable energy inclusion and others - are described.(author)

  20. Energy systems security

    CERN Document Server

    Voeller, John G

    2014-01-01

    Energy Systems Security features articles from the Wiley Handbook of Science and Technology for Homeland Security covering topics related to electricity transmission grids and their protection, risk assessment of energy systems, analysis of interdependent energy networks. Methods to manage electricity transmission disturbances so as to avoid blackouts are discussed, and self-healing energy system and a nano-enabled power source are presented.

  1. Neutron flux measuring system for nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aoki, Kazuo.

    1977-01-01

    Purpose: To avoid the generation of an undesired scram signal due to abrupt changes in the neutron level given to the detectors disposed near the boundary between the moderator and the atmosphere. Constitution: In a nuclear reactor adapted to conduct power control by the change of the level in the moderator such as heavy water, the outputs from the neutron detectors disposed vertically are averaged and the nuclear reactor is scramed corresponding to the averaged value. In this system, moderator level detectors are additionally provided to the nuclear reactor and their outputs, moderator level signal, are sent to a power averaging device where the output signals of the neutron detectors are judged if they are delivered from neutrons in the moderator or not depending on the magnitude of the level signal and the outputs of the detectors out of the moderator are substantially excluded. The reactor interlock signal from the device is utilized as a scram signal. (Seki, T.)

  2. Modelling aerosol behavior in reactor cooling systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDonald, B.H.

    1990-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of some of the areas of concern in using computer codes to model fission-product aerosol behavior in the reactor cooling system (RCS) of a water-cooled nuclear reactor during a loss-of-coolant accident. The basic physical processes that require modelling include: fission product release and aerosol formation in the reactor core, aerosol transport and deposition in the reactor core and throughout the rest of the RCS, and the interaction between aerosol transport processes and the thermalhydraulics. In addition to these basic physical processes, chemical reactions can have a large influence on the nature of the aerosol and its behavior in the RCS. The focus is on the physics and the implications of numerical methods used in the computer codes to model aerosol behavior in the RCS

  3. Safety Analysis for Power Reactor Protection System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eisawy, E.A.; Sallam, H.

    2012-01-01

    The main function of a Reactor Protection System (RPS) is to safely shutdown the reactor and prevents the release of radioactive materials. The purpose of this paper is to present a technique and its application for used in the analysis of safety system of the Nuclear Power Plant (NPP). A more advanced technique has been presented to accurately study such problems as the plant availability assessments and Technical Specifications evaluations that are becoming increasingly important. The paper provides the Markov model for the Reactor Protection System of the NPP and presents results of model evaluations for two testing policies in technical specifications. The quantification of the Markov model provides the probability values that the system will occupy each of the possible states as a function of time.

  4. Considerations on nuclear reactor passive safety systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2016-01-01

    After having indicated some passive safety systems present in electronuclear reactors (control bars, safety injection system accumulators, reactor cooling after stoppage, hydrogen recombination systems), this report recalls the main characteristics of passive safety systems, and discusses the main issues associated with the assessment of new passive systems (notably to face a sustained loss of electric supply systems or of cold water source) and research axis to be developed in this respect. More precisely, the report comments the classification of safety passive systems as it is proposed by the IAEA, outlines and comments specific aspects of these systems regarding their operation and performance. The next part discusses the safety approach, the control of performance of safety passive systems, issues related to their reliability, and the expected contribution of R and D (for example: understanding of physical phenomena which have an influence of these systems, capacities of simulation of these phenomena, needs of experimentations to validate simulation codes)

  5. Control and instrumentation system of the Zero Power Reactor at IEA, Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peluso, M.A.V.; Matsuda, K.; Hukai, R.

    1974-01-01

    The control and instrumentation system of the Zero Power Reactor at the IEA (Institute of Atomic Energy - Sao Paulo, Brazil) is described. Technical specifications of the main items of equipment are presented in a general way. Information is also given on the connection between the system described and the electrical supply system of the IEA reactor physics laboratory [pt

  6. Transients in reactors for power systems compensation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdul Hamid, Haziah

    This thesis describes new models and investigations into switching transient phenomena related to the shunt reactors and the Mechanically Switched Capacitor with Damping Network (MSCDN) operations used for reactive power control in the transmission system. Shunt reactors and MSCDN are similar in that they have reactors. A shunt reactor is connected parallel to the compensated lines to absorb the leading current, whereas the MSCDN is a version of a capacitor bank designed as a C-type filter for use in the harmonic-rich environment. In this work, models have been developed and transient overvoltages due to shunt reactor deenergisation were estimated analytically using MathCad, a mathematical program. Computer simulations used the ATP/EMTP program to reproduce both single-phase and three-phase shunt reactor switching at 275 kV operational substations. The effect of the reactor switching on the circuit breaker grading capacitor was also examined by considering various switching conditions.. The main original achievement of this thesis is the clarification of failure mechanisms occurring in the air-core filter reactor due to MSCDN switching operations. The simulation of the MSCDN energisation was conducted using the ATP/EMTP program in the presence of surge arresters. The outcome of this simulation shows that extremely fast transients were established across the air-core filter reactor. This identified transient event has led to the development of a detailed air-core reactor model, which accounts for the inter-turn RLC parameters as well as the stray capacitances-to-ground. These parameters are incorporated into the transient simulation circuit, from which the current and voltage distribution across the winding were derived using electric field and equivalent circuit modelling. Analysis of the results has revealed that there are substantial dielectric stresses imposed on the winding insulation that can be attributed to a combination of three factors. (i) First, the

  7. Holland's reactor centre makes the shift to energy research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1978-01-01

    The change of name in 1976 of Reactor Centrum Nederland (RCN) to Energieonderzoek Centrum Nederland (ECN) reflects its expansion to activities in non-nuclear fields. A brief summary is given of these activities, including those in co-operation with other organisations. Amongst the fields of interest in non-nuclear fields are joint projects on risk analysis, future energy strategies, wind power, and environmental research. Work on fusion reactor technology is expanding. (UK)

  8. Assessment of a small pressurized water reactor for industrial energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klepper, O.H.; Fuller, L.C.; Myers, M.L.

    1977-01-01

    An evaluation of several recent ERDA/ORNL sponsored studies on the application of a small, 365 MW(t) pressurized water reactor for industrial energy is presented. Preliminary studies have investigated technical and reliability requirements; costs for nuclear and fossil based steam were compared, including consideration of economic inflation and financing methods. For base-load industrial steam production, small reactors appear economically attractive relative to coal fired boilers that use coal priced at $30/ton

  9. Effects of Nuclear Energy on Sustainable Development and Energy Security: Sodium-Cooled Fast Reactor Case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sungjoo Lee

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available We propose a stepwise method of selecting appropriate indicators to measure effects of a specific nuclear energy option on sustainable development and energy security, and also to compare an energy option with another. Focusing on the sodium-cooled fast reactor, one of the highlighted Generation IV reactors, we measure and compare its effects with the standard pressurized water reactor-based nuclear power, and then with coal power. Collecting 36 indicators, five experts select seven key indicators to meet data availability, nuclear energy relevancy, comparability among energy options, and fit with Korean energy policy objectives. The results show that sodium-cooled fast reactors is a better alternative than existing nuclear power as well as coal electricity generation across social, economic and environmental dimensions. Our method makes comparison between energy alternatives easier, thereby clarifying consequences of different energy policy decisions.

  10. Coolant monitoring systems for PWR reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luzhnov, A.M.; Morozov, V.V.; Tsypin, S.G.

    1987-01-01

    The ways of improving information capacity of existing monitoring systems and the necessity of designing new ones for coolant monitoring are reviewed. A wide research program on development of coolant monitoring systems in PWR reactors is analyzed. The possible applications of in-core and out-of-core detectors for coolant monitoring are demonstrated

  11. State system experience with safeguarding power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roehnsch, W.

    1982-01-01

    This session describes the development and operation of the State System of Accountancy and Control in the German Democratic Republic, and summarizes operating experience with safeguards at power reactor facilities. Overall organization and responsibilities, containment and surveillance measures, materials accounting, and inspection procedures will be outlined. Cooperation between the IAEA, State system, facility, and supplier authorities will also be addressed

  12. Laser fusion power reactor system (LFPRS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kovacik, W.P.

    1977-01-01

    This report gives detailed information for each of the following areas: (1) reference concept description, (2) nuclear design, (3) structural design, (4) thermal and fluid systems design, (5) materials design and analysis, (6) reactor support systems and balance of plant, (7) instrumentation and control, (8) environment and safety, (9) economics assessment, and (10) development requirements

  13. Management system requirements for small reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, K.A., E-mail: kenneth.jones@cnsc-ccsn.gc.ca [Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada)

    2013-07-01

    This abstract identifies the management system requirements for the life cycle of small reactors from initial conception through completion of decommissioning. For small reactors, the requirements for management systems remain the same as those for 'large' reactors regardless of the licensee' business model and objectives. The CSA N-Series of standards provides an interlinked set of requirements for the management of nuclear facilities. CSA N286 provides overall direction to management to develop and implement sound management practices and controls, while other CSA nuclear standards provide technical requirements and guidance that support the management system. CSA N286 is based on a set of principles. The principles are then supported by generic requirements that are applicable to the life cycle of nuclear facilities. CNSC regulatory documents provide further technical requirements and guidance. (author)

  14. Fuel handling system of nuclear reactor plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faulstich, D.L.

    1991-01-01

    This patent describes a fuel handing system for nuclear reactor plants comprising a reactor vessel having an openable top and removable cover for refueling and containing therein, submerged in coolant water substantially filling the reactor vessel, a fuel core including a multiplicity of fuel bundles formed of groups of sealed tube elements enclosing fissionable fuel assembled into units. It comprises a fuel bundle handing platform moveable over the open top of the reactor vessel; a fuel bundle handing mast extendable downward from the platform with a lower end projecting into the open top reactor vessel to the fuel core submerged in water; a grapple head mounted on the lower end of the mast provided with grappling hook means for attaching to and transporting fuel bundles into and out from the fuel core; and a camera with a prismatic viewing head surrounded by a radioactive resisting quartz cylinder and enclosed within the grapple head which is provided with at least three windows with at least two windows provided with an angled surface for aiming the camera prismatic viewing head in different directions and thereby viewing the fuel bundles of the fuel core from different perspectives, and having a cable connecting the camera with a viewing monitor located above the reactor vessel for observing the fuel bundles of the fuel core and for enabling aiming of the camera prismatic viewing head through the windows by an operator

  15. Neutral-beam systems for magnetic-fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fink, J.H.

    1981-01-01

    Neutral beams for magnetic fusion reactors are at an early stage of development, and require considerable effort to make them into the large, reliable, and efficient systems needed for future power plants. To optimize their performance to establish specific goals for component development, systematic analysis of the beamlines is essential. Three ion source characteristics are discussed: arc-cathode life, gas efficiency, and beam divergence, and their significance in a high-energy neutral-beam system is evaluated

  16. Modeling and simulation of CANDU reactor and its regulating system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javidnia, Hooman

    phenomena related to the transfer of the energy from the core. The main function of the reactor regulating system is to control the power of the reactor. This is achieved by using a set of detectors. reactivity devices. and digital control algorithms. Three main reactivity devices that are activated during short-term or intermediate-term transients are modeled in this thesis. The main elements of the digital control system are implemented in accordance to the program specifications for the actual control system in CANDU reactors. The simulation results are validated against requirements of the reactor regulating system. actual plant data. and pre-validated data from other computer codes. The validation process shows that the simulation results can be trusted in making engineering decisions regarding the reactor regulating system and prediction of the system performance in response to upset conditions or disturbances. KEYWORDS: CANDU reactors. reactor regulating system. nodal model. spatial kinetics. reactivity devices. simulation.

  17. The computerized reactor period measurement system for China fast burst reactor-II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Wuwen; Jiang Zhiguo

    1996-01-01

    The article simply introduces the hardware, principle, and software of the computerized reactor period measurement system for China Fast Burst Reactor-II (CFBR-II). It also gives the relation between fission yield and pre-reactivity of CFBR-II reactor system of bared reactor with decoupled-component and system of bared reactor with multiple light-material. The computerized measurement system makes the reactor period measurement into automatical and intelligent and also improves the speed and precision of period data on-line process

  18. Computer measurement system of reactor period for China fast burst reactor-II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Wuwen; Jiang Zhiguo

    1997-01-01

    The author simply introduces the hardware, principle, and software of the reactor period computer measure system for China Fast Burst Reactor-II (CFBR-II). It also gives the relation between Fission yield and Pre-reactivity of CFBR-II reactor system of bared reactor with decoupled-component and system of bared reactor with multiple light-material. The computer measure system makes the reactor period measurement into automation and intellectualization and also improves the speed and precision of period data process on-line

  19. The Molten Salt Fast Reactor as Highly Efficient Transmutation System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merk, B.; Rohde, U.; Scholl, S.

    2013-01-01

    Conclusion and future steps: • MSFR offers very attractive features for efficient transmutation; • significant advantages due to liquid fuel and online refuelling and reprocessing; • significant developments are required on the way to application; • system is very promising for transmutation; • development of a safety approach for liquid fuel reactors (RSWG); • investigation of possibilities to solve the “last transmuter” problem (ICAPP2013) – as future for countries envisaging nuclear phase out or no transition to fast reactor fleet for energy production; • establishing of a strong group “MSFR for transmutation”; • development of a transmutation optimized design

  20. Power conditioning system for a nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higashigawa, Yuichi; Joge, Toshio.

    1981-01-01

    Purpose: To provide a power conditioning system for a BWR type reactor which has a function to be automatically operated within a range that the relationship between the heat power of the reactor and the electric power of an electric generator does not lose the safety of fuel by eliminating the unnecessary fluctuation of the power of the reactor. Constitution: A load request error signal fed from a conventional turbine control system to recirculation flow regulator is eliminated, and a reactor power conditioning system is newly provided, to which an electric generator power signal, a reactor average power area monitor signal and a load request signal are inputted. Thus, the load request signal is compared directly with the electric power of the electric generator, the recirculation flow rate is controlled by the compared result, and whether the correlation between the heat power of the reqctor and the electric power of the generator satisfies the correlation determined to prove the safety of fuel or not is checked. If this correlation is satisfied, the recirculation flow rate is merely automatically controlled. (Yoshino, Y.)

  1. Advanced Fuel Cycle Economic Analysis of Symbiotic Light-Water Reactor and Fast Burner Reactor Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D. E. Shropshire

    2009-01-01

    The Advanced Fuel Cycle Economic Analysis of Symbiotic Light-Water Reactor and Fast Burner Reactor Systems, prepared to support the U.S. Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) systems analysis, provides a technology-oriented baseline system cost comparison between the open fuel cycle and closed fuel cycle systems. The intent is to understand their overall cost trends, cost sensitivities, and trade-offs. This analysis also improves the AFCI Program’s understanding of the cost drivers that will determine nuclear power’s cost competitiveness vis-a-vis other baseload generation systems. The common reactor-related costs consist of capital, operating, and decontamination and decommissioning costs. Fuel cycle costs include front-end (pre-irradiation) and back-end (post-iradiation) costs, as well as costs specifically associated with fuel recycling. This analysis reveals that there are large cost uncertainties associated with all the fuel cycle strategies, and that overall systems (reactor plus fuel cycle) using a closed fuel cycle are about 10% more expensive in terms of electricity generation cost than open cycle systems. The study concludes that further U.S. and joint international-based design studies are needed to reduce the cost uncertainties with respect to fast reactor, fuel separation and fabrication, and waste disposition. The results of this work can help provide insight to the cost-related factors and conditions needed to keep nuclear energy (including closed fuel cycles) economically competitive in the U.S. and worldwide. These results may be updated over time based on new cost information, revised assumptions, and feedback received from additional reviews.

  2. Advanced Fuel Cycle Economic Analysis of Symbiotic Light-Water Reactor and Fast Burner Reactor Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shropshire, D.E.

    2009-01-01

    The Advanced Fuel Cycle Economic Analysis of Symbiotic Light-Water Reactor and Fast Burner Reactor Systems, prepared to support the U.S. Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) systems analysis, provides a technology-oriented baseline system cost comparison between the open fuel cycle and closed fuel cycle systems. The intent is to understand their overall cost trends, cost sensitivities, and trade-offs. This analysis also improves the AFCI Program's understanding of the cost drivers that will determine nuclear power's cost competitiveness vis-a-vis other baseload generation systems. The common reactor-related costs consist of capital, operating, and decontamination and decommissioning costs. Fuel cycle costs include front-end (pre-irradiation) and back-end (post-irradiation) costs, as well as costs specifically associated with fuel recycling. This analysis reveals that there are large cost uncertainties associated with all the fuel cycle strategies, and that overall systems (reactor plus fuel cycle) using a closed fuel cycle are about 10% more expensive in terms of electricity generation cost than open cycle systems. The study concludes that further U.S. and joint international-based design studies are needed to reduce the cost uncertainties with respect to fast reactor, fuel separation and fabrication, and waste disposition. The results of this work can help provide insight to the cost-related factors and conditions needed to keep nuclear energy (including closed fuel cycles) economically competitive in the U.S. and worldwide. These results may be updated over time based on new cost information, revised assumptions, and feedback received from additional reviews.

  3. Digital instrumentation system for nuclear research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aghina, Mauricio A.C.; Carvalho, Paulo Vitor R.

    2002-01-01

    This work describes a proposal for a system of nuclear instrumentation and safety totally digital for the Argonauta Reactor. The system divides in the subsystems: channel of pulses, channel of current, conventional instrumentation and safety system. The connection of the subsystems is made through redundant double local net, using the protocol modbus/rtu. So much the channel of pulses, the current channel and safety's system use modules operating in triple redundancy. (author)

  4. Kinetic energy storage system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaeggi, M.; Folini, P.

    1983-09-03

    A flywheel system for the purpose of energy storage in decentral solar- or wind energy plants is introduced. The system comprises a rotor made out of plastic fibre, a motor/generator serving as electro-mechanical energy converter and a frequency-voltage transformer serving as electric adapter. The storable energy quantity amounts to several kWh.

  5. The IAEA power reactor information system - PRIS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laue, H.J.; Qureshi, A.; Skjoeldebrand, R.; White, D.

    1983-01-01

    The IAEA Power Reactor Information System, PRIS, is based on a collection of basic design data and operating experience data which the IAEA started in 1970. PRIS is used for annual publications on 'Power Reactors in Member States', 'Operating Experience with Nuclear Power Stations in Member States', which gives annual operating information for individual plants, and a 'Performance Analysis Report' summarizing each year's and earlier experience. Since 1973 information has been collected in a systematic manner on significant plant outages (= more than 10 full power hours). There is now information on more than 10,000 outages in the system which permits some conclusions to be drawn both in regard to individual plants and to categories of plants on the significance of different outage reasons and different types of equipment failures. PRIS has not been intended to be a component reliability information system as an international data collection must stop short of the level of detail which would be needed for that purpose. The objectives of PRIS have been to provide a factual background for assumptions on parameters which are essential for economic evaluations and for systems operation planning (load factor and availability). The outage information does, however, lend itself to conclusions about generic problems in different categories of plants and it can be used by an individual operator to find other plants where information about particular problems can be obtained. It would also now be possible to use PRIS for setting availability goals based on experience and not only on theoretical design considerations. The paper demonstrates the conclusions which can be drawn from 662 reactor years of operation of light and heavy water pressurized reactors and 390 reactor years of boiling water reactors and, in particular, the role that the main heat removal system and its components have played in the equipment failure category

  6. System modeling and reactor design studies of the Advanced Thermionic Initiative space nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, H.H.; Abdul-Hamid, S.; Klein, A.C.

    1996-01-01

    In-core thermionic space reactor design concepts that operate at a nominal power output range of 20 to 50 kW(electric) are described. Details of the neutronic, thermionic, thermal hydraulics, and shielding performance are presented. Because of the strong absorption of thermal neutrons by natural tungsten and the large amount of natural tungsten within the reactor core, two designs are considered. An overall system design code has been developed at Oregon State University to model advanced in-core thermionic energy conversion-based nuclear reactor systems for space applications. The results show that the driverless single-cell Advanced Thermionic Initiative (ATI) configuration, which does not have driver fuel rods, proved to be more efficient than the driven core, which has driver rods. The results also show that the inclusion of the true axial and radial power distribution decrease the overall conversion efficiency. The flattening of the radial power distribution by three different methods would lead to a higher efficiency. The results show that only one TFE works at the optimum emitter temperature; all other TFEs are off the optimum performance and result in a 40% decrease of the efficiency of the overall system. The true axial profile is significantly different as there is a considerable amount of neutron leakage out of the top and bottom of the reactor. The analysis reveals that the axial power profile actually has a chopped cosine shape. For this axial profile, the reactor core overall efficiency for the driverless ATI reactor version is found to be 5.84% with a total electrical power of 21.92 kW(electric). By considering the true axial power profile instead of the uniform power profile, each TFE loses ∼80 W(electric)

  7. On the safety performance of the advanced nuclear energy systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Shounan

    1999-01-01

    Some features on the safety performances of the Advanced Nuclear Energy Systems are discussed. The advantages and some peculiar problems on the safety of Advanced Nuclear Energy Systems with subcritical nuclear reactor driven by external neutron sources are also pointed out in comparison with conventional nuclear reactors

  8. A Case Study: Implementation of a Management System for the TRIGA Mark II Research Reactor at the Laboratory of Applied Nuclear Energy (LENA) of the University of Pavia, Italy. Annex I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    This annex provides an example for the implementation of a management system for operating organizations of research reactors, based on a case study in which the implementation of such a system has been completed. The case study relates the experience of the Applied Nuclear Energy Laboratory (hereafter referred to as LENA) of the University of Pavia, Italy. This example is used because of the recent completion of the implementation of an integrated management system, and also because of the specific characteristics of the organization (such as the limited number of staff, limited financial resources, etc.), which are often typical for organizations that operate smaller research reactors. Section I-1 gives a brief presentation of the organization, including the scope of work, the main activities performed, the organizational structure, the identification of interested parties and the applicable requirements and standards. Section I-2 describes the LENA Management System, the reasons for its implementation, the stages of its development and the processes involved. Some practical examples related to the development of the LENA Management System are discussed in Section I-3, indicating the choices made by the organization. In particular, Section I-3.12 shows the correlation between the LENA Management System processes and the processes considered in the main body of this publication.

  9. Level controlling system in BWR type reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joge, Toshio; Higashigawa, Yuichi; Oomori, Takashi.

    1981-01-01

    Purpose: To reasonably attain fully automatic water level control in the core of BWR type nuclear power plants. Constitution: A feedwater flow regulation valve for reactor operation and a feedwater flow regulation valve for starting are provided at the outlet of a motor-driven feedwater pump in a feedwater system, and these valves are controlled by a feedwater flow rate controller. While on the other hand, a damp valve for reactor clean up system is controlled either in ''computer'' mode or in ''manual'' mode selected by a master switch, that is, controlled from a computer or the ON-OFF switch of the master switch by way of a valve control analog memory and a turn-over switch. In this way, the water level in the nuclear reactor can be controlled in a fully automatic manner reasonably at the starting up and shutdown of the plant to thereby provide man power saving. (Seki, T.)

  10. Reactor coolant pressure boundary leakage detection system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dissing, E.; Svansson, L.

    1980-01-01

    This study deals with a system for monitoring the leakage of reactor coolant. This system is based primarily on the detection of the 13 N content in the containment atmosphere. 13 N is produced from the oxygen of the reactor water via the recoil proton nuclear process Hl+016/yields/ 13 N+ 4 He. The generation is therefore independent of fuel element leakage and of the corrosion product content in the water. It is solely related to the neutron flux level in the reactor core. Typical figures for the equilibrium 13 N concentration in the containment atmosphere following a 4 kg/minute coolant leakage are 5 kBq m/sup -3/ and 7 kBq m/sup -3/ for BWR and PWR respectively. These levels are readily measured with a 10 liter Ge(Li) flow detector assembly operated at elevated pressure. 8 refs

  11. Reactor coolant pressure boundary leakage detection system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dissing, E.; Svansson, L.

    1980-01-01

    This study deals with a system for monitoring the leakage of reactor coolant. This system is based primarily on the detection of the N13 content in the containment atmosphere. N13 is produced from the oxygen of the reactor water via the recoil proton nuclear process Hl+016/yields/Nl3+He4. The generation is therefore independent of fuel element leakage and of the corrosion product content in the water. It is solely related to the neutron flux level in the reactor core. Typical figures for the equilibrium N13 concentration in the containment atmosphere following a 4 kg/minute coolant leakage are 5 kBq m/sup -3/ and 7 kBq m/sup -3/ for BWR and PWR respectively. These levels are readily measured with a 10 liter Ge(Li) flow detector assembly operated at elevated pressure. 8 refs

  12. Reactor coolant pressure boundary leakage detection system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dissing, E.; Svansson, L.

    1979-08-01

    The present paper deals with a system for monitoring the leakage of reactor coolant. This system is based primarily on the detection of the N13 content in the containment atmosphere. N13 is produced from the oxygen of the reactor water via the recoil proton nuclear process H1+016 → N13+He4. The generation is therefore independent of fuel element leakage and of the corrosion product content in the water. It is solely related to the neutron flux level in the reactor core. Typical figures for the equilibrium N13 concentration in the containment atmosphere following a 4 kg/minute coolant leakage are 5 kBq m -3 and 7 kBq m -3 for BWR and PWR respectively. These levels are readily measured with a 10 liter Ge (Li) flow detector assembly operated at elevated pressure. (Auth.)

  13. Coolant clean up system in nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tajima, Fumio; Iwami, Hiroshi.

    1981-01-01

    Purpose: To decrease the amount of main steams and improve the plant heat efficiency by the use of condensated water as coolants for not-regenerative heat exchangers in a coolant clean up system of a nuclear reactor. Constitution: In a coolant clean up system of a nuclear reactor, a portion of condensates is transferred to the shell of a non-regenerative heat exchanger by way of a condensate pump for non-regenerative heat exchanger through a branched pipeway provided to the outlet of a condensate desalter for using the condensates as the coolants for the shell of the heat exchanger and the condensates are then returned to the inlet of a feedwater heater after the heat exchange. The branched flow rate of the condensates is controlled by the flow rate control valve mounted in the pipeway. Condensates passed through the heat exchanger and the condensates not passed through the heat exchanger are mixed and heated in a heater and then fed to the nuclear reactor. In a case where no feedwater is necessary to the nuclear reactor such as upon shutdown of the reactor, the condensates are returned by way of feedwater bypass pipeway to the condensator. By the use of the condensates as the coolants for the heat exchanger, the main steam loss can be decreased and the thermal load for the auxiliary coolant facility can be reduced. (Kawakami, Y.)

  14. High Temperature Fusion Reactor Cooling Using Brayton Cycle Based Partial Energy Conversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juhasz, Albert J.; Sawicki, Jerzy T.

    2003-01-01

    For some future space power systems using high temperature nuclear heat sources most of the output energy will be used in other than electrical form, and only a fraction of the total thermal energy generated will need to be converted to electrical work. The paper describes the conceptual design of such a partial energy conversion system, consisting of a high temperature fusion reactor operating in series with a high temperature radiator and in parallel with dual closed cycle gas turbine (CCGT) power systems, also referred to as closed Brayton cycle (CBC) systems, which are supplied with a fraction of the reactor thermal energy for conversion to electric power. Most of the fusion reactor's output is in the form of charged plasma which is expanded through a magnetic nozzle of the interplanetary propulsion system. Reactor heat energy is ducted to the high temperature series radiator utilizing the electric power generated to drive a helium gas circulation fan. In addition to discussing the thermodynamic aspects of the system design the authors include a brief overview of the gas turbine and fan rotor-dynamics and proposed bearing support technology along with performance characteristics of the three phase AC electric power generator and fan drive motor.

  15. An accelerator-driven reactor for meeting future energy demand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Hiroshi; Yang, Y.; Yu, A.

    1997-01-01

    Fissile fuel can be produced at a high rate using an accelerator-driven Pu-fueled subcritical fast reactor which avoids encountering a shortage of Pu during a high growth rate in the production of nuclear energy. Furthermore, the necessity of the early introduction of the fast reactor can be moderated. Subcritical operation provides flexible nuclear energy options along with high neutron economy for producing the fuel, for transmuting high-level waste such as minor actinides, and for efficiently converting excess and military Pu into proliferation-resistant fuel

  16. Review of Operation and Maintenance Support Systems for Research Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin, Kyungho; Heo, Gyunyoung; Park, Jaekwan

    2014-01-01

    Operation support systems do not directly control the plant but it can aid decision making itself by obtaining and analyzing large amounts of data. Recently, the demand of research reactor is growing and the need for operation support systems is increasing, but it has not been applied for research reactors. This study analyzes operation and maintenance support systems of NPPs and suggests appropriate systems for research reactors based on analysis. In this paper, operation support systems for research reactors are suggested by comparing with those of power reactors. Currently, research reactors do not cover special systems in order to improve safety and operability in comparison with power reactors. Therefore we expect to improve worth to use by introducing appropriate systems for research reactors. In further research, we will develop an appropriate system such as applications or tools that can be applied to the research reactor

  17. CRNL research reactor retrofit Emergency Filtration System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Philippi, H.M.

    1990-01-01

    This paper presents a brief history of NRX and NRU research reactor effluent air treatment systems before describing the selection and design of an appropriate retrofit Emergency Filtration System (EFS) to serve these reactors and the future MX-10 isotope production reactor. The conceptual design of the EFS began in 1984. A standby concrete shielding filter-adsorber system, sized to serve the reactor with the largest exhaust flow, was selected. The standby system, bypassed under normal operating conditions, is equipped with normal exhaust stream shutoff and diversion valves to be activated manually when an emergency is anticipated, or automatically when emergency levels of gamma radiation are detected in the exhaust stream. The first phase of the EFS installation, that is the construction of the EFS and the connection of NRU to the system, was completed in 1987. The second phase of construction, which includes the connection of NRX and provisions for the future connection of MX-10, is to be completed in 1990

  18. The reactor antineutrino anomaly and low energy threshold neutrino experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cañas, B. C.; Garcés, E. A.; Miranda, O. G.; Parada, A.

    2018-01-01

    Short distance reactor antineutrino experiments measure an antineutrino spectrum a few percent lower than expected from theoretical predictions. In this work we study the potential of low energy threshold reactor experiments in the context of a light sterile neutrino signal. We discuss the perspectives of the recently detected coherent elastic neutrino-nucleus scattering in future reactor antineutrino experiments. We find that the expectations to improve the current constraints on the mixing with sterile neutrinos are promising. We also analyze the measurements of antineutrino scattering off electrons from short distance reactor experiments. In this case, the statistics is not competitive with inverse beta decay experiments, although future experiments might play a role when compare it with the Gallium anomaly.

  19. Recuperation of the energy released in the G-1, an air-cooled graphite reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chambadal, P.; Pascal, M.

    1955-01-01

    The CEA (in his five-year setting plan) has objective among others, the realization of the two first french reactors moderated with graphite. The construction of the G-1 reactor in Marcoule, first french plutonic core, is achieved so that it will diverge in the beginning of 1956 and reach its full power in the beginning of the second semester of the same year. In this report we will detail the specificities of the reactor and in particular its cooling and energy recuperation system. The G-1 reactor being essentially intended to allow the french technicians to study the behavior of an energy installation supply taking its heat in a nuclear source as early as possible. (M.B.) [fr

  20. Reactor shutdown system of prototype fast breeder reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Govindarajan, S.; Singh, Om Pal; Kasinathan, N.; Paramasivan Pillai, C.; Arul, A.J.; Chetal, S.C.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: The shutdown system of PFBR is designed to assure a very high reliability by employing well known principles of redundancy, diversity and independence. The failure probability of the shutdown system limited to -6 / ry. Salient features of the shutdown system are: Two independent shutdown systems, each of them able to accommodate an additional single failure and made up of a trip system and an associated absorber rod group. Diversity between trip systems, rods and mechanisms. Initiation of SCRAM by two diverse physical parameters of the two shutdown systems for design events leading potentially to unacceptable conditions is the core. The first group of nine rods called control and safety rods (CSR) is used for both shutdown as well as power regulation. The second group consisting of three rods known as diverse safety rods (DSR) is used only for shutdown. Diversity between the two groups is ensured by varying the operating conditions of the electromagnets and the configurations of the mobile parts. The reactivity worth of the absorber rods have been chosen such that each group of rods would ensure cold shutdown on SCRAM even when the most reactive rod of the group fails to drop. Together the two groups ensure a shutdown margin of 5000 pcm. The speed and individual rod worth of the CSR is chosen from operational and safety considerations during reactor start up and raising of power. Required drop time of rods during SCRAM depends on the incident considered. For a severe reactivity incident of 3 $/s this has to be limited to 1s and is ensured by limiting electromagnet response time and facilitating drop by gravity. Design safety limits for core components have been determined and SCRAM parameters have been identified by plant dynamic analysis to restrict the temperatures of core components within the limits. The SCRAM parameters are distributed between the two systems appropriately. Fault tree analysis of the system has been carried out to determine the

  1. Cirus reactor: a milestone in Indian Atomic Energy Programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ranjan, Rakesh; Karhadkar, C.G.; Bhattacharya, S.

    2017-01-01

    Cirus, a 40 MW_t_h, high flux, thermal neutron research reactor achieved first criticality on 10"t"h July 1960. It had vertical core, natural metallic Uranium rods in Aluminium clad as fuel, demineralised light water as coolant, heavy water as moderator, Helium as cover gas and graphite as reflector. A low-pressure containment was provided for the reactor and some of the important associated reactor systems. Reactor start-up and power regulation was effected by controlled adjustment of moderator level in the reactor vessel. Boron carbide rods were used as primary shut down devices. Dumping of heavy water from core worked as secondary shut down device. Seawater was used as secondary coolant for removal of the fission heat of the reactor. Initial operation of Cirus was marred by several difficulties, primarily arising out of water chemistry in primary cooling water system. It took almost 3 years to systematically resolve these problems and achieve stable operation of reactor. Cirus could be operated at its rated power by the year 1963

  2. Development of a Neutron Flux Monitoring System for Sodium-cooled Fast Reactors

    OpenAIRE

    Verma, Vasudha

    2017-01-01

    Safety and reliability are one of the key objectives for future Generation IV nuclear energy systems. The neutron flux monitoring system forms an integral part of the safety design of a nuclear reactor and must be able to detect any irregularities during all states of reactor operation. The work in this thesis mainly concerns the detection of in-core perturbations arising from unwanted movements of control rods with in-vessel neutron detectors in a sodium-cooled fast reactor. Feasibility stud...

  3. Advanced reactor systems: safety and regulatory aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gopalakrishnan, A.

    1994-01-01

    Safety features which are desirable in futuristic reactor systems have been the subject of several studies over the past decade by different expert groups. When one discusses this subject, therefore, in a somewhat non-specific and qualitative manner, it is best to make use of the already available collective wisdom and literature on the matter. (author). 3 refs

  4. Coolant cleanup system for a nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shiina, Atsushi; Usui, Naoshi; Yamamoto, Michiyoshi; Osumi, Katsumi.

    1983-01-01

    Purpose: To maintain the electric conductivity of reactor water lower and to minimize the heat loss in the cleanup system by providing a low temperature cleanup system and a high temperature cleanup system together. Constitution: A low temperature cleanup system using ion exchange resins as filter aids and a high temperature cleanup system using inorganic ion exchange materials as filter aids are provided in combination. A part of the reactor water in a reactor pressure vessel is passed through a conductivity meter, one portion of which flows into the high temperature cleanup system having no heat exchanger and filled with inorganic ion exchange materials by way of a first flow rate control valve and the other portion of which flows into the low temperature cleanup system having heat exchangers and filled with the ion exchange materials by way of a second control valve. The first control valve is adjusted so as to flow, for example, about more than 15% of the feedwater flow rate to the high temperature cleanup system and the second control valve is adjusted with its valve opening degree depending on the indication of the conductivity meter so as to flow about 2 - 7 % of the feedwater flow rate into the low temperature cleanup system, to thereby control the electric conductivity to between 0.055 - 0.3 μS/cm. (Moriyama, K.)

  5. Self-consistent nuclear energy systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimizu, A.; Fujiie, Y.

    1995-01-01

    A concept of self-consistent energy systems (SCNES) has been proposed as an ultimate goal of the nuclear energy system in the coming centuries. SCNES should realize a stable and unlimited energy supply without endangering the human race and the global environment. It is defined as a system that realizes at least the following four objectives simultaneously: (a) energy generation -attain high efficiency in the utilization of fission energy; (b) fuel production - secure inexhaustible energy source: breeding of fissile material with the breeding ratio greater than one and complete burning of transuranium through recycling; (c) burning of radionuclides - zero release of radionuclides from the system: complete burning of transuranium and elimination of radioactive fission products by neutron capture reactions through recycling; (d) system safety - achieve system safety both for the public and experts: eliminate criticality-related safety issues by using natural laws and simple logic. This paper describes the concept of SCNES and discusses the feasibility of the system. Both ''neutron balance'' and ''energbalance'' of the system are introduced as the necessary conditions to be satisfied at least by SCNES. Evaluations made so far indicate that both the neutron balance and the energy balance can be realized by fast reactors but not by thermal reactors. Concerning the system safety, two safety concepts: ''self controllability'' and ''self-terminability'' are introduced to eliminate the criticality-related safety issues in fast reactors. (author)

  6. Potential of small nuclear reactors for future clean and safe energy sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sekimoto, H.

    1992-01-01

    To cope with the various kinds of energy demands expected in the 21st century, it is necessary to explore the potential of small nuclear reactors and to find a way of promoting their introduction to society. The main goal of current research activities is 'the constitution of the self-consistent nuclear energy system'. These activities can be understood by realizing that the nuclear community is facing a turning point for its survival in the 21st century. Self-consistency can be manifested by investigating and developing the potential advantages of the nuclear fission reaction and lessening the potential disadvantages. The contributions in this volume discuss concepts of small reactors, applications of small reactors, and consistency with conventional energy supply systems

  7. Nuclear reactor plants and control systems therefor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    de Boer, G.A.; de Hex, M.

    1976-01-01

    A nuclear reactor plant is described comprising at least two hydraulically separated but thermally interconnected heat conveying circuits, of which one is the reactor circuit filled with a non-water medium and the other one is the water-steam-circuit equipped with a steam generator, a feed water conduit controlled by a valve and a steam turbine, and a control system mainly influenced by the pressure drop caused in said feed water conduit and its control valve and having a value of at least 10 bars at full load

  8. Rodded shutdown system for a nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golden, M.P.; Govi, A.R.

    1978-01-01

    A top mounted nuclear reactor diverse rodded shutdown system utilizing gas fed into a pressure bearing bellows region sealed at the upper extremity to an armature is described. The armature is attached to a neutron absorber assembly by a series of shafts and connecting means. The armature is held in an uppermost position by an electromagnet assembly or by pressurized gas in a second embodiment. Deenergizing the electromagnet assembly, or venting the pressurized gas, causes the armature to fall by the force of gravity, thereby lowering the attached absorber assembly into the reactor core

  9. Method of controlling ECCS system in reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oohashi, Hideaki; Ikehara, Morihiko.

    1982-01-01

    Purpose: To eliminate the risk of misoperation and thereby improve the reliability of ECCS system upon accident. Method: ECCS system for nuclear reactor is automatically started by either of signals from a water level detector in a pressure vessel or from a pressure detector in a reactor container. Further, the ECCS system is started or stopped by the manual operation irrespective of the signals, and the signals from the pressure detector are isolated from the ECCS-starting signal by the contacts which actuate interlocked with the stopping operation of the manual operation switch. Then, after stopping the ECCS system by the manual operation, the ECCS system is started by the signals from the water level detector irrespective of the signals from the pressure detector. (Seki, T.)

  10. High temperature energy storage performances of methane reforming with carbon dioxide in a tubular packed reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, Jianfeng; Chen, Yuan; Ding, Jing; Wang, Weilong

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Energy storage of methane reforming in a tubular packed reactor is investigated. • Thermochemical storage efficiency approaches maximum at optimal temperature. • Sensible heat and heat loss play important roles in the energy storage system. • The reaction and energy storage models of methane reforming reactor are established. • The simulated methane conversion and energy storage efficiency fit with experiments. - Abstract: High temperature heat transfer and energy storage performances of methane reforming with carbon dioxide in tubular packed reactor are investigated under different operating conditions. Experimental results show that the methane reforming in tubular packed reactor can efficiently store high temperature thermal energy, and the sensible heat and heat loss besides thermochemical energy storage play important role in the total energy storage process. When the operating temperature is increased, the thermochemical storage efficiency first increases for methane conversion rising and then decreases for heat loss rising. As the operating temperate is 800 °C, the methane conversion is 79.6%, and the thermochemical storage efficiency and total energy efficiency can be higher than 47% and 70%. According to the experimental system, the flow and reaction model of methane reforming is established using the laminar finite-rate model and Arrhenius expression, and the simulated methane conversion and energy storage efficiency fit with experimental data. Along the flow direction, the fluid temperature in the catalyst bed first decreases because of the endothermic reaction and then increases for the heat transfer from reactor wall. As a conclusion, the maximum thermochemical storage efficiency will be obtained under optimal operating temperature and optimal flow rate, and the total energy efficiency can be increased by the increase of bed conductivity and decrease of heat loss coefficient.

  11. Pressure vessel codes: Their application to nuclear reactor systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1966-01-01

    A survey has been made by the International Atomic Energy Agency of how the problems of applying national pressure vessel codes to nuclear reactor systems have been treated in those Member States that had pressurized reactors in operation or under construction at the beginning of 1963. Fifteen answers received to an official inquiry form the basis of this report, which also takes into account some recently published material. Although the answers to the inquiry in some cases data back to 1963 and also reflect the difficulty of describing local situations in answer to standard questions, it is hoped that the report will be of interest to reactor engineers. 21 refs, 1 fig., 2 tabs

  12. The electronuclear cycle: from fission to new reactor systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belier, G.; Cugnon, J.; Lapoux, V.; Liatard, E.; Porquet, Marie-Genevieve; Rudolf, G.

    2006-09-01

    The Joliot Curie School trains each year, and since 1981, PhD students, post-Doctorates and researchers on scientific breakthroughs performed in a topic related to nuclear physics, in a broad range. These proceedings brings together the 11 lectures given at the 2006 session of Joliot Curie School on the topic of the electronuclear cycle: - Fission: from phenomenology to theory (Berger, J.F.); - Physics of nuclear reactors (Baeten, P.); - Data modeling and evaluation (Bauge, E.; Hilaire, S.); - Measurement of cross sections of interest for minor actinides incineration (Jurado, B.); - Spallation data and modelling for hybrid reactors (Boudard, A.); - Nuclear wastes: overview (Billard, I.); - Long living nuclear wastes transmutation processes and feasibility (Varaine, F.); - Hybrid reactors: recent advances for a demonstrator (Billebaud, A.); - Systems of the future and strategy (David, S.); - Non-nuclear energies (Nifenecker, H.); - Fundamental physics with ultracold neutrons (Protasov, K). The last section is a compilation of abstracts of presentations given by Young searchers' (Young searchers' seminars)

  13. Nuclear Hybrid Energy System Modeling: RELAP5 Dynamic Coupling Capabilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piyush Sabharwall; Nolan Anderson; Haihua Zhao; Shannon Bragg-Sitton; George Mesina

    2012-09-01

    The nuclear hybrid energy systems (NHES) research team is currently developing a dynamic simulation of an integrated hybrid energy system. A detailed simulation of proposed NHES architectures will allow initial computational demonstration of a tightly coupled NHES to identify key reactor subsystem requirements, identify candidate reactor technologies for a hybrid system, and identify key challenges to operation of the coupled system. This work will provide a baseline for later coupling of design-specific reactor models through industry collaboration. The modeling capability addressed in this report focuses on the reactor subsystem simulation.

  14. Sandia Pulsed Reactor Facility (SPRF) calculator-assisted pulse analysis and display system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Estes, B.F.; Berry, D.T.

    1980-02-01

    Two solid-metal fast burst type reactors (SPR II and SPR III) are operated at the Sandia Pulsed Reactor Facility. Since startup of the reactors, oscilloscope traces have been used to record (by camera) the pulse (power) shape while log N systems have measured initial reactor period. Virtually no other pulse information is available. A decision was made to build a system that could collect the basic input data available from the reactor - fission chambers, photodiodes, and thermocouples - condition the signals and output the various parameters such as power, energy, temperature, period and lifetime on hard copy that would provide a record for operations personnel as well as the experimenter. Because the reactors operate in short time frames - pulse operation - it is convenient to utilize the classical Nordheim-Fuchs approximation of the diffusion equation to describe reactor behavior. This report describes the work performed to date in developing the calculator system and analytical models for computing the desired parameters

  15. Reactor alarm system development and application issues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drexler, J E; Oicese, G O [INVAP S.E. (Argentina)

    1997-09-01

    The new hardware and software technologies, and the need in research reactors for assistance systems in operation and maintenance, have given an appropriate background to develop a computer based system named ``Reactor Alarm System`` (RAS). RAS is a software package, user oriented, with emphasis on production, experiments and maintenance goals. It is designed to run on distributed systems conformed with microcomputers under QNX operating system. RAS main features are: (a) Alarm Panel Display; (b) Alarm Page; (c) Alarm Masking and Inhibition; (d) Alarms Color and Attributes; (e) Condition Classification; and (f) Arrangement Presentation. RAS design allows it to be installed as a part of a computer based Supervision and Control System in new installations or retrofit existing reactor instrumentation systems. The analysis of human factors during development stage and successive user feedback from different applications, brought out several RAS improvements: (a) Multiple-copy alarm summaries; (b) Improved alarm handling; (c) Extended dictionary; and (d) Enhanced hardware availability. It has proved successful in providing new capabilities for operators, and also has shown the continuous increase of user-demands, reflecting the expectations placed today on computer-based systems. (author). 6 figs, 1 tabs.

  16. Reactor alarm system development and application issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drexler, J.E.; Oicese, G.O.

    1997-01-01

    The new hardware and software technologies, and the need in research reactors for assistance systems in operation and maintenance, have given an appropriate background to develop a computer based system named ''Reactor Alarm System'' (RAS). RAS is a software package, user oriented, with emphasis on production, experiments and maintenance goals. It is designed to run on distributed systems conformed with microcomputers under QNX operating system. RAS main features are: a) Alarm Panel Display; b) Alarm Page; c) Alarm Masking and Inhibition; d) Alarms Color and Attributes; e) Condition Classification; and f) Arrangement Presentation. RAS design allows it to be installed as a part of a computer based Supervision and Control System in new installations or retrofit existing reactor instrumentation systems. The analysis of human factors during development stage and successive user feedback from different applications, brought out several RAS improvements: a) Multiple-copy alarm summaries; b) Improved alarm handling; c) Extended dictionary; and d) Enhanced hardware availability. It has proved successful in providing new capabilities for operators, and also has shown the continuous increase of user-demands, reflecting the expectations placed today on computer-based systems. (author). 6 figs, 1 tabs

  17. Reactor power system deployment and startup

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wetch, J.R.; Nelin, C.J.; Britt, E.J.; Klein, G.; Rasor Associates, Inc., Sunnyvale, CA; California Institute of Technology, Pasadena)

    1985-01-01

    This paper addresses issues that should receive further examination in the near-term as concept selection for development of a U.S. space reactor power system is approached. The issues include: the economics, practicality and system reliability associated with transfer of nuclear spacecraft from low earth shuttle orbits to operational orbits, via chemical propulsion versus nuclear electric propulsion; possible astronaut supervised reactor and nuclear electric propulsion startup in low altitude Shuttle orbit; potential deployment methods for nuclear powered spacecraft from Shuttle; the general public safety of low altitude startup and nuclear safe and disposal orbits; the question of preferred reactor power level; and the question of frozen versus molten alkali metal coolant during launch and deployment. These issues must be considered now because they impact the SP-100 concept selection, power level selection, weight and size limits, use of deployable radiators, reliability requirements, and economics, as well as the degree of need for and the urgency of developing space reactor power systems. 5 references

  18. Fault-tolerant reactor protection system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaubatz, D.C.

    1997-01-01

    A reactor protection system is disclosed having four divisions, with quad redundant sensors for each scram parameter providing input to four independent microprocessor-based electronic chassis. Each electronic chassis acquires the scram parameter data from its own sensor, digitizes the information, and then transmits the sensor reading to the other three electronic chassis via optical fibers. To increase system availability and reduce false scrams, the reactor protection system employs two levels of voting on a need for reactor scram. The electronic chassis perform software divisional data processing, vote 2/3 with spare based upon information from all four sensors, and send the divisional scram signals to the hardware logic panel, which performs a 2/4 division vote on whether or not to initiate a reactor scram. Each chassis makes a divisional scram decision based on data from all sensors. Each division performs independently of the others (asynchronous operation). All communications between the divisions are asynchronous. Each chassis substitutes its own spare sensor reading in the 2/3 vote if a sensor reading from one of the other chassis is faulty or missing. Therefore the presence of at least two valid sensor readings in excess of a set point is required before terminating the output to the hardware logic of a scram inhibition signal even when one of the four sensors is faulty or when one of the divisions is out of service. 16 figs

  19. Fuel transfer system for a nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katz, L.R.; Marshall, J.R.; Desmarchais, W.E.

    1977-01-01

    Disclosed is a fuel transfer system for moving nuclear reactor fuel assemblies from a new fuel storage pit to a containment area containing the nuclear reactor, and for transferring spent fuel assemblies under water from the reactor to a spent fuel storage area. The system includes an underwater track which extends through a wall dividing the fuel building from the reactor containment and a car on the track serves as the vehicle for moving fuel assemblies between these two areas. The car is driven by a motor and linkage extending from an operating deck to a chain belt drive on the car. A housing pivotally mounted at its center on the car is hydraulically actuated to vertically receive a fuel assembly which then is rotated to a horizontal position to permit movement through the wall between the containment and fuel building areas. Return to the vertical position provides for fuel assembly removal and the reverse process is repeated when transferring an assembly in the opposite direction. Limit switches used in controlling operation of the system are designed to be replaced from the operating deck when necessary by tools designed for this purpose. 5 claims, 8 figures

  20. Encapsulated nuclear heat source reactors for energy security

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greenspan, E.; Susplugas, A.; Hong, S.G.; Monti, L.; Sumini, M.; Okawa, T.

    2006-01-01

    A spectrum of Encapsulated Nuclear Heat Source (ENHS) reactors have been conceptually designed over the last few years; they span a power range from 10 MWe to -200 MWe and consider a number of coolants and fuel types. Common features of all these designs include very long life cores - exceeding 20 effective full power years; nearly zero burnup reactivity swing; natural circulation; superb safety; autonomous load following capability; simplicity of operation and maintenance. ENHS reactors could be of particular interest for providing electricity, thermal energy and, possibly, desalinated water to communities that are not connected to a central electricity grid such as to many pacific islands and to remote communities in the mainland of different countries. ENHS reactors provide energy security by virtue of a couple of features: (1) Once an ENHS reactor is commissioned, the community has assured clean energy supply for at least 20 years without needing fuel supply. (2) The energy value of the fuel loaded (in the factory) in the ENHS module is preserved; what is needed for generating energy for additional 20+ years is to remove the fission products, add depleted uranium for makeup fuel, refabricate fuel rods and load into a new module. This fuel recycling is envisioned done by either the supplier country or by a regional or international fuel cycle centre. As the ENHS module is replaced at its entirety at the end of the core life - that is brought about by radiation damage, the ENHS plant life is likely to last for over 100 years. The above features also offer exceptional stability in the price of energy generated by the ENHS reactor. The reference ENHS design will be described followed by a brief description of the design options developed and a summary of their performance characteristics

  1. Steam generating system in LMFBR type reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurosawa, Katsutoshi.

    1984-01-01

    Purpose: To suppress the thermal shock loads to the structures of reactor system and secondary coolant system, for instance, upon plant trip accompanying turbine trip in the steam generation system of LMFBR type reactors. Constitution: Additional feedwater heater is disposed to the pipeway at the inlet of a steam generator in a steam generation system equipped with a closed loop extended from a steam generator by way of a gas-liquid separator, a turbine and a condensator to the steam generator. The separated water at high temperature and high pressure from a gas-liquid separator is heat exchanged with coolants flowing through the closed loop of the steam generation system in non-contact manner and, thereafter, introduced to a water reservoir tank. This can avoid the water to be fed at low temperature as it is to the steam generator, whereby the thermal shock loads to the structures of the reactor system and the secondary coolant system can be suppressed. (Moriyama, K.)

  2. Solar energy conversion systems

    CERN Document Server

    Brownson, Jeffrey R S

    2013-01-01

    Solar energy conversion requires a different mind-set from traditional energy engineering in order to assess distribution, scales of use, systems design, predictive economic models for fluctuating solar resources, and planning to address transient cycles and social adoption. Solar Energy Conversion Systems examines solar energy conversion as an integrative design process, applying systems thinking methods to a solid knowledge base for creators of solar energy systems. This approach permits different levels of access for the emerging broad audience of scientists, engineers, architects, planners

  3. Distributed computer control system for reactor optimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, A.H.

    1983-01-01

    At the Oldbury power station a prototype distributed computer control system has been installed. This system is designed to support research and development into improved reactor temperature control methods. This work will lead to the development and demonstration of new optimal control systems for improvement of plant efficiency and increase of generated output. The system can collect plant data from special test instrumentation connected to dedicated scanners and from the station's existing data processing system. The system can also, via distributed microprocessor-based interface units, make adjustments to the desired reactor channel gas exit temperatures. The existing control equipment will then adjust the height of control rods to maintain operation at these temperatures. The design of the distributed system is based on extensive experience with distributed systems for direct digital control, operator display and plant monitoring. The paper describes various aspects of this system, with particular emphasis on: (1) the hierarchal system structure; (2) the modular construction of the system to facilitate installation, commissioning and testing, and to reduce maintenance to module replacement; (3) the integration of the system into the station's existing data processing system; (4) distributed microprocessor-based interfaces to the reactor controls, with extensive security facilities implemented by hardware and software; (5) data transfer using point-to-point and bussed data links; (6) man-machine communication based on VDUs with computer input push-buttons and touch-sensitive screens; and (7) the use of a software system supporting a high-level engineer-orientated programming language, at all levels in the system, together with comprehensive data link management

  4. Renewable Energy Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Henrik; Mathiesen, Brian Vad; Connolly, David

    2014-01-01

    on the electricity sector, smart energy systems include the entire energy system in its approach to identifying suitable energy infrastructure designs and operation strategies. The typical smart grid sole focus on the electricity sector often leads to the conclusion that transmission lines, flexible electricity......This paper presents the learning of a series of studies that analyse the problems and perspectives of converting the present energy system into a 100 % renewable energy system using a smart energy systems approach. As opposed to, for instance, the smart grid concept, which takes a sole focus...... are to be found when the electricity sector is combined with the heating and cooling sectors and/or the transportation sector. Moreover, the combination of electricity and gas infrastructures may play an important role in the design of future renewable energy systems. The paper illustrates why electricity smart...

  5. Development of Reactor Protection System (RPS) in Reactor Digital Instrumentation and Control System (ReDICS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohd Khairulezwan Abdul Manan; Mohd Sabri Minhat; Ridzuan Abdul Mutalib

    2013-01-01

    RTP Research Reactor are in the process upgraded from analogue control console system to a digital control console system . Upgrade process requires a statistical study to improve safety during reactor operation. RPS was developed to meet the needs of operational safety and at the same time comply with the guidelines set by the IAEA. RPS is in analog and hardware with industry standard interfaced with digital DAC (Data Acquisition and Control) and OWS (Operator Work Station). (author)

  6. COMPRESS - a computerized reactor safety system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vegh, E.

    1986-01-01

    The computerized reactor safety system, called COMPRESS, provides the following services: scram initiation; safety interlockings; event recording. The paper describes the architecture of the system and deals with reliability problems. A self-testing unit checks permanently the correct operation of the independent decision units. Moreover the decision units are tested by short pulses whether they can initiate a scram. The self-testing is described in detail

  7. Advanced liquid metal reactor plant control system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dayal, Y.; Wagner, W.; Zizzo, D.; Carroll, D.

    1993-01-01

    The modular Advanced Liquid Metal Reactor (ALMR) power plant is controlled by an advanced state-of-the-art control system designed to facilitate plant operation, optimize availability, and protect plant investment. The control system features a high degree of automatic control and extensive amount of on-line diagnostics and operator aids. It can be built with today's control technology, and has the flexibility of adding new features that benefit plant operation and reduce O ampersand M costs as the technology matures

  8. Dust removal system for fusion experimental reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onozuka, M.; Ueda, Y.; Takahashi, K.; Oda, Y.; Seki, Y.; Ueda, S.; Aoki, I.

    1995-01-01

    Development of a dust removal system using static electricity has been conducted. It is envisioned that the system can collect and transport dust under vacuum. In the system, the dust is charged by dielectric polarization and floated by an electrostatic attraction force that is generated by the DC electric field. The dust is then transported by the electric curtain formed by the three-phase AC electric field. Experimental investigation has been conducted to examine the characteristics of the system. Current research results indicate that the dust removal system using static electricity can be used for fusion experimental reactors

  9. Dust removal system for fusion experimental reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Onozuka, M.; Ueda, Y.; Takahashi, K.; Oda, Y. [Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd., Yokohama (Japan); Seki, Y.; Ueda, S.; Aoki, I. [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Naka, Ibaraki (Japan)

    1995-12-31

    Development of a dust removal system using static electricity has been conducted. It is envisioned that the system can collect and transport dust under vacuum. In the system, the dust is charged by dielectric polarization and floated by an electrostatic attraction force that is generated by the DC electric field. The dust is then transported by the electric curtain formed by the three-phase AC electric field. Experimental investigation has been conducted to examine the characteristics of the system. Current research results indicate that the dust removal system using static electricity can be used for fusion experimental reactors.

  10. Intermediate-energy neutron beams from reactors for NCT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brugger, R.M.; Less, T.J.; Passmore, G.G.

    1986-01-01

    This paper discusses ways that a beam of intermediate-energy neutrons might be extracted from a nuclear reactor. The challenge is to suppress the fast-neutron component and the gamma-ray component of the flux while leaving enough of the intermediate-energy neutrons in the beam to be able to perform neutron capture therapy in less than an hour exposure time. Moderators, filters, and reflectors are considered. 11 references, 7 figures, 3 tables

  11. Direct energy conversion for fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barr, W.L.

    1977-01-01

    Complex multistage plasma converters were tested at efficiencies approaching 90% at low energies and powers, and simpler, more cost-effective versions at 65% efficiency. Laboratory tests of neutral-beam direct converters at 15 keV and 2 kW gave 70% efficiency. A 120-keV, 1.5-MW version is being tested

  12. The promises and challenges of future reactor system developments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, S. H.; Chang, M. H.; Kim, H. J.

    2007-01-01

    Nuclear power is an inevitable option in Korea to overcome the scarcity of national energy resources and to reduce its overseas energy dependency. During the past three decades, Korea has accomplished outstanding achievements in facilitating a nuclear power development. The share of nuclear power in electricity generation has been rapidly increasing since 1978. Nuclear power has provided Korea with a most economically and environmentally-friendly way of generating electric energy, and has contributed a lot to its national economy growth. It will continue to do so in the future. For a stable and economical supply of electricity, nationwide efforts toward achieving self-reliance in nuclear power technology have been pursued. To date, a series of nuclear technology self-reliance programs such as CANDU fuel technology, PWR fuel technology, and nuclear reactor (KSNPP) technology have been successfully completed. KSNP is a technologically advanced power plant modified by Koreas' own operating experience and domestic technology and designed by adapting several advanced technologies suitable for its national situation. The KSNP was applied to the construction of Yonggwang 5 and 6 and Ulchin 5 and 6 and is now being replicated to provide a stable, economical and reliable electric power supply. Through a comprehensive nuclear Research and Development programs, an enhancement of its indigenous nuclear technology capability is currently being pursued. The effort has focused on improving its indigenous nuclear power technology such as improvements in safety and economy of the KSNP (KSNP+), a 600 MWe class KSNP and advanced fuels, and the establishment of industrial codes and standards. In addition, a Korean Advanced Power Reactor (APR 1400) and a System integrated Modular Advanced Reactor (SMART) are currently under development. The APR 1400 with a capacity of 1,400 MWe will be characterized by its drastically enhanced safety, reliability, and operability as well as its

  13. Reactor shutdown back-up system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirao, Seizo; Sakashita, Motoaki.

    1982-01-01

    Purpose: To prevent back flow of poison upon injection to a moderator recycling pipeway. Constitution: In a nuclear reactor comprising a moderator recycling system for recycling and cooling moderator through a control rod guide pipe and a rapid poison injection system for rapidly injecting a poison solution at high density into the moderator by way of the same control rod guide pipe as a reactor shutdown back-up system, a mechanism is provided for preventing the back flow of a poison solution at high density into the moderator recycling system upon rapid injection of poison. An orifice provided in the joining pipeway to the control rod guide pipe on the side of the moderator recycling system is utilized as the back flow preventing device for the poison solution and the diameter for the orifice is determined so as to provide a constant ratio between the pressure loss in the control rod guide pipe and the pressure loss in the moderator recycling system pipe line upon usual reactor operation. (Kawakami, Y.)

  14. Nuclear energy renaissance and reactor physics. Enlightenment of PHYSOR'08

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peng Feng

    2010-01-01

    In relation to world's growing energy demands and concerns on global warming, nuclear energy as a sustainable resource is in its new period of renaissance. This is reflected in the record number of 447 papers on the International Conference on the Physics of Reactors--PHYSOR'08 held in Switzerland in 2008. The contents of these papers include the developments and frontiers in various directions of reactor physics. Featured by vast area of subjects, these emphasize the fact that the scope of the reactor physicist's R and D interests has expands considerably in recent years. The main keynote addresses and technical plenary lectures are briefly introduced. Some items concerned by the conference, such as: the status and perspective of nuclear energy's R and D, deployment and policy in main nuclear nations, the potential role of nuclear energy in mitigation global warming and slow down the GHG release, the sustainability of resource for nuclear energy utilization. Status and outlook about the needs of research and test facilities required in nuclear energy development, etc. are discussed. (authors)

  15. Morphological evolution of copper nanoparticles: Microemulsion reactor system versus batch reactor system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Ming; Tang, Zengmin; Kim, Woo-Sik; Yu, Taekyung; Park, Bum Jun

    2017-07-01

    In the synthesis of nanoparticles, the reaction rate is important to determine the morphology of nanoparticles. We investigated morphology evolution of Cu nanoparticles in this two different reactors, microemulsion reactor and batch reactor. In comparison with the batch reactor system, the enhanced mass and heat transfers in the emulsion system likely led to the relatively short nucleation time and the highly homogeneous environment in the reaction mixture, resulting in suppressing one or two dimensional growth of the nanoparticles. We believe that this work can offer a good model system to quantitatively understand the crystal growth mechanism that depends strongly on the local monomer concentration, the efficiency of heat transfer, and the relative contribution of the counter ions (Br- and Cl-) as capping agents.

  16. Analysis of reactor strategies to meet world nuclear energy demands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ligon, D.M.; Brogli, R.H.

    1979-07-01

    A number of reactor deployment strategies for long-term nuclear system development are analyzed from a global perspective in terms of resource utilization and economic benefits. Two time frames are chosen: 1975 - 2025 and 1975 - 2050. Uranium demand for various strategies is compared with uranium supply assuming different production capabilities and resource base. The analysis shows that a given reactor deployment strategy could strongly influence the extent of uranium exploration and production. Power systems cost comparisons are made to identify clearly competitive or non-competitive reactors. The sensitivity of power cost to different uranium price projections and nuclear demands is also examined. The results indicate that breeders are necessary to support a long-term nuclear power system. Advanced converter-breeder symbiotic systems, particularly those operating on the Th/U-233 cycle, have clear advantages in terms of resources and economics

  17. Wind energy analysis system

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    M.Ing. (Electrical & Electronic Engineering) One of the most important steps to be taken before a site is to be selected for the extraction of wind energy is the analysis of the energy within the wind on that particular site. No wind energy analysis system exists for the measurement and analysis of wind power. This dissertation documents the design and development of a Wind Energy Analysis System (WEAS). Using a micro-controller based design in conjunction with sensors, WEAS measure, calcu...

  18. Molten-salt reactor information system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haubenreich, P.N.; Cardwell, D.W.; Engel, J.R.

    1975-06-01

    The Molten-Salt Reactor Information System (MSRIS) is a computer-based file of abstracts of documents dealing with the technology of molten-salt reactors. The file is stored in the IBM-360 system at ORNL, and may be searched through the use of established interactive computer programs from remote terminals connected to the computer via telephone lines. The system currently contains 373 entries and is subject to updating and expansion as additional information is developed. The nature and general content of the data file, a general approach for obtaining information from it, and the manner in which material is added to the file are described. Appendixes provide the list of keywords currently in use, the subject categories under which information is filed, and simplified procedures for searching the file from remote terminals. (U.S.)

  19. Computational analysis of battery optimized reactor integral system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, J. S.; Son, H. M.; Jeong, W. S.; Kim, T. W.; Suh, K. Y.

    2007-01-01

    Battery Optimized Reactor Integral System (BORIS) is being developed as a multi-purpose fast spectrum reactor cooled by lead (Pb). BORIS is an integral optimized reactor with an ultra-long life core. BORIS aims to satisfy various energy demands maintaining inherent safety with the primary coolant Pb, and improving economics. BORIS is being designed to generate 23 MW t h with 10 MW e for at least twenty consecutive years without refueling and to meet the Generation IV Nuclear Energy System goals of sustainability, safety, reliability, and economics. BORIS is conceptualized to be used as the main power and heat source for remote areas and barren lands, and also considered to be deployed for desalinisation purpose. BORIS, based on modular components to be viable for rapid construction and easy maintenance, adopts an integrated heat exchanger system operated by natural circulation of Pb without pumps to realize a small sized reactor. The BORIS primary system is designed through an optimization study. Thermal hydraulic characteristics during a reactor steady state with heat source and sink by core and heat exchanger, respectively, have been carried out by utilizing a computational fluid dynamics code and hand calculations based on first principles. This paper analyzes a transient condition of the BORIS primary system. The Pb coolant was selected for its lower chemical activity with air or water than sodium (Na) and good thermal characteristics. The reactor transient conditions such as core blockage, heat exchanger failure, and loss of heat sink, were selected for this study. Blockage in the core or its inlet structure causes localized flow starvation in one or several fuel assemblies. The coolant loop blockages cause a more or less uniform flow reduction across the core, which may trigger coolant temperature transient. General conservation equations were applied to model the primary system transients. Numerical approaches were adopted to discretized the governing

  20. Reliability analysis of reactor protection systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alsan, S.

    1976-07-01

    A theoretical mathematical study of reliability is presented and the concepts subsequently defined applied to the study of nuclear reactor safety systems. The theory is applied to investigations of the operational reliability of the Siloe reactor from the point of view of rod drop. A statistical study conducted between 1964 and 1971 demonstrated that most rod drop incidents arose from circumstances associated with experimental equipment (new set-ups). The reliability of the most suitable safety system for some recently developed experimental equipment is discussed. Calculations indicate that if all experimental equipment were equipped with these new systems, only 1.75 rod drop accidents would be expected to occur per year on average. It is suggested that all experimental equipment should be equipped with these new safety systems and tested every 21 days. The reliability of the new safety system currently being studied for the Siloe reactor was also investigated. The following results were obtained: definite failures must be detected immediately as a result of the disturbances produced; the repair time must not exceed a few hours; the equipment must be tested every week. Under such conditions, the rate of accidental rod drops is about 0.013 on average per year. The level of nondefinite failures is less than 10 -6 per hour and the level of nonprotection 1 hour per year. (author)

  1. Guidance for the application of an assessment methodology for innovative nuclear energy systems. INPRO manual - Physical protection. Vol. 6 of the final report of phase 1 of the International Project on Innovative Nuclear Reactors and Fuel Cycles (INPRO)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-11-01

    The International Project on Innovative Nuclear Reactors and Fuel Cycles (INPRO) was initiated in the year 2000, based on a resolution of the IAEA General Conference (GC(44)/RES/21). The main objectives of INPRO are (1) to help to ensure that nuclear energy is available to contribute in fulfilling energy needs in the 21st century in a sustainable manner, (2) to bring together both technology holders and technology users to consider jointly the international and national actions required to achieve desired innovations in nuclear reactors and fuel cycles; and (3) to create a forum to involve all relevant stakeholders that will have an impact on, draw from, and complement the activities of existing institutions, as well as ongoing initiatives at the national and international level. This document follows the guidelines of the INPRO report M ethodology for the assessment of innovative nuclear reactors and fuel cycles, Report of Phase 1B (first part) of the International Project on Innovative Nuclear Reactors and Fuel Cycles (INPRO) , IAEA-TECDOC-1434 (2004), together with its previous report G uidance for the evaluation for innovative nuclear reactors and fuel cycles, Report of Phase 1A of the International Project on Innovative Nuclear Reactors and Fuel Cycles (INPRO), IAEATECDOC-1362 (2003). This INPRO manual is comprised of an overview volume and eight additional volumes covering the areas of economics (Volume 2), infrastructure (Volume 3), waste management (Volume 4), proliferation resistance (Volume 5), physical protection (Volume 6), environment (Volume 7), safety of reactors (Volume 8), and safety of nuclear fuel cycle facilities (Volume 9). The INPRO Manual for the area of physical protection (Volume 6) provides guidance to the assessor of an INS (innovative nuclear energy system) under a physical protection regime in a country that is planning to install a nuclear power program (or maintaining or enlarging an existing one), and describes the application of the

  2. A cost and safety superiority of fusion-fission hybrid reactor in China nuclear energy development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pereslavtszev, P.E.; Luan Guishi; Xia Chengang

    1994-08-01

    Considering economy and safety, an optimization model of nuclear energy developing scenarios of China was set up. An objective function to optimize was determined. Three prospective developing scenarios of China nuclear energy system including hybrid reactor were calculated and discussed. In the system which has no fissile material exchange with other system, a smooth developing model has a smooth distribution of inventory of Pu, thus the potential danger of whole nuclear energy system will be decreased. This scheme will improve investment effectiveness. Result shows that the optimization is necessary and the significant profit in cost and safety can be obtained. (5 tabs., 8 figs., 12 refs.)

  3. Design and construction of reactor containment systems of the prototype fast breeder reactor MONJU

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikeda, Makinori; Kawata, Koji; Sato, Masaki; Ito, Masashi; Hayashi, Kazutoshi; Kunishima, Shigeru.

    1991-01-01

    The MONJU reactor containment systems consist of a reactor containment vessel, reactor cavity walls and cell liners. The reactor containment vessel is strengthened by ring stiffeners for earthquake stresses. To verify its earthquake-resistant strength, vibration and buckling tests were carried out by using 1/19 scale models. The reactor cavity walls, which form biological shield and support the reactor vessel, are constructed of steel plate frames filled with concrete. The cell liner consists of liner plates and thermal insulation to moderate the effects of sodium spills, and forms a gastight cell to maintain a nitrogen atmosphere. (author)

  4. Flexible energy systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Henrik

    2003-01-01

    The paper discusses and analyses diffent national strategies and points out key changes in the energy system in order to achieve a system which can benefit from a high percentage of wind and CHP without having surplus production problems, introduced here as a flexible energy system....

  5. power system reliability in supplying nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gad, M.M.M.

    2007-01-01

    this thesis presents a simple technique for deducing minimal cut set (MCS) from the defined minimal path set (MPS) of generic distribution system and this technique have been used to evaluate the basic reliability indices of Egypt's second research reactor (ETRR-2) electrical distribution network. the alternative system configurations are then studied to evaluate their impact on service reliability. the proposed MCS approach considers both sustained and temporary outage. the temporary outage constitutes an important parameter in characterizing the system reliability indices for critical load point in distribution system. it is also consider the power quality impact on the reliability indices

  6. Emergency cooling system for the PHENIX reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Megy, J.M.; Giudicelli, A.G.; Robert, E.A.; Crette, J.P.

    Among various engineered safeguards of the reactor plant, the authors describe the protective system designed to remove the decay heat in emergency, in case of complete loss of all normal decay heat removal systems. First the normal decay heat rejection systems are presented. Incidents leading to the loss of these normal means are then analyzed. The protective system and its constructive characteristics designed for emergency cooling and based on two independent and highly reliable circuits entirely installed outside the primary containment vessel are described

  7. Integral reactor system and method for fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Neil Edward; Brown, Michael S; Cheekatamarla, Praveen; Deng, Thomas; Dimitrakopoulos, James; Litka, Anthony F

    2013-11-19

    A reactor system is integrated internally within an anode-side cavity of a fuel cell. The reactor system is configured to convert hydrocarbons to smaller species while mitigating the lower production of solid carbon. The reactor system may incorporate one or more of a pre-reforming section, an anode exhaust gas recirculation device, and a reforming section.

  8. REACTOR: an expert system for diagnosis and treatment of nuclear reactor accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelson, W.R.

    1982-01-01

    REACTOR is an expert system under development at EG and G Idaho, Inc., that will assist operators in the diagnosis and treatment of nuclear reactor accidents. This paper covers the background of the nuclear industry and why expert system technology may prove valuable in the reactor control room. Some of the basic features of the REACTOR system are discussed, and future plans for validation and evaluation of REACTOR are presented. The concept of using both event-oriented and function-oriented strategies for accident diagnosis is discussed. The response tree concept for representing expert knowledge is also introduced

  9. Thermofluid effect on energy storage in fluidized bed reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahfoudi, Nadjiba; El Ganaoui, Mohammed; Moummi, Abdelhafid

    2016-05-01

    The development of innovative systems of heat storage is imperative to improve the efficiency of the existing systems used in the thermal solar energy applications. Several techniques were developed and realized in this context. The technology of the sand fluidized bed (sandTES) offers a promising alternative to the current state-of-the-art of the heat storage systems, such as fixed bed using a storage materials, as sand, ceramic, and stones, etc. Indeed, the use of the fluidization technique allows an effective heat transfer to the solid particles. With the sand, an important capacity of storage is obtained by an economic and ecological material [N. Mahfoudi, A. Moummi, M. El Ganaoui, Appl. Mech. Mater. 621, 214 (2014); N. Mahfoudi, A. Khachkouch, A. Moummi B. Benhaoua, M. El Ganaoui, Mech. Ind. 16, 411 (2015); N. Mahfoudi, A. Moummi, M. El Ganaoui, F. Mnasri, K.M. Aboudou, 3e Colloque internationale Francophone d"énergétique et mécanique, Comores, 2014, p. 91]. This paper presents a CFD simulation of the hydrodynamics and the thermal transient behavior of a fluidized bed reactor of sand, to determine the characteristics of storage. The simulation shows a symmetry breaking that occurs and gave way to chaotic transient generation of bubble formation after 3 s. Furthermore, the predicted average temperature of the solid phase (sand) increases gradually versus the time with a gain of 1 °C in an interval of 10 s. Contribution to the topical issue "Materials for Energy Harvesting, Conversion and Storage (ICOME 2015) - Elected submissions", edited by Jean-Michel Nunzi, Rachid Bennacer and Mohammed El Ganaoui

  10. Sensitivity Analysis of Reactor Regulating System for SMART

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeon, Yu Lim; Kang, Han Ok; Lee, Seong Wook; Park, Cheon Tae

    2009-01-01

    The integral reactor technology is one of the Small and Medium sized Reactor (SMR) which has recently come into a spotlight due to its suitability for various fields. SMART (System integrated Modular Advanced ReacTor), a small sized integral type PWR with a rated thermal power of 330MWt is one of the advanced SMR. SMART developed by the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI), has a capacity to provide 40,000 m3 per day of potable water and 90 MW of electricity (Chang et al., 2000). Figure 1 shows the SMART which adopts a sensible mixture of new innovative design features and proven technologies aimed at achieving highly enhanced safety and improved economics. Design features contributing to a safety enhancement are basically inherent safety improving features and passive safety features. Fundamental thermal-hydraulic experiments were carried out during the design concepts development to assure the fundamental behavior of major concepts of the SMART systems. A TASS/SMR is a suitable code for accident and performance analyses of SMART. In this paper, we proposed a new power control logic for stable operating outputs of Reactor Regulating System (RRS) of SMART. We analyzed the sensitivity of operating parameter for various operating conditions

  11. Hydrogen Production from Water by Photosynthesis System I for Use as Fuel in Energy Conversion Devices (a.k.a. Understanding Photosystem I as a Biomolecular Reactor for Energy Conversion)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-04-01

    Hydrogen Production from Water by Photosynthesis System I for Use as Fuel in Energy Conversion Devices (a.k.a. Understanding Photosystem I as...Laboratory Adelphi, MD 20783-1197 ARL-TR-6904 April 2014 Hydrogen Production from Water by Photosynthesis System I for Use as Fuel in Energy...Final 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 10/1/2010–10/1/2013 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Hydrogen Production from Water by Photosynthesis System I for Use as Fuel

  12. The radon monitoring system in Daya Bay Reactor Neutrino Experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chu, M.C.; Kwan, K.K.; Kwok, M.W.; Kwok, T.; Leung, J.K.C.; Leung, K.Y.; Lin, Y.C.; Luk, K.B.; Pun, C.S.J.

    2016-01-01

    We developed a highly sensitive, reliable and portable automatic system (H 3 ) to monitor the radon concentration of the underground experimental halls of the Daya Bay Reactor Neutrino Experiment. H 3 is able to measure radon concentration with a statistical error less than 10% in a 1-h measurement of dehumidified air (R.H. 5% at 25 °C) with radon concentration as low as 50 Bq/m 3 . This is achieved by using a large radon progeny collection chamber, semiconductor α-particle detector with high energy resolution, improved electronics and software. The integrated radon monitoring system is highly customizable to operate in different run modes at scheduled times and can be controlled remotely to sample radon in ambient air or in water from the water pools where the antineutrino detectors are being housed. The radon monitoring system has been running in the three experimental halls of the Daya Bay Reactor Neutrino Experiment since November 2013.

  13. Application of controlled thermonuclear reactor fusion energy for food production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dang, V.D.; Steinberg, M.

    1975-06-01

    Food and energy shortages in many parts of the world in the past two years raise an immediate need for the evaluation of energy input in food production. The present paper investigates systematically (1) the energy requirement for food production, and (2) the provision of controlled thermonuclear fusion energy for major energy intensive sectors of food manufacturing. Among all the items of energy input to the ''food industry,'' fertilizers, water for irrigation, food processing industries, such as beet sugar refinery and dough making and single cell protein manufacturing, have been chosen for study in detail. A controlled thermonuclear power reactor was used to provide electrical and thermal energy for all these processes. Conceptual design of the application of controlled thermonuclear power, water and air for methanol and ammonia synthesis and single cell protein production is presented. Economic analysis shows that these processes can be competitive. (auth)

  14. Technical Requirements For Reactors To Be Deployed Internationally For the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ingersoll, Daniel T.

    2007-01-01

    The Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) seeks to create an international regime to support large-scale growth in the worldwide use of nuclear energy. Fully meeting the GNEP vision may require the deployment of thousands of reactors in scores of countries, many of which do not use nuclear energy currently. Some of these needs will be met by large-scale Generation III and III+ reactors (>1000 MWe) and Generation IV reactors when they are available. However, because many developing countries have small and immature electricity grids, the currently available Generation III(+) reactors may be unsuitable since they are too large, too expensive, and too complex. Therefore, GNEP envisions new types of reactors that must be developed for international deployment that are 'right sized' for the developing countries and that are based on technologies, designs, and policies focused on reducing proliferation risk. The first step in developing such systems is the generation of technical requirements that will ensure that the systems meet both the GNEP policy goals and the power needs of the recipient countries. Reactor systems deployed internationally within the GNEP context must meet a number of requirements similar to the safety, reliability, economics, and proliferation goals established for the DOE Generation IV program. Because of the emphasis on deployment to nonnuclear developing countries, the requirements will be weighted differently than with Generation IV, especially regarding safety and non-proliferation goals. Also, the reactors should be sized for market conditions in developing countries where energy demand per capita, institutional maturity and industrial infrastructure vary considerably, and must utilize fuel that is compatible with the fuel recycle technologies being developed by GNEP. Arrangements are already underway to establish Working Groups jointly with Japan and Russia to develop requirements for reactor systems. Additional bilateral and multilateral

  15. Material challenges for the next generation of fission reactor systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buckthorpe, Derek

    2010-01-01

    The new generation of fission reactor systems wil require the deployment and construction of a series of advanced water cooled reactors as part of a package of measures to meet UK and European energy needs and to provide a near term non-fossil fuel power solution that addresses CO 2 emission limits. In addition new longer term Generation IV reactor tye systems are being developed and evaluated to enhance safety, reliability, sustainability economics and proliferation resistance requirements and to meet alternative energy applications (outside of electricity generation) such as process heat and large scale hydrogen generation. New fission systems will impose significant challenges on materials supply and development. In the near term, because of the need to 'gear up' to large scale construction after decades of industrial hibernation/contraction and, in the longer term, because of the need for materials to operate under more challenging environments requiring the deployment and development of new alternative materials not yet established to an industrial stage. This paper investigates the materials challenges imposed by the new Generation III+ and Generation IV systems. These include supply and fabrication issues, development of new high temperature alloys and non-metallic materials, the use of new methods of manufacture and the best use of currently available resources and minerals. Recommendations are made as to how these materials challenges might be met and how governments, industry, manufacturers and researchers can all play their part. (orig.)

  16. Material challenges for the next generation of fission reactor systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buckthorpe, Derek [AMEC, Knutsford, Cheshire (United Kingdom)

    2010-07-01

    The new generation of fission reactor systems wil require the deployment and construction of a series of advanced water cooled reactors as part of a package of measures to meet UK and European energy needs and to provide a near term non-fossil fuel power solution that addresses CO{sub 2} emission limits. In addition new longer term Generation IV reactor tye systems are being developed and evaluated to enhance safety, reliability, sustainability economics and proliferation resistance requirements and to meet alternative energy applications (outside of electricity generation) such as process heat and large scale hydrogen generation. New fission systems will impose significant challenges on materials supply and development. In the near term, because of the need to 'gear up' to large scale construction after decades of industrial hibernation/contraction and, in the longer term, because of the need for materials to operate under more challenging environments requiring the deployment and development of new alternative materials not yet established to an industrial stage. This paper investigates the materials challenges imposed by the new Generation III+ and Generation IV systems. These include supply and fabrication issues, development of new high temperature alloys and non-metallic materials, the use of new methods of manufacture and the best use of currently available resources and minerals. Recommendations are made as to how these materials challenges might be met and how governments, industry, manufacturers and researchers can all play their part. (orig.)

  17. Reactor core flow rate control system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakuma, Hitoshi; Tanikawa, Naoshi; Takahashi, Toshiyuki; Miyakawa, Tetsuya.

    1996-01-01

    When an internal pump is started by a variable frequency power source device, if magnetic fields of an AC generator are introduced after the rated speed is reached, neutron flux high scram occurs by abrupt increase of a reactor core flow rate. Then, in the present invention, magnetic fields for the AC generator are introduced at a speed previously set at which the fluctuation range of the reactor core flow rate (neutron flux) by the start up of the internal pump is within an allowable value. Since increase of the speed of the internal pump upon its start up is suppressed to determine the change of the reactor core flow rate within an allowable range, increase of neutron fluxes is suppressed to enable stable start up. Then, since transition boiling of fuels caused by abrupt decrease of the reactor core flow rate upon occurrence of abnormality in an external electric power system is prevented, and the magnetic fields for the AC generator are introduced in such a manner to put the speed increase fluctuation range of the internal pump upon start up within an allowable value, neutron flux high scram is not caused to enable stable start-up. (N.H.)

  18. RIMACS, Reactor Inspection Main Control System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    1 - Description of program or function: RIMACS prepares for automatic inspection files on each inspection item for the reactor. These automatic inspection files provide the data to move RIROB (Reactor Inspection Robot) with laser by interpreting the coordinates of LASPO (Laser Positioner) and the laser detecting device of RIROB in three dimensional space. In addition, when RIROB arrives at the inspecting location, the files provide all values of the manipulator's motions to acquire the ultrasonic data. RIMACS provides various modules in order to perform these complex functions, and the functions are programmed on graphic user interface for the convenience of the user. RIMACS provides various functions, such as insertion of reactor production data, selection of the reactor for inspection, the creation of automatic inspection file, the selection of the inspection item, inspection simulation, and automatic inspection procedures. It also provides all other functions, which are necessary for the inspection, such as operating program download and manual control of LASPO and RIROB, the inspection simulation and the inspection status display by means of the graphic screen, and SODAS (ultra-Sonic Data Acquisition System) drive verification. 2 - Methods: Moving path and operation procedures for inspection robot are generated automatically with Kinematics algorithm. 3 - Restrictions on the complexity of the problem: A graphics display with MS-Window capability is required

  19. Overheating preventive system for reactor core fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, Daiju

    1981-01-01

    Purpose: To ensure the cooling function of reactor water in a cooling system in case of erroneous indication or misoperation by reliable temperature measurement for fuels and actuating relays through the conversion output obtained therefrom. Constitution: Thermometers are disposed laterally and vertically in a reactor core in contact with core fuels so as to correspond to the change of status in the reactor core. When there is a high temperature signal issued from one of the thermometers or one of conversion circuits, the function of relay contacts does not provide the closed state as a whole. When high temperature signals are issued from two or more thermometers of conversion circuits from independent OR circuits, the function of the relay contacts provides the closure state as a whole. Consequently, in the use of 2-out of 3-circuits, the entire closure state, that is, the misoperation of the relay contacts for the thermometer or the conversion circuits can be avoided. In this way, by the application of the output from the conversion circuits to the logic circuit and, in turn, application of the output therefrom to the relay groups in 2-out of 3-constitution, the reactor safety can be improved. (Horiuchi, T.)

  20. Validation of reactor core protection system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Sang-Hoon; Bae, Jong-Sik; Baeg, Seung-Yeob; Cho, Chang-Ho; Kim, Chang-Ho; Kim, Sung-Ho; Kim, Hang-Bae; In, Wang-Kee; Park, Young-Ho

    2008-01-01

    Reactor COre Protection System (RCOPS), an advanced core protection calculator system, is a digitized one which provides core protection function based on two reactor core operation parameters, Departure from Nucleate Boiling Ratio (DNBR) and Local Power Density (LPD). It generates a reactor trip signal when the core condition exceeds the DNBR or LPD design limit. It consists of four independent channels adapted a two-out-of-four trip logic. System configuration, hardware platform and an improved algorithm of the newly designed core protection calculator system are described in this paper. One channel of RCOPS was implemented as a single channel facility for this R and D project where we performed final integration software testing. To implement custom function blocks, pSET is used. Software test is performed by two methods. The first method is a 'Software Module Test' and the second method is a 'Software Unit Test'. New features include improvement of core thermal margin through a revised on-line DNBR algorithm, resolution of the latching problem of control element assembly signal and addition of the pre-trip alarm generation. The change of the on-line DNBR calculation algorithm is considered to improve the DNBR net margin by 2.5%-3.3%. (author)

  1. Staged membrane oxidation reactor system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Repasky, John Michael; Carolan, Michael Francis; Stein, VanEric Edward; Chen, Christopher Ming-Poh

    2012-09-11

    Ion transport membrane oxidation system comprising (a) two or more membrane oxidation stages, each stage comprising a reactant zone, an oxidant zone, one or more ion transport membranes separating the reactant zone from the oxidant zone, a reactant gas inlet region, a reactant gas outlet region, an oxidant gas inlet region, and an oxidant gas outlet region; (b) an interstage reactant gas flow path disposed between each pair of membrane oxidation stages and adapted to place the reactant gas outlet region of a first stage of the pair in flow communication with the reactant gas inlet region of a second stage of the pair; and (c) one or more reactant interstage feed gas lines, each line being in flow communication with any interstage reactant gas flow path or with the reactant zone of any membrane oxidation stage receiving interstage reactant gas.

  2. Dense Z-pinch (DZP) as a fusion power reactor: preliminary scaling calculations and sysems energy balance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hagenson, R.L.; Tai, A.S.; Krakowski, R.A.; Moses, R.W.

    1980-01-01

    A conceptual DT fusion reactor concept is described that is based upon the dense Z-pinch (DZP). This study emphasizes plasma modeling and the parametric assessment of the reactor energy balance. To this end simple analytic and numerical models have been developed and evaluated. The resulting optimal reactor operating point promises a high-Q, low-yield system of a scale that may allow the use of conventional high-voltage Marx/water-line technology to drive a potentially very small reactor system

  3. Linear programming optimization of nuclear energy strategy with sodium-cooled fast reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Je Whan; Jeong, Yong Hoon; Chang, Yoon Il; Chang, Soon Heung

    2011-01-01

    Nuclear power has become an essential part of electricity generation to meet the continuous growth of electricity demand. A Sodium-cooled Fast Reactor (SFR) was developed to extend uranium resource utilization under a growing nuclear energy scenario while concomitantly providing a nuclear waste management solution. Key questions in this scenario are when to introduce SFRs and how many reactors should be introduced. In this study, a methodology using Linear Programming is employed in order to quantify an optimized growth pattern of a nuclear energy system comprising light water reactors and SFRs. The optimization involves tradeoffs between SFR capital cost premiums and the total system U3O8 price premiums. Optimum nuclear growth patterns for several scenarios are presented, as well as sensitivity analyses of important input parameters

  4. Cost benefit analysis of reactor safety systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maurer, H.A.

    1984-01-01

    Cost/benefit analysis of reactor safety systems is a possibility appropriate to deal with reactor safety. The Commission of the European Communities supported a study on the cost-benefit or cost effectiveness of safety systems installed in modern PWR nuclear power plants. The following systems and their cooperation in emergency cases were in particular investigated in this study: the containment system (double containment), the leakage exhaust and control system, the annulus release exhaust system and the containment spray system. The benefit of a safety system is defined according to its contribution to the reduction of the radiological consequences for the environment after a LOCA. The analysis is so far performed in two different steps: the emergency core cooling system is considered to function properly, failure of the emergency core cooling system is assumed (with the possible consequence of core melt-down) and the results may demonstrate the evidence that striving for cost-effectiveness can produce a safer end result than the philosophy of safety at any cost. (orig.)

  5. LCA of Energy Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laurent, Alexis; Espinosa Martinez, Nieves; Hauschild, Michael Zwicky

    2018-01-01

    Energy systems are essential in the support of modern societies’ activities, and can span a wide spectrum of electricity and heat generation systems and cooling systems. Along with their central role and large diversity, these systems have been demonstrated to cause serious impacts on human health...... , ecosystems and natural resources. Over the past two decades, energy systems have thus been the focus of more than 1000 LCA studies, with the aim to identify and reduce these impacts. This chapter addresses LCA applications to energy systems for generation of electricity and heat . The chapter gives insight...

  6. Laser fusion hybrid reactor systems study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-07-01

    The work was performed in three phases. The first phase included a review of the many possible laser-reactor-blanket combinations and resulted in the selection of a ''demonstration size'' 500 MWe plant for further study. A number of fast fission blankets using uranium metal, uranium-molybdenum alloy, and uranium carbide as fuel were investigated. The second phase included design of the reactor vessel and internals, heat transfer system, tritium processing system, and the balance of plant, excluding the laser building and equipment. A fuel management scheme was developed, safety considerations were reviewed, and capital and operating costs were estimated. Costs developed during the second phase were unexpectedly high, and a thorough review indicated considerable unit cost savings could be obtained by scaling the plant to a larger size. Accordingly, a third phase was added to the original scope, encompassing the redesign and scaling of the plant from 500 MWe to 1200 MWe

  7. Major Findings of the IAEA/INPRO Collaborative Project on Global Architectures of Innovative Nuclear Energy Systems with Thermal and Fast Reactors and a Closed Nuclear Fuel Cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuznetsov, V.; Fesenko, G.; Kriachko, M.; Dixon, B.; Hayashi, H.; Usanov, V.

    2013-01-01

    GAINS objectives: Rationale: • Increasing interest in MSs in joint modelling of global and regional trends in nuclear power taking into account technical innovations and multilateral cooperation; • Modelling of the kind requires agreed methodological platform to analyse transition strategies from the present to future nuclear energy system (NES). Overall objectives: Address technical & institutional issues of developing a global architecture for the sustainable NES in the 21st century: • develop a framework (common methodological platform, databases, assumptions & boundary conditions); • perform sample studies; • indicate potential areas for application of GAINS framework

  8. Power conditioning for space nuclear reactor systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berman, Baruch

    1987-01-01

    This paper addresses the power conditioning subsystem for both Stirling and Brayton conversion of space nuclear reactor systems. Included are the requirements summary, trade results related to subsystem implementation, subsystem description, voltage level versus weight, efficiency and operational integrity, components selection, and shielding considerations. The discussion is supported by pertinent circuit and block diagrams. Summary conclusions and recommendations derived from the above studies are included.

  9. Replacement energy, capacity, and reliability costs for permanent nuclear reactor shutdowns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    VanKuiken, J.C., Buehring, W.A.; Hamilton, S.; Kavicky, J.A.; Cavallo, J.D.; Veselka, T.D.; Willing, D.L.

    1993-10-01

    Average replacement power costs are estimated for potential permanent shutdowns of nuclear electricity-generating units. Replacement power costs are considered to include replacement energy, capacity, and reliability cost components. These estimates were developed to assist the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission in evaluating regulatory issues that potentially affect changes in serious reactor accident frequencies. Cost estimates were derived from long-term production-cost and capacity expansion simulations of pooled utility-system operations. Factors that affect replacement power cost, such as load growth, replacement sources of generation, and capital costs for replacement capacity, were treated in the analysis. Costs are presented for a representative reactor and for selected subcategories of reactors, based on estimates for 112 individual reactors

  10. Development of intellectual reactor design system IRDS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kugo, T.; Tsuchihashi, K.; Nakagawa, M.; Mori, T.

    1993-01-01

    An intellectual reactor design system IRDS has been developed to support feasibility study and conceptual design of new type reactors in the fields of reactor core design including neutronics, thermal-hydraulics and fuel design. IRDS is an integrated software system in which a variety of computer codes in the different fields are installed. An integration of simulation modules are performed by the information transfer between modules through design model in which the design information of the current design work is stored. An object oriented architecture is realized in frame representation of core configuration in a design data base. The knowledge relating to design tasks to be performed are encapsulated, to support the conceptual design work. The system is constructed on an engineering workstation, and supports efficiently design work through man-machine interface adopting the advanced information processing technologies. Optimization methods for design parameters with use of the artificial intelligence technique are now under study, to reduce the parametric study work. A function to search design window in which design is feasible is realized in the fuel pin design. (orig.)

  11. Reactor component inventory system at FFTF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ordonez, C.R.; Redekopp, R.D.; Reed, E.A.

    1985-02-01

    A reliable inventory control system was developed at the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) to keep track of the occupancy of 900 refueling facility locations, to compile historical data on the movement of each reactor assembly, and to simulate assembly moves. The simulate capability is valuable because it allows verification of documents before they are issued for use in the plant, and eliminates the possibility of planning illegal or impossible moves. The system is installed on a UNIVAC 1100 computer and is maintained using a data base management system by Sperry Univac called MAPPER

  12. Renewable Energy Tracking Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renewable energy generation ownership can be accounted through tracking systems. Tracking systems are highly automated, contain specific information about each MWh, and are accessible over the internet to market participants.

  13. New secondary energy systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schulten, R.

    1977-01-01

    As an introduction, the FRG's energy industry situation is described, secondary energy systems to be taken into consideration are classified, and appropriate market requirements are analyzed. Dealt with is district heating, i.e. the direct transport of heat by means of circulating media, and long-distance energy, i.e. the long-distance energy transport by means of chemical conversion in closed- or open-cycle systems. In closed-cycle systems heat is transported in the form of chemical latent energy. In contrast to this, chemical energy is transported in open-cycle systems in the form of fuel gases produced by coal gasification or by thermochemical water splitting. (GG) [de

  14. Basic concept of common reactor physics code systems. Final report of working party on common reactor physics code systems (CCS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-03-01

    A working party was organized for two years (2001-2002) on common reactor physics code systems under the Research Committee on Reactor Physics of JAERI. This final report is compilation of activity of the working party on common reactor physics code systems during two years. Objectives of the working party is to clarify basic concept of common reactor physics code systems to improve convenience of reactor physics code systems for reactor physics researchers in Japan on their various field of research and development activities. We have held four meetings during 2 years, investigated status of reactor physics code systems and innovative software technologies, and discussed basic concept of common reactor physics code systems. (author)

  15. Reactor units for power supply to the Russian Arctic regions: Priority assessment of nuclear energy sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mel'nikov N. N.

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Under conditions of competitiveness of small nuclear power plants (SNPP and feasibility of their use to supply power to remote and inaccessible regions the competition occurs between nuclear energy sources, which is caused by a wide range of proposals for solving the problem of power supply to different consumers in the decentralized area of the Russian Arctic power complex. The paper suggests a methodological approach for expert assessment of the priority of small power reactor units based on the application of the point system. The priority types of the reactor units have been determined based on evaluation of the unit's conformity to the following criteria: the level of referentiality and readiness degree of reactor units to implementation; duration of the fuel cycle, which largely determines an autonomy level of the nuclear energy source; the possibility of creating a modular block structure of SNPP; the maximum weight of a transported single equipment for the reactor unit; service life of the main equipment. Within the proposed methodological approach the authors have performed a preliminary ranking of the reactor units according to various criteria, which allows quantitatively determining relative difference and priority of the small nuclear power plants projects aimed at energy supply to the Russian Arctic. To assess the sensitivity of the ranking results to the parameters of the point system the authors have observed the five-point and ten-point scales under variations of importance (weights of different criteria. The paper presents the results of preliminary ranking, which have allowed distinguishing the following types of the reactor units in order of their priority: ABV-6E (ABV-6M, "Uniterm" and SVBR-10 in the energy range up to 20 MW; RITM-200 (RITM-200M, KLT-40S and SVBR-100 in the energy range above 20 MW.

  16. Dosimetry system of the RB reactor; Dozimetarski sistem reaktora RB

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lolic, B; Vukadin, D [Boris Kidric Institute of nuclear sciences, Vinca, Belgrade (Yugoslavia)

    1962-07-01

    Although RB reactor is operated at very low power levels, safety and dosimetry systems have high importance. This paper shows detailed dosimetry system with fundamental typical components. Estimated radiation doses dependent on reactor power are given at some characteristic points in the rooms nearby reactor.

  17. Heat exchangers in heavy water reactor systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mehta, S.K.

    1988-01-01

    Important features of some major heat exchange components of pressurized heavy water reactors and DHRUVA research reactor are presented. Design considerations and nuclear service classifications are discussed

  18. High energy resolution characteristics on 14MeV neutron spectrometer for fusion experimental reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iguchi, Tetsuo [Tokyo Univ., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Nuclear Engineering Research Lab.; Takada, Eiji; Nakazawa, Masaharu

    1996-10-01

    A 14MeV neutron spectrometer suitable for an ITER-like fusion experimental reactor is now under development on the basis of a recoil proton counter telescope principle in oblique scattering geometry. To verify its high energy resolution characteristics, preliminary experiments are made for a prototypical detector system. The comparison results show reasonably good agreement and demonstrate the possibility of energy resolution of 2.5% in full width at half maximum for 14MeV neutron spectrometry. (author)

  19. Energy Systems Integration Facility News | Energy Systems Integration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Facility | NREL Energy Systems Integration Facility News Energy Systems Integration Facility Energy Dataset A massive amount of wind data was recently made accessible online, greatly expanding the Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) has completed technology validation testing for Go

  20. Fission energy program of the US Department of Energy, FY 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-03-01

    Information is presented concerning the National Energy Plan and fission energy policy; fission energy program management; converter reactor systems; breeder reactor systems; and special nuclear evaluations and systems

  1. Nuclear technologies for local energy systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDonnell, F.N.; Lynch, G.F.

    1990-03-01

    If nuclear energy is to realize its full potential as a safe and cost-effective alternative to fossil fuels, applications beyond those that are currently being serviced by large, central nuclear power stations must be identified and appropriate reactors developed. The Canadian program on reactor systems for local energy supply is at the forefront of these developments. This program emphasizes design simplicity, low power density and fuel rating, reliance on natural processes, passive systems, and reduced reliance on operator action. The first product, the SLOWPOKE Energy System, is a 10 MW heat source specifically designed to provide hot water to satisfy the needs of local heating systems for building complexes, institutions and municipal district heating systems. A demonstration heating reactor has been constructed at the Whiteshell Nuclear Research Establishment in Manitoba and has been undergoing an extensive test program since first operation in 1987 July. Based on the knowledge learned from the design, construction, licensing and operational testing of this facility, the design of the 10 MW commercial-size unit is well advanced, and Atomic Energy of Canada Limited is prepared to commit the construction of the first commercial unit. Although the technical demonstration of the concept is important, it is recognized that another crucial element is the public and regulatory acceptance of small nuclear systems in urban areas. The decision by a community to commit the construction of a SLOWPOKE Energy System brings to a sharp focus the current public apprehension about nuclear technologies

  2. Primary cooling system for BWR type reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ibe, Eishi; Takahashi, Masanori; Aoki, Yasuko

    1993-01-01

    The present invention effectively uses information from a plurality of sensors in order to suppress corrosion circumstance of a nuclear reactor. That is, a predetermined general water quality factor at a predetermined position is determined as a standard index. A concentration of a water quality improver is controlled such that the index is within an aimed range. For this purpose, the entire sensor groups disposed in a primary coolant system of a nuclear reactor are divided into a plural systems of sensor groups each disposed on every different positions. Then, a predetermined sensor group (standard sensor group) is connected to a computing device and a data base so that it is always monitored for calculating and estimating the standard index. Only oxidative ingredient in water at the measuring point is noted, and a concentration distribution which agrees with an actually measured value of oxidative ingredients is extracted from data base and used as a correct concentration distribution. With such procedures, reactor water quality can be estimated accurately while compensating erroneous factors of individual sensors. Even when a new sensor is used, it is not necessary to greatly change control logic. (I.S.)

  3. Pursuing nuclear energy with no nuclear contamination - from neutron flux reactor to deuteron flux reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, X. Z.; Wei, Q. M.; Liu, B.; Zhu, X. G.; Ren, S. L.

    2007-01-01

    follows: (1) Selective Resonant tunneling model has predicted 3-deuteron fusion which has been found in experiments [6, 7] as well. The reasonable inference is the neutrino emission from the metal hydrides. The feasibility of detection of this neutrino is discussed based on the information from the KamLAND neutrino detector in Japan. (2) Nano-meter technique should be used to increase the deuterium flux through the palladium surface. (3) Gas-discharge tube in combination with optical monochrometer would be the suitable experiment at the current funding level. (4) Negative feed-back should be used to solve the problem of the reproducibility; then, based on the deuteron flux a self-sustaining reactor would be feasible. References [1]. Xing Z. Li, Jian Tian, Ming Y. Mei and Chong X. Li, 'Sub-barrier Fusion and Selective Resonant Tunneling,' Phys. Rev., C 61, 024610 (2000) [2]. Xing Z. Li, Bin Liu, Si Chen, Qing Ming Wei, and Heinrich Hora, 'Fusion cross-sections for inertial fusion energy,' Laser and Particle Beam, 22,469 (2004) [3]. G. Fralick , et al., 'Results of an Attempt to Measure Increased Rates of the Reaction D +D--- 3 He + n in a Nonelectrochemical Cold Fusion Experiment,' NASA Technical Memorandum 102430 (1989) [4]. Xing Z. Li, et al., 'Correlation between abnormal deuterium flux and heat flow in a D/Pd system,' J. Phys. D: Appl. Phys. 36 3095-3097, (2003) [5]. Y. Iwamura, et al., 'Elemental Analysis of Pd Complexes: Effects of D 2 gas permeation, 'Jpn. J. Appl. Phys., 41 4642 (2002) [6]. J. Kasagi, et al., 'Energetic Protons and Alpha Particles Emitted in 150-keV Deuteron Bombardment on Deuterated Ti,' J. Phys. Soc. Japan, 64 (3), 778 (1995) [7]. A. Takahashi, et al., 'Anomalous enhancement of three-body deuteron fusion in titanium deuteride with low-energy D + beam implantation,' Fusion Technol., 34, 256 (1998)

  4. Monitoring system in reactor dry well

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horie, Akira; Suzuki, Shun-ichi; Yamamoto, Shinji; Kubokawa, Toshihiko; Takagi, Sakae; Yokosawa, Makoto.

    1991-01-01

    A failed portion of a dry well in a BWR type reactor is monitored and identified from a remote place by a simple structure. That is, laser beams are irradiated under scanning to a portion to be monitored. Then, the reflection light is monitored by a light receiving and monitoring system, and abnormalities such as defects or leaks of monitored portion are optically detected by a remote viewing equipment. With such a constitution, the portion to be monitored in poor operation circumstances of the reactor dry well can always be monitored efficiently from a remote place. The device of the present invention does not undergo the effect of radiation noises, etc. and it is excellent in heat resistance and radiation resistance. (I.S.)

  5. A stereoscopic television system for reactor inspection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friend, D.B.; Jones, A.

    1980-03-01

    A stereoscopic television system suitable for reactor inspection has been developed. Right and left eye views, obtained from two conventional black and white cameras, are displayed by the anaglyph technique and observers wear appropriately coloured viewing spectacles. All camera functions, such as zoom, focus and toe-in are remotely controlled. A laboratory experiment is described which demonstrates the increase in spatial awareness afforded by the use of stereo television and illustrates its potential in the supervision of remote handling tasks. Typical depth resolutions of 3mm at 1m and 10mm at 2m have been achieved with the reactor instrument. Trials undertaken during routine inspection at Oldbury Power Station in June 1978 are described. They demonstrate that stereoscopic television can indeed improve the convenience of remote handling and that the added display realism is beneficial in visual inspection. (author)

  6. Nuclear reactor insulation and preheat system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wampole, N.C.

    1978-01-01

    An insulation and preheat system is disclosed for preselected components of a fluid cooled nuclear reactor. A gas tight barrier or compartment of thermal insulation surrounds the selected components and includes devices to heat the internal atmosphere of the ocmpartment. An external surface of the compartment of enclosure is cooled, such as by a circulating fluid. The heating devices provide for preheating of the components, as well as maintenance of a temperature sufficient to ensure that the reactor coolant fluid will not solidify during shutdown. The external cooling limits the heat transferred to other plant structures, such as supporting concrete and steel. The barrier is spaced far enough from the surrounded components so as to allow access for remote or manual inspection, maintenance, and repair

  7. Refueling system for a nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koschkin, J.N.; Ordynskij, G.V.; Schchijan, C.G.; Schapkin, A.F.; Fadeev, A.I.; Laptev, F.V.; Batjukov, V.I.; Korolkov, K.I.; Borodin, I.V.; Tschernomordik, E.N.

    1979-01-01

    With the refueling system fuel elements are transferred from the intermediate distributing chamber within the fast breeder reactor vessel to the storage tanks for new and irradiated fuel elements outside of the reactor vessel and vice versa. It consists of a hermetic chamber, filled with inert gas, within which the refueling machine, having got a vertical swing pipe, is placed. On the swing pipe there is mounted by means of a bracket a hanging support tube for a tube manipulator that can be moved over the openings to the fuel elements. At the end of the tube manipulator there is a gripping device whose drive mechanism is arranged within the support tube. The swing pipe is moved by means of a drive mechanism outside of the chamber. (DG) [de

  8. Passive systems for light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adinolfi, R.; Noviello, L.

    1990-01-01

    The paper reviews the most original concepts that have been considered in Italy for the back-fitting of the nuclear power plants in order to reduce the probability and the importance of the release to the environment in case of a core melt. With reference either to BWR or PWR, passive concepts have been considered for back-fitting in the following areas: pump seals damage prevention and ECCS passive operation; reactor passive depressurization; molten reactor core passive cooling; metal containment passive water cooling through a water tank located at high level; containment isolation improvement through a sealing system; containment leaks control and limitation of environmental release. In addition some considerations will be made on the protection against external events introduced from the beginning on the PUN design either on building and equipment lay-out either on structure design. (author). 5 figs

  9. The Liquid Annular Reactor System (LARS) propulsion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Powell, J.; Ludewig, H.; Horn, F.; Lenard, R.

    1990-01-01

    A concept for very high specific impulse (greater than 2000 seconds) direct nuclear propulsion is described. The concept, termed the liquid annular reactor system (LARS), uses liquid nuclear fuel elements to heat hydrogen propellant to very high temperatures (approximately 6000 K). Operating pressure is moderate (approximately 10 atm), with the result that the outlet hydrogen is virtually 100 percent dissociated to monatomic H. The molten fuel is contained in a solid container of its own material, which is rotated to stabilize the liquid layer by centripetal force. LARS reactor designs are described, together with neutronic and thermal-hydraulic analyses. Power levels are on the order of 200 megawatts. Typically, LARS designs use seven rotating fuel elements, are beryllium moderated, and have critical radii of approximately 100 cm (core L/D approximately equal to 1.5)

  10. Reactor coolant system and containment aqueous chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torgerson, D.F.

    1986-01-01

    Fission products released from fuel during reactor accidents can be subject to a variety of environments that will affect their ultimate behavior. In the reactor coolant system (RCS), for example, neutral or reducing steam conditions, radiation, and surfaces could all have an effect on fission product retention and chemistry. Furthermore, if water is encountered in the RCS, the high temperature aqueous chemistry of fission products must be assessed to determine the quantity and chemical form of fission products released to the containment building. In the containment building, aqueous chemistry will determine the longer-term release of volatile fission products to the containment atmosphere. Over the past few years, the principles of physical chemistry have been rigorously applied to the various chemical conditions described above. This paper reviews the current state of knowledge and discusses the future directions of chemistry research relating to the behavior of fission products in the RCS and containment

  11. Neutron energy spectra calculations in the low power research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Omar, H.; Khattab, K.; Ghazi, N.

    2011-01-01

    The neutron energy spectra have been calculated in the fuel region, inner and outer irradiation sites of the zero power research reactor using the MCNP-4C code and the combination of the WIMS-D/4 transport code for generation of group constants and the three-dimensional CITATION diffusion code for core analysis calculations. The neutron energy spectrum has been divided into three regions and compared with the proposed empirical correlations. The calculated thermal and fast neutron fluxes in the low power research reactor MNSR inner and outer irradiation sites have been compared with the measured results. Better agreements have been noticed between the calculated and measured results using the MCNP code than those obtained by the CITATION code. (author)

  12. Reactor coolant pump monitoring and diagnostic system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singer, R.M.; Gross, K.C.; Walsh, M.; Humenik, K.E.

    1990-01-01

    In order to reliably and safely operate a nuclear power plant, it is necessary to continuously monitor the performance of numerous subsystems to confirm that the plant state is within its prescribed limits. An important function of a properly designed monitoring system is the detection of incipient faults in all subsystems (with the avoidance of false alarms) coupled with an information system that provides the operators with fault diagnosis, prognosis of fault progression and recommended (either automatic or prescriptive) corrective action. In this paper, such a system is described that has been applied to reactor coolant pumps. This system includes a sensitive pattern-recognition technique based upon the sequential probability ratio test (SPRT) that detects incipient faults from validated signals, an expert system embodying knowledge bases on pump and sensor performance, extensive hypertext files containing operating and emergency procedures as well as pump and sensor information and a graphical interface providing the operator with easily perceived information on the location and character of the fault as well as recommended corrective action. This system is in the prototype stage and is currently being validated utilizing data from a liquid-metal cooled fast reactor (EBR-II). 3 refs., 4 figs

  13. Decision aid systems for nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evrard, J.M.; Martinez, J.M.

    1992-01-01

    The development of new techniques, especially in the field of artificial intelligence, makes it possible to design more powerful computerized systems, supporting tasks related to the design and operation of nuclear power plants. The potential contribution and perspectives for the integration of such systems depend upon whether the improvement of existing plants, the design of next generation reactors or future projects are concerned. We present four systems which show the state-of-the-art as regards knowledge-based systems. The first system is related to the automatic generation of procedures dealing with loss of electrical sources. The second one aims at assisting the power plant utility in following the technical specifications during maintenance operations. Finally, the last two are designed to help an emergency team evaluate and forecast the evolution of an accidental situation in a nuclear reactor. Perspectives for on-line operator assistance are then discussed, as well as the main technical themes which will make it possible to design such systems. We conclude with the difficulties which are encountered upon the integration of these tools: their validation and task sharing between man and machine

  14. Systems analysis of the CANDU 3 Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolfgong, J.R.; Linn, M.A.; Wright, A.L.; Olszewski, M.; Fontana, M.H. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1993-07-01

    This report presents the results of a systems failure analysis study of the CANDU 3 reactor design; the study was performed for the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. As part of the study a review of the CANDU 3 design documentation was performed, a plant assessment methodology was developed, representative plant initiating events were identified for detailed analysis, and a plant assessment was performed. The results of the plant assessment included classification of the CANDU 3 event sequences that were analyzed, determination of CANDU 3 systems that are ``significant to safety,`` and identification of key operator actions for the analyzed events.

  15. Passive cooling systems in power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aharon, J.; Harrari, R.; Weiss, Y.; Barnea, Y.; Katz, M.; Szanto, M.

    1996-01-01

    This paper reviews several R and D activities associated with the subject of passive cooling systems, conducted by the N.R.C.Negev thermohydraulic group. A short introduction considering different types of thermosyphons and their applications is followed by a detailed description of the experimental work, its results and conclusions. An ongoing research project is focused on the evaluation of the external dry air passive containment cooling system (PCCS) in the AP-600 (Westinghouse advanced pressurized water reactor). In this context some preliminary theoretical results and planned experimental research are for the fature described

  16. Computation system for nuclear reactor core analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vondy, D.R.; Fowler, T.B.; Cunningham, G.W.; Petrie, L.M.

    1977-04-01

    This report documents a system which contains computer codes as modules developed to evaluate nuclear reactor core performance. The diffusion theory approximation to neutron transport may be applied with the VENTURE code treating up to three dimensions. The effect of exposure may be determined with the BURNER code, allowing depletion calculations to be made. The features and requirements of the system are discussed and aspects common to the computational modules, but the latter are documented elsewhere. User input data requirements, data file management, control, and the modules which perform general functions are described. Continuing development and implementation effort is enhancing the analysis capability available locally and to other installations from remote terminals

  17. Small Wind Energy Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simões, Marcelo Godoy; Farret, Felix Alberto; Blaabjerg, Frede

    2017-01-01

    considered when selecting a generator for a wind power plant, including capacity of the AC system, types of loads, availability of spare parts, voltage regulation, technical personal and cost. If several loads are likely inductive, such asphase-controlled converters, motors and fluorescent lights......This chapter intends to serve as a brief guide when someone is considering the use of wind energy for small power applications. It is discussed that small wind energy systems act as the major energy source for residential or commercial applications, or how to make it part of a microgrid...... as a distributed generator. In this way, sources and loads are connected in such a way to behave as a renewable dispatch center. With this regard, non-critical loads might be curtailed or shed during times of energy shortfall or periods of high costs of energy production. If such a wind energy system is connected...

  18. Introduction to nuclear power reactors and their health physics systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brtis, J.S.

    1982-01-01

    This paper provides an introduction to: (1) the major systems of Boiling Water Reactors (BWR's) and Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR's), (2) the production and distribution of radiation sources in BWR's and PWR's, (3) the regulatory and functional requirements for nuclear power reactor design from a health physics standpoint, (4) the health physics systems provided to meet such requirements, and (5) a bibliography of documents germane to power reactor health physics design

  19. Reactor, radioactive isotopes and nuclear energy: their avatars in Venezuela

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roche, M.

    1981-01-01

    A brief history of nuclear affairs in Venezuela, since the decision to bring a research reactor (3MW) to Venezuela (1954) to current situation, is presented. Since the establishment of the National Council for Nuclear Affairs (CONAN) and then of the National Council for the Development of Nuclear Industry (CONADIN), steps are being taken to train nuclear engineers, since most studies thus far indicate the last few years of the Century as the time when nuclear energy will have to supplement other sources

  20. Smart energy management system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, Aniruddha; Singh, Jugdutt

    2010-04-01

    Peak and average energy usage in domestic and industrial environments is growing rapidly and absence of detailed energy consumption metrics is making systematic reduction of energy usage very difficult. Smart energy management system aims at providing a cost-effective solution for managing soaring energy consumption and its impact on green house gas emissions and climate change. The solution is based on seamless integration of existing wired and wireless communication technologies combined with smart context-aware software which offers a complete solution for automation of energy measurement and device control. The persuasive software presents users with easy-to-assimilate visual cues identifying problem areas and time periods and encourages a behavioural change to conserve energy. The system allows analysis of real-time/statistical consumption data with the ability to drill down into detailed analysis of power consumption, CO2 emissions and cost. The system generates intelligent projections and suggests potential methods (e.g. reducing standby, tuning heating/cooling temperature, etc.) of reducing energy consumption. The user interface is accessible using web enabled devices such as PDAs, PCs, etc. or using SMS, email, and instant messaging. Successful real-world trial of the system has demonstrated the potential to save 20 to 30% energy consumption on an average. Low cost of deployment and the ability to easily manage consumption from various web enabled devices offers gives this system a high penetration and impact capability offering a sustainable solution to act on climate change today.

  1. What Is Energy Systems Integration? | Energy Systems Integration Facility |

    Science.gov (United States)

    NREL What Is Energy Systems Integration? What Is Energy Systems Integration? Energy systems integration (ESI) is an approach to solving big energy challenges that explores ways for energy systems to Research Community NREL is a founding member of the International Institute for Energy Systems Integration

  2. Innovative Nuclear Reactors Implementation in the Armenian Energy Sector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gevorgyan, A.

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of the present paper is to demonstrate the importance of nuclear energy development in Armenia with the use of innovative nuclear reactors when considering the long-term energy planning, taking into account the specific conditions and tendencies, which are formed and developed in economy of Armenia and, in particular, in fuel-energy complex of the country. When developing the long-term program, the main factors among others considered were assumed to be the energy independence and energy security of a country, and not only the least 'cost factor', as it was usually done before. When that program was under development, such social aspects as application of the infrastructure existing within the relevant sphere, and financing of decommissioning of existing units of the Armenian NNP were also took into consideration. The studies performed have shown that implementation of innovative medium size reactors would enable the energy sector of Armenia to meet all those requirements. The issues of environmental protection were also taken into consideration when developing that program. (authors)

  3. An MHD energy storage system comprising a heavy-water producing electrolysis plant and a H2/O2/CsOH MHD generator/steam turbine combination to provide a means of transferring nuclear reactor energy from the base-load regime into the intermediate-load and peaking regimes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Townsend, S.J.; Koziak, W.W.

    1975-01-01

    The concept is presented of the MHD Energy Storage System, comprising a heavy-water producing electrolysis plant for electricity absorption, hydrogen/oxygen storage and a high-efficiency MHD generator/steam turbine unit for electricity production on demand from the grid. The overall efficiency at 56 to 60 percent is comparable to pumped storage hydro, but at only one-half to two-thirds the capital cost and at considerably greater freedom of location. The MHD Energy Storage System combined with the CANDU nuclear reactor in Canadian use can supply all-nuclear energy to the grid at a unit energy cost lower than when oil or coal fired plants are used in the same grid

  4. Evaluation of tritium production rate in a gas-cooled reactor with continuous tritium recovery system for fusion reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsuura, Hideaki, E-mail: mat@nucl.kyushu-u.ac.jp [Department of Applied Quantum Physics and Nuclear Engineering, Kyushu University, 744 Motooka, Fukuoka 819-0395 (Japan); Nakaya, Hiroyuki; Nakao, Yasuyuki [Department of Applied Quantum Physics and Nuclear Engineering, Kyushu University, 744 Motooka, Fukuoka 819-0395 (Japan); Shimakawa, Satoshi; Goto, Minoru; Nakagawa, Shigeaki [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 4002 Oarai, Ibaraki 311-1393 (Japan); Nishikawa, Masabumi [Graduate School of Engineering Science, Kyushu University, 6-10-1 Hakozaki, Fukuoka 812-8581 (Japan)

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: • The performance of a gas-cooled reactor as a tritium production system was studied. • A continuous tritium recovery using helium gas was considered. • Gas-cooled reactors with 3 GW output in all can produce ∼6 kg of tritium in a year • Performance of the system was examined for Li{sub 4}SiO{sub 4}, Li{sub 2}TiO{sub 3} and LiAlO{sub 2} compounds. -- Abstract: The performance of a high-temperature gas-cooled reactor as a tritium production with continuous tritium recovery system is examined. A gas turbine high-temperature reactor of 300-MWe (600 MW) nominal capacity (GTHTR300) is assumed as the calculation target, and using the continuous-energy Monte Carlo transport code MVP-BURN, burn-up simulations for the three-dimensional entire-core region of the GTHTR300 were performed. A Li loading pattern for the continuous tritium recovery system in the gas-cooled reactor is presented. It is shown that module gas-cooled reactors with a total thermal output power of 3 GW in all can produce ∼6 kg of tritium maximum in a year.

  5. OECD Nuclear Energy Agency Activities Related to Fast Reactor Development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dujardin, Thierry; Gulliford, Jim

    2013-01-01

    • Despite impact of Fukushima, there remains a high level of interest in continued development of advanced nuclear systems and fuel cycles: – better use of natural resources; – minimisation of waste and reduction of constraints on deep geological repositories. • Ambitious R&D programmes on-going at national level in many countries, also through international projects: – expected to lead to development of advanced reactors and fuel cycle facilities. • OECD/NEA will continue to support member countries in field of fast reactor development and related advanced fuel cycles: – forum for exchange of information; – collaborative activities

  6. Development of fluid system design technology for integral reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, D. J.; Chang, M. H.; Kang, D. J. and others

    1999-03-01

    This study presents the technology development of the system design concepts of SMART, a multi-purposed integral reactor with enhanced safety and operability, for use in diverse usages and applications of the nuclear energy. This report contains the following; - Design characteristics - Performance and safety related design criteria - System description: Primary system, Secondary system, Residual heat removal system, Make-up system, Component cooling system, Safety system - Development of design computer code: Steam generator performance(ONCESG), Pressurizer performance(COLDPZR), Steam generator flow instability(SGINS) - Development of component module and modeling using MMS computer code - Design calculation: Steam generator thermal sizing, Analysis of feed-water temperature increase at a low flow rate, Evaluation of thermal efficiency in the secondary system, Inlet orifice throttling coefficient for the prevention of steam generator flow instability, Analysis of Nitrogen gas temperature in the pressurizer during heat-up process, evaluation of water chemistry and erosion etc. The results of this study can be utilized not only for the foundation technology of the next phase basic system design of the SMART but also for the basic model in optimizing the system concepts for future advanced reactors. (author)

  7. Concept of magnet systems for LHD-type reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imagawa, S.; Takahata, K.; Tamura, H.; Yanagi, N.; Mito, T.; Obana, T.; Sagara, A.

    2008-10-01

    Heliotron reactors have attractive features for fusion power plants, such as no need for current drive and a wide space between the helical coils for the maintenance of in-vessel components. Their main disadvantage was considered the necessarily large size of their magnet systems. According to the recent reactor studies based on the experimental results in the Large Helical Device, the major radius of plasma of 14 to 17 m with a central toroidal field of 6 to 4 T is needed to attain the self-ignition condition with a blanket space thicker than 1.1 m. The stored magnetic energy is estimated at 120 to 140 GJ. Although both the major radius and the magnetic energy are about three times as large as ITER, the maximum magnetic field and mechanical stress can be comparable. In the preliminary structural analysis, the maximum stress intensity including the peak stress is less than 1,000 MPa that is allowed for strengthened stainless steel. Although the length of the helical coil is longer than 150 m that is about five times as long as the ITER TF coil, cable-in-conduit conductors can be adopted with a parallel winding method of five-in-hand. The concept of the parallel winding is proposed. Consequently, the magnet systems for helical reactors can be realized with small extension of the ITER technology. (author)

  8. Autonomous Control Capabilities for Space Reactor Power Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wood, Richard T.; Neal, John S.; Brittain, C. Ray; Mullens, James A.

    2004-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA's) Project Prometheus, the Nuclear Systems Program, is investigating a possible Jupiter Icy Moons Orbiter (JIMO) mission, which would conduct in-depth studies of three of the moons of Jupiter by using a space reactor power system (SRPS) to provide energy for propulsion and spacecraft power for more than a decade. Terrestrial nuclear power plants rely upon varying degrees of direct human control and interaction for operations and maintenance over a forty to sixty year lifetime. In contrast, an SRPS is intended to provide continuous, remote, unattended operation for up to fifteen years with no maintenance. Uncertainties, rare events, degradation, and communications delays with Earth are challenges that SRPS control must accommodate. Autonomous control is needed to address these challenges and optimize the reactor control design. In this paper, we describe an autonomous control concept for generic SRPS designs. The formulation of an autonomous control concept, which includes identification of high-level functional requirements and generation of a research and development plan for enabling technologies, is among the technical activities that are being conducted under the U.S. Department of Energy's Space Reactor Technology Program in support of the NASA's Project Prometheus. The findings from this program are intended to contribute to the successful realization of the JIMO mission

  9. Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems Construction Cost Reductions through the Use of Virtual Environments - Task 5 Report: Generation IV Reactor Virtual Mockup Proof-of-Principle Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Timothy Shaw; Anthony Baratta; Vaughn Whisker

    2005-01-01

    Task 5 report is part of a 3 year DOE NERI-sponsored effort evaluating immersive virtual reality (CAVE) technology for design review, construction planning, and maintenance planning and training for next generation nuclear power plants. Program covers development of full-scale virtual mockups generated from 3D CAD data presented in a CAVE visualization facility. Created a virtual mockup of PBMR reactor cavity and discussed applications of virtual mockup technology to improve Gen IV design review, construction planning, and maintenance planning

  10. Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems Construction Cost Reductions through the Use of Virtual Environments - Task 5 Report: Generation IV Reactor Virtual Mockup Proof-of-Principle Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Timothy Shaw; Anthony Baratta; Vaughn Whisker

    2005-02-28

    Task 5 report is part of a 3 year DOE NERI-sponsored effort evaluating immersive virtual reality (CAVE) technology for design review, construction planning, and maintenance planning and training for next generation nuclear power plants. Program covers development of full-scale virtual mockups generated from 3D CAD data presented in a CAVE visualization facility. Created a virtual mockup of PBMR reactor cavity and discussed applications of virtual mockup technology to improve Gen IV design review, construction planning, and maintenance planning.

  11. Development of a system model for advanced small modular reactors.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewis, Tom Goslee,; Holschuh, Thomas Vernon,

    2014-01-01

    This report describes a system model that can be used to analyze three advance small modular reactor (SMR) designs through their lifetime. Neutronics of these reactor designs were evaluated using Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended (MCNPX/6). The system models were developed in Matlab and Simulink. A major thrust of this research was the initial scoping analysis of Sandias concept of a long-life fast reactor (LLFR). The inherent characteristic of this conceptual design is to minimize the change in reactivity over the lifetime of the reactor. This allows the reactor to operate substantially longer at full power than traditional light water reactors (LWRs) or other SMR designs (e.g. high temperature gas reactor (HTGR)). The system model has subroutines for lifetime reactor feedback and operation calculations, thermal hydraulic effects, load demand changes and a simplified SCO2 Brayton cycle for power conversion.

  12. Passive safety systems for integral reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuul, V.S.; Samoilov, O.B.

    1996-01-01

    In this paper, a wide range of passive safety systems intended for use on integral reactors is considered. The operation of these systems relies on natural processes and does not require external power supplies. Using these systems, there is the possibility of preventing serious consequences for all classes of accidents including reactivity, loss-of-coolant and loss of heat sink as well as severe accidents. Enhancement of safety system reliability has been achieved through the use of self-actuating devices, capable of providing passive initiation of protective and isolation systems, which respond immediately to variations in the physical parameters of the fluid in the reactor or in a guard vessel. For beyond design base accidents accompanied by complete loss of heat removal capability, autonomous self-actuated ERHR trains have been proposed. These trains are completely independent of the secondary loops and need no action to isolate them from the steam turbine plant. Passive safety principles have been consistently implemented in AST-500, ATETS-200 and VPBER 600 which are new generation NPPs developed by OKBM. Their main characteristic is enhanced stability over a wide range of internal and external emergency initiators. (author). 10 figs

  13. Passive safety systems for integral reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuul, V S; Samoilov, O B [OKB Mechanical Engineering (Russian Federation)

    1996-12-01

    In this paper, a wide range of passive safety systems intended for use on integral reactors is considered. The operation of these systems relies on natural processes and does not require external power supplies. Using these systems, there is the possibility of preventing serious consequences for all classes of accidents including reactivity, loss-of-coolant and loss of heat sink as well as severe accidents. Enhancement of safety system reliability has been achieved through the use of self-actuating devices, capable of providing passive initiation of protective and isolation systems, which respond immediately to variations in the physical parameters of the fluid in the reactor or in a guard vessel. For beyond design base accidents accompanied by complete loss of heat removal capability, autonomous self-actuated ERHR trains have been proposed. These trains are completely independent of the secondary loops and need no action to isolate them from the steam turbine plant. Passive safety principles have been consistently implemented in AST-500, ATETS-200 and VPBER 600 which are new generation NPPs developed by OKBM. Their main characteristic is enhanced stability over a wide range of internal and external emergency initiators. (author). 10 figs.

  14. ADAPTIVE CONTROL SYSTEM OF INDUSTRIAL REACTORS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vyacheslav K. Mayevski

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes a mathematical model of an industrial chemical reactor for production of synthetic rubber. During reactor operation the model parameters vary considerably. To create a control algorithm performed transformation of mathematical model of the reactor in order to obtain a dependency that can be used to determine the model parameters are changing during reactor operation.

  15. Advanced thermionic reactor systems design code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewis, B.R.; Pawlowski, R.A.; Greek, K.J.; Klein, A.C.

    1991-01-01

    An overall systems design code is under development to model an advanced in-core thermionic nuclear reactor system for space applications at power levels of 10 to 50 kWe. The design code is written in an object-oriented programming environment that allows the use of a series of design modules, each of which is responsible for the determination of specific system parameters. The code modules include a neutronics and core criticality module, a core thermal hydraulics module, a thermionic fuel element performance module, a radiation shielding module, a module for waste heat transfer and rejection, and modules for power conditioning and control. The neutronics and core criticality module determines critical core size, core lifetime, and shutdown margins using the criticality calculation capability of the Monte Carlo Neutron and Photon Transport Code System (MCNP). The remaining modules utilize results of the MCNP analysis along with FORTRAN programming to predict the overall system performance

  16. Nuclear reactor cavity floor passive heat removal system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Tyler A.; Neeley, Gary W.; Inman, James B.

    2018-03-06

    A nuclear reactor includes a reactor core disposed in a reactor pressure vessel. A radiological containment contains the nuclear reactor and includes a concrete floor located underneath the nuclear reactor. An ex vessel corium retention system includes flow channels embedded in the concrete floor located underneath the nuclear reactor, an inlet in fluid communication with first ends of the flow channels, and an outlet in fluid communication with second ends of the flow channels. In some embodiments the inlet is in fluid communication with the interior of the radiological containment at a first elevation and the outlet is in fluid communication with the interior of the radiological containment at a second elevation higher than the first elevation. The radiological containment may include a reactor cavity containing a lower portion of the pressure vessel, wherein the concrete floor located underneath the nuclear reactor is the reactor cavity floor.

  17. Summary of space nuclear reactor power systems, 1983--1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buden, D.

    1993-08-11

    This report summarizes major developments in the last ten years which have greatly expanded the space nuclear reactor power systems technology base. In the SP-100 program, after a competition between liquid-metal, gas-cooled, thermionic, and heat pipe reactors integrated with various combinations of thermoelectric thermionic, Brayton, Rankine, and Stirling energy conversion systems, three concepts:were selected for further evaluation. In 1985, the high-temperature (1,350 K), lithium-cooled reactor with thermoelectric conversion was selected for full scale development. Since then, significant progress has been achieved including the demonstration of a 7-y-life uranium nitride fuel pin. Progress on the lithium-cooled reactor with thermoelectrics has progressed from a concept, through a generic flight system design, to the design, development, and testing of specific components. Meanwhile, the USSR in 1987--88 orbited a new generation of nuclear power systems beyond the, thermoelectric plants on the RORSAT satellites. The US has continued to advance its own thermionic fuel element development, concentrating on a multicell fuel element configuration. Experimental work has demonstrated a single cell operating time of about 1 1/2-y. Technology advances have also been made in the Stirling engine; an advanced engine that operates at 1,050 K is ready for testing. Additional concepts have been studied and experiments have been performed on a variety of systems to meet changing needs; such as powers of tens-to-hundreds of megawatts and highly survivable systems of tens-of-kilowatts power.

  18. Summary of space nuclear reactor power systems, 1983--1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buden, D.

    1993-01-01

    This report summarizes major developments in the last ten years which have greatly expanded the space nuclear reactor power systems technology base. In the SP-100 program, after a competition between liquid-metal, gas-cooled, thermionic, and heat pipe reactors integrated with various combinations of thermoelectric thermionic, Brayton, Rankine, and Stirling energy conversion systems, three concepts:were selected for further evaluation. In 1985, the high-temperature (1,350 K), lithium-cooled reactor with thermoelectric conversion was selected for full scale development. Since then, significant progress has been achieved including the demonstration of a 7-y-life uranium nitride fuel pin. Progress on the lithium-cooled reactor with thermoelectrics has progressed from a concept, through a generic flight system design, to the design, development, and testing of specific components. Meanwhile, the USSR in 1987--88 orbited a new generation of nuclear power systems beyond the, thermoelectric plants on the RORSAT satellites. The US has continued to advance its own thermionic fuel element development, concentrating on a multicell fuel element configuration. Experimental work has demonstrated a single cell operating time of about 1 1/2-y. Technology advances have also been made in the Stirling engine; an advanced engine that operates at 1,050 K is ready for testing. Additional concepts have been studied and experiments have been performed on a variety of systems to meet changing needs; such as powers of tens-to-hundreds of megawatts and highly survivable systems of tens-of-kilowatts power

  19. Simulation of pulsed accidental energy release in a reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryshanskii, V.A.; Ivanov, A.G.; Uskov, A.A.

    1995-01-01

    At the present time the strength of the load-bearing members of VVER and fast reactors during a hypothetical accident is ordinarily investigated in model experiments [1]. A power burst during an accident is simulated by a nonnuclear exothermal reaction in water, which simulates the coolant and fills the model. The problem is to make the correct choice of the simulator of the accidental energy burst as an effective (i.e., sufficiently high working capacity) source of dangerous loads, corresponding to the conditions of an accident. What factors and parameters determine the energy release? The answers to these questions are contradictory

  20. Safety system upgrades to a research reactor: A regulatory perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lamarre, G.B.; Martin, W.G.

    2003-01-01

    The NRU (National Research Universal) reactor, located at the Chalk River Laboratories of Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL), first achieved criticality November 3, 1957. AECL continues to operate NRU for research to support safety and reliability studies for CANDU reactors and as a major supplier of medical radioisotopes. Following a detailed systematic review and assessment of NRU's design and the condition of its primary systems, AECL formally notified the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission's (CNSC) predecessor - the Atomic Energy Control Board - in 1992 of its intention to upgrade NRU's safety systems. AECL proposed seven major upgrades to provide improvements in shutdown capability, heat removal, confinement, and reactor monitoring, particularly during and after a seismic event. From a CNSC perspective, these upgrades were necessary to meet modern safety standards. From the start of the upgrades project, the CNSC provided regulatory oversight aimed at ensuring that AECL maintained a structured approach to the upgrades. The elements of the approach include, but are not limited to, the determination of project milestones and target dates; the formalization of the design process and project quality assurance requirements; the requirements for updated documentation, including safety reports, safety notes and commissioning reports; and the approval and authorization process. This paper details, from a regulatory perspective, the structured approach used in approving the design, construction, commissioning and subsequent operation of safety system upgrades for an existing and operating research reactor, including the many challenges faced when attempting to balance the requirements of the upgrades project with AECL's need to keep NRU operating to meet its important research and production objectives. (author)

  1. Energy production systems engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Blair, Thomas Howard

    2017-01-01

    Energy Production Systems Engineering presents IEEE, Electrical Apparatus Service Association (EASA), and International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) standards of engineering systems and equipment in utility electric generation stations. Electrical engineers that practice in the energy industry must understand the specific characteristics of electrical and mechanical equipment commonly applied to energy production and conversion processes, including the mechanical and chemical processes involved, in order to design, operate and maintain electrical systems that support and enable these processes. To aid this understanding, Energy Production Systems Engineeringdescribes the equipment and systems found in various types of utility electric generation stations. This information is accompanied by examples and practice problems. It also addresses common issues of electrical safety that arise in electric generation stations.

  2. Development of generation IV nuclear energy systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsui, Kazuaki; Oka, Yoshiaki; Ogawa, Masuro; Ichimiya, Masakazu; Noda, Hiroshi

    2003-01-01

    The fifth 'Generation IV International Forum (GIF), Policy Group Meetings' was held at the Zen-Nikku Hotel in Tokyo, on September 19-20, 2002, under participations of Abraham, Secretary of DOE in U.S.A., Columbani, Secretary of CEA in France, Fujiie, Chairman of CAE in Japan, Kano, Parliamental Minister of MIS in Japan, and so on. Ten nations entering GIF (Argentina, Brazil, Canada, France, Japan, Korea, South Africa, Switzerland, U.K., and U.S.A.) selected six next generation nuclear energy concepts for objects of international cooperative research and development aiming at its practice by 2030. These concepts applicable to not only power generation, but also hydrogen production, sea water purification, and so on, are sodium liquid metal cooled reactor (Japan), high temperature gas cooled reactor (France), Super-critical pressure water cooled reactor (SCWR: Canada), Lead metal cooled reactor (Switzerland), Gas cooled fast reactor (U.S.A.), and molten salts reactor. On the generation IV nuclear reactor systems aiming to further upgrade their sustainability, safety, economical efficiency, and nuclear non proliferation, the 'Plans on Technical Development' (Road-map) to decide priority of their R and Ds has been cooperatively discussed under frameworks of international research cooperation by the GIF members nations. Here were shared descriptions on nuclear fuel cycle as a remise of technical evaluation and adopted concepts by Japanese participants contributing to making up the Road-map. (G.K.)

  3. Development of integrated nuclear data utilization system for innovative reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naoki, Yamano; Masayuki, Igashira; Akira, Hasegawa; Kiyoshi, Kato

    2005-01-01

    An integrated nuclear data utilization system has been developing for innovative nuclear energy systems such as innovative reactors and accelerator-driven systems. The system has been constructed as a modular code system, which consists of a managing system and two subsystems. The management system named CONDUCT controls system resource management of the PC Linux server and the user authentication through Internet access. A subsystem is the nuclear data search and plotting subsystem based on a SPES engine developed by Hokkaido University. Nuclear data such as EXFOR, JENDL-3.3, ENDF/B-VI and JEFF-3.1 can be searched and plotted in the subsystem. The other is the nuclear data processing and utilization subsystem, which is able to handle JENDL-3.3, ENDF/B-VI and JEFF-3.1 to generate point-wise and group cross sections in several formats, and perform various criticality and shielding benchmarks for verification of nuclear data and validation of design methods for innovative reactors. This paper presents an overview of the integrated nuclear data utilization system, describes the progress of the system development to examine the operability of the user interface and discuss specifications of the two subsystems. (authors)

  4. Sophistication of burnup analysis system for fast reactor (2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yokoyama, Kenji; Hirai, Yasushi; Tatsumi, Masahiro

    2010-10-01

    Improvement on prediction accuracy for neutronics characteristics of fast reactor cores is one of the most important study domains in terms of both achievement of high economical plant efficiency based on reasonably advanced designs and increased reliability and safety margins. In former study, considerable improvement on prediction accuracy in neutronics design has been achieved in the development of the unified cross-section set as a fruit of a series of critical experiments such as JUPITER in application of the reactor constant adjustments. For design of fast reactor cores improvement of not only static characteristics but also burnup characteristics is very important. For such purpose, it is necessary to improve the prediction accuracy on burnup characteristics using actual burnup data of 'JOYO' and 'MONJU', experimental and prototype fast reactors. Recently, study on effective burnup method for minor actinides becomes important theme. However, there is a problem that analysis work tends to become inefficient for lack of functionality suitable for analysis of composition change due to burnup since the conventional analysis system is targeted to critical assembly systems. Therefore development of burnup analysis system for fast reactors with modularity and flexibility is being done that would contribute to actual core design work and improvement of prediction accuracy. In the previous study, we have developed a prototype system which has functions of performing core and burnup calculations using given constant files (PDS files) and information based on simple and easy user input data. It has also functions of fuel shuffling which is indispensable for power reactor analysis systems. In the present study, by extending the prototype system, features for handling of control rods and energy collapse of group constants have been designed and implemented. Computational results from the present analysis system are stored into restart files which can be accessible by

  5. Nuclear Reactor RA Safety Report, Vol. 8, Auxiliary system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-11-01

    This volume describes RA reactor auxiliary systems, as follows: special ventilation system, special drainage system, hot cells, systems for internal transport. Ventilation system is considered as part of the reactor safety and protection system. Its role is eliminate possible radioactive particles dispersion in the environment. Special drainage system includes pipes and reservoirs with the safety role, meaning absorption or storage of possible radioactive waste water from the reactor building. Hot cells existing in the RA reactor building are designed for production of sealed radioactive sources, including packaging and transport [sr

  6. Development of Vibration Diagnostic System in Research Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    EL-Kafas, A. A.

    1999-01-01

    Early failure detection and diagnosis system are an important group with increasing interest with the operating support system. Already existing system to monitor integrity of primary system components are vibration and acoustic monitoring system (2,3). The development of vibration diagnostic system for MARIA reactor (30 MW)-the second research reactor in Poland -was made. The new system is applied for the Egypt research reactor (ETRR-1). This paper represents the result obtained during the operation of this activity that carried out at MARIA and ETRR-1 reactors

  7. Energy efficiency system development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leman, A. M.; Rahman, K. A.; Chong, Haw Jie; Salleh, Mohd Najib Mohd; Yusof, M. Z. M.

    2017-09-01

    By subjecting to the massive usage of electrical energy in Malaysia, energy efficiency is now one of the key areas of focus in climate change mitigation. This paper focuses on the development of an energy efficiency system of household electrical appliances for residential areas. Distribution of Questionnaires and pay a visit to few selected residential areas are conducted during the fulfilment of the project as well as some advice on how to save energy are shared with the participants. Based on the collected data, the system developed by the UTHM Energy Team is then evaluated from the aspect of the consumers' behaviour in using electrical appliances and the potential reduction targeted by the team. By the end of the project, 60% of the participants had successfully reduced the electrical power consumption set by the UTHM Energy Team. The reasons for whether the success and the failure is further analysed in this project.

  8. Cable handling system for use in a nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crosgrove, R.O.; Larson, E.M.; Moody, E.

    1982-01-01

    A cable handling system for use in an installation such as a nuclear reactor is disclosed herein along with relevant portions of the reactor which, in a preferred embodiment, is a liquid metal fast breeder reactor. The cable handling system provides a specific way of interconnecting certain internal reactor components with certain external components, through an assembly of rotatable plugs. Moreover, this is done without having to disconnect these components from one another during rotation of the plugs and yet without interfering with other reactor components in the vicinity of the rotating plugs and cable handling system

  9. Coolant cleanup system for BWR type reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kinoshita, Shoichiro; Araki, Hidefumi.

    1993-01-01

    The cleanup system of the present invention removes impurity ions and floating materials accumulated in a reactor during evaporation of coolants in the nuclear reactor. That is, coolants pass pipelines from a pressure vessel using pressure difference between a high pressure in the pressure vessel and a low pressure at the upstream of a condensate filtration/desalting device of a condensate/feed water system as a driving source, during which cations and floating materials are removed in a high temperature filtration/desalting device and coolants flow into the condensate/feedwater system. Impurities containing anions are removed here by the condensates filtration/desalting device. Then, they return to the pressure vessel while pressurized and heated by a condensate pump, a feed water pump and a feed water heater. At least pumps, a heat exchanger for heating, a filtration/desalting device for removing anions and pipelines connecting them used exclusively for the coolant cleanup system are no more necessary. (I.S.)

  10. Greener energy systems energy production technologies with minimum environmental impact

    CERN Document Server

    Jeffs, Eric

    2012-01-01

    Recent years have seen acceleration in the development of cleaner energy systems. In Europe and North America, many old coal-fired power plants will be shut down in the next few years and will likely be replaced by combined cycle plants with higher-efficiency gas turbines that can start up and load quickly. With the revival of nuclear energy, designers are creating smaller nuclear reactors of a simpler integrated design that could expand the application of clean, emission-free energy to industry. And a number of manufacturers now offer hybrid cars with an electric motor and a gasoline engine t

  11. Fusion-supported decentralized nuclear energy system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jassby, D.L.

    1979-04-01

    A decentralized nuclear energy system is proposed comprising mass-produced pressurized water reactors in the size range 10 to 300 MW (thermal), to be used for the production of process heat, space heat, and electricity in applications where petroleum and natural gas are presently used. Special attention is given to maximizing the refueling interval with no interim batch shuffling in order to minimize fuel transport, reactor downtime, and opportunity for fissile diversion. These objectives demand a substantial fissile enrichment (7 to 15%). The preferred fissile fuel is U-233, which offers an order of magnitude savings in ore requirements (compared with U-235 fuel), and whose higher conversion ratio in thermal reactors serves to extend the period of useful reactivity and relieve demand on the fissile breeding plants (compared with Pu-239 fuel). Application of the neutral-beam-driven tokamak fusion-neutron source to a U-233 breeding pilot plant is examined. This scheme can be extended in part to a decentralized fusion energy system, wherein remotely located large fusion reactors supply excess tritium to a distributed system of relatively small nonbreeding D-T reactors

  12. Nuclear Hybrid Energy Systems: Challenges and Opportunities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    P. Sabharwall; S.B. Sitton; S.J. Yoon; C. Stoots

    2014-07-01

    With growing demand of energy and costs of the fossil fuels, coupled with the environmental concerns have resulted in an increased interest in alternative energy sources. Nuclear hybrid energy systems (NHES) are being considered which incorporates renewable energy sources such as solar and wind energy combined with nuclear reactor and energy storage to meet the peak hours demand imposed on the grid, along with providing process heat for other potential industrial applications. This concept could potentially satisfy various energy demands and improve reliability, robustness and resilience for the entire system as a whole, along with economic and net efficiency gains. This paper provides a brief understanding of potential NHES system and architecture along with the challenges

  13. Historical evolution of nuclear energy systems development and related activities in JAERI. Fission, fusion, accelerator utilization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tone, Tatsuzo [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2001-03-01

    Overview of the historical evolution of nuclear energy systems development and related activities in JAERI is given in the report. This report reviews the research and development for light water reactor, fast breeder reactor, high temperature gas reactor, fusion reactor and utilization of accelerator-based neutron source. (author)

  14. Parametric systems analysis for ICF hybrid reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berwald, D.H.; Maniscalco, J.A.; Chapin, D.L.

    1981-01-01

    Parametric design and systems analysis for inertial confinement fusion-fission hybrids are presented. These results were generated as part of the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) sponsored Feasibility Assessment of Fusion-Fission Hybrids, using an Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) hybrid power plant design code developed in conjunction with the feasibility assessment. The SYMECON systems analysis code, developed by Westinghouse, was used to generate economic results for symbiotic electricity generation systems consisting of the hybrid and its client Light Water Reactors (LWRs). These results explore the entire fusion parameter space for uranium fast fission blanket hybrids, thorium fast fission blanket hybrids, and thorium suppressed fission blanket types are discussed, and system sensitivities to design uncertainties are explored

  15. Integrated systems analysis of the PIUS reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fullwood, F.; Kroeger, P.; Higgins, J. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)] [and others

    1993-11-01

    Results are presented of a systems failure analysis of the PIUS plant systems that are used during normal reactor operation and postulated accidents. This study was performed to provide the NRC with an understanding of the behavior of the plant. The study applied two diverse failure identification methods, Failure Modes Effects & Criticality Analysis (FMECA) and Hazards & Operability (HAZOP) to the plant systems, supported by several deterministic analyses. Conventional PRA methods were also used along with a scheme for classifying events by initiator frequency and combinations of failures. Principal results of this study are: (a) an extensive listing of potential event sequences, grouped in categories that can be used by the NRC, (b) identification of support systems that are important to safety, and (c) identification of key operator actions.

  16. Integrated systems analysis of the PIUS reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fullwood, F.; Kroeger, P.; Higgins, J.

    1993-11-01

    Results are presented of a systems failure analysis of the PIUS plant systems that are used during normal reactor operation and postulated accidents. This study was performed to provide the NRC with an understanding of the behavior of the plant. The study applied two diverse failure identification methods, Failure Modes Effects ampersand Criticality Analysis (FMECA) and Hazards ampersand Operability (HAZOP) to the plant systems, supported by several deterministic analyses. Conventional PRA methods were also used along with a scheme for classifying events by initiator frequency and combinations of failures. Principal results of this study are: (a) an extensive listing of potential event sequences, grouped in categories that can be used by the NRC, (b) identification of support systems that are important to safety, and (c) identification of key operator actions

  17. Reactor accident diagnostic expert system: DISKET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, Kazuo; Yokobayashi, Masao

    1989-11-01

    A reactor accident diagnostic system DISKET has been developed to identify the cause and the type of an abnormal transient of a nuclear power plant. The system is based on the knowledge engineering and consists of an inference engine IERIAS and a knowledge base. The main features of DISKET are the following: Time-varying characteristics of transient can be treated and knowledge base can be divided into several knowledge units to handle a lot of rules effectively. This report has been provided for the convenience of DISKET's users and consists of three parts. The first part is the description of the whole system, the details of the knowledge base of DISKET are described in the second part, and how to use the DISKET system is explained in the third part. (author)

  18. Operator Support System for Pressurized Water Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei Renjie; Shen Shifei

    1996-01-01

    Operator Support System for Pressurized Water Reactor (OSSPWR) has been developed under the sponsorship of IAEA from August 1994. The project is being carried out by the Department of Engineering Physics, Tsinghua University, Beijing, China. The Design concepts of the operator support functions have been established. The prototype systems of OSSPWR has been developed as well. The primary goal of the project is to create an advanced operator support system by applying new technologies such as artificial intelligence (AI) techniques, advanced communication technologies, etc. Recently, the advanced man-machine interface for nuclear power plant operators has been developed. It is connected to the modern computer systems and utilizes new high performance graphic displays. (author). 6 refs, 4 figs

  19. Principle of human system interface (HSI) design for new reactor console of PUSPATI TRIGA Reactor (RTP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zareen Khan Abdul Jalil Khan; Ridzuan Abdul Mutalib; Mohd Idris Taib; Mohd Khairulezwan Abdul Manan; Nurfarhana Ayuni Joha; Mohd Sabri Minhat; Izhar Abu Hussin

    2013-01-01

    Full-text: This paper will describe the principle of human system interface design for new reactor console in control room at TRIGA reactor facility. In order to support these human system interface challenges in digital reactor console. Software-based instrumentation and control (I and C) system for new reactor console could lead to new human machine integration. The proposed of Human System Interface (HSI) which included the large display panels which shows reactor status, compact and computer-based workstations for monitoring, control and protection function. The proposed Human System Interface (HIS) has been evaluated using various human factor engineering. It can be concluded that the Human System Interface (HIS) is designed as to address the safety related computer controlled system. (author)

  20. The Development of an INL Capability for High Temperature Flow, Heat Transfer, and Thermal Energy Storage with Applications in Advanced Small Modular Reactors, High Temperature Heat Exchangers, Hybrid Energy Systems, and Dynamic Grid Energy Storage C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, Xiaodong; Zhang, Xiaoqin; Kim, Inhun; O'Brien, James; Sabharwall, Piyush

    2014-01-01

    The overall goal of this project is to support Idaho National Laboratory in developing a new advanced high temperature multi fluid multi loop test facility that is aimed at investigating fluid flow and heat transfer, material corrosion, heat exchanger characteristics and instrumentation performance, among others, for nuclear applications. Specifically, preliminary research has been performed at The Ohio State University in the following areas: 1. A review of fluoride molten salts' characteristics in thermal, corrosive, and compatibility performances. A recommendation for a salt selection is provided. Material candidates for both molten salt and helium flow loop have been identified. 2. A conceptual facility design that satisfies the multi loop (two coolant loops [i.e., fluoride molten salts and helium]) multi purpose (two operation modes [i.e., forced and natural circulation]) requirements. Schematic models are presented. The thermal hydraulic performances in a preliminary printed circuit heat exchanger (PCHE) design have been estimated. 3. An introduction of computational methods and models for pipe heat loss analysis and cases studies. Recommendations on insulation material selection have been provided. 4. An analysis of pipe pressure rating and sizing. Preliminary recommendations on pipe size selection have been provided. 5. A review of molten fluoride salt preparation and chemistry control. An introduction to the experience from the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment at Oak Ridge National Laboratory has been provided. 6. A review of some instruments and components to be used in the facility. Flowmeters and Grayloc connectors have been included. This report primarily presents the conclusions drawn from the extensive review of literatures in material selections and the facility design progress at the current stage. It provides some useful guidelines in insulation material and pipe size selection, as well as an introductory review of facility process and

  1. The Development of an INL Capability for High Temperature Flow, Heat Transfer, and Thermal Energy Storage with Applications in Advanced Small Modular Reactors, High Temperature Heat Exchangers, Hybrid Energy Systems, and Dynamic Grid Energy Storage C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Xiaodong [The Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States); Zhang, Xiaoqin [The Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States); Kim, Inhun [The Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States); O' Brien, James [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Sabharwall, Piyush [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2014-10-01

    The overall goal of this project is to support Idaho National Laboratory in developing a new advanced high temperature multi fluid multi loop test facility that is aimed at investigating fluid flow and heat transfer, material corrosion, heat exchanger characteristics and instrumentation performance, among others, for nuclear applications. Specifically, preliminary research has been performed at The Ohio State University in the following areas: 1. A review of fluoride molten salts’ characteristics in thermal, corrosive, and compatibility performances. A recommendation for a salt selection is provided. Material candidates for both molten salt and helium flow loop have been identified. 2. A conceptual facility design that satisfies the multi loop (two coolant loops [i.e., fluoride molten salts and helium]) multi purpose (two operation modes [i.e., forced and natural circulation]) requirements. Schematic models are presented. The thermal hydraulic performances in a preliminary printed circuit heat exchanger (PCHE) design have been estimated. 3. An introduction of computational methods and models for pipe heat loss analysis and cases studies. Recommendations on insulation material selection have been provided. 4. An analysis of pipe pressure rating and sizing. Preliminary recommendations on pipe size selection have been provided. 5. A review of molten fluoride salt preparation and chemistry control. An introduction to the experience from the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment at Oak Ridge National Laboratory has been provided. 6. A review of some instruments and components to be used in the facility. Flowmeters and Grayloc connectors have been included. This report primarily presents the conclusions drawn from the extensive review of literatures in material selections and the facility design progress at the current stage. It provides some useful guidelines in insulation material and pipe size selection, as well as an introductory review of facility process and components.

  2. The determination of neutron energy spectrum in reactor core C1 of reactor VR-1 Sparrow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vins, M. [Department of Nuclear Reactors, Faculty of Nuclear Sciences and Physical Engineering, Czech Technical University, V Holesovickach 2, 180 00 Prague 8 (Czech Republic)], E-mail: vinsmiro@seznam.cz

    2008-07-15

    This contribution overviews neutron spectrum measurement, which was done on training reactor VR-1 Sparrow with a new nuclear fuel. Former nuclear fuel IRT-3M was changed for current nuclear fuel IRT-4M with lower enrichment of 235U (enrichment was reduced from former 36% to 20%) in terms of Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors (RERTR) Program. Neutron spectrum measurement was obtained by irradiation of activation foils at the end of pipe of rabit system and consecutive deconvolution of obtained saturated activities. Deconvolution was performed by computer iterative code SAND-II with 620 groups' structure. All gamma measurements were performed on Canberra HPGe. Activation foils were chosen according physical and nuclear parameters from the set of certificated foils. The Resulting differential flux at the end of pipe of rabit system agreed well with typical spectrum of light water reactor. Measurement of neutron spectrum has brought better knowledge about new reactor core C1 and improved methodology of activation measurement. (author)

  3. The geo-reactor. A link between nuclear fission and geothermal energy?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Degueldre, Claude; Fiorina, Carlo

    2013-01-01

    Recent high-precision isotope analysis data suggests the potential occurrence of a geo-reactor. Specific gas isotopes that could have been generated by binary and ternary fissions were identified in volcano emanations or as soluble/associated species in crystalline rocks and semi-quantitatively evaluated as isotopic ratio or estimated amounts. Presently if it is evident that according to the actinide inventory on the Earth, local potential criticality of the geo-system may have been reached, several questions remain such as why, where and when did a geo-reactor be operational? Even if the hypothesis of a geo-reactor operation in the proto-Earth period should be acceptable, it could be difficult to anticipate that a geo-reactor is still operating today. This could be tested in the future by assessing and reconstructing the system by antineutrino detection and tomography through the Earth. The present paper focuses on the geo-reactor conditions including history, spatial extension and regimes. The discussion based on recent calculations involves investigations on the limits in term of fissile inventory, size and power, based on stratification through the gravitational field and the various features through the inner mantel, the boundary with the core, the external part and the inner-core. the reconstruction allows to formulating that from the history point of view there are possibilities that the geo-reactor reached criticality in a proto-Earth period as a thorium/uranium reactor triggered by an under-layer with heavier actinides. The geo-reactor should be a key component of geothermal energy sources. (author)

  4. NEPTUNE: a modular system for light-water reactor calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bouchard, J.; Kanevoky, A.; Reuss, P.

    1975-01-01

    A complete modular system of light water reactor calculations has been designed. It includes basic nuclear data processing, the APOLLO phase: transport calculations for cells, multicells, fuel assemblies or reactors, the NEPTUNE phase: reactor calculations. A fuel management module, devoted to the automatic determination of the best shuffling strategy is included in NEPTUNE [fr

  5. Scaling laws for modeling nuclear reactor systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nahavandi, A.N.; Castellana, F.S.; Moradkhanian, E.N.

    1979-01-01

    Scale models are used to predict the behavior of nuclear reactor systems during normal and abnormal operation as well as under accident conditions. Three types of scaling procedures are considered: time-reducing, time-preserving volumetric, and time-preserving idealized model/prototype. The necessary relations between the model and the full-scale unit are developed for each scaling type. Based on these relationships, it is shown that scaling procedures can lead to distortion in certain areas that are discussed. It is advised that, depending on the specific unit to be scaled, a suitable procedure be chosen to minimize model-prototype distortion

  6. Calorimetric and reactor coolant system flow uncertainty

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bates, L.; McLean, T.

    1991-01-01

    This paper describes a methodology for the quantification of errors associated with the determination of a feedwater flow, secondary power, and Reactor Coolant System (RCS) flow used at the Trojan Nuclear Plant to ensure compliance with regulatory requirements. The sources of error in Plant indications and process measurement are identified and tracked, using examples, through the mathematical processes necessary to calculate the uncertainty in the RCS flow measurement. An error of approximately 1.4 percent is calculated for secondary power. This error results, along with the consideration of other errors, in an uncertainty of approximately 3 percent in the RCS flow determination

  7. Nuclear reactor fuel rod attachment system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christiansen, D.W.

    1983-01-01

    The invention involves a technique to quickly, inexpensively and rigidly attach a nuclear reactor fuel rod to a support member. The invention also allows for the repeated non-destructive removal and replacement of the fuel rod. The proposed fuel rod and support member attachment and removal system consists of a locking cap fastened to the fuel rod and a locking strip fastened to the support member or vice versa. The locking cap has two or more opposing fingers shaped to form a socket. The fingers spring back when moved apart and released. The locking strip has an extension shaped to rigidly attach to the socket's body portion

  8. Pressure suppression system for a nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jost, N.

    1977-01-01

    The invention pertains to a pressure suppression system for PWR reactors where the parts enclosing the primary coolant are contained in two pressure-tight separate chambers. According to the invention, these chambers are partly filled with water and are connected with each other below the water surface. This way, gases cannot escape from the containment, not even if a valve and a line are damaged at the same time, as the vapours released condensate in the water of at least one of the other chambers. (HP) [de

  9. Reactor protection system refurbishment at Paks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hetzmann, A.; Turi, T.

    1997-01-01

    The history and the milestones of the reactor protection system refurbishment are outlined. During the preparation phase of the refurbishment project, detailed requirements have been set up and specific technical solutions developed. The structure of the project documents prepared during these activities is shown in a figure. The life cycle of the project was divided into four phases: the preparatory phase; the design and manufacturing phase; the installation and commissioning phase; and the operation phase. For all four Paks units a time schedule for implementation was set up. The licensing process is dealt with; the principal license was issued in June 1996. (A.K.)

  10. Energy Usage Analysis System

    Data.gov (United States)

    General Services Administration — The EUAS application is a web based system which serves Energy Center of Expertise, under the Office of Facilitates Management and Service Programs. EUAS is used for...

  11. Flow energy conversion system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sargsyan, R.A.

    2011-01-01

    A cost-effective hydropower system called here Flow Energy Converter was developed, patented, manufactured and tested for water pumping, electricity generation and other purposes especially useful for the rural communities. The system consists of water-driven turbine with plane-surface blades, power transmission means and pump and/or generator. Working sample of the Flow Energy Converter was designed and manufactured at the Institute of Radio Physics and Electronics

  12. Systems engineering and the licensing of Small Modular Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kulesa, T., E-mail: tkulesa@us.ibm.com [IBM, Philidelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Soderholm, K., E-mail: Kristiina.Soderholm@fortum.com [Fortum Power (Finland); Fechtelkotter, P., E-mail: pfech@us.ibm.com [IBM, Boston, Massacheusets (United States)

    2014-07-01

    Both global warming and the need for dependable sources of energy continue to make nuclear power generation an appealing option. But a history of cost overruns, project delays, and environmental disaster has pushed the industry to innovate and design a more flexible, scalable, and safe source of nuclear energy - the small modular reactor. Innovation in generation technology creates disruption in already complex licensing and regulatory processes. This paper discusses how the application of systems engineering and requirements management can help combat confusion, rework, and efficiency problems across the engineering and compliance life cycle. The paper is based on the PhD Dissertation 'Licensing Model Development for Small Modular Reactors (SMRs) - Focusing on Finnish Regulatory Framework', approved in 2013. The result of the study gives recommendations and tools to develop and optimize the licensing process for SMRs. The most important SMR-specific feature, in terms of licensing, is the modularity of the design. Here the modularity indicates multi-module SMR designs, which creates new challenges in the licensing process. Another feature impacting licensing feasibility is the plan to build many standardized power plants in series and use factory-fabricated modules to optimize the construction costs. SMR licensing challenges are under discussion in many international forums, such as World Nuclear Association Cooperation in Reactor Design Evaluation and Licensing Small Modular Reactor group (WNA CORDEL SMR) group and IAEA INPRO regulators' forum. This paper also presents an application of the new licensing process using Systems Engineering, Requirements Management, and Project Management practices and tools. (author)

  13. Systems engineering and the licensing of Small Modular Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulesa, T.; Soderholm, K.; Fechtelkotter, P.

    2014-01-01

    Both global warming and the need for dependable sources of energy continue to make nuclear power generation an appealing option. But a history of cost overruns, project delays, and environmental disaster has pushed the industry to innovate and design a more flexible, scalable, and safe source of nuclear energy - the small modular reactor. Innovation in generation technology creates disruption in already complex licensing and regulatory processes. This paper discusses how the application of systems engineering and requirements management can help combat confusion, rework, and efficiency problems across the engineering and compliance life cycle. The paper is based on the PhD Dissertation 'Licensing Model Development for Small Modular Reactors (SMRs) - Focusing on Finnish Regulatory Framework', approved in 2013. The result of the study gives recommendations and tools to develop and optimize the licensing process for SMRs. The most important SMR-specific feature, in terms of licensing, is the modularity of the design. Here the modularity indicates multi-module SMR designs, which creates new challenges in the licensing process. Another feature impacting licensing feasibility is the plan to build many standardized power plants in series and use factory-fabricated modules to optimize the construction costs. SMR licensing challenges are under discussion in many international forums, such as World Nuclear Association Cooperation in Reactor Design Evaluation and Licensing Small Modular Reactor group (WNA CORDEL SMR) group and IAEA INPRO regulators' forum. This paper also presents an application of the new licensing process using Systems Engineering, Requirements Management, and Project Management practices and tools. (author)

  14. Shock absorber system for nuclear reactor ice condenser compartment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meier, J.F.; Rudd, G.E.; Pradhan, A.V.; George, J.A.; Lippincott, H.W.; Sutherland, J.D.

    1979-01-01

    A shock absorber system was designed to absorb the energy imparted to doors in a nuclear reactor ice condenser compartment as they swing rapidly to an open position. Each shock absorber which is installed on a wall adjacent to each door is large and must absorb up to about 40,000 foot pounds of energy. The basic shock absorber component comprises foam enclosed in a synthetic fabric bag having a volume about twice the foam volume. A stainless steel knitted mesh bag of the same volume as the fabric bag, contains the fabric bag and its enclosed foam. To protect the foam and bags during construction activities at the reactor site and from the shearing action of the doors, a protective sheet metal cover is installed over the shock absorber ends and the surface to be contacted by the moving door. With the above shock absorber mounted on a wall behind each door, as the door is forcibly opened by steam pressure and air resulting from a pipe break in the reactor compartment, it swings at a high velocity into contact with the shock absorber, crushes the foam and forces it into the fabric bag excess material thus containing the foam fragmented particles, and minimizes build-up of pressure in the bag as a result of the applied compressive force

  15. Overview of the US Department of Energy Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCarthy, K.A.; Williams, D.L.; Reister, R.

    2012-01-01

    The US Department of Energy Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program is focused on enabling the long-term operation of US commercial power plants. Decisions on life extension will be made by commercial power plant owners - the information provided by the research and development activities in the LWRS Program will reduce the uncertainty (and therefore the risk) associated with making those decisions. The LWRS Program encompasses two facets of long-term operation: (1) manage the aging of plant systems, structures, and components so that nuclear power plant lifetimes can be extended and the plants can continue to operate safely, efficiently, and economically; and (2) provide science-based solutions to the nuclear industry that support implementation of performance improvement technologies. An important aspect of the Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program is partnering with industry and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to support and conduct the long-term research needed to inform major component refurbishment and replacement strategies, performance enhancements, plant license extensions, and age-related regulatory oversight decisions. The Department of Energy research, development, and demonstration role focuses on aging phenomena and issues that require long-term research and/or unique Department of Energy laboratory expertise and facilities and are applicable to all operating reactors. This paper provides an overview of the Department of Energy Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program, including vision, goals, and major deliverables. (author)

  16. Electric Energy Consumption of Multi Purpose Reactor GA. Siwabessy During Reactor Operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koes Indrakoesoema

    2012-01-01

    Electrical power supply of Reactor Center Multi Purpose obtained from PT PLN to 3030 kVA power contracts. Distribution to existing loads in PRSG divided into 3 (three) lines, each of which is supplied through a transformer BHT01, BHT02 and BHT03, each transformer have capacity of 1600 kVA. During reactor operation, only 2 lines that serve loads, each line serve 2 primary pump motor and 2 secondary pump motor. Electrical power for 24 hours for measurement BHT01, the average is 288 kW, for BHT02 is 641 kW and BHT03 is 466 kW. The energy absorbed by each transformer for 24 hours of measurement, for BHT01 is 6.44 MWh, BHT02 absorb 14.8 MWh and BHT03 absorb 10.9 MWh. (author)

  17. Solar Energy Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-01-01

    Calibrated in kilowatt hours per square meter, the solar counter produced by Dodge Products, Inc. provides a numerical count of the solar energy that has accumulated on a surface. Solar energy sensing, measuring and recording devices in corporate solar cell technology developed by Lewis Research Center. Customers for their various devices include architects, engineers and others engaged in construction and operation of solar energy facilities; manufacturers of solar systems or solar related products, such as glare reducing windows; and solar energy planners in federal and state government agencies.

  18. Living Systems Energy Module

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-09-26

    The Living Systems Energy Module, renamed Voyage from the Sun, is a twenty-lesson curriculum designed to introduce students to the major ways in which energy is important in living systems. Voyage from the Sun tells the story of energy, describing its solar origins, how it is incorporated into living terrestrial systems through photosynthesis, how it flows from plants to herbivorous animals, and from herbivores to carnivores. A significant part of the unit is devoted to examining how humans use energy, and how human impact on natural habitats affects ecosystems. As students proceed through the unit, they read chapters of Voyage from the Sun, a comic book that describes the flow of energy in story form (Appendix A). During the course of the unit, an ``Energy Pyramid`` is erected in the classroom. This three-dimensional structure serves as a classroom exhibit, reminding students daily of the importance of energy and of the fragile nature of our living planet. Interactive activities teach students about adaptations that allow plants and animals to acquire, to use and to conserve energy. A complete list of curricular materials and copies of all activity sheets appear in Appendix B.

  19. Small Wind Energy Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simoes, Marcelo; Farret, Felix Alberto; Blaabjerg, Frede

    2015-01-01

    devices, and a centralized distribution control. In order to establish a small wind energy system it is important to observe the following: (i) Attending the energy requirements of the actual or future consumers; (ii) Establishing civil liabilities in case of accidents and financial losses due to shortage...... or low quality of energy; (iii) Negotiating collective conditions to interconnect the microgrid with the public network or with other sources of energy that is independent of wind resources; (iv) Establishing a performance criteria of power quality and reliability to end-users, in order to reduce costs...... and guaranteeing an acceptable energy supply. This paper discuss how performance is affected by local conditions and random nature of the wind, power demand profiles, turbine related factors, and presents the technical issues for implementing a self-excited induction generator system, or a permanent magnet based...

  20. Alternative Energy Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    West, M.; Duckers, L.; Lockett, P.; Loughridge, B.; Peatfield, T.; White, P.

    1984-01-01

    The Coventry (Lanchester) Polytechnic Wave Energy Group has been involved in the United Kingdom wave energy research programme since its inception in 1975. Whilst the work of the group is mainly concerned with wave energy, and currently is directed towards the design of a wave energy device tailored to the needs of isolated/island communities, it has some involvement with other aspects of the alternatives. This conference, dealing with alternative energy systems and their electrical integration and utilisation was engendered by the general interest which the Polytechnic group members have in the alternatives and their use. The scope for electrical integration and utilisation is very broad. Energy for family groups may be provided in a relatively unsophisticated way which is acceptable to them. Small population centres, for example island communities relying upon diesel equipment, can reap the benefits of the alternatives through their ability to accept novel integration schemes and a flexible approach to the use of the energy available. Consumers already enjoying the benefits of a 'firm' electricity grid supply can use energy from a variety of alternative systems, via the grid, without having to modify their energy consumption habits. In addition to the domestic and industrial applications and coastal possibilities, specialist applications in isolated environments have also emerged. The Proceedings detail practical, technical and economic aspects of the alternatives and their electrical integration and utilisation.

  1. Core test reactor shield cooling system analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larson, E.M.; Elliott, R.D.

    1971-01-01

    System requirements for cooling the shield within the vacuum vessel for the core test reactor are analyzed. The total heat to be removed by the coolant system is less than 22,700 Btu/hr, with an additional 4600 Btu/hr to be removed by the 2-inch thick steel plate below the shield. The maximum temperature of the concrete in the shield can be kept below 200 0 F if the shield plug walls are kept below 160 0 F. The walls of the two ''donut'' shaped shield segments, which are cooled by the water from the shield and vessel cooling system, should operate below 95 0 F. The walls of the center plug, which are cooled with nitrogen, should operate below 100 0 F. (U.S.)

  2. Nuclear reactors transients identification and classification system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bianchi, Paulo Henrique

    2008-01-01

    This work describes the study and test of a system capable to identify and classify transients in thermo-hydraulic systems, using a neural network technique of the self-organizing maps (SOM) type, with the objective of implanting it on the new generations of nuclear reactors. The technique developed in this work consists on the use of multiple networks to do the classification and identification of the transient states, being each network a specialist at one respective transient of the system, that compete with each other using the quantization error, that is a measure given by this type of neural network. This technique showed very promising characteristics that allow the development of new functionalities in future projects. One of these characteristics consists on the potential of each network, besides responding what transient is in course, could give additional information about that transient. (author)

  3. Event tree analysis for the system of hybrid reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Yongwei; Qiu Lijian

    1993-01-01

    The application of probabilistic risk assessment for fusion-fission hybrid reactor is introduced. A hybrid reactor system has been analysed using event trees. According to the character of the conceptual design of Hefei Fusion-fission Experimental Hybrid Breeding Reactor, the probabilities of the event tree series induced by 4 typical initiating events were calculated. The results showed that the conceptual design is safe and reasonable. through this paper, the safety character of hybrid reactor system has been understood more deeply. Some suggestions valuable to safety design for hybrid reactor have been proposed

  4. Power control system in BWR type reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishizawa, Yasuo.

    1980-01-01

    Purpose: To control the reactor power so that the power distribution can satisfy the limiting conditions, by regulating the reactor core flow rate while monitoring the power distribution in the reactor core of a BWR type reactor. Constitution: A power distribution monitor determines the power distribution for the entire reactor core based on the data for neutron flux, reactor core thermal power, reactor core flow rate and control rod pattern from the reactor and calculates the linear power density distribution. A power up ratio computing device computes the current linear power density increase ratio. An aimed power up ratio is determined by converting the electrical power up ratio transferred from a load demand input device into the reactor core thermal power up ratio. The present reactor core thermal power up ratio is subtracted from the limiting power up ratio and the difference is sent to an operation amount indicator and the reactor core flow rate is changed in a reactor core flow rate regulator, by which the reactor power is controlled. (Moriyama, K.)

  5. Computer System Analysis for Decommissioning Management of Nuclear Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nurokhim; Sumarbagiono

    2008-01-01

    Nuclear reactor decommissioning is a complex activity that should be planed and implemented carefully. A system based on computer need to be developed to support nuclear reactor decommissioning. Some computer systems have been studied for management of nuclear power reactor. Software system COSMARD and DEXUS that have been developed in Japan and IDMT in Italy used as models for analysis and discussion. Its can be concluded that a computer system for nuclear reactor decommissioning management is quite complex that involved some computer code for radioactive inventory database calculation, calculation module on the stages of decommissioning phase, and spatial data system development for virtual reality. (author)

  6. Device for detecting failure of reactor system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyazawa, Tatsuo.

    1979-01-01

    Purpose: To make it possible to rapidly detect any failure in a reactor system prior to the leakage of coolants. Constitution: The dose of beta line is computed from the difference between the power of a detector for reacting with both beta and gamma lines and a detector for reacting only with gamma line to detect the failure of a reactor system, thereby to raise the detection speed and improve the detection accuracy. More specifically, a radiation detector A detects gamma and beta lines by means of piezoelectric elements. A radiation detector B caused the opening of the detector A to be covered with a metal, and detects only gamma line. The detected values of detectors A and B are amplified by an amplifier and applied to a rate meter and a counter, the values being converted into DC and introduced into a comparison circuit, where the outputs of the rate meter are compared with each other. When the difference is more than the predetermined range, it is supplied as output to an alarm circuit where an alarm signal is produced. (Nakamura, S.)

  7. Energy saving synergies in national energy systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thellufsen, Jakob Zinck; Lund, Henrik

    2015-01-01

    In the transition towards a 100% renewable energy system, energy savings are essential. The possibility of energy savings through conservation or efficiency increases can be identified in, for instance, the heating and electricity sectors, in industry, and in transport. Several studies point...... to various optimal levels of savings in the different sectors of the energy system. However, these studies do not investigate the idea of energy savings being system dependent. This paper argues that such system dependency is critical to understand, as it does not make sense to analyse an energy saving...... without taking into account the actual benefit of the saving in relation to the energy system. The study therefore identifies a need to understand how saving methods may interact with each other and the system in which they are conducted. By using energy system analysis to do hourly simulation...

  8. The thorium fuel cycle in water-moderated reactor systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Critoph, E.

    1977-01-01

    Current interest in the thorium cycle, as an alternative to the uranium cycle, for water-moderated reactors is based on two attractive aspects of its use - the extension of uranium resources, and the related lower sensitivity of energy costs to uranium price. While most of the scientific basis required is already available, some engineering demonstrations are needed to provide better economic data for rational decisions. Thorium and uranium cycles are compared with regard to reactor characteristics and technology, fuel-cycle technology, economic parameters, fuel-cycle costs, and system characteristics. There appear to be no major feasibility problems associated with the use of thorium, although development is required in the areas of fuel testing and fuel management. The use of thorium cycles implies recycling the fuel, and the major uncertainties are in the associated costs. Experience in the design and operation of fuel reprocessing and active-fabrication facilities is required to estimate costs to the accuracy needed for adequately defining the range of conditions economically favourable to thorium cycles. In heavy-water reactors (HWRs) thorium cycles having uranium requirements at equilibrium ranging from zero to a quarter of those for the natural-uranium once-through cycle appear feasible. An ''inventory'' of uranium of between 1 and 2Mg/MW(e) is required for the transition to equilibrium. The cycles with the lowest uranium requirements compete with the others only at high uranium prices. Using thorium in light-water reactors, uranium requirements can be reduced by a factor of between two and three from the once-through uranium cycle. The light-water breeder reactor, promising zero uranium requirements at equilibrium, is being developed. Larger uranium inventories are required than for the HWRs. The lead time, from a decision to use thorium to significant impact on uranium utilization (compared to uranium cycle, recycling plutonium), is some two decades

  9. Fully integrated analysis of reactor kinetics, thermalhydraulics and the reactor control system in the MAPLE-X10 research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shim, S.Y.; Carlson, P.A.; Baxter, D.K.

    1992-01-01

    A prototype research reactor, designated MAPLE-X10 (Multipurpose Applied Physics Lattice Experimental - X 10MW), is currently being built at AECL's Chalk River Laboratories. The CATHENA (Canadian Algorithm for Thermalhydraulic Network Analysis) two-fluid code was used in the safety analysis of the reactor to determine the adequacy of core cooling during postulated reactivity and loss-of-forced-flow transients. The system responses to a postulated transient are predicted including the feedback between reactor kinetics, thermalhydrauilcs and the reactor control systems. This paper describes the MAPLE-X10 reactor and the modelling methodology used. Sample simulations of postulated loss-of-heat-sink and loss-of-regulation transients are presented. (author)

  10. Systems aspects of a space nuclear reactor power system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaffe, L.; Fujita, T.; Beatty, R.; Bhandari, P.; Chow, E.; Deininger, W.; Ewell, R.; Grossman, M.; Bloomfield, H.; Heller, J.

    1988-01-01

    Various system aspects of a 300-kW nuclear reactor power system for spacecraft have been investigated. Special attention is given to the cases of a reusable OTV and a space-based radar. It is demonstrated that the stowed length of the power system is important to mission design, and that orbital storage for months to years may be needed for missions involving orbital assembly.

  11. Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, Reactor Engineering Division annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-09-01

    Research activities in the Division of Reactor Engineering in fiscal 1980 are described. The work of the Division is closely related to development of multipurpose Very High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor and fusion reactor, and development of Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor carried out by Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation. Contents of the report are achievements in fields such as nuclear data and group constants, theoretical method and code development, integral experiment and analysis, shielding, reactor and nuclear instrumentation, reactor control and diagnosis, and fusion reactor technology, and activities of the Committee on Reactor Physics. (author)

  12. Auxiliary reactor for a hydrocarbon reforming system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clawson, Lawrence G.; Dorson, Matthew H.; Mitchell, William L.; Nowicki, Brian J.; Bentley, Jeffrey M.; Davis, Robert; Rumsey, Jennifer W.

    2006-01-17

    An auxiliary reactor for use with a reformer reactor having at least one reaction zone, and including a burner for burning fuel and creating a heated auxiliary reactor gas stream, and heat exchanger for transferring heat from auxiliary reactor gas stream and heat transfer medium, preferably two-phase water, to reformer reaction zone. Auxiliary reactor may include first cylindrical wall defining a chamber for burning fuel and creating a heated auxiliary reactor gas stream, the chamber having an inlet end, an outlet end, a second cylindrical wall surrounding first wall and a second annular chamber there between. The reactor being configured so heated auxiliary reactor gas flows out the outlet end and into and through second annular chamber and conduit which is disposed in second annular chamber, the conduit adapted to carry heat transfer medium and being connectable to reformer reaction zone for additional heat exchange.

  13. LIB fusion. Plasma system and reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niu, K.

    1985-01-01

    Twelve Marx generators, whose total stored energy is 21MJ and diode voltage is 9MV or 4.1MV, supply the energy to diodes to extract proton beams. The combination of two types of diodes are used. One type of diode has the outer radius of 32.3cm and the inner radius of 30cm insulated by the radial magnetic field and extracts the rotating ring beam whose energy is 0.80MJ, pulse width is 40ns, propagation energy is 4.1MeV, mean rotation energy is 3.3MeV and electric current along the propagation direction is 1.4MA. The other type of diodes is the ordinal one, from which the proton beam of 0.52MJ, 40ns, 4.1MeV and 2.5MA is extracted and fills the inner hollow part of the rotating ring beam. The argon gas filling the reactor cavity with the number density of 10 22 /m 3 neutralizes the charge of proton beam during lns, but does not neutralize the current of the beam because the mean Larmor radius of electron in the argon gas is shorter than the electron mean free path. The proton beam pinches to the radius of 5.5mm by the action of self-induced magnetic field in the azimuthal direction and its propagation is stablized by the action of self-induced magnetic field in the propagation direction. The cryogenic hollow shell target of 6mm radius consists of three layers of Pb, Al and DT fuel

  14. Electrical energy systems

    CERN Document Server

    El-Hawary, Mohamed E

    2007-01-01

    Features discussions ranging from the technical aspects of generation, transmission, distribution, and utilization to power system components, theory, protection, and the energy control center that offer an introduction to effects of deregulating electric power systems, blackouts and their causes, and minimizing their effects.

  15. Space nuclear reactors: energy gateway into the next millennium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Angelo, J.A. Jr.; Buden, D.

    1981-01-01

    Power - reliable, abundant and economic - is the key to man's conquest of the Solar System. Space activities of the next few decades will be highlighted by the creation of the extraterrestrial phase of human civilization. Nuclear power is needed both to propel massive quantities of materials through cislunar and eventually translunar space, and to power the sophisticated satellites, space platforms, and space stations of tomorrow. To meet these anticipated future space power needs, the Los Alamos National Laboratory is developing components for a compact, 100-kW(e) heat pipe nuclear reactor. The objectives of this program are to develop components for a space nuclear power plant capable of unattended operation for 7 to 10 years; having a reliability of greater than 0.95; and weighing less than 1910 kg. In addition, this heat pipe reactor is also compatible for launch by the US Space Transportation System

  16. Using Flow Electrodes in Multiple Reactors in Series for Continuous Energy Generation from Capacitive Mixing

    KAUST Repository

    Hatzell, Marta C.

    2014-12-09

    Efficient conversion of “mixing energy” to electricity through capacitive mixing (CapMix) has been limited by low energy recoveries, low power densities, and noncontinuous energy production resulting from intermittent charging and discharging cycles. We show here that a CapMix system based on a four-reactor process with flow electrodes can generate constant and continuous energy, providing a more flexible platform for harvesting mixing energy. The power densities were dependent on the flow-electrode carbon loading, with 5.8 ± 0.2 mW m–2 continuously produced in the charging reactor and 3.3 ± 0.4 mW m–2 produced in the discharging reactor (9.2 ± 0.6 mW m–2 for the whole system) when the flow-electrode carbon loading was 15%. Additionally, when the flow-electrode electrolyte ion concentration increased from 10 to 20 g L–1, the total power density of the whole system (charging and discharging) increased to 50.9 ± 2.5 mW m–2.

  17. The Smart Energy System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jurowetzki, Roman; Dyrelund, Anders; Hummelmose, Lars

    Copenhagen Cleantech Cluster has launched a new report, which provides an overview of Danish competencies relating to smart energy systems. The report, which is based on a questionnaire answered by almost 200 companies working with smart energy as well as a number of expert interviews, focuses on...... production, large scale solar heat, fuel cells, heat storage, waste incineration, among others, the report draws a picture of Denmark as a research and development hub for smart energy system solutions.......Copenhagen Cleantech Cluster has launched a new report, which provides an overview of Danish competencies relating to smart energy systems. The report, which is based on a questionnaire answered by almost 200 companies working with smart energy as well as a number of expert interviews, focuses...... on the synergies which are obtained through integration of the district heating and district cooling, gas, and electricity grid into a single smart energy system. Besides documenting the technology and innovation strengths that Danish companies possess particularly relating to wind, district heating, CHP...

  18. Nuclear energy in Canada: the CANDU system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robertson, J.A.L.

    1979-10-01

    Nuclear electricity in Canada is generated by CANDU nuclear power stations. The CANDU reactor - a unique Canadian design - is fuelled by natural uranium and moderated by heavy water. The system has consistently outperformed other comparable nuclear power systems in the western world, and has an outstanding record of reliability, safety and economy. As a source of energy it provides the opportunity for decreasing our dependence on dwindling supplies of conventional fossil fuels. (auth)

  19. The failure diagnoses of nuclear reactor systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheng Huanxing.

    1986-01-01

    The earlier period failure diagnoses can raise the safety and efficiency of nuclear reactors. This paper first describes the process abnormality monitoring of core barrel vibration in PWR, inherent noise sources in BWR, sodium boiling in LMFBR and nuclear reactor stability. And then, describes the plant failure diagnoses of primary coolant pumps, loose parts in nuclear reactors, coolant leakage and relief valve location

  20. The digital reactor protection system for the instrumentation and control of reactor TRIGA PUSPATI (RTP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nurfarhana Ayuni Joha; Izhar Abu Hussin; Mohd Idris Taib; Zareen Khan Abdul Jalil Khan

    2010-01-01

    Reactor Protection System (RPS) is important for Reactor Instrumentation and Control System. The RPS comprises all redundant electrical devices and circuitry involved in the generation of those initiating signals associated to the trip protective function. The instrumentation system for the RPS provides automatic protection signals against unsafe and improper reactor operation. The physical separation is provided for all of the redundant instrumentation systems to preserve redundancy. The safety protection systems using circuits composed of analog instruments and relays with relay contacts is difficult to realize from various reasons. Therefore, an application of digital technology can be said a logical conclusion also in the light of its functional superiority. (author)

  1. Methane-steam reforming by molten salt - membrane reactor using concentrated solar thermal energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanuki, K.; Nakajima, H.; Hasegawa, N.; Kaneko, H.; Tamaura, Y.

    2006-01-01

    By utilization of concentrated solar thermal energy for steam reforming of natural gas, which is an endothermic reaction, the chemical energy of natural gas can be up-graded. The chemical system for steam reforming of natural gas with concentrated solar thermal energy was studied to produce hydrogen by using the thermal storage with molten salt and the membrane reactor. The original steam reforming module with hydrogen permeable palladium membrane was developed and fabricated. Steam reforming of methane proceeded with the original module with palladium membrane below the decomposition temperature of molten salt (around 870 K). (authors)

  2. Validation of the VTT's reactor physics code system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanskanen, A.

    1998-01-01

    At VTT Energy several international reactor physics codes and nuclear data libraries are used in a variety of applications. The codes and libraries are under constant development and every now and then new updated versions are released, which are taken in use as soon as they have been validated at VTT Energy. The primary aim of the validation is to ensure that the code works properly, and that it can be used correctly. Moreover, the applicability of the codes and libraries are studied in order to establish their advantages and weak points. The capability of generating program-specific nuclear data for different reactor physics codes starting from the same evaluated data is sometimes of great benefit. VTT Energy has acquired a nuclear data processing system based on the NJOY-94.105 and TRANSX-2.15 processing codes. The validity of the processing system has been demonstrated by generating pointwise (MCNP) and groupwise (ANISN) temperature-dependent cross section sets for the benchmark calculations of the Doppler coefficient of reactivity. At VTT Energy the KENO-VI three-dimensional Monte Carlo code is used in criticality safety analyses. The KENO-VI code and the 44GROUPNDF5 data library have been validated at VTT Energy against the ZR-6 and LR-0 critical experiments. Burnup Credit refers to the reduction in reactivity of burned nuclear fuel due to the change in composition during irradiation. VTT Energy has participated in the calculational VVER-440 burnup credit benchmark in order to validate criticality safety calculation tools. (orig.)

  3. Dynamic simulation platform to verify the performance of the reactor regulating system for a research reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2015-07-01

    Digital instrumentation and controls system technique is being introduced in new constructed research reactor or life extension of older research reactor. Digital systems are easy to change and optimize but the validated process for them is required. Also, to reduce project risk or cost, we have to make it sure that configuration and control functions is right before the commissioning phase on research reactor. For this purpose, simulators have been widely used in developing control systems in automotive and aerospace industries. In these literatures, however, very few of these can be found regarding test on the control system of research reactor with simulator. Therefore, this paper proposes a simulation platform to verify the performance of RRS (Reactor Regulating System) for research reactor. This simulation platform consists of the reactor simulation model and the interface module. This simulation platform is applied to I and C upgrade project of TRIGA reactor, and many problems of RRS configuration were found and solved. And it proved that the dynamic performance testing based on simulator enables significant time saving and improves economics and quality for RRS in the system test phase. (authors)

  4. System of Modelling and Calculation Analysis of Neutron- Physical Experiments at Fast Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moiseyev, A.V.

    2008-01-01

    There is an actual task on storage, processing and analysis of the unique experimental data received on power fast reactors for their subsequent use in projects of fast reactors of new (4.) generation. For modeling and carrying out analysis of experiments the integrated computing system MODEXSYS has been developed. In this system the mechanism for consecutive calculation of a fast reactor states with the detailed description of its components is created. The system includes the database describing fast reactor states, results of neutron-physical characteristics measurements at fast reactor, calculation and benchmark models of experiments and calculation results. In system convenient search means and the special graphics shell are provided. It has Interfaces for processing of calculation results and their analysis. MODEXSYS system has been applied for analysis of three types of experiments at fast reactor: k eff , control rod worth and energy release distribution. The most important results of this analysis are described. Application of MODEXSYS system will raise accuracy and reliability of forecasting of fast reactors neutron-physical characteristics; for BN-600 reactor recommended level of accuracy is resulted. (authors)

  5. System of Modelling and Calculation Analysis of Neutron- Physical Experiments at Fast Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moiseyev, A.V. [SSC RF - IPPE, 1 Bondarenko Square, Obninsk, Kaluga Region 249033 (Russian Federation)

    2008-07-01

    There is an actual task on storage, processing and analysis of the unique experimental data received on power fast reactors for their subsequent use in projects of fast reactors of new (4.) generation. For modeling and carrying out analysis of experiments the integrated computing system MODEXSYS has been developed. In this system the mechanism for consecutive calculation of a fast reactor states with the detailed description of its components is created. The system includes the database describing fast reactor states, results of neutron-physical characteristics measurements at fast reactor, calculation and benchmark models of experiments and calculation results. In system convenient search means and the special graphics shell are provided. It has Interfaces for processing of calculation results and their analysis. MODEXSYS system has been applied for analysis of three types of experiments at fast reactor: k{sub eff}, control rod worth and energy release distribution. The most important results of this analysis are described. Application of MODEXSYS system will raise accuracy and reliability of forecasting of fast reactors neutron-physical characteristics; for BN-600 reactor recommended level of accuracy is resulted. (authors)

  6. Proceedings of the nineteenth symposium of atomic energy research on WWER reactor physics and reactor safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vidovszky, I.

    2009-10-01

    The present volume contains 55 papers, presented on the nineteenth symposium of atomic energy research, held in Varna, Bulgaria, 21-25 September 2009. The papers are presented in their original form, i. e. no corrections or modifications were carried out. The content of this volume is divided into thematic groups: Fuel Management, Spectral and Core Calculations, Core Surveillance and Monitoring, CFD Analysis, Reactor Dynamics Thermal Hydraulics and Safety Analysis, Physical Problems of Spent Fuel Decommissioning and Radwaste, Actinide Transmutation and Spent Fuel Disposal, Core Operation, Experiments and Code Validation - according to the presentation sequence on the Symposium. (Author)

  7. Thermal energy and bootstrap current in fusion reactor plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becker, G.

    1993-01-01

    For DT fusion reactors with prescribed alpha particle heating power P α , plasma volume V and burn temperature i > ∼ 10 keV specific relations for the thermal energy content, bootstrap current, central plasma pressure and other quantities are derived. It is shown that imposing P α and V makes these relations independent of the magnitudes of the density and temperature, i.e. they only depend on P α , V and shape factors or profile parameters. For model density and temperature profiles analytic expressions for these shape factors and for the factor C bs in the bootstrap current formula I bs ∼ C bs (a/R) 1/2 β p I p are given. In the design of next-step devices and fusion reactors, the fusion power is a fixed quantity. Prescription of the alpha particle heating power and plasma volume results in specific relations which can be helpful for interpreting computer simulations and for the design of fusion reactors. (author) 5 refs

  8. Energy-analysis of the total nuclear energy cycle based on light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kistemaker, J.

    1975-01-01

    The energy economy of the total nuclear energy cycle is investigated. Attention is paid to the importance of fossil fuel saving by using nuclear energy. The energy analysis is based on the construction and operation of power plants with an electric output of 1000MWe. Light water moderated reactors with a 2.7 - 3.2% enriched uranium core are considered. Additionally, the whole fuel cycle including ore winning and refining, enrichment and fuel element manufacturing and reprocessing has been taken into account. Neither radioactive waste storage problems nor safety problems related to the nuclear energy cycle and safeguarding have been dealt with, as exhaustive treatments can be found elswhere

  9. Understanding renewable energy systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quaschning, Volker

    2005-01-15

    Beginning with an overview of renewable energy sources including biomass, hydroelectricity, geothermal, tidal, wind and solar power, this book explores the fundamentals of different renewable energy systems. The main focus is on technologies with high development potential such as solar thermal systems, photovoltaics and wind power. This text not only describes technological aspects, but also deals consciously with problems of the energy industry. In this way, the topics are treated in a holistic manner, bringing together maths, engineering, climate studies and economics, and enabling readers to gain a broad understanding of renewable energy technologies and their potential. The book also contains a free CD-ROM resource, which includes a variety of specialist simulation software and detailed figures from the book. (Author)

  10. Performance analysis of Brayton cycle system for space power reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Zhi; Yang Xiaoyong; Zhao Gang; Wang Jie; Zhang Zuoyi

    2017-01-01

    The closed Brayton cycle system now is the potential choice as the power conversion system for High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactors because of its high energy conversion efficiency and compact configuration. The helium is the best working fluid for the system for its chemical stability and small neutron absorption cross section. However, the Helium has small mole mass and big specific volume, which would lead to larger pipes and heat exchanger. What's more, the big compressor enthalpy rise of helium would also lead to an unacceptably large number of compressor's stage. For space use, it's more important to satisfy the limit of the system's volume and mass, instead of the requirement of the system's thermal capacity. So Noble-Gas binary mixture of helium and xenon is presented as the working fluid for space Brayton cycle. This paper makes a mathematical model for space Brayton cycle system by Fortran language, then analyzes the binary mixture of helium and xenon's properties and effects on power conversion units of the space power reactor, which would be helpful to understand and design the space power reactor. The results show that xenon would lead to a worse system's thermodynamic property, the cycle's efficiency and specific power decrease as xenon's mole fraction increasing. On the other hand, proper amount of xenon would decrease the enthalpy changes in turbomachines, which would be good for turbomachines' design. Another optimization method – the specific power optimization is also proposed to make a comparison. (author)

  11. Nuclear calculation for employing medium enrichment in reactors of Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyasaka, Yasuhiko

    1979-01-01

    The fuel used for the research reactors of Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) is presently highly enriched uranium of 93%. However, the U.S. government (the supplier of fuel) is claiming to utilize low or medium enriched uranium from the viewpoint of resistivity to nuclear proliferation, and the availability of highly enriched uranium is becoming hard owing to the required procedure. This report is described on the results of nuclear calculation which is the basis of fuel design in the countermeasures to the reduction of enrichment. The basic conception in the reduction of enrichment is three-fold: to lower the latent potential of nuclear proliferation as far as possible, to hold the present reactor performance as far as possible, and to limit the reduction in the range which is not accompanied by the modification of reactor core construction and cooling system. This time, the increase of the density and thickness of fuel plates and the effect of enrichment change to 45% on reactivity and neutron flux were investigated. The fuel of UAl sub(x) - Al system was assumed, which was produced by powder metallurgical method. The results of investigations on JRR-2 and JMTR reactors revealed that 45% enriched fuel does not affect the performances much. However, deterioration of the performances is not neglegible if further reduction is needed. In future, the influence of the burn-up effect of fuel on the life of reactor cores must be investigated. (Wakatsuki, Y.)

  12. Strategies for plutonium recycle in a system of pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leaver, D.E.W.

    1976-01-01

    A methodology is developed to allow a utility fuel manager to determine economic strategies for recycling plutonium in a system of light water reactors. One possible plutonium recycle strategy would be self-generated recycle, in which plutonium discharged from a reactor is recycled back to that same reactor as soon as possible. Another possible strategy is to recycle all the plutonium discharged from several reactors into one reactor. Such a strategy might be advantageous if the reactor receiving the plutonium were of a type that utilized plutonium more effectively than other reactors in the system. There are several considerations which affect the economics of recycling a batch of plutonium to one reactor or cycle vs. another, or which would favor a special recycling strategy. Among these are cycle energy, length of time that plutonium is stored prior to recycle, and isotopes of the plutonium. The methodology developed is used to quantitatively illustrate the effect on recycle strategy of these parameters. The problem of choosing the plutonium recycle strategy which results in the minimum fuel cost is formulated as a mathematical programming problem. The objective function for this problem is the total discounted fuel cost for the reactor system over a specified planning period. The savings of an optimal recycle strategy over self-generated recycle would be typically one million dollars per year for a utility with several large PWRs

  13. Fuel assembly transfer and storage system for nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allain, Albert; Thomas, Claude.

    1981-01-01

    Transfer and storage system on a site comprising several reactors and at least one building housing the installations common to all these reactors. The system includes: transfer and storage modules for the fuel assemblies comprising a containment capable of containing several assemblies carried on a transport vehicle, a set of tracks for the modules between the reactors and the common installations, handling facilities associated with each reactor for moving the irradiated assemblies from the reactor to a transfer module placed in loading position on a track serving the reactor and conversely to move the new assemblies from the transfer module to the reactor, and at least one handling facility located in the common installation building for loading the modules with new assemblies [fr

  14. Two-particle correlations in reactor systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mika, J.

    1975-01-01

    A study is made of the relationship between the general transport equation and the correlation matrix equation, in reactor systems. How some of the results obtained so far for the generalized transport equation can be simply translated to the correlation matrix equation is indicated. In particular, the semigroup formalism developed for the generalized transport equation is used to prove the existence and uniqueness of solution to the correlation matrix equation. The generalized transport equation is rigorously formulated in a Hilbert space of square integrable functions. The semigroup formalism for that equation is introduced and the solution expressed in terms of the semigroup. The correlation matrix equation is then formulated. It is shown how the semigroup formalism developed for the generalized transport equation can be applied to the correlation matrix equation and used to prove the existence theorem. Some applications of the semigroup formalism are then indicated. Firstly, the simple one point model obtained from the general equations is introduced. Secondly, the well known phenomenon of the linear increase with time of the components of the correlation matrix in a critical reactor is analyzed. Finally, it is shown how the singular perturbation method developed recently for the generalized transport equation can be applied to the correlation matrix equation. (U.K.)

  15. Energy Multiplier Module (EM{sup 2}) - advanced small modular reactor for electricity generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bertch, T.; Schleicher, R.; Choi, H.; Rawls, J., E-mail: timothy.bertch@ga.com [General Atomics, San Diego, California (United States)

    2013-07-01

    In order to provide cost effective nuclear energy in other than large reactor, large grid applications, fission technology needs to make further advances. 'Convert and burn' fast reactors offer long life cores, improved fuel utilization, reduced waste and other benefits while achieving cost effective energy production in a smaller reactor. General Atomics' Energy Multiplier Module (EM{sup 2}), a helium-cooled compact fast reactor that augments its fissile fuel load with either depleted uranium (DU) or used nuclear fuel (UNF). The convert and burn in-situ provides 250 MWe with a 30 year core life. High temperature provides a simple, high efficiency direct cycle gas turbine which along with modular construction, fewer systems, road shipment and minimum on site construction support cost effectiveness. Additional advantages in fuel cycle, non-proliferation and siting flexibility and its ability to meet all safety requirements make for an attractive power source, especially in remote and small grid regions. (author)

  16. Aerosol core nuclear reactor for space-based high energy/power nuclear-pumped lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prelas, M.A.; Boody, F.P.; Zediker, M.S.

    1987-01-01

    An aerosol core reactor concept can overcome the efficiency and/or chemical activity problems of other fuel-reactant interface concepts. In the design of a laser using the nuclear energy for a photon-intermediate pumping scheme, several features of the aerosol core reactor concept are attractive. First, the photon-intermediate pumping concept coupled with photon concentration methods and the aerosol fuel can provide the high power densities required to drive high energy/power lasers efficiently (about 25 to 100 kW/cu cm). Secondly, the intermediate photons should have relatively large mean free paths in the aerosol fuel which will allow the concept to scale more favorably. Finally, the aerosol core reactor concept can use materials which should allow the system to operate at high temperatures. An excimer laser pumped by the photons created in the fluorescer driven by a self-critical aerosol core reactor would have reasonable dimensions (finite cylinder of height 245 cm and radius of 245 cm), reasonable laser energy (1 MJ in approximately a 1 millisecond pulse), and reasonable mass (21 kg uranium, 8280 kg moderator, 460 kg fluorescer, 450 kg laser medium, and 3233 kg reflector). 12 references

  17. GNES-R: Global nuclear energy simulator for reactors task 1: High-fidelity neutron transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clarno, K.; De Almeida, V.; D'Azevedo, E.; De Oliveira, C.; Hamilton, S.

    2006-01-01

    A multi-laboratory, multi-university collaboration has formed to advance the state-of-the-art in high-fidelity, coupled-physics simulation of nuclear energy systems. We are embarking on the first-phase in the development of a new suite of simulation tools dedicated to the advancement of nuclear science and engineering technologies. We seek to develop and demonstrate a new generation of multi-physics simulation tools that will explore the scientific phenomena of tightly coupled physics parameters within nuclear systems, support the design and licensing of advanced nuclear reactors, and provide benchmark quality solutions for code validation. In this paper, we have presented the general scope of the collaborative project and discuss the specific challenges of high-fidelity neutronics for nuclear reactor simulation and the inroads we have made along this path. The high-performance computing neutronics code system utilizes the latest version of SCALE to generate accurate, problem-dependent cross sections, which are used in NEWTRNX - a new 3-D, general-geometry, discrete-ordinates solver based on the Slice-Balance Approach. The Global Nuclear Energy Simulator for Reactors (GNES-R) team is embarking on a long-term simulation development project that encompasses multiple laboratories and universities for the expansion of high-fidelity coupled-physics simulation of nuclear energy systems. (authors)

  18. An approach to a self-consistent nuclear energy system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujii-e, Yoichi; Arie, Kazuo; Endo, Hiroshi

    1992-01-01

    A nuclear energy system should provide a stable supply of energy without endangering the environment or humans. If there is fear about exhausting world energy resources, accumulating radionuclides, and nuclear reactor safety, tension is created in human society. Nuclear energy systems of the future should be able to eliminate fear from people's minds. In other words, the whole system, including the nuclear fuel cycle, should be self-consistent. This is the ultimate goal of nuclear energy. If it can be realized, public acceptance of nuclear energy will increase significantly. In a self-consistent nuclear energy system, misunderstandings between experts on nuclear energy and the public should be minimized. The way to achieve this goal is to explain using simple logic. This paper proposes specific targets for self-consistent nuclear energy systems and shows that the fast breeder reactor (FBR) lies on the route to attaining the final goal

  19. Reactor power reduction system and method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruno, S.J.; Dunn, S.A.; Raber, M.

    1978-01-01

    A method of operating a nuclear power reactor is disclosed which enables an accelerated power reduction of the reactor without completely shutting the reactor down. The method includes monitoring the incidents which, upon their occurrence, would require an accelerated power reduction in order to maintain the reactor in a safe operation mode; calculating the power reduction required on the occurrence of such an incident; determining a control rod insertion sequence for the normal operation of the reactor, said sequence being chosen to optimize reactor power capability; selecting the number of control rods necessary to respond to the accelerated power reduction demand, said selection being made according to a priority determined by said control rod insertion sequence; and inserting said selected control rods into the reactor core. 11 claims, 13 figures

  20. Reactor protection system including engineered features actuation system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palmaers, W.

    1982-01-01

    The safety concept requires to ensure that - the reactor protection system - the active engineered safeguard - and the necessary auxiliary systems are so designed and interfaced in respect of design and mode of action that, in the event of single component failure reliable control of the consequences of accidents remains ensured at all times and that the availability of the power plant is not limited unnecessarily. In order to satisfy these requirements due, importance was attached to a consistent spacial separation of the mutually redundant subsystems of the active safety equipment. The design and layout of the reactor protection system, of the power supply (emergency power supply), and of the auxiliary systems important from the safety engineering point of view, are such that their subsystems also largely satisfy the requirements of independence and spacial separation. (orig./RW)