WorldWideScience

Sample records for reactivity measurement facility

  1. Measuring and monitoring KIPT Neutron Source Facility Reactivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cao, Yan [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Gohar, Yousry [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Zhong, Zhaopeng [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2015-08-01

    Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) of USA and Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology (KIPT) of Ukraine have been collaborating on developing and constructing a neutron source facility at Kharkov, Ukraine. The facility consists of an accelerator-driven subcritical system. The accelerator has a 100 kW electron beam using 100 MeV electrons. The subcritical assembly has keff less than 0.98. To ensure the safe operation of this neutron source facility, the reactivity of the subcritical core has to be accurately determined and continuously monitored. A technique which combines the area-ratio method and the flux-to-current ratio method is purposed to determine the reactivity of the KIPT subcritical assembly at various conditions. In particular, the area-ratio method can determine the absolute reactivity of the subcritical assembly in units of dollars by performing pulsed-neutron experiments. It provides reference reactivities for the flux-to-current ratio method to track and monitor the reactivity deviations from the reference state while the facility is at other operation modes. Monte Carlo simulations are performed to simulate both methods using the numerical model of the KIPT subcritical assembly. It is found that the reactivities obtained from both the area-ratio method and the flux-to-current ratio method are spatially dependent on the neutron detector locations and types. Numerical simulations also suggest optimal neutron detector locations to minimize the spatial effects in the flux-to-current ratio method. The spatial correction factors are calculated using Monte Carlo methods for both measuring methods at the selected neutron detector locations. Monte Carlo simulations are also performed to verify the accuracy of the flux-to-current ratio method in monitoring the reactivity swing during a fuel burnup cycle.

  2. Small Sample Reactivity Measurements in the RRR/SEG Facility: Reanalysis using TRIPOLI-4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hummel, Andrew [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Palmiotti, Guiseppe [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-08-01

    This work involved reanalyzing the RRR/SEG integral experiments performed at the Rossendorf facility in Germany throughout the 1970s and 80s. These small sample reactivity worth measurements were carried out using the pile oscillator technique for many different fission products, structural materials, and standards. The coupled fast-thermal system was designed such that the measurements would provide insight into elemental data, specifically the competing effects between neutron capture and scatter. Comparing the measured to calculated reactivity values can then provide adjustment criteria to ultimately improve nuclear data for fast reactor designs. Due to the extremely small reactivity effects measured (typically less than 1 pcm) and the specific heterogeneity of the core, the tool chosen for this analysis was TRIPOLI-4. This code allows for high fidelity 3-dimensional geometric modeling, and the most recent, unreleased version, is capable of exact perturbation theory.

  3. Aperture area measurement facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — NIST has established an absolute aperture area measurement facility for circular and near-circular apertures use in radiometric instruments. The facility consists of...

  4. Electronic Warfare Signature Measurement Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Electronic Warfare Signature Measurement Facility contains specialized mobile spectral, radiometric, and imaging measurement systems to characterize ultraviolet,...

  5. Electronic Warfare Signature Measurement Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Electronic Warfare Signature Measurement Facility contains specialized mobile spectral, radiometric, and imaging measurement systems to characterize ultraviolet,...

  6. Aircraft Horizontal Thrust Measurement Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — This facility is designed to support the DoD mission by providing unique air vehicle installed engine performance (thrust output) measurements. This system consists...

  7. Littoral Measurements Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — FUNCTION: Barny units measure ocean currents and sea surface heights on continental shelves and in ocean straits. SEPTR units are similar to Barnys but also record...

  8. First OH reactivity measurements in Harvard Forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herdlinger-Blatt, I. S.; Martin, S. T.; Hansel, A.; McKinney, K. A.

    2013-12-01

    The OH reactivity provides critical insight into the HOx budget under actual atmospheric conditions, and has implications for the production of ozone and the formation of secondary organic material. Previous studies have indicated that the OH reactivity measured at field sites often exceeds model estimations, but current experiments remain inconclusive about the origin of the discrepancy between the modeled and measured OH reactivity (Lou et al., 2010). As of now there are only a limited number of atmospheric studies of total OH reactivity available, so to improve understanding of the OH reactivity more studies are needed. The first OH reactivity measurements in the northeastern United States are being performed during the summer of 2013 at Harvard Forest. Harvard forest, is located about 100 km west of the Boston metropolitan area, is one of the most intensively studied forests in North America. The main biogenic VOC emitted from Harvard Forest is isoprene followed by monoterpenes and methanol. Sampling for the OH reactivity measurements will be conducted from a 30m tall meteorological tower at the Harvard Forest site. The air is drawn into a reaction cell where the OH reactivity is determined using the Comparative Reactivity Method (Sinha et al., 2008) employing a High-Sensitivity Proton Transfer Reaction Mass Spectrometer (Lindinger et al., 1998, Hansel et al., 1998). In addition to the OH reactivity measurements, the most abundant compounds present in the air sample will be quantified using PTR-MS. The quantification of these compounds is needed to compare the theoretical calculated OH reactivity with the measured OH reactivity data. The measurements will be used to evaluate our understanding of the OH budget at Harvard Forest. References: A. Hansel, A. Jordan, C. Warneke, R. Holzinger, and W. Lindinger.: Improved Detection Limit of the Proton-transfer Reaction Mass Spectrometer: On-line Monitoring of Volatile Organic Compounds at Mixing Ratios of a Few PPTV

  9. Stockbridge Antenna Measurement and Research Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Stockbridge Antenna Measurement Facility is located 23 miles southwest of AFRL¹s Rome Research Site. This unique measurement facility is designed to evaluate the...

  10. Statistical error analysis of reactivity measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thammaluckan, Sithisak; Hah, Chang Joo [KEPCO International Nuclear Graduate School, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-10-15

    After statistical analysis, it was confirmed that each group were sampled from same population. It is observed in Table 7 that the mean error decreases as core size increases. Application of bias factor obtained from this research reduces mean error further. The point kinetic model had been used to measure control rod worth without 3D spatial information of neutron flux or power distribution, which causes inaccurate result. Dynamic Control rod Reactivity Measurement (DCRM) was employed to take into account of 3D spatial information of flux in the point kinetics model. The measured bank worth probably contains some uncertainty such as methodology uncertainty and measurement uncertainty. Those uncertainties may varies with size of core and magnitude of reactivity. The goal of this research is to investigate the effect of core size and magnitude of control rod worth on the error of reactivity measurement using statistics.

  11. Temperature Measurements in the Magnetic Measurement Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolf, Zachary

    2010-12-13

    Several key LCLS undulator parameter values depend strongly on temperature primarily because of the permanent magnet material the undulators are constructed with. The undulators will be tuned to have specific parameter values in the Magnetic Measurement Facility (MMF). Consequently, it is necessary for the temperature of the MMF to remain fairly constant. Requirements on undulator temperature have been established. When in use, the undulator temperature will be in the range 20.0 {+-} 0.2 C. In the MMF, the undulator tuning will be done at 20.0 {+-} 0.1 C. For special studies, the MMF temperature set point can be changed to a value between 18 C and 23 C with stability of {+-}0.1 C. In order to ensure that the MMF temperature requirements are met, the MMF must have a system to measure temperatures. The accuracy of the MMF temperature measurement system must be better than the {+-}0.1 C undulator tuning temperature tolerance, and is taken to be {+-}0.01 C. The temperature measurement system for the MMF is under construction. It is similar to a prototype system we built two years ago in the Sector 10 alignment lab at SLAC. At that time, our goal was to measure the lab temperature to {+-}0.1 C. The system has worked well for two years and has maintained its accuracy. For the MMF system, we propose better sensors and a more extensive calibration program to achieve the factor of 10 increase in accuracy. In this note we describe the measurement system under construction. We motivate our choice of system components and give an overview of the system. Most of the software for the system has been written and will be discussed. We discuss error sources in temperature measurements and show how these errors have been dealt with. The calibration system is described in detail. All the LCLS undulators must be tuned in the Magnetic Measurement Facility at the same temperature to within {+-}0.1 C. In order to ensure this, we are building a system to measure the temperature of the

  12. Reactivity Measurement and Analysis System (RMAS-7)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cordero, D.; Izquierdo, J.

    2015-07-01

    This paper tries to describe the Reactivity Measurement and Analysis System 7 (RMAS-7), which is an Areva’s hardware and software solution capable of accomplishing the physic startup tests in a work shift. RMAS-7 is a modular solution designed to be a powerful, convenient data collection and analysis system based on Ethernet communication network. This last feature allows RMAS-7 to have a distributed architecture. (Author)

  13. Facility Measurement Uncertainty Analysis at NASA GRC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, Julia; Hubbard, Erin

    2016-01-01

    This presentation provides and overview of the measurement uncertainty analysis currently being implemented in various facilities at NASA GRC. This presentation includes examples pertinent to the turbine engine community (mass flow and fan efficiency calculation uncertainties.

  14. International Mapping of Antenna-Measurement Facilities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boccia, Luigi; Breinbjerg, Olav; Di Massa, Giuseppe

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents a comprehensive international mapping of antenna-measurement facilities. This initiative, conducted within the framework of the Antenna Centre of Excellence (ACE) of the European Union, is oriented toward all institutions having research, development, or operational activities...

  15. Reactivation of the Shock-Tunnel Facility at Fort Cronkhite. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1982-05-01

    This final report describes the results of work undertaken to reactivate the Shock Tunnel Facility at Battery Townsley, Fort Cronkhite, Marin County, California. The facility has been reactivated and can not be utilized for blast testing. The major emphasis will be testing of concepts pertaining to programs of interest to the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) and in particular to civil defense oriented research. However, a wide variety of testing requirements can be accommodated. For example, past programs at the facility have included: tests of debris from trees subjected to blast for Bell Telephone Laboratories; tests of the response of aluminum hull panels to blast loading and of the response of a model surface effects ship for the Naval Ship Research and Development center, and tests of the response of a radome prototype to blast loading conducted for ANCOM (the radome manufacturer). The Shock Tunnel Facility is located in a former coastal defense 16-inch gun emplacement constructed by the US Army beginning in 1938. It was converted in 1967 to serve as a facility for full-scale testing of the loading and response of structural elements and civil defense equipment. It remained in operation until November 1976 when Battery Townsley was turned over to the National Park Service. Work under the present purchase order consisted of the following major tasks: (I) cleanup and secure the facility, (II) reactivate the shock tunnel, and (III) design permanent facility improvements. (WHK)

  16. Evaluation of reactivity monitoring techniques at the Yalina - Booster sub-critical facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becares Palacios, V.

    2014-07-01

    The management of long-lived radioactive wastes produced by nuclear reactors constitutes one of the main challenges of nuclear technology nowadays. A possible option for its management consists in the transmutation of long lived nuclides into shorter lived ones. Accelerator Driven Subcritical Systems (ADS) are one of the technologies in development to achieve this goal. An ADS consists in a subcritical nuclear reactor maintained in a steady state by an external neutron source driven by a particle accelerator. The interest of these systems lays on its capacity to be loaded with fuels having larger contents of minor actinides than conventional critical reactors, and in this way, increasing the transmutation rates of these elements, that are the main responsible of the long-term radiotoxicity of nuclear waste. One of the key points that have been identified for the operation of an industrial-scale ADS is the need of continuously monitoring the reactivity of the subcritical system during operation. For this reason, since the 1990s a number of experiments have been conducted in zero-power subcritical assemblies (MUSE, RACE, KUCA, Yalina, GUINEVERE/FREYA) in order to experimentally validate these techniques. In this context, the present thesis is concerned with the validation of reactivity monitoring techniques at the Yalina-Booster subcritical assembly. This assembly belongs to the Joint Institute for Power and Nuclear Research (JIPNR-Sosny) of the National Academy of Sciences of Belarus. Experiments concerning reactivity monitoring have been performed in this facility under the EUROTRANS project of the 6th EU Framework Program in year 2008 under the direction of CIEMAT. Two types of experiments have been carried out: experiments with a pulsed neutron source (PNS) and experiments with a continuous source with short interruptions (beam trips). For the case of the first ones, PNS experiments, two fundamental techniques exist to measure the reactivity, known as the prompt

  17. A comparison of goniophotometric measurement facilities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorseth, Anders; Lindén, Johannes; Dam-Hansen, Carsten

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we present the preliminary results of a comparison between widely different goniophotometric and goniospectroradiometric measurement facilities. The objective of the comparison is to increase consistency and clarify the capabilities among Danish test laboratories. The study will seek...... to find the degree of equivalence between the various facilities and methods. The collected data is compared by using a three-way variation of principal component analysis, which is well suited for modelling large sets of correlated data. This method drastically decreases the number of numerical values...... needed to represent the data. The model shows good agreement with data, while also highlighting the differences between the measurements. We conclude that the method could be useful for comparing large sets of goniophotometric data....

  18. A Comparison of Goniophotmetric Measurement Facilities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorseth, Anders; Lindén, Johannes; Dam-Hansen, Carsten

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we present the preliminary results of a comparison between widely different goniophotometric and goniospectroradiometric measurement facilities. The objective of the comparison is to increase consistency and clarify the capabilities among Danish test laboratories. The study will seek...... to find the degree of equivalence between the various facilities and methods. The collected data is compared by using a three-way variation of principal component analysis, which is well suited for modelling large sets of correlated data. This method drastically decreases the number of numerical values...... needed to represent the data. The model shows good agreement with data, while also highlighting the differences between the measurements. We conclude that the method could be useful for comparing large sets of goniophotometric data....

  19. Waste measurements at a plutonium facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wachter, J.R.

    1992-01-01

    Solid plutonium contaminated wastes are often highly heterogeneous, span a wide range of chemical compositions and matrix types, and are packaged in a variety of container sizes. NDA analysis of this waste depends on operator knowledge of these parameters so that proper segregation, instrument selection, quality assurance, and uncertainty estimation can take place. This report describes current waste measurement practices and uncertainty estimates at a US plutonium scrap recovery facility and presents a program for determining reproducibility and bias in NDA measurements. Following this, an operator's perspective on desirable NDA upgrades is offered.

  20. Directional reflectance characterization facility and measurement methodology

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGuckin, B. T.; Haner, D. A.; Menzies, R. T.; Esproles, C.; Brothers, A. M.

    1996-08-01

    A precision reflectance characterization facility, constructed specifically for the measurement of the bidirectional reflectance properties of Spectralon panels planned for use as in-flight calibrators on the NASA Multiangle Imaging Spectroradiometer (MISR) instrument is described. The incident linearly polarized radiation is provided at three laser wavelengths: 442, 632.8, and 859.9 nm. Each beam is collimated when incident on the Spectralon. The illuminated area of the panel is viewed with a silicon photodetector that revolves around the panel (360 ) on a 30-cm boom extending from a common rotational axis. The reflected radiance detector signal is ratioed with the signal from a reference detector to minimize the effect of amplitude instabilities in the laser sources. This and other measures adopted to reduce noise have resulted in a bidirectional reflection function (BRF) calibration facility with a measurement precision with regard to a BRF measurement of 0.002 at the 1 confidence level. The Spectralon test piece panel is held in a computer-controlled three-axis rotational assembly capable of a full 360 rotation in the horizontal plane and 90 in the vertical. The angular positioning system has repeatability and resolution of 0.001 . Design details and an outline of the measurement methodology are presented.

  1. Measuring Memory Reactivation With Functional MRI: Implications for Psychological Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Benjamin J; Wagner, Anthony D

    2013-01-01

    Environmental cues often remind us of earlier experiences by triggering the reactivation of memories of events past. Recent evidence suggests that memory reactivation can be observed using functional MRI and that distributed pattern analyses can even provide evidence of reactivation on individual trials. The ability to measure memory reactivation offers unique and powerful leverage on theoretical issues of long-standing interest in cognitive psychology, providing a means to address questions that have proven difficult to answer with behavioral data alone. In this article, we consider three instances. First, reactivation measures can indicate whether memory-based inferences (i.e., generalization) arise through the encoding of integrated cross-event representations or through the flexible expression of separable event memories. Second, online measures of memory reactivation may inform theories of forgetting by providing information about when competing memories are reactivated during competitive retrieval situations. Finally, neural reactivation may provide a window onto the role of replay in memory consolidation. The ability to track memory reactivation, including at the individual trial level, provides unique leverage that is not afforded by behavioral measures and thus promises to shed light on such varied topics as generalization, integration, forgetting, and consolidation.

  2. New luminescence measurement facilities in retrospective dosimetry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lapp, Torben; Jain, Mayank; Thomsen, Kristina Jørkov

    2012-01-01

    thermoelectrically cooled NIR sensitive PMT (detection window peak at 855 nm, FWHM 27 nm). Software and electronics have been modified to allow standard TL and OSL measurements in the same sequence as RL measurements. Together with a new bleaching source based on a high-power UV LED (395 nm; 700 mW/cm2......This paper gives a review of recent developments in luminescence measurement facilities on the Risø TL/OSL reader including radio-luminescence (RL), exo-electron and violet stimulation attachments, and a method for characterising and if necessary correcting for beta irradiation source non......-uniformity.We first describe improvements to the existing RL option to allow near infra-red detection (NIR) during irradiation by the built-in 90Sr/90Y beta source. The RL optical signal is collected by a liquid light guide through an F34-901 interference filter and detection is based on a dedicated...

  3. Developments in radiation, stimulation and observation facilities in luminescence measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøtter-Jensen, L.; Andersen, C.E.; Duller, G.A.T.;

    2003-01-01

    This paper summarises recent developments in the Riscircle divide TL/OSL reader. These new developments include an elevated temperature irradiation facility that has been expanded to measure variable temperature radioluminescence (RL) during beta irradiation. This RL facility allows the measurement...... facilities, and illustrates their applications with representative measurements. (C) 2003 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved....

  4. Measurements of reactive gaseous rocket injector admittances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janardan, B. A.; Daniel, B. R.; Bell, W. A.; Zinn, B. T.

    1979-01-01

    The paper describes the results of an experimental study of the quantitative determination of the capabilities of the combustion processes associated with coaxial gaseous propellant rocket injectors to drive combustor pressure oscillations. The data, obtained by employing the modified impedance tube technique with compressed air as the oxidizer and acetylene gas as the fuel, describe the frequency dependence of the admittance of the combined injector-combustion process. The measured data are compared with the predictions of the Feiler and Heidmann analytical model utilizing different values for the characteristic combustion time tau sub b. The values of tau sub b which result in a best fit between the measured and predicted data are indicated for different equivalence ratios. It is shown that for the coaxial injector investigated in this study the tau sub b varies between 0.7 and 1.2 msec for equivalence ratios in the range of 0.57 to 1.31. In addition, the experimental data indicate that the tested injector system could drive combustion instabilities over a frequency range that is in qualitative agreement with the predictions of the Feiler and Heidmann model.

  5. The Comparative Reactivity Method ─ a new tool to measure total OH Reactivity in ambient air

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Lelieveld

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Hydroxyl (OH radicals play a vital role in maintaining the oxidizing capacity of the atmosphere. To understand variations in OH radicals both source and sink terms must be understood. Currently the overall sink term, or the total atmospheric reactivity to OH, is poorly constrained. Here, we present a new on-line method to directly measure the total OH reactivity (i.e.~total loss rate of OH radicals in a sampled air mass. In this method, a reactive molecule (X, not normally present in air, is passed through a glass reactor and its concentration is monitored with a suitable detector. OH radicals are then introduced in the glass reactor at a constant rate to react with X, first in the presence of zero air and then in the presence of ambient air containing VOCs and other OH reactive species. Comparing the amount of X exiting the reactor with and without the ambient air allows the air reactivity to be determined. In our existing set up, X is pyrrole and the detector used is a proton transfer reaction mass spectrometer. The present dynamic range for ambient air reactivity is about 6 to 300 s−1, with an overall maximum uncertainty of 25% above 8 s−1 and up to 50% between 6–8 s−1. The system has been tested and calibrated with different single and mixed hydrocarbon standards showing excellent linearity and accountability with the reactivity of the standards. Potential interferences such as high NO in ambient air, varying relative humidity and photolysis of pyrrole within the setup have also been investigated. While interferences due changing humidity and photolysis of pyrrole are easily overcome by ensuring that humidity in the set up does not change drastically and the photolytic loss of pyrrole is measured and taken into account, respectively, NO>10 ppb in ambient air remains a significant interference for the current configuration of the instrument. Field tests in the tropical rainforest of Suriname (~53 s and the urban atmosphere of Mainz

  6. Fluxes of chemically reactive species inferred from mean concentration measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Galmarini, S.; Vilà-Guerau De Arellano, J.; Duyzer, J.H.

    1997-01-01

    A method is presented for the calculation of the fluxes of chemically reactive species on the basis of routine measurements of meteorological variables and chemical species. The method takes explicity into account the influence of chemical reactions on the fluxes of the species. As a demonstration o

  7. Measuring Satisfaction with Student Housing Facilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nurul U.M. Najib

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: In the past decade, resident satisfaction has been used as an important indicator in evaluating student housing quality and services. This study investigates the level of resident satisfaction with student housing facilities. In particular, it examines the level of student satisfaction with living accommodations at one of the leading universities in Malaysia. Approach: The residential satisfaction framework was based on post-occupancy evaluations and has been utilized in previous studies; we expand the framework to address physical and social variables. Face-to-face surveys were conducted with participants who were selected using a cluster sampling technique. Results: The results show a mean satisfaction level of 2.61, which indicates that students are generally satisfied with student housing facilities. This score was lower, however, than the results of previous studies. Conclusion: By assessing residential satisfaction among students, we hope to provide valuable feedback to housing administrators and facility managers of higher learning institutions, thus enabling them to improve their services and offer better housing facilities in the near future.

  8. On reactive oxygen species measurement in living systems

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Studies devoted to the detection and measurement of free radicals in biological systems generally generated accepted methods of reactive oxygen species (ROS) level analysis. When out of control, ROS induces tissue damage, chronic inflammatory processes and cellular functional disturbances. Aerobic organisms have adapted to defense against ROS aggression by developing potent antioxidant mechanisms. Recent advances in ROS measurement methodology allow the study of ROS biology at a previously un...

  9. The Mothball, Sustainment, and Proposed Reactivation of the Hypersonic Tunnel Facility (HTF) at NASA Glenn Research Center Plum Brook Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Scott R.; Lee, Jinho; Stephens, John W.; Hostler, Robert W., Jr.; VonKamp, William D.

    2010-01-01

    The Hypersonic Tunnel Facility (HTF) located at the NASA Glenn Research Center s Plum Brook Station in Sandusky, Ohio, is the nation s only large-scale, non-vitiated, hypersonic propulsion test facility. The HTF, with its 4-story graphite induction heater, is capable of duplicating Mach 5, 6, and 7 flight conditions. This unique propulsion system test facility has experienced several standby and reactivation cycles. The intent of the paper is to overview the HTF capabilities to the propulsion community, present the current status of HTF, and share the lessons learned from putting a large-scale facility into mothball status for a later restart

  10. Reactivity worth measurements with Caliban and Silene experimental reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casoli, P.; Authier, N. [CEA Valduc, 21 - Is-sur-Tille (France)

    2008-07-01

    Reactivity worth measurements of material samples put in the central cavities of nuclear reactors allow to test cross section nuclear databases or to extract information about the critical masses of fissile elements. Such experiments have already been completed on the CALIBAN and SILENE experimental reactors operated by the Criticality and Neutronics Research Laboratory of Valduc (Cea, France), using the perturbation measurement technique. Feasibility studies have been performed to prepare future experiments on new materials (beryllium, copper, tantalum, {sup 237}Np) and results show that the obtained values for most materials are clearly above the measurement limits and then the perturbation technique can be used even with smaller size samples.

  11. The Global Atmosphere Watch reactive gases measurement network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin G. Schultz

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Long-term observations of reactive gases in the troposphere are important for understanding trace gas cycles and the oxidation capacity of the atmosphere, assessing impacts of emission changes, verifying numerical model simulations, and quantifying the interactions between short-lived compounds and climate change. The World Meteorological Organization’s (WMO Global Atmosphere Watch (GAW program coordinates a global network of surface stations some of which have measured reactive gases for more than 40 years. Gas species included under this umbrella are ozone, carbon monoxide, nitrogen oxides, and volatile organic compounds (VOCs. There are many challenges involved in setting-up and maintaining such a network over many decades and to ensure that data are of high quality, regularly updated and made easily accessible to users. This overview describes the GAW surface station network of reactive gases, its unique quality management framework, and discusses the data that are available from the central archive. Highlights of data use from the published literature are reviewed, and a brief outlook into the future of GAW is given. This manuscript constitutes the overview of a special feature on GAW reactive gases observations with individual papers reporting on research and data analysis of particular substances being covered by the program.

  12. Measurements and models of reactive transport in geological media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berkowitz, Brian; Dror, Ishai; Hansen, Scott K.; Scher, Harvey

    2016-12-01

    Reactive chemical transport plays a key role in geological media across scales, from pore scale to aquifer scale. Systems can be altered by changes in solution chemistry and a wide variety of chemical transformations, including precipitation/dissolution reactions that cause feedbacks that directly affect the flow and transport regime. The combination of these processes with advective-dispersive-diffusive transport in heterogeneous media leads to a rich spectrum of complex dynamics. The principal challenge in modeling reactive transport is to account for the subtle effects of fluctuations in the flow field and species concentrations; spatial or temporal averaging generally suppresses these effects. Moreover, it is critical to ground model conceptualizations and test model outputs against laboratory experiments and field measurements. This review emphasizes the integration of these aspects, considering carefully designed and controlled experiments at both laboratory and field scales, in the context of development and solution of reactive transport models based on continuum-scale and particle tracking approaches. We first discuss laboratory experiments and field measurements that define the scope of the phenomena and provide data for model comparison. We continue by surveying models involving advection-dispersion-reaction equation and continuous time random walk formulations. The integration of measurements and models is then examined, considering a series of case studies in different frameworks. We delineate the underlying assumptions, and strengths and weaknesses, of these analyses, and the role of probabilistic effects. We also show the key importance of quantifying the spreading and mixing of reactive species, recognizing the role of small-scale physical and chemical fluctuations that control the initiation of reactions.

  13. Description and Results: Antenna Measurement Facility Comparisons [Measurements Corner

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alberica Saporetti, Maria; Foged, Lars; Sierra Castañer, Manuel

    2017-01-01

    In recent years, formalized facility comparison activities have become important for the documentation and validation of laboratory proficiency and competence and mandatory for achieving accreditation such as that of the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) 17025 or similar...

  14. Developments in radiation, stimulation and observation facilities in luminescence measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boetter-Jensen, L. E-mail: lars.boetter@risoe.dk; Andersen, C.E.; Duller, G.A.T.; Murray, A.S

    2003-10-01

    This paper summarises recent developments in the Risoe TL/OSL reader. These new developments include an elevated temperature irradiation facility that has been expanded to measure variable temperature radioluminescence (RL) during beta irradiation. This RL facility allows the measurement of TL, OSL and RL in the same software-controlled automatic sequence. To provide an alternative to the {sup 90}Sr beta source, the performance of a software-controlled mini X-ray generator has been investigated. This has the advantage of providing a range of dose rates spanning more than three orders of magnitude up to more than 2 Gy/s. A separate bleaching facility has also been added to the reader, new powerful infrared (IR) light-emitting diodes have replaced the IR laser diode in the general OSL unit, and an IR laser has been included in the single-grain OSL attachment. This paper describes these new facilities, and illustrates their applications with representative measurements.

  15. Development and Investigation of Reactivity Measurement Methods in Subcritical Cores

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wright, Johanna

    2005-05-01

    Subcriticality measurements during core loading and in future accelerator driven systems have a clear safety relevance. In this thesis two subcriticality methods are treated: the Feynman-alpha and the source modulation method. The Feynman-alpha method is a technique to determine the reactivity from the relative variance of the detector counts during a measurement period. The period length is varied to get the full time dependence of the variance-to-mean. The corresponding theoretical formula was known only with stationary sources. In this thesis, due to its relevance for novel reactivity measurement methods, the Feynman-alpha formulae for pulsed sources for both the stochastic and the deterministic cases are treated. Formulae neglecting as well as including the delayed neutrons are derived. The formulae neglecting delayed neutrons are experimentally verified with quite good agreement. The second reactivity measurement technique investigated in this thesis is the so-called source modulation technique. The theory of the method was elaborated on the assumption of point kinetics, but in practice the method will be applied by using the signal from a single local neutron detector. Applicability of the method therefore assumes point kinetic behaviour of the core. Hence, first the conditions of the point kinetic behaviour of subcritical cores was investigated. After that the performance of the source modulation technique in the general case as well as and in the limit of exact point kinetic behaviour was examined. We obtained the unexpected result that the method has a finite, non-negligible error even in the limit of point kinetic behaviour, and a substantial error in the operation range of future accelerator driven subcritical reactors (ADS). In practice therefore the method needs to be calibrated by some other method for on-line applications.

  16. Spent fuel measurements. passive neutron albedo reactivity (PNAR) and photon signatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eigenbrodt, Julia [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Menlove, Howard Olsen [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-03-29

    The International Atomic Energy Agency’s (IAEA) safeguards technical objective is the timely detection of a diversion of a significant quantity of nuclear material from peaceful activities to the manufacture of nuclear weapons or of other nuclear explosive devices or for purposes unknown, and deterrence of such diversion by the risk of early detection. An important IAEA task towards meeting this objective is the ability to accurately and reliably measure spent nuclear fuel (SNF) to verify reactor operating parameters and verify that the fuel has not been removed from reactors or SNF storage facilities. This dissertation analyzes a method to improve the state-of-the-art of nuclear material safeguards measurements using two combined measurement techniques: passive neutron albedo reactivity (PNAR) and passive spectral photon measurements.

  17. Direct N2O5 reactivity measurements at a polluted coastal site

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. J. Gaston

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Direct measurements of N2O5 reactivity on ambient aerosol particles were made during September 2009 at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography (SIO Pier facility located in La Jolla, CA. N2O5 reactivity measurements were made using a custom flow reactor and the particle modulation technique alongside measurements of aerosol particle size distributions and non-refractory composition. The pseudo-first order rate coefficients derived from the particle modulation technique and the particle surface area concentrations were used to determine the population average N2O5 reaction probability, γ(N2O5, approximately every 50 min. Insufficient environmental controls within the instrumentation trailer led us to restrict our analysis primarily to nighttime measurements. Within this subset of data, γ(N2O5 ranged from γ(N2O5 are important, such as organic coatings or non-aqueous particles. The largest apparent driver of day-to-day variability in the measured γ(N2O5 at this site was the particle nitrate loading, as inferred from both the measured particle composition and the parameterizations. The relative change in measured γ(N2O5 as a function of particle nitrate loading appears to be consistent with expectations based on laboratory data, providing direct support for the atmospheric importance of the so-called "nitrate effect".

  18. Direct N2O5 reactivity measurements at a polluted coastal site

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. A. Prather

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Direct measurements of N2O5 reactivity on ambient aerosol particles were made during September 2009 at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography (SIO Pier facility located in La Jolla, CA. N2O5 reactivity measurements were made using a custom flow reactor and the particle modulation technique alongside measurements of aerosol particle size distributions and non-refractory composition. The pseudo-first order rate coefficients derived from the particle modulation technique and the particle surface area concentrations were used to determine the population average N2O5 reaction probability, γ(N2O5, approximately every 50 min. Insufficient environmental controls within the instrumentation trailer led us to restrict our analysis primarily to nighttime measurements. Within this subset of data, γ(N2O5 ranged from 2O5 are important, such as organic coatings or non-aqueous particles. The largest apparent driver of day-to-day variability in the measured γ(N2O5 at this site was the particle nitrate loading, as inferred from both the measured particle composition and the parameterizations. The relative change in measured γ(N2O5 as a function of particle nitrate loading appears to be consistent with expectations based on laboratory data, providing direct support for the atmospheric importance of the so-called "nitrate effect".

  19. Skin test reactivity among Danish children measured 15 years apart

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, SF; Ulrik, Charlotte Suppli; Porsbjerg, C

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Knowledge of secular trends in the prevalence of allergy among children stems in large part from questionnaire surveys, whereas repeated cross-sectional studies using objective markers of atopic sensitization are sparse. OBJECTIVES: To investigate whether the prevalence of skin prick...... (n = 527) and the second in 2001 (n = 480). Skin test reactivity to nine common aeroallergens was measured at both occasions. RESULTS: The prevalence of positive SPT to at least one allergen decreased from 24.1% in 1986 to 18.9% in 2001, (p = 0.05). We found a declining prevalence of sensitization...

  20. Quality assessment in nursing home facilities: measuring customer satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mostyn, M M; Race, K E; Seibert, J H; Johnson, M

    2000-01-01

    A national study designed to assess the reliability and validity of a nursing home customer satisfaction survey is summarized. One hundred fifty-nine facilities participated, each responsible for the distribution and collection of 200 questionnaires randomly sent to the home of the resident's responsible party. A total of 9053 completed questionnaires were returned, for an average adjusted response rate of 53%. The factor analysis identified 4 scales: Comfort and Cleanliness, Nursing, Food Services, and Facility Care and Services, each with high reliability. Based on a multiple regression analysis, the scales were shown to have good criterion-related validity, accounting for 64% of the variance in overall quality ratings. Comparisons based on select characteristics indicated significantly different satisfaction ratings among facilities. The results are interpreted as providing evidence for the construct validity of a multidimensional customer satisfaction scale with measured reliability and criterion-related validity. Moreover, the scale can be used to differentiate satisfaction levels among facilities.

  1. Measurement of Outflow Facility Using iPerfusion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph M Sherwood

    Full Text Available Elevated intraocular pressure (IOP is the predominant risk factor for glaucoma, and reducing IOP is the only successful strategy to prevent further glaucomatous vision loss. IOP is determined by the balance between the rates of aqueous humour secretion and outflow, and a pathological reduction in the hydraulic conductance of outflow, known as outflow facility, is responsible for IOP elevation in glaucoma. Mouse models are often used to investigate the mechanisms controlling outflow facility, but the diminutive size of the mouse eye makes measurement of outflow technically challenging. In this study, we present a new approach to measure and analyse outflow facility using iPerfusion™, which incorporates an actuated pressure reservoir, thermal flow sensor, differential pressure measurement and an automated computerised interface. In enucleated eyes from C57BL/6J mice, the flow-pressure relationship is highly non-linear and is well represented by an empirical power law model that describes the pressure dependence of outflow facility. At zero pressure, the measured flow is indistinguishable from zero, confirming the absence of any significant pressure independent flow in enucleated eyes. Comparison with the commonly used 2-parameter linear outflow model reveals that inappropriate application of a linear fit to a non-linear flow-pressure relationship introduces considerable errors in the estimation of outflow facility and leads to the false impression of pressure-independent outflow. Data from a population of enucleated eyes from C57BL/6J mice show that outflow facility is best described by a lognormal distribution, with 6-fold variability between individuals, but with relatively tight correlation of facility between fellow eyes. iPerfusion represents a platform technology to accurately and robustly characterise the flow-pressure relationship in enucleated mouse eyes for the purpose of glaucoma research and with minor modifications, may be applied

  2. Radioactivity measurements for the ERMES project at the STELLA facility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gallese B.

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available STELLA (SubTErranean Low Level Assay is the ultra low background facility of the Gran Sasso National Laboratories (L.N.G.S. in Italy. It is mainly devoted to material screening and rare events physics due to its very low radioactive background. Nevertheless, also environmental samples are measured within the collaboration with the ERMES (Environmental Radioactivity Monitoring for Earth Sciences project. After a short description of the facility some on-going applications within the ERMES project will be briefly presented. The usefulness of doing environmental radioactivity measurements in a deep underground laboratory will be shortly discussed.

  3. Measurement and Research of Equivalent Temperature Coefficient of Reactivity for CARR

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI; Jian-long; LV; Zheng; HUA; Xiao; XIAO; Shi-gang; LIU; Tian-cai; RAN; Huai-chang

    2012-01-01

    <正>The reactor with a negative temperature coefficient of reactivity has inner stability, which is a important symbol of inherent reactor safety. During the reactor start-up Commissioning Stage C for CARR, the measurement of equivalent temperature coefficient of reactivity is a important experiment by the way of measuring the reactivity change resulting of the equivalent temperature variation in the reactor core.

  4. Skin test reactivity among Danish children measured 15 years apart

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, SF; Ulrik, Charlotte Suppli; Porsbjerg, C;

    2006-01-01

    test (SPT) positivity in Danish children has changed from 1986 to 2001. METHODS: Serial cross-sectional studies of two different random population samples of children aged 7 to 17 years of age, living in urban Copenhagen, Denmark, were performed 15 years apart. The first cohort was investigated in 1986...... (n = 527) and the second in 2001 (n = 480). Skin test reactivity to nine common aeroallergens was measured at both occasions. RESULTS: The prevalence of positive SPT to at least one allergen decreased from 24.1% in 1986 to 18.9% in 2001, (p = 0.05). We found a declining prevalence of sensitization...... to most allergens tested, statistically significant; however, only for mugwort and Alternaria iridis. Among subjects, who were sensitized to only one allergen, we found significantly fewer individuals with reactions to D. pteronyssinus and mugwort. CONCLUSIONS: The prevalence of atopic sensitization...

  5. Skin test reactivity among Danish children measured 15 years apart

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, SF; Ulrik, Charlotte Suppli; Porsbjerg, C

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Knowledge of secular trends in the prevalence of allergy among children stems in large part from questionnaire surveys, whereas repeated cross-sectional studies using objective markers of atopic sensitization are sparse. OBJECTIVES: To investigate whether the prevalence of skin prick...... (n = 527) and the second in 2001 (n = 480). Skin test reactivity to nine common aeroallergens was measured at both occasions. RESULTS: The prevalence of positive SPT to at least one allergen decreased from 24.1% in 1986 to 18.9% in 2001, (p = 0.05). We found a declining prevalence of sensitization...... to most allergens tested, statistically significant; however, only for mugwort and Alternaria iridis. Among subjects, who were sensitized to only one allergen, we found significantly fewer individuals with reactions to D. pteronyssinus and mugwort. CONCLUSIONS: The prevalence of atopic sensitization...

  6. Recent integral cross section validation measurements at the ASP facility

    CERN Document Server

    Packer, L W; Gilbert, M; Lilley, S; Pampin, R

    2013-01-01

    This work presents new integral data measured at the ASP 14 MeV neutron irradiation facility at Aldermaston in the UK, which has recently become available for fusion-related work through the CCFE materials programme. Measurements of reaction products from activation experiments using elemental foils were carried out using gamma spectrometry in a high efficiency, high-purity germanium (HPGe) detector and associated digital signal processing hardware. Following irradiation and rapid extraction to the measurement cell, gamma emissions were acquired with both energy and time bins. Integral cross section and half-life data have been derived from these measurements. Selected integral cross section values are presented from the measurement campaigns.

  7. Measurement of photoneutron spectrum at Pohang Neutron Facility

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, G N; Lee, Y S; Skoy, V; Cho, M H; Ko, I S; Namkung, W; Lee, D W; Kim, H D; Ko, S K; Park, S H; Kim, D S; Ro, T I; Min, Y G

    2002-01-01

    The Pohang Neutron Facility, an electron linear accelerator (linac) based pulsed neutron facility, was constructed for nuclear data production in Korea. It consists of an electron linac, a water-cooled Ta target with a water moderator, and a time-of-flight path with an 11 m length. The neutron energy spectra are measured for different water levels inside the moderator and compared with calculations by the Monte Carlo N-Particle transport code. The optimum size of the water moderator is determined based on these results.

  8. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility Management Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mather, James [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2016-04-01

    Mission and Vision Statements for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)’s Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility Mission The ARM Climate Research Facility, a DOE scientific user facility, provides the climate research community with strategically located in situ and remote-sensing observatories designed to improve the understanding and representation, in climate and earth system models, of clouds and aerosols as well as their interactions and coupling with the Earth’s surface. Vision To provide a detailed and accurate description of the Earth atmosphere in diverse climate regimes to resolve the uncertainties in climate and Earth system models toward the development of sustainable solutions for the nation's energy and environmental challenges.

  9. Differentiating challenge reactivity from psychomotor activity in studies of children's psychophysiology: considerations for theory and measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bush, Nicole R; Alkon, Abbey; Obradović, Jelena; Stamperdahl, Juliet; Boyce, W Thomas

    2011-09-01

    Current methods of assessing children's physiological "stress reactivity" may be confounded by psychomotor activity, biasing estimates of the relation between reactivity and health. We examined the joint and independent contributions of psychomotor activity and challenge reactivity during a protocol for 5- and 6-year-old children (N = 338). Measures of parasympathetic reactivity (respiratory sinus arrhythmia [RSA]) and sympathetic reactivity (preejection period [PEP]) were calculated for social, cognitive, sensory, and emotional challenge tasks. Reactivity was calculated relative to both resting and a paired comparison task that accounted for psychomotor activity effects during each challenge. Results indicated that comparison tasks themselves elicited RSA and PEP responses, and reactivity adjusted for psychomotor activity was incongruent with reactivity calculated using rest. Findings demonstrate the importance of accounting for confounding psychomotor activity effects on physiological reactivity.

  10. Advanced Measurement Devices for the Microgravity Electromagnetic Levitation Facility EML

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brillo, Jurgen; Fritze, Holger; Lohofer, Georg; Schulz, Michal; Stenzel, Christian

    2012-01-01

    This paper reports on two advanced measurement devices for the microgravity electromagnetic levitation facility (EML), which is currently under construction for the use onboard the "International Space Station (ISS)": the "Sample Coupling Electronics (SCE)" and the "Oxygen Sensing and Control Unit (OSC)". The SCE measures by a contactless, inductive method the electrical resistivity and the diameter of a spherical levitated metallic droplet by evaluating the voltage and electrical current applied to the levitation coil. The necessity of the OSC comes from the insight that properties like surface tension or, eventually, viscosity cannot seriously be determined by the oscillating drop method in the EML facility without knowing the conditions of the surrounding atmosphere. In the following both measurement devices are explained and laboratory test results are presented.

  11. C-reactive Protein: Repeated Measurements will Improve Dialysis Patient Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobo, Gabriela; Qureshi, Abdul Rashid; Lindholm, Bengt; Stenvinkel, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Systemic inflammation is a common feature in the uremic phenotype and associates with poor outcomes. The awareness regarding the importance of inflammation assessment in chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients has risen in recent years, and despite the development of novel biomarkers, C-reactive protein (CRP) is still the most measured inflammatory parameter. Notwithstanding, the possible weak points of CRP determination, this biomarker has demonstrated being useful both for guidance in clinical practice and for risk estimation. In addition, regular determination of CRP among dialysis patients has been associated with better outcomes in different dialysis facilities. Because persistent inflammation may be a silent reflection of various pathophysiologic alterations in CKD, it is crucial that inflammatory markers are regularly monitored and therapeutic attempts be made to target this inflammation.

  12. Measurement Capabilities of the DOE ARM Aerial Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid, B.; Tomlinson, J. M.; Hubbe, J.; Comstock, J. M.; Kluzek, C. D.; Chand, D.; Pekour, M. S.

    2012-12-01

    The Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program is a climate research user facility operating stationary ground sites in three important climatic regimes that provide long-term measurements of climate relevant properties. ARM also operates mobile ground- and ship-based facilities to conduct shorter field campaigns (6-12 months) to investigate understudied climate regimes around the globe. Finally, airborne observations by ARM's Aerial Facility (AAF) enhance the surface-based ARM measurements by providing high-resolution in situ measurements for process understanding, retrieval algorithm development, and model evaluation that is not possible using ground-based techniques. AAF started out in 2007 as a "virtual hangar" with no dedicated aircraft and only a small number of instruments owned by ARM. In this mode, AAF successfully carried out several missions contracting with organizations and investigators who provided their research aircraft and instrumentation. In 2009, the Battelle owned G-1 aircraft was included in the ARM facility. The G-1 is a large twin turboprop aircraft, capable of measurements up to altitudes of 7.5 km and a range of 2,800 kilometers. Furthermore the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 provided funding for the procurement of seventeen new instruments to be used aboard the G-1 and other AAF virtual-hangar aircraft. AAF now executes missions in the virtual- and real-hangar mode producing freely available datasets for studying aerosol, cloud, and radiative processes in the atmosphere. AAF is also heavily engaged in the maturation and testing of newly developed airborne sensors to help foster the next generation of airborne instruments. In the presentation we will showcase science applications based on measurements from recent field campaigns such as CARES, CALWATER and TCAP.

  13. 'Reactive' nano-complex coated medical cotton: a facile avenue for tailored release of small molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rather, Adil Majeed; Mahato, Sulendar; Maji, Kousik; Gogoi, Neeha; Manna, Uttam

    2017-08-15

    Controlled and sustained release of drug-like small molecules in an aqueous medium still remains a challenging problem due to rapid infiltration of liquid water in most reported drug release systems. However, internal-superhydrophobicity with an antifouling property extending beyond the surface of a material recently has been recognized as a potential avenue for sustained and extended release of drug-like small molecules. Sluggish removal of metastable trapped air in a superhyrophobic material provides a basis to achieve extended release of encapsulated small molecules. In this article, naturally abundant medical-cotton-extensively used in wound management including control of bleeding, absorbance of secretions and protecting wounds from contamination-is strategically exploited in tailoring (from rapid to extended) the release of small molecules by appropriate modulation of liquid water wettability. Modulation included bio-mimicked adhesive and non-adhesive superhydrophobicity of the medical cotton without erosion of any polymeric material. In this process, amine 'reactive' nano-complexes (RNC) were prepared by just mixing branched poly(ethylenimine) (BPEI) with dipentaerythritol pentaacrylate (5Acl) in ethanol with appropriate compositions. Then they were covalently immobilized on fibrous medical-cotton through a facile and robust 1,4-conjugated addition reaction. Residual acrylate moieties in the immobilized RNC provide an opportunity to tailor water wettability through strategic and appropriate post-chemical modification of RNC-coated medical cotton with a primary amine containing various small molecules. This medical-cotton with tunable wettability was exploited further to control the release rate of small molecules from rapid (100 days) times. A volatile solvent induced transient and reversible switching of anti-fouling properties which allowed further varying the amount of post-loading small molecules into the medical cotton up to 2.36 wt% without

  14. Vibrational measurement for commissioning SRF Accelerator Test Facility at Fermilab

    CERN Document Server

    McGee, M W; Martinez, A; Pischalnikov, Y; Schappert, W

    2012-01-01

    The commissioning of two cryomodule components is underway at Fermilab's Superconducting Radio Frequency (SRF) Accelerator Test Facility. The research at this facility supports the next generation high intensity linear accelerators such as the International Linear Collider (ILC), a new high intensity injector (Project X) and other future machines. These components, Cryomodule #1 (CM1) and Capture Cavity II (CC2), which contain 1.3 GHz cavities are connected in series in the beamline and through cryogenic plumbing. Studies regarding characterization of ground motion, technical and cultural noise continue. Mechanical transfer functions between the foundation and critical beamline components have been measured and overall system displacement characterized. Baseline motion measurements given initial operation of cryogenic, vacuum systems and other utilities are considered.

  15. Vibrational measurement for commissioning SRF Accelerator Test Facility at Fermilab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGee, M.W.; Leibfritz, J.; Martinez, A.; Pischalnikov, Y.; Schappert, W.; /Fermilab

    2011-03-01

    The commissioning of two cryomodule components is underway at Fermilab's Superconducting Radio Frequency (SRF) Accelerator Test Facility. The research at this facility supports the next generation high intensity linear accelerators such as the International Linear Collider (ILC), a new high intensity injector (Project X) and other future machines. These components, Cryomodule No.1 (CM1) and Capture Cavity II (CC2), which contain 1.3 GHz cavities are connected in series in the beamline and through cryogenic plumbing. Studies regarding characterization of ground motion, technical and cultural noise continue. Mechanical transfer functions between the foundation and critical beamline components have been measured and overall system displacement characterized. Baseline motion measurements given initial operation of cryogenic, vacuum systems and other utilities are considered.

  16. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Facilities Newsletter - September 1999

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holdridge, D. J., ed

    1999-09-27

    The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program September 1999 Facilities Newsletter discusses the several Intensive Observation Periods (IOPs) that the ARM SGP CART site will host in the near future. Two projects of note are the International Pyrgeometer Intercomparison and the Fall Single Column Model (SCM)/Nocturnal Boundary Layer (NBL) IOP. Both projects will bring many US and international scientists to the SGP CART site to participate in atmospheric research.

  17. Improved clinical facility for in vivo nitrogen measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnan, S S; McNeill, K G; Mernagh, J R; Bayley, A J; Harrison, J E

    1990-04-01

    The design and construction of a hospital clinical facility for in vivo prompt gamma neutron activation analysis for total body nitrogen (TBN) measurement is described. The use of 252Cf neutron sources gives a better signal-to-background ratio compared with 238Pu-Be sources of equal strength, thus yielding better reproducibility of measurements. By measuring the hydrogen and nitrogen signals separately using appropriate gating circuits, signal-to-background ratio is further improved. Measurements using a urea phantom (5.63 kg nitrogen as urea in 34.53 kg of water) show that 2 x 6 micrograms 252Cf sources gives a nitrogen signal-to-background ratio of 5.6 (compared with 3.4 in the case of a 2 x 10 Ci 238Pu-Be source) and a reproducibility for nitrogen signal of +/- 1.1% (CV) and for hydrogen signal (internal standard) of +/- 2.33% (CV). Approximately 30 minutes of patient's time is required for each TBN measurement with an estimated reproducibility of +/- 3.8% (CV). The radiation dose to the patient is about 0.2 mSv (effective dose equivalent; QF = 10) per 20 min measurement. A report for the clinician is produced within a few minutes after the measurement by a dedicated IBM-PC computer. The entire facility is clean, comfortable and the electronics and computer processing are simple and economical.

  18. Summertime total OH reactivity measurements from boreal forest during HUMPPA-COPEC 2010

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. C. Nölscher

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Ambient total OH reactivity was measured at the Finnish boreal forest station SMEAR II in Hyytiälä (Latitude 61°51' N; Longitude 24°17' E in July and August 2010 using the Comparative Reactivity Method (CRM. The CRM – total OH reactivity method – is a direct, in-situ determination of the total loss rate of hydroxyl radicals (OH caused by all reactive species in air. During the intensive field campaign HUMPPA-COPEC 2010 (Hyytiälä United Measurements of Photochemistry and Particles in Air – Comprehensive Organic Precursor Emission and Concentration study the total OH reactivity was monitored both inside (18 m and directly above the forest canopy (24 m for the first time. The comparison between these two total OH reactivity measurements, absolute values and the temporal variation have been analyzed here. Stable boundary layer conditions during night and turbulent mixing in the daytime induced low and high short-term variability, respectively. The impact on total OH reactivity from biogenic emissions and associated photochemical products was measured under "normal" and "stressed" (i.e. prolonged high temperature conditions. The advection of biomass burning emissions to the site caused a marked change in the total OH reactivity vertical profile. By comparing the OH reactivity contribution from individually measured compounds and the directly measured total OH reactivity, the size of any unaccounted for or "missing" sink can be deduced for various atmospheric influences. For "normal" boreal conditions a missing OH reactivity of 58%, whereas for "stressed" boreal conditions a missing OH reactivity of 89% was determined. Various sources of not quantified OH reactive species are proposed as possible explanation for the high missing OH reactivity.

  19. Measurement and Analysis of Sodium Void Reactivity Effect in CEFR

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    The sodium void reactivity effect (SVRE) is one of the important parameters in the design and safety analysis of sodium-cooled fast reactors. In some serious accident conditions, for example the total instantaneous blockage (TIB) accident,

  20. Total OH reactivity measurements in Paris during the 2010 MEGAPOLI winter campaign

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Dolgorouky

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Hydroxyl radicals play a central role in the troposphere as they control the lifetime of many trace gases. Measurement of OH reactivity (OH loss rate is important to better constrain the OH budget and also to evaluate the completeness of measured VOC budget. Total atmospheric OH reactivity was measured for the first time in an European Megacity: Paris and its surrounding areas with 12 million inhabitants, during the MEGAPOLI winter campaign 2010. The method deployed was the Comparative Reactivity Method (CRM. The measured dataset contains both measured and calculated OH reactivity from CO, NOx and VOCs measured via PTR-MS, GC-FID and GC-MS instruments. The reactivities observed in Paris covered a range from 10 s−1 to 130 s−1, indicating a large loading of chemical reactants. The present study showed that, when clean marine air masses influenced Paris, the purely local OH reactivity (20 s−1 is well explained by the measured species. Nevertheless, when there is a continental import of air masses, high levels of OH reactivity were obtained (120–130 s−1 and the missing OH reactivity measured in this case jumped to 75%. Using covariations of the missing OH reactivity to secondary inorganic species in fine aerosols, we suggest that the missing OH reactants were most likely highly oxidized compounds issued from photochemically processed air masses of anthropogenic origin.

  1. Total OH reactivity measurements in Paris during the 2010 MEGAPOLI winter campaign

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Dolgorouky

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Hydroxyl radicals play a central role in the troposphere as they control the lifetime of many trace gases. Measurement of OH reactivity (OH loss rate is important to better constrain the OH budget and also to evaluate the completeness of measured VOC budget. Total atmospheric OH reactivity was measured for the first time in an European Megacity: Paris and its surrounding areas with 12 million inhabitants, during the MEGAPOLI winter campaign 2010. The method deployed was the Comparative Reactivity Method (CRM. The measured dataset contains both measured and calculated OH reactivity from CO, NOx and VOCs measured via PTR-MS, GC-FID and GC-MS instruments. The reactivities observed in Paris covered a range from 10 s−1 to 130 s−1, indicating a large loading of chemical reactants. The present study showed that, when clean marine air masses influenced Paris, the purely local OH reactivity (20 s−1 is well explained by the measured species. Nevertheless, when there is a continental import of air masses, high levels of OH reactivity were obtained (120–130 s−1 and the missing OH reactivity measured in this case jumped to 75%. Using covariations of the missing OH reactivity to secondary inorganic species in fine aerosols, we suggest that the missing OH reactants were most likely highly oxidized compounds issued from photochemically processed air masses of anthropogenic origin.

  2. Total OH reactivity measurements in Paris during the 2010 MEGAPOLI winter campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolgorouky, C.; Gros, V.; Sarda-Esteve, R.; Sinha, V.; Williams, J.; Marchand, N.; Sauvage, S.; Poulain, L.; Sciare, J.; Bonsang, B.

    2012-10-01

    Hydroxyl radicals play a central role in the troposphere as they control the lifetime of many trace gases. Measurement of OH reactivity (OH loss rate) is important to better constrain the OH budget and also to evaluate the completeness of measured VOC budget. Total atmospheric OH reactivity was measured for the first time in an European Megacity: Paris and its surrounding areas with 12 million inhabitants, during the MEGAPOLI winter campaign 2010. The method deployed was the Comparative Reactivity Method (CRM). The measured dataset contains both measured and calculated OH reactivity from CO, NOx and VOCs measured via PTR-MS, GC-FID and GC-MS instruments. The reactivities observed in Paris covered a range from 10 s-1 to 130 s-1, indicating a large loading of chemical reactants. The present study showed that, when clean marine air masses influenced Paris, the purely local OH reactivity (20 s-1) is well explained by the measured species. Nevertheless, when there is a continental import of air masses, high levels of OH reactivity were obtained (120-130 s-1) and the missing OH reactivity measured in this case jumped to 75%. Using covariations of the missing OH reactivity to secondary inorganic species in fine aerosols, we suggest that the missing OH reactants were most likely highly oxidized compounds issued from photochemically processed air masses of anthropogenic origin.

  3. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility Annual Report 2006

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LR Roeder

    2005-11-30

    This annual report describes the purpose and structure of the ARM Climate Research Facility and ARM Science programs and presents key accomplishments in 2006. Noteworthy scientific and infrastructure accomplishments in 2006 include: • Collaborating with the Australian Bureau of Meteorology to lead the Tropical Warm Pool-International Cloud Experiment, a major international field campaign held in Darwin, Australia • Successfully deploying the ARM Mobile Facility in Niger, Africa • Developing the new ARM Aerial Vehicles Program (AVP) to provide airborne measurements • Publishing a new finding on the impacts of aerosols on surface energy budget in polar latitudes • Mitigating a long-standing double-Intertropical Convergence Zone problem in climate models using ARM data and a new cumulus parameterization scheme.

  4. Facility for the (p, n) polarization transfer measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakai, H. [Tokyo Univ. (Japan). Dept. of Phys.; Okamura, H. [Tokyo Univ. (Japan). Dept. of Phys.; Otsu, H. [Tokyo Univ. (Japan). Dept. of Phys.; Wakasa, T. [Tokyo Univ. (Japan). Dept. of Phys.; Ishida, S. [Tokyo Univ. (Japan). Dept. of Phys.; Sakamoto, N. [Tokyo Univ. (Japan). Dept. of Phys.; Uesaka, T. [Tokyo Univ. (Japan). Dept. of Phys.; Satou, Y. [Tokyo Univ. (Japan). Dept. of Phys.; Fujita, S. [Tokyo Univ. (Japan). Dept. of Phys.; Hatanaka, K. [Research Center for Nuclear Physics, Osaka University, Mihogaoka, Ibaraki 567 (Japan)

    1996-01-21

    We have designed and constructed a facility to measure the complete polarization transfer coefficient D{sub ij} for the (p,n) reaction at intermediate energies. The facility consists of a beam swinger dipole magnet used for angular distribution measurements and a 100 m tunnel for the neutron energy measurement by the time-of-flight method. Typical neutron energy resolution is about 1.85 MeV for 290 MeV neutrons including a contribution of 1 MeV due to the target thickness. The background associated with this tunnel system was carefully investigated and found to be negligibly small. A dipole magnet for the neutron spin rotation is installed in the neutron flight path to measure the longitudinal polarization as well as the induced polarization. The neutron polarimeter which consists of 6 planes of the two-dimensional position-sensitive neutron detectors with a size of 1 m x 1 m x 0.1 m has been constructed. Its effective left-right analyzing power left angle A{sup eff}{sub y} right angle has been calibrated at 194, 290 and 384 MeV. The figure-of-merit value defined by left angle A{sup eff}{sub y} right angle {sup 2} x {epsilon}{sub DS} at 290 MeV is 4.05 x 10{sup -4}, where {epsilon}{sub DS} is the double scattering efficiency. (orig.).

  5. Noble Gas Measurement and Analysis Technique for Monitoring Reprocessing Facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Charlton, William S [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1999-09-01

    An environmental monitoring technique using analysis of stable noble gas isotopic ratios on-stack at a reprocessing facility was developed. This technique integrates existing technologies to strengthen safeguards at reprocessing facilities. The isotopic ratios are measured using a mass spectrometry system and are compared to a database of calculated isotopic ratios using a Bayesian data analysis method to determine specific fuel parameters (e.g., burnup, fuel type, fuel age, etc.). These inferred parameters can be used by investigators to verify operator declarations. A user-friendly software application (named NOVA) was developed for the application of this technique. NOVA included a Visual Basic user interface coupling a Bayesian data analysis procedure to a reactor physics database (calculated using the Monteburns 3.01 code system). The integrated system (mass spectrometry, reactor modeling, and data analysis) was validated using on-stack measurements during the reprocessing of target fuel from a U.S. production reactor and gas samples from the processing of EBR-II fast breeder reactor driver fuel. These measurements led to an inferred burnup that matched the declared burnup with sufficient accuracy and consistency for most safeguards applications. The NOVA code was also tested using numerous light water reactor measurements from the literature. NOVA was capable of accurately determining spent fuel type, burnup, and fuel age for these experimental results. Work should continue to demonstrate the robustness of this system for production, power, and research reactor fuels.

  6. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility (ACRF) Annual Report 2007

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LR Roeder

    2007-12-01

    This annual report describes the purpose and structure of the program, and presents key accomplishments in 2007. Notable achievements include: • Successful review of the ACRF as a user facility by the DOE Biological and Environmental Research Advisory Committee. The subcommittee reinforced the importance of the scientific impacts of this facility, and its value for the international research community. • Leadership of the Cloud Land Surface Interaction Campaign. This multi-agency, interdisciplinary field campaign involved enhanced surface instrumentation at the ACRF Southern Great Plains site and, in concert with the Cumulus Humilis Aerosol Processing Study sponsored by the DOE Atmospheric Science Program, coordination of nine aircraft through the ARM Aerial Vehicles Program. • Successful deployment of the ARM Mobile Facility in Germany, including hosting nearly a dozen guest instruments and drawing almost 5000 visitors to the site. • Key advancements in the representation of radiative transfer in weather forecast models from the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts. • Development of several new enhanced data sets, ranging from best estimate surface radiation measurements from multiple sensors at all ACRF sites to the extension of time-height cloud occurrence profiles to Niamey, Niger, Africa. • Publication of three research papers in a single issue (February 2007) of the Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society.

  7. Cosmic muon flux measurements at the Kimballton Underground Research Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalousis, L. N.; Guarnaccia, E.; Link, J. M.; Mariani, C.; Pelkey, R.

    2014-08-01

    In this article, the results from a series of muon flux measurements conducted at the Kimballton Underground Research Facility (KURF), Virginia, United States, are presented. The detector employed for these investigations, is made of plastic scintillator bars readout by wavelength shifting fibers and multianode photomultiplier tubes. Data was taken at several locations inside KURF, spanning rock overburden values from ~ 200 to 1450 m.w.e. From the extracted muon rates an empirical formula was devised, that estimates the muon flux inside the mine as a function of the overburden. The results are in good agreement with muon flux calculations based on analytical models and MUSIC.

  8. Cosmic Muon Flux Measurements at the Kimballton Underground Research Facility

    CERN Document Server

    Kalousis, L N; Link, J M; Mariani, C; Pelkey, R

    2014-01-01

    In this article, the results from a series of muon flux measurements conducted at the Kimballton Underground Research Facility (KURF), Virginia, United States, are presented. The detector employed for these investigations, is made of plastic scintillator bars readout by wavelength shifting fibers and multianode photomultiplier tubes. Data was taken at several locations inside KURF, spanning rock overburden values from ~ 200 to 1450 m.w.e. From the extracted muon rates an empirical formula was devised, that estimates the muon flux inside the mine as a function of the overburden. The results are in good agreement with muon flux calculations based on analytical models and MUSIC.

  9. Fuel Conditioning Facility Electrorefiner Model Predictions versus Measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D Vaden

    2007-10-01

    Electrometallurgical treatment of spent nuclear fuel is performed in the Fuel Conditioning Facility (FCF) at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) by electrochemically separating uranium from the fission products and structural materials in a vessel called an electrorefiner (ER). To continue processing without waiting for sample analyses to assess process conditions, an ER process model predicts the composition of the ER inventory and effluent streams via multicomponent, multi-phase chemical equilibrium for chemical reactions and a numerical solution to differential equations for electro-chemical transport. The results of the process model were compared to the electrorefiner measured data.

  10. Measurement of OH reactivity by laser flash photolysis coupled with laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Daniel; Whalley, Lisa K.; Ingham, Trevor; Edwards, Peter M.; Cryer, Danny R.; Brumby, Charlotte A.; Seakins, Paul W.; Heard, Dwayne E.

    2016-07-01

    OH reactivity (k'OH) is the total pseudo-first-order loss rate coefficient describing the removal of OH radicals to all sinks in the atmosphere, and is the inverse of the chemical lifetime of OH. Measurements of ambient OH reactivity can be used to discover the extent to which measured OH sinks contribute to the total OH loss rate. Thus, OH reactivity measurements enable determination of the comprehensiveness of measurements used in models to predict air quality and ozone production, and, in conjunction with measurements of OH radical concentrations, to assess our understanding of OH production rates. In this work, we describe the design and characterisation of an instrument to measure OH reactivity using laser flash photolysis coupled to laser-induced fluorescence (LFP-LIF) spectroscopy. The LFP-LIF technique produces OH radicals in isolation, and thus minimises potential interferences in OH reactivity measurements owing to the reaction of HO2 with NO which can occur if HO2 is co-produced with OH in the instrument. Capabilities of the instrument for ambient OH reactivity measurements are illustrated by data collected during field campaigns in London, UK, and York, UK. The instrumental limit of detection for k'OH was determined to be 1.0 s-1 for the campaign in London and 0.4 s-1 for the campaign in York. The precision, determined by laboratory experiment, is typically < 1 s-1 for most ambient measurements of OH reactivity. Total uncertainty in ambient measurements of OH reactivity is ˜ 6 %. We also present the coupling and characterisation of the LFP-LIF instrument to an atmospheric chamber for measurements of OH reactivity during simulated experiments, and provide suggestions for future improvements to OH reactivity LFP-LIF instruments.

  11. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility (ACRF) Annual Report 2008

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LR Roeder

    2008-12-01

    The Importance of Clouds and Radiation for Climate Change: The Earth’s surface temperature is determined by the balance between incoming solar radiation and thermal (or infrared) radiation emitted by the Earth back to space. Changes in atmospheric composition, including greenhouse gases, clouds, and aerosols, can alter this balance and produce significant climate change. Global climate models (GCMs) are the primary tool for quantifying future climate change; however, there remain significant uncertainties in the GCM treatment of clouds, aerosol, and their effects on the Earth’s energy balance. In 1989, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science created the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program to address scientific uncertainties related to global climate change, with a specific focus on the crucial role of clouds and their influence on the transfer of radiation in the atmosphere. To reduce these scientific uncertainties, the ARM Program uses a unique twopronged approach: • The ARM Climate Research Facility, a scientific user facility for obtaining long-term measurements of radiative fluxes, cloud and aerosol properties, and related atmospheric characteristics in diverse climate regimes; and • The ARM Science Program, focused on the analysis of ACRF and other data to address climate science issues associated with clouds, aerosols, and radiation, and to improve GCMs. This report provides an overview of each of these components and a sample of achievements for each in fiscal year (FY) 2008.

  12. Emittance Measurements of the SSRL Gun Test Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hernandez, Michael; Clendenin, James; Fisher, Alan; Miller, Roger; Palmer, Dennis; Park, Sam; Schmerge, John; Weaver, Jim; Wiedemann, Helmut; Winick, Herman; Yeremian, Dian; /SLAC; Meyerhofer, David; Reis, David; /Rochester U.

    2011-09-01

    A photocathode RF gun test stand is under construction in the injector vault of the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory at SLAC. The goal of this facility is to produce an electron beam with a normalized emittance of 1-3[mm-mr], a longitudinal bunch duration of the order of 10[ps] FWHM and approximately 1[nC] of charge per bunch. The beam will be generated from a laser driven copper photocathode RF gun developed in collaboration with BNL, LBL and UCLA. The 3-5[MeV] beam from the gun will be accelerated using a SLAC three meter S-band accelerator section. The emittance of the electron beam will be measured through the use of quadrupole scans with phosphor screens and also a wire scanner. The details of the experimental setup will be discussed, and first measurements will be presented and compared with results from PARMELA simulations.

  13. SHEAR STRENGTH MEASURING EQUIPMENT EVALUATION AT THE COLD TEST FACILITY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MEACHAM JE

    2009-09-09

    Retrievals under current criteria require that approximately 2,000,000 gallons of double-shell tank (DST) waste storage space not be used to prevent creating new tanks that might be susceptible to buoyant displacement gas release events (BDGRE). New criteria are being evaluated, based on actual sludge properties, to potentially show that sludge wastes do not exhibit the same BDGRE risk. Implementation of the new criteria requires measurement of in situ waste shear strength. Cone penetrometers were judged the best equipment for measuring in situ shear strength and an A.P. van den berg Hyson 100 kN Light Weight Cone Penetrometer (CPT) was selected for evaluation. The CPT was procured and then evaluated at the Hanford Site Cold Test Facility. Evaluation demonstrated that the equipment with minor modification was suitable for use in Tank Farms.

  14. Guidance on the Stand Down, Mothball, and Reactivation of Ground Test Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volkman, Gregrey T.; Dunn, Steven C.

    2013-01-01

    The development of aerospace and aeronautics products typically requires three distinct types of testing resources across research, development, test, and evaluation: experimental ground testing, computational "testing" and development, and flight testing. Over the last twenty plus years, computational methods have replaced some physical experiments and this trend is continuing. The result is decreased utilization of ground test capabilities and, along with market forces, industry consolidation, and other factors, has resulted in the stand down and oftentimes closure of many ground test facilities. Ground test capabilities are (and very likely will continue to be for many years) required to verify computational results and to provide information for regimes where computational methods remain immature. Ground test capabilities are very costly to build and to maintain, so once constructed and operational it may be desirable to retain access to those capabilities even if not currently needed. One means of doing this while reducing ongoing sustainment costs is to stand down the facility into a "mothball" status - keeping it alive to bring it back when needed. Both NASA and the US Department of Defense have policies to accomplish the mothball of a facility, but with little detail. This paper offers a generic process to follow that can be tailored based on the needs of the owner and the applicable facility.

  15. OH radical reactivity in an Indiana Forest: Measurements and model comparisons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigler, P. S. R.; Bottorff, B.; Lew, M.; Stevens, P. S.; Leonardis, T.; Locoge, N.; Sklaveniti, S.; Dusanter, S.; Kundu, S.; Wood, E. C. D.; Gentner, D. R.

    2015-12-01

    The hydroxyl (OH) radicals plays an important role in the chemistry of the atmosphere. OH radical reactions initiate the oxidation of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) which can lead to the production of ozone and secondary organic aerosols in the atmosphere. In addition, reactions of OH radicals controls the lifetime of methane and other greenhouse gases that affect the radiative balance of the atmosphere. Previous measurements of total hydroxyl radical reactivity in forest environments have found discrepancies between measured values and those calculated from collocated measurements of biogenic VOC (BVOC) concentrations. Additional measurements of total OH reactivity together with measurements of BVOCs are needed to understand the source of this missing reactivity and to further constrain atmospheric chemistry models. Total hydroxyl radical (OH) reactivity was measured using a turbulent flow reactor were made during summer 2015 as part of the Indiana Radical, Reactivity and Ozone Production Intercomparison (IRRONIC). This campaign took place in a forested area at the Indiana Research and Teaching Preserve (IURTP) near the Bloomington campus characterized by high mixing ratios of isoprene and low mixing ratios of NOx. Measurements of a suite of VOCs and oxygenated VOCs was also conducted at the site, allowing a comparison of the observed reactivity with the expected OH reactivity from these measurements.

  16. Measurements of methane emissions from natural gas gathering facilities and processing plants: measurement methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. R. Roscioli

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Increased natural gas production in recent years has spurred intense interest in methane (CH4 emissions associated with its production, gathering, processing, transmission and distribution. Gathering and processing facilities (G&P facilities are unique in that the wide range of gas sources (shale, coal-bed, tight gas, conventional, etc. results in a wide range of gas compositions, which in turn requires an array of technologies to prepare the gas for pipeline transmission and distribution. We present an overview and detailed description of the measurement method and analysis approach used during a 20-week field campaign studying CH4 emissions from the natural gas G&P facilities between October 2013 and April 2014. Dual tracer flux measurements and onsite observations were used to address the magnitude and origins of CH4 emissions from these facilities. The use of a second tracer as an internal standard revealed plume-specific uncertainties in the measured emission rates of 20–47%, depending upon plume classification. Combining downwind methane, ethane (C2H6, carbon monoxide (CO, carbon dioxide (CO2, and tracer gas measurements with onsite tracer gas release allows for quantification of facility emissions, and in some cases a more detailed picture of source locations.

  17. Measurement of Reactive Oxygen Species, Reactive Nitrogen Species, and Redox-Dependent Signaling in the Cardiovascular System: A Scientific Statement From the American Heart Association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griendling, Kathy K; Touyz, Rhian M; Zweier, Jay L; Dikalov, Sergey; Chilian, William; Chen, Yeong-Renn; Harrison, David G; Bhatnagar, Aruni

    2016-08-19

    Reactive oxygen species and reactive nitrogen species are biological molecules that play important roles in cardiovascular physiology and contribute to disease initiation, progression, and severity. Because of their ephemeral nature and rapid reactivity, these species are difficult to measure directly with high accuracy and precision. In this statement, we review current methods for measuring these species and the secondary products they generate and suggest approaches for measuring redox status, oxidative stress, and the production of individual reactive oxygen and nitrogen species. We discuss the strengths and limitations of different methods and the relative specificity and suitability of these methods for measuring the concentrations of reactive oxygen and reactive nitrogen species in cells, tissues, and biological fluids. We provide specific guidelines, through expert opinion, for choosing reliable and reproducible assays for different experimental and clinical situations. These guidelines are intended to help investigators and clinical researchers avoid experimental error and ensure high-quality measurements of these important biological species.

  18. Development of Sirius facility that simulates void-reactivity feedback, and regional and core-wide stability estimation of natural circulation BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Furuya, M.; Inada, F.; Yasuo, A. [Tokyo Electric Power Co., Inc., Central Research Institute (Japan)

    2001-07-01

    The SIRIUS facility was designed and constructed for highly accurate simulation of core-wide and regional instabilities of the BWR. A real-time simulation was performed in the digital controller for modal point kinetics of reactor neutronics and fuel-rod conduction on the basis of measured void fractions in reactor core sections of the thermal-hydraulic loop. Stability experiments were conducted for a wide range of fluid conditions, power distributions, and fuel rod thermal conductivity time constants, including the normal operating conditions of a typical natural circulation BWR. The results showed that there is a sufficiently wide stability margin under normal operating conditions, even when void-reactivity feedback is taken into account. (author)

  19. Detailed characterization of a Comparative Reactivity Method (CRM) instrument for ambient OH reactivity measurements: experiments vs. modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michoud, Vincent; Locoge, Nadine; Dusanter, Sébastien

    2015-04-01

    The Hydroxyl radical (OH) is the main daytime oxidant in the troposphere, leading to the oxidation of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) and the formation of harmful pollutants such as ozone (O3) and Secondary Organic Aerosols (SOA). While OH plays a key role in tropospheric chemistry, recent studies have highlighted that there are still uncertainties associated with the OH budget, i.e the identification of sources and sinks and the quantification of production and loss rates of this radical. It has been demonstrated that ambient measurements of the total OH loss rate (also called total OH reactivity) can be used to identify and reduce these uncertainties. In this context, the Comparative Reactivity Method (CRM), developed by Sinha et al. (ACP, 2008), is a promising technique to measure total OH reactivity in ambient air and has already been used during several field campaigns. This technique relies on monitoring competitive reactions of OH with ambient trace gases and a reference compound (pyrrole) in a sampling reactor to derive ambient OH reactivity. However, this technique requires a complex data processing chain that has yet to be carefully investigated in the laboratory. In this study, we present a detailed characterization of a CRM instrument developed at Mines Douai, France. Experiments have been performed to investigate the dependence of the CRM response on humidity, ambient NOx levels, and the pyrrole-to-OH ratio inside the sampling reactor. Box modelling of the chemistry occurring in the reactor has also been performed to assess our theoretical understanding of the CRM measurement. This work shows that the CRM response is sensitive to both humidity and NOx, which can be accounted for during data processing using parameterizations depending on the pyrrole-to-OH ratio. The agreement observed between laboratory studies and model results suggests a good understanding of the chemistry occurring in the sampling reactor and gives confidence in the CRM

  20. Application of reactive compensation method in thermal facilities%无功补偿方法在热力设施中的应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    袁银生

    2012-01-01

    简要介绍了有功功率和无功功率的概念,阐述了无功补偿的意义,对无功补偿的原理和补偿方法的发展进行了论述,对热力设施用电特性进行分析,并对热力设施用电的无功补偿方法及具体应用提出一定见解,以指导实践。%This paper briefly introduces the definition of active power and reactive power,describes the meaning of reactive compensation,discusses reactive compensation principles and compensation methods,analyzes the power supply characteristics of thermal facilities,and then puts forward specific application and some views on the reactive compensation method in the power supply of thermal facilities,so as to guide practice.

  1. Cerebrovascular reactivity in migraineurs as measured by transcranial Doppler

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, T.D.; Harpold, G.J. (Alabama Univ., Birmingham, AL (USA). School of Medicine); Troost, B.T. (Bowman Gray School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC (USA))

    1990-04-01

    Transcranial Doppler ultrasound is a relatively new diagnostic modality which allows the non-invasive assessment of intracranial circulation. A total of 10 migraine patients were studied and compared to healthy controls without headaches. Migraineurs during the headache-free interval demonstrated excessive cerebrovascular reactivity to CO{sub 2}, evidenced by an increase in middle cerebral artery blood flow velocity of 47% {plus minus} 15% compared to 28% {plus minus} 14% in controls. Differences between the two study groups revealed no significant decrease in middle cerebral artery blood flow velocity with hypocapnia. However, the differences between middle cerebral artery blood flow velocity during hyperventilation and CO{sub 2} inhalation were significantly different comparing migraineurs and controls. Instability of the baseline blood flow velocities was also noted in migraineurs during the interictal period. Characteristics which may allow differentiation of migraineurs from other headache populations could possibly be obtained from transcranial Doppler ultrasound flow studies. 24 refs., 2 tabs.

  2. Assessing Reactive Strength Measures in Jumping and Hopping Using the Optojump™ System

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Robin Healy; Ian C. Kenny; Andrew J. Harrison

    2016-01-01

    ...) versus a force platform in the estimation of temporal and reactive strength measures. In two separate investigations, twenty physically active males performed double-leg and single-leg drop jumps from a box height...

  3. Inpatient Psychiatric Facility Quality Measure Data – by State

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Inpatient Psychiatric Facility Quality Reporting (IPFQR) program currently uses six measures. Psychiatric facilities that are eligible for this program may have...

  4. Hot gas flow cell for optical measurements on reactive gases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grosch, Helge; Fateev, Alexander; Nielsen, Karsten Lindorff

    2013-01-01

    was validated for high resolution measurements at temperatures of up to 800 K (527 degrees C) in the ultraviolet (UV) and infrared (IR) regions (190-20 000 nm). Verification of the gas temperature in the cell is provided by a thermocouple and emission/transmission measurements in the IR and UV regions. High...

  5. Activities on Nuclear Data Measurements at Pohang Neutron Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Guinyun

    2009-03-01

    We report the activities of the Pohang Neutron Facility which consists of an electron linear accelerator, a water-cooled Ta target, and a 12-m time-of-flight path. It has been equipped with a four-position sample changer controlled remotely by a CAMAC data acquisition system, which allows simultaneous accumulation of the neutron time of flight spectra from 4 different detectors. It can be possible to measure the neutron total cross-sections in the neutron energy range from 0.1 eV to few hundreds eV by using the neutron time-of-flight method. A 6LiZnS(Ag) glass scintillator was used as a neutron detector. The neutron flight path from the water-cooled Ta target to the neutron detector was 12.1 m. The background level was determined by using notch-filters of Co, In, Ta, and Cd sheets. In order to reduce the gamma rays from bremsstrahlung and those from neutron capture, we employed a neutron-gamma separation system based on their different pulse shapes. The present measurements of several samples (Ta, Mo) are in general agreement with the evaluated data in ENDF/B-VI. We measured the thermal neutron capture cross-sections and the resonance integrals of the 186W(n,γ)187W reaction and the 98Mo(n,γ)99Mo reaction by the activation method using the 197Au(n,γ)198Au monitor reaction as a single comparator. We also report the isomeric yield ratios for the 44 m, gSc isomeric pairs produced from four different photonuclear reactions 45Sc(γ,n)44m,gSc, natTi(γ,xn1p)44m,gSc, natFe(γ,xn5p)52m,gMn, and 103Rh(γ,4n)99m,gRh by using the activation method.

  6. Reactive Agility Performance in Handball; Development and Evaluation of a Sport-Specific Measurement Protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spasic, Miodrag; Krolo, Ante; Zenic, Natasa; Delextrat, Anne; Sekulic, Damir

    2015-09-01

    There is no current study that examined sport-specific tests of reactive-agility and change-of-direction-speed (CODS) to replicate real-sport environment in handball (team-handball). This investigation evaluated the reliability and validity of two novel tests designed to assess reactive-agility and CODS of handball players. Participants were female (25.14 ± 3.71 years of age; 1.77 ± 0.09 m and 74.1 ± 6.1 kg) and male handball players (26.9 ± 4.1 years of age; 1.90 ± 0.09 m and 93.90±4.6 kg). Variables included body height, body mass, body mass index, broad jump, 5-m sprint, CODS and reactive-agility tests. Results showed satisfactory reliability for reactive-agility-test and CODS-test (ICC of 0.85-0.93, and CV of 2.4-4.8%). The reactive-agility and CODS shared less than 20% of the common variance. The calculated index of perceptual and reactive capacity (P&RC; ratio between reactive-agility- and CODS-performance) is found to be valid measure in defining true-game reactive-agility performance in handball in both genders. Therefore, the handball athletes' P&RC should be used in the evaluation of real-game reactive-agility performance. Future studies should explore other sport-specific reactive-agility tests and factors associated to such performance in sports involving agile maneuvers. Key pointsReactive agility and change-of-direction-speed should be observed as independent qualities, even when tested over the same course and similar movement templateThe reactive-agility-performance of the handball athletes involved in defensive duties is closer to their non-reactive-agility-score than in their peers who are not involved in defensive dutiesThe handball specific "true-game" reactive-agility-performance should be evaluated as the ratio between reactive-agility and corresponding CODS performance.

  7. Method for Standardizing Sonic-Boom Model Pressure Signatures Measured at Several Wind-Tunnel Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mack, Robert J.

    2007-01-01

    Low-boom model pressure signatures are often measured at two or more wind-tunnel facilities. Preliminary measurements are made at small separation distances in a wind tunnel close at hand, and a second set of pressure signatures is measured at larger separation distances in a wind-tunnel facility with a larger test section. In this report, a method for correcting and standardizing the wind-tunnel-measured pressure signatures obtained in different wind tunnel facilities is presented and discussed.

  8. Retinal hemodynamic oxygen reactivity assessed by perfusion velocity, blood oximetry and vessel diameter measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klefter, Oliver Niels; Lauritsen, Anne Øberg; Larsen, Michael

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: To test the oxygen reactivity of a fundus photographic method of measuring macular perfusion velocity and to integrate macular perfusion velocities with measurements of retinal vessel diameters and blood oxygen saturation. METHODS: Sixteen eyes in 16 healthy volunteers were studied at two...... measurements may provide comprehensive information about retinal metabolism....

  9. Recent ion measurements within the modified DPF-1000U facility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwiatkowski Roch

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In this note we describe measurements of ion beams emitted along the z-axis of the DPF-1000U facility operated at 23 kV, 334 kJ, and with the initial deuterium pressure of 1.6–2 hPa. The DPF-1000U device was recently renewed and equipped with a dynamic gas-puff valve placed inside the inner electrode. The investigated ions were recorded by means of ion pinhole cameras equipped with solid state nuclear track detectors of the PM-355® (PADC type. The energy spectra of ions were determined using a Thomson spectrometer placed on the symmetry axis at a distance of 160 cm from the electrodes outlets. The ion images recorded during discharges performed under different experimental conditions show that the ion beams have a complex structure, usually in the form of a central bunch and an annular stream composed of many micro-beams. Energies of the registered deuterons have been in the range of 30–700 keV, while the fast protons (which originated from the hydrogen remnants had energies in the range of 300–850 keV.

  10. Implosion dynamics measurements at the National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicks, D. G.; Meezan, N. B.; Dewald, E. L.; Mackinnon, A. J.; Olson, R. E.; Callahan, D. A.; Döppner, T.; Benedetti, L. R.; Bradley, D. K.; Celliers, P. M.; Clark, D. S.; Di Nicola, P.; Dixit, S. N.; Dzenitis, E. G.; Eggert, J. E.; Farley, D. R.; Frenje, J. A.; Glenn, S. M.; Glenzer, S. H.; Hamza, A. V.; Heeter, R. F.; Holder, J. P.; Izumi, N.; Kalantar, D. H.; Khan, S. F.; Kline, J. L.; Kroll, J. J.; Kyrala, G. A.; Ma, T.; MacPhee, A. G.; McNaney, J. M.; Moody, J. D.; Moran, M. J.; Nathan, B. R.; Nikroo, A.; Opachich, Y. P.; Petrasso, R. D.; Prasad, R. R.; Ralph, J. E.; Robey, H. F.; Rinderknecht, H. G.; Rygg, J. R.; Salmonson, J. D.; Schneider, M. B.; Simanovskaia, N.; Spears, B. K.; Tommasini, R.; Widmann, K.; Zylstra, A. B.; Collins, G. W.; Landen, O. L.; Kilkenny, J. D.; Hsing, W. W.; MacGowan, B. J.; Atherton, L. J.; Edwards, M. J.

    2012-12-01

    Measurements have been made of the in-flight dynamics of imploding capsules indirectly driven by laser energies of 1-1.7 MJ at the National Ignition Facility [Miller et al., Nucl. Fusion 44, 228 (2004)]. These experiments were part of the National Ignition Campaign [Landen et al., Phys. Plasmas 18, 051002 (2011)] to iteratively optimize the inputs required to achieve thermonuclear ignition in the laboratory. Using gated or streaked hard x-ray radiography, a suite of ablator performance parameters, including the time-resolved radius, velocity, mass, and thickness, have been determined throughout the acceleration history of surrogate gas-filled implosions. These measurements have been used to establish a dynamically consistent model of the ablative drive history and shell compressibility throughout the implosion trajectory. First results showed that the peak velocity of the original 1.3-MJ Ge-doped polymer (CH) point design using Au hohlraums reached only 75% of the required ignition velocity. Several capsule, hohlraum, and laser pulse changes were then implemented to improve this and other aspects of implosion performance and a dedicated effort was undertaken to test the sensitivity of the ablative drive to the rise time and length of the main laser pulse. Changing to Si rather than Ge-doped inner ablator layers and increasing the pulse length together raised peak velocity to 93% ± 5% of the ignition goal using a 1.5 MJ, 420 TW pulse. Further lengthening the pulse so that the laser remained on until the capsule reached 30% (rather than 60%-70%) of its initial radius, reduced the shell thickness and improved the final fuel ρR on companion shots with a cryogenic hydrogen fuel layer. Improved drive efficiency was observed using U rather than Au hohlraums, which was expected, and by slowing the rise time of laser pulse, which was not. The effect of changing the Si-dopant concentration and distribution, as well as the effect of using a larger initial shell thickness

  11. Measurements of reactive gaseous rocket injector response factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janardan, B. A.; Daniel, B. R.; Bell, W. A.; Zinn, B. T.

    1977-01-01

    The results presented represent the first successful attempt at the measurement of the driving capabilities of coaxial gaseous propellant rocket injectors. The required data have been obtained by employing the modified impedance tube technique with compressed air as the oxidizer and acetylene gas as the fuel. The data describe the frequency dependence of the injector admittances, from which the frequency dependence of the injection response factors can be calculated. The measured injector admittances have been compared with the predictions of the Feiler and Heidmann (1967) analytical model assuming different values for the characteristic combustion time. The values of combustion time which result in a best fit between the measured and predicted data are indicated for different equivalence ratios. It is shown that for the coaxial injector system investigated in this study the characteristic combustion times vary between .7 and 1.2 msec for equivalence ratios in the range of .57 to 1.31. The experimental data clearly show that the tested injector system could indeed drive combustion instabilities over a frequency range that is in qualitative agreement with the predictions of the Feiler and Heidmann model.

  12. [Preventive measures against tuberculosis in working facilities and companies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Kiminori; Satou, Ken

    2007-03-01

    The health care program in working facilities and companies have played a significant part in prevention of tuberculosis. However, the ordinary national tuberculosis survey policy was abolished in April, 2005 and the tuberculosis survey for salary-earners is on the brink of drastic change. In this symposium the current status of the prevailing survey of tuberculosis in working facilities and companies was reviewed and the future direction of the tuberculosis survey in comparison to that in lung cancer survey was discussed. 1. Epidemiological trends of tuberculosis from the tuberculosis surveillance data: Masako OHMORI (Research Institute of Tuberculosis, Japan Anti-Tuberculosis Association). The estimated rate of tuberculosis case discovery by periodical mass screening in the working facilities was 0.033% and it was higher than that in general adult population. The detection rate of tuberculosis in nurses who suffered from tuberculosis reached 40.4% by an aid of mass X-ray screening and 8.7% by contact tracing. The risk of onset of the disease was 4.3 times higher nurses than in general at the same years of age. The importance of infection control measures in the medical facilities was emphasized. 2. Current status and problems in tuberculosis control in a large-sized company: Yusuke NAKAOKA (Department of Occupational Health, Osaka Railway Hospital, West Japan Railway Company). Some preventive modalities against TB such as periodical medical check-up and awareness programs have been done for the purpose of prevention in our company. The prevalence of the disease has significantly reduced in number. The specific circumstances in large-sized company should be taken into consideration, and it is important for company workers and health professionals to recognize their roles in preventing the infectious disease. 3. Are there any differences between clinical cases and control people working for small-sized companies in the onset of tuberculosis?: Osamu NAKASHIMA, Kohei

  13. IASI measurements of reactive trace species in biomass burning plumes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.-F. Coheur

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available This work presents observations of a series of short-lived species in biomass burning plumes from the Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI, launched onboard the MetOp-A platform in October 2006. The strong fires that have occurred in the Mediterranean Basin – and particularly Greece – in August 2007, and those in Southern Siberia and Eastern Mongolia in the early spring of 2008 are selected to support the analyses. We show that the IASI infrared spectra in these fire plumes contain distinctive signatures of ammonia (NH3, ethene (C2H4, methanol (CH3OH and formic acid (HCOOH in the atmospheric window between 800 and 1200 cm−1, with some noticeable differences between the plumes. Peroxyacetyl nitrate (CH3COOONO2, abbreviated as PAN was also observed with good confidence in some plumes and a tentative assignment of a broadband absorption spectral feature to acetic acid (CH3COOH is made. For several of these species these are the first reported measurements made from space in nadir geometry. The IASI measurements are analyzed for plume height and concentration distributions of NH3, C2H4 and CH3OH. The Greek fires are studied in greater detail for the days associated with the largest emissions. In addition to providing information on the spatial extent of the plume, the IASI retrievals allow an estimate of the total mass emissions for NH3, C2H4 and CH3OH. Enhancement ratios are calculated for the latter relative to carbon monoxide (CO, giving insight in the chemical processes occurring during the transport, the first day after the emission.

  14. K {sub infinity} measurements of HTR lattices by oscillated zero reactivity technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benedetti, F.; Brighenti, G.; Chiodi, P.L.; Ghilardotti, G.; Guiliani, C.

    1972-06-15

    The principles of the K {sub infinity} measurement of a HTR lattice, carried out by the oscillated zero reactivity method have been reported at the 9th DCPM. The RB-2 reactor modifications, requested for these measurements have been shown at the 10th DCPM. This report summarizes the modified RB-2 reactor characteristics, the present status of measurements, some preliminary results, and, the next measurements program. The report reflects the status of the work at the end of May 1972.

  15. Material control in nuclear fuel fabrication facilities. Part II. Accountability, instrumentation and measurement techniques in fuel fabrication facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borgonovi, G.M.; McCartin, T.J.; McDaniel, T.; Miller, C.L.; Nguyen, T.

    1978-01-01

    This report describes the measurement techniques, the instrumentation, and the procedures used in accountability and control of nuclear materials, as they apply to fuel fabrication facilities. A general discussion is given of instrumentation and measurement techniques which are presently used being considered for fuel fabrication facilities. Those aspects which are most significant from the point of view of satisfying regulatory constraints have been emphasized. Sensors and measurement devices have been discussed, together with their interfacing into a computerized system designed to permit real-time data collection and analysis. Estimates of accuracy and precision of measurement techniques have been given, and, where applicable, estimates of associated costs have been presented. A general description of material control and accounting is also included. In this section, the general principles of nuclear material accounting have been reviewed first (closure of material balance). After a discussion of the most current techniques used to calculate the limit of error on inventory difference, a number of advanced statistical techniques are reviewed. The rest of the section deals with some regulatory aspects of data collection and analysis, for accountability purposes, and with the overall effectiveness of accountability in detecting diversion attempts in fuel fabrication facilities. A specific example of application of the accountability methods to a model fuel fabrication facility is given. The effect of random and systematic errors on the total material uncertainty has been discussed, together with the effect on uncertainty of the length of the accounting period.

  16. Measuring reactive oxygen and nitrogen species with fluorescent probes: challenges and limitations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalyanaraman, Balaraman; Darley-Usmar, Victor; Davies, Kelvin J.A.; Dennery, Phyllis A.; Forman, Henry Jay; Grisham, Matthew B.; Mann, Giovanni E.; Moore, Kevin; Roberts, L. Jackson; Ischiropoulos, Harry

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this position paper is to present a critical analysis of the challenges and limitations of the most widely used fluorescent probes for detecting and measuring reactive oxygen and nitrogen species. Where feasible, we have made recommendations for the use of alternate probes and appropriate analytical techniques that measure the specific products formed from the reactions between fluorescent probes and reactive oxygen and nitrogen species. We have proposed guidelines that will help present and future researchers with regard to the optimal use of selected fluorescent probes and interpretation of results. PMID:22027063

  17. 33 CFR Appendix A to Part 105 - Facility Vulnerability and Security Measures Summary (Form CG-6025)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Security Measures Summary (Form CG-6025) A Appendix A to Part 105 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY MARITIME SECURITY MARITIME SECURITY: FACILITIES Pt. 105, App. A Appendix A to Part 105—Facility Vulnerability and Security Measures Summary (Form CG-6025)...

  18. Absolute measurement of the DT primary neutron yield on the National Ignition Facility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leeper R.J.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The measurement of the absolute neutron yield produced in inertial confinement fusion target experiments conducted on the National Ignition Facility (NIF is essential in benchmarking progress towards the goal of achieving ignition on this facility. This paper describes three independent diagnostic techniques that have been developed to make accurate and precise DT neutron yield measurements on the NIF.

  19. Intercomparison of the comparative reactivity method (CRM) and pump-probe technique for measuring total OH reactivity in an urban environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, R. F.; Blocquet, M.; Schoemaecker, C.; Léonardis, T.; Locoge, N.; Fittschen, C.; Hanoune, B.; Stevens, P. S.; Sinha, V.; Dusanter, S.

    2015-10-01

    The investigation of hydroxyl radical (OH) chemistry during intensive field campaigns has led to the development of several techniques dedicated to ambient measurements of total OH reactivity, which is the inverse of the OH lifetime. Three techniques are currently used during field campaigns, including the total OH loss rate method, the pump-probe method, and the comparative reactivity method. However, no formal intercomparison of these techniques has been published so far, and there is a need to ensure that measurements of total OH reactivity are consistent among the different techniques. An intercomparison of two OH reactivity instruments, one based on the comparative reactivity method (CRM) and the other based on the pump-probe method, was performed in October 2012 in a NOx-rich environment, which is known to be challenging for the CRM technique. This study presents an extensive description of the two instruments, the CRM instrument from Mines Douai (MD-CRM) and the pump-probe instrument from the University of Lille (UL-FAGE), and highlights instrumental issues associated with the two techniques. It was found that the CRM instrument used in this study underestimates ambient OH reactivity by approximately 20 % due to the photolysis of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) inside the sampling reactor; this value is dependent on the position of the lamp within the reactor. However, this issue can easily be fixed, and the photolysis of VOCs was successfully reduced to a negligible level after this intercomparison campaign. The UL-FAGE instrument may also underestimate ambient OH reactivity due to the difficulty to accurately measure the instrumental zero. It was found that the measurements are likely biased by approximately 2 s-1, due to impurities in humid zero air. Two weeks of ambient sampling indicate that the measurements performed by the two OH reactivity instruments are in agreement, within the measurement uncertainties for each instrument, for NOx mixing ratios

  20. The CERN n_TOF facility: a unique tool for nuclear data measurement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingrone F.

    2016-01-01

    The characteristics and performances of the two experimental areas of the n_TOF facility will be presented, together with the most important measurements performed to date and their physics case. In addition, the significant upcoming measurements will be introduced.

  1. Comparison of tests for the measurement of C-reactive protein in the low range

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bos, R.; Maat, M. de

    1998-01-01

    C-reactive protein (CRP) has recently been identified as an independent risk factor for cardiovascular disease. The published studies all used highly sensitive immunological assays that were specially designed in-house to measure CRP in the sub-clinical (normal) range. However, these tests are not

  2. Effects of Beijing Olympics control measures on reducing reactive hydrocarbon species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Shao; Bin, Wang; Sihua, Lu; Bin, Yuan; Ming, Wang

    2011-01-15

    Stringent air-quality control measures were implemented for the 2008 Beijing Olympic Games. This large-scale manmade experiment provided an opportunity to evaluate the effectiveness of measures to reduce the reactivity of hydrocarbons (HCs) from emission sources, which is important for ground-level ozone abatement. Photochemical initial concentrations (PICs), i.e., the levels of HCs from sources before undergoing chemical reactions, were calculated from ambient measurements. PICs obtained using the ratio method for HCs and the sequential reaction model for alkyl nitrates were in good agreement. Propene, 1-butene, iso-butene, trans-2-butene, cis-2-butene, trans-2-pentene, and m,p-xylene were identified as key reactive species in terms of their photochemical consumptions and correspondent ozone formation potentials (OFPs). During the Olympics and Paralympics, the PICs of these seven species were reduced by 27-66%, contributing 20% to the reduction in total PICs and 60% to the reduction in total OFP compared with June levels. Source apportionments from the chemical mass balance model indicated that gasoline vehicle exhaust was the predominant contributor to the key reactive species (45-78%). Reductions of gasoline vehicle exhaust during the Olympics and Paralympics explained 53-77% and 59-68% of the reductions in PICs of the key reactive HCs and total OFP, respectively.

  3. Analytical estimation of control rod shadowing effect for excess reactivity measurement of High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakano, Masaaki; Yamashita, Kiyonobu; Fujimoto, Nozomu; Nojiri, Naoki; Takeuchi, Mitsuo; Fujisaki, Shingo [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan). Oarai Research Establishment; Tokuhara, Kazumi; Nakata, Tetsuo

    1998-05-01

    The control rod shadowing effect has been estimated analytically in application of the fuel addition method to excess reactivity measurement of High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR). The movements of control rods in the procedure of the fuel addition method have been simulated in the analysis. The calculated excess reactivity obtained by the simulation depends on the combinations of measuring control rods and compensating control rods and varies from -10% to +50% in comparison with the excess reactivity calculated from the effective multiplication factor of the core where all control rods are fully withdrawn. The control rod shadowing effect is reduced by the use of plural number of measuring and compensation control rods because of the reduction in neutron flux deformation in the measuring procedure. As a result, following combinations of control rods are recommended; 1) Thirteen control rods of the center, first, and second rings will be used for the reactivity measurement. The reactivity of each control rod is measured by the use of the other twelve control rods for reactivity compensation. 2) Six control rods of the first ring will be used for the reactivity measurement. The reactivity of each control rod is measured by the use of the other five control rods for reactivity compensation. (author)

  4. Consideration on Preventive and Protective Measures Against Insider Threats at R.O.K. Nuclear Facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Seung Min; Lee, Jung Ho; Koh, Moon Sung [Korea Institute of Nuclear Nonproliferation and Control, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    This paper focuses on the current status of measures used to prevent, detect and respond to potential insiders at nuclear facilities in the Republic of KOREA. Measures against insiders are then analyzed based on IAEA guidelines. Insiders are able to take advantage of their access rights and knowledge of a facility to bypass dedicated security measures. They can also threaten cyber security, safety measures, and material control and accountancy (MC and A). Insiders are likely to have the time to plan their actions. In addition, they may work with an external adversary who shares their objectives. An insider threat is a great risk to a security system because of the access, authority, and special knowledge that someone within a facility possesses. Therefore, it is imperative that effective measures be taken to prevent insider incidents. A combination of preventive and protective measures offers the best solution to mitigating rogue elements within a facility.

  5. Helium mass flow measurement in the International Fusion Superconducting Magnet Test Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baylor, L.R.

    1986-08-01

    The measurement of helium mass flow in the International Fusion Superconducting Magnet Test Facility (IFSMTF) is an important aspect in the operation of the facility's cryogenic system. Data interpretation methods that lead to inaccurate results can cause severe difficulty in controlling the experimental superconducting coils being tested in the facility. This technical memorandum documents the methods of helium mass flow measurement used in the IFSMTF for all participants of the Large Coil Program and for other cryogenic experimentalists needing information on mass flow measurements. Examples of experimental data taken and calculations made are included to illustrate the applicability of the methods used.

  6. Efficiency and emission of crop residues combustion facilities in Serbia: Status and needed measures for improvement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martinov Milan

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Use of crop residues as fuel has a long tradition in rural areas of Serbia. Numerous biomass-fueled facilities were built during the 80s. Among those were small facilities for household heating, with thermal power from 5 to 50 kW, medium-size facilities for farm and greenhouses, with thermal power 50 to 1000 kW, and large facilities for processing of agricultural products, with thermal powers higher than 1000 kW. The results showed that the level of biomass combustion facilities is in general very low. This is especially the case for heating facilities used for house-hold heating. The measures for improvement were proposed. .

  7. 47 CFR 2.948 - Description of measurement facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... supporting structures, and all structures within 5 times the distance between the measuring antenna and the device being measured. (4) Description of structures used to support the device being measured and the... for Standardization/International Electrotechnical Commission (ISO/IEC) Standard 17025, “General...

  8. Engineering on abolishment measure of nuclear fuel facilities. Application of 3D-CAD to abolishment measure of nuclear fuel facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Annen, Sotonori; Sugitsue, Noritake [Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Inst., Ningyo Toge Environmental Engineering Center, Kamisaibara, Okayama (Japan)

    2001-12-01

    The Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute (JNC) progresses some advancing R and Ds required for establishment of the nuclear fuel cycle under considering on safety, economical efficiency, environmental compatibility, and so on. An important item among them is a technology on safe abolishment of a nuclear energy facility ended its role, which is called the abolishment measure technique. Here was introduced at a center of viewpoint called on use of three dimensional CAD (3D-CAD), on outlines of engineering system for abolishment measure (subdivision engineering system) under an object of nuclear fuel facilities, constructed through subdivision and removal of refinement conversion facilities, by the Ningyo-toge Environmental Engineering Center of JNC. (G.K.)

  9. Assessing Reactive Strength Measures in Jumping and Hopping Using the Optojump™ System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Healy Robin

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to assess the concurrent validity of the Optojump™ system (Microgate, Bolzano, Italy versus a force platform in the estimation of temporal and reactive strength measures. In two separate investigations, twenty physically active males performed double-leg and single-leg drop jumps from a box height of 0.3 m and a 10 s vertical bilateral hopping test. Contact time, flight time and total time (the sum of contact and flight time were concurrently assessed during single and double-leg drop jumps and during hopping. Jump height, the reactive strength index and the reactive strength ratio were also calculated from contact time and flight time. Despite intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs for all variables being close to 1 (ICC > 0.975, a significant overestimation was found in contact time (0.005 ± 0.002 s and underestimations in flight time (0.005 ± 0.003 s, the reactive strength index (0.04 ± 0.02 m·s-1 and the reactive strength ratio (0.07 ± 0.04. Overestimations in contact time and underestimations in flight time were attributed to the physical design of the Optojump™ system as the transmitter and receiver units were positioned 0.003 m above the floor level. The Optojump™ demonstrated excellent overall temporal validity with no differences found between systems for total time. Coaches are advised to be consistent with the instrumentation used to assess athletes, however, in the case of comparison between reactive strength values collected with the Optojump™ and values collected with a force platform, regression equations are provided.

  10. [Measurement of airway resistance and reactivity in guinea pigs using double-chamber plethysmography].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Wei-min; Lai, Ke-fang; Luo, Yuan-ming; Liu, Chun-li; Chen, Ru-chong; Luo, Wei; Zhong, Nan-shan

    2009-05-01

    To establish a method for measurement of airway resistance (sRaw) and reactivity in guinea pigs. Methacholine spray at gradient concentrations was given to guinea pigs. PC100 was defined as the concentration of methacholine when the sRaw doubled in the guinea pigs using a double-chamber plethysmograph. The time for the recovery of PC100 resistance to baseline levels was measured. The sRaw and PC100 were measured twice on days 1 and 15 (4 time points) in the guinea pigs before and after OVA challenge. PC100 in a normal guinea pig airway was shown to recover the baseline level within 1 h. Double-chamber plethysmographical measurement of the sRaw and PC100 in normal guinea pigs did not show significant differences between the time points [sRaw: 3.25-/+0.67, 3.33-/+0.58, 3.30-/+0.56, and 3.32-/+0.75 cm H2O.s; log2PC100: 8.48-/+0.94, 8.64-/+1.04, 8.56-/+0.67, and 8.64-/+0.60, respectively, P>0.05]. The sRaw and airway reactivity were significantly increased in guinea pigs challenged with OVA [sRaw: 7.08-/+1.82 vs 2.87-/+0.53 cmH2O.s, Pmeasurement of sRaw and airway reactivity in guinea pig is established successfully.

  11. Low-Cost Security Measures for School Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Clearinghouse for Educational Facilities, 2008

    2008-01-01

    This paper discusses a variety of school safety and security measures that may be implemented at little or no cost and without the use of complex technology. Measures are presented according to these categories: (1) General; (2) Outside the Building; and (3) Inside the Building.

  12. Reactivity in rapidly collected hygiene and toilet spot check measurements: a cautionary note for longitudinal studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Benjamin F; Khush, Ranjiv S; Ramaswamy, Padmavathi; Rajkumar, Paramasivan; Durairaj, Natesan; Ramaprabha, Prabhakar; Balakrishnan, Kalpana; Colford, John M

    2015-01-01

    Discreet collection of spot check observations to measure household hygiene conditions is a common measurement technique in epidemiologic studies of hygiene in low-income countries. The objective of this study was to determine whether the collection of spot check observations in longitudinal studies could itself induce reactivity (i.e., change participant behavior). We analyzed data from a 12-month prospective cohort study in rural Tamil Nadu, India that was conducted in the absence of any hygiene or toilet promotion activities. Our data included hygiene and toilet spot checks from 10,427 household visits. We found substantial evidence of participant reactivity to spot check observations of hygiene practices that were easy to modify on short notice. For example, soap observed at the household's primary handwashing location increased from 49% at enrollment to 81% by the fourth visit and remained at or above 77% for the remainder of the study. © The American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene.

  13. A transparent Pyrex μ-reactor for combined in situ optical characterization and photocatalytic reactivity measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dionigi, Fabio; Nielsen, Morten Godtfred; Pedersen, Thomas;

    2013-01-01

    -vis-near infrared range of wavelengths (photon energies between ∼0.4 and ∼4.1 eV). The absorbance of a photocatalytic film obtained with a light transmission measurement during a photocatalytic reaction is presented as a proof of concept of a photocatalytic reactivity measurement combined with in situ optical...... characterization. Diffuse reflectance measurements of highly scattering photocatalytic nanopowders in a sealed Pyrex μ-reactor are also possible using an integrating sphere as shown in this work. These experiments prove that a photocatalyst can be characterized with optical techniques after a photocatalytic...

  14. A GIS Based Integrated Approach to Measure the Spatial Equity of Community Facilities of Bangladesh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meher Nigar Neema

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The distribution of public facilities and their spatial equity is an important matter to be considered while planning public facilities. However, most of the studies in the literature have taken into consideration only a single type of facility while leaving other facilities unconsidered. In this paper an integrated spatial index for public facilities has been developed integrating GIS and spatial analysis models. The index measures the spatial equity based on the accessibility of 6 different types of public facilities for 5247 unions and 476 sub-districts of Bangladesh. Spatial autocorrelation techniques have been applied to understand the spatial pattern of accessibility. In fact it helps to understand the characteristics of spatial equity both for disaggregated and aggregated levels. It has been found that variation accessibilities to the facilities across the space are significant. Distribution of some facilities are spatially clustered to some particular areas means those areas are in an advantageous position in terms of accessibility while other areas are in a backward condition. The proposed index and the spatial autocorrelation will help to identify which areas should receive more priority in allocating particular types of public facilities in the future.

  15. Real catalysis on single crystalline model catalysts with in-situ reactivity measurement

    OpenAIRE

    O. Shekhah; Ranke, W.; Schlögl, R.

    2003-01-01

    The pressure and materials gap between reactivity studies in UHV and real catalysis can only be overcome by application of in-situ methods for catalyst characterization and/or activity measurements under realistic pressure and temperature conditions. As a model reaction we study the economically important catalytic dehydrogenation of ethylbenzene (EB) to styrene (St) [1]. The technical catalyst consists of potassium-promoted iron oxides. We use single crystalline epitaxial layers of Fe2O3, Fe...

  16. Buckling measurement in the IPEN/MB-01 nuclear reactor in cylindrical configuration of minor excess of reactivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Purgato, Rafael Turrini; Bitelli, Ulysses d' Utra; Aredes, Vitor Ottoni; Silva, Alexandre F. Povoa da; Santos, Diogo Feliciano dos; Lima, Ana Cecilia de Souza, E-mail: ubitelli@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    This work presents the results of experimental Buckling in the IPEN/MB-01 nuclear reactor in its cylindrical configuration with 28 fuel rods along its diameter. The IPEN/MB-01 is a zero power reactor designed to operate at a maximum power of 100 watts. It is a versatile nuclear facility, which allows for the simulation of all the characteristics of a nuclear power reactor making it an ideal test bed for this kind of measurement. A mapping of neutron flux inside the reactor is carried out in order to determine the total Buckling of the cylindrical configuration. The reactor was operated for one hour. Then, the activity of the fuel rods is measured by gamma ray spectrometry using a HPGe solid state detector and a suitable rod scanner. Photon energies of 276.6keV from {sup 239}Np (neutron capture (n,?) nuclear reaction) and 293.3keV from {sup 143}Ce (fission (n,f) nuclear reaction on both {sup 238}U and {sup 235}U) , are respectively along both axial and radial directions. Other measurements are performed using gold wires and foils along radial and axial directions of the reactor core. The three methods above resulted in a weighted average value of 93.18 ± 8.47 m-2 for the Total Buckling of this cylindrical core configuration with 28 control rods along its diameter with 568 fuel rods and only 271 pcm of excess reactivity. (author)

  17. Neutron diffraction facility for internal stress measurements at JAERI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsuchiya, Yoshinori; Minakawa, Nobuaki; Morii, Yukio [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokyo (Japan)

    1997-06-01

    The Neutron Diffractometer for Residual Stress Analysis (RESA) is a two axis type neutron diffractometer with a goniometer controllable to specimen position in high precision for spatial distribution measurement of residual stress and with one- and zero-dimensional detectors, and has a characteristics of providing a pin-hole type neutron ray diaphragm to obtain local informations of the specimen. It is elucidated from the reported examples that the RESA in JAERI has a capacity of sufficient detection to a local strain with 10{sup -3} to 10{sup -4}. The residual stress measurement in JAERI is just in beginning state, and has many necessities to do a lot of trial measurements on various materials in future. And, when finishing the construction of pulsed neutron source under planning in JAERI, it can be expected to realize a neutron intensity of more than one hundred for the residual stress measurement and to construct a powerful measurement instrument in combination with introduction of testing method for TOF. (G.K.)

  18. Simulation of Viscous and Reactive Hypersonic Flows Behaviour in a Shock Tube Facility: TVD Schemes and Flux Limiters Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Boulahia

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Work performed in this study concerns mainly the analysis and the wisely use of TVD type schemes (total variation diminishing for numerical simulation of reactive flows, these schemes are first presented in scalar equation. Their extension to Euler equations for a reactive gas mixture is conducted through the approximate extended solver of Riemann problem. A comparative study of specific variants of TVD schemes has been made in the case of one-dimensional unsteady flow for an inert and reactive gas mixture, which represents the classical instance of a shock tube. The purpose of this investigation is to highlight the general behaviour (order of accuracy and performance of TVD schemes with various flux limiters for the simulation of reactive flows and in particular, to make possible the capture of the shock wave together with waves expansion for choosing the appropriate scheme to apply eventually in simulation of hypersonic viscous flow in chemical non equilibrium.

  19. Measurements at the ISL-EMA 1 railgun facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peter, H.; Wey, J. (Institut Franco-Allemand de Recherches de Saint-Louis, 68 (France))

    1991-01-01

    In this paper the instrumentation of a 500 kJ, 15 mm bore diameter railgun and the power switching are described in detail. Emphasis has been laid on electro-optical measurement techniques. The presented results include electrical measurements on the switching circuit, breech and muzzle voltages and projectile position. In addition, material problems concerning rail erosion with plasma-driven projectiles are discussed. After some ten shots with peak currents up to 600 kA, rails and insulators were fully operational. The rail material loss has been tolerable. The surface roughness increased remarkably, due to the formation of a porous heterogeneous, nearly insulating surface layer of variable thickness.

  20. Development of measurement technique of large negative reactivity by an inverse kinetics rod drop method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahashi, Hiroyuki; Takeuchi, Mitsuo; Murayama, Yoji [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2001-11-01

    The determination of the large negative reactivity by a rod drop method is conducted by the change of the average neutron density in the core between the critical condition at constant power and the deep subcritical condition. The neutron density is measured with a neutron detector which output the pulse or electric current signal without time delay. If an electric-current-output neutron detector is used for the measurement, a logarithmic amplifier is required to measure over a wide range of neutron density of more than 3 digits and the time delay characteristic of the amplifier may badly influence the measurement results. The authors developed a measurement technique with an inverse kinetics rod drop (IKRD) method compensating the time delay characteristic of a logarithmic amplifies, and confirmed the validity and high precision of the technique by applying it to the measurement data obtained in the characteristic experiments of the JRR-3M silicide core. (author)

  1. Reactive Strength Index Modified Is a Valid Measure of Explosiveness in Collegiate Female Volleyball Players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kipp, Kristof; Kiely, Michael T; Geiser, Christopher F

    2016-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the validity of the reactive strength index modified (RSImod) as a measure of lower body explosiveness. Fifteen female, National Collegiate Athletic Association Division I volleyball players performed vertical countermovement jumps (CMJs) while standing on a force plate. Each player performed 3 CMJs. The vertical ground reaction forces collected during each jump were used to calculate jump height, time to take-off, time to peak force, peak force, peak rate of force development, and peak power; the latter 3 variables were all normalized to body mass. Reactive strength index modified was calculated as the ratio between jump height and time to take-off. All variables, except for jump height, were then entered a factor analysis, which reduced the input data into 2 factors: a force factor and a speed factor. Although RSImod loaded more strongly onto the force factor, further analysis showed that RSImod loaded positively onto both force and speed factors. Visual analysis of the Cartesian coordinates also showed that RSImod loaded into the quadrant of greater force and speed abilities. These results indicate that the construct of RSImod, as derived from CMJ force-time data, captures a combination of speed-force factors that can be interpreted as lower body explosiveness during the CMJ. Reactive strength index modified therefore seems to be a valid measure to study lower body explosiveness.

  2. Wire Scanner Beam Profile Measurements: LANSCE Facility Beam Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gilpatrick, John D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Batygin, Yuri K. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Gonzales, Fermin [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Gruchalla, Michael E. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kutac, Vincent G. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Martinez, Derwin [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sedillo, James Daniel [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Pillai, Chandra [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Rodriguez Esparza, Sergio [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Smith, Brian G. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-05-15

    The Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) is replacing Wire Scanner (WS) beam profile measurement systems. Three beam development tests have taken place to test the new wire scanners under beam conditions. These beam development tests have integrated the WS actuator, cable plant, electronics processors and associated software and have used H{sup -} beams of different beam energy and current conditions. In addition, the WS measurement-system beam tests verified actuator control systems for minimum profile bin repeatability and speed, checked for actuator backlash and positional stability, tested the replacement of simple broadband potentiometers with narrow band resolvers, and tested resolver use with National Instruments Compact Reconfigurable Input and Output (cRIO) Virtual Instrumentation. These beam tests also have verified how trans-impedance amplifiers react with various types of beam line background noise and how noise currents were not generated. This paper will describe these beam development tests and show some resulting data.

  3. Feasibility of reactivity worth measurements by perturbation method with Caliban and Silene experimental reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casoli, Pierre; Authier, Nicolas [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Centre d' Etudes de Valduc, 21120 Is-Sur-Tille (France)

    2008-07-01

    Reactivity worth measurements of material samples put in the central cavities of nuclear reactors allow to test cross section nuclear databases or to extract information about the critical masses of fissile elements. Such experiments have already been completed on the Caliban and Silene experimental reactors operated by the Criticality and Neutronics Research Laboratory of Valduc (CEA, France) using the perturbation measurement technique. Calculations have been performed to prepare future experiments on new materials, such as light elements, structure materials, fission products or actinides. (authors)

  4. Coherent radiation spectrum measurements at KEK LUCX facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shevelev, M., E-mail: mishe@post.kek.jp [KEK: High Energy Accelerator Research Organization, 1-1 Oho, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Aryshev, A., E-mail: alar@post.kek.jp [KEK: High Energy Accelerator Research Organization, 1-1 Oho, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Araki, S.; Fukuda, M. [KEK: High Energy Accelerator Research Organization, 1-1 Oho, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Karataev, P. [John Adams Institute at Royal Holloway, University of London, Egham, Surrey TW20 0EX (United Kingdom); Terunuma, N.; Urakawa, J. [KEK: High Energy Accelerator Research Organization, 1-1 Oho, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan)

    2015-01-21

    This paper demonstrates the detailed design concept, alignment, and initial testing of a Michelson interferometer for the THz spectral range. We present the first results on the measurement of a coherent transition radiation spectrum and describe the performance of a pair of ultra-fast broadband room temperature Schottky barrier diode detectors. We discuss the main criteria of interferometer beam splitter optimization, the alignment technique, the high-precision calibration and linearity check of the motion system.

  5. Central Reactivity Measurements on Assemblies 1 and 3 of the Fast Reactor FR0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Londen, S.O.

    1966-01-15

    The reactivity effects of small samples of various materials have been measured, by the period method at the core centre of Assemblies 1 and 3 of the fast zero power reactor FR0. For some materials the reactivity change as a function of sample size has also been determined experimentally. The core of Assembly 1 consisted only of uranium enriched to 20 % whereas the core of Assembly 3 was diluted with 30 % graphite. The results have been compared with calculated values obtained with a second-order transport-theoretical perturbation model and using differently shielded cross sections depending upon sample size. Qualitative agreement has generally been found, although discrepancies still exist. The spectrum perturbation caused by the experimental arrangement has been analyzed and found to be rather important.

  6. Technical note: A facility for respiration measurements in cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado, F S; Tomich, T R; Ferreira, A L; Cavalcanti, L F L; Campos, M M; Paiva, C A V; Ribas, M N; Pereira, L G R

    2016-06-01

    A respiration system consisting of 4 climate-controlled chambers and 1 set of flowmeters and analyzers was constructed and validated. Each chamber had volume of 21.10m(3) (3.68×2.56×2.24m) and was made from steel with double-glazed windows on either side enabling visual contact between animals. The chambers are independently climate-controlled and can maintain temperature and relative humidity in a range from 5 to 45°C and 30 to 80%, respectively. A flow generator and mass flowmeter continuously pull air from each chamber and a slight negative pressure inside the chamber is ensured. Air from all chambers and ambient air share a common gas analysis and data acquisition system for monitoring O2, CO2, and CH4 concentrations over the measurement period, with the cycle time set to 20min. Analyzers are regularly calibrated and the chambers have mean recoveries of 99.0 and 98.0% for CO2 and CH4, respectively. The chambers are equipped with infrared cameras and electronic feed and water bins for intake measurements, as well as sensors for monitoring animal position and heart rate. Data acquisition and analysis software is used to calculate the rate of consumption of O2 and production of CO2 and CH4. The dynamic respiration measurements are integrated with feed intake data and other sensors. The daily gas exchanges are estimated by integration to determine methane emission and heat production. We conducted a trial with 12 lactating 3/4 Holstein × 1/4 Gyr crossbred dairy cows (6 multiparous and 6 primiparous) under 2 feeding regimens (ad libitum or restricted) to validate the system. Two 22-h respiration measurements were obtained from each cow. Restricted-fed cows showed lower values for milk yield, methane emission, and heat production compared with ad libitum-fed animals. We found no difference between groups for CH4 produced per kilogram of dry matter intake. Repeatability for CH4 emission and heat production was high (0.97 and 0.92, respectively). The respiration

  7. A New Facility for the Measurement of Thin Films of Ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temple, Jon; Watkins, R. E. J.; Bowles, N. E.; Irshad, R.; Howett, C. J. A.; Calcutt, S. B.

    2009-09-01

    Accurate knowledge of the optical properties of surface and atmospheric constituents is crucial to ensure the reliable interpretation of remotely observed planetary spectra. A new facility has been developed at Oxford to enable the production of thin films for spectroscopic measurement at temperatures varying from 300K to 70K. An innovative method has been designed to deposit the films uniformly on to a cooled substrate. The facility is equipped to measure visible and infrared spectra from 600nm to 300µm. Preliminary measurements have been made using carbon dioxide to characterise the performance of the facility. Experiments later this year will measure the infra-red spectra of ammonia and ammonium hydrosulphide ice with a view to retrieving optical properties. These compounds are prevalent in the upper layers of Jupiter's cloud deck. Detailed knowledge of their optical properties at representative temperatures will therefore improve the accuracy of data from spectral measurements of the Jovian atmosphere.

  8. Self-reported trait mindfulness and affective reactivity: a motivational approach using multiple psychophysiological measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosme, Danielle; Wiens, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    As a form of attention, mindfulness is qualitatively receptive and non-reactive, and is thought to facilitate adaptive emotional responding. One suggested mechanism is that mindfulness facilitates disengagement from an affective stimulus and thereby decreases affective reactivity. However, mindfulness has been conceptualized as a state, intervention, and trait. Because evidence is mixed as to whether self-reported trait mindfulness decreases affective reactivity, we used a multi-method approach to study the relationship between individual differences in self-reported trait mindfulness and electrocortical, electrodermal, electromyographic, and self-reported responses to emotional pictures. Specifically, while participants (N = 51) passively viewed pleasant, neutral, and unpleasant IAPS pictures, we recorded high-density (128 channels) electrocortical, electrodermal, and electromyographic data to the pictures as well as to acoustic startle probes presented during the pictures. Afterwards, participants rated their subjective valence and arousal while viewing the pictures again. If trait mindfulness spontaneously reduces general emotional reactivity, then for individuals reporting high rather than low mindfulness, response differences between emotional and neutral pictures would show relatively decreased early posterior negativity (EPN) and late positive potential (LPP) amplitudes, decreased skin conductance responses, and decreased subjective ratings for valence and arousal. High mindfulness would also be associated with decreased emotional modulation of startle eyeblink and P3 amplitudes. Although results showed clear effects of emotion on the dependent measures, in general, mindfulness did not moderate these effects. For most measures, effect sizes were small with rather narrow confidence intervals. These data do not support the hypothesis that individual differences in self-reported trait mindfulness are related to spontaneous emotional responses during picture

  9. Self-reported trait mindfulness and affective reactivity: a motivational approach using multiple psychophysiological measures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danielle Cosme

    Full Text Available As a form of attention, mindfulness is qualitatively receptive and non-reactive, and is thought to facilitate adaptive emotional responding. One suggested mechanism is that mindfulness facilitates disengagement from an affective stimulus and thereby decreases affective reactivity. However, mindfulness has been conceptualized as a state, intervention, and trait. Because evidence is mixed as to whether self-reported trait mindfulness decreases affective reactivity, we used a multi-method approach to study the relationship between individual differences in self-reported trait mindfulness and electrocortical, electrodermal, electromyographic, and self-reported responses to emotional pictures. Specifically, while participants (N = 51 passively viewed pleasant, neutral, and unpleasant IAPS pictures, we recorded high-density (128 channels electrocortical, electrodermal, and electromyographic data to the pictures as well as to acoustic startle probes presented during the pictures. Afterwards, participants rated their subjective valence and arousal while viewing the pictures again. If trait mindfulness spontaneously reduces general emotional reactivity, then for individuals reporting high rather than low mindfulness, response differences between emotional and neutral pictures would show relatively decreased early posterior negativity (EPN and late positive potential (LPP amplitudes, decreased skin conductance responses, and decreased subjective ratings for valence and arousal. High mindfulness would also be associated with decreased emotional modulation of startle eyeblink and P3 amplitudes. Although results showed clear effects of emotion on the dependent measures, in general, mindfulness did not moderate these effects. For most measures, effect sizes were small with rather narrow confidence intervals. These data do not support the hypothesis that individual differences in self-reported trait mindfulness are related to spontaneous emotional responses

  10. Noninterceptive beam energy measurements in line D of the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gilpatrick, J.D.; Carter, H.; Plum, M.; Power, J.F.; Rose, C.R.; Shurter, R.B. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, M. S. H808, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

    1995-05-05

    Several members of the Accelerator and Operations Technology (AOT) division beam-diagnostics team performed time-of-flight (TOF) beam-energy measurements in line D of the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF) using developmental beam time. These measurements provided information for a final design of an on-line beam energy measurement. The following paper discusses these measurements and how they apply to the final beam energy measurement design. {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}.

  11. Noninterceptive beam energy measurements in line D of the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilpatrick, J. D.; Carter, H.; Plum, M.; Power, J. F.; Rose, C. R.; Shurter, R. B.

    1995-05-01

    Several members of the Accelerator and Operations Technology (AOT) division beam-diagnostics team performed time-of-flight (TOF) beam-energy measurements in line D of the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF) using developmental beam time. These measurements provided information for a final design of an on-line beam energy measurement. The following paper discusses these measurements and how they apply to the final beam energy measurement design.

  12. Noninterceptive beam energy measurements in line D of the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gilpatrick, J.D.; Carter, H.; Plum, M.; Power, J.F.; Rose, C.R.; Shurter, R.B.

    1995-12-31

    Several members of the Accelerator and Operations Technology (AOT) division beam-diagnostics team performed time-of-flight (TOF) beam-energy measurements in line D of the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF) using developmental beam time. These measurements provided information for a final design of an on-line beam energy measurement. The following paper discusses these measurements and how they apply to the final beam energy measurement design.

  13. EMFR HRA of the Newport Antenna Measurement Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-07-15

    1600 has upper and lower transmit bays. The upper transmit bay houses four antennas, and the lower transmit bay houses three antennas. These...MPE at 73 feet in front of the antenna (2) Readings for the 6-foot antenna: • 5.0% of upper tier MPE within 1 foot of the ray dome • 50.0% of...lower tier MPE within 1 foot of the ray dome b. Evaluation of Engineering Control Measures: Various engineering controls are utilized to include key

  14. Reproducibility of parameters of postocclusive reactive hyperemia measured by diffuse optical tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidal-Rosas, Ernesto E.; Billings, Stephen A.; Chico, Timothy; Coca, Daniel

    2016-06-01

    The application of near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) to assess microvascular function has shown promising results. An important limitation when using a single source-detector pair, however, is the lack of depth sensitivity. Diffuse optical tomography (DOT) overcomes this limitation using an array of sources and detectors that allow the reconstruction of volumetric hemodynamic changes. This study compares the key parameters of postocclusive reactive hyperemia measured in the forearm using standard NIRS and DOT. We show that while the mean parameter values are similar for the two techniques, DOT achieves much better reproducibility, as measured by the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC). We show that DOT achieves high reproducibility for muscle oxygen consumption (ICC: 0.99), time to maximal HbO2 (ICC: 0.94), maximal HbO2 (ICC: 0.99), and time to maximal HbT (ICC: 0.99). Absolute reproducibility as measured by the standard error of measurement is consistently smaller and close to zero (ideal value) across all parameters measured by DOT compared to NIRS. We conclude that DOT provides a more robust characterization of the reactive hyperemic response and show how the availability of volumetric hemodynamic changes allows the identification of areas of temporal consistency, which could help characterize more precisely the microvasculature.

  15. Measuring the biosphere-atmosphere exchange of total reactive nitrogen by eddy covariance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ammann, C.; Wolff, V.; Marx, O.; Brümmer, C.; Neftel, A.

    2012-11-01

    The (net) exchange of reactive nitrogen (Nr) with the atmosphere is an important driver for ecosystem productivity and greenhouse gas exchange. The exchange of airborne Nr includes various trace compounds that usually require different specific measurement techniques, and up to now fast response instruments suitable for eddy covariance measurements are only available for few of these compounds. Here we present eddy covariance flux measurements with a recently introduced converter (TRANC) for the sum of all Nr compounds (∑Nr). Measurements were performed over a managed grassland field with phases of net emission and net deposition of ∑Nr and alternating dominance of oxidized (NOX) and reduced species (NH3). Spectral analysis of the eddy covariance data exhibited the existence of covariance function peaks at a reasonable time lag related to the sampling tube residence time under stationary conditions. Using ogive analysis, the high-frequency damping was quantified to 19%-26% for a low measurement height of 1.2 m and to about 10% for 4.8 m measurement height. ∑Nr concentrations and fluxes were compared to parallel NO and NO2 measurements by dynamic chambers and NH3 measurements by the aerodynamic gradient technique. The average concentration results indicate that the main compounds NO2 and NH3 were converted by the TRANC system with an efficiency of near 100%. With an optimised sample inlet also the fluxes of these compounds were recovered reasonably well including net deposition and net emission phases. The study shows that the TRANC system is suitable for fast response measurements of oxidized and reduced nitrogen compounds and can be used for continuous eddy covariance flux measurements of total reactive nitrogen.

  16. Measuring the biosphere-atmosphere exchange of total reactive nitrogen by eddy covariance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Ammann

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The (net exchange of reactive nitrogen (Nr with the atmosphere is an important driver for ecosystem productivity and greenhouse gas exchange. The exchange of airborne Nr includes various trace compounds that usually require different specific measurement techniques, and up to now fast response instruments suitable for eddy covariance measurements are only available for few of these compounds.

    Here we present eddy covariance flux measurements with a recently introduced converter (TRANC for the sum of all Nr compounds (∑Nr. Measurements were performed over a managed grassland field with phases of net emission and net deposition of ∑Nr and alternating dominance of oxidized (NOX and reduced species (NH3. Spectral analysis of the eddy covariance data exhibited the existence of covariance function peaks at a reasonable time lag related to the sampling tube residence time under stationary conditions. Using ogive analysis, the high-frequency damping was quantified to 19%–26% for a low measurement height of 1.2 m and to about 10% for 4.8 m measurement height.

    ∑Nr concentrations and fluxes were compared to parallel NO and NO2 measurements by dynamic chambers and NH3 measurements by the aerodynamic gradient technique. The average concentration results indicate that the main compounds NO2 and NH3 were converted by the TRANC system with an efficiency of near 100%. With an optimised sample inlet also the fluxes of these compounds were recovered reasonably well including net deposition and net emission phases. The study shows that the TRANC system is suitable for fast response measurements of oxidized and reduced nitrogen compounds and can be used for continuous eddy covariance flux measurements of total reactive nitrogen.

  17. Measuring the biosphere-atmosphere exchange of total reactive nitrogen by eddy covariance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Ammann

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The (net exchange of reactive nitrogen (Nr with the atmosphere is an important driver for ecosystem productivity and greenhouse gas exchange. The exchange of airborne Nr includes various trace compounds that usually require different specific measurement techniques, and up to now fast response instruments suitable for eddy covariance measurements are only available for few of these compounds.

    Here we present eddy covariance flux measurements with a recently introduced converter (TRANC for the sum of all Nr compounds (∑Nr. Measurements were performed over a managed grassland field with phases of net emission and net deposition of ∑Nr and alternating dominance of oxidized (NOx and reduced species (NH3. Spectral analysis of the eddy covariance data exhibited the existence of covariance function peaks at a reasonable time lag related to the sampling tube residence time under stationary conditions. Using ogive analysis, the high-frequency damping was quantified to 19–26% for a low measurement height of 1.2 m and to about 10% for 4.8 m measurement height.

    ∑Nr concentrations and fluxes were compared to parallel NO and NO2 measurements by dynamic chambers and NH3 measurements by the aerodynamic gradient technique. The average concentration results indicate that close-to-full conversion of the main compounds NO2 and NH3 was generally obtained by the TRANC system. With an optimised sample inlet also the fluxes of these compounds were recovered fairly including net deposition and net emission phases. The study shows that the TRANC system is suitable for fast response measurements of oxidized and reduced nitrogen compounds and can be used for continuous eddy covariance flux measurements of total reactive nitrogen.

  18. On the Light Speed Anisotropy vs Cosmic Microwave Background Dipole: European Synchrotron Radiation Facility Measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Gurzadyan, V G; Kashin, A; Margarian, A T; Bartalini, O; Bellini, V; Castoldi, M; D'Angelo, A; Didelez, J P; Salvo, R D; Fantini, A; Gervino, G; Ghio, F; Girolami, B; Giusa, A; Guidal, M; Hourany, E; Knyazyan, S; Kouznetsov, V; Kunne, Ronald Alexander; Lapik, A; Levi-Sandri, P; Llères, A; Mehrabyan, S S; Moricciani, D; Nedorezov, V; Perrin, C; Rebreyend, D; Russo, G; Rudnev, N; Schärf, C; Sperduto, M L; Sutera, M C; Turinge, A

    2007-01-01

    The measurement of the Compton edge of the scattered electrons in GRAAL facility in European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF) in Grenoble with respect to the Cosmic Microwave Background dipole reveals up to 10 sigma variations larger than the statistical errors. We now show that the variations are not due to the frequency variations of the accelerator. The nature of Compton edge variations remains unclear, thus outlining the imperative of dedicated studies of light speed anisotropy.

  19. Review of nuclear data improvement needs for nuclear radiation measurement techniques used at the CEA experimental reactor facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Destouches, Christophe

    2016-03-01

    The constant improvement of the neutron and gamma calculation codes used in experimental nuclear reactors goes hand in hand with that of the associated nuclear data libraries. The validation of these calculation schemes always requires the confrontation with integral experiments performed in experimental reactors to be completed. Nuclear data of interest, straight as cross sections, or elaborated ones such as reactivity, are always derived from a reaction rate measurement which is the only measurable parameter in a nuclear sensor. So, in order to derive physical parameters from the electric signal of the sensor, one needs specific nuclear data libraries. This paper presents successively the main features of the measurement techniques used in the CEA experimental reactor facilities for the on-line and offline neutron/gamma flux characterizations: reactor dosimetry, neutron flux measurements with miniature fission chambers and Self Power Neutron Detector (SPND) and gamma flux measurements with chamber ionization and TLD. For each technique, the nuclear data necessary for their interpretation will be presented, the main identified needs for improvement identified and an analysis of their impact on the quality of the measurement. Finally, a synthesis of the study will be done.

  20. Review of nuclear data improvement needs for nuclear radiation measurement techniques used at the CEA experimental reactor facilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Destouches Christophe

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The constant improvement of the neutron and gamma calculation codes used in experimental nuclear reactors goes hand in hand with that of the associated nuclear data libraries. The validation of these calculation schemes always requires the confrontation with integral experiments performed in experimental reactors to be completed. Nuclear data of interest, straight as cross sections, or elaborated ones such as reactivity, are always derived from a reaction rate measurement which is the only measurable parameter in a nuclear sensor. So, in order to derive physical parameters from the electric signal of the sensor, one needs specific nuclear data libraries. This paper presents successively the main features of the measurement techniques used in the CEA experimental reactor facilities for the on-line and offline neutron/gamma flux characterizations: reactor dosimetry, neutron flux measurements with miniature fission chambers and Self Power Neutron Detector (SPND and gamma flux measurements with chamber ionization and TLD. For each technique, the nuclear data necessary for their interpretation will be presented, the main identified needs for improvement identified and an analysis of their impact on the quality of the measurement. Finally, a synthesis of the study will be done.

  1. Comparison of Aqueous Outflow Facility Measurement by Pneumatonography and Digital Schiøtz Tonography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazemi, Arash; McLaren, Jay W; Lin, Shuai-Chun; Toris, Carol B; Gulati, Vikas; Moroi, Sayoko E; Sit, Arthur J

    2017-01-01

    It is not known if outflow facilities measured by pneumatonography and Schiøtz tonography are interchangeable. In this study we compared outflow facility measured by pneumatonography to outflow facility measured by digital Schiøtz tonography. Fifty-six eyes from 28 healthy participants, ages 41 to 68 years, were included. Intraocular pressure (IOP) was measured in the sitting and supine positions with a pneumatonometer. With the subject in the supine position, IOP was recorded for 2 minutes by using a pneumatonometer with a 10-g weight and for 4 minutes by using a custom digital Schiøtz tonometer. Outflow facility was determined from the changes in pressure and intraocular volume and a standard assumed ocular rigidity coefficient for each instrument, respectively, and by using an ocular rigidity coefficient calculated by measuring pressure without and with a weight added to the pneumatonometer tip. The outflow facility was 0.29 ± 0.09 μL/min/mm Hg by Schiøtz tonography and 0.24 ± 0.08 μL/min/mm Hg by pneumatonography (P < 0.001) when using the standard assumed constant ocular rigidity coefficient. Mean calculated ocular rigidity coefficient was 0.028 ± 0.01 μL-1, and outflow facility determined by using this coefficient was 0.23 ± 0.08 μL/min/mm Hg by Schiøtz tonography and 0.21 ± 0.07 μL/min/mm Hg by pneumatonography (P = 0.003). Outflow facilities measured by the two devices were correlated when the ocular rigidity was assumed (r = 0.60, P < 0.001) or calculated (r = 0.70, P < 0.001). Outflow facilities measured by pneumatonography were correlated with those measured by Schiøtz tonography, but Schiøtz tonography reported approximately 10% to 20% higher facilities when using the standard method. When ocular rigidity was determined for each eye, differences were smaller. Measurements from these devices cannot be compared directly.

  2. Measurements of reactive halogen species as oxidants of mercury over the Gulf of Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volkamer, R.; Coburn, S.; Dix, B. K.; Sinreich, R.; Terschure, A. F.; Edgerton, E. S.; Wu, Y.; Nair, U. S.

    2011-12-01

    The gas-phase reaction of bromine and chlorine radicals with gaseous elemental mercury (GEM) is a source for gaseous oxidized mercury (GOM). It has been established that oxidation by bromine is relevant at high latitudes, and can also occur in mid-latitude regions (Peleg et al. 2007), or in the free troposphere. A subject of ongoing debate concerns the role of free tropospheric bromine vs boundary layer bromine in oxidizing mercury. Here we present measurements of reactive halogen species bromine oxide (BrO) and iodine oxide (IO) along with gaseous oxidized mercury (GOM), gaseous elemental mercury (GEM), and particulate mercury (Hgp) at a coastal location in Gulf Breeze, Fl. The University of Colorado has deployed a research grade Multi Axis Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (MAX-DOAS) instrument to measure BrO, IO, as well as formaldehyde (HCHO), glyoxal (CHOCHO), nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and oxygen dimers (O4). Here we present the compilation of the data collected by this instrument over the time period from May 2009 to January 2011, which include the first measurements of BrO, IO, and CHOCHO over the Gulf of Mexico. We also present several case studies for days where significant amounts of reactive halogens were measured, explore the sources and back trajectories of the air masses carrying these compounds, and relate our observations to mercury data collected at a nearby SEARCH network site.

  3. Commissioning experience and beam physics measurements at the SwissFEL Injector Test Facility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Schietinger

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The SwissFEL Injector Test Facility operated at the Paul Scherrer Institute between 2010 and 2014, serving as a pilot plant and test bed for the development and realization of SwissFEL, the x-ray Free-Electron Laser facility under construction at the same institute. The test facility consisted of a laser-driven rf electron gun followed by an S-band booster linac, a magnetic bunch compression chicane and a diagnostic section including a transverse deflecting rf cavity. It delivered electron bunches of up to 200 pC charge and up to 250 MeV beam energy at a repetition rate of 10 Hz. The measurements performed at the test facility not only demonstrated the beam parameters required to drive the first stage of an FEL facility, but also led to significant advances in instrumentation technologies, beam characterization methods and the generation, transport and compression of ultralow-emittance beams. We give a comprehensive overview of the commissioning experience of the principal subsystems and the beam physics measurements performed during the operation of the test facility, including the results of the test of an in-vacuum undulator prototype generating radiation in the vacuum ultraviolet and optical range.

  4. Strategies for measuring flows of reactive nitrogen at the landscape scale

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Theobald, M.R.; Akkal, N.; Bienkowski, J.

    2011-01-01

    .g., hydrological flows) or the interface between two media (e.g., exchange between the soil and the atmosphere). However, the study of flows of Nr at the landscape scale requires a more integrated approach that combines measurement techniques to quantify the flows from one medium to the next. This paper discusses......Within a rural landscape there are flows of reactive nitrogen (Nr) through and between the soil, vegetation, atmosphere and hydrological systems as well as transfer as a result of agricultural activities. Measurements of these flows and transfers have generally been limited to individual media (e...... the design of an experiment carried out in the NitroEurope IP to characterise the Nr flows in six contrasting European rural landscapes during a period of 1-2 years. The focus is on characterisation as it is not possible to measure all Nr Methods/Approach flows at all locations and, therefore...

  5. TRANC – a novel fast-response converter to measure total reactive atmospheric nitrogen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Wolff

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The input and loss of plant available nitrogen (reactive nitrogen: Nr from/to the atmosphere can be an important factor for the productivity of ecosystems and thus for its carbon and greenhouse gas exchange. We present a novel converter for reactive nitrogen (TRANC: Total Reactive Atmospheric Nitrogen Converter, which offers the opportunity to quantify the sum of all airborne reactive nitrogen compounds (∑Nr in high time resolution. The basic concept of the TRANC is the full conversion of all Nr to nitrogen monoxide (NO within two reaction steps. Initially, reduced Nr compounds are being oxidised, and oxidised Nr compounds are thermally converted to lower oxidation states. Particulate Nr is being sublimated and oxidised or reduced afterwards. In a second step, remaining higher nitrogen oxides or those generated in the first step are catalytically converted to NO with carbon monoxide used as reduction gas. The converter is combined with a fast response chemiluminescence detector (CLD for NO analysis and its performance was tested for the most relevant gaseous and particulate Nr species under both laboratory and field conditions. Recovery rates during laboratory tests for NH3 and NO2 were found to be 95 and 99%, respectively, and 97% when the two gases were combined. In-field longterm stability over an 11-month period was approved by a value of 91% for NO2. Effective conversion was also found for ammonium and nitrate containing particles. The recovery rate of total ambient Nr was tested against the sum of individual measurements of NH3, HNO3, HONO, NH4+, NO3−, and NOx using a combination of different well-established devices. The results show that the TRANC-CLD system precisely captures fluctuations in ∑Nr concentrations and also matches the sum of all individual Nr compounds measured by the different single techniques. The TRANC features a specific design with very short distance between the sample air inlet and the place where the thermal

  6. Evaluation of the Initial Isothermal Physics Measurements at the Fast Flux Test Facility, a Prototypic Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John D. Bess

    2010-03-01

    The Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) was a 400-MWt, sodium-cooled, low-pressure, high-temperature, fast-neutron flux, nuclear fission reactor plant designed for the irradiation testing of nuclear reactor fuels and materials for the development of liquid metal fast breeder reactors (LMFBRs). The FFTF was fueled with plutonium-uranium mixed oxide (MOX) and reflected by Inconel-600. Westinghouse Hanford Company operated the FFTF as part of the Hanford Engineering Development Laboratory (HEDL) for the U.S. Department of Energy on the Hanford Site near Richland, Washington. Although the FFTF was a testing facility not specifically designed to breed fuel or produce electricity, it did provide valuable information for LMFBR projects and base technology programs in the areas of plant system and component design, component fabrication, prototype testing, and site construction. The major objectives of the FFTF were to provide a strong, disciplined engineering base for the LMFBR program, provide fast flux testing for other U.S. programs, and contribute to the development of a viable self-sustaining competitive U.S. LMFBR industry. During its ten years of operation, the FFTF acted as a national research facility to test advanced nuclear fuels, materials, components, systems, nuclear power plant operating and maintenance procedures, and active and passive reactor safety technologies; it also produced a large number of isotopes for medical and industrial users, generated tritium for the U.S. fusion research program, and participated in cooperative, international research work. Prior to the implementation of the reactor characterization program, a series of isothermal physics measurements were performed; this acceptance testing program consisted of a series of control rod worths, critical rod positions, subcriticality measurements, maximum reactivity addition rates, shutdown margins, excess reactivity, and isothermal temperature coefficient reactivity. The results of these

  7. Reactivity of dogs' brain oscillations to visual stimuli measured with non-invasive electroencephalography.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miiamaaria V Kujala

    Full Text Available Studying cognition of domestic dogs has gone through a renaissance within the last decades. However, although the behavioral studies of dogs are beginning to be common in the field of animal cognition, the neural events underlying cognition remain unknown. Here, we employed a non-invasive electroencephalography, with adhesive electrodes attached to the top of the skin, to measure brain activity of from 8 domestic dogs (Canis familiaris while they stayed still to observe photos of dog and human faces. Spontaneous oscillatory activity of the dogs, peaking in the sensors over the parieto-occipital cortex, was suppressed statistically significantly during visual task compared with resting activity at the frequency of 15-30 Hz. Moreover, a stimulus-induced low-frequency (~2-6 Hz suppression locked to the stimulus onset was evident at the frontal sensors, possibly reflecting a motor rhythm guiding the exploratory eye movements. The results suggest task-related reactivity of the macroscopic oscillatory activity in the dog brain. To our knowledge, the study is the first to reveal non-invasively measured reactivity of brain electrophysiological oscillations in healthy dogs, and it has been based purely on positive operant conditional training, without the need for movement restriction or medication.

  8. Total OH reactivity measurements using a new fast Gas Chromatographic Photo-Ionization Detector (GC-PID

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Sinha

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The primary and most important oxidant in the atmosphere is the hydroxyl radical (OH. Currently OH sinks, particularly gas phase reactions, are poorly constrained. One way to characterize the overall sink of OH is to measure directly the ambient loss rate of OH, the total OH reactivity. To date, direct measurements of total OH reactivity have been either performed using a Laser-Induced Fluorescence (LIF system ("pump-and-probe" or "flow reactor" or the Comparative Reactivity Method (CRM with a Proton-Transfer-Reaction Mass Spectrometer (PTR-MS. Both techniques require large, complex and expensive detection systems. This study presents a feasibility assessment for CRM total OH reactivity measurements using a new detector, a Gas Chromatographic Photoionization Detector (GC-PID. Such a system is smaller, more portable, less power consuming and less expensive than other total OH reactivity measurement techniques.

    Total OH reactivity is measured by the CRM using a competitive reaction between a reagent (here pyrrole with OH alone and in the presence of atmospheric reactive molecules. The new CRM method for total OH reactivity has been tested with parallel measurements of the GC-PID and the previously validated PTR-MS as detector for the reagent pyrrole during laboratory experiments, plant chamber and boreal field studies. Excellent agreement of both detectors was found when the GC-PID was operated under optimum conditions. Time resolution (60–70 s, sensitivity (LOD 3–6 s−1 and overall uncertainty (25% in optimum conditions for total OH reactivity were similar to PTR-MS based total OH reactivity measurements. One drawback of the GC-PID system was the steady loss of sensitivity and accuracy during intensive measurements lasting several weeks, and a possible toluene interference. Generally, the GC-PID system has been shown to produce closely comparable results to the PTR-MS and thus in suitable environments (e.g. forests it

  9. A new method for total OH reactivity measurements using a fast Gas Chromatographic Photo-Ionization Detector (GC-PID

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. C. Nölscher

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The primary and most important oxidant in the atmosphere is the hydroxyl radical (OH. Currently OH sinks, particularly gas phase reactions, are poorly constrained. One way to characterize the overall sink of OH is to measure directly the ambient loss rate of OH, the total OH reactivity. To date direct measurements of total OH reactivity have been either performed using a Laser Induced Fluorescence (LIF system ("pump-and-probe" or "flow reactor" or the Comparative Reactivity Method (CRM with a Proton Transfer Reaction Mass Spectrometer (PTR-MS. Both techniques require large, complex and expensive detection systems. This study presents a feasibility assessment for CRM total OH reactivity measurements using a new detector, a Gas Chromatographic Photo-Ionization Detector (GC-PID. Such a system is smaller, more portable, less power consuming and less expensive than other total OH reactivity measurement techniques.

    Total OH reactivity is measured by the CRM using a competitive reaction between a reagent (here pyrrole with OH alone and in the presence of atmospheric reactive molecules. The new CRM method for total OH reactivity has been tested with parallel measurements of the GC-PID and the previously validated PTR-MS as detector for the reagent pyrrole during laboratory experiments, plant chamber and boreal field studies. Excellent agreement of both detectors was found when the GC-PID was operated under optimum conditions. Time resolution (60–70 s, sensitivity (LOD 3–6 s−1 and overall uncertainty (25% in optimum conditions for total OH reactivity were equivalent to PTR-MS based total OH reactivity measurements. One drawback of the GC-PID system was the steady loss of sensitivity and accuracy during intensive measurements lasting several weeks, and a possible toluene interference. Generally, the GC-PID system has been shown to produce closely comparable results to the PTR-MS and thus in suitable environments (e.g. forests it

  10. The added value of C-reactive protein measurement in diagnosing pneumonia in primary care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Minnaard, Margaretha C; de Groot, Joris A H; Hopstaken, Rogier M

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: C-reactive protein (CRP) is increasingly being included in the diagnostic work-up for community-acquired pneumonia in primary care. Its added diagnostic value beyond signs and symptoms, however, remains unclear. We conducted a meta-analysis of individual patient data to quantify...... the added value of CRP measurement. METHODS: We included studies of the diagnostic accuracy of CRP in adult outpatients with suspected lower respiratory tract infection. We contacted authors of eligible studies for inclusion of data and for additional data as needed. The value of adding CRP measurement......, it still left a substantial group of patients classified at intermediate risk, in which clinical decision-making remains challenging....

  11. 75 FR 71733 - Requirements for Measurement Facilities Used for the Royalty Valuation of Processed Natural Gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-24

    ..., flare gas, condensate, natural gas liquids, or any other products recovered from Federal production... Used for the Royalty Valuation of Processed Natural Gas AGENCY: Bureau of Ocean Energy Management... measurement equipment at gas plants and other processing facilities. SUMMARY: This notice provides...

  12. Nuclear Material Accountancy Assessment Technical Measures in Nuclear Centrifuge Enrichment Facility

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    Nuclear material accountancy assessment is the main technical measures for nuclear materials regulatory. It is an important basis to detect theft, loss and the illegal diversion of nuclear material. In order to implement the control of nuclear materials for nuclear facilities,

  13. Measuring the Efficient Utilization of Medical Personnel at Navy Military Treatment Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-06-01

    Subject Terms (continue on reverse if necessary and Identify by block number) Field Group Subgroup effectiveness,efficiency,health,hospital,medical, NIHSS ...the study.v, xi I. INTRODUCTION A. PROBLEM Managers of medical treatment facilities (MTFs) lack reliable performance measures that capture, in a...Value Engineering b. Product diversification c. Product simplification d. Research and development e. Product standardization f. Reliability

  14. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility (ACRF Instrumentation Status: New, Current, and Future)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    JW Voyles

    2008-01-30

    The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into the following four sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (3) proposed future instrumentation, and (4) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development.

  15. Long term Suboxone™ emotional reactivity as measured by automatic detection in speech.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Edward; Han, David; Dumouchel, Pierre; Dehak, Najim; Quatieri, Thomas; Moehs, Charles; Oscar-Berman, Marlene; Giordano, John; Simpatico, Thomas; Barh, Debmalya; Blum, Kenneth

    2013-01-01

    Addictions to illicit drugs are among the nation's most critical public health and societal problems. The current opioid prescription epidemic and the need for buprenorphine/naloxone (Suboxone®; SUBX) as an opioid maintenance substance, and its growing street diversion provided impetus to determine affective states ("true ground emotionality") in long-term SUBX patients. Toward the goal of effective monitoring, we utilized emotion-detection in speech as a measure of "true" emotionality in 36 SUBX patients compared to 44 individuals from the general population (GP) and 33 members of Alcoholics Anonymous (AA). Other less objective studies have investigated emotional reactivity of heroin, methadone and opioid abstinent patients. These studies indicate that current opioid users have abnormal emotional experience, characterized by heightened response to unpleasant stimuli and blunted response to pleasant stimuli. However, this is the first study to our knowledge to evaluate "true ground" emotionality in long-term buprenorphine/naloxone combination (Suboxone™). We found in long-term SUBX patients a significantly flat affect (p<0.01), and they had less self-awareness of being happy, sad, and anxious compared to both the GP and AA groups. We caution definitive interpretation of these seemingly important results until we compare the emotional reactivity of an opioid abstinent control using automatic detection in speech. These findings encourage continued research strategies in SUBX patients to target the specific brain regions responsible for relapse prevention of opioid addiction.

  16. Long term Suboxone™ emotional reactivity as measured by automatic detection in speech.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward Hill

    Full Text Available Addictions to illicit drugs are among the nation's most critical public health and societal problems. The current opioid prescription epidemic and the need for buprenorphine/naloxone (Suboxone®; SUBX as an opioid maintenance substance, and its growing street diversion provided impetus to determine affective states ("true ground emotionality" in long-term SUBX patients. Toward the goal of effective monitoring, we utilized emotion-detection in speech as a measure of "true" emotionality in 36 SUBX patients compared to 44 individuals from the general population (GP and 33 members of Alcoholics Anonymous (AA. Other less objective studies have investigated emotional reactivity of heroin, methadone and opioid abstinent patients. These studies indicate that current opioid users have abnormal emotional experience, characterized by heightened response to unpleasant stimuli and blunted response to pleasant stimuli. However, this is the first study to our knowledge to evaluate "true ground" emotionality in long-term buprenorphine/naloxone combination (Suboxone™. We found in long-term SUBX patients a significantly flat affect (p<0.01, and they had less self-awareness of being happy, sad, and anxious compared to both the GP and AA groups. We caution definitive interpretation of these seemingly important results until we compare the emotional reactivity of an opioid abstinent control using automatic detection in speech. These findings encourage continued research strategies in SUBX patients to target the specific brain regions responsible for relapse prevention of opioid addiction.

  17. The Perceived Stress Reactivity Scale: Measurement Invariance, Stability, and Validity in Three Countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlotz, Wolff; Yim, Ilona S.; Zoccola, Peggy M.; Jansen, Lars; Schulz, Peter

    2011-01-01

    There is accumulating evidence that individual differences in stress reactivity contribute to the risk for stress-related disease. However, the assessment of stress reactivity remains challenging, and there is a relative lack of questionnaires reliably assessing this construct. We here present the Perceived Stress Reactivity Scale (PSRS), a…

  18. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report July 1–September 30, 2012

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Voyles, JW

    2012-10-10

    Individual datastreams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility fixed and mobile research sites are collected and routed to the Data Management Facility (DMF) for processing in near-real-time. Instrument and processed data are then delivered approximately daily to the ARM Data Archive, where they are made freely available to the research community. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of processed data records received daily at the Data Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual datastream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998.

  19. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report October 1–December 31, 2012

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Voyles, JW

    2013-01-11

    Individual datastreams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility fixed and mobile research sites are collected and routed to the Data Management Facility (DMF) for processing in near-real-time. Instrument and processed data are then delivered approximately daily to the ARM Data Archive, where they are made freely available to the research community. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of processed data records received daily at the Data Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual datastream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year dating back to 1998.

  20. The CERN n_TOF facility: a unique tool for nuclear data measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mingrone, F.; Aberle, O.; Andrzejewski, J.; Audouin, L.; Bécares, V.; Bacak, M.; Balibrea-Correa, J.; Barbagallo, M.; Barros, S.; Bečvář, F.; Beinrucker, C.; Berthoumieux, E.; Billowes, J.; Bosnar, D.; Brugger, M.; Caamaño, M.; Calviño, F.; Calviani, M.; Cano-Ott, D.; Cardella, R.; Casanovas, A.; Castelluccio, D. M.; Cerutti, F.; Chen, Y.; Chiaveri, E.; Colonna, N.; Cortés-Giraldo, M. A.; Cortés, G.; Cosentino, L.; Damone, L.; Diakaki, M.; Domingo-Pardo, C.; Dressler, R.; Dupont, E.; Durán, I.; Fernández-Domínguez, B.; Ferrari, A.; Ferreira, P.; Finocchiaro, P.; Furman, V.; Ganesan, S.; Garcia-Rios, A. A.; Gawlik, A.; Gheorghe, I.; Glodariu, T.; Gonçalves, I. F.; Gonzàlez, E.; Goverdovski, A.; Griesmayer, E.; Guerrero, C.; Gunsing, F.; Göbel, K.; Harada, H.; Heftrich, T.; Heinitz, S.; Heyse, J.; Jenkins, G.; Jericha, E.; Käppeler, F.; Kadi, Y.; Katabuchi, T.; Kavrigin, P.; Ketlerov, V.; Khryachkov, V.; Kimura, A.; Kivel, N.; Kokkoris, M.; Krtička, M.; Leal-Cidoncha, E.; Lederer, C.; Leeb, H.; Lerendegui, J.; Lo Meo, S.; Lonsdale, S.; Losito, R.; Macina, D.; Marganiec, J.; Martínez, T.; Massimi, C.; Mastinu, P.; Mastromarco, M.; Matteucci, F.; Maugeri, E. A.; Mendoza, E.; Mengoni, A.; Milazzo, P. M.; Mirea, M.; Montesano, S.; Musumarra, A.; Nolte, R.; Oprea, A.; Patronis, N.; Pavlik, A.; Perkowski, J.; Praena, J.; Quesada, J. M.; Rajeev, K.; Rauscher, T.; Reifarth, R.; Riego-Perez, A.; Rout, P.; Rubbia, C.; Ryan, J. A.; Sabaté-Gilarte, M.; Saxena, A.; Schillebeeckx, P.; Schmidt, S.; Schumann, D.; Sedyshev, P.; Smith, A. G.; Stamatopoulos, A.; Tagliente, G.; Tain, J. L.; Tarifeño-Saldivia, A.; Tassan-Got, L.; Tsinganis, A.; Valenta, S.; Vannini, G.; Variale, V.; Vaz, P.; Ventura, A.; Vlachoudis, V.; Vlastou, R.; Wallner, A.; Warren, S.; Weigand, M.; Weiss, C.; Wolf, C.; Woods, P. J.; Wright, T.; Žugec, P.

    2016-06-01

    The study of the resonant structures in neutron-nucleus cross-sections, and therefore of the compound-nucleus reaction mechanism, requires spectroscopic measurements to determine with high accuracy the energy of the neutron interacting with the material under study. To this purpose, the neutron time-of-flight facility n_TOF has been operating since 2001 at CERN. Its characteristics, such as the high intensity instantaneous neutron flux, the wide energy range from thermal to few GeV, and the very good energy resolution, are perfectly suited to perform high-quality measurements of neutron-induced reaction cross sections. The precise and accurate knowledge of these cross sections plays a fundamental role in nuclear technologies, nuclear astrophysics and nuclear physics. Two different measuring stations are available at the n_TOF facility, called EAR1 and EAR2, with different characteristics of intensity of the neutron flux and energy resolution. These experimental areas, combined with advanced detection systems lead to a great flexibility in performing challenging measurement of high precision and accuracy, and allow the investigation isotopes with very low cross sections, or available only in small quantities, or with very high specific activity. The characteristics and performances of the two experimental areas of the n_TOF facility will be presented, together with the most important measurements performed to date and their physics case. In addition, the significant upcoming measurements will be introduced.

  1. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report October 1-December 31, 2016

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Voyles, Jimmy [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Individual datastreams from instrumentation at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility fixed and mobile research observatories (sites) are collected and routed to the ARM Data Center (ADC). The Data Management Facility (DMF), a component of the ADC, executes datastream processing in near-real time. Processed data are then delivered approximately daily to the ARM Data Archive, also a component of the ADC, where they are made freely available to the research community. For each instrument, ARM calculates the ratio of the actual number of processed data records received daily at the ARM Data Archive to the expected number of data records. DOE requires national user facilities to report time-based operating data.

  2. Torsion pendulum facility for direct force measurements of LISA GRS related disturbances

    CERN Document Server

    Carbone, L; Ciani, G; Dolesi, R; Hüller, M; Tombolato, D; Vitale, S; Weber, W J

    2007-01-01

    A four mass torsion pendulum facility for testing of the LISA GRS is under development in Trento. With a LISA-like test mass suspended off-axis with respect to the pendulum fiber, the facility allows for a direct measurement of surface force disturbances arising in the GRS. We present here results with a prototype pendulum integrated with very large-gap sensors, which allows an estimate of the intrinsic pendulum noise floor in the absence of sensor related force noise. The apparatus has shown a torque noise near to its mechanical thermal noise limit, and would allow to place upper limits on GRS related disturbances with a best sensitivity of 300 fN/Hz^(1/2) at 1mHz, a factor 50 from the LISA goal. Also, we discuss the characterization of the gravity gradient noise, one environmental noise source that could limit the apparatus performances, and report on the status of development of the facility.

  3. Commissioning experience and beam physics measurements at the SwissFEL Injector test Facility

    CERN Document Server

    Schietinger, T.; Aiba, M.; Arsov, V.; Bettoni, S.; Beutner, B.; Calvi, M.; Craievich, P.; Dehler, M.; Frei, F.; Ganter, R.; Hauri, C. P.; Ischebeck, R.; Ivanisenko, Y.; Janousch, M.; Kaiser, M.; Keil, B.; Löhl, F.; Orlandi, G. L.; Ozkan Loch, C.; Peier, P.; Prat, E.; Raguin, J.-Y.; Reiche, S.; Schilcher, T.; Wiegand, P.; Zimoch, E.; Anicic, D.; Armstrong, D.; Baldinger, M.; Baldinger, R.; Bertrand, A.; Bitterli, K.; Bopp, M.; Brands, H.; Braun, H. H.; Brönnimann, M.; Brunnenkant, I.; Chevtsov, P.; Chrin, J.; Citterio, A.; Csatari Divall, M.; Dach, M.; Dax, A.; Ditter, R.; Divall, E.; Falone, A.; Fitze, H.; Geiselhart, C.; Guetg, M. W.; Hämmerli, F.; Hauff, A.; Heiniger, M.; Higgs, C.; Hugentobler, W.; Hunziker, S.; Janser, G.; Kalantari, B.; Kalt, R.; Kim, Y.; Koprek, W.; Korhonen, T.; Krempaska, R.; Laznovsky, M.; Lehner, S.; Le Pimpec, F.; Lippuner, T.; Lutz, H.; Mair, S.; Marcellini, F.; Marinkovic, G.; Menzel, R.; Milas, N.; Pal, T.; Pollet, P.; Portmann, W.; Rezaeizadeh, A.; Ritt, S.; Rohrer, M.; Schär, M.; Schebacher, L.; Scherrer, St.; Schlott, V.; Schmidt, T.; Schulz, L.; Smit, B.; Stadler, M.; Steffen, Bernd; Stingelin, L.; Sturzenegger, W.; Treyer, D. M.; Trisorio, A.; Tron, W.; Vicario, C.; Zennaro, R.; Zimoch, D.

    2016-10-26

    The SwissFEL Injector Test Facility operated at the Paul Scherrer Institute between 2010 and 2014, serving as a pilot plant and test bed for the development and realization of SwissFEL, the x-ray Free Electron Laser facility under construction at the same institute. The test facility consisted of a laser-driven rf electron gun followed by an S-band booster linac, a magnetic bunch compression chicane and a diagnostic section including atransverse deflecting rf cavity. It delivered electron bunchesof up to200 pC chargeand up to 250 MeV beam energy at a repetition rate of 10 Hz. The measurements performed at the test facility not only demonstrated the beam parameters required to drive the first stage of a FEL facility, but also led to significant advances in instrumentation technologies, beam characterization methods and the generation, transport and compression of ultralow-emittance beams. We give a comprehensive overview of the commissioning experience of the principal subsystems and the beam physics measureme...

  4. Commissioning experience and beam physics measurements at the SwissFEL Injector Test Facility

    CERN Document Server

    Schietinger, T; Aiba, M; Arsov, V; Bettoni, S; Beutner, B; Calvi, M; Craievich, P; Dehler, M; Frei, F; Ganter, R; Hauri, C P; Ischebeck, R; Ivanisenko, Y; Janousch, M; Kaiser, M; Keil, B; Löhl, F; Orlandi, G L; Loch, C Ozkan; Peier, P; Prat, E; Raguin, J -Y; Reiche, S; Schilcher, T; Wiegand, P; Zimoch, E; Anicic, D; Armstrong, D; Baldinger, M; Baldinger, R; Bertrand, A; Bitterli, K; Bopp, M; Brands, H; Braun, H H; Brönnimann, M; Brunnenkant, I; Chevtsov, P; Chrin, J; Citterio, A; Divall, M Csatari; Dach, M; Dax, A; Ditter, R; Divall, E; Falone, A; Fitze, H; Geiselhart, C; Guetg, M W; Hämmerli, F; Hauff, A; Heiniger, M; Higgs, C; Hugentobler, W; Hunziker, S; Janser, G; Kalantari, B; Kalt, R; Kim, Y; Koprek, W; Korhonen, T; Krempaska, R; Laznovsky, M; Lehner, S; Pimpec, F Le; Lippuner, T; Lutz, H; Mair, S; Marcellini, F; Marinkovic, G; Menzel, R; Milas, N; Pal, T; Pollet, P; Portmann, W; Rezaeizadeh, A; Ritt, S; Rohrer, M; Schär, M; Schebacher, L; Scherrer, St; Schmidt, V Schlott T; Schulz, L; Smit, B; Stadler, M; Steffen, B; Stingelin, L; Sturzenegger, W; Treyer, D M; Trisorio, A; Tron, W; Vicario, C; Zennaro, R; Zimoch, D

    2016-01-01

    The SwissFEL Injector Test Facility operated at the Paul Scherrer Institute between 2010 and 2014, serving as a pilot plant and testbed for the development and realization of SwissFEL, the X-ray Free-Electron Laser facility under construction at the same institute. The test facility consisted of a laser-driven rf electron gun followed by an S-band booster linac, a magnetic bunch compression chicane and a diagnostic section including a transverse deflecting rf cavity. It delivered electron bunches of up to 200 pC charge and up to 250 MeV beam energy at a repetition rate of 10 Hz. The measurements performed at the test facility not only demonstrated the beam parameters required to drive the first stage of an FEL facility, but also led to significant advances in instrumentation technologies, beam characterization methods and the generation, transport and compression of ultra-low-emittance beams. We give a comprehensive overview of the commissioning experience of the principal subsystems and the beam physics meas...

  5. X-ray source development for EXAFS measurements on the National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coppari, F.; Thorn, D. B.; Kemp, G. E.; Craxton, R. S.; Garcia, E. M.; Ping, Y.; Eggert, J. H.; Schneider, M. B.

    2017-08-01

    Extended X-ray absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS) measurements require a bright, spectrally smooth, and broad-band x-ray source. In a laser facility, such an x-ray source can be generated by a laser-driven capsule implosion. In order to optimize the x-ray emission, different capsule types and laser irradiations have been tested at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). A crystal spectrometer is used to disperse the x-rays and high efficiency image plate detectors are used to measure the absorption spectra in transmission geometry. EXAFS measurements at the K-edge of iron at ambient conditions have been obtained for the first time on the NIF laser, and the requirements for optimization have been established.

  6. Setting up a Rayleigh Scattering Based Flow Measuring System in a Large Nozzle Testing Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panda, Jayanta; Gomez, Carlos R.

    2002-01-01

    A molecular Rayleigh scattering based air density measurement system has been built in a large nozzle testing facility at NASA Glenn Research Center. The technique depends on the light scattering by gas molecules present in air; no artificial seeding is required. Light from a single mode, continuous wave laser was transmitted to the nozzle facility by optical fiber, and light scattered by gas molecules, at various points along the laser beam, is collected and measured by photon-counting electronics. By placing the laser beam and collection optics on synchronized traversing units, the point measurement technique is made effective for surveying density variation over a cross-section of the nozzle plume. Various difficulties associated with dust particles, stray light, high noise level and vibration are discussed. Finally, a limited amount of data from an underexpanded jet are presented and compared with expected variations to validate the technique.

  7. X-ray source development for EXAFS measurements on the National Ignition Facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coppari, F; Thorn, D B; Kemp, G E; Craxton, R S; Garcia, E M; Ping, Y; Eggert, J H; Schneider, M B

    2017-08-01

    Extended X-ray absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS) measurements require a bright, spectrally smooth, and broad-band x-ray source. In a laser facility, such an x-ray source can be generated by a laser-driven capsule implosion. In order to optimize the x-ray emission, different capsule types and laser irradiations have been tested at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). A crystal spectrometer is used to disperse the x-rays and high efficiency image plate detectors are used to measure the absorption spectra in transmission geometry. EXAFS measurements at the K-edge of iron at ambient conditions have been obtained for the first time on the NIF laser, and the requirements for optimization have been established.

  8. Completely automated measurement facility (PAVICOM) for track-detector data processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aleksandrov, A.B. [Lebedev Physical Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, Leninskii prospect 53, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation)]. E-mail: alanbor@sci.lebedev.ru; Apacheva, I.Yu. [Lebedev Physical Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, Leninskii prospect 53, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); Feinberg, E.L. [Lebedev Physical Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, Leninskii prospect 53, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); Goncharova, L.A. [Lebedev Physical Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, Leninskii prospect 53, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); Konovalova, N.S. [Lebedev Physical Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, Leninskii prospect 53, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); Martynov, A.G. [Lebedev Physical Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, Leninskii prospect 53, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); Polukhina, N.G. [Lebedev Physical Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, Leninskii prospect 53, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); Roussetski, A.S. [Lebedev Physical Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, Leninskii prospect 53, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); Starkov, N.I. [Lebedev Physical Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, Leninskii prospect 53, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); Tsarev, V.A. [Lebedev Physical Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, Leninskii prospect 53, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation)

    2004-12-11

    A review of technical capabilities and investigations performed using the completely automated measuring facility (PAVICOM) is presented. This very efficient facility for track-detector data processing in the field of nuclear and high-energy particle physics has been constructed in the Lebedev physical institute. PAVICOM is widely used in Russia for treatment of experimental data from track detectors (emulsion and solid-state trackers) in high- and low-energy physics, cosmic ray physics, etc. PAVICOM provides an essential improvement of the efficiency of experimental studies. In contrast to semi-automated microscopes widely used until now, PAVICOM is capable of performing completely automated measurements of charged particle tracks in nuclear emulsions and track detectors without employing hard visual work. In this case, track images are recorded by CCD cameras and then are digitized and converted into files. Thus, experimental data processing is accelerated by approximately a thousand times. Completely automated facilities similar to PAVICOM came into operation in scientific centers of Japan, Italy, some other countries, and in CERN. In Russia, PAVICOM is the only facility of such a type. Its capabilities are so wide that it serves not only the needs of investigations being performed at the LPI but is also used by other Russian laboratories and institutes. Thus, PAVICOM actually plays the role of a multipurpose user center.

  9. Measurement of basic thermal-hydraulic characteristics under the test facility and reactor conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eduard A Boltenko; Victor P Sharov [Elektrogorsk Research and Engineering Center, EREC, Bezimyannaja Street, 6, Elektrogorsk, Moscow Region, 142530 (Russian Federation); Dmitriy E Boltenko [State Scientific Center of Russian Federation IPPE, Bondarenko Square, Obhinsk, Kaluga Region, 249020 (Russian Federation)

    2005-07-01

    Full text of publication follows: The nuclear power of Russia is based on the reactors of two types: water-water - WWER and uranium - graphite channel RBMK. The nuclear power development is possible with performance of the basic condition - level of nuclear power plants (NPP) safety should satisfy the rigid requirements. The calculated proof of NPPs safety made by means of thermal-hydraulic codes of improved estimation, verified on experimental data is the characteristic of this level. The data for code verification can be obtained at the integral facilities simulating a circulation circuit of NPP with the basic units and intended for investigation of circuit behaviour in transient and accident conditions. For verification of mathematical models in transient and accident conditions, development of physically reasonable methods for definition of the various characteristics of two-phase flow the experimental data, as the integrated characteristics of a flow, and data on the local characteristics and structure of a flow is necessary. For safety assurance of NPP it is necessary to monitor and determine the basic thermalhydraulic characteristics of reactor facility (RF). It is possible to refer coolant flow-rate, core input and output water temperature, heat-power. The description of the EREC works in the field completion and adaptation of certain methods with reference to measurements in dynamic modes of test facility conditions and development of methods for measurements of basic thermal-hydraulic characteristics of reactor facilities is presented in the paper. (authors)

  10. What You Find Depends on How You Measure It: Reactivity of Response Scales Measuring Predecisional Information Distortion in Medical Diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nurek, Martine; Kostopoulou, Olga

    2016-01-01

    "Predecisional information distortion" occurs when decision makers evaluate new information in a way that is biased towards their leading option. The phenomenon is well established, as is the method typically used to measure it, termed "stepwise evolution of preference" (SEP). An inadequacy of this method has recently come to the fore: it measures distortion as the total advantage afforded a leading option over its competitor, and therefore it cannot differentiate between distortion to strengthen a leading option ("proleader" distortion) and distortion to weaken a trailing option ("antitrailer" distortion). To address this, recent research introduced new response scales to SEP. We explore whether and how these new response scales might influence the very proleader and antitrailer processes that they were designed to capture ("reactivity"). We used the SEP method with concurrent verbal reporting: fifty family physicians verbalized their thoughts as they evaluated patient symptoms and signs ("cues") in relation to two competing diagnostic hypotheses. Twenty-five physicians evaluated each cue using the response scale traditional to SEP (a single response scale, returning a single measure of distortion); the other twenty-five did so using the response scales introduced in recent studies (two separate response scales, returning two separate measures of distortion: proleader and antitrailer). We measured proleader and antitrailer processes in verbalizations, and compared verbalizations in the single-scale and separate-scales groups. Response scales did not appear to affect proleader processes: the two groups of physicians were equally likely to bolster their leading diagnosis verbally. Response scales did, however, appear to affect antitrailer processes: the two groups denigrated their trailing diagnosis verbally to differing degrees. Our findings suggest that the response scales used to measure information distortion might influence its constituent processes, limiting

  11. On-line measurements of particle-bound reactive oxygen species (ROS) in Beijing wintertime air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steimer, Sarah; Wragg, Francis; Kalberer, Markus

    2017-04-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS), present in particles or generated by particle components upon deposition of particles in the human lung, are widely thought to be one of the main contributors to particle-related toxicity. However, there is so far only relatively little data available on their concentrations in ambient air, which makes it difficult to gauge their impact on air quality. Recent studies have shown that a large fraction of particle-bound ROS in secondary organic aerosol is relatively short-lived, with lifetimes of several minutes. Traditional off-line sampling with high-volume samplers is therefore likely to severely underestimate ROS concentrations, showing the need for using on-line instrumentation. We have recently developed a compact on-line instrument for the measurement of particle-bound ROS (OPROSI). To measure ROS concentrations, particles are continuously extracted and the extract is reacted with 2'7'-dichlorofluorescein (DCFH) in presence of horseradish peroxidase (HRP). This leads to formation of a fluorescent dye, which is detected spectroscopically. The instrument allows for up to 16 h of continuous measurement with a time resolution of ≤12 min and a limit of detection of 3.85 nmol [H2O2] equivalent per m3 air. For this study, we have used the OPROSI to continuously measure the concentration of particle-bound ROS in Beijing wintertime air during the first half of the Air Pollution and Human Health in a Developing Megacity (APHH-Beijing) campaign in November and December 2016. Measured ROS data are compared with other air pollution parameters such as total particulate mass, ozone and NOx as well as with meteorological measurements such as temperature and humidity.

  12. A transparent Pyrex μ-reactor for combined in situ optical characterization and photocatalytic reactivity measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dionigi, F.; Hansen, O. [CINF, Department of Physics, Building 312, Fysikvej, Technical University of Denmark, DTU, DK-2800 Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark); Department of Micro- and Nanotechnology, Nanotech, Building 345 East, Technical University of Denmark, DTU, DK-2800 Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark); Nielsen, M. G.; Chorkendorff, I.; Vesborg, P. C. K. [CINF, Department of Physics, Building 312, Fysikvej, Technical University of Denmark, DTU, DK-2800 Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark); Pedersen, T. [Department of Micro- and Nanotechnology, Nanotech, Building 345 East, Technical University of Denmark, DTU, DK-2800 Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark)

    2013-10-15

    A new Pyrex-based μ-reactor for photocatalytic and optical characterization experiments is presented. The reactor chamber and gas channels are microfabricated in a thin poly-silicon coated Pyrex chip that is sealed with a Pyrex lid by anodic bonding. The device is transparent to light in the UV-vis-near infrared range of wavelengths (photon energies between ∼0.4 and ∼4.1 eV). The absorbance of a photocatalytic film obtained with a light transmission measurement during a photocatalytic reaction is presented as a proof of concept of a photocatalytic reactivity measurement combined with in situ optical characterization. Diffuse reflectance measurements of highly scattering photocatalytic nanopowders in a sealed Pyrex μ-reactor are also possible using an integrating sphere as shown in this work. These experiments prove that a photocatalyst can be characterized with optical techniques after a photocatalytic reaction without removing the material from the reactor. The catalyst deposited in the cylindrical reactor chamber can be illuminated from both top and bottom sides and an example of application of top and bottom illumination is presented.

  13. A transparent Pyrex μ-reactor for combined in situ optical characterization and photocatalytic reactivity measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dionigi, F; Nielsen, M G; Pedersen, T; Hansen, O; Chorkendorff, I; Vesborg, P C K

    2013-10-01

    A new Pyrex-based μ-reactor for photocatalytic and optical characterization experiments is presented. The reactor chamber and gas channels are microfabricated in a thin poly-silicon coated Pyrex chip that is sealed with a Pyrex lid by anodic bonding. The device is transparent to light in the UV-vis-near infrared range of wavelengths (photon energies between ~0.4 and ~4.1 eV). The absorbance of a photocatalytic film obtained with a light transmission measurement during a photocatalytic reaction is presented as a proof of concept of a photocatalytic reactivity measurement combined with in situ optical characterization. Diffuse reflectance measurements of highly scattering photocatalytic nanopowders in a sealed Pyrex μ-reactor are also possible using an integrating sphere as shown in this work. These experiments prove that a photocatalyst can be characterized with optical techniques after a photocatalytic reaction without removing the material from the reactor. The catalyst deposited in the cylindrical reactor chamber can be illuminated from both top and bottom sides and an example of application of top and bottom illumination is presented.

  14. A transparent Pyrex μ-reactor for combined in situ optical characterization and photocatalytic reactivity measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dionigi, F.; Nielsen, M. G.; Pedersen, T.; Hansen, O.; Chorkendorff, I.; Vesborg, P. C. K.

    2013-10-01

    A new Pyrex-based μ-reactor for photocatalytic and optical characterization experiments is presented. The reactor chamber and gas channels are microfabricated in a thin poly-silicon coated Pyrex chip that is sealed with a Pyrex lid by anodic bonding. The device is transparent to light in the UV-vis-near infrared range of wavelengths (photon energies between ˜0.4 and ˜4.1 eV). The absorbance of a photocatalytic film obtained with a light transmission measurement during a photocatalytic reaction is presented as a proof of concept of a photocatalytic reactivity measurement combined with in situ optical characterization. Diffuse reflectance measurements of highly scattering photocatalytic nanopowders in a sealed Pyrex μ-reactor are also possible using an integrating sphere as shown in this work. These experiments prove that a photocatalyst can be characterized with optical techniques after a photocatalytic reaction without removing the material from the reactor. The catalyst deposited in the cylindrical reactor chamber can be illuminated from both top and bottom sides and an example of application of top and bottom illumination is presented.

  15. Material control in nuclear fuel fabrication facilities. Part II. Accountability, instrumntation, and measurement techniques in fuel fabrication facilities, P. O. 1236909. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borgonovi, G.M.; McCartin, T.J.; McDaniel, T.; Miller, C.L.; Nguyen, T.

    1978-12-01

    This report describes the measurement techniques, the instrumentation, and the procedures used in accountability and control of nuclear materials, as they apply to fuel fabrication facilities. Some of the material included has appeared elswhere and it has been summarized. An extensive bibliography is included. A spcific example of application of the accountability methods to a model fuel fabrication facility which is based on the Westinghouse Anderson design.

  16. Biosphere-atmosphere exchange of reactive nitrogen and greenhouse gases at the NitroEurope core flux measurement sites: Measurement strategy and first data sets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skiba, U.; Drewer, J.; Tang, Y.S.

    2009-01-01

    The NitroEurope project aims to improve understanding of the nitrogen (N) cycle at the continental scale and quantify the major fluxes of reactive N by a combination of reactive N measurements and modelling activities. As part of the overall measurement strategy, a network of 13 flux ‘super sites...... by a network of low-cost flux measurements (Level-2, 9 sites) and a network to infer reactive N fluxes at 58 sites (Level-1), for comparison with carbon (C) flux measurements. Measurements at the Level-3 sites include high resolution N2O, NO (also CH4, CO2) fluxes, wet and dry N deposition, leaching of N and C...

  17. Quantitative measurements of C-reactive protein using silicon nanowire arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min-Ho Lee

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Min-Ho Lee, Kuk-Nyung Lee, Suk-Won Jung, Won-Hyo Kim, Kyu-Sik Shin, Woo-Kyeong SeongKorea Electronics Technology Institute, Gyeonggi, KoreaAbstract: A silicon nanowire-based sensor for biological application showed highly desirable electrical responses to either pH changes or receptor-ligand interactions such as protein disease markers, viruses, and DNA hybridization. Furthermore, because the silicon nanowire can display results in real-time, it may possess superior characteristics for biosensing than those demonstrated in previously studied methods. However, despite its promising potential and advantages, certain process-related limitations of the device, due to its size and material characteristics, need to be addressed. In this article, we suggest possible solutions. We fabricated silicon nanowire using a top-down and low cost micromachining method, and evaluate the sensing of molecules after transfer and surface modifications. Our newly designed method can be used to attach highly ordered nanowires to various substrates, to form a nanowire array device, which needs to follow a series of repetitive steps in conventional fabrication technology based on a vapor-liquid-solid (VLS method. For evaluation, we demonstrated that our newly fabricated silicon nanowire arrays could detect pH changes as well as streptavidin-biotin binding events. As well as the initial proof-of-principle studies, C-reactive protein binding was measured: electrical signals were changed in a linear fashion with the concentration (1 fM to 1 nM in PBS containing 1.37 mM of salts. Finally, to address the effects of Debye length, silicon nanowires coupled with antigen proteins underwent electrical signal changes as the salt concentration changed.Keywords: silicon nanowire array, C-reactive protein, vapor-liquid-solid method

  18. Control rod reactivity measurement by rod-drop method at a fast critical assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, L.; Yin, Y.; Lian, X.; Zheng, C. [Inst. of Nuclear Physics and Chemistry in CAEP, P. O. Box 919 210, Mianyang, Sichuan, 621900 (China)

    2012-07-01

    Rod-drop experiments were carried out to estimate the reactivity of the control rod of a fast critical assembly operated by CAEP. Two power monitor systems were used to obtain the power level and integration method was used to process the data. Three experiments were performed. The experimental results of the reactivity from the two power monitor systems were consistent and showed a reasonable range of reactivity compared to results from positive period method. (authors)

  19. A new and inexpensive temperature-measuring system. Application to photovoltaic solar facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bohorquez, Miguel Angel Martinez; Enrique Gomez, Juan Manuel; Andujar Marquez, Jose Manuel [Departamento de Ingenieria Electronica, de Sistemas Informaticos y Automatica, Universidad de Huelva, Carretera Huelva - Palos de la, Frontera S/N, 21819 Huelva (Spain)

    2009-06-15

    This article presents the design, construction and testing of a new and inexpensive digital sensor-based temperature-measuring system, whose principal characteristics are: precision, ease of connection, immunity to noise, remote operation and easy scaling, and all this at a very low cost. This new digital sensor-based measuring system overcomes the traditional problems of digital measuring sensors, offering characteristics similar to Pt100-based measuring systems, and therefore can be used in any installation where reliable temperature measurement is necessary. It is especially suitable for installations where cost is a deciding factor in the choice of measuring system. It presents a practical application of the developed instrumentation system for use in photovoltaic solar facilities. This new temperature-measuring system has been registered in the Spanish Patent and Trademark Office with the number P200803364. (author)

  20. Measurements of UV-generated free radicals/reactive oxygen species (ROS) in skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrling, Th.; Jung, K.; Fuchs, J.

    2006-03-01

    Free radicals/reactive oxygen species (ROS) generated in skin by UV irradiation were measured by electron spin resonance (ESR). To increase the sensitivity of measurement the short life free radicals/ROS were scavenged and accumulated by using the nitroxyl probe 3-carboxy-2,2,5,5-tetrametylpyrrolidine-1-oxyl (PCA). The spatial distribution of free radicals/ROS measured in pig skin biopsies with ESR imaging after UV irradiation corresponds to the intensity decay of irradiance in the depth of the skin. The main part of free radicals/ROS were generated by UVA (320-400 nm) so that the spatial distribution of free radicals reaches up to the lower side of the dermis. In vivo measurements on human skin were performed with a L-band ESR spectrometer and a surface coil integrating the signal intensities from all skin layers to get a sufficient signal amplitude. Using this experimental arrangement the protection of UVB and UVA/B filter against the generation of free radicals/ROS in skin were measured. The protection against ROS and the repair of damages caused by them can be realized with active antioxidants characterized by a high antioxidative power (AP). The effect of UV filter and antioxidants corresponding to their protection against free radicals/ROS in skin generated by UVAB irradiation can be quantified by the new radical sun protection factor (RSF). The RSF indicates the increase of time for staying in the sun to generate the same number of free radicals/ROS in the skin like for the unprotected skin. Regarding the amount of generated free radicals/ROS in skin as an biophysical endpoint the RSF characterizes both the protection against UVB and UVA radiation.

  1. The Construction of the Fast Resistive Bolometer for a SXR Measurement on the GIT-12 Facility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jakub Cikhardt

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A lot of kinds of instruments are used for the SXR measurement at pulsed power facilities, but most of them are difficult to calibrate absolutely. For the determination of the energy of SXR radiated by the discharge on Z-pinches, it is possible to use the bolometer which can be calibrated analytically. The bolometer can be constructed with the sufficient sensitivity and, at the same time, with the time resolution in the order of nanoseconds. This bolometer was designed and constructed for the measurement on the 5MA facility GIT-12 at the Institute of High Current Electronics (IHCE of the Siberian Branch Russian Academy of Sciences in Tomsk. The experiments on GIT-12 with the neon and deuterium gas-puff load were diagnosed by the copper bolometer with the time resolution of 4 ns and the sensitivity of 12 V cm2 J-1.

  2. Completely automated measurement facility (PAVICOM) for track-detector data processing

    CERN Document Server

    Aleksandrov, A B; Feinberg, E L; Goncharova, L A; Konovalova, N S; Martynov, A G; Polukhina, N G; Roussetski, A S; Starkov, NI; Tsarev, V A

    2004-01-01

    A review of technical capabilities and investigations performed using the completely automated measuring facility (PAVICOM) is presented. This very efficient facility for track-detector data processing in the field of nuclear and high-energy particle physics has been constructed in the Lebedev physical institute. PAVICOM is widely used in Russia for treatment of experimental data from track detectors (emulsion and solid-state trackers) in high- and low-energy physics, cosmic ray physics, etc. PAVICOM provides an essential improvement of the efficiency of experimental studies. In contrast to semi-automated microscopes widely used until now, PAVICOM is capable of performing completely automated measurements of charged particle tracks in nuclear emulsions and track detectors without employing hard visual work. In this case, track images are recorded by CCD cameras and then are digitized and converted into files. Thus, experimental data processing is accelerated by approximately a thousand times. Completely autom...

  3. Pitfalls and Security Measures for the Mobile EMR System in Medical Facilities

    OpenAIRE

    Yeo, Kiho; Lee, Keehyuck; Kim, Jong-Min; Kim, Tae-Hun; Choi, Yong-Hoon; Jeong, Woo-Jin; Hwang, Hee; Baek, Rong Min; Yoo, Sooyoung

    2012-01-01

    Objectives The goal of this paper is to examine the security measures that should be reviewed by medical facilities that are trying to implement mobile Electronic Medical Record (EMR) systems designed for hospitals. Methods The study of the security requirements for a mobile EMR system is divided into legal considerations and sectional security investigations. Legal considerations were examined with regard to remote medical services, patients' personal information and EMR, medical devices, th...

  4. Analysis of electromagnetic pulse (EMP measurements in the National Ignition Facility's target bay and chamber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brown C.G.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available From May 2009 to the present we have recorded electromagnetic pulse (EMP strength and spectrum (100 MHz – 5 GHz in the target bay and chamber of the National Ignition Facility (NIF. The dependence of EMP strength and frequency spectrum on target type and laser energy is discussed. The largest EMP measured was for relatively low-energy, short-pulse (100 ps flat targets.

  5. Time-integrated measurements of fusion-produced protons emitted from PF-facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malinowska, A.; Szydlowski, A.; Zebrowski, J.; Sadowski, M. J.; Scholz, M.; Schmidt, H.; Karpinski, P.; Jaskola, M.; Korman, A.

    2006-01-01

    The paper reports on measurements of fusion reaction protons, which were emitted from high-current Plasma Focus discharges. The experiments were carried out on two Plasma Focus facilities (PF-360 and PF-1000) and the obtained results are compared in the paper. The paper presents some detailed maps of the fusion proton fluxes, which were recorded with the pinhole cameras. These maps show distributions and shapes of fast proton sources within the pinch plasma column.

  6. New Indices of Endothelial Function Measured by Digital Thermal Monitoring of Vascular Reactivity: Data from 6084 Patients Registry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morteza Naghavi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Endothelial function is viewed as a barometer of cardiovascular health and plays a central role in vascular reactivity. Several studies showed digital thermal monitoring (DTM as a simple noninvasive method to measure vascular reactivity that is correlated with atherosclerosis risk factors and coronary artery disease. Objectives. To further evaluate the relations between patient characteristics and DTM indices in a large patient registry. Methods. DTM measures were correlated with age, sex, heart rate, and systolic and diastolic blood pressure in 6084 patients from 18 clinics. Results. DTM vascular reactivity index (VRI was normally distributed and inversely correlated with age (r=-0.21, p<0.0001. Thirteen percent of VRI tests were categorized as poor vascular reactivity (VRI < 1.0, 70 percent as intermediate (1.0 ≤ VRI < 2.0, and 17 percent as good (VRI ≥ 2.0. Poor VRI (<1.0 was noted in 6% of <50 y, 10% of 50–70 y, and 18% of ≥70 y. In multiple linear regression analyses, age, sex, and diastolic blood pressure were significant but weak predictors of VRI. Conclusions. As the largest database of finger-based vascular reactivity measurement, this report adds to prior findings that VRI is a meaningful physiological marker and reflects a high level of residual risk found in patients currently under care.

  7. Measurement of fenestration net energy performance: Considerations leading to development of a Mobile Window Thermal Test (MoWitt) facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klems, J.H.

    1988-08-01

    The authors present a detailed consideration of the energy flows entering a building space and the effect of random measurement errors on determining fenestration performance. Estimates of error magnitudes are made for a passive test cell; they show that a more accurate test facility is needed for reliable measurements on fenestration systems with thermal resistance 2-10 times that of single glazing or with shading coefficients less than 0.7. A test facility of this type, built at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, is described. The effect of random errors in this facility is discussed and computer calculations of its performance are presented. The discussion shows that, for any measurement facility, random errors are most serious in nighttime measurements, and systematic errors are most important in daytime measurements. It is concluded that, for this facility, errors from both sources should be small.

  8. Flux measurements of reactive nitrogen compounds using a chemiluminescence analyser with different converter types

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ammann, Christof; Wolff, Veronika

    2015-04-01

    The availability of reactive nitrogen (Nr) is a key limiting factors for the productivity and the competition success of individual species. On the other hand, certain nitrogenous compounds can also be emitted from natural or managed ecosystems. Thus the quantification of the Nr exchange can be essential for the interpretation of ecosystem behavior. For the observation of Nr dry deposition and emission the eddy covariance (EC) method is preferable since it does not modify the environmental conditions of the ecosystem, is less prone to wall effects than chamber methods, and is less affected by gas phase chemical reactions than gradient methods. Since the various Nr compounds can undergo fast chemical reactions and have differing chemical and physical characteristics, a variety of detection techniques is usually necessary that often cannot meet the fast response requirements of the EC technique. Here we show applications of a fast response 2-channel NO analyzer suitable for EC measurements. In combination with different inlet converters (photolytic converter, gold catalyst converter, and high-temperature steel converter), the system could alternatively be used for flux measurements of NO2, NOy, and total Nr. The quantification of By combining the 2-channel analyzer with the NOy and total Nr converter simultaneously, the NH3 flux could be determined from the difference between the two channels. Concentration and flux measurements of the system were verified by inter-comparison with other methods. Potential problems include the damping of high-frequency fluctuations in the inlet system. It is therefore important to place the converter close to the sampling inlet and to quantify and correct the damping effects. Moreover, like most other flux measurement techniques, the system is susceptible to non-stationary trace gas concentrations that often occur near pollution sources.

  9. Position measurements for the isotope production facility and the switchyard kicker upgrade projects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gilpatrick, J. D. (John Douglas); Barr, D. S. (Dean S.); O' Hara, J. F. (James F.); Shurter, R. B. (Robert B.); Stettler, M. W. (Matthew W.); Martinez, D. G. (Derwin G.)

    2003-01-01

    The Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) is installing two beam lines to both improve operational tuning and provide new capabilities within the facility. The Isotope Production Facility (IPF) will provide isotopes for medical purposes by using the H' beam spur at 100 MeV and the Switchyard Kicker Upgrade (SYK) will allow the LANSCE 800-MeV H beam to be rapidly switched between various beam lines within the facility. The beam position measurements for both of these beam lines uses a standard micro-stripline beam position monitor (BPM) with both a 50-mm and 75-mm radius. The cable plant is unique in that it unambiguously provides a method of verifying the operation of the complete position measurement. The processing electronics module uses a log ratio technique with error corrections such that it has a dynamic range of -12 dBm to -85 dBm with errors less than 0.15 dB within this range. This paper will describe the primary components of these measurement systems and provide initial data of their operation.

  10. Temperature Measurement in PV Facilities on a Per-Panel Scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel A. Martínez

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the design, construction and testing of an instrumentation system for temperature measurement in PV facilities on a per-panel scale (i.e., one or more temperature measurements per panel. Its main characteristics are: precision, ease of connection, immunity to noise, remote operation, easy scaling; and all of this at a very low cost. The paper discusses the advantages of temperature measurements in PV facilities on a per-panel scale. The paper presents the whole development to implementation of a real system that is being tested in an actual facility. This has enabled the authors to provide the readers with practical guidelines, which would be very difficult to achieve if the developments were implemented by just simulation or in a theoretical way. The instrumentation system is fully developed, from the temperature sensing to its presentation in a virtual instrument. The developed instrumentation system is able to work both locally and remotely connected to both wired and wireless network.

  11. New Directions in Measuring Reactive and Proactive Aggression: Validation of a Teacher Questionnaire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polman, Hanneke; de Castro, Bram Orobio; Thomaes, Sander; van Aken, Marcel

    2009-01-01

    The well-known distinction between reactive and proactive aggression is theoretically important but empirically controversial. Recently, aggression researchers have argued that we should separate the form and function of aggression to make a clearer distinction between reactive and proactive aggression. This article describes the validation of a…

  12. New Directions in Measuring Reactive and Proactive Aggression: Validation of a Teacher Questionnaire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polman, Hanneke; de Castro, Bram Orobio; Thomaes, Sander; van Aken, Marcel

    2009-01-01

    The well-known distinction between reactive and proactive aggression is theoretically important but empirically controversial. Recently, aggression researchers have argued that we should separate the form and function of aggression to make a clearer distinction between reactive and proactive aggression. This article describes the validation of a…

  13. A high precision method for quantitative measurements of reactive oxygen species in frozen biopsies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirsti Berg

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: An electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR technique using the spin probe cyclic hydroxylamine 1-hydroxy-3-methoxycarbonyl-2,2,5,5-tetramethylpyrrolidine (CMH was introduced as a versatile method for high precision quantification of reactive oxygen species, including the superoxide radical in frozen biological samples such as cell suspensions, blood or biopsies. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Loss of measurement precision and accuracy due to variations in sample size and shape were minimized by assembling the sample in a well-defined volume. Measurement was carried out at low temperature (150 K using a nitrogen flow Dewar. The signal intensity was measured from the EPR 1st derivative amplitude, and related to a sample, 3-carboxy-proxyl (CP• with known spin concentration. RESULTS: The absolute spin concentration could be quantified with a precision and accuracy better than ±10 µM (k = 1. The spin concentration of samples stored at -80°C could be reproduced after 6 months of storage well within the same error estimate. CONCLUSION: The absolute spin concentration in wet biological samples such as biopsies, water solutions and cell cultures could be quantified with higher precision and accuracy than normally achievable using common techniques such as flat cells, tissue cells and various capillary tubes. In addition; biological samples could be collected and stored for future incubation with spin probe, and also further stored up to at least six months before EPR analysis, without loss of signal intensity. This opens for the possibility to store and transport incubated biological samples with known accuracy of the spin concentration over time.

  14. Hypergol Maintenance Facility Hazardous Waste South Staging Areas, SWMU 070 Corrective Measures Implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Ralinda R.

    2016-01-01

    This document presents the Corrective Measures Implementation (CMI) Year 10 Annual Report for implementation of corrective measures at the Hypergol Maintenance Facility (HMF) Hazardous Waste South Staging Areas at Kennedy Space Center, Florida. The work is being performed by Tetra Tech, Inc., for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) under Indefinite Delivery Indefinite Quantity (IDIQ) NNK12CA15B, Task Order (TO) 07. Mr. Harry Plaza, P.E., of NASA's Environmental Assurance Branch is the Remediation Project Manager for John F. Kennedy Space Center. The Tetra Tech Program Manager is Mr. Mark Speranza, P.E., and the Tetra Tech Project Manager is Robert Simcik, P.E.

  15. Screening symptoms of reactive attachment disorder: evidence for measurement invariance and convergent validity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vervoort, Eleonora; De Schipper, J Clasien; Bosmans, Guy; Verschueren, Karine

    2013-09-01

    The Relationship Problems Questionnaire (RPQ) was developed to screen symptoms of the inhibited and disinhibited subtype of reactive attachment disorder (RAD). This study further examines the psychometric properties of the RPQ in children with severe emotional and behavioural problems by testing its measurement invariance across informants and its convergent validity. Parents and teachers of 152 children [mean age (Mage) = 7.92] from 20 schools for special education filled out the RPQ and the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ). During a home visit in a subsample of 77 children the Disturbances of Attachment Interview (DAI) was administered to the caregiver and the child was observed using an observational schedule for RAD. Exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses revealed the expected two-factor structure for both parent and teacher RPQ. Configural and metric invariance, but no scalar invariance, were obtained across informants. Both RPQ-subscales had acceptable to good internal consistencies and correlated as expected with similar DAI-subscales. Furthermore, the disinhibited RPQ-scale related with observations of the child's approach to a stranger. Finally, significant associations were found between the RPQ and the SDQ. Overall, the RPQ has good psychometric qualities as a multi-informant instrument for RAD-symptoms in children with severe emotional and behavioural problems.

  16. Measuring Empathic Tendencies: Reliability And Validity of the Dutch Version of the Interpersonal Reactivity Index

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim De Corte

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available The Interpersonal Reactivity Index (IRI; Davis, 1980 is a commonly used self-report instrument designed to assess empathic tendencies. The IRI consists of four separate subscales: Perspective Taking (PT, Fantasy (FS, Empathic Concern (EC, and Personal Distress (PD. The objective of this study was to examine the psychometric properties of a Dutch version of the IRI. The IRI was administered to a Dutch sample of 651 normal functioning adults. The factor structure of the IRI was examined by using confirmatory factor analysis (CFA. The results of the CFA revealed that there is room for improvement and modification of the original theoretical model. The validity of the IRI was tested using internal criteria (i. e., scale intercorrelations and external criteria (i. e., correlations with subscales of the EQ-i (Bar-On, 1997, the NEO-FFI (Hoekstra, Ormel, & De Fruyt, 1996, Mach-IV (Van Kenhove, Vermeir, & Verniers, 2001, Rosenberg Self-esteem Scale (Rosenberg, 1965, and the WAIS-III (Wechsler, 2000. Overall, the internal consistency, construct validity, and factor structure of scores from the Dutch version of the IRI suggest that it is a useful instrument to measure people's self-reported empathic tendencies.

  17. Beam position and phase measurements of microampere beams at the Michigan State University REA3 facility

    CERN Document Server

    Crisp, J; Durickovic, B; Kiupel, G; Krause, S; Leitner, D; Nash, S; Rodriguez, J A; Russo, T; Webber, R; Wittmer, W; Eddy, N; Briegel, C; Fellenz, B; Slimmer, D; Wendt, M

    2013-01-01

    A high power CW, heavy ion linac will be the driver accelerator for the Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB) being designed at Michigan State University (MSU). The linac requires a Beam Position Monitoring (BPM) system with better than 100 micron resolution at 100 microamperes beam current. A low beam current test of the candidate technology, button pick-ups and direct digital down-conversion signal processing, was conducted in the ReA3 re-accelerated beam facility at Michigan State University. The test is described. Beam position and phase measurement results, demonstrating ~250 micron and ~1.5 degree resolution in a 45 kHz bandwidth for a 1.0 microampere beam current, are reported.

  18. Techniques for Measuring Aerosol Attenuation using the Central Laser Facility at the Pierre Auger Observatory

    CERN Document Server

    ,

    2013-01-01

    The Pierre Auger Observatory in Malarg\\"ue, Argentina, is designed to study the properties of ultra-high energy cosmic rays with energies above 1018 eV. It is a hybrid facility that employs a Fluorescence Detector to perform nearly calorimetric measurements of Extensive Air Shower energies. To obtain reliable calorimetric information from the FD, the atmospheric conditions at the observatory need to be continuously monitored during data acquisition. In particular, light attenuation due to aerosols is an important atmospheric correction. The aerosol concentration is highly variable, so that the aerosol attenuation needs to be evaluated hourly. We use light from the Central Laser Facility, located near the center of the observatory site, having an optical signature comparable to that of the highest energy showers detected by the FD. This paper presents two procedures developed to retrieve the aerosol attenuation of fluorescence light from CLF laser shots. Cross checks between the two methods demonstrate that re...

  19. A decision support system for quantitative measurement of operational efficiency in a blood collection facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kros, John F; Yim Pang, Robyn

    2004-04-01

    A decision support system (DSS) is presented that allows users to input, analyze, and output data derived from blood banking operations. The DSS developed is a hybrid system that is both data and model driven. The system provides information, models, and data manipulation tools to assist users in the quantitative measurement of the operational efficiency in a blood collection facility. A relational database was developed to address the four major variables, which impact the cost per unit of blood being collected. Using visual basic, a user interface and mathematical model were developed establishing the relationships to analyze cost per unit of collected blood. Using inputs from users and historical financial data, the DSS calculates the cost per unit as each of the major variables is altered. Real life situations by the mobile operations team at a blood collection facility were used to test the DSS.

  20. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report October 1–December 31, 2011

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Voyles, JW

    2012-01-09

    Individual raw datastreams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real-time. Raw and processed data are then sent approximately daily to the ARM Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of processed data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual datastream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998.

  1. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report January 1–March 31, 2012

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Voyles, JW

    2012-04-13

    Individual raw datastreams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real-time. Raw and processed data are then sent approximately daily to the ARM Data Archive, where they are made available to the research community. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of processed data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual datastream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998.

  2. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report: October 1 - December 31, 2010

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sisterson, DL

    2011-03-02

    Individual raw datastreams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real-time. Raw and processed data are then sent approximately daily to the ARM Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of processed data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual datastream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998.

  3. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report July 1–September 30, 2011

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Voyles, JW

    2011-10-10

    Individual raw datastreams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real-time. Raw and processed data are then sent approximately daily to the ARM Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of processed data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual datastream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998.

  4. Cerebral Blood Flow and Transcranial Doppler Sonography Measurements of CO(2)-Reactivity in Acute Traumatic Brain Injured Patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reinstrup, Peter; Ryding, Erik Hilmer; Asgeirsson, Bogi;

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cerebral blood flow (CBF) measurements are helpful in managing patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI), and testing the cerebrovascular reactivity to CO(2) provides information about injury severity and outcome. The complexity and potential hazard of performing CBF measurements...... limits routine clinical use. An alternative approach is to measure the CBF velocity using bedside, non-invasive, and transcranial Doppler (TCD) sonography. This study was performed to investigate if TCD is a useful alternative to CBF in patients with severe TBI. METHOD: CBF and TCD flow velocity...... measurements and cerebrovascular reactivity to hypocapnia were simultaneously evaluated in 27 patients with acute TBI. Measurements were performed preoperatively during controlled normocapnia and hypocapnia in patients scheduled for hematoma evacuation under general anesthesia. MAIN FINDING AND CONCLUSION...

  5. Microbeam facility extension for single-cell irradiation experiments. Investigations about bystander effect and reactive oxygen species impact

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanot, M.; Khodja, H.; Daudin, L.; Hoarau, J.; Carriere, M.; Gouget, B. [CEA Saclay, Lab. Pierre Sue (LPS), CEA-CNRS UMR9956, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    2006-07-01

    The LPS microbeam facility is based on a KN3750 Van de Graaff accelerator devoted to microbeam analysis [1]. It is equipped with two horizontal microbeam lines used in various fields such as material science, geological science, nuclear material science and biology. Since two years, a single ion hit device is being developed at the LPS. The setup is dedicated to the study of ionizing radiation effects on living cells by performing single ion irradiation at controlled doses and locations. This study will complete current researches conducted on uranium chemical toxicity on renal an d osteoblastic cells. After ingestion, most uranium is excreted from the body within a few days except small fraction that is absorbed into the blood-stream (0.2 to 5%) and then deposit and preferentially in kidneys and bones, where it can remain for many years. Uranium is a heavy metal and a primarily alpha emitter. It can lead to bone cancer as a result of the ionizing radiation associated with the radioactive decay products. The study of the response to an exposure to alpha particles will permit to distinguish radiotoxicity and chemical toxicity of uranium bone cells with a special emphasis or the bystander effect at low dose.All the beam lines at the LPS nuclear microprobe are horizontal and under vacuum. A dedicated deflecting magnet was inserted in one of the two available beam lines of the facility. The ion beam is extracted to air using a 100 nm thick silicon nitride membrane, thin enough to induce negligible effects on the ions in terms of energy loss and spatial resolution. By this way, we believe that we minimize the experimental setup impact on the living cells easing the detection of low irradiation dose impact. The atmosphere around the samples is also important to guaranty low stressed cell culture conditions. A temperature, hygrometry and CO{sub 2} controlled atmosphere device will be implanted in the future. The irradiation microbeam is produced using a fused silica

  6. Measurement based analysis of active and reactive power losses in a distribution network with wind farms and CHPs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Torsten

    2007-01-01

    The paper presents an investigation of the active and reactive power losses in a distribution network with wind turbines and combined heat and power plants. The investigation is based on 15 min average power measurements and load flow calculations in the power system simulation tool PowerFactory...

  7. TRANC – a novel fast-response converter to measure total reactive atmospheric nitrogen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Marx

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The input and loss of plant available nitrogen (N from/to the atmosphere can be an important factor for the productivity of ecosystems and thus for its carbon and greenhouse gas exchange. We present a novel converter for the measurement of total reactive nitrogen (TRANC: Total Reactive Atmospheric Nitrogen Converter, which offers the opportunity to quantify the sum of all airborne reactive nitrogen (Nr compounds in high time resolution. The basic concept of the TRANC is the full conversion of total Nr to nitrogen monoxide (NO within two reaction steps. Initially, reduced N compounds are being oxidised, and oxidised N compounds are thermally converted to lower oxidation states. Particulate N is being sublimated and oxidised or reduced afterwards. In a second step, remaining higher N oxides or those originated in the first step are catalytically converted to NO with carbon monoxide used as reduction gas. The converter is combined with a fast response chemiluminescence detector (CLD for NO analysis and its performance was tested for the most relevant gaseous and particulate Nr species under both laboratory and field conditions. Recovery rates during laboratory tests for NH3 and NO2 were found to be 95 and 99%, respectively, and 97% when the two gases were combined. In-field longterm stability over an 11-month period was approved by a value of 91% for NO2. Effective conversion was also found for ammonium and nitrate containing particles. The recovery rate of total ambient Nr was tested against the sum of individual measurements of NH3, HNO3, HONO, NH4+, NO3, and NOx using a combination of different well-established devices. The results show that the TRANC-CLD system precisely captures fluctuations in Nr concentrations and also matches the sum of all

  8. The effect of sensor sheltering and averaging techniques on wind measurements at the Shuttle Landing Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merceret, Francis J.

    1995-01-01

    This document presents results of a field study of the effect of sheltering of wind sensors by nearby foliage on the validity of wind measurements at the Space Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF). Standard measurements are made at one second intervals from 30-feet (9.1-m) towers located 500 feet (152 m) from the SLF centerline. The centerline winds are not exactly the same as those measured by the towers. A companion study, Merceret (1995), quantifies the differences as a function of statistics of the observed winds and distance between the measurements and points of interest. This work examines the effect of nearby foliage on the accuracy of the measurements made by any one sensor, and the effects of averaging on interpretation of the measurements. The field program used logarithmically spaced portable wind towers to measure wind speed and direction over a range of conditions as a function of distance from the obstructing foliage. Appropriate statistics were computed. The results suggest that accurate measurements require foliage be cut back to OFCM standards. Analysis of averaging techniques showed that there is no significant difference between vector and scalar averages. Longer averaging periods reduce measurement error but do not otherwise change the measurement in reasonably steady flow regimes. In rapidly changing conditions, shorter averaging periods may be required to capture trends.

  9. Microdosimetric measurements in the thermal neutron irradiation facility of LENA reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colautti, P; Moro, D; Chiriotti, S; Conte, V; Evangelista, L; Altieri, S; Bortolussi, S; Protti, N; Postuma, I

    2014-06-01

    A twin TEPC with electric-field guard tubes has been constructed to be used to characterize the BNCT field of the irradiation facility of LENA reactor. One of the two mini TEPC was doped with 50ppm of (10)B in order to simulate the BNC events occurring in BNCT. By properly processing the two microdosimetric spectra, the gamma, neutron and BNC spectral components can be derived with good precision (~6%). However, direct measurements of (10)B in some doped plastic samples, which were used for constructing the cathode walls, point out the scarce accuracy of the nominal (10)B concentration value. The influence of the Boral(®) door, which closes the irradiation channel, has been measured. The gamma dose increases significantly (+51%) when the Boral(®) door is closed. The crypt-cell-regeneration weighting function has been used to measure the quality, namely the RBEµ value, of the radiation field in different conditions. The measured RBEµ values are only partially consistent with the RBE values of other BNCT facilities.

  10. Emission Spectroscopy and Radiometric Measurements in the NASA Ames IHF Arc Jet Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winter, Michael W.; Raiche, George A.; Prabhu, Dinesh K.

    2012-01-01

    Plasma diagnostic measurement campaigns in the NASA Ames Interaction Heating Facility (IHF) have been conducted over the last several years with a view towards characterizing the flow in the arc jet facility by providing data necessary for modeling and simulation. Optical emission spectroscopy has been used in the plenum and in the free jet of the nozzle. Radiation incident over a probe surface has also been measured using radiometry. Plenum measurements have shown distinct radial profiles of temperature over a range of operating conditions. For cases where large amounts of cold air are added radially to the main arc-heated stream, the temperature profiles are higher by as much as 1500 K than the profiles assumed in flow simulations. Optical measurements perpendicular to the flow direction in the free jet showed significant contributions to the molecule emission through inverse pre-dissociation, thus allowing determination of atom number densities from molecular emission. This has been preliminarily demonstrated with the N2 1st Positive System. Despite the use of older rate coefficients, the resulting atom densities are reasonable and surprisingly close to flow predictions.

  11. A computer-controlled experimental facility for krypton and xenon adsorption coefficient measurements on activated carbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Del Serra, Daniele; Aquaro, Donato; Mazed, Dahmane; Pazzagli, Fabio; Ciolini, Riccardo, E-mail: r.ciolini@ing.unipi.it

    2015-07-15

    Highlights: • An experimental test facility for qualification of the krypton and xenon adsorption properties of activated carbons. • The measurement of the adsorption coefficient by using the elution curve method. • The simultaneous on-line control of the main physical parameters influencing the adsorption property of activated carbon. - Abstract: An automated experimental test facility, intended specifically for qualification of the krypton and xenon adsorption properties of activated carbon samples, was designed and constructed. The experimental apparatus was designed to allow an on-line control of the main physical parameters influencing greatly the adsorption property of activated carbon. The measurement of the adsorption coefficient, based upon the elution curve method, can be performed with a precision better than 5% at gas pressure values ranging from atmospheric pressure up to 9 bar and bed temperature from 0 up to 80 °C. The carrier gas flow rate can be varied from 40 up to 4000 N cm{sup 3} min{sup −1} allowing measurement of dynamic adsorption coefficient with face velocities from 0.3 up to 923 cm min{sup −1} depending on the gas pressure and the test cell being used. The moisture content of the activated carbon can be precisely controlled during measurement, through the relative humidity of the carrier gas.

  12. Measuring the impact of non-monetary incentives on facility delivery in rural Zambia: a clustered randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, P; Connor, A L; Guo, E; Nambao, M; Chanda-Kapata, P; Lambo, N; Phiri, C

    2016-04-01

    In Zambia, only 56% of rural women deliver in a health facility, and improving facility delivery rates is a priority of the Zambian government. 'Mama kit' incentives - small packages of childcare items provided to mothers conditional on delivering their baby in a facility - may encourage facility delivery. This study measured the impact and cost-effectiveness of a US$4 mama kit on rural facility delivery rates in Zambia. A clustered randomised controlled trial was used to measure the impact of mama kits on facility delivery rates in thirty rural health facilities in Serenje and Chadiza districts. Facility-level antenatal care and delivery registers were used to measure the percentage of women attending antenatal care who delivered at a study facility during the intervention period. Results from the trial were then used to model the cost-effectiveness of mama kits at-scale in terms of cost per death averted. The mama kits intervention resulted in a statistically significant increase in facility delivery rates. The multivariate logistic regression found that the mama kits intervention increased the odds of delivering at a facility by 63% (P-value < 0.01, 95% CI: 29%, 106%), or an increase of 9.9 percentage points, yielding a cost-effectiveness of US$5183 per death averted. This evaluation confirms that low-cost mama kits can be a cost-effective intervention to increase facility delivery rates in rural Zambia. Mama kits alone are unlikely to completely solve safe delivery challenges but should be embedded in larger maternal and child health programmes. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Design and calibration of a test facility for MLI thermal performance measurements below 80K

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boroski, W.; Kunzelman, R.; Ruschman, M.; Schoo, C.

    1992-04-01

    The design geometry of the SSC dipole cryostat includes active thermal radiation shields operating at 80K and 20K respectively. Extensive measurements conducted in a Heat Leak Test Facility (HLTF) have been used to evaluate the thermal performance of candidate multilayer insulation (MLI) systems for the 80K thermal shield, with the present system design based upon those measurement results. With the 80K MLI geometry established, efforts have focused on measuring the performance of MLI systems near 20K. A redesign of the HLTF has produced a measurement facility capable of conducting measurements with the warm boundary fixed at 80K and the cold boundary variable from 10K to 50K. Removing the 80K shield permits measurements with a warm boundary at 300K. The 80K boundary consists of a copper shield thermally anchored to a liquid nitrogen reservoir. The cold boundary consists of a copper anchor plate whose temperature is varied through boil-off gas from a 500 liter helium supply dewar. A transfer line heat exchanger supplies the boil-off gas to the anchor plate at a constant and controlled rate. The gas, which serves as cooling gas, is routed through a copper cooling tube soldered into the anchor plate. Varying the cooling gas flow rate varies the amount of refrigeration supplied to the anchor plate, thereby determining the plate temperature. A resistance heater installed on the anchor plate is regulated by a cryogenic temperature controller to provide final temperature control. Heat leak values are measured using a heatmeter which senses heat flow as a temperature gradient across a fixed thermal impedance. Since the thermal conductivity of the thermal impedance changes with temperature, the heatmeter is calibrated at key cold boundary temperatures. Thus, the system is capable of obtaining measurement data under a variety of system conditions. 7 refs.

  14. Main components and performances of the IMGC calibration facilities for liquid helium flow rate measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivetti, A.; Martini, G.; Goria, R.; Lorefice, S.

    Within the framework of a National Project on superconductivity two facilities have been designed and built at the Istituto di Metrologia 'G. Colonnetti' (IMGC) with the purpose of studying and calibrating liquid helium flowmeters in the range 1-20 g s -1 of liquid helium (LHe). After a brief description of these set-ups, this Paper examines in detail the solutions adopted in the design of the main calibration facility, particularly with regard to the circulating pump and the submerged driving motor. The latter has been devised for working only at LHe temperature, having an a.c. three-phase stator winding made of thin superconducting wire. The construction characteristics and operation conditions are discussed. As a flow rate reference, a new turbine flowmeter with its rotor magnetically suspended by the Meissner effect (described in another paper presented at the workshop), is used. A LHe flow rate transducer, based upon the measurement of the transit time of short thermal pulses, has been designed and tested with these facilities: the good results obtained using commercial low cost diodes as ΔT sensors are reported.

  15. Basic Design of Experimental Facility for Measuring Pressure Drop of IHX in a SFR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ko, Yung-Joo; Eoh, Jae-Hyuk; Kim, Hyungmo; Lee, Dong-Won; Jeong, Ji-Young; Lee, Hyeong-Yeon [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Dong Eok [Kyungpook National Univ., Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    The conceptual design of the Prototype gen-IV SFR (PGSFR) with a 150 MWe capacity was commenced in 2012 through the national long-term R and D program by KAERI. Then, PGSFR is now being designed with the defense in depth concept with active, passive and inherent safety features to acquire design approval for PGSFR from the Korean regulatory authority by 2020. PGSFR is a sodium-cooled pool-type fast reactor with all primary components including the primary heat transport system (PHTS) pumps and IHXs are located inside a sodium pool. The heat produced due to fission in the core is transported by primary sodium to secondary sodium in a sodium to sodium intermediate heat exchanger (IHX), which in turn is transferred to water in a steam generator (SG). Basic design of the IHX flow characteristic test facility, WEIPA was conducted based on the three-level scaling methodology in order to preserve the flow characteristics of the IHX in PGSFR. This test facility is intended to measure a high precision pressure drop at the shell-side of the IHX. This paper describes the aspects of the current design features of the IHX in PGSFR, scaling and basic design features of the facility.

  16. Comparing perceived and objectively measured access to recreational facilities as predictors of physical activity in adolescent girls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Molly M; Evenson, Kelly R; Cohen, Deborah A; Cox, Christine E

    2007-05-01

    A number of studies in recent years have identified both self-report and objectively measured accessibility of recreational facilities as important predictors of physical activity in youth. Yet, few studies have: (1) examined the relationship between the number and proximity of objectively measured neighborhood physical activity facilities and respondents' perceptions and (2) compared objective and self-report measures as predictors of physical activity. This study uses data on 1,367 6th-grade girls who participated in the Trial of Activity for Adolescent Girls (TAAG) to explore these issues. Girls reported whether nine different types of recreational facilities were easily accessible. These facilities included basketball courts, golf courses, martial arts studios, playing fields, tracks, skating rinks, swimming pools, tennis courts, and dance/gymnastic clubs. Next, geographic information systems (GIS) were used to identify all the parks, schools, and commercial sites for physical activity located within a mile of each girl's home. These sites were then visited to inventory the types of facilities available. Girls wore accelerometers to measure their weekly minutes of non-school metabolic equivalent weighted moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MW-MVPA). The number of facilities within a half-mile of girls' homes strongly predicted the perception of easy access to seven out of nine facility types. Both individual facility perceptions and the total number of facilities perceived were associated with increased physical activity. For each additional facility perceived, girls clocked 3% more metabolic equivalent weighted moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (p girls tended to record 3% more of this kind of physical activity (p raising the profile of existing facilities may help increase physical activity among adolescent girls.

  17. Measurement and modeling of engineered nanoparticle transport and aging dynamics in a reactive porous medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naftaly, Aviv; Dror, Ishai; Berkowitz, Brian

    2016-07-01

    A continuous time random walk particle tracking (CTRW-PT) method was employed to model flow cell experiments that measured transport of engineered nanoparticles (ENPs) in a reactive porous medium. The experiments involved a water-saturated medium containing negatively charged, polyacrylamide beads, resembling many natural soils and aquifer materials, and having the same refraction index as water. Negatively and positively charged ENPs were injected into a uniform flow field in a 3-D horizontal flow cell, and the spatial and temporal concentrations of the evolving ENP plumes were obtained via image analysis. As a benchmark, and to calibrate the model, Congo red tracer was employed in 1-D column and 3-D flow cell experiments, containing the same beads. Negatively charged Au and Ag ENPs demonstrated migration patterns resembling those of the tracer but were slightly more dispersive; the transport was well represented by the CTRW-PT model. In contrast, positively charged AgNPs displayed an unusual behavior: establishment of an initial plume of essentially immobilized ENPs, followed by development of a secondary, freely migrating plume. The mobile plume was found to contain ENPs that, with aging, exhibited aggregation and charge inversion, becoming negatively charged and mobile. In this case, the CTRW-PT model was modified to include a probabilistic law for particle immobilization, to account for the decreasing tendency (over distance and time) of the positively charged AgNPs to attach to the porous medium. The agreement between experimental results and modeling suggests that the CTRW-PT framework can account for the non-Fickian and surface-charge-dependent transport and aging exhibited by ENPs in porous media.

  18. Reactivity of chlorine radical with submicron palmitic acid particles: kinetic measurements and products identification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Mendez

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The heterogeneous reaction of Cl. radicals with sub-micron palmitic acid (PA particles was studied in an aerosol flow tube in the presence or in the absence of O2. Fine particles were generated by homogeneous condensation of PA vapors and introduced in the reactor where chlorine atoms are produced by photolysis of Cl2 using UV lamps surrounding the reactor. The effective reactive uptake coefficient (γ has been determined from the rate loss of PA measured by GC/MS analysis of reacted particles as a function of the chlorine exposure. In the absence of O2, γ = 14 ± 5 indicates efficient secondary chemistry involving Cl2. GC/MS analyses have shown the formation of monochlorinated and polychlorinated compounds in the oxidized particles. Although, the PA particles are solid, the complete mass can be consumed. In the presence of oxygen, the reaction is still dominated by secondary chemistry but the propagation chain length is smaller than in the absence of O2 which leads to an uptake coefficient γ = 3 ± 1. In the particulate phase, oxocarboxylic acids and dicarboxylic acids are identified by GC/MS. Formation of alcohols and monocarboxylic acids are also suspected. All these results show that solid organic particles could be efficiently oxidized by gas-phase radicals not only on their surface, but also in bulk by mechanisms which are still unclear. Furthermore the identified reaction products are explained by a chemical mechanism showing the pathway of the formation of more functionalized products. They help to understand the aging of primary tropospheric aerosol containing fatty acids.

  19. Reactivity of chlorine radical with submicron palmitic acid particles: kinetic measurements and product identification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendez, M.; Ciuraru, R.; Gosselin, S.; Batut, S.; Visez, N.; Petitprez, D.

    2013-12-01

    The heterogeneous reaction of Cl• radicals with submicron palmitic acid (PA) particles was studied in an aerosol flow tube in the presence or in the absence of O2. Fine particles were generated by homogeneous condensation of PA vapours and introduced into the reactor, where chlorine atoms were produced by photolysis of Cl2 using UV lamps surrounding the reactor. The effective reactive uptake coefficient (γ) has been determined from the rate loss of PA measured by gas chromatography-mass spectrometer (GC/MS) analysis of reacted particles as a function of the chlorine exposure. In the absence of O2, γ = 14 ± 5 indicates efficient secondary chemistry involving Cl2. GC/MS analysis has shown the formation of monochlorinated and polychlorinated compounds in the oxidized particles. Although the PA particles are solid, the complete mass can be consumed. In the presence of oxygen, the reaction is still dominated by secondary chemistry but the propagation chain length is smaller than in the absence of O2, which leads to an uptake coefficient γ = 3 ± 1. In the particulate phase, oxocarboxylic acids and dicarboxylic acids were identified by GC/MS. The formation of alcohols and monocarboxylic acids is also suspected. A reaction pathway for the main products and more functionalized species is proposed. All these results show that solid organic particles could be efficiently oxidized by gas-phase radicals not only on their surface but also in bulk by mechanisms which are still unclear. They help to understand the aging of primary tropospheric aerosol containing fatty acids.

  20. Reactivity of chlorine radical with submicron palmitic acid particles: kinetic measurements and products identification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendez, M.; Ciuraru, R.; Gosselin, S.; Batut, S.; Visez, N.; Petitprez, D.

    2013-06-01

    The heterogeneous reaction of Cl. radicals with sub-micron palmitic acid (PA) particles was studied in an aerosol flow tube in the presence or in the absence of O2. Fine particles were generated by homogeneous condensation of PA vapors and introduced in the reactor where chlorine atoms are produced by photolysis of Cl2 using UV lamps surrounding the reactor. The effective reactive uptake coefficient (γ) has been determined from the rate loss of PA measured by GC/MS analysis of reacted particles as a function of the chlorine exposure. In the absence of O2, γ = 14 ± 5 indicates efficient secondary chemistry involving Cl2. GC/MS analyses have shown the formation of monochlorinated and polychlorinated compounds in the oxidized particles. Although, the PA particles are solid, the complete mass can be consumed. In the presence of oxygen, the reaction is still dominated by secondary chemistry but the propagation chain length is smaller than in the absence of O2 which leads to an uptake coefficient γ = 3 ± 1. In the particulate phase, oxocarboxylic acids and dicarboxylic acids are identified by GC/MS. Formation of alcohols and monocarboxylic acids are also suspected. All these results show that solid organic particles could be efficiently oxidized by gas-phase radicals not only on their surface, but also in bulk by mechanisms which are still unclear. Furthermore the identified reaction products are explained by a chemical mechanism showing the pathway of the formation of more functionalized products. They help to understand the aging of primary tropospheric aerosol containing fatty acids.

  1. Study of 234U(n,f) Resonances Measured at the CERN n_TOF Facility

    CERN Document Server

    Leal-Cidoncha, E; Paradela, C; Tarrío, D; Leong, L S; Audouin, L; Tassan-Got, L; Praena, J; Berthier, B; Ferrant, L; Isaev, S; Le Naour, C; Stephan, C; Trubert, D; Abbondanno, U; Aerts, G; Álvarez, H; Álvarez-Velarde, F; Andriamonje, S; Andrzejewski, J; Badurek, G; Baumann, P; Bečvář, F; Berthoumieux, E; Calviño, F; Calviani, M; Cano-Ott, D; Capote, R; Carrapiço, C; Cennini, P.; Chepel, V; Chiaveri, E.; Colonna, N; Cortes, G; Couture, A; Cox, J; Dahlfors, M; David, S.; Dillmann, I; Domingo-Pardo, C; Dridi, W; Eleftheriadis, C; Embid-Segura, M; Ferrari, A.; Ferreira-Marques, R; Fujii, K; Furman, W; Gonçalves, I; González-Romero, E; Gramegna, F; Guerrero, C; Gunsing, F; Haas, B; Haight, R; Heil, M; Herrera-Martinez, A.; Igashira, M; Jericha, E; Kadi, Y.; Käppeler, F; Karadimos, D; Kerveno, M; Koehler, P; Kossionides, E; Krtička, M; Lampoudis, C; Leeb, H; Lindote, A; Lopes, I; Lozano, M; Lukic, S; Marganiec, J; Marrone, S; Martínez, T; Massimi, C; Mastinu, P; Mengoni, A; Milazzo, P M; Moreau, C; Mosconi, M; Neves, F; Oberhummer, H; O'Brien, S; Oshima, M; Pancin, J; Papadopoulos, C; Pavlik, A; Pavlopoulos, P.; Perrot, L; Pigni, M T; Plag, R; Plompen, A; Plukis, A; Poch, A; Pretel, C; Quesada, J; Rauscher, T.; Reifarth, R; Rubbia, C.; Rudolf, G; Rullhusen, P; Salgado, J; Santos, C; Sarchiapone, L.; Savvidis, I; Tagliente, G; Tain, J L; Tavora, L; Terlizzi, R; Vannini, G; Vaz, P; Ventura, A.; Villamarin, D; Vincente, M C; Vlachoudis, V.; Vlastou, R; Voss, F; Walter, S; Wiescher, M; Wisshak, K

    2014-01-01

    We present the analysis of the resolved resonance region for the U-234(n,f) cross section data measured at the CERN n\\_TOF facility. The resonance parameters in the energy range from 1 eV to 1500 eV have been obtained with the SAMMY code by using as initial parameters for the fit the resonance parameters of the JENDL-3.3 evaluation. In addition, the statistical analysis has been accomplished, partly with the SAMDIST code, in order to study the level spacing and the Mehta-Dyson correlation.

  2. Southeast Alaska Acoustic Measurement Facility (SEAFAC) environmental data base review, evaluation, and upgrade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strand, J.A.; Skalski, J.R.; Faulkner, L.L.; Rodman, C.W.; Carlile, D.W.; Ecker, R.M.; Nicholls, A.K.; Ramsdell, J.V.; Scott, M.J.

    1986-04-01

    This report summarizes the principal issues of public concern, the adequacy of the environmental data base to answer the issues of concern, and the additional data collection required to support a National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) review of the proposed Southeast Alaska Acoustic Measurement Facility (SEAFAC). The report is based on a review of the readily available environmental literature and a site visit. Representatives of local, state, and federal agencies were also interviewed for their personal insights and concerns not discovered during the literature review.

  3. The CERN n_TOF Facility: Neutron Beams Performances for Cross Section Measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Chiaveri, E; Andrzejewski, J; Audouin, L; Barbagallo, M; Bécares, V; Bečvář, F; Belloni, F; Berthoumieux, E; Billowes, J; Boccone, V; Bosnar, D; Brugger, M; Calviani, M; Calviño, F; Cano-Ott, D; Carrapiço, C; Cerutti, F; Chin, M; Colonna, N; Cortés, G; Cortés-Giraldo, M A; Diakaki, M; Domingo-Pardo, C; Duran, I; Dressler, R; Dzysiuk, N; Eleftheriadis, C; Ferrari, A; Fraval, K; Ganesan, S; García, A R; Giubrone, G; Gómez-Hornillos, M B; Gonçalves, I F; González-Romero, E; Griesmayer, E; Guerrero, C; Gunsing, F; Gurusamy, P; Hernández-Prieto, A; Jenkins, D G; Jericha, E; Kadi, Y; Käppeler, F; Karadimos, D; Kivel, N; Koehler, P; Kokkoris, M; Krtička, M; Kroll, J; Lampoudis, C; Langer, C; Leal-Cidoncha, E; Lederer, C; Leeb, H; Leong, L S; Losito, R; Mallick, A; Manousos, A; Marganiec, J; Martínez, T; Massimi, C; Mastinu, P F; Mastromarco, M; Meaze, M; Mendoza, E; Mengoni, A; Milazzo, P M; Mingrone, F; Mirea, M; Mondalaers, W; Paradela, C; Pavlik, A; Perkowski, J; Plompen, A; Praena, J; Quesada, J M; Rauscher, T; Reifarth, R; Riego, A; Robles, M S; Roman, F; Rubbia, C; Sabaté-Gilarte, M; Sarmento, R; Saxena, A; Schillebeeckx, P; Schmidt, S; Schumann, D; Tagliente, G; Tain, J L; Tarrío, D; Tassan-Got, L; Tsinganis, A; Valenta, S; Vannini, G; Variale, V; Vaz, P; Ventura, A; Versaci, R; Vermeulen, M J; Vlachoudis, V; Vlastou, R; Wallner, A; Ware, T; Weigand, M; Weiss, C; Wright, T; Žugec, P

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the characteristics of the existing CERN n\\_TOF neutron beam facility (n\\_TOF-EAR1 with a flight path of 185 meters) and the future one (n\\_TOF EAR-2 with a flight path of 19 meters), which will operate in parallel from Summer 2014. The new neutron beam will provide a 25 times higher neutron flux delivered in 10 times shorter neutron pulses, thus offering more powerful capabilities for measuring small mass, low cross section and/or high activity samples.

  4. Characterization of the hot electron population with bremsstrahlung and backscatter measurements at the National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albert, Felicie; Hohenberger, Matthias; Michel, Pierre; Divol, Laurent; Doeppner, Tilo; Dewald, Edward; Bachmann, Benjamin; Ralph, Joseph; Turnbull, David; Goyon, Clement; Thomas, Cliff; Landen, Otto; Moody, John

    2016-10-01

    In indirect-drive ignition experiments, the hot electron population, produced by laser-plasma interactions, can be inferred from the bremsstrahlung generated by the interaction of the hot electrons with the target. At the National Ignition Facility (NIF), the upgraded filter-fluorescer x-ray diagnostic (FFLEX), a 10-channel, time-resolved hard x-ray spectrometer operating in the 20- to 500-keV range, provides measurements of the bremsstrahlung spectrum. It typically shows a two-temperature distribution of the hot electron population inside the hohlraum. In SRS, where the laser is coupled to an electron plasma wave, the backscattered spectrum, measured with the NIF full-aperture backscatter system (FABS), is used to infer the plasma wave phase velocity. We will present FFLEX time-integrated and time-resolved measurements of the hot electron population low-temperature component. We will correlate them with electron plasma wave phase velocities inferred from FABS spectra for a range of recent shots performed at the National Ignition Facility. This work was performed under the auspices of the US Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  5. Emittance measurements and minimization at the SwissFEL Injector Test Facility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduard Prat

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The emittance of the electron beam is crucial for Free-Electron Laser facilities: it has a strong influence on the lasing performance and on the total length of the accelerator. We present our procedure to measure and minimize the projected and slice emittance at the SwissFEL Injector Test Facility. The normalized slice emittance resolution achieved is about 3 nm and the longitudinal resolution is about 13 fs, with measurement errors estimated to be below 5%. After performing a full optimization we have obtained, for uncompressed beams, a slice emittance of about 200 nm for a beam charge of 200 pC, and a slice emittance of about 100 nm for 10 pC. These values are consistent with our simulations and are well below the requirements of the SwissFEL under construction at the Paul Scherrer Institute. At these bunch charges our measured slice emittances are, to our knowledge, the lowest reported so far for an electron linear accelerator.

  6. The Bremen mass spectrometric facility for the measurement of helium isotopes, neon, and tritium in water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sültenfuss, Jürgen; Roether, Wolfgang; Rhein, Monika

    2009-06-01

    We describe the mass spectrometric facility for measuring helium isotopes, neon, and tritium that has been operative at this institute since 1989, and also the sampling and sample preparation steps that precede the mass spectrometric analysis. For water samples in a near-equilibrium with atmospheric air, the facility achieves precision for (3)He/(4)He ratios of+/-0.4% or better, and+/-0.8 % or better for helium and neon concentrations. Tritium precision is typically+/-3 % and the detection limit 10 mTU ( approximately 1.2.10(-3) Bq/kg of pure water). Sample throughputs can reach some thousands per year. These achievements are enabled, among other features, by automation of the measurement procedure and by elaborate calibration, assisted by continual development in detail. To date, we have measured more than 15,000 samples for tritium and 23,000 for helium isotopes and neon, mostly in the context of oceanographic and hydrologic work. Some results of such work are outlined. Even when atmospheric tritium concentrations have become rather uniform, tritium provides water ages if (3)He data are taken concurrently. The technique can resolve tritium concentrations in waters of the pre-nuclear era.

  7. Measurement facilities and accuracy limits of sampling digital interferometers. Meresi lehetoesegek es hibaanalizis digitalis mintavetelezoe interferometeren

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Czitrovszky, A.; Jani, P.; Szoter, L.

    1990-12-15

    We discuss the measurement facilities of a recently development sampling digital interferometer for machine tool testing. As opposed to conventional interferometers the present device provides possibilities for the digital storage up to 4 kHz of the complete information of the motion so that displacement, velocity, acceleration and power density spectrum measurement can be performed. An estimation is given for the truncation, round-off, jitter and frequency-aliasing sources of error of the reconstructed motion parameters. On the basis of the Shannon sampling theory optimal conditions of measurement parameters are defined for the case when the accuracy of the reconstructed part of motion and vibration is equal to the resolution of the conventional interferometer. 7 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Measurement of the longitudinal phase space at the photo injector test facility at DESY Zeuthen

    CERN Document Server

    Lipka, D; Bähr, J; Flöttmann, K; Richter, D; Stephan, F; Zhao, Q

    2002-01-01

    The photo injector test facility at DESY Zeuthen (PITZ) has been developed with the aim to deliver low emittance electron beams and study its characteristics for future applications at free electron lasers and linear accelerators. The energy of the electron beam varies in the range between 4 and 5 MeV. One of the important properties of the delivered beam is the longitudinal phase space of the electron beam. Measurements of the momentum distributions show a small energy spread. The principle of the measurement of the bunch length will be discussed, time resolutions will be shown and preliminary results will be given. The design to measure the correlation between momentum and time distribution of the electron bunch will be shown with calculated resolutions.

  9. Neutron-Induced Fission Measurements at the Dance and Lsds Facilities at Lanl

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jandel, M.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Bond, E. M.; Chadwick, M. B.; Couture, A.; O'Donnell, J. M.; Fowler, M. M.; Haight, R. C.; Hayes-Sterbenz, A. C.; Rundberg, R. S.; Rusev, G. Y.; Ullmann, J. L.; Vieira, D. J.; Wilhelmy, J. B.; Wu, C. Y.; Becker, J. A.; Alexander, C. W.; Belier, G.

    2014-09-01

    New results from neutron-induced fission measurements performed at the Detector for Advanced Neutron Capture Experiments (DANCE) and Lead Slowing Down Spectrometer (LSDS) are presented. New correlated data on promptfission γ-ray (PFG) distributions were measured using the DANCE array for resonant neutron-induced fission of 233U, 235U and 239Pu. The deduced properties of PFG emission are presented using a simple parametrization. An accurate knowledge of fission γ-ray spectra enables us to analyze the isomeric states of 236U created after neutron capture on 235U. We briefly discuss these new results. Finally, we review details and preliminary results of the challenging 237U(n,f) cross section measurement at the LSDS facility.

  10. The Implementation of Performance Measurement System (PMS: Malaysian Facilities Management (FM Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myeda N.E.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Performance Measurement System (PMS is an effective performance measurement tool and technique that is being widely implemented in the global industries. Literature has suggested the significant contributions of its implementation in enhancing the strategic service delivery and performance. However, there is little study undertaken to explore the PMS implementation in Facilities Management (FM industry, particularly focusing on Malaysia. This study explores the PMS practice among FM practitioners and their knowledge in Performance Measurement (PM generally. Findings from this study also proposed the 20 contributing factors that the FM practitioners believed are the barriers in implementing PMS. This research also suggests the future research opportunities in developing a PMS framework that can be used as guidance for FM service delivery in Malaysia.

  11. First results from the CARIBU facility: mass measurements on the r-process path.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Schelt, J; Lascar, D; Savard, G; Clark, J A; Bertone, P F; Caldwell, S; Chaudhuri, A; Levand, A F; Li, G; Morgan, G E; Orford, R; Segel, R E; Sharma, K S; Sternberg, M G

    2013-08-09

    The Canadian Penning Trap mass spectrometer has made mass measurements of 33 neutron-rich nuclides provided by the new Californium Rare Isotope Breeder Upgrade facility at Argonne National Laboratory. The studied region includes the 132Sn double shell closure and ranges in Z from In to Cs, with Sn isotopes measured out to A=135, and the typical measurement precision is at the 100 ppb level or better. The region encompasses a possible major waiting point of the astrophysical r process, and the impact of the masses on the r process is shown through a series of simulations. These first-ever simulations with direct mass information on this waiting point show significant increases in waiting time at Sn and Sb in comparison with commonly used mass models, demonstrating the inadequacy of existing models for accurate r-process calculations.

  12. Measuring the bunch frequency multiplication at the 3rd CLIC Test Facility

    CERN Document Server

    Dabrowski, AE; Bravin, E; Corsini, R; Dobert, S; Lefevre, T; Rabiller, A; Soby, L; Skowronski, P K; Tecker, F; Egger, D; Ferrari, A; Welsch, C P

    2012-01-01

    The CLIC Test Facility 3 (CTF3) is being built and commissioned by an international collaboration to test the feasibility of the proposed Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) drive beam generation scheme. Central to this scheme is the use of RF deflectors to inject bunches into a delay loop and a combiner ring, in order to transform the initial bunch frequency of 1.5 GHz from the linac to a final bunch frequency of 12 GHz. To do so, the machine's transverse optics must be tuned to ensure beam isochronicity and each ring's length can finally be adjusted with wiggler magnets to a sub millimeter path length accuracy. Diagnostics based on optical streak camera and RF power measurements, in particular frequency bands, have been designed to measure the longitudinal behaviour of the beam during the combination. This paper presents the diagnostics and recent commissioning measurements.

  13. Measurements of nuclear data and possibility to construct the nuclear data production facility based on electron linac

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Namkung, Won; Ko, In Soo; Cho, Moo Hyun; Kim, Gui Nyun; Lee, Young Seok; Kang, Heung Sik [Pohang University of Science and Technology, Pohang(Korea)

    2001-04-01

    In order to construct an infrastructure to produce nuclear data, we studied three main items; (1) Study on the possibility to construct a facility for nuclear data production, (2) Production of nuclear data for nuclear power plant, and (3) Pulsed neutron source based on a 100-MeV electron linac at Pohang Accelerator Laboratory (PAL). We confirmed the possibility to build a nuclear data production facility utilizing a 100-MeV electron linac at PAL and manpower who wanted to participate the nuclear data production experiments. In order to measure the nuclear data for nuclear power plant, we used several nuclear data production facilities in abroad. We measured total cross sections and neutron caprure cross sections for {sup nat}Dy and {sup nat}Hf using the pulsed neutron facility in the Research Reactor Institute, Kyoto University (KURRI). The neutron capture cross sections for {sup 161,162,163,164}Dy were measured at KURRI in the neutron energy region between 0.001 eV and several tens keV, and at the fast neutron facility in Tokyo Institute of Technology in the neutron energy region between 10 keV and 100 keV. We also measured the neutron capture cross sections and gamma multiplicity of {sup 232}Th at the IBR30 in Dubna, Russia. We have construct a pulsed neutron source using a 100-MeV electron linac at PAL. We measured neutron time-of-flight (TOF) spectra in order to check the characteristics of the pulsed neutron source. We also measured a neutron total cross sections of W and Cu. The pulsed neutron facility can be utilized in the education facility for nuclear data production and the test facility for the R and D purpose of the nuclear data production facility. 29 refs., 57 figs., 22 tabs. (Author)

  14. The effect of sensor spacing on wind measurements at the Shuttle Landing Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merceret, Francis J.

    1995-01-01

    This document presents results of a field study of the effect of sensor spacing on the validity of wind measurements at the Space Shuttle landing Facility (SLF). Standard measurements are made at one second intervals from 30 foot (9.1m) towers located 500 feet (152m) from the SLF centerline. The centerline winds are not exactly the same as those measured by the towers. This study quantifies the differences as a function of statistics of the observed winds and distance between the measurements and points of interest. The field program used logarithmically spaced portable wind towers to measure wind speed and direction over a range of conditions. Correlations, spectra, moments, and structure functions were computed. A universal normalization for structure functions was devised. The normalized structure functions increase as the 2/3 power of separation distance until an asymptotic value is approached. This occurs at spacings of several hundred feet (about 100m). At larger spacings, the structure functions are bounded by the asymptote. This enables quantitative estimates of the expected differences between the winds at the measurement point and the points of interest to be made from the measured wind statistics. A procedure is provided for making these estimates.

  15. Molecular Tagging Velocimetry Development for In-situ Measurement in High-Temperature Test Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andre, Matthieu A.; Bardet, Philippe M.; Burns, Ross A.; Danehy, Paul M.

    2015-01-01

    The High Temperature Test Facility, HTTF, at Oregon State University (OSU) is an integral-effect test facility designed to model the behavior of a Very High Temperature Gas Reactor (VHTR) during a Depressurized Conduction Cooldown (DCC) event. It also has the ability to conduct limited investigations into the progression of a Pressurized Conduction Cooldown (PCC) event in addition to phenomena occurring during normal operations. Both of these phenomena will be studied with in-situ velocity field measurements. Experimental measurements of velocity are critical to provide proper boundary conditions to validate CFD codes, as well as developing correlations for system level codes, such as RELAP5 (http://www4vip.inl.gov/relap5/). Such data will be the first acquired in the HTTF and will introduce a diagnostic with numerous other applications to the field of nuclear thermal hydraulics. A laser-based optical diagnostic under development at The George Washington University (GWU) is presented; the technique is demonstrated with velocity data obtained in ambient temperature air, and adaptation to high-pressure, high-temperature flow is discussed.

  16. Flow Property Measurement Using Laser-Induced Fluorescence in the NASA Ames Interaction Heating Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grinstead, Jay Henderson; Porter, Barry J.; Carballo, Julio Enrique

    2011-01-01

    The spectroscopic diagnostic technique of two photon absorption laser-induced fluorescence (TALIF) of atomic species has been applied to single-point measurements of velocity and static temperature in the NASA Ames Interaction Heating Facility (IHF) arc jet. Excitation spectra of atomic oxygen and nitrogen were recorded while scanning a tunable dye laser over the absorption feature. Thirty excitation spectra were acquired during 8 arc jet runs at two facility operating conditions; the number of scans per run varied between 2 and 6. Curve fits to the spectra were analyzed to recover their Doppler shifts and widths, from which the flow velocities and static temperatures, respectively, were determined. An increase in the number of independent flow property pairs from each as-measured scan was obtained by extracting multiple lower-resolution scans. The larger population sample size enabled the mean property values and their uncertainties for each run to be characterized with greater confidence. The average plus or minus 2 sigma uncertainties in the mean velocities and temperatures for all 8 runs were plus or minus 1.4% and plus or minus 11%, respectively.

  17. Force Measurement Improvements to the National Transonic Facility Sidewall Model Support System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodliff, Scott L.; Balakrishna, Sundareswara; Butler, David; Cagle, C. Mark; Chan, David; Jones, Gregory S.; Milholen, William E., II

    2016-01-01

    The National Transonic Facility is a transonic pressurized cryogenic facility. The development of the high Reynolds number semi-span capability has advanced over the years to include transonic active flow control and powered testing using the sidewall model support system. While this system can be used in total temperatures down to -250Â F for conventional unpowered configurations, it is limited to temperatures above -60Â F when used with powered models that require the use of the high-pressure air delivery system. Thermal instabilities and non-repeatable mechanical arrangements revealed several data quality shortfalls by the force and moment measurement system. Recent modifications to the balance cavity recirculation system have improved the temperature stability of the balance and metric model-to-balance hardware. Changes to the mechanical assembly of the high-pressure air delivery system, particularly hardware that interfaces directly with the model and balance, have improved the repeatability of the force and moment measurement system. Drag comparisons with the high-pressure air system removed will also be presented in this paper.

  18. Design studies related to an in vivo neutron activation analysis facility for measuring total body nitrogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stamatelatos, I E; Chettle, D R; Green, S; Scott, M C

    1992-08-01

    Design studies relating to an in vivo prompt capture neutron activation analysis facility measuring total body nitrogen are presented. The basis of the design is a beryllium-graphite neutron collimator and reflector configuration for (alpha, n) type radionuclide neutron sources (238PuBe or 241AmBe), so as to reflect leaking, or out-scattered, neutrons towards the subject. This improves the ratio of thermal neutron flux to dose and the spatial distribution of thermal flux achieved with these sources, whilst retaining their advantage of long half-lives as compared to 252Cf based systems. The common problem of high count-rate at the detector, and therefore high nitrogen region of interest background due to pile-up, is decreased by using a set of smaller (5.1 cm diameter x 10.2 cm long) NaI(Tl) detectors instead of large ones. The facility described presents a relative error of nitrogen measurement of 3.6% and a nitrogen to background ratio of 2.3 for 0.45 mSv skin dose (assuming ten 5.1 cm x 10.2 cm NaI(Tl) detectors).

  19. Design studies related to an in vivo neutron activation analysis facility for measuring total body nitrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stamatelatos, I.E.M.; Chettle, D.R.; Green, S.; Scott, M.C. (Birmingham Univ. (United Kingdom). School of Physics and Space Research)

    1992-08-01

    Design studies relating to an in vivo prompt capture neutron activation analysis facility measuring total body nitrogen are presented. The basis of the design is a beryllium-graphite neutron collimator and reflector configuration for ({alpha}, n) type radionuclide neutron sources ({sup 238}PuBe or {sup 241}AmBe), so as to reflect leaking, or out-scattered, neutrons towards the subject. This improves the ratio of thermal neutron flux to dose and the spatial distribution of thermal flux achieved with these sources, whilst retaining their advantage of long half-lives as compared to {sup 252}Cf based systems. The common problem of high count-rate at the detector, and therefore high nitrogen region of interest background due to pile-up, is decreased by using a set of smaller (5.1 cm diameter x 10.2 cm long) NaI(Tl) detectors instead of large ones. The facility described presents a relative error of nitrogen measurement of 3.6% and a nitrogen to background ratio of 2.3 for 0.45 mSv skin dose (assuming ten 5.1 cm x 10.2 cm NaI(Tl) detectors). (author).

  20. Whistler mode based explanation for the fast reconnection rate measured in the mit versatile toroidal facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Nagendra

    2011-12-01

    Despite the widely discussed role of whistler waves in mediating magnetic reconnection (MR), the direct connection between such waves and the MR has not been demonstrated by comparing the characteristic temporal and spatial features of the waves and the MR process. Using the whistler wave dispersion relation, we theoretically predict the experimentally measured rise time (τ(rise)) of a few microseconds for the fast rising MR rate in the Versatile Toroidal Facility at MIT. The rise time is closely given by the inverse of the frequency bandwidth of the whistler waves generated in the evolving current sheet. The wave frequencies lie much above the ion cyclotron frequency, but they are limited to less than 0.1% of the electron cyclotron frequency in the argon plasma. The maximum normalized MR rate R=0.35 measured experimentally is precisely predicted by the angular dispersion of the whistler waves.

  1. Detailed measurements and modelling of thermo active components using a room size test facility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weitzmann, Peter; Svendsen, Svend

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes an investigation of thermo active components based on prefabricated hollow core concrete decks. Recent years have given an increased awareness of the use of thermo active components as an alternative to mechanical cooling systems in office buildings. The investigation covers...... measurements in an office sized test facility with thermo active ceiling and floor as well as modelling of similar conditions in a computer program designed for analysis of building integrated heating and cooling systems. A method for characterizing the cooling capacity of thermo active components is described...... based on measurements of the energy balance of the thermo active deck. A cooling capacity of around 60W/m² at a temperature difference of 10K between room and fluid temperature has been found. It is also shown, that installing a lowered acoustic ceiling covering around 50% of the ceiling surface area...

  2. Measurement of neutron total cross-sections of 209Bi at the Pohang Neutron Facility

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Tao-Feng; Kim, Guinyun

    2014-01-01

    Measurements of neutron total cross-sections of natural bismuth in the neutron energy region from 0.1 eV to 100 eV have been performed by using the time-of-flight method at the Pohang Neutron Facility, which consists of an electron linear accelerator, a water-cooled tantalum target with a water moderator, and a 12-m-long time-of-flight path. A 6Li-ZnS(Ag) scintillator with a diameter of 12.5 cm and a thickness of 1.6 cm is employed as a neutron detector, and a piece of high purity natural bismuth metallic plates with a thickness of 3 mm is used for the neutron transmission measurement. The present results were compared with the evaluated data from ENDF/B VII.1 and other previous reported experimental data.

  3. Preparing and measuring ultra-small radiocarbon samples with the ARTEMIS AMS facility in Saclay, France

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delque-Kolic, E., E-mail: emmanuelle.delque-kolic@cea.fr [LMC14, CEA Saclay, Batiment 450 Porte 4E, 91191 Gif sur Yvette (France); Comby-Zerbino, C.; Ferkane, S.; Moreau, C.; Dumoulin, J.P.; Caffy, I.; Souprayen, C.; Quiles, A.; Bavay, D.; Hain, S.; Setti, V. [LMC14, CEA Saclay, Batiment 450 Porte 4E, 91191 Gif sur Yvette (France)

    2013-01-15

    The ARTEMIS facility in Saclay France measures, on average, 4500 samples a year for French organizations working in an array of fields, including environmental sciences, archeology and hydrology. In response to an increasing demand for the isolation of specific soil compounds and organic water fractions, we were motivated to evaluate our ability to reduce microgram samples using our standard graphitization lines and to measure the graphite thus obtained with our 3MV NEC Pelletron AMS. Our reduction facility consists of two fully automated graphitization lines. Each line has 12 reduction reactors with a reduction volume of 18 ml for the first line and 12 ml for the second. Under routine conditions, we determined that we could reduce the samples down to 10 {mu}g of carbon, even if the graphitization yield is consequently affected by the lower sample mass. Our results when testing different Fe/C ratios suggest that an amount of 1.5 mg of Fe powder was ideal (instead of lower amounts of catalyst) to prevent the sample from deteriorating too quickly under the Cs+ beam, and to facilitate pressing procedures. Several sets of microsamples produced from HOxI standard, international references and backgrounds were measured. When measuring {sup 14}C-free wood charcoal and HOxI samples we determined that our modern and dead blanks, due to the various preparation steps, were of 1.1 {+-} 0.8 and 0.2 {+-} 0.1 {mu}g, respectively. The results presented here were obtained for IAEA-C1, {sup 14}C-free wood, IAEA-C6, IAEA-C2 and FIRI C.

  4. A calibration facility to provide traceable calibration to upper air humidity measuring sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuccaro, Rugiada; Rosso, Lucia; Smorgon, Denis; Beltramino, Giulio; Fernicola, Vito

    2017-04-01

    Accurate knowledge and high quality measurement of the upper air humidity and of its profile in atmosphere is essential in many areas of the atmospheric research, for example in weather forecasting, environmental pollution studies and research in meteorology and climatology. Moving from the troposphere to the stratosphere, the water vapour amount varies between some percent to few part per million. For this reason, through the years, several methods and instruments have been developed for the measurement of the humidity in atmosphere. Among the instruments used for atmospheric sounding, radiosondes, airborne and balloon-borne chilled mirror hygrometer (CMH) and tunable diode laser absorption spectrometers (TDLAS) play a key role. To avoid the presence of unknown biases and systematic errors and to obtain accurate and reliable humidity measurements, these instruments need a SI-traceable calibration, preferably carried out in conditions similar to those expected in the field. To satisfy such a need, a new calibration facility has been developed at INRIM. The facility is based on a thermodynamic-based frost-point generator designed to achieve a complete saturation of the carrier gas with a single passage through an isothermal saturator. The humidity generator covers the frost point temperature range between -98 °C and -20 °C and is able to work at any controlled pressure between 200 hPa and 1000 hPa (corresponding to a barometric altitude between ground level and approximately 12000 m). The paper reports the work carried out to test the generator performances, discusses the results and presents the evaluation of the measurement uncertainty. The present work was carried out within the European Joint Research Project "MeteoMet 2 - Metrology for Essential Climate Variables" co-funded by the European Metrology Research Programme (EMRP). The EMRP is jointly funded by the EMRP participating countries within EURAMET and the European Union.

  5. Measuring Physical Activity with Pedometers in Older Adults with Intellectual Disability : Reactivity and Number of Days

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hilgenkamp, Thessa; Van Wijck, Ruud; Evenhuis, Heleen

    2012-01-01

    The minimum number of days of pedometer monitoring needed to estimate valid average weekly step counts and reactivity was investigated for older adults with intellectual disability. Participants (N = 268) with borderline to severe intellectual disability ages 50 years and older were instructed to we

  6. Measuring Physical Activity with Pedometers in Older Adults with Intellectual Disability: Reactivity and Number of Days

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilgenkamp, Thessa; Van Wijck, Ruud; Evenhuis, Heleen

    2012-01-01

    The minimum number of days of pedometer monitoring needed to estimate valid average weekly step counts and reactivity was investigated for older adults with intellectual disability. Participants (N = 268) with borderline to severe intellectual disability ages 50 years and older were instructed to wear a pedometer for 14 days. The outcome measure…

  7. QUALITATIVE MEASUREMENTS OF IGE AND IGG IN HUMAN ASTHMATIC SERUM FOR MOLD REACTIVITY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rational: Molds have the ability to induce allergic asthma-like responses in mouse models; however, their role in human disease is unclear. This study was to develop a screening tool for reactivity of human sera to mold extracts by using a minimal amount of sera for a qual...

  8. A flow-tube based laser-induced fluorescence instrument to measure OH reactivity in the troposphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingham, T.; Goddard, A.; Whalley, L. K.; Furneaux, K. L.; Edwards, P. M.; Seal, C. P.; Self, D. E.; Johnson, G. P.; Read, K. A.; Lee, J. D.; Heard, D. E.

    2009-08-01

    A field instrument utilising the artificial generation of OH radicals in a sliding injector flow-tube reactor with detection by laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy has been developed to measure the rate of decay of OH by reaction with its atmospheric sinks. The OH reactivity instrument has been calibrated using known concentrations of CO, NO2 and single hydrocarbons in a flow of zero air, and the impact of recycling of OH via the reaction HO2+NO→OH+NO2 on the measured OH reactivity has been quantified. As well as a detailed description of the apparatus, the capabilities of the new instrument are illustrated using representative results from deployment in the semi-polluted marine boundary layer at the Weybourne Atmospheric Observatory, UK, and in a tropical rainforest at the Bukit Atur Global Atmospheric Watch station, Danum Valley, Borneo.

  9. Validation of commercially available automated canine-specific immunoturbidimetric method for measuring canine C-reactive protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hillström, Anna; Hagman, Ragnvi; Tvedten, Harold;

    2014-01-01

    with a human CRP assay previously validated for canine CRP determination. Samples from 40 healthy dogs were analyzed to establish a reference interval. RESULTS: Total imprecision was ..., there was good agreement between the validated human CRP assay and the new canine-specific assay. Healthy dogs had CRP concentrations that were less than the limit of quantification of the Gentian cCRP method (6.8 mg/L). CONCLUSIONS: The new canine-specific immunoturbidimetric CRP assay is a reliable and rapid......BACKGROUND: Measurement of C-reactive protein (CRP) is used for diagnosing and monitoring systemic inflammatory disease in canine patients. An automated human immunoturbidimetric assay has been validated for measuring canine CRP, but cross-reactivity with canine CRP is unpredictable. OBJECTIVE...

  10. New Platforms for Suborbital Astronomical Observations and In Situ Atmospheric Measurements: Spacecraft, Instruments, and Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodway, K.; DeForest, C. E.; Diller, J.; Vilas, F.; Sollitt, L. S.; Reyes, M. F.; Filo, A. S.; Anderson, E.

    2014-12-01

    Suborbital astronomical observations have over 50 years' history using NASA's sounding rockets and experimental space planes. The new commercial space industry is developing suborbital reusable launch vehicles (sRLV's) to provide low-cost, flexible, and frequent access to space at ~100 km altitude. In the case of XCOR Aerospace's Lynx spacecraft, the vehicle design and capabilities work well for hosting specially designed experiments that can be flown with a human-tended researcher or alone with the pilot on a customized mission. Some of the first-generation instruments and facilities that will conduct solar observations on dedicated Lynx science missions include the SwRI Solar Instrument Pointing Platform (SSIPP) and Atsa Suborbital Observatory, as well as KickSat sprites, which are picosatellites for in situ atmospheric and solar phenomena measurements. The SSIPP is a demonstration two-stage pointed solar observatory that operates inside the Lynx cockpit. The coarse pointing stage includes the pilot in the feedback loop, and the fine stage stabilizes the solar image to achieve arcsecond class pointing. SSIPP is a stepping-stone to future external instruments that can operate with larger apertures and shorter wavelengths in the solar atmosphere. The Planetary Science Institute's Atsa Suborbital Observatory combines the strengths of ground-based observatories and space-based observing to create a facility where a telescope is maintained and used interchangeably with either in-house facility instruments or user-provided instruments. The Atsa prototype is a proof of concept, hand-guided camera that mounts on the interior of the Lynx cockpit to test target acquisition and tracking for human-operated suborbital astronomy. KickSat sprites are mass-producible, one inch printed circuit boards (PCBs) populated by programmable off the shelf microprocessors and radios for real time data transmission. The sprite PCBs can integrate chip-based radiometers, magnetometers

  11. Measurements of X-ray spectral opacity of dense plasma at Iskra-5 laser facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Annenkov, V.I.; Bel' kov, S.A.; Bessarab, A.V.; Bondarenko, S.V.; Garanin, R.V.; Kochemasov, G.G.; Kovalenko, V.P.; Pinegin, A.V.; Suslov, N.A.; Zhidkov, N.V. [Russian Federal Nuclear Centre - VNIIEF, Sarov (Russian Federation)

    2006-06-15

    The powerful iodine ISKRA-5 laser facility has been upgraded and now operates on the second harmonic. Experiments were performed to measure the X-ray spectral opacity of dense plasma of different materials. Sample of Al and Au material under study was fabricated as a thin plate with the 0.1-0.15 {mu}m thickness and was heated by the soft X-rays generated by irradiation of a thin film gold converter by one beam of the ISKRA-5 laser facility. Typical laser intensity on the converter was (1-5).10{sup 13} W/cm{sup 2} and laser pulse duration was 0.5-0.6 ns. The effective temperature of sample under experimental conditions did not exceed 30-40 eV. The sample was tempered by about 1 {mu}m plastic layers on both sides to avoid its rarefaction during heating and to obtain a quasi-stationary layer of a dense plasma prepared to be probed by a back-lighter. The back-lighter was aluminum or dysprosium film irradiated by another beam of the ISKRA-5 laser facility with an intensity of 10{sup 14}-10{sup 15} W/cm{sup 2}. Probe X-rays were registered by a Bragg spectrometer with spatial resolution. Comparison between experimental data and simulations is discussed. In the case of Al sample, 3 absorption lines corresponding to 1s-2p transition of the Al{sup +4}-Al{sup +6} ions are recorded. The absorption of the Au sample is very close to the absorption of the cold material. The theoretical simulations show that the temperature of the heated Al sample is about 20-25 eV, substantial amount of the Au sample remains unheated at a solid density.

  12. Muon Flux Measurements at the Davis Campus of the Sanford Underground Research Facility with the {\\sc Majorana Demonstrator} Veto System

    CERN Document Server

    Abgrall, N; Avignone, F T; Barabash, A S; Bertrand, F E; Bradley, A W; Brudanin, V; Busch, M; Buuck, M; Byram, D; Caldwell, A S; Chan, Y-D; Christofferson, C D; Chu, P -H; Cuesta, C; Detwiler, J A; Dunagan, C; Efremenko, Yu; Ejiri, H; Elliott, S R; Galindo-Uribarri, A; Gilliss, T; Giovanetti, G K; Goett, J; Green, M P; Gruszko, J; Guinn, I S; Guiseppe, V E; Henning, R; Hoppe, E W; Howard, S; Howe, M A; Jasinski, B R; Keeter, K J; Kidd, M F; Konovalov, S I; Kouzes, R T; LaFerriere, B D; Leon, J; Lopez, A M; MacMullin, J; Martin, R D; Massarczyk, R; Meijer, S J; Mertens, S; Orrell, J L; O'Shaughnessy, C; Overman, N R; Poon, A W P; Radford, D C; Rager, J; Rielage, K; Robertson, R G H; Romero-Romero, E; Ronquest, M C; Schmitt, C; Shanks, B; Shirchenko, M; Snyder, N; Suriano, A M; Tedeschi, D; Trimble, J E; Varner, R L; Vasilyev, S; Vetter, K; Vorren, K; White, B R; Wilkerson, J F; Wiseman, C; Xu, W; Yakushev, E; Yu, C -H; Yumatov, V; Zhitnikov, I

    2016-01-01

    We report the first measurement of the total MUON flux underground at the Davis Campus of the Sanford Underground Research Facility at the 4850 ft level. Measurements were done with the Majorana Demonstrator veto system arranged in two different configurations. The measured total flux is (5.04+/-0.16) x 10^-9 muons/s/cm^2.

  13. Flow measurement by pulsed-neutron activation techniques at the PKL facility at Erlangen (Germany). [PWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kehler, P.

    1982-03-01

    Flow velocities in the downcomer at the PKL facility (in Erlangen, Germany) were measured by the Pulsed-Neutron Activation (PNA) techniques. This was the first time that a fully automated PNA system, incorporating a dedicated computer for on-line data reduction, was used for flow measurements. A prototype of a portable, pulsed, high-output neutron source, developed by the Sandia National Laboratories for the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, was also successfully demonstrated during this test. The PNA system was the primary flow-measuring device used at the PKL, covering the whole range of velocities of interest. In this test series, the PKL simulated small-break accidents similar to the one that occurred at TMI. The flow velocities in the downcomer were, therefore, very low, ranging between 0.03 and 0.35 m/sec. Two additional flow-measuring methods were used over a smaller range of velocities. Wherever comparison was possible, the PNA-derived velocity values agreed well with the measurements performed by the two more conventional methods.

  14. A Large-scale Test Facility for Heat Load Measurements down to 1.9 K

    CERN Document Server

    Dufay, L; Rieubland, Jean Michel; Vandoni, Giovanna

    2002-01-01

    Laboratory-scale tests aimed at minimizing the thermal loads of the LHC magnet cryostat have gone along with the development of the various mechanical components. For final validation of the industrial design with respect to heat inleaks between large surfaces at different temperatures, a full-scale test cryostat has been constructed. The facility reproduces the same pattern of temperature levels as the LHC dipole cryostat, avoiding the heat inleaks from local components like supports and feedthroughs and carefully minimizing fringe effects due to the truncated geometry of the facility with respect to the LHC cryostats serial layout. Thermal loads to the actively cooled radiation screen, operated between 50 K and 65 K, are measured by enthalpy difference along its length. At 1.9 K, the loads are obtained from the temperature difference across a superfluid helium exchanger. On the beam screen, the electrical power needed to stabilize the temperature at 20 K yields a direct reading of the heat losses. Precise i...

  15. Estimates of Radioxenon Released from Southern Hemisphere Medical isotope Production Facilities Using Measured Air Concentrations and Atmospheric Transport Modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eslinger, Paul W.; Friese, Judah I.; Lowrey, Justin D.; McIntyre, Justin I.; Miley, Harry S.; Schrom, Brian T.

    2014-09-01

    Abstract The International Monitoring System (IMS) of the Comprehensive-Nuclear-Test-Ban-Treaty monitors the atmosphere for radioactive xenon leaking from underground nuclear explosions. Emissions from medical isotope production represent a challenging background signal when determining whether measured radioxenon in the atmosphere is associated with a nuclear explosion prohibited by the treaty. The Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO) operates a reactor and medical isotope production facility in Lucas Heights, Australia. This study uses two years of release data from the ANSTO medical isotope production facility and Xe-133 data from three IMS sampling locations to estimate the annual releases of Xe-133 from medical isotope production facilities in Argentina, South Africa, and Indonesia. Atmospheric dilution factors derived from a global atmospheric transport model were used in an optimization scheme to estimate annual release values by facility. The annual releases of about 6.8×1014 Bq from the ANSTO medical isotope production facility are in good agreement with the sampled concentrations at these three IMS sampling locations. Annual release estimates for the facility in South Africa vary from 1.2×1016 to 2.5×1016 Bq and estimates for the facility in Indonesia vary from 6.1×1013 to 3.6×1014 Bq. Although some releases from the facility in Argentina may reach these IMS sampling locations, the solution to the objective function is insensitive to the magnitude of those releases.

  16. Estimates of radioxenon released from Southern Hemisphere medical isotope production facilities using measured air concentrations and atmospheric transport modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eslinger, Paul W; Friese, Judah I; Lowrey, Justin D; McIntyre, Justin I; Miley, Harry S; Schrom, Brian T

    2014-09-01

    The International Monitoring System (IMS) of the Comprehensive-Nuclear-Test-Ban-Treaty monitors the atmosphere for radioactive xenon leaking from underground nuclear explosions. Emissions from medical isotope production represent a challenging background signal when determining whether measured radioxenon in the atmosphere is associated with a nuclear explosion prohibited by the treaty. The Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO) operates a reactor and medical isotope production facility in Lucas Heights, Australia. This study uses two years of release data from the ANSTO medical isotope production facility and (133)Xe data from three IMS sampling locations to estimate the annual releases of (133)Xe from medical isotope production facilities in Argentina, South Africa, and Indonesia. Atmospheric dilution factors derived from a global atmospheric transport model were used in an optimization scheme to estimate annual release values by facility. The annual releases of about 6.8 × 10(14) Bq from the ANSTO medical isotope production facility are in good agreement with the sampled concentrations at these three IMS sampling locations. Annual release estimates for the facility in South Africa vary from 2.2 × 10(16) to 2.4 × 10(16) Bq, estimates for the facility in Indonesia vary from 9.2 × 10(13) to 3.7 × 10(14) Bq and estimates for the facility in Argentina range from 4.5 × 10(12) to 9.5 × 10(12) Bq.

  17. Automated System Calibration and Verification of the Position Measurements for the Los Alamos Isotope Production Facility and the Switchyard Kicker Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barr, D.; Gilpatrick, J. D.; Martinez, D.; Shurter, R. B.

    2004-11-01

    The Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory has constructed both an Isotope Production Facility (IPF) and a Switchyard Kicker (XDK) as additions to the H+ and H- accelerator. These additions contain eleven Beam Position Monitors (BPMs) that measure the beam's position throughout the transport. The analog electronics within each processing module determines the beam position using the log-ratio technique. For system reliability, calibrations compensate for various temperature drifts and other imperfections in the processing electronics components. Additionally, verifications are periodically implemented by a PC running a National Instruments LabVIEW virtual instrument (VI) to verify continued system and cable integrity. The VI communicates with the processor cards via a PCI/MXI-3 VXI-crate communication module. Previously, accelerator operators performed BPM system calibrations typically once per day while beam was explicitly turned off. One of this new measurement system's unique achievements is its automated calibration and verification capability. Taking advantage of the pulsed nature of the LANSCE-facility beams, the integrated electronics hardware and VI perform calibration and verification operations between beam pulses without interrupting production beam delivery. The design, construction, and performance results of the automated calibration and verification portion of this position measurement system will be the topic of this paper.

  18. Two-Group Theory of the Feynman-Alpha Method for Reactivity Measurement in ADS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lénárd Pál

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The theory of the Feynman-alpha method, which is used to determine the subcritical reactivity of systems driven by an external source such as an ADS, is extended to two energy groups with the inclusion of delayed neutrons. This paper presents a full derivation of the variance to mean formula with the inclusion of two energy groups and delayed neutrons. The results are illustrated quantitatively and discussed in physical terms.

  19. Measuring neutron yield and ρR anisotropies with activation foils at the National Ignition Facility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bleuel D.L.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Neutron yields at the National Ignition Facility (NIF are measured with a suite of diagnostics, including activation of ∼20–200 g samples of materials undergoing a variety of energy-dependent neutron reactions. Indium samples were mounted on the end of a Diagnostic Instrument Manipulator (DIM, 25–50 cm from the implosion, to measure 2.45 MeV D-D fusion neutron yield. The 336.2 keV gamma rays from the 4.5 hour isomer of 115mIn produced by (n,n′ reactions are counted in high-purity germanium detectors. For capsules producing D-T fusion reactions, zirconium and copper are activated via (n,2n reactions at various locations around the target chamber and bay, measuring the 14 MeV neutron yield to accuracies on order of 7%. By mounting zirconium samples on ports at nine locations around the NIF chamber, anisotropies in the primary neutron emission due to fuel areal density asymmetries can be measured to a relative precision of 3%.

  20. X-ray scattering measurements on imploding CH spheres at the National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraus, D.; Chapman, D. A.; Kritcher, A. L.; Baggott, R. A.; Bachmann, B.; Collins, G. W.; Glenzer, S. H.; Hawreliak, J. A.; Kalantar, D. H.; Landen, O. L.; Ma, T.; Le Pape, S.; Nilsen, J.; Swift, D. C.; Neumayer, P.; Falcone, R. W.; Gericke, D. O.; Döppner, T.

    2016-07-01

    We have performed spectrally resolved x-ray scattering measurements on highly compressed polystyrene at pressures of several tens of TPa (100 Mbar) created by spherically convergent shocks at the National Ignition Facility. Scattering data of line radiation at 9.0 keV were recorded from the dense plasma shortly after shock coalescence. Accounting for spatial gradients, opacity effects, and source broadening, we demonstrate the sensitivity of the elastic scattering component to carbon K -shell ionization while at the same time constraining the temperature of the dense plasma. For six times compressed polystyrene, we find an average temperature of 86 eV and carbon ionization state of 4.9, indicating that widely used ionization models need revision in order to be suitable for the extreme states of matter tested in our experiment.

  1. Total OH reactivity measurements in ambient air in a southern Rocky Mountain ponderosa pine forest during BEACHON-SRM08 summer campaign

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakashima, Yoshihiro; Kato, Shungo; Greenberg, Jim; Harley, P.; Karl, Thomas G.; Turnipseed, A.; Apel, Eric; Guenther, Alex B.; Smith, Jim; Kajii, Yoshizumi

    2014-03-01

    Total OH reactivity was measured during the Bio-hydro-atmosphere interactions of Energy, Aerosols, Carbon, H2O, Organics and Nitrogen-Southern Rocky Mountain 2008 field campaign (BEACHON-SRM08) held at Manitou Experimental Forest (MEF) in Colorado USA during the summer season in August, 2008. The averaged total OH reactivity was 6.8 s-1, smaller than that measured in urban or suburban areas, while sporadically high OH reactivity was also observed during some evenings. The total OH reactivity measurements were accompanied by observations of traces species such as CO, NO, NOy, O3 and SO2 and VOCs. From the calculation of OH reactivity based on the analysis of these trace species, 35.3-46.3% of OH reactivity for VOCs came from biogenic species that are dominated by 2-methyl-3-butene-2-ol (MBO), and monoterpenes. MBO was the most prominent contribution to OH reactivity of any other trace species. A comparison of observed and calculated OH reactivity shows that the calculated OH reactivity is 29.5-34.8% less than the observed value, implying the existence of missing OH sink. One of the candidates of missing OH was thought to be the oxidation products of biogenic species.

  2. Total OH reactivity measurements in ambient air in a southern Rocky mountain ponderosa pine forest during BEACHON-SRM08 summer campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakashima, Yoshihiro; Kato, Shungo; Greenberg, Jim; Harley, Peter; Karl, Thomas; Turnipseed, Andrew; Apel, Eric; Guenther, Alex; Smith, Jim; Kajii, Yoshizumi

    2014-03-01

    Total OH reactivity was measured during the Bio-hydro-atmosphere interactions of Energy, Aerosols, Carbon, H2O, Organics and Nitrogen-Southern Rocky Mountain 2008 field campaign (BEACHON-SRM08) held at Manitou Experimental Forest (MEF) in Colorado USA in August, 2008. The averaged total OH reactivity was 6.7 s-1, smaller than that measured in urban (33.4 s-1, Yoshino et al., 2012) and suburban (27.7 s-1, Yoshino et al., 2006) areas in Tokyo in the same season, while sporadically high OH reactivity was also observed during some evenings. The total OH reactivity measurements were accompanied by observations of traces species such as CO, NO, NOy, O3 and SO2 and Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs). From the calculation of OH reactivity based on the analysis of these trace species, 46.3% of OH reactivity for VOCs came from biogenic species that are dominated by 2-methyl-3-buten-2-ol (MBO), and monoterpenes. MBO was the most prominent contribution to OH reactivity of all trace species. A comparison of observed and calculated OH reactivity shows that the calculated OH reactivity is 29.5% less than the observed value, implying the existence of missing OH sinks. One of the candidates of missing OH is thought to be the oxidation products of biogenic species.

  3. Measuring the diffusion of palliative care in long-term care facilities – a death census

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santos-Eggimann Brigitte

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The dissemination of palliative care for patients presenting complex chronic diseases at various stages has become an important matter of public health. A death census in Swiss long-term care facilities (LTC was set up with the aim of monitoring the frequency of selected indicators of palliative care. Methods The survey covered 150 LTC facilities (105 nursing homes and 45 home health services, each of which was asked to complete a questionnaire for every non-accidental death over a period of six months. The frequency of 4 selected indicators of palliative care (resort to a specialized palliative care service, the administration of opiates, use of any pain measurement scale or other symptom measurement scale was monitored in respect of the stages of care and analysed based on gender, age, medical condition and place of residence. Results Overall, 1200 deaths were reported, 29.1% of which were related to cancer. The frequencies of each indicator varied according to the type of LTC, mostly regarding the administration of opiate. It appeared that the access to palliative care remained associated with cancer, terminal care and partly with age, whereas gender and the presence of mental disorders had no effect on the indicators. In addition, the use of drugs was much more frequent than the other indicators. Conclusion The profile of patients with access to palliative care must become more diversified. Among other recommendations, equal access to opiates in nursing homes and in home health services, palliative care at an earlier stage and the systematic use of symptom management scales when resorting to opiates have to become of prime concern.

  4. Advancing Reactive Tracer Methods for Measurement of Thermal Evolution in Geothermal Reservoirs: Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitchell A. Plummer; Carl D. Palmer; Earl D. Mattson; Laurence C. Hull; George D. Redden

    2011-07-01

    The injection of cold fluids into engineered geothermal system (EGS) and conventional geothermal reservoirs may be done to help extract heat from the subsurface or to maintain pressures within the reservoir (e.g., Rose et al., 2001). As these injected fluids move along fractures, they acquire heat from the rock matrix and remove it from the reservoir as they are extracted to the surface. A consequence of such injection is the migration of a cold-fluid front through the reservoir (Figure 1) that could eventually reach the production well and result in the lowering of the temperature of the produced fluids (thermal breakthrough). Efficient operation of an EGS as well as conventional geothermal systems involving cold-fluid injection requires accurate and timely information about thermal depletion of the reservoir in response to operation. In particular, accurate predictions of the time to thermal breakthrough and subsequent rate of thermal drawdown are necessary for reservoir management, design of fracture stimulation and well drilling programs, and forecasting of economic return. A potential method for estimating migration of a cold front between an injection well and a production well is through application of reactive tracer tests, using chemical whose rate of degradation is dependent on the reservoir temperature between the two wells (e.g., Robinson 1985). With repeated tests, the rate of migration of the thermal front can be determined, and the time to thermal breakthrough calculated. While the basic theory behind the concept of thermal tracers has been understood for some time, effective application of the method has yet to be demonstrated. This report describes results of a study that used several methods to investigate application of reactive tracers to monitoring the thermal evolution of a geothermal reservoir. These methods included (1) mathematical investigation of the sensitivity of known and hypothetical reactive tracers, (2) laboratory testing of novel

  5. Branch-level measurement of total OH reactivity for constraining unknown BVOC emission during the CABINEX (Community Atmosphere-Biosphere INteractions Experiments-09 Field Campaign

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Kim

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available We present OH reactivity measurements using the comparative reactivity method with a branch enclosure technique for four different tree species (red oak, white pine, beech and red maple in the UMBS PROPHET tower footprint during the Community Atmosphere Biosphere INteraction EXperiment (CABINEX field campaign in July of 2009. Proton Transfer Reaction-Mass Spectrometry (PTR-MS was sequentially used as a detector for OH reactivity and BVOC including isoprene and monoterpenes (MT, in enclosure air, so that the measurement dataset contains both measured OH reactivity and calculated OH reactivity from well-known BVOC. The results indicate that isoprene and MT, and in one case a sesquiterpene, can account for the measured OH reactivity. Significant discrepancy between measured OH reactivity and calculated OH reactivity from isoprene and MT is found for the red maple enclosure dataset but it can be reconciled by adding reactivity from emission of a sesquiterpene, α-farnesene, detected by GC-MS. This leads us to conclude that no significant unknown BVOC emission contributed to ambient OH reactivity from these trees at least during the study period. This conclusion leads us to explore the contribution from unmeasured isoprene (the dominant OH sink in this ecosystem oxidation products such as hydroxyacetone, glyoxal, methylglyoxal and C4 and C5-hydroxycarbonyl using recently published isoprene oxidation mechanisms (Mainz Isoprene Mechanism II and Leuven Isoprene Mechanism. Evaluation of conventionally unmeasured first generation oxidation products of isoprene and their possible contribution to ambient missing OH reactivity indicates that the ratio of OH reactivity from unmeasured products over OH reactivity from MVK + MACR is strongly dependent on NO concentrations. The unmeasured oxidation products can contribute ~7.2% (8.8% from LIM and 5.6% by MIM 2 when NO = 100 pptv of the isoprene contribution towards total ambient OH reactivity. This amount can

  6. Fast neutron measurements at the nELBE time-of-flight facility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junghansa A. R.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The compact neutron-time-of-flight facility nELBE at the superconducting electron accelerator ELBE of Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf has been rebuilt. A new enlarged experimental hall with a flight path of up to 10 m is available for neutron time-of-flight experiments in the fast energy range from about 50 keV to 10 MeV. nELBE is intended to deliver nuclear data of fast neutron nuclear interactions e.g. for the transmutation of nuclear waste and improvement of neutron physical simulations of innovative nuclear systems. The experimental programme consists of transmission measurements of neutron total cross sections, elastic and inelastic scattering cross section measurements, and neutron induced fission cross sections. The inelastic scattering to the first few excited states in 56Fe was investigated by measuring the gamma production cross section with an HPGe detector. The neutron induced fission of 242Pu was studied using fast ionisation chambers with large homogeneous actinide deposits.

  7. First Measurement of Reaction-in-Flight Neutrons at the National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonchev, Anton; Cerjan, C.; Fortner, D.; Henry, E.; Shaughnessy, D.; Schnieder, D.; Stoeffl, W.; Stoyer, M.; Yeamans, C.; Boswell, M.; Bredeweg, T.; Grim, G.; Jungman, G.; Fowler, M.; Hayes, A.; Obst, A.; Rundberg, R.; Schulz, A.; Wilhelmy, J.; Wilde, C.; Bhike, M.; Fallin, B.; Gooden, M.; Howell, C.; Toenow, W.; LLNL/LANL/TUNL Collaboration

    2014-09-01

    The first measurement of reaction-in-flight (RIF) neutrons, also known as tertiary neutrons, has been performed at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) using an activation technique. Thulium foils positioned at 50 cm from the burning deuterium-tritium (DT) capsule have been exposed to the characteristic DT neutron spectrum. The high-energy part of these neutrons with energies above 15.0 MeV can produce 167Tm via the 169Tm(n,3n) reaction. The 208-keV γ-ray, emitted from the decay of 167Tm with a half-life of 9.2 days, has been measured using two clover detectors. The first preliminary result implies that the ratio of RIF neutrons (En>15.0 MeV) versus the total neutrons is 1x10-4 +/- 3x10-5. The important implication of these measurements on our knowledge of the charged-particle stopping power in strongly coupled quantum-degenerate plasma will be presented.

  8. 129I measurements on the 1MV AMS facility at the Centro Nacional de Aceleradores (CNA, Spain).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Guzmán, J M; López-Gutiérrez, J M; Pinto-Gómez, A R; Holm, E

    2012-01-01

    The AMS system at CNA has been the first 1MV compact AMS system designed and manufactured by HVE. In this paper we present the experimental set-up for (129)I measurements in this facility. Charge state +3 has been selected at high-energy side and an optimum stripper pressure of 6×10(-3)mbar of argon (mass thickness of about 0.15μgcm(-2)) has been reached to obtain lowest blank values ((129)I/(127)I≅3×10(-13)). The measurements of the reference materials provided by the IAEA have demonstrated the viability of this facility to make routine measurements of (129)I at environmental levels. This blank value obtained is enough for the measurement of most environmental samples and comparable with other reported backgrounds obtained in facilities working at higher energies and higher charge states.

  9. State and Federal Regulatory measurement responsibilities around medical facilities. [Diagnostic x-ray, radioisotope, and radiotherapy facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lanzl, L.H.

    1976-01-01

    Radiation exposure to man is due chiefly to diagnostic x-ray procedures, in which radiation is intentionally directed toward a patient. Radiation therapy presents a lesser problem because a smaller percentage of the population is subjected to such treatment. Recently, some innovative steps were taken in the State of Illinois to reduce patient exposure in four diagnostic procedures without reducing the benefits derived therefrom. However, if these procedures are to be carried out properly, it is necessary to increase the precision and accuracy of radiation exposure measurements to the order of +-2 percent. The usual accuracy and precision of radiation protection measurements are of the order of +- 20 percent. Thus, should the Illinois radiation protection rules become widely adopted, the national dosimetry network will need to upgrade exposure measurement techniques. (auth)

  10. Extreme-ultraviolet collector mirror measurement using large reflectometer at NewSUBARU synchrotron facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iguchi, Haruki; Hashimoto, Hiraku; Kuki, Masaki; Harada, Tetsuo; Kinoshita, Hiroo; Watanabe, Takeo; Platonov, Yuriy Y.; Kriese, Michael D.; Rodriguez, Jim R.

    2016-06-01

    In extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) lithography, the development of high-power EUV sources is one of the critical issues. The EUV output power directly depends on the collector mirror performance. Furthermore, mirrors with large diameters are necessary to achieve high collecting performance and take sufficient distance to prevent heat and debris from a radiation point of the source. Thus collector mirror development with accurate reflectometer is important. We have developed a large reflectometer at BL-10 beamline of the NewSUBARU synchrotron facility that can be used for mirrors with diameters, thicknesses, and weights of up to 800 mm, 250 mm, and 50 kg, respectively. This reflectometer can measure reflectivity with fully s-polarized EUV light. In this study, we measured the reflectance of a 412-mm-diameter EUV collector mirror using a maximum incident angle of 36°. We obtained the peak reflectance, center wavelength and reflection bandwidth results and compared our results with Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt results.

  11. Modern Facilities for Experimental Measurement of Dynamic Loads Induced by Humans: A Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vitomir Racic

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper provides a critical overview of available technology and facilities for determining human-induced dynamic forces of civil engineering structures, such as due to walking, running, jumping and bouncing. In addition to traditional equipment for direct force measurements comprising force plate(s, foot pressure insoles and instrumented treadmills, the review also investigates possibility of using optical motion tracking systems (marker-based and marker-free optoelectronic technology and non-optical motion tracking systems (inertial sensors to reproduce contact forces between humans and structures based on body kinematics data and known body mass distribution. Although significant technological advancements have been made in the last decade, the literature survey showed that the state-of-the-art force measurements are often limited to individuals in artificial laboratory environments. Experimental identification of seriously needed group- and crowd-induced force data recorded on as-built structures, such as footbridges, grandstands and floors, still remains a challenge due to the complexity of human actions and the lack of adequate equipment.

  12. Lineshape measurements of He-β spectra on the ORION laser facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beiersdorfer, P.; Brown, G. V.; Shepherd, R.; Allan, P.; Brown, C. R. D.; Hill, M. P.; Hoarty, D. J.; Hobbs, L. M. R.; James, S. F.; Chung, H. K.; Hill, E.

    2016-10-01

    We have utilized a newly developed high-resolution X-ray spectrometer to measure the shapes of spectral lines produced from laser-irradiated targets on the Orion laser facility in the United Kingdom. We present measurements of the He-β spectra of chlorine and chromium from targets irradiated by either a long-pulse or a short-pulse laser beam. The experimental conditions provide a spread in plasma density ranging from about 1019 to about 1024 cm-3. We present spectral calculations that show that the relative intensities of the Li-like satellite lines can be used to infer the density in the lower range, especially if the lithiumlike satellite lines are well resolved. In addition, we use the Stark-broadened width of the He-β line to infer densities above about 1022 cm-3. In the case of a short-pulse irradiated chromium foil, we find that the He-like chromium is produced at a density of almost 8 g/cm3, i.e., solid density. In addition, we can infer the electron temperature from the observation of dielectronic recombination satellite lines.

  13. Measurements and simulations of wakefields at the Accelerator Test Facility 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snuverink, J.; Ainsworth, R.; Boogert, S. T.; Cullinan, F. J.; Lyapin, A.; Kim, Y. I.; Kubo, K.; Kuroda, S.; Okugi, T.; Tauchi, T.; Terunuma, N.; Urakawa, J.; White, G. R.

    2016-09-01

    Wakefields are an important factor in accelerator design, and are a real concern when preserving the low beam emittance in modern machines. Charge dependent beam size growth has been observed at the Accelerator Test Facility (ATF2), a test accelerator for future linear collider beam delivery systems. Part of the explanation of this beam size growth is wakefields. In this paper we present numerical calculations of the wakefields produced by several types of geometrical discontinuities in the beam line as well as tracking simulations to estimate the induced effects. We also discuss precision beam kick measurements performed with the ATF2 cavity beam position monitor system for a test wakefield source in a movable section of the vacuum chamber. Using an improved model independent method we measured a wakefield kick for this movable section of about 0.49 V /pC /mm , which, compared to the calculated value from electromagnetic simulations of 0.41 V /pC /mm , is within the systematic error.

  14. The 236U neutron capture cross-section measured at the n_TOF CERN facility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mastromarco M.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The 236U isotope plays an important role in nuclear systems, both for future and currently operating ones. The actual knowledge of the capture reaction of this isotope is satisfactory in the thermal region, but it is considered insufficient for Fast Reactor and ADS applications. For this reason the 236U(n, γ reaction cross-section has been measured for the first time in the whole energy region from thermal energy up to 1 MeV at the n_TOF facility with two different detection systems: an array of C6D6 detectors, employing the total energy deposited method, and a FX1 total absorption calorimeter (TAC, made of 40 BaF2 crystals. The two n_TOF data sets agree with each other within the statistical uncertainty in the Resolved Resonance Region up to 800 eV, while sizable differences (up to ≃ 20% are found relative to the current evaluated data libraries. Moreover two new resonances have been found in the n_TOF data. In the Unresolved Resonance Region up to 200 keV, the n_TOF results show a reasonable agreement with previous measurements and evaluated data.

  15. Diagnostic development in precise opacity measurement of radiatively heated Al plasma on Shenguang II laser facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao Yang [Wuhan National Laboratory for Optoelectronics, Institute of Optoelectronics Science and Engineering, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China); Research Center of Laser Fusion, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China); Yang Jiamin; Zhang Jiyan [Research Center of Laser Fusion, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China); Liu Jinsong; Yuan Xiao [Wuhan National Laboratory for Optoelectronics, Institute of Optoelectronics Science and Engineering, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China); Jin Fengtao [Research Center of Laser Fusion, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China); Department of Physics, National University of Defense Technology, Changsha 410073 (China)

    2009-04-15

    Simultaneous measurements of the self-emission spectrum, the backlighting source spectrum, and the transmission spectrum in one shot, which reduce the experimental uncertainties from shot-to-shot fluctuation, are essential for precise opacity experiments. In order to achieve precise absorption spectrum of Al plasmas, a special half sample sandwich target was designed and short backlighter was used to provide time- and space-resolving diagnostics on the Shenguang II high power laser facility. In the measurement, a cylindrical cavity with CH foam baffles was used to provide a clean x-ray radiation environment for sample heating. The x-ray source spectrum, the transmission spectrum, and the self-emission spectrum of the soft x-ray heated Al sample were recorded in one shot with a penta-erythritol tetrakis (hydroxymethy) methane C(CH{sub 2}OH){sub 4} (PET) crystal spectrometer by using the point-projection method. Experimental results have been compared with the calculation results of a detailed level accounting opacity code.

  16. The measurement of angular differential cross sections at the SSL Atomic Scattering Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kvale, Thomas J.

    1988-01-01

    The design of the SSL Atomic Scattering Facility (ASF) located at the NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center as well as some of the initial experiments to be performed with it, are covered. The goal is to develop an apparatus capable of measuring angular differential cross sections (ADCS) for the scattering of 2 to 14 eV atomic oxygen from various gaseous targets. At present little is known about atomic oxygen scattering with kinetic energies of a few eV. This apparatus is designed to increase the understanding of collisions in this energy region. Atomic oxygen scattering processes are of vital interest to NASA because the space shuttle as well as other low earth orbit satellites will be subjected to a flux of 5 eV atomic oxygen on the ram surfaces while in orbit. The primary experiments will involve the measurements of ADCS for atomic oxygen scattering from gaseous targets (in particular, molecular nitrogen). These, as well as the related initial experiments involving thermal He scattering from N2 and O2 targets will be described.

  17. 6D Phase Space Measurements at the SLAC Gun Test Facility

    CERN Document Server

    Schmerge, J

    2003-01-01

    Proposed fourth generation light sources using SASE FELs to generate short pulse, coherent X-rays require demonstration of high brightness electron sources. The Gun Test Facility (GTF) at SLAC was built to test high brightness sources for the proposed Linac Coherent Light Source at SLAC. The GTF is composed of an Sband photocathode rf gun with a Cu cathode, emittance compensating solenoid, single 3 m SLAC linac section and e-beam diagnostic section with a UV drive laser system. The longitudinal emittance exiting the gun has been determined by measuring the energy spectrum downstream of the linac as a function of the linac phase. The e-beam pulse width, correlated and uncorrelated energy spread at the linac entrance have been fit to the measured energy spectra using a least square error fitting routine. The fit yields a pulse width of 2.9 ps FWHM for a 4.3 ps FWHM laser pulse width and 2% rms correlated energy spread with 0.07% rms uncorrelated energy spread. The correlated energy spread is enhanced in the lin...

  18. ``Super'' Gas Cherenkov Detector for Gamma Ray Measurements at the National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrmann, Hans W.; Kim, Y. H.; McEvoy, A. M.; Zylstra, A. B.; Lopez, F. E.; Griego, J. R.; Fatherley, V. E.; Oertel, J. A.; Batha, S. H.; Stoeffl, W.; Church, J. A.; Carpenter, A.; Rubery, M. S.; Horsfield, C. J.; Gales, S.; Leatherland, A.; Hilsabeck, T.; Kilkenny, J. D.; Malone, R. M.; Shmayda, W. T.

    2015-11-01

    New requirements to improve reaction history and ablator areal density measurements at the NIF necessitate improvements in sensitivity, temporal and spectral response relative to the existing Gamma Reaction History diagnostic (GRH-6m) located 6 meters from target chamber center (TCC). A new DIM-based ``Super'' Gas Cherenkov Detector (GCD) will ultimately provide ~ 200x more sensitivity to DT fusion gamma rays, reduce the effective temporal resolution from ~ 100 to ~ 10 ps and lower the energy threshold from 2.9 to 1.8 MeV, relative to GRH-6m. The first phase is to insert the existing coaxial GCD-3 detector into a reentrant well on the NIF chamber which will put it within 4 meters of TCC. This diagnostic platform will allow assessment of the x-ray radiation background environment within the well which will be fed into the shielding design for the follow-on ``Super'' GCD. It will also enable use of a pulse-dilation PMT which has the potential to improve the effective measurement bandwidth by ~ 10x relative to current PMT technology. GCD-3 has been thoroughly tested at the OMEGA Laser Facility and characterized at the High Intensity Gamma Ray Source (HIgS).

  19. Intrinsic noise of a superheated droplet detector for neutron background measurements in massively shielded facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Ana C.; Morlat, Tomoko A.; Felizardo, Miguel; Kling, Andreas; Marques, José G.; Prudêncio, Maria I.; Marques, Rosa; Carvalho, Fernando P.; Roche, Ignácio Lázaro; Girard, Thomas A.

    2017-09-01

    Superheated droplet detectors are a promising technique to the measurement of low-intensity neutron fields, as detectors can be rendered insensitive to minimum ionizing radiations. We report on the intrinsic neutron-induced signal of C2ClF5 devices fabricated by our group that originate from neutron- and alpha-emitting impurities in the detector constituents. The neutron background was calculated via Monte Carlo simulations using the MCNPX-PoliMi code in order to extract the recoil distributions following neutron interaction with the atoms of the superheated liquid. Various nuclear techniques were employed to characterise the detector materials with respect to source isotopes (238U, 232Th and 147Sm) for the normalisation of the simulations and also light elements (B, Li) having high (α, n) neutron production yields. We derived a background signal of 10-3 cts/day in a 1 liter detector of 1-3 wt.% C2ClF5, corresponding to a detection limit in the order of 10-8 n cm-2s-1. Direct measurements in a massively shielded underground facility for dark matter search have confirmed this result. With the borosilicate detector containers found to be the dominant background source in current detectors, possibilities for further noise reduction by 2 orders of magnitude based on selected container materials are discussed.

  20. Velocity Measurements at Six Fish Screening Facilities in the Yakima River Basin, Washington, Summer 1988 : Annual Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abernethy, C. Scott; Neitzel, Duane A.; Lusty, E. William

    1989-11-01

    The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), the United States Bureau of Reclamation (USSR), and the Washington State Department of Ecology (WDOE) are funding the construction and evaluation of fish passage facilities and fish protection facilities at irrigation and hydroelectric diversions in the Yakima River Basin, Washington State. The program provides offsite enhancement to compensate for fish and wildlife losses caused by hydroelectric development throughout the Columbia River Basin, and addresses natural propagation of salmon to help mitigate the impact of irrigation in the Yakima River Basin. This report evaluates the flow characteristics of the screening facilities. Studies consisted of velocity measurements taken in front of the rotary drum screens and within the fish bypass systems during peak flows. Measurements of approach velocity and sweep velocity were emphasized in these studies; however, vertical velocity was also measured. 5 refs., 18 figs., 15 tabs.

  1. Distribution of physical activity facilities in Scotland by small area measures of deprivation and urbanicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ogilvie David

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim of this study was to examine the distribution of physical activity facilities by area-level deprivation in Scotland, adjusting for differences in urbanicity, and exploring differences between and within the four largest Scottish cities. Methods We obtained a list of all recreational physical activity facilities in Scotland. These were mapped and assigned to datazones. Poisson and negative binomial regression models were used to investigate associations between the number of physical activity facilities relative to population size and quintile of area-level deprivation. Results The results showed that prior to adjustment for urbanicity, the density of all facilities lessened with increasing deprivation from quintiles 2 to 5. After adjustment for urbanicity and local authority, the effect of deprivation remained significant but the pattern altered, with datazones in quintile 3 having the highest estimated mean density of facilities. Within-city associations were identified between the number of physical activity facilities and area-level deprivation in Aberdeen and Dundee, but not in Edinburgh or Glasgow. Conclusions In conclusion, area-level deprivation appears to have a significant association with the density of physical activity facilities and although overall no clear pattern was observed, affluent areas had fewer publicly owned facilities than more deprived areas but a greater number of privately owned facilities.

  2. Measurements and modeling of emissions, dispersion and dry deposition of ammonia from swine facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajwa, Kanwardeep Singh

    Ammonia has recently gained importance for its increasing atmospheric concentrations and its role in the formation of aerosols. Studies have shown increasing atmospheric concentration levels of NH3 and NH 4+, especially in the regions of concentrated animal feeding operations. Atmospheric inputs of reduced nitrogen as ammonia and ammonium by dry and wet deposition may represent a substantial contribution to the acidification of semi natural ecosystems and could also affect sensitive coastal ecosystems and estuaries. The anaerobic lagoon and spray method, commonly used for waste storage and disposal in confined animal feeding operations (CAFO), is a significant source of ammonia emissions. An accurate emission model for ammonia from aqueous surfaces can help in the development of emission factors. Study of dispersion and dry deposition patterns of ammonia downwind of a hog farm will help us to understand how much ammonia gets dry deposited near the farm, and how remaining ammonia gets transported farther away. An experimental and modeling study is conducted of emissions, dispersion and dry deposition of ammonia taking one swine farm as a unit. Measurements of ammonia flux were made at 11 swine facilities in North Carolina using dynamic flow-through chamber system over the anaerobic waste treatment lagoons. Continuous measurements of ammonia flux, meteorological and lagoon parameters were made for 8-10 days at each farm during each of the warm and cold seasons. Ammonia concentrations were continuously measured in the chamber placed over the lagoon using a Thermo Environmental Instrument Incorporated (TECO) Model 17c chemiluminescnce ammonia analyzer. A similar ammonia analyzer was used to measure ammonia concentrations at selected locations on the farm. Barn emissions were measured using open-path Fourier transform infrared (OP-FTIR) spectroscopy. A 10 m meteorological tower was erected at each site to measure wind speed and direction, temperature, relative humidity

  3. A heat transport benchmark problem for predicting the impact of measurements on experimental facility design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cacuci, Dan Gabriel, E-mail: cacuci@cec.sc.edu

    2016-04-15

    Highlights: • Predictive Modeling of Coupled Multi-Physics Systems (PM-CMPS) methodology is used. • Impact of measurements for reducing predicted uncertainties is highlighted. • Presented thermal-hydraulics benchmark illustrates generally applicable concepts. - Abstract: This work presents the application of the “Predictive Modeling of Coupled Multi-Physics Systems” (PM-CMPS) methodology conceived by Cacuci (2014) to a “test-section benchmark” problem in order to quantify the impact of measurements for reducing the uncertainties in the conceptual design of a proposed experimental facility aimed at investigating the thermal-hydraulics characteristics expected in the conceptual design of the G4M reactor (GEN4ENERGY, 2012). This “test-section benchmark” simulates the conditions experienced by the hottest rod within the conceptual design of the facility's test section, modeling the steady-state conduction in a rod heated internally by a cosinus-like heat source, as typically encountered in nuclear reactors, and cooled by forced convection to a surrounding coolant flowing along the rod. The PM-CMPS methodology constructs a prior distribution using all of the available computational and experimental information, by relying on the maximum entropy principle to maximize the impact of all available information and minimize the impact of ignorance. The PM-CMPS methodology then constructs the posterior distribution using Bayes’ theorem, and subsequently evaluates it via saddle-point methods to obtain explicit formulas for the predicted optimal temperature distributions and predicted optimal values for the thermal-hydraulics model parameters that characterized the test-section benchmark. In addition, the PM-CMPS methodology also yields reduced uncertainties for both the model parameters and responses. As a general rule, it is important to measure a quantity consistently with, and more accurately than, the information extant prior to the measurement. For

  4. Comparison of Antenna Measurement Facilities with the DTU-ESA 12 GHz Validation Standard Antenna within the EU Antenna Centre of Excellence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pivnenko, Sergey; Pallesen, Janus Engberg; Breinbjerg, Olav

    2009-01-01

    The primary objective of many antenna measurement facilities is to provide a specified high accuracy of the measured data. The validation of an antenna measurement facility is the process of proving that such a specified accuracy can be achieved. Since this constitutes a very challenging task......, antenna measurement accuracy has been the subject of much research over many years and a range of useful measures have been introduced. Facility comparisons, together with antenna standards, error budgets, facility accreditations, and measurement procedure standards, constitute an effective measure...... towards facility validations. This paper documents the results of a comparison between 8 European antenna measurement facilities with a specially designed reference antenna, the DTU-ESA 12 GHz Validation Standard Antenna (VAST-12). The electrical and mechanical properties of the VAST-12 antenna...

  5. Measurement, analysis, and modeling of hydrogen sulfide emissions from a swine facility in North Carolina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blunden, Jessica

    Annual global source contributions of sulfur compounds to the natural atmospheric environment are estimated to be 142 x 106 tons. Although not quantified, volatilization from animal wastes may be an important source of gaseous reduced sulfur compounds. Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is a colorless gas emitted during decomposition of hog manure that produces an offensive "rotten egg" odor. Once released into the atmosphere, H 2S is oxidized and the eventual byproduct, sulfuric acid, may combine with other atmospheric constituents to form aerosol products such as ammonium bisulfate and ammonium sulfate. In recent years, confined animal feeding operations (CAFOs) have increased in size, resulting in more geographically concentrated areas of animals and, subsequently, animal waste. In North Carolina and across the southeastern United States anaerobic waste treatment lagoons are traditionally used to store and treat hog excreta at commercial hog farms. Currently, no state regulations exist for H2S gaseous emissions from animal production facilities in North Carolina and the amount of H2S being emitted into the atmosphere from these potential sources is widely unknown. In response to the need for data, this research initiative has been undertaken in an effort to quantify emissions of H2S from swine CAFOs. An experimental study was conducted at a commercial swine farm in eastern North Carolina to measure hydrogen sulfide emissions from a hog housing unit utilizing a mechanical fan ventilation system and from an on-site waste storage treatment lagoon. A dynamic flow-through chamber system was employed to make lagoon flux measurements. Semi-continuous measurements were made over a one-year period (2004-2005) for a few days during each of the four predominant seasons in order to assess diurnal and temporal variability in emissions. Fan rpm from the barn was continuously measured and flow rates were calculated in order to accurately assess gaseous emissions from the system

  6. Measuring relative humidity in the radioactive environment of the IRRAD proton facility

    CERN Document Server

    Paerg, Marten

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the project was to obtain information on relative humidity conditions at different locations in the IRRAD proton facility. Due to high radiation levels inside the facility, different sensors had to be qualified and dedicated electronics had to be built to transfer the data of the sensors over long wires to a less radioactive area, where it could be collected.

  7. Manufacture of Single 60Co Source Irradiation Facility and the Measurement of Reference Radiation Filed

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO; Fei; WANG; Hong-yu; NI; Ning; ZHANG; Li; HOU; Jin-bing; SONG; Ming-zhe

    2012-01-01

    <正>Reference radiation filed produced by isotope source is necessary for calibration of radiation dose meter. 60Co single source radiation facility is an important method to produce reference radiation. Collimation design of the facility is good for characteristics of the field, but there are scattered photon influences however. Scattered radiation is mainly come from collimation, source shield, floor, walls and

  8. An evaluation of electrochemical potentiokinetic reactivation techniques for in-service measurements on Type 304 stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stoner, K.J.

    1989-01-01

    Electrochemical potentiokinetic reactivation (EPR) tests can be used to measure quantitatively the sensitization of Type 304 stainless steel. The single loop (SL) and double loop (DL) EPR techniques were compared as non-destructive methods for determining sensitization under both laboratory and simulated field environments. Measurements were performed on specimens heat-treated to produce levels of sensitization from no sensitization to heavy sensitization. At temperatures of 22/degree/C and 30/degree/C testing with standard laboratory and portable field apparatus, both EPR techniques were capable of distinguishing sensitization levels at the range spanning those characterized as being non-susceptible and susceptible to intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC). Through correlations developed for the test data, it is possible to translate field results to the standard laboratory test conditions. This was demonstrated for the SL test through measurements performed on a pipe specimen containing IGSCC. 12 refs., 12 figs., 2 tabs.

  9. Electromagnetic Interference/Compatibility (EMI/EMC) Control Test and Measurement Facility: User Test Planning Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scully, Robert C.

    2011-01-01

    Test process, milestones and inputs are unknowns to first-time users of the EMI/EMC Test Facility. The User Test Planning Guide aids in establishing expectations for both NASA and non-NASA facility customers. The potential audience for this guide includes both internal and commercial spaceflight hardware/software developers. It is intended to assist their test engineering personnel in test planning and execution. Material covered includes a roadmap of the test process, roles and responsibilities of facility and user, major milestones, facility capabilities, and inputs required by the facility. Samples of deliverables, test article interfaces, and inputs necessary to define test scope, cost, and schedule are included as an appendix to the guide.

  10. Global Modelling of the total OH reactivity: validation against measurements and atmospheric implications of the 'missing' sink

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferracci, Valerio; Archibald, Alexander T.; Pyle, John A.

    2017-04-01

    The removal of most trace gases emitted into the atmosphere is primarily initiated by reaction with the hydroxyl radical, OH. A number of field campaigns over the last two decades have observed the presence of a "missing" sink of the OH radical in a variety of regions across the planet, from urban areas to remote forests: comparison of the direct measurements of the OH loss rate, also known as total OH reactivity, with the sum of individual known OH sinks (obtained via the simultaneous detection of species such as volatile organic compounds and nitrogen oxides) indicated that, in some cases, up to 80% of the total OH loss rate was unaccounted for. The implications of this finding are significant, as a potentially major OH sink operating in the atmosphere is not currently accounted for in atmospheric models: the presence of an additional OH sink might, for instance, lead to an increase in the atmospheric lifetime of a number of trace species, including high-impact greenhouse gases such as methane. The only modelling of the total OH reactivity is currently performed on a regional scale; a thorough assessment of the impact of the missing sink on the chemistry and climate of the planet by global modelling is therefore highly desirable. In this work a chemistry-climate model (the Met Office's Unified Model with the United Kingdom Chemistry and Aerosols scheme, UM-UKCA) was used to calculate the total OH reactivity at the planetary boundary layer. The model output was validated against available field measurements to verify that the known OH sinks observed in the field were reproduced correctly by the model: a good agreement was found between the data from more than 30 field campaigns and the model output. Following this, the effects of introducing novel OH sinks in the chemistry scheme were investigated. The first step was the introduction in the model of the newly characterised reactions of peroxy radicals (RO2) with OH, the kinetics and products of which have only

  11. Measurement of reaction-in-flight neutrons using thulium activation at the National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grim, G. P.; Rundberg, R.; Fowler, M. M.; Hayes, A. C.; Jungman, G.; Boswell, M.; Klein, A.; Wilhelmy, J.; Tonchev, A.; Yeamans, C. B.

    2014-09-01

    We report on the first observation of tertiary reaction-in-flight (RIF) neutrons produced in compressed deuterium and tritium filled capsules using the National Ignition Facility at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA. RIF neutrons are produced by third-order, out of equilibrium ("in-flight") fusion reactions, initiated by primary fusion products. The rate of RIF reactions is dependent upon the range of the elastically scattered fuel ions and therefore a diagnostic of Coulomb physics within the plasma. At plasma temperatures of ˜5 keV, the presence of neutrons with kinetic energies greater than 15 MeV is a unique signature for RIF neutron production. The reaction 169Tm(n,3n)167Tm has a threshold of 15.0 MeV, and a unique decay scheme making it a suitable diagnostic for observing RIF neutrons. RIF neutron production is quantified by the ratio of 167Tm/168Tm observed in a 169Tm foil, where the reaction 169Tm(n,2n)168Tm samples the primary neutron fluence. Averaged over 4 implosions1-4 at the NIF, the 167Tm/168Tm ratio is measured to be 1.5 +/- 0.3 x 10-5, leading to an average ratio of RIF to primary neutron ratio of 1.0 +/- 0.2 x 10-4. These ratios are consistent with the predictions for charged particle stopping in a quantum degenerate plasma.

  12. A new and facile method for measurement of apparent density of monodisperse polymer beads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qi; Srinivasan, Balasubramanian; Li, Yuanpeng; Jing, Ying; Xing, Chengguo; Chang, Jin; Wang, Jian-Ping

    2010-03-15

    The apparent density, an intrinsic physical property of polymer beads, plays an important role in the application of beads in micro-total analysis systems and separation. Here we have developed a new, facile and milligram-scale method to describe the motion of beads in aqueous solution and further detect the apparent density of beads. The motion of beads in solutions is determined by the viscosity of solutions and the density difference between beads and solutions. In this study, using various glycerol aqueous solutions with certain viscosities and densities, the motion time (i.e. floating or sedimentation time) of hybrid polymer beads was experimentally measured and theoretically deduced, and consequently, the apparent density of monodisperse beads can be quickly and easily calculated. The results indicated that the present method provided a more precise way to predict the movement of hybrid beads in aqueous solution compared with the approach for commercial use. This new method can be potentially employed in flow cytometry, suspension stability, and particle analysis systems.

  13. Guide for radiological characterization and measurements for decommissioning of US Department of Energy surplus facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Denahm, D. H.; Barnes, M. G.; Jaquish, R. E.; Corley, J. P.; Gilbert, R. O.; Hoenes, G. R.; Jamison, J. D.; McMurray, B. J.; Watson, E. C.

    1983-08-01

    This Guide describes the elements of radiological characterization at DOE excess facilities in preparation for, during, and subsequent to decommissioning operations. It is the intent of this Guide and accompanying appendices to provide the reader (user) with sufficient information to carry out that task with a minimum of confusion and to provide a uniform basis for evaluating site conditions and verifying that decommissioning operations are conducted according to a specific plan. Some areas of particular interest in this Guide are: the need to involve appropriate staff from the affected states in the early planning stages of decommissioning; the need for and suggested methods of radiological site characterization to complete a decommissioning project, including: historical surveys, environmental pathway analyses, statistical sampling design, and choosing appropriate instrumentation and measurements; the need for and emphasis on quality assurance, documentation and records retention; the establishment of a Design Objective approach to applying site-specific contamination limits based on the ALARA philosophy; the establishment of a ''de minimis'' or minimum dose level of concern for decommissioning operations based on existing standards, experience and ALARA considerations.

  14. Frailty Levels in Residential Aged Care Facilities Measured Using the Frailty Index and FRAIL-NH Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theou, Olga; Tan, Edwin C K; Bell, J Simon; Emery, Tina; Robson, Leonie; Morley, John E; Rockwood, Kenneth; Visvanathan, Renuka

    2016-11-01

    To compare the FRAIL-NH scale with the Frailty Index in assessing frailty in residential aged care facilities. Cross-sectional. Six Australian residential aged care facilities. Individuals aged 65 and older (N = 383, mean aged 87.5 ± 6.2, 77.5% female). Frailty was assessed using the 66-item Frailty Index and the FRAIL-NH scale. Other measures examined were dementia diagnosis, level of care, resident satisfaction with care, nurse-reported resident quality of life, neuropsychiatric symptoms, and professional caregiver burden. The FRAIL-NH scale was significantly associated with the Frailty Index (correlation coefficient = 0.81, P care needs, with the Frailty Index having stronger associations with all of these measures. The FRAIL-NH scale is a simple and practical method to screen for frailty in residential aged care facilities. © 2016, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2016, The American Geriatrics Society.

  15. Atmospheric Electric Field measurements at Eastern North Atlantic ARM Climate Research Facility: Global Electric Circuit Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, Francisco; Silva, Hugo; Nitschke, Kim; Azevedo, Eduardo

    2016-04-01

    The Eastern North Atlantic (ENA) facility of the ARM programme (established an supported by the U.S. Department of Energy with the collaboration of the local government and University of the Azores), is located at Graciosa Island of the Azores Archipelago (39° N; 28° W). It constitutes a strategic observatory for Atmospheric Electricity since it is located in the Atlantic Ocean basin exposed to clean marine aerosol conditions which reduces the well known spectral signature of atmospheric pollution and enables the study of the so called Global Electrical Circuit (GEC). First evidences of the existence of a GEC affecting the Earth's Electric Environment has retrieved by the Carnegie cruise expedition, in what became known as the Carnegie Curve. Those measurements were made in the Ocean in several campaigns and the present studies aims at reconsidering measurements in similar conditions but in a long-term basis, at least 5 years. This will contribute to the understanding of the long-term evolution of the Ionospheric Potential (IP). In literature there is theoretical evidence that it is decreasing IP in strength, but that conjecture is still lacking valid experimental evidence. Moreover, to clearly identify the GEC signal two effects must be taken into account: the effect of surface radon gas variation, because the Azores Archipelago is a seismic active region the possible influence of Earthquakes cannot be discarded easily; the effect of short-term solar activity on the Atmospheric Electricity modulation, solar flares emitting solar particles (e.g., solar energetic protons) need to be considered in this study.

  16. Measurement and modelling of reactive transport in geological barriers for nuclear waste containment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Qingrong; Joseph, Claudia; Schmeide, Katja; Jivkov, Andrey P

    2015-11-11

    Compacted clays are considered as excellent candidates for barriers to radionuclide transport in future repositories for nuclear waste due to their very low hydraulic permeability. Diffusion is the dominant transport mechanism, controlled by a nano-scale pore system. Assessment of the clays' long-term containment function requires adequate modelling of such pore systems and their evolution. Existing characterisation techniques do not provide complete pore space information for effective modelling, such as pore and throat size distributions and connectivity. Special network models for reactive transport are proposed here using the complimentary character of the pore space and the solid phase. This balances the insufficient characterisation information and provides the means for future mechanical-physical-chemical coupling. The anisotropy and heterogeneity of clays is represented using different length parameters and percentage of pores in different directions. Resulting networks are described as mathematical graphs with efficient discrete calculus formulation of transport. Opalinus Clay (OPA) is chosen as an example. Experimental data for the tritiated water (HTO) and U(vi) diffusion through OPA are presented. Calculated diffusion coefficients of HTO and uranium species are within the ranges of the experimentally determined data in different clay directions. This verifies the proposed pore network model and validates that uranium complexes are diffusing as neutral species in OPA. In the case of U(vi) diffusion the method is extended to account for sorption and convection. Rather than changing pore radii by coarse grained mathematical formula, physical sorption is simulated in each pore, which is more accurate and realistic.

  17. Nanoindentation and atomic force microscopy measurements on reactively sputtered TiN coatings

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Harish C Barshilia; K S Rajam

    2004-02-01

    Titanium nitride (TiN) coatings were deposited by d.c. reactive magnetron sputtering process. The films were deposited on silicon (111) substrates at various process conditions, e.g. substrate bias voltage (B) and nitrogen partial pressure. Mechanical properties of the coatings were investigated by a nanoindentation technique. Force vs displacement curves generated during loading and unloading of a Berkovich diamond indenter were used to determine the hardness () and Young’s modulus () of the films. Detailed investigations on the role of substrate bias and nitrogen partial pressure on the mechanical properties of the coatings are presented in this paper. Considerable improvement in the hardness was observed when negative bias voltage was increased from 100–250 V. Films deposited at |B| = 250 V exhibited hardness as high as 3300 kg/mm2. This increase in hardness has been attributed to ion bombardment during the deposition. The ion bombardment considerably affects the microstructure of the coatings. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) of the coatings revealed fine-grained morphology for the films prepared at higher substrate bias voltage. The hardness of the coatings was found to increase with a decrease in nitrogen partial pressure.

  18. Automated Computer-Based Facility for Measurement of Near-Field Structure of Microwave Radiators and Scatterers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mishra, Shantnu R.;; Pavlasek, Tomas J. F.;; Muresan, Letitia V.

    1980-01-01

    An automatic facility for measuring the three-dimensional structure of the near fields of microwave radiators and scatterers is described. The amplitude and phase for different polarization components can be recorded in analog and digital form using a microprocessor-based system. The stored data...

  19. Photovoltaic Engineering Testbed: A Facility for Space Calibration and Measurement of Solar Cells on the International Space Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landis, Geoffrey A.; Bailey, Sheila G.; Jenkins, Phillip; Sexton, J. Andrew; Scheiman, David; Christie, Robert; Charpie, James; Gerber, Scott S.; Johnson, D. Bruce

    2001-01-01

    The Photovoltaic Engineering Testbed ("PET") is a facility to be flown on the International Space Station to perform calibration, measurement, and qualification of solar cells in the space environment and then returning the cells to Earth for laboratory use. PET will allow rapid turnaround testing of new photovoltaic technology under AM0 conditions.

  20. Measurement of depth distributions of (3)H and (14)C induced in concrete shielding of an electron accelerator facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endo, Akira; Harada, Yasunori; Kawasaki, Katsuya; Kikuchi, Masamitsu

    2004-06-01

    The estimation of radioactivity induced in concrete shielding is important for the decommissioning of accelerator facilities. Concentrations of (3)H and (14)C in the concrete shielding of an electron linear accelerator were measured, and the depth distributions of (3)H and (14)C and gamma-ray emitters were discussed in relation to their formation reactions.

  1. Measuring three aspects of motivation among health workers at primary level health facilities in rural Tanzania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Miho; Maufi, Deogratias; Mwingira, Upendo John; Leshabari, Melkidezek T; Ohnishi, Mayumi; Honda, Sumihisa

    2017-01-01

    The threshold of 2.3 skilled health workers per 1,000 population, published in the World Health Report in 2006, has galvanized resources and efforts to attain high coverage of skilled birth attendance. With the inception of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), a new threshold of 4.45 doctors, nurses, and midwives per 1,000 population has been identified. This SDG index threshold indicates the minimum density to respond to the needs of health workers to deliver a much broader range of health services, such as management of non-communicable diseases to meet the targets under Goal 3: Ensure healthy lives and promote well-being for all people of all ages. In the United Republic of Tanzania, the density of skilled health workers in 2012 was 0.5 per 1,000 population, which more than doubled from 0.2 per 1,000 in 2002. However, this showed that Tanzania still faced a critical shortage of skilled health workers. While training, deployment, and retention are important, motivation is also necessary for all health workers, particularly those who serve in rural areas. This study measured the motivation of health workers who were posted at government-run rural primary health facilities. We sought to measure three aspects of motivation-Management, Performance, and Individual Aspects-among health workers deployed in rural primary level government health facilities. In addition, we also sought to identify the job-related attributes associated with each of these three aspects. Two regions in Tanzania were selected for our research. In each region, we further selected two districts in which we carried out our investigation. The two regions were Lindi, where we carried out our study in the Nachingwea District and the Ruangwa District, and Mbeya, within which the Mbarali and Rungwe Districts were selected for research. All four districts are considered rural. This cross-sectional study was conducted by administering a two-part questionnaire in the Kiswahili language. The first

  2. Reactivity worth measurements on fast burst reactor Caliban - description and interpretation of integral experiments for the validation of nuclear data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richard, B. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique et Aux Energies Alternatives CEA, DAM, VALDUC, F-21120 Is-sur-Tille (France)

    2012-07-01

    Reactivity perturbation experiments using various materials are being performed on the HEU fast core CALIBAN, an experimental device operated by the CEA VALDUC Criticality and Neutron Transport Research Laboratory. These experiments provide valuable information to contribute to the validation of nuclear data for the materials used in such measurements. This paper presents the results obtained in a first series of measurements performed with Au-197 samples. Experiments which have been conducted in order to improve the characterization of the core are also described and discussed. The experimental results have been compared to numerical calculation using both deterministic and Monte Carlo neutron transport codes with a simplified model of the reactor. This early work led to a methodology which will be applied to the future experiments which will concern other materials of interest. (authors)

  3. Time resolved measurement of film growth during reactive high power pulsed magnetron sputtering (HIPIMS) of titanium nitride

    CERN Document Server

    Mitschker, Felix; Benedikt, Jan; Maszl, Christian; von Keudell, Achim

    2013-01-01

    The growth rate during reactive high power pulsed magnetron sputtering (HIPIMS) of titanium nitride is measured with a temporal resolution of up to 25 us using a rotating shutter concept. According to that concept a 200 um slit is rotated in front of the substrate synchronous with the HIPIMS pulses. Thereby, the growth flux is laterally distributed over the substrate. By measuring the resulting deposition profile with profilometry and with x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, the temporal variation of the titanium and nitrogen growth flux per pulse is deduced. The analysis reveals that film growth occurs mainly during a HIPIMS pulse, with the growth rate following the HIPIMS phases ignition, current rise, gas rarefaction, plateau and afterglow. The growth fluxes of titanium and nitrogen follow slightly different behaviors with titanium dominating at the beginning of the HIPIMS pulse and nitrogen at the end of the pulse. This is explained by the gas rarefaction effect resulting in a dense initial metal plasma and...

  4. K{sub {infinity}} measurements of HTR lattices by oscillated zero reactivity technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benedetti, F.; Brighenti, G.; Chiodi, P.L.; Giuliani, C.

    1973-10-15

    Referring to 9th DCPM and 15th DCPM (AGN), the measurements program has been scheduled as foreseen, with some variations suggested by the experience development. The measurements are scheduled to be completed by the end of 1973, but we have judged interesting to present some of the results obtained to date.

  5. Measurement of the 242Pu(n,f) Cross Section at the CERN n_TOF Facility

    CERN Document Server

    Tsinganis, A; Guerrero, C; Colonna, N; Calviani, M; Vlastou, R; Andriamonje, S; Vlachoudis, V; Gunsing, F; Massimi, C; Altstadt, S; Andrzejewski, J; Audouin, L; Barbagallo, M; Bécares, V; Bečvář, F; Belloni, F; Billowes, J; Boccone, V; Bosnar, D; Brugger, M; Calviño, F; Cano-Ott, D; Carrapiço, C; Cerutti, F; Chin, M; Cortés, G; Cortés-Giraldo, M A; Diakaki, M; Domingo-Pardo, C; Duran, I; Dressler, R; Dzysiuk, N; Eleftheriadis, C; Ferrari, A; Fraval, K; Ganesan, S; García, A R; Giubrone, G; Gómez-Hornillos, M B; Gonçalves, I F; González-Romero, E; Griesmayer, E; Gurusamy, P; Hernández-Prieto, A; Jenkins, D G; Jericha, E; Kadi, Y; Käppeler, F; Karadimos, D; Kivel, N; Koehler, P; Kokkoris, M; Krtička, M; Kroll, J; Lampoudis, C; Langer, C; Leal-Cidoncha, E; Lederer, C; Leeb, H; Leong, L S; Losito, R; Mallick, A; Manousos, A; Marganiec, J; Martínez, T; Massimi, C; Mastinu, P F; Mastromarco, M; Meaze, M; Mendoza, E; Mengoni, A; Milazzo, P M; Mingrone, F; Mirea, M; Mondalaers, W; Paradela, C; Pavlik, A; Perkowski, J; Plompen, A; Praena, J; Quesada, J M; Rauscher, T; Reifarth, R; Riego, A; Robles, M S; Roman, F; Rubbia, C; Sabaté-Gilarte, M; Sarmento, R; Saxena, A; Schillebeeckx, P; Schmidt, S; Schumann, D; Tagliente, G; Tain, J L; Tarrío, D; Tassan-Got, L; Valenta, S; Vannini, G; Variale, V; Vaz, P; Ventura, A; Versaci, R; Vermeulen, M J; Wallner, A; Ware, T; Weigand, M; Weiss, C; Wright, T; Žugec, P

    2014-01-01

    The accurate knowledge of relevant nuclear data is crucial for the design of advanced nuclear systems. These data include neutron cross sections of various plutonium isotopes and other minor actinides. The Pu-242(n,f) cross section was measured at the CERN n\\_TOF facility, taking advantage of the wide energy range (from thermal to GeV) and the high instantaneous flux of the neutron beam. Preliminary results for the measurement are presented.

  6. The SCANDAL facility - How to measure elastic neutron scattering in the 50-130 MeV range

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klug, Joakim

    2001-01-01

    The interest in neutrons of energies above 20 MeV is growing rapidly, since new applications are being developed or have been identified. Transmutation of nuclear waste and cancer therapy with neutron beams are two research fields that would benefit from new neutron scattering data at these energies. A facility for detection of scattered neutrons in the energy interval 50-130 MeV, SCANDAL (SCAttered Nucleon Detection AssembLy), has been developed and installed at the neutron beam facility of the The Svedberg Laboratory in Uppsala. It can be used to study the (n,n), (n,p) and (n,d) reactions. This thesis describes the layout of the setup, the experimental procedure, and data analysis principles. The performance of the spectrometer is illustrated with measurements of the (n,p) and (n,n) reactions on {sup 1}H and {sup 12}C. In addition, the neutron beam facility is described in some detail.

  7. Effect of Fibrinogen on Platelet Reactivity Measured by the VerifyNow P2Y12 Assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobrovolsky, A B; Laguta, P S; Guskova, E V; Yarovaya, E B; Titaeva, E V; Storozhilova, A N; Panchenko, E P

    2016-05-01

    The VerifyNow assay is based upon the ability of activated platelets to cross-link beads coated with fibrinogen. However, fibrinogen is an abundant protein of blood, and therefore it may affect test results by competing with fibrinogen of beads for binding to platelets. To test this assumption, we assessed the influence of artificial alteration of fibrinogen level in blood samples obtained from donors (n = 9) and patients on clopidogrel therapy (n = 8) on the results of the VerifyNow P2Y12 assay. Fibrinogen level was altered by adding to blood samples 1/10 volume of fibrinogen solution (10.56 g/liter) or corresponding buffer. Relative to baseline, addition of buffer significantly increased platelet reactivity, whereas addition of fibrinogen decreased it. Analysis of the relationship between change in platelet reactivity values (dBase and dPRU) and change in fibrinogen concentration (dFg) revealed strong negative correlations: dBase = -63.3 × dFg - 27.1 (r = -0.924, p fibrinogen strongly influences results of the VerifyNow P2Y12 assay, and (ii) correcting for fibrinogen effect may be needed to improve the accuracy of the test in the measuring of antiplatelet effect of clopidogrel therapy.

  8. Experimental Antithrombotic Effect of Garlic Varieties Measured by a Global In Vitro Test of Platelet Reactivity and Spontaneous Thrombolytic Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshinobu Ijiri

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Prevention of arterial thrombotic diseases has high priority over treatment in developed countries. Unsuitable life style such as inappropriate quality and quantity of daily diet is known to increase the risk for acute thrombotic events, while a regular diet with proven antithrombotic effects might be beneficial in preventing the disease. The present study was undertaken as a part of a series of research in screening vegetables, fruits and medicinal herbs for antithrombotic activity by animal models of thrombosis. In the present study the effects of fifteen garlic varieties (accessions on platelet reactivity and spontaneous (endogenous thrombolytic activity were measured ex vivo from saline-diluted rat blood by the Global Thrombosis Test (GTT. All accessions showed antithrombotic activity but the activity varied between accessions. The heat stable antithrombotic activity was dominantly due to inhibition of platelet reactivity to high shear stress while the spontaneous thrombolytic activity was not affected. These findings suggest that daily intake of garlic as part of an antithrombotic diet may be beneficial for the prevention of arterial thrombotic disorders.

  9. Source Term Estimates of Radioxenon Released from the BaTek Medical Isotope Production Facility Using External Measured Air Concentrations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eslinger, Paul W.; Cameron, Ian M.; Dumais, Johannes R.; Imardjoko, Yudi; Marsoem, Pujadi; McIntyre, Justin I.; Miley, Harry S.; Stoehlker, Ulrich; Widodo, Susilo; Woods, Vincent T.

    2015-10-01

    Abstract Batan Teknologi (BaTek) operates an isotope production facility in Serpong, Indonesia that supplies 99mTc for use in medical procedures. Atmospheric releases of Xe-133 in the production process at BaTek are known to influence the measurements taken at the closest stations of the International Monitoring System (IMS). The purpose of the IMS is to detect evidence of nuclear explosions, including atmospheric releases of radionuclides. The xenon isotopes released from BaTek are the same as those produced in a nuclear explosion, but the isotopic ratios are different. Knowledge of the magnitude of releases from the isotope production facility helps inform analysts trying to decide whether a specific measurement result came from a nuclear explosion. A stack monitor deployed at BaTek in 2013 measured releases to the atmosphere for several isotopes. The facility operates on a weekly cycle, and the stack data for June 15-21, 2013 show a release of 1.84E13 Bq of Xe-133. Concentrations of Xe-133 in the air are available at the same time from a xenon sampler located 14 km from BaTek. An optimization process using atmospheric transport modeling and the sampler air concentrations produced a release estimate of 1.88E13 Bq. The same optimization process yielded a release estimate of 1.70E13 Bq for a different week in 2012. The stack release value and the two optimized estimates are all within 10 percent of each other. Weekly release estimates of 1.8E13 Bq and a 40 percent facility operation rate yields a rough annual release estimate of 3.7E13 Bq of Xe-133. This value is consistent with previously published estimates of annual releases for this facility, which are based on measurements at three IMS stations. These multiple lines of evidence cross-validate the stack release estimates and the release estimates from atmospheric samplers.

  10. Comparison of optimized algorithms in facility location allocation problems with different distance measures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Rakesh; Chandrawat, Rajesh Kumar; Garg, B. P.; Joshi, Varun

    2017-07-01

    Opening the new firm or branch with desired execution is very relevant to facility location problem. Along the lines to locate the new ambulances and firehouses, the government desires to minimize average response time for emergencies from all residents of cities. So finding the best location is biggest challenge in day to day life. These type of problems were named as facility location problems. A lot of algorithms have been developed to handle these problems. In this paper, we review five algorithms that were applied to facility location problems. The significance of clustering in facility location problems is also presented. First we compare Fuzzy c-means clustering (FCM) algorithm with alternating heuristic (AH) algorithm, then with Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO) algorithms using different type of distance function. The data was clustered with the help of FCM and then we apply median model and min-max problem model on that data. After finding optimized locations using these algorithms we find the distance from optimized location point to the demanded point with different distance techniques and compare the results. At last, we design a general example to validate the feasibility of the five algorithms for facilities location optimization, and authenticate the advantages and drawbacks of them.

  11. Method of measuring nighttime U-values using the Mobile Window Thermal Test (MoWiTT) Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klems, J.H.

    1992-04-01

    Although primarily designed for studying the dynamic net energy flows through fenestration systems over the full diurnal cycle, the Mobile Window Thermal Test (MoWiTT) Facility is also frequently used to measure nighttime U-values. These measurements have the advantage of incorporating the exterior film coefficient resulting from the true ambient conditions at a particular time and location, rather than relying on a laboratory simulation of some assumed average or extreme condition. On the other hand, the MoWiTT is a much more complicated facility than a laboratory hot box, and the number of potential error sources is correspondingly larger. The method of deriving the nighttime U-value from directly measured data and the effect of random and systematic errors are discussed.

  12. Strategies for measuring flows of reactive nitrogen at the landscape scale

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Theobald, M.R.; Akkal, N.; Bienkowski, J.

    2011-01-01

    the design of an experiment carried out in the NitroEurope IP to characterise the Nr flows in six contrasting European rural landscapes during a period of 1-2 years. The focus is on characterisation as it is not possible to measure all Nr Methods/Approach flows at all locations and, therefore...

  13. Measuring reactive nitrogen emissions from point sources using visible spectroscopy from aircraft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melamed, M L; Solomon, S; Daniel, J S; Langford, A O; Portmann, R W; Ryerson, T B; Nicks, D K; McKeen, S A

    2003-02-01

    Accurate measurements of nitrogen dioxide (NO2), a key trace gas in the formation and destruction of tropospheric ozone, are important in studies of urban pollution. Nitrogen dioxide column abundances were measured during the Texas Air Quality Study 2000 using visible absorption spectroscopy from an aircraft. The method allows for quantification of the integrated total number of nitrogen dioxide molecules in the polluted atmosphere and is hence a useful tool for measuring plumes of this key trace gas. Further, we show how such remote-sensing observations can be used to obtain information on the fluxes of nitrogen dioxide into the atmosphere with unique flexibility in terms of aircraft altitude, and the height and extent of mixing of the boundary layer. Observations of nitrogen dioxide plumes downwind of power plants were used to estimate the flux of nitrogen oxide emitted from several power plants in the Houston and Dallas metropolitan areas and in North Carolina. Measurements taken over the city of Houston were also employed to infer the total flux from the city as a whole.

  14. The Weird World, and Equally Weird Measurement Models: Reactive Indicators and the Validity Revolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayduk, Leslie A.; Robinson, Hannah Pazderka; Cummings, Greta G.; Boadu, Kwame; Verbeek, Eric L.; Perks, Thomas A.

    2007-01-01

    Researchers using structural equation modeling (SEM) aspire to learn about the world by seeking models with causal specifications that match the causal forces extant in the world. This quest for a model matching existing worldly causal forces constitutes an ontology that orients, or perhaps reorients, thinking about measurement validity. This…

  15. Evaluation of a catalytic reduction technique for the measurement of total reactive odd-nitrogen NOy in the atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahey, D. W.; Eubank, C. S.; Hubler, C. S.; Fehsenfeld, F. C.

    1985-01-01

    The suitability of a technique for the measurement of total reactive odd-nitrogen NOy-containing species in the atmosphere has been examined. In the technique, an NOy component species, which may include NO, NO2, NO3, HNO3, peroxyacetyl nitrate, and particulate nitrate, are catalytically reduced by CO to form NO molecules on the surface of a metal converter tube, and the NO product is detected by chemiluminescence produced in reaction with O3. Among the catalysts tested in the temperature range of 25-500 C, Au was the preferred catalyst. The results of laboratory tests investigating the effects of pressure, O3, and H2O on NOy conversion, and the possible sources of interference, have shown that the technique is suitable for atmospheric analyses. The results of a test in ambient air at a remote ground-based field site are included.

  16. An integrated model to measure service management and physical constraints' effect on food consumption in assisted-living facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Hui-Chun; Shanklin, Carol W

    2008-05-01

    The United States is experiencing remarkable growth in the elderly population, which provides both opportunities and challenges for assisted-living facilities. The objective of this study was to explore how service management influences residents' actual food consumption in assisted-living facilities. Physical factors influencing residents' service evaluation and food consumption also were investigated. A total of 394 questionnaires were distributed to assisted-living residents in seven randomly selected facilities. The questionnaire was developed based on an in-depth literature review and pilot study. Residents' perceived quality evaluations, satisfaction, and physical constraints were measured. Residents' actual food consumption was measured using a plate waste technique. A total of 118 residents in five facilities completed both questionnaires and food consumption assessments. Descriptive, multivariate analyses and structural equation modeling techniques were employed. Service management, including food and service quality and customer satisfaction, was found to significantly influence residents' food consumption. Physical constraints associated with aging, including a decline in health status, chewing problems, sensory loss, and functional disability, also significantly influenced residents' food consumption. A significant relationship was found between physical constraints and customer satisfaction. Foodservice that provides good food and service quality increases customer satisfaction and affects residents' actual food consumption. Physical constraints also influence residents' food consumption directly, or indirectly through satisfaction. The findings suggest that food and nutrition professionals in assisted-living should consider the physical profiles of their residents to enhance residents' satisfaction and nutrient intake. Recommendations for exploring residents' perspectives are discussed.

  17. In situ measurements of IO and reactive iodine aboard the RV Sonne during SHIVA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heard, Dwayne; Walker, Hannah; Ingham, Trevor; Huang, Ru-Jin; Wittrock, Folker

    2013-04-01

    Halogenated very short-lived substances (VSLS) are emitted from the oceans by marine species such as macroalgae and phytoplankton and contribute to halogen loading in the troposphere and lower stratosphere. The SHIVA (Stratospheric Ozone: Halogen Impacts in a Varying Atmosphere) project combined ship-borne, aircraft-based and ground-based measurements in and over the South China Sea and the Sulu Sea, and around the coast of Malaysian Borneo. In this paper we present measurements of IO radicals in coastal and open ocean regions made onboard the German research vessel RV Sonne in November 2011 between Singapore and Manila, via the northern coast of Malaysian Borneo (South China Sea) and the Sulu Sea. In situ measurements of IO were made on 12 days by the University of Leeds laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) instrument, with a detection limit of 0.3 pptv for a 30 minute averaging period. The cruise average IO concentration was found to be 1.2 pptv, with a maximum concentration of 2.4 pptv in the middle of the Sulu Sea, an area known for high biological activity. Only a weak diurnal profile was observed, with IO detected above the detection limit on 10 out of the 11 nights when the LIF instrument was operational. Measurements of IO at night in the open ocean have not previously been reported and indicate the presence of gas phase or heterogeneous mechanisms that recycle iodine species without requiring light. There was reasonable agreement for IO concentrations measured by the University of Leeds LIF and the University of Bremen MAX-DOAS instruments, for which a comparison will be presented. I2, ICl and HOI were measured by the University of Mainz using a coupled diffusion denuder system followed by analysis using gas chromatography coupled with ion trap mass spectroscopy, with a detection of 0.17 pptv for 30 mins (I2). The cruise average I2 concentration was found to be 2.0 pptv, with a maximum concentration observed during one night of 12.7 pptv on the northern coast

  18. Design of the opacity spectrometer for opacity measurements at the National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, P. W.; Heeter, R. F.; Ahmed, M. F.; Dodd, E.; Huffman, E. J.; Liedahl, D. A.; King, J. A.; Opachich, Y. P.; Schneider, M. B.; Perry, T. S.

    2016-11-01

    Recent experiments at the Sandia National Laboratory Z facility have called into question models used in calculating opacity, of importance for modeling stellar interiors. An effort is being made to reproduce these results at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). These experiments require a new X-ray opacity spectrometer (OpSpec) spanning 540 eV-2100 eV with a resolving power E/ΔE > 700. The design of the OpSpec is presented. Photometric calculations based on expected opacity data are also presented. First use on NIF is expected in September 2016.

  19. Accelerating flow propagator measurements for the investigation of reactive transport in porous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colbourne, A. A.; Sederman, A. J.; Mantle, M. D.; Gladden, L. F.

    2016-11-01

    NMR propagator measurements are widely used for identifying the distribution of molecular displacements over a given observation time, characterising a flowing system. However, where high q-space resolution is required, the experiments are time consuming and therefore unsuited to the study of dynamic systems. Here, it is shown that with an appropriately sampled subset of the q-space points in a high-resolution flow propagator measurement, one can quickly and robustly reconstruct the fully sampled propagator through interpolation of the acquired raw data. It was found that exponentially sampling ∼4% of the original data-points allowed a reconstruction with the deviation from the fully sampled propagator below the noise level, in this case reducing the required experimental time from ∼2.8 h to 2D imaging data. Such insights are of importance in understanding well acidisation and CO2 sequestration processes.

  20. Long Term Suboxone™ Emotional Reactivity As Measured by Automatic Detection in Speech

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Addictions to illicit drugs are among the nation’s most critical public health and societal problems. The current opioid prescription epidemic and the need for buprenorphine/naloxone (Suboxone®; SUBX) as an opioid maintenance substance, and its growing street diversion provided impetus to determine affective states (“true ground emotionality”) in long-term SUBX patients. Toward the goal of effective monitoring, we utilized emotion-detection in speech as a measure of “true” emotionality in 36 ...

  1. Viscoelasticity measurement of gel formed at the liquid-liquid reactive interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ujiie, Tomohiro

    2012-11-01

    We have experimentally studied a reacting liquid flow with gel formation by using viscous fingering (VF) as a flow field. Here, two systems were employed. In one system, sodium polyacrylate (SPA) solution and ferric ion solution were used as the more and less viscous liquids, respectively. In another system, xthantan gum (XG) solution and the ferric ion solution were used as the more and less viscous liquids, respectively. We showed that influence of gel formation on VF were qualitatively different in these two systems. We consider that the difference in the two systems will be caused by the difference in the properties of the gels. Therefore, we have measured the rheological properties of the gels by means of a rheometer. In the present study, viscoelasticity measurement was performed by two methods. One is the method which uses Double Wall Ring sensor (TA instrument) and another is the method using parallel plate. In both viscoelasticity measurements, the behavior of the formed gel was qualitatively consistent. We have found that the gel in the SPA system shows viscoelastic fluid like behavior. Moreover, we have found that the gel in the XG system shows solid like behavior.

  2. Investigation of potential interferences on the measurement of dissolved reactive phosphate using zirconium oxide-based DGT technique

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qin Sun; Yifei Chen; Di Xu; Yan Wang; Shiming Ding

    2013-01-01

    A diffusive gradients in thin films (DGT) technique based on hydrous zirconium oxide (Zr-oxide) has been recently developed for the measurement of dissolved reactive phosphate (DRP).In this study,the detailed performance of the DGT technique is reported.Spiking experiments revealed that several orthophosphate monoester compounds contributed to the Zr-oxide DGT measurements of DRP.However,such a phenomenon is unlikely to occur during field conditions due to the low concentration of organic P in typical natural waters.The presence of Cl-(up to 106 g/L),SO42-(up to 16 g/L),HCO3-(up to 817 g/L),and AsO2-and AsO43-(both up to 1 mg As/L) in solutions had negligible effects on the measurement of DRP.The threshold concentrations of Cl-,SO42-and HCO3-have been increased from previous reports for the measurements of DRP using other adsorbent-based DGT techniques.The capacity for DGT measurements of DRP decreased with increasing solution pH (4.2-9.2).The lowest capacity (95 μg P/cm2 at pH 9.2) was still greater than that of other DGT techniques that are usually used for the measurement of DRP (2-12 μg P/cm2).The Zr-oxide binding gel could be stored for up to 2 years without any aging effect.This period of validity was considerably longer than the ferrihydrite binding gel that is commonly used in present DGT devices (6 months).The field application revealed that the concentrations of DRP measured in three fresh water samples using the Zr-oxide DGT technique were in agreement with those of the traditional colorimetric method.

  3. On-road Emissions of Reactive Nitrogen through In-situ, Mobile Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, K.; Tao, L.; Pan, D.; Golston, L.; Miller, D. J.; Zondlo, M. A.

    2014-12-01

    Ammonia (NH3) is a key precursor to atmospheric fine particulate matter (PM2.5), with strong implications for regional air quality and global climate change. Existing atmospheric measurements suggest that urban traffic may provide significant amount of NH3. NH3 emissions in urban areas may cause greater impact on air quality and human health, because other aerosol tracers, like NO and NO2, are emitted by similar on-road sources. However, the on-road NH3 emission inventories are subject to significant uncertainties. A mobile platform is developed by mounting multiple portable (total power ~ 100 W, weight ~ 25 kg), high-resolution (10 Hz), open-path sensors on top of a passenger car. On-road NH3 emissions are quantified in the real-world driving conditions by synchronized NH3, CO, and CO2 measurements. The mobile platform has covered over 16,000 km in the US and China since 2013. The total on-road sampling time is over 300 hours. Major US metropolitan areas that have been sampled include LA, SF, Houston, Philadelphia, and Denver. Three Chinese megacities (Beijing, Baoding, and Shijiazhuang) were sampled in both 2013 and 2014. The average emission factors (grams of NH3 emitted per kilogram of fuel) range from 0.3 to 0.5 g/kg. Different methodologies were compared, including on-road emission ratios, tunnel measurements, and city-scale gradient measurements. These methodologies yielded the same emission factor for Houston (0.4±0.05 g/kg) within the sampling uncertainties and showed that multiple approaches are consistent with one another. The observed NH3 emission ratios indicate that National Emisison Inventory (NEI) underestimates on-road NH3 emissions by up to 50% in some major urban areas. On-road NH3 emission factors show higher values in both stop-and-go driving conditions and freeway speeds with a minimum near 70 km/h. This is consistent with another observation that the emission factors in urban traffic are generally larger than suburban traffic. Road gradient

  4. Instrumentation to Support PIV and HPIV Measurements in an Axial Turbomachine Flow Visualization Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    in axial turbomachines and use the data to address turbulence and flow modeling issues that are specific to such complex environments. The motivation...stress modeling for LES. The report describes in detail our unique two-stage axial- turbomachine flow visualization facility, specifying the instruments

  5. Relative tropospheric photolysis rates of acetaldehyde and formaldehyde measured at the European Photoreactor Facility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilsson, Elna Johanna Kristina; Bache-Andreassen, Lihn; Johnson, Matthew Stanley;

    2009-01-01

    The photolysis rates of HCHO, DCDO, CH3CHO, and CH3CDO are studied by long-path FTIR spectroscopy in natural tropospheric conditions at the European Photoreactor Facility (EUPHORE) in Valencia, Spain. Average relative photolysis rates jHCHO/jDCDO ) 3.15 ( 0.08 and jCH3CHO/jCH3CDO ) 1.26 ( 0...

  6. Lidar Based Emissions Measurement at the Whole Facility Scale: Method and Error Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Particulate emissions from agricultural sources vary from dust created by operations and animal movement to the fine secondary particulates generated from ammonia and other emitted gases. The development of reliable facility emission data using point sampling methods designed to characterize regiona...

  7. RISK ASSESSMENT BY STRUCTURAL ANALYSIS AND VIBRATION MEASUREMENT EQUIPMENT OPERATING AT OIL FACILITIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marius STAN

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Vibration analysis applications in operation is one of the diagnostic methods ofoperation of the facility. Analysis of these types of failures indicated the existence of specificfeatures prints and related equipment vibration spectra. Modeling and identification of theseparticular aspects in the spectrum of vibration machines help to control the operation of oilfacilities built safely.

  8. Operation and Performance Measurement on Engines in Sea Level Test Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-03-01

    operations which may ho performed in order to imorove a % signal ci, change its existing form into another one for the purpose of electrical comnatibility ...facility that allows realistic gas turbine core engine cyclic testing with fully instrumented components. This corporate funded Low Cycle Fatigue

  9. Calorimeter probes for measuring high thermal flux. [in electric-arc jet facilities for planetary entry heating simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, L. D.

    1979-01-01

    The paper describes expendable, slug-type calorimeter probes developed for measuring high heat-flux levels of 10-30 kW/sq cm in electric-arc jet facilities. The probes are constructed with thin tungsten caps mounted on Teflon bodies; the temperature of the back surface of the tungsten cap is measured, and its rate of change gives the steady-state, absorbed heat flux as the calorimeter probe heats to destruction when inserted into the arc jet. It is concluded that the simple construction of these probes allows them to be expendable and heated to destruction to obtain a measurable temperature slope at high heating rates.

  10. Chip electrophoresis as a novel approach to measure the polyphenols reactivity toward human saliva.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinaldi, Alessandra; Iturmendi, Néréa; Gambuti, Angelita; Jourdes, Michael; Teissedre, Pierre-Louis; Moio, Luigi

    2014-06-01

    Saliva is a biological fluid with a multifunctional role that makes it interesting in terms of research and diagnostic possibilities. In food research, human saliva represented a useful tool by which we measure the tactile sensation elicited by polyphenol-rich beverages called astringency. A method based on SDS-PAGE analysis of saliva before and after the binding reaction with wine polyphenols has been successfully used in previous studies for measuring wine astringency by means of the saliva precipitation index. In this work, chip electrophoresis was used alternatively to SDS-PAGE and results were compared. Chip electrophoresis provides a very good reproducibility for wine and grape astringency. Moreover, this approach is much faster than the conventional SDS-PAGE method requiring several hours for an analysis. Another advantage over traditional gel is lower sample and reagent volume requirements, as well as the lower and less toxic wastes, contributing benefits to health and environment. The application of this novel method allowed, using the principal component analysis, to distinguish grapes and wines according to the saliva precipitation index and structural characteristics determined by the phoroglucinolysis analysis.

  11. Measurements of reactive nitrogen produced by tropical thunderstorms during BIBLE-C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koike, M.; Kondo, Y.; Kita, K.; Takegawa, N.; Nishi, N.; Kashihara, T.; Kawakami, S.; Kudoh, S.; Blake, D.; Shirai, T.; Liley, B.; Ko, M.; Miyazaki, Y.; Kawasaki, Z.; Ogawa, T.

    2007-09-01

    The Biomass Burning and Lightning Experiment phase C (BIBLE-C) aircraft mission was carried out near Darwin, Australia (12°S, 131°E) in December 2000. This was the first aircraft experiment designed to estimate lightning NO production rates in the tropics, where production is considered to be most intense. During the two flights (flights 10 and 13 made on December 9 and 11-12, respectively) enhancements of NOx (NO + NO2) up to 1000 and 1600 parts per trillion by volume (pptv, 10-s data) were observed at altitudes between 11.5 and 14 km. The Geostationary Meteorological Satellite (GMS) cloud (brightness temperature) data and ground-based lightning measurements by the Global Positioning and Tracking System (GPATS) indicate that there were intensive lightning events over the coast of the Gulf of Carpentaria, which took place upstream from our measurement area 10 to 14 h prior to the measurements. For these two flights, air in which NOx exceeded 100 pptv extended over 620 × 140 and 400 × 170 km2 (wind direction × perpendicular direction), respectively, suggesting a significant impact of lightning NO production on NOx levels in the tropics. We estimate the amount of NOx observed between 11.5 and 14 km produced by the thunderstorms to be 3.3 and 1.8 × 1029 NO molecules for flights 10 and 13, respectively. By using the GPATS lightning flash count data, column NO production rates are estimated to be 1.9-4.4 and 21-49 × 1025 NO molecules per single flash for these two flight data sets. In these estimations, it is assumed that the column NO production between 0 and 16 km is greater than the observed values between 11.5 and 14 km by a factor of 3.2, which is derived using results reported by Pickering et al. (1998). There are however large uncertainties in the GPATS lightning data in this study and care must be made when the production rates are referred. Uncertainties in these estimates are discussed. The impact on the ozone production rate is also described.

  12. Visitor’s Guide to Oliktok Point Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility, North Slope of Alaska

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Desilets, Darin [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Helsel, Fred M. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Bendure, Al O. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Lucero, Daniel A. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Ivey, Mark D. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Dexheimer, Danielle N. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2016-04-01

    The importance of Oliktok Point, Alaska, as a focal point for climate research in the Arctic continues to grow with the addition of a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Monitoring (ARM) Climate Research Facility Mobile Facility (AMF) and the expansion of infrastructure to support airborne measurements. The site hosts a suite of instruments for making multi-year, high-fidelity atmospheric measurements; serves as a base of operations for field campaigns; and contains the only Restricted Airspace and Warning Area in the U.S. Arctic, which enables the use of unmanned aircraft systems. The use of this site by climate researchers involves several considerations, including its remoteness, harsh climate, and location amid the North Slope oilfields. This guide is intended to help visitors to Oliktok Point navigate this unique physical and administrative environment, and thereby facilitate safe and productive operations.

  13. Neutron calibration facility with an Am-Be source for pulse shape discrimination measurement of CsI(Tl) crystals

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, H S; Choi, J H; Choi, S; Hahn, I S; Jeon, E J; Joo, H W; Kang, W G; Kim, G B; Kim, H J; Kim, K W; Kim, S C; Kim, S K; Kim, Y D; Kim, Y H; Lee, J H; Lee, J K; Leonard, D S; Li, J; Myung, S S; Olsen, S L; So, J H

    2014-01-01

    We constructed a neutron calibration facility based on a 300-mCi Am-Be source in conjunction with a search for weakly interacting massive particle candidates for dark matter. The facility is used to study the response of CsI(Tl) crystals to nuclear recoils induced by neutrons from the Am-Be source and comparing them with the response to electron recoils produced by Compton scattering of 662-keV $\\gamma$-rays from a $^{137}$Cs source. The measured results on pulse shape discrimination (PSD) between nuclear- and electron-recoil events are quantified in terms of quality factors. A comparison with similar result from a neutron reactor demonstrate the feasibility of performing calibrations of PSD measurements using neutrons from a Am-Be source.

  14. Measurement of Local Reactive and Resistive Photoresponse of a Superconducting Microwave Device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anlage, Steven M.; Zhuravel, Alexander P.; Ustinov, Alexey V.

    2006-03-01

    Despite the voluminous work on the nature of nonlinear effects in high-temperature superconductors (HTS), the causes are not completely clear and remain under debate. The Laser Scanning Microscope (LSM) is a spatially-resolved method that can simultaneously measure optical and high frequency properties of HTS devices. Earlier results showed high resolution images of non-uniform microwave current distributions near the edge of a patterned transmission line structure [A. P. Zhuravel, A. V. Ustinov, K. S. Harshavardhan, and S. M. Anlage, Appl. Phys. Lett. 81, 4979 (2002)]. We have developed a new operational mode in which the microscope separately images the resistive and inductive components of the bolometric photoresponse. The two images show interesting and dramatic differences, leading to new insights about linear and nonlinear properties of HTS microwave devices.

  15. A table-top ion and electron beam facility for ionization quenching measurement and gas detector calibration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muraz, J.F.; Médard, J.; Couturier, C.; Fourrel, C.; Guillaudin, O.; Lamy, T.; Marton, M.; Riffard, Q.; Sortais, P.; Santos, D.; Sauzet, N.

    2016-10-01

    In the frame of the MiMAC project, the LPSC (Laboratoire de Physique Subatomique et de Cosmologie) has developed COMIMAC, a miniaturized and transportable table-top beam line, producing ions or electrons to make measurements of the “quenching” factor in ionization and detector calibration. The energy range of the COMIMAC beam facility starts from a few tens of eV up to 50 keV.

  16. Preliminary diagnosis of areal density in the deuterium fuel capsule by proton measurement at SG-III facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xing; Luo, Xing; Zheng, Jianhua; Chen, Zhongjing; Yan, Ji; Pu, Yudong; Jiang, Wei; Huang, Tianxuan; Yang, Zhenghua; Yang, Pin; Tang, Qi; Song, Zifeng; Jiang, Shao'en; Liu, Shenye; Yang, Jiamin; Wang, Feng

    2017-05-01

    Areal density (ρR) is one of the crucial parameters in the inertial confinement fusion. Measurement of the fusion products is a more feasible method to diagnose ρR than other methods, such as X-ray. In the capsules filled with D2 fuel or D-3He fuel, proton is an ideal probe to diagnose the implosion ρR in different emission times and directions by measurements of the proton yields and spectra. By D-D reaction protons and D-3He reaction protons, the diagnostics of the total and fuel ρR, ρR evolution, implosion asymmetry and mix effect have been demonstrated at OMEGA and NIF facilities. Also some advanced proton diagnostics instruments are developed with a high level capability. Preliminary diagnosis of ρR in the deuterium involved fuel capsules by measurement of protons at SG-III facility was implemented. A fusion product emission and transport code by Monte-Carlo method was developed. The primary and secondary protons emission and transport in the fuel and shell plasmas were able to be simulated. The relations of the proton energy loss and the secondary proton yields with the areal density were inspected. Several proton spectrometers have been built up at SG-III facility, such as a step ranged filter (SRF) proton spectrometer and a wedged range filter (WRF) proton spectrometer. Some proton response simulation codes and the codes for proton spectra reconstruction were also developed. The demonstrations of ρR diagnostics at SG-III facility by D-D reaction and D-3He reaction proton spectra measurements are presented.

  17. Index and Bulk Parameters for Frequency-Direction Spectra Measured at CERC Field Research Facility, September 1991 to August 1992

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-05-01

    Index and Bulk Parameters for Frequency- Direction Spectra Measured at CERC Field Research Facility, September 1991 to August 1992 Accion For by...Prepared for U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Washington, DC 20314-1000 Under Civil Works Research Work Unit 32484 M US Army Corps of Engineers Waterways...that affect coastal engineering pro- jects. This effort was authorized by Headquarters, U.S. Army Corps o.’ Engi- neers (HQUSACE), under Civil Works

  18. Fission Fragment Angular Distribution measurements of 235U and 238U at CERN n_TOF facility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leal-Cidoncha E.

    2016-01-01

    In order to measure the FFAD of neutron-induced reactions, a fission detection setup based on parallel-plate avalanche counters (PPACs has been developed and successfully used at the CERN-n_TOF facility. In this work, we present the preliminary results on the analysis of new 235U(n,f and 238U(n,f data in the extended energy range up to 200 MeV compared to the existing experimental data.

  19. In situ measurements and modeling of reactive trace gases in a small biomass burning plume

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Markus; Anderson, Bruce E.; Beyersdorf, Andreas J.; Crawford, James H.; Diskin, Glenn S.; Eichler, Philipp; Fried, Alan; Keutsch, Frank N.; Mikoviny, Tomas; Thornhill, Kenneth L.; Walega, James G.; Weinheimer, Andrew J.; Yang, Melissa; Yokelson, Robert J.; Wisthaler, Armin

    2016-03-01

    An instrumented NASA P-3B aircraft was used for airborne sampling of trace gases in a plume that had emanated from a small forest understory fire in Georgia, USA. The plume was sampled at its origin to derive emission factors and followed ˜ 13.6 km downwind to observe chemical changes during the first hour of atmospheric aging. The P-3B payload included a proton-transfer-reaction time-of-flight mass spectrometer (PTR-ToF-MS), which measured non-methane organic gases (NMOGs) at unprecedented spatiotemporal resolution (10 m spatial/0.1 s temporal). Quantitative emission data are reported for CO2, CO, NO, NO2, HONO, NH3, and 16 NMOGs (formaldehyde, methanol, acetonitrile, propene, acetaldehyde, formic acid, acetone plus its isomer propanal, acetic acid plus its isomer glycolaldehyde, furan, isoprene plus isomeric pentadienes and cyclopentene, methyl vinyl ketone plus its isomers crotonaldehyde and methacrolein, methylglyoxal, hydroxy acetone plus its isomers methyl acetate and propionic acid, benzene, 2,3-butanedione, and 2-furfural) with molar emission ratios relative to CO larger than 1 ppbV ppmV-1. Formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, 2-furfural, and methanol dominated NMOG emissions. No NMOGs with more than 10 carbon atoms were observed at mixing ratios larger than 50 pptV ppmV-1 CO. Downwind plume chemistry was investigated using the observations and a 0-D photochemical box model simulation. The model was run on a nearly explicit chemical mechanism (MCM v3.3) and initialized with measured emission data. Ozone formation during the first hour of atmospheric aging was well captured by the model, with carbonyls (formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, 2,3-butanedione, methylglyoxal, 2-furfural) in addition to CO and CH4 being the main drivers of peroxy radical chemistry. The model also accurately reproduced the sequestration of NOx into peroxyacetyl nitrate (PAN) and the OH-initiated degradation of furan and 2-furfural at an average OH concentration of 7.45 ± 1.07 × 106 cm-3 in the

  20. Measurements of reactive chlorocarbons over the Surinam tropical rain forest: indications for strong biogenic emissions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. A. Scheeren

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available Contrary to the understanding of the emissions and chemical behavior of halocarbons from anthropogenic sources (e.g. CFCs and HCFCs, the biogeochemistry of naturally emitted halocarbons is still poorly understood. We present measurements of chloromethane (methyl chloride, CH3Cl, trichloromethane (chloroform, CHCl3, dichloromethane (CH2Cl2, and tetrachloroethylene (C2Cl4 from air samples taken over the Surinam rainforest during the 1998 LBA/CLAIRE campaign. The samples were collected in stainless steel canisters on-board a Cessna Citation jet aircraft and analyzed in the laboratory using a gas chromatograph equipped with FID and ECD. The chlorocarbons we studied have atmospheric lifetimes of ~1 year or less, and appear to have significant emissions from natural sources including oceans, soils and vegetations, as well as biomass burning. These sources are primarily concentrated in the tropics (30º N-30º S. We detected an increase as a function of latitude of methyl chloride, chloroform, and tetrachloroethylene mixing ratios, in pristine air masses advected from the Atlantic Ocean toward the central Amazon. In the absence of significant biomass burning sources, we attribute this increase to biogenic emissions from the Surinam rainforest. From our measurements, we deduce fluxes from the Surinam rainforest of 7.6±1.8 μg CH3Cl m−2 h−1, 1.11±0.08g CHCl3 μm−2 h−1, and 0.36±0.07 μg C2Cl4 m−2 h−1. Extrapolated to a global scale, our emission estimates suggest a large potential source of 2 Tg CH3Cl yr−1 from tropical forests, which could account for the net budget discrepancy (underestimation of sources, as indicated previously. In addition, our estimates suggest a potential emission of 57±17,Gg C2C4 yr−1

  1. Plasma facilities measuring equipment and high-voltage systems for basic research and technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sadowski, M.; Pawlowicz, W. [eds.] [Soltan Inst. for Nuclear Studies, Otwock-Swierk (Poland)

    1994-12-31

    The report presents short description and the main technical data of various devices and systems designed and constructed at the Thermonuclear Research Dept. of the Soltan Institute for Nuclear Studies (SINS) in Swierk n. Warsaw, Poland. Different Plasma-Focus (PF) facilities of energy ranging from several kJ to 360 kJ, as well as the Ion Implosion Facilities of energy equal to 400 kJ, are shortly described. We present different cameras and analyzers used for studies of ions and X-rays. We also describe e.g. IONOTRONs used for material engineering. High-Voltage Pulse Generators developed for the voltage range from 40 kV to 2.4 MV, various Data Acquisition Systems, and special Vacuum Stands. Some selected technical units used in high-voltage systems are also presented. (author). 32 figs.

  2. Coastal measurements of short-lived reactive iodocarbons and bromocarbons at Roscoff, Brittany during the RHaMBLe campaign

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. J. Carpenter

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Atmospheric concentrations of the volatile reactive iodocarbons C2H5I, 1-C3H7I, 2-C3H7I, CH2ICl, CH2IBr, CH2I2 and bromocarbons CH2Br2 and CHBr3 were determined by GC/MS analysis of marine boundary layer air at Roscoff, Brittany on the northwest coast of France during September 2006. Comparison with other coastal studies suggests that emissions of these trace gases are strongly influenced by site topography, seaweed populations and distribution, as well as wind speed and direction and tide height. Concentrations of the very short-lived dihalomethanes CH2IBr and CH2I2 in particular showed evidence of tidal dependence, with higher concentrations observed at low tide during maximum exposure of seaweed beds. We also present a limited number of halocarbon measurements in surface seawater and estimate sea-air fluxes based on these and simultaneous air measurements. CH2Br2 and CHBr3 were strongly correlated both in air and in seawater, with CH2Br2/CHBr3 ratios of 0.19 in air and 0.06 in water. The combined midday I atom flux from the photolabile diahlomethanes CH2I2, CH2IBr and CH2ICl of ~5×103 molecules cm−3 s−1 is several orders of magnitude lower than the estimated I atom flux from I2 based on coinciding measurements at the same site, which indicates that at Roscoff the major I atom precursor was I2 rather than reactive iodocarbons.

  3. Gadolinium-148 And Other Spallation Production Cross Section Measurements For Accelerator Target Facilities

    CERN Document Server

    Kelley, K C

    2004-01-01

    At the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center accelerator complex, protons are accelerated to 800 MeV and directed to two tungsten targets, Target 4 at the Weapons Neutron Research facility and the 1L target at the Lujan Center. The Department of Energy requires hazard classification analyses to be performed on these targets and places limits on certain radionuclide inventories in the targets to avoid characterizing the facilities as “nuclear facilities.” Gadolinium-148 is a radionuclide created from the spallation of tungsten. Allowed isotopic inventories are particularly low for this isotope because it is an alpha-particle emitter with a 75-year half-life. The activity level of Gadolinium-148 is low, but it encompasses almost two-thirds of the total dose burden for the two tungsten targets based on present yield estimates. From a hazard classification standpoint, this severely limits the lifetime of these tungsten targets. The cross section is not well-established experimentally and this is t...

  4. A new method for direct total OH reactivity measurements using a fast Gas Chromatographic Photo-Ionization Detector (GC-PID)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nölscher, A. C.; Sinha, V.; Bockisch, S.; Klüpfel, T.; Williams, J.

    2012-04-01

    The primary and most important oxidant in the troposphere is the hydroxyl radical (OH). Currently the atmospheric sinks of OH are poorly constrained. One way to characterize the overall sink term of OH is to measure directly the ambient loss rate of OH, the total OH reactivity. The first direct measurements of total OH reactivity were performed using laser induced fluorescence (LIF) [1], [2]. Recently a new method for determining OH reactivity was developed called the comparative reactivity method (CRM) [3]. The measurement principle is based on a competitive reaction between a reactive molecule not normally present in air with OH, and atmospheric OH reactive molecules with OH. The reactive molecule (X), is passed through a Teflon coated glass reactor and its concentration is monitored with a suitable detector. OH radicals are then introduced into the reactor at a constant rate to react with X, first in the presence of zero air and then in the presence of ambient air containing OH reactive species. Comparing the amount of X exiting the reactor with and without the competing ambient air molecules directly provides the atmospheric total OH reactivity. In the first version of this set up, molecule X is pyrrole (C5H4N) and the detector used is a proton transfer reaction mass spectrometer (PTR-MS). In comparison to the original LIF based system, the PTR-MS has the advantage of being smaller, less expensive, and commercially available. However, using the PTR-MS for total OH reactivity measurements prevents it from probing the broad variety of volatile organic compounds in ambient air. Moreover, even smaller, less expensive and more portable detectors are available. This work examines the potential for a GC-PID in order to make the total OH reactivity measurement accessible to more practitioners. This study presents measurements of total OH reactivity with a custom built GC-PID (VOC-Analyzer from IUT-Berlin, now ENIT (Environics-IUT GmbH))[4]. The GC-PID is small (260

  5. A Measurement Management Technology for Improving Energy Efficiency in Data Centers and Telecommunication Facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hendrik Hamann, Levente Klein

    2012-06-28

    Data center (DC) electricity use is increasing at an annual rate of over 20% and presents a concern for the Information Technology (IT) industry, governments, and the society. A large fraction of the energy use is consumed by the compressor cooling to maintain the recommended operating conditions for IT equipment. The most common way to improve the DC efficiency is achieved by optimally provisioning the cooling power to match the global heat dissipation in the DC. However, at a more granular level, the large range of heat densities of today's IT equipment makes the task of provisioning cooling power optimized to the level of individual computer room air conditioning (CRAC) units much more challenging. Distributed sensing within a DC enables the development of new strategies to improve energy efficiency, such as hot spot elimination through targeted cooling, matching power consumption at rack level with workload schedule, and minimizing power losses. The scope of Measurement and Management Technologies (MMT) is to develop a software tool and the underlying sensing technology to provide critical decision support and control for DC and telecommunication facilities (TF) operations. A key aspect of MMT technology is integration of modeling tools to understand how changes in one operational parameter affect the overall DC response. It is demonstrated that reduced ordered models for DC can generate, in less than 2 seconds computational time, a three dimensional thermal model in a 50 kft{sup 2} DC. This rapid modeling enables real time visualization of the DC conditions and enables 'what if' scenarios simulations to characterize response to 'disturbances'. One such example is thermal zone modeling that matches the cooling power to the heat generated at a local level by identifying DC zones cooled by a specific CRAC. Turning off a CRAC unit can be simulated to understand how the other CRAC utilization changes and how server temperature responds

  6. Malondialdehyde measurement in oxidized foods: evaluation of the spectrophotometric thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) test in various foods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papastergiadis, Antonios; Mubiru, Edward; Van Langenhove, Herman; De Meulenaer, Bruno

    2012-09-26

    The ability of the spectrophotometric thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) test to determine malondialdehyde (MDA) in various food matrices was evaluated. MDA was extracted from the foods; the extract reacted with thiobarbituric acid (TBA); and the formed TBA-MDA adduct was measured spectrophotometricaly at 532 nm. In parallel, the TBA-MDA adduct was analyzed with high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) coupled with fluorescence detection. Oils and unprocessed and uncooked meat and fish products did not exhibit any significant difference in the amount of MDA measured by the two methods, indicating that the major substance reacting with TBA and forming an adduct that absorbs at 532 nm was MDA. However, in products such as dry nuts, pork sausages, cooked fish, and gouda cheese, an overestimation of MDA was observed, indicating that TBARS test was unsuitable for accurate determination of MDA. Furthermore, the results in the present work suggest that the overestimation of MDA by the TBARS test as it was applied is related to the interference of other than secondary lipid oxidation products.

  7. Recent Advances in Antenna Measurement Techniques at the DTU-ESA Spherical Near-Field Antenna Test Facility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Breinbjerg, Olav; Pivnenko, Sergey; Kim, Oleksiy S.

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports recent antenna measurement projects and research at the DTU-ESA Spherical Near-Field Antenna Test Facility at the Technical University of Denmark. High-accuracy measurement projects for the SMOS, SENTINEL-1, and BIOMASS missions of the European Space Agency were driven...... by uncertainty requirements of a few hundredths of dB for the directivity and correspondingly strong requirements for gain and/or phase. Research and development of 1:3 bandwidth range probes, and the near-field to far-field transformation algorithm accounting for the higher-order azimuthal modes...

  8. The pattern recognition software for automatic treatment of track detector data at the PAVICOM completely automated measuring facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aleksandrov, A. [Lebedev Physical Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, Leninskii pr., 53, Moscow, 119991 (Russian Federation); Kashkarov, L. [Vernadsky Institute of Geochemistry and Analytical Chemistry of Russian Academy of Sciences, Kosygina str., 19, Moscow, 119991 (Russian Federation); Polukhina, N. [Lebedev Physical Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, Leninskii pr., 53, Moscow, 119991 (Russian Federation)], E-mail: poluhina@sci.lebedev.ru; Starkov, N. [Lebedev Physical Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, Leninskii pr., 53, Moscow, 119991 (Russian Federation)], E-mail: starkov@sci.lebedev.ru

    2008-08-15

    A software for the PAVICOM completely automated measuring facility is developed. The facility is used to analyse charged-particle tracks in solid-state detectors (nuclear emulsions, CR-39 films, meteorite olivin, etc.) applied in high-energy physics, nuclear physics, and astrophysics. The scanning of the detectors is performed by a PC-controlled CCD camera. The track-image processing program implements filtering, clustering, and tracking procedures to determine the track parameters. Dedicated routines and procedures were developed to perform the track analysis for different kinds of scientific applications. The PAVICOM is capable of determining geometric characteristics of tracks (length, width, etc.), their spatial distribution, and the magnitude of the particle charge.

  9. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report April 1–June 30, 2011

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Voyles, JW

    2011-07-25

    Individual raw datastreams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real-time. Raw and processed data are then sent approximately daily to the ARM Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of processed data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual datastream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998.

  10. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report January 1–March 31, 2011

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sisterson, DL

    2011-04-11

    Individual raw datastreams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real-time. Raw and processed data are then sent approximately daily to the ARM Data Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of processed data records received daily at the Data Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual datastream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998.

  11. Neutron capture cross section measurement of 151Sm at the CERN neutron time of flight facility (n_TOF).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbondanno, U; Aerts, G; Alvarez-Velarde, F; Alvarez-Pol, H; Andriamonje, S; Andrzejewski, J; Badurek, G; Baumann, P; Becvár, F; Benlliure, J; Berthoumieux, E; Calviño, F; Cano-Ott, D; Capote, R; Cennini, P; Chepel, V; Chiaveri, E; Colonna, N; Cortes, G; Cortina, D; Couture, A; Cox, J; Dababneh, S; Dahlfors, M; David, S; Dolfini, R; Domingo-Pardo, C; Duran, I; Embid-Segura, M; Ferrant, L; Ferrari, A; Ferreira-Marques, R; Frais-Koelbl, H; Furman, W; Goncalves, I; Gallino, R; Gonzalez-Romero, E; Goverdovski, A; Gramegna, F; Griesmayer, E; Gunsing, F; Haas, B; Haight, R; Heil, M; Herrera-Martinez, A; Isaev, S; Jericha, E; Käppeler, F; Kadi, Y; Karadimos, D; Kerveno, M; Ketlerov, V; Koehler, P; Konovalov, V; Krticka, M; Lamboudis, C; Leeb, H; Lindote, A; Lopes, I; Lozano, M; Lukic, S; Marganiec, J; Marrone, S; Martinez-Val, J; Mastinu, P; Mengoni, A; Milazzo, P M; Molina-Coballes, A; Moreau, C; Mosconi, M; Neves, F; Oberhummer, H; O'Brien, S; Pancin, J; Papaevangelou, T; Paradela, C; Pavlik, A; Pavlopoulos, P; Perlado, J M; Perrot, L; Pignatari, M; Plag, R; Plompen, A; Plukis, A; Poch, A; Policarpo, A; Pretel, C; Quesada, J; Raman, S; Rapp, W; Rauscher, T; Reifarth, R; Rosetti, M; Rubbia, C; Rudolf, G; Rullhusen, P; Salgado, J; Soares, J C; Stephan, C; Tagliente, G; Tain, J; Tassan-Got, L; Tavora, L; Terlizzi, R; Vannini, G; Vaz, P; Ventura, A; Villamarin, D; Vincente, M C; Vlachoudis, V; Voss, F; Wendler, H; Wiescher, M; Wisshak, K

    2004-10-15

    The151Sm(n,gamma)152Sm cross section has been measured at the spallation neutron facility n_TOF at CERN in the energy range from 1 eV to 1 MeV. The new facility combines excellent resolution in neutron time-of-flight, low repetition rates, and an unsurpassed instantaneous luminosity, resulting in rather favorable signal/background ratios. The 151Sm cross section is of importance for characterizing neutron capture nucleosynthesis in asymptotic giant branch stars. At a thermal energy of kT=30 keV the Maxwellian averaged cross section of this unstable isotope (t(1/2)=93 yr) was determined to be 3100+/-160 mb, significantly larger than theoretical predictions.

  12. Chemical Reactivity Test (CRT)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zaka, F. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-12-13

    The Chemical Reactivity Test (CRT) is used to determine the thermal stability of High Explosives (HEs) and chemical compatibility between (HEs) and alien materials. The CRT is one of the small-scale safety tests performed on HE at the High Explosives Applications Facility (HEAF).

  13. Recent Progress in Entry Radiation Measurements in the NASA Ames Electric ARC Shock Tube Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruden, Brett A.

    2012-01-01

    The Electric Arc Shock Tube (EAST) at NASA Ames Research Center is NASA's only working shock tube capable of obtaining conditions representative of entry in a multitude of planetary atmospheres. The facility is capable of mapping spectroscopic signatures of a wide range of planetary entries from the Vacuum Ultraviolet through Mid-Wave Infrared (120-5500 nm). This paper summarizes the tests performed in EAST for Earth, Mars and Venus entries since 2008, then focuses on a specific test case for CO2/N2 mixtures. In particular, the paper will focus on providing information for the proper interpretation of the EAST data.

  14. Accurate measurements of vadose zone fluxes using automated equilibrium tension plate lysimeters: A synopsis of results from the Spydia research facility, New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wöhling, Thomas; Barkle, Greg; Stenger, Roland; Moorhead, Brian; Wall, Aaron; Clague, Juliet

    2014-05-01

    Automated equilibrium tension plate lysimeters (AETLs) are arguably the most accurate method to measure unsaturated water and contaminant fluxes below the root zone at the scale of up to 1 m². The AETL technique utilizes a porous sintered stainless-steel plate to provide a comparatively large sampling area with a continuously controlled vacuum that is in "equilibrium" with the surrounding vadose zone matric pressure to ensure measured fluxes represent those under undisturbed conditions. This novel lysimeter technique was used at an intensive research site for investigations of contaminant pathways from the land surface to the groundwater on a sheep and beef farm under pastoral land use in the Tutaeuaua subcatchment, New Zealand. The Spydia research facility was constructed in 2005 and was fully operational between 2006 and 2011. Extending from a central access caisson, 15 separately controlled AETLs with 0.2 m² surface area were installed at five depths between 0.4 m and 5.1 m into the undisturbed volcanic vadose zone materials. The unique setup of the facility ensured minimum interference of the experimental equipment and external factors with the measurements. Over the period of more than five years, a comprehensive data set was collected at each of the 15 AETL locations which comprises of time series of soil water flux, pressure head, volumetric water contents, and soil temperature. The soil water was regularly analysed for EC, pH, dissolved carbon, various nitrogen compounds (including nitrate, ammonia, and organic N), phosphorus, bromide, chloride, sulphate, silica, and a range of other major ions, as well as for various metals. Climate data was measured directly at the site (rainfall) and a climate station at 500m distance. The shallow groundwater was sampled at three different depths directly from the Spydia caisson and at various observation wells surrounding the facility. Two tracer experiments were conducted at the site in 2009 and 2010. In the 2009

  15. Relaxation time: a proton NMR-based approach as a metric to measure reactivity of engineered nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paruthi, Archini; Misra, Superb K.

    2017-08-01

    The toxicological impact of engineered nanoparticles in environmental or biological milieu is very difficult to predict and control because of the complexity of interactions of nanoparticles with the varied constituents in the suspended media. Nanoparticles are different from their bulk counterparts due to their high surface area-to-volume ratio per unit mass, which plays a vital role in bioavailability of these nanoparticles to its surroundings. This study explores how changes in the spin-spin nuclear relaxation time can be used to gauge the availability of surface area and suspension stability of selected nanoparticles (CuO, ZnO, and SiO2), in a range of simulated media. Spin-spin nuclear relaxation time can be mathematically correlated to wetted surface area, which is well backed up by the data of hydrodynamic size measurements and suspension stability. We monitored the change in spin-spin relaxation time for all the nanoparticles, over a range of concentrations (2.5 -100 ppm) in deionized water and artificial seawater. Selective concentrations of nanoparticle suspensions were subjected for temporal studies over a period of 48 hrs to understand the concept of spin-spin nuclear relaxation time-based reactivity of nanoparticle suspension. The nanoparticles showed high degree of agglomeration, when suspended in artificial seawater. This was captured by a decrease in spin-spin nuclear relaxation time and also an increment in the hydrodynamic size of the nanoparticles.

  16. Transmittance Measurement of a Heliostat Facility used in the Preflight Radiometric Calibration of Earth-Observing Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czapla-Myers, J.; Thome, K.; Anderson, N.; McCorkel, J.; Leisso, N.; Good, W.; Collins, S.

    2009-01-01

    Ball Aerospace and Technologies Corporation in Boulder, Colorado, has developed a heliostat facility that will be used to determine the preflight radiometric calibration of Earth-observing sensors that operate in the solar-reflective regime. While automatically tracking the Sun, the heliostat directs the solar beam inside a thermal vacuum chamber, where the sensor under test resides. The main advantage to using the Sun as the illumination source for preflight radiometric calibration is because it will also be the source of illumination when the sensor is in flight. This minimizes errors in the pre- and post-launch calibration due to spectral mismatches. It also allows the instrument under test to operate at irradiance values similar to those on orbit. The Remote Sensing Group at the University of Arizona measured the transmittance of the heliostat facility using three methods, the first of which is a relative measurement made using a hyperspectral portable spectroradiometer and well-calibrated reference panel. The second method is also a relative measurement, and uses a 12-channel automated solar radiometer. The final method is an absolute measurement using a hyperspectral spectroradiometer and reference panel combination, where the spectroradiometer is calibrated on site using a solar-radiation-based calibration.

  17. Transmittance measurement of a heliostat facility used in the preflight radiometric calibration of Earth-observing sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czapla-Myers, J.; Thome, K.; Anderson, N.; McCorkel, J.; Leisso, N.; Good, W.; Collins, S.

    2009-08-01

    Ball Aerospace and Technologies Corporation in Boulder, Colorado, has developed a heliostat facility that will be used to determine the preflight radiometric calibration of Earth-observing sensors that operate in the solar-reflective regime. While automatically tracking the Sun, the heliostat directs the solar beam inside a thermal vacuum chamber, where the sensor under test resides. The main advantage to using the Sun as the illumination source for preflight radiometric calibration is because it will also be the source of illumination when the sensor is in flight. This minimizes errors in the pre- and post-launch calibration due to spectral mismatches. It also allows the instrument under test to operate at irradiance values similar to those on orbit. The Remote Sensing Group at the University of Arizona measured the transmittance of the heliostat facility using three methods, the first of which is a relative measurement made using a hyperspectral portable spectroradiometer and well-calibrated reference panel. The second method is also a relative measurement, and uses a 12-channel automated solar radiometer. The final method is an absolute measurement using a hyperspectral spectroradiometer and reference panel combination, where the spectroradiometer is calibrated on site using a solar-radiation-based calibration.

  18. AGLITE: a multi-wavelength lidar for measuring emitted aerosol concentrations and fluxes and air motion from agricultural facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkerson, Thomas D.; Bingham, Gail E.; Zavyalov, Vladimir V.; Swasey, Jason A.; Hancock, Jed J.; Crowther, Blake G.; Cornelsen, Scott S.; Marchant, Christian; Cutts, James N.; Huish, David C.; Earl, Curtis L.; Andersen, Jan M.; Cox, McLain L.

    2006-12-01

    AGLITE is a multi-wavelength lidar developed for the Agricultural Research Service (ARS), United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) and its program on particle emissions from animal production facilities. The lidar transmitter is a 10 kHz pulsed NdYAG laser at 355, 532 and 1064 nm. We analyze lidar backscatter and extinction to extract aerosol physical properties. All-reflective optics and dichroic and interferometric filters permit all wavelengths to be measured simultaneously, day or night, using photon counting by MTs, an APD, and fast data acquisition. The lidar housing is a transportable trailer suitable for all-weather operation at any accessible site. We direct the laser and telescope FOVs to targets of interest in both azimuth and elevation. The lidar has been applied in atmospheric studies at a swine production farm in Iowa and a dairy in Utah. Prominent aerosol plumes emitted from the swine facility were measured as functions of temperature, turbulence, stability and the animal feed cycle. Particle samplers and turbulence detectors were used by colleagues specializing in those fields. Lidar measurements also focused on air motion as seen by scans of the farm volume. The value of multi-wavelength, eye-safe lidars for agricultural aerosol measurements has been confirmed by the successful operation of AGLITE.

  19. Design and calibration of a test facility for MLI thermal performance measurements below 80K. [Multilayer insulation (MLI)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boroski, W.; Kunzelman, R.; Ruschman, M.; Schoo, C.

    1992-04-01

    The design geometry of the SSC dipole cryostat includes active thermal radiation shields operating at 80K and 20K respectively. Extensive measurements conducted in a Heat Leak Test Facility (HLTF) have been used to evaluate the thermal performance of candidate multilayer insulation (MLI) systems for the 80K thermal shield, with the present system design based upon those measurement results. With the 80K MLI geometry established, efforts have focused on measuring the performance of MLI systems near 20K. A redesign of the HLTF has produced a measurement facility capable of conducting measurements with the warm boundary fixed at 80K and the cold boundary variable from 10K to 50K. Removing the 80K shield permits measurements with a warm boundary at 300K. The 80K boundary consists of a copper shield thermally anchored to a liquid nitrogen reservoir. The cold boundary consists of a copper anchor plate whose temperature is varied through boil-off gas from a 500 liter helium supply dewar. A transfer line heat exchanger supplies the boil-off gas to the anchor plate at a constant and controlled rate. The gas, which serves as cooling gas, is routed through a copper cooling tube soldered into the anchor plate. Varying the cooling gas flow rate varies the amount of refrigeration supplied to the anchor plate, thereby determining the plate temperature. A resistance heater installed on the anchor plate is regulated by a cryogenic temperature controller to provide final temperature control. Heat leak values are measured using a heatmeter which senses heat flow as a temperature gradient across a fixed thermal impedance. Since the thermal conductivity of the thermal impedance changes with temperature, the heatmeter is calibrated at key cold boundary temperatures. Thus, the system is capable of obtaining measurement data under a variety of system conditions. 7 refs.

  20. Autonomic nervous activation triggered during induction of reactive hyperemia exerts a greater influence on the measured reactive hyperemia index by peripheral arterial tonometry than on flow-mediated vasodilatation of the brachial artery in patients with hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomiyama, Hirofumi; Yoshida, Masanobu; Higashi, Yukihito; Takase, Bonpei; Furumoto, Tomoo; Kario, Kazuomi; Ohya, Yusuke; Yamashina, Akira

    2014-10-01

    Flow-mediated vasodilatation of the brachial artery (FMD) and reactive hyperemia index (RHI) measured by peripheral arterial tonometry are known to be weakly associated with one another, but the mechanisms underlying this weak association remain to be clarified. We examined whether the autonomic nervous activation induced by the 5 min forearm clamping used to induce reactive hyperemia might exert any influence on the FMD and RHI in subjects with hypertension. In 115 subjects with hypertension (age 61±1 years), the FMD and RHI were measured simultaneously, and the heart rate variability (HRV) parameters (low-frequency component (LF), high-frequency component (HF), and the ratio (LF/HF) between the two) were calculated from the electrocardiographic recordings obtained before and after the start of forearm clamping. A multivariate linear regression analysis with adjustments for confounding variables demonstrated that the RHI, but not the FMD, was significantly associated with the percent change of the LF/HF associated with forearm clamping (beta=-0.204, P=0.043). In conclusion, autonomic nervous system activation, especially sympathetic activation, induced by 5-min forearm clamping utilized to provoke reactive hyperemia may significantly affect the RHI rather than FMD in subjects with hypertension.

  1. Associations of C-reactive protein with measures of obesity, insulin resistance, and subclinical atherosclerosis in healthy, middle-aged women

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.E. Hak (Liesbeth); C.D. Stehouwer (Coen); M.L. Bots (Michiel); K.H. Polderman; C.G. Schalkwijk (Casper); I.C.D. Westendorp (Iris); J.C.M. Witteman (Jacqueline); A. Hofman (Albert)

    1999-01-01

    textabstractObesity, the insulin resistance syndrome, and atherosclerosis are closely linked and may all be determinants of an increased acute-phase response. In this study, we examined the relationship of C-reactive protein (CRP) with measures of obesity, variables of

  2. “Diversity” of Care Givers and Aggressive Abused Children with Reactive or Proactive aggression in Child welfare Facilities through Examining Residential Map, the New Assessment Method for Estimating Relationships among Children and Care Givers.

    OpenAIRE

    Fujioka, Takashi

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to consider on the assessment through one of measures, Residential Map for aggressive abused children in child welfare institutes. There are three types are reactive and proactive aggression and Non-emotional aggression.When a child does not succeed in control of his or her own anger or control of irritation, it will be happened aggressive situation among children.About children in child nursing home, the author explained Residential Map for 6 staffs for grasping ...

  3. Guidance for the Implementation and Follow-up of Identified Energy and Water Efficiency Measures in Covered Facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2012-09-01

    This document provides specific guidance to agencies on the implementation and follow-up of energy and water efficiency measures identified and undertaken per Section 432 of the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 (EISA) (42 U.S.C. 8253(f)(4) and (5)) This guidance also provides context for how these activities fit into the comprehensive approach to facility energy and water management outlined by the statute and incorporates by reference previous DOE guidance released for Section 432 of EISA and other related documents. 42 U.S.C. 8253(f)(7)(A) specifies that facility energy managers shall certify compliance for each covered facility with the 42 U.S.C. 8253(f)(2)-(5) requirements via a web-based tracking system and make it publicly available. This document also describes the role of the tracking system that has been developed for the collection and reporting of data needed for the demonstration of compliance and progress toward meeting all energy and water efficiency requirements outlined in the statute.

  4. Resource Conservation and Recovery Act corrective measures study: Area 6 decontamination pond facility, corrective action unit no. 92

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-10-01

    Corrective Action Unit (CAU) No. 92, the Area 6 Decontamination Pond Facility (DPF), is an historic disposal unit located at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) in Nye County, Nevada (Figures 1 - 1, 1-2, and 1-3). The NTS is operated by the U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV), which has been required by the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) to characterize the DPF under the requirements of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Part A Permit (NDEP, 1995) for the NTS and Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 265 (1996c). The DPF is prioritized in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO, 1996) but is governed by the permit. The DPF was characterized through sampling events in 1994, 1996, and 1997. The results of these sampling events are contained in the Final Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Industrial Site Environmental Restoration Site Characterization Report, Area 6 Decontamination Pond Facility, Revision I (DOE/NV, 1997). This Corrective Measures Study (CMS) for the Area 6 DPF has been prepared for the DOE/NV`s Environmental Restoration Project. The CMS has been developed to support the preparation of a Closure Plan for the DPF. Because of the complexities of the contamination and regulatory issues associated with the DPF, DOE/NV determined a CMS would be beneficial to the evaluation and selection of a closure alternative.

  5. Accelerated Discovery of Thermoelectric Materials: Combinatorial Facility and High-Throughput Measurement of Thermoelectric Power Factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Cañadas, Jorge; Adkins, Nicholas J E; McCain, Stephen; Hauptstein, Bastian; Brew, Ashley; Jarvis, David J; Min, Gao

    2016-06-13

    A series of processes have been developed to facilitate the rapid discovery of new promising thermoelectric alloys. A novel combinatorial facility where elements are wire-fed and laser-melted was designed and constructed. Different sample compositions can be achieved by feeding different element wires at specific rates. The composition of all the samples prepared was tested by energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS). Then, their thermoelectric properties (power factor) at room temperature were screened in a specially designed new high-throughput setup. After the screening, the thermoelectric properties can be mapped with the possibility of identifying compositional trends. As a proof-of-concept, a promising thermoelectric ternary system, Al-Fe-Ti, has been identified, demonstrating the capability of this accelerated approach.

  6. Mach-Zehnder fiber-optic links for reaction history measurements at the National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, E. Kirk; Herrmann, H. W.; Stoeffl, W.; Horsfield, C. J.

    2010-08-01

    We present the details of the analog fiber-optic data link that will be used in the chamber-mounted Gamma Reaction History (GRH) diagnostic at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) located at the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory in Livermore, California. The system is based on Mach-Zehnder (MZ) modulators integrated into the diagnostic, with the source lasers and bias control electronics located remotely to protect the active electronics. A complete recording system for a single GRH channel comprises two MZ modulators, with the fiber signals split onto four channels on a single digitizer. By carefully selecting the attenuation, the photoreceiver, and the digitizer settings, the dynamic range achievable is greater than 1000:1 at the full system bandwidth of greater than 10 GHz. The system is designed to minimize electrical reflections and mitigate the effects of transient radiation darkening on the fibers.

  7. Neutron capture cross section measurement of $^{151}Sm$ at the CERN neutron Time of Flight Facility (nTOF)

    CERN Document Server

    Abbondanno, U; Alvarez-Velarde, F; Alvarez-Pol, H; Andriamonje, Samuel A; Andrzejewski, J; Badurek, G; Baumann, P; Becvar, F; Benlliure, J; Berthoumieux, E; Calviño, F; Cano-Ott, D; Capote, R; Cennini, P; Chepel, V; Chiaveri, Enrico; Colonna, N; Cortés, G; Cortina-Gil, D; Couture, A; Cox, J; Dababneh, S; Dahlfors, M; David, S; Dolfini, R; Domingo-Pardo, C; Durán, I; Embid-Segura, M; Ferrant, L; Ferrari, A; Ferreira-Marques, R; Frais-Kölbl, H; Furman, W; Gonçalves, I; Gallino, R; Gonzalez-Romero, E; Goverdovski, A; Gramegna, F; Griesmayer, E; Gunsing, F; Haas, B; Haight, R; Heil, M; Herrera-Martínez, A; Isaev, S; Jericha, E; Kappeler, F; Kadi, Y; Karadimos, D; Kerveno, M; Ketlerov, V; Köhler, P; Konovalov, V; Krticka, M; Lamboudis, C; Leeb, H; Lindote, A; Lopes, I; Lozano, M; Lukic, S; Marganiec, J; Marrone, S; Martinez-Val, J; Mastinu, P; Mengoni, A; Milazzo, P M; Molina-Coballes, A; Moreau, C; Mosconi, M; Neves, F; Oberhummer, Heinz; O'Brien, S; Pancin, J; Papaevangelou, T; Paradela, C; Pavlik, A; Pavlopoulos, P; Perlado, J M; Perrot, L; Pignatari, M; Plag, R; Plompen, A; Plukis, A; Poch, A; Policarpo, Armando; Pretel, C; Quesada, J; Raman, S; Rapp, W; Rauscher, T; Reifarth, R; Rosetti, M; Rubbia, Carlo; Rudolf, G; Rullhusen, P; Salgado, J; Soares, J C; Stéphan, C; Tagliente, G; Taín, J L; Tassan-Got, L; Tavora, L; Terlizzi, R; Vannini, G; Vaz, P; Ventura, A; Villamarín, D; Vincente, M C; Vlachoudis, V; Voss, F; Wendler, H; Wiescher, M; Wissha, K

    2004-01-01

    The measurement of **1**5**1Sm(n, gamma)**1**5**2Sm (samarium) cross section showed improved performance of the new spallation neutron facility. It covered a wide energy range with good resolution, high neutron flux, low backgrounds and a favourable duty factor. The samarium cross section was found to be of great importance for characterizing neutron capture nucleosynthesis in asymptotic giant stars. The combination of these features provided a promising basis for a broad experimental program directed towards application in astrophysics and advanced nuclear technologies. (Edited abstract)

  8. Measurement of the $^{240,242}$Pu(n,f) cross section at the CERN n_TOF facility

    CERN Document Server

    Tsinganis, A; Guerrero, C; Colonna, N; Calviani, M; Vlastou, R; Andriamonje, S; Vlachoudis, V; Gunsing, F; Massimi, C; Altstadt, S; Andrzejewski, J; Audouin, L; Barbagallo, M; Bécares, V; Becvár, F; Belloni, F; Billowes, J; Boccone, V; Bosnar, D; Brugger, M; Calviño, F; Cano-Ott, D; Carrapiço, C; Cerutti, F; Chin, M; Cortés, G; Cortés-Giraldo, M A; Diakaki, M; Domingo-Pardo, C; Duran, I; Dressler, R; Dzysiuk, N; Eleftheriadis, C; Ferrari, A; Fraval, K; Ganesan, S; García, A R; Giubrone, G; Gómez-Hornillos, M B; Gonçalves, I F; González-Romero, E; Griesmayer, E; Gurusamy, P; Hernández-Prieto, A; Jenkins, D G; Jericha, E; Kadi, Y; Käppeler, F; Karadimos, D; Kivel, N; Koehler, P; Kokkoris, M; Krtiˇcka, M; Kroll, J; Lampoudis, C; Langer, C; Leal-Cidoncha, E; Lederer, C; Leeb, H; Leong, L S; Losito, R; Mallick, A; Manousos, A; Marganiec, J; Martínez, T; Mastinu, P F; Mastromarco, M; Meaze, M; Mendoza, E; Mengoni, A; Milazzo, P M; Mingrone, F; Mirea, M; Mondalaers, W; Paradela, C; Pavlik, A; Perkowski, J; Plompen, A; Praena, J; Quesada, J M; Rauscher, T; Reifarth, R; Riego, A; Robles, M S; Roman, F; Rubbia, C; Sabaté-Gilarte, M; Sarmento, R; Saxena, A; Schillebeeckx, P; Schmidt, S; Schumann, D; Tagliente, G; Tain, J L; Tarrío, D; Tassan-Got, L; Valenta, S; Vannini, G; Variale, V; Vaz, P; Ventura, A; Versaci, R; Vermeulen, M J; Wallner, A; Ware, T; Weigand, M; Weiss, C; Wright, T; Zugec, P

    2014-01-01

    Knowledge of neutron cross sections of various plutonium isotopes and other minor actinides is crucial for the design of advanced nuclear systems. The $^{240 , 242}$Pu(n,f) cross sections were measured at the CERN n_TOF facility, taking advantage of the wide energy range (from thermal to GeV) and the high instantaneous f ux of the neutron beam. In this work, preliminary results for $^{242}$Pu are presented along with a theoretical cross section calculation performed with the EMPIRE code.

  9. Combination of Fibrinogen and High-sensitivity C-reactive Protein Measurements is Potential in Identification of Acute Coronary Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Djanggan Sargowo

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Acute myocardial infarction (AMI is one of cardiovascular diseases with high morbidity and mortality rates. Novel biomarkers that can detect accurately acute coronary syndrome (ACS at early stage, are necessary to improve current strategies and/or to identify subjects who are at risk. Fibrinogen and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP roles in inflammation process could be potential for ACS early detection. This study was conducted to evaluate measurements of fibrinogen and hs-CRP on ACS. METHODS: An analytic observational study with cross sectional approach was conducted on patients with Troponin I positive. After signing informed consent, anamnesis and complete blood count were conducted. Besides that, liver function, renal function, and blood glucose tests were conducted as well. Samples of selected subjects were quantified with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA for Troponin I, fibrinogen and hs-CRP. Then statistical analyses were performed. RESULTS: There were 76 subjects in each ACS and non-ACS groups. ACS group showed significant higher levels of both fibrinogen and hs-CRP compared to Non-ACS group (p=0.000. Among evaluated risk factors, diabetes mellitus (DM (p=0.003 and hypertension (p=0.000 were significantly higher in ACS group than in non-ACS group. Among evaluated clinical factors, blood glucose (p=0.001 and age (p=0.000 were significantly higher in ACS group than in non-ACS group. Combination of fibrinogen and hs-CRP measurements showed the highest sensitivity (75.00%, specificity (80.26%, accuracy (77.63%, positive predictive value (79.19% and negative predictive value (76.25%. CONCLUSIONS: Since fibrinogen and hs-CRP were increased in ACS group and combination of fibrinogen and hs-CRP measurements showed the highest sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, positive predictive value and negative predictive value, we suggest that combination of fibrinogen and hs-CRP measurements could give added value to

  10. Measurement of integral diffraction coefficients of crystals on beamline 4B7of Beijing Synchrotron Radiation Facility

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yang Jia-Min; Hu Zhi-Min; Wei Min-Xi; Zhang Ji-Yan; Yi Rong-Qing; Gan Xin-Shi; Zhao Yang; Cui Ming-Qi; Zhu Tuo; Zhao Yi-Dong; Sun Li-Juan; Zheng Lei; Yan Fen

    2011-01-01

    Integral diffraction coefficients of the crystal are the essential data of a crystal spectrometer which is extensively used to measure quantitative x-ray spectra of high temperature plasmas in kilo-electron-volt region. An experimental method has been developed to measure the integral diffraction coefficients of crystals on beamline 4B7 of Beijing Synchrotron Radiation Facility. The integral diffraction coefficients of several crystals including polyethylene terephthalate (PET), thallium acid phthalate (TIAP) and rubidium acid phthalate (RAP) crystals have been measured in the x-ray energy range 2100-5600 eV and compared with the calculations of the 'Darwin Prins' and the 'Mosaic' models. It is shown that the integral diffraction coefficients of these crystals are between the calculations of the 'Darwin Prins' and the 'Mosaic' models, but more close to the 'Darwin Prins' model calculations.

  11. A Scanning laser-velocimeter technique for measuring two-dimensional wake-vortex velocity distributions. [Langley Vortex Research Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gartrell, L. R.; Rhodes, D. B.

    1980-01-01

    A rapid scanning two dimensional laser velocimeter (LV) has been used to measure simultaneously the vortex vertical and axial velocity distributions in the Langley Vortex Research Facility. This system utilized a two dimensional Bragg cell for removing flow direction ambiguity by translating the optical frequency for each velocity component, which was separated by band-pass filters. A rotational scan mechanism provided an incremental rapid scan to compensate for the large displacement of the vortex with time. The data were processed with a digital counter and an on-line minicomputer. Vaporized kerosene (0.5 micron to 5 micron particle sizes) was used for flow visualization and LV scattering centers. The overall measured mean-velocity uncertainity is less than 2 percent. These measurements were obtained from ensemble averaging of individual realizations.

  12. Airborne measurements of reactive organic trace gases in the atmosphere - with a focus on PTR-MS measurements onboard NASA's flying laboratories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wisthaler, Armin; Mikoviny, Tomas; Müller, Markus; Schiller, Sven Arne; Feil, Stefan; Hanel, Gernot; Jordan, Alfons; Mutschlechner, Paul; Crawford, James H.; Singh, Hanwant B.; Millet, Dylan

    2017-04-01

    Reactive organic gases (ROGs) play an important role in atmospheric chemistry as they affect the rates of ozone production, particle formation and growth, and oxidant consumption. Measurements of ROGs are analytically challenging because of their large variety and low concentrations in the Earth's atmosphere, and because they are easily affected by measurement artefacts. On aircraft, ROGs are typically measured by canister sampling followed by off-line analysis in the laboratory, fast online gas chromatography or online chemical ionization mass spectrometry. In this work, we will briefly sum up the state-of-the-art in this field before focusing on proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) and its deployment onboard NASA's airborne science laboratories. We will show how airborne PTR-MS was successfully used in NASA missions for characterizing emissions of ROGs from point sources, for following the photochemical evolution of ROGs in a biomass burning plume, for determining biosphere-atmosphere fluxes of selected ROGs and for validating satellite data. We will also present the airborne PTR-MS instrument in its most recent evolution which includes a radiofrequency ion funnel and ion guide combined with a compact time-of-flight mass spectrometer and discuss its superior performance characteristics. The development of the airborne PTR-MS instrument was supported by the Austrian Federal Ministry for Transport, Innovation and Technology (bmvit) through the Austrian Space Applications Programme (ASAP) of the Austrian Research Promotion Agency (FFG) (grants #833451, #847967). This work was also partly supported by NASA under grant #NNX14AP89G.

  13. Unexpectedly Facile Rh(I) Catalyzed Polymerization of Ethynylbenzaldehyde Type Monomers: Synthesis of Polyacetylenes Bearing Reactive and Easy Transformable Pendant Carbaldehyde Groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedláček, Jan; Havelková, Lucie; Zedník, Jiří; Coufal, Radek; Faukner, Tomáš; Balcar, Hynek; Brus, Jiří

    2017-02-23

    The chain coordination polymerization of (ethynylarene)carbaldehydes with unprotected carbaldehyde groups, namely ethynylbenzaldehydes, 1-ethynylbenzene-3,5-dicarboxaldehyde, and 3-[(4-ethynylphenyl)ethynyl]benzaldehyde, is reported for the first time. Polymerization is catalyzed with various Rh(I) catalysts and yields poly(arylacetylene)s with one or two pendant carbaldehyde groups per monomeric unit. Surprisingly, the carbaldehyde groups of the monomers do not inhibit the polymerization unlike the carbaldehyde group of unsubstituted benzaldehyde that acts as a strong inhibitor of Rh(I) catalyzed polymerization of arylacetylenes. The inhibition ability of carbaldehyde groups in (ethynylarene)carbaldehydes seems to be eliminated owing to a simultaneous presence of unsaturated ethynyl groups in (ethynylarene)carbaldehydes. The reactive carbaldehyde groups make poly[(ethynylarene)carbaldehyde]s promising for functional appreciation via various postpolymerization modifications. The introduction of photoluminescence or chirality to poly(ethynylbenzaldehyde)s via quantitative modification of their carbaldehyde groups in reaction with either photoluminescent or chiral primary amines under formation of the polymers with Schiff-base-type pendant groups is given as an example.

  14. The international soil moisture network: A data hosting facility for global in situ soil moisture measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    In situ measurements of soil moisture are invaluable for calibrating and validating land surface models and satellite-based soil moisture retrievals. In addition, long-term time series of in situ soil moisture measurements themselves can reveal trends in the water cycle related to climate or land co...

  15. C-reactive protein levels in patients on maintenance hemodialysis: reliability and reflection on the utility of single measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stigant, Caroline E; Djurdjev, Ognjenka; Levin, Adeera

    2005-01-01

    Single C-reactive protein (CRP) values have been associated with death and cardiovascular disease in dialysis patients. We prospectively obtained multiple CRP values in stable patients, hypothesizing that values would remain stable in the absence of disease and that a single CRP value would be a reliable marker of risk. Four CRP values per week for three consecutive weeks were obtained in 10 clinically stable patients receiving conventional HD. Using prespecified cutoffs of 2.2 and 4.4 mg/l, the frequency of risk misclassification relative to the lowest CRP value obtained was determined. Within and between patient variability was also calculated. The median age was 54 years, and the average duration of dialysis was 41 months. Nine out of ten patients had at least one abnormal CRP value (>2.2 mg/l), six had all values elevated, and seven had an abnormal median CRP. The overall coefficient of reliability was 0.63 (95% CI 0.42-0.87). The misclassification rate varied with cutoff, and ranged from 0-83% and 0-58% using upper limit of normal (ULN) and twice ULN, respectively. The within patient variability was 0.37 for the entire cohort, and 0.33 when three patients with intercurrent acute inflammation were excluded. CRP exhibits short term variability in HD patients, resulting in a risk of misclassification depending on sampling time and chosen cutoff point. Single CRP values must be interpreted with caution, and multiple measurements, or use of other biomarkers, should be considered.

  16. A New Panel Test Facility for Effective Thermal Conductivity Measurements up to 1,650°C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barth, Gerald; Gross, Ulrich; Wulf, Rhena

    2007-10-01

    A new steady-state panel test facility is presented which has been designed and constructed for effective thermal-conductivity measurements of insulations in the temperature range between 300 and 1,650°C following ASTM C201-93 and DIN V ENV-1094. Square-shaped samples (length of 400 mm) are used, heated from above and settled on a water-cooled calorimeter system to obtain a one-dimensional steady-state temperature field. The heat is supplied by electrical heating elements freely hanging inside a furnace which is completely constructed from ceramic components to withstand temperatures up to about 1,800°C. The calorimeter system consists of a square central measuring zone (length of 100 mm) surrounded by guard loops to avoid heat losses in all directions. The samples, e.g., a number of fiber mats, one on top of the other up to a maximum height of 110 mm, are open to ambient pressure and atmosphere (air). Measurements include the heat flow rate (taken in the central calorimeter), temperature differences across individual layers of the sample (measured by a series of thermocouples which regularly have to be calibrated), and the thickness of the respective layers (before and after the experiment). The thermal conductivities range from 0.025 to 2 W · m-1 · K-1, and both isotropic and non-isotropic materials can be investigated due to the one-dimensional characteristic of the temperature field. Measurements for alumina fiber mats are presented, and good agreement is found with respective results from other methods and test facilities.

  17. Energetics Measurements of Silver Halfraum Targets at the National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, M. J.; Fournier, K. B.; Brown, C. G.; Dunlop, W. H.; Kane, J. O.; Mirkarimi, P. B.; Patterson, R.; Schneider, M.; Widmann, K.; Guyton, R.; Giraldez, E.

    2013-10-01

    The energetics of silver halfraum targets are presented from laser plasma experiments at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Four beams from the NIF laser were used to heat the halfraum targets with ~ 10 kJ of energy in a 1 ns square laser pulse. The silver halfraum targets were spheres 2 mm in diameter with an 800 μm laser entrance hole (LEH). Targets with different sphere wall thicknesses (8 to 16 μm) were characterized. The energetics and the laser coupling to the targets were determined to be 0.92 by using the NIF X-ray (Dante) and optical backscatter diagnostics (NBI and FABS). The energy losses from the targets were through X-ray radiation and backscatter from laser plasma instabilities (SRS and SBS) from the LEH. As expected the different wall thickness had different levels of burn through emission. The thickest walled target (~ 15.9 μm) had very low radiative losses through the target wall. The thinnest walled targets (~ 8 μm) radiated about 0.2 of the input energy into the X-ray region. This work was done under the auspices of the U. S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  18. Conceptual provisions of the implementation of energy saving measures in the residential facilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meshcheryakova Tatiana

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Research purpose is identification of sales problems of energy saving actions for residential sector of economy, including with use of the power service contract. The choice of the object of the study is related to the general issues on energy saving of residential facilities and increasing the number of unresolved problems. Unfortunately, the efficiency of energy consumption of housing stock is extremely low that directly leads to an increase in citizens’ payments for public utilities (housing and communal services. There are many problems associated with the aging of fixed assets: it becomes especially evident in winter seasons. The level of quality of delivery, distribution and consumption of expensive heat resources that has the greatest impact on a residence comfort and sometimes human life and health, is very low. Our population faces to year overheating or freezing, to leakages through worn pipes and the subsequent disconnection of water and heat. Despite the public declaration of the of the active processes of modernization of the housing municipal economy in the Russian Federation, the implementation of the necessary energy-saving elements in the housing sector is evolving very slowly. The article presents conceptual positions, which will bring the issues related to energy saving and efficiency to a new level.

  19. Au Foil Activation Measurement and Simulation of the Concrete Neutron Shielding Ability for the Proposed New SANRAD Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radebe, M. J.; Korochinsky, S.; Strydom, W. J.; De Beer, F. C.

    The purpose of this study was to measure the effective neutron shielding characteristics of the new shielding material designed and manufactured to be used for the construction of the new SANRAD facility at Necsa, South Africa, through Au foil activation as well as MCNP simulations. The shielding capability of the high density shielding material was investigated in the worst case region (the neutron beam axis) of the experimental chamber for two operational modes. The everyday operational mode includes the 15 cm thick poly crystalline Bismuth filter at room temperature (assumed) to filter gamma-rays and some neutron spectrum energies. The second mode, dynamic imaging, will be conducted without the Bi-filter. The objective was achieved through a foil activation measurement at the current SANRAD facility and MCNP calculations. Several Au foilswere imbedded at different thicknesses(two at each position) of shielding material up to 80 cm thick to track the attenuation of the neutron beam over distance within the shielding material. The neutron flux and subsequently the associated dose rates were calculated from the activation levels of the Au foils. The concrete shielding material was found to provide adequate shielding for all energies of neutrons emerging from beam port no-2 of the SAFARI-1 research reactorwithin a thickness of 40 cm of concrete.

  20. Facility for Measuring the Spatial Uniformity of the Radiation Power of the Surface of the Large-Area Blackbody

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morozova, S. P.; Dunaev, A. Y.; Katysheva, A. A.; Sapritsky, V. I.; Parfentyev, N. A.; Ogarev, S. A.; Karpunin, D. N.

    2017-05-01

    The new stage of the development of space-borne information systems is the creation of the Global Earth Observation System. For the full functioning of such a system, it is necessary to provide the uniformity of measurements of all national systems as members of the global system, with high-quality measurement data. This requires the implementation of a high level of ground (prelaunch) calibration of Earth remote sensing instruments. To solve these problems, there were created calibration facilities on the basis of large vacuum chambers with vacuum reference radiation sources, including sources on the basis of black bodies with a wide aperture of 500 mm in the spectral range from 3 {μ}m to 14 {μ}m. Such a facility was created by FGUP "VNIIOFI" in cooperation with FGUP "TsNIIMash". The ground calibration of Earth remote sensing instruments is being carried out by using blackbody models as radiation sources with known spectral radiance. Facility for ground calibration of remote sensing devices on spectral radiance is based on the usage of a large-aperture blackbody (LABB) with 500 mm diameter and working temperature range from 213 K to 423 K, as a radiation source. This calibration setup comprises a set of reference blackbodies, such as a blackbody on the phase transition of Gallium, a variable-temperature blackbody with temperature range from 213 K to 423 K, a reference blackbody cooled with liquid nitrogen, and IR Fourier spectrometer utilized as a comparator to perform LABB calibration on spectral radiance. The second important characteristic of LABB is the uniformity of spectral radiance across the radiating aperture of this blackbody. The paper describes the device for measuring the spatial homogeneity of the radiation power of the LABB's radiating surface. This device is based on the use of two-color InSb-CdHgTe detector equipped with modulator and IR lens, which are mounted on a two-axis translation stage suitable for operation in vacuum and installed in the

  1. A novel approach for predicting acyl glucuronide reactivity via Schiff base formation: development of rapidly formed peptide adducts for LC/MS/MS measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jianyao; Davis, Margaret; Li, Fangbiao; Azam, Farooq; Scatina, JoAnn; Talaat, Rasmy

    2004-09-01

    A novel technique to study the reactivity of acyl glucuronide metabolites to protein has been developed and is described herein. Considered here are acyl glucuronide metabolites, which have undergone the rearrangement of the glucuronic acid moiety at physiological temperature and pH. The investigation of the reactivity of these electrophilic metabolites was carried out by measuring the rate of reaction of rearranged AG metabolites in forming the corresponding acyl glucuronide-peptide adduct in the presence of Lys-Phe. This differs from the parallel technique used in forming AG adducts of proteins that have been previously reported. In the study described here, the Schiff base adduct, diclofenac acyl glucuronide-Lys-Phe product, was generated and structurally elucidated by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS) analysis. The product structure was proved to be a Schiff base adduct by chemical derivatization by nucleophilic addition of HCN and chemical reduction with NaCNBH(3), followed by LC/MS/MS analysis. It is proposed here that the degree of reactivity of acyl glucuronides as measured by covalent binding to protein is proportional to the amount of its peptide adduct generated with the peptide technique described. The application of this technique to the assessment of the degree of reactivity of acyl glucuronide metabolites was validated by developing a reactivity rank of seven carboxylic acid-containing drugs. Consistency was achieved between the ranking of reactivity in the peptide technique for these seven compounds and the rankings found in the literature. In addition, a correlation (R(2) = 0.95) was revealed between the formation of a peptide adduct and the rearrangement rate of the primary acyl glucuronide of seven tested compounds. A structure effect on the degree of reactivity has demonstrated the rate order: acetic acid > propionic acid > benzoic acid derivatives. A rational explanation of this order was proposed, based on the inherent

  2. SMILETRAP - A Penning trap facility for precision mass measurements using highly charged ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergstroem, I.; Carlberg, C.; Fritioff, T.; Douysset, G.; Schoenfelder, J.; Schuch, R. E-mail: schuch@physto.se

    2002-07-21

    The precision of mass measurements in a Penning trap increases linearly with the charge of the ion. Therefore we have attached a Penning trap, named SMILETRAP, to the electron beam ion source CRYSIS at MSL. CRYSIS is via an isotope separator connected to an ion source that can deliver singly charged ions of practically any element. In CRYSIS charge state breeding occurs by intense electron bombardment. We have shown that it is possible to produce, catch and measure the cyclotron frequencies of ions in the charge region 1+ to 52+. The relevant observable in mass measurements using a Penning trap is the ratio of the cyclotron frequencies of the ion of interest and ion used as a mass reference. High precision requires that the two frequencies are measured after one another in the shortest possible time. For reasons of convenience the precision trap operates at room temperature. So far it has been believed that warm traps working at 4 K are required for high mass precision with exactly one ion in the trap at a time. In this paper we demonstrate that mass precision of a few parts in 10{sup 10} also can be obtained in a warm trap at a pressure of about 5x10{sup -12} mbar by stabilizing the pressure in the He-dewar, the trap temperature and the frequency synthesizer. In order to reduce the influence of changes of the magnetic field to a level below 10{sup -10}, the scanning of the frequencies close to the resonances of both the ion of interest and the reference ion is done in a total time <2 min. Trapping of ions is a statistical procedure, allowing more than one ion to be trapped in each measurement cycle. However, after completing the measurements it is possible to reject all information except for events based on 1 and 2 trapped ions. The procedures of producing, transporting, catching, exciting and measuring the cyclotron resonance frequencies of highly charged ions and the mass reference ions with the time-of-flight method are described. In routine measurements with

  3. Measurements and simulation of induced activity at the CERN-EU high- energy reference field facility

    CERN Document Server

    Brugger, M; Mitaroff, W A; Roesler, S

    2003-01-01

    Samples of aluminum, copper, stainless steel, iron, boron nitride, carbon composite and water were irradiated by the stray radiation field produced by interactions of high-energy hadrons in a copper target. The specific activity induced in the samples was measured by gamma spectrometry. In addition, the isotope production in the samples was calculated with detailed Monte-Carlo simulations using the FLUKA code. Results of the simulation are in reasonable agreement with the measured activities. 7 Refs.

  4. Note: Radiochemical measurement of fuel and ablator areal densities in cryogenic implosions at the National Ignition Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hagmann, C., E-mail: hagmann1@llnl.gov; Shaughnessy, D. A.; Moody, K. J.; Grant, P. M.; Gharibyan, N.; Gostic, J. M.; Wooddy, P. T.; Torretto, P. C.; Bandong, B. B.; Bionta, R.; Cerjan, C. J.; Bernstein, L. A.; Caggiano, J. A.; Sayre, D. B.; Schneider, D. H.; Henry, E. A.; Fortner, R. J. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Avenue, Livermore, California 94551 (United States); Herrmann, H. W. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Knauer, J. P. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States)

    2015-07-15

    A new radiochemical method for determining deuterium-tritium (DT) fuel and plastic ablator (CH) areal densities (ρR) in high-convergence, cryogenic inertial confinement fusion implosions at the National Ignition Facility is described. It is based on measuring the {sup 198}Au/{sup 196}Au activation ratio using the collected post-shot debris of the Au hohlraum. The Au ratio combined with the independently measured neutron down scatter ratio uniquely determines the areal densities ρR(DT) and ρR(CH) during burn in the context of a simple 1-dimensional capsule model. The results show larger than expected ρR(CH) values, hinting at the presence of cold fuel-ablator mix.

  5. Measurement of the $^{242}$Pu(n,f) reaction cross-section at the CERN n_TOF facility

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2080481; Kokkoris, Michael; Vlachoudis, Vasilis

    The accurate knowledge of relevant nuclear data, such as the neutron-induced fission cross sections of various plutonium isotopes and other minor actinides, is crucial for the design of advanced nuclear systems as well as the development of comprehensive theoretical models of the fission process. The $^{242}$Pu(n,f) cross section was measured at the CERN n_TOF facility taking advantage of the wide energy range and the high instantaneous flux of the neutron beam. In this work, results for the $^{242}$Pu(n,f) measurement are presented along with a detailed description of the experimental setup, Monte-Carlo simulations and the analysis procedure, and a theoretical cross section calculation performed with the EMPIRE code.

  6. Study of the background in the measuring station at the n_TOF facility at CERN: sources and solutions

    CERN Document Server

    Zanini, L; Aerts, G; Andriamonje, Samuel A; Andrzejewski, J; Angelopoulous, A; Assimakopoulos, Panayiotis; Bacri, C-O; Badurek, G; Berthoumieux, E; Baumann, P; Beer, H; Benlliure, J; Berthier, B; Bondarenko, I; Borcea, C; Bos, A J J; Boscolo-Marchi, E; Bustreo, N; Calviño, F; Cano-Ott, D; Capote, R; Carlson, P; Charpak, Georges; Chauvin, N; Cennini, P; Chepel, V; Colonna, N; Cortés, G; Cortina-Gil, D; Corvi, F; Cusmano, A; Dababneh, S; Dahlfors, M; Damianoglou, D; David, S; Dimovasili, E; Domingo, C; Doroshenko, A; Duran-Escribano, I; Eleftheriadis, C; Embid, M; Ferrant, L; Ferrari, A; Ferreira-Marques, R; Frais-Kölbl, H; Furman, W; Fursov, B; Garzón, J A; Giomataris, Ioanis; Gledenov, Y; Gonzalez-Romero, E; Goverdovski, A; Gramegna, F; Griesmayer, E; Gunsing, F; Haefner, P; Haight, R; Heil, M; Herrera-martinez, A; Hollander, P; Ioannou, P; Isaev, S; Jericha, E; Kadi, Y; Kappeler, F; Karadimos, D; Karamanis, D; Kayukova, A; Kazakov, L; Kelic, A; Ketlerov, V; Kitis, G; Köhler, P E; Kopach, Y; Kossionides, E; Kroshkina, I; Lacoste, V; Lamboudis, C; Leeb, H; Leprêtre, A; Lopes, M; Lozano, M; Marrone, S; Martínez-Val, J M; Mastinu, P; Mengoni, A; Meunier, R; Mezentsev, A J; Milazzo, P; Minguez, E; Mitrofanov, V; Moreau, C; Müller, A; Nicolis, N; Nikolenkov, V; Oberhummer, Heinz; Pakou, A; Pancin, J; Papadopoulous, K; Papaevangelou, T; Paradela, C; Paradelis, T; Pavlik, A; Pavlopoulos, P; Perrez-Parra, A; Perriale, L; Perlado, J M; Peskov, Vladimir; Piksaikin, V; Plag, R; Plompen, A; Plukis, A; Poch, A; Policarpo, Armando; Popov, A; Popov, Y P; Pretel, C; Quesada, J M; Radermacher, E; Rapp, W; Rauscher, T; Reifarth, R; Rejmund, F; Rubbia, Carlo; Rudolf, G; Rullhusen, P; Sakelliou, L; Saldaña, F; Samylin, B; Savvidis, I; Savvidis, S; Sedyshev, P; Stéphan, C; Szalanski, P; Tagliente, G; Taín, J L; Tapia, C; Tassan-Got, L; Terchychnyi, R; Tsabaris, C; Tsangas, N; van Eijk, C W E; Vannini, G; Ventura, A; Villamarin, A; Vlachoudis, V; Vlastou, R; Voinov, A; Voss, F; Wendler, H; Wiescher, M; Wisshak, K; Zanini, L; Zeinalov, S; Zhuravlev, B; CERN. Geneva. SPS and LHC Division

    2001-01-01

    A background roughly two orders of magnitude higher than tolerable was found in the n_TOF facility at CERN during the first measurements [1]. This note describes a series of additional measurements performed in the n_TOF experimental area to study the origin and the characteristics of the background. The program of these measurements was determined taking into account the results from the simulations carried out by the EET group [2]. A first phase of measurements confirmed what was expected from the simulations, namely that the dominant source of background was due to neutrons generated by negative muon capture. Actions to reduce the background were taken according to the results from both measurements and simulations. An iron shielding wall 3.2 m thick was then placed in between the sweeping magnet and the second collimator, with the purpose of stopping most of the muons. In a second phase of measurements, results showed that the additional shielding reduced the main component of the background by about a fa...

  7. Combining moving inlets for measuring gradients of reactive trace gases and thoron measurements for the determination of near surface fluxes -first results from the Amazon rain forest-

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sörgel, Matthias; Artaxo, Paulo; Kesselmeier, Jürgen; Quesada, Carlos Alberto; Ferreira de Souza, Rodrigo Augusto; Trebs, Ivonne; Vega, Oscar; Yañez-Serrano, Ana Maria

    2016-04-01

    For many compounds of interest no fast response sensors for the determination of eddy covariance fluxes are available. Therefore, flux-gradient relationships are used. The most common are the aerodynamic gradient method and the modified Bowen ratio method. For those approaches some assumptions have to be made which restrict their use. An alternative approach to calculate these fluxes might be given by the "thoron clock" method. The radon isotope Thoron (220Rn) is exhaled from the soil and has a half life time of 56 seconds. Therefore, it exists in measureable amounts only close to the ground and is hardly advected. Its only source is the radioactive decay of Thorium in soil. As it is a noble gas Thoron is not influenced by biochemical processes in air. Consequently, its concentration profile only depends on vertical mixing and the radioactive decay which is a physical constant. According to Lehmann et al. (1999) and Plake and Trebs (2013) a transport-time can be directly calculated from two heights thoron concentration/activity for the layer in-between without further assumptions. From this transport time the transfer velocity is derived which is then applied to calculate the fluxes of other (reactive) trace gases. A major advantage of the method is that the transport-time is known and using the measured concentration profile the chemical loss of a compound can be directly calculated and corrected for. We have applied this method for a first time in the Amazon rainforest during a field campaign at the ATTO site 150 km North East of Manaus in the dry season of 2014. We measured gradients of NO, NO2, O3, HONO and VOCs by using a movable inlet on a lift system close to the forest floor (0.19 m, 0.52 m and 1.59 m). A Thoron profile was measure in parallel at the lower two heights. First results of the gradients, the transport times and some preliminary flux values will be presented. References: Lehmann, B.E., Lehmann, M., Neftel, A .: 220 Radon calibration of near

  8. An improved visualization-based force-measurement technique for short-duration hypersonic facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laurence, Stuart J.; Karl, Sebastian [Institute of Aerodynamics and Flow Technology, Spacecraft Section, German Aerospace Center (DLR), Goettingen (Germany)

    2010-06-15

    This article is concerned with describing and exploring the limitations of an improved version of a recently proposed visualization-based technique for the measurement of forces and moments in short-duration hypersonic wind tunnels. The technique is based on tracking the motion of a free-flying body over a sequence of high-speed visualizations; while this idea is not new in itself, the use of high-speed digital cinematography combined with a highly accurate least-squares tracking algorithm allows improved results over what have been previously possible with such techniques. The technique precision is estimated through the analysis of artificially constructed and experimental test images, and the resulting error in acceleration measurements is characterized. For wind-tunnel scale models, position measurements to within a few microns are shown to be readily attainable. Image data from two previous experimental studies in the T5 hypervelocity shock tunnel are then reanalyzed with the improved technique: the uncertainty in the mean drag acceleration is shown to be reduced to the order of the flow unsteadiness, 2-3%, and time-resolved acceleration measurements are also shown to be possible. The response time of the technique for the configurations studied is estimated to be {proportional_to}0.5 ms. Comparisons with computations using the DLR TAU code also yield agreement to within the overall experimental uncertainty. Measurement of the pitching moment for blunt geometries still appears challenging, however. (orig.)

  9. An improved visualization-based force-measurement technique for short-duration hypersonic facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurence, Stuart J.; Karl, Sebastian

    2010-06-01

    This article is concerned with describing and exploring the limitations of an improved version of a recently proposed visualization-based technique for the measurement of forces and moments in short-duration hypersonic wind tunnels. The technique is based on tracking the motion of a free-flying body over a sequence of high-speed visualizations; while this idea is not new in itself, the use of high-speed digital cinematography combined with a highly accurate least-squares tracking algorithm allows improved results over what have been previously possible with such techniques. The technique precision is estimated through the analysis of artificially constructed and experimental test images, and the resulting error in acceleration measurements is characterized. For wind-tunnel scale models, position measurements to within a few microns are shown to be readily attainable. Image data from two previous experimental studies in the T5 hypervelocity shock tunnel are then reanalyzed with the improved technique: the uncertainty in the mean drag acceleration is shown to be reduced to the order of the flow unsteadiness, 2-3%, and time-resolved acceleration measurements are also shown to be possible. The response time of the technique for the configurations studied is estimated to be ˜0.5 ms. Comparisons with computations using the DLR TAU code also yield agreement to within the overall experimental uncertainty. Measurement of the pitching moment for blunt geometries still appears challenging, however.

  10. Measuring the reactivity of commercially available zero-valent iron nanoparticles used for environmental remediation with iopromide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid, Doris; Micić, Vesna; Laumann, Susanne; Hofmann, Thilo

    2015-10-01

    The high specific surface area and high reactivity of nanoscale zero-valent iron (nZVI) particles have led to much research on their application to environmental remediation. The reactivity of nZVI is affected by both the water chemistry and the properties of the particular type of nZVI particle used. We have investigated the reactivity of three types of commercially available Nanofer particles (from Nanoiron, s.r.o., Czech Republic) that are currently either used in, or proposed for use in full scale environmental remediation projects. The performance of one of these, the air-stable and thus easy-to-handle Nanofer Star particle, has not previously been reported. Experiments were carried out first in batch shaking reactors in order to derive maximum reactivity rates and provide a rapid estimate of the Nanofer particle's reactivity. The experiments were performed under near-natural environmental conditions with respect to the pH value of water and solute concentrations, and results were compared with those obtained using synthetic water. Thereafter, the polyelectrolyte-coated Nanofer 25S particles (having the highest potential for transport within porous media) were chosen for the experiments in column reactors, in order to elucidate nanoparticle reactivity under a more field-site realistic setting. Iopromide was rapidly dehalogenated by the investigated nZVI particles, following pseudo-first-order reaction kinetics that was independent of the experimental conditions. The specific surface area normalized reaction rate constant (kSA) value in the batch reactors ranged between 0.12 and 0.53Lm(-2)h(-1); it was highest for the uncoated Nanofer 25 particles, followed by the polyacrylic acid-coated Nanofer 25S and air-stable Nanofer Star particles. In the batch reactors all particles were less reactive in natural water than in synthetic water. The kSA values derived from the column reactor experiments were about 1000 times lower than those from the batch reactors, ranging

  11. Developing mass spectrometric techniques for boundary layer measurement in hypersonic high enthalpy test facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, G. M., Jr.; Lewis, B. W.; Nowak, R. J.; Eide, D. G.; Paulin, P. A.; Upchurch, B. T.

    1983-01-01

    Thermodynamic flow properties of gases in the boundary layer or the flowfield have been mainly deduced from pressures and temperatures measured on a model. However, further progress with respect to an understanding of these properties requires a more complete characterization of the layer including determination of the gas composition and chemistry. Most attempts to measure boundary layer chemistry involve the employment of a mass spectrometer and an associated gas sampling system. The three major limiting factors which must be addressed for species measurement in aerothermodynamic investigations on models at reentry stream velocities, are gas sampling effects, instrument limitations, and problems with data acquisition. The present investigation is concerned with a concentrated effort to quantitatively identify and correct for instrument and sampling system effects, and to develop a miniaturized high performance mass spectrometer for on-model real-time analysis of the boundary layer and its associated atmosphere.

  12. Test facility for simultaneous measurement of electrical and thermal contact resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misra, Prashant; Nagaraju, J.

    2004-08-01

    A test setup has been developed for simultaneously evaluating the electrical contact resistance (ECR) and thermal contact resistance/conductance (TCR/TCC) across meta-metal contacts at different contact pressures and mean interface temperatures. ECR and TCC across brass-brass contacts in vacuum have been measured simultaneously at different contact pressures and mean interface temperatures. The results obtained are found to be in agreement with the theoretical models available in the literature for ECR and TCC, independently from each other. The maximum absolute uncertainties in the measurement of ECR and TCC with the present setup are estimated to be ±0.003% and ±4.4%, respectively. Apart from contact resistance measurements, the setup is also used to determine thermal conductivity of unknown materials viz., oxygen-free high-conductivity copper and brass, at different temperatures.

  13. Characterization of a High Temporal Resolution TDLAS System for Measurements in a Shock Tube Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Förster, F.; O'Byrne, Sean; Kleine, H.; Weigand, B.

    Transient heating and pressurization of a gas by shock waves can be useful for a variety of purposes, particularly for configurations involving shock wave focussing. Unless the geometry is particularly simple, the time history of temperature can be difficult to predict accurately. Hence, a non-intrusive measurement technique with high temporal resolution is required to record the time history of the very rapidly changing temperature of a shock-heated flow. One promising measurement techniques for these high-speed flows is Tunable Diode Laser Absorption Spectroscopy (TDLAS)

  14. Electron temperature measurements inside the ablating plasma of gas-filled hohlraums at the National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrios, M. A.; Liedahl, D. A.; Schneider, M. B.; Jones, O.; Brown, G. V.; Regan, S. P.; Fournier, K. B.; Moore, A. S.; Ross, J. S.; Landen, O.; Kauffman, R. L.; Nikroo, A.; Kroll, J.; Jaquez, J.; Huang, H.; Hansen, S. B.; Callahan, D. A.; Hinkel, D. E.; Bradley, D.; Moody, J. D.

    2016-05-01

    The first measurement of the electron temperature (Te) inside a National Ignition Facility hohlraum is obtained using temporally resolved K-shell X-ray spectroscopy of a mid-Z tracer dot. Both isoelectronic- and interstage-line ratios are used to calculate the local Te via the collisional-radiative atomic physics code SCRAM [Hansen et al., High Energy Density Phys 3, 109 (2007)]. The trajectory of the mid-Z dot as it is ablated from the capsule surface and moves toward the laser entrance hole (LEH) is measured using side-on x-ray imaging, characterizing the plasma flow of the ablating capsule. Data show that the measured dot location is farther away from the LEH in comparison to the radiation-hydrodynamics simulation prediction using HYDRA [Marinak et al., Phys. Plasmas 3, 2070 (1996)]. To account for this discrepancy, the predicted simulation Te is evaluated at the measured dot trajectory. The peak Te, measured to be 4.2 keV ± 0.2 keV, is ˜0.5 keV hotter than the simulation prediction.

  15. A diamond detector for inertial confinement fusion X-ray bang-time measurements at the National Ignition Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MacPhee, A G; Brown, C; Burns, S; Celeste, J; Glenzer, S H; Hey, D; Jones, O S; Landen, O; Mackinnon, A J; Meezan, N; Parker, J; Edgell, D; Glebov, V Y; Kilkenny, J; Kimbrough, J

    2010-11-09

    An instrument has been developed to measure X-ray bang-time for inertial confinement fusion capsules; the time interval between the start of the laser pulse and peak X-ray emission from the fuel core. The instrument comprises chemical vapor deposited polycrystalline diamond photoconductive X-ray detectors with highly ordered pyrolytic graphite X-ray monochromator crystals at the input. Capsule bang-time can be measured in the presence of relatively high thermal and hard X-ray background components due to the selective band pass of the crystals combined with direct and indirect X-ray shielding of the detector elements. A five channel system is being commissioned at the National Ignition Facility at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory for implosion optimization measurements as part of the National Ignition Campaign. Characteristics of the instrument have been measured demonstrating that X-ray bang-time can be measured with {+-} 30ps precision, characterizing the soft X-ray drive to +/- 1eV or 1.5%.

  16. Electron temperature measurements inside the ablating plasma of gas-filled hohlraums at the National Ignition Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barrios, M. A.; Liedahl, D. A.; Schneider, M. B.; Jones, O.; Brown, G. V.; Fournier, K. B.; Moore, A. S.; Ross, J. S.; Landen, O.; Kauffman, R. L.; Nikroo, A.; Kroll, J.; Callahan, D. A.; Hinkel, D. E.; Bradley, D.; Moody, J. D. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94551 (United States); Regan, S. P. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States); Jaquez, J.; Huang, H. [General Atomics, San Diego, California 92121 (United States); Hansen, S. B. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87123 (United States)

    2016-05-15

    The first measurement of the electron temperature (T{sub e}) inside a National Ignition Facility hohlraum is obtained using temporally resolved K-shell X-ray spectroscopy of a mid-Z tracer dot. Both isoelectronic- and interstage-line ratios are used to calculate the local T{sub e} via the collisional–radiative atomic physics code SCRAM [Hansen et al., High Energy Density Phys 3, 109 (2007)]. The trajectory of the mid-Z dot as it is ablated from the capsule surface and moves toward the laser entrance hole (LEH) is measured using side-on x-ray imaging, characterizing the plasma flow of the ablating capsule. Data show that the measured dot location is farther away from the LEH in comparison to the radiation-hydrodynamics simulation prediction using HYDRA [Marinak et al., Phys. Plasmas 3, 2070 (1996)]. To account for this discrepancy, the predicted simulation T{sub e} is evaluated at the measured dot trajectory. The peak T{sub e}, measured to be 4.2 keV ± 0.2 keV, is ∼0.5 keV hotter than the simulation prediction.

  17. SIMCON 3.1. LLRF system control board measurements (for TESLA Test Facility)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pietrasik, R.

    2006-07-15

    The SIMCON control systems for superconducting cavity resonators are described. These systems consist of analog and digital I/O systems, a clock system, an Ethernet link, optical input systems, a RS232 interface, a VME section with booting FPGA devices, and a Virtex2Pro section. The measurements of different parameters by this system are described. (HSI)

  18. SMILETRAP - A Penning trap facility for precision mass measurements using highly charged ions

    CERN Document Server

    Bergström, I; Fritioff, T; Douysset, G; Schoenfelder, J; Schuch, R

    2002-01-01

    The precision of mass measurements in a Penning trap increases linearly with the charge of the ion. Therefore we have attached a Penning trap, named SMILETRAP, to the electron beam ion source CRYSIS at MSL. CRYSIS is via an isotope separator connected to an ion source that can deliver singly charged ions of practically any element. In CRYSIS charge state breeding occurs by intense electron bombardment. We have shown that it is possible to produce, catch and measure the cyclotron frequencies of ions in the charge region 1+ to 52+. The relevant observable in mass measurements using a Penning trap is the ratio of the cyclotron frequencies of the ion of interest and ion used as a mass reference. High precision requires that the two frequencies are measured after one another in the shortest possible time. For reasons of convenience the precision trap operates at room temperature. So far it has been believed that warm traps working at 4 K are required for high mass precision with exactly one ion in the trap at a ti...

  19. Silicon detectors for the neutron flux and beam profile measurements of the n_TOF facility at CERN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musumarra, Agatino; Cosentino, Luigi; Barbagallo, Massimo; Colonna, Nicola; Damone, Lucia; Pappalardo, Alfio; Piscopo, Massimo; Finocchiaro, Paolo

    2016-09-01

    The demand of new and high precision cross section data for neutron-induced reactions is continuously growing, driven by the requirements from several fields of fundamental physics, as well as from nuclear technology, medicine, etc. Several neutron facilities are operational worldwide, and new ones are being built. In the coming years, neutron beam intensities never reached up to now will be available, thus opening new scientific and technological frontiers. Among existing facilities, n_TOF at CERN provides a high intensity pulsed neutron beam in a wide energy range (thermal to GeV) and with an extremely competitive energy resolution that also allows spectroscopy studies. In order to ensure high quality measurements, the neutron beams must be fully characterized as a function of the neutron energy, in particular by measuring the neutron flux and the beam transverse profile with high accuracy. In 2014 a new experimental area (EAR2), with a much higher neutron flux, has been completed and commissioned at n_TOF. In order to characterize the neutron beam in the newly built experimental area at n_TOF, two suitable diagnostics devices have been built by the INFN-LNS group. Both are based on silicon detectors coupled with 6Li converter foils, in particular Single Pad for the flux measurement and Position Sensitive (strips and others) for the beam profile. The devices have been completely characterized with radioactive sources and with the n_TOF neutron beam, fulfilling all the specifications and hence becoming immediately operational. The performances of these devices and their high versatility, in terms of neutron beam intensity, make them suitable to be used in both n_TOF experimental areas. A description of the devices and the main results obtained so far will be presented.

  20. Reactivity and recovery from different types of work measured by catecholamines and cortisol : a systematic literature overview

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sluiter, JK; Frings-Dresen, MHW; Meijman, TF; van der Beek, AJ

    2000-01-01

    Objectives-To review occupational health, laboratory, and sports Literature on neuroendocrine reactivity and recovery from mental, combined mental and physical, or physical tasks. Methods-A systematic literature search was performed in eight databases. Studies with catecholamines or cortisol as effe

  1. A new approach to control noise from entertainment facilities: Active control and measurement of amplified community noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peppin, Richard J.; Casamajó, Joan

    2003-04-01

    While traffic noise is perhaps the most pervasive of community noises, much of the contribution now comes from amplified sound: live music, discos, theme parks, and exercise studios. Those producing the sound or music want it loud and those not interested want to be protected against noise. Noise limits at the receiving or producing property line must be met for the minimum community acceptance. However the time-, and perhaps the spatially-, varying sound in entertainment facilities is often constantly modified (and maybe monitored) near the source of the sound. Hence it is hard to relate and to control the sound at the property line. This paper presents a unique noise control device. It is based on the octave band ``transfer function'' between the sound produced in the entertainment area and the noise received at the property line. The overall insulation can be measured and is input to the instrument. When a noise level limit is exceeded at the receiver, due to the amplified interior noise at the facility, the sound output of the device is automatically controlled to reduce the noise. The paper provides details of the design and possible abatement scenarios with examples.

  2. Measuring service quality of public dental health care facilities in Kelantan, Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    John, Jacob; Yatim, Fekriah Mohd; Mani, Shani Ann

    2011-09-01

    This study investigates patients' expectations and perceptions of service quality in public dental health care and measures their "satisfaction gap." This descriptive study involved 481 dental outpatients in Kelantan, Malaysia. A modified SERVQUAL 20-item instrument was used to assess patients' expectations before and perceptions after receiving dental treatment. The "satisfaction gap" was then measured. showed that patients visiting for management of dental pain were more satisfied (P = .007) than those visiting with appointment. The most significant service quality dimensions were related to responsiveness, assurance, and empathy of the dental health care providers. There was a significant difference between the patients' expectations and their perceptions of service provided (P < .01) with regard to all dimensions. In conclusion, dental service providers should give emphasis to the compassionate and emotional aspects of care and to remember that they are integral components of quality service.

  3. Assessment of Retrofitting Measures for a Large Historic Research Facility Using a Building Energy Simulation Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young Tae Chae

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available A calibrated building simulation model was developed to assess the energy performance of a large historic research building. The complexity of space functions and operational conditions with limited availability of energy meters makes it hard to understand the end-used energy consumption in detail and to identify appropriate retrofitting options for reducing energy consumption and greenhouse gas (GHG emissions. An energy simulation model was developed to study the energy usage patterns not only at a building level, but also of the internal thermal zones, and system operations. The model was validated using site measurements of energy usage and a detailed audit of the internal load conditions, system operation, and space programs to minimize the discrepancy between the documented status and actual operational conditions. Based on the results of the calibrated model and end-used energy consumption, the study proposed potential energy conservation measures (ECMs for the building envelope, HVAC system operational methods, and system replacement. It also evaluated each ECM from the perspective of both energy and utility cost saving potentials to help retrofitting plan decision making. The study shows that the energy consumption of the building was highly dominated by the thermal requirements of laboratory spaces. Among other ECMs the demand management option of overriding the setpoint temperature is the most cost effective measure.

  4. Gas Cherenkov Detectors For Gamma Ray Measurements At The National Ignition Facility (NIF)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrmann, Hans W.; Kim, Y. H.; Zylstra, A. B.; Lopez, F. E.; Griego, J.; Fatherley, V. E.; Oertel, J. A.; Batha, S. H.; Carpenter, A.; Khater, H.; Hernandez, J. E.; Rubery, M. S.; Horsfield, C. J.; Gales, S.; Leatherland, A.; Hilsabeck, T.; Kilkenny, J. D.; Malone, R. M.; Hares, J. D.; Milnes, J.; Shmayda, W. T.

    2016-10-01

    New requirements to improve reaction history and ablator areal density measurements at the NIF necessitate diagnostic capability improvements in sensitivity, temporal and spectral response relative to the existing Gamma Reaction History diagnostic (GRH-6m) located 6 meters from target chamber center (TCC). Relative to GRH-6m, a new DIM-based ``Super'' Gas Cherenkov Detector (GCD) will ultimately provide 200x more sensitivity to DT fusion gamma rays, reduce the effective temporal resolution from 100 to 10 ps and lower the energy threshold from 2.9 to 1.8 MeV. Initially, the existing GCD-3 will be placed into a reentrant well, putting it within 4 meters of TCC. This diagnostic platform will allow assessment of the x-ray radiation background environment within the well which will be fed into the shielding design for the follow-on ``Super'' GCD. It will also enable use of a pulse-dilation PMT (PD-PMT) which has the potential to improve the effective measurement bandwidth by 10x relative to current PMT technology. Initial measurements of both GCD-3 on NIF and a PD-PMT prototype on ORION will be discussed.

  5. An in situ trap capacitance measurement and ion-trapping detection scheme for a Penning ion trap facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reza, Ashif; Banerjee, Kumardeb; Das, Parnika; Ray, Kalyankumar; Bandyopadhyay, Subhankar; Dam, Bivas

    2017-03-01

    This paper presents the design and implementation of an in situ measurement setup for the capacitance of a five electrode Penning ion trap (PIT) facility at room temperature. For implementing a high Q resonant circuit for the detection of trapped electrons/ions in a PIT, the value of the capacitance of the trap assembly is of prime importance. A tunable Colpitts oscillator followed by a unity gain buffer and a low pass filter is designed and successfully implemented for a two-fold purpose: in situ measurement of the trap capacitance when the electric and magnetic fields are turned off and also providing RF power at the desired frequency to the PIT for exciting the trapped ions and subsequent detection. The setup is tested for the in situ measurement of trap capacitance at room temperature and the results are found to comply with those obtained from measurements using a high Q parallel resonant circuit setup driven by a standard RF signal generator. The Colpitts oscillator is also tested successfully for supplying RF power to the high Q resonant circuit, which is required for the detection of trapped electrons/ions.

  6. Distribution of radionuclides in an iron calibration standard for a free release measurement facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hult, Mikael; Stroh, Heiko; Marissens, Gerd; Tzika, Faidra; Lutter, Guillaume; Šurán, Jiri; Kovar, Petr; Skala, Lukas; Sud, Jaromír

    2016-03-01

    A Europallet-sized calibration standard composed of 12 grey cast iron tubes contaminated with (60)Co and (110m)Ag with a mass of 246kg was developed. As the tubes were produced through centrifugal casting it was of particular concern to study the distribution of radionuclides in the radial direction of the tubes. This was done by removing 72 small samples (swarf) of ~0.3g each on both the inside and outside of the tubes. All of the samples were measured in the underground laboratory HADES.

  7. Suitability Measurement and Analysis for El Centro Naval Air Facility OLS. Opportune Landing Site Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-10-01

    radioactive source at the end of the rod and the detector at the rear of the machine housing. The source rod is extended at 50-mm (2-in.) increments...Systems Workshop Phoenix, AZ, 21–24 April 2008. Stolf, R., R. Klaus, and C. Vaz, 2005, Response to “Comments on ‘Simultaneous Measurement of Soil...americium beryllium radiation source to emit neutrons from the base of the instru- ment. The neutrons collide with water hydrogen atoms and slow. The

  8. The magnetic recoil spectrometer (MRSt) for time-resolved measurements of the neutron spectrum at the National Ignition Facility (NIF).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frenje, J A; Hilsabeck, T J; Wink, C W; Bell, P; Bionta, R; Cerjan, C; Gatu Johnson, M; Kilkenny, J D; Li, C K; Séguin, F H; Petrasso, R D

    2016-11-01

    The next-generation magnetic recoil spectrometer for time-resolved measurements of the neutron spectrum has been conceptually designed for the National Ignition Facility. This spectrometer, called MRSt, represents a paradigm shift in our thinking about neutron spectrometry for inertial confinement fusion applications, as it will provide simultaneously information about the burn history and time evolution of areal density (ρR), apparent ion temperature (Ti), yield (Yn), and macroscopic flows during burn. From this type of data, an assessment of the evolution of the fuel assembly, hotspot, and alpha heating can be made. According to simulations, the MRSt will provide accurate data with a time resolution of ∼20 ps and energy resolution of ∼100 keV for total neutron yields above ∼10(16). At lower yields, the diagnostic will be operated at a higher-efficiency, lower-energy-resolution mode to provide a time resolution of ∼20 ps.

  9. Design of the 15 GHz BPM test bench for the CLIC test facility to perform precise stretchedwire RF measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Silvia Zorzetti, Silvia; Galindo Muño, Natalia; Wendt, Manfred

    2015-01-01

    The Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) requires a low emittance beam transport and preservation, thus a precise control of the beam orbit along up to 50 km of the accelerator components in the sub-m regime is required. Within the PACMAN3 (Particle Accelerator Components Metrology and Alignment to the Nanometer Scale) PhD training action a study with the objective of pre-aligning the electrical centre of a 15 GHz cavity beam position monitor (BPM) to the magnetic centre of the main beam quadrupole is initiated. Of particular importance is the design of a specific test bench to study the stretched-wire setup for the CLIC Test Facility (CTF3) BPM, focusing on the aspects of microwave signal excitation, transmission and impedance-matching, as well as the mechanical setup and reproducibility of the measurement method.

  10. The magnetic recoil spectrometer (MRSt) for time-resolved measurements of the neutron spectrum at the National Ignition Facility (NIF)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frenje, J. A.; Hilsabeck, T. J.; Wink, C. W.; Bell, P.; Bionta, R.; Cerjan, C.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Kilkenny, J. D.; Li, C. K.; Séguin, F. H.; Petrasso, R. D.

    2016-11-01

    The next-generation magnetic recoil spectrometer for time-resolved measurements of the neutron spectrum has been conceptually designed for the National Ignition Facility. This spectrometer, called MRSt, represents a paradigm shift in our thinking about neutron spectrometry for inertial confinement fusion applications, as it will provide simultaneously information about the burn history and time evolution of areal density (ρR), apparent ion temperature (Ti), yield (Yn), and macroscopic flows during burn. From this type of data, an assessment of the evolution of the fuel assembly, hotspot, and alpha heating can be made. According to simulations, the MRSt will provide accurate data with a time resolution of ˜20 ps and energy resolution of ˜100 keV for total neutron yields above ˜1016. At lower yields, the diagnostic will be operated at a higher-efficiency, lower-energy-resolution mode to provide a time resolution of ˜20 ps.

  11. The magnetic recoil spectrometer (MRSt) for time-resolved measurements of the neutron spectrum at the National Ignition Facility (NIF)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frenje, J. A., E-mail: jfrenje@psfc.mit.edu; Wink, C. W.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Li, C. K.; Séguin, F. H.; Petrasso, R. D. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Hilsabeck, T. J.; Kilkenny, J. D. [General Atomics, San Diego, California 92186 (United States); Bell, P.; Bionta, R.; Cerjan, C. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)

    2016-11-15

    The next-generation magnetic recoil spectrometer for time-resolved measurements of the neutron spectrum has been conceptually designed for the National Ignition Facility. This spectrometer, called MRSt, represents a paradigm shift in our thinking about neutron spectrometry for inertial confinement fusion applications, as it will provide simultaneously information about the burn history and time evolution of areal density (ρR), apparent ion temperature (T{sub i}), yield (Y{sub n}), and macroscopic flows during burn. From this type of data, an assessment of the evolution of the fuel assembly, hotspot, and alpha heating can be made. According to simulations, the MRSt will provide accurate data with a time resolution of ∼20 ps and energy resolution of ∼100 keV for total neutron yields above ∼10{sup 16}. At lower yields, the diagnostic will be operated at a higher-efficiency, lower-energy-resolution mode to provide a time resolution of ∼20 ps.

  12. Validity of 2 devices for measuring steps taken by older adults in assisted-living facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergman, Randall J; Bassett, David R; Muthukrishnan, Suresh; Klein, Diane A

    2008-01-01

    This 2-part study examined validity of selected motion sensors for assessing physical activity in older adults residing in assisted-living communities. Twenty-one older adults (mean age = 78.6 +/- 13.1 years) wore the StepWatch 3 Step Activity Monitor (SW3) and the Yamax Digi-Walker SW-200 pedometer (DW). Part I compared accuracy of these devices for measuring steps taken over 161 m. Part II compared devices over a 1-day (24-hour) period. In part I, the DW recorded 51.9% (r2 = -.08, P = .75) and the SW3 recorded 102.6% (r2 = .99, P < .001) of steps. In part II, the DW measured significantly fewer steps (1587 +/- 1057 steps) than did the SW3 (6420 +/- 3180 steps). The SW3 pedometer was more accurate in counting steps and recorded higher 24-hour step counts than the DW pedometer. Thus, the SW3 is a valid research instrument for monitoring activity in the assisted-living population.

  13. [Preventive measures of food poisoning at care facilities for the elderly--current status and problems in food poisoning by noroviruses].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezoe, Kumiko; Nagatomi, Hideki; Imaizumi, Iwao

    2012-08-01

    Food poisoning at care facilities for the elderly has been breaking out approximately ten cases per year nationwide from 2001 to 2010. Especially, it reflected the characteristics of food poisoning caused by noroviruses at a high rate. Usually we have been preventing from food poisoning by noroviruses working on existing measures such as temperature control of food materials, sanitary handlings of cooking tools and table wares, and so on. Additionally, the most effective measures to avoid secondary pollution at care facilities for the elderly is that all members at these facilities have to have a sense of crisis about food poisoning by noroviruses and managers at these facilities must take care of health control for all staff.

  14. Dosimetric measurements and Monte Carlo simulation for achieving uniform surface dose in pulsed electron beam irradiation facility

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    V C Petwal; J N Rao; Jishnu Dwivedi; V K Senecha; K V Subbaiah

    2010-03-01

    A prototype pulsed electron beam irradiation facility for radiation processing of food and medical products is being commissioned at our centre in Indore, India. Analysis of surface dose and uniformity for a pulsed beam facility is of crucial importance because it is influenced by various operating parameters such as beam current, pulse repetition rate (PRR), scanning current profile and frequency, scanning width and product conveying speed. A large number of experiments are required to determine the harmonized setting of these operating parameters for achieving uniform dose. Since there is no readily available tool to set these parameters, use of Monte Carlo methods and computational tools can prove to be the most viable and time saving technique to support the assessment of the dose distribution. In the present study, Monte Carlo code, MCNP, is used to simulate the transport of 10 MeV electron beam through various mediums coming into the beam path and generate an equivalent dose profile in a polystyrene phantom for stationary state. These results have been verified with experimentally measured dose profile, showing that results are in good agreement within 4%. The Monte Carlo simulation further has been used to optimize the overlapping between the successive pulses of a scan to achieve ± 5% dose uniformity along the scanning direction. A mathematical model, which uses the stationary state data, is developed to include the effect of conveyor speed. The algorithm of the model is discussed and the results are compared with the experimentally measured values, which show that the agreement is better than 15%. Finally, harmonized setting for operating parameters of the accelerator are derived to deliver uniform surface dose in the range of 1–13 kGy/pass.

  15. Measuring health system responsiveness at facility level in Ethiopia: performance, correlates and implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakob, Bereket; Ncama, Busisiwe Purity

    2017-04-11

    Health system responsiveness measures (HSR) the non-health aspect of care relating to the environment and the way healthcare is provided to clients. The study measured the HSR performance and correlates of HIV/AIDS treatment and care services in the Wolaita Zone of Ethiopia. A cross-sectional survey across seven responsiveness domains (attention, autonomy, amenities of care, choice, communication, confidentiality and respect) was conducted on 492 people using pre-ART and ART care. The Likert scale categories were allocated percentages for analysis, being classified as unacceptable (Fail) and acceptable (Good and Very Good) performance. Of the 452 (91.9%) participants, 205 (45.4%) and 247 (54.6%) were from health centers and a hospital respectively. 375 (83.0%) and 77 (17.0%) were on ART and pre-ART care respectively. A range of response classifications was reported for each domain, with Fail performance being higher for choice (48.4%), attention (45.5%) and autonomy (22.7%) domains. Communication (64.2%), amenities (61.4%), attention (51.4%) and confidentiality (50.1%) domains had higher scores in the 'Good' performance category. On the other hand, 'only respect (54.0%) domain had higher score in the 'Very Good' performance category while attention (3.1%), amenities (4.7%) and choice (12.4%) domains had very low scores. Respect (5.1%), confidentiality (7.6%) and communication (14.7%) showed low proportion in the Fail performance. 10.4 and 6.9% of the responsiveness percent score (RPS) were in 'Fail' and Very Good categories respectively while the rest (82.7%) were in Good performance category. In the multivariate analysis, a unit increase in the perceived quality of care, satisfaction with the services and financial fairness scores respectively resulted in 0.27% (p responsiveness scores are better ways of measuring responsiveness. Improving quality of care, client satisfaction and financial fairness will be important interventions to improve responsiveness

  16. Towards jitter-free pump-probe measurements at seeded free electron laser facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danailov, Miltcho B; Bencivenga, Filippo; Capotondi, Flavio; Casolari, Francesco; Cinquegrana, Paolo; Demidovich, Alexander; Giangrisostomi, Erika; Kiskinova, Maya P; Kurdi, Gabor; Manfredda, Michele; Masciovecchio, Claudio; Mincigrucci, Riccardo; Nikolov, Ivaylo P; Pedersoli, Emanuele; Principi, Emiliano; Sigalotti, Paolo

    2014-06-02

    X-ray free electron lasers (FEL) coupled with optical lasers have opened unprecedented opportunities for studying ultrafast dynamics in matter. The major challenge in pump-probe experiments using FEL and optical lasers is synchronizing the arrival time of the two pulses. Here we report a technique that benefits from the seeded-FEL scheme and uses the optical seed laser for nearly jitter-free pump-probe experiments. Timing jitter as small as 6 fs has been achieved and confirmed by measurements of FEL-induced transient reflectivity changes of Si3N4 using both collinear and non-collinear geometries. Planned improvements of the experimental set-up are expected to further reduce the timing jitter between the two pulses down to fs level.

  17. Measurement of 230Pa and 186Re Production Cross Sections Induced by Deuterons at Arronax Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duchemin, Charlotte; Guertin, Arnaud; Metivier, Vincent; Haddad, Ferid; Michel, Nathalie

    2014-02-01

    A dedicated program has been launched on production of innovative radionuclides for PET imaging and for β- and α targeted radiotherapy using proton or α particles at the ARRONAX cyclotron. Since the accelerator is also able to deliver deuteron beams up to 35 MeV, we have reconsidered the possibility of using them to produce medical isotopes. Two isotopes dedicated to targeted therapy have been considered: 226Th, a decay product of 230Pa, and 186Re. The production cross sections of 230Pa and 186Re, as well as those of the contaminants created during the irradiation, have been determined by the stacked-foil technique using deuteron beams. Experimental values have been quantified using a referenced cross section. The measured cross sections have been used to determine expected production yields and compared with the calculated values obtained using the Talys code with default parameters.

  18. Computer simulated building energy consumption for verification of energy conservation measures in network facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plankey, B.

    1981-01-01

    A computer program called ECPVER (Energy Consumption Program - Verification) was developed to simulate all energy loads for any number of buildings. The program computes simulated daily, monthly, and yearly energy consumption which can be compared with actual meter readings for the same time period. Such comparison can lead to validation of the model under a variety of conditions, which allows it to be used to predict future energy saving due to energy conservation measures. Predicted energy saving can then be compared with actual saving to verify the effectiveness of those energy conservation changes. This verification procedure is planned to be an important advancement in the Deep Space Network Energy Project, which seeks to reduce energy cost and consumption at all DSN Deep Space Stations.

  19. Materials accounting in a fast-breeder-reactor fuels-reprocessing facility: optimal allocation of measurement uncertainties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dayem, H.A.; Ostenak, C.A.; Gutmacher, R.G.; Kern, E.A.; Markin, J.T.; Martinez, D.P.; Thomas, C.C. Jr.

    1982-07-01

    This report describes the conceptual design of a materials accounting system for the feed preparation and chemical separations processes of a fast breeder reactor spent-fuel reprocessing facility. For the proposed accounting system, optimization techniques are used to calculate instrument measurement uncertainties that meet four different accounting performance goals while minimizing the total development cost of instrument systems. We identify instruments that require development to meet performance goals and measurement uncertainty components that dominate the materials balance variance. Materials accounting in the feed preparation process is complicated by large in-process inventories and spent-fuel assembly inputs that are difficult to measure. To meet 8 kg of plutonium abrupt and 40 kg of plutonium protracted loss-detection goals, materials accounting in the chemical separations process requires: process tank volume and concentration measurements having a precision less than or equal to 1%; accountability and plutonium sample tank volume measurements having a precision less than or equal to 0.3%, a shortterm correlated error less than or equal to 0.04%, and a long-term correlated error less than or equal to 0.04%; and accountability and plutonium sample tank concentration measurements having a precision less than or equal to 0.4%, a short-term correlated error less than or equal to 0.1%, and a long-term correlated error less than or equal to 0.05%. The effects of process design on materials accounting are identified. Major areas of concern include the voloxidizer, the continuous dissolver, and the accountability tank.

  20. Materials accounting in a fast-breeder-reactor fuels-reprocessing facility: optimal allocation of measurement uncertainties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dayem, H.A.; Ostenak, C.A.; Gutmacher, R.G.; Kern, E.A.; Markin, J.T.; Martinez, D.P.; Thomas, C.C. Jr.

    1982-07-01

    This report describes the conceptual design of a materials accounting system for the feed preparation and chemical separations processes of a fast breeder reactor spent-fuel reprocessing facility. For the proposed accounting system, optimization techniques are used to calculate instrument measurement uncertainties that meet four different accounting performance goals while minimizing the total development cost of instrument systems. We identify instruments that require development to meet performance goals and measurement uncertainty components that dominate the materials balance variance. Materials accounting in the feed preparation process is complicated by large in-process inventories and spent-fuel assembly inputs that are difficult to measure. To meet 8 kg of plutonium abrupt and 40 kg of plutonium protracted loss-detection goals, materials accounting in the chemical separations process requires: process tank volume and concentration measurements having a precision less than or equal to 1%; accountability and plutonium sample tank volume measurements having a precision less than or equal to 0.3%, a shortterm correlated error less than or equal to 0.04%, and a long-term correlated error less than or equal to 0.04%; and accountability and plutonium sample tank concentration measurements having a precision less than or equal to 0.4%, a short-term correlated error less than or equal to 0.1%, and a long-term correlated error less than or equal to 0.05%. The effects of process design on materials accounting are identified. Major areas of concern include the voloxidizer, the continuous dissolver, and the accountability tank.

  1. Reactive Attachment Disorder and Disinhibited Social Engagement Disorder in School-Aged Foster Children - A Confirmatory Approach to Dimensional Measures

    OpenAIRE

    Lehmann, Stine; Breivik, Kyrre; Heiervang, Einar; Havik, Toril; Odd E. Havik

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the factor structure and external correlates of the constructs Reactive Attachment Disorder (RAD) and Disinhibited Social Engagement Disorder (DSED) from the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5). The following were addressed: First, do our data support the DSM-5 conceptualization of RAD/DSED as two separate constructs? Second, are RAD and DSED distinct from other well-established dimensions of child psychopathology? Third, what are the ...

  2. Measurement and analysis of the $^{243}$Am neutron capture cross section at the n_TOF facility at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Mendoza, E; Guerrero, C; Berthoumieux, E; Abbondanno, U; Aerts, G; Alvarez-Velarde, F; Andriamonje, S; Andrzejewski, J; Assimakopoulos, P; Audouin, L; Badurek, G; Balibrea, J; Baumann, P; Becvar, F; Belloni, F; Calvino, F; Calviani, M; Capote, R; Carrapico, C; Carrillo de Albornoz, A; Cennini, P; Chepel, V; Chiaveri, E; Colonna, N; Cortes, G; Couture, A; Cox, J; Dahlfors, M; David, S; Dillmann, I; Dolfini, R; Domingo-Pardo, C; Dridi, W; Duran, I; Eleftheriadis, C; Ferrant†, L; Ferrari, A; Ferreira-Marques, R; Fitzpatrick, L; Frais-Koelbl, H; Fujii, K; Furman, W; Goncalves, I; Gonz alez-Romero, E; Goverdovski, A; Gramegna, F; Griesmayer, E; Gunsing, F; Haas, B; Haight, R; Heil, M; Herrera-Martinez, A; Igashira, M; Isaev, S; Jericha, E; Kappeler, F; Kadi, Y; Karadimos, D; Karamanis, D; Ketlerov, V; Kerveno, M; Koehler, P; Konovalov, V; Kossionides, E; Krticka, M; Lampoudis, C; Leeb, H; Lindote, A; Lopes, I; Lossito, R; Lozano, M; Lukic, S; Marganiec, J; Marques, L; Marrone, S; Martınez, T; Massimi, C; Mastinu, P; Mengoni, A; Milazzo, P M; Moreau, C; Mosconi, M; Neves, F; Oberhummer, H; O’Brien, S; Oshima, M; Pancin, J; Papachristodoulou, C; Papadopoulos, C; Paradela, C; Patronis, N; Pavlik, A; Pavlopoulos, P; Perrot, L; Pigni, M T; Plag, R; Plompen, A; Plukis, A; Poch, A; Praena, J; Pretel, C; Quesada, J; Rauscher, T; Reifarth, R; Rosetti, M; Rubbia, C; Rudolf, G; Rullhusen, P; Salgado, J; Santos, C; Sarchiapone, L; Savvidis, I; Stephan, C; Tagliente, G; Tain, J L; Tassan-Got, L; Tavora, L; Terlizzi, R; Vannini, G; Vaz, P; Ventura, A; Villamarin, D; Vicente, M C; Vlachoudis, V; Vlastou, R; Voss, F; Walter, S; Wendler, H; Wiescher, M; Wisshak, K

    2014-01-01

    Background:The design of new nuclear reactors and transmutation devices requires to reduce the present neutron cross section uncertainties of minor actinides. Purpose: Reduce the $^{243}$Am(n,$\\gamma$) cross section uncertainty. Method: The $^{243}$Am(n,$\\gamma$) cross section has been measured at the n_TOF facility at CERN with a BaF$_{2}$ Total Absorption Calorimeter, in the energy range between 0.7 eV and 2.5 keV. Results: The $^{243}$Am(n,$\\gamma$) cross section has been successfully measured in the mentioned energy range. The resolved resonance region has been extended from 250 eV up to 400 eV. In the unresolved resonance region our results are compatible with one of the two incompatible capture data sets available below 2.5 keV. The data available in EXFOR and in the literature has been used to perform a simple analysis above 2.5 keV. Conclusions: The results of this measurement contribute to reduce the $^{243}$Am(n,$\\gamma$) cross section uncertainty and suggest that this cross section is underestimate...

  3. Measurement of the 241Am neutron capture cross section at the n_TOF facility at CERN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendoza, E.; Cano-Ott, D.; Altstadt, S.; Andriamonje, S.; Andrzejewski, J.; Audouin, L.; Balibrea, J.; Bécares, V.; Barbagallo, M.; Bečvář, F.; Belloni, F.; Berthier, B.; Berthoumieux, E.; Billowes, J.; Boccone, V.; Bosnar, D.; Brugger, M.; Calviño, F.; Calviani, M.; Carrapiço, C.; Cerutti, F.; Chiaveri, E.; Chin, M.; Colonna, N.; Cortés, G.; Cortés-Giraldo, M. A.; Diakaki, M.; Dillmann, I.; Domingo-Pardo, C.; Durán, I.; Dzysiuk, N.; Eleftheriadis, C.; Fernández-Ordóñez, M.; Ferrari, A.; Fraval, K.; Furman, V.; Gómez-Hornillos, M. B.; Ganesan, S.; García, A. R.; Giubrone, G.; Gonçalves, I. F.; González, E.; Goverdovski, A.; Gramegna, F.; Griesmayer, E.; Guerrero, C.; Gunsing, F.; Gurusamy, P.; Heftrich, T.; Heinitz, S.; Hernández-Prieto, A.; Heyse, J.; Jenkins, D. G.; Jericha, E.; Käppeler, F.; Kadi, Y.; Karadimos, D.; Katabuchi, T.; Ketlerov, V.; Khryachkov, V.; Koehler, P.; Kokkoris, M.; Kroll, J.; Krtička, M.; Lampoudis, C.; Langer, C.; Leal-Cidoncha, E.; Lederer, C.; Leeb, H.; Leong, L. S.; Lerendegui-Marco, J.; Licata, M.; Losito, R.; Manousos, A.; Marganiec, J.; Martínez, T.; Massimi, C.; Mastinu, P.; Mastromarco, M.; Mengoni, A.; Milazzo, P. M.; Mingrone, F.; Mirea, M.; Mondelaers, W.; Paradela, C.; Pavlik, A.; Perkowski, J.; Plompen, A. J. M.; Praena, J.; Quesada, J. M.; Rauscher, T.; Reifarth, R.; Riego-Perez, A.; Robles, M.; Roman, F.; Rubbia, C.; Ryan, J. A.; Sabaté-Gilarte, M.; Sarmento, R.; Saxena, A.; Schillebeeckx, P.; Schmidt, S.; Schumann, D.; Sedyshev, P.; Tagliente, G.; Tain, J. L.; Tarifeño-Saldivia, A.; Tarrío, D.; Tassan-Got, L.; Tsinganis, A.; Valenta, S.; Vannini, G.; Variale, V.; Vaz, P.; Ventura, A.; Vermeulen, M. J.; Versaci, R.; Vlachoudis, V.; Vlastou, R.; Wallner, A.; Ware, T.; Weigand, M.; Weiss, C.; Wright, T.; Žugec, P.

    2017-09-01

    New neutron cross section measurements of minor actinides have been performed recently in order to reduce the uncertainties in the evaluated data, which is important for the design of advanced nuclear reactors and, in particular, for determining their performance in the transmutation of nuclear waste. We have measured the 241Am(n,γ) cross section at the n_TOF facility between 0.2 eV and 10 keV with a BaF2 Total Absorption Calorimeter, and the analysis of the measurement has been recently concluded. Our results are in reasonable agreement below 20 eV with the ones published by C. Lampoudis et al. in 2013, who reported a 22% larger capture cross section up to 110 eV compared to experimental and evaluated data published before. Our results also indicate that the 241Am(n,γ) cross section is underestimated in the present evaluated libraries between 20 eV and 2 keV by 25%, on average, and up to 35% for certain evaluations and energy ranges.

  4. Inference of total DT fusion neutron yield from prompt gamma-ray measurements at the National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Church, J. A.; Herrmann, H. W.; Stoeffl, W.; Caggiano, J. A.; Cerjan, C.; Sayre, D.

    2014-10-01

    Prompt D-T fusion gamma-rays measured at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) with the Gamma-ray Reaction History detector (GRH) have been used recently to infer the total DT fusion neutron yield of inertial confinement fusion (ICF) implosions. DT fusion produces energetic gamma-rays (16.75 MeV) with a small branching ratio of approximately (4.2 +/- 2.0)e-5 γ/n. While the large error bar precludes use of the branching ratio for an accurate yield determination, the gamma-rays themselves provide the most unperturbed measure of fusion burn and can be used for such a purpose. A cross-calibration for the DT fusion gamma-ray to neutron signal is obtained via low areal density exploding pusher implosions which have mostly unperturbed neutron and gamma-ray signals. The calibration is then used to infer total DT neutron yield from gamma-ray measurements on high areal-density, cryogenically layered implosions in which neutrons are heavily down-scattered (up to 30%). Furthermore, the difference between the gamma-ray inferred total DT yield and the primary neutron yield (unscattered neutrons) can be used to estimate the total down-scatter fraction. Error analysis and comparison of yield values will be presented. This work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344, LLNL-ABS-657694.

  5. A High-Speed Continuous Recording High Flow Gas Sampler for Measuring Methane Emissions from Pneumatic Devices at Oil and Natural Gas Production Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrara, T.; Howard, T. M.

    2016-12-01

    Studies attempting to reconcile facility level emission estimates of sources at oil and gas facilities with basin wide methane flux measurements have had limited success. Pneumatic devices are commonly used at oil and gas production facilities for process control or liquid pumping. These devices are powered by pressurized natural gas from the well, so they are known methane sources at these sites. Pneumatic devices are estimated to contribute 14% to 25% of the total greenhouse gas emissions (GHG) from production facilities. Measurements of pneumatic devices have shown that malfunctioning or poorly maintained control systems may be emitting significantly more methane than currently estimated. Emission inventories for these facilities use emission factors from EPA that are based on pneumatic device measurements made in the early 1990's. Recent studies of methane emissions from production facilities have attempted to measure emissions from pneumatic devices by several different methods. These methods have had limitations including alteration of the system being measured, the inability to distinguish between leaks and venting during normal operation, or insufficient response time to account of the time based emission events. We have developed a high speed recording high flow sampler that is capable of measuring the transient emissions from pneumatic devices. This sampler is based on the well-established high flow measurement technique used in oil and gas for quantifying component leak rates. In this paper we present the results of extensive laboratory controlled release testing. Additionally, test data from several field studies where this sampler has been used to measure pneumatic device emissions will be presented.

  6. Measurement of the 241Am and the 243Am Neutron Capture Cross Sections at the n_TOF Facility at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Mendoza, E; Guerrero, C; Altstadt, S; Andrzejewski, J; Audouin, L; Barbagallo, M; Bécares, V; Bečvář, F; Belloni, F; Berthoumieux, E; Billowes, J; Boccone, V; Bosnar, D; Brugger, M; Calviani, M; Calviño, F; Carrapiço, C; Cerutti, F; Chiaveri, E; Chin, M; Colonna, N; Cortés, G; Cortés-Giraldo, M A; Diakaki, M; Domingo-Pardo, C; Duran, I; Dressler, R; Dzysiuk, N; Eleftheriadis, C; Ferrari, A; Fraval, K; Ganesan, S; García, A R; Giubrone, G; Gómez-Hornillos, M B; Gonçalves, I F; González-Romero, E; Griesmayer, E; Gunsing, F; Gurusamy, P; Jenkins, D G; Jericha, E; Kadi, Y; Käppeler, F; Karadimos, D; Kivel, N; Koehler, P; Kokkoris, M; Korschinek, G; Krtička, M; Kroll, J; Langer, C; Lederer, C; Leeb, H; Leong, L S; Losito, R; Manousos, A; Marganiec, J; Martínez, T; Mastinu, P F; Mastromarco, M; Massimi, C; Meaze, M; Mengoni, A; Milazzo, P M; Mingrone, F; Mirea, M; Mondelaers, W; Paradela, C; Pavlik, A; Perkowski, J; Pignatari, M; Plompen, A; Praena, J; Quesada, J M; Rauscher, T; Reifarth, R; Riego, A; Roman, F; Rubbia, C; Sarmento, R; Schillebeeckx, P; Schmidt, S; Schumann, D; Tagliente, G; Tain, J L; Tarrío, D; Tassan-Got, L; Tsinganis, A; Valenta, S; Vannini, G; Variale, V; Vaz, P; Ventura, A; Versaci, R; Vermeulen, M J; Vlachoudis, V; Vlastou, R; Wallner, A; Ware, T; Weigand, M; Weiß, C; Wright, T J; Žugec, P

    2014-01-01

    The capture cross sections of Am-241 and Am-243 were measured at the n\\_TOF facility at CERN in the epithermal energy range with a BaF2 Total Absorption Calorimeter. A preliminary analysis of the Am-241 and a complete analysis of the Am-243 measurement, including the data reduction and the resonance analysis, have been performed.

  7. Determining initial enrichment, burnup, and cooling time of pressurized-water-reactor spent fuel assemblies by analyzing passive gamma spectra measured at the Clab interim-fuel storage facility in Sweden

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Favalli, A., E-mail: afavalli@lanl.gov [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM (United States); Vo, D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM (United States); Grogan, B. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Jansson, P. [Uppsala University, Uppsala (Sweden); Liljenfeldt, H. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Mozin, V. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA (United States); Schwalbach, P. [European Commission, DG Energy, Euratom Safeguards Luxemburg, Luxemburg (Luxembourg); Sjöland, A. [Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Company, Stockholm (Sweden); Tobin, S.J.; Trellue, H. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM (United States); Vaccaro, S. [European Commission, DG Energy, Euratom Safeguards Luxemburg, Luxemburg (Luxembourg)

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of the Next Generation Safeguards Initiative (NGSI)–Spent Fuel (SF) project is to strengthen the technical toolkit of safeguards inspectors and/or other interested parties. The NGSI–SF team is working to achieve the following technical goals more easily and efficiently than in the past using nondestructive assay measurements of spent fuel assemblies: (1) verify the initial enrichment, burnup, and cooling time of facility declaration; (2) detect the diversion or replacement of pins; (3) estimate the plutonium mass [which is also a function of the variables in (1)]; (4) estimate the decay heat; and (5) determine the reactivity of spent fuel assemblies. Since August 2013, a set of measurement campaigns has been conducted at the Central Interim Storage Facility for Spent Nuclear Fuel (Clab), in collaboration with Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Company (SKB). One purpose of the measurement campaigns was to acquire passive gamma spectra with high-purity germanium and lanthanum bromide scintillation detectors from Pressurized Water Reactor and Boiling Water Reactor spent fuel assemblies. The absolute {sup 137}Cs count rate and the {sup 154}Eu/{sup 137}Cs, {sup 134}Cs/{sup 137}Cs, {sup 106}Ru/{sup 137}Cs, and {sup 144}Ce/{sup 137}Cs isotopic ratios were extracted; these values were used to construct corresponding model functions (which describe each measured quantity’s behavior over various combinations of burnup, cooling time, and initial enrichment) and then were used to determine those same quantities in each measured spent fuel assembly. The results obtained in comparison with the operator declared values, as well as the methodology developed, are discussed in detail in the paper.

  8. Determining initial enrichment, burnup, and cooling time of pressurized-water-reactor spent fuel assemblies by analyzing passive gamma spectra measured at the Clab interim-fuel storage facility in Sweden

    Science.gov (United States)

    Favalli, A.; Vo, D.; Grogan, B.; Jansson, P.; Liljenfeldt, H.; Mozin, V.; Schwalbach, P.; Sjöland, A.; Tobin, S. J.; Trellue, H.; Vaccaro, S.

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of the Next Generation Safeguards Initiative (NGSI)-Spent Fuel (SF) project is to strengthen the technical toolkit of safeguards inspectors and/or other interested parties. The NGSI-SF team is working to achieve the following technical goals more easily and efficiently than in the past using nondestructive assay measurements of spent fuel assemblies: (1) verify the initial enrichment, burnup, and cooling time of facility declaration; (2) detect the diversion or replacement of pins; (3) estimate the plutonium mass [which is also a function of the variables in (1)]; (4) estimate the decay heat; and (5) determine the reactivity of spent fuel assemblies. Since August 2013, a set of measurement campaigns has been conducted at the Central Interim Storage Facility for Spent Nuclear Fuel (Clab), in collaboration with Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Company (SKB). One purpose of the measurement campaigns was to acquire passive gamma spectra with high-purity germanium and lanthanum bromide scintillation detectors from Pressurized Water Reactor and Boiling Water Reactor spent fuel assemblies. The absolute 137Cs count rate and the 154Eu/137Cs, 134Cs/137Cs, 106Ru/137Cs, and 144Ce/137Cs isotopic ratios were extracted; these values were used to construct corresponding model functions (which describe each measured quantity's behavior over various combinations of burnup, cooling time, and initial enrichment) and then were used to determine those same quantities in each measured spent fuel assembly. The results obtained in comparison with the operator declared values, as well as the methodology developed, are discussed in detail in the paper.

  9. A facile, branched DNA assay to quantitatively measure glucocorticoid receptor auto-regulation in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jason R. Schwartz; Purvaba J. Sarvaiya; Lily E. Leiva; Maria C. Velez; Tammuella C. Singleton; Lolie C. Yu; Wayne V. Vedeckis

    2012-01-01

    Glucocorticoid (GC) steroid hormones are used to treat acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) because of their pro-apoptotic effects in hematopoietic cells.However,not all leukemia cells are sensitive to GC,and no assay to stratify patients is available.In the GC-sensitive T-cell ALL cell line CEM-C7,auto-up-regulation of RNA transcripts for the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) correlates with increased apoptotic response.This study aimed to determine if a facile assay of GR transcript levels might be promising for stratifying ALL patients into hormone-sensitive and hormone-resistant populations.The GR transcript profiles of various lymphoid cell lines and 4 bone marrow samples from patients with T-cell ALL were analyzed using both an optimized branched DNA (bDNA) assay and a real-time quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction assay.There were significant correlations between both assay platforms when measuring total GR (exon 5/6) transcripts in various cell lines and patient samples,but not for a probe set that detects a specific,low abundance GR transcript (exon 1A3).Our results suggest that the bDNA platform is reproducible and precise when measuring total GR transcripts and,with further development,may ultimately offer a simple clinical assay to aid in the prediction of GC-sensitivity in ALL patients.

  10. Inertial Confinement Fusion alpha-heating signatures in prompt gamma-ray measurements at the National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Church, Jennifer; Herrmann, Hans; Cerjan, Charlie; Sayre, Daniel; Carpenter, Arthur; Liebman, Judy; Stoeffl, Wolfgang; Kim, Yongho

    2015-11-01

    Prompt gamma-rays measured at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) with the Gamma-ray Reaction History detector (GRH) supply vital diagnostic information, such as the peak burn time, burn width, and total neutron yield, from prompt DT-fusion gamma-ray emission during high convergence implosion experiments. Additionally, the stagnated cold shell density distribution may be inferred from the time-integrated, calibrated 12C (n,n' γ) signal, thus providing estimates of remaining ablator carbon areal density. Furthermore, simulations suggest that alpha heating signatures might be accessible using more highly resolved temporal gamma-ray emission. Correlation of these signatures with time-dependent neutron emission will constrain the implosion dynamics immediately prior to thermonuclear burn. Measurement of these gamma-ray signatures will be discussed along with updates on our work toward inferred total DT yield and 12C areal density. This work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Dept. of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07-NA27344, LLNL-ABS-670282.

  11. Measuring client satisfaction and the quality of family planning services: A comparative analysis of public and private health facilities in Tanzania, Kenya and Ghana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agha Sohail

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Public and private family planning providers face different incentive structures, which may affect overall quality and ultimately the acceptability of family planning for their intended clients. This analysis seeks to quantify differences in the quality of family planning (FP services at public and private providers in three representative sub-Saharan African countries (Tanzania, Kenya and Ghana, to assess how these quality differentials impact upon FP clients' satisfaction, and to suggest how quality improvements can improve contraceptive continuation rates. Methods Indices of technical, structural and process measures of quality are constructed from Service Provision Assessments (SPAs conducted in Tanzania (2006, Kenya (2004 and Ghana (2002 using direct observation of facility attributes and client-provider interactions. Marginal effects from multivariate regressions controlling for client characteristics and the multi-stage cluster sample design assess the relative importance of different measures of structural and process quality at public and private facilities on client satisfaction. Results Private health facilities appear to be of higher (interpersonal process quality than public facilities but not necessarily higher technical quality in the three countries, though these differentials are considerably larger at lower level facilities (clinics, health centers, dispensaries than at hospitals. Family planning client satisfaction, however, appears considerably higher at private facilities - both hospitals and clinics - most likely attributable to both process and structural factors such as shorter waiting times and fewer stockouts of methods and supplies. Conclusions Because the public sector represents the major source of family planning services in developing countries, governments and Ministries of Health should continue to implement and to encourage incentives, perhaps performance-based, to improve quality at public

  12. Measurement of reactive species generated by dielectric barrier discharge in direct contact with water in different atmospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovačević, Vesna V.; Dojčinović, Biljana P.; Jović, Milica; Roglić, Goran M.; Obradović, Bratislav M.; Kuraica, Milorad M.

    2017-04-01

    The formation of hydroxyl radical and long-living chemical species (H2O2, O3, \\text{NO}3- and \\text{NO}2- ) generated in the liquid phase of a water falling film dielectric barrier discharge in dependence on the gas atmosphere (air, nitrogen, oxygen, argon and helium) was studied. The chemical molecular probe dimethyl sulfoxide was employed for quantification of ˙OH, and the influence of hydroxyl radical scavenging on formation of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species was investigated. In addition to liquid analysis, plasma diagnostics was applied to indicate possible reaction pathways of plasma–liquid interaction. The highest ˙OH production rate of 1.19  ×  10‑5 mol l‑1 s‑1 was found when water was treated in oxygen, with a yield of 2.75  ×  10‑2 molecules of ˙OH per 100 eV. Formation of hydrogen peroxide in air, nitrogen and argon discharges is determined by recombination reaction of hydroxyl radicals, reaching the highest yield of about 0.7 g kWh‑1 when distilled water was treated in argon discharge. Ozone formation was dominant in oxygen and air discharges. Strong acidification along with formation of reactive nitrogen species was detected in water treated in air and nitrogen discharges.

  13. Ambulatory Surgical Measures - Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Ambulatory Surgical Center Quality Reporting (ASCQR) Program seeks to make care safer and more efficient through quality reporting. ASCs eligible for this...

  14. Aerosol scattering and absorption during the EUCAARI-LONGREX flights of the Facility for Airborne Atmospheric Measurements (FAAM) BAe-146: can measurements and models agree?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Highwood, E. J.; Northway, M. J.; McMeeking, G. R.; Morgan, W. T.; Liu, D.; Osborne, S.; Bower, K.; Coe, H.; Ryder, C.; Williams, P.

    2012-08-01

    Scattering and absorption by aerosol in anthropogenically perturbed air masses over Europe has been measured using instrumentation flown on the UK's BAe-146-301 large Atmospheric Research Aircraft (ARA) operated by the Facility for Airborne Atmospheric Measurements (FAAM) on 14 flights during the EUCAARI-LONGREX campaign in May 2008. The geographical and temporal variations of the derived shortwave optical properties of aerosol are presented. Values of single scattering albedo of dry aerosol at 550 nm varied considerably from 0.86 to near unity, with a campaign average of 0.93 ± 0.03. Dry aerosol optical depths ranged from 0.030 ± 0.009 to 0.24 ± 0.07. An optical properties closure study comparing calculations from composition data and Mie scattering code with the measured properties is presented. Agreement to within measurement uncertainties of 30% can be achieved for both scattering and absorption, but the latter is shown to be sensitive to the refractive indices chosen for organic aerosols, and to a lesser extent black carbon, as well as being highly dependent on the accuracy of the absorption measurements. Agreement with the measured absorption can be achieved either if organic carbon is assumed to be weakly absorbing, or if the organic aerosol is purely scattering and the absorption measurement is an overestimate due to the presence of large amounts of organic carbon. Refractive indices could not be inferred conclusively due to this uncertainty, despite the enhancement in methodology compared to previous studies that derived from the use of the black carbon measurements. Hygroscopic growth curves derived from the wet nephelometer indicate moderate water uptake by the aerosol with a campaign mean f(RH) value (ratio in scattering) of 1.5 (range from 1.23 to 1.63) at 80% relative humidity. This value is qualitatively consistent with the major chemical components of the aerosol measured by the aerosol mass spectrometer, which are primarily mixed organics and

  15. The progenitor cell inhibition assay to measure the anti-leukemic reactivity of T cell clones against acute and chronic myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Hoorn, M A W G; van Luxemburg-Heijs, S A P; van Bergen, C A M; Bongaerts, R; Willemze, R; Falkenburg, J H F

    2003-10-01

    Adoptive immunotherapy with donor T lymphocytes may be used as a treatment for relapsed leukemia after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (SCT). In vitro selected and expanded anti-leukemic T cells may be more effective in inducing a response in vivo. To identify the anti-leukemic reactivity of in vitro generated T cells, standard target cell read-out assays like the 51Cr-release assay are not always appropriate. We developed an assay in which the ability of T cells to antigen specifically inhibit the in vitro growth of leukemic progenitor cells in the presence of cytokines can be measured. This assay allows the evaluation of the cytolytic or suppressive potential of leukemia reactive T cells for prolonged periods of time. The assay is based on inhibition of [3H]thymidine incorporation by the leukemic progenitor cells induced by multiple hematopoietic growth factors. T cell clones with a known specificity were used to compare the analytic potential of the new assay with those of other cytotoxicity assays. Based on the results of the T cell clones, a modification of a limiting dilution assay was developed to identify anti-leukemic allogeneic T cells in HLA identical donor-recipient combinations selected on their ability to inhibit the in vitro growth of CML or AML progenitor cells, to be used for the generation of leukemia-reactive CTL lines for clinical use.

  16. Development of a Risk-adjustment Model for the Inpatient Rehabilitation Facility Discharge Self-care Functional Status Quality Measure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deutsch, Anne; Pardasaney, Poonam; Iriondo-Perez, Jeniffer; Ingber, Melvin J; Porter, Kristie A; McMullen, Tara

    2017-07-01

    Functional status measures are important patient-centered indicators of inpatient rehabilitation facility (IRF) quality of care. We developed a risk-adjusted self-care functional status measure for the IRF Quality Reporting Program. This paper describes the development and performance of the measure's risk-adjustment model. Our sample included IRF Medicare fee-for-service patients from the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services' 2008-2010 Post-Acute Care Payment Reform Demonstration. Data sources included the Continuity Assessment Record and Evaluation Item Set, IRF-Patient Assessment Instrument, and Medicare claims. Self-care scores were based on 7 Continuity Assessment Record and Evaluation items. The model was developed using discharge self-care score as the dependent variable, and generalized linear modeling with generalized estimation equation to account for patient characteristics and clustering within IRFs. Patient demographics, clinical characteristics at IRF admission, and clinical characteristics related to the recent hospitalization were tested as risk adjusters. A total of 4769 patient stays from 38 IRFs were included. Approximately 57% of the sample was female; 38.4%, 75-84 years; and 31.0%, 65-74 years. The final model, containing 77 risk adjusters, explained 53.7% of variance in discharge self-care scores (P<0.0001). Admission self-care function was the strongest predictor, followed by admission cognitive function and IRF primary diagnosis group. The range of expected and observed scores overlapped very well, with little bias across the range of predicted self-care functioning. Our risk-adjustment model demonstrated strong validity for predicting discharge self-care scores. Although the model needs validation with national data, it represents an important first step in evaluation of IRF functional outcomes.

  17. Reactive and regulative temperament in patients with compulsive buying and non-clinical controls measured by self-report and performance-based tasks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voth, Eva M; Claes, Laurence; Georgiadou, Ekaterini; Selle, Janine; Trotzke, Patrick; Brand, Matthias; de Zwaan, Martina; Müller, Astrid

    2014-10-01

    To examine reactive and regulative temperament in patients with compulsive buying (CB) by means of self-report measures and performance-based tasks and to explore the relationship between both measurement approaches. The study included 31 treatment-seeking patients with CB (25 women, 6 men) and an age and gender matched non-clinical control group without CB (CG). All participants answered the Compulsive Buying Scale (CBS). Reactive temperament was assessed using the Behavioral Inhibition System/Behavioral Activation System Scales (BIS/BAS) and the Iowa Gambling Task (IGT). Regulative temperament was measured using the Effortful Control subscale of the Adult Temperament Questionnaire (ATQ-EC) and a computerized version of the Stroop Task. To control the results for depression, the Patient Health Questionnaire-Depression Scale (PHQ-9) was administered. Crude group comparisons revealed higher BIS and BAS scores, poorer IGT performance and lower ATQ-EC scores in the CB-group compared to the CG. The groups did not differ in their performance on the Stroop task. After controlling for depressive symptoms that were significantly higher in the CB-group, only the group differences in BAS reactivity remained significant. No significant associations were found between questionnaires and performance-based tasks. Overall, the findings indicate that CB in the present clinical sample of treatment-seeking patients was mainly associated with higher approach tendencies and more depressive symptoms. The lacking correlation between self-reports and performance-based tasks is in line with prior research and suggests that both methodologies tap into different aspects of temperament. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Measurement and analysis of the $^{241}$Am(n,$\\gamma$) cross section at the CERN n_TOF facility.

    CERN Document Server

    Fraval, Kevin

    In the context of the current nuclear technology, the radiotoxicity of the spent fuel of a typical PWR reactor is dominated by minor actinides for times greater than 104 years. In particular, 241Am and its 432 years half-life is responsible for about half of the minor actinide content of a PWR spent fuel. This thesis work consisted in measuring and analysing the 241Am(n, ) cross section at the CERN n TOF facility. After selecting exclusively the events obtained with lead shielding in front of the C6D6 detectors, the amplitude-energy calibration has to be adjusted with time, by using a photon coming from the 27Al(,,p)30Si reaction. Histogram extraction included applying a weighting function (obtained by MCNP simulation), a dead time correction, and a normalization to the compound nucleus excitation energy. The background corrected spectra were normalized relatively to the 4.9 eV resonance on 197Au. Finally, the resonance analysis was performed using the SAMMY code. The extracted thermal value is 678±68 barns,...

  19. Real-time, high-resolution x-ray diffraction measurements on shocked crystals at a synchrotron facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Y M; Turneaure, Stefan J; Perkins, K; Zimmerman, K; Arganbright, N; Shen, G; Chow, P

    2012-12-01

    The Advanced Photon Source (APS) at Argonne National Laboratory was used to obtain real-time, high-resolution x-ray diffraction measurements to determine the microscopic response of shock-compressed single crystals. Disk shaped samples were subjected to plane shock wave compression by impacting them with half-inch diameter, flat-faced projectiles. The projectiles were accelerated to velocities ranging between 300 and 1200 m/s using a compact powder gun designed specifically for use at a synchrotron facility. The experiments were designed to keep the sample probed volume under uniaxial strain and constant stress for a duration longer than the 153.4 ns spacing between x-ray bunches. X-rays from a single pulse (crystals at the APS are presented. Analytic developments to determine the effects of crystal substructure and non-ideal geometry on the diffraction pattern position and shape are presented. Representative real-time x-ray diffraction data, indicating shock-induced microstructural changes, are presented for a shock-compressed Al(111) sample. The experimental developments presented here provided, in part, the impetus for the Dynamic Compression Sector (DCS) currently under development at the APS. Both the synchronization∕x-ray detection methods and the analysis equations for high-resolution single crystal x-ray diffraction can be used at the DCS.

  20. Real-time measurement of reactive gases (NO, NO2, O3, CO) at ERSA, Cape Corsica, a long term Observatory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pichon, Jean-Marc; Colomb, Aurelie; Gheusi, Francois; Sauvage, Stephane; Pont, Veronique; Tison, Emmanuel; Bordier, Florent; Grignion, Guillaume; Savelli, Jean-Luc; Dulac, Francois; Sciare, Jean; Nicolas, Jose; Bourrianne, Thierry; Bouvier, Laetitia

    2013-04-01

    Important efforts have been put in 2012 in order to implement the infrastructure and instrumentation for a fully equipped background monitoring station at Ersa, Cape Corsica, key location at the crossroads of dusty southerly airmasses and polluted outflows from the European continent. The ERSA observatory is a french initiative within the framework of CHARMEX (Chemistry-Aerosol Mediterranean Experiment (ChArMEx, http://charmex.lsce.ipsl.fr/) and CORSICA (Centre d'Observation Régional pour la Surveillance du Climat et de l'environnement Atmosphérique et océanographique en Méditerranée occidentale (http://www2.obs-mip.fr/corsica) . The measurements of the station include real-time measurement of reactive gases (O3, CO, NO, NO2), off-line VOC measurements (cylinders, cartridges), a broad spectrum of aerosol properties (chemical composition, ground optical properties, integrated and space-resolved optical properties , size distribution properties, mass, hygroscopicity as well as dry/wet depositions). Among all the parameters, reactive gases are recognized as precursors of ozone and aerosol. The primarily emitted nitrogen oxides (NOx=NO+NO2) have a substantial impact on radical chemistry, ozone (O3) formation and aerosol by their atmospheric oxidation to aerosol nitrate. Carbon monoxide (CO) is mostly primarily emitted from combustion processes, but it is also formed in substantial amounts from the oxidation of methane (CH4) and volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Due to its high global turn-over rates CO is a major O3 precursor, and it has a strong impact on the oxidizing capacity and thus indirectly on the concentration of the climate gas CH4. O3 is a climate gas itself, however, also strongly involved in NO/NO2 partitioning and oxidizing capacity, thus coupling back on several photochemical processes. Accordingly, impacts on climate are multiple and rather complex. The understanding requires high quality, long-term observations of these reactive species. We

  1. 电网功率因数的测量及无功自动补偿控制%Power-factor measurement and reactive automitic compensation control

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘骏跃

    2001-01-01

    提出一种精度较高的功率因数测量方法。利用单片计算机实现对低压电网无功补偿电容器组的自动投切控制,可适用于各种负载、各类用户。%A high precision method of power-factor measurement is researched,and a reactive power compensation control system to low voltage network with capacitor bank is realized by sing-chip computer 8031.The controller apply to every user and every load.

  2. Reactive Hypoglycemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... from low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) that occurs while fasting. Signs and symptoms of reactive hypoglycemia may include ... and very important. It's also important to include physical activity in your daily routine. Your doctor can help ...

  3. Reactive Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eren Erken

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Reactive arthritis is an acute, sterile, non-suppurative and inflammatory arthropaty which has occured as a result of an infectious processes, mostly after gastrointestinal and genitourinary tract infections. Reiter syndrome is a frequent type of reactive arthritis. Both reactive arthritis and Reiter syndrome belong to the group of seronegative spondyloarthropathies, associated with HLA-B27 positivity and characterized by ongoing inflammation after an infectious episode. The classical triad of Reiter syndrome is defined as arthritis, conjuctivitis and urethritis and is seen only in one third of patients with Reiter syndrome. Recently, seronegative asymmetric arthritis and typical extraarticular involvement are thought to be adequate for the diagnosis. However, there is no established criteria for the diagnosis of reactive arthritis and the number of randomized and controlled studies about the therapy is not enough. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2013; 22(3.000: 283-299

  4. Fast bedside measurement of blood count and C-reactive protein in newborns compared with conventional methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papa, F; Rongioletti, M; Majolini, M B; Collegiani, V; Vaccarella, C; Notarmuzi, M L; Cortesi, M; Pasqualetti, P; Cicchese, M; Agostino, R; Liumbruno, G M

    2012-01-01

    Abnormal complete blood count (CBC) and high plasma C-reactive protein (CRP) are associated with neonatal infections and could be helpful in the diagnosis of neonatal sepsis and to monitor the antibiotic treatment. The aim of this work is to evaluate and compare the performance of a bedside analyzer for blood count and C-reactive protein (CRP) with a conventional analyzer in a neonatal population. 150 capillary or venous blood samples of term and preterm newborns were processed on an ABX-MicrosCRP200 analyzer and on a SysmexXE2100 (conventional hematology analyzer) for CBC, leukocyte differential, reticulocytes, and nucleated red blood cells (NRBC); high-sensitivity CRP (hs-CRP) was performed on a ModularPE. The differences between complete blood count and CRP were regressed against their means and assessed by means of intra-class-correlation. The intra-class-correlation for white blood cell (WBC) was 0.98, for hemoglobin 0.97, for hematocrit 0.96, for mean corpuscular volume 0.95, and for platelet 0.98. ABX-MicrosCRP200 overestimated the WBC (+1.27 x 10(3)/microL; p < 0.001), hematocrit (+1.80%; p < 0.001), and platelet (+13.55 x 10(3)/microL; p < 0.001). The intra-class-correlation for CRP was high (0.97), without systematic difference between the two values (p = 0.64). The agreement between the two methods was high for both tests. However, the SD of the difference for WBC and platelet could be clinically important in leukopenic or thrombocytopenic newborns.

  5. Utilizing chromophoric dissolved organic matter measurements to derive export and reactivity of dissolved organic carbon exported to the Arctic Ocean: A case study of the Yukon River, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, R.G.M.; Aiken, G.R.; Butler, K.D.; Dornblaser, M.M.; Striegl, R.G.; Hernes, P.J.

    2009-01-01

    The quality and quantity of dissolved organic matter (DOM) exported by Arctic rivers is known to vary with hydrology and this exported material plays a fundamental role in the biogeochemical cycling of carbon at high latitudes. We highlight the potential of optical measurements to examine DOM quality across the hydrograph in Arctic rivers. Furthermore, we establish chromophoric DOM (CDOM) relationships to dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and lignin phenols in the Yukon River and model DOC and lignin loads from CDOM measurements, the former in excellent agreement with long-term DOC monitoring data. Intensive sampling across the historically under-sampled spring flush period highlights the importance of this time for total export of DOC and particularly lignin. Calculated riverine DOC loads to the Arctic Ocean show an increase from previous estimates, especially when new higher discharge data are incorporated. Increased DOC loads indicate decreased residence times for terrigenous DOM in the Arctic Ocean with important implications for the reactivity and export of this material to the Atlantic Ocean. Citation: Spencer, R. G. M., G. R. Aiken, K. D. Butler, M. M. Dornblaser, R. G. Striegl, and P. J. Hernes (2009), Utilizing chromophoric dissolved organic matter measurements to derive export and reactivity of dissolved organic carbon exported to the Arctic Ocean: A case study of the Yukon River, Alaska, Geophys. Res. Lett., 36, L06401, doi:10.1029/ 2008GL036831. Copyright 2009 by the American Geophysical Union.

  6. Measurements of Sensitivity of Implosion-Phase Mixing to Low-Mode Symmetry at the National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacLaren, S. A.; Sayre, D. B.; Khan, S. F.; Ma, T.; Tipton, R. E.; Pino, J. E.; Salmonson, J. D.; Ralph, J. E.; Rygg, J. R.; Casey, D. T.; Kyrala, G. A.

    2016-10-01

    The 2-Shock platform at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) is a non-igniting indirect-drive target designed to produce a near 1D-like implosion for hydro-code validation. This is accomplished with a sub-scale (675 µm radius) capsule in a nominal (2.875 mm radius) near-vacuum hohlraum, providing a case-to-capsule ratio 63% larger that that of a standard ignition target. Additionally, the low aspect ratio (3.9) of the capsule shell combined with the temperature of the foot pulse essentially eliminates ablation front instability growth. The result is a platform that is well suited to the study of mixing at the gas-ablator interface without these complicating factors. A layer of CD plastic on the inner 3.2 µm of the CH capsule shell filled with a mixture of hydrogen and tritium allows us to infer the mixture of ablator material into the gas through the ratio of DT to TT neutron production. In 2015, we used the 2-Shock platform to measure the sensitivity of ablator-gas mixing to inner surface roughness and implosion convergence ratio. This year we developed the capability to deliberately adjust the low-mode in-flight symmetry of the implosion in both the prolate and oblate directions. We present the initial results of mix measurements from deliberately low-mode asymmetric implosions aimed at determining the relationship between this type of asymmetry and mix. This work was performed under the auspices of the Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC, (LLNS) under Contract No. DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  7. Measurement and simulation of lineal energy distribution at the CERN high energy facility with a tissue equivalent proportional counter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rollet, S; Autischer, M; Beck, P; Latocha, M

    2007-01-01

    The response of a tissue equivalent proportional counter (TEPC) in a mixed radiation field with a neutron energy distribution similar to the radiation field at commercial flight altitudes has been studied. The measurements have been done at the CERN-EU High-Energy Reference Field (CERF) facility where a well-characterised radiation field is available for intercomparison. The TEPC instrument used by the ARC Seibersdorf Research is filled with pure propane gas at low pressure and can be used to determine the lineal energy distribution of the energy deposition in a mass of gas equivalent to a 2 microm diameter volume of unit density tissue, of similar size to the nuclei of biological cells. The linearity of the detector response was checked both in term of dose and dose rate. The effect of dead-time has been corrected. The influence of the detector exposure location and orientation in the radiation field on the dose distribution was also studied as a function of the total dose. The microdosimetric distribution of the absorbed dose as a function of the lineal energy has been obtained and compared with the same distribution simulated with the FLUKA Monte Carlo transport code. The dose equivalent was calculated by folding this distribution with the quality factor as a function of linear energy transfer. The comparison between the measured and simulated distributions show that they are in good agreement. As a result of this study the detector is well characterised, thanks also to the numerical simulations the instrument response is well understood, and it's currently being used onboard the aircrafts to evaluate the dose to aircraft crew caused by cosmic radiation.

  8. Muon flux measurements at the davis campus of the sanford underground research facility with the MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR veto system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abgrall, N.; Aguayo, E.; Avignone, F. T.; Barabash, A. S.; Bertrand, F. E.; Bradley, A. W.; Brudanin, V.; Busch, M.; Buuck, M.; Byram, D.; Caldwell, A. S.; Chan, Y.-D.; Christofferson, C. D.; Chu, P.-H.; Cuesta, C.; Detwiler, J. A.; Dunagan, C.; Efremenko, Yu.; Ejiri, H.; Elliott, S. R.; Galindo-Uribarri, A.; Gilliss, T.; Giovanetti, G. K.; Goett, J.; Green, M. P.; Gruszko, J.; Guinn, I. S.; Guiseppe, V. E.; Henning, R.; Hoppe, E. W.; Howard, S.; Howe, M. A.; Jasinski, B. R.; Keeter, K. J.; Kidd, M. F.; Konovalov, S. I.; Kouzes, R. T.; LaFerriere, B. D.; Leon, J.; Lopez, A. M.; MacMullin, J.; Martin, R. D.; Massarczyk, R.; Meijer, S. J.; Mertens, S.; Orrell, J. L.; O'Shaughnessy, C.; Overman, N. R.; Poon, A. W. P.; Radford, D. C.; Rager, J.; Rielage, K.; Robertson, R. G. H.; Romero-Romero, E.; Ronquest, M. C.; Schmitt, C.; Shanks, B.; Shirchenko, M.; Snyder, N.; Suriano, A. M.; Tedeschi, D.; Trimble, J. E.; Varner, R. L.; Vasilyev, S.; Vetter, K.; Vorren, K.; White, B. R.; Wilkerson, J. F.; Wiseman, C.; Xu, W.; Yakushev, E.; Yu, C.-H.; Yumatov, V.; Zhitnikov, I.

    2017-07-01

    We report the first measurement of the total muon flux underground at the Davis Campus of the Sanford Underground Research Facility at the 4850 ft level. Measurements were performed using the MAJORANADEMONSTRATOR muon veto system arranged in two different configurations. The measured total flux is (5.31 ± 0.17) ×10-9 μ /s/cm2. Demonstrate a path forward to achieving a background rate at or below 1 count/(ROI-t-y)in the 4-keV region of interest (ROI) around the 2039-keV Q-value for 76Ge ββ(0ν) decay. This is required for tonne-scale germanium-based searches that will probe the inverted-ordering neutrino-mass parameter space for the effective Majorana neutrino mass in ββ(0ν) decay. Show technical and engineering scalability toward a tonne-scale instrument. Perform searches for additional physics beyond the Standard Model, such as dark matter and axions. The MAJORANA Collaboration has designed a modular instrument composed of two cryostats built from ultra-pure electroformed copper, with each cryostat capable of housing over 20 kg of HPGe detectors. The MAJORANADEMONSTRATOR contains 30 kg of detectors fabricated from Ge material enriched to 88% in 76Ge and another 15 kg fabricated from natural Ge (7.8% 76Ge). The modular approach allows us to assemble and optimize each cryostat independently, providing a fast deployment with minimal effect on already-operational detectors.Starting from the innermost cavity, the cryostats are surrounded by a compact graded shield composed of an inner layer of electroformed copper, a layer of commercially sourced C10100 copper, high-purity lead, an active muon veto, borated polyethylene, and pure polyethylene shielding. The cryostats, copper, and lead shielding are enclosed in a radon exclusion box and rest on an over-floor table that has openings for the active muon veto and polyethylene shielding panels situated below the detector. The entire experiment is located in a clean room at the 4850 ft level of SURF. A high

  9. The flexible asymmetric shock tube (FAST): a Ludwieg tube facility for wave propagation measurements in high-temperature vapours of organic fluids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mathijssen, T.; Gallo, M.; Casati, E.; Nannan, N.R.; Zamfirescu, C.; Guardone, A.; Colonna, P.

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes the commissioning of the flexible asymmetric shock tube (FAST), a novel Ludwieg tube-type facility designed and built at Delft University of Technology, together with the results of preliminary experiments. The FAST is conceived to measure the velocity of waves propagating in

  10. Materials Characterization Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Materials Characterization Facility enables detailed measurements of the properties of ceramics, polymers, glasses, and composites. It features instrumentation...

  11. Start of operation of the barrel measuring facility II-01. Implementation into operational processes; Inbetriebnahme der Fassmessanlage FAME II-01. Einbindung in die betrieblichen Ablaeufe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buesing, B. [GNS Gesellschaft fuer Nuklear-Service mbH, Essen (Germany); Escher, M. [Wissenschaftlich-Technische Ingenieurberatung GmbH (WTI), Juelich (Germany)

    2013-07-01

    For the operation of the barrel measuring facility (FAME) II-01 a variety requirements to the measuring techniques were defined and tested in the frame of start-up. The used mechanical engineering and measuring technique complies with the state-of-the-art. Using the barrel measuring facility quality assured determinations of the dose rate and the nuclide-specific activity inventory were performed. For the evaluation of the gamma spectrometric measurements of FAME II-01 appropriately qualified personnel is available. The implementation of the facility in combination with the connection to the data base system PIK-AS and AVK it guaranteed that important data are available in real-time for the measuring process and the subsequent work steps. Besides this it is guaranteed that using the import/export functions relevant data are reviewed, supplemented and exchanged between the systems without transfer errors. The determined data of the dose rate and gamma spectrometric measurements allow an activity determination of the waste package with quality assurance and close to reality. Conservative assumptions in the frame of activity calculations for the later final disposal can be reduced. The automated operation of FAME allows also the reduction of radiation exposure of the personnel.

  12. Recent Re-Measurement of the Neutron and Gamma-Ray Fields at Large Distances from a Prompt Critical Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-04-01

    PROMPT CRITICAL FACILITY (U) by T. Cousins and B.E. Hoffarth Nuclear Effects Section Electronics Division and H. Ing and K. Tremblay Bubble Technology...to define the neutron and gamma-ray energy spectra at various distance (up to - 1 km) from the critical facility at the Nuclear Efects Directorate...results good to within -12%. The above should prove categorically that in fision or degraded fission environments the bubble dosimeter (BD-IOOR) is

  13. Correlation between turbidimetric and nephelometric methods of measuring C-reactive protein in patients with unstable angina or non-ST elevation acute myocardial infarction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Correia Luis C. L.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the performance of the turbidimetric method of C-reactive protein (CRP as a measure of low-grade inflammation in patients admitted with non-ST elevation acute coronary syndromes (ACS. METHODS: Serum samples obtained at hospital arrival from 68 patients (66±11 years, 40 men, admitted with unstable angina or non-ST elevation acute myocardial infarction were used to measure CRP by the methods of nephelometry and turbidimetry. RESULTS: The medians of C-reactive protein by the turbidimetric and nephelometric methods were 0.5 mg/dL and 0.47 mg/dL, respectively. A strong linear association existed between the 2 methods, according to the regression coefficient (b=0.75; 95% C.I.=0.70-0.80 and correlation coefficient (r=0.96; P<0.001. The mean difference between the nephelometric and turbidimetric CRP was 0.02 ± 0.91 mg/dL, and 100% agreement between the methods in the detection of high CRP was observed. CONCLUSION: In patients with non-ST elevation ACS, CRP values obtained by turbidimetry show a strong linear association with the method of nephelometry and perfect agreement in the detection of high CRP.

  14. Using highly sensitive C-reactive protein measurement to diagnose MODY in a family with suspected type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besser, Rachel E J; Jones, Jackie; McDonald, Timothy J; Smith, Rebecca; Shepherd, Maggie H; Hattersley, Andrew T

    2012-07-11

    The authors report an adolescent who was found to have diabetes on routine blood testing. The initial diagnosis was type 2 diabetes because she was obese, did not have type 1 diabetes antibodies and both parents had diabetes. Highly sensitive C-reactive protein (hsCRP) was low in the proband and her father (≤0.1 mg/l) indicating that type 2 diabetes was unlikely, and that hepatocyte nuclear factor 1-α-maturity onset diabetes of the young (HNF1A-MODY) was the most likely diagnosis. Following a genetic diagnosis of HNF1A-MODY in the proband and her father, both patients were treated with gliclazide, with improvement in HbA1c. This case highlights the challenges of making a correct diagnosis of MODY in young onset diabetes. The authors report the first case where hsCRP, an easily available biomarker, has been used on an individual level to determine appropriate genetic testing of MODY in a family whose main differential diagnosis was familial type 2 diabetes.

  15. A multiple metrics approach to prioritizing strategies for measuring and managing reactive nitrogen in the San Joaquin Valley of California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horowitz, Ariel I.; Moomaw, William R.; Liptzin, Daniel; Gramig, Benjamin M.; Reeling, Carson; Meyer, Johanna; Hurley, Kathleen

    2016-06-01

    Human alteration of the nitrogen cycle exceeds the safe planetary boundary for the use of reactive nitrogen (Nr). We complement global analysis by analyzing regional mass flows and the relative consequences of multiple chemical forms of Nr as they ‘cascade’ through multiple environmental media. The goals of this paper are (1) to identify the amounts of Nr that flow through a specific nitrogen rich region, (2) develop multiple metrics to characterize and compare multiple forms of Nr and the different damages that they cause, and (3) to use these metrics to assess the most societally acceptable and cost effective means for addressing the many dimensions of Nr damage. This paper uses a multiple metrics approach that in addition to mass flows considers economic damage, health and mitigation costs and qualitative damages to evaluate options for mitigating Nr flows in California’s San Joaquin Valley (SJV). Most analysis focuses attention on agricultural Nr because it is the largest flow in terms of mass. In contrast, the multiple metrics approach identifies mobile source Nr emissions as creating the most economic and health damage in the SJV. Emissions of Nr from mobile sources are smaller than those from crop agriculture and dairy in the SJV, but the benefits of abatement are greater because of reduced health impacts from air pollution, and abatement costs are lower. Our findings illustrate the benefit of a comprehensive multiple metrics approach to Nr management.

  16. Methodological considerations of electron spin resonance spin trapping techniques for measuring reactive oxygen species generated from metal oxide nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Min Sook; Yu, Kyeong-Nam; Chung, Hyun Hoon; Park, Soo Jin; Lee, Ah Young; Song, Mi Ryoung; Cho, Myung-Haing; Kim, Jun Sung

    2016-05-01

    Qualitative and quantitative analyses of reactive oxygen species (ROS) generated on the surfaces of nanomaterials are important for understanding their toxicity and toxic mechanisms, which are in turn beneficial for manufacturing more biocompatible nanomaterials in many industrial fields. Electron spin resonance (ESR) is a useful tool for detecting ROS formation. However, using this technique without first considering the physicochemical properties of nanomaterials and proper conditions of the spin trapping agent (such as incubation time) may lead to misinterpretation of the resulting data. In this report, we suggest methodological considerations for ESR as pertains to magnetism, sample preparation and proper incubation time with spin trapping agents. Based on our results, each spin trapping agent should be given the proper incubation time. For nanomaterials having magnetic properties, it is useful to remove these nanomaterials via centrifugation after reacting with spin trapping agents. Sonication for the purpose of sample dispersion and sample light exposure should be controlled during ESR in order to enhance the obtained ROS signal. This report will allow researchers to better design ESR spin trapping applications involving nanomaterials.

  17. Measurement of the 238U Radiative Capture Cross Section with C6D6 at the CERN n_TOF Facility

    CERN Document Server

    Mingrone, F; Altstadt, S; Andrzejewski, J; Audouin, L; Barbagallo, M; Bécares, V; Bečvář, F; Belloni, F; Berthoumieux, E; Billowes, J; Bosnar, D; Brugger, M; Calviani, M; Calviño, F; Cano-Ott, D; Carrapiço, C; Cerutti, F; Chiaveri, E; Chin, M; Colonna, N; Cortés, G; Cortés-Giraldo, M A; Diakaki, M; Domingo-Pardo, C; Duran, I; Dressler, R; Eleftheriadis, C; Ferrari, A; Fraval, K; Ganesan, S; García, A R; Giubrone, G; Gonçalves, I F; González-Romero, E; Griesmayer, E; Guerrero, C; Gunsing, F; Hernández-Prieto, A; Jenkins, D G; Jericha, E; Kadi, Y; Käppeler, F; Karadimos, D; Kivel, N; Koehler, P; Kokkoris, M; Krtička, M; Kroll, J; Lampoudis, C; Langer, C; Leal-Cidoncha, E; Lederer, C; Leeb, H; Leong, L S; Losito, R; Mallick, A; Manousos, A; Marganiec, J; Martínez, T; Mastinu, P F; Mastromarco, M; Mendoza, E; Mengoni, A; Milazzo, P M; Mirea, M; Mondalaers, W; Paradela, C; Pavlik, A; Perkowski, J; Plompen, A; Praena, J; Quesada, J M; Rauscher, T; Reifarth, R; Riego, A; Robles, M S; Rubbia, C; Sabaté-Gilarte, M; Sarmento, R; Saxena, A; Schillebeeckx, P; Schmidt, S; Schumann, D; Tagliente, G; Tain, J L; Tarrío, D; Tassan-Got, L; Tsinganis, A; Valenta, S; Vannini, G; Variale, V; Vaz, P; Ventura, A; Vermeulen, M J; Vlachoudis, V; Vlastou, R; Wallner, A; Ware, T; Weigand, M; Weiß, C; Wright, T; Žugec, P

    2014-01-01

    We present the preliminary results of the U-238(n,gamma) reaction cross section measurement, performed on April 2012 at the CERN n\\_TOF facility using C6D6 scintillation detectors over an energy range from thermal to 1 MeV. The goal of this measurement, which is part of a larger proposal, is to reach an uncertainty of 2\\% in the cross section. The experimental set-up and the methods used to obtain this result are described.

  18. New method to assess the pozzolanic reactivity of mineral admixtures by means of pH and electrical conductivity measurements in lime:pozzolan suspensions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tashima, M. M.

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available A very simple method based on electrical conductivity and pH measurements was proposed for assessing reactivity of pozzolans. Calcium hydroxide:pozzolan water suspensions were monitored by means of measurements of electrical conductivity and pH values. In these suspensions, Ca(OH2 in solid state was initially present, being them, thus, saturated in this reagent. Three testing temperatures were selected (40, 50 and 60 °C. In the experiments carried out, calcium hydroxide was suspended in deionized water for yielding a lime saturated suspension. The addition of siliceous pozzolan (two types of rice husk ash RHA and two types of densified silica fume DSF were tested to the saturated lime suspension can produce the unsaturation of the system, depending on the testing time, testing temperature and reactivity of pozzolan. When unsaturation was reached, the loss of electrical conductivity was higher than 30% and the variation of pH was higher than 0.15 units. These threshold values were selected for characterizing the reactivity of pozzolans by means of a proposed template, classifying the pozzolan in three different reactivity levels.En este trabajo se propone un método simple basado en medidas de conductividad eléctrica y pH. Se determinaron los valores de conductividad eléctrica y pH de suspensiones acuosas de hidróxido cálcico:puzolana. En las suspensiones, había inicialmente Ca(OH2 en estado sólido, de manera que dichas suspensiones estaban, por tanto, saturadas respecto a ese reactivo. Se seleccionaron tres temperaturas de trabajo (40, 50 and 60 °C. En las experiencias, el hidróxido cálcico fue mezclado con agua desionizada, generando una suspensión saturada en cal. La adición de puzolana silícea (se ensayaron dos tipos de ceniza de cáscara de arroz y dos tipos de humo de sílice densificado a la suspensión saturada de cal puede producir la insaturación del sistema, dependiendo del tiempo, temperatura y reactividad de la puzolana

  19. Facilities & Leadership

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — The facilities web service provides VA facility information. The VA facilities locator is a feature that is available across the enterprise, on any webpage, for the...

  20. Measurement of stray radiation within a scanning proton therapy facility: EURADOS WG9 intercomparison exercise of active dosimetry systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farah, J., E-mail: jad.farah@irsn.fr; Trompier, F. [Institut de Radioprotection et de Sûreté Nucléaire (IRSN), Pôle Radioprotection de l’Homme, BP17, Fontenay-aux-Roses 92260 (France); Mares, V.; Schinner, K.; Wielunski, M. [Helmholtz Zentrum München, Institute of Radiation Protection, Ingolstädter Landstraße 1, Neuherberg 85764 (Germany); Romero-Expósito, M.; Domingo, C. [Departament de Física, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Bellaterra E-08193 (Spain); Trinkl, S. [Helmholtz Zentrum München, Institute of Radiation Protection, Ingolstädter Landstraße 1, Neuherberg 85764, Germany and Physik-Department, Technische Universität München, Garching 85748 (Germany); Dufek, V. [Czech Technical University in Prague, FNSPE, Břehová 7, Prague 115 19, Czech Republic and National Radiation Protection Institute, Bartoškova 28, Prague 140 00 (Czech Republic); Klodowska, M.; Liszka, M.; Stolarczyk, L.; Olko, P. [Institute of Nuclear Physics PAN, Radzikowskiego 152, Krakow 31-342 (Poland); Kubancak, J. [Czech Technical University in Prague, FNSPE, Břehová 7, Prague 115 19, Czech Republic and Department of Radiation Dosimetry, Nuclear Physics Institute, Řež CZ-250 68 (Czech Republic); and others

    2015-05-15

    Purpose: To characterize stray radiation around the target volume in scanning proton therapy and study the performance of active neutron monitors. Methods: Working Group 9 of the European Radiation Dosimetry Group (EURADOS WG9—Radiation protection in medicine) carried out a large measurement campaign at the Trento Centro di Protonterapia (Trento, Italy) in order to determine the neutron spectra near the patient using two extended-range Bonner sphere spectrometry (BSS) systems. In addition, the work focused on acknowledging the performance of different commercial active dosimetry systems when measuring neutron ambient dose equivalents, H{sup ∗}(10), at several positions inside (8 positions) and outside (3 positions) the treatment room. Detectors included three TEPCs—tissue equivalent proportional counters (Hawk type from Far West Technology, Inc.) and six rem-counters (WENDI-II, LB 6411, RadEye™ NL, a regular and an extended-range NM2B). Meanwhile, the photon component of stray radiation was deduced from the low-lineal energy transfer part of TEPC spectra or measured using a Thermo Scientific™ FH-40G survey meter. Experiments involved a water tank phantom (60 × 30 × 30 cm{sup 3}) representing the patient that was uniformly irradiated using a 3 mm spot diameter proton pencil beam with 10 cm modulation width, 19.95 cm distal beam range, and 10 × 10 cm{sup 2} field size. Results: Neutron spectrometry around the target volume showed two main components at the thermal and fast energy ranges. The study also revealed the large dependence of the energy distribution of neutrons, and consequently of out-of-field doses, on the primary beam direction (directional emission of intranuclear cascade neutrons) and energy (spectral composition of secondary neutrons). In addition, neutron mapping within the facility was conducted and showed the highest H{sup ∗}(10) value of ∼51 μSv Gy{sup −1}; this was measured at 1.15 m along the beam axis. H{sup ∗}(10) values

  1. Repeated measures of body mass index and C-reactive protein in relation to all-cause mortality and cardiovascular disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    O'Doherty, Mark G; Jørgensen, Torben; Borglykke, Anders

    2014-01-01

    Obesity has been linked with elevated levels of C-reactive protein (CRP), and both have been associated with increased risk of mortality and cardiovascular disease (CVD). Previous studies have used a single 'baseline' measurement and such analyses cannot account for possible changes in these which...... body mass index (BMI) and CRP with all-cause mortality and CVD. Being overweight (≥25-obese (≥30-....79-0.94) and 0.80 (0.72-0.89). A similar relationship was found, but only for overweight in Glostrup, HR (95 % CI) 0.88 (0.76-1.02); and moderately obese in Tromsø, HR (95 % CI) 0.79 (0.62-1.01). Associations were not evident between repeated measures of BMI and CVD. Conversely, increasing CRP concentrations...

  2. Characterizing the chemical evolution of air masses via multi-platform measurements of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) during CalNEX: Composition, OH reactivity, and potential SOA formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilman, J. B.; Kuster, W. C.; Bon, D.; Warneke, C.; Lerner, B. M.; Williams, E. J.; Holloway, J. S.; Pollack, I. B.; Ryerson, T. B.; Atlas, E. L.; Blake, D. R.; Herndon, S. C.; Zahniser, M. S.; Vlasenko, A. L.; Li, S.; Alvarez, S. L.; Rappenglueck, B.; Flynn, J. H.; Grossberg, N.; Lefer, B. L.; De Gouw, J. A.

    2011-12-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are critical components in the photochemical production of ozone (O3) and secondary organic aerosol (SOA). During the CalNex 2010 field campaign, an extensive set of VOCs were measured at the Pasadena ground site, and aboard the NOAA WP-3D aircraft and the WHOI Research Vessel Atlantis. The measurements from each platform provide a unique perspective into the emissions, transport, and atmospheric processing of VOCs within the South Coast Air Basin (SoCAB). The observed enhancement ratios of the hydrocarbons measured on all three platforms are in good agreement and are generally well correlated with carbon monoxide (CO), indicating the prevalence of on-road VOC emission sources throughout the SoCAB. Offshore measurements aboard the ship and aircraft are used to characterize the air mass composition as a function of the land/sea-breeze effect. VOC ratios and other trace gases are used to identify air masses containing relatively fresh emissions that were often associated with offshore flow and re-circulated continental air associated with onshore flow conditions. With the prevailing southwesterly airflow pattern in the LAB throughout the daytime, the Pasadena ground site effectively functions as a receptor site and is used to characterize primary VOC emissions from downtown Los Angeles and to identify the corresponding secondary oxidation products. The chemical evolution of air masses as a function of the time of day is investigated in order to determine the relative impacts of primary emissions vs. secondary VOC products on OH reactivity and potential SOA formation. The reactivity of VOCs with the hydroxyl radical (OH) at the Pasadena site was dominated by the light hydrocarbons, isoprene, and oxygenated VOCs including aldehydes (secondary products) and alcohols (primary anthropogenic emissions). Toluene and benzaldehyde, both of which are associated with primary anthropogenic emissions, are the predominant VOC precursors to the

  3. Assessment of impaired vascular reactivity in a rat model of diabetic nephropathy: effect of nitric oxide synthesis inhibition on intrarenal diffusion and oxygenation measured by magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hueper, Katja; Hartung, Dagmar; Gutberlet, Marcel; Gueler, Faikah; Sann, Holger; Husen, Bettina; Wacker, Frank; Reiche, Dania

    2013-11-15

    Diabetes is associated with impaired vascular reactivity and the development of diabetic nephropathy. In a rat model of streptozotocin-induced diabetic nephropathy, the effects of systemic nitric oxide (NO) synthesis inhibition on intrarenal diffusion and oxygenation were determined by noninvasive magnetic resonance diffusion tensor imaging and blood O2 level-dependent (BOLD) imaging, respectively. Eight weeks after the induction of diabetes, 21 rats [n = 7 rats each in the untreated control group, diabetes mellitus (DM) group, and DM with uninephrectomy (DM UNX) group] were examined by MRI. Diffusion tensor imaging and BOLD sequences were acquired before and after NO synthesis inhibition with N-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME). In the same rats, mean arterial pressure and vascular conductance were determined with and without the influence of L-NAME. In control animals, NO synthesis inhibition was associated with a significant increase of mean arterial pressure of 33.8 ± 4.3 mmHg (P animals. Similarly, L-NAME challenge induced a significant reduction of renal transverse relaxation time (T2*) at MRI in control animals, indicating reduced renal oxygenation after L-NAME injection compared with baseline. DM UNX animals did not show a significant T2* reduction after NO synthesis inhibition in the renal cortex and attenuated T2* reduction in the outer medulla. MRI parameters of tissue diffusion were not affected by L-NAME in all groups. In conclusion, BOLD imaging proved valuable to noninvasively measure renal vascular reactivity upon NO synthesis inhibition in control animals and to detect impaired vascular reactivity in animals with diabetic nephropathy.

  4. Comparison between the measured and calculated reactivity in measuring the effectiveness of the emergency protection at the stage of physical start-up of unit no. 3 at the Kalinin nuclear power plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavun, O. Yu.; Popykin, A. I.; Shevchenko, R. A.; Shevchenko, S. A.

    2012-12-01

    This paper presents comparisons between the effectiveness of the emergency protection under both stationary and nonstationary formulations calculated with the use of the RADUGA-7.5 package [1] and experimental data obtained in measuring the "weight" of the emergency protection in the process of physical start-up of the VVER-1000 reactor of unit no. 3 of the Kalinin NPP. On the basis of the results obtained, recommendations are given on comparing the measured and calculated reactivity and parameters determined by using its value.

  5. Investigating the Effect of Inflammation on Atrial Fibrillation Occurrence by Measuring Highly Sensitive C-reactive Protein (hs-CRP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahdi Hassanzadeh Delui

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Atrial fibrillation (AF is the most prevalent cardiac arrhythmias that cardiologists and internists encounter. The goal of this article is to clarify an overview of the evidence linking inflammation to AF existence, which may highlight the effect of some pharmacological agents that have genuine potential to reduce the clinical burden of AF by modulating inflammatory pathways. Materials and Methods: In a case-control study, 50 patients with atrial fibrillation (AF with different etiologies and 50 patients with sinus rhythm and similar bases were selected. Sampling for highly sensitive c-reactive (hs-CRP was done on the patients presenting with AF to the Ghaem hospital between October 2006 and June 2007. Results: Mean age of the patients was 62 years with maximum of 90 and minimum of 36 and standard deviation of 13.80. The most frequent age group was 71-80years. Fifty-four percent of patients were male and 46% were female. Mean serum hs-CRP levels in AF patients with hypertension (HTN ,Ischemic heart disease(IHD, Valvular heart disease (VHD, HTN+IHD and hyperthyroidism were 8.10, 9.40, 8.68, 10.16 and 5.98 mg/Lit; respectively. There was significant difference between hs-CRP levels in hypertensive patients in the two groups (P=0.010. Similar results were observed in IHD patients, VHD patients and HTN+IHD patients in two groups (P=0.015, P=0.037, P=0.000. Conclusion: In addition to some risk factors like baseline cardiac diseases, aging, thyrotoxicosis, pulmonary embolism, pneumonia and cardiac surgery, there also appears to be consistent links between hs-CRP, a marker of inflammation, and the pathogenesis of AF.

  6. Biochemistry Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Biochemistry Facility provides expert services and consultation in biochemical enzyme assays and protein purification. The facility currently features 1) Liquid...

  7. Thermal distortion test facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stapp, James L.

    1995-02-01

    The thermal distortion test facility (TDTF) at Phillips Laboratory provides precise measurements of the distortion of mirrors that occurs when their surfaces are heated. The TDTF has been used for several years to evaluate mirrors being developed for high-power lasers. The facility has recently undergone some significant upgrades to improve the accuracy with which mirrors can be heated and the resulting distortion measured. The facility and its associated instrumentation are discussed.

  8. Measurements and calculations of air activation in the NuMI neutrino production facility at Fermilab with the 120-GeV proton beam on target

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rakhno, I. L. [Fermilab; Hylen, J. [Fermilab; Kasper, P. [Fermilab; Mokhov, N. V. [Fermilab; Quinn, M. [Fermilab; Striganov, S. I. [Fermilab; Vaziri, K. [Fermilab

    2017-09-18

    Measurements and calculations of the air activation at a high-energy proton accelerator are described. The quantity of radionuclides released outdoors depends on operation scenarios including details of the air exchange inside the facility. To improve the prediction of the air activation levels, the MARS15 Monte Carlo code radionuclide production model was modified to be used for these studies. Measurements were done to benchmark the new model and verify its use in optimization studies for the new DUNE experiment at the Long Baseline Neutrino Facility (LBNF) at Fermilab. The measured production rates for the most important radionuclides – 11C, 13N, 15O and 41Ar – are in a good agreement with those calculated with the improved MARS15 code.

  9. Measurement of fenestration net energy performance: considerations leading to development of the mobile window thermal test (MoWiTT) facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klems, J.H.

    1984-07-01

    A detailed consideration of the energy flows entering the energy balance on a building space and the effect of random measurement errors on the determination of fenestration performance is presented. Estimates of the error magnitudes are made for a passive test cell and it is shown that a more accurate test facility is necessary for reliable measurements on fenestration systems with thermal resistance in the range 2 to 10 times that of single glazing or shading coefficient less than 0.7. A test facility of this type, the MoWiTT, which has been built at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, is described. The effect of random errors in the MoWiTT is discussed and computer calculations of its performance are presented. The discussion shows that, for any measurement facility, random errors are most serious for nighttime measurements, while systematic errors are most important for daytime measurements. It is concluded that, for the MoWiTT, errors from both sources are expected to be small.

  10. Relative contributions of interface pressure, shear stress, and temperature on ischemic-induced, skin-reactive hyperemia in healthy volunteers: a repeated measures laboratory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lachenbruch, Charlie; Tzen, Yi-Ting; Brienza, David; Karg, Patricia E; Lachenbruch, Peter A

    2015-02-01

    Although the primary risk factors for pressure ulcer development - pressure, shear, skin temperature, moisture, and friction - have been identified for decades, the relative contribution of each to this risk remains unclear. To confirm the results of and expand upon earlier research into the relative contributions of interface pressures, shear stress, and skin temperature among 4 healthy volunteers, a study involving 6 additional healthy 40- to 75-year-old volunteers was conducted and results of the 2 studies were pooled. All 3 variables (interface pressures, shear stress, and skin temperature) were systematically and randomly varied. In the prone position, volunteers each underwent 18 test conditions representing different combinations of temperature (28˚ C, 32˚ C, 36˚ C), pressure (8.0 and 13.3 kPa), and shear (0, 6.7, and 14.0 kPa) using a computer-controlled indenter applied to the sacrum for 20 minutes exerting weights of 100 g and 200 g to induce 0.98 N and 1.96 N of shear force, respectively. Each condition was tested twice, resulting in a total of 360 trials. Magnitude of postload reactive hyperemia as an index of ischemia was measured by laser Doppler flowmetry. Fixed effects regression models were used to predict 3 different indices of reactive hyperemic magnitude. Friedman tests were performed to compare the reactive hyperemia among 3 different skin temperatures or shear stresses under the same amount of localized pressure. In all regression models, pressure and temperature were highly significant predictors of the extent of reactive hyperemia (P pressure and shear stress, and the difference was more profound between 32˚ C and 36˚ C than between 28˚ C and 32˚ C. These results confirm that, in laboratory settings, temperature is an important factor in tissue ischemia. Additional studies examining the relative importance of pressure, shear, and temperature and potential effects of lowering temperature on tissue ischemia in healthy volunteers and

  11. Is structured observation a valid technique to measure handwashing behavior? Use of acceleration sensors embedded in soap to assess reactivity to structured observation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ram, Pavani K; Halder, Amal K; Granger, Stewart P; Jones, Therese; Hall, Peter; Hitchcock, David; Wright, Richard; Nygren, Benjamin; Islam, M Sirajul; Molyneaux, John W; Luby, Stephen P

    2010-11-01

    Structured observation is often used to evaluate handwashing behavior. We assessed reactivity to structured observation in rural Bangladesh by distributing soap containing acceleration sensors and performing structured observation 4 days later. Sensors recorded the number of times soap was moved. In 45 participating households, the median number of sensor soap movements during the 5-hour time block on pre-observation days was 3.7 (range 0.3-10.6). During the structured observation, the median number of sensor soap movements was 5.0 (range 0-18.0), a 35% increase, P = 0.0004. Compared with the same 5-hour time block on pre-observation days, the number of sensor soap movements increased during structured observation by ≥ 20% in 62% of households, and by ≥ 100% in 22% of households. The increase in sensor soap movements during structured observation, compared with pre-observation days, indicates substantial reactivity to the presence of the observer. These findings call into question the validity of structured observation for measurement of handwashing behavior.

  12. Is Structured Observation a Valid Technique to Measure Handwashing Behavior? Use of Acceleration Sensors Embedded in Soap to Assess Reactivity to Structured Observation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ram, Pavani K.; Halder, Amal K.; Granger, Stewart P.; Jones, Therese; Hall, Peter; Hitchcock, David; Wright, Richard; Nygren, Benjamin; Islam, M. Sirajul; Molyneaux, John W.; Luby, Stephen P.

    2010-01-01

    Structured observation is often used to evaluate handwashing behavior. We assessed reactivity to structured observation in rural Bangladesh by distributing soap containing acceleration sensors and performing structured observation 4 days later. Sensors recorded the number of times soap was moved. In 45 participating households, the median number of sensor soap movements during the 5-hour time block on pre-observation days was 3.7 (range 0.3–10.6). During the structured observation, the median number of sensor soap movements was 5.0 (range 0–18.0), a 35% increase, P = 0.0004. Compared with the same 5-hour time block on pre-observation days, the number of sensor soap movements increased during structured observation by ≥ 20% in 62% of households, and by ≥ 100% in 22% of households. The increase in sensor soap movements during structured observation, compared with pre-observation days, indicates substantial reactivity to the presence of the observer. These findings call into question the validity of structured observation for measurement of handwashing behavior. PMID:21036840

  13. Infrared Cloud Imager Development for Atmospheric Optical Communication Characterization, and Measurements at the JPL Table Mountain Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nugent, P. W.; Shaw, J. A.; Piazzolla, S.

    2013-02-01

    The continuous demand for high data return in deep space and near-Earth satellite missions has led NASA and international institutions to consider alternative technologies for high-data-rate communications. One solution is the establishment of wide-bandwidth Earth-space optical communication links, which require (among other things) a nearly obstruction-free atmospheric path. Considering the atmospheric channel, the most common and most apparent impairments on Earth-space optical communication paths arise from clouds. Therefore, the characterization of the statistical behavior of cloud coverage for optical communication ground station candidate sites is of vital importance. In this article, we describe the development and deployment of a ground-based, long-wavelength infrared cloud imaging system able to monitor and characterize the cloud coverage. This system is based on a commercially available camera with a 62-deg diagonal field of view. A novel internal-shutter-based calibration technique allows radiometric calibration of the camera, which operates without a thermoelectric cooler. This cloud imaging system provides continuous day-night cloud detection with constant sensitivity. The cloud imaging system also includes data-processing algorithms that calculate and remove atmospheric emission to isolate cloud signatures, and enable classification of clouds according to their optical attenuation. Measurements of long-wavelength infrared cloud radiance are used to retrieve the optical attenuation (cloud optical depth due to absorption and scattering) in the wavelength range of interest from visible to near-infrared, where the cloud attenuation is quite constant. This article addresses the specifics of the operation, calibration, and data processing of the imaging system that was deployed at the NASA/JPL Table Mountain Facility (TMF) in California. Data are reported from July 2008 to July 2010. These data describe seasonal variability in cloud cover at the TMF site

  14. Proposal to Build an Electron-Photon Facility at NAL and to Measure Photon Scattering at High Energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dorfan, D.E.; Flatte, S.M.; Heusch, C.A.; Luxton, G.; del Papa, C.; Seiden, A.

    1971-07-18

    a photon beam becoming available at NAL at an early date. We propose to participate actively, as we have done in the past, in the design and implementation of the electron-photon facility, and to perform at the earliest possible date an experiment which will yield information on three vitally important processes in photon scattering: (1) measurement of the total hadronic photon cross-section on nucleons and nuclei; (2) elastic photon scattering (proton compton effect); (3) inelastic photon scattering; as a byproduct, we will have data on yields of {pi}{sup 0}, {eta}{sup 0}, X{sup 0}, {omega}{sup 0}, ... through their 2{gamma} or 3{gamma} decay modes. The set of experiments proposed here, together with experiments proposed by other groups, will tell us not only about the structure of the hadrons, but about the behavior of the photon at high energies. It has the virtue of being accessible through one basic, well-integrated set of experimental equipment, as detailed. The facility as well as the detection apparatus is being developed in consultation with the MIT - Canada collaboration. Equipment may be shared, and some of the running may be able to proceed compatibly. The success of this program will depend crucially on the design of appropriate halo-free beam lines; and on the early design and testing of optimal shower detection equipment - for both energy measurement and localization (or trajectory reconstruction). Our group has considerable experience in both these areas. Shower detectors are being built in Santa Cruz and can be conveniently tested at nearby SLAC. Also, a beam designed by our group, which we feel is flexible, economical, and viable, is included in this proposal. The essential feature of our proposal is this: Our shower detection equipment can be tested and calibrated in available SLAC beams before the first turn-on of the NAL photon beam, and will be ready at that time. While information on the longitudinal and lateral shower spread can be

  15. Construction and commissioning test report of the CEDM test facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, C. H.; Kim, J. T.; Park, W. M.; Youn, Y. J.; Jun, H. G.; Choi, N. H.; Park, J. K.; Song, C. H.; Lee, S. H.; Park, J. K

    2001-02-01

    The test facility for performance verification of the control element drive mechanism (CEDM) of next generation power plant was installed at the site of KAERI. The CEDM was featured a mechanism consisting of complicated mechanical parts and electromagnetic control system. Thus, a new CEDM design should go through performance verification tests prior to it's application in a reactor. The test facility can simulate the reactor operating conditions such as temperature, pressure and water quality and is equipped with a test chamber to accomodate a CEDM as installed in the power plant. This test facility can be used for the following tests; endurance test, coil cooling test, power measurement and reactivity rod drop test. The commissioning tests for the test facility were performed up to the CEDM test conditions of 320 C and 150 bar, and required water chemistry was obtained by operating the on-line water treatment system.

  16. First 3D numerical simulations validated with experimental measurements during a LOVA reproduction inside the new facility STARDUST-Upgrade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ciparisse, J.F.; Malizia, A. [Associazione EUROFUSION-ENEA, Department of Industrial Engineering, University of Rome “Tor Vergata”, Rome 00133 (Italy); Poggi, L.A., E-mail: poggi@ing.uniroma2.it [Associazione EUROFUSION-ENEA, Department of Industrial Engineering, University of Rome “Tor Vergata”, Rome 00133 (Italy); Gelfusa, M. [Associazione EUROFUSION-ENEA, Department of Industrial Engineering, University of Rome “Tor Vergata”, Rome 00133 (Italy); Murari, A. [Consorzio RFX-Associazione EUROFUSION-ENEA per la Fusione, Padova I-35127 (Italy); Mancini, A.; Gaudio, P. [Associazione EUROFUSION-ENEA, Department of Industrial Engineering, University of Rome “Tor Vergata”, Rome 00133 (Italy)

    2015-12-15

    Highlights: • We model supersonic, turbulent 3D flow in the “STARDUST-Upgrade” facility. • We simulate air expansion into a low pressure vessel. • We compare numerical results with experimental results. - Abstract: The aim of this work is to simulate a Loss of Vacuum Accident (LOVA) in the STARDUST (Small Tank for Aerosol Removal and DUST)-UPGRADE facility. These events are one of the major safety concerns in Tokamaks, since they can cause the mobilization and the dispersion of radioactive dust contained in a fusion reactor. The first step in the study of a LOVA event is the estimation, by means of numerical simulations, of the pressurization transient in the vacuum chamber. The STARDUST-UPGRADE facility, which has a cylindrical shape, is considered as a case study. An air inlet is located in a radial position with respect to the facility, so the numerical domain is symmetric and, therefore, only a half of it has been considered in the simulation. A time-dependent mass flow rate is imposed at the inlet, in a range consistent with experimental estimates. The simulation takes 20 s and the attention is focused on the mean pressure value over time and on the Mach number distribution. The results are presented and discussed in the perspective of simulating LOVAs in ITER (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor).

  17. Comparison of OH concentration measurements by DOAS and LIF during SAPHIR chamber experiments at high OH reactivity and low NO concentration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Fuchs

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available During recent field campaigns, hydroxyl radical (OH concentrations that were measured by laser-induced fluorescence (LIF were up to a factor of ten larger than predicted by current chemical models for conditions of high OH reactivity and low NO concentration. These discrepancies, which were observed in forests and urban-influenced rural environments, are so far not entirely understood. In summer 2011, a series of experiments was carried out in the atmosphere simulation chamber SAPHIR in Jülich, Germany, in order to investigate the photochemical degradation of isoprene, methyl-vinyl ketone (MVK, methacrolein (MACR and aromatic compounds by OH. Conditions were similar to those experienced during the PRIDE-PRD2006 campaign in the Pearl River Delta (PRD, China, in 2006, where a large difference between OH measurements and model predictions was found. During experiments in SAPHIR, OH was simultaneously detected by two independent instruments: LIF and differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS. Because DOAS is an inherently calibration-free technique, DOAS measurements are regarded as a reference standard. The comparison of the two techniques was used to investigate potential artifacts in the LIF measurements for PRD-like conditions of OH reactivities of 10 to 30 s−1 and NO mixing ratios of 0.1 to 0.3 ppbv. The analysis of twenty experiment days shows good agreement. The linear regression of the combined data set (averaged to the DOAS time resolution, 2495 data points yields a slope of 1.02 ± 0.01 with an intercept of (0.10 ± 0.03 × 106 cm−3 and a linear correlation coefficient of R2 = 0.86. This indicates that the sensitivity of the LIF instrument is well-defined by its calibration procedure. No hints for artifacts are observed for isoprene, MACR, and different aromatic compounds. LIF measurements were approximately 30–40% (median larger than those by DOAS after MVK (20 ppbv and

  18. Comparison of OH concentration measurements by DOAS and LIF during SAPHIR chamber experiments at high OH reactivity and low NO concentration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuchs, H.; Dorn, H.-P.; Bachner, M.; Bohn, B.; Brauers, T.; Gomm, S.; Hofzumahaus, A.; Holland, F.; Nehr, S.; Rohrer, F.; Tillmann, R.; Wahner, A.

    2012-07-01

    During recent field campaigns, hydroxyl radical (OH) concentrations that were measured by laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) were up to a factor of ten larger than predicted by current chemical models for conditions of high OH reactivity and low NO concentration. These discrepancies, which were observed in forests and urban-influenced rural environments, are so far not entirely understood. In summer 2011, a series of experiments was carried out in the atmosphere simulation chamber SAPHIR in Jülich, Germany, in order to investigate the photochemical degradation of isoprene, methyl-vinyl ketone (MVK), methacrolein (MACR) and aromatic compounds by OH. Conditions were similar to those experienced during the PRIDE-PRD2006 campaign in the Pearl River Delta (PRD), China, in 2006, where a large difference between OH measurements and model predictions was found. During experiments in SAPHIR, OH was simultaneously detected by two independent instruments: LIF and differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS). Because DOAS is an inherently calibration-free technique, DOAS measurements are regarded as a reference standard. The comparison of the two techniques was used to investigate potential artifacts in the LIF measurements for PRD-like conditions of OH reactivities of 10 to 30 s-1 and NO mixing ratios of 0.1 to 0.3 ppbv. The analysis of twenty experiment days shows good agreement. The linear regression of the combined data set (averaged to the DOAS time resolution, 2495 data points) yields a slope of 1.02 ± 0.01 with an intercept of (0.10 ± 0.03) × 106 cm-3 and a linear correlation coefficient of R2 = 0.86. This indicates that the sensitivity of the LIF instrument is well-defined by its calibration procedure. No hints for artifacts are observed for isoprene, MACR, and different aromatic compounds. LIF measurements were approximately 30-40% (median) larger than those by DOAS after MVK (20 ppbv) and toluene (90 ppbv) had been added. However, this discrepancy has a

  19. Reactive Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aceto, Luca; Ingolfsdottir, Anna; Larsen, Kim Guldstrand

    A reactive system comprises networks of computing components, achieving their goals through interaction among themselves and their environment. Thus even relatively small systems may exhibit unexpectedly complex behaviours. As moreover reactive systems are often used in safety critical systems......, the need for mathematically based formal methodology is increasingly important. There are many books that look at particular methodologies for such systems. This book offers a more balanced introduction for graduate students and describes the various approaches, their strengths and weaknesses, and when...... they are best used. Milner's CCS and its operational semantics are introduced, together with the notions of behavioural equivalences based on bisimulation techniques and with recursive extensions of Hennessy-Milner logic. In the second part of the book, the presented theories are extended to take timing issues...

  20. An automated online instrument to quantify aerosol-bound reactive oxygen species (ROS) for ambient measurement and health-relevant aerosol studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wragg, Francis P. H.; Fuller, Stephen J.; Freshwater, Ray; Green, David C.; Kelly, Frank J.; Kalberer, Markus

    2016-10-01

    The adverse health effects associated with ambient aerosol particles have been well documented, but it is still unclear which aerosol properties are most important for their negative health impact. Some studies suggest the oxidative effects of particle-bound reactive oxygen species (ROS) are potential major contributors to the toxicity of particles. Traditional ROS measurement techniques are labour-intensive, give poor temporal resolution and generally have significant delays between aerosol sampling and ROS analysis. However, many oxidising particle components are reactive and thus potentially short-lived. Thus, a technique to quantify particle-bound ROS online would be beneficial to quantify also the short-lived ROS components. We introduce a new portable instrument to allow online, continuous measurement of particle-bound ROS using a chemical assay of 2'7'-dichlorofluorescein (DCFH) with horseradish peroxidase (HRP), via fluorescence spectroscopy. All components of the new instrument are attached to a containing shell, resulting in a compact system capable of automated continuous field deployment over many hours or days. From laboratory measurements, the instrument was found to have a detection limit of ˜ 4 nmol [H2O2] equivalents per cubic metre (m3) air, a dynamic range up to at least ˜ 2000 nmol [H2O2] equivalents per m3 air and a time resolution of ≤ 12 min. The instrument allows for ˜ 16 h automated measurement if unattended and shows a fast response to changes in concentrations of laboratory-generated oxidised organic aerosol. The instrument was deployed at an urban site in London, and particulate ROS levels of up to 24 nmol [H2O2] equivalents per m3 air were detected with PM2.5 concentrations up to 28 µg m-3. The new and portable Online Particle-bound ROS Instrument (OPROSI) allows fast-response quantification; this is important due to the potentially short-lived nature of particle-bound ROS as well as fast-changing atmospheric conditions

  1. Measurements of reactive trace gases and variable O3 formation rates in some South Carolina biomass burning plumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akagi, S. K.; Yokelson, R. J.; Burling, I. R.; Meinardi, S.; Simpson, I.; Blake, D. R.; McMeeking, G. R.; Sullivan, A.; Lee, T.; Kreidenweis, S.; Urbanski, S.; Reardon, J.; Griffith, D. W. T.; Johnson, T. J.; Weise, D. R.

    2013-02-01

    In October-November 2011 we measured trace gas emission factors from seven prescribed fires in South Carolina (SC), US, using two Fourier transform infrared spectrometer (FTIR) systems and whole air sampling (WAS) into canisters followed by gas-chromatographic analysis. A total of 97 trace gas species were quantified from both airborne and ground-based sampling platforms, making this one of the most detailed field studies of fire emissions to date. The measurements include the first emission factors for a suite of monoterpenes produced by heating vegetative fuels during field fires. The first quantitative FTIR observations of limonene in smoke are reported along with an expanded suite of monoterpenes measured by WAS including α-pinene, β-pinene, limonene, camphene, 4-carene, and myrcene. The known chemistry of the monoterpenes and their measured abundance of 0.4-27.9% of non-methane organic compounds (NMOCs) and ~ 21% of organic aerosol (mass basis) suggests that they impacted secondary formation of ozone (O3), aerosols, and small organic trace gases such as methanol and formaldehyde in the sampled plumes in the first few hours after emission. The variability in the initial terpene emissions in the SC fire plumes was high and, in general, the speciation of the initially emitted gas-phase NMOCs was 13-195% different from that observed in a similar study in nominally similar pine forests in North Carolina ~ 20 months earlier. It is likely that differences in stand structure and environmental conditions contributed to the high variability observed within and between these studies. Similar factors may explain much of the variability in initial emissions in the literature. The ΔHCN/ΔCO emission ratio, however, was found to be fairly consistent with previous airborne fire measurements in other coniferous-dominated ecosystems, with the mean for these studies being 0.90 ± 0.06%, further confirming the value of HCN as a biomass burning tracer. The SC results also

  2. Measurements of reactive trace gases and variable O3 formation rates in some South Carolina biomass burning plumes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. W. T. Griffith

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available In October–November 2011 we measured trace gas emission factors from seven prescribed fires in South Carolina (SC, US, using two Fourier transform infrared spectrometer (FTIR systems and whole air sampling (WAS into canisters followed by gas-chromatographic analysis. A total of 97 trace gas species were quantified from both airborne and ground-based sampling platforms, making this one of the most detailed field studies of fire emissions to date. The measurements include the first emission factors for a suite of monoterpenes produced by heating vegetative fuels during field fires. The first quantitative FTIR observations of limonene in smoke are reported along with an expanded suite of monoterpenes measured by WAS including α-pinene, β-pinene, limonene, camphene, 4-carene, and myrcene. The known chemistry of the monoterpenes and their measured abundance of 0.4–27.9% of non-methane organic compounds (NMOCs and ~ 21% of organic aerosol (mass basis suggests that they impacted secondary formation of ozone (O3, aerosols, and small organic trace gases such as methanol and formaldehyde in the sampled plumes in the first few hours after emission. The variability in the initial terpene emissions in the SC fire plumes was high and, in general, the speciation of the initially emitted gas-phase NMOCs was 13–195% different from that observed in a similar study in nominally similar pine forests in North Carolina ~ 20 months earlier. It is likely that differences in stand structure and environmental conditions contributed to the high variability observed within and between these studies. Similar factors may explain much of the variability in initial emissions in the literature. The ΔHCN/ΔCO emission ratio, however, was found to be fairly consistent with previous airborne fire measurements in other coniferous-dominated ecosystems, with the mean for these studies being 0.90 ± 0.06%, further confirming the value of HCN as a biomass burning tracer. The

  3. Measurements of reactive trace gases and variable O3 formation rates in some South Carolina biomass burning plumes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. W. T. Griffith

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available In October–November 2011 we measured trace gas emission factors from seven prescribed fires in South Carolina (SC, US, using two Fourier transform infrared spectrometer (FTIR systems and whole air sampling (WAS into canisters followed by gas-chromatographic analysis. A total of 97 trace gas species were quantified from both airborne and ground-based sampling platforms, making this one of the most detailed field studies of fire emissions to date. The measurements include the first emission factors for a suite of monoterpenes produced by heating vegetative fuels during field fires. The first quantitative FTIR observations of limonene in smoke are reported along with an expanded suite of monoterpenes measured by WAS including α-pinene, β-pinene, limonene, camphene, 4-carene, and myrcene. The known chemistry of the monoterpenes and their measured abundance of 0.4–27.9% of non-methane organic compounds (NMOCs and ~21% of organic aerosol (mass basis suggests that they impacted secondary formation of ozone (O3, aerosols, and small organic trace gases such as methanol and formaldehyde in the sampled plumes in first few hours after emission. The variability in the initial terpene emissions in the SC fire plumes was high and, in general, the speciation of the initially emitted gas-phase NMOCs was 13–195% different from that observed in a similar study in nominally similar pine forests in North Carolina ~20 months earlier. It is likely that differences in stand structure and environmental conditions contributed to the high variability observed within and between these studies. Similar factors may explain much of the variability in initial emissions in the literature. The ΔHCN/ΔCO emission ratio, however, was found to be fairly consistent with previous airborne fire measurements in other coniferous-dominated ecosystems, with the mean for these studies being 0.90 ± 0.06%, further confirming the value of HCN as a biomass burning tracer. The SC

  4. Facilities Management and Corporate Real Estate Management as Value Drivers: How to Manage and Measure Adding Value

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    a variety of different fields with practical experience. It also includes 12 interviews with practitioners, shedding light as to how they manage adding value in practice. This is a much needed resource for practitioners, researchers and teachers from the field of FM and CREM, as well as students at both......Facilities Management (FM) and Corporate Real Estate Management (CREM) are two closely related and relatively new management disciplines with developing international professions and increasing academic attention. Both disciplines have from the outset a strong focus on controlling and reducing cost...... for real estate, facilities and related services. In recent years there has been a change towards putting more focus on how FM/CREM can add value to the organisation. The book is research based with a focus on guidance to practice. It offers a transdisciplinary approach, integrating academic knowledge from...

  5. Simulated Performance of the Integrated Passive Neutron Albedo Reactivity and Self-Interrogation Neutron Resonance Densitometry Detector Designed for Spent Fuel Measurement at the Fugen Reactor in Japan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ulrich, Timothy J. II [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lafleur, Adrienne M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Menlove, Howard O. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Swinhoe, Martyn T. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Tobin, Stephen J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Seya, Michio [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Bolind, Alan M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-07-16

    An integrated nondestructive assay instrument, which combined the Passive Neutron Albedo Reactivity (PNAR) and the Self-Interrogation Neutron Resonance Densitometry (SINRD) techniques, is the research focus for a collaborative effort between Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and the Japanese Atomic Energy Agency as part of the Next Generation Safeguard Initiative. We will quantify the anticipated performance of this experimental system in two physical environments: (1) At LANL we will measure fresh Low Enriched Uranium (LEU) assemblies for which the average enrichment can be varied from 0.2% to 3.2% and for which Gd laced rods will be included. (2) At Fugen we will measure spent Mixed Oxide (MOX-B) and LEU spent fuel assemblies from the heavy water moderated Fugen reactor. The MOX-B assemblies will vary in burnup from {approx}3 GWd/tHM to {approx}20 GWd/tHM while the LEU assemblies ({approx}1.9% initial enrichment) will vary from {approx}2 GWd/tHM to {approx}7 GWd/tHM. The estimated count rates will be calculated using MCNPX. These preliminary results will help the finalization of the hardware design and also serve a guide for the experiment. The hardware of the detector is expected to be fabricated in 2012 with measurements expected to take place in 2012 and 2013. This work is supported by the Next Generation Safeguards Initiative, Office of Nuclear Safeguards and Security, National Nuclear Security Administration.

  6. Study of electrical power facilities and measures for planned outages in Japanese hemodialysis clinics after the Great East Japan Earthquake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishida, Kai; Sawa, Manami; Fujiwara, Kousaku; Hirose, Minoru; Tsuruta, Harukazu; Takeuchi, Akihiro; Ikeda, Noriaki

    2013-02-01

    The Great East Japan Earthquake on 11 March 2011 caused major damage in northeastern Japan. The Kanto region experienced a massive electrical power shortage in the summer of 2011. A questionnaire was submitted to 354 hemodialysis clinics in Kanagawa prefecture and the Tokyo metropolitan area, excluding isolated islands, and 176 responses were analyzed (49.7%). The questions included evaluation of the availability of a private electricity generator, countermeasures in case of a planned outage, awareness of saving electricity, and improvement of safety of medical devices or electrical facilities after the earthquake. Only 12% of the clinics had private electricity generators and many clinics had no plans to introduce this facility. However, 96% of the clinics had established countermeasures to deal with a planned outage. Many clinics planned to provide dialysis on a different day or at a different time. All clinics had tried hard to establish procedures to save electricity in the summer of 2011, and 84% of the clinics had reconsidered and improved the safety of medical devices or electricity facilities after the earthquake. These results show that the awareness of crisis management was greatly improved in the wake of the earthquake.

  7. Duration to Admission and Hospital Transfers Affect Facility Rankings from the Postacute 30-Day Rehospitalization Quality Measure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, James E; Prvu Bettger, Janet; Fisher, Steve R; Karmarkar, Amol M; Kumar, Amit; Ottenbacher, Kenneth J

    2017-06-01

    To examine changes in facility-level risk-standardized rehospitalization rankings for postacute inpatient rehabilitation facilities after modifying two model parameters. We used national Medicare enrollment, claims, and assessment data to study 522,260 patients discharged from inpatient rehabilitation in fiscal years 2010-2011. We calculated risk-standardized 30-day unplanned rehospitalization rates for 1,135 inpatient rehabilitation facilities using four approaches. The first model replicated the current postacute risk-standardization methodology and included patients discharged from acute hospitals up to 30 days prior to postacute admission and excluded patients transferred directly back to acute hospitals following rehabilitation. Our alternative models excluded patients with delayed admissions (>1 day between acute discharge and postacute admission) and counted direct transfers back to acute as rehospitalizations. Excluding patients with delayed admissions and counting direct transfers back to acute care as rehospitalizations substantially impacted rankings of more than half the postacute providers: 29 percent had better and 27 percent had worse quintile rankings. Changing the timeframes for duration to admission and rehospitalization will have profound effects on postacute provider quality performance ratings. Reporting rehospitalization rates is an important issue with the explicit goal of improving the quality of postacute care. Research is needed to understand and minimize potential unintended consequences of this quality metric. © Health Research and Educational Trust.

  8. C-reactive protein, established risk factors and social inequalities in cardiovascular disease – the significance of absolute versus relative measures of disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hedblad Bo

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The widespread use of relative scales in socioepidemiological studies has recently been criticized. The criticism is based mainly on the fact that the importance of different risk factors in explaining social inequalities in cardiovascular disease (CVD varies, depending on which scale is used to measure social inequalities. The present study examines the importance of established risk factors, as opposed to low-grade inflammation, in explaining socioeconomic differences in the incidence of CVD, using both relative and absolute scales. Methods We obtained information on socioeconomic position (SEP, established risk factors (smoking, hypertension, and hyperlipidemia, and low-grade inflammation as measured by high-sensitive (hs C-reactive protein (CRP levels, in 4,268 Swedish men and women who participated in the Malmö Diet and Cancer Study (MDCS. Data on first cardiovascular events, i.e., stroke or coronary event (CE, was collected from regional and national registers. Social inequalities were measured in relative terms, i.e., as ratios between incidence rates in groups with lower and higher SEP, and also in absolute terms, i.e., as the absolute difference in incidence rates in groups with lower and higher SEP. Results Those with low SEP had a higher risk of future CVD. Adjustment for risk factors resulted in a rather small reduction in the relative socioeconomic gradient, namely 8% for CRP (≥ 3 mg/L and 21% for established risk factors taken together. However, there was a reduction of 18% in the absolute socioeconomic gradient when looking at subjects with CRP-levels Conclusion C-reactive protein and established risk factors all contribute to socioeconomic differences in CVD. However, conclusions on the importance of "modern" risk factors (here, CRP, as opposed to established risk factors, in the association between SEP and CVD depend on the scale on which social inequalities are measured. The one-sided use of the relative

  9. Relative Reactivity Measurements of Stabilized CH2OO, Produced by Ethene Ozonolysis, Toward Acetic Acid and Water Vapor Using Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yajima, Ryoji; Sakamoto, Yosuke; Inomata, Satoshi; Hirokawa, Jun

    2017-08-31

    We investigated the relative reactivity of stabilized CH2OO, produced by ethene ozonolysis, toward acetic acid and water vapor at a temperature of 298 ± 2 K and atmospheric pressure. Hydroperoxymethyl acetate produced through the reaction between stabilized CH2OO and acetic acid was monitored using a chemical ionization mass spectrometer as a function of the acetic acid concentration at different relative humidities. The rate of the reaction between CH2OO and water vapor depended quadratically on the water vapor concentration, suggesting that CH2OO reacted with water dimers in preference to water monomers. We obtained the bimolecular rate constant for the reaction between CH2OO and water dimer relative to the rate constant for the reaction between CH2OO and acetic acid, k3/k1, of (6.3 ± 0.4) × 10(-2). The k3 value of (8.2 ± 0.8) × 10(-12) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1) was derived by combining with a k1 value of (1.3 ± 0.1) × 10(-10) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1), which has been previously reported by direct kinetic studies. The k3 value thus obtained is consistent with the absolute rate constants measured directly, suggesting that the reactivity of CH2OO is irrespective of the CH2OO generation method, namely, ethene ozonolysis or diiodomethane photolysis. We indirectly determined the yield of stabilized CH2OO from the ozonolysis of ethene of 0.59 ± 0.17 and 0.55 ± 0.16 under dry and humid (relative humidity 23-24%) conditions, respectively, suggesting that the yield is independent of the water vapor concentration. Our results suggest that hydroperoxymethyl acetate is the sole product of the reaction between stabilized CH2OO and acetic acid. The approach presented here can likely be extended to studies of the reactivities of more complicated and atmospherically relevant stabilized Criegee intermediates.

  10. Synthesis and novel reactivity of halomethyldimethylsulfonium salts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu; Fletcher; Dolbier Jr WR

    2000-06-02

    Iodomethyl-, chloromethyl-, and fluoromethyldimethylsulfonium salts, 4b-d, have been synthesized and are observed to be highly reactive molecules that exhibit extraordinary diversity with respect to the nature of their reactivity, undergoing facile direct substitution (S(N)2) reactions, but also being highly susceptible to electron-transfer reactions. Cyclic voltametry experiments indicated that the iodomethyldimethylsulfonium compound, 4b, is a potent electron acceptor, even surpassing the reactivity of perfluoro-n-alkyl iodides in that capacity. The iodo- and chloromethyldimethylsulfonium salts, 4b,c, as well as the analogous iodomethyltrimethylammonium salt, 3a, are shown to be reactive SET acceptors.

  11. Mass measurement of cooled neutron-deficient bismuth projectile fragments with time-resolved Schottky mass spectrometry at the FRS-ESR facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Litvinov, Yu.A.; Geissel, H. [Giessen Univ. (Germany); Radon, T. [Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung mbH, Darmstadt (DE)] [and others

    2005-06-01

    Masses of 582 neutron-deficient nuclides (30{<=}Z{<=}85) were measured with time-resolved Schottky mass spectrometry at the FRS-ESR facility at GSI, 117 were used for calibration. The masses of 71 nuclides were obtained for the first time. A typical mass accuracy of 30 {mu}u was achieved. These data have entered the latest atomic mass evaluation. The mass determination of about 140 additional nuclides was possible via known energies (Q-values) of {alpha}-, {beta}-, or proton decays. The obtained results are compared with the results of other measurements. (orig.)

  12. 124Xe(n,γ125Xe and 124Xe(n,2n123Xe measurements for National Ignition Facility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhike Megha

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The cross section for the 124Xe(n,γ125Xe reaction has been measured for the first time for neutron energies above 100 keV. In addition, the 124Xe(n,2n123Xe reaction has been studied between threshold and 14.8 MeV. The results of these measurements provide sensitive diagnostic tools for investigating properties of the inertial confinement fusion plasma in Deuterium-Tritium (DT capsules at the National Ignition Facility (NIF located at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory.

  13. High-resolution measurements of the DT neutron spectrum using new CD foils in the Magnetic Recoil neutron Spectrometer (MRS) on the National Ignition Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gatu Johnson, M., E-mail: gatu@psfc.mit.edu; Frenje, J. A.; Li, C. K.; Petrasso, R. D.; Séguin, F. H. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Bionta, R. M.; Casey, D. T.; Eckart, M. J.; Grim, G. P.; Hartouni, E. P.; Hatarik, R.; Sayre, D. B.; Skulina, K.; Yeamans, C. B. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Farrell, M. P.; Hoppe, M.; Kilkenny, J. D.; Reynolds, H. G.; Schoff, M. E. [General Atomics, San Diego, California 92186 (United States)

    2016-11-15

    The Magnetic Recoil neutron Spectrometer (MRS) on the National Ignition Facility measures the DT neutron spectrum from cryogenically layered inertial confinement fusion implosions. Yield, areal density, apparent ion temperature, and directional fluid flow are inferred from the MRS data. This paper describes recent advances in MRS measurements of the primary peak using new, thinner, reduced-area deuterated plastic (CD) conversion foils. The new foils allow operation of MRS at yields 2 orders of magnitude higher than previously possible, at a resolution down to ∼200 keV FWHM.